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Arthur B. Ferriss

ARCHITECTURAL SAMPLES

2008 - 2013


INDEX

“Every spirit builds itself a house; and beyond its house a world; and beyond its world, a heaven. Know then, that the world exists for you. For you is the phenomenon perfect. What we are, that only can we see. All that Adam had, all that Caesar could, you have and can do. Adam called his house, heaven and earth; Caesar called his house, Rome; you perhaps call yours, a cobler’s trade; a hundred acres of ploughed land; or a scholar’s garret. Yet line for line and point for point, your dominion is as great as theirs, though without fine names. Build, therefore, your own world.”

- Raplh Waldo Emerson


20/20 TOWER

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY - STUDIO - SPRING 2013

YPSILANTI MULTI-MEDIA LABORATORY

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN - COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO - FALL 2010

WOODWARD AVENUE LIBRARY

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN - STUDIO - FALL 2011

OFFICE BUILDING: FACADE DESIGN

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN - STRUCTURES II - SPRING 2012


20/20 TOWER 20/20 Tower is a mixed use residential tower adjacent to Kyle Field in College Station, Texas. The goal of the tower design was to provide a landmark for those arriving to College Station and to compliment Texas A&M’s 2020 initiative for campus growth, development, and densification. The tower’s program consists of residential units and an exclusive game day hotel for Aggie friends and family. The tower provides breathtaking views of the surrounding landscape and box seating for those seeking a unique view into Kyle Field. The formal organization of each program is meant to enhance these views and provide maximum interaction between residents and the surrounding environment. The cladding of the 20/20 Tower utilizes a three part concrete, terra-cotta, and glazed curtain wall (double facade) assembly. This material palette allows for climate conscious facade treatment and exploration beyond the traditional masonry construction found on Texas A&M’s campus. In doing so, the tower provides aesthetic relief; One which embraces diversity and more closely reflects the energy of the student population on campus.


20/20 TOWER

STUDIO SPRING 2013


ORGANIZTION

SECTION: SOUTHWEST 50’ SECTION: SOUTHWEST 25’

50’

AREA DISTRIBUTION HOTEL

ORGANIZTION

100’

40 UNITS @ 300 SQ-FT

HOTEL

36,000 SQ-FT

40 UNITS @ 300 SQ-FT CHECK-IN/SERVICE @ 10,000 SQ-FT

100’

25’

36,000 SQ-FT AREA DISTRIBUTION

STADIUM SEATING @ 14,000 SQ-FT

STADIUM SEATING @ 14,000 SQ-FT

LOBBY

CHECK-IN/SERVICE @ 10,000 SQ-FT

RESIDENTIAL LOBBY

96,000 SQ-FT

40 UNITS: RESIDENTIAL

20 UNITS @ 2,000 SQ-FT

96,000 SQ-FT

100’

58,000 SQ-FT SHELL & CORE

15 STORIES

AREA DISTRIBUTION HOTEL

40 UNITS @ 300 SQ-FT

STADIUM SEATING @ 14,000 SQ-FT CHECK-IN/SERVICE @ 10,000 SQ-FT

LOBBY RESIDENTIAL

20 UNITS @ 2,000 SQ-FT

LOBBY FITNESS DAYCARE

20 UNITS @ 1,800 SQ-FT

TOTAL:

6,300 SQ-FT

7,000 SQ-FT

12,500 SQ-FT

6,300 SQ-FT

RESTAURANT10,000 SQ-FT 12,500 SQ-FT LOBBY TOTAL:

DAYCARE

SEE WALL SECTION

20 @ 1000 SQ-FT

15 STORIES

DAYCARE

LOBBY

7,000 SQ-FT

SHARED PATIO SPACES:

LOBBY

FITNESS RESTAURANT

FITNESS

RESTAURANT

RADIUS OF VISION MAP

96,000 SQ-FT 40 UNITS:

LOBBY

RADIUS OF VISION MAP

SHARED PATIO SPACES:

20 @ 1000 SQ-FT 36,000 SQ-FT 15 STORIES

183,400 SQ-FT

7,000 SQ-FT

10,000 SQ-FT 183,400 SQ-FT

6,300 SQ-FT 12,500 SQ-FT

LOBBY

10,000 SQ-FT

TOTAL:

183,400 SQ-FT

SEE WALL SECTION

RADIUS OF VISION MAP

20 30 40

10 20

10 20 30 40

40

40

40

40

50

50

40

40

50

30

50

30

30

20

40

20

10 30

30

10 10

10

20

20

30

30

20

10

20

20

10

30

20

40

10

50

10

40

50

30

40

20

30

10

10

SEE WALL SECTION

20/20 TOWER

SOUTHWEST ELEVATION - SECTION - PROGRAM ORGANIZATION - DIAGRAM

SHELL & CORE

50’ 25’

58,000 SQ-FT

ORGANIZTION

SECTION: SOUTHWEST

20 UNITS @ 2,000 SQ-FT SHARED PATIO SPACES: UNITS @ 1,800 SQ-FT 20 @ 1000 20 SQ-FT

SHELL & CORE

58,000 SQ-FT

40 UNITS: 20 UNITS @ 1,800 SQ-FT


200’ 100’

PLAN: RESIDENCE ENTRY

SECTION DIAGRAM: MULTIPLE GROUNDS

3

2 1

DN

SITE PLAN: GROUND LEVEL

DD

400’

DD

200’ 100’

HYBRID SECTION: DIAGRAM


4

5

6

PLAN: LEVELS 8, 11, 14, 17 1

2

3

4

5

6

PLAN: LEVELS 6, 9, 12, 15,18 1

2

4

5

6

PLAN: LEVELS 7, 10, 13, 16,19

RESIDENTIAL FACADE PERSPECTIVE

3

SITE PLANS - SECTION DIAGRAMS - GARAGE ROOF ENTRY - RESIDENTIAL PLANS 3

a

2

a

b

1

a

b

WALL SECTION: RESIDENTIAL FACADE

b

ALUMINUM FLASHING

TERTIARY GLASS CAVITY WALL

SITE-CAST CONCRETE W. SLAB BANDS

CONCRETE BALCONY

TERRACOTTA TILES

ARTHUR FERRISS

20/20 TOWER


b

b

WALL SECTION: RESIDENTIAL FACADE

b

RESIDENTIAL FACADE PERSPECTIVE

ALUMINUM FLASHING

TERTIARY GLASS CAVITY WALL

SITE-CAST CONCRETE W. SLAB BANDS

CONCRETE BALCONY

TERRACOTTA TILES

20/20 TOWER ARTHUR FERRISS


WALL SECTION - FACADE PERSPECTIVE - BALCONY INTERIOR - BALCONY


VIEW FROM KYLE FIELD - VIEW INTO KYLE FIELD


YPSILANTI MULTI-MEDIA LABORATORY Ypsilanti is a small community in Southeast Michigan built on a history of manufacturing and production. However, since the mid 1950’s and the closing of the Kaiser Frazier plant in nearby Willow Run, Ypsilanti has suffered its fair share of hard times. In order re-inspire industry in the region, our studio focused on developers in a different sort of production; digital multi-media. Using research gathered from MIT’s multi-media labs, the goal was to design a facility that would house a high visibility think tank for emerging media display technology developers. Requirements for these technologies included providing raised access flooring and an open plan for ultimate floor-to-floor versatility. Providing adequate indoor/outdoor gallery space was also a concern and is reflected by the large rectilinear surfaces of the site-cast concrete walls. The project’s site is an in-fill between storefronts, straddling a major pedestrian thoroughfare. In order to preserve this thoroughfare and maximize public exposure to media being developed, the traditional display front is reorientated along the long axis of the site. The passage forms a dogtrot for the public to pass through and a two story interstitial outdoor space for viewing emerging technology. The form of the complex mullion glass facade used to produce this cut through is inspired by the concept of “synthetic erosion”. Its function is to bring in natural light and create a sense of energy while passing through the space.


YPSILANTI MULTI-MEDIA LABORATORY

COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO FALL 2010


INTERIOR STAIRWAY - FACADE FORM DIAGRAM - SECTIONS


FORMAL INSPIRATION - OUTDOOR INTERSTITIAL GALLERY


803


WOODWARD AVENUE LIBRARY The purpose Woodward Avenue Library study was to consider what a contemporary library design means in terms of both its place within a community, as well as society. Initial efforts were focused on simply defining “what is a library?� However, as the semester would unfold, the main objective became understanding how a library design could possibly fit into the strange distopian landscape found along Woodward Ave., Detroit. The proposed library looked to unveil certain truths about the realities of the complex conditions found in Detroit. This was achieved by translating, metaphorically, some of the tensional aspects of life within this community, into built form. More importantly, the reality of the situation and design suggest that in order for a library to achieve positive results within this context, it must draw power from attention outside the confines of its immediate surroundings. There is simply not enough life left in this area to enable any sort of sense of community, and/or justify a library at all. So the goal of this library design became, then, to focus efforts towards designing a library as a beautiful object. One that could define itself outside the context of its immediate surroundings and provide a place within the community for people to project their aspirations onto.


WOODWARD AVENUE LIBRARY

STUDIO FALL 2011


THIRD LEVEL

GROUND LEVEL

ELEVATION SKETCH - MODELS - PLANS

SECOND LEVEL


SECTION - MAIN ENTRY


OFFICE BUILDING: FACADE DESIGN A design for an office building wall/facade system. The facade is two part, utilizing an external fixed solar shading system along with triple glazed glass walls between floors. The goal was to cleanly couple this facade system with a reinforced concrete structure. Spans between bays were designed as slab bands in order to further maximize floor to ceiling height and natural lighting into the office space. The rendered axon illustrates the lighting effect produced by the fixed solar shading system. Supplementary axon, elevation, and section begin to describe some of the finer detailing of each element.


OFFICE BUILDING: FACADE DESIGN

STRUCTURES II SPRING 2012


AXON - ELEVATION - SECTION


CONTACT

Cell | 248 709 1486

ARTHUR B. FERRISS

Email | a.b.ferriss@gmail.com


OBJECTIVE

To contribute my architectural and planning skills and build upon my interest in healthcare design with a firm focused on improving lives.

EDUCATION

Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas • College of Architecture • M. Architecture, CHSD certificate program

Sept. 2012 – Present

The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan • Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning • B.S. Architecture

Graduated Apr. 2012

Jensen + Partners Intern • Planned, modeled, and rendered clinic modules for AltaMed Health Services • Assisted in the master planning of Denver Health Medical Center • Implemented Lean Healthcare strategies for improved office efficiency and throughput

May 2012 – Aug. 2013

Center for Health Systems and Design Graduate Research Assistant, Texas A&M University • Partner with Professor Kirk Hamilton in systematic literature review • Interpreted data from scholarly articles on national and international critical care • Examined environmental factors that influence nosocomial infection rates

Sept. 2012 – May 2013

CARMA Media Lab Assistant, University of Michigan Library Systems • Digital video archiving of lecture series, conventions, and on campus exhibitions • Video and still frame post production editing for web/media distribution • Research involving the benefits of lecture and contiguous video capture

Sept. 2011 – Oct. 2012

BSA LifeStructures Spring Internship • Participated in user group process for emergency department project • Surveyed existing conditions for outpatient clinic project • Contributed to the design of Methodist’s Hospital, Chicago Il., ER entry vestibule

Mar. 2011

EMPLOYMENT HISTORY

SKILLS

EXTRACURRICULAR

Lean Green Belt Certified, AUTOCAD, conversant in Revit, Rhinoceros, SketchUp, V-Ray, Adobe CS4-CS6 Suites, Microsoft Office, Final Cut Pro, RefWorks, graphic layouts

• Student Health Environment Association (SHEA) Member • AIAS Member • Volunteer in Relay for Life Charity Event • Acolyte of Mariner’s Church of Detroit

2007-2012 (Annually) Sept. 2000 – Aug. 2008


Arthur Ferriss Portfolio