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Emilia-Romagna

Travel industry insights / November 2018

Uncover Italy’s best-kept secret as you venture into Bologna, an enchanting realm of under-the-radar history, world-class gastronomy and stunning vistas

Holiday habits

The figures are out on what’s hot or not in the world of travel

Responsible travel

G Adventures founder Bruce Poon Tip shares his vision of future tourism

WTM London

All the news, events and insights from this year’s show at the ExCel

S P E C I A L

E D I T I O N

Win! Flights to South America with Air Europa


World Travel Market 2018 Floorplan Up to North Gallery Rooms

EU 80

tom House r ExCel R Station

Canning Town Shuttle Buses

London Taxis

EU 50

EU 17 EU 16

EU 15

EU 14

EU 13

EU 10

EU 250

EU 340 EU 330

EU 50

300

Up to North Gallery Rooms

10

EU EU EU 203 204 205

9

EU 420

EU 80

EU 400

EU 31 EU 30 EU 29 EU 27 EU 26

EU 750

EU 850

EU EU 950 955

EU 648 EU 628 EU

EU 700

EU

EU

EU555

EU 350

EU 450

EU 550

EU 1175

EU 206

LA 12

West LA Cloakroom 22

LA

LA 100 200

LA 32

Americas Cafe

LA 240

EU 880

LA 150

LA 250

LA 355

LA 357

WTM Buyers’ Club Lounge

Sponsored by

WTM Buyers’ Club Lounge

LA 360

Inspiration Zone Americas

EU 13

EU 112

S2 EU 10

LA 406

EU EU EU 203 204 205

EU 9

CA

CA 207

CA 208

CA 207CA 205 209

200

500

CA 215

LA 10 LA

12 CA CA CA 120 122 125 130WestCA LA 140LA22 Cloakroom

CA 440

LA 36

LA 570 LA 560

CA 245 CA 250

CA 150

LA 39 LA 40

CA 250 LA LA 50 570 A Taste of ITLM LACA @ WTM LA 52

LA 360

Inspiration Zone Americas

LA 58

560 260 LA 59

LA 150

NA 300 100

LA CA 150 260 CA 265 NA CA 172 350 NA 177

CA 360

NA 200 NA

EU 1201 EU

EU 900

1201

1108

909 1001

905

EU

EU 948

EU

1250 EU

EU 1401

1209

EU 1401

EU 1330

EU 1409 EU

EU 1409

EU 1450

EU EU1501 1505

N5 N5

NA 140

140

NA 240 NA 150

LA 340NA

CA LA 265 250 NA 172 NA 177

NA 160 NA

CA170CA 358 NA 360 175

NA 180

250

NA 160 NA 170 NA 175

NA 165

NA 180

302

NA 302 NA

NA 300 BL2

EU 501

NA 401NA

401

NA 402

402

S4 S4

EU 601

EU 508

NA

ME 101

403 ME 101

NA 403

NA

NA LA 165 350

NA

LA 406

EU

EU 1610

NA NA 240 LA 420

NA 270

Inspiration NA Zone 280 Americas

330

NA 330 CA NA 340 120

CA CA CA NA 122 NA125 130

LA 250 440

NA 260 LA

450

NA 270

NA

LA LA 265 260 NA 355 357 LA 360

LA 500

280

CA NA 340 140 350

NA 350

NA 265

NA 360

CA NA 150 NA 360 370

NA 370

LA 570 LA 560

Up to South Gallery Rooms

EU 801

EU 805

EU 1540 EU 1520

EU 1601

1420 1601

ME

N3

202

ME

CA 205

CA 209

ME 203 ME

203

ME

ME 204 ME

ME 305ME

204

N4

305

ME ME 300

ME 200 200

300

CA 200 CA 215

NA 440

NA 301

CA 300

NA CA 440 220

NA 100

NA 200

NA 302

NA 300

NA 401

NA 402

NA 403

NA 450

CA CA 246 240

CA 250

CA NA 260 470

NA 150

NA 470 Media Pavilion CA 265 NA 172 NA 177

NA 400

NA

NA 160

NA 170 NA

NA 270

NA 280

180 Conference Room

358 360

NA 440

ME 250

EU 1209

EU 1401

ME 401

N5

ME 500 ME

600

ME 203

ME 200

ME 204

ME 305

ME 401

ME

ME 400

ME300 540

ME 640

ME 360 ME140 ME 362

190d ME 190c ME 190b ME 190a

NA NA ME150 International Centre 350 450 Media ME NA 265

NA 360

Sponsored by362

190j ME 190i ME 190h ME 190g

International Media Centre

NA 370

Sponsored by ME

NA 470

Media Pavilion

580

ME 195l ME 195k ME 195j ME 195i ME 195h ME 195g

ME ME 445 440 ME

ME ME ME 195f ME 450 451 195e ME ME 452 195d ME ME 195c ME 195f 195l ME ME 195b ME 195e ME 195k ME 195a ME ME 452

195j ME 195i ME 195h ME 195g

195d ME 195c ME 195b ME 195a

ME 250

ME 645

550

ME ME 450 451

ME 362

ME 190l ME 190k ME 190j ME 190i ME 190h ME 190g

International Media Centre Sponsored by

ME 170a

WTM Press Up to South Conference Room

ME 195l ME 195k ME 195j ME 195i ME 195h ME 195g

ME 647 ME 660

ME 195f ME 195e ME 195d ME 195c ME 195b ME 195a

ME ME 450 451 ME 452

ME 649

ME 647 ME 660

Gallery Rooms

Up to South Gallery Rooms

EU 1501

Up to South Gallery Rooms

EU 1505

EU 1508

AF

Chargin Zone

AF 120 ME

ME 406

ME 603

AF 600 130

AF 140

AF 140

ME 540

AF 358

AF 150ME

AF 350

640

Africa

AF AF AF AF Café 155 157 150 040 AFME 165645

ME Inspiration Zone 550Africa & Middle East

AF190

AF

ME 649

AF 240

Charging Zone

AF 120

AF190

E 16

AF 401

AF 040

645

ME 190f ME 190e ME 190d ME 190c ME 190b ME 190a

S6 S6 AF240 100 AF 110

AF ME 130

ME ME ME 445 440

ME 550 ME 360

AF 100 AF 110

500

ME 640

E 1

BL6

ME 603

406

E 1

1500

EU 1409

ME 603ME

S5

ME 100

ME ME 190f 190l ME ME 190e 190k ME ME 190d 190j ME ME 190cME190i ME ME 190f ME 190l 190bME190h ME ME 190e ME 190k 190aME190g ME

ME 406

ME 600 ME

500

ME 202

ME 360

NA 340

NA 250

ME WTM NA Press 260 165 580 Conference Room

175 ME 170a Media WTM Press Pavilion CA CA CA NA

350

NAME 330 250

NA 240

ME 580

EU 1205

ME ME 445 440

ME150

ME 170a

BL4

EU 1201

ME 540

ME150

450

ME ME 400

ME 101

ME140

CA NA 245

ME 401

400

CA ME140 330

NA 140

EU 1108

S4

CA 310

E 1 EU 1701

N6EU N6 EU 1400

S5 S5

EU EU 909 1001

EU 905

S3 CA 208

E 1

BL6

EU 901

E 17

1560

EU 1600EU EU 1700 1550 1600

EU 1410

202 ME WTM Sales Office

Up 400 to Platinum Suites NA ME100 400& Titanium Room100

CA 207

LA 400

EU 701

E 1

1570 1578

EU 1610 EU

EU EU 1508 EU

EU 1508 1320 EU 1300

1501

EU 1720 EU EU

EU EU EU EU 1432 1435 1437 1439

EU 1505 EU

EU

EU 17 172

EU EU 1592 1596

EU 1442

EU 1340

1200 EU 1400 1400

EU 174

1620

EU 1478

EU 1111

EU EU 1393 1390

1500

EU EU

EU 1100

EU 1470

EU EU 1500

EU 1410 1410

EU EU1209

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EU 17

EU 1640

EU 1620

EU 1395

EU 1350

EU 1175

EU 1000

EU 1205 EU

EU EU 1386 1387 EU 1380 EU 1383 EU 1381

1420

EU 1150

EU 938

EU EU 177 176 EU 17

EU 1750

EU 1540 EU

EU 1520

EU EU EU EU 1432 1435 1437 1439

EU EU 1174 1170

N4 N4

EU 600

S2

CA LA 330 300

LA 240 NA

NA 301 NA

N2

300

LA 305

150

Up to CA SouthCA Sponsored by Gallery Rooms 350 358

NA

100 NA 200

S1

WTM Buyers’ Club Lounge

Up to South Gallery Rooms

CA

CA CA 246 240NA

CA CA 246 240

EU 408

NA 301

N1 BL1

330

245

CA 150

CA 300

EU 401

CA 310

310

LA 200 CA

100

Americas CA Cafe

LA 450

CA CA 205CA 209

LA 102

LA 32

140

EU 301

CA 220

CA 220 LA 120

CA

LA 357

EU 940 EU 930

EU 1108 EU

EU

1420 EU EU 1180EU 1280

EU 1300

EU EU 950 955

EU 800

EU

BL4 BL4

S3 S3

EU 206

CA 208

CA 200

LA CA 500

LA 420

LA LA 450 355

EU

EU 905 901

EU 700

EU

EU 1785

EU 1770

& Titanium & Titanium Room Room

CA 215

LA 350

LA 350

EU 14

EU

EU U 178

Ga EU 17

EU 1780

EU 1550

EU 1550

EU 1442

1190 1320 EUEU 1320 1300

EU 1050

EU EU 1001EU EU 909 EU

EU 1650

EU

EU EU 1560 1570 1578

International Travel&Tourism Awards

LA 59

LA 150

LA 250

EU

EU901 805

WTM WTM SalesSales Office Office

CA

340 LA 440

LA 340

EU

805 EU 801

EU 648 EU 628

EU 1592 1596

EU 1478

EU 1560

EU EU EU 1330

EU 1090

Up to Platinum Suites Suites Up to Platinum

BL2

LA LA 400

CA CA CA LA125 130 122

LA 240

EU EU EU 801 428 701

N3 N3 EU 400

N2

EU 16

EU EU 701 420

601

EU 640 EU 620

EU 1450

EU 1111

EU 1450

International Travel&Tourism Awards

LA 58

LA

EU 508

EU 1470

EU 953

EU 500

EU 1650

EU EU 1570 1578 EU

EU EU 1393 1390

International Travel&Tourism Awards

LA 52

LA 305

LA 300 400

LA 420

LA 39 LA 40

LA 50 LAA Taste of ITLM 150 @ WTM

300

LA 406

601 EU 501

EU 440

EU 348

EU 332

EU EU 300

EU 17

S2

LA 305

EU

EU EU 501 EU 508 408

EU 15

BL2

EU 340 EU 330

EU 200

EU 408

EU 401

N2

S1

LA LA 200

EU 301

South Halls

LA 36

LA 39 LA 40

EU 401

N1

West Entrance

South Halls

LA 10

LA 100

EU 301

Canning Town Shuttle Buses

EU 50

EU 1395

EU

EU 1200

EU 850

EU 1478

EU 1111

1432 1435 1437 1439 EU EU EU Up to North EU Up to North EU EU 1330 1340 1540 1520 1640 Gallery Rooms 1442 Gallery Rooms 1740

EU 750

678

EU 1470

EU 1340

EU 1200

EU EU 1592 1596

Up to North Gallery Rooms

EU EU 1393 1390

EU 1350

EU795

Ideas Arrive EU Here Cafe 790

EU 1395

EU 1350

EU 1250

EU 1100

EU 650

EU 558

EU EU 1386 1387 EU 1380 EU 1383 EU 1381

EU 1250

EU Up to NorthEU 1100 1000Gallery Rooms

EU EU 938 EU 930 674 900 670 EU

EU 580

EU EU 1386 1387 EU 1380 EU 1383 EU 1381

EU 1280

EU 1150

EU EU EU EU 938948 930 940

Up to North EU Gallery Rooms 800

EU 1180

EU 1150

EU EU EU 953 948 1000

EU 940

EU 1280

EU EU 1174 1170

EU 1050

EU 900

EU 600

EU

EU 1190 1175

EUEU EU 953955 950

EU 800

380

EU 250

EU 110

EU 700

EU EU 1174 1170

EUEU 1050 1090

EU 880

EU 850

EU 620

EUEU 270 600

EU 265

260

EU 28

Ideas Arrive EU Here Cafe 790

EU 750 674

EU 678

EU 648 EU EU 628 640

EUInspiration Zone - Europe 428

Green Room EU

EU 400

London BL1Taxis

LA 102

LA 102

LA 36

Sponsored by

EU 640 EU 620

EU 500

EU 24 EU 23 EU 22 EU 18

EU EU EU EU 203 206 EU 204 EU 205 EU

Americas Cafe

LA 59

EU 428

EU 13

LA 32

LA 58

332 EU

EU 420 300

EU795

EU

1190 Up to North 1180 Gallery Rooms

EU 25

S1

LA 52

EU 558

EU 440

EU

EU 670

EU

EU 1090

880 Gallery Rooms

EU 650

EU 500

EU 348

EU 14

BL1

LA 50 A Taste of ITLM @ WTM

EU

EU 450

EU 550

EU 15

N1

West LA Cloakroom 22

EU 340 EU 330

EU 16

112

LA 150

Up to North Gallery Rooms

Ideas Arrive EU EU Up to North Here Cafe 790

EU 674

EU 678

EU 650

EU 558

EU555

EU 440

EU 348

To Custom House for ExCel DLR Station

EU 9

LA 12

EU 332

EU 200 EU

EU 17

EU 450

EU 350

EU 250

EU 200

EU 24 EU 23 EU 22 EU 18

EU 550

EU 270

EU 670

EU 580

EU555

EU 350

EU 265

EU 110

EU 25

LA 10

EU 380

EU

North Halls

EU 112

EU Up to North 580 Rooms Gallery

270 Inspiration Zone - Europe

28

EU 31 EU 30 EU 29 EU 27 EU 26

North Halls

don Taxis

EU 110

EU 24 EU 23 EU 22 EU 18

EU EU 80 265

Green Room EU 260 EU

EU 25

North Halls West Entrance South Halls

ing Town tle Buses

260

EU 28

EU 31 EU 30 EU 29 EU 27 EU 26

EU 380

Inspiration Zone - Europe

Green Room EU

To Custom House for ExCel DLR Station

Up to North Gallery Rooms EU795

Inspiration 195 Zone Africa & Middle East

ME 647 ME 660

AF AF 360 365 AF AF AF AF 04 155 368 157

AF AF 380165AF190 ME

AF 649 195

Up to South Gallery Rooms

Insp Z Af Mid

A 3

Up to Sout Gallery Room


AF 380

AF 470

AF AF 481 480

AF 455 AF 457 AF 459

AF 560

AF 770

AF 671

AF AS 760 060

AF 6780

Africa - New Exhibitor Pavilion

AF AF AF AF AF AF AF 590 591 592 687 686 685 684

AS 300

AF 681 AF 682 AF 683

AS 165

AS 160

AS AS 167 169

AS 180

Up to ITT Members’ Lounge

AF 681 AF 682 AF 683

AF 681 AF AS 682 603 AF 683

400

AS AS 538 539 AS AS 530 533

AS AS 549 547 AS AS 540 545

AS 450

AS 455

AS 430

TT TT 310h 310g

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AS 155

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AS 155

AS 160 N9

AS 259

AS 158

TT 110

TT 115

AS AS 189

AS 801

800

AS 656 AS 660

AS 750

AS 570

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AS AS AS 580 585 680

AS 670 AS 675

AS 905

900

AS 350

TT TT 227 228 TT 225

AS AS 259

AS AS 265

AS 1000

AS 350

AS 860

AS 865

AS 890

AS 867

AS 898

AS 980

AS AS 989 985

NA 280

NA 180

TT 205

510

Bar

LA 357

AS 430

AS 538 539 AS AS AS AS 530 533

AS 448

549TT 547 AS 340 AS AS 540 545 AS 440 AS

555

AS 455

650

AS AS 656 AS 555 660

AS 450

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AS 670 AS 675

AS AS AS AS AS 460 570 580 585 680

AS 470

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650 AS 765 AS

AS 1150

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Asia Café

LA 360

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L 35 LA 250

LA 35

L 34 LA 240 TTTT TT 737628 626

TT 516 TT TT 525 TT 523

422 TT TT TT 420 310r 310q

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TT

TT

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310d 310c

TT

TT

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Advice Clinic

TT TT 324 323

TT TT 431 432

TT TT 310d 310c

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TT 212

TT TT TT 217 219 TT 220

210

TT 110

TT 217

TT

T>F Sales

TT 230

Lift

Stairs

Radio

Up to South Gallery Rooms

Restaurant

S9 AS 801

Disabled Toilets

AS 901

AS

WTM Buyers’ Club Lounge

LA 150

TT 340

670 AS 675

T>F Keynote Theatre

AS

N1

N2 S2

AS 900 800 N3

N4

S3

S4

Prayer room

Cloakroom

901

AS 905

AS AS 1000

Car Park

Info Point / Information

N5

AS AS 1100

N6

S5

S6

First aid

Info Point / Information Sponsored By Israel

N8 S8

S7

London Taxis

T>F TRAVEL FORWARD AS 1200

N7

1000

AS 1100 N9

N10

S9

S10

MIDDLE EAST

AFRICA & NORTH AFRICA

ASIA/PACIFIC & INDIAN AS OCEAN

AS AS 930 935

EAST CLOAKROOM AS N11

Private Coaches

1200

AS AS 940 945

East Cloakroom

AS 950

AS 850

AS 850

AS 750

N11

860

AS 865

AS 890

AS AS 985 AS 989 AS 860

AS 865

AS 890

WTM & T>F Registration

AS 1050

AS AS 1040 1150

AS AS 940 945

AS 950

AS 1070

AS 980

AS 867

S11 AS AS 790 795

AS 1140

869

AS 867

AS 898

Inspiration Zone - Asia

AS 980

AS AS 989 985

AS 1050

AS 1060

AS 1170

AS 1070

Inspiration Zone - Asia

Networking Area

AS 1233 AS 1230 AS 1248 AS 1243

AS Green 1140

Room

AS 1260 AS 1261 AS 1265 AS 1267

Asia Café

AS 1350

AS 1170

AS AS 1250 1240 AS 1251

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AS Global WTM 1252 AS Stage 1258

WTM Global Stage

AS 1260 AS 1261 AS 1265 AS 1267

Asia Café

Toilets

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Prayer room

S3

I

N5 UK & N4 INTERNATIONAL HUB IRELAND S4

N6

N7 S6

N6

TRAVEL

S5

AS 1350

WTM Global Stage

LONDON

– November 201

WTM & T>F Registration

N8

MIDDLE EAST S7 S8

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– November 201

1220 AS 1235

AS 1150

S2

N5

East Cloakroom

LONDON

SHUTTLE

AS AS 1250 1240 AS 1251 AS 1252 AS 1258

N3

MIDDLE EAST

S11

City Airport Shuttle Buses

AS 1243

AS 1040

AS 1060

AS 869

AS 898

AS AS 930 935

N2

THE AMERICAS & S4 S5 THE CARIBBEAN

S11

Speed AS 1225 Networking Area Speed AS

AS 1230 AS 1248

S3

N4

N11

WTM & T>F Registration

S11

AS 1233

N3

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To Prince Regent DLR station

S10

AS UK & INTERNATIONAL 1002 HUB IRELAND

900

East Cloakroom

335 T>F Keynote Theatre

N10

Cash machines/ATM

S10

AS 1002 AS

905 EUROPE AS

S1

Toilets

THE AMERICAS & THE CARIBBEAN

TT 130

N10 Escalator

Cloakroom

TT 550

TT

TT TT TT 227 228 335 TT TT 230 225

T>F Sales

120 TT 130

S2

WEST

TT 552

TT TT 332 330

TT TT 332 330

TT 219

TT TT TT 227 228 220 TT 225

TT 115

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TT 115

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Toilets

TT 250

TT 435

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TT 333

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310b 310a

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TT TT 434 250

TT TT 328 327

TT 434

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535 TT TT

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Radio

S6

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TT CLOAKROOM 651

TT 650

Disabled Toilets

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EUROPE

TT 652

652

525

TT TT 527 422 TT TT 420 430

TT TT 426 427

TT Conference 735 Theatre

T>F Networking Bar TT

TT TT 523 TT527

TT530

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Recharge zone

Lift

Restaurant

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TT 837

TT T>F 737

TT 730

721 727

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TT 750

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TT 416

310 310t 310s

TT 936

TT TTTT TT 835 726 725 839 TT TT 837 TT

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Green Room

AS 1350

Sponsored by

LA 58

LA 59

LA 150 LA 52

LA 39 LA 40

LA 32

LA 36

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Private Coaches

City Airport Shuttle Buses

TT 750

REGISTRATION

790 AS 795

Networking Area

AS 1260 AS 1261 AS 1265 AS 1267

AS 1070

TT 935

TT T>F Product 720 Showcase Theatre

TT TT 410 TT 413 415 TT

TT TT 413TT415 TT

AS

656 AS AS 660AS 765AS AS

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AS AS 1250 1240 AS 1251 AS 1252 AS 1258

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AS 800 700

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801

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TT 930

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521 550 522 AS AS AS AS 538 TT 539 TT520 537 435

AS 450

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AS TT AS 521 535 522 552 AS TT AS 520 533 537 AS TTAS

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N10

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TT 920

TT 820

N9

LA 560

AS 601

AS 700 400

ASAS TT 420 651 510 TT

AS AS 530 533250 AS

AS 603

503

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CA CA 358 360

NA 270

NA 165

NA 175

NA 160

NA 170

NA 172 NA 177

CA 265

CA 260

LA 570

AS 601AS

Up to AS ASSouth AS Gallery Rooms 271 261 AS 470

Inspiration Zone - Asia

TT TT 310m 310k

TT 556

TT 817

CA 350

NA 265

NA 260

AS AS

460

AS 1060

AS 869

AS 501

Conference Theatre AS

AS400 500 TT

TT 735

N10 AS

1100

S9

Coffee/Café Area

TT TT TT TT 725 726 622 730 TT TT TT 721 727 620

TT TTTT TT TT TT TT 306310s 308310r 310q 310 310t

TT TT 310f 310e

N9

AS 1233

AS AS 930 935

AS 950

West LA Cloakroom 22

ME 170a

Media Pavilion

NA 470

NA 370

NA 360

TT 230

250

AS 1002

Americas Cafe

LA 100 LA 10

WTM Press Conference Room

ME 580 TT TT 332 330

AS 765

AS AS 790 795

AS 500

TT 737

AS 1225 AS 1220 AS 1235

AS 850

Up to South Gallery Rooms

LA 200

LA 102

International Media Centre

ME 362

ME 250 NA 450 TT 333

AS 264

AS AS 940 945

AS 650

TT 434

ASAS AS 265271 261

AS 370 AS

AS 901

TT 430 TT TT 431 432

TT TT 325 326

256 TT130 AS T>F Sales 250

AS 370

S9

Advice Clinic

TT TT 328 327

TT 120

AS 264

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700

AS 460

Up to South Gallery Rooms

AS TT

TT AS AS 212 217 219 240 256 TT TT 158 210 220

TT 205

N9

S8

Coffee/Café Area

TT TT 720 616

TT 416

TT 409

TT TT 307 301 TP TT 709 TT TT 306 308200

TP 601

LA 360

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403

LA 355

TT TT 310r 310q

TT TT 310m 310k

TT TT 426 427

N8

S7

SYMBOLS KEY

TT 719

TT 816

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Inspiration Zone Americas

TT TT 306 308

TT 425

TT530

TT 527

LA 350

LA 340

TT TT TT 310 310t 310s

TT 307

South Halls AS AS 271 261

TT TT

TT

TT 525 TT 523

AS413 415 AS 248 245 TT TT 323 AS AS 324AS TT T>F Startup Showcase 240248TT 322 320245 410

TT 401 837

LA 250

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LA 12

ME 452

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AS 180

CA 150

TT 416

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AS AS AS AS TT 401 TT 403839AS 501 AS503 835

LA 450

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AS 448 AS 440 AS 555

NA 250 NA 150

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Up to ITT AS AS 510 Members’ Lounge 420

AS 250

AS 370

NA 350

NA 340

NA 330

NA 240

CA CA 246 240

CA 140

TT TP 400 715 TT TP 305 711

TT 615

TT 750

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AS TT630 512 517 AS 652AS TT TT 517 626 628 AS 512TT 1350T>F Networking 650

TT 622 TT 620

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The whole world, in one place

H

Come see ABTA Magazine on Stand TP270

ello and welcome to this special edition of ABTA Magazine, available exclusively at this year’s World Travel Market in London. We’ve taken this opportunity to review the last year by delving into ABTA’s just-released Holiday Habits Report (p26), celebrating the sucesses of the Travel Association’s campaigns over the last 12 months (p16), as well as looking ahead to the future of travel. As ever in the world of travel, it’s been an eventful year. As Nikki White, ABTA’s director of destinations and sustainability writes on p66: every destination has some kind of issue. You don’t have to look far – as Gary Noakes considers in a piece on the long-term impact of the falling pound on p30 – but the travel industry remains resilient. WTM is not only an opportunity to engage with tourist boards, associations and operators from across the globe, but also to celebrate this incredible industry. We’ve divided this magazine by region: UK (beginning p33), Europe (p39), the Americas and Caribbean (p44), Africa (p49), the Middle East (p54) and Asia Pacific (p58). At the the beginning of each of these sections, we’ll share our picks from WTM, including the best talks, events and, of course, on-stall drinks. We’ve then chosen eight destination that are deserving of your attention in 2019, including the beautiful Emilia-Romagna region Italy, which graces our cover. The region is home to the cultural powerhouse of Bologna, quaint villages, Apennine-shadowed landscapes and, as Barbara Noe Kennedy writes on p40, some of Italy’s very best food. We’ll take you across the world from London’s exceptional dining scene (p34), to Oman’s luxurious resorts in the desert (p55), to cruise safaris on the Zambezi (p50) and on to Hokkaido, Japan’s wild northern most island (p60). There’s also an interview with G Adventures founder Bruce Poon Tip on p21, where he reminisces about this first WTM and shares all the latest from the small group specialist. We hope you enjoy reading. Look out for our daily email during WTM, which will detail all the latest news from the event as well as the day’s highlights. If you’re not already signed up to our emails, head over to abtamag.com/subscribe.

Tell us your thoughts

We would love to hear your thoughts about this issue of ABTA Magazine, the latest created by Waterfront Publishing. The magazine has a new look, editorial focus, and an increased and improved distribution, meaning it now spans the breadth of the travel industry, reaching from frontline agents to the boardroom. Send your thoughts to info@ABTAmag.com.

Highlights from WTM Monday

Wednesday

Wednesday

Keynote: Instagram and Travel (10.45-11.25, WTM Global Stage – AS1350)

Travel Advice Essentials From ABTA and the FCO (10.3011.30, UKI & International Inspiration Zone – TA190)

Food Tourism & ABTA’s Make Holidays Greener (14.0014.30, UKI & International Inspiration Zone – TA190)

ABTAmag.com

November 2018

4


Air Europa at World Travel Market Air Europa will be exhibiting at this year’s World Travel Market. Come and meet us at stand CA330 where our team will be delighted to update you on Air Europa’s growing network across Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as our exciting new fleet of Boeing 787 Dreamliners.

For more information, call: 0871 423 0717 or visit: www.aireuropaexperts.com


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Today’s travellers must hear what you have to tell them if they are going to buy from you, but shouting at them is not the answer. Trouble is, they are bombarded with more information than ever before, hundreds of messages every day. And the reality is almost none of those messages hit home. That’s where Flagship Consulting comes in, helping you focus on the PR messages and communications campaigns that have most impact.

It’s why our clients see improved business results when they work with us.

Give us a call on 020 7680 7104 or contact us at inspiration@flagshipconsulting.co.uk to see how marketing communications can help deliver moments of maximum impact for your business.


November 2018

40 50

FEATURES

Competition Win two return tickets to any of Air Europa’s Dreamliner destinations

Eat, stay, love Emilia-Romagna, Italy’s bestkept secret

Set sail on safari Watch and wonder at Africa’s abundant wildlife from the water

ABTA Magazine is created by Waterfront Publishing on behalf of ABTA Waterfront Publishing 12-18 Hoxton Street London N1 6NG waterfront-publishing.com 020 3865 9360

No need to gamble Get good odds on the huge variety of eateries in Downtown Las Vegas

Sales manager Bryan Johnson bryan@waterfront-publishing.com 020 3865 9338 Sales manager Emily Norris emily@waterfront-publishing.com 020 3865 4815

65

45

With thanks to: Jill Sayles, Gary Noakes, Andrew Forbes, Daniel Allen, Nicky Holford, James Litston, Jack Pitkeathley ABTAmag.com info@ABTAmag.com Twitter: @ABTAMagazine Facebook: ABTAMagazine

Director Sam Ballard sam@waterfront-publishing.com

Head of design Billy Odell billy@ABTAmag.com

ABTA 30 Park Street, London SE1 9EQ

Director Anthony Pearce anthony@waterfront-publishing.com

Business travel editor Jenny Southan jenny@ABTAmag.com 020 3456 7899

Chief executive Mark Tanzer

Head of sales Simon Leeming simon@waterfront-publishing.com 020 3865 9337

Sub-editors Nathaniel Cramp, Emily Eastman, Jason Riley

Chairman Noel Josephides

7


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We Are WEX—Your Partner For All Things Payments FIND US AT STAND TT230 AT WTM LONDON www.wexeurope.com | +44 (0) 203 553 5835 | sales@wexeurope.com


In the November issue

34

03 10

Editor’s letter The time is here – are you ready for WTM?

11

News The latest travel industry news, including cruise, aviation, hotels and touring

15 55

61 Contributors Jenny Southan is an awardwinning freelance travel journalist, and editor and founder of trend forecaster Globetrender. Billy Odell is a freelance illustrator and graphic designer based in London. You can see his cartoons and sketches at billyodell.com Gary Noakes is a writer and editor specialising in travel and the nuts and bolts of the industry, particularly aviation. Esme Fox is a travel journalist, writing for Lonely Planet, Rough Guides, BBC Travel and The Daily Telegraph

ABTAmag.com

On trend We explore the numbers behind ABTA’s Holiday Habits Report and Japan’s big target

ABTA section We bring you up to date with all of the latest news, campaigns and events from ABTA

21

Interview: Bruce Poon Tip The G Adventures founder speaks to us ahead of his keynote speech on Monday

26

Holiday Habits Take a look at ABTA’s in-depth look at how the British holiday market performed last year

30

Industry insights Gary Noakes analyses the falling pound and explains what it means for the travel industry

33

WTM: UK We round up the key UK events at WTM plus take a look at the London restaurant scene

39

WTM: Europe From river cruises in France to Italy’s best kept secret, as well as an overview of Europe

44

WTM: Americas Jenny Southan hits the Vegas strip plus we round up all the events from around the show

49

WTM: Africa Heidi Fuller-Love boards a safari cruise, while we look at the best Africa events at the show

54

WTM: Middle East We journey to Oman plus preview an exclusive session on Dubai’s Expo 2020

58

WTM: Asia Anthony Pearce heads to Hokkaido, Japan November 2018

9


News On trend

On trend HOLIDAY HABITS The number of solo travellers has grown threefold since 2011, according to ABTA’s Holiday Habits Report

Every issue we reveal the numbers behind the biggest stories in travel

The Holiday Habits Report, which looks at the changing trends of British holidaymakers, says the number of holidays being taken has remained stable. Overall, 86 per cent of respondents took a holiday either at home or abroad in the 12 months to August 2018. The number of holidays taken has fallen from 3.8 to 3.4 per person – the same as in 2016, but down on last year. This decrease is being driven by two main factors: people taking fewer UK breaks, and people taking fewer shorter breaks, at home and abroad. The number of short UK breaks fell from 1.3 to 1.1 per person, with people instead choosing to take longer foreign holidays. For more information, see ABTA.com.

CRUISE LINES INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION

€10.4 bn

The cruise industry generated €10.4 billion for the UK economy in 2017, according to research conducted on behalf of Clia

40 million

the annual number of overseas tourists that Japan is hoping to get to by 2020. Tokyo is set host the 2019 ABTA Convention 10 November 2018

49

tonnes

The estimated amount of plastic waste either avoided through the reduction of plastic use or removed from the ecosystem via clean-ups during ABTA’s Make Holidays Greener campaign this year.

ABTAmag.com


News November 2018

All the latest headlines from the world of travel

WTM 2018 officially opens By Sam Ballard World Travel Market 2018 has officially opened its doors. The three-day travel event, which is now in its 38th year, will see 51,000 travel professionals from around the world descend on London’s ExCel Centre. At last year’s event, organisers estimate that one million meetings were held, resulting in £3 billion worth of contracts being signed. About 5,000 companies exhibited. As well as the trade show, there will be

an extensive conference session that will include many of the world’s most influential tourism ministers and CEOs. Eliza Reid, the first lady of Iceland, will take part in a panel to mark 100 years of suffragettes (below). Other speakers during the conference include Johan Lundgren, CEO of easyJet; Bruce Poon Tip, founder of G Adventures; and Andrew Flintham, managing director of Tui UK, who will be speaking on a panel along with the bosses of Travel Counsellors, Euromonitor International and Hilton. ABTAmag.com

WTM conference highlights Keynote: Instagram and Travel Join Neasa Bannon, Instagram’s travel lead for EMEA, to hear how the platform passed the magic billion users threshold in June. What is behind its popularity, how are the best travel influencers and brands using it and how can travel marketeers get involved? Monday 10.45-11.25, WTM Global Stage – AS1350

How to Get Billions of Video Views A handful of video content creators represent a huge proportion of the billions of views on Facebook. How have they gained such a strong presence, what are their plans in travel and tourism, and how can advertisers in the sector work with them? Monday 11.35-12.15, WTM Global Stage – AS1350

Global Consumer Trends: Opportunities for the Travel Industry Online services have given consumers more choice than ever – but there are signs of a backlash. People are seeking out human advice in an attempt to cut through the noise, giving brands a new opportunity. Monday 12.00-13.00, Press Conference Theatre – International Media Centre – ME580

100 Years of Suffragettes: International Perspectives for the Travel Industry Eliza Reid, the first lady of Iceland, joins a panel of influential women to mark the 100th anniversary of British women gaining the right to vote. The session will discuss progress made, as well as the international women’s movement, including sexual harassment and the #MeToo movement. Monday 12.30-13.30, Europe Inspiration Zone – EU80

How to Discover More Passion, Purpose and Happiness in Travel The founder of G Adventures, Bruce Poon Tip, gives a keynote address at this year’s WTM. Having been at the forefront of responsible travel for 28 years, Poon Tip has led a company built around using the power of tourism to empower local communities, including the creation of the foundation Planeterra. Monday 14.00-14.45, WTM Global Stage – AS1350

Travel Leaders Speak – UK Travel Market: What to Expect in 2019 This panel discussion sees four senior UK travel leaders giving their view of what is currently driving the UK outbound and inbound travel markets. Speakers will be asked to outline the key factors that have affected their sectors in 2018 and how the year has traded. They will then discuss the outcomes expected for 2019. Monday 14.15-15.30, Europe Inspiration Zone – EU80

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November 2018 11


News

Japan: 40m visitors by 2020 By Sam Ballard Japan is set to welcome 40 million visitors a year by 2020, claims the executive vicepresident of its national tourist board. Mamoru Kobori of the Japan National Tourism Organization (JNTO) said the country had experienced double-digit growth for the sixth consecutive year. Last year’s record high of 28.69 million was up by 19 per cent on the 24 million who visited in 2016. Between January and July of 2018, the country experienced another 19 per cent increase. Speaking at the Visit Japan Travel & MICE Mart 2018 (VJTM) in Tokyo, Kobori said that Japan was closing the gap on one of Asia’s most popular destinations, Thailand, which welcomed 32.59 million visitors in 2016. Tokyo will host the Rugby World Cup in 2019 and the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2020. The JNTO said it expected 400,000 rugby fans to visit the city next year. The UK is one of six European countries that account

for almost four per cent of all tourism to the country. British tourists are also among the top spenders there, according to the JNTO. At an event taking place on the same day as Kobori’s announcement, Yuriko Koike, the governor of Tokyo, said that the city has been investing in infrastructure to make it more tourist-friendly. She said that as the first city to host the Paralympic Games twice, Tokyo has a “responsibility to make roads and rail stations without barriers for those with accessibility issues”. She added that there would be more signs put up in English in the Japanese capital. The JNTO said that Britons were most likely to visit Japan for the culinary experience. It said that culture and history, sightseeing and, to a lesser extent, shopping were also factors. The 2019 ABTA Travel Convention is set to be held in Toyko. For more information, see p15 and ABTA.com ABTAmag.com

New routes for British Airways By ABTA Magazine staff British Airways has revealed more details about its new 2019 roster, including flights to Charleston in the southern US, Preveza in Greece and Bastia in Corsica. The company also announced a four-flightsa-week service to Osaka, Japan, in September as well as a route to Pittsburgh, which will also be four-flights-a-week. The Osaka route launches on 31 March. British Airways will become the only carrier to offer a UK-toPittsburgh service, when that route launches on 2 April 2019. There will also be an increase of the carrier’s Nashville route, which will operate daily. The Heathrow-to-Charleston route will launch from 4 April on board a Boeing 787-8 Dreamliner, with return fares starting from £600. Flights will run from Thursdays to Sundays. Sean Doyle, BA’s director of network and alliances, said: “You can’t help but get sucked into the old world charm of Charleston:

12 November 2018

cobblestone streets, colourful houses and historical buildings make it a unique city. Recently we launched flights to Nashville and New Orleans, and earlier this year announced a route to Pittsburgh. Travelling to the States is as popular as ever, so we’re pleased to be adding this city to our extensive global network and giving customers even more choice of destinations.” The Preveza flights will operate on

Wednesday and Sunday from 26 May through to 29 September. Bastia will operate every Sunday from 25 May to 28 September. Doyle added: “We’re always developing our leisure offering and are committed to giving customers more choice of destinations at competitively low prices, so we’re pleased to be adding two more spots to our summer schedule.” ABTAmag.com

ABTAmag.com


News

Cruise makes UK €10.4bn By ABTA Magazine staff The cruise industry generated €10.4 billion for the UK economy in 2017, according to research conducted on behalf of Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA). This represents around 22 per cent of the industry’s ‘total output’ in Europe. Employment and other direct expenditures made up €3.85 billion of this, up 18 per cent on 2015. The remaining €6.55 billion was indirect and induced expenditure. Andy Harmer, CLIA UK & Ireland director, said: “The figures released today bear testament to the cruise industry continuing to make significant contributions to the UK’s economy, and the multi-billion valuation shows that cruise is a major player within the travel sector. “More Brits are choosing a cruise holiday, more cruise passengers are

embarking on a cruise from UK ports, and the number of ports-of-call visitors continues to increase. “This, along with more jobs being created through the cruise industry, translates into great economic benefits for the country.” There were 37,720 roles generated by cruise-related expenditures; 17,183 Britons worked for cruise lines, either in administrative offices or as crew on board ships. Other jobs included direct suppliers to the cruise lines and the employees of establishments that provide goods and services to cruise passengers. This paid €1.41 billion in employee compensation. The UK cruise industry sustains an estimated 44,690 indirect and induced jobs. The average job generated by the cruise industry paid just over €38,300 in employee compensation. ABTAmag.com

WTM conference highlights Social Contract: Expired From the Arab Spring to Brexit, citizens across the world are increasingly standing up against the status quo, demanding a new social contract. With growing fear comes new opportunities. What is the role of travel and tourism to rebuild faith and continue to drive growth, integration and prosperity? Monday 14.15-15.15, Platinum Suite 3&4

Challenges Ahead for the Airline Industry As fuel prices rise and Brexit looms, aviation expert John Strickland looks at the outlook for the industry. With several recent airline failures, costs rising and competition intense, which carriers are best placed to weather the storms of winter and where do the opportunities lie? Tuesday 10.30-10.50, Middle East & Africa Inspiration Zone – AF190

2018 UNWTO & WTM Ministers’ Summit: Investment in Tourism Technology The summit will provide a platform for tourism leaders in both the public and private sectors to share best practices and explore investment opportunities in tourism technology. The session will include a ministerial roundtable at 12pm. Tuesday 11.00-13.00, WTM Global Stage – AS1350

Creating a Killer Content Brand Strategy The Digital Tourism thinktank is back once again with three sessions on how to maximise the potential of content as part of brand strategy. It will take a look at content trends, which creators are really disrupting the space and how brands are using content to create meaningful engagement with visitors throughout the visitor cycle. Tuesday 15.30-17.00, WTM Global Stage – AS1350

Responsible Tourism – How Much Progress Have We Made? The BBC’s Tanya Beckett hosts a panel of female leaders to consider how much progress has been made towards achieving sustainability in the travel sector. Has the emergence of women leaders in travel and tourism companies made a difference to responsible tourism? Wednesday 11.15-12.00, Europe Inspiration Zone – EU8

The Best Use of Social Media 2018 Join us for the Awfully Entertaining Social Media (Awesomes) of 2018. In 2015, it was Iceland with its brilliant Ask Gudmundur campaign, while in 2016 it was Visit Finland and its Polar Night Magic campaign. In 2017 it was the Faroe Islands’ Translate Project. Will the accolade head to the North Atlantic again in 2018? Wednesday 15.40-16.30, WTM Global Stage – AS1350

14 November 2018

ABTAmag.com


ABTA news November 2018

All the latest reports, comment, campaigns and events from ABTA – The Travel Association

Highlights of the ABTA Travel Convention 2018 Industry shows ‘cautious optimism’ at event held in Spain as Brexit deadline approaches By ABTA Magazine staff Holiday Sickness Scams, which had been damaging the reputation of UK holidaymakers, at The Travel Convention 2018, held in Seville on 8-10 October. The event saw speakers from across the industry take to the stage, including the bosses of DER Touristik, easyJet and Midcounties Co-operative. Mark Tanzer, ABTA’s chief executive, kicked off proceedings by sounding a note of cautious optimism, saying while “the future is unlikely to be paradise, there’s no reason to believe that it will be hell, either”. In one of the most well received addresses of the first day, Bryony Gordon, a feature writer at The Telegraph, spoke on the subject of mental illness. A poll taken at the convention found that only 56 per cent of delegates would feel comfortable telling their bosses that they were experiencing a mental-health problem. Simon Manley, the British ambassador to Spain, spoke about the importance of the UK to the country, with around 19 million Britons taking a trip to Spain in 2017. “Spain has a lot of skin in the game,” he said, referring to the ongoing Brexit negotiations.One of the final sessions of the day was a panel called The Future of the Expert with Derek Jones, CEO of DER Touristik UK; Alistair Rowlands, boss of Midcounties Co-operative; Becky Power, sector director of Travel at Google.

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When asked about the expertise of Kuoni, Jones said that the business enjoyed a 70 per cent conversion rate for customers in their stores, adding that human contact, coupled with knowledge was key to the company’s success. Rowlands backed this up, adding: “You can’t replace the trust element of a travel agent. It’s earned over time. As retailers, we have a Net Promoter score of 94. People want to work with people.” ABTA also released its much-anticipated Holiday Habits Report during the Convention. The study showed that the number of solo travellers increased threefold since 2011. Other interesting findings to come out of the report included that Britons are now taking longer foreign holidays – although this was at the detriment of the domestic holiday market. Mark Tanzer said: “Despite pressures on household incomes, Britons are clearly wedded to their holidays, with travel a spending priority. Holidaymakers are becoming increasingly costconscious, seeking value for money and budgeting more wisely in their holiday choices. “We’re at a unique juncture in the UK’s history as the nation counts down to leaving the EU. People understandably have questions and concerns about what impact Brexit may have on the cost of travel, but it is very encouraging that Europe tops the bill as the place they wish to visit next year, and holiday bookings more widely are looking positive for the year ahead.” ABTA.com

November 2018 15


ABTA News

2019 Convention heads to Tokyo

ABTA to help tackle modern slavery

By ABTA Magazine staff

By ABTA Magazine staff

The 2019 Travel Convention is to be held in Tokyo, it has been revealed. The annual event, which was this year held in Seville, Spain on 8-10 October, will take place from 7-9 October. Guests will stay at the Grand Prince Hotel New Takanawa, which is directly connected to the International Convention Center Pamir, where the business sessions will take place. The convention is expected to attract about 500 members of the UK travel industry. The event will take place during the Rugby World Cup, which is also being held in Japan. The Japanese National Tourism Organisation (JNTO), Japan Association of Travel Agents (JATA), ANA - All Nippon Airways and Prince Hotels & Resorts will be the host partners for the Convention. Mark Tanzer, ABTA’s chief executive, said: “I am delighted that Tokyo will be hosting the 2019 Travel Convention. “With British holidaymakers showing an increasing interest in visiting Japan, the convention will provide a great opportunity to show travel professionals all that it has to offer – from its incredible cuisine, beautiful landscapes and traditional architecture to its super-speed trains and illuminated skyscrapers. ABTA.com

ABTA has launched resources to help members identify and report modern slavery and tackle it within supply chains. ABTA has worked with Members on human-rights issues for many years through programmes such as Better Places, which addresses the environmental, social and economic impacts of tourism, and its Travelife certification scheme for hotels and accommodations. ABTA’s new training and guidelines supports members to understand modern slavery, develop strategies to tackle it and train staff to recognise and report it. As many as 40.3 million people worldwide were victims of modern slavery in 2016. Modern slavery includes activities of forced labour and human trafficking, and can also involve sexual exploitation. The training and guidelines were developed in partnership with Stronger Together. The online training is an introductory course that helps staff understand what modern slavery is, where and how it can occur, what to look out for and how to report it. The training is available to ABTA members for free via the ABTA Knowledge Zone. The guidelines provide more details for those who have responsibility for developing policies and practices to tackle modern slavery in their business and supply chains and are available for free on the ABTA Member Zone. ABTA.com

ABTA ‘most trusted’ ABTA is the country’s most trusted travel scheme, according to new research. Respondents were asked to rank the travel organisations they are most confident in, on a scale of one to four (one being most confident). ABTA was ranked first on 58 per cent of occasions, 12 per cent above the next most trusted organisation, Atol (46 per cent) and almost three times more than Trustpilot (20 per cent). Victoria Bacon, ABTA director of brand and business development, said: “At a time when consumer trust in business has fallen consumers remain very confident in ABTA and our values as an organisation. ABTA.com

ABTA online The latest travel advice

The latest on visas, health requirements and destinations. See abta. com/tips-and-latest/ latest-travel-advice

16 November 2018

ABTA campaigns

The full list of ABTA’s campaigns, which raise awareness of important travel issues. See abta. com/tips-and-latest/abtacampaigns

ABTAmag.com


ABTA campaigns ABTA counts campaign sucesses

By ABTA Magazine staff Over the last 12 months ABTA has conducted a number of campaigns providing clear, expert advice to consumers on a range of travel related matters. These achieved widespread coverage in print, online and on TV and radio. Fraudsters regularly target travel arrangements and ABTA, in partnership with City of London Police and Get Safe Online, warned about the scale of the problem, offering advice on how to avoid fraud and the costs to victims,

both financial and emotional. Every year mopeds and quad bike accidents result in the serious injury or death of many overseas holidaymakers. ABTA’s advice to consumers is clear and concise, only hire a quad bike as part of an organised excursion and never hire a moped. Going overseas without travel insurance or without the right policy, can have extremely serious consequences. In partnership with the Foreign Office, ABTA identified the scale of the problem and the potential substantial costs, which uninsured travellers can and do incur.

This year saw a spike in the number of balcony related safety incidents, many resulting in serious injury or death. ABTA’s annual balcony safety campaign seeks to encourage people to take care when on their balconies. In the first six months of 2018, there were a number of serious injuries and deaths among young people following falls from balconies. ABTA was the go-to place for comment by national media on how young people can stay safe on holiday, with ABTA spokesperson sharing their advice and tips. ABTA.com

Make Holidays Greener cuts plastic By ABTA Magazine staff An estimated 49 tonnes of plastic waste has either been avoided or removed from the environment this year, the Make Holidays Greener campaign has found. Make Holidays Greener is the annual campaign led by ABTA in partnership with Travelife for Accommodation. It ran from

ABTAmag.com

June to September 2018 and this year’s theme was ‘Say no to plastic.’ Travel businesses shared the steps they have taken to reduce the amount of plastic they use, amounting to 43 tonnes. Another six tonnes of plastic was removed through clean-up operations. More than 70 ABTA members and travel businesses, from tour operators to hotels, participated in the

campaign. Companies highlighted existing initiatives to cut down on plastics including reducing the use of plastic straws or offering filtered water as an alternative to bottled water, which contributed to MHG 2018’s total figures, while others made commitments to future activities, such as eliminating all avoidable single-use plastics in the next five years. ABTA.com

November 2018 17


ABTA Events

Events ABTA conferences and events deliver practical training for the travel industry and help keep you and your staff up to date on the most important, business-critical issues, with a focus on practical learning. Visit ABTA.com/events to learn more about our upcoming events and register your place.

November 15 Communicating FCO and other Travel Advice to Customers, London Get practical, expert guidance on how best to communicate travel advice pre and post-booking and while customers are in resort.

November 15

November 20

November 26

Social Media in Travel, London Smart travel businesses are increasingly turning to social media advertising to help them build credibility and generate enquiries. Expert speakers will help you understand how to harness the power of social advertising to sell more.

Apprenticeships in the Travel Industry, London Get to grips with the practicalities of apprenticeships, including understanding funding, choosing a training provider, meeting off-the-job training requirements and attracting and keeping the best talent.

Travel Trends 2019, London Hear insights from ABTA on travel trends and destinations to watch for next year. An evening networking event will host top travel journalists from consumer, trade and national media – a meeting point for professionals from across the travel sector.

November 29

November 29

December 4

The Over 50s Holiday Market, London The over 50s holiday market is lucrative and growing fast. This conference, now in its third year, will focus on trends, travel insights, innovations and how to reach and engage with this demographic.

An Introduction to Customer Health and Safety Management, London Designed for travel organisations of all sizes, this seminar will provide guidance and support on how to get started with health and safety within your business.

Advanced Complaints Management Seminar, London This advanced-level seminar will give you a greater understanding of how to manage your complaints process. Plus, take away top tips that you can implement within your business.

20 November 2018

ABTAmag.com


Bruce Poon Tip G Adventures Sam Ballard hears how the small-group specialist has redefined responsible travel

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or many people within the travel industry, the World Travel Market holds a special place in their hearts. It may have been where they first got an opportunity to meet a supplier face-to-face or where they struck that first big business deal. For Bruce Poon Tip, the founder of G Adventures, it was one of the first steps to building what is now one of the leading companies in the world of responsible travel. “When I was starting the company I went to a library that had global phone books to find out if there were any other companies doing what we do,” Poon Tip explains to ABTA Magazine. “This was in 1990 and there was no Google. “That was how I learnt about this thing called WTM. There was no email back then, and long-distance calls were so expensive, so I wrote a letter requesting more information. “I ended up spending my whole year’s marketing budget on flying to London to attend.”

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The gamble has clearly paid off. Fast forward 28 years and G Adventures is a global brand with more than 2,000 employees in 28 offices around the world. People in 160 countries book tours every year. “For us, WTM was crucial. It started everything. It made the difference between us being a tiny tour operator and a global brand.” Poon Tip’s first experience of WTM, which, by his own admission, he did on the cheap – staying in a hostel with a group of Nepalese guys who were cooking dal bhat over a fire in the backyard – gave him the opportunity to meet wholesalers faceto-face to discuss representation, scope out potential competitors and pitch his fledgling company. “We got in front of all of these people and explained our idea, which they had never heard before. It was about using local transportation, travelling by rickshaws; grassroots travel like staying with tribes in the Amazon. I was trying to

convince them that this was something that people wanted. “However, most would turn their noses up at it – they didn’t think anyone wanted to do it. “There was a real stigma attached to backpacker-style travel. It was seen as being cheap and poor – that’s not what travel is all about. And tours with just 12 people? No one ever did tours that small.” The formula has clearly worked. And, at this year’s conference, Poon Tip is returning as a speaker, delivering one of the conference’s key speeches (Monday, November 5, 14:00 on WTM Global Stage) entitled “How to discover more passion, purpose and happiness in travel”. “It’s going to be a talk on the future of tourism. I’ve now had 28 years in the travel industry, so this will be a chance to look at the emergence of ecotourism in the 90s and look at how that developed into responsible tourism. I also want to speak about how society has changed in parallel – we have become more conscious consumers.”

November 2018 21


Interview ABTA Magazine

This is an area that Poon Tip knows back to front. In 2003 he founded Planeterra, which connects tourism with social enterprise initiatives around the world, such as Women on Wheels – a group that helps teach women in India, including single mothers, how to drive and hires them as taxi drivers. G Adventures then uses Women on Wheels for its airport pickups in Delhi, something particularly reassuring for the huge number of single female travellers who take G trips. It’s all about travel boosting local communities, rather than leaving them worse off. G Adventures estimates that it has helped more than 50,000 people through its social impact projects. However, when pushed on whether the industry has become more conscious in its entirety, Poon Tip is reluctant to agree. “It’s pulling in both sides,” he explains. “Responsible travel is the fastest-growing travel sector, I think next to river cruising. But the all-inclusive market is growing too. In that market it’s amenities over destination – and that market is growing just as fast.” The ability for G Adventures to have claimed some level of ownership in the responsible travel space is in no small part down to the company having such a vocal leader in Poon Tip, who says that wellness is set to be his next big focus.

22 November 2018

“Wellness fits in perfectly with what we’re trying to do,” he says. “Our travellers want to have something more on their holiday than an all-inclusive offer. The world has changed significantly. People are living in an extremely wired and engaged world where they are attached to their phones and work 24/7. “There is a genuine desire to disconnect when you go on holidays, to recharge. Wellness is something that we weren’t talking about 20 years ago, but society has changed and we have changed in parallel with society.” The new tours will include yoga in Bali, where travellers will also take holy baths and try traditional herbal medicines, or Colombia where there will be guided meditation by a waterfall. “People increasingly want to focus on themselves and recharge. They love our style of travel but perhaps don’t want to be that active while on holiday, so these new tours will give them that option,” Poon Tip adds. “When people say they want to go away, they go to an all-inclusive resort or on a cruise. We need to redefine that space.” When asked about what challenges Poon Tip faces as he steers G Adventures from a “mid-sized tour operator to a large company” (his words), his first answer is, unsurprisingly, on maintaining the customer experience and particularly a

Pictured Above: Women on Wheels, a group that helps teach women how to become taxi drivers in Delhi

structure that won’t affect the company’s current innovation and speed to market. These include recent moves such as developing the G Adventures app to allow for a chat function, which enables members of a tour to communicate with each other and their tour leader as soon as they book on a trip. The company has also launched an in-app Gear Shop, where you can buy merchandise from social enterprises – good news for those who wanted to purchase extra souvenirs but didn't have the cash or luggage space while they were away. As G Adventures continues to grow and innovate, the speech Poon Tip will deliver at WTM will act as a homecoming of sorts, according to the man at the top. “It was the birthplace of us going from being a local tour operator here in Canada to being a global player. I’m very thankful, but also very excited about coming back.” ABTAmag.com

ABTAmag.com


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aga offers an exciting range of escorted tours. From rail to cruise tours, we take you on unforgettable journeys through some of the world’s most beautiful and dramatic regions, visiting world-famous sights, getting to the heart of the local culture and experiencing the ever-changing scenery and landscapes. And all from the comfort of our well-appointed coaches, trains or ships. Designed exclusively for the over 50s, our tours comprise of a diverse range of itineraries across European and long-haul destinations; from Spain to Uzbekistan and Croatia to the Himalayas. There are also

Rocky Mountains and Alaskan Adventure Discover the natural beauty of Canada and Alaska and admire the breathtaking scenery of the Rockies as you journey on the Rocky Mountaineer train. Explore the vibrant city of Vancouver, then enjoy a seven-night cruise along the Alaskan coastline.

specialist themed tours, such as gorilla trekking in Uganda or tracing the Spanish pilgrimage routes with our expert guides. Our well-balanced itineraries are expertly planned to balance busy days of sightseeing with quieter days for relaxing or independent exploration. Plus, our tours are clearly rated, stating how active each is and ensuring customers choose the one most suited to them. Experienced Tour Managers are always on-hand, meeting guests on arrival at the airport and being available throughout each journey. Solo travellers always receive a warm welcome. Single rooms are available at no

extra cost on many of our itineraries and, because more than a fifth of our customers are solo travellers, we offer a wide range of exclusive solo departures. Join small groups for big adventures in groups of no more than 14 on selected departures. We offer fantastic value for money and included extras – guests on all worldwide tours and selected European tours get a VIP door-to-door travel service. Our all-inclusive tours offer even more, from included excursions to drinks packages. Whatever you choose, we guarantee satisfaction: 98% of our customers rate their holiday as ‘excellent’ or ‘good’.

Patagonia: A Tour to the Ends of The Earth Using Buenos Aires as your launch pad, explore the gateway to Tierra del Fuego, El Calafate and the majestic panoramas of Torres Del Paine and the Perito Moreno glacier.


Inclusions: • Optional travel insurance underwritten by Great Lakes Insurance SE, UK Branch, and additional cancellation rights, unless you have your own, in which case a reduction is available • VIP door-to-door travel service on all Worldwide holidays and selected European tours • A Saga Tour Manager or Cruise Escort • All tour travel in air-conditioned transport (where applicable) • Visits to many of the must-see sights • Cruise ship facilities and hotel accommodation as described • Return economy flights, coach or rail travel, as specified on the holiday pages • All airport taxes, fees and charges plus allowance for one piece of hold baggage per person (even on no-frills airlines) • Named hotel accommodation and meals • Porterage at your accommodation • Return transfer between your overseas airport and your accommodation • A visa, on selected holidays, as required for all British Citizens resident in the UK • Port taxes

Gorillas of Uganda Enjoy a nine-night tour of Uganda, including gorilla trekking and chimpanzee tracking. Hike in the Rwenzori Mountains, cruise the Kazinga Channel and explore Mburo National Park.

Uzbekistan: Heart of the Silk Route Embark on an eastern adventure to the exotic cities of Uzbekistan, a historic crossroads on the Great Silk Route’s path across Central Asia. Travel across a rugged landscape little changed since the days of Genghis Khan and Alexander the Great.

The Golden Triangle and Tiger Trail Discover India’s famed Golden Triangle – Delhi, regal Jaipur and romantic Agra – and keep an eye out for the elusive tiger on safari in Ranthambore National Park.

A World in One Country So diverse is South Africa that it is almost a world in one country! Discover the incredible wildlife of Kruger National Park, the scenic Garden and Wine Routes, and the beauty of the magnificent Cape Coast.


Feature Trends

Holiday Habits Solo holidays, cash consciousness and younger cruise passengers were among some of the key talking points in ABTA’s Holiday Habits Report 2018

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he Holiday Habits Report, which looks at the changing trends of British holidaymakers, says the number of holidays being taken has remained stable. Overall, 86 per cent of respondents took a holiday either at home or abroad in the 12 months to August 2018. The number of holidays taken has fallen from 3.8 to 3.4 per person – the same as in 2016, but down on last year. This decrease is being driven by two main factors: people taking fewer UK breaks, and people taking fewer shorter breaks, at home and abroad or both. The number of short UK breaks fell from 1.3 per person to 1.1 per person, with people

26 November 2018

instead choosing to take longer foreign holidays. The average person took 1.0 foreign holidays of seven nights or longer, an increase from 0.9 in 2017 and 0.7 in 2016. However, the pound’s performance against the euro meant that holidaymakers were more acutely aware of the price of their holiday. Value for money was a priority for 60 per cent of people booking a package holiday. “Despite pressures on household incomes, Britons are clearly wedded to their holidays, with travel a spending priority. Holidaymakers are becoming increasingly cost-conscious, seeking value for money and budgeting more wisely in their

holiday choices,” Mark Tanzer, ABTA chief executive, said. “We’re at a unique juncture in the UK’s history as the nation counts down to leaving the EU, so naturally more people’s thoughts turn to what Brexit means for travel. People understandably have questions and concerns about what impact Brexit may have on the cost of travel, but it is very encouraging that Europe tops the bill as the place they wish to visit next year, and holiday bookings more widely are looking positive for the year ahead.” The Holiday Habits Report also found that the number of people choosing to travel solo

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had increased by threefold since 2011. Now, almost one in six people, 15 per cent, choose to travel on their own, compared to 12 per cent in 2017 and 6 per cent in 2011. The main reason behind the increase in solo travel is that it gave individuals the opportunity to do what they want while on holiday, with 76 per cent citing it as the main reason to go away, up 3 per cent on 2017. According to ABTA’s findings, the rise of technology – including smartphones with GPS capability – has meant travelling alone is a lot less daunting than it was in the past. This has not meant that those travelling on their own stick to well-known routes, however. Solo travellers are twice as likely to holiday in Antarctica than those travelling with friends or family. “There has been significant growth in the number of people travelling by themselves over the last few years, with the majority choosing to holiday solo so that they can do what they want,” Tanzer added. “Going on holiday by yourself means you don’t have to compromise on your choice of destination, your itinerary or the activities you take part in. Whether they’re single or just want some

‘me time’, people now have an incredible choice of holidays and destinations to choose from and it has become so much easier to explore the world. Travel companies have responded to demand by offering a diverse range of options for people booking by themselves.” The most popular types of holiday taken were a city break (48 per cent), followed by a beach holiday (40 per cent). Countryside break (21 per cent), sightseeing trip (15 per cent) and an all-inclusive holiday (15 per cent) followed. The cruise market is another sector that threw up some surprising results. According to ABTA’s data, 12 per cent of 18-34 year-olds are looking to take a cruise in the next 12 months, compared to 11 per cent of 18-24 year olds in 2017. Interestingly, the number of young people who are open to the idea of taking a cruise has increased by 3 per cent to 53 per cent. Of the overall market, 58 per cent of people are interested in taking a cruise. “The cruise industry is adapting to the changing demographics and demands of holidaymakers,” said Victoria Bacon, ABTA

director of brand and business development. “Young people are showing a significant interest in cruise holidays and companies are investing in tech upgrades to appeal to this next generation of holidaymakers, with many capitalising on new technology and fast wi-fi across their fleets. “On-board preferences are changing too, with the quality of food and drink now the number one priority, and many companies are reflecting this by offering menus curated by Michelin-star chefs and wider ranges of cuisine to cater to evolving tastes.” When it came to looking ahead, ABTA said that holidays would remain a spending priority despite the political uncertainty that would come after Brexit. More than half, 51 per cent, said that they would spend the same on their holiday. However, fewer people are planning on spending more next year than they did this year – 25 per cent compared to 31 per cent in 2017. The overall picture suggests people are being more cost conscious in the face of uncertainty, but they are clearly still very committed to taking holidays, both at home and abroad. ABTAmag.com

**or a home swap, homestay, couch-surfing *or sporting holiday (walking, cycling, sailing, trekking)

ABTAmag.com

November 2018 27


Promotion

A nation reborn

UPVISION

100 years on since the Czech lands were first united into one nation, it’s the perfect time to savour the country’s captivating history and bustling present 100 YEARS ON

In 1918, as the First World War finally ground to a halt, the Czech nation was born. Founded by Tomáš Masaryk, the so-called “President Liberator”, Czechoslovakia ushered in remarkable new era of political, architectural and cultural achievement. In the country’s beautiful capital, the imposing Prague Castle was reimagined in striking fashion by Jože Plečnik, the Slovenian architect; at the same time, Alphonse Mucha, a pioneer of the Czech art nouveau movement, produced his masterpieces; and composer Leoš Janáček took his operas to the world stage. Industry followed suit, with the emergence of Czech brands such as Skoda and Pilsner Urquell, the first golden lager, named after Plzeň, the city where it was first brewed. Bohemian Crystal, famous since the Renaissance, continued to signify, as it does today, artisanship, beauty and quality. Although the Velvet Divorce of 1993 saw the country split and the Czech Republic emerge as its own nation, the successes of

28 November 2018

Czechoslovakia’s early years can still be enjoyed in this centenary year. Now is the perfect time to visit.

MODERN WORLD

From 1918, many cities in the new republic, such as Brno, Hradec Králové and Zlín, saw their architecture transformed as Czech modernism swept all before it. Brno embraced functionalism, an austere style which gave the country’s second largest city a reputation as one of Europe’s most progressive metropolises. Direct flights connect London to the city where striking examples of this architecture survive: you can visit the magnificent Villa Tugendhat, completed in 1930 by Mies van der Rohe and now a Unesco World Heritage Site. The city also boasts incredible bars and a burgeoning restaurant scene. In Hradec Králové, 30 minutes from Pardubice (served by direct flights from London Stansted), you will find the incredible buildings of Jan Kotěra, a leading light in Czech modernism.

CAFÉ CULTURE

With 13 non-stop flights a day from London (and six more divided between Manchester, Bristol, Edinburgh and Birmingham), Prague, with its Gothic architecture, bustling bars and arts scene, is just two hours from the UK. In the Czech capital you can visit the cafés played host to an underground anti-communist movement. It was around these tables that dissident poets, philosophers and musicians, including the country’s future president, Václav Havel, met to coordinate their opposition to the regime which finally toppled in 1989. Some of the best cafés are the remarkable Parisian-style Café Louvre, visited by the likes of Franz Kafka and Albert Einstein; Café Imperial, with its stunning art deco interior; and the Municipal House Café, designed in the art nouveau style. See czechtourism.com

Czech Tourism will be at the World Travel Market, stall EU1620 ABTAmag.com


Prague: The perfect winter getaway! The enchanting scenery, romantic atmosphere and the world’s best Christmas market in the heart of Europe. Come and enjoy the true winter holiday spirit. Visit the Prague City Tourism stall (NH6 – EU1620) at World Travel Market London and find out more. Or get inspired at Prague.eu


Industry insights currency

Industry insights

The falling pound Gary Noakes sees how sterling holds up against non-euro currencies, and how this might dictate post-Brexit travel

30 November 2018

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ive months before Brexit, a question consumers and travel organisers are keen to have answered is how currency rates will be affected – and how this will influence holiday spending. No one needs reminding that following the Brexit referendum in June 2016, the pound’s value fell from €1.3 to €1.16 in a fortnight and, in terms of consumer exchange rates, has stayed below €1.2 ever since. Sterling has also fallen against the dollar – with which aviation fuel is bought. Although this September’s $1.32 level seems not far below the pre-referendum $1.47, memories of a pound buying $1.75 a decade ago are just that. This is in tandem with a rise in oil prices; crude oil now trades at about $69 a barrel, compared with $50 a year ago, meaning aviation fuel is more expensive. Hedging smooths currency and oil price spikes, but on the face of it, it’s not looking good. The long-term picture, however, may give some hope, as Post Office Travel Money’s Andrew Brown explains: “If you were to do a graph over the last 10 years, the euro would range from around €1.4 to a low of around €1.02. The average would not be much different from where it is today, around €1.2, and the travel market has grown steadily since the economic crisis of 2008/9.” ONS figures confirm this; last year, a record 72.8 million Britons went abroad, two million more than in 2016. Figures now surpass the previous peak of 12 years ago (69.5 million of us travelled abroad in 2006) and have a long way to fall

ABTAmag.com

before they hit 2010’s trough of 55 million visits – Brexit’s effects will have to be very corrosive before that figure is seen again. Similarly, look at the long-term oil price trend and you find a spread between $140 in 2008 and $35 in 2016, with $100-plus rates for several years in-between, so perhaps we should not be too alarmed, although Brown concedes that the 10-year spread on the dollar is much wider than the euro’s. “That has an impact,” he says.

In the post-Brexit era, there will still be many countries where the pound is strong In short-haul, operators have been switching to non-euro destinations – witness Tui UK’s move into Croatia’s islands of Krk and Rab next summer. Croatia saw a 26 per cent jump in UK arrivals last year and Tui is following canny consumers away from the western Mediterranean. As well as the destination switch, Brown points to another change in the past decade: that of flexible durations, which help consumers manage costs in times of unfavourable exchange rates. “Go back 10 years and it was seven or 14-night holidays. Now, we’ve seen some shrinkage as people who can’t afford a fortnight go for 10 nights,” he says. Whatever the pound’s woes, somewhere is always worse off than us and, currently,

that country is Turkey. August saw the imposition of US sanctions on Turkish metal exports, a punch to Turkey’s already weak economy that prompted the lira to crash. In September 2017, a pound bought around 4.8 lira; a year later, sterling was worth 8 lira and back came the bargainloving Brits. Figures from market research company GfK show UK bookings to Turkey are up 80 per cent year on year. The switch is also apparent in longhaul, with hotspots such as South Africa trending. In-country costs have fallen in 14 of 34 long-haul destinations surveyed by the Post Office, with Brazil’s down 33 per cent since last year and Cape Town’s down 20 per cent in a year, both due to their respective currency’s weakness. Sterling might not buy as many euros as it once did, but in some places, it still ensures a luxury break at bargain rates. In the post-Brexit era, there will be many countries where the pound is still powerful. The burgeoning number of flight options means much greater flexibility and cheap long-haul destinations are within easier reach. But perhaps none of this really matters. A survey of 500 consumers by payment advice service DCC Forum found 70 per cent could not identify the correct dollar exchange rate, and 41 per cent that of the euro. Ignorance is bliss, and the number of Brits travelling abroad seems set to increase. The recent Holiday Habits Report revealed says that 60 per cent of the population took a foreign holiday in the past 12 months – the highest figure since 2011. ABTAmag.com

November 2018 31


The UK Our round-up of some of the noteworthy conference events at WTM London this year, starting with the UK Data for Destination Marketing How should a destination seek to capture the attention of a traveller when competing against so many other enticing holiday choices? The solution lies in the insights available through data, and leveraging them to take the most effective marketing actions in each distribution channel. Here, you’ll learn how to filter out the noise and focus on the most important data points to ensure your marketing campaign’s success. Monday 11.00-12.00, UKI & International Inspiration Zone – TA190 Travel Advice Essentials From ABTA and the FCO This aim of this session is to explore FCO travel advice and raise awareness of the different elements within its country advice. As well as the importance of informing customers about advice before and after they make bookings, this will examine what to consider if the advice changes for customers who have booked and for those already at the resort. You will also get an insight into ABTA’s role in working with the FCO. Wednesday 10.30-11.30, UKI & International Inspiration Zone – TA190

ABTAmag.com

Wales Reimagined: Transforming Industrial Landscapes Through Tourism Innovation Wales’s stunning natural environment has long made it a visitor attraction – but its post-industrial landscapes are also attracting attention internationally thanks to world-leading adventure and cultural attractions. Join representatives from Visit Wales, Zip World, BikePark Wales, Surf Snowdonia and National Museum Wales to find out how innovative adventure and culture experiences are helping to transform and future-proof Wales’s visitor economy. Tuesday 10.30-11.30, UKI & International Inspiration Zone – TA190 How Podcasting Can Strengthen Your Brand In this session, you will hear about the rise of podcasting, what they can achieve for your brand, how to make your own podcast, what makes a good travel and hospitality podcast, and how to market and monetise your own recording. Tuesday 13.30-14.30, UKI & International Inspiration Zone – TA190

PR Campaigns With Impact – Lessons From Leading Marketeers Chaired by Frank Marr, this panel will discuss how travel PRs and marketers can learn from other sectors, new tactics and how to create impactful campaigns. The panel includes Conrad Bird, GREAT Britain Campaign director behind one of the UK’s biggest and most effective global marketing campaigns of all time. Wednesday 12.45-13.45, UKI & International Inspiration Zone – TA190 Food Tourism & ABTA’s Make Holidays Greener The volume of food and beveragepackaging waste that is created by consumers, including travellers, is shocking and surprising. ABTA has put together one of the world’s best programmes to help drive awareness of the issue and help improve the situation. In this TV talkshowstyle interview, World Food Travel Association’s executive director, Erik Wolf, will interview ABTA’s senior destinations & sustainability manager, Clare Jenkinson, about ABTA’s programme. Wednesday 14.00-14.30, UKI & International Inspiration Zone – TA190

November 2018 33


UK London dining

Capital ideas The London restaurant scene isn’t short on world-beating places to dine out. Anthony Pearce shares some of his current favourites

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few eyebrows were raised when, in a recent feature on London’s increasingly impressive dining scene, The New York Times wrote that just 10 years ago, you could only get the likes of boiled mutton and porridge at restaurants in the British capital. Bizarre assertions aside, the piece, which celebrates what it calls the city’s “recent flowering as a culinary destination”, is one of many that points out what Londoners have known for a while: it’s fantastic city to dine out in. In fact, the food revolution began longer ago than the broadsheet would have you believe, with the openings of The River Café and St John, the birth of the celebrity chef, the regeneration of areas such as London Bridge and Shoreditch, and the move towards organic eating. What’s great about London’s food scene now is its diversity. The city may have 71 Michelin stars, including four restaurants with three stars, but the fine-dining scene only tells a tiny bit of the story. In London, you can enjoy almost any cuisine – including contemporary, inventive British food – that’s as good as you’ll get anywhere. Here are six of our favourites to try.

THE CLASSIC

St John, Smithfield A former smokehouse found around the corner from Smithfield Market, this ‘nose-

34 November 2018

to-tail’ eatery opened in 1994. Its eccentric head chef Fergus Henderson almost singlehandedly pioneered the resurgence in offalbased dishes. Expect the likes of crispy pig cheek and dandelion, or grilled lamb hearts with chard and aioli, served in a relaxed atmosphere. Anthony Bourdain called it “the restaurant of my dreams”.

THE NEW OPENING

Rovi, Fitzrovia Through his Guardian recipes and six cafés and restaurants in London, Israeli-British food writer and chef Yotam Ottolenhghi has had a profound effect on the capital’s eating habits. Although firmly rooted in Middle Eastern cooking, his new, seventh venture, Rovi, is unlike anything he’s done before. The 85-seat restaurant serves a veg-heavy menu with a focus on fermentation and cooking over fire, and may be his best yet.

THE HIPSTER FAVOURITE

Bao, Soho A street food-to-restaurant mainstay success story, Bao in Soho ticks all the boxes: it’s centrally located, innovative, delicious and affordable. The menu is built around the Taiwanese delicacy bao ( fluffy, white steamed buns), which cost just £3.75. Choose from the likes of braised pork with peanut powder, or soy-milkmarinated chicken, sichuan mayo and kimchi, and a host of equally delicious sides, accompanied by green tea. There’s

no reservations and the space is tiny, so expect long queues.

THE SHOWSTOPPER

Social Eating House, Soho Michelin-starred chef Jason Atherton is behind no less than seven restaurants in London, not to mention ventures in New York, Dubai and elsewhere, but Social Eating House may well be his best. More informal and relaxed than the likes of the grand Berner’s Tavern, this Soho eatery serves ‘bistro-style’ dishes in a low-lit setting. The food is traditionally British, and the ingredients are locally sourced (menus tell you how far they have travelled), but fans of Atherton will know these dishes are created in his own innovative, sophisticated, often theatrical style, delivered by chef patron Paul Hood. Food this inventive doesn’t come cheap.

THE HOMELY SPOT

Honey & Co, Fitzrovia This husband-and-wife run café and restaurant, which serves hearty Middle Eastern cuisine, has been a favourite of Londoners since it opened in 2012. Founders Itamar Srulovich and Sarit Packer have since launched a couple of cookbooks, a shop and second restaurant, but this tiny original site, where diners sit elbow-to-elbow, remains a treat. The food, unfussy and generous in portion, matches the relaxed and homely atmosphere. ABTAmag.com

ABTAmag.com


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UK Theatre

Show time From a boyband musical to classic drama, there’s much to see onstage in the new year. Here, we pick the nation’s best new productions LONDON

All About Eve Noel Coward Theatre 2 February-11 May Tony Award-winning Ivo van Hove will direct a new adaptation of All About Eve, the film by Joseph L Mankiewicz, which won six Academy Awards in 1950. Starring Gillian Anderson (The Fall) and Lily James (Baby Driver), All About Eve is about Margo Channing, a huge name on Broadway (originally played by Bette Davis), who is worried her career is fading as she approaches her 40s. Eve Harrington, a young fan, is hired as Margo’s assistant and slowly begins to manipulate her life.

MANCHESTER

The Band Lyric Theatre, The Lowry 16-27 January Featuring the music of Take That, The Band, written by Olivier Award-winning writer Tim Firth, is playing in Manchester ahead of moving to London’s West End. The play is set in 1993 and focuses on five 16-year-old girls for whom the band is everything. The once inseparable group of friends reunite after 25 years apart and try again to fulfil their dream of meeting the boyband. Expect Never Forget, Back for Good, A Million Love Songs, Relight My Fire and more.

36 November 2018

LONDON

Aspects of Love Southwark Playhouse 7 January-9 February Following an acclaimed season at Manchester’s Hope Mill Theatre, Aspects Of Love is to transfer to London’s Southwark Playhouse in January. Directed by Jonathan O’Boyle (Hair), the reimagined production will star most of the original cast, including Kelly Price as Rose Vibert. With music by Andrew Lloyd Webber, the play, set in France in 1947, and based on the novel by David Garnett, features the iconic song Love Changes Everything among others.

LONDON

Waitress Adelphi Theatre 8 March The hit Broadway musical Waitress will transfer to London’s Adelphi Theatre in spring 2019, with previews available in February. The show features an original score by acclaimed singer-songwriter Sara Bareilles, best known for the 2007 hit single Love Song. The musical is based on the film of the same name, about a waitress, Jenna, in an abusive relationship with her husband, Earl. When she unexpectedly becomes pregnant, she begins an illicit affair…

UK TOUR

Hair Beginning at New Wimbledon Theatre, London From 5 March After acclaimed seasons in London and Manchester, Hair will tour the country to celebrate the show’s 50th anniversary. Winner of a 2018 WhatsOnStage Award, this legendary rock musical is written by Gerome Ragni (book and lyrics), James Rado (book and lyrics) and Galt MacDermot (music), and takes viewers back to the Summer of Love in 1967 with Hair’s hippies in the East Village of New York City.

UK TOUR

Little Miss Sunshine Beginning at Arcola Theatre, London From 21 March Based on the Academy Award-winning 2006 film Little Miss Sunshine, this musical is heading from Broadway to the UK in 2019. Created by James Lapine (Into the Woods) and William Finn (Falsettos), the offbeat comedy follows the Hoover family as they travel to California to help their daughter Olive compete in a beauty contest. It will run for seven weeks in London before heading on a UK tour from the New Wolsey, Ipswich on 20 May, visiting Salford, York, Brighton. Bradford, Glasgow, Birmingham and more.

ABTAmag.com


FALKLAND ISLANDS

Visit the Falkland Islands Imagine a place that is so far off the beaten track you have miles of stunning landscape, beaches and magnificent bird life all to yourself. Imagine a silence that is only broken by the call of the birds, and your own footsteps as you explore these beautiful islands in the South Atlantic Ocean. This is the Falkland Islands, one of the last great wilderness destinations where your trip becomes an adventure. Four wheel drives are our mode of transport, and our little planes will take you to islands abundant with penguins, albatrosses and petrels that are there for you alone to discover and enjoy. At the end of each day you can look forward to traditional cosy Falkland Islands hospitality in the hotels, lodges and guesthouses scattered around the islands.

Escape on a holiday like no other.

@FITB Tourism ilovethefalklands info@falklandislands.com +500 22215 falklandislands.com


Promotion

Sleigh ride

Germany’s largest theme park opens its doors for the 18th time this winter – providing thrills, Christmas markets and plenty of festive cheer

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his Christmas, Germany’s largest theme park will once again welcome visitors to a winter wonderland that combines festive cheer and white-knuckle thrills. From November 24, Europa-Park opens its doors to the public, who will be able to enjoy the park’s 3,000 snow-covered Christmas trees, 10,000 Christmas tree baubles, the colourful Bellevue Ferris wheel and atmospheric Christmas markets. Even in winter, thrilling rides – such as the Eurosat - CanCan Coaster and Eurosat Coastiality – remain open. Exciting adventures await the whole family in 15 European themed areas. Here’s what you can expect.

SPECTACULAR SHOWS

With 400 international artists performing at Europa-Park, guests are never far away from something spectacular. This year, guests can visit the colourful world at the Greek themed area with the Circus Revue. In the heated tent, artists, clowns and elegant ballet dances will amaze visitors, while kids can

38 November 2018

enjoy the children’s musical The Great Gift. There’s also the thrilling ice show Surpr’Ice and the Son of Santa Claus providing fun for all the family. The French themed area boasts impressive new multimedia shows on the Eurosat - CanCan Coaster every 30 minutes starting at 5pm. Plus, there’s the spectacular Winter Starlight Parade with a stop at the 18-metre-high Christmas tree on the Luxemburger Square at 5pm each day.

RIZZI’S WINTERWORLD

Once again, Europa-Park will present the legendary works of James Rizzi, considered one of the most influential artists in US post-war history, during its winter opening. In the new Treasury in the German Alley, visitors can discover more than 60 pictures and numerous wooden toys of the American Pop Art artist – including many unique items that have never been seen in public.

CHRISTMAS MARKETS

Visitors to Europa-Park will adore the OldFashioned Christmas Market surrounding

the Bavarian Beer Garden. Here, they can indulge in delicacies; sausage and cheese specialities, fine chocolates, and spirits, and in the Backhaus, Dresdener hand bread – fresh from the oven. Guests can also enjoy Eiszauber mulled wine and fruit punch, plus stews and grilled specialities in the many bistros, cafés, snack bars and restaurants throughout the park. The Spices - Cuisines of the World restaurant will be open for the first time during the winter.

COSY HOTELS

After a unique day of fun, guests can relax at one of five park-owned adventure hotels, festively decorated for the season. Guests can relax and unwind in the generous wellness and spa areas. What’s more, the park even houses the two Michelin star Ammolite - The Lighthouse Restaurant. Europa-Park is open 24 November to 6 January (excl 24 and 25 December) and on 12 and 13 January 2019. See europapark.com

ABTAmag.com


Europe Find out more about the European market with six conference events with not missed at WTM London this year Coping With Success in Major Cities Barcelona has led the way in addressing the challenges of overtourism as other cities begin to address the problem of success. In order to tease out the available strategies for coping with success, as well as managing greater numbers of domestic and international visitors, Martin Brackenbury will interview senior destination managers from key cities, looking at what management strategies are available, what works and what doesn’t. Monday 12.30-13.30, WTM Global Stage Unforgettable Journeys: the Science of Creating Memorable Branded Travel Content Join BBC head of insight, Dr Hamish McPharlin, as he reveals some surprising facts on how emotion and memory work together to help you ensure that your travel brand is remembered and engaged with. Tuesday 12.00-12.45, Europe Inspiration Zone – EU80

ABTAmag.com

Keeping Ahead of Megatrends Shaping Travel Euromonitor International’s Travel team presents its pick of the megatrends that will impact upon the travel industry in years to come. From always-on consumers to new ways of shopping and a greater focus on experiences, Euromonitor’s megatrends research will provide insight into the future of the travel industry. Tuesday 13.30-14.30, Press Conference Theatre – International Media Centre – ME580 Destination Challenge 2018 – Pitches WTM London and the Digital Tourism Think Tank (DTTT) are working with I Amsterdam and Paris Tourism to bring the brightest minds of industry visionaries together to help solve one of the biggest issues in tourism. The question at hand: how can we overcome the challenge of overcrowding in tourism hotspots and spread the value of tourism wider? Wednesday 15.00-16.30, Europe Inspiration Zone – EU80

Meet Johan Lundgren, the CEO of easyJet, and Hear About the Future of easyJet, and Aviation Markets In an exclusive one-to-one, we sit down with the new easyJet boss. Bringing vast experience from a long career at TUI, we’ll explore his plans for one of Europe’s leading low-cost airlines. There’s been plenty of challenges on his agenda of late, with a summer of ATC and strike disruption, plus Brexit potentially looming around the corner. Don’t miss this session. Monday 16.00-17.00, Europe Inspiration Zone – EU80 What Can We Learn From Barcelona? Executives and politicians from Barcelona lead a session where they will share with participants the ways in which they have attempted to tackle the challenges of overtourism in a city that resolutely avoided making scapegoats of tourists. Tuesday 12.30-13.40, Platinum Suite 4

November 2018 39


Europe Emilia-Romagna

Eat, stay, love Barbara Noe Kennedy savours the flavours of Emilia-Romagna, Italy’s best-kept secret

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f Emilia-Romagna weren’t just one of many remarkable regions in Italy, each more stunning than the next for its art, Roman ruins, culinary traditions, surprising wines and cypress-dotted landscapes, this enchanting realm just north of Tuscany would be better known. But it’s not, making it that much more endearing for its under-the-radar villages, ancient castles, Apennine-shadowed landscape and, most of all, its contributions to the Italian gastronomic repertoire. Emilia-Romagna is the birthplace, after all, of tortellini, lasagna, prosciutto di Palma, balsamic vinegar and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. Oh, and a popular little dish called spaghetti bolognese (known as tagliatelle

40 November 2018

ragù here). Throw in a vineyard or three, and you’ll have forgotten all about the Italian darlings that top everyone’s list (yes, we’re talking about you, Tuscany). Terracotta-hued Bologna, the region’s capital, is a panoply of medieval towers and Renaissance palaces. Europe’s oldest university, the University of Bologna, began here in 1088, counting Dante, Petrarch and Copernicus among its illustrious alumni. Its students today give the city a young, energetic vibe. Among the capital’s coveted stash of sights are Pinacoteca Nazionale di Bologna, with works by Raphael and Tintoretto; the Basilica di Santo Stefano, comprising seven interlocking churches built over a thousand years; and Museo

ABTAmag.com


della Storia di Bologna, spanning the city’s 2,500-year history. But, above all, Bologna is a gourmand’s paradise, with a fantastic array of the “best restaurants you’ve never heard of”, not to mention Mercato delle Erbe, a buzzing citycentre marketplace dating back to 1919. There’s also Fico Eataly World, a food park extravaganza that opened in November 2017 on the outskirts of the city. Be sure to come hungry. From here, a string of alluring towns – each former Roman strongholds and each offering its own take on cuisine, history and culture – dot a portion of the ancient Roman road Via Emilia (SS9 on modern maps), heading northwest along the Po Valley. There’s Modena, the incomparable birthplace of balsamic vinegar and home to the brilliant Osteria Francescana (perhaps Emilia-Romagna’s only restaurant that everyone’s heard of). You also need to taste the regional Lambrusco wines, which admittedly haven’t received the best accolades outside of Italy. Judge for yourself at Medici Ermete

ABTAmag.com

and Albinea Canali wineries, both near the stylish town of Reggio Emilia. Elegant Parma, further northwest, is beloved for its chi-chi designer shops and its venerated theatre (Verdi was a native son of Parma province, if that gives any hint to the calibre). Don’t miss Correggio’s Assumption of the Virgin at the Duomo, considered one of the High Renaissance’s greatest paintings. Near Piacenza, Luretta winery offers tantalising vintages of organic wines that have been aged in a 1,000-year-old castle. As you reach the region’s westernmost edge, you will have enjoyed an allencompassing Emilia-Romagna experience, guaranteed. That said, the region offers so much more: revitalising spas, Byzantine mosaics, the world’s most deified sports cars, and white-sand beaches overlooking the dazzling Adriatic, to name a few. Here’s a bit of advice: hire a car – or bike – and ramble down Emilia-Romagna’s cypressshaded lanes, taking in the rosemarysage-scented countryside. As the EmiliaRomagnian sun shines, the larks sing,

and another Lambrusco-graced meal awaits in the next terracotta hamlet, you know you have discovered an intimate, uncrowded (and less expensive) side of Italy. Where are all the visitors, you ask? They’re exploring Italy’s so-called darlings, leaving EmiliaRomagna all to you. For now, anyway, until the word gets out.

WHERE TO STAY

The luxe Art Hotel Commercianti, in the heart of Bologna’s medieval centre, was originally born as a tower house in the early 11th century. Emilia-Romagna has many medieval castles that have since been converted to hotels with first-class spas and gourmet restaurants. Two of the best are Castello di Tabiano near Parma and Hotel Torre di San Martino near Piacenza.

HOW TO GET THERE

The flight from London to Bologna’s Guglielmo Marconi di Bologna Airport takes less than two hours; British Airways and Ryanair both offer direct flights. ABTAmag.com

November 2018 41


Europe France

Inland adventures With river cruises rising in popularity, Anthony Pearce joins Uniworld on the Rhône

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nder the baking summer sun on the SS Catherine’s top deck, a glass of wine in hand, we set sail from Lyon on a journey south to Provence, where vineyards, Roman ruins and Mediterranean cuisine awaits. It’s easy, almost immediately, to understand the appeal of river cruising, a market that has grown hugely in the UK in recent years. Since 2012, the numbers have risen from 130,000 total guests to 210,000 in 2017, with European itineraries now representing almost 90 per cent of all cruises. But while the Rhine and the Danube remain the Big Two when it comes to continental offerings (making up nearly 60 per cent), the Rhône in France, the next largest share, offers perhaps the most quintessential river cruising experience. Opening up cultural-powerhouse cities, quaint villages, bucolic charms and superb food and wine, these cruises, which begin in Lyon and end in Avignon (but also take in the Saône, Burgundy and Arles), provide an incredible way to see France in

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a luxurious and relaxing way, with the option of more active travel should you want it. With a locally inspired menu and wine list, a French cruise director and a ridiculously ornate interior, Uniworld’s SS Catherine is designed for well-heeled guests who don’t want to just see France, but truly experience it. With an oftendeserted on-board pool, a spacious stateroom with an adjustable Juliette balcony, and the decadent Leopard Bar, the ship is truly a luxurious proposition. One of the beauties of river cruising is how centrally ships dock in towns and cities. Unlike their larger ocean counterparts, which can often be upwards of an hour from the main attraction (see Civitavecchia for Rome), the river-cruise port is usually just a short stroll from each city’s centre. In Lyon, we dock next to the Lumière University Lyon 2, a 10-minute walk from the Place Bellecour, the city’s huge, tree-lined public square, home to flower stalls and small art museums, and

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from which the 15th century Cathédrale Saint-Jean-Baptiste is visible. In the city, we go in search of its famed secret passages, known as Traboules, originally created in the fourth century for the city’s many silk weavers hoping to avoid rain showers, but later used by the resistance during Nazi occupation. Uniworld, which includes all but the most extravagant shore excursions, offers a tour of these hard-to-spot passages, with behindlocked-door access to many that are hidden away in buildings. Signs with a blue lion or gold flower on the wall mark each passage. Lyon is regarded as the birthplace of French cuisine, and no visit to the city would be complete without properly sampling its food. Bouchon – wood-panelled, rustic taverns particular to Lyon – serve hearty, honest and often superb food: we opted for La Tete de Lard (13 Rue Désirée), just north of the Museum of Fine Arts, where my poor

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French meant I inadvertently ordered lamb brain (surprisingly delicious). That evening, before leaving Lyon on its way to Burgundy, the ship docked at La Confluence, near the meeting point of the Rhône and Saône, the fast-changing industrial area of the city, home to new nightclubs, venues and restaurants housed in former warehouses. Here, we’re able to take in the Musée des Confluences, a science centre and anthropology museum built in a jaw-dropping deconstructivist style. In Beaune, a walled town in the centre of France’s Burgundy winemaking region, we wander cobblestone streets and take in the Hospices of Beaune, a former charitable almshouse founded in 1443, before taking a tour of the surrounding countryside, which is almost exclusively made up of vineyards. The Route des Grands Crus, a 60km route that runs along the foot of the Côte d’Or escarpment, from Dijon in the north to Santenay in the south, is a Unesco World Heritage Site. Following a return to Lyon, the ship heads south down the Rhône, taking in Tournon (Tain-l’Hermitage), Viviers, Avignon and Arles. As we arrive in Viviers, the heavens open, bringing to an end a two-month summer dry spell, and the town quickly floods. Fortunately, there’s a longenough pause in the rainfall to stop for an éclair, wander the cobblestone paths and head to its highest point to admire the view – terracotta rooftops pan out towards the Rhône as mountains tower in the distance. The following day sees a morning spent exploring the walled city of Avignon, including the magnificent Palais des Papes and the half-collapsed Pont Saint-Bénézet. Later, we head out on an excursion: a kayaking trip down the Gardon river. It’s a unique experience that takes us under the Pont du Gard, an elevated Roman aqueduct. Our journey concludes in Tarascon the next day, where we join a coach to Arles, known for its remarkable Roman ruins. The city, which houses an ancient amphitheatre, is perhaps best known for the influence it had on Vincent van Gogh, who painted hundreds of works there (including Sunflowers and The Yellow House) in just a short amount of time. ABTAmag.com

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Americas WTM

The Americas Our pick of the events covering North and South America and the Caribbean at this year’s WTM London conference How America Travels: Learn Where and Why Americans Are Travelling and Capture Your Share of the Demand Eager to grow your business to American consumers? Join Zane Kerby, president and CEO of the American Society of Travel Advisors (ASTA), to learn how to connect with and sell to US-based travel advisors. Move beyond the geographical distance, break through the cultural differences and build bridges to better serve US travellers. Monday 11.00-11.44, Americas Inspiration Zone – LA360

How Caribbean Islands Can Work With Influencers, a Case Study With Antigua Barbuda Join the Antigua and Barbuda Tourism Authority, Brighter Group and Traverse as they look back at the successful Love Antigua Barbuda ‘influencer’ conference, which took place in May. You’ll hear more about how the Caribbean islands can best connect with digital influencers and content creators. Monday 15.00-16.00, Americas Inspiration Zone – LA360

USA and the LGBT Tourism Market: Where Next? Using the latest USA LGBT2030 research data – an expanded presentation of the latest LGBT2030 data from Out Now – this results-focused event shines a light on individual traveller feedback as well as big-picture data to let you know what’s happening in this market. Wednesday 12.30-13.30, Americas Inspiration Zone, LA360

Indigenous Tourism With the growth in experiential tourism, there is a growing awareness of the scale of the contribution which well-managed tourism can make to local economic development. This event, moderated by WTM’s responsible tourism advisor, Harold Goodwin, looks at the increasing understanding of indigenous tourism. Wednesday 15.05-15.50, Americas Inspiration Zone, LA360

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Destination Crisis Management – Plan, Prepare and Protect Moderated by ABTA’s Victoria Bacon, a panel of destinations from the Americas will discuss how to prepare and manage a crisis – whether it is natural or manmade. You’ll learn about how they managed communications with the media throughout situations, and what was put in place so that it was business as usual. Monday 13.30-14.30, Americas Inspiration Zone – LA360 Accelerating Smart Sustainability For Destinations Destination representatives are invited to engage in a discussion about accelerating smart sustainability solutions, helping individual travellers and companies practise more sustainable behaviour on a large scale. This session illustrates how destinations can make headway towards a more sustainable future. Tuesday 15.30-16.00, Americas Inspiration Zone, LA360

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No need to gamble Jenny Southan gets good odds on the huge variety of eateries in Downtown Las Vegas

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November 2018 45


Americas Las Vegas

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he majority of people visiting Sin City stay on the Strip, and it’s easy to understand why – it’s where all the luxury hotels are, the flashy casinos and fancy restaurants. Love it or loathe it, you can eat incredibly well in Las Vegas – over the years it has seriously upped its game from the all-you-can-eat buffets of before. You can eat black cod miso at Nobu in Caesar’s Palace, Oscietra caviar at the MGM Grand’s Joel Robuchon and whole roasted branzino at David Chang’s Momofuku in the Cosmopolitan. Las Vegas is no longer just about slot machines, but haute cuisine. There is a limit, however, to the amount of fine-dining your stomach and wallet can manage in one trip. Fortunately, just a 20-minute drive away in Downtown Las Vegas, a host of trendy new dining places are emerging, putting this eclectic area of the city on the map. In fact, the area as a whole is being revitalised thanks to investment from local millionaire entrepreneur Tony Hsieh, founder of online

Q&A with Cathy Tull Chief marketing officer of the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority What are the must-see experiences/events/locations in Las Vegas?

One of the best things about Las Vegas is there is something for everyone. We have the best restaurants, entertainment, spas, pools, special events and outdoor adventures, just to name a few. Las Vegas is constantly evolving, so whether you’ve visited once or a dozen times, there’s something new to see or experience. In the past year, we’ve had three professional sports teams come to our city: Vegas Golden Knights ice hockey, Aces professional women’s basketball and the Las Vegas Lights FC. We are excited for the Raiders football team, who just had a game at Wembley Stadium, to relocate in just a couple of years. The atmosphere at these sporting events is electrifying. Downtown Las Vegas has an eclectic mix of restaurants, shops,

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artwork and museums and gives the visitor a real sense of the history of the destination. We have an amazing mix of artists with resident shows including Bruno Mars, Gwen Stefani, Lionel Richie and Lady Gaga, who begins her residency this winter. Las Vegas is also surrounded by natural beauty, so a hike in Red Rock Canyon or a helicopter flight to the Grand Canyon are must-do activities.

When is the best time to visit Las Vegas?

We are lucky that Las Vegas is a true year-round destination with unique special events and entertainment offerings that suit every taste. The best time of year to visit completely depends on your personal interests. A music lover would especially enjoy the Life is Beautiful Festival in the fall, Electric Daisy Carnival in

the spring, or any of the residency shows such as the Backstreet Boys, Cher or Rod Stewart. For the foodies out there, Vegas Uncork’d is a weekend full of food, wine and fun. A sports fan should check out the Ultimate Vegas Sports Weekend in early March where you can enjoy hockey, Nascar, rugby, UFC and bull riding all in one weekend. Las Vegas enjoys warm and mild temperatures most of the year, which is perfect for relaxing pool days and outdoor adventures.

Do you have a favourite Las Vegas hotel?

With nearly 150,000 rooms, Las Vegas has more inventory and variety than any other US destination, so there is something for everyone’s taste and style. I can tell you some unique aspects about a few hotels to help make the

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decision easier. The Bellagio is a true Las Vegas icon. The displays in the Conservatory and Botanical Gardens are so inspired, creators consult with many different artists to bring seasonal creations to life. The Flamingo Las Vegas just finished massive room renovations and even has a wildlife habitat complete with exotic birds and real flamingos. The Cromwell is a unique boutique hotel that offers one of the best views of the Strip from the pool. The Park MGM is also newly renovated and rebranded and the NoMad is a popular, chic brand that just opened this fall.

Do you have a favourite restaurant?

Las Vegas is a culinary mecca featuring the best restaurants from the finest chefs in the world, so I can always find something that I am craving! A great way to experience multiple eateries is by booking a Lip Smackin’ Foodie Tour, which arranges for guests to experience four or five different venues on one tour. The guides are fun and knowledgeable and their list of tours are expanding all the time to include restaurants in Strip hotels, including Aria and The Venetian, plus a Downtown Las Vegas tour that incorporates a great deal of history in the dine-around. Las Vegas has a stellar reputation

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shoe store Zappos, which has a campus nearby. There are still some unsavoury parts of Fremont Street, but if you know where to go you’ll discover eating and drinking worthy of the hippest parts of Brooklyn and Shoreditch. Head to Donut Bar (124 S 6th St) on your coffee break and take your pick from trays of fresh doughnuts. The most popular is the pocket-sized creme brulee, a crisp glaze on the outside with a smooth vanilla cream filling. The maple bourbon, Nutella, and strawberry split are also delicious. At lunchtime, pop into Evel Pie (508 Fremont St) for New York-style pizza slices in a bar inspired by famous American daredevil Evel Knievel; Goblin Sausage, Cheesy Rider and Veg’d Out are all up for grabs. When your meetings are over, Bin 702 (707 E Fremont) in the Container Park does charcuterie cheese boards and wine on tap. While the outrageous Heart Attack Grill (450 Fremont St) has been plying its trade for years, publicly weighing customers before beckoning them in for the world’s

tallest hamburger, the Kitchen at Atomic, just up the road at 927 Fremont St, is a rather more stylish joint. It’s actually one of the oldest bars in the city – back in the 1950s it used to let people sit on the roof to watch the atomic bomb tests going off in the desert. Opened last year, the restaurant now serves elevated New American fare (poached lobster mac and cheese bites anyone?). If you’re in search of Mexican flavours, La Comida (100 S 6th St) serves more brands of tequila than it has seats, and dishes up all manner of tacos, enchiladas and burritos, piling pico de gallo, jalapeño and creamy guacamole into moreish bundles. Meanwhile, Park on Fremont (506 Fremont St) has a picturesque garden out the back where you can order tender, smoked beef brisket sandwiches, and Carson Kitchen (124 S 6th St) goes out of its way to impress with gourmet small plates. The baked brie with bacon jam, wild mushroom and smoked mozzarella flatbread, and cocoa-espresso NY strip steak are standout. Eating out in these parts is no gamble. ABTAmag.com

for welcoming celebrity chefs, but the first to set up here was Wolfgang Puck. His signature restaurant Spago is still a popular hotspot. Other celebrity chefs with popular Las Vegas restaurants include Gordon Ramsey, Giada De Laurentiis, Masaharu Morimoto, Bobby Flay, Tom Colicchio, Joel Robuchon and Jose Andres, just to name a few.

would round out the night and the choices, as mentioned before, are endless.

Describe your perfect day in Las Vegas

How about I give you a perfect Las Vegas day for a visitor! Start your day with peace and relaxation with a one-hour morning session of yoga at the Dolphin Habitat at the Mirage, or a morning helicopter flight to the Grand Canyon. Next you can brunch at any number of fine restaurants including Primrose at Park MGM or the Bacchanal Buffet at Caesars Palace. Next you may want to get some sun at one of the many luxury pools, such as at the Waldorf Astoria, the trendy Cosmopolitan or the rooftop pool at Downtown Grand. For some retail therapy, check out the new Wynn Plaza, the Grand Bazaar Shops at Bally’s or the Las Vegas Premium outlets. You can also spend the afternoon practising your swing at Top Golf Las Vegas or flying down Fremont Street on the SlotZilla zip line. Dinner and a show

Tell us about Las Vegas’s ever growing sports scene

I think you’d struggle to find a destination that hosts a wider variety of sporting events than Las Vegas. We have long been home to some of the most iconic boxing and MMA matches, the National Finals Rodeo, the PGA tour, minor league baseball, Nascar and the Rock’n’Roll Marathon. Now, with the addition of ice hockey, women’s basketball, soccer and the upcoming relocation of the National Football League’s Raiders from Oakland, Las Vegas will continue to build its reputation as the sports capital of the world.

What do the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority have in store for WTM this year? We are launching an immersive concept that will allow WTM visitors to enter the fabulous world of Las Vegas right on the show floor. Using state-of-the-art technology, the immersive multisensory experience will provide a muchneeded escape to a Las Vegas show, pool or outdoor adventure. Stop by the stand to experience it for yourself!

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Africa Our selection of the best WTM London sessions about this flourishing tourism region Business Taking Responsibility For Security, Health And Safety At the very heart of the responsibility agenda is the security, health and safety of guests and visitors, and how this is taken care of. In unfamiliar places, even with domestic tourists, there are health and safety risks which travellers are unaccustomed to. How best can these be managed and reduced? Whose responsibility is it? The focus in this panel is on the role of businesses in ensuring all guests and visitors are covered. Monday 10.30-11.00, Middle East & Africa Inspiration Zone – AF190 RwandAir CEO Interview RwandAir, an airline which is investing in fleet aircraft and adding to its network, is led by Yvonne Manzi Makolo, one of the few female CEOs in the industry. In an interview with John Strickland, director of JLS Consulting, she will outline her strategy to take RwandAir forward and so help the burgeoning Rwandan tourism industry. Monday 13.45-14.30, Middle East & Africa Inspiration Zone – AF190

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World Responsible Tourism Day Opening: Hear from South Africa’s Minister of Tourism The post-apartheid democratic government adopted responsible tourism, understanding that the industry could create employment and offer development opportunities in rural and urban areas. Derek Hanekon, South Africa’s minister of tourism, will reflect on the country’s initiatives and why this approach matters. Wednesday 11.00-11.15, Europe Inspiration Zone – EU80 She Trades: Empowering African Women Entrepreneurs Through Tourism This panel brings together experienced female speakers who own tourism SMEs in Kenya and Ghana. It will focus on how women in tourism can be best supported and connected to the international market to enhance the business opportunities valuable to them and able to empower them. Tuesday 11.45-12.30, Middle East & Africa Inspiration Zone – AF190

Tourism Investing in Africa’s Future: The Gambia and Uganda In Bwindi in Uganda, local communities are successfully developing new products for sale to tourists and increasing their incomes. Meanwhile, a new Gambian administration is promoting inclusive culture-centred tourism, utilising the untapped potential of the River Gambia, which disperses economic benefit to rural areas and extends the season. This session looks at these two places creating sustainable livelihoods for local people. Tuesday 16.00-16.30, Middle East & Africa Inspiration Zone – AF190 West Africa Integrated Travel – Boundaries Unlocked, London 2018 This wide-ranging session includes a talk from tourism ministers from Ghana, Cape Verde and Mali, as well as panels and discussions on how to unlock the tourism potential in West Africa while tackling sustainability and safeguarding culture across the region. Monday 15.30-18.00, Middle East & Africa Inspiration Zone – AF190

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Africa safari cruise

Set sail on safari Watch and wonder from the water at Africa’s abundant wildlife, writes Heidi Fuller-Love

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ith its leopards and lions, medicinal plants and colourful birds, it’s no wonder that the vast continent of Africa is renowned for the diversity of its wildlife. If you’ve ever dreamed of getting up close to the ‘big five’ – lion, leopard, elephant, rhinoceros and Cape buffalo – what better way to do so than to take a safari cruise? For these, you’ll glide through the jungle, stop over in remote lodges or travel to ports that offer easy access to world-class game parks and nature reserves. If you’re seeking comfort, choose companies such as Silversea or Regent Seven Seas, which have larger ships featuring more facilities. But if your main concern is encountering the local wildlife, it’s best to pick smaller expedition vessels owned by companies such as AmaWaterways or CroisiEurope. So grab your binoculars, slip on some safari wear and follow us on a bucket-list

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tour of must-not-miss safari cruises for nature lovers.

WILD ON THE RIVER

If you wish to see wildlife up close, a river cruise – on vessels that are relatively quiet and can travel along narrow waterways – is ideal. To spot big cats as well as giraffe and Cape buffalo, choose a cruise along the Cuando River, which follows the northern border of Botswana’s Chobe National Park. If you prefer to see lions, hippos and elephants, you should consider heading for the shores and waters of Lake Kariba, on the Zambia and Zimbabwe border.

WHO DOES IT?

For lashings of adventure mixed with a good old dose of comfort, choose AmaWaterways’ 12-night Rivers & Rails of Africa Cruise (amawaterways.com). This exciting safari cruise combines time in Cape Town and Victoria Falls

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with a thrilling four-night trip along the Cuando (Chobe) River. There’s also a breathtaking three-night luxury rail trip from Zimbabwe to South Africa, stopping at Hwange Game Reserve, which is home to elephants, lions and African wild dogs.

USEFUL TIPS Do take it as it comes – unlike many aspects of a cruise, spotting wildlife can’t be planned. Don’t be careless – trailing a hand in the water or getting too close to that hippo could easily end in disaster.

SAFARI ON THE OCEAN

Several major cruise lines offer wildlifespotting options in Africa and some offer pre- and post-cruise safari land extensions, too. Most cruises leave from Cape Town and call at Richards Bay, which offers easy access to Hluhluwe-Imfolozi Park – renowned as one of the country’s best reserves for spotting rhino – as well Port Elizabeth, which is close to Addo Elephant National Park. Some cruises also include Kenya’s Mwaluganje Elephant Sanctuary near Mombasa on their itineraries.

WHO DOES IT?

Regent Seven Seas (rssc.com) has a 15-night South African Cheer itinerary round trip from Cape Town, which includes safari excursions to world-renowned game reserves ranging from Addo Elephant Park to Mpongo Private Game Reserve. This exciting cruise also includes a trip to see the unique wild horses of the vast Namib coastal desert and a stopover in Walvis Bay to see flamingos, pelicans and other rare birdlife. Alternatively, Silversea’s breathtaking 14-day Mombasa to Cape Town itinerary (silversea.com) takes in several of South Africa’s top game reserves, plus a trip to see the monkeys in Zanzibar’s Jozani Forest Reserve and the chance to snorkel out to explore Madagascar’s spectacular Nosy Tanikely marine reserve. But for those seeking the ultimate bucket-list trip, you should take Cunard’s 24-night cruise from Hong Kong to Cape Town (cunard.co.uk) on board the Queen Victoria. From exclusive, one-of-a-kind wildlife excursions to a plethora of exotic port calls, this luxurious, nine-country safari cruise is sure to tick all the boxes. ABTAmag.com

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November 2018 51


Promotion

History today

With the largest coastline on the Mediterranean and located at the historical crossing point of Europe, Africa and Asia, Greece is simply unmissable

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enowned for its unspoilt fishing villages, fascinating archaeological sites, postcard-perfect coastlines and delicious and authentic food, mainland Greece offers the perfect Mediterranean escape. Here we pick three destinations deserving of your attention.

METEORA

Home to one of the largest and most important group of Eastern Orthodox monasteries in the country, Meteora is a Unesco World Heritage Site. Perched upon jutting rocks, these incredible buildings combine history with geographical wonder, resulting in one of Greece’s most spectacular sights. Meterora itself means ‘hovering in the air’, and the region is home to the Holy Monastery of Great Meteoron, containing a 14th century katholikon church, as well as the difficult-to-reach Monastery of the Holy Trinity, where visitors have to cross a valley climb 140 or so steps to reach its entrance. James Bond fans make recognise it from For Your Eyes

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Only. Meteora is served by the nearby towns of Kalambaka and Kastraki. Getting there: A train to Kalambaka station from Athens takes five hours and 20 minutes, and there are also seasonal flights from London to Kalamata Airport, which is two-and-a-half hours’ drive from Meteora.

MONEMVASIÁ

Founded in the sixth century, the breathtaking medieval tower town of Monemvasiá is a popular wedding location, given its dramatic backdrops. Located on the southeastern coast of the Peloponnese, this peaceful and isolated town is built into the side of a rockface 100 metres above sea level. Residents live in the cobblestone lower town, home to four working churches and a handful of restaurants and hotels. The deserted upper town, the original fortress, is ripe for exploration. Getting there: Almost seperated from the mainland bar a short causeway, the town is around three-and-a-half hours by bus from Athens, and six hours by ferry from Piraeus.

PELION

A mountain in southeastern Thessaly, Pelion offers a chance ot authentic, smalltown Greek life. Surrounded by fishing villages and deserted beaches, with stone buildings carved out of grey and blue slate and red clay. Of the 24 villages circling Pelion, Portaria, at the foot of the mountain, is the most cosmopolitan, but provides a gateway to sea and ski resorts. Boasting luxurious hotels, traditional hostels, restaurants and tavernas, coffee houses, bars and shops, it’s the busiest village in the region. Alternatively, there’s Tsagkarada, found 500 metres above sea level on the eastern side of Pelion. A wild frontier of Greece, its dense forests and sparsely populated village look out to the azure Aegean Sea. Pelion’s highest summit, Stavros, is 1.624 metres, stretching for around 50km, and is loved by thrill-seekers. Getting there: Seasonal direct flights connect London and Volos. Alternatively, there are year-round flights to Thessaloniki, which is two hours’ drive to Volos.

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Middle East WTM

The Middle East WTM London addresses the issues facing an area undergoing vast change – here’s our pick of the sessions to look out for Creating Shared Value Michael Porter, the Harvard academic who gave us cluster theory, has been pointing to the importance of businesses going beyond CSR and creating shared value – that is, initiating and growing employment and enterprise opportunities for neighbourhood communities. While the growth of the experience economy and an increasing interest in the local tourism industry has many advantages, four businesses show how creating shared value makes great economic sense. Monday 11.00-12.00, Middle East & Africa Inspiration Zone – AF190 Expo 2020 Showcases The Future of Sustainability – Water and Energy As Dubai aims to create the most sustainable Expo in history for 2020, this session attempts to discover the incredible efforts being taken to leave a legacy of cutting-edge sustainability practices which will inspire generations to come. Monday 12.55-13.20, Middle East & Africa Inspiration Zone – AF190

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New Direction for Gulf Air Following his appointment in 2017 as CEO, Gulf Air’s Krešimir Kucko will be interviewed by director of JLS Consulting, John Strickland, about his plans to ensure a bright future for the airline. The business was once the market leader in the Gulf region but has recently struggled against heavy competition. With fleet renewal, a new network and renewed product strategy, there will be plenty to learn in this exclusive WTM interview. Tuesday 10.50-11.30, Middle East & Africa Inspiration Zone – AF190 An Exclusive Preview of Expo 2020, Featuring the UK Pavilion With just two years to go before its opening, Expo 2020 will preview why it will be a must-visit event. In addition, for the first time, Laura Faulkner OBE will describe to the travel trade the incredible design and detailing of the UK Pavilion. Wednesday 10.30-11.00, Middle East & Africa Inspiration Zone – AF190

Jordan: a World Leader in Gastrodiplomacy Jordan has a culture of using food as a tool to foster understanding – evidenced in the use of the phrase karam, which translates as generosity, or that ‘the guest is king’. The result is that visitors leave Jordan with the impression of a respectful, hospitable and peace-loving country. This session will show how to leverage an area’s food and drink offering as gastrodiplomacy. Wednesday 15.30-16.00, Middle East & Africa Inspiration Zone – AF190 How Are Mainstream Travel Companies and Destinations Attempting to Take Advantage of the Rise of Halal Travel? The global halal tourism sector is growing at a fast pace and savvy mainstream travel companies and destinations are adapting how they do business to cater for Muslim travellers. We hear from industry organisations and destinations that are leading the way. Tuesday 13.00-13.45, Middle East & Africa Inspiration Zone – AF190

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A new oasis Jenny Southan stays cool in the desert as she explores the great outdoors of Oman

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Middle East Oman

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am standing on top of a sand dune at sunset, the wind whipping swirls of grit into the air off the rippling ridge, the sky a hazy pink beyond. My feet sink gently into the sand as I look out, noticing a camel making its way down the face of a dune beyond. Down below is our camp, a cluster of palms and cineraria trees providing shade for an emerald swimming pool in an otherwise barren landscape. The 45-degree heat of the day has subsided and, as night draws on, it gets more comfortable. Once the sun has slid behind the horizon I get back into the white 4x4 that drove me up here and descend precariously back down the steep side of the dune to the Thousand Nights (thousandnightsoman.com) oasis where I am staying. The Middle Eastern country of Oman is predominantly desert (about 80 per cent), with the rest occupied by mountains and stretches of coastline. Sharqiya Sands alone, where I am, covers about 12,500 square km. Closed from May until August, when it is too hot to bear (temperatures often reach 55 degrees), during the rest of the year the camp has air-conditioned tents, as well as a handful of villas, available for visitors to spend a night and get a feel for what Bedouin life is like. In more recent times, many of these nomadic Arabs have grown wealthy from trading camels (those bred to race can sell for up to £200,000, my

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tour guide Ali tells me). Before going off-road and heading into the desert, I see numerous new-build mansions being built by Bedouin families, whose tents have been given a serious upgrade. Unlike the emirates of Dubai and Abu Dhabi, which have rapidly converted desert into metropolis, Oman is seeking to attract tourists to its natural wonders and outdoor pursuits. Just two years ago it received three million visitors, but it is aiming for five million by 2020. It is part of the Sultanate of Oman’s drive to diversify its economy, which, at the moment, is reliant on oil, gas and agriculture (dates, limes and coconut palms primarily, as well as frankincense and damask roses, mainly for domestic use). In the spring, the capital saw the launch of a new US$1.8 billion terminal at Muscat International Airport for international flights (both British Airways and Oman Air fly nonstop from London), and a new e-visa application system for people from the UK (costing 20 OMR/£39 for a 26B tourist visa), meaning tourists no longer have to queue for one when they arrive. Nearby is the 310-room Kempinski Hotel Muscat, which was unveiled in April, and has a huge outdoor pool by the beach. However, I want to get out of the city to explore the Al Hajar mountains, a few hours’ drive away, where the four-year-old Alila Jabal Akhdar (alilahotels.com) resort is located, 2,000m above sea level.

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‘Rather than converting desert into metropolis, Oman is seeking to attract tourists to its natural wonders and outdoor pursuits’ In contrast to the desert camp, the air around the Alila is cool and clear, and the terrain Mars-like and rocky, with the exception of straggly juniper trees and clumps of tall grasses. Upon arrival at the hotel’s reception, I am greeted by a man in a floor-length robe and neat embroidered hat, who serves me fresh squishy dates and cardamom coffee from a silver pot (the Omanis take hospitality very seriously). I am immediately impressed by the hotel’s architecture, which has combined local stone and timber beams to construct a low-rise complex of buildings in which the 84 guest suites are located. Mine has a particularly stunning view of the aweinspiring gorge that the hotel is built on the edge of. You can, of course, come here to relax by the pool and read whatever thriller you picked up at the airport – or you can take advantage of the array of exciting outdoor

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activities on offer. For daredevils, the Alila can arrange climbing experiences for people of mixed abilities on the property’s very own via ferrata (“iron path”). Once you have your helmet and harness on, you can work your way across the yawning mouth of a cave sunk deep into the limestone cliffs below thanks to a 20m-high tightrope wire that’s been pegged in place. You can also sign up for canyon walks, abseiling and treks to the floor of the valley. About half an hour’s drive away is the Anantara Al Jabal Al Akhdar (anantara. com), another high-end hotel perched on the edge of a canyon. It also offers its own 200m via ferrata, plus a couple of zip lines and the option of mountain biking and archery. However, I decide to set off with a guide down dusty paths to explore a trio of largely abandoned villages carved into the hillside, following a trail that takes me down steep stone steps, following a traditional ‘falaj’ irrigation system of small channels that deliver water to the rose terraces. In March, the flowers are harvested to make rose water, a precious commodity in these parts. For many decades, the region has been so fertile it earned the name Green Mountains, but an ongoing drought has left it looking parched. There is still a dramatic beauty to the place, though, and it leaves me wanting to come back for more – perhaps next time for a spa retreat at the Six Senses Zighy Bay. ABTAmag.com

Pictured Left to Right: Muscat at dusk; a welcome escape from the heat; explore dusty paths; Oman’s jagged coastline

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Asia Pacific WTM

Asia Pacific The top session picks of WTM London from this most lucrative of destinations How Chinese Demands and Innovations Change the Global Tourism Industry Prof Dr Wolfgang Arlt discusses the trends and developments in Chinese outbound tourism, followed by company presentations and a panel on how Chinese demand and innovation will change the global tourism industry. Monday 11.00-12.00, Asia Inspiration Zone – AS1070 The Wellness and Wellbeing Hour – Asia Global Wellness Tourism Economy 2018 study authors Ophelia Yeung and Katherine Johnston will examine the detailed data and unique trends driving Asia’s record growth in this vital wellness sector. It will be followed by discussions on global wellness travel trends, crystal sound healing experience and meditation. Wednesday 14.30-15.30, Asia Inspiration Zone – AS1070

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Responsible Tourism and China In 2017 there were over five billion visits to tourism sites by domestic tourists, including foreigners with local visitor permits, plus 139 million international arrivals. Only seven per cent of Chinese citizens have passports yet they made 145 million overseas trips in 2017. In 2016 Chinese tourists spent $2,611million abroad, with Americans paying out just $1,236million. China has more impact on international travel and tourism than any other country. What are the prospects for responsible tourism in China and what impact will growing numbers of Chinese tourists have on the destinations they visit? Tuesday 11.00-11.45, Asia Inspiration Zone – AS1070 Tapping into China Outbound Market with Social International travel spend from China has grown 10-fold in a decade, and social media has become of prime importance in planning travel. A panel of regional experts discuss the trends. Monday 14.00-14.45, Asia Inspiration Zone – AS1070

Leveraging Destination Brands to Attract Higher Value Travel Customers This session will explore the business case for strong destination brands, how tour operators can align their product and experience offerings, plus methods for measuring impact. The session will involve a facilitated discussion with marketing strategists from select DMOs with audience participation. Wednesday 10.30-11.15, Asia Inspiration Zone – AS1070 The Secrets of India India has 22 languages, over 1000 dialects and is the birthplace of four world religions – language, dress and food changes every 100 miles. Yet the world looks at travel to India as just ‘the Golden Triangle’ when it is so much more. This panel will explore the more unusual aspects of Indian tourism. Tuesday 15.30-16.30, Asia Inspiration Zone – AS1070

ABTAmag.com


A different Japan Anthony Pearce gets off the Golden Route and enjoys the fresh produce and bucolic beauty of Hokkaido, the northernmost of Japan’s main islands

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mist hangs over the peaceful Lake Onuma, obscuring the volcanic Mount Komagatake, which sits across the water. There is barely a soul in sight. The neonlit streets of Tokyo’s Shibuya, home to the world’s busiest intersection, feel a long, long way away. With its dense alpine forests, volcanic landscapes, hot springs and heavy snowfall in winter, the sparsely populated and strikingly beautiful Hokkaido remains Japan’s wild frontier. The most northerly of its main islands, the prefecture makes up 20 per cent of the country’s land area

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but only five per cent of its population. To put that in perspective: Tokyo’s population density is 6,158 people per square kilometre; Hokkaido’s is just 72. Yet Hokkaido is remarkably accessible; Tokyo Haneda is an hour’s flight away, while the famed Hokkaido Shinkansen – better known as the bullet train – links the capital to the port city of Hakodate. Although known for its ski resorts, Hokkaido has much more to offer than winter sports, as hikers, cyclists and other adventure seekers will attest. With cherry blossoms in spring, lavender in summer and beautiful autumn foliage, the island

boasts breathtaking scenery year-round, as well as a fascinating history (that of its indigenous people, the Ainu), Sapporo beer, Nikka whisky and perhaps the world’s finest seafood. It’s no surprise that Lonely Planet named Hokkaido the top destination to visit in Asia in 2016. Sixty-five per cent of tourists who visit Japan explore its famed golden route – Tokyo, Hakone (for Mount Fuji) and Kyoto. But with a target of 40 million visitors a year by 2020 (see news, p11), the government is keen to promote lesser-known regions and four-seasons tourism. It’s an easy sell: Hokkaido, which in parts feels more

November 2018 59


Asia Pacific Japan

Scandinavian than it does classically Japanese, has charm in abundance. As we soon discover in its lively capital, Sapporo – a calmer, but just as enthralling version of Tokyo – Hokkaido isn’t all about the great outdoors, but also its unique culture. Susukino, Sapporo’s bustling red-light district, is its most famous area, known for nightclubs, bars, izakayas (Japanese pubs) and restaurants. In the city, we eat at the Sapporo Beer Garden, adjacent to its famous beer brewery, where we enjoy a Mongolian-style banquet. The food is a major part of Hokkaido’s appeal. The region is known for its produce – from dairy (milk, cheese and ice cream) to beef, whisky and beer. Each meal time, we’re treated to a feast: salmon, trout, scallop, squid, sea urchin, crab and octopus make up sushi, sashimi (raw fish) and tempura dishes, while we also try Japanese curry, ramen, broths, hot pots and sticky rice. Each dish is simple – never overpowered with flavour, with soy sauce or wasabi as an accompaniment – and thus completely reliant on the quality of the ingredients. The fish is the freshest, and best, I’ve ever tasted. In Hakodate, we take in the city lights from Mount Hakodate, explore the historic Old Public Hall of Hakodate Ward, the city’s charming red-brick bay-area docks,

which bears a strong resemblance to San Francisco, and its bustling Morning Market, which appears to serve every type of seafood there is. Here, moving among locals, cruise ship passengers and other tourists, we sample squid that is caught as we wait. At the Nikka distillery in the Yoichi district of the Shiribeshi subprefecture, we’re treated to award-winning singlemalt whisky, the result of one man’s pilgrimage to Scotland in the early 1900s and lifelong obsession with Islay malt. Whisky is a slow-moving world, but Nikka is now considered one of the world’s top producers. As one Japanophile quips: “When the Japanese decide to do something, they master it.” It’s true that Japan is unlike any other country in Asia, or indeed the world. That it is a high-tech, highly developed nation is obvious from the moment you step off the plane: public transport is extremely punctual (our bullet train arrives five minutes early). It is also incredibly clean in all public spaces – you won’t spot litter anywhere). Even here, in what is essentially the country’s outback, everything runs like clockwork; there’s an attention to detail in every part of society that makes it one of the world’s most fascinating destinations. ABTAmag.com

Exploring Hokkaido and beyond by train From Hakodate, we took the Hokkaido Shinkansen bullet train, which can travel at 260kmh, through the Seikan Tunnel to Aomori in the Tohoku region on Honshu, the largest island. The city, the capital of an underexplored region, is home to the Nebuta Festival, which takes place in August and is known for its elaborate illuminated floats. Outside of the festival season, the Nebuta Museum Wa Rasse, which charts its history and displays some of the incredible four-ton creations (left), is well worth a visit. Purchasing a JR East-South Hokkaido Rail Pass is a great way to explore Hokkaido and beyond.

60 November 2018

ABTAmag.com


Far East festivities Next year will mark 200 years since Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles landed in Singapore – an anniversary that will be celebrated throughout the year, writes Esme Fox

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n January 29 1819, Raffles landed in Singapore, and quickly signed a treaty with local rulers establishing it as a British trading post, and an important link between India and China. Although he left just nine days later, turning control over to the East India Company, Raffles returned in 1822 and set about creating an ambitious town plan. He knew that the key to Singapore’s success was to create communal harmony and build different cultural districts for the merchants and traders. Today, Singapore still has areas dedicated to different cultures, including Chinatown, Little India and Kampong Glam. A melting pot of cuisines, traditions and languages, Singapore’s multi-ethnic society makes it one of Asia’s most intriguing destinations. With its superb and diverse food, worldleading cocktail scene and dedication to

ABTAmag.com

green space (such as the Supertrees at the 250-acre Gardens by the Bay), Singapore is becoming an increasingly popular city break destination, particularly as its airport continues to expand (the Jewel Terminal at Changi Airport is set to open next year). The bicentennial celebrations will kick off at the end of January with the i Light Singapore festival. It will focus on the theme ‘Bridges of Time’ and feature commemorative light installations set up across Marina Bay, the Singapore River and Civic District. In February, Singapore will go all out for Chinese New Year, ushering in the Year of the Pig with the River Hongbao festival, complete with fireworks, street performers and handcrafted lanterns. Throughout the year, there will also be several exhibitions held at some of the country’s most prominent museums, including the National Museum of Singapore and the National Gallery

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Asia Pacific Singapore

of Singapore. During January and February, the Asian Civilisations Museum will hold a special exhibition entitled Raffles in Southeast Asia, exploring Raffles’ journey to Singapore. Being the only museum in the region devoted to exploring its artistic heritage, it’s well worth a visit, even if your trip doesn’t coincide with this commemorative exhibit. In March, the Singapore Heritage Festival will take place, celebrating the country’s multicultural legacy through a combination of guided tours, open-house events, films and exhibitions. The historic Fort Canning Centre, which once served as the Headquarters of the Far East Command Centre and British Army Barracks, will also be opening a new attraction next year, tracing the stories of Singapore’s early settlers and communities. Visit during June to September to experience the new commemorative historical trails, featuring projections at historic spots such as Telok Ayer Street and the Fort Gate. On August 9, one of the key commemorative events will take place during the National Day parade, and later in the month, visitors can look forward to the Singapore Night Festival. During the event, interactive installations and performances will be set up across the Bras Basah heritage precinct. The projections on the façade of the Singapore Art Museum and the National Museum of Singapore are set to be two of the top highlights. The legendary Raffles Hotel is also set to reopen in time for the bicentennial events of 2019, after an extensive renovation. Having first opened in 1887 with only 10 rooms, the new refurbishment will restore the celebrated Long Bar, home of the Singapore Sling cocktail, to its original location. Besides these commemorative events and celebrations, Singapore offers travellers a slew of attractions, which are great to experience at any time of year. From the famous Singapore Zoo; and the impressive Gardens by the Bay, home to 50-metre vertical tree gardens; to the fantastical Sentosa Island, complete with rides, activities and beaches; and even Michelin-starred street food, this small country packs a punch. ABTAmag.com

62 November 2018

ABTAmag.com


The ABTA Country Guides will be published in February 2019 in five editions: ABTA Member Services; UK & Europe; Middle East & Africa; Asia & Australasia; The Americas & The Caribbean. Containing vital information about destinations across the globe, such as geography, currency, weather, tourist office contact information, foreign office advice and more, the guides are an essential tool for travel agents.

TRALASIA ASIA & AUS

18 untry Guide 20 Country By Co

– Volume 4:

TRALASIA ASIA & AUS

Y Y BY COUNTR ABTA COUNTR

Distributed to travel agencies across the country, the guides are intended to be kept on shelves, shared among staff, and referred to regularly, helping agents learn more about destinations and sell more holidays. The comprehensive guides are unique in publishing and available only in print. The guides will be perfect bound, B5 in size and printed on high-quality matt paper.

2018

Email info@ABTAmag.com for more information


Gamesroom

Gamesroom Crossword 

















 







ACROSS

DOWN

7. Self-esteem (3) 8. Attack (7) 9. City of Seven Hills (4) 10. Ollie’s oppo (4) 13. One way to disappear (4,4,3) 14. It breaks daily (4) 15. Golda ---, former Israeli PM (4) 18. Some shipping routes (7) 19. Pale or brown beverage (3)

1. Testify (4,7) 2. Cabin attendant (4,7) 3. Large liquid container (3) 4. Put into action (3) 5. Port at the tip of Chile (5,6) 6. Travel plans (11) 11. When a ship should arrive (1,1,1) 12. Knight’s honorific (3) 16. Billy Connolly, the Big --- (3) 17. Cleo’s killer (3)

 





Word up



How many words can you make out of these letters?

E A

Sudoku 1

3

4

4 5

8 2

3

8 9 6

8 5

6

1

6

8

2

64 November 2018

1 4

6

6

5

9

9

1 3

1

6

3

9

7

3

5 8

3

C K C S R W

7

2

4 7

9 7

2

J

3

6

5 Find the gamesroom solutions in the January 2019 issue of ABTA Magazine ABTAmag.com


ABTA Magazine

Where in the world? Name the city in these four images

Competition time WIN! 2 return tickets to South America!

To celebrate the addition of Air Europa’s new Boeing 787 Dreamliners to its fleet, the airline is giving away two return economy tickets to any of its Dreamliner destinations. These include Miami, Sao Paulo, Bogota, Santo Domingo, Lima, Buenos Aires and Panama, Air Europa’s latest route, launching on 25 February 2019. To enter the competition, answer the following question:

How many destinations in Latin America does Air Europa fly to? Email your answer to info@ABTAmag.com before 19 December 2018.

Win A 2-night stay at INNSIDE Manchester Win a two-night stay at the INNSIDE Manchester, located in the First Street development in the heart of Manchester To enter the competition, answer the following question:

What is the name of the travel trade booking platform for Meliã Hotels? Email your answer to info@ABTAmag.com before 31 December 2018. Terms and conditions apply for both competitions. See ABTAmag.com/2018/11/01/terms

ABTAmag.com

November 2018 65


Final word Nikki White

Final word

Each issue we speak to an ABTA employee about their work. This time, it’s Nikki White, director of destinations and sustainability

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y role is incredibly varied: I work across operations, health and safety and crisis management – speaking to members, destinations and the Foreign Office (FCO). Sustainable tourism is also a critical part of my role, which includes looking at environmental issues, human rights, the modern slavery act, accessibility, child safeguarding and animal welfare. I travel a lot with my job, speaking at engagements, raising the profile of sustainability or meeting ministers on operational challenges. I feed back information from our members about challenges they are facing. Our peak season is out-of-season, working in preparation for future challenges that may arise in destinations. The hurricanes in the Caribbean last year are a good example. Having worked with Members and the FCO on the immediate situation we then, in the aftermath, liaised with the Caribbean Tourism Organization, FCO and people in the region to help with longer-term planning and getting back into the destination. It’s our role to reach out through those stakeholders. We need to be able to give members credible information to help them make decisions about returning to destinations, as there is a lot of misinformation at the time of crisis. Where there are gaps, we push hard to get that information on behalf of the industry. Many destinations get back on their feet very quickly; they are very good at recovery, and you wouldn’t want to exclude them as they need a boost at that point. Then there’s the matter of ‘overtourism’, although I don’t personally like that term, as it oversimplifies such a big issue. So much of it comes down to integrated destination planning. For one area, there might be too much tourism at one point, but another part

66 November 2018

might not have the tourism they need. It’s about looking at the much bigger picture, and looking at the individual destinations or resorts and the challenges they face there. More focus on the supporting infrastructure for locals and tourists is needed in many places. We also work very closely with our Members on health and safety matters, reviewing the incidents and evidence on an ongoing basis and exploring solutions to emerging issues. In some cases we decide to run public information campaigns to make customers aware of important information and any potential risks, such as balconies, quad bikes and mopeds and how to stay safe in the water. It’s very important that the travel industry is constantly looking ahead, and putting steps in place to make sure we’re leading the debate and working on emerging issues. When we launched our guidance on animal welfare back in 2013, there wasn’t anything like it out there. It’s been a very important source of information for our Members and the wider industry. Members raise issues, and customers bring issues up and then we’ll find a relevant NGO or charity, and look at academic work, to keep our thinking up to date. My team is also developing training to help our Members’ staff develop their skills and understanding of particular areas. So far this year we have launched a new module that helps frontline staff talk to their customers about the availability of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office travel advice, and we’ve updated our training on accessibility. Members can access this training at abta.com. No two days are the same, so I’m always ready for something new crossing my desk. ABTAmag.com

ABTAmag.com


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Profile for ABTA Magazine

ABTA Magazine – Special Edition  

A special edition of ABTA Magazine available at the World Travel Market in London. In this issue, we round all the latest news and events fr...

ABTA Magazine – Special Edition  

A special edition of ABTA Magazine available at the World Travel Market in London. In this issue, we round all the latest news and events fr...

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