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Aberdeen Passion Plays Presents

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aberdeen passion ONE LIFE GIVEN

PROGRAMME 6th & 7th April 2012 Aberdeen Exhibition & Conference Centre


aberdeen PASSION

01224-826256 admin@aberdeenpassion.com www.aberdeenpassion.com

Steering Group Alan Campbell Frazer Ramsay Andrew Sykes

Programme Editors

Frazer Ramsay Andrew Sykes

Contributors

Dougie Adam Rev Capt Gerry Bowyer Frazer Ramsay Andrew Sykes George Sykes

Design Work Frazer Ramsay

Photography Graham Dargie Douglas Taylor Andrew Sykes Street Pastors Teen Challenge

Printing

WELCOME

to first century Jerusalem where momentous events are taking place! Passover week in Jerusalem is a powder keg – the city is full to bursting with pilgrims and the occupying Roman army delight in reminding everyone that they are the only law. There’s always trouble, but this year is different. Word is spreading about a man from Nazareth who is attracting crowds and provoking the Jewish religious authorities. This unknown man from a Galilean backwater, challenges everything when he arrives in Jerusalem. Even his arrival on a donkey is a challenge - that is how scriptures say the Messiah will arrive. He even challenges the High Priest and the religious authorities on their hypocrisy. But above all, he challenges perceptions and values - he welcomes prostitutes and tax collectors, the pariahs of society. Such a stir cannot go unnoticed and the High Priest doesn’t take a challenge to his position lightly. A conspiracy soon takes shape, growing in intensity, a conspiracy that will not rest until the challenge is ended one way or another. This is the start of a week that will shake the world, the last week of the life of Jesus

as he puts himself on a collision course with the religious authorities. As the week progresses the tension grows and the move to eliminate Jesus gathers pace. We follow Jesus from his triumphal entry into Jerusalem, to the clearing of the temple, the last supper, his trial and his ultimate crucifixion. But this is not the end because ultimately Jesus even challenges death itself. The staging of a large-scale passion play in Aberdeen started life as an idea over ten years ago. During the past 1218 months it has taken root and grown into the production you see before you today. It is our hope that this will mark the first of a regular staging of a largescale passion play in the North East of Scotland for years to come. The Aberdeen Passion draws its cast and crew from across the North East of Scotland and includes both Christian and non-Christian alike. Regardless of your stance on whether the claims made by Jesus Christ, the central character of the events portrayed in this play, are true or not, we believe the message His life and actions delivered are a challenge to us all in how we live our lives, both as individuals and as a community.

Douglas Taylor

Aberdeen Passion Plays c/o The Church Office Bridge of Don Baptist Church Centre Dubford Road Bridge of Don Aberdeen, AB23 8GS

We hope you enjoy the play and thank you for your support. Alan, Andrew, Frazer Steering Group


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A PASSIONATE HISTORY The events of Holy Week leading up to Easter are by their very nature dramatic.

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t is therefore not surprising that, beginning in the Middle Ages, Christians began to act out the events of the Passion and Resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Why ‘Passion’? We tend to think of ‘passion’ today as strong emotion – anger, fear, desire or love – but it originally meant ‘suffering’ - what people had to endure or put up with, and in particular what Jesus had to endure in his trials and execution. The first recorded account is of the four line encounter in the Gospel between the angels and the women visiting the tomb on Easter Sunday being spoken by two priests, as part of the Easter Sunday morning service. Angel: Mary: Angel:

Who are you looking for? Jesus of Nazareth. He is not here. He has risen, as he foretold. Go and announce that he is risen from the dead.

The idea caught on, and more and more scenes and characters from the events of Holy Week were added. Different parts of the church became locations for the action. The plays were

in Latin, and all the players clergy – priests, monks, nuns, and choirboys. The earliest Passion Play was performed at Montecassino in the 12th Century. Its twelve scenes in sophisticated Latin verse begin with Judas bargaining with Caiaphas, and end with Mary’s lament for her son at the foot of the cross.The plays became so popular that they had to be moved outside the church building. In time, the plays were performed in the vernacular languages, by lay people, and aimed to tell the whole story of the Bible including Creation, Noah’s Ark and Christmas as well as the events of Holy Week. European cities vied with each other to stage lavish performances. The cycles of Mystery Plays such as the Coventry and York cycles took days to perform. Plays became less popular at the time of the Reformation, but continued in parts of Poland and Austria. Probably the most famous is the Oberammagau Passion Play first performed in 1634, and now performed every ten years. 2000 villagers are involved in the production, which plays to over 500,000 people in the season. Modern Passion Plays are performed all over the world, often with large casts and elaborate staging. The world record for the number of actors on stage at one time is held by Olesa in Spain (726!)

THE ALPHA COURSE alphacourse.org

an opportunity to explore the meaning of life

starting soon at a church near you

There have been several passion plays staged in the UK in recent years including those staged in Edinburgh, Glasgow, Manchester, Southampton and Port Talbot. The Aberdeen Passion: One Life Given is a local response of the Aberdeen & North East Scotland community to present the key events of St Luke’s account of the Passion and Resurrection in a clear modern accessible form, believing that the Good News is as relevant here and now as it has always been.

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Graham Dargie

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“There’s a man who was my friend and he’s been speaking, He’s betraying me to men who want me dead, And they’re coming now... “ From the song “The Garden”


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ONE LIFE GIVEN A group of men & women are sitting just outside Jerusalem, looking towards the city walls. This is Jesus and his followers. Entering the City

For three years, Jesus has been travelling around Galilee, talking sometimes to small groups, sometimes to large crowds. He has told stories to help them understand, he has fed huge crowds from virtually nothing, and he has healed people, even bringing the dead back to life. But now the travelling is done. There is a sense of unease amongst the disciples about going into Jerusalem – as James puts it “We’re not ready to take them on”. And Jesus does not slip quietly into the city, instead he is welcomed by large, noisy crowds waving branches as he enters through the East Gate on a donkey, fulfilling the prophecies about the Messiah – the significance of this is not lost on the authorities.

three times before morning – Peter is outraged. Jesus then goes to the Garden of Gethsemane to pray – these are his last moments of reflection.

Arrested

Late on Thursday night, Judas leads the Temple Guard to Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane, away from the crowds. The disciples’ reaction to Jesus’ arrest is a mixture of shock, fear and anger. Peter, ever the headstrong one, makes a lunge for those who have come to arrest Jesus and wounds one of them. Jesus tells them not to fight and heals the man. As Jesus is taken to Caiaphas’ home, Peter and John follow.

Jerusalem is the seat of power both of the religious authorities and the Roman occupying force. Word has spread about what Jesus has been doing. And when Jesus causes uproar in the temple courtyard by throwing the money changers out, calling them thieves, he makes a direct challenge to the Chief Priest Caiaphas and the Jewish High Council. Caiaphas will not allow anyone to challenge his position and is determined to stop the commotion around Jesus growing any larger. He tries to discredit him, to trick him, but Jesus avoids all the traps set for him and his popularity grows by the day. The whole city is talking about him, and Caiaphas is left appearing to have lost his authority. Caiaphas is incensed and he moves to remove Jesus permanently from the scene. Caiaphas has a trump card, though - Judas, one of Jesus’ disciples has agreed to betray his friend and provide information to the Temple Guard. The plot to eliminate Jesus begins to take shape.

Peter is approached by several people who recognise him as one of Jesus’ followers. In a state of fear and dismay, Peter denies that he even knows Jesus. Peter’s anger and fear blinds him till realisation dawns. He had sworn to Jesus just a few hours earlier that he would never let him down. Peter is crushed at the thought of his own betrayal of Jesus.

Sharing a Last Meal

Tried

Jesus shares the Passover meal with his disciples. They have become so close this group – they have become a family. He explains why he must sacrifice himself, using bread and wine as symbols of his suffering. And he also tells him that one of them, one of this family, will betray him. The peace of the meal is shattered by this devastating statement – the disciples argue angrily over who is under suspicion. Jesus warns Peter not to let his faith fail. Peter in his usual impetuous way, vehemently states that his belief in and support for Jesus will never fail even if it means death. But Jesus tells Peter he will deny him

“All your pain is because of me I’ll never clean the slate Of the fact of my treachery” Peter Time is now of the essence – for Caiaphas to be successful, before dawn while the city sleeps, he must force first the Jewish High Council and then Pilate to agree that Jesus is so dangerous he must be executed. This process is illegal and unjustifiable but Caiaphas is determined to the point of obsession to have Jesus silenced. Late into that same Thursday night, the High Council is convened and Caiaphas asks Jesus, who has clearly been mistreated in his short time in custody, whether he claims to

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Graham Dargie

aberdeenPassion aberdeenPassion be the Messiah. When Jesus confirms this, this is enough “proof” for Caiaphas. The High Council convict Jesus of blasphemy, with one dissenting voice, that of Joseph of Arimathea.

“This is the life I’ve been given So I have to die for the living It’s about to start, there’s no other way to save them” From “The Garden” Then in the early hours of Friday morning, Caiaphas takes Jesus to Pilate, the Roman Procurator of Judea – only he has the authority to order an execution. But Pilate sees no threat in Jesus – he tells Caiaphas to punish him and send him away but Caiaphas is insistent. When

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he mentions that Jesus is from Galilee – which is Herod’s jurisdiction, Pilate sends a disgruntled Caiaphas to Herod. Caiaphas now tries to force Herod to have Jesus killed. Jesus, who is now badly beaten and injured, says nothing in response to Herod’s questions. Herod gives up after dressing Jesus in “royal” robes and sends him back to Pilate. Caiaphas is not going to let these delays prevent him from making sure his plan succeeds and he returns to Pilate with a hired mob. Pilate is still very uncomfortable about what he is being asked to do but he sees a way out. The Roman Procurator traditionally allows the release of a prisoner at Passover and Pilate offers the crowd the opportunity to release Jesus. However Caiaphas has the mob primed and ready and instead they shout for the release of Barabbas, found guilty of murder and insurrection. And the crowd is whipped up even more to shout for Jesus to be crucified. Pilate has no choice but to order the crucifixion.

Executed

Crucifixion is a horrifyingly agonising punishment – it isn’t quick and it isn’t

dignified. A mocking sign is placed above his head proclaiming him “King of the Jews”, and the guards draw lots for his clothes. The searing pain of the nails driven through wrists and feet and the inability to breathe properly in that position make it a long excruciating day for Jesus. The mood of the soldiers in charge of the crucifixion has changed as the day has passed – their mockery and insults have faded and even the battlehardened centurion is now convinced that an innocent man has been put to death. Only the women are there to witness Jesus’ death, and as his lifeless body is taken down from the cross, it seems as if it was all for nothing – the disciples are hidden and scared, the crowds who had flocked to hear Jesus have melted away, Caiaphas has won. As the sun is setting on Friday, Joseph of Arimathea takes the body of Jesus and places it in his own family tomb – a stone is rolled over the entrance to the tomb. Jewish law forbids the touching of a dead body on Saturday, the Sabbath, and so the women plan to go to the tomb on Sunday to put oils and spices on his body – the traditional way of honouring the dead.


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“Early morning, the third day, Found the stone was rolled away The Saviour’s tomb an empty space With only questions

Graham Dargie

in its place” The Empty Tomb

The women rush back to tell the disciples who are sceptical to say the least. Peter goes to see the tomb for himself, finding nothing but the cloths that Jesus’ body had been wrapped in. Meanwhile, Cleopas and his wife who are part of the wider circle of Jesus’ disciples are heading back to their home in Emmaus. Another traveler joins their discussion but seems to know nothing of recent events, although he knows the scriptures and tells them that the

sacrifice of the Messiah was foretold and necessary. They ask the man to eat with them and as he breaks the bread, they recognise that the man is Jesus. As they jump to their feet, he is gone. The two disciples run straight back the seven miles to Jerusalem to tell the others and suddenly....Jesus is among them. Now they can all see with their own eyes, see the wounds to his hands, feel that he is real. The disciples are overwhelmed with joy, but Peter’s joy quickly gives way to guilt remembering his vehement denial outside Caiaphas’ home. Jesus forgives

him with a smile. Jesus cannot stay, however. Peter is the one who must lead them now and they all have their part to play in taking Jesus’ message to the world.

“He paid the price I should have paid, And suddenly, it’s looking like a beautiful day.” From “One Day Like This” Death Defeated

Jesus has defeated death not by military might or by revolution but by submission to suffering - and this is the true meaning of Passion. He received a hero’s welcome into Jerusalem but within a week, his life was ended in agony on a cross with only a handful of soldiers and women to witness it. But this was his purpose, by allowing himself to be mistreated, abused, insulted and then killed in the worst way imaginable, he took the punishment that is due a broken world. Graham Dargie

But, when the women go to the tomb on Sunday morning, they find the heavy stone moved away and the tomb empty. They are angry, thinking someone has removed the body as a further insult, but an angel tells them they shouldn’t look for the living among the dead.

One week that changed the world, one man who was God’s son, one ultimate sacrifice, One Life Given.

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Blinking in the morning sun Thinking over what He’s done Wondering what he’s begun Knowing now he is the one When I saw him dragged away I was filled with such despair I must admit I lost all hope But suddenly it’s looking like a beautiful day Falsely accused and falsely tried Any sense of justice died Hammered nails thru feet and hands We crucified a guiltless man Cos he was dead then came to life And only now I see the light I understand it was for me And suddenly, it’s looking like a beautiful day He paid the price I should have paid And suddenly, it’s looking like a beautiful day From the song “One Day Like This”

IS THE PASSION STILL RELEVANT? W

hy are people making their way to the Aberdeen Exhibition & Conference Centre this Easter to watch the Aberdeen Passion? Twenty-first century Aberdeen with its reputation as Scotland’s least religious city seems a world away from first century Palestine. Does it not seem bizarre or even a little creepy given the agony and horror of crucifixion that crowds still are drawn to remember and even celebrate Jesus’ death on the cross? Who else but Jesus Christ could still draw the crowds in large numbers two thousand years after it looked as if his life had ended in pain and failure at the hands of Roman soldiers in Jerusalem? Even today Socrates, Plato and Aristotle are regarded as great and influential philosophers who all pre-date Jesus life, yet it is hard to imagine a dramatic re-telling of their lives or teaching appealing to more than a handful of spectators if

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it was attempted in Aberdeen. So, what’s so different or special about Jesus’ story that it still seems to resonate and appeal to people half a world and twenty centuries away from where it all reached a climax in Jerusalem?

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t the core of all of Christianity’s claims about Jesus is the belief that Jesus still counts today because He still goes on making a difference to ordinary people’s lives here and now. The same brave and ballsy guy who railed against the hypocrisy of the religious leaders in his day and who refused to play ball when Roman governor Pontius Pilate tried in vain to save his life still casts an elusive shadow when today’s church strays out of reach from the people it is there to serve or when politicians send armies into war with God supposedly on


aberdeenPassion Douglas Taylor

Supported Charities The staging of The Aberdeen Passion is being operated on a strictly non-profit basis. Everyone involved, with the exception of some professional support we needed to hire in, are giving their time and talents free of charge. Monies generated through ticket sales, as well as any financial donations, are being used to cover the costs associated with putting something on of this scale with any income generated by the project over and above this being distributed between two locally active charities which we feel live out the message of the passion story to the people of Aberdeen city & shire. We are very pleased that Teen Challenge (North East Scotland), part of the UK and Global Teen Challenge Ministries, one of the most successful outreach and drug rehabilitation programmes in the world, and Street Pastors (Aberdeen), an inter-denominational Church response to urban problems which engages with people on the streets to care, listen and dialogue with, are willing to associate themselves and their amazing work with The Aberdeen Passion. More information on both these charities can be found towards the end of this programme and we would stongly encourage you to find out more about their work by contacting them, visiting their stands in the Exhibition Centre foyer or going to their individual websites.

their side. Time and time again in the pages of the Gospels Jesus made a difference to people’s lives when they had no expectation that their life could veer away from the paths they had always known. After he encountered Jesus, an ordinary fisherman named Simon would discover that he had an amazing destiny in front of him. A woman caught in adultery and about to be stoned to death by a baying crowd was rescued and offered total forgiveness and a new way forward. Blind men could see and lame men could walk, a cheat and a liar like Zacchaeus the tax collector suddenly stopped caring about embezzling money for himself and was ready to give his ill-gotten fortune away. Jesus changes lives and thousands still make this same claim today in irreligious Aberdeen.

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o, why will people be making their way to the Aberdeen Exhibition & Conference Centre this Easter to watch the Aberdeen Passion? Beyond the drama and spectacle in a story of betrayal, injustice, suffering and death people are still attracted to Jesus and the hope that twenty centuries later He is alive and able, irrespective of age, gender, status, sexual orientation, colour, creed or personal history, to change lives and bring hope, life, love, forgiveness, simplicity and a future into our complicated and often broken modern lives. His was one life given - for all.

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Graham Dargie

PASSION PLAYERS Cast

Jesus ......................................................... Brad Morrison

Person 1 ................................................... Meg Galloway

Peter .......................................................... Iain Bell

Person 2 ................................................... Julia Simpson

John ........................................................... Robert McGregor

Person 3 ................................................... Martha Brown

James ........................................................ Paul Finch

Person 4 ................................................... Colleen Michie

Philip ......................................................... Chika Ekeh

Person 5 ................................................... Craig Smith

Judas Iscariot ......................................... Andrew Sykes

Chief Temple Guard ............................. Ian Adam

Matthew .................................................. Alastair Revolta

Temple Guards ...................................... Sean Morgan

Caiaphas .................................................. John Cow Herod ........................................................ Graham Bruno

Centurion ................................................ Paul Beaumont

Pilate ......................................................... Andrew Clarke

Roman Soldiers ..................................... Nicholas Cow

Mary Magdalene ................................... Liz Bolton

..................................... Shaun Proctor

Mary, Mother of Jesus ......................... Moira Allan

..................................... David Beaumont

Salome ...................................................... Mo Allan

Angel ......................................................... Chris George

Joseph of Arimathea ........................... George Sykes

Ensemble ................................................ Mark Allan

Cleopas .................................................... Gordon Rait

................................................ Aaron Bell

Cleopas’ Wife .......................................... Jo George

................................................ Abigail Bolton

Bystander ................................................ Nathaniel Benstead

................................................ Carrie Bolton

Pharisee ................................................... Chris George

................................................ Katie Clarke

Sadducee ................................................. Colin Allan

................................................. Chloe Meenan

Andrew .................................................... Ali Michie

................................................ Anna Morgan

Bartholemew ......................................... Iain McDiarmid

................................................ Karen Robertson

Thomas ................................................... Stewart Mitchell

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...................................... Jim Porter


Mattie Addies

Heidi Douglas

Bob Montague

Elaine Sykes

Marion Beaumont

Jenny Gough

Margaret Noble

Kathryn Sykes

Ross Bell

Bill Haining

Ruth Rossiter (soloist)

Lauren Sykes (soloist)

Josef Boon

Frances Jardine

Heather Simpson

Bethany Taylor

Sheila Burton

Joan Keith

Lizzy Simpson (soloist)

Peter Williams (soloist)

Barbara Cow

Ros Leslie (soloist)

Moira Smith

Matthew Cow

Izy McPhee (soloist)

Charlotte Stewart

Angela Milne Daniel

Stephen McPhee (soloist)

Jennifer Strachan (soloist)

Jamie Allan

Ben Clarke

Heather Gordon

Cameron Taylor

Rachel Bolton

Ruth Earnshaw

Peter Leslie

Michael Thomson

Helen Clark

Peter Fairhurst

George Norval

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Choir

Band

Production Team Writer & Director ................................... Andrew Sykes

Lighting Designer ................................. Simon Gane

Assistant Director ................................. Brad Morrison

Lighting Technical Support .............. Red SG Productions

Band Leader ........................................... George Norval

Sound Team Leader ............................. Keith Simpson

Choir Leader ........................................... Jenny Sim

Sound Team ............................................ Adam Bolton

Administration ...................................... Frazer Ramsay

............................................ Daniel Cow

Treasurer .................................................. Chris Schenk

............................................ Ian Leslie

Venue Liaison ......................................... Alan Campbell

............................................ Kevin Wakeford

Publicity Coordination ........................ Frazer Ramsay

............................................ Robert Fairhurst

........................ Audrey Walber

Set Design ............................................... Tony Burns

Ticket Coordination ............................. Alan Campbell

Set & Prop Construction .................... Colin Allan

Digital & Print Design .......................... Frazer Ramsay

..................... Ian Cadle

Stage Manager ...................................... Ian Cadle

..................... Sean Morgan

Assistant Stage Manager ................... Vicki Pirie

Make-Up .................................................. Lynne Patterson

Cast Catering .......................................... Beatrice Montague

First-Aid Coordinator ........................... David Connor

Costume Coordinator ......................... Elaine Adamson

Health & Safety Coordinator ............. Frazer Ramsay

Costume Team ....................................... Helen Campbell

Welcome Team Coordinator ............. Beatrice Montague

....................................... Frances Dickson

Website & Social Media ...................... Frazer Ramsay

....................................... Sandra Rae

Song Lyrics .............................................. Andrew Sykes

....................................... Alison Strudwick

.............................................. Colin Allan

....................................... Susan Bedford

.............................................. Ros Leslie

....................................... Peta Fysh ....................................... Sara Gordon ....................................... Agnes Mellis

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CROSSING THE NORTH EAST Crucifixion on a cross was a real, and barbaric, historical method of execution. So why has the Christian church so readily embraced it as its main symbol? And why carry it around the North East of Scotland in the cold and rain?

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hristians believe the cross is where God does ALL the work. It is a symbol of God’s power; of the work he did to save mankind. It is both the focus of pride and a symbol of salvation. In Christianity the cross reminds Christians of God’s act of love in Christ’s sacrifice at Calvary - ”the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world.” The cross also reminds Christians of Jesus’ victory over sin and death, since it is believed that through His death and resurrection He conquered death itself. Christians venerate it not as a material object seen in isolation but as the symbol of the sacrifice by which Christ saved them, as the instrument of Christ’s triumph. Processing a cross to mark a significant event in the Christian calendar has been a fixture in many parts of the world for centuries, some dating back to the first and second centuries AD. For many years Aberdeen itself witnessed Easter cross processions across the city, a tradition that still happens in parts of the North East. In reflecting on this it became important to us that the cross, being such an important part of the production, was not simply a prop but, like those processional crosses, was something rooted in its area, something that could connect with the land and its people. To achieve this we took the actual cross used in the production on a tour of the cities, towns, villages and landmarks of the North East. At each stop, where the cross rested, we took a small part of the ground on which it stood to include in the set to connect the cross and the Aberdeen Passion with the North East and its people.


13 Photographs Douglas Taylor & Andrew Sykes

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Graham Dargie

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Teen Challenge

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TEEN CHALLENGE

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een Challenge (North East Scotland) is the local branch of Teen Challenge UK and one of the two charities The Aberdeen Passion hopes to support with surplus income from the production. Teen Challenge UK started in the late Seventies and now works in fifteen locations in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland and is a Christian faith based organisation. The charity tackles one of the greatest social problems and challenges facing our Nation today and believes that Teen Challenge UK has a positive answer to the present drug epidemic in our country. Since its first residential centre opened in 1984 thousands of young people with serious addictions, averaging at least ten years per person, have been through their programmes and a large majority of them have gone on to live successful and drug free lives. Teen Challenge believes that everybody deserves another chance. The ministry is built on and driven by Christian values and beliefs which clearly show how precious and loved each

Teen Challenge UK is a charity that operates nationally to help young people who have developed life controlling problems, especially drug and alcohol addictions, and also to offer preventative help to those who may be in danger of doing so. human being is. Teen Challenge seeks to take that message to young people whose lives are messed up, who have lost all sense of self worth, self esteem and often the will to live. The charity believes everbody deserves the opportunity to live in freedom, becoming everything they were created to be. Teen Challenge’s overarching goal is to help people become mentally sound, physically well, emotionally balanced, socially adjusted & spiritually alive. The local centres are at Sunnybrae near Fyvie and Benaiah near Mintlaw, for further information see www.tcns.org.uk or phone 01651-89162

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PASTORS (ABERDEEN) Aberdeen Street Pastors is an interdenominational Church initiative that seeks to respond positively to the various issues facing our evening economy and all those that visit our city centre during the weekends.

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ver the last four and half years Aberdeen Street Pastors have been actively building partnerships and relationships between the Church and those that work and socialize in our vibrant city centre community. Each weekend can see around 20,000 people come in to the centre, celebrating with friends, enjoying the restaurants, bars and later the clubs as they dance into the small hours. We at Street Pastors are connecting with this diverse community through simple acts of kindness, and making ourselves available to care. Our hope is to demonstrate Gods’ love by being a listening ear and offering practical care and support, whether it’s a pair of flip flops for the girls hobbling around on heels or a supportive arm as we walk people to taxi ranks, administering first aid or calming people down when tempers fray often due to over indulging. We have celebrated with many and have been brought to tears as we have sought to support those that are experiencing the loss of loved ones, spouses and friends. Others have shared their concerns for the future and asked the all important spiritual questions of “ where is God in all of this? If there is a

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God, that is?” We don’t claim to have all the answers but we aim is to show that the church is serious about people and helping the general public to see, feel and hear the goodness of God. This means we are committed not only to reaching people where they are at but also equipping a younger generation to make more positive life decisions through the development of a School Pastor project. Our mission is still to surprise the people of Aberdeen by being present in unusual places at unusual times, to listen and meet needs. After four years we are deeply encouraged by the level of support and encouragement our teams are receiving from the general public, our partners and the police. Aberdeen Street Pastors is just one of 14 initiatives in Scotland overseen by the Ascension Trust Scotland. In the UK the initiatives number over 200 with nearly 9500 volunteers committed to seeing our streets become safer. This is a movement that is equipping the wider Church to connect with its community in a more meaningful and practical way. For more information please visit www.streetpastors.co.uk

Street Pastors

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STREET


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WITHOUT WHOM T

The Aberdeen Passion would like to say a special thank you to everyone who has supported the production in so many different ways. The Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre Management (www. aecc.co.uk),in particular Craig Buchanan, Steve Morris and Eilidh Stewart and their teams. Sir Jack and Lady Lydia Stewart-Clark of Dundas Castle (www.dundascastle.co.uk) for their amazing kindness in allowing us to borrow many of the costumes used in this production. Louise Nicolson and her team at BreadPR (www.breadpr.com) for all their help and advice.

Christian bookshops BOOKS BIBLES CARDS GIFTS MUSIC

CLC are delighted to support the Aberdeen Passion - One Life Given. Please visit our bookstall in the foyer either before or after the Passion today. If you are looking for a Bible or good Christian books, sunday school resources, greeting cards, gifts or music why not visit our newly enlarged bookshop at The Credo Centre 12-14 John Street Aberdeen AB25 1BT Tel 01224 641620 or email us at aberdeen@clcbookshops.com CLC are a registered charity and a Christian missionary organisiation serving in nearly 60 countries around the world.

Irene Adam for her advice & support.

GRAHAM DARGIE

The Aberdeen Passion would like to thank Graham Dargie for his very generous donation of his time and skills to the production.

COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Suzanne Lofthus, Artistic Director of Cutting Edge Theatre Company (www. cuttingedgetheatre.co.uk), Edinburgh for all her support and advice. Leon Gray and his team at Aberdeen Performing Arts (www. boxofficeaberdeen.com) for all their help with the ticket sales through the Aberdeen Box Office. The members, Deacons and Elders of Bridge of Don Baptist Church Centre (www.bodbaptist.org.uk) for their generous donation of rehearsal space and Church Office time and resources.

Stationery Leaflets

Flyers Brochures

Newsletters Books

Business forms Perfect binding

The Aberdeen Passion would like to thank McKenzie Print, Dyce for all their help and support with printing both this Programme and the Made With Passion! cookbooks.

Frank Falls from Attic Theatre Company (www.attictheatre.co.uk) for his help with props. Trinity Church of the Nazarene (www. trinitychurchperth.org.uk) for providing the Roman soldier costumes. Heart-felt thanks to those individuals who have shown their commitment to the Passion by contributing to its costs. The wider Aberdeen and North East Church communities.

sales@mckenzie-print.com |

01224 774161/775000

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FINDING OUT MORE

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o now you’ve seen the Aberdeen Passion… what did you think of it all? Was Jesus just a good guy who was unfortunate enough to be in the wrong place at the wrong time ending up the tragic victim of a miscarriage of justice, another holy man whose mission ended in failure and disillusionment? Or is there something more to it than that? You might have come here as part of a group or been dragged along by Christian friends or maybe you saw a poster somewhere and came along on your own. It’s possible that you’ve maybe seen something in the Aberdeen Passion which has raised questions for you. If Jesus really lived and if this stuff really happened and it wasn’t a mistake or tragedy but is somehow part of God’s plan, how should I respond?

Prayer – God, Are You There? If you are not sure what to think but feel like something has changed because of what you’ve seen and experienced then try praying about it… and be honest as you do so. You don’t have to use big religious sounding words that you may have heard when you were small and your school visited church. Your prayers can be as long or as short as you like and you can talk and listen to God any time and anywhere. You may feel a bit stupid at first, like you are going crazy and talking to someone who you can’t see and who might not even be there, but take a risk and see what happens. “Father God, I’m here and I have lots of questions and don’t know what to think about Jesus and the cross and resurrection. I’m not even sure if you are there or if you care about me but if you are there and if you really do care about me, please show me the way forward

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and deal with my doubts. If you really can change my life and if you really have forgiven me because of the cross then help me to find out about this new life on offer to me and give me the courage to experience it. If Jesus is the key to this then help me to invite him into my life and live my life doing the things and saying the things which please you. In Jesus’ name, Amen.”

It’s About Relationship Not Dogma and Theories Often Christians are portrayed in the media as being extreme and unlikeable. However, being a follower of Jesus isn’t really about adopting a set of theories or dogmas. The main thing about being a Christian is having a relationship with Jesus. Christianity can be summed up in two words which Jesus used often: “Follow me”. Jesus asks to be No.1 in your life (you follow Him rather than the other way around) but also offers to be your best friend, with you every step of the way through life, someone who is always there for you, walking alongside you and listening to you day by day. Like any other friendship you need to work at it and make time for your friend, meet with them, talk with them and spend time with them. There will be ups and downs along the way and points where you don’t always ‘get’ what Jesus is up to or what he is wanting you to do. You’re not alone in this, Jesus often bamboozled the disciples too but they stuck with him even in the hard times and he promised He would never forsake us either and would be with us always.

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f you are wanting to find out more then one of the best places to look is still the Bible - the place where many

people still believe that God has set down the most important things we need to know about God, life, us and our world. The Bible is a collection of different books, letters and songs written over hundreds of years and very few people who begin reading on page one aiming to read the Bible cover to cover make it to the last page. If the story of the passion has got you interested try reading the book of Luke for yourself and find out more about His life and teaching. Most people find a modern translation like the New International Version or The Message easier to follow. You can try these translations free online at www.biblegateway.com. It helps to pray before you start reading. Ask God to help you understand his message as you read the Bible and to live by His truth.

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eing a follower of Jesus isn’t easy and everyone needs some friendly support to keep going and that’s where a church can help. Some churches run courses like Alpha and Christianity Explored which are designed to help explore what Christianity is really all about and these give you the chance to hear and read about some of the key truths of Christianity but also give you space to air your own opinions and ask questions and learn from other group members. If you came to The Aberdeen Passion with a friend who goes to church ask where they go or if they can recommend a good church for you to try. Alternatively contact The Aberdeen Passion team who will be able to help you out with finding a church or helping you to find an appropriate person to speak with.


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Graham Dargie

aberdeenPassion


ÂŁ5.00 per copy Available from CLC bookshop and the CLC stall in the Exhibition Centre foyer during the production. Alternatively you can order a copy from The Aberdeen Passion at the address below.

www.aberdeenpassion.com Aberdeen Passion Plays, c/o The Church Office, Bridge of Don Baptist Church Centre Dubford Road, Bridge of Don, Aberdeen, AB23 8GS


The Aberdeen Passion 2012 Programme