Page 1


For the Milk Chocolate Layers

2 ounces good-quality milk chocolate, coarsely chopped

1

2

1

⁄2 cup dark unsweetened cocoa powder (like Valrhona) ⁄3 cup hot coffee

⁄3 cup whole milk

1 1⁄3 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1

⁄2 teaspoon salt

5 ounces(11⁄4 sticks) unsalted butter, softened, cut into 1⁄2-inch cubes

3 large eggs

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

2 ounces (1⁄2 stick) unsalted butter, softened, cut into 1⁄2-inch cubes

1

⁄2 cup smooth peanut butter (see page 000)

<TK> cup confectioners’ sugar

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

For the Vanilla Peanut Butter Frosting

1 cup granulated sugar 1

⁄4 cup all-purpose flour 1 cup whole milk

1

8 ounces (2 sticks) unsalted butter, cool but not cold, cut into 1⁄2-inch cubes

⁄4 cup heavy cream

1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon Peanut Butter Filling

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

For the assembly

Yield: One 8-inch, 2-layer cake

⁄2 cup granulated sugar

For the Peanut Butter Filling

AT OUR BAKERY, our staff churns through many tons of butter, eggs, flour, chocolate, and sugar. They are nimble, efficient, and focused and they always—even under extreme pressure—produce spectacular and bountiful baked goods. Occasionally, in the midst of so many ingredients and recipes passing so quickly through so many skilled hands, errors occur. On even rarer occasions, these errors produce something worth preserving. Our Oopsy Daisy Cake began life as one of those odd kitchen accidents—when Blair Van Sant mistakenly swapped milk chocolate for dark chocolate. Not only did the “accident” work, it became a signature cake. The Oopsy sponge is paler and sweeter than its dark chocolate cousin and is practically engineered (even if accidentally) to be filled with a sweet dose of peanut butter filling and swathed in our light and fluffy vanilla peanut butter frosting. It is the kind of cake you want for your birthday and hope that there are many leftovers for late-night snacking.

1 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar 1

OOPSY DAISY CAKE

1

⁄4 cup roasted salted peanuts, chopped

Milk chocolate is sexy all of a sudden, and the breadth and quality keep improving. We wholly encourage you to try some of the newer, more exciting brands available (we currently love TCHO)—taste testing is fun. Please do avoid using a run-of-the-mill, chalky, overly sweet milk chocolate in this cake. Aim for something without any artificial ingredients and a high cocoa liquor content.

BAKED NOTE:

MAKE THE CAKE Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Butter two 8-inch round cake pans, line the bottoms with parchment paper, and butter the parchment. Dust with flour and knock out the excess flour. Place the chocolate and cocoa powder in medium-size heatproof bowl. Pour the hot coffee directly over the chocolate and cocoa and whisk until combined. Add the milk and whisk until smooth. In another bowl, sift together the flour, baking soda, and salt. Set aside. In the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter and both sugars on medium speed until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition, then add the vanilla and beat until incorporated. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl and mix again for 30 seconds. Add the flour mixture in three parts, alternating with the chocolate mixture, beginning and ending with the flour mixture.

22 PEANUT BUTTER


CANDY BAR COOKIES THERE IS SOMETHING almost maniacal about stuffing a candy bar inside a cookie and dipping the whole thing in chocolate. It suggests a more-is-more attitude, a winner-take-all approach to crafting dessert that so often leads one down the depraved path. Thankfully, this cookie perseveres—it is not morally corrupt. It is, in fact, just about as sweet as a baby kitten. Renato first crossed paths with the Candy Bar Cookie in Germany (there, they are called Riegel) by way of a Christmas cookie platter. He was instantly smitten—and surprised— by the chewy candy bar center lurking inside the simple butter cookie exterior. Though the original German cookie is sans chocolate shell, Renato decided to update this recipe. He dips each cookie in whatever chocolate is on hand (double dipping encouraged), adds a dash of color via decorations, and presents them as large, jewel-like truffles. The cookies are beautiful and delicious, and tailor-made for special occasions.

For the Candy Bar Cookies

2 cups all-purpose flour

1

⁄2 cup sugar 1 tablespoon dark unsweetened cocoa powder (like Valrhona)

1

⁄8 teaspoon salt

7 ounces (1 ¾ sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 large egg yolk

20 fun-size Mounds, cut in half OR 40 Reese’s Mini Peanut Butter Cups

For the assembly

Yield: cookies Yield: 40 40 cookies This recipe was tested using a variety of candy bars; however, we think it works best with halved, fun-size Bounty (probably hard to find in some areas), Mounds, and 3 Musketeers bars. Whole Rolo caramels and Reese’s Mini Peanut Butter Cups are also great choices.

BAKED NOTE:

MAKE THE CANDY BAR COOKIES In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, cocoa powder, and salt. In the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter on medium speed until creamy. Add the egg yolk and beat until combined. Add the flour mixture and mix on low speed until just incorporated. The dough will look sandy. Shape the dough into a disk, wrap the disk in plastic wrap, and refrigerate until chilled, about 1 hour. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line two large baking sheets with parchment paper. Dust a work surface with a sprinkling of flour. Unwrap the chilled dough and place directly on the work surface. Roll the dough a 1⁄4-inch thick round. Using a 2 ¼-inch (or thereabouts) round cookie cutter, cut the dough into circles and transfer them to the prepared baking sheets. Reroll the dough scraps and cut out more circles. Use your hands to roll the candy pieces into the shape of a ball (or vaguely in the shape of a ball). Place each candy ball on a circle of dough and wrap the dough around the

51 CHOCOLATE

4 ounces good-quality dark chocolate (60 to 72%), coarsely chopped

4 ounces good-quality white chocolate, coarsely chopped

3 tablespoons sprinkles (optional)

3 tablespoons nonpareils (optional)


For the dough

3 1⁄2 cups bread flour

1

⁄4 cup granulated sugar

1

⁄4 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar

3 teaspoons instant dry yeast

1 teaspoon salt

1

1

⁄4 teaspoon ground ginger

1

⁄4 teaspoon ground cardamom

3 ounces (3⁄4 stick) unsalted butter, softened, cut into 1⁄2-inch cubes

⁄2 teaspoon cinnamon

2

⁄3 cup whole milk

1 large egg 2

⁄3 cup pumpkin puree (see page 000)

For the filling

3

1

⁄4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

1

1

⁄4 teaspoon ground cloves

1

⁄4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

1

⁄4 teaspoon salt 1 ounce (1⁄4 stick) unsalted butter, melted

For the assembly

1 ounce (1⁄4 stick) unsalted butter, melted

For the Cream Cheese Frosting

2 1⁄2 ounces cream cheese, softened 1

AMERICA’S FOOD COURTS and highway rest stops are filled with myriad oddities and vast collections of the absurd—bizarre and horrible fast food chains that wouldn’t survive outside the protective womb of a mall or the glamless oasis of a roadside pit stop—but even in these locales a shop dedicated to a single breakfast item (oversized cinnamon rolls)seems slightly alien. Yet I find myself transfixed by the store, its yeasty cinnamon aroma lulling its followers into a trancelike state. How is this a business concept? How many cinnamon rolls can one person eat in a given year? Why aren’t there more flavors? None of these questions matter as I place my order, my heart beating erratically in anticipation. Our Pumpkin Cinnamon Rolls were created as a partial ode to this chain store, a chain store beloved by Renato. They are surprisingly simple to put together and highly impressive to serve for a Sunday brunch. They taste like delicate bites of coffee klatch heaven and, as they bake, your entire home will smell like the perfect fall day—pumpkin-y, cinnamon-y bliss. The whole experience is like having a mini, personal Cinnabon in your house (not really a bad thing).

⁄4 cup granulated sugar

⁄2 teaspoons cinnamon

PUMPKIN CINNAMON ROLLS

⁄4 cup buttermilk, well shaken

1 3⁄4 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted

Yield: to rolls 12 rolls Yield: 10 10 to 12 If you want to make your morning slightly easier, you can make the bulk of this recipe the night before a big brunch or breakfast. Once the rolls are sliced and in the pan, cover them with two tight layers of plastic wrap and refrigerate them overnight. In the morning, remove the pan from the refrigerator and proceed with the recipe as normal; however, make sure you allow sufficient time for the dough to come to room temperature and rise (double) properly.

BAKED NOTE:

MAKE THE DOUGH Butter one 10-inch round cake pan, line the bottom with parchment paper, and butter the parchment. Dust the parchment with flour and knock out the excess flour. In the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, mix the flour, sugars, yeast, salt, cinnamon, ginger, and cardamom on medium speed. Add the butter and mix until incorporated, about 1 minute. Add the milk and egg and mix on low speed until incorporated. Add the pumpkin puree and mix on medium speed for 3 minutes. The dough will look light orange in color and feel soft and sticky.

76 PUMPKIN


For the Cream Cheese Filling

8 ounces cream cheese, softened

1

⁄3 cup granulated sugar

1 large egg

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1

⁄4 teaspoon salt

6 ounces good-quality white chocolate, coarsely chopped

For the Chocolate Cheesecake Muffins

3 cups all-purpose flour

1 ⁄2 cups granulated sugar 1

1

⁄2 cup firmly packed light brown sugar

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 tablespoon espresso powder

2 teaspoons salt

1

8 ounces good-quality dark chocolate (60 to 72%), coarsely chopped, divided

3 ounces (3⁄4 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature, cut into ½-inch cubes

1 cup hot coffee

⁄2 cup dark unsweetened cocoa powder (like Valrhona)

¾ cup hot water

1

⁄4 cup plus 2 tablespoons canola oil

1 tablespoon white vinegar

3 large eggs

2 tablespoons sanding sugar (optional)

CHOCOLATE CHEESECAKE MUFFINS THE CHOCOLATE CHEESECAKE muffin was born as a direct, middle-finger-in-theair response to the viral, kudzu-like growth of the bran muffin. Our muffin, the perfect melding of chocolate and cream cheese, is our volley in the muffin wars. Bran muffins, often the texture of dry hay and aging newsprint, are not really muffins—they are really just ill-advised attempts to make something pseudo-nutritional in muffin form. If you want something entirely wholesome and boringly nutritious for breakfast, eat a bowl of bran. If you want something interesting, tasty, and incredibly fun for breakfast, make and eat these muffins. The ratio of butter to flour to egg to oil in muffins is just shy of the ratio needed for cupcakes (sans frosting), and we celebrate, rather than shun, this connection. This is a perfect breakfast treat—the chocolate portion of this muffin is dark without being too sweet and is studded with chocolate chunks for texture and flavor, while the cheesecake filling is a welcome tangy surprise. It’s our chocolate for breakfast philosophy fully realized. Yield: Yield:18 18muffins muffins I am slightly hesitant to note that Chocolate Cheesecake Muffins are equally delicious as basic chocolate muffins. In fact, the recipe makes beautiful chocolate muffins—no need to make any serious changes, just leave out the cream cheese filling steps. If you are feeling motivated, the muffins sans filling taste especially interesting sliced, toasted, and lightly buttered—like a toasty cupcake.

BAKED NOTE:

MAKE THE CREAM CHEESE FILLING In the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the cream cheese on medium speed until smooth. Add the sugar and beat until the sugar is incorporated and the mixture is lump free. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl and add the egg, vanilla, and salt, beating until completely incorporated, about 1 minute. Fold in the white chocolate chunks. Refrigerate the filling while you make the muffins. (The cream cheese filling can be stored in the refrigerator, tightly covered, for up to 3 days.)

MAKE THE CHOCOLATE CHEESECAKE MUFFINS Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly spray each cup of a standard 12-inch muffin pan with nonstick cooking spray and use a paper towel to spread the oil evenly along the bottom and up the sides of each cup.

108 CHEESE


CHEDDAR CORN SOUFFLÉ YES, THIS INCREDIBLY rich, creamy, Cheddar Corn Soufflé can be served as a dessert—a studious, old-school, cheese course. It can also be served as an appetizer. Or as a side. Or, less typically, as a main course. We actually encourage you, if you are feeling full of morning pep, to try it out on unsuspecting breakfast or brunch guests. Fact is, we don’t really care when you serve this multipurpose concoction, we just encourage you to make it often. Our riff on this venerable dish is punched up with the decidedly unsubtle extra-sharp cheddar (we have classic macaroni and cheese on the brain) and a handful of corn—the two flavors complement each other well and the corn adds a bright burst of texture. Finally, we think our perfectly golden Cheddar Corn Soufflé is one of those dishes that “fancifies” the mood with little effort, and everyone knows we could use a bit more fancy in our life. Yield: 66 main-dish main-dish or or 10 10 side-dish side-dish servings servings Yield: If you prefer a more pronounced corn taste, you can increase the corn in the recipe from anywhere up to 3/4 cup total without affecting the soufflé.

BAKED NOTE:

2 tablespoons finely grated fresh Parmesan cheese for dusting

1

⁄2 teaspoon salt

1

⁄2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

1

⁄2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1

1 cup whole milk

2 ounces (1⁄2 stick) unsalted butter

1

5 large eggs, separated, plus 1 large egg white, at room temperature

In a small bowl, whisk together the salt, nutmeg, black pepper, and cayenne. Set aside. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, warm, but do not boil, the milk. Remove from heat once tiny bubbles appear around the pan’s perimeter. In a medium, heavy-bottomed saucepan, melt the butter. Add the flour and whisk until completely combined, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from the heat, wait 30 seconds, then slowly stream the milk into the butter mixture while whisking constantly. Continue whisking until smooth, and return to the heat. Cook until the mixture bubbles and becomes thick, 8 to 10 minutes. When bubbles appear, remove from the heat and whisk in the spice mixture. Continue stirring vigorously for about 1 minute to release some of the heat. Add the 5 egg yolks, one at a time, whisking after each addition. After all of the egg yolks are completely incorporated, transfer mixture to a large bowl. In another large bowl (or in the bowl of a standing mixer fitted with the whisk attachment), whisk the 6 egg whites vigorously for 1 minute. Sprinkle the cream of tartar over the whites and continue beating until the egg whites form stiff peaks.

115 CHEESE

⁄4 cup all-purpose flour

⁄4 teaspoon cream of tartar

3

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F and position the rack in the center. Lightly butter the bottom and sides of a 1 ½-quart soufflé dish. Dust the soufflé dish with the parmesan cheese (so that it adheres to the butter) and knock out the excess.

⁄4 teaspoon ground cayenne

1 cup packed grated extra-sharp cheddar cheese (about 4 ounces) 1

⁄2 cup fresh corn kernels or frozen corn, thawed

Baked Elements by Matt Lewis & Renato Poliafito, photographs by Tina Rupp - STC  

The third and much‐anticipated cookbook from the bestselling Baked boys, featuring recipes calling for Matt Lewis & Renato Poliafito’s 10 fa...

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