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Expanding Our Horizons 2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars

July 10–14 | Seattle


Celebrate! American Pharmacy Educator

Week

Coming to Your College or School of Pharmacy

October 24–30, 2010


TABLE OF CONTENTS Upcoming Meetings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Presidential Welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 AACP Leadership. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 General Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 House of Delegates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Sponsors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 CE Instructions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 CE Disclosure Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Seminars Eligible for CPE Credit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 AACP Walmart Scholars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Pre-Session Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Featured Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Roundtable Topics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 School Posters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Research/Education Posters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Exhibitors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Exhibitor Floor Plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Hotel Floor Plans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

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UPCOMING MEETINGS Bridges to Our Bright Future

Annual 2011 July 9–13 Grand Hyatt San Antonio San Antonio, Texas

2011 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars

July 9–13  San Antonio, Texas

2012 July 14–18 Gaylord Palms Resort Kissimmee, Florida (Orlando area)

interim 2011 February 26–March 2 Hyatt Regency Savannah Savannah, Georgia

Enhancing Diabetes Care through an Interprofessional Approach to Performance Improvement

Register Today! Enhancing Diabetes Care Regional Meetings Modeled after the interprofessional team-based performance improvement processes used by the HRSA Collaborative, these regional meetings offer an opportunity to learn a successful proven approach to team performance improvement in the delivery of care to diabetic patients with a focus on underserved populations. Continuing education credit is available for attendees. Registration is $25. Remaining regional meeting dates and locations are: • July 29, 2010: University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa. • August 25, 2010: The University of Mississippi, Jackson, Miss.

Funding provided by an unrestricted educational grant from:

www.aacp.org/meetingsandevents/othermeetings/diabetes/Pages/default.aspx

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2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


PRESIDENTIAL WELCOME Dear Colleagues, For more than 110 years, AACP has been creating and developing outstanding programs, products and services to promote pharmacy education and enhance teaching and leadership skills for pharmacy faculty. It is now time to reflect on the progress we have made and begin Expanding Our Horizons in pharmacy education so together we can determine our future. AACP is proud to present the 2010 Annual Meeting and Seminars in Seattle, Wash. Over the next five days, we have scheduled rich educational sessions that will challenge the most seasoned academician and accelerate the development of new faculty. There are more than 100 opportunities for professional development in areas including: Assessment, Department Chair Leadership, Experiential Education, Faculty Development, Leadership and Management, Research and Science, and Student Affairs. I enthusiastically welcome our plenary speakers, Tom Vander Ark, MBA, managing partner of Revolution Learning; Christopher Murray, M.D., D.Phil., director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation; and Andy S. Stergachis, Ph.D., R.Ph., professor of epidemiology and global health at the University of Washington Schools of Pharmacy and Public Health. Vander Ark will kick off our meeting at 8:00 a.m. on Sunday, July 11 during the Opening General Session. Drs. Stergachis and Murray will examine the global influence of health policy and future priorities for research and health-system funding on Monday, July 12 at 10:45 a.m. during the 2010 Science Plenary. Don’t miss the annual Examining Excellence Plenary on Tuesday, July 13 at 10:00 a.m. where we will honor the recipients of the Dawson, Chalmers and Volwiler awards. Also on Tuesday at 7:00 p.m., we will present the 2010 Rufus A. Lyman Award. This award is presented annually to the author(s) of the best paper that appears in the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. You will notice a stronger attendance by students, residents and fellows this year. Sixty-five recipients of the AACP Walmart Scholars Program, now in its sixth year, are attending the AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars. Please welcome these future faculty members and share your joy of teaching and discovering new knowledge. Please remember that AACP staff is readily available to assist you with your meeting or membership needs. If you have any questions, stop by the Registration and Information Desk and staff will be more than happy to assist you. We hope you enjoy this rewarding experience. Now, let’s begin Expanding Our Horizons! Sincerely,

Jeffrey N. Baldwin, Pharm.D. President

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

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AACP LEADERSHIP Board of Directors Officers Jeffrey N. Baldwin

President University of Nebraska Medical Center Rodney A. Carter

John A. Bosso Council of Faculties Chair-elect South Carolina College of Pharmacy– MUSC Campus

Julianna E. Szilagyi Council of Faculties Immediate Past Chair University of Houston

Michelle M. Kalis

President-elect University of Minnesota

Council of Sections Chair Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston

Victor A. Yanchick

Patricia A. Marken

Immediate Past President Virginia Commonwealth University

Council of Sections Chair-elect University of Missouri–Kansas City

John A. Pieper

Council of Sections Immediate Past Chair Butler University

Speaker of the House The University of New Mexico

Sudip K. Das

Treasurer The University of Georgia Lucinda L. Maine

Executive Vice President & CEO American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

Members of the Board Jeffrey N. Baldwin

President University of Nebraska Medical Center

Rodney A. Carter President-elect University of Minnesota

Victor A. Yanchick Immediate Past President Virginia Commonwealth University

Patricia D. Kroboth Council of Deans Chair University of Pittsburgh

J. Christopher Bradberry Council of Deans Chair-elect Creighton University

Barbara E. Hayes Council of Deans Immediate Past Chair Texas Southern University

Gary R. Matzke

Gary R. Matzke Chair Virginia Commonwealth University

John A. Bosso Chair-elect South Carolina College of Pharmacy– MUSC Campus

Julianna E. Szilagyi Immediate Past Chair University of Houston

Dana P. Hammer Secretary University of Washington

Council of Sections Administrative Board Michelle M. Kalis

John A. Pieper Keith N. Herist

Council of Faculties Administrative Board

Speaker of the House The University of New Mexico

Chair Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston

Keith N. Herist

Patricia A. Marken

Treasurer The University of Georgia

Lucinda L. Maine Executive Vice President & CEO American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

Council of Deans Administrative Board Patricia D. Kroboth

Chair-elect University of Missouri–Kansas City

Sudip K. Das Immediate Past Chair Butler University

Cynthia P. Koh-Knox Secretary Purdue University

Chair University of Pittsburgh

Academic Section Officers

J. Christopher Bradberry

Biological Sciences

Chair-elect Creighton University

Barbara E. Hayes Immediate Past Chair Texas Southern University

Alice Gardner Chair Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Worcester

Stephen A. O’Barr Daniel C. Robinson Secretary Western University of Health Sciences

Chair-elect Western University of Health Sciences

Michelle M. Kalis David S. Forbes Administrative Board Representative The University of Montana

Immediate Past Chair Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston

Bruce Waldrop Secretary Samford University

Council of Faculties Chair Virginia Commonwealth University

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2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


AACP LEADERSHIP Chemistry A. Michael Crider Chair Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Kathy D. Webster Chair-elect University of Maryland Eastern Shore

John M. Beale Jr. Immediate Past Chair St. Louis College of Pharmacy

Carolyn J. Friel Secretary Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Worcester

Continuing Professional Education

K.T.L. Vaughan

Alicia S. Bouldin

Chair-elect University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Secretary The University of Mississippi

Vernon K. Duba

Special Interest Group (SIG) Officers

Immediate Past Chair The University of Iowa

Amy C. Knehans Secretary University of Hawaii at Hilo

Pharmaceutics

Administrative and Financial Officers Charlotte S. Klaus Chair University of Colorado Denver

Bill J. Bowman

Eric J. Johnson

Chair Midwestern University/Glendale

Chair-elect The University of Oklahoma

Thomas J. Cook

Robert M. Duca

Chair-elect Touro College of Pharmacy–New York

Immediate Past Chair University of California, San Francisco

Nita K. Pandit

Candise A. Morris

Chair University of Washington

Immediate Past Chair Drake University

Secretary University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

Carriann E. Richey

Melanie A. Jordan

Karan N. Dawson

Chair-elect Butler University

Secretary Midwestern University/Glendale

Michael L. Simeone

Pharmacy Practice

Immediate Past Chair University of Rhode Island

Timothy E. Welty

Kristin L. Wilson

Chair The University of Kansas

Secretary The University of Texas at Austin

Timothy J. Ives

Experiential Education

Chair-elect University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Assessment Melissa S. Medina Chair The University of Oklahoma

Cindy D. Stowe Chair-elect University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Curriculum Lauren S. Schlesselman

Patricia A. Marken

Chair University of Connecticut

Chair Drake University

Immediate Past Chair University of Missouri–Kansas City

Naser Z. Alsharif

Rhonda M. Jones

Jennifer M. Trujillo

Chair-elect Creighton University

Chair-elect Creighton University

Secretary University of Colorado Denver

Eric H. Hobson

Philip M. Hritcko

Social and Administrative Sciences

Denise A. Soltis

Immediate Past Chair University of Connecticut

Kristen L. Goliak Secretary University of Illinois at Chicago

Libraries/Educational Resources Susan McGuinness Chair University of California, San Diego

Betsy L. Sleath Chair University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Shane P. Desselle Chair-elect The University of Oklahoma

Karen B. Farris Immediate Past Chair The University of Iowa

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

Immediate Past Chair Belmont University

Development Directors Robert C. Busch Chair University of Minnesota

Kelly A. Markey Immediate Past Chair University of Florida

Susan K. Brown Secretary The University of Texas at Austin

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AACP LEADERSHIP Geriatric Pharmacy Annie Y. Lam Chair University of Washington

Michael R. Brodeur

Chair-elect University of Illinois at Chicago

Pharmacy Ethics Kem P. Krueger

Substance Abuse Education and Assistance Julie C. Kissack Chair Harding University

Chair-elect Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Chair University of Wyoming

Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning

Christopher T. Owens

Michael S. Monaghan

Nicole J. Brandt

Chair-elect Idaho State University

Chair Creighton University

Pamela C. Heaton

Jeff J. Cain

Immediate Past Chair University of Maryland

Global Pharmacy Education Michael Z. Wincor Chair University of Southern California

Immediate Past Chair University of Cincinnati

Chair-Elect University of Kentucky

Public Health

Brent Fox

Carrie M. Maffeo

Hazel H. Seaba

Chair Butler University

Chair-elect The University of Iowa

John M. Conry

Rosalie Sagraves

Chair-elect St. John’s University

Immediate Past Chair University of Illinois at Chicago

Jack E. Fincham

Immediate Past Chair Auburn University

Tracy Chapman Secretary Creighton University

Women Faculty Susan M. Meyer

Ellen M. Schellhase

Immediate Past Chair University of Missouri–Kansas City

Chair University of Pittsburgh

Secretary Purdue University

James D. Nash

Carolyn Ford

Secretary Sullivan University

Chair-elect Wingate University

Self-Care Therapeutics/ Nonprescription Medicine

Lynda H. Oderda

Chair The Ohio State University

Gregory J. Higby

Linda G. MacLean

AACP Staff

History of Pharmacy Robert A. Buerki

Chair-elect University of Wisconsin–Madison

Chair Washington State University

Laboratory Instructors

Jenny A. Van Amburgh

Karen Kopacek Chair University of Wisconsin–Madison

Jeffrey C. Reist Chair-elect The University of Iowa

Lauren S. Schlesselman Immediate Past Chair University of Connecticut

Melissa M. Dinkins Secretary University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Pharmacogenomics Daniel A. Brazeau Chair University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

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William T. Beck

Immediate Past Chair The University of Utah

Lucinda L. Maine Executive Vice President & CEO

Immediate Past Chair Northeastern University

Jennifer L. Athay

Kelly Scolaro

Pam L. Barrett

Secretary University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Student Services Personnel Bernadette K. Brown

Director of Student Affairs

Accountant

Victoria L. Breeding Governance Programs Administrative Assistant

Chair Butler University

Daniel J. Cassidy

James Robertson Jr.

Melinda D. Colón

Chief Operating Officer

Chair-elect Texas A&M Health Science Center

Assistant Director of Governance Programs and Meetings

Donald A. Godwin

Diane L. Drakeley

Immediate Past Chair The University of New Mexico

Program Coordinator

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


AACP LEADERSHIP Sandra (Angie) A. Edwards

Bradford E. Miller

Danielle A. Taylor

Member Services Associate

Program Manager

Research Manager

Tricia Ekenstam

Rebecca M. Morgan

Maureen O. Thielemans

Graphic Designer and Print Production Manager

Director of Communications

Communications Manager

Jennifer M. Patton

Richelle D. Wilkins Meetings Assistant

Director of Meetings and Exhibits

Director of Institutional Research and Data Systems

Robert (Buzz) Kerr

Cecilia M. Plaza

Vice President of Academic Affairs

Director of Academic Affairs and Assessment

Barbra A. Gustis

S. Whitney Zatzkin Manager of Policy and Advocacy

William G. Lang Vice President of Policy and Advocacy

Sibu Ramamurthy Director of Financial Services

Allan L. Lee Director of Technology

Invited Organizations Abbott Laboratories Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education American Association of Colleges of Nursing American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine American Association of Colleges of Podiatric Medicine American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists American College of Apothecaries American College of Clinical Pharmacy American Dental Education Association American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education American Pharmacists Association American Society of Consultant Pharmacists American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Amgen Inc. Association of Academic Health Centers Association of American Medical Colleges Association of Faculties of Pharmacy of Canada Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry Association of Schools of Allied Health Professionals Association of Schools of Public Health AstraZeneca PLC Boehringer Ingelheim Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. Consumer Healthcare Products Association Eli Lilly & Co. Food Marketing Institute

GlaxoSmithKline PLC Healthcare Distribution Management Association Mallinckrodt Inc. Merck & Co, Inc. National Alliance of State Pharmacy Associations National Association of Boards of Pharmacy National Association of Chain Drug Stores National Community Pharmacists Association National Council on Patient Information and Education National Institutes of Health National Pharmaceutical Council Novartis AG Novo Nordisk Inc. Ortho-McNeil Pfizer Inc. Procter & Gamble Co. Research!America Rite Aid Corporation Sanofi-Aventis Pharmaceuticals Schering Laboratories TRICARE Management Activity U.S. Air Force U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Drug Evaluation and Research U.S. Navy U.S. Pharmacopeia U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps Wal-Mart Stores Inc. Wyeth Pharmaceuticals

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

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GENERAL INFORMATION Meeting Space Annual Meeting programs and events will be held at the Sheraton Seattle and Grand Hyatt Seattle Hotels; however, exhibitor and research/education poster sessions will be held on the 6th floor of the Washington State Convention Center, located directly across from the North side of the Sheraton Seattle Hotel. Please be sure to identify the hotel room when pre-selecting your session attendance.

Name Badges and Tickets Please wear your name badge throughout the AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars. It is your ticket for entry into all sessions and functions. You will not be permitted to participate in any of the events without it. Should you lose your badge or ticket during the Annual Meeting, please stop by the Registration and Information Desk located in the Spruce Room, Second Floor of the Sheraton Seattle Hotel and AACP staff will issue you a new one.

Log-in instructions can be found on page 12. Access codes will be displayed at the conclusion of each session. Attendees will need each program access code in order to receive continuing education credits. Attendees will have 45 days from the last day of the conference to submit documentation for credit, but will have one year to print any statement of credits for their records. Questions regarding CPE credits can be directed to Danielle Fife in the Office of Continuing Education at the VCU School of Pharmacy at 804-828-3003 or by e-mail at s2dcfife@vcu.edu. VCU School of Pharmacy Office of Continuing Education is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

Poster Sessions and Abstracts

Messages Messages may be posted for meeting registrants on the AACP bulletin board in the registration area. Please note: position openings will be removed from the bulletin board. Please contact Maureen O. Thielemans, AACP communications manager, at mthielemans@aacp.org for instructions on placing an advertisement in the AACP Online Career Center.

The School Poster Session will be held during the Welcome Reception from 6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m. on Saturday, July 10 in the Sheraton Seattle Hotel in the Grand Ballroom, Second Floor. Pages 47–50 contain a list of all posters to be presented including the title, primary author, time and number. Full abstracts can be printed from the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education Web site at www.ajpe.org. The Research/Education Poster Sessions will be presented during three sessions in Ballrooms 6E and 6F on the 6th level of the Washington State Convention Center, 800 Convention Place, located across the street from the Sheraton Seattle Hotel.

Child Care Services and Attendance

Poster Session I: Sunday, July 11, 4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

For health and safety considerations, children under the age of 16 are not permitted to attend any functions, including the Closing Banquet, exhibit hall or educational programs. However, children of award winners may attend the presentation of the award to their parent; this must be prearranged with AACP staff.

Poster Session II: Monday, July 12, 9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Poster Session III: Monday, July 12, Noon–1:30 p.m.

Authors will be available from 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. during Poster Session I, 9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m. during Poster Session II and Noon–1:00 p.m. during Poster Session III. Pages 51–77 contain a list of all posters to be presented, including the title, primary author, time and number. Full abstracts can be printed from the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education Web site at www. ajpe.org.

AACP does not provide child care services during the Annual Meeting. Attendees requiring assistance with child care should contact their hotel concierge.

Continuing Pharmaceutical Education Credits

Spouse Hospitality Room

AACP, in conjunction with the Office of Continuing Education at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), will offer select sessions that qualify for Continuing Pharmaceutical Education (CPE) credit at the 2010 Annual Meeting. At no additional cost, all qualified meeting registrants can elect to participate in this program. Attendees will have the opportunity to receive credits for each session offered or sign up for individual course offerings. Participating sessions are marked with an ACPE program number and the number of contact hours (CEUs) throughout the program schedule, beginning on page 25. A list of all CPE-certified programs is also located on pages 14–18. Attendees can submit their evaluation and print individual statement of credits by accessing our Learning Management System (LMS) at http://aacp.pharmacy.vcu.edu/.

The Chelan Room, First Floor at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel will be open Sunday through Tuesday from 8:00 a.m.–Noon for spouses and guests to gather for various activities, such as planning trips, playing cards, quilting and reading.

Registration and Information Desk Hours The Registration and Information Desk is located in the Spruce Room, Second Floor. Hours are subject to change. Friday, July 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m. Saturday, July 10 . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m.–6:30 p.m. Sunday, July 11 . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30 a.m.–6:00 p.m. Monday, July 12 . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. Tuesday, July 13. . . . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m. Wednesday, July 14 . . . . . . . . 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

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2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


GENERAL INFORMATION Press Information

in the Diamond Room, First Floor/Lobby Level at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel.

All media inquiries from newspapers, trade press, radio, social media and television are to be directed to Rebecca M. Morgan, director of communications, at 202-280-8068.

AACP would like to thank Liaison International for donations made to support the cyber café and the University of Florida for staffing it.

Continental Breakfast Continental breakfast will only be available for registered and pre-session attendees during all five days of the Annual Meeting. Breakfast will be available in the Second and Third Floor Foyers of the Sheraton Seattle Hotel, unless otherwise noted. Attendees must wear their name badges in order to attend the continental breakfasts. Saturday, July 10. . . . . . . 7:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Saturday, July 10–Tuesday, July 13 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Wednesday, July 14 8:00 a.m.–Noon

(for Teachers Seminar attendees only, Second Floor Foyer only)

Saturday, July 10. . . . . . . 7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m. (for Leadership Pre-Session attendees only, Grand Hyatt Seattle: First Floor Foyer)

Sunday, July 11. . . . . . . . . Monday, July 12. . . . . . . . Tuesday, July 13. . . . . . . . Wednesday, July 14. . . . .

DON’T FORGET!

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m. 6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m. 6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m. 7:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Name badges are your ticket to all Annual Meeting events.

Cyber Café A cyber café for checking e-mails and printing session handouts will be provided Saturday, July 10 through Wednesday, July 14

HELL my nam e is

O

The Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT®) is an admission exam used by the majority of colleges and schools of pharmacy. Since 1974, the PCAT has helped pharmacy schools identify qualified candidates for admission.

PCAT is pleased to announce that a new computer-based version of the PCAT will be piloted on the same test date as the October 2010 paper-based administration. By July 2011, the PCAT will be 100% computer-based and will be administered at Pearson VUE testing centers. Please stop by booth #115 for more information on the computer-based test and the Official PCAT Practice Test. The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy endorses the PCAT as the official preferred admission test for entrance to pharmacy college.

800.627.7271

|

PsychCorp.com

Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. or its affiliate(s). All rights reserved. Pearson and PsychCorp are trademarks and PCAT, and the Design for Psi are registered trademarks, in the U.S. and/or other countries, of Pearson Education, Inc. or its affiliate(s). 4634 06/10

4634-10_PCAT AACP_AD_SR_f.indd 1

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

6/14/10 1:06 PM

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HOUSE OF DELEGATES House of Delegates Information and Schedule Delegate Sign-In

AACP Speaker of the House and Parliamentarian

Delegates for the 2010 AACP House of Delegates (HOD) must sign in with the AACP Credentials Committee at the Grand Ballroom Foyer, Second Floor prior to each session. The Credentials Committee is available to sign in delegates from 7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. on Sunday, July 11 for the first session of the HOD, and from 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. on Wednesday, July 14 for the final session. The First House of Delegates will begin promptly at 10:00 a.m. on Sunday, July 11, and the Final House of Delegates will begin promptly at 8:30 a.m. on Wednesday, July 14. The designated individuals establishing a record of attendance with the Credentials Committee at the first session of the HOD carry the delegated vote for the entire meeting of the HOD unless the Credentials Committee approves a change as provided in the HOD Rules of Procedures. In the absence of a delegate or alternate delegate, the seat shall be declared vacant. A briefing for all delegates will be held on Saturday, July 10 at 4:30 p.m. in the Metropolitan A Room, Third Floor.

AACP’s Speaker of the House and Parliamentarian will be available for consultation in the registration area on Sunday, July 11 from 11:30 a.m.–Noon, Tuesday, July 13 from 8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m. and by appointment.

2010 House of Delegates Schedule Saturday, July 10 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Delegate Briefing Metropolitan A, Third Floor

Sunday, July 11 7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

First House of Delegates Sign-In Grand Ballroom Foyer, Second Floor

Resolutions Process

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Any individual member of AACP may submit resolutions for consideration. Five signatures of AACP members, in addition to the originator’s signature, must appear on the resolution, which should be prepared in typewritten form for consideration by the AACP Bylaws and Policy Development Committee. Any member seeking to establish a position or policy on behalf of the Council of Deans or the Council of Faculties should submit resolutions through that particular body.

First House of Delegates Session Grand Ballroom, Second Floor

Monday, July 12 8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Reports of the 2009–2010 Standing Committees Willow A, Second Floor 6:00 p.m.

Council, Academic Section and Special Interest Group members may submit resolutions using either of the above methods (i.e., through the relevant association unit or as individual members).

Deadline for Resolutions

The AACP Bylaws and Policy Development Committee must receive all resolutions for review prior to 6:00 p.m. on Monday, July 12. Resolutions should be submitted to the AACP staff office and directed to the attention of Cynthia J. Boyle (University of Maryland), chair of the Bylaws and Policy Development Committee. The AACP staff office is located in the Juniper/Medrona Room, Second Floor. The Open Hearing of the Bylaws and Policy Development Committee will be held from Noon–1:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 13 in Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor, at which time the proposed resolutions from committees and members will be discussed by all interested meeting attendees.

Tuesday, July 13

AACP Staff Office Juniper/Medrona, Second Floor

Noon–1:30 p.m.

Open Hearing Bylaws & Policy Development Committee Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor

Wednesday, July 14 7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Final House of Delegates Sign-In Grand Ballroom Foyer, Second Floor

This year’s Annual Meeting will again feature the opportunity for attendees to interact with the standing committees on Academic Affairs, Argus Commission, Advocacy, Professional Affairs, Research and Graduate Affairs and the Special Committee on Substance Abuse and Pharmacy Education, to discuss their reports’ proposed policy statements and recommendations. This special session will be held in the Willow A Room, Second Floor on Monday, July 12 from 8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

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8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Final House of Delegates Session Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


SPONSORS Platinum Sponsors

Gold Sponsors

Silver Sponsors

Bronze Sponsors

Pharmacy

Award Sponsors Platinum AACP Walmart Scholars Program

Volwiler Research Achievement Award

Pharmacy

Gold Paul R. Dawson Biotechnology Award

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

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CE INSTRUCTIONS

CE INSTRUCTIONS Virginia Commonwealth University Office of Continuing Education is proud to provide the Learning Management System (LMS) for your use at the 2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars, Expanding Our Horizons. This LMS will allow you to complete your evaluations, print your statements of credit and maintain a transcript of the continuing education you completed during the conference. If you have questions regarding your CE from the conference, please contact the VCU School of Pharmacy at 804-828-3003.

Log-In Directions: 1. Go to this Web site: http://aacp.pharmacy.vcu.edu/. 2. Locate the “Sign In” icon on the left side of the page. 3. If you are a registered user, please log in with your username/password. 4. If you are a new user, please “Create Account” and complete the profile.

Obtaining Your Statement of Credit: 1. Go to the Web site http://aacp.pharmacy.vcu.edu/ and log in. 2. Choose the date tab that corresponds to your CE course. 3. Click the register box next to the course you completed. 4. Verify Account Information, Click Next. 5. Select Registration Type—“Pharmacist,” Click Next. 6. Select Return to Activities Calendar. 7. Return back to the date tab and click View Confirmation next to the course you have completed. 8. Click on Live Activities. 9. Click on Evaluation Icon. 10. Enter the code you received at the end of your course, Click Next. Note: Codes are not case sensitive. 11. Complete evaluation, Click Next. 12. Click Print All Certificates. 13. Select Print to PDF. Note: This will allow you to save and print your certificate.

12

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


CE INFORMATION DISCLOSURE Disclosure of Faculty Conflict of Interest 2010 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) • June 22, 2010 In compliance with the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), Criteria for Quality and Interpretive Guidelines, the VCU Office of Continuing Education discloses all relevant relationships which program faculty and planners report having with commercial interests whose products or services they may discuss during their presentation or they may select as topics for presentations.

Reports having no relevant relationship to disclose: Naser Z. Alsharif Sean L. Bates James W. Blankenship Barbara F. Brandt Brenda S. Bray Susan P. Bruce Linda Catanzaro Tracy A. Chapman Marie A. Chisholm-Burns Lindsay Christensen David Clark Lisa R. Clayville Heather Brennan Congdon Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner Peter M. Brody Jr.

Jennifer Danielson Margarita V. DiVall Jack E. Fincham Jill M. Fitzgerald Rex W. Force Andrea R. Franks Jody S. Gandy Stephanie F. Gardner Cara A. Harshberger Kristen Lehman Helms John Holmes Gayle A. Hudgins Lisa D. Inge Brandon T. Jennings Barbara L. Jolly Christene Jolowsky

Reports having served as a consultant to various pharmaceutical companies: David G. Fuentes—IRIS Clinic/School of Professional Psychology Pacific University Oregon Vern Duba—Lexi-Comp Academic Advisory Council Heather Mul Petrelli—Owns a business for educational consulting; not related to pharmacy–College Edge, LLC Rosalie Sagraves—Member, Board of Directors, Advanced Life Sciences (biopharmaceutical sciences company) Patricia A. Chase Keith A. Swanson—Nonprescription Medications Academy Steering Committee Member 2007–2010 (supported by Procter and Gamble)

Rhonda M. Jones Abir Kahaleh Michael G. Kendrach Julie C. Kissack Harold L. Kohn Janelle L. Krueger Marti Lindsey Patrick M. Malone Marianne McCollum W. Cary Mobley Michael S. Monaghan Rebecca D. Moote Michael H. Nelson David W. Newton Wesley A. Nuffer Peggy S. Odegard

Regina F. Peacock Dawn M. Pettus Bart Ragon Juancho Ramirez Luke E. Rice Renee L. Rose Leigh Ann Ross Hazel H. Seaba Ellen M. Schellhase Lisa Scholz Kristine S. Schonder Kelly L. Scolaro Amy L. Seybert Cariann Richey Smith Katie J. Suda Jeremy L. Thomas

Christopher John Turner K. T. L. Vaughan Ashley H. Vincent Eleanor M. Vogt Regis R. Vollmer Susan S. Vos Deepti Vyas Thomas Waters Stanley S. Weber Julie J. Wilkinson Judith Wilson Michael Z. Wincor Cherokee Layson-Wolf Eric A. Wombwell Lisa J. Woodard Donald J. Woodyard

Reports having received grant/research support from various pharmaceutical companies/state, national or federal agencies:

Reports having participated on speaker’s bureaus of various pharmaceutical companies:

Rosemin Kassam—Received research funding from community chains to develop and implement patient care programs; some of the stores involved in this study are represented by these funding organizations.

Michelle M. Zingone—Merck & Co., Inc.

Jennifer L. Rodis—OSU Office of Outreach and Engagement, Community Pharmacy Foundation

Linda G. MacLean Terri L. Warholak—Pharmacy Quality Assurance Allana J. Sucher—Pfizer Pharmaceuticals Jeff J. Cain—Turning Technologies, Inc. Mark S. Johnson—Sanofi-Aventis

Diana I. Brixner—Travel grant from “The Medical Pipeline”

Reports having received other financial or material support from various pharmaceutical companies/state, national or federal agencies:

Timothy J. Ives—NIH, Centers for Medicine/ Medicaid Services (CMS)

Kari L. Franson—Colorado Department of Health and Environment

Gary M. Oderda—Travel Grant from “The Medical Pipeline”

Patrick R. Finley—Neuroscience Education Institution—Advisory Board

Debbie C. Byrd—Tennessee Department of Health

In compliance with the ACPE guidelines, all relationships reported above have been resolved according to VCU’s Policy on Conflict of Interest. All presenting faculty affirm that they will employ the best available evidence from all sources to support any clinical recommendations made in their presentations. If the learner detects any commercial bias in any presentation, they should document their observations on the program evaluation form.

Fred Doloresco III—New York State Department of Health Mark S. Johnson—Stock Shareholder for Merck

Verified by

Sean L. Bates Executive Director for Postgraduate Programs CE Administrator – Office of Continuing Education VCU School of Pharmacy

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

13


SEMINARS ELIGIBLE FOR CPE CREDIT Time

ACPE Number

Contact Title hours (CEU)

Saturday, July 10 4:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

294-999-10-059-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Learning Objectives:

Sunday, July 11 10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Learning Objectives:

Sunday, July 11 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Learning Objectives: Sunday, July 11 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

Sunday, July 11 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Learning Objectives: Sunday, July 11 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

Sunday, July 11 1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

14

American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (AJPE) Author’s Workshop

1. Enable participants to comprehend and discuss important aspects (IDEAS, Survey Research, etc.) in the development of their manuscript for AJPE. 2. Enable participants to get feedback from peers in similar disciplines in the development of manuscripts for AJPE through a small group breakout session. 3. Enable participants to comprehend key elements in the review process of manuscripts for AJPE and how this will relate to the development of their manuscripts.

294-999-10-065-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: Application Toward Integrated Learning of the Medical Pipeline in the Pharm.D. Curriculum

1. To describe how the evolution of medical technology provides an opportunity to teach about drug discovery, development, formulation and delivery, the diagnostics and devices used to detect and treat disease, the incidence and prevalence of the disease, the economic cost of the disease per person and the cost to society, along with a discussion regarding the potential regulatory approval within the U.S. and the likelihood of reimbursement by public and private payers. 2. To list options for teaching, such as part of a therapeutics course, as an elective to evaluate the potential value of these new technologies in healthcare, or possibly as a clinical skills lab where various components of the curriculum can be used in an applied manner. 3. To gain feedback from the audience on ways to improve and expand these approaches in various areas of the Pharm.D. curriculum and prioritize them toward an action plan.

294-999-10-060-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Continuing Professional Education Section: Sharing Tools: Needs Assessment, Active Learning, Faculty Guidance and Outcomes Analysis

1. Discuss the ACPE CPE Standards with regard to needs assessment, faculty guidance and outcomes analysis. 2. Identify available tools and key tool components necessary to implement the new standards. 3. Discuss how CPD principles can be applied to programs through the use of these tools.

294-999-10-061-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Experiential Education Section: Assessment of Student Performance in the Advanced Experiential Environment

1. Describe appropriate methods to assess student performance in the experiential environment. 2. Describe the development and implementation of a standardized regional Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) assessment instrument. 3. Share practical lessons learned based on experiences of developing and implementing a standardized regional APPE assessment instrument.

294-999-10-062-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Libraries/Educational Resources Section: Lightning Librarians: Unconference Talks, Questions, Problems, Solutions, and Discussion

1. To provide a time for rapid dissemination of ideas, problems, and solutions from the L/ER membership. 2. To open up discussion and collaboration in the section to its membership. 3. To demonstrate to the general AACP membership the broad interests and activities of the L/ER membership.

294-999-10-063-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Pharmaceutics Section: Teaching Sterile Compounding: Meeting the Standards in Real and Virtual Environments

1. The participant will learn the practice standards that guide the compounding of sterile preparations. 2. The pharmacy educator will be able to describe important educational competencies for sterile compounding training. 3. The pharmacy educator will be able to describe different approaches to teaching sterile compounding to student pharmacists. 4. The participant will discover how virtual reality can be used to teach cleanroom concepts to student pharmacists.

294-999-10-064-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Pharmacy Practice Section: Pathways to Mentoring: Developing Future Faculty Mentors

1. Identify the roles of administrators and senior faculty in developing mentors. 2. Describe examples of mentoring plans used to transition mid-career faculty to becoming mentors. 3. Develop methods to evaluate the progress achieved when utilizing formal mentoring programs.

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


SEMINARS ELIGIBLE FOR CPE CREDIT Time

ACPE Number

Contact Title hours (CEU)

Monday, July 12 8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

294-999-10-066-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Learning Objectives:

Monday, July 12 8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Learning Objectives: Monday, July 12 10:30 a.m.–Noon

Learning Objectives: Monday, July 12 3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

Monday, July 12 3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

Monday, July 12 3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

Monday, July 12 3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

Experiential Education Section: Portfolios in Experiential Education and Beyond: Lessons Learned

1. Describe steps taken to develop and implement a portfolio process to document, assess and track student performance in experiential education. 2. Describe potential portfolio applications throughout the curriculum and opportunities for faculty/preceptor involvement. 3. Explain obstacles and challenges experienced during the implementation and/or expansion of a portfolio process. 4. Share practical tips and lessons learned regarding the use of portfolios within the curriculum.

294-999-10-067-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Libraries/Educational Resources Section: There’s an App for That: Mobile Resources and Web 3.0 in Pharmacy Education

1. To describe current mobile apps for pharmacy and healthcare use. 2. To discuss how mobile resources are used in pharmacy practice. 3. To explore how libraries can partner with schools to provide educational materials using mobile resources.

294-999-10-068-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: Beyond Pharmacotherapy: Spirituality and Humor in Medicine

1. Recognize the importance of spirituality historically and in 21st century medical practice. 2. Provide an overview of the literature concerning the relationship between spirituality and health outcomes. 3. Learn tools and techniques for incorporating spirituality in patient care, teaching and daily practice.

294-999-10-069-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Curriculum SIG: Under the Surface: A Closer Look at Our Hidden Curricula

1. Identify ways in which student, faculty and staff participation, attitude, professionalism and/or civility are rewarded at colleges of pharmacy. 2. Discuss obstacles to addressing these core values that are not part of any particular course but of the broader curricular construct. 3. Explore potential solutions or pitfalls that can be encountered when addressing these obstacles. 4. Compare and contrast how these traits may enhance or impair the greater mission of the curriculum and colleges of pharmacy.

294-999-10-070-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Global Pharmacy SIG: How to Build a Winning Global Experience for Pharm.D. Students

1. Summarize the current global activities of U.S. colleges and schools of pharmacy. 2. Describe the activities and organizational framework of two model global Pharm.D. student experiences. 3. Compare and contrast a spectrum of possible learning objectives for a global experience. 4. Identify those planning elements for a global experience that would be necessary to implement a global experience at the participant’s school. 5. Create a list of resources needed to develop, implement and provide a global experience. 6. Participate in a discussion of strategies, practices and activities that contribute to successful student global experiences.

294-999-10-071-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Joint Session: Continuing Professional Education and Social and Administrative Sciences Sections: Meeting the Needs of Underserved Patients Through Scholarship, Teaching and Continuing Professional Development

1. Describe programs that currently exist to promote education and development for underserved patients. 2. Identify opportunities for scholarship and resources to support these programs. 3. Outline how continuing professional development can be used to fine-tune skills to address the needs of underserved patients.

294-999-10-072-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Pharmacy Practice Section: Getting Involved with Advocacy in Pharmacy Practice

1. Describe the basic structure of the federal legislative process, with an overview of the different healthcare agencies. 2. Describe some of the areas of impact of the healthcare reform legislation on pharmacy education. 3. Describe how pharmacy faculty can take an active role in the healthcare legislation decision-making process. 4. Describe opportunities that schools of pharmacy can use to interact with state boards of pharmacy and state legislatures.

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

15


SEMINARS ELIGIBLE FOR CPE CREDIT Time

ACPE Number

Contact Title hours (CEU)

Monday, July 12 3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

294-999-10-073-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Learning Objectives:

Monday, July 12 3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

Tuesday, July 13 8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Learning Objectives:

Tuesday, July 13 8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Learning Objectives:

Tuesday, July 13 8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Learning Objectives:

Tuesday, July 13 1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

Tuesday, July 13 1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

16

Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine SIG: Self-Care Concepts in the Geriatric Population

1. Identify specific characteristics that cause geriatric patients to respond differently to OTC medications. 2. Recognize the concerns and risks associated with taking OTC medications in this population. 3. Describe significant drug-related problems involving OTC medications that occur in this population. 4. Implement an active learning activity involving the geriatric population into an OTC course.

294-999-10-074-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: Applying Business Models to Experiential Education

1. Identify, apply and refine methods for determining solvency in terms of site abundance and availability for an experiential program. 2. Identify, apply and refine methods for determining efficiency (i.e. how well a unit accomplishes its mandates with the tools given) for an experiential program. 3. Identify, apply and refine methods for determining value (i.e. return on investment) for an experiential program. 4. Articulate the potential value of financial and comparative analysis (i.e. benchmarking) in experiential education.

294-999-10-075-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Section: Instructional Technology: Who is Using What and Where?

1. Describe the extent of instructional technology use among colleges and schools of pharmacy. 2. Describe the benefits of selected examples of instructional technology. 3. Identify which college or school can be a resource for questions related to instructional technology uses.

294-999-10-076-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: Developing a Practice Based Research Network (PBRN): A Tale of Two Colleges

1. Describe AACP’s four strategies for developing a PBRN. 2. Identify opportunities to employ these strategies at the participants’ institutions. 3. Discuss the challenges and keys to successful project implementation within the newly-formed PBRN. 4. Formulate a plan for the growth and development of a PBRN.

294-999-10-078-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: Heart Matters in Pharmacy Practice: Faculty Orientation and Training

1. To familiarize participants with the course context, development, components and assessment. 2. To provide a micro course experience with the learning tools. 3. To determine faculty interest and ability to offer the course in their own setting.

294-999-10-079-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: Nuts and Bolts of Integrating Human Patient Simulation into the Pharm.D. Curriculum

1. Distinguish important factors to consider during a cost analysis of adopting HPS into the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum. 2. Match programmatic and curricular outcomes with the right level of simulation technology. 3. Develop strategies for partnering with other healthcare disciplines to create interprofessional HPS learning opportunities for student pharmacists. 4. Construct, with a team, a pharmacy-focused HPS patient case scenario.

294-999-10-080-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: HealthWISE = Winning Investigations for Students and Elders: Student Pharmacists as Science Educators

1. Articulate the value of student pharmacist service-learning opportunities through pharmacy school partnerships with K-12 educational communities. 2. Promote student pharmacist communication skill development through science teaching experience in elementary schools. 3. Develop an elective HealthWISE course at this pharmacy school. 4. Identify professional program competencies that student pharmacists will address in the HealthWISE course. 5. Compare implementation of the HealthWISE course at 3 pharmacy schools over 2 years.

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


SEMINARS ELIGIBLE FOR CPE CREDIT Time

ACPE Number

Contact Title hours (CEU)

Tuesday, July 13 1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

294-999-10-081-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Learning Objectives:

Tuesday, July 13 1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

Tuesday, July 13 1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

Tuesday, July 13 3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

Tuesday, July 13 3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

Tuesday, July 13 3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Learning Objectives:

Special Session: Improving Teaching and Learning Across the Generations: We Know Who They Are, Now What?

1. Explain generational differences that influence styles of teaching and learning. 2. Apply methods for providing high-quality feedback in experiential learning settings. 3. Demonstrate techniques to adapt classroom teaching and course management for millennial learners. 4. Assist students in adapting their behaviors to the expectations of the pharmacy profession.

294-999-10-082-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: Shared Successes: Adopting an Innovative Advanced Community Pharmacy Experience Model at Multiple Colleges of Pharmacy

1. Describe The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy Partner for Promotion® program model of training, patient-centered service development and advanced community pharmacy practice experience site enhancement. 2. Identify the adaptations necessary to implement the Partner for Promotion® program at The University of Utah College of Pharmacy. 3. Discuss the processes involved in adopting an innovative experiential endeavor with community pharmacies, including tips for success for faculty interested in engaging in these types of collaborations with faculty at other colleges or schools of pharmacy.

294-999-10-077-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: Leadership and Advocacy Development for Student Pharmacists and Faculty

1. Explain the importance of leadership and advocacy development for student pharmacists and faculty. 2. Describe results from the AACP COF Leadership and Advocacy Task Force’s survey of U.S. and Canadian pharmacy school’s leadership and advocacy development activities for student pharmacists and faculty. 3. Discuss possible indicators of success in leadership and advocacy development with student pharmacists and faculty. 4. Review and critique criteria for characterizing and selecting best practices in leadership and advocacy development in colleges/schools of pharmacy. 5. Outline recent innovations in leadership and advocacy development in pharmacy education.

294-999-10-083-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: Fast Track Facilitator Training: Using Facilitator Guides to Achieve Higher Levels of Learning

1. Identify why facilitator training is an essential component of delivering higher levels of learning. 2. Recognize components that are important when training facilitators to lead activities utilizing higher learning problem solving. 3. Describe how facilitator guides enhance the goals and objectives of the facilitated session. 4. Differentiate between essential and non-essential elements when constructing a facilitator guide. 5. Utilize the essential elements to design a facilitator guide based on a provided learning activity.

294-999-10-084-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: Implementing Interprofessional Education in the Classroom

1. Explain essential components of effective interprofessional teamwork and the impact this has on patient safety and quality of care. 2. Identity strategies for successful implementation of interprofessional learning activities. 3. Identify significant barriers to developing and executing interprofessional learning activities. 4. Discuss important curricular components for interprofessional activities and how to assess the outcomes of these activities. 5. Outline steps for creating a new interprofessional activity.

294-999-10-085-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: Progressive Learning Strategies for Foundations in Critical Thinking

1. Discuss the importance of critical thinking in pharmacy education. 2. Discuss the design of a dual technology course. 3. To overview simulation-based learning. 4. To engage the audience in dual technology learning and assessment. 5. Describe how to convert other instructional strategies into TBL format. 6. Describe the experience of TBL from the learner’s and facilitator’s perspective. 7. Identify strategies to overcome common challenges in implementing TBL.

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

17


SEMINARS ELIGIBLE FOR CPE CREDIT Time

ACPE Number

Contact Title hours (CEU)

Tuesday, July 13 3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

294-999-10-086-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Learning Objectives:

Special Session: Quality Assurance Strategies to Assess and Improve Introductory and Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Programs

1. To describe quality assurance strategies implemented by four experiential programs. 2. To present evidence that the four quality assurance strategies improved student learning outcomes for IPPE and APPE programs. 3. To present evidence that the four quality assurance strategies improved assessment of student learning. 4.To share lessons learned in the implementation of the four quality assurance strategies. 5. To engage the audience in a discussion regarding quality assurance in experiential education. At the completion of this session, participants will be able to: 1. Describe four successful quality assurance experiential education strategies. 2. Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the four quality assurance strategies. 3. Discuss the challenges for implementing quality assurance strategies for experiential education.

Wednesday, July 14 8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Learning Objectives:

Wednesday, July 14 8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Learning Objectives:

Wednesday, July 14 8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Learning Objectives:

294-999-10-087-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: Maximizing the Potential of a Dynamic Curricular Map

1. Cite examples of key variables that form the structure of a dynamic curricular map. 2. Identify existing databases that can be linked to the curricular map. 3. Develop a syllabus template that can be used to continuously update the curricular map. 4. Discuss efficiencies that can be realized by using data collected in the dynamic curricular map.

294-999-10-088-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: Experiential Education Student Involvement in Public Projects–Drug Information, Pharmacy Benefit Management and Informatics

1. Describe the public-academic partnership and associated roles for student pharmacists. 2. Evaluate efficiency gains created by student participation in contract/service work. 3. Identify research opportunities, strengths and weaknesses associated with involving students in pharmaceutical policy and claims analysis.

294-999-10-089-L04-P

1.5 (0.150)

Special Session: Simulation-based Learning to Enhance Practice Skills: Trials and Triumphs

1. To overview simulation-based learning in teaching and assessing practice skills in pharmacy education. 2. Recognize various modalities employed for patient care simulation exercises. 3. Recognize the utility of Benner’s Theory using vague and specific cues when teaching novice learners. 4. Describe the various assessment methods used for summative and formative evaluation when using simulation-based learning. 5. Discuss the benefits and limitations of utilizing high fidelity mannequins and standardized patients. 6. Design and integrate hybrid simulation experiences in your own pharmacy curriculum. 7. To facilitate discussion on the future use of simulation in enhancing practice skills within pharmacy education.

AACP thanks Creighton University for its sponsorship of the 2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars

18

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


AACP WALMART SCHOLARS AACP welcomes you to the 2010 Annual Meeting and Seminars. We hope you enjoy your time interacting with potential future colleagues in academic pharmacy. This meeting guide is to be used in conjunction with the Official Program Guide to help you in selecting sessions. While all sessions will introduce you to interesting and thought-provoking topics in academic pharmacy and the profession, some sessions will be more applicable based on your level of pharmacy education or postgraduate training. AACP has noted sessions required for Walmart scholars to attend. All others are strongly recommended. Should you have questions, please visit the Registration and Information Desk.

Pharmacy AACP appreciates Walmart’s support for faculty recruitment activities.

Required Sessions for both the Student and Faculty Mentor to Attend Saturday, July 10 8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m. AACP Walmart Scholars Meet and Greet Aspen, Second Floor An opportunity for the 2010 AACP Walmart Scholars and their advisors to meet and learn how to maximize their meeting experience.

8:30 a.m.–11:45 a.m. Teachers Seminar: Opening Session: Leading and Creating Interprofessional Education for the 21st Century Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor Student Fee: $125; Attendee fee: $195 (covers entire Teachers Seminar Pre-Session) See Registration and Information Desk. The rapidly changing healthcare environment requires that graduates from all health professions programs work together to achieve successful and cost-effective health outcomes. This Teachers Seminar will address the development, delivery and sustainability of interprofessional education focusing on insti-

tutional level issues, interprofessional science, interprofessional simulations and interprofessional professionalism.

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. Graduate Student Program

Metropolitan B, Third Floor Join a panel of deans and department chairs to discuss “How to get your first job in academia.”

Sunday, July 11 4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m. Exhibitors’ Opening Reception & Research/Education Poster Session I Name Badge Required Washington State Convention Center, Ballrooms 6E & 6F, Sixth Floor Poster presenters will be at their poster from 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

6:45 p.m.–7:45 p.m. Council of Faculties and Department Chairs Welcome AACP Walmart Scholars Willow, Second Floor

An opportunity for the Council of Faculties and Department Chairs to welcome the 2010 AACP Walmart Scholars and their respective faculty advisors to discuss how scholars can maximize their meeting experience with potential future colleagues in the Academy.

Monday, July 12 9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m. Research/Education Poster Session II Name Badge Required Washington State Convention Center, Ballrooms 6E & 6F, Sixth Floor Poster Presenters will be at their poster from 9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Noon–1:30 p.m. Boxed Lunch in Exhibit Hall and Research/Education Poster Session III Ticket and Name Badge Required Washington State Convention Center, Ballrooms 6E & 6F, Sixth Floor Poster Presenters will be at their poster from Noon–1:00 p.m.

Suggested Sessions for both the Student and Faculty Mentor to Attend Saturday, July 10 6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m. AACP Welcome Reception & School Posters

connect young people in emerging economies with viable life options.

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m. First House of Delegates Session

Grand Ballroom, Second Floor Name Badge Required Show your school spirit by wearing your team’s colors and logos. There will be two awards– individual and team–given to those who embody the best school spirit!

Grand Ballroom, Second Floor All attendees are welcome to hear reports from AACP leaders and guests. Recommendations of the Bylaws and Policy Development Committee will be open for debate in town hall format.

Sunday, July 11

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m. Innovations in Teaching

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m. Opening General Session

Grand Ballroom, Second Floor AACP’s Opening General Session will expand our horizons on educational innovation. The keynote presentation features Tom Vander Ark, MBA, managing partner of Revolution Learning. His organization critically assesses innovations that improve educational engagement, access and efficiency, including those that

Tuesday, July 13 Willow A, Second Floor Recipients of the 2010 Innovations in Teaching Award will present their winning portfolio.

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m. Examining Excellence: 2010 Awards Plenary

Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor Join the recipients of the Chalmers, Dawson and Volwiler awards for a candid and engaging

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

discussion of their views on what qualities mark excellence in pharmacy education and research.

7:00 p.m.–9:30 p.m. AACP Closing Banquet

Grand Ballroom, Second Floor Ticket and Name Badge Required The closing banquet celebrates the Association’s collective accomplishments over the past year and honors the recipients of the Rufus A. Lyman Award and the Distinguished Service Award.

Wednesday, July 14 8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m. Final House of Delegates Session

Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor Administrative and faculty delegates meet to adopt policy statements and conduct other business before the 2010 House of Delegates.

19


SOCIAL AND PRE-SESSION EVENTS Social Events SAT

7•10 SUN

7•11 MON

7•12 TUES

7•13

Don’t miss a chance to socialize and network with your colleagues at one of the many social events we have planned for you.

Saturday, July 10

Education Poster Session III

6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

Ticket and Name Badge Required

AACP Welcome Reception & School Posters Grand Ballroom, Second Floor Name Badge Required

Sis-boom-bam! Wear your school’s colors, team jersey or come as the mascot. Show your pride in your school and the good work that you do over drinks and conversation with old and new friends. There will be two awards—individual and team—given to those who embody the best school spirit!

Sunday, July 11 4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Exhibitors’ Opening Reception & Research/ Education Poster Session I Name Badge Required

Washington State Convention Center, Ballrooms 6E & 6F, Sixth Floor Join the more than 35 exhibitors for hors d’oeuvres and refreshments as you browse their latest products and services and visit with colleagues at their posters from 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Washington State Convention Center, Ballrooms 6E & 6F, Sixth Floor Join AACP and dozens of exhibitors for a boxed lunch while visiting with colleagues at their posters from Noon–1:00 p.m.

Tuesday, July 13 7:00 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

AACP Closing Banquet Grand Ballroom, Second Floor The closing banquet of the 2010 AACP Annual Meeting celebrates our collective accomplishments over the past year. The AACP Distinguished Service Award will be presented to Jimmy R. Mitchell, M.P.H., R.Ph., director of the Office of Pharmacy Affairs in the Health Resources and Services Administration, for his commitment and dedication to patient safety, clinical pharmacy services and collaboration with academic pharmacy. The Rufus A. Lyman Award will be presented to Dr. Rosemin Kassam and Mona Kwong, both of The University of British Columbia. Please note: a ticket and name badge are required. All guests are required to select a banquet table and redeem their invitation for a reserved seating ticket at the Registration and Information Desk located in the Spruce Room, Second Floor, no later than 4:00 p.m. on Monday, July 12. Dress is cocktail attire.

Monday, July 12 Noon–1:30 p.m.

Boxed Lunch in Exhibit Hall and Research/

Pre-Session Events PharmCAS Pre-Sessions PharmCAS Overview and PharmAdMIT Training for New Users

FRI

7•9 SAT

7•10

Friday, July 9 1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m. Metropolitan A, Third Floor This session is geared toward new users and is a great refresher for experienced users. It will provide an overview of the PharmCAS admissions portal and the PharmAdMIT software. Participants will become familiar with the PharmCAS admissions portal and will learn how to set up the PharmAdMIT software for school specific needs, create correspondence, rank applicants, generate reports and much more!

PharmCAS and PharmAdMIT Updates Saturday, July 10 8:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. Willow, Second Floor Presenters will review PharmCAS and PharmAdMIT enhancements for the 2010-2011 admissions cycle, trend data and survey results. PharmCAS Advisory Panel members will be present and participants will have an opportunity to share experiences and pose questions to the panel, staff and other users. Fee: $250 (fee applies if attendee is not registered for the full meeting; fee includes both sessions) See the Registration and Information Desk.

20

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


PRE-SESSION EVENTS Leadership Pre-Session: Development Performance for Colleges of Pharmacy

SAT

7•10

Saturday, July 10 8:30 a.m.–3:15 p.m. Grand Hyatt Seattle: Eliza Anderson Amphitheater Fee: $195. See the Registration and Information Desk; availability is limited. This workshop, presented by Joe K. Golding, chairman and CEO of Advancement Resources, LLC, will help college of pharmacy deans, faculty and development professionals explore concepts, tools and skills that are a critical part of the donor development process.

Joe K. Golding Chairman and CEO Advancement Resources, LLC

In addition to understanding the various responsibilities of deans, faculty members, development professionals and volunteers in the development process, participants will also discover breakthrough ways to engage donors and donor prospects. This workshop will help participants gain the skills necessary to craft more compelling vision stories and identify ways to remove existing roadblocks, deepen donor commitment and discover more significant gifts.

HELL my na me is

O

DON’T FORGET! 2010 Teachers Seminar: Leading and Creating Interprofessional Education for the 21st Century

Name badges are your ticket to all Annual Meeting events.

Saturday, July 10 8:30 a.m.–3:15 p.m. Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor Fee: $195 (Students: $125) See the Registration and Information Desk; availability is limited. The 2010 AACP Teachers Seminar focuses on developing, implementing and sustaining interprofessional education. Interprofessional/interdisciplinary care is the overarching theme of U.S. healthcare reform. With the future of U.S. healthcare focusing on teambased care, this engaging workshop will explore institutional issues facing leaders and teaching issues facing faculty to prepare our students for success in interprofessional environments.

SAT

7•10

The seminar features Dr. John H.V. Gilbert, international expert in interprofessional education and project lead for the Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative. Lunch will be provided for registered attendees.

John H.V. Gilbert, Ph.D., FCAHS Project Lead, Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative Founding Principal & Professor Emeritus, College of Health Disciplines, The University of British Columbia

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

21


FEATURED EVENTS Opening General Session Keynote Presentation Sunday, July 11 8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m. Grand Ballroom, Second Floor

SUN

7•11

Speaker:

Moderator:

Tom Vander Ark, MBA

Jeffrey N. Baldwin, Pharm.D.

Managing Partner

AACP President

Revolution Learning

Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy

Kicking off the 2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars is Tom Vander Ark, MBA, managing partner of Revolution Learning. His organization critically assesses innovations that improve educational engagement, access and efficiency, including those that connect young people in emerging economies with viable life options. He is the founding blogger of www.EdReformer.com, a community of advocates, innovators, entrepreneurs and investors seeking to improve student learning worldwide, and was the first executive director for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. AACP President Jeffrey N. Baldwin will moderate the session and provide a summary of key AACP accomplishments of the past year.

Annual Fund Giving Strategies Presented by the Development Directors Special Interest Group Sunday, July 11

SUN

7•11

9:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Grand Hyatt Seattle: Leonesa III, First Floor

Tammie L. Ruda Executive Director of Annual Giving Brown University

Please join the Development Directors Special Interest Group for a workshop that will provide attendees an opportunity to develop and enhance their annual fund giving strategies. Tammie L. Ruda, executive director of annual giving at Brown University and Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) speaker, will lead the discussion that focuses on how to create a reunion giving program or leadership giving in the annual fund; grow annual giving with challenge gifts; and use metrics to manage and evaluate an annual fund. Ruda oversees a robust annual fund program that includes class campaigns, direct marketing, student philanthropy, high-end annual giving and recognition programs, and a parents program. She is the author of two chapters in Donor Relations: The Essential Guide to Stewardship Policies, Procedures, and Protocol (CASE, 1999) and is a frequent conference presenter. Fee: $250 (fee only applies if attendee is not registered for the full meeting) See the Registration and Information Desk.

22

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


FEATURED EVENTS Mission Impossible?: Budget Savings Through Operational Efficiency Presented by the Administrative and Financial Officers Special Interest Group Sunday, July 11 10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. Grand Hyatt Seattle: Leonesa I, First Floor Administrators are scrambling to find new ways to reduce expenses. Increasing operational efficiency using the LEAN approach has been proven successful at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). Find out how the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy cut costs and learn how you can implement these same concepts.

Women Faculty SIG Luncheon, Business Meeting and “My Lunch”: A Live Social Network Activity

SUN

7•11

Sunday, July 11 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Cirrus Room, 35th Floor This annual business meeting and luncheon of the Women Faculty SIG will engage participants in “My Lunch” – a live social networking activity. Discussion questions based on themes from the SIG book club selections will be placed at each table so that participants can “friend” each other while sharing observations, experiences and ideas. Fee: $45; Limited availability. Ticket and name badge required.

Fee: $250 (fee only applies if attendee is not registered for the full meeting) See the Registration and Information Desk.

2010 Science Plenary Monday, July 12 10:45 a.m.–Noon Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor The 2010 Science Plenary features the work underway at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington. IHME monitors global health conditions and health systems, as well as evaluates interventions, initiatives and reforms, and as such, provides high quality and timely information on health so that policymakers, researchers, donors, practitioners, local decision-makers and others can better allocate limited resources to achieve optimal results. Multiple global health efforts have sprung up over the past several decades as health spending has risen to unprecedented heights, accounting for 9 percent of world economic output. Yet a lack of objective, comparable and comprehensible information on health hinders these various efforts from achieving their highest aims. By attracting a core of talented researchers and collaborating with key actors and institutions to mutual benefit, the Institute will build the needed base of objective evidence about what works and what does not work to improve health conditions and health systems performance. Most importantly, the Institute intends to make this evidence base freely and readily available in the public domain. Better health information can be expected to lead to more knowledgeable decision-making and higher achievements in health.

MON

7•12

IHME Director Christopher Murray, M.D., D.Phil., will keynote the plenary to provide more insight into this important work. Andy S. Stergachis, Ph.D., R.Ph., professor of epidemiology and global health at the University of Washington Schools of Pharmacy and Public Health, will respond to this presentation by identifying key areas of research and education relevant to pharmacy and public health. Christopher Murray, M.D., D.Phil. Director Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

Andy S. Stergachis, Ph.D., R.Ph. Professor of Epidemiology and Global Health University of Washington Schools of Pharmacy and Public Health

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

Moderator: Thomas A. Baillie, Ph.D., D.Sc., M.Sc.

Dean University of Washington School of Pharmacy

23


FEATURED EVENTS Examining Excellence: 2010 Awards Plenary Honoring the Chalmers, Dawson and Volwiler Award Winners Tuesday, July 13

TUES

7•13

Image: (c) majedphoto.com

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m. Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor Robert K. Chalmers Distinguished Pharmacy Educator Award

Paul R. Dawson Biotechnology Award

Volwiler Research Achievement Award

Mary Anne Koda-Kimble, Pharm.D.

Harold L. Kohn, Ph.D.

Hartmut C. Derendorf, Ph.D.

Dean University of California, San Francisco School of Pharmacy

Kenan Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Eshelman School of Pharmacy

Distinguished Professor and Chairman of the Department of Pharmaceutics University of Florida College of Pharmacy

Supported by

Supported by

Moderator: Victor A. Yanchick, Ph.D. Dean Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy

Join moderator Victor A. Yanchick as he leads a stimulating dialogue on excellence in pharmacy education and research.

AACP Closing Banquet Tuesday, July 13 7:00 p.m.–9:30 p.m. Grand Ballroom, Second Floor The closing banquet of the 2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars celebrates the Academy’s collective accomplishments over the past year. The AACP Distinguished Service Award will be presented to Jimmy R. Mitchell, M.P.H., R.Ph., for his commitment and dedication to patient safety, clinical pharmacy services and collaboration with academic pharmacy. The Rufus A. Lyman Award will be presented to Dr. Rosemin Kassam and Mona Kwong, both of The University of British Columbia, for the best paper published in the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education in 2009. A ticket is required for this event; dress is cocktail attire. Rufus A. Lyman Award

TUES

7•13

AACP Distinguished Service Award

Rosemin Kassam, B.Sc. Pharm, Pharm.D.

Jimmy R. Mitchell, M.P.H., R.Ph.

Associate Professor, Director for the Structured Practice Education Program Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences The University of British Columbia

Director Office of Pharmacy Affairs, Health Resources and Services Administration

Mona Kwong, B.Sc. Pharm, M.Sc. Lecturer, Research Associate and Coordinator for the Structured Practice Education Program Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences The University of British Columbia

24

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


SCHEDULE

Friday, July 9 • Saturday, July 10 Friday, July 9 S

1:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

PharmCAS Overview and PharmAdMIT Training for New Users Metropolitan A, Third Floor Fee: $250 (fee applies if attendee is not registered for the full meeting) See Registration and Information Desk.

This session is geared toward new users and is a great refresher for experienced users. It will provide an overview of the PharmCAS admissions portal and the PharmAdMIT software. Participants will become familiar with the PharmCAS admissions portal and will learn to set up the PharmAdMIT software for school specific needs, create correspondence, rank applicants, generate reports and much more! (Moderator) Jennifer L. Athay, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Lexi Losch, PharmCAS Team Leader, Liaison International, Inc., (Speaker) Chris Ferraraccio, AdMIT Product Support Specialist, Academic Management Systems

4:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

Registration and Information Desk Spruce, Second Floor

Saturday, July 10 7:00 a.m.–6:30 p.m.

Registration and Information Desk Spruce, Second Floor 7:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast Grand Ballroom Foyer, Second Floor For Teachers Seminar Attendees Only

7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast Grand Hyatt Seattle: First Floor Foyer For Leadership Pre-Session Attendees Only

8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Cyber Café/Computer Lab Diamond, First Floor

W

8:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

AACP Walmart Scholars Meet and Greet Aspen, Second Floor An opportunity for the 2010 AACP Wal-

mart Scholars and their advisors to meet and learn how to maximize their meeting experience. (President) Jeffrey N. Baldwin, University of Nebraska Medical Center; (Speaker) Lucinda L. Maine, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

S

8:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

PharmCAS and PharmAdMIT Updates Willow, Second Floor Fee: $250 (fee applies if attendee is not registered for the full meeting) See Registration and Information Desk.

Presenters will review PharmCAS and PharmAdMIT enhancements for the 2010–2011 admissions cycle, trend data and survey results. PharmCAS Advisory Panel members will be present and participants will have an opportunity to share experiences and pose questions to the panel, staff and other users. (Moderator) Jennifer L. Athay, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Jennifer L. Clutter, West Virginia University

A C D E F R W 8:30 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Teachers Seminar: Opening Session: Leading and Creating Interprofessional Education for the 21st Century Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor Student Fee: $125; Attendee fee: $195 (covers entire Teachers Seminar Pre-Session) See Registration and Information Desk.

The rapidly changing healthcare environment requires that graduates from all health professions programs work together to achieve successful and cost-effective health outcomes. This Teachers Seminar will address the development, delivery and sustainability of interprofessional education focusing on institutional level issues, interprofessional science, interprofessional simulations and interprofessional professionalism. (Moderator) Michelle M. Kalis, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston; (Speaker) John H.V. Gilbert, Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative; (Speaker) Victor A. Yanchick, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Wendy Duncan, St. Louis College of Pharmacy; (Speaker)

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

Samuel M. Poloyac, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Peggy S. Odegard, University of Washington; (Speaker) Jody Gandy, American Physical Therapy Association

A

8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

SAT

7•10

Assessment & Accreditation System Training Diamond, First Floor By Invitation Only

Training session for the schools that agreed to participate in the pilot study for the online assessment & accreditation system. Liaison International, Inc., AACP and ACPE will provide training/demo for participants. 8:30 a.m.–3:15 p.m.

Leadership Pre-Session: Breakthrough Development Performance for Colleges of Pharmacy Grand Hyatt Seattle: Eliza Anderson Amphitheater Attendee fee: $195 (covers entire Leadership PreSession.) See Registration and Information Desk.

This intense workshop will explore concepts, tools and skills that are a critical part of the donor development process. Participants will gain the skills necessary to craft more compelling vision stories and identify ways to remove existing

Track Symbols: A

Assessment

C

Curriculum

D

Department Chairs

E

Experiential Education

F G

Faculty Development

L

Leadership/Management

R

Research and Science

S

Student Affairs

W

Walmart Scholars

Global

25


SCHEDULE roadblocks, deepen donor commitment and discover more significant gifts. (Speaker) Joe K. Golding, Advancement Resources, LLC

SAT

7•10

10:00 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Teachers Seminar Beverage Break Grand Ballroom Foyer, Second Floor 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

PharmCAS Advisory Panel Queen Anne, Third Floor Closed committee meeting. 11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Teachers Seminar Lunch Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor Luncheon for Teachers Seminar attendees only. Noon–1:00 p.m.

Leadership Pre-Session Lunch Grand Hyatt Seattle: Princessa, First Floor Luncheon for Leadership Pre-Session attendees only.

C D F R

1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m.

Teachers Seminar Break-out #1: Interprofessional Science Education Grand Ballroom A, Second Floor Discussion of approaches to development and implementation of interprofessional science education programs with a focus on teaching translational research in the health sciences.

Track Symbols:

26

A

Assessment

C

Curriculum

D

Department Chairs

E

Experiential Education

F G

Faculty Development

L

Leadership/Management

R

Research and Science

S

Student Affairs

W

Walmart Scholars

Global

(Speaker) Samuel M. Poloyac, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Kim R. Brouwer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A C E F

1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m.

Teachers Seminar Break-out #2: Simulations in Interprofessional Learning and Assessment Grand Ballroom B, Second Floor Discussion of interprofessional simulations. (Speaker) Brenda S. Bray, Washington State University; (Speaker) Peggy S. Odegard, University of Washington

A C E F

1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m.

Teachers Seminar Break-out #3: Interprofessional Professionalism Metropolitan B, Third Floor Discussion of learning and assessing professional behavior in interprofessional environments. (Speaker) Jody Gandy, American Physical Therapy Association; (Speaker) Dana P. Hammer, University of Washington

C D L

1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m.

Teachers Seminar Break-out #4: Special Break-out for Academic Leaders Issaquah, Third Floor Discussion of leadership issues in interprofessional education including institutional and professional cultural barriers, opportunities and sustainability. (Speaker) John H.V. Gilbert, Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative; (Speaker) Victor A. Yanchick, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Wendy Duncan, St. Louis College of Pharmacy

S

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Special Session: Paperless Admissions Processes Aspen, Second Floor This workshop will include a discussion on creating a paperless admissions environment. Becoming paperless is environmentally responsible and saves time and money. Topics will include benefits and concerns of becoming paperless, scanning and saving procedures and more. Ask questions and share suggestions to help move to this process. (Speaker) Christine Stumm, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Richard F. O’Brocta, St. John Fisher College; (Speaker) Laura M. Fox, Presbyterian College; (Speaker) James Walter, Midwestern University/Glendale; (Speaker) Tara M. Hennessy, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston; (Speaker) Elizabeth Heffernan, University of Hawaii at Hilo

C D F R

1:50 p.m.–2:40 p.m.

Teachers Seminar Break-out #5: Interprofessional Science Education (A repeat of Break-out #1) Grand Ballroom A, Second Floor Discussion of approaches to development and implementation of interprofessional science education programs with a focus on teaching translational research in the health sciences. (Speaker) Samuel M. Poloyac, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Kim Brouwer, R. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A C E F

1:50 p.m.–2:40 p.m.

Teachers Seminar Break-out #6: Simulations in Interprofessional Learning and Assessment (A repeat of Break-out #2) Grand Ballroom B, Second Floor Discussion of interprofessional simulations. (Speaker) Brenda S. Bray, Washington State University; (Speaker) Peggy S. Odegard, University of Washington

A C E F

1:50 p.m.–2:40 p.m.

Teachers Seminar Break-out #7: Interprofessional Professionalism (A repeat of Break-out #3) Metropolitan B, Third Floor Discussion of learning and assessing professional behavior in interprofessional environments. (Speaker) Jody Gandy, American Physical Therapy Association; (Speaker) Dana P. Hammer, University of Washington

C D L

1:50 p.m.–2:40 p.m.

Teachers Seminar Break-out #8: Special Break-out for Academic Leaders (A repeat/continuation of Break-out #4) Issaquah, Third Floor Discussion of leadership issues in interprofessional education including institutional and professional cultural barriers, opportunities and sustainability. (Speaker) John H.V. Gilbert, Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative; (Speaker) Victor A. Yanchick, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Wendy Duncan, St. Louis College of Pharmacy

S

2:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Centralized Criminal Background Check Service Training Session Willow, Second Floor This training session will be conducted by Certiphi Screening, Inc., and will be held for all schools participating in the PharmCAS-facilitated Centralized Crimi-

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


SCHEDULE nal Background Check Service. (Speaker) Suzi Arant, Certiphi Screening Inc.

A C D E F R W 2:45 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

(Speaker) Robert A. Blouin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Anna Ratka, Texas A&M Health Science Center; (Speaker) David P. Zgarrick, Northeastern University

Teachers Seminar Closure

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor End-of-seminar closure discussion with summaries from break-out sessions.

Queen Anne, Third Floor Closed committee meeting.

(Moderator) Michelle M. Kalis, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences-Boston; (Speaker) Samuel M. Poloyac, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Peggy S. Odegard, University of Washington; (Speaker) Jody Gandy, American Physical Therapy Association; (Speaker) Dana P. Hammer, University of Washington

3:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Council of Ohio Colleges of Pharmacy Admiral, Third Floor By Invitation Only

Current updates and discussions among the colleges of pharmacy in Ohio. 3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

New Faculty/FirstTimers Aspen, Second Floor Attendees are invited to an informal session to share, learn and network with colleagues about the wonderful opportunities available during the AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars. (President) Jeffrey N. Baldwin, University of Nebraska Medical Center; (Speaker) William G. Lang, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Council of Deans Administrative Board Meeting Alki Boardroom, Fourth Floor Business meeting of the Council of Deans (COD) Administrative Board. (Chair) Patricia D. Kroboth, University of Pittsburgh

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Council of Sections Business Meeting Issaquah, Third Floor Business meeting of the Council of Sections, consisting of the section chairs, chairs-elect and immediate past chairs.

Rho Chi Executive Council (Moderator) Robert L. McCarthy, Rho Chi Society National President

3:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

Council of Faculties Administrative Board Meeting Richmond Boardroom, Fourth Floor Business meeting of the Council of Faculties (COF) Administrative Board. (Chair) Gary R. Matzke, Virginia Commonwealth University

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Catholic Pharmacists Mass Wallingford, Third Floor Everyone is welcome! (Moderator) Edward M. DeSimone II, Creighton University

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

(EAB) member or an Editor (E). The ratio of authors to EAB member or E will be no more than 5:1. (Moderator) Gayle A. Brazeau, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Moderator) Jack E. Fincham, University of Missouri–Kansas City; (Moderator) Claire W. Anderson, University of Nottingham CE# 294-999-10-059-L04-P

5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m. Greenwood, Third Floor All interested section members and officers are welcome to this meeting with the Grace and Harold Sewell Fund Stipend recipients. New members will have an orientation to AACP Annual Meeting programs and events. Instruction and information regarding requirements for the stipend recipients will be offered. (Chair) Susan McGuinness, University of California, San Diego; (Moderator) Vicki J. Killion, Purdue University; (Speaker) Jill S. Nissen, St. Louis College of Pharmacy

6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

AACP Welcome Reception & School Posters Grand Ballroom, Second Floor Name Badge Required

Metropolitan A, Third Floor All delegates are encouraged to attend for an overview of the business to be conducted at the 2010 AACP House of Delegates sessions and to review House policies and procedures.

Show your school spirit by wearing your team’s colors and logos. There will be two awards–individual and team–given to those who embody the best school spirit!

F R

4:30 p.m.–6:00 p.m.

American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (AJPE) Author’s Workshop Willow, Second Floor Space is limited.

This interactive workshop is designed for authors to discuss and ask questions about manuscripts in preparation. The session format will be small groups facilitated by an Editorial Advisory Board

7•10

Visiting Librarians Welcome

Delegate Briefing

(Speaker of the House) John A. Pieper, The University of New Mexico; (Parliamentarian) Lawrence “LB” Brown, The University of Tennessee

SAT

L

7:30 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

Academic Leadership Fellows Program Commencement Willow, Second Floor By Invitation Only

A culmination and celebration of the accomplishments for the sixth cohort of the Academic Leadership Fellows Program (ALFP). Fellows are feted during a special commencement ceremony marked by a certificate of completion and special mementos commemorating their individual and cohort success.

(Chair) Michelle M. Kalis, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston

W

3:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Graduate Student Program Metropolitan B, Third Floor Join a panel of deans and department chairs to discuss “How to get your first job in academia.”

DON’T FORGET!

HELL my na me is

O

Name badges are your ticket to all Annual Meeting events.

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

27


INFORMATION SCHEDULE

See what’s happening at the AACP Booth! SUN

7•11 MON

7•12

Do you have questions about the new accreditation component of the PEAS system or how to submit a manuscript in the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (AJPE)? Are you interested in learning more about Education Scholar, or want more information about AACP membership or dues? Stop by AACP booths #315 and #317 during exhibitor hours to explore many of the programs, products and services that will help you educate and train future pharmacists, educators and pharmaceutical scientists.

AACP will be giving out PRIZES to visitors! We’ll see you there!

Sunday, July 11

Monday, July 12

4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

9:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Membership

AJPE

Daniel J. Cassidy, AACP Chief Operating Officer

Education Scholar Cecilia M. Plaza, AACP Director of Academic Affairs and Assessment

Institutional Research and PEAS Jennifer M. Patton, AACP Director of Institutional Research and Data Systems

APN Goes Digital American Pharmacy Educator Week Rebecca M. Morgan, AACP Director of Communications

AJPE Joseph T. DiPiro, Editor Gayle A. Brazeau Jack E. Fincham Karen T. Shipp

28

Joseph T. DiPiro, Editor Gayle A. Brazeau Jack E. Fincham Karen T. Shipp

Student Affairs PharmCAS Student Background Checks Jennifer L. Athay, AACP Director of Student Affairs 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Experiential Education Interprofessional Education Women’s Health Curriculum Development Academic Leadership Fellows Program Robert (Buzz) Kerr, AACP Vice President of Academic Affairs

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


SCHEDULE

Sunday, July 11 6:30 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Registration and Information Desk

Opening General Session

Spruce, Second Floor 6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast Grand Ballroom & Metropolitan Ballroom Foyers

L

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Academic Leadership Fellows Program Alumni Networking Breakfast Willow, Second Floor This breakfast for Fellows alumni, incoming Fellows and current and past dean facilitators will provide an opportunity to network and reunite with past participants and welcome the incoming Fellows of the seventh cohort. 6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Topical Roundtables Metropolitan B, Third Floor Please see page 44 for more information. (Moderator) Michelle M. Kalis, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences-Boston

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Prayer Breakfast Aspen, Second Floor (Moderator) Daniel A. Hussar, University of the Sciences in Philadelphia

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

ACPE’s Revised Evaluation Instrument for Professional Degree Programs in Pharmacy Metropolitan A, Third Floor ACPE’s evaluation instrument for professional degree programs (the “rubric”) has been revised. The instrument serves as the basis for the evaluation of professional degree programs as well as a template for college and school self-studies. The session will outline changes in format and requirements and the implementation timeline. (Speaker) Jeffrey W. Wadelin, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education   

7:00 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

First House of Delegates Sign-In Grand Ballroom Foyer, Second Floor All delegates must register their attendance during this sign-in hour. 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Cyber Café/Computer Lab Diamond, First Floor

Grand Ballroom, Second Floor AACP’s Opening General Session will expand our horizons on educational innovation. The keynote presentation features Tom Vander Ark, MBA, managing partner of Revolution Learning. His organization critically assesses innovations that improve educational engagement, access and efficiency, including those that connect young people in emerging economies with viable life options. (President) Jeffrey N. Baldwin, University of Nebraska Medical Center; (Speaker) Tom Vander Ark, Revolution Learning

L

9:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Development Directors SIG: Annual Fund Giving Strategies Grand Hyatt Seattle: Leonesa III, First Floor Fee: $250 (fee applies if attendee is not registered for the full meeting) See Registration and Information Desk.

A 4-hour workshop on Annual Fund strategies that will specifically focus on: • Segmenting Prospects to Improve Results • Leadership Giving in the Annual Fund • Growing Annual Giving with Challenge Gifts • Using Metrics to Manage and Evaluate Your Annual Fund (Moderator) Marie M. Parfitt Pattie, University of California, San Francisco; (Chair) Kelly A. Markey, University of Florida; (Chair) Robert C. Busch, University of Minnesota (Speaker) Tammie L. Ruda, Brown University

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Beverage Break Grand Ballroom & Metropolitan Ballroom Foyers 10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

First House of Delegates Session Grand Ballroom, Second Floor All attendees are welcome to hear reports from AACP leaders and guests. Recommendations of the Bylaws and Policy Development Committee will be open for debate in town hall format. (Speaker of the House) John A. Pieper, The University of New Mexico; (Presidentelect) Rodney A. Carter, University of Minnesota; (Treasurer) Keith N. Herist, The University of Georgia

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

L

10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Administrative and Financial Officers SIG: Mission Impossible?: Budget Savings Through Operational Efficiency Grand Hyatt Seattle: Leonesa I, First Floor Fee: $250 (Fee applies if attendee is not registered for the full meeting) See Registration and Information Desk.

SUN

7•11

Administrators are scrambling to find new ways to reduce expenses. Increasing operational efficiency using the LEAN approach has been proven successful at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). Find out how the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy cut costs and learn how you can implement these same concepts. (Chair) Charlotte S. Klaus, University of Colorado Denver; (Speaker) Mike Patil, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

C G

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Special Session: Application Toward Integrated Learning of the Medical Pipeline in the Pharm.D. Curriculum Metropolitan B, Third Floor Learn how to evaluate the role of devices,

Track Symbols: A

Assessment

C

Curriculum

D

Department Chairs

E

Experiential Education

F G

Faculty Development

L

Leadership/Management

R

Research and Science

S

Student Affairs

W

Walmart Scholars

Global

29


SCHEDULE diagnostics and drugs in the pipeline as a tool toward integrated learning models for the professional pharmacy program. The workshop will present options, solicit additional alternatives and then prioritize strategies to utilize pipeline products as interactive teaching tools.

SUN

7•11

(Speaker) Diana I. Brixner, The University of Utah; (Speaker) Emily Hunter, The University of Utah; (Speaker) Gary M. Oderda, The University of Utah CE #: 294-999-10-065-L04-P

F

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Women Faculty SIG: Luncheon, Business Meeting and “My Lunch”–A Live Social Network Activity Cirrus Room, 35th Floor Fee: $45. Ticket and Name Badge Required.

This annual business meeting and luncheon of the Women Faculty SIG will engage participants in “My Lunch” – a live social networking activity. Discussion questions based on themes from the SIG book club selections will be placed at each table so that participants can “friend” each other while sharing observations, experiences and ideas. (Chair) Susan M. Meyer, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Gina G. Garrison, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Teacher of the Year Luncheon Willow A, Second Floor By Invitation Only

Sponsored by

Pharmacy

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

USP Luncheon Willow B, Second Floor By Invitation Only

R

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Chemistry Section: End of Drug Lifecycle: What Happens Once ADME is Completed? Queen Anne, Third Floor This program will discuss the impact of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PCPPs) on the environment. In pharmacy education we often neglect the importance of drug disposal and the fate of drugs after excretion. This session will provide some insights into how these products may affect our health and environment. An overview of PCPPs in the environment will be presented, some of the adverse health effects associated with PCPPs will be discussed, and the role of wastewater treatment in the removal of

30

PCPPs will be described. (Speaker) Robin M. Zavod, Midwestern University/Downers Grove; (Speaker) Helen E. Smith, University of the Incarnate Word; (Moderator) Kathy D. Webster, University of Maryland Eastern Shore; (Speaker) Eric Dickenson, Advanced Water Technology Center

F L R

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Continuing Professional Education Section: Sharing Tools: Needs Assessment, Active Learning, Faculty Guidance and Outcomes Analysis Metropolitan A, Third Floor The purpose of this session is to share continuing pharmacy education tools between providers. We will seek to discuss best practices and incorporation of CPD principles. (Moderator) Kathleen A. McCartney, University of Colorado Denver; (Moderator) Jill M. Fitzgerald, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) David Fuentes, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) CoraLynn B. Trewet, The University of Iowa CE #: 294-999-10-060-L04-P

A E

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Experiential Education Section: Assessment of Student Performance in the Advanced Experiential Environment Grand Ballroom C, Second Floor Pharmacy accreditation standards require pharmacy colleges/schools to assess student performance and attainment of desired outcomes during pharmacy practice experiences. This session will describe appropriate ways to assess student performance in the experiential environment. The Northwest Pharmacy Experiential Consortium, representing seven pharmacy programs, will present the development, implementation and lessons learned of a regionally standardized advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) assessment instrument. (Moderator) Rhonda M. Jones, Creighton University; (Speaker) Jody Gandy, American Physical Therapy Association; (Speaker) Juancho Ramirez, Oregon State University CE #: 294-999-10-061-L04-P

A L R

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Libraries/Educational Resources Section: Lightning Librarians: Unconference Talks, Questions, Problems, Solutions, and Discussion Wallingford, Third Floor In this session, nine members of the Libraries/Education Resources Section will each have five minutes to present a question,

problem or solution to participants. Then the room will be divided into small groups to discuss each talk. Speakers will be selected to allow for just-in-time research and problems to be addressed. (Moderator) K.T. L. Vaughan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill CE #: 294-999-10-062-L04-P

C

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Pharmaceutics Section: Teaching Sterile Compounding: Meeting the Standards in Real and Virtual Environments Issaquah, Third Floor This program will review important concepts and practical advice for teaching sterile compounding, beginning with a review of sterile compounding guidelines, followed by a talk on different approaches to teaching sterile compounding, and concluding with a description of a novel approach of using virtual reality to teach cleanroom concepts. (Moderator) William C. Mobley, University of Florida; (Speaker) David W. Newton, Shenandoah University; (Speaker) Ashley H. Vincent, Purdue University; (Speaker) Regina F. Peacock, Shenandoah University CE #:294-999-10-063-L04-P

D F

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Pharmacy Practice Section: Pathways to Mentoring: Developing Future Faculty Mentors Grand Ballroom D, Second Floor This session will emphasize the transition of faculty from their initial years in academics, up to where they move from being mentees to being a mentor. We will have three different perspectives: a dean, a department chair and a senior faculty member who directs a school of pharmacy-based mentoring program. A case study will be used to highlight the different strategies that may be used. (Moderator) June F. Johnson, Drake University; (Speaker) Patricia A. Chase, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Marie A. Chisholm-Burns, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Harold L. Kohn, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Robert A. Kerr, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy CE #: 294-999-10-064-L04-P

L F

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Social and Administrative Sciences Section: Mentoring Relationships Among Faculty: Seizing Opportunities and Avoiding Pitfalls Metropolitan B, Third Floor

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


SCHEDULE This program will discuss theoretical foundations underpinning successful mentoring relationships and mentoring programs, describe successful mentoring relationships from the mentor’s and mentee’s perspective, and feature cases and testimonials from faculty at various stages of their career to highlight best practices in mentoring. (Moderator) Jan Kavookjian, Auburn University; (Speaker) Shane P. Desselle, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Nicholas G. Popovich, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Karen L. Rascati, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) S. Suresh Madhavan, West Virginia University; (Speaker) Bijal M. Shah, Touro University California

D L R

1:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Special Session: Faculty Leadership in Translating Pharmacy Practice-based Research into Policy and Advocacy Grand Ballroom A, Second Floor Pharmacy faculty leadership is crucial in translating practice-based research to enrich healthcare reform conversations, advocacy and policy initiatives. Current pharmacy faculty initiatives will be highlighted and opportunities that can be leveraged at the state and federal level will be discussed. (Moderator and Speaker) Marie A. Smith, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Thomas E. Buckley, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Gary R. Matzke, Virginia Commonwealth University

2:30 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Beverage Break Grand Ballroom & Metropolitan Ballroom Foyers

A

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Chemistry Section: Business Meeting and Research Presentation Queen Anne, Third Floor This session will be devoted to the annual business meeting of the Chemistry Section. A research presentation by Srikanth Kolluru on discovery of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors will be included. (Chair) A. Michael Crider, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Srikanth Kolluru, Texas A&M Health Science Center

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Metropolitan A, Third Floor This business meeting will discuss section business, as well as current topics related to the section’s role in standard 26 and the recent IOM report on Redesigning Continuing Education in Health Professions.

Metropolitan B, Third Floor Section business will be conducted, including committee reports and installation of officers.

(Chair) Karan N. Dawson, University of Washington

E

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Experiential Education Section: Business Meeting Grand Ballroom C, Second Floor This is the business meeting of the Experiential Education Section. (Chair) Denise A. Soltis, Drake University

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Libraries/Educational Resources Section: Business Meeting Wallingford, Third Floor This is the business meeting of the Libraries/Educational Resources Section. (Chair) Susan McGuinness, University of California, San Diego; (Speaker) Amy C. Knehans, University of Hawaii at Hilo

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Pharmaceutics Section: Business Meeting

Grand Ballroom A, Second Floor Recipients of the 2010 Award for Excellence in Assessment will present their winning portfolio.

Issaquah, Third Floor This is the business meeting of the Pharmaceutics Section. (Chair) Bill J. Bowman, Midwestern University/Glendale

D E F L

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Pharmacy Practice Section: Business Meeting and Sustaining Departments of Pharmacy Practice During Uncertain Economic Times

Kirkland, Third Floor This is the business meeting of the Biological Sciences Section. We will conduct business and hear a report from a former NIP awardee.

Grand Ballroom D, Second Floor With recent budget cuts, pharmacy practice departments are experiencing loss of faculty positions. This increases the stress on faculty who teach and precept in the professional degree program, limiting the

Biological Sciences Section: Business Meeting

(Chair) Alice Gardner, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Worcester

(Moderator) Timothy E. Welty, The University of Kansas; (Speaker) Barbara G. Wells, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) J. Chris Bradberry, Creighton University; (Speaker) Marie A. Chisholm-Burns, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Annie Wong-Beringer, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Richard A. Helms, The University of Tennessee

Continuing Professional Education Section: Business Meeting

Award for Excellence in Assessment

(Moderator) Sharon K. McDonough, Auburn University; (Speaker) Charles R. Phillips, Drake University; (Speaker) Pauline A. Cawley, Pacific University Oregon

ability of faculty to be involved in scholarship, and negatively impacting the professional development of both faculty and students. This session will focus on opportunities for retaining faculty and programs during recession periods.

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

SUN

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Social and Administrative Sciences Section: Business Meeting

(Chair) Betsy L. Sleath, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Karen B. Farris, The University of Iowa

A

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Special Session: Utilizing AACP Curriculum Quality Survey Results for Benchmarking: NonParametric Analyses for NonMathematicians Willow A, Second Floor The session will present integration of AACP Graduating Student, Faculty and Preceptor Survey data to benchmark curricular outcomes. Applications will include methods to virtually create comparison datasets. Specific examples will include basic computer syntax, nonparametric test assumptions-limitations, analysis of output and comparisons across individual AACP surveys at the program level. (Moderator) Katherine K. Knapp, Touro University California; (Speaker) Terrill Tang, Touro University California; (Speaker) Eric Ip, Touro University California; (Speaker) Karl Meszaros, Touro University California

C L

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

History of Pharmacy SIG: Meeting the ACPE Guidelines Part 2: History of Pharmacy Content Throughout the Curriculum Willow B, Second Floor As a follow-up to last year’s successful session on meeting ACPE guidelines concerning the history of pharmacy, three speakers will share experiences incorporating history of pharmacy content in other required courses. The session will conclude with a short panel discussion and a question-and-answer session.

31


SCHEDULE (Chair) Robert A. Buerki, The Ohio State University; (Speaker) Cynthia J. Boyle, University of Maryland; (Speaker) William E. Fassett, Washington State University; (Speaker) Gregory J. Higby, University of Wisconsin–Madison

G

2:45 p.m.–4:15 p.m.

Special Session: Successful Partnering in Global Pharmacy Education

SUN

7•11

Aspen, Second Floor This session features information about successful twinning partnerships between educators in the U.S. and other countries and will involve the American International Health Alliance. Guests from Afghanistan’s Kabul University, the Office of the Minister of Higher Education, and the Kandahar Regional Military Hospital are attending the AACP meeting to initiate collaboration with colleges and schools in the U.S. The 20-year Pan American Conference on Pharmaceutical Education will also be featured. (Moderator) Lucinda L. Maine, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy; (Speaker) Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Laura Laskofski, American International Health Alliance; (Speaker) Osman Babury, Kabul University

W

4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m.

Exhibitors’ Opening Reception & Research/Education Poster Session I Washington State Convention Center, Ballrooms 6E & 6F, Sixth Floor Name Badge Required

Join the more than 35 exhibitors for hors d’oeuvres and refreshments as you browse their latest products and services and visit with colleagues at their posters from 4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

Rho Chi Society Advisors Workshop and Reception Ravenna, Third Floor

their respective faculty advisors to discuss how scholars can maximize their meeting experience with potential future colleagues in the Academy. (Chair) Gary R. Matzke, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Chair-elect) John A. Bosso, South Carolina College of Pharmacy– MUSC Campus; (Immediate Past Chair) Julianna E. Szilagyi, University of Houston; (Chair-elect Designate) Virginia Scott, West Virginia University

6:45 p.m.- 7:45 p.m.

St. Louis College of Pharmacy Alumni Reception/Meet President Pieper Admiral, Third Floor By Invitation Only

By Invitation Only (Moderator) Robert L. McCarthy, Rho Chi Society National President

An opportunity for St. Louis College of Pharmacy alumni to meet the new president, John A. Pieper.

W

7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

6:45 p.m.–7:45 p.m.

Council of Faculties and Department Chairs Welcome AACP Walmart Scholars Willow, Second Floor An opportunity for the Council of Faculties and Department Chairs to welcome the 2010 AACP Walmart Scholars and

Past Presidents Dinner Grand Hyatt Seattle; The Tasting Room at Ruth’s Chris Steak House By Invitation Only

AACP past presidents dinner hosted by Immediate Past President Victor A. Yanchick of Virginia Commonwealth University.

Monday, July 12 6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

PCAT Advisory Committee Meeting

MON

7•12

Cedar, Second Floor Closed committee meeting. (Moderator) Jennifer L. Athay, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast Grand Ballroom & Metropolitan Ballroom Foyers 6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Special Interest Group Cabinet Aspen, Second Floor The chairs, chairs-elect and immediate past chairs will meet to discuss the business of the AACP Special Interest Groups. (Moderator) Lucinda L. Maine, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

How to Implement Pharmacybased Identification and Screening for Memory Decline: A Breakfast Roundtable Discussion on the Curricular Guide for Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy Issaquah, Third Floor Learn about different ways that colleges and schools of pharmacy have implemented the Curricular Guide. and ask questions to the panel. Hosted by Eisai, Inc. 6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

NCPA Deans Advisory Council Meeting

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Greenwood, Third Floor Discussion of NCPA student affairs activities and development.

Topical Roundtables

7:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Metropolitan B, Third Floor Please see page 45 for more information. (Moderator) Michelle M. Kalis, Massachusetts Col-

32

lege of Pharmacy and Health Sciences-Boston

Registration and Information Desk Spruce, Second Floor

8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Cyber Café/Computer Lab Diamond, First Floor 8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Reports of the 2009–2010 Standing Committees Willow A, Second Floor The session provides interested attendees an opportunity to interact with the standing committees of Academic Affairs, Advocacy, Argus Commission, Professional Affairs, Research and Graduate Affairs, and the special committee on Substance Abuse and Pharmacy Education. Following brief presentations by committee chairs on the key recommendations contained in the report, roundtable discussions on the reports and implementation strategies will be led by committee members. (Speaker) Gary M. Oderda, The University of Utah; (Speaker) Nancy DeGuire, University of the Pacific; (Speaker) JoLaine R. Draugalis, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) See-

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


SCHEDULE na L. Haines, Palm Beach Atlantic University; (Speaker) Kenneth L. Audus, The University of Kansas; (Speaker) Paul W. Jungnickel, Auburn University

A C E

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Experiential Education Section: Portfolios in Experiential Education and Beyond: Lessons Learned Grand Ballroom A, Second Floor Several pharmacy colleges/schools are in the process of developing, implementing or revising portfolios to document, assess and track student performance within experiential education, as well as throughout the curriculum. This session will be a panel of three schools presenting their experiences of developing, implementing and/or expanding a student portfolio process. Each school will also share their practical tips and lessons learned thus far. (Moderator) Rhonda M. Jones, Creighton University; (Speaker) Christene M. Jolowsky, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Amy L. Seybert, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Michael G. Kendrach, Samford University CE #: 294-999-10-066-L04-P

F L

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Geriatric SIG: Experience and Potential for Pharmacy Leadership in Interdisciplinary/ Interprofessional Geriatrics Education Willow B, Second Floor Pharmacy faculty panelists will share their experiences and discuss the implementation of interdisciplinary/interprofessional geriatric education programs, including program essentials and pitfall avoidance. (Moderator) Annie Y. Lam, University of Washington; (Moderator) Michael R. Brodeur, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences; (Speaker) Joy B. Plein, University of Washington; (Speaker) Mark A. Stratton, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Gayle A. Hudgins, The University of Montana

E

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Libraries/Educational Resources Section: There’s an App for That: Mobile Resources and Web 3.0 in Pharmacy Education Grand Ballroom C, Second Floor This session focuses on the challenges and opportunities facing pharmacy librarians and faculty as social Internet applications, electronic drug informa-

tion sources and mobile technologies become increasingly available to student pharmacists, healthcare providers and patients. The role of the librarian in the learning approach for Web 3.0 utility will be discussed. Participants will review mobile resources for pharmacists and brainstorm how best to educate students, preceptors and faculty. (Moderator) K.T.L. Vaughan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Vern Duba, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Bart Ragon, University of Virginia CE #: 294-999-10-067-L04-P

C

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Pharmacy Ethics SIG: Fostering a Commitment to Uphold Ethical Standards: A Practical Guide for Addressing Ethics in Pharmacy School Curricula Metropolitan B, Third Floor In this interactive presentation, an audience response system will be used to identify the type, quantity and sequencing of ethics-related education in the attendee’s current program curricula. Successful methods and resources for teaching and integrating ethics into professional pharmacy education will then be described, including the integration of ethical training and professionalism at various stages of didactic and experiential education. (Chair) Kem P. Krueger, University of Wyoming

C E R

F L R

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Examining the Value of Community Pharmacy Residency Programs: A Survey of Schools and Practice Sites Aspen, Second Floor Colleges and schools of pharmacy have played an important role in the development and administration of community pharmacy residency programs. Researchers will discuss the results of a survey that examined the value and implementation barriers of community pharmacy residencies to participating and nonparticipating schools and practice sites. (Speaker) Lawrence M. Brown, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Joseph K. Bonnarens, Pacific University Oregon

D F L

MON

7•12

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Women Faculty SIG: The Power of Negotiation in Achieving Your Goals Grand Ballroom D, Second Floor This nuts-and-bolts workshop will give you basic tools and techniques for negotiating to achieve your goals. Academic issues such as determining the salary you should be earning, determining the raise you deserve with a promotion, and how to negotiate a raise will be addressed. (Moderator) Carolyn Ford, Wingate University; (Speaker) Evelyn Murphy, The Wage Project, Inc.

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Public Health SIG: Healthy People 2020 and Application to Pharmacy Education Metropolitan A, Third Floor This session will sensitize pharmacy educators to the newly-released U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Healthy People 2020 objectives for promoting health and preventing disease. Speakers will discuss the role of the pharmacist in public health and methods for incorporation of Healthy People 2020 into the pharmacy curriculum. (Moderator) John M. Conry, St. John‘s University; (Speaker) Patrick W. O’Carroll, Regional Health Administrator, USPHS Region X; University of Washington; (Speaker) Andy S. Stergachis, University of Washington; (Speaker) Jack E. Fincham, University of Missouri–Kansas City

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

Track Symbols: A

Assessment

C

Curriculum

D

Department Chairs

E

Experiential Education

F G

Faculty Development

L

Leadership/Management

R

Research and Science

S

Student Affairs

W

Walmart Scholars

Global

33


SCHEDULE W

9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Research/Education Poster Session II Washington State Convention Center, Ballrooms 6E & 6F, Sixth Floor Name Badge Required

Poster Presenters will be at their poster from 9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m. 9:00 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Washington State Convention Center, Ballrooms 6E & 6F, Sixth Floor 9:30 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

MON

7•12

Beverage Break Grand Ballroom & Metropolitan Ballroom Foyers After networking with poster presenters and visiting exhibitor booths in the Washington State Convention Center, head back to the Sheraton Seattle Hotel for a beverage break and more exciting Annual Meeting programming. 10:45 a.m.–Noon

2010 Science Plenary Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor The 2010 Science Plenary features Christopher Murray, M.D., D.Phil., director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), and Andy S. Stergachis, Ph.D., R.Ph., professor of epidemiology and global health at the University of Washington Schools of Pharmacy and Public Health. IHME, a Gates Foundationfunded institute, is redrawing the picture of health and disease burden across the globe, influencing health policy and future priorities for research and health system funding. (Moderator) Thomas A. Ballie, University of Washington; (Speaker) Christopher Murray, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation; (Speaker) Andy S. Stergachis, University of Washington

C

10:30 a.m.–Noon

Special Session: Beyond Pharmacotherapy: Spirituality in Healthcare Metropolitan B, Third Floor Spirituality can influence health outcomes. This session will focus on how a school of pharmacy uses a multidisciplinary approach to teach pharmacy and nursing students the importance of considering a patient’s spirituality when treating patients. The presenter will describe spirituality coursework at Shenandoah

34

University and demonstrate application to teaching and clinical practice. (Speaker) Mark S. Johnson, Shenandoah University CE #: 294-999-10-068-L04-P

10:45 a.m.–Noon

Preparing Pharm.D. Graduates for Health-System Practice Grand Ballroom D, Second Floor This workshop builds on the work of a ACPE/ASHP task force on competencies for Pharm.D. graduates entering healthsystem practice. Workshop participants will discuss relevant competencies, where these competencies are best addressed in the curriculum, appropriate teaching and learning methodologies, and effective assessment strategies. (Speaker) Robert S. Beardsley, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Cynthia Brennan, University of Washington

10:45 a.m.–Noon

The 2009 National Pharmacy Practice Survey Analysis and NAPLEX Standard Setting Metropolitan A, Third Floor The session will present processes and outcomes from the 2009 National Pharmacy Practice Survey administered and analyzed by NABP. In addition, the process of determining the acceptable levels of practice standards for entry-level pharmacists and the passing standards for the NAPLEX will be reviewed. (Speaker) Maria Boyle, NABP; (Speaker) Joy Matthews-Lopez, NABP

W

Noon–1:30 p.m.

Boxed Lunch in Exhibit Hall and Research/Education Poster Session III Washington State Convention Center, Ballrooms 6E & 6F, Sixth Floor Ticket and Name Badge Required

Poster Presenters will be at their poster from Noon–1:00 p.m. 1:30 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Council of Deans Business Meeting Metropolitan A, Third Floor (Chair) Patricia D. Kroboth, University of Pittsburgh

1:30 p.m.–3:15 p.m.

Council of Faculties Business Meeting Metropolitan B, Third Floor (Chair) Gary R. Matzke, Virginia Commonwealth University

1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

AACP/Eisai Focus Group—Next

Steps for the Curricular Guide Admiral, Third Floor Brainstorm strategies for developing tools and resources to expand the use of the Curricular Guide to student IPPE and APPE experiences. 3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Beverage Break Grand Ballroom & Metropolitan Ballroom Foyers 3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Council of Deans Special Session: Higher Education Opportunity: Consequences of Policy Choices We Have Made and Continue to Make Metropolitan A, Third Floor Dr. Tom Mortenson will discuss the impact of changing demography, labor market demand for ever higher skill levels, and globalization on the future of higher education and the consequences of government policy choices we have made and continue to make. (Moderator) Patricia D. Kroboth, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Tom Mortenson, The Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education

C

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Curriculum SIG: Under the Surface: A Closer Look at Our Hidden Curricula Grand Ballroom A, Second Floor This session is designed to open a discussion revolving around issues of participation, attitude, professionalism, attendance and civility that make up part of what is often referred to as the hidden curriculum. Examples of successful college of pharmacy efforts and how these have been developed and implemented will be highlighted. Obstacles to creating a harmonized academic environment that produces well-rounded, professional graduates will be discussed, as well as some potential solutions with their actual or projected benefits and pitfalls. Finally, a panoramic view of the academic institution will be given to explore how some of these items may constructively or adversely impact other college initiatives such as curricular revision or experiential education opportunities. (Speaker) Susan P. Bruce, Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy; (Speaker) Stephanie F. Gardner, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker) Julie C. Kissack, Harding University CE #: 294-999-10-069-L04-P

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


SCHEDULE C E G

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Global Pharmacy SIG: How to Build a Winning Global Experience for Pharm.D. Students Willow B, Second Floor The AACP Survey of Current Global Affiliations of U.S. Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy–2009 will be presented. Two exemplar APPE rotations will be showcased. A participatory section will cover learning objectives for global experiences, essential elements of a global experience (using a worksheet) and pitfalls to avoid. (Moderator) Michael Z. Wincor, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Rosalie Sagraves, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) Ellen M. Schellhase, Purdue University; (Speaker) Hazel H. Seaba, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Susan H. Staggs, The University of Iowa CE #: 294-999-10-070-L04-P

F R

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Joint Session: Continuing Professional Education and Social and Administrative Sciences Sections: Meeting the Needs of Underserved Patients Through Scholarship, Teaching and Continuing Professional Development Metropolitan B, Third Floor This program will address how faculty may help students, professionals and researchers meet the needs of underserved patients. Specifics to be included are an example of an urban studies certificate, safety-net programs, and details on how HRSA and APhA can support future scholarly endeavors for underserved populations. (Moderator) Barbara L. Jolly, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Devra Khanh Dang, University of Connecticut; (Speaker) Steven W. Chen, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Lisa Scholz, APhA CE #: 294-999-10-071-L04-P

C F

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Laboratory Instructors SIG: Laboratory Teaching and Workload Grand Ballroom C, Second Floor Drs. Lauren S. Schlesselman and Michael C. Brown will begin this session by reporting their survey findings related to laboratory instructor work load and teaching responsibilities. Following the presentation, informational round table sessions will be offered related to teaching and scholarship in contemporary pharmacy practice and pharmaceutical compounding laboratory courses to

allow participants to discuss issues and share best practices. (Chair) Karen Kopacek, University of Wisconsin–Madison; (Moderator) Jeffrey C. Reist, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Michael C. Brown, Concordia University Wisconsin; (Speaker) Lauren S. Schlesselman, University of Connecticut

C R

(Moderator) Linda G. MacLean, Washington State University; (Speaker) Keith A. Swanson, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) Cherokee Layson-Wolf, University of Maryland CE #: 294-999-10-073-L04-P

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Pharmacogenomics SIG: The Science Grand Ballroom B, Second Floor Pharmacogenomics will contribute greatly to improved therapeutics but it requires a more realistic understanding among future pharmacy practitioners of the role of environmental factors, multiple genes with multiple variants, and human population genetic structure play in predicting individual drug efficacy and toxicity. In this session we present some of the science that underlies pharmacogenomics and the bioinformatic resources available to educators. (Speaker) Reginald F. Frye, University of Florida; (Speaker) Michelle Whirl Carrillo, Stanford University

D E F L

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Pharmacy Practice Section: Getting Involved with Advocacy in Pharmacy Practice Grand Ballroom D, Second Floor This session will emphasize an understanding of the legislative process, both federal and state, as well as opportunities for pharmacy faculty to interact with their elected officials and staff, in an effort to develop relationships to advance the pharmacy education agenda. (Moderator) Timothy J. Ives, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Stephanie M. Hammonds, Health Resources and Services Administration; (Speaker) Leigh Ann Ross, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Stephen W. Schondelmeyer, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, University of Maryland CE #: 294-999-10-072-L04-P

C

active learning activities will be presented to equip participants with tools to incorporate into their curricula.

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine SIG: SelfCare Concepts in the Geriatric Population Grand Hyatt Seattle: Leonesa I, First Floor Geriatric populations are high utilizers of nonprescription medications. Students need to know how to be able to handle population variables in making safe and effective recommendations. Examples of

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

E L

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: Applying Business Models to Experiential Education Grand Hyatt Seattle: Leonesa II & III, First Floor With the ever-growing emphasis on experiential education, tools are needed to analyze a program in financial/budgetary terms (the language of administration). This interactive session applies business planning concepts to experiential education and involves participants in refining a model for financial analysis and benchmarking for implementation.

MON

7•12

(Speaker) Jennifer Danielson, University of Washington; (Speaker) Stanley S. Weber, University of Washington; (Speaker) Juancho Ramirez, Oregon State University; (Speaker) Janelle L. Krueger, University of Wyoming; (Speaker) Cara A. Harshberger, University of Wyoming; (Speaker) Luke E. Rice, Washington State University; (Speaker) Gayle A. Hudgins, The University of Montana; (Speaker) Lindsay M. Christensen, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) Becky Shipman, Pacific University Oregon CE #: 294-999-10-074-L04-P

A C D

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: Tales from the Self-study Front–Accreditation Process Pearls Willow A, Second Floor This special session will provide learners with an overview of various approaches to the completion of a self-study document and associated site visit. Attendees will learn how different institutions have approached the drafting of this critical document including innovative approaches such as the conduct of a mock site visit. The session will also review pearls that panelists associate with successful execution of a self-study process and on-site visit. Speakers represent a mixture of institution types (public, private, etc.) that recently completed self-study visits. (Speaker) Frank Romanelli, University of Kentucky; (Speaker) Charles T. Taylor Jr., University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Judith T. Barr, Northeastern University

35


SCHEDULE L

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Academic Leadership Fellows Program Mentoring Session for Dean Sponsors Cedar, Second Floor An orientation session for the dean mentors of the incoming ALFP cohort. (Moderator) Robert E. Smith, Auburn University

A

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Assessment SIG: Business Meeting

MON

7•12

Grand Ballroom C, Second Floor The meeting will focus on the SIG goals and future activities with emphasis on PEAS and a white paper. (Chair) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma

C

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Curriculum SIG: Business Meeting Greenwood, Third Floor During this session, the Curriculum SIG will conduct its annual business meeting. This year the session will include election of officers and approval of the SIG bylaws. (Chair) Lauren S. Schlesselman, University of Connecticut

G

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Global Pharmacy SIG: Business Meeting Grand Ballroom B, Second Floor This is the annual business meeting of

the Global Pharmacy Education SIG. (Chair) Michael Z. Wincor, University of Southern California; (Speaker) Hazel H. Seaba, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Ellen M. Schellhase, Purdue University; (Speaker) Rosalie Sagraves, University of Illinois at Chicago

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

History of Pharmacy SIG: Business Meeting Kirkland, Third Floor Brief business meeting to elect new officers of the History of Pharmacy SIG and to discuss future programming.

36

A

Assessment

C

Curriculum

D

Department Chairs

E

Experiential Education

F G

Faculty Development

L

Leadership/Management

R

Research and Science

S

Student Affairs

W

Walmart Scholars

Global

(Moderator) Amista L. Salcido, The University of Texas at Austin; (Speaker) Jenny A. Van Amburgh, Northeastern University; (Chair) Linda G. MacLean, Washington State University

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Substance Abuse Education and Assistance SIG: Business Meeting

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Medina, Third Floor This business meeting will be conducted with members on-site. The new chair will be installed and current events will be discussed.

Laboratory Instructors SIG: Business Meeting

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

(Chair) Robert A. Buerki, The Ohio State University

Metropolitan A, Third Floor This is the annual business meeting of the Laboratory Instructors SIG. (Chair) Karen Kopacek, University of Wisconsin–Madison

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Pharmacy Ethics SIG: Business Meeting Queen Anne, Third Floor During this session the activities for the upcoming year will be discussed and potential SIG leaders will be identified. (Chair) Christopher T. Owens, Idaho State University; (Speaker) Pamela C. Heaton, University of Cincinnati

R

Track Symbols:

This business meeting will be conducted for the members of the Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine Special Interest Group.

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Pharmacogenomics SIG: Business Meeting Willow B, Second Floor Pharmacogenomics SIG business meeting. (Moderator) William T. Beck, University of Illinois at Chicago

R

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Public Health SIG: Business Meeting Willow A, Second Floor This meeting will provide an opportunity for the Public Health SIG membership to gather to discuss the business of the SIG. Items to be discussed/addressed include SIG activities, committee reports and election/installation of new officers. (Chair) Carrie M. Maffeo, Butler University

C

(Chair) Julie C. Kissack, Harding University

Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning SIG: Business Meeting Diamond, First Floor This is the annual business meeting of the Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning (TiPEL) Special Interest Group. (Chair) Michael S. Monaghan, Creighton University

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Libraries/Educational Resources Section: Basic Resources for Pharmacy Education Editorial Board Meeting Wallingford, Third Floor This is the business meeting for the Basic Resources for Pharmacy Education editorial board. (Chair) Sharon Giovenale, University of Connecticut; (Chair) Barbara Nanstiel, Wilkes University

6:00 p.m.–7:30 p.m.

AACP President’s Reception Cirrus Room, 35th Floor By Invitation Only

Sponsored by (President) Jeffrey N. Baldwin, University of Nebraska Medical Center

7:30 p.m.–9:00 p.m

ALFP Dean Facilitators Reception Hyatt at Olive 8: Urbane Coffee & Wine Bar

5:15 p.m.–6:15 p.m.

Self-Care Therapeutics/Nonprescription Medicine SIG: Business Meeting Grand Hyatt Seattle: Leonesa I, First Floor

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


SCHEDULE

Tuesday, July 13 6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast Grand Ballroom & Metropolitan Ballroom Foyers 6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Topical Roundtables Metropolitan B, Third Floor Please see page 46 for more information. (Moderator) Michelle M. Kalis, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences– Boston

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

CEO Deans of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions Breakfast Cedar, Second Floor Pick up your continental breakfast and join your colleagues for an informal discussion about issues affecting those of us with responsibility for allied health professions in addition to our pharmacy administrative duties. (Moderator) Hewitt W.“Ted” Matthews, Mercer University

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Associate and Assistant Deans Roundtable Discussions Breakfast Grand Ballroom C, Second Floor Pick up your continental breakfast and join your colleagues for an informal discussion about issues affecting associate and assistant deans. (Moderator) Gireesh V. Gupchup, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

Pharmacist’s Letter Faculty/Educators Breakfast Meeting Grand Hyatt Seattle: Leonesa I, First Floor 6:45 a.m.–7:45 a.m.

University of Minnesota Legacy of Leadership Breakfast Grand Hyatt Seattle: Leonesa III, First Floor By Invitation Only

Reunion of alumni and past/current faculty. 7:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Registration and Information Desk Spruce, Second Floor

A

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Assessment SIG: Speaking the Same Tongue: Coming to Consen-

sus on the Language of Assessment and Evaluation Grand Ballroom C, Second Floor Those charged with undertaking assessment and evaluation quickly discover that language–often inconsistent and sometimes contradictory–is a significant obstacle. Presentations and dialogue will initiate the development of a white paper to guide academic pharmacists in navigating the literature and communicating their results, issues and best practices. (Chair) Melissa S. Medina, The University of Oklahoma; (Speaker) David W. Fielding, The University of British Columbia; (Speaker) Gayle A. Brazeau, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Zubin H. Austin, University of Toronto; (Speaker) Robert A. Blouin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Susan M. Meyer, University of Pittsburgh

D

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Department Chair Session: Sustaining Program Quality During Uncertain Economic Times Metropolitan B, Third Floor This session targets the dilemmas faced by department chairs in an uncertain and challenging economic environment. This is a solutions-oriented discussion offering an opportunity for chairs to discuss with each other the challenges they face and possible successful solutions. (Moderator) John A. Bosso, South Carolina College of Pharmacy–MUSC Campus

C

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Innovations in Teaching Willow A, Second Floor Recipients of the 2010 Innovations in Teaching Award will present their winning portfolio. (Moderator) Mary Anne Koda-Kimble, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Seena L. Haines, Palm Beach Atlantic University; (Speaker) Reza Karimi, Pacific University Oregon; (Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota

C

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Joint Session: Chemistry and Pharmaceutics Sections: Clinical Reasoning Education: The Science and Craft, and Roles of the Basic Sciences Metropolitan A, Third Floor In this program, a leading clinical reason-

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

ing researcher will discuss the development of clinical reasoning skills in healthcare professionals, with a goal of giving pharmacy educators ideas for developing these skills in student pharmacists. A subsequent talk will focus on describing roles of basic sciences in clinical reasoning education. (Moderator and Speaker) William C. Mobley, University of Florida; (Chair) Kathy D. Webster, University of Maryland Eastern Shore; (Speaker) Vimla Patel, Arizona State University

C D E F L 8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Academic Health Center and College of Pharmacy Synergy for Interprofessional Collaboration Grand Ballroom D, Second Floor This program will provide strategies for creating synergistic relationships between colleges of pharmacy and academic health centers. Panelists from the University of Minnesota and University of Washington will share how they created a transformative interprofessional environment in a period of increasing accountability and diminishing resources. The session will review the administrative models used to provide leadership and sustainability while discussing examples of interprofessional innovation successes resulting from collaborative partnerships.

TUES

7•13

(Moderator and Speaker) Charles T. Taylor Jr., University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Barbara F. Brandt, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Brenda Zierler, University of Washington; (Speaker) Nanci L. Murphy, University of Washington

R

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Developing a Practice Based Research Network (PBRN): A Tale of Two Colleges Willow B, Second Floor Faculty from two colleges will discuss their use of the AACP Key Strategies for Launching a Pharmacy PBRN Initiative to successfully create a funded PBRN. This workshop will explore the PBRN development process through an interactive format including mini-lectures, small group activities and panel discussion. (Moderator) Jeremy L. Thomas, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; (Speaker)

37


SCHEDULE Michelle M. Zingone, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Debbie C. Byrd, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Katie J. Suda, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Andrea R. Franks, The University of Tennessee CE #: 294-999-10-076-L04-P

C D F R

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Technology in Pharmacy Education and Learning Section: Instructional Technology: Who is Using What and Where?

TUES

7•13

Aspen, Second Floor This session will present data related to the use of classroom instructional technology used by the colleges and schools of the Academy. Examples include course management software, classroom capturing products, Web conferencing, online testing and e-portfolio products. Selected products will be demonstrated and discussions will highlight experiences with use. (Chair) Michael S. Monaghan, Creighton University; (Speaker) Patrick M. Malone, The University of Findlay; (Speaker) Tracy Chapman, Creighton University; (Speaker) Jeff J. Cain, University of Kentucky CE #: 294-999-10-075-L04-P

8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Cyber Café/Computer Lab Diamond, First Floor

C E F

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Special Session: Heart Matters in Pharmacy Practice: Faculty Orientation and Training Cirrus Room, 35th Floor This program will orient and train faculty in a unique course utilizing storytelling and reflection to re-introduce humanism into the pharmacy curriculum. Inspired by comparable work in schools of medicine, we address “How can we fully attend to our patients? And how do we develop the courage to care?” (Speaker) Eleanor M. Vogt, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Patrick R. Finley, University of California, San Francisco CE #: 294-999-10-078-L04-P

S

8:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Student Services Personnel SIG: Developing an Objective and Measurable Admissions Process and Business Meeting Issaquah, Third Floor This session describes how two schools have developed an objective admissions process to include file review and interview assessments. This will be an active session in which attendees will develop their own scoring system utilizing an algo-

38

rithm, and an objective and measurable interview question with rubric to quantify applicant responses. The objective is for attendees to leave with a customized example of how to develop a scoring system for the file review process and how to develop a measurable interview assessment tool. (Chair) James Robertson Jr., Texas A&M Health Science Center; (Moderator) Heather M. Petrelli, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine; (Speaker) Jill A. Morgan, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Cherokee LaysonWolf, University of Maryland; (Speaker) Janene M. Madras, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

perspective will include construction, layout, instrument reliability and summary statistics. Validity of score interpretation and uses of PCOA® data will be addressed, including ideas for curricular and program-based research. (Speaker) Maria Boyle, NABP; (Speaker) Joy Matthews-Lopez, NABP

11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Lunch On Your Own 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

AJPE Editorial Board Luncheon Ravenna, Third Floor

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

By Invitation Only (Editor) Jospeh T. DiPiro, South Carolina College of Pharmacy

Beverage Break

Noon–1:30 p.m.

Grand Ballroom & Metropolitan Ballroom Foyers 10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Examining Excellence: 2010 Awards Plenary Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor Join the recipients of the Chalmers, Dawson and Volwiler awards for a candid and engaging discussion of their views on what qualities mark excellence in pharmacy education and research. (Moderator) Victor A. Yanchick, Virginia Commonwealth University; (Speaker) Mary Anne Koda-Kimble, University of California, San Francisco; (Speaker) Harold L. Kohn, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Hartmut C. Derendorf, University of Florida

S

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

Criminal Background Check Session Metropolitan A, Third Floor This session will explore the use of Criminal Background Checks (CBCs) in the pharmacy school admissions process. Specifically, the session will include strategies to handle, interpret and make decisions about CBC information. It will also provide information about the AACP Centralized Criminal Background Check program for PharmCAS participants. (Speaker) Suzi Arant, Certiphi Screening Inc.

10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m.

A 360º View of the Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment (PCOA®) Examination: An Overview of its History, Development, Score Interpretation and Uses Willow B, Second Floor This session will include an overview of the history and development of the PCOA® examination. A psychometric

Open Hearing Bylaws & Policy Development Committee Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor All attendees are invited to provide input on proposed policy and resolutions to be sent to the House of Delegates. (Speaker of the House) John A. Pieper, The University of New Mexico; (Chair) Cynthia J. Boyle, University of Maryland

Noon–1:30 p.m.

URAC Focus Group and Luncheon Wallingford, Third Floor By Invitation Only

This session will solicit input from attendees on ideas of schools of pharmacy (students and faculty) being more knowledgeable and involved in the pharmacy quality accreditation process. 1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Washington State Coalition for Language Access (WASCLA) Monthly Meeting Queen Anne, Third Floor Closed Meeting

Improve language access for citizens to obtain information about medications.

L

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Academic Leadership Fellows Program Group Presentations Willow B, Second Floor The 2009–2010 Academic Leadership Fellows Program cohort will present their group projects. Topics include: • Approaches to management of dilemmas; • Appropriate faculty behaviors in social interactions with student pharmacists; • Professional technical standards among colleges and schools of pharmacy; • Student engagement in professional

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


SCHEDULE political advocacy; and • ALFP’s impact on dean facilitators’ ability to lead and develop leadership.

C

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Biological Sciences Section: Curricular Planning and Implementation of Stand-alone and Integrated Pharmacogenomics Models Metropolitan B, Third Floor This session will introduce two curricular models of pharmacogenomics. One model is a stand-alone course, the other is an integrated course. Three speakers will present how these models were originally planned and implemented, how they have changed over time and what changes might be proposed for further improvement. (Moderator) Eric Hanson, University of Southern Nevada; (Speaker) Ying Huang, Western University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Eunice P. Chung, Western University of Health Sciences; (Speaker) Jeffrey R. Bishop, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Chair) Alice Gardner, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Worcester

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Bylaws & Policy Development Committee Executive Session Richmond Boardroom, Fourth Floor Closed committee meeting.

C

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Nuts and Bolts of Integrating Human Patient Simulation into the Pharm.D. Curriculum Aspen, Second Floor Doctor of Pharmacy programs across the country have adopted or are considering adoption of human patient simulation (HPS) into their curricula. Three important areas of teaching with HPS will be highlighted during this special session: cost analysis of HPS, opportunities for interprofessional simulations and HPS scenario development for Pharm.D. curricula. (Speaker) Amy L. Seybert, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Peggy S. Odegard, University of Washington; (Speaker) Brenda S. Bray, Washington State University CE #: 294-999-10-079-L04-P

R

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: 2009 National Pharmacist Workforce Study: Implications for Pharmacy Educators

Metropolitan A, Third Floor Three issues from the 2009 National Pharmacist Workforce Study will be discussed: 1) comparison of work settings and practice activities for pharmacists with a Pharm.D. degree and those with a B.S. degree only, 2) taxonomy of pharmacist practice patterns, and 3) differences between rural and non-rural pharmacy practice. (Speaker) William R. Doucette, The University of Iowa; (Speaker) Caroline A. Gaither, University of Michigan; (Speaker) Ronald S. Hadsall, University of Minnesota

A

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Charting the Course: Planning Efficient and Effective Approaches to Assessment and Evaluation Cirrus Room, 35th Floor Effective assessment and evaluation undergird quality assurance and improvement at every level of the academic enterprise. However, too many have invested significant resources, only to be disappointed by outcomes. This session will present a proven methodology to create a mission-centered assessment plan and a framework for assessing and improving it. (Speaker) David W. Fielding, The University of British Columbia; (Speaker) Zubin H. Austin, University of Toronto; (Speaker) Robert A. Blouin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Speaker) Gayle A. Brazeau, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Susan M. Meyer, University of Pittsburgh

C E R

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: HealthWISE = Winning Investigations for Students and Elders: Student Pharmacists as Science Educators Grand Ballroom C, Second Floor HealthWISE places student pharmacists in elementary classrooms to deliver hands-on science education. Student pharmacists gain new communication skills they can connect to the healthcare environment and promote math and science careers to learners. This program will provide pharmacy educators with tools to implement HealthWISE in their pharmacy schools and communities. (Speaker) Lisa J. Woodard, Washington State University; (Speaker) James W. Blankenship, University of the Pacific; (Speaker) Judi S. Wilson, San Joaquin County Office of Education; (Speaker) Marti Lindsey, The University of Arizona CE #: 294-999-10-080-L04-P

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

A E F

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Improving Teaching and Learning Across the Generations: We Know Who They Are, Now What? Grand Ballroom D, Second Floor Four 20-minute sessions utilizing lecture and active-learning will enable faculty to tailor teaching methods to millennial students. They include: 1) overview of the generations, 2) guidance for delivering high-quality feedback, 3) lecture techniques and classroom management, 4) teaching millennial students to adapt their behaviors to the pharmacy profession. (Moderator) Julie J. Wilkinson, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine; (Speaker) Rex W. Force, Idaho State University; (Speaker) Julie J. Wilkinson, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine; (Speaker) John Holmes, Idaho State University; (Speaker) Heather M. Petrelli, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine CE #: 294-999-10-081-L04-P

E L

TUES

7•13

1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Shared Successes: Adopting an Innovative Advanced Community Pharmacy Experience Model at Multiple Colleges of Pharmacy Issaquah, Third Floor The Partner for Promotion® program (PFP) is a longitudinal APPE during which Pharm.D. students work with faculty and community pharmacists to develop and implement patient-centered services. Two institution’s faculty collaborated to adopt PFP into their curricula. This special session describes the methods for engaging in these types of partnerships. (Speaker) Brandon T. Jennings, The University of Utah; (Speaker) Jennifer L. Rodis, The Ohio State University CE #: 294-999-10-082-L04-P

C D F L S 1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

Special Session: Leadership and Advocacy Development for Student Pharmacists and Faculty Willow A, Second Floor This program will share the results of a U.S. survey of colleges/schools on student pharmacist and faculty leadership and advocacy development. Innovative educational practices will be profiled, indicators of success in leadership and advocacy development will be discussed and draft criteria for best practices will be examined.

39


SCHEDULE (Moderator) Leigh Ann Ross, The University of Mississippi; (Speaker) Cameron C. Lindsey, University of Missouri–Kansas City; (Speaker) Kristin K. Janke, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Julie C. Kissack, Harding University; (Speaker) Rabia Tahir, Touro College of Pharmacy–New York CE #: 294-999-10-077-L04-P

3:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Beverage Break Grand Ballroom & Metropolitan Ballroom Foyers

L

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Academic Leadership Fellows Program Group Debrief Grand Hyatt Seattle: Leonesa III, First Floor 3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

TUES

7•13

Planning for the Future: APhA Career Pathway Evaluation Program for Pharmacy Professionals Metropolitan B, Third Floor This session will provide an overview of the APhA Career Pathway Evaluation Program for Pharmacy Professionals. This program is an excellent tool for your student pharmacists to use to evaluate themselves and the career options available to them. In addition, this session will provide information on incorporating the APhA Career Pathway Evaluation Program into your school’s curriculum. (Speaker) Elizabeth A. Cardello, APhA

Track Symbols:

40

A

Assessment

C

Curriculum

D

Department Chairs

E

Experiential Education

F G

Faculty Development

L

Leadership/Management

R

Research and Science

S

Student Affairs

W

Walmart Scholars

Global

C

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Substance Abuse Education and Assistance SIG: AACP Special Committee on Substance Abuse and Pharmacy Education Report Metropolitan A, Third Floor This session will provide a review of the report of the AACP Special Committee on Substance Abuse and Pharmacy Education, as well as an update to the curricular guidelines regarding substance abuse and addictive disease and the guidelines for the Development of Addiction and Related Disorders Policies for Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy. (Moderator) Julie C. Kissack, Harding University; (Speaker) Paul W. Jungnickel, Auburn University

D F R

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: Faculty Development in Academic Pharmacy: Are We Practicing What We Preach? Grand Hyatt Seattle: Leonesa I, First Floor The AACP Faculty Affairs Committee will characterize the current state of affairs of faculty development in colleges/schools of pharmacy. This interactive session will present an evidence-based literature review and survey, and share real time data from AACP faculty delegates collected using an audience response system. (Speaker) Nicholas G. Popovich, University of Illinois at Chicago; (Speaker) David J. Edwards, Wayne State University; (Speaker) Andrea R. Franks, The University of Tennessee; (Speaker) Cynthia A. Naughton, North Dakota State University; (Speaker) Yashwant V. Pathak, Sullivan University; (Speaker) Kristine S. Schonder, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Pamela L. Stamm, Auburn University; (Speaker) Phillip L. Thornton, Wingate University

F

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: Fast Track Facilitator Training: Using Facilitator Guides to Achieve Higher Levels of Learning Issaquah, Third Floor Training is a vital component of the pharmacy educational process for those involved in facilitating higher level learning activities. Development of appropriate materials, along with structured training, allows educators to promote consistent high level problem solving skills necessary for patient care activities. Two colleges of pharmacy

will assist participants in the identification of essential key elements needed in the development of these facilitator guides. Components that are crucial in the development of structured training for those involved in the delivery of higher levels of learning will be reviewed. (Moderator) Lisa D. Inge, University of Florida; (Speaker) Lisa R. Clayville, University of Florida; (Speaker) Kristen L. Helms, Auburn University; (Speaker) Renee L. Rose, University of Florida CE #: 294-999-10-083-L04-P

A E

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: Quality Assurance Strategies to Assess and Improve Introductory and Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Programs Grand Hyatt Seattle: Leonesa II, First Floor Changes in ACPE accreditation standards, coupled with increased numbers of colleges and schools of pharmacy and larger class sizes, have focused attention on quality assurance issues related to introductory (IPPE) and advanced (APPE) pharmacy practice experience programs. This program will consist of presentations by speakers from four colleges and schools of pharmacy that have implemented successful quality assurance strategies to assess and improve IPPE and APPE programs. (Moderator) Abby A. Kahaleh, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine; (Speaker) Christopher J. Turner, University of Colorado Denver; (Speaker) Margarita V. DiVall, Northeastern University; (Speaker) Rosemin Kassam, The University of British Columbia; (Speaker) Terri L. Warholak, The University of Arizona; (Speaker) Wesley A. Nuffer, University of Colorado Denver CE #: 294-999-10-086-L04-P

D L

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: To Chair or Not to Chair—Discover the Answer to this Question Greenwood, Third Floor A must for those interested in becoming a department chair and who are new chairs. The perspectives of seasoned and new chairs regarding the responsibilities and required skill sets will be provided. Differences between chairing a science and practice department, at a research and teaching-intensive school, will be discussed. (Moderator) Anne Y. Lin, College of Notre Dame of Maryland; (Speaker) John A. Bosso,

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


SCHEDULE South Carolina College of Pharmacy–MUSC Campus; (Speaker) Edward F. Foote, Wilkes University; (Speaker) Robert P. Soltis, Drake University; (Speaker) Jimmi Hatton-Kolpek, University of Kentucky

C

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: Implementing Interprofessional Education in the Classroom Willow B, Second Floor Realizing the vision of a medical home for every patient, including a smoothly functioning healthcare team, requires implementation of inter-professional education across curricula. This session offers commentaries on such efforts at three universities, with perspectives from the editor of the recent AJPE special section of the topic. (Moderator) Kelly Scolaro, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; (Moderator) Susan M. Meyer, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Donald J. Woodyard, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill; (Speaker)

Barbara F. Brandt, University of Minnesota; (Speaker) Heather B. Congdon, University of Maryland CE #: 294-999-10-084-L04-P

3:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Special Session: Progressive Learning Strategies for Foundations in Critical Thinking Aspen, Second Floor This session will review the importance of critical thinking in pharmacy education and discuss innovative strategies for developing these skills. Speakers will provide two examples of efficient instructional techniques through active audience participation. (Speaker) Amy L. Seybert, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Rebecca D. Moote, Regis University; (Speaker) David R. Clark, Regis University; (Speaker) Marianne McCollum, Regis University; (Speaker) Michael H. Nelson, Regis University; (Speaker) Allana J. Sucher, Regis University

5:30 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

ACPE Team Member Reception Willow A, Second Floor 7:00 p.m.–9:30 p.m.

AACP Closing Banquet Grand Ballroom, Second Floor The closing banquet celebrates the Association’s collective accomplishments over the past year and honors the recipients of the Rufus A. Lyman Award and the Distinguished Service Award. Please note: a ticket and name badge are required. All guests are required to select a banquet table and redeem their invitation for a reserved seating ticket at the Registration and Information Desk located in the Spruce Room, Second Floor, no later than 4:00 p.m. on Monday, July 12. Dress is cocktail attire. (President) Jeffrey N. Baldwin, University of Nebraska Medical Center

TUES

7•13

CE #: 294-999-10-085-L04-P

Wednesday, July 14 7:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Registration and Information Desk Spruce, Second Floor 7:00 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast Grand Ballroom & Metropolitan Ballroom Foyers 7:30 a.m.–8:30 a.m.

Final House of Delegates Sign-In Grand Ballroom Foyer, Second Floor All delegates must register their attendance during this sign-in hour. 8:00 a.m.–Noon

Cyber Café/Computer Lab Diamond, First Floor 8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Final House of Delegates Session Grand Ballrooms A & B, Second Floor Administrative and faculty delegates meet to adopt policy statements, elect a new speaker, and conduct other business before the 2010 House of Delegates. (Speaker of the House) John A. Pieper, The University of New Mexico; (Speaker) Lucinda L. Maine, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

C

8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Special Session: Maximizing the Potential of a Dynamic Curricular Map Metropolitan B, Third Floor The curricular map can become a dynamic tool that increases efficiencies within a school’s curriculum by integrating key components into established data collection systems within the school. This interactive session will demonstrate a model of how data collection systems can be programmed to produce a sustainable curricular map. (Speaker) Regis R. Vollmer, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Thomas Waters, University of Pittsburgh CE #: 294-999-10-087-L04-P

F

8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Special Session: Defining, Developing and Implementing Professional Development Programs for Faculty and Students Grand Ballroom C, Second Floor This seminar will discuss the value of professional development in colleges and schools of pharmacy. Related ACPE accreditation standards will be covered

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

and strategies will be presented for the development and implementation of specific professional development activities for faculty and students. (Speaker) Mary R. Monk-Tutor, Samford University; (Speaker) Dana P. Hammer, University of Washington; (Speaker) Alan R. Spies, The University of Oklahoma

C

8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Special Session: A Novel Approach to Teach Pharm.D. Pharmacoeconomics: Using the AMCP Format for Monographs and FMCP P&T Competition

WED

7•14

Willow B, Second Floor This session focuses on teaching pharmacoeconomics to Pharm.D. students and using the AMCP Format/P&T competition as a means to do that. We modified competition procedures for a P3 pharmacoeconomics class; our goal is to discuss the overall idea and specific choices made to use this as a pharmaceconomics learning activity. (Speaker) Jonathan D. Campbell, University of Colorado Denver; (Speaker) Robert J. Valuck, University of Colorado Denver; (Speaker) David Veenstra, University of Washington; (Speaker) Sean D. Sullivan, University of Washington; (Speaker) Richard Fry, Foundation for Managed Care Pharmacy

41


SCHEDULE C F

8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Special Session: Challenges in Drug Discovery: An Academic Perspective Willow A, Second Floor The underlying principle of any pharmacy education is drugs and their action(s). The session focuses on academic contributions to drug discovery. Attending educators will appreciate the complexity of the field, and in turn, communicate that to their students. It will also be beneficial to those interested in applied research. (Moderator) Maria Kontoyianni, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; (Speaker) Terry P. Lybrand, Vanderbilt University; (Speaker) Michael H. Gelb, University of Washington; (Speaker) Ken Lewis, ZymoGenetics, Inc.

E

WED

7•14

8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Special Session: Experiential Education Student Involvement in Public Projects–Drug Information, Pharmacy Benefit Management and Informatics Metropolitan A, Third Floor Successful integration of experiential students in the 2nd–4th year into an

academic and government collaboration to improve Medicaid pharmaceutical policy and perform public health initiatives is described. The complex rotation involving drug information, informatics and pharmaceutical policy provide quality education, improved efficiency and research opportunities. (Moderator) Peter M. Brody Jr., University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Linda Catanzaro, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; (Speaker) Fred Doloresco III, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York CE #: 294-999-10-088-L04-P

8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Special Session: Simulationbased Learning to Enhance Practice Skills: Trials and Triumphs Issaquah, Third Floor Simulation has been used successfully in healthcare education to enhance practice skills. This session will overview current simulation use in pharmacy education, share experiences in developing a simulation series coinciding with a therapeutics course and will discuss the future of simulation. Participants will discuss teaching and assessment of practice.

souri–Kansas City; (Speaker) Amy L. Seybert, University of Pittsburgh; (Speaker) Erica J. Russell, University of Missouri–Kansas City; (Speaker) Eric A. Wombwell, University of Missouri–Kansas City CE #: 294-999-10-089-L04-P

C

8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Special Session: Qualitative Evaluation of Case Studies in Pharmacy Ethics Aspen, Second Floor Ethics case discussions have been part of a pharmacy second professional year law course for 12 years. Responding to a complaint that case discussions had been too medical, student groups have developed their own. The session will address the format of classroom ethics discussions and a qualitative evaluation of 134 submitted cases. (Speaker) Thomas Hazlet, University of Washington; (Speaker) Michael L. Ayres, University of Washington

(Speaker) Deepti Vyas, University of Mis-

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42

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


INFORMATION

Come see us at Booth 109

Visit us inOur Seattle in Booth • July#305, • Seattle Expanding Horizons 10–14 307.

43


ROUNDTABLE TOPICS Sunday, July 11 Title

Name

School

1

Academic Outcomes Comparison Between 3-year and 4-year Pharm.D. Programs

Naushad K. Ghilzai

Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

2

Achieving Supply and Demand Balance in Pharmacy Education

Mitchell R. Emerson

Midwestern University/Glendale

3

Benefits of a Faculty-Led Institutional Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

Karyn M. Sullivan

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Worcester

4

Cardiovascular Disease Course for Pharm.D. Students: A Novel Integrated Approach

Rajat Sethi

Texas A&M Health Science Center

5

Caring for the Underserved: Student/Resident Learning Opportunities Through the HRSA-Patient Safety and Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative

Sharon E. Connor

University of Pittsburgh

6

Department Chair Actions that Create Positive Outcomes

Bernard A. Sorofman

The University of Iowa

7

Experiential Education in Pharmaceutical Sciences

Miriam A. Ansong

Sullivan University

8

"Exploring Academic Life" Elective: Development and Implementation

Jenny A. Van Amburgh

Northeastern University

9

Faculty Development Programming

Rolee Pathak

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

10

Implementation of a Menu of Pharmacotherapeutics Workshop/Recitation Formats to Enhance Student’s Clinical Skills

Kathy E. Komperda

Midwestern University–Chicago

11

Improving Student Engagement in a Multi-Campus Lecture: A Focus on the Use of SMS Text Polling

Eric A. Wombwell

University of Missouri–Kansas City

12

Incorporating Service-Learning into Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

Jennifer Malinowski

Wilkes University

13

Interprofessional Education—Integrating Medical Residents and Pharmacy Students During an Evidence Based Pharmacotherapy Elective Rotation

Jessica Starr

Auburn University

14

Modernization and Renovation of Pharmacy Skills Laboratory Facilities

Melanie A. Jordan

Midwestern University/Glendale

15

Patient Simulation and Pharmacy Education

Sarah P. Shrader

South Carolina College of Pharmacy

16

Role of the Clinical Pharmacist in the Patient-Centered Medical Home in a Medically Underserved Area

Sarah T. Melton

Appalachian College of Pharmacy

17

Teaching Pharmacy Students to Evaluate Online Consumer Health Information

Morgan L. Sperry

University of Missouri–Kansas City

18

The Roots of the Pharmacy Profession and the Pharm.D. Program: Are They Still Connected?

Roseane M. Santos

South University

19

Using Standardized Patients for Teaching and Assessment in Pharmacy Education

Donald J. Woodyard

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

20

Using Webcams to Record and Assess Simulated PharmacistPatient Encounters in the Classroom

Karl Hess

Western University of Health Sciences

Table #

SUN

7•11

44

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


ROUNDTABLE TOPICS Monday, July 12 Title

Name

School

1

Bridging Education in Pharmacy: The Foreign Pharmacy Graduate Equivalency Examination (FPGEE)

Fadi M. Alkhateeb

University of Charleston

2

Campus Interviews: Innovations and Best Practices

Thomas A. Robertson

Palm Beach Atlantic University

3

Challenges in Coordinating Team Taught Integrated Pharmacotherapy Courses

Srikanth Kolluru

Texas A&M Health Science Center

4

Developing an Interprofessional Curriculum Which Incorporates Both Didactic and Simulation Experiences

Deepti Vyas

University of Missouri–Kansas City

5

Development and Teaching Interprofessional Courses

Melanie A. Dodd

The University of New Mexico

6

Development of Advanced Community Practice Experiences for the UMKC School of Pharmacy

Peggy G. Kuehl

University of Missouri–Kansas City

7

Enhancing Community Pharmacy Practice and Research Opportunities—Use of the Well TIP (Targeted Intervention Program) Method

Jeanine P. Abrons

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

8

Experience with the Use of Online Synchronous Classroom Technology (WIMBA) to Administer a Seminar Course

Andrew J. Smith

University of Missouri–Kansas City

9

How is Evidence Based Medicine Being Taught in U.S. Schools of Pharmacy?

Patrick J. Bryant

University of Missouri–Kansas City

10

Implementation of a Travel Clinic at an Ambulatory Care Clinic—Incorporating Advanced Professional Pharmacy Practice Rotation Students

Sheila Seed

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Worcester

11

Innovative Learning Activities for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Students within Community Hospitals

Ragini S. Bhakta

University of Southern Nevada

12

Integrating Health Information Technology Instruction Across the Curriculum Using Blended Learning

Patricia A. Marken

University of Missouri–Kansas City

13

Learning Contracts: Evaluating Students in a Laboratory Setting

Andrea L. Duchac

University of Wisconsin–Madison

14

Molecular Modeling Assignments to Aid Professional Pharmacy Students' Learning Acquisition

Robert J. Doerksen

The University of Mississippi

15

Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment—What Are We Doing to Limit It?

Robin M. Zavod

Midwestern University/Downers Grove

16

Pharmacy Admissions Interviewing: Scoring Rubrics, Tips for Success

Laurie L. Briceland

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

17

Team-based Interactive Learning Sessions for Pharmacy Calculations

Thomas J. Cook

Touro College of Pharmacy–New York

18

The "Business" of Experiential Education: Business Planning for Experiential Programs

Jennifer Danielson

University of Washington

19

University Sponsored Interprofessional Wellness Fair for the Uninsured Patient

Crystal D. Obering

University of Missouri–Kansas City

Table #

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

MON

7•12

45


INFORMATIONTOPICS ROUNDTABLE Tuesday, July 13 Title

Name

School

1

Board Certification Should be a Requirement of Pharmacy Practice Faculty

Joseph J. Saseen

University of Colorado Denver

2

Caring for the Underserved: A Curriculum Framework

John M. Conry

St. John's University

3

Coordinating Pharmacy Skills Labs on Multiple Campuses

Raymond A. Lorenz

Auburn University

4

Developing an Objective and Measurable Admissions Process

Heather M. Petrelli

Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

5

Disruptive and Distressed Students: How to Manage While Maintaining Patient and Campus Safety

Wendy C. Cox

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

6

Effectively Using Professional Staff as “Faculty Extenders” in Facilitating Experiential Education Faculty Leadership for Program Development

William P. Wynn III

South University

7

E-Portfolios in the Pharm.D. Curriculum: Sharing Best Practices for Administration and Review

Rochelle M. Roberts

The University of Texas at Austin

8

Formalizing Peer Review: From Planning to Implementation

Kristen L. Helms

Auburn University

9

Fostering a Positive Work Climate in the Department

Andrew A. Webster

Belmont University

10

Fostering a Relationship with the Department Chair

Dolores Nobles-Knight

Chicago State University

11

Implementing Team-Based Learning for Biological Science Content Delivery in an Integrated Curriculum

Stephen W. Luckey

Regis University

12

Improving Learning Through Critical Thinking

Adnan Dakkuri

Ferris State University

13

Integrated APPEs: Addressing the Report of the Summit to Advance Experiential Education in Pharmacy

Michael Gonyeau

Northeastern University

14

Leadership Development and Public Health Advocacy in Pharmacy Education

Katherine Y. Yang

University of California, San Francisco

15

Longitudinal Integration of IPPE Experiential Courses Using a Hospital Based Mentor Model

Kristen Brown

University of Colorado Denver

16

Student-Centered Culture of Assessment

Marianne McCollum

Regis University

17

The Effective Use of an Office of Institutional Research in Program Assessment

Eric G. Boyce

University of the Pacific

18

The Role of Pain Pharmacotherapy in Pharmacy Education

Kenneth C. Jackson II

Pacific University Oregon

19

Use of Team-Based Learning to Teach Health Economics and Policy

Marianne McCollum

Regis University

20

Web 2.0 Applications in Pharmacy Education

Gary D. Theilman

The University of Mississippi

Table #

TUES

7•13

46

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


SCHOOL POSTERS SALT: The Scholarship of Assessment, Learning and Teaching Saturday, July 10 • 6:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.

SAT

Affiliation

Title

Primary Author

1

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Comparing Student Achievement Between a Satellite and Main Campus

Robert A. Hamilton

2

Appalachian College of Pharmacy

Integration of Service Based Pharmacy Experiences into the Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum in Rural Appalachia

Susan L. Mayhew

3

Auburn University

"SALT"ing the Curriculum: A Scholarly Approach to Assessment, Learning and Teaching

Sharon McDonough

4

Belmont University

Win-Win: Developing Partnerships to Leverage Global Health Education and Activity

Eric H. Hobson

5

Chicago State University

Building Student Pharmacists' Practice Skills for IPPE Success: USP Chapter 797 Certification

Miriam A. Mobley Smith

6

Creighton University

Partnering with NABP to Assess a Dual Pathway Program

Michael S. Monaghan

7

D'Youville College

First Year of Collaborative Learning Practicum: Integration of Teaching, Learning, Assessment and Implications for Scholarship

David A. Gettman

8

Drake University

Assessment of Teaching: Integrating Faculty, Department, and College Goals

Charles R. Phillips

9

Duquesne University

A Novel, Multifaceted Approach to Teaching Life-Long Learning

Jennifer E. Heasley

10

East Tennessee State University

Survey of Active Learning Processes Used in U.S. Colleges of Pharmacy

David W. Stewart

11

Hampton University

Faculty Mentoring: Aiding in Transition from Theory to Practice

Beverly Hamilton

12

Harding University

Visual Mapping of Pharmacy Curricular Competencies

Daniel H. Atchley

13

Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

Kids Eat Healthy: A Pharmacy Student Service Learning Program Providing Nutrition Education to Children

Rebecca A. Falter

14

Loma Linda University

Curriculum Mapping: A Layered Approach to Understanding the Curriculum

Nancy E. Kawahara

15

Long Island University

Use of Assessment Data to Drive Curricular Change

Tina Zerilli

16

Mercer University

Promotion of SALT Through the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning

J. Grady Strom

17

Midwestern University/Downers Grove

Advancing the Scholarship of Assessment, Learning and Teaching by Establishing a Center for Teaching Excellence

Timothy J. Todd

18

North Dakota State University

Applying Public Health Theories to Implement a SmokeFree Policy: A Pharmacy Practice Project

Christian B. Albano

19

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

Building an Innovative, Integrated, Interprofessional Longitudinal Curriculum

Susan P. Bruce

20

Northeastern University

An Inventory of the Scholarship of Assessment, Learning and Teaching at Northeastern University

Judith T. Barr

Poster #

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

7•10

47


SCHOOL POSTERS Affiliation

Title

Primary Author

21

Ohio Northern University

Ohio Northern University Raises Healthcare Awareness in the Community Through Outreach Efforts

Jon E. Sprague

22

The Ohio State University

An Interdisciplinary Approach to Teaching Medication Adherence: A Collaborative Between the Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine

Katy E. Trinkley

23

Oregon State University

A Systematic Approach to Improving Teaching Evaluation Response Rates

Ann Zweber

24

Pacific University Oregon

Promoting Faculty Enrichment in a Learner-Centered Pharm.D. Program

Reza Karimi

25

Regis University

Supporting Active Learning in Teams: Using Team-Based Learning (TBL) to Deliver an Integrated Pharmacy Curriculum

Stephen W. Luckey

26

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Development and Implementation of a New Faculty Orientation Seminar

Mary M. Bridgeman

27

Saint Joseph College

Assessing Professional Development–A Case for Practice Integration

Bruce Edgren

28

Samford University

Use of an E-Portfolio System to Assess Student Perception of Curricular Outcome Achievement

Terri M. Wensel

29

Shenandoah University

School-Wide Curricular Efforts: Curricular Mapping for Assessment and Accreditation

Elizabeth A. Sheaffer

30

South Dakota State University

Fostering the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning at South Dakota State University

Jane R. Mort

31

Southwestern Oklahoma State University

Lunar Cycle Effects: True or False

E. Ben Welch

32

St. John Fisher College

Evaluation of a Top 200 Class Utilizing Active and SelfDirected Learning Techniques

Richard F. O'Brocta

33

St. Louis College of Pharmacy

Strengthening the Research Culture at St. Louis College of Pharmacy

Peter D. Hurd

34

Texas A&M Health Science Center

RCOP Faculty Development Programs: Fostering Communicaton and Learning

Barry Bleidt

35

Texas Southern University

Use of OSCE to Evaluate the Curriculum and Student Learning

Flora G. Estes

36

The University of Utah

University of Utah Health Sciences Center Interdisciplinary Team Education

Mark A. Munger

37

Touro College of Pharmacy– New York

Creating and Sustaining a Culture of Scholarship at Touro College of Pharmacy

Thomas J. Cook

38

Union University

Potential Determinants of First Year Pharmacy Student Success

Blake Watkins

39

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

An Integrated Peer-Review Annual Faculty Performance Review Process in the Pharmacy Practice Department

Gayle A. Brazeau

40

University of California, San Francisco

What is the Science Foundation Needed for Pharmacists of the Future?

Mitra Assemi

41

University of Cincinnati

Promoting SALT Through Faculty Development Initiatives at the University of Cincinnati

Shauna M. Buring

42

University of Colorado Denver

Novel Hospital-Based Mentor Model Integrated Longitudinally Within the Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience Curriculum

Kristen Brown

Poster #

SAT

7•10

48

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


SCHOOL POSTERS Affiliation

Title

Primary Author

43

University of Connecticut

Development and Assessment of New Correlated Pharmacy Problem Solving Courses

Lauren S. Schlesselman

44

The University of Findlay

Integration of Simulation into Pharmacy Curriculum: The University of Findlay Experience

Debra Parker

45

The University of Georgia

Optimizing a Skills Laboratory Course Series for Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Deborah L. Elder

46

University of Houston

Facilitating Scholarly Interchange via Electronic Media

Julianna E. Szilagyi

47

University of Illinois at Chicago

Development of an Assessment Map and Plan for a Doctor of Pharmacy Program with Two Campuses

Suzanne M. Rabi

48

University of Kentucky

Meeting the Need: A Multi-Pronged Approach to Promoting the Scholarship of Assessment, Learning and Teaching

Jeff J. Cain

49

University of Maryland

Cross-Course Testing—Concept and Implementation of Coordinated Quizzes at the UMB School of Pharmacy

Yunting Fu

50

University of Minnesota

Student-Generated, Case-Based Multiple Choice Questions: Assessment of a Student/Faculty Collaborative Effort

Anne-Marie M. SchulloFeulner

51

The University of Mississippi

SALT and PePPeR: An Integrated Commitment to the Scholarship of Assessment, Learning and Teaching

Alicia S. Bouldin

52

University of Missouri– Kansas City

Pharmacotherapy Course Series Grading Rubric: Assessment of Utilization by Faculty

Elizabeth A. Winans

53

The University of Montana

SALT Test? Using Glassock's Standards and SALT Criteria to Rate Teaching and Admissions Activities

Jean T. Carter

54

The University of New Mexico

Getting the Whole Picture: Triangulating Assessment Data to Ensure Curricular Integrity

John A. Pieper

55

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A "Sandwich" Approach to Enhancing the Scholarship of Teaching

Adam M. Persky

56

The University of Oklahoma

Assessment of Curricular "Streams" of Knowledge and Skill Development

Susan E. Conway

57

University of Pittsburgh

Assessment Matrix to Facilitate Curricular Evaluation at the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy

Amy L. Seybert

58

University of Puerto Rico

Curricular Alignment of ACPE Standards 2007 and NAPLEX Blueprint at the University of Puerto Rico

Edna Almodovar

59

University of Southern Nevada

Shared Faculty Memorandum of Understanding between Intermountain Medical Center and the University of Southern Nevada

Darla Zarley

60

University of the Incarnate Word

Evolution of the Annual Student Assessment and Progression Exam: A Tool for Measuring Student Competency

Sushma Ramsinghani

61

University of the Pacific

Using Academic Centers to Enhance the Scholarship of Learning (Emphasizing Effective Teaching and Assessment Strategies)

Sian Carr-Lopez

62

University of the Sciences in Philadelphia

School-Wide Curricular Efforts to Enhance Teaching Scholarship

Laura A. Mandos

63

The University of Toledo

"One-Stop Shopping" for Experiential Pre-requisites

Amie L. Smith

Poster #

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

SAT

7•10

49


SCHOOL POSTERS Affiliation

Title

Primary Author

64

University of Washington

The Development of a SOAP Note Assessment and Feedback Form (SNAFF)

Colleen A. Catalano

65

Virginia Commonwealth University

Creating a Scholarship of Assessment, Learning, and Teaching Group in a School of Pharmacy

Spencer E. Harpe

66

Washington State University

Emergencies in the Community Pharmacy—Human Patient Simulation

Jennifer D. Robinson

67

Western University of Health Sciences

Advancing Application of Therapeutic Knowledge and Skills by Implementing Integration Courses Throughout the Curriculum

Eunice P. Chung

68

Wilkes University

Achieving the Scholarship of Assessment, Learning, and Teaching (SALT) Through Strategic Planning

Adam VanWert

Poster #

SAT

7•10

DON’T FORGET!

Name badges are your ticket to all Annual Meeting events.

HELL my na me is

O

You are invited to A BREAKFAST ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION How to Implement Pharmacy-based Identification and Screening for Memory Decline: Curricular Guide for Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy Learn about different ways that schools and colleges of pharmacy have implemented the Curricular Guide and ask questions to the panel.

Monday, July 12 6:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m. Issaquah, Third Floor Hosted by Eisai, Inc.

50

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Biological Sciences

Sunday, July 11 • 4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m. Poster #

Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

1

Buhler, Amber V.

Teaching Pharmacy Students How to Work within InterProfessional Teams

Pacific University Oregon

2

Castillo, Israel

Effects of Sodium Butyrate, Curcumin and Genestein on MCT1 Expression in Caco2 Cells

Nova Southeastern University

3

Cruthirds, Danielle L.

Biochemistry and Athophysiology Instruction in U.S. Schools of Pharmacy: Characteristics and Perceptions of Student Preparedness

Samford University

4

Culhane, James M.

Promoting Diversity in Pharmacy Though Participation in a College Preparatory Program for Native American Students

College of Notre Dame of Maryland

5

Goodman-Snitkoff, Gail

Use of Written Assignments in Large Lecture Classes

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

6

Karimi, Reza

Integrative Learning and Assessment: An Effective Tool to Promote and Assess Student Learning

Pacific University Oregon

7

Karimi, Reza

Learning Bridge: A Learning Tool that Positively Affects Student Learning, Preceptor Training, and Faculty Teamwork

Pacific University Oregon

8

Khan, Seher A.

Alpha-eleostearic Acid Inhibits the Growth of Human Prostate Carcinoma PC-3 Cells

Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

9

Kolluru, Srikanth

Effects of Clinical Scenario-Based Exams on Integration of Basic Sciences in Pharmacotherapy Courses

Texas A&M Health Science Center

10

Kolluru, Srikanth

Role of Learning Objectives to Improve Student Learning and Effective Teaching in Integrated Pharmacy Courses

Texas A&M Health Science Center

11

Maize, David F.

Integration of Social Networking Into Both In- and Outside of the Classroom

University of the Incarnate Word

12

Marvanova, Marketa

The Role and Effectiveness of Virtual Laboratory Exercises as a Pharmaceutical Sciences Learning Tool

Belmont University

13

Ray, Sidhartha D.

Most Hepatorenal Toxins Consistently Produce Caspase-Activated DNAse (CAD)-Dependent DNA Ladders and Induce Apoptosis In Vivo

Long Island University

14

Rose, Tyler M.

Race to Glucose: A Board Game to Assist Pharmacy Student Learning of Metabolic Pathways

University of Southern Nevada

15

Santos, Roseane M.

Bio-Evaluation of Chlorogenic Acids in Natural Products

South University

16

Schlemmer, R. Francis

Assessing Strategies to Encourage Student Completion of Course and Instructor Evaluations

University of Illinois at Chicago

17

Seefeldt, Teresa M.

Promoting Diversity in Pharmacy Through Participation in a College Preparatory Program for Native American Students

South Dakota State University

18

Sethi, Rajat

Breaking Boundaries: Pharmacy Students Continued Education Through Independent Research Elective

Texas A&M Health Science Center

19

Sethi, Rajat

Ozone-Induced Enhanced Sensitivity to Changes In Mammalian Cardio-Respiratory Physiological Parameters

Texas A&M Health Science Center

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

SUN

7•11

51


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

20

Sethi, Rajat

Regulatory Role of Caveolin 1 and Caveolin 3 in Ozone Induced Cardio-toxicity

Texas A&M Health Science Center

21

Smith, Katherine

Admissions Criteria and Predictors of Success in an Accelerated Pharm.D. Program with a Block Curriculum

University of Southern Nevada

22

Surratt, Christopher K.

Research Funding Expectations as a Function of Faculty Teaching/Administrative Workload

Duquesne University

23

VanWert, Adam

Novel Interactions of Beta-Lactam Antibiotics with Renal Organic Anion Transporter 3 (Oat3)

Wilkes University

Poster #

SUN

7•11

Chemistry

Sunday, July 11 • 4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m. Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

24

Beck, Kimberly M.

Evaluation of a Beta-Lactam Structure Activity Relationship Game

Butler University

25

Bucholtz, Ehren C.

Can Learning for Learning Sake Provide Measurable Gains in Knowledge?

St. Louis College of Pharmacy

26

Davis, Patrick J.

Development of an Academic Track at The University of Texas College of Pharmacy

The University of Texas at Austin

27

Friel, Carolyn J.

Synthesis of Novel 17beta-estradiol Dimers via Sonogashira Coupling

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Worcester

28

Jorvig, Erik

Factors Influencing Student Participation in a Laboratory Research Elective at a Three-Year College of Pharmacy

University of Southern Nevada

29

Liu, Shengquan

Novel Thiochromane Ring Modified SHetA2 Analogs Inhibit Growth of ER Positive Breast Cancer Cell MCF7

Touro University California

30

Mercer, Susan L.

Determination of the Abuse Potential of Daytrana® Transdermal Patches

Lipscomb University

31

Philip, Ashok E.

Student Perceptions of a Science-Based Drug Information Poster: Groundwork for an Interdisciplinary Elective Course

Union University

32

Puglisi-Weening, Melany

Chemical Defenses of the Green Alga Penicillus Dumetosus

Chicago State University

33

Riggs, Robert M.

Design and Evaluation of an Audience Response System Driven Tournament-style Game

Samford University

34

Roche, Victoria F.

Drug Wars: A Comprehensive Computerized Medicinal Chemistry Case Study Focusing on the Treatment of Asthma

Creighton University

35

Sethi, Rajat

An Improved HPLC Method for Identification and Quantitation of Polyamines as Benzoylated Derivatives

Texas A&M Health Science Center

36

Webster, Andrew A.

Design, Development, and Implementation of a Professional Pharmacy Curriculum in Iraqi Kurdistan

Belmont University

Poster #

52

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Poster #

Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

37

Weston, G. Scott

A Longitudinal, Objective Analysis of Student Pharmacist Writing Samples

Harding University

38

Weston, G. Scott

Use and Perceptions of Asynchronous Audio-Visual Technologies in Pharmacy Schools in North America

Harding University

39

Zavod, Robin M.

Auxiliary Labels—Just There for Decoration?

Midwestern University/Downers Grove

SUN

7•11 Continuing Professional Education Sunday, July 11 • 4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m. Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

40

Benzeroual, Kenza E.

Evaluation of Pharmacists Education and Training Needs in Pharmacogenomics

Long Island University

41

Bruskiewitz, Ruth H.

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Three Mass Marketing Attempts for a Continuing Pharmacy Education Program

University of Wisconsin–Madison

42

DeGuire, Nancy

Implementing a Continuous Professional Development (CPD) Process for First-semester Pharmacy Students

University of the Pacific

43

Gettig, Jacob P.

Evaluation of a Pharmacy Management and Leadership Curriculum for Pharmacy Residents and Fellows

Midwestern University/Downers Grove

44

Kasmer, Richard J.

Faculty Development Program Designed to Improve Skills in Dealing with Issues of Student Professionalism

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

45

Kast, Nicole M.

Digital Writing as Final Summative Evaluation Activity for Practicing Pharmacists within an Online CPE Activity

University of Minnesota

46

Kendrach, Michael G.

Developing a Student E-Portfolio Across the Curriculum

Samford University

47

O’Brocta, Richard F.

A Continuous Professional Development (CPD) Student Program

St. John Fisher College

48

Schindel, Terri J.

Use of Standardized Patients in a Professional Development Course on Menopause

University of Alberta

49

Stutz, Misty M.

A Current Assessment of Clinical Pharmacy Services in Louisville, Kentucky, a Collaborating Opportunity

Sullivan University

50

Trewet, CoraLynn B.

Application of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Through Continuing Education Activities

The University of Iowa

51

Young, Anita

Cultural Awareness and the Community Pharmacist

Northeastern University

Poster #

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

53


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Pharmacy Practice

Sunday, July 11 • 4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m. Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

52

Abdelmageed, Ahmed

Development of Online Documentation for Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE)

Husson University

53

Ambizas, Emily M.

Utilizing Video Vignettes to Teach Self-Care in a Pharmacy Practice Laboratory

St. John’s University

54

Anderson, Glenn

Comparison of OSCE Absolute Criteria Reliability Established Using the Angoff and Borderline Group Regression Procedures

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

55

Anderson, Glenn

Evaluation of the Predictive Relationship of Third-year Student Assessment Outcomes to Graduate NAPLEX Performance

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

56

Ayes, Kimberly B.

Drug Information Services for the 21st Century: Utilizing Mobile Lipscomb University Technology to Provide Real Time Drug Information

57

Barone, Joseph A.

Evaluating Pharmacy Students’ Understanding of the Pharmaceutical Industry

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

58

Bartelme, Kassandra M.

Evaluation of a Pilot Community Engagement Course in Partnership with Local Community Health Centers

University of Minnesota

59

Bastianelli, Karen MS

Images and Cultures: Understanding Interprofessional Cultures Project Embedded within a Pharmaceutical Care Clinic Elective

University of Minnesota

60

Batz, Forrest

Pharmacy Student Use of Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) and Medical Software

University of Hawaii at Hilo

61

Bell, Gillian

Evaluation of Faculty and Student Perceptions of Effective Study Methods and Materials and Course Mastery

The University of Tennessee

62

Benedict, Neal J.

Applying a Branched-Outcome Decision Making Model to Virtual Patient Simulations to Enhance Student Learning

University of Pittsburgh

63

Berry, Tricia M.

Health Literacy: Use of the Four Habits Model to Improve Communication

St. Louis College of Pharmacy

64

Bloodworth, Lauren S.

Incorporating a Medication Therapy Management Certificate Program into the Pharmacy Curriculum

The University of Mississippi

65

Bolesta, Scott

Pharmacy Students’ Perceived Value of Physical Assessment Instruction by Nursing or Pharmacy Faculty

Wilkes University

66

Borgelt, Laura M.

Designing an Elective Course by Beginning with the End in Mind

University of Colorado Denver

67

Bottenburg, Michelle M.

Use of a Skills-Based Exam to Document Competency in an Advanced Pharmacy Skills and Applications Course

Drake University

68

Bray, Brenda S.

Impact of Training with Interactive Computer Software on Performance During a Cardiac Emergency Simulation

Washington State University

69

Brown, Michael C.

Development of a Teaching Effort Map to Help Guide Hiring Strategies and Timelines

Concordia University Wisconsin

70

Brown, Michael C.

Guiding Principles Fostering Curriculum Schedule Design at a New School of Pharmacy

Concordia University Wisconsin

Poster #

SUN

7•11

54

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Poster #

Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

71

Brownlee, Seth P.

Development of Pharmacy Skills Assessments (PSA) to Evaluate Clinical and Communication Skills of Pharmacy Students

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

72

Butler, Lakesha M.

The Impact of a Pharmacy High School Minority Summer Camp on Student’s Interest in Pharmacy

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

73

Campbell, Jennifer A.

Pharmacists in Community Service (PICS): Assessing the Direct and Indirect Impact of PICS

Appalachian College of Pharmacy

74

Cannon, Bradley C.

An Interdisciplinary Approach to Critical Care Training Through Simulation

University of Illinois at Chicago

75

Capehart, Krista

Business Model for Community Clinical Pharmacy Services: A Pharmacy and Graduate Business School Collaboration

University of Charleston

76

Cawley, Pauline A.

Black & White to Shades of Gray: IPPE Facilitated Transition from Science-based to Clinically-based Curriculum

Pacific University Oregon

77

Charneski, Lisa

Student Perceptions of Prerecorded Lecture Followed by Active Learning Session with Clicker Technology Across Two Campuses

University of Maryland

78

Chavez, Benjamin

Downloadable Audio Lectures to Enhance Learning in the Pharmacy Curriculum

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

79

Chavez, Benjamin

Fun with Pharmacy: Game Show Activities in the Classroom

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

80

Chavez, Benjamin

Implementation and Effectiveness of a Structured Debate in a Pharmacy Classroom

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

81

Chelette, Candace E.

Assessing “Check-Tech” Active Learning Exercises within a Professional Pharmacy Practice Laboratory Setting

The University of Louisiana at Monroe

82

Christensen, Keith J.

Utilization of Pharmacy Residents as Pharmacotherapeutics Case Study Coordinators

Creighton University

83

Clark, David R.

Participant Impressions of Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI) Use in Interviewing Student Applicants

Regis University

84

Conway, Jeannine M.

Computer Based Simulation to Teach Informal Logic and Evidence Based Reasoning: A Pilot Study

University of Minnesota

85

Crannage, Andrew J.

Developing a Question Bank for Use on Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

St. Louis College of Pharmacy

86

Creekmore, Freddy M.

Assessing the Impact of an Introduction to Pharmacotherapy Course on Learning in the Pharmacotherapy Series

East Tennessee State University

87

Crosby, Steven J.

Incorporation of Medication Regimen Review and Medication Therapy Management Components into an Advanced Practice Course

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston

88

Crouch, Michael A.

A Multipronged Approach Encouraging Postgraduate Residency Training

South University

89

Crouch, Michael A.

Evaluation of a Blended, Multistate Teaching and Learning Development Series for Pharmacy Residents

South University

90

Daugherty, Kimberly K.

Experience with an Exam Remediation Procedure in a 3-Year Accelerated Program

Sullivan University

91

Davison, Lindsay E.

Identification and Classification of Plagiarism by Student Pharmacists and Pharmacy Faculty

Purdue University

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

SUN

7•11

55


INFORMATION RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

92

DeHart, Renee M.

Student Attitudes Towards Incorporating Cultural Awareness Activities into a Required First Year Pharmacy Course

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

93

Deloatch, Kimberly H.

Using Repeated Measures to Evaluate Differences in Student Academic Performance Between Campuses

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

94

Dikun, Joseph A.

Implementation of Interactive “Code Blue” Exercises in the Laboratory Component of a Parenteral Products Course

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

95

DiVall, Margarita V.

Faculty Attitudes, Experiences, and Outcomes Pre/Post Implementation of a Formalized Peer Observation and Evaluation Program

Northeastern University

96

Dodd, Melanie A.

Development and Implementation of an Interprofessional Geriatric Assessment Course

The University of New Mexico

97

Donaldson, Amy R.

Comparing Standardized Patient and Faculty Scores on an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

Auburn University

98

Dornblaser, Emily K.

Putting the Cart Before the Horse?: Early Introduction of Patient Counseling in P1 Year

University of New England

99

Duchac, Andrea L.

The Use of Technology in a Pharmacokinetics Module: Student Preferences and the Impact on Student Learning

University of Wisconsin–Madison

100

Earl, Grace L.

Computer-Based Instruction on Substance Abuse and Drug Diversion in the Doctor of Pharmacy Program

University of the Sciences in Philadelphia

101

English II, Dale E.

A Multifaceted Initiative to Teaching Students Compounding of Sterile Products

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

102

Eukel, Heidi

Rural Patients’ Perceptions About Pharmacists’ Roles in the Provision of Health Care

North Dakota State University

103

Evans, Emily W.

Changes in Students’ Viewpoints on Controversial Topics After Online “Community Chats” in a Women’s Health Elective

The University of Louisiana at Monroe

104

Falcione, Bonnie A.

Development and Evaluation of a Rubric to Assess Value of Student WIKI Contributions

University of Pittsburgh

105

Falcione, Bonnie A.

Evaluation of Student and Faculty Use and Satisfaction with WIKI Technology for Collaborative Case-Based Learning

University of Pittsburgh

106

Falter, Rebecca A.

Kids Eat Healthy: A Pharmacy Student Service Learning Program Providing Nutrition Education to Children

Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

107

Ferullo, Joseph

Educating PY3 Students on Building a Successful Business Model in an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Course

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston

108

Fortner, Jeff

Improving Patient Consultation Skills Using Rapid-cycle Feedback

Pacific University Oregon

109

Foster, Karla T.

A Case-based Interprofessional Education Experience Between Pharmacy and Physician Assistant Students

Mercer University

110

Fravel, Michelle A.

Audio Interdisciplinary Hospital Rounds to Teach Critical Thinking Skills: A Simulation in Listening

The University of Iowa

111

Frenzel, Jeanne E.

Assessment of Aseptic Technique of First Year Professional Pharmacy Students Using Webcams

North Dakota State University

112

Frick, Jacob

Implementation of an Electronic Medical Record in an Integrated Patient Care Course

University of Southern Nevada

Poster #

SUN

7•11

56

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


RESEARCH/EDUCATION INFORMATION POSTERS Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

113

Frick, Jacob

Use of the Television Series, House, M.D., to Promote Critical Thinking Skills in Pharmacotherapeutics

University of Southern Nevada

114

Friesner, Daniel L.

Does Operating a Community Telepharmacy Affect Dispensing Errors within the Practice? Evidence from North Dakota

North Dakota State University

115

Fuentes, David

Documenting Trends in Empathy and Learning in a Psychopharmacotherapy Course

Pacific University Oregon

116

Fuentes, David

Integrating “Personality” into Psychopharmacotherapy Instruction in a Pharmacy Curriculum

Pacific University Oregon

117

Fuentes, David

Supplementing Lectures with Cases, Essays and Drug Information Applications to Promote Active and Life-long Learning

Pacific University Oregon

118

Galal, Suzanne M.

Evaluation of Diabetes Practice Laboratory Involving Activelearning and Role Playing Techniques in a Large Classroom

University of the Pacific

119

Galal, Suzanne M.

Exploring the Relationship of Social and Emotional Competence on Student-Patient Consultation Performance

University of the Pacific

120

Gallegos, Patrick J.

Pharmacy Students’ Perception Changes with First Exposure to Team-Based Learning in a Medication Use Systems Course

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

121

Gallegos, Patrick J.

Quality of Team Performance Evaluation Using Team-Based Learning in Second Year Pharmacy Students

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

122

Gallimore, Casey

Implementing an Oncology Virtual Patient into a Pharmacotherapy Lab Course

University of Wisconsin–Madison

123

Gallimore, Casey

Utilizing the WPQC Comprehensive Medication Review and Assessment Model to Teach Medication Therapy Management

University of Wisconsin–Madison

124

Gim, Suzanna

Impact of a Didactic Literature Evaluation Course on Student Perception of the Value of Journal Club

Long Island University

125

Gogineni, Hyma P.

Incorporating and Implementing Active Learning Tools within an Institutional Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE)

Loma Linda University

126

Gonyeau, Michael

A 12 Week Integrated Ambulatory Care and Internal Medicine APPE

Northeastern University

127

Gonyeau, Michael

Development of a Leadership Retreat for Student Pharmacist Leaders

Northeastern University

128

Gonzalvo, Jasmine D.

Pharmaceutical Care of Diabetes—An Elective Course

Purdue University

129

Grace, Patricia M.

Implementing a Rubric for Grading Extemporaneously Prepared Prescription Based Products in a Professional Practice Laboratory

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

130

Grace, Patricia M.

Order Effect of Laboratory Section on Grades in a Professional Practice Laboratory

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

131

Guirguis, Lisa

Improvisation to Improve First Year Pharmacy Students’ SelfEfficacy Toward Patient Communication

University of Alberta

132

Hale, Katherine S.

Montana PharmAssist Program: Continuing Education Reviews and Patient Encounters—How Does Training Translate into Practice?

The University of Montana

133

Harrell, Kristopher

T.E.A.M. Mississippi: Successful Multidisciplinary Partnerships to Increase Childhood Obesity Awareness in Rural Southern Communities

The University of Mississippi

Poster #

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

SUN

7•11

57


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

134

Hart, Nancy B.

Pharm.D. Students’ Participation in Faculty’s Research: Benefits and Challenges from Their Perspectives

Nova Southeastern University

135

Herndon, Christopher M.

Consensus Recommendations from the Strategic Planning Summit for the Advancement of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacy

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

136

Hess, Karl

Implementing Health Fair Screening Lectures into the Curriculum: Impact on Participant Knowledge and Student Confidence

Western University of Health Sciences

137

Hess, Rick

Assessment of an Interprofessional Communications Course Using Standardized Patients

East Tennessee State University

138

Hilaire, Michelle L.

Logistics and Legalities: Applying Law Class to a Clinical Rotation

University of Wyoming

139

Hoffman, Janice

California Pharmacy Student Leadership Program: Influence on Student Leadership, Teamwork, Research Skills, and Professional Involvement

Western University of Health Sciences

140

Hoffman, Janice

Inter-facilitator Impact on Student Performance in Case-Based Discussions

Western University of Health Sciences

141

Hsu, Donald I.

Comparison of Selected Admission Criteria with First-year Pharmacy Academic and Objective Structured Clinical Exam Performance

Western University of Health Sciences

142

Hudgins, Gayle A.

Health Professions Student Training Program in Wellness Screening

The University of Montana

143

Hurd, Peter D.

Health Literacy: Assessment of the Skills and Attitudes of Student Pharmacists Using a Web-based Questionnaire

St. Louis College of Pharmacy

144

Isaac, Kristi M.

Use of Peer Evaluation to Enhance Student Confidence, Attitude, and Quality of SOAP Notes

Xavier University of Louisiana

145

Jackevicius, Cynthia

Effect of an Evidence-Based Medicine Course on Students’ SelfReported Ability-Based Outcomes

Western University of Health Sciences

146

Jackowski, Rebekah M.

Pre-pharmacy and Pharmacy Student Use of Social Networking Sites

The University of Arizona

147

Jackson II, Kenneth C.

Pain Passport: A Methodology for Assessing Competency in Pain Pharmacotherapy

Pacific University Oregon

148

Janke, Kristin K.

Development of a Tool to Assess Student Professionalism: A Multi-institutional Pilot

University of Minnesota

149

Johnson, Mary M.

North Carolina Pharmacy Based Immunization Initiatives

Campbell University

150

Jun, Jeany K.

Lecture-based Versus Small Group-based Teaching of Diabetes Medical Nutrition Therapy (DM MNT)

Western University of Health Sciences

151

Kanaan, Abir

Integrating Pharmacy Students into the Curricular Mapping Process

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Worcester

152

Kaun, Megan A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Academic Dishonesty in Professional Division Pharmacy Students

The University of Toledo

153

Kautza, Stacy

Implementation and Evaluation of a Longitudinal Performancebased Assessment as a Pharmacotherapy Lab Practical

University of Wisconsin–Madison

154

Kearns, Jamie L.

Development of a Dermatology Elective with a Focus on Cosmeceutical Compounding

Duquesne University

Poster #

SUN

7•11

58

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


RESEARCH/EDUCATION INFORMATION POSTERS Poster #

Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

155

Kearns, Jamie L.

Overactive Bladder Disease in an Ambulatory Population

Duquesne University

156

Kelly, Barbara

Impact of Critical Pharmacy Knowledge Courses on the Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

Palm Beach Atlantic University

157

Kier, Karen L.

Simulating Ambulatory Care Cases in a Capstone Course Using Background, Assessment, Recommendation, and Follow-up Format

Ohio Northern University

158

Kleppinger, Erika L.

Development of an Integrated Pharmacy Skills Laboratory Course Sequence

Auburn University

159

Koenig, Marianne

Reexamining the Student Teacher Model Through PGY-1 Resident Self Assessment and Course Design

Duquesne University

160

Kulinski, Nichole M.

Using Interactive Whiteboards in the Pharmaceutical Care Learning Center to Impact Student Learning

University of Minnesota

161

Lacroix, Matthew

Development of an Introductory Course for the Profession of Pharmacy and Introductory Pharmacy Experiences

University of New England

162

Lancaster, Scott

First Year Student Perceptions of Performing Clinical Skills Using OSCEs in an Accelerated Pharm.D. Program

South University

163

Layson-Wolf, Cherokee

APPE Teaching Elective Students and Their Role in Developing New Practice Lab Activities

University of Maryland

164

Lee, Jeannie K.

The Use of Focus Groups to Develop the Advanced Patient Care Course

The University of Arizona

165

Lindsey, Cameron C.

An Analysis of a Student-led Respiratory Disease Educational Program in an Underserved Population

University of Missouri–Kansas City

166

Linger, Rebecca S.

The Development and Implementation of a Class in Ethnopharmacology of Appalachia

University of Charleston

167

Losinski, Victoria L.

Student Pharmacist Impact on Patient Care Outcomes

University of Minnesota

SUN

7•11

Innovations in Teaching

Sunday, July 11 • 4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m. Poster #

Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

Winners 168

Karimi, Reza

Learning Bridge: An Integrative Tool that Bridges Didactic and Experiential Curricula to Positively Affect Student Learning, Preceptor Training, and Faculty Teamwork

Pacific University Oregon

169

Janke, Kristin K.

Defining a Learning Process for Strengths Education in Pharmacy: An Eight Year Journey

University of Minnesota

Honorable Mention 170

Seybert, Amy L.

High Fidelity Human Patient Simulation to Enhance Critical Thinking Skills within the Pharmacy Curriculum

University of Pittsburgh

171

Mathews, Jennifer

Deaf Strong Hospital: A Role-Reversal Exercise Emphasizing Cultural Competency and Awareness

St. John Fisher College

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

59


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Experiential Education

Monday, July 12 • 9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

MON

7•12

60

Poster #

Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

1

Abrons, Jeanine

Enhancing Community Pharmacy Practice and Research Opportunities: Use of the Well-TIP Method

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

2

Allen, Sheila M.

Student and Preceptor Views on Time Utilization During a Community Pharmacy Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

University of Illinois at Chicago

3

Andrews, Laurel L.

Evaluation of Patient Satisfaction Levels Regarding Pointof-Care Testing in Community Settings

The University of Louisiana at Monroe

4

Barr, Judith T.

Authentic Learning in a University-based Advanced Pharmacy Practice Educational Experience (APPEE)

Northeastern University

5

Berry, Tricia M.

Introductory Practice Experiences Focusing on Safe Medication Use Practices in Community and Health-System Settings

St. Louis College of Pharmacy

6

Billock Riendeau, Allison

Student Interest in Service Learning at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

7

Boesen, Kevin P.

Evaluating the Impact of Rural Rotations on Perceptions of Rural Pharmacy Practice

The University of Arizona

8

Bohan, KarenBeth H.

Pass/Fail vs. Graded Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE): Current Practices and Stakeholder Opinions

Wilkes University

9

Boyle, Cynthia J.

Competencies: From Definition to Performance

University of Maryland

10

Brazeau, Gayle A.

Community Engagement Through a Church-Based Wellness Clinic for IPPE Experiences

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

11

Briceland, Laurie L.

Creation of Certification of Hours (COH) Form to Document APPE Student Attendance

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

12

Brooks, Kay L.

A Collaborative University/County Partnership to Provide IPPEs that Improve Health Awareness and Outcomes

The University of Georgia

13

Brooks, Natalie

Difference in Attitudes and Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Between Student Pharmacists and Student Nurses

St. Louis College of Pharmacy

14

Brown, Sarah E.

Development and Implementation of a Regional Collaboration for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiential Education

Pacific University Oregon

15

Buckley, Thomas E.

Advocating for the Profession Through a Public Health Rotation

University of Connecticut

16

Carbonara, Gina M.

Over-the-Counter Medication Tours: An Innovative Approach to Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

West Virginia University

17

Clarke, Cheryl L.

Utilizing Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience Students to Improve Pertussis Immunization Rates in Mothers of Newborns

Drake University

18

Clay, Patrick G.

Introducing Research Careers to Pharmacy Students: Igniting a Flame, Not Scalding for Life

Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Poster #

Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

19

Coover, Kelli L.

Assessment of P4 Students’ Participation in Medication Therapy Management Services on Community Pharmacy Rotations

Creighton University

20

Copeland, Debra A.

Utilization of IPPE Assessments to Improve Student, Preceptor and Programmatic Outcomes

Northeastern University

21

Copeland, Jeffrey T.

Experiential Education Curricular Mapping: Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

University of the Incarnate Word

22

Cox, Christine F.

Preceptor Development Utilizing Statewide Regional Meetings

Southwestern Oklahoma State University

23

Culhane, Nicole

Community-based Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences to Enhance Communication and Interviewing Skills Among First-year Student Pharmacists

College of Notre Dame of Maryland

24

Danielson, Jennifer

An Examination of Operational Definitions for Core Required APPEs

University of Washington

25

Darbishire, Patricia L.

A Novel Method for Teaching and Assessing Students’ Medication Knowledge, Dispensing, and Counseling Skills

Purdue University

26

DiCenzo, Robert

Assessing APPE Student Interest in Twitter as a Means of Experiential Education Office (EEO) Communication

St. John Fisher College

27

Duchac, Andrea L.

Impact of a Bootcamp to Prepare First-year Student Pharmacists for IPPE Experiences

University of Wisconsin–Madison

28

Ernsthausen, Lori

A Unique Model for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE): First-year Experience

The University of Findlay

29

Esposito, Emily R.

Interactive Approaches to Teaching Clinical Toxicology: Integrating Pharmaceutical Sciences, Drug Information and Poison Control Centers

Sullivan University

30

Feret, Brett

A Comparison of the Structure of the Offices of Experiential Education in a Regional Consortium

University of Rhode Island

31

Fiebelkorn, Karl

Household Pharmaceutical Waste Collection Events

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

32

Flowers, Schwanda K.

Comparison of Preferred Incentives, Motivation and Satisfaction of Community and Institutional APPE Preceptors in Arkansas

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

33

Frick, Lara

The Amazing Rx: Student Satisfaction with Case Based Application of Clinical Knowledge

University of Southern Nevada

34

Garcia, Katie A.

Description of Pharmacy Services in Pediatric Rehabilitation Hospitals

Duquesne University

35

Gilbreath, Marsha N.

Perceptions of Preparedness for Institutional PharmacyRelated Activities Based on IPPE: Two Years of Experience

Mercer University

36

Grady, Sarah E.

Use of Student Pharmacist Feedback During a Journal Club in an Advanced Practice Experience

Drake University

37

Gupta, Eric K.

Development of an Academic Experiential Rotation to Promote Academia as a Career Goal

Western University of Health Sciences

38

Hale, Katherine S.

Evaluation of Required Medication Therapy Management Activities in Advanced Community Pharmacy Practice Experiences in Montana

The University of Montana

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

MON

7•12

61


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

39

Hogue, Michael D.

Analysis of Affiliation Agreements and Complaince Management for Experiential Education: Experiences of the SPEEC Consortium Schools

Samford University

40

Jackson II, Kenneth C.

Implementation of a Health System Tracking Approach to Assignment of Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

Pacific University Oregon

41

Jacob, Susan

Evaluation of the Value of a Pharmacy Service Publication (PharmBeat) for Patients

Western University of Health Sciences

42

Jeffres, Meghan

The Evaluation of Educational Games During Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

University of Southern Nevada

43

Johanson, Erin

First Year Student Pilot Meetings: Taking the Time to Build Relationships in a Large Class

Midwestern University/Glendale

44

Johanson, Erin

Preceptor Training Webinar Programs—Using GoToWebinar to Reach Preceptors Nationwide

Midwestern University/Glendale

45

Jones, Rhonda M.

Impact of an Experiential Quality Assurance Process

Creighton University

46

Joseph, Andrea S.

Designing Longitudinal, Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences That Integrate and Complement Didactic Coursework

Thomas Jefferson University

47

Jun, Jeany K.

Student Attitudes Towards Interprofessional Education in a Primary Care Clinic

Western University of Health Sciences

48

Klein, Christine M.

Blogging: A Unique Forum for Student Presentations and Reflection

Mercer University

49

Kroon, Lisa

Development and Implementation of a Standardized Patient Exercise to Promote Interprofessional Learning

University of California, San Francisco

50

Lawson Jr., Kenneth A.

Analysis of Students’ Evaluations of Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences by Region, Rotation Type, and Year

The University of Texas at Austin

51

Leon, Nicholas

Healthcare-Related Service Learning in an Inner-City Secondary School

Thomas Jefferson University

52

Lundquist, Lisa M.

Cost Savings of Clinical Interventions Made by Pharm.D. Students at a Community Teaching Hospital

Mercer University

53

Miller, Mindi S.

Utilizing APPE Students to Assist with Medication Reconciliation and Anticoagulation Requirements in Two Community Hospitals

The University of Georgia

Poster #

MON

7•12

DON’T FORGET!

62

Name badges are your ticket to all Annual Meeting events.

HELL my na me is

O

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Libraries/Educational Resources Monday, July 12 • 9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m. Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

54

Ansong, Miriam A.

Using Web 2.0 to Create Quality Assurance (QA) Program for Drug Information Practice and Education

Sullivan University

55

Brown, Richard W.

Promoting Critical Reflection via a Strategy of Ad Deconstruction and Video Annotation

University of Minnesota

56

Carle, Martha H.

Broadening Coursework Horizons: Designing Online Courses for Significant Learning

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

57

Carle, Martha H.

Integrating a Virtual Learning Environment into Faculty Culture

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

58

Childress, BC

Comparing the Design, Structure, and Delivery Methods of Literature Evaluation Courses Among 3-year Pharmacy Programs

Sullivan University

59

Davis, Tamra S.

Faculty Development: A Cohort for Active Learning Using Education Scholar

The University of Oklahoma

60

Hughes, Peter J.

Assessment of Electronic Drug Information Resource Availability in Alabama Pharmacies

Samford University

61

Koomer, Ajoy

Quantitative Measurement of Student Attainment of Sullivan University College of Pharmacy Program-level ABOs

Sullivan University

62

Koomer, Ajoy

Tracking Performance of Sullivan University College of Pharmacy Students Using Pharmacy Curricular Outcomes Assessment ( PCOA)

Sullivan University

63

Lapidus, Mariana

Using Synchronous and Asynchronous Instruction to Teach Drug Literature Evaluation Course: Reaching Out to Remote Campuses

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston

64

Lourdes Ceballos-Coronel, Maria

“Bridging the Gap” in Pharm.D. Physical Assessment Through Inter-Professional Collaboration

Sullivan University

65

Lourdes Ceballos-Coronel, Maria

Enhancement of the Pharm.D. Clinical Laboratory Course Through Integration of Experiential Learning Modalities

Sullivan University

66

Martin, Jennifer R.

Demonstrating the Literature Search Process Through Innovative Role Play Instruction for Pharmacy Students

The University of Arizona

67

McConville, Jason T.

Assessment of Student Performance in Biopharmaceutics Using the TurningPoint Audience Response System

The University of Texas at Austin

68

McFarland, Annette T.

Developing a Community Health Resource Website for the State of Indiana

Butler University

69

Medina, Melissa S.

Assessing Student Leadership Styles in a Dual Campus Environment

The University of Oklahoma

70

Pace, Heather A.

Impact of Web Based Technology on Pharmacy Seminar Course

University of Missouri–Kansas City

71

Reardon, Dean

Using a Server Hosted Microsoft Access Database Instrument to Map Curricular Competencies

University of Charleston

Poster #

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

MON

7•12

63


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

72

Roberts, Rochelle M.

The First Year of the E-Portfolio in a Pharm.D. Program

The University of Texas at Austin

73

Stone, Sean M.

Pharmacy Students’ Use of Library and Information Resources

Drake University

74

Vaughan, K.T.L.

An Analysis of Library Holdings as Compared to the Basic Resources for Pharmaceutical Education List

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

75

Waldrop, Jean A.

Know Your Librarian: An In-Depth Look at Librarians Working in AACP Institutions

Harding University

76

Waskiewicz, Rhonda A.

Assessment of Pharmacy Students’ Test-taking Motivation in a Low-Stakes PCOA Test Administration

Wilkes University

Poster #

MON

7•12

Pharmaceutics

Monday, July 12 • 9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

64

Poster #

Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

77

Brazeau, Gayle A.

NAPLEX Performance as a Function of Grades in a Pharmacotherapeutics Sequence and Cumulative Grade Point Averages

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

78

Brazeau, Gayle A.

Student Academic Performance in 2004–2010 Graduates as a Function of Pre-Pharmacy Years of College

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

79

Bucholtz, Ehren C.

Quantitative Analysis of Concentration for Solid Samples Utilizing Infrared Spectroscopy

St. Louis College of Pharmacy

80

Buckner, Ira

The Impact of a Novel Pharmaceutics/Pharmacy Practice “Cross-Over” Assessment on Student Learning and Beliefs

Duquesne University

81

Cook, Thomas J.

Team-Based Interactive Learning Sessions for Pharmacy Calculations

Touro College of Pharmacy– New York

82

Dey, Surajit

Retention of Key Pharmacokinetic Concepts Among Preceptors from Institutional and Community Pharmacy Settings

University of Southern Nevada

83

Elder, Deborah L.

Stability of Extemporaneously Prepared Midazolam Intranasal Gel

The University of Georgia

84

Fox, Laura M.

Use of a Course Management System to Facilitate a Paperless Admissions Process

Presbyterian College

85

Hedaya, Mohsen A.

Effect of Food on the Bioavailability of Ciprofloxacin, A Model BCS Class III Drug

Kuwait University

86

Hussain, Muhammad D.

Active Learning and Engagement of Students in Large Classes with Student Response Technology

Texas A&M Health Science Center

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

87

Hussain, Muhammad D.

Folate Receptor Targeted Protoporphyrin IX for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer

Texas A&M Health Science Center

88

Karla, Pradeep K.

DRD2 Polymorphisms Associated with Nicotine Dependence in African Americans

Howard University

89

Karla, Pradeep K.

Identifying the Presence of New Drug Efflux Transporter (MRP4) in Human Cornea

Howard University

90

Koomer, Ajoy

Perceptions of Pharmacy Students Towards Nanotechnology: Responses to an Elective in Nanotechnology Applications

Sullivan University

91

Nutan, Mohammad T.

Pharmaceutical Compounding Laboratory Course, Paving the Way to Careers in Compounding Pharmacy

Texas A&M Health Science Center

92

Sheaffer, Elizabeth A.

A Comparative Study of Testing Methods in Pharmacy Calculations and Pharmaceutics

Shenandoah University

93

Shrewsbury, Robert P.

An Analysis Requirement for Compounded Products. Is It Worth It?

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

94

Siddig, Aladin A.

Evaluation of the Development of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology Elective Course for the Doctor of Pharmacy Program

University of Charleston

95

Vadlapatla, Rajesh

Sequenced, Dispersed IPPE Implementation in a New, Block-Formatted Curriculum

Saint Joseph College

96

White, Catherine A.

Development of an Emergency Formulary for Providing Pharmacy Care at Disaster Sites

The University of Georgia

97

Zhao, Fang

Punch or Tamp—Capsule Compounding in Pharmaceutics Lab Courses

St. John Fisher College

98

Zheng, Haian

Pharmaceutics in Motion: Embracing Computer Modeling and Multimedia Presentation in Pharmacy Education

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Poster #

MON

7•12

Social and Administrative Sciences Monday, July 12 • 9:00 a.m.–10:30 a.m. Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

99

Alkhateeb, Fadi M.

Bachelor of Sciences in Pharmaceutical Sciences: A Review

University of Charleston

100

Alkhateeb, Fadi M.

Pharmacy Administration Education in Colleges of Pharmacy in Jordan

University of Charleston

101

Andrews, Laurel L.

Comparison of Obsessive-Compulsive Behaviors in Pharmacy Students to Success in the Pharmacy Curriculum

The University of Louisiana at Monroe

Poster #

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

65


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Poster #

Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

102

Ayes, Kimberly B.

Cross Curriculum Collaboration: Using One Assignment to Meet Education Objectives in More Than One Course

Lipscomb University

103

Ayres, Michael L.

Trial of Teaching Methods for Bioethics Education of Pharmacy Students

University of Washington

104

Barnett, Mitchell

Assessing Student Knowledge and Interest in the Implementation of Pharmacogenomics

Touro University California

105

Bentley, John P.

Assessment of an Integrated Drug Literature Evaluation Course

The University of Mississippi

106

Bernard, Daphne B.

Utilization of a Structured Assessment Process for Learning Enhancement in an Integrated Therapeutics Laboratory Course

Howard University

107

Blake, Kimberly B.

Association of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) Knowledge, Perceived Risk, Diet and Physical Activity Behaviors

West Virginia University

108

Bonnarens, Joseph K.

First Year of PharmCAS—The Aftermath: A School’s Continued Journey Through the Admissions Process

Pacific University Oregon

109

Bryant, Keysha L.

Qualitative Behavioral Intervention Analysis of Pharmacy Students During Remediation Program

Palm Beach Atlantic University

110

Buckley, Thomas E.

Developing Cultural Competency Through a Public Health Rotation

University of Connecticut

111

Cain, Jeff J.

E-Professionalism, Social Media, and Residents: Residency Program Directors’ Views

University of Kentucky

112

Carter, Jean T.

Initial Experiences with a Two-day Intensive Interdisciplinary Team Building Course

The University of Montana

113

Chesnut, Renae J.

Pharmacy Student Entrepreneurial Orientation (PSEO) Drake University Scale: Developing a Baseline Measurement and Comparison

114

Chung, Eunice P.

What Are the Barriers in Developing Valid and Reliable Assessments?

Western University of Health Sciences

115

Chung, Eunice P.

What Factors Influence Student Course Evaluation Scores?

Western University of Health Sciences

116

Church, Timothy J.

Mandatory Chemical Dependency Training and its Role in a College of Pharmacy Curriculum

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

117

Cisneros, Robert M.

The Role of Blackboard® Discussion in a Medication Errors Elective Course

Campbell University

118

Cisneros, Robert M.

The Use of Shutterfly® in a Medication Errors Elective Course

Campbell University

119

Clark, Suzanne

Developing an Occupational Health Needs Assessment and Experience Survey

University of Wyoming

120

Davis, Tamra S.

Peer Observation: A Faculty Initiative

The University of Oklahoma

121

DeBisschop, Michael

Course-embedded Assessment at a New School of Pharmacy: A Pilot Project

St. John Fisher College

122

Dhing, Conrad

The Development of First-Year 4Cs Courses to Teach SelfDirected Lifelong Learning Skills in Pharmacy Students

Husson University

MON

7•12

66

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

123

Draugalis, JoLaine R.

Preparation Strategies and Career Paths of Pharmacy Deans: A 20-Year Perspective

The University of Oklahoma

124

Dunn, Kimberly J.

Potential Impact of an Early Alert Technology on College of Pharmacy Students’ Success

Campbell University

125

Dye, Joseph T.

Meet Patient X: A Novel Approach Integrating Problembased Learning, Medication Therapy Management and Patient Care

Mercer University

126

English, Clayton D.

Prevalence of Alcohol Abuse and Consumption Among Pharmacy Students at Six U.S. Schools of Pharmacy

Nova Southeastern University

127

Fairclough, Jamie L.

Stress, Spirituality, and Health-Related Quality of Life Among Pharmacy Students

Palm Beach Atlantic University

128

Finnin, Miki L.

Faculty Survey to Determine Cultural Comptency Content in Current Pharmacy Curriculum

The University of Oklahoma

129

Frank, Abigail

Assessing the Expectations and Outcomes of an International Experience for Pharmacy Students

University of Minnesota

130

Frick, Jacob

Correlation of Pharmacy Students’ Perceived Difficulty and Level of Interest in Pharmacotherapeutic Topics

University of Southern Nevada

131

Frick, Lara

Stress and Quality of Life in a Three-Year, Block System Doctor of Pharmacy Program

University of Southern Nevada

132

Fuji, Kevin T.

Case Study of a Health Informatics Course for Pharmacy Students

Creighton University

133

Gettman, David A.

Online AACP Public Health SIG Questionnaire Utilizing the Clinical Prevention and Population Health Curriculum Framework

D’Youville College

134

Hagemeier, Nicholas E.

An Economic Analysis of Pursuing a Ph.D. Degree after Completion of a Pharm.D. Degree

Purdue University

135

Harpe, Spencer E.

Effects of Learning-Centered Assessment on Pharmacy Students’ Attitudes Towards and Knowledge of Statistics

Virginia Commonwealth University

136

Harpe, Spencer E.

Publication Patterns of Resident-Authored Abstracts Presented During the 2006–2007 Residency Year

Virginia Commonwealth University

137

Hess, Aleda M.

A Qualitative Analysis of the Impact of the Geriatric Medication Game© on Pharmacy Students’ Attitudes

Purdue University

138

Huston, Sally A.

Assessing Pharmacy Students Attitudes Towards Pharmacogenomic Testing

The University of Georgia

139

Huston, Sally A.

Learning Styles Assessment of 4 Pharmacy Class Cohorts at The University of Georgia College of Pharmacy

The University of Georgia

140

Jenkins, Tara

Evaluation of a Student-directed Current Events Requirement in a Healthcare Systems Course

The University of Kansas

141

Jones, Kim M.

The Influence of Information Contained within Social Networking Sites on the Hiring Practices of Pharmacists

Union University

142

Kasmer, Richard J.

“My First Employee.” Implementing a Pharmacy Personnel Course to Instill and Develop Management Skills

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

Poster #

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

MON

7•12

67


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

143

Kasmer, Richard J.

Utilizing Innovative Technology to Create a Virtual Poster Session on Professionalism During National Pharmacy Week

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

144

Kavookjian, Jan

Motivational Interviewing Curriculum Content in U.S. Health Professions Schools: A National Survey

Auburn University

145

Kiersma, Mary E.

Factors Affecting Students’ Perceptions of the Professional Role of a Pharmacist

Purdue University

146

Kiritsy, Paul J.

Increasing an Understanding of Adherence Through Interprofessional Education

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Boston

147

Knecht, Kathryn T.

Health Professional Education Outcomes from a Health Sciences University-sponsored Community Music Program

Loma Linda University

148

Lahoz, Monina R.

Using a CD-based Proprietary NAPLEX Review Program to Longitudinally Assess Cohort 2 Students’ Knowledge Levels

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Worcester

149

Lane, Daniel C.

Examining the Relationship Between Organizational Culture, Work Attitudes, Job Roles and Organizational Change

University of Michigan

150

Langness, Jacob

Bridging the Gap: A Unique Lecture Series to Educate Future Practitioners on Minnesota Communities

University of Minnesota

151

Law, Anandi V.

Monographs as an Integrative Application of Evidence Based-Medicine and Pharmacoeconomics in the Pharm.D. Curriculum

Western University of Health Sciences

152

Macias-Moriarity, Lilia Z.

Assessing the Use of Active Learning Techniques in an Accelerated Pharmacy Program: Challenges and Recommendations

South University

153

Morgan, Gabrielle F.

Development of a Student Pharmacist Mentoring Program Serving Undergraduate Pre-Pharmacy Students at Campbell University

Campbell University

154

Morgan, Gabrielle F.

Health Fairs as a Recruitment Tool: Serve the Public, Train Student Pharmacists and Recruit Students

Campbell University

155

Morgan, Gabrielle F.

Student Pharmacist Ambassador Program: Utilization of Current Students to Enhance Recruitment

Campbell University

156

Mount, Jeanine K.

Oversight of Pharmacy Education: ACPE Accreditation Activities, 2000–2009

University of Wisconsin–Madison

157

Nesbit, James M.

Communication Overhaul: A Right Brained Course For Teaching Left Brained Students

Harding University

158

Newton, Gail D.

Development and Evaluation of a Simulation to Teach Curriculum Development in a Graduate Program

Purdue University

159

Null, Kyle D.

The Relationship Between Quantitative-based Admissions Criteria and Performance in a Drug Literature Evaluation Course

The University of Mississippi

160

Patterson, Brandon J.

Development of a Pharmacy Practice Laboratory Module Focused on Doing Research as Pharmacists

The University of Iowa

161

Peirce, Gretchen L.

Identifying Psychological Contract Breaches in Academic Pharmacy Using a Modified Delphi Procedure

The University of Oklahoma

162

Peirce, Gretchen L.

Pharmacy Faculty’s Perceptions of Important Organizational Citizenship Behaviors

The University of Oklahoma

Poster #

MON

7•12

68

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

163

Planas, Lourdes G.

Development and Validation of a Rubric to Assess Student Pharmacists’ Problem-solving Skills

The University of Oklahoma

164

Rickles, Nathaniel M.

Comparative Evaluation of Using Standardized Patients vs. Peers in Communication Skills Lab

Northeastern University

165

Rogers, Erica

The Influence of a Patient Counseling Course on Communication Apprehension of First-Year Pharmacy Students

Union University

166

Roke-Thomas, Marie

Service Learning Project Identifies Decreased Emergency Room (ER) Visits for the Uninsured

Wilkes University

167

Sangasubana, Nisaratana

Consumers’ Information Sources and Ability to Provide Generic OTC Examples: Accurate or Not

Nova Southeastern University

168

Sankaranarayanan, Jayashri

Assessing Faculty and Preceptors’ Needs, Preferences, Workload-Satisfaction, and Resource Use for Planning Professional Development Programs

University of Nebraska Medical Center

169

Shiyanbola, Olayinka

Assessing the Reliability of an Admission Interview Process in a College of Pharmacy

South Dakota State University

170

Smith, Marie A.

Pharmacy Practice and E-Health Leadership Strategies for the Patient-centered Medical Home

University of Connecticut

171

Spooner, Joshua J.

School of Pharmacy Seat Deposit Policies for Accepted Pharmacy Students

Western New England College

172

Tahir, Rabia

Student Posters in Pharmacy: Through the Lens and into the Classroom

Touro College of Pharmacy– New York

173

Wang, Yingchen

Predictors of Student Academic Performance in the First Professional Year

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

174

Weber, Stanley S.

A Course Inventory and Curricular Mapping Tool

University of Washington

175

West-Strum, Donna S.

Pharmacy Students’ and Professors’ Attitudes and Opinions Toward Facebook and E-Professionalism

The University of Mississippi

176

Wilson, Jane E.

Peer Mentoring: A Reciprocal Journey of Development for Student Pharmacists

The University of Oklahoma

177

Wilson, Jane E.

Student Assessment of a Distance Education Learning Environment: A Qualitative Approach

The University of Oklahoma

178

Witry, Matthew

Student Pharmacist Views on a College Sponsored Formal Mentoring Program

The University of Iowa

179

Yang, Yi

Adherence to Oral Hypoglycemic Agents Among Patients with Diabetes: A Retrospective Cohort Study

The University of Mississippi

180

Yang, Yi

Effects of Receipt of Guideline-Recommended Care on Risks for Hospitalization and Mortality in Adults with Diabetes

The University of Mississippi

181

Zorek, Joseph A.

The Utilization and Effectiveness of Guest Speakers in a Professional Development Seminar Series

University of Illinois at Chicago

Poster #

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

MON

7•12

69


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Experiential Education

Monday, July 12 • Noon–1:30 p.m. Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

1

Ma, Joseph D.

Design of a Drug Discovery, Development, and Commercialization Elective

University of California, San Diego

2

Ma, Joseph D.

Development of a Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Industry Mentorship Program for Pharmacy Students

University of California, San Diego

3

Malhotra, Jodie

Development and Validation of an Assessment Tool for Evaluating Students on Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPEs)

Regis University

4

Martin, Beth A.

Pharmacist Evaluation of First-year Student Pharmacists’ Professionalism: A Pilot Survey

University of Wisconsin–Madison

5

Mason, Nancy A.

Longitudinal Early Practice Experience (LEPE-IPPE): Impact on Students and Community Partners

University of Michigan

6

McEwen, Deanna W.

Use of a Community Based Model for Providing Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPEs)

The University of Georgia

7

Metzger, Nicole L.

Assessment of the Effectiveness of Faculty Facilitated Institutional Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences at Four Hospitals

Mercer University

8

Meyer, Douglas A.

Rubric-Driven Grade Contracts for Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) Courses

Concordia University Wisconsin

9

Meyer, Kristin S.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) in Parkinson’s Support Groups

Drake University

10

Miller, Christopher M.

Structuring an Interdisciplinary Nutrition Support APPE Rotation to Enhance Services and Improve Interdepartmental Communication

University of Kentucky

12

Motycka, Carol A.

Evaluating Professionalism in Distance Education

University of Florida

13

O’Brien, Karen K.

An Experiential Model of Pharmacy & Dentistry Partners Promoting Public Health in Underserved Populations

Creighton University

14

Packard, Kathleen A.

A Tool to Teach Heart Failure Guidelines and Assess Therapy in a Cardiology Rotation

Creighton University

15

Palmieri, James A.

Examining the Impact of Service Learning on Pharmacy Students’ Knowledge of Poisonings, Toxicology, and Professional Development

University of the Pacific

16

Pereira, Chrystian R.

Poster Presentations in an APPE Experience

University of Minnesota

17

Policastri, Anne

From Simulation to Practice: Integration of Patient Care Lab Skills with Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

University of Kentucky

18

Policastri, Anne

Usefulness and Applicability of a Pharmacy Management Course in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Rotations

University of Kentucky

19

Prescott, Gina M.

An Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) Rubric to Enhance Preceptor Effectiveness

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

20

Ratka, Anna

Introduction to Academic Pharmacy: Elective Course to Raise Student Awareness About a Career in Academia

Texas A&M Health Science Center

Poster #

MON

7•12

70

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

21

Ray, Nancy E.

A Review of College Communication with Preceptors

The University of Oklahoma

22

Reidt, Shannon L.

Development of an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) in a Home Care Medication Therapy Management Practice

University of Minnesota

23

Rodis, Jennifer L.

Involving Pharmacy Students in Journal Clubs Through Pharmacy Practice Residents as Facilitators

The Ohio State University

24

Rodriguez, Raquel

Roundtables as a Needs Assessment Tool for Future Preceptor Program Development

University of Minnesota

25

Roesch, Darren

Effects of Guided Web 2.0 Interactions on Development of Culturally-Competent Pharmacy Care Skills

Texas A&M Health Science Center

26

Roland, Brian

Comparison of Residency and Non-residency Trained APPE Community Preceptors on Recent Graduate Attitude and Behaviors

Wilkes University

27

Ruehter, Valerie L.

Incorporating Novel Instruction and Testing Methods for Aseptic Technique Skills in an Existing IPPE

University of Missouri–Kansas City

28

Sanoski, Cynthia A.

Survey of Pharmacy Students’ Attitudes/Perceptions of Patients: 2-Year Results

Thomas Jefferson University

29

Scott, Day

Professional Development for the Millennial Generation

Palm Beach Atlantic University

30

See, Carla J.

Development of a Remediation Process for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

West Virginia University

31

Seybert, Amy L.

Systematic Documentation of Student-Patient Experiences: The “PITT” Form

University of Pittsburgh

32

Shogbon, Angela O.

Impact of Pharmacy Students on Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences at a Community Non-teaching Hospital

Mercer University

33

Slack, Marion K.

Web-based Modules for Orienting Health Sciences Students to a Field Experience in Community Health

The University of Arizona

34

Smith, Connie L.

Perceptions of Students, Faculty, and Institutional Pharmacists Regarding Institutional Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE)

The University of Louisiana at Monroe

35

Smith, Michael J.

Delivering Asthma Education to Schoolchildren with Asthma and Their Parents/Caregivers: A Longitudinal Service-Learning Model

The University of Oklahoma

36

Smith, Winter J.

A Structured, Longitudinal Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) Medicine Rotation

The University of Oklahoma

37

Snyder, Ann M.

SOAP Note Scoring Rubric was Developed and Implemented

University of Florida

38

Soltis, Denise A.

Building an IPPE Program to Build Skills

Drake University

39

Soltis, Denise A.

The Impact of a Collaborative International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) in Belize

Drake University

40

Sonnett, Travis E.

Preceptor Evaluation and Feedback Regarding a PY1 IPPE Experiential Community Pharmacy Program

Washington State University

41

Staggs, Susan H.

The Role of Student Self-Assessment and Previous Work Experience in Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPEs)

The University of Iowa

Poster #

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

MON

7•12

71


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

42

Staton, April

Using Facebook as a Communication Tool in Experiential Learning and Admissions

Auburn University

43

Stelter, Nora L.

Enhancing Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPEs) Across the Curriculum in the Community Chain Pharmacy Setting

Drake University

44

Stevenson, Lynn

Maximizing the Use of Database Technology for Management of Experiential Education Programs

Auburn University

45

Sumanasekera, Wasana

A Unique Experiential Learning Approach in Pharmacy Education: Introduction to Basic Cell Biology Laboratory Research

Sullivan University

46

Thompson, Amy N.

Pharmacy Students Establishing and Facilitating a Diabetes Self-management Education Class

South Carolina College of Pharmacy–MUSC Campus

47

Towers, Terrence T.

Expanding Community Pharmacy Practice Through an Elective Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

48

Truong, Hoai-An

Assessment Tool for Planning and Implementing Pharmacist-Directed Health Promotion Activities

University of Maryland

49

Volino, Lucio

Impact of Rotation Experiences on Student Perceptions of Pharmacy Communications Activities

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

50

von Waldner, Trina J.

The Farm Worker Family Health Program: A Service Learning Experience for Pharmacy Students

The University of Georgia

51

White, Traci M.

Observation Experiences Improve Pre-Pharmacy Student Understanding of Pharmaceutical Care

The University of New Mexico

52

Woodyard, Donald J.

Communicating With Other Health Professionals: The Simulations for Inter-Disciplinary Education (SIDE) Project

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

53

Woodyard, Donald J.

Receiving Direct Feedback from an OSCE: Does the Method Matter?

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Poster #

MON

7•12

Pharmacy Practice

Monday, July 12 • Noon–1:30 p.m. Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

55

Lounsbery, Jody L.

An Assessment Solution for a High-Enrollment, Online Nursing Pharmacotherapy Course

University of Minnesota

56

Lundquist, Lisa M.

Communication Skills: Students’ Perception and Faculty Evaluation of Performance on Therapeutics Oral Examinations

Mercer University

57

Lundquist, Lisa M.

Comparison of Performance on Written and Oral Examinations to Communication Skills

Mercer University

58

Lundquist, Lisa M.

Students’ Perceptions of Preparedness to Critically Evaluate Literature Before and After Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

Mercer University

59

Lundquist, Lisa M.

Students’ Performance and Perceptions of Preparedness to Critically Evaluation Literature: Two Years Experience

Mercer University

Poster #

72

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Poster #

Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

60

Maidhof, William

Utilization of an Automated Medication Storage Device (AutoCarousel™) to Educate Students About Pharmacy Workflow

St. John’s University

61

Malhotra, Jodie

Using Team-Based Learning (TBL) to Deliver the APhA Pharmacy-Based Immunization

Regis University

62

Marciniak, Macary W.

Implementation and Evaluation of Pharmacotherapy Continuing Education Sessions in a Community Pharmacy Residency Program Network

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

63

Marcotullio, Nicole A.

Examining the Effectiveness of an Elective Course for PY-3 Students Based on PGY-1 Resident Self-Assessment

Duquesne University

64

Marshall, Leisa L.

Teaching Millennial Students: Case Based Approach to Integrate Pathophysiology, Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacology and Therapeutics

Mercer University

65

Martin, Beth A.

Student Perceptions and Confidence with Presenting, Applying and Integrating Three Pharmacy Perspectives in an Interdisciplinary Course

University of Wisconsin–Madison

66

Marvanova, Marketa

Factors Associated with Patients’ Understanding of Their Pre-Admission Medication Regimen

Belmont University

67

May, J. Russell

Development of Electives That Are Efficient for Faculty and Educational for Students

The University of Georgia

68

May, J. Russell

Quality Assessment of a Team-Taught, Learner-Centered Pharmacotherapy Course

The University of Georgia

69

Mazan, Jennifer L.

Pharmacy Student Wellness and Compliance Program

Midwestern University/Downers Grove

70

McCall III, Kenneth L.

Pens and Needles: Assessment of Parenteral Compounding Skills Prior to the Introductory Experiential Courses

University of New England

71

McGory, Robb

Assessment of Pharmacotherapeutic Skills Through the Use of Practical Examinations

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

72

McGory, Robb

Development of Student Evaluation Skills Utilizing a Longitudinal Integrated Peer Review System

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

73

McGory, Robb

Integration of Physical Assessment and Triage Skills into a College of Pharmacy Curriculum

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

74

McIntosh, Jennifer

Integrating Population Health into a Pharmacotherapy Seminar Course

Northeastern University

75

Metzger, Anne H.

Evaluation of the Pharmacy Faculty Member’s Perspective on the Student/Faculty Relationship in Online Social Networks

University of Cincinnati

76

Moore, Mark

Operation Safe Camel: A Full Scale Exercise Utilizing Student Pharmacists & Faculty in Disaster Response

Campbell University

77

Morello, Candis M.

First-Year Student Pharmacist Attitude and Knowledge of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Using Self-Guided Learning

University of California, San Diego

78

Morris, Jennifer L.

Assessment of Web-based Training (WBT) Modules on Learning Facilitation During APPE in Pediatrics

Purdue University

79

Mort, Jane R.

Evidence Based Seminar Rubric Revision

South Dakota State University

80

Moye, Pamela M.

Modified Team-Based Learning (MTBL) and Long-Term Retention in a Therapeutics Module

Mercer University

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RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS

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Poster #

Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

81

Murphy, Nanci L.

Interprofessional Education Curricular Mapping Across Four Health Sciences Programs at the University of Washington

University of Washington

82

Nappi, Jean M.

An Academician Preparation Program: Statewide Outreach to Residents in South Carolina

South Carolina College of Pharmacy–MUSC Campus

83

Neighbors, Melissa D.

Knowledge Retention and Clinical Use of a First-Year Student Pharmacist Diabetes Self-Care Education Program

University of California, San Diego

84

Neill, Kathryn K.

Faculty Development Workshop Series to Improve Delivery and Assessment of Student Learning

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

85

Neill, Kathryn K.

Implementation of a Faculty Item Review Process for Examination Content in the Therapeutics Coursework

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

86

Nkansah, Nancy

Diversity in Pharmacy: Evaluation of Recruitment Practices of California Schools

University of California, San Francisco

87

Nykamp, Diane

Evaluation of the Use of Natural Medicines in a Self Care and Medication Elective

Mercer University

88

Nykamp, Diane

Factors that Influenced Student Authors to Participate in a Scholarly Experience Leading to a Publication

Mercer University

89

Nykamp, Diane

Integrating a Virtual Patient with Multiple Disease States into a Pharmacotherapy Course

Mercer University

90

Nykamp, Diane

Pharmacy Student and Preceptor Perceptions of Student Preparedness for the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

Mercer University

91

O’Brocta, Richard F.

Development of a Professionalism Pledge at a New School of Pharmacy

St. John Fisher College

92

Oesterman, Paul

The Value of Using Pharmacy Students to Educate Adolescents Regarding Rx and OTC Misuse

University of Southern Nevada

93

O’Neil, Michael

The Prevention Clinic: Implementation of a Relapse Prevention Clinic for Patients with Drug or Alcohol Addiction

University of Charleston

94

Palkovic, Lindsay

Familiarity with Calculations Improves Patient Survival Rates During Advanced Cardiac Life Support Simulations

University of the Sciences in Philadelphia

95

Palkovic, Lindsay

Impact of Using Computer Simulation on Outcomes of Simulated Mannequin-based Advanced Cardiac Life Support Cases

University of the Sciences in Philadelphia

96

Pathak, Rolee

Implementation of a Post-Rotational P4 Seminar

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

97

Piascik, Mary M.

Personal Health Habits Assessment as a Learning Tool to Guide Healthy Lifestyle Initiatives in PY1 Students

University of Kentucky

98

Poepping-Faulkner, Michele A.

Depression in Pharmacy Students: an Evaluation Across Pathway, Gender, Ethnicity and Year in Program

Creighton University

99

Poirier, Therese I.

Assessment of Approaches to Addressing American Pharmacy Educator Week

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

100

Porter, Kalen B.

Teaching Residents How to Teach: Opportunities for Pharmacy Residents to Learn About Academia

The University of Georgia

101

Powell, Patricia H.

An Elective to Prepare Pharmacy Students to Design and Implement a Medication Therapy Management Service

South Carolina College of Pharmacy–USC Campus

102

Prescott, Gina M.

Motivations for Pharmacy Students to Join Professional Organizations

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

103

Prescott Jr., William A.

Developing Leaders in Pharmacy: Assessment of Learning Outcomes for an Elective Leadership Course

University at Buffalo, The State University of New

104

Rabi, Suzanne M.

Assessment of Pharmacy Student Communication Skills Through Rubric Evaluation

University of Illinois at Chicago

105

Rabi, Suzanne M.

Assessment of Pharmacy Student Self-confidence on One Specific Outcome Ability: Conceptual Competence

University of Illinois at Chicago

106

Rabi, Suzanne M.

Blended Learning for Pharmacy Students: Use of Pre-recorded Online Lectures and Live Classroom Discussion

University of Illinois at Chicago

107

Rabi, Suzanne M.

Development of an Interprofessional Education (IPE) Elective: A Pilot Study

University of Illinois at Chicago

108

Rich, Wesley D.

Cessation with Communication: Motivating Pharmacy Students to Counsel for Smoking Cessation

Campbell University

109

Robinson, Jennifer D.

Incorporating Student Centered Active Learning Strategies into an Applied Patient Care Laboratory Setting

Washington State University

110

Ross, Leigh Ann

Community Pharmacy and Academic Partnership to Provide Generalized Medication Therapy Management in Underserved Region

The University of Mississippi

111

Ross, Leigh Ann

Development of a School of Pharmacy PGY1 Community Pharmacy Residency Program

The University of Mississippi

112

Runyon, Autumn L.

Horizontal Integration of Pharmaceutics and Pharmacy Practice Courses Using a Novel “Cross-Over” Assessment

Duquesne University

113

Russell, Erica J.

Development and Implementation of Hybrid Simulations to Introduce Novice Learners to Acute Clinical Situations

University of Missouri–Kansas City

114

Ryan, Gina J.

Practice of New Pharmacists Following a Diabetes-emphasis Curriculum Versus General Pharmacy Education

Mercer University

115

Ryan-Haddad, Ann M.

Health Information Sources and Believability for Pharmacy Students

Creighton University

116

Sagraves, Rosalie

Survey of Current Global Affiliations of U.S. Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy–2009

University of Illinois at Chicago

117

Santee, Jennifer A.

Professional Electives: What is Offered, What are Students Taking, and What do Students Want?

University of Missouri–Kansas City

118

Schlesselman, Lauren S.

How Do Pharmacy Faculty Teach? Determining Teaching Styles at an Accredited U.S. School of Pharmacy

University of Connecticut

119

Schlesselman, Lauren S.

How Do Pharmacy Students Learn? Determining Learning Styles at an Accredited U.S. School of Pharmacy

University of Connecticut

120

Schneider, Eric F.

Design, Implementation and Evaluation of a Summative Exam for P-2 Students

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

121

Scolaro, Kelly

Pharmacy Students Reveal a Sensitive Side: Assessing Student Counseling Skills on Sensitive Topics using OSCEs

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

122

Scott, David M.

Comparing Error Rates Across Community Telepharmacies and Traditional (Nontelepharmacy) Community Pharmacies

North Dakota State University

123

Scott, Steven A.

Enhancing Leadership Skills of Students Through the Development and Execution of an Orientation Program

Purdue University

124

See, Sharon

A Novel Team Based Examination in a Large Case Based Therapeutics Course

St. John’s University

125

See, Sharon

Use of a Tablet PC in a Case Based Advanced Therapeutics Course

St. John’s University

Poster #

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RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS

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76

Poster #

Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

126

Seybert, Amy L.

A Dual Immersive Technology Course Using Online Learning and Simulation Based Learning

University of Pittsburgh

127

Seybert, Amy L.

Creating an Open Source Pharmacy Student Porfolio for Use as Assessment and Professional Portfolios

University of Pittsburgh

128

Sibbald, Debra

Pharmacists Assessed for Over-the-Counter (OTC) Best Practice Knowledge in Secret-Shopper Evaluations by Pharmacy Students

University of Toronto

129

Sicat, Brigitte L.

Development and Assessment of an Interprofessional Education Experience in a Primary Care Teaching Clinic

Virginia Commonwealth University

130

Sincak, Carrie A.

Pharmacy Student Perceptions and Performance in an Elective Internal Medicine Lecture and Practicum and Beyond

Midwestern University/Downers Grove

131

Smith, Kelly M.

Use of Social Media for Student Recruitment by U.S. Colleges of Pharmacy

University of Kentucky

132

Stewart, Roxie L.

Impact of a Faculty-taught American Heart Association Basic Life Support Healthcare Provider Course

The University of Louisiana at Monroe

133

Story, Rayanne A.

Pharmacy Students in the Emergency Department; a Different Approach to Medication Reconciliation

Harding University

134

Stowe, Cindy D.

Development and Implementation of a High-stakes Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)-based Senior Summative Examination

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

135

Stowe, Cindy D.

Preferred Communication Methods Among Pharmacy Students

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

136

Sucher, Brandon J.

Student Progression: The Impact and Perceived Value of Supplemental Instruction Sessions

Regis University

137

Sullivan, Karyn M.

Utilizing a Health Literacy-centered Process to Develop Warfarin Patient Education Materials

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Worcester

138

Tackett, Kimberly L.

Problem Based Learning in a Critical Care Elective

South University

139

Tahir, Rabia

Developing a Community-based Public Health-oriented Practicum for Pharmacy Students Through Collaboration Between Community and Academic Stakeholders

Touro College of Pharmacy– New York

140

Talluto, Beverly A.

Development of a Web-Based P4 Capstone Review Course

Texas A&M Health Science Center

141

Theilman, Gary D.

A Paperless System for Collaborative Grading of Weekly Problem-based Learning Assignments

The University of Mississippi

142

Thompson, Dennis F.

Evaluating the Soler Method in Bibliometric Searches

Southwestern Oklahoma State University

143

Thompson, Paula A.

Level of Confidence of Practicing Pharmacists in Caring for Older Adults

Samford University

144

Tilleman, Jennifer A.

Promoting Safe Medication Disposal in Nebraska

Creighton University

145

Todd, Timothy J.

Pharmacy Student Acquisition of Pediatric Over-the-Counter Cost Awareness

Midwestern University/Downers Grove

146

Uden, Don

Disaster Preparedness, an Interprofessional Simulated Experience

University of Minnesota

147

Ulbrich, Timothy R.

The Heart Disease Group Project (HDGP): A Longitudinal, Team-Based, Self-Study Case Using Interprofessional Teams

Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


RESEARCH/EDUCATION POSTERS Primary Author

Title

Affiliation

148

Umland, Elena M.

Faculty and Student Attitudes Towards Interprofessional Education: Correlations and Opportunities

Thomas Jefferson University

149

Umland, Elena M.

Pharmacy Faculty and Student Readiness for Interprofessional Learning at a Large Medical and Health-sciences University

Thomas Jefferson University

150

Valdez, Connie A.

Impact of Student Directed Activities and Personalized Formative Feedback on Skills Development in a Large Class

University of Colorado Denver

151

Van Amburgh, Jenny A.

Student Opportunities to Learn About Careers in Academia —‘Exploring Academic Life’ Elective

Northeastern University

152

Van Amburgh, Jenny A.

Succession Planning in U.S. Pharmacy Schools

Northeastern University

153

Vyas, Deepti

Description of Satellite/Distance Programs within Pharmacy University of Missouri–Kansas City Schools in the United States

154

Wang, Fei

Developing a New Integrated Dermatology Course for Pharmacy Students

University of Connecticut

155

West, Teri L.

Anticholinergic Burden of Older Adults in the Community

The Ohio State University

156

West, Teri L.

Impact of Teaching Development Activities During Residency on Pharmacy Careers

The Ohio State University

157

Wilkinson, Julie J.

LECOM Master of Science in Medical Education

Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine

158

Wittman, Deborah A.

Blended Learning Strategies in a New College of Pharmacy: Enhancing Student Therapeutic Relationships with Patient Care

Touro College of Pharmacy– New York

159

Wittman, Deborah A.

Enhancing Student’s Assessment of Patient Drug Therapy Problems in a Pharmacy Practice Laboratory Environment

Touro College of Pharmacy– New York

160

Woelfel, Joseph A.

Incorporating Pharmacy Practice Experiential Education and Community Outreach in Senior Care into the Curriculum

University of the Pacific

161

Wombwell, Eric A.

Please Leave Your Cell Phone ON! Using Text Messaging in the Classroom

University of Missouri–Kansas City

162

Wong, Siu-Fun

Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Question-Based Learning Method to Promote a Student-centered Learning Paradigm

Western University of Health Sciences

163

Wong, Siu-Fun

Outcome Evaluation of Interprofessional Education Using Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) as an Assessment Tool

Western University of Health Sciences

164

Wooding, Fae Gwen

Descriptive Evaluation of a Medical Writing Elective Course

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences–Worcester

165

Wuller, Cynthia A.

Description and Evaluation of a Capstone Research Experience

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

166

Yancey, Abigail W.

Comparing Outcomes from Two Consecutive Therapeutics Semesters that Utilized a Lecture-capture Device

St. Louis College of Pharmacy

167

Yancey, Abigail W.

Comparing Perceptions from Two Consecutive Therapeutics Semesters that Utilized a Lecture-capture Device

St. Louis College of Pharmacy

168

Zapantis, Antonio

Impact of Platform/Poster Project within a Therapeutics Course on Drug Information Skills

Nova Southeastern University

169

Zarley, Darla

Student Perspectives on Evaluating Faculty in the Classroom

University of Southern Nevada

170

Zemrak, Wesley R.

All Hands on Deck: Utilization of a 5-station OSCE During the First-year Introduction to Pharmacy Course

University of New England

Poster #

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EXHIBITORS 2010 Exhibitor Descriptions Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), Booth 215

American Pharmacists Association (APhA), Booth 316

ACPE, the national agency for the accreditation of professional degree programs in pharmacy and providers of continuing pharmacy education, is based in Chicago, Ill. The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, American Pharmacists Association, National Association of Boards of Pharmacy and American Council on Education appoint ACPE’s Board of Directors.

APhA is the leader in providing professional information, education and advocacy for pharmacists in all practice settings. APhA resources help develop your students’ clinical and management skills, enhance their communication techniques and motivate them to lead in the profession. See the latest resources for the pharmacy classroom at the APhA booth. Be sure to visit www. pharmacist.com, the one Web site for all your professional and educational needs.

Advanced Informatics/E*Value, Booth 209 More than 65 colleges of pharmacy use E*Value to help maintain accreditation standards and remove administrative burdens related to assessment, optimized scheduling, site management, experiential tracking, electronic portfolios, curriculum mapping, coursework and performance outcomes reporting. As the premier all-in-one pharmacy-specific solution, E*Value delivers an unmatched set of tools and support services, empowering our pharmacy clients to achieve their performance objectives.

Academic Management Systems (subsidiary of Liaison International), Booths 305, 307 Platinum Sponsor

The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists is the national organization for hospital and health-system pharmacists and has a long history of improving medication use and enhancing patient safety. ASHP’s publishing group is a leader in providing both students and faculty in schools of pharmacy with innovative educational resources.

Certiphi Screening, Inc., Booth 212 Certiphi Screening® is a leader in student screening, creating AACP’s centralized student screening program and helping individual schools and other fields of study build thorough, compliant student screening programs. Certiphi® also provides applicant screening services to top healthcare organizations. Certiphi’s applicant screening services are endorsed by the American Hospital Association.

Academic Management Systems now supports approximately 70 pharmacy schools using PharmAdMIT and more than 25 pharmacy schools using CoursEval, which can serve the course, instructor, peer, self, and other quality assessment needs of your school or your entire campus. At this meeting we are also exhibiting SiteAssign, a new lottery-driven assignment program designed to help manage experiential learning site placements. Please visit our booths #305, 307 for details.

Collaborative Education Institute (CEI), Booth 220 Searching for innovative and cost effective preceptor development opportunities? CEI develops and delivers educational activities to advance pharmacy practice. Stop by to learn about our preceptor development curriculum including an interactive journal club that could be just what you are looking for. For more information, visit our Web site at www.TheCEInstitute.org.

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) and American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education (AJPE), Booths 315, 317 American Pharmacy Educator Week, membership and the new accreditation component of PEAS are just a few of AACP’s programs, products and initiatives that attendees can discuss directly with AACP staff at booths 315 and 317 during exhibitor hours. AJPE Editors will also be available to answer questions about the Journal, submission and review processes, and the recent volume increase. See page 28 for a full list of guests at the AACP/AJPE Booth.

Community Pharmacy Foundation, Booth 314

American DataBank, Booth 309

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), Booth 205

The Community Pharmacy Foundation is an organization whose primary purpose is to assist community pharmacy practitioners by providing resources for research and development to encourage new capabilities and continuous improvements in the delivery of patient care.

American DataBank (ADB) specializes in providing complete healthcare background screening solutions. Our newest service, a custom-designed Immunization Tracking System (ITS) ensures compliant management for all students relieving 90 percent of the administrative burden for your staff. ADB services range from criminal to FBI fingerprinting, drug screening, all abuse registries, immunization/compliance tracking, plus an administrative system to view results at a glance.

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American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP), Booth 216

The Department of Veterans Affairs focuses on recruiting healthcare professionals and students throughout the U.S. to provide the best care for our veterans. Promoting a diverse workforce and offering a wide array of employment benefits, scholarships and retention initiatives, the VA is a leader in our nation’s healthcare industry.

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


EXHIBITORS Drug Store News, Booth 218 For more than 30 years, Drug Store News has been a provider of quality continuing pharmacy education. Stop by to learn more about our Immunization Administration Training, author and speaker opportunities for faculty, and how to get free digital editions of Pharmacy Practice and Pharmacy Tech News for your students.

Eisai Inc., Booth 109 Silver Sponsor Eisai Inc. is a U.S. pharmaceutical subsidiary of Eisai Co., Ltd., a research-based human healthcare (hhc) company that discovers, develops and markets products throughout the world. Eisai focuses its efforts in three therapeutic areas: neurology, gastrointestinal disorders and oncology/critical care.

FDA Center for Drug Evaluation & Research, Booth 219 The U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) makes sure that safe and effective drugs are available to improve the health of the American people. CDER ensures that prescription and over-the-counter drugs, both brand name and generic, work correctly and that the health benefits outweigh known risks.

FDA Office of Women’s Health, Booth 213 The U.S. Food and Drug Administration Office of Women’s Health addresses the health issues of the nation’s women by funding scientific research, collaborating with national organizations to sponsor outreach efforts, and disseminating free publications on a variety of topics including diabetes, medication safety, menopause, contraception, heart disease and mammography.

Gold Standard, Booth 214 Gold Standard/ELSEVIER uses innovative technologies to provide a complete suite of drug information and decision support solutions. With a tenacious commitment to product quality, our solutions empower healthcare organizations, professionals and consumers to meet the most pressing healthcare challenges, improve patient safety and ensure optimal outcomes. Visit us at www.goldstandard.com or call 1-800-375-0943.

Iowa Drug Information Service, Booth 202 Iowa Drug Information Service (IDIS) is a database of index records to evidence-based information about drugs and drug therapy in humans. The complete article is available on the Web and CD-ROM. The database facilitates correct use of structured vocabularies for sensitive yet specific search results for information. IDIS supports teaching, service and scholarship.

Jones & Bartlett Learning, Booth 103 Jones & Bartlett Learning is a world-leading provider of instructional, assessment and learning-performance management solutions for the secondary, post-secondary and professional markets. We endeavor to develop educational programs and services that improve learning outcomes and enhance student

achievement by uniquely combining authoritative content written by respected authors with innovative, proven and engaging technology applications that meet the diverse needs of today’s instructors, students and professionals.

Lexi-Comp, Inc., Booth 207 Lexi-Comp, Inc. provides clear, concise and accurate clinical reference solutions to healthcare professionals in hospitals, as well as students in pharmacy, nursing and medical schools. Our content covers pharmacology, drug interactions, laboratory/diagnostic tests, natural products, infectious diseases and toxicology. It is accessible online, as well as on handheld devices, including smartphones and the iPhone™. For more information, please call 1-800-837-5394 or visit www.lexi.com.

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Booth 217 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a Wolters Kluwer Health company is a leading international publisher of health science publications, including these new editions: Martin’s Physical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 6e; Wilson and Gisvold’s Textbook of Organic Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 12e; Ansel’s Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms and Drug Delivery Systems, 9e; and Rowland and Tozer’s Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics, 4e. Stop by our booth to view our journals and the latest pharmacy resources.

LiveText, Booth 313 Learning Assessment & Accreditation Management Flexibility without the Complexity—easy to implement, easy to learn and easy to use. LiveText offers the most complete learning assessment and accreditation management solution that integrates powerful reporting and extensive e-portfolio tools to continuously improve your program and meet pharmacy accreditation needs.

McCreadie Group, Inc., Booth 318 PharmAcademic is a new Web-based tool to assist colleges and schools of pharmacy with curricular management and mapping, assessments and experiential training. PharmAcademic is integrated with PharmPortfolio, a life-long learning electronic portfolio that will follow the students as they enter residencies and the workforce.

McGraw-Hill, Booths 119, 121 McGraw Hill’s print and online medical products provide residents, clinicians, students and researchers with instant answers to clinical questions from the most trustworthy sources, including Joseph T. DiPiro’s Pharmacotherapy: A Pathophysiologic Approach and Harrison’s Online, 17e. Visit our booth for more information on our updated medical content, tools, illustrations, videos, PDA downloads, books and so much more. www. mcgraw-hillmedical.com, www.accesspharmacy.com, www. accessmedicine.com, www.accessemergencymedicine.com, and www.harrisonspractice.com.

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EXHIBITORS National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) Foundation, Booth 304

Professional Compounding Centers of America (PCCA), Booth 107

The NCPA Foundation supports pharmacy schools, students, faculty and pharmacists. Since its beginning in 1953, the NCPA Foundation has provided more than $11 million dollars in research grants, educational loans, scholarships, leadership awards and financial aid. In 2004, the NCPA Foundation established an endowment fund to launch the “NCPA Pruitt-Schutte Student Business Plan Competition.” For more information on the NCPA Foundation, go to www.ncpafoundation.org.

PCCA’s mission is to strengthen the role, position and skills of member compounding pharmacists so they can meet the unique healthcare needs of patients through our exceptional service, highest-quality products, shared innovations and education. One patient. One physician. One pharmacist. A triad relationship with a common goal: achieving a positive therapeutic outcome for the patient. And in the midst of this relationship and this common goal is PCCA, the leader in pharmacy compounding since 1981.

Natural Standard, Booth 308

Rite Aid Corporation, Booths 206, 208

Natural Standard was founded by clinicians and researchers to provide high quality, evidence-based information about complementary and alternative therapies. This international multidisciplinary collaboration includes contributors from more than 100 eminent academic institutions. Natural Standard is impartial, not supported by any interest group, professional organization or product manufacturer. Institutional subscriptions, custom content and licensing are available.

Rite Aid has approximately 4,800 pharmacies in 31 states and the District of Columbia. As the largest drugstore operator on the East Coast, we provide efficient workflow in our pharmacy design, an industry-leading pharmacy computer system, automation and clinical services training for our talented community pharmacists.

Pearson, Booth 115 Gold Sponsor Pearson is a leading publisher of psychological, counseling, development, cognitive, achievement and career interest assessments, which provide greater insight as you make decisions to achieve successful outcomes. Our well-validated tools include the PCAT, a pharmacy specific test that measures general academic ability and scientific knowledge necessary for the commencement of pharmaceutical education.

Pharmaceutical Press, Booth 319 Pharmaceutical Press—publisher of Remington and Martindale. Pharmaceutical Press is the new publisher of Remington and a global provider of pharmaceutical information. Submit a case study for peer review and publication within our forthcoming Remington online portal. Drop by booth number 319 to find out more. Cash prizes will be awarded to the best submissions.

Pharmacist’s Letter advises pharmacists on new developments and recommends appropriate action. Pharmacist’s Letter also provides required training for practicing and student pharmacists (HIPAA, meth training, bloodborne pathogens, etc). The Preceptor Training & Resource Network delivers preceptor training and development and provides tools for managing training among students and preceptors.

Three billion times a day, P&G brands touch the lives of people around the world. The company has one of the strongest portfolios of trusted, quality, leadership brands, including Prilosec OTC®, Align® and Metamucil®. Visit our booth to learn about our company and products.

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RXinsider is a software development firm providing solutions to the pharmacy profession. Our Pharmacy Academic Suite of products includes RXportfolios (lifelong, professional ePortfolios for pharmacy professionals), RXoutcome (outcomes & assessment ePortfolios for student pharmacists), and RXpreceptor (experiential education management and scheduling software).

SFI Medical Publishing, Booth 204 SFI Medical Publishing specializes in delivering innovative, high quality drug study guides for the pharmaceutical education field. Our publications, including Sigler’s Pharmacy Drug Cards, Nonprescription Drug Cards, IV Drug Cards and Dietary Supplement Drug Cards, are excellent resources for professors of pharmacy practice. Visit us at www.sfirx.com.

STAT!Ref, Booth 312

Pharmacist’s Letter, Booth 306

Procter & Gamble Health Care, Booth 105 Silver Sponsor

Rxinsider, Booth 117

STAT!Ref® Online is a cross-searchable, electronic medical resource that integrates core titles with evidence-based information and innovative tools like Anatomy.TV and MedCalc 3000 and a medical dictionary. Stop by our display to see what’s new!

Wal-Mart Stores Inc., Booth 113 Silver Sponsor Careers with a purpose. We believe that quality healthcare is the foundation to a better life. To do this we provide the tools and resources to deliver quality healthcare every day. Between our locations, offers of training and prospects for advancement, we provide opportunity for pharmacists like no one else.

Zanfel Laboratories, Booth 203 Zanfel Poison Ivy Wash is the only product clinically shown to remove urushiol (yoo-ROO-shee-ol), the toxin found in poison ivy, oak, and sumac, ANYTIME after breakout and relieve itching within 30 seconds. Please contact us at 800-401-4002 or visit www.zanfel.com for sales and product information.

2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


EXHIBITOR FLOOR PLAN

Washington State Convention Center Ballrooms 6E & 6F, Sixth Floor Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

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HOTEL FLOOR PLAN Sheraton Seattle Hotel First Floor Lobby Level

Second Floor

Third Floor

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2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


HOTEL FLOOR PLAN 35th Floor Union Street Tower

Fourth Floor Pike Street Tower

Fourth Floor Union Street Tower

Expanding Our Horizons • July 10–14 • Seattle

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HOTEL FLOOR PLAN Grand Hyatt Seattle Hotel

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2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars


The Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS) is a centralized application service that is used by the majority of colleges and schools of pharmacy. Designed for firstyear professional pharmacy degree applicants, PharmCAS offers a simple, efficient process to apply to multiple colleges and schools of pharmacy using a single Webbased application. Contact Jennifer L. Athay at jathay@aacp.org today for more information!

Institutional participation in PharmCAS is free!

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Discover 路 Learn 路 Care : Improve Health

Post a job on the AACP Online Career Center! Visit http://pharm.aacp.associationcareernetwork.com to post and search for career opportunities in academic pharmacy. Simply click on Job Search or Employer Home to create an account and get started. Only one position is allowed per online career advertisement and must be no more than 2,500 words. Member institutions pay just $360 for a 30-day posting. The rate is $600 for non-member institutions. To receive the member rate, contact Maureen O. Thielemans at mthielemans@aacp.org or 703-739-2330 ext. 1022. Payment is by credit card only and must be made at the time the ad is submitted.


Bridges to Our Bright Future 2011 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars

PHOTO: SAN ANTONIO CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

July 9–13  San Antonio, Texas


2010 AACP Annual Meeting and Seminars