Issuu on Google+

a aro n j. ac ker m an selec ted work s


about This book is progress statement of my pursuit of a graduate degree in landscape architecture. It represents my creative process, design flexibility, technical skill, and evolution as a student. Merging my background in urban and environmental planning with design, these works exemplify a comprehensive understanding of the physical and cultural processes that shape environments and envision creative design solutions that realize the complexities of the modern landscape. Works were chosen that communicate design solutions driven by both analytical procedure and artistic narrative in varying scales and contexts.

Aaron J. Ackerman 295 W. California Blvd., #14 Pasadena, CA 91105 916.296.3115 ackerman.aaron@gmail.com


contents 01

02

desertwash

orbit

SYSTEM DEMONSTRATION + PLANTING PLAN

SCULPTURE GARDEN + URBAN PUBLIC SPACE

[p.3]

[p.11]

03

04

rethinking the bench

reclaiming the

river edge

BENCH DESIGN + BUILD

COMMUNITY OPEN SPACE + REGIONAL SPORTS PARK

[p.21]

[p.25]

05

harada house

resumé

LANDSCAPE REHABILITATION + VISITOR CENTER [p.33]

[p.39]


3 / DE SE RT WASH


01

wash SYSTEM DEMONSTRATION & PLANTING PLAN SCIENCE COURTYARD, CAL POLY POMONA SPRING 2015 ocated on the Cal Poly Pomona campus, the sciences department courtyard is a half-acre intimate space encased on all sides by classroom facilities. Generally underused, the current courtyard primarily functions as a space funneling pedestrian flow moving to and from the surrounding classroom buildings. It lacks basic elements that encourage use and comfort. Hot temperatures, lack of shade, wind, and evaporation add to the difficulties of enjoying the space.

L

The intent of the design was to re-envision the space as a landscape that could be both an amenity and a living laboratory for students and professors. Designed to imitate a desert wash, it would function as a low water landscape and demonstrate ecological drainage processes. Educational opportunities for increasing student understanding of landscape, rainwater accumulation and harvesting, and the benefits of low impact stormwater management would ultimately be achieved.

D E S E RT WAS H / 4


F1

RY

NDA

A

NA C

CAL

MO Y PO POL

U S BO MPU

Dr. sity r e iv Un

PROJECT SITE D

Library Env. Design g Kellog Dr.

44

0

300

Dr. sity ver Uni

LOCATION 600 FEET

Temple Ave. Lyle Center

CLIMATE IMAT MATE MAT TE E The climate conditions of Pomona are characterized by short mild winters and long dry summers. Annual percipitated ranges from 12-17 inches per year. 3.5” 87°

5 / ACK E R MAN


E

GA

UM S P

PS

MICROCLIMATE P

EQUINOX SUMMER SOLSTICE

B

WINTER SOLSTICE

M

T

W

ES

PO

O

NA

B

O

U

FULL SUN PARTIAL FULL SHADE D E S E RT WAS H / 6


A

L

B’

A’

B

0

8

16 FEET

ground cover

infiltration basin

plaza + seating

active mound hardscape paths

PROGRAM 7 / D E SE RT W ASH


WATER EFFICIENCY Planting design for the landscape was developed for water use efficiency, adhereing to the hydrozone model of considiring both sun exposure and plant irrigation demand. A majority of the landscape contains very low water use desert adapted plants, that perform well in the warm, dry climate of Pomona.

partial shade

H-h20 M-h20 L-h20

sun

Estimated Total Water Use (ETWU) was calculated for the design based on local reference evapotranspiration rate, plant factor value, the area of each irrigation hydrozone, and irrigation efficiency. Irrigation demand in gallons per year for the landscape is as follows: Irrigation Zone 1 (7,068 sf) - 164,575 Irrigation Zone 2 (200 sf) - 5,603 Irrigation Zone 3 (300 sf) - 13,071 TOTAL = 135,765 gallons per year

IRRIGATION DEMAND

HYDROZONES D E S E RT WAS H / 8


SYSTEM DEMONSTRATION The design envisions a zero runoff landscape that is capable of containing, infiltrating, and harvesting rain water of a 24 hour medium rain event. Roof and surface drainage of a 1� rain event at the site would be expected to produce up to 1,270 gallons of water. Much of this water would be directed to a central infiltration basin, designed with a capacity to hold up to 1,500 gallons. Rain water filling the basin could be captured and held in a subsurface storage tank and later tapped for irrigation reuse.

SEE DETAIL CUTOUT

DRAINAGE FROM ROOF

INFILTRATION BASIN

SUBSURFACE STORAGE TANK

A B

C

D E

F G

RAINWATER HARVEST DETAIL A B C D

Roof water flushed through downspout filter Sub-surface connection pipe (gravity) Surface runoff Infiltration basin

9 / DE SE RT WASH

E Percolation F Modular storage basin G Pumped to irrigation system

SUBSU SURFA SU UR RFACE CE WATER PI PIPE IPE P PE


Salvia chamaedryoides

Agave attenuata

Anigozanthos 'Bush Sunset'

Acacia willardiana

Juncus var.

Parkinsonia 'Desert Museum'

A

A’

Berberis 'Golden Abundance'

B

Prosopis chilensis

Dudleya var.

Agave attenuata

Parkinsonia 'Desert Museum'

Achillea millefolium

B’

B’

D E S E RT WAS H / 10


1 1 / ACK E RMAN


02

bit

SCULPTURE PARK

CITY OF POMONA, ARTS COLONY WINTER 2015

S

ituated at the center of Pomona’s bourgeoning Arts Colony, the half-acre space will support the City’s intention to provide a public space for displaying sculptural art in its downtown. Home to an aspiring community of young artists, the design for the downtown space provides an opportunity for these artists to share their works with the public in an experience that can be both active and casual. It may function simultaneously as an art museum and an urban public space. The concept for the design is inspired by the idea of building a “creative orbit,” where forms radiate out from and remain connected to a focal sculpture anchored at the center of the site. The forms establish smaller spaces within the park, allowing visitors to experience each sculpture independently without distraction while remaining connected to the entirety of the space.

OR BIT / 12


1. LOCATION

PROJECT SITE

MET

ROL

ST.

INK

PA RK AV E.

2ND

DOWNTOWN POMONA

2. ARTS COMMUNITY N

Youth Arts Center

Visual Arts Pomona

E MIL 1/2

Museum of Ceramic Arts

2nd Street Sculptures Loft on 2nd

dA Center for Arts

School of Fine Arts

PROJECT SITE

3. CONNECTION + RELATIONSHIP

CONCEPT NARRATIVE 1 3 / ACK E RMAN

4. APPLY CONCEPT


SCULPTURE FOCUL SCULPTURE

5. ELEMENTS

6. SPACES

OR BIT / 14


A

B C E

A D H

G A

F

J

I

K

To draw in visitors, two primary entrances maintain site lines to the anchor sculpture situated in the center of the space. Once in the park, the smaller sculptures and subspaces which orbit the center are then revealed. More intimate experiences are 1 5 / ACK E RM AN

discovered suggesting visitors to interact with each individual installation without distraction. An accessible elevated terrace completes the design, adding interest and allowing the space to be viewed whole.


SITE PLAN A / EXISTING SIDEWALK B / BOLLARD LIGHT (TYP.) C / GLEDITSIA TRIACANTHOS (TYP.) D / CORTEN STEEL PLANTER EDGE (TYP.) E / RECLAIMED WOOD SEATWALL (TYP.) F / SMALL SCULPTURE MOUNTING (TYP.) G / LARGE SCULPTURE

A’

H / MEDIUM SCULPTURE MOUNTING (TYP.) I / CERCIS OCCIDENTALIS (TYP.)

K N

J / OVERHEAD LIGHTING STRUCTURE K / RAMP L / COVERED PAVILION ABOVE RESTROOMS M / RESTROOMS N / EXISTING BUILDING

M

0

10

20 FEET

L

SUBSPACES

ELEVATED TERRACE OR BIT / 16


A

1 7 / ACK E RMAN

LARGE SCULPTURE

SMALL SCULPTURE MOUNTING

MEDIUM SCULPTURE MOUNTING

RECLLAIMED WOOD SEATWALL

CORTEN STEEL PLANTER EDGE

BOLLARD LIGHT

EXISTING SIDEWALK


A’

OR BIT / 18

EXISTING BUILDING

COVERED TERRACE

RESTROOMS

RAMP TO TERRACE


1 9 / ACK E RMAN


Perspective illustrating park entrance with clear site lines to anchor sculpture and discoverable subspaces. OR BIT / 20


rethin 2 1 / ACK E RMAN


03

“AVA� WOOD BENCH DESIGN & BUILD SPRING 2015 his project was an assignment for our landscape construction class, and was a collaboration with first year graduate students Luis Pedraza, Kevin Maynard, and myself. The concept for our bench started off from three radically different ideas. The first idea utilized a wheelbarrow style bench; the second, was a symmetrical design with two planters bookending a seating area; and the third idea, which was the one we ultimately chose, was a simple modern style with a shelf below the seating area. Part of what is unique about this last concept was that we've hidden (for the most part) all the fastening bolts which were used to connect the pieces. Also, we've used virtually one piece of wood for the entire construction 2 x 4s. The simple linear concept reflects a clean and efficient building style and presents well. Our bench is sturdy and handsome and provides ample access for books or plants in a shelf area that spans its entire length.

T

In addition to assisting with the design and build of the bench, I completed the design of the booklet and photographs, which is what is illustrated in this spread. Our bench was one of five selected by the professors to be placed in the Japanese Friendship Garden in Balboa Park, San Diego.

nking the h b bench R ET H I NK IN G THE BE N CH / 22


1

2 11’4” ’ 4”

1’6”

1’6” 6

5’-0””

4’5” 3

1’4”

4

1

4X4D DOUGLAS OUGLAS FIR LE LENGTH ENGTH OF THE BENC BENCH CH 55’’

2

4 X 4 DOUGLAS FIR SIDE LENGTHS 1’3/4””

3

4 X 4 DOUGLAS FIR SLATS ON SEAT 3’

4

4 X 4 DOUGLAS FIR SHELVES 4’5” NO OTE: A LL 4X4 4X4 JOINED JOINE ED BY SCREWS AND FINISHIN NG NAILS IN NOTE: ALL FINISHING B ETWEEN LAYERS AS S TO NOT BE VISIBLE E BETWEEN

2 3 / ACK E RMAN


R ET H I NK IN G THE BE N CH / 24


CITY OF BAKERSFIELD

2 5 / ACK E RMAN


04

reclaiming ng th the river

edge

OPEN SPACE & REGIONAL SPORTS PARK BAKERSFIELD, CA WINTER 2015

T

he proposed design will create a community open space and sports park with an active and accessible river edge located on 20 acres adjacent to the Kern River in Bakersfield, California. The driving theme of the design is inspired by the ecological and cultural services of the river. In addition to providing unique vegetation, wildlife habitats, and open space, the river is a major cultural and recreational corridor for the City and is a distinct riparian visual relief from the dry flat character of the Bakersfield basin. The design envisions a variety of community sports fields and a reinforced connection between the park and river. Moments of introduced channelization would split and slow river flows at the park’s edges, allowing visitors to interact and experience the water in new ways. Design throughout the park reinforces the river theme. A children’s playground would include educational water features that could mimic rise and fall of river flows. Furthermore, the proposed bike and pedestrian nature trails take on serpentine like river forms, flowing through a palette of grasses, wildflowers, and oak trees.

R EC L A I M I NG THE R IVE R E D GE / 26


2 7 / ACK E RMAN


B

S/B

/ FB

PA

N/

SIO ES NC O C NIC

PIC

L

AL

BB

/ ION

L AL

FAST RIVER

S ES

B

/B

R /R

AMONDS (4) BASEBALL DI D & TRACK (1) EL FOOTBALL FI DS (2) SOCCER FIEL TS (4) TENNIS COUR URT (1) CO BASKETBALL S /RESTROOM CONCESSION G PARKIN CESS VEHICULAR AC PLAYGROUND PICNIC AREA BUILDING CE MAINTENAN KERN RIVER DENCES SI EXISTING RE MERCIAL M EXISTING CO CHURCH SCHOOL MTN. VIEWS RESOURCES BIOLOGICAL

/S

FB

G/

IN RK

NC /CO

M

M CO

VIEW S/EC OL/P ICNIC R/RE S/CH URC H/SC HOO

RIVE

ACCESSIBLE + ACTIVE RIVER L/VIE

WS/E COL

PROGRAM COMPATIBILITY R EC L A I M I NG THE R IVE R E D GE / 28


Kern River (primary)

EXISTING

RIPARIAN

2 9 / ACK E RMAN

Introduced channelized portion of the Kern River intneded to slow water flow along the parks edge, allowing a more accessible river.

C H A NNEL FU L L W I DT H

RIVER BANK

Area of fill inteded to channelize river. Planted with native riparian species. Not intended to be accessible.

INTRODUCED CHANNEL

INTRODUCED FILL

river edge scenario Re-envisioned edges along the channel bank will take on a variety of ecologically sensative, minimal form typologies, including gentle steps as shown here.


Edge Fill

Trail

Perdiodic Inundation Flood Control

Channel

Trail

Kern River (primary)

GRASS L AND

A network of pedestrian trails are envisioned for the park, providing access to natural spaces and passive recreation opporunities.

BICYCLE TRAIL

Natural landscape environemnt encouraging passive recreation and picknicking.

PROPOSED (100 YR FLOOD)

PEDESTRIAN TRAIL

PICNIC AREA

PROPOSED (NORMAL FLOW)

A regional bicycle trail spans the park’s southern boundary, connecting to and extending the City’s existing network of bicycle infrastructure.

WO O D L A ND

R EC L A I M I NG THE R IVE R E D GE / 30


pa SITE PLAN A / LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL DIAMOND B / ADULT BASEBALL DIAMOND C / SOFTBALL DIAMOND A

D / ADULT SOCCER FIELD

C

E / YOUTH SOCCER FIELD

A

F / FOOTBALL FIELD & TRACK

L

G / BASKETBALL COURT H / TENNIS COURT G

I / PLAYGROUND J / SKATE PARK K / OPEN TURF L / CONCCESSION/RESTROOMS M / COMMUNITY GARDEN

H

N / PICNIC AREA

D

B

O / RE-ENVISIONED RIVER EDGE P / CHANNELIZED RIVER SEGMENT Q / PEDESTRIAN TRAIL R / BIKE TRAIL

R Q

N P

O

KERN RIVER

VEHICLE 3 1 / ACK E RMAN

PEDESTRIAN & BICYCLE


I G E

M H K

J

K

F

RECREATION

OPEN SPACE/PASSIVE RECREATION R EC L A I M I NG THE R IVE R E D GE / 32


EXISTING

PRESERVE/ REMOVE

FOCAL POINT

BUILDING/ LANDSCAPE HARMONY

SPACE EFFICIENCY

PASSIVE LIGHT

PRIVACY/ INTIMACY

3 3 / ACK E RMAN

ACTIVATE


05

harada

house

LANDSCAPE REHABILITATION & VISITOR CENTER RIVERSIDE, CA SPRING 2015

B

uilt in 1880, the Harada House National Historic Landmark embodies the Japanese American immigration experience in California. It is the saga of one family’s struggle to achieve the American promise of freedom, citizenship, and a better life for their children. Donated to the City of Riverside in 2004 and managed by the City’s Metropolitan Museum, the Harada House and neighboring property (Robinson House) are envisioned to be preserved and repurposed as a historic museum and garden for the City, telling not only the story of the Harada’s, but the struggles of immigration in the United States. Guided by two primary goals, the design for this undertaking intends to enhance the historic and cultural significance of the Harada House while creating a space that evokes peaceful individual reflection and unification. Features include a central radial focal form housing an upper outdoor courtyard and sub level theater and exhibit hall. These spaces are connected by an elongated ramp, intending to gradually tell the story of the Harada’s as visitors move through the space. This project was a collaborative effort between myself, former landscape graduate student Daniel Lee, and visiting Taiwanese architecture student Sandy Kao.

HARADA HOUS E / 34


1910 Single Family Craftsman & Victorian Architecture

LIM E

ST.

LEM ON

ST.

OR AN RY ST. MU LB ER

LIM E

ST.

LEM ON

ST.

OR AN

GE

ST.

1908 Single Family Craftsman & Victorian Architecture

ST.

CONTRIBUTING HISTORIC STRUCTURES

GE

NEIGHBORHOOD STRUCTURE

1884 Single Family Craftsman & Victorian Architecture

HARADA HOUSE 1915 Single Family Craftsman & Victorian Architecture

MA

RK

ET

ST.

NATIONAL HISTORIC LANDMARK 1880 Single Family Craftsman & Victorian Architecture

2N

ST.

ST. HARADA HOUSE

CIRCULATION

HARADA HOUSE

HISTORIC DISTRICT 3 5 / ACK E RMAN

HW

5TH

Y. 9 1

LIM

ES T.

ON

DS T.

LEM

3R

OR AN

GE

ST.

DS T.


The history of Riverside is the story of many different groups of people coming together in both conflict and community. The heritages of which can be found right at street level.

INSPIRATION

The Harada House Historic District buildings and sites tell a story of civil liberties. Here, leading men and women of differing backgrounds contested constitutional constraints on the rights of Japanese Americans. These places matter. They tell the story of individuals, families, and communities who forged for better futures.

INVERT

LEM ON ST.

IMAGINE

HARADA HOUS E / 36


PEACH TREE GROVE

PLAZA

HARADA HOUSE

ENTRY PATH

EXHIBIT

COURTYARD

VISITOR CENTER

GREEN ROOF

A

LEMON ST.

B

3 7 / ACK E R MAN

RAMP

A’

ROBINSON HOUSE

EXHIBIT

VISITOR CENTER

THEATER

COURTYARD

B’


SITE PLAN HARADA HOUSE

0

5

10FT

B’

RAMP TO EXHIBIT

EXHIBIT SHED

COURTYARD A’

A PLAZA

GREEN ROOF

VISITOR CENTER HARADA HOUSE

ROBINSON HOUSE

RAIN GARDEN

ADA PARKING

B HARADA HOUS E / 38


The world is not to be put in order; the world is order, incarnate. It is for us to harmonize with this order. - Henr y Miller

Aaron J. Acke rman 2 9 5 W. C al i forn i a B l vd. , #14 Pasaden a, C A 91105 916.296 .3 1 1 5 ackerman.aaron@gmail.com


resumĂŠ EDUCATION 2014-2017 2006

Master of Landscape Architecture / .. B.S. City and Regional Planning / ..

EXPERIENCE 2011-2014 2006-2009 2005 2004

Associate Planner / EMC Planning Group / .. Urban Designer / RBF Consulting / .. Planning Internship / Community Development / .. Planning Internship / Sacramento County Planning / ..

AWARDS & HONORS 2015 2015 2015

Lifescapes International Scholarship Recipient Delta Epsilon Lota Academic Honor Society Certificate of Achievement / Japanese Friendship Garden / Balboa Park

CO-CURRICULAR 2016-present 2016 2015 2011-2014 SKILLS

Officer / ASLA / Urban Design Professional Practice Network Design Volunteer / SCOPE & USGBC / Green Building Retrofit International Study Abroad / Castiglion Fiorentino / Italy Chair / APA / California Northern Chapter / Monterey Bay Region Photoshop Illustrator InDesign Lightroom After Effects

AutoCAD ArcGIS SketchUp Rhinoceros (limited)

(references upon request)

Drawing/Sketching Photography Graphic Design


a aron j . ac ke r man 916.296.3115 ackerm an .aaro n @ g m ail .co m


Aaron Ackerman 2016 Landscape Architecture Portfolio