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Academic Pharmacy NOW

The News Magazine of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

Volume 9 2016 Issue 4

Immunizing Against

STRESS

Pharmacists are doing more to keep patients healthy, in ways that might surprise you. 12

Also in this issue: Virtual Anatomy Gets Real 5 Mobile Memorization 8


who we are @AACPharmacy

Academic Pharmacy The News Magazine of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 1727 King Street, Floor 2 Alexandria, VA 22314 p: 703-739-2330 P f: 703-836-8982

www.aacp.org

Founded in 1900, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy is the national organization representing the interests of pharmacy education. AACP comprises all accredited colleges and schools of pharmacy, including more than 6,600 faculty, approximately 63,800 students enrolled in professional programs and 4,800 individuals pursuing graduate study.

Letters to the Editor

NOW

CEO & Publisher

Lucinda L. Maine

Editorial Director

Lynette R. Bradley-Baker

Editor

Maureen Thielemans

mthielemans@aacp.org

Editorial Assistant

Kyle R. Bagin

kbagin@aacp.org

We welcome your comments. Please submit all letters to the editor to communications@aacp.org.

About Academic Pharmacy Now Academic Pharmacy Now highlights the work of AACP member pharmacy schools and faculty. The magazine is published as a membership service.

Subscriptions To subscribe, visit http://www.aacp.org/news/ shopaacp/Pages/publications.aspx.

Change of Address For address changes, contact Terry J. Ryan, Associate Director of Membership Development, at tryan@aacp.org.

Advertising For advertising rates, please visit http://www.aacp.org/news/academic pharmnow/pages/advertisingwithaacp.aspx. Š2016 by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. All rights reserved. Content may not be reprinted without prior written permission.

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Academic Pharmacy NOW  2016 Issue 4

Art Director

Tricia Gordon

tgordon@aacp.org

Web Assistant

Sean Clark

sclark@aacp.org

Senior Advisor, Outreach and Communications

Stephanie Saunders Fouch sfouch@aacp.org

Freelance Writer

Athena Ponushis

Freelance Writer

Jane E. Rooney

Volume 9 2016 Issue 4


@AACPharmacy a look inside

campus connection

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Head of the (Virtual) Class Virtual anatomy studies at ISU amplifies academia while advancing patient care.

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Boost the Brain’s Power to Retain The University of Florida College of Pharmacy is taking a game-like approach to teaching that engages students on their mobile devices by sending information at spaced intervals. The result? A significant increase in students’ knowledge retention.

community impact

12

Immunizing Against Stress Pharmacists are doing more to keep patients healthy, in ways that might surprise you.

@AACPharmacy

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Shining the Light on #PharmEd16

From cutting-edge technology to dynamic speakers and engaging programming, the 2016 AACP Annual Meeting put a spotlight on the innovation and collaboration driving pharmacy education and practice forward.

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2016 Member To-Do List Whether it’s renewing your membership for next year or voting in the AACP Elections, there’s a lot to do before next semester!

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community note publisher’s impact

Dear Colleagues: With unanimous approval of the 2016 House of Delegates, AACP now has an updated strategic plan to guide our work for the next several years. Unlike many plans that are written and then quickly recede into the background of getting the “real work” done, this new plan has momentum. It became clear as the top priorities of the plan were crystallizing that many of our members needed the most immediate assistance with stronger recruitment to assure that the right number of high quality applicants are available to pursue our Pharm.D. programs (Priority 1). Yet, as the Planning Committee and staff, and ultimately our Board, examined these top priorities the unique relationship between Priorities 1 through 4 became more and more obvious. Our recruitment efforts will not meet expectations if the public perception of what pharmacists’ contemporary roles actually are goes unchanged (Priority 2). While it is not easy to communicate or depict the “brainwork” of our graduates, it is essential in order to drive demand for pharmacists’ services and seats in our classes. Accelerat-

ing the transformation of practice has to happen to make our depiction of pharmacists as caregivers more broadly available to those seeking care from the profession (Priority 3). Also, part of Priority 3 and Priority 4 is the acceleration of change in our degree programs. The rising generations of learners are digital natives for whom traditional teaching methods are less effective. Fortunately there is evidence of innovation as reflected in stories in this issue of Academic Pharmacy Now. We are on the hunt for your stories of practice and education transformation efforts. And we also seek your meaningful collaboration with other aspects of the 2016 plan implementation process. A call for recruitment champions was sent to the deans this month and we will be seeking brand ambassadors as our pharmacy repositioning work progresses. Together we will help others understand that pharmacists truly do help people live healthier, better lives! Sincerely,

Web Exclusives View the AACP Strategic Plan by visiting http://www.aacp.org/about/Pages/StrategicPlan.aspx.

Lucinda L. Maine, Ph.D., R.Ph. CEO and Publisher

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Academic Pharmacy NOW  2016 Issue 4


campus connection

Head of the (Virtual) Class

Virtual anatomy studies at ISU amplifies academia while advancing patient care. By Athena Ponushis At some colleges of pharmacy students are scrubbing up and dissecting cadavers with scalpels, but at Idaho State University they’re standing over computer-generated human bodies and dissecting them digitally. There’s no substitute for the classical, cadaveric way, but technology is supplementing anatomy studies, reinforcing what students have felt with their hands and seen with their eyes, in a virtual world that unleashes their minds. The possibilities with virtual dissections are infinite. Digital bodies and anatomical systems can be explored intuitively, and a large library of scans of diseased states and case studies can be explored. Two Anatomage Tables at the Virtual Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory, part of the new L.S. and Aline W. Skaggs Treasure Valley Anatomy & Physiology Laboratories in Meridian, Idaho, take anatomy renderings from medical imaging data of real human beings to facilitate virtual dissection. This enables students to peel off skin, muscles and bones to see organs, slice them open and go back again, all with the swipe of a hand on a screen.

laptop. Such systems are revolutionizing education. Abstract anatomical concepts that students may not have had the fortune to see in a donated body are now laid out before them in 3-D. Dr. Robin Dodson, who took the lead in developing the Meridian site, sees the virtual lab as a complement to the lab complex. “We now have a cadaver lab, a bioskills lab, a virtual 3-D lab, and they work wonderfully together. Each one brings something to the educational ‘Aha!” moment of a student,” said Dodson, professor, interim department chair PSCI, associate dean for extended programs and special assistant to the associate VP, academic programs. Beyond enhancing the educational moment, Dodson could foresee virtual

anatomy technology translating to better interprofessional practice and better patient care.

Seeing More Means Doing More Educators see virtual anatomy technology, like the Anatomage Table, as an added tool, allowing students to do things they can’t do as easily, or maybe not at all, with donated bodies. You can take anatomical parts off and put them back on, flip the body and see from behind, zoom in, isolate a system or an organ, add anatomy to an X-ray visual, and above all else, you can make a mistake. As Jack Choi, technologist, founder and CEO of Anatomage Inc., quips in his TED talk, you would not want to hear “Whoops,” in real life, but it the digital space, you can hit “Undo.”

Three BodyViz Stations allow students to further explore anatomy, even planning surgical procedures, on an iPad or

Brian Atkinson, Instructional Technologist, is using BodyViz software to demonstrate rotating and zooming in on an image using an Xbox controller. The image is created from patient MRI scans and allows for visualization of a midline brain tumor.

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campus connection

Atkinson is demonstrating differences in tissue density using color in order to visually examine the tumor and surrounding tissue.

Watching how the students adapt to virtual anatomy has really been a joy, said Ms. Lorinda Smith, clinical assistant professor and manager of the Treasure Valley Anatomy & Physiology Laboratories. “It’s interesting to watch them in small groups work together to figure out how to do things. They become excited about it in a way that’s different than they would if they were presented with an atlas of anatomy,” Smith said. “They work together really well to try and figure out how to make something happen or how to explore a particular area. For example, if students just want to see the nervous system, but the stomach and the intestines are in the way, they can push a button and remove it and see what they see. It’s engaging and gets people excited about learning in a different way.”

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Smith said students get comfortable lab, but a young child could come into with the technology pretty quickly. the virtual lab and explore anatomy. She has noticed some students prefer “I think it gives young people a chance to learn virtually first, then go look at to become interested in the idea of cadaveric specimens. Others like to use the virtual tools for review. It’s this going into a health profession,” Smith combination that she sees as the advan- said. “It’s fascinating, interesting and cool, so it opens a door that otherwise tage at ISU—not the virtual lab alone, might be closed.” not the gross anatomy lab alone, but what these labs offer together—havTo any faculty who might find virtual ing multiple tools to look at anatomy technology foreign as a teaching tool, from multiple directions in multiple Smith said it’s surprisingly user-friendways, that’s what most valuable to the ly and would probably be easier to students. incorporate than one might think. So if you’re reluctant, keep an open mind. Opening Virtual Bodies Opens

the Proverbial Door

Another advantage? Virtual anatomy is accessible. People who would not typically have access to cadaver dissection could have access to virtual anatomy technology. Also, it may not be appropriate to have an 11-year-old in the cadaver

“If you’re anti-technology, or against wanting to add any kind of 3-D virtual anatomy to other types of anatomy study, I suggest you keep an open mind and try it out yourself. There are a lot of things you can do with virtual anatomy that are more difficult to do


campus connection

Students inside the Virtual Anatomy Laboratory at ISU-Meridian.

with a cadaver, or more expensive, or more time consuming.” ISU acquired its virtual tools from grants and donations: The Virtual Anatomy & Physiology Lab was sponsored by the Blue Cross of Idaho Foundation for Health. One Anatomage Table was donated by Delta Dental of Idaho and the other by the Idaho Department of Labor Workforce Development grant. One BodyViz station was purchased by the Jeff Tunison Community Fund supported by Capital Matrix and another also through the Idaho Department of Labor Workforce Development grant.

From the Lab, Around the Globe, Back to the PatientCentered Home Dodson has a vision of how virtual anatomy can be taken from universi-

ties and integrated into best practices. Because virtual technology allows students to view a real patient being treated for a real pathology, students can scroll through the steps over time and see if the pathology has been improving or not. Virtual anatomy now becomes an assessment tool. “If you have students working interprofessionally as a team, it actually drives the whole concept of a patient-centered home,” Dodson said. “It really is an opportunity to bring together not only other disciplines, but actually look at real patient data as it exists and determine whether you’re making progress or not.” Virtual anatomy technology also has the capability of sharing content, extending this access globally. A medical team in Idaho could connect with a medical team in Central America, and

in real time, discuss similar pathophysiologies in different geographies to collaborate on successful treatment protocols. “You can deliver this data anywhere in the world where you’ve got Wi-Fi,” Dodson said. Virtual anatomy technology makes it possible for student pharmacists, medical students, residents, faculty and practicing surgeons to review systems before a lecture, before an exam, or before a surgery, providing opportunities to incorporate best practices and work together as a team. The way Dodson sees it, the technology is unlimited. “The only thing that would limit this is our imagination.” P Athena Ponushis is a freelance writer based in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

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Boost the Brain’s Power to Retain The University of Florida College of Pharmacy is taking a gamelike approach to teaching that engages students on their mobile devices by sending information at spaced intervals. The result? A significant increase in students’ knowledge retention. By Jane E. Rooney Suppose you are a student pharmacist who must memorize the characteristics of many different medications for an upcoming exam. Perhaps you study in a traditional way, say by using flashcards or re-reading notes or class material. You might ace the test, but how likely is it that you will remember the information a month later? How about a year or two after you’ve graduated and landed a job that requires you to recall specific details about drug classifications, names and indications? Studies show that in as little as 30 days, 79 percent of knowledge is forgotten. But what if just by using something students carry with them every day—their mobile devices—their knowledge retention could get a significant boost?

testing (reading, watching a video) and conceptual mapping (drawing diagrams to relate concepts) show that testing is the most effective approach. “Major universities and teaching hospitals around the world have found that integrating this type of clinically proven program from Qstream Healthcare into their educational and patient safety initiatives makes knowledge retention engaging and convenient,” said Mary Hallice, director of healthcare solutions at Qstream Healthcare. “It has tremendous benefits to both learning and on-the-job performance.”

fingertips. With the rise of social media, they want immediate feedback. This system allows for that.”

A 21st-Century Study Buddy When Sando experimented with the Qstream Healthcare software in 2015, the UF College of Pharmacy was in the process of redesigning its curriculum. She saw an opportunity to use the new technology in her course Professional Practice Skills Laboratory I and II, which occurs in the first professional year of the curriculum. “It was very user friendly,” she noted. “I used it for eight weeks prior to rolling it out with my students in September 2015.” Participants receive e-mail invitations to the Qstream challenge. Students are asked questions via a mobile device every few days; as soon as they answer they receive immediate feedback. The technology lets students know what percentage of participants gave different answers and also provides links to resources, as well as an explanation for why a certain answer is correct. There is a discussion board that allows participants to interact with each other and debate.

Dr. Karen Sando, clinical assistant professor at the University of Florida College of Pharmacy, learned about Qstream Healthcare’s technology while That’s the idea behind an innovative attending a program for health educaconcept known as spaced education tors at the Harvard-Macy Institute that takes a more game-like apin 2015. “One of the cognitive science proach to teaching, now being used at techniques we discussed is spacing out some pharmacy and medical schools. material. Instead of giving a bunch of Qstream Healthcare uses an interval information at once, it’s been shown to reinforcement methodology, incorpoimprove long-term retention if you give rating “spacing” and “testing” effects bits of information over time,” Sando into a simple mobile delivery platform. explained. “A common thing students Peer-reviewed clinical trials show that do when they study is to re-read mate- “The students are assigned teams and knowledge retention can significantly rial. Long-term, students have a tough they earn points for correct answers,” increase if information is presented and time retrieving that information. InSando said. “There are individual and reinforced over spaced intervals of time. terval testing can help students retain team top scores. They get a team name Testing is an effective learning process material.” Incorporating technology in and each individual person gets a when combined with immediate answer the classroom is a natural fit for 21stdescriptor (real names are not used). I feedback. Studies comparing the testcentury learners, she added. “Today’s recognize the top individual and the top ing effect to passive learning without students like information at their team finishers at the end of the semester.”

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campus connection

A sample from the University of Florida College of Pharmacy’s Qstream program, detailing the top 200 CNS drugs for first-year students. Student pharmacists must pass an exam every semester on different aspects of the drugs.

Qstream appealed to Sando because it allows for a self-study component. The curriculum requires that student pharmacists pass an exam each semester covering different aspects of the top 200 drugs. Students who don’t pass with an 80 percent must re-take the exam. Sando did not want to devote too much class time to covering the information but knew that students needed to learn it. “This material is memorization based,” she explained. “There isn’t a great way for me to teach that. This system uses these cognitive science techniques that have been shown to be effective but delivers information in a way that newer learners can engage with.”

had. We also evaluated self-efficacy before and after Qstream [looking at students’ knowledge and confidence regarding the top 200 drugs]. There was a significant increase in each objective following the use of Qstream.”

The survey asked for comments to find out what students like most and least about the Qstream technology. “On the positive side, they liked the question format, they liked getting immediate feedback, they liked the competition aspect, and they said it was fun and that the email reminders prompted them to study,” Sando noted. “In terms of negative aspects, they didn’t like that it was a small number of questions (we only did 15). This year we are going She said that Qstream Healthcare’s to increase the number of questions. approach to spacing out the questions They also didn’t like that there wasn’t works well for students who need to commit so many details to memory. “It’s enough variation—we stuck with one drug classification. They wanted to see a struggle to remember all the information, especially drug-related information,” questions for all of the agents. They also wanted the questions more freshe noted. “This type of application is quently. I had it set up so it just sent out useful to help with the long-term retenquestions every two days.” tion of memorization-based material.”

Game On

Having finished the pilot year, Sando is looking ahead to what comes next. Sando made the Qstream portion of “This year we are going to continue usthe course optional to maintain the fun ing Qstream for the top 200 drugs, but game aspect. She surveyed students we’re also adding it to help students who participated in the fall and spring prepare for an end-of-year calculations semesters; she is still analyzing the exam,” she said. “That’s another selfspring data but has results from the fall study component throughout the three 2015 survey, which included 21 student years of pharmacy school. We’re going teams. “Students had gains between the first time they answered a question to use Qstream in the spring to help test and prompt students to study on and the second attempt,” Sando said, major concepts.” She is currently workexplaining that Qstream will send a question again if someone gets it wrong ing with Qstream Healthcare to set up the question series and scoring compothe first time. “The proficiency level nent for the spring. from the first to the second attempt improved for 13 of the 15 questions we

Sando pointed out that the technology’s game-like setup makes studying more engaging and that the competitive element pushes students to work harder. According to the survey comments, students really enjoyed that the system fosters a social aspect to learning. “At this year’s AACP meeting, one of the speakers mentioned precision teaching,” she noted. “We talk about individualizing care for patients. When it comes to education, we’re moving away from education for the masses and asking, ‘how does interaction with material differ from one adult learner to another? How do we best design content for an individual’s level of engagement?’ The social aspect of learning is something we’re just figuring out how to tap into.” P Jane E. Rooney is a freelance writer based in Oakton, Virginia.

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community impact

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Academic Pharmacy NOW  2016 Issue 4


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community impact

Immunizing Against

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community impact

STRESS

Pharmacists are doing more to keep patients healthy, in ways that might surprise you. For nearly 10 years, a pharmacy faculty member at the University of Minnesota has visited her patients’ in their homes, ensuring their medications are working properly. A professor at UCSF is helping workers combat stress with tools such as mindfulness and heart-centered appreciation. Others are out in their communities fighting the opioid epidemic with education and overdose assistance. The recurring theme is always patient care. At Pharmacy Education 2016 in July, AACP launched a national campaign called Healthy Starts Here. Our goal is to share stories of the vital work pharmacists and researchers do in pharmacies, communities and laboratories. Academic Pharmacy NOW  2016 Issue 4

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community impact

In this issue of Academic Pharmacy Now we’re highlighting the unique ways pharmacists, and researchers, are going beyond the lab and outside the classroom to help patients live healthier and better lives. Whether it’s immunizing for stress, or educating the public about caffeine absorption, pharmacists and researchers are on the front lines, helping people make more informed decisions about their healthcare. Here are just a few examples of their work, which illustrate and underscore how Healthy Starts Here.

UCSF Develops Program to Help San Francisco Workers Deal with Stress on the Job By Beth Winegarner (This article was originally published by University of California, San Francisco, at http://tiny.ucsf.edu/resilience.)

“This is an example of how pharmacists, who are on the frontline of healthcare delivery, can promote wellness through nonmedication strategies and provide practical tools to manage stress to help improve the health of our San Francisco community.” ­— Dr. Lisa Kroon

Each time a library patron comes up to the help desk, Valerie Reichert tries to take a deep breath. It’s a technique the Bernal Heights librarian learned through a stress-relief workshop for city and county workers who often work with the public. Reichert is one of about 600 San Francisco city and county workers who’ve gone through workshops offered through a collaboration between UC San Francisco’s School of Pharmacy and the city over the last five years. Any work with the public involves being present for each request, and no one is perfect at it, Reichert noted. “Resiliency tools gave me a couple extra seconds to figure out how to best serve each patron. As a result, I had a better day, too.”

Collaboration Started with Muni Drivers The collaboration between UCSF and the City and County of San Francisco started in 2011 with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA), which oversees ground transportation in San Francisco, including the Muni system, which runs the buses and trains. Dr. Eleanor Vogt, a professor in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy, initially talked with the city about Muni drivers’ high rate of diabetes. These discussions surfaced the significant job-related stress issues, and Vogt offered to help. Laura Chalfant, development director of BackFirst, the provider for a health and wellness program for SFMTA employees called Road to Fitness, said she immediately saw the benefits of the UCSF Stress-Relief and Resiliency Medicine Training for Muni workers. More than 100 of them have since gone through the training.

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Image credit: Susan Merrell/UCSF

community impact

“One participant said afterward, ‘I realized today that I create my own stress,’” Chalfant said. “I think many people think of stress as something that happens to them, but in reality you can use these tools to manage stress more effectively and to cope.”

Henry Kahn (left), M.D., and Eleanor Vogt (center), Ph.D., R.Ph., developed and implemented the stress-relief program for San Francisco city workers.

Resiliency and Managing Stress Mindfulness has become a buzzword in countless workplaces over the past few years. Vogt began looking into the science 20 years ago while serving as a senior fellow at the National Patient Safety Foundation at the American Medical Association. Her initial work was studying how stress and burnout contributed to medical error and patient risk. Vogt said that in addition to the growing epidemic of practitioner burnout, the research documenting the role of stress in initiating or complicating disease is growing daily. The interactive workshop training is based on emerging science showing that our thoughts and feelings have more impact on us than ever thought possible, she said. The topics and techniques include a look at the emerging science and practice using the evolving tools, including visualization, mindfulness, heart-centered appreciation, storytelling and reframing mind-sets with “take-home” applications. At first glance, it may seem like an unlikely project for a pharmacy school to take on. “In fact, pharmacists are on the front lines, and patients see pharmacists more than

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community impact

any healthcare provider,” Vogt said. “With our coaching, counseling and caring, we are the ‘medicine’ too. Just as we immunize for flu, we can immunize for stress.” Dr. Lisa Kroon, chair of the Department of Clinical Pharmacy, noted that the UCSF School of Pharmacy is deeply involved in the community through health screenings, immunization programs and education for seniors. “This is an example of how pharmacists, who are on the frontline of healthcare delivery, can promote wellness through non-medication strategies and provide practical tools to manage stress to help improve the health of our San Francisco community.”

Experiential Education with Vogt at AACP In September, AACP staff learned firsthand how to combat stress during a workshop with Vogt. We practiced power poses, slowed breathing techniques and shifting our mindset to focus on something or someone for which we are grateful.

Inside a Workshop During a workshop, the instructor plays a video depicting fast-paced urban scenes: taxis zooming by, gridlocked city streets, pedestrians rushing to their next commitment. For the first half of the video, jarring and discordant music plays. But in the second half, a symphony plays Pachelbel’s “Canon in D,” and workshop participants visibly relax at the change in tone. “That shift shows that if you can find a way to take a step back, or listen to nice music or even remember Pachelbel’s ‘Canon,’ it can help calm you,” said Dr. Henry Kahn, a clinical professor in the School of Medicine, who’s partnered with Vogt on developing and implementing the program. Vogt then asks everyone to sit with their eyes closed, breathe deeply for a few minutes and then think of someone or something for which they are grateful. Research has shown that deep breathing combined with this kind of “heart appreciation” practice lowers levels of the stress hormone cortisol and may increase our immune response as well. The workshop isn’t all about sitting quietly and breathing.

Dr. Eleanor Vogt shows AACP staff the power and science of the “Superman Pose,” to combat stress and anxiety in their work.

Vogt also talks about research indicating that body language and position can influence mood and stress, noting that sitting hunched over tells the body it feels smaller and needs protection, creating a feeling of powerlessness, which in turn increases cortisol levels. She asks everyone to stand up and try out “power poses,” with their hands on their hips like Wonder Woman, and then with their arms raised and expansive like an Olympic victor, and note their feelings.

Promising Results Dr. Catherine Dodd, director of the San Francisco Health Service System, which negotiates benefits for San Francisco public employees and retirees, said that once she saw the workshop for herself, she knew she had to bring it to more city workers. During that workshop, Vogt connected a burly SFMTA manager to a machine that tracked his heart rate and then told him to take some deep breaths, Dodd said. “You could see his heart beat slow down as he thought of something he liked. And she said, ‘Send him love’ to the other participants and, sure enough, it slowed down more,” Dodd said. “It sold me.” Then in the summer of 2015, the system launched a pilot program advertising the stress and resiliency training to all city human resource professionals. continued on page 18

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Far-reaching Effects of Research Research isn’t always about working in a lab trying to develop new medications to treat some of the world’s most dangerous diseases. Oftentimes it’s the work that affects patients’ everyday lives that has the most impact. Research from Virginia Commonwealth University exploring possible connections between genes and cigarette addiction, and a Washington State University analysis of caffeine absorption in individuals also demonstrates how Healthy Starts Here. Researchers at the VCU School of Pharmacy have identified specific sets of genetic variants that are significantly associated with cigarette addiction. Pinpointing these genetic variants could eventually assist in identifying the biological mechanism behind nicotine addiction and in generating novel drug therapy targets to help people break their addiction to nicotine. The study, “Deep Sequencing of Three Loci Implicated in Large-Scale Genome-Wide Association Study Smoking Meta-Analyses,” was published in 2015 in the Oxford University Press journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research. “We dug deeper into genes known to be associated with smoking,” said Dr. Shaunna L. Clark Verhulst, Assistant Professor, Center for Biomarker Research and Precision Medicine, VCU School of Pharmacy. Previous large-scale, genomewide association studies have identified three genes that are related to cigarette addiction, but the VCU-led study is the first to identify specific sets of genetic variants that might be responsible. Researchers at the CBRPM sequenced the three genes and their adjacent regions to get a complete catalog of all the genetic variation that could be contributing to addiction. Sequencing the entire gene allowed Clark and her colleagues to examine variants that other studies had not addressed, such as rare variants not commonly found in the population and regulatory variants that can increase or decrease gene expression.

For many of us, having a cup of coffee—or two—is a regular part of the day. But for those people who prefer energy drinks to coffee, are they absorbing caffeine at a quicker rate than they would with a regular cup of joe? Research from WSU College of Pharmacy says no. “Concerns have been expressed that energy drinks consumed rapidly provide a dangerous jolt of caffeine,” said Dr. John R. White Jr, professor and department chair of the Pharmacotherapy Department, who was the principal investigator on the study. The research team included health sciences faculty from the WSU Colleges of Pharmacy, Medicine and Nursing. They wanted to see if there was statistical significance in caffeine absorption rates between the two beverage options. The team compared coffee to energy drink, hot to cold, and rapid to slow consumption rates. Essentially, they wanted to see if you would get a higher, more rapid peak caffeine level if you slammed your coffee cold, as opposed to slowly sipping your coffee hot. They also compared coffee to energy drinks to address the concern that, ounce for ounce, rapidly consumed energy drinks provide a greater “jolt” of caffeine concentration in the body. The verdict? According to their findings published in the journal Clinical Toxicology in April, “caffeine exposure was very similar between the five conditions studied,” and “would not be expected to result in clinically significant differences in effect.” Energy drinks often get a bad rap but thanks to White’s research, patients can make smart choices about their caffeinated beverages.

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Immunizing Against Stress continued from page 16 More than 270 city workers from the Department of Public Health, SFMTA, Human Resources, Health Service System, the Arts Commission and the San Francisco Public Libraries participated. Of that group, 79 percent said they found the training useful, with 86 percent recommending it to a friend and 83 percent reporting that they were likely to make a change as a result of the class.

Share Your Story How are pharmacists helping people live healthier, better lives? How have you helped a patient? Share your story on Twitter and Facebook by using the hashtag #HealthyStartsHere.

Training to Teach the Public After several years of successfully training city employees in reducing their own stress, Vogt and Kahn are now turning to training city workers how to teach such workshops. As part of the San Francisco Public Library’s ongoing training program to keep staff current with technology and skill updates, Reichert and Ann Dorman, manager of the Parkside Branch Library, will work with UCSF’s Vogt and Kahn to develop a resiliency training model for library use. Once tested, the librarians will be able offer these programs to one another across all 28 San Francisco libraries and to the general public. “After taking the training twice, I am convinced this training is a powerful tool for the library,” Reichert said. P

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Shining the Light on #PharmEd16 From cutting-edge technology to dynamic speakers and engaging programming, the 2016 AACP Annual Meeting put a spotlight on the innovation and collaboration driving pharmacy education and practice forward. By Kyle R. Bagin Southern California’s brilliant sunshine coupled with the electric atmosphere within the conference provided the perfect backdrop for Pharmacy Education 2016. Faculty, staff and administrators from around the country came together in Anaheim to discuss the challenges, and solutions, facing pharmacy education and practice. #PharmEd16 was also a year of firsts: it was the first Annual Meeting to offer continuing education credits directly to attendees, the TechXPO debuted a new opportunity for attendees to get up-closeand-personal with a company’s products and services, and individuals were able to give back to the local Anaheim community through a partnership with Chef Bruno and Caterina’s Club.

A Bright New Mindset Opening General Session keynoter Robert B. Tucker, president of The Innovation Resource, gave attendees a lesson in

AACP President Cynthia J. Boyle addresses the Sunday audience. “Pharmacy schools and colleges are stronger together through this Association. We need each other as we re-imagine, re-invent, and re-ignite pharmacy education to improve health for all.”

leading their institutions out of the darkness with “I-Skills,” powerful tools and strategies to bring innovation to their work. Shining a flashlight into the crowd he said, “Embrace the opportunity mindset. Our mindset going into a challenge is the most important thing we have.” At the Science Symposium, Dr. Laurence Hurley led a panel discussion helping connect research from the bench to the bedside, taking the audience through a journey of their experiences in translating today’s discoveries into tomorrow’s cures. Inspiration and education came together in full force at the Tuesday General Session. Speaker Drew Dudley challenged the audience with a thought-provoking presentation. “Why do you matter?” he asked. “We have to plan to matter.” Diving deep into themes of identity, appreciation and passion, Dudley inspired attendees to think more critically about their personal and professional choices.

Robert B. Tucker shows attendees the way toward developing their “I-Skills” at the Opening General Session.

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Academic Pharmacy NOW  2016 Issue 4

Want to re-live the learning? Or download your favorite experience from the meeting? Visit the hi-res Pharmacy Education 2016 gallery here: http://ow.ly/QX4s305weFn


@AACPharmacy

Plugged In: Annual Meeting attendees had the chance to connect through dynamic roundtable discussion, meet and discuss topics via the Web Event App, or bring the conversation to the public through social media.

Social Snapshots

@bridgesa Jul 25

Overheard at #pharmed16: “I don’t think many people yet understand how significant the shift in standards 16 is.”

Looking Forward

#PharmEd16 created a sense of community beyond face-to-face networking. Attendees used Twitter, Facebook and @OSUPharmacy Jul 25 Instagram to share thoughts, opinions, “We do active learning with students... need to do that with faculty and staff” questions and best practices on-theWilliam Moore Student Services SIG spot. Relive some of the social media #pharmed16 enthusiasm from the meeting by check@uga2uk Jul 25 ing out these tweets:

Catch the creative spirit in Music City at Pharmacy Education 2017! Explore new ways to promote the profession, learn from leaders in healthcare, and strengthen the pipeline for a diverse and qualified applicant pool, July 15–19, at the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center in Nashville.

@backpackinglib Jul 24

Innovation Exposition

If rate of change outside your school is faster than inside your school, disruption is imminent #roberttucker #pharmed16

@Pharmacy_Times Jul 24

Tucker: “Embrace the opportunity mindset. Our mindset going into a challenge is the most important thing we have.” #pharmed16

@DrJeffCain Jul 24

A culture of #innovation doesn’t happen unless risk-taking and new [ideas] are incentivized. #PharmEd16

@AACPharmacy Jul 24

“What can we accomplish together as an association that we can’t independently?” Dr. DiPiro (@VCU) asks #PharmEd16.

Jacobson’s start-up tips for faculty business guidance, career trajectory, COI transparency, understanding time commitment. #pharmed16

@DrACR24 Jul 26

It’s easier to stand up for an ideal than to live up to it. @DayOneDrew #pharmed16

@hanksoru Jul 26

We celebrate random acts of kindness. Let’s try celebrating conscious acts of kindness. <3 #PharmEd16 #intentionalityisimportant #leadership

@jamsballard Jul 26

Growth doesn’t happen in large steps, but it’s through “annoying” small steps. #leadership #pharmed16

@jeffreyekoma Jul 24

No one buys products, people buy solutions... #pharmed16 #TechExpo

Interested in exhibit and sponsorship opportunities for the 2017 Annual Meeting in Nashville? Contact Jeff Rhodes, vice president of advertising, sponsorship information and sales, Network Media Partners, at jrhodes@ networkmediapartners.com. P Kyle R. Bagin is Digital Media Manager at AACP.

@alexaljets Jul 24

Students don’t email each other. Educators need to engage on platforms students are using. Lessons from Tech in Pharm Ed SIG. #pharmed16

The latest technology and cutting-edge information came together in the Exhibition Hall and during Research/Education Poster Sessions spanning two days. Attendees browsed innovative tools to advance their work, while networking with peers about their posters.

Pasta With a Purpose “How many people love pasta?” Hundreds of hands went up as Chef Bruno Serato addressed the Tuesday General Session audience. Annual Meeting attendees generously donated dried pasta, sauce and more than $2,000 to Serato’s Caterina’s Club charity, which feeds over 1,800 low-income children nutritionally balanced meals every day. To learn more, visit http://caterinasclub.org/.

Academic Pharmacy NOW  2016 Issue 4

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@AACPharmacy

Vote in the AACP Elections The 2016 AACP Election Guide is now online. View the full slate of candidates, learn about their professional background, and read statements by the president-elect nominees. Take a moment to review your member profile and confirm membership to Councils and Sections to ensure your ballot will be accurate.

Eligible voters have been sent an e-mail to access the virtual polling place through their AACP username and password. The election closes on Nov. 11. Visit http://www. aacp.org/governance/elections to learn more.

Maximize Your AACP Membership in 2017 Renew your membership and utilize all of the professional development opportunities AACP has to offer: • Collaborate with peers through AACP Connect, a new online community exclusively for members • Stay informed via AJPE, Academic Pharmacy Now and enhanced E-Lert Newsletters • Take advantage of targeted Webinar programming • Apply for start-up funding through the New Investigator Award • Join more than 2,000 of your colleagues attending the Annual Meeting • And much more at www.aacp.org

Watch your Inbox for more information about renewing your membership soon.

Help AACP Recognize Outstanding Educators and Innovators Submit nominations online by 11:59 p.m. PT on Wednesday, Dec. 7. Criteria and nomination information can be found on the AACP Web site: http://www.aacp.org/career/awards •

• •

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Robert K. Chalmers Distinguished Pharmacy Educator Award: Recognizing outstanding achievements as an educator and mentor. Paul R. Dawson Award: Recognizing research related to health services delivery affecting patient outcomes. Volwiler Research Achievement Award: Recognizing an individual’s record of sustained excellence in scientific research. NEW THIS YEAR: Lifetime Achievement Award recognizes individuals who have significantly contributed to AACP and pharmacy education through instruction, leadership/ service and research/scholarship for 25 years or more.

Academic Pharmacy NOW  2016 Issue 4

Robert K. Chalmers Distinguished Pharmacy Educator Award

Paul R. Dawson Award

John E. Murphy, Pharm.D.

Associate Dean Professor of Academic Affairs and Assessment The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy

Volwiler Research Achievement Award

Marie A. Chisholm-Burns, Pharm.D., M.P.H., MBA

“I am truly “Receiving the honored Chalmers Award and humbled is an honor of to receive the a lifetime. Many 2015 Dawson Dr. Murphy joined The University of Arizona College of of the individuals Award, and I Pharmacy as professor and head of the Department of recognized with this want to sincerely Pharmacy Practice and Science in 1991, held the position of award, as well as thank and assistant dean for professional affairs fromAACP 2003 to 2005, the person for which the selection comand gained his current title of associate dean for academic it is named, have mittee rec- of affairs and assessment in 2005. He isfor thethis recipient helped shape the face several professional and teachingognition. awards over the years, Those who of pharmacy education. I including the Award for Sustained Contributions the know me knowtoI am Literature of Pharmacy Practice committed from the ASHP am pleased to be counted toResearch the pharand Education Foundation in 2003, the Education among that group.” macy profession, eduAward from the American College of Clinical —John E. Murphy cation and to improving

Dean Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences The University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy

K.H. Lee, Ph.D.

Kenan Distinguished Professor of Medicinal Chemistry Director of Natural Products Research Laboratories University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy

“I am deeply honored to be selected as

Dr. Chisholm-Burns is nationally and internationally-known for the recipient ofpatient her work in improving healthcare delivery systems and the 2015 outcomes. She created the Medication AccessVolwiler Program, or Awardto from MAP, which strives to increase access medications for solid-organ transplant patients through various AACP. It is means really such a as enrollment in Medicaid, Medicare, insurance, Pharmacy in 2012, and the Harvey A.K. Whitney joy to private be engaged healthcare forin all. I know foundations, and pharmaceutical assistance Award from ASHP 2014. in companies’ this very exciting almost everyone here is programs. As a result of her efforts, she has attracted and rewarding field approximately $10 million in research support as committed to these causes as of research, as every principal investigator from state sources, industry, well, and I share this award day, we have a chance foundations, and the National Institutes of Health. with you.”

In his 45-year career at the Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Dr. Lee has written more than 823 research articles, been issued more than 110 patents, and has been invited to deliver more than 400 lectures and presentations. His research labs combine the fields of natural products and synthetic medicinal chemistry research to discover and develop bioactive natural products as clinical trial drug candidates. The lab has discovered several thousand bioactive natural products that have been used to develop pharmaceutical agents, such as the anti-HIV drug Bevirimat, derived from a Chinese herb.

to follow the past and discover something new.” —K.H. Lee

—Marie A. Chisholm-Burns

Sponsored by:


@AACPharmacy

Click and Recruit AACP’s Upgraded Online Career Center Take advantage of the best recruitment tool in the academic pharmacy community: the AACP Online Career Center. AACP’s upgraded platform features a dedicated customer service line and user-friendly interface, in addition to affordable access to a large pool of Academy-focused candidates. Just go to http://pharm.aacp.associationcareernetwork.com/Common/HomePage.aspx and click “Post a Job” to get started.

Announcing a New Direction for AACP’s INterim Meeting February 25–28 Wyndham Grand Rio Mar Beach Resort & Spa Rio Grande, Puerto Rico

We’re doing more than changing the name of this important meeting: We’re changing the direction, to focus on leadership strategies for a wider audience. Every year we’ll bring important discussions and practical recommendations to enhance leadership development at every level of the Academy. INfluence 2017 represents the best of leadership development. Sessions will provide innovative approaches for current and emerging leaders, and will present tactics for success and opportunities for feedback and participation.

We aim to Inspire, Innovate and Invigorate. Join us for INfluence 2017: The AACP INterim Meeting. Registration opens soon.

Academic Pharmacy NOW  2016 Issue 4

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Academic Pharmacy Now: 2016 Issue 4  

Immunizing Against Stress: Pharmacists are doing more to keep patients healthy, in ways that might surprise you.

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