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The News Magazine of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

Academic Pharmacy NOW

Jul | Aug | Sept 2010

Volume 3 Issue 3

There’s No Place Like the

Medical Home American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Discover · Learn · Care : Improve Health


table of contents

News in Brief 5

News Briefs

7

In Memoriam

9

Capitol Hill News

Features 2010 AACP Annual Meeting

Will

on the

10

UH Hilo Receives HIT Grant

14

Florida Researchers Collect Samples in the Keys

16

2010 Teachers of the Year

47

Faculty News

22

Advancing Science and Stimulating the Economy

32

Cau Mem tion: ber Wor s at k

Page 7: University of Washington School of Pharmacy Page 8: RDBscope; photo credit Steven Heller Pages 12-13: Dr. Rosalie Sagraves, AACP Interim Chief Science Officer Page 15: University of Florida College of Pharmacy Pages 20-21: Steve Schneider Photography

Page 25: The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy Back cover: istockphoto.com

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There’s No Place Like the Medical Home

Photo Credits

Page 23: University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy

2

Leading By Example

Front cover: istockphoto.com

Members Working for You

18

Hill

Faculty News 45

Expanding Our Horizons


letter from the editor

Dear Colleagues: Timing is everything, and by my observation, 2010 is a remarkable time in the history of our profession. There is serious movement to reform the delivery and payment for healthcare in the U.S., not just due to federal health reform legislation but because private payers and patients are tired of the old way of managing healthcare. Within these reform efforts the story is emerging clearly that, “You cannot have quality healthcare without comprehensive pharmacy services.” These are not my own words. I borrowed them from Jimmy R. Mitchell, recipient of the 2010 AACP Distinguished Service Award and former Director of the Office of Pharmacy Affairs (OPA) in the Health Resources and Services Administration. Under Jimmy’s leadership, the office launched clinical pharmacy demonstration projects first and then several rounds of a patient safety and clinical pharmacy services collaborative. Through this work, Jimmy, and OPA more broadly, became a major proponent for engaging colleges and schools of pharmacy in the care of patients served by community health centers, HIV/AIDS programs and other HRSA-supported health delivery systems that form the safety-net for caring for the most vulnerable and underserved people in our society. In the third round of the patient safety collaborative, nearly 100 colleges and schools of pharmacy are engaged in making pharmacy services more widely available. This is amazing community engagement and collaboration! A hallmark of the work of OPA is the consistent manner of measuring and evaluating the impact of better medication management on patient outcomes. The evidence continues to accumulate throughout the healthcare system that health improves and costs decrease when medication use is effectively managed. Evidence also indicates that engaging pharmacists as medication use specialists is key to this improved model of care. In the reforms underway in 2010 and beyond, health policy leaders and other healthcare providers are seeking answers to important questions, including how to increase the availability of primary care services. Demand for such services is expected to grow dramatically as people who have previously found it difficult to obtain health insurance find more affordable access to coverage. Recent reports from several AACP standing committees examined the contributions to primary care access and quality that pharmacists, pharmacy faculty and student pharmacists could make. As in the work of the OPA, our analysis revealed substantial evidence that quality primary care requires integration of medication therapy management services provided ideally by pharmacists. Numerous models of such services are documented in the literature. Taking full advantage of the opportunities to integrate pharmacists and medication therapy management into existing and emerging health delivery systems requires leadership from our schools, our faculties, our alumni and our students. Armed with ample evidence that clearly shows how pharmacists truly make a difference in the outcomes of care, agents of change must work to help all the members of the patient-centered health team become aware of what Jimmy Mitchell often repeats, “You cannot have quality healthcare without comprehensive pharmacy services.” Sincerely,

Lucinda L. Maine, Ph.D., R.Ph. Executive Vice President and CEO

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about us

Academic Pharmacy NOW

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Established in 1972 as AACP News, Academic Pharmacy Now features comprehensive news stories that reflect the discovery, learning and caring of more than 100 U.S. colleges and schools of pharmacy. It is the only magazine focused strictly on the advancements of pharmacy faculty and their students. The magazine is distributed to all U.S. pharmacy institutions as well as more than 3,200 individual AACP members across the country. Published quarterly as a membership service by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Inc. For address change, please return mailing label with current school affiliation.

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©2010 by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. All rights reserved. Content may not be reprinted without prior written permission. We welcome your comments.

Executive Vice President/Executive Editor

Digital Requirements

Lucinda L. Maine

Academic Pharmacy Now supports a digital workflow and requires digital ad submission. Ads must be submitted as press-ready pdf files or tiff files. Fonts and images must be embedded. All images must be saved as at least 300 DPI @ 100% of finished size. Ads may be submitted as grayscale or 4-color CMYK. Full-page ads run 8.5� by 11� with a full bleed; half-page ads run 5.5� by 8.5� with a two-sided bleed. For any questions on ad requirements, e-mail Tricia Ekenstam, art director, at tekenstam@ aacp.org. To submit advertisements, simply e-mail ads directly to Rebecca Morgan, senior editor, at rmorgan@aacp.org or Maureen O. Thielemans, managing editor at mthielemans@aacp.org.

Senior Editor

Rebecca M. Morgan rmorgan@aacp.org Managing Editor

Maureen O. Thielemans mthielemans@aacp.org Art Director

Tricia Ekenstam

Issuance & Closing Dates Frequency: 4 issues a year

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American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Discover · Learn · Care : Improve Health

Issue Closing Date

Jan/Feb/Mar

December 15, 2010

Apr/May/Jun

March 15, 2011

Jul/Aug/Sep

Oct/Nov/Dec

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June 15, 2011 September 15, 2011


news in brief

News Briefs UT Austin Pharmacy Professor Developing New Vaccine Delivery Systems

Pharmacy and Touro’s Master of Science degree program.

“HealthStart!” will teach health literacy and pharmaceutical safety to Harlem students, grades pre-K–2, as well as to their parents and teachers, using various learning tools including Multidisciplinary researchers from The University of Texas at video, school lesson plans, hands-on interactive sessions and Austin (UT Austin) College of Pharmacy and College of Natu- community outreach. The program is scheduled to launch at ral Sciences are joining forces at a new pediatric research facil- P.S. 197 in Harlem in the fall with an animated video and supity to make an impact on children’s health challenges. port materials designed for early and pre-readers. A member of that team is Dr. Zhengrong (Rong) Cui, who re- “The goal is to create a program that can be used in other Harcently joined the UT Austin College of Pharmacy faculty. Cui is lem schools, and eventually throughout the entire country,” said developing a novel model for the delivery of vaccines through Stuart Feldman, Ph.D., dean of the Touro College of Pharmacy, the skin and he believes that not only will this be less painful noting that in addition to classroom instruction, students will for children, but it also has the potential to deliver a more ef- be brought to the Touro-Harlem Medical Library and the Touro fective vaccine. College of Pharmacy for interactive group learning sessions. “Vaccines are extensively given to children to promote the development of immunity against infectious diseases, and any development of new vaccines and alternative, non-invasive routes of vaccination would be very beneficial,” said Cui, an associate professor of pharmaceutics. “The skin has evolved to protect not only by acting as a physical barrier, but also by its role in our powerful immune system,” he added. Cui also is working to develop nanoparticles and using them as delivery systems for vaccine antigens or small molecular anti-cancer chemicals.

Touro-Harlem Medical Library Awarded Prestigious Grant The Touro-Harlem Medical Library has been awarded a competitive $30,000 grant to create a health literacy program for underserved populations. “HealthStart!” is being developed by the Touro-Harlem Medical Library, the Touro College of Pharmacy and “Project Aspire,” a public health initiative of the Children’s Health Education Foundation at Touro College.

The video will be developed by seven-time Emmy award winner Ian Ellis James, who created the Hip Hop Stroke video for the National Stroke Association and Harlem Hospital.

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Professor Receives $1.4M Grant to Study Septic Shock Dr. Arnold Johnson, a professor at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, has been awarded a four-year grant from the National Institutes of Health in the amount of $1.4 million to study lung inflammation associated with septic shock. Septic shock is a dangerous bodily response to infection that has a 40 percent mortality rate, affects five to ten percent of intensive care unit patients and causes more than 200,000 deaths each year. Infections, especially in cases such as pneumonia, appendicitis and meningitis, can lead to septic shock wherein patients develop low blood pressure and organ injury. Septic shock is treated with antibiotics and often requires blood-pressureraising drugs and mechanical ventilation.

Funding for the new program will be provided by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health and the Department of Health and Human Services. The library is one of “Our research will study the lung response to various disease only two institutions in the mid-Atlantic region to be awarded states with the goal of improving cell function and preventing such a grant. lung injury,” Johnson said. “The number of people who die from septic shock has doubled in the last 20 years because of The Touro-Harlem Medical Library, which opened in Sepseveral factors, including an aging population, an increasing tember 2007, provides information and resources in the areas reliance on strong, immune-weakening drug therapies and the of basic science, bio-medicine, health, pharmacy and public growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.” health to support the curriculum and research goals of the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, the Touro College of

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news in brief

Massachusetts Pharmacy School and Health Center Partnership Improves Care Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health SciencesWorcester/Manchester has partnered with Holyoke Health Center (HHC), a private, nonprofit health center to provide pharmacy services to the low-income and medically underserved populations of greater Holyoke, Mass. Dr. Heather L. Upchurch, assistant professor of pharmacy practice, and Tracey Cole, HHC pharmacy director, supervise up-to-five Pharm.D. candidates every six weeks. As part of the advanced experiential education rotation in ambulatory care, student pharmacists are integrated with primary care and increase clinical pharmacy services to HHC. Each student rounds with a primary care provider six hours per week and performs pre-visit chart reviews and detailed written consultations/SOAP notes to the providers. As part of the patient’s primary care visit, the students perform medication reconciliation and are available to providers for specific drug consults. Each student also assists in HHC’s Medication Therapy Management clinic for high risk patients. Since October of 2009, through Federal Capital Improvement Program funding and a Health Resources and Services Administration expansion grant, more than $250,000 was invested to open a second 340B pharmacy at the Chicopee Health Center location in Chicopee, Mass. In addition, a second private consultation room, used for MTM visits, and technology upgrades were added to the HHC pharmacy. An additional full-time clinical pharmacist started July 1, which will increase access to clinical pharmacy services for patients and allow for more student pharmacists to experience rotations at HHC.

UNC-Chapel Hill Pharmacy Education Expanding to UNC Asheville The University of North Carolina (UNC) Board of Governors approved UNC-Chapel Hill’s plan to expand its pharmacy education program to UNC Asheville in partnership with Mission Health System. The UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy in Chapel Hill will create a satellite pharmacy program that will be based at UNC Asheville. The program at UNC Asheville is an expansion of the successful partnership the UNC-Chapel Hill pharmacy school has had with Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) since 2005. The start-up costs for the program will be covered by a $2.5 million fundraising initiative spearheaded by the Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce. By the fourth year of the program, its cost is projected to be fully covered by tuition and by Mission Health System funding half the clinical faculty’s salaries. The partnership program should not require any state funding. Like its counterpart at ECSU, the satellite program at UNC Asheville will educate more pharmacists in an area of North Carolina that doesn’t have enough healthcare providers in general. The UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy recognized the need for more healthcare practitioners in western North Carolina through workforce research undertaken by the UNC Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research and made expansion into the area part of its strategic plan five years ago. The satellite program could enroll up to 40 Doctor of Pharmacy students a year.

New Members Join AJPE Editorial Board Three new editorial board members have been appointed to the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. The Board members beginning their three-year terms are Alicia S. Bouldin, research associate professor at The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy; Dr. Brent Fox, assistant to the dean for educational technology at Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy; and Dr. Catherine A. Elstad, clinical associate professor and associate dean of student services at Washington State University College of Pharmacy. They will join Dr. Naser Z. Alsharif (Creighton University), Dr. Shelley L. ChambersFox (Washington State University) and Dr. Peter D. Hurd (St.

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Louis College of Pharmacy), who have been reappointed for three-year terms, and 16 continuing members of the Board. Board members serve as reviewers for manuscripts, write editorial viewpoints, serve as guest editors, review Journal performance and recommend to the editor topics that would be of interest to Journal readers. Board members completing their terms are Dr. Timothy S. Tracy (University of Minnesota), Nicholas G. Popovich (University of Illinois at Chicago) and Kristin K. Janke (University of Minnesota).


news in brief

Purdue Radio Program Focuses on ‘Engineering Pharmaceuticals’ The life-saving potential—and soaring cost—of developing new drugs is the subject of the third installment of Purdue University’s Global Challenges radio series, a collection of programs designed to spotlight the role of engineering and other disciplines in solving pressing global challenges.

Yet, he’s survived a disease for five years that only 30 years ago killed 100 percent of its victims.

“Engineering Pharmaceuticals” has been produced by the Purdue University College of Pharmacy, College of Engineering and WFYI Public Radio in Indianapolis.

Researchers whose work is highlighted in the program include Dr. Marietta L. Harrison, professor of medicinal chemistry and molecular pharmacology and director of the Oncological Sciences Center at Purdue; Dr. Charles Buck, director of operations at Purdue’s Bindley Biosciences Center; Dr. Gintaras “Rex” Reklaitis, professor of chemical engineering at Purdue; and Dr. Fernando Muzzio, professor of chemical engineering at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, partners in a National Science Foundation-funded program to improve the pharmaceutical manufacturing process.

The program, narrated by Barbara Bogaev, former host and editor of “Weekend America,” looks at the science and technology being used in the hunt for new drugs targeted to very specific forms of disease. It explores the labyrinthine process of gaining approval from government regulators and it follows the path of those who figure out how to manufacture new drugs for efficacy and safety. Much of the program centers on the experiences of Matt Grossman, a freshman at Landmark College in Putney, Vt. Five years ago, a few weeks after his bar mitzvah, Grossman was diagnosed with a brain tumor. The list of drugs he has been given is long and frightening. The drugs have left him with problems such as trouble processing information. That’s why he’s at Landmark, a college designed for youths with problems like cognitive deficits, dyslexia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

“To be quite honest, if I hadn’t had chemo, I probably would have been dead,” he says on the program.

Among others interviewed are Jeff Hatfield, CEO of Vitae Pharmaceuticals; Dr. Jerome Kassirer, former editor-in-chief of the New England Journal of Medicine, who gives a critical view of the pharmaceutical industry; and Craig Lustig, a cancer survivor and cancer patient advocate. “Engineering Pharmaceuticals” is available online at http:// www.pharmacy.purdue.edu/radio.php and is being broadcast nationally on public radio stations.

In Memoriam

Nathan A. Hall

Dr. Nathan A. Hall, former professor of pharmacy at the University of Washington (UW), died June 2 after suffering a stroke. He was 92. Dr. Hall entered UW at the age of 16 and graduated summa cum laude at age 19. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He earned his Ph.D. in pharmacy at UW, married Florence Turnbull in 1960, and was a professor of pharmacy at the university until his retirement in 1981. “Dr. Hall was my undergraduate mentor; he had a major influence on my career and research,” said Dr. William L. Hayton, UW Class of 1967 and now associate dean of the College of Pharmacy at The Ohio State University. “I was a participant in the NSFsponsored Undergraduate Research Program and was in his lab at Bagley Hall from 1965-67. We conducted drug absorption studies using a fish model. One of our published papers based on this work won a Lunsford Richardson Pharmacy Award. The cash was applied to purchase a 1966 Buick!” He added,

“Dr. Hall was instrumental in getting me to go to graduate school. I was very lucky to have known him and to have received his guidance.” In 1959, Hall was awarded a Fulbright Senior Lectorship to the University of Malay in Singapore. In 1968, he took a sabbatical to serve as visiting professor of pharmacy at the University of Sydney in Australia. He and his wife enjoyed traveling. According to Dr. Wendel L. Nelson, who knew him before and during his long retirement, Hall was “very competitive, and very good” at sports, including bowling, handball and golf, “which he played right into his 90s.” Hall is survived by his children, Dennis and Pamella, seven grandchildren, and his brother, Gregory. He will be missed by his many friends and admirers in the School of Pharmacy and the Academy, and he will be long remembered for his contributions to science at UW.

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news in brief

USC Pharmacy Faculty Member Honored at White House Dr. Roberta Diaz Brinton, director of the University of Southern California (USC) Science Technology and Research Program, was presented with the prestigious 2010 Presidential Citizens Medal by President Barack Obama in a ceremony at the White House on Aug. 4. “What unites these citizens—what makes them special—is the determination they share to find a wrong and right it; to see a need and meet it; to recognize when others are suffering and take it upon themselves to make a difference,” said President Obama at the ceremony. Considered among the nation’s highest civilian awards, the Presidential Citizens Medal recognizes citizens who have performed exemplary deeds of service for the nation. Twelve other citizens were honored along with Brinton, having been chosen from a pool of some 6,000 applicants. Brinton was recognized for her work in improving science and technology education for students in Los Angeles through the USC Science Technology and Research program, known as STAR, for the last 22 years. The program provides elementary, middle and high school students and their teachers with unique access and tools that are structured to engage students in science.

experiments, using research technologies and even working on journal articles. Ultimately, the experience gives these students a high-level science background, which gives them stellar experiential training when applying to colleges and, in many, igniting a lifelong interest in science and in mentoring future generations. The STAR program has served thousands of minority and disadvantaged children in the Los Angeles area over the past two decades. Those who went through the secondary school lab experience have had a 100 percent rate of attending and completing college. Many of the students who participate in the program are the first in their families to attend college. While Brinton has been a stalwart director of STAR, she also runs an impressive research enterprise at the School of Pharmacy, where she holds the R. Pete Vanderveen Chair in Therapeutic Discovery and Development. Her work focuses on neurodegeneration, with an emphasis on Alzheimer’s disease. Recently, a compound to prevent or delay Alzheimer’s disease discovered in her lab was funded for a clinical trial by the National Institutes of Health.

“I am very grateful for this honor,” Brinton said. “And I especially want to thank USC President C. L. Max Nikias, President Emeritus Steven Sample and School of Pharmacy Dean R. Pete Vanderveen for their persistent support of this program and its outreach into our community.” A cornerstone of the program is the opportunity for high school students to become working members of research teams in labs throughout USC. As an embedded portion of their secondary school curriculum, these students are in the lab daily, conducting

Dr. Roberta Diaz Brinton, director of the University of Southern California Science Technology and Research Program, received the prestigious 2010 Presidential Citizens Medal by President Barack Obama in a ceremony at the White House on Aug. 4.

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Capitol Hill News

news oin  n brief

Will by Will Lang

the

Hill

Heavy Lifting Ahead The passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA) [1] may have seemed like heavy work, but implementation of its hundreds of provisions will pale in comparison. Yet, the opportunity for advancing the vision of the pharmacist as an integral member of the healthcare team outweighs the challenges of implementation. The legislation reflects decades of patient, provider and policy expert interest in increasing access to care that is affordable and of high quality. Addressing the quality issue is where provisions that discuss coordination of care and determine the effectiveness of care intersect. While many of these quality provisions will be initially implemented as demonstrations and pilot projects, the opportunity for these models of care to become the standard of care are clearly delineated in the law. Pharmacy faculty can and should play an important role in collaborating in the development, implementation and evaluation of these demonstration and pilot projects. As mentioned above, improving the quality of healthcare, especially by improving care coordination, is a primary implementation concern of healthcare reform. It is a disappointing and often life-threatening aspect of our current healthcare system that a patient’s care is a scatter-shot attempt to improve health outcomes. Multiple providers attempting to provide care within multiple healthcare facilities without sufficient feedback places a patient in jeopardy of unsatisfactory care and our economy in jeopardy due to unnecessary care. Within the healthcare reform legislation are many provisions that will, over time, attempt to improve patient care and reduce costs. Of particular interest are the provisions that will help create a better-coordinated, patient-centered, team-based approach to care, which is supported by health information technology, and are the legislative expression of recommendations in reports and statements of a number of health policy, delivery and quality organizations [2], [3], [4], [5],[6]. The medical home, or more appropriately called the patientcentered medical home (PCMH), is the model most frequently equated with improving the coordination of a patient’s care. The PPACA includes provisions that authorize the development, implementation and evaluation of PCMH models. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation, authorized within Section 3021 of the law, will be responsible for selecting models that include “promoting broad payment and practice reform in primary care, including patient-centered medical home models for high-need individuals, medical homes that address women’s unique healthcare needs, and

models that transition primary care services away from feefor-service based reimbursement and toward comprehensive payment or salary-based payment.” Improving the quality of care through improved coordination models such as the medical home is already an area of research and service for some pharmacy faculty. The implementation of healthcare reform legislation provides ample opportunity for academic pharmacy to advance improvements in patient care through the integration of clinical pharmacy services envisioned in the move to the Doctor of Pharmacy as the professional degree. It is essential for faculty members who are engaged in such endeavors to communicate this engagement with AACP staff and public policy experts to influence how models are developed and evaluated. Faculty members not engaged will be doing the public, students, the pharmacy profession and their institutions a disservice if they remain on the sidelines since models of care will ultimately lead to some models becoming the standard for future healthcare delivery. The community outreach will require substantial effort. Pharmacy faculty need to immediately engage with state Medicaid programs and medical societies to develop relationships and help overcome bias and preconceived ideas of what it takes to improve the quality of care. This edition of Academic Pharmacy Now includes articles that provide some framework for successful engagement that will help make the heavy lifting just a little easier. Build and strengthen your academic pharmacy advocacy portfolio by visiting AACP’s Web site at www.aacp.org/ issuesandadvocacy/advocacy/AdvocacyInAction. The following citations are sources of information regarding the patient-centered medical home: [1] Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, Public Law 111-148, http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=111_cong_ bills&docid=f:h3590pp.txt.pdf [2] Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality, April 8, 2003, Institute of Medicine http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2003/Health-ProfessionsEducation-A-Bridge-to-Quality.aspx [3] Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative www.pcpcc.net [4] HRSA Patient Safety and Clinical Pharmacy Collaborative www.hrsa.gov/ patientsafety [5] Institute for Healthcare Improvement www.ihi.org [6] National Committee for Quality Assurance www.ncqa.org academic Pharmacy now  Jul/Aug/Sept 2010

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news in brief

University of Hawaii at Hilo College of Pharmacy Awarded $16 Million for Healthcare Pilot Project A consortium led by the University of Hawaii at Hilo (UH Hilo) College of Pharmacy to use health information technology to provide better healthcare to Big Island residents has been awarded $16,091,390. The funds were awarded through a grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Hawaii County is one of 17 communities across the nation chosen to serve as pilot communities to develop wide-scale use of electronic medical records through the Beacon Communities program. “Given the geography of the Big Island, getting in to see a healthcare professional can be difficult for some residents,” said Sen. Daniel K. Inouye. “In order to maximize this precious time with patients, healthcare professionals need immediate access to up-to-date information in order to properly diagnose and treat the patient. Integrating our vast network of public and private healthcare professionals in Hawaii is vital to ensuring that patients receive the highest quality of care. Health information helps ensure that patients are receiving care that accounts for every aspect of their medical history.” The UH Hilo College of Pharmacy is the lead applicant organization for the grant from the Hawaii County Beacon Community Consortium, a group of educators, healthcare providers, insurers and other community members. The group was formed to strengthen and use health information technology to continuously improve healthcare quality, cost-efficiency and population health in Hawaii County. “This award is particularly monumental for bringing in money to the state and the significant improvement in serving the healthcare needs of patients in Hawaii,” said Dr. John M. Pezzuto, dean of the College of Pharmacy. “We’re pleased that the UH Hilo College of Pharmacy could take a leading role in this initiative, which demonstrates the strength of partnerships throughout the state at all levels.”

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UH Hilo Chancellor Dr. Rose Tseng said she is pleased to join with so many community partners in this important effort to improve healthcare on the island. “Many of our island’s dedicated medical leaders are coming together to advance this goal and I truly believe that, when we all work together, great things can happen,” Tseng said. “This group will maximize the potential of information technology to lower the cost and enhance the quality of care for our island.” The effort will concentrate on the implementation of a regionwide Health Information Exchange and Patient Health Record solution. The system will use secure, Internet-based care coordination and tele-monitoring tools to increase access to specialty care for patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes and hypertension, the White House announcement said. Karen L. Pellegrin, director of strategic planning for the College of Pharmacy, said the project would not be possible without tremendous effort and staff time from businesses in the community such as KTA and T&T Electric, as well as members of the consortium. “Given an extraordinary level of community engagement and stakeholder leadership at the highest levels, the College of Pharmacy is honored to work alongside these other community leaders,” Pellegrin said. “Our goals are to improve prevention of disease, improve access to appropriate care and reduce health disparities for Hawaii Island residents.”


news in brief

U of M Study Shows Targeting the Blood-brain Barrier May Delay Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease University of Minnesota (U of M) researchers may be one step closer to slowing the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

with a steroid-like chemical that activates PXR, the amount of beta-amyloid protein in the brain is reduced. The activation of the PXR was found to increase the expression of a blood-brain barrier protein called P-glycoprotein. This protein transports beta-amyloid out of the brain.

A study that appears in the May issue of Molecular Pharmacology shows that by targeting the blood-brain barrier, researchers from the College of Pharmacy and the National Institute “We know that P-glycoprotein levels are reduced in the bloodof Environmental Health Sciences were able to slow the accu- brain barrier in Alzheimer’s patients, and we now have demonmulation of a protein associated with the progression of the strated that P-glycoprotein may play a pivotal role in clearing illness in mice. beta-amyloid from the brain” said Dr. Bjoern Bauer, assistant professor at the College of Pharmacy and senior author of the The researchers say this study may provide the experimental paper. basis for new strategies that can be used to treat Alzheimer’s patients. “When we treated the Alzheimer’s mice with a chemical that activates PXR, blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein increased, The blood-brain barrier is the brain’s main defense system—it and beta-amyloid brain levels in the mice reduced by as much separates the brain from the rest of the body’s blood supply. as 60 percent within seven days to the levels of healthy mice,” The barrier both prevents harmful toxins in the blood from en- he said. tering the brain and removes harmful toxins that are byproducts of chemical reactions in the brain. It is possible that reduced P-glycoprotein expression at the blood-brain barrier may be an early indicator of Alzheimer’s Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disease disease, even before the cognitive symptoms appear and that it that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills, and eventu- contributes to beta-amyloid accumulation in the brain, said Dr. ally disrupts function of major organs. Estimates vary, but ex- Anika Hartz, lead author on the paper and research associate in perts suggest that as many as 2.6-5.1 million Americans may the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the have Alzheimer’s. U of M Medical School, Duluth campus. One hallmark of Alzheimer’s is the deposition of beta-amyloid protein in the brain. This protein clumps to form plaques that destroy neurons. Neuron loss leads to cognitive impairment and memory loss.

One of the challenges confronting the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s is being able to clearly diagnose the disease process when brain damage is minimal, before any symptoms occur.

In this study, the researchers were able to reduce the accumulation of beta-amyloid protein in the brain by targeting a certain receptor in the brain known as the pregnane X receptor, or PXR.

The researchers plan to conduct a study where the Alzheimer’s mice are fed a PXR-activating compound in their diet for 12-18 months. The cognitive skills of the animals will be monitored regularly, along with their P-glycoprotein levels, to determine whether the feeding regimen delays the onset of cognitive impairment.

When researchers treated genetically modified mice that model human Alzheimer’s disease (developed by Dr. Karen H. Ashe, professor in the Department of Neurology and Neuroscience)

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news in brief

AACP Co-Sponsors VII Pan American Conference on Pharmaceutical Education

T

he VII Pan American Conference on Pharmaceutical Education, co-sponsored by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and AACP, was held May 24–26, 2010 in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Participants came from more than 20 countries in Central, North and South America, as well as the Caribbean islands. The theme of the 2010 Pan American Conference was Competency-Based Training. The conference executive committee selected a format of workshops and discussions with only a few presentations so that attendees could have multiple opportunities to participate. One set of workshops allowed for discussion of the accreditation document on pharmaceutical education, Proposal for Accreditation of Pharmacy Careers in Latin America. Another set of workshops enabled participants to discuss the Basic Pharmaceutical Education Plan for the 21st Century, a curricular plan that was developed during previous Pan American Conferences and refined over time. Other workshop topics included Reflection on the Role of the Pharmacist and Training Orientation; a Permanent Forum for Discussion and Proposals for Pharmaceutical Education: Is It Necessary?; and, Technologies for Communication, Education and Networking.

would allow for more coordination of the organization between conferences. Dr. José Luis Castro, PAHO consultant, and members of the executive committee will determine the type of individual needed for the position and begin the hiring process. The Pan American Commission for Pharmaceutical Education held its business meetings during the conference. The commission is composed of one delegate from each country in the Americas that was represented. Mexico was selected to host the 2012 conference and Cuba in 2014. Conference organizers hope that a significant number of AACP members will attend the 2012 Pan American Conference in October 2010 and will support our Mexican colleagues as they host the meeting. More information about that conference will be available via AACP and its Global Pharmacy Education SIG. AACP members who participated in the 2010 Pan American Conference included Dr. Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, head of the Department of Pharmacy Practice at the University of Maryland

Host country members presented their viewpoints about the role of pharmacists in a governmental healthcare system during a roundtable discussion titled “Integration of Health Care within the Teaching Experience–The Experience of Brazil.” By the close of the conference, delegates agreed that much had been accomplished in the areas of accreditation and curriculum planning, and it was determined that the Pan American Conference on Pharmaceutical Education should become more structured. This would start with the hiring of an individual to be a permanent secretary, which

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School of Pharmacy; Mike Rouse, assistant executive director, international & professional affairs, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education; and Dr. Rosalie Sagraves, dean emeritus and professor emeritus at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy and consultant in Global Pharmacy Education for AACP. Rodriguez de Bittner represents AACP on the Pan American Commission for Pharmaceutical Education, and as a member of the Conference Executive Committee, and led several workshop sessions and discussions during the conference. Mike Rouse represented the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) Pharmacy Education Taskforce Advisory Group and is project leader for Quality Assurance. He updated attendees concerning the taskforce’s work and its future plans for global pharmacy education, as well as sharing information concerning advancements in quality assurance. Sagraves presented an update on global pharmacy education from an AACP perspective and spoke of how the Pan American Conference could become a more formalized

The 2010 Pan American Conference, held in Porto Alegre, Brazil, focused on competency-based training and featured workshops that discussed wide-ranging topics such as the accreditation document on pharmaceutical education, the Proposal for Accreditation of Pharmacy Careers in Latin America and the Basic Pharmaceutical Education Plan for the 21st Century, a curricular plan that was developed during previous Pan American Conferences and refined over time.


news in brief organization and a future member of the Global Alliance for Pharmacy Education (GAPE), a recently organized group of pharmacy education associations around the globe. In addition to attending the VII Pan American Conference on Pharmaceutical Education, some attendees, including those from the U.S., attended several functions of the XX Pan-American Pharmacy Congress, which was also held in Porto Alegre. Rodriguez de Bittner was an invited speaker at the Congress and spoke about the Maryland P3 (Patients, Pharmacists, Partnerships) Program, which is a program for self-insured employers that provides pharmacist coaches who help employees manage their chronic disease(s). For this program, Rodriguez de Bittner and her University of Maryland colleagues were recipients of one of the 2010 Pinnacle Awards, which are presented annually by the American Pharmacists Association Foundation.

Dr. Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, head of the Department of Pharmacy Practice at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, and Alejandro Nieto Rodriguez, executive director of the Mexican Association of Pharmacy Schools.

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news in brief

“It’s the biodiversity that makes the Florida Keys a hot spot for researchers,” Luesch said.

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University of Florida Marine Researchers Collect Samples Amidst Growing Oil Threat As the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico steadily migrated toward Florida last June, University of Florida (UF) marine researchers hurried to collect underwater marine algae samples in the Florida Keys. Dr. Hendrik Luesch, an associate professor of medicinal chemistry at the UF College of Pharmacy, took his research team to Long Key in hopes of advancing early drug discoveries that may yield cancer-fighting properties hidden in marine algae. It’s an expedition he has made annually for four years, but this year it seems there might be a limit on how long the ecosystem will yield its specimens. According to scientists, nearly five million barrels of oil were released into the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion on April 20. “Cyanobacteria, or organisms that overgrow coral reefs, are shown to produce drug-like compounds that may be exploited for biomedical purposes such as anti-cancer drugs,” Luesch said. The warm waters and mild year-round temperatures allow marine life to flourish in the Keys, creating a predatory environment among these organisms, Luesch said. In order to survive, marine organisms develop defense systems, sort of like a chemical survival kit. Researchers use these toxic chemicals as the basis for creating drugs that can target and fight cancers. “It’s the biodiversity that makes the Florida Keys a hot spot for researchers,” Luesch said. At the same time, the coral reefs are also a very sensitive ecosystem, he said. For example, the extended chill in the tropical waters last January caused sea turtles to become cold-stunned and killed more

than 85 percent of reefs in certain areas, according to Cynthia Lewis, a biological scientist at the Keys Marine Laboratory in Long Key, where the UF researchers collected specimens. Scientists in Florida don’t know what to expect, she said. “We are concerned and watchful,” she added. “We don’t know how far the marine impact may go.” Lewis and nine other scientific teams under the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission took baseline samples on the Gulf and Atlantic coasts from Key Largo to Key West to establish pre-impact marine wildlife assessments, she said. One challenge with his research, Luesch noted, is the randomness of finding an organism and the length of time it takes to isolate and test a compound for its specific drug-producing qualities. Environmental variables may change, which means the organism may change as well. “We may find an interesting species, but it takes months of research just to isolate the active compound and analyze the properties in our lab,” Luesch said. “Attempts to re-collect often fail because we do not always see the same organism again.” Two compounds from the oceans have been developed into drugs that are on the market today—one treats cancer, and the other is a pain reliever. Fourteen more are in clinical trials. Scientists simply don’t know how many biological organisms are in the ocean, Luesch said, but marine organisms often produce multiple compounds, and he estimates that more than 90 percent have not yet been discovered. What does the largest-ever oil spill disaster mean to Luesch and his research? “I am thinking what everyone else in the United States and in the world is thinking—what a catastrophe this is for mankind and especially the area in the Gulf of Mexico,” he said. “Secondly, I am concerned for the marine discovery efforts by our groups and other groups in this area.”

Dr. Hendrik Luesch, associate professor of medicinal chemistry at the University of Florida College of Pharmacy, sorts through the day’s diving samples of blue-green algae on June 10, 2010, during an expedition to the Florida Keys. Along with members of his UF marine natural products lab, Luesch raced toacademic collect new Pharmacy samples as envinow  Jul/Aug/Sept 2010 ronmental impacts from the migrating oil spill threatened Florida.

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news in brief

2010 Teachers of the Year Each year, AACP member institutions submit their Teachers of the Year for recognition at the Annual Meeting and Seminars. This year’s honorees were feted at a special luncheon and at the Closing Banquet of the 2010 Annual Meeting in Seattle. AACP con­gratulates the 2010 Teachers of the Year: Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Dr. Ray Chandrasekara Dr. Jeffrey M. Voigt Appalachian College of Pharmacy Dr. Charles R. Breese Dr. Sarah T. Melton Auburn University Dr. Erika L. Kleppinger Butler University Dr. Alexander J. Ansara Dr. Kimberly M. Beck California Northstate College of Pharmacy Dr. Leanne Coyne Creighton University Dr. Karen K. O’Brien Dr. Victoria F. Roche Drake University Dr. Sarah E. Grady East Tennessee State University Dr. Stacy D. Brown Dr. Brian L. Odle Dr. Victoria E. Ramsauer Florida A&M University Dr. Janet Barber Ms. Tanaga A. Boozer Dr. Charlie W. Colquitt Dr. Tonya S. Martin Dr. Leonard R. Rappa Dr. Kinfe K. Redda

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Hampton University Dr. Deidre R. Payne Husson University Dr. Aaron M. Domina Dr. David B. Romerill Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine Dr. Naushad K. Ghilzai Dr. Lakhu Keshvara Dr. Dolores A. Kutzer Long Island University Dr. Hamid Rahim Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences-Boston Dr. Erika Felix-Getzik Dr. Dan Kiel Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences-Worcester Dr. Abir Kanaan Midwestern University/ Downers Grove Dr. Carrie A. Sincak

Northeastern University Dr. Eugene A. Bernstein Dr. Jason W. Lancaster

South Carolina College of Pharmacy-USC Campus Dr. Betsy W. Blake

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy Dr. Dale E. English II Dr. Kristen L. Longstreth Dr. Sharanie V. Sims

South Dakota State University Dr. Daniel J. Hansen

Nova Southeastern University Dr. Kevin A. Clauson

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Dr. A. Michael Crider Dr. Keith A. Hecht

Oregon State University Dr. David T. Bearden Dr. Gary E. DeLander Dr. Philip J. Proteau Dr. J. “Fred” Stevens

Southwestern Oklahoma State University Dr. Tom W. Davis Dr. Carroll L. Ramos

Pacific University Oregon Dr. Pauline A. Cawley Dr. Fawzy Elbarbry

St. Louis College of Pharmacy Dr. John M. Beale Jr.

Palm Beach Atlantic University Dr. Dana A. Brown

Texas A&M Health Science Center Dr. Lacy Daniels Dr. Srikanth Kolluru Dr. Mohammad T. Nutan

Regis University Dr. Stephen W. Luckey

Midwestern University/ Glendale Dr. Kimberly Cauthon Dr. Stephanie J. Counts

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Dr. Joseph A. Barone

North Dakota State University Dr. Stephen T. O’Rourke

South Carolina College of Pharmacy-MUSC Campus Dr. Sarah P. Shrader

academic Pharmacy now  Jul/Aug/Sept 2010

South University Dr. Martin M. Zdanowicz

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Dr. Craig D. Cox Dr. Reza Mehvar Dr. Nikita Mirajkar Dr. Quentin R. Smith Dr. Sanjay K. Srivastava The Ohio State University Dr. Dennis B. McKay Dr. Vinita B. Pai


news in brief

The University of Arizona Dr. David A. Apgar Dr. John W. Regan

The University of Texas at Austin Dr. Edward “Ted” M. Mills

The University of British Columbia Dr. Brian E. Cairns Mr. Tamiz Kanji Dr. Peter S. Loewen Ms. Tessa Nicholl Dr. Wayne Riggs Mr. Tony T. Seet

The University of Toledo Dr. Vincent F. Mauro

The University of Georgia Dr. Brian D. Buck

Union University Dr. Kim M. Jones Dr. David A. Kuhl Dr. Joel S. Owen

The University of Iowa Dr. Robert F. Shaw The University of Kansas Dr. James M. Backes The University of Louisiana at Monroe Dr. Benny L. Blaylock Dr. David J. Caldwell Dr. Jeffery D. Evans Dr. Blair P. Wilbert The University of Mississippi Dr. Brian L. Crabtree Mr. Larry A. Krohn Dr. David J. McCaffrey Dr. Christopher R. McCurdy Dr. Justin J. Sherman The University of Montana Dr. Douglas R. Allington Dr. Keith K. Parker The University of New Mexico Dr. Gretchen M. Ray The University of Oklahoma Dr. Vincent C. Dennis The University of Tennessee Dr. Shaunta’ M. Ray Dr. Katie J. Suda

The University of Utah Dr. James N. Herron Touro University California Dr. Eric Ip

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Dr. Peter M. Brody Jr. University of Alberta Dr. Nese Yuksel University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Dr. Russell B. Melchert Dr. T. Scott Warmack University of California, San Francisco Dr. Brad Colwell Dr. Nam Do Dr. Peter Forni Dr. Andrea Iannucci Dr. Jeffrey Lansman Dr. Conan MacDougall Dr. Marisa Mendez Dr. Virginia Okabayashi University of Cincinnati Dr. Bradley E. Hein University of Colorado Denver Dr. Douglas N. Fish Dr. Brian A. Hemstreet University of Connecticut Dr. Charles M. White University of Florida Dr. Michael J. Meldrum

University of Hawaii at Hilo Dr. Douglas Adriance-Mejia Dr. Linda Connelly Dr. Lara Gomez Dr. Aaron Jacobs Dr. Eugene A. Konorev Dr. Supakit Wongwiwatthananukit University of Houston Dr. Aditi Marwaha Dr. Lynn Simpson University of Illinois at Chicago Dr. Bradley C. Cannon University of Kentucky Dr. James R. Pauly Dr. Frank Romanelli University of Maryland Dr. Neha U. Sheth University of Minnesota Dr. Jeannine M. Conway Dr. Timothy P. Stratton University of MissouriKansas City Dr. Steven C. Stoner University of Nebraska Medical Center Dr. Edward “Ted” Roche University of New England Dr. Glenn W. Rosenthal University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Dr. Ralph H. Raasch University of Pittsburgh Dr. Kristine S. Schonder University of Rhode Island Dr. Anne L. Hume University of Southern California Dr. Edward Lieskovan Dr. Stan G. Louie Dr. Veena Venugopalan Dr. Michael Z. Wincor

University of the Incarnate Word Dr. Mark C. Granberry University of the Pacific Dr. Myo-Kyoung Kim University of the Sciences in Philadelphia Dr. Lisa E. Davis University of Toronto Dr. Ian Crandall Ms. Marie A. Rocchi Dr. Debra Sibbald University of Washington Dr. Karan N. Dawson Dr. Gary W. Elmer Ms. Michaelene Kedzierski Dr. Nanci L. Murphy University of WisconsinMadison Dr. Steven G. Oakes University of Wyoming Dr. Bruce W. Culver Dr. Jennifer L. Petrie Washington State University Dr. Catherine A. Elstad Dr. Mark W. Garrison Dr. Beth A. Vorderstrasse Dr. John R. White Jr. West Virginia University Dr. David P. Elliott Western University of Health Sciences Dr. Eric K. Gupta Wilkes University Dr. Jon D. Ference Dr. Kenneth A. Pidcock Dr. Adam VanWert Wingate University Dr. Samir A. Kouzi Xavier University of Louisiana Dr. Yashoda V. Pramar

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Pharmacy Educators Expand Their Horizons in Seattle at the 2010 AACP Annual Meeting news in brief

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More than 1,700 members of the Academy convened in the Emerald City July 10–14 eager to attend the 2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars. With highly informative special sessions on faculty development, assessment and experiential education, meeting attendees left armed with tools to continue Expanding Our Horizons at their home institutions and ready to shape the future of global healthcare. “The 2010 AACP Annual Meeting continues to receive rave reviews from members, attendees, guests and exhibitors,” said Dr. Lucinda L. Maine, AACP executive vice president and CEO. “The event exceeded all expectations and we look forward to continuing this trend next year in San Antonio.”

www.aacp.org/annualmeeting10 academic Pharmacy now  Jul/Aug/Sept 2010

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The Teachers Seminar kicked off the Annual Meeting on Saturday, July 10 as more than 250 educators and students gathered at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel to learn about developing, implementing and sustaining interprofessional education. Attendees listened to keynote speaker Dr. John H.V. Gilbert, project lead for the Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative, as he emphasized the importance of communicating “interprofessional,” which he described as getting the right word and the word right. Using The University of British Columbia model of expose, immerse and master, Gilbert explained that through exposure, students should be allowed to develop a sense of their profession and understand areas of collaboration, while immersion in collaborative practice learning environments and mastery of these skills after graduation or licensure is critical. Following the morning’s opening session, participants had the opportunity to attend several break-outs that featured some of the country’s foremost experts on interprofessional education. Donning matching t-shirts with the phrase “Carter’s Crew” printed on the back, faculty from the University of Minnesota claimed victory at the Show Your School Spirit Welcome Reception, which officially kicked off Annual Meeting festivities on Saturday evening. Dressed in maroon and gold, College of Pharmacy Dean Dr. Marilyn K. Speedie accepted the top prize on behalf of the more than 20 Golden Gophers who showed support for the-President-Elect Dr. Rodney A. Carter. Groups from The Ohio State University, The University of Oklahoma and Camp-

bell University embodied their school’s spirit with matching shirts and decorative jewelry. The reception also featured School Posters addressing the topic of SALT: The Scholarship of Assessment, Learning and Teaching, at which attendees could mingle and network with fellow pharmacy educators. Tom Vander Ark, managing partner of Revolution Learning and founding blogger of www.EdReformer.com, spoke about The Future of Learning at the Opening General Session on Sunday, July 11. He enlightened the standing-room-only crowd about the concept of blended learning, a shift to online delivery of education for at least part of the day with the intention of making learning, staffing and facilities more productive. The model is designed to serve digital natives and promote personalization, problem solving and critical thinking, all skills that are essential to the education of today’s student pharmacists. Later that day, Vander Ark blogged about the use of computer simulations and experiential learning in academic pharmacy, noting that the Academy appears to be leading the way in the utilization of blended learning in the classroom. “… It’s clear that the ‘21st century skills’ conversation is alive and well at AACP. They are thinking hard about how to prepare health care professionals to work on teams, to communicate effectively, and solve problems for patients.” Programming at the 2010 Annual Meeting explored new developments in pharmacy education and practice. More than 100 special sessions provided attendees with an abundance of professional development opportunities. Sessions spanned four days and focused on innovative topics such as tailoring teaching methods to millennial students and building a winning global experience at colleges and schools of pharmacy. New to this

Top: Two Annual Meeting attendees discuss a poster from the University of the Pacific during the AACP Welcome Reception and School Posters session. Middle: AACP President Dr. Rodney A. Carter (middle) and his family proudly wear t-shirts that read “Carter’s Crew.” Bottom: AACP Past President Dr. Victor A. Yanchick (far right) leads a stimulating discussion of what marks excellence in pharmacy education and research with AACP’s top award winners: Paul R. Dawson Biotechnology Award recipient Dr. Harold L. Kohn (far left), Volwiler Research Achievement Award winner Dr. Hartmut C. Derendorf (second from left) and Robert K. Chalmers Distinguished Pharmacy Educator Award winner Dr. Mary Anne Koda-Kimble (second from right).

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year’s meeting were three Webinars: Clinical Reasoning Education: The Science and Craft, the Roles of the Basic Sciences, presented by the Pharmaceutics and Chemistry Sections, as well as Pathways to Mentoring: Developing Future Faculty Mentors and Business Meeting and Sustaining Departments of Pharmacy Practice During Uncertain Economic Times, both presented by the Pharmacy Practice Section. All three Webinars are available on the AACP Annual Meeting Web site at www. aacp.org/annualmeeting10. Attendees also had three opportunities to peruse the record-number of research and education posters that highlighted individual and school research activities, while discussing the latest pharmacy education products and services at each of the nearly 40 exhibitor booths. The new Exhibit Hall Passport drew hundreds of meeting attendees to the hall and provided them with a chance to win fantastic prizes such as an iPad, a flat screen TV, a Visa gift card and a complimentary registration to the 2011 Annual Meeting in San Antonio. The Academy gathered together on Tuesday night to celebrate its collective accomplishments. The Closing Banquet featured the presentation of the Rufus A. Lyman Award to authors Dr. Rosemin Kassam and Mona Kwong from The University of British Columbia (UBC) for the best paper published in the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. The award recognizes a nearly decade-long effort on behalf of Dr. Kassam’s team at UBC to provide a meaningful and evidence-based experience for her students, one that has resulted in positive outcomes for countless patients, she said. Honoring his commitment and dedication to patient safety, clinical pharmacy services and collaboration with academic pharmacy, the Distinguished Service Award was presented to Jimmy R. Mitchell, former director of the Office of Pharmacy Affairs in the Health Resources and Services Administration. Mitchell is co-chair of HRSA’s Patient Safety and Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative and Top: Dr. Anne Y. Lin, dean of the College of Notre Dame of Maryland School of Pharmacy, talks about AACP’s programs, products and services with AACP Director of Communications Rebecca M. Morgan at the Exhibitor’s Opening Reception. Bottom: Jimmy R. Mitchell (middle), former director of the Office of Pharmacy Affairs at the Health Resources and Services Administration, accepts the AACP Distinguished Service Award at the Closing Banquet with Immediate Past President Dr. Jeffrey N. Baldwin (left) and AACP Executive Vice President and CEO Dr. Lucinda L. Maine (right).

his office administers the 340B Drug Pricing Program through which more than 14,000 outpatient clinics and disproportionate share hospitals purchase approximately $5 billion annually in discounted drugs. Mitchell accepted the award with “great awe” and thanked his family and rewarding relationship with AACP. He also thanked his two sons, whose surprise attendance at the banquet brought tears to Mitchell’s eyes as they read a note from his wife who was unable to attend. Dr. Victor A. Yanchick, AACP past president, was presented with a presidential clock honoring his continued service to the Association and the Academy. Following the presentation, he led the audience in a rousing sing-a-long to Janis Joplin’s “Mercedes Benz.” Dr. Frank S. Abbott, retiring director of the Association of Faculty of Pharmacy of Canada and the Association of Pharmacy Deans of Canada, was also recognized at the banquet for his commitment and support of pharmacy education in North America. Abbott was instrumental in the success of the AACP/AFPC joint meeting in 2008 in Chicago and in the founding of the Global Alliance for Pharmacy Education. AACP would like to gratefully acknowledge the generous support of the meeting’s sponsors and exhibitors, as well as the many speakers and contributors who helped make the 2010 Annual Meeting an unequivocal success. While the bar has been raised yet again for the 2011 Annual Meeting July 9–13 in San Antonio, AACP will continue to build Bridges to Our Bright Future in pharmacy education and practice through the Annual and other AACP meetings. We hope to see you there!

President Carter Believes Pharmacy’s Stars Are Aligning AACP President Dr. Rodney A. Carter, associate dean and professor at the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, announced that during his presidential term he’ll focus on expanding innovative models of pharmacy practice. President Carter believes pharmacy’s stars are aligning to provide new opportunities in compensation for pharmacy services; fellow health professionals and the medical home models are recognizing pharmacists’ value in the healthcare team; pharmacist-provided primary care is gaining support; and the knowledge and evidence generated by academic pharmacy has opened many doors in healthcare reform legislation. To learn more about President Carter’s vision of “The Stars Are Aligning,” visit the AACP Annual Meeting Web site at www.aacp.org /annualmeeting10.   —Maureen O. Thielemans

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Leading by Example

Creating the next generation of leaders in pharmacy among our students and faculty is a top priority for colleges and schools across the country. Whether through elective courses, special retreats and institutes, or earmarked funding to aide students in attending professional meetings, leadership development models are being utilized throughout the Academy. Academic Pharmacy Now takes a look at how some schools are working to ensure that the profession of pharmacy has adequate numbers of change agents for the future.

Midwestern University/Downers Grove Midwestern University’s Chicago College of Pharmacy sponsored a Student Leadership Institute for the last several years, offering innovative skill-building exercises and opportunities to not only its own students, but also to students from neighboring pharmacy colleges.

and then communicate independently throughout the duration of the program. Encompassed within the program is the opportunity for the student to shadow his or her mentor during a leadership activity such as attending an association committee or board meeting, or a meeting at the mentor’s practice site.

The biannual program is open to all second- and third-year student pharmacists throughout Illinois who are chosen through a competitive process. Selected students commit to attend four educational sessions spread over a four-month period. In addition to providing innovative leadership skilltraining offered by professional training organizations, the Institute pairs each student with a pharmacy mentor who is already established in a pharmacy career. The student and his or her mentor meet to discuss the goals and expectations of each,

Some of the topics offered at past Institutes include communication, awareness of self and others, situational leadership and business etiquette. Another requirement of the Institute is to have the student present a “Careers in Pharmacy” talk at a local high school. This provides the student an opportunity to practice the skills he or she has learned in the course, to model leadership traits for others and to perhaps attract leaders of the future to the profession.

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academic Pharmacy now  Jul/Aug/Sept 2010


University of Illinois at Chicago This fall, the new University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy at Rockford opens its doors to its inaugural class. The establishment of this regional campus is the result of efforts spearheaded by Dean Jerry Bauman to expand the institution’s presence as the flagship college of pharmacy within the state of Illinois. An exciting piece of the Rockford curriculum will be the Rural Pharmacy Education Program (RPharm)— modeled after the highly successful Rural Medical Medication Program (RMED) run by the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford. This program recruits students from rural, medically underserved areas of Illinois and trains them in the unique aspects of rural healthcare in hopes that they will become primary

care physicians practicing in rural areas of Illinois upon completion of their training. The RMED Program has been highly successful, with 80 percent of students going into primary care and 70 percent practicing in rural Illinois. The College of Pharmacy plans to use the same recruitment methods and curriculum as RMED. RPharm students will train interprofessionally with medical students during their four years at Rockford with the hope that they will develop collaborative practices in rural areas upon graduation. This program has the potential to develop a unique practice model that can significantly improve healthcare delivery in rural communities.

University of Minnesota In an effort to facilitate the development of pharmacists who will seek to lead change, the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy offers a focused set of intentional learning opportunities that build on one another and reinforce one another. The college’s Leadership Emphasis Area (LEA) within the Pharm.D. curriculum allows students to engage in multiple didactic, experiential and self-directed learning activities. In 2010, nine students graduated with the Leadership Emphasis and 13 students graduated in 2009. Fifteen students from the Class of 2011 are currently enrolled in the program. Student pharmacists can start taking leadership elective courses during their second or third professional year that focus on core attributes of successful leaders and the strategies used to lead change. For those who choose to continue in the LEA, the experience extends throughout their fourth year and encompasses a total of 18 credits.

Students who have participated in the school’s leadership development courses have highlighted the Leadership Networking Partners (LNP) program as one of their most valued experiences. The program pairs students with recognized pharmacist leaders from the Minnesota community for a longitudinal shared mentorship experience. Students are assigned a pharmacist with whom they will meet at least four times over the course of a semester via two one-on-one, off-campus visits and two campus-based group sessions. This program is embedded in two 2-credit courses titled Leading Change in Pharmacy. After completing the Leading Change in Pharmacy courses, students can elect to continue in the Leadership Emphasis Area. Among other requirements, students enrolled in the LEA are required to enroll in an experience titled Leading Change Project, which engages students in identifying an area in which change is needed, develop a vision for change and apply the principles learned from previous coursework while leading the desired change.

Above: Kassandra Bartelme, a 2009 LEA graduate, said “Through the LEA, I learned valuable information about leading change, project management and the importance of networking—all of which is not taught in traditional courses. The LEA gave me opportunities I would not have had otherwise—opportunities that opened my eyes to the impact even one pharmacist can have on the profession.” Left: Graduates of the 2010 Leadership Emphasis Area program are: (back row) Michael Schroeder, Ilya Danelich, Arinzechukwu Nkemdirim Okere, Stacey Rewitzer and (front row) Ashley Gray, Alexia Knick, Dianna Seng, Meghan Kelly and Alison Knutson.

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University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Faculty at the University at Buffalo, The State University of New York (UB) were growing concerned that a potential critical leadership shortage within the profession of pharmacy could occur if students are not able to access the skills and guidance necessary to develop strong leadership capabilities.

South Carolina College of Pharmacy At the South Carolina College of Pharmacy (SCCP), leadership development is a central tenet of a quality improvement initiative called SCCP Excellence. The program is designed to hardwire behaviors that enable the college to reach organizational goals through measurable and accountable individual action. The tools to implement SCCP Excellence help current leaders with mentoring and assessing, help future leaders to develop, and help both reach their goals. “SCCP Excellence is all about aligning department goals with college goals and then raising everybody’s level of leadership and accountability,” said Dr. Joseph T. DiPiro, executive dean. “We all have an individual responsibility for reaching the goals we set collectively. SCCP Excellence gives us the process for systemic quality improvement through behavior modification, leadership development, and rigorous assessment. Without strong leadership, the other two don’t happen.” Examples of leadership development models at SCCP include Leadership Development Institutes; leaders “rounding” with their employees regularly to find out what systems are working well, what tools they could use to do their jobs better and who should be recognized for exemplary work; and assessment, wherein the college utilizes Key Performance Indicators that offer benchmarking and metric-based assessment. “The overall model of SCCP Excellence is for institutional quality improvement,” said DiPiro. “But leadership development is an integral part of how you get there.”

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To address this concern, Dr. William A. Prescott Jr., clinical assistant professor, and Dr. Gayle A. Brazeau, former associate dean for academic affairs, began organizing a leadership elective allowing Pharm.D. students the opportunity to enhance their leadership potential. In 2008, the UB School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences designed Developing Leaders in Pharmacy, a one-credit hour, two-semester elective course to introduce students to leadership in the profession of pharmacy. Enrollment in this course is limited to 12 second- and third-professional year students. Given the limited number of available seats, students must formally apply to the course, with preference given to students who have held and currently hold leadership positions, as these students have the opportunity to reflect upon previous and current experience as leaders. The primary goals of this course are to provide students with the tools necessary to develop their leadership skills and to encourage them to continue developing these skills upon completion of the course. Students are assigned readings on topics such as identification of personal strengths and weaknesses, communication skills, relationship building, attitude, professionalism and ethics. Classroom discussions are student-led and are facilitated by the course coordinator and guest speakers who exemplify the attributes of a leader. To assess the impact of this course on participating students, an anonymous online survey was distributed, with student responses being very positive as to the impact of the course; 95 percent agreed or strongly agreed that this course prepared them to be a more effective leader, with 90 percent indicating that they plan to continue developing their leadership skills beyond graduation from the course.

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences The Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (ACPHS) Leadership and Professional Development Fund was established nearly 10 years ago by President James J. Gozzo to help students develop professional and leadership skills, represent the college at key conferences and meetings, and bring new skills and knowledge back to the ACPHS community. The fund is chiefly designed to cover the cost of registration fees for professional conferences and symposia. In the past four academic years alone, the college has provided financial support of nearly $45,000 to help approximately 300 students attend such events. Students approved for funding have used the money to attend meetings and events of organizations such as the American Pharmacists Association–Academy of Student Pharmacists, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Infectious Disease Society of America, American College of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists and the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists. To ensure a wider segment of the campus benefits from each granting of funds, conference attendees are required to complete an educational activity related to their conference experience within 30 days of attending an event. Examples of educational activities include writing an article for the student newspaper or conducting an oncampus informational session. The Leadership and Development Fund has seen increased interest in recent years and the college expects annual requests to surpass $15,000 in the near future.

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feature story

The University of Toledo The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy is developing leaders in the field of medication therapy management (MTM), in a way that few other schools have done, through a course titled Medication Therapy and Disease State Management. This course, a requirement for the Pharm.D. curriculum since spring of 2005, is remarkable in its scope and focus on medication therapy management.

Above: The University of Toledo College of Pharmacy held its first annual leadership retreat at Camp Miakonda, a local camp that hosts a Leadership Challenge Adult Leadership Development Program. The camp has an outdoor course that challenges participants to work together to conquer difficulties and solve problems while positively encouraging one another.

The cutting-edge course covers not only the clinical side of MTM, but also the development, implementation and evaluation of these programs in real-life settings. The programs developed in the course are not just hypothetical. Each year, about 30 percent of the programs developed by students in this course are actually implemented by the pharmacists with whom they work. In fact, the Lucas County Medication Therapy Management program that is in its fifth year is an expansion of a program developed by students in the course. This program has been able to demonstrate and sustain key outcomes, generating interest from other employers in the area who are interested in starting and sponsoring pharmacist-provided MTM programs for their own employees. By developing these MTM programs, students at The University of Toledo gain valuable experience that contributes to improved health outcomes in their communities. In addition to its MTM leadership course, the college held its first annual leadership retreat for the officers of all 11 student pharmacist organizations and select incoming freshmen. The student participants spent a day in workshops and team-building activities designed to forge bonds between the groups and allow them to get to know one another. Students participated in an outdoor challenge at Camp Miakonda, then listened to a presentation on “authentic leadership” delivered by a member of the Department of Management faculty. The daylong retreat culminated with a Student Leadership Dinner sponsored by Walgreens.

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feature story

Academic Pharmacy Advances Science While Stimulating the Economy On Feb. 13, 2009, Congress passed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) to spur domestic job creation in emerging industries and create a long-term foundation for economic growth. As part of the overall $100 billion federal government investment, funding was provided to federal public health agencies including the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). This edition of Academic Pharmacy Now highlights colleges and schools of pharmacy across the country that are utilizing these funds to advance science, improve health, and stimulate innovation and economic growth.

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feature story

Purdue University Dr. Eric L. Barker, assistant dean for graduate programs and associate professor of medicinal chemistry and molecular pharmacology, received ARRA funding to support the development of cutting-edge techniques to allow the characterization of chemicals involved in brain signaling, which are derived from fatty acids. These molecules, endogenous cannabinoids, mimic the actions of marijuana in the brain. They are involved in multiple physiological processes including controlling pain, stress response, appetite and mood. By measuring these compounds in the brain with this new technology, it may be possible to identify new pathways that can be targeted with new therapeutic drugs. Understanding the molecular basis for controlling the production and metabolism of the endogenous cannabinoids is critical for future therapeutic drug discovery efforts targeting this system. Such drugs have potential therapeutic effects in conditions such as convulsions, movement disorders, epilepsy, chronic pain, anxiety, obesity, multiple sclerosis and glaucoma. Also receiving funding was Professor of Medicinal Chemistry Dr. Robert L. Geahlen, whose application funded through the ARRA was for a “competitive revision” that sought support to extend the specific aims of a currently-funded proposal. The parent grant focused on an exploration of the role certain protein molecules called protein kinases play in the immune system.

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The new research is attempting to apply results obtained in studies at the cellular level to an entire organism. The goal is to help understand the immune system of a whole animal by developing a “knock-in” mouse in which a gene that originates from within an organism is replaced by a gene that encodes an engineered form of the enzyme. Engineering a normal gene for a protein involved in regulation of immune cells into one that can be turned off when desired will help reveal how lymphocytes recognize pathogens and how cells respond to a foreign pathogen by becoming activated to produce antibodies to that particular pathogen. The results of this research could provide a platform for further understanding the development and activation of immune cells.


feature story Through the ARRA, the NIH has awarded a competitive grant of more than $777,000 to University of Maryland School of Pharmacy and Johns Hopkins University researchers to study the costs, risks and benefits of treatments for blood disorders that affect more than 10,000 elderly patients each year. The challenge grant targets a widely accepted practice by clinicians of controlling anemia of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), sometimes called pre-leukemias, with erythropoietin, a hormone controlling red blood cell production. Drugs called erythropoietin stimulating agents, or ESAs, are effective in treating anemia in MDS patients. However, little is known about the drugs’ longer-term health effects. Myelodysplastic syndromes are the most common hematologic malignancy in the elderly. “In this study, we will use data from regional cancer registries that are linked to Medicare enrollment and insurance claims data,” said Dr. Amy J. Davidoff, research associate professor of pharmaceutical health services research (PSHR) at the School of Pharmacy. “We will examine the characteristics of Medicare beneficiaries with MDS, patterns of treatment, safety and effectiveness of ESA use, and costs of care.”

University of Maryland

Doctors have treated MDS patients with ESAs to control anemia for about 15 years. This treatment has had a 20 to 40 percent response rate and median response duration of two years. However, there is a serious lack of large-scale clinical trial evidence supporting longer-term clinical benefits, according to Davidoff and co-grantees, Dr. Sheila Weiss Smith, a professor in PHSR and director of the School of Pharmacy’s Center for Drug Safety, Dr. Maria Baer, professor and director of the Hematologic Malignancies Program at the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, and Dr. Steven Gore, professor at Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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feature story

The University of Mississippi

The University of Mississippi (UM) has received $31.7 million to expand the Thad Cochran Research Center, the primary research facility of the School of Pharmacy’s National Center for Natural Products Research (NCNPR).

“It is exciting to see the achievement of this milestone for Ole Miss and the School of Pharmacy,” said Dr. Larry A. Walker, NCNPR’s director since 2001. “This is another major step toward a world-class natural products research center, as envisioned by the school’s leaders over two decades ago.” HRSA and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are providing $17.8 million and the NIH is providing $13.9 million. Competition for the NIH funds was stiff, as each qualifying institution was allowed to submit up to three proposals to its Extramural Research Facilities Improvement Program. Under this program to renovate or construct facilities supporting biomedical or behavioral research, NIH made 63 awards totaling $675 million. UM’s pharmacy school is the only Mississippi recipient and the nation’s only pharmacy school to receive an award from this program. Designed for research involving discovery of natural products for pharmaceutical and agricultural commercialization, construction of NCNPR’s first phase began in 1992 with USDA funds appropriated by Congress. Personnel occupied the partially completed facility in 1995, and this 115,000-square-foot building was completed in 2000. The second building will complete the NCNPR complex and enable researchers to translate basic research into clinical studies and commercial natural products. Its amenities will include a facility for clinical studies,

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an expanded specimen repository and laboratories for scaling-up extraction and synthesis of bulk natural products, determining a natural product’s toxicity and mechanism of action at the cellular level, and discovering microbial and marine natural products. “Completion of the center envisioned so long ago is finally within our grasp,” said Dr. Barbara G. Wells, dean of the School of Pharmacy. “This second research building will allow us to advance our research programs to the next level.”


University of Houston

feature story

University of Houston College of Pharmacy researchers received a total of $1.47 million in new or supplemental research awards from the NIH through the ARRA. Dr. Richard A. Bond, professor of pharmacology, received a two-year, $682,000 grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for the next phase of his ongoing investigation into the use of beta2-adrenoreceptor (ß2AR) inverse agonists as a potential therapeutic agent for mild, chronic asthma. Through Bond’s previous research and in two related small-scale clinical trials, chronic administration of beta blockers decreased airway hyper-responsiveness and produced broad anti-inflammatory effects, including dramatic changes in airway epithelium and reduced mucous production. The new R01 grant for “Mechanisms of beta-blocker induced improvements in asthma” will test Bond’s hypothesis that beta-blockers influence airway epithelium via ß2ARs to exert their therapeutic effects. Dr. Ke-He Ruan, professor of pharmacology and director of the college’s Center for Experimental Therapeutics and Pharmacoinformatics, has received a two-year, $450,000 award from the NIH’s new Challenge Grants in Health and Science Research (RC1) program for “Prostacyclin-secreting Cells as Therapy for Pulmonary Artery Hypertension.” Ruan serves as a principal investigator with another principal investigator, Dr. Richard Dixon, director of the Wafic Said Molecular Cardiology Research Lab in the Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital. Their work is based on Ruan’s pending U.S. patent for a novel, engineered “tri-catalytic” enzyme that produces a vascular protector against heart disease called prostacyclin, which dilates blood vessels and prevents blood clots. Prostacyclin is reduced in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, which is a rare, but incurable disease with a high mortality rate. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s total twoyear award for the collaborative project is $1 million.

projects, which supported the addition of a Houston-area high school science teacher to his lab in the summer of 2009. Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutics Dr. Romi Ghose received a one-year, $53,954 supplement from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for her K01 study of “Hepatic Drug Metabolism in Inflammation.” Ghose is investigating the mechanisms by which expression of key drug metabolizing enzymes is suppressed in the liver during inflammation and infection, which increases susceptibility to adverse drug reactions.

Also receiving ARRA funding is Dr. Bradley K. McConnell, assistant professor of pharmacology. His two-year, $260,876 supplement from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute will help further his investigation into whether disruption of a cardiac molecular signaling pathway that affects contractility may yield a new therapeutic target for patients with heart failure. The supplement supports a new post-doctoral fellow, as well as lab equipment and supplies, for the next phase of his R01 grant on “Targeted Disruption of Ruan also received a $24,696 suppleBeta-adrenergic Signaling to Increase ment to his existing NIH-funded R01 Cardiac Contractility.” academic Pharmacy now  Jul/Aug/Sept 2010 31


feature story

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feature  Improving the quality and coordination ofstory care for patients through a physician-led, integrated team approach is the foundation for the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model.

There’s No Place Like the

Medical Home academic Pharmacy now  Jul/Aug/Sept 2010

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feature story While not a new concept, the PCMH has been the topic of recent discussion, due in large part to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA). The act includes provisions that authorize the development, implementation and evaluation of PCMH models, which will provide health professions educators with numerous opportunities to play a significant role in the medical home discussion. Some pharmacy faculty at our nation’s colleges and schools of pharmacy are already leading the way in promoting the role of the pharmacist and health professions educator in the PCMH model of care. University of Connecticut pharmacy faculty member Dr. Marie A. Smith’s article asserting “Why Pharmacists Belong in the Medical Home” in the May 2010 edition of Health Affairs illustrates the effect pharmacists can have in the delivery of primary care through effective medication therapy management. As well-educated and highly-skilled health professionals, pharmacists can utilize their complementary knowledge to provide better care for patients, she said, however; they are often underused in the medical home model. Other members of the Academy are becoming engaged in the medical home discussion, as evidenced in this edition of Academic Pharmacy Now. Whether helping patients understand the complexity of their medication regimen or providing care to the underserved at a federally-funded health center, America’s pharmacy educators are undoubtedly improving the quality and coordination of care through the Patient-Centered Medical Home. 34

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feature story

University of Pittsburgh In early 2009, the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) St. Margaret and the UPMC Health Plan partnered to attempt to answer the question: How can the pharmacist provision of care be economically viable and available to greater numbers of patients in order to improve care? This question is the basis for the “Successful Collaborative Relationships to Improve PatienT care (SCRIPT) Project,” which aims to integrate pharmacists into a medical home. The foundation of the SCRIPT Project is the unique perspective and collaboration of each of the partners. UPMC St. Margaret is a 249bed acute care hospital with more than 800 associated primary care and specialty physicians. Their researchers include a physician leader, pharmacist leader, pharmacy resident and hospital administrator who all bring an interest in the medical home model, improving patient care and supporting physicians in their practices. The UPMC Health Plan is a full-range health insurance provider whose researchers include pharmacist leaders, a health economist and a research project leader. The School of Pharmacy research team includes pharmacist faculty and a community pharmacy resident who are interested in understanding how a pharmacist can successfully integrate into a medical home and, in turn, how to make that integration replicable, scalable and sustainable. The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Department of Family Medicine researchers include two physician faculty members who serve as advisors to the project. Together, this diverse research team seeks to carry out the project’s goal of identifying the impact of a pharmacist providing care and service in family practice/medical home offices. The project involves two pharmacists who have been integrated halftime into four family physician office practices each operating as a medical home. Each pharmacist is responsible for two family physician practices. The pharmacists provide direct, individualized patient care, provide medication reconciliation upon hospital discharge, and contribute to overall medication-related management of the practice (diabetes education, anticoagulation protocols, etc). The pharmacists document their patient care encounters in the electronic medical record and study databases. They meet regularly with a member of the research team to review patient cases and ensure consistency of care between sites. In addition, the research team meets on a routine basis to review the overall progress of the project and keep to the agreed upon timeline. The partnership has been essential for the School of Pharmacy’s success at being willing to “look outside of the (academic) box” and see opportunities for collaboration. Whatever the outcome of the SCRIPT Project, the School of Pharmacy will have learned vital information as to the role of the pharmacist in the medical home, the impact on patient care and the physician practice, and the appropriate education of pharmacists, physicians and others to create an ideal functioning team in the medical home.

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University of Connecticut Two University of Connecticut (UConn) School of Pharmacy faculty members, Dr. Stefanie C. Nigro, assistant professor of pharmacy practice, and Dr. Fei Wang, associate clinical professor of pharmacy practice, have been working toward increasing the role of the pharmacist in the medical home through their work in Connecticut medical facilities, in addition to educating students about such an important role. Nigro works at a federally-funded health center in Connecticut that primarily serves patients who are underserved, underprivileged, and in most cases, lacking adequate insurance. She works with the other physicians and nurses, taking an active role in the medical home model. For her, the medical home is “a fundamental way of thinking about coordinating continuous care for patients when they come to see their physicians.� Nigro currently has two UConn students working with her. In order to teach them more about patient care, the students accompany her to patient visits and assist in medication reconciliations. The students compile medication history and help with educating the patients, such as teaching them how to use blood pressure meters, insulin pens, inhalers, etc. Wang works at Hartford Hospital in a primary care teaching clinic that is affiliated with the UConn Schools of Medicine, Pharmacy, and Nursing. Like Nigro, she provides her pharmacy services as part of a team-based model of care to a culturally diverse, medically challenging and mostly underinsured and underserved population of Hartford. Wang is responsible for the development and implementation of new collaborative practice pharmacy services in the adult primary care practice. She developed a smoking cessation program and a cardiovascular risk reduction program in the areas of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and hyperlipidemia to emphasize wellness and prevention strategies in primary care. Patients are referred by their primary care providers to the pharmacy service for collaborative care management, medication therapy management or patient education. These programs are a great complement to current physician and nursing staff services and provide another level of more individualized patient care, which motivates and empowers patients to self-manage their chronic disease states better. As a member of the primary care interprofessional team to improve medication use and enhance patient safety, she works closely on a daily basis with providers in their continuity of care clinics to improve medication reconciliation, interview patients for a medication history, identify drug-related problems, identify non-compliant patients, recommend appropriate evidence-based interventions, provide patient counseling and education, and help monitor patient outcomes. Her student pharmacists are integrated into this medical model and enjoy the close interprofessional collaboration with UConn medical students, medical residents and staff.

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Duquesne University Student pharmacists from Duquesne University sit in utter disbelief with a patient who proceeds to dump no less than 50 prescription bottles onto the consultation table at the pharmacist’s clinic office. A physician-assistant student also sits in on the consult. This is where a clinical pharmacist spends time with experiential students at an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) site in an unofficial medical home. The clinic is housed within a primary care medical practice located in downtown Pittsburgh about six blocks from campus. The patient is one of nearly 200 who have been referred to Dr. Hildegarde J. Berdine, associate professor of pharmacy practice, by the primary care physicians over the past two-and-a-half years for a variety of consultations. The patient has congestive heart failure and is overwhelmed by all the prescription medicine he receives through his mail order plan. Many of the pharmacist-patient interactions are centered on medication adherence as was evident in the scene just described. Other consultations involve disease management for diabetes, obesity or congestive heart failure. Following up on specific drug therapy, averting adverse drug problems and optimizing therapy are important facets of care offered to patients of this medical home practice. Patients have developed strong relationships with Berdine and continue to see her for support in diabetes self management, weight reduction and pre-bariatric surgery counseling and pain management. Some patients bring medication trays to be filled by Berdine and her students with their own prescription medicines, samples, or medicines secured by Prescription Assistance Programs. A number of these patients have fallen on hard times, becoming unemployed or working in low paying jobs without health insurance. Berdine and her students ensure that all diabetes patients who consult with the pharmacist are assessed at each visit for compliance with performance measures indicated on a standard flow sheet from various health insurance plans. Clinical pharmacists support health information technology by teaching staff and physicians how to use electronic medical records, e-prescribing software, evidence-based medicine treatment algorithm tools and other clinical decision support tools. Pharmacists are a readily-available drug information source within the medical home. The physicians ask Berdine for evidence to support their clinical decisions. The clinical pharmacist documents the patient visit in standard SOAP format including an updated problem list, medication list and patient-oriented goals. Berdine insists that the medication list is up to date and accurate, a sometimes difficult task in the outpatient setting. Medication reconciliation is conducted at each visit and most importantly during the first week of discharge from the hospital when the patient follows up with his/her physician. Berdine supports the patient by teaching self management skills and empowers the individual to take control of their chronic disease. She enlists the patient’s input in developing a care plan and clear achievable goals. Motivational interviewing skills and identification of stages of change are used to facilitate patient progress.

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faculty news

Faculty News Auburn University

Drake University

Appointments/Elections

Appointments/Elections

• Jessica Ballone, assistant clinical professor of pharmacy practice

• Brian Gentry, assistant professor of pharmacology

• Richard Hansen, professor and department head of pharmacy care systems • Sherry P. Martin, assistant clinical professor of pharmacy practice and director of the Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience program • David J. Riese II, associate dean for research and graduate programs, and professor of pharmacal sciences

• Xiaoyi Shan, assistant professor of health sciences

Awards • Renae J. Chesnut received the C. Boyd Granberg Professional Leadership Award. • Sheryl L. Compton received the Faculty Preceptor of the Year Award. • Michele Evink received the Adjunct Faculty Preceptor of the Year Award.

• Pamela L. Stamm has been named to the editorial board of Diabetes Spectrum.

• Megan Friedrich received the Hartig Faculty Development Award.

Grants

• Sarah E. Grady received the Teacher of the Year Award.

• Heather P. Whitley is principal investigator for a grant, Walking in Diabetic Shoes, funded for 20102013 at $2,500 by Medical Scholars Week. • William R. Willard, Family Practice and Medical Student Endowed Support Fund; the University of Alabama School of Medicine, promotes educational excellence for students and supports priority needs in the College of Community Health Sciences at the University of Alabama.

Promotions • Salisa Westrick was promoted to associate professor with tenure.

Retirements • Robert E. Smith, professor of pharmacy practice is retiring, effective Sept. 1, 2010.

• Melissa M. Murer Corrigan received the 2009 Lawrence C. and Delores M. Weaver Medal of Honor. • Melissa Nelson received the Introductory Practice Experience Preceptor of the Year Award. • Charles R. Phillips was recognized with an Award for Excellence in Assessment from AACP. • Denise A. Soltis received the Hartig Distinguished Professor Award. • Geoffrey C. Wall received the Mentor of the Year Award.

Promotions • June F. Johnson has received a promotion to the rank of full professor of pharmacy practice. • Kristin S. Meyer has received a promotion to the rank of associate professor. • Craige C. Wrenn has received academic tenure and a promotion to the rank of associate professor.

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faculty news

Duquesne University Grants • Jelena M. Janjic, principal investigator. Project Title: Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsions for Simultaneous Delivery of COX2 Inhibitor and Antiproliferative Agent to Breast Tumors. Period of Project: June 1, 2010 to May 30, 2012. Source: Duquesne University Faculty Development Fund (FDF). Amount Granted 09-10: $9,968. Total Grant: $9,968. • David A. Johnson, principal investigator. Project Title: Effect of Caffeine and Choline on Short-term Memory in Adult and Middle Aged Human Subjects. Period of Project: April 30, 2010 to May 1, 2011. Source: Interdisciplinary Research Program of the Mylan School of Pharmacy and Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Amount Granted 09–10: $3,800. Total Grant: $3,800. • Khalid Kamal, principal investigator. Project Title: Examining the Consequences of Multiple Sclerosis from a Patient Perspective. Period of Project: April 1, 2010 to Aug. 30, 2010. Source: Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation. Amount Granted 09–10: $20,268.75. Total Grant: $20,268.75. • Jamie L. Kearns, principal investigator. Co-Investigators: Robert L. Maher Jr., Autumn Tami. Project Title: Community Pharmacist Clinical Intervention. Period of Project: March 1, 2010–March 1, 2011. Source: Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association (PPA) Educational Foundation. Amount Granted 09-10: $500. Total Grant: $1,000.

Promotions • Peter L. Wildfong, associate professor

East Tennessee State University Appointments/Elections • L. Brian Cross, associate professor and vice-chair of pharmacy practice • Michael A. Crouch, professor and associate dean for professional education and academic affairs • Stacy E. Eon, assistant professor of pharmacy practice

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Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine Appointments/Elections • Kimberly A. Burns was recently inducted as president of the American Society of Pharmacy Law.

Awards • Hershey S. Bell was presented with the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine William D. Miller Award.

Mercer University Grants • Ashish A. Advani and Jessica L. Jones, fourth-year student pharmacist, were awarded a $6,000 grant from Community Pharmacy Foundation for “The role of picture-based patient education pamphlets for enhancement of patient comprehension of prescription medication information.” • Ajay K. Banga received a grant of $60,000 for “Investigate strategies to increase and measure dermal levels of cosmeceuticals” from Skin Medica Inc. He was also awarded a $17,500 grant from Skin Medica Inc. to investigate “enhancement strategies for delivery of cosmeceuticals.” • Vanthida Huang, J.P. Salomone, P. Abraham, et al. received a grant in the amount of $68,000 to coinvestigate “Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of doripenem in critically ill trauma patients with sepsis at Grady Health System” from Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Inc. • Nader H. Moniri received a grant of $15,000 for “In vivo analysis of the role of omega-3 fatty acids in regulation of GPR120 expression” from the Diabetes Action Research Foundation. • Michelle B. Redding received a grant of $14,300 for “Developing a pediatric medication treatment management program” from Community Pharmacy Foundation. • Chad M. VanDenBerg was awarded a grant for $63,350 from Solvay Pharmaceuticals for Solvay/ Mercer Fellowship in Clinical Drug Development.


ion: Caut s at ber Mem rk Wo

feature story Members Working For You

Pharmacists on Healthcare Teams Significantly Improve Patient Care

Incorporating pharmacists as members of the healthcare team in direct patient care roles is a viable solution to improving U.S. healthcare, according to the results of a comprehensive, systematic review of the healthcare literature led by AACP member Dr. Marie A. Chisholm-Burns. The article, “US Pharmacists’ Effect as Team Members on Patient Care: Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses,” is set to be published in the October 2010 edition of Medical Care and examines the effect of pharmacist-provided direct patient care on therapeutic, safety and humanistic outcomes. Dr. Chisholm-Burns, University of Arizona College of Pharmacy department head and professor of pharmacy practice, led a team of researchers who found that involving pharmacists in direct patient care activities has favorable effects, including reducing adverse drug events and improving outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. The interprofessional team comprised of experts in pharmacy, medicine, nursing, health economics, public health, library science, social work and information technology conducted a search that led them to more than 50,000 articles, which was narrowed down to approximately 300 that met study criteria for the systematic review. “We’re trying to help determine the effectiveness of pharmacists who are providing direct patient care,” Chisholm-Burns said. “Our study is very comprehensive; it crosses age groups, practice environments and disease states.”

• Chad M. VanDenBerg and Alan C. Wright received a grant in the amount of $21,216 for “Changes in the pupillary light reflex in response to ingestion of immediate-release and extended-release caffeine formulations” from The Beverage Institute for Health and Wellness, LLC; and were awarded a $15,252 grant from Eli Lilly and Co. for “Changes in the pupillary light reflex in response to duloxetine.”

Retirements • Richard A. Jackson, professor

Samford University Appointments/Elections • Michael D. Hogue was elected president-elect of American Pharmacist’s Association Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management. • Anna Meador was appointed as pharmacy director

Study results revealed that patients were 47 percent less likely to experience an adverse drug event when a pharmacist was involved in their care. Pharmacist interventions also significantly improved outcomes when pharmacists were involved in disease management, particularly for patients with diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia. Communicating the study’s results to the public is a challenge, Chisholm-Burns added, but one that must be met to ensure patients receive the best care possible. “We are all consumers of healthcare and it’s important for Americans to understand how a pharmacist can help improve their care,” she said. In her role as an educator, she instills in her students a sense of responsibility and commitment to be excellent healthcare providers through their words and actions. Inspiring leaders and providing a forum through which they can build strong relationships and partnerships is also important. Pharmacy educators like Chisholm-Burns all play a critical role in working toward improving the public’s health, she said, and each can provide a different piece of the puzzle. “While the end-users, the patients, are closer to the pharmacy practice faculty member, other pharmacy faculty all play a role. For example, the medicinal chemist is making compounds that one day they hope will be part of the solution to providing care. No one has a larger contribution than the other, all of us are key stakeholders.”

of the Christ Health Center and assistant professor of pharmacy practice.

Awards • Susan P. Alverson, Pharmaceutical, Social and Administrative Sciences Faculty Member of the Year Award • Jennifer W. Beall, Faculty Preceptor of the Year Award • Marshall E. Cates, Pharmacy Practice Faculty of the Year Award • Jeffrey A. Kyle, New Faculty Member of the Year Award • Elizabeth A. McCullough, Pharmacy Staff Member of the Year Award • Bruce Waldrop, Margaret Self Propst Pharmacy Teacher of the Year Award

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faculty news

Promotions

Retirements

• Kimberly W. Benner was promoted to professor of pharmacy practice.

• Arnold W. Karig, campus dean for the Medical University of South Carolina

• Michael D. Hogue received tenure in the pharmacy practice department.

Southwestern Oklahoma State University

• David R. Luthin was promoted to associate professor of pharmaceutical, social and administrative sciences. • Angela Thomason was promoted with tenure to associate professor of pharmacy practice. • Bruce Waldrop was promoted with tenure to associate professor of pharmaceutical, social and administrative sciences.

South Carolina College of Pharmacy Appointments/Elections • Charles Bennett, South Carolina Center of Economic Excellence Endowed chair in Medication Safety and Efficacy and the Frank P. and Josie M. Fletcher professor of pharmacy • Kim Creek, vice-chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences • Brie Dunn, assistant professor and clinical specialist in critical care

Awards • LeAnn B. Norris was named New Practitioner of the Year by the Hematology-Oncology Pharmacists Association.

Promotions • Philip D. Hall, Medical University of South Carolina campus dean • Lorne J. Hofseth was promoted to associate professor with tenure. • Heather Kokko was named permanent director of pharmacy at the Medical University Hospital. • Patrick D. Mauldin was granted tenure and promoted to professor.

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Appointments/Elections • Jaehwa Choi, assistant professor • Chelsea O. Church (president), Nancy Williams (president-elect), Edna Patatanian (secretary) for 2010–11 were elected in the Oklahoma Society of Health-System Pharmacists. • Scott F. Long, chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences • Hardeep Singh, assistant professor

Promotions • Rahmat Talukder, associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences • Nancy T. Williams, professor of pharmacy practice

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Appointments/Elections • Alice C. Ceacarenu was appointed to the board of directors of the New York State Council of HealthSystem Pharmacists Research and Education Foundation. • Eugene D. Morse has been appointed at-large laboratory director to serve on the executive committee of AIDS Clinical Trials Group. Morse was also appointed to the steering committee of the New York State Research Centers Consortium. • Robert G. Wahler has been named section leader of the National Council of Hospice and Palliative Care Professionals and will be part of the NCHPP Executive Committee.


faculty news

Awards • Alice C. Ceacarenu was awarded the Clinical Pharmacy Services Research Award by the New York State Council of Health-System Pharmacists for the project “Evaluation the prognostic value of adiponectin levels in diabetics with breast cancer-role of insulin sensitizers.” • Alan Forrest received the Oncology One Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Grants • Alice C. Ceacarenu and Alan Forrest have been awarded a $300,000.00 for the “Peter T. Rowley Breast Cancer Research Grant” by the New York State Department of Health.

University of Connecticut Grants • Amy C. Anderson, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/NIH/National Institute of General Medicine Science. Amount of award: $263, 991.00. Title: Design of C. Parvum and T. Gondii Dhfr-Ts Inhibitors; and, source of award: National Institutes of Health/Duke University. Amount of award: $3,200.00. Title: Computational Active-Site Redesign & Binding Prediction Via Molecular Ensambles. • Brian J. Aneskievich, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. Amount of award: $272,298.00. Title: Keratinocyte Nuclear Receptor Coactivators. • William Baker, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Amount of award: $200,000.00. Title: Mechanical Thromboectomy in Acute Stroke. • Urs A. Boelsterli, principal investigator. Source of award: Pfizer, Inc. Amount of award: $159,600.00. Title: Assessment of Drug-Induced Idiosyncratic Hepatoxicity In Vivo Using the Heterozygous Sod2+/- Mouse Model. • Robin H. Bogner, principal investigator. Source of award: FDA/National Institute for Pharmaceutical Technology and Education. Amount of award: $66,000.00. Title: Scale-Up of Lyophilization Using

Dimensionless Prediction; source of award: U.S. Pharmacopeia. Amount of award: $25,000.00. Title: Establishing Best Practices in Dissolution Testing for Drug Salts; source of award: PHS/FDA/National Institute for Pharmaceutical Technology and Education. Amount of award: $9,294.00. Title: Development of Qbd Guidance Elements on Design Space Specifications Across Scale; and, source of award: Mixed Sources. Amount of award: $14,778.00. Title: Interaction of Crystalline Compounds with Porous Excipients Vis Vapor Phase. • Diane J. Burgess, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Amount of award: $6,626.00. Title: Miniaturized Wireless Implantable Biosensors for Metabolic Monitoring; source of award: PHS/NIH/NIBIB/Biorasis, Inc. Amount of award: $123,431.00. Title: Needle-Implantable, and Wireless Multi-Sensor for Continuous Glucose Monitoring; source of award: DOD/Army Medical Research and Material Command. Amount of award: $490,001.00. Title: Miniaturized Wireless Implantable Biosensors F/Multiple Analyte Monitoring; source of award: PHS/NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Amount of award: $226,335.00. Title: Miniaturized Wireless Implantable Biosensors for Metabolic Monitoring; and, source of award: U.S. Pharmacopeia. Amount of award: $25,000.00. Title: In Vitro Release Method for Microsphere Stability and Performance Testing. • Bodhisattwa Chaudhuri, principal investigator. Source of award: Mixed Sources. Amount of award: $18,000.00. Title: Numerical Modeling, Optimization, & Scale Up of Pharm. Milling in a Hammer Mill; source of award: Mixed Sources. Amount of award: $20,000.00. Title: Numerical Modeling, Optimization & Scale Up of Pharm. Milling in a Hammer Mill; and, source of award: Mixed Sources. Amount of award: $38,000.00. Title: Quantifying Drying Performance of a Filter Dryer: Experiments and Stimulation. • Craig I. Coleman, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Amount of Award: $550,000.00. Title: Acute Coronary Syndrome Thromboectomy Comparative Effectiveness Review. • Kyle M. Hadden, principal investigator. Source of award: University of Connecticut Health Center.

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faculty news

Amount of Award: $30,000.00. Title: Synthesis and Evaluation of Vitamin D3 Analogues as Inhibitors of the Oncogenic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway. • Sean M. Jeffrey, principal investigator. Source of award: VA/Providence Medical Center. Amount of Award: $13,610.00. Title: Group Intervention for Dm Guideline Implementation. • Devendra S. Kolonia, principal investigator. Source of award: Genentech, Inc. Amount of Award: $97,996.00. Title: A Mechanistic Investigation of Protein-Polyol Interactions; source of award: Genentech, Inc. Amount of award: $80,000.00. Title: Characterization of Protein Charge Distributions by Dipole Moment; and, source of award: Genentech, Inc. Amount of award: $80,000.00. Title: Rheological Characterization of Antibody Solutions. • John B. Morris, principal investigator. Source of award: American Petroleum Institute. Amount of Award: $32,832.00. Title: Upper Respiratory Tract Uptake of Naphthalene. • Michael J. Pikal, principal investigator. Source of award: Mixed Sources. Amount of Award: $35,000.00. Title: Center for Pharmaceutical Processing Research; source of award: Baxter Healthcare Corporation. Amount of award: $102,715.00. Title: Investigations Into the Freeze-Drying of OilIn-Water Emulsions as Stable Drug; source of award: Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturing of America. Amount of award: $20,000.00. Title: Critical Factors in Biopreservation of Freeze-Dried Protein Formulations; source of award: Mixed Sources. Amount of award: $35,000.00. Title: Center for Pharmaceutical Processing Research; and, source of award: NIH/Physical Science, Inc. Amount of award: $115,000.00. Title: Process Endpoint Monitor for Lyophilized Drugs for Cancer Treatment. • Lauren S. Schlesselman, principal investigator. Source of award: Future University. Amount of Award: $446,000.00. Title: Curriculum Development and Assessment for Pharmacy Professional Degree Program. • Olga Y. Vinogradova, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Amount of award: $229,500.00. Title: Investigation of the Vegfr/Integrin Cytoplasmic Domains Interaction; source of award: PHS/NIH/

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National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Amount of award: $57,375.00. Title: Investigation of the Vegfr/Integrin Cytoplasmic Domains Interaction; and, source of award: American Heart Association. Amount of award: $49,500.00. Title: Structural Insights into the Skelemin Regulate Integrin Function. • Charles M. White, principal investigator. Source of award: PHS/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Amount of award: $17,019.00. Title: Treatments for Epilepsy; and, source of award: PHS/Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Amount of award: $577,982.00. Title: Treatments for Epilepsy. • Dennis L. Wright, principal investigator. Source of award: Promiliad Biopharma, Inc. Amount of Award: $50,425.00. Title: New Antibiotic Targeting Fatty Acid Biosynthesis.

University of Florida Appointments/Elections • Joseph A. Delaney, assistant professor • Carinda Field, clinical associate professor • Anna Hall, clinical assistant professor • Heather Hardin, clinical assistant professor • Carrie Haskell-Luevano was appointed to the editorial advisory board of the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. • Teresa L. Kauf was appointed to a four-year term as co-editor and member of editorial board of the journal, Value in Health. • John S. Markowitjjz, professor • Folakemi Odedina, professor of pharmaceutical outcomes & policy • Teresa Roane, clinical assistant professor • Burcin Unel, clinical assistant professor • Katie Vogle-Anderson, clinical assistant professor • Haojie Zhu, assistant research professor


faculty news

Awards • Jason Frazier received a University of Florida 2010-11 Jack Wessel Excellence Award for Assistant Professors, a one-time productivity award of $5,000 in support of young researchers. • Ann M. Snyder is the first pharmacist to receive the University of Florida College of Medicine Master Educator Fellowship certificate.

Grants • Michael J. Katovich has been awarded a five-year NIH award for $2.5M from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute for “Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme2 in Vascular Endothelial Function.” • Almut G. Winterstein has received a two-year $482,000 award from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality for “Comparative Safety and Effectiveness of Stimulants in Medicaid Youth with ADHD.” This year she was also chosen as one of the University of Florida Research Foundation Professors for 2010-2013 and will receive a $5,000 annual salary supplement and a $3,000 grant to support her research in pharmacoepidemiology and patient safety.

Promotions • Jason Frazier, associate professor of pharmacodynamics • Bin Liu, associate professor of pharmacodynamics • Hendrik Luesch, associate professor of medicinal chemistry

Retirements • Gerald E. Gause, associate scholar in pharmacodynamics

University of Houston Appointments/Elections • Robert L. Emerson Jr. has been appointed clinical associate professor and director, ambulatory based advanced pharmacy practice experiences in clinical sciences & administration department. • Bradley K. McConnell has been appointed to the editorial board of Clinical and Experimental Hyper-

tension. • Vincent H. Tam has been re-appointed to the editorial board of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. • Meghana Trivedi has been appointed assistant professor in clinical sciences & administration.

Awards • Kimberly K. Birtcher has been named the Gulf Coast Society of Health-System Pharmacists’ 2010 Outstanding Pharmacist. • Elizabeth A. Coyle has been elected Fellow of the American College of Critical Care Medicine. • Mustafa F. Lokhandwala has been elected Fellow of the American Society of Nephrology.

Grants • Hua Chen has received a one-year, $60,000 Research Starter Grant in Health Outcomes from the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers of America Foundation for her project, “The Definition, Utilization and Development of Long-term Psychotropic Polypharmacy in Children and Adolescents.” • Diana S-L. Chow has received a $45,000 grant from the Gillson Longenbaugh Foundation for her “Transdermal Delivery of Lactone-stabilized Camptothecin Derivative for Breast Cancer Treatment.” • Joydip Das has received a three-year, $450,000 grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism for “Role of Protein Kinase C Regulatory Domains in Modulating Alcohol Actions.” • Kevin W. Garey has received a two-year, $80,140 grant from Merck & Co. for “Susceptibility and Recurrence of Candida Species Before and After a Formulary Change from Caspofungin to Micafungin in Patients with Candidemia.” • Ming Hu has received a $1.1 million subcontract award (in collaboration with Washington University) from the National Institute for Complementary and Alternative Medicine for “Chemoprevention of Lung Cancer with Red Ginseng Extracts.” • Vincent H. Tam has received a three-year, $450,000 grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for “Clinical Pharmacology of Polymyxin B.”

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faculty news

• Rosa F. Yeh and Ming Hu have received a three-year, $113,537 subcontract award (in collaboration with Baylor College of Medicine and University of Texas) from the National Institute for Complementary and Alternative Medicine for “Phase I Study to Evaluate Safety and Toxicity of EGCG in HIV-1-Infected Individuals.”

The University of Iowa Appointments/Elections • Jay D. Currie was selected as chair-elect of the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management (APPM) Section of Community and Ambulatory Practice for 2010-2011.

Awards • Paul N. Abramowitz is the recipient of the 2010 Distinguished Alumni Award of the University of Michigan College of Pharmacy. • William R. Doucette was selected as an American Pharmacists Association Fellow. • Michael W. Duffel has been named the 2010 Regents Award for Faculty Excellence. • James A. Ponto received the American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management (APhA-APPM) Presentation Merit Award for his poster presentation titled “Evaluation of Alternative Methods for Radiochemical Purity Testing of In-111 Capromab Pendetide.”

ciation of Chain Drug Stores-American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Pharmacy Faculty Development Fellowship in Community Practice. • Jeffrey Gonzalez was named Faculty Preceptor of the Year by the graduating Class of 2010. • Jill A. Morgan was named Faculty Member of the Year by the graduating Class of 2010. • The Maryland P3 Program (Patients, Pharmacists, Partnerships), under the direction of Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, received the American Pharmacists Association Foundation’s Pinnacle Award Group Practice/Health System/Corporation Category. • Sheila Weiss Smith received the 2010 University of Maryland, Baltimore Patricia Sokolove Outstanding Mentor Award for her dedication and effort in mentoring graduate and professional students.

Grants • Lisa Charneski received $100,256 from Suburban Hospital for “Innovative Pharmacotherapy Services.” • Amy Davidoff received $423,000 from the American Cancer Society for “Supplemental Medical and Drug Insurance and Cancer-related Spending.” • Mary Lynn McPherson received $50,000 from King Pharmaceuticals for “Development of a Monograph on Pain Management, Focusing on REMS (Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies).” • Meghan K. Sullivan received $170,640 from Safeway, Inc., for “Safeway Wellness Prevention Program.”

• Bernard A. Sorofman has been selected as one of the 2010 recipients of the Michael J. Brody Award for Faculty Excellence in Service.

• Hongbing Wang received $21,000 from BASF SE for “Mechanistic Studies of Direct CAR Activation.”

University of Maryland

• Bruce Yu received $18,906 from the University of Maryland, College Park for “Force Sensitive NanoNetworks.”

Appointments/Elections • James E. Polli was appointed to the Food and Drug Administration’s Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology Advisory Committee for a fouryear term.

Awards • Lauren B. Angelo received the 2010 National Asso-

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academic Pharmacy now  Jul/Aug/Sept 2010

Promotions • Sarah L. Michel has been promoted to associate professor with tenure in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. • Jill A. Morgan has been promoted to associate professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science.


faculty news

• C.S. Raman has been promoted to associate professor with tenure in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

University of Minnesota Appointments/Elections

• Jon C. Schommer is PI on a $30,438 grant from Anthurium Solutions, Inc. for the “Project to Develop a Voice-Activated Pharmacy/Patient Consultation System to Support Medication Therapy Management Delivery and Billing Services.” Co-investigators are Chrystian R. Pereira and Sarah M. Westberg, and consultant is Lowell J. Anderson.

• Ling Li will join the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy on July 26 as the VFW endowed chair pharmacotherapy for the elderly.

University of Missouri– Kansas City

• Carston (Rick) Wagner is the first to hold the endowed chair in medicinal chemistry.

Awards

Grants • Richard C. Brundage is the recipient of a Pfizer Fellowship in Pharmacometrics award. The award will pay $220,000 over five years ($55,000 per year) to support graduate students in pharmacometrics. • Each of the following received a $30,000 Engebretson Drug Design & Development Grant: Vekatram R. Mereddy for his project, “Development of Novel Small Molecule MCT1 Inhibitors as Anti-Cancer Agents”; and Daniel A. Harki for his project, “Development of L-Nucleoside Anticancer Agents.” • Keri H. Naglosky, Marcia M. Worley, Timothy P. Stratton and Randall D. Seifert received a $63,000 grant for their study, “Pilot Study to Determine the Effectiveness of Pharmacist Provided MTM Using Face-to-Face and TeleMTM in the Treatment of Long-Haul Drivers with Hypertension Department of Transportation Classifications Stage 1, 2 and 3.” • Jayanth Panyam received a $26,996 grant from the Randy Shaver Cancer Research and Community Fund in support of his project, “Dual Targeted Multifunctional Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Brain Tumors.” • Ronald J. Sawchuk and Belinda Cheung received new funding of $299,969 from Alcon Labs for the continuation of their project, “Testing the Penetration of Moxifloxacin into Chinchilla Middle Ear using Transtympanic Membrane Delivery Formulation” through Dec. 31, 2010. Alcon Labs has also agreed to retain an option to license the patented technology for an additional sum of $50,000.

• The UMKC School of Pharmacy has announced the receipt of an estate gift commitment from Robert Sperry, a local resident whose family has longtime ties to the pharmacy industry. Sperry has requested that the gift be used to fund the creation of an endowed chair in geriatric pharmacotherapy and to support School of Pharmacy students through the UMKC Pharmacy Foundation.

The University of Montana Grants • John M. Gerdes and Richard J. Bridges have been awarded $199,995 from the Robert Packard Center for ALS Research for Cerebral PET Imaging Agents for Monitoring ALS Therapy and Astroglia: from Chemicals to Rodents to Humans. • Andrij Holian has been awarded $10,883 from Montana State University for Remote Detection of Chemicals Associated with Clandestine Drug Labs. • Kendra Procacci has been awarded $100,000 from the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services for Implementing Asthma Clinics in Community Pharmacies. • Andrea Stierle has been awarded $542,136 from NIH to study Signal Transduction Enzyme Inhibitors from Extremophilic Microbes as Anticancer Agents. • Andrea Stierle and Donald Stierle have been awarded $15,000 from Montana State University for Novel Antifungal Agents from Acid Mine Waste Microbes.

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faculty news

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

on Instructional Excellence Innovation in Education Award for “A Novel Approach to Teaching Clinical Decision-Making Using Virtual Patient Technology.”

Grants

• Lauren J. Jonkman received board certification as a pharmacotherapy specialist (BCPS).

• David S. Lawrence and Vyas Sharma, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, $100,000, Instrument-free detection of DNA disease markers.

• Joanne G. Kowiatek was named a Fellow of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists.

Promotions

• Brian A. Potoski received the 2010 Faculty Preceptor of the Year Award.

• Russell J. Mumper, executive associate dean for academics

Retirements

• Kristine S. Schonder was selected as the recipient of the 2010 Stanford I. Cohen Teacher of the Year Award.

• Anthony J. Hickey, professor

Grants

University of Pittsburgh

• Robert B. Gibbs received a three-year, $399,989 grant from the National Science Foundation for “Role of GPR30 in Estrogen-Mediated Effects on Cholinergic Function and Cognition.”

Appointments/Elections • Sandra L. Kane-Gill has been appointed co-chair of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Program Committee for Congress in 2012. • Song Li was appointed to serve as a member of the National Institutes of Health Developmental Therapeutics Study Section, Center for Scientific Review, for a three-year term. • Dexi Liu was appointed to serve as chair of the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Membership Committee for a one-year term. • Susan M. Meyer was appointed to represent the profession of pharmacy on the Interprofessional Collaborative Practice and Education Panel. She has been elected to a second three-year term on the Board of Directors of the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research and has also been elected as Region II East Coast Region Councilor for the Rho Chi Society.

• Wen Xie received a five-year, $1.6 million National Institutes of Health grant for “A Novel Role of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Hepatic Steatosis.” He also received an $83,582 supplement from the National Institutes of Health for his existing grant, “Regulation of Sulfotransferases by LXR and Its Implication in Pathophysiology.”

Promotions • Levent Kirisci, professor of pharmaceutical sciences • Lisa C. Rohan, associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences with tenure • Michael M. Vanyukov, professor of pharmaceutical sciences • Taira Wada, instructor of pharmaceutical sciences

The University of Tennessee

• Samuel M. Poloyac was co-chair of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Meeting, Clinical Focus on Hypothermia: Keeping It Cool - How to Implement Hypothermia in Your Clinical Practice.

Appointments/Elections

Awards

• Peter A. Chyka was installed as a distinguished practitioner member of the Pharmacy Academy of the National Academies of Practice.

• Neal J. Benedict, along with colleagues in the School of Medicine, received a Provost’s Advisory Council

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academic Pharmacy now  Jul/Aug/Sept 2010

• Lawrence M. Brown was installed as a Trustee of APhA in March 2010.


faculty news

• Stephanie J. Phelps was installed in March 2010 as chair of the National Academies of Practice Pharmacy Academy.

Grants • Candace S. Brown, Boehringer Ingelheim, Filbanserin in postmenopausal women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder. • Lawrence M. Brown, NACDS Foundation, Services for the creation of a Web-based patient care database. • Trevor McKibbin, UT Cancer Institute, Protein changes within P13-Akt-mTOR and EGFR pathways. • P. David Rogers, NIH, Novel Azole Resistance Mechanisms of Candida albicans. • Michael C. Storm, UT Research Foundation, Pediatric dosage of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids. • Michelle M. Zingone, State of Tennessee, Pharmacist-Physician Collaboration for Diabetes Care.

The University of Toledo Awards • Vincent F. Mauro was awarded the Outstanding Teacher of the Year by the 2010 Doctor of Pharmacy class.

The University of Utah Appointments/Elections • Diana I. Brixner has been appointed to the Board of the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacists (AMCP) for a second year.

Awards • Diane Ogborn (P2) and her mentor, Karen M. Gunning, received a scholarship for the 2010 AACP Wal-Mart Scholars Program.

University of Washington Awards • The School of Pharmacy’s Pharmaceutical Out-

comes Research and Policy Program (PORPP) is a founding member of the UW Centers for Comparative and Health Systems Effectiveness (CHASE) Alliance.

Grants • Kenneth E. Thummel received a multi-million dollar U01 grant to create a new Center on Pharmacogenetics in Rural and Underserved Populations. Thummel will be the co-principal investigator of the grant with a professor in the UW School of Medicine.

Promotions • Isabelle Ragueneau-Majlessi has joined the Department of Pharmaceutics faculty as a clinical associate professor. She also became director of the School of Pharmacy’s Metabolism and Transport Drug Interaction Database.

Virginia Commonwealth University Appointments/Elections • Daniel Adkins was named assistant professor. • Gretchen Brophy was appointed to the American College of Critical Care Medicine Nominating Committee. • Laura A. Morgan was named director of the School of Pharmacy’s Foundations Lab. • Renee Murray was appointed to a three-year term on the Editorial Advisory Board of Pharmacy Today. • James X. Zhang was cross-appointed as an affiliate faculty member in the VCU School of Medicine’s Department of Epidemiology and Community Health. He also was appointed to the Scientific Committee of the American Society of Health Economists.

Awards • Umesh R. Desai received the School of Pharmacy’s 2010 Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching. • Jean-Venable “Kelly” R. Goode was one of 14 pharmacy professionals inducted into the National Academies of Practice as a 2010 Distinguished Prac-

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faculty news

titioner and Scholar. • Gary R. Matzke was among the inaugural class of fellows inducted into the National Academies of Practice. • The School of Pharmacy’s Pharmacist Collaborative Care in the Community program—represented by Akash J. Alexander, Sallie D. Mayer, Gary R. Matzke, Leticia R. Moczygemba, Amy Rudenko and Evan Sisson—won the university’s 2010 Currents of Change Award for overall excellence in community engagement. The School of Pharmacy also was named as participant in two 2010–11 community partnership programs: “Improving Access and Quality of Care for the Medically Underserved Through the Interdisciplinary Enhanced Teaching Model” and “Una Vida Sana: Assessing and Improving the Health Status of Richmond’s Hispanic Community Through Health Professional Service Learning.” • Thomas P. Reinders received the 2010 Robert J. DeSalvo Distinguished Alumnus Award during the University of Cincinnati’s James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy Hooding and Recognition Ceremony in June.

Grants • Mary Jayne Kennedy, $263,462 grant from the Commonwealth Health Research Board for “Evaluation of mitochondrial gene sequence variants as biomarkers of aminoglycoside-induced renal injury in newborn infants.” • Patricia W. Slattum (co-PI), $1,250,000 NCRR (R25) grant from the National Institutes of Health for “Project CRESST: Clinical Research Education for Science Students and Teachers.”

Washington State University Appointments/Elections • R. Keith Campbell, appointed, editorial board of World Journal of Diabetes • Lawrence J. Cohen, elected to National Academies of Practice; appointed, editorial board of Psychiatry 2010 • Joshua J. Neumiller, appointed, editorial board of World Journal of Diabetes

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academic Pharmacy now  Jul/Aug/Sept 2010

• Gary M. Pollack, new dean of the College of Pharmacy

Awards • Joshua J. Neumiller was awarded a faculty development fellowship in geriatric pharmacy from American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education, $25,000.

Wayne State University Appointments/Elections • Hossam M. Ashour, assistant professor of pharmacy practice • Fei Chen, associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences • Christopher Guiliano, assistant professor of pharmacy practice • Emily Martin, assistant professor of pharmacy practice • Anna Moszczynska, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences

Grants • Michael J. Rybak and Celine Vidaillac, Cerexa Pharmaceuticals/Forest Laboratories, $81,092, In vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) evaluation of ceftaroline versus ceftriaxone against clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae with differing susceptibility to cephalosporins. • Michael J Rybak, Cerexa, Inc.,$81,092, In Vitro Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) Evaluation of Ceftaroline versus Ceftriaxone Against Clinical Isolates of Streptococcus Pneumoniae with Differing Susceptibility to Cephalosporins. • Patrick M. Woster, $1,311,950 for five years from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, Identification of LSD1 inhibitors targeting epigenetic regulation in tumor cells.

Promotions • Steve Firestine, promotion and tenure to associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences


faculty news

Retirements • Paul J. Munzenberger, associate professor of pharmacy practice

West Virginia University Appointments/Elections • Marie A. Abate and Arthur I. Jacknowitz were reappointed to the NAPLEX Review Committee for the term 2010-2013. • Arthur I. Jacknowitz served as chair of the Committee of Tellers at the 2010 USP Convention and was recognized for 30 years of service to USP and his attendance at 6 consecutive conventions (1985-2010). • Kimberly Kelly was appointed associate professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Systems and Policy.

• Virginia Scott was selected as the AACP Council of Faculties chair-elect. • Letha Sooter was appointed assistant professor in the Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences. • Ashlee McMillan was appointed clinical assistant professor and director of skills development.

Awards • Usha Sambamoorthi was the recipient of the Steven Banks Award for Mentoring in Mental Health Research. • Terry L. Schwinghammer was selected as a Fellow in the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management.

Retirements

• Gretchen Kreckel was appointed clinical assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy.

• Joseph K.H. Ma, professor in the WVU School of Pharmacy Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, retired in June after 34 years of outstanding service to West Virginia University.

• John (Jay) Martello was appointed clinical assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy.

Emerging Schools

• Xiaoyun Pan was appointed assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Systems and Policy.

Manchester College

• Charles D. Ponte was appointed to the editorial board for Pharmacotherapy, the official journal of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

Appointments/Elections • Philip J. Medon will join Manchester College as vice president and dean of the School of Pharmacy. He also will serve as a professor of pharmacy and toxicology.

• W. Clarke Ridgway was elected interim treasurer of the American Institute of the History of Pharmacy. • Usha Sambamoorthi was appointed professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Systems and Policy.

Remember to submit your Faculty News today! It’s fast and easy to make sure your college or school of pharmacy is featured in the Faculty News section of Academic Pharmacy Now. Visit the AACP Web site at www.aacp.org and complete the School News Submission Form on the News and Publications portion of the Web site. academic Pharmacy now  Jul/Aug/Sept 2010

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American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Discover · Learn · Care : Improve Health

1727 King Street · Alexandria, VA 22314 p: 703-739-2330 · f: 703-836-8982 · www.aacp.org For address change, please return mailing label with current school affiliation.

Watch Your Mailbox! In October, your college or school of pharmacy will be receiving your American Pharmacy Educator Week toolkit. It contains a myriad of resources designed to help you implement inventive ways to encourage students to consider careers in academic pharmacy. American Pharmacy Educator Week materials will also be available for download on the AACP Web site by visiting www.aacp.org/ career/facultyrecruitment/apew. Don’t forget to submit your activities for inclusion in an upcoming issue of Academic Pharmacy Now. E-mail communications@aacp.org with stories and photos of how you celebrated the discoveries and accomplishments of America’s pharmaceutical scientists and educators.

How will you celebrate? October 24–30, 2010


Academic Pharmacy Now: Jul/Aug/Sept 2010