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AARON MICHALICEK ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


AARON MICHALICEK aaronmichalicek@gmail.com aaronmichalicek@ku.edu (314) 827-8511 https://issuu.com/aaronmichalicek/docs/spring_2020_portfolio


PROFILE EXPERIENCE

I’m a fourth year architecture student at the University of Kansas, set to graduate with my master’s degree in the spring of 2022. 2020 • LAMAR JOHNSON COLLABORATIVE - Saint Louis, Missouri Architectural Intern

- Research Project - Construction Documents - Printing and Compiling Specifications - Design Work on Ongoing Projects

2019, 2020 • MITCHELL WALL ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN - Saint Louis, Missouri Architectural Intern - Conceptual Designs - Renovation floorplans - Surveys - Drafting

2019 - PRESENT • TEACHING ASSISTANT - UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS Intro to Design Computation - Grading - Tutorial Videos - Help Lab

2015 • WOLFE ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN - Saint Louis, Missouri Architectural Intern

EDUCATION

2017 - PRESENT • UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS, LAWRENCE KS - 3.96 GPA Master of Architecture 2019 - 2020 • STUDY ABROAD IN ASIA - UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS Singapore, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia), Tokyo (Japan) 2019 •PRITZKER LAUREATE ARCHITECTURE TOUR

AWARDS/ HONORS

Dallas - Fort Worth, Texas

2019 - PRESENT • MULTI-CULTURAL ARCHITECTURE SCHOLARS PROGRAM 2012 - 2016 • FIRST ROBOTIC COMPETITION Team Lead, Manufacturing, Research & Development Rookie of the Year Award - 2015 Dean’s List Semi-Finalist

2020 • UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM Outstanding Presentation Award 2017 - 2019 • UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS HONOR ROLL 6 Consecutive Semesters 2019 • BEST 3RD YEAR PORTFOLIO - UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS

SKILLS

2019, 2020 • AIA STL SCHOLARSHIP Revit, Sketchup, 3ds Max, Lumion, Enscape, Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator


“You cannot simply put something new into a place. You have to absorb what you see around you, what exists on the land, and then use that knowledge along with contemporary thinking to interpret what you see.� - Tadao Ando


TABLE OF CONTENTS 01 MUSEUM OF AFROFUTURISM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 02 BERINGIA TOWERS . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 03 LAWRENCE BICYCLE CENTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 04 COMPUTER SCIENCE STUDY HALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 REFERENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60


01 MUSEUM OF AFROFUTURISM Location: Fort Worth, Texas Project Type: Individual Professor: Kapila Silva Class: ARCH 508 Fall 2019

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It’s well known that throughout history, people of African descent have been underrepresented in literature, art, and movies. When people of this descent are depicted in almost any art medium, there are a narrow set of stereotypes that they fall into, often relating to slavery, gangs, or the poverty that affects parts of Africa. Afrofuturism is a growing cultural ideology that seeks to create a tradition-inspired high-tech future that draws reference from history, but ultimately allows people of African descent the opportunity to create their own future outside of those stereotypes. The Museum of Afrofuturism celebrates this movement through


showcasing art and by telling a story through the architectural language. The journey takes you through a marketplace that is inspired by the layout of traditional African cities and the markets that reside within them. To truly understand the idea behind Afrofuturism and its significance, it’s important to understand the scarred history of the continent and its people. To do that, the museum takes you down underground, into a dark first gallery that tells this story. From there, an elevator takes you from the gloom of the first gallery and into one of the four brightly lit gallery ‘pods,’ celebrating the upward mobility that Afrofuturist artists are

creating through their work. These four pods contain the rest of the galleries, which spiral through in a continuous path, showcasing Afrofuturist work such as literature, paintings, music, and films. Lastly, the museum is located adjacent to the famed Kimbell Art Museum and Museum of Modern Art Museum in For Worth, Texas. The design language of the museum is derived from the context of these adjacent buildings and sculptures and from vernacular forms of African architecture and art patterns, creating a building that distinctly references these themes but in a futuristic manner that relates to the core idea of Afrofuturism.

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01 CONCEPTUAL DIAGRAMS

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01 GROUND FLOOR PLAN The ground floor blurs the line between museum and public space. Shops and stalls line the paths that lead towards the entrance of the museum, providing the feeling of walking through a market in a city. This also includes the museum’s cafe, gift shop, and office spaces on this level.

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This works to draw visitors into the complex after they have left the Museum of Modern Art or the Kimbell Art museum.


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01 LOWER LEVEL FLOOR PLAN The lower level serves three primary functions: the beginning of the museum, parking, and the support spaces, such as storage, a clean shop, and a connection to the offices located back on the first floor. Additionally, there are classrooms located just off of the museum

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lobby. Elevators take visitors from the first gallery space up into the first pod, which houses the rest of the museum.


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Cafe Seating

01 SECTION 9


Typical Gallery

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MUSEUM LOBBY 11


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01 CONSTRUCTION & DETAILS Each of the four pods is constructed around a central concrete core. This core houses vertical circulation and HVAC equipment, including fire staircases and elevators. A steel cantilever sits atop the core, reaching out in all directions. This provides the support for the roof and 24 steel columns which hang off of this cantilever. These steel columns in turn provide support for the facade and for the floors inside the pod. One edge of the floor is supported off of this framework, and the other rests on a concrete

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corbel attached to the concrete core. This system allows the unique shape to cantilever out while keeping the core open for circulation. This solution was required because using a backspan to support the floors and facade through the core would inhibit that vertical circulation. The pods are clad in a fairly typical metal siding system and a curtainwall glass facade. The roof is a standard EPDM roofing membrane.


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Programs Used: Revit Rhino Sketchup Photoshop Lumion 16


02 BERINGIA TOWERS Location: Kansas City, Missouri Project Type: Individual Professor: Shannon Criss Class: ARCH 608 Fall 2020

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The basis of this project stems from a fundamental need to design our cities to accommodate a certain density of population, both from an economic and environmental standpoint. Vishaan Chakrabarti argues in his book “A Country of Cities” that our current way of life uses far more of our planet’s resources than we have available. In his book, he makes the case for cities with a density of at least 30 units per acre. With proper infrastructure such as bike and pedestrian friendly streets and public transportation, a city of this density reduces the need for individual vehicles and

reduces our collective carbon footprint to a level that is sustainable. With that in mind, this project aims to address issues of mobility and density by creating a mixed-use tower that creates economic opportunies, adds to an existing housing stock below the 30/acre goal, and creates a more walkable environement between to major portions of the Kansas City area.

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02 KANSAS CITY - RIVER MARKET The ideal site for the project is one that has both room for and improvement and the basic infrastructure needed to support the density goal. For this project, the River Market area was chosen, as it fit this criteria. The area has an easy to use, free public transit system in the KC street

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car. It has a below-desired density of 23 unit per acre, and is littered with many parking lots that cater to individual vehicle traffic. These criteria provide the basic building blocks for creating a city with the ideal density in a pedestrian friendly manner.


The Highway 35 Split The River Market area is largely cut off from the rest of the main Kansas City area. Highway 35 acts a divider. The highway has 3 lanes in each direction, plus grass embankments and on/off ramps, totalling nearly 400 feet across.

KC Street Car In 2016, Kansas CIty opened its street car for public use. Since then, the system averages nearly 6,500 daily passengers across 10 designated stops - 3 of which serve the River Market region. This street car system provides one of the fundamental building blocks for a successful urban area - public transit.

River Disconnect Despite its name, the River Market area does not connect well to the Missouri River that sits just to the north, especially from the context of the main downtown area. of Kansas City One overlook provides access to a trail that is adjacent to the riverfront. The rest is largely seperated by the railroad tracks that run along the norther edge.

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02 CONCEPTUAL DIAGRAMS

Demo Exising Structure

Towers split in two and twisted to open towards KC views.

Slope of site b alleyway with

Collector road suppress connection between the


becomes rear h retail space.

sed to allow pedestrian e site and the parking lot.

Mass extruded from lot lines and solar access requirements.

Final design connects River Market and KC Downtown with park-like bridge.


Park Picnic Structure

Basketball Court

Tennis Court

02 SITE It’s important for the park to give back to its surroundings in the sense that it must provide space for the community to use it. Projects such as the Highline in New York, while successful as attractions and increasing surrounding land value, often times do not offer enough space

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for the existing community members to use the space functionally. For that reason, the park has both walking/biking paths and picnic shelters for extended stays. Lastly, a tennis court and basketball court provide extra space for the community to use.


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02 FLOOR PLANS 1. Retail Space 2. Park 3. North Alley 4. Picnic Shelter

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5. Living & Dining 6. Bedroom 7. Vertical Garden 8. Egress Stairs

9. Elevator 10. Corridor 11. Delaware Street


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Modular Wall System

Solar Water Heater

Fixed Window

Frosted Glass Tube

Frosted Glass Tube

Mullion Frame

Mullion Frame Stud Wall Module

Stud Wall Module

Energy Recovery

Daylight Porch Access

Balcony Module Guardrail

Door

02 SECTION

Mullion Frame


Mechanical Screening Mini Split Condenser

Fire Staircase Concrete Core

Mini Split Unit

Porch Wall Module

Energy Recovery Wall Module Daylight Wall Module

West Independence Avenue

Alley Retail

Automated Parking Architect’s Office

Retail Floor Storefront System


02 CONSTRUCTION DETAILS 29


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Programs Used: Revit Rhino Photoshop Lumion Enscape Infraworks 36


03 LAWRENCE BICYCLE CENTER Location: Lawrence, Kansas Project Type: Individual Professor: Thom Allen Class: ARCH 208 Fall 2018

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This project’s goal was to investigate the history of East Lawrence and to revitalize the area and community by bringing in an artist or craftsman to the area who could share their knowledge and skills. To do this, I was tasked with creating an addition to an existing historic limestone house. After evaluating the surrounding area, I determined that introducing a place where people could come to learn about bicycles would both be beneficial to the community, but would also fit in nicely. Lawrence is an upand-coming cycling town, with more bike paths

and lanes being added all the time. The site is not only within biking distance of the downtown district, but also in close proximity to the newly added Lawrence Loop bike trail. Ultimately the goal was to provide a place where this master craftsman would be able to stay for several months, provide a tool library and workshop, and a museum space/teaching facility. I decided that the museum, which tells the history of cycling in Lawrence, should occupy the historic limestone structure, and that the addition should become the living quarters and workshop.

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The original house.

Roof removed.

New addition, separate but related.

Singular roof joins the two structures.

03 CONCEPT

1. Original House

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1. Concept Sketch

1. Concept Model


03 CONSTRUCTION I did not want to detract from the history of the limestone by creating a fake limestone addition, but also wanted to create an addition that would not be an eyesore in the neighborhood. To do this, I left the limestone structure primarily intact towards the front, and created a new glass addition towards the rear. The roof shape continues along the length of the structure,

ensuring that the two parts still feel cohesive. A series of wood frames with steel diagonal bracing supports the inner structure. These wood frames continue into the limestone structure, supporting the roof. With the second floor removed from the old house, the museum space becomes an atrium.

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03 FIRST FLOOR PLAN The first floor houses the workshop and museum space. The program also dictates a restroom accessible to the public and storage. These are located in the central core of the space. The glass on the west side rests in a sliding track system and can be raised to provide easy

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access to the outdoor space. This is designed so that on a nice day, work on bikes can take place inside or outside, and testing of the bikes can happen quickly and easily. The open space to the south can easily be used for teaching children to ride their bicycle.


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1. Bike Shop 2. Glass Garage Door 3. Bathroom

4. Storage 5. Museum/Lecture Space 6. Outdoor Teaching Space

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03 SECOND FLOOR PLAN The second floor is where the living quarters are. There’s a full bath, a small kitchen with an oven, cooktop, sink, dishwasher, and refrigerator. On west side is the living room, with room for a couch and coffee table. On the east side is the bedroom, which has a bed and closet.

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Operation of the glass sliding door on the first level can occur from both levels. There is a giant wheel connected via chain to the weight system of the door, which keeps everything in balance. This can be reached from both floors.


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1. Living Area 2. Kitchen 3. Bathroom

4. Closet 5. Bedroom 6. Museum/Lecture Space

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Living Space

03 ELEVATION 45


Museum & Lecture Hall

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Programs Used: Revit Sketchup Photoshop Lumion 50


04 COMPUTER SCIENCE STUDY HALL Location: Lawrence, Kansas Project Type: Individual Professor: Amy Van de Riet Class: ARCH 109 Spring 2018

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This project was the first full building that I designed in an architectural studio. The prompt was to pick an academic major and design a study space specifically for them on campus. I chose computer science. Our site was located on the hill just south of Watson Library. The site has a significant slope and has excellent views past the edge of Lawrence. This project was my first introduction to working with a specific site and with contours. The program consisted of 6 private study spaces, 2 of which were to be ADA accessible, along

with bathrooms, mechanical rooms, storage, a collaborative space, and an outdoor study space. From there, we were given the challenge of designing individual study spaces based off of some sort of container, and building the rest of our structure from there.

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04 CONCEPT My chosen container was a computer tower, given my major of choice. I played around quite a bit both with sketching and physical model making in order to arrive at an arrangement that satisfied me and meshed with the sloped topography of the site. Ultimately I arrived at staggering each pod back and forth across the landscape. This allowed me to provide views towards the south for each pod, and allowed the space created by staggering them to become the entry and collaborative space.

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The program also dictated an outdoor study space. Between that and the attempt to mold the design to the landscape, it was natural to place the outdoor terrace on the southeast side. This provides warmth from the sun in the winter, and the tree in the center and the surrounding context provides shade in the hotter months.


1. Concept Model

2. Concept Model

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04 FIRST FLOOR PLAN Not only did staggering each of the six pods provide space for the collaborative space, but it also provided room for mechanical rooms, storage, and restrooms in the east and west corners.

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The geometry and design language in plan is derived from computer circuitry. The bike racks are designed to mimic SATA ports. It’s a subtle detail that likely wouldn’t be noticed by someone in the space, but gives meaning to the design language.

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1. Study Pod 2. ADA Acesssible Study Pod 3. Community Study Area

4. Mechanical/Storage 5. Bathroom 6. Patio

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Programs Used: Revit Sketchup Photoshop Lumion 60


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REFERENCES

KAPILA SILVA, PHD, AIA (SL)

Associate Professor of Architecture School of Architecture & Design University of Kansas Marvin 311 1465 Jayhawk Blvd Lawrence, KS 66045 (T) +1.785.864.1150 (M) 414.334.1290 (E) kapilads@ku.edu

HUGO SHEWARD, PHD

Assistant Professor School of Architecture & Design University of Kansas Marvin 112 1465 Jayhawk Blvd Lawrence, KS 66045 (E) hugo-sheward@ku.edu

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aaronmichalicek@ku.edu - aaronmichalicek@gmail.com - (314) 827-8511


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