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Roswell Daily Record THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

Vol. 121, No. 92 50¢ Daily / $1 Sunday

INSIDE NEWS

MILITARIES VIE FOR ARCTIC EDGE YOKOSUKA, Japan (AP) — To the world’s militar y leaders, the debate over climate change is long over. They are preparing for a new kind of Cold War in the Arctic, anticipating that rising temperatures there will open up a treasure trove of resources, long-dreamed-of sea lanes and a slew of potential conflicts. - PAGE A6

TOP 5 WEB For The Past 24 Hours

• What’s more Roswell than trees? • Vanguard elm graces Center grounds • ‘You forgot my snack?’ • College Blvd. extension opens Friday • Goddard, Roswell split pair

INSIDE SPORTS

Governor demands choices for judicial vacancy SANTA FE (AP) — Republican Gov. Susana Martinez, like her Democratic predecessor, wants a choice of candidates when it comes to appointing judges and she’s flexing her gubernatorial power to make her point. Martinez has asked an independent judicial nominating commission to go back to work and send her more than one candidate for a judicial vacancy in southern New Mexico. For-

mer Gov. Bill Richardson took a similar approach in 2007, and the dispute ended up before the state Supreme Court. Richardson, however, never got the extra judicial candidates he sought.

In New Mexico, the governor appoints district judges from candidates recommended by a bipartisan nominating commission, which is made up of judges, lawyers and members of the public who are

Romney veep search under way

not lawyers. Unlike many boards and commissions, the governor names only a few members of a nominating commission. Judges, legislative leaders and a statewide organization of lawyers select most members.

A screening commission last month interviewed four applicants for a judgeship in the 6th Judicial District that covers Grant, Hidalgo and Luna counties but recommended only one person

Preparedness to serve and loyalty to Romney are likely to trump other credentials as the all-but-sure Republican nominee looks to avoid the blowback John McCain faced four years ago with his surprise choice of the little-known, first-term Alaska governor for the GOP ticket. Questions about Palin’s readiness to serve, McCain’s decision-making and his advisers’ vetting came to define the Arizona senator’s flawed campaign.

HIGH ...84˚ LOW ....50˚

CLASSIFIEDS..........B6 COMICS.................B4 ENTERTAINMENT.....B6 FINANCIAL .............B5 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........A8 LOTTERIES ............A2 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8

INDEX

“The gover nor simply wants to uphold the sepa-

The commission is to meet on May 1 to consider the governor’s request, but See VACANCY, Page A3

Mindful of that, Romney will put

Rey Berrones Photo

Roswell "Chamber Girls" Jenieva Ornelas, Candace Lewis and Kathleen Garcia (top row) paint the town crimson with Jennifer Green and Mallory Driggers in an effort to spread Aggie spirit to Roswell. The public, as well as NMSU alumni and Aggie fans, are invited to attend the reception from 6 - 8:30 p.m. at the J. Ross Thomas Reception Room on the NMMI campus.

Wild hogs expected eventually in Dona Ana County

Hansen blew his chance to be a Kentucky Derby favorite. He finished second in the Blue Grass Stakes after a daylong art project in which the near-white colt’s tail was dyed blue, only to be rinsed off before the race. After being beaten by Dullahan on the final weekend of major Derby preps, Hansen - PAGE B1

TODAY’S FORECAST

Scott Dar nell, a spokesman for the governor, said Martinez’s request for more nominees “has nothing to do with the particular applicant who was submitted.”

rate constitutional duties assigned to the judicial nominating commission and the governor, respectively. State law affords her the opportunity to fill the vacancy as opposed to the judicial nominating commission, in effect, making the appointment,” Darnell said in a statement.

BOSTON (AP) — Don’t look for a vice presidential shocker from Mitt Romney. His choice of a running mate — a search he announced Monday he has begun — will be guided by both his methodical, riskaverse corporate training and the lessons his party lear ned from Sarah Palin’s selection.

UNION RAGS BACK ATOP RANKINGS

• E. Leamon Metcalf • Rex B. Vaughan - PAGE A6

— Deming lawyer Jennifer DeLaney, a Democrat. All of the applicants are running for the judgeship in this year’s elections — two Democrats and two Republicans.

Chamber has Aggie spirit!!!

The tale as old as time...

OBITUARIES

TUESDAY

www.rdrnews.com

See ROMNEY, Page A3

TODAY’S

April 17, 2012

Mark Wilson Photo

Summer Souza rehearses her role as Belle for the upcoming presentation of Beauty and the Beast at Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell. Showtimes are Friday, April 20, and Saturday, April 21, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 22, at 2:30 p.m., with additional shows on Friday, April 27, and Saturday, April 28, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 29, at 2:30 p.m. at the ENMU-R Performing Arts Center. Tickets can be purchased online at: showtix4u.com.

LAS CRUCES (AP) — Wild hogs are likely on their way to Dona Ana County as the animals continue to spread across parts of New Mexico, federal officials said. The Las Cruces Sun-News reports (http://bit.ly/IqZwbP ) that the animals have spread from two New Mexico counties seven years ago to 17 today and are present along the Rio Grande in neighboring Sierra County. They travel along the river because it’s a source of water. Alan May, state director for U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services, said feral pigs have been spreading mostly in eastern New Mexico counties. But somehow, likely because humans transported them, they’ve reached the Rio Grande basin. They’ve got a presence in Sierra, Socorro and Valencia counties, too. The animals, a cross between domestic pigs and Eurasian hogs introduced by hunters into the U.S., can reach up to 250 or 300 pounds. They breed prolifi-

cally, travel in groups of about 10 to 15 and are dif ficult to eradicate. “These guys are really bad news in New Mexico,” he said. “Feral hogs are absolutely an environmental and ecological disaster. There will be a lot of property damage and probably some disease issues.” Feral pigs are likely to reach Dona Ana County first at the Garfield and Hatch area. That area’s economic base is farming, and many far mers rely on buried, drip irrigation systems. May said the pigs can eat crops and sometimes young lambs, goats and calves, and they root up fields. State Land Office Commissioner Ray Powell said he’s trying to sound a warning alarm about the growing feral pig problem. They’ll environmentally devastate the trust lands they reach, he said. “These animals do a lot of damage to areas with water,” See HOGS, Page A3

US prepares for last major Afghan offensive KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — For Taliban militants and U.S. strategists alike, all roads in this impoverished country of mountain passes, arid deserts and nearly impassable goat tracks lead to this ancient capital of 3 million people nestled in a high and narrow valley.

The Taliban made their intentions clear over the weekend, mounting spectacular coordinated attacks that spawned an 18-hour battle with Afghan and NATO forces. And now, the U.S. is gearing up for what may be the last major American-

run offensive of the war — a bid to secure the approaches to the city. While bombings and shootings elsewhere in Afghanistan receive relatively little attention, attacks in the capital alarm the general population, undermine the government’s reputation and frighten foreigners into fleeing the country. That’s why insurgents on Sunday struck locations that were so fortified they could cause little or no damage, including the diplomatic quarter, the parliament and a NATO base. “These are isolated attacks that are done for

symbolic purposes, and they have not regained any territory,” U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said Monday. The U.S.-led spring of fensive, expected to begin in the coming weeks, may be NATO’s last chance to shore up Kabul’s defenses before a significant withdrawal of combat troops limits its options. The focus will be regions that control the main access routes, roads and highways into Kabul from the desert south and the mountainous east. These routes are used not only by militants but by

See AFGHAN, Page A3

AP Photo

An Afghan soldier, second from left, part of the National Directorate of Security chats with his colleague in front of a building which was attacked by militants after a gun battle in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, April 16, 2012.


Roswell Daily Record

Vacancy

Continued from Page A1

there’s no guarantee the panel will send the governor additional names. “If we have more people applying, then maybe,� said Brenda Villegas, a commission member from Deming. She said DeLaney was the most qualified of the original applicants. “I just hope the governor reconsiders and accepts it if we send up the same name, if we don’t find other candidates,� said Villegas. Commission member Fred Sherman, a Deming lawyer, said additional applicants are being solicited, but the commission wasn’t trying to pick a fight with Martinez by initially recommending only one candidate. “What we want is the best, and judges should be that,� said Sherman. “If we had 10 people that were qualified and would be the kind of judges that we would want, you would have 10 people going up to her.� Since taking off last year, Martinez has appointed six district judges and there are three vacancies to be filled, including the one in the 6th Judicial District. That vacancy was created by the retirement in February of District Judge Gary Jeffreys, who was appointed by for mer GOP Gov. Gary Johnson and served on the court for 15 years. Whoever is appointed to the vacancy could end up with a short tenure because the winner of the general election will become judge. Because of that, some lawyers may not be interested in applying for the vacancy, Sherman said. In 2007, Richardson came up empty handed when a commission

Hogs

Continued from Page A1

Powell said. “They root around and tear up the ground, but they also act like vacuum cleaners eating everything in their way — toads, snakes, birds, small animals.� In addition, the pigs

declined to recommend additional candidates for a vacant judgeship in Carlsbad. The dispute went to the Supreme Court, which ordered the commission to solicit additional applicants. But in a setback for Richardson and his successors, the justices didn’t require the commission to provide more nominees to a governor. Instead, the court directed the commission to make a “good faith effort� to submit at least two names for consideration.

When the commission stuck with its original nominee, Richardson declined to make an appointment. It then fell to the chief justice of the Supreme Court to fill the judgeship and he picked the individual recommended by the commission — a for mer district judge who Richardson had previously appointed but who lost in an election. District Judge J. Richard Brown continues to serve on the 5th Judicial District court.

New Mexico’s system for naming judges was established by a constitutional amendment adopted by voters in 1988 and combines a merit selection process with a partisan requirement. election Before the current system, New Mexico elected its judges in partisan contests like other state and local offices.

The commission screens candidates and makes recommendations to the gover nor. A judge, once appointed, must run for partisan election to keep the position. Thereafter, a judge is subject to periodic nonpartisan retention elections, in which voters decide yes or no to retain the judge. are known to carry a number of diseases. Feral pig populations aren’t regulated or managed by the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, said Dan Williams, a spokesman for the agency. That means they can be hunted with no limits, like coyotes, another unregulated species.

US govt: Other targets eyed before NYC subway plot NEW YORK (AP) — A former yellow cab driverturned-al-Qaida recruit testified for the first time Monday that he drove around New York City in early 2009 casing potential targets for a terrorist attack, including Grand Central Terminal, Times Square and the New York Stock Exchange. Zarein Ahmedzay told a Brooklyn jury that he and two former high school classmates — Najibullah Zazi and Adis Medunjanin — also considered striking Penn Station or city movie theaters before settling on attacking Manhattan subway lines as suicide bombers. Ahmedzay also recounted a meeting at an al-Qaida hideout in Pakistan, where the three agreed to become martyrs. Terror operatives encouraged the men to complete the mission before the end of George W. Bush’s second term as president, he said. The testimony followed opening statements at the trial of Medunjanin, 27, a Bosnian-born Muslim and naturalized U.S. citizen who has pleaded not guilty to conspiracy to use weapons of mass destruction, providing material support to a terrorist organization and other charges. Zazi and Ahmedzay pleaded guilty and agreed to testify again Medunjanin in a bid for leniency. Prosecutors alleged

that after the three men received terror training, they slipped back into the United States and formed a sleeper cell of would-be suicide bombers that in 2009 nearly pulled off one of the most chilling terror plots since the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. The men “were prepared to kill themselves and everyone else around them — men, women and children,� said Assistant U.S. Attorney James Loonam. “These men came so close — within days of carrying out this attack.� Defense attorney Robert Gottlieb countered by accusing the government of using “inflammatory rhetoric� about al-Qaida and terrorism to prevent jurors “from seeing the truth about this case.� The lawyer conceded his client had sought to support the Taliban’s struggle against U.S. forces in Afghanistan, but denied he ever agreed to kill American civilians for alQaida. Zazi and Ahmedzay admitted in their pleas that they wanted to avenge U.S. aggression in the Middle East. Ahmedzay testified Monday that Medunjanin encouraged him to follow a more radical form of Islam by giving him recordings of sermons of U.S.-born extremist cleric Anwar al-Awlaki.

GENERAL

Romney

Continued from Page A1

experience at the top of his list of qualities as he chooses a No. 2, according to senior advisers and GOP operatives familiar with his thinking. They spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak candidly about a process Romney himself is trying to keep as private as possible as he works to narrow a field that may begin with as many as a dozen prospective candidates. “The hallmark for Governor Romney’s candidacy, and how he would be as president, is that he approaches these decisions in a well-thoughtout methodical way,� said Steve Duprey, a former McCain adviser and current New Hampshirebased member of the Republican National Committee. “It won’t be like the McCain campaign where there was a big surprise and effort to create a game changer.� For all the secrecy surrounding the process, the for mer Massachusetts governor did give a few hints about his plans Monday, disclosing that he had chosen his former chief of staf f and 2008 presidential campaign manager, Beth Myers, to lead the vetting and analysis of prospective running mates. Several other members of the tight-knit cadre that has surrounded Romney for years also are likely to be involved. Romney was largely tight-lipped beyond the staffing announcement. He said the selection

Afghan

Continued from Page A1

traders carrying goods from Pakistan and Iran. The strategy in eastern Afghanistan involves clearing militants from provinces such as Ghazni, just south of the capital. The pivotal region links Kabul with the Taliban homeland in the south and provinces bordering Pakistan to the east. NATO, under U.S. command, will also conduct more operations in eastern provinces such as Paktika and Paktia that are considered major infiltration routes to the capital from insurgent safe havens in Pakistan. Afghan and U.S. officials blamed the Pakistan-based Haqqani network, which is part of the Taliban and has close links with al-Qaida, for the weekend attacks that left 36 insurgents, eight policemen and three civilians dead in Kabul and three eastern provinces. But Ar my Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, said officials have not concluded whether the attacks emanated out of Pakistan. Declining numbers of international troops in the coming months are also forcing coalition forces to focus less on remote and thinly populated places such as eastern Nuristan. They hope to move responsibility for those areas to the Afghan security forces. Coalition forces last summer made gains in traditional Taliban strongholds such as Kandahar and Helmand provinces in the south, areas they must now hold with fewer troops. By September, as many as 10,000 U.S. Marines are scheduled to leave Helmand and hand over the lead for security to Afghan forces in the former Taliban stronghold. “It’s going to be a very busy summer,� Gen. John Allen, the top U.S. and NATO commander, said recently. “The campaign will balance the drawdown of the surged forces with the consolidation of our

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

would certainly happen before the Republican National Convention in late August. But he wouldn’t provide any more guidance on any internal deadline his team has set. And when asked about potential choices — and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, specifically — Romney hedged, as he has consistently in recent months. “Well I think he’s one of the terrific leaders in our party, but I think it’s way too early to begin narrowing down who the potential vice presidential nominees might be,� Romney said in an interview with Diane Sawyer of ABC News outside Fenway Park in Boston. “But we’re beginning that process, we’ll talk about a lot of folks, and then go through the kind of vetting and review process that you have to go through to make sure whoever you select will pass the evaluation that’s required by the American people.� In addition to his running mate being prepared to assume the presidency, Romney has laid out only one other public criterion: that he or she oppose abortion rights. The condition could help reassure social conservatives that Romney is serious about his opposition to abortion — a sore point because he supported abortion rights when he ran for the Senate in 1994. Several Republicans familiar with Romney’s thinking downplay the importance of choosing a running mate from a particular battleground state or an important voting demographic. Romney also is expected to avoid a candidate with the kind of star power that might distract too

much attention from the party’s main campaign themes — Republicans are working to make the election a referendum on President Barack Obama — or overshadow the GOP presidential nominee himself. Rubio, 40, is one such celebrity candidate. And the junior Florida senator also has little experience, in the midst of only his second year on Capitol Hill. Still, Rubio is both a conservative favorite and potential bridge to the growing Hispanic voting bloc, which typically favors Democrats. He’s a rising star within the Republican Party. Ohio Sen. Rob Portman also is near the top of many speculative lists of potential running mates. Portman endorsed Romney early and campaigned hard for him in his home state. Romney, who won Ohio by a slim margin, knows Portman and is said to respect him. The Ohio senator also is unlikely to spring any surprises on the Romney campaign. He’s been confir med to two Cabinet posts — he served as U.S. trade representative under President George H.W. Bush and then as Bush’s director of the Office of Management and Budget. Romney also is likely to consider conservative favorites talked about often, such as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley and Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell. Still, if he’s looking for experience, that group has just five years of guber natorial experience among the three. More experienced Republicans also are like-

holdings in the south, continued combat operations� and an ef fort to push Afghan security forces into the lead. The U.S. this month finished moving the 1st brigade of the 82nd Airborne into Ghazni to help clear out a Taliban stronghold in Andar district. It could be one of the largest remaining American clearing operations of the war. It is not known when that operation will take place, but Ghazni is located at a key chokepoint with the country’s main highway from the south to Kabul running through it. The highway runs just past Andar district. “If you secure Andar, you have secured Ghazni, and you have secured Afghanistan,� the governor of Ghazni, Musa Khan, told U.S. forces last week at a handover ceremony with departing Polish troops. Eliminating the Ghazni problem is an important part of the plan to transition security responsibility from foreign forces to the nascent Afghan National Security Forces. After September, the U.S.-led coalition may not

have enough troops on the ground for such large-scale operations and will increasingly have to depend on the Afghans to take the lead. The U.S.-led coalition is keen to show that the 330,000-strong Afghan forces are capable of filling in a vacuum left by the withdrawal of 33,000 U.S. forces by the end of September. It also wants to use them more and more in operations against insurgent forces in key battlegrounds such as the east. Last week Afghan forces carried out an operation in eastern Nuristan, a Taliban stronghold, with only support from coalition forces. “This was yet another example of the successful transition we have been seeing throughout the past year, as the ANSF are planning, leading and executing very productive combat operations against the insurgency,� Allen said. “We expect to see more of these types of successful ANSF-led operations as we progress further into the spring and summer,� he added. Afghan forces are to peak at 352,000 by the end of the year and are expected

A3

ly to be in the mix, and they could help Romney mitigate some political liabilities. Chief among those vulnerabilities is his wealth of as much as $250 million and his struggle to connect with working-class voters.

Former two-term Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty comes from a workingclass background that could help. He’s been aggressively campaigning on Romney’s behalf since suspending his presidential campaign last year.

GOP budget guru Paul Ryan, R-Wis., also came from humble beginnings. Ryan campaigned at Romney’s side for several days ahead of Wisconsin’s recent Republican primary, a victory that helped push Rick Santorum out of the race. It’s unclear whether R yan’s role as face of the Congressional Republican budget plan, which includes a fundamental transfor mation of Medicare, would present too much political risk.

Over the coming months, the only thing that’s certain in an otherwise uncertain process is that Palin’s shadow — and the troubles of 2008 — will be looming large.

“There’s one thing the people in the Republican establishment agree on: There was clearly not a thorough thought process or vetting that went into the vetting of Sarah Palin. They didn’t ask the fundamental questions or spend enough time with her,� said Sara Fagen, a former political director for President George W. Bush. “I don’t think they’re going to make the same mistake.� to take over much of the fighting as the U.S. draws down an additional 23,000 troops to 68,000 by the end of September. U.S. troop levels reached a high of about 100,000 last year.

Estimates of the Taliban fighting force hover around 25,000.

The Afghan ar my and police are now in charge of security for areas home to half the nation’s population, with coalition forces in a support role. The coalition hopes to keep handing over control until Afghan forces are fully in charge by the end of 2013, with all combat troops scheduled to withdraw from the country by the end of 2014.

The U.S. may retain a small number of forces past that date to help train and mentor the Afghan army and help with counterterrorism efforts. There is very little appetite in Western countries for keeping troops in Afghanistan, but U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker said Sunday’s attack shows the danger of withdrawing inter national forces too quickly.

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A2 Tuesday, April 17, 2012

GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Rabies prompts Carlsbad cat program suspension

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A rabies outbreak in Carlsbad has prompted a local shelter to suspend efforts to trap feral cats. Volunteers for the program run by the Noah’s Ark Animal Shelter recently trapped a rabid skunk and learned that it had tangled with a group of feral cats. The group traps feral cats in Carlsbad so they can be vaccinated, spayed or neutered and released back into the wild.

STATE BRIEFS

Heinrich holds campaign cash edge over Balderas

SANTA FE (AP) — Democrat Martin Heinrich has nearly four times more campaign cash than his opponent, Hector Balderas, in the race for New Mexico’s open U.S. Senate seat, according to the latest financial reports. Heinrich, a two-ter m congressman from Albuquerque, reported a cash balance of more than $1.5 million at the end of March. Balderas, who is the state auditor, had cashon-hand of $394,890 in the race for the Senate seat being vacated by fiveterm Democratic Sen. Jeff Bingaman. The state’s primary election is June 5. The filing deadline was Sunday for the latest quarterly campaign finance report. In the race for the Republican nomination, former Congresswoman Heather Wilson’s campaign reported a balance of more than $1.4 million and Las Cruces businessman Greg Sowards had $705,861. Wilson collected contributions of about $757,823 from January through March. Sowards, who

The shelter’s board suspended the program because of the danger last week. At least a dozen Eddy County residents have been forced to get rabies shots this year, and more than 30 pet dogs have been euthanized because of exposure. Noah’s Ark Director Angela Cary told the Carlsbad Current-Argus (http://bit.ly/IdAP3q) that the shelter is not abandoning the program, just sus-

owns a day care business, loaned his campaign $100,000 and collected $4,135 in contributions from individuals, according to a finance report summary released by his campaign on Monday. The latest loan boosted to slightly more than $1.1 million the amount of personal money Sowards has pumped into the race. Heinrich raised $489,346 during the quarter and spent $301,938. Balderas collected net contributions of $126,897 and had operating expenditures of $165,109. Wilson spent $374,715 in the quarter, and Sowards’ expenditures were $35,235.

Tucumcari Probation and Parole Office burns down

TUCUMCARI (AP) — Authorities are investigating a fire that destroyed the Tucumcari Probation and Parole Office. The fire was reported about 3:45 a.m. Monday and there’s no immediate word on the possible cause of the blaze. Adjacent offices suffered smoke damage. The New Mexico Corrections Department has occupied the building for about 20 years.

pending it until the rabies outbreak wanes. “Unfortunately, more stray/feral cats will be euthanized in the next few months than ever, but we are doing so in an attempt to protect the people and pets in the community,” Cary said. Carlsbad Police Department Lt. Jennifer Moyers said most of the cats that tangled with the rabid skunk have been trapped and animal control officers

are still attempting to trap the remaining three cats in the group. A rabid skunk was also observed with a group of more than 10 feral cats on Canal Street. Moyers said last week that seven of the cats have been trapped and animal control officers continue to trap in that area. Cary said residents are conditioned to “run the other way” if they encounter a skunk, but their first instinct with a

The department now is in the process of moving to the District Courthouse by the end of this month. In preparation for the move, all the files were taken out of the office last Friday and taken to the Clovis Office.

To ensure no bacteriological contamination occurred during the outage, the NMED required the water be tested before the advisory was lifted.

Boil advisory being lifted for NM Water Works

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The state Environment Department’s Drinking Water Bureau is lifting the precautionary boil water advisory for the New Mexico Water Works water system in Bernalillo County. The system has about 30 connections serving an estimated 115 people. NMED issued the precautionary advisory April 12 following a water outage. KRQE-TV says the advisory applied only to drinking water for the New Mexico Water Works water system and didn’t extend to any of the other surrounding water systems. New Mexico Water Works water system consumers were advised to seek an alternate source of drinking water such as bottled water, or boil the water for five minutes before drinking, cooking and dishwashing.

First contract awarded for Navajo water project

GALLUP (AP) — Federal of ficials say they have awarded the first construction contract for work on the massive federal Navajo-Gallup Water Supply Project. The 280-mile, $1 billion pipeline project will serve more than 43 Navajo communities in New Mexico and Arizona, the city of Gallup and a portion of the Jicarilla Apache Nation in northern New Mexico. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced the $10.75 million contract with Idaho-based McMillen LLC on Monday. The company will be placing the first four miles of the pipeline near Twin Lakes in wester n New Mexico. Federal officials say the first water delivery to Navajo communities could happen in two to three years. The pipeline project was authorized by legislation passed by Congress in

Boy to school officials: Mom, sister dead at home

LAS VEGAS (AP) — A 9year -old boy arrived at school Monday with a grisly story: His mother and sister were dead at their home four blocks away. Minutes later, police found the bodies of a 10year-old girl and her mother — along with a bloodcovered father and an unharmed 4-year-old boy — in a modest home in a West Las Vegas neighborhood, authorities said. The five people belonged to a single family, police Officer Jacinto Rivera said. The man, who was hospitalized with a head injury, was not immediately identified as a suspect or charged. Police wouldn’t immediately say how or when the slayings occurred, but Rivera said there was no immediate evidence of a

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break-in at the home or that a suspect was on the loose. One neighbor, Lucinda Jackson Griffith, said she heard at least one gunshot early Monday. Longtime neighbor, Dick Webb, said he had walked past the home less than 90 minutes before the boy arrived at school. He said he didn’t notice anything amiss. Rivera called it too early in the investigation to determine a motive, and said investigators were working carefully to collect evidence inside the singlestory stucco home with a motorcycle and two sport utility vehicles in the driveway. “We get one shot at a homicide scene. Our No. 1 priority is to find out what happened,” the police

SOIL TEMPS

NW Roswell 53° EGP 52° Dexter 52° S. of Hagerman 49° Hagerman 60° Average 53°

spokesman said. “Right now we don’t know what happened.” Clark County spokesman Erik Pappa said the 4-yearold and 9-year -old boys were in the custody of child protective services because they didn’t have an adult caregiver. Clark County Department of Family Services officials planned to try to locate other relatives before placing the boys together with a foster family, department spokeswoman Christine Skorupski said. Police cordoned off the entire block near the home during their investigation. Officials said the boy was uninjured when he arrived at Mabel Hoggard Elementary School, where his older sister also was enrolled. Principal Celese Rayford declined comment.

Clark County School District spokeswoman Amanda Fulkerson wouldn’t describe how or what the boy told school officials, or whether other students were told what happened. School administrators quickly notified police about the boy’s story and began mobilizing its crisis response team to help students process the tragedy, Fulkerson said. The campus, with about 450 students in grades kindergarten through 5, was “struggling to sort out emotions and details of a tragedy that claimed the life of a student at home this weekend,” she said. Students also were being reminded that school “is always a safe zone with caring adults that can help in uncertain situations,” Fulkerson said.

“Real Estate Corner”

HOME SALESMANSHIP

by Connie DeNio of Roswell 622-7191 or 626-7948

One person’s negative can be another’s positive. This is true when it comes to selling your house. Assess your home’s features. Think of ways to turn potential disadvantages into appealing advantages for the buyer. Do you have a huge unruly yard? To a gardener your lot could mean many wonderful

outdoor hours. It is a teeny, tiny yard? That’s great for a person on the go who doesn’t want to be saddled with weekends of weeding. Every home has its attractions for the right buyer. Playing them up as features, not faults, can pave the road to selling success. ©

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friendly cat, especially when it approaches a child, is to pet it. “The only thing that will keep us from having to euthanize more pets is if every owner in Carlsbad does the right thing and keeps their animals up-todate on rabies vaccinations,” she said. “If rabies gets a foothold in the huge feral cat population, it would be extremely dangerous for pets and people, especially children.”

Each year, about 50 to 70 New Mexicans receive post-exposure treatment for rabies. But health officials were alarmed by the concentration of 12 treatments in a single county in just a couple of months. The cause of the outbreak appears to be a combination of a large skunk population and the region’s extended drought, forcing skunks to look for food in areas where there are people and pets.

2009. The legislation settled Navajo water rights claims in the San Juan River Basin.

accepted the bond application last week. A final vote is expected next month.

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A proposed recycling plant is expected to employ 35 people when it’s completed. The project proposed for Albuquerque’s North Valley neighborhood is expected to create about 135 direct construction jobs. The plant would have 35 full-time employees when it’s completed. The Albuquerque Journal reports that Friedman Recycling of Albuquerque LLC has asked county commissioners to consider approving $16 million in industrial revenue bonds, a financing mechanism that provides tax incentives. Under the deal, Friedman would spend about $19.5 million to acquire land and build a 70,000square-foot processing warehouse. As part of the deal, the company would get about $1.9 million in property tax breaks over a 30-year period. The county commission

SANTA FE (AP) — A new campaign finance report shows a national labor union continues to pour money into a New Mexico political action committee that’s critical of Republican Gov. Susana Martinez. A report filed with the Federal Election Commission shows the Independent Source PAC received $90,000 from the Communications Workers of America in January and February. The union contributed $100,000 last year. The PAC spent $91,251 from January through March, including nearly $12,900 for cable television advertising that it said was in support of President Barack Obama. The group has issued reports critical of the governor’s education secretary and the awarding of a lease allowing the Downs at Albuquerque to build a larger casino at the state fairgrounds. The PAC had cash-onhand of about $9,200 at the end of March.

National union gives Proposed NM $90K to NM political recycling plant expected to employ 35 group

Could better tornado warnings cause complacency? OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Forecasters who issued dire warnings ahead of last weekend’s tornado outbreak in the Midwest deemed the effort a success Monday, largely because dozens of tornadoes caused only a handful of deaths. But they expressed concern about future public complacency. The National Weather Service’s Storm Prediction Center issued a rare highrisk warning days ahead of the storms, sternly urging residents across several states to prepare for “life-threatening” weather. State officials and residents in communities where tornadoes hit praised the effort, noting only six lives were lost. But many of the tornadoes touched down in rural areas, mostly in Kansas. Forecasters worried that could result in people tuning out future

warnings because they were not in this outbreak’s path. It was only the second time in the National Weather Service’s history that the agency labeled an approaching storm system as “high risk” more than 24 hours in advance. The other time was in April 2006, when nearly 100 tornadoes raked across the southeastern U.S. Both times, the early predictions were on target. Meteorologist Rick Smith said he hopes that for residents who prepared and were spared, that their work doesn’t lead to complacency. “I don’t want people to think preparedness efforts are ever wasted,” Smith said. “The weather radios people bought, the plans people reviewed on Friday and Saturday, it’s not like you’re never going to use those again.”

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A4 Tuesday, April 17, 2012

OPINION

Roswell Daily Record

Gary Johnson morphs into a presidential contender

Gary Johnson hasn’t forgotten who he is. Maybe our former governor couldn’t elbow his way into Republican presidential debates, but he hasn’t been ignored by the media. Recently, he was even on Comedy Central’s “Colbert Report,” where he held his own with comedian-satirist Stephen Colbert — no easy feat. I once harpooned Johnson’s rambling speeches and off-topic digressions, but today he’s a poised speaker who communicates clearly and stays on message. The political caterpillar has become a butterfly. His message: He’s fiscally conservative and socially tolerant and believes most Americans are too. He wants a balanced budget and supports gay marriage. He would protect privacy and legalize marijuana. He would reduce spending, reframe entitlement programs, and end the wars. “We should have gotten out of

SHERRY ROBINSON ALL SHE WROTE

Afghanistan 11 years ago,” he said in an interview with Politico. “Romney is saying we should stay in Afghanistan until the mission is accomplished. What does that mean?” Obama, he said, has “doubled down” on an unpopular and directionless war and might try to score political points with a strike on Iran before the November election. Johnson, who is 59 but looks 40, recently said he can do all these things as a Libertarian and intends to wear that mantle for the long haul. Because he’s been campaigning

outside the state, we haven’t kept up with Johnson, but last week he popped back in view. In an interview in Nevada, he said Republican presidential front runner Mitt Romney’s choice of our very own Gov. Susana Martinez as running mate would be a “Palin-esque” mistake because of her inexperience and her hardline stand on illegal immigrants. We all know that for many reasons Martinez outshines former veep candidate Sarah Palin. In his choice of words, Johnson wasn’t so much making a direct comparison as simply pointing out Martinez’s weaknesses. She, like the president, is still climbing the learning curve. For months, pundits, bloggers and barbershop prognosticators have speculated on Martinez’s potential contributions to the Republican ticket and her chances of becoming the nominee for vice president. The usual argument is she’d help with the

Hispanic and female vote. That’s only until those voters hear about her crusade to end driver’s licenses for undocumented immigrants and her elimination of the Commission on the Status of Women. (The governor responded that while she opposes driver’s licenses, she supports guest worker programs.) Martinez has said firmly she isn’t interested, and we want to believe her, but why the constant presence of a political consultant whose fingerprints seem to be on everything she does? And that, says one observer, may be at least partially behind Johnson’s comment. New Mexico political blogger Joe Monahan wrote that it seems “Johnson has a basic lack of respect for Martinez. ... He sees her as a puppet, not the independent thinker and actor” he considers himself to be. Then Monahan indulges in some armchair analysis and spec-

ulates that Johnson may also envy Martinez’s limelight. Nah. The comment was just Johnson speaking his mind. As usual. From my own armchair, I doubt that envy is a familiar emotion to Johnson. He’s comfortable with himself and with being the longshot candidate. In the same spirit he enters triathlons or climbs Mount Everest, he enjoys the challenge of coming from behind and making a dent in political discourse. Johnson is confident he can prevail at the Libertarian Party’s national convention May 5 in Las Vegas; his nine opponents are unknowns. Currently, he’s polling at 7 percent against Obama and Romney. If he can reach 15 percent, he could take the stage against the major -party candidates, and say all the things they can’t say. That alone makes his run worthwhile. © New Mexico News Services 2012

EDITORIAL

Obamacare darkens fiscal outlook

A new study has concluded that President Barack Obama’s health care law, which the Supreme Court could wholly or partially invalidate within a few months, would add $530 billion to the federal budget deficit by 2021. Gover nment debt already is $15.6 trillion, and will be trillions higher by that date, even without the added burden of Obamacare. The study is by Charles Blahous, a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and is titled “The Fiscal Consequences of the Affordable Care Act.” Blahous is a conservative. But in 2010, President Obama appointed him a Republican trustee for Medicare and Social Security. The study’s summary: “Supporters argued that this comprehensive health care reform would deliver a much-needed correction to the government’s unsustainable fiscal outlook and would benefit the country’s overall fiscal situation. However, between now and 2021, the ACA is expected to add as much as $530 billion to federal deficits while increasing spending by more than $1.15 trillion. Despite the fondest hopes from its supporters, the passage of the ACA unambiguously darkens a dim fiscal picture.” Backers of Obamacare attacked Blahous’ study. Jonathan Chait wrote in New York magazine: “He’s assuming that Medicare’s deficits will automatically go away. Therefore, the roughly $500 billion in Medicare savings that Obama used to help cover the uninsured is money that Blahous assumes the government wouldn’t have spent anyway.” Well, Medicare itself cost just $3 billion when it started in 1966. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ CPI Inflation Calculator, that should have risen to $20 billion in 2010. But because of cost inefficiencies and new care and coverage mandates added by Congress, the actual price tag in 2010 was $560 billion — 28 times as much. “While the Obama administration is all over the airwaves today trying to discredit Charles Blahous’ new study, he is a respected scholar whose statistics, I believe, are accurate,” Sally Pipes told us; she’s the president and CEO of the Pacific Research Institute in San Francisco and an expert on medical finances. Her new book is “The Pipes Plan: The Top 10 Ways to Dismantle and Replace Obamacare.” She added that the president had two goals: “bending the cost curve down and achieving universal coverage. Neither goal is going to be met. For obvious political reasons the administration does not like to focus on the true cost. Remember, the president wanted a health care bill that cost no more than $900 billion over 10 years. The Congressional Budget Office recently revised upward its original estimate of $940 billion over 10 years to $1.76 trillion from 2012-22. That is almost double the original CBO estimate that was released following the president signing the bill into law on March 23, 2010.” It’s just what we should expect from a 2,700-page legislative monstrosity. When the administration was making oral arguments in defense of the law before the U.S. Supreme Court last week, Justice Steven Breyer commented, “I haven’t read every word of that, I promise. So what do you propose that we do, other than spend a year reading all this?” And he’s a Democrat, appointed by President Bill Clinton, likely to approve the law’s contested mandate that all Americans obtain government-approved health insurance or pay a penalty. His words were an echo of Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-San Francisco, when as House speaker she was ramming the legislation through Congress in 2010, she said, “We must pass Obamacare to find out what’s in it.” The evidence keeps coming in that Obamacare is the equivalent of putting leeches on people — just trillions more expensive. Guest Editorial The Orange County Register

The hunting of people has to end

When night falls, people are being hunted in our country, hunted by men wearing camouflage and carrying assault weapons. Hunted like prey. On the evening of April 8, in Pima County, Ariz., men dressed in military gear shot at a pickup truck carrying people who likely were unarmed. They were not able to fight back when the bullets began to rain down on them. Two people ended up dead. This happened in an area of Arizona where many undocumented immigrants are known to cross the border

Doonesbury

DEAR DOCTOR K: I am a 42-year-old man who drinks alcohol pretty much every day. Although I don’t feel “out of control” from the amount I drink, I know it’s more than the recommended amount. How can I nip this in the bud before it goes too far? DEAR READER: If you have just one drink a day, there’s evidence that this actually may be healthy. More than two drinks a day for men under 65, more than one a day for men over 65, or more than one a day for a woman of any age can raise the risk of alcoholrelated diseases. One alcohol-related dis-

MARIA HINOJOSA SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

into the U.S. I can only guess that these unidentified camouflaged men have been on the hunt before. Reports of two previously unknown border vigilante operations, including one that apparently hired U.S. Marines as paid mercenaries, surfaced

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

ease is addiction to alcohol. Alcohol addicts — true alcoholics — need alcohol to function every day, and can experience unpleasant withdrawal symptoms if they don’t have something to drink. So if your daily alcohol intake is potentially unhealthy, it is something to be concerned about. Most

last summer when a computer hacking group released internal documents attributed to the Arizona Department of Public Safety. I also can only guess that government officials know about these groups and have done nothing. In fact, this is the modus operandi of our own government. Every night, our government sends out agents of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s National Fugitive Operations Program to hunt down “fugitives” and find them in their

people who overindulge with alcohol are not true alcoholics. However, a growing number of people drink more than they should. Even though they have not yet reached the point of needing alcohol to function, they are on a slippery slope. That’s why addressing your overindulgence sooner rather than later is a good idea. Like you, most people who are concerned they may be drinking too much want to cut down rather than quit altogether. For some, cutting down is possible. But others eventually find that See DR. K, Page A5

homes in the wee hours of the mor ning. These agents misidentify themselves by wearing outfits that say “POLICE” on their baseball caps and their black jackets. But these ICE agents are not members of a police unit. They are immigration agents. And yet, on a daily basis, they misrepresent who they are — a basic violation of how we believe legal authorities should operate in our country. The fugitives these immi-

See HINOJOSA, Page A5

25 YEARS AGO

April 17, 1987 • Edward N. David and Sharon M. Fer ns, both of Roswell, received degrees from Texas Tech University at the conclusion of the 1986 fall semester. David, 23, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward David of Roswell, received a bachelor of business degree in administration, marketing. He is a 1982 graduate of Goddard High School. Ferns, 23, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Ferns of Roswell, graduated magna cum laude and received a bachelor of fine arts degree in interior design. She is a 1981 graduate of Roswell High School.


LOCAL

Roswell Daily Record

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

A5

Books offer advice on how to grow plants in the Southwest LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

The 2012 theme for National Volunteer Week is Volunteers — Everyone Counts. Volunteerism takes many forms and is performed by a wide range of people. Ivan Scheier, volunteer and author of several books about volunteering, states, “The broadest, and maybe the most meaningful definition of volunteering: Doing more than you have to because you want to, in a cause you consider good.” The staff of the Roswell Public Library would like to thank all the special people who volunteer at the library or through library related programs. Books On Wheels volunteers deliver library books to those unable to visit the library. Books Again, the used book store operated by members of the Friends of the Library organization, uses the proceeds to benefit the library. The Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania Ave., is open Monday and Tuesday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., on Wednesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and on Sunday from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information or to ask a question, call (575) 6 2 2 - 7 1 01, email rplref@roswellpubliclibrary.org using “Question” in the subject line, or by text messaging, just text AskRPL to 66746. Librarians are available to help.

Book Talk

April is National Landscape Architecture Month. Landscape architects plan and design land

LETTERS

areas for parks, recreational facilities, gardens and other properties. However, at this time of year when stores tempt the eyes with beautiful plants, the gardening bug can bite anyone. Amanda Davis, reference librarian, reminds us that the climate and soil around Roswell may make it dif ficult to grow everything we see in the stores and catalogs. Worry not, because the library has plenty of books for gardeners whether they have a “green thumb” or a “not-so-green thumb.” From basic gardening information to the unique needs of the Southwest, plant lovers will find books to improve their gardening adventures. Jeff Gillman and Meleah Maynard provide a handy guide for getting down to the basics on growing a better garden in “Decoding Gardening Advice: the Science Behind the 100 Most Common Recommendations.” Although some books can overwhelm with information making it hard to find useful advice, the explanations and examples in this title are detailed without being verbose. The authors break down the information into chapters by subject; featuring soil, watering, pest/disease control, mulch, bulbs, vegetables and even lawn care. At the beginning of each chapter, different gardening tips associated with that sub-

Obama and the courts

Dear Editor: I was not expecting to hear President Obama speak out against activist judges. For decades, our liberals have depended on the courts to accomplish what voters would find repugnant. A good example was the recent decision by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals which stuck down California’s Proposition 8. Proposition 8 was an amendment to the California Constitution, duly passed by the voters of that state, declaring a marriage to be between a man and a woman. The federal court ruled it was unconstitutional. Where was the outrage by our president? Obama seemed to be threatening the Supreme Court justices who might soon overturn his Health Care Reform Act (Obamacare). He was reported as saying, “I’d just remind conservative commentators that for years what we’ve heard is the biggest problem on the bench is judicial activism or a lack of judicial restraint — that an unelected group of people would somehow overturn a duly constituted and passed law.” We must wonder what President Obama learned at Harvard Law School. In his lifetime, he has seen the courts use legal gymnastics to decide that a woman has a right to destroy an unborn baby in her womb (Roe vs. Wade 1973). In 1963 (Engel v. Vitale), our high court decided that prayer in public schools is unconstitutional. Hmmm, why did no one ever come to that conclusion in the previous 171 years since the First Amendment was

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

they need to stop completely — that’s easier for them than cutting down. For them, drinking a little alcohol seems to breed a desire to drink more. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism suggests the following steps to help people cut back on their drinking: — Put it in writing. Make a list of the reasons to curtail your drinking, such as feeling healthier, sleeping better or improving your relationships. — Set a drinking goal. Set a limit on how much you will drink. Keep your drinking below the recommended guidelines. This means no more than one standard drink per day for women, as well as men ages 65 and older. And no more than two standard drinks per day for men under 65. — Keep a diary of your drinking. For three to four weeks, keep track of every time you have a drink. Include informa-

tion about what and how much you drink. Compare this to your goal. If you’re having trouble sticking to your goal, discuss it with your doctor or another health professional. — Don’t keep alcohol in your house. Particularly if you have set a goal of drinking no alcohol, having none at home can help limit your drinking. — Choose alcohol-free days. Decide not to drink a day or two each week. You may want to abstain for a week or a month to see how you feel physically and emotionally without alcohol in your life. One r e s ou r c e y o u might find helpful is the new book “Almost Alcoholic” by my Harvar d M e d i ca l S c h o ol c olleagues Robert Doyle, M . D . , a n d J os e p h N o w in s k i , P h .D . You can find out more about i t at my website, www.AskDoctorK.com. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. Go to his website to send questions and get additional information.)

Shop the classifieds

ject are relegated into segments as “Good Advice,” “Advice That’s Debatable,” “Advice That’s Just Wrong.” The tips consist of one or two pages and offer “the real dirt” tidbits. The scientific facts back up the advice to make this a welcome primer on starting a garden the right way. Container gardening is the practice of growing plants exclusively in containers instead of planting them in the ground. Scott Calhoun and L ynn Hassler’s “Hot Pots: Container Gardening in the Arid Southwest” offers inspiration for a plant paradise located on a porch, patio, balcony, etc. One reason container gardening is popular with growers is the flexibility in design and the creativity of the containers, a bonus as there are many alternatives to store-bought pots. The book’s photos are bright and gorgeous, showing off the various colors that can be achieved, even for those living in the high plains or desert. It is a very list-oriented guide, so that the gardener can just read through the names and descriptions of specific flowers to see what to expect and how best to care for them. “Hot Pots” shows just how “hot” pot container growing can be with its festive approach to gardening. For more of a guidebook to your Southwest planting needs, check out Baker Morrow’s “Best

Plants For New Mexico Gardens and Landscapes: Keyed to Cities and Regions in New Mexico and Adjacent Areas;” Greg Starr’s “Cool Plants for Hot Gardens: 200 Water -Smart Choices for the Southwest;” or Tom Whitson’s “Weeds of the West.”

What’s Happening?

This week’s free story and craft hours will highlight How Does Your Garden Grow on Wednesday and Batter Up on Saturday. Kids who participate in the story portion of the program will enjoy using their imagination and precut materials to create crafts related to the story theme. The stories may vary between programs and the quantity of some craft items may be limited. The How Does Your Garden Grow Wednesday story times begin at 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. The fun books might feature “How Does Your Garden Grow,” “Grandmother’s Garden” or “Up, Down, and Around” or a felt board presentation of Tops and Bottoms in the afternoon. Crafts may include using a paper tube to create a planter pot and then “planting” paper flowers and vegetables in the planter, designing plant markers or decorating a gardening hat. Come celebrate the beginning of baseball season during the Batter Up story time on Saturday at 2 p.m. The bases could be loaded with stories such as “Take Me Out to the Ballgame,” “First Base Hero,” “Clorinda Plays Baseball” or “The First Pitch: How Baseball Began.” Following the stories, participants will be treated to a “seventh inning stretch”

ratified? Obama actually has a valid point. The Constitution of the United States does not give the judicial branch the authority of constitutional review. The court assumed that role in the 1803 Marbury vs. Madison case. We see a problem with consistency, however. Is he really against activist judges or just the ones who disagree with him? In fact, the President himself appointed as Supreme Court justice — perhaps the queen of activist judges — Sonia Sotomayor. As a justice on the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals, she was quoted as saying, “The court of appeals is where policy is made.” Where policy is made? The role of the judicial branch is to interpret the law, not make policy. One difference between the recent hearings and some of the other cases mentioned above: Obamacare is clearly unconstitutional. Nowhere can we find precedent for forcing people to buy health insurance. Mr. Obama sounds like a bully used to getting his way. We must hope that in the November election, we put people in office who have a more balanced perspective. Thank you. Russell A. Scott Roswell

Contraceptives play important role

Dear Editor: I would like to offer a response to the letter published Sunday, April 8, written by Delma Craig.

Hinojosa Continued from Page A4

gration agents are looking for are often legal immigrants. They have green cards and have lived here for years. They are your neighbors, and at some point in their history, they may have committed a nonviolent crime and served their time. But now they are being hunted by immigration officials so they can be captured and put into detention facilities, then deported, oftentimes with no access to a lawyer or a judge. Like the men who were killed in that pickup truck in Arizona, no one gets a chance to hear from them. They are just numbers on a page, numbers to be hunted and added to the tally of the 400,000 people Congress has funded ICE to deport. I am saddened that we live in a country where a man can shoot an unarmed teenager and not be arrested for weeks, where an ignorant 19-year-old can go out with

surprise. For the crafts, kids will create a baseball bead trinket and use baseball graphics to decorate a foam visor and a pair of paper sunglasses.

Books Again

If you love to read, if you love to purchase books for yourself or if you love to give books as gifts, Books Again is the place to shop for bargains. This is a used book store that could have you shouting “Eureka, look at what I found.” Each month features a special sale and in April, all religion, arts and crafts books may be bought for $1 each. There is also a 25 cent table and a section of Harlequin-type romances for 10 cents each. Other materials are still a bargain at approximately one-fourth of the original price. These include fiction in many genres and non-fiction on a wide variety of subjects, with books for children, teens and adults, as well as books on cassette and CD. Members of the Friends of the Library will receive a 10 percent discount. Books Again, 404 W. Second St., is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Parking is located behind the store. Books Again is the primary funding source for the projects of The Friends of the Roswell Public Library. An upcoming program sponsored by the Friends is a visit by Heloise, the icon of household hints on May 17. Attendance is free, but tickets are required as seating is limited. Tickets will be available at the library and at Books Again starting on April 24. Watch for more information.

Ms. Craig, it saddened me to read your letter regarding the mandate requiring insurance companies to pay for contraceptives with no co-pay. I really think it would be an incredibly healing experience if you could find in your heart the same level of Christian love and compassion that motivated President Obama in the drafting of the woman’s health-care mandate. Several surveys have found that over 90 percent of those of the Catholic faith on a regular basis have used, or are presently using, some form of contraceptive. Surveys show that 65 percent of Americans are in favor of this mandate. Also, 24 states presently have very similar mandates regarding women’s health care with no reported ill effects to any religious faith. With all due respect, I find it hard to believe that it is such a major issue as you have made it to be. As 50 percent of all pregnancies are unplanned, I support this mandate in the belief, and hope, it will greatly reduce the number of abortions, as well as reduce the number of unloved and unwanted babies brought into this world to be raised in abusive, dysfunctional homes. Hopefully, an added benefit would be that it will help unload our overloaded health-care system Respectfully, John Grogan Roswell an adult man and shoot unarmed black men in Tulsa, Okla., and where hate crimes are on the rise against Latinos and immigrants. I am deeply uncomfortable that as night falls, people who think they have the best interest of this country carry weapons to hunt people in a war against legal and undocumented immigrants, a practice that has grown on the watch of the current administration. I am saddened to live in a country where our elected leadership does not take the bully pulpit and unite us as one country, one in which people aren’t hunted and pulled from their homes and separated from their children. I also am angry and more committed than ever to speaking out for the good of our country. Maria Hinojosa is an award-winning broadcast journalist. She hosts the Emmy Award-winning “Maria Hinojosa: One-on-One” on PBS, and is the anchor and managing editor of her own NPR show, “Latino USA.” Contact her at mh@futuromediagroup.org. © 2012 by Maria Hinojosa

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A6 Tuesday, April 17, 2012 OBITUARIES

E. Leamon Metcalf

A funeral service is scheduled for 10 a.m., Thursday, April 19, 2012, at Taber nacle Baptist Church for E. Leamon Metcalf, 86, who passed away on Friday, April 13, 2012, in Roswell. The Rev. Pastor Jerry Beaver will be offici-

NATION/OBITUARIES ating with burial to follow at South Park Cemetery. Elmer was born July 9, 1925, in Elida, to John Carroll Metcalf and Effie May Graves. His parents preceded him in death. He is also preceded in death by his daughter Ruby Jean Currin in 2006; three brothers, two sisters, three grandchildren and one great-grandchild; Jessie Ann Arnold Metcalf after 45 years of marriage and Helen Payton Arnold. Elmer is survived by his wife Marie Metcalf of the family in Roswell; daughters Bobbye Heron and husband Ron of Garland, Texas, Georgia Haynes and husband Roy of Artesia, and Susan Stevenson Webber of Georgia; son-in-law John Currin of Dalton, Ga.; sister Lucille Nunnly of

Roswell; seven grandchildren, twenty-eight greatgrandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Elmer was a lifelong resident of Roswell and a member of Tabernacle Baptist Church. He retired from Armstrong Construction as a foreman after 45 years. Elmer was highly respected by all people he came into contact with. He was the most wonderful husband, father, grandfather, uncle and great great-grandfather. He will be missed dearly by all knew him. Pallbearers will be Forest Metcalf, Jerry Metcalf, Roy Lee Ridgway, Dave Bilmier, Kim Talbott and Dale Berry. Honorary pallbearers will be Ron Heron, Ray Haynes, Cary Roberson, Robert Rankin, Leslie Ridgway, Mike McGuffey, Heath

Metcalf, James Mason, Jerry Nunnally and Marion Metcalf. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at ballardfuneralhome.com

Rex B. Vaughan

Rex B. Vaughan was born in Silverton, Texas, to L.V. and Emma Earl Vaughan on Jan. 19, 1928. He passed away on April 14, 2012, in Roswell. Rex was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He was a longstanding member of the N.M. Horsemen’s Association and N.M. Breeders Association. He was a Master of 32 degree Scottish Rite of Freemasonry and Worthy Noble of Mystic Shrine. Rex

Roswell Daily Record was a resident of Ruidoso Downs, almost 40 years. Rex was preceded in death by his parents and three sisters, Waldene, Nettie Mae and Mildred. Survivors include his four children, Vicky Vaughan of Lubbock, Texas, (two grandsons and one greatgrandson); Rod Vaughan and wife Debi of Lakeland, Fla., (three granddaughters and one great-grandson); Pam Williams and husband Wayne of Ruidoso Downs, and Randy Vaughan and wife June of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, (two grandsons). Rex wished to be cremated and no services to be held. Memorial contributions may be made to a favorite charity. His Spirit has been given to the Lord, may he rest in

peace. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at ballardfuneralhome.com In memory of my father‌ Rex Boyd Vaughan You are not forgotten or unloved Your legacy remains and your purpose fulfilled.. Life was hard and trials were many The race is completed and the finish line crossed The scales of justice and mercy prevail Forgiveness is given and received through Christ Rest and rejoice in your new life It was bought and paid for at great price Your burden is lifted at the foot of the cross

As ice cap melts, militaries vie for Arctic edge YOKOSUKA, Japan (AP) — To the world’s military leaders, the debate over climate change is long over. They are preparing for a new kind of Cold War in the Arctic, anticipating that rising temperatures there will open up a treasure trove of resources, long-dreamed-of sea lanes and a slew of potential conflicts. By Arctic standards, the region is already buzzing with military activity, and experts believe that will increase significantly in the years ahead. Last month, Norway wrapped up one of the largest Arctic maneuvers ever — Exercise Cold Response — with 16,300 troops from 14 countries training on the ice for everything from high intensity war fare to terror threats. Attesting to the harsh conditions, five Norwegian troops were killed when their C-130 Hercules aircraft crashed near the summit of Kebnekaise, Sweden’s highest mountain. The U.S., Canada and Denmark held major exercises two months ago, and in an unprecedented move, the military chiefs of the eight main Arctic powers — Canada, the U.S., Russia, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland — gathered at a Canadian military base last week to specifically discuss regional security issues. None of this means a shooting war is likely at the North Pole any time soon. But as the number of workers and ships increases in the High North to exploit oil and gas reserves, so will the need for policing, border patrols and — if push comes to

shove — military muscle to enforce rival claims. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates that 13 percent of the world’s undiscovered oil and 30 percent of its untapped natural gas is in the Arctic. Shipping lanes could be regularly open across the Arctic by 2030 as rising temperatures continue to melt the sea ice, according to a National Research Council analysis commissioned by the U.S. Navy last year. What countries should do about climate change remains a heated political debate. But that has not stopped north-looking militaries from moving ahead with strategies that assume current trends will continue. Russia, Canada and the United States have the biggest stakes in the Arctic. With its military budget stretched thin by Iraq, Afghanistan and more pressing issues elsewhere, the United States has been something of a reluctant northern power, though its nuclear -powered submarine fleet, which can navigate for months underwater and below the ice cap, remains second to none. Russia — one-third of which lies within the Arctic Circle — has been the most aggressive in establishing itself as the emerging region’s superpower. Rob Huebert, an associate political science professor at the University of Calgary in Canada, said Russia has recovered enough from its economic troubles of the 1990s to significantly rebuild its Arctic military capabilities, which were a key to the overall Cold War strategy of the Soviet Union, and has increased its bomber

patrols and submarine activity. He said that has in turn led other Arctic countries — Norway, Denmark and Canada — to resume regional military exercises that they had abandoned or cut back on after the Soviet collapse. Even nonArctic nations such as France have expressed interest in deploying their militaries to the Arctic. “We have an entire ocean region that had previously been closed to the world now opening up,� Huebert said. “There are numerous factors now coming together that are mutually reinforcing themselves, causing a buildup of military capabilities in the region. This is only going to increase as time goes on.� Noting that the Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the globe, the U.S. Navy in 2009 announced a beefed-up Arctic Roadmap by its own task force on climate change that called for a three-stage strategy to increase readiness, build cooperative relations with Arctic nations and identify areas of potential conflict. “We want to maintain our edge up there,� said Cmdr. Ian Johnson, the captain of the USS Connecticut, which is one of the U.S. Navy’s most Arctic-capable nuclear submarines and was deployed to the North Pole last year. “Our interest in the Arctic has never really waned. It remains very important.� But the U.S. remains illequipped for large-scale Arctic missions, according to a simulation conducted by the U.S. Naval War College. A summary released last month found the Navy is “inadequately prepared

AP Photo

In this March 12, photo, Petty Officer Marcos Colon, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., stands beside torpedo tubes on the USS Connecticut, a Sea Wolf-class nuclear submarine, during a port call at a U.S. naval base at Yokosuka, south of Tokyo, Japan.

to conduct sustained maritime operations in the Arctic� because it lacks ships able to operate in or near Arctic ice, support facilities and adequate communications. “The findings indicate the Navy is entering a new realm in the Arctic,� said Walter Berbrick, a War College professor who participated in the simulation. “Instead of other nations relying on the U.S. Navy for capabilities and resources, sustained operations in the Arctic region will require the Navy to rely on other nations for capabilities and resources.� He added that although the U.S. nuclear submarine fleet is a major asset, the Navy has severe gaps elsewhere — it doesn’t have any icebreakers, for example. The only one in operation belongs to the Coast Guard. The U.S. is

currently mulling whether to add more icebreakers. Acknowledging the need to keep apace in the Arctic, the United States is pouring funds into figuring out what climate change will bring, and has been working closely with the scientific community to calibrate its response. “The Navy seems to be very on board regarding the reality of climate change and the especially large changes we are seeing in the Arctic,� said Mark C. Serreze, director of the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado. “There is already considerable collaboration between the Navy and civilian scientists and I see this collaboration growing in the future.� The most immediate

challenge may not be war — both military and commercial assets are sparse enough to give all countries elbow room for a while — but whether militaries can respond to a disaster. Heather Conley, director of the Europe program at the London-based Center for Strategic and International Studies, said militaries probably will have to rescue their own citizens in the Arctic before any confrontations arise there. “Catastrophic events, like a cruise ship suddenly sinking or an environmental accident related to the region’s oil and gas exploration, would have a profound impact in the Arctic,� she said. “The risk is not militarization; it is the lack of capabilities while economic development and human activity dramatically increases that is the real risk.�

Spaniards livid over King Juan Carlos’ elephant hunt

MADRID (AP) — In one fell swoop, King Juan Carlos of Spain has managed to unite right and left, young and old, those with jobs and those without in universal outrage over his tone-deaf African hunting safari. As Spain foundered amid economic woes, what did the 74-year -old monarch do? He slipped away to hunt elephants in southern Africa. Let’s count the ways that miscalculation of elephantine proportions has turned into a public relations disaster. — A lavish trip amid severe economic pain at home. Interest rates for Spanish bonds have risen alarmingly in recent days, with fears mounting that the country could be the next in Europe to need a bailout. Not exactly the right time to go on an exotic holiday that one major newspaper estimated could cost twice a Spanish worker’s average annual wages. Spain is also struggling with 23 percent unemployment — the highest in the 17-nation eurozone — which soars to nearly 50

percent for young workers. The trip makes the king’s earlier comments about how he can’t sleep at night thinking about the country’s unemployed ring rather hollow. “Awful. I think what the king did is awful,� said Angelica Diaz, a 70-year-old homemaker pushing a baby stroller in Madrid. “Because of the lack of solidarity with people here who are going hungry. What he did is wrong. He has to show more humanity.� — A secret trip that even the government did not know about. This particular trip — it is not clear if taxpayer money was used — only became public when the king stumbled and fell before dawn Friday at his bungalow in Botswana and fractured his right hip, forcing an emergency flight home and hip replacement surgery. The El Mundo newspaper said the king had not told Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy’s government of his trip abroad until after the accident. “The prime minister must know at all times where the

head of state is,� El Mundo said in an editorial. — A trip that just adds to royal family gaffes. Juan Carlos’ family has been in the news lately — for all the wrong reasons. The king’s son-in-law Inaki Urdangarin is a suspect in a corruption case, accused of using his position to embezzle several million euros in public contracts through a not-for-profit foundation he ran. Over Easter, the king’s 13-year-old grandson shot himself in the foot with a shotgun, even though by law in Spain you must be 14 to handle a gun. The boy’s father could face a fine. — A trip that even outraged longtime supporters: The conservative newspaper El Mundo ran a cartoon with two scenes: the king’s crown on the ground and the word “Bang! above it� — the loud report of an elephant gun — then the pachyderm thudding to the ground and smashing the crown to bits. The paper said the king has done a lot for Spain, especially overseeing its

transition to democracy after the death of longtime dictator Gen. Francisco Franco in 1975. But its lead editorial on Sunday read “An irresponsible trip at the worst possible time.� Juan Carlos should “admit his mistake and learn from what happened,� the paper said, sounding as if it were admonishing a child. — A trip that blasts a hole in the king’s conservation credentials. The king is an honorary president of the Spanish branch of the World Wildlife Fund — which could raise questions about why an alleged conservation enthusiast is killing some of the most intelligent animals on

NOBLE FINANCE

“We want to make you a loan�

the planet. — A trip that leaves Spain with a fill-in monarch. With his father now out on medical leave for at least a month, 44-year-old Crown Prince Felipe is filling in. No one of any real import is calling for the king to step aside, but some have taken the very rare step of urging him to apologize. But del Rey said the king could not have shown poor-

er lack of judgment with his elephant-hunting trip. He does not expect the king to abdicate, although he said it would be the “elegant� thing to do.

He added that Crown Prince Felipe must be livid — both with his father and with his brother -in-law Urdangarin — for making the Spanish royal family look so bad.

Last Minute IRA Contributions To Be Postmarked No Later Than April 17th.

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I am here to assist you with all your IRA needs. Call Today! 575.625.9282 110 West Country Club Road, Suite 2 Roswell, New Mexico www.cfcoroswell.com

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Roswell Daily Record

BUSINESS REVIEW

FattKidds Zone owner Matthew Little (right) and his brother Frank Little stand in the store. FattKidds Zone is having a big sale this Friday and Saturday. Check it out!

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

A7

FattKidds Zone Tobacco, Pipes and Accessories and Urban Apparel is located at 325 South Main Street (the entrance is off east Tilden Street). They are open from 11:00 a.m. until 9:00 p.m. seven days a week. The phone number is 575-627-5487.

FattKidds Zone will be having a 420 Blowout Sale this Friday and Saturday, April 20 and 21, where everything in the store is “Buy Two get One Free” (equal or less value) FattKidds Zone Tobacco, Pipes and Accessories and Urban Apparel, located at 325 South Main Street, carries Americanmade and imported TobaccoPipes and WaterPipes in a wide variety of sizes and colors made out of Pyrex Glass, acrylic, ceramic and metal. They have custom Alien and animal pieces, Bubblers, Chillums, Steam Rollers, Vaporizers, Hand Held Vaporizers, Stems and Bowls, Glass on Glass, Pull bowl, InsideOut, Percolators, Hookahs, Coals and Shesha. They also carry Rolling Papers, Cigar Wraps, Lighters, Butane, Rollers, Rolling Trays, Zippos, Glass Cleaners, Scales, Storage Safes, Detox and Aromatic Herbal Incense. All for Tobacco use only. You must be 18 years or older with valid I.D. to purchase. FattKidds Zone also carries Urban Apparel for men with name brands such as Coogi, ENYCE, Black Label, Echo and Girbaud. They

also carry football, basketball and baseball jerseys.

FattKidds Zone will be having a 420 Blowout Sale this Friday and Saturday, where everything in the store is

“Buy Two get One Free” (equal or less value.) They will have Glass Blowers on site to create custom pieces for you right before your very eyes.

FattKidds Zone is at 325 S. Main St. in Roswell. The entrance is on Tilden Street on the south side of the building. The phone number is 575-627-5487 and they are open Monday through Sunday from 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

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Just some of the amazing name brand and custom Tobacco WaterPipes here at FattKidds Zone.

Display racks at FattKidds Zone filled with name brand Urban Apparel, with plenty of shorts for the summer heat wave.

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A8 Tuesday, April 17, 2012

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Sunny and warmer

Clear

Wednesday

Sunny; breezy in the p.m.

Thursday

Friday

Mostly sunny and warm

Saturday

Mostly sunny

Mostly sunny

Sunday

Sunny and very warm

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Monday

Very warm with some sun

High 84°

Low 50°

88°/52°

87°/55°

80°/51°

80°/50°

87°/52°

87°/55°

S at 4-8 mph POP: 0%

ESE at 10-20 mph POP: 0%

W at 10-20 mph POP: 5%

NE at 8-16 mph POP: 5%

NE at 6-12 mph POP: 25%

SSE at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

SSE at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

NE at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 5 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 72°/42° Normal high/low ............... 77°/45° Record high ............... 95° in 1925 Record low ................. 27° in 1961 Humidity at noon .................. 17%

Farmington 70/41

Clayton 74/46

Raton 70/36

Precipitation 24 hours ending 5 p.m. Mon. 0.00” Month to date ....................... trace Normal month to date .......... 0.26” Year to date .......................... 0.36” Normal year to date .............. 1.59”

Santa Fe 71/39

Gallup 66/35

Tucumcari 76/49

Albuquerque 72/50

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 76/44

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading 69 0-50

51-100

Good

Moderate

101-150

Ruidoso 69/47

151+

Unhealthy Unhealthy sensitive

T or C 77/51

Source: EPA (Forecast) & TCEQ (Yesterday)

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed. New

Rise 6:25 a.m. 6:24 a.m. Rise 4:14 a.m. 4:45 a.m. First

Apr 21

Apr 29

Set 7:30 p.m. 7:31 p.m. Set 4:35 p.m. 5:30 p.m.

Full

Last

May 5

May 12

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Your intuition lets you know that much is going on behind the scenes. If you tune in, making the right decision is easy. Others rejoice once they understand where you are coming from. Take a walk, center and reorient your thinking. Tonight: Indulge a little more than usual. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH A meeting sets the stage for you to find out more infor mation. You might want to get the opinions of key friends and associates. When the day is done, you’ll realize that others are with you on the right side of the tracks. Tonight: Express your happiness. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH You often wonder about someone you regularly deal with, and now you will get answers. The decision remains: How much do you want to be

Alamogordo 79/49

Silver City 75/43

ROSWELL 84/50 Carlsbad 84/51

Hobbs 80/50

Las Cruces 77/51

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2012

involved with this person? Do you need or want more responsibility? No one says you must decide immediately. Tonight: Deal with an older relative. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Some people are just lucky. Whether you usually fit into this category or not, you do today if you detach and don’t get triggered. Taking risks is emotional for you, yet you are likely to be on the winning side. News that comes in seems too good to be true. Tonight: In the whirlwind of your imagination. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Someone wants to share some uncomfortably intimate details about a situation. Your attitude says “no,” so don’t worry; this person probably will catch on and get a case of lockjaw. Mobilize others’ energy toward a key cause or commitment. Focus on a project, but count on some healthy distractions. Tonight: Respond to a request. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You might be taken aback by someone’s behavior. Take the high

road; rather than judge, be understanding. Detach from triggering situations, and you will be far more content. Your ability to visualize emerges and allows you to complete some details. Tonight: Go along with a friend’s idea. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH You plunge into whatever you are doing, but be aware that this activity is not a solo venture. Let a partner or associate let you know exactly what is going on with him or her. Incorporate this person more frequently into your activities. Tonight: You need some relaxation. Choose a favorite activity SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH You have your own way of saying “yes” or “no.” Sometimes this comes across through your willingness to listen. You delight others when you decide to toss your energy into their activities. The quality of your relationships will get better as a result. Tonight: Don’t try to tell anyone that you are networking as you party away. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-

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Sponsoring Businesses

Roswell Daily Record

Regional Cities Today Wed. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

79/49/s 72/50/s 59/30/pc 85/53/s 84/51/s 61/32/pc 74/46/pc 61/38/s 76/44/s 78/45/s 71/49/s 70/41/s 66/35/s 80/50/s 77/51/s 69/38/pc 67/45/pc 76/44/s 80/51/s 79/46/s 65/35/s 70/36/pc 57/30/pc 84/50/s 69/47/s 71/39/pc 75/43/s 77/51/s 76/49/pc 70/44/pc

86/49/s 78/52/s 64/37/s 90/57/s 88/56/s 65/32/s 80/47/s 68/33/s 83/50/s 85/49/s 77/51/s 75/45/s 70/41/s 84/49/s 87/58/s 74/43/s 73/41/s 82/54/s 85/54/s 82/50/s 69/37/s 76/41/s 60/33/s 88/52/s 75/53/s 75/44/s 84/50/s 82/57/s 87/50/s 74/43/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

Dec. 21) HHHH You might want to rethink a situation in broader terms. Listen to a friend or associate who is dealing with a comparable situation. You might choose to revise your stance. Schedule time with a family member, whether at lunch or later tonight. Tonight: Have a reflective chat. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) HHHH You might start a conversation, but ending it could be a little more difficult. Apparently, you caught this person on a ranting day, where he or she needs to talk and clear his or her chest. Realize what is happening between you and this person. Tonight: Return calls and emails, then decide. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

50/35/pc 76/58/t 76/48/s 76/46/s 76/54/t 58/41/pc 56/38/pc 79/56/s 74/40/pc 56/39/pc 80/58/s 84/70/s 80/59/t 68/47/pc 72/50/pc 81/64/s 78/58/s 78/50/s

52/36/s 71/55/pc 64/45/c 60/45/pc 65/50/sh 70/46/c 62/47/s 81/61/s 74/40/s 64/49/s 87/61/s 85/70/s 82/58/pc 72/51/pc 78/54/pc 81/64/s 75/58/s 82/55/s

U.S. Extremes

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

82/71/pc 80/54/s 60/49/pc 78/58/t 78/49/s 72/53/pc 84/61/pc 77/50/s 90/62/s 65/39/pc 58/43/c 80/56/t 70/51/pc 62/51/pc 70/59/s 57/42/c 86/58/s 75/54/pc

83/71/s 83/61/s 66/40/t 78/62/t 64/48/pc 73/52/t 86/65/pc 64/46/pc 92/66/s 66/44/s 59/48/r 66/53/sh 76/55/pc 66/46/pc 67/60/pc 57/42/r 88/58/s 62/47/c

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 93° .............. Westfield, Mass. Low: 15° .................Big Piney, Wyo.

High: 76° ..........................Carlsbad Low: 15° ..............................Chama

National Cities Seattle 57/42

Billings 60/38 San Francisco 60/48

Minneapolis 60/49

Atlanta 76/58

El Paso 80/58

Houston 80/59 Miami 82/71

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

New York 78/49 Washington 75/54

Kansas City 72/50

Los Angeles 78/58

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Detroit 56/39

Chicago 58/41

Denver 74/40

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE

Feb. 18) HHHH How you handle your finances will have implications on others. Even if you are alone, you will see the impact of your actions. A lifestyle change could make you smile. Be smart in a negotiation. Tonight: Decide to invite friends over. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Your ability to say what you mean while also lightening up the

moment is a tremendous asset. You might note that someone is observing and trying to replicate your style. Pitch in, and help this person lear n to be more diplomatic. Tonight: Reach out for a favorite person.

BORN TODAY Singer Liz Phair (1967), actress Jennifer Gar ner (1972), American financier


SPORTS

Tuesday, April 17, 2012 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

LOCAL SCHEDULE TUESDAY APRIL 17 H.S. BASEBALL 4 p.m. • Hobbs at Roswell (DH) • Goddard at Portales (DH) • NMMI at Dexter H.S. GOLF 8 a.m. • Dexter, Goddard, NMMI, Roswell at Spring Classic, at NMMI Golf Course and Spring River Golf Course

Section

Roswell Daily Record

B

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

NMMI boys run streak to 32 straight LAWRENCE FOSTER RECORD ASST. SPORTS EDITOR

Go to a high school doubles tennis match and you will hear the teams communicating with words like “switch” and “yours.” Then go and watch NMMI’s No. 1 doubles team of Jose Gonzalez and Fed-

erico Sanchez. What isn’t said speaks louder than words could. The Colt duo is so familiar with each other’s game that words aren’t necessary for switches to happen. It is high school doubles at its finest. On Monday against Lovington, Gonzalez and

H.S. SOFTBALL 4 p.m. • Dexter at Loving 5 p.m. • Goddard at Artesia (DH) H.S. TENNIS 3:30 p.m. • Goddard vs. Roswell, at Cahoon Park

SP OR TS SHORTS ALTRUSA GOLF TOURNEY The Altrusa Club of Roswell will host a four-person scramble golf tournament on Saturday, April 21, at NMMI Golf Course. The tournament begins with an 8 a.m. shotgun start. The cost is $80 per player, which includes two mulligans, green fees, car t fees, range balls, breakfast and lunch. The deadline to enter is April 18. Entry forms are available at the NMMI Golf Course pro shop. For more information, call 624-9799 or 622-6033.

ENMMC RACE FOR THE ZOO The 19th annual Eastern New Mexico Medical Center Race for the Zoo will be held on Saturday, May 12, at 8 a.m. at the Spring River Zoo. The event features a 10K run and walk, a 5K run and a 2-mile walk. For more information, call 624-6720.

• More Shorts on B2

NA T I O N A L BRIEFS BRONCOS SIGN WR STOKLEY ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) — Brandon Stokley, who made one of the most famous catches in Broncos history, is returning to Denver to play with old friend Peyton Manning. Stokley signed a oneyear deal with the Broncos Monday. In June, he’ll turn 36, the same age as Manning, whom he played with in Indianapolis from 2003-06. Stokley’s first stint with the Broncos (2007-09) was best known for his “Immaculate Deflection” catch that stunned the Cincinnati Bengals in the 2009 season opener. Down 7-6 with 28 seconds left, Kyle Orton’s underthrown pass to Brandon Marshall was tipped by cornerback Leon Hall and into the hands of Stokley, who raced for an 87-yard TD and a 127 win in Josh McDaniels’ head coaching debut. Stokley played with the Seahawks in 2010 and the Giants last year. He worked out with Manning in March while the quarterback was in Denver to listen to John Elway’s pitch and also has been playing catch with Manning at local high school football fields over the last month. Stokley is a 14th-year pro who was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens in 1999 out of Southwestern Louisiana, which is now called the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He’s played in 131 regular season games with 339 catches for 4,680 yards and 34 TDs. He’s also played in 14 playoff games with 43 catches for 620 yards and six TDs. He won Super titles with Baltimore in 2000 and Indianapolis in 2006.

Days left to register

19

Lawrence Foster Photos

NMMI’s Josh Shure hits a backhand shot during a match in the Colts’ dual match with Lovington, Monday.

Colt Federico Sanchez returns a volley during NMMI’s win over Lovington, Monday.

Sanchez used their cohesiveness to pave the way for NMMI’s 9-0 win over the Wildcats, the Colts’ 32nd consecutive victory. Through the first four games of Gonzalez and

Sanchez’s match against Cameron Crawford and Alfredo Jaras, the score was tied at two, but the Colts took control of the match in the next two games.

Gonzalez had serve to put NMMI back on top and, after giving up a 15-0 lead with an error, the Colts See STREAK, Page B3

Union Rags back atop AP’s Derby rankings

Hansen blew his chance to be a Kentucky Derby favorite. He finished second in the Blue Grass Stakes after a daylong art project in which the near -white colt’s tail was dyed blue, only to be rinsed off before the race. After being beaten by Dullahan on the final weekend of major Derby preps, Hansen has been replaced by Union Rags at No. 1 on the AP’s latest Run to the Roses’ Top 10 list of contenders. Union Rags regained the top spot he held for most of the prep season before his third-place finish after a tough trip in the Florida Derby on March 31. Trained by Michael Matz and owned by Phyllis Wyeth of Chadds Ford Stable, Union Rags comes into the Derby on May 5 with four victories in six starts,

among them the Fountain of Youth in February and the Champagne last October. Hansen, sent off as the 65 favorite in the 13-horse field, took the lead as expected but faded in the stretch as Dullahan rallied for a 1 1⁄4-length win over the synthetic Polytrack at Keeneland. Dullahan’s big win moved the colt trained by Dale Romans into the No. 6 spot. Hansen dropped to No. 8. In Saturday’s other major Derby prep, Bodemeister went wire-to-wire for a 9 1⁄2-length romp over stablemate Secret Circle in the Arkansas Derby at Oaklawn Park. The 1-2 finish for Bob Baffert gives the Hall of Fame trainer a double shot at winning his fourth Kentucky Derby. See ROSES, Page B3

AP Photo

Bodemeister and jockey Mike Smith, far right, lead, from left, Sabercat and jockey Corey Nakatani, Secret Circle and jockey Rafael Bejarano and Cozzetti and jockey Jose Lezcano down the stretch to win the $1,000,000 Arkansas Derby in Hot Springs, Ark., Saturday.

Manning works with new team Local briefs: Rockets

Jacob Tamme, left, and quarterback Peyton Manning talking during workouts in the weight room at the Broncos’ headquarters in Englewood, Colo., Monday.

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) — Peyton Manning is back in his element, barking out calls, throwing passes and working out with his new teammates. It sure beats watching, wondering and worrying. He’s still finding his comfort zone in Denver after spending 14 seasons in Indianapolis, but Manning is back serving as both quarterback and coach on the football field instead of pacing the sideline and wondering when his neck is going to allow him to return to the huddle. Manning and his new teammates reported to the Broncos’ headquarters Monday morning for the start of the team’s offseason conditioning program. After some work in the classroom and weight room, Manning threw passes to his new receivers during some on-field work without the coaches, who aren’t allowed to join them See MANNING, Page B3

in 7th at Spring Classic

The Goddard Rocket boys golf team wrapped up the first day of the Spring Classic in seventh place with a 330 team aggregate. Clovis and Hobbs lead the tournament at 304 and Deming is third at 310. For the Rockets, Ian Rodriguez led the way with an 80, while Ian Garcia shot 81, Tom Snyder shot 82, Bryce Mott shot 87 and Kemp Kuykendall shot 92. Roswell is 14th after the first day at 352. Jake Andreis led the Coyotes with a 78, Henry Candelaria shot 80, Zach Jennings shot 85 and Daniel Lopez carded a 109. NMMI’s Luis Flores shot 82 and teammate Lance Hinkle fired a 105. Dexter’s Nathan Fuller carded a 92. Hobbs’ Kenneth Fadke is the individual leaderboard after a first-round 71 at the NMMI Golf Course. Clovis’ Ethan Peterson is second at 73 and Deming’s Derek Baeza is third at 74. The second round is today at Spring River Golf Course.

Prep baseball

Gateway Chr. 11-12, Loving JV 1-3 The Gateway Christian baseball team swept a pair from the Loving junior varsity squad in convincing fashion on Monday. In Game 1, Gateway raced out to a 4-0 lead in the first and never looked back in a five-inning victory over See BRIEFS, Page B3


B2 Tuesday, April 17, 2012

SPORTS

Montoya inks letter to play at Chaminade

Roswell Daily Record

New Mexico Military Institute sophomore Daniella Montoya signed her national letter of intent to continue her academic and athletic career at Chaminade University in Honolulu on Monday. Montoya will continue her career as a setter under new Silverswords coach Kahala Kabalis, who made Montoya her second signee since taking over the program in January. Montoya was an all-conference and all-region pick in both of her seasons at the Institute and holds the school’s single season and career marks for assists. She helped lead the Broncos to a 45-31 mark during her two seasons under Bronco coach Shelby Forchtner. In 2011, the Robertson (Las Vegas, N.M.) product led the Western Junior College Athletic Conference in assists with 1,391, which set the single-season mark at NMMI. In 2010, Montoya recorded 970 assists. For her career, Montoya finished with 2,361 assists. Montoya, who carries a 3.86 GPA at the Institute, will major in psychology at Chaminade.

Golf

World Golf Ranking By The Associated Press Through April 15 1. Rory McIlroy . . . . . . . . . . . .NIR 2. Luke Donald . . . . . . . . . . .ENG 3. Lee Westwood . . . . . . . . . .ENG 4. Bubba Watson . . . . . . . . . .USA 5. Hunter Mahan . . . . . . . . . .USA 6. Martin Kaymer . . . . . . . . . .GER 7. Steve Stricker . . . . . . . . . . .USA 8. Tiger Woods . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 9. Phil Mickelson . . . . . . . . . .USA 10. Justin Rose . . . . . . . . . . . .ENG 11. Adam Scott . . . . . . . . . . . .AUS 12. Louis Oosthuizen . . . . . . . .SAF 13. Charl Schwartzel . . . . . . . .SAF 14. Webb Simpson . . . . . . . . .USA 15. Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 16. Dustin Johnson . . . . . . . . .USA 17. Jason Day . . . . . . . . . . . . .AUS 18. Graeme McDowell . . . . . . .NIR 19. Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 20. Keegan Bradley . . . . . . . .USA 21. Sergio Garcia . . . . . . . . . .ESP 22. Nick Watney . . . . . . . . . . .USA 23. Brandt Snedeker . . . . . . . .USA 24. Peter Hanson . . . . . . . . . .SWE 25. Ian Poulter . . . . . . . . . . . .ENG 26. K.J. Choi . . . . . . . . . . . . . .KOR 27. Bo Van Pelt . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 28. Mark Wilson . . . . . . . . . . .USA 29. Zach Johnson . . . . . . . . . .USA 30. Jason Dufner . . . . . . . . . . .USA 31. John Senden . . . . . . . . . . .AUS 32. Sang-Moon Bae . . . . . . . .KOR 33. Thomas Bjorn . . . . . . . . . .DEN 34. David Toms . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 35. Carl Pettersson . . . . . . . .SWE 36. Martin Laird . . . . . . . . . . . .SCO 37. Alvaro Quiros . . . . . . . . . . .ESP 38. Simon Dyson . . . . . . . . . .ENG 39. Robert Karlsson . . . . . . . .SWE 40. Anders Hansen . . . . . . . . .DEN 41. Aaron Baddeley . . . . . . . . .AUS 42. Jim Furyk . . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 43. Paul Casey . . . . . . . . . . . .ENG 44. Paul Lawrie . . . . . . . . . . . .SCO 45. Rickie Fowler . . . . . . . . . .USA 46. Francesco Molinari . . . . . . .ITA 47. Fredrik Jacobson . . . . . . .SWE 48. Geoff Ogilvy . . . . . . . . . . .AUS 49. Ben Crane . . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 50. K.T. Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . .KOR

MLB

Major League Baseball At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press American League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .6 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .5 New York . . . . . . . . . .5 Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .5 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .5 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .4 Kansas City . . . . . . . .3 Minnesota . . . . . . . . . .3 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .4 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .3 Sunday’s Games

9.59 9.48 8.27 6.47 5.82 5.58 5.53 5.48 5.32 5.21 5.13 5.12 5.11 4.95 4.86 4.84 4.79 4.79 4.46 4.29 4.15 4.10 4.07 3.96 3.86 3.74 3.42 3.39 3.34 3.22 3.21 3.20 3.17 3.07 3.06 3.02 3.02 3.01 2.98 2.97 2.95 2.91 2.90 2.86 2.86 2.83 2.83 2.77 2.77 2.75

L 4 4 5 5 6

Pct .600 .556 .500 .500 .400

L 2 5 6 6

Pct GB .800 — .545 2 1⁄2 .400 4 .333 4 1⁄2

L 3 4 4 7 7

GB — 1⁄2 1 1 2

Pct GB .700 — .556 1 1⁄2 .500 2 .300 4 .300 4

SPORTS SHORTS PARTY ON THE RIVER SPORTING EVENTS The Yucca Recreation Center is accepting registrations for the Party on the River flag football tournament, the co-ed sand volleyball tournament and the three different tugs-of-war. The flag football tournament will be held on May 7-8 and the deadline to enter is May 4. The cost per team is $80 and six players are allowed per team. The sand volleyball tournament will be held on May 5-6 and the deadline to enter is April 30. The cost is $80 per team and six players are allowed per team. The fiesta tug, powder puff tug and the junior fiesta tug will be held on May 5 at Cahoon Park. The registration fee is $100 for the fiesta and powder puff tugs and $75 for the junior fiesta tug. The deadline to enter is May 4 at 5 p.m. Registration forms for the flag football and sand volleyball tournaments can be picked up at the Yucca Recreation Center office, located at 500 S. Richardson Ave., from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday, and registration forms for the tugs-of-war can be picked up at the Roswell Adult and Senior Center at 807 N. Missouri Ave. For more information, call 624-6796 or 624-6718.

Toronto 9, Baltimore 2 Boston 6, Tampa Bay 4 Cleveland 13, Kansas City 7 Detroit 5, Chicago White Sox 2 Texas 4, Minnesota 3 Seattle 5, Oakland 3 N.Y. Yankees 11, L.A. Angels 5 Monday’s Games Tampa Bay 1, Boston 0 Minnesota 7, N.Y. Yankees 3 Baltimore 10, Chicago White Sox 4, 10 innings Detroit 3, Kansas City 2 Oakland at L.A. Angels, 8:05 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Minnesota (Liriano 0-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 0-0), 5:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Niemann 0-1) at Toronto (R.Romero 1-0), 5:07 p.m. Texas (Lewis 1-0) at Boston (Lester 0-1), 5:10 p.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 0-0) at Chicago White Sox (Danks 1-1), 6:10 p.m. Detroit (Smyly 0-0) at Kansas City (B.Chen 0-0), 6:10 p.m. Oakland (T.Ross 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Haren 0-1), 8:05 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 0-1) at Seattle (Millwood 0-0), 8:10 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 5:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 5:07 p.m. Texas at Boston, 5:10 p.m. Baltimore at Chicago White Sox, 6:10 p.m. Detroit at Kansas City, 6:10 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 8:05 p.m. Cleveland at Seattle, 8:10 p.m.

National League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Washington . . . . . . . . .8 New York . . . . . . . . . .7 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .5 Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .7 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .4 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .4 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . . .4 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .3 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . .3 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Los Angeles . . . . . . . .9 Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Colorado . . . . . . . . . . .4 San Francisco . . . . . . .4 San Diego . . . . . . . . . .3

L 3 3 5 5 6

L 3 6 6 6 7 7

L 1 3 6 6 8

Pct GB .727 — 1⁄2 .700 1 .500 2 ⁄2 .500 2 1⁄2 .400 3 1⁄2 Pct .700 .400 .400 .400 .300 .300

GB — 3 3 3 4 4

Pct GB .900 — .700 2 .400 5 .400 5 .273 6 1⁄2

Sunday’s Games Miami 5, Houston 4, 11 innings Cincinnati 8, Washington 5, 11 innings Atlanta 7, Milwaukee 4 Philadelphia 8, N.Y. Mets 2 St. Louis 10, Chicago Cubs 3 Arizona 5, Colorado 2 Pittsburgh 4, San Francisco 1 L.A. Dodgers 5, San Diego 4 Monday’s Games Washington 6, Houston 3 N.Y. Mets 6, Atlanta 1 San Diego 7, Colorado 1 Arizona 5, Pittsburgh 1 Philadelphia 5, San Francisco 2 Tuesday’s Games Houston (W.Rodriguez 0-1) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 0-0), 5:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Dempster 0-1) at Miami (Jo.Johnson 0-2), 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 0-1) at Atlanta (Delgado 1-0), 5:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 2-0) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 1-1), 6:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 1-0) at St. Louis (Lohse 2-

WALKER AVIATION MUSEUM GOLF TOURNAMENT The Walker Aviation Museum Foundation will hold its second annual golf tournament on May 12 at the NMMI Golf Course. The four-person scramble begins with an 8 a.m. shotgun star t and the cost is $60 per player, which includes breakfast, lunch, hats and awards. Entries are due by May 7. Forms are available at the course, the Roswell Chamber of Commerce, Roswell Livestock and Farm Supply and the Walker Aviation Museum. For more information, call 420-9664.

ALL SAINTS GOLF TOURNEY All Saints Catholic School will hold its annual golf tournament on Saturday, May 19, at Spring River Golf Course. The four-person scramble begins with shotgun starts at 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. The cost is $60 per player and includes green fees, cart fees, two mulligans and lunch. The deadline to enter is May 11. Entry forms are available at the course and at the school. For more information, call 627-5744.

SCOREBOARD

0), 6:15 p.m. San Diego (Bass 0-1) at Colorado (Moyer 02), 6:40 p.m. Pittsburgh (Karstens 0-1) at Arizona (I.Kennedy 2-0), 7:40 p.m. Philadelphia (Blanton 1-1) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 1-1), 8:15 p.m. Wednesday’s Games N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 10:10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Arizona, 1:40 p.m. Houston at Washington, 5:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Miami, 5:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Milwaukee, 6:10 p.m. Cincinnati at St. Louis, 6:15 p.m. San Diego at Colorado, 6:40 p.m. Philadelphia at San Francisco, 8:15 p.m.

NBA

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct x-Boston . . . . . . . . . .36 25 .590 New York . . . . . . . . . .31 29 .517 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .31 29 .517 New Jersey . . . . . . . .22 40 .355 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .22 40 .355 Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct y-Miami . . . . . . . . . . .43 17 .717 x-Atlanta . . . . . . . . . .36 25 .590 x-Orlando . . . . . . . . . .36 25 .590 Washington . . . . . . . .15 46 .246 Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . .7 53 .117 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct y-Chicago . . . . . . . . .46 15 .754 x-Indiana . . . . . . . . . .39 22 .639 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .29 31 .483 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .22 38 .367 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .20 39 .339

NFL

GB — 4 1⁄2 4 1⁄2 14 1⁄2 14 1⁄2

GB — 7 1⁄2 7 1⁄2 28 1⁄2 36

GB — 7 16 1⁄2 23 1⁄2 25

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB — y-San Antonio . . . . . .42 16 .724 Memphis . . . . . . . . . .35 25 .583 8 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 28 .548 10 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .32 29 .525 11 1⁄2 New Orleans . . . . . . .19 42 .311 24 1⁄2 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB — y-Oklahoma City . . . .44 16 .733 Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .34 27 .557 10 1⁄2 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 30 .516 13 Portland . . . . . . . . . . .28 34 .452 17 20 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .25 37 .403 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB — x-L.A. Lakers . . . . . . .39 22 .639 x-L.A. Clippers . . . . . .37 23 .617 1 1⁄2 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . .32 29 .525 7 Golden State . . . . . . .22 37 .373 16 19 Sacramento . . . . . . . .20 41 .328 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division

Sunday’s Games Miami 93, New York 85 L.A. Lakers 112, Dallas 108, OT Sacramento 104, Portland 103 Toronto 102, Atlanta 86 Orlando 100, Cleveland 84 Boston 94, Charlotte 82 Chicago 100, Detroit 94, OT New Orleans 88, Memphis 75 Denver 101, Houston 86 Monday’s Games New Orleans 75, Charlotte 67 Indiana 111, Minnesota 88 Atlanta 109, Toronto 87 Orlando 113, Philadelphia 100 Miami 101, New Jersey 98 Washington 87, Chicago 84 Denver 105, Houston 102 Utah 123, Dallas 121, 3OT Phoenix 125, Portland 107 San Antonio at Golden State, 8:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Indiana at Philadelphia, 5 p.m.

Golf scores

Cleveland at Detroit, 5:30 p.m. Memphis at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Boston at New York, 6 p.m. San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Philadelphia at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Chicago at Charlotte, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at Washington, 5 p.m. Detroit at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m. Toronto at Miami, 5:30 p.m. New York at New Jersey, 5:30 p.m. New Orleans at Memphis, 6 p.m. Orlando at Boston, 6 p.m. Houston at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Denver, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Sacramento, 8 p.m. Utah at Portland, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at Phoenix, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Golden State, 8:30 p.m.

Bradshaw, Williams give support to Saints, Payton

CHOUDRANT, La. (AP) — Former Super Bowl-winning quarterbacks Terry Bradshaw and Doug Williams expressed support for beleaguered Head Coach Sean Payton and the New Orleans Saints on Monday. “I really feel bad for Coach Payton and the Saints,” Bradshaw said during his annual fundraising golf tournament for Louisiana Tech University at the Squire Creek Golf and Country Club. “I like Coach Payton. He’s a good guy. I hate that this became an issue and I thought the suspension handed down was pretty strong. “But I can also understand the message that commissioner (Roger Goodell) is trying to send. It’s just a bad situation that the Saints’ organization has to overcome and move on from and I am confident that they will.” Payton has been suspended for the entire 2012 season as part of the punishment handed down regarding the Saints’ bounty system under former defensive coordinator Gregg Williams. “Honestly, when this came out, I never gave it much of a thought because football is a rough and tumble game,” said Bradshaw, who guided the Pittsburgh Steelers to four Super Bowl titles during his Hall of Fame career. “It’s hit or be hit. I never knew of any bounties being placed on me when I was playing the game because I just assumed every defender was going to try and tackle the guy with the football as hard as he could. I considered myself as a tough player because you have to be tough to play this game.” Williams, the first African-American quarterback ever to start in a Super Bowl and who guided the Washington Redskins to a 42-10 win over the Denver Broncos in 1988, said: “I hate it for Coach Payton because I’m a big fan of his. “It’s going to be tough for a while with him gone, but I believe the Saints will get all of their pieces to the puzzle together and come out OK with this situation. They’ve got a lot of talent on that team. It just might take a little while for everybody to adjust to what has happened.” Asked if he thought bounties were ever placed on him during his career, Williams said, “I never did, but then again I just assumed it was every defender’s goal to try and get the quarterback, regardless of what you want to call it. “You’re talking about football. It’s a tough game.” When asked about adapting to the loss of their coach, Bradshaw said, “I just can’t imagine what it will be like not to have your head coach for an entire season. “But having a great leader such as (Drew) Brees will help. It will be important for them (the Saints) getting him signed because he’s like having a coach out there.”

Transactions

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press

PGA-RBC Heritage Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At Harbour Town Golf Links Hilton Head, S.C. Purse: $5.7 million Yardage: 7,101; Par: 71 Final Round Carl Pettersson (500), $1,026,000 . . . . . . . . . . .70-65-66-69 — 270 Zach Johnson (300), $615,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-68-66-70 — 275 Colt Knost (190), $387,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-66-69-74 — 276 Billy Mayfair (123), $250,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-67-69 — 278 Kevin Stadler (123), $250,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-67-68 — 278 Matt Bettencourt (95), $198,075 . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-68-69 — 279 Boo Weekley (95), $198,075 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-66-70-73 — 279 Harris English (75), $153,900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-68-73-71 — 280 Matt Every (75), $153,900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-73-67 — 280 Jim Furyk (75), $153,900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-75-67-70 — 280 Charley Hoffman (75), $153,900 . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-65-71-70 — 280 Kevin Na (75), $153,900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68-69-73 — 280 Mark Anderson (57), $106,875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-69-68 — 281 Brian Davis (57), $106,875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-68-73 — 281 Robert Garrigus (57), $106,875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-66-70-74 — 281 Vaughn Taylor (57), $106,875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-73-70-71 — 281 Rory Sabbatini (53), $85,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-68-72 — 282 Brandt Snedeker (53), $85,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-67-69-75 — 282 Kevin Streelman (53), $85,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-68-70-70 — 282 Greg Chalmers (50), $66,405 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-73-70 — 283 D.A. Points (50), $66,405 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-68-71-70 — 283 John Rollins (50), $66,405 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-70-71 — 283 Michael Thompson (50), $66,405 . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-70-72 — 283 Cameron Beckman (45), $47,310 . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-66-74 — 284 Chad Campbell (45), $47,310 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-70-72-75 — 284 Jason Dufner (45), $47,310 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78-66-67-73 — 284 Bob Estes (45), $47,310 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-67-75-71 — 284 Mark Wilson (45), $47,310 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72-68-71 — 284 Stephen Ames (39), $34,699 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-74-66-74 — 285 Kevin Chappell (39), $34,699 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-73-70 — 285 Brendon de Jonge (39), $34,699 . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-71-72 — 285 Charles Howell III (39), $34,699 . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-77-68 — 285

LEFT: Daniella Montoya poses for a photo with, front row from left, NMMI assistant coach Pam Grano, NMMI head coach Shelby Forchtner; back row, father Steve Montoya and mother Francis Montoya after signing her national letter of intent to continue her academic and volleyball career at Chaminade University in Honolulu on Monday.

BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended free agent RHP Estarlin Arias 50 games after he tested positive for metabolites of Boldenone, a performanceenhancing substance, under the minor league drug prevention and treatment program. National League SAN DIEGO PADRES—Activated INF-OF Mark Kotsay from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Brad Brach to Tucson (PCL). SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Agreed to terms with LHP Madison Bumgarner on a six-year contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS—Signed C Mikki Moore. WASHINGTON WIZARDS—Signed G Morris Almond. Waived Roger Mason Jr. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS—Signed S Rashad Johnson, RB LaRod Stephens-Howling and CB Greg Toler to one-year qualifying offers. Signed QB Rich Bartel, RB Alfonso Smith, DE Ronald Talley and LB Brandon Williams. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Signed LS Clark Harris and S Jeromy Miles. DALLAS COWBOYS—Released K Kai Forbath. BRONCOS—Signed WR DENVER Brandon Stokley to a one-year contract. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Signed WR Lee Evans to a one-year contract. Signed K Sam Swank, LB JoJo Dickson and DT David Howard. NEW YORK GIANTS—Signed CB Antwaun Molden. NEW YORK JETS—Announced LB Aaron Maybin signed his one-year restricted free agent tender. Signed DE Jay Richardson and S DeAngelo Smith. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Re-signed S Matt Giordano. PITTSBURGH STEELERS—Re-signed QB Charlie Batch to a one-year contract. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Re-signed LB London Fletcher. Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS—Signed WR Yamon Figurs. WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS—Signed WR Terrence Edwards. Announced Liam Martin and Ossama AbouZeid were elected to the board of directors. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL—Suspended Pittsburgh F Craig Adams one game for instigating a fight at 15:18 of the third period of an April 15 game against Philadelphia. Fined Pittsburgh coach Dan Bylsma $10,000 for Adams’ actions. Fined Ottawa F Zenon Konopka $2,500 and the franchise $10,000, for Konopka’s conduct prior to an April 14 game at New York. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Recalled F Jeremy Morin, F Brandon Pirri, D Joe Lavin, D Ryan Stanton and G Carter Hutton from Rockford (AHL) and F Brandon Saad from Saginaw (OHL). DETROIT RED WINGS—Recalled G Tom McCollum, D Travis Ehrhardt, D Garnet Exelby, D Doug Janik, D Brian Lashoff, D Brendan Smith, F Joakim Andersson, F Louis-Marc Aubry, F Fabian Brunnstrom, F Francis Pare and F Tomas Tatar from Grand Rapids Griffins (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Fired assistant coaches Scott Allen and Dean Chynoweth. PHOENIX COYOTES—Recalled F Alexandre Bolduc, F Marc-Antoine Pouliot and G Justin Pogge from Portland (AHL). OLYMPICS International Cycling Union ICU—Suspended Russian cyclist Denis Galimzyanov after testing positive for a banned blood booster. U.S. Anti-Doping Agency USADA—Suspended weightlifter Pat Mendes two years after testing positive for human growth hormone. SOCCER Major League Soccer CHICAGO FIRE—Signed F Chris Rolfe. PHILADELPHIA UNION—Signed MF-F Kai Herdling. PORTLAND TIMBERS—Acquired F Sebastian Rincon from Club Atletico Atenas (Uruguay).

Trevor Immelman (39), $34,699 . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-71-72 — 285 Lee Janzen (39), $34,699 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-73-71 — 285 Jerry Kelly (39), $34,699 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-69-72-72 — 285 Geoff Ogilvy (39), $34,699 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-67-74-70 — 285 Bud Cauley (31), $24,510 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-68-74-73 — 286 Tim Clark (31), $24,510 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-67-72-74 — 286 Luke Donald (31), $24,510 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-69-71-71 — 286 J.J. Henry (31), $24,510 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-72-72 — 286 Spencer Levin (31), $24,510 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72-71-70 — 286 John Mallinger (31), $24,510 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-73-72 — 286 Heath Slocum (31), $24,510 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-70-74 — 286 Jason Bohn (24), $16,473 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-69-77 — 287 Michael Bradley (24), $16,473 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-64-71-78 — 287 Gary Christian (24), $16,473 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-68-76-72 — 287 Graham DeLaet (24), $16,473 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-68-73-72 — 287 Tom Gillis (24), $16,473 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-74-72 — 287 Matt Kuchar (24), $16,473 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-69-69-77 — 287 Marc Leishman (24), $16,473 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-70-75 — 287 Jeff Maggert (24), $16,473 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-71-69-73 — 287 John Daly (18), $13,367 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74-68-76 — 288 Tommy Gainey (18), $13,367 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-68-80 — 288 Webb Simpson (18), $13,367 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-74-70-73 — 288 Charlie Wi (18), $13,367 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73-73-74 — 288 Stuart Appleby (14), $12,825 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-71-76 — 289 James Driscoll (14), $12,825 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-75-70 — 289 Hunter Haas (14), $12,825 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-74-67-77 — 289 Chez Reavie (14), $12,825 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-70-79 — 289 Will Claxton (10), $12,369 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-73-75 — 290 Ken Duke (10), $12,369 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-73-73 — 290 Shaun Micheel (10), $12,369 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-73-76-69 — 290 Kyle Stanley (10), $12,369 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-75-72 — 290 Joe Durant (7), $12,027 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-77-73 — 291 Nick O’Hern (7), $12,027 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-78-70 — 291 Briny Baird (5), $11,856 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-71-78 — 292 Fredrik Jacobson (4), $11,742 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-67-74-81 — 293 Sean O’Hair (3), $11,628 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-79-73 — 294 Lucas Glover (2), $11,514 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-74-78 — 296 Brian Harman (1), $11,343 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-74-82 — 297 Rocco Mediate (1), $11,343 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-74-79 — 297

USL W-League D.C. UNITED WOMEN—Signed D Becky Sauerbrunn. SOFTBALL Amateur Softball Association ASA—Named Steven Embree assistant director of marketing and communications. COLLEGE NAIA—Announced St. Andrews, Gwinnett, Indiana-Kokomo and Lindenwood have been admitted to full membership, effective August 1. BALL STATE—Named Bill Scholl athletic director. DUKE—Named Glen Lanham wrestling coach. Announced men’s freshman basketball G-F Michael Gbinije will transfer. FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL—Named Richard Pitino men’s basketball coach and signed him to a five-year contract. KANSAS—Named Mahogany Green women’s assistant basketball coach. Announced men’s freshman basketball F Merv Lindsay will transfer. NORTH TEXAS—Named Mike Petersen women’s basketball coach. OHIO STATE—Announced men’s sophomore basketball F J.D. Weatherspoon and sophomore G Jordan Sibert will transfer. PURDUE—Announced men’s junior basketball G John Hart will transfer. SAN JOSE STATE—Announced the resignaton of athletic director Tom Bowen to take the same job at Memphis. Named Marie Tuite interim athletic director. WASHINGTON—Announced senior F Perris Blackwell will transfer from San Francisco.

WNBA

2012 WNBA Draft List By The Associated Press At Bristol, Conn. Monday First Round 1. Los Angeles, Nnemkadi Ogwumike, F, Stanford 2. Seattle (from Chicago), Shekinna Stricklen, G, Tennessee 3. Minnesota (from Washington), Devereaux Peters, F, Notre Dame 4. Tulsa, Glory Johnson, F, Tennessee 5. San Antonio, Shenise Johnson, G, Miami 6. Phoenix, Samantha Prahalis, G, Ohio State 7. New York, Kelly Cain, C, Tennessee 8. Washington (from Atlanta), Natalie Novosel, G, Notre Dame 9. Connecticut, Astan Dabo, C, Mali 10. Washington (from Seattle), LaSondra Barrett, F, LSU 11. Indiana, Sasha Goodlett, C, Georgia Tech 12. Minnesota, Damiris Dantas, C, Brazil Second Round 1. Los Angeles (from Tulsa), Farhiya Abdi, F, Sweden 2. Atlanta (from Washington), Tiffany Hayes, G, Connecticut 3. Los Angeles (from Chicago), Khadijah Rushdan, G, Rutgers 4. Los Angeles, Tyra White, G, Texas A&M 5. Tulsa (from San Antonio), Riquna Williams, G, Miami 6. Minnesota (from Phoenix), Julie Wojta, F, Wisconsin-Green Bay 7. Minnesota (from New York), Kayla Standish, F, Gonzaga 8. Minnesota (from Atlanta), Nika Baric, G, Russia 9. Connecticut, Chay Shegog, C, North Carolina 10. Seattle, Keisha Hampton, F, DePaul 11. Chicago (from Indiana through Seattle), Shey Peddy, G, Temple 12. Phoenix (from Minnesota), C’eira Ricketts, G, Arkansas Third Round 1. Tulsa, Vicki Baugh, C, Tennessee 2. Washington Anjale Barrett, G, Maryland 3. Chicago, Sydney Carter, G, Texas A&M 4. Los Angeles, April Sykes, F, Rutgers 5. Tulsa (from San Antonio), Lynetta Kizer, C, Maryland 6. Phoenix, Christine Flores, F, Missouri 7. Minnesota (from New York), Jacki Gemelos, G, USC 8. Atlanta, Isabelle Yacoubou, C, France 9. Phoenix (from Connecticut), Amanda Johnson, F, Oregon 10. Indiana (from Seattle), Courtney Hurt, F, VCU 11. Washington (from Indiana), Briana Gilbreath, G, USC 12. New York (from Minnesota), Katelyn Redmond, G-F, Gonzaga

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Tuesday, April 17 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 5 p.m. MLB — Regional coverage, Texas at Boston or Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees 8 p.m. MLB — Regional coverage, Philadelphia at San Francisco or Cleveland at Seattle NBA BASKETBALL 6 p.m. TNT — Boston at New York 8:30 p.m. TNT — San Antonio at L.A. Lakers NHL 5:30 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, Game 4, Nashville at Detroit 7 p.m. CNBC — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, Game 3, Phoenix at Chicago


Roswell Daily Record

Roses

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Bodemeister, with two wins and two seconds in four starts, moved to No. 4, and Secret Circle improved to No. 5. Unbeaten Gemologist remained No. 2, having punched his ticket to Churchill Downs with his win in the Wood Memorial at Aqueduct on April 7. Creative Cause is No. 3 off a consistent record that includes a win in the San Felipe and a second-place finish to I’ll Have Another in the Santa Anita Derby. Mike Smith, who rode Bodemeister for the first time, will be aboard the colt named for Baffert’s 7-yearold son, Bode, in the Derby. Rafael Bejarano will ride Secret Circle. “He ran like he did when he broke his maiden,” Baffert said referring to the

colt’s 9 1 ⁄ 4 -length win at Santa Anita on Feb. 11. “He was relaxed. His last race (second in the San Felipe), he sort of fell apart going to the gate, he got hot; he was a mess. ... (In the Arkansas Derby) he was pretty calm, cool and relaxed. He did everything very professionally.” Romans, meanwhile, has himself a horse for the Triple Crown races a year after winning the Preakness with Shackleford. “I think he will run well on dirt,” Romans said even though Dullahan is 0 for 3 on dirt at Churchill Downs. “He ran a big race in the Breeders’ Cup last fall (at Churchill) and he is better this year. He should handle the surface.” Kendall Hansen, who owns Hansen, made the call to have the end of his colt’s tail dyed blue for the Blue Grass. When word got out, he was called before the

SPORTS

stewards and threatened with a fine. There was talk the horse could be scratched if he entered the paddock with a blue tail, so the dye was removed. Trainer Mike Maker was not pleased with what took place. “Maybe (Hansen) could’ve relaxed a little bit more if he didn’t have somebody working on his tail all the time. I don’t know. It kind of hurt me and Mike’s relationship,” the owner said. “We’re going to have to talk it out. It was just a lack of communication. I went to a lot of effort to get this thing arranged.” A Derby contender or two could emerge after Saturday’s top 3-year-old races, the Jerome at Aqueduct and the Lexington at Keeneland. ——— 1. Union Rags (Michael Matz, trainer; Julien Leparoux, jockey): Back on top,

and could wind up betting favorite when Derby gates open. ... Worked 4 furlongs in 48.1 last week at Palm Meadows before being vanned to Keeneland to prep for Derby. ... Next start: Kentucky Derby (G1), Churchill Downs, May 5. ... Derby future wager odds: 92. 2. Gemologist (Todd Pletcher, Javier Castellano): Wood Memorial (G1) winner takes 5-0 record to Churchill Downs. ... Last unbeaten who won Derby was Big Brown in 2008. ... Next start: Kentucky Derby. ... Odds: 12-1. 3. Creative Cause (Mike Harrington, Joel Rosario): San Felipe (G2) winner and Santa Anita Derby (G1) runner-up heads from Hollywood Park to Churchill Downs on April 28. ... Next start: Kentucky Derby. ... Odds: 8-1. 4. Bodemeister (Bob Baffert, Mike Smith): Arkansas

Tuesday, April 17, 2012 Derby (G1) winner will try to become first Derby winner with four prior starts since Exterminator in 1918. ... Next start: Kentucky Derby. ... Odds: 22-1. 5. Secret Circle (Baffert, Rafael Bejarano): Baffert says his Arkansas Derby runner -up “ran a great race, too.” ... Next start: Kentucky Derby. ... Odds: 30-1. Dullahan (Dale 6. Romans, Kent Desormeaux): Came up with big finish to win Blue Grass (G1) and earn trip to Derby. ... Romans: “I think he’ll run well on dirt.” ... Next start: Kentucky Derby. ... Odds: 23-1. 7. I’ll Have Another (Doug O’Neil, Mario Gutierrez): Santa Anita Derby winner ships from Hollywood to Churchill on April 28. ... Jockey headed to first Derby. ... Next start: Kentucky Derby. ... Odds: 21-1. 8. Hansen (Mike Maker,

B3

Ramon Dominguez): Blue Grass runner -up gave no indication he would thrive at 1 1 ⁄ 4 -mile Derby distance. ... Still won Gotham and 2-year -old championship last year. ... Next start: Kentucky Derby. ... Derby odds: 8-1. 9. Take Charge Indy (Patrick Byrne, Calvin Borel): Borel says Florida Derby winner will “get better in time.” ... Never discount rail-riding Borel on Derby day. ... Next start: Kentucky Derby. ... Odds: 15-1. Alpha (Kiaran 10. McLaughlin, Dominguez): Wood runner -up being vanned to Churchill after getting an all-clear from precautionary ultrasound on left front leg to check on cut. ... Next start: Kentucky Derby. ... Odds: 21-1. Keep an eye on: Daddy Long Legs, Daddy Nose Best, El Padrino, Mark Valeski, Sabercat.

Luebke leads Padres to 7-1 win over Rockies

DENVER (AP) — Cory Luebke threw seven efficient innings and Chase Headley tied a team record with three doubles, helping the San Diego Padres snap a four-game skid with a 7-1 victory over the Colorado Rockies on Monday night.

Luebke (1-1) breezed through the Rockies lineup on a brisk night, giving up six hits and one run. Lately, the Padres have made themselves quite at home at Coors Field, winning seven of their past nine in the hitter friendly

San Diego Padres starting pitcher Cory Luebke throws to the plate against the Colorado Rockies during the first inning of his team’s win, Monday.

Manning

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outdoors until OTAs start up in May. “Everybody’s been looking forward to this day for some time now,” Manning said. “I thought it was a productive first day, but we’ve got a lot of work to do.” He didn’t want to make any rash judgments about his receiving corps and although he said he was pleased with his first of ficial workout since signing a five-year, $96 million deal with Denver on March 20, Manning declined to talk about his health or the progress he’s made as he regains his arm strength following a series of neck operations that sidelined him for all of last season and led to his departure from Indy. “I’m not going to get into these weekly reports. I’ve kind of been there and done that all fall of last year,” said Manning, who is rehabbing under the direction of head athletic trainer Steve “Greek” Antonopulos and new strength and conditioning coach Luke Richesson. “I’m enjoying being under one roof, being supervised by those two guys,” Manning said. Wide receiver Eric Decker, who has caught more passes from Manning than anyone else over the last month thanks to a series of

workouts at local high schools, said the four time MVP’s passes were precise and powerful. “I’m not his doctor, I don’t know how to speak on his health, but catching balls from him, it looks like there’s nothing wrong to me,” Decker said. “He’s throwing great balls, he’s getting the work in just like we’re getting the work in, knocking the rust off. I see no issues at this point.” Although he’s been putting in a lot of miles finding remote high school fields to practice on, Manning said he hasn’t really gotten to know his new city yet. “It’s been all business,” he said. “Everybody’s asking where I’m living. I’ve been living over here in the facility.” Rehabbing, lifting weights and studying his new playbook. Manning said he was glad to throw the ball around at team headquarters rather than sneaking around to the local high school fields to play catch with Decker and good friend Brandon Stokley, who signed a one-year deal to return to the Broncos on Monday. Manning, 36, has always embraced the offseason regimen, and he said he’s sure he wasn’t the only one who was relieved Monday when NFL teams opened their doors for the voluntary of fseason conditioning programs that were scut-

park. They did a bulk of their damage with doubles, hitting seven for the game. Jeremy Guthrie (1-1) was feeling under the weather, but gave it a go despite a sore throat. With the bullpen taxed from so much recent work, Guthrie really had no choice but to hang in there as long as possible. The righty allowed six runs and nine hits before being lifted for a pinch hitter. Nick Hundley drove in three runs, Cameron Maybin added two RBIs and Headley scored three runs. Not only that, but Headley’s three doubles was the 35th time in team history a player has done that and the first since Hundley on Aug. 31, 2010. Gold Glove shortstop Troy Tulowitzki remains in a fielding funk for the Rockies as he committed his fourth error of the season on a hard grounder by Luebke, which led to a run. He had only six miscues all of last season. Colorado scored in the second when Tyler Colvin singled in Michael Cuddyer. That would be all the damage Luebke allowed. The lefty was even allowed to work his way out of a jam in his last inning. With two on and two out, Luebke got pinch hitter

tled last year by the league’s lockout. “I am (excited), there’s no question. I think a lot of players around the NFL will tell you the lockout threw a lot of players off their routine and what they’re used to,” Manning said. “So, I (like) the fact that everybody’s allowed to be in the facility now working out under one roof, we can throw on the field now, right next to the weight room now as opposed to going to a high school. That was what you had to do, but it’s nice to be able to do everything here and have some time with the coaches, as well.” Because the coaches can’t join them on the practice fields until next month, the players run the on-field portion of the program themselves, and this arrangement is perfectly suited for Manning, who will direct the installation of the Broncos’ new no-huddle offense. Manning, though, said he felt like the new kid in school. “I think a number of us did. I was with Jacob Tamme and Joel Dreessen, Caleb (Hanie), the same way. We have some new guys. So, I’m lear ning as we go, as well,” Manning said. “Certainly when you get out there on the field and you’re throwing passes to receivers, you feel a little more comfortable there, as far as knowing what you’re doing a little bit.”

Jason Giambi to ground out to end the threat. Andrew Cashner pitched the eighth and Micah Owings finished the ninth. The Padres jumped on Guthrie early, scoring twice in the first inning and another in the second. Guthrie was facing the Padres for only the second time in his career. He held San Diego to a run over eight innings in a win on June 20, 2007, while with Baltimore. Headley had a solid game against the team he grew up idolizing. He’s from nearby in Fountain, Colo., and always seems to hit well at Coors Field. Then again, he hits well at all stops on the road — hitting .304 from home. Carlos Gonzalez missed a third straight game with

Briefs

strep throat. He said his strength is steadily returning, maybe even enough to play on Tuesday night. “I don’t feel 100 percent yet, but getting better each day,” he said before the game. With their bullpen stretched thin, the Rockies needed Guthrie to go deep into the game. The relievers have already thrown 36 innings this season. Guthrie took one for the team, throwing 103 pitches. Just in case, manager Jim T racy held of f on starter Jhoulys Chacin’s bullpen session Monday, preferring to wait to see if he might be needed in an emergency. The Rockies have a day off later in the week, so they could afford to push Chacin’s throwing

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the Falcons. Christopher Taylor picked up the win after allowing one run on two hits and striking out seven over four innings of work. At the plate, Jacob Moody and Andrew Meeks each had two hits for the Warriors. Meeks also drove in three runs. In Game 2, it was Loving which got off to the fast start, but Gateway battled back with nine combined runs in the second and third innings to take control. Stephen Bechtel picked up the victory after giving up three runs on five hits and striking out five in six innings. At the plate, Meeks was 2 for 4 with two RBIs and two runs scored. Tyler Raines also drove in two runs and Taylor, Chris Bonham and Caleb Kimberly each scored two runs.

Boys tennis

Goddard 9, Alamogordo 0 The Goddard boys tennis team swept

Streak

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won the next three points to take a 40-15 lead. Lovington wouldn’t go away easily, however. The Wildcats got to within 4030 on a Gonzalez error and knotted it up when Crawford caught Sanchez cheating to the middle and busted a forehand winner down the abandoned alley. NMMI got the advantage with an ace by Gonzalez and won the match when Crawford went to the well one too many times. Sanchez was cheating toward the middle and Crawford once again tried to blast a winner down the alley, but Sanchez was prepared and was able to get the ball back over the net. Crawford was caught off guard and his return shot went into the net, giving the Colts a 3-2 lead. In the next game, Lovington led 40-30 but NMMI’s non-verbal communication forced a deuce. During the ralley,

session back. Before the game, San Diego activated utility player Mark Kotsay from the 15-day disabled list. The 36-year-old signed with the Padres last November, but missed the opening 10 games of the season due to a strained right calf muscle. NOTES: To make room on the roster for Kotsay, the Padres optioned RHP Brad Brach to T riple-A Tucson on Monday. ... Rockies LHP Jorge De La Rosa tossed 60 pitches a four-inning simulated game on Monday. He’s still mending from elbow surgery that sidelined him last season. ... LHP Josh Outman (oblique strain) threw 30 pitches in a bullpen session. He will throw another on Wednesday.

all nine matches from Alamogordo, Monday. Singles winners for the Rockets were Konnor Kundomal (first; 4-6, 7-5, 11-9), Tristan Collar (second; 6-1, 6-1), Darren Powers (third; 6-0, 1-6, 11-9), Eric Lamm (fourth; 6-4, 6-2), Derrick Collins (fifth; 61, 6-2), Martin Joyce (sixth; 6-1, 6-1). Kundomal and Collar won 6-4, 6-4 at first doubles, Powers and Lamm won 7-5, 6-2 at second doubles, and Collins and Joyce won 6-1, 7-6 (7-3) at third doubles.

Girls tennis

Goddard 6, Alamogordo 3 The Goddard girls tennis team picked up a victory over Alamogordo on Monday. Singles winners for the Rockets were Gabrielle Joyce (first; 6-4, 6-4), Lexi Cassels (second; 6-3, 3-6, 10-8), Katie Hillman (fourth; 6-2, 6-4), Anisha Suri (fifth; 6-2, 3-6, 11-9) and Brooke Bates (sixth; 6-3, 7-5). Joyce and Hillman won 6-2, 6-1 at second doubles for the Rockets.

Crawford was forced to chase a ball off the court and his return went deep to the baseline. Without a word or look, Sanchez ducked, knowing that his teammate was going to rifle a forehand down the middle to take advantage of Crawford’s court placement. Gonzalez won the point to force a deuce. After four more deuces, NMMI got the advantage when Crawford hit a backhand into the net. The Colts broke Lovington when Sanchez rocketed a deep forehand to Jaras. All Jaras could do was hit a pop up and Gonzalez was at the net and could have gone for the overhead winner. Instead, he let Sanchez, who wouldn’t have to be backing up to hit it, get the winner. Colt coach Jim Kelly said that the non-verbal communication comes from the familiarity Sanchez and Gonzalez have with each other. “They have been playing together for two years,” he said. “(I teach them in practice that) if you poach and you go across the center line, the

back man already knows that he is going to cover the back door, that way there is no ‘I’ formation. Those two don’t really need to talk to each other because they do know how each other plays, what they are capable of and where they are going to be.” Gonzalez and Sanchez only lost one game the rest of the way to win 6-2, 6-1. Other doubles wins for NMMI came from Gavin L ynch and Josh Shure (second; 6-0, 6-0 over Daniel Capps and Guillermo Garcia) and Luis Moncada and Luis Zaragoza (third; 6-1, 6-0 over Edgar Rojas and Carlos Corrales). Singles wins came from Gonzalez (first; 6-2, 6-4 over Crawford), L ynch (second; 6-0, 6-2 over Capps), Jorge Garza (third; 6-0, 6-2 over Jaras), Gerry Estrella (fourth; 6-0, 6-0 over Rojas), Tom Rios (fifth; 60, 6-0 over Garcia) and Shure (sixth; 6-2, 6-0 over Corrales). l.foster@rdrnews.com


B4 Tuesday, April 17, 2012

on a shelf for the next shopper, it usually ends up on the floor. So we now have a slick surface that someone can slip on and fall. When they are placed on an item in the dairy or meat case, they inevitably fall to the bottom and clog the drains, which causes water backups — another safety hazard — not to mention it’s trash we must fish out. All of this takes time and money away from the associates performing our duties in a very low-profit industry. By leaving an unwanted coupon on a store shelf for the next customer, Chicago Clipper is NOT “paying it forward.” She’s adding to the problem. So, please, folks, keep your coupons in your purse, wallet, pocket or coupon book until you get to the checkout line. FLORIDA BUTCHER

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: I’m a 43-year-old veteran of the grocery industry. I am also an associate of one of the premier supermarkets in the country, and I disagree with your response to “Chicago Clipper” (Feb. 18)! Coupons are a necessary evil and are graciously accepted, but they create an abundance of work for retailers. It takes countless hours of sorting, logging, filling out forms, mailing and receiving to be reimbursed for the face value of the coupon. This is hardly a benefit to the grocer. The abuse and fraud associated with coupons adds up into millions of dollars. When a customer leaves one

DEAR FLORIDA BUTCHER: Thank you for pointing out to my readers and me some of the problems coupons may create. Your sentiments were repeated by many retailers. However, other shoppers and retailers offered suggestions that may help to eliminate the problem, including: coupon exchanges, donating them to

Jumble

COMICS

the military, posting them on Freecycle, Craigslist or Facebook, etc. Read on: HHHHH

DEAR ABBY: I am a coupon user. I am also a grocery store employee. I constantly have to pick up coupons left by customers who are “paying it forward” or “being generous.” Not only are they a safety hazard, but they make our store look unkempt. We pride ourselves in maintaining a high standard of appearance. We actually clean up more coupons than those we redeem. Why not hand the extra coupons to your checker and ask that they be offered to the next customer? As for litterbugs who leave expired coupons laying around, every check stand is equipped with a garbage can, and an employee will be more than happy to throw out your trash if you ask. STORE MANAGER IN MONTANA DEAR ABBY: I leave coupons for others, but I often go one step further. If I see someone with the item in his or her cart, I’ll offer the coupon directly to that person. So far, I have met pleas-

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

TEYSZ

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

SUMAFO CREWNH A:

Yesterday’s

Family Circus

DEAR ABBY: I’m a widow with a 20-year-old car and I accidentally smashed in its front end. When I got home and my neighbor saw what had happened, he spent his next weekend at a wreckage yard buying all the necessary replacements. The following weekend he reassembled my car to perfection. Would he take any money for his efforts? No! Abby, there are wonderful people in this world and he is certainly one of them. And incidentally, he is a Navy captain on active duty. LEE IN SAN DIEGO

DEAR LEE: So your guardian angel wears a Navy uniform! He’s not only an officer and a gentleman, but also a master mechanic. You are one lucky lady, and he is a sweetheart.

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

EECIN

ant people who are happy to get a break at the cash register. I have also met people who have told me how delighted they were to find coupons on shelves. MARIE IN MAINE HHHHH

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) KHAKI FABRIC EXHALE Jumbles: BATCH Answer: When the state park levied a usage fee for its trails, he faced a — TAX HIKE

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Dear Heloise: Many people check their SMOKE-DETECTOR BATTERIES when switching to and from daylight saving time. It’s also a good time to check the backup battery in your bedroom alarm clock or clock radio. Simply unplug the device for a few seconds and then reconnect. If the time shown is correct, the battery is good and will keep the device working in the event of a nighttime power failure. Bill in Harrisonburg, Va.

Dear Heloise: I’ve been waiting tables for 11 years, and I feel that if people understood a couple of things, they would tip better. The tip you give your server usually is shared with a busboy, a hostess and a bartender. I have to tip these employees based on my SALES, not my tips. (Heloise here: Many restaurants “pool” tips, and the total is divided among certain employees on a percentage basis.) If the guests’ check is $100 and they leave a 10 percent tip of $10, I have to give $1 to the bar and hostess and $3 to the busboy. This leaves me with $5. If the table doesn’t tip at all, I still have to tip based on those sales, so I’m actually paying $5 to have served that table. Servers get taxed on our sales and tips. We live off our tips. I know times are tough, but if people cannot afford to tip the proper amount, then they should eat at a place that does not require a service charge! Ashley in Camarillo, Calif. Ashley, many people don’t know what you have shared. But also remember that a tip is for good service and is usually not required, unless it’s a party over a certain number of people. Most servers work very hard and do deserve a good tip. Heloise

Blondie

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

HHHHH

Hi, Heloise: I cleaned out my attic and had many pairs of baby and children’s shoes that I wanted to donate. I was afraid they would become separated after I dropped them off at the donation site. I bought a package of 50 zip ties and zip-tied each pair together! Now they can’t come apart, no matter what, until someone cuts them apart! Maria G., via email Dear Heloise: Will you please tell companies to stamp their addresses on the envelope that customers send back. I hate the ones with the clear window. You’d better get the paper in correctly or else! A Reader, Youngstown, Ohio

The Wizard of Id

Dear Heloise: While walking my dog, I saw a couch sitting on the street. It looked fairly decent. I am upset at the people who were throwing a perfectly good couch away. Someone could have used this couch, and now it probably has gone to the dump. Pat in Warren, Ohio

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Roswell Daily Record


FINANCIAL

Roswell Daily Record

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg DirEMBear ... 13.42 +.24 DirxSCBull ... 55.12 +.28 A-B-C DirxEnBull ... 44.12 -.52 ABB Ltd .71e 19.66 +.31 Discover .40 32.52 -.37 .60f 41.66 -.19 AES Corp ... 12.44 +.04 Disney AFLAC 1.32 42.80 -.08 DollarGen ... 45.89 -.41 AK Steel .20 7.39 ... DomRescs2.11f 50.74 +.46 AT&T Inc 1.76 30.61 +.07 DowChm 1.28f 33.60 +.40 AbtLab 2.04f 59.85 +.26 DuPont 1.64 52.72 +.70 AberFitc .70 46.78 -.38 DukeEngy 1.00 20.63 +.22 Accenture 1.35 61.88 -.67 DukeRlty .68 14.36 +.16 ... d.36 -.01 ... 7.70 -.03 Dynegy AMD Aeropostl ... 21.09 -.01 E-CDang ... 8.63 -1.56 ... 28.81 -.06 .70 47.23 -.59 EMC Cp Aetna 1.52f 46.71 -.16 .40 41.99 -.25 Eaton Agilent AlcatelLuc ... 1.95 -.04 EatnVan .76 26.61 +.14 .12 9.86 +.01 EdisonInt 1.30 42.44 +.87 Alcoa Allstate .88f 32.47 +.17 ElPasoCp .04 29.31 -.47 AlphaNRs ... 15.53 -.13 EldorGld g .18f 14.23 -.22 AlpAlerMLP1.00e16.43 -.08 EmersonEl 1.60 50.20 +.11 1.64 31.38 -.11 EnCana g .80 17.50 -.16 Altria AmBev 1.23e 42.45 -.27 Enerpls g 2.16 d18.52 -.24 AMovilL s .28e 23.76 -.10 ENSCO 1.50f 51.46 -.06 AEagleOut .44 17.22 +.37 ExcoRes .16 d5.93 +.08 AEP 1.88 37.76 +.45 Exelon 2.10 37.81 +.32 AmExp .80f 57.83 +.55 ExxonMbl 1.88 84.01 +1.06 AmIntlGrp ... 32.81 +.33 FMC Tech ... 46.38 -.74 AmTower .84 63.72 +.56 FidlNFin .56f u18.53 +.11 AmeriBrgn .52 37.48 -.05 FstHorizon .04 9.83 +.06 Anadarko .36 73.37 -1.59 FT Fincl .33e 14.95 +.06 AnglogldA .49e 33.45 -.56 FT IndPrd .10e 18.89 +.07 Annaly 2.37e 15.77 +.07 FirstEngy 2.20 45.42 +.48 .20 11.88 -.04 .60 48.52 +.06 FordM Aon plc Apache .68f 92.27 -1.38 ForestLab ... 33.64 +.19 ArcelorMit .75 17.41 +.13 ForestOil s ... 11.41 +.05 ArchCoal .44 d9.75 -.24 FranceTel1.90e 13.36 +.04 ArchDan .70 30.79 +.04 FMCG 1.25f 36.92 -.02 ... 6.61 -.07 ArcosDor .18e 18.83 -.04 Frontline ArmourRsd1.20m 6.73 +.01 Fusion-io n ... 26.49 -.88 AuRico g ... 8.71 -.24 G-H-I Avon .92 23.03 -.49 BB&T Cp .80f 30.83 +.34 Gafisa SA .29e d4.27 -.06 BHP BillLt2.20e 70.84 +.39 GameStop .60 21.70 +.47 BP PLC 1.92f 42.51 +.36 Gannett .80f 13.89 -1.15 .50f 26.43 -.13 BRFBrasil .42e 18.62 ... Gap .60 40.80 -.25 GenElec .68 18.90 +.02 BakrHu BallCorp .40f 42.78 +.01 GenMills 1.22 38.74 +.04 BcoBrad pf .81r 16.64 -.03 GenMotors ... 23.42 -.38 BcoSantSA.82e d6.43 +.03 GenOn En ... 1.94 -.03 BcoSBrasil .36e 8.31 -.19 Genworth ... 7.62 -.03 .04 8.79 +.11 Gerdau .21e 9.38 -.12 BkofAm BkNYMel .52 23.29 +.18 GlaxoSKln2.33e 45.58 +.99 Barclay .39e 13.56 -.04 GoldFLtd .44e 12.77 -.05 ... 18.99 -.30 Goldcrp g .54 41.40 -.21 Bar iPVix BarrickG .60 40.81 -.80 GoldmanS 1.40 117.73 +2.64 Baxter 1.34 54.10 -3.93 Goodyear ... 10.41 -.18 BeazerHm ... 2.85 -.05 HCP Inc 2.00f 39.33 +.40 BerkH B ... 79.67 +.85 HSBC 2.05e 43.09 +.13 BestBuy .64 21.85 -.19 Hallibrtn .36 32.06 -.35 BigLots ... 45.00 -.51 Hanesbrds ... 27.41 -.48 Blackstone .88f 14.59 +.06 HarmonyG .08e d9.63 -.16 BlockHR .80 16.70 -.18 HartfdFn .40 20.10 -.05 ... 7.09 -.16 Boeing 1.76f 72.68 -.24 HltMgmt BostonSci ... 5.51 -.11 Heckmann ... 4.15 -.05 BrMySq 1.36 32.93 +.39 HeclaM .05f 4.16 -.04 1.92 52.62 -.03 C&J Egy n ... 16.49 -.54 Heinz ... 14.33 -.30 CBRE Grp ... 18.36 +.15 Hertz .40 54.26 -1.02 .40 32.31 -.20 Hess CBS B CMS Eng .96 21.89 +.35 HewlettP .48 24.31 -.26 CSX s .48 22.08 +.16 HollyFrt s .40a 28.38 -1.66 CVS Care .65 43.61 +.18 HomeDp 1.16 u51.69 +.73 CblvsNY s .60 13.34 +.13 HonwllIntl 1.49 58.00 -.07 CabotOG s .08f 29.54 -1.06 HostHotls .24f 16.38 +.07 Calpine ... 16.81 -.29 HovnanE ... 1.98 -.02 Cameco g .40 20.53 +.04 Huntsmn .40 14.35 +.13 Cameron ... 49.49 -1.32 IAMGld g .25f 12.41 -.31 ... 6.95 -.10 CampSp 1.16 33.27 +.26 ING CdnNRs gs .42f 31.89 -.10 ION Geoph ... 5.45 -.10 iShGold ... 16.10 -.04 CapOne .20 53.28 -.19 CapitlSrce .04 6.54 +.02 iSAstla 1.09e 23.24 +.09 CardnlHlth .86 40.58 +.05 iShBraz 1.50e 62.10 -.40 .56e 27.41 -.03 Carnival 1.00 31.44 +.22 iSCan Caterpillar 1.84 106.74 +.85 iShGer .67e 21.93 +.31 Celanese .24 46.55 -.06 iSh HK .41e 17.34 -.04 Cemex .32t 6.67 -.13 iShJapn .20e 9.74 +.02 Cemig pf 1.78e 24.95 +.08 iSh Kor .70e 58.92 -.11 CenterPnt .81f 19.32 +.15 iSMalas .60e 14.57 -.06 CntryLink 2.90 38.11 +.02 iShMex .78e 60.07 -.03 ChesEng .35 d19.19 -.76 iSTaiwn .47e 13.03 -.08 ... 30.56 +.01 Chevron 3.24 101.51 +.73 iShSilver Chicos .21 15.07 +.15 iShChina25.77e 37.08 -.34 Chimera .48e 2.76 +.01 iSSP500 2.63e 137.48 -.11 Chubb 1.64f 71.00 +1.34 iShEMkts .81e 41.95 -.22 .04 47.68 -.63 iShiBxB 4.87e 116.00 ... Cigna Citigrp rs .04 34.00 +.59 iShB20 T 3.77e 116.67 -.17 CliffsNRs 2.50f 69.25 -.06 iS Eafe 1.71e 52.70 +.38 2.40 70.08 -.15 iShiBxHYB6.94e 89.99 +.14 Clorox .90 73.84 -.40 iSR1KV 1.51e 68.06 +.21 Coach CobaltIEn ... 26.35 -2.03 iSR1KG .81e 64.54 -.28 CocaCola 2.04f 72.44 +.50 iSR2KV 1.38e 70.44 +.38 CocaCE .64f 27.98 +.20 iShR2K 1.10e 79.67 +.13 ColgPal 2.48f 97.67 +.46 iShREst 2.20e 61.70 +.71 Comerica .40 30.86 +.31 iShDJHm .07e 14.36 +.03 1.44 55.15 +.33 CompSci .80 27.36 +.34 ITW ComstkRs ... 15.46 -.52 IngerRd .64 39.53 -.15 3.00 202.72 -.08 ConAgra .96 25.87 +.10 IBM ConocPhil 2.64 73.83 +.20 IntlGame .24 16.11 -.25 1.05 32.86 -.11 ConsolEngy.50f 34.01 +.31 IntPap ConstellA ... 21.51 -.08 Interpublic .24 10.77 -.01 .49 24.68 -.03 Invesco Corning .30 13.57 -.01 Covidien .90 53.50 +.26 IronMtn 1.00 29.52 -.13 ItauUnibH .84e 17.15 -.14 CSVS2xVxS ... 8.41 -.12 CSVelIVSt s ... 10.57 +.20 IvanhM g ... d12.03 -.76 CredSuiss .82e 26.03 +.30 J-K-L CrwnCstle ... 54.26 +.40 Cummins 1.60 114.10 +.08 JPMorgCh1.20f 43.33 +.12 .32 23.07 +.04 Jabil D-E-F Jaguar g ... d3.43 -.11 DCT Indl .28 5.75 +.11 JanusCap .20 8.08 +.06 DDR Corp .48f 14.32 +.19 JohnJn 2.28 63.98 +.44 DR Horton .15 14.78 -.04 JohnsnCtl .72 32.40 -.17 .70 74.13 -.56 DanaHldg .20 14.24 ... JoyGlbl Danaher .10 54.04 +.16 JnprNtwk ... 20.84 -.36 DeanFds ... 11.72 +.14 KB Home .10m 7.87 -.18 ... 13.86 -.68 Deere 1.84f 79.57 +.10 KeyEngy DelphiAu n ... 31.99 +.14 Keycorp .12 8.04 +.07 2.96f u74.73 +.38 KimbClk ... 10.25 +.12 DeltaAir .76 18.44 +.33 DenburyR ... 18.00 +.09 Kimco g .16f 9.38 -.13 Kinross DeutschBk1.07e 44.39 +.09 DevonE .80 67.00 -.84 KodiakO g ... 8.97 -.33 1.28f 50.75 +1.16 DxFnBull rs ... 99.09 +1.92 Kohls 1.16 37.58 +.23 DirSCBear ... 19.63 -.08 Kraft .46 23.57 +.06 DirFnBear ... 22.26 -.47 Kroger Corp ... 8.08 -.05 LSI DirLCBear ... 21.69 +.09 DirDGldBll1.02e 13.42 -.77 LVSands 1.00 58.91 -1.85 LennarA .16 25.79 -.32 DrxEnBear ... 11.15 +.14 Name

Name Sell Chg Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.60 +.06 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.55 +.06 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.56 +.04 GrowthI 27.76 -.12 InfAdjBd 13.03 -.01 Ultra 25.78 -.26 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.68 -.04 AMutlA p 27.10 +.08 BalA p 19.36 +.04 BondA p 12.70 -.01 CapIBA p 50.71 +.15 CapWGA p34.57 +.14 CapWA p 20.96 +.03 EupacA p 38.50 +.19 FdInvA p 38.34 +.02 GovtA p 14.43 ... GwthA p 31.98 -.11 HI TrA p 10.97 -.01 IncoA p 17.25 +.07 IntBdA p 13.69 ... ICAA p 29.18 +.04 NEcoA p 27.08 -.08 N PerA p 29.09 +.07 NwWrldA 50.91 -.04 SmCpA p 37.78 -.08 TxExA p 12.79 +.01 WshA p 29.79 +.09 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.50 +.19 IntlVal r 26.89 +.09 MidCap 38.90 -.32 MidCapVal20.92 -.04 Baron Funds: Growth 54.38 -.01

Bernstein Fds: 13.93 +.01 IntDur DivMu 14.82 ... TxMgdIntl 13.44 +.07 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 19.24 +.08 GlAlA r 19.21 ... BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.86 -.01 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 19.29 +.08 GlbAlloc r 19.31 ... Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 52.80 -.56 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 66.20+1.02 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.70 -.02 DivrBd 5.11 +.01 TxEA p 13.95 ... Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.76 -.02 AcornIntZ 38.60 +.03 LgCapGr 14.09 -.17 ValRestr 48.16 -.18 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.02 -.08 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n 9.99 +.04 USCorEq1 n11.75 ... USCorEq2 n11.53 ... DWS Invest S: MgdMuni S 9.32 -.01 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.29 +.04 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 35.68 +.04 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.25 ...

... 24.98 -.28 Level3 rs 1.96 39.60 +.42 LillyEli Limited 1.00f 47.91 +.24 .32 24.18 +.03 LincNat LinkedIn n ... 101.08 -6.16 LionsGt g ... 12.12 -.46 LockhdM 4.00 89.57 +.27 ... 8.30 -.14 LaPac Lowes .56 u32.05 +.36 LyonBas A1.00a 44.28 +.21

M-N-0

... 10.11 -.06 MBIA 1.00 25.35 +.11 MDC ... 3.45 -.09 MEMC ... 4.15 -.05 MGIC MGM Rsts ... 13.72 -.20 Macys .80f 40.01 +.03 MagHRes ... 6.11 +.04 Manitowoc .08 13.72 -.22 Manulife g .52 12.96 -.04 MarathnO s .68f 29.48 -.22 MarathP n 1.00 40.01 -1.61 MktVGold .15e 46.64 -.86 MV OilSv s ... 38.62 -.59 MV Semi n ... 34.67 +.13 MktVRus .58e 29.65 -.49 MktVJrGld1.59e 22.61 -.44 .40 37.31 ... MarIntA MarshM .88 32.20 +.28 .30 12.20 +.06 Masco McDrmInt ... 11.16 -.27 McDnlds 2.80 96.58 -.39 McKesson .80 89.77 -.71 ... 8.72 -.29 McMoRn McEwenM ... 3.82 -.09 ... 9.14 -.34 Mechel Medtrnic .97 37.55 +.04 Merck 1.68 37.95 +.17 MetLife .74 35.49 -.15 MetroPCS ... 8.29 -.11 ... 42.10 -1.52 MKors n MobileTele1.06e 18.15 -.09 Molycorp ... 31.68 -1.04 Monsanto 1.20 76.87 -.20 MonstrWw ... 8.62 -.08 MorgStan .20 17.50 +.22 .50f 50.12 -.12 Mosaic MotrlaSolu .88 48.19 -.21 MuellerWat .07 3.55 +.05 NCR Corp ... u21.95 +.52 NRG Egy ... d14.34 -.24 NV Energy .52 15.75 +.21 NYSE Eur 1.20 27.34 -.15 ... 15.49 -.67 Nabors NOilVarco .48 77.91 -.61 NY CmtyB 1.00 13.28 +.12 NewellRub .32 17.19 +.06 NewfldExp ... 32.32 -.56 NewmtM 1.40 48.17 -.51 Nexen g .20 18.45 +.08 NiSource .92 24.16 +.24 NikeB 1.44 109.40 +.60 NobleCorp .54e 35.17 -.58 NokiaCp 1.26e d4.09 +.07 ... 4.29 +.05 Nomura Nordstrm 1.08f 55.52 +.53 NorflkSo 1.88f 68.24 +.80 NoestUt 1.18f 36.20 +.40 Novartis 2.46e 55.20 +.87 Nucor 1.46 41.68 +.11 OasisPet ... 30.76 +.74 OcciPet 2.16f 87.26 -1.31 OfficeDpt ... 3.11 +.05 Omnicom 1.20f 49.19 +.46 OwensCorn ... 34.25 +.02 OwensIll ... 24.21 +.51

P-Q-R

PG&E Cp 1.82 43.01 +.75 PNC 1.60f 62.14 +.86 PPL Corp 1.44f 26.93 +.16 Pandora n ... d8.27 -.39 PatriotCoal ... 6.26 +.08 PeabdyE .34 27.94 -.44 .80 33.88 -.18 Penney PepcoHold 1.08 18.47 +.11 PepsiCo 2.06 65.99 +.93 PetrbrsA 1.23e 23.30 -.28 Petrobras 1.23e 24.24 -.26 Pfizer .88f 21.98 +.13 PhilipMor 3.08 87.04 -.80 PitnyBw 1.50 16.64 -.04 ... 39.71 -1.17 PlainsEx .56f 42.90 +.08 Potash PwshDB ... 28.06 -.28 PS USDBull ... 22.07 -.09 PS KBWBk.44e 24.29 +.25 ... 8.85 -.25 PrecDrill ProLogis 1.12 34.01 +.53 ProShtS&P ... 36.68 +.04 PrUShS&P ... 15.86 +.02 PrUlShDow ... 13.33 -.14 ProUltQQQ ... 111.66 -2.43 PrUShQQQ ... 32.11 +.69 ProUltSP .27e 55.17 -.10 PrUShtFin ... 42.53 -.59 ProUShL20 ... 18.73 +.04 ProShtR2K ... 27.00 -.08 ProUltR2K .01e 40.38 +.05 ProUSSP500 ... 9.77 +.04 PrUltSP500.03e 78.01 -.22 PrUVxST rs ... 17.90 -.69 ProUSSilv ... 10.97 -.04 ProUShEuro ... 19.53 -.18 ProctGam 2.25f 66.78 +.97 ProgrssEn 2.48 51.67 +.14 ProgsvCp .41e 22.61 +.27 ProUSR2K ... 31.81 -.07 Prudentl 1.45f 60.07 +.16 PSEG 1.42f 30.02 +.33 ... 8.43 -.11 PulteGrp Qihoo360 ... 20.14 -1.64 QuantaSvc ... 20.89 +.15 QksilvRes ... d4.04 -.08 RadianGrp .01 3.44 -.10 RadioShk .50 5.99 +.04 Raytheon 2.00f u52.60 +.07 RegionsFn .04 6.21 +.10 ... 7.14 -.19 Renren n RioTinto 1.45e 54.95 +.07 RiteAid ... 1.55 -.11 ... 32.40 -.66 Rowan RylCarb .40 26.96 -.34 RoyDShllA 3.36 67.84 +.60 .12 18.05 -.27 Ryland

Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq n19.45 -.02 EmMktV 29.35 -.03 IntSmVa n 15.13 +.01 LargeCo 10.81 ... USLgVa n 20.75 ... US Micro n14.34 +.07 US Small n22.30 +.06 US SmVa 25.29 +.09 IntlSmCo n15.29 +.02 Fixd n 10.34 ... IntVa n 15.48 +.08 Glb5FxInc n11.11 ... 2YGlFxd n 10.12 ... DFARlE n 25.34 +.40 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 72.36 +.17 Income 13.62 +.01 31.29 +.16 IntlStk Stock 110.57 +.33 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I n 11.24 +.01 TRBd N p n11.24 +.01 Dreyfus: 43.35 +.04 Aprec Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.34 +.06 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.01 +.01 GblMacAbR9.96 -.01 LgCapVal 18.39 +.06 FMI Funds: LgCap p n 16.54 +.09 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.64 ... FPACres 28.05 +.05 Fairholme 29.89 +.11 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.42 ... StrValDvIS 4.81 +.03

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high low settle chg. CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Apr 12 120.97 121.17 120.02 120.72 +.20 Jun 12 116.20 116.57 115.25 116.15 +.08 Aug 12 119.30 119.50 118.25 119.02 -.03 Oct 12 125.35 125.67 124.30 125.00 -.10 Dec 12 127.52 128.00 126.67 127.35 -.15 Feb 13 128.75 129.02 127.90 128.45 -.30 Apr 13 129.65 129.65 129.30 129.65 -.30 Jun 13 126.25 126.70 126.25 126.70 Aug 13 126.90 126.90 126.90 126.90 -.40 Last spot N/A Est. sales 6169. Fri’s Sales: 55,419 Fri’s open int: 349471, up +3200 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Apr 12 150.65 151.00 150.20 150.35 -.17 May 12 151.80 152.55 151.30 151.92 +.40 Aug 12 155.22 155.97 154.80 155.47 +.25 Sep 12 157.00 157.00 156.52 156.97 +.25 Oct 12 157.85 158.00 157.55 157.87 +.10 Nov 12 158.35 158.50 158.25 158.50 +.33 Jan 13 158.30 158.30 158.20 158.20 +.90 Mar 13 157.60 157.60 157.60 157.60 +.60 Last spot N/A Est. sales 1845. Fri’s Sales: 11,453 Fri’s open int: 41160, up +432 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Apr 12 82.75 82.82 82.17 82.30 -.45 May 12 90.00 90.00 87.82 88.55 -1.57 Jun 12 90.07 90.07 88.32 88.72 -1.50 Jul 12 90.35 90.35 89.00 89.37 -1.15 Aug 12 90.80 90.97 89.42 90.15 -.85 Oct 12 83.12 83.40 82.15 82.72 -.83

S-T-U

.48 12.17 -.07 SAIC SAP AG .82e 63.73 -1.69 SK Tlcm ... 13.70 -.08 SpdrDJIA 3.51e 129.07 +.67 SpdrGold ... 160.46 -.39 SpdrWldxUS.71e 23.56 +.07 S&P500ETF2.64e137.05-.09 SpdrHome .16e 20.80 +.07 SpdrS&PBk.39e 22.94 +.21 SpdrLehHY3.70e 39.13 +.06 SpdrSTCpBd.54e30.53 +.02 SpdrLehAgB2.29e58.24 +.04 SpdrS&P RB.46e 27.38 +.29 SpdrRetl .53e 60.15 +.28 SpdrOGEx .38e 52.45 -.91 SpdrMetM .51e 48.09 -.11 STMicro .40 6.79 -.06 Safeway .58 21.63 +.44 StJude .92f 38.25 -.33 Salesforce ... 154.93 -4.44 SandRdge ... 7.11 -.16 Sanofi 1.76e 36.55 +.34 SaraLee .46 21.54 +.04 Schlmbrg 1.10f 67.44 -.94 Schwab .24 13.75 -.12 SeadrillLtd3.06e 37.18 +.11 SiderurNac.81e 8.99 -.12 SilvWhtn g .24e 29.65 -1.51 SimonProp3.80fu148.64+3.90 Solutia .15 27.99 +.03 SonyCp .16e 17.51 +.15 SouthnCo 1.96f 45.18 +.44 SthnCopper2.07r 31.26 +.17 SwstAirl .02 7.99 +.05 SwstnEngy ... d27.98 -.42 SpectraEn 1.12 30.02 -.31 SpiritAero ... 24.05 -.36 SprintNex ... 2.51 -.17 SP Matls .76e 36.24 +.11 SP HlthC .71e 36.59 +.01 SP CnSt .89e 33.77 +.14 SP Consum.62e 44.39 -.16 SP Engy 1.10e 68.24 -.46 SPDR Fncl .22e 15.24 +.11 SP Inds .75e 36.43 +.10 SP Tech .39e 29.30 -.31 SP Util 1.40e 34.66 +.33 ... 4.53 +.18 StdPac StanBlkDk 1.64 77.36 +.70 StarwdHtl .50f 55.43 -.65 StateStr .96f 43.68 +.49 StratHotels ... 6.54 +.19 SumitMitsu ... 6.64 -.04 Suncor gs .44 30.79 +.26 Sunoco .80f 37.92 +.02 SunTrst .20 22.83 +.25 SupEnrgy ... 24.61 -.04 Supvalu .35 6.52 +.11 Synovus .04 2.04 +.04 Sysco 1.08 29.68 +.37 TCF Fncl .20 10.91 +.08 .46f 40.19 +.37 TJX s TaiwSemi .52e 15.10 ... TalismE g .27 12.50 +.02 Target 1.20 57.39 -.04 TataMotors.45e u28.85 +.93 TeckRes g .80f 36.70 +.03 TelefEsp 2.14e 14.85 +.04 TenetHlth ... 5.28 -.02 ... 16.29 ... Teradyn ... 22.19 -.10 Terex Tesoro ... 22.55 -1.09 Textron .08 27.01 +.16 3D Sys s ... u26.28 +1.86 3M Co 2.36f 86.40 +.71 TimeWarn 1.04f 35.71 +.02 TitanMet .30 14.01 +.19 TollBros ... 23.22 +.27 Total SA 2.38e 48.59 +.82 Transocn 3.16 47.98 -.76 Travelers 1.64 59.16 +1.04 TrinaSolar ... 6.40 -.16 TwoHrbInv1.60e 10.31 +.08 TycoIntl 1.00 54.58 +.16 Tyson .16 17.89 -.04 UBS AG ... 12.48 ... US Airwy ... 8.13 +.29 USG ... 16.80 +.30 UltraPt g ... d18.59 -.41 UnionPac 2.40 108.09 +.05 UtdContl ... 22.30 +.86 UPS B 2.28f 79.56 ... US Bancrp .78f 31.16 +.26 US NGs rs ... 15.14 +.20 ... 39.18 +.03 US OilFd USSteel .20 28.33 +.13 UtdTech 1.92 79.88 +.08 UtdhlthGp .65 57.36 -.69 UnumGrp .42 23.54 +.27

V-W-X-Y-Z

Vale SA 1.55e 22.70 -.56 Vale SA pf1.55e 22.25 -1.41 ValeroE .60 23.36 -.78 VangREIT2.10e 63.12 +.85 VangEmg .91e 42.37 -.20 VangEur 1.91e 43.79 +.49 VangEAFE1.06e 32.60 +.20 VerizonCm 2.00 37.43 +.17 .88 120.83 -2.33 Visa Vonage ... 1.99 -.05 Vornado 2.76 82.15 +2.21 WPX En n ... 15.74 -.21 WalMart 1.59f 60.58 +.81 Walgrn .90 33.30 +.26 WalterEn .50 62.87 -1.57 WeathfIntl ... 13.36 -.45 WellPoint 1.15f 68.73 -.52 WellsFargo .88f 33.15 +.31 ... 39.57 +.55 WDigital WstnRefin .16 17.62 -.88 WstnUnion .40f 17.73 +.17 Weyerhsr .60 20.70 -.04 WmsCos 1.04f u31.34 -.76 .44 21.22 +.41 XL Grp XcelEngy 1.04 26.39 +.37 .17 7.89 +.05 Xerox YPF Soc 3.40e d19.50 -2.45 Yamana g .22f 14.83 -.33 YingliGrn ... 3.30 -.14 Youku ... 24.23 -.55 YumBrnds 1.14 72.25 -.61

Fidelity Advisor A: GovtInc 10.77 ... NwInsgh p 22.13 -.17 GroCo n 94.95 -.94 StrInA 12.34 ... GroInc n 20.01 +.01 Fidelity Advisor I: GrowCoF 94.89 -.94 NwInsgtI n 22.41 -.18 GrowthCoK94.89 -.95 Fidelity Freedom: HighInc r n 8.95 ... FF2010 n 13.84 ... Indepn n 24.89 -.11 FF2010K 12.79 -.01 IntBd n 10.96 ... FF2015 n 11.56 -.01 IntmMu n 10.55 +.01 FF2015K 12.84 -.01 IntlDisc n 30.21 +.14 FF2020 n 13.97 -.01 InvGrBd n 11.78 ... FF2020K 13.24 -.01 InvGB n 7.79 ... FF2025 n 11.60 -.01 LgCapVal 10.93 +.03 FF2025K 13.35 -.02 LowP r n 39.68 +.04 FF2030 n 13.81 -.01 LowPriK r 39.66 +.03 FF2030K 13.50 -.01 Magelln n 70.99 -.26 FF2035 n 11.42 -.01 MidCap n 29.38 -.07 FF2035K 13.57 -.02 MuniInc n 13.28 +.01 FF2040 n 7.97 -.01 NwMkt r n 16.51 +.02 FF2040K 13.62 -.01 OTC n 61.27 -.82 Fidelity Invest: 100Index 9.67 -.01 AllSectEq 12.44 -.03 Puritn n 19.11 -.04 AMgr50 n 15.88 ... AMgr20 r n13.09 ... PuritanK 19.11 -.03 Balanc n 19.46 -.03 RealE n 30.50 +.47 BalancedK19.46 -.03 SAllSecEqF12.45 -.03 BlueChGr n48.95 -.46 SCmdtyStrt n8.79 -.08 Canada n 51.82 +.01 SCmdtyStrF n8.81 CapAp n 28.51 -.02 .07 CpInc r n 9.14 ... SrEmrgMkt16.30 -.04 Contra n 75.91 -.60 SrsIntGrw 11.24 +.07 ContraK 75.88 -.60 SrsIntVal 8.44 +.07 DisEq n 23.52 -.06 SrInvGrdF 11.78 -.01 DivIntl n 27.88 +.12 StIntMu n 10.85 ... 8.54 ... DivrsIntK r 27.85 +.12 STBF n DivGth n 28.92 -.08 StratInc n 11.05 +.01 Eq Inc n 44.14 +.17 TotalBd n 11.04 ... EQII n 18.53 +.08 USBI n 11.83 ... Fidel n 34.64 -.09 Value n 70.39 +.18 FltRateHi r n9.81 ... Fidelity Selects: GNMA n 11.89 +.01 Gold r n 38.45 -.69

Dec 12 80.70 80.75 79.80 80.20 Feb 13 81.80 81.80 80.80 80.90 Apr 13 83.00 83.00 81.80 82.00 May 13 87.50 87.50 87.00 87.00 Jun 13 88.50 88.50 87.80 87.80 Jul 13 87.50 87.50 86.80 86.80 Aug 13 85.80 Last spot N/A Est. sales 16407. Fri’s Sales: 53,247 Fri’s open int: 253122, up +3208

-1.02 -1.00 -1.10 -1.00 -1.20 -1.20

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high low settle COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 12 92.01 92.13 88.08 88.08 Jul 12 89.45 89.79 86.55 87.25 Oct 12 90.25 90.25 87.87 87.87 Dec 12 88.29 88.59 85.60 86.37 Mar 13 88.91 89.14 87.05 87.22 May 13 89.15 89.36 87.52 87.52 Jul 13 89.35 89.81 86.80 87.74 Oct 13 86.13 Dec 13 86.70 Mar 14 87.81 Last spot N/A Est. sales 45575. Fri’s Sales: 54,225 Fri’s open int: 189539, up +257

chg.

-4.00 -2.48 -2.56 -2.31 -2.32 -2.25 -1.93 -1.93 -2.02 -2.02

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low settle

chg.

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 12 616ü 625ø 615 616ü -7ü Jul 12 620 630ø 620 621ü -9 Sep 12 638 644ø 633 634ü -10ü

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

AMEX

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 2062038 8.79 +.11 S&P500ETF1377222137.05-.09 SPDR Fncl1092568 15.24 +.11 iShEMkts 606143 41.95 -.22 NokiaCp 604030 4.09 +.07

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Vringo 182217 Dreams 135090 CheniereEn104409 NovaGld g 35735 NthnO&G 22476

Last 3.97 3.40 16.99 6.63 19.00

Chg +.93 +.79 +.13 -.36 -.94

%Chg +30.6 +30.3 +10.3 +8.8 +7.9

Name Vol (00) Last SiriusXM 599614 2.17 MicronT 550990 7.12 PwShs QQQ54255965.45 Microsoft 375037 31.08 Apple Inc 367551580.13

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg -.06 +.16 -.74 +.26 -

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg Name AmrRlty 3.05 +.71 +30.2 Vringo 5.94 +.55 +10.2 Dreams BkAtl A rs Sealy cv16 72.95 +6.16 +9.2 AvalonHld iPSEEafe 92.17 +7.17 +8.4 ParkCity 3.82 +.29 +8.2 ProlorBio Feihe Intl

Last 3.97 3.40 5.08 3.70 5.47

Chg +.93 +.79 +.48 +.30 +.40

Name Last Chg %Chg Name E-CDang 8.63 -1.56 -15.3 Orbital YPF Soc 19.50 -2.45 -11.2 Glowpoint Lentuo 3.31 -.33 -9.1 WizrdSft rs NBGre pfA 5.42 -.52 -8.8 UraniumEn FortunaSlv 3.81 -.33 -8.0 MGTCap rs

Last 5.11 2.26 2.58 2.85 2.31

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg -.71 -12.2 Halozyme 8.56 -2.72 -24.1 -.24 -9.7 NewLeadH 2.21 -.41 -15.6 -.26 -9.2 FFinSvc 3.41 -.56 -14.1 -.23 -7.5 Spreadtrm 14.93 -2.03 -12.0 -.16 -6.57 WstptInn g 33.47 -4.16 -11.1

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

Name

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

1,724 1,305 117 3,146 58 51 3,405,562,332

52-Week High Low 13,297.11 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 381.99 467.64 8,718.25 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 868.57 601.71

Div

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

Last 12,921.41 5,234.65 456.24 7,949.57 2,358.76 2,988.40 1,369.57 14,386.90 798.08

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume Net Chg +71.82 +37.61 +4.14 +18.47 +5.42 -22.93 -.69 -11.48 +1.79

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

PE Last ...

Chg

.04 3.24

8.79 +.11

CocaCola

2.04f

20

72.44 +.50

Disney

.60f

16

41.66 -.19

EOG Res

.68f

24 102.77 -.56

FordM

.20

8 101.51 +.73

7

11.88 -.04

HewlettP

.48

8

24.31 -.26

HollyFrt s

.40a

5

28.38 -1.66

Intel

.84

12

28.41 +.32

IBM

3.00

16 202.72 -.08

Merck

1.68

19

37.95 +.17

YTD %Chg Name

31.08 +.26

Chg +3.82 +2.56 +.60 +.35 +1.87

%Chg +100.5 +41.4 +30.0 +17.2 +16.8

Div

DIARY

1,318 1,177 120 2,615 58 55 1,553,073,596

% Chg +.56 +.72 +.92 +.23 +.23 -.76 -.05 -.08 +.22

YTD 52-wk % Chg % Chg +5.76 +5.90 +4.28 +.44 -1.82 +10.60 +6.32 -3.96 +3.53 -.68 +14.71 +9.25 +8.90 +4.94 +9.07 +3.78 +7.71 -2.85

PE Last

Chg

YTD %Chg -7.9

+58.1 Oneok Pt s

2.44f

16

53.17 -.34

-4.6 PNM Res

.58f

10

18.26 +.22

+.2

+3.5 PepsiCo

2.06

16

65.99 +.93

-.5

.88f

17

21.98 +.13

+1.6

+4.3 SwstAirl

.02

31

7.99 +.05

-6.7

+10.4 TexInst

.68

17

32.20 +.01

+10.6

+11.1 Pfizer

-5.6 TimeWarn

1.04f

13

35.71 +.02

-1.2

+21.3 TriContl

.43e

...

15.56 -.04

+9.3

+17.1 WalMart

1.59f

13

60.58 +.81

+1.4

+10.2 WashFed

.32

14

17.05 +.48

+21.9

.88f

11

33.15 +.31

+20.3

26.39 +.37

-4.5a

+.7 WellsFargo

HOW TO READ THE MARKET IN REVIEW 11

Last 7.62 8.74 2.60 2.39 12.98

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

211 253 32 496 9 10 Lows 103,698,85596

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Chevron

.80

DIARY

INDEXES

BkofAm

Microsoft

Name Endocyte EdelmanFn OptiBk rsh ExceedCo CdrsVlly

+19.7 XcelEngy

1.04

15

Here are the 525 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 400 most active on the Nasdaq National Markets and 100 most active on American Stock Exchange. Mutual funds are 450 largest. Stocks in bold changed 5 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name Div Last Chg (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at Name the beginning of each letters’ list. AAR .48 12.88 # Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock, based on latest quar- ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 ACM Op .80 7.25 # terly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise footnoted. ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. ACMSp .96 7.50 # Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... mark. Fund Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold. Chg: Daily net change in the NAV.

Name Sell AAL Mutual: Bond p 9.49 CaGrp 14.47 MuBd 10.43 SmCoSt 9.73

Chg

-.03 Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. d – New 52-.01 wk low during trading day. g – Dividend in Canadian $. Stock price in U.S.$. n – -.05 New issue in past 52 wks. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. s – Split or stock dividend of 25 pct or more in last 52 wks. Div begins with date of split or stock dividend. u – New 52-wk high during trading day. v – Trading halted on primary market. Unless noted, dividend rates are annual disbursements based on last declaration. pf – Preferred. pp – Holder owes installment(s) of purchase price. rt – Rights. un – Units. wd – When distributed. wi – When issued. wt – Warrants. ww – With warrants. xw – Without warrants. Dividend Footnotes: a – Also extra or extras. b – Annual rate plus stock dividend. c – Liquidating dividend. e – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos. f – Annual rate, increased on last declaration. i – Declared or paid after stock dividend or split. j – Paid this year, dividend omitted, deferred or no action taken at last meeting. k – Declared or paid this year, accumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m – Annual rate, reduced on last declaration. p – Init div, annual rate unknown. r – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos plus stock dividend. t – Paid in stock in last 12 mos, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or distribution date. x – Ex-dividend or ex-rights. y – Ex-dividend and sales in full. z – Sales in full. vj – In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such companies. • Most active stocks above must be worth $1 and gainers/losers $2. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Wednesday’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

MUTUAL FUNDS

-.01

Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv n48.57 -.03 500Idx I 48.57 -.03 Fidelity Spart Adv: ExMktAd r n38.86 ... 500IdxAdv n48.57-.03 IntAd r n 31.79 +.21 TotMktAd r n39.53-.02 USBond I 11.82 -.01 First Eagle: 47.74 -.01 GlblA OverseasA21.43 -.06 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.12 ... Frank/Temp Frnk A: CalTFA p 7.33 ... FedTFA p 12.42 +.01 FoundAl p 10.44 +.03 GrwthA p 49.23 -.14 HYTFA p 10.60 +.01 IncomA p 2.13 ... NYTFA p 11.97 +.01 RisDvA p 36.57 +.18 StratInc p 10.43 -.01 USGovA p 6.91 +.01 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv x n12.93 .10 IncmeAd 2.12 +.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.15 ... Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.09 +.03 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.28 ... GlBd A px 12.97 -.09 GrwthA p 17.35 +.01 WorldA p 14.75 ... Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC px 13.00 -.09

GE Elfun S&S: US Eqty 43.17 -.13 GMO Trust III: Quality 23.53 +.01 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 19.42 +.14 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.38 -.05 Quality 23.54 +.01 Goldman Sachs Inst: 7.09 -.01 HiYield MidCapV 36.60 +.02 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.55 ... CapApInst 43.14 -.37 IntlInv t 57.70 +.52 Intl r 58.27 +.53 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.48 -.02 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.68 -.06 Div&Gr 20.70 +.09 TotRetBd 11.89 +.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.69 +.01 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.92 -.01 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.26 +.02 CmstkA 16.52 +.05 EqIncA 8.80 +.01 GrIncA p 19.90 +.05 HYMuA 9.73 ... Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.47 +.01 AssetStA p25.24 +.02 AssetStrI r 25.47 +.02 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.95 +.02

Dec 12 658ø 665ü 654 655ü Mar 13 673ü 678fl 669 670ü May 13 684 684ø 681ø 684ü Jul 13 692 695ü 689 689ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 215169. Fri’s Sales: 173,857 Fri’s open int: 467613, up +6628 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel 621 623ü May 12 623 629 Jul 12 615fl 618fl 611 613ü Sep 12 542 551ü 535 540fl Dec 12 525fl 535ø 525 526ü 533 537ø Mar 13 538fl 546 May 13 550ø 550ø 544fl 545ü Jul 13 559 559 551 552ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 558475. Fri’s Sales: 365,024 Fri’s open int: 1362554, up +2951 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 12 325 327ü 322ü 323 Jul 12 328 331ü 326 327 Sep 12 333 333 330ø 330ø 334 334 Dec 12 335 335 Mar 13 344ü 344ü 344ü 344ü May 13 344ü 344ü 344ü 344ü Jul 13 344ü 344ü 344ü 344ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 1404. Fri’s Sales: 1,699 Fri’s open int: 11112, off -450 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 12 1420ü 1435fl 1415ø 1420 Jul 12 1429 1439fl 1419ø 1424ü Aug 12 1421fl 1424fl 1407fl 1411fl Sep 12 1388ø 1390ü 1374ø 1378ø Nov 12 1350ü 1363 1345 1350 Jan 13 1351 1361fl 1345fl 1351fl Mar 13 1349fl 1349fl 1332ø 1337ü May 13 1331fl 1336fl 1319 1324ü Jul 13 1322 1333fl 1316 1321ü Aug 13 1292 1298 1292 1298 Last spot N/A Est. sales 425797. Fri’s Sales: 267,705 Fri’s open int: 796842, up +6912

-10 -10ø -9 -9

JPMorgan R Cl: ShtDurBd 11.00 +.01 JPMorgan Select: USEquity n10.96 -.02 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd n 11.93 +.01 HighYld n 7.87 ... IntmTFBd n11.30 ... ShtDurBd n10.99 ... USLCCrPls n21.82 .05 Janus T Shrs: BalancdT 26.30 -.08 OvrseasT r35.76 -.24 PrkMCVal T21.50 +.04 Twenty T 60.01 -.48 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 12.36 -.02 LSBalanc 13.06 -.01 LSGrwth 12.97 -.02 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.17 -.11 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p16.78 ... Longleaf Partners: Partners 28.82 -.06 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.63 +.01 StrInc C 15.13 +.02 LSBondR 14.57 +.01 StrIncA 15.05 +.02 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.38 +.01 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.42 +.01 BdDebA p 7.88 ... ShDurIncA p4.59 ... Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t4.62 ...

FUTURES

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

-6 -7ø -14fl -10fl -10ø -10fl -10

-4fl -4 -2ø -2

-16fl -16ø -13 -13ü -11fl -11 -11 -8ü -8ü -8

Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.59 ... MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.76 +.03 ValueA 24.44 +.09 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.55 +.09 MFS Funds Instl: IntlEq n 17.55 +.13 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.92 ... Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.35 +.03 MergerFd n 15.72 -.02 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.60 +.01 TotRtBdI 10.60 +.01 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 37.40 -.35 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.38 +.03 GlbDiscZ 28.75 +.03 QuestZ 17.13 +.02 SharesZ 21.26 +.03 Neuberger&Berm Fds: GenesInst 48.27 -.02 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 50.07 -.02 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.26 ... Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.48 -.04 18.18 -.05 Intl I r Oakmark 46.41 -.01 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.20 ... GlbSMdCap14.86+.01 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 33.00 -.07

low settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. May 12 102.80 103.37 101.80 102.93 Jun 12 103.23 103.84 102.28 103.37 Jul 12 103.80 104.27 102.74 103.81 Aug 12 104.00 104.61 103.14 104.18 Sep 12 104.16 104.85 103.40 104.45 Oct 12 104.29 104.87 103.65 104.58 Nov 12 104.43 105.16 103.80 104.65 Dec 12 104.85 105.26 103.78 104.70 Jan 13 104.42 105.22 103.89 104.75 Feb 13 104.47 104.69 104.04 104.69 Mar 13 104.65 104.99 103.76 104.54 Apr 13 104.28 May 13 103.97 Jun 13 103.74 104.40 103.00 103.64 Jul 13 103.23 Aug 13 102.84 Sep 13 102.47 Oct 13 102.16 Nov 13 101.81 Dec 13 101.57 102.46 101.05 101.52 Jan 14 101.04 Feb 14 100.61 Mar 14 100.16 Apr 14 99.72 Last spot N/A Est. sales 677515. Fri’s Sales: 501,173 Fri’s open int: 1585280, up +5439 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon May 12 3.3448 3.3502 3.2615 3.2670 Jun 12 3.2650 3.2667 3.1893 3.1941 Jul 12 3.1978 3.1978 3.1300 3.1324 Aug 12 3.1134 3.1232 3.0784 3.0825 Sep 12 3.0632 3.0722 3.0290 3.0354 Oct 12 2.9212 2.9212 2.8744 2.8821 Nov 12 2.8667 2.8667 2.8396 2.8401 Dec 12 2.8445 2.8477 2.8106 2.8180 Jan 13 2.8350 2.8350 2.8117 2.8117 Feb 13 2.8197

chg.

+.10 +.05 +.01 -.02 -.10 -.18 -.26 -.34 -.39 -.42 -.45 -.48 -.49 -.50 -.53 -.56 -.60 -.65 -.68 -.71 -.74 -.77 -.81 -.85

-.0791 -.0726 -.0673 -.0618 -.0576 -.0536 -.0510 -.0493 -.0472 -.0458

GlobA p 58.85 +.16 GblStrIncA 4.19 ... IntBdA p 6.32 ... MnStFdA 35.90 -.17 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.37 ... RoMu A p 16.64 +.01 RcNtMuA 7.24 ... Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 32.64 -.07 6.32 +.01 IntlBdY IntGrowY 28.17 +.16 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.18 -.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r10.61 ... AllAsset 12.10 ... ComodRR 6.56 -.06 11.68 ... DivInc EmgMkCur10.42 ... EmMkBd 11.66 -.01 FltInc r 8.60 -.02 FrgnBd 10.80 -.01 9.23 ... HiYld InvGrCp 10.68 ... LowDu 10.45 ... RealRtnI 12.12 -.01 9.81 ... ShortT 11.18 -.01 TotRt TRIII 9.84 ... PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.45 ... RealRtA p 12.12 -.01 TotRtA 11.18 -.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.18 -.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.18 -.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.18 -.01

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET

.96 86.88 +.56 Div Last Chg Costco ... 30.92 -.63 Cree Inc A-B-C ... 20.99 -.39 Crocs ASML Hld .59e 49.34 +.65 Ctrip.com ... 21.05 -.28 CubistPh ... 39.90 -.20 ATP O&G ... 6.42 -.09 ... 4.84 +.35 AVI Bio ... 1.04 ... Curis ... 7.20 -.15 CypSemi .44f 14.32 +.07 Accuray ... 8.77 -.25 Achillion D-E-F ... 26.97 -.44 AcmePkt ... 17.06 -.14 ActivsBliz .18f 12.26 -.16 DFC Glbl ... 32.85 -.34 DeckrsOut ... d61.53 -.58 AdobeSy ... 16.13 +.02 Adtran .36 29.51 -.36 Dell Inc ... 8.81 -.04 AEterna g ... .66 -.01 Dndreon ... 11.70 -.16 Dentsply .22 39.61 +.17 Affymax ... 36.73 -.03 DiamndF lf ... d21.28 +.44 AkamaiT Akorn ... 10.58 -.77 DirecTV A ... 48.75 -.35 ... 88.67 -.35 DiscCm A ... 51.89 +.19 Alexion s Alexza h ... .63 -.00 DishNetwk2.00e 31.44 -.25 Alkermes ... 17.47 -.09 DollarTree ... u96.57 +.55 AllosThera ... 1.82 +.01 DonlleyRR 1.04 12.02 +.10 AllscriptH ... 16.00 -.29 DrmWksA ... 16.99 -.01 AlteraCp lf .32 37.57 +.09 DryShips .12t 3.27 -.03 ... 9.63 -.06 Dunkin n .60 30.95 -.42 Amarin ... 9.91 -.15 Amazon ... 185.50 -2.96 E-Trade ... 35.50 -.62 ACapAgy5.00m 30.09 -.02 eBay ... 7.92 +.01 AmCapLtd ... 8.60 +.13 eResrch ARltyCT n .70 10.96 +.01 EaglRkEn .84f 9.10 -.24 Amgen 1.44 66.26 +.67 ErthLink .20 7.77 -.05 AmkorT lf ... 5.64 -.05 EstWstBcp .40f 22.03 +.16 ... 23.22 -.49 EdelmanFn .20 u8.74 +2.56 Amylin AnalogDev1.20f 37.93 -.11 ElectArts ... d15.21 -.97 Ancestry ... 22.25 -.55 EndoPhrm ... 35.69 +.07 AntheraPh ... d1.97 -.10 Endocyte ... 7.62 +3.82 ... 33.56 -.52 A123 Sys ... .93 -.01 EngyXXI ... 8.72 +.02 ApolloGrp ... 36.12 -.58 Entegris EntropCom ... 5.03 -.08 ApolloInv .80m 7.15 +.01 ... 153.99 -1.62 Apple Inc 10.60 580.13 - Equinix Ericsson .37e 9.46 +.06 25.10 ApldMatl .36f 11.86 +.06 Exelixis .10p 4.67 -.10 ... 7.26 -.22 Expedia s .36 31.21 -.60 ArQule ArenaPhm ... 2.74 -.14 ExpdIntl .50 46.02 -.31 AresCap 1.48f 16.13 +.20 ExpScripts ... 56.80 -.18 ... 14.66 -.10 F5 Netwks ... 122.04 -.08 AriadP Ariba Inc ... 35.01 +.18 FLIR Sys .28f 23.67 +.02 ArmHld .16e 27.89 -.05 Fastenal s .68f 48.25 -.54 ... 3.43 +.08 FifthStFin 1.15 9.28 -.02 ArrayBio Arris ... 11.15 +.07 FifthThird .32 14.11 +.09 ... 17.62 -.44 ArubaNet ... 20.89 -.25 Finisar AscenaRt s ... 21.14 +.13 FinLine .24f 20.93 -.14 9.13 +.10 FstNiagara.32m AsscdBanc .20f 13.22 +.11 ... 20.82 -.01 ... 8.85 ... FstSolar Atmel Autodesk ... 41.09 -.16 FstMerit .64 15.98 +.21 ... 68.74 +.24 AutoData 1.58 54.70 +.21 Fiserv ... 6.88 +.03 AvagoTch .52f 37.05 -.23 Flextrn FocusMda .14p 24.14 -.51 AvanirPhm ... 2.94 +.04 AvisBudg ... 12.58 -.09 Fortinet s ... 27.05 -.45 BE Aero ... 43.63 -.57 Fossil Inc ... 127.45 -3.00 BGC Ptrs .68 6.72 -.02 FosterWhl ... 21.76 -.16 BMC Sft ... 39.31 +.12 FriendFd n ... 1.14 -.07 ... 147.66 -3.72 FrontierCm.40m 4.17 +.05 Baidu ... 1.25 -.05 BedBath ... 69.55 +.14 FuelCell Biodel h ... .61 +.07 FultonFncl .28f 10.28 +.09 BiogenIdc ... 125.78 +.44 FushiCopp ... 7.00 +.35 ... 32.73 -.01 BioMarin G-H-I BioSante h ... .56 -.03 BreitBurn 1.80f 17.36 -.16 GT AdvTc ... 7.33 +.04 2.00e 44.59 -.32 Garmin Broadcom .40f 36.54 -.17 .52f 24.93 +.31 BroadVisn ... 30.00 -.55 Gentex BrcdeCm ... 5.38 -.08 GileadSci ... 45.86 +.35 CA Inc 1.00f 26.64 -.11 GluMobile ... 4.36 -.16 CH Robins 1.32 64.81 +.68 GolLNGLtd1.30f 35.99 -.61 ... 606.07 CVB Fncl .34 11.30 +.11 Google Cadence ... 11.49 -.02 18.53 ... 7.33 -.10 GrWlfRes CdnSolar ... 3.54 +.25 CpstnTrb h ... .94 -.03 GreenMtC ... 43.72 +.13 CareerEd ... 6.94 -.05 GrifolsSA n .55t 7.88 +.06 Carrizo ... 25.39 -.73 Groupon n ... d12.67 -.45 Cavium ... 28.69 -.24 GulfportE ... 25.62 -1.12 Celgene ... 78.16 -.16 HMS Hld s ... 27.60 -.76 CelldexTh ... 4.17 -.01 Halozyme ... 8.56 -2.72 CentEuro ... 4.23 -.41 Hasbro 1.44f 35.76 -.42 ... 8.22 +.07 HercOffsh ... 4.25 -.29 CentAl ... 20.60 -.27 ... 73.24 +.31 Hologic Cerner s ChrmSh ... 5.99 +.09 HotTopic .32f 9.77 -.01 ... 62.93 +.45 HudsCity .32 6.67 +.03 ChkPoint ... 7.14 -.04 Cheesecake ... 29.45 -.15 HumGen ChinaInf rs ... 1.23 -.14 HuntJB .56f u56.91 +.91 CienaCorp ... 16.02 -.14 HuntBnk .16 6.33 +.11 CinnFin 1.61 34.26 +.39 IAC Inter .48 49.16 -.24 Cirrus ... 23.18 -.22 iGateCorp ... 18.35 -.77 Cisco .32f 19.73 -.13 iShAsiaexJ1.05e 55.72 -.08 CitrixSys ... 75.56 +.44 IdenixPh ... 7.39 -.46 ... 44.97 -2.20 CleanEngy ... 18.93 -1.02 Illumina Clearwire ... 1.92 -.21 ImunoGn ... 12.26 -.08 ... 17.35 -.30 CognizTech ... 72.70 -1.10 Incyte ... 7.55 +.06 ... 66.35 +.57 Infinera Coinstar ... 51.38 -.66 Comcast .65f 29.77 +.26 Informat Comc spcl .65f 29.37 +.20 Infosys .75e 47.49 -1.66 ... 6.78 -.01 CommVlt ... 52.78 -.11 IntgDv .84 u28.41 +.32 CmplGnom ... 2.72 -.11 Intel .40 d31.85 -1.07 Compuwre ... 8.58 +.01 InterDig Comverse ... 6.42 -.01 InterMune ... 11.75 +.35 .48 10.63 +.03 Conns ... 18.69 +1.08 Intersil .60 60.31 -.03 Copart s ... 26.06 +.42 Intuit ... 7.33 -.20 Isis CorinthC ... 3.64 -.08

Name

Name

J-K-L

... 9.04 +.01 Questcor ... 40.80 -.53 QuinStreet ... 11.65 +.06 ... 4.38 -.09 RF MicD ... 5.66 +.01 ... 1.39 +.04 Rambus JA Solar Randgold .20 86.79 -2.25 JDS Uniph ... 12.93 -.08 ...u122.54 -.06 JamesRiv ... 4.98 ... Regenrn JazzPhrm ... 44.75 -.93 RschMotn ... 13.42 +.53 ... 4.84 +.06 RexEnergy ... d9.25 -.12 JetBlue ... 7.14 +.06 RiverbedT ... 26.51 +.99 KIT Digitl KLA Tnc 1.40 52.68 -.04 RosettaR ... 46.51 -1.03 ... 12.42 +.14 RossStrs s .56f 59.22 +.16 Kulicke LKQ Corp ... 30.05 +.08 Rovi Corp ... 28.81 -.37 LamResrch ... 42.15 -.03 RoyGld .60 60.42 -3.51 Lattice ... 6.21 -.06 S-T-U LeapWirlss ... 8.22 -.30 LibGlobA ... 48.91 +.19 SBA Com ... u52.26 +.12 LibtyIntA ... 18.39 -.38 SLM Cp .50f 14.84 -.01 ... 45.39 -.29 SalixPhm ... 48.46 -.05 LifeTech LimelghtN ... 3.04 +.01 SanDisk ... 40.95 -.17 .80 24.79 +.14 Sapient .35e 12.33 +.19 Lincare LinearTch 1.00f 32.51 +.46 SciClone ... 6.49 ... LinnEngy 2.76 37.97 +.03 SeagateT 1.00f u28.51 +1.13 ... u51.58 +.28 SearsHldgs .33t 57.90 +.23 Liquidity Lufkin .50 74.67 -3.38 SeattGen ... 18.28 -.22 lululemn gs ... 73.40 -.11 SelCmfrt ... u34.25 +.20 Sequenom ... 4.30 +.31 M-N-0 SvcSource ... 15.69 -.05 .45e 93.83 +1.01 MAP Phm ... 13.30 +.37 Shire MIPS Tech ... 6.28 -.03 Shutterfly ... 29.16 -.32 MagicJck s ... 24.05 +1.13 SigmaAld .80f 70.89 -.07 ... 5.80 +.03 MAKO Srg ... 41.55 -.96 SilicnImg MannKd ... d2.11 -.05 Slcnware .28e 5.82 -.07 ... 13.76 -.40 MarvellT ... 15.25 +.13 SilvStd g ... 61.56 -2.44 Mattel 1.24f 31.01 -3.12 Sina ... 2.17 -.06 MaximIntg .88 27.39 +.13 SiriusXM MedAssts h ... 12.40 -.49 SkywksSol ... 26.05 -.24 MelcoCrwn ... 14.19 -.10 SmithWes ... 7.88 +.03 MentorGr ... 14.09 -.04 SmithMicro ... 2.05 +.27 MergeHlth ... 4.61 +.16 SodaStrm ... 34.41 -1.21 ... 50.64 -1.91 Micrel .16 9.49 ... Sohu.cm Microchp 1.40f 35.70 -.11 SolarCap 2.40 20.48 -.42 ... 7.12 +.16 SonicCorp ... 7.00 -.06 MicronT ... 9.83 +.32 Microsoft .80 31.08 +.26 SpectPh .80 26.95 +.07 SpiritAir n ... u22.05 +.52 Molex MonstrBv s ... 63.38 -.88 Spreadtrm .40 14.93 -2.03 ... 1.10 -.03 Staples .44f 15.67 +.14 Motricity Mylan ... 22.10 +.03 StarScient ... 2.76 -.07 MyriadG ... 23.87 +.18 Starbucks .68 u59.65 -2.02 ... 19.00 +.01 StlDynam .40 13.70 -.01 NII Hldg NXP Semi ... 24.74 +.59 Stratasys ... 41.21 +5.23 NasdOMX ... 24.43 -.14 SusqBnc .12 9.42 +.13 NatPenn .28f 9.14 +.17 SwisherHy ... 1.99 +.12 NektarTh ... 7.21 -.03 Symantec ... 18.18 +.10 NetApp ... 39.79 -.34 Synaptics ... 32.26 -.73 Netflix ... 101.15 -3.02 Synopsys ... 29.90 +.05 NetwkEng ... .98 -.10 TD Ameritr .24 18.78 -.08 NewsCpA .17m 19.12 -.03 TakeTwo ... 14.15 -.52 NewsCpB .17m 19.44 -.08 Targacept ... 4.46 +.06 .08 3.85 -.01 NorTrst 1.20f 46.16 +.46 Tellabs Novavax ... 1.22 +.03 TeslaMot ... 32.25 -1.34 ... 47.13 -.04 TevaPhrm .96e 45.05 +.86 Novlus .68 32.20 +.01 NuanceCm ... 23.65 -.34 TexInst ... 32.31 -.11 ... 13.99 -.17 Thoratec Nvidia ... 32.68 -.63 OReillyAu ... u94.76 +.41 TibcoSft OmniVisn ... 19.18 -.37 TitanMach ... 34.75 -1.25 ... 10.92 -.38 OnSmcnd ... 8.29 -.19 TiVo Inc ... d4.06 -.15 TractSupp .48 98.01 -.37 Oncothyr OnyxPh ... 40.92 +.08 TripAdv n ... 33.83 -.67 ... 5.67 -.15 OpenTable ... 39.83 -2.08 TriQuint OpnwvSy ... u2.76 +.17 USA Tech h ... 1.62 +.25 OptimerPh ... 13.22 +.09 UltaSalon 1.00e u93.15 -1.78 Oracle .24 28.64 +.14 Umpqua .28 12.89 +.15 Orexigen ... 4.01 +.11 UtdTherap ... 41.34 -.29 UrbanOut ... 28.48 -.19

IstaPh

P-Q-R

V-W-X-Y-Z

PDL Bio .60 6.17 +.08 PMC Sra ... 6.88 -.03 Paccar .72a 43.06 +.31 PanASlv .15f d19.65 -.38 ParamTch ... 20.54 -.31 .20 15.66 -.54 PattUTI Paychex 1.28 30.94 +.11 Pendrell ... d1.26 -.91 PeopUtdF .63 12.73 +.24 PerfectWld2.00e 13.31 -.70 .32 104.53 +.39 Perrigo PetSmart .56 56.32 -.17 Polycom s ... d13.28 -.34 ... 1.86 +.06 Popular Power-One ... 4.56 +.11 PwShs QQQ.49e 65.45 -.74 Powrwv rs ... 1.22 -.10 Pozen ... u7.61 +.45 PriceTR 1.36f 62.18 +.13 ... 702.00 priceline 33.18 PrimoWtr ... 1.64 -.13 PrUPShQQQ ... 11.74 +.35 PrUltPQQQ ... 108.57 -3.53 ProspctCap1.22 10.79 +.11 QIAGEN ... 15.05 +.05 Qlogic ... 16.29 -.21 Qualcom 1.00f 66.25 -.42 QualityS s .70 39.93 -.07 QuantFuel ... .58 -.02

ValueClick ... 20.20 -.15 VanSTCpB1.89e 79.25 +.06 VeecoInst ... 27.50 -.80 VBradley ... 28.29 -1.05 Verisign 2.75e u40.58 -.09 ... 35.49 -.68 VertxPh ViacomB 1.00 46.40 -.38 ... 3.09 -.04 Vical VirgnMda h .16 24.30 +.10 ViroPhrm ... 20.93 -1.08 ... 21.85 -.29 Vivus Vodafone 2.10e 27.24 +.29 WarnerCh ... 15.46 +.12 WebMD ... d22.65 -.34 Wendys Co .08 4.89 -.07 WstptInn g ... 33.47 -4.16 WetSeal ... 3.34 +.14 WholeFd .56 84.96 -.35 Windstrm 1.00 11.23 +.03 Wynn 2.00a 123.37 -2.11 ... 5.52 -.01 X-Rite .88f 35.27 +.07 Xilinx YRC rs ... 7.18 +.85 Yahoo ... 14.79 -.09 Yandex n ... 26.46 -.10 ... 11.06 -.35 Zagg Zillow n ... 34.82 -2.22 ZionBcp .04 20.80 +.26 Zynga n ... 10.95 -.91

HstnAEn ... ... iBio ImpOil gs .48f InovioPhm ... KeeganR g ... LkShrGld g ... LongweiPI ... LucasEngy ... ... Metalico MdwGold g ... NavideaBio ... NeoStem ... NBRESec .24 Nevsun g .10f NwGold g ... NA Pall g ... NthnO&G ... NovaGld g ... ParaG&S ... ... PhrmAth PionDrill ... PolyMet g ... Protalix ... Quaterra g ... ... Quepasa QuestRM g ...

RareEle g ... ... Rentech Richmnt g ... Rubicon g ... SamsO&G ... TanzRy g ... Taseko ... ... Tengsco TrnsatlPet ... ... TriValley TriangPet ... Tucows g ... Ur-Energy ... ... Uranerz UraniumEn ... VantageDrl ... ... VirnetX VistaGold ... VoyagerOG ... Vringo ... Vringo wt ... WFAdvInco1.02 WizrdSft rs ... YM Bio g ...

AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg CrSuisInco .32 CrSuiHiY .32 DejourE g ... DenisnM g ... DocuSec ... Dreams ... EV LtdDur 1.25 EVMuniBd .80 ElephTalk ... EntGaming ... ExeterR gs ... ExtorreG g ... FrkStPrp .76 ... GSE Sy GamGldNR1.68 GascoEngy ... Gastar grs ... GenMoly ... GoldResrc .60 GoldenMin ... GoldStr g ... ... GldFld GranTrra g ... GrtBasG g ... GtPanSilv g ... Hemisphrx ...

AbdAsPac .42 7.35 +.03 ... .61 -.03 Adventrx AlexcoR g ... 6.35 -.15 AlldNevG ... 29.57 -1.33 AmApparel ... 1.02 +.02 AmLorain ... 1.36 +.15 AntaresP ... 3.00 +.01 Augusta g ... 2.67 -.09 Aurizon g ... 4.79 -.04 AvalnRare ... 2.53 -.13 ... 2.27 -.10 Bacterin Ballanty ... 5.77 -.09 Banro g ... 3.94 -.24 BarcUBS36 ... 41.18 -.33 BarcGSOil ... 25.83 +.02 BrigusG g ... .83 +.05 CAMAC En ... .86 -.03 CardiumTh ... .23 -.01 ... .41 -.02 CelSci CFCda g .01 21.46 -.14 CheniereEn ... u16.99 +.13 CheniereE 1.70 23.05 -.45 ChinaShen ... 1.48 ... ComstkMn ... 1.86 -.05

Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n 27.78 +.03 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.05 -.05 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.02 +.01 Price Funds: BlChip n 44.98 -.55 CapApp n 22.17 -.02 EmMktS n 31.49 -.01 EqInc n 24.74 +.05 EqIndex n 36.94 -.02 Growth n 37.08 -.47 HlthSci n 37.02 -.13 HiYield n 6.70 ... InstlCpG 18.69 -.27 IntlBond n 9.87 +.04 Intl G&I 12.37 +.05 IntlStk n 13.63 +.04 MidCap n 58.01 -.17 MCapVal n23.15 -.03 N Asia n 15.68 +.01 New Era n 42.42 -.30 N Horiz n 34.90 -.16 N Inc n 9.75 ... OverS SF n 7.88 +.05 R2010 n 15.98 ... R2015 n 12.43 -.01 R2020 n 17.22 -.02 R2025 n 12.62 -.02 R2030 n 18.13 -.03 R2035 n 12.83 -.02 R2040 n 18.26 -.04 ShtBd n 4.85 ... SmCpStk n34.32 +.09 SmCapVal n37.16+.21 SpecGr n 18.74 -.05 SpecIn n 12.62 +.01 Value n 24.50 +.05 Principal Inv: LgCGI In 10.21 -.10

Mar 13 2.8348 Apr 13 2.9800 2.9800 2.9636 2.9636 May 13 2.9500 2.9540 2.9500 2.9540 Jun 13 2.9324 Jul 13 2.9002 Aug 13 2.8652 Sep 13 2.8276 Oct 13 2.6905 Nov 13 2.6540 Dec 13 2.6335 Jan 14 2.6375 Feb 14 2.6500 Mar 14 2.6560 Apr 14 2.7560 Last spot N/A Est. sales 174609. Fri’s Sales: 190,809 Fri’s open int: 355028, up +577 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu May 12 1.986 2.030 1.976 2.016 Jun 12 2.084 2.128 2.076 2.108 Jul 12 2.204 2.241 2.187 2.222 Aug 12 2.288 2.319 2.273 2.305 Sep 12 2.330 2.357 2.311 2.346 Oct 12 2.421 2.444 2.401 2.432 Nov 12 2.687 2.724 2.687 2.709 Dec 12 3.058 3.075 3.036 3.061 Jan 13 3.225 3.240 3.204 3.224 Feb 13 3.223 3.250 3.223 3.236 Mar 13 3.215 3.231 3.196 3.213 Apr 13 3.180 3.210 3.180 3.194 May 13 3.220 3.246 3.219 3.238 Jun 13 3.279 3.296 3.278 3.291 Jul 13 3.323 3.354 3.323 3.347 Aug 13 3.350 3.400 3.348 3.370 Sep 13 3.354 3.383 3.353 3.376 Oct 13 3.414 3.423 3.399 3.414 Nov 13 3.530 3.560 3.521 3.545 Dec 13 3.734 3.780 3.724 3.761 Jan 14 3.890 3.890 3.858 3.869 Feb 14 3.880 3.880 3.840 3.854 Mar 14 3.800 3.815 3.783 3.799 Apr 14 3.685 3.685 3.660 3.673 May 14 3.705 3.705 3.693 3.693 Last spot N/A Est. sales 316126. Fri’s Sales: 448,048 Fri’s open int: 1296228, up +22467

3.82 3.09 .31 1.43 3.51 u3.40 16.04 13.22 d1.70 .62 2.47 d5.15 10.32 2.25 15.67 .24 2.51 3.08 25.13 6.52 1.54 1.13 6.34 .66 2.00 .33

+.01 -.01 -.00 -.01 -.05 +.79 +.06 +.09 -.20 +.09 -.09 -.26 +.15 +.04 -.18 -.01 -.02 +.06 +.03 -.40 -.06 -.03 -.01 -.05 -.06 -.02

3.63 1.55 44.34 .60 3.10 .90 1.67 1.81 4.09 1.35 2.69 .33 4.23 3.62 9.46 2.55 19.00 6.63 2.34 1.46 7.75 1.05 6.12 .44 3.85 2.15

-.09 +.19 +.60 -.03 -.06 -.03 -.03 -.38 +.03 +.03 -.04 +.01 +.04 -.05 -.22 -.06 -.94 -.36 -.07 -.06 -.30 -.07 -.13 -.03 -.03 -.10

LT2020In 12.17 ... 500Adml n126.31 -.06 HYCorp n 5.82 ... LT2030In 12.03 ... GNMA Ad n11.06 ... HlthCre n 135.21 +.30 GrwAdm n 35.66 -.22 InflaPro n 14.38 -.01 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.90 +.01 HlthCr n 57.05 +.13 IntlGr n 18.21 +.12 VoyA p 22.63 -.20 HiYldCp n 5.82 ... IntlVal n 28.71 +.09 InfProAd n 28.25 -.01 ITIGrade n 10.13 -.01 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.61 +.01 ITBdAdml n11.84 ... LifeCon n 16.85 +.01 PremierI r 19.97 ... ITsryAdml n11.64 ... LifeGro n 22.72 +.02 IntGrAdm n57.92 +.38 LifeMod n 20.31 +.01 Russell Funds S: StratBd 11.14 ... ITAdml n 14.16 ... LTIGrade n10.39 -.02 ITGrAdm n10.13 -.01 Morg n 19.93 -.11 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 38.79 -.02 LtdTrAd n 11.16 ... MuInt n 14.16 ... S&P Sel 21.44 -.01 LTGrAdml n10.39 -.02 PrecMtls r n18.45 -.18 LT Adml n 11.53 ... PrmcpCor n14.30 +.01 Scout Funds: Intl 30.83 +.14 MCpAdml n98.12 -.14 Prmcp r n 66.14 +.09 MorgAdm n61.79 -.36 SelValu r n19.81 ... Selected Funds: AmShD 42.76 +.06 MuHYAdm n10.96 ... STAR n 20.07 ... PrmCap r n68.63 +.10 STIGrade n10.75 ... Sequoia 158.57 +.55 ReitAdm r n89.52 StratEq n 20.35 ... TCW Funds: +1.40 TgtRetInc n11.91 ... TotRetBdI 9.91 +.01 STsyAdml n10.77 ... TgRe2010 n23.54+.01 Templeton Instit: STBdAdml n10.63-.01 TgtRe2015 n13.01 ForEqS 17.91 +.06 ShtTrAd n 15.93 ... +.01 Thornburg Fds: STFdAd n 10.84 ... TgRe2020 n23.08+.02 IntValA p 26.23 +.12 STIGrAd n 10.75 ... TgtRe2025 n13.13 IncBuildC p18.24 +.07 SmCAdm n36.40 +.05 +.01 IntValue I 26.82 +.13 TxMCap r n68.52 -.05 TgRe2030 n22.52+.02 Tweedy Browne: TtlBAdml n11.02 ... TgtRe2035 n13.54 GblValue 23.30 +.04 TStkAdm n34.22 -.02 +.01 VALIC : ValAdml n 21.84 +.10 TgtRe2040 n22.24 StkIdx 25.54 -.02 WellslAdm n57.03+.11 +.02 Vanguard Admiral: WelltnAdm n56.89+.17 TgtRe2045 n13.96 BalAdml n 23.04 -.01 Windsor n 47.70 +.11 +.01 CAITAdm n11.53 ... WdsrIIAd n49.78 +.06 Wellsly n 23.54 +.05 CpOpAdl n73.15 +.06 Vanguard Fds: Welltn n 32.94 +.10 EMAdmr r n35.34 -.06 DivdGro n 16.24 +.06 Wndsr n 14.13 +.03 Energy n 109.51 -.43 Energy n 58.33 -.23 WndsII n 28.04 +.03 EqInAdm n n48.35 EqInc n 23.06 +.12 Vanguard Idx Fds: +.26 Explr n 78.57 -.21 DvMkInPl r n93.95+.75 ExplAdml n73.12 -.20 GNMA n 11.06 ... MidCpIstPl n106.90 ExtdAdm n43.58 ... GlobEq n 17.59 +.04 .15

-.0442 -.0425 -.0421 -.0417 -.0419 -.0421 -.0423 -.0425 -.0426 -.0411 -.0411 -.0411 -.0411 -.0411

+.035 +.024 +.020 +.018 +.016 +.011 +.001 -.002 -.001 -.001 -.001 -.002 -.002 -.002 -.002 -.002 -.002 -.004 -.004 -.004 -.006 -.008 -.008 -.012 -.012

B5

5.69 2.10 6.85 2.97 1.96 5.05 3.12 .94 1.21 .15 5.78 1.33 1.09 1.99 2.85 1.47 24.13 2.92 2.40 u3.97 u1.18 10.20 2.58 1.69

-.21 -.09 +.08 -.04 -.07 +.02 ... -.02 -.02 +.00 -.37 -.11 -.01 -.08 -.23 -.02 -.62 -.03 -.10 +.93 +.33 +.02 -.26 -.06

TotIntAdm r n23.63 +.11 TotIntlInst r n94.51 +.43 TotIntlIP r n94.53 +.43 500 n 126.30 -.06 Balanced n23.04 -.01 MidCap n 21.62 -.03 SmCap n 36.37 +.05 STBnd n 10.63 -.01 TotBnd n 11.02 ... TotlIntl n 14.13 +.07 TotStk n 34.21 -.02 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n 23.05 ... DevMkInst n9.02 +.07 ExtIn n 43.57 ... FTAllWldI r n84.01 +.42 GrwthIst n 35.65 -.23 InfProInst n11.51 ... InstIdx n 125.49 -.06 InsPl n 125.49 -.07 InsTStPlus n30.97-.02 MidCpIst n 21.67 -.04 SCInst n 36.40 +.06 TBIst n 11.02 ... TSInst n 34.23 -.01 ValueIst n 21.84 +.11 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl n 104.33 -.05 MidCpIdx n30.96 -.05 STBdIdx n 10.63 -.01 SmCpSig n32.80 +.05 TotBdSgl n11.02 ... TotStkSgl n33.03 -.02 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.32 +.01 Yacktman Funds: Fund p n 18.53 +.06 Focused n 19.78 +.08

METALS NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Mon. Aluminum -$0.9278 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.7035 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $3.6240 N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Lead - $2072.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9126 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1653.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1648.70 troy oz., NY Merc spot Mon. Silver - $31.430 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $31.364 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Platinum -$1575.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1571.70 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised


B6 Tuesday, April 17, 2012

CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record

‘Hunger Games’ earns $21.5M to slap down ‘Stooges’ LOS ANGELES (AP) — Movie fans have chosen real violence over the slapstick variety as “The Hunger Games” held of f “The Three Stooges” to remain the No. 1 weekend movie. Lionsgate’s “The Hunger Games,” the blockbuster about teens competing in a televised fight to the death, stayed on top for a fourth-straight weekend with $21.5 million. That raises the film’s domestic total to $337.1 million. “I think a couple of weeks ago, if someone had told us where we’d be, we would have said, ‘We’d like to see that number, but it would be a pleasant surprise.’ So we’re in that pleasant surprise spot at this point,” said Richie Fay, head of distribution for Lionsgate. Peter and Bobby Farrelly’s slapstick update “The Three Stooges” opened in second-place with $17.1 million, according to studio estimates Sunday. That was well above industry expectations of around $10 million for the 20th Century Fox

Legals

---------------------------------Pub. April 3, 10, 17, 2012 IN THE FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT CHILDREN’S COURT DIVISION COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO STATE OF NEW MEXICO, ex rel, CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES DEPT. In the Matter of: X.R. and M.R., Children. and Concerning: TINA RAMUS and STEVEN RICKETSON, Respondents.

update starring Chris Diamantopoulos as Moe, Sean Hayes as Larry and Will Sasso as Curly. Fox executives had figured the movie would appeal mainly to young males. But it also pulled in older men who grew up on the Stooges and a fair number of women and girls as whole families tur ned out to see it, said Chris Aronson, the studio’s head of distribution. “If you’re predisposed to open your mind, it’s a laugh riot,” Aronson said. The acclaimed horror tale “The Cabin in the Woods” debuted in third-place with $14.9 million. A smart, twisting take on the genre produced and co-written by Joss Whedon (“Buf fy the Vampire Slayer”), the long-delayed “Cabin in the Woods” had been one of the films caught up in MGM’s bankruptcy but was finally released by Lionsgate. On the 100th anniversary of the ship’s sinking on April 15, 1912, the 3-D version of James Cameron’s “Titanic” sailed past

Legals

the $2 billion mark worldwide. “T itanic” is just the second blockbuster to top $2 billion, trailing only the next film Cameron made — the sci-fi sensation “Avatar,” which took in $2.8 billion. Domestically, “Titanic” held the No. 4 spot with $11.6 million. The 3-D re-release has taken in $44.4 million domestically to lift the film’s lifetime total to $645.2 million. “Titanic” also pulled in $88.2 million in 69 overseas markets, including a huge $58 million 3-D debut in China. That brought the 3-D reissue’s overseas total to $146.4 million and the worldwide sum for re-release to $190.8 million. Added to the $1.84 billion take from the original release of the 1997 hit, “Titanic” has climbed to a lifetime total of about $2.03 billion. Another big overseas haul came with Universal’s “Battleship,” which opened with $58 million in 26 countries five weeks ahead of

GARAGE SALES

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Publish April 3, 10, 17, 2012 NOTICE is hereby given that on March 19, 2012, Kaywal, Inc., Michael Lackey, P.O. Box 1060, Roswell, New Mexico, 88202-1060, c/o Atkins Engineering Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 3156, Roswell, New Mexico 88202-3156; filed Application No. RA-1470 & RA-1470-S; RA-1470-A with the STATE ENGINEER for permit to change place of use of 595.50 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, of shallow groundwater diverted from shallow wells RA-1470 located in the NW1/4SW1/4SE1/4 and RA-1470-S located in the SW1/4SE1/4SW1/4, both in Section 15, Township 11 South, Range 24 East N.M.P.M., The subject water rights are presently authorized for the irrigation of 206.7 acres described as follows:

NO: JQ-2011-30

SUBDIVISION SECTION TOWNSHIP RANGE ACREAGE Move-From Part of S1/2S1/2NE1/4; Part of E1/2SE1/4SE1/4NW1/4; Part of SE1/4; Part of SE1/4SW1/4; Part of E1/2E1/2NE1/4SW1/4 and Part of E1/2E1/2SW1/4SW1/4 15 11 S. 24 E 196.7 15 11 S. 24 E. 10.0 Part of E1/2E1/2SE1/4SE1/4 206.7

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

Applicant proposes to change the place and amount of irrigated acreage to the following:

TO THE ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT: STEVEN RICKETSON You are hereby notified that an action has been filed against you in the said Court and County by the State of New Mexico in which the State of New Mexico has filed a petition alleging that you have neglected or abused X.R., a child born to you on October 26, 2004, and M.R., a child born to you on October 19, 2003, and the State is requesting the Court to enter judgment against you. The above procould ulticeeding mately result in the termination of your parental rights You are further notified that this matter will be presented to the Children’s Court Division of the District Court in Chaves County, New Mexico, thirty (30) days after the last publication of this notice. WITNESS my hand and Seal of the District Court of the State of New Mexico.

SUBDIVISION Move-To Part of SE1/4 Part of S1/2NE1/4 Part of S1/2NW1/4 Part of SW1/4

KENNON CROWHURST Clerk of the District Court Children’s Court Division By: /s/Cynthia Brackeen DEPUTY The name of the State’s attorney is Andrew J. Malone, whose address is #4 Grand Ave Plaza, Roswell, New Mexico, 88201, and telephone number is (575)624-6071.

SECTION 15 15 15 15

TOWNSHIP 11 S. 11 S. 11 S. 11 S.

its U.S. debut on May 18. The action tale featuring Taylor Kitsch and Liam Neeson is inspired by the game Battleship. “The Hunger Games” added $15 million overseas to bring its international total to $194 million and its worldwide haul to $531 million. The weekend’s other new domestic wide release, Film District’s sci-fi story “Lockout,” opened at No. 9 with $6.3 million. The movie stars Guy Pearce trying to quell an uprising at an orbiting space prison. With no big new debut on the domestic front, the overall box office slipped for only the second weekend this year. Domestic revenues totaled $117 million, down 10 percent from the same weekend last year, when “Rio” led with $39.2 million, according to boxoffice tracker Hollywood.com. Domestic revenues this year are at $2.98 billion, 19.3 percent ahead of 2011’s, putting Hollywood on a record money pace with a big summer lineup just

RANGE 24 E.) 24 E.) 24 E.) 24 E.)

ACREAGE

Up to 198.50

Application is made to reconfigure the location and amount of irrigated acreage under State Engineer Files RA-1470 and RA-1470-A to match land presently being irrigated. Applicant will reduce the amount of irrigated acreage to an amount not to exceed 198.5 acres of irrigated land. If less than 198.5 acres is irrigated the water right will be stacked on the acreage being irrigated.

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice

BACKGROUND EXTRAS needed Film title: The Rambler Film production: Rambler Film LLC Compensation: Film Credit & IMDB credit. Project Description: Independent feature film is looking for extras to on set and part of this film. This is a great opportunity to be on set and in a movie. All ethnicity, gender, body types are welcome must be 18 years or older. No experience necessary. Please include your name, age, email address, Headshot or photograph of yourself. Telephone number where you can be reached please submit your information to ramblercasting@live.com or contact Jeanette Mejia Loera @ production office # is 575-622-1245 from 8am to 5 pm

For Results You Can Measure

015. Personals Special Notice

PAY CASH for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles. Entire households & estates welcome. Call 627-2033 or 623-6608.

025. Lost and Found

Missing Boston Terrier scar on face & crooked tail answers to Nala, very friendly tag has old # please call 575-208-9299. Small reward! FOUND BOSTON Terrier. Call for more details, 622-8950.

EMPLOYMENT 045. Employment Opportunities THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD is now accepting applications for the position of: GRAPHIC and WEB DESIGNER The ideal candidate will produce print advertising for local accounts. Responsibilities include designing and implementing work of a high visual and conceptual quality, working directly with sales, clients and design team members. Desired Qualifications:

REWARD MISSING! Black & White Springer/Britnney Spaniel male. Last seen on 4/10/12 on Kiva Ln and Pine Lodge. Call or txt Andrea 575-420-8763 FOUND LAB in Enchanted Hills. Call to identify. 575-637-6445 LOST MINI Poodle mix, black/silver, no collar. Lost in Linda Vista area Garden Monterey streets 4/12 evening. Please call 622-8945

The above described move-from and move-to lands are located approximately 1/2 mile southeast of the City of Roswell, Chaves County, New Mexico. Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (objection must be legible, signed, and include the writer’s complete name, phone number and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment, you must specifically identify your water rights*; and/or (2) Public Welfare/Conservation of Water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must be filed, in triplicate, with the State Engineer, 1900 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, within ten (10) days after the date of the last publication of this Notice. Facsimiles (faxes) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is hand-delivered or mailed and postmarked within 24-hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protests can be faxed to the Office of the State Engineer, (575) 623-8559. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 72 NMSA 1978.

weeks away. The superhero tale “The Avengers” kicks off the summer season May 4. Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to Hollywood.com. Where available, latest international numbers are also included. Final domestic figures will be released Monday. 1. “The Hunger Games,” $21.5 million ($15 million international). 2. “The Three Stooges,” $17.1 million. 3. “The Cabin in the Woods,” $14.9 million. 4. “Titanic” in 3-D, $11.6 million ($88.2 million international). 5. “American Reunion,” $10.6 million ($11.8 million international). 6. “Mirror Mirror,” $7 million. 7. “Wrath of the Titans,” $6.9 million. 8. “21 Jump Street,” $6.8 million. 9. “Lockout,” $6.3 million. 10. “Dr. Seuss’ the Lorax,” $3 million.

• Experience with Adobe InDesign, Quark Express PhotoShop, Illustrator, Adobe Acrobat • Web Design • Proficient in using Mac platform • Proficient in creating all levels of advertisements • Be pro-active and organized, manage work effectively under multiple deadlines and handle concurrent projects This is a full-time position. Interested applicants, please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Vonnie Fischer 2301 N. Main Roswell, NM 88201

Try The Classifieds!

Or e-mail to: addirector@ rdrnews.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!

045. Employment Opportunities

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM BEGIN A rewarding career as a Comfort Keeper. We are currently looking for people to provide in-home, non-medical, homemaker/ personal care services for our clients. Varied shifts are available. Stop by our office at 1410 South Main to complete an application.


Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

SOLITAIRE HOMES of Roswell is offering a position in sales. Applications are being accepted in person. No phone calls please. 4001 W. Second St. Roswell, NM 88201. PT Math and Spanish Teachers The Sidney Gutierrez Middle School in Roswell, NM, a public charter school, is looking to fill the following staff positions for the 2012-2013 school year: Part Time Math teacher for Algebra I and Part Time Spanish teacher. The teacher must have appropriate NM State Teaching Certifications or be eligible for licensure waivers. Please send a letter request to SGMS, 69 Gail Harris St, Roswell, NM 88203, on or before April 20, 21012. For additional information, please contact Joe Andreis at 575-347-9703.

PROGRESSIVE DENTAL office seeks highly motivated team player for dental assistant position. Computer skills and an attitude of providing the highest quality patient care are essential. Bring your resume and cover letter to Randy Barone, DDS at 805 W. Alameda. Hiring immediately live-in home health caregiver needed. Some travel involved. Send resume to morningstar_88119@yahoo.com or please call 575-355-1111

ADMIRAL BEVERAGE is hiring CDL driver position must be filled immediately, and only serious prospects need apply. Must have clean driving record. Great benefits, excellent pay, group health insurance. 1018 S. Atkinson

GATEWAY CHRISTIAN Preschool is currently taking application for part time teachers. We’re looking for Christian workers with high-energy and good people skills who love children. Minimum High School Diploma or higher is needed, and experience working with children is also a requirement. Apply at 1900 N. Sycamore, no phone calls please. Farmers Country Market is now accepting applications for an experienced Cake Decorator (part-time). Also looking for good, clean and friendly Produce and Grocery night stocker. Apply in person. No Phone Calls. Plant Operator/ Lab Technician Full Time for asphalt emulsion materials, testing production. Experience preferred but will train. Pay DOE. Must have valid drivers license, pass drug screen & physical. Physical Requirements: Ability to work outdoors, lift up to 50 pounds, and perform work using a full range body motion (stooping and crawling). Subject to on-call and occasional overtime requirements. Apply 8am-1pm at: Western Emulsions 49 East Martin St., Roswell, NM 88203 Email: ron@westernemulsions.com

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

Front counter help needed. Aplpy in person, no phone calls please. 1139 S. Main

Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR

Beauticians, now you can choose rent a booth, work by commission or buy your own booth equipment. Your choice. 575-317-2510

Looking for a doorman/security. Please apply at 2000 N. Main.

THE ROSWELL Daily Record is now accepting applications for the position of: OUTSIDE SALES The ideal candidate must possess excellent customer service skills, superior organizational skills a self-starter and strong work ethic. Bilingual a must. Experience or background in advertising also helpful. Must be computer literate. This is a full time position. Interested Applicants please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Vonnie Fischer, 2301 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88201 or e-mail to: addirector@rdrnews.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!

DO YOU need more customers? Do you want to be on top of Google Search? If you are a business- you won’t want to miss this....we are taking the first 5 businesses who contact us either via email or phone and you pick Any Package we offer for only $50. Some of our packages can cost up to $5,000 and you get if for $50. We do social media marketing, Facebook, twitter YouTube, mobile marketing, QR code campaigns, mobile coupons, Logo design, graphic design, website design and much, much more. Visit www.gonewsocial.com and email us at support@gonnewsocial.com or call us at 915-503-2995 or 1-800-309-2040.

J&J HOME Care, Inc. has an immediate opening for DD Waiver Case Manager in our Roswell Office. Applicants must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Work Psychology, Criminal Justice, Human Services or a related field. Preferably bilingual, competitive wages and benefits. Please fax resume to J&J Case Management Roswell Office at 575-623-1542 or mail resume to 105 W. 3rd Street, Suite 333, Roswell, NM 88210, Attention Angela. COULD YOU use some extra cash? It’s easy, just introduce gonewsocial.com to any business who could use our services which include: Social media marketing, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, mobile marketing, QR Code campaigns, mobile coupons, logo design, graphic design, website design and much, much more. Visit www.gonewsocial.com and watch our affiliate program video to learn more. OPERATOR WANTED, stripper oil wells or prospects, pay top $, call 760.612.9833. Sales Position: All About Spas and Leisure Living is looking for a responsible individual who is seeking long term employment. Join our team, selling quality hot tubs, pool tables and Tempur-pedic mattresses. Great earning potential with opportunity for advancement. Must be able to pass drug screening & background check. Inquire at 3700 N. Main St., Roswell. ROSWELL JOB Corps Center is currently seeking a Residential Living Manager. Manager will manage and plan all residential living operations during all shifts to include dormitory maintenance and cleanliness, student leadership, staff schedules, assignments, staff hiring and evaluations. Sunset 1600 Apartments is seeking a skilled maintenance person. Must have a valid driver’s license and vehicle. Must clear a background check and be able to work in heat of the day. Call John, 623-2494. REQUISITION# 104501 Maintenance mechanic needed. Must be able to pass drug test. Apply At Ameripride Linen on 04/11/12 to 04/25/12/ 515 N Virginia, Roswell NM 88201 Competitive salary and benefits. May apply online at careebuilers.com This is a full time position. No phone calls will be accepted AA/EEO EMPLOYER M/F/D/V

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575) 622-7710 #45 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: o

o

o

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

EXPIRES o ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

Bealls now hiring for Estee Lauder Counter Manager. Dependable w/retail management experienced applicants with cosmetic experience please apply: 4501 N. Main, Roswell. CNA’s & Home Health Aides, Personal Care by Design is now accepting applications for Full & Part time positions. Weekend shifts will be required. Please stop by 217-A N. Main St. for applications. PT RECEPTIONIST position available at Culligan (M-F, 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.). duties include, but are not limited to , answering phones, customer service, accounts receivable, and working FT when the other receptionist is on vacation or sick. Will require working full time until training is complete. Requires that you are reliable, organized, a team-player, have basic computer skills, telephone skills, good communication skills, and professionalism. Please drop off your resume in person at 1303 N. Garden Roswell, NM. No phone calls please.

Dennis the Menace

B7

SERVICES

GROUNDMAN Central Valley Electric Cooperative has two openings for full-time Groundmen. For a complete position description and application form, go to our website at www.cvecoop.org and click on the employment tab. Application forms may be obtained online or at our offices located at 1505 N. 13th Street in Artesia, NM. Please submit applications and resumes by April 30, 2012. CUSTOMER SERVICE Representative. Applicant must be over 21, a mature, non-smoker, with the ability to communicate effectively in the fast paced travel industry. We require a clean MVD record and scheduling flexibility. Generous incentive program based on your ability to sell. Contact Bryan at Hertz Rent a Car, Main Airport Terminal, Roswell International Air Center 8AM - 2PM. Phone calls not accepted. POSITION OPEN: Clerical worker, data input, must have computer skills. General filing. Valid New Mexico driver’s license with clean driving record required due to use of company vehicle to run required errands for office. Please send resume or information on work history with references and skills and contact information to: PO Box 1897 Unit 299, Roswell, NM 88202. NOW TAKING applications for Experienced Servers. Must be 21 years of age and liquor certified. Apply in person at Billy Ray’s, 118 E. 3rd. No phone calls, please. Non-Certified Patrol Officer, Salary $16.85 – 17.25 Hourly Depending on Shift. Applications will be accepted until 4:00pm on Wednesday, April 25, 2012. Complete job description and applications at the Village of Ruidoso, 313 Cree Meadows Dr. Ruidoso, NM 88345. Phone 258-4343 or 1-877-700-4343. Fax 258-5848. Website www.ruidoso-nm.gov “Drugfree Workplace” EEOE. HIRING at ROSWELL TOYOTA – Receptionist position. Seeking a courteous professional. We will train, experience not required. We offer an excellent benefit package including HEALTH, DENTAL, VISION, 401k and PAID VACATION. All applicants must pass a drug test. Apply in person at 2211 W. 2nd St. Ask for BJ or George. ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER JOBS in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper to place your ad or log onto www.nmpress.org for more information. ATTENTION JOINT & Muscle Pain Sufferers: Clinically proven all-natural supplement helps reduce pain and enhance mobility. Call 888-466-1077 to try Hydraflexin RISK-FREE for 90 days. Office part-time. Typical duties. Submit resume: Box 1797, Roswell, 88202. Electrician Substation Journeyman, Apprentices and Labors, Travel Required. Send resume to: Interstate Elec. Contrs.,Inc. Fax(303)424-2903. EOE Progressive, energetic dental practice needs an enthusiastic detail oriented person to work the front desk. Computer skills a must and dental experience a definite plus. Please bring resume to 824 N. Main St.

105. Childcare NEED CHILD care? Find the widest range of available childcare for your children and their needs. 1-800-691-9067 or www.newmexic okids.org. You may also call us; Family Resource & Referral 622-9000 and we can help you navigate the system.

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 SUPERIOR SERVICES, parking lot & tree services. 575-420-1873 SUNSHINE WINDOW Service Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458

150. Concrete

Running Bear Concrete Construction Foundations, patios, driveways & curbing, 317-6058

185. Electrical

BIG HORN Electric Professional work, affordable price. 575-317-8345 NM Lic#367662.

195. Elderly Care

DEPENDABLE PRIVATE Caregiver to the rescue, yrs. of exp. Tina 420-8877

200. Fencing

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

210. Firewood/Coal ELM $205 - cord delivered. Fir - $225 - cord delivered. Pecan $330 - cord delivered. You pick up or half cords available. Call 575-420-9751 or 575-420-8447. Graves Farm, 622-1889.

230. General Repair

IT’S SPRING Time! D&B Property Maintenance is your repair specialist for all of your home repairs or upgrades. Free estimates. Call 623-8922. “No job too small, one call does it all” Milligan Contracting for all your home improvements call Geary at 575-578-9353 look for me on Angie’s list. CARPENTRY, DRY wall, painting & concrete. We guarantee. 626-2050

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738 Junk Removable will remove residential and commercial junk furniture, property clean up & much more. Call Juan 626-6121

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Spring Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242. Lawn mowing, trimming, cutting down trees etc. 626-8587 or 910-2033 WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Lawn & field mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming - Rock installation & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121. LANDSCAPING, ROCK & gravel. Specializing in sprinklers, fencing, odd jobs. Gonzales Enterprises, 317-8053.

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork GARCIA’S LAWN Mowing, Trimming, Sprinkler Repairs, Trash, much more. Call 575-914-0803. Mowing, trimming, landscaping, clean up dependable & honest 910-1436 or 622-8263 Mow Grass, Trim Bushes, Clean Ups, Hauling Trash Leaf Raking, flower beds, tree pruning, rock yards & rototilling. Repair sprinklers & fences. 347-8156 or 347-8157, Pedro Basic Lawn service, property clean-up and much, more Danny 575-420-4385 or 623-1773.

345. Remodeling NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing GUTTERS For All Your Rain Gutter Needs! Call WH Seamless Aluminum Gutter Systems, LLC. Locally owned. Free estimates. 575-626-0229. Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

285. Miscellaneous Services

RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397

ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare. Get a FREE talking meter and diabetic testing supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, this meter eliminates painful finger pricking! Call 866-406-2158

Starting at $45/mo 4718 W. 2nd at Brown Rd. 420-1274 or 637-4972

THE NEW MEXICO SEED LOAN PROGRAM is available to small businesses owned by individuals with disabilities and provides low interest loans for the purchase of equipment and related supplies needed to expand or start a business. Contact the New Mexico Seed Loan Program at 1-855-891-8295 or www.nmseedloans.org for more information. A low interest loan program of DVR State of New Mexico. ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFERERS with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP Replacement Supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 866-938-5101.

www.rancheroswelding.com

393. Storage Sheds 395. Stucco Plastering

RWC Lath and Stucco. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397

400. Tax Service

www.rancheroswelding.com

Anaya Gross Receipts Consulting & Tax Service. For all of your tax needs personal, business, e-file. Compare our prices. Habla Espanol 575-623-1513 508 W. 2nd St.

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185

310. Painting/ Decorating

SUPERIOR SERVICES, parking lot & tree services. 575-420-1873

Quality Painting! Affordable prices, Sr. Discounts. Mike 622-0072

Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting at affordable prices. Call 637-9108.

316. Pet Services

Groomer pick-up & take home 16yrs exp. Groom S-M-L dog. 317-3269

332. Pool Services

Need pool service? D&B Property maintenance is your certified pool operator specialist. Weekly, bi-weekly & monthly pool service available. Free Estimates. Call 623-8922.

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insurance. www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale 3107 Futura, 3 bed 1 3/4 ba. 2 car garage. Ex. cond. w/lots of updates 622-7703

345. Remodeling

FSBO: $95k, 4br/2ba 2000 sqft w/upstairs br & balcony, 323 E Hervey. 626-9593

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 625-9924 / 626-4153.

4Bd1Ba, well & city wtr, fncd yrd, new carpet, drs & paint, M-Th 624-1331 3BR 1BA 1 car garage, fenced yard, 81 Lighthall, $75k possible owner finance w/down payment. 627-9942 FSBO Amazing kitchen! 3br/3ba, 3 Jemez Ct, $291,000. Call 578-0952

WORD AD DEADLINE

BEAUTIFUL NW all brick 3/2.5/2 2486 sq ft. Large eat-in kitchen with granite countertops, new tile floors & light fixtures, Dining room, gorgeous spacious yard, quiet cul-de-sac. Walking distance to shopping. $260,000.00 Call Kim 575-626-5353

POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Newly remodeled historic district 2br w/ref.air, gorgeous home, owner financing possible w/down payment. Call 575-420-0359.

To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SATURDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS 11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50 Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

www.rdrnews.com

BEAUTIFUL 3BR, 2 bath NE Roswell updated appliances, mature landscape. Sprinkler system front/back 514 Sunrise Rd. 626-9607 Owner Financing, 4br/2.5ba plus bonus room, large dining & family rooms, new carpet, paint, flooring & more. $6k down, approx. $565 per month plus T&I, 504 W. McGaffey, 910-1050 FSBO: 4/2/2, large kitchen, great neighborhood. 2 Isla Ct. No Owner Financing call-317-8131


B8 Tuesday, April 17, 2012 490. Homes For Sale NEWLY REMODELED 3br $50k OBO. Owner will not finance. 575-405-9075 McDaniel Home Solutions 317-1078/317-4373 Remodeled 3/2 $90k 3/2 Futura $112,500 Like new 3/2 Orchard 3/1 N. Richardson $78k FSBO 3/2/2 fenced yard newer A/C new tile nice NE area. Seller will pay $3k towards buyers closing + $2k carpet allowance $132,900 Ben 317-6408

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale Do You Own Water Rights? We Buy, Sell, Lease, and Research Water Rights. Lea, Eddy, and Roosevelt Counties. Call WaterBank 505-843-7643

540. Apartments Unfurnished

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722.

Available May 1st, 3br, 2ba, 3105 S. Wyoming, $900 mo, $500 dep, no indoor pets/smoking no HUD. 575-578-0772

Town Plaza Apartments New Owners, friendly new managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs & downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Senior HUD WELCOME. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 1st MONTH FREE All Bills Paid, Free Cable, 1BR $530 2BR $630, 3br/2ba $730 mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281 1&2Bd, wtr pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 2BR/1BA, W/D hookups, all bills pd, 207 W. Mathews, $550/mo, $500/DD. 317-6479 1 BR, $295m $200dep.. gas/water paid, 511 W. Mt. View Rd. #4. 317-4307 PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN.

Price Reduced 3 acres w/excellent pipe corrals, wonderful location in N. Roswell, Berrendo wtr, elec., small office, tack room & hay shed. Call 575-746-3694

LARGE 2BR duplex, 2 full baths, 1 car garage, ref air, stove, fridge, DW, dryer hookups, no smoking or pets, $700/mo, $450/dep, 610 N. Lea, 622-6158 home or 626-6168 cell.

20 ACRES WITH WATER! Near Ruidoso $34,900. New to market, municipal water, maintained roads and electric. Won’t last at this price! Call NMRS 866-906-2857.

EFFICIENCY 1 br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348.

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

Main & Poe, 4600 sf $60sf, busy crnr, lrg pkg lot, kit equip, M-Th 624-1331 Commercial Property for sale 410 S. Main will condier owner financiing. 623-9772 or 575-420-9072

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

FOR SALE by owner a doublewide 3 br, 2 bath, includes lot. $60k 10% down payment. For more info call 575-840-8424 or 622-6203 2002 FLEETWOOD, double carport, 2 storage buildings, 1000 E. College #38. 622-7703 16X75, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, for more information call 575-914-8300 NEWLY REMODELED manufactured home, 3br/2ba, in Sr. Park, beautiful, handicap equipped w/ramp. Call 575-317-6489. 2br/2ba in nice adult park, $25k, includes patio covers, shed, etc. 622-6786 WE BUY used mobile homes. Single & Double wides. 575-622-0035. D01090 2005 FLEETWOOD, doublewide, 3br/2ba, garden tub, decks & carport, appliances stay, ceiling fans, ref air, $49,900, in Sr. park. 627-0840 2BR/1BA with lot, $33,000. 622-0238 2BR/1BA with lot, $33,000. 622-0238

520. Lots for Sale

PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan land West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 60x134 $18,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. We Take Visa and Mastercard! 420-1352.

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 121 E. Byrne, 2BR, 1BA, $350 month 1104 1/2 #B N. Missouri, 1BR, 1BA, $375 month Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604 1BR/1BA COTTAGE. Application & references required, $600/mo, internet & water paid. 914-1165

EFFICIENCY 2 BR, downtown, clean, water paid. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD Call 623-8377

618 S. Aspen, 3BR, 1BA, $800 month (By Appt.) 806 W. 5th, 2BR, 1BA, $800 month 1312 N. Lea, 3BR, 2BA, $900 month 1913 Clover, 3BR, 2BA, $1300 month 838 Broken Arrow, 4BR, 2BA, $1400 month 1915 Clover, 3BR, 2BA, $1200 month 3305 Trailing Heart, 3BR, 2BA, $1300 month 1800 E. Country Club, 4BR, 2BA, $1800 (Country Living) Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604 HUD ACCEPTED, totally remodeled, 37 H. St., 2br, $490, 575-626-9530 1BR, NO HUD or pets, wtr pd, $450/mo, $400/dep. 317-7373 2BR/1BA, 1 car garage, quiet area 1203 E. Walnut $550/mo + Dep. 317-8296 1BR $400 mo. $200 dep. water paid no pets/Hud. 609 1/2 W. 8th 910-1300 3br/1ba, nice fenced front/backyard, pets allowed w/pet deposit, 215 E. McCune, HUD ok, wtr pd, $850/mo, $500/dep, 623-8922. 2br/1ba, No HUD, no pets. Call or text after 6pm. 575-624-1989. TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 Available Immediately 3br/2ba, major appliances, 2 car garage w/opener, fireplace, North, fenced yard, ref. air, $1100, $800/dep. 575-622-4500 or 575-703-0298. 3115 FUTURA, 4 bd, 2 ba, ref air, Goddard Schools, $1,400/mo, $1,400/dep, 1 yr. lease. 627-9942 3/2 CUL-DE-SAC $900, $500/dep, 106 W. Hendricks, 317-4373.

908 W. 8th Apt B, 3bd/2ba, all utl. pd. $400/dep. $675mo., appliances, bckgrd. & credit check required, No Hud no w/d hookup. 505-296-4057

3 BR 1 ba $575 mo. dep $300 no pets/Hud 575-420-0798

Super nice 2/2, ref air, walk-in closets, stv, frdg, dw, $625, 317-3904 or 317-1078

3br/1.5ba, large backyard, garage, stove, fridge, no pets, $750/mo, $500/dep, Avail. May 1st. 317-6285

ROSWELL 2 br apartment $600/mo, wtr pd, fridge, w/d hookups, stove 1700 N Pontiac Dr. 626-864-3461

1516 N. Pontiac, 2br, 1ba, near parks, new stove & ref., w/d hookups, hardwood floors, completely remodeled, fenced yard, very clean and cute, $650 monthly, plus dep., No large dogs (small or medium okay), No HUD. References and Rental History required. Call 317-3929.

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished 2Bd 2Ba, shrt term, $500 wkly, util pd, No Pets, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 ENCHANTED HILLS: Clean, luxury, totally furnished, 2br/2ba, 2 car gar., fenced yard w/covered patio & grill, all utilities pd, FLETC ready, 622-4470 or 626-4666 Furnished Efficiency $350/mo. $250/dep. Bills pd. No pets. 1 or 2 people only. 423 E. 5th St. 622-5301. Townhouse, 2br/2ba, 1car garage, ref. air, Completely furnished 575-910-1605 FLETC Homes for rent. Long & short term rentals. 5 minutes from FLETC. Brand new & beautiful! Visit our website: www.lgrentalhomes.com or Call 420-0519. FLETC OR On-Assingment Nurse. Housekeeper, cable, internet. Best Area. Call 627-7218 or 637-5797 NICE Executive home for FLETC 3 br, 2 bath 306 W. Onyx. Call 575-626-2249 or 575-734-7437.

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

555. Mobile Homes for Rent RENT TO own- 3br 2b. Small down payment and space rent under $500 monthly. 1137 McCall Loop #153. 624-2436

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places Professional office 4 rent, 111 S. Kentucky @ Walnut St.,150 or 185sq. 623-8331 STORES, OFFICES and warehouse for rent. Reasonable rent, 1723 SE Main. 626-3738 OFFICE OR Retail space for Rent. Prime downtown area. Please call 622-8711. 2108 S. Main, storefront, 1200sf, $500/$500dep. Call Don or Barbara 627-9942

2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

1200 sqft building, park-like setting, maintenance included, 400 E. College. 420-9970

LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com!

Available for lease in May, 2012 —1,950 sf building at 110 N. Richardson. Remodeled in 2009. $1,625 mo.. Realtime Realty, LLC. 622-3200-Ext. 2

3BR/2BA, $600/DEP, $850/mo, 1108 S. Missouri. Call Julie 505-220-0617. 2BR, 1BA, 610 B. S. Wyoming $550 mo., $400 dep. Call Julie 505-220-0617. 3br 1ba. ref air, fenced yard 1 car 69 Lighthall RIAC $700m.$700 dep 627-9942 Newly remodeled 3br/2ba in Roswell, furnished avail. $1250/mo, $1000/dep

103 N. Pennsylvania, 1500 sqft, break room, 3 nice offices, ref air, $550/mo, avail. 3/1. Owner maintains yard. 317-6479 Business space available Sycamore & Second one 30x75 w/office and two 25x50 w/office prices are negotiable with 1 or more year lease. Call 627-0814 or come by Planet storage Office space: newly remodeled, 750 sf $800, 350sf $400 all bills paid 622-2564

www.RentRoswellHomes.com

- Chris 575-317-3245 COUNTRY HOME 3br 2b, 2 livrm on 5ac. $1300 dep $1300 mo. metal bld w/dble garage w/carport 575-973-5472 lv msg 2 BED room house for rent at 810 E. Hendricks 622-6540

FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546.

CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record

580. Office or Business Places

640. Household Goods

790. Autos for Sale

790. Autos for Sale

BUILDING FOR rent or lease divided in three parts:1st& 2nd 4000sq.ft. 3rd 10000sq.ft 507 E 2nd owner will remodel to suit tenant ready to move in completely remolded Will lease part or all sections. 575-622-4596 or 575-420-6270 ask for Dean

QUICK SALE: Sears washer & dryer $300 or $150 ea, ex. condition; 6 pc bedroom set, ex. cond. w/extras, $595; 6 pc dinette set, $150, 2 extensions, seats 12; many extra items, very cheap, everything must go. 200 E. 22nd St. #21, 622-2400.

2004 350Z convertible silver w/black top 25.75K miles 18” wheels. $17,500. Call 420-2456.

2 Furnished offices/walk to court house/internet & wtr pd, $350/$400. 317-3904

Twin size overhead bed/desk & drawer unit, dark wood,$300. 623-5458.

Tired of the Hassle in trading or selling your car or truck? Economy Motors will either purchase your vehicle or consign it for sale at No Cost To You!! Call or come by for details. Economy Motors 2506 N. Main Roswell, NM 88201 625-2440. * 16 yrs in business * * Family owned & operated * * Licensed, Bonded & Insured *

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale NEED FURNITURE? Shop Blair’s Trading Post for the best prices in town for your household items. We buy & sell furniture, appliances, home decor, collectibles, electronics, saddles, jewelry, tools, fishing & camping items, movies plus everything else from A-Z. Including many hard to find items. Serving Roswell for 40 years. Open daily 9-5. Accept Visa & MC. 5611 Hummingbird Ln. 627-2033 AWESOME DEALS Hundreds of new & exciting items arrive daily at Blairs Monterey Flea market at 1400 W. 2nd. Stop & shop to find great deals on furniture, jewelry, bows, purses, mens & womens apparel, herbs, remedies, smoke pipes, NFL & Nascar items, skate boards, SW decor, piñatas, engraving, toys, plus much more. Open Thurs-Tue 9-5 623-0136 Front load 5 cycle washer, energy saver, $250; HDTV RCA, $400. 208-2531

A BEAUTIFUL set of six new dark red leather high-back dining table side chairs $1200; a new brushed nickel chandelier w/subtle scrollwork - bottom tier 6 lights, top tier 3 lights. Lights are tulip shaped translucent glass $475; All in climate-controlled storage since day of purchase. 575-623-6202

POWER WHEELCHAIR, neutron R51, Invacare, 350 watt, 250 lbs max, nearly new, $1200 317-2353 Power wheelchair, hospital bed, walker, lift chair, commode chair. 622-7638 27’ REFRIGERATOR for sale, never been used, stainless steel/french door style, $2200 obo. Call Sarah at 575-799-1252 INDUSTRIAL HD storage tubs w/lids, 21”x15”x5” deep, $2.00 each, $1.50 ea over 100 items, $1.00 ea over 500 items, .50 ea over 1000 items. 626-3766 or 623-6155 100 PERCENT Guaranteed Omaha Steaks - SAVE 65 percent on the Family Value Collection. NOW ONLY $49.99 Plus 3 FREE GIFTS & right-to-the-door delivery in a reusable cooler. ORDER TODAY at 1-877-291-6597 or www.OmahaSteaks.com/ family22, use code 45069TVP. DISH NETWORK. Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels FREE for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 877-867-1441 EVER CONSIDER a Reverse Mortgage? At least 62 years old? Stay in your home & increase cash flow! Safe & Effective! Call Now for your FREE DVD! Call Now 877-841-2034 Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed! Twin size overhead bed/desk & drawer unit, dark wood,$300. 623-5458. Dreamy wedding dress, never worn, size 14, Ivory, lots of beading, lace-up back, $350, call 623-5458. Electric cooktop $100; dual wall ovens $75; dishwasher $75; countertop w/sink & faucets $75. All in excellent condition. 623-0414 John Deere 6.75 HP mulching mower. Excellent cond. $150 obo 623-0790 THE TREASURE Chest. Roseville, Weller, Hull, McCoy, Rare Tiffin, depression & carnival glass, china cabinets, Randolf Waltzer Piano, thrifts, toys. Wed-Sat, 10-5, 1204 W. Hobbs, 914-1855.

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM PUPPY LOVE Grooming Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also - 575-420-6655 BOXER PUPPIES for sale Call 575-317-1351 Pembroke Welsh Corgi puppies. Highly intelligent, great disposition breed, $200-$300. 575-317-1237 CKC REG. yellow labs $300 1M, 1F, 12wks, dewclaws removed, shots 317-4603 or 627-0115 Full blooded German Shepherds. $300. Call or text for pics 432-934-4994.

RECREATIONAL 750. Sports Equipment

REMINGTON, 870 wingmaster, 20ga, 2 3/4, wood pump, $325. 317-2353

765. Guns & Ammunition

REMINGTON, 7MM mag, mod 700, BDL, red field scipe 3x9, $575 317-2353

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

2009 SUZUKI LT-R450/Z Quad special edition, low riding time, new tires, great condition, every scheduled maintenance up to date, $5500 obo. 575-420-0431 1987 SUZUKI GS4, $800, 578-1373. 2001 HD Dyna superglide 67k excellent cond. $4800 negotiable 575-484-3508 ‘09 H-D Softail custom, 1500 miles, $13,500 OBO. 420-5153

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com 2003 FLEETWOOD Pride triple slides, 5th wheel, 1 owner, under cover, very clean, easy to live in, $25,900. 575-622-0655 or cell, 575-637-8403.

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

GOT GOLD? I got cash! Call Ted to sell your gold jewelry for the best deal in Roswell. 578-0805

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous PAY CASH for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles. Entire households & estates welcome. Call 627-2033 or 623-6608.

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

1973 CUSTOM El Camino, $4500, 627-0115.

796. SUVS

GMC 3/4 ton 4x4 engine is Tight. New radiator, rebuilt transfer case, excellent ranch truck or dairy truck. I have the title, but it has a tax lien on it so if you need a truck that will only be driven on private road or want to make an offer to piece it out, call 575-578-9770.

2004 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED, AUTOMATIC, 8 Cylinder, leather interior, black exterior, tan interior, 17” chrome wheels, power locks & windows & driver’s seat, heated seats, sunroof, CD player, anti-theft system & keyless entry. Great condition, high mileage, $5500 OBO, Call 575-317-3092 (cell) or 575-625-9500 (office).

‘99 JEEP Grand Cherokee Larado 4x4, leather, V-8, like new, $4950. 444-8224 2006 FORD Xscape Hybrid, mint, 66,100 miles, $11,800, 208-0718 for appt

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Steel Buildings 18x26-$2850 20x31-$3620 24x31-$4560 30x41-$8345 4718 W. 2nd at Brown Rd 420-1274 or 637-4972

KENMORE SEWING machine, model 158, with cabinet, made in Japan $150 317-2353

1999 F250, runs great, good condition, $4950. Call 622-0072.

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

700. Building Materials

745. Pets for Sale

1967 PLYMOUTH Sport Fury III, $4000. 910-0042

‘97 Ford Escort SW, 1 fam. car, 137k, many HW miles, 28-33 mpg, excellent ac/heat, good tires & brakes, new battery, carrier rack, no accidents, excellent safety rating, cheap insurance, $2800 obo. 626-7150

UPRIGHT SAMICK piano, barely used, oak, $2400. Call 623-5458.

5 HOLE wire hanging rabbit cages with Feeders. Rabbits for sale. 625-2909 after 6pm.

2002 TOYOTA Tacoma. 4 dr, White, & Clean!! Dark tint, custom wheels, & more. $11,500 OBO. Call 317-4626.

1938 CHEVY car, for more info, call 317-4189.

665. Musical Merchandise

720. Livestock & Supplies

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special Notice 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Garage Sales

001 North 002 Northeast 003 East 004 Southeast 005 South 006 Southwest 007 West 008 Northwest

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 163 Disability Care 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 181 Drywall 185 Electrical 190 Engraving/Commercial Art 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood/Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Water/Well 229 Gutters 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 237 Heating 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 271 Legal Services 273 Bankruptcy 275 Locksmith 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 312 Patio Covers 315 Pest Control 316 Pet Services 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 383 Siding 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 392 Storage Shed 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service

420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 431 Water Wall Services 435 Welding 439 Windows & Doors 440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money to Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

488 Home Inspecitions 490 Homes for Sale 492 Homes for Sale/Rent 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch/Sale 500 Business for Sale 505 Investment Comm. Bus. Prop. 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 521 Cemetery Lots for Sale 525 Building to be Moved 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 552 Rent to Own Houses 555 Mobile Homes for Rent 558 Roommates Wanted 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Places 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 608 Jewelry 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver/Buy 620 Want to Buy – Misc. 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 632 Art for Sale 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computer Equipment 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereo/Phonographs Access 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Farm Equipment 675 Camera/Photo Equipment 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 691 Restaurant Equipment 695 Machinery Tools Farm/Ranch 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock Wanted 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles & Scooters 780 RV’s/Campers Hauling 785 Trailers Wanted 788 Auto Transport

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Pickups/Trucks/Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Auto. Antique/classic 805 Imported Autos 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted to Buy Autos 820 Aircraft Sales/Service

Miscellaneous

9997 Wed/Anniv/Engage 9998 Obituaries

Tues 4-17-12 newspaper  

Roswell Daily Recor