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Attendee Brochure

Nov. 28­­–29 Build your Experience Design the Future

REGISTER NOW at abexpo.com to receive FREE expo hall admission by using discount code DM20.

abexpo.com Owner &  Producer:

Founder & Presenter:

Official Publication:

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Hall A | Boston, MA info@abexpo.com | 888.529.1641


Andersen® Architectural Collection Big Door Series – Weiland® wood Liftslide multi-panel, bi-parting doors. Architect: Stuart Narofsky, FAIA.

ANDERSEN® at ABX 2018 brings you –

LARGE DOORS: How to select the right door Modern design trends are favoring larger openings, and while this blank canvas offers the architect a wide-range of options, it can also pose a challenge. Because of the almost unlimited variations of different types, styles, and available options for large doors, it is often more important that the architect understands how to make the selection process, rather than which specific door to choose. The process for specifying should include client aesthetic expectations, environmental conditions, building performance, and durability concerns.

Date: Wednesday, November 28th Time: 3:30pm Location: CE Learning Zone CEU: 1 HSW Visit www.abexpo.com for more details.

Explore the possibilities at andersenwindows.com/ac “Andersen” and all other marks where denoted are trademarks of Andersen Corporation. ©2018 Andersen Corporation. All rights reserved.

1808_AW_ABX Big Door 8x10.5Ad – Continuing Ed Course.indd 1

8/16/18 3:32 PM


Headline Letter fromPage the President

ABX2018 November 28­­–29 Boston Convention & Exhibition Center Hall A | Boston, MA

ABX is owned and produced by Informa Exhibitions, host of the construction industry’s market-leading events in North America and around the globe. Industry insight, coupled with an innovative and entrepreneurial approach, provides Informa Exhibitions customers and partners with the opportunity to create business advantage and access markets.

A chapter of the American Institute of Architects, the Boston Society of Architects/AIA (BSA/AIA) consists of nearly 4,500 members and offers unparalleled programs, services, and publications that foster innovation, equity, economic vitality, and resiliency throughout New England, North America, and the world. BSA/AIA is the founder and presenter of ABX.

ArchitectureBoston, a quarterly publication of the Boston Society of Architects/AIA, explores the ways architecture influences and is influenced by our environment and our society.

BSA Space is Boston’s leading center for architecture and design, and is home to the Boston Society of Architects/AIA and the BSA Foundation.

A charitable sister organization to the Boston Society of Architects/AIA, its goal is to use design to promote the public good. The Foundation has brought design education, community design resources, and a slate of design-based programs addressing regional challenges to over 100,000 people since 2014.

Welcome to ABX— the New England Building Industry’s premier forum for discovery, innovation, and the advancement of best practices. The ABX conference program and the hundreds of new products demonstrated throughout the exhibition hall allow us to see all the different ways in which our industry is shaping New England and the wider world. Design and construction are prime economic drivers. We provide jobs, and strengthen the homes, workplaces, and civic buildings of our communities. Our technical achievements explore new ways of thinking about and using materials and developing enclosures. We are creating mechanisms for resilience and adaptation that protect against flooding and sea-level rise, and cost-effective ways to reduce and eliminate carbon emissions. By keeping our project delivery methodologies sharp, our businesses align with evolving marketplace demands. In everything we do, BSA/AIA members and our allies in the design and construction industry pursue excellence. At the Boston Society of Architects/AIA and the BSA Foundation, we believe in the transformative power of design, creating a city and region filled with flourishing spaces and people. The ABX conference program is filled with opportunities to learn how BSA/AIA members and their partners are working to maintain Massachusetts’ role as a national leader in climate change, affordable housing, mass transit, and social equity. I invite you to learn more about our civic goals and activities by visiting architects.org/goals; but only after you attend ABX. Because at ABX, you can shake hands with your colleagues, sit down and share ideas and experiences, and enjoy all the different ways that architecture brings people together. Thank you for being part of the ABX community. Jay Wickersham FAIA 2018 BSA/AIA President ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Make the Most of ABX Page Headline

REGISTER NOW at abexpo.com to receive FREE expo hall admission by using discount code DM20.

Make the most of ABX 2018 Build your network at the largest design and construction industry event in the Northeast and design your future by exploring trends, new technologies and educational workshops. During the two-day show you will meet face-toface with 300+ exhibitors of all sizes displaying products, services, ideas and innovations. The educational conference program is an integral part of the ABX experience offering 100 accredited workshops designed to polish skills, spark ideas and offer real world-solutions. If you are an architect, builder/contractor, engineer, interior designer, landscape architect or any other design and construction professional of any level, you will walk away inspired to expand your business.

Register at abexpo.com to receive FREE expo hall admission by using discount code DM20.

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA


Table of Contents Page Headline

Contents

How to Register ONLINE abexpo.com/register

Make the Most of ABX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 BSA Space @ ABX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 • Boston Society of Architects/AIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 • BSA Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 • MakeTank. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 • Architecture Trivia Night. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Specialty Focus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 • Interiors Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 • Landscape Architecture & Design Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Show Floor Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 • Exhibits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 • ABX Photo Exhibit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 • deCordova | Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 • SMPS Marketing Audits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 • The Quad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 • Open Architecture Collaborative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 • Design Technology Throwdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Show Floor Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 • NEW CE Learning Zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 • Book Signing with Patrick Ahearn, FAIA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Special Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 • NEW Welcome Party . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 • Happy Hour in the Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 • Colormix Forecast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 • Women in Design Symposium. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 • Alumni Receptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Exhibitor List. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Schedule by Day/Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Additional Opportunities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Pre-Show Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 • NEW SAP Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 • NEW Tuesday Intensive Workshops. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Emerging Professionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Continuing Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Educational Tracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Sponsors and Partners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Registration Pricing and Packages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Prepare for the Show . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

Tracks

BY PHONE 224.563.3751 | 866.452.2815 BY MAIL Complete the Registration Form and make check payable in U.S. funds to: ArchitectureBoston Expo c/o CompuSystems 2651 Warrenville Rd., Ste. 400 Downers Grove, IL 60515 Email: registration@abexpo.com Fax: 708.344.4444 ON-SITE REGISTRATION Monday, Nov. 26 1:00 pm–5:00 pm Tuesday, Nov. 27 7:00 am–5:00 pm Wednesday, Nov. 28 7:00 am–6:30 pm Thursday, Nov. 29 7:00 am–4:00 pm

Stay Connected #ABX2018 facebook.com/abxboston twitter.com/abxboston instagram.com/abxboston linkedin.com/groups/8643545

Mobile App

Better Housing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Beyond Flooding: Designing Resilience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Brand and Marketing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Code and Standards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Culture and Practice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Enclosures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Energy, Climate, Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Healthy Environments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Now Trending. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Project Delivery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Project Types and Processes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Reposition, Renovate, Revitalize. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Urban Solutions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

Easily manage your ABX experience through the mobile app — add educational workshops to your agenda, schedule meetings, locate exhibitors and events, connect with fellow attendees and exhibitors, and easily print your name badge on-site by scanning your registration barcode. Search ABX in the app store.

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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PageSpace Headline BSA @ ABX

BSA Space @ ABX Booth #414 Get the most out of this year’s ABX by utilizing all the resources available to help you fully prepare for the show. Want to know how the Boston Society of Architects/AIA (BSA/AIA) can advance your career and business? Interested in hearing about the BSA Foundation’s positive impact in Greater Boston’s communities?

Design Gallery Explore a gallery of winning projects from the 2018 BSA Design Awards programs. These annual programs honor design excellence and outstanding technical achievement. Also, purchase your tickets for the 8th BSA Design Awards Gala (January 17, 2019) onsite! Ask BSA/AIA staff for more details.

ArchitectureBoston magazine Grab a free cup of coffee while reading articles from all of ArchitectureBoston magazine’s 2018 issues! Spring: Port; Summer: Food; Fall: Ethics; Winter: Safe.

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA


Headline BSAPage Space @ ABX

BSA Foundation The BSA Foundation has brought design education, community design resources, and a slate of design-based programs addressing regional challenges to over 100,000 people since 2014. Learn more about how the Foundation works with all of Greater Boston’s neighborhoods to build a more resilient, equitable and architecturally vibrant city.

Membership Chats

Have Fun With Design!

Talk to BSA/AIA staff about how to join a community of A/E/C professionals and gain access to a wide range of benefits and services. Attendees will learn about 43 driven-member knowledge communities by talking to chairpersons.

Taking place during the Happy Hour in the Hall, you can flex your knowledge and play for glory and prizes at the BSA Foundation’s Architecture Trivia Night, emceed by Haril Pandya FAIA, Principal at CBT Architects. One drink ticked is included with your Architecture Trivia Night registration.

Come see what the BSA MakeTANKer’s have in store this year...!

Women in Design will have the results from their ‘How We Work’ office policy and equity survey on display. Topics include: time off, flexibility, working from home, parental leave, career and professional growth, plus job satisfaction. Come visit WiD to discuss the data, hear it presented by the authors, and participate in round two of their survey! All while having a complimentary drink. ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Specialty Focus Page Headline

Specialty Focus NEW Interiors Feature Building and design professionals who specialize in interiors now have an improved show experience with the addition of expanded educational offerings, new show floor features, exhibitors and products.

Residential Interiors Presented by Houzz Join Houzz on the show floor for design consultations and open dialogue. Houzz is the online platform for architecture, interior and landscape design, and home improvement.

Featured Exhibitors Visit these booths to find inventive designs and products to invigorate your business. ACGI | Booth #620 Benjamin Moore Paints | Booth #314 Best Tile | Booth #1149 Caesarstone | Booth #1044 California Closets | Booth #930 Cambria | Booth #1430 Conklin Office Furniture | Booth #1321 Crown Point Cabinetry | Booth #914 Eastern Marketing Corp. | Booth #630 F.W. Webb | Booth #638 Galaxy Glass & Stone | Booth #732 House of Rohl | Booth #530

Educational Workshops Below are accredited educational workshops tailored specifically to professionals working with interior environments. View credits in the Educational Tracks section on pages 27-62.

Wednesday, Nov. 28

Houzz | Booth #1144 Lepage Millwork | Booth #338 LG Hausys America, Inc. | Booth #1128 Nova USA Wood Products Booth #1314 Oasis Shower Doors | Booth #846 Polycor Inc. | Booth #754

TIME

CODE

TITLE

PPG Industries Inc. | Booth #224

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE11

Healthy IAQ in Schools–Earning LEED v4 IEQ Credits

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE16

Design for Happiness

Rakks Architectural Shelving Booth #214

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE30

Repositioning of Suburban Two Story Office and R&D Buildings

Shiplights | Booth #816

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE42

Street to Suite, Lobby Repositioning’s Key Ingredients

Spring Lighting Group | Booth #631

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE54

Culture Defining Design: Improving Access and Inclusion

Stonewood Products | Booth #938 Tate Access Floors | Booth #1332

Thursday, Nov. 29

The Sherwin-Williams Company Booth #913

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH08

The Devil in the Details: Leveraging Brand via Architecture

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH23

Color Unplugged

Vermont Wide Plank Flooring, LLC Booth #713

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH31

Cooler, Faster, Smaller: A Modular Dutch Hotel Disruptor

Your German Kitchen | Booth #1038

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH39

Tech Workplaces in an Agile World

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA


Specialty Focus Page Headline

NEW Landscape Architecture & Design Feature ABX has partnered with leading industry associations to create show highlights tailored to landscape architects and designers. A new partnership with DIY’s Dean & Derek from “Indoors Out” and “Rock Solid” brings related content to the show floor. New enhancements include expanded educational offerings, new relevant show floor features and additional exhibitors/products.

Featured Exhibitors

Educational Workshops

Ashfield Stone Mfg. LLC | Booth #542

Below are accredited workshops of interest to the landscape architecture profession. View credits in the Educational Tracks section on pages 27-62.

Stop by these booths to explore creative and innovative products and designs catered to landscape architects.

AZEK Building Products | Booth #1125 BETA Group, Inc. | Booth #1213 Black Bear Coatings & Concrete Booth #1540

Wednesday, Nov. 28

Boral Building Products | Booth #614

TIME

CODE

TITLE

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE03

Climate Resilient Design: Overcoming Hurdles

Delgado Stone Distributors, LLC Booth #419

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE06

Revitalizing the Iconic Christian Science Plaza

Fieldstone Veneer Inc | Booth #1246

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE15

Resilience Implementation and Strategies in NYC and Boston

Fortress Railing Products | Booth #529

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE27

What Can We Do Beyond 2050? Long Term Adaptation Strategies

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE39

Preparing South Boston for Sea Level Rise & Storm Surges

Genest Concrete Works Inc. Booth #755

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE50

Improving the Flood Resistance of Buildings

Hanover Architectural Products Booth #714 JC Stone | Booth #744 Lashway Lumber | Booth #843

Thursday, Nov. 29

New York Quarries, Inc. | Booth #1318 Northeast Masonry Distributor Booth #543

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH03

Post-Maria Puerto Rico: Defining Resilient Recovery

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH09

Boston Groundwater Recharge–Why? How? & Results!

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH12

Building Local Equity with Parks and Working Green Spaces

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH15

Adapting to Climate Change: Infrastructure and Resiliency

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH21

Shifting Gears: Urban Design for Autonomous Vehicles

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH27

Retrofitting Buildings for Flood Risks

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH30

Room to Grow Greener: Assessing Site Development in Boston

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH38

Designing for Flooding and Sea Level Rise

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH41

Resiliency Planning for Multi-family Coastal Development

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH43

Enrich the Public Realm with Interpretive Interactive Media

Nova USA Wood Products Booth #1314 Parksite | Booth #218 Portland Stone Ware Co., Inc. Booth #629 Sika Scofield | Booth #618 Stonewood Products | Booth #938 STONEYARD® | Booth #814 Stratham Hill Stone / LandCare Stone Booth #1431 Vermont Verde Antique | Booth #738 Woodway / LWO Corp. | Booth #1219

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Show Floor Features Page Headline

Show Floor Features Exhibits

SMPS Marketing Audits

In the main hall of the BCEC you will find 300+ companies, manufacturers and suppliers of all sizes showcasing their latest products, technologies and innovations for the design and construction industry. Meet one-on-one with the people behind these products and services, learn how they work, and get answers to your questions.

Receive feedback on the effectiveness of your firm’s marketing materials by signing up for a 20-minute marketing audit with SMPS Boston (Society for Marketing Professional Services). A Certified Professional Services Marketer (CPSM) will review your marketing materials and provide advice on how to improve their effectiveness. This is a complimentary service provided by SMPS Boston in booth #1343.

ABX Photo Exhibit The ABX Photo Exhibit celebrates New England architecture, landscape architecture, and interior design while promoting New England design practitioners to prospective collaborators and clients of all types. Selected from a diverse representation of design firms, project types, project sizes, and locations, the photos are available for viewing in the custom display along the aisles of the exhibit hall.

deCordova | Store ABX will host a booth from deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum in Lincoln, MA – presenting (and selling!) a selection of its curated merchandise for the holiday season from the extraordinary deCordova | Store. Shop their intriguing offerings, learn about events at the Park and Museum, investigate their vibrant Corporate Membership and Art-Lending program – and maybe experience some handson art-making and construction while you are in the booth. Something for all attendees to check out!

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA


Show Floor Features Page Headline

The Quad Short for “Quadrangle,” Quad is a public square at the center of a college campus--a place of vibrancy, playfulness, and connectivity. In our increasingly dense urban habitats, city dwellers seek to discover similar environments in the places they live, work, and play. This year the Quad exhibit is designed by Stantec’s WHAT’S IN team and fabricated and assembled by Jobsite Steel Manufacturing, The New England Carpenters Union and East Coast Interiors (ECI).

Open Architecture Collaborative Learn more about the work of the Open Architecture Collaborative (OAC) as they explain how the organization operates several projects for non-profit organizations in the Boston area and several educational, healthcare and community projects around the world. The workshop will focus on similarities and differences among these varied projects and how they are designed using volunteer design teams. Also discussed will be the challenges and rewards of providing free services to communities in need around the world. OAC provides pro-bono architectural and design services for communities in need, locally and in the developing world. It also acts as a facilitator for the provision of such pro-bono services by other individuals, organizations and firms.

WHAT’S IN was established in 2012 by a group of young architects who were challenged by the rising housing costs in Boston. They set a goal to find urban housing solutions that are more accessible to the greater work force. Over the course of 6 years the research group has gathered data on housing preferences, designed affordable housing prototypes, studied cost saving solutions, and cultivated collaborations with other groups. They’ve shared their research and ideas in innovative ways for all of their six years. This year WHAT’S IN explored methods of achieving density and affordability through advances in technology, sustainability, policy, and compact design. They found solutions through collaborations and by prototyping algorithmic platforms that streamline the design and construction processes and allow for the mass production of urban compact modular housing.

Design Technology Throwdown Sponsored by BSA Dynamo-litia, Design Technology Throwdown returns to ABX 2018 for a competition where teams face off to see who can design the best solution to a mutual design problem. A champion will be crowned for the best use of contemporary technology to develop, document and validate their design. Presentation and Awards: Thursday, Nov. 29 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm | CE Learning Zone

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Show Floor Education Page Headline

Show Floor Education NEW CE Learning Zone The new CE Learning Zone provides in-depth information and analysis presented by our exhibitor community. EarnAIA Continuing Education (CE) credits through these 60-minute sessions that provide practical, innovative ideas and solutions to invigorate your business. Sessions are held on the show floor with seating on a first-come, first-served basis. Registration required.

Wednesday, Nov. 28 TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

EXHIBITOR

GAF

11:00 am–12:00 pm

LZ01

1 LU

Air Barriers and Vapor Retarders—A Deep Dive into the Facts and Misconceptions in the Roofing Industry

12:30 pm–1:30 pm

LZ02

1 LU|HSW

Whole Building Ventilation: Providing Healthy, Comfortable & Energy Efficient Indoor Solutions

Zehnder

2:00 pm–3:00 pm

LZ03

1 LU|HSW

Storefront or Curtain Wall? “Seeing Through the Difference”

Tubelite Inc.

3:30 pm–4:30 pm

LZ04

1 LU

Large Doors: How to Select the Right Door

Andersen

Thursday, Nov. 29 TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

EXHIBITOR

11:00 am–12:00 pm

LZ06

1 LU|HSW

Designing with Fire-Rated Glass

SaftiFirst

5:00 pm–6:00 pm

LZ10

Design Technology Throwdown Presentation and Awards

Design Technology Throwdown

Book Signing with Patrick Ahearn, FAIA Timeless: Classic American Architecture for Contemporary Living Wednesday, Nov. 28 | 12:00 pm Booth #1252 From the architect of HGTV’s Dream Home 2015, Timeless presents an exclusive tour of Patrick Ahearn’s classical homes in some of New England’s most affluent communities. 10” x 12” | Hardcover | 256 pp | $60 ABX sale price: $48

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA


Special Events Page Headline

Special Events NEW Welcome Party

Colormix Forecast CMF | Colormix Forecast

Wednesday, Nov. 28 6:00 pm–9:00 pm

Wednesday, Nov. 28 10:30 am–12:30 pm

After a full day of buying, selling and learning, head to the Third Floor Foyer outside the Grand Ballroom to unwind with your colleagues at this not-to-be missed party. Discover countless opportunities to mix and mingle with old friends, as well as network with industry leaders and innovators while enjoying music and delicious hors d’oeuvres. Admission includes two drink tickets.

Happy Hour in the Hall Wed., Nov. 28 & Thu., Nov. 29 5:00 pm–6:00 pm

Wrap up a successful day at ABX 2018 with happy hour! Cash bars will be set up throughout the show floor offering beer and wine.

Every color has its character. Some are born in distant places and shaped by epic voyages. Some colors recall the past, others live in the moment, and some take you places you’ve never been before. Sherwin-Williams has gathered 42 trend colors into a master palette, then arranged them into six unique color personalities. Learn how these colors will impact design trends and perspectives in 2019.

Drink Tickets While the Welcome Party admission includes two drink tickets, you can purchase additional tickets to distribute to customers or just to enjoy yourself. These tickets will be good for one beverage of choice at the Welcome Party or the Happy Hour in the Hall.

Register at abexpo.com to receive FREE expo hall admission by using discount code DM20.

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Women in Design Symposium Page Headline

Women in Design Symposium Thursday, Nov. 29 “From the Ground Up: Grassroots Initiatives” will explore the genesis, execution and growth of grassroots movements as they relate to the design community. Created to foster conversation and learning, this one-day symposium includes the WiD Keynote Breakfast and workshops on the topic of Grassroots Initiatives that will explore grassroots movements which have increased as people seek to fill voids in social, policy, and implementation aspects of the built environment. WD01 8:30 am - 10:30 am

Kristen Chin, Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellow, Urban Edge / Jamaica Plain Neighborhood Development Corporation

From the Ground Up: Grassroots Initiatives- Women in Design Keynote

Courtney Sharpe, Director of Cultural Planning, City of Boston Office of Arts and Culture

How can we have a positive impact on our world? In recent years grassroots movements have increased as people seek to fill voids in social, policy, and implementation aspects of the built environment. Grassroots movements are often initiated in the public realm, with architects and designers playing a role alongside other professionals and members of the public to achieve a community, regional, or even national goal. Whatever the goal of grassroots movements- whether to change policy, to support disadvantaged groups, or to add physically to the built environment- there are common challenges. These include identifying a need, building support, growing effectively, and ultimately implementing measures to address the need. In this keynote discussion we bring together architectural practitioners, educators, and community engagement professionals to explore the genesis, execution, and growth of grassroots movements as they relate to the design community along with the skills that we as designers can bring to their success. Yanel de Angel, AIA, Associate Principal, Perkins + Will

Jennie Stephens, Director, School of Public Policy & Urban Affairs; Dean’s Professor of Sustainability Science & Policy; Director for Strategic Research Collaborations, Global Resilience Institute Northeastern University Moderator: Jennifer Hardy, AIA, Associate, Leers Weinzapfel Associates Architects

TH22 11:00 am - 12:30 pm | 1.5 LU

Youth to Youth, Organizing to Address Youth Homelessness See page 56 for description. WD05 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Women in Design Award of Excellence Ceremony & Luncheon The Women in Design Award of Excellence honors individuals who exhibit exceptional achievement in person, process, product and position in design for the for the built environment in the New England area. During this luncheon, we present the award to this year’s winners and hear from them about design, the design community, and the path that made them the truly special individuals we are honoring. Join us for this truly inspiring celebration.

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

2018 Award Recipients: • Deneen Crosby, Principal, Crosby Schlessinger Smallridge • Uma Ramanathan, AIA, Principal, Shepley Bulfinch • Renee Loth, Editor, ArchitectureBoston TH46 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm | 1.5 LU

Lessons from Grassroots Design Build for Professional Practice See page 53 for description. WD09 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Women in Design Happy Hour Join us as we wrap up the symposium with a Happy Hour on the show floor. Network with your colleagues, enjoy a cocktail, and discuss the ways you envision Grassroots Initiatives changing the world for the better. At the happy hour we will have a donation box and information available about Rosie’s Place, a charity that WiD supports annually. Rosie’s Place is a women’s shelter in Boston that provides a safe and nurturing environment where poor and homeless women maintain their dignity, seek opportunity, and find security in their lives. Join us and help support this worthy cause and great organization. (Free and open to all with access to the Expo floor. Cash bar.)


Alumni Receptions Page Headline

Alumni Receptions Thursday, Nov. 29 | 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Join alumni, faculty, staff and friends for an evening of engaging conversation, networking and updates. Reconnect and network about your time and share how your experience shaped your careers. AE02 | Boston Architectural College (BAC) BAC’s alumni, faculty, and friends will gather for an evening of networking, socializing, and an update from the BAC. Enjoy refreshments and hors d’oeuvres while catching up with old friends and connecting with new ones.

conversation, fantastic raffle prizes and to learn about their new vision. Current, new and prospective members are all invited! The cost is free, so don’t miss out on a fun networking opportunity with your industry peers.

AE09 | University of Massachusetts (UMass)

Friends, faculty, staff, and alumni of RPI will reconnect to expand business and professional contacts.

Join alumni, friends, faculty, students, and staff of Architecture, Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning (LARP), and Building and Construction Technology (BCT) at UMass Amherst for an evening of engaging conversation, networking, and updates. Event will be held offsite at Steffian Bradley Architects, 88 Black Falcon Ave #353, Boston, MA 02210. Light refreshments will be served. Questions? Call or email us at jcrossman@umass.edu or 413.577.0943.

AE06 | Roger Williams University (RWU)

AE10 | Wentworth Institute of Technology (WIT)

Join alumni, faculty, staff and friends of RWU for an evening of power networking and socializing.

Gather with alumni, friends, faculty and staff of Wentworth Institute of Technology (WIT) for an evening of socializing, networking and making new friends.

AE04 | Northeastern University (NEU) NEU’s friends, faculty, staff, and alumni will come together for an evening of networking and dynamic conversation.

AE05 | Renssealer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

AE07 | Syracuse University Syracuse University encourages alumni, faculty, staff and friends to reconnect for an evening of camaraderie and fun.

AE08 | Society for Marketing Professional Services (SMPS) Join the SMPS for networking,

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Exhibitor Listing Page Headline

2018 Exhibitors A

D 3A Composites USA, Inc.

I

• Dakota DesignStaff

Icynene Spray Foam Insulation

Abatron, Inc.

DaVinci Roofscapes

iLuminate Products And Ecoglo

ACGI

Delgado Stone Distributors, LLC

Imtek

Allen & Major Associates, Inc.

Drytech International SA

Innerglass Window Systems, LLC

Allied Window

Dryvit Systems, Inc.

InterAmerica Stage, Inc.

Allura

International Code Council

American Fyre Designs • Andersen Windows & Doors

E J

Arauco

East Coast Lightning Equipment, Inc.

Architectural Openings Inc

Eastern Marketing Corporation

Jain Americas Inc.

Architectural Products Magazine

EF Cost Recovery

James Hardie Building Products

Ashfield Stone Mfg. LLC

Existing Conditions Surveys, Inc.

JC Stone

ATAS International, Inc.

Extron Electronics

JELD-WEN Windows and Doors

Avenere Cladding LLC AZEK Building Products

F B

K F.W. Webb Home

Kalwall Corporation

Fantech

Kemper System America, Inc.

Bambu Global

Ferguson Perforating

Benjamin Moore Paints

Fieldstone Veneer Inc

Best Tile

Fire Magic Grills

BETA Group, Inc.

Foard Panel Inc

Black Bear Coatings & Concrete

FORMA Beyond Fortress Railing Products

• Bluebird Graphic Solutions

Fujitsu General America, Inc.

Boral Building Products Bostik, Inc.

GAF

BSA Space

Galaxy Glass & Stone

Builder + Architect Magazine

Genest Concrete Works Inc. Georgia Pacific Gypsum LLC GKD-USA, Inc.

C

Glass-Shield Industrial Paint • GRAPHISOFT

Caesarstone

Guardian Industries

California Closets

Gypsorb, LLC

Cambria Caoba Doors CertainTeed Corporation

Legrand Building Control Systems Lepage Millwork LG Hausys America, Inc. Louisiana-Pacific Building Products

G

BROSCO

C.R. Laurence Co. Inc.

Lashway Lumber

Longfellow’s Cedar Shingles

Boston Cedar Brinc Building Products

L

M Maibec, Inc. Makepeace/An Archimedia Solutions Group LLC Company Marino Ware Marketing & Sales Associates Marvin and Integrity Windows & Doors MBCI • MicroCAD Training & Consulting Miles Industries LTD

H

Millennium Forms, LLC

Coastal Forest Products, Inc.

Hancock Associates

Multivista

CoatingsPro

Hanover Architectural Products Henry Company

The Murus Company

Commercial Acoustics Conklin Office Furniture

Holbrook Lumber

CR Technology, Inc.

Home Healthsmith LLC

• Crown Point Cabinetry Custom Building Products

House of Rohl Huber Engineered Woods, LLC.

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

my CADD


Exhibitor Listing Page Headline

N

S

V

Nana Wall Systems

S-5!

V+S Galvanizing

National Grid

SAFTI FIRST

Vectorworks, Inc

NCARB

SBA Loan Group

VELUX America Inc

New England Carpenters Union

Shepherd’s Finance, LLC

Vermont Verde Antique

New England Home Magazine

The Sherwin-Williams Company

Vermont Wide Plank Flooring, LLC

New England Real Estate Journal

Sierra Pacific Windows

VERSATEX Trimboards

New England Soundproofing

SIGA Cover, Inc.

Vitro Architectural Glass

New York Quarries, Inc.

SIGCO, Inc.

Nichiha USA, Inc.

Sika Corporation

Northeast Masonry Distributors

Sika Scofield

Northeastern Lumber Manufacturers Asso.

Simpson Strong-Tie

Water Hero

Northshore Home Magazine

SMPS Boston

The Western Group

Nova USA Wood Products

Solar Seal Company

Western Red Cedar Lumber Association

Nuheat

Spring Lighting Group Inc

Weyerhaeuser

Stainless Steel Coatings, Inc.

WHAT’S IN

Stonewood Products

Winco Window Co. - True Enterprises, Inc.

STONEYARD®

Window Services, Inc.

Stratham Hill Stone / LandCare Stone

Woodway / LWO Corporation

O OACB

W

Oasis Shower Doors OMAI, Inc. Thermo Expert

Woonsocket Glass Fabricators

T Y

Takeform

P

TAMLYN

Your German Kitchen

The Pappas Company, Inc.

Tate Access Floors

YouthBuild Boston

Paradis MetalWorks LLC

Thoughforms

Parksite

Timber Trading Group

Parrett Manufacturing, Inc.

Topaz Engineering Supply, Inc. Tremco Commercial Sealants & Waterproofing

• Pella Corporation Pilkington North America

Tri-Color Glass

Polycor Inc.

Triumph Modular, Inc.

Portland Stone Ware Co., Inc. PPG Industries Inc.

Tubelite Inc.

BSA/AIA Allied Members

U.S. Department of Commerce

ABX would like to thank the BSA/AIA Allied Members for their support of the show.

Unilux Windows &Door

• Andersen Windows & Doors

Universal Window and Door, LLC.

• Bluebird Graphic Solutions

University of Hartford, Department of Architecture

• Crown Point Cabinetry

Produits Forestier Lamco Inc

U Q Quebec Wood Export Bureau

R

urbanNext RAB Lighting Rakks Architectural Shelving Real Fyre Gas Logs

Zehnder America, Inc. Zero Gravity Skin

Trespa North America Ltd.

PlanGrid

Z

USG

• Dakota DesignStaff • GRAPHISOFT • MicroCAD Training & Consulting • Pella Corporation

RTS Reps Runtal North America, Inc.

Orange = Gold and Silver Level Sponsors

• = BSA/AIA Allied Members Exhibitor List as of September 4, 2018

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Page Headline

BSA Space 290 Congress Street Boston, MA 02210 BSA Space is free and open to the public.

Hours Monday through Friday 10:00 am to 6:00 pm Weekends and holidays 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

BSA Space is Boston’s leading center for architecture and design. Upcoming exhibitions include: CANSTRUCTION 2018 OCTOBER 7–OCTOBER 26

IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST MARCH–APRIL, 2019

2018 BSA DESIGN AWARDS NOVEMBER 2018–JANUARY 2019

BALANCING ACT: URBANISM IN THE DIGITAL AGE MAY–SEPTEMBER 2019

Exhibitions are supported by the BSA Foundation. For more details about the Foundation’s vision to build a better Boston by engaging communities, inspiring vision, and provoking positive change, visit Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA BSA Space @ ABX (booth #414).

architects.org/bsaspace

Le BS


Page Headline

day m ays m

Help build a better Boston Since 2014, BSA Foundation programs

have reached more than 100,000 people by engaging communities, inspiring vision, and provoking positive change.

E

The BSA Foundation is working to make Boston a model of a resilient, equitable, and architecturally vibrant city through programs including: • Youth design education • Community design resources • Collaborative visioning Support the BSA Foundation’s work: architects.org/foundation/give

Learn more about the BSA Foundation at BSA Space @ ABX, booth #414.

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Conference Schedule Page Headline

Pre-Show Education

Tuesday, Nov. 27 Morning TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

TRACK

Pre-Show Education Pre-Show Education

8:00 am–12:00 pm

TE01

*

The Building Sector’s Role in Shaping Resilience Potential in Our City and Its Region

8:00 am–4:00 pm

SAP

*

Safety Assessment Program (SAP) Training

Afternoon 1:00 pm–5:00 pm

TE02

*

Advanced Enclosure Detailing Workshop

Pre-Show Education

*View pre-show education credits at abexpo.com/workshops.

Core Program

Wednesday, Nov. 28 Morning TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

TRACK

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE01

1.5 LU

Details for the Building Enclosure

Enclosures

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE02

1.5 LU

Understanding Glass Distortion

Enclosures

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE03

1.5 LU|HSW

Climate Resilient Design: Overcoming Hurdles

Beyond Flooding: Designing Resilience

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE04

1.5 LU

Built to Grow: Talent Management for Architects

Culture and Practice

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE05

1.5 LU|HSW

ADA Updates 2018

Code and Standards

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE06

1.5 LU

Revitalizing the Iconic Christian Science Plaza

Reposition, Renovate, Revitalize

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE07

1.5 LU|HSW

Energy Plus Housing for All

Better Housing

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE08

1.5 LU

Expanding Context: Understanding User Needs and Data Inputs

Now Trending

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE09

1.5 LU

How to Prepare Buildings for Shared Mobility and Autonomy

Urban Solutions

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE10

1.5 LU

OCPTD – Integrated Project Delivery at the Cleveland Clinic

Project Delivery

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE11

1.5 LU

Healthy IAQ in Schools – Earning LEED v4 IEQ Credits

Healthy Environments

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE12

1.5 LU|HSW

Biodiversity, Climate Change and the Built Environment

Energy, Climate, Systems

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA Architects


Conference Page Schedule Headline

Late Morning TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

TRACK

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE13

1.5 LU|HSW

Air Infiltration Reduction Testing: A Pilot Program

Enclosures

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE14

1.5 LU|HSW

The Double Wall – Overcladding an Existing Building

Enclosures

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE15

1.5 LU|HSW

Resilience Implementation and Strategies in NYC and Boston

Beyond Flooding: Designing Resilience

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE16

1.5 LU|HSW

Design for Happiness

Culture and Practice

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE17

1.5 LU|HSW

ADA and Mass Access Regulations: Untangling the Confusion

Code and Standards

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE18

1.5 LU

Existing Conditions Assessment for Small Projects

Reposition, Renovate, Revitalize Project Types and Processes

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE19

1.5 LU

Get Schooled: Cost Effective School Design in Massachusetts

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE20

1.5 LU

Discover Your Why to Develop Your Personal Brand

Brand and Marketing

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE21

1.5 LU|HSW

The Bus Stops Here–Bus Rapid Transit & the Public Realm

Urban Solutions

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE22

1.5 LU

Thinking Inside the Box: Modular Construction Demystified

Project Delivery

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE23

1.5 LU|HSW

Human Responses to Biophilic Design in Buildings

Healthy Environments

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE24

1.5 LU|HSW

People, Power, and Place: How Civic Engagement Drives Design

Urban Solutions

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE25

1.5 LU

High Performance Exterior Rehabilitation

Reposition, Renovate, Revitalize

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE26

1.5 LU

Renderings Don't Count

Enclosures Beyond Flooding: Designing Resilience

Afternoon 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE27

1.5 LU|HSW

What Can We Do Beyond 2050? Long Term Adaptation Strategies

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE28

1.5 LU

Practice Paradigms: Models That Test Traditional Practice

Culture and Practice

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE29

1.5 LU|HSW

Boston’s Construction Boom-Understanding/Fixing Noise Issues

Code and Standards

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE30

1.5 LU

Repositioning of Suburban Two Story Office and R&D Buildings

Reposition, Renovate, Revitalize

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE31

1.5 LU|HSW

Strategies for Community Process in Affordable Housing

Better Housing Brand and Marketing

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE32

1.5 LU

Identify & Develop Your Future Business Development Leaders

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE33

1.5 LU|HSW

The Next Global Transformation of Cities

Urban Solutions

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE34

1.5 LU

The Power of P3’s – The UMass Story

Project Delivery Healthy Environments

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE35

1.5 LU|HSW

A Comparison of Health-Focused Standards: WELL versus Fitwel

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE36

1.5 LU

Regenerative Development and Design

Energy, Climate, Systems

Mid-Afternoon 3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE37

1.5 LU

Precon Perspectives on Building Enclosure: Design to Reality

Enclosures

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE38

1.5 LU|HSW

Mirror, Mirror on the–Roof? A History of Core Sunlighting

Enclosures

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE39

1.5 LU|HSW

Preparing South Boston for Sea Level Rise & Storm Surges

Beyond Flooding: Designing Resilience

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE40

1.5 LU

Technical Storytelling: Data Visualization and Architecture

Now Trending

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE41

1.5 LU|HSW

Multifamily Development: Beyond the Building Code Basics

Code and Standards

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE42

1.5 LU

Street to Suite, Lobby Repositioning's Key Ingredients

Reposition, Renovate, Revitalize

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE43

1.5 LU

Pushing Wood to Higher Heights

Better Housing

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE44

1.5 LU

Trends in Architecture – Follow or Ignore?

Now Trending

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE45

1.5 LU|HSW

Learning from the Garden City

Urban Solutions

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE46

1.5 LU

Punching Above Your Weightclass

Energy, Climate, Systems

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE47

1.5 LU|HSW

What Not to Spec: Toxins, Endocrine Disruptors, Carcinogens

Healthy Environments

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE48

1.5 LU|HSW

Optimizing Energy in Water Harvesting and Recycling

Energy, Climate, Systems

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Conference Schedule Page Headline

Evening TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

TRACK

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE49

1.5 LU|HSW

Photovoltaics and Their Impact on Roofing Assemblies

Energy, Climate, Systems

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE50

1.5 LU|HSW

Improving the Flood Resistance of Buildings

Beyond Flooding: Designing Resilience

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE51

1.5 LU

The Future of Modeling and Simulation in the Design Process

Now Trending

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE52

1.5 LU

A Strategic Framework for Stewardship of State Assets

Reposition, Renovate, Revitalize

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE53

1.5 LU|HSW

Evolving Toward Zero in Affordable Multifamily

Better Housing

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE54

1.5 LU|HSW

Culture Defining Design: Improving Access and Inclusion

Project Types and Processes

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE55

1.5 LU

The Intersection of Queer and Architecture

Now Trending

Thursday, Nov. 29 Morning 8:30 am–10:00 am

TH01

1.5 LU

Overcoming Design Challenges of High Performance

Enclosures

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH02

1.5 LU

Trouble with the Curve

Enclosures

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH03

1.5 LU|HSW

Post-Maria Puerto Rico: Defining Resilient Recovery

Beyond Flooding: Designing Resilience

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH04

1.5 LU

Where’s the Architecture in Smart Buildings?

Now Trending Energy, Climate, Systems

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH05

1.5 LU

Thinking BIG & Small: A 2030 Multi-Building Improvement Plan

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH06

1.5 LU|HSW

Avoiding Paving Problems on Waterproofed Decks

Project Types and Processes

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH07

1.5 LU|HSW

Passive House Multifamily–Building Inherent Value

Better Housing

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH08

1.5 LU

The Devil in the Details: Leveraging Brand via Architecture

Brand and Marketing

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH09

1.5 LU|HSW

Boston Groundwater Recharge–Why? How? & Results!

Urban Solutions Project Delivery

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH10

1.5 LU

Best Value Pre-cast Facades: Design Assist/integrated Design

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH11

1.5 LU|HSW

Natural Gas, Public Health and Architects Healthy Environments

Healthy Environments

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH12

1.5 LU|HSW

Building Local Equity with Parks and Working Green Spaces

Beyond Flooding: Designing Resilience

Late Morning 11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH13

1.5 LU|HSW

Panel on the Latest Methods of Air Sealing for Multi-family

Enclosures

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH14

1.5 LU

Demystifying Energy Modeling

Energy, Climate, Systems

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH15

1.5 LU|HSW

Adapting to Climate Change: Infrastructure and Resiliency

Beyond Flooding: Designing Resilience

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH16

1.5 LU

Taking Care of Our Talent

Culture and Practice

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH17

1.5 LU|HSW

Building Code Requirements for Exterior Walls

Code and Standards

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH18

1.5 LU|HSW

Working Towards Carbon Neutral in the City of Cambridge

Energy, Climate, Systems

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH20

1.5 LU

Strategos – Actions Speak Louder Than Words

Brand and Marketing

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH21

1.5 LU|HSW

Shifting Gears: Urban Design for Autonomous Vehicles

Urban Solutions

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH22

1.5 LU

Youth to Youth, Organizing to Address Youth Homelessness

Project Types and Processes

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH23

1.5 LU

Color Unplugged

Project Types and Processes

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH24

1.5 LU

Community Building from Mid-century to Tomorrow

Now Trending

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA Architects


Conference Page Schedule Headline

Afternoon TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

TRACK

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH25

1.5 LU|HSW

Unitized Facade Systems: Options, Trends, Lessons Learned

Enclosures

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH26

1.5 LU

Integrated Design with Early HVAC Sizing

Enclosures

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH27

1.5 LU|HSW

Retrofitting Buildings for Flood Risks

Beyond Flooding: Designing Resilience

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH28

1.5 LU

Business as Unusual – Learning and Innovating with Peers

Culture and Practice

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH29

1.5 LU|HSW

Code Challenges of Wood Mid-Rise Podium Construction

Code and Standards

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH30

1.5 LU|HSW

Room to Grow Greener: Assessing Site Development in Boston

Energy, Climate, Systems

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH31

1.5 LU

Cooler, Faster, Smaller: A Modular Dutch Hotel Disruptor

Project Types and Processes

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH32

1.5 LU

Construction Cost Forecast for Capital Projects

Now Trending

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH34

1.5 LU

Leveraging the Design-Build Method to Transform Campus Life

Project Delivery

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH35

1.5 LU|HSW

Introducing Fitwel

Healthy Environments

Mid-Afternoon 3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH36

1.5 LU

Glazing Systems: State of the Industry and Lessons Learned

Enclosures

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH37

1.5 LU

New Paradigm: Architect/Engineer Collaborative Energy Models

Energy, Climate, Systems

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH38

1.5 LU|HSW

Designing for Flooding and Sea Level Rise

Beyond Flooding: Designing Resilience

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH39

1.5 LU

Tech Workplaces in an Agile World

Culture and Practice

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH40

1.5 LU|HSW

4 Years of Experience with a Net-Zero House 2012-2016

Reposition, Renovate, Revitalize

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH41

1.5 LU|HSW

Resiliency Planning for Multi-Family Coastal Development

Better Housing

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH42

1.5 LU

Client Experience as Competitive Marketing Advantage

Brand and Marketing

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH43

1.5 LU

Enrich the Public Realm with Interpretive Interactive Media

Urban Solutions

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH44

1.5 LU

3 Cities, 3 Architects, 1 Project: Digital Age Collaboration

Project Delivery

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH45

1.5 LU|HSW

Winthrop Square–The Next Generation of Urban Development

Energy, Climate, Systems

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH46

1.5 LU

Lessons from Grassroots Design Build for Prof. Practice

Project Delivery

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH47

1.5 LU

Specs for Small Projects

Code and Standards

Register at abexpo.com to receive FREE expo hall admission by using discount code DM20.

Kohler Environmental Center, Choate Rosemary Hall, Robert A.M. Stern Architects. Photo by Peter Aaron Architectural Photography. 2016 Citation Winner for Sustainable Design.

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Additional Opportunities Page Headline

Additional Opportunities

In addition to the pre-show education and our core educational program, ABX offers many educational and networking opportunities. Explore the entire show, from the new CE Learning Zone in the expo hall, to the Wednesday night Alumni Receptions in the meeting rooms. You can customize your show experience by selecting from a variety of events we have available.

Wednesday, Nov. 28 TIME

CODE

TITLE

10:30 am–12:30 pm

CMF

Colormix Forecast

11:00 am–12:00 pm

LZ01

Presented by GAF: Air Barriers and Vapor Retarders—A Deep Dive into the Facts and Misconceptions in the Roofing Industry

12:30 pm–1:30 pm

LZ02

Presented by Zehnder: Whole Building Ventilation: Providing Healthy, Comfortable & Energy Efficient Indoor Solutions Book Signing with Patrick Ahearn, FAIA

12:00 pm–1:00 pm 2:00 pm–3:00 pm

LZ03

Presented by Tubelite: Storefront or Curtain Wall? “Seeing Through the Difference”

3:30 pm–4:30 pm

LZ04

Presented by Andersen: Large Doors: How to Select the Right Door

5:00 pm–6:00 pm

Happy Hour in the Hall

5:00 pm–6:00 pm

Architecture Trivia Night

6:00 pm–9:00 pm

WP

Welcome Party

Thursday, Nov. 29 TIME

CODE

TITLE

8:30 am–10:30 am

WD01

From the Ground Up: Grassroots Initiatives – Women in Design Keynote

11:00 am–12:00 pm

LZ06

Presented by SaftiFirst: Designing with Fire-Rated Glass

1:00 pm–2:30 pm

WD05

Women in Design Award of Excellence Ceremony & Luncheon

5:00 pm–6:00 pm

LZ10

Design Technology Throwdown Presentation and Awards Happy Hour in the Hall

5:00 pm–6:00 pm 5:00 pm–6:00 pm

WD09

Women in Design Happy Hour

6:00 pm–8:00 pm

AE02

Alumni Reception | Boston Architectural College (BAC)

6:00 pm–8:00 pm

AE04

Alumni Reception | Northeastern University (NEU)

6:00 pm–8:00 pm

AE05

Alumni Reception | Renssealer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

6:00 pm–8:00 pm

AE07

Alumni Reception | Syracuse University

6:00 pm–8:00 pm

AE09

Alumni Reception | University of Massachusetts (UMass)

6:00 pm–8:00 pm

AE10

Alumni Reception | Wentworth Institute of Technology (WIT)

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA


Pre-Show PageEducation Headline

Pre-Show Education NEW SAP Training Tuesday, Nov. 27 | 8:00 am–4:30 pm

SAP | Disaster Assistance Building Evaluator Training Workshop This workshop certifies attendees as Building Evaluators in the nationally recognized Safety Assessment Program (SAP). The program is managed by the California Office of Emergency Services with cooperation from professional organizations, including the American Institute of Architects, the Boston Society of Civil Engineers Section and the Structural Engineers Association of Massachusetts.

Ken Filarski, FAIA, AICP, LEED AP BDC, SITES AP, CFM, Architect/Planner, Filarski/ Architecture+Planning+ Research

Philip Loheed, AIA, NCARB, Assoc ASLA, Principal / President, Design Parthership Plus / Earthos Institute, Inc.

Mike Fillion , Vice President - Data Services, Tahzoo

Ninian Stein, M.A., M.E.Sc., PhD, Lecturer in Environmental Studies and Anthropology, Tufts University

NEW Tuesday Intensive Workshops Tuesday, Nov. 27 | 8:00 am–12:00 pm

TE01 | The Building Sector’s Role in Shaping Resilience Potential in our City and its Region

Hosted by the MA Architects & Engineers for Emergency Response Task Force Networking from 8:00 am - 8:30 am;

As we building professionals develop a more resilient metro urban Boston, what do we need to know about the New England region, its changing climate, its economy, and its critical resources—water, food, energy, biodiversity, land—to ensure resilience? This half-day workshop is envisioned as a round table conversation, coupled with breakout sessions, between urban resilience experts, designers and developers, and regional experts in climate, natural resources, and economy. The goal of this session is to understand the interconnectedness between the urban center and its region, and to identify paths forward to work with this interconnected system to optimize its potential. The workshop brings together practitioners, experts and thinkers from the urban center and the region to discuss relationships, threats, opportunities and pathways for regionally contextualized resilience development. During breakout sessions, attendees will grapple with key topics of urban-regional systems, and their natural resources, climate, economy and how to apply this understanding to resilience development. Attendees learn about the wider context within which their portion of the building sector operates. Urban-regional potential within a changing climate will be the overarching theme for all discussions.

Lunch provided from 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm.

Peter Papesch, AIA, Principal, Papesch Associates

Rose Grant, AIA, Disaster Assistance Committee Chair

Franziska Amacher, FAIA, NCARB, LEED, WBE, Principal, Amacher and Associates

This workshop will allow professional Architects, Engineers, and building inspectors to become certified to assist local governments and perform safety evaluations of the built environment in the aftermath of a natural disaster or catastrophe. It will teach participants to conduct rapid damage assessments of structures affected by earthquakes, as well as wind and water damage. Case studies will be presented and discussed to illustrate examples of possible damage scenarios that a Second Responder could encounter and how to properly assess the damage and record it for later use by emergency management personnel. Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to consistently and safely assess structures for habitability and will receive a nationally recognized Cal OES registration ID card from the state of CA. Attendees will also be introduced to the FEMA requirements and protocols for responders operating in a post-disaster theater, and will be prepared to take the self-study online courses required of Second Responders who wish to perform post-disaster assessments.

Antje Danielson, Director of Education, MIT Energy Initiative Elijah Plymesser, Director of LOCUS Massachusetts, Smart Growth America Sarah Howard, Earthos Institute, Executive Director, Co-author Boston Bioregion Resilience Project Pallavi Mande, Charles River Watershed Association, Director of the Blue Cities Program, Harvard Loeb Fellow

Tuesday, Nov. 27 | 1:00 pm–5:00 pm

TE02 | Advanced Enclosure Detailing Workshop Exterior envelope detailing is one of the most complex design challenges architects regularly face. Adding to the complexity are the everincreasing performance requirements envelopes must meet. With all this, how can architects maintain technical excellence? This workshop breaks down the complexity of designing exterior envelope into discrete, easy to remember stages of development which can be applied to any design. The methods we will share have been developed with evolving technologies and performance requirements over the last 20 years and are used in our practice every day. The workshop will be divided up into three parts: a group discussion on fundamental detailing principals, case study examples of how those principles are employed, and a hands-on session where we apply these principles and re-imagine details from notable mid-century modern buildings. Bradford Prestbo, AIA, Director of Technical Resources, Sasaki Associates Christopher O’Hara, PE, SECB, Founding Principal | Facade Director, 30372142 Stan Su, AIA, LEED AP, BD+C, Director of Enclosure Design, Morphosis Will Babbington, PE, LEED AP, BD+C, Principal | Facade Design Director, AIA

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Page Headline Education

Emerging Professionals Are you a young practitioner who has been in the industry for 5 years or less? If so, ABX has resources and programming just for you. ABX offers new graduates and professionals transitioning into the industry discounted educational workshops designed to build your skills and ensure your firm’s continued success.

Wednesday | 8:30 am–10:00 am

Thursday | 8:30 am–10:00 am

WE03 | Climate Resilient Design: Overcoming Hurdles

TH02 | Trouble with the Curve

Wednesday | 11:00 pm–12:30 pm

TH23 | Color Unplugged

WE20 | Discover Your Why to Develop Your Personal Brand

Thursday | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

To receive the discount on workshops, you must register online at abexpo.com and select yes to the registration question, “Are you an Emerging Professional?”

WE28 | Practice Paradigms: Models that Test Traditional Practice

The following sessions were chosen by the BSA/AIA Emerging Professionals Network to receive discount pricing. Please note that discounted sessions are not eligible for continuingeducation credits.

Wednesday | 1:30 pm–3:00 pm

Thursday | 11:00 pm–12:30 pm

TH35 | Introducing Fitwel Thursday | 3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH44 | 3 Cities, 3 Architects, 1 Project: Digital Age Collaboration

Wednesday | 3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE44 | Trends in Architecture – Follow or Ignore? Wednesday | 6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE55 | The Intersection of Queer and Architecture

Continuing Education Earn all the continuing-education credits you need for the year at ABX. Architects and other industry professionals can earn continuing-education credits by attending ABX workshops. Attendees earn one (1) AIA Learning Unit for each workshop hour (e.g., 1.5 LUs for a 90-minute workshop) with the exception of tours, from which travel time may be subtracted. In addition, to meet credit requirements for Health, Safety and Welfare (HSW) look for those workshops with the HSW notation in the Attendee Program.

Please note that AIA/CES no longer requires Sustainable Design as part of your overall continuing-education requirement. To track continuingeducation credits, AIA members must include their membership number when registering. If you are not an AIA member, please email your request for a certificate of attendance to ce@architects.org. Note for Massachusetts architects: Massachusetts registered architects must earn a minimum of 12 credits annually.

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA


Educational Tracks Page Headline

DESIGN YOUR PROGRAM

Tracks The ABX educational program features 100 workshops organized into 13 tracks designed to stimulate your thinking, sharpen your skills and grow every aspect of your business. Mix and match among tracks to create your ideal schedule.

Gemma Observatory, Anmahian Winton. Photo by AW Architects + Client. 2016 Award Winner for Honor Awards for Design Excellence.

Educational

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Educational Tracks Page Headline

Better Housing Track at-a-Glance

Wednesday TIME

CREDITS

TITLE

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE07

CODE

1.5 LU|HSW

Energy Plus Housing for All

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE31

1.5 LU|HSW

Strategies for Community Process in Affordable Housing

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE43

1.5 LU

Pushing Wood to Higher Heights

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE53

1.5 LU|HSW

Evolving Toward Zero in Affordable Multifamily

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH07

1.5 LU|HSW

Passive House Multifamily–Building Inherent Value

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH41

1.5 LU|HSW

Resiliency Planning for Multi-Family Coastal Development

Thursday

Wednesday November 28

Greg Smith, AIA, Associate, Studio G Architects Mike Browne, PHIUS+ Rater and Verifier, LEED-H

WE07

Jon Rudzinski, Principal, Rees-Larkin Development LLC

Energy Plus Housing for All 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU|HSW Energy positive housing, where the building makes more energy onsite than used over the course of a year is not new. Unfortunately, itís typically reserved for housing targeted to homeowners or renters with higher incomes. Whatís missing is the opportunity to create energy positive and carbon neutral housing that is targeted to low- and moderate-income homeowners and renters. How can we change this? 1. An integrated design approach to include all stakeholders. 2. Design to Passive House to reduce building energy use. 3. Cost-optimize to refine design / systems in all phases of design. 4. include deeper affordability by utilizing existing housing subsidy programs (e.g. low-income housing tax credits) for rental housing and limited equity cooperatives 5. integrate into the neighborhood (diversify the design and construction team to create jobs and wealth within the neighborhood the project is located). Our panel includes an architect, an energy rater and modeler and a developer who will discuss two projects that propose to do just this.

Rater, HERS Rater, NGBS Verifier, RESNET Trainer and QAD, Principal

WE31

Strategies for Community Process in Affordable Housing 1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Creating affordable housing and keeping neighborhoods open for all is difficult to achieve in todayís expensive housing construction market. In advanced urban democracies, it has become necessary to negotiate the design of multi-family housing not only with elected officials but with the citizenry. In Massachusetts, Chapter 40B creates opportunities as well as challenges. This process can be long and fraught with pit-falls – slowing down and increasing the cost of much needed housing – as city- and state- wide priorities are re-litigated block-by-block. But, does it have to be a negative or dreaded experience? New digital platforms allow more of the community to be reached, and real dialogue between the project team and the neighbors can be achieved earlier and more consistently than ever before. Knowing community concerns can help designers better respond to varied feedback and structure neighborhood and city presentations.

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

Strategies to knit affordable housing into existing neighborhoods while maintaining the urban fabric lead to successful projects that can garner city support. This panel will bring together a developer, city official, and an architect. Three projectsólocated in Cambridge, Dorchester, and East Boston – on which the panelists have each had a role will be used as exemplars. George Gard, AIA, ULI Associate, MAUD, Architect, Bruner/Cott Jason Korb, Principal, Capstone Communities Anna Dolmatch, Housing Planner, City of Cambridge, Community Development Department Kathryn Bilgen, LEED AP, Architect, Bruner/ Cott Architects

WE43

Pushing Wood to Higher Heights 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU Changes in the 2015 International Building Code (IBC) to allow the use of Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) have significantly enhanced the ability to build taller housing structures in wood construction. The changes are allowing height, area and construction type options for mixed-use structures previously not possible. CLT has been used in Europe for the past 15 years, providing increased speed and efficiency in construction. This session will combine the insights of an architect, code expert, and structural


Educational Tracks Page Headline

engineer to: 1. Briefly explore the history of wood as a building element. 2. Provide an overview of CLT and its use in housing over the past decade. 3. Review the IBC code changes relevant to CLT and other mass timber structural elements. 4. Present and evaluate the detailing issues in a highrise CLT multifamily housing structure. 5. Provide an update on CLT fabrication in the U.S. Nancy Ludwig, FAIA, LEED AP, President and Senior Principal, ICON Architecture Rimas Veitas, PE, President, Veitas & Veitas James Ierardi, PhD, PE, Partner, AKF

WE53

Evolving Toward Zero in Affordable Multifamily 6:00 pm–7:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Affordable multi family construction poses both unique challenges and opportunities for indoor air quality and energy, water, and material efficiency. While scheduling and cost often dictate specifications, many finance authorities require demonstrated efficiency for funding. Using three case studies, this presentation will demonstrate from design through construction how this developer progressively improved with each consecutive affordable housing development. From The Heights at Darien which were barely Energy Star certified to Crescent Crossings which is Energy Star plus Indoor airPLUS to the Passive House Designed developments in Hartford and Bridgeport, this session will demonstrate how to move design and construction to high performance. We will review modeling tools and predicted savings as compared to actual consumption and demonstrate the evolution of getting to net zero. Karla Butterfield, LEED AP Homes, Sustainability Director, Steven Winter Associates, Inc.

Thursday November 29

TH41

TH07

Resiliency, sustainability, and public Massachusetts Chapter 91 waterfront access have become more integrated into the development planning process in residential neighborhoods within the City of Boston. Increasing awareness of these civic issues have widened the conversation to community stakeholders, design professionals, and policy leaders. As a result, research is becoming formalized into guidelines that are driving “best” design practices and regulatory oversight to collectively improve the relationship between private development and civic open space, the preservation and protection of our coastal ecologies, and their relationship to housing typologies. Analyzed through the lens of complex regulatory, environmental, and urban design drivers on a coastal site in East Boston, our team will discuss how multi-family development projects can integrate these complex planning measures while remaining sensitive to differentiating scales within varied neighborhood contexts. We will discuss development opportunities available on sites that are becoming points of vulnerability along the Boston coastline, and the role of architectural and landscape design in the context of communities at greater risk of flooding. Furthermore, this session will focus on sustainable design and energy efficiency when providing a mix of micro to multiple bed housing unit typologies.

Resiliency Planning for Multi-Family Coastal Development 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW

Passive House Multifamily– Building Inherent Value 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU|HSW Real estate professionals can lead the transformation toward a more sustainable, equitable and prosperous future. Passive House design principals offer a fundamental opportunity to help us meet these goals. Applicable to nearly all building types, a Passive House approach not only dramatically reduces utility bills, operating costs and carbon footprints, but as a natural byproduct, delivers buildings that are far more durable, highly resilient, and phenomenally comfortable and healthy to be in. It is an integrated and collaborative approach that fundamentally incorporates the long view, fostering ecological and social wellness, as well as healthy enterprise. Using two case studies, we will discuss the design and construction principles that are employed to radically reduce energy consumption and produce super-efficient, cost-effective buildings that are affordable to operate, comfortable to be in, and resilient. The 28-unit mixed use Distillery North is the largest Passive House project in Massachusetts. Now almost two years in operation, we will share details, testing data and lessons learned that are being implemented in Concord Highlands, a 98-unit affordable housing project that started construction in the Spring of 2018. Michelle Apigian, AIA, LEED AP, AICP, CPHC, Associate, ICON Architecture

Theodore Touloukian, AIA, President, Touloukian Touloukian Inc. Bob Uhlig, FASLA LEED AP BD+C, President/ CEO/Principal, Halvorson Design Jamie Fay, AICP, CEP, President, Fort Point Associates, Inc.

Mark Gendron, PE, LEED AP, President, Acorn Consulting Engineers, Inc. Charles Emerson, RA; NCARB, Multifamily Manager, CHFA

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Educational Tracks Page Headline

Beyond Flooding: Designing Resilience Track at-a-Glance

Wednesday TIME

CREDIT

TITLE

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE03

CODE

1.5 LU|HSW

Climate Resilient Design: Overcoming Hurdles

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE15

1.5 LU|HSW

Resilience Implementation and Strategies in NYC and Boston

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE27

1.5 LU|HSW

What Can We Do Beyond 2050? Long Term Adaptation Strategies

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE39

1.5 LU|HSW

Preparing South Boston for Sea Level Rise & Storm Surges

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE50

1.5 LU|HSW

Improving the Flood Resistance of Buildings

TH03

1.5 LU|HSW

Post-Maria Puerto Rico: Defining Resilient Recovery

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH12

1.5 LU|HSW

Building Local Equity with Parks and Working Green Spaces

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH15

1.5 LU|HSW

Adapting to Climate Change: Infrastructure and Resiliency

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH27

1.5 LU|HSW

Retrofitting Buildings for Flood Risks

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH38

1.5 LU|HSW

Designing for Flooding and Sea Level Rise

Thursday 8:30 am–10:00 am

Wednesday November 28 WE03

Climate Resilient Design: Overcoming Hurdles 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU|HSW Developers, engineers, and architects want to include climate resiliency into their development projects for marketing, public health and environmental reasons. However, it’s not easy being green. What makes it so challenging to include climate-resilient design (e.g. “living shorelines”) into their projects? What are the regulatory issues and prevailing perspectives, in Massachusetts that make it so tricky? Engage with policy and permitting specialists working with developers and their teams on numerous high profile projects in Greater Boston to reflect upon the current difficulties, and discuss ways of overcoming them. Several piloted ideas will be presented such as

leveraging public and private interests, finding permitting openings, and working cooperatively with resource agencies. Also learn about the recent efforts to change federal, state, and local regulation to make being green and resilient common practice. Julie Conroy, AICP, Senior Environmental Planner, Fort Point Associates, Inc. Deanna Moran, Director of Environmental Planning, Conservation Law Foundation Mia Mansfield, Climate Ready Boston Program Manager, City of Boston Office of Environment, Energy and Open Space Jill Valdés Horwood, JD LLM, Director of Policy, Boston Harbor Now

WE15

Resilience Implementation and Strategies in NYC and Boston 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW This discussion will focus on the various pathways cities have been able to deal with large-scale resilience planning from NYC to Boston, and the large role funding has played in determining those

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

narratives. In NYC, Hurricane Sandy exposed the vulnerabilities of Lower Manhattan’s diverse and underserved communities. Subsequently, NYC engaged in developing planning and recovery programs; the East Side Coastal Resiliency (ESCR) and Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency (LMCR) projects emerged from these efforts. In December 2016, The City of Boston released Climate Ready Boston as part of a city-wide effort to prepare for the future, outlining specific actions to be undertaken. In 2017, the first sitespecific study was published, focusing on the waterfronts of East Boston and Charlestown. The funding of these large-scale landscape and infrastructure projects, while sharing similarities, have diverged in their allowances for implementation. In NYC, HUD and FEMA funding allowed large-scale infrastructure projects to advance, despite starts and stalls. For Climate Ready Boston, site conditions allow the City to leverage 2030 capital projects to build a framework for incremental interventions. In this discussion, we will focus on narratives of implementation,


Educational Tracks Page Headline

community involvement, and adaptability both to a changing climate and the contexts of funding and policy considerations. Amy Whitesides, Masters of Landscape Architecture, Studio Director, Stoss Matthijs Bouw, Founding Principal of One Architecture, One Architecture + Urbanism Carrie Grassi, Deputy Director for Planning, NYC Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resiliency Mia Mansfield, Climate Ready Boston Program Manager, City of Boston Office of Environment, Energy and Open Space

WE27

What Can We Do Beyond 2050? Long Term Adaptation Strategies 1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW This past year, intense Nor’easterns exposed the risks of climate change in cities across the Eastern Seaboard. While cities have been developing plans for mitigation and adaptation, we should ask how will these plans adapt to new projections of a faster sea level rise or increased intensity of storm events. This panel will discuss tools to assess and transform the frameworks for resilience set today, which will have long-term consequences. To begin defining these questions, we will discuss recent efforts by Climate Ready Boston to present a ‘layered approach:’ first facilitating localized infrastructural interventions to address short term threats, second, creating long-term visions for new public infrastructure addresses and finally, developing flexibility and relationships to connect policy, development, and resilience planning. We will also discuss the ongoing East Side Coastal Resiliency (ESCR) and Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency (LMCR) projects, whose combination can provide an example for adaptive long-term plans in Lower Manhattan. To conclude, we will explore how this ‘layered approach’ in NYC and Boston (which has a wide range of efforts outside East Boston and Charlestown) can help set strategies for cities address challenges in an incremental and dynamic manner while engaging in an iterative dialogue with the community. Matthijs Bouw, Founding Principal of One Architecture, One Architecture + Urbanism

Amy Whitesides, Masters of Landscape Architecture, Studio Director, Stoss Mia Mansfield, Climate Ready Boston Program Manager, City of Boston Office of Environment, Energy and Open Space Nasser Brahim, Senior Climate Change Planner, Kleinfelder

WE39

Preparing South Boston for Sea Level Rise & Storm Surges 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW As demonstrated during the January and March storms of 2018, Boston is at risk for coastal flooding and storm surges, particularly in the Fort Point Channel and Seaport neighborhoods. The City’s ongoing initiative, Climate Ready Boston, seeks innovative ways to plan for and mitigate the effects of climate change with targeted studies focused on the districts most at risk. A team of experts led by Arcadis—with Halvorson Design, CivicMoxie, and the Woods Hole Group—was engaged to provide a comprehensive study focused on the coastal areas and neighborhoods of the South Boston waterfront. The goal of Climate Ready South Boston is to develop a series of near and longterm strategies for protecting the city from rising sea levels, coastal flooding, and storm surges, while at the same time creating social, environmental, and economic benefits and value to the people of South Boston. During this presentation, the speakers will review key details from the report, giving audience members a better understanding of the flood risks and flood pathways for South Boston, a brief overview of flood mapping dynamics, and the solutions developed through conversations with building owners and the community to reduce the risk of flooding in this growing district. Rob Adams, ASLA, Principal, Halvorson Design Partnership, Inc.

WE50

Improving the Flood Resistance of Buildings 6:00 pm–7:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Severe flooding can endanger life, but even moderate levels of flooding can lead to extensive damages and disruption of building operations. Water source contamination and inhibited access are significant problems, coupled with damages to structures and interior contents. Contaminated water can destroy electrical infrastructure, mechanical systems, etc. Business interruption can last from a few days to over a year. Due to climate change and revisions to FEMA flood maps in 2016, many buildings not previously categorized as being at risk are now subject to flooding. As a result, insurers are informing their clients of the potential risks and associated increases in flood insurance coverage, if flood mitigation procedures are not enacted. Gale’s presentation will discuss how to identify areas of facilities vulnerable to flooding, and the options and systems available to protect properties from potentially catastrophic damages to structures, building contents, and impacts on building operations. The presentation will focus on addressing potential hazards at existing facilities. It is usually not as easy as building a levee around the property. Oftentimes, a hybrid solution must be developed, incorporating a variety of systems, including barriers, flood gates, deployable flood walls, backflow devices, storage tanks and ejector pumps, upgraded stormwater systems, etc. Edward Stewart, RRC, Associate, Gale Associates, Inc. Peter Spanos, P.E., CFM, LEED® AP, Project Engineer, Gale Associates, Inc. David Moran, Assistant Vice President, Senior Engineering Specialist, FM Global–Boston Operations

Carly Foster, AICP, CFM, Principal Resilience Planner, Arcadis Richard McGuinness, Deputy Director for Climate Change and Environmental Planning, Boston Planning & Development Agency Kirk Bosma, PE, Senior Coastal Engineer, Woods Hole Group

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Educational Tracks Page Headline

Thursday November 29

TH12

TH15

Building Local Equity with Parks and Working Green Spaces

Adapting to Climate Change: Infrastructure and Resiliency

8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU|HSW

11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW

TH03

In Boston and New York City, large city parks and open space networks have proved vital forces in the creation of public value and strengthening social resilience. In both cities, green spaces can be leveraged as holistic infrastructural armature infused with multiple functions: interventions simultaneously warding off storm surge with detention basins and bioswales absorbing stormwater, equipped with facilities to host CDOs and local groups. Implemented together, these measures can carve out a new role for urban open space as the face of social resilience central to community health. It is well studied that collaborative design with communities allows designers to maximize benefit and the success of public spaces. Through case studies of the East Harlem Resiliency Study (NYC) and the Moakley Park Vision Plan (Boston), the importance of local capacity building in the design process has been central to planning resilient public spaces. In NYC, the study leverages a educational partnership with DREAM Charter School through an honors class on climate change. In Boston, the vision plan hosted a series of events connecting user groups and communicating the park’s scale and present use, helping designers better optimize the space incrementally while also incorporating climate-adaptive interventions.

Green Infrastructure strategies and techniques are becoming more mainstream as our urban environments deal with increased stormwater management issues as well as a changing climate. Increasingly, Green Infrastructure strategies are incorporated into urban stormwater management solutions due to the increased benefits over traditional stormwater management approaches, including climate change resilience. This session will give a brief overview of Green Infrastructure techniques and demonstrate how they are implemented in urban environments. The drivers behind Green Infrastructure, including legal drivers, will be discussed. GI benefits as they relate to stormwater management, climate change resilience and triple bottom line benefits will also be presented. Presentations will center on the synergies between landscape architects, planners, and civil engineers and their roles in planning, designing, and championing integrated Green Infrastructure. Case studies will be presented from Boston Green Infrastructure projects including coastal resilience projects currently underway, as well as projects in other communities which serve as precedent for innovative collaboration between designers and engineers.

Alex Marchinski, Senior Landscape Designer, Stoss Landscape Urbanism

Scott Turner, PE, AICP, LEED AP ND, Vice President, Director of Planning, Nitsch Engineering

Post-Maria Puerto Rico: Defining Resilient Recovery 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU|HSW Co-sponsored by the BSA’s Global Practice Network and the Committee on Resilient Environments (CORE), this panel presentation and discussion will examine the state of recovery in Puerto Rico. Hurricanes Irma and Maria highlighted the long-term challenges of this Caribbean country at the frontlines of a changing climate. The initial disaster response exposed systems and processes that – while often not ideal – must be recognized and examined for their potential to influence longterm recovery. Pedro Sifre, who has documented conditions on the ground in 2018, will present historical context and the current state of recovery. Ramón Bueno, who has studied the links between climate change impacts and societal and economic conditions, will explore resilience as an equitable balance of social, environmental, and economic concerns, informed by the best climate science available. Dave Hampton, who has assisted in the recovery efforts in Haiti and elsewhere will frame a discussion around the central questions: what is resilient recovery? From what? For whom? And who decides? This interactive session is intended to spark further discussion on how design professionals can better impact recovery at home and abroad. Dave Hampton, Principal, re:ground llc Pedro Sifre, PE, Senior Principal, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger

Lindsay Woodson, Urban Planner, One Architecture & Urbanism Allison Perlman, Project Manager, City of Boston Parks and Recreation, Design and Construction

Ramon Bueno, Master in Science, MIT, 1977, Climate Change & Development Specialist, Independent Consultant Mark Careaga, AIA, Associate Principal, Payette

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

Amy Whitesides, Masters of Landscape Architecture, Studio Director, Stoss


Educational Tracks Page Headline

TH27

TH38

Retrofitting Buildings for Flood Risks

Designing for Flooding and Sea Level Rise

1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW

3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW

Responses to rising sea-levels, increased storm impacts, and more frequent major precipitation events can be categorized according to scale, from the individual building to the region. This presentation will focus on specific strategies and best practices for enhancing resilience, passive survivability, and floodresistance at the scale of the individual building, the neighborhood, and the district or floodplain. With the City of Boston’s planned implementation of a Floodplain Design Overlay District such specific strategies will be required throughout significant areas of the City. Learn what to expect from the proposed new zoning regulations and how to satisfy these expected requirements.

Changing FEMA maps, requirements for floodproofing, rising sea levels, and calls for resiliency are some of the new challenges that designers, owners, insurers, and government officials are facing as inland and coastal flooding occurs more frequently. Owners and insurers are asking designers to address the increased risks of flooding as new policies and forecasts are issued about the impacts of climate change. Owner’s expectations for resilient building performance have been heightened and government agencies are demanding that designers consider resilience. This presentation will address flood risks at new and existing buildings, discuss strategies for reducing flood risk, and review building design to resist flooding. We will explain building code requirements for flood hazard areas and describe basic approaches for wet and dry floodproofing. We will discuss vulnerability assessments of existing facilities and concepts for mitigating risk. We will also discuss the forecasts for sea level rise and strategies for addressing uncertainty in future sea levels in building design and construction.

A. Vernon Woodworth, FAIA, Consultant, AKF Group

Greg Doelp, P.E., RRC, Senior Principal, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. Casey Stevenson, P.E., Senior Project Manager, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc.

Register at abexpo.com to receive FREE expo hall admission by using discount code DM20.

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Educational Tracks Page Headline

Brand and Marketing Track at-a-Glance

Wednesday TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE20

1.5 LU

Discover Your Why to Develop Your Personal Brand

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE32

1.5 LU

Identify & Develop Your Future Business Development Leaders

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH08

1.5 LU

The Devil in the Details: Leveraging Brand via Architecture

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH20

1.5 LU

Strategos – Actions Speak Louder Than Words

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH42

1.5 LU

Client Experience as Competitive Marketing Advantage

Thursday

Wednesday November 28 WE20

Discover Your Why to Develop Your Personal Brand 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU

Sponsored by SMPS A personal brand gives you the ability to stand out in a sea of similar people. Your brand is your reputation. It’s your calling card. It’s what you’re known for and how people experience you. It’s about bringing who you are to what you do and how you do it. A positive personal brand encompasses the key traits that embody who you are, highlighting your best qualities such as problem solver, creative thinker, connector, dealmaker, or whatever matters most to you that you are capable of sustaining. Delivering your brand clearly will create a memorable experience, either positively or negatively. The easiest way to share your brand is to have something to say, when people ask, you tell them about

yourself. You should already know how you would answer this question. Remember, you want the person to leave knowing your favorite traits about yourself, enough to get them interested in getting to know more about you. This session will take you through the key insights into how sharing your WHY connects people at a deeper level and will take you through exercises to develop your personal WHY and create your WHY driven elevator pitch. Jen Newman, CPSM, CEO, Ignite Coaching & Consulting, LLC

WE32

Identify & Develop Your Future Business Development Leaders 1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU

Sponsored by SMPS With the landscape becoming increasingly competitive for A/E/C and environmental consulting firms, the importance of institutionalizing a firm-wide business development is paramount to the long-term success of your firm. Relying on a few key

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

“rainmakers” puts your firm at risk. And the inability to tap and develop future business development leaders all too often results in departure of key talent— to other firms and other industries. This workshop addresses the following topics and others: 1. The economics of building a top-down business development culture. 2. What to look for when identifying future business development talent—both from within and during the hiring process. 3. In building a firm-wide business development culture, which talent and leadership development strategies yield the highest return-oninvestment? Richard Friedman, Founder & President, Friedman & Partners


Educational Tracks Page Headline

Thursday November 29

TH20

TH42

Strategos – Actions Speak Louder Than Words

Client Experience as Competitive Marketing Advantage

11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU

3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU

TH08

Sponsored by SMPS

Sponsored by SMPS In this highly competitive environment, forward-thinking firms are realizing that creating an unrivalled client experience (CX) is truly the key to creating genuine differentiation and sustained competitive advantage. A client’s experience is the cumulative impact of every single touch point and interaction they have with a firm. While CX is every employee’s job, creating and implementing an effective CX program doesn’t happen in a vacuum—someone must own the program. And marketing departments are in the best position to “quarterback” the end-to-end customer experience in their firms. Leveraging real-world examples, this session will help attendees understand how to create a standout CX program for their firm. They’ll gain actionable insights to help make the case for marketing’s ownership of the end-to-end client experience and the steps and tools needed to make it happen.

Meredith McCarthy, AIA, Architect, Sasaki

With the acceleration of social media, how does marketing know if their strategies are working? Do you understand your AI data? If you are planning to build and launch an A/E firm, growth is what you should be concerned with and prepared for. How exactly can you architect a strategy, without breaking the bank, while engaging with the community and building a Rockstar firm? Practical strategic approaches with marketing data involves more than visualization or applying the latest MarTech tool. Relationship building, intuition, domain knowledge, and reasonable approximations can mean the difference between a successful campaign and a catastrophic failure. We’ll dive into best practices I’ve extracted from solving real marketing/BD problems like: turning strategic plans into actions, recalculating mid-trip, expanding social networks organically, turning problems into solutions, working backwards, and testing SEO advertising while contributing to society. We’ll explore real world cases and expect active learning and social interaction. With the constant changing environment of marketing/BD, we often get lost when marketing strategies fail in real world situations. Drawing inspiration from the scientific method, statistical analysis techniques in engineering, and social justice, we will walk through examples that illustrate creative solutions and solve marketing problems with real proven data.

Carrie Hawley, IALD, MIES, LEED AP, Senior Principal, HLB Lighting Design

Katie May Tucker, President and Senior Producer, KT did Marketing

The Devil in the Details: Leveraging Brand via Architecture 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU Brand is defined as the distinctive characteristics of a business. It is the expressed personality of a company committed to a set of core missions and goals. A company’s brand is its lifeblood. Customers and employees alike are expecting corporations to live up to the standards they set. How does that ambiguous noun—brand—translate into the design of a company’s physical space? In a time where companies are facing massive challenges in recruiting and retaining talent in an ever changing market, a company’s brand has become a major part of its draw. Office design must take into consideration the attitudes, ideals, and intentions of the corporation and create a place that not only supports them, but nourishes them and allows them to thrive. This lively presentation focuses on what brand means for a company; what it means in the design of a workplace; how to achieve a space that feels exceptionally unique without sacrificing functionality or financial responsibility on the part of the user. We’ll also engage the audience in exercises on how to find the essence of a company’s brand; how do we create a vision for a project and design; how that vision can support the bottom line. Victor Vizgaitis, AIA, LEED AP, Principal, Sasaki Marisa Wohl, Director of Workplace Experience, Akamai Technologies

Tim Asimos, CPSM, Vice President, Director of Digital Innovation, circle S studio

Register at abexpo.com to receive FREE expo hall admission by using discount code DM20.

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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36

Educational Tracks Page Headline

Code and Standards Track at-a-Glance

Wednesday TIME

CREDIT

TITLE

WE05

1.5 LU|HSW

ADA Updates 2018

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE17

1.5 LU|HSW

ADA and Mass Access Regulations: Untangling the Confusion

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE29

1.5 LU|HSW

Boston’s Construction Boom-Understanding/Fixing Noise Issues

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE41

1.5 LU|HSW

Multifamily Development: Beyond the Building Code Basics

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH17

1.5 LU|HSW

Building Code Requirements for Exterior Walls

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH29

1.5 LU|HSW

Code Challenges of Wood Mid-Rise Podium Construction

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH47

1.5 LU

Spec for Small Projects

8:30 am–10:00 am

Thursday

CODE

Wednesday November 28

WE17

WE29

ADA and Mass Access Regulations: Untangling the Confusion

Boston’s Construction BoomUnderstanding/Fixing Noise Issues

11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW

1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW

WE05

Do you know that the ADA requires accessibility in employee only areas and the Mass access regs do not? Mass covers private residential and the ADA does not? In this workshop, we cover critical areas where the regulations of the Massachusetts Architectural Access Board and the ADA Standards differ: alterations, vertical access, toilet rooms, ramps, technical infeasibility, variances, to name a few. We will also discuss where the requirements conflict and present a few resolutions. Finally, since the ADA is a civil rights law, we will review accessibility requirements for older building not planning alterations.

Noise/sound problems seem to sneak up on architects and MEP engineers more and more. One day you are getting complaints that there’s an echo in a new multi-story glass lobby, and the next day a neighbor to one of your buildings is complaining about a loud AHU on the roof. What to do? Hire an acoustical engineer, but now you are inundated by new set of unfamiliar terminology. Decibel here and dB there. Now what? This program will help architects, engineers and building owners understand basic acoustic terms and metrics. The session will include a discussion of sound weighting metrics, and statistical descriptors such as LN’s and LEQ will be explained in common sense terms. How does noise level differ from noise exposure? This too will be covered, along with an explanation of the uses of each type of acoustical metric. We will also review the various noise limits from Federal, state and local authorities and how are they specified. The session will include case studies, and a few exercises in measuring various acoustical parameters (including noise logging and room acoustics) will be demonstrated with live professionalgrade instrumentation.

ADA Updates 2018 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU|HSW Please join the annual update on the Americans with Disabilities Act. We will review the work the U.S. Access Board has done over the past year, items in the accessibility pipeline, new technical assistance material and research projects. We will also cover areas that the Board continues to get questions on (almost 30 years after the law went into effect). Dave Yanchulis, BA, Accessibility Specialist, U.S. Access Board Kathy Gips, Director of Training, New England ADA Center/Institute for Human Centered Design

Kathy Gips, Director of Training, New England ADA Center/Institute for Human Centered Design Dave Yanchulis, BA, Accessibility Specialist, U.S. Access Board Deborah Ryan, Principal, Deborah A. Ryan & Associates

Michael Bahtiarian, INCE Board Certified, Principal Consultant, ACENTECH Alex Odom, Consultant, ACENTECH

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA


Educational Tracks Page Headline

WE41

Multifamily Development: Beyond the Building Code Basics 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW The presentation focuses on all things multifamily relating to fire and life safety code compliance. A walk through the building codes as well as fire and life safety standards is guided by an experienced code consulting professional. As-of-right compliance strategies as well as alternative methods are explored for topics that include, but are not limited to, podium construction, fireresistance ratings, sprinkler protection, accessibility, occupancy separation, NPFA 285, and roofdecks. Chosen topics for the presentation were largely based on industry interest and actual project experience. Case studies are used to illustrate the intent of the code. Learning Objectives: 1. Understand the relevant code requirements affecting multifamily construction projects. 2. Understand where complying as-of-right with local fire and life safety codes is essential to the safety of the occupants. 3. Identify areas of the code in which compliance alternatives are common and where variances from the prescriptive requirements can potentially be achieved. 4. Understand what’s new in the fire and life safety industry related to multifamily buildings and which topics will have the biggest impact on projects. Eric Montplaisir, Licensed Fire Protection Engineer; Certified Speci, Principal Fire Protection Engineer, NFPA, SFPE, ICC

Thursday November 29 TH17

Building Code Requirements for Exterior Walls 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Exterior wall construction has been the center of attention for a number of large fires occurring recently around the world. The materials and construction methods for exterior walls are constantly evolving as design teams seek to improve building performance while also incorporating the desired aesthetic appeal. With these new design methods comes new code requirements to ensure the safety of building occupants and firefighters is maintained. In this presentation, we will cover the different materials and methods that are permitted by the codes and how they came to be. This will cover the requirements as they pertain to fire separation distance, fire resistance ratings, allowable openings, combustible materials, foam plastics, and other pertinent subjects as they relate to exterior wall construction. Donald Havener, P.E., Principal Fire Protection Engineer, Cosentini Associates Keith Flanders, PE, Senior Fire Protection Engineer, Cosentini Associates

best practice approaches during the planning and production phase? Topics that will be discussed under planning and production phases will include 3-HR podium Approaches, overview of exterior wall and intersections for type III and V Construction, and best practice approaches for floor ceiling, demising and corridor wall assemblies. 2. What is the best practice approach during the construction phase of a project? Topics that will be discussed under construction phase will include a brief overview of the latest NFPA Safeguarding Construction, NFPA 241 approach to this building type, best practices of introducing active fire protection during construction, common challenges faced in the field in achieving NFPA 241 compliance, the reasonableness of requesting a phased occupancy given recent fire events and ownership perspective and cost implications of best practice approach for safeguarding construction. Mark Soltysiak, RA, LEED AP BD+C, Associate, STANTEC Architecture and Engineering P.C. Peter Harrod, PE, Principal, Code Red Associates Zachary Skarzynski, Development Associate, Pritzker Realty Group Caitlin Gamache, PE, Consultant, Code Red Associates

TH47

Specs for Small Projects 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU

TH29

Code Challenges of Wood Mid-Rise Podium Construction 1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Panel discussion will focus on building code compliance challenges in designing/building wood mid-rise construction in the Boston metro region. With the number of recent fires to residential wood mid-rise podium projects, there is an increased interest in understanding available construction means/methods that can help mitigate the risk associated with this building type. Discussion will focus on two questions: 1. What are the

Sponsored by CSI Boston You can write specs for small projects yourself! We compare the advantages of specs-on-the-drawings and preliminary project descriptions; outline specs; short-form specs; full specs; and specs in BIM. Topics include an overview of CSI form. You will understand the common types of specs in use today, develop confidence in writing specs for small projects yourself and improve coordination between contracts and architectural and engineering specs. Mark Kalin, FAIA FCSI LEED, President, Kalin Associates Inc.

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Educational Tracks Page Headline

Culture and Practice Track at-a-Glance

Wednesday TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE04

1.5 LU

Built to Grow: Talent Management for Architects

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE16

1.5 LU|HSW

Design for Happiness

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE28

1.5 LU

Practice Paradigms: Models That Test Traditional Practice

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH16

1.5 LU

Taking Care of Our Talent

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH28

1.5 LU

Business as Unusual – Learning and Innovating with Peers

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH39

1.5 LU

Tech Workplaces in an Agile World

Thursday

Wednesday November 28 WE04

Built to Grow: Talent Management for Architects 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU Too often, A/E/C firms run the risk of prioritizing design management over people management. In today’s evolving marketplace, talent management is proving to be much more than glorified babysitting. Quite the opposite in fact, it’s become a leading indicator of success. Firms that want to design, build, AND make money at the same time need smart talent management strategies linked closely to their business objectives. What is talent management? Smart recruiting, onboarding, training and development, performance management, succession planning, diversity, and employee engagement. This interactive session will cover all of the above and prove that managing talent is much more than adventures in babysitting. Joel Peterson, SHRM-SCP, Chief Operating Officer / Director of H.R., Goshow Architects, AIA New York, SHRM

WE16

Design for Happiness 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW The most common and recurrent goal of human beings is happiness. One of the most powerful tools to create environments that promote happiness is design. During the past decade there has been plenty of research around happiness, but very few development and participation from the Built Environment, so how can we promote among designers a vision that through design we can help individuals reach the happiness desired? Design is a magic crystal that helps you visualize your environment as it could be, not as it is... thou design is the turning point of transformation, future definition, and happiness. Juan Baumgartner, Architect, Industrial Designer, CEO, IIDA, Green Building Counsil, IUA, SBID, Singularity University, Design Thinkers Academy

WE28

Practice Paradigms: Models That Test Traditional Practice 1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU This session examines the external forces that are reshaping the scale, specialization and composition of design practice. It also highlights the internal aspects of the design and

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

planning professions that are under to remain stable. Practice Paradigms brings together two architects and an urban planner/urban designer to discuss the rapidly evolving trends with design practice. Emerging business models are moving away from conventional design practice and towards convergence and transdisciplinarity. These trends are empowered by creativity, collaboration and enhanced communication as a result of technology. Challenges to the traditional design firm are coming from many directions. On the one hand, consolidation continues to take place with large corporate conglomerates actively seeking to acquire small and mid-size firms that specialize. At the same time, an entrepreneurial ethic has cultivated niche firms and virtual practices that can compete, in teams, on the global stage. New technology and project delivery models are increasing competition and blurring the boundaries between traditional practice silos. David Gamble, AIA, AICP, Lecturer / Principal, Harvard Graduate School of Design / Gamble Associates Mark Pasnik, AIA, Principal, over,under Christine Dunn, AIA, Principal, Sasaski


Educational Tracks Page Headline

Thursday November 29

TH28

TH39

Business as Unusual – Learning and Innovating with Peers

Tech Workplaces in an Agile World

TH16

Renee Chu, Aerospace Engineer, Facebook

Who has time to work on continuous improvement for our companies, our projects, and ourselves? How about finding relevant lessons learned for our challenging projects that reside within our own companies as well as our partners? How about identifying, developing, or testing new ideas for improving the quality of the workday and work environment for our colleagues and ourselves? Anyone can, if they make it a priority for personal growth and corporate strategy. In this session, we will discuss the efforts of around a dozen companies that regularly work on projects in the Boston metro area to establish an Owner-Architect-Engineer-Contractor Peer Learning Lab (OAEC-PLL). This group was formed to discuss and improve the processes around Project Team Alignment, Owner Decisionmaking, Management of Design & Delivery Processes, and Knowledge Management. Our mission is to “Build a Project Culture that Fosters Respect and Trust through Collaborative Learning and Experimentation.” We will review how our group established our mission and goals, determined the nature of our interaction (e.g., discussions, office visits), shared our lessons learned, and conducted our small experiments. In doing so, we hope to inspire audience members to consider forming their own peer learning labs to do the same.

Justine Orlando, MA CSL, Construction Project Manager, Shawmut Design and Construction

Cynthia Tsao, PhD, Director of Lean Strategy, Consigli Construction Co., Inc.

Miranda Aisling, M.Ed. Community Art, Founder & Executive Director, Miranda’s Hearth

Bernadette Muncy, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP BD+C, Senior Associate, Architecture Discipline Lead, SmithGroup

Taking Care of Our Talent 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU Throughout the A/E/C industry, demands for excellence are high and burn out, to one degree or another, is familiar to many. The panel will identify common principles in the successful holistic approaches that today’s thought leaders in other high-performance industries have implemented to combat the stress of working in a demanding industry. The panel will discuss how to apply these successful practices to the A/E/C Industry. For example one panelist will be sharing a story about a local technology university that developed a theater program as a creative outlet for non-theater majors to combat self-harm incidents. Following the panel the attendees will break out into small group each moderated by one of the panelists to brainstorm solutions to the specific issues that the attendees face in their careers. The goal is for attendees to leave empowered with actionable ideas that they can implement in their circles. The word “our” in the title is meant to capture both what we as individuals can do for self-care, as well as what we can do corporately to take care of our talent. Cynthia Staats, P.E. (VT), LEED AP, Senior Staff II–Building Technology, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger,

1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU

3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU Agile methodologies were conceived as a solution to the behemoth software development processes of the 1980s. Slow, isolated, cumbersome, and difficult to adapt to changing customer needs, these older workstyles quickly lost favor when it became apparent that constant communication and collaboration was needed for success. While management styles changed, workplaces were slow to adapt. Today’s Agile workplaces need to be more than just a collection of seating arrangements. In this session, we’ll talk about some of the common beliefs around Agile workspaces, and look at the physical and psychological needs that must be addressed to ensure success for these new work practices. Taking cues from the Agile Manifesto, we’ll break down the myths, confirm some home truths, and find our way around obstacles to help you design workspaces that are as flexible and energetic as the teams that work in them. Oriana Merlo, NCIDQ, WELL AP, LEED AP ID+C, Senior Project Manager, NELSON

Matt Roberts, AIA, Senior Associate, Architect, Project Manager, Stantec Jessica Stebbins, IIDA, LEED AP, Principal, Health Market Sector Leader, USGBC, ASHE

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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40

Educational Tracks Page Headline

Enclosures Track at-a-Glance

Wednesday TIME

CREDITS

TITLE

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE01

CODE

1.5 LU

Details for the Building Enclosure

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE02

1.5 LU

Understanding Glass Distortion

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE13

1.5 LU|HSW

Air Infiltration Reduction Testing: A Pilot Program

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE14

1.5 LU|HSW

The Double Wall – Overcladding an Existing Building

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE26

1.5 LU

Renderings Don’t Count

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE37

1.5 LU

Precon Perspectives on Building Enclosure: Design to Reality

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE38

1.5 LU|HSW

Mirror, Mirror on the – Roof? A History of Core Sunlighting

Thursday 8:30 am–10:00 am

TH01

1.5 LU

Overcoming Design Challenges of High Performance Envelopes

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH02

1.5 LU

Trouble with the Curve

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH13

1.5 LU|HSW

Panel on the Latest Methods of Air Sealing for Multi-Family

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH25

1.5 LU|HSW

Unitized Facade Systems: Options, Trends, Lessons Learned

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH26

1.5 LU

Integrated Design with Early HVAC Sizing

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH36

1.5 LU

Glazing Systems: State of the Industry and Lessons Learned

Wednesday November 28 WE01

Details for the Building Enclosure 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU In this workshop you learn how to stay out of trouble when detailing building enclosures. A brief review of building science (the management of heat, air and moisture) is combined with a review of contemporary details for commercial and residential construction and how the principles of building science are applied to them. The principles of rainscreen cladding are integrated into the presentation. The presenter is nationally known for his expertise in the design of building enclosures. Included in the presentation will be: 1. The principles of building science and how to avoid condensation problem.

2. The affect of climate on various details. 3. The recent issues with building code mandated fire testing of foam plastic insulation and weather barrier membranes. 4. Detailing of watertight building enclosures and wood frame, steel frame, brick veneer, double-sealed precast concrete, and metal panel enclosures. 5. Detailing at openings for: curtain walls, storefronts, and windows, and roof to wall connections and expansion joints. 6. Quality assurance for the building enclosure. Richard Keleher, AIA, CSI, LEED AP

WE02

Understanding Glass Distortion 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU Glass is a highly visible and highly variable part of the built environment. The performance and aesthetics of the glass can greatly affect the perception

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

of the viewer as well as the user. This presentation will review basis glass properties, glass types, and fabrication methods, with an emphasis on the heat treatment process and its impact on optical distortion (bow, edge kink, roller wave, etc.). The presentation will include an overview of industry standards related to optical distortion, discuss glass types that are more susceptible to optical distortion, and discuss proper specification of heat treated glass to avoid optical distortion issues. These topics will be reinforced through a series of case studies dealing with evaluation of optical distortion in installed glass units. Tony Cinnamon, Licensed Architect Illinois and Iowa, Associate Principal, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Assoc., Inc. Sarah Sinusas, Professional Engineer California and Connecticut, Senior Associate, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Assoc., Inc.


Educational Tracks Page Headline

WE13

Air Infiltration Reduction Testing: A Pilot Program 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW In their quest for deeper energy savings, many projects seek energy conservation measures (ECMs) opportunities focused on the building enclosure, in addition to the efficient HVAC systems and efficiency lighting equipment based savings. The Air Infiltration Reduction Pilot Program seek to demonstrate cost effective means to increase the Multi-Family program savings through air infiltration reduction beyond Code, combined with Advanced Enclosure Performance and High Efficiency HVAC systems. The team included National Grid’s Strategy Group, SMMA’s Sustainability and Energy Group and ICF. The pilot program evaluation included application of air infiltration testing standards and methodology in support to advanced air infiltration reduction design and construction best practices. The program measured the air infiltration reduction energy savings through whole building enclosure air tightness testing on 6 high rise high performance multi-family facilities. The objective was to assess the feasibility of developing an energy conservation measure [ECM] within the multi-family incentives program, as well as informing its potential application to other utility commercial and institutional (C&I) incentives programs. Francis Boucher, LEED AP, CEM, Senior Engineer, Program Manager, National Grid Martine Dion, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C, Principal, Director of Sustainable Design, SMMA Kristen Simmons, AIA, NCARB, LEED BC+D, ICF

WE14

The Double Wall – Overcladding an Existing Building 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Taking existing, occupied buildings offline to complete extensive facade repairs to address leakage, deteriorated or damaged facade elements, insufficient energy performance, or aesthetic upgrades can be challenging. Moving and temporarily relocating the building occupants and providing temporary data and communication systems in order to allow a business to continue to function can make an extensive facade rehabilitation project unappealing. More building

owners are considering keeping the existing facade in place and overcladding the exterior, thereby eliminating the need to move the occupants and disturb interior finishes and mechanical systems along the exterior walls. This presentation will discuss design considerations and construction challenges of overcladding existing facades. It will cover the interior and exterior aesthetic impacts, implications and possible upgrades to the existing building structure, design of the new structure to support the new cladding, and design considerations for the interstitial space between the new and existing walls. We will discuss case studies illustrating overcladding strategies; one case study will utilize a curtain wall overclad and another on a historic facade that will utilize a masonry cladding to replicate the historic features of the original facade. Annemarie DerAnanian, PE, Senior Staff II, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Douglas Pac, P.E., Senior Staff II–Building Technology, Simpson Gumpertz and Heger

WE26

Renderings Don’t Count 1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU Renderings Don’t Count is about realizing the vision on the most ambitious designs. Our case studies illustrate ways these designs have been achieved and the process and technologies used. The case studies include structures, facades and in most cases the holistic integration of both to find synergies, efficiency and thermal performance. The solutions use conventional systems in unconventional ways; advanced materials such as ultra high performance concrete, reinforced polymers, carbon fiber and structural glass. The discussion will not just be about the solution to the problem but why the solution was chosen. When designing these systems, the answer to “Why?” is important to achieving the most appropriate solution to the project’s challenges, whether they be geometry, performance, efficiency, or cost. The course will demonstrate how early collaboration of a skilled team can help make even the most challenging designs evolve from rendering to built work.

WE37

Precon Perspectives on Building Enclosure: Design to Reality 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU A successful preconstruction phase is critical to designing and executing highperformance enclosures. It is during this time that the architect, consultants, and contractor must work collaboratively to translate design intent and performance requirements into physical reality. Presented from the perspective of an architect, enclosure consultant, and contractor, this interactive session will focus on three key activities which lead up to construction: trade delegation and coordination, the submittal and shop drawing review process, and physical mock-up construction and performance testing. The three panelists will share their viewpoints primarily through the lens of two institutional projects, which will serve as case studies. This discussion will walk through the preconstruction process, highlighting challenges both technical and organizational. To help attendees translate the session to their own work and practice, the session will end with the panelist sharing their own lessons learned and best practice recommendations, along with the moderator engaging the audience to share their perspective on similar experiences and challenges. Jeffrey Abramson, AIA, LEED AP, Associate, Payette Emily Hopps, P.E., Associate Principal, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Amy Sowersby, Project Manager, Turner Construction Co.

Christopher O’Hara, PE, SECB, Founding Principal | Facade Director, 30372142

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Educational Tracks Page Headline

WE38

Mirror, Mirror on the – Roof? A History of Core Sunlighting 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Natural lighting is the most efficient form of renewable power because it is used immediately for its native properties without conversion to another medium and attendant losses. While the health benefits of natural light are well known, it can be difficult to provide in a densely built environment. According to the Illuminating Engineering Society, “Active core sunlighting is the process of intercepting sunlight at the envelope of a building with solar tracking optics, transporting it, and directing it within the building so as to provide appropriate illumination for a host of ambient, task and accent lighting applications.” As technological advances with mirrored systems and controls make the technique more practical it is useful to see examples of successes and failures over the years. Although mirrored systems for bringing light into buildings have been attempted since the mid-1800’s, recent advances in controls and materials show promise for more sophisticated results. As cities become more densely built, access to daylight from within buildings becomes more difficult to achieve. Active core sunlighting can be a tool to support the viability of cities, sustainable design and a healthy built environment by bringing natural light deep into the interior of a building. Jeffrey Berg, AIA, LC, LEED AP BD+C, Senior Lighting Designer/Supervising Architect, WSP USA.

Thursday November 29 TH01

Overcoming Design Challenges of High Performance Envelopes 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU Critical in the design of high performance building envelopes is the early identification of energy targets coupled with early-stage thermal and building energy modeling. Together the targets and analysis serve to guide an iterative design process from system selection through project delivery. Three institutional projects will serve as case studies. All three projects represent signature expansion of their respective campuses with energy targets 40% below their ASHRAE benchmarks and meeting the 2030 Commitment. This discussion will walk through the integrated process utilizing parametric modeling, daylight and glazing analysis, physical mock-ups, on-site testing and a design assist delivery method to ensure and performance of their envelopes met the project requirements at every step. Although their energy targets and design processes were similar, the solutions demonstrate wide ranging possibilities from highly customized form-giving sunshades, orchestration of standard components and minimalist design. Andrea Love, AIA, LEED Fellow, Principal, Director of Building Science, Payette Jeffrey Abramson, AIA, LEED AP, Associate, Payette Robert Pasersky, AIA, Associate Principal, Payette Wesley Schwartz, AIA, Senior Associate, Payette

TH02

Trouble with the Curve 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU Recent trends in architectural design have not only increased the demand for complex geometry, but also the desire for high performance and transparent facades. While free-form curvilinear geometries may be achieved through the use of warm-bending techniques such as hot bending and lamination bending, the associated fabrication costs tend to be prohibitively expensive when compared Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

to traditional flat glass and often require strict manufacturing and installation tolerances. Cold bending allows for the realization of curved glass facades at a reduced fabrication premium, however it is usually limited to large radius, single curvature applications. The development of new parametric modeling tools and advances in computational analysis design of free-form architectural geometry have facilitated the rationalization of complex doublecurved facades using singly-curved panels. Technological developments in both façade engineering and the glass industry have yielded a broad array of opportunities for the application of cold-bending techniques which were previously limited by geometric complexity as well as the capability of fabricators. This workshop will explore some basic principles of cold-bending as well as its aesthetic implications in order to afford architects, façade engineers and other industry professional with a more comprehensive understanding about the potential prospects and pitfalls associated with curved glass. Claudio Adami, Facade Consultant, Senior Project Director, Thornton Tomasetti Stefanie Schober, Facade Consultant, Senior Project Director, Thornton Tomasetti

TH13

Panel on the Latest Methods of Air Sealing for Multi-Family 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Air-sealing within a multi-family (or multi-zone) building remains a very challenging element of controlling infiltration, ventilation air and overall air-movement through a building. Its impacts are far-reaching including energy use and air quality and durability. This panel discussion will be a deep dive into the variety of current materials and methods that can safely and predictably deliver these benefits — including some of the most exciting new approaches. Michael Browne will bring experience in testing air-tightness large buildings and attached dwellings. Doug Lamm will bring his deep understanding of products and processes developed for these purposes. Tom Holmes will bring the contractor experience of actually accomplishing excellent results through a combination of strategies.


Educational Tracks Page Headline

Mike Browne, PHIUS+ Rater and Verifier, LEED-H Rater, HERS Rater, NGBS Verifier, RESNET Trainer and QAD, Principal, Advanced Building Analysis, LLC Doug Lamm, CEO, principal investigator, Building Envelope Materials Thomas Holmes, Senior Project Manager, Aspen Environmental

TH25

Unitized Facade Systems: Options, Trends, Lessons Learned 1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Prefabricated building enclosure systems are growing in popularity as they lend themselves to streamlining construction schedules and reducing overall construction costs while offering the potential for increased quality due to assembly in controlled factory environments. The current market for prefabricated wall systems is diverse and extensive, ranging from precast concrete wall panels to unitized glass and metal curtain wall systems. The presentation will discuss various approaches to panelization/ unitization of facade systems and the practical advantages and disadvantages of each, focusing on large shop-fabricated sections of the enclosure or also known as “megapanels.” The presenters will cover topics such as design, installation/ constructability, coordination, durability, weatherproofing, thermal performance, and other practical considerations. Highlighting case studies of their past projects, they will discuss common issues that can occur during design and construction and how to prevent them to get the most benefit from a unitized system. Christopher Grey, P.E. (MA), Senior Staff II– Building Technology, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger (SGH) Derek McCowan, P.E., Senior Project Manager, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc.

TH26

TH36

Integrated Design with Early HVAC Sizing

Glazing Systems: State of the Industry and Lessons Learned

1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU

3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU

Design aesthetics and energy performance are often believed to be at odds with one another. However, if addressed early in design through collaboration with architects and engineers, they can complement and strengthen each other. The patient room design for a new inpatient hospital in Boston highlights a successful workflow between the design team and engineers to shape the façade to meet the client’s aesthetic aspirations while hitting energy reduction targets through early HVAC sizing. Multiple questions shaped the analysis and design process throughout the schematic design phase. The panelists will explain the evolution of the project and how these questions directly shaped the façade of the patient rooms. A few of the factors explored will be the optimal angle of façade serration, type and size of glazing, perimeter heating system, capacity and limitations of chilled beams, validation of E+ against TRANE Trace, and family zone lay-out and comfort. Close collaboration between architects and engineers allowed for a well-informed early HVAC design for the patient rooms to reduce total energy usage and maintain a compelling aesthetic strategy. The panelists will elaborate on lessons learned and tips for successful teamwork.

Modern day enclosure and glazing systems are complex and to produce a design that is both high-performance and constructible, coordination between various systems is critical. In addition, contractors, engineers, and architects are always working to minimize conflicts throughout the design and construction process. We will provide an overview of glazing system options and the variety of forms they come in and explain some of the design challenges and performance limitations between each system. We will also discuss the advantages of early analysis envelope design to facilitate detailing, waterproofing, and optimization for construction installation of primarily window and window wall systems. We will also discuss the most common issues we see during design and construction highlighting examples from past projects. Christopher Grey, P.E. (MA), Senior Staff II– Building Technology, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger (SGH)

Melanie Silver, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Building Scientist, Payette Associates Ari Greenberg, LEED AP BD+C, HVAC + Energy Engineer, BR+A Consulting Engineers Christopher Mackey, AIA, Building Scientist, Payette Megan van der Linde, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Associate, Payette

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ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Educational Tracks Page Headline

Energy, Climate, Systems Track at-a-Glance

Wednesday TIME

CREDIT

TITLE

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE12

CODE

1.5 LU|HSW

Biodiversity, Climate Change and the Built Environment

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE36

1.5 LU

Regenerative Development and Design

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE46

1.5 LU

Punching Above Your Weightclass

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE48

1.5 LU|HSW

Optimizing Energy in Water Harvesting and Recycling

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE49

1.5 LU|HSW

Photovoltaics and Their Impact on Roofing Assemblies

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH05

1.5 LU

Thinking BIG & Small: A 2030 Multi-Building Improvement Plan

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH14

1.5 LU

Demystifying Energy Modeling

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH18

1.5 LU|HSW

Working Towards Carbon Neutral in the City of Cambridge

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH30

1.5 LU|HSW

Room to Grow Greener: Assessing Site Development in Boston

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH37

1.5 LU

New Paradigm: Architect/Engineer Collaborative Energy Models

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH45

1.5 LU|HSW

Winthrop Square – The Next Generation of Urban Development

Thursday

Wednesday November 28

WE36

WE12

Regenerative Development and Design (or, healing the world in 18 months — truly possible, if. . .) We have all the physical technologies we need to heal the earth — right now. Deep Green Buildings and Infrastructure, Organizational Development ‘technologies’, Polycanopy farming, holistic management, and permaculture techniques can begin to bring back a healthy trajectory and harmony between humans and ‘nature’ in 18 months. The same principles apply to human development and social systems as well as habitat. Living systems thinking applies to all of life. So, what’s slowing us down? How can we shift our organization and business practices to effectively engage, motivate, and learn what’s required for meaningful and rapid change? Bill Reed will introduce the foundational living system processes that are the basis for the practice of Regenerative Development and Design. These have been proven to invite massive change, alignment between human-to-human and human-to-nature relationships. It is not so difficult, but it IS

Biodiversity, Climate Change and the Built Environment 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU|HSW The Architectural profession has been among the leaders in addressing the problems of greenhouse emissions and the AIA has taken some fairly strong positions on going further. However, while greenhouse emissions are part of the problem of climate change, they are only a part. The wider issues around climate change include a much broader destruction of the biological systems that support life on this planet. We as architects need to educate ourselves on the issues of biodiversity and find ways to address these issues in our designs to start reversing climate change. This presentation will introduce you to this wider picture, the larger issues in our climate future and what we as a profession can do to promote climatic healing. Christopher Haines, AIA, NCARB, LFA, CPHC, Principal, Permadigms

Regenerative Development and Design 1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

a different way of working — compared to the fragmented processes used in our development, government, design and construction world. William Reed, AIA, LEED, Principal, Regenesis.

WE46

Punching Above Your Weightclass 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU While LEED v4 Silver is a worthwhile goal, we know that it represents the “middle of the pack,” not the leading edge of high performance. Our contract with a university client for a new 210,000 square foot 300-bed student housing project required only that level of certification, but we thought it would be possible to deliver greater value by targeting more aggressive sustainability goals, specifically the Passive House standards and the Living Building Challenge Materials Petal. By demonstrating that these more ambitious goals could be delivered within the same design and construction budget, we moved the needle and provided a significantly better project. We will provide key findings associated with energy modeling, solar shading, water management, healthy materials, and high-performance building envelope.


Educational Tracks Page Headline

We will explore the metrics we employed to evaluate a variety of options and their return on investment, to make it palatable to naysayers and confirm financial feasibility. The presentation will also discuss the teams’ persistent approach to strive for a better building and how we navigated discussions with the complex group of university stakeholders. Stephen Feige, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Associate, Goody Clancy Michael Pulaski, PhD LEED AP BD+C, Vice President, Thornton Tomasetti Charley Stevenson, LEED AP BD+C, Owner, Integrated Ecostrategy

WE48

Optimizing Energy in Water Harvesting and Recycling 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW With water in short supply in many areas of the world, the desire to expand the use of rainwater harvesting and water recycling is ever increasing — but are these systems increasing total energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions? In this workshop, Derek Anderson of Arup will present a new approach for assessing the full life cycle energy consumption of rainwater harvesting and water recycling systems. This will include estimating and comparing energy demands of on-site water collection, treatment, and distribution systems to the embedded energy in local municipal water supply and combined sewer treatment systems. Methods for optimizing both water and energy consumption will be demonstrated through case studies. The workshop will also include a discussion on weighting relevant sustainability criteria, including water consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, flood risk, water quality, economics, and resilience. Derek Anderson, PE, ENV SP, Senior Civil Engineer, Arup

WE49

Photovoltaics and Their Impact on Roofing Assemblies 6:00 pm–7:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW As the demand for renewable energy sources is increasing and more energy programs are available, photovoltaic (PV) arrays are being installed on roof areas more frequently. Proper planning when considering installing PV arrays can greatly reduce the potential for roof

leaks, voided roof warranties, structural damage, and unnecessary expenses. These considerations should include evaluation of the existing roof system and planning for the installation of a roof top PV system, selection of the appropriate PV system for the building, design of the PV system attachment to the building and roof, design of roof repairs or roof replacement in conjunction with the PV installation, maintenance of the roof and PV arrays, and evaluation of the costs associated with each phase. Specifically, the owner and designer should review the condition and warranty duration of the existing roof system, the available capacity of the existing structure, options for PV systems and attachments, roof manufacturer limitations, life safety for maintenance, fire safety, and the appropriate coordination of the various tradesmen before, during, and after construction. Terence DaCosta, E.I.T., Senior Project Engineer, Gale Associates, Inc. Jeffrey Ziske, E.I.T., Project Engineer, Gale Associates, Inc.

Thursday November 29 TH05

Thinking BIG & Small: A 2030 Multi-Building Improvement Plan 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU Planning for big goals, like becoming a Net Zero community, while attending to the smallest details of maintaining and improving a diverse portfolio of buildings is hard. To accomplish this task, Cambridge Dept. of Public Works developed an integrated longterm capital improvement plan that simultaneously moves the city toward its overarching goals while detailing and executing fine-grained emergency and deferred maintenance projects. It has been an ambitious undertaking with many priorities. The Cambridge Municipal Facilities Improvement Plan (MFIP) is 43-building (1.77 million square feet), 13-year capital planning program designed to achieve a low carbon, energy efficient building portfolio that is resilient, maintainable, accessible, and supportive of occupant well-being and inclusive design. Representatives

from the City, Arup engineering, and ICON Architecture will detail the specific processes of establishing and building consensus around the project’s goals. They will share data collection and visualization methods, tools developed, initial projects, and lessons learned. Ned Collier, AIA, LEED AP, Principal, ICON Architecture Julie Lynch, Registered Architect, Project Manager, City of Cambridge Department of Public Works Rebecca Hatchadorian, LEED AP BD+C, Associate | Sustainability, Arup

TH14

Demystifying Energy Modeling 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU Energy modeling is an integral component of modern building design, especially for projects aiming for high energy efficiency and Net Zero goals. Having a model in place at the project’s outset can help designers make and communicate design decisions more effectively. Early stage energy modeling allows more decisions to be made with consideration to energy efficiency, and is particularly important for projects with ambitious energy performance goals. So how can architects understand this tool more fully to evaluate the energy consumption of projects early in the design process? What questions are important to ask, and when in the design process should we be asking them? What is driving the differences when engineers arrive at different outcomes for the same project? This workshop will demystify the energy modeling process by creating a dialogue between architects and energy modeling engineers. By bringing different roles and perspectives to the conversation, we will discuss ways to establish productive relationships between all parties involved so that each group is able to see positive outcomes from the process while contributing to environmental sustainability. Gary Brock, Assoc. AIA, LEED AP, Designer, HMFH Architects Dana Etherington, PE, BEMP, CEM, LEED AP, WELL AP, Director of Energy and Sustainability, NV5 Magda Lelek, PE, LEED AP, Principal, Andelman and Lelek Engineering, Inc. Chris Schaffner, PE, LEED Fellow, WELL AP, Licensed BREEAM Assessor, Founder and President, The Green Engineer, Inc.

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Educational Tracks Page Headline

TH18

Working Towards Carbon Neutral in the City of Cambridge 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW In 2015, the City of Cambridge took the extraordinary step of committing to a 25-year Net Zero Action Plan, with the goal of transforming the City into a Net Zero community by 2040. The Martin Luther King School and The King Open/ Cambridge Street Upper Schools and Community Complex (KOCSUSCC) are among the City’s first projects to be built under this ambitious mandate. The Design Team’s took on this lofty charge and developed the site, schools, and community center to meet the Net Zero Emissions challenge. The broader team committed to an energy efficient design and operation of the facilities. The Martin Luther King School designed their project to LEED V3 and produced 47% of the annual energy required for the building on site. The King Open project utilized the LEED V4 system, and optimized newer technologies to achieve 60% of the Net Zero Goal onsite. To date, Net Zero buildings have been relatively small compared to the 273,000 sf KOCSUSCC and 170,000sf of the Martin Luther King School due to the limitations of current on-site power generating technologies. Join the design teams to discuss the intricacies of Net Zero design on larger scale projects. Sindu Meier, AIA, LEED AP, BD +C, Senior Associate, William Rawn Associates, Architects, Inc. Michael Black, Construction Program Manager, City of Cambridge Samuel Lasky, AIA, LEED AP, BD + C, Associate Principal, William Rawn Associates, Architects, Inc. Kate Bubriski, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Fitwel Ambassador, Director of Sustainability & Building Performance, Arrowstreet

TH30

Room to Grow Greener: Assessing Site Development in Boston 1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Green roofs, permeable pavement, rain gardens: green infrastructure technologies have been around for decades now and are frequently integrated into new development projects in Boston. However, while researchers and designers in other cities are intensely innovating and employing sustainable site development principles, local standards of practice

in greater Boston generally lag behind in comparison. Our panel’s collective experience spans the continent and crosses scales, yet our presentation will focus on parcel-scale development projects in and around Boston. We will identify what is prohibiting best management practices from being implemented as common practice in local urban infill projects, and look at breaking down the financial, legal/ regulatory, technical/physical and cultural barriers to implementing sustainable, low-impact approaches to site development. We will dig in and share both our heartaches and successes, along with our predictions and hopes for the future of A/E/C industry projects. In addition to providing our personal design/ engineering/construction insight, we will weave in input and anecdotes collected from others, from both the public and private sector, who have been directly involved in the implementation and maintenance of green infrastructure.

recent museum project. Specifically, the project utilizes a low-energy radiant slab system that involved a full-building energy model from the engineering team that was coordinated with detailed THERM heat flow simulations and solar radiation studies from the architectural team. Both the project’s architects and engineers teams will examine the technical challenges of this workflow, including the scripting/automation methods that enabled coordination between the engineer’s supply-side iterations and the architect’s exploration of the slab/envelope detailing. Presenters will discuss newfound benefits of combining skill sets, including better modeling practices, more accurate depictions of designs, and new graphic representations of results.

Becky Rupel, PLA, SITES AP, ASLA, Landscape Architect, Copley Wolff Design Group

Julie Janiski, CPHC, LEED AP, Associate Principal, BuroHappold Engineering

Nicole Holmes, PE, LEED AP BD+C, Senior Project Manager, Green Infrastructure Planning, Nitsch Engineering

TH45

Brendan Shea, GRP, Co-Owner, Director of Field Operations, Recover Green Roofs Christine Wilson, PLA, SITES AP, ASLA, Landscape Architect, Copley Wolff Design Group Mark Winterer, GRP, CSL, Owner, Director of Operations, Recover Green Roofs

TH37

New Paradigm: Architect/Engineer Collaborative Energy Models 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU While traditional building and HVAC designs have permitted architecture and engineering teams to work relatively independently of one another, implementing newer low-energy systems often demands that both teams blend their skillsets and actively collaborate. With this paradigm shift towards collaboration, the use of energy models is changing from a singular model built by one person with one piece of software to an interconnected network of studies where the outputs of one study inform the inputs of another. Here, we present a project where such blending of skillsets and interconnected energy modeling was required to realize the full energy-saving potential of a

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

Christopher Mackey, Assoc. AIA, Building Scientist, Payette John Swift, PE, CEM, LEED BD+C, Principal, Buro Happold Engineering Leon Auvil, AIA, Senior Associate, CSI

Winthrop Square – The Next Generation of Urban Development 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Winthrop Square, a 1.6 million square foot mixed use high-rise development in the heart of downtown Boston, built to be a catalyst of change in the industry. Leading with an aggressive green building strategy, this iconic project is seeking Passive House certification for the 750,000 square feet of commercial office space, which would make it the largest Passive House certified project in the world. Learn how the project team is integrating Passive House design with LEED Platinum, WELL certification and an innovative technology platform. This integrated approach in this highperformance building will create new standards for workplace efficiency, wellness, and sustainability. Brad Mahoney, LEED AP, Sustainability, Technology and Commercial Office Lead, MP Boston Stephen Matkovits, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, Principal, Handel Architects LLP Lois Arena, PE, Director, Passive House Services, Steven Winter Associates, Inc Julia Rogers, LEED AP+, CSM, Director of Sustainability, WSP Engineers


Educational Tracks Page Headline

Healthy Environments Track at-a-Glance

Wednesday TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE11

1.5 LU

Healthy IAQ in Schools – Earning LEED v4 IEQ Credits

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE23

1.5 LU|HSW

Human Responses to Biophilic Design in Buildings

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE35

1.5 LU|HSW

A Comparison of Health-Focused Standards: WELL versus Fitwel

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE47

1.5 LU|HSW

What Not to Spec: Toxins, Endocrine Disruptors, Carcinogens

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH11

1.5 LU|HSW

Natural Gas, Public Health and Architects

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH35

1.5 LU|HSW

Introducing Fitwel

Thursday

Wednesday November 28 WE11

Healthy IAQ in Schools – Earning LEED v4 IEQ Credits 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU As new research continues to define the impact of air quality on brain function, we take an in-depth look at healthy indoor air quality in schools and explore collaborative solutions that can help meet some of LEED v4’s Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) credits and the WELL Building Standard Air features. Our panel includes a Sustainable Design consultant, an Architect/Specifier, and a Contractor who will look at the IEQ credits from different points of view, sharing collaborative strategies to help inform your practices. This session will focus on four LEED v4 BD+C credits: Enhanced IAQ Strategies, Low-Emitting Materials, Construction IAQ Management Plan, and IAQ Assessment. The panel

will provide an overview of the credit requirements and then move to an in-depth discussion on the importance of early design decisions, integrating the LEED credit requirements into your project specifications, and the successful implementation of each credit. You will hear from field practitioners on the values of and challenges to healthy indoor air quality in schools. Project examples and experiences will be used to support the discussion. Through collaboration and early-design decisions, the LEED v4 BD+C IEQ credits can be achieved and contribute to improved indoor air quality and positively impact occupant health. Caroline Havey, LEED AP BD+C, SITES AP, Senior Project Manager, The Green Engineer Steven Burke, LEED & WELL Faculty, Fitwel Ambassador, Sustainability Manager, Consigli Construction Company, Inc. Lisa Goodwin Robbins, RA, CCS, LEED ap, Architect/Specifier, Kalin Associates Conor McGuire, LEED AP BD+C, Director of Sustainability, Columbia Construction Company

WE23

Human Responses to Biophilic Design in Buildings 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Biophilic design, which incorporates natural elements into the built environment, has received increasing attention in both design and health fields. Epidemiological and experimental studies have provided sufficient evidence that contact with outdoor nature has positive impacts on human health and wellbeing. However, the potential for similar health benefits in indoor biophilic environments remains unclear. This session will introduce two randomized crossover studies conducted by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, which examine the physiological and cognitive responses to biophilic indoor environments by using virtual reality (VR), eye-tracking and wearable biomonitoring sensors. The results indicate that biophilic design may be beneficial in reducing stress and improve cognitive function in indoor environments. Additionally, the parity in results in virtual and real environments provides evidence that using VR can be an effective tool to simulate visual exposures when access to the real environment is not feasible. The findings on health impacts of biophilic design in buildings could provide useful information for the design community in

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Educational Tracks Page Headline

how to consider biophilic design in their projects. Piers MacNaughton, ScD, Associate Director, Center for Climate, Health and the Global Environment, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Jie Yin, ScM, MUP, PhD Student in Population Health Sciences, Harvard University Nastaran Arfaei, M.Arch, Researcher, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Blake Jackson, AIA, NCARB, LEED/WELL Faculty, Fitwel Ambassador, EcoDistricts AP, Sustainable Design Leader–Northeast, Stantec

WE35

A Comparison of Health-Focused Standards: WELL versus Fitwel 1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW We spend over 90% of our time indoors; thus, the built environment has a profound impact upon our health and wellness! This presentation looks at the emerging trend of health and wellness design, as codified within the WELL and Fitwel standards. These standards emerged around 2016 to transform evidence-based research into actionable steps designers, contractors, owners, operators, and tenants can use to positively impact health and wellness across the built environment. Each represents a different approach towards integration of health into the built environment along a spectrum of potential performance, both building upon the LEEDv4 rating system’s market prevalence so that projects seeking “efficiency” can also prioritize “health.” We will look at the drivers for health and wellness, and then, we will introduce both standards. Each will be explored in terms of their terminology, rules, administrative costs, implementation timelines, team members, scopes, and who is using each standard. The audience will gain insight to each standard, how they are similar or different, and where they might be appropriate for themselves and/or their clients. Blake Jackson, AIA, NCARB, LEED/WELL Faculty, Fitwel Ambassador, EcoDistricts AP, Sustainable Design Leader–Northeast, Stantec Steven Burke, LEED & WELL Faculty, Fitwel Ambassador, Sustainability Manager, Consigli Construction Company, Inc.

WE47

What Not to Spec: Toxins, Endocrine Disruptors, Carcinogens 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW The products you specify—and how you structure your specs—have enduring impact on your building’s occupants, the community where the product is made, and the workers who install it. We’ll share lessons learned about screening and choosing products employing the most rigorous material vetting standards in green building certifications – the Living Building Challenge Red List. Where do you focus and where should you not? This session will coach designers in approaches and procedures to make any project healthier through careful materials selection. And while it’s not designed to get you through the LBC Materials Petal, it will undoubtedly help.

use of gas as an energy source. Passive design, renewable energy sources like wind, solar and geothermal systems are available options today, as urban microgrids will be shortly. The presenters of the workshop consist of Regina Laroque, a doctor from Mass General Hospital who is both a lecturer at Harvard Medical School and a Wellesley natural resources commissioner; Nathan Phillips, a professor or Earth and Environment at Boston University; and Blake Jackson, a practicing architect and sustainability director at Stantec, a large architectural and engineering firm. Peter Papesch, AIA, Principal, Papesch Associates Blake Jackson, AIA, NCARB, LEED/WELL Faculty, Fitwel Ambassador, EcoDistricts AP, Sustainable Design Leader–Northeast, Stantec Nathan Phillips, Massachusetts, Professor, Boston University

Lisa Carey Moore, LEED AP BD + C Matt Root, CPHC, Senior Project Manager, Integrated Eco Strategy Christopher Nielson, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, Architect, Bruner / Cott Architects

Thursday November 29 TH11

Natural Gas, Public Health and Architects 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU|HSW Architects are legally required to adhere to public safety regulations. The fact that Massachusetts regulations have not yet addressed the dangers of natural gas to health doesn’t mean the large dangers don’t exist. Gas pipes leak, and the methane which gets emitted harms both plant roots as well as humans. The panelists of this workshop will show why these pipes leak, address the health dangers from natural gas leaks, enumerate the medical implications for all communities by the gas leaks, and explain how architects as well as owners can take steps to avoid the negative effects of natural gas. Owners and architects play an important role when considering how to minimize the

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

TH35

Introducing Fitwel 1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Fitwel is a new health-focused rating system, which transforms evidence-based medical research into actionable steps that built environment professionals can utilize to generate positive health impacts across the built environment. This presentation looks at the Fitwel in detail, addressing the drivers for health, as well as specific system attributes of the system, including timeline, scope, cost, applicability, strategies, credentialing, and who is using the standard around the globe. Additionally, a case study in Boston (311 Summer Street) will illustrate the tenets of the standard, as implemented on an existing, historic facility, providing real-world time, cost, and overlaps with LEED certification. The main aim of this presentation is to make the audience aware of this system’s existence, as well as to illustrate how easy and necessary it is to promote health and wellness in the built environment. Blake Jackson, AIA, NCARB, LEED/WELL Faculty, Fitwel Ambassador, Sustainable Design Leader– Northeast, Stantec


Educational Tracks Page Headline

Now Trending Track at-a-Glance

Wednesday TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE08

1.5 LU

Expanding Context: Understanding User Needs and Data Inputs

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE40

1.5 LU

Technical Storytelling: Data Visualization and Architecture

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE44

1.5 LU

Trends in Architecture — Follow or Ignore?

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE51

1.5 LU

The Future of Modeling and Simulation in the Design Process

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE55

1.5 LU

The Intersection of Queer and Architecture

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH04

1.5 LU

Where’s the Architecture in Smart Buildings?

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH24

1.5 LU

Community Building from Mid-Century to Tomorrow

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH32

1.5 LU

Construction Cost Forecast for Capital Projects

Thursday

Wednesday November 28 WE08

Expanding Context: Understanding User Needs and Data Inputs 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU People are using spaces differently, and their needs are becoming more complex. Data and information are more widely available, and our clients are expecting our recommendations to rely on more than just ‘professional intuition.’ Existing Architectural models of learning mostly from experience are no longer acceptable for client’s seeking a measurably successful design. On the other hand, simply referring to ‘data’ findings without context or interpretation will only result in a partial understanding as flawed as designing in a vacuum. A toolkit of both analytical and empathy-based inputs is required to properly translate user needs and other data-points into a design, and post-occupancy observations are critical to refine these techniques to support ever more complex future requirements.

This session with introduce attendees to the existing and emerging tools available to help designers and architects to better understand their client and user groups needs using a context-driven design approach. It will also highlight findings from post-occupancy research into how spaces are used beyond opening day, and current trends in human-centric design. Integrated into the design process, these tools can allow us to create some truly innovative solutions that will serve our clients from opening day well into the future. Erin Corcoran, OAA, NCARB, Architect, Gensler

WE40

Technical Storytelling: Data Visualization and Architecture 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU Architecture, like so many professions, is being inundated with more and more data. This session will explore how architects can use data and data visualization at all phases of project design and planning to influence their projects. Impactful data visualizations and explorations can help architects

gain insight into their own practice and communicate technical stories to clients and colleagues in order to influence design and drive change within a practice. This session will explore how data visualizations can be used to understand user behavior, develop planning paradigms, enhance building design, understand environmental and occupant impacts and tune building performance. The presentation will demonstrate how we are using data visualizations across our own practice to better understand an array of issues. Speakers include a building scientist, a 3D visualization expert, a science and lab planner, and an architect all who been leading efforts to integrate data visualization techniques into the practice. Andrea Love, AIA, LEED Fellow, Principal, Director of Building Science, Payette Abigail Klima, AIA, Associate, Payette Hilary Barlow, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Architect, Payette David Hamel, 3D Visualization Manager, Payette

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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WE44

WE51

WE55

Trends in Architecture — Follow or Ignore?

The Future of Modeling and Simulation in the Design Process

The Intersection of Queer and Architecture

3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU

6:00 pm–7:30 pm | 1.5 LU

6:00 pm–7:30 pm | 1.5 LU

Frank Lloyd Wright reminds us that, “Every great architect is — necessarily — a great poet. (S)he must be a great original interpreter of his time, his day, his age.” We designers are surrounded by fast changing trends. Which trends should we follow and which should we ignore? How can we avoid being lured by a trend? Or should we give in? How can we foresee which architectural trends will define the next decade and beyond? Architecture leaves a long standing print. It is not as flexible as interior design or fashion industry. Buildings cannot easily change their look. So how can we make a building attractive and relevant not only for today‘s, but for tomorrow’s generation as well? In this session we will explore the rise, life and decay of some recent trends using both case studies and concepts. We would investigate psychological, technological and social reasons behind trends and which have a solid base and chance to survive and become an ”architectural language,” and which are likely to become outdated quickly. We will discuss the core and features timeless verses trendy design.

Modeling and simulation have changed the design process and the way professionals in the A/E/C industry collaborate with one another. With this new power, we have a means of communicating that brings clients, facility managers, building users, and designers together to experience design concepts in a way that drawings and specifications never could. Yet, this shift involves much more than simple visual representations plugged into a pair of VR goggles. Every day, simulation programs reshape how clients experience a wide range of design factors: simulations of thermal performance, daylighting and lighting density, and acoustical properties now allow us to see, feel, and hear how design decisions affect the finished product before laying a single brick. These modeling techniques allow designers to understand building performance in an accurate and detailed way. Evaluating scenarios on a building scale, room scale, and down to the material of the screws in exterior wall assembly anticipates challenges and invites design solutions during design rather than possible corrective action post-occupancy. This discussion brings together leaders in the design profession that discuss the role that modeling and simulation play in the design process now, and what the future may hold.

Over the last few years, the American Institute of Architects has focused on and expended considerable energy and resources on diversity and inclusion within the profession of architecture. After decades of being dominated by white men, recognition has been given to the idea that women and minorities need to play a larger role and given greater consideration if the profession is going to survive. Committees have been formed. Surveys have been conducted. Reports issued. Conferences held. However, the discussion about diversity and inclusion often stops at women and minorities. How is the LGBTQ+ community being considered as part of those discussions? As members of AIA, if we are going to talk about diversity and inclusion, if we are going to have that conversation, then the AIA needs to include everyone, not just the individuals that fit a visible criteria. LGBTQ+ architects, already an integral part of the architecture community, are in the position of being the silent minority. To be truly inclusive, the AIA needs to listen to LGBTQ+ voices and include their input as new policies are being made.

Michael Giardina, AIA, NCARB, Architecture Design Principal, NAIOP, National Trust Tatiana Person, AIA, LEED AP BC+C, Senior Associate, Jacobs

Larry Paschall, AIA, Architect/Firm Owner

Benjamin Markham, LEED AP, Director, Architectural Acoustics, Acentech Luka Matutinovic, P.Eng., LEED AP BD+C, Director, National Performance Analysis, WSP Lee Dykxhoorn, AIA, Senior Project Architect, Charles Rose Architects Miep Keller, LEED AP, Project Architect, Ann Beha Architects

Register at abexpo.com to receive FREE expo hall admission by using discount code DM20.

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA


Educational Tracks Page Headline

Thursday November 29

TH24

TH32

Community Building from Mid-Century to Tomorrow

Construction Cost Forecast for Captial Projects

11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU

1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU

TH04

Modernism, with its revolutionary stylistic and social agendas, reached New England in full force during the mid 20th century. Here it merged with ideas about nature and man’s relationship to it, political and financial currents that promoted suburban development, and an established trend of communitarian and utopian visions. Pioneers like TAC and Walter Pierce designed and developed modernist communities with an ethos of serving the middle class, promoting social engagement, and creating buildings and neighborhoods that integrated with and celebrated their natural surroundings. These ambitious developments were supported in their early (and in some cases ongoing) years by residents, who through grassroots efforts crafted the social fabric of their communities. Neighborhood associations organized social activities, safeguarded common land from future development, and created lasting physical amenities for common use. What can we learn from these volunteers and community builders? How did the physical environments of mid-century developments support the social orders they sought to achieve? What tools and characteristics best enabled their successes and where did they fail? Perhaps most critically, this panel will explore how these lessons can inform future development by considering current examples of projects that aim to create collaboration and social engagement through physical form.

What should owners budget for cost escalation in the current economy? What pricing structure should we use to accurately estimate costs for projects? This presentation will explore trends in real exchange rates, construction volumes, and major global construction inputs such as oil, steel and copper. Conclusions from these trends will provide the attendees with the understanding of micro and macro economic drivers and their role in construction costs. We will examine and evaluate macroeconomic leading indicators such as equities, GDP and job creation to establish which economic gear we are in now for this economic expansion. Using this information we will present a construction weather map for the country and forecast where construction costs will likely trend over the next 2 years. Through the Reconciliation Tracker, we will provide data and metrics from hundreds of reconciled projects. We will examine how pricing levels have changed and advise what we expect for 2018 and 2019. Lastly, we will analyze two case studies of construction procurement and provide guidance on effective ways to procure projects in an escalating market. How will your procurement schedule affect costs? How can you use procurement to strategically minimize your exposure to construction escalation?

Katie Flynn, AIA, Principal, Hisel Flynn Architects Janne Corneil, Assoc. AIA, Principal, U3 Studio

Zachary Bergeron, LEED AP, Associate, Vermeulens

Lisa Giersbach, ASLA, Principal, G2 Collaborative Landscape Architecture

Karima Maloney, LEED AP, Senior Project Manager, Vermeulens

Where’s the Architecture in Smart Buildings? 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU This year we have seen an increasing interest in Internet of Things (IoT) and incorporating it into our physical environments. Such as connected utilities, security, parking etc with sensors and apps to optimize resources and to increase user experience. The current marketplace portrays building can be made smart by plugging in a series of sensors, algorithms, apps and use of smart products, (such as smart window systems, furniture systems, solar energy). We believe architecture have a greater role to play, than being an aesthetic shell, in the making of a smart building. Join us in this workshop to examine what makes building smart, the role of architecture design in Smart Buildings, the impact of IoT in how we approach architecture and what the possible outcomes are in the various integration of technology and design. Michael Giardina, AIA, NCARB, Architecture Design Principal, NAIOP, National Trust Lorraine Chan, LEED Green Associate, Architectural Designer, Jacobs

James Vermeulen, LEED AP, PQS, Managing Principal, Vermeulens

Anne Grady, Architectural Historian, Independent Scholar

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Project Delivery Track at-a-Glance

Wednesday TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

WE10

1.5 LU

OCPTD – Integrated Project Delivery at the Cleveland Clinic

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE22

1.5 LU

Thinking Inside the Box: Modular Construction Demystified

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE34

1.5 LU

The Power of P3’s – The UMass Story

8:30 am–10:00 am

Thursday TH10

1.5 LU

Best Value Pre-cast Facades: Design Assist/integrated Design

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH34

1.5 LU

Leveraging the Design-Build Method to Transform Campus Life

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH44

1.5 LU

3 Cities, 3 Architects, 1 Project: Digital Age Collaboration

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH46

1.5 LU

Lessons from Grassroots Design Build for Professional Practice

8:30 am–10:00 am

Wednesday November 28 WE10

OCPTD – Integrated Project Delivery at the Cleveland Clinic 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU The Cleveland Clinic has developed a project delivery method they call the Owner Controlled Team Project Delivery (OCTPD). By connecting Owner, Architect, and CM through a series of team building workshops and sharing all information on design, construction costs and schedule, the Owner, Architects, and Construction Manager were able to take joint ownership for the project’s success. Empowering participants to take action has also made the project safer and more productive. Early in the project, the Construction Manager reviewed the Architect’s drawings for phasing, constructability, and cost. In construction, the Architect had a full-time presence in the Construction Manager’s trailer and provided real-time. This level of “In the Tent” collaboration led to a collegiality not often found on a jobsite. “You have to build the culture before you build the structure” David Doren, Owner’s PM. The success of OCTPD projects at the Clinic span architecture, budgeting, and client satisfaction.

Sindu Meier, AIA, LEED AP, BD +C, Senior Associate, William Rawn Associates, Architects, Inc.

WE34

Samuel Lasky, AIA, LEED AP, BD + C, Associate Principal, William Rawn Associates, Architects, Inc.

1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU

Jeffery Abke, LEED AP, Senior Project Manager, Turner Construction Company Joseph Strauss, AIA, Director, Planning and Design, The Cleveland Clinic

WE22

Thinking Inside the Box: Modular Construction Demystified 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU The Graphic is one of the largest modular projects in the City of Boston. Featuring a modular building on podium, the owner, architect, and contractor will discuss the design and construction process, perceptions of modular product, and pros and cons of off-site fabrication. Within this general framework the team will touch on issues of quality, timeliness, and sustainability. Kendra Halliwell, AIA, LEED-H AP, Practice + Design Team Leader, ICON Architecture, Inc. Paul Goodwin, Development Project Manager, Berkeley Investments, Inc. Owen Huisenga, M.Arch, VDC Manager, Tocci Building Corporation Bart Tocci, Business Development, Tocci Building Corporation

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

The Power of P3’s – The UMass Story UMass campuses are advancing P3 projects with project deals that are structured to achieve success. This panel discussion will describe UMass’ motivation to go P3 and strategies that created projects that assure high quality construction, student satisfaction, stakeholder collaboration and financial viability. The panel will discuss key elements of the recently completed 1,000-bed UMass Boston project and the UMass Dartmouth initiative currently in development. The session will outline the important objectives for both projects, including “Why P3?”, the project validation process and the economics that assured the projects’ successful outcomes. Specific information will describe the universities’ collaboration in connection with the formulation of project programs, design and construction quality. The panel will summarize the criteria established for the development and management agreements that made the deals attractive to UMass and the respective developers. The speakers will illustrate how these methodologies are transferable to other P3 opportunities. The panel will engage in a discussion with attendees who will gain a better


Educational Tracks Page Headline

understanding of how to make P3 projects successful for all project stakeholders.

TH34

Alan Resnick, B. Architecture, Vice President, Brailsford & Dunlavey

1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU

Patricia Filippone, CPA, Executive Director, University of Massachusetts Building Authority William Davis, Executive Vice President, Capstone Development Julie Skolnicki, AIA, LEED AP, Senior Vice President of University Partnerships, EdR Trust

Thursday November 29 TH10

Best Value Pre-cast Facades: Design Assist/integrated Design 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU As an increasing number of concrete buildings of the late 20th century are renovated, the advantages of new architectural precast cladding with an almost unlimited variety of appearances become desirable as a way to bridge between existing and new. The challenge is how to address aesthetics, constructability and cost in a manner which achieves the best value. Using as a case study, the recent expansion of Fairfield University’s student center, a panel consisting of owner, architect, contractor and pre-cast fabricator will describe the successful design-assist process, which relied on an integrated team approach. Stiff budget and schedule requirements were major drivers, but still allowed the design to embrace custom sizes and details like tapered shapes, line-work, and multiple finishes. Ultimately 10,450 square feet of decorative precast panels were installed in six days. Using the design-assist delivery system, the project successfully met the budget and schedule requirements with a design endorsed by the University Trustees. Lisa Ferreira, AIA LEED AP, Associate Principal, Goody Clancy David Frassinelli, Vice President, Fairfield University John Turmelle, Senior Estimator, Skanska USA Building Robert Del Vento, V.P. / General Manager, Coreslab Structures (CONN) Inc.

Leveraging the Design-Build Method to Transform Campus Life The New England Institute of Technology’s first-ever residence hall was completed in Fall 2017, and it has already had a transformative impact on the school’s culture. To achieve this outcome, the project team (consisting of the Owner, Program Manager, Construction Manager, and Architect) employed specific strategies to leverage the Design-Build method’s typical benefits relating to cost and schedule, while also achieving excellence in both design and construction quality. The session will highlight key moments in the project timeline, including the initial programming and budgeting assessment, Design-Builder selection process, collaborative design, and construction. The team’s strategies are replicable and scalable and will be of interest to designers, builders, and owners. The panel looks forward to a spirited dialogue and aspires to engage the audience throughout the presentation. Luke Mitchell, MCP, Project Manager, Brailsford & Dunlavey Phil Parsons, Vice President and General Counsel, New England Institute of Technology John Martin, AIA LEED AP, Principal, Elkus Manfredi Jeff Fishbone, Vice President, Cranshaw Construction

TH44

3 Cities, 3 Architects, 1 Project: Digital Age Collaboration 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU Projects are becoming increasingly complex, requiring team of specialists and collaboration among multiple architecture firms. This presentation brings together three architecture firms from three cities for the first mass timber student housing in the United States, Stadium Drive Housing Complex at University of Arkansas. We will share the collaborative design process that leveraged each firm’s specialty under a singular Design Collective to realize the University’s vision for a live-learn community of students and faculty built with crosslaminated timber structure as a model for active learning and sustainable

living. Bridging Boston, Fayetteville, and St. Louis, the Design collective of Leers Weinzapfel Associates, Modus Studio, and Mackey Mitchell Architects led the client team of the University’s facilities management, campus planning, and housing departments through a step by step process that identified the risks and rewards of being the first in the country to implement this new construction type for student housing. Principals from the three firms will share their recipe of aspirational vision, mutual respect, leadership rotation, strategic planning, and use of both analog and digital tools that mitigated risks and achieved consensus among numerous stakeholders. Tom Chung, AIA, LEED BD+C, Principal, Leers Weinzapfel Associates Chris Baribeau, AIA, Principal, Modus Studio Kyle Wagner, AIA, LEED BD+C, Principal, Mackey Mitchell Architects

TH46

Lessons from Grassroots Design Build for Professional Practice 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU

Sponsored by WID Once considered only an “alternative” project delivery method, communitydriven design build projects can provide powerful lessons and insight into more traditional processes. Join Miriam Gee of Co-Everything and Sam Batchelor of designLAB architects for stories and lessons from the job sites of communitydriven design/build projects. Miriam and Sam share roots in Steve Badanes’ University of Washington Neighborhood Design/Build Studio. Collectively, they have co-taught and collaborated on over two dozen student-lead and non-profit design/build projects over the past ten years in academia and professional practice. This workshop will be a high-energy overview of how the A/E/C industry can benefit from these grassroots processes, followed by a hands-on community engagement and design/build that use the consensusdriven design methodology. Sam Batchelor, AIA, Partner, designLAB architects Miriam Gee, AIA, LEED P BD+C, Architect, Co-Everything, Build Lightly Studio, Placetailor

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Project Types and Processes Track at-a-Glance

Wednesday TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE19

1.5 LU

Get Schooled: Cost Effective School Design in Massachusetts

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE54

1.5 LU|HSW

Culture Defining Design: Improving Access and Inclusion

Thursday 8:30 am–10:00 am

TH06

1.5 LU|HSW

Avoiding Paving Problems on Waterproofed Decks

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH22

1.5 LU

Youth to Youth, Organizing to Address Youth Homelessness

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH23

1.5 LU

Color Unplugged

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

TH31

1.5 LU

Cooler, Faster, Smaller: A Modular Dutch Hotel Disruptor

Wednesday November 28 WE19

Get Schooled: Cost Effective School Design in Massachusetts 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU In Massachusetts, where the cost of living, materials, and labor are high, it is vitally important to make reasonable and appropriate expenditures when designing and constructing high quality learning environments. Through materials, programming, systems, and detailing choices, designers can accommodate a range of budgets while creating an educational environment where students can thrive. We’ll discuss the key drivers in the costs of Massachusetts public school design– making critical design choices for high quality learning environments; cost effective and responsible methods that deliver high quality learning environments; using life cycle analysis

of materials and systems; and design choices to promote reasonable and appropriate expenditures decisions by clients. Using MSBA funded and charter school project experiences, the panel will give insight into cost-effective K-12 academic design and construction. The panel will provide observations from both the architectural side as well as the view of owner’s project managers, giving a 360-degree view of Massachusetts school projects and design. Gail Sullivan, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C, Managing Principal & President, Studio G Architects Larry Spang, AIA, LEED AP, Principal, Arrowstreet Philip Lewis, AIA, LEED AP, Principal, HMFH Margaret Minor Wood, AIA, LEED AP, Project Director, Pinck & Co

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

WE54

Culture Defining Design: Improving Access and Inclusion 6:00 pm–7:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW

Sponsored by SMPS and AGC This workshop joins the voices of landscape and building architects with owners and public space advocates. They discuss how architects and landscape architects create more integrated, holistic solutions for sites where needs for development, and for open space, are equally urgent. Potential focus areas: 1. Footprint and construction: a value proposition for both city and campus. 2. Tradeoffs: When do we yield footprint, in favor of landscape? 3. Definitions: How has our definition of landscape/ open-scape changed? 4. Community: Who benefits from the balance and often regulated interface of open and closed space. 5. Successes: What solutions allow for iterative design and co-development, and…when does development doom these intentions? The panel digs in to Boston, New York, Washington DC


Educational Tracks Page Headline

and Seattle to demonstrate resilient, balanced and inspiring urban and campus, settings.

TH22

TH23

Youth to Youth, Organizing to Address Youth Homelessness

Color Unplugged

Lisa Frisbie, Director of Marketing & Communications, AGC MA

11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU

Michael Hayes, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Master Planning & Capital Projects, UMass Dartmouth Chaz Repak, SVP. Global Real Estate, Facilities & Security, Dow Jones Lauren Perich, IIDA, Interior Designer, Studio O+A Christy Murphy, LEED AP, Sr. Project Manager, Compass Project Management

Thursday November 29 TH06

Avoiding Paving Problems on Waterproofed Decks 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU|HSW The architectural industry has extensive information how to design successful waterproofing systems for plazas and podiums including numerous published presentations and articles, and the reliability of plaza waterproofing has steadily improved over the years. Many of the problems experienced on plazas and podiums today are related to the paving systems installed over the top of the waterproofing. Paving over waterproofing is prone to cracking, shifting, heaving, piling, staining, crumbling, premature deterioration, and other problems if not properly designed and installed. This presentation focuses on designing and installing highperforming and durable paving systems over waterproofed decks. It will cover issues such as paving systems, setting beds, joint construction, and joint layout. We will review how to avoid staining and cracking problems in paving, and in particular, paving over waterproofing. Greg Doelp, P.E., RRC, Senior Principal, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. Philip Moser, P.E. (MA), Senior Project Manager, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc.

Sponsored by WID Y2Y Harvard Square, a student-run 24-hour shelter and gathering place for homeless young adults, utilizes a youthto-youth model for a safe, affirming environment. It provides community, shelter, meals, health care and services in a church basement. Studio G Architects and SHED Studio engaged homeless youth in the design process to create spaces that meet the needs of young adults who have experienced trauma and require tailored services and spaces. Y2Y feels like a modern hostel, not a shelter: Youth enter a lounge, with varied sitting areas to socialize, gather for peer groups, and share meals. A health outpost and offices are arrayed along the edges gives access to support and health services. Homeless LGBTQ youth raised concerns about genderidentified spaces, resulting in genderneutral sleeping spaces and bathrooms. Custom-built ‘capsule’ bunks have shutters for individual privacy, perforated walls for supervision, and individual storage units, lamps and charging stations. The panel will discuss the Y2Y model of youth to youth support and organizing; the process Y2Y and the architects utilized to engage homeless youth in visioning, programming; the resulting design, which breaks ground in gender inclusivity and trauma-informed design; and the potentially broad social impact of this replicable model. Gail Sullivan, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C, Managing Principal & President, Studio G Architects Rashmi Ramaswamy, LEED AP, Principal, SHED Studio Sam Greenberg, Co-Founder, Y2Y

11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU Let’s skip the slide show and see how color works in real light. Using large chip samples, this workshop will demonstrate how to evaluated space on location. You will learn strategies to use color and materials to meet common architectural objectives and produce a color plan that addresses today’s concerns for energy and wellbeing. Do’s and don’t, tips and tricks; this workshop is a color lesson for those that want to finesse an interior project, saving money and time, while saving resources and the planet. Kimberly Collins Jermain, Architectural Color Designer/Teacher, North Shore Community College

TH31

Cooler, Faster, Smaller: A Modular Dutch Hotel Disruptor 1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU citizenM was born in the Netherlands, the creation of a global fashion company owner imagining a different kind of hotel. This session will highlight the unique aspects of a hotel brand seeking to re-invent the typical hotel experience by understanding the basic needs of a traveler who wants affordable luxury and great design. With major projects in Boston and six other urban centers in the US, citizenM is disrupting traditional hotel brands with speed to market and just a little bit of irreverence. Case studies will highlight construction projects in Europe and the US, where an entire guest room package is transported on a single cargo ship and assembled on site. We will demystify the modular construction method and its issues regarding union labor, seismic codes, building systems integration, acoustics, on-site greenhouse gas emissions and construction waste. Jim Stanislaski, AIA, LEED BD+C, Senior Associate, BSA Jung Hoon Paek, RA, LEED AP, Design Manager / Project Manager, citizenM Hotels

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Page Headline

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ArchitectureBoston Expo MOBILE APP Have ABX and Boston at your fingertips. With the free mobile app, you can quickly find exhibitors, education, events and more from any mobile device ... anywhere, anytime. Features include: - Interactive Map: Easily navigate the show floor. Find exhibitors and booth locations. - Show Alerts: Get real-time information and updates during show time. - Your Calendar: Review your scheduled appointments to ensure you are on time to all Exhibitor meetings. - Network & Share: Join the show chatter. Read and post comments on Twitter and Facebook

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Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA


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Educational Tracks Page Headline

Reposition, Renovate, Revitalize Track at-a-Glance

Wednesday TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

WE06

1.5 LU

Revitalizing the Iconic Christian Science Plaza

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE18

1.5 LU

Existing Conditions Assessment for Small Projects

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE25

1.5 LU

High Performance Exterior Rehabilitation

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE30

1.5 LU

Repositioning of Suburban Two Story Office and R&D Buildings

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE42

1.5 LU

Street to Suite, Lobby Repositioning's Key Ingredients

6:00 pm–7:30 pm

WE52

1.5 LU

A Strategic Framework for Stewardship of State Assets

8:30 am–10:00 am

Thursday 3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH40

1.5 LU|HSW

Wednesday November 28 WE06

Revitalizing the Iconic Christian Science Plaza 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU Originally designed by I. M. Pei & Partners and Araldo Cossutta, Associated Architects, in the 1960s, The First Church of Christ, Scientist’s (TFCCS) 14-acre plaza is a privately owned publicly accessible open space. The original landscape architecture, reflective of its time, includes seating and trees that formed barriers and is not aligned with the current vision of TFCCS to provide a welcoming outdoor urban oasis for the surrounding community. The original concrete materials are failing and the reflecting pool has been leaking into the garage below. This workshop will focus on the revitalization of the plaza, including modernizing the pedestrian visitor experience and solving the complex technical challenges of the 70,000 sf reflecting pool while being

4 Years of Experience with a Net-Zero House 2012-2016

sensitive to its landmarked status. Sustainability goals and implementation of water efficiency measures, while maintaining the important reflectivity of the pool will be discussed. And, with several adjacent projects in development, including the construction of a large tower, the team will address “Logistical Harmony” or orchestrating the plaza scope while keeping community paths maintained and the church operational. The $60M reconstruction of the plaza began in the Fall of 2016 with a targeted reopening date in the Spring of 2019. Erik Servies, AIA, Senior Project Manager, Redgate Robert Herlinger, AIA, Chief Architect and Strategist, The First Church of Christ, Scientist Christopher Bridle, Senior Associate, CRJA-IBI Group

WE18

Existing Conditions Assessment for Small Projects 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU The cost and schedule impact of discovering building deficiencies during the later stages of a project are significant. This is particularly true

for small projects, where the fees for pre-design condition assessment, and consultant services, are typically limited. This workshop will introduce attendees to a structured, quantitative building assessment technique that can assist in identifying deficiencies and identify areas which may require further exploration. This session will introduce the tools required to perform a qualitative assessment as well as provide a stepby-step guide to ensure that the most important building systems are reviewed. The session will provide an overview of the key building systems to assess, typical deficiencies expected in buildings of a certain age, and the signs indicating potential problems by referring to case studies. This session will also introduce a number of helpful tools to consider when performing an assessment. The target audience for this session is practitioners involved in small residential and commercial projects wishing to learn more about existing condition assessment. Gerhard van der Linde, AIA LEED BD+C, Architect, Elkus Manfredi Architects

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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WE25

WE30

WE42

High Performance Exterior Rehabilitation

Repositioning of Suburban Two Story Office and R&D Buildings

Street to Suite, Lobby Repositioning’s Key Ingredients

1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU

1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU

3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU

Air-tight construction in the U.S. has become common in the last decade but the vast majority of our existing building stock still features traditional exterior envelopes. Typically, these fall well short of today’s energy benchmarks. Confronted with the choice to renovate or build new, institutional owners are faced with a choice of accepting a number of risks versus high expense. The initial savings of renovating can be considerable compared to new construction but, inappropriate or incomplete exterior solutions may not be sufficiently effective to justify their expense and may introduce new unforeseen exterior envelope issues. As preair-tight buildings continue to age and degrade, this issue will pose an ongoing challenge with significant cost and performance implications. When does it makes sense to renovate vs build new? What procedural tools are available to assure conforming results? This presentation will examine financial and constructability factors at play. The recently completed Spurk Classroom building on the Northern Essex Community College campus will serve as a case study. Representatives from the architect and the exterior consultant will relate their perspectives on both the renovation evaluation process as well as the outcome of the project relative to its initial goals.

The two story Digital Equipment, Wang Lab, Apollo Computer, etc., Office and R&D model is obsolete. Left behind are 100,000 sf empty or under utilized shells along the Route 128 and 495 corridors. This workshop will discuss the design and engineering inefficiencies of these buildings and creative design and engineering options to facilitate the redevelopment of them. It will review how to take advantage of this market, repositioning them for redevelopment and profitability. This building market phenomena has existed for over ten years. With buildings left empty or underutilized, is the time right and are the market conditions there to format a new approach? Is it commercially feasible and profitable or is it time for the wrecking ball? Renovation challenges: Current building conditions; inefficient entry points, oversized atria, outdated and undersized MEP systems, light parking counts, outdated facades, code compliance issues, small floor plates, low clear heights, energy code issues...to name some of the issues. Design challenges: To attract today’s high tech and service companies, a “new look” and new building systems will be required. Radical architectural/ engineering solutions will need to be considered to accommodate their space utilization needs including new entry points and atria with amenities.

With the increase in building stock that has passed their prime as it relates to lobby design, owners are looking not only to breathe new life into these spaces, but also adapt and repurpose their lobbies and common areas as experience centers for their tenants. From the street to the tenants’ suites, the choreography and careful curation of the user experience can transform an underutilized lobby to a thriving and enlivened third space that attracts and retains tenants. Both urban and suburban case studies will be discussed from the context of the owner and design team. This workshop will focus on the key considerations that must be addressed when formulating, designing, and executing a new lobby and common space concept.

David de Sola, AIA, LEED BD+C, Founding Principal, 3iVE

Chuck Reilly, SIOR, NAIOP, MassEcon Site Finder, ReadyMass 100, Town of Westwood Zoning Board of Appeals Board Member, VP Business Development, Design Builder/ Construction Manager

Tim Rhoads, AIA, LEED BD+C, Associate, Dimella Shaffer

Greg Klemmer, SIOR, Senior Vice President, Colliers International Scott Tully, Principal Chief Investment Officer, Novaya Real Estate Ventures LLC Dennis McCarthy, AIA, Director of Design, PDA

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

William K. Abramowitz, Director of Acquisition & Asset Management, TH Real Estate Colleen Arria, NCIDQ, LEED AP BD+C, Associate, Stantec Larry Grossman, AIA, LEED AP, Senior Principal, Stantec Amanda Lennon, NCIDQ, Associate, Stantec Kate Ryan, Associate, Stantec


Educational Tracks Page Headline

WE52

A Strategic Framework for Stewardship of State Assets 6:00 pm–7:30 pm | 1.5 LU As is common with many institutional owners, the Commonwealth faces a significant backlog of deferred maintenance in addition to the need for updated capital infrastructure to support on-going and new models of government services. By necessity, the decisions we make together with our user agency clients to prioritize and identify solutions to their capital needs must include multiple ways to solve the problem — the level of straight capital investment for new or fully renovated facilities that’s needed is not achievable within the current economic constraints. Creative solutions including leasing, targeted capital investment, public/private partnerships, and even adjustments to ways of doing business must be employed for us to be responsive to needs within a balanced budget. DCAMM leadership is engaged in several initiatives to identify alternatives to solve the problem, in the context of the limited capital resources and the changing nature of state services, to ensure we are landing on the most strategic approach to solving facility needs. Our panel, representing Real Estate, Capital Planning and Facilities Management perspectives will explain the guiding principles behind our approaches and provide examples of successful processes that are driving more cost-effective and comprehensive solutions for the Commonwealth.

Thursday November 29 TH40

4 Years of Experience with a Net-Zero House 2012-2016 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW This workshop will show how we took an energy guzzling leaky old house that had been converted into two cramped apartments, each with 2 bedrooms. We converted it into two spacious two-story three bedroom apartments by optimizing the layout. With the new very efficient building envelope, and HVAC systems, appliances and fixtures and with the added hybrid solar collectors, the house produced more energy than it consumes. We will describe our strategies and what equipment worked well and what caused problems and how occupant behavior has affected the energy consumption and indoor air quality. Franziska Amacher, FAIA, NCARB, LEED, WBE, Principal, Amacher and Associates

Elayne Campos, Assoc. AIA, Deputy Director, Planning, Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance, Commonwealth of MA Elizabeth Minnis, AIA, Deputy Commissioner, Planning, Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance, Commonwealth of MA Beth Rubenstein, Deputy Commissioner, Real Estate, Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance, Commonwealth of MA

Register at abexpo.com to receive FREE expo hall admission by using discount code DM20.

Hope Davis, Deputy Commissioner, Facilities Management and Maintenance, Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance, Commonwealth of MA

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Educational Tracks Page Headline

Urban Solutions Track at-a-Glance

Wednesday TIME

CODE

CREDIT

TITLE

8:30 am–10:00 am

WE09

1.5 LU

How to Prepare Buildings for Shared Mobility and Autonomy

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE21

1.5 LU|HSW

The Bus Stops Here – Bus Rapid Transit & the Public Realm

11:00 am–12:30 pm

WE24

1.5 LU|HSW

People, Power, and Place: How Civic Engagement Drives Design

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

WE33

1.5 LU|HSW

The Next Global Transformation of Cities

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

WE45

1.5 LU|HSW

Learning from the Garden City

8:30 am–10:00 am

TH09

1.5 LU|HSW

Boston Groundwater Recharge – Why? How? & Results!

11:00 am–12:30 pm

TH21

1.5 LU|HSW

Shifting Gears: Urban Design for Autonomous Vehicles

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

TH43

1.5 LU

Enrich the Public Realm with Interpretive Interactive Media

Thursday

Wednesday November 28 WE09

How to Prepare Buildings for Shared Mobility and Autonomy 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU The challenge of planning for the coming automated mobility revolution is posing increasing risks for land developers and municipal officials. On one hand, the development community sees the potential of reduced auto ownership translating into car-free developments with no need to invest millions in parking garages, yet traditional market forces prevail, forcing many to overbuild parking that will become underutilized before the bonds are due. On the other hand, forwardthinking cities have long sought to reduce congestion by reducing parking supplies in return for expanded transit, biking and walking accommodation, yet the sudden demand from developments to build no parking puts officials in a bind when parking demand remains high today. This panel will describe a number of successful interim strategies designed to help developers and municipalities bridge the gap until full autonomy — if it

comes — renders private auto ownership and any on-site parking a thing of the past. By leveraging new zoning tools, parking use data, district management strategies, shared mobility technologies, and several new approaches to garage and site construction, we can help ensure that our urban investments are secure, financially sustainable, and beneficial to the future urban form expected once cars are regularly driving us around. Jason Schrieber, AICP, Senior Principal, Stantec

WE21

The Bus Stops Here – Bus Rapid Transit & the Public Realm 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Boston’s growth in both population and employment over the past decades has spurred the construction of entirely new neighborhoods and transformed the city’s physical landscape and skyline. However, the region’s transit system has seen relatively minimal augmentation during this time, an imbalance that has lead to ever-increasing traffic and gridlock that inhibits effective and equitable mobility. One proven solution for enhancing the existing transit system is the introduction of Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) along primary

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

transportation corridors. Through a combination of bus lanes, prepaid alldoor boarding, enclosed bus shelters, and signal priority, bus travel can be transformed into a reliable, high-speed mode that makes better and more equitable use of Boston’s notoriously limited streets. While the introduction of high-functioning “gold-standard” BRT is relatively straightforward in gridded cities with wide avenues, “European” cities such as Boston present a unique design challenge. Streets are often narrow, change dimension and direction along their length, and intersect at irregular angles. For high-standard BRT be implemented successfully without cannibalizing recent hardwon streetscape improvements (such as protected bike lanes), designers, advocates, planners, officials, and engineers must come together to design inventive solutions tailored to Boston’s unique circumstances. Brian Gregory, Assoc. AIA, Architectural Designer, Gamble Associates Ingrid Bengtson, AIA, Architect, Utile Architecture and Planning Kathryn Carlson, Director of Transportation, A Better City Stacy Thompson, Executive Director, Livable Streets Alliance


Educational Tracks Page Headline

WE24

People, Power, and Place: How Civic Engagement Drives Design

WE33

WE45

The Next Global Transformation of Cities

11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW

1:30 pm–3:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW

Visionary planning and investment in urban development and the public realm has been a hallmark of progressive cities. In the midst of unprecedented urban growth, continued attention to design excellence will be critical to building and sustaining equitable, healthy, and socioeconomically vibrant communities. This session will consider the role of civic leadership and public engagement in driving design excellence while building and strengthening communities, catalyzing economic development, and inspiring civic pride. Over the past 30 years the Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence (RBA) has explored “the subtle and difficult process of creating excellence in the urban environment.” Since 1987 the RBA has recognized and documented 83 projects from across the United States that illustrate a diversity of approaches to urban development as well as lessons learned and common attributes. What can we learn from past winners to inform our current work and the critical issues faced by Boston and other cities today? This session will incorporate local and national case studies and interactive discussion with people involved in urban design, development, and research to explore how civic engagement can drive design excellence and shape the future of Boston.

Architects shape buildings. Buildings shape cities. But the future of cities is not what it used to be. Social migrations to cities are a world-wide phenomenon, but the twentieth century model of cities has outlived its usefulness. New paradigms are needed for architects, planners, developers as well as regulators. This workshop will hear from John Cleveland, ED of Boston’s Green Ribbon Commission and President of the Innovation Network for Communities, and Philip Norton Loheed, President of Earthos, on how the need to aggressively tackle the realities of climate change is radically shifting the future paradigm of cities. This new model for urban development changes the way we approach our interdependence with bioregions, ecosystem conservation, social equity and our systems for wealth creation. The workshop will explore how all participants of society’s construction sector can prepare creatively for this future and accelerate our transition from the modern city paradigm that has dominated society for the last century and a half. Peter Papesch, AIA, Principal, Papesch Associates John Cleveland, President, Innovation Network for Communities Philip Loheed, AIA NCARB Assoc ASLA, Principal / President, Design Parthership Plus / Earthos Institute, Inc.

Anne-Marie Lubenau, FAIA, Director, Rudy Bruner Award for Urban Excellence, Bruner Foundation

Learning from the Garden City 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW The forecasted growth of our city centers for the next decade will push the limits of current city planning and design mechanisms. New strategies will be required to understand and tackle these challenges to urban design and city building in a humanistic and considerate manner. Widely heralded as “The Garden City,” the Republic of Singapore has continually deployed innovative new models for land-use and urban planning, sustainable and efficient transportation systems, and housing programs seeking to improve the quality of life of its citizens. The Republic of Singapore – similar in size to that of the metro Boston region – has faced the issue of high density, mega-scale and livability head-on and with great success. Singapore has quickly become a model for forwardlooking city planning and development. Singapore may be a long distance from Boston, but there are many take away lessons that, if embraced, can prove useful in guiding Boston, and other North American cities forward. Following over a decade of work supporting large-scale design and construction projects in Singapore, Jaron Lubin, a Design Principal at Somerville-based Safdie Architects will share his insights from living and working in the Garden City using three recently completed projects as case studies. Jaron Lubin, Assoc. AIA, Principal, Safdie Architects

Renee Loth, Massachusetts, Editor, ArchitectureBoston Ted Landsmark, PhD, JD, M.Env.D., Director, Kitty and Michael Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy, Northeastern University Cynthia Smith, FASLA, CLARB, Vice President, Halvorson Design Partnership, Inc. Karilyn Crockett, Lecturer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

I count myself lucky to have a show of this caliber right in my backyard. People travel far and wide to find similar quality exhibitors and presenters; I just drive 40 minutes to Boston. There is always an air of energy, excitement and camaraderie. It is a not to be missed, best of Boston event. Allison Iantosca, Owner/President F.H. Perry Builder | 12 year attendee

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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Educational Tracks Page Headline

Thursday November 29

TH43

TH09

Integrating art and history into public outdoor spaces is a successful strategy in creating that “sense of place” that designers strive for. Such elements are usually represented in the built form, providing cues for which visitors can learn from and identify the space with. Through advancements in communication technology, it is possible to drape layers of digital media over the built environment, increasing the depth of the messages being presented. This is augmented reality. In 2018, 77% of Americans carry smart phones, up from just 35% in 2011. They have become the standard tool for sharing information, and are regularly used in schools, workplaces, and homes. They have become an effective means of broadcasting messages to a diverse group. Augmented reality applications use a smartphone’s built in GPS and touch screen to function, so there is no hardware or headset required. The only step for the end user is to download an app. This summer, Bostonians will be able to experience augmented reality at Harbor Way, a public plaza in the Seaport’s Innovation District. Here visitors will experience a series of “stops” each of which will offer uniquely focused physical and digital details about the site’s history.

Boston Groundwater Recharge – Why? How? & Results! 8:30 am–10:00 am | 1.5 LU|HSW In 2006, Article 32 of the City of Boston Zoning Code was implemented thereby creating the Groundwater Conservation Overlay District which requires groundwater recharge for all new/ renovated projects. In the past 12 years, engineers have implemented creative ways to recharge groundwater in the dense urban environment and have also discovered additional environmental benefits. The panel will discuss the purpose of the regulation, the various recharge methods, and its impacts. John Schmid, Professional Engineer, Vice President–Executive Project Manager, Nitsch Engineering Christian Simonelli, Executive Director, Boston Groundwater Trust (BGwT)

TH21

Shifting Gears: Urban Design for Autonomous Vehicles 11:00 am–12:30 pm | 1.5 LU|HSW Autonomous vehicle technology has moved beyond the whimsical illustrations of the 1950s and the early experimental designs of Google. The technology is poised to disrupt the current model of urban mobility and create a window of opportunity to rethink the design and function of the public realm and explore new compact urban building types. An interdisciplinary panel of speakers will lead a discussion on how urban design can help cities better manage the transition to autonomous vehicles and networked mobility. How soon can we expect to see autonomous vehicles as a significant mode of transportation? Will shared mobility create opportunities for ‘Micro Transit-Oriented Development’ around pickup and dropoff zones? What are the key decisions that designers and policymakers will face? How will autonomous vehicles impact the urban fabric, and what are the key opportunities for architects and urban designers to intervene?

Enrich the Public Realm with Interpretive Interactive Media 3:30 pm–5:00 pm | 1.5 LU

Christopher Scheufler, BSLA UMASS Amherst, Landscape Architect, Copley Wolff Design Group Scott Rabiet, Owner, Principal, Amaze Design, LLC Bruce Spero, Principal/Creative Director, Trivium Interactive Meghan Marchie, PLA, ASLA, Landscape Architect, Copley Wolff Design Group

Register at abexpo.com to receive FREE expo hall admission by using discount code DM20.

Alykhan Mohamed, Urban Planner, Sasaki Associates Isabel Zempel, ASLA, Principal, Sasaki

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

Lea


BSA Space 290 Congress Street Boston, MA 02210 BSA Space is free and open to the public.

Hours Page Headline Monday through Friday63 10:00 am to 6:00 pm Weekends and holidays 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

BE CELEBRATED. BE CONNECTED. BECOME A BSA/AIA MEMBER. Join our diverse community of architects, engineers, interior, landscape and construction professionals and gain access to a wide range of benefits and services to support your business.

Learn more at BSA Space @ ABX by visiting booth #414.

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

architects.org


64

Sponsors and Partners Page Headline

Sponsors and Partners Gold Sponsors

Silver Sponsors

Bronze Sponsors

BSA Allied Members

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA


Sponsors and Headline Partners Page

Sponsors and Partners Association Partners

Media Partners

Show Partners

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

65


66

Registration Pricing and Packages Page Headline

Registration Pricing and Packages PACKAGE

BSA MEMBER

BSA MEMBER

BSA MEMBER

NON-MEMBER

NON-MEMBER

NON-MEMBER

EARLY-BIRD RATE

PRE-SHOW RATE

ON-SITE RATE

EARLY-BIRD RATE

PRE-SHOW RATE

ON-SITE RATE

8/20 - 10/29

10/30 - 11/25

11/26 - 11/30

8/20 - 10/29

10/30 - 11/25

11/26 - 11/30

$700

Enclosures

TH01

Two-Day Pass

$450

$525

$600

$550

$625

Wednesday Day Pass

$300

$350

$400

$375

$425

$475

Thursday Day Pass

$240

$280

$320

$300

$340

$380

A La Carte Workshops

$75

$85

$95

$90

$100

$110

Expo Pass

$25

$35

$45

$25

$35

$45

$40

$40

$50

$40

$40

$50

Colormix Forecast

FREE

FREE

FREE

FREE

FREE

FREE

CE Learning Zone

$50

$60

$70

$60

$70

$80

Safety Assessment Program Training

$150

$150

$150

$200

$200

$200

The Building Sector’s Role in Shaping Resilience Potential in Our City

$200

$225

$250

$225

$250

$275

Advanced Enclosure Detailing Workshop

$200

$225

$250

$225

$250

$275

SMPS Marketing Audits

FREE

FREE

FREE

FREE

FREE

FREE

ADDITIONAL EDUCATION

SPECIAL EVENTS

Enclosures

TH01

Open Architecture Collaborative

Enclosures

TH01 $25

$25

$25

$25

$25

$25

Drink Tickets

$8

$8

$8

$8

$8

$8

Architecture Trivia Night

$8

$8

$8

$8

$8

$8

$250

$275

$300

$270

$295

$320

Women in Design Breakfast

$55

$70

$85

$60

$75

$90

Women in Design Luncheon

$55

$70

$85

$60

$75

$90

Women in Design Happy Hour

$55

$70

$85

$60

$75

$90

FREE

FREE

FREE

FREE

FREE

FREE

Welcome Party

Women in Design Symposium

Alumni Receptions

Two-Day Pass and Day Passes

Cancellation Policy

All-inclusive value passes make earning your annual credits more cost-effective than ever before. Choose the package to fit your needs and budget and enjoy a variety of workshops, special events and expo hall admission at a discounted rate from previous years. Don’t need a whole pass? All workshops are still available a la carte.

Cancellations received on or before November 12, 2018, will be refunded 80% of all fees paid. Expo Only registration is non-refundable. After November 12, no refunds will be made for any cancellations or no-shows (this includes conference registration, expo hall, workshops or optional events). Substitutions may be made at any time prior to the start of the show if the request is in writing (address to the right) by the original registrant.

General Questions Questions about registration should be directed to registration@abexpo.com, 224.563.3751 or 866.452.2815. For general show information, please contact info@abexpo.com, 888.529.1641 or 972.536.6444.

Owner & Producer: Informa Exhibitions | Founder & Presenter: Boston Society of Architects/AIA

HOW TO REGISTER ONLINE abexpo.com/register

BY PHONE 224.563.3751 | 866.452.2815

BY MAIL Complete the Registration Form and make check payable in U.S. funds to: ArchitectureBoston Expo c/o CompuSystems 2651 Warrenville Rd., Ste. 400 Downers Grove, IL 60515 Email: registration@abexpo.com Fax: 708.344.4444


Prepare for the Show Page Headline

Prepare for the Show Accommodations

Apply for a Scholarship

ABX has reserved a block of rooms at select hotels for ABX participants. To receive special show discounts on hotels, you must book your reservations through abexpo.com where youíll benefit from the easiest, least-restrictive way to secure rooms at the lowest possible rate. Reservations are accepted on a firstcome, first-served basis.

Scholarships have been established for industry professionals who, without scholarship assistance, could not afford to attend ABX. You can easily apply online at abexpo.com/scholarships. Applications are due Tuesday, October 30.

Convince Your Boss We understand that there are a lot of variables that go into deciding whether to attend ABX registration, events, hotels, ROI, etc. As it can be difficult to ask for approval to attend, we have created this Justification Toolkit to assist with gaining approval. For tips and tools that will help you present your case visit abexpo.com/justification.

Women in Design Scholarships

Tony Platt Scholarships

WiD celebrates and encourages success and leadership for women in the design community. As such, we offer full-day scholarships for student and design professionals to attend the WiD symposium. Scholarship recipients will be selected based on the essay application at abexpo.com/scholarships. For questions, contact widboston@gmail.com, subject line “WID ABX Scholarship.”

Established in memory of Tony Platt FAIA, a Boston architect and visionary who died in 1998, this scholarship covers two complimentary ABX workshops. At the heart of Tony’s vision was a commitment to broadening the intellectual and professional opportunities for everyone in the industry.

Build your Network Design the Future

ABX 2018 November 28–29 | For more information visit abexpo.com

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ABX2018 Exhibits & Conference: November 28-29, 2018 Boston ConventionNOW & Exhibition Center | Hall A | Boston, MA REGISTER abexpo.com | info@abexpo.com | 888.529.1641 | 972.536.6444 at abexpo.com to

receive FREE expo

Innovative Products. Thought-provoking Presentations. Unlimited Technological Advances. hall admission by Join design and construction industry leaders at ABX | ArchitectureBoston Expo for a face-to-face usingwhere discount experience you will gain a broad new vision, fresh contacts, newly discovered opportunities and cutting-edge ideas to propel your business. code DM20.

Show Floor Features

Specialty Spotlight

Educational Workshops

• NEW Hall A (the main hall) • 300+ exhibits • 16 hours of exhibit time • BSA Space @ ABX • The Quad • Photo Exhibit • Open Architecture Collaborative • SMPS Marketing Audits • deCordova | Store • Design Technology Throwdown

• NEW Residential Interiors presented by Houzz • NEW Landscape Architecture & Design Features • NEW Dean & Derek from DIY’s “Indoors Out” and “Rock Solid” • NEW Book signing by Patrick Ahearn, designer of HGTV Dreamhouse in 2015

• 148 education hours • 100 workshops • 13 idea-stimulating educational tracks • Special rate for Emerging Professionals

Show Floor Education • NEW CE Learning Zone

Pre-Show Education • NEW SAP Training • NEW Tuesday Intensive Workshops

Special Events • • • • • •

NEW Welcome Party on the Third Floor Floyer Happy Hour in the Hall Architecture Trivia Night Colormix Forecast Women in Design Symposium Alumni Receptions

Build your Experience Design the Future

Owner &  Producer:

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Official Publication:

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ABX18 Attendee Brochure  

Explore all ABX has to offer — including show floor highlights, educational workshops, special events, and more.

ABX18 Attendee Brochure  

Explore all ABX has to offer — including show floor highlights, educational workshops, special events, and more.