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The News Magazine of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

Academic Pharmacy NOW

Oct | Nov | Dec 2009

Volume 2 Issue 4

cience S of Safety the

e f Sa s t n e i t Pa s p e e K y m e d a c A

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Discover 路 Learn 路 Care : Improve Health


table of contents

News in Brief

Features

News Briefs

9

Professor Pays Homage to Heritage

10

In Memoriam

11

Capitol Hill News

13

UF Students Feel the Heat

17

Will

on the

CTSA

NIH

5

20

CTSA Academic Pharmacy Helps Expand NIHSponsored Program

Hill

The Science of Safety

Teaching Patients to be Heart Smart in Toledo

Academy Keeps Patients Safe

24 Science Safety the

of

Faculty News 33

Faculty News

35

Members Working for You

Photo Credits Cau Mem tion: ber Wor s at k

Cover: istockphoto.com

Cincinnati Academic Health Center

Page 9: LeRoy Salerni

Page 31: The University of Arizona

Page 10: Washington State University, The University of Iowa

Page 35: University of Florida

Page 12: Campbell University Page 13: University of Florida Page 14: Maureen Thielemans, AACP Page 15: istockphoto.com

50 2

The Last Word

Page 16: University of Minnesota Pages 17: The University of Toledo Page 24: istockphoto.com Page 27: Dave Collins, University of

academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

Back cover: istockphoto.com Back cover–overwrap: istockphoto.com


letter from the editor

Dear Colleagues: Despite having been a student and (to a limited extent) practitioner of quality improvement in healthcare for more than 20 years, I still find it a challenge to communicate to students and colleagues exactly where pharmacy education and practice and “the science of safety/quality” intersect. This is even true after a decade of attention to safety in the healthcare system stimulated by multiple reports from the Institute of Medicine, beginning with To Err is Human. Perhaps it is because contemporary pharmacy really is all about the science of safety and the relevant content perfuses our curricula, our clinical practice and our research. You now find evidence-based medicine, population health monitoring, medication therapy management, pharmacogenomics, research design and patient safety as important courses or course components in every school’s curricular map. This issue of Academic Pharmacy Now shines a spotlight on how this manifests in the work of our faculty across the spectrum of the relevant sciences. While chatting recently with Dr. Donna S. West-Strum, co-investigator of the FDA-funded analysis of the science of safety in the contemporary pharmacy curriculum, she shared some perspectives she gleaned from a national survey and several case studies of how pharmacy educators prepare Pharm.D. and graduate students to contribute more in this expanding arena of patient care and research. She emphasized that this truly does cut across every discipline and requires attention to activities like the FDA Sentinel Initiative. Dr. Abraham G. Hartzema, who recently completed a yearlong sabbatical at FDA working on the scientific framework for the Sentinel program, is featured in this issue’s “Members Working for You.” His important work will continue as the FDA works to create a much more robust, prospective monitoring system for post-marketing surveillance of the drugs and devices they regulate. Pharmacists and pharmacy faculty have much to contribute to the design, management and interpretation of findings from such a system. The issue of patient safety as a driver of healthcare quality is an important component of healthcare reform. Cutting across each of these health policy areas are the issues of having an adequately prepared workforce. Health professions educators must accept the responsibility that our graduates are able to collect and synthesize patient and population health information and translate it into meaningful information to share with patients, their caregivers, and all their providers so that we might move toward the delivery of patient-centered care that is evidence-based. This is why the science of safety is so integral to quality pharmacy education and care. We wish you and your loved ones the very best as this year comes to an end and look forward to extending our relationships in service to you in 2010 and beyond. Sincerely,

Lucinda L. Maine, Ph.D., R.Ph. Executive Vice President and CEO

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about us

Academic Pharmacy NOW

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Established in 1972 as AACP News, Academic Pharmacy Now features comprehensive news stories that reflect the discovery, learning and caring of more than 100 U.S. colleges and schools of pharmacy. It is the only magazine focused strictly on the advancements of pharmacy faculty and their students. The magazine is distributed to all U.S. pharmacy institutions as well as more than 3,200 individual AACP members across the country. Published quarterly as a membership service by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Inc. For address change, please return mailing label with current school affiliation.

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©2009 by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. All rights reserved. Content may not be reprinted without prior written permission. We welcome your comments.

Executive Vice President/Executive Editor

Digital Requirements

Lucinda L. Maine

Academic Pharmacy Now supports a digital workflow and requires digital ad submission. Ads must be submitted as press-ready pdf files or tiff files. Fonts and images must be embedded. All images must be saved as at least 300 DPI @ 100% of finished size. Ads may be submitted as grayscale or 4-color CMYK. Full-page ads run 8.5� by 11� with a full bleed; half-page ads run 5.5� by 8.5� with a two-sided bleed. For any questions on ad requirements, e-mail Tricia Ekenstam, art director, at tekenstam@ aacp.org. To submit advertisements, simply e-mail ads directly to Rebecca Morgan, senior editor, at rmorgan@aacp.org or Maureen O’Hara, managing editor at mohara@aacp.org.

Senior Editor

Rebecca M. Morgan rmorgan@aacp.org Managing Editor

Maureen Thielemans

mthielemans@aacp.org Art Director

Tricia Ekenstam

Issuance & Closing Dates Frequency: 4 issues a year

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 1727 King Street Alexandria, VA 22314 703-739-2330• Fax: 703-836-8982

www.aacp.org

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Discover · Learn · Care : Improve Health

Issue Closing Date

Jan/Feb/Mar

December 15, 2009

Apr/May/Jun

March 15, 2010

Jul/Aug/Sep

Oct/Nov/Dec

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academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

June 15, 2010 September 15, 2010


news in brief

News Briefs UH Hilo College of Pharmacy Awarded Grant to Expand Graduate Programs

said Gilliland. “Their excitement and knowledge must be coupled with leadership. The combination will directly impact a student’s desire to learn and also the future of pharmacy.”

The University of Hawaii at Hilo (UHH) will use a $951,000 federal grant to expand graduate programs within the College of Pharmacy and to setup a physical therapy degree track, according to Senator Daniel K. Inouye’s office.

UT Austin Professor Receives NIH Grant for Male Fertility Research

Part of the money, awarded through a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, will be used to establish a dual M.S.nurse practitioner, family nurse practitioner specialty/Doctor of Pharmacy (FNP/Pharm.D.) degree, the first of its kind in the U.S. “Students studying at the University of Hawaii at Hilo’s College of Pharmacy are able to take advantage of the best that Western science, Eastern traditions and native Hawaiian heritage has to offer as they explore the healing arts,” said Senator Inouye. “We must continue to expand the educational opportunities available to them so that new ways to heal our sick and prevent illness emerge.” UHH will use its 2009 Congressionally-directed grant for a variety of other programs. Some of the funds will also be used to develop a clinical pharmacist training and supply model for rural and underserved areas of Hawaii, and create a general practice pharmacy residency program/drug information and medication therapy management center/distance learning program.

Auburn Campaign for Professorships Receives Significant Gift to Harrison School of Pharmacy Auburn University alumnus Dr. David Gilliland recently designated a $1.05 million gift to support seven professorships at the Harrison School of Pharmacy at Auburn University. The gift will count toward Auburn’s current campaign to fund 81 professorships. Auburn University President, Jay Gogue, identified raising funds for professorships as a key strategic initiative for the university. Professorships reward faculty with exceptional merit. These funds offer a huge morale boost by providing salary enhancements to faculty who stimulate young minds and contribute to building programs that enhance the university. “A first-rate education stems from professors who are not only knowledgeable, but are also good mentors and role models,”

Dr. John H. Richburg, associate professor of pharmacy at The University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy, has received a five-year $1.5 million National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to study the adverse effects of environmental toxicants on male fertility and disease. Richburg is investigating a class of compounds, called phthalates, used in the manufacturing of plastics and other common consumer products. “Exposure to low levels of phthalates during the fetal period of testicular development may cause testicular cancer or infertility later in adult life,” Richburg said. Despite the association of exposure to these agents and infertility, very little is known of the mechanisms by which they act on the male reproductive system. “If we can understand the underlying mechanisms at the molecular and cellular level that account for the effects of toxic compounds, then we can develop more effective strategies to prevent disease and infertility,” Richburg said. Richburg’s lab at the university is internationally recognized for its work on revealing the molecular mechanisms that regulate cell death in the testis and the influence that environmental chemicals have on these processes. The insights gained from this research are expected to allow for the development of a clinical treatment that will effectively treat the cancer while sparing the fertility and post-treatment quality of life for these young men.

Human Ingenuity + Cutting Edge Technology = Award-Winning Program at SCCP At the South Carolina College of Pharmacy (SCCP), sure hands at the tiller of the information technology program have leveraged applications and architecture to produce an award-winning distance education program. The program was recognized with the Technology in Education/Govern-

academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

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news in brief

ment Award, recognizing a company or organization for the application or development of innovative technology-based projects and programs that impact government or education and related operations. “We’re justifiably proud of our distance education and information technology programs,” said Dr. Joseph T. DiPiro, executive dean of SCCP. “We’ve invested in getting the right equipment systems and the right people to run them. Part of that is our distance education program, which enables our students to be taught by the state’s foremost expert—from various locations — while still enjoying all the benefits of a predominantly face-to-face educational experience.” The annual awards are presented to the leaders and innovators in technology from the Columbia Information Technology Council.

UM Receives Grand Challenges Explorations Grant for Innovative Global Health Research The University of Mississippi (UM) has received a $100,000 Grand Challenges Explorations grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The grant will support an innovative global health research project conducted by Larry A. Walker, director of the National Center for Natural Products Research (NCNPR), titled “Primaquine Revisited—Safety and Efficacy of Primaquine Enantiomers.” Walker’s project is one of 81 grants announced by the Gates Foundation in the second funding round of Grand Challenges Explorations, an initiative to help scientists around the world explore bold and largely unproven ways to improve health in developing countries. The grants were provided to scientists in 17 countries on six continents. The initiative is highly competitive, receiving more than 3,000 proposals in this round. The UM project focuses on reducing the toxicity of primaquine, which is a mixture of two isomers, or molecules that have the same composition but are mirror images of each other. The idea is to test whether one of the isomers alone will kill malaria parasites but produce fewer toxic side effects for humans. Primaquine is a key weapon against malaria cases caused by the Plasmodium vivax parasite because this species lies dormant for a time in the patient’s liver.

Correction In the July/Aug/Sept 2009 edition of Academic Pharmacy Now, the article “Raising the Bar” incorrectly attributed University of Southern Nevada’s clinical pharmacy initiative to College of Pharmacy Dean Renee E. Coffman. Founding dean and current university President Dr. Harry Rosenberg led the program’s efforts.

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academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

Sullivan University Hosts Plant-Based Therapeutics Symposium Sullivan University College of Pharmacy and Kentucky BioProcessing, LLC recently collaborated to promote a very specialized area of research on natural products. In mid-July, these two organizations joined forces to host the Plant-Based Therapeutics Symposium. The conference addressed very specialized research development that contributes to humanity at large by promoting protein and peptide drugs obtained from plants. Researchers from more than 10 states and two countries shared their findings on plant-made pharmaceuticals during the first day of the conference, hosted at Sullivan. Plant-based therapeutics are part of a developing science that uses natural proteins and peptides from living organisms, primarily plants, to produce remedies for various ailments. Utilizing such a plant-based transient, or transgenic gene expression system, significantly reduces the time, risk and huge capital expense of a typical bioreactor.

LECOM School of Pharmacy announces new dean The Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM) has promoted Dr. Hershey Bell as vice president of academic affairs and dean of the LECOM School of Pharmacy. Dr. Bell replaces Dr. Donald A. Tuttle who served as the pharmacy school dean at the college for five years. Dr. Bell began teaching at LECOM as clinical professor of family medicine and associate dean for faculty development and evaluation in 2004. He will continue to oversee faculty development, the Master of Science in medical education program, and the Teaching and Learning Center.


news in brief

Butler University Launches Clinic Pharmacy Continuing its efforts to develop public health-related programs and outreach activities across the state, student pharmacists in Butler University’s College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (COPHS) have partnered with students from the Indiana University School of Medicine to develop a student-run clinic housed in Neighborhood Fellowship Church located on Indianapolis’ eastside. Butler’s contribution to the clinic, which opened in August, is the student-run pharmacy, Butler University Community Outreach Pharmacy (BUCOP). Services provided by the BUCOP include counseling on non-drug therapies and chronic disease prevention. The BUCOP will initially target uninsured and underserved patients within the Neighborhood Fellowship community— a community where roughly 50 percent

of residents live at or below the poverty level. The BUCOP began by treating only patients with acute problems who agreed to be seen and diagnosed by a member of the IU Student Clinic. Long-term plans call for further expansion of the clinic into the greater Indianapolis area.

members include Tyler Trueg, Kalin Clifford, Katrina Coffey and Annie Webster. All are in the third year of Butler’s professional pharmacy program. COPHS dean Mary H. Andritz and assistant professor of pharmacy practice Dr. Kristal L. Williams serve as mentors for the program.

BUCOP Committee Chairman Eliza Dy said the idea of serving the healthcare needs of the community was what interested her most in becoming involved in this project.

Dy said because the clinic is entirely student-run it will provide a unique learning experience for her fellow committee members and other Butler student pharmacists, who will be able to experience everything from pharmacy management to one-on-one patient counseling.

“In a time when uninsured populations are ever increasing, I think it is important for us to reach out and support members of our community. I immediately saw the potential of a pharmacy that would provide free medication and counseling.” Dy is one of five Butler student pharmacists leading the BUCOP. Other committee

“Each student that participates in the clinic will walk away not only learning about different aspects of running a pharmacy but more importantly about the different ways they can serve their community as pharmacists,” Dy said.

University of Maryland Study Finds Medicare Part D Healthy for Enrollees Researchers found that Part D in 2006 made statistically significant improvements in the health, access to medications and financial hardships of previously uninsured beneficiaries. Medicare beneficiaries’ activities of daily living (ADL) improved in their first year of the Medicare Part D senior prescription drug plan, according to a groundbreaking study presented by University of Maryland School of Pharmacy researchers at the Annual AcademyHealth meetings in June. In a study of Medicare records, the researchers found that Part D in 2006 resulted in “small but statistically significant” improvements in the health status of previously uninsured beneficiaries and in their access to medications. Nearly two-thirds of people with no drug coverage in 2005, before the plan, enrolled in Part D in 2006, the most recent

year of available files from the Medicaid Current Beneficiary Survey. “It’s a rich source of information about beneficiary characteristics, health status and activity limitations,” said study leader Dr. Amy Davidoff, research assistant professor at the school. “These individuals arguably had the most to gain from the new program, and thus represent an obvious population of policy interest.” Previous studies of Part D focused mainly on enrollment patterns, ease of access and beneficiary options. “Much less is known about the impact of Part D on the health and well being of beneficiaries who enrolled. It will be years before definitive answers are available, but it is now possible to assess selected potential short-term health benefits associated with Part D,” said Dr. Bruce C. Stuart, professor and director of the school’s Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging.

The study also revealed that Part D enrollees experienced twice as much improvement, 8 percent, in their financial hardships than non-enrollees, at 4 percent. And non-enrollees were 3 percent less likely to report improved health in 2006 compared to 2005, relative to enrollees. Both groups reported similar counts of ADL limitations in 2005 but they declined for Part D enrollees and increased for non-enrollees. “Our findings suggest that in its inaugural year, the program was modestly successful in achieving its stated aims,” said Stuart. “The program, now in its fourth year, needs further study to determine whether the short-term gains we identified were maintained or improved further.”

academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

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news in brief

AJPE Features Article on Teaching Prevention of Medication Errors Ensuring the competence of pharmacy school graduates in the science of safety is the focus of not only this issue of Academic Pharmacy Now but also an article in volume 73, issue six of the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (AJPE). This issue features “A Computer-based Module for Prescribing Error Instruction,” which evaluates an instructional module’s effectiveness at changing third-year doctor of pharmacy (Pharm.D.) students’ ability to identify and correct prescribing errors. Authors Dr. Michael J. Peeters, Dr. Gayle L. Kamm and Dr. Svetlana A. Beltyukova describe evaluation of a module for instruction in identifying and preventing prescribing errors using a stringent randomized controlled research design. Upon module completion, Pharm.D. students’ ability to identify and correct prescribing errors had improved as documented through a

series of worksheets. Course instructors hope that future students can use this computer-based module prior to the scheduled class time for this topic and allow in-class discussion to build beyond the technical prescribing errors illustrated in the module to include discussion of therapeutic errors as well. AJPE also features other insightful articles on teaching prevention of medication errors such as “Laboratory Session to Improve First-year Pharmacy Students’ Knowledge and Confidence Concerning the Prevention of Medication Errors” by Dr. Mary E. Kiersma, Dr. Patricia L. Darbishire, Dr. Kimberly S. Plake, Christopher Oswald, Pharm.D. candidate, and Dr. Brenda M. Walters. To read these and other original peer-reviewed articles that advance pharmacy education, visit the AJPE Web site at www.ajpe.org.

NACDS and NACDS Foundation Honor Pharmacy Faculty, Students with New Awards Pharmacy faculty and students were honored by the National Association of Chain Drug Stores (NACDS) and NACDS Foundation with two new awards at the 2009 NACDS Pharmacy & Technology Conference: Community Pharmacy Faculty Award and Student Pharmacist Advocacy Competition. Supported by Wyeth, the Community Pharmacy Award was established to recognize a full-time or shared pharmacy faculty member who has made significant contributions to the practice of community pharmacy through innovations in patient care. Faculty members are assessed on their accomplishments in advancing patient care through community pharmacy as well as preparation of future leaders in pharmacy care. This year’s first-place award recipient is Dr. Jean-Venable “Kelly” R. Goode from Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy. The school will receive a $5,000 stipend for a project in Dr. Goode’s area of community pharmacy practice. Dr. Goode serves as the director of the Community Pharmacy Practice Program and the Community Pharmacy Practice Residency Program. The first runner-up is Dr. Stefanie P. Ferreri from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the second runner-up is Dr. Kimberly M. Crosby from The University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy. “The NACDS Foundation recognizes the important role community pharmacy faculty play in preparing students for careers as care givers in community pharmacy, as well as advancing patient care in community pharmacy,” said Edith A. Rosato, president of the NACDS Foundation.

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academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

The Student Pharmacist Advocacy Competition was established by NACDS to promote interest in pharmacy advocacy among student pharmacists as well as recognize those who are making a positive impact on the pharmacy profession through advocacy. Applicants were assessed on the creativity and originality of their advocacy efforts, their effort to engage a variety of advocates, planning and execution procedures, the sustainability of the advocacy efforts and follow-up actions. The first-place winners are Julie Hull and Tessa Rife from West Virginia University School of Pharmacy. Hull and Rife led efforts that mobilized 55 pharmacy students to participate in a Pharmacist’s Legislative Day at the West Virginia state Capitol. They displayed a multi-faceted approach to advocacy, developing educational sessions, presentations, pamphlets and other resources to educate students on how to be advocates for the pharmacy profession. The first runner-up is Andrew Helm from Washington State University College of Pharmacy. Helm took action when a proposal that would have made Washington’s state reimbursement to pharmacies the worst in the nation was put forth in the state legislature. Helm is working with faculty at Washington State University to develop a curriculum for leadership, advocacy and professional development. In addition, he led a team of 76 students to Washington’s State Pharmacy Legislative Day.


news in brief

Butler University Professor’s Italian Sabbatical is a Dream Come True Dr. LeRoy Salerni’s personal and professional dream was to teach and conduct research in Italy as a tribute to his heritage. In 2003, his dream was realized as he and his wife, Marti, arrived in Italy to begin a sabbatical in the homeland of his immigrant parents at the University of Pisa. Salerni’s plans for an Italian sabbatical began over a decade ago. In 1999, Dr. Patricia A. Chase, new dean at the Butler University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, met with the then-professor of medicinal chemistry to inquire about his professional needs and requests. Salerni conveyed his desire to take a sabbatical, the first in his 30-year career, and Dean Chase pledged her support. More than a year later Salerni received the first of 13 offers from universities throughout Italy. Upon arriving in his new home in July 2003, Salerni traveled throughout Italy and other parts of Europe as his teaching responsibilities at the University of Pisa did not begin until September. Outside of Italy, he visited Switzerland, Poland and Germany. It was these excursions, in addition to his daily adventures in Pisa, that prompted Salerni to record and eventually compile them into a book about his sabbatical in, The Youngest Son, Memoirs from the Motherland. “Sabbaticals are a structured time for professional renewal and

growth, giving well-established faculty an opportunity to model and emphasize the importance of lifelong learning to our students,” said current College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Dean Mary H. Andritz. In his book, Salerni recalls the similarities and differences between academic pharmacy in America and in Italy. “The aesthetic qualities, infrastructure and often the manpower of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences of the University of Pisa are not the equal of American institutions,” he said. “Despite these handicaps, they produce a steady stream of quality publications in a variety of journals related to organic, biochemistry and medicinal chemistry.” Following his nearly six-and-a-half-month sabbatical, Salerni returned to Butler University and retired in 2005. By 2007, he had devoted 36 years to pharmacy academia, finished his memoir and realized a lifelong dream. “I have always believed that I love teaching and preparing for class. My sabbatical in Italy placed a resounding affirmation of that belief. I also recognized, perhaps for the very first time, that Butler University was a perfect fit for me. I retired knowing that I was a very lucky guy and I am proof that perseverance pays.”

AACP Pharmacy-based Identification and Screening for Memory Decline:

EW

N

Curricular Guide for Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy • Increase awareness of and access to tools and resources for pharmacy-based memory screening • Facilitate meaningful teaching and training activities within colleges and schools of pharmacy





Pharmacy–based Identification and Screening for Memory Decline 

• Use in professional practice laboratories, geriatric practice courses, service-based learning activities and student organization activities

 Curricular Guide for Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy    Preparedby: JannB.Skelton,RPh,MBA SilverPenniesConsulting

  For 

TheAmericanAssociationofCollegesofPharmacy  July2009

To access and download the Curricular Guide for Pharmacy-based Identification and Screening for Memory Decline, please visit the Curricular Resource Section of www.aacp.org. The Guide was developed by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) with financial support from Eisai Inc. The development of the Guide was directed by an Academic Advisory Committee composed of AACP members with experience implementing pharmacy-based memory decline screening and academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009 identification services. 

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news in brief

In Memoriam

Robert A. Wiley

Larry M. Simonsmeier Larry M. Simonsmeier, professor emeritus at Washington State University (WSU) College of Pharmacy, died on July 17, 2009. Born in Swea City, Iowa on Sept. 16, 1944, he was the son of Irene and Marvin Simonsmeier. Simonsmeier was a 1967 graduate of the Drake University College of Pharmacy in Des Moines and the University of Denver College of Law in 1973. After practicing both pharmacy and law he embarked on a highly successful career as an academician at Washington State University. Joining the faculty of the WSU College of Pharmacy as an assistant professor, he quickly rose through the professorial ranks to be professor of pharmacy law. He continued his affiliation at WSU as professor emeritus until his passing. He also served the college in administrative roles as associate dean, acting dean and dean. His decanal term was highlighted by rallying alumni and students to stave off an attempt by officials of the Council on Higher Education of the State of Washington to close the pharmacy degree program at WSU. “While difficult circumstances may have been the impetus for his career as dean, it was his honesty, humility and genuine concern for others that made him successful,” said College of Pharmacy Dean William H. Campbell. “When Larry retired from the deanship he was revered by students, faculty staff and a legion of friends. His legacy continues through their daily actions influenced by his gentle soul and basic decency.” Simonsmeier also served WSU as executive director of the Office of Intellectual Property, director of the WSU Research and Technology Park and president of the WSU Research Foundation.

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Relocating to Portland, Ore. in the late 1990s, he served as a senior advisor for health technologies to the Portland Development Commission, as executive director of the Oregon Biotechnology Association and Foundation, and as a consultant to the vice chancellor for public affairs of the Oregon University System. His service to professional organizations was highly noteworthy. For a quarter century he served as editor of the monthly newsletter of the American Society for Pharmacy Law, an organization he served as president during 1978-80. He was an editor of Pharmacy Law Digest, the most widely used pharmacy law text and reference in the U.S. For more than 20 years he authored a pharmacy law column in Pharmacy Times distributed to 50,000 pharmacies in the U.S. In recognition of his contributions to the field of pharmacy law, the American Society for Pharmacy Law annually presents the Larry M. Simonsmeier Award to individuals who have made outstanding written contributions to the fields of pharmacy law, food and drug law, drug policy or related areas. He is survived by his wife Barbara; two sons, David of Spokane, Wash. and Stephen (Chris) of Vancouver, Wash.; two stepsons, Scott Gerloff of Beaverton, Ore. and Mark (Lisa) Gerloff of Birmingham, Ala.; and two grandchildren in Vancouver and two step grandchildren in Birmingham. Contributions can be made to the Larry M. Simonsmeier Memorial Scholarship, c/o WSU College of Pharmacy, P.O. Box 646510, Pullman, WA 99164, and the Larry M. Simonsmeier Award, American Society for Pharmacy Law, 3085 Stevenson Dr. #200, Springfield, IL 62703-4440.

academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

The University of Iowa College of Pharmacy Dean Emeritus Robert A. Wiley died Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2009. Dr. Wiley was born Sept. 5, 1934 in Ann Arbor, Mich. and was married to Josephine Olesksy in 1955. He received a B.S. in pharmacy from the University of Michigan and his Ph.D. in pharmaceutical chemistry from the University of California, San Francisco. Following Army service in Europe, Wiley taught pharmacy at The University of Kansas for 22 years and The University of Iowa for 16 years, including service as the dean of the College of Pharmacy from 1984 to 1991. He also enjoyed his work with the Rotary Club and Habitat for Humanity. Per Robert’s wishes, his body has been donated to The University of Iowa through the Deeded Body Program for scientific research. Those wanting to donate in his memory may do so through Habitat for Humanity.


Capitol Hill News

by Will Lang

Academic Pharmacy Plays More Than Just a Supporting Role Over the past two years, this column has brought to the attention of educators, healthcare professionals, policymakers and other stakeholders and members of the public the impact that AACP members have on issues important to these groups, individually and collectively. Successful advocacy is a matter of applying group-specific messages in a consistent manner over time. Advocates recognize that success is rarely the result of a one-time communication and that finding common interests among the above groups can lead to greater impact by working together. Relationship initiation, development and maintenance require regular contact with stakeholders. This edition of Academic Pharmacy Now bridges the end of one year and the start of another, making it an ideal time to review our success and remember the need to continue bringing our successes to the attention of the groups mentioned above. The focus of this edition spotlights the role AACP members play in helping the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) meet its expansive, yet essential, public health mission. This mission includes ensuring the safety and efficacy of food, drugs, biologics and medical devices. In various AACP publications, including this magazine, we have written about the role that AACP played in the development and passage of the FDA Amendments Act (FDAAA). AACP clearly articulated the public health benefit of a stronger relationship between academic institutions and the FDA. This message was part of advocacy efforts and sign-on letters from multiple organizations, including AACP. The impact of this coalition approach is apparent in the resulting legislation. The legislation includes numerous provisions that provide the FDA with the opportunity to look to academic partnerships to meet the intent of the law. The development of stronger publicprivate partnerships envisioned by the law are being developed. AACP members are assisting the FDA in assessing the integration of the concepts of the science of safety across a drug’s life cycle into the professional pharmacy curriculum. This partnership allows the FDA to benefit from the research capacity of the Academy while influencing the professional curriculum so that pharmacists are prepared to meet the public health expectations and needs of the federal public health agency and the public. Maintaining the relationship means that pharmacy educators will enjoy a presentation by the new FDA commissioner, Dr. Margaret Hamburg, at the 2010 AACP Interim Meeting. Congress continues to debate healthcare reform legislation. Big picture provisions and issues, such as abortion, whether to include a public insurance option and government intrusion into healthcare decision-making dominate the news. What is missing from the news are the provisions that are focused on improving the quality of care that we all receive when we access healthcare services. These quality improvement provisions include creating the opportunity for all of us to have greater access to wellness and prevention services. The legislation recognizes that chronic illness costs our society a great deal in terms of health and economic outcomes. Since medications can and do play a growing and essential role in managing chronic illness and preventing further disease progression, Congress has included several provisions related to the management of medications used in patient therapy. The inclusion of these provisions are a result of academic pharmacy being at the forefront of helping members of Congress and their staff understand the impor-

Willnewsonin brief the Hill

tance of medication therapy management as a preventive service. This message of prevention and improved quality of care is shared by other organizations and presented to Congress and their staff in the messages of individual organizations and collectively through coalitions. Some AACP members have worked to educate them around these issues for years. The results of these well-maintained relationships is undeniable. Like many health professions, pharmacy education has included faculty recruitment and retention as a priority issue in its policy and advocacy agenda. Academic pharmacy faces significant recruitment issues in light of a graying Academy, increased educational capacity of existing institutions and the opening of new academic institutions. AACP has brought this issue to the attention of Congress for many years, including through legislation originally introduced by Representative Jim McGovern (D-MA). The Pharmacy Education Aid Act included a faculty loan repayment program aimed at creating a faculty recruitment incentive for colleges and schools of pharmacy. The message of addressing the high demand for pharmacists through a variety of mechanisms, including faculty recruitment, was shared by many professional pharmacy organizations. The importance that AACP, its members, and other organizations and partners place on faculty recruitment and retention led to the creation of the inaugural American Pharmacy Educator Week. This project clearly reflects the success of targeted messaging and shared interests. The week-long celebration of pharmacy faculty included the introduction of a congressional resolution, House Resolution 857, by our long-standing partner Rep. McGovern. This good-faith effort by the congressman and his staff was a result of a well-maintained relationship by AACP and some of our member institutions. While we were thrilled that the congressman introduced the resolution, the value of a congressional statement of support for a strong Academy has not been reflected through the advocacy of AACP members. This short-coming can easily be rectified since the resolution remains viable until the end of the 111th Congress in December 2010. Because faculty recruitment and retention is truly an issue of importance, we should support McGovern and the members of the U.S. House of Representatives that have co-sponsored the resolution by actively engaging in a concerted effort to get enough members of Congress to co-sponsor the legislation and have it brought to the House floor for passage. Maintaining relationships is an important advocacy principle. Show that you value our well-established relationships within Congress by accessing the “how-to” information in the Dec. 4 AACP E-lert: http://www.aacp.org/ news/Elert/Pages/Dec0409.aspx. Regardless of whether Congress passes comprehensive healthcare reform legislation this year or next, academic pharmacy plays an important role through its teaching, research and service. Our nation still needs to discuss and develop national strategies for quality, health professions workforce, and prevention and wellness. The relationships that you develop with your state and local health department, state Medicaid program, family physician practices, state medical societies, and other potential and current partners interested in increasing access to high quality healthcare services for all Americans will ensure that your work is recognized for the benefits it brings to society. academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

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news in brief

Campbell University Rides for Diabetes Research In 2003, the North Carolina chapter of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) approached the Campbell University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences for help in planning the 2004 “Tour de Cure.” The cycling event, sponsored by ADA, is held in more than 40 states with the goal of raising funds for diabetes research. Each rider promises to raise a minimum amount in order to participate. The 2004 event included a new route that began on campus at Campbell University and ended one day and 150 miles later in Wilmington, N.C., with an overnight rest stop in between. Dr. Thomas J. Holmes Jr., associate chair and professor of pharmaceutical sciences, assisted ADA in coordinating the logistics as well as organizing “Team Campbell,” composed primarily of student pharmacist cyclists. Since then, Dr. Robert M. Cisneros, assistant professor of pharmacy practice, joined the team and has ridden in five consecutive tours. Student volunteers along with Drs. Cisneros and Holmes continue to help coordinate Team Campbell every year, which has raised more than $50,000 for diabetes research. The average size of Team Campbell is about 20 riders and the team has twice won the largest team award. In 2009, the North Carolina ADA added two one-day events. In addition to the longer two-day ride, a 12-mile family ride and a 40-mile ride are now

Above: North Carolina Tour de Cure riders line up for the start of the return trip to Wilmington, N.C. Right: Campbell University student pharmacist Valerie Rydberg, left, and friend Amy Haase, right, get ready to start the second day of the Tour de Cure.

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options. More than 400 riders participated in the 2009 N.C. event and thanks to support from CVS Caremark and the College of Pharmacy, cyclists wore special Team Campbell jerseys. Campbell student pharmacist Roger Reeder said that the opportunity to meet many new friends during the ride was a high point for him. “Even if we don’t know all the people riding, for those two days at least you became best friends that are helping each other for a great cause. It brought awareness to those that didn’t know much about how serious diabetes is, and for those that know about diabetes, a stronger desire to help find a cure for it.” Participating on Team Campbell has led to great camaraderie among Campbell student pharmacists, faculty team members and among all the riders in the event. “My first ride was two years ago. I remember the first time I found out that diabetics rode in the Tour de Cure. I was amazed; that is what you call determination,” said Kelly Carter, another Campbell student pharmacist who has ridden in the Tour. “Crossing that finish line always brings tears and huge smiles of joy, not just for being finished and ready for food, but for accomplishment in knowing that I just participated in an event that may one day better my life or the life of someone I love.”


news in brief

Under the Hot, White Light at the University of Florida Students in white coats — palms sweating, hearts racing — sit in class knowing they may be called on to defend their researched prescription-care plan. It is a test of everything they have learned in the first two years of pharmacy school and they can’t continue without passing this course on patient care.

The two professors, however, persevered and ultimately created a class that they believe yields highly competent and more successful pharmacists. His early intuition now has been validated at professional development seminars on teaching, Munyer said.

“You can imagine sitting there in class hoping and praying that your name doesn’t get called on,” said Paul L. Doering, a distinguished service professor in the University of Florida (UF) College of Pharmacy. “But the minute it does, it’s your turn to have 125 sets of eyes on you.”

“Through the ‘90s students were uncomfortable at first,” he said “It appears to be just the right teaching style for today’s millennial students because of the active engagement, studentcentered learning in a high-tech classroom setting.”

The class is pharmacotherapy V and verbal defense—or “verbal assault” as students jokingly call it—is just a portion of what is expected in the class. And the video camera adds even more pressure. “The class started out as an idea sketched on a cafeteria napkin back in the early 1990s,” said Doering. His colleague, Thomas O. Munyer, a clinical associate professor in the college, wanted to change the way pharmacy courses were taught by placing the responsibility on the students. They would have to come to class prepared and ready to use the information they had been given, Doering said. The video camera would be used as a learning tool for students to later review. Skeptical at first, Doering agreed to take on the new teaching style, but soon found himself in the “worst semester of his teaching career” because of heavy student resistance. It was a huge change from what previous students had endured, and the concept of critiquing their own and the others’ video recordings did not sit well.

This two-semester long course gives students an immersion in patient care through six unique scenarios — each lasting four days — called main cases. Other topics covered in the course include self-care, which is what the students will see during their community pharmacy rotations, and geriatrics and Medicare education. The professors also emphasize pharmacokinetics, the field of pharmacy that applies mathematical principles to describe a drug’s journey through the body. Through role-playing simulations, students participate in pharmacist-physician and pharmacist-patient situations that are designed to imitate what they will experience during their clinical rotations and beyond. From the information they receive prior to class, during class interactions and from what they have researched themselves, students develop their care plan. Preparing in small groups, students are mindful that anyone in the group can be called on to present. Clinicians who accept students for rotational training internships have seemed very impressed with UF student pharmacists and want them in their pharmacies, Munyer said. He attributes this in part to the “real life” scenarios they research and practice in this innovative and challenging pharmacotherapy course.

David M. Angaran, clinical pharmacy professor at the University of Florida College of Pharmacy, instructs student pharmacists in the course pharmacotherapy V in which they must defend their researched prescription-care plan.

academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

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news in brief

AACP Wal-Mart Scholars Return from Annual Meeting Inspired to Teach Sixty-five pairs of students and faculty mentors attended the 2009 Annual Meeting and Seminars in Boston last July as winners of the AACP Wal-Mart Scholars program. Wal-Mart has generously increased its support of academic pharmacy by awarding 65 $1,000 scholarships in 2009, up from 20 in 2005. The intent of the AACP Wal-Mart Scholars program is to strengthen the recipient’s skills and commitment to a career in academic pharmacy through their participation in the AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars. The $1,000 scholarship pays for the student’s registration and travel expenses and defrays about half the faculty mentor’s expenses.

Margaret Wallace of North Dakota State University agreed with her peers’ sentiments. “Interacting with individuals who are successfully doing what I wish to pursue was very inspiring. I am grateful for this experience.”

As part of the requirement for scholarship winners, the student and faculty mentors attended the Teachers Seminar, Technology in Teaching, presented by Dr. Patrick Jackson. The seminar explored and illustrated various ways to implement new technologies such as Twitter, podcasts, blogs and wikis into the learning environment to encourage student involvement and thus enhance learning. Student pharmacist Danijela Stojanovic of The University of Texas at Austin wrote in her evaluation of the program, “Not only do these methods inspire us to learn more, but they also show the passion professors have for teaching.”

AACP Wal-Mart Scholars also expressed gratitude for their experiences. “I thank Wal-Mart for their support of the scholarship and for directly impacting my career aspirations,” said Oluwakemi Odesina from the University of Charleston. “This remarkable experience strongly reinforced my commitment to a career in academic pharmacy. I am fully committed to the profession and a career in academia is the perfect way for me to give back.”

Passion and inspiration were recurring themes expressed by students as they shared their impressions of the meeting and their reasons for pursuing a career in academic pharmacy. “Before I had the opportunity to attend the AACP Annual Meeting, I was completely undecided in which direction to pursue my future goals. As a result, I have been directed toward what I believe is my passion,” Stojanovic said.

Sixty-five pairs of students and faculty mentors had the opportunity to network with potential future colleagues in the Academy at the 2009 AACP Annual Meeting in Boston, Mass.

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Other students found the experience helpful in focusing their career goals. “It definitely had a great impact on my future long-term goals. I was planning on applying for a residency later this winter, but now I will focus my efforts on residencies that have coinciding academic appointments,” said Mike Schroeder from the University of Minnesota.

AACP wishes the scholarship winners great success and thanks Wal-Mart for its continuing support of careers in academic pharmacy. —Diane Drakeley­ Application materials for the 2010 program are available on the AACP Web site under Career Development, then Research Grants, Fellowships and Scholarship Programs, and are due at AACP by 5:00 p.m. EST on Feb. 15, 2010. Questions? Contact Dr. Jennifer L. Athay at jathay@aacp.org.


The AACP Wal-Mart

in  ScholarsnewsProgram brief

Network

Learn

Apply

More than two-thirds of the nation’s faculty, staff, administrators and deans attend the AACP Annual Meeting. They are involved with teaching, research, public service and patient care. Others serve as consultants for local, state, national and international organizations. Disciplines within academic pharmacy include biological sciences, clinical science, experiential education, drug discovery, medicinal/ natural products and pharmacology.

More than 60 sessions ranging from assessment to motivational interviewing were presented at recent Annual Meetings. Past keynote speakers include rep resentatives from the Institute of Medicine, famous authors, national health experts and former Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Each year, the AACP Annual Meeting pre-session focuses on developing the leadership qualities of today’s pharmacy faculty.

The AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars offer Wal-Mart recipients a venue to explore career options with the ultimate goal of enhancing their commitment to a career in academic pharmacy. The program will provide $1,000 scholarships to student/faculty pairs from AACP member institutions to attend the 2010 meeting in Seattle, Wash., July 10-14. Deadline for submission is Feb.15, 2010. For more information, visit the AACP Web site, www.aacp.org.

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 1727 KING Street Alexandria, VA 22314 www.aacp.org

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It’s your profession. Make a difference. academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009


news in brief

Medication Therapy Management Program Expands at University of Minnesota Based on its success as a pilot at the Duluth campus, eligible University of Minnesota employees and dependents enrolled in the university’s health plan, UPlan, now have access to a new medication therapy management (MTM) benefit. Through face-to-face assessments, UPlan network pharmacists work with eligible members and their physicians or other caregivers to establish and achieve drug therapy treatment goals, avoid or minimize undesirable medication effects and improve clinical outcomes. MTM services are provided at no cost to UPlan members taking four or more UPlan covered prescriptions and overthe-counter medications for chronic conditions. Participating members who meet program requirements are eligible for an $8 per prescription reduction of their copays. Dr. Randall D. Seifert, senior associate dean and professor, initially proposed the MTM pilot as a benefit for Duluth-based employees. With support from Gregory R. Fox, University of Minnesota Duluth vice chancellor, Seifert worked with colleagues to launch the MTM pilot in November 2007. Recently, the university’s Advisory Work Group, led by Dr. Frank Cerra, senior vice president for health sciences, approved the university-wide expansion. “In the Duluth pilot, we have identified an average of three to four drug therapy problems per person served,” explained Seifert. “In addition, the communication with the patients’ physicians has been collaborative and wellreceived.” The concept of MTM has existed since the early 1990s and has been a standard of care in pharmacy curriculums since the mid-’90s, according to Dr. Stephen W. Schondelmeyer, professor and Century Mortar Club endowed chair. “We have

Through face-to-face assessments, University of Minnesota UPlan network pharmacists work with eligible members and their physicians or other caregivers to establish and achieve drug therapy treatment goals, avoid or minimize undesirable medication effects and improve clinical outcomes.

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demonstrated through various studies at the university that MTM does affect healthcare quality and costs. Employers are interested in offering MTM services for employees. We envision that this new network of pharmacists could contract with other employers across Minnesota to offer MTM. Eventually, there is potential to create a national network.” Dr. Sarah M. Westberg, assistant professor and MTM network manager for UPlan, said that positive feedback from the Duluth pilot helped the university make the leap to offer the MTM program to all UPlan members university-wide. Potentially 13,000 out of the approximately 37,000 UPlan members, about one-third of the total enrollees, are likely to qualify for the program. “We know that pharmacists provide MTM help to improve patient outcomes by optimizing medication use,” said Westberg. “We also want to ensure that all eligible UPlan members have access to an MTM pharmacist in a geographically convenient location.“ The expansion is a sign of the growing importance of MTM in the pharmacy profession. “What we’re building is a whole new practice for pharmacists on a global scale,” said Seifert. “It could become the primary part of pharmacy practice in the future, much more than distribution services.”


news in brief

The University of Toledo Helps Patients Become Heart Healthy For patients in the cardiac rehabilitation program at The University of Toledo Medical Center (UTMC), the support and care by a multidisciplinary team provides them with the tools they need to move forward into a healthier future. The program, open to patients who have suffered cardiac events or heart problems, helps patients get fit and improve their overall health. According to the American Heart Journal article “Clinical evidence for a health benefit from cardiac rehabilitation: An update,” patients participating in such programs experience “a 25-30 percent reduction in total and cardiovascular mortality” compared to patients who do not participate in cardiac rehab. Patients who enroll in the 12-week program at UTMC work with a team that includes a physician, nurses, exercise physiologists, a dietician and a pharmacist who educate them on various aspects of their disease states. During the cardiac rehab program’s clinic hours, the Morse Center is buzzing with activity. Patients begin each session by having their vitals taken and recorded by the staff. Weight, blood pressure, blood glucose levels and heart rate are markers of their progress during the program. Patients spend an hour exercising while wearing a heart monitor to help them stay within their target heart rate ranges. The cardiac rehab staff

tailors an individual program for each patient, taking into account their physical abilities and risk factors. Following exercise, patients attend one of the cardiac rehab program’s nine informational sessions. These sessions, conducted by the interdisciplinary team, focus on aspects of wellness that are relevant to cardiac patients, from nutritional and weight loss counseling to smoking cessation. Having a pharmacist participate in the cardiac rehab program is a relatively new development, prompted by The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy Dean Johnnie L. Early Jr.’s positive experiences as a patient in the program a few years ago. The pharmacy segment of the program involves patient counseling and education that focuses on adherence to medication regimens. Dr. Amie L. Smith, assistant professor of pharmacy practice, is the pharmacist who participates in the program. Smith counsels patients about the properties of common cardiac medications including aspirin, warfarin and clopidogrel. She discusses the benefits and side effects of each medication, as well as interactions that can occur with other prescription, over-thecounter and herbal remedies. Patients appreciate the opportunity to ask specific questions about their medications, and they are encouraged to keep an open dialog with their physicians and other healthcare providers. Patients leave the cardiac rehab program feeling healthier, more informed and empowered. They know what questions to ask their healthcare providers and they have taken a personal stake in their health. UTMC’s cardiac rehabilitation program exemplifies the benefits of collaborative healthcare, combining the expertise of healthcare professionals with patient education to increase overall wellness.

Dr. Amie L. Smith, assistant professor of pharmacy practice at The University of Toledo, is the pharmacist who currently participates in the cardiac rehabilitation program. Smith counsels patients about the properties of common cardiac medications including aspirin, warfarin and clopidogrel.

academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

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Diary of a PharmCAS Super-User

tinct IT is here. Two dis AS and PharmAdM use mC o ar wh Ph e os of th cle – cy The seventh ers have evolved us IT M Ad rm th ha AS/P ve developed eir groups of PharmC and those who ha ms ra og —a pr o tw e th ms. I am the latter only the basics of e of these progra us ie th un r ng he izi ot m xim fro ons staff own ways for ma h ly met some admissi ug nt ro ce re th I ta n da he W AS ! SUPER-USER at using PharmC th ys wa e ar on sh ssi to mi need and ad versities, I felt the ed the application ogram has improv pr IT dM mA ar Ph the e. process for my offic eping tion process is ke cts of the applica pe as tions nt ca rta pli po ap im w ps. When ne One of the most go ging them in grou na ey th ma d IT an dM s nt mA ca ar track of appli ported into Ph im d an AS cre mC I , ar m Ph e applicant tab are downloaded fro manager under th t lis d. ing ive Us ce t. re lis s nt te it wa into the full applica according to the da wnload, naming it tus, I create a list sta ’s nt ca pli ap ate a list for each do ch ea ge an ch d cations an process, I create As I process appli into the interview ve mo we As . els tus lev ate lists for offers for each of the sta cants. Finally, I cre pli ap d we e lists vie ter in d are only a few of th lists for invited an ed groups. These lat e or cu on tri ve ma ha d n an ca t fice. Each lis made, accepted ed. flow within the of ed rk ne r wo e ge th e lon tat no ili if that help fac can be removed e on ch ea d an s, ter more identifying fil s ecklist of all piece time. I create a ch of ts lo d ve re sa ide n ns ca tab cation is co The supplemental d before an appli at must be receive th it is marked as re on , ati es rm riv fo ar in of of information nt ce rre pie cu e ch th ea n ter he en “complete.” W will automatically mAdMIT program d. I like the fact ceived. The Phar marked it as receive o wh er n mb me ff e sta if necessary. Whe date and the offic for additional notes ce pla da s mA ha ar m Ph ite ve nt, I ha that each checklist d from an applica e ecklist are receive tus. I can easily se sta nt rre cu all items on the ch ’s nt ca pli ap of at t th lis y change I can run a MIT automaticall lemental items or turned in all supp ve ha s nt ca pli ap which ssing. ecific items still mi those who have sp are is that as the items supplemental tab e e th Th of s. re nt tu ca fea pli t le to the ap The other efficien information availab is on th ing ke ck ma cli I d, By ive rt. marked as rece lemental item expo e output tab is supp information to last item under th dated supplemental up e th ad lo up to le log into their appli this option, I am ab ere applicants can wh l tly rta ea Po gr nt p ca ste pli simple the PharmCAS Ap as received. This items I’ve marked m applicants. fro s ive ce re e cation and see the fic one calls my of ph of er mb nu e th reduces ent GPA calcuoximately 24 differ pr ap ide ov pr IT AdM and level, underPharmCAS/Pharm A by academic year GP to in bup d ide div math or science su lations. These are d GPA by specific an e te es ua Th ad 2. gr A s GP rsu l 1 and a loca graduate work ve IT has a local GPA dM ol. ho mA sc ar ch Ph ea n, by tio ject. In addi s that can be set up l GPA calculation are two additiona tion methods dMIT communica mA ar Ph t en ici eff how plicants by e-mail Have I mentioned mmunicate with ap co to ed me s ow all e letters with merg are? PharmAdMIT able to personaliz . I’m ils s. ma ter elet al ted idu in nts or send indiv or traditional pr ca pli ap of ts lis ar e I have Ph mail entir applicant data, e’s status to “deny,” ange an applicant ch I to print hard en me wh e, ow nc all o For insta dMIT will als mA ar Ph opri. ter let a official look is appr mAdMIT generate think that a more I en core wh th ad ive he ce ter re g, applicants copies on my let reen” by e-mailin pies “g co th ing wi go I ed ck am pa ly ate. Not on plicant’s file isn’t ap an d an er ick qu respondence much

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academic Pharmacy now  Jul/Aug/Sept 2009

The following is the third in a series of diary entries from a PharmCAS Super-User, documenting their experience from the launch of the program to present time. Be sure to check out future entries in upcoming editions of Academic Pharmacy Now.

of every piece of co rrespondence and all communications are maintai ned in their queue or log within applicants’ profile s. I wish I had disco vered the local sc oring setup option earlier. For ye ars I relied on expo rting applicant data to Excel and manipulating it fro m there. Now, all I have to do is get my admission s committee to decide on what ite ms should be inclu ded in applicants’ scores and how these items are weighted. I enter these items an d weights into the scoring setup and voilà – no mo re Excel spreadsh eets! No more hand calculations! The system automa tically generates a numeric rank ing score for each applicant. There are times I need quick and ea sy reports, so what do I do? I re ly on PharmAdM IT, which gives users two nice op tions under the ou tput tab. General reports is sim ilar to creating lists in list manager. I can create a re port based on certa in filters and select which fields of information I wa nt to include on the printed repo rt. Graphical DrillD own is just what it says – a gr aphical way of look ing at data. It uses lists to initiall y filter data and th en allows users to “drill down” in terms of applicant type, official status, current sta tus, state of perman ent residence, undergraduate sc hool, gender and check list completion. The repo rt results are on-sc reen graphs that can be printed . By using PharmC AS data through the PharmAdMIT program to the extent I do, I’v e been able to seriously streamlin e the work flow wi thin in my office. Isn’t it about time you became a SUPER-USER and discovered ho w you can make th e operations in your office more eff icient?

Can you guess the identity of this PharmCAS Super-User? Keep reading the diary to find out who it might be.


ns, adminof topics and comthe counokie year” balance remain 7. “Often it nd getedly occur eping the d advance .”

The

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feature story

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feature story

NIH

CTSA Academic Pharmacy Helps Expand NIHSponsored Program

Seven academic health centers (AHC) were awarded the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) by the National Institutes of Health in July, joining an elite cadre of 46 institutions dedicated to improving bench to bedside delivery of healthcare. Five AACP member institutions play significant collaborative roles with the new consortium members as the NIH works to accelerate the process that develops laboratory discoveries into treatments for patients, to engage communities in clinical research and to train a new generation of clinical and translational scientists. The seven institutions will receive $171 million over five years to help researchers accomplish these goals.

academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

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feature story Pharmacy schools at the Medical University of South Carolina, University of Florida, University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences join the University of Cincinnati that was added to the consortium in April. Each college or school of pharmacy is involved in the consortium in a variety of capacities:

Medical University of South Carolina The goal of the South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute is to create a sustainable home at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to advance clinical and translational research as a distinct discipline and facilitate collaboration across other disciplines. The SCTR Institute awarded approximately $500,000 in 2009 pilot project grants to faculty at MUSC and the University of South Carolina (USC). Fourteen grants were awarded to both schools, including five to faculty in the South Carolina College of Pharmacy (SCCP). Ten grants were awarded in the category of discovery, three in early career and one in novel methodology. The grants averaged $50,000 and are for new, first-time funded projects. Faculty on SCCP’s USC campus awarded grants include Dr. Sondra H. Berger, Dr. Campbell McInnes and Dr. Georgi Petkov. Faculty on SCCP’s MUSC campus awarded grants include Dr. John J. Lemasters and Dr. Rick G. Schnellmann. All faculty members are in the Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences. “The research done by the faculty at the South Carolina College of Pharmacy has the potential for significant national impact in healthcare,” said Dr. Joseph T. DiPiro, SCCP executive dean. “A pilot project award from the SCTR Institute gives its recipient an opportunity to expand his or her research and multiply its potential impact.”

University of Cincinnati The Center for Clinical and Translational Science and Training (CCTST) is transforming the research environment among the University of Cincinnati and its affiliated partners in the community and industry. Among the CCTST’s many partnerships is the James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy. According to Dr. Pankaj B. Desai, professor of pharmacokinetics, the college will play a vital role in carrying out the research and educational mission of the CTSA. One of its key components is a Master of Clinical and Translational Research degree. Several years ago, the college began offering an M.S. degree in drug development that provided pharmacists working in practice or other industries an opportunity to return to academia and learn about drug development. As the CTSA application moved forward, the drug development curriculum was folded into the grant as part of this new degree. The James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy has also created a joint Pharm.D./Ph.D. program to attract Pharm.D. students to postgraduate research. The CTSA will provide funding for student stipends for those who are completing their Pharm.D. degree and wish to participate in lab research and further their interest in Ph.D.-level work. According to Desai, this was a natural evolution. “We discovered that the highly qualified students in our Ph.D. program came from the Pharm.D. class,” he said. “We’ve got topof-the-line Pharm.D. students and want to recruit that talent into our Ph.D. program.”

University of Florida The University of Florida (UF) will receive nearly $26 million over five years to speed the transformation of scientific discoveries into medical advances for patients. The CTSA will support multidisciplinary research at UF in fields such as biomedical informatics, gene therapy, aging, nanotechnology and infectious diseases. As part of UF’s proposal to secure the prestigious award, the UF College of Pharmacy contributed to three important translational science areas: drug development, translational research, and graduate and professional education and training. Last year, the Comprehensive Drug Development Center received preliminary funding for development at the UF Research & Education Center at Lake Nona, Fla. “Working along the FDA’s critical path initiative, this research center would position UF as one the top drug development research and graduate training centers in the world,” said Dr. William J. Millard, executive associate dean for UF College of Pharmacy. Two important areas of translational research are underway at the college that demonstrate examples of research programs in drug development. The first is pharmaceutics research in pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics assessment of drug candidates and associated pharmacometrics to strengthen drug development through optimizing or streamlining the process. The second is pharmacogenomics research including clinical research in genotyping and support for graduate work with the patient focus in multiple lab sciences.

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University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

The University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS) will fundamentally alter clinical and translational investigation at UIC and partnering institutions, including the College of Pharmacy. Harnessing diverse backgrounds, interests and expertise, CCTS will catalyze collaborative thinking and innovation. The center will organize, finance and house the infrastructure, expertise and resources for clinical and translational investigators within a single academic home, crossing administrative boundaries to harness and enhance existing UIC resources.

The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) formed the Arkansas Center for Clinical and Translational Research (ACCTR) to synergize clinical and translational research programs and revamp institutional research endeavors.

Dr. Michael E. Johnson, professor and director of the College of Pharmacy’s Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, is also director of the Translational Technologies and Resources Core (TTRC) in UIC’s CCTS. The TTRC is responsible for providing access to basic resources and advanced technologies to augment clinical and translational research. The core provides contact information and direct access to many of the resources (shared campus facilities, instrumentation, services and protocols) available at UIC. It also provides referrals to the clinical community of new and unique technologies available from the laboratories of individual cross-campus investigators to enhance innovative research. These interactions foster cross-discipline collaborations that are critical for “proof-of-concept” experiments, and enable multi-department and cross-college research program projects.

Under the umbrella of the ACCTR is the Novel Methodologies and Pilot Studies Program. Dr. Martin Hauer-Jensen, associate dean for research in the College of Pharmacy, serves as a “rainmaker” within the program whose primary role is to foster collaborative interactions and nurture investigators across disciplines in the development of novel ideas in translational research. Funding for these innovative projects ranges from $50,000 to $150,000 and is available to any UAMS scientist or clinician through three classes of awards. Researchers seek guidance from one of the eight rainmakers who counsel the applicants on their current proposal. After the formal submission of an application, the rainmaker designates a subject matter expert elsewhere on campus to review the application and score it appropriately. After all applications have been scored, the eight-member team ranks each proposal and forwards their recommendations to the executive CTSA committee for funding. Initial interest in the first cycle of funding was quite high, which Hauer-Jensen believes is due to two main reasons. NIH funding for research has decreased considerably, he said, so there is a deep desire for funds. The NIH also received a plethora of applications for stimulus money, for which only a small percentage received funding. Therefore, many proposals have gone unfunded and can easily be reformatted to fit one of the ACCTR’s award venues.

A

cademic pharmacy has become a prominent player in clinical and translational research since the NIH launched the CTSA network in 2006. That year, the University of California, San Francisco and the University of Pittsburgh were awarded CTSA grants. Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences faculty partnered with AHCs and biomedical research institutions across upstate New York to form a CTSA Institute. The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy and the University of Southern California were among 52 AHCs awarded a planning grant from NIH that same year. The University of Iowa, University of Michigan, University of Washington and University of Wisconsin-Madison were awarded the CTSA grant in 2007. Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and St. Louis College of Pharmacy collaborated with recipients Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Washington University, respectively. In 2008, five more universities joined the consortium, with colleges or schools of pharmacy serving as supporting partners in the grants. These include the University of Colorado Denver, The Ohio State University, Northeastern University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and The University of Texas at Austin.

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cience S of Safety the

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s p e e k y m e d a c A Pat i e n t s Sa f e Colleges and schools of pharmacy around the

country are taking steps to further drug safety. Drs. David A. Holdford, Terri L. Warholak and Donna S. WestStrum, recipients of a grant to study how concepts of the drug life cycle are integrated into the pharmacy curriculum, define the science of safety as the systematic study of the intended and unintended impact of drugs and medical devices on disease(s) at all stages of the drug product life cycle. Academic Pharmacy Now takes a look at what some member institutions are doing to ensure the competence of their graduates in the science of safety while helping the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) meet its public health mission.

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d n a l y r Ma f o y it s r e iv Un At the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Dr. Sheila Weiss Smith, who in a 2007 editorial published in the New England Journal of Medicine charged the FDA with “sidelining safety,” is first to note that faculty members in the school’s Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) are on the “front lines” of the drug safety issue. Their mission is to improve drug use and reduce adverse drug events by employing “pharmacovigilance.” “Pharmacovigilance is the study of the safety of marketed drugs under the practical conditions of clinical use in large communities,” said Dr. Ilene H. Zuckerman, professor and chair of PHSR. “As a scientific endeavor, the impetus for this area comes mainly from post-marketing surveillance, mandated by the FDA within their regulatory oversight of pharmaceutical manufacturers.” Some researchers, such as Zuckerman and Weiss Smith, and fellow department members Drs. Julie M. Zito and Linda Simoni-Wastila have focused on pharmacoepidemiological research—the data-driven backbone for pharmacovigilance—for more than a decade and a half. “In FDA parlance, we are doing phase IV studies,” said Zito, who is tightly focused on pediatric drug safety issues. “Not enough energy, resources or infrastructure are dedicated to assessing a drug in terms of safety after it hits the market.” The formation of a Center for Drug Safety is an idea whose time has come, said Zuckerman. Also, partnering with the private sector for best results is appealing. Dr. Sally Van Doren, a member of the school’s Board of Visitors, agrees. “The School of Pharmacy has a great pharmacoepidemiology team,” said Van Doren, president and CEO of BioSoteria, Inc., a company focused on drug safety surveillance through the drug’s entire life cycle. “However, when it comes to pharmacovigilance and public safety, it’s ‘all hands on deck’ and partnerships with academia, government, private sectors and healthcare practitioners is the right path forward.”

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Dr. Sigal Kaplan, an epidemiologist with the FDA and a 2004 graduate of the school, recalls her training at the School of Pharmacy and the mentoring afforded her by Weiss Smith and others as she gained experience in analyzing large databases. According to Kaplan, her course work in the pharmacoepidemiology track was the basis for her understanding of various research study designs and for familiarizing her with healthcare databases that can be used for research on drug safety issues. At the FDA, she reviews protocols for post-marketing surveillance studies that use large databases of administrative claims and health records. Analysis of large databases is also the backbone of SimoniWastila’s research into drug safety as it pertains to adolescents, young adults and the elderly. The problem faced by SimoniWastila is a “paucity of data” available for studying prescription drug misuse and abuse, and concomitant drug safety issues. “Education needs to bridge parents, children and providers,” said Simoni-Wastila. “There are myriad theories for the growing problem of prescription drug abuse, but the biggest factor is likely increased availability of abusable prescription drugs, especially to children. If providers prescribe a 30-day supply and people don’t use them all, they stay in the medicine cabinet where anyone has access.” For Zuckerman, one of the most important missions for the School of Pharmacy is to train the next generation of drug safety experts, researchers and educators who will be able to help protect consumers. “We have come a long way over the years and currently have a great breadth of research ongoing in the area of drug safety,” concluded Zuckerman. “Yet, there is a long way to go. Having a center dedicated to drug safety research and education will make a huge difference in changing the ‘culture’ of drug safety, whether in terms of reducing the risk of unintended misuse or addiction, or being on the front lines of surveillance and risk management.”


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Universit y of Cincinnati On the surface, the University of Cincinnati James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy’s master’s of pharmaceutical sciences program in drug development is geared toward the non-traditional student—meaning students seeking a graduate degree while working full-time. But the term “non-traditional” also applies to the kind of person this program is designed to attract. “These students are a very diverse group of people coming together by design or accident. They are learning from each other as much as from the instructors, and we are learning from them too,” said Dr. Pankaj B. Desai, program director and professor of pharmacokinetics. Desai spearheaded the development of this program and has served as the director since its launch in 2004. Biopharmaceutical companies and clinical research organizations (CROs) have a growing need for employees cross-trained in scientific and regulatory aspects of drug development. Two second-year students—Dr. Brenna Carey and Lindsay Boeing—exemplify this sought after diversity of backgrounds. Carey works full-time at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in the department of pulmonary biology and neonatology and Boeing, who holds a B.A. in biology and psychology, works full-time as a clinical studies project manager for Kendle International Inc. “I see myself transitioning from a basic scientist to more of a translational scientist,” said Carey, adding that she now has a better understanding of the drug development process and the regulations that the government has set forth.

The coursework has been enlightening as well for Boeing. “I can see now how a clinical trial is designed – whether it is a phase I study or a large phase III trial; how a detailed protocol comes to be, why it’s important and why it has to be done a certain way.” While the program drives the students to achieve a better understanding of reasoning and protocols, it also facilitates career enhancement, said adjunct professor Dr. William K. Sietsema, vice president of regulatory affairs at Kendle. “Graduates of this program move on to bigger and better things” with their current employer or with another employer, Sietsema explained. And because the curriculum is a mix of different aspects of industry and government, it’s necessary that the student population be a mix of education and experiences, said adjunct professor Dr. Kevin L. Skare, who retired from Procter & Gamble as the senior director of global medical operations. “Our students have such a diversity of backgrounds. We have those like Lindsay with their bachelor’s degree, but we have Ph.D.s, M.D.s and Pharm.D.s as well.” Skare and Sietsema co-teach the phase II and III clinical trials courses. Since its inception in 2004, the program has graduated 36 students. There are currently 20 students enrolled in the program.

The University of Cincinnati James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy’s master’s of pharmaceutical sciences program in drug development is geared toward the non-traditional student—meaning students seeking a graduate degree while working full-time. Students from diverse pharmacy backgrounds leads to enhanced learning within the group and on behalf of the instructors.

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Washington State Universit y Lectures from a cadre of different pharmacists employed in medication safety occur in almost half of the classes in the medication error prevention course at Washington State University. The elective course is four years old and now well-developed by the tenured professor and former dean who teaches it. As of fall 2010, it will be a required class for all third-year student pharmacists. It’s just one more addition to a curriculum already infused with a focus on medication safety. The drug safety lessons begin in the first year in the compounding laboratory of Dr. Shelley Chambers-Fox, where students design projects around the topic. In one recent project students measured how much medication was left behind during compounding – separating the measurements according to whether the medication was a solid or liquid, and whether it was mixed on glass, ceramic, pill tile or ointment paper. They then had to figure out how they would compensate for the loss. In another project, students went out during their spring break and weighed medication on the balances in their hometown pharmacies, then compared those weights to the ones they got on the balances in class, which sparked intense interest in the types of balances used in pharmacy and how to get the most accurate weights. Their weighing and measuring is checked by the instructor when their end product is analyzed for accuracy. The same check is done for their lessons on dispensing and the mixing of sterile products. Anything critical completed incorrectly requires the student to do the assignment over until he/ she gets it right. Regular exam questions, beginning in students’ second year in the patient care labs, continually test the their ability to calculate correctly. Then in the third year of that lab, professors Brenda S. Bray and Catrina Schwartz intentionally include a pharmacy calculation problem on every quiz. The third-year course is designed with a zero tolerance for “critical” errors, meaning the student gets zero points for the entire quiz or in-lab exercise if the mistake could lead to serious harm for a patient. Other courses in the third year focus on medication safety. In the over-the-counter drugs course, one issue studied is the confusion among consumers about all the different products

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of a certain brand and how taking each product for different ailments could results in unintended overdoses. The designing of the soon-to-be-required medication error prevention course was the subject of a presentation made by its instructor, Dr. William E. Fassett, at the 2008 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars. At the time, there was a relatively small number of schools with such a class and WSU was one of the early schools to teach it, Fassett said. The course is based on the text, Medication Errors, second edition, by Michael R. Cohen, and supplemented with several readings. Its goal is to meet 12 of the competency-based outcomes in the school’s curriculum, which were adopted by the faculty three years ago and based on the belief pharmacists can help the healthcare system significantly reduce medication errors in certain circumstances.

pharmacists can help the healthcare system significantly reduce medication errors in certain circumstances.


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n o t g in h s a W f o y it s r e Univ The University of Washington School of Pharmacy has long been devoted to research and education that focuses on drug safety. On the research side, the school is home to a metabolism and transport drug interaction database that is used by researchers worldwide to prevent harmful interactions in the drug-development stage. It also has an internationally renowned center for pharmacoeconomics, drug safety and pharmaceutical policy research — the Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy Program. On the teaching side, medication safety and quality improvement are emphasized in three core courses and one elective course for Pharm.D. students. Those classes range from introductory institutional pharmacy experience to human behavior and communication in pharmacy. Another class that all student pharmacists are required to take the first quarter of their first year, principles of evidence-based medicine includes an introduction to pharmacovigilance. In this seminar, students learn methods to ensure the safety of

drugs that have already gone to market. Specific topics covered in the seminar include: understanding and avoiding adverse drug events; conducting post-marketing drug surveillance; and improving the current mechanisms for reporting adverse events. A group of faculty recently designed a new class called medication safety and pharmacy to add to the courses already available. The courses’ objectives are to provide students with an in-depth understanding of how medication errors occur and conditions that contribute to errors and events. Students will learn how to: identify high-risk areas within the medicationuse system; assess working conditions and factors contributing to errors/adverse events; and propose changes to prevent future errors and adverse events. Health information technology will also be studied. The class will be offered for the first time in spring 2010 as an elective, with the long-term goal of making it a core part of the pharmacy curriculum.

The Universit y of Iowa The University of Iowa College of Pharmacy integrates continuous quality improvement (CQI) directly into its pharmacy practice lab curriculum. Doctor of Pharmacy candidates at The University of Iowa spend six contiguous semesters in our pharmacy practice lab and CQI is integrated throughout all six semesters. The simulated ‘Hawkeye Pharmacy” has adopted the “Pharmacy Quality Commitment” (PQC), a program donated by the PQC company, to help infuse CQI into the curriculum and effectively instruct students how to systemically reduce medication errors that occur during the prescription filling process. As early as the second week of school, first-year student pharmacists begin to use a continuous quality improvement approach to complete the process of receiving a new prescription from a patient. Over the course of seven weeks they cover the prescription dispensing process from receipt of prescription to delivery to the

patient. This prescription filling workflow system is divided into steps that are summarized on laminated cards at student desks and described in more detail in the PQC content modules in the content management system. As the student moves through the second year of pharmacy practice laboratory, systematic approaches to counseling patients is added, while during the third year the focus turns to identifying and documenting events, performing root cause analysis and then developing plans for improvement and reassessment to determine if the problem has been solved. A systematic approach to avoiding errors is also utilized when instructing students on how to check the compounding forms and final compounded products produced during sterile compounding, whether for an antibiotic or for a total daily parenteral nutrition solution.

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h g r u b s t it P f o y it s r e iv Un continuous quality improvement (CQI) at the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy provides a structured, organizational process for involving personnel in planning and executing a continual flow of improvements with a goal of providing quality healthcare that meets or exceeds expectations. These CQI processes can be used to improve patient safety, improve processes of care and solve problems in healthcare. Interdisciplinary CQI teams include interprofessional practitioners such as pharmacists, nurses, physicians, respiratory therapists, information specialists and quality experts. Focal points for quality and safety improvements can include a combination of process, outcome and even economic measures such as look-alike, sound-alike medications, medication errors, adverse events, and morbidity and mortality metrics. The CQI learning module at the school is titled “Continuous Quality Improvement: Theory and Application to Practice.” It is part of the profession of pharmacy series and is contained within a three-credit course on healthcare outcomes and pharmacoeconomics. Students are required to take this course at the end of their professional year.

Students are taught the basic principles of quality improvement, origins of healthcare quality management, and groups/ regulatory influence on healthcare quality and safety. Additionally, sources of information for healthcare improvements are provided as references for students for their case application project during the required practicum. Students also listen to two CQI presentations, one by a clinical faculty member and one that was completed in a prior student group, to learn how CQI methods can be applied to real-life quality improvement and/or safety solutions. The backbone for the methodology is the FOCUS-PDCA performance improvement methodology, which is endorsed by the American Hospital Association and is used in many healthcare facilities today as their model for improvement. For the practicum assignment, students work in groups, select a healthcare quality/safety initiative from sources such as National Quality Forum, Healthy People 2010, ASHP 2015 or other suggested sites, and create a QI indicator measures, root cause analysis and an evidence-based, data-driven improvement and education plan. Susan J. Skledar, associate professor at the School of Pharmacy, teaches the course and believes that as a faculty member it is fascinating to see the work that the students identify as areas for improvement in healthcare quality and safety, and how they challenge each other to find workable solutions, both to affect patient care and to improve their own efficiency. Several of the students’ projects have been evaluated and implemented as process changes within the school. To showcase their work, students present their projects to the class and to a panel of faculty, clinical pharmacists and/or quality experts from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, their affiliated partner healthcare facility. The panel asks questions and sparks discussion among the students.

CQI processes can be used to improve patient safety, improve

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Students reported that they enjoyed hearing about how CQI applies in real life and indicated that this experience changed their views on pharmacy’s role in healthcare today.

re processes of ca ems and solve probl in healthcare.

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The Universit y of Arizona Dr. Marie A. Chisholm-Burns, professor and head, Department of Pharmacy Practice & Science at The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, has provided student pharmacists both research and educational experiences related to drug safety in the care of renal transplant recipients. In the area of research, she has conducted studies demonstrating the role of pharmacy services, which included student pharmacists, in reducing adverse drug events, optimizing therapeutic and economic outcomes, and increasing medication access among renal transplant patients. Students were also included on some of the publications involving these topics. Recently, Dr. Chisholm-Burns received a R01 grant from NIH/NIDDK to conduct a randomized controlled trial involving maximizing therapeutic effects of immunosuppressive agents (antirejection medications). She has also delivered

numerous educational programs on the topic of immunosuppressant medication adverse drug reactions to student pharmacists, pharmacy and medical residents, physicians, pharmacists and nurses. She was appointed to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee for a five-year term, which advises the commissioner of food and drugs on risk management and communication, quantitative evaluation, safety, efficacy, and abuse potential of drugs and other substances, and recommends actions to be taken.

The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy Professor and Department Head Dr. Marie A. Chisholm-Burns, fourth from left, has conducted studies demonstrating the role of pharmacy services, which included student pharmacists, in reducing adverse drug events, optimizing therapeutic and economic outcomes, and increasing medication access among renal transplant patients.

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Call us today to discuss how your company can take advantage of this invaluable advertising opportunity in the most widely read pharmacy education magazine available! Contact Rebecca Morgan at 703-739-2330 x1032 or rmorgan@aacp.org.


faculty news

Faculty News Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Appointments/Elections • Kathy Boland, associate professor of pharmacy practice, Vermont campus • Ronald J. DeBellis, associate professor of pharmacy practice and assistant dean for student affairs, Vermont campus • Paul Denvir, assistant professor of communication, Department of Arts and Sciences, Albany campus • Anthony Nicasio, assistant professor of pharmacy practice, Albany campus • Dorothy Pumo, professor of pharmaceutical sciences, Vermont campus • Michael Racz, assistant professor of biostatistics, Department of Arts and Sciences, Albany campus

• Sommer O. Zarbock, assistant professor of pharmacy practice, Vermont campus

Awards • Vickie Peters received the Sara Marie Cicarelli Member of the Year award from the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Sciences-New York (ASCLSNY).

Grants • Stefan Balaz received a $1.35 million award from NIH for his grant titled “Conceptual Prediction of Drug Bioactivities in Cell-Based Assays: cell-QSAR.” • Michael P. Kane received a $49,000 award from Abbott Diabetes Care to conduct a Glucose Meter Accuracy Study comparing the Yellow Springs Instrument with Venous Laboratory Glucose Measurements and

Plasma-Calibrated Value-Added Glucose Meters. • Margaret Malone received a $25,000 award from GlaxoSmithKline to study the efficacy of Orlistat 60mg in the management of pre-operative weight loss required before bariatric surgery. • Shaker A. Mousa received a $373,000 award from NIH for his grant titled “Site-directed Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer using Novel Angiogenesis Inhibitor.” He also received a $654,000 award from NIH as part of a team studying the Development of Bioengineered Heparin from a Non-Animal Source. • Amit P. Pai received a $109,400 award from Pfizer to study the pharmacokinetics of Voriconazole in obese subjects.

Auburn University Appointments/Elections • Leslie Hamilton, assistant clinical professor • Emily McCoy, assistant clinical professor • Marilyn J. Novell, assistant clinical professor • Nathan Pinner, assistant clinical professor

• Joseph Ybarra, assistant clinical professor

Awards • Miranda R. Andrus was inducted as a Fellow in the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (FCCP). • Cherry W. Jackson was inducted as a Fellow in the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (FASHP).

• Jared K. Johnson received the Distinguished Young Pharmacist Award from the Alabama Pharmacy Association. • Kimberly Braxton Lloyd was named Faculty Member of the Year by the Alabama Pharmacists Association. • Gordon S. Sacks has been chosen to participate in the AACP Academic Leadership Fellows

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faculty news

Program for 2009–2010. • The Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy (AUHSOP) was one of three winners of the inaugural 2009 Award for Excellence in Assessment by AACP. Sharon McDonough, Kristen L. Helms, Paul W. Jungnickel, E. Kelly Hester and Jan Kavookjian represented Auburn by present-

ing the winning portfolio submission in a Special Session at the 2009 AACP Annual Meeting.

Grants • Angela I. Calderon (PI) and Vansireee Mulabagal have been awarded a 2009-2010 United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Fellowship to carry out the project LC-MS based fingerprint profile

and quantitative analysis of Euterpe oleracea (açaì) dietary supplements and raw materials. The award is $25,000 over one year.

Retirements • Bruce A. Berger, professor of pharmacy care systems retired effective Sept. 30, 2009 after 28 years of service.

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Appointments/Elections • Edward M. Bednarczyk was appointed as chair-elect (20102011) of the Clinical Sciences section of the APhA-Academy of the Pharmaceutical Research and Science. • Donald E. Mager was elected as vice chair, American Association of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology and Translational Research. • Eugene D. Morse was appointed as co-chair Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance, Oral Pharmacokinetics Focus Group, AIDS Clinical Trial Group. Morse was also selected as a member of the Sustained Release Drugs Task Force for the AIDS Clinical Trials Group.

• Marilyn E. Morris was elected as member-at-large, American Association of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Awards • Gayle A. Brazeau received the State University of New York Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Faculty Service. • Karl Fiebelkorn received the Pharmacists Society of the State of New York Faculty Excellence Award. Karl was also appointed as secretary of the New York State Health Systems Pharmacist Conference. • Alfred T. Reiman received the Individual School Spirit Award at the 2009 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting.

• Robert M. Straubinger received the State University of New York Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities.

Promotions • William J. Jusko was promoted to State University of New York Distinguished Professor.

Grants • Kathleen M. Tornatore received a $427,000 R21 grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to study Genomic and Cellular Markers and Chronic Renal Allograft Function.

University of Cincinnati Appointments/Elections • Teresa M. Cavanaugh, assistant professor of pharmacy practice and administrative sciences

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• Kelly T. Epplen, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy practice

Grants • S. Kevin Li received funding

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from NIH in the amount of $235,500 for his research titled “Iontophoresis to Improve Nail Diseases Treatment.”


ion: Caut s at ber Mem rk Wo

faculty news Members Working For You University of Florida Professor Uses FDA Sabbatical to Improve Science of Safety

Academic pharmacy can and does play a significant role in helping federal agencies, such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), achieve their public health mission while meeting their strategic goals. Dr. Abraham G. Hartzema, professor and eminent scholar at the University of Florida (UF) College of Pharmacy, is one such faculty member who took advantage of an opportunity at the FDA to share his knowledge and expertise in pharmacoepidemiology and health outcomes research. Hartzema spent a one-year sabbatical at the FDA working on the Sentinel Initiative. The initiative emanated from the 2007 FDA Amendments Act which required the FDA to create an active surveillance system for monitoring drugs. Its goal is to build and implement such a system that will eventually be used to monitor all FDA-regulated products and the agency needed Hartzema to translate this mandate into operation. Pharmacy educators’ knowledge and expertise is untapped by agencies such as the FDA, according to Hartzema. “FDA needs the manpower,” he said. “We can play a major role in the future of drug safety.” Upon returning to UF, Hartzema has continued his involvement with the FDA as one of three principal investigators and consultant to the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership, a public-private partnership between the FDA, the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health and PhRMA. This initia-

tive provides the scientific underpinning of the Sentinel system. Hartzema’s academic home was recently awarded a five-year grant to prepare Pharm.D.-commissioned officers for various tasks within the FDA. The administration’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) partnered in graduate education for the first time with UF in an effort to recruit individuals to become research scientists trained in safety and regulatory decision-making. The FDA/CDER Graduate Scholarship program works in collaboration with the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps. It offers funded graduate education to career-minded healthcare professionals who are interested in research surrounding the safe, effective and cost-effective use of medications. The new research program provides masters and doctorate education developed to advance scientific training and analysis involved in the safety and regulatory decisions unique to the center’s and agency’s mission. The partnership plans to admit 15 to 20 recent graduates from the health sciences annually into graduate programs in the UF College of Pharmacy Department of Pharmaceutical Outcomes & Policy. Extensive hands-on experience in FDA regulatory science, including regulatory review opportunities and mentoring, will be provided by affiliate faculty located at CDER.

Remember to submit your Faculty News today! It’s fast and easy to make sure your college or school of pharmacy is featured in the Faculty News section of Academic Pharmacy Now. Visit the AACP Web site at www.aacp.org and complete the School News Submission Form on the News and Publications portion of theacademic Web site. Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009 35


faculty news

College of Notre Dame of Maryland Appointments/Elections • Kwadwo Amankwa, assistant professor, clinical and administrative sciences • Gilda M. Anroman, assistant dean for student affairs

• Paulo Carvalho, assistant professor, pharmaceutical sciences • Jane Frumin, assistant professor, clinical and administrative sciences

Creighton University Grants • Kimberly A. Galt received a grant in the amount of $69,659.50 from the Community Pharmacy Foundation for her project titled “Pharmacists for Patient Safety.”

University of Florida Appointments/Elections • John Markowitz, a professor in the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research • Charles Peloquin, a professor in the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research • Rhonda Cooper-DeHoff, an associate professor in the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research • Rachel Hrabchak, a clinical assistant professor and new AHEC pharmacist in the Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research • Michael J. Mueller, an assistant

clinical professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy • Karen P. Whalen, a clinical associate professor and assistant campus director in St. Petersburg • Lisa R. Clayville, a clinical assistant professor at the Orlando campus • Robin Moorman Li, a clinical assistant professor at the Jacksonville campus • Hanine Mansour, a clinical assistant professor at the St. Petersburg campus • The Florida Pharmacy Association has appointed three UF College of Pharmacy faculty to leadership positions in 2009–10.

Hampton University Appointments/Elections • Corinne Ramaley has been appointed interim dean.

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At the annual meeting in July Karen Whalen was installed as the 2009–2010 FPA president. William H. Riffee was named speaker-elect and Carol A. Motycka was elected chair of the Education Council.

Awards • Julie A. Johnson has been selected by the American College of Clinical Pharmacy to receive its highest award, the 2009 Therapeutic Frontiers Lecture Award. • Bin Liu was selected as one of 10 University of Florida faculty members to receive the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Distinguished Mentor Award for 2009–2010.


faculty news

University of Houston Appointments/Elections • Susan M. Abughosh, lecturer in the Department of Clinical Sciences & Administration • Jason L. Eriksen has been appointed to the Texas Alzheimer’s Disease State Plan Partnership. • Rustin D. Crutchley has become the first pharmacist named to the Steps Toward Academic Research Fellowship Program based at the NIH-supported Texas Center for Health Disparities at the University of North Texas Health Science Center. • Amelia M. Issa, associate professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences & Administration • Claire M. Mach, assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences & Administration • F. Lamar Pritchard, dean and professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences & Administration • Suja S. Rajan, assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences & Administration

• Ke-He Ruan has been appointed associate editor of Future Medicinal Chemistry. • Vincent H. Tam has become the first pharmacist to be elected to the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases Board of Directors. • Anne M. Tucker, clinical associate professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences & Administration

Awards • Amelia M. Issa won first place (blue ribbon) award for “Understanding the clinical utility and adoption of pharmacogenomics: A quantitative analysis of patient decision-making” in the Molecular Epidemiology/Pharmacogenomics research poster category at the 2009 annual meeting of the International Society for Pharmacoepidemiology. • Michael L. Johnson received the 2009 Distinguished Service Award from the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research.

• Maria V. Tejada-Simon received a Carl Storm Underrepresented Minority Fellowship award to present at the Gordon Research Conference on Dendrites: Molecules, Structure and Function.

Grants • Kevin W. Garey received a $45,000 grant from Merck for “Clinical outcomes in candidemia patients based on in vitro susceptibility.” • Romi Ghose received a oneyear, $53,954 supplement (2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for “Hepatic drug metabolism in inflammation.” • Bradley K. McConnell received a two-year, $260,876 supplement (2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute for “Targeted disruption of Beta-adrenergic signaling to increase cardiac contractility.”

The University of Iowa Awards • Karen B. Farris was selected for the AACP 2009– 2010 Academic Leadership Fellows Program.

• CoraLynn B. Trewet has been awarded Fellow status with the National Lipid Association.

Idaho State University Appointments/Elections • Paul S. Cady has been appointed interim dean.

academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

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faculty news

Lake Erie College of Pharmacy Appointments/Elections • Duc P. Do, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences

Promotions • Abby A. Kahaleh, associate professor of pharmacy practice

• Naushad M. Khan Ghilzai, chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, assistant dean of assessment and faculty development chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, AACP-ALFP Fellow • Rachel R. Ogden, director of student promotion and retention

• Seher A. Khan, associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences

University of Maryland Appointments/Elections • Lauren B. Angelo was named a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science. • Lauren M. Hynicka was named an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science. • Jason M. Noel has been named director of continuing education. • C. S. Raman was named an associate professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. • Sudha Veeraraghavan was named a research associate professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Awards • Cynthia J. Boyle received the 2009 Seidman Distinguished Achievement Award from the Maryland Pharmacists Association. • Stephen M. Hoag has been named a Fellow of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists.

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academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

• Charmaine D. Rochester received the 2009 Innovative Pharmacy Practice Award from the Maryland Pharmacists Association. • Peter Swaan has been named a Fellow of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists. • Hoai An Truong was named to the Maryland Pharmacists Association’s Board of Trustees.

Grants • Cherokee Layson-Wolf received $39,528 from NeighborCare of Maryland, Inc. for PG1 Community Pharmacy Practice Residency. • Angela Wilks received $375,000 from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for Structure-function of the Shigella Dysenteriae Heme Uptake Operon (shu).

Retirements • Donald O. Fedder, a 1950 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy and a professor of pharmaceutical health services research, retired after 25 years of service and has been named an emeritus professor.


faculty news

Mercer University Appointments/Elections • Ajay K. Banga has been appointed as an associate editor for the journal Therapeutic Delivery. • Lisa M. Lundquist was selected to participate in the AACP Academic Leadership Fellows Program. • Pamela M. Moye, clinical assistant professor, was appointed to the AACP Nominations Committee of Teachers of Pharmacy Practice Section.

Awards • James W. Bartling, associate dean, was honored with the prestigious Bowl of Hygeia award for community service from the Georgia Pharmacy Association.

Grants • Ashish A. Advani was awarded a $50,678 grant for the Drug Infor-

mation Residency program from Alaven Pharmaceuticals, LLC. • Martin J. D’Souza has been awarded a $100,000 collaborative planning grant from the Georgia Research Alliance with investigators from Emory University and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to explore using nanotechnology to deliver a pneumonia vaccine. • Diane F. Matesic was awarded a $226,815 three-year grant from the National Cancer Institute of NIH titled, “Biochemical mechanisms of PBA and ChK in tumorigenic cells.” • Phillip S. Owen, Pamela M. Moye and Gina J. Ryan were awarded a $6,102.28 educational grant for “Hot Topics in the ICU: Sedation & Delirium Assessments and Therapies from Hospira Educational.”

• Gina J. Ryan, clinical associate professor, received a grant in the amount of $5,685 for “Achieving inpatient anticoagulation initiatives and project destiny: what it means for your future” from Ortho-McNeil. • Chad M. VanDenBerg, clinical associate professor, was awarded a $95,828 grant for A Phase I, single dose, randomized, open-label, crossover, pharmacokinetic study comparing three formulations of CX 157 in healthy volunteers from CeNeRx Biopharma Inc. • Chad M. VanDenBerg was awarded a $439,572 grant for Effect of LY2062430, an anti-amyloid beta monoclonal antibody, on the progression of Alzheimer’s Disease as compared with placebo from Eli Lilly.

University of Minnesota Appointments/Elections

Promotions

• Peter Dosa has joined the Institute for Therapeutics Discovery and Development as assistant program director.

• Brian J. Isetts has been promoted to professor with tenure.

• Daniel Harki has joined the Department of Medicinal Chemistry as an associate professor. • Keri Naglosky has joined the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Pharmaceutical Sciences as an assistant professor. • Erin Sheets has joined the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Pharmaceutical Sciences as an associate professor with tenure.

• Wendy L. St. Peter has been promoted to professor with tenure. • Chengguo (Chris) Xing has been promoted to associate professor with tenure.

Grants • Aurelle Johnson has been awarded a 2009 AFPE Minority Pharmacy Faculty New Investigator Grant. The grant, in the amount of $10,000, runs for one year. • Jayanth Panyam, along with co-PIs

Chris Macosko and Tom Hoye received an MN Futures Research Grant for their study “Beyond TaxolR: Nanoparticle Delivery of a Paclitaxel Silicate Prodrug.” The grant provides $250,000 over two years. Panyam also received NIH funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 for his project, “Sustained Release Curcumin Microspheres for Breast Cancer Chemoprevention.” The grant award is $151,000 over a two-year period.

Retirements • Linda M. Strand, professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Care & Health Systems, retired from the university in June.

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faculty news

The University of Mississippi Appointments/Elections • Jane E. Cross, clinical instructor, pharmacy practice • Abir El-Alfy, assistant professor, pharmacology, and research assistant professor, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences • Ashley W. Ellis, clinical assistant professor, pharmacy practice • David Murray, assistant professor, pharmacology, and research assistant professor, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences • Kayla Stover, assistant professor, pharmacy practice • Justin Sherman, associate professor, pharmacy practice • Donna S. West-Strum, associate professor and chair, pharmacy administration, and research associate professor, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Grants • Ameeta K. Agarwal received $213,277 from the National Institutes of Health – National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for the study of “Molecular Targets of Novel Antifungal Compounds.” • Mitchell A. Avery and Stephen J. Cutler received $1,055,172 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the “Development and Testing of New Antimalarial Drugs.” • Benjamin F. Banahan, Noel E. Wilkin, Patrick F. Pace and William B. Lobb received $286,899 from the Department of Health and Human Services/Centers for

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“Medicare and Medicaid Services for Evaluating the BearingPoint (BP) Medication Use Measures in the Medicaid Population.” • Alice M. Clark and Ameeta Agarwal received $300,328 from NIH/NIAID for “New Drugs for Opportunistic Infections.” • Asok K. Dasmahapatra and Kristine L. Willett received $69,974 from NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism for “Ethanol Action in Japanese Medaka: Alteration in Specific Gene Methylation.” • Mahmoud A. Elsohly and Ikhlas A. Khan received $421,577 from the National Institute on Drug Abuse for “Production, Analysis, and Distribution of Cannabis, Marijuana Cigarettes and Related Materials.”

Service© Implementation and Evaluation Project.” • Erin R. Holmes and Benjamin F. Banahan received $20,000 from the National Community Pharmacists Association for “Managing Pharmacy Workflow to Improve Medication Adherence and Other Patient Outcomes.” • Melissa Jacob and Khalid Ashfaq received $12,500 from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University/National Institutes of Health for “Development of New Agents Against Cryptococcal Infections.” • Seongbong Jo received $39,000 from Branching Tree BV for “In Vitro Drug Release from Aliphatically Modified Biodegradable Block Copolymer-Based Thermogel.”

• Mark T. Hamann received $100,000 from Kraft Foods, Inc. for “Determining the Phytochemistry of Sweet Extracts from Plant X2.”

• Ikhlas A. Khan and Troy J. Smillie received $60,000 from Holista Biotech for “Isolation and Identification of Marker Compound from Labisia pumila.”

• Raymond Highsmith, Marc Slattery and Robert Woolsey received $4,158,361 from the U.S. Dept. of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for “National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology Integrated Research and Technology Development.”

• Ikhlas A. Khan and Larry A. Walker received $1,610,001 from the Food and Drug Administration for “Science-Based Authentication of Dietary Supplements.”

• Erin R. Holmes received $10,000 from AACP for “Community Pharmacy Technicians’ Emotional Labor and Resultant Work Life Outcomes.” • Erin R. Holmes and Benjamin F. Banahan received $125,000 from Cardinal Health for “RxSync

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• Ikhlas A. Khan, David S. Pasco and Troy J. Smillie received $100,000 from Herbalife International, Inc. for “Quality Assessment of Botanicals.” • Thomas Lombardo, John P. Bentley and Sandra I. Bentley received $10,000 from UMMC/State of Mississippi for “ACT Now” Tobacco Intervention Program. • Soumyajit Majumdar received


faculty news

$103,855 from the NIH/National Eye Institute for “Localized Modulation of RPE P-gp/MRP Activity for Back-of-the-Eye Drug Delivery.” • David J. McCaffrey received $13,630 from the Healthcare Convention & Exhibitors Association for “Message in a Bottle – Pharmaceutical Promotion to Physicians, A Message Lost in Skepticism?” • Christopher R. McCurdy received $349,075 from National Institutes of Health for “Novel Pharmacologic Interventions for Drugs of Abuse.” • S. Narasimha Murthy received $69,830 from NIH for “Electropulsation Mediated Drug Therapy for Onychomycosis.” • S. Narasimha Murthy received $140,875 from Transport Pharmaceuticals, Inc. for “Electrically Mediated Trans-Nail Delivery of Drugs.” • Dale G. Nagle and Yu-Dong Zhou received $263,869 from the NIH/ National Cancer Institute for “Anticancer Drug Discovery that Targets Tumor Hypoxia.” • John M. Rimoldi received $28,800 from The University of Mississippi Medical Center/National Institutes of Health/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute for “Synthesis of Carbon Monoxide Donors and Heme Oxygenase Inhibitors.” • Leigh Ann Ross received $56,250 from Baptist Memorial Hospital-North Mississippi for “The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy and Baptist Memorial Hospital-North Mississippi Agreement.” • Leigh Ann Ross received $25,000 from The University of Mississippi

Medical Center for “The University of Mississippi Medical CenterContract for Residency Training Program Support.” • Leigh Ann Ross received $24,000 from the Mississippi State Hospital for the “Mississippi State Hospital and UM School of Pharmacy Agreement.” • Leigh Ann Ross received $1,000,000 from the Delta Health Alliance/HRSA for “Delta Pharmacy Patient Care Management Services.” • Troy J. Smillie received $4,000 from the Federal Trade Commission for the “Analysis of Plant Samples or Dietary Supplements for the Presence of Hoodia gordonii.” • Larry A. Walker received $2,394,518 from the USDA, ARS for the Development of Natural Products from Plants and Microbes for “Replacement of Synthetic Pesticides.” • Larry A. Walker and Ikhlas A. Khan received $523,141 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for the “Discovery and Development of Natural Product-Based Insect Management Compounds for Medical, Veterinary and Urban Concern.” • Larry A. Walker, N.P. Dhammika Nanayakkara and Babu L. Tekwani received $2,884,909 from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command for the “Development of Safer Drugs for Malaria and Leishmaniasis.” • Larry A. Walker, Babu L. Tekwani and N.P. Dhammika Nanayakkara received $100,000 from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for “Primaquine Revisited Part IV – Safety and Efficacy of Primaquine Isomers.”

• Barbara G. Wells received $10,000 from Walgreens for the Walgreens Diversity Scholarship. • Barbara G. Wells and Charles D. Hufford received $8,465,935 from HRSA for “National Center for Natural Products Research–Phase II.”

• Barbara G. Wells and Leigh Ann Ross received $2,180,804 from the Department of Health and Human Services/HRSA for “The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy Instructional and Research Facility – Phase I.” • Kristie L. Willett received $139,114 from the U.S. Army Engineering Research and Development Center for the study “Distribution, Bioaccumulation and Toxicity of Nanosilver Particles in Medaka (Oryzias latipes).”

Promotions • Shirley M. Hogan, clinical associate professor, pharmacy practice • Dale G. Nagle, professor, pharmacognosy, and research professor, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences • N.P. Dhammika Nanayakkara, research professor, National Center for Natural Products Research • Samir A. Ross, research professor, National Center for Natural Products Research

Retirements • Dewey D. Garner has announced his retirement effective Jan. 31, 2009. • John P. Juergens has announced his retirement effective Aug. 31, 2008.

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faculty news

The University of Montana Grants • Richard J. Bridges received $197,066 from the Montana Board of Research & Commercialization Technology for “Enhancement of Applied Research in Biomedicine.” • Jean T. Carter and Bryan Cochran have been awarded $141,500 from NIH for “Predicting the Development of Opioid Abuse and Dependence.” • John M. Gerdes received $1,124,967 from NIH for “PET Imaging Tracers to Quantify Norepinephrine Transporter in the Brain.” • John M. Gerdes has received $43,316 from NIH for “Arenavirus Entry and its Inhibition.” • Andrij Holian has been awarded $9,730 from NIH for an ARRA supplement to his “Defining the Roles of Macrophages Subsets and NK Lymphocytes in Silicosis” grant.

• Mike P. Kavanaugh has been awarded $18,180 from NIH for an ARRA supplement to his “Characterization and Use of a Fluorescent Endocannabinoid Transporter Substrates” grant. • Diana I. Lurie and J.B. Alexander Ross have received $415,821 from NIH for an Olympus FV 1000 Scanning Confocal TIRF Imaging Workstation. • Lori J. Morin received $206,182 from HHS, Bureau of Health Professions, for scholarships for disadvantaged students in pharmacy. • Lori J. Morin has been awarded $1,214,452 from HRSA for a Native American Center of Excellence. • David Shepherd has been awarded $9,730 from NIH for an ARRA supplement to his “Consequences of AhR Activation in Dendritic Cells” grant.

University of New England Appointments/Elections • Douglas H. Kay is the interim dean at the University of New England College of Pharmacy.

The University of New Mexico Appointments/Elections • Matthew Campen, associate professor, pharmaceutical sciences • Stefani Hines was appointed as an advisory board member and as a member of the associate editor board for the leading international environmental health research journal, Environmental Health Perspectives. • Bernadette A. Johnson, assistant professor, pharmacy practice

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• Jeffrey P. Norenberg was elected by the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) House of Delegates to serve as the director-at-large on the SNM Board of Directors. He was also appointed to serve on the SNM Education and Research Foundation Board of Directors. • A. Mary Vilay, assistant professor, pharmacy practice


faculty news

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Grants • Craig Lee, $1.55 million over five years, NIH, “Cytochrome P450 Derived Eicosanoids and Inflammation.”

Ohio Northern University Appointments/Elections • Kristen Finley has been elected clinical/pharmacotherapeutic member-at-large for the American Pharmacists Association under their Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management (APPM) section.

The University of Oklahoma Appointments/Elections • H. Anne Pereira, associate dean of research and professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences • Alan R. Spies, director of professional development and associate professor, Department of Pharmacy: Clinical and Administrative Sciences

Grants

• Toni L. Ripley, investigator, NIH-NHLBI, $25,000, “Bridging anticoagulation in patients who require temporary interruption of warfarin therapy for an elective invasive procedure or surgery (“BRIDGE”).

Promotions • Tamra S. Davis, clinical assistant professor, Department of Pharmacy: Clinical and Administrative Sciences -Tulsa

• Randle M. Gallucci, principal investigator, NIHNIOSH R03, $146,500, “The role of IL-6 in jet fuel irritant dermatitis.”

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faculty news

University of Pittsburgh Appointments/Elections • Jan H. Beumer was elected to the editorial board of Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology. • Pamela Havrilla Smithburger, assistant professor of pharmacy and therapeutics • Scott Mark was invited to serve on the AACP Finance Committee for 2009–2010. • Samuel M. Poloyac was named director of the Small Molecule Biomarker Core (SMBC), a new facility at the University of Pittsburgh, housed in the School of Pharmacy. • Kristine S. Schonder has been appointed to the American College of Clinical Pharmacy Education Affairs Committee and to the AACP Council of Faculties Faculty Affairs Committee for 2009–2010.

• Amy L. Seybert was invited to serve on the editorial board of the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.

Awards • Melissa Somma McGivney was named a Fellow of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

Grants • Wen Xie received a $900,266 grant from the National Institutes of Health for Hepatoprotective Role of the Orphan Nuclear Receptor LXR. • Xiang-Qun Xie received a $16,000 grant from the University of Pittsburgh for his project, “Medicinal Chemistry Studies Based on the Discovered CB2 Leads.”

Purdue University Grants

Laboratories-PGSRM 2009-Program at Purdue.”

• Eric L. Barker and David E. Nichols received $208,489 from PHS-NIH National Institute on Drug Abuse for “Psychostimulant Recognition by Serotonin Transporters.”

• Mark S. Cushman received $1,341,115 from PHSNIH National Cancer Institute for “Natural Inhibitors of Carcinogenesis-Year 17.”

• Eric L. Barker and Vincent J. Davisson received $228,750 from PHS-NIH National Institute on Drug Abuse for “Lipodemic Profile of Endocannabinoids from Neuronal Cells.”

• Vincent J. Davisson received $227,874 from National Science Foundation for “IDBR: Development of a Multivariate Hyper-Spectral Instrument for HighResolution Chemical Imaging of Cell StructureAmendment 1.”

• Eric L. Barker and Val J. Watts received $30,000 from Ara Parseghian Medical Research Foundation for “Drug Screening Assay Development for Niemann-Pick Disease Type C.”

• Arun K. Ghosh received $309,030 from University of Illinois for “Design and Synthesis of SARS Protease Inhibitors.”

• Stephen R. Byrn received $3,000 from Eli Lilly and Company for “Funding Request for the 41st Annual Pharmaceutics Graduate Student Research Meeting (PGSRM 2009).” • Stephen R. Byrn received $5,000 from Abbott Laboratories for “Funding for 41st Annual Pharmaceutics Graduate Student Research Meeting from Abbott

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academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

• Marietta L. Harrison received $384,262 from Indiana University for “Cancer Care Engineering.” • Karen S. Hudmon received $389,180 from PHSNIH National Cancer Institute for “ASK, ADVISE, REFER: Promoting Pharmacy-Based Referrals to Tobacco Quitlines.” • Karen S. Hudmon received $31,410 from University


faculty news

of California, San Francisco for “Dissemination of the Rx for Change in Psychiatry Curriculum.” • Douglas J. LaCount received $25,546 from University of Notre Dame for “Yeast Two-Hybrid Analysis of Plasmodium Falciparum VTS and HSP40 Binding Partners.” • Douglas J. LaCount received $75,000 from Showalter Trust for “Functional Analysis of InterferonStimulated Genes.” • Markus A. Lill received $148,714 from PHS-NIH National Institute of General Medical Science for “Dynamic Scoring: A Novel Method for Quantitative Modeling of Guest-Host Association.”

tional Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for “Protein Stability and Antiviral Activity in Human Rhinovirus.” • David J. Riese received $72,415 from Massachusetts General Hospital for “Gefitnib-Sensitive EGFR Mutations in Lung Cancer.” • Jean-Christophe Rochet received $22,156 from PHS-NIH National Institute Neuro Disorders, Strokes for “Membrane Binding and Aggregation of a-Synuclein.” • Amy H. Sheehan received $1,000 from Ortho-McNeil Janssen Science Affairs LLC for “Amendment 1 to Grant 203594.”

• David E. Nichols and Val J. Watts received $363,458 from PHS-NIH National Institute of Mental Health for “Development of Potentially Selective Dopamine Agonists.”

• Lynne S. Taylor received $150,000 from Abbott Laboratories for “Design of Optimally Performing Amorphous Solid Dispersion Systems through Rational Polymer Selection.”

• Laurie L. Parker and Jean-Christophe Rochet received $75,000 from Showalter Trust for “Impact of Neuronal Microenvironmental and Kinase Inhibitors on Apoptosis-Related Neurodengeneration in Alzheimer’s Disease.”

• Ross V. Weatherman received $262,891 from PHSNIH National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for “Novel Bioconjugates as Probes of Estrogen Receptors.”

• Rodolfo Pinal received $65,000 from Cima Labs, Inc. for “Feasibility Proposal for Evaluating Purdue University Patent Application Using Three Model Compounds.” • Kimberly S. Plake received $20,000 from Pharmaceutical Research & Manufacturing of America Foundation, Inc. for “Effect of Body Image Satisfaction on Readiness to Change for Diet, Exercise, and Medication Adherence in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.”

• Val J. Watts and David E. Nichols received $225,059 from PHS-NIH National Institute of Mental Health for “Development of Allosteric Modulators for D1 Dopamine Receptors.” • Val J. Watts received $24,946 from PHS-NIH National Institute of Mental Health for “D2 ReceptorInduced Sensitization of Adenylate Cyclase.” • Alan J. Zillich received $121,811 from Indiana Family and Social Services Administration for “Effect of a Pharmacy Case Program (DailyMed) on Clinical and Economic Outcomes.”

• Carol B. Post received $22,441 from PHS-NIH Na-

Samford University Appointments/Elections • Ashlee M. Best, clinical instructor • Peter J. Hughes, drug information specialist/assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice

• Maryam Iranikhah, assistant professor of pharmacy practice • C. Whitney White, assistant professor of pharmacy practice

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faculty news

University of the Sciences in Philadelphia Appointments/Elections • John A. Gans has been appointed executive director of healthcare leadership in Mayes

College of Healthcare Business and Policy at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. In addition to his role as executive director of healthcare leadership,

Dr. Gans will serve as a professor of healthcare and pharmaceutical business and as a professor of pharmacy.

South Carolina College of Pharmacy Appointments/Elections • P. Brandon Bookstaver has been named vice chair of the Program Planning Committee for the Society of Infectious Diseases Pharmacists. • John A. Bosso was appointed professor and chair of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences, and chair-elect of the Council of Faculties of AACP. • Clara Dismuke, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences • Amy D. Grant, director of experiential education • Heather Kokko, clinical assistant professor of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences, and interim director of pharmacy services at Medical University Hospital Authority

• Richard M. Schulz, professor and vice chair of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences • Dana Stafkey-Mailey, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences • Sherine Swee Lin Chan, assistant professor of pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences • Kristin Turner, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences • Yuxun Wang, assistant professor of pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences • Cathy Worrall, assistant dean for student affairs and experiential education • PeiSheng Xu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences

• Chung Jen James Chou, assistant professor of pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences

• Jun Zhu, assistant professor of pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences

• Lindsy Meadowcraft, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences

• S. Bryan Ziegler, assistant dean for student affairs

• Yuri K. Peterson, assistant professor of pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences

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Grants • Sondra H. Berger, South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research (SCTR) Institute,

academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

$50,000, “Nucleotide Stress Response for Cancer Drug Discovery” • W. Michael Dickson, Dana Stafkey-Mailey and P. Brandon Bookstaver, Health Sciences South Carolina, $26,000, “A Study of Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infections in US Hospitals” • John J. Lemasters, SCTR Institute, $50,000, “Cyclosporin A Derivatives to Prevent Progression of Heart Failure” • Campbell McInnes, SCTR Institute, $50,000, “Selective Plk1 Anti-Tumor therapeutics Through Polo Box Domain Inhibition” • Campbell McInnes, Douglas Pittman and Charles D. Smith, National Institutes of Health, $200,000, “Cell cycle specific CDK inhibitors as potential antitumor therapeutics through REPLACE” • Jill E. Michels, South Carolina Department of Health & Environmental Control (SC DHEC), $180,000, “SC DHEC Bioterrorism Project” • Georgi Petkov, SCTR Institute, $50,000, “Identification and


faculty news

Characterization of Potassium Ion Channels as New Therapeutic Targets to Control Overactive Bladder” • Rick G. Schnellmann, SCTR Institute, $50,000, “Treatment of Acute Kidney Injury with Suramin” • Zhi Zhong, National Institutes of Health, $366,000, “Mechanisms of In Vivo Ethanol-Induced Mi-

tochondrial Depolarization”

Promotions • Katherine H. Chessman, professor of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences (tenure) • Philip D. Hall, MUSC campus associate dean (full professor)

external affairs, MUSC campus • John C. Voris, professor and chair of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences • C. Wayne Weart, professor of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences

Retirements • Peter F. Edwards, director of

St. Louis College of Pharmacy Appointments/Elections • Kacie X. Ballantini, assistant professor of pharmacy practice • Leigh Boehmer, assistant professor of pharmacy practice • Christy Burrows, assistant professor of pharmacy practice • Kristin Campbell, assistant professor of pharmacy practice

• Andrew Crannage, assistant professor of pharmacy practice

• Lindsey Pritchard, assistant professor of pharmacy practice

• Allison Kleiber, basic and pharmaceutical sciences

• Lauren Roberts, assistant professor of pharmacy practice

• Jamie Pitlick, assistant professor of pharmacy practice

• Noha Salama, basic and pharmaceutical sciences

• Matthew K. Pitlick, assistant professor of pharmacy practice

Sullivan University Appointments/Elections • Abeer Al-Ghananeem, associate professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences Department • Christopher Betz, associate professor, Clinical & Administrative Sciences Department • BC Childress, drug information specialty resident • Chad Coulter, assistant professor, Clinical & Administrative Sciences Department

• Julie Harting, PGY2 infectious disease specialty resident • Jennifer Hibbs, assistant professor, Clinical & Administrative Sciences Department • Maggie Mangino, assistant professor, Clinical & Administrative Sciences Department

Promotions • Kimberly K. Daugherty, associate professor and assistant dean of academic affairs

• Barbara L. Jolly, associate professor and director of the Office of Lifelong Professional Development • Ajoy Koomer, assistant professor and director of the Office of Program Assessment • Yashwant V. Pathak, professor, assistant dean of research and director of CENTERA (Center for Nanotechnology Education, Research, and Application)

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faculty news

The University of Tennessee Awards • Stephanie J. Phelps was recently presented the 2009 Distinguished Service Award by the Tennessee Society of Health-System Pharmacists.

Virginia Commonwealth University Appointments/Elections • Gretchen M. Brophy received a 2009 Presidential Citation from the Society of Critical Care Medicine at its 38th Annual Congress in February in Nashville, Tenn.

• Joanne Peart received the School of Pharmacy’s 2009 Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching. • Patricia W. Slattum received the university’s Distinguished Service Award at its 27th annual faculty convocation.

• Karen Bryant has joined the dean’s office as graduate education coordinator, reporting to Susanna WuPong, director of Pharmaceutical Sciences Graduate Programs.

• Benjamin W. Van Tassell and Mark A. Munger were selected for the 2009 Outstanding Paper of the Year Award by the ACCP Cardiology PRN.

• Jeff C. Delafuente has been elected to a second term on the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists board of directors. He also has been elected secretary of the Commonwealth Council on Aging for the 2009-10 program year.

• Tish R. Moczygemba has been named the 2009 recipient of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Research and Education Foundation’s Junior Investigator Research Grant.

• Denise L. Emminger is director of the APPE program (Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience). • David A. Holdford is vice chairman of graduate studies and graduate program director for pharmacotherapy and pharmacy administration. • Gary R. Matzke is on the AACP Board of Directors as chairman-elect of the Council of Faculties. • Amy L. Pakyz has been named chairwoman of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Task Force for the Society of Infectious Diseases Pharmacists.

Awards • Kai I. Cheang has been named an ACCP Fellow and was honored during the 2009 ACCP Annual Meeting in Anaheim, Calif.

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academic Pharmacy now  Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

Grants

Promotions • Donald F. Brophy and Gretchen M. Brophy were promoted to professors of pharmacy. • Dr. Kai I. Cheang was promoted to associate professor of pharmacy and awarded tenure.

Retirements • Wesley J. Poynor retired as an associate professor in the Department of Pharmaceutics.


faculty news

The University of Utah Appointments/Elections • Chris M. Ireland has been appointed as interim dean of the College of Pharmacy, effective October 1.

University of Washington Appointments/Elections

Awards

• Jeannine S. McCune accepted an invitation from the National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services to serve as a member of its Developmental Therapeutics Study Section, Center for Scientific Review.

• Thomas A. Baillie received an award from the International Isotope Society for distinguished service to the society.

• Scott Ramsey has been elected president of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research.

• Srikanth Kadiyala received a best new investigator poster research presentation award at the International Society of Pharmacoeconomics Research international meeting. He collaborated with Erin Strumpf at McGill University in Montreal on his presentation.

Washington State University Appointments/Elections • William H. Campbell is interim dean of the Washington State University College of Pharmacy.

West Virginia University Awards • Virginia G. Scott was selected as the recipient of the 2009 Lambda Kappa Sigma Advisor Award.

• Charles D. Ponte has been selected as the American Society of Pain Educators (ASPE) Academic Pain Educator of the Year.

Xavier University of Louisiana Appointments/Elections • Kathleen B. Kennedy has been appointed interim dean.

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the last word Full-time Pharmacy Practice and Pharmaceutical Sciences Faculty 1986–2009 3000 Pharmacy Practice

Pharmaceutical Sciences

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Full-time Faculty in the Pharmaceutical Sciences 1986–2009 800

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Medicinal Chemistry MedChem

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THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER presents

The First Tennessee Chair of Excellence Symposium The Future of Education, Research and Practice in Pharmacy

Joseph T. DiPiro, Pharm.D.

Executive Dean and Professor South Carolina College of Pharmacy

Barbara G. Wells, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPP Dean and Professor Executive Director, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy

Marilyn K. Speedie, Ph.D. Dean and Professor College of Pharmacy University of Minnesota

January 22, 2010 • 9:00 am (CST) Wassell Randolph Student Alumni Center (SAC) • O.D. Larry Dining Room 800 Madison Avenue • Memphis, TN 38163 Live streaming video is available at: http://tinyurl.com/y8dhy15

of Pharmacy academic Pharmacy now College Oct/Nov/Dec 2009

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Department of Clinical Pharmacy


Renew Your Membership Today! There is no better time to renew your membership with the most dynamic and influential organization in pharmacy education. In 2009, AACP revamped its Web site and created a state-of-the-art clearinghouse of useful resources for curriculum, programmatic assessment, advocacy initiatives, as well as academic recruitment and retention tools. As an AACP member, you will continue to have full access to the site’s rich content and products. AACP will continue its digital overhaul in 2010 as we transition from print to online publications in an effort to provide you with the most up-to-date information while reducing our carbon footprint. The Profile of Pharmacy Students, Profile of Pharmacy Faculty, Pharmacy School Admission Requirements, and Academic Pharmacy Now will be available as easy-to-read onscreen publications, with the option to purchase a print copy for a low member price. Members will also have the opportunity to access the Online Roster of Faculty and Professional Staff Directory, which will replace the AACP Roster of Faculty and Professional Staff print publication. This directory is the enhanced version of the current Online Membership Directory and will offer many of the same great features. All features of the Roster will now be available on the AACP Web site, with the most current and comprehensive information about your peers accessible at your fingertips.

AACP offers so many other outstanding member benefits which include: •

low registration rates at annual and interim meetings;

memberships in multiple SIGs and up to two national sections for sharing ideas and learning from colleagues;

advocacy and outreach to key public opinion leaders;

awards programs to recognize stellar achievements in pharmacy education and research;

funding sources for research initiatives;

networking and professional development opportunities through meetings and electronic communications; and

educational programming and resources to aid you in the classroom.

We estimate that these resources and many more offer you a combined value of over $1,000 for the cost of your $100 membership. To continue receiving this rich portfolio of benefits of your AACP membership, simply return your payment with the redesigned invoice mailed to you in October or renew online at www.aacp.org by Dec. 31, 2009. Completed membership forms can be faxed to 703-836-8982 or mailed to: AACP, 1727 King St., Alexandria, VA 22314. If you have any questions, contact Angie Edwards, member services associate, at aedwards@ aacp.org or 703-739-2330, ext. 1035.

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Discover · Learn · Care : Improve Health


Academic Pharmacy Now: Oct/Nov/Dec 2009