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Winter 2018

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION


SKY

e h t r o f h c a e R

JAD SRB LUCKY’S SMOKIN COPPER (10749903) 2018 DENVER STOCK SHOW OVERALL GRAND CHAMPION We believe LUCKY’S SMOKIN COPPER became the first dappled buck to have earned the Overall Grand Champion buck honors at a major livestock show. But it does not stop there as LUCKY’S SMOKIN COPPER has an unbelievable pedigree with LK7 LUCKY DOG *Ennobled for a sire, who is the full brother to LK7 DEVIL SPOTS *Ennobled. However, where we think LUCKY’S SMOKIN COPPER’S pedigree dis�nguishes him from the balance of the dappled pack is on the maternal side which features many of the great sires of the breed including CSB BROKEN S SMOKIN HOT RUGER *Ennobled, AABG STAUS QUO *Ennobled, DCW –BO JANGLES *Ennobled, WARDS CAT IN THE HAT *Ennobled, and SWE MAIN EVENT *Ennobled.

WE WILL BE OFFERING FOR SALE A SELECT SET OF DOES BRED TO SMOKIN COPPER THIS YEAR. SEMEN FROM SMOKIN COPPER WILL BE OFFERD ON VERY LIMITED BASIS IN 2018. Please contact Ken Baty (970) 685-1745 or Ranch Manager Ricky Farmer (970) 342-3824

Ken, Jane & Sydney Baty | Loveland, CO | sakbboergoats.com


Is is that time already?

Letter from the Editor

It just doesn't seem possible that we are heading into February as I write this message. This issue includes the National Show Packet with hotels, schedules, rules and entry forms. Please read through this information carefully if you are attending the 2018 National Show. For many who read this magazine, though, you are watching from home or keeping your herd moving in the direction you've chosen. We haven't forgotten about you. There are some great reads about abortive diseases from Jackie Mauldin and prventing cyanide poisoning in sorghum. There is also a great article, written by Dr. Stephen White on scrapie identification and eradicatin. We all have to have a herd identifier for the USDA for scrapie, but have you ever konwn exactly what this disease does to your livestock? Dr. White talks about scrapie and new ways to identify the disease through DNA. The final article in the magazine is written by a junior. The artilce is about our young ag students choosing to raise Boer goats over other species. I encourage young, aspiring junior members to submit articles through the editor email for editorial review. It is always nice to see that we are generating some great students to carry our association into the future. With that in mind, don't forget about the regional shows taking place across the United States. These shows have some generous sponsors, who are listed in the junior section. Thank you to each of you who have donated time, auction items and money to help keep our future involved in this great industry.

Karla Blackstock

Is it your turn to make a difference in the goat industry?

ABGA Judges Certification School June 21-23, 2018 Evans Agricultural Complex Perkins, OK. Contact Sonia@abga.org at the ABGA office for additional information. Deadline to enroll: May 18, 2018 The Boer Goat - 1


2017-2018 AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

Board of Directors

REGION 9: DERIC WETHERELL (EC) PRESIDENT: dpwether@yahoo.com REGION 8: ROBERT WASHINGTON (EC) VICE-PRESIDENT: robert.washington64@gmail.com REGION 15: SUSAN BURNER SECRETARY: wvburners@comcast.net REGION 14: DENISE CRABTREE TREASURER: adcrabtree@horizonview.net REGION 1: KIMBERLY LIEFER (EC) • kimberly@aaprinaacres.com REGION 2: SCOTT PRUETT (EC) • eieiowefarms@yahoo.com REGION 3: CLARK HUINKER • chuinker@fmtvets.com REGION 4: JEREMY CHURCH (EC) • jeremy.church@live.com REGION 5: KENNY ELWOOD • kennyelwood@hotmail.com REGION 6: PAUL GRAFE • pgrafe@valbridge.com REGION 7: DAWN STEWARD • dawnsteward25332@gmail.com REGION 10: JOSH STEPHANS • jcstephans@yahoo.com REGION 11: JESSE CORNELIUS (EC) • jcornelius@nettleton.k12.ms.us REGION 12: KIM MORGAN • km4881@gmail.com REGION 13: KATHY DAVES-CARR • dxdarlin1@yahoo.com REGION 16: SARA DAVIS • csdavis@oakhollowlivestock.com PAST PRESIDENT: CINDY PRICE-WESTFALL • cindy_price_westfall@yahoo.com *EC DENOTES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBER

2017 AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

Staff

LARY DUNCAN, Chief Executive Officer • lary@abga.org MARY ELLEN VILLARREAL, Executive Director • mary@abga.org MARIA LEAL, Registration Support • marial@abga.org SONIA CERVANTEZ, Accounts Receivable • sonia@abga.org AARON GILLESPIE, Show & Youth Coordinator • aaron@abga.org NICOLE PETRELLA, Receptionist • nicole@abga.org CIERRA MARTINEZ, Support Staff • cierra@abga.org PAMELA O'DELL, Support staff • pamela@abga.org

ABGA OFFICE HOURS: Monday-Friday • 8:00 am to 5:00 pm (CST)

2 - The Boer Goat

Letter from the President Hello fellow ABGA members, Congratulations to all that attended, exhibited, won classes or were named champions in the recent stock shows. It was nice to visit with friends, talk to those I haven’t seen since June and also meet and become acquainted with new people at the Ft. Worth Stock Show. We have a lot to look forward to this year and as I visit with everyone, I think it is a general consensus that the first thing we are all anxiously awaiting is the end of this miserably cold winter weather. I hope and pray that everyone and their animals have been able to handle the extreme temperatures safely. The JABGA Regional Series is just around the corner and it was very evident from the results in Ft. Worth that the jrs are a force to be reckoned with as each of the divisions saw our JABGA members placing at the top. I hope to see and be able to visit with many of the jrs around the country as the JABGA Regional Series gets started in April and continues through the Nationals in June. We are also looking forward to the upcoming National Show. New this year for Nationals and also a part of the JABGA Regional Series are the wether and commercial doe classes and split showmanship classes for marketing and breeding stock. There will also be a VIP reception for all of the JABGA Regional sponsors and the always exciting and ever improving Awards Appreciation Dinner and Auction. If you have not donated to the JABGA and would like to, I encourage you to contact Aaron at the ABGA office. Please watch for more exciting information about the National Show in the magazine or online. One more exciting piece to look forward to this spring is the kickoff of the pilot program to develop a database of information on kidding and development of goats. Hopefully we can work towards getting some performance data and have another piece of information to put in our breeding toolbox. I would personally like to thank all of our current board members for all of the work they have put into the ABGA this year. March is the deadline for those aspiring to be directors to fill out and submit applications to the office. I would encourage anyone who would like to make a commitment to the ABGA to apply. With spring rapidly approaching, I want to wish everyone the best of luck in the kidding barn and the show ring!! Deric Wetherell President ABGA Board of Directors


In This Issue

4

Affiliates

5

CEO's Messge

6

Scrapie Eradication

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

ABOUT THE COVER Gunn Farms' Gunn1 Elliemay illustrates the elegance of the Boer goat doe. Shown at the Comfort Classic in Boerne, Texas by owner Brandie Gunn.

10 JABGA Information 15 Standouts The Boer Goat

16 Rules on Percentage Registry 17 National Show Packet 31 Calendar of Events 33 Preventing Cyanide in Sorghum

CONTACT

1207 S. BRYANT BLVD. SUITE C SAN ANGELO, TX 76903 TEL: 325.486.2242 FAX: 325.486.2637

PUBLISHER

AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION KARLA BLACKSTOCK, MANAGING EDITOR & CREATIVE DIRECTOR

35 Young Farms Choosing Boers 38 Abortive Dieseases in Goats 43 Classified Ads 44 Photos from around the ABGA

INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING?

The next issue of The Boer Goat will be our Spring 2018 issue. Make sure to showcase your ranch or company by advertising in the business card section or by purchasing ad space.

WANT TO SEE YOUR PHOTO IN THE MAGAZINE?

If you would like to see your photo in the The Boer Goat, please submit your picture to editor@abga. org. Please send photos in the largest size you have available and include your name for print.

The Boer Goat hereby expressly limits its liability resulting from any and all misprints, errors and/or all inaccuracies whatsoever in the advertisement and editorial content published by The Boer Goat and its said liability is here by limited to the refund of the customer or its payment for the said advertisement, the running of a corrected advertisement, or editorial notice. Notification by the customer of any errors must be made within 30 days of distribution of the magazine. The opinions or views expressed in all editorials are those of the writer or persons interviewed and not The Boer Goat. The Boer Goat does, however, reserve the right to edit or refuse all material, which might be objectable in content. No material or part thereof, may be reproduced or used out of context without prior, specific approval of a proper credit to The Boer Goat.

The Boer Goat - 3


AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

Affiliates Program

Boer Goat Association of North Carolina Contact: Kelly Clark PO Box 36479; Greensboro, NC 27416 Email: KellyClark@triad.rr.com Serving States: North Carolina

Northern California Meat Goat Association Contact: Carl McCosker PO Box 553 Gridley, CA 95948 Email: ncmga@yahoo.com 530-205-7922

Keystone Goat Producers Association 125 Ivy Drive, Middletown, PA 17057 Email: camstoys@comcast.net Serving States: Pennsylvania, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia, West Virginia, New Jersey, New York

Tall Corn Meat Goat Wether Assoc, Inc Contact: James Shepard 4458 32nd St; Grinnell IA 50112 Email: dcc3200@gmail.com Website: www.meatgoatwether.com Serving States: Iowa

Nebraska Sheep & Goat Producers Association Contact: Elysabeth Kierl – Executive Secretary 210 Road N Guide Rock, NE 68942 Email: ne.sheep.goat@gmail.com 308-390-3001 Serving States: Nebraska

Snake River Meat Goat Association 24617 Cemetery Rd.; Middleton ID 83644 Email: srmga@outlook.com Serving States: Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California, Nevada, Montana, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico

The objectives of the ABGA Affiliate program include: • To provide resources at the local clubs level • To provide networking opportunities for the local clubs • To attract and retain goat producers • To assist with educational opportunities • To cultivate grassroots input from local clubs

Local clubs benefit from joining the group of recognized affiliates by receiving:

Affiliates have the opportunity to apply for funds to conduct educational seminars in their area. They can apply for cost share programs such as a display booth for the club. At the end of each year, membership rosters of the local affiliate will be matched with the membership roster of the association. The affiliate will receive a membership match of $1.00 per match for each person who is a member of both the affiliate and the ABGA. The affiliates are notified of future programs as they become available.

• • • •

Listing on the Affiliate page of The Boer Goat including a short description Listing on the Affiliate section of ABGA website with description of club’s mission Listing of club events (shows and educational events) on the ABGA Event Calendar Monthly listing of new ABGA members in the Affiliate’s area

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• • • •

Eligibility to receive ABGA promotional and educational material for club events Eligibility for educational funds Eligibility for cost share programs Membership matching funds at the end of each year Opportunities for future programs


Message A number of new events are in play this year to improve our JABGA programs. Many of our members and the businesses have partnered with the Boer goat industry to help make these changes a reality. To all of you, I humbly say, “THANK YOU”. Please understand that we would like to be doing even more for the kids than we are doing presently. This year is only phase one and if all goes well we have plans to expand the new regional program. We have done our best to level the playing field so all the kids have a reasonable chance to compete for the top prizes. The numerous contests within this JABGA program count for the lion’s share of the points a child needs to accumulate to win top overall honors. Each of these individual contests have their own set of prizes as well so you do not even have to show a goat to win a prize. In fact, each participant is limited to only the points their top placing animal receives in the final tally. The contests include judging, a sales talk, public speaking, a skill-a-thon, and showmanship for both the breeding and market / commercial exhibitors. Early on in the planning phase of this year’s JABGA program, one issue that was identified, that is addressed within this new program, was the need to expand the scope of our shows. This is considered valuable given by expanding attendance we make ourselves more marketable to the very vendors who are helping us make much of what we are doing possible. Furthermore, it is the belief of many, that once these kids who participate on the commercial / market side of these shows and realize what they are missing, they will want

from the CEO ...

to be a part of what the JABGA members already have. These new regional shows will feature a jackpot show for market livestock and a commercial doe show with cash prizes. In the past, we had attempted leadership conferences for the JABGA, but this was not well attended and fell to the way side. There is still a tremendous demand for information from our newer members, and the plan is to provide training within these shows to aid those who are looking for help or to simply enhance the knowledge of what they already know. I suspect the fitting and showmanship portion of these programs will be well received as this seems to be an area many are looking to improve upon. Sullivan Supply has engaged some of the best fitters in the industry to hold these demonstrations. With more than $5,000 in cash and prizes to distribute at each of the five regional shows and triple that at this year’s National Show, I would be sure to mark one or two of these shows on your calendar as I am certain a good time will be had by all who attend. On a separate note, the changes to our percentage registry will happen in 2018. There are a few items I need to note involving these changes so you can plan your breeding’s accordingly. First, the program will have a small affect on some purebred animals. What affects you once we implement this in six months, is if you breed a 94% purebred doe to a low percentage purebred buck the resulting buck kids will no longer be recognized as a purebred buck given in the new system there will be no rounding up based on set herd book values as we have done in the past. We

will be working in true percentages going forward. In other words, you will be required to meet the actual minimum 96.875% to be recognized as a purebred buck. In the case of a doe, the new purebred minimum is only 93.75%. On the other end of the spectrum, to have a FIRST generation 50% buck recognized as a registered percentage buck, either his dam or sire must have been a fullblood animal with DNA from an ABGA approved lab on file at the ABGA office. Second generation 50% bucks can be created from any combination of percentage animals as long as the resulting percentage equals at least 50% and the sire's DNA from an approved lab is on file with the ABGA office. For example, in a case where a second or higher generation cross such as a 75% sire is mated to a 25% female the male progeny’s percentage has to equal at least 50% registered Boer goat for the buck kids to be eligible for registration. There are a number of other minor rules that will apply, but the two I have noted will be the ones with the greatest impact on breeders. We should have these new rules for registration up and posted on the ABGA website. They found be found on page 16 of this magazine. I feel for those of you that have endured one of our tougher winters in recent times. Realizing having been there before just how tough this can be. Let’s all hope things balance out and we have a warm sunshine spring with pastures full of bouncing kids to even things out a bit.

The Boer Goat - 5


Scrapie Resistant Goats:

Keep Your Herd Healthy and Help Your Business with a New DNA Test Stephen N. White PhD, David A. Schneider DVM, PhD, DACVIM (LAIM) • Classical scrapie is an infectious disease of goats and sheep that causes slowly progressive but ultimately fatal degeneration of the brain. • The most common clinical signs observed in goats are lack of coordination and gait abnormalities, although behavioral changes are often the first sign. • The National Scrapie Eradication Program benefits all small ruminant producers by reducing scrapie in the U.S. and working towards import/export status for the U.S. as a scrapie-free country. • Historically, a single diagnosis of classical scrapie results in permanent quarantine or euthanasia of all goats on a farm. However, USDA is planning to pilot genetic based cleanup plans for goats similar to what was done for sheep. • Recently, a large panel of researchers convened by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) concluded two naturally occurring goat alleles (S146 and K222 versions of the prion gene) confer resistance to classical scrapie in goats. • The EFSA panel concluded S146 and K222 have better evidence for scrapie resistance in goats than did R171 when it was first recommended as the basis for resistant sheep. • Boer goats are known to have a high S146 allele frequency, and as many as half the goats in some Boer herds have at least one copy of S146. • Tests to determine goat genotypes are commercially available.

Scrapie and Risks to Your Operation Scrapie is a fatal brain disease of goats and sheep for which there is no treatment. Scrapie occurs in two forms: classical and Nor98-like (an atypical form). Both forms result in progressive accumulation of an abnormal form of the prion protein and loss of brain cells that often leads to abnormal behavior, lack of coordination, gait abnormalities and reduced mobility and body condition - but which always leads to death. Under the microscope, the progressive loss of cells eventually causes the brain to look like a sponge—full of small holes. An important difference between the two forms of scrapie is that classical scrapie is infectious between susceptible animals whereas the Nor98-like atypical form is not. Classical scrapie has resulted in significant trade restrictions worldwide and has been targeted for eradication by several countries, including the U.S. and Canada. Scrapie eradication must be a joint effort in goats and sheep since classical scrapie can be shared in both directions between them, especially from exposure to infected birth products. For instance, goats who like to “help” during lambing are at risk through exposure to the afterbirth of an infected ewe and, likewise, foster lambs are at risk if fed milk from an infected goat. Even a single case of classical scrapie

6 - The Boer Goat

can have devastating consequences for large producer and small family operations alike, since eradication requires either permanent quarantine or euthanasia of all exposed goats and exposed genetically susceptible sheep. The sheep industry has had an important tool in the struggle to eradicate classical scrapie in the form of genetic resistance. Of the many prion gene alleles (alternative sequences or versions of the gene) that may be inherited by sheep, strong resistance to classical scrapie comes from the R171 allele, which changes the amino acid at position 171 of the prion protein to arginine (written simply as “R”). The only exception is if a sheep also inherits the V136 allele, which instead enhances susceptibility to infection by changing position 136 to valine (V). As long as a sheep has at least one R171 allele and no V136 allele, the sheep has strong resistance to infection with classical scrapie. Increasing the genetic resistance of sheep reduces the overall farm risk of contracting scrapie. Keeping only resistant sheep (AAQR and AARR – those with at least one resistant R171 and no copies of V136) eliminates the need to quarantine permanently or euthanize animals should classical scrapie be diagnosed in a susceptible animal. Thus, the operation is not in jeopardy of being shut down if genetically


resistant animals are used. In addition, genetic resistance in sheep has been a key factor in the progress made by scrapie eradication programs. In fiscal year 2005, near the start of the accelerated National Scrapie Eradication Program, 180 flocks and herds with scrapie were identified in the U.S. While the program has been very successful in lowering this number to a few flocks/herds per year with none in FY 2017, the U.S. still has not achieved scrapie-free status.

Goat Genetic Resistance to Scrapie: Growing International Recognition Genetic resistance has not been available to the goat industry until recently. Two naturally occurring prion gene alleles in goats have shown exceptional promise for conferring resistance. The first is S146, which denotes a serine (S) amino acid at prion protein position 146. The second is K222, which denotes a lysine (K) amino acid at position 222. Early indications that these two alleles might each confer resistance came from studies of natural outbreaks of classical scrapie in which goats bearing either the S146 or K222 allele did not develop evidence of infection despite presumably long exposures to diseased herd mates. Most convincing is the apparent strong resistance of goats bearing the S146 or K222 allele despite being deliberately exposed at birth to uniform high doses of classical scrapie. The European Union has had a severe problem with goat scrapie, recording more than 10,500 goat scrapie cases in the last 15 years (2002-2017). In the midst of this ongoing scrapie problem, the European Commission made a specific request of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) to evaluate how strong the evidence is for genetic resistance to scrapie in goats and what should be done to utilize such genetics to reduce scrapie in goats. In response, EFSA convened a panel of European experts and recently published a comprehensive review of research that reached some important conclusions for the goat industry.

Specifically, they concluded that the S146 and K222 alleles confer genetic resistance to classical scrapie in goats. This was based on a thorough evaluation of all the available evidence, including that mentioned above. Furthermore, they concluded that today’s evidence for the genetic resistance conferred by these two alleles in goats exceeds that which was available at the time the recommendation was made to use the resistance conferred by the R171 allele in sheep. Thus, the commissioned report similarly recommends the use of genetic resistance in goats to augment scrapie eradication. The specific rules for how to implement genetics in scrapie eradication were left to individual European countries but none have yet been finalized. However, they will be based on EFSA’s scientific conclusions about S146 and K222. The USDA has not yet formally recognized these alleles but plans to conduct genetic-based herd cleanup pilot projects similar to what was done for sheep when genetic resistance was first identified in sheep. Many studies done in many different laboratories around the world have shown even one copy of either S146 or K222 confers strong resistance to classical scrapie in goats, much like R171 in sheep. Furthermore, the situation in goats may be simpler than sheep because no allele that enhances susceptibility (like V136 in sheep) has been found in goats that could weaken genetic resistance. Thus, it is likely that goats with one copy of S146 or K222 will be considered less susceptible to classical scrapie the same as sheep with one copy of R171.

Opportunity: How to Benefit your Operation with Goat Scrapie Resistance Selective breeding to increase the number of goats bearing the S146 and/or K222 alleles of the prion gene will improve scrapie resistance in your herd. This can benefit your operation in a few ways. First, improving scrapie resistance will reduce the chances of scrapie occurring in your operation. This improves goat health and the sustainability of your operation. Secondly, there are often first-mover advantages for operations that adopt new technology like this. For

The Boer Goat - 7


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James Scifres – 580-450-5611 Krisha Geffert – 307-760-0327 Kaylee Keppy – 563-370-5012

Josh Elkins – 979-255-8309 Dave Mullins – 317-766-4132

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example, becoming known as a source of scrapie-resistant goats may increase your visibility and sales. Finally, eventual opportunities in import/export markets for animals, semen, and embryos with scrapie resistant genetics are likely.

How to Access S146 and/or K222? You May Already Have Them! Research suggests that some of your goats (or those of someone you know) may already have S146 or K222. The S146 allele is common in the U.S. An initial survey of U.S. goat genetics found S146 in 7 out of 10 goat breeds tested, including: Boer, Nubian, LaMancha, Alpine, Saanen, Tennessee fainting goats (myotonic), and Pygmy goats. Further, the S146 allele is probably present in even more breeds and will be found once additional goats from those breeds are tested. The S146 allele is particularly common in Boer and Nubian goats (each >30% allele frequency in initial U.S. survey). In an initial sampling of 64 Boer goats, 50% had one copy of S146 and 12% had two copies. While further testing will refine estimates of how common S146 is in North America, it is likely that you or someone you know will have Boer goats with S146. The K222 allele is present in many breeds, particularly dairy breeds. An initial U.S. survey identified it in both Toggenburg and LaMancha goats. Other studies have identified K222 in

8 - The Boer Goat

most breeds of European descent), including Saanen, Alpine, and Anglo-Nubian. As with S146, the K222 allele is probably present in even more breeds and will be found once additional goats from those breeds are tested. Genetic testing services have recently become available at the Veterinary Genetics Laboratory at UC-Davis. Details may be found at this website: https://www.vgl. ucdavis.edu/services/GoatScrapie.php * ABGA has arranged preferential pricing of $25 ($23 if combined with paternity or other tests) for ABGA members doing DNA testing at VGL. Similarly, additional testing services are being developed at NeoGen Genomics, Inc. (GeneSeek). Once operational, details of their services will be available at this website: http://genomics.neogen.com/en/ research-and-development-genomic-discovery#sheep-and-goat

How to use Scrapie Resistance Alleles Once You Find Them Scrapie resistance can enhance your breeding program and the health of your herd in major ways, but it needs to be used carefully. Specifically, selection of goats that are superior for many traits (and not just scrapie resistance by itself) will help maintain the overall health and productivity of your herd. Also, selecting animals from diverse family backgrounds will help avoid inbreeding. The overall goal is to boost or add scrapie resistance without diminishing other aspects of quality goat breeding. In this way, you can improve herd health, sustainability, and profitability in your operation. Stephen White has been a geneticist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service for 15 years. White studies susceptibility to infectious disease with special emphasis on small ruminants. David Schneider has been a Research Veterinary Medical Officer with the USDA Agricultural Service for 11 years. Schneider studies the prion diseases of small ruminant and cervid species. Mention of trade names or commercial products in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing specific information and does not imply recommendation or endorsement by the USDA to the exclusion of others that may also be suitable. USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.


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The NLPA Sheep and Goat Fund assists the U.S. sheep and goat industries by financing projects that strengthen and enhance the production and marketing of sheep and goats and their products. It is a valuable tool to expand your operation and take it beyond the farm gate. Learn how you can benefit from the fund at sheepandgoatfund.com.

Invest in equipment and business development Facilitate flock/herd expansion Improve marketing and product quality

The Boer Goat - 9


JUNIOR AMERICAN

BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

It is that time again and the dates have been set. The 2018 ABGA National Show will be held in Grand Island, NE. Fonner Park will host the week-long event from June 9th through 15th, 2018. The ABGA/JABGA would like to invite you to be a part of a major fundraiser for the JABGA. During the 2018 National Show week, a silent auction and live auction will be held. All of the proceeds from the items donated will go directly to the JABGA. All donations are accepted and much appreciated. Please see below for examples of past items donated:0 Home DÊcor Tack Gifts Livestock Crosses Show equipment Homemade goods Registered goats Candles Leads Gift basket Implanted Recips Paintings Buckets Gift cards Breeding Services/Semen Picture frames Feeders Jewelry Embryo’s/Flushes Wall hangings Fitting equipment Apparel Fitting Services Each donor will have their name published in an issue of The Boer Goat, on the JABGA Facebook page, and on the ABGA website. During the show, names of the donors will be announced over the public address system and a special thank you given. Please find attached an information sheet that must be returned with each donated item. I would like to thank past donors for their support and encourage potential donors to contribute to a great cause. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me. Again thank you for your continued support of the ABGA/JABGA and the Boer goat industry. See you back in Grand Island! Aaron Gillespie ABGA Show/Youth Coordinator

REDDEN BROS. 12396 W. Co. Rd. 100N. Norman, In 47264 Tom. 812-583-3875 Jackie 812-278-4697 Ike 812-325-5080

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Regional Shows Area 1 Red Bluff, CA April 28, 2018 Area 2 Altamont, Il May 26, 2018 Area 3 Springfield, OH May 5, 2018 Area 4 Pendleton, SC May 19, 2018 Area 5 Sweetwater, Tx April 14, 2018

JABGA National Show Grand Island, NE June 10-12, 2018

Find Us on Facebook or at ww.roxwillboregoats.net/ Derek Abrevaya | 937620-8724 derekabrevaya@roxwilboregoats.com The Boer Goat - 11


BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

JUNIOR AMERICAN

Junior News and Updates (cont.) JABGA Director Packets must be received in ABGA office by mail, fax or email (aaron@abga.org) by March 1st to be considered. Also, don't forget about the ABGA Scholarship Application. The application can be found online and must be submitted online by April 1st. All supporting material must also be postmarked by April 1 and mailed to the ABGA office (Attn: Aaron Gillespie) to be considered.

JUNIOR CONTESTS • JABGA Breeding Show Sullivan’s

JABGA Commercial Doe Show JABGA Market Show (wethers/ does)

Flare

• Amplifies Hair Dimension & Shine. • Works on all hair types in all temperatures.

• JABGA Showmanship (will be split into two categories: breeding and commerical/ market)

Sullivan’s

Fresh and Feminine • Boost metabolic fat burning for fresher appearance.

• Sales Talk • Skill-a-thon • Goat Judging

Sullivan’s

Mini 360 Smart Brush • Now Available in 6” Design • High Quality Brush Tip • Ends Covered for no blower whistle.

• Public Speaking • Fitting Contest

Sullivan Supply Inc. Dunlap, Iowa - 1-800-475-5902 • Hillsboro, Texas - 1-800-588-7096 • Lodi, California - 1-888-914-5972

www.sullivansupply.com


Public Speaking Topics Junior Division (4 to 8) Regional Show: What is your favorite farm animal and why? National Show: How do you wash your goat?

Intermediate Division (9 to 13) Regional Show: Why is it important to wear proper show attire in the show ring? National Show: What have you learned from raising goats?

Senior Division (14 & over) Regional Show: How has/will livestock effect your career choice? National Show: How do you stomp out bullying in the show ring?

• Live Internet Bidding

2018 JABGA OR S N O P S

• Online Webcast of Auctions • Pre-Bidding and Absentee Bidding • Tag/On Farm Sales • Online Only Auctions Be sure to contact us to book your upcoming auction to be broadcast online!

Aaron Tompkins 336-363-4639 atompkin@vt.edu

2018 National Show Charity Shirts STOMP Out Bullying™ is the leading national nonprofit dedicated to changing the culture for all students. It works to reduce and prevent bullying, cyberbullying, sexting and other digital abuse, educates against homophobia, LGBTQ discrimination, racism and hatred, and deters violence in schools, online and in communities across the country. In this diverse world, STOMP Out Bullying promotes civility, inclusion and equality. It teaches effective solutions on how to respond to all forms of bullying, as well as educating kids and teens in school and online. It provides help for those in need and at risk of suicide, and raises awareness through peer mentoring programs in schools, public service announcements by noted celebrities, and social media campaigns. You can donate to the charity of choice by ordring from the National Show Website.


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14 - The Boer Goat

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in the Boer Goat Industry Congratulations to the breeders and owners of the animals listed below. The following animals have received the awards of Ennoblement, Doe of Excellence and Sire of Merit.

DOE OF EXCELLENCE

Name CLCC MISS PERFECT RUMBLE GSR SWEET BLISS JC BOER GOATS SAMBUCA

SIRE OF MERIT

Name AABG JAGGER

Sex D D D

Owner Lori Copeland Piper Fisher Julie Carreiro

Breeder Lori Copeland Sarah Brend Julie Carreiro

Sex B

Owner Marlene Terrell

Breeder Able Acres

Sex B B B B B B B D D D D D D

Owner Paul & Kim Morgan Kahla Shigeta Joanie Baker & Vanessa Triplett Brandie Gunn Maurice & Kim Erwin Able Acres Ed, Tonjia, Josh & Katie Mayne Randall & Lauren Firey Jeri Troesken Paul & Kim Morgan Chestnut Springs Farm Sherri & Ed Biggs Darcy Boettger

Breeder Paul & Kim Morgan Terry Brown Tyler Van Voorst Carlie Callahan Maurice & Kim Erwin Jeff & Sheryl Pearcy Ed, Tonjia, Josh & Katie Mayne Able Acres Jack & Anita Mauldin Amy & Lyndon Graber Phillip, Anita & Levi Messer Aryn May Roger McSwain

ENOBLEMENTS Name 2M BOER GOATS ALL IN CAPRIOLE'S DESIGNATED DRIVER

TVVF CHARLIE SC4 4C WRANGLER ERWIN RED BARON S G R CADDY'S BRING IT ON KATIE FREIGHTLINER AABG KICKIN' CLASS MAUL "CERTAINLYHOT N SASSY" 2M BOER GOATS 2M ALL ABOUT ME RED5 RED GATE ENCORE BSA SHE'S ALL ABLAZE RM 1410


Herd Book Registry Rules (New Percetage Registry - effective Aug. 15)

Bucks I. To be eligible for registration, a registered percentage buck must have been conceived after January 1, 2015, and his sire or if sired by a commercial buck then his dam, must have DNA on file with the ABGA office from U.C. Davis veterinary genetics lab. And, a buck's reported lineage must be 50% or more registered Boer goat and meet the following additional requirements: 1. A 1st generation 50% buck from an unregistered parent must have one registered fullblood Boer Goat parent. (Does or bucks with purebred pedigrees will not meet the minimum requirement to create a 50% buck when mated to a commercial animal.) 2. A buck created from any combination of registered percentage, purebred, and fullbood animals where the percent of registered Boer Goat lineage equals no less than 50% can be registered. 3. The highest actual percentage of registered Boer goat lineage a buck can accumulate without becoming a purebred is 96.874%

Does II. To be eligible for registration, a registered percentage doe must have a minimum Boer goat registered lineage equaling 25% or more and meet the following additional requirements: 1. Sire must have DNA on file with the ABGA office from an U.C. Davis veterinary genetics lab that qualifies to the animal's reported lineage. 2. A doe created from a combination of registered commercial, percentage, purebred and fullblood animals where the % of registered Boer Goat lineage equals no less than 25% can be registered. 3. The highest actual percentage of registered Boer goat lineage a doe can accumulate without becoming a purebred is 93.749%. 4. To be registerd as a 25% thru 49.999% doe, she must have been conceived after January 1, 2015. 16 - The Boer Goat


Hotel and Grounds Information Mainstay Hotel 3051 S. Locust Street Grand Island, NE 68801 (308) 3829280

Holiday Inn * 2503 S. Locust Street Grand Island, NE 68801 (877) 859-5095

Roadway Inn 3205 S. Locust St. Grand Island, NE 68801 (308) 384-1333

Borders Inn & Suites 3333 Ramada Rd. Grand Island, NE 68801 (308) 384-5150

Best Western Hotels & Resorts 2707 S. Locust Street Grand Island, NE 68801 (308) 381-8855

Camping / RV Parking at Fonner Park 700 S Stolley Park Rd Grand Island, NE 68802 308-382-4515

*ABGA attendees will get a room for 99.95 + tax and have to be reserved by May 9, 2018. The Boer Goat - 17


2018 ABGA and JABGA National Show Entry Form Owner Name

Member Number

Address City, State, Zip Contact Telephone

Alternate Telephone

 

Exhibitor Name

Entry #

      

Registration #

Complete Form Include payment (Check, Money Order, or Credit Card) Mail, fax, or email application to ABGA Note Animal Health Requirements B&O = Bred & Owned (Current JABGA Members Only) Entry Deadline is May 7, 2018 (5:00pm CST) $10.00 Additional Fee per animal for each class entry received May 8, 2018 through May 15, 2018 (5:00pm CST) Entry Fees DOUBLED if received May 16, 2018 and after. Substitution Fee is $25.00 See 2018 ABGA National Show Rules for complete details.

 NATIONAL SHOW ENTRIES Tattoos National Show Right Left B & O (Circle One)

Open Fees

Junior Fees

Totals

1

ABGA JABGA BOTH

$40.00

$30.00

$

2

ABGA JABGA BOTH

$40.00

$30.00

$

3

ABGA JABGA BOTH

$40.00

$30.00

$

4

ABGA JABGA BOTH

$40.00

$30.00

$

5

ABGA JABGA BOTH

$40.00

$30.00

$

6

ABGA JABGA BOTH

$40.00

$30.00

$

7

ABGA JABGA BOTH

$40.00

$30.00

$

8

ABGA JABGA BOTH

$40.00

$30.00

$

9

ABGA JABGA BOTH

$40.00

$30.00

$

10

ABGA JABGA BOTH EXTRAS B & O (JABGA Only)

$40.00 QTY

$30.00 Fees x $20.00

$

Member Name

Special Penning Requests

Member #

$

Member Name

Member #

Pairs Classes

x $5.00

$

Member Name

Member #

Shavings

x $8.00

$

Member Name

Member #

Membership Dinner

x $10.00

$

Special Needs

TOTAL

$

Special Penning Requirements Based on the pen chart, how many pens do you require? ____________ Number of bucks 1 year and older:___________________

Number of does with kids at side:____________________ Number of problem does:___________________

Handicapped: □ YES

□ NO

The National Show Superintendents will do its best to honor all requests for assigned pens, but please be aware that that mat not always be possible. Requests for separate pens for bucks over a year old and does with kids at their side will be given priority. If you are handicapped or have other special circumstances, please be sure to note that in the section above.

Payment: _____Visa _____MC _____AmEx _____Disc 3 Digit Code(____) _____Check (#_____) _____MO _____Cash _________________________________ ________ _____________________________ _____________________________ Card Number

Exp.Date

Cardholder’s Signature

__________________________________________________________________________

Print Name on Card

Cardholder Address and Zip Code if different from above

Applicant hereby acknowledges and agrees that the American Boer Goat Association, its officers, directors, agents, employees and volunteers (hereafter collectively “ABGA”) shall not be responsible for any loss, injury or damage in connection with, arising out of, or incident to the National Show. Applicant further and hereby expressly waives all rights to claim against ABGA by reason of, and releases ABGA from any liability whatsoever with respect to any injury to person or damage to or loss of property (including consequential damages) resulting from any cause whatsoever (expressly including ABGA’s negligence). Applicant hereby agrees to hold harmless and unconditionally indemnify ABGA against and for all claims, liabilities, losses, costs, expenses, and damages (actual, consequential or punitive) which ABGA may at any time suffer or sustain or become liable for by reason of any accidents, damages, injuries or losses either to persons, property or both, of participant, of any other participant, of any other parties, or to the property of ABGA, in any matter arising from, connected with or incident to the activities hereunder, including but not limited to any negligent act or omission of ABGA, its officers, agents, employees, or volunteers. The undersigned applicant further acknowledges the receipt of a copy of the National Show Rules and certifies that he/she has read and understands them. Applicant further agrees to abide by all of the Show Rules and acknowledges that the Executive Committee of ABGA reserves the final and absolute right (a) to interpret the Show Rules; and (b) to determine all matters, questions and differences in regard thereto and from which determination no appeal or cause of action shall be available.

X______________________________ _______ ________ X_______________________________ ________ ________ Signature

Date

ABGA #

Signature (if owner is under 18 years of age)

Date

Relationship

RETURN ENTRY FORM TO: American Boer Goat AssociationTM 1207 S. Bryant Blvd; Ste C, San Angelo, TX 76903 Phone 325-486-2242•Fax 325-486-2637


Name of Company

2018 ABGA AND JABGA NATIONAL SHOW Please complete the following Vendor Space /Sponsor Form Product/Service

Address City, State, Zip Contact Telephone

Alternate Telephone

Fax

Contact Person

Email

Please mark one

VENDOR SPACE PROGRAMS PLATINUM VENDOR $1200__________ • Buckle Sponsorship (Announcer acknowledgement when buckle is presented) • Name/Logo Banner hung inside Five Points Show Arena • Sidebar Advertisement on ABGA website National Show page through November 30, 2017 • Name recognition in Show Program • 3 – 10’X10’ booth exhibition spaces GOLD VENDOR $1,000__________ • Name recognition in Show Program • Sidebar Advertisement on ABGA website National Show page through November 30, 2017 • 3 – 10’X10’ booth exhibition spaces SILVER VENDOR $800__________ • 3 – 10’X10’ booth exhibition spaces BRONZE VENDOR $600__________ • 2 – 10’X10’ booth exhibition spaces

SPONSOR PROGRAMS DIAMOND SPONSOR $10,000_______ • Prominent sponsor name/logo banner recognition at main entrance • Opening welcome presentation and remarks • Prominent sponsor name/logo banner inside show ring • Recognition of company sponsorship throughout show announcements • One grand champion bronze statue sponsorship (Announcer acknowledgment when statue is presented) • Two Buckle Sponsorships (Announcer acknowledgement when buckles are presented) • Name/Logo banner hung inside Five Points Show arena • Two page ad in Boer Goat Magazine • Large Banner Advertisement on ABGA website National Show page through November 30, 2017 • Name recognition in show program SAPPHIRE SPONSOR $2,500______ • Prominent sponsor name/logo banner inside show ring • Two Buckle Sponsorships (Announcer acknowledgement when buckles are presented) • Name/Logo banner hung inside Five Points Show Arena • One page ad in Boer Goat Magazine • Sidebar Advertisement on ABGA website National Show page through November 30, 2017 • Name recognition in show program

COPPER VENDOR $300__________ • 1 – 10’X10’ booth exhibition space

*All digital media and printed banners must be supplied by the vendor PAYMENT: ____Visa

____MC

____Am Ex

____Disc 3 digit code (_________)

_____________________________________________ Card Number

______________ Expiration Date

____Check (#__________)

____MO

____Cash

_____________________________________________________________ Cardholder’s Signature Print Name on Card

_______________________________________________________________________________ Cardholder Address and Zip Code if different from above

Applicant hereby acknowledges and agrees that the American Boer Goat Association, its officers, directors, agents, employees, and volunteers (hereafter collectively “ABGA”) shall not be responsible for any loss, injury, or damage in connection with, arising out of, or incident to the ABGA National Show. Applicant further and hereby expressly waives all rights to claims against the ABGA by reason of, and releases ABGA from any liability whatsoever with respect to, any injury to person or damage to or loss of property (including consequential damages) resulting from any cause whatsoever (expressly including ABGA’s negligence). Applicant hereby agrees to hold harmless and unconditionally indemnify ABGA against and for all claims, liabilities, losses, costs, expenses, and damages (actual or consequential, or punitive) which ABGA may at any time suffer or sustain or become liable for by reason of any accidents, damages, injuries or losses either to persons, property, or both, of participant, of any other participant, of any other parties, or to the property of ABGA, in any matter arising from, connected with or incident to the activities hereunder, including but not limited to any ne gligent act or omission of ABGA, it’s officers, agents, employees, or volunteers.


2018 NATIONAL SHOW SCHEDULE SATURDAY- June 9 4:00 pm to 8:00 pm - JABGA and Buy In's unload and move in For a fee, ABGA National Show Exhibitors will be permitted to arrive and unload on Saturday June 8th from 4:00 pm-8:00 pm. A fee of $10 per head with a maximum cost of $100 per Exhibitor will be charged for early arrival. Only JABGA entries are exempt from this fee. ABGA entries traveling with a JABGA participant are not exempt from the early arrival fee. 4:00 pm to 8:00 pm - ABGA Show Office will be open

SUNDAY - June 10 8:00 am to 2:00 pm - JABGA unload, move & check in *JABGA exhibitors, commercial does and wethers must be in place and checked in and PAPERWORK SUBMITTED TO THE OFFICE by 2pm 8:00 am to 4:00 pm - ABGA unload, move & check in 2:00 pm - JABGA Meeting 3:00 pm - JABGA Breeding Stock Showmanship – Seniors First 3:00-6:00 pm - Scales open for commercial does and wethers 5:00 pm - Dinner break and Boot Scramble 6:00 pm - Wether and Commercial doe showmanship – Seniors 1st 4:00 pm ABGA Show Office closes

MONDAY - June 11 8:00 am to 12:00 pm - ABGA unload, move & check-in (must unload from the outside of the barn- no exceptions)

7:45 am - OPENING CEREMONY AND WELCOME 8:00 am - JABGA National Bred and Owned Breeding Stock Show Followed by the JABGA Commercial Doe and Wether Show Noon - LUNCH ( Sullivan’s Supply Demonstration) 1:00 pm - Resume JABGA Commercial Doe and Wether show 2:00 – 5:00 pm - Public Speaking 6:00 pm - Sullivan’s JABGA Fitting demonstration and contest (following show conclusion)

TUESDAY - June 12 8:00 am to 5:00 pm - JABGA Coloring Contest 8:00 am to 5:00 pm - JABGA Skillathon 8:00 am - Begin JABGA National Show

20 - The Boer Goat

Noon - LUNCH (Sullivan’s Supply Demonstration) 1:00 pm - Resume JABGA National Show 6:00 pm - JUDGES CONTINUING EDUCATION (following show conclusion)

6:00 pm - JABGA Sales Talk  

WEDNESDAY - June 13 7:30 am - JABGA Goat Judging Contest 7:45 am - Opening Ceremonies 8:00 am - ABGA National Open Show begins with Percentage Does Noon - LUNCH (JABGA Goat Judging Contest - Reasons) 1:00 pm - Resume ABGA National Open Show Percentage Pair Classes Immediately Follow Conclusion of Percentage Show Percentage Get of Sire, Percentage Doe Herd ABGA National Open Junior Fullblood Show Begins 6:00 pm - VIP Reception

THURSDAY - June 14 8:00 am - Resume ABGA National Open Fullblood Doe Show Noon - LUNCH (Old Timer Showmanship) 1:00 pm - Resume ABGA National Open Fullblood Doe Show Specialty Doe Class 5 yrs or older, Fullblood Doe Pair Classes Immediately follows selection of Overall Champions 6:00 pm - ABGA General Membership Meeting 6:30 pm - ABGA and JABGA Awards Appreciation Dinner & Auction 7:00 pm - Silent Auction ends

FRIDAY - June 15 [Anti-Bullying Day] (Proceeds to be donated to Stompoutbullying.org)

8:00 am - ABGA National Open Buck Show Noon - LUNCH 1:00 pm - Resume ABGA National Open Buck Show, Specialty Bucks 5 yrs or older, Open Buck Show group classes follows selection of Overall Champions, Best Pair of Bucks kids, Best Pair of Sr. Bucks from above classes, Get of Sire, Produce of Dam, Breeders herd

SATURDAY - June 16 All animals must be out of barn by noon.


2018 ABGA / JABGA National Show Rules Eligibility – ABGA National Show: Exhibitors must be a current active adult or junior member or junior member’s sibling or step sibling with current membership at same address with linked junior accounts documented with the American Boer Goat Association to submit a show entry for the ABGA National Show. Competition is open to goats registered in the Herd books of ABGA. No entries will be accepted until the animal is first registered in an ABGA herd book. Active or junior members of ABGA must be listed as the current owner on the ABGA registration prior to entry. Custom fitters/ agents, if different from the owner, will register with the Show Chair if the owner will not be in attendance at the show. There is no limit on the number of goats that can be entered in a class by a member. Application for entry must be on current, official entry forms. Junior members can enter the ABGA National Show by completing the entry and paying the correct fees for each goat.   Eligibility – JABGA National Show: Exhibitors must be a current member of the Junior American Boer Goat Association to submit a show entry for the JABGA National Show. Goats must be registered in the JABGA member’s name or junior member’s sibling or step sibling with current membership at same address with linked junior accounts documented with ABGA. All goats that are not bred and owned over the age of ninety (90) days must be in the herdbook by May 14, 2018 11:59 P.M. CST. No ranch or family name can be listed in the owner section of the certificate. There is no limit on the number of goats that can be entered in a class by a member. If the JABGA owner has more than one entry in a class, the other goats must be shown by another JABGA member. Application for entry must be on current, official entry forms. Defining an Exhibitor: Throughout the ABGA and JABGA National Show Rules the term “exhibitor” is defined as the owner or junior member’s sibling or step sibling with current membership with linked junior accounts documented with ABGA, of the goat listed in the ABGA registry. Defining a Participant: Throughout the ABGA National Show and JABGA National Show Rules the term “participant” includes but is not limited to an exhibitor, agent, custom fitter, vendor, office staff, ring steward or spectator. Junior Exhibitor Age Requirement: In order to show, the junior exhibitor must be at least 4 years of age on the day of the show. Maximum exhibitor age is 18 years of age on January 1,

2018. JABGA Showmanship Classes: Exhibitors entered in showmanship classes must own or be a junior member’s sibling or step sibling with current membership at same address with linked junior accounts documented with the ABGA of the goat that is being shown. The animal shown in showmanship must have been entered in the JABGA or JABGA Bred and Owned show by the same exhibitor showing it in showmanship. Age division will be determined based on the contestant’s age on January 1st, for the division of competition. a. Junior Division- 4-8 years of age b. Intermediate Division- 9-13 years of age c. Senior Division- 14-18 years of age Special Needs of an Exhibitor: Exhibitors with special needs are required to indicate what special needs they have on the entry form and check in at the office upon arrival at the show. Interpretation and Violation of Rules During the Show: The American Boer Goat Association (ABGA) Executive Committee has final and absolute right to interpret these rules and to arbitrarily settle and determine all matters, questions and differences in regard thereto or occurring during, or incident to, the ABGA National Show or JABGA National Show. The ABGA further reserves to its Executive Committee the right to amend or add to these rules as its judgment may determine. Any exhibitor, custom fitter, agent or spectator who violates any of the rules will forfeit all privileges and be subject to such penalty as the Executive Committee may order. The Executive Committee may apply other penalties and sanctions from time to time as deemed appropriate. Show Superintendents: National Show regulations and show rules will be adhered to and enforced by ABGA National Show Superintendents. Judges Decision: The decision of the judges shall be final in all cases except where fraud or misrepresentation on the part of an exhibitor is proven. Any such claim of an exhibitor’s fraud or misrepresentation must be timely submitted as an official protest. Official Protests: Official protests for exhibitor’s fraud or misrepresentation shall be submitted to the Show Chair in writing and be accompanied by $300.00 fee. The ABGA Executive Committee reserves the right to refund the $300.00 fee. Only members in good standing with ABGA can file a protest. Any such protest must plainly state the fraud or The Boer Goat - 21


misrepresentation of the exhibitor. Any protest filed more than 24 hours after the alleged incident shall not be considered. Protests shall be referred to the Executive Committee which shall have full and final authority to determine the matter and from whose decision there is no appeal. The Executive Committee will determine the method in which the protest is reviewed. Judging procedures shall not be interrupted for protest investigation.   Disqualification: Any goat showing any pronounced defect or abnormality will be barred from the show. Any evidence of a cosmetic surgical alteration of an exhibited goat will be a disqualification. Any goat found not to be in accordance with ABGA Rules and Regulations will be disqualified. Artificial coloring that alters the natural color of a goat will be a disqualification. Artificial coloring that enhances the goat’s natural color is acceptable. Illegible tattoos or tattoos inconsistent with registration papers will result in disqualification. A microchip inconsistent with registration papers will result in disqualification. An exhibitor must provide a reading device if a microchip is utilized for identification. Any goat testing positive for any performance enhancing drug and/ or chemical, their substitutes or derivatives will be disqualified. Should any goat that has been awarded a prize be disqualified before its class has been dismissed from the show ring, the lower placing goats shall move up to fill the vacancy. Should any goat be disqualified after the class has been dismissed from the show ring, the lower placing goats will not move into any higher position. No Liability: ABGA or JABGA SHALL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY LOSS, INJURY OR DAMAGE IN CONNECTION WITH, ARISING OUT OF OR INCIDENTAL TO THE ABGA NATIONAL SHOW or JABGA NATIONAL SHOW. Release of Liability: PARTICIPANT EXPRESSLY WAIVES ALL RIGHTS TO CLAIM AGAINST ABGA BY REASON OF, AND RELEASES ABGA FROM ANY LIABILITY WHATSOEVER WITH RESPECT TO, ANY INJURY TO PERSON OR DAMAGE TO OR LOSS OF PROPERTY (INCLUDING CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES) RESULTING FROM ANY CAUSE WHATSOEVER (EXPRESSLY INCLUDING ABGA’S NEGLIGENCE). Indemnification: PARTICIPANT AGREES TO HOLD HARMLESS AND UNCONDITIONALLY INDEMNIFY ABGA AGAINST AND FOR ALL CLAIMS, LIABILITIES, LOSSES, COSTS, EXPENSES, AND DAMAGES (ACTUAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR PUNITIVE) WHICH ABGA MAY AT ANY TIME SUFFER OR SUSTAIN OR BECOME LIABLE FOR BY REASON OF ANY ACCIDENTS, DAMAGES, INJURIESOR LOSSES EITHER TO PERSONS, PROPERTY OR BOTH, 22 - The Boer Goat

OF PARTICIPANT, OF ANY OTHER PARTICIPANT, OF ANY OTHER PARTIES, OR TO THE PROPERTY OF ABGA, IN ANY MATTER ARISING FROM, CONNECTED WITH OR INCIDENT TO THE ACTIVITIES HEREUNDER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY NEGLIGENT ACT OR OMISSION OF ABGA, IT’S OFFICERS AGENTS, EMPLOYEES OR VOLUNTEERS. [THE TERM “ABGA” MEANS AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION, JUNIOR AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION, ITS OFFICERS, DIRECTORS, AGENTS, EMPLOYEES, RING STEWARDS, AND VOLUNTEERS.] Computing Ages for ABGA & JABGA National Show: ABGA will establish June 1 as the date for computing age classes. Determining Class Breaks for Junior Division ABGA National Show: The Junior Division in the Percentage does, Fullblood Does and Fullblood Bucks will be broken by age starting with the youngest to the oldest with no more than a 90 day age spread in each class. Class breaks will not be determined until all entries have checked in at the National Show. Entry Deadline: To enter the 2018 National show without paying late entry fees, your entries must be in the ABGA office by the end of business day May 7, 2018 (5:00 P.M. CST). Entry fees are nonrefundable. Entry Fees / Late Entries: The entry fee for goats is $40 per head in the ABGA National Show and $30 per head in the JABGA National Show. The entry fee for the Bred and Owned JABGA is $20 per head. Substitutions are available for a fee of $25 per head until the end of Check In at 4:00 p.m. Sunday June 10, 2018 for JABGA exhibitors, and 12:00 p.m. Monday, June 11, 2018, for ABGA Open Show Exhibitors. All entry fee(s) for goats received after 5:00 P.M. CST on May 8th are subject to a late fee. Mail courier and other delays are not considered in determining entry fees: the receipt date will determine if a late entry fee is required. There will be an additional $10 per animal late fee charged for each class entry received between May 8th 2018 and May 15th 2018. Any late entries received from May 16th 2018 and before the end of Check In at 4:00 p.m. Sunday June 10th 2018 for JABGA exhibitors, and 12:00 p.m. Monday, June 11th, 2018, for ABGA Open Show Exhibitors will require a double entry fee. Any entry received after May 15, 2018 will not be in the show program. No entries will be accepted until the animal is first listed in the ABGA herd book. Entries are required to provide the information as listed on the entry form. Entry for group classes is required but will also be done at check-in. Identification: All goats must have a legible permanent ear


identification (ear tags* are not permanent IDs) and or a microchip (owner must supply reader) corresponding to the ABGA registration certificate upon arrival on the grounds. GOATS WILL BE DISQUALIFIED FROM JUDGING WITHOUT PROPER IDENTIFICATION. All goats must be registered purebred, fullblood or percentage Boer goats. Percentage doe classes are for goats 50% to 87.5% Boer. Fullblood classes are for does that are 15/16 blood (93.7%) and higher and 31/32 blood (96.8%) and higher for bucks. Progeny of fresh does will NOT be allowed in the ring. Goats entered in group classes also must be entered and shown in the appropriate individual class. Any animal disqualified in a regular class for a cull fault or tattoo will not be eligible for the pairs or group classes. (*please see attached JABGA National Regional Show rules in reference to Commercial Does and Market Goats.) By 24 months of age, does must have kidded or show evidence of visible udder formation consistent with late-term pregnancy. JABGA Bred & Owned Classes: All JABGA National Show entries where the JABGA member is both the animal’s sole Breeder and Owner can be entered into the applicable JABGA Bred & Owned Class in addition to the regular class for an additional $20.00. The breeder of an animal is the owner or lessee of record of a kid’s dam on the date of service. Heelers / JABGA National Show: Heelers are allowed in the JABGA National Show in the yearling classes and older to assist youth exhibitors under the age of twelve (12) as of January 1, 2018 or members with physical or mental disabilities. [The youth exhibitor must show their goat and be assisted by the heeler]. Heelers must be current JABGA Member. A heeler is allowed to only lead and or hold the animal. Unauthorized Goats: Goats for which the owner has not paid an entry fee will not be allowed on the grounds, with the exception of those goats that are nursing (Examples: the dam of a 60-day-old entry or the 40-day-old offspring of a two-yearold entry). All goats on the grounds must meet Nebraska State health requirements. Unruly Goats: The exhibitor will be liable for damage to fences, other goats or injury to people. In addition to penning, unruly bucks may be required to be restrained or removed from the show if deemed necessary by the show management. If any goat is a threat to the public or is unruly, precautions must be taken. Exhibitors are responsible for the actions of their goats. Judging: Exhibitors are responsible for knowing the times at which their goats will be judged. Any goat not presented promptly will be ruled ineligible and barred from competition in the class.

Participant Conduct: If any participant, in any way, whether in person or by agent or employee, interferes with the judges, show officials or staff during their adjudication or shows any disrespect to them or the show, ABGA may demand a proper apology from the exhibitor, may exclude the exhibitor and goat in question from competition, bar exhibitor from the grounds, and may also withhold prizes that may have been awarded. The Executive Committee may apply other penalties and sanctions from time to time as deemed appropriate. Nebraska State Fairgrounds at Fonner Park Regulations: Exhibitors are responsible for knowing the regulations of the Nebraska State Fairgrounds. Regulations will be enforced by ABGA Show Chair and/or Nebraska State Fairgrounds at Fonner Park officials. Any charges or material cost incurred by ABGA due to an exhibitor violation or ignorance of these regulations will be paid by the exhibitor. The facility is a non-smoking, no alcohol venue, and cooking is not allowed inside the facility. Goat Health Requirements: To be eligible to compete at the ABGA / JABGA National Shows exhibitors will need a Medication Report filled out and turned into the office with their entry packet. Goats must be accompanied by a current health certificate to enter the state of Nebraska. The health certificate is to be issued by your veterinarian within the past 30 days and must state the goats are for show purposes. All goats are expected to be healthy, free of disease and in show condition. All goats in the barn must comply with Federal and State Scrapie and the state of Nebraska animal health requirements. ABGA assumes no duty or responsibility nor shall it otherwise be liable to any exhibitor for any of the following: (i) the   prevention of disease; (ii) the protection of goats from disease or exposure to disease; (iii) the enforcement of animal health laws or regulations; or (iv) notifications or warnings about disease or other animal health related concerns. In this regard, ABGA shall not be liable for any damages, injuries or losses arising from, connected with or related to disease or the exposure of goats thereto. This includes, but is not limited to, actual and consequential damages. Nebraska State Veterinary Office: The Nebraska State USDA Office contact number is (402) 471-2351. The website is: www.nda.nebraska.gov/regulations/animal/tilac.html#7. Each exhibitor’s veterinarian is required to call the Nebraska State USDA Office to obtain animal health requirements. Exhibitors failing to meet Nebraska animal health requirements are subject to fines and removal from the Nebraska State Fairgrounds at Fonner Park. The Boer Goat - 23


Veterinary Services: ABGA will provide contact information to exhibitors during check-in of a local veterinarian that can assist exhibitors with goat health issues. The contact information of the veterinarian will also be posted in the check-in area.

Board of Directors and agrees to have such goat submitted to such tests as may be requested.

DNA Testing / Urine, Ultrasound, Blood, or Hair Testing: The ABGA reserves the right to perform one or any combination of Pets: Pets (dogs, in particular) are strictly prohibited from a random DNA, urine, blood, and or hair laboratory test, and being on the grounds. or an ultrasound scan of any goat entered for competition, at ABGA’s discretion. The ABGA reserves the right to test any or Exhibitor Parking: The Nebraska State Fairgrounds at all champions at their discretion. The conclusions based upon Fonner Park will provide trailer parking which is at the risk the analysis of any of these tests by the veterinarian in charge of the exhibitor. Exhibitors may only park in designated shall be final, conclusive, and without recourse against ABGA, areas reserved for the ABGA Nationals. Vehicles and trailers any officer, director, volunteer or employee there of or any improperly parked will be fined and towed at the exhibitor’s veterinarian appointed by the ABGA. The exhibitor waives any expense. right of action which he might have for action taken under this rule and releases ABGA and the veterinarian from any claims Exhibitor Numbers: Each entry will be assigned a number. or demands whatsoever in connection with the inspection or Exhibitors will receive cards which correspond with the testing of any such goat or any ruling or action taken due to numbers; these cards must be worn by the exhibitor in the the conclusion of the veterinarian. All testing required by the show ring when goats are being judged. ABGA will be performed at a laboratory selected by ABGA, excluding ultrasound which may be performed on location, will Show Schedule: A tentative schedule is listed in the show be paid for by ABGA and will be completed within 60 days after packet and noted as subject to change. The schedule of classes the show. If a goat tests positive for a performance enhancing for the show will be posted each day. The schedule of classes substance at the national show the exhibitor will be subject is at the discretion of the Ring Stewards based on in the barn to disciplinary actions as described in the ABGA Rules and entries. Regulations.   All Goats MUST Be Out of the Barn by Noon Sat., June 16, 2018. NOTE: With the exception of sales of semen or goats owned by the exhibitor advertising on the End Cap, or the exhibitor Buy In Arrival: For a fee, ABGA National Show Exhibitors will be whose goats are penned in the pens, NO VENDOR OR permitted to arrive and unload on Saturday June 8th from 4:00 INDIVIDUAL SALES WILL BE ALLOWED from the Display / Tack pm-8:00 pm. A fee of $10 per head with a maximum cost of Pens or End Cap Areas. End Cap Size: 12 X 6. Exhibitor’s Display $100 per Exhibitor will be charged for early arrival. Only JABGA must stay within the defined area for end caps. entries are exempt from this fee. ABGA entries traveling with a JABGA participant are not exempt from the early arrival fee. Pens: Pens will be assigned based on 1.5 goats per pen based on the number goats presented by the exhibitor to show officials Fitting: Fitting will be left to the discretion of the exhibitor. at check-in. Allowances are made for a tack area and multiple All fitting and trimming must be done in the designated area. bucks over one year of age providing space is available. The No fitting or trimming will be permitted in the arena area. assigning of pens is at the discretion of the superintendents. Any altering of pigmentation is prohibited. If an exhibitor’s Pens for entries received at check-in are subject to availability. goat is found to have altered pigmentation, the goat will be Additional shavings will be available for a fee at the Fairgrounds disqualified from the show and the exhibitor will be subject office. Pens will be pre-assigned before the show. Members can to terms of ABGA Rules and Regulations. Any evidence of divide the pens with a divider. If several exhibitors want to pen a cosmetic surgical alteration of an exhibited goat will be a together, they must note this on their entry form. Exhibitors disqualification and that exhibitor will be subject to terms may have a sign over their exhibit advertising their own herd. of ABGA Rules and Regulations. The use of any performance Show Superintendents can remove exhibitors’ signs at their enhancing drug and/or chemical, their substitutes or discretion. A goat pen can be used as a tack or display as long derivatives, is prohibited and will result in disqualification as the display and tack fits in the pen. Tack and goat carts will and that exhibitor will be subject to terms of ABGA Rules and not be allowed in alleys, showing area or staging area. Pen Size Regulations. The exhibitor agrees to submit any goat entered 6x6. by him/her to inspection by any veterinarian appointed by the 24 - The Boer Goat


Premier Exhibitor Award: The Premier Exhibitor Award will be given to the Premier Percentage Exhibitor and the Premier Fullblood Exhibitor determined by the 10 point system. The exhibitor must be an active member of ABGA and be listed as the current owner on the ABGA registration certificate and in ABGA records. Each exhibitor must enter a minimum of three goats in the respective herd books. If there are 10 or more goats in the class, the first place goat will receive 10 points, second place 9 points, etc., through tenth. If there are less than 10 goats, the first place goat will receive points equal to the number in the class. Class totals will be determined from the total number of goats entered in a class from the official class sheets. Goats owned in partnership will accrue points for that partnership towards the Premier Percentage Exhibitor or Premier Full Blood Exhibitor Award. In the event of a tie, the exhibitor winning the most first place awards will receive the award. If the tie still exists, then the one with the most second place awards will win. If necessary, this process will continue until the tie is broken. ABGA will post accumulated points daily. It will be the responsibility of the exhibitor to review these points and report any discrepancies to the Show Chair.

in all JABGA classes and first through fifth on bred and owned JABGA classes. Junior, Yearling, and Senior Division Grand Champions and Reserve   Grand Champions receive a rosette in the JABGA and Bred & Owned JABGA shows. A cash prize, banner and trophy will be awarded to the Overall Grand Champion ($400) and Overall Reserve Grand Champion ($300) goats in the JABGA and Bred & Owned JABGA show. JABGA Premiums: Premiums in the individual JABGA and (JABGA Bred and Owned classes excluding payments for 6th8th) will be paid based on the following Schedule: # in class

1st 2nd 3 rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 1 – 2 20 3 – 4 25 20 5 – 8 30 25 20 9 – 12 35 30 25 20 13 – 16 40 35 30 25 20 17 – 20 45 40 35 30 25 20 21 – 24 50 45 40 35 30 25 20 25 + 55 50 45 40 35 30 25 20

Champion points Premier Exhibitor Award will be determined as follows: Placing Points Grand Champion Junior Percentage 10 pts Reserve Champion Junior Percentage 5 pts Grand Champion Yearling Percentage 10 pts Reserve Champion Yearling Percentage 5 pts Grand Champion Senior Percentage 10 pts Reserve Champion Senior Percentage 5 pts National Grand Champion Percentage 10 pts National Reserve Champion Percentage 5 pts Grand Champion Junior Fullblood 10 pts Reserve Champion Junior Fullblood 5 pts Grand Champion Yearling Fullblood 10 pts Reserve Champion Yearling Fullblood 5 pts Grand Champion Senior Fullblood 10 pts Reserve Champion Senior Fullblood 5 pts National Grand Champion Fullblood 10 pts National Reserve Champion Fullblood 5 pts The Donald Bird Premier Breeder: The point system for the Premier Exhibitor will be used giving the same points to the breeder. THIS AWARD IS FOR FULLBLOOD BOER GOATS ONLY. *Awards for Junior Show Classes: Class winners will receive a buckle in both the JABGA and Bred & Owned JABGA shows. Ribbons will be awarded to the first through tenth place goats

*Per IRS Regulations, a cash prize may be subject to an IRS Form 1099 and will be held for proper documentation as required. Premier Sire Award: The Premier Sire Award will be given to the sire that has accumulated the most class points (10 point system) earned by three or more exhibited offspring during the 2018 National. If there are 10 or more goats in the class, the first place goat will receive 10 points, second place 9 points, etc., through tenth. If there are less than 10 goats, the first place goat will receive points equal to the number in the class. Class totals will be determined from the total number of goats entered in a class from the official class sheets. The Premier Sire Award will be presented to the current owner of record according to ABGA. Any animal disqualified in a regular class for a cull fault or tattoo will not be eligible for the pairs or group classes. Pair Classes: Entry fee is $5 per pair. Goats must be shown in their regular class and pre-entered. Pair entries must be owned by the same exhibitor. Entry Deadline and Entry Fees / Late Entries Rules apply. BEST PAIR CLASSES: See Class Schedule Best Pair of Kids: Both sexes represented. One fullblood/purebred The Boer Goat - 25


doe and a fullblood buck kid that has shown in respective classes.

JABGA NATIONAL SHOW COMPETITION RULES Individual Competition

Group Classes: The following rules apply for group classes. The goats must be shown in their regular class and pre-entered by the Yearling division class of each division. Exhibitors will have 1. At the JABGA National Show, overall competition will to fill out and bring a card to the ring listing each animals tattoo be determined by highest points earned in 4 of the 6 following and registration number for the group classes. events: Public Speaking, Livestock Judging, Sales talk, JABGA Sanctioned goat show, Skillathon and Showmanship. FULLBLOOD GET OF SIRE: Three fullblood or purebred offspring of the same buck with both sexes represented. Do not have to 2. At the JABGA National Show, points will be awarded be owned by the same person. to the top 15 competitors in Public Speaking, Livestock Judging, Sales Talk, Skillathon and Showmanship, with the highest score PERCENTAGE GET OF SIRE: Three percentage does, any age that receiving 15 points and each subsequent score receiving one are out of the same buck (50%, 75%, & 87% are eligible) Do not point less, down to one point for 15th place. have to be owned by the same person. 3. At JABGA National Show, points will be awarded FULLBLOOD PRODUCE OF DAM: Two offspring of the same doe. for the top placing animal for each exhibitor with first place Do not have to be owned by the same person. receiving 10 points and each subsequent placing receiving one less point, down to one point for 10th place. Points will be PERCENTAGE PRODUCE OF DAM: Two offspring of the same awarded to the highest placing entry for each participant to doe. Do not have to be owned by the same person, and must include, JABGA Sanctioned Show, market, and commercial doe be a 75% or better. show. Maximum of 10 points will be awarded based on the highest placing of a single animal. FULLBLOOD BREEDER’S HERD: The exhibitor of the breeders herd must be breeder of record. Goats owned by other 4. If a participant competes in more than one JABGA exhibitors may be included provided the exhibitor of the regional show, their highest 4 placings in the Public Speaking, breeder’s herd is the breeder of the included goat(s): 1.) Two Livestock Judging, Sales talk, Goat Show, Skillathon, and fullblood or purebred does less than 12 months, Showmanship will be used to determined their total regional 2.) Two fullblood or purebred does 12 months or greater, 3.) a score that will be used for the National Competition. (one score buck of any age. per competition area)   PERCENTAGE DOE BREEDER’S HERD: The exhibitor of the herd 5. Each participant can earn an additional 10 bonus must be breeder of record. Goats owned by other exhibitors points by attending and participating in more than one JABGA may be included provided the exhibitor of the breeder’s herd Regional Show or participating in the National Show. Total is the breeder of the included goat(s). 1.) Two percentage does additional bonus points are limited to 10 per participant. less than 12 months, 2.) Two percent- age does 12 months or greater. 6. JABGA Sanctioned show rules will be followed for JABGA National show. Recognition and Awards 1. To receive awards, contestants must attend the entire awards ceremony. Any unclaimed prizes will be forfeited. 2. Ties: in the event of ties in the overall competition, ties will be broken by comparing scores in the following events: a. 1st tie breaker Showmanship b. 2nd tie breaker Skillathon c. 3rd tie breaker Goat Judging 26 - The Boer Goat


3. National Awards will be presented to the top five competitors in each age division for Public Speaking, Sales Talk, Livestock Judging, Skillathon and Showmanship.

also be selected for drug testing. At time of testing Quality Assurance Forms will be available to provide information of any medication recently given.

4. National Show Awards will be presented to cumulative 12. Minimum 50% payout on entry fees high point winner for each age division and a single overall   JABGA National Show Winner JABGA Market Show 1. Wethers and does can be exhibited 5. Junior Division winners cannot compete for the single overall JABGA National Show winner 2. Participants must show their own market goat unless JABGA Commercial Doe Show there are two or more entries entered by the same participant in a particular class. This includes the champion drive. 1. Participants must show their own commercial doe unless there are two or more commercial does entered by 3. Market goats must have ownership declared before the same participant in a particular class. This includes the weigh-in and may not be entered or shown in another youth’s champion drive name after being weighed in. 2. Commercial doe must have ownership declared before 4. Market goats must be slick shorn to an even length weigh-in and may not be entered or shown in another youth’s above the hock but excluding the head and tail switch. name after being weighed in. 5. Wethers may not have testicular tissue or exhibit 3. Commercial Does may be exhibited with hair. behavioral signs of still being intact male. 4. Does exhibited in the commercial doe show are not permitted to be exhibited in the ABGA or JABGA sanctioned show. 5. Participation at the National Show is limited to JABGA members. 6.

Ethical Fitting Practices must be observed at all times.

7. The commercial does will be shown in Divisions by age. Class breaks within the divisions will be calculated by weight. Show management reserves the right to adjust the class numbers and breaks as needed. 8. a. b. c.

Classes will be divided into three divisions Class 1 will be for does that have all milk teeth in place Class 2 will be for does with 2 adult teeth in place Class 3 will be for does with 4 tooth and older

9. Grand and Reserve in each Division will compete for Grand and Reserve Champion commercial doe. 10. All Commercial does must have scrapie tag in place and match health certificate.

6. Participation at the National Show is limited to JABGA members. 7.

Ethical Fitting Practices must be observed at all times.

8. Market goats will be shown in classes by weight. Show Management reserves the right to adjust the class numbers and breaks as needed. 9. Classes will be divided evenly into three divisions a. Light b. Medium c. Heavy . 10. Grand & Reserve in each Division will compete for Grand & Reserve Champion Market Goat. 11. All market goats must have a scrapie tag in place and match health certificate. 12. Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion animals at the National Show will be drug tested. Random animals may also be selected for drug testing. At time of testing Quality Assurance Forms will be available to provide information of any medication recently given.

11. Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion animals at the National Show will be drug tested. Random animals may The Boer Goat - 27


MKT

65 66 67 68

28 - The Boer Goat

2018 JABGA Show 2018 JABGA Show

Class Date Range Class Name Start Date Ending Date Percentage Doe Kids, 0 to under 3 months 3/2/18 6/1/18 Percentage Doe Kids, 3 to under 6 months 12/2/17 3/1/18 Percentage Doe Kids, 6 to under 9 months 9/2/17 12/1/17 Percentage Doe Kids, 9 to under 12 months 6/2/17 9/1/17 GRAND CHAMPION JUNIOR PERCENTAGE DOE RESERVE CHAMPION JUNIOR PERCENTAGE DOE Percentage Yearling Does, 12 to under 16 months 2/2/17 6/1/17 Percentage Yearling Does, 16 to under 20 months 10/2/16 2/1/17 Percentage Yearling Does, 20 to under 24 months 6/2/16 10/1/16 GRAND CHAMPION YEARLING PERCENTAGE DOE RESERVE CHAMPION YEARLING PERCENTAGE DOE Percentage Two Year Old Does, 24 to under 36 months 6/2/15 6/1/16 Percentage Aged Does, 36 plus months n/a 6/1/15 GRAND CHAMPION SENIOR PERCENTAGE DOE RESERVE CHAMPION SENIOR PERCENTAGE DOE NATIONAL GRAND CHAMPION PERCENTAGE DOE NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION PERCENTAGE DOE Best Pair of Percentage Doe Kids – from classes 1, 2, 3 or 4 Best Pair of Percentage Does one year or older – from classes 7, 8, 9 ,12 or 13 Produce of Percentage Dam – See Group Classes rules Percentage Get A Sire – See Group Classes rules Breeders Percentage Doe Herd – See Group Classes rules Fullblood Doe Kids, 0 to under 3 months 3/2/18 6/1/18 Fullblood Doe Kids, 3 to under 6 months 12/2/17 3/1/18 Fullblood Doe Kids, 6 to under 9 months 9/2/17 12/1/17 Fullblood Doe Kids, 9 to under 12 months 6/2/17 9/1/17 GRAND CHAMPION JUNIOR FULLBLOOD DOE RESERVE CHAMPION JUNIOR FULLBLOOD DOE Fullblood Yearling Does, 12 to under 16 months 2/2/17 6/1/17 Fullblood Yearling Does, 16 to under 20 months 10/2/16 2/1/17 Fullblood Yearling Does, 20 to under 24 months 6/2/16 10/1/16 GRAND CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD DOE RESERVE CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD DOE Fullblood Two Year Old Does, 24 to under 36 months 6/2/15 6/1/16 Fullblood Aged Does, 36 plus months n/a 6/1/15 GRAND CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD DOE RESERVE CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD DOE NATIONAL GRAND CHAMPION FULLBLOOD DOE NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION FULLBLOOD DOE Best pair of Doe Kids – from class 23, 24, 25 or 26 Best pair of Senior Does one year or older from class 29, 30, 31, 34 or 35 Fullblood Buck Kids, 0 to under 3 months 3/2/18 6/1/18 Fullblood Buck Kids, 3 to under 6 months 12/2/17 3/1/18 Fullblood Buck Kids, 6 to under 9 months 9/2/17 12/1/17 Fullblood Buck Kids, 9 to under 12 months 6/2/17 9/1/17 GRAND CHAMPION JUNIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK RESERVE CHAMPION JUNIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK Fullblood Yearling Bucks, 12 to under 16 months 2/2/17 6/1/17 Fullblood Yearling Bucks, 16 to under 20 months 10/2/16 2/1/17 Fullblood Yearling Bucks, 20 to under 24 months 6/2/16 10/1/16 GRAND CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD BUCK RESERVE CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD BUCK Fullblood Two Year Old Bucks, 24 to under 36 months 6/2/15 6/1/16 Fullblood Aged Bucks, 36 plus months n/a 6/1/15 GRAND CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK RESERVE CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK NATIONAL GRAND CHAMPION FULLBLOOD BUCK NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION FULLBLOOD BUCK Best Pair of Buck Kids – from classes 41, 42, 43 or 44 Best Pair of Senior Bucks one year or older – from classes 47, 48, 49, 52 or 53 Best pair of Kids, both sexes represented – See New Pair Classes rules Produce of Dam –See Group Classes rules Get of Sire – See Group Classes rules Breeders Fullblood Herd – See Group Classes rules Commerical Doe Show, Junior Does (All milk teeth present) Commerical Doe Show, Yearling Does (2 permanent teeth) Commerical Doe Show, Senior Doe (More than 2 permanent teeth) Market Show (Breaks determined by weight)

2018 JABGA Show

JABGA NATIONAL SHOW CLASSES

Pairs

CDS Group

CDS Group

Fullblood Bucks

Fullblood Does

Percentage Does

Class # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 Pairs 61 62 63 64

MKT


Group

Pairs

Percentage Junior Doe Kids GRAND CHAMPION JUNIOR PERCENTAGE DOE RESERVE CHAMPION JUNIOR PERCENTAGE DOE Percentage Yearling Does, 12 to under 16 months Percentage Yearling Does, 16 to under 20 months Percentage Yearling Does, 20 to under 24 months GRAND CHAMPION YEARLING PERCENTAGE DOE RESERVE CHAMPION YEARLING PERCENTAGE DOE Percentage Two Year Old Does, 24 to under 36 months Percentage Aged Does, 36 plus months GRAND CHAMPION SENIOR PERCENTAGE DOE

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46

RESERVE CHAMPION SENIOR PERCENTAGE DOE NATIONAL GRAND CHAMPION PERCENTAGE DOE NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION PERCENTAGE DOE Best Pair of Percentage Doe Kids – from class 1 Best Pair of Percentage Does one year or older – from classes 4, 5, 6, 9, or 10 Produce of Percentage Dam – See Group Classes rules Percentage Get A Sire – See Group Classes rules Breeders Percentage Doe Herd – See Group Classes rules Fullblood Junior Doe Kids GRAND CHAMPION JUNIOR FULLBLOOD DOE RESERVE CHAMPION JUNIOR FULLBLOOD DOE Fullblood Yearling Does, 12 to under 16 months Fullblood Yearling Does, 16 to under 20 months Fullblood Yearling Does, 20 to under 24 months GRAND CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD DOE RESERVE CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD DOE Fullblood Two Year Old Does, 24 to under 36 months Fullblood Aged Does, 36 plus months GRAND CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD DOE RESERVE CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD DOE NATIONAL GRAND CHAMPION FULLBLOOD DOE NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION FULLBLOOD DOE Best pair of Doe Kids – from class 20 Best pair of Senior Does one year or older from class 23, 24, 25, 28, or 29 Fullblood Junior Buck Kids GRAND CHAMPION JUNIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK RESERVE CHAMPION JUNIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK Fullblood Yearling Bucks, 12 to under 16 months Fullblood Yearling Bucks, 16 to under 20 months Fullblood Yearling Bucks, 20 to under 24 months GRAND CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD BUCK RESERVE CHAMPION YEARLING FULLBLOOD BUCK Fullblood Two Year Old Bucks, 24 to under 36 months Fullblood Aged Bucks, 36 plus months GRAND CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK

47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55

RESERVE CHAMPION SENIOR FULLBLOOD BUCK NATIONAL GRAND CHAMPION FULLBLOOD BUCK NATIONAL RESERVE CHAMPION FULLBLOOD BUCK Best Pair of Buck Kids – from class 36 Best Pair of Senior Bucks one year or older from classes 39, 40, 41, 44, or 45 Best pair of Kids, both sexes represented – See New Pair Classes rules Produce of Dam –See Group Classes rules Get of Sire – See Group Classes rules Breeders Fullblood Herd – See Group Classes rules

Class Date Range Start Date 6/2/17

Ending Date 6/1/18

2/2/17 10/2/16 6/2/16

6/1/17 2/1/17 10/1/16

6/2/15 n/a

6/1/16 6/1/15

6/2/17

6/1/18

2/2/17 10/2/16 6/2/16

6/1/17 2/1/17 10/1/16

6/2/15 n/a

6/1/16 6/1/15

6/2/17

6/1/18

2/2/17 10/2/16 6/2/16

6/1/17 2/1/17 10/1/16

6/2/15 n/a

6/1/16 6/1/15

2018 ABGA Open Show

Class Name

# 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

2018 ABGA Open Show 2018 ABGA Open Show

ABGA NATIONAL SHOW CLASSES

Pairs

Group

Fullblood Bucks

Fullblood Does

Percentage Does

Class

The Boer Goat - 29


The Cattle and Sheep Barns are on each side of 5 Points Arena where the Show Ring is located. They are both connected to the arena.

Pens are 6 ft by 6 ft CATTLE BARN Pen Layout. 19 20 17 18 15 16 13 14 11 12 9 10 7

8

5

6 4

1

2

Wash Racks

Wash Racks

SHEEP BARN Pen Layout. O P M N K L I J G H E F C D A B

Vendor Area Wash Racks

Wash Racks

The Boer Goat - 37


AMERICAN BOER GOAT ASSOCIATION

Calender OF EVENTS 2018 Show

Date

Location - State

March

Contact

Peach State Classic

March 3

Georgia National Fair Grounds - Georgia

Kim Veal

IMGP Spring Fling

Marcy 10

Seneca FFA Barn - Illinois

Deric Wetherell

RODEO Austin ABGA/JABGA Show

March 15

Travis County Expo Center - Texas

Stephanie Mazurkiewicz

April Best in the West ABGA/JABGA Shows

April 7-8

Shasta District Fair - California

Judy Hoffman

JABGA Area 5 Regional Show

April 14

Nolan County Coliseum - Texas

Katherine Klug

Morehead State Spring Classic

April 14

Derrickson Agriculture Complex

Chanis Cox

Kidding Around Classic

April 21

Daviess County 4-H Fairgrounds - IN

Kristin Allen

OBGA SIlver Series Spring Classic

April 21-22

Garvin County Fair Barns at Wacker Park -OK

Theodora Behne

Show Me Spring Spectacular

April 21

Missouri State Fairgrounds -MO

Tracy Diefenbach

Bourbon and Boers

April 21

Scott County Fair - KY

Jason Brashear

April Fools

April 28-29

Central Washington State Fair Park -WA

Patti Butler

Orange County Classic

April 28

Orange Co. 4-H Fairgrounds - IN

Michael Lash

Weld Co. Goat Extravaganza Open and

April 29

Island Grove Park - CO

Jennifer Johnson Seltzer

Jr. Shows April Sunshine State Calssic

May 4-5

Southeastern Livestock Pavilion - FL

Amanda Durham

Bedford County Classic

May 5

Bedford Co. AG Ext - TN

Kathy Simmons

Boers de Mayo ABGA/JABGA

May 5-6

Payette County Fairgrounds - ID

Koben Shigeta

JABGA Area 3 Regional Show

May 5

Clark County Fairgrounds - OH

Tracy Diefenbach

The Buckeye Boer Bash

May 6

Clark County Fairgrounds - OH

Tracy Diefenbach

Lookout Mtn. Goat Show

May 12-13

Dekalb County Fairgrounds - AL

Anita Ramsey

IBGC Summer Series at Ripley Co.

May 12

Ripley County Fairgrounds _IN

Adrienne Kidder

Tower Tree Classic

May 12

Decatur Co. Fairgrounds - IN

Monica Hansen

Spring Fling Meat Goat Show

May 12

Lucas County Fairgrounds - IA

Nikki Thummel

WV Boer Goat Blitz ABGA/JABGA Show

May 19-20

Jefferson County Fairgrounds - WV

Susan Burner

IBGC Summer Series at Carroll County

May 19

Carroll County 4-H Fairgrounds - IN

Adrienne Kidder

Heart of IN Boer Goat Show

May 20

Johnson County 4H & Ag Fairgrounds - IN

Hannah Goeb

Poweshiek Co. Boer-Nanza

May 26-27

Poweshiek Co. Fairgrounds - IA

Rose Shepard

SD End of School Blowout

May 26-27

Tripp Fairgrounds - SD

Jennifer Martinez

JABGA Area 2 Regional Show

May 26

Effingahm Co. Fairgrounds - IL

Deric Wetherell

IMGP Regional Round Up

May 27

The Boer Goat - 31


Previnting Cyanide Poinoning in Sorghum Sorghum is a popular forage crop used in livestock production systems capable of producing substantial quantities of feed during the warmer months of the year. Sorghum is a feed source that can be grazed, ensiled or made in to hay. Negative characteristic of sorghum from an animal health perspective is its capabilities to cause cyanide and nitrate poisoning. Sorghum can contain lethal levels of prussic acid better known as cyanide. As well as cyanide, sorghum can have elevated levels of nitrates. Both nitrates and cyanide can cause significant animal health problems including death. Careful management can greatly lower any potential animal health risk associated with feeding sorghum to livestock. Minimising the Risk of Cyanide Poisoning • Selective breeding by seed companies against negative traits like high levels of prussic acid has resulted in sorghum varieties that are relatively safe. Grain sorghums and sweet sorghums generally have higher prussic acid levels than other varieties. Your seed supplier should be able to provide you with recommendations as to the suitability of specific varieties for grazing. • New growth and /or regrowth plant material will typically contain high levels of prussic acid. When stock consume the new growth or regrowth material the prussic acid is digested, releasing cyanide which is absorbed by the animal. The amount of cyanide absorbed can be sufficient to kill an animal. For this reason it is recommended not to graze sorghum when it is less than 45 cm in height for short varieties

32 - The Boer Goat

and 65cm for tall varieties. Although this decreases the risk of poisoning it does not guarantee safe grazing. • Avoid grazing hungry stock on sorghum. When introducing stock onto sorghum it is recommended that they receive plenty of roughage before going into the paddock. This will decrease the amount of material they can consume in the first grazing period and decrease the risk of ill effects. • Maintain a close eye on stock for the first 48 hours when introducing stock on to sorghum. It is ideal to watch the animals continuously for the first 2 hours. Affected stock often die within minutes of eating a lethal dose of sorghum. • Provide stock with a sulphur lick (10% sulphur in a salt lick). Sulphur plays an important role in detoxification of cyanide as it is released in the digestive process. Some research has shown that sulphur added to the diet may also result in increased production when animals are grazing sorghum exclusively. • If buying sorghum silage, have it feed tested for cyanide and nitrate levels before feeding to stock. Sorghum that is dangerous to graze will also be dangerous to livestock after it has been cut for hay or silage. Minimising the Risk of Nitrate Poisoning • Nitrates accumulate in many different plants with sorghum being one plant well recognised for this negative trait. There are many conditions that result in nitrate accumulation. Generally, plants accumulate nitrates when soil nitrate is high but conditions are not suitable for normal forage growth. Moisture stress, cloudy weather, and herbicide application are factors that can increase accumulation of nitrates. • To minimise the risk associated with nitrate poisoning it is important that hungry stock are not introduced on


to sorghum. Take special care if the crop has been moisture stressed or the crop has a high uptake of nitrogen influenced by fertiliser application. Treatments for Cyanide and Nitrate Poisoning Monitor stock closely and if any stock show signs of distress contact your local Department of Primary Industries Animal Health staff or your local veterinarian for specific advice and assistance. There are products that can assist with the recovery of animals suffering nitrate and cyanide poisoning, however professional advice should obtained to get an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Summary of Key Points • Select a safe variety of sorghum for grazing. • Avoid grazing plants under 45 cm for short and 65 for tall varieties. • Avoid grazing stressed plants or fresh growth shortly after the plant has been stressed. • Avoid putting hungry stock onto sorghum. Make sure stock have plenty of roughage prior to grazing sorghum. • Provide stock with a source of sulphur. (Salt block with 10% sulphur). • Monitor stock closely during the first 2 hrs and then keep a close eye on stock for next 48 hrs. • Always test sorghum silage for nitrate and cyanide levels. Written by Sam Ellis, Kerang. Printed with permisison from the National LIbrary of Australia.

Oklahoma Boer Goat Association Invites You!! Make plans to join us for our spring show: April 21-22 2018 Pauls Valley OK Part of Silver Series Classic Scholarship opportunities High point buckles Great company!!

Special thanks to the Pauls Valley Tourism Board and Garvin County for their generous donations and use of the barns!! For more information please contact Theodora Behne at 580-583-2050 or visit

www.oklahomaboergoatassociation.com The Boer Goat - 33


Young Farmers Find Their Stride in the Goat Market

Mysti-Ane’ Pearce

When my sister came home from college she brought home a couple of goats named Gizmo, Toby, and Razz-a-matazz. Usually, siblings come home with tattoos or significant others but not my sister; it was goats. These goats were my gateway into the meat goat market. While my sister didn’t bring home meat goats, our good friends, the Pryor’s owners of Pryor Downs, owned a large commercial meat goat herd. So, in 2008, we started our meat goat herd and never looked back. I made all the decisions with which ones to buy and how they to take care of them. At that time, the industry was just starting to take hold with young people and those around the United States. Starting a Boer goat herd was something new to everyone for showing or for commercial reasons. Today, the industry is getting on its feet and starting to boom in both the showing community and commercial industry. As long as I have been alive my family had never owned any livestock. My sister coming home from college with the goats was my first experience outside typical household pets. Having the goats and raising them is what really peaked my interest in the industry. After the first trial run of goats, I was ready to jump in and own a herd of goats. Over the years I have found quite a few other young goat herd owners. They jumped into the business with different goals, but all of us carry the same love for animals, especially the goats we own. The one thing I learned was agriculture education was the driving force to start young peoples herds. Phoebe Frazer, a senior Agriculture Education major at the University of Missouri, has owned meat goats for four years. Now, her family runs around 40 head of Boer goats, the most popular meat goat in the industry, and Boer crosses as a small commercial herd. She and her family chose goats for very simple reasons. “They were much easier than dairy goats. That’s really the main reason,” Frazer explained when asked why meat goats over dairy goats. Plus, she knew someone who had a large herd of meat goats, much like the Pryors, so they were easily obtainable near her in Mexico, Missouri. Her mother had worked for the man who had four babies he didn’t have time to look after. “We started with the four and then we got five more a month later… and now here we are with about 40,” Frazer confessed. The choice was not just because of how easy goats seem to be, but the cost is low to begin a herd as well. Frazer’s father also dreamed about raising goats for retirement. “Dad had always wanted goats for retirement, so we started them a little early because I needed something for

34 - The Boer Goat

my SAE,” Frazer, like me, and many other young goat owners start their herds because of a SAE or supervised agriculture experience a term used in agriculture classrooms. This is something they do outside of the classroom and can earn them prestigious degrees through the FFA organization. The goal for Frazer’s herd is to keep producing and having goats to supply her buyers. Her main customers are families looking for meals for quinceañeras. When asked about the people who buy her goats Frazer explained, “Really, we get a lot of people from different cultures who buy our goats. They love to have them at celebrations and family events. I have heard the same from other producers as well.” Goat meat is actually very popular in a lot of other cultures. There are recipes that put goat meat in curry, stews, and just grilled on its own. The United States is one of the only markets where goat meat isn’t a staple. Countries like Mexico and Africa have goat meat quite often because of their perfect size. People love to have goats at celebrations just like Frazer explained. It can be a little part of their culture. Frazer’s experience parallels Brittany Couch’s, a senior Animal Science major at the University of Central Missouri, experience with getting into goats. “I enjoy goats and more than other livestock. They are not as much work compared to cattle, they are also way easier to take care of overall,” Couch stated. Couch has owned Boer goats for five years now and has a very small herd of about ten head of goats. She focuses mainly on the show side of the industry unlike Frazer. She started out with a couple of goats and caught the show bug quite fast. Couch then made many connections in the industry and started looking for more show quality goats. Her plan for raising and producing Boer goats is not just for their meat quality but also to look appealing in the show ring something she learned she loved the minute she stepped into her first one. While show quality goats are her end goal, Couch always remembers where she started. She hopes that one day she will be able to raise enough goats to help support local FFA students on their adventures into the goat industry. Frazer and Couch both agree that goats are great, but it does not mean they come without a little heartache. Frazer put it quite simply, “Goats like to die.” Couch and I agreed. My first Boer baby born on my farm disappeared a week after it was born, most likely eaten by a lurking predator since it liked to squeeze through the fence. Couch has the same problems with goats getting their heads stuck in fences and overly protective mamma goats. Frazer has had to deal with a lot goats dyeing after giving birth, leaving the babies for her


to take care of.. All three of us know the hardships of owning goats, but it is the same with any kind of livestock, not just goats. The last thing both Frazer and Couch agree on is that goats are a great industry for anyone to get into. Couch recalled all the good things about goats, “They are not too much maintenance, fun to own, and easy to pair with other livestock. They are the perfect starter animals for younger producers who maybe have never had animals before. The industry is growing and filled with so many great people. I have met lifelong friends showing my goats.” Frazer, even though she does not show her livestock believes the same thing. Her family has been happy with the outcome of their goat operation. Couch is excited to save up and keep growing her little herd. The three of us started our goat herds before we were out of college. It wasn’t our parents’ choices but our own. Goats are a great start to any young person’s dream to own-

THERE’S A NEW KID ON THE BLOCK

ing a farm. Meat goats are easy to setup and easy to maintain when compared against other livestock. The industry is growing and it is evident from the amount of shows and the availability of meat in markets like the one at the University of Missouri, that have started carrying goat meat as not a specialty but a staple. Goat herds, like with any livestock can have their hardships but the benefits out way anything the goats can do. This is a great endeavor either as a gateway to bigger animals or like Couch, Frazer, and myself, the perfect hobby to have on the side. Frazer has her 40 head of commercial goats and Couch has her small show goat herd. Both of them can agree that owning goats is worth it. There is a lot of support in the industry and Couch can verify it, “When I started I knew almost nothing about goats. My family hadn’t owned anything like that before. I was going in there blind. Now, I have met so many people that have really helped me and supported me in this adventure. I have made some true friends I would never want to turn back.”

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The Boer Goat - 35


36 - The Boer Goat


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Abortive Diseases Causes of Abortions in Goats Jackie Mauldin www.jackmauldin.com

Abortions are most commonly seen during the final 2 months of pregnancy. Does are normally very fertile animals but may have a higher incidence of abortion compared to other farm animals. Abortion rates of 5% are common and rates below that are considered good. Many infectious agents, events causing stress, drugs, nutritional deficiencies and toxic plants may be the cause of a Doe aborting. Infectious causes may be the common reason for a Doe aborting and should be considered the most likely cause if a herd has an abortion outbreak. In an infectious abortion, it is most often a placental disease.

Chlamydia

Chlamydial abortion is one of the most common causes of infectious abortion in goats. Pigeons and sparrows may be the carrier of the organism that causes Chlamydia and ticks or insects may play a role in the transmission. Non-pregnant Does may become infected but the organism can stay dormant creating little or no immune response. The organism may stay dormant until the Doe becomes pregnant resulting in both an abortion and the immune response. Inflammations of the placenta caused by the infection prevent the normal transfer of nutrients across the placenta and that results in the fetal death and it's abortion. After a Doe aborts, she will normally develop a good immune response that eliminates the Chlamydia from her uterus normally within 3 months of the abortion. The infectious organism does not proliferate and attack the placenta until around 90 days after breeding. Chlamydia has been found in a buck's semen 29 days after being experimentally infected however the primary modes of transmission are from vaginal or uterine secretions of aborting Does and Does shedding the organism the following year. During future breeding seasons, the Does normally show no signs of infertility and the natural immunity following an abortion lasts around 3 years. In newly infected herds, 25% to 60% of the Does may abort. In herds that have been exposed to the infection, abortion rates drop to between 1% to 15% and the new abortions generally are in new animals to the herd. The abortions generally occur in the last month of the pregnancy but may happen as early as day 100 of pregnancy. Does may show loss of appetite, run fever and show a bloody vaginal discharge 2-3 days before aborting.

38 - The Boer Goat

Treatment - If chlamydial is confirmed or highly likely to be present, it is common to treat all Does remaining at risk of aborting. Treat with long-acting oxytetracycline (20 mg/kg IM or SC). Bio Mycin 200 is one antibiotic that can be used. Some have given the drug twice a week during the final 4-6 weeks of pregnancy. However because of the management difficulties, the most effective process seems to be one injection every three days for three times before kidding followed by an injection 3 weeks after kidding. Aborting females should be removed from the herd for at least 3 weeks, and fetuses and placentas should be burned or buried.

Toxoplasmosis

One of the most common parasitic infections in goats. This is associated with a coccidium of cats. Cats become infected by consuming uncooked meat scraps, placentas, and small rodents. Goats become infected by eating grass, hay or garin contaminated by cat feces.It can result in abortion, stillbirths and weak kids. However, reducing exposure to cat may help but in may lead to an increase in rats that carry other diseases. Animals remain infected for life and may abort in future pregnancies so you may want to cull infected Does. Feeding decoquinate or monensin throughout pregnancy may reduce the incidence of abortion. These are often used in goat medicated feed.

Q Fever

Q Fever is a bacterial disease capable of being transmitted from animals to people caused by Coxiella burnetii, a rickettsial organism. C. burnetii may be found in sheep, cattle, goats, cats, dogs, some wild animals (including many wild rodents), birds, and ticks. Animals shed the organism in their urine, feces, milk, and especially in their birth products. Abortion or stillbirths occur in late pregnancy, but only when the placenta has been severely damaged. Treatment - Treat with long-acting oxytetracycline (20 mg/ kg IM or SC). Bio Mycin 200 is one antibiotic that can be used. One injection every three days for three times before kidding followed by an injection 3 weeks after kidding. Placentas and aborted fetuses should be destroyed by burning. After a Doe is infected, she can carry the organism indefinitely, shedding it in milk and at kidding.

Listeriosis

caused by listeria monocytogenes an ubiquitous organism


that may be found in soil, water, plant litter and digestive tract of ruminants. Abortions occur in the last 2 months. Abortions have been attributed to the feeding of contaminated silage. Grazing on boggy, high-pH soils can also cause the infection. Treatment - Bio Mycin 200 is one antibiotic that can be used. One injection every three days for three times before kidding followed by an injection 3 weeks after kidding. The addition ofchlortetracycline to the feed has been reported to stop bortions during a listeriosis outbreak. Chlamydiosis is a major cause of abortion in goats. It is caused by Chlamydia psittaci, a gram negative intracellular organism. The organism is also the cause of arthritis, conjunctivitis and respiratory diseases. After exposure the organism multiplies in the intestine, eye or genital tract. It gains access to the placenta and fetus and causes abnormal absorption of nutrients through the placenta, leading to death and abortion of the fetus. Other animals become exposed by ingesting diseased placenta or uterine discharges. Symptoms: Symptoms include abortion during the last two months of pregnancy, especially in the last two weeks. Fetuses usually appear fresh. The doe is usually not clinically ill, and the placenta is not retained. Fertility is usually normal in subsequent pregnancies though it is thought that immunity decreases after three years. The organism can be transmitted to other does in the herd. Treatment: Medical care includes treating all susceptible does with tetracycline or tylosin, or other effective antibiotics. Consult your veterinarian for an appropriate course of treatment. Prevention: Control measures include practicing good sanitation and establishing an effective vaccination program. Buy replacement does and kids from reputable sources with no history of the condition. Chlamydia is contagious to humans.

Toxoplasmosis

The main problem in goats affected by this organism is abortions. The organism is a protozoan called Toxoplasma gondii. Toxoplasma is a one-celled parasite. It is more of a problem in sheep and is a major cause of abortion, mummification, stillbirth, and weak kids. Cats are the carrier of the organism. They become infected by eating uncooked meat scraps, placentas, and small rodents. Recently infected cats then shed the eggs in their feces. Goats become infected by eating grass, hay, or grain contaminated by cat feces. It reaches the reproductive tract by the blood after invasion of the small intestine. If the goat is pregnant at the time of initial infection, Toxoplasma commonly invades the placen-

ta and fetus approximately two weeks after initial infection of the doe. Fetuses infected in the first half of pregnancy are more apt to die than fetuses infected in the second half. Previously infected goats are usually resistant to abortion when challenged again by the organism. Symptoms are aborted fetuses, typically in the first half of pregnancy. The definitive diagnosis is made using laboratory analysis based on serology or histology. There is no effective treatment recognized for toxoplasmosis at this time. Control is based on sound sanitation and best management practices. Steps should be taken to prevent exposure of susceptible goats to the eggs in cat feces during pregnancy. Store grain and feed in covered containers. Keep a closed herd of cats on the premises. Spay and neuter cat populations. Do not feed raw meat to cats. Dispose of aborted fetuses and placentas in acceptable manners. Wear protective gloves when handling infected material and pasteurize milk and properly cook meat fed to cats. This organism is contagious to humans, and pregnant women should be careful when handling cat feces and contaminated aborted material. Vaccination is available.

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The Boer Goat - 39


40 - The Boer Goat


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44 - The Boer Goat


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