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MARCH 6, 2014

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PECOS LIFESTYLES & ENTERTAINMENT MAGAZINE

Navy Sea Chanters

Also Inside:

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Healing Art | Lisa Marie Presley | Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast


CONTENTS

PAUL RODRIGUEZ

Thursday, March 6, 2014 Volume 21, Issue 5

Publisher: Charles Fischer Editor: Rey Berrones Ad Design: Sandra Martinez, Steve Stone Columnists: Donald Burleson, Stu Pritchard Roswell Daily Record Staff Writers: Lawrence Foster, Randal Seyler Roswell Daily Record Staff Photographer: Mark Wilson

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Roswell Daily Record’s

DUSTIN LYNCH

Contributing Photographer: Ruth David Get in touch with us online Facebook: facebook.com/PecosVisionMagazine Twitter: twitter.com/PecosVision Pinterest: pinterest.com/VisionMagazine Email: vision@rdrnews.com www: rdrnews.com/?page_id=215 For advertising information, call 622-7710

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Minors mus mustt be by accompanied ac companied by an adult.

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For F or tick tickets ets visit InnoftheMountainGods. nnoftheMountainGods.com InnoftheMountainGods.com o or o call (5 or 75) 4647053 (575) 464-7053

Mescalero, Mescaler o, NM near ear Ruidoso |

Plains Park Shopping Center Great Service, Free Parking, Quality Products At The Following Merchants: DFN Computers & Internet Farmers Country Market Lopez Insurance Agency Just Cuts Beauty Shop La Familia Care Center Bank of the Southwest Postal Annex (Located in Just Cuts) Plains Park Beauty Shop H N R Nutrition Roswell Community Little Theater ICON Cinema Located on West Hobbs at Union and Washington. Serving Roswell for over 40 years.

Your friendly neighborhood center

Correspondence: Vision Magazine welcomes correspondence, constructive criticism and suggestions for future topics. Mail correspondence to Vision Magazine, P.O. Drawer 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202-1897 or vision@roswell-record.com.

5 - 12 Pull-out Entertainment Calendar 13

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In The Spotlight

Navy Sea Chanters

Culture

Assurance Home

Kiwanis Pancake Festival

Submissions: Call 622-7710, ext. 309, for writers’ guidelines. Vision Magazine is not responsible for loss or damage to unsolicited materials. Vision Magazine is published twice a month at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. The contents of the publication are Copyright 2012 by the Roswell Daily Record and may not be reprinted in whole or part without written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved. One copy of each edition is provided to 13,000 weekday subscribers to the Roswell Daily Record in the first and third Friday newspaper of each month. An additional 3,000 to 5,000 copies are made available free of charge to county residents and visitors and select site newsstands, and direct mailed to non-subscribers in the retail trade zone. Subscriptions are available by mail for $2 a month or free through subscription to the Roswell Daily Record. The Roswell Daily Record and Vision Magazine are represented nationally by Paper Companies Inc.

On The Cover

Arts

Healing Art

Music

Lisa Marie Presley

Screen

50 to 1 hits the big screen

History

Remembering Roswell Part 2

UFOlogy

Astronaut Gordon Cooper saw film of a UFO landing

The Navy Sea Chanters to play a free concert at New Mexico Military Institute. Courtesy Photo


for children, complete with friends and a family structure. The home also provides counseling for the kids. “These kids are heroes to me,” Malone said. “Imagine being 14- or 15years old, and having no parents, no one to take care of you. These kids overcome unimaginable hardships, and that is what a hero does.” Since 1979, Assurance Home has been doing its part to break the cycle of violence, according to the website assurancehome.org. The majority of young people who have successfully completed the Assurance Home program are leading happy, productive lives. “These kids look like just any other teenagers, they all have their cell phones and skateboards and are just like any other teens,” Malone said. Currently there are 14 children living at Assurance Home. “It’s not about quantity, it is about quality of care.” Malone joined the staff of the home in the early 1970s, and said he has been called “Pops” by the kids since he was in his 30s. “I am probably getting closer to “Grandpops” age now,” he said, jokingly.

CULTURE

A

Assurance Home

Randal Seyler Record Staff Writer ssurance Home is a Roswell tradition with a track record of successfully raising abused and abandoned children. “Assurance Home is only here because there are so many wonderful people in our community who care about kids,” said Ron Malone, the home’s executive director. Malone was the guest speaker at the Kiwanis Club of Roswell meeting on Feb. 25.

The children who come through the Assurance Home get the love and support they need to go on to have successful lives. During the past 35 years, thousands of children have been served by the home. “They work in our communities, raise their own children, attend college and serve our country through military service,” Malone said. “We consider it a success if our children go on to have families of their own and be good parents.” Assurance Home includes a 16-acre property that includes the main house, the James Ranch Youth Shelter, several apartments for our In-Reach Program, a large yard, basketball court, greenhouse, shop and ropes course, as well as horse stables, riding area and pasture. “If you haven’t been out there, it is a beautiful, beautiful place.” Most programs like Assurance Home that are well established and successful were created by and have the support of large endowment funds. However, Assurance Home has never had an endowment to support SEE

HOME ON PAGE 14

Courtesy Photo

Assurance Home provides more than just a roof

Assurance Home is a United Way agency, Malone said, and the home has been very much blessed over the years. Assurance Home provides a place for abused and abandoned children to live, Malone said. Children come to the home through various circumstances, but often they are orphaned, abandoned or have been abused. More than just providing a place to stay, Assurance Home provides a life

THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014 | VISION MAGAZINE / 3


E

very place is known for something.

Until 2009, if you asked someone about Roswell, they would likely comment UFOs, aliens or something along those lines. Fast forward roughly five years and if you ask the same question, the same answers will come up. The difference, however, is another answer is just as likely — Mine That Bird. In 2009, the gelding overcame huge odds — 50 to 1, to be exact — on his way to an improbable victory at the Kentucky Derby. That win earned Mine That Bird a Sports Illustrated cover, among other accolades, and, on March 21, he will receive the Hollywood treatment when his movie “50 to 1” is released. While Hollywood and New York City tend to get the bells and whistles when it comes to films, “50 to 1” brings the proverbial red carpet to Roswell. Heather Gandy, vice president of marketing for Allen Theatres, said that it is a privi-

lege to host the event. “This is a tremendous honor the Galaxy 8 to host an event that honors both the horse and its owners,” she said.“Not very many people can say that a motion picture was made based on a true story of your life. Roswell has community members that can say that and we are excited we can provide the community a way to show support for this film.” On March 21, there will be a special showing of the movie at 7 p.m. that includes some extra goodies. Tickets for the event are $20 and go on sale on Friday, Feb. 28. Tickets are only available at the Galaxy 8 box office and will include a meet and greet with the honorees, including Mine That Bird co-owners Dr. Leonard Blach and Mark Allen, hors d’oeuvres and admission to the film. An added benefit of attending the special event is that proceeds will go to Reins for Life. Reins for Life is a Dexterbased organization that is “dedicated to improving the

SCREEN

Roswell goes Hollywood with ʻ50 to 1ʼ

Lawrence Foster Record Asst. Sports Editor

The story of Mine That Bird hits the big screen

Photos courtesy Ten Furlongs LLC Jockey Calvin Borel (playing himself) races Mine That Bird (Sunday Rest) at Churchill Downs in a scene from ’50 to 1.’

Photos courtesy Ten Furlongs LLC Producer/Director Jim Wilson talks to Christian Kane (far left) and Skeet Ulrich during filming of “50 to 1.’

4 | VISION MAGAZINE / THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014

lives of people with mental, physical and emotional disabilities using horseback therapy,” according to its Facebook page. The organization was founded in 1994 by Terry Bogle, who said the program is far more than just a pony ride. “I want people to know it is not just a pony ride. We work on daily living skills,” she said. “We work on a lot of vocabulary (math and other things). That is all done from the horse.” Gandy said that partnering with Reins for Life was an easy decision. “We knew about this organization and when we were brainstorming ways to create an event to honor Mine That Bird and his owners, we just thought it sounded like a great fit,” she said. If you can’t make the special event, fear not because there

are other showings of the film and special events. The Kentucky Derby trophy will be on display at Galaxy 8 on March 21 and Mine That Bird himself will be there — just not in the theatre. On March 22, there will be an event for the entire family to help celebrate the film. The event will be a collaboration between KBIM 93.9 FM and Allen Theatres and details will be released as the event approaches. Normal show times for the film will be 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7 p.m. and 9:45 p.m. Monday through Friday, with an additional show time of 11:30 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday from March 21 to April 3. For more information about Allen Theatres, go to allentheatresinc.com. If you want more information on Reins for Life, visit its Facebook page.


Alamogordo

The Firebird

Every Week, Tues - Sun

Shroud Exhibit and Museum The Turin Shroud interactive exhibit at White Sands Mall in Alamogordo offers a backlit, full-sized picture, the only interactive VP8 Image Analyzer 3D experience. The exhibitʼs goal is make Turin Shroud available to all including the vision impaired. Hours are Sunday from 2 p.m. -4 p.m., Tuesday - Friday from 1 p.m. 6 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Free admission. For more information, call 4462113, or visit ShroudNM.com.

March 11

March 8

Vocaldente Gemanyʼs most successful acappella export, Vocaldente is playing the Flickinger Center at 7 p.m. Vocaldente has established itself as an internationally sought-after vocal ensemble, winning international competitions and boasting impressive references. vocaldente have also impressed on the international stage, convincing jurors from all areas of vocal and a cappella music, from classical style to voice pop, such as John Potter (former The Hilliard Ensemble member), Ward Swingle (founder of The Swingle Singers) and Anders

Jalkéus (The Real Group). The quintet have prevailed at the biggest and most significant national and international vocal and a cappella competitions in Asia, Europe and the United States. For more information on Vocaldente, visit vocaldente.org. For more information on the performance, visit flickingercenter.com.

Saturday March 15

Spencer Theater

A double-header of love and enchantment is expressed with physical distinction in Ruidoso Dance Ensembleʼs adaptations of “The Firebird” and the humorous western “Rodeo” in Spencer spotlights. Separated by intermission, these two spirited tales are rich, entertaining adventures for the whole family. The two one-act ballets are adorned with beautiful scores, outstanding dancing, lavish sets, scenic drops and costumes – a fulsome production for which the Ruidoso Dance Ensemble has gained renown. “Rodeo” is packed with American optimism, and features bravura dancing for the men in a unique style derived from horseback riding and cattle roping. Performances are at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets are $30. For more information, call 1-888-818-7872 or visit spencertheater.com.

“Hometown Proud”

Ellis Island American Family Theater presents Ellis Island at the Flickinger Center at 6:30 p.m. For thousands of weary immigrants, Ellis Island was the fierst stop in a new and exciting land of promise. american Family Theater brings the immigrant expereince to life with this poignant family musical. For more information on the performance, visit flickingercenter.com.

Alto

March 15

The Firebird A double-header of love and enchantment is expressed with physical distinction in Ruidoso Dance Ensembleʼs adaptations of “The Firebird” and the humorous western “Rodeo” in Spencer spotlights. Separated by intermission, these two spirited tales are rich, entertaining

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adventures for the whole family. The Firebird is based on a beloved Russian fairy tale, Stravinskyʼs “The Firebird” tells the story of Prince Ivan who becomes lost in the forest while hunting and mistakenly enters an enchanted garden belonging to the evil sorcerer Katscheï. As Prince Ivan is hunting, he encounters a magical Firebird with whom he becomes captivated and captures, but sets free once the Firebird promises to assist him by giving him a magical feather. He can use the feather if ever heʼs in trouble. Trouble does come in the form of Katscheïʼs evil powers and a pack of entranced princesses roaming that same forest glen. Ah, but the beautiful Firebird reappears, transforming what could be impending doom into victory for all that is good and true. The two one-act ballets are adorned with beautiful scores, outstanding dancing, lavish sets, scenic drops and costumes – a fulsome production for which the Ruidoso Dance Ensemble has gained renown. Rodeo: With its world famous score by Aaron Copland, “Rodeo” is a humorous love story about a tomboyish Cowgirl in the pioneer west thatʼs out to win the attention of the Head Wrangler. The 6 >>

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>>5 Cowgirl is a misfit among the men and women in her community, acting as a boy as a means to being liked by the boys. Unfortunately for the tomboy Cowgirl, the Wrangler is attracted to the Rancherʼs Daughter, who has also caught the eye of the Champion Roper. “Rodeo” is packed with American optimism, and features bravura dancing for the men in a unique style derived from horseback riding and cattle roping. Performances are at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets are $30. For more information, call 1-888-818-7872 or visit spencertheater.com.

Lisa Marie Presley

Hobbs

March 7, 8

No Limits Monster Truck Tour The No Limits Monster Truck Tour is coming to Lea County Event Center on Friday, March 7 and Saturday, March 8th at 7:30 p.m. on both nights. Tickets are on sale now, call 575391-2900 for more information.

Artesia March 18

Lightwire Theatre-Dino-Light Lightwire Theater presents DiNO-Light as created by Corbian Visual Arts and Dance where electroluminescent creatures light up the darkness in a heart-rending original tale. Truly unique and visually dazzling, DiNO (formally known as Darwin) has been praised for its cutting edge blend of pup-

petry, technology, and dance audiences all over the world. The performance will be at 7 p.m. at the Ocotillo Performing Arts Center, 310 W Main St. Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for kids. For more information call the OPAC at 575-7464212.

Sunday March 9

The Liberty

Lisa Marie Presley, daughter of music legend Elvis Presley, will perform at 8 p.m. on Sunday, March 9, at The Liberty in Roswell. For tickets to Lisa Marie Presley's only New Mexico performance, visit www.thelibertyinc.com.

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March 9

An Afternoon of American Jazz NMJC Community Band, with guest performance by the Carlsbad Wind Symphony, presents An Afternoon Of American Jazz at NMJC Watson Hall Auditorium at 3 p.m. General admission is $5, $3 for seniors, and free to children and students. For information call 575-492-2844.

March 14, 15, 16, 20, 21, 22

Dixie Swim Club Join us for the hilarious comedy “The Dixie Swim Club.” This younger cousin to the audience favorite “Steel Magnolias” follows the lives of five

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Southern ladies through annual “girls weekends” at their North Carolina beach house. Starting 22 years after they were swim team mates in college, the ladies share their lifeʼs successes and struggles with witty Southern banter, sweet tea, biscuits, and the charm you only find in Dixie! Donʼt miss this chance to meet Sheree Hollinger (Christie Harkness), Lexie Richards (Rebecca Venegas), Jeri Neal McFeely (Nikki Law), Vernadette Sims (Kerri Gray), and Dinah Grayson (Debi Feltman, in her stage debut), share their life and laughter, and experience this lighthearted and riotously funny comedy by the authors of 2011ʼs “The Hallelujah Girls.” Tickets are $10. For more information, visit communityplayersofhobbs.com.

Roswell

Every Week, Mon - Sat

Lest We Forget: Roswell Army Airfield - The Early Years This Walker Aviation Museum display will remain through the end of the year. This exhibit features a short history of the base and many items from the WWII era, as well as information about the planes that flew at Roswell Army Airfield from 1941-1945. The museum is open from 10 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. For more information, call 7 >>


>>6 347-2464 or visit wafbmuseum.org.

Bleach Blonde

Every Week, Mon - Sat

Peace Through Strength This Walker Aviation Museum exhibit is a tribute to the 579th Strategic Missile Squadron assigned to Walker Air Force Base during the early 1960s. The squadron was responsible for operating and maintaining 12 Atlas missile silos around the greater Roswell area. The exhibit was funded through a grant from the Association of Air Force Missileers. The museum is open from 10 a.m. 3:30 p.m. For more information, call 347-2464 or visit www.wafbmuseum.org.

Every Wed

Sing Out Loud at Club Revue Sing Out Loud, Wednesdays, from 9pm to 11:30pm, at Club Revue, located at 3905 SE Main. Enjoy karaoke night with no cover charge and drink specials. Sing Out Loud is a 21 and over event. For more information call 623-8557

Every Week, Wed, Sat

Karaoke at Billy Rayʼs Restaurant and Lounge Karaoke at Billy Rayʼs Restaurant and Lounge at 118 East Third St. from 9 p.m - until people stop singing.

Every Thu

Ritmo Latino at El Toro

ritos Mexican Kitchen Los Band Dʼ Dos playing Latin Pop and Country music at Los Cerritos Mexican Kitchen at 2103 N. Main from 6 p.m - 9 p.m. For more information, call Los Cerritos Mexican Kitchen at 622-4919.

Every Saturday

Saturday March 8

The Unity Center

Bleach Blonde will be performing at the Unity Center Concert at 6 p.m. on March 8 at the Roswell Boys and Girls Club, located at 201 S. Garden. Bleach Blonde's debut album, Starving Artist, was released on Sept. 24 via Rise Records. Bleach Blonde is fronted by lead vocalist Danny "Stills" Stillman. The band came together when the Denver-based singer began writing via email with guitarist David Barella and drummer Danny Cooper, who lived in LA at the time. A month later, the trio joined forces with guitarist Michael Payne and bass player Coty Eikenberg. The five members officially formed Bleach Blonde, a name reminiscent of shared memories in Venice Beach and an homage to Nirvana. Also performing will be Dear You, and Like Wolves. Admission is $8. For more information visit facebook.com/theunitycenter.

Bravo Ritmo Latino plays El Toro Bravo at 102 S. Main St. from 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. For more information, call El Toro Bravo at 622-9280.

Bravo David and Tina plays El Toro Bravo at 102 S. Main St. from 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. For more information, call El Toro Bravo at 622-9280.

David and Tina at El Toro

Los Band Dʼ Dos at Los Cer-

Every Week, Fri, Sat

Every Week, Thu

Open Mic at Ginsberg Music Ginsberg Music opens up the stage every Saturday from 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. P.A. system and drums are provided, all other instruments must be brought by the musician.

Sept 7, 2013 - March 9, 2014

Tweeting Elations Join us in celebrating Aria Finch and her exhibition, soon after she receives the 2013 Governorʼs Awards for Excellence in the Arts. Well known to all, Finch will present a new body of work in clay that borders on the mystical, often. Through her medium, she evokes the viewer to ponder unanswered questions by entering her world to participate in the narrative of our own imagination. For more information, visit roswellmuseum.org.

Feb 28 - April 13

Joseph Pintz: Useful and Useless Joseph Pintzʼs functional and sculptural ceramic work explores the role that domestic objects play in fulfilling our physical and emotional needs.

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Inspired by his Midwestern roots, Pintz often recreates hand tools and other seemingly mundane objects. In the process, the dense meaning of these objects is transferred into clay. The installation at the Roswell Museum and Art Center is up from March 1 - April 13.

March 8

Kiwanis Pancake Festival The 45th annual Kiwanis Pancake Festival will be held from 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, March 8, at the Roswell Convention & Civic Center. Tickets are $5 and the proceeds go to help Roswell youth activities. Besides breakfast, there will also be entertainment throughout the event. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 317-3695.

March 8

Second Saturday Art Workshop Second Saturday is a free art class for kids in grades 3-12 held at the Roswell Museum and Art Center located at 100 W. 11th St. from 10 a.m. to noon. The March 8 program is Shape Shifting with MoMAZoZo Artists Paula Wilson and Mike Lagg. This will be a free three-dimensional form building workshop using a variety of dynamic wood pieces. Students are taught joinery tech10 >>

THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014 | VISION MAGAZINE / 7


L

isa Marie Presley, daughter of music legend Elvis Presley, will perform at 8 p.m. on Sunday, March 9, at The Liberty in Roswell. Presley, a nationally known singer/songwriter who boasts an edgy, sultry voice is now on the fourth leg of the tour promoting her most recent album, “Storm and Grace.” Memphis-bor n Presley reclaims her southern roots on the album, which was released in 2012. Produced by 12-time Grammy Awardwinner T Bone Burnett, "Storm & Grace" follows 2005's "Now What" and her Gold-certified debut album, "To Whom It May Concern" (2003). Her latest criticallyacclaimed album, “Storm & Grace,” is worth talking about. In a recent interview, Presley talked about “Storm & Grace,” its accompanying tour, and some of her other recent musical endeavors in her native hometown of Memphis, where she not only recorded at the legendary Sun Studios, but also performed live on the same stage where a young and upcoming artist named Elvis Presley performed in 1954. She also recently did a home recording, so to speak. But in her case, “home” just happened to the Jungle Room in a place called Graceland. Presley’s debut album, “To Whom It May Concern,” was released in 2003 and was followed by 2005’s “Now What.” Seven years passed before she reemerged with “Storm & Grace,” but with it she presented some of her most inspired work. She says the

songs began to take shape in 2010, not long after relocating to England. Her muse was her own life. “It always just comes from what’s going on in my life,” says Presley, 46. “Every one of my records is the same — whatever’s happening. It’s just a way for me to sort of purge whatever experience I’ve gone through.” For the songs on “Storm and Grace,” Presley says quite a bit of purging was necessary. And though she offers no specifics when it comes to discussing their inspiration, she is very open about the fact that it was a frustrating time in her life. “When I did this record, I was just writing to get myself through a certain period,” she says. “I didn’t have a deal, or a label or anything in mind. I was just writing for myself as I was processing a lot of things. I had to completely get rid of everything I once knew in my life — it was like an awakening. I was realizing that things around me weren’t as they seemed and people around me weren’t what I thought.” In May of 2012, she and her band — which includes her husband, guitarist Michael Lockwood — recorded at Sun Studio in Memphis in the same room where her father, in 1954, recorded a little number called “That’s All Right” that helped launch a musical revolution. The performance was later aired on PBS television. “I loved it,” says Presley. “It was very exciting for all of us. We spent the whole day there at a CD signing and a recording. Everybody had a big smile on their face. It was

MUSIC

Lisa Marie Presley

Randal Seyler Record Staff Writer great.” Another historical moment came just five months ago, when Presley performed at the Levitt Shell in Memphis. The outdoor pavilion, former-

Courtesy photo

Lisa Marie Presley offers grace after the storm

ly known as the Overton Park Bandshell, is the same place where a young Elvis Presley — while building a regional following but still two years away from national fame –

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performed in 1954. “That was emotional,” she says. “I was really nervous. It was a free concert, and we had no idea what was going SEE PRESLEY ON PAGE 14

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Making art helps heal trauma

Children learn to express their feelings on tragedy through art

S

Rey Berrones Vision Editor

alvation Army Capt. Beau Perez saw children dealing with the aftermath of the trauma created by the shooting at Berrendo Middle School. These children were expressing their feelings through art in a way that they were unable to articulate through words. It made sense to him that part of the healing process for trauma is to express an acknowledgement of the hurt, and then to express hope for the future. He said, "These kids are doing art therapy. This is a moment of healing." Perez got together with the Anderson Museum of Contemporary Art to co-sponsor a youth art contest that aimed to walk the participants through these stages of healing. The contest asked for two pieces of art sized 8.5 by 11 inches or larger. The first

piece should depict hurt; the second, hope. The winning students were given a scholarship to the Salvation Army Summer Camp in Arizona. 20 scholarships were given in total. The winning entries are now part of the display that is hung in a Roswell Mall storefront. Anjy Cooper, the manager of the Mall was happy to hang them because that was the location that the parents eventually reunited with the students during the day of the shooting. In a way, it is helping those involved at the Roswell Mall get started on healing as well. Perez was thrilled to work with the Anderson Museum, and said he feels that projects like this help the entire community address this tragedy and ultimately heal.

FARMERS COUNTRY MARKET

Del Norte - Plains Park - 2nd & Garden

ARTS

Mark Wilson Photo Young artists and their families check out the winning entries of the Healing Art Contest at the Anderson Museum of Contemporary Art, Thursday. The contest, sponsored by the museum and Salvation Army, was open to all Roswell students aged 7 and older. 20 winning entries were chosen and those students received a scholarship to The Salvation Army Summer Camp in Arizona.

For Week of March 10 - March 14

Breakfast

Lunch

MON

Morning Sausage Roll, Juice Testing Snack: Animal Crackers/Juice

Golden Burrito, Sliced Bell Pepper, Sliced Apples

TUES

Pancake Sausage on a Stick Testing Snack: Goldfish Crackers/Juice

Corn Dog, Baby Carrots, Oranges

WED

Bosco Cheese Stick, Juice Testing Snack: Graham Crackers/Juice

Hamburger, Bean Dip, Grapes

THURS

Muffin, Cheese Stick, Juice Testing Snack: Giant Gold Fish/Juice

Pepperoni Pizza, Broccoli, Oranges

FRI

Egg and Potato Burrito, Juice Testing Snack: Bug Bites/Juice

Grilled Cheese Sandwich, Sliced Apples

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BREAKFAST CEREAL SERVED DAILY. ALL MEALS ARE SERVED WITH YOUR CHOICE OF LOW FAT MILK: WHITE, CHOCOLATE OR STRAWBERRY. MENU SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014 | VISION MAGAZINE / 9


>>7 niques to enable fantastic, futuristic, mobile, stationary, expansive, and creative sculptural creations. Space is limited. Please call Meredith Bennett at 575-624-6744, extension 22 to register your child.

Navy Sea Chanters

March 9

March 8

Knitting Clinic Knitting Clinic, Saturday, March 8, at 10 a.m., at the Roswell Public Library, located at 301 N Pennsylvania. For more information call 6227101

March 8

BMS Benefit Jackpot Rodeo Berrendo Middle School Benefit Jackpot Rodeo, Saturday, March 8, at 10 a.m., at 1400 E. Poe. A rodeo for children of all ages, including a stick horse race, mixed ribbon roping, team barrel races, calf scrambles and round robin team roping. Concession stands will be open. For more information call 578-4626 or 625-2581.

March 8

Bleach Blonde The Unity Center will host a concert at 6 p.m. at the Roswell Boys and Girls Club, featuring music by Bleach Blonde, Dear You, and Like Wolves. Admission is $8. The

Great selection of Coach Handbags, Wallets & Shoes.

Monday March 10

Pearson Auditorium

The Navy Band Sea Chanters is the United States Navyʼs official chorus. The ensemble performs a variety of music ranging from traditional choral music, including sea chanteys and patriotic fare, to opera, Broadway, and contemporary music. NMMI will host a free concert given by the Navy chorus at 7:30 p.m. at the Pearson Auditorium. Under the leadership of Chief Musician Adam Tyler, the Sea Chanters perform for the public throughout the United States. At home in Washington, they perform for the president, vice president and numerous congressional, military and foreign dignitaries. In 1956, Lt. Harold Fultz, then the bandʼs assistant leader, organized a group from the Navy School of Music to sing chanteys and patriotic songs for the State of the Nation dinner. An immediate success, Adm. Arleigh Burke, then chief of naval operations, transferred them to the Navy Band, named them the Sea Chanters and tasked this all-male chorus with perpetuating the songs of the sea. In 1980, the group added women to their ranks and expanded their repertoire to include everything from Brahms to Broadway.

Peachtree Village Retirement Community 1301 W. Country Club Rd. Roswell, NM 88201 575-627-8070

www.peachtreeret.com

• Beautiful Apartments Studio 1&2 Bedroom • Superb Dining • Housekeeping • Transportation • Activities • Bus Tours of the Countryside

“Home Is Where The Heart Is”

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Boys and Girls Club is located at 201 S. Garden. For more information, visit facebook.com/theunitycenter.

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10 | VISION MAGAZINE / THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014

Lisa Marie Presley Lisa Marie Presley, daughter of music legend Elvis Presley, will perform at 8 p.m. on Sunday, March 9, at The Liberty in Roswell. Her latest album, “Storm & Grace,” is produced by T-Bone Burnett, the accomplished Grammy-winning and Academy Award-winning producer whose work included projects with Bob Dylan, Roy Orbison, John Mellencamp, Counting Crows, Elton John, Elvis Costello, Natalie Merchant, The Wallflowers and Alison Krauss and Robert Plant. Burnett loved the material and easily agreed to produce the songs. The result is widely regarded as her best work. Rolling Stone called it “the album she was born to make a raw, powerful country, folk and blues collection that finds her embracing her Southern roots and family name.” For tickets to Lisa Marie Presleyʼs only New Mexico performance, visit www.thelibertyinc.com.

March 10

Navy Sea Chanters The Navy Band Sea Chanters is the United States Navyʼs official chorus. The ensemble performs a variety of music ranging from traditional choral music, including sea chanteys and patriotic fare, to opera, Broadway, and contemporary music. NMMI will host a free concert given by the Navy chorus at 7:30 p.m. at the Pearson Auditorium.

March 14

Retro Fit Retro Fit plays Pecos Flavors Winery at 7 p.m. Admission is $5. For more information, call 627-6265.

CALENDAR

March 14

Betrayal Fight Or Fall Booking and Designs presents Betrayal an upand-coming hardcore band out of Los Angeles, Calfornia. Betrayal currently has 2 albums out via Mediaskare Records including their newest release “Abandonment.” Also on the bill is Immortal Prophecy, Perplexity, and So It Begins. For more information, visit facebook.com/theunitycenter.

March 15 - 16

Gun Show There will be a Gun Show Saturday, March 15, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, March 16, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Roswell Convention Center, located at 912 N. Main. Admission is $5 per person and children 10 and under are free. For more information call 575-430-8681

March 21 - 30

The Curious Savage Roswell Community Little Theatre Production “The Curious Savage,” Friday, March 21 through Sunday, March 23 and Friday, March 28 through Sunday, March 30, at the Roswell Community Little Theatre, located at 1717 S. Union. Friday and Saturday performances take place at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday matinees take place at 2 p.m. Reservations are advised for Friday and Saturday performances. The Curious Savage is a touching play full of mystery, humor and intrigue. How will the sprite, elderly, Mrs. Savage solve her problems now that she is institutionalized and has less than caring family? Somehow she does! Donʼt miss this fascinating slice of life. For reservations or for more information call 622-1982.

Ruidoso

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>>10

Paul Rodriguez

Every Week, Thu

Karaoke at Cree Meadows Lounge Karaoke with DJ Pete, every Thursday evening from 6 p.m. - 11 p.m. at Cree Meadows Lounge. There is also an all you can eat taco bar for $5.95 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

jects during the Ski Apache Scavenger Hunt from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Team work is crucial in order to find all the items in the time allowed. There is a time limit and winners will be determined on fastest time and most items found. Entry fee is $30 per team. For more information, visit skiapache.com.

March 15

March 12

Ski Apache Pond Skim The Ski Apache Pond Skim is from noon to 3 p.m. at Ski Apache. This fun-filled day begins with the Beach Bod Contest with contestants dressed for the beach – swimsuits for the ladies and trunks for the guys – accessorized by ski or board boots. A fun run on the slopes, mingle with the crowd and then a “parade ” on the plaza all precede the selection of the winners. The top contestants then become a judge for the Pond Skimming Competition. Costumed skiers and boarders attempt to gain enough speed and air during a single run to make it across the pond. Prizes will be awarded to the top finishers in both competitions. For more information, visit skiapache.com.

Saturday March 15

Inn of the Mountain Gods

Comedian Paul Rodriguez has been making audiences laugh all over the world (in Spanish and English) for nearly three decades with his unique brand of humor that is a perfect blend of his Latin heritage, the American dream and his undeniable universal appeal. As an actor and comedian, Paul Rodriguezʼs multi-faceted career includes starring roles and featured appearances in more than 45 films and countless television series and comedy specials. Voted one of the most influential Hispanics in America, Rodriguez has remained a constant force in his community and the world of comedy throughout his career. Among his many credits, appearances on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and “Last Call with Carson Daly,” have helped Rodriguez become a spearhead of Latin-American comedians. Rodriguez has several hit projects to his credit including the comedy concert film “The Original Latin Kings of Comedy.“ Rodriguez not only produced the film, but starred alongside Cheech Marin, George Lopez and Carlos Mencia. Donʼt miss comedian Paul Rodriguez, Saturday, March 15 at 8 p.m. at Inn of the Mountain Gods. For more information, call 464-7777 or visit innofthemountaingods.com.

March 15

Ski Apache Scavenger Hunt Three person teams scour the mountain to find hidden ob-

NEW MEXICO PROSTHETIC-ORTHOTIC CENTER, INC. ADAM DUTCHOVER CPO CERTIFIED ORTHOTIST AND PROSTHETIST

2515 N. Kentucky Roswell NM 88201 Phone (575) 623-0344 Fax (575) 623-6696

Trained and credentialed staff Personal attention

ACCREDITED

Se Habla Español

The Great Ski Apache Shovel Race Contestants will ride decorated shovels on Easy Street from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Add-ons, themes and decorations are encouraged but the shovel must be the seat and it must touch the snow. Prizes awarded based on speed and style. Entry fee is $10. For more information, visit skiapache.com.

March 15

Paul Rodriguez Comedian Paul Rodriguez has been making audiences laugh all over the world (in Spanish and English) for nearly three decades with his unique brand of humor that is a perfect blend of his Latin heritage, the American dream and his undeniable universal appeal. As an actor and comedian, Paul Rodriguezʼs multi-faceted career includes starring roles and featured appearances in more than 45 films and countless television series and comedy

CALENDAR

specials. Voted one of the most influential Hispanics in America, Rodriguez has remained a constant force in his community and the world of comedy throughout his career. Among his many credits, appearances on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and “Last Call with Carson Daly,” have helped Rodriguez become a spearhead of Latin-American comedians. As an accomplished writer, director and producer for television and film, Rodriguez has several hit projects to his credit including the comedy concert film “The Original Latin Kings of Comedy.“ Rodriguez not only produced the film, but starred alongside Cheech Marin, George Lopez and Carlos Mencia. Donʼt miss comedian Paul Rodriguez, Saturday, March 15 at 8 p.m. at Inn of the Mountain Gods. For more information, call 464-7777 or visit innofthemountaingods.com. If you would like your event listed on the entertainment calendar, please email vision@rdrnews.com or call 622-7710 ext. 309.

30

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Applause Honeycomb Shades MITH PAINT

1608 S. Main 622-2020 Mon-Fri 7:30 - 5:30 Sat. 8-12

THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014 | VISION MAGAZINE / 11


CULTURE

Kiwanians to hold Pancake Festival

T

Randal Seyler Record Staff Writer

Enjoy flapjacks for a great cause

12 | VISION MAGAZINE / THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014

he Kiwanis Club of Roswell discussed their upcoming Pancake Festival and the Kiwanis Inter national program to eliminate tetanus in children during the Feb. 25 meeting at K-Bob’s Steakhouse. T he 45th annual Kiwanis Pancake Festival will be held from 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, March 8, at the Roswell Convention & Civic Center. Tickets are $5 and the proceeds go to help Roswell youth activities. Besides breakf ast, there will also be entertainment throughout the event. The annual event will be held with the help of local Key Clubs, Builders Clubs, and the new Circle K International. All proceeds will benefit Kiwanis youth activities in Roswell. Enjoy pancakes, sausage, coffee, and entertainment. Purchase tickets to the event from a Key Club, Builder, Kiwanis, or CKI member for $5. For more information or to purchase pancake f estival tickets, call 317-3695. Kiwanis Club members also watched a video on the Kiwanis’ current global campaign for children. The Eliminate Project aims to raise $110 million and save the lives of a 129 million mothers and their future babies. In par tnership with UNICEF, Kiwanis is committing by 2015 to eliminating maternal/neonatal tetanus, a disease that kills one baby every nine minutes. By targeting this disease, Kiwanis will not only save lives but

Flipping pancakes at a previous Pancake Festival also pave the way for other interventions that will boost mater nal health and child survival among the poorest, most underser ved women and children in the world, according to the website, www.kiwanis.org. The Eliminate Project was announced at the 95th Annual Kiwanis International Convention in June 2010, and this project will tap into Kiwanis' global volunteer network and strength in reaching communities and leaders, along with UNICEF’s field staff, technical expertise and unbeatable supply chain to wipe out this centuries-old disease. Locally, the Kiwanis Club of Roswell members have been collecting money at each meeting to donate to the project, but club members have been encouraged to continue their support of the international project.

Ruth David Photo

During Kiwanis’ first global campaign for children, the Worldwide Service Project for IDD, members worked to vir tually eliminate iodine deficiency disorders, the world’s leading preventable cause of mental retardation, while raising more than $100 million, according to the website. The IDD project was heralded as one of the most successful health initiatives in the world, and today those dollars are at work in more than 103 nations — and the number of households consuming iodized salt has jumped from an estimated 20 percent in 1990 to more than 70 percent, saving developing nations and the world billions of IQ points. As of Feb. 16, Kiwanians world wide have raised more than $2.59 million f or T he Eliminate Project.


A history of the Sea Chanters

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

R

Randal Seyler Record Staff Writer

Navy Sea Chanters

Courtesy photos

Navy Sea Chanters to perform at NMMI oswell and Chaves County will host the Navy Band Sea Chanters for the first time in at least 16 years on Monday, March 10, when the chorus performs at the New Mexico Military Institute. NMMI will host a free concert given by the Navy chorus at 7:30 p.m. at the Pearson Auditorium. “T he Navy Band Sea Chanters tour regularly, and they are kicking off this tour in Albuqueque,”said Lt. Col. Steven Thorp, associate prof essor of music and NMMI choral director. T he Navy Band Sea

Chanters is the United States Navy’s official chorus. The ensemble performs a variety of music ranging from traditional choral music, including sea chanteys and patriotic fare, to opera, Broadway, and contemporary music. Under the leadership of Chief Musician Adam Tyler, the Sea Chanters perform for the public throughout the United States. At home in Washington, they perf orm for the president, vice president and numerous congressional, military and foreign dignitaries. T hor p said a member of the Navy chor us visited

NMMI to check out the facilities, and was pleased with Pearson Auditorium. “We completely renovated the auditorium three years ago, and now we are really more of a perf orming ar ts center than an auditorium,” Thorp said. “We have very nice f acilities, including dressing rooms.” The auditorium also seats 1,200. T hor p said he recently returned from Washington, D.C., where he had escorted a group of NMMI students to a national militar y School band and choir festival. “When we were there, we saw the Army chor us per-

f orm,” T hor p said. “T hey were ver y f orceful, a ver y powerful group. Now here in a week we’ll get to see the Navy chor us perf orm — we’re going from Green to Blue.” Thorp said expect the Navy chorus to do more than just patriotic music. “I think of them as more of a military ‘Glee,’” Thorp said. “They do the patriotic tunes, but they also do pop songs and show tunes. T hey will use microphones and they have a band that travels with them, so they are much more than just military music.” The concert at NMMI is free

The Navy Band Sea Chanters began in 1956, Lt. Harold Fultz, then the band’s assistant leader, organized a group from the Navy School of Music to sing chanteys and patriotic songs for the State of the Nation dinner. An immediate success, Adm. Arleigh Burke, then chief of naval operations, transferred them to the Navy Band, named them the Sea Chanters and tasked this allmale chorus with perpetuating the songs of the sea. In 1980, the group added women to their ranks and expanded their repertoire to include everything from Brahms to Broadway. The Sea Chanters are frequently found at the center of our most important national events, including inauguration day in 2009. They have played a vital role in comforting the nation in times of mourning, including appearances at memorials for the astronauts of the space shuttle Columbia and the presidential wreath laying ceremony at the United Airlines flight 93 crash site in Shanksville, Pa. Their performance of “Amazing Grace” for the National Day of Prayer and Remembrance at the National Cathedral in SEE

CHANTERS ON PAGE 14

to the public, but tickets are required. Thorp said tickets will be available through the NMMI Music Depar tment before March 10, and will be available at the door the night of the performance. “We are asking ticket holders to come to the show before 7:15 p.m., and after 7:15 p.m. we will have tickets for people who haven’t gotten them in advance.” For more information or for tickets, contact Thorp at 6248443.

THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014 | VISION MAGAZINE / 13


CHANTERS

HOME

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Washington after the events of 9/11 inspired all in attendance as well as a national television audience. In 2004, the chorus participated in former President Reagan’s funeral at the National Cathedral, and in 2007 performed in the U.S. Capitol’s rotunda as former President Ford was lying in state. The chorus was instrumental in the dedication ceremonies of the World War II memorials in Bedford, Va., and in Washington. In 1994, they provided music at the funeral of former President Nixon in Yorba Linda, Calif., and the interment of former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis at Arlington National Cemetery. They have appeared at the Kennedy Center Honors and with the National Symphony Orchestra for the nationally telecast “National Memorial Day Concerts” at the U.S. Capitol. In addition the group has appeared on “Larry King

Live” and “CBS This Morning” as well as at the premier of the movie “Pearl Harbor.”

14 | VISION MAGAZINE / THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014

In 2008, the Sea Chanters performed with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir under the di-

rection of Mack Wilburg. Noted choral directors Dale Warland, and Donald Neuen have guest conducted the ensemble, and renowned composers Michael McCarthy, Roger Bourland, William MacDuff and Lloyd Pfautsch have written works especially for them. Other notable orchestral appearances include the Kansas City Symphony, the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra, the Baltimore Symphony and the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra. The Sea Chanters have enjoyed a great reputation performing with such stars as Perry Como, Marian Anderson, Kenny Rogers and Lionel Richie. Throughout their history, the Sea Chanters have remained true to the Navy’s watchwords of pride and professionalism, and they continue to flourish as a vibrant ensemble.

its operation, but the Assurance Home Foundation has been established to help ensure that Assurance Home will be here to support many future generations of children, according to the website. Assurance Home Foundation is a private, nonprofit corporation with a separate Board of Directors and its goal is to support the operational needs of Assurance Home so that, eventually, the Home will become self-sufficient and not depend on outside funding for existence. The Foundation also aims to provide scholarships to every child who successfully completes the Assurance Home program and wants to further his or her education or vocational training. “Our funding is up and down,” Malone said. “Like any family, we have good years and sometimes we have bad years, but we always seem to make it.” For more information about Assurance Home or to make a donation, visit assurancehome.org or call 6241780.

PRESLEY

Continued from Page 8

to happen, and it ended up that 6,500 people came. It felt like a homecoming for me. My family was there. My kids were there. My mom flew in. It was a big deal. It was pressure, but fun. I had to really kind of focus on what I was doing. It was very emotional and very intense, but I had to focus on the technicalities of what I normally think about when I’m doing a show. Otherwise, it would just be overwhelming.”


HISTORY By Stu Pritchard Roswell Historian

Remembering Roswell - Part 2

Historian Stu Pritchard recalls days past in Roswell

G

A Roswell family poses with their decorated car, just before the Cotton Carnival Parade. ood times make such nice memories, like the "Cotton Carnival" which was held on Nor th Main at Spr ing River. We always had two parades; the main parade

seemed to be much larger than we have today. T here were cars and buggies all decorated with paper flowers and garlands, scads of horses, some donkeys and a lot of cowboys, genuine cow-

Photo courtesy Historical Society for Southeast New Mexico

boys who sat their steeds like kings -- cowgirls, too, all gussied up and smiling so you just knew they were looking at you. Carl Johnson, "of course" (his motto) had a contraption consisting of a

barrel with a saddle on it at the end of a pole. His Model T had off-kilter wheels that made that barrel buck like an ol' "strawber r y roan." Atop this rig some durn fool was holding on for dear life.

Oft times the politicians were put in the line following the animals and bef ore the "scoopers" with their shovels. Seemed right, somehow. Next day's parade was "Old Timers." The old folks moved down the parade route, many of them walking the full length of Main Street. Afterward, ever yone went to a big, free, barbeque at Haynes' Dream Park. It was located on Spr ing River, which at one time had a small dam and a miniature paddle boat on the little lake. Ranch cooks got together, dug a large pit, cooked a number of beef quar ters over night, added cor n-onthe-cob, a chunk of bread and black coffee, a speech or two, and everyone had a fine time -- kids, too. I remember "Cap" Mossman holding forth in the J.P. White building. Cap was or iginator of the Ar izona Rangers. It was he who tracked down and arranged teh hanging of the infamous outlaw, Augustine Chacon. I remember Sally Chisum Robert. The former "Queen of the Jinglebob" lived just a few blocks west of our home. I have always thought her life story was so full of rich historical happenings that I consider her one of the early West's most fascinating people. Amonette's Boot and Saddlery was known throughout the entire West. Even today, Ed Amonette is spoken of in reverent tones by those associated with the cattle trades. I could go into the rear of teh shop and get great leather scraps, then make a genuine leather holster for my "rubber" gun, a wooden sixshooter that held a number of rubber bands made from inner-tubes. Stretched on the barrel and rolled f or easy release, we could shoot down r ustlers, malcreants and even Billy the Kid.

THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014 | VISION MAGAZINE / 15


UFOLOGY

Astronaut Gordon Cooper saw film of a UFO landing

Looking Up

I

By Donald Burleson n the annals of UFO studies a few people stand out as truly exceptional investigators who have greatly advanced our knowledge in the field. One name that comes to mind is that of the late Allen Hynek. Another, beyond question, is Leonard Stringfield.

When Len Stringfield died in 1994, he left behind a vast collection of notes and papers gathered from his years of interviewing firsthand professional military and civilian witnesses to the UFO phenomenon. Recently, MUFON (the Mutual UFO Network) has come into possession of those documents and has labored to make them available to researchers. They constitute a treasure trove of insights. Let me cite an example involving astronaut Gordon Cooper (1927-2004). As is widely known, Cooper was outspoken about his many UFO sightings, maintaining to the end of his life that the U.S. government has concealed massive amounts of UFO information. The incident to be described here

has been reported elsewhere, but Len Stringfield’s papers off er an important new twist. At the age of 30, Cooper (then a captain) was assigned to Edwards Air Force Base in southern California as a test pilot and project manager. (Edwards AFB at the time was home to the Air Research and Development Command, conducting constant aircraft capability tests.) On the morning of 3 May 1957 Cooper sent a crew out to a remote area to photograph precision landings. Later the crew came back to him with a bizarre but demonstrably true story. They had observed, and more importantly photographed, a strange airbor ne object over a dry lakebed. The object, disk-

shaped and some 30 feet in diameter, landed on the lakebed, perching itself on a set of landing gear legs (rather reminiscent, I would add, of the Socorro landing that would occur in 1964). The photo crew took both stills and moving picture film of the landing. They approached to try to get some closer shots, but when they drew too close, the disk lofted at a steep angle and shot out of sight. Cooper at the time observed that the air base seemed to attract frequent UFO visits. (We all remember extensive media coverage of that fact, right? Right.) Cooper contacted his super iors up the chain of command in Washington, and they ordered the photos and the motion picture film to be

sealed in a pouch and sent up the line. But this is where Len Stringfield’s account differs from other versions in one essential detail. Traditionally it has been held that Cooper, who was ordered not to look at the motion picture film before sending it to D.C., obeyed and did not do so. But according to the Stringfield papers, Cooper viewed the film at least a dozen times, understandably fascinated with it. Needless to say, after the film reached Washington, Cooper never heard anything of it again. It is a reasonable speculation that Cooper’s viewing of this no doubt remarkable film could only have added to the vehemence with which he later came to speak of UFO secrecy.

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16 | VISION MAGAZINE / THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014

Vision for March 6, 2014  

Vision for March 6, 2014, featuring articles on the Navy Sea Chanters, the Healing Art Competition, Lisa Marie Presley and more.

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