Issuu on Google+

The News Magazine of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

Academic Pharmacy NOW Winter 2013

Volume 6 Issue 1

Engaging Younger Generations Wide-ranging student recruitment initiatives build enthusiasm for rewarding pharmacy careers. 24

Also Inside: 14 From Fellow to Leader 18 A Week to Celebrate American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Discover 路 Learn 路 Care : Improve Health

Academic Pharmacy NOW Winter 2013

Volume 6 Issue 1

Departments 5 News Briefs 9 Academy in Action • Great Question! • Translating Genetic Information Into Improved Care

12 Around the World

Features 14 A Legacy of Leadership By Maureen Thielemans AACP’s Academic Leadership Fellows Program is committed to ensuring future leaders in pharmacy education and beyond.

18 And the Award Goes to…

• International Education:

Compiled and edited by Jane Rooney and Maureen Thielemans

• What’s Going on in GAPE?

Pharmacy schools rolled out the red carpet to celebrate their faculty during American Pharmacy Educator Week.

Mission Not Impossible

31 Faculty News 47 The Last Word • Pharmacy Alumni Survey: Summary Report 2012

24 Words Worth Spreading

Columns 3 Maine Message By Lucinda L. Maine 8 Will on the Hill

Stepping Up for STEM By William G. Lang

2

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

By John Michael Segars and Jane Rooney AACP and its members are reaching out to younger generations to extol pharmacy careers. On the cover: Dr. Jesse Martinez, vice dean, academic diversity and development at Western University of Health Sciences College of Pharmacy, and student pharmacist Reginald Soriano are supervising ninth graders who are making toothpaste.

maine message

Dear Colleagues: The doctor is out? Not exactly, but how refreshing it was to read The New York Times lead editorial titled, “When the Doctor is Not Needed.” The article is one in a series of opinion pieces aimed at reducing the cost of medical care while improving quality. Its key point was that the worsening shortage of primary care physicians can be addressed most effectively by the more appropriate and evidence-based use of other professionals, including pharmacists. I usually hold my breath when I begin reading pieces on a reformed health system. I know that in too many cases the “obvious” is overlooked and the roles pharmacists can play in improving quality and saving dollars go unmentioned. Not the case here. Citing the report submitted to the U.S. Surgeon General by top pharmacy leaders in the Public Health Service, the editorial suggests that more pharmacists should be empowered through state and federal regulations to manage medications, including initiating, adjusting and stopping therapy. The editorial addressed other professionals, including nurse practitioners, community health workers, retail clinic professionals and in-home care coordinators. Thinking we’ll fix what doesn’t work in healthcare by adding more of the same players playing the same roles is simply wrong. The AACP Council of Deans task force chaired by Dean M. Lynn Crismon, Ph.D., last year provided a laser focus on what this new health system will require of our graduates. We know they are bright clinicians armed with the most remarkable knowledge of medications. Virtually all leave school credentialed to make important contributions to public health priorities, especially increasing immunization rates in our communities. Essential competencies for their continued success include the ability to provide education and coaching to an increasingly diverse patient population, work in teams, lead and continuously adapt to change, provide physical assessments, and use electronic patient health records and registries. All of these concepts were loudly reinforced at the September summit convened by ACPE. The path forward is illuminated. Opportunities for pharmacy practitioners, educators and students to accelerate the needed changes in medication optimization, access to care and care coordination have never been closer to meaningful materialization. As President Bootman challenged us, “Let’s get to all the right tables of influence.” We certainly have much to bring with us. Sincerely,

Lucinda L. Maine, Ph.D., R.Ph. CEO and Publisher

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

3

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 1727 King Street Alexandria, VA 22314 Phone: 703-739-2330 • Fax: 703-836-8982 www.aacp.org Founded in 1900, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy is the national organization representing the interests of pharmacy education. AACP comprises 129 accredited colleges and schools of pharmacy, including more than 6,500 faculty, approximately 60,000 students enrolled in professional programs and 5,100 individuals pursuing graduate study.

AACP Vision

Academic pharmacy will transform the future of healthcare to create a world of healthy people.

Academic Pharmacy NOW CEO & Publisher

Lucinda L. Maine Editorial Director

William G. Lang Editor

Maureen Thielemans mthielemans@aacp.org Art Director

Tricia Ekenstam Gordon tekenstam@aacp.org

Director of Communications and Marketing

Gerry Romano

gromano@aacp.org

AACP Mission

The mission of AACP is to lead and partner with our members in advancing pharmacy education, research, scholarship, practice and service to improve societal health. We will accomplish this mission by: • • •

• •

• • •

Providing forums for faculty development and networking. Disseminating cutting-edge pedagogy related to professional and graduate education. Fostering environments and stimulating the development of resources that support the research and scholarship of faculty. Creating leadership and advocacy skills development opportunities for members and students. Fostering development of innovative professional and graduate education programs, assessment, resources and strategies. Facilitating members’ development, evaluation and dissemination of new practice models through collaboration with other healthcare organizations and practitioners. Facilitating development of products, programs and services for members that create efficiencies and effectiveness, and enhance value. Ensuring the appropriate infrastructure and resources are in place to advance our mission. Providing advocacy for academic pharmacy. Supporting faculty and graduates dedicated to and equipped for life-long learning, utilizing models of continuing professional development.

4

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

Letters to the Editor

We welcome your comments. Please submit all letters to the editor to communications@aacp.org.

About Academic Pharmacy Now

Academic Pharmacy Now highlights the work of AACP member pharmacy schools and faculty. The magazine is published quarterly by AACP as a membership service.

Subscriptions

To subscribe, visit http://www.aacp.org/news/shopaacp/ Pages/publications.aspx.

Change of Address

For address changes, contact Terry J. Ryan, Membership and Database Manager, at tryan@aacp.org.

Advertising

For advertising rates, please visit http://www.aacp.org/ news/academicpharmnow/pages/advertisingwithaacp.aspx. ©2013 by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. All rights reserved. Content may not be reprinted without prior written permission.

News Briefs First IOM Pharmacy Fellow Named AACP and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy, with a generous gift in honor of AACP President J. Lyle Bootman, Ph.D., have pledged $826,000 to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to create a permanent two-year pharmacy fellowship. Dr. Samuel G. Johnson, clinical pharmacy specialist at Kaiser Permanente Colorado in Denver and clinical instructor at the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, has been selected as the 2012–2014 Anniversary Fellow. Johnson’s current practice focuses on the clinical applications of personalized medicine for Kaiser patients in the Denver region. “With a major contribution from Research Corporation Technologies and the Frederick Gardner Cottrell Foundation, we are pleased to provide this grant, which will enable early career health scientists in the field of pharmacy to gain valuable experience in shaping policies that improve the nation’s health,” said Bootman, dean of the College of Pharmacy at The University of Arizona. Each fellow will be assigned to an IOM board and is expected to continue his or her academic posts. The IOM provides objective, evidence-based advice to policymakers, health professionals, the private sector and the public. For more information about the fellowship, visit http://www.iom.edu and search Samuel G. Johnson.

Ohio State Tackles Collegiate Prescription Drug Abuse The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy, in partnership with several state and national agencies and other campus units, offered its first Collegiate Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention Conference in August. The two-day event hosted more than 120 attendees from 28 colleges and universities, nonprofit organizations and government agencies.

OU Scientists Studying Protein’s Role in Alzheimer’s Disease Low-grade inflammation in the brain is believed to play a significant role in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, releasing toxic substances that can kill neurons and contribute to cognitive decline. But key to that process may be a protein called CAP37 that acts as an inflammatory mediator in the brain, said Dr. H. Anne Pereira, a professor and associate dean for research at The University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy. The expression of CAP37 has been observed in the brains of individuals dying from Alzheimer’s disease. “We want to know whether CAP37 plays a neuroprotective or neurotoxic role in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease,” said Pereira, whose research is funded by a three-year, $135,000 grant from the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology. “By identifying the manner in which CAP37 interacts with neurons and other cells in the brain known as microglia, we will better understand the process of neuroinflammation and be able to design potential new drugs for halting or slowing the disease process.”

Students Begin Translational Program at UT Austin University of Texas at Austin student pharmacists Julieta Scalo and Kelly Daniels are members of the first class working toward a Ph.D. in translational science, a cooperative program involving UT Austin and three other University of Texas System institutions. The program, which is one of about 20 translational science Ph.D. programs in the United States, trains scientists to move health and medical discoveries from the research laboratory to the patient at a faster pace. Daniels will study the prevention and treatment of healthcareassociated infections, such as pneumonia and catheter-related bloodstream infections. Scalo will study oncology and work on a project that investigates the treatment of sleep disturbances in cancer patients.

Prescription drug abuse has been on the rise and, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States. College “This program will lead to well-trained individuals who are able campuses are not immune to this issue, with one in four people to mobilize scientific discoveries and apply them in ways that aged 18 to 20 reporting having used medications non-medical- are helpful to patients,” said Dr. Chris Frei, an associate profesly at least once in their lives, according to the National Survey sor in the College of Pharmacy who is involved in the program. on Drug Use and Health.

Participants formed teams of three to five people, attending University of Maryland Report Focuses on group sessions and workshops aimed at creating plans to im- Hard-to-Reach Patients plement on their campuses. Teams were also able to apply for “Integrating Patients’ Voices in Study Design Elements,” a small grants made possible by the Cardinal Health Foundation report based on a six-month study led by the University of and the Ohio Department of Health to help implement these Maryland School of Pharmacy, encourages medical researchprevention strategies. Resources that resulted from the confer- ers to include hard-to-reach patients in future studies and ence are available at http://pharmacy.osu.edu/outreach/rxa- clinical trials. buseresources/. “Researchers usually don’t [reach out] to some groups of patients perhaps because it takes more time and effort to include

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

5

news briefs them,” said Dr. C. Daniel Mullins, study leader and a professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research at the school. “But these overlooked people typically have greater health needs.” Mullins received a contract from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), an independent agency created to help patients, their caregivers and clinicians make better-informed healthcare decisions. His consortium of leaders from community and research groups in Baltimore—including interprofessional faculty members at the university— gathered feedback in dozens of focus groups from caregivers and hard-to-reach patients with different medical conditions. Among the coalition’s suggestions: use a period of “pre-engagement” when recruiting research participants and partners; involve the full spectrum of people who will be affected by the research; and provide a lay summary of findings at an end-ofstudy celebration.

In Memoriam Maven J. Myers Mr. Maven J. Myers, faculty member at the University of the Sciences Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, died on May 6, 2011. He was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and later lived in Springfield, Pennsylvania, and Port St. Lucie, Florida. Myers began teaching at the college in 1965 in pharmacy administration and pharmacy law. He moved through the ranks of the professorate, holding posts such as professor of pharmacy administration, chair of the department of pharmacy, associate dean for pharmacy, dean of health sciences and vice president of academic affairs. While he was dean of health sciences, Myers facilitated the curricular issues to implement the general education requirements for all students. He was an advisor to Phi Delta Chi and was engaged with students on many levels. He was chairman of the American Pharmaceutical Association’s Economics and Administrative Sciences Section, served on numerous national editorial boards and was local president of the American College of Apothecaries, in addition to serving as an officer in many other pharmacy associations.

Anthony P. Sorrentino Dr. Anthony P. Sorrentino passed away on Sept. 24, 2012. He was engaged in various roles with the University of the Sciences Philadelphia College of Pharmacy since he first arrived as a student in 1955. He served as an adjunct faculty member since 1972. Sorrentino joined the university full time in 1996 as the director of experiential resources for the Doctor of Pharmacy program and was appointed as a full-time faculty member in 2004. He retired from the university in 2009 and was awarded the first Anthony Sorrentino Graduation Award for excellence in hospital and health-system pharmacy in spring 2012. Following graduation with his bachelor’s degree in pharmacy in 1959, Sorrentino practiced community pharmacy before joining the Pharmacy Department at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in 1966 as an assistant director. He returned

6

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

to the University of the Sciences, where he obtained his doctor of pharmacy degree in 1971. He then served as the director of pharmacy for what is now Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. In 1978 he became the assistant director for outpatient pharmacy services and manager of the Jefferson Apothecary.

Joseph V. Swintosky Dr. Joseph V. Swintosky, dean emeritus of the University of Kentucky (UK) College of Pharmacy, died on Sept. 13, 2012, at the age of 90. He was an accomplished educator and product formulation scientist, who helped lead the college to prominence during his tenure as dean from 1967 to 1987. A native of Kewaunee County, Wisconsin, Swintosky received his bachelor’s degree and Ph.D. in pharmacy from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In 1967, Swintosky became the fourth dean of the UK College of Pharmacy. The university established the Dr. Joseph V. Swintosky Distinguished Lecture in his honor in 1994. Swintosky also helped found and organize the American Pharmacists Association Academy of Pharmaceutical Sciences (now known as the APhA Academy of Pharmaceutical Research and Science) and became its second president in 1967.

Frank D. O’Connell Dr. Frank D. O’Connell, professor emeritus at West Virginia University, passed away on Sept. 4, 2012. He was born in Lynn, Massachusetts, on July 21, 1927, and later resided in Morgantown, West Virginia. A veteran of the U.S. Army, he was stationed in Berlin during the occupation in 1946 and was honorably discharged in 1947. After graduating from the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy with his bachelor’s and master’s degrees, O’Connell was awarded a Ph.D. in pharmacognosy from Purdue University in 1957 and subsequently accepted an assistant professorship at the West Virginia University School of Pharmacy. During his 33 years at WVU, he was promoted to associate and full professor, was appointed associate dean, served as acting dean and was awarded professor emeritus upon his retirement in 1990.

Amy E. Lodolce Dr. Amy E. Lodolce, adjunct associate professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy, and assistant director, UIC-COP Drug Information Group, passed away on Aug. 31, 2012, after fighting a recent illness. Lodolce taught at the Chicago State University College of Pharmacy in the literature evaluation and evidence-based medicine course for second-year student pharmacists. Lodolce received a Pharm.D. from UIC in 1998. She completed a pharmacy residency program at Michael Reese Hospital and then joined UIC’s College of Pharmacy as a clinical assistant professor and as a clinical pharmacist and drug information specialist. In 2005, she was promoted to assistant director of drug information. She was also a faculty advisor to Phi Delta Chi, a professional pharmacy fraternity.

SAVE THE DAT

E

Annual Meeti ng July 13–17 Chicago

PHARMACY EDUCATION

2 013 ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

7

will on the hill

Stepping Up for STEM Academic pharmacy can minimize the impact of the gathering storm. By William G. Lang In 2007 the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) published an influential report describing the peril faced by the United States for its decreasing attention to robust science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) in kindergarten through undergraduate education. Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Educating America for a Brighter Economic Future was written at the request of members of Congress interested in knowing, “What are the top 10 actions, in priority order, that federal policymakers could take to enhance the science and technology enterprise so that the United States can successfully compete, prosper, and be secure in the global community of the 21st century? What strategy, with several concrete steps, could be used to implement each of those actions?”

Local Outreach Is Key The committee assembled by NAS had only 10 weeks to develop their response, but the report clearly stated that because business leaders expect an educated workforce, it is imperative to the country’s economic benefit that at least four key areas of action be considered: K–12 education (10,000 Teachers, 10 Million Minds), research (Sowing the Seeds), higher education (Best and Brightest), and economic policy (Incentives for Innovation). Improving STEM education in K-12 requires recruiting “the best and brightest” to educate those students. Colleges and schools of pharmacy can increase the success of local recruitment and retention efforts through community partnerships. This outreach can provide new K-12 faculty with science and health professions mentors who may be the key to reaching a new generation of potential researchers and health professionals. Sowing the seeds that bloom into individuals full of curiosity in seeking new knowledge can be facilitated through programs that put high school students into the research labs of pharmacy faculty, where they are engaged in real work with clear expectations. Bringing the best and brightest to your campus to see what the education of a pharmacist actually entails can create a pipeline of potential applicants that are ready, eager and aware of the educational expectations and opportunities. Economic policy requires a continued commitment to educating individuals with the ability to create and change laws that recognize the value of research, teaching and service in the community, state and nation.

Supporting Your STEM Efforts One federal agency that is prepared to assist you in meeting any of the four key areas of focus stated in the report is the National Science Foundation. Before and after the publication

8

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

of that landmark report, NSF established award programs that seek to integrate and strengthen STEM education across the education continuum. In its 2011–2016 strategic plan, NSF stands ready to “Prepare and engage a diverse STEM workforce motivated to participate at the frontiers.” This goal is activated through the Directorate for Education and Human Resources, which provides competitive awards that can strengthen your student and faculty capacity to collaborate within and outside of their institution. The awards also can be used for faculty outreach initiatives to assist undergraduate students in their journey toward professional and graduate education. Although it is not currently providing funding, NSF issued 31 Innovation through Institutional Integration (I3) awards, all focused on improving collaboration and increasing STEM capacity in various educational settings. Examples of approaches that include STEM education and student and faculty experiences are available on the I3 Web site. William G. Lang is Vice President of Policy and Advocacy at AACP; wlang@aacp.org.

Resources National Academy of Sciences www.nasonline.gov

Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Educating America for a Brighter Economic Future http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=11463 National Science Foundation www.nsf.org Directorate for Education and Human Resources http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=EHR Innovation through Institutional Integration (I3) http://nsf-i3.org/

academy in action

Great Question! Executives in the wider association world got an enlightening glimpse of AACP.

There’s an association for everything—pharmacy educators, home builders, grape growers, poodle breeders, you name it. Even though their focus differs, one association can learn a lot from another. That’s why ASAE: The Center for Association Leadership invited AACP Executive Vice President and CEO Lucinda L. Maine, Ph.D., R.Ph., to take a few questions from AACP member Amy Franks, Pharm.D., assistant professor of pharmacy practice at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, then shared the responses in ASAE’s magazine. Here’s the dialogue that appeared in Associations Now, giving executives at nonprofit organizations from A to Z insights into AACP. Amy Franks: What is the foremost challenge you see for AACP in the next five years? Lucinda Maine: Both higher education and healthcare are in the midst of “disruptive innovation,” and our members live at that intersection. AACP’s challenge is to consider how to help our members prepare not just to survive but to thrive in the face of what may be very different business realities in the future. This makes the charge of the 2012–2013 Argus Commission [a group comprising the past five AACP presidents, who examine key professional issues] exciting and important. The commission’s current charge is to assess the game-changers. Franks: Given the current era of healthcare reform, how should we as academicians adapt our curricula to better prepare our students to enter the profession? Maine: We must prepare graduates to be team-ready contributors to patient-centered care. We’re not far from this focus today, and what is tremendous is that other players in healthcare now recognize that they really need the medication-use specialist (a.k.a. our graduates) on the team.

? ?? ? ?

?

? ?

Franks: What excites you most about AACP’s membership? Maine: I’d have to say that it is their incredible level of engagement in the programs and meetings and services we provide. Even the person who conducted our member-needs analysis this past year remarked that he rarely encounters members of an organization as engaged and committed as AACP members. Reprinted with permission. Copyright, ASAE: The Center for Association Leadership (November 2012), Washington, DC.

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

9

academy in action

Translating Genetic Information Into Improved Care The University of Florida delivers personalized medicine to heart patients. Personalized medicine—a concept in which an understanding of a patient’s genetic makeup is used to enhance treatment— is becoming reality at UF&Shands, the University of Florida Academic Health Center. Under a new standard of care, UF doctors will help ward off heart attacks or strokes after heart procedures by taking a person’s genetic information into account before prescribing medications that prevent blood clots. Patients at UF&Shands who undergo a procedure that involves passing a thin tube into the left side of the heart to diagnose or treat heart disease will now be routinely screened for biological signals in their blood. Physicians hope to discover clues about how patients might respond to a common anticlotting drug called clopidogrel, also sold as Plavix. “In 2010, the Food and Drug Administration changed clopidogrel’s label to warn clinicians that it may not work for high-risk heart patients with certain genetic traits. But there hasn’t been a good way to get genetic information to doctors so they can use it during treatment,” said Dr. Julie A. Johnson, director of the UF Clinical and Translational Science Institute’s (CTSI) Personalized Medicine Program and the UF College of Pharmacy’s Center for Pharmacogenomics. “Over the past year, we worked with stakeholders across our health system to tackle that challenge, and we are now able to deliver on the promise of personalized medicine.”

A Blueprint for Better Health This initial use of personalized medicine at UF&Shands will help the roughly 1,500 patients per year treated at the cardiac catheterization lab, 40 percent of whom are likely to be prescribed clopidogrel. Over time, UF&Shands will expand the new approach to more patients. “The model we’ve developed can provide a blueprint for other health systems that want to use evidence-based genetic information to improve patient care,” said Dr. David R. Nelson, director of the UF CTSI. “This is a major step toward being able to translate more than a decade of groundbreaking genomic research into better health.” Stanford University adopted the UF&Shands model, and UF and Stanford researchers collaborated to develop a custom chip to collect and screen DNA samples for a total of 256 genetic variations that are suspected of influencing how the body responds to medications, including the seven relevant to clopidogrel. UF Pathology Laboratories is using the new gene chip as part of a related research study. Participants can have their additional 249 results stored in a secure database for future use in clinical care and research. Funding for the UF CTSI Personalized Medicine Program and the collaboration with Stanford came from a grant of nearly $500,000 through the Clinical and Translational Sci-

Reducing Complications The screening is no different than a typical blood draw for patients. One sample is sent to UF Pathology Laboratories to determine if any of the seven genetic variations that influence how the body responds to clopidogrel are present. Results are typically available within 24 hours and are added to the patient’s electronic medical record. If the results suggest that clopidogrel is not the best treatment option, the electronic medical record system will alert the cardiologist and recommend that alternate drugs be prescribed. “This helps us prescribe the right medication the first time and absolutely has the potential to reduce complications,” said Dr. R. David Anderson, an associate professor of medicine at UF and director of interventional cardiology and the cardiac catheterization laboratory at UF&Shands. The new screening procedure is in line with the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) vision to use patients’ genetic information to tailor their healthcare. The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act allows people to benefit from personalized medicine without fear of genetic discrimination by health insurance companies or employers.

10

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

Dr. Julie A. Johnson (right) and Dr. R. David Anderson review an alert that appears in a cardiac patient’s electronic medical record when genetic results suggest a prescribed drug may not be effective. (Photo by Jesse Jones/University of Florida).

academy in action

Genetic Testing in the Community Pharmacy ence Awards program, led by NIH’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. A $350,000 grant from the NIH Pharmacogenomics Research Network provides additional support. For now, NIH funding will cover the screening costs at UF&Shands. UF researchers will study the program as it rolls out to assess and optimize its cost-effectiveness and impact on patient care.

The Ohio Northern University (ONU) Raabe College of Pharmacy, along with Kroger Pharmacy, received a Community Pharmacy Foundation grant that focuses on looking at genetics relative to drug therapy. The clinical study includes testing patient genetic information relative to a specific metabolizing enzyme that is responsible for converting clopidogrel to its active form. Using genetic testing in the community pharmacy setting, researchers will try to identify individuals for whom the drug is

likely not working. These individuals can then be given an alternative medicine. The study is being performed in collaboration with Kroger Pharmacies at several sites, but primarily in Marion, Ohio. Lab work and analysis will occur at ONU. Dr. David R. Bright, assistant professor of pharmacy practice, is the principal investigator. Dr. David F. Kisor, professor of pharmacokinetics and chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, and Dr. Jeffery Talbot, associate professor of pharmacology, are co-investigators.

SAVE THE DATE 2013 AACP Institute

Teaching Essentials: Building a Foundation for Student Learning, Constructing Assessments, and Effective Teaching May 20–22 • The National Conference Center • Leesburg, Virginia

Student Learning

Constructing Assessments

Effective Teaching

The 2013 AACP Institute has been designed to provide teams of beginning pharmacy educators, with an experienced faculty member as the team leader, a foundation and practical application of fundamental teaching principles to take back and share with colleagues at their home institutions. Teams of 3–5 will engage in sessions that focus on developing learner-centered sessions, constructing assessments, and evaluating the effectiveness of teaching.

http://www.aacp.org/meetingsandevents/2013Institute/Pages/default.aspx ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

11

around the world

International Education: Mission Not Impossible Providing care to residents of Belize, Drake’s pharmacy faculty and students practice their skills and improve their cultural awareness. International experiences have been a part of Drake University’s pharmacy program since 1997, when three students visited Australia for a four-week community pharmacy practice experience. Drake has continued to expand its faculty and student involvement abroad, with learning opportunities in Canada, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador and other countries—including, most recently, Belize.

From Unique Experience to Permanent Rotation

visit allows them to expand their skills in providing care to culturally diverse patients and makes them better suited to teach topics in cultural competency. Soltis completed a sabbatical at Hillside during the spring 2012 semester. She helped the site further develop its pharmacy services, studied the interprofessional environment, and established additional experiential avenues for health science majors and students pursuing global and comparative public health concentrations.

The program’s largest growth has come from the college’s part- “My experience has been transformative,” said Soltis. “I learned nership with Hillside International Healthcare in the Toledo how to better communicate with different cultures, be creDistrict of Belize. Hillside International was established to sup- ative in therapy to care for patients with limited resources and plement the national healthcare system in the Central American demonstrate more patience. I learned to appreciate the simple country. This faith-based organization provides care through things in life that in the United States we take for granted.” many channels. It established a permanent clinic facility, mobile outreach clinics, community health worker training and Patients Provide Healing, Too community education for villages and school children. Drake’s Hearing traumatic stories from patients was not uncommon pharmacy rotation was developed by a group of facutly that for Soltis while in Belize. She recalls helping a four-year-old visited the clinic in 2008: Ms. Denise A. Soltis, assistant dean girl who lost half her foot in a machete accident. The child for clinical affairs; Dr. June F. Johnson, professor of pharmacy came into the clinic several times to get her dressing changed. practice and department chair; and a faculty member from the Soltis gave her some pain medication and helped distract her University of Wisconsin-Madison. The University of Iowa and from the discomfort of the procedure. Lipscomb University were later added to the partnership. As a result, the clinic now has student pharmacist placements each month year-round. It runs on licensed volunteers from the United States and the United Kingdom. The rotation provides experiential opportunities for students in medicine, physical therapy, nursing, pharmacy and physician assistant programs from the United States, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Germany and Austria.

Everybody Grows The experience is multicultural and interprofessional. At Hill­ side, student pharmacists work closely with medical students to select therapy and dosing for patients. They use their pharmacy skills and applications (PSA) training, a component of Drake’s Pharm.D. curriculum, to counsel patients on medication usage, and provide education to community members and school children on topics such as dental hygiene and safe water usage. To date, more than 60 Drake Pharm.D. students have completed this rotation. The site also provides development for faculty members as they supervise the students while in Belize. The

12

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

Drake student pharmacists who are at Hillside on rotation use their skills to counsel patients on medication usage and provide education to community members and school children on topics such as dental hygiene, safe water usage and personal hygiene in villages that do not have plumbing.

around the world

The girl’s mother shared with Soltis that while the child was being treated in the hospital, her positive outlook never wavered. During her stay in the amputee unit, she saw many patients suffering from diabetes and missing parts of their legs. The girl looked around at the other people in the unit and said to her mom, “at least I have my leg.”

Questions Lead to Cultural Clues In addition to experiential rotations, more international topics are being incorporated in the Drake pharmacy curriculum. For example, a thread in the PSA series focuses on developing skills in the journey toward cultural competence. This series expands on what the college did previously to teach student pharmacists to counsel patients from different backgrounds. Students must now examine ways in which culture, race and socioeconomic status can affect patient outcomes. PSA teaches how to elicit health beliefs from patients through guided questions, and how to plan care with those health beliefs in mind. In the second year of the doctor of pharmacy program, PSA students complete a diversity service experience that places them in sites where there are multicultural patient populations and lets them practice providing care to different populations. The College of Pharmacy will continue its work of preparing global citizens. Plans for additional faculty development programs are under way to help educators incorporate more international topics into their individual classes. Through these opportunities and more, Drake is well on its way to making it a mission accomplished. Adapted with permission from an article in Drake University’s Blue magazine.

Denise A. Soltis, assistant dean for clinical affairs at Drake University, completed a sabbatical in Belize from January to June 2012. She helped Hillside further develop its phar­macy services, studied the interprofessional environment, and established additional experiential avenues for health science majors and students pursuing global and comparative public health concentrations.

What’s Going on in GAPE? It’s been a busy two years for the Global Alliance for Pharmacy Education. GAPE leaders met during the 2012 AACP Annual Meeting to discuss key initiatives in pharmacy education reform across Europe and the Americas. In October, representatives from all GAPE member organizations—along with the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education and invited guests from the Pan American Health Organization and from Africa—met during the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) Centennial Congress in Amsterdam. Attendees discussed a variety of important topics, including: •

four Webinars GAPE will offer member organizations in 2013;

the Asian Association of Schools of Pharmacy profile of programs for their region that might be replicated by other GAPE organizations;

the need to determine the scope of pharmacy practice in countries represented by GAPE member organizations; and

how GAPE and FIP might do more work together in the future.

Don’t forget to check out the GAPE Web site, www.gapenet.org, which allows individual members of GAPE organizations to explore shared resources, read the latest news, and find out when and where member groups will have their annual meetings.

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

13

A

Legacy of Leadership For nearly a decade, AACP’s Academic Leadership Fellows Program has been committed to ensuring future leaders in pharmacy education and beyond. By Maureen Thielemans

Can someone be born a leader? Sure, but leaders can also be made. The proof is in AACP’s Academic Leadership Fellows Program (ALFP). Its goal is to create future leaders in academic pharmacy and higher education by helping them identify, develop and hone the skills that are necessary to step into those roles. Graduates of the year-long program are challenged through seminars, strengths assessments, networking events and even physical tests. As AACP gets ready to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the program, Academic Pharmacy Now takes a look at ALFP’s past, present and years ahead, and how it produces future leaders who are ready to change the face of academic pharmacy. 14

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

Marie A. Chisholm-Burns, Dean, The University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy ALFP Cohort: 2007–2008 My top 5 strengths are: Achiever Analytical Learner Deliberative Woo How do you define leadership? Leadership is the ability to influence others to strive to achieve a vision. Leaders should work with integrity, moral fortitude and courage. How did the program help you grow in your career? The program helped me grow in my career through two key mechanisms: it developed my networking skills and demonstrated the importance of mentorship.

Executing an Idea During her year as AACP president in 2002–2003, Dr. Barbara G. Wells, dean emeritus at The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, identified a void in development programs available for faculty. Schools were focusing on enhancing other skills, such as research, teaching and clinical practice capabilities, but leadership was not a high priority, she said. “It was clear to me, and others, that this was a serious oversight.” At her direction, the Board of Directors began discussing potential ways to assist faculty in enhancing their leadership abilities. Wells credits former AACP staff, including Dr. Ken W. Miller and Dr. Arlene A. Flynn, for playing critical roles in bringing the program to fruition. Other key players were Dr. Robert E. Smith, Dr. Patricia W. Chase and Dr. N. Karl Haden, who offered advice on the program’s structure, speaker quality and overall curriculum. After a year of planning, the Academic Leadership Fellows Program commenced its first cohort in 2004.

A Balancing Act With Miller’s and Flynn’s departure in 2010, Dr. Buzz A. Kerr, a professor emeritus at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, assumed the primary staff oversight position for the program. His longstanding focus on department chair development and faculty leadership was an excellent complement to the program and to his staff role. Kerr noticed that his predecessors had a strong emotional connection to the program, and it didn’t take him long to see why. “Watching the growth of the Fellows—in personal and professional ways—is extremely rewarding,” Kerr said. “At the end, they are very emotional, and you feel it too.” Kerr retired from his post at AACP in December 2012, passing the ALFP oversight reigns to Dr. Ruth E. Nemire, AACP’s associate executive vice president.

What was the most rewarding aspect of the program? There were two aspects of the program that I consider most rewarding. The first was interacting with my cohort and developing peer relationships. The second was identifying my strengths using StrengthsFinders. What lessons learned do you use in your professional or personal day-to-day life? There are so many lessons related to leadership that I took away from the program. Briefly, I think my primary lessons relate back to: being an authentic leader and the concept of servant leadership; knowing my strengths and when and how to get others involved; and keeping an eye on the vision and mission, while being cognizant of environmental cues.

But before the commencement ceremony and bittersweet goodbyes, Program Manager Bradford E. Miller works carefully to put together the next cohort of Fellows. Staff and an external review committee of Academy members evaluate applications and make the final selections based on the candidate’s merit. After determining the top candidates, the group pays careful attention to the balance of the cohort; the goal is to make the group reflect AACP’s institutional membership. It is a carefully crafted equation that incorporates several factors, such as: Is the Fellow from a private or public school? How well is the research spectrum of our member institutions represented? Does the cohort include institutions from various geographical regions? When those questions and others are answered, six groups comprised of five Fellows are selected, and each is assigned a leadership facilitator.

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

15

Gireesh V. Gupchup, Dean, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Pharmacy ALFP Cohort: 2006–2007 My top 5 strengths are: Woo Maximizer Arranger Harmony Futuristic How do you define leadership? Leadership is helping your organization to strategically maximize its potential. A wise mentor once told me that leadership is “holding a mirror to your face and shining the rays of the sun on your people, thereby allowing them to thrive.” How did the program help you grow in your career? The networking was invaluable. What was the most rewarding aspect of the program? During the program I had the opportunity to interview all four of my university’s vice chancellors and get their career advice. This was an extremely rewarding experience and I received a lot of practical tips. The program challenged me to: Think critically about where I wanted my career to go and what impact I could have on the Academy and the profession.

The Leadership Journey Begins During the second week of August, the Fellows meet for the first time and begin their year of leadership discovery at the Airlie Center, a quiet retreat in northern Virginia. It’s a pivotal moment for them, Miller noted. “Arriving at the Airlie Center is their first exposure to each other, the program, our concepts and ideas.” The week-long immersion offers few distractions for the Fellows, he adds, and the days are full with in-depth topics and speakers. Team-building activities are a hallmark of Session I, and they include a series of ropes courses designed to challenge individuals in mental and physical ways. Climbing to the summit of a 30-foot pole while group members cheer you on is one of the most exciting experiences of the program, Fellows say.

16

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

With the physical highs come the engagement lows. For some Fellows, the biggest challenge of the program is staying connected with their team throughout the year when not at one of AACP’s four sessions in residence. A required group activity that keeps teams engaged is designing, conducting and reporting on a research project that addresses an important issue in academic pharmacy. AACP staff offer guidance to the groups on topics to pursue, but they do not direct the subject matter. It’s up to the

Miriam A. Mobley Smith, Dean, Chicago State University College of Pharmacy ALFP Cohort: 2006–2007 My top 5 strengths are: Strategic Maximizer Learner Context Self-assurance How do you define leadership? Leadership is a combination of several characteristics including: the ability to motivate and/or inspire individuals to be at their best and be successful; the ability to support others by showing them and then letting them do; and the ability to show vulnerability when needed. A leader serves as a sage advisor who uses sound principles for organizational management and oversight. A leader celebrates the successes of others ahead of themselves and is one who manages with a “servant’s heart.” What was the most rewarding aspect of the program? I truly enjoyed the opportunity to participate in a diverse faculty research, presentation and publication collaboration, as well as networking with colleagues who I have remained close with to this day. The program challenged me to: Consider broader perspectives for effective organizational decision-making. What lessons learned do you use in your professional or personal day-to-day life? Decision-making based on framing/re-framing the situation(s) you are faced with and always using emotional intelligence when facing professional or personal issues.

Fellows to select a topic, execute it and submit the final report to the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education for publication. To help maintain engagement, Fellows are given leadership homework assignments while mentors are asked to regularly incorporate learning activities with their faculty member into their home curriculum.

“What Are Your Top Five?” “Most people think they have to shore up their weaknesses,” Kerr said. “When actually, they should leverage their strengths, and the strengths around them, to develop teams with complementary strengths.” Fellows learn this critical takeaway during Session I’s analysis of the Gallup Organization’s StrengthsFinders program. In the weeks before the program begins, Fellows answer questions intended to help uncover their talents. Fellows are encouraged to use their top strengths in every exercise throughout the year. The most common strengths among Fellows are Input, Learner and Achiever. “Fellows must learn to bring back the components of StrengthsFinders to their home environment and implement those strategies,” Kerr said. “We emphasize to Fellows: ‘Focus on yourself and how you can improve as opposed to improving someone else.’ As a leader you have to balance that.”

Reaching Another Summit—On Capitol Hill For some Fellows the toughest challenge comes during the ropes course at Airlie or while developing their project thesis statement. But for many, Session II poses one of the most difficult tests of the program—a visit to Capitol Hill, where they meet their school’s congressional delegation and staff. It’s a relationship-building exercise that carries a great amount of significance, Miller said. They’re responsible for directing a conversation with the legislators, without subject input from AACP. Here’s one of their first opportunities to use their strengths, Kerr added. And for some, it’s an eye-opening moment because they see the program’s teachings taking effect. “We let them be anxious to see how they manage it,” Kerr said. “That’s what a leader does.”

Making a Difference in Pharmacy and Healthcare Later this year, the 10th cadre of faculty will begin the path toward leadership. With any milestone comes an opportunity for assessment: AACP plans to convene an advisory committee, comprised of AACP staff, former Fellows and facilitators, and external stakeholders, who will analyze ALFP’s successes as well as areas for improvement. Pharmacy school deans who continually support ALFP by nominating Fellows to the program will be asked to identify the positive traits they see in the leaders returning to their school as well as the aspects of leadership they believe are still lacking in faculty.

Dennis F. Thompson, Dean, Southwestern Oklahoma State University College of Pharmacy ALFP Cohort: 2005–2006 My top 5 strengths are: Learner Maximizer Individualization Analytical Intellections How do you define leadership? Creating a vision for people; painting a picture and asking others to join you on a journey toward a goal. How did the program help you grow in your career? It taught me not to worry so much about my deficits, but to focus on my strengths. The program challenged me to: Have confidence in myself to reach high. What lessons learned do you use in your professional or personal day-to-day life? To analyze my life and discover what is important to me.

Now in its ninth year, ALFP boasts 260 graduates, 15 of whom are in CEO dean positions. Others have applied their skills in higher education and association leadership positions. As the program continues to evolve, the imprint that graduates make in academic pharmacy and beyond will grow, too. Thanks to this unique experience, they will be ready to lead with their strengths. Maureen Thielemans is Communications Manager at AACP and editor of Academic Pharmacy Now; mthielemans@aacp.org.

The Academic Leadership Fellows Program is looking for its next group of leaders. To apply, visit the AACP Web site at http://www.aacp.org/career/leadership.

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

17

feature story

And the Award Goes to…

Pharmacy Edu 18

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

ucators

During the week of October 22, pharmacy schools rolled out the red carpet to celebrate their faculty members’ extraordinary research, teaching and service. Compiled and edited by Jane Rooney and Maureen Thielemans

Across the nation, pharmacy educators were honored during the fourth annual American Pharmacy Educator Week. Trivia contests, luncheons, receptions and digital displays were just some of the ways students could learn about their professors’ personal and professional accomplishments. Through these activities and more, pharmacy schools shined the spotlight on their dedicated educators. ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

19

A Glimpse Into the Future The University of Tennessee Throughout the week, monitors at the Memphis and Knoxville campus buildings at The University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy displayed a slideshow featuring faculty, their accomplishments and some interesting “Did You know” facts. For example, one slide noted that Dr. Stephan Foster, professor in the Department of Clinical Medicine, was inducted into the National Academies of Practice in spring 2012 and was the first pharmacist on the CDC advisory committee on immunization practices. A reception held in Knoxville allowed students to talk with faculty and learn more about academia and their professional backgrounds. As in previous years, students signed up for faculty shadowing experiences. They participated in research and case reports that they hope will lead to poster presentations and publications. Third-year student pharmacist Blake Poole, who shadowed Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy Andrea Franks, Pharm.D., said, “shadowing Dr. Franks allowed me to get a small glimpse into the world of academia and further research the topic to better understand the role of the academic pharmacist. It was eye opening to see all of the things in which you can become involved. Pharmacy educators influence the lives of future pharmacists, which could lead to the advancement of the profession.” Franks plans to nominate Poole for the AACP Walmart Scholars Program and serve as his mentor at the 2013 AACP Annual Meeting if he is selected. Another student pharmacist, Kayla Werner, shadowed Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy Shaunta’ Ray, Pharm.D. The third-year student highlighted the benefits of putting her skills into real-world practice. “My experience with the faculty shadowing program has thoroughly enhanced my pharmacy school experience,” Werner said. “Dr. Ray allowed me to accompany her on family medicine rounds and shadow her residents meeting with patients. It has broadened my knowledge of the field and helped me apply what I am learning in school. I have learned the impact academia has on the future of pharmacy.”

At Belmont University, pharmacy faculty members submitted three clues as part of the “Get to Know Your Faculty” scavenger hunt. Students were encouraged to visit the college’s Web site to learn more about their professors and hopefully crack the case.

Top: (L to R) University of Tennessee student pharmacists Levi Lancaster (P3), Ian Morris (P4) and Brandon Sipe (P4) at the student reception. Morris and Sipe were completing an academia rotation in October and assisted with American Pharmacy Educator Week planning and events. Bottom: Student pharmacists celebrate American Pharmacy Educator Week with faculty at the reception.

Getting to Know You Belmont University To kick off American Pharmacy Educator Week, Belmont University sent all student pharmacists an e-mail describing activities scheduled for the next five days. Among them was a “Get to Know Your Faculty” scavenger hunt. Participating faculty members submitted three clues related to their alma mater(s), hobbies, pets and other favorites. Students used in-person interviews and the college’s Web site to learn more about their professors and hopefully crack the case. The winner of the scavenger hunt received a gift card to a local favorite eatery. Also during the week, faculty members posted on their office doors their reasons for entering academia. This encouraged interaction between students and faculty and informed students about what’s required of an academic career.

20

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

Enlightening Interviews Northeast Ohio Medical University Northeast Ohio Medical University and its College of Pharmacy celebrated the week with several activities, starting by adorning its campus with stickers, giving away wristbands and handing out booklets. NEOMED faculty and staff showed their support for the profession by also wearing pins. Students selected outstanding pharmacy educators to be recognized by the college. These faculty and preceptors were interviewed about why they chose a career in academic pharmacy and asked about their most memorable teaching moments. These vignettes were posted online, shared via the university’s social media accounts, highlighted in a special edition of the college’s newsletter and displayed on video monitors in various buildings.

A campus-wide lunch-and-learn session capped off the celebration and featured College of Pharmacy faculty in a “Life in Academia” panel presentation. The panel included newly appointed Dean Charles T. Taylor, Pharm.D., as well as Dr. Susan P. Bruce, chair and professor of pharmacy practice, and Dr. Christopher Shelby, assistant professor of pharmacy practice. The presentation gave students a more in-depth look at the various positions within academia by allowing them to talk with faculty and administrators about their unique career paths.

Northeast Ohio Medical University placed AACP materials, including stickers, wristbands and booklets around campus for all faculty, staff, students and visitors to read. A campus-wide lunch-and-learn session featured College of Pharmacy educators during a “Life in Academia” panel presentation, which was the highlight of the week’s activities.

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

21

Wowed by Mentors’ Work Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science The College of Pharmacy at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science hosted a “Meet the Faculty” roundtable discussion on Oct. 25, the first of its kind for the college. Faculty got together with small groups of students, who learned about their educators’ professional history, their roles at the college, and their interests and hobbies outside of pharmacy. Students also got to know some new professors over pizza. Dr. D. Eric Walters, associate dean for research, impressed students with his accomplishments in molecular modeling in industry and academia, as did Dr. David HT Harrison, professor of pharmaceutical sciences. While his professional background is biochemistry, his hobbies are electronics and microcontroller programming. At the roundtable session he demonstrated his LED-based spinning wheel executive decision maker. “You could see the students’ anticipation as they learned more about the career paths of their mentors,” said Dr. Marc S. Abel, associate dean for academic and student affairs. “The best part of being a pharmacy educator is helping students come to realize their own great potential. Working with such a bright, humble group of dedicated individuals is an added bonus.” More than 30 student pharmacists attended a “Meet the Faculty” roundtable discussion at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science. Faculty chatted about their professional history, their roles at the college, and their interests and hobbies outside of pharmacy.

A Tasty Way to Say Thanks What’s a popular way to reward star performers? Feed them! As part of American Pharmacy Educator Week, the Campbell University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Alumni Association hosted a breakfast for faculty, staff and students. Also saying thanks through food was Fairleigh Dickinson University School of Pharmacy. Its students signed a giant card and hosted a surprise ice cream bar for all faculty, staff and students. Finally, the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine School of Pharmacy-Georgia Campus gathered faculty and students together for a casual lunch-and-learn to celebrate its educators and get students interested in the teaching profession.

22

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

Students at Harding University College of Pharmacy showed their appreciation for pharmacy faculty by hanging a banner and hosting a breakfast.

What We Love

feature story

To celebrate American Pharmacy Educator Week, AACP asked faculty to complete this sentence: “The best part about being a pharmacy educator is…” The reasons may vary, but one thing is certain— pharmacy educators love their jobs.

Hoping for an Aha! Harding University The Council of Students at Harding University College of Pharmacy expressed appreciation for their educators with a banner and a breakfast spread. The council also produced a slideshow that ran all week on monitors throughout the building with photos and quotes from educators answering the phrase, “Why I Became an Educator.”

“…that moment when a student smiles with the realization that my true goal is to ensure that they have rewarding experiential experiences.” —Dr. Keith DelMonte Director of Experiential Education St. John Fisher College

“…educating others…it has and will remain my mission to always give back in this manner as long as I am engaged in clinical practice.” —Dr. Abimbola Farinde

Clinical Staff Pharmacist and Preceptor

“I became an educator because I love it when students get that ‘Aha!’ moment when all of that learning, memorizing and studying suddenly pays off and applying the information just clicks. That positive energy students have is contagious,” said Dr. Melissa Shipp, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice. Dr. Jeffrey B. Mercer, assistant professor and assistant dean for experiential education, said, “I became an educator because I love this profession and want to move it forward. I believe that pharmacists are uniquely positioned to serve as patient care advocates, and the future of pharmacy practice starts with education.”

“…challenging and inspiring our practitioners of tomorrow.” —Dr. Linda K. Ohri

To convey appreciation for local pharmacists who serve as preceptors, the student chapters of the National Community Pharmacists Association and American Pharmacists Association–Academy of Student Pharmacists delivered deli trays to local pharmacies. The Student Society of Health-System Pharmacists honored those serving in area hospitals with gift baskets.

Assistant Professor Virginia Commonwealth University

             Even though American Pharmacy Educator Week is over, the curtain never closes on the extraordinary work faculty perform every day—educating the rising stars of pharmacy! Jane Rooney is a freelance writer based in Oakton, Virginia. Maureen Thielemans is Communications Manager at AACP and editor of Academic Pharmacy Now; mthielemans@aacp.org.

Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice Creighton University

“...connecting with my parents on a professional level, as they, too, dedicated their careers to teaching. Even though my students are at least 10 to 20 years older than [my parents’ students] were, some things about the classroom and this calling are universal.” —Dr. Emily P. Peron

“…the light bulb moment when a student’s face lights up because he or she finally got it!” —Dr. Deanna Tran

Assistant Professor University of Maryland

“...working in the lab with the students to produce great products that are beneficial to public health.” —Dr. Desuo Wang

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine School of Pharmacy– Georgia Campus

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

23

feature story

24

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

feature story

Words Worth Spreading AACP and its members are reaching out to younger generations to extol pharmacy careers. By John Michael Segars and Jane Rooney

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

25

The numbers don’t paint a rosy picture: In the 2011–12 admissions cycle, the Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS) experienced a 0.3 percent decrease in applicants and a 5.0 percent decrease in applications submitted. That decrease was mainly due to applicants applying to fewer schools. But there is no cause for alarm—AACP and its members have a prescription to revive interest in pharmacy careers. A national strategic plan was implemented by the Association in 2012 to recruit students and demonstrate the advantages of devoting their lives to the rewarding healthcare challenges that pharmacy work entails. Individual and institutional members are also taking innovative steps to capture students’ attention and boost enrollment in pharmacy programs.

26

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

A Recruiting Mission Last summer, the AACP Board of Directors agreed to complete a formal review of national admissions recruitment strategies by 2013. The Association was also tasked with finding ways to better promote and market available graduate pharmacy programs. AACP has incorporated information about the graduate programs into the PharmCAS Web site and in the 2014–15 application cycle, any graduate programs that want to integrate into PharmCAS to collect applications will be able to do so. Other initiatives include centralizing the electronic application process and making it more user-friendly. Additional recruitment activities are under way. The Pharmacy Career Information Council is a collaboration of pharmacy organizations whose mission is to assist prospective and current student pharmacists in

accessing information about pharmacy career pathways. AACP serves as the coordinator and primary customer support center for PCIC. The Foundations of the Future Pharmacist Initiative involves three smaller programs. The first, Pharmacy Is Right for Me, is an educational campaign that aims to inspire and foster the next generation of pharmacy leaders in the United States. Students, parents and educators can access interactive online tools, resources and testimonials that highlight exciting and diverse career opportunities. AACP, the American Pharmacists Association and Optum Rx, a pharmacy benefits management organization, collaborated on this project. Taking part in the Pharmacy Is Right for Me campaign is the College of Pharmacy at Western University of Health Sciences. The college contributed four “Inspiring Journeys” videos to the campaign’s Web site and provided on-campus programs to get middle- and high-school students interested in pharmacy and healthcare. In one workshop, Pomona Unified School District students learned how to make toothpaste in the college’s lab during Palomares Academy of Health Sciences’ Project Lead the Way Biomedical Program in 2011.

Like Parent, Like Child Three first-year students at The University of Georgia College of Pharmacy realized they had something in common that set them apart from the other 141 members of the class of 2016. Leigh Ann Perri, Andrew May and Harrison Jozefczyk are all children of College of Pharmacy faculty. Dr. Matthew Perri is a professor of clinical and administrative pharmacy and Dr. J. Russell May is a clinical professor in the department’s clinical program in Augusta. Dr. Kenneth Jozefczyk, an adjunct member of the department, is the director of pharmacy at Memorial University Medical Center in Savannah. Very few students in the college’s 109-year history have followed in their parents’ footsteps. Leigh Ann and Andrew earned their bachelor’s degrees in 2006. Leigh Ann studied early childhood education at UGA and worked for several years as an elementary school teacher; Andrew earned his degree in business administration at Appalachian State University. Neither one felt fulfilled in their path, so they chose to dedicate the next four years of their lives to studying pharmacy.

At left, ninth graders from Palomares Academy of Health Sciences are instructed by WesternU Clinical Associate Professor Rudolf Mireles, Pharm.D., on how to use a milling machine. Below, two students are focused on mixing the ingredients for the toothpaste demonstration.

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

27

The second part of the initiative is the Tour for Diversity in Medicine. Its mission is to cultivate future physicians of different racial and ethnic backgrounds by hosting workshops on students’ home campuses. The tour only includes medicine and dentistry thus far, but AACP is working to add pharmacy. Lastly, AACP will work with Kaplan and the Pharmacy College Admission Test to implement a robust PCAT prep program. Another strategic plan objective focuses on offering financial discounts for disadvantaged students in the PCAT prep program and in PharmCAS to increase the diversity of the qualified applicant pool.

Molding Young Minds “Someday I’d like to help people like my pharmacist helped me. Maybe that is what I will grow up to be!” This quote is from a new children’s book, Pharmacy and Me, an emerging resource being used to educate kindergarten through third-grade students about the pharmacy profession. Nine students at Butler University used an interprofessional approach to create this book as part of the Pharmacy Is Right for Me campaign. The book tells the story of a young girl who visits a retail pharmacy for the first time with her dad. The pharmacist delivers sore-throat relieving medication to eliminate her cold symptoms. Throughout the book children learn about the vital role a pharmacist plays in the community and in helping others.

A similar book published in 2004 titled Saving Emma builds awareness of elementary school-aged children about the history of apothecary pharmacy. Written by Bebe Willoughby, director of the Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum, the book takes place in the museum’s current home, Alexandria, Virginia, in 1798. It tells the story of Nathan, a young man who travels great distances to find a cure for his baby sister’s illness. After inquiring with the local doctor and midwife, he eventually arrives at the apothecary, which sells him herbs and powders that will improve his sister’s health. Nathan returns with the medicine and his sister’s fever breaks. The experience makes him grateful to the pharmacist and sparks an interest in becoming the apothecary’s apprentice. The pages of this heartwarming story teach children that medicines may have changed since 1798, but healthcare providers working together to improve patients’ health outcomes is still a core element of pharmacy practice. AACP Executive Vice President and CEO Lucinda L. Maine, Ph.D., R.Ph., writes in a section that she contributed to the book, “In some ways pharmacy practice is becoming more like it was in the past. Pharmacists in communities all across America are available to listen to people with concerns about their health and help them find medicines that can make them feel better.”

A Hands-On Experience for High Schoolers Targeting a slightly older age group, Mercer University’s Col-

“Someday I’d like to help people like my pharmacist helped me. Maybe that is what I will grow up to be!” —Pharmacy and Me “In some ways pharmacy practice is becoming more like it was in the past. Pharmacists in communities all across America are available to listen to people with concerns about their health and help them find medicines that can make them feel better.” —Saving Emma

Young readers of this charming story can be inspired to follow in the pharmacist’s footsteps. Butler students from the elementary education, communications and pharmacy departments created the book as part of a senior project. Dr. Erin L. Albert, assistant professor of pharmacy practice, is the pharmacy advisor for the project. “My responsibility was to gather resources necessary to publish the project, deal with the publishing agreements and contracts, and help build the overall timeline and deliverables.” Her role stemmed from the desire to educate a colleague’s young daughter about what her mother did every day at work as a pharmacist. Albert noted that the students had to learn how to work with professionals in different fields and how to clearly convey information about a pharmacist’s role to the non-pharmacy students.

28

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

lege of Pharmacy and Health Sciences offered a three-day pharmacy summer program last July designed to foster diversity in the pharmacy field. Now in its second year thanks to a $10,000 gift from Walgreens, the Mercer Pharmacy Scholars Summer Program welcomes to campus rising high-school sophomores, juniors and seniors who’ve expressed interest in pursuing a pharmacy career. Most of the 50 participating high-school students came from Atlanta area high schools. The program included activities in a lab and workshops in pharmacy ethics, drug identification and patient care. One activity involved a mock crime scene that helped students understand how to use information about drug interactions, overdoses and unidentified medication in determining what happened to a patient. Field trips to local pharmacies—in both community and hospital settings—were also part of the program. A panel

Top Notch The U.S. News & World Report Best Jobs of 2013 underscores what we already know: Pharmacy is a fantastic profession. Pharmacists took third place in the report, coming in just behind dentists at number one and nurses at number two. The list analyzed employment growth, median salary, future job prospects, the unemployment rate, and the occupation’s estimated stress level and work-life balance. The report credits strong job growth for pharmacists: “With excellent prospects and a solid average salary, the pharmacist profession nabs the No. 3 spot on our list. Possessors of a Pharm.D. can anticipate nearly 70,000 available jobs this decade, the brunt in physician offices, outpatient care centers, and nursing homes.”

U.S. News & World Report Best Jobs of 2013: 1. Dentist 2. Registered Nurse 3. Pharmacist 4. Computer Systems Analyst 5. Physician

Above left: High school student Joseph Bryant participates in a compounding exercise at Mercer University’s Pharmacy Scholars Summer Program. Below left: Two high school students prepare for an exercise on the dangers of misusing prescription drugs.

Sciences and senior vice president of Mercer’s new Health Sciences Center.

of pharmacists from various backgrounds (e.g., public health service, pharmacy benefits management company, independent pharmacy) discussed pharmacy careers with the students. “This summer program is critically important to increasing awareness among young people about the unique training, expertise and value of pharmacists and pharmaceutical sciences within the healthcare delivery system,” said Dr. Hewitt W. “Ted” Matthews, dean of the College of Pharmacy and Health

“My experience at Mercer University as a pharmacy scholar was such a life-changing experience,” said Joseph Bryant, who took part in last summer’s program. “It allowed me to understand what it takes to become a pharmacist and the different routes that people may choose to get there.” His mother, Annette Bryant, noted that “students actually get to do hands-on exercises on how medicine is made. The program made such an impression on my son that he chose pharmacy as his topic for his senior project.” Now those are words well worth spreading as recruitment initiatives press forward. John Michael Segars is a 2013 Pharm.D. candidate at The University of Mississippi who completed his APPE at AACP; Jane Rooney is a freelance writer based in Oakton, Virginia.

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

29

members working for

you

Weighing the Options Through research, teaching and community outreach, educators play a huge part in reversing a growing epidemic. By Brandon Dyson Pharmacy faculty are leading the fight against obesity, asserts Dr. Wanli Smith of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. As an assistant professor, Smith has been studying the molecular pathways and mechanisms of obesity for nearly 10 years. She also teaches the pharmacology and drug discovery of obesity and other related diseases to student pharmacists.

An Uphill Battle The United States has been struggling with obesity for decades—and we are losing ground, says Smith. “One in three Americans is obese, and currently there are not a lot of treatment options available.” That’s why she decided to partner with the Network to Overcome Obesity Now (NOON) in its efforts to raise public awareness about this growing epidemic. NOON emphasizes that the excessive morbidity and mortality associated with obesity has farreaching effects on both the physical and economical health of our nation, and that more effective treatments need to be researched in order to help reverse the trend. Smith spoke as an expert on behalf of NOON at a congressional debriefing that underscored obesity as a chronic disease in need of extended treatment options. “I wanted to do whatever I could to help the nation fight this growing health problem,” she explained. Smith also highlighted that NOON had an impact—in 2012, the FDA approved the new obesity medications Belviq® and Qnexa®.

Big Role, Small Changes, Profound Effect The critical role that pharmacy faculty play in the fight against obesity is multi-faceted, says Smith. “We develop research that increases the availability of new drugs for all diseases, including obesity; and we train the next gen-

eration of pharmacists.” These future pharmacists eventually become community leaders and can have a tremendous impact on reinforcing healthy lifestyles and medication adherence to their patients. Faculty members are also responsible for training Ph.D. students and postdoctoral fellows who may eventually make discoveries that enhance our knowledge or lead to new treatments. Smith points out that even seemingly small changes or advances can have a profound effect. Sparking a student’s interest or emphasizing a healthy diet and exercise to a patient can collectively lead to a great impact on our nation’s health.

Reduction Research Working with NOON to increase public exposure and disease awareness, Smith called for national investment in obesity research to help the efforts in her laboratory and other research teams. She also believes that, “in the longterm, my efforts working with NOON will create more awareness in my students and may motivate more of them toward a career in obesity research and healthcare.” One thing is certain; the contribution of members such as Dr. Wanli Smith help us gain significant headway in the battle of the bulge. Brandon Dyson is a 2013 Pharm.D. candidate at Howard University who completed his APPE at AACP.

For more information on NOON, please visit http://overcomeobesitynow.org.

30

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

Faculty News Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Appointments/Elections • Charles Bergeron has been hired as an assistant professor of in the Department of Basic and Social Sciences. • Ian Douglas has been hired as vice provost for innovative learning and academic support services; he will also serve as associate professor of health care management and informatics. • Arcadius V. Krivoshein has been hired as an assistant professor of in the Department of Basic and Social Sciences.

Campbell University Appointments/Elections • Leigh Foushee, clinical associate professor of pharmacy practice • Michael Jiroutek, assistant professor of clinical research

Awards • Andrew J. Muzyk received the 2012 Association for Academic Psychiatry Psychiatric Education Award for his part in creating an interactive course for the Duke University psychiatry residency program.

Promotions • D. Byron May, chair of pharmacy practice

• Kimberly Skylstad has been hired as an instructor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice.

Retirements

Awards

Chicago State University

• Kathy A. Boland received the University of Vermont “Family Medicine Resident Appreciation Award” for excellence in teaching. • Clayton English received the University of Vermont School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry “Psychiatry Residents Award” for excellence in academic teaching.

Grants • Amy Barton-Pai received a one-year, $63,369.08 grant from Covance to study autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. • Ronald J. DeBellis received a two-year, $294,776 grant from Pfizer for screening, educating and providing pneumococcal vaccine to elderly patients in Vermont. • Catherine E. Murphy received a two-year, $14,752 grant from the University of Vermont to conduct a medication therapy management pilot project. • Nimish Patel received a one-year, $27,800 grant from Vertex Pharmaceuticals to identify the prevalence and available management strategies of drug interactions with telaprevir in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. • Markus Stein received a five-year, $413,160 subcontract from Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University as part of an NIH grant to study substrates responsible for CagA-mediated pathogenesis of helicobacterpylori.

• Larry N. Swanson, chair of pharmacy practice

Appointments/Elections • Cindy Arocena, clinical assistant professor for the Department of Pharmacy Practice • Michael Bradaric, assistant professor for the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences • Rebecca Castner, clinical assistant professor for the Department of Pharmacy Practice • Carmita A. Coleman, associate dean for the Office of Academic Support and Student Affairs • Michael Danquah, assistant professor for the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences • Heather E. Fields, clinical assistant professor for the Department of Pharmacy Practice • Marketa Marvanova, clinical associate professor for the Department of Pharmacy Practice • Jozef Stec, assistant professor for the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences • Katrina Sutton, director of professional labs for the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences • Beverly A. Talluto, director of continuing education for the Office of Academic Affairs • Rosalyn Vellurattil, capstone director for the Office of Academic Affairs • Louis Wright, executive director of development for the Office of the Dean ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

31

faculty news

Promotions • Ehab A. Abourashed, chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Concordia University Wisconsin Appointments/Elections • Christian Albano, assistant professor of pharmaceutical administration

Drake University Appointments/Elections • Wendy Mobley-Bukstein has joined the college’s faculty as assistant professor of pharmacy practice. • James Sacco has joined the college’s faculty as assistant professor of pharmaceutical science.

• Ann Biesboer, assistant professor of pharmacy practice

• Ronald J. Torry has been appointed to chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical, Biomedical and Administrative Sciences.

• Loren-Ashley Cooper, assistant professor of pharmacy practice

• Timothy E. Welty has joined the faculty as professor and chair of clinical sciences.

• Anne LaDisa, assistant professor of pharmacy practice

Grants

• Ann Patten, assistant professor of pharmacy practice • Michael Pickart, associate professor of pharmaceutical science • Sarah Ray, assistant professor of pharmacy practice • Nancy Stoehr, assistant professor of pharmaceutical science

Grants • Joseph E. McGraw Sr. was awarded a four month $15,000 sub award from the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee to perform Dioxin/PBDE analysis in September 2011 and a one year NIEHS Children’s Environmental Health Sciences sub award to study the characterization of lipids in women and children (obesity) in May 2012. • Daniel S. Sem was awarded a five year $605,000 NIH R-01 sub award from the Medical College of Wisconsin for Vascular Hematology research in February 2012; an annually renewable CTSI sub award for $8,000 from the Milwaukee School of Engineering on “Creating research labs and classrooms: A Role for Physical Modeling Projects in the Undergraduate Curriculum (CREST)” in February 2012; and a three year $383,000 NIH AREA grant to study the tuberculosis molecule in May 2012. • Daniel S. Sem and Joseph E. McGraw Sr. were awarded a two year $20,000 Clinical Translational Science Institute (CTSI) sub award from Marquette University to study the symptoms of Schizophrenia in April 2012.

Promotions • Andrew Traynor, promoted to associate professor of pharmacy practice

32

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

• The university received a gift of $300,000 from Hy-Vee, Inc., to distinctlyDrake—the university’s current fundraising effort. The gift will go toward the construction of the Morgan E. Cline Atrium for Pharmacy and Science.

Duquesne University Appointments/Elections • L.A. O’Donnell, editorial board of The Journal of Microbiology and Biology Education • K.J. Tidgewell, assistant professor of medicinal chemistry

Grants • J.P. Elliott and G.L. Cherpes, principal investigator(s). Co-investigator(s): K.M. Kamal, C. Harrison, B. Herk, M. McCrossin and M. Riedy. Project title: Metabolic Risks Associated with Antipsychotic Medication use in Patients with PraderWilli Syndrome. Period of project: April 2012 to April 2013. Source: Prader-Willi Syndrome Association USA. Amount granted: $6,660. Total grant: $6,660. • Thomas J. Mattei, principal investigator; Terri Kroh, co-investigator. Project title: Hill Pharmacy Outreach Program. Period of project: July 2012 to July 2014. Source: McAuley Ministries. Amount granted: $50,000. Total grant: $100,000. • P.L.D. Wildfong and I.S. Buckner, principal investigator(s). Project title: Physical Characterization of Complex Mixtures: Solid Dispersion API:Polymer Miscibility Determination. Period of project: September 1, 2012 to August 31, 2013. Source: National Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Education (NIPTE) and U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA). Amount granted 12–13: $85,413. Total grant: $85,413.

faculty news

Promotions • David A. Johnson has been appointed division head of pharmaceutical sciences. • Patricia A. Keys has been appointed division head of clinical, social and administrative sciences.

Howard University Appointments/Elections • Anthony K. Wutoh has been appointed dean of the College of Pharmacy.

Mercer University Grants • Ajay K. Banga was awarded a $27,500 grant for “Formulation, development and testing of analgesic skin patches” from Little Innovations LLC. Banga also received a $10,000 grant for “Excipient analysis in formulations” from ProPharmaCon LLC and a grant for $193,750 for “Permeation enhancement of a hormonal gel” from Abbott Laboratories. • Ajay K. Banga and Ayyappa Chaturvedula were awarded a $125,000 grant for “Intradermal/topical and transdermal product development” from GlaxoSmithKline. • Gina J. Ryan and Kathryn M. Momary received a $67,212 research grant for “Preliminary analysis of lipoprotein subclasses, apoprotein levels and genetic architecture of African-American males with type 2 diabetes” from Merck. • Chad M. VanDenBerg and Vanthida Huang received a $122,172 grant for “A randomized, controlled, crossover study evaluating the effects of snack product formulations on afternoon slump” from Cognitive Research Corporation.

Midwestern University/ Downers Grove Appointments/Elections • Shridhar V. Andurkar has been installed as chair of AACP’s Chemistry Section. • Jacob P. Gettig is continuing as secretary, CPE Section of AACP. • Ana C. Quiñones-Boex is continuing as secretary, Social and Administrative Sciences Section for AACP. • Laura Waite has been hired as an assistant professor in pharmacy practice.

• Robin M. Zavod has been installed as chair-elect for the AACP Council of Faculties.

Awards • Nancy Fjortoft received the William L. Blockstein Award of Merit, CPE Section for AACP. • Annette Gilchrist was accepted in the Early Career Reviewer program at the Center for Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health. • Marc Sheetz received the 2012 Young Investigator Award from the Society of Infectious Disease Pharmacists; accepted in the Early Career Reviewer program at the Center for Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health. • Susan R. Winkler was awarded fellow status in the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

Grants • Jacob P. Gettig was awarded $5,000 from Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; awarded $5,000 from Merck & Co., Inc.; awarded $7,500 from Novo Nordisk, Inc. for the “1st Annual Updates in Diabetes Management and Education” CE program. • Anil Gulati received a grant of $96,694 for the project titled “Nanocarrier formulation of ETB receptor agonist, IRL-1620, for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease” from the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation. • Marc Sheetz was awarded $10,000 by the Society of Infectious Diseases for the project titled “Quantifying the Magnitude of Clinical Virulence of KPC Through Translational Study.”

Midwestern University/Glendale Appointments/Elections • David Alexander Sclar has been appointed to chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice.

Northeast Ohio Medical University Appointments/Elections • Charles T. Taylor has been named dean of the College of Pharmacy.

Purdue University Appointments/Elections • David A. Colby was elected secretary/treasurer for the Drug Discovery and Development Interface Sec-

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

33

faculty news

tion of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists. • Gloria P. Sachdev was installed as the director at large for the Section of Ambulatory Care Practitioners of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists.

Awards • John Hertig received a Distinguished Service Award from the ASHP New Practitioners Forum. • Kellie Jones was elected as a fellow of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy. • Lynne S. Taylor received the 2012 AAPS Pharmaceutical Research Meritorious Manuscript Award for “Understanding the Behavior of Amorphous Pharmaceutical Systems during Dissolution.” She was elected as a fellow of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists.

Grants • Albert A. Bowers and Tony R. Hazbun received $73,302 from Showalter Trust for “Harnessing Orphan Drugs: Accessing the Anticancer Activity of Thiazolyl Peptides.” • Stephen R. Byrn and Michael D. Murray received $820,546 Indiana University School of Medicine for “Indiana Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI)—Year 5 Funding.” • Noll L. Campbell received $57,988 from Indiana University for “Pharmacological Management of Delirium; Amendment 2.” • Mark S. Cushman received $75,000 from Showalter Trust for “Development of Novel Antimicrobial Compounds Against Multidrug Resistance Bacterial Pathogens, Including Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA).” He also received $223,849 from PHS-NIH National Cancer Institute for “Novel Topoisomerase I Inhibitors.”

cer Care Engineering.” • Tony R. Hazbun received $254,479 from PHS-NIH National Institute of General Medical Science, for “Integrated Genomewide Analysis of the IpL 1 Kinase Signaling Network.” • Marlene O. Heeg received $100,000 from Amgen, Inc. for “2012 IPC Global Educational Initiative”; $95,000 from Multi-Sponsored Industrials for “2012 Rome Update from Digestive Diseases Week”; and $600,000 from Multi-Sponsored Industrials for “2012 Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Centers of Educational Expertise and National Initiative.” • Gregory H. Hockerman received $279,409 from PHS-NIH National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for “L-Type Ca2+ Channel Modulation of Beta Cells Function.” • Chang-Deng Hu received $559,270 from the U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity for “Targeting PRMT5 as a Novel Radiosensitization Approach for Primary and Recurrent Prostate Cancer Treatment.” • Gregory T. Knipp received $17,043 from Catalent Pharma Solutions for “Comparison of Dissolution Times Between Contrast Filled Vegi-Capsules and Gel Capsules via CT Scan in the Porcine Model.” • Douglas J. Lacount received $74,995 from Showalter Trust for “Selective Antagonism of v-ATPase to Treat Viral Infection.” He also received $283,939 from PHSNIH National Institute of General Medical Science for “A Temporal View of the Plasmodium-Red Blood Cells Interactome.” • Wanqing Liu received $75,000 from Showalter Trust for “A Genome-Wide Integrated Analysis of Micrornas in Human Hepatic Fat Accumulation.” • Christiane L. Nash received $1,400 from Fred Run Ltd for “Pharmacy Diabetes Education Program.”

• Ryan M. Drenan received $239,548 from PHS-NIH National Institute on Drug Abuse for”Alpha6* nAChRs in Dopamine Transmission and Nicotine Dependence.” He also received $75,000 from Showalter Trust for “Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors as Therapeutic Targets in Parkinson’s Disease.”

• Chiwook Park received $176,126 from National Science Foundation for “Transient Partial Unfolding in Proteins; Amendment 2 for Grant 104724.” He also received $280,954 from PHS-NIH National Institute of General Medical Science for “Identification of Protein-Metabolite Interactome.”

• Robert L. Geahlen received $335,249 from PHS-NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for “Tyrosine Kinases and Lymphocyte Activation.”

• Laurie Parker received $187,043 from PHS-NIH National Cancer Institute for “Label-Free, Real-Time Detection of Kinase Activity in Vitro and in Single Cells Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS).”

• Marietta L. Harrison received $45,405 from Indiana University School of Medicine for “Warfighter Can-

34

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

faculty news

• Sonak D. Pastakia received $29,994 from Indiana University for “Lenalidomide and Thalidomide Ampath Risk Management Program.”

South Carolina College of Pharmacy

• Rodolfo Pinal received $49,999 from Trask Trust Fund for “Development of Novel Prefabricated Film Based Dosage Forms: Eye on Commercialization.”

Appointments/Elections

• Christophe-Jean Rochet received $40,000 from PhRMA Foundation for “Role of Age-Related Autophagy Impairment in Parkinson’s Disease Pathogenesis.” • Amy H. Sheehan received $45,000 from the Food and Drug Administration for joint “FDA/Industry/ Academic Regulatory Pharmaceutical Fellowship.” • Lynne S. Taylor received $70,000 from Anasys Instruments for “New Biomedical Imaging Platform Based on Nanoscale IR Spectroscopy.” She also received $369,403 from Abbott Laboratories for “Optimizing Amorphous Solid Dispersions through Modification of Solution Phase Behavior with Additives.” • James E. Tisdale, Brian R. Overholser and Kevin M. Sowinski received $143,000 from the American Heart Association Midwest Affiliate for “Influence of Progesterone Administration on Drug-Induced QT Interval Prolongation and Torsades de Pointes.” • Elizabeth M. Topp received $250,048 from National Institutes of Health for “Protein Aggregation in Amorphous Solids.” • Val J. Watts and Chang-Deng Hu received $378,283 from PHS-NIH National Institute of Mental Health for “D2 Receptor-Induced Sensitization of Adenylate Cyclase.” • Val J. Watts and David E. Nichols received $139,384 from Army Natick Research & Development Laboratories for “Novel Vector Control Solutions for Protecting Health of US Military.” • Kara D. Weatherman received $12,500 from Cardinal Health for “Cardinal Health Fellowship in Clinical Nuclear Pharmacy and Radiopharmaceutical Safety.” • Alan J. Zillich and Margie E. Snyder received $19,083 from Amedisys for “A Study Design Proposal for: Evaluating the Efficacy of a Medication Management Program.”

• Jennifer Baker, director of experiential education • John Bian, associate professor of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences • Joseph T. DiPiro, chair of Council of Deans, AACP • Kevin Lu, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences • Leah Siskind, assistant professor of pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences

Awards • Brandon Bookstaver, Health-System Pharmacist of the Year, South Carolina Society of Health-System Pharmacists • Rick G. Schnellmann, Distinguished University Professor, Medical University of South Carolina • Wayne Weart, Procter & Gamble Leadership Award, Phi Lambda Sigma

Grants • Craig Beeson and Rick G. Schnellmann, NIH Small Business Innovation Research, $1.1 million, “High Throughput Nephrotoxicant Assay” and “Inducers of Mitochondrial Biogenesis.” • Campbell McInnes, Tobacco Research Pilot Project, “Selective Plk1 Anti-Tumor Therapeutics through Polo Box Domain Inhibition.” • Jill E. Michels, Palmetto Health Alliance Office of Community Service, “Palmetto Health Alliance Education Collaboration.” • Igor Roninson, Small Business Innovation Research, $1.5 million, for company Senex Lorne Hofseth NIH RO1, “Targeting Protein Arginine Deiminases to Prevent Colitis and Colon Cancer.” • Rick G. Schnellmann and Kenneth Tew are the lead researchers on a $10.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Center for Research Resources Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE).

Promotions

Samford University

• Brandon Bookstaver, vice-chair of the Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Outcomes Sciences

Retirements

• Amy Grant, assistant dean of student affairs, University of South Carolina (USC) campus

• Robert H. Schrimsher, professor

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

35

faculty news

• Lorne Hofseth, director of graduate programs, USC campus • Bryan Ziegler, executive director of the Kennedy Pharmacy Innovation Center

St. Louis College of Pharmacy Awards • Clark Kebodeaux was named to the inaugural class of the National Association of Chain Drug Stores Faculty Scholars Program. • St. Louis College of Pharmacy has been named a Great College to Work For by The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Promotions

• Dianne May was elected to the American College of Clinical Pharmacy’s Drug Information Practice & Research Network (PRN) as treasurer. • Russell May has been reappointed to the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Section of Clinical Specialists and Scientists Educational Steering Committee. • Michael W. Neville, selected as chair of Faculty Development Committee for 2012–2013, AACP Section of Teachers of Pharmacy Practice; also installed as chair of Laboratory Instructors Special Interest Group. • Kelley Norris was appointed to the University Healthsystem Consortium (UHC) Pediatrics Council.

• Ehren C. Bucholtz, associate professor, organic chemistry

• Trina J. von Waldner, installed as chair of the AACP Public Health Special Interest Group.

• Bob Zebroski, professor, history

Awards

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

• Aaron Beedle is one of 10 junior faculty selected for the 2012-2014 Lilly Teaching Fellow program by UGA’s Center for Teaching and Learning.

The University of Georgia

• The college’s Student National Pharmaceutical Association (SNPhA) has been selected as one of the Top 3 Chapters in the Small Chapter Category. The chapter also won the Ride-Aid Chauncey L. Cooper Chapter Excellence Small Chapter (1-25 members) Award.

Appointments/Elections

Grants

Appointments/Elections • Quentin Smith has been appointed permanent CEO dean of the School of Pharmacy.

• Brian D. Buck has been appointed to the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Section Advisory Group (SAG) on Preceptor Skills Development. • Brian S. Cummings was selected to join the Early Career Review (ECR) program at the Center for Scientific Review at the National Institutes of Health. He was also appointed to the Executive Leadership Council (ELC) of the Clarke-Oconee American Cancer Society. • Kimberly Hamby has been hired as the new director of alumni affairs.

• Azza El-Remessy received $25,180 from the American Heart Association for study of role of TXNIP in mediating microvascular inflammation and dysfunction. • Susan C. Fagan received $25,180 from the American Heart Association for study of mechanisms of vascular protection of angiotension receptor blockade after stroke and received $11,439 from the Veteran’s Administration Medical Center for IPA-Shenoymechanisms and consequences.

Remember to submit your Faculty News today! is It’s fast and easy to make sure your college or school of pharmacy featured in the Faculty News section of Academic Pharmacy Now. Visit the AACP Web site at www.aacp.org and complete the School News Submission Form on the News and Publications portion of the Web site.

Issue Closing Date Spring 2013 Summer 2013 Fall 2013

February 15, 2013 May 15, 2013 August 15, 2013

36

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

faculty news

• Dexi Liu received a National Institutes of Health grant for $387,878 for computer-assisted hydrodynamic gene delivery for hemophilia gene therapy. • Cory Momany received a National Science Foundation grant for $153,258 for study of structure and function of BENM and CATM for bacterial LYSTtype transcriptional regulators. • Somanath Shenoy received a $315,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health for study of protein kinase B (AKT)-mediated pathway regulation endothelial-barrier function. • Han-Rong Weng received a National Institutes of Health grant for $286,513 for study of glial-cytokine-neuronal interactions in neuropathic pain.

The University of Mississippi Appointments/Elections • Phil Ayers, A.S.P.E.N. Board of Directors, vice chair of BPS Nutrition Support Council, chair of ASHP Section Advisory Group for Preceptor Development, A.S.P.E.N. Parental Nutrition Safety Task Force chair, MPhA director-at-large of executive committee, chair of MPhA Government Affairs, MSHP legislative chair • Alicia S. Bouldin, president-elect of Phi Lambda Sigma • Walter G. Chambliss, immediate past president and member of the Executive Council of APhA-APRS • Zia Shiriat Madar, chair Basic Sciences Section, APhA-APRS

Grants • Alice M. Clark and Ameeta K. Agarwal, principal investigators. Source of award: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Amount: $392,035. Title: New Drugs for Opportunistic Infections. • Ikhlas A. Khan and Larry A. Walker, principal investigators. Source of award: Food and Drug Administration. Amount: $2,308,000. Title: Science Based Authentication of Dietary Supplements. • Dale G. Nagle and Yu-Dong Zhou, principal investigators. Source of award: National Institutes of Health. Amount: $262,130. Title: Anticancer Drug Discovery that Targets Tumor Hypoxia. • Michael A. Repka and Soumyajit Majumdar, principal investigators. Source of award: Hercules, Inc. Amount: $80,000. Title: Fundamentals Studies in the Application of Ashland Aqualon Polymers for Hot-Melt Extrusion for the Oral Delivery of Soluble and Insoluble Drugs from Tablets, Capsules and Oral Film Dosage Forms. • Kristine L. Willett, principal investigator. Source of award: U.S. Army Engineering Research and Development Center. Amount: $248,000. Title: Distribution, Bioaccumulation and Toxicity of Nanosilver Particles in Medaka (Oryzias latipes).

Promotions • John P. Bentley, professor of pharmacy administration and research professor in the Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

• Michael A. Repka, vice chair of the Formulation Design and Development Section of AAPS

• Alicia S. Bouldin, professor of pharmacy administration, research professor for instructional assessment and advancement and associate dean of outcomes assessment and learning advancement.

• Donna S. West-Strum, chair-elect of ESAS Section, APhA-APRS

• Amar G. Chittiboyina, senior research scientist at National Center for Natural Products Research.

Awards • Phil Ayers received the APPE Preceptor of the Year Award and was named a fellow of ASHP.

• Kyle D. Null, research assistant professor in the Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and assistant professor of pharmacy administration.

• Erin R. Holmes received the UM-School of Pharmacy Friend of the Student Award.

Retirements

• Rahul Khanna received the UM-School of Pharmacy New Investigator of the Year Award. • David J. McCaffrey was named a School of Pharmacy Distinguished Teaching Scholar and received the UM Excellence in Advising Award as well as a Certificate of Merit for Outstanding Faculty Advisor Award from the National Academic Advising Association.

• John D. Cleary, coordinator of research and professor of pharmacy practice. • John S. Williamson, professor of medicinal chemistry and research professor in the Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

37

faculty news

The University of Montana Grants • Andrij Holian and Tony Ward have received $1,350,000 from NIH to train rural and underserved youth to understand and pursue scientific careers. • Zeina Jaffar has received $424,500 from NIH to study CB2 agonists as novel therapeutic agents that limit allergic lung inflammation. • Curtis W. Noonan has received $25,000 from the USDA, Forest Service to investigate long term health effects of exposures encountered during wild land fire suppression.

The University of Rhode Island Appointments/Elections • Nicole J. Asal, assistant professor clinical pharmacy practice • Xiaoqun Dong, assistant professor biomedical & pharmaceutical science • Christine M. Eisenhower, assistant professor clinical pharmacy practice • Michelle L. Thomas, assistant professor clinical pharmacy practice

Grants • Fatemeh Akhlaghi, NIH, $332,479, Altered Hepatic Disposition of Statins by Diabetes Melitus. • Bongsup Cho, NIH, $288,753, Sequence Effects of Arylalmine-DNA Adducts. • Ruitang Deng, NIH, $275,476, Crosstalk Between Estrogen and Bile Acid Signaling Pathway. • Xiaoqun Dong, American Assoc. of Cancer Res., $25,877, NR5A2/LRH1 As a Potential Therapeutic Target of Pancreatic Cancer. • Elaina Goldstein, HHS, $5,269,821, Health Care Innovation Challenge. • Anita Jackson, RI Foundation, $6,594, PharmacistInitiation of Post-Exposure Doxycyline for Lyme Prophylaxis. • Stephen Kogut, Healthcentric Advisors, $49,431, Reducing Adverse Drug Events: Patient Safety and Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative.

• Abraham Kovoor, RI Foundation, $15,000, Role of the Striatal Specific Protein, RGS9-2, in Regulating Body Weight and Adiposity. • Navindra P. Seeram, Maple Syrup Producers of Quebec, $16,728, Complex Sugar Identification of Maple Syrup; Maple Syrup Producers of Quebec, $47,410, Routine Analysis of Maple Syrup; and Maple Syrup Producers of Quebec, $94,362, Synergistic Effects of Maple Syrup. • Zahir A. Shaikh, NIH, $3,374,711, RI Network for Excellence in Biomedical and Behavioral Research. • Angela L. Slitt, Ardane, $57,648, Treatment of Stroke Using a Novel PDZ Binding Peptidomimetic Drug; and NIH, $361,672, Effect of Nutritional Status on MRP2 Expression and Biliary Excretion of Bisphenol A. • David R. Worthen, Illuminoss Medical, Inc., $29,897, Intramedullary Orthopedic Drug Delivery Studies.

Promotions • Brian J. Quilliam was appointed associate dean for student and academic affairs.

The University of Toledo Appointments/Elections • Paul W. Erhardt, professor of medicinal chemistry, distinguished university professor

Grants • Ming-Cheh Liu, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, $74,900, Ontogeny of the Phase II cytosolic sulfotransferases and adverse drug reactions.

Touro College of Pharmacy– New York Appointments/Elections • Mary Choy, president-elect, New York City Society of Health-System Pharmacists

Awards • Mary Choy was recently honored with the 2012 New York City Society of Health-System Pharmacists “Harold Neham Memorial Award.”

Grants • Mary Choy received the Student Society of HealthSystem Pharmacists Development Grant, $500.

38

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

faculty news

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

• Lanita S. White has joined the faculty as an assistant professor of pharmacy practice and the director of the 12th Street Health and Wellness Center.

Appointments/Elections

Awards

• Joseph P. Balthasar was named to the editorial board of CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology. • Kalpesh Desai, senior research scientist, pharmacy practice • Rubie Ghazal, adjunct instructor, Office of Assessment • Michael Krajewski, senior research scientist, pharmacy practice • Mohamed Mohamoud, clinical assistant professor, pharmacy practice • Marilyn E. Morris was elected new executive council president by the AAPS Executive Council.

Awards • Sathy V. Balu-Iyer was recipient of the 2012 Innovation in Biotechnology Award, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists. • Marilyn E. Morris is the recipient of the 2012 UB Distinguished Postdoctoral Mentor Award.

Promotions • Rebecca H. Brierley, assistant dean, external affairs • Diane Fisher, assistant dean, research administration • Candise A. Morris, associate dean, resource management

• Grazyna Nowak received the 2012 UAMS Educational Technology Excellence Award, recognizing her excellent work in creating and leveraging online course materials to further student learning. • The college’s student chapter of Kappa Psi received the 2012 Nicholas W. Fenny Industry Improvement Award, given annually to the Collegiate Chapter that shows the greatest percentage improvement (greater than 5%) in grade point average over the past year.

Grants • Nicki L. Hilliard received increased funding for the Nuclear Education Online program from Mallinckrodt, the Pharmaceuticals Business of Covidien’s Grants and Compliance Committee, who approved her proposal titled “DOT Training for Shippers and Transporters of Radiopharmaceuticals.” • T. Scott Warmack led a team of faculty colleagues that received a Million Hearts initiative Team Up, Pressure Down $5,000 grant.

University of California, San Francisco Awards • Xiaokun Shu received the 2012 NIH Director’s Pioneer Award.

• Christine Stumm, registrar and assistant director of admissions and advisement

University of Cincinnati

• Mark J. Wrobel, clinical assistant professor and director of advisement

Grants

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Appointments/Elections • Kendrea M. Jones was appointed to a three-year term on the American Burn Association’s education committee. • Holly D. Maples was appointed to the Arkansas Children’s Hospital Consortium of America’s antimicrobial stewardship committee. • Jacob T. Painter has joined the faculty as an assistant professor of pharmacy practice in the Division of Pharmaceutical Evaluation and Policy.

• Yuhang Zhang, 3-year grant from National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases/ NIH, $235,000, “Coordinated Regulation of Hair Growth and Pigmentation by Dermal Papilla Cells.”

University of Illinois at Chicago Appointments/Elections • Larisa H. Cavallari was elected to a three-year term as an American College of Clinical Pharmacy Research Institute trustee. • Isaac H. Cha was appointed to the National Board of Medical Examiners® (NBME) Pharmacology and Biochemistry Test Committee and to the United States Medical Licensing Examination® (USMLE) Step 1 Pharmacology and Biochemistry Test Mate-

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

39

faculty news

rial Development Committee (TMDC) for a two-year term. • James J. Thielke is chair-elect of the Immunology/ Transplant Practice Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

Awards

• Paul S. Shapiro has been appointed chair of the National Institutes of Health Study Section on Cancer Therapeutics AREA Grant Applications. • Jana Shen has been named an associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences and co-director of the Computer-Aided Drug Design Center.

• William T. Beck was named a 2012 UIC Distinguished Professor.

• Sarah E. Tom has been named an assistant professor of pharmaceutical health services research.

Grants

• Deanna Tran has been named an assistant professor of pharmacy practice and science.

• Joanna E. Burdette has received a four-year $720,000 grant from the American Cancer Society of Illinois for her research, which focuses on epithelial cells, or surface and lining cells, in this case, of the female reproductive system. • Seungpyo Hong is a 2012 recipient of the $25,000 New Investigator Grant Award in Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technologies from the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists.

University of Maryland Appointments/Elections • Bethany DiPaula has been appointed to the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists’ Section Advisory Group on Preceptor Skills Development. • Natalie D. Eddington has been named chair of the board of directors of the National Institute for Pharmaceutical Technology and Education. • Nicholas M. Fusco has been named an assistant professor of pharmacy practice and science. • Jeffrey Gonzales has been appointed chair of the Proposal and Grants Review Committee of the Critical Care Pharmacotherapy Trials Network. • Lauren M. Hynicka has been named the School of Pharmacy’s alternate delegate to AACP. • Amy Ives has been named an assistant professor of pharmacy practice and science. • Jill A. Morgan has been named chair of AACP’s Special Interest Group on Student Services. • Katie Pincus has been selected to participate in the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Research and Education Foundation Research Boot Camp. • Tim Rocafort has been named an assistant professor of pharmacy practice and science. • Leah C. Sera has been named an assistant professor of pharmacy practice and science.

40

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

• James A. Trovato has been named chair of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists’ House of Delegates for 2012–2013. • Connie H. Yoon has been named an assistant professor of pharmacy practice and science.

Awards • Alexander D. MacKerell Jr. has been named the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s Researcher of the Year as part of the university’s Founders Week activities. • Mary Lynn McPherson has been named the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s Teacher of the Year as part of the university’s Founders Week activities. • The School of Pharmacy’s Lambda Kappa Sigma Professional Pharmacy Fraternity was named the 2012 Outstanding Collegiate Chapter of the Year and the 2012 Outstanding Alumni Chapter of the Year.

Grants • Nicole J. Brandt received $33,273 from Econometrica, Inc. for “Medication Therapy Management Improvements.” • Thomas C. Dowling received $1.6 million from Mylan Pharmaceuticals for “Single Dose Fed Bioequivalence Study of Bosentan Tables in Healthy Volunteers.” • Joga Gobburu received $40,000 from Biogen Idec, Inc. for a translational research fellowship. • Steve Hoag received $16,000 from FMC Corporation for “Spray Coating of Aquacoat ECD: The Applications of QBD Principles,” and $142,923 from U.S. Pharmacopeia for “Development of a Spectral Database for Excipients, Drug Substances and Drug Products.” • Maureen A. Kane received $28,750 from the Ragon Institute for “Role of Retinoic Acide in HIV Intestinal Mucosal Immunity.”

faculty news

• Cherokee Layson-Wolf received $97,704 from Professional Pharmacy Services, Inc. • Raymond C. Love received $1.1 million from the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene for “Peer to Peer Review–Pediatrics.” • Amanda Ogelsby-Sherrouse received $159,064 from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for “Mechanism of heme regulation of a P. aeruginosa non-coding RNA.” • Francoise Pradel received $700,000 from the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene for “The Maryland Strategic Prevention Framework Process and Outcome Evaluation.” • Emily Reese received $25,000 from the PhRMA Foundation for “Value of Information: The Contribution of the PSA Screening Test to Prostate Cancer Diagnosis.” • Linda Simoni-Wastila received $400,000 from the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene for “The State Epidemiology Outcomes Workgroup.” • Ting Wang received $25,000 from the United States Pharmacopeia for “Developing the Scientific Basis for the Application of Spectroscopic and Chemometric Methods to Excipient Identification and Adulteration Detection.” • Ilene H. Zuckerman received $422,125 from the National Institute on Aging for “Long-Term Anticoagulation Therapy after Traumatic Brain Injury in Older Adults.”

• Gretchen Riker, assistant professor • Hoai-An Truong, assistant dean for professional affairs and associate professor

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Appointments/Elections • Stacy Bailey, assistant professor • Elena Batrakova, associate professor • Albert Bowers, assistant professor • Daniel Forrister, clinical assistant professor • Alexander “Sasha” Kabanov, Mescal Swain Distinguished Professor • Devika Manickam, research assistant professor • Chad Petit, research assistant professor • Nicole Pinelli, assistant professor • Manmohan Singh, adjunct professor • Marina Sokolsky-Papkov, research assistant professor • Kuo Yang, research assistant professor • Xiang Yi, research assistant professor

Promotions • Joel F. Farley, associate professor • Stephen V. Frye, Fred Eshelman Distinguished Professor

Promotions

• Craig Lee, associate professor

• Kristin Watson has been promoted to associate professor of pharmacy practice and science.

• Carla Y. White, interim regional associate dean for Elizabeth City

Retirements

Retirements

• David A. Knapp, a professor of pharmaceutical health services research and former dean of the School of Pharmacy, retired on June 30, 2012, and was named a professor emeritus.

University of Maryland Eastern Shore Appointments/Elections • Kimberly Couch, assistant professor • Dana Fasanella, assistant professor • Robert Freeman, professor • William Harbester, assistant professor

• Kenneth F. Bastow, professor • Moo J. Cho, professor • Rudolph “Rudy” Juliano, professor • Ralph H. Raasch, associate professor

University of Saint Joseph Awards • Bruce Edgren has been named a 2012–2013 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Health Policy Fellow. • Ted Gorham, 2012 Institutional Pharmacy Preceptor of the Year Award Winner

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

41

faculty news

• Leslie Hosking Sexton, 2012 Community Pharmacy Preceptor of the Year Award Winner

• Laura A. Mandos, promotion to professor of clinical pharmacy

University of the Sciences

• Cathy Y. Poon, promotion to professor of clinical pharmacy

Appointments/Elections • Jessica L. Adams, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy • Angela Bingham, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy • Lisa Charneski, associate professor of clinical pharmacy • Samantha Decker, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy • Stacy Elder, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy • Benjamin J. Ereshefsky, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy

University of Washington Appointments/Elections • Dayl Eccles has been elected chairperson of external relations on the executive board of the International Pharmaceutical Students’ Federation. • Amber Glass has joined the Department of Pharmacy as clinical assistant professor and interim director of Community Residency Programs. • Shanna K. O’Connor has joined the Department of Pharmacy as assistant professor and Kelley-Ross Faculty Fellow.

• Jane Frumin, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy

• Dave D. Veenstra has been appointed to the Institute of Medicine’s Roundtable on Translating GenomicBased Research for Health.

• Anisha B. Grover, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy

Awards

• Diane Hadley, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy • Katherine F. Koffer, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy • Alice Lim, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy

Awards • Lisa A. Lawson was named the 2011 recipient of the Paul F. Parker Award of the University of Kentucky Residency Program and also named the 2012 winner of the Kappa Epsilon Career Achievement Award.

Grants • Lisa E. Davis, source and amount: University of Texas Health Science, $456,589. Title: “Inhibition of Authophagy: A Novel Therapeutic Strategy.” • Catherine C. Moore, source and amount: Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, $14,391. Title: “Experimental and Computational Analysis of GPCR Phosphoregulation.”

Promotions • Michael J. Cawley, promotion to professor of clinical pharmacy • Gladys G. Duenas earned her board certification as a board certified ambulatory care pharmacotherapist.

42

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

• Jashvant Unadkat was named the recipient of the 2012 Research Achievement Award in Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Drug Metabolism by the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists. • A team of student pharmacists recently placed ninth in the Good Neighbor National Community Pharmacists Association’s (NCPA) Pruitt-Schutte Business Plan Competition. Donald F. Downing was their mentor.

Grants • Cathy Yeung received a Norman S. Coplon Extramural Grant for promising young kidney researchers. She will receive $200,000 for her project, “A genomic approach to understanding uremic toxicity and the association with cardiovascular disease.” • The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has awarded a five-year contract to the Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC). • UW received $1,932,169 in funding for a period of two years for a new federal initiative to engineer 3-dimensional chips containing living cells and tissues that imitate the structure and function of human organs. Department of Pharmaceutics faculty members Edward Kelly, Danny Shen, Ken Thummel and Joanne Wang are among the UW researchers involved in this initiative.

faculty news

Virginia Commonwealth University Appointments/Elections • Adam M. Hawkridge is assistant professor for the Department of Pharmaceutics and Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science. • Mary Jayne Kennedy is vice-chair for clinical research in the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science. • Mary Peace McRae is assistant professor for the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science. • Jennifer Neal is assistant professor for the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science. • Kelechi “KC” Ogbonna is assistant professor for the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science. • Emily P. Peron is assistant professor for the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science. • Ron Polk received the first Distinguished Alumni Award from Yale-New Haven Hospital Department of Pharmacy Services. • Rafael Saenz is assistant dean for the school’s new satellite division at the University of Virginia. • Brigitte L. Sicat is vice-chair for clinical practice in the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science. • Evan Sisson is on the editorial board of The Diabetes Educator, the journal of the American Association of Diabetes Educators. • Patricia W. Slattum received the first ACE Virginia Award for Excellence in Advocacy and Community Engagement in the field of gerontology.

Awards • Dave L. Dixon has been certified as a clinical lipid specialist by the Accreditation Council for Clinical Lipidology.

Grants • Norman V. Carroll; NCPA Foundation; $44,500; “Comparison of the Costs of Prescriptions Dispensed Through Retail and Mail Order Pharmacies.”

Wayne State University Appointments/Elections • Brian L. Crabtree, professor and chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice • Marcy T. DelMonte, assistant professor (clinical) of pharmacy practice • David J. Edwards, emeritus professor of pharmacy practice • Anjan Kowluru has been appointed a member of the Endocrinology-A Board of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit Review Board in the Department of Veterans Affairs. • Melissa Lipari, assistant professor (clinical) of pharmacy practice

Grants • Anjan Kowluru, National Eye Institute, NIH, $1,600,000, NADPH Ixidase Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Diabetic Retinopathy; and Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, $110,000, Tiam-Rac1 Signaling Axis Mediates Beta Cell Dysfunction in Type 1 Diabetes. • Emily T. Martin, National Institute of Allergy & Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, $641,605, Defining Precursors to VRSA Emergence: Epidemiology of MRSA & VRE Dual Infection. • David Oupicky, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH, $426,000, DrugBased Polycations for Combination Drug-Gene delivery. • Michael J. Rybak, Cerexa Pharmaceuticals, $84,012, Evaluation of a Ceftaroline plus Avibactam Against Common Pathogenic Anaerobic Bacteria in a One-compartment in vitro Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model; and Forest Pharmaceuticals, $81,893, Evaluation of a ceftaroline plus daptomycin de-escalation protocol against isogneic MRSA/VISA pair in a hollow-fiber pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model.

Promotions • Sheila M. Wilhelm was promoted to associate professor (clinical).

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

43

faculty news

West Virginia University Appointments/Elections • David P. Elliott serving as the program chair for the 2014 American Geriatrics Society Annual Scientific Meeting Program Committee. • Franklin Huggins, clinical assistant professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy-Charleston Division • Charles D. Ponte is a member of the American Association of Diabetes Educators pharmacist committee on evaluating CE programs for pharmacists. • Jeremy Prunty, clinical assistant professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy-Charleston Division • Yon Rojanasakul was appointed as the co-leader of the Sara Crile and James Frederick Allen Lung Cancer program, WVU Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center. • Terry L. Schwinghammer was elected to the Board of Regents of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy. • Douglas C. Slain was appointed as one of 14 healthsystem pharmacy leaders to an American Society of Health-System Pharmacists task force on organizational structure.

Awards • Arthur I. Jacknowitz was selected as the National Community Pharmacists Association 2012 Outstanding Faculty Liaison of the Year. • Jonathan M. Kline was selected for participation in the AACP Academic Leadership Fellows Program for 2012-2013. • Elizabeth J. Scharman was selected as the 2012 recipient of the American Academy of Clinical Toxicology Distinguished Service Award. • Douglas C. Slain was selected as a fellow of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. • Tara R. Whetsel, board certification in Advanced Diabetes Management (BC-ADM).

Grants • Marie A. Abate received $164,642 as a co-investigator from the DHHS/CDC for her project, “Concurrent Drug, Alcohol, and Decedent Characteristics in Deaths due to Opioids” as part of the Injury Control Research Center. • Gina M. Baugh received a $5,000 grant from the WVU Center for Civic Engagement 2012-13

44

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

Campus-Community LINK Program for a service learning project, “WVU Upward Bound Interactive Workshops.” • Erik A. Bey received $333,333 as a co-investigator for “Building Research Excellence in Energy and Health Sciences at West Virginia University,” from the WV EPSCoR. • David P. Elliott received $10,223 as a co-investigator from the US DHHS/HRSA as part of the “West Virginia Geriatric Education Center.” • Peter M. Gannett was awarded $300,000 from the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission for “Cancer Nanotechnology STEM Graduate Education and Training Fellows.” • Robert K. Griffith was awarded $42,241 from Marshall University as a co-investigator for the project “West Virginia IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (WV-INBRE)” funded by the NIH/NCRR. • Jason D. Huber received NIH-NINDS funding in the amount of $314,059 for his project, “Age Influences Neuropoietic Signaling at the Neurovascular Unit During Stroke.” Huber is also co-investigator for the project, “Combination Treatment of TPA and Apyrase for Stroke in Aged Female Rats,” funded by APT Therapeutics, Inc., in the amount of $98,708. He was also awarded $14,690 for “Shift Work and Stroke: Use of Animal Models to Identify Critical Factors” from the CDC/NIOSH. • Kimberly M. Kelly received $30,000 as a co-investigator from the American Cancer Society as part of the “American Cancer Society Institutional Research Grant.” • S. Suresh Madhavan received $405,316 from the Unisys Corporation for “Unisys Pharmacy Provider Call Center.” • Rae R. Matsumoto was awarded $100,491 from the University of Maryland for “Opioids with Delta Antagonist and Mu Agonist Activity” funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. She also received $24,983 for “Evaluation of Pharmacological Actions of Putative Sigma-1 Receptor Ligands” from Avanir Pharmaceuticals, Inc. • William Petros received $121,783 as a co-investigator on the project, “COBRE for Signal Transduction,” from the National Institutes of Health-National Center for Research Resources.

faculty news

• Yon Rojanasakul was awarded $366,300 by the NIHNHLBI for his research, “Prediction and Mechanism of Carbon Nanotube-induced Fibrosis.” • Usha Sambamoorthi was awarded $19,839 from the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center for her project, “Positive Deviance, Healthcare Expenditures and Outcomes in Diabetes.” • Elizabeth J. Scharman was awarded $118,596 from the US DHHS/HRSA for “Poison Control Centers Stabilization and Enhancement Grant Program.” • Virginia Scott was awarded an Astellas grant in the amount of $15,000 for a continuing education project in support of the 2012 Society of Infectious Disease Pharmacists Annual Meeting. • Douglas C. Slain is co-investigator on a project, “Developing a Center of Excellence for Outpatient HIV Early Intervention Services at West Virginia University,” which was awarded $393,714 by the US DHHS-HRSA. • Letha J. Sooter ($49,810), Peter M. Gannett ($57,885) and Yon Rojanasakul ($66,783) are coinvestigators on a grant from the WV EPSCoR for “Biotechnology for Public Security and Environmental Safety.” • Letha J. Sooter received $17,316 as a co-investigator on a project, “CITeR Codesign Initiative,” from the Department of Justice. She is also serving as the mentor of Ph.D. student Ryan Williams who was awarded a $6,500 AFPE fellowship renewal to continue to study, “The Selection of Prostate Cancer Cell-Specific Molecular Recognition Elements (MRE) for Targeted Therapy and Disease Detection,” in her laboratory. • Grazyna D. Szklarz was awarded $5,000 from the Centers for Disease Control/National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health for “Heterologously Expressed Purified P450 Protein Samples.”

Promotions • Matthew L. Blommel, clinical associate professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy • Gerald M. Higa, professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy • Tara R. Whetsel, clinical associate professor, Department of Clinical Pharmacy

Retirements • W. Clarke Ridgway, assistant dean, Office of Student

Services, effective June 30, 2013, after 31 years of dedicated service to West Virginia University and the School of Pharmacy.

Western New England University Appointments/Elections • David M. Baker was appointed as foundation director for the Massachusetts Pharmacists Association Foundation Board of Directors. He was also reappointed, for a second one-year term, to the Massachusetts Pharmacists Association’s Government and Legislative Affairs. • Diptiman Bose was appointed assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical & Administrative Sciences. • Kam L. Capoccia was appointed as a member of the Board of Directors on the American Association of Diabetes Educators, Massachusetts Coordinating Body. • Izabela A. Collier was appointed as a Board Member of the Diabetes Educators Educating Massachusetts (DEEM) Coordinating Body. • Matthew Dintzner was appointed associate professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical & Administrative Sciences. • Shamima Khan was appointed assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical & Administrative Sciences. • Shannon Kinney was appointed assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical & Administrative Sciences. • James J. Knittel was elected AACP Chemistry Section chair-elect, 2012–13. He was also appointed to the AACP Chemistry Abstracts Review Committee for the 2012 Annual Meeting; reviewer for the AACP Chemistry Section New Investigator Award, 2012 National Meeting; and reviewer for the AAPS Drug Design and Discovery Section Abstract 2012 National Meeting. • Clinton Mathias was appointed as a member of the Education Committee, American Association of Immunology. He was also the director, High School Teacher’s Summer Research Program for the American Association of Immunology. • Yoonsun Mo was appointed clinical assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice.

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

45

faculty news

• Eric C. Nemec was appointed to the Advisory Group on Pharmacy Informatics Education in the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Section of Informatics. He was also appointed to the Section of Pharmacy Practice: Pharmacy Advocacy-AACP. • Ronny Priefer was appointed professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical & Administrative Sciences. • Evan T. Robinson was appointed chair of the Bylaws and Policy Development Committee for 2012–13. He was also appointed to the CAPE Advisory Panel on Educational Outcomes. • Lucia Rosé was appointed to the Board of Trustees, AIDS Foundation of Western MA. • Natalia Shcherbakova was appointed assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical & Administrative Sciences. • Rodney Siwale was appointed assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical & Administrative Sciences Appointments (external to the College of Pharmacy).

Awards • David Baker was awarded 2012 Professor of the Year Award, Western New England University College of Pharmacy.

Grants

Michael Rust (BME), American Society for Quality Biomedical Division, Dr. Richard J. Schlesinger Grant Program, 2012. • Ronny Priefer was awarded a $65,000 grant (over 3 years) from The American Chemical SocietyPetroleum Research Fund (ACS-PRF). The title of the grant is: “Synthesis and Multilayering of Poly (4-vinylphenol) Derivatives for Future Applications as Proton Exchange Membranes in Fuel Cells.”

Western University of Health Sciences Promotions • Arezoo Campbell has been promoted to associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences. • Sheryl L. Chow has been promoted to associate professor of pharmacy practice and administration. • Karl M. Hess has been promoted to associate professor of pharmacy practice and administration. • Ying Huang has been promoted to associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences. • Anandi V. Law has been promoted to professor of pharmacy practice and administration. • Kabir Lutfy has been promoted to professor of pharmaceutical sciences.

• Daniel R. Kennedy was awarded a $3,000 grant from the American Society for Quality-Microfluidic System to compare the potency of topoisomerase II poisons on human colorectal cancer cells, co-PI with

Click and Recruit: AACP’s Online Career Center Take advantage of the best recruitment tool in the academic pharmacy community: the AACP Online Career Center. Posting a job—and reaching a large pool of candidates—is easy and inexpensive. Just go to http://pharm.aacp.associationcareernetwork.com and click on Job Search or Employer Home to view instructions and fees. For more information, contact Maureen Thielemans at mthielemans@aacp.org or 703-739-2330 ext. 1022.

46

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

the last word

Pharmacy Alumni Survey: Summary Report 2012 The Alumni Survey was available for online access in the AACP Centralized Survey System on May 7, 2012. As of September 2012, 58 out of 102 (56.9%) eligible schools of pharmacy with alumni administered the survey to their 2007–2011 alumni classes. A total of 15,730 alumni were invited to complete the survey; 2,729 alumni submitted the

survey for a total response rate of 17.3 percent. Response rates per school ranged from 2.6 percent to 59.7 percent. For more information regarding this summary report or the administration of the survey, please contact Danielle A. Taylor, associate director of institutional research and effectiveness (dtaylor@aacp.org).

Total number of schools: 58 (29 public, 29 private) Total number of responses: 2,729

Indicate the degree to which you agree or disagree with these statements: Strongly Disagree 1.8% (50) Unable to Comment Disagree 1.0% (28) 5.5% (150)

Level of involvement with the Alumni Association Moderate

Heavy

(regularly attend functions)

(past or present service as an officer or on the board of directors)

2.1% (58)

0.9% (24)

Minimal

(occasionally attend functions)

28.7% (783)

None 68.3% (1864)

Level of involvement in most active pharmacy organization Moderate

(regularly attend meetings, occasionally serve on committees)

9.5% (259)

Heavy

(regularly serve on committees and/or serve as an officer)

3.7% (102)

Not a member of a pharmacy organization 34.8% (950)

Minimal

As I reflect on my pharmacy education, I would rate the overall quality of my education experience as very good.

Agree 37.2% (1015)

Strongly Disagree 7.6% (208)

Since graduation, the college/school has solicited my input/feedback for programmatic improvement.

Strongly Agree 54.5% (1486)

Unable to Comment 6.7% (182) Strongly Agree 18.9% (515)

Disagree 24.8% (678) Agree 42.0% (1146)

(occasionally attend meetings)

52.0% (1418)

Current or former preceptor

Current or former pharmacy school adjunct faculty Yes 17.7% (484)

No 52.1% (1422)

Yes 47.9% (1307)

Strongly Disagree 1.6% (43)

No 82.3% (2245)

The college/school communicates effectively with alumni about college/school activities.

Unable to Comment 3.7% (100)

Disagree 11.5% (315)

Strongly Agree 24.6% (670)

Agree 58.7% (1601)

ACADEMIC PHARMACY NOW  Winter 2013

47

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Discover · Learn · Care : Improve Health

1727 King Street · Alexandria, VA 22314 p: 703-739-2330 · f: 703-836-8982 · www.aacp.org For address change, please return mailing label with current school affiliation.

Renew & Advance Renewing your AACP membership today is your first step to career advancement. The next step is to fully engage in the only association whose primary focus is to address your needs as a pharmacy educator. Take advantage of the countless membership benefits that advance your professional development. • Expand your network. Build lifelong relationships with colleagues across the country. There is no better way to meet peers and share ideas than through AACP meetings and online networking opportunities. Join AACP special interest groups (SIGs) and sections. Stay connected throughout the year with access to the online roster. • Increase your knowledge. Count on AACP resources to keep you fully informed. The wealth of information at your fingertips includes the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, the Profile of Pharmacy Faculty, Academic Pharmacy Now magazine, institutional research data, and discipline-specific Webinars. • Get recognized. AACP members have many recognition opportunities, including the Academic Leadership Fellows Program, which prepares the most promising pharmacy faculty for roles as future leaders. The many AACP awards programs conducted each year allow the association to honor outstanding faculty achievements.

Important Reminder: To submit Annual Meeting program and poster proposals, you must be an AACP member.

For only $100, you’ll continue to benefit from these invaluable resources, programs and opportunities—as well as many others. Simply visit www.aacp.org or call 703.739.2330. If you have any questions, please contact Angie Edwards, member services associate, at mail@aacp.org. Help shape the future of pharmacy education. Renew your AACP membership today!


Academic Pharmacy Now: Winter 2013