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Abilene, Texas USA


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contents Download the conference Mobile App or EPUB at acu.edu/connectedsummit

Welcome to ACU........................................................... 4 About ACU....................................................................... 5 Mobile Learning at ACU........................................... 6 ACU Innovations........................................................... 7 ACU Connected Facts................................................. 8 Sponsors............................................................................ 9 Schedule at a Glance................................................ 10 Campus Map................................................................. 13 Schedule.......................................................................... 14 ACU Wireless Information..................................... 30

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Welcome to

acu!

We are compelled by our Promise to be a vibrant, innovative, Christ-centered community that engages students in authentic spiritual and intellectual growth, equipping them to make a real difference in the world. We are known for our commitment to quality teaching and remarkable research opportunities for undergraduates, each enhanced through the mentoring of outstanding Christian scholars. Our reputation is growing exponentially, attracting record numbers of students and the acclaim of education experts. We are a global leader in the study and application of mobile-learning technology, and our talented, well-prepared graduates are in high demand. We hope you enjoy your time on our campus, and the conversations that will take place these next few days. It is our hope that our Connected Summit will help you make many connections with others committed to exploring the impact of mobile learning on education.

Phil Schubert, Ed.D., President 4

acu.edu/connectedsummit


About

acu

Founded in 1906, Abilene Christian University is a private university with an enrollment of more than 4,700. Its mission is to educate students for Christian service and leadership throughout the world. While ACU is affiliated with the Churches of Christ, it welcomes all students who value the strong Christian environment and exceptional academic programs offered on campus. Students from 50 states and territories, and 42 nations, attend ACU. The diverse and global environment cultivates a strong learning experience. Students are served by more than 230 full-time faculty members, 97 percent of whom hold terminal degrees in their fields. Undergraduates regularly participate in significant research projects alongside faculty members, and many ACU students go on to earn their doctorates. The incorporation of cutting-edge technology into learning has positioned the university as a leader in the integration of mobile-learning. Students use their iPhones or iPod touches as part of the university’s innovative academic and social experiences. The university includes the colleges of Arts and Sciences, Biblical Studies, Business Administration, Education and Human Services, the Graduate School, the Graduate School of Theology, the School of Information Technology and Computing, the School of Social Work, the Honors College, and the School of Nursing. ACU’s College of Business Administration remains in the 5 percent of business schools in the world officially accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. The Department of Journalism and Mass Communication produces The Optimist, the first student newspaper to be published on Apple’s iPad. Several academic departments across campus have collaborated on the project, pairing ACU’s oldest student medium with a brand-new device. The Body & Soul pre-health professions program at ACU offers students unique opportunities that prepare them for success in professional schools. Graduates are accepted into medical school at a rate almost double the national average. ACU’s teacher education program offers an innovative Summer Institute for Beginning Teachers, during which alumni return to campus to network and share experiences from their first years in the classroom. Since 1999, ACU students and faculty members in the Department of Physics have been part of the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment (PHENIX) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The PHENIX project uses the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), the world’s highest energy density particle accelerator, to study the “perfect” liquid, which is created by crashing ions together. ACU physics undergraduates are listed as co-authors on numerous papers presenting the project’s groundbreaking research, including four of the top 20 most-cited papers on hadron physics over the last decade. Abilene Christian students have numerous learning opportunities outside the classroom, from summer internships with top firms in various fields to exciting Study Abroad classrooms in Europe, South America and Asia.

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Mobile learning at

acu

In a world of search engines, social networking and mobile computers, students have access to more information than one could process in a lifetime. At ACU, we are training students to not merely consume these vast amounts of information, but to assess information, to synthesize thoughts, to generate new ideas, and to contribute meaningfully to conversations of global importance. We are exploring how these technologies can be used to help people learn in new ways. And we are discovering how these tools can aid us in our mission to educate students for Christian service and leadership throughout the world. In 2008, ACU became the first university to equip every student in its freshman class with a mobile-learning device. Students received their choice of an iPhone or an iPod touch. All

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full-time undergraduates now have mobile devices, and ACU faculty members are working to discover new and effective ways to use mobile learning in the classroom. ACU’s mobile-learning initiative has received both national and international honors, including Alcatel-Lucent’s first-ever Dynamic Enterprise Award, for its innovative communications solution that enhances the learning experience for students. At the Handheld Learning Conference, a British educational conference, ACU was one of three finalists for the Handheld Learning Innovation Award for Tertiary Education. ACU also received the Institutional Excellence in Information Communication Technology Award by the Association for Information Communications Technology Professionals in Higher Education.


acu

Innovations

The ACU Learning Commons, located on the main floor of Brown Library, offers support for the creation of academic work in a warm, bright and inviting atmosphere. It includes multiple computer stations set up for individual and group work; a café serving snacks, coffee and other beverages; the Writing Center, which offers writing support and help to all students; and the PitStop service desk, which provides technical support to students, faculty and staff. Student service is the primary focus of the Learning Commons, though it also is a popular venue for faculty and staff to conduct meetings, grab a cup of coffee and interact with the campus community. The Adams Center for Teaching and Learning has been housed in the Brown Library since 1992. It includes the Office of Instructional and Faculty Enrichment, Educational Technology, and the Scholar-in-Residence, as well as several meeting spaces and a computer lab. The Adams Center partners with faculty and faculty groups, including the Faculty Enrichment Committee and the Faculty Senate, to address broad areas related to teaching, learning and technology. The Adams Center also hosts numerous workshops and meetings each semester, spurring on opportunities for innovation, focus and leadership within the community of leaders and emerging leaders among ACU faculty members. As ACU’s mobile-learning initiative continues to expand, AT&T has reaffirmed its commitment both to education and to the use of mobile technology. In May 2010, the company presented the university with a check for $1.8 million, a contribution that will bring two important components of the mobile-learning initiative to life and expand its research element. The AT&T Learning Studio, which opens this week on the top floor of ACU’s Brown Library, will provide a curricular laboratory to support experiments with new media tools and strategies in courses across the curriculum. The studio will provide students and faculty a place to try new ways of producing and sharing messages with audiences across campus or around the world. The new facility will include audio booths for recording interviews and podcasts; editing bays for basic audio and video production; film screening rooms; and a high-end production studio with HD video capabilities. Trained technical staff will provide support to students and faculty as they hone their new media skills and develop projects and presentations. The K-12 Professional Development Institute will help facilitate the training of primary and secondary teachers around the world in using new media and mobile technology for teaching and learning. The institute will focus on introducing mobile broadband learning to K-12 teachers. It will include a prototype classroom overseen by two full-time professionals in ACU’s Department of Teacher Education. The Mobile-Learning Research Program at ACU conducts research on the effectiveness of mobile broadband learning initiatives and strategies. AT&T’s contribution will support the work of the mobile-learning research coordinator and provide faculty stipends to increase ACU’s Mobile-Learning Fellows Program, accelerating and expanding the university’s mobile-learning research. ACU will then share the findings from its research with both the university and K-12 communities, using best practices to further its work in places such as the Learning Studio and the K-12 Professional Development Institute. acu.edu/connectedsummit

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Footage included a biochemistry class taught by Dr. Autumn Sutherlin and comments from Dr. William Rankin. • AT&T provided a $1.87 million grant to help ACU establish the AT&T Learning Studio, the K-12 Professional Development Institute and the Mobile-Learning Research Program. • ACU, Cambridge University Press and Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs announced their collaboration on research projects to study the future of publishing.

Abilene Christian University 2009-10 Mobile-Learning Report

Highlights

Highlights from ACU’s 2009-10 Mobile-Learning Report, which can be viewed or downloaded at issuu.com/abilenechristian

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• ACU became the first university to have its student newspaper published for the iPad when the award-winning Optimist hit the Apple store last spring. The fast-moving, collaborative project was completed by students and faculty from the Department of Journalism and Mass Communiction, the Department of Art and Design, and the School of Information Technology and Computing. • The university announced it would expand its mobile-learning initiative to provide all of its nearly 4,000 undergraduate students with iPhones or iPod touches for the 2010-11 academic year. • When Apple announced its new iPad on Dec. 27, 2010, “NBC Nightly News” coverage that evening included a spotlight on ACU’s mobile-learning initiative, showing how the iPhone and iPod touch are being integrated throughout the academic environment.

• Six ACU faculty members served as Mobile-Learning Fellows for 2009-10: Dr. Brad Crisp, Dr. Jaime Goff, Dr. Mark Phillips, Cynthia Powell, Dr. Jennifer Shewmaker and Dr. Autumn Sutherlin. • ACU was named one of “America’s Best Colleges” for 2010 by U.S. News and World Report, also finishing second in the Master’s Universities-West category of A Strong Commitment to Teaching, which highlighted 80 schools with an “an unusual commitment to undergraduate teaching.” Forbes included ACU in its 2010 “America’s Best Colleges” rankings, placing it among the top 7 percent of U.S. universities. The magazine collaborated with the Center for College Affordability and Productivity for its research. • Wired magazine’s online “Gadget Lab” profiled ACU’s mobile-learning initiative in a feature story by Brian X. Chen. • The Department of Theatre set aside a section of its venue for patrons to use their iPhones to interact with cast members during the Abilene Shakespeare Festival’s performances of Othello. Actors worked behind the scenes to clarify difficult Shakespearean vocabulary, to share brief scene summaries and to interact through a live blog.


sp o n s o r ed b y Premier Sponsors

Express Sponsor

Single Sponsors

Pro Sponsor

Meal & Break Sponsors Monday Lunch Booth Sponsors

Monday Break

Tuesday Lunch

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Schedule at a Glance

Welcome and Opening Keynote ............... Cullen Auditorium Karen Cator, U.S. Department of Education

l The Process, Impact and Future of One-to-One iPads at Cedars School of Excellence l Get Comfortable! Be Mobile: Training Programs For Mobile Learning l The Value-Added Benefits of VLEs (Virtual Learning Environments) to the Student Learning Journey l Calufusion: The Fusing of Technology with Learning and Life l Evaluating Mobility in the ACU Classroom: Apps, Podcasts, Student Response Systems and More

9:45 - 11 a.m.

5 - 6:30 p.m.

Track Session 1

Connected Talks 2: Rethinking Textbooks in the 21st-Century ....................................... Cullen Auditorium

Monday, February 28, 2011 8:15 - 9:30 a.m.

l Exploring the Mobile Media Workflow at Penn State l Mobile Learning and Student Engagement l From Paper to Digital: The Future of Textbooks l Engaging the 21st-Century Learner l Put a Device In Their Hand l Manor New Tech High School: Success in CBL/PBL Education & Innovation l Beyond Textbooks: Vail’s Digital Resources Initiative l Evaluating Campus-Wide Mobile Initiatives

Matt MacInnis, Inkling Sidney Burrus, Rice University Jeff Shelstad, Flatworld Knowledge Martin Fröhlich and Felix Hofmann, PaperC GmbH

6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Dinner ............................................. Teague Special Events Center

11:15 a.m. - 12:25 p.m.

7:45 - 9 p.m.

Lunch ............................................... Teague Special Events Center

Evening Keynote Event .................................. Moody Coliseum

12:30 - 2 p.m.

Steve Wozniak, co-founder, Apple; chief scientist, Fusion IO Plus live music by The Rocketboys

Connected Talks 1: Extending Learning in the 21st-Century ....................................... Cullen Auditorium

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Don Henderson, Apple, Inc. Abdul Chohan, Essa Academy (England) Allison Cerra, Alcatel-Lucent Maria Andersen, Muskegon Community College

8:30 - 9:45 a.m. AT&T Learning Studio Tours ........... Third Floor, Brown Library Track Session 3

2:15 - 3:15 p.m. Vendor Spotlights & Demos Alcatel-Lucent Vendor Spotlight An Education Revolution: Teaching the Millennials ............................. Cullen Auditorium. AT&T Learning Studio at ACU - Grand Opening .................. Third Floor, Brown Library Refreshments ................................................ Cullen Auditorium,

Teague Special Events Center and AT&T Learning Studio

3:30 - 4:45 p.m. Track Session 2 l Creating Consumption: Using the iPad to Gather, Produce, and Publish Content while creating a Mobile (and Green!) Journalism Course l Mobile Learning: The Learner’s Perspective l Reading in the Digital Era: The Future of Books and the Future of Education

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l Video is the Killer Mobile App l Mobile Learning and Student Engagement l Jekyll and Hyde: A Book with Augmented Reality l Social Learning: Designing Interactive Tools to Enable Active Reading and Sharing l Managing & Measuring Mobility’s Impact on Transforming Teaching & Learning l Deploying iPads as Exploratory Learning Devices l The Future Is Not What It Used To Be l The Process, Impact and Future of One-to-One iPads at Cedars School of Excellence l Evaluating Digital Texts: What We Know and What We Need to Know

10 - 11:15 a.m. AT&T Learning Studio Tours ........... Third Floor, Brown Library Track Session 4 l Faculty Approaches to Teaching with Mobile Media l HeadsUp: A Mobile Tool for Deepening Classroom Discussion


l What Things May Come: A Panel Discussion on ePublishing and eBooks l Personalizing Learning with the iPod touch l Service Desk Battle: Providing Support for Mobile Devices l The Kurogo Open Source Mobile Portal l Mobile Access to All Things Academic: MOX l Evaluating Digital Texts: What We Know and What We Need to Know

Tracks and Track Sponsors Media & Mobility Brown Library Core Classroom

S ponsored By

11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Morning Keynote .......................................... Cullen Auditorium Adrian Sannier, former UTO, Arizona State University; product vice president, Pearson eCollege

Teaching & Learning Hunter Welcome Center McCaleb Conference Center, Room B

12:30 - 1:45 p.m. Lunch ............................................... Teague Special Events Center

2 - 3:15 p.m. AT&T Learning Studio Tours ........... Third Floor, Brown Library Track Session 5 l The Impact of Mobility on Campus Media Centers l Faculty Perspective on Mobile Learning l Faculty- and Student-Created Digital Books: Building Next-Generation Course Resources l Teachers and Tech: Goals, Efficacy and Reflection l The Challenges of Mobile Connectivity l Seton Hill University: The Griffin Technology Advantage l The Journey to Mobile Learning l Social Media, Augmented Reality and Recent Advances in Mobile Learning

3:15 - 3:45 p.m.

S ponsored By

The Future of Books Hunter Welcome Center McCaleb Conference Center, Room C

S ponsored By

K-12 Education Hunter Welcome Center McCaleb Conference Center, Room A

S ponsored By

Break ................................................................. Cullen Auditorium

3:30 - 5 p.m. Connected Talks 3: Integrating Digital Tools in 21st-Century Education ........................... Cullen Auditorium Sarah Herrlinger, Apple, Inc. Matt Federoff, Vail Unified School District (Arizona); Fraser Speirs, Cedars School of Excellence (Scotland); Bill Rankin, Abilene Christian University

5 p.m. Conference Prize Giveaway ........................ Cullen Auditorium All registered conference attendees are eligible for the prize drawings. Registrants must be present to win.

Infrastructure & Logistics McGlothlin Campus Center, Living Room

S ponsored By

Campus Spotlights Shore Art Gallery

Research Hunter Welcome Center Alumni Conference Room

S ponsored By

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Mobilize Your University!

Universities World-Class Performance, Disruptively Affordable All Phones, All Networks

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Course Information & Reading Lists

Full Library Access

People Directory

Campus Mapping

Athletics

Emergency Information

Calendar/Events

Blogs & Twitter

Shuttle Schedule

Third Party Content

Tailored to your audience

Enable easier and faster communication

Share the latest developments with your community

Keep your community up-to-date to maximize participation

Provide on-the-go information for easier transportation planning

Including catalog search, integration with all ILS systems

Find any building and information such as addresses and hours Support the safety and security of your community

Integrated social networking tools

Such as Wikipedia, searchable Bible...

For more information contact info@boopsie.com http://www.boopsie.com/libraries

490 S. California Ave. Suite 105 Palo Alto, CA 94306 P. (650) 241-3300

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Ambler Avenue 36 68 61 60

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Connected Summit Parking

1 – A.B. Barret Hall (BRT) 2 – A.B. Morris Hall (MOR) 3 – Abilene Educational Supply (AES) 4 – ACU Press and Leafwood Publishers (PRS) 5 – Adams Hall (ADH) 6 – Beauchamp Amphitheatre (AMP) 7 – Bennett Gymnasium (BEN) 8 – Bonneau Family Indoor Batting Facility (BON) 9 – Brown Library, Learning Commons, Learning Studio, and Adams Center for Teaching and Learning (LIB) 10 – Chambers Hall (CHA) 11 – Chapel on the Hill (COH) 12 – Computer Service Center (CSC) 13 – Crutcher Scott Field (CSF) 14 – Cullen Auditorium (CUL) 15 – Don H. Morris Center (DMC) 16 – Duncum Center for Conflict Resolution (CCR) 17 – Eager Tennis Pavilion (EAG)

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INSET: South Campus

Connected Summit Meeting Facilities

18 – Education Building (EDB) 19 – Edwards Hall (EDW) 20 – Elmer Gray Stadium (EGS) 21 – Faubus Fountain Lake 22 – Fire Station Theatre (FST) 23 – Flag Plaza (FLG) 24 – Foster Science Building (FSB) 25 – Galaxy Park 26 – Gardner Hall (GAR) 27 – GATA Fountain (GAT) 28 – Gibson Health and Physical Education Center, Scruggs Gymnasium (GIB) 29 – Gilbreth-Scott Team Room 30 – Hardin Administration Building (ADM) 31 – Hope for the Future Sculpture 32 – Hunter Welcome Center (HWC) 33 – Jacob’s Dream Sculpture 34 – Labyrinth and Rich Welcome Plaza 35 – Larry Sanders Intramural Fields 36 – Lunsford Foundation Trail 37 – Mabee Business Building (MBB)

38 – Mabee Hall (MAB) 39 – Mabee Library Auditorium (MLA) The Core Classroom 40 – Mail Production Center (B02) 41 – McDonald Hall (MCD) 42 – McGlothlin Campus Center, The Campus Store, The Depot, The Living Room and The World Famous Bean (MCG) 43 – McKinzie Hall (MCK) 44 – Money Student Recreation and Wellness Center (MRW) 45 – Moody Coliseum (COL) 46 – Moore House (MRE) 47 – Nelson Hall (NEL) 48 – Nichols House (NIC) 49 – North House (NRT) 50 – Onstead-Packer Biblical Studies Building (BSB) 51 – Physical Resources Building (PRB) 52 – Police Department Building (UPD)

53 – Powell Fitness Center (PFC) 54 – Sewell Theatre (SWL) 55 – Sherrod Building (SHB) 56 – Sherrod Residential Park (SRP) 57 – Shore Art Gallery (SHO) 58 – Sikes Hall (SIK) 59 – Smith Hall (SMH) 60 – Soccer Field 61 – Soccer and Softball Fieldhouse 62 – Teague Special Events Center (TEC) 63 – Tower of Light (TWL) 64 – University Park Apartments (UPA) 65 – Vanderpool Building (VAN) 66 – WACU Museum / Jennings House (WAC) 67 – Wally Bullington Football Practice Facility 68 – Wells Field (WEL) 69 – Wildcat Disc Golf Course 70 – Williams Performing Arts Center (WPA) 71 – Zellner Hall (ZEL) 72 – Zona Luce Building (ZON)

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Monday, February 28 8:15 - 9:30 a.m.

Teaching & Learning......................Hunter Welcome Center,

McCaleb Conference Center, Room B

Mobile Learning and Student Engagement Christopher Higgins............Interim Director of Academic Support, University of Maryland

Keynote Presentation.................. Cullen Auditorium Transforming American Education: Learning Powered by Technology Karen Cator........Director, Office of Educational Technology, U.S. Department of Education Now is the time! Education faces unparalleled opportunities with the advent not only of new technologies, but also of the new pedagogies that are emerging. Join Karen Cator, a top educational technologist at the U.S. Department of Education as she presents the national Education Technology Plan with particular emphasis on the specific goals and recommendations and the “Getting Started Now” section. Cator is the director of the Office of Educational Technology at the U.S. Department of Education. She has devoted her career to creating the best possible learning environments for this generation of students. Prior to joining the department, Cator directed Apple’s leadership and advocacy efforts in education. In this role, she focused on the intersection of education policy and research, emerging technologies, and the reality faced by teachers, students and administrators. Cator holds a master’s degree in school administration from the University of Oregon and a bachelor’s degree in early childhood education from Springfield College. She is past chair of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills and has served on several boards, including the Software & Information Industry Association – Education.

9:45 - 11:00 a.m. Media & Mobility.................. Brown Library, Core Classroom Exploring the Mobile Media Workflow at Penn State Chris Millet .... Manager of Advanced Learning Projects, Penn State The concept of mobility is often associated with the use of portable devices, but can also encompass technologies that enable data portability and the ability to not only access your information but to do meaningful work, even media production, from anywhere and any device. Combined together, freedom of location and platform can enable students to engage in creative expression in a manner that is more social and which considers the context of their environment more fully. This presentation will discuss the pedagogies related to mobile learning, as well as specific technologies currently being used at Penn State, including HTML5, Kaltura (a Web-based media authoring tool), and iPod touch devices, to create a complete capture-to-publish mobile media workflow.

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The University of Maryland is in its third year of its Mobility Initiative. It has encompassed everything from student recruitment, to app development, to class projects. This session will focus on student engagement in the mobility initiative. It will include the experiences of faculty and students when using mobile devices for teaching and learning. Specific focus will be given to Digital Cultures and Creativity, and Information 3.0, two dynamic programs incorporating iPads and iPod touches with other technologies to engage students in learning. We also will discuss broader student engagement in our mobility programming contest that has attracted more than 100 students developing apps useful for campus and beyond.

The Future of Books......................Hunter Welcome Center,

McCaleb Conference Center, Room C

From Paper to Digital: The Future of Textbooks Moving from Digital Books (PDFs) to eTextbooks: What a True eTextbook Should Look Like Roger Von Holzen....... Director, Center for Information Technology in Education, Northwest Missouri State University Recent headlines announcing the arrival (finally!) of the digital textbook on campus and the great savings this movement from paper to digital will provide college students has proven to be more hype than reality. Even though the typical digital textbook is priced at approximately half the cost of the newly printed version of the book, few students are willingly embracing the digital platform. During this time of economic stress, why haven’t students taken this money-saving option? This paper will argue that the primary reason involves a lack of innovation. Most students who have been exposed to digital textbooks find they are dealing with PDF files that afford less flexibility and convenience than the current print technology affords them – that moving from paper to digital is more of a step down than a step up. Unfortunately, the hype and the damaging reality experienced by many students has set back the movement toward eTextbooks just at the moment when rapidly evolving hardware and software technologies are actually converging to enable the delivery of the ideal eTextbook experience. This session will initially delve into the technical, pedagogical and social issues behind the failure of the current batch of digital textbooks to gain a viable foothold in the American educational landscape. It will then explore and demonstrate the extensive array of features that will be required to move from the static world of printed textbooks into the fully integrated realm of true eTextbooks, discussing hardware platform delivery systems, eTextbook publication formats, interactive learning objects, course management systems integration, customization by faculty, and student-centered learning features. Finally, participants in this session will be asked to contribute their thoughts and ideas about what a true eTextbook experience should look like.


iPad or iFad: The Reality of a Paperless Classroom

Campus Spotlights.................................... Shore Art Gallery.

Ian Shepherd.................................. Associate Professor of Business, Abilene Christian University

Manor New Tech High School: Success in CBL/PBL Education & Innovation

Brent Reeves................... Associate Professor of Computer Science, Abilene Christian University This presentation will discuss the benefits, problems and possible solutions to teaching a Microeconomics class in a completely paperless fashion, exploring the use of the iPad as a tool to move students from a classroom infused with standard technologies into a truly mobile environment. The advent of the iPad has fundamentally changed a teacher’s ability to mobilize the student’s learning environment, freeing students to interact with one another and with course content in a way not possible with laptop or desktop machines. While the iPhone made paperless classrooms possible, the iPad, with its functionality and versatility, has made the paperless classroom practical, allowing teachers and students to use online texts, virtual games, electronic documents, group projects and applications such as Blackboard, Numbers, and QuickOffice in new ways. By focusing on a baseline comparison of a traditional Macroeconomics class featuring compulsory laptop usage with a Microeconomics class requiring iPad usage, this presentation will provide valuable insights into how usage patterns shift, altering the dynamics of classroom interaction. Finally, in addition to its exploration of some of the more technical issues described above, this presentation will report on overall student and faculty perceptions of the class and provide descriptions of specific class activities, outlining the advantages and limitations of this new technology as a course tool.

K-12 Education..................................Hunter Welcome Center,

McCaleb Conference Center, Room A

Engaging the 21st-Century Learner Tabitha Branum.................................................................Director, Coppell New Tech High School (Texas) If Rip Van Winkle woke up today what would be the one thing he would be able to recognize ... K-12 Public Schools. How can you engage learners who have immediate access to information at their fingertips? How can you enrich learning for the gifted while also meeting the needs of the at-risk learner? The K-12 system must figure out a way to reengage the 21st-century learner. New Tech High at Coppell is on the journey to transforming 21st-century education. Come share in the journey as one school shares how project-based learning, technology immersion, and a huge paradigm shift is changing the face of education.

Infrastructure & Logistics.....

McGlothlin Campus Center, Living Room

Put a Device in Their Hands Don Silvius......... Technology Support Services Help Desk Manager, Shenandoah University Joshua Tooley................................... Manager of Student Support, Abilene Christian University Melissa Alsing................................ Director of Information Systems .......................................................................... Seton Hill University The logistics associated with selecting, distributing, and equipping faculty and students with mobile devices are some of the more complex elements of a mobile-learning initiative. Learn how institutions have addressed these elements and coordinated with technology partners to ensure users have devices to engage learning initiatives.

Les Simpson

Apple Distinguished Educator and Instructor of Digital Media Literacy Manor New Tech High School (Texas)

and Steven Zipkes............................................................. Principal Manor New Tech High School (Texas) In its fourth year of operation, the 100 percent challenge-based learning / problem-based learning (CBL/PBL) Manor New Technology High School has welcomed more than 4,000 guests through its doors, all wanting to know the secrets to its success. This presentation by principal Steven Zipkes and Apple Distinguished Educator Les Simpson will explore how the campus performs so well and what its innovative curriculum means for education reform.

Beyond Textbooks: Vail’s Digital Resources Initiative Matt Federoff......................................... Chief Information Officer, Vail Unified School District (Arizona) Begun as an outgrowth of Empire High School’s one-to-one laptop program, Vail’s Beyond Textbooks initiative provides one answer to what the world might look like after textbooks – a model that leverages (and encourages the creation of) online resources to undergird instruction. Though some might worry that Vail’s initiative would be smothered by requirements and complexities in the highly controlled world of K-12 education, Vail’s teachers and technologists have created a truly revolutionary system that leverages new models for content creation and distribution and teacher support while continuing rigorously to meet state standards. This snapshot shows how Vail has been transformed by this fundamental change and shows some of the mechanisms they’ve used to advance learning in their district.

Research ..............................................Hunter Welcome Center,

Alumni Conference Room

Evaluating Campus-Wide Mobile Initiatives Rockies Mobile Dana La Fleur.............................. Director of Learning Architecture, Bridgepoint Education In today’s connected world, university students expect mobility and flexibility in accessing their learning environment. A recent University of the Rockies survey indicated that 36 percent of students have tried to access their online course through their mobile device, and of those 31 percent did so using the iPhone. To meet this need, Bridgepoint Education and the University of the Rockies developed the Rockies Mobile initiative. As a starting point, developers collected data to identify typical student behaviors within the Learning Management System. The results showed students were spending 45 percent of their time reading and posting to discussion forums, and that 35 percent of total pages viewed were course schedules. This data informed the initial Rockies Mobile feature set, which includes access to discussion forums, school news and alerts, contact information and course schedules. The Rockies Mobile initiative will launch with a pilot program, and through tracking actual student usage and behaviors we will continue to develop and optimize the mobilelearning experience.

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collaborate to create and implement solutions to authentic challenges. This presentation will introduce the basic principles of challenge-based learning and offer useful information for those interested in pursuing this compelling educational model.

Mobile Learning Research at ACU Brad Crisp..................... Assistant Professor of Information Systems, Abilene Christian University This presentation summarizes faculty-conducted research on ACU’s mobile-learning initiative. An overview of key questions and methods that have guided our examination of the experiences of students and faculty with mobile technologies inside and outside of the classroom will be provided. Key research findings will also be articulated, such as the repeated observation that iPhone users provide more favorable responses than iPod touch users. Suggestions for future research that will potentially benefit administrators and researchers who are examining other types of learning initiatives will be summarized.

One-to-One Mobile Device Deployment in a School Abdul Chohan.......................... Director, Essa Academy (UK) Essa Academy was the first school in the UK to give an iPod touch to all students and staff as a way of increasing access to information and deepening and expanding learning beyond the classroom. The creativity that that has been inspired by the use of this technology has been amazing. Staff and students are able to have seamless communication that facilitates the development of learning conversations, and the feedback educators are able to provide is not only of a higher quality, but also is powerfully personalized. This session will not only explore the ways that technology has enabled transformation, but will also describe how the integration of technology has contributed to Essa Academy’s vision for a new building that has recently begun construction.

Seton Hill University: The Griffin Technology Advantage Philip Komarny............. Vice President for Information Technology, and CIO, Seton Hill University Mary Ann Gawelek......................Provost and Dean of the Faculty, Seton Hill University A widespread implementation of any new campus initiative calls for a comprehensive plan for assessment across departments and academic programs. At Seton Hill University, the Griffin Technology Advantage initiative involved extensive preparation by staff and faculty to launch the use of new technology in and out of the classroom in Fall 2010. Expected impacts include: the creation of a teaching and learning environment which went beyond the confines of the traditional classroom in time and space; widespread use of mobile technology for instantaneous access to information; deepening of critical and creative thinking through interactive teaching strategies; increased student engagement in learning; and decreased costs through use of e-texts. The university also thought two related objectives might be achieved, enhanced campus vibrancy and increased administrative efficiencies.

Where’s the “Learn This” Button? Maria Andersen......... Learning Futurist and Math Professor, Muskegon Community College Learning needs to be more personalized. We all know this. But rarely does anyone describe a practical way actually to accomplish that goal. This presentation will delineate not only how we can (and will) do it, but will up the stakes, arguing that learning could be measured (gasp!) outside of educational institutions, with learners free to gobble up knowledge as they roam the Internet following their changing interests.

11:15 a.m. - 12:25 p.m.

2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

Lunch............................................... Teague Special Events Center

Alcatel-Lucent Vendor Spotlight .....Cullen Auditorium.

12:30 - 2 p.m.

An Education Revolution: Teaching the Millennials Gus Vasilakis............ Vice President Enterprise Sales, Alcatel-Lucent

Connected Talks.............................. Cullen Auditorium Extending Learning in the 21st Century The Shift – Technology Trends in a 2.0 World Allison Cerra............................Vice President, Alcatel-Lucent Technology adoption is occurring at an unprecedented rate. As a hyperconnected society becomes acculturated to on-demand, multimedia content across any device, the resulting implications to education and commerce are seismic. This session will explore some of the recent technology shifts and what current behaviors could signal about the future of academia and industry.

Challenge-Based Learning Don Henderson..........................Senior Manager of Creative Expression for Apple Education, Apple, Inc. Challenge-based learning is a multidisciplinary approach to teaching and learning where students and teachers 16

Never before in human history has a generation grown up with the wide variety of connected devices and instantaneous communications as our digital native “Millennials” have. Educators are now in the unenviable position of competing for – and winning – the attention of these students. This presentation will provide, through case studies and examples, an overview of the solutions that Alcatel-Lucent and Bell Laboratories have created which leverage social media, video conferencing, interactive whiteboard collaboration, augmented reality and digital textbooks to help a university evolve or revolutionize their pedagogical practices.

AT&T Vendor Spotlight ...................AT&T Learning Studio,

Third Floor, Brown Library

Introducing: The AT&T Learning Studio Xavier Williams...................................... Senior Vice President, AT&T Join AT&T and ACU in a ribbon-cutting ceremony and tour as we celebrate the opening of the AT&T Learning Studio on the top floor of the Brown Library on ACU’s campus. It will support students and faculty as they explore the way we live, learn and communicate in a


digital world. The Learning Studio provides students and faculty a place to develop new ideas, approaches or mobile learning solutions and share them with a global audience.

Refreshments..............................................Cullen Auditorium,

Teague Special Events Center and AT&T Learning Studio

3:30 - 4:45 p.m. Media & Mobility.................. Brown Library, Core Classroom Creating Consumption: Using the iPad to Gather, Produce, and Publish Content while Creating a Mobile (and Green!) Journalism Course Wendy M. Chapman........................ Director of Web Technologies, Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, University of Southern California Bill Celis............................................................ Associate Professor, Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, University of Southern California Matt Frank..................................................... New Media Specialist, Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, University of Southern California The iPad promised to change the way we consume content, but USC Annenberg wanted to investigate the potential of utilizing a highly mobile device with a long battery life to change the way journalists produce content. In this session, journalism professor Bill Celis, Wendy M. Chapman (Annenberg School director of Web technologies) and Matt Frank (new media specialist), will discuss how they collaborated to develop a course where students could produce substantial multimedia journalism using only an iPad. The session will describe how the iPad was used in the field to gather reports, edit content and publish the stories to the school’s Wordpress CMS. The session also will outline the design of the assignments, which iPad applications were used to produce multimedia content and push it to cloud-based applications such as Flickr and YouTube. Celis also will discuss how he modified the course so the class readings and resources could be accessed using the iPad via the Kindle app and Blackboard, making the course green and paperless. Finally, this session will discuss lessons learned in implementing such a course and internal observations, as well as feedback from the students on how effective the device was in the field and how it changed the way they tell stories.

The Future of Books......................Hunter Welcome Center,

McCaleb Conference Center, Room C

Reading in the Digital Era: The Future of Books and the Future of Education Building for the Next Information Age: Envisioning the Future of Books William Rankin.......................... Director of Educational Innovation, Abilene Christian University Almost six centuries ago, when Gutenberg’s press first made mass access to information possible, the world saw an explosion of creativity. Educational, political, and religious institutions were radically transformed as those who had once been excluded found new opportunities to participate. The resulting transformation unleashed the waves of invention that created the modern world. Now, a new generation of technologies is emerging that could change the world just as radically. The first true digital books – books that are location-aware, media-rich, mobile, broadly-interlinked, and socially-connected – are on the horizon, offering a new kind of access that could be just as transformative as Gutenberg’s revolution. This talk will briefly outline the trajectory of educational media from the first books through the first truly digital books as a way of tracing what’s next for education.

Reading in the Digital Era Lourdes Epstein Cal y Mayor..................... Directora de Biblioteca, Tecnológico de Monterrey As the world of information provides increasing access to resources, the academic community needs to reconsider the relationship between information itself and the “meaning” of how we receive it. Such an understanding provides insights into how and why the concept of reading is being redefined in the digital era. This perspective also allows us to see how the users or “readers” of information are driving trends in information access rather than merely being driven by them. Understanding the new literacy’s possibilities and the reading impact for groups and individuals also allows us to draw a map of changing cultural criteria for what constitutes literacy and for how people conceptualize their interaction with information.

K-12 Education..................................Hunter Welcome Center,

McCaleb Conference Center, Room A

Teaching & Learning......................Hunter Welcome Center,

The Process, Impact and Future of One-to-One iPads at Cedars School of Excellence

Mobile Learning: The Learner’s Perspective

Fraser Speirs.......................................... Head of Computing and IT, Cedars School of Excellence (Scotland)

McCaleb Conference Center, Room B

Student Panel, facilitated by Dwayne Harapnuik................... Director of Faculty Enrichment, Abilene Christian University In this panel format, session participants will be able to interact with higher education students who are using mobile devices in the classroom.

Scotland’s new Curriculum for Excellence aims to bring breadth, challenge and relevance back to the classroom. At the same time, technology is now an unstoppable force in society. At Cedars School of Excellence, we are committed to finding the best ways to integrate technology into teaching and learning. This talk will present the decision-making process that led to Cedars School of Excellence becoming the first in the world to deploy one-to-one iPads throughout the school. It will discuss the early impact of these devices and share insights into Cedars’ view of the future of teaching and learning with technology in K-12 through Curriculum for Excellence.

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Infrastructure & Logistics...... McGlothlin Campus Center,

Research ..............................................Hunter Welcome Center,

Get Comfortable! Be Mobile: Training Programs For Mobile Learning

Evaluating Mobility in the ACU Classroom: Apps, Podcasts, Student Response Systems and More

Michael Reuter..........................Director of Technology Operations, Central Michigan University

Effect of Student Response Systems on Student Achievement and Study Time

Kristy Strickland............................................... Technology Trainer, Abilene Christian University

Autumn Sutherlin................... Associate Professor of Biochemistry, Abilene Christian University

Ensuring students, faculty, and administrators are comfortable with mobile devices is critical to the success of mobile-learning initiatives. Learn training techniques, advice, examples and insights that institutions have leveraged while integrating new mobile technologies.

In five studies, use of student handheld response systems (clickers) in chemistry and biology classrooms has been studied to elucidate their effect on student learning. Three studies used Qwizdom Q4 clickers, while two employed Turning Point ResponseWare for the iPhone/ iPod Touch. All studies were conducted in two sections of university level science courses where one section served as a control and the other was treated. The first three studies were in introductory level chemistry, the fourth in organic chemistry, and the fifth in general biology. In all five, the study design was quasiexperimental using switching treatments with replication. Student pre- and post-attitudinal surveys were administered to all students in both sections. The students’ university grade point average and ACT scores were examined to determine the equivalency of the groups. The quiz and exam scores were analyzed to determine if there was a significant difference in achievement.The first study examined the effect of students using clickers during instruction when the teaching method was consistent between the sections. The second study looked at the effect of changing teaching methodology when the clickers were used. The third study focused on the effect of clickers on students self-reported study time and the significance of assigning value to in-class clicker questions. In the first three studies, there was no statistically significant difference in the achievement between the control and experimental groups on exams. Over the course of all three studies there was a slight but statistically significant difference in quizzes with the control group averaging slightly higher. In all studies, students self-reported that the clickers helped them learn the class material. The current studies are repeating the third study in a general biology course and organic chemistry course to attempt to assess the difference in courses and instructors.

Living Room

Campus Spotlights.................................... Shore Art Gallery. The Value-Added Benefits of VLEs (Virtual Learning Environments) to the Student Learning Journey Pez Kooner......................................IT Communications Consultant, Birmingham City University (UK) Ron Austin.............................. Senior Lecturer and Course Director, Birmingham City University (UK) The presentation will discuss the value that VLEs (Moodle/apps) can bring to the student-learning journey, looking in detail at a cohort of students and their engagement with course modules via the VLE. The use of iPhones and Android phones to disseminate course materials and quizzes also improves the students’ learning journey. The presentation will conclude by describing how Birmingham City University’s initiative is cncouraging engagement with the learning process in an open and accessible format.

Calufusion: The Fusing of Technology with Learning and Life. Charles Mance.... Vice President for University Technology Services, California University of Pennsylvania Growing out of an idea that mobility in the classroom would transform education, Calufusion seeks to create a three-phase approach for enhancing student engagement, teaching, and learning. This presentation will give a brief history of the concepts behind Calufusion, an update of where California University of Pennsylvania is today, a description of issues and difficulties we have identified along the way, a list of challenges the university has faced as it has developed this initiative, and a vision for the future. In addition to Calufusion, the university also is undertaking three new major technology initiatives that will further bolster the mobile initiative and enhance the teaching and learning aspects of mobility. This presentation also will introduce these three critical initiatives. First, a campus WiFi initiative will provide full coverage to all university properties and venues, a capability that research and experience indicated had to be addressed when deploying mobile devices to a large population of users. Second, and in parallel with the WiFi deployment, a smart classroom initiative will provide the necessary technology to outfit 74 general-purpose classrooms, providing the link between mobility and the classroom experience. Finally, the establishment of the Teaching and Learning Center (TLC) will provide initial and ongoing training of faculty, students, and staff in emerging technologies and their educational uses.

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Alumni Conference Room

Establishing Ubiquitous Learning: Building Upon Successful Mobile Technology Programs Priya Nihalani.................................. Chief Research Officer (GYLO); Doctoral Student in Learning, Cognition and Instruction, GYLO; The University of Texas at Austin Innovative technologies have the power to transform education. Mobile technologies, for instance, hold unique potential to enable learning processes anytime, anywhere (Bonk, 2009). However, the abundance of innovative technologies’ inability to transform education is a recurring trend (Christensen, Baumann, Ruggles, & Sadtler, 2006). We previously reported issues common to unsuccessful mobile learning initiatives as well as a pilot of ‘Statistics I,’ an iPhone/iPod touch app developed through evidence-based methods (Nihalani & Mayrath, 2010). The primary issue was applications’ pedagogically ineffective designs. The most common mobile learning has been direct applications of eLearning techniques from desktop computers to mobile devices. Yet, in reality, the transformation of learning content in a form appropriate for mobile devices is far from linear. ‘Statistics I’ was not designed based on a desktop version. The app was designed to leverage the iPhone’s pedagogical affordances for experiential learning and based on interdisciplinary research. Secondly, the absence of educator training to effectively integrate new technology in their classrooms was addressed by working with the current study’s instructor to integrate


the app appropriately in her course. At present, eTextbooks are expected to attempt widespread adoption within two years (Johnson, Levine, Smith, & Stone, 2010). How can we break the predictable trend? The present study successfully implemented a mobile educational application (‘Statistics I’) in an introductory statistics course. As an alternative to simply reporting findings, we sought to determine principles that can be applied to the eTextbook adoption.

Using iPhones as a Testing Platform: Questions of Academic Integrity Darryl Jinkerson .................... Associate Professor of Management, Abilene Christian University While anecdotal accounts of academic misconduct on tests within ACU and its College of Business Administration are common, no empirical data exists on how much of the problem is a function of the testing format used by professors in administering their respective exams. This study assessed the effect of varying the testing format by comparing the frequency of cheating and student attitudes toward cheating when their exam was presented in the traditional (Scantron) format versus the opportunity to present it in a scrambled, random format via the iPhone (or other technology platform). The research design used was a variation of the Repeated-Treatment Design (Cook & Campbell, 1979). The key question addressed was does the testing platform improve academic integrity (i.e., reduce cheating). Data was collected via a series of tests/quizzes administered in MGMT 439 in Fall 2010. For each exam/quiz administered, one section received the exam using the traditional paper based/Scantron format while the other received the exam/quiz via their iPhone including randomized item and option presentation. Following each exam/quiz, an anonymous self-report instrument was completed by all students on which they selected one of the following: 1) they were not tempted to cheat because the opportunity to see a neighbor’s answers did not present itself; 2) they definitely had the opportunity to cheat (because they could see their neighbors answers) but chose not to; or 3) they had opportunity and chose to copy answers from a neighbor. The presentation will share the results of the study as well as discussion of future methodology enhancements.

Evaluating the Use of Mobile Technology in the Undergraduate and Graduate Classroom Stephen Baldridge ................... Assistant Professor of Social Work, Abilene Christian University The purpose of this study was to measure student perceptions of the effectiveness of mobile device usage in and out of class as a form of delivering course content. This study analyzed and compared data from two separate classes: a freshman class with complete device ubiquity (supplied to the students by the university), and a graduate class in which students may or may not have had mobile devices. A survey used for the mobile-learning initiative at Abilene Christian University was adapted for use by the researchers. The areas evaluated were: identification of the primary remote device used by the student; its importance at the university; usage in a specific course; how it was used in the courses under study; and, how effective the technology was in teaching class remotely (without professor present). Preliminary analysis suggests the iPhone was the primary device both owned and used for mobile learning. Also, all devices were more effective when everyone had use of a remote device in the classroom, i.e., undergraduate students were more consistent in their ability to access/use them. Also, multiple problems were identified regarding remote teaching which will help in planning for later distant teaching opportunities. A full review of the complete findings will be presented by the primary author.

5 - 6:30 p.m. Connected Talks.............................. Cullen Auditorium Rethinking Textbooks in the 21st Century Your Textbook is a Vinyl Record Matt MacInnis ............................. Founder and CEO, Inkling Ah, the textbook, the very cornerstone of modern learning. Lesson plans, lectures, study sessions and exams often revolve around one, and not without good reason: it’s critical that students have trustworthy, consistent information about the topics they’re studying. Why, though, must the format be a book? It really oughtn’t be. While local pundits rail on about the costs of textbooks, we might consider informing them that we really don’t want a textbook at any price. Instead, we want something more effective. Something modular and flexible. Something interactive. Something that’s cheaper and better. We wouldn’t want vinyl records at a lower price if we could easily have an iPod. So why are we wasting time arguing about the price of something we don’t want? In this brief presentation, Matt MacInnis will highlight a handful of constraints we often inadvertently accept when we talk about “digital textbooks,” exploring the opportunities afforded by the iPad that we often miss as a result of these bookish blind spots. The presentation will conclude by showing specific examples of how Inkling takes advantage of iPad in simple ways that make a huge difference to learning.

OER, Connexions and the Next Textbook Sidney Burrus ............................... Dean of Engineering and Member of Connexions Board, Rice University The current printed textbook is, without question, the primary technology used in education. Along with classroom lectures, homework, laboratory experiments, and examinations, a very mature system for almost all of education has evolved and has served us well for many years. Now, however, we have new digital technologies, which along with new cognitive learning theories, new open-access copyright licenses, new social-network-enabled communities of learners, and a shift of emphasis from teaching to learning, all of which are engendering significant improvements in education. This session will develop the ideas surrounding Open Educational Resources (OER) and will focus on a particular implementation, Connexions, as an example of this new approach in the educational world.

Freeing the Textbook: Building a Sustainable 21st-Century Publishing Model Jeff Shelstad.......... Founder and CEO, Flatworld Knowedge. While the disruptive power of the Internet promises wider access to knowledge and new legal licensing structures open the door for enhanced sharing, old business models often stand in the way. How have we arrived at the era of the $200 textbook, with stakeholders so enmeshed in the status quo that they don’t seem to question it – even though none of them are being particularly well served? And how can new business models bring disruptive innovation to educational publishing, building a sustainable, new, 21st-century publishing model, based on free and open textbooks, in the process? This paper will explore these questions, offering new perspectives on the future of academic publishing. 19


Between Open Access and Commerce: A Case Study of a Freemium Business Model for Academic and Specialist eBooks Martin Fröhlich................. Founder and Managing Director, PaperC GmbH Felix Hofmann................... Founder and Managing Director, PaperC GmbH How can we find a balance between Open Access and Commerce, offering free knowledge as well as the possibility of commercial profit for publishers and authors? The founders of PaperC believe that freemium business approaches will be the future of publishing. In this session, they will present a case study of how a freemium model could work to revolutionize the ebook market. One of the central problems of the eBook market is known as the “arrow information paradox”: In the fields of information and knowledge, market mechanisms fail because potential customers want to know a product in order to make a purchasing decision. But if this product is itself information, the need for purchasing vanishes once customers know what it contains. Illegal filesharing, which poses a serious threat to publishers, can be considered one of the offsprings of this paradoxal situation. In collaboration with such publishers as O’Reilly, de Gruyter, OECD, and Pearson Education Germany, PaperC is forwarding a freemium model to circumvent this paradox. This model permits users to read full books online completely free of charge, with payments reserved for valuable premium functions: saving or printing pages, copying text with or without citation, highlighting and annotating text selections, and managing their research and books in a dedicated online library. Through granting customers the choice to decide what proportion of the product they want to purchase, PaperC and similar freemium models could help diminish illegal file-sharing and enhance access to knowledge.

6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Dinner............................................. Teague Special Events Center

Tuesday, March 1 8:30 - 9:45 a.m. AT&T Learning Studio Tours..................... Brown Library Learning Studio Staff .........................Abilene Christian University The new AT&T Learning Studio on the top floor of ACU’s Brown Library seeks to explore the ways we live, learn and communicate in a digital world. It was designed with groups in mind, and features collaboration spaces and tools to help teams be more productive. The facility also provides students and faculty access to high quality studios for audio and video production to help them share their next big idea. The Learning Studio will be dedicated Monday afternoon, followed by opportunities for attendees to tour and ask questions about the facility. Spots are limited, so please reserve your space by visiting acu.edu/learningstudiotour.

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acu.edu/connectedsummit

Monday, February 28 7:30 - 9 p.m.

Keynote Presentation.................... Moody Coliseum Steve Wozniak is one of the true icons of Silicon Valley. An engineer’s engineer, Woz helped spark the personal-computing revolution, designing the Apple I (introduced in 1976), and most notably, the Apple II (introduced in 1977). Even in those early days of computing, Woz began to include features in Apple’s computers that would help everyday people learn and explore – color, sophisticated graphics, powerful storage capabilities, and multi-voice audio – but he also insisted on two essential and transformative characteristics: simplicity and usability. In the intervening years, Wozniak’s notion that empowering everyday people with easy-to-use technology and broad access would help drive a social revolution has proven strikingly true. In this conversation, we’ll ask this pioneer about his focus on education, his ongoing work with emerging technologies, and his vision for the future of technology and society. Wozniak’s work has helped shape the computing industry since the 1970s. In 1976, he and Steve Jobs founded Apple Computer Inc. with Wozniak’s Apple I personal computer. The following year, he introduced his Apple II personal computer, featuring a central processing unit, a keyboard, color graphics, and a floppy disk drive. Wozniak holds a degree in electrical engineering and computer science from UC-Berkeley, and has received the National Medal of Technology from the President of the United States. After leaving Apple in 1985, Wozniak was involved in various business and philanthropic ventures, focusing primarily on computer capabilities in schools and stressing hands-on learning and encouraging creativity for students. He founded the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and was the founding sponsor of the Tech Museum, Silicon Valley Ballet and Children’s Discovery Museum of San Jose. Wozniak currently serves as chief scientist for Fusion-io and has published a New York Times best-selling autobiography, iWoz: From Computer Geek to Cult Icon.


Media & Mobility.................. Brown Library, Core Classroom Video is the Killer Mobile App Kyle Bowen........................ Director, Informatics, Purdue University One of the most powerful content creation features of any mobile device is the camera. The latest generation of smartphones has not only improved picture quality, but with the addition of both back and front-facing cameras, mobile devices can now visually chronicle any activity. In the hands of a student, this technology becomes an effective means for evaluation, self-assessment, and peer-to-peer learning. Purdue University is experimenting with a new mobile video system, called DoubleTake, that enables students to capture, share, and watch videos from virtually anywhere using their smartphone. Once submitted, DoubleTake provides instructors an easy way to assign, manage, and grade student video projects. This system also uses a unique encoding process that makes use of idle machines in campus computer labs, offices, and supercomputing clusters – providing students with a movie-studio sized render farm in their pocket. This presentation will discuss how the technology was used across a variety of courses, and information learned during development and implementation of the application. A hands-on demonstration will be available for presentation attendees. More information can be found at purdue.edu/studio/doubletake/.

Social Learning: Designing Interactive Tools to Enable Active Reading and Sharing Myriam Ribière.....................Group Leader, Social Communication, Department, Alcatel-Lucent Bell Laboratories, France Natalie Ebenreuter.......................... Interaction Design Researcher, Alcatel-Lucent Bell Laboratories, France As a first step towards facilitating social learning, this session will present an early prototype application designed to enable students to create different types of annotations and symbolic markups around the content of a digital book. In addition, this session will also present preliminary research findings regarding the various tasks and approaches that students take as they gather and share knowledge. Insight into these strategies provides us with a greater understanding of student practices, needs and requirements. This, in turn, requires us to rethink the use and function of digital books and to envision new ways of leveraging social networks as readers engage with informative content.

K-12 Education.................................

Hunter Welcome Center McCaleb Conference Center, Room A

Managing & Measuring Mobility’s Impact on Transforming Teaching & Learning

Teaching & Learning......................Hunter Welcome Center,

James R. Veitenheimer.......................................... Superintendent, Keller Independent School District (Texas)

Mobile Learning and Student Engagement

Leonard S. Avecilla.............................................DISCOVERY Team, Keller Independent School District (Texas)

McCaleb Conference Center, Room B

Maria Andersen.................... Learning Futurist and Math Professor, Muskegon Community College We’ve seen many major industries undergo dramatic change in the last decade (i.e. manufacturing, newspapers, and customer service). While education seems ‚“untouchable” to those within the system, there are many “levers of change” that have the potential for dramatic restructuring of higher education as well. Online courses, adaptive computer assessment systems, open-source textbooks, edupunks, pay-by-the-month degrees, these are just some of the levers that are prying at the corners of higher education. In this presentation I will identify many of the levers of change that have the potential to shift higher education, resources to learn more about these, and a few scenarios that describe some of the possible future of higher education.

The Future of Books......................Hunter Welcome Center,

McCaleb Conference Center, Room C

Jekyll and Hyde: A Book with Augmented Reality Martin Kovacovsky....................... Visual Communication Designer, Hügli & Kovacovsky Marius Hügli.................................. Visual Communication Designer,. Hügli & Kovacovsky This presentation will demonstrate our project “Jekyll and Hyde,” in which we combined a book with augmented reality (AR). Besides providing an extensive live demo of the project, this presentation will address the design process, offering an overview of the challenges and benefits of designing for augmented reality and of the overall role that AR can play in how people interact with information.

Lara Lee Hogg.....................................................................Trustee, Keller Independent School District (Texas) Producing real gains in teaching effectiveness and learning outcomes requires management of the many simultaneously interacting variables that regulate success. Without enough attention to the entire range of influences, success is compromised (e.g. deploying devices without appropriate training, or sufficiently widespread teacher buy-in). Deploying technology without changing, in parallel, how teachers teach results in merely “a digital version of industrial age delivery.” Under these circumstances, real gains for learning outcomes, student product or performance may not result. This presentation describes our 21st-century instructional models, as a framework for considering the challenges in deploying mobility, and for managing technology-centric delivery.

Infrastructure & Logistics...... McGlothlin Campus Center,

Living Room

Deploying iPads as Exploratory Learning Devices Amy Campbell.................................................... Assistant Director, Center for Instructional Technology, Duke University The advent of the iPad, with its unique computing format, has stirred faculty excitement and interest in mobile computing on our campus, and has spurred many faculty to think about whether and how this new type of device could change their classrooms and the way they think about teaching with technology. We have been encouraging faculty to experiment with iPads as learning and productivity devices, to see whether iPads allow faculty to accomplish teaching activities they may not have been able to do as easily in the past. In this session, Amy will briefly share: 1. Our process for managing the loaner programs, including managing and configuring the devices, handling and reviewing program applications, and distributing and collecting the devices. acu.edu/connectedsummit

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2. Our efforts to build a campus user community for information and experience sharing around iPads. 3. Some faculty and student experiences with iPads in courses and academic programs ranging from music to writing, computer science, engineering, medical residency, and foreign languages.

Campus Spotlights.................................... Shore Art Gallery. The Future is Not What It Used To Be Abdul Chohan............................. Director, Essa Academy (England) Starting in December 2009, Essa Academy began providing an iPod touch to each of its students. The creativity and student success inspired by the use of this technology has been amazing. This presentation will allow participants to have a more in-depth perspective on how equipping students with mobile devices has transformed this school in the north of Britain. As staff and students are able to communicate more seamlessly, and as educators are able to provide feedback that is not only of a higher quality, but is also powerfully personalized, this once struggling school has unprecedented success. Abdul Chohan, a chief architect of Essa Academy’s mobile initiative, will outline the remarkable change his school has seen and will describe how mobile technologies are even impacting the design of new facilities.

The Process, Impact and Future of One-to-One iPads at Cedars School of Excellence Fraser Speirs.......................................... Head of Computing and IT, Cedars School of Excellence (Scotland) This talk will present the decision-making process that led to Cedars School of Excellence becoming the first in the world to deploy one-to-one iPads throughout the school. It will discuss the early impact of these devices and share insights into Cedars’ view of the future of technology in K-12 education.

Research...............................................Hunter Welcome Center,

Alumni Conference Room

Evaluating Digital Texts: What We Know and What We Need to Know The Challenge of Using eTextbooks in Higher Education Roger Von Holzen................... Director, Distance Learning Services; Director, Center for Information Technology in Education; and Director, Textbook Services, Northwest Missouri State University Over the past several years, online classes have been slowly delving into the realm of eTextbooks, primarily motivated by cost and delivery issues. Until Fall 2008, that was the case with Northwest Missouri State University. But starting that fall, Northwest undertook an initial pilot study to test the feasibility of moving toward an eTextbook-based academic environment. The pilot focused on utilizing Sony’s eReader. During the second phase of the pilot, Northwest expanded its eTextbook offerings to more than two-thirds of its 6,500 students, but this time, basing the delivery of the eTextbooks via campus-provided notebook computers. This session will focus on the findings of Northwest’s two pilot projects and also will detail the challenges faced by current eTextbook technology.

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An Evaluation of eTextbooks: Are Designers Listening to Researchers? Michael Mayrath ......................................... President, CEO, GYLO . Traditional textbook publishers are facing a historical shift similar to what music publishers experienced 10 years ago. Digital distribution models and open-source content will fundamentally change the way instructional content is delivered. Especially in higher education, textbook prices continue to increase forcing students to search for digital alternatives to expensive paper textbooks. Today’s college students are digital natives who use technology in all aspects of their lives; however, they continue to resist digital textbooks because these eTextbooks do not utilize the affordances of the medium. Students naturally bring expectations of interactivity to digital environments. These students are accustomed to finding answers by searching online with keywords then exploring with links. In contrast, today’s digital textbooks are frequently just PDFs from existing textbooks with page turner arrows. This simplistic content conversion strategy, although cost efficient, cheats the user because the digital textbook is not interactive, engaging, social, or internally hyperlinked. Further, there is generally zero integration of technology-based assessments into existing digital textbooks. Yet, digital environments allow for rich and robust assessments that provide custom feedback and scaffolding. Another missed opportunity for digital textbooks to utilize the affordances of the medium. This presentation challenges the current state of digital textbooks and argues for an instructional design paradigm shift. As a community of educators, administrators, and innovators, we must lead the change we seek and strive to fully capture the potential of the medium by creating digital textbooks that redefine traditional models of delivering instructional content.

Textbooks v. eTextbooks: Do Students Trust One Over Another? Alyssa Reinhardt ............................................. Doctoral Candidate, The University of Texas at Austin Widespread adoption of eTextbooks is expected within the next two to three years (Johnson, Levine, Smith, & Stone, 2010). For states already allocating funds to eTextbook purchases (e.g., Texas), estimated time-to-adoption might be even sooner. eTextbooks currently lack a standard set of defining features, beyond being digitally based, and thus exist in multiple formats spanning digital texts resembling print-based textbooks to Wikipedia-type pages to interactive course modules. University pilots have demonstrated differential learning outcomes resultant of these varying formats (Precel, Eshet-Alkalai, & Alberton, 2009). However, a relationship yet to be explored is how perceived credibility of instructional material varies across eTextbook formats and impacts learning. This study investigated differences in credibility judgments across common eTextbook formats, compared to printed texts, to inform designers and educators of student needs before widespread adoption occurs. Designers must gain a greater understanding of student needs before widespread adoption occurs. Until pedagogically effective development occurs, educators must also be weary of utilizing eTextbooks in their courses. Providing designers with criteria aligned with educational research may be the first step in this process and is explored to a greater extent in the conducted study.


Studying Students’ Annotation Strategies in the Digital Textbook Robert McKelvain......................................Professor of Psychology, Abilene Christian University The presentation will review the methodology and preliminary findings of a project collaboration between ACU and Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs designed to understand university students annotation strategies in a digital textbook.

Evaluation of Digital Texts: Pilots of Microeconomics and Marketing on the Inkling Platform Scott Perkins...................Coordinator of Mobile Learning Research, Abilene Christian University Three years ago, ACU began deploying mobile devices to students in a campus-wide initiative attempting to harness the potential of these devices to enhance educational experiences. With release of Apple’s iPad, another glimpse of the future of higher education seems apparent, one in which students carry their course texts and personal media in a sort of “digital backpack” that is light, enjoyable, and always connected to the world of information and friends. However, the integration of technology into academic programs has not always improved educational outcomes, as appropriate deployment and use seem a prerequisite for improved engagement and learning. This paper reports on two full-semester trials of digital texts in one Microeconomics and one Marketing class at ACU where students provided ongoing evolution of the text, Inkling platform, and the iPad across the semester. Results clearly show that students eagerly anticipate a future where they expect to have light-weight and constant access to their academic texts. However, student participants also explicitly articulate obstacles and challenges they perceive to successfully migrating to digital formats for reading, studying, and preparing for the workplace they anticipate. The trend toward digital texts is readily apparent from recent state-wide school board adoptions; thus, extending initial empirical evaluations of reading and learning on these platforms is of both immediate and critical need.

10 - 11:15 a.m. AT&T Learning Studio Tours..................... Brown Library Learning Studio Staff ........................ Abilene Christian University

Jaime Goff.........................................Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Marriage and Family Therapy, Abilene Christian University Stephen Baldridge ................... Assistant Professor of Social Work, Abilene Christian University When podcasting first hit college campuses, it came with several artifacts or ghosts of educational media past. The majority of content focused on lectures, where recording focused on the technical challenge of distributing 60- to 90-minute captures of the classroom experience. The first wave of research emphasized that class captures didn’t discourage classroom attendance and improved access for exam review. This faculty panel will consider a range of approaches to faculty and student podcasting beyond the classroom capture model. What other models might capture student attention outside the classroom? How do mobile media players and recorders help create new models? What is the best measure for the success of these models: student test scores, media creation or academic independent skills, or media views or some other engagement measure?

Teaching & Learning......................Hunter Welcome Center,

McCaleb Conference Center, Room B

HeadsUp: A Mobile Tool for Deepening Classroom Discussion James Langford............Director of Innovation and Implementation Abilene Christian University Kyle Dickson................................... Director, AT&T Learning Studio, Associate Professor of English, Abilene Christian University Much early development in the mobile education space has focused on campus information, content distribution, or textbooks and study aids. When teachers and developers at Abilene Christian asked what common classroom problems were not represented in the first wave of app development, they settled on the small-group discussion. Interviews with faculty and students revealed a wide disparity of practices and compromises in classrooms currently structured around discussion-based or team-based learning. Based on these focus groups, the team developed HeadsUp, a mobile application that seeks to decrease time devoted to group setup and increase the quality and complexity of group interactions.

The Future of Books......................Hunter Welcome Center,

McCaleb Conference Center, Room C

The new AT&T Learning Studio on the top floor of ACU’s Brown Library seeks to explore the ways we live, learn and communicate in a digital world. It was designed with groups in mind, and features collaboration spaces and tools to help teams be more productive. The facility also provides students and faculty access to high quality studios for audio and video production to help them share their next big idea. The Learning Studio will be dedicated Monday afternoon, followed by opportunities for attendees to tour and ask questions about the facility. Spots are limited, so please reserve your space by visiting acu.edu/learningstudiotour.

What Things May Come: A Panel Discussion on ePublishing and eBooks

Media & Mobility.................. Brown Library, Core Classroom

This panel discussion will explore emerging trends and opportunities in the future of digital books, allowing audience members to pose questions to a group of forward-thinking corporate and academic experts. What features will future textbooks have to have in order to take advantage of emerging pedagogical trends? How will intellectual property laws impact digital texts? What economic and distribution models are emerging, and how will these impact the educational use of digital texts? Session attendees are invited to bring their questions and come prepared for a lively discussion.

Faculty Approaches to Teaching with Mobile Media Cynthia Powell .............................Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Abilene Christian University Autumn Sutherlin ........................Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Abilene Christian University

William Rankin (moderator)................. Abilene Christian University Sidney Burrus ....................................................... Rice Connexions Natalie Ebenreuter.................................... Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs Martin Fröhlich and Felix Hofmann.................................. PaperC Matt MacInnis...................................................................... Inkling Myriam Ribière.......................................... Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs Jeff Shelstad................................................. Flatworld Knowledge.

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K-12 Education..................................Hunter Welcome Center,

Research...............................................Hunter Welcome Center,

Personalizing Learning with the iPod touch

Evaluating iPad Pilot Programs

Louise Duncan.......................eLearning Coordinator, Lead Teacher, Shepparton High School (Australia)

The Modern Textbook for the Modern Student

McCaleb Conference Center, Room A

Practical examples from Australia of how the iPod touch has been used for differentiation in the K12 classroom for ESL (English as a second language), literacy and numeracy support, LOTE (languages other than English) and middle years engagement.

Infrastructure & Logistics...... McGlothlin Campus Center,

Living Room

Service Desk Battle: Providing Support for Mobile Devices Greg Smith............Chief Information Officer, George Fox University. Eric Lemmons .... PitStop (Computer Support Services) Coordinator, Abilene Christian University Scott Miller............. Seton Hill University Solutions Center Manager, Seton Hill University How will the increased adoption of more powerful mobile devices be supported by our university? Will our traditional academic computing habits prevent our students from taking advantage of these new opportunities?

Campus Spotlights.................................... Shore Art Gallery. The Kurogo Open Source Mobile Portal Pete Akins..................................................... Developer, ModoLabs. Mobile portals are important to all institutions. Students, employees and the public are increasingly using mobile devices to consume campus services and expectations are growing. Kurogo is a highly customizable, open-source framework that has gone through several iterations from its beginnings at MIT. Its goal is to provide institutions with an open-source solution that is easy to use, but also highly extendable and customizable, with the support of a growing community. This presentation will highlight the features of Kurogo and document existing uses showing its extensibility and power.

Mobile Access to All Things Academic: MOX Lee M. Colaw................ Chief Information Officer, Amarillo College More than 99 percent of students have a mobile device. They text, tweet, call, search, and more, and they’re just waiting for teachers to give them mobile access to all things academic. See how one institution answered the call with Datatel MOX, a powerful application that gives all campus constituents an easier way to manage their academic and work experience. MOX delivers maps, contacts, directories, news, notifications, and events straight to the smart phone, giving students, faculty, and staff anytime access to the important information they need.

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Alumni Conference Room

Rick Lytle........................ Dean, College of Business Administration, Abilene Christian University For centuries, tangible printed text has been at the heart of learning for mankind. Today, elementary through collegiate education continue to be dominated by traditional printed textbooks. Textbook efficacy results from a variety of factors including, but not limited to content, size, sequencing of material, breadth of scope, and layout (colors, inserts, and pictures). However, this longstanding learning form may be heading for antiquity. Today, learning material is being published in digital format for use on mobile devices which could eventually replace the traditional classroom textbook. The purpose of this research is to explore student and faculty perceptions regarding learning with digital textbooks on mobile devices. Specifically, last fall we conducted a study about the iPad mobile device and the Inkling eTextbook within the educational system. We surveyed faculty and administration at Abilene Christian University, Texas A&M University, The University of Texas at Austin, and the Abilene Independent School District. The purpose of the survey was to discover the opinions of teachers and administration relative to the use of the iPad as an educational tool and the eTextbook as a replacement for traditional, physical textbooks. Three-hundred and ninety-eight respondents from a variety of different departments and educational perspectives completed the survey. Respondents were asked about their experience with the iPad and their opinions about its usefulness in the classroom and to learning in general. We also asked questions about the characteristics of physical textbooks that are most important to them, seeking how the best of the traditional textbook can be translated onto an iPad eTextbook. Overall, our research findings indicate significant positive evaluation of the iPad and the eTextbook as an educational tool. An overwhelming 91 percent of respondents stated that they thought the iPad was a “generally useful product.” Moreover, 82 percent of respondents believed the iPad would be useful specifically in a classroom situation. Finally, over half (60 percent) of the respondents indicated they would actually consider buying an iPad in the near future. The study reveals a variety of opinions, interesting information and trends regarding the iPad, eTextbooks, and learning. We believe the knowledge discovered through our research could open doors to a higher level of learning for educational institutes everywhere. The iPad and Inkling have introduced the modern textbook for the modern student.

iPad as an Effective Technology for Taking an Online Program Scott Hamm....................................... Online Instructional Designer, Abilene Christian University The emergence of mobile technology has presented extensive opportunities for asynchronous learning and collaboration among students and instructors, particularly in online learning. It allows individuals to access course materials and information virtually any time and any place and provides promising prospects for the future of education and pragmatic instruction. The predominant objective of this study was to explore students’ perceptions of their utilization of the Apple iPad across varying environments (i.e. school/work, home and travel) and activities to evaluate the advantages and obstacles of engaging such innovations. Additional measures assessed participant usage, collaboration with peers and instructors, engagement and the potential educational value


of the device. Identification of which aspects of the iPad separate it from comparable mobile technologies currently being employed was also investigated.

Enhancing Mobility and Productivity for MBA Students: The iPad as a Professional Tool

11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Keynote Presentation ................. Cullen Auditorium If Not Now, When?

Patricia Burr................Distinguished Chair of International Business, Incarnate Word University

Adrian Sannier........... Former UTO, Arizona State University Product Vice President, Pearson eCollege

Marshall Eidson...................................... Chief Information Officer, Incarnate Word University

The challenges facing American education are formidable, and seem to call for change more radical than incremental. For more than two decades technology has been “on the verge” of transforming education, yet from pre-K through higher education, for the most part school has remained unchanged. Is it possible that the force that has continually improved nearly every other facet of modern life will ultimately have no fundamental impact on education? Or are we finally at the brink of real change? In his talk, Sannier will explore the unfulfilled expectations for technology in education and consider whether conditions are finally right for major change.

UIW’s year-long iPad Pilot Program, begun in August 2010, is integrated into the MBA Program, and iPads are supplied at no cost to all students in the Program. Student achievement and successes are assessed for best practices and learning challenges on a frequent basis. Lessons learned address learner fear, coaching for appropriate application use, incorporating technology without robbing discipline content, translating new skill sets into next day’s on-the-job environment, and acknowledging challenges of providing campus technology support. Included for discussion are an eight-week-use plan, examples of applications used, costs involved, and class photos and student feedback.

Freed-Hardeman University’s iPad Pilot (Summer 2010 & Fall 2010) M. Monte Tatom........... Director of Quality Enhancement Program, Freed-Hardeman University Freed-Hardeman University (FHU) began an iPad Pilot during the Summer 2010 term with the General Chemistry 1 class (four students) during June and the General Chemistry 2 class (five students) during July. The iPad Pilot was continued during the Fall 2010 term with Technical Theater Production 1 (11 students), Technology and the Special Education Teacher (four students), Natural Resource Conservation (12 students), Introduction to Photography (15 students), and Human Resource Management (nine students). Results will be shared from our qualitative research of FHU iPad Pilot that was conducted during Summer 2010 and Fall 2010. Comments will be shared from both the students and faculty that were involved in the pilot concerning the use of the iPad and various apps that were utilized.

12:30 - 1:45 p.m. Lunch............................................... Teague Special Events Center 2 - 3:15 p.m. AT&T Learning Studio Tours..................... Brown Library Learning Studio Staff ........................ Abilene Christian University The new AT&T Learning Studio on the top floor of ACU’s Brown Library seeks to explore the ways we live, learn and communicate in a digital world. It was designed with groups in mind, and features collaboration spaces and tools to help teams be more productive. The facility also provides students and faculty access to high quality studios for audio and video production to help them share their next big idea. The Learning Studio will be dedicated Monday afternoon, followed by opportunities for attendees to tour and ask questions about the facility. Spots are limited, so please reserve your space by visiting acu.edu/learningstudiotour.

Media & Mobility.................. Brown Library, Core Classroom The Impact of Mobility on Campus Media Centers Kyle Dickson................................... Director, AT&T Learning Studio, Abilene Christian University Chris Millet....................... Manager of Advanced Learning Projects, Penn State University Matt Frank..................................................... New Media Specialist, Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, University of Southern California Kyle Bowen..................... Director of Informatics, Purdue University Over the last decade, campuses across the country have developed new media centers and studios to help students and faculty of all skill levels produce media projects. Often identified by high-end workstations and digitization equipment, these centers sought to acu.edu/connectedsummit 25


bring users to a central location where training and production of media might be enhanced. What impact will mobile creation, editing, and publishing tools have on the traditional role of the new media center? How have our audiences or methods adapted in response to our mobile users? (*Session will begin with a short tour of the AT&T Learning Studio on the top floor of the Brown Library.)

Infrastructure & Logistics...... McGlothlin Campus Center,

Living Room

The Challenges of Mobile Connectivity

Teaching & Learning ....................Hunter Welcome Center,

Tom Anderson.....Apple Network Engineer, Shenandoah University

Mobile Learning: The Teacher’s Perspective

Dempsey Peterson .................................. Senior Network Analyst, ...............................................................Abilene Christian University

McCaleb Conference Center, Room B

Faculty Panel, facilitated by Dwayne Harapnuik................... Director of Faculty Enrichment, Abilene Christian University In this panel format, session participants will be able to hear from and interact with higher education faculty who are using mobile devices to enhance learning.

The Future of Books......................Hunter Welcome Center,

McCaleb Conference Center, Room C

Faculty- and Student-Created Digital Books: Building Next-Generation Course Resources Chapter 0: How 20 Freshmen Created Their Own Electronic Text Mark Phillips............ Associate Professor of Management Sciences, Abilene Christian University During Fall 2010, an honors section of Introduction to Business was challenged to create their own electronic textbook replacement. This presentation will briefly summarize the process, including both high and low points, concluding with a look at the open-source product currently being used by students in the course.

K-12 Education..................................Hunter Welcome Center,

McCaleb Conference Center, Room A

Teachers and Tech: Goals, Efficacy and Reflection Into the Looking Glass: Using Video as Scaffold for Teacher Reflection Sheila Delony... Professor of Education, Abilene Christian University Effective teacher reflection requires that the image reflected on be accurate. Many times, teachers and teacher candidates are asked to reflect on their teaching, but depend only on their memories as the object of reflection. The accessibility and mobility of video recording lends itself to utilizing videos as tools for improving teacher reflection. This presentation will share the benefits and limitations of video reflection in a field-based, senior-level teacher preparation course. Teacher candidates in the course recorded small group reading lessons, reflected on their teaching, and applied their findings to subsequent lessons.

The Bus is Leaving; Are Your Teachers on Board?: Preparing the 21st-Century Teacher Billie McConnell.................Director of K-12 Digital Learning Institute, Abilene Christian University Preparing teachers to integrate technology is one of the most important, and perhaps least planned, parts of an implementation. This presentation will explore the factors that will help teachers understand the expectations and goals, help administrators have 26

realistic expectations, and inform all concerned of the roadblocks and success factors from other initiatives.

acu.edu/connectedsummit

Arthur Brant ........................... Director of Enterprise Infrastructure, ...............................................................Abilene Christian University Mobile device connectivity offers some unique challenges in terms of both coverage and capacity. Learn what institutions have done to address these challenges in order to ensure a robust and functional connected environment.

Campus Spotlights.................................... Shore Art Gallery. Seton Hill University: The Griffin Technology Advantage Philip Komarny............. Vice President for Information Technology, CIO, Seton Hill University Mary Ann Gawelek......................Provost and Dean of the Faculty, Seton Hill University The Griffin Technology Advantage, Seton Hill’s commitment to provide students with the best in technology and collaborative learning tools, ensures that Seton Hill students will be uniquely suited to whatever careers they choose‚ even careers that have not yet been created. Beginning in the fall of 2010, all first-year undergraduate students at Seton Hill received a 13” MacBook Pro laptop and an iPad, all full-time upperclassmen and graduate students received an iPad, and all full-time faculty received an iPad (with application support of up to $30). As part of this initiative, students have complete access to these mobile technologies for use in classes as well as for personal use. With this technology at their fingertips, students can create a just-intime learning environment, stay in touch with professors, advisors and classmates, research any topic at any time, engage in hybrid and fully online courses, and access a whole host of Seton Hill technology services. In doing so, students are learning the technological skills they’ll need in the 21st-century workforce. Seton Hill’s faculty are involved in year-long training on the effective use of web 2.0 tools to enhance the learning experience, and they have been meeting for teaching and learning forums focused on the use of the iPad in the classroom. Early assessments results from the first semester of the program are quite promising.

The Journey to Mobile Learning John Hermes.............. Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Oklahoma Christian University John Hanlon ...... Manager of Technology Solutions and Innovation, Oklahoma Christian University Oklahoma Christian University has offered support for mobile technologies as part of its strategic objective for over a decade. While the technologies have continued to evolve, the vision for a ubiquitous learning community has remained the same. This session provides an overview of the University’s successful leadership in technology innovation that has enhanced student learning environments and the university community, through a mobile one-to-one laptop program, a smart phone/handheld program, and mobile application development.


Research...............................................Hunter Welcome Center,

Alumni Conference Room

Social Media, Augmented Reality and Recent Advances in Mobile Learning Can Augmented Reality Put the “Mobile” in Mobile Learning? Kenny Jones......... Associate Professor of Art, Foundations Director, Abilene Christian University Augmented Reality (AR) can be described as layering virtual digital content on top of “real life” sites, in this case seen through an iPhone camera in real time. In this project, the potential for AR to enhance the learning experience of students, while offering an enhanced experience to those who come to view artwork on the ACU campus was investigated. Preliminary project findings with art students who create and design for publicly viewed AR content will be described.

Reducing Discrepant Perceptions Between Home and School Use of Mobile Learning Technologies Louise Duncan...................................................... Leading Teacher, Shepparton High School, DEECD, Victoria, Australia There is a clear disconnection between the way students perceive technologies at home and school. This presentation looks at data gathered in Australia in a range of trials using the iPod touch and iPad to successfully improve student engagement and outcomes. This information is used to increase the confidence of educators to use mobile technologies in their learning programs, to reduce parent and community skepticism and to bridge the gap between use of mobile technologies in formal and informal learning settings by our students.

Putting Mobile Back in Mobile Learning Mark van’t Hooft ................................ Researcher / Tech Specialist, Kent State University Recent critics of mobile learning have argued that the mLearning revolution has merely provided “mobile learning in the classroom” (Nash, 2009), which is an oxymoron at best. While mobile tools provide one-to-one access to digital tools in formal classroom settings that is relatively cheap and affordable, it is their mobility that creates the most powerful opportunities for learning. This presentation will discuss the importance of “mobile” in mobile learning, illustrated with examples from a variety of projects.

3:15 - 3:45 p.m. Break ...............................................................Cullen Auditorium 3:30 - 5 p.m. Connected Talks.............................. Cullen Auditorium Integrating Digital Tools in 21st-Century Education Reaching All Learners: Apple Technology for Special Needs

For more than 25 years, Apple has provided new and innovative solutions for people with disabilities, allowing them to access – and enjoy using – the Mac, iPod, iPhone, iPad and Apple TV. Apple includes assistive technology in its products as a standard feature – at no additional cost. During this session, Sarah Herrlinger, a senior manager at Apple who speaks powerfully about the importance of universal access in education, will explore the ways that Apple has implemented accessibility features into its iOS devices.

The End of the IT Department? Fraser Speirs .............................. Head of Computing and IT, Cedars School of Excellence (Scotland) There was a time when the first question a geek asked the owner of a newly-broken computer was “have you installed any new software recently?” As the post-PC era rolls in – and as the iOS App Store has given consumers confidence that installing software can, under no circumstances, break their computer – that question is changing. But this raises an important new question: why do we “manage” traditional computers in an organization and do those same rationales apply to the new generation of mobile devices that is replacing them? There may be good reasons to manage desktop-class computers tightly, but in an era when mobile devices come with their own managed App Stores, is this still necessary? This talk will explore the idea that the broad changes we’re seeing in smartphone platforms and the associated change in attitudes toward exploring their full capabilities should be allowed and even encouraged in schools.

The Open Content Revolution Matt Federoff.............................. Chief Information Officer, Vail Unified School District (Arizona) After two decades, the Web is really starting to deliver on the promise of readily available, high-quality content for nearly every subject imaginable. Nearly all of this content is free, and is therefore “open content” — ready to be used, modified, and shared again. With such a vast repository of content available, we need to come up with ways to index and share it that are meaningful to educators and address their specific goals. If these needs can be met, schools can leave expensive textbooks behind and move towards the future of Open Content.

Turning the Page: The Next Chapter in Education William Rankin .............. Director of Educational Innovation, Abilene Christian University In this wrap-up of overall conference themes, William Rankin will offer a vision for how mobility, mobile media and mobile content creation, and next-generation digital resources are transforming education. As mobile devices become increasingly powerful and as they offer new forms of creativity and connectivity, we’re seeing an exciting – and sometimes dizzying – array of pedagogies and educational opportunities emerge. These new models are challenging educators throughout K-12 and higher education to rethink teaching and learning, considering a new trajectory for student engagement. Challenging attendees to implement changes in their own institutions, this session will synthesize some of the key insights and conclusions offered by speakers at this year’s Connected Summit.

Sarah Herrlinger ....................... Senior Manager, Education Apple, Inc. acu.edu/connectedsummit 27


To learn more about things to do and places to eat while in Abilene, visit abilenevisitors.com

Getting to Know

abilene As the home of three award-winning Christian universities, a community college, a technical college and a graduate engineering program and School of Pharmacy of a major state university, Abilene is highly invested in higher education. The defining city of West Texas, Abilene was founded in 1881 and is a place where the frontier spirit is still applied to discovery, development and creativity. More than 115,000 friendly people call Abilene home, and it is one of the most-visited cities in the state by tourists. With cultural events rivaling much larger metropolitan areas,

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Abilene features the historic Paramount Theatre, The Grace Museum, the Center for Contemporary Arts, and the National Center for Children’s Illustrated Literature. The multimedia-rich Frontier Texas! museum is one of only a few in the world with life-sized holographic figures. They help tell the history of the Texas frontier from 1780 to 1880, and the talented, determined people who helped settle it. A few miles south of town, the Buffalo Gap Historical Village interprets history of the area from the 1870s to the 1920s. Abilene has a popular zoo, and distinctive public art can be seen around the city, especially the critically

acclaimed Jacob’s Dream sculpture site on ACU’s campus. The city also enjoys a longtime relationship with Dyess Air Force Base, where B-1B Lancer squadrons and the 317th Airlift Group provide strategic support to U.S. military operations around the globe each day. In downtown Abilene, the 12th Armored Division Memorial Museum pays tribute to the thousands of Americans who were based at nearby Camp Barkeley and who led some of the most critical missions of World War II. Abilene has beautiful sunrises and sunsets across gigantic open skies, and

the city is always looking for ways to innovate, to attract business, to beautify its surroundings, to preserve and celebrate its history, and to encourage its youth. Abilenians are passionate about living out their faith through community service (often led by its nearly 10,000 college students), values-based decision making in everyday business, mutual respect, and a concern for people who are less fortunate. Legendary barbecue, Tex-Mex and steaks also headline a tremendously rich culture of local restaurants we hope you’ll be able to experience before you return home, or the next time you visit. acu.edu/connectedsummit

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acu

Guest Wireless Network Access Guests to the Abilene Christian University campus are welcome to use the wireless network to access the Internet. To gain access, guests are requested to provide an accurate name, phone number, and email address. Guest access is provided on a provisional 24-hour basis, meaning that after 24 hours, the guest will have to register their computer or mobile device again. The following instructions are provided to assist in the Guest Registration process.

1. From a laptop or wireless device, connect to “ACU Wireless” network.

2. Once connected to the “ACU Wireless” network, open a Web browser. All Web connections should be automatically redirected to the network registration server. If the Web connection doesn’t appear to be redirected, then type in the URL acu.edu. 3. Once the Web connection has been redirected, a Web page will be displayed with platform options. Guests can choose the link labeled “Guest Users” located at the top right hand of the page. 4. The “Guest Users” link will load a page where users can enter their name, phone number, email address and device type. 5. Upon submitting this information, a page will be displayed where guests can select their operating system to access instruction on how to disconnect and reconnect to the wireless network. This step completes the registration process. If ACU guests encounter problems accessing the wireless network or registering as a guest, the ACU Technology Support Helpdesk is available to provide assistance. Guests can call 325-674-4357 to reach a Helpdesk representative.

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A CLASSROOM WITHOUT WALLS. Learning shouldn’t stop at the classroom door. Give your students classroom access without walls. With a Verizon Wireless Mobile Broadband solution, your students can download a lecture, upload a project and post on a study group wall, all from off campus. The largest high-speed wireless network in America brings the classroom into their world. VZW.GOV@VERIZONWIRELESS.COM MOBILE BROADBAND

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ACU Connected Summit 2011 Program  

Abilene Christian University Connected Summit 2011 Program

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