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The News Magazine of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

Academic Pharmacy NOW

Apr | May | Jun 2009

Volume 2 Issue 2

Academic PHarmacy

GOES GREEN American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Discover 路 Learn 路 Care : Improve Health


table of contents

News in Brief 5

Features Awards Section

News Briefs

10

In Memoriam

23: Rufus A. Lyman Award 24: Robert K. Chalmers Distinguished

11

Capitol Hill News

24: 24: 25:

18

Funding Levels Increase at Member Institutions

Will

on the

22

Diary of a PharmCAS Super-User

23

2009 Annual Meeting Preview

Hill

Faculty News

43

Members Working for You

54 2

30: 31:

GOING GREEN

Leading the REVOLUTION

36

2009 Annual Meeting

Faculty News 41

26: 28:

Pharmacy Educator Award Paul R. Dawson Biotechnology Award Volwiler Research Achievement Award Inaugural Award for Excellence in Assessment APhA Awards for AACP 2009 AACP/Walmart Scholarship Recipients Innovations in Teaching Crystal APPLE Award

• • • • •

Academic Pharmacy Is Going Green

Butler University Mercer University Loma Linda University University of Colorado Denver The University of Louisiana at Monroe

Photo Credits Cau Mem tion: ber Wor s at k

The Last Word

academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

Cover: istockphoto.com Page 7: Oregon State University College of Pharmacy

Page 16: University of Southern California School of Pharmacy Pages 20–21: AACP

Page 8: Drake University College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences

Page 36: istockphoto.com

Page 10: Rick J. Carlson: www.nextthingsfirst.com; Dr. Thomas Lloyd Chesnut: Nova Southeastern College of Pharmacy; Tom Kalhorn: University of Washington School of Pharmacy

Pages 40–41: Loma Linda University School of Pharmacy

Page 12: Joseph V. Labolito/Temple University Page 15: Rosalie Sagraves

Pages 38–39: Butler University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Page 41: University of Colorado Denver School of Pharmacy Page 45: University of Florida College of Pharmacy


letter from the editor

Dear Colleagues: We all know that the simple admonition of “just do the right thing” is more easily said than done. If things were that easy then pharmacists would have been receiving compensation for patient care services for decades! This issue of Academic Pharmacy Now profiles the work of individuals and groups who are “doing the right thing” in a variety of contexts. Community engaged service delivery, innovation in teaching and educational assessment, and break through research that will touch the lives of cancer patients are all examples of people doing good by doing right. AACP commends this work and encourages each of you to let us know about other stellar examples of the Academy’s engagement in service to others. Our cover story captures the timely and important practices of several of our schools in the green movement. Few doubt that paying attention to the carbon footprint of our personal and organizational activities is essential to the sustainability of our global ecosystem. Deliberately designing or retrofitting our physical plants and campuses to minimize the environmental impact of our schools’ operations is truly a challenge. Hats off to those who have tackled this issue head on. It is timely to note that the new headquarters of the American Pharmacists Association on Constitution Avenue in Washington is a LEED certified property, signifying the association’s commitment to “go green.” Congratulations to APhA on this commitment and on the new home for pharmacy on the National Mall. “Doing the right thing” is an interesting theme for this time in Washington, DC as those who attended the AACP Interim Meeting in February learned first-hand. “Yes We Can” is the theme that propelled the Obama administration into power. So many forces aligned against him in his first 100 days—the disintegrating global economy, two wars, appointees with tax histories that became front page, all show stopping stories. Yet we saw passage of a landmark economic recovery package that included substantial funding for health research, as well as reversal of policies on stem cell research, interrogation practices and other legacies of the Bush administration. “Just doing the right thing.” Now we turn to healthcare reform. Over the last 100 days many of the key stakeholders in the effort to reshape 17 percent of the U.S. economy have espoused a commitment “to just do the right thing.” We must find coverage for the uninsured. We must address prevention and problems of quality and safety in the current system. As the good intentions begin to translate into legislation later this year it will be interesting to see how long special interests are laid aside in order to implement some of the tough provisions needed to right the problems in our healthcare delivery system, including the failure to fully liberate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the nation’s pharmacists, our graduates. AACP will use your examples of “doing the right thing” in our efforts to position pharmacists as part of the solution to better healthcare design and delivery. Sincerely,

Lucinda L. Maine, Ph.D., R.Ph. Executive Vice President and CEO

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about us

Academic Pharmacy NOW

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Established in 1972 as AACP News, Academic Pharmacy Now features comprehensive news stories that reflect the discovery, learning and caring of more than 100 U.S. colleges and schools of pharmacy. It is the only magazine focused strictly on the advancements of pharmacy faculty and their students. The magazine is distributed to all U.S. pharmacy institutions as well as more than 3,200 individual AACP members across the country. Published quarterly as a membership service by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Inc. For address change, please return mailing label with current school affiliation.

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©2009 by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. All rights reserved. Content may not be reprinted without prior written permission. We welcome your comments.

Executive Vice President/Executive Editor

Digital Requirements

Lucinda L. Maine

Academic Pharmacy Now supports a digital workflow and requires digital ad submission. Ads must be submitted as press-ready pdf files or tiff files. Fonts and images must be embedded. All images must be saved as at least 300 DPI @ 100% of finished size. Ads may be submitted as grayscale or 4-color CMYK. Full-page ads run 8.5� by 11� with a full bleed; half-page ads run 5.5� by 8.5� with a two-sided bleed. For any questions on ad requirements, e-mail Tricia Ekenstam, art director, at tekenstam@ aacp.org. To submit advertisements, simply e-mail ads directly to Rebecca Morgan, senior editor, at rmorgan@aacp.org or Maureen O’Hara, managing editor at mohara@aacp.org.

Senior Editor

Rebecca M. Morgan rmorgan@aacp.org Managing Editor

Maureen O’Hara mohara@aacp.org Art Director

Tricia Ekenstam

Issuance & Closing Dates Frequency: 4 issues a year

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 1727 King Street Alexandria, VA 22314 703-739-2330• Fax: 703-836-8982

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American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Discover · Learn · Care : Improve Health

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Issue Closing Date

Jan/Feb/Mar

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Jul/Aug/Sep

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June 15, 2009 September 15, 2009


news in brief

News Briefs New Mexico Senator Visits College of Pharmacy to Discuss Environmental Health On Dec. 17, then-Senator-elect Tom Udall met with The University of New Mexico College of Pharmacy and other Health Sciences Center (HSC) faculty to discuss the HSC’s commitment to environmental public health in New Mexico. Also in attendance was Dr. Samuel H. Wilson, acting director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Toxicology Program of the National Institutes of Health, as well as Dr. Allen Dearry, NIEHS associate director for Environmental Public Health. Wilson and Dearry briefed Sen. Udall on the NIEHS mission and explained their ongoing partnership with the HSC. Faculty from the College of Pharmacy and the School of Medicine informed the senator-elect on current research projects and key issues New Mexicans are facing in regards to environmental health, such as air quality in communities and its effect on asthmatic children.

Howard Pharmacy Students Provide Free Diabetes Screening in Mobile Clinic An estimated 23.6 million children and adults are living with diabetes in the United States and approximately 5.7 million are undiagnosed. In response to these statistics, the Howard University Hospital Diabetes Treatment Center (HUH DTC) acquired a mobile van unit last summer to provide free diabetes screening for local Washington, DC residents. The screenings are available through funding from the District of Columbia Department of Health for underserved residents in five of the city’s eight wards. Students from Howard University School of Pharmacy provide diabetes screenings, blood pressure screenings and body mass index screenings to the public. They also provide lifestyle modification counseling to the participants. The students find these experiences to be invaluable as they have a firsthand experience of how a health screening program may impact the lives of people in the community.

Two University of Iowa College of Pharmacy Divisions Become UI Pharmaceuticals To better facilitate The University of Iowa (UI) College of Pharmacy’s drug development and manufacturing capabilities, two of its service divisions—the Division of Pharmaceutical Service and

the Center for Advanced Drug Development (CADD)—have merged to form UI Pharmaceuticals (UIP). Dr. Mickey Wells, director of Pharmaceutical Service, leads UIP. Dr. Alta Botha, director of CADD, serves as scientific director of UIP. UIP has approximately 80 pharmaceutical professionals. Merging the two divisions formalizes what was already occurring on a practical level, said Dr. Donald Letendre, dean of the college, “Both divisions have worked closely with each other for years, so bringing together these two units will only enhance collaboration and lead to greater opportunities in drug discovery and development.”

NACDS Foundation Recognizes Future Leaders of Pharmacy The National Association of Chain Drug Stores (NACDS) Foundation announced that it will award $172,000 in pharmacy student scholarships, including two named scholarships: the Robert J. Bolger Scholarship and the Taro Research Foundation Scholarship. Due to a remarkable growth in benefactor contributions, 85 scholarships were awarded in 2008. In 2007, 60 pharmacy scholarships were awarded, an increase from 40 in 2006. This year’s Robert J. Bolger Scholarship recipients are Rita Kasliwal of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, and Hui (Jamie) Yun of the Texas A&M Health Science Center Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy. This year’s Taro Research Foundation Scholarship recipients are Sarah Providence of the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy and Emily Lunz of the Duquesne University Mylan School of Pharmacy.

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy Creates Center for Drug Safety The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, through its Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR), is forming a Center for Drug Safety in an effort to improve public health by enhancing the safety of marketed medications. Dr. Ilene H. Zuckerman, chair of PHSR, has appointed Dr. Sheila Weiss Smith, professor of pharmaceutical health services research, as director of the new center. As a comprehensive School of Pharmacy, the University of Maryland has many faculty members working across the drug safety and risk management spectrum. The center will build upon their expertise and provide a framework for improved collaborations within the school and with other entities on campus.

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news in brief

The center’s core areas of research include pharmacoepidemiology and risk management in children and the elderly as they relate to the treatment of chronic diseases, medication misuse, and policy and regulatory issues. Through grants and private contracts, the center faculty will be developing and assessing new methods for population-based monitoring of drugs and biologicals and testing and disseminating new approaches to drug safety and risk management to inform policy and practice.

Boston Bans Tobacco Sales in Pharmacies On Feb. 9, Boston became the second city to ban the sale of cigarettes from pharmacies. New rules approved by the city’s public health commission also bans colleges from selling tobacco products on campus and forces smoking bars to shut their doors within a decade. CVS and Walgreens make up the largest number of pharmacies in the city and both chains have agreed to comply with the new rules.

UT Austin Pharmacy Faculty Member’s Research Published in Science Magazine Using cancer cells that were originally isolated from an anaplastic large cell lymphoma patient, two researchers, including a faculty member of The University of Texas at Austin’s College of Pharmacy, have identified a novel regulatory mechanism in inflammatory signaling of immune cells that may prove beneficial in treating cancer.

Their study was published in the Jan. 9 issue of Science magazine. Dr. Casey Wright, assistant professor of pharmacy, said researchers wanted to better understand how the membrane protein, CD30, contributes to lymphoma. CD30 is a cell surface receptor that communicates signals from the extracellular environment into the cell, resulting in a cellular response. It has been recognized since the early 1980s that CD30 is present in very high amounts in certain lymphomas and leukemias, much more than in normal cells. In the study, the researchers uncovered an unexpected partner protein that interacts with CD30. This protein, known as ARNT, is best characterized for its role in mediating the metabolism of environmental toxins and also for mounting the hypoxic response in cells exposed to low oxygen levels.

Faye Panasci and Family Give $1 Million to Support UB’s New Pharmacy Home The namesake of Fay’s Drugs, Faye Panasci, has given $1 million to the University at Buffalo (UB) School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, where her husband and father-in-law began their quest to build the highly successful chain of pharmacies that catered to their customers’ every need. Along with her son, David Panasci, and daughter, Beth Leventhal, Faye Panasci is continuing the family’s tradition of giving back to UB begun by Henry A. Panasci Jr. and his father, Henry A. Panasci Sr. They are contributing $1 million to fund the atrium of the new home for the pharmacy school, John Kapoor Hall on the UB South (Main Street) Campus. In honor of the family’s generosity, UB will name the atrium the Panasci Atrium.

Save the Date for the

AACP Curricular Change Summit! September 9–12, 2009

Scottsdale Resort & Conference Center

The Summit will address: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Future Graduates Pre-Professional Curriculum Addressing Competencies for the Future in the Professional Curriculum Roles of Innovation in Education Delivery, and Assessing Transformation and Change in the Professional Curriculum

Your college- or school-based teams involved in curriculum planning and development are encouraged to participate in this enriching event that will provide background for discussion and debate for planning, revision and continuous quality improvement for the professional curriculum.  Apr/May/June 2009 6 registration opens Online next month. Space is limited! academic Pharmacy now

The Curricular Change Summit will be in place of the AACP Institutes traditionally held in May/June of each year.

Scottsdale, Arizona


news in brief

Genetic Discovery at Oregon State Could Lead to Advances in Dental Treatment Researchers at the College of Pharmacy at Oregon State Uni- growth of new enamel. Some research groups are already havversity have identified the gene that ultimately controls the ing success growing the inner portions of teeth in laboratory production of tooth enamel, a significant advance that could animal experiments, but those teeth have no hard coatings – some day lead to the repair of damaged enamel, a new concept the scientists lacked the genetic material that makes enamel. in cavity prevention and restoration, or even the production of “A lot of work would still be needed to bring this to human apreplacement teeth. plications, but it should work,” Kioussi said. “It could be really The gene, called Ctip2, is a “transcription factor” that was al- cool—a whole new approach to dental health.” ready known to have several functions – in immune response and the development of skin and the nervous system. Scientists Now that they’ve made the initial discovery, the OSU team of researchers will continue their basic research and hope to see can now add tooth development to that list. its human applications in approximately four to six years. “It’s not unusual for a gene to have multiple functions, but before this we didn’t know what regulated the production of tooth enamel,” said Chrissa Kioussi, an assistant professor in the College of Pharmacy at Oregon State University and one of the collaborators on the study. “This is the first transcription factor ever found to control the formation and maturation of ameloblasts, which are the cells that secrete enamel.” The researchers used a laboratory mouse model in this study in which this gene has been “knocked out” and its protein is missing. Such mice lack basic biological systems and cannot live after birth, but allow scientists to study what is there and what’s missing. In this case, the mice had rudimentary teeth ready to erupt, but they lacked a proper enamel coating and never would have been functional. A normal mouse tooth on the left where ameloblast cells that produce enamel are glowing in red. On the right is a tooth with the Ctip2 gene deleted and little enamel has been able to form.

The findings were just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. With an understanding of its genetic underpinning, Kioussi said it may be possible to use tooth stem cells to stimulate the

AJPE Expands to Include More Submissions The American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (AJPE) will increase publication from six to eight issues in 2009 and from eight to 10 issues in 2010. This expansion is to meet the increased number of submissions from U.S. and international authors. “This will allow us to publish more quality research findings, instructional design ideas and insightful special articles in a timely manner,” said Dr. Joseph T. DiPiro, editor of AJPE. “As the numbers of pharmacy schools and faculty have increased, the overall scholarly activity of the Academy has greatly increased. Also, we are receiving many more international submissions.”

AJPE, which is the official journal of AACP, has experienced an unprecedented increase (approximately 50 percent) in the number of manuscripts submitted in recent years, and is consistently ranked by AACP members as one of the most valued resources provided by the Association. Its publication dates back more than 100 years. Senior Assistant Editor Karen Shipp and Associate Editors Gayle Brazeau, Jack Fincham and Claire Anderson, along with editorial board members, have all contributed to the Journal’s expansion.

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news in brief Drake Pharmacy Students Work to Reform Healthcare through State Legislation Two Drake University pharmacy students are working to change the face of healthcare in Iowa through an independent study internship with Drake alumnus and Iowa State Sen. Jack Hatch.

Faculty members who worked with Sen. Hatch to develop the program include Dr. Jane E. DeWitt, associate professor of social and administrative sciences in pharmacy and instructor for the independent study; Dr. Renae J. Chesnut, associate dean for academic and student affairs and associate professor of pharmacy practice; and Julie Smith, director of the Drake Law School’s Center for Legislative Practice.

Stephanie Swain and Andrew Roberts are working with Sen. Hatch on a comprehensive reform bill, Senate File 48, which will help to increase access to healthcare, most notably for every single child in Iowa. The bill also will alleviate shortages in the healthcare workforce and increase transparency in the “Pharmacists are extremely underused in today’s healthcare healthcare system. The two students are specifically working to system,” said Roberts who is in his second year of the Doctor help expand the role of pharmacists as healthcare providers. of Pharmacy program. “Being an advocate for the profession may be the most effective way to help pharmacists reach their For example, the legislation would enable pharmacists to be full potential.” reimbursed by insurance providers for conducting medication therapy reviews, including developing plans for resolving Swain and Roberts had the opportunity to present the bill at a patients’ medication-related problems and performing health subcommittee meeting in February. Two senators and approxiscreenings and lab tests within the pharmacist’s scope of prac- mately 100 lobbyists were in attendance to testify for or against tice. Pharmacists also would be reimbursed for monitoring and sections of the bill. Most recently, the bill has passed out of evaluating patients’ responses to medication therapies, includ- subcommittee and committee, and will be on the Senate floor ing assessing lab results for tests provided to pharmacists. for debate and a vote this month. From left: Iowa Pharmacy Association President Bill Baer, Andrew Roberts, Sen. Jack Hatch and Stephanie Swain gather at the Iowa Capitol in Des Moines.

“Stephanie and Drew have been invaluable. They researched specific sections of the bill and provided arguments that would expand healthcare to every Iowan,” said Sen. Hatch, who earned his bachelor’s and graduate degrees from Drake in 1972 and 1973, respectively. This internship became available for the first time last fall to students in Drake’s College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. “There is not a more exciting time to be involved in politics than right now,” said Swain, who is in her third year of the Doctor of Pharmacy program and is also pursuing a master’s degree in public administration.

Compounds Could Knock Out Cancer Tumors without Toxic Effects Dr. Aleem Gangjee, distinguished professor of medicinal chemistry at Duquesne University’s Mylan School of Pharmacy, and his team of collaborators continue to test a compound that appears not only to prevent cancer tumors from developing but to eliminate already-existing tumors. In 2008, tests of a new compound developed by Gangjee showed that it stifled the growth of cancer tumors, which were composed of KB tumor cells, in mice. An unexpected result also showed that the compound shrunk and eventually eliminated cancer tumors in another group of mice, which remained tumor-free for 60 days. “What we’re seeing here is a compound that can treat earlyand late-stage cancer,” Gangjee said. “There are many ramifications to that.” A finding that particularly excites the noted cancer researcher is that neither test group suffered toxic effects, showing that

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the compound fights cancer cells without harming other organs and tissues—even in animals already weakened by advancestage tumors. Treatments of late-stage cancer commonly involve drugs toxic not only to the involved organ, but to surrounding tissues. As many cancers grow, they become more difficult to thwart because their cells become more diversified. “Cancer cells are not the same; cells vary in a particular cancer and in a specific person, and sometimes diversify further as cancer progresses,” Gangjee said. This new compound, however, shows an ability to target even these diverse cancer cells. Further studies of the compound will examine ovarian cancer in mice. Collaborators in the research, which is funded through the National Institutes of Health, include the Karmanos Cancer Center and Wayne State University in Detroit.


news in brief UT Austin College of Pharmacy Graduate Student Recognized on NBC’s The Today Show for her Global HIV/AIDS Initiative Graduate student Milli Reddy represented the College of Pharmacy on the Feb. 13 edition of The Today Show when she discussed her proposal to improve quality of life to AIDS and HIV patients in South Africa. Reddy is one of three UT Austin pharmacy students who participated in the Clinton Global Initiative University Feb. 13–14 held at UT Austin. All of the approximate 1,000 attendees were expected to make a Commitment to Action—a comprehensive, formal plan of action to address a specific problem. Third-year pharmacy student Karla Cruz and second-year student Misbah Moten attended the conference armed with ideas to expand global awareness of antibiotics and the growing emergence of antibiotic resistant “super bugs.” The conference is a product of the William J. Clinton Foundation, established by former U.S. President Bill Clinton with the mission to “strengthen the capacity of people throughout the world to meet the challenges of global interdependence.” The foundation focuses on four critical areas: health security, economic empowerment, leadership development and citizen service, and racial, ethnic and religious reconciliation. All of the approximate 1,000 attendees were expected to make a Commitment to Action—a comprehensive formal plan of action to address a specific problem.

Cruz and Moten say they plan to utilize the college’s student organizations and their affiliations with similar student organizations across the nation to help educate the public more fully about antibiotics. “Where all of our student organizations have wonderful causes they foster, we see this as an opportunity to see the entire college community get behind this important issue,” Moten said. Reddy’s program involves providing support to patients in South Africa who live with HIV and AIDS and to the clinics that provide services to them. Currently several public healthcare clinics and hospitals are dispensing antiretroviral medication funded by the South African government. Her plan involves setting up an antiretroviral drug and research center at the Dream Center, a nonprofit HIV care facility situated in Kwa-Zula Natal, South Africa. “My intention is to collaborate with the South African Department of Health to create a central registry of patients,” she explained. “Such a registry could be used to conduct health outcomes research and adverse drug reaction surveillance.” Her long-term plan is to extend the services within the Dream Center to include psychological and emotional support, and to partner with the Retired Teachers Association in the area to offer educational assistance to patients whose schooling was affected by this disease.

U of M Study: Living Kidney Donors As Healthy As Non-Donors Risk for high blood pressure, kidney failure, other major health conditions are not increased by donating a kidney.

quality of life, the study found that 60 percent of donors have physical and mental health summary scores that are above the scores of the general population. This may be a direct consequence of the routine screening of donors for important health conditions at the time of donation.

It appears that kidney donors have survival rates similar to that of the general population – that is, their life span does not seem to be altered or negatively impacted after donation, according to new research out of the University of Minnesota. In “This study affects our profession because pharmacists know addition, donors’ risk for developing kidney failure, high blood their patients with diabetes—the leading cause of kidney disease pressure, diabetes and/or cancer is very similar to someone —and chronic kidney disease very well,” said Gross. “These patheir age, gender and ethnicity who is not a donor. tients often rely on their pharmacists for help understanding new medications and devices for self-monitoring. It is important for The study, published in the Jan. 29 edition of the New England pharmacists to know about transplantation and organ donation, Journal of Medicine and co-authored by University of Minneso- and to encourage patients with deteriorating kidney function to ta College of Pharmacy Professor Dr. Cynthia Gross, examined find out if these options are right for them and their families.” the long-term outcomes of nearly 3,700 people who donated a kidney at the University of Minnesota dating back to 1963. Gross continued, “The number of people waiting for an organ Out of that group, researchers randomly chose 255 men and transplant continues to out-pace the availability of donors. women for more detailed studies of kidney function and qual- While living donors have helped close the gap between need ity of life. and availability for some patients, donor awareness campaigns to promote organ donation after death should still be a priority The study shows that a donor’s life span does not seem to be and pharmacists can help spread the word.” altered because of their donation, and risk of kidney failure is actually lower than what is reported in the general U.S. popu- The study was funded with a grant by the National Institutes of lation. Moreover, using standardized tools for assessment of Health and a contribution from the Libin Fund.

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news in brief

In Memoriam

Rick J. Carlson

Dr. Thomas Lloyd Chesnut

Tom Kalhorn

Rick J. Carlson, an affiliate professor in the Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy Program (PORPP) at the University of Washington (UW) School of Pharmacy, died from a heart attack on Feb. 13.

Dr. Thomas Lloyd Chesnut, associate dean of research and graduate affairs at Nova Southeastern University School of Pharmacy, passed away on Jan. 7, 2009 at the age of 66. A native of Morton, Miss., Chesnut earned an M.S. and Ph.D. degree in biology from Mississippi State University. He held positions at the University of North Texas, The University of Montana, Ohio University, Louisiana State University – Shreveport, Georgia College and Central Florida University. His notable accomplishments include leading Ohio University from a Doctoral I classification to Carnegie Research II status and tripling The University of Montana’s research volume from $22M to $65M in only six years.

Tom Kalhorn, research scientist in the University of Washington (UW) Department of Medicinal Chemistry’s Mass Spectrometry Center, died unexpectedly on March 2, two days after suffering an epileptic seizure. Kalhorn received his Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry and political science from Grinnell College in Iowa and did some graduate work in chemistry at The University of Kansas.

Carlson went to St. Olaf College and received his JD at the University of Minnesota. In 1968, he joined the Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies as a research attorney where he drafted the legislation that initiated the HMO movement across the country. He served as the chairman of the California governor’s Council on Wellness and Physical Fitness and became the first director of the California Trends Project. Over the years, Carlson worked as a consultant to major institutions in the healthcare industry and also served in leadership roles at HealthMagic, a healthcare technology company headquartered in Denver, and Age Wave Health Services, located in California’s Bay Area. During his life, he published and coauthored several books, including The Dilemmas of Punishment and The End of Medicine, which was a seminal book in the health field. In 2001, Carlson became an affiliate professor at the UW School of Pharmacy. “Rick was a valued member of PORPP and contributed to many of our projects related to pharmacogenomics and diagnostics, as well as our annual conference on genetics, outcomes and economics,” said PORPP Director Dr. Sean Sullivan.

Chesnut also possessed extensive international expertise. He served as consultant to the National Research Council of Thailand for the establishment of a National Biocontrol Research Center; as director for the USAID-IPPC to organize and develop Thai expertise in biological control methods in Southeast Asia; and as project manager for the USAID Professional Enhancement Program – a program which provided 32 master’s and Ph.D. degrees to members of the Ministry of Education in Namibia, Africa. Survivors include his wife of 26 years, Rollene Chesnut of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.; daughter, Leslie Chesnut of Valley View, Texas; sons, Chris Chesnut of Denton, Texas and Clint Chesnut of Irving, Texas.

Portions of Rick Carlson’s memorial were taken from the Aspen Daily News.

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Kalhorn’s career with UW began in 1983. He worked in the Department of Pharmaceutics as a research technician and lecturer until 2003 when he accepted the position of research scientist in the Mass Spectrometry Center. Some of Kalhorn’s important contributions to the UW Departments of Pharmaceutics and Medicinal Chemistry pertained to the drug-interaction-program project grant, where he prepared critical metabolite standards for drugs of interest. He introduced a standalone course on quantitative analysis methodologies and was a frequent contributor to departmental cumulative exams. He was known throughout the school for his analytical expertise and intelligence. Kalhorn’s colleagues considered him a conscientious and capable teacher who gave selflessly of his time and expertise to benefit graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.


Capitol Hill News

by Will Lang and Maureen O’Hara

Willnewsonin brief the Hill

AACP Members Witness Policy in Action For many AACP members, the Interim Meeting means meeting with members of Congress and their staff. This essential grassroots tradition offers some the opportunity to establish a relationship with the office, and for others the opportunity to strengthen or renew an existing relationship. Whether you are a new or seasoned participant, creating and maintaining this relationship is important to you as an individual, your institution, AACP and your profession. This past February, AACP arranged nearly 150 individual meetings for AACP members to meet with their congressional delegation. The purpose was to ensure that members of Congress and their staff were aware of the integral role pharmacy faculty and pharmacy students play in healthcare delivery. The broad issues being discussed in connection with healthcare reform—quality, payment and prevention—each benefit from the teaching, research and service roles of pharmacy faculty as well as the service activities of our students. Each year, in describing the importance of Hill visits and maintaining congressional member and staff relationships, AACP staff utilize proven, yet often generic, approaches to the “Hill visit.” The generic approach is important in building confidence among some attendees that seem more anxious about this 20 minute meeting than they do about regularly teaching a class of 100 students. The fact that thousands of U.S. citizens engage in this quintessential Washington, D.C. approach to policy influence can create confidence in even the most anxious attendee. An area in which we want to improve is letting attendees know that their visits can, and do, engender real opportunity for academic pharmacy. During the 2009 Interim Meeting, Denise A. Soltis, director of experiential programs at Drake University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, found herself in the middle of the healthcare reform debate as a special guest of Senator Charles Grassley, R-IA, ranking member of the Senate Finance Committee. Soltis attended a hearing of the Senate Finance Committee on Feb. 25, 2009 during which the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) presented a report titled “Scoring Health Care Reform: CBO’s Budget Options.” She shared with Academic Pharmacy Now what she took away from the committee hearing and what important messages she made sure to deliver.

What aspects of healthcare reform were discussed at the hearing? Director of the CBO Dr. Douglas Elmendorf addressed many different options for reforming healthcare, such as creating “medical homes” and bundling services for patients, but none of these options included pharmacy. Physicians and hospitals were mentioned frequently, but never any other healthcare providers. I approached Dr. Elmendorf after the hearing and informed him that he hadn’t included pharmacy in the healthcare reform discussion. I also told him that his two examples of efficient health systems, Kaiser Permanente in Colorado and the Mayo Clinic,

both utilize pharmacists for clinical services at a much higher rate than other systems. He admitted he didn’t know anything about this.

What was your key message to the director and his staff? Pharmacy is an integral part of the healthcare system. Caring for patients, making medication suggestions, evaluating medication adherence are all things a pharmacist does all day. We are oftentimes left out of the national discussion on healthcare reform and we shouldn’t be. We need to utilize pharmacists even more than we do now.

With whom else did you meet? After the hearing we met with Andrew McKechnie, health policy advisor to the Senate Finance Committee, and discussed the research being conducted at our institutions. He was particularly interested in learning more about how we obtain funding and from what sources. I told him that at Drake we are constantly looking for funding from all types of sources, including NIH.

Why should members of the Academy be involved in policy and advocacy? These are essential opportunities for members of the profession to speak up about the integral role pharmacy plays in a patient’s healthcare delivery. And with President Obama’s goal to update and improve healthcare, changes will have to be made that involve us tremendously. You might be saying to yourself, Denise talked with two individuals, how great of an impact could this possibly have on healthcare reform? As explained at the 2009 Interim Meeting, AACP works in collaboration with a host of other healthcare and education organizations to further our separate and collective strategic goals. One such coalition is the Leadership for Medication Management (LMM). The LMM recently met with staff from the CBO to discuss how they determine the cost of congressional legislative proposals. Because AACP had a new contact on the CBO staff, thanks to Denise’s discussion at the hearing, we were able to gain a better understanding of how to approach the meeting between LMM and CBO staff. Denise’s conversation with Dr. Elmendorf and subsequently his staff person helped establish an improved preliminary understanding of how CBO approaches their actuarial work which made the ensuing meeting a success. Pharmacy educators and their students can be an invaluable resource to their congressional delegation and the staff that supports them. To learn more about becoming involved in AACP’s policy and advocacy efforts or to obtain suggested topics of discussion with congressional members, visit http://www.aacp.org/ issuesandadvocacy.

academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

11


news in brief

Clearing the Fog Temple University researcher gets $1.5 million grant to examine side effect of chemotherapy Many of the side effects from chemotherapy are well documented: fatigue, nausea and hair and weight loss. But there is another one that has split the medical community about whether it even exists. It’s called chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits or “chemo fog” and pharmacologist Dr. Ellen A. Walker hopes her research not only proves its real, but finds the cause. Walker, associate professor of pharmacodynamics at the Temple University School of Pharmacy, received a $1.5 million National Institutes of Health grant at the beginning of this year to study the possible effects of drugs used during chemotherapy on cognitive impairment. It is a big grant, with perhaps even bigger implications for how researchers and patients deal with chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits, which chemotherapy patients liken to being in a fog, as if they’re brain isn’t working right. Misplaced items, inability to multi-task, short-term memory loss are hallmarks of the condition. And while there is clinical evidence to support its existence, research studies on the topic are scant. “My colleague Dr. Robert Raffa and I were stunned at the lack of published literature, considering cancer patients have been getting chemotherapy for nearly 50 years,” said Dr. Walker. “Most studies have looked at how well chemotherapeutic agents kill the tumor, not if they cause a cognitive deficiency, like memory loss.” Walker and Raffa decided to fill that void. Two years ago, Walker and Pharm.D. student John Foley, set out to see if cerThe chemo fog research team: (From left) Ronald Tallarida, performs analysis of drug combination data and synergy effects; Swati Nagar, pharmacokinetics expert who translates human drug regimens to mice doses; Ellen A. Walker, principal investigator, psychologist and pharmacologist who designs and carries out the experiments; Rachel Clark-Vetri, oncology pharmacist who chooses which drugs to use; and Bob Raffa, pharmacologist who acts as the interface between the clinical and preclinical literature and will help analyze results and synergy effects.

12

academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

tain chemotherapeutic agents caused memory and learning deficits in mice. They tested two older drugs commonly used to treat breast cancer, a cancer with recently higher survival rates whose survivors have dominated the limited clinical research on chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits. They suspected the drugs, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil, weren’t toxic alone, but when given together, could cause deficits. Six months into their research, their hunch proved right. “Alone, methotrexate didn’t cause learning or recall deficits in mice when given once. Mice given 5-flurouracil once showed some deficits in recall, but when we gave the mice both drugs, it had a synergistically worse effect on their ability to learn and remember.” In other words, the mice forgot what they learned a day after being given the chemotherapeutic agents. And as Walker expanded their research, giving the drugs once a week for three weeks, they saw even more deficits than just giving it acutely. Armed with their results, this one-time side project became a priority. What followed were months of research and the involvement of more colleagues to help define better dose combinations and regimens. But there was also the ping-pong of NIH reviews and revisions to endure and Walker and her research team had run out of money. In March 2008, a $50,000 bridge grant through the Office of Research and Strategic Initiatives allowed her research to continue. Eight months later, the NIH sent word that they were not only


news in brief

funding Walker’s research with a five year, $1.5 million grant, but she received a priority percentile ranking of 0.8, placing it at or very near the top of all peer applications. “I had to look at the score twice because I couldn’t believe it,� she said. It wasn’t just Walker who was impressed by the score. “I was delighted to learn about the grant and its truly outstanding ranking,� said Dr. Larry F. Lemanski, senior vice president for research and strategic initiatives at Temple. “This major grant from the National Institutes of Health will allow Walker to significantly expand her research programs. At the same time, the award will increase Temple’s reputation as a major player in this very important field of biomedical research.� Indeed the funding will allow Walker to triple her efforts. She can put someone full-time on the project and study four more chemotherapeutic agents. Down the road, she would like to fig-

ure out how to protect the brain before chemotherapy to prevent chemo fog. For now, there is still controversy surrounding “chemo fog,� as clinicians and scientists debate if the disease itself or the drugs to fight cancer cause it. Other culprits could include genetics, hormone inhibitors, anemia and early-onset menopause. Instead of a natural onset, chemotherapy often catapults women into menopause, potentially leaving them fuzzy-minded. And there are those who doubt “chemo� fog is real, Walker believes it is. She recalls how during her mother’s battle with breast cancer, she put a chicken still covered in plastic wrapping in the oven for dinner. “It seemed like she wasn’t always thinking clearly even after her chemotherapy was over. I always wondered was it the psychological stress of cancer, the chemotherapy, or some other side effect of the many medications she received.� Dr. Ellen A. Walker may well be on her way to finding the answer.

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news in brief

VA Residency Program Grows as Veterans Return Home As the largest provider of pharmacy direct patient care in the country, the Department of Veteran’s Affairs (VA) Veterans Health Administration faces unique staffing challenges unlike those of other healthcare providers.

his 33 years experience as a VA Residency Program Director. His expertise is vital in creating new residency programs, conducting site visits in preparation of accreditation surveys, supporting both residency directors and residents with his vast experience and working with ASHP to coordinate efforts to improve current programs.

Lori Golterman, Pharm.D., clinical pharmacy specialist and head of the national VA residency programs in the Pharmacy “Wherever there are programs for physiBenefits Management (PBM) Services, cians and psychiatrists, for example, we is working to ensure every veteran has a should also have programs for pharmacy pharmacist with whom to discuss their residents’ to support these interdisciplincare. Once synonymous with geriatrics, ary training programs,” Golterman says. the VA has recently seen a change in its There are many VA facilities that still do patient population—now younger and in- not have pharmacy residency programs cludes both men and women. VA will see more than 75,000 Veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with mental health related problems. Post traumatic Stress “If our goal is to teach Disorder (PTSD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) comprises a large majority of people how to take patients VA treats. The complicated medicare of patients, not cation regimens these patients require means that the VA’s recruitment needs take care of drugs, then have changed dramatically to include pharmacists trained in these specialties. this is the way to do it.” The VA Pharmacy Residency Program can help meet these needs. It is the largest program for advanced clinical pharmacy training in the country, offering more than 80 different ASHP-accredited programs across the VA healthcare system in a variety of practice areas such as infectious disease, ambulatory care and psychiatry. Golterman began to build staffing measures to place trained residents into these open positions and over the last six years, the program has grown from approximately 140 residents to more than 405. VA is seeing a great need to include pharmacists as an integral member of the healthcare team and this means that there are more opportunities for pharmacists in VA than ever before, say Golterman. William N. Jones, pharmacy program manager for Educational Development, Performance Improvement and Research, Southwest Consolidated Mail Outpatient Pharmacy, has supported the residency programs over the past three years with

14

and it is a goal to try to change that over the next few years,” she says. Throughout this growing phase, “we want to support and maintain the quality of the programs as best we can from the national perspective,” Jones added.

are available to them to reduce their educational debts (e.g. Education Debt Reduction Programs and Education Incentive Scholarship Programs) and also the benefits VA offers. Although we do try to keep our residents in VA, we know that if they leave VA, they will be excellent ambassadors for promoting VA to future residents.” Cutting-edge technology and research make the VA one of the most advanced healthcare systems in the world, but combating the stigma of an old, antiquated system is a huge issue with which they do battle. VA offers one of the most progressive pharmacy practice sites in the country and it gives residents the experience they need, which is critical for professional growth. Both Golterman and Jones believe the VA offers a uniquely rewarding experience for students who complete a residency, and stresses the personal and professional benefits that residents receive only at the VA. Pharmacy students completing rotations at the VA make up the largest recruitment pool for residency positions and Golterman says further communication with colleges and schools of pharmacy is crucial to enlisting future residents. Videos and letters are sent to all major associations and organizations, as well as to pharmacy institutions, to spread the word about the types of residencies the VA offers. The VA Web site highlights these residencies so students can learn more about the program and the facility where it is conducted. A significant presence at the American Society of HealthSystem Pharmacists (ASHP) Midyear Clinical Meeting also helps promote the residency program.

Monthly calls with program directors provide much needed support in preceptor development as well as calls with experts to help with the accreditation processes. We also have monthly calls with residents, says Golterman, which address a range of topics concerning resident development, such as interviewing, statistics, publish- “The VA is one of the few places you can ing, Board Certification process and pre- see real continuity with patients,” Jones sentations from leaders in the profession. says. “If our goal is to teach people how to take care of patients, not take care of “Our mission is to train pharmacists for drugs, then this is the way to do it.” the VA and the profession” says Golterman. “We try to recruit our own residents To learn more about the VA Residency into VA by explaining what VA programs Program, or to apply for a residency, visit www.pbm.va.gov.

academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009


news in brief

AACP Co-Sponsors VI Pan American Conference on Pharmaceutical Education The VI Pan American Conference on Pharmaceutical Education, Working Towards Quality in Pan-American Pharmaceutical Education: Accreditation, Integration and Prospects of the Profession, was held this past November in Montevideo, Uruguay as part of the meeting of the South American Pharmaceutical Federation (FEFAS). Conference sponsors included the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the South American Pharmaceutical Federation (FEFAS) and AACP. Conference participants came from more than 20 countries in Central, North and South America, as well as various Caribbean island nations. Topics were timely and included accreditation, Good Pharmacy Practice (GPP), methods for teaching pharmaceutical care and the rational use of medicines. In addition to lectures in various topic areas, roundtable discussions and workshops were held to provide participants opportunities to further explore these important topics. One workshop allowed representatives to discuss a draft accreditation framework for pharmaceutical education that would apply to all pharmacy schools in Latin America. Another workshop permitted representatives to develop consensus proposals for self-assessment and a basic curriculum. In addition, several workshops consisted of open discussions on various topics while students in attendance had an opportunity to interact and learn about pharmacy education and practice in Latin American countries. The Pan American Commission for Pharmaceutical Education held its business meeting during the conference. The commission is composed of one delegate from each country in the Americas that was in attendance. Delegates agreed that

the commission needed to be more active in working together, especially between Pan American Conferences. They therefore established new procedures by which the commission would be run and decided that Pan American Conferences would be held every other year rather than every three years. Brazil was nominated to host the next conference in 2010 with Cuba recognized as an alternate site. AACP members participating in the Pan American Conference included Dr. Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, department chairperson, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy; Mike Rouse, assistant executive director, international & professional affairs of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE); and Dr. Rosalie Sagraves, dean emerita and professor emerita, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy and consultant in global pharmacy education for AACP. Dr. Rodriguez de Bittner serves as a member of the Pan American Conference Steering Committee and gave presentations during the Conference in the areas of pharmaceutical care and curriculum. She represents AACP on the Pan American Commission for Pharmaceutical Education. Mike Rouse represented the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) Pharmacy Education Taskforce Advisory Group and is project leader for Quality Assurance. He presented a summary of the Taskforce’s work and future plans in global pharmacy education as well as sharing information concerning advancements in quality assurance. Dr. Sagraves presented an overview of global pharmacy education from AACP’s perspective and a summary of the work of AACP member colleges and schools in the international arena in education, practice and research.

Clockwise from top: A pharmacy along the Avenue 18 de Julio in Montevideo, Uruguay. Numerous panel discussions were held at the Radisson Victoria Plaza Hotel in Montevideo, the site of the VI Pan American Conference on Pharmaceutical Education. The Palacio Estévez, an 18th century building located in the Plaza Independencia, contains an extensive collection of presidential memorabilia.

academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

15


news in brief

USC Hosts Schools of Pharmacy and Safety-net Clinics Partnership Conference While politicos revved up the healthcare debate in Washington, pharmacy leaders from around the country met in Los Angeles to consider ways to improve healthcare for some of the nation’s most vulnerable residents and save scarce healthcare dollars. The University of Southern California (USC) School of Pharmacy hosted “Developing Partnerships between Schools of Pharmacy and Safety-Net Clinics” on Feb. 12 and 13 in Los Angeles. More than 90 people attended the conference, including representatives from 30 colleges and schools of pharmacy as well as from clinics, associations and government. The USC School of Pharmacy was the recipient of AACP’s inaugural Transformative Community Service Award for their work in transforming the provision of care in safety-net clinics in Los Angeles. The winning group identified a way to improve health outcomes for some of the neediest residents of Los Angeles in a cost effective way. The program was held in collaboration with the Department of Health and Human Services Health Resources & Services Administration’s (HRSA) Patient Safety & Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative. The goal of the conference was to show the success stories of schools currently running clinical pharmacy services in the healthcare safety net and to encourage colleagues to enter this practice setting at their own schools. Conference speakers showed how today’s extraordinary need for healthcare, especially for the uninsured and the homeless, offers an excellent opportunity for clinical pharmacists to practice at the highest level while meeting the needs of these patients. Pharmacists practicing in these settings not only provide medication therapy management for typically the hardestto-manage patients with chronic diseases but also overhaul the formulary in these settings to maximize access to a wide range of drugs and medical devices.

“The safety net provides the ‘low hanging fruit’ to today’s clinical pharmacist,” said Dennis Wagner, deputy director at the HRSA Center for Quality. “Here the need is so great that the potential for the pharmacist to make an enormous, transformative difference is extraordinary.” Wagner was one the many speakers at the program from HRSA who shared their experiences and worked to recruit new partners for the agency’s Patient Safety & Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative. The collaborative, currently with 68 teams of clinical pharmacists practicing in safety-net settings nationwide, is charged with adding new teams to expand pharmacy practices across the country. One HRSA team presented at the conference, illustrating how the partnership between a medical director and a clinical pharmacist can really make a clinic a better place for patients, staff and funders. Dr. Steven Chen, associate professor at the USC School of Pharmacy, and Dr. Paul Gregerson, chief medical officer at the JWCH Institute in Los Angeles, told the story of their partnership in the care of the underserved in a skid row clinic in Los Angeles. Gregerson is a physician and Chen is a clinical pharmacist. Gregerson laid out a step-by-step approach to engaging safetynet clinic medical directors and/or administrators in establishing clinical pharmacy services in their facilities. Gregerson explained the value of having clinical pharmacists and students practicing at the clinic, “It has resulted in better quality of care, improved efficiency, saved money, increased provider productivity and improved patient and provider satisfaction. With clinical pharmacists, the clinic is just a happier and better place.” Chen provided an overview of how to move the ball forward at schools where there is a will to do this but the way is still being paved. He shared practical experiences in dealing with LA clinics and showed how to overcome roadblocks as schools contemplate this practice site. According to Dr. R. Pete Vanderveen, dean of the USC School of Pharmacy and host of the conference, “The safety-net environment has been a win:win for USC. It allows us to fulfill our societal mission of reaching out to our community while providing an opportunity to practice pharmacy at a very high level. Further, this setting is an excellent training site for students and residents and a fertile scholarship platform for faculty.”

Presenters at USC’s Safety-net Conference included Dennis Wagner (HRSA), Steven W. Chen (USC and a HRSA Health and Safety Collaborative team member), Denise Geolot (HRSA), Paul Gregerson (JWCH Institute and a HRSA team member with USC) and Jimmy Mitchell (HRSA).

16

academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009


news in brief

The Community Pharmacy Foundation Wants YOU The Community Pharmacy Foundation (CPF) wants to make a difference in the world of patient care and community pharmacy practice, and is enlisting the help of several key players: colleges and schools of pharmacy.

healthcare providers. Focus grants range from approximately $50,000–$60,000 each and can be awarded to a school, department chair or faculty member who is involved in the design, concept creation and evaluation of the particular project. Focus grants are significant not only in their sizeable amount of funding but because those involved with the projects are creating new templates for innovative practice and patient care.

The group’s mission is to provide resources for research and development to encourage continuous improvements in community pharmacy and the delivery of patient care. Whether it’s through smaller grants awarded to individual community “The more we have consistent and coordinated evaluation methpharmacists or larger grants given to statewide or regional odology means that those results can be extrapolated,” said health plans, state pharmacy associations, or colleges and Louis Sesti, R.Ph., the foundation’s executive director. “Our schools of pharmacy, the foundation hopes to not only fund goal is to share these results with the profession through publiinnovative projects consistent with its cation, and as a result, the profession mission, but raise awareness and forge will learn how to proceed with the relationships with other pharmacy challenges associated with the goals.” stakeholders. Colleges and schools Partnering with colleges and schools of pharmacy can play a vital role in of pharmacy provides the foundadeveloping these relationships, leadtion with the opportunity to award ing to greater exposure of the work a matching grant in those instances of the foundation and the innovative where faculty have received funding practice-based projects it supports. from other public or private sourcAccording to its Web site, the Comes, thus significantly increasing the munity Pharmacy Foundation was esfunds with which the grantees can tablished in 2000 out of a settlement work. Awarding a matching grant on behalf of community pharmacies also promotes the work of the founacross the United States through class dation and forges key relationships action litigation against discriminabetween CPF, pharmacy schools and tory pricing issues. The foundation, other stakeholders. which became operational in 2002, “Expanding our endeavors with was originally governed by a court apAACP and its members will undoubtpointed Board of Directors consisting edly impact the world of healthcare of four community pharmacists and a policy,” Sesti explained. “The conretired judge of the United States Distacts, resources and creditability trict Court in Illinois. that a college or school of pharmacy From 2002–2008, the foundation has brings to the table is invaluable.” awarded funding to 80 grant proposals totaling more than $3.5 million. About one-third of those grants have gone to individual Faculty at colleges and schools of pharmacy can submit grant pharmacists who have initiated smaller-scale projects, such as applications year-round. After an application is submitted, educating elementary school students in New Orleans about ju- the foundation’s Board of Directors reviews it at their next venile diabetes or funding pharmacy residents’ projects in poster calendar-quarterly meeting. If approved, the Board requests sessions that discuss disease states like hypertension or diabetes. that a grant proposal be submitted and following that review process determines if funding is to be awarded. To learn more Given to larger-scale projects, the foundation’s focus grants about the foundation and how to submit a grant application, are part of an initiative to reach out to colleges and schools visit the CPF Web site at http://www.communitypharmacyof pharmacy to tackle the many challenges associated with foundation.org/. patient safety and medication use. They also seek to address the overall goals linked to medication therapy management –Maureen O’Hara services provided by pharmacists in collaboration with other

From 2002–2008, the foundation has awarded funding to 80 grant proposals totaling more than $3.5 million.

academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

17


Funding Levels Increase at

Schools see an increase of more Total Amount of Grants and Contracts Awarded per Full-time Equivalent (FTE) Ph.D.-level Faculty

Rank 1

Institution

Total NIH Award

Total # of FTE Ph.D.

Total Award per Ph.D. FTE

University of California,

$25,765,626

45

$572,569

San Francisco

2

University of California,

$7,436,647

14

$531,189

San Diego

3

The University of Kansas

4

The University of Utah

5

The University of Arizona

6

University of Nebraska

$17,660,489

40

$441,512

$18,432,622

58

$317,804

$8,118,097

26

$312,235

$5,047,810

18

$280,434

Medical Center

7

University of North Caro-

$16,186,510

59

$274,348

lina at Chapel Hill

8

Northeastern University

$5,136,388

19

$270,336

9

University of Colorado

$7,271,657

27

$269,321

10 11 12 13

Total NIH Award

Total # of FTE Ph.D.

Total Award per Ph.D. FTE

30

Wayne State University

$1,634,790

15

$108,986

31

Oregon State University

$2,103,519

21

$100,168

32

University of Maryland

$4,025,923

41

$98,193

33

Florida A & M University

$3,309,125

35

$94,546

34

University of Minnesota

$5,484,968

59

$92,966

35

The University of Iowa

$2,183,723

25

$87,349

36

West Virginia University

$1,201,845

14

$85,846

37

Texas Tech University

$1,896,706

27

$70,248

$759,851

12

$63,321

Health Sciences Center

38

North Dakota State University

39

The University of Tennessee

$1,191,057

20

$59,553

Denver

40

University of Houston

$1,627,261

28

$58,116

The University of Montana

41

Washington State Uni-

$1,270,684

22

$57,758

University of

$7,791,467 $7,409,002

30 29

$259,716 $255,483

versity

Washington

42

Duquesne University

$1,075,597

19

$56,610

University of Michigan

43

University of

$1,084,533

23

$47,154

University at Buffalo, The

$5,356,175

23

$232,877

$4,512,356

20

$225,618

$6,983,053

34

$205,384

State University of New York

14

Institution

Rank

University of Wisconsin– Madison

Connecticut

44

Temple University

$739,600

16

$46,225

45

Virginia Commonwealth

$1,480,634

35

$42,304

University

46

The University of Oklahoma

$940,178

23

$40,877

15

University of Florida

$6,401,646

34

$188,284

47

The University of Georgia

$977,713

29

$33,714

16

Rutgers University, The State

$7,906,071

43

$183,862

48

University of Wyoming

$266,785

8

$33,348

$4,741,712

26

$182,374

49

University of Cincinnati

$587,204

20

$29,360

50

University of the Sciences

$444,789

17

$26,164

University of New Jersey

17

South Carolina College of Pharmacy

18

University of Missouri–

$3,150,844

18

$175,047

Kansas City

19

University of Southern

$6,125,586

35

$175,017

California

20

Purdue University

$8,081,516

47

$171,947

21

University of Illinois at

$9,193,930

56

$164,177

Chicago

22

The University of Texas at

$4,876,211

30

$162,540

Austin

in Philadelphia

51

University of Puerto Rico

$230,450

11

$20,950

52

The University of Toledo

$518,260

27

$19,195

53

Albany College of Pharmacy

$690,514

40

$17,263

and Health Sciences

54

University of the Pacific

$311,996

19

$16,421

55

Auburn University

$277,400

17

$16,318

56

Hampton University

$142,204

10

$14,220

57

Xavier University of

$204,552

15

$13,637

23

University of Rhode Island

$4,338,719

27

$160,693

24

University of Pittsburgh

$6,194,156

41

$151,077

58

Creighton University

$224,673

18

$12,482

25

The University of Mis-

$5,811,511

43

$135,151

59

St. John’s University

$433,664

39

$11,120

60

University of Louisiana at

$175,000

24

$7,292

$59,225

13

$4,556

sissippi

26

University of Kentucky

$5,226,089

41

$127,466

27

The Ohio State University

$5,080,329

41

$123,910

28

Texas Southern

$1,959,192

16

$122,450

$2,541,470

23

$110,499

University

29

The University of New Mexico

18

academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

Louisiana

Monroe

61

Western University of Health Sciences

62

Idaho State University

$61,996

15

$4,133

63

University of Arkansas for

$72,375

21

$3,446

Medical Sciences


Member Institutions

news in brief

than 5 percent over 2007

Grand Total of NIH Total+ Awards plus non-NIH Federal Agency plus Foundation/Association Awards Rank

Institution

Grand Total

1

University of California, San Francisco

$27,562,670

2

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

$24,471,628

3

The University of Utah

$18,432,622

4

The University of Kansas

$17,997,395

5

The University of Mississippi

$16,020,975

6

University of Washington

$14,287,620

7

University of Illinois at Chicago

$14,171,071

8

Rutgers University, The State University of New Jersey

$11,413,243

9

The University of Montana

10

Rank

Institution

Grand Total

32

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

$2,966,290

33

The University of New Mexico

$2,541,470

34

Wayne State University

$2,337,790

35

University of Houston

$2,268,988

36

The University of Iowa

$2,183,723

37

University of Connecticut

$2,131,033

38

Oregon State University

$2,103,519

39

Texas Southern University

$1,959,192

$10,133,702

40

The University of Tennessee

$1,885,647

The University of Arizona

$9,976,878

41

The University of Georgia

$1,789,134

11

University of California, San Diego

$9,082,588

42

Virginia Commonwealth University

$1,480,634

12

Purdue University

$8,906,769

43

North Dakota State University

$1,294,685

13

University of Colorado Denver

$8,672,905

44

West Virginia University

$1,223,441

14

University of Minnesota

$8,154,753

45

University of Cincinnati

$1,183,316

15

University of Wisconsin–Madison

$8,091,013

46

The University of Oklahoma

$1,170,732

16

University of Pittsburgh

$7,807,675

47

Duquesne University

$1,075,597

17

University of Florida

$7,775,428

48

Temple University

$739,600

18

The Ohio State University

$7,739,151

49

$690,514

19

University of Southern California

$7,679,865

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

50

The University of Toledo

$518,260

20

University of Michigan

$7,606,317

51

University of the Sciences in Philadelphia

$444,789

21

University of Kentucky

$6,546,824

52

St. John’s University

$433,664

22

University of Rhode Island

$5,991,420

53

University of the Pacific

$311,996

23

The University of Texas at Austin

$5,921,652

54

Auburn University

$277,400

24

University of Maryland

$5,506,109

55

University of Wyoming

$266,785

25

Northeastern University

$5,252,348

56

Creighton University

$224,673

26

South Carolina College of Pharmacy

$5,158,036

57

Xavier University of Louisiana

$204,552

27

University of Nebraska Medical Center

$5,047,810

58

University of Louisiana at Monroe

$175,000

28

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

$4,755,801

59

Hampton University

$142,204

29

Washington State University

$3,722,979

60

$72,375

30

Florida A & M University

$3,309,125

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

61

Idaho State University

$61,996

31

University of Missouri–Kansas City

$3,259,930

62

Western University of Health Sciences

$59,225

academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

19


2009 AACP Interi

Academic Pharmacy’s Role in Valu Pharmacy educators gathered in Arlington, Va. Feb. 22–25 eager to discuss ways in which the Academy can prepare its students to meet the growing challenges facing today’s pharmacists through teaching, research and service. Speakers at the 2009 AACP Interim Meeting, themed Academic Pharmacy’s Role in Value-Driven Healthcare, provided attendees with an overall context for healthcare reform, conveyed expectations from federal agencies regarding the role of the pharmacist and established research expectations for the Academy across a broad range of healthcare issues. Kicking off the meeting was AACP’s vice president of policy and advocacy William G. Lang, who gave the keynote presentation. Providing an overview of healthcare reform in the first session of the 111th Congress, Lang described how AACP is attempting to influence the environment in Washington and within Congress, and highlighted evidence of such accomplishments. AACP’s efforts to help facilitate fundamental changes to our healthcare delivery system are plentiful. Utilizing evidence in literature to support the Association’s positions, as well as creating policy agendas and policy briefs that guide advocacy initiatives, are key elements in AACP’s advocacy endeavors and healthcare reform discussions. Equally important are partnerships with other organizations, Lang noted. Whether seeking to increase funding for federal public health agencies through the Coalition for Health Funding or continual support for the Title VII health professions education programs through the Health Professions and Nursing Education Coalition, AACP is a partner with other stakeholders to ensure the continued success of academic pharmacy. New to this year’s Interim Meeting was the presentation of awards in two distinct categories, both of which are vital to pharmacy education and providing value in healthcare delivery. Eight groups were recognized for their outstanding academic-practice partnerships with the presentation of the 2008 Crystal APPLE awards. Experiential education now

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academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

comprises more than 30 percent of the pharmacy curriculum but more important than the quantity of education, excellent experiential education is essential to equip the next generation of doctorallyprepared pharmacists with the abilities and attitudes necessary to deliver evidence-based, patient-centered care. The Crystal APPLE award is unique in that it recognizes a team consisting of an outstanding practitioner preceptor, the experiential education program leader and the practice site administrative leadership who altogether ensure that all the resources are in place to offer students the best possible learning and professional development experiences. Receiving this year’s Crystal APPLE awards are Samford University, University of Maryland, Northeastern University, University of Michigan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Cincinnati, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and Virginia Commonwealth University. Profiles of their winning partnerships can be found in each issue of Academic Pharmacy Now, as well as on the AACP Web site under Career Development, then Awards.


im Meeting

news in brief

ue-Driven Healthcare Inaugural awards in the area of community engaged service were also bestowed upon student and faculty groups from member institutions. “With the worsening economic crisis, the world needs professionals of all kinds to embark on substantial new efforts to offer a helping hand and a willing heart to those less fortunate,” said Victor A. Yanchick, AACP president. Students must be involved in the projects’ design and delivery of many different types of services, including preventive and primary healthcare services for people both in and out of the United States who stand outside the existing care delivery system. The four student-led community engagement projects and one school of pharmacy honored for their extraordinary commitment to community service were the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, University of Missouri–Kansas City School of Pharmacy, University of Washington School of Pharmacy and the University of Southern California School of Pharmacy. Members from the winning teams facilitated a “lunch and learn,” leading informal discussions with attendees about the ways in which their projects delivered consumer education about medication use and expanded access to affordable healthcare. Later in the day, awardees were feted at a reception where attendees could learn more about each project while visiting each school’s poster and networking with colleagues. Today’s pharmacy faculty must work to prepare a healthcare professional who is competent to respond to the unidentified expectations and needs of society. Regardless of the roadblocks that practice acts can create, academic pharmacy showed that it is working across these boundaries to meet the public’s current expectations and engaging with communities to ensure their future expectations can also be met. To learn more about the Crystal APPLE and Community Engagement Award winners, as well as view other meeting materials, visit the Interim Meeting Information section of the AACP Web site, www.aacp.org.

—Maureen O’Hara Left page: AACP President Victor A. Yanchick welcomes members of the Academy to the 2009 AACP Interim Meeting. Right page: First photo: AACP’s Crystal APPLE Awards, Student Community Engaged Service Awards and Transformative Community Service Award were bestowed upon the winners during the 2009 Interim Meeting. Second photo, from left: Stuart Feldman, Touro College of Pharmacy New York, Carole L. Kimberlin, University of Florida, Terri L. Warholak, The University of Arizona, and David D. Allen, Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Pharmacy, comprise a panel moderated by AACP President Victor A. Yanchick that discussed how the Academy is responding to external expectations of the pharmacist. Third photo: One of four Student Community Engaged Service Awards was presented to students from the University of Minnesota, along with faculty advisor Robert J. Cipolle and College of Pharmacy Dean Marilyn K. Speedie. Fourth photo: The University of Southern California was honored with the inaugural Transformative Community Service Award. Accepting the award was Steven W. Chen, Melvin F. Baron, Kathleen A. Johnson and School of Pharmacy Dean R. Pete Vanderveen.

21


Diary of a PharmCAS Super-User

ge Application e Pharmacy Colle th d ce du tro in CP tions. PharmCAS, June 1, 2003: AA to member institu fit ne be a g to as S) for those applyin Service (PharmCA plication service ap pared liz to ra se nt oo ce ns may ch a Web-based member institutio 03ich 20 wh e in th g ol rin ho sc pharmacy s participated du ol ho sc y ac m ar 43 ph ilestone in the ticipate. Initially, d a significant m ke ar m is Th .* cle cy ols and how those 2004 admissions to pharmacy scho ied pl ap s nt de stu way prospective ceived. the information re schools processed to deal each school had to the first cycle, up ern exng di nc co lea s of s th In the mon Three main area . on iti ns tra e th g to w they would be with issues relatin plications and ho ap of er ogy mb nu d s and the technol isted: the increase personnel change of ty ili ib . ss m po ste e sy processed, th ovided by the new the information pr needed to access ff to the training of sta most schools was by plid se ap e es es dr th ad w ue ho The first iss re received and we ns tio cica pl ne s ap y meant it wa handle the new wa any instances this m In l d. na se es tio di oc pr ad even hire cations would be ties, retool staff or ili sib ich on wh sp re ny b pa jo m essary to shift Inc. (the parent co on International, ement Systems staff. AACP, Liais Academic Manag d an ) m ste sy S CA are) were readily houses the Pharm armAdMIT softw Ph e th d r fo ny pa g at conferences an (the parent com g, as well as trainin in in le tra nd e ha sit to on le fer ab available to of ant schools were ensure that particip S directly or via Webcasts, to her via PharmCA eit s rd co re ns io miss IT. the electronic ad tool, PharmAdM the local software of e us e th h ug ro th e PharmAdMIT portunity to use th op e th d ight ha s ol ho figuring that it m All participant sc forgo this option to ugh ted ro op th y nt an we m s t ce school software bu the first cycle. On ges in an le ch nd ff ha sta to t ou ch ab be too mu e better ideas at ul rm fo t to igh le m ab plications training, they were e processing of ap th w d ho an y, y ar ss og ce ol techn that might be ne ate their current and how to evalu that we decided d gla re we have to change, e W were needed. ts en em nc PharmCAS; it ha th en wi decide if compatibility its of e us ca be IT to use PharmAdM easier. th the data much made working wi ion detailed informat plicants access to ap ce ve ien ga en ly nv on co t with the PharmCAS no s, it provided them ol d ho an sc eb t W an e cip th rti about the pa an application via ter en lly ts, ica ip on ctr , transcr of being able to ele ials (PCAT scores application mater of n informat tio se e ica pl on ap e e id prov tion). Once th da en m onic m co re of an nt it out as electr TOEFL, letters ied, PharmCAS se rif opy ve -c d rd an ha ed in itt d bm tion was su IT software) an M Ad m ar Ph e th with nated. An online download (to use e applicant desig th s ol ho rsc or ol w application info format to the scho opportunity to vie e th ll us we ve as , ga at l rm rta rd-copy fo Admissions Po ic download or ha n on tio ctr ica ele rif via ve d e th ive mation rece ed and was in itt bm su en ibe pl d ap at ha nt for as information th parable compone nt Portal, the com ica re verified pl we Ap e ey th Th s. as es ns proc their applicatio ck tra to em th cants, allowed hools. n and sent out to sc mitted more tha

22

ants have sub c er 73,500 applicprograms at press time (29 publi S’s inception, ov *Since PharmCA ons to what is now 76 participant 278,400 applicati and 43 private). academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

The following is the first in a series of diary entries from a PharmCAS Super-User, documenting their experience from the launch of the program to present time. Be sure to check out future entries in upcoming editions of Academic Pharmacy Now.

June 1, 2004: M any benefits resu lted from the implementation of Ph armCAS. Ease of access to applicant information was a benefit for ap plicants as well as for participant schools. Two addi tional benefits became apparent after the first Ph armCAS cycle. Most participant schools experienc ed a substantial increase in both th e size and diversity of their applicant pools – I know we definitely did! Some schools saw as much as a 12 0 percent increase in the number of applications. Th e PharmAdMIT so ftware helped us to more effici ently sort throug h them. Prior to PharmCAS, it wa s difficult to draw usable conclusions about phar macy applicants nationwide because outside of total application numbers and applicant gender da ta, most schools ha d access to only their own applica tion data. The im plementation of PharmCAS made consistent, detailed information readily available about a participan t school’s own applicant pool an d about the overall applicant pool (of all participant schools). As with anythin g new, the impl ementation of PharmCAS caused many changes in the admissions processes. Of cour se, some changes were smoother than others! Howe ver, with the help of AACP, Liaison International, Inc. and Academ ic Management Systems, this mile stone change to a centralized application system was met with gr eat success. Not only did the move to PharmCAS prom pt many positive changes in sc hools’ admissions processes, but this free service and companion so ftware added a great benefit for AACP member in stitutions. The first-cycle experie nce also opened th e gates of communication amon g participant scho ols, PharmCAS, Liaison Internatio nal, Inc. and Acad emic Management Systems in terms of sharing their experiences and how things m ight be improved for future cycles.

Can you guess the identity of this PharmCAS Super-User? Keep reading the diary to find out who it might be.


Leading the

REVOLUTION 2009 AACP Annual Meeting

July 18–22 • BOSTON The world’s pharmacy educators will convene at the 2009 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars in Boston eager to shape the future of global healthcare. With exciting programs for faculty recruitment and retention, pharmacy education assessment, accreditation and leadership, AACP is poised now more than ever to help our members work to solve the issues of tomorrow. AACP stands ready to explore new developments in pharmacy education and practice. Attendees will be armed with the latest tools, programs and services to prepare the next generation of pharmacists and educators. Join us in Boston July 18–22 for incredible opportunities for growth and development as pharmacy academia continues leading the healthcare education revolution!

Celebrating Excellence in Education AACP will honor three educators for their lifetime achievements in the pharmacy profession and three authors of the best paper published in the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (AJPE) at the 2009 Annual Meeting.

AACP President Victor A. Yanchick, Dean of the School of Pharmacy at Virginia Commonwealth University, will present the Robert K. Chalmers Distinguished Pharmacy Educator Award, the Paul R. Dawson Biotechnology Award and the Volwiler Research Achievement Award during the Examining Excellence: 2009 Awards Plenary on Monday, July 20 at 10:30 a.m. AACP Past President Barbara Wells will lead recipients of these three prestigious awards in a candid and engaging discussion of their views on what qualities mark excellence in pharmacy education and research. Receiving the award for the best paper published AJPE in 2008 are three authors from the universities of Tennessee and Memphis. The Rufus A. Lyman Award will be presented at the AACP Closing Banquet on Tuesday, July 21 at 7:00 p.m. when the Association celebrates its collective accomplishments over the past year.

Read more about the award winners 23


Robert K. Chalmers Distinguished Pharmacy Educator Award Bruce A. Berger, Ph.D., professor and head of the Department of Pharmacy Care Systems at the Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy, will receive the Robert K. Chalmers Distinguished Pharmacy Educator Award for his excellence as an instructor, his outstanding achievements as a researcher and scholar, and his overall impact on pharmacy education and the profession. A background in pharmacy and psychology has helped Berger craft innovative instruction for student pharmacists, pharmacists and other health professionals during his 25-year career at Auburn University. His focus on helping professionals develop enhanced communication skills has led to improved patient care and moved the practitioner and patient into a more collaborative partnership. At Auburn, he conducts research and workshops on health behavior change, patients’ treatment adherence and new service roles for the pharmacist. His humanistic approaches to instruction have allowed his students to make a difference with improved interpersonal communication and patient adherence with health behaviors. Berger, who has been a consultant to companies such as Pfizer and Proctor & Gamble, has presented more than 800 papers and seminars and has attracted more than $4 million in research funding. The award, named for the late Robert K. Chalmers, former AACP president and distinguished educator, consists of a Steuben glass owl sculpture and a $12,500 cash prize.

Volwiler Research Achievement Award Duane D. Miller, Ph.D., will receive the Volwiler Research Achievement Award for his outstanding research and contributions to the field of pharmaceutical sciences. Miller joined The University of Tennessee in 1992 as the Harriet S. Van Vleet endowed chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and is currently associate dean of research and graduate studies in the College of Pharmacy at UT. Described as an outstanding scientist by his colleagues, Miller has more than 200 publications, 30 patent disclosures, three new compounds with two in preclinical trials and one in phase 2 clinical trials. His research has been well recognized, having received the American Chemical Society Medicinal Chemist of the Year award in 2008, as well as The University of Tennessee B. Otto and Kathleen Wheeley Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer in 2005. Among Miller’s research interests is the design and synthesis of new drug molecules. He has a strong interest in stereochemical aspects of drug molecules and developing drugs for new areas in which we currently lack therapeutic agents, or in areas in which we need to develop new drugs with fewer side effects. The award consists of a gold medal and a $12,500 cash prize and was established in honor of the late Ernest H. Volwiler, Abbott Laboratories former president and research director.

Paul R. Dawson Biotechnology Award

Rufus A. Lyman Award

Dr. Rodney J. Ho, Ph.D., will receive the Paul R. Dawson Biotechnology Award for his contributions to contemporary teaching and scholarship in biotechnology.

Authors of “The Economic Impact of a College of Pharmacy” will receive the Rufus A. Lyman Award for the best paper published in AJPE in 2008. Dick R. Gourley, Pharm.D., and Shelley I. White-Means, Ph.D., both of The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, and Jeff Wallace, Ph.D., of the University of Memphis authored the paper, which quantifies the dollar value of economic returns to a community when a college of pharmacy attains its fourfold mission of research, service, patient care and education.

Ho is associate dean for research and new initiatives and the Milo Gibaldi endowed professor of pharmaceutics at the University of Washington (UW) School of Pharmacy. Throughout his distinguished career, Ho has demonstrated a commitment to the area of biotechnology-based therapeutic agents through both teaching and research. He developed a biotechnology elective course offered to both graduate and professional students at UW in 1992 and co-authored the first textbook of its kind, Biotechnology and Biopharmaceutics: Transforming Proteins and Genes into Drugs, published in 2003. Development and evaluation of liposome formulations has been a lifelong research area for Ho. He has examined delivery to specific tissues such as brain and lymphatic tissues, two targets for the treatment of cancer and HIV. He is a recognized expert in the area of liposome formulations, evidenced by his extensive research funding in these areas, publication record and service on NIH review panels, and holds five patents in the area of liposome technology and therapeutics. The award is named in honor of Amgen former vice president of marketing and sales, Paul R. Dawson, a staunch supporter of education in biotechnology. It consists of a double helix glass sculpture and a $10,000 cash prize.

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academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

Since 1989, Gourley has served as professor of pharmacy and dean of The University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy. He is the author or co-author of 69 manuscripts, 11 proceedings and 16 books, and is the recipient of more than $9 million in grants and contracts. White-Means is professor of health economics in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at The University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Her research publications focus on racial and ethnic health disparities; labor market and retirement implications of care giving; and health and medical care utilization of underserved populations including the aged, women and ethnic minorities. Wallace has been an economist and research associate professor of applied economic research at the Sparks Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the University of Memphis since 1994. He specializes in economic impact studies, having completed a study of the economic impact of Baptist Memorial Health Care Corporation and the Memphis International Airport, both in 2005. Supported by Merck & Company, Inc., the award is presented as a framed certificate along with a stipend of $5,000 to be shared by the authors of the paper.


awards section

Honoring Excellence in Assessment The inaugural AACP Award for Excellence in Assessment recognizes outstanding Doctor of Pharmacy assessment programs for their progress in developing and applying evidence of outcomes as part of the ongoing evaluation and improvement of pharmacy professional education. Recipients of the award will present their winning portfolio at the 2009 Annual Meeting in Boston on Sunday, July 19 at 1:00 p.m. The award-winning programs are: An Annual Skill Based Mastery Exam as the Backbone for an Academic Assessment Program was conducted by Gregory L. Alston and Bryan L. Love from Wingate University School of Pharmacy. ACPE Standards 2007 challenges institutions to graduate students who possess the knowledge, skills and abilities required of competent entry-level pharmacy practitioners. Few institutions have implemented a program to demonstrate skill mastery. Without an effective technique for demonstrating skill mastery, schools may not comply with ACPE Standards. The objective was to create a reliable, valid and useful skill mastery assessment to inform curricular decisions and demonstrate compliance with ACPE standards. The faculty created Terminal Ability Based Outcomes (TABO) Statements. The team selected a sample of these abilities to be tested by multiple choice exam. Minimal competency cut scores were calculated using a modified Angoff process. The assessment included 61 items for P1 students, 94 items for P2 students, 128 for P3 students and 170 items for P4 students. The mastery score for the exam was calculated using the weighted average of the item cut-scores. A sub-score for each TABO was generated. An individual score report allowed each student to identify their unique areas of strength/weakness and remediate any deficiencies. Summary global reports provided a thorough analysis of curricular effectiveness. For the spring 2008 exam, 235 out of 239 examinees demonstrated overall mastery. All P3 and P4 students demonstrated mastery. The internal reliability of all four 2008 exams – P1 (0.65), P2 (0.81), P3 (0.82), P4 (0.80) – were satisfactory. Validity was enhanced by proper test design. A pharmacy school can develop a reliable, valid, useful, skill mastery exam tailored to the specific needs of the institution.

A Progress Examination for Assessing Students’ Readiness for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences was designed by Mitchell J. Barnett, Karl Meszaros, Karna McDonald, Heidi Wehring, David J. Evans, Debra S. Sasaki-Hill, Paul C. Goldsmith and Katherine K. Knapp, all from Touro University California College of Pharmacy. The objective was to create a valid assessment tool to evaluate the readiness of pharmacy students for advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). The Triple Jump Examination (TJE), created by the faculty of the College of Pharmacy, Touro University California, is tailored to the four-year, two-plus-two curriculum of the college. The TJE consists of three parts: 1) a written, case-based, closed-book exam, followed by 2) a written, case-based, open-book exam, and 3) an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). The TJE is administered at the end of each four academic semesters. Progression of students to APPEs is dependent on achieving a preset minimum cumulative (weighted average) score in the four consecutive TJE exams. The predictive utility of the examination was demonstrated by a very strong correlation between the cumulative TJE scores and the precep-

tor grades in the first year (P3) of APPE rotations (r = 0.60, p>0.001). Reliability of the TJE was shown by strong correlations among the four successive TJE exams. A survey probing the usefulness of TJE indicated acceptance by both students and faculty. The TJE program is an effective tool for the assessment of pharmacy students’ readiness for the experiential years. In addition, the TJE provides guidance for students to achieve preparedness for APPE.

Beyond Formulas: Enhancing the Selection Process to Improve Assessment of Candidates for Admission to Pharmacy School was conducted by Sharon McDonough, Kristen L. Helms, Paul W. Jungnickel, E. Kelly Hester and Jan Kavookjian of Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy. While traditional admissions criteria such as grade point averages, standardized test scores and recommendation letters are important to consider, these factors provide only a limited picture of an applicant’s potential for success in a Doctor of Pharmacy program. Personal characteristics, such as attitudes and values shaped by one’s experience, contribute as well to success or failure in such professional programs. However, admissions decisions can be challenging when the process goes beyond strict formulas. Unacceptable attrition rates in the Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy (AUHSOP) entering class of 2002 drove the school to re-evaluate the efficacy of its admissions process. The objective was to improve the admissions process to facilitate a more comprehensive approach to assessment of applicants. The AUHSOP developed a list of expected attributes of entering students based on the school’s curricular outcomes and educational philosophy. These attributes reflect ways of being that are not easily measured using traditional admission criteria. Included attributes are: humanistic caring skills, professional commitment, confidence, independence/motivation, adaptive attitude and communication skills. In collaboration with internal and external stakeholders, the AUHSOP developed an admissions process that utilizes a combination of informal interaction with multiple members of the school, formal individual interviews and assessment of group interactions. Candidates for admission have the opportunity to interact with a broad range of people in the AUHSOP and are critiqued based upon personable attributes that would not be evident on paper. To enhance the efficacy of the admissions process, a rigorous self-assessment of individual interview questions, group activities and evaluator training is conducted systematically. The admissions committee elicits feedback from faculty, staff, students and alumni involved in the interview process. Benchmarks such as on-time graduation rates help to determine the strengths and limitations of the selection process. As a result, attrition rates have fallen markedly, ontime graduation rates have nearly doubled, and the rate of students completing the first year successfully has increased dramatically since restructuring of the admissions process.

academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

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awards section

Practitioners Honor Academicians as Top Pharmacists Remington Honor Medal John A. Gans, Pharm.D., has been awarded the 2009 Remington Honor Medal, the pharmacy profession’s highest honor administered by APhA. Dr. Gans has been APhA’s executive vice president and chief executive officer since 1989. Prior to joining APhA, Gans served on the faculty and was dean of the School of Pharmacy at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science (now known as the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia), where he earned his B.S. in pharmacy in 1966 and his Doctor of Pharmacy in 1969. Dr. Gans began his career in 1966 as a community pharmacist in Broomall, Penn. During 1967–68, Dr. Gans held a residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Following his residency, he became assistant director of pharmacy at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and held that position from 1968–70. He was a pioneer in the area of parenteral nutrition and clinical pharmacy. From 1974 to 1985, he served as the managing director of Pharmaservices, a consultant firm to nursing homes. Named for eminent community pharmacist, manufacturer and educator Joseph P. Remington, the award was established in 1918 to recognize distinguished service and/or outstanding achievement on behalf of American pharmacy during the preceding year, culminating in the past year, or for a sustained period of time.

Hugo H. Schaefer Award Dr. Henry Lewis III, dean and professor of pharmacy practice at Florida A&M University’s (FAMU) College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, is the 2009 recipient of APhA’s Hugo H. Schaefer Award. Established by APhA in 1964 in honor of its long-time treasurer, the award recognizes outstanding voluntary contributions to the organization, the profession and society. Dr. Lewis’ pharmacy career spans more than 35 years. For the past 14 years, he has served as dean of FAMU’s College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences—his alma mater. He has also served as dean of the College of Pharmacy at Texas Southern University. A native of Tallahassee, Fla., he received his Bachelor of Science degree in pharmacy from FAMU and his Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Mercer University. He completed postdoctoral training at the Institute for Education Management at Harvard University. Dr. Lewis is a past president of the Minority Health Professions Foundation. He is also past president of the Foundation’s sister agency, the Association of Minority Health Professions Schools.

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academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

Daniel B. Smith Practice Excellence Award Dr. Samuel C. Augustine of Omaha, Neb. is the recipient of the APhA Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management (APhAAPPM) 2009 Daniel B. Smith Practice Excellence Award. Established to honor Daniel B. Smith, APhA’s first president, the award recognizes outstanding performance and achievements of a pharmacist in any practice setting who has distinguished himself or herself and the profession of pharmacy. Dr. Augustine was selected in recognition of his outstanding contributions to nuclear pharmacy, hospital pharmacy and sterile compounding. He has developed many of the individual patient dosing procedures found in the clinical setting today involving the use of radiopharmaceuticals for lymphoma therapy. Dr. Augustine’s distinguished service on the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Sterile Compounding Committee (SCC), including his work on the development and revisions to USP General Chapter <797> Pharmaceutical Compounding-Sterile preparations is notable. Dr. Augustine is currently professor of pharmacy practice at Creighton University School of Pharmacy and Health Professions. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1973 and his Doctor of Pharmacy degree in 1979, both at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

APhA Honorary Membership Dr. Kenneth Leibowitz, assistant professor of communication in the department of behavioral and social sciences at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, is the recipient of the 2009 APhA Honorary Membership. Honorary membership in APhA is conferred by the Board of Trustees upon individuals, either within the profession of pharmacy or outside of it, whose activities and achievements have had a significant positive impact on public health, the pharmacy profession and its practitioners. Leibowitz’s impact on the profession of pharmacy spans the last 25 years through his development of the National Patient Counseling Competition (NPCC). Based on his observations regarding the evolving professional role of pharmacists, he developed a patient counseling assignment that he included in his communication course that was required for all student pharmacists. This assignment was evaluated in pilot competitions, and as a result of their success, the United States Pharmacopeia and APhA agreed to support the first national competition, which was held at APhA’s 1985 Annual Meeting.


awards section The stars of academic pharmacy shone brightly at the 2009 APhA Annual Meeting and Exposition in San Antonio, Texas, April 3–6 as many members of the Academy were honored by APhA and its academies. APhA Names Fellows for 2009 On Feb. 10, 2009, APhA announced the selection of the 2009 APhA Fellows. Fellows are either members of the APhA Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management (APhA-APPM) or the APhA Academy of Pharmaceutical Research and Science (APhA-APRS), with a minimum of 10 years professional experience. Fellows have demonstrated progressive, exemplary service and achievements in his or her professional area through service to APhA academies and other national, state and local professional organizations.

AACP members named Fellows by the APhA Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management are: • Melvin F. Baron, Pharm.D., MPA, FACA, FCPHA, University of Southern California School of Pharmacy • Charles Curtis Barr, Pharm.D., Creighton University School of Pharmacy and Health Professions • Richard N. Herrier, Pharm.D., The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy • Michael D. Hogue, Pharm.D., Sam-

ford University McWhorter School of Pharmacy • Sheri L. Stensland, Pharm.D., Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy

AACP members named Fellows by the APhA Academy of Pharmaceutical Research and Science are:

• James W. McAuley, Ph.D., The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy • Frank Romanelli, Pharm.D., MPH, BCPS, University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy

• William R. Garnett, Pharm.D., Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy

• David P. Zgarrick, Ph.D., Drake University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Scientific Awards, APhA Academy of Pharmaceutical Research and Science

APhA-APPM Distinguished Achievement Awards

Research Achievement Award in the Pharmaceutical Sciences

• Community and Ambulatory Practice: Nicole M. Gattas, Pharm.D., BCPS, St. Louis College of Pharmacy

• Ian W. Mathison, Ph.D., D.Sc., Ferris State University College of Pharmacy

• John P. Bentley, MBA, M.S., Ph.D., The University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy

Practitioner Awards, APhA Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management:

• Clinical/Pharmacotherapeutic Practice: Jay D. Currie, Pharm.D., The University of Iowa College of Pharmacy

• David A. Holdford, Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy

Student Awards, APhA Academy of Student Pharmacists Academy of Student Pharmacists Outstanding Chapter Advisor Award

• JoLaine Reierson Draugalis, R.Ph., Ph.D., The University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy

• Cameron C. Lindsey, Pharm.D., BC-ADM, University of Missouri – Kansas City School of Pharmacy

Clinical Research Paper Award

Academy of Student Pharmacists Outstanding Dean Award

• Joseph P. Vande Griend, Pharm.D., BCPS, University of Colorado Denver School of Pharmacy

• Kenneth B. Roberts, Ph.D., University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy

Profession-wide Awards and Honors APhA Gloria Niemeyer Francke Leadership Mentor Award • Marialice S. Bennett, R.Ph., FAPhA, The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy

Community Pharmacy Residency Excellence in Precepting Award • Jeffery A. Goad, Pharm.D., University of Southern California School of Pharmacy

APhA Chapter of the Year Award • University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Pharmacy

academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

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awards section

Walmart/AACP Annual Conference Scholarship Program 2009 Recipients AACP is pleased to announce the 65 student-faculty recipients for the 2009 AACP/Walmart Scholars Program. AACP and Walmart share the commitment to help colleges and schools of pharmacy ensure there is an adequate number of well-prepared individuals who aspire to join the faculties of our expanding programs across the country. The program provides $1,000 travel scholarships to 65 student-faculty pairs from AACP member institutions to attend the 2009 AACP Annual Meeting and the Teachers Seminar in Boston, Mass., July 18–22. This momentous program continues to grow each year thanks to Walmart’s support and dedication. Congratulations to all who have been selected! 1. Daniel Aistrope, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Todd Sorensen

16. Craig W. Freyer, University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Diana M. Sobieraj

2. Krisan T. Anderson, Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Pamela Stamm

17. Kristian S. Fruge, University of Louisiana at Monroe College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jessica H. Brady

3. Andrew Berry, University of Washington School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jennifer Danielson

18. Abigail M. Frye, University of Washington School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Nanci Murphy

4. Sara D. Best, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Frank Hughes

19. Kevin T. Fuji, Creighton University School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Kimberly A. Galt

5. Michael A. Biddle, Jr., West Virginia University School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Charles D. Ponte

20. Adrienne M. Gilligan, The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Terri Warholak

6. Angela L. Bingham, University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Mary Hess

21. Jennifer (Dongwen) Guo, University of Florida College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Richard Segal

7. Danielle F. Ciuffetelli, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jean Scholtz

22. Thomas H. Hatch, Loma Linda University School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Reza Taheri

8. Natalie J. Dearing, Howard University College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Monika Daftary 9. Dennis T. Do, Western University of Health Sciences College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Eric K. Gupta 10. Calea Anne Driscoll, Purdue University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Nicholas G. Popovich 11. Melissa Skelton Duke, The University of Utah College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. John A. Pieper 12. Elizabeth C. Engle, Ferris State University College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Kim Hancock 13. Clayton D. English, University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Lauren S. Schlesselman 14. Jessica L. Epley, East Tennessee State University Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. David Stewart 15. Salia Farrokh, St. John Fisher College Wegmans School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jennifer Mathews

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academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

23. Shannon A. Hendricks, The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. James McAuley 24. Aleda M. Hess, Purdue University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Kimberly S. Plake 25. Allison R. Knutson, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jeannine Conway 26. Lena Kwan, Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Robin M. Zavod 27. Tammy L. Lambert, The University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Kevin Farmer 28. Samantha C. Lee, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Doneka Scott 29. Shirley Lee, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Stuart Haines 30. Pamela Lincoln, University of Southern California School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Michael Wincor


awards section 31. Anthony Luparello, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Rajender Aparasu

49. Amanda R. Pitterele, University of Wisconsin – Madison School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Karen Kopacek

32. Christine T. Luu, University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Kelly Lee

50. Andrew N. Schmelz, Purdue University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Brian M. Shepler

33. Kelly E. Martin, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Deborah Sturpe

51. Michael L. Schroeder, University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Kristin Janke

34. Sarah S. McDaniel, Washington State University College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Colleen Terriff

52. Ann K. Schwemm, The University of Iowa College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Karen Farris

35. Kathryn Givens Merkel, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Lisa Dinkins

53. Jason C. Simeone, University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Celia MacDonnell

36. Emily K. Min, University of California, San Francisco School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Robin Corelli 37. Leslie A. Mooney, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Melanie Claborn 38. Crystal N. Mounce, University of Cincinnati James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Shauna M. Buring 39. Katherine L. Muhlstadt, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Cathy Santanello

54. Danijela Stojanovic, The University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jamie C. Barner 55. Joshua T. Swan, The University of Mississippi College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Leigh Ann Ross 56. Lori R. Tangorra, Drake University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Darla Klug Eastman 57. Melissa A. Taylor, Northeastern University School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Debra J. Reid 58. Melissa L. Thompson, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. John A. Bosso

40. Cynthia N. Nguyen, University of the Incarnate Word Feik School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. David Trang

59. Davalyn S. Tidwell, University of Southern California School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Edith Mirzaian

41. Stefanie C. Nigro, Northeastern University School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jenny A. Van Amburgh

60. Saumil M. Vaghela, University of Appalachia College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sarah T. Melton

42. Chessa R. (Heirigs) Nyberg, University of Missouri - Kansas City School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Brooke Y. Patterson

61. Margaret L. Wallace, North Dakota State University College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Donald Miller

43. Oluwakemi O. Odesina, University of Charleston School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Michelle R. Easton

62. Marie V. Wehenkel, University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Kelly Smith

44. Maria A. Osborne, University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. James J. Pschirer

63. Megan D. Wheatley, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Dawn Pettus

45. Shelley Otsuka Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Joseph Schober

64. Matthew Witry, The University of Iowa College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Michelle Fravel

46. Michael A. Parker, Wingate University School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jacqueline L. Olin

65. Christine Kelly Yocum, Palm Beach Atlantic University Lloyd L. Gregory School of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Seena Haines

47. Brandon J. Patterson, The University of Iowa College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. William R. Doucette 48. Stuart K. Pitman, The University of Iowa College of Pharmacy, Faculty Mentor: Dr. Bernard Sorofman

academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

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awards section

Recognizing Innovations in Teaching Each year, the AACP Council of Faculties recognizes the novel teaching, learning strategies and assessment methods of three faculty teams as part of the Innovations in Teaching competition. This year’s winners will participate in a special session at the 2009 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars in Boston on Tuesday, July 21 at 8:00 a.m. The award-winning programs are: Pharmacotherapy in Geriatrics: Improving Student Perception and Knowledge Through an Active Learning Course Model was conducted by Erica L. Estus, Anne L.

medication problems, visit an integrated health clinic, experience an alternative form of healing and write critical reflections describing their learning.

Hume and Norma J. Owens from the University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy. The development, implementation and assessment of a 3-credit course on pharmacotherapy in geriatrics is presented. The course emphasizes a patient-centered approach using active, self-directed learning to enhance students’ abilities to understand diverse biologic, medical and psychosocial issues associated with aging. The elective has been offered three times with 50 students enrolling over three semesters. In addition to discussing fundamental concepts and geriatric syndromes, activities have included discussion and assessment of medically complex older adults, presentation of controversies in clinical geriatrics, book and film clubs, an “Adopt-a-Patient” project, and scientific and reflective writing.

Patients taught the students not only the impact of illness but many life lessons. Students felt the discussions resulted in enhanced learning from students’ comments especially when related to different cultural beliefs. The critical reflections helped students think about their own beliefs, cultural differences and incorporation into pharmaceutical care. The role playing exercises, the integrated clinic fieldtrip and alternative healing visit were helpful to develop cultural competency. Evaluations were very positive and increased yearly. A patient-centered course with non-medical media can improve cultural knowledge and cultural competency skills of student pharmacists.

Students participate in site visits at independent, assisted, skilled or community models of care. Activities also included patient interviews, assessments for fall risks and medication appropriateness and participation in Tai-chi and Wii® bowling events. Through these visits, students interacted with older adults at various levels of care. This course has stressed active, self-directed learning through traditional and nontraditional teaching/ learning methods. It is easily adaptable to students with varying knowledge and skills. Initial concerns regarding discussion of conditions not yet covered in the core curriculum were not realized and all students improved in their approach to medically complex older adults. Additionally, student perception of aging improved through activities in and out of the classroom.

Patients’ Perspectives on Health, Illness, and Culture was designed by Mary Beth O’Connell of Wayne State University Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. To provide pharmaceutical care inclusive of culture, pharmacists need to understand, be respectful of and utilize cultural aspects. As the U.S. minority population increases, greater needs for culturally-focused healthcare exist, especially to decrease healthcare disparities. The objective was to increase the cultural competency of student pharmacists early in their pharmacy curriculum through an innovative course utilizing a totally patient-focused approach with extensive use of patients from diverse cultures, non-medical media and critical reflections. People from various ethnic, religious, economic, physical functioning or sexual orientation cultures and/or with various chronic illnesses interact with students during a 2-credit summer elective. Students watch movies, read fiction or autobiographical books, engage in discussions sharing their cultural perspectives, participate in role playing exercises focusing on culturally related

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Pharmacy Care in Disaster Settings was conducted by Catherine A. White, Charles H. McDuffie, George E. Francisco Jr., J. Warren Beach, Brian D. Buck and Robin L. Southwood, all from The University of Georgia College of Pharmacy. The objective was to develop and evaluate a project that will help students practice pharmacy in disaster situations. The scenario consisted of students providing pharmacy care and dispensing medications under a directive from the governor that allows pharmacists to dispense medication without a prescription to 60 flash flood victims who have no medication and limited access to their medical records. Students have access to the Disaster Medical Assistant Team formulary. Teams of three to four students were assigned 10 patients (sex, age and chief complaint). Initially, students generated six to eight questions for the patient and were allowed to ask follow-up questions after reviewing the answers provided by the faculty. After the second round of questioning, the teams made recommendations for dispensing medications/patient instructions. A pre- and post-test was conducted to evaluate student performance and perception of their abilities. Sixty students completed this project. A significant increase in student confidence in dispensing medications, making therapeutic substitutions and counseling patients was observed after completion of the project. Major lessons learned included learning how to ask “good” questions, trials of a limited formulary and discovering that there is not always a perfect solution for patients in an emergency setting. This project helped students understand the complexities of practicing pharmacy care in disaster settings as well as the importance of communication skills. Faculty learned that more experiences in patient counseling and decision making need to be incorporated throughout the curriculum.


2008 Crystal APPLE Award Recipients Academic-Practice Partnership: Samford University—Perry County Health Department and Health Care System APPE Title: Ambulatory Care (Rural); Practice Site Type: Ambulatory Care Clinic Bobby G. Bryant, Pharm.D., Dean Professional Experience Program: Robert Henderson, Pharm.D. Preceptor: Charles D. Sands, Pharm.D. Site Administrator: Frances Ford, RN, Director, Sewing Seeds of Hope Academic-Practice Partnership: University of Maryland— Clinical Center at the National Institutes of Health APPE Title: Ambulatory Care; Practice Site Type: Ambulatory Care Clinic Natalie D. Eddington, Ph.D., Dean Professional Experience Program: Cynthia Boyle, Pharm.D. Preceptor: Frank Pucino, Pharm.D. Site Administrator: David K. Henderson, M.D., Clinical Center Deputy Director Academic-Practice Partnership: Northeastern University— Boston Medical Center APPE Title: Intensive Care Unit; Practice Site Type: Hospital/Institutional John R. Reynolds, Pharm.D., Dean Professional Experience Program: Debra Copeland, Pharm.D. Preceptor: John Marshall, Pharm.D. Site Administrator: Arthur C. Theodore, M.D., Director, Medical Intensive Care Unit Academic-Practice Partnership: University of Michigan— East Ann Arbor Health Center APPE Title: Ambulatory Care; Practice Site Type: Ambulatory Care Clinic Frank J. Ascione, Ph.D., Dean Professional Experience Program: Nancy Mason, Pharm.D. Preceptor: Hae Mi Choe, Pharm.D. Site Administrator: Connie Standiford, M.D., Associate Medical Director, Ambulatory Care Services

news in brief 2008

Academic-Practice Partnership: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill—Mission Health Hospitals APPE Title: Neurotrauma Critical Care; Practice Site Type: Hospital/ Institutional Robert A. Blouin, Pharm.D., Dean Professional Experience Program: Kim Leadon, M.Ed. Preceptor: Elizabeth L. Michalets, Pharm.D. Site Administrator: Joe Damore, CEO, and Ellen Williams, Director of Pharmacy Academic-Practice Partnership: University of Cincinnati— Community Pharmacy Care APPE Title: Ambulatory Care/Community Advanced Experience; Practice Site Type: Community Pharmacy Independent Daniel Acosta, Jr., Ph.D., Dean Professional Experience Program: Michael Doherty, Pharm.D. Preceptor: Michael A. Hegener, Pharm.D. Site Administrator: Don Ruwe, Pharmacist and Owner Academic-Practice Partnership: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center—Veterans Administration APPE Title: Geriatrics; Practice Site Type: Long-term Care/Extended Care Facility Arthur A. Nelson, Jr., Ph.D., Dean Professional Experience Program: Craig Cox, Pharm.D. Preceptor: Angela Treadway, Pharm.D. Site Administrator: Cynthia Foslien-Nash, Pharmacy Director Academic-Practice Partnership: Virginia Commonwealth University—Buford Road Pharmacy APPE Title: Community, Advanced Community, Compounding Elective, Entrepreneur Elective; Practice Site Type: Community Pharmacy Independent Victor A. Yanchick, Ph.D., Dean Professional Experience Program: Beverly Talluto, Pharm.D. Preceptor: Ronald G. Davis, B.S. Site Administrator: Ronald G. Davis, Pharmacist in Charge, Owner

Sponsored by Merck & Company, Inc.

Eight colleges and schools of pharmacy and their practice partners have been awarded the 2008 AACP Crystal APPLE Award for achieving excellence in providing exemplary experiential education. The AACP Crystal APPLE (Academic-Practice Partnerships for Learning Excellence) Award recognizes the contributions of faculty and administrators at colleges and schools of pharmacy, and the pharmacist practitioner educators and administrators who are their practice partners, in successfully conducting and supporting quality experiential education in exemplary patient care clinical teaching environments. Over the next year, Academic Pharmacy Now will feature profiles describing each awarded partnership. The profiles are located on the AACP Web site. All eight schools and their practice partners received their Crystal APPLE Award at the 2009 Interim Meeting, Feb. 22–25 in Arlington, Va. academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

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awards section

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy

Patient Care Model Meets Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Goals

2008 Crystal APPLE Award Recipients Long-Term Care/ Extended Care Facility Dallas, Texas

2008 Pharmaceutical care is offered throughout the VA facility. Pharmacists are in both centralized and decentralized locations; some perform primarily distributive functions, while others round with interdisciplinary teams and work in primary care clinics. Students on rotation work closely with their preceptors, communicating with patients at the bedside, obtaining medication histories and providing discharge counseling. The VA has an extensive CQI program. The pharmacy has core per-

Academic-Practice Partnership: Samford University—Perry Academic-Practice Partnership: of North pharmacy services and determine formance measuresUniversity used to evaluate County Health Department and Health Care System Carolina at Chapel Hill—Mission Health Hospitals changes and allocate resources. APPE Title: Ambulatory Care (Rural); Practice Site Type: APPE Title: Neurotrauma Critical Care; Practice Site Ambulatory Care Clinic Type: Hospital/ Institutional Dean: Arthur A. Nelson Jr., Ph.D. Bobby G. Bryant, Pharm.D., Dean Robert A.MTM Blouin, services Pharm.D., are Deanprovided to patients both on an appointment and home visit basis, with about 15 patients Professional Experience Program: Robert Henderson, Professional Experience Program: Kim Leadon, M.Ed. being actively monitored per Professional Experience Program: Craig Cox, Pharm.D. Pharm.D. Preceptor: Elizabeth L. Michalets, Pharm.D. day, per pharmacy practitioner at this JCAHO-accredited site. Care is Preceptor: Charles D. Sands, Pharm.D. Site Administrator: Joein Damore, CEO, andelectronic Ellen Williams, Preceptor: Angela Treadway, Pharm.D. documented the patient’s medical record that is accessible Site Administrator: Frances Ford, RN, Director, Sewing Director of Pharmacy to all VA health providers caring for the patient. Site Administrator: Seeds of Hope Cynthia Foslien-Nash, Academic-Practice Partnership: University of Cincinnati— Pharmacy Director Academic-Practice Partnership: University of Maryland— Community Pharmacy Care Clinical Center at the National Institutes of Health APPE Title: Ambulatory Care/Community Advanced APPE Title: Ambulatory Care; Practice Site Type: AmbuExperience; Practice Site Type: Community Pharmacy The site is committed to education; continuing competency and profeslatory Care Clinic Independent sional development are part of its systematic continuous quality imNatalie D. Eddington, Ph.D., Dean Daniel Acosta, Jr., Ph.D., Dean provement efforts. The site offers in-house training and support for CE, Professional Experience Program: Cynthia Boyle, Experience Program: Michael Doherty, This Veterans Administration site is a long-term care facility part Professional of a Pharm.D. Pharm.D.certificate and advance training programs. The site works with numerlarger health system located urban Dallas, Texas. Fully automated Preceptor: Frank Pucino,in Pharm.D. Preceptor: A. Hegener, Pharm.D. offering many residencies, and nearly 200 ousMichael educational partners, dispensing electronic medical records support this interdisciplinSiteand Administrator: David K. Henderson, M.D., Clinical Site Administrator: Don Ruwe,students Pharmacistcompleted and Owner the six-week geriatric APPE in APPEs. Seventeen Centerwhere Deputypatient Director care is provided both at the bedside and ary practice, 2007, which is offered eight times a year. Partnership: Texas Tech University in outpatient areas under collaborative practice agreements. Academic-Practice These Academic-Practice Partnership: Northeastern University— Health Sciences Center—Veterans Administration “scopeBoston of practice” agreements give pharmacists prescribing authority. Students conduct a Site drug or Long-term medication utilization review during the Practice Type: Medical Center APPE Title: Geriatrics; Partners APPE worked together a state-of-the-art rotation. Additional projects are assigned on a case-by-case basis, at Care/Extended Care Facility Title: Intensive to Carecreate Unit; Practice Site Type: geriatrics rotation, withHospital/Institutional an “intersection point” teaching model that allows diversity Arthur A.the Nelson, Jr., Ph.D., of Dean discretion the preceptor and student. Students in the geriatric Professional Experience Program: Craig Cox, Pharm.D. John R. Reynolds, Pharm.D., Dean of learning among specialties, students and schools. rotation perform topic discussions, in-service education programs and Preceptor: Angela Treadway, Pharm.D. Professional Experience Program: Debra Copeland, take a finalCynthia comprehensive over core geriatric disease state and Site Administrator: Foslien-Nash,exam Pharmacy Pharm.D. Director medication related topics. Preceptor: John Marshall, Pharm.D. Site Administrator: Arthur C. Theodore, M.D., Director, Mission: Medical “To care for him his Academic-Practice Partnership: Virginia Commonwealth Intensive Carewho Unit shall have borne the battle and for University—Buford Road Pharmacy widow and his orphan.” APPE Title: Community, Advanced Community, ComAcademic-Practice Partnership: University of Michigan— pounding Elective, Entrepreneur Elective; Practice Site Ann to Arbor Health We willEast strive meet the Center needs of the nation’s veterans and their famiType: Community Pharmacy Independent Ambulatory Care; Practice Site Type: AmbulaDr. Angela Treadway is an assistant professor of pharmacy practice at lies todayAPPE andTitle: tomorrow by: becoming an even more veteran-focused Victor A. Yanchick, Ph.D., Dean tory Care Clinic the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy. organization, functioning as a single, comprehensive provider of seamProfessional Experience Program: Beverly Talluto, Frank J. Ascione, Ph.D., Dean less service to the men and women whoNancy haveMason, served our nation; Pharm.D. cul- Dr. Treadway received a Pharm.D. degree from The University of Texas Professional Experience Program: Preceptor: Ronald G.inDavis, B.S.completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at Methat Austin 1999, tivating aPharm.D. dedicated VA workforce of highly skilled employees who Preceptor: Choe, Site Administrator: RonaldofG.Memphis, Davis, Pharmacist odist Hospitals Tenn.inand a Primary Care Residency at the understand, believeHae in Mi and takePharm.D. pride in our vitally important mission; Site Administrator: Connie Standiford, M.D., Associate Charge, Owner South Texas Veterans Health Care System in San Antonio, Texas. She continuously benchmarking the quality and delivery of our service Medical Director, Ambulatory Care Services

Practice Site is Committed to Education

Veterans Administration

Practice Site Mission and Vision

Preceptor Information/Preceptor SpecificCriteria

with the best in business and use innovative means and high technology to deliver world-class service; and fostering partnerships with veterans organizations, the Department of Defense and other federal agencies, state and local veterans organizations, and other stakeholders to leverage resources and enhance the quality of services provided to veterans.

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is a board-certified pharmacotherapy specialist. Her practice, teaching and research interests center around geriatric pharmacotherapy in home care. She avails herself of preceptor training through the School of Pharmacy, through ACCP and at other national organizations. She is an active member of ACCP, ASCP and ASHP. Sponsored by Merck & Company, Inc.


awards section

Preceptor Demonstrates Leadership

Experiential Program Characteristics

Dr. Treadway is a respected, inspirational leader who has played an integral role in developing the geriatric APPE at the VA. Colleagues say she is dedicated to her practice, students and patients. She has served in numerous leadership positions within the ACCP Geriatrics Practice and Research Network and is currently its president. She engages in self-initiated quality assurance measurement. She collaborates with other health professionals to ensure integration of pharmacy into the teaching programs and healthcare teams. She has served on several school-wide committees including the Ad Hoc Strategic Planning Committee and the Executive Committee.

The Experiential Program’s goal is to engage in continuous quality improvement strategies that allow them to maintain a high level of student education. The vice chair of experiential programs oversees a decentralized staff that has standardized experiences across a diverse group of preceptors and four campuses. The experiential program has seven staff members.

Role Model Practitioner Dr. Treadway’s philosophy is to balance practice and teaching to provide patient-centered care, and ensure interdisciplinary healthcare team members understand and perform their roles in the patient care process. Colleagues say she has a positive attitude, is organized and works well with others. Peers say she is very good at using her clinical skills to uncover difficult medication issues. Others are impressed by her ability to provide education to a diverse patient population and find unique ways to deliver messages to patients. Her delivery of quality patient care has been recognized through patient feedback to the site’s director and a VA North Texas Courtesy in Action Star award.

Effective Teacher Peers and students describe Dr. Treadway as an inspiring, enthusiastic, innovative teacher, as well as a resource, role model and mentor. She uses a stepwise approach to teaching and tailors the experience to each student. She challenges students to “think forward” and approach situations with a global perspective. She makes students an integral part of the site’s care team.

Characteristics and Development of this APPE Rotation The VA provides a diverse patient population and a team-based training environment that provides opportunities for multiple rotation training experiences at all levels in this seven-year partnership.

Goals and Objectives of APPE Goals and objectives of this APPE are to: • Demonstrate content knowledge including the pathophysiology, diagnosis and diagnostic studies, clinical laboratory medicine, monitoring parameters, non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment, and pharmacology/clinical application of pharmacotherapy in core disease states. • Gather information, identify medication-related problems, formulate interventions as part of the SOAP process. • Develop a sense of patient responsibility and advocate for vulnerable elders. • Display professionalism and positive representation of pharmacy.

Academic-Practice Partnership Model

Lessons Learned/Advice for Others

The practice partners are independent entities operating with affiliation agreement/memorandum of understanding to conduct experiential education. The preceptor is in a shared faculty position (50 percent time) at the university.

To move an academic-practice partnership for experiential education forward in a positive, successful direction, these partners suggest:

Dr. Craig Cox is an associate professor in the pharmacy practice department at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy, Lubbock campus. His practice site is adult medicine at the University Medical Center. He has served as the vice chair of experiential programs, overseeing all experiential rotation activities offered at four campuses for nearly three years. Dr. Cox received a Pharm.D. degree from Washington State University and completed a critical care specialty residency with TTUHSC School of Pharmacy in Amarillo. He has helped lead the core and elective experiential rotation manual revision process toward standardization. In addition, he developed the online student portfolio system, allowing students to use the continuing professional development model and to track outcomes.

• Working as a team with a clear understanding of each other’s mission and goals. • Prioritizing goals and developing timelines to meet them. • Patience. Be willing to take small steps and build slowly. Unique attributes of this partnership include the diversity of rotation types offered by the VA and the scope of practice model for providing patient care where pharmacists have provider status.

academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

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awards section

Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy

Patient Care Model Meets Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Goals

2008 Crystal APPLE Award Recipients Community Pharmacy Independent

Richmond, Va.

Academic-Practice Partnership: Samford University—Perry County Health Department and Health Care System APPE Title: Ambulatory Care (Rural); Practice Site Type: Dean: Victor A. Yanchick, Ambulatory Care Clinic Ph.D. Bobby G. Bryant, Pharm.D., Dean Professional Experience Program: Beverly A. Talluto, Professional Experience Program: Robert Henderson, Pharm.D. Pharm.D. Preceptor: Charles D. Sands, Pharm.D. Preceptor: Ronald G. Davis, Site Administrator: FrancesB.S.Pharm Ford, RN, Director, Sewing Seeds of Hope

2008 The Healthy Living Center is operated by clinical pharmacists who are completing residency programs with VCU. Care is documented using SOAP notes and provided to the patient’s physician. The site is instituting a new quality improvement program examining workflow adjustments based upon the Institute for Safe Medication Practice guidelines. Patients are seen on an appointment and/or walk-in basis with 10-15

Academic-Practice University of NorthPatients are recruited using print/rapatientsPartnership: being actively monitored. Carolina at Chapel Hill—Mission Health Hospitals dio advertisements, word of mouth, through the dispensing process as APPE Title: Neurotrauma Critical Care; Practice Site well as from physician referral. The pharmacy utilizes collaborative pracType: Hospital/ Institutional agreements. MTM services are billed to Mirixa and Humana, while Robert A.tice Blouin, Pharm.D., Dean Professional Program: KimisLeadon, otherExperience point-of-care testing billedM.Ed. under a fee-for-service model. Preceptor: Elizabeth L. Michalets, Pharm.D. Site Administrator: Joe Damore, CEO, and Ellen Williams, Director of Pharmacy

Practice Site is Committed to Education

The practice is committed toCincinnati— education, offering three APPEs, and Site Administrator: Ronald G. Davis, Pharmacist in Charge, Academic-Practice Partnership: University of an ASHP-accredited residency site. Twenty-three students Communityserving Pharmacyas Care OwnerAcademic-Practice Partnership: University of Maryland—

Clinical Center at the National Institutes of Health APPE Title: Ambulatory Advanced completed theCare/Community five-week rotation in 2007, which is offered nine times APPE Title: Ambulatory Care; Practice Site Type: AmbuExperience; Site Type: Community Pharmacy perPractice year. Continuous professional development is fully supported and latory Care Clinic Independent embraced by the preceptor/owner who has completed several advanced Natalie D. Eddington, Ph.D., Dean Daniel Acosta, Jr., Ph.D., Dean certifications encourages the staff to pursue advanced education. Professional Experience Program: Cynthia Boyle, Professional Experienceand Program: Michael Doherty, Pharm.D. Pharm.D.Students are engaged in all practice aspects and participate in discusBuford Road Pharmacy is an independent community pharmacy locatPreceptor: Frank Pucino, Preceptor: Michael A. Hegener, Pharm.D. sion groups on clinical guidelines, chronic diseases and present a semied in suburban Richmond, Va.Pharm.D. This CLIA-waived site’s Healthy Living Site Administrator: David K. Henderson, M.D., Clinical Site Administrator: Don Ruwe, Pharmacist and Owner nar to the pharmacy staff at the rotation’s end. Center Clinic MTM services, including point-ofCenteroffers Deputycomprehensive Director care testing, anticoagulation services, an immunization/travel Academic-Practice clinic, Partnership: Texas Tech University Academic-Practice Partnership: University— medication administration training Northeastern for long-term care facilities,Health sup-Sciences Center—Veterans Administration Medical Center APPE Title: Geriatrics; Practice Site Type: Long-term ported Boston by extensive dispensing automation. The 15,000-square-foot Care/Extended Care Facility APPE Title: Intensive Care Unit; Practice Site Type: pharmacy’s four FTE pharmacists and nine FTE technicians fill Arthur 350 A. Nelson, Jr., Ph.D., Dean Hospital/Institutional prescriptions day. The pharmacy’s 12,000-square-foot front-end Ron Experience Davis received his B.S.Pharm from MCV in 1973. Ron practiced at Professional Program: Craig Cox, Pharm.D. John R.per Reynolds, Pharm.D., Dean has OTC Professional medications,Experience supplements, herbal products, Preceptor: Angelaa Treadway, Pharm.D. Program: Debra Copeland,diagnostic/moniRevco, community chain pharmacy, before opening his own store in Cynthia Pharm.D. toring devices, medical supplies and durable medical equipment. Site TheAdministrator: 1975. In 1991, heFoslien-Nash, bought andPharmacy continues to operate Buford Road PharDirector Preceptor: John Marshall, Pharm.D. pharmacy has separate drop-off and pick up windows with semiprivate macy. Ron is certified in diabetes, asthma and pain management. He Site Administrator: Arthur C. Theodore, M.D., Director, and private counseling has precepted students forCommonwealth more than 30 years and is an instructor at Academic-Practice Partnership: Virginia Medical Intensive areas. Care Unit University—Buford Road Pharmacy the MCV/VCU School of Pharmacy. He serves on multiple boards and APPE Title: Community,including Advanced Community, Com- School of Pharmacy National Academic-Practice Partnership: University of Michigan— committees the MCV/VCU pounding Elective, Entrepreneur Elective; Practice Site East Ann Arbor Health Center Advisory Board, Experiential Education Advisory Board and CurricuType: Community Pharmacy Independent APPEisTitle: Care; Practice Site patients, Type: AmbulaOur mission to beAmbulatory 100% committed to our our employees, Committee, National and Regional GNP Advisory Boards, Virginia Victor A. lum Yanchick, Ph.D., Dean tory Care Clinic product quality and excellent customer service. We are committed to Pharmacists Association, Richmond Professional Experience Program: Beverly Talluto, Pharmacists Association and the Frank J. Ascione, Ph.D., Dean providingProfessional the highestExperience level of Program: healthcare andMason, customer services posPharm.D.Virginia Academy of Independent Pharmacies and Bon Air Rotary. He Nancy sible. Preceptor: Pharm.D. Davis, B.S. with the Innovative Pharmacy of the Year Award hasRonald beenG.recognized Preceptor: Hae Mi Choe, Pharm.D. Site Administrator: Ronald G. Davis, Pharmacist in (2001), the MCV Preceptor Award, the MCV Distinguished Alumni of Site Administrator: Connie Standiford, M.D., Associate Charge, Owner We will distinguish ourselves through excellence in optimizing patient the Year Award, Disability Friendly Work Environment Award, PrecepMedical Director, Ambulatory Care Services care in the communities we serve. We will do this through our nine

Buford Road Pharmacy

Preceptor Information/Preceptor SpecificCriteria

Practice Site Mission & Vision

commitments: 1) Mutual Respect with both patients and employees; 2) Professional Supervision; 3) Competitive Wages; 4) Good Working Conditions; 5) Open Communication; 6) Fair Policies; 7) Job Security; 8) Career Growth; and 9) Equal Opportunity.

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tor of the Month (September 2003) and Pharmacist of the Year (2004) by Good Neighbor Pharmacies. He received a Purple Heart, Bronze Star and Silver Star for his military service in Vietnam. He is an active member of the West End Assembly of God church, having served as Sponsored by Merck & Company, Chairman of the Board of Deacons, taught classes andInc.participated in medical mission trips.


awards section

Preceptor Demonstrates Leadership Ron Davis is widely recognized for his vision and leadership. He attributes much of his success to the family atmosphere for which his practice is known and reflecting his practice philosophy to build personal patient relationships to affect changes that make patients healthier. He is a deeply committed preceptor, and has created a comprehensive and innovative community practice.

Role Model Practitioner Ron motivates and inspires pharmacists to develop pharmaceutical care services by example. His mission for pharmacy is to create a center to help people control and manage their disease states. Peers say he is “low-key and empathetic” and has a “great talent for listening and being sensitive to other’s concerns.” He believes being involved in shaping pharmacy’s future is everyone’s responsibility.

Effective Teacher Ron has a deep commitment to professional practice and the teaching activities at the site. He teaches by example, and demonstrates effective interactions with patients, physicians, pharmacists and staff. He displays a passion for teaching. Ron sees his role as a preceptor not solely as a teacher, but as a pharmacist, mentor and role model. He communicates excitement and enthusiasm to pharmacists, students and residents, and inspires and pushes them to perform at levels they thought were unattainable.

Academic-Practice Partnership Model The practice partners are independent entities operating with affiliation agreement/memorandum of understanding to conduct experiential education. The preceptor is employed by the practice site with non-salaried status at the academic institution. Dr. Beverly A. Talluto has served as VCU School of Pharmacy’s assistant dean of experiential education since 2004. Dr. Talluto is past chair of AACP’s PEPSIG. She has been instrumental in creating PEPSIG Ask the Experts Questions and Mentor Program, and created a resource library for preceptor and experiential program development. She participates extensively in AACP. Dr. Talluto has extensive, longterm experience developing and implementing innovative experiential education tools and programs, conducting research in the area and providing leadership in national professional associations.

Experiential Program Characteristics The Experiential Education Program has numerous preceptor communication and training initiatives, including a quarterly Preceptor Newsletter, twice-yearly preceptor recognition for CE events and Colloquia meetings on the last day of six APPE rotations. The experiential program has a Drug-Related Problem Web-based reporting program that fosters documentation and awareness of drug problems in all the school’s IPPE and APPE experiential activities. A Web-based

mentor program allows students to ask questions of all preceptors and archive retrievable responses. The program is guided by two advisory boards: an internal Clinical Advisory Board and external OEE Advisory Board.

Characteristics and Development of this APPE Rotation Community and advanced community rotations have been in existence for more than 10 years. In 2004 and 2007, required rotation objectives were reviewed and updated to follow Cape Outcomes, the VCU Global and ACPE standards. Ongoing rotation evaluation was refined by implementing the EMS Web-based system that allows for student assessment, global outcome achievement, professional behavior, preceptor and site assessment and preceptor professionalism.

Goals and Objectives of APPE This APPE’s learning objectives are to: • Identify potential drug-related problems and determine whether these have occurred. • Demonstrate the ability to provide pharmacist-delivered patient care to a diverse patient population. • Provide accurate and appropriate drug information and consultation to pharmacists and other healthcare professionals. • Participate in one aspect of a patient care pharmacy service (i.e., development, implementation, compensation, marketing or outcomes evaluation). • Communicate both verbally and in writing about advanced community pharmacy practice. • Perform physical assessment to evaluate drug therapy outcomes and identify objective findings appropriate for documenting drug effects and/or toxicity.

Lessons Learned/Advice for Others To move an academic-practice partnership for experiential education forward in a positive, successful direction, these partners suggest: • Not being restrictive in what you are willing to do. Practice is continually evolving and the school provides great incentive to participate and be a partner for change. • Understanding and respecting each partner’s role. Unique attributes of this partnership include the residency program, active participation by both partners, close proximity to the school, opportunities for preceptor growth, and respect and cooperation among the partners.

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School Colors Aside,

GOES


, Academic Pharmacy

GREEN Pharmacy institutions around the country are working to create a better world not just through their research, teaching and service, but also through their countless eco-friendly initiatives. Whether faculty are utilizing video conferencing or simply using both sides of the paper like Washington State University College of Pharmacy, all colleges and schools are doing their part to reduce our waste and reuse our resources. Academic Pharmacy Now takes a look at some of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;greenâ&#x20AC;? initiatives our members are implementing to reduce our collective carbon footprint.


feature story

Butler University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences May 8, 2009 marked the one-year anniversary of the beginning of Butler University’s construction of a $14 million addition to its pharmacy and health sciences building. The addition, which is funded in part by a $25 million grant from the Lilly Endowment Inc., will allow Butler’s College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences to recruit more pharmacy faculty and accept more transfer students. It also satisfies the university’s goal to become a ‘greener’ campus. The building is expected to open in fall 2009. “We have six objectives for the grant, one of which is to become an employer of choice among pharmacy faculty,” said Dr. Mary H. Andritz, dean of the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. “One of the ways you do that is to have a good infrastructure —buildings, classrooms, laboratories and offices that allow instructors to be successful in the classroom and with their scholarship.”

coming Butler’s first LEED, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, building on campus. According to the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), Butler’s pharmacy and health sciences addition would become the second LEED-Silver facility in Indianapolis and the third LEED-Silver facility in the state. The USGBC offers four certification levels: certified, silver, gold and platinum. Some of the ‘green’ components of the addition include waterless urinals in the men’s restroom and hand dryers rather than paper towels in all restrooms. Bicycle storage, changing rooms and showers will be added for people who ride their bikes to work. Additionally, 5 percent of the building’s parking lot will be reserved for hybrid vehicles. Classrooms will feature a combination of natural light and soft electric lights to reduce electricity use. Green electricity will be purchased through a program with Indianapolis Power & Light. Additionally, some of the heat generated from the university’s data center, which is being moved to the new addition, will be used to heat the building.

Components of the 40,000-square-foot, four-story building include two new classrooms with seating for an entire Pharm.D. class, a student lounge, faculty offices and project rooms, and two laboratories — a history and physical laboratory to support Butler’s Physician Assistant (PA) program and a As part of the construction, the university will also research lab for the pharmaceutical sciences faculty. renovate two pharmacy instructional labs in the With the new research lab, the college hopes to existing building, which was built in 1951. grow the pharmaceutical sciences program from four to seven faculty members. “What’s so exciting is that at the end of this whole project, every [COPHS] research laboratory and With the addition of the History and Physical Laboevery instructional laboratory will be brand new or ratory, the entire PA program will be on campus for totally renovated,” Andritz said. “That will be a huge the first time in its 13-year history. benefit to our students and our faculty.” “Some of the courses, such as the ones that will take place in the new history and physical lab, took place at Clarian Health due to lack of space in the college,” Andritz said. “The new lab will allow us to bring that portion of the program and those faculty members back on campus.” The addition will also enable the college to accept transfer students into the professional phase of the pharmacy program, something it had not been able to do in recent years. “In 2006–2007, we had 697 transfer applications for fewer than five openings,” said Andritz. The university hopes this addition will serve as a standard for all new construction projects by be-

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feature story

Mercer University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Helping the environment was the key topic at Mercer University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences’ interdisciplinary seminar “Caring for Creation, Ethical Response to Climate Change” held in February. Forty Doctor of Pharmacy students from the college attended the seminar, in addition to 200 Mercer students and faculty representing the college’s physician assistant program, theology, nursing, business and education. The event was organized by the Mercer Atlanta Campus Quality Enhancement Plan Team as part of a campus-wide effort to examine ethical issues.

Construction is underway on the stateof-the-art, LEED-Silver certified addition to the Butler University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. When complete, the building will be the second LEED-Silver facility in Indianapolis and the third of its kind in the state.

The event involved a partnership between Mercer University and Harvard Medical School’s Center for Health and the Global Environment. Plenary session topics included “The Science of Climate Change,” “The Health Effects of Climate Change,” and “Religious and Ethical Reflections on Climate Change.” During interactive breakout sessions, students shared perspectives from their disciplines as they discussed topics such as basic climate science, local environmental policy, and climate change and human health. As a result of conference participation, a “Green Team” was formed for Mercer’s Atlanta campus to serve as a grassroots catalyst to implement plans for greening the campus. Pharmacy students and faculty are members of the “Green Team.” The team is initiating a recycling program for paper and plastics via a county-wide recycling program and recycling print cartridges through a local retailer. Recycling bins will be placed in the administration and classroom buildings, as well as in the campus apartments. Future plans include installation of waterless urinals and use of energy efficient lighting. Student participants in the interdisciplinary seminar reflected on how they can start to incorporate changes that will reduce their carbon footprint – on and off campus. “Many of the ideas that were presented concerned consuming less resources and making more efficient use of those we must use,” said second-year pharmacy student Katherine Wolf. “The idea of recycling and cutting back is one that makes sense. It will require self-discipline to implement.” In response to statements made at the conference that a rise in global temperature will increase the incidence of tropical diseases, third-year pharmacy student Kate Gillette commented, “I’m going to try to do my part to decrease my carbon footprint and make the small changes that I can to prevent this sort of healthcare nightmare.”

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feature story

Loma Linda University School of Pharmacy Loma Linda University School of Pharmacy is providing greener transportation to its faculty and staff, using fewer fossil fuels and encouraging exercise.

The fire engine-red Columbia electric cart provides on-campus transportation for School of Pharmacy faculty and staff. It can safely travel on roads with posted speed limits of less than 35 miles-per-hour.

“Transportation is a potential bottleneck to productivity,” said Dr. Billy Hughes, dean of the School of Pharmacy.” By providing green alternatives to this challenge, we can facilitate efficiency

while doing what is right for our planet.” A 2009 Nissan Altima Hybrid was purchased in April 2008 primarily for the use of the experiential education faculty and staff. They frequently travel across California to evaluate and assess clinical rotation sites for pharmacy students. The most-recognizable electric cart on campus was purchased in June 2008. Its bright red color, shiny wheels and tires are easy to spot. It is available to all pharmacy

The University of Louisiana at Monroe College of Pharmacy While The University of Louisiana at Monroe may not be building a new facility, students there are making strides to help their college “go green.” Bran Fanguy, a third-year pharmacy student, currently coordinates all student-led recycling efforts for the Bienville campus. Fanguy said that enthusiasm to recycle and reuse grows by the day. The students currently recycle Number One and Number Two plastics (commonly known as PET/PETE and HDPE plastics), steel, tin and aluminum. They receive a small amount of profit for the aluminum, which in turn purchases liners and recycling containers. Paper bins are located at the Bienville Building entrance and exits. “We want to ensure the program continues in the future and that our university never has to foot the bill for its cost,” said Fanguy. In the spirit of community partnership, pharmacy students have teamed up with Aron’s Pharmacy in their recycling efforts. Aron’s Pharmacy saves their Number One and Number Two plastics for the students, who then bring them to the recycling facility Monroe Iron and Metal each week. According to Fanguy, Aron’s Pharmacy typically has about 20 pounds of plastic per week; the college of pharmacy usually has about 15 pounds per week. “We just wanted everyone to know that the college of pharmacy students have made an effort to become as green as possible,” he said.

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feature story faculty and staff to get around campus. This street-legal vehicle is DMV-registered and may be driven on any road with a posted speed limit up to 35 miles-per-hour.

Walmart donated two tricycles, complete with behind the seat baskets for hauling items. Helmets were also provided.

Rounding out the green transportation initiative are two bicycles and two tricycles. The Trek™ Lime and Trek™ Lime Lite bicycles were donated by Cyclery USA in Redlands, Calif. They are unique in that they have automatic three-speed transmissions. The bicycle monitors speed and pedal pressure to determine which gear is best.

“I’m delighted that our corporate partners have stepped up to the plate and assisted our efforts to advance this green initiative,” said Hughes. “Together we can improve our workflow while doing something to benefit our environment.” Billy Hughes, dean of the School of Pharmacy, accepts two tricycles from Walmart as part of the School of Pharmacy’s initiative to provide eco-friendly transportation for faculty and staff. Pictured with the dean are Walmart representatives Day Gooch, regional talent specialist, and Todd Williams, former pharmacy district manager.

University of Colorado Denver School of Pharmacy The University of Colorado Denver School of Pharmacy is incorporating many “green” features into the building of its new 165,000-square-foot building to house the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. While some are common, such as low flow fixtures in restrooms and laboratories, and the use of low VOC paints, tile and carpet, others are not. The new building will have a light colored roof and sidewalks to reduce the “heat island” effect, and the lighting and ventilation systems will be managed in such a way to take advantage of daylight and periods of vacancy through infrared and motion sensors in labs and offices. The School of Pharmacy is certainly on its way to building a state-of-the-art facility that is carbon conscious.

has been specifically geared to carefully manage the recyclable materials being used on the project, as well as the collection and disposition of “remnants” for reuse. In addition to the greening of the building, the UC Denver School of Pharmacy has instituted a bimonthly e-newsletter, which has made it possible to reduce printing and increase the frequency with which the school communicates with its audiences. An artist’s rendering of the new, 165,000-square-foot building to house the UC Denver Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Sustainable and recycled products are also being used throughout the building. Even the brick will be supplied from a source within 500 miles of the site. The construction process academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009

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Call us today to discuss how your company can take advantage of this invaluable advertising opportunity in the most widely read pharmacy education magazine available! Contact Rebecca Morgan at 703-739-2330 x1032 or rmorgan@aacp.org.


faculty news

Faculty News The University of Arizona Appointments/Elections • Richard N. Herrier, clinical associate professor

Awards • Richard N. Herrier became an American Pharmacists Association Fellow. • Jason Hurwitz has been chosen to receive a postdoctoral fellowship in health outcomes from the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America Foundation. • Serrine S. Lau will receive the 2009 Education Award from the Society of Toxicology this March. • Raymond A. Lorenz has been recognized as a Board Certified Psychiatric Specialist.

• John E. Murphy has been named the 2009 Leonard Lecturer by The University of Texas College of Pharmacy. • Haley M. Phillippe has been recognized as a Board Certified Pharmacotherapy Specialist.

Grants • Marie A. Chisholm-Burns is the principal investigator of a grant titled “Medication Access Program” from the Mason Trust for $998,072. • Grant H. Skrepnek is the principal investigator of a grant titled “A Needs Assessment of Patients with Lung Disease in the United States” from Novartis for $49,250.

Auburn University Awards

Promotions

• Kenneth N. Barker, PI, and Betsy A. Flynn, co-PI, received the following contracts for research and development on the AU Medication Error Detection System (AU MEDS): MedAccurcy LLP, $138,832, for Dec. l, 2008–Nov. 30, 2009; Lancaster General Hospital, $30,000, Sept. 15, 2008–Sept. 14, 2009; DCH Regional Medical Denter, $30,000, Jan. 12, 2008–Jan. 11, 2009.

• Kimberly Braxton Lloyd has been named assistant dean for health services.

• Angela I. Calderón, PI, has received the Research Starter Grant from the American Society of Pharmacognosy for “Pf Thioredoxin Reductase ScreeningBased Lead Identification For Malaria,” for a total grant of $5,000.

• Kristen L. Helms has been promoted to clinical associate professor. • Erika L. Kleppinger has been promoted to clinical associate professor. • Kurt A. Wargo has been promoted to clinical associate professor. • Jan Kavookjian has been promoted to associate professor with tenure.

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faculty news

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Appointments

Awards

• Alan Forrest was appointed to the ACCP-Federal Drug Administration “Blue-Ribbon Task Force,” to develop a position paper on the optimization of drug development using pharmacometrics.

• Eugene Morse, PI, received an $880,000 grant to fund a Medication Management Research Network (MMRN). • Gayle Brazeau received the 2007–08 University at Buffalo Faculty Senate Outstanding Service Award.

Campbell University Grants • Under the direction of Dr. Brenda D. Jamerson, clinical research Fellow Jason Moss was recently awarded a $2,000 grant from the American Pharmaceutical Association to study the effects Vitamin D could have on a cancer patient’s response to chemotherapy.

University of Cincinnati Appointments/Elections • Elizabeth A. Eichel, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy

• Gerald B. Kasting received a three-year award in the amount of $491,139 from COLIPA, the European Cosmetics and Toiletries Association, “Prediction of Epidermal Bioavailability of Contact Allergans.”

• Anne H. Metzger, assistant professor of clinical pharmacy

Retirements

Grants

• Adel A. Sakr, professor of industrial pharmacy and pharmaceutics

• Gary A. Gudelsky, co-investigator, received a twoyear NIH grant for $400,000 for the project titled “Antipsychotics, hypoglycemia, glutamate and cognition.”

College of Notre Dame of Maryland Appointments/Elections • College of Notre Dame of Maryland School of Pharmacy has appointed Payal Agarwal, assistant professor, pharmaceutical sciences.

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ion: Caut s at ber Mem rk Wo

Consumer medication information falls short, UF researchers say Two University of Florida pharmacy faculty members told a U.S. Food and Drug Administration panel in February that the information accompanying prescription medicine often does not follow FDA format and content recommendations. This, according to Dr. Carole L. Kimberlin, professor of pharmaceutical outcomes and policy and Dr. Almut G. Winterstein, assistant professor of pharmaceutical outcomes and policy, can lead to incomprehensible information for consumers. Consumers should be able to easily recognize essential information in the drug handouts, and the fonts should be relatively large and readable. These factors affect the quality and accessibility of the instructions and other information consumers need to safely take their prescription medicines. The FDA does not have regulatory authority over such information, so it varies from one pharmacy to the next—even for the same medications. The information comes from private companies that collect and format the data for pharmacies to distribute. “The generation of the consumer medication information (CMI) is not really the primary purpose of their software,” Kimberlin said. “It’s almost an afterthought.” The software has other features and purposes, she said, which can make it difficult for a patient to read, or even find, the important information about their medication. For example, an attached leaflet might con-

Members faculty  Working For You! news

tain store coupons or ads for other prod- patients or easily understood, and it may ucts. Portions of the information might even actually hinder comprehension in the long be cut out due to lack of available space. run. For some patients, she emphasized, Kimberlin says one leaflet she examined di- knowing how to properly use their medicarected patients in the “side effects” section tions can be a matter of life or death. to see also the “warnings” section, however, “warnings” had been cut out, as well as “I think this is more a philosophical issue of the “precautions” and “contraindications” how much do you want the government to regulate certain things,” Winterstein said. sections. “A private company will only put as much In 2001, the FDA funded a study by Uni- effort financially into this as requested or versity of Wisconsin researchers that sent required. I mean some of these leaflets are trained shoppers to pharmacies across the really bad, to say the least.” country to fill prescriptions for specific medications. Pamphlets of information handed Kimberlin and Winterstein were among out with the drugs were then evaluated by other pharmacy stakeholders at the public a group of experts according to FDA stan- hearing before the FDA’s Risk Communicadards for factors such as the comprehen- tion Advisory Committee. Together they adsiveness of the information and its format. vised the FDA to consider developing one Non-experts also evaluated the documents standard format for consumer medication information. They recommended that the for consumer usefulness. FDA generate a patient label template that Kimberlin and Winterstein conducted a all pharmacies would use to create one similar study in 2008, also with FDA fund- type of leaflet that is dispensed to patients. ing, and compared their results with the “The reality is our research shows that after previous ones. this has been in the private domain for a “What we found was that there was more decade now, it really is not up to the stancontent, more pieces of information includ- dards that are needed in most of the information leaflets that ed,” she said. “So were given to patients,” said Kimberlin, “but from that perspecthat the formatting, the reading level, the tive, I think the FDA font size, how easy it is to read in terms of has a good chance the spacing between lines — all of the for- that people will matting that would make it more readable agree that having a and interpretable did not improve at all.” more prescriptive system would probIn addition, Winterstein said the increase ably be better.” in information does not mean it is useful to

Remember to submit your Faculty News today! It’s fast and easy to make sure your college or school of pharmacy is featured in the Faculty News section of Academic Pharmacy Now. Visit the AACP Web site at www.aacp.org and complete the Apr/May/June School News academic Pharmacy now 2009 45 Submission Form on the News and Publications portion of the new site.


faculty news

University of Connecticut Appointments/Elections

Grants

• Ben A. Bahr recently became a member of the University of Connecticut Stem Cell Institute, the European Task Force on Brain and Lysosomal Neurodegenerative Diseases, and a member of the Editorial Board for the journals Neurochemical Research and Rejuvenation Research.

• Amy C. Anderson, co-PI, and Dennis L. Wright, coPI, have been notified that their R01 grant “Targeting DHFR to Design Antimicrobial Agents” has been renewed.

• Bodhi Chaudhuri has been selected as a reviewer for the journal Chemical Engineering Science. • Sean M. Jeffery was appointed as an adjunct assistant professor at the Yale School of Medicine. • Effie L. Kuti has been invited to serve on the board of The Annals of Pharmacotherapy. • John B. Morris was appointed to: the National Academy of Science/National Research Council Committee on Emergency and Continuous Exposure Guidance Levels for Selected Submarine Contaminants, the Society of Toxicology Scientific Liaison Task Force, the State of Virginia Inhalation Toxicology Advisory Committee, and the U.S.EPA, Peer Review Panel for Propionaldehyde.

Awards • Craig I. Coleman has been named an ACCP New Investigator and will receive his award at the Opening General Session of the 2009 International Congress on Clinical Pharmacy in Orlando.

• Ben A. Bahr recently received funding from the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation ($219,962 for two years), Connecticut State Stem Cell Research Initiative ($450,000 for four years), and MERZ Pharmaceuticals ($122,300 for two years). • Craig I. Coleman and C. Michael White received their second AHRQ EPC contract/project for a topic development project evaluating the use of recombinant human growth hormone in patients with cystic fibrosis. • John B. Morris has received a grant from the American Petroleum Institute for a project on biomarkers for naphthalene-induced airway injury. • Michael J. Pikal received a grant from the FDA (through NIPTE) for “Quality by Design for Parenteral Freeze Dried Products” and another grant for (Bioengineering Research Partnership) from NIH for “Ambient Dry State Preservation of Therapeutic Macromolecules.” • Marie A. Smith, PI, Marghie Giuliano, co-PI, and Devra Dang, Effie L. Kuti and Thomas E. Buckley, all investigators, received notification that the CT Dept of Social Services has approved their proposal for the “E-Prescribing Medication Info Exchange” project.

Creighton University Appointments/Elections

Awards

• Justin A. Tolman has been appointed as an assistant professor of pharmacy science.

• Kimberly A. Galt has earned the Distinguished Service Award from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Section of Clinical Specialists and Scientists.

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faculty news

Drake University Awards • Robert P. Soltis was named the first recipient of the C. Boyd Granberg Professional Leadership Award for his service to professional pharmacy organizations.

The University of Iowa Appointments/Elections • Kathy J. Rinehart has been named assistant dean for veterans affairs. • David L. Roman joined the Medicinal Natural Products Chemistry division.

Awards

• Lawrence Fleckenstein received the following grants: Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, $64,122, “Moxidectine Analysis for protocol 3110A1 – 1005”; Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, $50,244, “Moxidectine Analysis for protocol 3110A1 – 1002”; and Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, $7,500, “Method Validation in Support of Protocol number 3110A1 – 1002.”

• Jay D. Currie has been named this year’s recipient of the American Pharmacists Association Distinguished Achievement Award in Community and Ambulatory Practice Pharmacy.

• Michael W. Kelly is co-investigator on a grant in nursing for $913,875 for the Iowa Area Health Education Center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Health Resources & Services Administration.

• Erika J. Ernst and Michael E. Ernst have recently been named Fellows of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

• Caitlin Lemke, Pharmaceutical Research & Manufacturers of America foundation, $80,000.00, Post Doc Fellowship Training with Aliasger Salem.

• Jeffrey C. Reist, Michelle Fravel and Matthew Cantrell met the requirements to become Board Certified Pharmacotherapy Specialists.

• Kevin Moores, Wolters Kluwer Health, $18,696, “Off Label Drug Information Monographs.”

Grants • Tim Brenza received $80,000 from the Pharmaceutical Research & Manufacturers of America foundation for a Post Doc Fellowship Training with Jennifer Fiegel. • Jonathan A. Doorn received $1,498,725 from the NIH for “Organochlorine-mediated generation of a dopamine-derived neurotoxin.” • Jennifer Fiegel has received funding from Pharmaceutical Research & Manufacturers of America Foundation in the amount of $30,000 for “Development of Dry Powder Aerosols to Disperse and Eradicate Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infections in the Lung.”

• Peggy Nopoulos, PI, and Daryl J. Murry, Vincent Magnotta, Douglas Langbehn, Thomas Wassink, Eva Tsalikian, Jeffrey Murray, Lynn Richman, John Canady and Michael Karnell, co-investigators, have received funding from NIH in the amount of $407,533 for “Brain Structure, Function, and Growth in Children with Oral Cleft.” • Mick Wells, PI, has received funding from NIH in the amount of $67,797 for “Manufacturing of Oral and Topical Dosage Forms.”

Retirements • After 17 years of dedicated service to The University of Iowa, Rolland I. Poust retired Oct. 1, 2008. Dr. Poust was the director of pharmaceutical services and also served as a professor and interim division head in the division of pharmaceutics.

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faculty news

University of Maryland *Information on grants listed for Thomas C. Dowling and James E. Polli in the Jan/Feb/Mar 2009 issue was incorrectly submitted. Both grants were received by Dr. Polli.

Appointments/Elections • Bruce D. Anderson has been appointed to a Maryland Board of Pharmacy task force to develop an educational campaign to promote the safe use of acetaminophen to the public. • Richard N. Dalby has been named the new graduate program director for the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. • Thomas C. Dowling has been appointed to the editorial board of the journal Pharmacotherapy. • Mary Lynn McPherson has been elected a Distinguished Practitioner in the National Academies of Practice in Pharmacy and was named a Health Care Hero by the Maryland Daily Record newspaper. • Paul S. Shapiro has been named the associate dean for research and graduate studies. • Pam Voulalas was named a research assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Awards • Lisa Booze received the University of Maryland’s Top Terp Award, which honors excellence in education. • Dean Natalie D. Eddington has been selected for the Leadership Maryland Class of 2009. • Gerald M. Rosen received the 2009 University System of Maryland Board of Regents Collaborative Research Faculty Award. • Linda Simoni-Wastila received the Excellence in Mental Health Policy and Economics Research Award from the International Center of Mental Health Policy and Economics for the article “The Effect of a Three-Tier Formulary on Antidepressant Utilization and Expenditures,” which she co-authored. • Shannon Tucker has been awarded a 2009 Jane N. Ryland Fellowship by EDUCAUSE.

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Grants • Peter Butko received $16,093 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for “Mechanism of Action of the Insecticidal Toxin CYT1A: Biophysical and Biochemical Approach.” • Andrew Coop received $101,042 from the West Virginia University Research Corporation for “Synthesis and Evaluation of Sigma-Active Cocaine Antagonists.” • Raymond C. Love received $277,220 from the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene for “Thomas B. Finn Center: Improvement of Pharmacy Services.” • Mary Lynn McPherson received $75,000 from Alpharma Pharmaceuticals LLC for “Pain Management and Palliative Care Residency Agreement.” • Ebere Onukwugha received $113,604 from Pfizer for “Economic Burden of Overactive Bladder Symptoms.” She also received $26,992 from the National Center for Research Resources for “University of Maryland Multidisciplinary Clinical Research Career Development Program.” • James E. Polli received $35,000 from Bristol-Myers Squibb for “Prodrugs for the Intestinal Bile Acid Transporter to Improve Oral Bioavailability due to Low Intestinal Permeability.” • Linda Simoni-Wastila received $137,933 from GlaxoSmithKline for “COPD Prevalence, Medication Use, and Potential Cost Offsets for Elderly Medicare Beneficiaries.” • Peter Swaan received $239,000 from the U.S. Department of Energy for the Center for Nanomedicine and Cellular Delivery’s research into new nanoconstructs. Swaan also received $87,500 from The University of Utah for “Dendritic Biomaterials for Oral Delivery of Chemotherapeutics.” • Hongbing Wang received $35,000 from BristolMyers Squibb for “Define Regulatory Elements and Transcription Factors Involved in Mediating Nonclassical PXR-related CYP3A4 Enzyme Induction.”


faculty news

• Kristin Watson received $1,000 from the Maryland Society of Health-System Pharmacists for “Compliance with Laboratory Monitoring in Patients with Heart Failure Receiving Sprinolactone.” • Sheila Weiss Smith received $22,500 from the Veterans Affairs Medical Center for “Evaluating the Safety and Use of Erythropoietin Among Cancer Patients in

the VA Medical System.” She also received $80,282 from the National Cancer Institute for a sabbatical position. • Ilene H. Zuckerman received $141,933 from Merck for “Impact of Falls Among Patients with Osteoporosis.”

Mercer University Grants • Ashish A. Advani was awarded a $21,000 grant from Alaven Pharmaceuticals, LLC for the Drug Information Center. • Ajay K. Banga was awarded a grant in the amount of $100,000 from Transport Pharmaceuticals for “Transdermal Drug Delivery by a Combination of Microneedles and iontophoresis.” • Ajay K. Banga received a grant for $18,000 from Agile Therapeutics for “Formulation factors affecting skin permeation of hormones from a Transdermal patch.”

• Martin J. D’Souza received a grant from the Georgia Cancer Coalition in the amount of $50,000.00 for the study “Nanosphere Based Oral and Transdermal Vaccines for Breast Cancer-Next Generation of Vaccines.” Dr. D’Souza also received multiple grants from the Dialysis Clinic, Inc. for “Effect of microencapsulated catalase and superoxide dismutase microspheres on oxidative stress” ($12,435.00); “Combination of gentamicin and NF-kB microspheres” ($8,937.00); “Determination of the toxicity of the microspheres of the anti-sense oligonucleotides to NF-kB” ($5,644.00); “Effect of microencapsulated anti-sense oligomers to NF-kB on cytokine production”($6,142.00); and “Combination of gentamicin and NF-kB microspheres” ($8,937.00).

University of Louisiana at Monroe Appointments/Elections • W. Greg Leader has been named interim dean of the ULM College of Pharmacy.

Midwestern University Awards • Anil Gulati is a co-recipient of the Ranbaxy Research Award in the field of pharmaceutical sciences.

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faculty news

University of Minnesota Appointments/Elections • James C. Cloyd has been elected to the American Epilepsy Society Board of Directors. • Nichole Kulinski, assistant professor of pharmaceutical care and health systems • Mark M. Schneiderhan, associate professor of pharmacy practice and pharmaceutical science

Grants • Bjoern Bauer is the recipient of a $10,000 grant through the AACP New Investigators Program. His proposal is titled “Targeting cPLA2 to overcome Pglycoprotein-mediated drug-resistant epilepsy.” • Bjoern Bauer will serve as a co-investigator on a grant awarded by the Whiteside Institute for Clinical Research. The $14,950 grant will support the proposal “Improving glioblastoma chemotherapy through BCRP.” • James C. Cloyd received an FDA Orphan Product grant for his project “Phase I Study in Patients Supporting IV TPM for Neonatal Seizures.” This is the second peer review grant received for this project, bringing total funding to approximately $337,000. • Serguei V. Pakhomov, along with co-investigators Brian J. Isetts and Terrence J. Adam, have been awarded a $750,000, three-year grant through the

NIH/National Library of Medicine for their proposal “Semantic Relatedness for Active Medication Safety and Outcomes Surveillance.” • Robert J. Straka was awarded a 2008 Planning Grant in Health Disparities Research. The $20,000 grant is for the project “Pharmacogenomic Investigations in the Hmong Community” • Timothy P. Stratton received a $15,000 grant from the Arrowhead Area Agency on Aging for his project TeleMTM, which includes MTM interviews for homebound citizens in Carlton County. • Natalia Y. Tretyakova received two R01 NIH grant renewals. “DNA cross-linking by diepoxybutane” in the amount of $889,265, and “Sequence distribution of tobacco carcinogen-DNA adducts” in the amount of $1,052,880 have both been renewed through 2013. • Timothy S. Tracy received an NIH grant (sub-award) in the amount of $577,940 to study “Pharmacogenetics of Warfarin Induction and Inhibition.” This is a clinical trial that is part of the University of Washington Program Project grant on drug interactions. • Chengguo (Chris) Xing received a $30,000, one-year grant from the Leukemia Research Fund for his study “Small molecule inhibitors of Bcl-2 in the treatment of leukemia and other cancers.”

The University of Montana–Missoula Grants • Erica L. Woodahl received $10,000 from AACP to study pharmacogenomics in ABCB1 and the susceptibility to Parkinson’s disease.

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faculty news

University of Nebraska Medical Center Awards • Jeffrey N. Baldwin is a recipient of the Spirit of Community Service Award.

The University of Oklahoma Appointments • Peter N. Johnson has been appointed to the American Journal of Hospital Pharmacy editorial board and will serve the Journal through 2011.

• Nathan Shankar has been selected to serve as cochair of the Region IV Microbiology and Microbial Pathogenesis National Study Section for the American Heart Association.

University of the Sciences in Philadelphia Grants • Adeboye Adejare received $12,500 from WBT Pharmaceuticals for “Investigation of Anti-Cancer Properties of a Herbal Preparation.” He also coordinated a $89,619 grant from Delaware Valley Innovation Network to Wistar Institute for the BTT Program. • Bin Chen received $50,000 from Upenn/Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics for “Therapeutic Enhancement of Vascular Targeting Photodynamic Therapy.” • Natalia Coleman received $12,500 from WBT Pharmaceuticals for “Investigation of Anti-Cancer Properties of a Herbal Preparation.” • Russell J. DiGate received $50,000 from Target/Biotics/Eastern Technology Council for “Research on Topoisomerases for Antibiotic Development.” • Anil D’mello received $47,655 from Jenrin for “Effects of Maternal Low Protein Diets During Pregnancy and Lactation on Susceptibility of the Offspring to Obesity.”

• Pardeep K. Gupta received $96,000 from Phase Biosciences, Inc. for “Evaluation of Anti-Diabetic Activity of ELP Fusion Proteins in Normal and Diabetic Mouse and Rat Models.” He also received $90,000 from Terumo for “Optimization and Validation of Heparin Coating of Metal and Polymer Surfaces.” • Zhiyu Li received $15,000 from Russell Biotech, Inc. for “Characterization of Protein-A Bound RBI Particle for Antibody Purification.” He also received $217,005 from the NIH National Institute of General Medical Sciences for “Interaction Between B Cereus Rec.Q Helicase and Topoisomerase III.” • Catherine C. Moore received $10,000 from AACP for “GPCR Regulation in Metastatic Cancer Cells.” • Steven H. Neau received $227,786 from the NIH National Institute of General Medical Sciences for “Chitosan as a Pore Former in Coated Beads for Colon Specific Drug Delivery.”

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faculty news

Purdue University Grants • Steven R. Abel received $116,180 from Eli Lilly & Company for “Eli Lilly & Company Drug Information Residency.” He also received $73,225 from Health & Hospital Corp. of Marion County for “Health and Hospital Corp. of Marion County”; and $11,474 from Walgreens Company for “Purdue/ Walgreens Patient Counseling and Train the Trainer Programs.” • Kwadwo Amankwa received $62,572 from Community Health Network. • Stephen R. Byrn received $750,092 from Indiana University for “Indiana CTSI.” He also received $17,000 from Clinton Foundation HIV/AIDS Initiative for “Crystallization Optimization.” • Bruce C. Carlstedt received $16,493 from Regenstrief Institute for Health Care for “Regenstrief Institute Health Care.” • M. Teresa Carvajal received $263,917 from National Science Foundation for “Microstructural Evolution of Molecular Crystals.” • Mark S. Cushman received $236,716 from PHS-NIH National Cancer Institute for “Novel Indenoisoquinoline Topoisomerase I Inhibitors.” • Robert L. Geahlen received $52,349 from PHS-NIH National Cancer Institute for “Syk and Associated Proteins in Breast Cancer” and $252,516 from PHSNIH National Cancer Institute for “Syk and Associated Proteins in Breast Cancer.” • Robert L. Geahlen and Marietta L. Harrison received $219,085 from PHS-NIH National Cancer Institute for “Tyrosine Protein Kinases and Lymphocyte Activation.” • Arun K. Ghosh received $430,155 from PHS-NIH National Institute of General Medical Science for “Design and Synthesis of Nonpeptide Protease Inhibitors.” • Richard A. Gibbs and Marietta L. Harrison received $212,234 from PHS-NIH National Cancer Institute for “Chemical Probes of Protein Prenylation.”

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• Richard A. Gibbs received $242,563 from PHS-NIH National Cancer Institute for “Inhibition of Prenylated Protein Processing.” • Stanley L. Hem received $42,320 from Alcon Laboratories, Inc. for “Evaluation of Xanthan Gum for Use in Sterile Pharmaceutical Processing.” • Karen S. Hudmon received $16,352 from Department of Veterans Affairs for “Stop Tobacco-Attributable Risk after Stroke.” • Gregory T. Knipp received $19,841 from Bioanalytical Systems, Inc. for “Novel Animal Modeling of the Pharmacokinetic (PK) for Generic Formulations.” • D.J. Morre received $10,000 from NSE Products Inc. for “Testing of Serum and Cultured Fibroblasts for ArNOX Activity Patterns.” • David E. Nichols, Markus A. Lill and Val J. Watts received $227,092 from PHS-NIH National Institute on Drug Abuse for “Stereochemical Aspects of Hallucinogenesis.” • David E. Nichols and Val J. Watts received $6,250 from Trask Trust Fund for “IN Vivo Characterization of 2-Methyldihydrexidine, a Potential Orally-Active Dopamine D1 Agonist.” • Laurie L. Parker received $139,631 from PHS-NIH National Cancer Institute for “Biosensor Design for Detection and Analysis of Complex Signal Patterns in Cancer.” • Kimberly S. Plake and Carol E. Birk received $125,000 from Pharmacy Quality Alliance for “Measuring and Reporting Quality Performance and Medication Safety in Community Pharmacy.” • Jean-Christophe Rochet received $180,000 from Howard Hughes Medical Institute for “Development of a Stem Cell-Based Discovery Platform for Neurodengenerative Disease Therapeutics” and $100,000 from University of Nebraska for “Nanoimaging to Prevent and Treat Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease.” • Amy H. Sheehan received $6,000 from Eli Lilly and Company for “Joint Academic/FDA/Industry Fel-


faculty news

lowship Program in Pharmaceutical Drug Development.” • Amy H. Sheehan received $77,890 from Eli Lilly and Company for “Joint Academic/FDA/Industry Regulatory Pharmaceutical Fellowship Program, Eli Lilly and Company” and $30,000 from PHS-FDA Food and Drug Administration for “FDA Portion.” • Kevin M. Sowinski received $4,200 from Clarian Health Partners, Inc. for “Effects of Dardiopulmonary Bypass on Defuroxime Pharmacokinetics in Pediatric Cardiovascular Surgery Patients.” • Kenneth H. Summers received $70,298 from Pharmacy Quality Alliance for “Pharmacy Quality Alliance Proposal.”

• Craig K. Svensson received $10,000 from Eli Lilly & Company for “Funding Request for Counterfeit Medications - Current Approaches and Research Opportunities Ref: Grant ID 100128389. • Lynne S. Taylor received $50,000 from SSCI Incorporated for “Budget and Description for Amorphous Dispersion Sample Preparation and Testing Agreement.” • Val J. Watts received $224,513 from PHS-NIH National Institute of Mental Health for “D2 ReceptorInduced Sensitization of Adenylate Cyclase.” • Yoon Yeo received $10,000 from AACP for “Leukocyte-Mimetic Manoparticle Engineering for TumorTargeted Drug Delivery.”

St. Louis College of Pharmacy Retirements • Thomas F. Patton, president of St. Louis College of Pharmacy, has announced he will step down, effective June 30, 2010.

Temple University Appointments/Elections • Magid Abou-Gharbia has been appointed to the American Chemical Society’s Board-Presidential Task Force on Education.

The University of Toledo Appointments/Elections • Elisha Injeti, Ana Maria Oyarce and Caren L. Steinmiller, visiting assistant professors in the Department of Pharmacology

• Amie L. Smith, visiting assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice • Fred E. Williams has been appointed as a member of the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Planning Council.

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faculty news

University of Washington Appointments/Elections • Karan N. Dawson was named chair-elect of AACP’s section on continuing pharmacy education. • Lou P. Garrison served as World Health Organization temporary adviser at the meeting of the WHO Quantitative Immunization and Vaccines Related Research Advisory Committee. • Dana P. Hammer was elected secretary of AACP’s Council of Faculties. • Rodney J. Ho was named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He also

co-authored an article that was among the ten most frequently downloaded articles of 2008 and one that was among the ten most highly cited articles in 2008 in the Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. • Ivanka Karadzic has joined David R. Goodlett’s lab in the Department of Medicinal Chemistry as a visiting scholar from the University of Belgrade, Serbia.

Grants • Nanci L. Murphy and Peggy S. Odegard are part of a new three-year, $990,000 grant from the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation and $250,000 grant from the Hearst Foundation.

Washington State University Grants • Raymond M. Quock, American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, three-year, $27,000, Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship.

• Beth A. Vorderstrasse, NIH/NIAID, two-year, $224,250, “AhR-mediated enhancement of the early innate immune response to S. pneumoniae.”

Faculty News from emerging schools Concordia University Wisconsin Appointments/Elections • Dean L. Arneson has been appointed as the new academic dean. • Former Wisconsin state representative Curt Gielow has been appointed as the executive dean.

Grants • The School of Pharmacy at Concordia University Wisconsin has announced three lead gifts of $1 million each to establish the new school for the 2010–11 academic year.

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academic Pharmacy now  Apr/May/June 2009


the lastâ&#x20AC;&#x2030;word Percent of Pharm.D. Faculty with NIH Funding in 2008 University of Illinois at Chicago

University of Michigan Wayne State University

University of Minnesota

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

University of Washington Creighton University

The Ohio State University

The University of Iowa

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

University of Colorado Denver

University of Southern California

South Carolina College of Pharmacy The University of Texas at Austin

Xavier University of Louisiana

University of Florida

Circle size is proportional to percentage of Pharm.D.s funded Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Institution University of Washington University of Florida University of Colorado Denver University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill The Ohio State University The University of Texas at Austin Xavier University of Louisiana The University of Iowa Wayne State University University at Buffalo, The State University of New York University of Minnesota University of Southern California University of Michigan South Carolina College of Pharmacy Creighton University University of Illinois at Chicago

# FTE Pharm.D.

# Funded

% Funded

13 18 21 23 12 29 20 21 21 24 37 38 38 38 44 90

3 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

23.08 11.11 9.52 8.7 8.33 6.9 5 4.76 4.76 4.17 2.7 2.63 2.63 2.63 2.27 1.11

academic Pharmacy now ď&#x201A;§ Apr/May/June 2009

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