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The News Magazine of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

Academic Pharmacy NOW

Oct | Nov | Dec 2011

Volume 4 Issue 4

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G T H N I E G GA ID Academic Pharmacy, IHS and Tribes Partner to Fight Health Disparities

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Discover 路 Learn 路 Care : Improve Health

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table of contents

News in Brief News Briefs

7

2011 AACP Election Results

8

In Memoriam

9

Capitol Hill News

10 14

Will

18 on the

Hill

Professor Receives Grant to Develop Protection from the Sun Pharmabridge and Global Residency Programs Make an Impact Abroad

Faculty News 33 35

2

Faculty News Members Working for You

St. John’s University Alumni Offer an Inside Look

Academic Pharmacy, IHS and Tribes Working Together

CTSA

NIH

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Features

28

Three More Member Universities Join the CTSA Consortium

Photo Credits Front cover: istockphoto

Page 24: University of Maryland

Page 8: Robert Amador, Mark Langford Photography Page 13: Top: University of Connecticut; Bottom: Peter Morenus/UConn Photo

Page 25: Top: Courtesy of www.ihs.gov, celebrating the history of IHS pharmacy; Middle: Southwestern Oklahoma State University; Bottom: Courtesy of www.ihs. gov Web site celebrating the history of IHS pharmacy

Page 15: Karl Grobl

Page 27: University of Washington

Page 16: Robert Amador, Mark Langford Photography

Page 35: Gary R. Matzke, Virginia Commonwealth University

Page 12: Jessica Tommaselli/UConn Photo

Cau Mem tion: ber Wor s at k

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Pages 18–19: Maureen Thielemans, AACP Page 22: Western University of Health Sciences Page 23: The University of Iowa


letter from the editor

Dear Colleagues: What a flashback to the 1970s I had as I reviewed the material for this issue of Academic Pharmacy Now! The year was 1979 and I was an intern in the COSTEP system. My post was to the national office of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Pharmacy Branch. My mentor (and office mate thanks to the close confines of headquarters) was none other than Allen J. Brands, chief of the Pharmacy Branch since 1953! I had several duties that summer, including a research project on drug exposure during pregnancy and coordination of an orientation to the agencies within the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (now Health and Human Services) for all interns based in the Washington area. My transformative experience, however, came from learning at the knee of one of pharmacy’s master architects of the profession’s future, Dr. Brands. Allen and a small cadre of similarly vision-driven pharmacists began defining new roles for pharmacists as patient educators, medication experts and primary care providers more than 50 years ago. Their efforts were supported by other clinicians who quickly came to respect that pharmacists could provide extremely important services, especially for those Native Americans with chronic illness for whom adherence to medications was paramount. A detailed history is presented as a timeline from 1930 to the present at http://www.ihs.gov/Pharmacy/index.cfm?module=history. Pharmacy and pharmacy educators, specifically, have drawn upon the experiences and practice activities of Indian Health Service pharmacists for decades. Whether we look to find evidence that access to the full patient record is key to the provision and documentation of pharmaceutical care or seek affirmation that pharmacists, when needed to do so, are capable of providing primary care services in clinics and hospital settings, IHS pharmacy offers this insight and so much more to the profession. AACP continues to work closely with the leaders of IHS pharmacy, both to support them in their quest for sufficient resources to continue this important work and to export their experience to advance pharmacy practice in the private sector and with policymakers. We know we only captured a small number of the ongoing collaborations between IHS and our member colleges and schools. We have much to share with each other as we strive to advance the standard of practice for the services all pharmacists provide to their patients. Enjoy this issue of APN as well as your holiday break! There is much for us to do together in 2012 as we discover, learn and care to improve the health of the nation…and beyond! Sincerely,

Lucinda L. Maine, Ph.D., R.Ph. Executive Vice President and CEO

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about us

Academic Pharmacy NOW

2012 Classified Ad Rates Classified Advertising Rates (per insertion) Full Page

Established in 1972 as AACP News, Academic Pharmacy Now features comprehensive news stories that reflect the discovery, learning and caring of more than 120 U.S. colleges and schools of pharmacy. It is the only magazine focused strictly on the advancements of pharmacy faculty and their students. The magazine is distributed to all U.S. pharmacy institutions as well as more than 3,200 individual AACP members across the country. Published quarterly as a membership service by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Inc. For address change, please return mailing label with current school affiliation.

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©2011 by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. All rights reserved. Content may not be reprinted without prior written permission. We welcome your comments.

Executive Vice President/Executive Editor

Digital Requirements

Lucinda L. Maine

Academic Pharmacy Now supports a digital workflow and requires digital ad submission. Ads must be submitted as press-ready pdf files or tiff files. Fonts and images must be embedded. All images must be saved as at least 300 DPI @ 100% of finished size. Ads may be submitted as grayscale or 4-color CMYK. Full-page ads run 8.5� by 11� with a full bleed; half-page ads run 5.5� by 8.5� with a two-sided bleed. For any questions on ad requirements, e-mail Tricia Ekenstam, art director, at tekenstam@aacp. org. To submit advertisements, simply e-mail ads directly to Maureen Thielemans, editor, at mthielemans@aacp.org.

Editor

Maureen Thielemans

mthielemans@aacp.org Art Director

Tricia Ekenstam

tekenstam@aacp.org Special Contributor

Valerie Klemencic

Issuance & Closing Dates Frequency: 4 issues a year

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 1727 King Street Alexandria, VA 22314 703-739-2330• Fax: 703-836-8982

www.aacp.org

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Discover · Learn · Care : Improve Health

Issue Closing Date

Jan/Feb/Mar

December 15, 2011

Apr/May/Jun

March 15, 2012

Jul/Aug/Sep

Oct/Nov/Dec

June 15, 2012 September 17, 2012

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news in brief

News Briefs Menthol’s Soothing Effects May Cause People to Smoke More, Says UConn– Yale Research Team Researchers at the University of Connecticut (UConn) School of Pharmacy and Yale University have found the cooling properties of menthol suppress the respiratory system’s natural response to the irritants found in cigarette smoke, increasing the likelihood that people who smoke mentholated cigarettes will become addicted to them and suffer future health problems. The findings are particularly important for younger smokers, the researchers warn, because they tend to prefer menthol cigarettes over non-menthol brands. As an additive to cigarettes, menthol stimulates cold receptors, giving the sensation of coolness in the mouth, pharynx and lungs. While there has been much debate about the harmful effects of menthol cigarettes, the UConn-Yale study is the first to confirm menthol’s pharmacological effects on smokers and its potential connection to addiction and smokingrelated disease. The UConn-Yale research team found that in mice, vaporized menthol immediately blocked the response in airway receptors that promote sensations of irritation to protect the respiratory system. This study was supported by the National Institutes of Health and the American Asthma Foundation and can be found online in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology.

USC Pharmacy Faculty Members Publish Articles Addressing Costly Cancer Therapy and Illustrating the Advantages of a Psychiatric Pharmacist in a Safety-net Clinic Dr. Shetal Desai, assistant professor at the University of Southern California (USC) School of Pharmacy, was hired in 2007 to solve a growing problem at the Norris Cancer Hospital—the trend of payers to dispute chemotherapy treatments, averaging between $600,000 to $1 million each month. To combat this, Desai, a pharmacist with a managed-care background, established an in-house authorization center at Norris that works collaboratively with payers and manufacturersponsored patient assistance programs to obtain coverage for cancer chemotherapy treatments. The benefits were published in Desai’s article, “In-house authorization center to improve reimbursement for outpatient chemotherapy infusions,” which appeared in the May issue of the American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy.

Dr. Julie A. Dopheide, an associate professor also at the School of Pharmacy, has found a solution to the demand of specialty services, especially psychiatry, in safety-net clinics in Los Angeles. Dopheide, along with Bosun Chung of the Veterans Administration of Greater Los Angeles, and Paul Gregerson, of the JWCH Institute, worked together to bring a psychiatric pharmacist to the Center for Community Health safety-net clinic in Skid Row. In their article, “Psychiatric pharmacist and primary care collaboration at a skid-row safety-net clinic,” in July’s issue of the Journal of the National Medical Association, the authors explain that many homeless people using the clinic have mental disorders, but do not have access to a psychiatrist. Adding a psychiatric pharmacist and pharmacy residents provide patients with numerous services previously unavailable.

Students at Fairleigh Dickinson University’s Medco School of Pharmacy Will Receive Specialty Training Student pharmacists attending the Medco School of Pharmacy at Farleigh Dickinson University next year will be educated in several specialty pharmacy areas, including clinical trials management. According to Dr. Ruth E. Nemire, the school’s dean, Medco is developing programs that enable students to obtain a Pharm.D. alone or in combination with a master’s degree in pharmaceutical science, business administration or public administration. Specialty pharmacy areas that will be offered as part of the school’s programs include regulatory affairs, medicinal chemistry, medication therapy management and health informatics. The Medco School of Pharmacy is seeking accreditation and will open in the fall of 2012.

Virginia Commonwealth University Hosts Pharmacy Transformation Conference More than 90 Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) School of Pharmacy faculty, staff, students and alumni— along with pharmacy practitioners and leaders from across North America—convened in Richmond, Va. in June for the first “Pharmacy Practice in the Commonwealth of Virginia: The Practice Transformation Conference.” The daylong invitational meeting was designed to provide a forum for identifying key elements to integrate innovative and sustainable pharmacy practice models in various Virginia healthcare settings and to develop a consensus on priorities among the opportunities Virginia pharmacists should pursue to advance pharmacy services. The keynote address, “Healthcare Re-

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news in brief

form: Implications and Opportunities for Pharmacists,” was delivered by Dr. Gary R. Matzke, VCU School of Pharmacy associate dean for clinical research and public policy and immediate past chair of AACP’s Council of Faculties Administrative Board. In addition, plenary sessions were offered from an interprofessional panel of professors from around the country. The general consensus regarding critical elements needed to transform the profession was the development of innovative business models; pursuit of payment reforms for direct patient care-related services such as medication therapy management; and legislation and regulation revisions to expand the scope of practice.

St. Louis College of Pharmacy Inaugurates Fourth President Dr. John A. Pieper was installed as the fourth president of St. Louis College of Pharmacy (STLCOP) on Sept. 17, 2011. Among the day’s special guests were Steven Tilley, speaker of the Missouri House of Representatives; Donald Suggs, president and publisher of The St. Louis American; and Dr. Tom George, chancellor of the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Since beginning his post on Aug. 1, 2010, Pieper has laid the foundation for STLCOP’s future by guiding faculty, staff, students and alumni in creating a new strategic plan, STLCOP 20/20. A plenary session, “Forum on Interprofessional Education and Research,” was comprised of an interprofessional panel of deans, including Dr. Wendy C. Duncan, dean of pharmacy and vice president of academic affairs at STLCOP, and moderated by Dr. Lucinda L. Maine, executive vice president and CEO of AACP. Other speakers included Dr. Larry Shapiro, dean of the Washington University School of Medicine and executive vice chancellor for medical affairs, and Dr. Philip Alderson, dean of Saint Louis University School of Medicine and vice president for health sciences.

Providing Safe and Effective Pharmaceuticals: FDA Reviewers Participate in Training at Duquesne Some of the professionals who evaluate the safety and efficacy of pharmaceutical products visited Duquesne University for a week this fall to update their knowledge regarding modern methods of pharmaceutical development and manufacturing. Duquesne University’s Center for Pharmaceutical Technology (DCPT), an academic research center in the Mylan School of Pharmacy and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, hosted 27 reviewers from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Through classroom sessions and hands-on laboratory experiences, the FDA scientists studied current methods and novel technologies with the pharmaceutical experts of the DCPT. Duquesne is the only university in Pennsylvania and one of a handful of institutions nationwide to provide this type of training to FDA scientists who review

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new drug applications from the pharmaceutical industry and the manufacturing facilities where such products are made. A variety of faculty, scientific staff and graduate students delivered the training in cooperation with DCPT partners Emerson Process Management and CAMO Software Inc.

The University of Georgia College of Pharmacy Holds First Research Retreat Approximately 50 faculty at The University of Georgia College of Pharmacy assembled for the college’s first research retreat in August, featuring two nationally known leaders in academic pharmacy with expertise in the fields of clinical research and basic science research. The purpose of the oneand-a-half day retreat was to share information about current research, encourage interdisciplinary research collaborations, enhance communication among researchers and identify ways to build a strong research program. The key speakers invited to share their experiences and philosophy in building a world-class research environment were Dr. Michael E. Winter, professor emeritus of the University of California, San Francisco School of Pharmacy, and Dr. John T. Slattery, vice dean for research and graduate education at the University of Washington School of Medicine. Winter, a clinical scientist, addressed the faculty on the importance of research in the mission and success of a college of pharmacy. Dr. Vasu Nair, the college’s associate dean for research, gave an overview on basic science, translational and clinical research in the college. Faculty also gathered in small groups for discussions on opportunities and challenges facing clinical and translational research, and research in specific disciplines.

Mortar and Pestle Society Launches Web Site to Support Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum In 1933, the doors between the iconic curved windows closed for good on one of Alexandria, Virginia’s oldest continually operating businesses. For more than 114 years, the StablerLeadbeater family operated an apothecary retailing, wholesaling and manufacturing company that grew to include 11 local buildings at its peak. Today’s Mortar & Pestle Society developed from a group of concerned citizens who wanted to preserve the remaining Stabler-Leadbeater buildings and their contents as a glimpse of 18th and 19th century life in Alexandria. In 2006, after a major renovation, the Apothecary Museum was added to the historic properties owned and operated by the City of Alexandria. The Mortar & Pestle Society supports the museum with income from the society’s endowment, which funds conservation, education programs and other specific needs. The society’s Web site has been launched to raise awareness for the Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum and can be visited at http://www.mortarandpestlesociety.com.


news in brief

NACDS Foundation Announces Recipients of Funding for Next Wave of Community Pharmacy Residency Expansion Project (PREP) Grants The National Association of Chain Drug Stores (NACDS) Foundation announced the 12 academic institutions selected for the next wave of funding for the Community Pharmacy Residency Expansion Project (Community PREP). The $1.5 million educational grant program is designed to expand community pharmacy residencies for recent pharmacy school graduates. The recipients of this round of funding are: • Concordia University Wisconsin • Creighton University • Ferris State University • Midwestern University/Glendale • St. Louis College of Pharmacy • The Ohio State University • The University of Kansas • University at Buffalo, The State University of New York • University of Charleston • University of Kentucky

• University of Puerto Rico • University of Southern California The NACDS Foundation previously announced grants to Purdue University, University of Missouri-Kansas City and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in May. Each of these academic institutions will receive a $50,000 residency grant. Established in 2010, Community PREP seeks to create 30 new, fully accredited postgraduate community pharmacy residency opportunities through grants to non-profit colleges and schools of pharmacy. The grants are designed to foster the creation or expansion of a patient-focused residency program, where a faculty member or preceptor will oversee the selected pharmacy resident’s learning experience at a pharmacy practice site. Community PREP grant applications are accepted on a continuing basis. Fifteen additional awards will be granted in 2012. For more information, contact NACDS Foundation Executive Resident Nick Dorich at ndorich@nacds.org or 703-837-4140.

2011 AACP Election Winners AACP President-Elect

Mary M. (Peggy) Piascik, Ph.D. University of Kentucky

Council of Deans Chair-Elect

M. Lynn Crismon, Pharm.D. The University of Texas at Austin

Council of Faculties Chair-Elect

Robin M. Zavod, Ph.D. Midwestern University/Downers Grove

Council of Sections Chair-Elect

Timothy J. Ives, Pharm.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Academic Sections Biological Sciences Chair-elect: Marcos A. Oliveira, Ph.D. (University of the Incarnate Word) Chemistry Chair-elect: James J. Knittel, Ph.D. (Western New England University) Continuing Professional Education Chair-elect: Jill M. Fitzgerald, Pharm.D. (University of Connecticut) Experiential Education Chair-elect: Schwanda K. Flowers, Pharm.D. (University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences) Libraries/Educational Resources Chair-elect: Jean A. Waldrop, M.S. (Harding University) academic Pharmacy now 

Secretary: Christina M. Seeger, M.L.S. (University of the Incarnate Word) Pharmaceutics Chair-elect: Laura M. Fox, Ph.D. (Presbyterian College) Pharmacy Practice Chair-elect: Charles T. Taylor, Pharm.D. (University of Minnesota) Secretary: Shauna M. Buring, Pharm.D. (University of Cincinnati) Social and Administrative Sciences Chair-elect: Nathaniel M. Rickles, Ph.D. (Northeastern University) Secretary: Ana C. Quiñones-Boex, Ph.D. (Midwestern University/Downers Oct/Nov/Dec 2011 7 Grove)


news in brief

In Memoriam Dr. Sidney (Sid) D. Nelson, professor of medicinal chemistry and dean emeritus at the University of Washington (UW) School of Pharmacy, passed away suddenly on Friday, Dec. 9. He was 66 years old. Nelson had a profound impact on the school, the university, the scientific community and everyone who knew him. He received numerous awards and honors for his leadership, his teaching and his prolific research, which include: 2011 AACP Volwiler Research Achievement Award, Dean of the Year from the American Pharmacists Association–Academy of Student Pharmacists, UW Gibaldi Excellence in Teaching Award, UW School of Pharmacy Distinguished Alumnus Award, John J. Abel Award from the American Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, and the Frank R. Blood Award in Toxicology from the Society of Toxicology, to name a few.

Sidney (Sid) D. Nelson

Nelson had a deep love for the School of Pharmacy, his colleagues and his students. He was a constant presence at student events, alumni events and industry events over the years. He was an enthusiastic supporter of the people around him—cheering loudly in the audience (along with his wife, Joan) at academic and industry events when UW student pharmacists received awards; proudly supporting his Ph.D. students at scientific conferences around the world; regularly nominating his colleagues for prominent scientific honors; sending personal notes to alumni and former classmates when he heard exciting updates about their lives; and giving generously to the School of Pharmacy in the form of scholarships and a fund he and his wife created. “Sid was a caring, genuine man who left a positive impression on everyone who had the good fortune to know him,” said School of Pharmacy Dean Dr. Thomas A. Baillie. “The School of Pharmacy is not going to be the same without him. We will all remember his off-color sense of humor, his giant collection of penguin paraphernalia and his enduring authenticity.”

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Nelson was an alumnus of the University of Washington School of Pharmacy, graduating in 1968 with his B.S. in pharmacy. He went on to receive a Ph.D. in medicinal chemistry from the University of California, San Francisco. He joined the UW School of Pharmacy faculty in 1977. Nelson was dean of the school from 1994 to 2008. Under his leadership, the school converted to an entry-level Doctor of Pharmacy degree program and added a nontraditional approach that enabled existing pharmacists to obtain degrees. He also evolved the graduate programs and tirelessly expanded the school’s faculty. In 2008, he returned full-time to his research and teaching activities in the school’s Department of Medicinal Chemistry. In recent years, he held an NIH fellowship to conduct research in metabolomics/metabonomics at Imperial College London and he was named a National University of Singapore distinguished professor. “I had the good fortune of working with Sid, who was a trusted and esteemed colleague, in the Department of Medicinal Chemistry faculty in the 1990s,” Baillie recalled. “When I returned to the School of Pharmacy in 2008 to take over as dean, I knew I had big shoes to fill, but I also knew that he had left me with an amazing institution that he had helped build—with an exceptional community of faculty, staff, students and alumni. His death is a major loss to the school, the University of Washington, to the academic pharmacy community and to the greater scientific community.” Gifts can be made in Dr. Sid Nelson’s honor to the UW School of Pharmacy. To make a gift, visit www.pharmacy.washington.edu/support or contact the School of Pharmacy Office of Advancement at 206616-3217 or rxgiving@uw.edu. Checks can be made to the UW Foundation and sent to Claire Forster at UW School of Pharmacy, Box 357631, Seattle, WA 98195-7631.


Capitol Hill News

on Will news in  thbrief e Hill

by Will Lang

Indian Health Service and Academic Pharmacy:

A partnership focused on closing a shameful disparity gap. Improving the health of Native Americans and Alaska Natives (NAAN) has never been more important. Native Americans and Alaska Natives continue to have some of the greatest disparities in health status compared to the general U.S. population. Infant mortality, chronic illness, mental health disorders and substance abuse are more prevalent among Native Americans and Alaska Natives compared to any other population group in the United States. A lack of culturally appropriate care, distance to healthcare sites, lack of transportation, poor access to prevention and wellness programs, and a continuing shortage of health professionals are some of the reasons this disparities gap exists. For several decades now, pharmacists have played an integral role in care delivery in Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities. In fact, since 1966 all new IHS facilities have been built with individual, private counseling rooms. The teambased approach to care within the IHS that included the pharmacist continues to serve as a model for improved quality of care in other healthcare systems. To address these gaps, the Indian Health Service (IHS) was established in 1955 as a part of the U.S. Public Health Service and both are units of the Department of Health and Human Services. Today, the IHS is an organization that provides direct care services as well as supports tribes through public health research and program evaluation through its epidemiology centers. There are nearly 2 million individuals that identify themselves as Native American or Alaska Native. Much of their healthcare needs are met by services provided at IHS facilities, facilities contracted through IHS to provide care and tribally-supported facilities. While increases in facilities and improved access continue, the current funding level of $4.05 billion in FY10 meets just over 50 percent of the actual care needs of this wide-spread population. In fact, per capita healthcare spending for Native American and Alaska Natives is not quite half of what the average is for all Americans. The IHS works diligently to improve the quality of care and quantity of care to which Native Americans and Alaska Natives have access. An increased focus on prevention and wellness, provider support through telemedicine programs

and collaborations with health professions organizations and institutions are helping close the disparity gaps. Yet, with all the increased budgets, facility improvements and use of technology vacancy rates for health professionals to provide care continue to remain high. Over the last decade, pharmacy education has worked closely with the IHS and increasingly with tribal governments to improve the quality of care for Native Americans and Alaska Natives. This close working relationship has created the opportunity for two IHS supported programs in particular to play a significant role in reducing the vacancy rates for pharmacists. The IHS pharmacy residency training program is now recognized as an important program not just for the development and training of advance practice pharmacy professionals but also for the development of strong, competent organizational leaders. There are currently 18, ASHP-accredited, pharmacy residency sites within the IHS. One of the most important programs that helps improve provider, including pharmacist, recruitment and retention is the IHS loan repayment program. This program provides payment of up to $20,000 per year for a two-year commitment to practice full-time at an IHS site. While the vacancy rate for pharmacists is currently 11 percent, it continues a downward trend as more funds are available to support the loan repayment program. During the early years of this decade, pharmacists were among selected providers deemed by Congress as high priority recipients of loan repayment.

Organizational Foundation of the Indian Health Service •

Our Mission...to raise the physical, mental, social and spiritual health of American Indians and Alaska Natives to the highest level.

Our Goal...to assure that comprehensive, culturally acceptable personal and public health services are available and accessible to American Indian and Alaska Native people.

Our Foundation...to uphold the Federal Government’s obligation to promote healthy American Indian and Alaska Native people, communities and cultures and to honor and protect the inherent sovereign rights of Tribes. (From the Indian Health Service Web site.)

For general information about the IHS go to: www.ihs.gov For general information about the IHS pharmacy program go to: http://www.ihs.gov/ pharmacy/ For information about the IHS loan repayment program go to: http://www.ihs.gov/ JobsCareerDevelop/DHPS/lrp/ For information about the IHS pharmacy residency program go to: http://www.ihs. gov/medicalprograms/pharmacy/Resident/ For information about the Junior and Senior COSTEP programs go to: http://www.usphs. gov/student/COSTEP.aspx

Students interested in a career in the U.S. Public Health Service as a commissioned officer that can be placed in an Indian Health Service facility should consider participating in the Junior and Senior Commissioned Officer Student Training and Extern Program (COSTEP). The Junior COSTEP is an excellent way to gain exposure to the Commissioned Corps which can assist with determining whether this is an appropriate career path. If it is, the Senior COSTEP will help prepare you for that career. Both programs, like the residency and loan repayacademic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2011 ment programs, are highly competitive but provide a lifetime of benefit.

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news in brief

ACPHS Professor Receives Grant to Develop Chemical Compounds for Protection from the Sun Dr. Martha A. Hass, associate professor in the School of Arts and Sciences at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, has received a three-year grant from the National Institutes of Health in the amount of $453,896. She will be developing a series of chemical compounds that could prove instrumental in limiting the harmful effects of the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays.

Successful formulation of these compounds into lotions or creams may lead to products that could serve as effective complements to sunscreen by providing a second layer of UV protection.

Sunscreen products available today are designed to block UV radiation so it never hits the skin. But if the sunscreen wears off, it can leave the skin vulnerable to damage ranging from sunburn to scarring. Hass is working to prepare a series of new chemical compounds that would be absorbed into the epidermis (outer layer of skin) and protect the skin against damage caused by UV radiation. The compounds are designed to be “trapped” inside the skin and, though they metabolize over time, they are not washed off like conventional sunscreens. Successful formulation of these compounds into lotions or creams may lead to products that could serve as effective complements to sunscreen by providing a second layer of UV protection. The compounds, referred to as codrugs, are derived from Vitamin E and lipoic acid. Vitamin E and lipoic acid are non-toxic, naturally-occurring antioxidants, but their ability to protect against the damage caused by UV radiation is limited by two key factors: (1) they are absorbed into the skin at differ-

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ent rates, and (2) their instability causes them to quickly break down in the presence of heat and light. The new compounds proposed in the grant incorporate a design that helps address each of these limitations, in addition to enhancing the antioxidant effectiveness of both Vitamin E and lipoic acid. Hass’ initial research has shown that combinations of Vitamin E analogs with lipoic acid (or its derivatives), exhibit superior antioxidant properties, above and beyond what would be expected from using the two compounds independently (i.e., it’s a 1 + 1 = 3 effect). The novelty of these new codrugs is that they deliver the two antioxidants as a single molecule to the skin and, upon absorption, Vitamin E and lipoic acid are simultaneously released to provide synergistic antioxidant activity. “Both Vitamin E and lipoic acid are effective antioxidants independent of each other, but when the two compounds are combined into a single molecule, the result is enhanced chemical stability and the opportunity for the two antioxidants to act synergistically inside the skin,” Hass explains. Hass will be collaborating with Dr. Luciana B. Lopes, assistant professor at ACPHS, and Dr. J. Andrew Carlson, a professor and pathodermatologist at Albany Medical College. ACPHS students from both undergraduate and graduate programs will also be active contributors to the project.


Are you interested in a leadership role in academic pharmacy and higher education?

The AACP Academic Leadership Fellows Program is designed to develop the nation’s most promising pharmacy faculty for roles as future leaders in academic pharmacy and higher education. The four-session program includes in-depth leadership development; team building; exploration of legislative and public policy issues critical to pharmaceutical and higher education; and self and peer assessments.

The deadline to apply for the 2012–2013 Academic Leadership Fellows Program is March 9, 2012! If you are interested in the program, reach out to your Dean to begin the application process. Visit http://www.aacp.org/career/leadership for more information. Questions? Contact Bradford E. Miller at bmiller@aacp.org.

academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2011

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news in brief

Consortium Working with FDA to Improve Drug Manufacturing Standards Top researchers in pharmaceutical science and engineering are working with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to improve drug manufacturing standards in the United States. The University of Connecticut (UConn) is one of 10 member universities that make up the nonprofit National Institute for Pharmaceutical Technology and Education (NIPTE). The academic organization recently entered into a cooperative agreement with the FDA to conduct advanced research that is intended to improve drug safety, reduce healthcare costs and create jobs. As part of the agreement, universities in the consortium will receive cooperative research grants totaling up to $35 million over the next five years. Besides the University of Connecticut, the other NIPTE member institutions are Duquesne University, Illinois Institute of Technology, Purdue University, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, University of Puerto Rico, The University of Iowa, University of Kentucky, University of Maryland–Baltimore and the University of Minnesota. The research funding comes at a time when the current cost of bringing a drug to market in the U.S. exceeds $1 billion, and an increasing number of drugs and drug ingredients are being imported from abroad. Investment in the research of drug development and manufacturing is expected to improve America’s manufacturing competitiveness and create high-paying jobs. It is also expected to help reverse current outsourcing trends in the pharmaceutical industry by decreasing the cost to manufacture and improving the quality and safety of drugs. The UConn School of Pharmacy places a strong emphasis on pharmaceutical technology and manufacturing science. The school is a major contributor to NIPTE programs. UConn’s prowess in the field and the importance of pharmaceutical technology to industry is reflected by UConn’s Pfizer Distinguished Endowed Chair in Pharmaceutical Technology, an endowment from the world’s largest research-based biomedical and pharmaceutical company, Pfizer Inc.

Dr. Robin H. Bogner, left, speaks with a student pharmacist.

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UConn pharmacy professor Dr. Michael J. Pikal—who holds the Pfizer Chair—and Dr. Robin H. Bogner, an associate professor, have played an integral role in NIPTE’s work as both researchers and committee members. Pikal and Bogner were part of a research team whose work was recently funded by grants from the FDA to NIPTE. NIPTE Inc. is dedicated to fundamental research and education in pharmaceutical product development and manufacturing. The organization’s goal is to increase science and engineering-based understanding of this area so that novel, state-of-the-art technologies can be developed and science-based regulations implemented. These technologies will also enable new drug discoveries to be brought to market faster with less variability, higher predictability of performance and at a significantly lower cost. The FDA grant will support programs to rectify these drug development and manufacturing problems by creating ways to reduce time to market, improving small-batch production, promoting continuous manufacturing, saving money or energy, or reducing environmental impact from the manufacturing of products. Other potential research areas covered by the FDA grant include creating simulation models for new drug manufacturing techniques, developing advanced methodologies for quality control, and creating new models for drug delivery such as dry product inhalers, transdermal patches and liposomal products. Research conducted by NIPTE faculty is collaborative by design, to provide for coordinated publication of the cutting-edge research results.


news in brief

Top: Dr. Michael J. Pikal, Pfizer Distinguished Endowed Chair in Pharmaceutical Technology. Bottom: Students hand fill capsules at the dosage forms lab in the University of Connecticut Pharmacy/Biology Building.

[NIPTE] recently entered into a cooperative agreement with the FDA to conduct advanced research that is intended to improve drug safety, reduce healthcare costs and create jobs.

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l Pharma

cy •

o ba Gl

Academic Pharmacy Continues to Make Global Impact pharmacy with Pharm.D. programs, to help meet the need for qualified faculty in India. AACP’s Executive Vice President and CEO Dr. Lucinda L. Maine has been involved in many of the initiatives, including activities aimed at building capacity at schools of pharmacy in Ethiopia, sponsored by the schools of pharmacy at Howard University and Addis Ababa University.

Pharmabridge: a global network of pharmacists improving pharmacy services, patient care and community health in developing countries During her 33-year career with the World Health Organization (WHO), Swiss pharmacist Agathe Wehril frequently traveled to developing countries and visited schools of pharmacy and clinical settings. On those trips, she was repeatedly struck by the lack of up-to-date pharmacy education resources and pharmacists’ need for access to information and further education. To address this serious gap, upon her retirement from WHO in 1998, Wehril established Pharmabridge. The initiative, supported by the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP), supports pharmacists, pharmacies and schools of pharmacy in developing countries by providing reference books, textbooks, journals and pharmacist practice and training opportunities in more developed nations. Now, nearly 14 years later, more than 1,300 pharmacists from nearly 90 countries are registered members of Pharmabridge. Since 1998, thousands of reference books and textbooks have been donated by a variety of organizations, including the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, the American Pharmacists Association, Wolters Kluwer Health, the Merck Company and the International Pharmacy Students Federation. These donations are supplemented by donations from individual pharmacists of books and journals. More than 40 pharmacists from schools and hospitals in Egypt, Ghana, India, Nepal, Nigeria and Peru have had practice exposure in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. This past year, 11 pharmacists received practice exposure or training in clinical pharmacy, pediatric pharmacy, compounding, community pharmacy and CPD development. Acting as a global network for pharmacists, Pharmabridge also facilitates much-needed initiatives that help advance pharmacy, such as a faculty exchange between Indian and U.S. schools of

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These are just a few of the activities and efforts supported by Pharmabridge. There are many ways for schools of pharmacy, pharmacy faculty, deans and clinical pharmacists to participate in the initiative and help to improve pharmacy services, patient health and community health abroad. They include: • Participating in faculty exchanges; • Providing sites for practice exposure; • Offering lectures or running training workshops when traveling abroad; • Forwarding books and journals; and • Providing advice on postgraduate practice research. More information about Pharmabridge, including how to get involved, is available online at www.pharmabridge.org.

Purdue University College of Pharmacy creates new global health residency program Through Purdue University’s new global health residency program, pharmacy graduates are improving healthcare in Kenya, a country with few medical resources to meet the need generated by widespread disease, including HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis and diabetes. The one-year program, based in Eldoret, Kenya, provides graduates with firsthand experience delivering care to patients and helping to prepare the next generation of Kenyan pharmacists and physicians. “Through this program, Kenyan and American healthcare professionals work together in developing, providing and evaluating healthcare delivery in the resource-challenged environment of rural Kenya,” said Dr. Craig K. Svensson, dean of the College of Pharmacy at Purdue. “This is a remarkable opportunity to be part of developing solutions for one of the great global challenges of our day—delivering efficient, affordable and sustainable care across the global community.”


news in brief

AMPATH trainees care for patients at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital.

PGY2 Underserved Care and Global Health Residency at the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy The University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy established a residency based on the principle of “improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide” as put forth by JP Kaplan et al. in their 2009 Lancet article. The PGY2 Underserved Care and Global Health Residency focuses on building clinician-educators dedicated to and passionate about addressing health disparities locally and globally. Through this program, residents develop skills to design and deliver direct patient care and pharmacy services in resource-poor settings in a collaborative practice environment; to teach student pharmacists and other healthcare providers; and to design, implement, assess and publish a research project.

Although the residency is new, Purdue’s College of Pharmacy has had a presence in Kenya since 2003 in collaboration with the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare, or AMPATH, and the Indiana University-Kenya Partnership. In 2004, the college began an eight-week advanced pharmacy practice experience for students, now overseen by two onsite Purdue faculty members. The effort has grown over the past seven years from a volunteer program for faculty and an opportunity for student experience, to a clinical effort embedded in the environment. Purdue assists in offering services in more than 50 rural sites and recently began a diabetes management program, an anticoagulation program and a pharmacovigilance program to monitor adverse effects from medications. In addition, a program has been established to provide a variety of services and education programs for street children. Participation from Kenyan healthcare counterparts in the program has grown from one pharmacist to two adjunct clinical faculty and five clinical pharmacists. This year, the program has four residents, one graduate from Purdue and three from the University of Nairobi. Residents have one-month rotations in a variety of care settings, including a mother-baby hospital, an adult medicine ward, outpatient clinics and drug education outreach programs. Residents must also complete a research project.

Program Activities The resident works through the School of Pharmacy’s Grace Lamsam Pharmacy Program for the Underserved, providing direct patient care and improving medication use systems at several local partner sites. Using skills developed locally in lowresource settings, the resident is better prepared to provide service and support during a one- to two-month block experience with one or more global partner sites. International clinical experiences are available through Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi; Philippine General Hospital through the University of the Philippines in Manila; St. Luke’s Health Center in Beira, Mozambique; and Shoulder to Shoulder Pittsburgh-San José in San José del Negrito, Honduras. The resident’s role is to support local needs and assist practitioners on the ground. Current Resident The school’s current resident is Yardlee Kauffman. During the fall, she completed a rotation with Shoulder to Shoulder (STS) in San José, Honduras, which is a remote mountain village of 1,500 people. Using a model of community-oriented primary care, STS serves the surrounding area of approximately 6,500 people. Kauffman was involved in direct patient care as well as working to enhance systems to ensure consistent access to essential medicines. Kauffman plans to complete a research project at Kamuzu Central Hospital in Malawi in the spring. Goals This program trains future pharmacists to provide primary care pharmacy services in low-resource settings. Specifically, the PGY2 Underserved Care and Global Health Residency trains practitioners who are empathic, creative and culturally sensitive in solving problems for all patients, regardless of resources. The School of Pharmacy hopes this program can serve as a model for other schools of pharmacy to train a new generation of practitioners with the skills to tackle problems on a global scale.

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news in brief

AACP Walmart Scholars Return from Annual Meeting Inspired to Teach In this, the seventh successful year, the number of AACP Walmart Scholars increased from 65 to 75 pairs of student and faculty mentors chosen to attend the 2011 AACP Annual Meeting held in San Antonio, Texas in July. The intent of the AACP Walmart Scholars Program is to strengthen the recipient’s skills and commitment to a career in academic pharmacy through their participation in the AACP Annual Meeting. The $1,000 scholarship pays for the students’ expenses and defrays about half the faculty mentor’s expenses. As part of their experience, Walmart Scholars and their Mentors attended the Teachers Seminar, which provided many of the scholars with the opportunity to view academia from a different perspective. “The meeting gave me great insight into what a career in academia entails. Faculty members do so much more than just teach, and I was exposed to many of those responsibilities while in San Antonio,” said scholar Amanda Wojtusik from The University of Rhode Island. Michael Conley from Northeastern University echoed those sentiments saying, “I feel more confident in my capabilities of someday attaining a faculty position, and even more excited for what my future holds.” Other students found the experience served to focus their career goals. Kris Ochs from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville said, “This meeting has assured me that I do have a passion for

academia and has left me inspired to pursue academia in a more thorough manner.” Shanna O’Connor from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill believes academic pharmacy is “a ‘best-kept’ secret of the profession.” Walmart Scholarship winners also expressed gratitude for their experiences. “I would like to sincerely thank the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy and Walmart Corporation for providing me with the opportunity to take part in the 2011 AACP Walmart Scholars Program,” said Andrew Straznitskas of the University of Connecticut. “As a young pharmacist aspiring to begin a career in academia, this experience was invaluable. It gave me significant insight into academia as a profession by allowing me to learn more about the roles and challenges of pharmacy faculty in teaching, scholarship and service and providing an incredible opportunity to network with other academic professionals and students with similar interests on a national level.” All of us at AACP wish the AACP Walmart Scholars continued success and thank Walmart for its continuing support of careers in academic pharmacy! Application materials for the 2012 program are available on the AACP Web site under Career Development, then Research Grants, Fellowships and Scholarship Programs, and are due at AACP by 5:00 p.m. EST on Feb. 14, 2012. Questions? Contact Dr. Jennifer L. Athay at jathay@aacp.org. –Diane Drakeley Seventy-five pairs of students and faculty mentors had the opportunity to network with potential future colleagues in the Academy at the 2011 AACP Annual Meeting in San Antonio, Texas.

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The AACP WalMart

Scholarsfeature  Program story

Network

Learn

Apply

More than two-thirds of the nation’s faculty, staff, administrators and deans attend the AACP Annual Meeting. They are involved with teaching, research, public service and patient care. Others serve as consultants for local, state, national and international organizations. Disciplines within academic pharmacy include biological sciences, clinical science, experiential education, drug discovery, medicinal/ natural products and pharmacology.

More than 60 sessions ranging from assessment to motivational interviewing were presented at recent Annual Meetings. Past keynote speakers include rep resentatives from the Institute of Medicine, famous authors, national health experts and former Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Each year, the AACP Annual Meeting pre-session focuses on developing the leadership qualities of today’s pharmacy faculty.

The AACP Annual Meeting offers Walmart recipients a venue to explore career options with the ultimate goal of enhancing their commitment to a career in academic pharmacy. The program will provide $1,000 scholarships to student/faculty pairs from AACP member institutions to attend the 2012 meeting in Kissimmee, Florida, July 14–18. Deadline for sub mission is 5:00 p.m. EST on Feb. 14, 2012. For more information, visit the AACP Web site, www.aacp.org.

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 1727 KING Street Alexandria, VA 22314 www.aacp.org

It’s your profession. Make a difference. academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2011


St. John’s Alumni Offer an “Insider’s View” into Careers in Pharmacy What does it mean to take pride in your university? Simply ask any of the St. John’s University alumni who participate in the school’s Alumni Insider’s View program, a series of content-specific tracks and resources dedicated to helping current St. John’s students succeed in finding the best career possible. Participating alumni show them first-hand how to master job interviews, exhibit proper business etiquette and much more. The program goes beyond just basic networking; it immerses students in the behind-the-scenes world of a St. John’s professional. As the largest alumni chapter outside of the New York metropolitan area, the St. John’s University Washington, DC Alumni chapter coordinates the program’s U.S. Capital–Pharmacy Track, available to students in the St. John’s University College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions. Students receive an “insider’s view” into the various and diverse career paths in the pharmaceutical sciences through alumni-led panel discussions, one-on-one interactions and networking receptions.

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The two-day event in October 2011 began at MedImmune, one of the leaders in the biopharmaceutical industry, and included a Career Overview Panel featuring Notre Dame of Maryland University School of Pharmacy Founding Dean and Professor Dr. Anne Y. Lin, Colonel Dr. John Spain, deputy commander for clinical support at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Dr. Hiren Patel, regulatory health project manager at the FDA Center For Drug Evaluation and Research, and Dr. Robert Fuentes, senior director for medical information at MedImmune. DC Alumni Lead Chapter Coordinator Laura Cranston moderated the event. Providing students with the academic pharmacy perspective, Lin, who received her bachelor’s and doctor of pharmacy degree from St. John’s, spoke about how her academic career began—at her alma mater as a clinical faculty member. “I wanted to influence students,” she said, reflecting on why she chose academia. “I wanted to pay it forward and say ‘thank you’ to St. John’s.” Interestingly, each of the panel members spoke about being chil-


dren of immigrant parents and how they are living examples of what’s possible in this country.

in mentorship, both as a mentee and future mentor, and to remember that they can learn something from everyone.

When asked whether she saw a saturation of the market for future pharmacists, Lin acknowledged that she has seen changes in the job market over the past six years, but that practice has also changed, and therefore, so must future pharmacists. Students must think “outside of the box” and look for opportunities to make themselves more marketable, she said. She also stressed the importance of learning in interprofessional teams to prepare students to be integral parts of future healthcare teams, and becoming involved in local and national healthcare advocacy efforts.

“Read beyond pharmacy,” Lin also emphasized. “And stay on the cutting edge of technology.” Insider’s View students concluded the day with a tour of MedImmune and a networking reception where they could learn more about the pharmacy careers presented by the panel, especially those in academic pharmacy. –Maureen Thielemans

Concluding the panel, Cranston, executive director of the Pharmacy Quality Alliance, Inc., asked the alumni to offer advice to students on how to stay current in their skill sets. Panel members encouraged the 50 students in attendance to engage

“I wanted to influence students,” she [Dr. Anne Y. Lin] said, reflecting on why she chose academia. “I wanted to pay it forward and say ‘thank you’ to St. John’s.”

Previous page: From left: Dr. Robert Fuentes, senior director for medical information, MedImmune; Dr. Anne Y. Lin, dean, Notre Dame of Maryland University School of Pharmacy; Dr. Hiren Patel, regulatory management officer, FDA; Dr. Robert A. Mangione, dean, College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions, St. John’s University; Ms. Laura Cranston, executive director, Pharmacy Quality Alliance, Inc.; and Colonel John Spain, deputy commander for clinical support, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Right: Dr. Anne Y. Lin, dean of the Notre Dame of Maryland University School of Pharmacy, talks to student pharmacists about her career path in academia.

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feature story

Academic Pharmacy, IHS and Tribes: Partners in Closing the Health Disparity Gap Every day, faculty and students at colleges and schools of pharmacy across the country are working to improve the health of American Indians and Alaska Natives by providing better access to care. They play an integral role in healthcare delivery, providing substantial clinical input into disease management, patient adherence and assuring patient medication safety. With diabetes, hypertension, and other chronic diseases prevalent in Native American and Alaska Native populations at a rate that surpasses the United States average, pharmacy faculty and students provide the detailed clinical medication information that supports the physician’s clinical diagnosis. Supported by strong academic partnerships, the Indian Health Service (IHS) continues its long tradition of integrating the pharmacist into the care delivery team and providing patients with medication therapy management, which is an essential element of their care. In this issue of Academic Pharmacy Now, we highlight partnerships between some AACP member institutions and the IHS and/or tribal communities that are providing necessary pharmacy services to improve health outcomes. academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2011

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feature story Western University of Health Sciences For more than 100 years, the Sherman Indian High School (SIHS), located in Riverside, Calif., has made its mission to educate the young men and women of the Native American tribes of the United States. SIHS today is an off-reservation, co-educational boarding high school for Native Americans, operated by the Bureau of Indian Education/Bureau of Indian Affairs, and is accredited by the Western Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. Western University of Health Sciences (WesternU) students demonstrate their commitment to the people of Pomona, Calif. and surrounding cities each time they come out to work at health fairs, support community events, and participate in campus outreach groups like the Pomona Health Career Ladders (PHCL) program. It is through these community outreach efforts that a relationship between WesternU and SIHS first began through the PHCL program. With the goal of increasing interest in health science careers among Native American youth, in order to eventually enhance the health status and professional aspirations of Native American populations, WesternU, California State University San Bernardino (CSUSB) and the SIHS established a partnership to address this issue by developing the Native Health Career Ladder (NHCL) program. Each of these educational institutions are well-established organizations serving economically disadvantaged, medically underserved populations. The NHCL program provides exactly that type of opportunity by introducing SIHS students to opportunities available in healthcare through a series of Saturday Academies, and providing student mentoring and academic tutoring in math and science skills. These events are held on-campus at WesternU and are staffed by faculty and students from the health and sciences colleges. Although the sessions are intended to be fun and interesting, each session is designed to meet specific state educational guidelines. They include introductory group sessions with required attendance by both students and parents, followed by topic or discipline specific lectures, break-out activities and other hands-on experiences for the students. Top: “Unity” statue on today’s Sherman Indian High School campus. Middle: 1911 students in uniform. Bottom: WesternU staff and student pharmacist Badal Satasia works with SIHS students at a health fair on the SIHS campus.

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feature story Ohio Northern University

The University of Iowa

Dr. Maggie Allen, a recent Ohio Northern University Raabe College of Pharmacy graduate, works with the Indian Health Service as a staff pharmacist with Winslow Indian Health Care Center (WIHCC) in Winslow, Ariz. WIHCC is a service unit of approximately 300 healthcare providers serving approximately 60,000 patients a year, most of whom are Navajo. The pharmacy serves patients seen in the clinics on site as well as the urgent care facility. They also have two site clinics that reach into the more remote areas of their service unit. A telepharmacy set up has the pharmacist stationed in the main clinic verifying prescriptions with technicians in the two remote field clinics to dispense the medications to the patients.

More than 20 years ago, an alumnus from The University of Iowa College of Pharmacy was working with Native American populations at the Zuni Comprehensive Community Health Center in Zuni, N.M. Recognizing the unique opportunities available through the Indian Health Service, the former Hawkeye reached out to develop rotations opportunities for Iowa students. Over the years, the partnerships spread from Zuni to Santa Fe to Rapid City and Sioux Falls, S.D. Every year, the opportunity to work with this underserved population draws students from Iowa to New Mexico or South Dakota.

Allen is currently a tribal hire pharmacist and should become a Commissioned Corps officer with the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) in the next few months. She has been interested in the USPHS since completing IPPE hours with the Bureau of Prisons during her third year of school. Allen was working with a Commissioned Corps officer during that time. Allen went on a rotation with the Indian Health Service in Lower Brule, S.D. during her final year of pharmacy school. Since she knew the USPHS was her ultimate career goal, she jumped at the opportunity to travel to the remote town of Lower Brule to get a true sense of what the IHS accomplished. This experience solidified her desire to work with the Indian Health Service.

As part of the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience, students are fully immersed in the facility and attend multi-disciplinary rounds. Participants are encouraged to visit many departments, observe procedures and interact with other healthcare professionals. Additionally, they gain familiarity with conditions and diseases specific to these Native American populations, particularly renal failure and diabetes. Students have met a variety of obstacles and challenges, from language barriers requiring the use of an interpreter to cultural differences surrounding the practice of medicine. One student described counseling a patient who was electing to postpone care for a religious season. Another counseled a patient, accustomed to traditional alternative healing, to the benefits of anticoagulation therapy. The students continue to enjoy the rotations with the Indian Health Service year after year. In addition to the diverse skills they are able to acquire and practice, they gain a cultural experience like no other.

Right: University of Iowa College of Pharmacy student Pamela Wong took part in unique cultural experiences during her rotation at Sioux San Hospital, including attending a powwow at the Pine Ridge Reservation.

Near right: During his rotation at Sioux San Hospital, University of Iowa College of Pharmacy student Jacob Heffter visited South Dakota’s Badlands with John Frazier, a pharmacy technician and Lakota native. academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2011

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feature story

Left: Former COSTEP interns from the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, from left: Catherine Lee, Kathleen Morneau, Janet Dudley, Jacklyn Finocchio, William Albanese and Ashley Burns.

University of Minnesota

University of Maryland The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has a long-standing relationship with the United States Public Health Service (USPHS), specifically the Indian Health Service, in which student pharmacists perform required and elective rotations at a variety of IHS sites. In some cases, students complete additional optional experiences through the Junior and Senior Commissioned Corps Officers Student Training and Extern Programs (JRCOSTEP and SRCOSTEP). Preceptors from IHS offer School of Pharmacy students experiences in public health, pharmacy administration and organizational management at its headquarters in Rockville, Md. They also gain experiences in ambulatory clinics and pharmaceutical care at AcomaCanoncito-Laguna Service Unit in New Mexico and opportunities in ambulatory clinics at Cherokee Indian Hospital in North Carolina. More than 50 School of Pharmacy students have completed rotations with the USPHS IHS throughout the years and approximately 20 of them have participated in the JRCOSTEP and SRCOSTEP programs. Many students who complete the JRCOSTEP program opt to return to those sites for an experiential rotation later in their pharmacy education. Similarly, students who completed experiential rotations applied for the SRCOSTEP as well as residencies with the IHS. Through these training and experiential rotations, the students had the opportunity to learn, apply and prepare to practice patient-centered care and population-based intervention, or both the micro- and macro-levels of public health pharmacy. School of Pharmacy faculty and student organizations have also benefited from the school’s close relationship with IHS. Dr. HoaiAn Truong, acting director of experiential learning and an assistant professor of pharmaceutical health services research at the school, completed his master’s of public health capstone experience at the IHS in Rockville, Md.

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The University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, Duluth, works with the Fond du Lac Band of the Lake Superior Chippewa (Ojibwe). Students are placed in the band’s health clinic, which has three locations in the state: Cloquet, Duluth and Minneapolis. Several alumni also currently work as pharmacists at the Fond Du Lac Band Clinic. Pharmacists and students provide services like medication therapy management, and clinics for anti-coagulation, asthma and a smoking cessation program. One of the college’s newer faculty members and Choctaw tribal member, Dr. Michelle Johnson-Jennings, also analyzes data collected from the Indian Health Service primary care providers regarding care for chronic pain. “One of the outcomes for these partnerships includes increasing the reputation of our college as a respectful partner in tribal community health research,” she said. Johnson-Jennings also works with the Choctaw Nation health department. Her expected long-term outcome is improving Choctaw Tribal members’ health and increased choices for a healthy lifestyle. “Through developing a research partnership, our college may have future opportunities to assist the Choctaw Nation and other tribes in addressing their identified healthcare needs and assist them with procuring grant funding to accomplish their research goals,” she said.


Southwestern Oklahoma State University

feature story

The Indian Health Service and Southwestern Oklahoma State University (SWOSU) College of Pharmacy began a cooperative effort to educate and train student pharmacists in the early 1970s. The foresight of early IHS leaders in Oklahoma helped to further refine and expand the relationship between pharmacy education and the clinical pharmacy practice environment. While it might appear that the relationship was of primary benefit to the College of Pharmacy, the IHS also benefited significantly. At one time there were more pharmacists who had graduated from SWOSU within the IHS system than from any other single college or school of pharmacy. Today, SWOSU continues to be one of the most highly represented pharmacy training institutions among the total active duty pharmacists in the IHS. This can be linked directly to the clinical practice rotations and experiences many SWOSU students had with the IHS when they were in school. The geographic location of the SWOSU College of Pharmacy, coupled with the sheer size of the Oklahoma City Area IHS healthcare delivery system, has contributed to the enduring nature of the relationship as well. Oklahoma has the largest Native American population of any region in the U.S. There are now approximately 60 IHS or tribal healthcare delivery locations, all with full-time pharmacy services, in Oklahoma along with nearly 320 locations nationwide. Through this partnership, the shared commitment to excellence in patient care and excellence in professional education, student pharmacists have been provided with a unique learning environment and exceptional opportunities to provide pharmacy services to the people of Oklahoma. Sometimes the relationship between the IHS practice of pharmacy and the SWOSU College of Pharmacy has taken a very personal turn. One former SWOSU student, Paula Veach, completed an experiential rotation at the Carnegie IHS facility in 1987. That ultimately led her to a long career with IHS at the Anadarko IHS facility, from which she recently retired. Veach must have influenced her daughter both toward a career in pharmacy and toward Southwestern, since her daughter Krystle is now enrolled as a student pharmacist at SWOSU.

Top: Lola Cain, SWOSU pharmacy graduate and long-time pharmacist at Claremore IHS circa 1988. Middle: Lawton IHS Pharmacists 1981; the Lawton IHS hospital was one of the original clinical sites for SWOSU in 1968. Bottom: Philip Anderson, Clinton IHS, one of the first pharmacists to use disease-based protocols instead of drug-based treatment protocols circa 1974.

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feature story The University of Oklahoma For more than 15 years, the University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy has been in a strong partnership with the Claremore Indian Hospital/Indian Health Service. Throughout this time, several pharmacists at the hospital have been appointed as clinical assistant professors with the college and operated in shared positions. These faculty members at the hospital not only have taken on the traditional roles as faculty members of a college of pharmacy, they have also continued to practice clinical pharmacy at the Claremore Indian Hospital. In addition to their traditional educator roles, the faculty members have provided IPPE and APPE rotations at the Claremore Indian Hospital. Each month, an average of five fourthyear students are assigned to the Claremore Indian Hospital to complete a clinical rotation. Throughout the academic year, second- and third-year students complete IPPE rotations as well. The rotations offered at the Claremore Indian Hospital include inpatient adult medicine, administration, research and several different ambulatory care clinics. Faculty advance their teaching skills and their clinical skills at the facility while lecturing and interacting with students. Students benefit from the joint relationship through clinical rotations, receiving mentoring, professional counseling on different aspects of pharmacy career choices, classroom assistance, and guidance with obtaining advanced certifications and residencies after completing their professional degrees. Student outcomes include analysis and discussion concerning rotation evaluations and classroom lectures. At the hospital, evaluation of student involvement is analyzed on a monthly basis to determine how beneficial the learning experience was for the students and whether this experience can be enhanced in any manner. One tangible outcome is motivation to complete residency training after graduation because of experiences at this facility. The university has had several students complete a residency at Claremore or seek other residencies within the IHS because of their time at this facility.

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University of Washington The University of Washington (UW) School of Pharmacy is engaged in multiple collaborations with tribal governments and the Indian Health Service. Currently, faculty and students at UW are involved in business-strategy and pharmaceutical care partnerships with three Washington tribes; residency and rotation programs with one Washington tribe; and a multi-state, multi-institution research program serving Alaska and Montana Native and rural Pacific Northwest populations. The School of Pharmacy has both a business-strategy partnership and pharmaceutical care partnership with the Nisqually Tribe near Olympia, Wash. Further, it has business-strategy partnerships with the Skokomish Tribe on the Olympic Peninsula and the Shoalwater Bay Tribe in Tokeland, Wash. Each of these collaborations are led by UW clinical professor of pharmacy Dr. Donald F. Downing. The School of Pharmacy’s Postgraduate Year 1 Community Pharmacy Practice Residency Program has a formal partnership with the Tulalip Clinical Pharmacy, an independent pharmacy contracted to serve members of the Tulalip Tribe in Tulalip, Wash. UW clinical associate professor of pharmacy Dr. Annie Y. Lam directs the program. Lam provides guidance and oversight of residency recruitment and training. She works collaboratively with Tulalip Clinical Pharmacy Director Asaad Awan and the pharmacists at Tulalip Clinical Pharmacy to ensure the residents achieve their competency and learning objectives. Through this pharmacy practice residency program, residents are working with tribal members to manage disease states, engage in preventative care and develop communication skills. The services the resident pharmacists are providing include medication therapy management, substance abuse counseling and management, and asthma and diabetes teaching. Finally, the UW School of Pharmacy has a tribal research partnership through the Northwest-Alaska Pharmacogenomic Research Network (NWA-PGRN). UW founded the NWA-PGRN in 2010 to address pharmacogenomic research in American Indian, Alaska Native and rural Pacific Northwest populations. The initial work of the NWA-PGRN is focusing on the pharmacogenetics of warfarin, tamoxifen and tacrolimus treatment.


Left: American Indians receiving research information at a powwow on the Flathead Reservation in Montana, summer 2009. Bottom: Dr. LeeAnna Muzquiz, a physician with the Confederated Salish Kootenai Tribes (CSKT), examining a patient. Muzquiz is a research collaborator with the NWA-PGRN.

UW Student Group Seeks to Increase Diversity in Science Programs The University of Washington is home to the sole student chapter of the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) in the Pacific Northwest. UW students established this chapter in 2007 with a goal of increasing student diversity in UW undergraduate and graduate science programs. The chapter membership includes graduate students from the School of Pharmacy and throughout the UW health sciences and other departments. Dr. Carlos E. Catalano, professor of medicinal chemistry, serves as the faculty adviser to the chapter. Members are extremely active in their recruitment efforts, particularly with pre-college programs. This past year, this has included relationships with: •

The SACNAS “sister” chapter at Royal City High School in the rural, predominantly Latino/a town of Royal City, Wash.;

The Edmonds School District in Edmonds, Wash., which has a high proportion of students from Hispanic and Native American backgrounds; and

The Clear Sky Science Outreach program, whose membership is comprised of predominantly Native American middle and high school students.

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feature story

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feature story

NIH

CTSA

Pharmacy Faculty Continue to Translate Excellence The National Institutes of Health (NIH) continues to expand its consortium of academic health centers dedicated to improving bench to bedside delivery of healthcare as five additional universities were awarded the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) in June 2011. Three AACP member institutions will play significant collaborative roles with the new consortium members as the NIH provides $200 million over five years to help enable researchers to provide new treatments more efficiently and effectively to patients.

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feature story Colleges and schools of pharmacy at The University of Kansas, University of Kentucky and University of Minnesota joined the 55 institutions added to the consortium from 2006–2010. The 2011 CTSAs expand consortium representation to two additional states—Kansas and Kentucky—extending the network to 30 states and the District of Columbia. With these most recent awards, the NIH is funding 60 CTSA institutions. Pennsylvania State University, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey and the University of California, Los Angeles round out the 2011 CTSA recipients. Each college or school of pharmacy is involved in the consortium in a variety of capacities:

University of Kentucky The University of Kentucky (UK) College of Pharmacy will play a substantial role in the university’s CTSA program. The college’s associate dean for research, Dr. Linda P. Dwoskin, will serve as director of the Drug Discovery and Development key function. The goal of this key function is to provide a streamlined and efficient framework to accelerate the translation of new discoveries at the cutting edge of pharmaceutical sciences. This key function will provide resources and expertise to support the full range of integrated services involved in bringing basic biological discoveries through the complex stages of therapeutic development, clinical trials and commercialization. Dwoskin will also be a “CATalyst” for the CTSA, serving as a concierge to aid UK researchers in accessing the resources they need to conduct experiments as part of the program. As director of the Drug Development key function and a Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS) CATalyst, Dwoskin will guide and nurture UK investigators through the entire process from discovery to commercialization. Under Dwoskin’s leadership, the key function will provide a comprehensive and complex framework for negotiating the multiple and overlapping steps toward clinical and translational science in the area of drug discovery and development. The Therapeutic Advisory Panel will assist with navigation through the drug discovery and development process. Members of the Therapeutic Advisory Panel include Dr. ChangGuo Zhan, Dr. Bradley D. Anderson, director of the Drug Development Division within the College of Pharmacy, who will serve as drug development expert for this stage; Dr. Audra

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L. Stinchcomb, faculty member in the Drug Development Division in the College of Pharmacy who has expertise in transdermal delivery; and Dr. Daniel P. Wermeling, who will provide expertise in both clinical pharmacology and regulatory stages of drug development. College of Pharmacy Dean Dr. Timothy S. Tracy is a member of the executive steering committee responsible for direction and oversight of the UK Center for Clinical and Translational Science and the CTSA grant. He will oversee functional integration of the College of Pharmacy’s new pharmacogenomics DNA core into the repository of centralized biospecimens at UK. Dr. Jeffery Talbert, director of the College of Pharmacy’s Institute for Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy (IPOP), will serve as director of CCTS Portal and co-director of Biomedical Informatics key functions. As director of the CCTS Portal, Talbert will lead a team developing a strategy to transform the research process by increasing collaboration, training, team science and to assist investigators with access to services while eliminating information “silos.” As co-director of Biomedical Informatics, Talbert and IPOP will serve as the Research Information Technology core for the CCTS. The informatics key function will facilitate and transform translational science at UK and throughout Kentucky and the surrounding region by developing theories, techniques and tools for transforming biomedical data into information to generate new knowledge and biomedical discoveries.


feature story

The University of Kansas

University of Minnesota

The University of Kansas Heartland Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (HICTR) is an academic home for clinical and translational research serving Kansas and the greater Kansas City region. The vision of the HICTR is to create a novel and transformative translational research enterprise from bench to bedside to community. Drawing on many years of experience reaching the frontiers of Kansas with educational, research and healthcare programs, the HICTR supports scientists and actively involves the community so that discoveries and research findings are more rapidly brought to the point of care.

The University of Minnesota Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) creates an academic home to promote clinical and translational research. The CTSI is developing an ongoing alignment with major statewide healthcare organizations and insurers, electronic networks, special and rural community populations, the state department of health and Mayo Clinic. As a result, the CTSI is in a position to have a strong impact on workforce training, healthcare outcomes and policy in Minnesota.

University of Kansas Professor of Pharmacy Practice Dr. Timothy E. Welty serves as director of the Pharmacokinetic/ Pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) program. The KU CTSA grant (Frontiers) focuses on the development of innovative therapies, including new drugs. As part of this initiative, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic expertise is extremely important. This part of the larger Frontiers program is designed to provide investigators with the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic resources needed to develop the projects. The PK/ PD program provides services ranging from study design, drug assay development and PK/PD modeling, to education. Other faculty members involved in the PK/PD program include Dr. J. Steven Leeder, who serves as the program’s associate director and is adjunct professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry; and Dr. Roger Rajewski, research professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, who serves as a collaborator in the PK/PD program. Dr. Scott Weir, courtesy professor in the School of Pharmacy and director of therapeutics for the Institute on Advancing Medical Innovation at KUMC, is director of the Institute for Advancing Medical Innovation portion of the CTSA. In addition, School of Pharmacy Dean Dr. Kenneth L. Audus chairs the Dean’s Advisory Committee for the CTSA.

The integration of university core functions will support clinical translational science research trainees and junior faculty with learner-tailored curricula. Others will accelerate bench-to-bedside translation and commercial applications. The university’s Biomedical Health Informatics initiative will provide networked clinical data and biospecimen resources while training future informatics scholars. Two University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy faculty members involved in the grant are Dr. Vadim J. Gurvich and Dr. Richard C. Brundage. Representing the college’s Institute for Therapeutics Discovery and Development, Gurvich is responsible for the drug discovery component of the CTSA and Brundage, who is director of the Center for Forecasting Drug Response, leads the clinical pharmacology efforts. The drug discovery center conducts research and education in the area of drug discovery and development, and provides scientific services to research and business communities in the area of drug discovery and development. Gurvich is also responsible for the drug manufacturing facility, which houses 20,000 square feet of office and laboratory space, including chemical process development, high throughput screening, and lead and probe discovery cores; medicinal chemistry; and analytical laboratories. Gurvich hopes the institute will play a significant role in the CTSA’s drug discovery and development, and with the translational facility in the college of pharmacy, it can support clinical trials and research as well.

A

cademic pharmacy has become a prominent player in clinical and translational research since the NIH launched the CTSA network in 2006. Institutions with colleges and schools of pharmacy involved with the consortium now include: University of California, San Francisco, University of Pittsburgh, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, The University of Arizona, University of Southern California, The University of Iowa, University of Michigan, University of Washington, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, St. Louis College of Pharmacy, University of Colorado Denver, The Ohio State University, Northeastern University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The University of Texas at Austin, the Medical University of South Carolina, University of Florida, University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, the University of Cincinnati, University of California, San Diego, Howard University, The University of New Mexico and Virginia Commonwealth University.

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faculty news

Faculty News Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Auburn University

Appointments/Elections

• John Allen, assistant clinical professor, Mobile, Ala.

• Amy Barton Pai has been named chair of the NYS Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Coalition. She has also been appointed as an editor for the Journal of Nephrology and Therapeutics. • Arlixer M. Coleman, assistant professor of health sciences, Albany Campus • Binshan Shi, assistant professor of health sciences, Albany Campus • Markus Stein, assistant professor of health sciences, Albany Campus • Joanna R. Schwartz has been named president of the Vermont Society of Health-System Pharmacists. • Eric J. Yager, assistant professor of arts and sciences, Albany Campus

Awards • Robert DiCenzo edited the Clinical Pharmacist’s Guide to Biostatistics and Literature Evaluation. • Amit P. Pai was awarded the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Regulatory Science Excellence Award for his work with the FDA Chronic Kidney Diseases Matrix Group. • A publication from Nimish Patel and Thomas P. Lodise was ranked second among the 25 most significant publications in infectious diseases pharmacotherapy of 2010 in a survey published by the American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy.

Grants • Martha A. Hass received a three-year grant from the National Institutes of Health in the amount of $453,896.

Retirements

Appointments/Elections

• Richard Hansen was elected chair of the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Pharmaceutical Research and Science (APhA-APRS) Economic, Social and Administrative Sciences (ESAS) Section. • Amber Hutchison, assistant clinical professor, Auburn, Ala. • Robin Koffarnus, assistant clinical professor, Montgomery, Ala. • Sarah Treadway, assistant clinical professor, Mobile, Ala. • Diana Wells, assistant clinical professor, Auburn, Ala.

Awards • Angela I. Calderon has been awarded a Provosts Award for Supporting Graduate Scholarship. • K. Paige Patterson was named Pharmacy Technician of the Year by the Alabama Pharmacy Association.

Grants • C. Randall Clark has been awarded a $484,819 grant from the DOJ for the project, Analytical and Synthetic Studies on Designer Drugs of the Piperazine Class. • Richard Hansen has been awarded a $20,000 grant from the University of North Carolina to support his project, “Nursing Home Medication Error Reporting System;” a $44,851 grant from Duke University to support “The Continuity of Medication Management” study; and a $212,850 grant for 10 months from the Foundation for National Institutes of Health to study the refinement of health outcome of interest definitions for drug safety surveillance.

• Robert M. Levin was awarded emeritus status. academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2011

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faculty news

• Tahir Hussain has been awarded a $945,238 grant from NIH for “Renal Angiotensin II Receptor Function in Obesity.” • Jayachandra Ramapuram has been awarded a $102,000 grant from FERA Pharmaceuticals, Inc., for the project, “Evaluation of Intraconazole Oral Solution Products”; a grant for $11,522 from SIGA Technologies to support “SIGA Technologies Service Agreement,” and a $120,000 NSF grant for “Pharmaceutical Applications of Nanoparticles.” • David J. Riese has been awarded a $74,502 grant from Purdue University for “Regulation of ErbB4 Signaling by Neuregulin Isoforms.” • Heather P. Whitley has been awarded a $25,000 grant from Diabetes Hands Foundation/Big Blue Test (DHF/BBT) to support her work with diabetic patients at the Capstone Rural Health Center in Parrish, Ala.

Promotions • Lori B. Hornsby, associate clinical professor, pharmacy practice

Retirements • William A. Villaume, associate professor, pharmacy care systems

Drake University Appointments/Elections • Allison Marr, adjunct assistant professor of pharmacy practice • Jennifer J. Steffensmeier, assistant professor of pharmacy practice

Awards • Rhonda C. Beemer received the National Society For Experiential Education’s Experiential Education Rising Leader Award. • June Felice Johnson, elected as fellow, ACCP

Grants • Kimberly A. Huey received notification from the National Institutes of Health (National Institute of

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Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases) that she has been awarded $414,990 over a 3-year period for completion of her project titled “VEGF and Skeletal Muscle Adaptation during Chronic Overload.”

Promotions • Denise A. Soltis will begin her sabbatical in Belize in January 2012.

Duquesne University Appointments/Elections • Jelena M. Janjic, editor, Journal of Bioprocessing and Biotechniques

Grants • Aleem Gangjee and Susan L. Mooberry, co-principal investigators. Project Title: Water Soluble Antimitotics That Circumvent Tumor Resistance. Period of Project: June 1, 2011 to March 31, 2016. Source: National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute (NCI). Amount Granted: Year 1 $168,523 Total Grant: $1,567,135 DU Award $842,615 (funded at 83%). • David A. Johnson, principal investigator. Project Title: Neurodegenerative LPS Model. Period of Project: August 16, 2011 to August 15, 2012. Source: Knopp Biosciences, LLC. Amount Granted 08-11: $85,740 Total Grant: $176,484.

Loma Linda University Appointments/Elections • Jim E. Pinder, director of academic affairs • Shastin L. Rains, director of enrollment and alumni affairs • Abby E. Rowland, director of development • Duane L. Tan, director of academic support

Promotions • Elvin A. Hernandez has been promoted to associate professor of pharmacotherapy and outcomes science.


ion: Caut s at ber Mem rk Wo

faculty news Members Working For You

AACP Member Leads Pharmacy Engagement Effort with Appointment to AHRQ Group

Dr. Gary R. Matzke, associate dean for clinical research and public policy at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy, has had a long-standing career of leadership and service to AACP and to academic pharmacy. His most recent position is no exception. Matzke, along with Dr. Leigh Ann Ross, associate dean for clinical affairs at the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, was appointed by AACP to serve on the newly-formed Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Effective Health Care Program Pharmacy Workgroup. The group is comprised of representatives from six key pharmacy associations: AACP, American Pharmacists Association, Association for Managed Care Pharmacy, American Society for Health-System Pharmacy, American College of Clinical Pharmacy and American Society of Consultant Pharmacists. The group first met in October 2010 and laid out an 18-month timeline of activities and discussions. Through in-person meetings, Web conferences and e-communications, the group is charged with two broad goals: assess the opportunities for collaboration between the Effective Health Care Program and the six pharmacy associations, and provide insight into ways to disseminate the agency’s products and information, which support the evidence-based decision making needs of health professionals including pharmacists, student pharmacists and faculty. Additional discussions focused on comparative effective research in pharmacy. The group agreed that there is very limited information that is shared with students, and therefore incorporated into pharmacy school curriculum, nor is there evidence of how residents are currently using AHRQ informational resources. Ongoing tasks for the group’s members include reviewing recent and upcoming Effective Health Care Program reports. Members routinely receive e-mails requesting comments on

Midwestern University/ Downers Grove Appointments/Elections • Shridhar V. Andurkar installed as chair elect, AACP Chemistry Section and appointed co-chair of the CME Committee, 15th BMM Convention. • Medha Joshi has been hired as an assistant professor in pharmaceutical sciences. • Karen M. Nagel-Edwards appointed chair, Section on Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, APhA-APRS. • Timothy J. Todd elected to the Board of Directors for the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group.

draft reports and key questions early on in the process. “It is an opportunity to continue to give back to the profession,” Matzke said about the appointment. “It is a pleasure to be able to contribute to the development of pathways to quality therapeutic information, such as the comparative effectiveness reviews developed by AHRQ in this instance, to pharmacists and particularly to the membership of AACP.” Matzke and Ross have also been charged to identify and introduce key individuals at various AACP institutions to AHRQ so that they and their colleagues can begin utilizing the agency’s informational resources in their courses and curriculum planning, as well as making them available to preceptors and alumni. “The Pharmacy Workgroup has benefited my career in the sense that it opened avenues for further comment and collaboration with individuals that I personally hadn’t had the chance to work with from different associations, as well as key AHRQ staff and contractors,” Matzke said. For more information about AHRQ’s Effective Health Care Program, visit http://www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/. —Maureen Thielemans

• Natarajan Venkatesan has been hired as an assistant professor in pharmaceutical sciences.

Awards • Susan R. Winkler graduated from the AACP Academic Leadership Fellows Program.

Promotions • Shaifali Bhalla has been promoted to associate professor of pharmacy science and awarded tenure. • Jill S. Borchert has been promoted to vice chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice. • Susan Cornell has been promoted to adjunct associate professor of pharmacy practice.

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faculty news

• Kathy E. Komperda has been awarded tenure in pharmacy practice.

Presbyterian College

• Amy A. Lullo has been promoted to associate director, Office of Experiential Education.

Appointments/Elections

• Huzefa H. Master has been promoted to associate professor of pharmacy practice.

• K. Dani Frederick-Duus, pharmaceutical and administrative sciences

Northeast Ohio Medical University

• Kathryn Nash Freeland, pharmacy practice

Awards • A jointly authored paper on recent findings in glaucoma research, of which Samuel D. Crish, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences, was the lead author, has been awarded The Lewis Rudin Glaucoma Prize of The New York Academy of Medicine.

Promotions • Timothy R. Ulbrich has been appointed director of pharmacy resident education.

Ohio Northern University Appointments/Elections • Michael P. Kane, visiting research scientist, Purdue University

Awards • ONU Raabe College of Pharmacy Kappa Epsilon chapter received the National Projects Excellence Award and garnered honorable mention as Outstanding Chapter of the Year Award.

Promotions • Karen L. Kier, director of assessment • Andrew M. Roecker, chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice, and director, continuing education • Kelly M. Shields, assistant dean, student services

• Zachary L. Anderson, pharmacy practice

• Edward E. Grace, pharmacy practice • Laura E. Happe, pharmaceutical and administrative sciences • Lise K. Langston, pharmacy practice • Tiffaney B. Threatt, pharmacy practice • Kristopher Virga, pharmaceutical and administrative sciences

Purdue University Appointments/Elections • Ryan M. Drenan joined the faculty as assistant professor of medicinal chemistry and molecular pharmacology. • Marlene O. Heeg, appointed as the new managing director, Office of Continuing Education and Professional Development. • Carol B. Post, appointed Macromolecular Structure and Function D Study Section, Center for Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health. • Gloria P. Sachdev, elected director-at-large, Section of Ambulatory Care Practitioners of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists.

Awards • Arun K. Ghosh received a MERIT award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.

Retirements

• Brian R. Overholser, named a fellow in the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

• Robert W. McCurdy, assistant dean and director of pharmacy student services/lecturer

• James E. Tisdale, named a fellow in the American Heart Association.

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faculty news

Grants • Steven R. Abel received $47,440 from Health Hospital Corp. of Marion County for “Health and Hospital Corp. of Marion County.” • Steven R. Abel and Margie E. Snyder received $15,000 from National Association of Chain Drug Stores, Inc. for “Kroger/Purdue Pharmacy Residency Program.” • Eric L. Barker received $14,000 from PHS-NIH National Institute on Alcohol Abuse for “Anxiety in a Genetic Animal Model of Alcoholism Role of Endocannabinoids.” • Robert W. Bennet and Karen S. Hudmon received $19,121 from Physicians Institute for Excellence in Medicine for “CS2day Par 2: Motivational Interviewing (MI).” • Stephen R. Byrn received $79,998 from Science Applications International Corp. for “SAID Sub P010054011 Grant 104859: Modification 4.” • Noll L. Campbell received $43,538 from Indiana University for “Pharmacological Management of Delirium; Amendment 1.” • David A. Colby and Gregory H. Hockerman received $75,000 from Showalter Trust for “Fluorinated Molecules for the Treatment of Drug Addiction.” • David A. Colby and Jean-Christophe Rochet received $147,980 from PHS-NIH National Institute on Aging for “Anthocyanins and Structural Derivatives for Drug Discovery in Age-Related Neurodegenerative Disorders.” • Mark S. Cushman received $324,817 from PHSNIH National Cancer Institute for “Novel Topoisomerase I Inhibitors.” • Ryan M. Drenan received $248,901 from PHS-NIH National Institute on Drug Abuse for “Alpha6* nAChRs in Dopamine Transmission and Nicotine Dependence.” • Robert L. Geahlen received $17,595 from PHSNIH National Cancer Institute for “Syk and Associated Proteins in Breast Cancer;” and received $19,186 from PHS-NIH National Cancer Institute

for “Tyrosine Protein Kinases and Lymphocyte Activation.” • Arun K. Ghosh received $225,916 from Wadsworth Center Health Res Inc. for “Inhibition and Mechanism of Flavivirus Methyltransferase”; received $686,989 from University of Illinois at Chicago for “Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Against Category-A Agents.” • Tony R. Hazbun received $254,830 from PHSNIH National Institute of General Medical Science for “Integrated Genomewide Analysis of the Ipl 1 Kinase Signaling Network.” • Gregory H. Hockerman received $73,200 from PHS-NIH National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases for “Role of Merg1 a K+Channel in the Onset of Skeletal Muscle Atrophy”; received $280,238 from PHS-NIH National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for “L-Type Ca2+Channel Modulation of Beta Cells Function.” • Gregory T. Knipp and Stephen R. Byrn received $22,705 from National Institute for Pharmaceutical Technology and Education for “Reviewer Education in State of the Art Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Technology.” • Douglas J. LaCount received $280,541 from PHSNIH National Institute of General Medical Science for “A Temporal View of the Plasmodium-Red Blood Cells Interactome.” • Marcus A. Lill received $218,252 from PHS-NIH National Institute of General Medical Science for “Novel Computational Methods for Modeling Cytochrome P450 Mediated Drug Metabolism.” • Michael D. Murray received $65,660 from University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana for “Health Literacy and Aging: A Process Knowledge Approach.” • Chiwook Park received $169,663 from National Science Foundation for “Transient Partial Unfolding in Proteins: Amendment 1.” • Laurie L. Parker received $187,510 from PHS-NIH National Cancer Institute for “Label-Free, RealTime Detection of Kinase Activity in Vitro and

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faculty news

in Single Cells Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS).”

Samford University

• Sonak D. Pastakia received $13,655 from Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis for “USAID-AMPATH Partnership: Academic Model for the Prevention and Treatment of HIV/AIDS.”

Appointments/Elections

• Rodolfo Pinal received $129,300 from Multi-Sponsored Industrials for “Center for Pharmaceutical Processing Research Consortium.” • Carol B. Post received $19,995 from PHS-NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for “Protein Stability and Antiviral Activity in Human Rhinovirus.” • Amy H. Sheehan received $18,804 from Johnson Johnson, Inc. for “Joint Academic/FDA/Industry Regulatory Pharmaceutical Fellowship ProgramJohnson Johnson”; received $83,804 from Lilly (ELI) and Company for “Joint Academic/FDA/ Industry Regulatory Pharmaceutical Fellowship Program-Lilly.” • Joseph Thomas received $18,995 from PHS-NIH National Institute on Aging for “Prognostic Significance of Insufficient Activity of Daily Living (ADL) Help on Health Outcomes/Utilization.” • Elizabeth M. Topp received $25,648 from National Institutes of Health for “Protein Aggregation in Amorphous Solids.” • Kara D. Weatherman received $25,000 from Cardinal Health for “Cardinal Health Fellowship in Clinical Nuclear Pharmacy and Radiopharmaceutical Safety.” • Yeonhee Yun received $380,611 from National Science Foundation Career Award for “OsmolyteGuided Nanoparticle Transport for Effective Drug/ Gene Delivery Across the Mucosal Barriers.” • Allan J. Zillich and Margie E. Snyder received $80,857 from Amedisys for “A Study Design Proposal for Evaluating the Efficacy of a Medication Management Program.”

• Jennifer W. Beall, director of introductory pharmacy practice experiences • Kimberley W. Benner was reappointed as a Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) evaluator for the 2010-11 Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act (BPCA) Priority List of Needs in Pediatric Therapeutics; Pulmonary Therapeutic Area and the Renal Disease Therapeutic Area Working Groups, 2011-2012. • Lindsey K. Elmore, assistant professor of pharmacy practice • Mary R. Monk-Tutor was invited to join the editorial board of Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning. • Jonathan M. Parker was appointed to PharmCAS/ PharmAdMIT Advisory Committee. • Jessica W. Skelley, assistant professor of pharmacy practice • Rachel Slaton, assistant professor of pharmacy practice • Terri M. Wensel, secretary of the Women Faculty SIG of AACP and director of curricular assessment and integration

Awards • Gary W. Bumgarner was awarded the Pharmaceutical, Social & Administrative Sciences Faculty Member of the Year Award. • Marshall E. Cates was awarded the Prestigious Educator Award. • B. DeeAnn Dugan was awarded the Pharmacy Practice Faculty Member of the Year Award. • Maryam Iranikhah was awarded the Margaret Self Propst Pharmacy Teacher of the Year Award. • Jeffrey A. Kyle and Whitney White were both awarded the Faculty Preceptor of the Year Award.

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faculty news

• Bruce Waldrop was awarded the Most Effective Lecturer Award. • Teresa W. Wilborn was awarded the Excellence in Teaching Award.

Promotions • Kimberley W. Benner, awarded tenure

Shenandoah University Appointments/Elections • Erin N. Adams received the Faculty Preceptor of the Year Award from the class of 2011. • Jennifer N. Clements was elected chair-elect of ACCP Endocrine Metabolism Practice Research Network (PRN).

Awards • Mary Ann F. Kirkpatrick received the Excellence in Innovation Award at the 130th Virginia Pharmacists Association Annual Meeting. • Alla Marks received the Golden Apple Teacher of the Year Award.

The University of Georgia Awards • Michael G. Bartlett was selected for the UGA Administrative Fellow leadership program. • Henry H. Cobb III, along with Pharm.D. student Tara Lee Fogleman, was named to the 2011 AACP Walmart Scholars Program. • Keith N. Herist, along with Pharm.D. student Bryan P. White, was named to the 2011 AACP Walmart Scholars Program. • George E. Francisco Jr., along with Pharm.D. student Allison L. Young, was named to the 2011 AACP Walmart Scholars Program.

Grants • Anthony C. Capomacchia received $5,000 from the Sloan Foundation for minority Ph.D. recruit-

ment and retention in pharmaceutical biomedical sciences at UGA. • Eileen J. Kennedy received $188,360 from the National Institutes of Health for study of probing the role of AKAPS in breast cancer using stapled peptide inhibitors. She also received a National Cancer Institute Transition Career Development Award (K22) from the National Institutes of Health for more than $570,600 over the next three years. • Mandi Murph received $3,250 from Chevron Chemical Co. for testing proprietary compounds for Chevron Phillips Chemical Company. • Somanath Shenoy was awarded nearly $1.6M from the National Institutes of Health over the next five years to study the regulatory role of protein kinaseB (Akt) and Src in mediating endothelial-barrier function and vascular permeability.

The University of Iowa Appointments/Elections • Heather Bream-Rouwenhorst is a clinical pharmacy specialist at the VA Medical Center, Iowa City and is an assistant professor (clinical) with the College of Pharmacy. • Kate M. Oltrogge is currently an assistant professor (clinical) in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science. • Stuart K. Pitman is an assistant professor (clinical) for the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science. • Mary Schroeder is a new assistant professor in the Division of Health Services Research. • Brandon Vakiner is an assistant professor (clinical) for the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science.

Awards • Barry L. Carter was selected by the American College of Clinical Pharmacy to receive the 2011 Russell R. Miller Award.

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faculty news

The University of Mississippi Appointments/Elections • David D. Allen, dean, effective Jan 1. 2012 • Mary A. Ballas, clinical assistant professor, pharmacy practice • Allison M. Bell, assistant professor, pharmacy practice • Tracy A. Brooks, assistant professor, pharmacology, and research assistant professor, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences • Courtney S. Davis, clinical assistant professor, pharmacy practice

• Alice M. Clark and Ameeta Agarwal received $384,375 from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for New Drugs for Opportunistic Infections. • John D. Cleary and Kayla R. Stover received $118,880 to study Cardiac Toxicity of Echinocandin Antifungals. • Robert J. Doerksen, Dawn Wilkins and Yixin Chen received $36,388 from Mississippi State University/National Science Foundation/Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research to study Combined Computational Chemistry and Computational Biology Modeling for Understanding Protein-Protein and Protein-Ligand Interactions-Competitive Seed Grant.

• Scott S. Malinowski, clinical assistant professor, pharmacy practice

• Mahmoud A. Elsohly and Ikhlas A. Khan received $866,768 from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for Production, Analysis and Distribution of Cannabis, Marijuana Cigarettes and Related Materials.

• Meagan A. Minor, clinical assistant professor, pharmacy practice, and coordinator of community pharmacy development

• Mark T. Hamann received $50,000 from Kraft Foods, Inc. to study Food Additives from Marine Bacteria, Algae and Invertebrates.

• Sarahmona M. Przybyla, research assistant professor, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences

• Erin R. Holmes received $4,000 from the National Association of Chain Drug Stores Foundation to study Pharmacy Student Perceptions of Community Pharmacy Residency Programs.

• Sarah Fontenot, clinical instructor, pharmacy practice

• Rebecca E. Taylor, clinical instructor, pharmacy practice

Grants • Benjamin F. Banahan received $206,697 from Endo Pharmaceuticals, Inc. to study Prevalence and Treatment of Central Precocious Puberty in the Medicaid Population. • Benjamin F. Banahan and Patrick Pace received $1,364,354 from the Mississippi Division of Medicaid/U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for Retrospective Drug Utilization Review, Support of the Drug Utilization Board and 2nd Level Appeal for Prior Authorization Process for the Miss. Division of Medicaid. • Charles L. Cantrell and Samir A. Ross received $240,000 from The International Science and Technology Center for Project Agreement #K1896p.

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• Ikhlas A. Khan, Mahmoud A. Elsohly, Troy Smillie and Aruna Weerasoriya received $344,906 from the University of Kentucky/National Institutes of Health for Advancing Drug Development in Medicinal Plants Using Transcriptomics and Metabolics. • Ikhlas A. Khan and Larry A. Walker received $1,608,000 from the Food and Drug Administration for Botanical Dietary Supplement Research. • Ikhlas A. Khan and Troy Smillie received $176,555 from the University of Illinois/National Institutes of Health for Botanical Identification, Characterization, Quality Assurance and Quality Control. • Soumyajit Majumdar and Michael A. Repka received $55,423 from ElSohly Laboratories, Inc./ National Institutes of Health for Development of


faculty news

Tetrahydrocannabinol Prodrugs for Topical Treatment of Glaucoma. • Christopher R. McCurdy received $171,259 from the National Institutes of Health for Non-Peptidic Neuropeptide FF Receptor Probes. He also received $311,025 from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Drug Abuse for Novel Pharmacologic Interventions for Drugs of Abuse. • Sathyanarayana N. Murthy received $66,533 from the National Institutes of Health for Transdermal Delivery of Iron. • Dale G. Nagle and Yu Dong Zhou received $243,214 from the National Institutes of Health for Anticancer Drug Discovery that Targets Tumor Hypoxia. • Michael A. Repka and Soumyajit Majumdar received $38,679 from BASF SE to study Properties of HME Extruded Films Containing Kollidon VA-64 and New Polymer, Soluplus. They also received $47,440 from Hercules Incorporated for Fundamental Studies in the Application of Low MW Klucel and Hot-Melt Extrusion for the Oral Delivery of Insoluble Drugs from Tablets, Capsules and Oral Film Dosage Forms.

Perceptions in Prostate Cancer. • Marc Slattery, John M. Rimoldi and Deborah Gochfeld received $75,000 from the University of North Carolina Wilmington/U.S. Department of Commerce/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to study Coral Reef Landscape Response to Ocean Acidification. • Gregory S. Tschumper, Amal Dass, Nathan Hammer, Keith Hollis, Randy Wadkins, Yixin Chen, Robert J. Doerksen and Maxine Harper received $375,128 from Mississippi State University/National Science Foundation for Modeling and Simulation of Complex Systems. • Larry A. Walker received $2,350,039 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service to study Discovery and Development of Natural Products for Pharmaceutical and Agrichemical Applications. • Larry A. Walker, Babu Tekwani and N.P. Dhammika Nanayakkara received $1,000,000 from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command for Development of Safer Drugs for Malaria and Leishmaniasis in U.S. Troops, Civilian Personnel and Travelers.

• Daniel M. Riche received $47,348 from the U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council to study the Impact of Blueberries on Hyperuricemia and Gout: A Pilot Study.

• Barbara G. Wells and Charles D. Hufford received $8,479,000 from the Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Services Administration for Phase II of the National Center for Natural Products Research.

• Leigh Ann Ross and Lauren S. Bloodworth received $300,000 from the Mississippi State Department of Health/Centers for Disease Control for the Pharmacy Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Project.

• Kristine L. Willett received $68,612 from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to study BaP-mediated Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity.

• Ziaeddin Shariat-Madar received $9,625 from August Wolff GmbH & Co. KG Arzneimettel to study Characterization of the Inhibitors of Prolylcarboxypeptidase.

• Jordan K. Zjawiony received $60,562 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill/National Institute of Drug Abuse to study Diterpenes as Selective Kappa Opioid Receptor Agents.

• Justin J. Sherman, Laurie E. Warrington, Daniel M. Riche, Leigh Ann Ross and Lauren S. Bloodworth received $49,000 from the National Rural Health Association/Emory University/U.S. Department of Health & Human Services/Centers for Disease Control to study Active Surveillance Attitudes and

• Jordan K. Zjawiony and Charles Burandt received $71,500 from the National Institutes of Health to study Psychopharmacology of Plants and Their Metabolites Used as Marijuana Substitutes.

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faculty news

Promotions • Brian L. Crabtree, professor, pharmacy practice, and coordinator of instruction • Soumyajit Majumdar, associate professor, pharmaceutics, and research associate professor, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences • Sathyanarayana N. Murthy, associate professor, pharmaceutics, and research associate professor, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences • Michael A. Repka, chair and professor, pharmaceutics, and research professor, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences • Yi Yang, associate professor, pharmacy administration, and research associate professor, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences

The University of Montana Grants • Annjeanette Belcourt-Dittloff received $19,962 from the Montana Mental Health Trust Settlement for Youth Suicide Prevention in Montana Tribal Communities: Resiliency and community based strategies to improve coping skills and protective factors among Native youth and families.

The University of Oklahoma Awards • Ryan Shupbach received the Allen J. Brands Clinical Pharmacist of the Year Award in June 2011.

Grants • Vibhudutta Awasthi, Advanced Biomarker Technologies, $22,500, “F-MISO validation.”; NIHNHLBI, $1.4 million, “Biologic evaluation of liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin.”; NIH-UKMC subcontract, $45,389, “Dietary prevention of cancer.” • Shane P. Desselle, American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education, $6,000, “Predoctoral fellowship for Gretchen Peirce.”

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academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2011

• Lucila Garcia-Contreras, Research Triangle Institute, $49,960, “Inhaled caprazamycin for tuberculosis therapy.” • Nancy A. Letassy, American Association of Diabetes Educators, $60,000, “Integration of diabetes self-management education in a patient-centered medical home.” • Youngjae You, Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, $135,000, “New BODIPY-type photosensitizers absorbing near IR light.”

The University of Tennessee Appointments/Elections • Rebecca F. Chhim, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy • Anthony J. Guarascio, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy • Bernd Meibohm, elected to ACCP Board of Regents • Anthony S. Rowe, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy • Emma M. Tillman, research assistant professor

Awards • Stephan L. Foster received Alumni Public Service Award and named Founding Member of Edward Jenner Society. • Ram I. Mahato was inducted as a fellow by the Controlled Release Society (CRS).

Promotions • Anita Airee, associate professor of clinical pharmacy • Heather M. Eppert, associate professor of clinical pharmacy • Shaunta M. Ray, associate professor of clinical pharmacy • Kelly C. Rogers, professor of clinical pharmacy


faculty news

Retirements

Promotions

• Emily B. Hak, professor, clinical pharmacy

• Miles P. Hacker, promoted to master teacher

• Lawrence J. Hak, professor, clinical pharmacy

• Ana Maria Oyarce, promoted from visiting assistant professor to lecturer

• Eugene B. Smith Jr., associate professor, clinical pharmacy • George C. Wood Sr., professor, pharmaceutical sciences

The University of Texas at Austin Appointments/Elections • James T. Doluisio has been named dean emeritus.

Awards • Donna M. Burkett is recipient of the William J. Sheffield Outstanding Alumnus Award. • Christopher R. Frei has been named recipient of the Distinguished Young Alumnus Award. • Kenneth A. Lawson Jr., along with Pharm.D. student Sofia Mnjoyan, was named to the 2011 AACP Walmart Scholars Program. • Marvin D. Shepherd, along with Marie A. Chisholm-Burns and Allison M. Vaillancourt of The University of Arizona, won the American Medical Writers Association’s (AMWA) distinguished 2011 Medical Book Award in the Health Care Professionals Category as editors on the pharmacy business textbook, Pharmacy Management, Leadership, Marketing and Finance.

• Caren L. Steinmiller, promoted from visiting assistant professor to lecturer

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Appointments/Elections • William T. Allaben, associate professor of pharmaceutical science • Nukhet Aykin-Burns, assistant professor of pharmacy practice • Peter A. Crooks, department chair of pharmaceutical sciences • Tiffany A. Dickey, assistant professor of pharmacy practice • Jan K. Hastings was installed as the AACP secretary of the Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicines Special Interest Group for 2011–2012. • Randy Haun, associate professor of pharmaceutical science, Northwest Campus • Victoria S. Seaton, assistant professor of pharmacy practice, Northwest Campus • Rachel A. Stafford, assistant professor of pharmacy practice

• Billy W. Woodward has been named to the Legend of Pharmacy Award.

• Guangrong Zheng, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences

The University of Toledo

Awards

Appointments/Elections • Sai Hanuman Sagar Boddu, assistant professor of pharmaceutics

• Marjan Boerma is the 2011 recipient of the Michael Fry Research Award. • Peter A. Crooks was named Arkansas Research Alliance (ARA) Scholar for 2011, the second researcher from the college to be awarded the distinction in two years.

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faculty news

• Daohong Zhou was named an ARA Scholar in 2010.

University of Connecticut

Promotions

Appointments/Elections

• T. Scott Warmack has been named associate dean for the Northwest Arkansas Campus of the college.

• Lisa M. Holle, professor of pharmacy practice

University of California, San Diego

• Marie A. Smith received the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) Research and Education Foundation’s 2011 Award for Innovation in Pharmacy Practice.

Appointments/Elections • Charles E. Daniels has been elected correspondants etrangers (foreign correspondent) by the Academie nationale de Pharmacie in France. • Candis M. Morello has been named associate dean for student affairs.

Awards • Pieter C. Dorrestein has been named the 2011 recipient of the Matt Suffness Award by the American Foundation for Pharmacognosy (AFP).

University of Cincinnati Appointments/Elections • Gerald B. Kasting, appointed chair of the Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences. • Giovanni M. Pauletti, appointed director of Graduate Program.

Promotions • Jianfei Guo, professor of pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacoeconomics • Daniel P. Healy, professor of pharmacy practice

Retirements • Wayne F. Conrad, professor, retired effective Sept. 1, 2011 following 27 years of service.

Awards

Grants • Amy C. Anderson, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease. Amount of award: $296,512.00. Title: Targeting Bacillus Dhfr: Structural Studies and Synthesis of Inhibitors; principal investigator, source of award: National Institutes of Health/ Duke University. Amount of award: $34,000.00. Title: Computational Active-Site Redesign Binding Prediction Via Molecular Ensembles; principal investigator, source of award: PHS/NIH/ National Institute of General Medical Sciences. Award amount: $237,650.00. Title: Design of C. Parvum and T. Gondii Dhfr-Ts Inhibitors; principal investigator, source of award: PHS/NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences. Amount of award: $23,765.00. Title: Targeting Dhrfr to Design Antimicrobial Agents. • Brian J. Aneskievich, principal investigator. Source of award: CT Department of Health Connecticut Innovation, Inc. Amount of award: $99,959.00. Title: Nuclear Receptor Control of Human Epidermal Stem Cells; principal investigator, sponsor: CT Department of Public Health CT Innovations, Inc. Amount of award: $99,935.00. Title: Nuclear Receptor Control of Human Epidermal Stem Cells. • Marcy J. Balunas, principal investigator. Source of award: American Cancer Society University of Connecticut Health Center. Amount of award: $30,000.00. Title: Novel Methodology for Discovery of Cytotoxic Payloads for Antibody-Drugs. • Robin H. Bogner, principal investigator. Source of award: Baxter Healthcare Corporation. Amount

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faculty news

of award: $50,000.00. Title: Application of Qbd Principles To Freeze Dried Injectable Pharmaceutical Products; principal investigator, source of award: U.S. Pharmacopeia. Amount of award: $25,000.00. Title: Comparison of Biorelevant Media and USP Compendial Media on Solution-Mediated Transformation of Amorphous Drugs during Dissolution. • Diane J. Burgess, principal investigator. Source of award: Merial Limited. Amount of award: $44,285.00. Title: In Vitro Release Testing of Eprinomectin LAI; principal investigator, source of award: PHS/DHHS/Food and Drug Administration. Amount of award: $99,500.00. A Quality by Design: Case Studies and Guidance Elements on Parenteral Dosage Forms; principal investigator, source of award: PHS/Food and Drug Administration. Amount of award: $12,000. Development of a Mathematical Model to Predict Drug Encapsulation Inside Liposomes containing a Hydrophilic API. • Bodhisattwa Chaudhuri, principal investigator. Source of award: Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturing of America. Amount of award: $60,000.00. Title: Experimentally Validated Modeling, Optimization and Scale-Up of High Shear Granulation Process. • Craig I. Coleman, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Amount of award: $299,938.00. Title: Biologic and Non-Biologic Systematic Agents and Phototherapy for treatment of Chronic Plaque Psoriasis; principal investigator, source of award: PHS/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Amount of award: $138,753.00. Title: The Use of Indirect Statistical Comparisons In Epc Reports. • Megan Jo Ehret, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/NIH/National Institute Mental Health Rutgers State University of New Jersey. Amount of award: $10,000.00. Title: A Psychotropic Medication Adherence: Development of An Inmate Interview Process. • Jennifer M. Girotto, principal investigator. Source of award: Connecticut Children’s Hospital. Amount of award: $1,683.00. Title: Advancing CF Outcomes through Improved Adherence.

• David F. Grant, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/NIH/National Institute of General Medical Sciences. Amount of award: $201,998.00. Title: Metabolomics Tools for Biomedicine. • M. Kyle Hadden, principal investigator. Source of award: V Foundation. Amount of award: $200,000. Title: A Chemical Biology Approach To Understanding The Anti-Cancer Effects of Vitamin D3. • Philip M. Hritcko, principal investigator. Source of award: Yale University VNAA/VNA East Inc. Amount of award: $18,900.00. Title: Connecticut Collaboration for Fall Prevention. • Sean M. Jeffery, principal investigator. Source of award: VA/Providence Medical Center. Amount of award: $6,805.00. Title: Group Intervention for Dm Guideline Implementation. • Devendra S. Kalonia, principal investigator. Source of award: Genetech, Incorporated. Amount of award: $102,900.00. Title: A Mechanistic Investigation of Protein-Polyol Interactions; principal investigator, source of award: Biogen Idec. Amount of award: $83,394.00. Title: Protein Silicone Interactions; principal investigator, source of award: Biogen Idec. Amount of award: $139,277.00. Title: Effect of Protein-Protein Interactions on Drying of Proteins. • Debra A. Kendall, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/NIH/GM. Amount of award: $325,084.00. Title: Redesign of Structural Regions of Alkaline Phosphates; principal investigator, source of award: PHS/NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse. Amount of award: $50,476.00. Title: Cannabinoid Receptor One-B Arrestin Interactions; principal investigator, source of award: PHS/ NIH/GM. Amount of award: $32,508.00. Title: Redesign of Structural Regions of Alkaline Phosphates; principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse. Amount of award: $287,975.00. Title: Determinants of the Cannabinoid Receptor Life Cycle. • José E. Manautou, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Amount of award: $376,129.00. Title: Transporter Expression

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faculty news

In Response To Hepatotoxicants; principal investigator, source of award: PHS/NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease. Amount of award: $308,909.00. Title: Transporter Expression In Response to Hepatotoxicants.

• Charles M. White, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/Agency For Healthcare Research and Quality. Amount of award: $375,000.00. Title: Comparative Effectiveness of VTE Prophylaxis In Orthopedic Surgery and Other Patient Populations.

• John B. Morris, principal investigator. Source of award: NIH/NHLBI Yale University. Amount of award: $140,540.00. Title: Counterirritation By Menthol: Molecular Targets And Role In Airway Disease; principal investigator, source of award: American Petroleum Institute. Amount of award: $109,395.00. Title: Naphthalene Nasal Glutathione Dose Response Characterization Study.

• Dennis L. Wright, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/NIH/National Cancer Institute. Amount of award: $197,655.00. Title: Hdac Inhibitors Inspired by Natural Products.

• Michael J. Pikal, principal investigator. Source of award: Givaudan Flavors Corporation. Amount of award: $142,065.00. Title: Dynamics In Polysaccharide Glasses and Their Impact on the Stability of Encapsulated Flavors; principal investigator, source of award: FDA/National Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Education. Amount of award: $32,283.00. Title: Reviewer Education in State of the Art Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Technology; principal investigator, source of award: PHS/NIH-Physical Science, Inc. Amount of award: $44,999.00. Title: Development of A Mini Lyophilizer For Pharmaceutical Product Formulation; principal investigator, source of award: Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturing of America. Amount of award: $20,000.00. Title: Critical Factors in Biopreservation of Freeze-Dried Protein Formulations. He also received additional funding from PHS/NIH DOC/NIST in the amount of $133,815.00. Title: Ambient, Dry State Preservation of Therapeutic Macromolecules. • Marie A. Smith, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/Centers for Medicare and Medicaid CT DSS. Amount of award: $133,453.00. Title: Hospital-to-Home Care Transition: Medication Reconciliation and Management. • Olga Y. Vinogradova, principal investigator. Source of award: American Heart Association. Amount of award: $66,000.00. Title: Shc in Integrin Signaling; principal investigator, source of award: PHS/NIH/ National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Amount of award: $191,250.00. Title: Investigation of the Vegfr/Integrin Cytoplasmic Domains Interaction.

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Promotions • Philip M. Hritcko, associate clinical professor • José E. Manautou, professor of pharmaceutical sciences

University of Florida Awards • Rhonda M. Cooper-DeHoff accepted an award at AHA Hypertension for a paper she first authored, which was selected as the top population science paper in the journal Hypertension for 2010. She was also selected as a recipient of the ASHP Foundation’s 2011 Literature Award and was selected as the winner of this year’s Best Paper Award for an article that was published in JAMA in July 2010.

University of Maryland Appointments/Elections • Janice Batzold has been named president elect of Alumni Association-International. • Sandeep Devabhakthuni has been named an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science. • Pedro E.M. Lopes has been named a research assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. • C. Daniel Mullins has been appointed to a fouryear term as a regular member of the National Cancer Institute’s Study Section NCI-J. • Katy Pincus has been named an assistant profes-


faculty news

sor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science.

• Joshua M. Thorpe, associate professor, pharmacy and therapeutics

• Fengtian Xue has been named an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

• Rima A. Mohammad was elected as chair-elect for the American College of Clinical Pharmacy GI/ Liver/Nutrition PRN for 2011–2012.

Awards • Natalie D. Eddington received a Distinguished Alumnus Award from the Howard University School of Pharmacy Alumni Association. • Wendy Klein-Schwartz and Suzanne Doyon received the 2010 Best Paper Award from the International Society of Pharmacoepidemiology. • The School of Pharmacy’s student chapter of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) received 2nd place in the AAPS’ 25 video competition. • James A. Trovato was named a fellow of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists.

Grants • C. Daniel Mullins received $403,700 from Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals for Colorectal Cancer CER. • Eberechukwu Onukwugha received $398,300 from Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals for Prostate Cancer CRC. • Francoise Pradel received $430,000 from the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene for The Maryland Strategic Prevention Framework (MSPF) Process and Outcome Evaluation. • Jai Bei Wang received $225,000 from the National Institute of Mental Health for Exploring the Role of HINT1 Protein in Neuronal Function. • Sheila Weiss-Smith received $30,095 from DrugLogic for Predoctoral Fellowship in Pharmacovigilance.

University of Pittsburgh Appointments/Elections • Carolyn T. Thorpe, assistant professor, pharmacy and therapeutics

• Kristine S. Schonder was selected as co-chair of the National Quality Forum Renal Endorsement Maintenance Steering Committee for End-Stage Renal Disease.

Awards • Donna M. Huryn has been selected as a fellow of the American Chemical Society. • Sandra L. Kane-Gill received the 2011 American College of Clinical Pharmacy Critical Care PRN Research Award. She also co-edited the recently published book, High-Risk IV Medication to Special Patient Populations. • Melissa A. Somma McGivney was selected by the National Association of Chain Drug Stores Foundation as the recipient of the 2011 Community Pharmacy Faculty Award. • Thomas D. Nolin and Amy L. Seybert were named fellows of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy. • Susan J. Skledar received the School of Pharmacy 2010–11 Residency Preceptor of the Year Award.

Grants • Janice L. Pringle received $2,000 from Astra Zeneca for “Qualitative Analysis of an Innovative Practice in Community Pharmacy.” • Maureen D. Reynolds received $113,625 from the National Institutes of Health-University of Michigan for “Center for Education and Drug Abuse Research (CEDAR) Computer Data Archiving Project.” • Xiang-Qun (Sean) Xie received $412,711 from the National Institutes of Health for “Screen and Design p18 Chemical Probes for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal.”

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faculty news

Promotions

Awards

• Jan H. Beumer, assistant professor in the tenure stream

• Thomas A. Baillie has been named a fellow of the American Chemical Society.

University of Southern California

• Cara L. McDermott received a UW Huckabay Teaching Fellowship to work with Dana P. Hammer and other professors to create a teaching module about hospice for Pharm.D. students.

Grants

Grants

• Marco Bortolato received a two-year, $445,500 R21 grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development for the project, “Interactions of MAO A with Vulnerability Factors for Aggression,” which he will be working on along with university professor Jean Shih, the Boyd P. and Elsie D. Welin Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, and postdoctoral students Simone Tambaro and Sean Godar. He has also received funding as part of a four-year $572,000 grant from the European Union for the COST project, “StructureBased Drug Design for Diagnosis and Treatment of Neurological Diseases.” Bortolato’s final grant comes from the Manitoba Health Research Council in the amount of $105,000 for the project, “A Neurodevelopmental Model of Adolescent Cannabinoid Exposure.”

• Carlos E. Catalano is a co-principal investigator on a new National Institutes of Health Post-Baccalaureate Research Education Program grant for $1,422,719.

University of Washington

• Gretchen M. Brophy was elected to the Neurocritical Care Society board of directors. She also served as chairwoman of the Biannual Satellite Conference for the Carolinas/Virginias Society of Critical Care Medicine.

Appointments/Elections • Donald F. Downing received the School of Pharmacy’s Institute for Innovative Pharmacy Practice (“I2P2”) Endowed Professorship. • Shiu-Lok Hu received the School of Pharmacy’s Milo Gibaldi Endowed Professorship in Pharmaceutics. • Sidney D. Nelson Jr. received the School of Pharmacy’s Drug Metabolism, Transport and Pharmacogenomic Research Endowed Professorship. • Peggy S. Odegard received the School of Pharmacy’s Shirley & Herb Bridge Endowed Professorship for Women in Pharmacy.

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• Impel NeuroPharma, a biotech founded by Rodney Ho and John Hoekman, received $750,000 from the Department of Defense’s Chemical and Biological Defense Program to assess how therapeutic drugs might break the blood-brain barrier to treat people exposed to chemical warfare agents.

Virginia Commonwealth University Appointments/Elections

• Wanda L. Coffey was appointed director of the Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience program in the Office of Experiential Education. • Jeffrey C. Delafuente was elected 2011-12 vice president of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists. • Krista L. Donohoe was appointed assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science. • Jean-Venable “Kelly” R. Goode was elected a threeyear trustee of the American Pharmacists Association.


faculty news

• Rong Huang II was appointed assistant professor in the Department of Medicinal Chemistry.

Wayne State University

• Diana R. Mack was appointed assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science. She also will practice with the VCU Health System internal medicine group.

Grants

• Sallie D. Mayer was appointed an affiliate assistant professor in the university’s Department of Family Medicine. • Ronald E. Polk was appointed an affiliate research professor in the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science. • Brigitte L. Sicat was appointed to the AACP Council of Deans-Council of Faculties Joint Task Force on Professionalism. • Evan M. Sisson was named to the editorial board of Diabetes Health magazine.

• Michael J. Rybak, Cerexa, Inc, $104,370, Evaluation of Ceftraroline (CPT) Activity vs Vancomycin (VAN) Against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) Strains in In-vitro Simulated Endocarditis Vegetation (SEV Model).

Wilkes University Awards • Judith L. Kristeller is the recipient of the 2011 Lambda Kappa Sigma Advisor Award.

Wingate University Appointments/Elections

• Douglas H. Sweet took office as vice chairman of the Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Drug Metabolism section at the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists’ 2011 Annual Meeting and Exposition.

• Holly F. Anderson, regional experiential director and assistant professor of pharmacy, Hendersonville Campus

Awards

• Lorne E. Basskin, regional dean, Hendersonville Campus

• J. Tyler Stevens was named Chapter Advisor of the Year at the national Phi Delta Chi fraternity 2011 Grand Council. • Nancy S. Yunker received the Adult Medicine PRN Mentoring Award at the 2011 American College of Clinical Pharmacy Annual Meeting.

• Robert Ashworth, assistant professor of pharmacy

• Cassie L. Boland, assistant professor of pharmacy • Michelle R. DeGeeter, assistant professor of pharmacy, Hendersonville Campus • Lindsey P. Koliscak, assistant professor of pharmacy

Washington State University

Grants

Promotions

• Tracy S. Hunter was awarded a $15,000 unrestricted educational grant from Pamlabs, LLC in the area of therapeutic uses of folate.

• Brenda S. Bray, clinical associate professor • Gary M. Pollack, vice provost of WSU Health Sciences division • Jonathan K. Reynolds, clinical associate professor

• Delilah J. Jackson, Jacqueline L. Olin and Michael L. Manolakis were awarded a Project Impact: Diabetes grant from the APhA Foundation in the amount of $25,000.

• Beth A. Vorderstrasse, clinical associate professor

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faculty news

Emerging Colleges and Schools

• Kirk Dineley, associate professor of pharmacology

Roosevelt University

• Tara Dymon, assistant professor of clinical sciences (ambulatory care)

Appointments/Elections

• David G. Fuentes Jr., associate professor of clinical sciences (psychiatry)

• Amusa Adebayo, associate professor of biopharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics • Fatima M. Ali, assistant professor of clinical sciences (internal medicine) • Meghana Aruru, assistant professor of pharmacy administration • Scott Benken, assistant professor of clinical sciences (critical care) • Joseph Bogdan, assistant professor of pharmacy administration • Cara M. Brock, instructor of clinical sciences • Balwant Chauhan, assistant professor of anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology

• Abby A. Kahaleh, associate professor of pharmacy administration • Sonali Kurup, assistant professor of medicinal chemistry • Ravikiran Panakanti, assistant professor of pharmaceutics • Lawrence A. Potempa, associate professor of biochemistry and immunology

Saint Joseph College Appointments/Elections • Michelle M. Kalis has been named provost and professor of biology and pharmaceutical sciences.

• Tonya Crawford, assistant professor of clinical sciences (infectious diseases)

Remember to submit your Faculty News today! It’s fast and easy to make sure your college or school of pharmacy is featured in the Faculty News section of Academic Pharmacy Now. Visit the AACP Web site at www.aacp.org and complete the School News Submission Form on the News and Publications portion of the Web site.

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Renew Your Membership Today!

faculty news

Don’t miss a single day of all that AACP brings to you and your career. As the Association representing your unique interests, AACP is continuously evaluating the issues and needs of the Academy to enhance its programs, products and services for our members. Our challenging and relevant educational programming, advocacy efforts, publications and partnership initiatives are all designed with you in mind. New to AACP members in 2012 are digital engagement tools available on the AACP Web site, additional networking opportunities both in-person and through free Webinars, as well as new faculty development and graduate education programs.

Renew your AACP membership today to receive these outstanding member benefits: 33 National meetings, workshops and seminars. Receive discounted rates to AACP’s must-attend meetings, including the 2012 Annual and Interim Meetings and the 2012 AACP Institute focused on team-based interprofessional education.

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33 Limitless opportunities for involvement and collaboration. Join multiple SIGs and up to two national Sections for sharing ideas and networking with colleagues. Utilize new member engagement tools such as discussion boards, blogs and wikis coming soon.

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33 Peer-reviewed material on education and scholarship. The American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education continues to bring increased visibility of your work through its 10 content-rich issues. 33 Academy recognition. AACP regularly recognizes member accomplishments in pharmacy education, research, publication and public service through a myriad of award programs, grants and fellowships.

For only $100, you’ll receive these invaluable resources and much more. Commit to advancing your academic career by renewing your AACP membership! Simply renew online at www.aacp.org by Dec. 31, 2011 or fax or mail completed membership forms to 703-836-8982 or AACP, 1727 King St., Alexandria, VA 22314. If you have any questions, contact Sandra “Angie” A. Edwards, member services associate, at aedwards@aacp.org or 703-7392330 ext. 1035.

DECEMBER

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Academic Pharmacy Now: Oct/Nov/Dec 2011