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Vol. 120, No. 116 50¢ Daily / $1 Sunday

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ENMU-R graduates 400 at Wool Bowl

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Rep. Ron Paul announced Friday that he will run for the GOP nomination for president in 2012, the third attempt for the man known on Capitol Hill as “Dr. No” for his enthusiasm for bashing runaway spending and government overreach. “Time has come around to the point where the people are agreeing with much ... - PAGE A7

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EMILY RUSSO MILLER RECORD STAFF WRITER

PAUL TOSSES HAT IN RING

May 14, 2011

Mark Wilson Photo

ENMU-R graduates Dara Sanders and Sam Chaves shield their eyes from the late evening sun at the Wool Bowl, Friday.

It was nothing but pomp and circumstance for the 400-plus students graduating at the Easter n New Mexico University-Roswell 55th Commencement Convocation, Friday evening at the Wool Bowl. Under blue skies between the 30-yard lines, some 300 ENMU-R students moved the tassels on their graduation caps from the right to the left side, as is tradition, to symbolize the transition from candidate

to graduate. Also participating in the ceremony were 13 students from ENMU in Portales, who received bachelor’s degrees and nine who received master’s degrees; 35 students from New Mexico Highlands University, who earned master’s degrees in social work; and about 16 cadets from the New Mexico Youth ChalleNGe Academy, who received certificates of employability. “We’re here to celebrate you, our students, soon to be our graduates,” Dr. Martyn Clay, provost for aca-

demic and student affairs at ENMU-R, told the sea of silver gowns in his opening remarks. “This graduation ceremony is a major milestone in your lives, and you’ll soon move on to the next steps in your continuing education or your chosen career.” Before the presentation of diplomas and conferring of degrees, student speaker Irma L. Acosta congratulated her fellow graduates for completing such an arduous task.

22 NMMI cadets receive gold bars, Friday

See ENMU-R, Page A3

MATTHEW ARCO RECORD STAFF WRITER

Two years of hard work, a sense of duty and commitment culminated with a single salute for 22 New Mexico Military Institute cadets, Friday. The group of young men and women received their first salutes as second lieutenants during the Institute’s Ar my ROTC Commission Ceremony. “After all that work, it was relieving,” said 2nd Lt. John Warren, referring to the moment of being commissioned. “We’re really proud of each other,” he said, adding that the years leading up to the moment were met with hard work and dedication. “(It’s been) a lot of MRE’s and sleepless nights.” Warren was joined by his fellow former cadets,

Mark Wilson Photo

New Mexico Military Institute cadets take their commissioning oaths during the Army ROTC Commissioning Ceremony held Friday morning at the campus chapel.

You’re getting a US visa! Not! Economy shortens trust funds’ lives See NMMI, Page A3

PANTHERS SEND GHS HOME

ALBUQUERQUE — The Goddard baseball team’s run through the NMAA Class 4A State Championship came to an abrupt end in the state semifinals on Friday at the hands of the second-seeded Piedra Vista Panthers. The Panthers pounded out 21 runs off of a combination of four Rocket pitchers and handed the sixth-seeded Rockets a 21-10 setback in five innings at Lobo Field on the campus of the University of New Mexico. - PAGE B1

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jackpot! Not so fast. For a few joyful days, more than 20,000 people around the world thought they literally had hit the lottery and won a chance to come and live legally in the United States. Oops, the State Department said Friday, we had computer problems and have to run the annual visa lottery again. The decision reopens

competition for 50,000 wild-card visas for people who otherwise would have little hope of qualifying. About 15 million had applied, so it’s good news for many people who thought they had lost. But the glitch, which the State Department blamed on an in-house programming error, dashes the hopes of people like Max, a 28-year-old German man. He had recently checked a

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INDEX

WASHINGTON (AP) — The bad economy has shortened the life of the trust funds that support Social Security and Medicare, the nation’s two biggest benefit programs, the government reported Friday. The annual checkup

said that the Medicare hospital insurance fund will now be exhausted in 2024, five years earlier than last year’s estimate. The new report says that the Social Security trust fund will be exhausted in

Spillway to open to save Baton Rouge, The Big Easy

TODAY’S • William S. (Bill) Coffey • Drusilla Macias • Jess Thompson - PAGE A7

department website and found what he’d hoped for: Out of a random drawing with overwhelmingly long odds, he was one of the lucky few who might get one of the visas. “It’s like you won $100,000, and then they just take it away from you and it’s gone,” said Max, who would give only his first name for fear that full

AP Photo

A secondary levee protecting 10,000 acres of farmland at Bunches Bend in East Carroll Parish, La., failed Friday.

See VISA, Page A3

LAKE PROVIDENCE, La. (AP) — In an agonizing trade-off, Army engineers said they will open a key spillway along the bulging Mississippi River as early as today and inundate thousands of homes and farms in parts of Louisiana’s Cajun country to avert a potentially bigger disaster in Baton Rouge and New Orleans. About 25,000 people and 11,000 structures could be in har m’s way when the gates on the Morganza

spillway are unlocked for the first time in 38 years. “Protecting lives is the No. 1 priority,” Army Corps of Engineers Maj. Gen. Michael Walsh said aboard a boat from the river at Vicksburg, Miss., hours before the decision was made to open the spillway. The opening will release a torrent that could submerge about 3,000 square miles under as much as 25 feet of water in some areas but take the pressure off the downstream levees pro-

See ECONOMY, Page A3

tecting New Orleans, Baton Rouge and the numerous oil refineries and chemical plants along the lower reaches of the Mississippi. Engineers feared that weeks of pressure on the levees could cause them to fail, swamping New Orleans under as much as 20 feet of water in a disaster that would have been much worse than Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Instead, the water will

Trey Nesselrodt: Father, community leader, pioneer, visionary

See FLOOD, Page A3

JONATHAN ENTZMINGER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Jonathan Entzminger Photo

Trey Nesselrodt

The Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock in 1620. About 200 years later, the Nesselrodt family set down roots in Roswell, where it remains to this day. “I was born in Virginia, and our family has been a pioneering family here (in Roswell) since the late 1800s,” Trey Nesselrodt, director of operations at Nesselrodt Heating and Cooling, said. “This is my town. I have a long-term commitment to it. This is where we’re from.” Nesselrodt, in the spirit of his family and tradition, is a craftsman

who spends his days making analytical decisions about business, heating and cooling, landscaping and anything that he can put his mind to. But most important, he is a father, husband and man of the community. However, the Trey Nesselrodt of today is a man who has lived through many different experiences. He’s a father of four children

ages 4 through 12. He called parenting “not easy,” but also not difficult, if one maintains a stronghold as a committed father. “I learn a lot from my kids. I learn the innocence of learning,” he said. “There’s nothing easy about it. There’s joy. The joy comes easy and See SPOTLIGHT, Page A3


A2 Saturday, May 14, 2011

GENERAL

AP-GfK Poll: Republicans shrug at GOP’s 2012 field

WASHINGTON (AP) — The more Republicans get to know their potential White House candidates, the less happy they are with their choices. It’s not that they dislike the individual candidates. They just give them a collective shrug as possible opponents for President Barack Obama. They’d like someone with a little more pizazz. Some 45 percent now say they’re dissatisfied with the GOP candidates who have declared or are thought to be serious about running, up from 33 percent two months ago, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll. Just 41 percent are satisfied with the likely Republican field, down from 52 percent. Plenty are holding out for somebody else. In North Carolina, retiree Robert Osborne is hoping New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will decide to run. In Indiana, farmer Brent Smith wishes Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour hadn’t backed away. In Georgia, stock clerk Susan Demarest would love to see somebody more like Ronald Reagan. While the Republican roster of candidates is growing almost by the day — Ron Paul declared on Friday, and Mike Huckabee says he’ll make an important announcement this weekend — satisfaction with the field appears to be shrinking. Future polling could give a better idea of whether the dramatic raid that led to the death of Osama bin Laden, which gave a boost to Obama’s approval rating, also served to dampen enthusiasm temporarily for Republican candidates. The poll was conducted May 5-9 by GfK Roper Public Affairs and Corporate Communications. It involved landline and cellphone interviews with 1,001

adults nationwide and had a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 4.2 percentage points. The survey included 378 Republicans, and that subset had a larger, 6.9 percentage point margin of error. Four years ago at this time, there was a clearly different dynamic for the GOP. In late May 2007, a Washington Post-ABC News poll found Republicans generally content with their choices: 68 percent said they were satisfied with “the choice of candidates for the Republican nomination for president,” though that was well below the 79 percent level of satisfaction among Democrats. So far this year, it looks like a case of GOP buyer’s remorse before all the merchandise is even out on the shelves. Lori Raney, who owns a drapery workroom in Canton, Ga., says she’s sure to vote for the party’s eventual nominee. But so far, she says, no standout candidate has emerged. She’d be happy to vote for somebody with a level head, but says a lot of voters demand something more. “Nowadays, people don’t really care about qualifications and common sense,” she says. “They want the celebrity figure to run for president. Republicans just don’t have the celebritytype figure.” Candidate by candidate, Republicans display widely varying impressions of those who are in the GOP race or thinking about joining. With the field still gelling, a number of potential candidates are so little known that many Republicans can’t venture an opinion. Former Arkansas Gov. Huckabee, who is viewed favorably by 72 percent of Republicans, has the highest rating of the lot. He’s thinking about running and said Friday he planned

•Police were dispatched to Little Lambs Day Care, 2300 S. Main St., Thursday, where a surveillance camera, worth $150, had been removed from the south side of the building. •Police were called to the Tabernacle Baptist Church, 1108 N. Richardson Ave., Thursday, after subjects entered one of their buses and took a control panel box from the vehicle.

Burglary

Thief nicks Lambs camera

Battery

Police were called to Walmart, 4500 N. Main St., Thursday, after an employee was struck by a subject. The employee refused to press charges, but the assailant was war ned about criminal trespass laws. In this instance, criminal trespass consists of knowingly entering a location once permission to enter has been denied or withdrawn.

LOTTERY NUMBERS

Police were dispatched to the 700 block of Sunrise Road, Thursday, following a burglary. The victims reported tools had been removed from a workshop. Items listed as stolen were a hand saw, a hand-saw rotor, two 90-degree office pipe wrenches, a compound miter saw and a hand drill. Total value of missing items is estimated at $494.

Anyone having information on these or any other crimes should contact Crime Stoppers, 888594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward.

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Panel backs new storage site for nuclear waste, however ...

WASHINGTON (AP) — A presidential commission looking for safe ways to dispose of the nation’s nuclear waste said Friday it is considering a plan to build one or more storage sites to replace a long-planned nuclear waste dump in Nevada. The 15-member commission, created by President Barack Obama, did not identify any proposed site for nuclear storage. Nor did commission members agree on whether there should be one or several sites for a nuclear dump, where waste would be stored for up to 100 years. The panel, for mally known as the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future, also suggested creation of a new organization, independent of the Energy Department, to locate and build a site to permanently bury nuclear waste. The Obama administration created the panel last year after canceling a longstanding plan to bury

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nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, a remote site 100 miles outside Las Vegas. The group released a series of recommendations by three subcommittees at a meeting on Friday. Lee Hamilton, a former Democratic congressman from Indiana who co-chairs the panel, said the recommendations may or may not be adopted by the full commission. A draft report on nuclear waste disposal is due in late July, with a final report expected by January. Commission members stressed that the storage facilities would not be the ultimate solution to the disposal of nuclear waste, some of which takes thousands of years to decay. An interim site “will only work if it’s combined with a process for getting an ultimate disposal site,” said commissioner John Rowe, chief executive of Exelon Corp., the nation’s largest nuclear supplier. Commission members also said it was crucial that officials generate local support before choosing an interim storage site or a permanent burial site. The Yucca Mountain plan is fiercely opposed by Nevada lawmakers, most notably Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a Democrat. Commissioner Phil Sharp, another for mer Democratic House member from Indiana, said it might make sense to build a series of regional storage sites to increase chances of generating local support and to ease transportation of nuclear waste from nuclear sites across the

country. Congress chose Yucca Mountain a quarter-century ago after a long and divisive political battle, which Sharp and other commissioners said should be avoided this time. Disputes over what to do about an estimated 71,000 tons of used fuel from the 104 U.S. nuclear reactors have lingered for years. Nuclear waste is currently stored on-site in pools or in dry casks. Regulators say both methods are safe. Concer ns about spent fuel gained greater urgency after a March 11 earthquake and tsunami triggered a nuclear crisis in Japan. The disaster damaged reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant and led to the loss of cooling water in at least one pool of spent radioactive fuel, raising the risk of a catastrophic radioactive release. Stephanie Mueller, a spokeswoman for Energy Secretary Steven Chu, said Chu and Obama believe nuclear energy must be part of a diversified energy mix for the country. Chu “remains committed to ensuring that the federal government fulfills its longterm disposal obligations for spent fuel and nuclear waste,” Mueller said. Commissioners said spent fuel stored at decommissioned reactors should be first in line to use an interim storage site once it becomes available. Construction is unlikely for several years even under the most optimistic timeframe, they said.

Listed in Tuesday’s Daily Record in Roswell’s Most Wanted, Lorenzo Timothy Alonzo was apprehended before noon, also on Tuesday. He is being held without bond in Chaves County Detention Center as fugitive from justice. He is wanted in Texas for armed robbery.

Email Fredda at: askfredda@yahoo.com your source of retirement living answers.

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a “very important” announcement on his TV show this weekend. For mer Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, who was the GOP vice presidential nominee in 2008, is viewed favorably by two-thirds of Republicans, as is Romney, who made a strong bid for the presidential nomination last time. Romney has all but announced this time; Palin is more of a question mark. Palin’s support has held steady among Republicans in recent months, but her unfavorable rating among all adults is at a new high of 59 percent. Just 36 percent of Americans overall have a favorable opinion of her. Romney’s favorability rating among Republicans has actually improved since March, growing from 59 percent to 66 percent. The only other major Republican with a favorability rating above 50 percent in the poll was former Speaker Newt Gingrich, who didn’t enter the presidential race until the week after the poll was conducted. His favorability rating was 61 percent. Businessman-TV celebrity Donald Trump was the only potential candidate to draw unfavorable reviews from half of Republicans. Forty-five percent viewed him favorably compared to 50 percent who rated him unfavorably. GOP favorability ratings for lesser-known Republicans asked about in the poll: for mer Texas Rep. Paul, 49 percent; Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota , 41 percent; former Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, 36 percent; former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, 33 percent; Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels, 30 percent; former Utah Gov. and Ambassador to China Jon Huntsman, 20 percent.

Roswell Daily Record

Monica asks: We live at a Retirement community and we really enjoy this community. A sales person from the other community has been to our building giving out flyers with very cheap apartments. After being at the building she has called my husband and myself several times, we have not decided to move but it is very inviting, why would someone from another community come into our building trying to get our residents to move? Dear Monica: Think about the ethics involved here and what type of marketing person would bend to those levels to acquire new residents? What is wrong with their facility that they must lower themselves to sneak around another facility to try and fill their facility? As I have said the cost to maintain and operate a building is virtually the same only higher for a larger building. How long can they operate and what are they sacrificing to lower their prices. There are different grades of food from the best to the worse and as always the worse is always cheaper. Ask the question what is the grade of your food and ask them to show you, remember misrepresentation is the name of the game and unless you see it you will be told what you want to hear. How about staff are they cutting back on staff in order to facilitate a rent decrease. Stop and think about the economy, fuel prices at an all time high which causes everything to increase in price, remember most everything we consume arrives by truck. How can you decrease rent prices when all other costs are increasing? This just doesn’t pass the smell test, something is just not right. From what you are describing I would not want to do business with anyone that is so unethical. Remember, if they are unethical with their business practices they will be the same with you. The facility will blame and raise the prices telling you they have no choice because of the economy. With prices like you describe it is only a matter of time before they increase them, no one is going to operate at a loss for a long period of time. Marketing ploys are exactly what the word means a maneuver to accomplish a goal and when that goal is accomplished they move on to a new one not necessarily in your favor. Be very careful, if it’s too good to be true, it generally is and you will be the one to suffer the consequences. My advise stay where you are at you know you are safe as you said and enjoy where you are now.

Fredda

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Roswell Daily Record

ENMU-R

Continued from Page A1

“Most importantly, I just want to thank the graduates for all their time and efforts that they’ve put into their degrees,” Acosta, an ENMU-R presidential scholar graduating with honors with an Associate of Arts in university studies, said. “They’ve gone through a lot, and I’m very proud of them.” The rambunctious crowd in the stands — about 3,000 people — cheered and hollered and blew air horns and rang cow bells when their particular favorites walked across the stage. The president of ENMU, Dr. Steven Gamble, made sure to thank the audience in his comments after he congratulated the graduates, and prompted spouses, children and grandparents to stand in recognition.

Spotlight Continued from Page A1

that makes it worthwhile. It’s only a commitment — there are no real difficulties. The most difficult part is hoping you make the right decisions, teach your kids the right things and instill patience and thought provoking.” His perspective on life has been shaped by his experiences with family and growing up in Roswell. Twenty years ago, at the age of 19, Nesselrodt helped lead his family business after the death of his father by assisting his mother in leadership roles, along with the help of his siblings John and Laura. “We’ve been a business for over 25 years,” Nesselrodt said. “(My father) started it, but when he passed away, we kept running it.” Seemingly, the ’92 New Mexico Military Institute graduate was putting his learned and natural leadership skills to the test in the early years of the transition at the family business in addition to “receiving a crash course in business administration.” Before his father’s death, Nesselrodt had plans to study biology. He spoke about moving into the business role and how it has impacted the life that he has today. “I was going to go into biology. When my father

Flood

Continued from Page A1

flow 20 miles south into the Atchafalaya Basin. From there it will roll on to Morgan City, an oiland-seafood hub and a community of 12,000, and then eventually into the Gulf of Mexico, flooding swamps and croplands. The corps said it will open the gates when the river’s flow rate reaches 1.5 million cubic feet per second and is predicted to keep rising, which is expected sometime today. Just north of the spillway at Red River Landing, the river had reached that flow rate, according to the National Weather Service. Some people living in the threatened stretch of countryside — an area known for small farms, fish camps and a drawling French dialect — have already started fleeing for higher ground. Sheriffs and National Guardsmen will war n people in a door-to-door sweep through the area, Gov. Bobby Jindal said. Shelters are ready to accept up to 4,800 evacuees, the governor said. The Ar my Corps of Engineers employed a similar cities-first strategy earlier this month when it blew up a levee in Missouri — inundating an estimated 200 square miles of far mland and damaging or destroying

GENERAL

“Our students will probably be the first to tell you that they had a lot of help along the way, a lot of help on the home front,” Gamble said, eliciting a thunderous applause. “Graduates, let’s face them and show them we really appreciate what they’ve done for us.” In the midst of the celebration, students reflected on their experiences and talked with friends and family about what the future might hold. Graduate Vanessa Sifuentes-Moncayo received both an Associate of Science and Certificate of Occupational Training in medical assisting and says she wants to continue her education at a radiology school. “It was really hard and time consuming, and I missed a lot of time with the kids, but hopefully it will pay of f,” SifuentesMoncayo said. New Mexico Highlands University graduate Teresa

Clark, who received a Master of Social Work, said she thinks her schooling at the Clovis campus will better prepare her for her career. “I plan on working for the military or the VA,” Clark said, adding that her husband is a squadron commander in the Air Force. “Now I can help the vets, and I can do therapy with them and give them strategies to work with because they need it.” The ceremony ended with the Roswell Fire Department setting off fireworks in a field behind the stadium. “Tonight is your night, a night of celebration, reflection and the beginning of new adventures,” Clay wrapped up his speech. “We know that you will continue to make us proud as you pursue even greater educational and career accomplishments.”

died, I moved back to Roswell to help my mom out with the business,” he said. “I took a shotgun approach to a business degree. Instead of biology I went into business. I’ve used this business to catapult me into the type of things that I like to do ... which has allowed me to work in many different aspects.” Nesselrodt said that it was important for him and his family to maintain the quality of service that the business was offering the community after “the rock” of the family, his father, had passed away. Since his ascension to head of the family business, he has become an active member of the community through Keep Roswell Beautiful, serves on a board for the revitalization of downtown and is a prominent member of the city’s diverse arts scene. Nesselrodt expounded on his role with the downtown revitalization committee. “It’s a revitalization for downtown Roswell. We’re trying to bring in more arts, community, bistros, cafes, small restaurants, small hotel lofts, but what that starts with is the idealism that we need to do that ourselves,” Nesselrodt said. “No one is going to come in here and buy up the town, it starts with the community ... and people getting involved, making our city more continuous.”

Nesselrodt practices what he preaches. He opened the Issacs Gallery on site at Nesselrodt Heating and Cooling around 2006. He believes that businesses and the arts should intersect in a way that allow both to coexist and compliment each other. He hopes that more institutions in the community will make an art space in their offices. “What we want to show is that it doesn’t matter what type of business or what you’re classified in, but that you can still be a part of arts and culture,” Nesselrodt said. “It’s a contemporary art gallery ... but it’s basically all work that was done in this period.” Nesselrodt is a craftsman who holds a unique view on family, communities and building a better tomorrow for the youth of Roswell and its citizens. As a man who works with his hands, only after planning every finite detail to do so, he looks for no recognition for his contributions. Instead, he hopes for his children and others to live a world where the community works together, completes tasks from start to finish and never gives up on the end goal. “This is our city, our town, it’s only going to be as good as we make it,” Nesselrodt said.

about 100 homes — to take the pressure off the levees protecting the town of Cairo, Ill., population 2,800. This intentional flood is more controlled, however, and residents are warned by the corps each year in written letters, reminding them of the possibility of opening the spillway. Meanwhile, with crop prices soaring, farmers along the lower Mississippi had been expecting a big year. But now many are facing ruin, with floodwaters swallowing up corn, cotton, rice and soybean fields. Cotton prices are up 86 percent from a year ago, and corn — which is feed for livestock, a major ingredient in cereals and soft drinks, and the raw material used to produce ethanol — is up 80 percent. Soybeans have risen 39 percent. The increase is attributed, in part, to worldwide demand, cropdamaging weather elsewhere and rising production of ethanol. While the Mississippi River flooding has not had any immediate impact on prices in the supermarket, the longter m ef fects are still unknown. A full damage assessment can’t be made until the water has receded in many places. Some of the estimates have been dire, though. More than 1,500 square miles of farmland in Arkansas, which pro-

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duces about half of the nation’s rice, have been swamped over the past few weeks. In Missouri, where a levee was intentionally blown open to ease the flood threat in the town of Cairo, Ill., more than 200 square miles of croplands were submerged, damage that will probably exceed $100 million. More than 2,100 square miles could flood in Mississippi. When the water level goes down — and that could take many weeks in some places — farmers can expect to find the soil washed away or their fields covered with sand. Some will probably replant on the soggy soil, but they will be behind their nor mal growing schedule, which could hurt yields. Many far mers have crop insurance, but it won’t be enough to cover their losses. And it won’t even come close to what they could have expected with a bumper crop. The river’s rise may also force the closing of the river to shipping, from Baton Rouge to the mouth of the Mississippi, as early as next week. That would cause grain barges from the heartland to stack up along with other commodities. If the portion is closed, the U.S. economy could lose hundreds of millions of dollars a day.

NMMI

Continued from Page A1

who were applauded by proud families, and present and retired members of the armed forces — all of whom lauded them on their accomplishment and wished them success in their future. “Welcome to the ranks of our nation’s finest,” said Maj. Gen. Charles A. Anderson, the commanding general of the First Army Division West and the ceremony’s guest speaker. “From this day forward your most important and sacred responsibility

VISA

Continued from Page A1

identification might jeopardize his chances in future applications. The State Department apologized. “Any results previously posted and available through the website are considered invalid,” the department said in a statement. “We sincerely regret any inconvenience or disappointment this problem might have caused.” The drawing, which the State Department calls the Diversity Visa Lottery, is an annual free-for-all established by Congress in 1994 to increase the number of immigrants from the developing world and from countries with traditionally low rates of

Economy Continued from Page A1

2036, one year earlier than before. The trustees for the funds said in their annual report that the worsening financial picture emphasized the need for Congress to make changes to avoid disruptive consequences in the future for millions of people who depend on health and pension benefits. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, who chairs the trustee’s panel, said the new report underscored “the need to act sooner rather than later to make reforms to our entitlement programs. ... We should not wait for the trust funds to be exhausted to make the reforms necessary to protect our current and future retirees.” The trustees said that they moved the target date for the Medicare hospital trust fund to be exhausted from 2029 to 2024 because of a weaker economy, which means fewer people working and paying Medicare premiums into the fund, and continued increases in health care costs. Last year’s report had extended the life of the Medicare fund by 12 years to reflect the savings that were included in the massive overhaul of health care that President Barack Obama got Congress to pass in 2010. Without the changes in health care law, the administration said the Medicare trust fund would be exhausted in 2016. The savings in the health care legislation are still included in the trustees’ projections but have been updated to reflect data on the economy and health care costs over the past year. Many experts believe that the savings included in Obama’s health care program will never be achieved because they include deep cuts in payments to doctors that Congress has routinely waived and other cost savings that will be difficult to realize. The Social Security trust fund was projected to be exhausted in 2036, compared with last year’s projection that it would be

Saturday, May 14, 2011

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entrusted to you is the privilege to lead American soldiers,” he said. “You have lived your institution’s vision.” Prior to receiving their first salute, the former cadets took their commissioning oaths and the Institute’s leaders who had ushered them to that point passed down a final lesson. “When you raise your right hand, your life will change forever,” said Lt. Col. Franz J. Conway, NMMI’s professor of military science. “This moment is that special.” Receiving gold bars were: Jon Burson, Andrew Carter, Meagan

Chopito, Paul J. Cortez, Christopher Dominey McKinney, Porsche Fluitt Pearland, Joel Fulsang Blandinsville, Harvey Johnson, Marc Kruithoff, Hayden Lienau, Joseph Mao, Gabrielle Miller, R yan Murrell, Marilyn Nurse, Christian Park, Mabel L ynne Priddy, Keith Ray, Robert Schneden, Nicole Tamapua, Jedidiah Teofilo, Jayde Unasa and John Warren. Upon completion of additional coursework, Cadet Megan Webb will be commissioned. In December, 2nd Lts. Daniel A. Dubuisson and Aaron J. Streitenberger were commissioned.

immigration to the U.S. Applicants do not have to have the usual family or employer sponsor. The lottery selects 90,000 names from a pool of online entrants. That number is winnowed to 50,000 winners through attrition, interviews and educational and occupational rules. For visas to be awarded in 2012, applicants had to submit entries between Oct. 5 and Nov. 3, 2010. The glitch meant that among 14.7 million entries, about 90 percent of the people picked to move on to the next step came from applications submitted the first two days. “These results are not valid because they did not represent a fair, random selection of the entrants as required by U.S. law,”

said David Donahue, the deputy assistant secretary of state whose office oversees the lottery. Donahue recorded an online video to apologize and explain the situation. The now-invalidated results became available online on May 1, and about 1.9 million people including Max had checked before the problem was uncovered on May 5. Of those who looked up their status, about 22,000 were informed erroneously that they had been selected to move to the next step in the process, the department said. A new lottery will be held from the existing pool of entries with winners announced in midJuly. Applicants do not need to re-enter. No new entries will be accepted.

depleted in 2037. The trustees said in 2037 the government will be taking in enough in Social Security payroll taxes to pay about three-fourths of existing benefits. The new report projected that the millions of Social Security recipients would receive a small, 0.7 percent cost of living increase in their benefit checks in 2012. In 2010 and 2011, there were no cost of living increases in the checks because inflation was low. A 0.7 percent increase would not be seen by many beneficiaries because the extra money would be eaten up by higher insurance premium payments for Medicare. The actual benefit increase will be determined based on the performance of the government’s Consumer Price Index. That figure will be released in October. Democrats and Republicans agree that Medicare must be addressed soon, but the consensus ends there, even as a bipartisan group of lawmakers headed by Vice President Joe Biden is holding talks on ways to

mattarco@roswell-record.com

tackle the nation’s mounting debt. Most Republicans and some Democrats in Congress have said they won’t vote to increase the government’s ability to borrow without significant spending cuts. The government is expected to reach its borrowing limit of $14.3 trillion by Monday. Geithner said Friday that Congress should “move as quickly as possible” to raise the borrowing limit. He has told lawmakers that he can take steps to delay until Aug. 2 what would be an unprecedented default on the debt. Changes to Medicare could be part of an agreement to increase the debt ceiling. But Social Security appears to be off the table. Many Democrats, including Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., have been adamant that they will not support cuts in Social Security benefits, even if they target future retirees. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell acknowledged on Thursday that changes to Social Security won’t be part of any agreement.


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OPINION

The virtue of paying with old fashioned cash

Question One: Do you remember how to pay with cash? Do you remember what it’s like to remove dollar bills from your wallet, hand them to a cashier, watch the cash register drawer spring open, and wait for the cashier to count your change? Question Two: When was the last time you bought something from a locally owned independent retail store? And the time before that? The two questions are related. We Americans sanctify Small Business only a little less than Apple Pie and Motherhood, but we abuse small business without mercy. I’m most familiar with the way regulators do this, especially in New Mexico, where rules are made and enforced as if busin es s o w n e rs h a d n o n e ed t o spend time operating their businesses but had all the time in

EDITORIAL

MERILEE

DANNEMANN TRIPLE SPACED

the world to fill out forms and figure out what the rules mean. That’s because the people who made the rules made no effort to explain them clearly, to coordinate any rule with any other rule, or to make comp lian ce simple or efficient. I have written about this before and will no doubt write about it again many times, so today I will not amplify. ABC’s evening news recently r an a f e at ur e s e ries aski ng, “What’s made in America any more?” I’m asking, where do we buy it?

Roswell Daily Record

B ased on m y info r m al and unscientific survey, it seems that the locally owned storefronts mostly belong to service b usi ne sse s, wh e r e per so nal attention is required and where trust matters — businesses like hair salons and auto mechanics. An awful lot of nail salons are operated by Vietnamese and Thais. I suspect this is not due to some obscure Asian cultural tradition but rather the very American tradition of new immigrants finding opportunity in i nde pen de nt bu si nes s, an d t oda y t he opp or tu n it y is in manicures and pedicures. T he loss of in dep en den t retailers is not only because of regulations, and it’s certainly not just economy of scale. It’s the decisions we make as consumers. We have come to rely on advertising, familiarity, bigb ox con ve nie nc e, an d t h e

assumption that the big guy or the national chain has a slightly better price. In the process we are losing local autonomy, individuality, local tax base, and — something that concer ns me esp eci al ly — t he habits of responsibility that go with ownership. But you know that. Another factor might be the way we pay. When you buy something with cash money, a complete transaction takes place between you and the seller. You have paid your money, the purchase is done, and the seller now has dollars that he can use to buy something else. But when you swipe that convenient little piece of plastic, you have added at least thr ee parties to the transaction: your bank, the stor e’s bank and a national clearinghouse. They all get paid, and the cost is buried in the purchase price.

Current news reports are raising awareness of these costs because of changes resulting from the Dodd-Frank financial refor m law enacted last year. But I decided to write about this because of a personal plea from a small business owner. She said, simply, that absorbing the cost of debit card fees is another blow to her ability to stay in operation — another straw on that poor camel’s back. In the past, when a business owner asked me to pay in cash, I thought it was to avoid paying gross receipts tax. And maybe it is. But right now I’m wondering whether these added transaction costs are doing us any good, and I’m thinking nobody needs to use a card for a $10 purchase, including me. So next time I come into your store, I’ll plan to have some money with me. © New Mexico News Services 2011

World Opinion Greece’s faltering economy

One year ago, the Greek economy was bailed out to the tune of 111 billion euros. Now the country is back for more. JeanClaude Juncker, the chairman of the Eurozone finance ministers, said that “Greece needs a further adjustment program.” What he actually meant was that Greece has not taken the hard decisions necessary to convince the markets that it is serious about restoring the integrity of its public finances. Standard and Poor’s, the credit rating agency, cut the country’s bond grade to junk status. Any bailout looks certain to require a contribution from the United Kingdom, even though we are not part of the Eurozone. It will not be the first time we have suffered such unfair treatment, thanks to the last government’s decision to sign the U.K. up to the bail-out mechanism. We have already contributed 7 billion to Ireland’s rescue and are liable for up to 6 billion to shore up Portugal. This exceeds the total savings so far made in our own deficitcutting program. In reality, it is Germany that will decide Greece’s fate. Germany announced the best export performance in its history, yet it continues to see its exemplary economic discipline being taken advantage of by an indigent Greece. At what point will the German taxpayer decide enough is enough? Guest Editorial The Telegraph, London

Nuclear power-plant safety

Prime Minister Naoto Kan has urged Chubu Electric Power Co. to shut down its Hamaoka nuclear power plant, which is located above the assumed epicentral area of the massive Tokai earthquake expected in the near future. Kan has called on the power company to halt operations of the Nos. 4 and 5 reactors at the plant and refrain from restarting the No. 3 reactor, which is undergoing a regular safety check. Now that the Great East Japan Earthquake has triggered an unexpected disaster at Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, it is hard to give the international community a convincing explanation for keeping the Hamaoka plant running. What should be noted here is that the Fukushima nuclear crisis has shattered the myth of the safety of nuclear power generation. Safety assurances have been replaced by perceptions that the worst nuclear accident in the world could occur in Japan. It is crucial to identify high-risk plants by analyzing their locations and past records. It is certainly difficult to immediately shut down all nuclear power plants. But the suspension of the Hamaoka plant should be a first step toward a new willingness to close down nuclear power plants when there are enough safety concerns. Guest Editorial The Asahi Shimbun, Tokyo DEAR DR. GOTT: I am a 60-year-old female. My ophthalmologist diagnosed me with an eye condition called retinitis pigmentosa (RP). I would like a second opinion. I know this is an incurable disease and I am rapidly going blind. Any information on slowing down the disease as well as diagnosing it would be greatly appreciated. If I am able to obtain a second opinion, what tests should I have to confirm the diagnosis? Should I have genetic testing done? DEAR READER: You have damage to the retina, an area at the back of the inner portion of the eye that converts images to nerve signals and sends them on to the brain. Generally speaking, the cells

Unnecessary spokespeople and endangered critters So here’s the deal. Does it bother you when government workers get in trouble and are placed on administrative leave with pay? You read about it all the time. You see them being led away in handcuffs on Albuquerque TV. One of the most recent examples was the Santa Fe school bus driver creep messing with 13-year-old girls on his bus. Even though he admitted it, they immediately placed this guy on administrative leave with pay. To their credit, Santa Fe Public Schools fired him soon thereafter. His free pay time was mercifully limited. Often these public employees sit at home for

Doonesbury

ASK DR. GOTT UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

that control night vision are likely to be affected; however, in some instances, retinal cone cells are damaged more. Symptoms can appear in childhood, with visual difficulties developing years later. A person with retinitis pigmentosa may lose peripheral or central vision, and he or she may have difficulty seeing at night or when there is mini-

NED

CANTWELL LOOKING ASKANCE

weeks or months at taxpayer expense. OK, since I am liable to run into Gary Mitchell at the post office, I get it. You are innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. So here’s the deal. From now on, when a public employee runs afoul of the law, he is

mal light available. Testing the retina is varied and may include dilating the pupils and examining the retina, determining visual acuity, performing refraction testing or retinal photography and a host of other possibilities. Protecting the eyes from ultraviolet light by wearing sunglasses may preserve vision. There are ongoing studies about the potential benefit of omega-3 fatty acids and one type of RP does respond to vitamin A. Your disorder will progress slowly. Peripheral vision is the first to go. Central vision loss is a late finding. You may also be faced with early cataracts or macular edema (retinal swelling). If you should develop cataracts that obstruct your vision, they can be

placed on administrative leave with pay, the check going into an escrow account he forfeits if found guilty. Other than the parade of medicine ads during dinner hour network news, graphically describing symptoms and side effects — most of which I suffer — what bothers me most about TV news is the teasing game played by Albuquerque newscasts. “There was a big announcement in Santa Fe today. We’ll tell you about it at 10.” So here’s the deal. Guys, if you’ve got the story you had better tell us now because there is a good chance we’ll be nighty-night by 10 and will

removed surgically. There are other conditions that behave in a similar fashion to retinitis pigmentosa. They include Laurence-Moon syndrome, Friedreich’s ataxia, myotonic dystrophy, mucopolysaccharidosis and Usher syndrome. Therefore, I believe you are accurate in asking whether a second opinion is in line. My guess is that you are unsure whether your insurance will allow a second opinion because I cannot imagine your physician would deny you the privilege of confirming the diagnosis. Because this is a hereditary disorder, you might request genetic counseling to determine whether your children or

See GOTT, Page A5

read the story in the morning paper. So why do we need you? Tell me this. If a bird doesn’t need a pilot, or a fish a swimming instructor, why does a lawyer need a spokesman? Have you ever met a lawyer at a loss for words? A luncheon of lawyers gaggles like a flock of geese in a barnyard. So they have to hire people to talk for them? I read that Bernalillo DA Kari Brandenburg was bringing on KOB-TV’s Kayla Anderson as a spokesperson. Have you ever heard Ms. Brandenburg handle a TV interview? Dynamite. Paying someone to

25 YEARS AGO

See CANTWELL, Page A5

May 14, 1986 • Sierra Middle School has selected Larry Harrell and Deidra Peak, both in eighth grade, and Sherri Hall and Derek Swickard, in seventh grade, as Students of the Month. Harrell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Larry Harrell, is involved in football, basketball and hunting. Peak, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Dunlap, is a member of Student Council and the Honor Society. Hall, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jake Hall, is a member of the Sierra Eagle Band, Honor Society and track team. Swickard, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Swickard, is a member of the Sierra Eagle Band and a Boy Scout. • Charles Benton, executive vice president of the Production Credit Association of Southern New Mexico, has been named branch manager of the Roswell office. He has been involved in agriculture for most of his life and has been with the Production Credit Association since 1973.


OPINION II

Roswell Daily Record

LETTERS

Mankind needs God’s rule

Dear Editor: Since religious leaders in the world are in bed with political leaders, they tell their members that their countries are being blessed by God in order to send their members to war to defend them. The reality is that the “ruler of the world” is God’s enemy. He once offered all the kingdoms of the world to God’s Son for one act of worship. Believe me when I say that the United States is in no way special or blessed by God any more than any other country. You’d think people would’ve figured that out when the U.S. lost to the “Godless” communist in Viet Nam! The letter dated Jan. 9 by Yvonne Lehman repeats that mistaken idea. She goes on to mention Great Britain and the United States in Bible prophecy. Together they form the last of the seven-headed wild beast. The Anglo-American power is also described as a beast that has two horns like a lamb (for the duel power) and speaks like a dragon. One reference work says “It’s two horns ‘like a lamb’ suggest that it makes itself out to be mild and inoffensive, with an enlightened form of government to which all the world should turn. But it speaks ‘as a dragon’ in that it uses pressure and threats and even outright violence wherever its version of rulership is not accepted.” (Anybody remember “shock and awe?”) This dual power is the same as the “false prophet” mentioned later in Revelation. It tells the world to make an image to the political system “wild beast” and this occurs when Woodrow Wilson encouraged the formation of the “League of Nations” now called the “United Nations.” This is the “scarlet colored wild beast” that supports and then later destroys “Babylon the Great” the world empire of false religion. It also serves as an “eighth king” at the very end for “one hour,” symbolically a short period of time and it too “goes off into destruction” at Armageddon along with all the other worldly governments at the hand of “God’s Heavenly Kingdom Government.” Well, that’s sort of a crash course on some of the things in Revelation. And many ask, how does a person get the “mark of the beast” on their forehead and right hand? This is not a microchip that the government imbeds in your skin. The mark signifies thought and action. To give you an example: This past election you were thinking about a candidate and then you went in and used your hand to vote. How about when you think about the words to the pledge of allegiance and raise your “right-hand” over your heart. You have the mark of the beast. In some countries, people are forced to buy a political party card in order to buy, sell and work or own property. Christians, of course, refuse. Those are just some examples. So should America worry? Well believe

Cantwell Continued from Page A4

speak for Brandenburg would have been like hiring me to pinch hit for Babe Ruth. So here’s the deal. In an unscientific survey conducted by this humble correspondent, it was discovered that 97.7 percent of cushy-job government spokesmen were taken from Albuquerque and Santa Fe media ranks. Henceforth, all spokesmen will be apportioned by state legislative districts. Congressman Steve Pearce is after another critter, this time the dunes sagebrush lizard. I have empathy for the congressman’s strategy, having made a column career poking fun at the lesser prairie chicken. It made people smile and it is safe, defenders of the lesser prairie chicken or dunes sagebrush lizard as sparse as the desert they roam. And, on a more serious note, for years this column ridiculed cockfighting until the state came to its senses and banned the “sport.” I personally have never met a dunes

Gott

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siblings are at risk as well. DEAR DR. GOTT: About 10 years ago, I was diagnosed with tardive dyskinesia, also known as TD. My tongue moved (wiggled) involuntary, continuously. A doctor said it would continue the rest of my life. This was distressing so I decided to fight it. I pressed my tongue tightly in my mouth to stop the movement. Then one morning I awoke and realized my tongue wasn’t moving. Then it started moving immediately. I thought perhaps it didn’t move when it was in a state of relaxation. During childbirth classes, I learned the technique of relaxing. When I relaxed my tongue with a conscious effort, it stopped moving. Eventually, the movement stopped. I hope this method will help some people with this disturbing affliction. DEAR READER: Tardive dyskinesia typically occurs after a patient has taken high doses of certain medications, over an extended period of time. It causes involuntary, repetitive tic-like movements — especially in the muscles of the face. TD is a result of damage to the body’s systems that use and process dopamine, a biochemical substance produced in the

me when I say, Americans are not going to start “turning to Jesus” and start receiving God’s blessings. It’s over for the entire world system of things. Man never had the right or the ability to rule himself. God allowed him to try so that it could be proven he couldn’t do it and no one would ever try it again. Now God’s Kingdom will take over from Heaven as one world government and will fix all the problems facing mankind. I don’t know about you, but I think that’s pretty “good news.” No wonder that’s all Jesus wanted to talk about. It was the theme of his entire ministry. I’m sure you didn’t know that because your church has a flag in it for you to place your confidence in. Tell me, how that’s been working out for you? Michel Scott Whitman Dexter

Evolution implausible

Dear Editor: The Second Law of Thermodynamics, called Entropy, (paraphrased) states that “things don’t wear up, things wear down. In 100 billion years a pile of bricks will be a pile of sand, not a house. Cars wear down, machinery wears down, people wear down. There is no real evidence, DNA notwithstanding, that anything wears up. Consider the miracle of birth. In the female everything has to be perfect. In the male everything has to be perfect. If I believe in evolution there had to be a time in history as things were evolving where everything in the female was evolving and was not yet perfect. Likewise, everything in the male was evolving and was not yet perfect. In this dual state of evolutionary development, lacking perfection, it would be impossible to produce a baby (e.g. no egg, yet, no sperm yet.) We can all see then that the human race ceased to be. Considering the complexity of the complete female and the complexity of the complete male, we must be looking at “parallel evolution.” The sexual apparatus of the male had to be evolving at exactly the same rate as the female-producing organs. Of course, this does not answer the question of how babies were made during this evolutionary time (million years without babies? 100 million years? Who knows?) The answer, of course, is that male and female had to be complete sexually the first time. There is no room here for evolution. The man and woman were made complete in Eden and produced babies ever since. In the Bible, I Cor. 1:20 (ASV) God says, “Where is the wise man? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world?” Man says the creation of life was an accident. God says, “I did it.” Whom do you believe? Walter Holm, BSME Roswell sagebrush lizard I liked and, encountering one, would probably jump atop a picnic table and go, “eeeuu!” But Pearce would quickly point out he considers his mission a little more important than breezy columns. The congressman is dead serious in his claim that Endangered Species status for the lizard will threaten a significant number of New Mexico oil jobs. Folks like the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance are dead serious in their assertion protecting the lizard is crucial to the habitat and that Pearce cannot back up his jobs claim. Somehow all this will get sorted out and, hopefully, both the dunes sagebrush lizard and the oil industry will survive. So here’s the deal. Why not more common animals? Why can’t we have an Endangered Species category for the Well-Heeled, Boot Scootin’, Fat-Wallet, Campaign Cash Cow? Have a nice day. (Ned Cantwell welcomes response at ncantwell@bajabb.com). brain. It functions as a neurotransmitter to regulate emotion and movement within the body. There are several medications that can cause symptoms of TD to include those for nasal allergies, mental illness and digestive disorders such as heartburn caused by GI reflux. One such digestive disorder drug is metoclopramide, sold under the name of Reglan in the United States. In 2004, a study of the medication’s effect on older women found an increased risk for developing symptoms of TD. By early 2009, the Food and Drug Administration issued a black-box warning to this effect. T reatment is commonly achieved through prevention in a couple of ways. The first is by changing the offending drug to another brand or lowering the dosage. Discontinuing the medication may be an option for some and often reverses TD, but sometimes it is permanent. As you so cleverly pointed out, it can be done through relaxation techniques. Some success has been noted for severe localized problems by using Botox. Dr. Peter H. Gott is a retired physician and the author of several books, including “Live Longer, Live Better,” “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Diet” and “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Cookbook,” which are available at most bookstores or online. His website is www.AskDrGottMD.com.

Saturday, May 14, 2011

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The 2011 Pecos Valley Iris Show results A6 Saturday, May 14, 2011

LOCAL

The annual Pecos Valley Iris Show was held at the Roswell Mall on Saturday, April 23, 2001. The theme of the show was “Once Upon a Time.” There were eight exhibitors and seventy-three irises were shown. This year’s iris show was dedicated to the memory of longtime member and friend, Lenora Rodgers. The best horticulture specimen of the show was a Border Bearded Iris called “Go for Bold,” and grower Clifton Frosch won the Col. William Harris Horticultural Excellence Award also. The runner-up best specimen of the show was a tall bearded Iris called “Wishful Thinking” which was grown by Pegi Naranjo. In the Horticulture Division the exhibitor that wins the most blue ribbons receives the top award given by the American Iris Society which is a silver medal. The silver medal winner was Pegi Naranjo. The American Iris Society bronze medal winners for the second-most blue ribbons were Joyce and Bob Hutchings. Horticulture Special Award winners were: Best black: “Superstition” - Pegi Naranjo

Best Blend: “Prowess” - Renate Reisel Best Bi-color: “Hi Calypso” - Pegi Naranjo Best Bi-tone “Keeping Up Appearances” - Bob and Joyce Hutchings Best Blue: “Victoria Falls” - Pegi Naranjo Best Brown: “Dodge City” - Renate Reisel Best Collection: “Planned Treasure” - Pegi Naranjo Best other: “Species Tectorium” (Dragon Fly) - Mary Herrington Best Plicata: “ Music Lesson: - Pegi Naranjo Best Purple: “Ravenwood” - Renate Reisel Best Red: “Picante” - Pegi Naranjo Best Pink: “Godsend” - Mary Herrington Best Seedling: “PBD 09-2” - Steve Kelly Best Self: “Love Me Tender” - Pegi Naranjo Best Space Age: “Conjuration” - Pegi Naranjo Best White: “Mesmerizer” - Pegi Naranjo Best Yellow: “Golden Beam” - Renate Reisel

KENW 2011 auction time

The 35th annual KENW Online Auction is scheduled for June 1 through June 10, and this year, there is an auction catalog available. For those who do not have a computer or do not have internet access, a 2011 Auction Catalog is now available for a $2 fee. Potential bidders can browse the catalog and then call KENW and telephone operators will place their bids for them. The cost of the catalog will be deducted from the auction invoice. Catalogs can be ordered by sending a check or money order to KENW Auction Catalog, 1500 S. Ave. K, Station #52, Portales, NM 88130. If you prefer to put the catalog on a credit card, please call KENW between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday at 1-888-367-5369 or 575-562-2112 (locally.) Auction website is: The http://auction.kenw.org and bidders can browse anytime day or night. However, when a person is ready to bid, they must first register. There is a REGISTER button at the top of each page, and bidders

In the Design Division of the Iris Show, the theme: “Once Upon a Time” was depicted in five classes with five

are asked to fill out the infor mation, choose their own password, and then start bidding. This year items will close at different times based on the value. When the Auction is over, winning bidders will be e-mailed an invoice and payments can be made by phone if using a credit card, by mail if sending a check or money order or in person at The Broadcast Center in Portales. All proceeds from the Auction go toward the programming costs for KENW-TV, the public television station serving Eastern New Mexico and West Texas. KENW is also carried on DirecTV and DISH networks. For more information, contact Sheryl Borden, Director of Marketing, at 575562-2112 (locally) or call toll-free at 1888-367-5369, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Items are still being accepted and if anyone (individuals or businesses) wants to be an auction sponsor, give Borden a call for more details.

Udall now accepting nominations

U.S. Sen. Tom Udall announced that his office has begun accepting applications for nominations to U.S. military service academies for the class of 2016. In a YouTube video for prospective nominees across New Mexico, Udall provided information about the process of applying to an academy.

“One of my duties as United States Senator is nominating outstanding young people from New Mexico to our nation's military service academies,” said Udall in the video. “More than anything, I cherish this opportunity to meet with some of our state's best and brightest – motivated High School students or recent graduates who want to dedicate their talents and leadership in service to our country.” U.S. military service academies provide those who enroll with an excellent education and opportunities for leadership in both military and civilian life. Four of the five service academies – the U.S. Military Academy (West Point), the U.S. Naval Academy, the U.S. Air Force Academy and the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy – require a Congressional, Vice-Presidential, or service-connected nomination. The U.S. Coast Guard Academy does not require a nomination. In addition to applying for a nomination, candidates must complete all application requirements for the academies to which they are applying.

Roswell Daily Record

designers participating with a total of 14 designs. The best design receives the “Pinkey Blackwell Design of Excellence Award.” The best design of the show was in the class “Finding Nemo” and was won by Pegi Naranjo. The runner -up best design was in the class: “Bambi” and was also won by Pegi Naranjo. The designer with the most blue ribbons is awarded the “Sweepstakes Award” and this year’s was won by Pegi Naranjo. Winners in the Design classes were: Class 1: “Alice in Wonderland” first place, Pegi Naranjo; second place Georgia Schoenecker; and third place Rene Mccoy - Honorable Mention: Renate Reisel Class 2: “Bambi” first place Pegi Naranjo; second place Georgia Schoenecker; and third place Renate Reisel Class 3: “Finding Nemo” first place Pegi Naranjo; and second place Renate Reisel Class 4: “Star Wars” first place Pegi Naranjo; second place Renate Reisel; and third place Isabel Olsen Class 5: “The Jetsons” first place Renate Reisel; and second place Isabel Olsen

Scout Camp to get swimming pool

Every summer hundreds of Boy Scouts from as far away as Louisiana head for Wehinahpay Mountain Camp, near Cloudcroft, to escape the heat and immerse themselves in the total Scouting experience. They hike, fish, shoot, climb, canoe and this summer for the first time, they’ll swim in a big, new swimming pool. Enclosed in a large building with changing areas, showers, and toilet facilities, the new swimming pool should be completed by the beginning of the 2011 camping season. Eighty by forty feet in size, the big pool will serve for teaching swimming and lifesaving skills as well as recreational use. “A swimming pool is the one thing this great camp was missing,” said Bill Armstrong Jr., vice-president of properties for the Conquistador Council. “Now our campers will have the best of both worlds. It adds a whole new dimension to Camp Wehinahpay.” The new swimming pool is the latest of several recent additions and improvements to the camp. Those include a climbing/rappelling tower, high ropes confidence course, new shelters at the rifle and shotgun ranges, a new archery range, renovated showers and latrines and the Derek Brooks Ecology Center with its three classroom-style learning areas.

Established in 1927 in the Sacramento Mountains of souther n New Mexico, Camp Wehinahpay, pronounced We-HinAh-Pay, has provided generations of young men with a grand outdoor adventure. The 320-acre camp is known for its beautiful wooded campsites, excellent staff and an exciting program of camp activities. During their week-long stay at Camp Wehinahpay, Scouts participate in a structured program that teaches teamwork, caring for others, setting a good example, and a greater appreciation for the natural world. They become more confident, more responsible, and more self-reliant. In short, they learn to “Be Prepared,” the Boy Scout motto. Wehinahpay Mountain Camp consistently meets the health, safety, and program standards set by the Boy Scouts of America. The camp staff is trained in both program and safety standards and skills. Key camp leaders complete the BSA National Camp School. The health officer is licensed by the state of New Mexico. Camping season begins in mid-June and continues through July. Camp Wehinahpay is owned and operated by the Conquistador Council of the Boy Scouts of America, headquartered in Roswell. Visit the Wehinahpay website at www.nmscoutcamp.org.

We try to publish all information about local events and achievements that we can, given time and space limitations. However, we have no legal or ethical requirement to publish everything we receive. Staff members make the final determination on when or if information is published. The Roswell Daily Record reserves the right to reject or edit announcements for any reason. We publish announcements only once, except in cases of error on our part. To submit an announcement for publication we require a typewritten, legible press release. The release should con-

tain the date, time, location, subject and any other relevant information. Press releases must include a name and contact information, should we have questions regarding the notice. All e-mailed Around Town, Area Scene and Local Achievement items MUST be sent to the Vistas editor at vistas@roswell-record.com, at least FIVE days prior to the requested publishing date. Any other announcements of upcoming events must also be e-mailed or delivered to the RDR a minimum of FIVE business days before a desired publication date.

VISTAS POLICY

Dogs and water: How to play and exercise safely Applications for a nomination by Udall can be submitted online at http://tomudall.senate.gov/academy. The deadline is October 1, 2011.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

When you think of four-legged swimmers, Labrador retrievers might come to mind. But any dog can take to the water if enticed properly. “I don’t think that every dog has an inherent skill. They might all have an idea what to do but some dogs do it much better than others. Some are born to swim. Some are never meant to put foot in the water,” said veterinarian Karl E. Jandrey, who works in the emergency and critical care units at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California, Davis. Valentine is a 4-year -old, 42-pound, short-snouted English bulldog with stumpy legs who is heavy on both ends and looks like she would sink if placed in water. For three years, James MacKinnon of Los Angeles, an Emmy-winning TV and movie makeup artist, went to great lengths to protect Valentine from the swimming pool at his home. Then a year ago, he started boarding her at Paradise Ranch Pet Resort in Sun Valley, a cagefree, luxury country club and water park for dogs about 25 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles. (You can board cats there too, but the water is off limits to them.) It turns out Valentine loves the water. During the eight months MacKinnon traveled for work last year, with more time away this year, Valentine lost seven pounds, partly due to swimming. Her health improved, her endurance grew and she became fast friends with a Rottweiler named Chico who loves to dive off the dock. She probably decided to try it when she saw how much fun all the other dogs — including Chico — were having, said Chico’s owner, Cora Wittekind, an animal behaviorist who worked with Valentine. The best way to turn your dog into a swimmer is to introduce water very early, as a puppy if possible, making sure the experience is pleasant, according to recom-

mendations from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Never let dogs get in water over their heads until they are accomplished swimmers, and don’t force or toss them in water. “Don’t push them to do things they don’t want to do,” Jandrey said. And beware of the risks. Based on emergency room visits, one of the most common backyard pool accidents happens when dogs walk onto pool covers. If the cover collapses, the dog gets trapped, struggles and inhales water, Jandrey said. Safety covers made of solid material can run hundreds of dollars, but are worth the investment if there’s a possibility your dog might jump on a soft pool cover. Another risk, if you are at the beach and your dog drinks salt water all day, is acute salt intoxication, Jandrey said. It’s easy to prevent — always carry fresh water for your dog and offer it often. A few gulps of salt water won’t harm your dog, but watch for vomiting and early neurological signs of salt poisoning like dullness and depression. (The chlorine in pool water, on the other hand, is not considered a major problem for dogs.) In fresh water, dogs can be infected by a parasite called giardia, which can hide in the most pristine of streams, Jandrey said. Usually dog and owner will get it by drinking from the same water source. Owners can also be exposed by cleaning up waste from infected dogs. Symptoms include mild diarrhea and vomiting. Backyard ponds may bloom with mold intoxicants that can cause neurological problems, liver disease and liver failure in dogs, Jandrey said. Owners should also know when their dogs have had enough water play. Dogs don’t float, but constantly paddle with all four legs, so they might tire faster than humans, Jandrey said. Some dogs, like Chico, will just keep jumping in the water, retrieving the ball and

returning for more, Wittekind said. Panting isn’t necessarily a sign of exertion, Jandrey said, it’s the way dogs adjust their temperature after getting hot. But if a dog squeaks, rattles, snores or makes other unusual sounds while breathing, a break is probably warranted, he said. During a dog’s first few trips into the water, and for dogs that aren’t as coordinated as Chico, life preservers or flotation devices can help, Jandrey said. Valentine wore a life vest when she went in deep water but was OK without one otherwise. Sunburn can be a problem for lighter-skinned dogs with little or no pigment around their eyelids and noses. Some dogs have just a thin coat of hair on their bellies, so reflected light from the ground can cause sunburn. In dire cases, sunburn or chronic exposure to sunlight can lead to thermal skin cancer, Jandrey said. Products available to protect dogs from sunburn include vests that block ultraviolet rays and sunscreen made with ingredients repellent to dogs to keep them from licking it. Dogs don’t belly-flop like people, so dock-diving won’t hurt a strong dog. And with four paws, most water landings are soft, Jandrey said. If you are going fishing, the ASPCA cautions to keep the dog away from fishing lines, lures, hooks and bait. The ASPCA also recommends rinsing a dog’s paws after contact with sand or salt water, drying a dog’s ears after any water contact and brushing dogs with heavy or soft coats after a dip because wet coats can mat and trap bacteria. You need the right toy too — one that won’t sink and send your dog to the bottom of the pool to fetch it. The best water toys are made of hard rubber with a flotation device and easy-to-grab rope attached, Wittekind said.


Roswell Daily Record

NATION/OBITUARIES/RECORDS

A7

Tea party godfather Ron State immigration laws may never be constitutional Paul announces for president SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Utah legislators passed an immigration law that they were confident wouldn’t end up the same way Arizona’s version did last year: tangled up in the courts. But 14 hours after Utah’s law went into effect this week, it, too, was before a federal judge. As the case goes through the courts, other states grappling with illegal immigration are paying close attention. Georgia is waiting for the gover nor’s signature on a comprehensive immigration bill that includes an enforcement measure very similar to Utah’s version. Alabama has one, too, and it is moving close to passage in the Legislature. The halting of Utah’s law could give them pause. After all, state lawmakers worked at length with attorneys to try to eliminate constitutional issues a federal judge raised with Arizona’s law. Despite those refinements, the bottom line remains the same, legal scholars say. Immigration is enforced by the federal gover nment, and any state attempting to tell the federal government how to enforce immigration laws is stepping into potentially unconstitutional territory. So far, courts have agreed with that assessment. The hold placed on parts of Arizona’s law by a district court judge was upheld in April by a three-judge panel of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, and earlier this week Gov. Jan Brewer said she plans to appeal the rulings to the U.S. Supreme Court. “The main reason the Arizona statute is bad is because it’s the state taking over immigration law,”

OBITUARIES

William (Bill) S. Coffey

Memorial services are scheduled for 2 p.m., Saturday, May 14, 2011, at LaGrone Funeral Chapel for William (Bill) S. Coffey, 93, of Roswell, who passed away on May 10, 2011. The Roswell Masonic Low 12 will officiate and be assisted by the Roswell Veterans Honor Guard. Bill was born in Paducah, Texas, to Eva Conner Coffey and Salathiel Coffey, both deceased. He was married to Ruth DeArmond in 1938. She preceded him in death. Three sisters, Laura T rees, Francis

PUBLIC RECORDS

Marriage Licenses May 11 Miguel J. Jaramillo, 37, and Leticia Moreno, 34, both of Roswell. May 12 Frank Shephard, 49, and Meagan M. Pacheco, 30, both of Roswell. Chase M. Greengrass, 19, and Chelsea M. Grimm, 19, both of Dexter. Bryan Sandoval, 20, and Bianca N. Molina, 18, both of Roswell. May 13

said Arizona State University law professor Paul Bender. “The Utah law is unconstitutional for the same reason.” While Utah’s law may still be overtur ned because it usurps federal authority, the state did narrow its law significantly and made it not as “blatantly unconstitutional” by trying to fix two other issues the courts have taken with Arizona’s law, Bender said. One change made by Utah and Georgia was the elimination of a clause found in the Arizona law that would compel police to check the citizenship status of anyone who they have “reasonable suspicion” to believe is in the country illegally — whether a crime has been committed or not. Because police would have been forced to determine immediately whether a person was potentially illegal, racial profiling was almost guaranteed, Bender said. Alabama’s proposed law contains the reasonable suspicion clause, but state Sen. Scott Beason, R-Gardendale, has maintained the bill is constitutionally sound. Utah police will be required to check the citizenship status of anyone arrested for a major crime. For minor offenses, such as traffic violations, the police can check at their discretion, but only if the person stopped doesn’t have valid identification. Georgia police would be given the power to check citizenship for all state offenses, but not required unless a person is booked into jail. Another change both states made was focusing enforcement on people committing a crime, instead of the Arizona approach that allowed police to check almost

anyone they legally encounter, Bender said. When coupled with a program beginning in 2013 that will allow illegal immigrants with jobs to live and work in the state, Utah finds itself cast as the considerate northern neighbor to Arizona. Protests in Utah have been minor. The death threats and widespread boycotts that followed the passage of Arizona’s law in 2010 are non-existent. Georgia, on the other hand, has seen multiple protests with thousands of people participating and national groups are threatening boycotts, despite the two laws being almost identical. Utah lawmakers credit their public relations success to the Utah Compact, a set of principles drafted by religious and business leaders. Supporters of Utah’s overhaul package claim it uses the compact’s ideals to balance compassion and enforcement. Most of the criticism of the package has focused on the guest worker program, which opponents describe as amnesty. But the missing outrage in Utah doesn’t diminish the constitutional hurdles, especially since the federal ruling on Arizona’s law focused on federal control of immigration. “We understand the desire of the defendants to distance themselves from the Arizona law,” said Karen Tumlin, managing attor ney for the National Immigration Law Center, who sued the state along with the American Civil Liberties Union. “But if you read the text of the bill, the same issues are at play.” Like Arizona, the Utah, Georgia and Alabama laws grant broader powers to police than the federal government permits.

Saturday, May 14, 2011

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Rep. Ron Paul announced Friday that he will run for the GOP nomination for president in 2012, the third attempt for the man known on Capitol Hill as “Dr. No” for his enthusiasm for bashing runaway spending and government overreach. “Time has come around to the point where the people are agreeing with much of what I’ve been saying for 30 years. So, I think the time is right,“ said the 75year-old Paul, who first ran for president as a Libertarian in 1988. Paul made his announcement in an interview on ABC’s “Good Mor ning America” from New Hampshire, where he planned his first event for his presidential campaign on Friday. Three years ago, the former flight surgeon and outspoken critic of the Federal Reserve became an Internet sensation — and a prodigious fundraiser— when he made a spirited but doomed bid for the 2008 Republican presidential nomination. First elected to Congress in 1976, he is known for holding unconventional

views while keeping a smile on his face, espousing a sort of modern Republican populism. The obstetrician has delivered more than 4,000 babies and is personally against abortion, but he doesn’t think the federal government should regulate it. That’s a function of state government, he says. He has also said he wants to abolish the Internal Revenue Service, favors returning the United States to the gold standard in monetary policy and wants the U.S out of Iraq and Afghanistan. Democrats have tried repeatedly to beat him in a congressional district that stretches from the outskirts of Corpus Christi to Galveston. But the independent swath of coastal Texas seems a good fit for the maverick doctor. He has 18 grandchildren, according to his website, and he and his wife of 54 years, Carol, are known widely in Paul’s district for the cookbooks they give away to supporters. “The secret to his success is his authenticity,” said Democratic consultant Jeff Crosby, who grew up in Paul’s district. “He’s an authentic nut.” Crosby, who worked to defeat Paul in 2006 — unsuccessfully — described the difficulty he had trying to persuade voters to reject what he thought were the candidate’s radical views. “Just the mere fact that he does what he says he’s going to do, regardless of how nutty or ineffective it may be, they like it,” Crosby said. “A lot of folks along the coast have never expected much from government, and they’re getting it.” Paul, a native of Pittsburgh, is both a spiritual father and actual father in the tea party movement. His son, tea party darling Rand Paul, won a Senate seat in Kentucky last year and has become an ardent

proponent of spending cuts and smaller government. As far back as 2007, long before people were evoking the fabled Boston Tea Party to symbolize their disgust with an overtaxing central government, Ron Paul was hosting a “Tea Party Fundraiser” aboard a shrimp boat near Galveston. Organizer and Paul campaign volunteer Elizabeth Day remembers that supporters wore period dress and rolled fake barrels of tea into the waters of the Gulf of Mexico. The elder Paul has built coalitions that include senior citizen “granny warriors” and pot-smoking libertarians. During his 1988 presidential run, High T imes magazine, which caters to marijuana users, published a cover story under the headline, “Ron Paul: Pro-Pot Presidential Candidate.” Paul has expressed the view that the states, not the federal gover nment, should regulate vices like pornography and drugs. What sets Paul apart most from his GOP brethren are his views that defense spending needs to shrink and that the U.S. should get out of its two wars. Paul says the conflicts are financially unsustainable — and another drag on a battered U.S. dollar that he believes is on the verge of collapse. He also disputes a fundamental underpinning of the war in Iraq, namely that Islamic terrorists must be stopped overseas before they can attack the United States. “They came over here because we were over there,” Paul said in the run-up to the 2008 campaign. “We occupy their territory. It would be like if the Chinese had their navy in the Gulf of Mexico.” Though he has voiced support for ter m limits, Paul has been in Congress for almost 30 years.

behind All those I dearly love So when tomorrow starts without me Don’t think we’re far apart For every time you think of me I’m right here in your heart. Friends may pay respects online at lagronefuneral chapels.com.

AP Photo

Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, speaks at the town hall in Exeter, N.H., Friday, where he announced his plans to seek the Republican nomination for president.

Adkins and Lionel Bain, all have preceded him in death. He was also preceded in death by his son William Glenn Coffey. Survivors include his daughter Marilyn Wilson and husband Jerry, of Hillsboro, Ore.; grandchildren, Starla Nunez and husband Henry, of Roswell, Connie (Secolo) Wilson and husband Ted, of Hillsboro, Stuart Wilson and wife Melinda, of Hillsboro, Brian Wilson and wife Liane, of Hillsboro, and Molly Wilson, of Hillsboro; greatgrandchildren, Heidi Killgo of Roswell; T revor and Taryn Nunez, of Roswell; Abraham and Elizabeth Wilson, Cloe and Oskar Wilson, and Ezra Wilson, all of Hillsboro; great-greatgrandchildren, Alexa Tegeda and Gabriel Miller, of Roswell, and Tahney Barela, of Albuquerque; and very special lady friend and longtime companion Connie Florez, of Roswell. Bill moved to Amarillo, Texas, at a very early age and graduated from Amarillo High School. He was a member of the 1935 Amar-

illo High School State Football Championship team. He was also a member of the track team and boxing team. He continued his education at Amarillo College. He later moved to Albuquerque and worked for Lever Bros. Co. as first territory salesman. He later worked for Lipton Tea Co. as a territory salesman. Bill joined the Navy to serve his country as a member of the Amphibious Forces. He returned and worked for Eames Produce Co. He then began his sales position with Folgers Coffee. He was mentioned in Ripley’s Believe it or Not while employed there for No. 1 territory in the United States and No. 1 sales representative. He then worked for Burkett Paper Co., which brought him to Roswell as territory salesman. He then opened his own business Billco Paper Co. and continued to serve southeastern New Mexico and west Texas as a very dedicated salesman for about 20 years. Bill became very involved in community work. He

spent more than 20 years as a referee in the Golden Glove State and National tour naments. He was a Hospice volunteer. He was credited for helping to start Little League baseball in Roswell and had a very large part in the building of what is now known as Eastside Little League Field. He was also coach of a Little League team that won so many games he was asked to divide the team and give some of his players to other teams. Bill was a member of the Roswell Elks Lodge 969 and Masonic Lodge No. 18 and became a Shriner in 1951. He was Shriner of the Year for the state of New Mexico in 2000. He was the proud holder of Fifty Year pins for each of these organizations including the Shriners, where every Shriner is a Mason. He was co-organizer of the Shrine Oriental Band. His most touching work was that of the chairman of the Shriners Children Hospital admissions. He touched many lives and helped numerous children receive

medical attention they could not afford. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Shriners Children’s Hospital or Masonic Building Fund, P.O. Box 1512, Roswell, NM 88202-1512. When tomorrow starts without me, And I am not here to see If the sun should rise and find your Eyes filled with tears for me I wish so much you wouldn’t cry The way you did today While thinking of the many things We didn’t get to say I know how much you love me As much as I love you And each time you think of me I know you’ll miss me, too But when tomorrow starts without me Please try to understand That Jesus came and called my name And took me by the hand And said my place was ready In heaven far above And that I’d have to leave

Scott A. Eastman, 32, and Jessica M. Granado, 24, both of Roswell. Accidents April 29 7:49 a.m. — Southeast Main Street; drivers — Ignacio Gonzales, 23, of Roswell, and Maria Pena Olle, 41, of New York City. May 5 3 a.m. — South Main and Frazier streets; driver — Jocelyn Boyse, 20, of Artesia. May 8

9:30 p.m. — 4501 N. Main St.; vehicle owned by Shane Villanueva, of Roswell. May 10 8:41 a.m. — East 19th Street and North Atkinson Avenue; drivers — Gerald Childress, 80, and Tom Brown, 51, both of Roswell. May 11 4:44 p.m. — 1100 block North Atkinson Avenue; drivers — Brenda Borleson, 61, and Judah Nunez, 49, both of Roswell.

4:50 p.m. — College Boulevard; drivers — Allen Brady, 54, and Colt Preston, 20, both of Roswell. 6:44 p.m. — West McGaffey and South Main streets; drivers — Mathew Velasco, 30, and Gabriella Baker, 17, both of Roswell. 7:45 p.m. — Main Street and Mescalero Road; drivers — Juan Martinez, 33, and Larry Nieto, 58, both of Roswell. May 12 7:45 a.m. — Walker

Road and Wells Street; drivers — Claudia Magana, 23, and Sabrina Dominguez, 41, both of Roswell. 8:37 a.m. — Main Street and Berrendo Road; drivers — Manuel Payne, 69, and Nicholas Cardinuto, 29, both of Roswell. 12:33 p.m. — Church and South Main streets; drivers — Slene Aguirre, 24, of Albuquerque, and Marc Garcia, 19, of Roswell.

Drusilla Macias

Services are pending at Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory for Drusilla Macias, 77, who passed away Friday, May 13, 2011, at Easter n New Mexico Medical Center. A further announcement will be made once arrangements have been finalized.

Jess Thompson

Services are pending at Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory for Jess Thompson, 88, who passed away Friday, May 13, 2011, at Eastern New Mexico Medical Center. A further announcement will be made once arrangements have been finalized.

4:04 p.m. — Fifth and Main streets; drivers — Teodoro Sandoval, 30, and Mariah Tice, 18, both of Roswell. 4:15 p.m. — 1300 S. Main St.; drivers — Lori Green, 36, and Mario Ledesma, 45, both of Roswell. 5:40 p.m. — Washington Avenue and Mescalero Road; drivers — Sandra Evans, 51, and Ashley Campbell, 21, both of Roswell.


A8 Saturday, May 14, 2011

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg DomRescs 1.97 u47.99 -.16 DoralFncl ... 1.88 +.09 A-B-C DowChm 1.00f 38.37 -.56 ABB Ltd 1.12e 25.86 -.60 DrPepSnap1.00 u41.78 +.36 AES Corp ... 12.44 -.14 DuPont 1.64 52.91 -.98 AFLAC 1.20 54.02 -.74 DukeEngy .98 u19.22 -.01 ... 50.99 -1.12 DukeRlty .68 14.42 -.13 AGCO AK Steel .20 14.23 -.47 Dynegy rs ... 5.62 -.17 ... 27.60 -.13 AMR ... 6.38 -.19 EMC Cp AT&T Inc 1.72 31.41 -.23 EOG Res .64 105.44 -.08 ... 3.00 +.15 EKodak AU Optron ... d7.90 -.20 AbtLab 1.92f u53.49 -.04 Eaton s 1.36 51.92 -.74 EdisonInt 1.28 39.55 -.03 AberFitc .70 74.26 -.94 Accenture .90 55.74 -.86 ElPasoCp .04 18.22 -.03 AdvAuto .24 u72.16 +2.75 ElPasoPpl 1.76 34.03 -1.64 ... u8.46 +.11 ... 8.90 -.03 Elan AMD ... 6.98 -.29 EldorGld g .10f 15.11 -.15 Aegon 1.38 53.53 -.71 EmersonEl Aetna .60f u43.85 +1.02 ... u52.58 +2.25 EnCana g .80 32.64 -.30 Agilent Agnico g .64 61.26 -.51 EndvSilv g ... 8.96 -.06 Agrium g .11 80.43 +1.21 ENSCO 1.40 54.07 -.91 AlcatelLuc ... 6.10 -.18 Exelon 2.10 41.74 -.26 Alcoa .12 17.10 -.05 ExxonMbl 1.88f 80.87 -.18 Allstate .84f 32.38 -.62 FMC Tch s ... 42.27 +.55 AlphaNRs ... 48.44 -1.95 FNBCp PA .48 10.75 -.33 Altria 1.52 u27.31 -.04 FedExCp .48 93.58 -1.38 AmBev s 1.16e 31.19 -.43 FibriaCelu ... 14.71 -.47 AMovilL .52e 50.80 -.32 FstHorizon .04 10.26 -.17 AEagleOut .44a 14.69 -.29 FMajSilv g ... 18.00 -.70 AEP 1.84 37.58 -.05 FirstEngy 2.20 42.53 -1.03 .50 69.00 -1.87 AmExp .72 49.49 -.05 Fluor ... 15.08 -.18 AmIntlGrp ... 30.42 -.75 FordM ... 34.23 -.09 ForestLab Ameriprise .92f 62.40 -.96 ... 30.94 +.06 Anadarko .36 74.06 -.27 ForestOil ... 5.22 -.20 AnalogDev .88 40.79 -.68 Fortress AnglogldA .20e 43.61 -.85 FMCG s 1.00a 48.27 -.45 Annaly 2.62e 17.67 -.15 FrontierCm .75 8.66 -.02 Apache .60 124.25 +.83 FrontierOil .24a 27.15 +.16 ArcelorMit .75 33.43 -1.35 G-H-I ArchCoal .44f 29.11 -1.07 ArchDan .64 32.20 -.10 Gafisa SA .29e 10.75 -.31 AssuredG .18 16.70 +.42 GameStop ... u26.72 +.79 AtlasEngy .28f 24.98 +2.78 GamGld g ... 9.52 +.05 .45f 23.05 -.05 AtlasPpln 1.60f 36.59 +4.38 Gap .92 30.18 -.20 GenDynam1.88f 74.37 -.44 Avon BB&T Cp .64f 26.63 -.57 GenElec .60f 19.89 -.25 BHP BillLt1.82e 92.63 -1.42 GenGrPr n .40 16.12 -.30 BHPBil plc1.82e 75.76 -1.40 GenMills s 1.12 u39.72 +.21 BP PLC .42e 42.93 -.65 GenMot n ... 31.07 -.35 .60 69.27 -1.13 GenOn En ... 3.63 -.07 BakrHu BcoBrades .81r 19.15 -.72 Genworth ... 11.22 -.30 BcoSantSA.79e 11.30 -.34 Gerdau .27e d10.38 -.19 BcoSBrasil .70e 11.19 -.19 GlaxoSKln2.11eu43.74 +.12 BkofAm .04 11.93 -.27 GoldFLtd .19e 15.34 -.20 BkNYMel .52f 28.07 -.42 Goldcrp g .41 47.76 +.06 Barclay .36e 17.80 -.46 GoldmanS 1.40 141.46 -1.29 Bar iPVix rs ... 23.63 +.30 Goodyear ... 17.77 -.22 BarrickG .48 45.01 -.14 GpTelevisa ... 22.91 -.18 1.24 59.23 -.14 HCP Inc 1.92 36.80 -.83 Baxter BerkH B ... 79.65 -1.05 HSBC 1.80e 52.54 -.28 BestBuy .60 32.31 +.62 Hallibrtn .36 46.00 -.64 BigLots ... 38.53 +.14 HarleyD .50f 38.12 -.01 Blackstone .40 17.40 -.16 HarmonyG .07e 13.13 -.31 BlockHR .60 15.82 -.14 HartfdFn .40f 27.57 -.38 Boeing 1.68 79.03 -.38 HltCrREIT 2.86f 50.65 -1.06 ... 11.10 -.24 BostonSci ... 6.84 -.07 HltMgmt ... 8.13 -.01 BrMySq 1.32 u28.81 -.10 HeclaM HelixEn ... 15.71 -.35 Buenavent .49e 38.41 -.58 CB REllis ... 25.94 -.43 HelmPayne .24 59.03 +.34 ... 16.39 -.38 CBS B .40f 25.94 -.55 Hertz .40 75.78 -.60 .04 u48.69 +.64 Hess CIGNA CMS Eng .84 u20.21 -.10 HewlettP .32 40.41 -.47 CNO Fincl ... 7.61 -.16 HomeDp 1.00f 37.01 -.28 1.44f 74.75 -2.24 HonwllIntl 1.33 60.51 -.35 CSX CVS Care .50 u38.13 -.06 HostHotls .08f 16.97 -.18 Cameco g .40 26.24 -.11 Huntsmn .40 19.14 -.31 Cameron ... 49.65 +.82 Hypercom ... 9.95 +.36 CampSp 1.16 35.19 +.85 IAMGld g .08f 18.76 -.05 ... 12.15 -.43 CdnNRs gs .36 40.71 -.87 ING CapOne .20 52.34 -.61 iShGold s ... 14.59 -.10 CapitlSrce .04 6.20 +.03 iSAstla .82e 26.21 -.42 CardnlHlth .86f 44.45 -.43 iShBraz 2.53e 71.58 -1.53 .50e 31.77 -.27 CareFusion ... u29.82 -.07 iSCan CarMax ... 30.93 -.43 iShGer .29e 26.79 -.59 Carnival 1.00 41.02 -.32 iSh HK .45e 19.08 -.03 Caterpillar 1.76 106.33 -2.30 iShJapn .14e 10.24 -.22 Celanese .24f 51.63 +.42 iSh Kor .44e 64.32 -1.31 .43t 8.18 -.02 iSMalas .34e 14.65 -.24 Cemex Cemig pf 1.89e 19.21 -.53 iShMex .54e 60.09 -.68 CenterPnt .79 18.73 -.17 iShSing .43e 14.03 -.07 CntryLink 2.90 42.42 +.43 iSTaiwn .29e 15.60 -.32 ... 34.39 +1.07 ChesEng .30 29.78 -.70 iShSilver Chevron 3.12f 102.39 -.37 iShChina25.63e 43.20 -.51 Chimera .66e 3.86 -.05 iShEMkts .64e 46.92 -1.05 Citigrp rs .04 41.53 -.89 iShSPLatA1.18e 50.37 -.81 CliffsNRs .56 84.37 -2.82 iShB20 T 3.99e 95.08 +.85 Coach .60 u59.99 -1.23 iS Eafe 1.42e 60.61 -.96 CocaCola 1.88 u68.18 -.13 iSR1KG .76e 61.48 -.54 CocaCE .52f u28.96 +.16 iSR2KG .53e 95.54 -1.23 Coeur ... 25.25 -.47 iShR2K .89e 83.51 -1.18 ColgPal 2.32f 86.55 -.66 iShREst 1.98e 60.81 -.56 Comerica .40 36.39 -.62 iShBasM .93e 78.48 -1.24 1.36 57.95 -.38 ... 28.80 -.91 ITW CmtyHlt ConAgra .92 25.52 ... IngerRd .48f 50.12 -.67 3.00f 169.92 -2.32 ConocPhil 2.64 71.43 -.09 IBM ... 14.45 -.02 ConsolEngy .40 47.27 -.60 Intl Coal ConstellEn .96 u36.89 -.18 IntlGame .24 18.34 -.20 1.05f 31.37 -.68 IntPap Corning .20 20.73 -.32 Covidien .80 55.84 -.29 Interpublic .24 11.56 +.17 Cummins 1.05 110.29 -2.83 IntraLks n ... 21.74 +.87 CurEuro .05e 140.52 -1.32 Invesco .49f 25.01 -.19 ItauUnibH .67e 22.19 -.60 D-E-F J-K-L DCT Indl .28 5.68 -.07 DR Horton .15 11.44 -.15 JPMorgCh1.00f 43.15 -.94 Jabil .28 21.58 -.01 DanaHldg ... 17.57 -.28 Danaher s .08 53.86 -.48 JanusCap .20f 10.91 -.51 JohnJn 2.28f 66.62 -.57 ... u17.23 +1.46 Darling DeanFds ... u13.41 +1.13 JohnsnCtl .64 38.62 -.76 1.40 87.72 -2.64 JnprNtwk ... 39.63 -.18 Deere ... 10.65 -.22 KB Home .25 11.07 -.15 DeltaAir ... 15.37 -.26 DenburyR ... 20.54 -.26 KeyEngy DeutschBk .93e 59.17 -2.01 Keycorp .04 8.27 -.26 .72 18.98 -.16 DevonE .68f 82.02 -.13 Kimco Dillards .16 u56.00 +7.41 Kinross g .10 d14.24 -.19 1.00 55.17 -.51 DrSCBr rs ... 35.11 +1.32 Kohls 1.16 u34.89 +.14 DirFnBr rs ... 43.15 +1.65 Kraft Kroger .42 u25.03 -.01 DirLCBr rs ... 34.09 +.80 DrxEMBull.84e 36.54 -2.34 LDK Solar ... 9.60 -.49 ... 7.62 +.05 DrxEBear rs ... 16.11 +.18 LSI Corp ... 42.60 -.79 DirEMBear ... 19.32 +1.17 LVSands ... 1.14 +.09 DrxFnBull ... 27.71 -1.17 LeeEnt LeggMason .32f 33.97 -.66 DirxSCBull ... 85.37 -3.52 DirxEnBull .05e 70.36 -.98 LennarA .16 17.52 -.22 Discover .24f 24.24 +.04 LexRltyTr .46 9.50 -.14 1.96 u38.95 +.19 Disney .40f 41.52 -.06 LillyEli Name

Name Sell Chg Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.65 -.22 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.60 -.21 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.62 -.04 GrowthI 27.49 -.23 24.24 -.18 Ultra American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.21 -.18 AMutlA p 27.01 -.19 BalA p 18.81 -.10 BondA p 12.36 +.02 CapIBA p 52.19 -.33 CapWGA p37.56 -.41 CapWA p 20.96 -.05 EupacA p 42.93 -.48 FdInvA p 38.96 -.33 GovtA p 14.04 +.02 GwthA p 32.02 -.30 HI TrA p 11.60 ... IncoA p 17.51 -.09 IntBdA p 13.52 +.01 IntlGrIncA p32.83 -.37 ICAA p 29.49 -.25 NEcoA p 26.94 -.27 N PerA p 29.89 -.26 NwWrldA 55.25 -.48 SmCpA p 40.21 -.39 TxExA p 12.01 +.02 WshA p 29.21 -.22 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.44 -.13 IntEqII I r 12.58 -.06 Artisan Funds: 23.05 -.20 Intl IntlVal r 28.55 -.26 MidCap 36.93 -.24 MidCapVal22.59 -.14 SCapVal 18.28 -.17

Baron Funds: Growth 55.81 -.57 SmallCap 26.29 -.30 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.95 +.02 DivMu 14.47 +.01 TxMgdIntl 15.89 -.17 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.70 -.15 GlAlA r 20.08 -.14 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.71 -.13 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.74 -.15 GlbAlloc r 20.19 -.14 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 57.06 -.67 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 64.46 -.62 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 31.29 -.35 DivEqInc 10.68 -.09 DivrBd 5.10 +.01 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 32.34 -.37 AcornIntZ 42.19 -.36 LgCapGr 13.99 -.12 ValRestr 51.89 -.42 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.29 -.01 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n11.72 -.18 USCorEq1 n11.83-.11 USCorEq2 n11.78-.12 DWS Invest S: MgdMuni S 8.81 +.02 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.91 -.24 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 36.32 -.23 NYVen C 34.64 -.22

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: chg.

-.85 -.87 -1.05 -1.17 -1.27 -1.25 -1.20 -1.25 -1.60

-.82 -1.47 -1.48 -1.45 -1.22 -1.72

+.23 +.35 -.30 -.20 +.10 +.48 +.40 +.30 +.20 +.35 +.15 +.25

M-N-0

MBIA ... 9.45 -.23 MEMC ... 11.01 -.27 MFA Fncl .94 8.16 -.06 MGIC ... 7.93 -.23 MGM Rsts ... 14.72 +.31 .40f 28.46 -.16 Macys Manitowoc .08 18.13 -.90 Manulife g .52 17.79 -.37 MarathonO1.00 51.10 -.07 MktVGold .40e 54.21 -.44 MktVRus .18e 36.94 -.70 MktVJrGld2.93e 34.69 -.67 MktV Agri .33e 52.88 +.14 MarIntA .40f 36.50 -.07 MarshM .84 29.74 -.38 .30 13.22 -.28 Masco MasseyEn .24 59.12 -1.73 McDrmInt s ... 20.47 -.70 McDnlds 2.44 80.74 +.08 McMoRn ... 16.41 +.30 ... 24.92 -.61 Mechel MedcoHlth ... 64.67 +.36 Medicis .32f 36.56 -1.40 Medtrnic .90 42.03 -.29 Merck 1.52 37.08 -.12 .74 44.41 -.66 MetLife MetroPCS ... 17.85 -.25 MitsuUFJ ... 4.68 -.17 MizuhoFn ... 3.28 -.10 MobileTele1.06e 20.21 -.46 Molycorp n ... 62.15 -3.01 Monsanto 1.12 63.79 -.22 MonstrWw ... 16.34 -.38 Moodys .56f 38.14 +.22 MorgStan .20 24.13 -.38 .20 67.35 -.37 Mosaic MotrlaMo n ... 24.02 -.96 MurphO 1.10 66.38 -.25 NYSE Eur 1.20 40.89 +.29 ... 26.74 ... Nabors NBkGreece.29e 1.40 +.01 NOilVarco .44 68.02 -.15 NatSemi .40 u24.40 -.01 Navistar ... 67.50 -1.22 NY CmtyB 1.00 16.26 -.20 NewellRub .32f 18.47 -.13 NewfldExp ... 70.07 +.30 NewmtM .80f 52.78 -.48 Nexen g .20 22.40 -.65 NiSource .92 u20.36 -.12 NikeB 1.24 86.26 +1.68 NipponTT ... 23.81 +.32 NobleCorp1.06e 39.59 +.02 NokiaCp .55e 8.54 -.12 Nordstrm .92 47.63 -1.54 NorflkSo 1.60 71.57 -1.41 NStarRlt .40 4.49 -.07 Novartis 2.53e u60.89 -.33 1.45 42.96 -1.32 Nucor OcciPet 1.84 102.36 -.73 OfficeDpt ... 4.72 +.04 OfficeMax ... 9.13 -.30 OilSvHT 2.36e 147.49 -.47 OshkoshCp ... 29.39 -.69 OwensIll ... 33.00 -.01

P-Q-R

PG&E Cp 1.82 46.02 -.50 ... 1.73 -.02 PMI Grp PNC 1.40f 61.80 -1.39 PPL Corp 1.40 27.93 -.10 PatriotCoal ... 22.28 -.96 PeabdyE .34 58.45 -2.65 PennWst g 1.08 25.90 +.63 Penney .80 38.44 -.08 PepcoHold 1.08 20.04 -.05 PepsiCo 2.06f u70.56 -.40 Petrohawk ... 24.33 -.07 PetrbrsA 1.34e 29.17 -.60 Petrobras 1.28e 33.04 -.63 Pfizer .80 20.92 +.03 PhilipMor 2.56 68.31 +.10 PhxNMda n ... 13.10 -1.65 PitnyBw 1.48 24.58 -.18 Potash s .28 51.58 +.49 PwshDB ... 29.04 +.05 ... 32.14 -.30 PS Agri PS USDBull ... 21.69 +.15 PrecDrill ... 14.31 +.31 PrUShS&P ... 20.39 +.32 ProUltQQQ ... 92.83 -2.20 PrUShQQQ rs... 48.97 +1.08 ProUltSP .39e 54.32 -.86 PrUShtFn rs ... 60.08 +1.57 ProUShL20 ... 34.39 -.57 ProUltSOG ... 30.16 +.22 ProUBasM .03e 51.28 -1.64 ProUltR2K .01e 48.31 -1.24 ProUSSP500 ... 15.31 +.36 ProUSSlv rs ... 19.70 -2.10 PrUltCrde rs ... 47.82 +.32 PrUShCrde rs... 45.36 -.33 ProSUltSilv ... 174.74 +9.20 ProUShEuro ... 17.87 +.32 ProctGam 2.10f u66.86 +.02 ProgsvCp 1.40e 21.15 -.34 ProLogis .45 15.55 -.30 ProUSR2K rs ... 41.90 +1.11 Prudentl 1.15f 63.13 -.83 PSEG 1.37 33.45 -.25 PulteGrp ... 7.60 -.06 QuantaSvc ... 19.73 +.14 QksilvRes ... 14.28 -.20 Rackspace ... 42.20 +.29 RadianGrp .01 d5.18 -.15 RadioShk .25 16.28 -.24 Raytheon 1.72f 49.19 -.01 RegionsFn .04 7.05 -.12 ReneSola ... 8.25 -.08 ... d13.16 +.56 Renren n RepubSvc .80 32.36 -.12 ReynAm s 2.12 u38.69 +.34 RioTinto 1.08e 66.23 -1.47 ... 1.21 -.04 RiteAid Rowan ... 38.04 +.15 ... 41.21 +.20 RylCarb RoyDShllA 3.36 69.63 -1.46 1.08 u55.05 +1.56 Ryder

S-T-U

SLM Cp .40 15.87 -.32 SpdrDJIA 3.00e 125.96 -1.03 SpdrGold ... 145.63 -.96 SpdrEMSmC1.73e54.62 -.78 SP Mid 1.55e 180.59 -1.76 S&P500ETF2.34e134.041.04 SpdrHome .31e 18.56 -.19 SpdrKbwBk.15e 24.63 -.45 SpdrLehHY4.38e 40.63 -.11 SpdrRetl .50e u54.10 -.30 SpdrOGEx .49e 57.02 -.39 SpdrMetM .41e 68.67 -1.60 Safeway .48 25.00 +.08 .84 51.97 -.20 StJude Saks ... 11.44 -.22 SandRdge ... 10.04 -.23 Sanofi 1.82e 38.10 -.17 SaraLee .46 19.26 +.33 Schlmbrg 1.00 82.71 -.81 Schwab .24 17.64 -.34 SeadrillLtd2.74e 32.66 -.45 ... 2.72 -.13 Sealy SemiHTr .57e 36.48 -.27 SiderurNac.81e 13.94 -.24 SilvWhtn g .12 34.10 +.14 SilvrcpM g .08 10.39 -.15 ... 20.55 -.36 SmithfF SouthnCo 1.89f u40.49 +.07 SthnCopper1.83e34.26 +.04 SwstAirl .02 12.07 -.07 SwstnEngy ... 41.20 -.21 SpectraEn 1.04 27.28 -.22 SprintNex ... 5.10 -.07 SP Matls 1.23e 38.65 -.50 SP HlthC .61e u36.08 -.11 SP CnSt .81e u32.11 -.04 SP Consum.56e 40.56 -.31 SP Engy 1.05e 73.79 -.36 SPDR Fncl .16e 15.77 -.23 SP Inds .64e 37.68 -.46 SP Tech .33e 26.46 -.33 SP Util 1.31e u33.91 -.16 StarwdHtl .30f 58.14 -1.01 StateStr .72f 45.55 -.97 Statoil ASA1.10e 25.75 -.21 StillwtrM ... 18.16 -.62 Stryker .72 63.28 +.12 Suncor gs .44f 39.87 -.48 .60 40.27 -.24 Sunoco SunTrst .04 27.47 -.63 Supvalu .35 10.88 -.06 Synovus .04 2.40 ... Sysco 1.04 31.78 -.31 TE Connect .64 36.69 -1.01 .76f u54.57 -.11 TJX TaiwSemi .47e 13.59 -.23 TalismE g .27f 21.09 -.24 Target 1.00 51.52 -.24 TeckRes g .60 46.36 -1.14 TelNorL .52e 16.02 -.48 TelefEsp s1.98e 23.85 -.39 TenetHlth ... 6.34 -.12 ... 16.18 +.03 Teradyn ... 31.30 -.42 Terex Tesoro ... 23.43 -.37 .52 35.18 -.15 TexInst Textron .08 24.61 -.20 ThermoFis ... u61.91 +.24 3M Co 2.20 96.01 -.64 TimeWarn .94 35.99 -.24 ... 19.23 -.21 TitanMet Total SA 3.16e 57.45 -1.09 Transocn .79e 68.42 +.94 Travelers 1.64f 62.33 -1.52 TrinaSolar ... 25.35 -.89 Turkcell .66e 14.05 -.29 TycoIntl 1.00 50.78 +1.28 .16 18.53 -.31 Tyson UBS AG ... 18.32 -.73 ... 9.41 -.21 US Airwy US Gold ... 6.68 -.27 ... 4.26 -.19 USEC UnilevNV 1.17e 32.52 -.47 UnionPac 1.90f 100.46 -1.97 UtdContl ... 25.58 +.09 UtdMicro .08e 2.73 -.06 UPS B 2.08 74.14 -.20 UtdRentals ... 26.07 -.60 US Bancrp .50f 25.02 -.31 US NGs rs ... 10.97 +.16 ... 39.44 +.16 US OilFd USSteel .20 44.65 -.95 UtdTech 1.92f 88.98 -.59 UtdhlthGp .50 u49.95 -.13 UnumGrp .37 26.22 -.46

V-W-X-Y-Z

Vale SA .90e 29.69 -.62 Vale SA pf .90e 26.28 -.63 ValeantPh .38a 50.07 -1.84 ValeroE .20 26.68 +.15 VangTSM1.29e 69.37 -.64 VangEmg .82e 47.42 -.97 VeriFone ... 47.14 +.50 VerizonCm 1.95 37.26 -.17 ViacomB .60 49.92 -.56 VimpelCm .80e 13.99 -.15 Visa .60 79.91 -.02 ... 4.66 -.18 Vonage WalMart 1.46f 55.72 ... .70 44.97 +.04 Walgrn WalterEn .50 119.30 -2.95 WsteMInc 1.36f 38.75 -.30 WeathfIntl ... 20.17 +.30 WellPoint 1.00 u80.25 +.25 WellsFargo .48f 27.93 -.30 WendyArby .08 4.95 -.05 ... 37.49 -.96 WDigital WstnRefin ... 15.73 -.09 WstnUnion .28 20.70 -.30 Weyerh .60 21.91 -.11 Whrlpl 2.00f 86.66 +1.27 WmsCos .50 30.26 -.26 .04 4.45 -.04 WilmTr WT India .15e 23.38 -.21 .44 23.00 -.38 XL Grp XcelEngy 1.01 u24.95 +.12 .17 10.21 -.09 Xerox Yamana g .18f 11.80 -.18 YingliGrn ... 10.66 -.47 ... 48.54 +2.23 Youku n YumBrnds 1.00 54.86 +.13

Est. sales 41512. Thu’s Sales: 51,028 Thu’s open int: 224761, up +2405 PORK BELLIES 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 11 126.50 Jul 11 121.00 Aug 11 106.50 Feb 12 120.00 Mar 12 120.50 Last spot N/A Thu’s Sales: Thu’s open int: , unch

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high low settle COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jul 11 145.49 148.49 142.06 145.15 Oct 11 130.45 132.00 127.50 127.55 Dec 11 119.50 120.61 113.76 115.61 Mar 12 112.98 113.85 107.80 109.47 May 12 108.95 108.99 104.01 105.34 Jul 12 106.20 107.50 102.07 103.85 Oct 12 96.80 Dec 12 97.50 98.20 94.07 95.75 Mar 13 96.75 May 13 100.00 100.00 97.37 97.37 Last spot N/A Est. sales 14365. Thu’s Sales: 11,635 Thu’s open int: 149170, off -955

chg.

+.85 -1.75 -3.58 -3.00 -1.47 -1.16 -1.16 -1.16 -2.25 -2.03

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 11 701 712 696 696 Jul 11 716 749ø 716 727fl Sep 11 777 794 772ü 777

chg.

-4ø -7fl -5ü

Roswell Daily Record

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

AMEX

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 1544883 11.93 -.27 S&P500ETF1429438134.041.04 iShSilver 859355 34.39 +1.07 iShEMkts 806845 46.92 -1.05

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) TrnsatlPet 42069 GoldStr g 36183 NwGold g 35373 NA Pall g 31958 CFCda g 31346

Last 2.30 2.61 9.27 3.90 20.70

Chg +.13 -.09 -.18 -.10 +.28

Name Vol (00) Last Yahoo 1034366 16.55 Cisco 783227 16.88 SiriusXM 683019 2.24 Microsoft 657965 25.03 PwShs QQQ56670958.41-

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg -.62 -.05 -.04 -.29

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Dillards AtlasPpln AtlasEngy iP SER2K Darling

Last 56.00 36.59 24.98 26.30 17.23

Chg +7.41 +4.38 +2.78 +2.25 +1.46

%Chg +15.3 +13.6 +12.5 +9.4 +9.3

Name NewConcEn AdcareH wt TianyinPh HeraldNB EngySvcs

Last 3.08 3.33 2.45 2.94 3.50

Chg %Chg Name +.38 +14.1 ARCA bio +.38 +12.9 Tranzyme n +.20 +8.9 GulfRes +.23 +8.5 Tree.com h +.24 +7.4 FstBkshs

Name Bitauto n ConcdMed PhxNMda n USANA ProUSSlv rs

Last 7.79 4.44 13.10 28.05 19.70

Chg -1.35 -.62 -1.65 -3.43 -2.10

%Chg -14.8 -12.3 -11.2 -10.9 -9.6

Name PacOffPT Bacterin n Quepasa Innovaro BioTime

Last 2.01 4.01 6.12 2.41 5.53

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg -.20 -9.0 LifePart s 5.62 -1.42 -20.2 -.39 -8.9 Vertro rs 2.66 -.59 -18.2 -.56 -8.4 Rambus 15.83 -3.44 -17.9 -.20 -7.7 ParkBcp 3.25 -.55 -14.5 -.38 -6.4 KipsBMd n 3.90 -.56 -12.6

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

889 2,161 105 3,155 181 22 3,516,269,996

52-Week High Low 12,876.00 9,614.32 5,565.78 3,872.64 439.88 346.95 8,718.25 6,355.83 2,490.51 1,689.19 2,887.75 2,061.14 1,370.58 1,010.91 14,562.01 15.80 868.57 587.66

Name

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

BkofAm

.04

22

Chevron

3.12f

10 102.39 -.37

CocaCola

1.88

14

68.18 -.13

Disney

.40f

18

41.52 -.06

EOG Res

.64

HewlettP

11.93 -.27

%Chg +33.5 +22.2 +19.6 +17.2 +15.96

DIARY

Last 12,595.75 5,383.91 436.91 8,371.67 2,350.28 2,828.47 1,337.77 14,186.94 835.67

Net Chg -100.17 -70.33 -2.63 -84.51 -20.32 -34.57 -10.88 -125.13 -11.86

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Chg

Chg +.63 +.90 +.53 +.93 +.83

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

186 281 46 513 11 5ows 103,579,73230

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 2.51 4.96 3.23 6.33 6.05

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

INDEXES

PE Last

FordM

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

Div

YTD %Chg Name

Div

623 1,989 106 2,718 91 48raldNB 1,871,109,230

% Chg -.79 -1.29 -.60 -1.00 -.86 -1.21 -.81 -.87 -1.40

YTD 52-wk % Chg % Chg +8.80 +18.60 +5.43 +19.97 +7.88 +15.03 +5.12 +18.28 +6.43 +27.13 +6.62 +20.52 +6.37 +17.79 +6.19 +18.81 +6.64 +20.42ntl

PE Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

-10.6 ONEOK Pt

4.60f

20

82.00 -.07

+3.1

+12.2 PNM Res

.50

20

15.94 +.09

+22.4

+3.7 PepsiCo

2.06f

19

70.56 -.40

+8.0

+10.7 Pfizer

.80

20

20.92 +.03

+19.5 -7.0

... 105.44 -.08

+15.3 SwstAirl

.02

20

12.07 -.07

...

7

15.08 -.18

-10.2 TexInst

.52

13

35.18 -.15

+8.2

.32

10

40.41 -.47

.94

15

35.99 -.24

+11.9

-4.0 TimeWarn

HollyCp

.60

14

56.66 +.50

+39.0 TriContl

.28e

...

14.88 -.14

+8.1

Intel

.84f

11

23.41 -.29

+11.3 WalMart

1.46f

13

55.72

...

+3.3

IBM

3.00f

14 169.92 -2.32

+15.8 WashFed

.24

13

15.27 -.11

-9.8

Merck

1.52

16

.48f

11

27.93 -.30

-9.9

24.95 +.12

+5.9

Microsoft

.64

37.08 -.12

+2.9 WellsFargo

HOW TO READ THE MARKET IN REVIEW 6

25.03 -.29

-10.3 XcelEngy

1.01

15

Here are the 525 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 400 most active on the Nasdaq National Markets and 100 most active on American Stock Exchange. Mutual funds are 450 largest. Stocks in bold changed 5 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letters’ list. AAR .48 12.88 # Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock, based on latest quar- ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 ACM Op .80 7.25 # terly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise footnoted. ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. # ACMSp .96 7.50 Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... mark. Fund Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold. Chg: Daily net change in the NAV.

AAL Mutual: Bond p 9.49 -.01

Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

MUTUAL FUNDS

Goldman Sachs Inst: GrOppt 26.16 -.24 HiYield 7.49 ... MidCapV 38.57 -.35 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.35 -.01 CapApInst 39.58 -.31 IntlInv t 62.98 -.84 Intl r 63.64 -.85 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.57 -.36 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI n 35.61 -.36 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 44.53 -.45 Div&Gr 20.87 -.18 Advisers 20.29 -.11 TotRetBd 11.22 +.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.42 +.05 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r17.51 -.12 Invesco Funds A: CapGro 14.33 -.13 Chart p 17.42 -.09 CmstkA 16.86 -.17 9.02 -.06 EqIncA GrIncA p 20.36 -.19 HYMuA 8.98 +.02 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 25.06 -.24 AssetStA p25.86 -.24 AssetStrI r 26.09 -.25 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.58 +.02 JPMorgan R Cl: ShtDurBd 11.01 +.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd n 11.57 +.01 HighYld n 8.40 ... IntmTFBd n10.98 +.01

Dec 11 835ø 853 830 835 Mar 12 876fl 893 871ø 875 May 12 882ü 895fl 880ø 884 Jul 12 888ü 904fl 885ø 891 Last spot N/A Est. sales 183604. Thu’s Sales: 133,138 Thu’s open int: 453781, up +1462 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 11 685ü 687fl 674fl 679 Jul 11 678 690 676ø 682 Sep 11 656fl 663ü 652ø 653fl Dec 11 627 638ø 626 627 Mar 12 640fl 649fl 637ø 638ø May 12 647 655ø 645ø 646ø Jul 12 657ü 663fl 653ø 653ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 424342. Thu’s Sales: 336,685 Thu’s open int: 1431543, off -5841 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 11 347 348ø 347 348ø Jul 11 341ü 353fl 341ü 344ø Sep 11 356 356fl 350ø 352 Dec 11 358 367ü 358 359ø Mar 12 373 373 371ø 371ø May 12 381 381 379ø 379ø Jul 12 389 389 387ø 387ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 893. Thu’s Sales: 990 Thu’s open int: 12325, off -211 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 11 1351ø 1352 1331 1337 Jul 11 1327ü 1353 1321fl 1329ø Aug 11 1324 1349fl 1320ü 1326ø Sep 11 1317ø 1342 1313ü 1318 Nov 11 1301 1336ü 1301 1310fl Jan 12 1315fl 1344 1315fl 1319ø Mar 12 1317fl 1345fl 1317fl 1321ü May 12 1313 1342 1313 1316fl Jul 12 1318ü 1342 1318 1320 Aug 12 1325 1325 1310ø 1310ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 253251. Thu’s Sales: 136,526 Thu’s open int: 552777, off -1636

-3ü -5ü -4fl -5ü

ShtDurBd n11.01 +.01 USLCCrPls n21.58.18 Janus T Shrs: BalancdT 26.38 -.13 OvrseasT r48.76 -.53 PrkMCVal T24.17 -.18 Twenty T 67.31 -.57 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 12.97 -.13 LSBalanc 13.50 -.08 LSGrwth 13.53 -.10 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p26.59.38 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.35 -.22 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p21.72 -.22 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p15.33 +.04 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.99 -.36 SmCap 30.01 -.03 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.93 -.03 StrInc C 15.60 -.03 LSBondR 14.87 -.04 StrIncA 15.52 -.03 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.49 -.01 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 12.04 -.11 BdDebA p 8.10 -.01 ShDurIncA p4.63 ... Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t4.66 +.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.72 -.06 ValueA 24.42 -.18

FUTURES

-2ü +1ø +fl -3ø -3ø -3ø -4

+1ø -2ø -2 -1ø -1ø -1ø -1ø

-8ü -13ü -13ø -15 -15ø -15ü -14 -14fl -14ø -14ø

MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.53 -.18 MFS Funds Instl: IntlEq n 19.09 -.19 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 6.03 +.01 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.26 -.11 Matthews Asian: PacTgrInv 23.60 -.08 MergerFd 16.25 -.02 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.54 +.01 TotRtBdI 10.54 +.01 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 14.41 -.17 MCapGrI 41.65 -.44 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.97 -.16 GlbDiscZ 31.37 -.16 QuestZ 18.74 -.10 SharesZ 22.28 -.11 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 49.96 -.51 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 51.73 -.53 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.55 ... MMIntEq r 10.12 -.12 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 29.26 -.14 20.44 -.10 Intl I r Oakmark r 44.90 -.35 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.18 -.05 GlbSMdCap16.62-.12 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 45.88 -.36 DvMktA p 35.59 -.31 GlobA p 65.63 -.66 GblStrIncA 4.39 -.01

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

... 3.71 -.16 Div Last Chg Curis Cyclacel ... 1.70 +.17 A-B-C CypSemi .36 21.87 -.11 ASML Hld .58e 39.64 -.89 Cytokinet ... 1.48 ... ATP O&G ... 17.27 -.06 D-E-F ... 1.82 -.05 AVI Bio ... 16.37 -.29 ... 7.12 -.18 Dell Inc Accelrys ... 38.03 +.23 ... 77.97 -1.32 Dndreon AcmePkt AcordaTh ... 26.05 +.78 Dentsply .20 u38.68 -.27 ActivsBliz .17f 11.51 -.19 Depomed ... 8.16 -.20 ... 118.41 -.07 ... 35.33 -.53 Dionex AdobeSy .36 42.24 -.96 DirecTV A ... u49.73 -.85 Adtran AEterna g ... 2.29 -.06 DiscCm A ... 44.27 -.65 Affymetrix ... 6.36 -.03 DishNetwk ... 28.81 -.39 ... 1.23 -.05 DonlleyRR 1.04 20.32 -.07 AgFeed ... 33.95 -.20 DrmWksA ... 25.58 -.45 AkamaiT ... 3.78 -.01 ... u17.75 +.74 drugstre Alkerm AllosThera ... 2.52 -.03 DryShips ... 4.40 -.28 AllscriptH ... 20.05 -.26 ETrade rs ... 16.06 -.24 ... 33.57 -.01 AlteraCp lf .24 48.30 -.34 eBay Amazon ...u202.56-3.51 ErthLink .20 7.97 -.18 ACapAgy 5.60e 29.62 -.17 EstWstBcp .20f 20.49 -.25 ... u23.70 +.82 AmCapLtd ... 10.06 -.20 ElectArts AmSupr ... 11.36 -.34 Emcore lf ... 2.48 -.08 ... u60.47 +.81 EndoPhrm ... 42.39 -.26 Amgen ... d1.52 -.20 AmkorT lf ... 6.79 -.12 Ener1 ... 8.92 -.14 Amylin ... 13.66 +1.00 Entegris EntropCom ... 8.87 -.18 Ancestry ... 39.80 -.16 A123 Sys ... 5.93 -.13 EricsnTel .37e 14.88 -.34 ... 10.95 +.03 ApolloGrp ... 42.59 -.20 Exelixis ApolloInv 1.12 11.27 -.29 Expedia .28 25.17 +.05 Apple Inc ... 340.50 -6.07 ExpdIntl .50f 53.07 -1.14 ApldMatl .32f 14.80 -.29 F5 Netwks ... 104.64 -1.12 ... u39.49 +.66 ArenaPhm ... 1.28 -.01 FEI Co AresCap 1.40 17.08 -.07 FLIR Sys .24 u36.11 -.27 FSI Intl ... 5.28 +.05 ... 8.96 -.24 AriadP Ariba Inc ... 33.52 -.20 Fastenal 1.04f 66.61 -.43 FifthThird .24f 12.49 -.22 ArmHld .09e 28.51 -.73 ... 25.06 -.91 Arris ... 10.96 -.15 Finisar ArubaNet ... 32.24 -.25 FstNiagara .64 13.72 -.43 ... 125.65 -6.42 AsiaInfoL ... 19.70 -.37 FstSolar ... 62.00 -.33 AspenTech ... 16.66 -.01 Fiserv ... 6.96 -.09 Flextrn AsscdBanc .04 14.13 -.29 Atheros ... 44.79 +.01 FocusMda ... 32.21 -1.64 ... 14.99 -.18 Fossil Inc ... 105.34 -1.42 Atmel Autodesk ... u45.57 -.42 FosterWhl ... 33.94 -.75 ... 1.61 +.02 AutoData 1.44 54.01 -.57 FuelCell AvagoTch .32f 34.89 -.17 G-H-I AvanirPhm ... 3.86 ... AvisBudg ... 18.21 -.21 GSI Cmce h ... 29.15 +.01 ... 11.36 -.08 ... 1.89 -.07 GT Solar Axcelis ... 35.12 -.12 BE Aero ... 37.84 -.46 Garmin GeronCp ... 4.96 -.03 BGC Ptrs .68f 8.53 -.19 ... u54.47 -.23 GileadSci ... 41.20 -.09 BMC Sft ... 6.01 -.13 BannerCp .04 2.84 +.01 GloblInd ... 55.65 -.53 GlbSpcMet .15 20.94 -1.27 BedBath ... 529.55 -5.50 BioClinica ... 5.50 +.06 Google BiogenIdc ... 96.61 -1.63 GrLkDrge .07 6.45 -.10 ... 3.23 +.53 ... 26.64 +.15 GulfRes BioMarin BioMimetic ... 8.10 -1.10 GulfportE ... 26.83 +.01 HansenNat ... 66.50 -.26 ... u2.61 +.07 BioSante BiostarPh ... 1.82 +.12 HanwhaSol ... 5.91 -.23 Harmonic ... 7.69 -.08 BlueCoat ... 24.30 -.38 BodyCen n ... 24.15 -.85 Hasbro 1.20f 48.05 -.28 BrigExp ... 26.94 -.70 HawHold ... 5.80 -.35 Broadcom .36 34.45 +.28 HercOffsh ... 5.81 -.11 ... 21.69 -.33 Broadwind ... 1.51 -.02 Hologic BrcdeCm ... 6.30 -.03 HotTopic .28 u7.96 +.12 .34 d8.43 -.26 HudsCity .32m d9.26 -.19 BrklneB ... 27.22 -.29 Bucyrus .10 91.26 -.02 HumGen .20f 22.90 -2.16 HuntBnk .04 6.58 -.07 CA Inc ... 34.62 -.95 CH Robins 1.16 79.77 -.91 IAC Inter CKX Inc ... 5.47 +.01 iGateCorp .15e 19.00 +.88 ... u76.26 +1.03 CadencePh ... 7.72 -.04 Illumina ... u10.92 +.15 ImpaxLabs ... 27.46 -.14 Cadence ... 8.00 -.26 CdnSolar ... 9.68 -.19 Imris gn ... 19.77 -.74 CapFdF rs .30a 11.46 ... Incyte ... 7.57 -.05 Infinera CpstnTrb h ... 1.81 -.01 ... 54.14 +.28 CaviumNet ... 45.25 -1.17 Informat CeleraGrp ... 8.05 +.02 InfosysT 1.35e 63.54 -.88 ... 5.01 ... Celgene ... 59.94 -.24 InspPhar ... 8.49 -.15 CentEuro ... 11.29 +.08 IntgDv Intel .84f 23.41 -.29 ... 15.70 -.69 CentAl .40 45.27 +.23 ... 79.70 -.05 InterDig Cephln ... 39.20 -1.23 InterMune ChkPoint ... 55.17 -.61 .48 14.82 -.35 ChildPlace ... 55.35 +.65 Intersil ... u55.35 -.54 ChiShngd n ... d1.25 -.40 Intuit CienaCorp ... 27.00 -.31 IridiumCm ... 8.68 +.20 ... 9.02 -.07 CinnFin 1.60 30.91 -.38 Isis ... 10.24 -.45 Cintas .49f u32.11 +.06 IstaPh ... 16.42 +.17 Cirrus J-K-L .24 16.88 -.05 Cisco ... 6.16 -.21 CitrixSys ... 83.73 -.25 JA Solar CleanEngy ... 14.22 -.08 JDS Uniph ... 21.16 -.57 Clearwire ... d4.00 +.01 JamesRiv ... 21.11 -.18 CognizTech ... 76.47 -1.54 JazzPhrm ... 28.37 -.89 ... 5.82 -.13 Comcast .45 25.13 -.31 JetBlue .70 87.48 -.48 Comc spcl .45 23.66 -.28 JoyGlbl Compuwre ... 11.21 -.16 KLA Tnc 1.00 44.43 -.46 ... 12.18 -.20 CorinthC ... 4.27 -.05 Kulicke .96f u82.72 -.60 LKQ Corp ... 26.59 -.06 Costco Cree Inc ... 42.02 -1.08 LamResrch ... 47.46 -.01 Crocs ... 22.20 -.22 LamarAdv ... 29.80 -.20 ... 7.01 +.01 Ctrip.com ... 47.52 -1.00 Lattice CubistPh ... u34.79 -.43 LawsnSft ... 11.09 -.02

Name

low settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Jun 11 98.37 100.70 97.09 99.65 Jul 11 98.86 101.21 97.60 100.12 Aug 11 99.22 101.54 98.01 100.48 Sep 11 99.57 101.85 98.34 100.79 Oct 11 99.75 101.98 98.61 101.00 Nov 11 99.98 102.10 99.00 101.14 Dec 11 99.99 102.07 98.78 101.23 Jan 12 100.53 102.04 99.48 101.21 Feb 12 100.98 101.98 99.66 101.15 Mar 12 101.01 101.59 99.55 101.04 Apr 12 100.85 100.92 98.89 100.92 May 12 100.69 100.78 100.69 100.78 Jun 12 99.36 101.42 98.45 100.64 Jul 12 100.38 Aug 12 100.09 Sep 12 99.83 Oct 12 99.62 Nov 12 99.46 Dec 12 97.88 100.11 97.00 99.37 Jan 13 99.04 Feb 13 98.76 Mar 13 98.51 Apr 13 98.30 May 13 98.09 Last spot N/A Est. sales 639298. Thu’s Sales: 978,223 Thu’s open int: 1663495, off -905 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Jun 11 3.0669 3.1388 3.0342 3.0744 Jul 11 2.9979 3.0577 2.9695 3.0163 Aug 11 2.9460 3.0021 2.9298 2.9748 Sep 11 2.9117 2.9587 2.8914 2.9417 Oct 11 2.7938 2.8119 2.7490 2.7990 Nov 11 2.7367 2.7807 2.7240 2.7670 Dec 11 2.7202 2.7660 2.6969 2.7534 Jan 12 2.7500 2.7550 2.7314 2.7550 Feb 12 2.7688 Mar 12 2.7826

chg.

+.68 +.64 +.63 +.65 +.68 +.72 +.77 +.77 +.77 +.78 +.80 +.82 +.85 +.86 +.87 +.86 +.84 +.84 +.84 +.82 +.81 +.79 +.77 +.74

+.0105 +.0225 +.0285 +.0285 +.0311 +.0295 +.0296 +.0296 +.0283 +.0271

LeapWirlss ... 16.75 -.28 Level3 ... 1.89 -.07 LibGlobA ... 45.52 -.50 LibtyMIntA ... 17.93 -.17 LibStarzA ... 76.25 -1.06 ... 55.71 -.64 LifeTech LimelghtN ... 6.09 -.01 LinearTch .96 34.82 -.44 LinnEngy 2.64 37.79 +.08 Logitech ... d12.89 -.26 lululemn g ... 95.23 -1.81

M-N-0

MIPS Tech ... 8.18 -.11 ... 6.30 -.08 Magma ... 3.99 -.09 MannKd MarinaB rs ... .45 ... ... 14.60 -.34 MarvellT .92 26.55 -.23 Mattel MaximIntg .84 27.79 -.34 MelcoCrwn ... 10.49 +.14 MentorGr ... 14.98 -.14 Microchp 1.38 40.87 -.44 MicronT ... 10.40 -.26 MicroSemi ... 23.11 -.53 Microsoft .64 25.03 -.29 Mindspeed ... 8.81 -.31 Molex .80f 26.95 -.65 Momenta ... 18.74 -.48 Monotype ... 14.91 -.32 Motricity n ... 8.71 -.29 Move Inc ... 2.12 -.04 Mylan ... 24.09 ... MyriadG ... u24.19 -.29 ... 43.40 -.29 NII Hldg NXP Sem n ... 29.36 -.48 NasdOMX ... 26.91 -.28 NetLogicM ... 39.35 -.31 NetApp ... 53.99 ... Netease ... 45.50 -.09 ... 246.52 +.75 Netflix NewsCpA .15 17.45 -.07 NewsCpB .15 18.10 -.15 NorTrst 1.12 48.24 -.58 ... 37.46 +.17 Novlus NuVasive ... 31.30 -1.05 NuanceCm ... 21.96 -.24 Nvidia ... 18.26 -2.24 OReillyAu ... 60.90 -.27 ... 10.31 -.37 Oclaro OmniVisn h ... 33.97 -.09 OnSmcnd ... 11.64 -.16 Oncothyr ... u5.91 +.41 ... u43.18 -.42 OnyxPh OpenTable ... 93.05 -.08 OpnwvSy ... 2.38 +.03 ... 1.94 -.06 Opnext Oracle .24f 35.19 -.54

P-Q-R

PDL Bio .60 6.37 -.14 PMC Sra ... 7.77 -.16 Paccar .48a 51.67 -1.59 PacSunwr ... 3.90 +.05 PanASlv .10 32.07 -.18 ParamTc h ... 22.70 -.52 PattUTI .20 27.69 -.11 Paychex 1.24 32.42 -.36 PensonWw ... 3.34 +.22 PeopUtdF .63f 13.16 -.10 PetsMart .50 u44.11 -.12 Polycom ... 57.70 -.35 ... 2.98 -.07 Popular Power-One ... 8.75 +.08 PwShs QQQ.39e 58.41 -.70 Powrwav ... 4.07 -.04 PriceTR 1.24f 62.00 -.78 ... 520.61 -3.35 priceline PrinctnR h ... d.22 -.03 PrUPShQQQ ... 23.87 +.78 ProspctCap1.21 11.81 -.06 QIAGEN ... 20.70 -.19 QiaoXing ... 1.80 -.05 QlikTech n ... 30.82 -.21 Qualcom .86f 57.12 -.22 QuantFu rs ... 5.13 -.17 QuestSft ... 22.65 -.19 ... 22.71 -.29 Questcor RF MicD ... 6.25 +.17 RadOneD ... 2.80 +.08 Rambus ... d15.83 -3.44 ... 3.71 -.01 RealNwk Rdiff.cm ... 12.50 -.45 Regenrn ... 53.03 +.35 RschMotn ... 43.24 -.55 RexEnergy ... 12.12 -.07 RosettaR ... 45.79 -.33 RossStrs .88f 82.64 +.20 Rovi Corp ... 58.23 -.92 RoyGld .44 56.88 -.60

SalixPhm ... 39.99 -.01 ... 46.49 -.88 SanDisk ... 12.01 -.12 Sanmina ... 2.44 +.04 Sanofi rt ... u14.52 +.11 Sapient SavientPh ... 8.39 -.09 ... u39.28 +.03 Savvis SciClone ... u5.56 +.43 SciGames ... 10.27 -.19 SeagateT .72 17.14 -.05 SeattGen ... 18.02 +.31 Sequenom ... 8.17 +.01 ShandaGm ... 6.90 -.29 .39e u94.76 -1.40 Shire ... 11.51 -.18 ShoreTel SifyTech ... 5.30 -.03 SilicnMotn ... u13.05 +.30 Slcnware .41e 6.76 -.10 SilvStd g ... 28.24 -.26 ... 106.88 -6.27 Sina SinoClnEn ... 2.39 -.06 ... 2.24 -.04 SiriusXM Sky-mobi n ... 11.75 -.33 SkywksSol ... 28.34 -.23 ... 9.15 -.01 SmartM SmithMicro ... d5.26 -.09 ... 83.36 -1.55 Sohu.cm Sonus ... 2.88 +.03 SpectPh ... 7.58 -.29 Spreadtrm ... 20.64 -.52 Staples .40f 20.25 -.15 StarScient ... 4.10 -.10 Starbucks .52 36.15 -.30 StlDynam .40f 17.35 -.10 SuccessF ... 33.45 +.15 SunPowerA ... 21.23 -.15 SunPwr B ... 21.01 -.05 SusqBnc .08f 8.73 -.27 SwisherH n ... 6.02 +.36 Symantec ... 20.06 -.36 SynthEngy ... 2.75 +.10 TD Ameritr .20 20.87 -.25 THQ ... 4.41 -.13 tw telecom ... u22.32 -.42 TakeTwo ... 15.93 -.06 TalecrisBio ... 28.19 -.01 ... 37.05 -.89 Taleo A Tekelec ... 8.67 -.18 ... 5.19 -.07 TlCmSys Telestone ... 6.96 +.44 .08 4.72 -.06 Tellabs ... d1.85 -.35 Tengion TeslaMot n ... 27.55 -.12 TevaPhrm .83e 49.67 -.13 ... 33.75 +.34 Thoratec ... 29.49 -.70 TibcoSft ... 9.41 -.01 TiVo Inc Toreador ... d4.98 -.37 Travelzoo ... 69.52 -4.41 TridentM h ... .87 -.05 TriQuint ... 13.51 -.16 21Vianet n ... 13.91 -.62 USA Tech h ... 2.25 +.12 UTStrcm ... 2.11 -.10 Ultratech ... u33.54 +1.07 Umpqua .20 11.31 -.26 UtdOnln .40 6.11 -.21 UnivDisp ... 45.08 -2.12 UrbanOut ... 32.62 -.37

V-W-X-Y-Z

ValueClick ... 18.12 +.09 VarianSemi ... 61.18 -.07 VeecoInst ... 51.62 -.49 Velti n ... 17.82 -.27 Verisign 5.75e 36.53 -.15 Vermillion ... 6.15 +.32 VertxPh ... 57.48 -.53 ... u4.59 -.22 Vical VirgnMda h .16 31.81 -.17 ViroPhrm ... 19.00 -.54 Vivus ... 7.98 -.04 Vodafone 1.33e 27.34 -.32 WarnerCh s8.50eu25.73 +.24 WashFed .24 15.27 -.11 ... 49.74 +.35 WebMD WernerEnt .20a 24.97 -.33 WetSeal ... 4.84 +.01 WholeFd .40 62.49 -.74 WilshBcp ... 3.20 +.01 Windstrm 1.00 13.30 -.01 Winn-Dixie ... 7.80 -.20 Wynn 2.00f 146.27 -.56 Xilinx .76f 35.95 -.30 YRC Ww rs ... 1.23 +.01 ... 16.55 -.62 Yahoo ... 4.77 -.08 Yongye Zagg ... 9.56 -.49 S-T-U ... 2.42 -.04 Zalicus SBA Com ... 38.66 -.49 ZionBcp .04 23.12 -.47 ... 3.36 -.12 SEI Inv .20 22.93 -.16 Zix Corp ... 8.41 ... STEC ... 14.80 -.22 Zoran

AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE

Name

Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. d – New 52- CaGrp 14.47 -.03 wk low during trading day. g – Dividend in Canadian $. Stock price in U.S.$. n – MuBd 10.43 -.01 New issue in past 52 wks. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. s – Split SmCoSt 9.73 -.05 or stock dividend of 25 pct or more in last 52 wks. Div begins with date of split or stock dividend. u – New 52-wk high during trading day. v – Trading halted on primary market. Unless noted, dividend rates are annual disbursements based on last declaration. pf – Preferred. pp – Holder owes installment(s) of purchase price. rt – Rights. un – Units. wd – When distributed. wi – When issued. wt – Warrants. ww – With warrants. xw – Without warrants. Dividend Footnotes: a – Also extra or extras. b – Annual rate plus stock dividend. c – Liquidating dividend. e – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos. f – Annual rate, increased on last declaration. i – Declared or paid after stock dividend or split. j – Paid this year, dividend omitted, deferred or no action taken at last meeting. k – Declared or paid this year, accumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m – Annual rate, reduced on last declaration. p – Init div, annual rate unknown. r – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos plus stock dividend. t – Paid in stock in last 12 mos, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or distribution date. x – Ex-dividend or ex-rights. y – Ex-dividend and sales in full. z – Sales in full. vj – In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such companies. • Most active stocks above must be worth $1 and gainers/losers $2. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Wednesday’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Delaware Invest A: 12.68 -.01 Indepn n 25.87 -.28 TotMktAd r n38.99-.35 StrInA Diver Inc p 9.35 ... Fidelity Advisor I: IntBd n 10.71 +.02 First Eagle: Dimensional Fds: 48.41 -.28 NwInsgtI n 21.03 -.16 IntmMu n 10.16 +.01 GlblA EmMCrEq n22.07 -.21 Fidelity Freedom: IntlDisc n 33.77 -.38 OverseasA23.31 -.12 EmMktV 35.71 -.39 FF2010 n 14.09 -.06 InvGrBd n 11.58 +.02 Frank/Temp Frnk A: IntSmVa n 18.10 -.24 FF2015 n 11.77 -.05 InvGB n 7.53 +.01 CalTFA p 6.79 +.01 LargeCo 10.57 -.09 FF2020 n 14.35 -.07 LgCapVal 12.24 -.11 FedTFA p 11.61 +.02 USLgVa n 21.84 -.18 FF2020K 13.57 -.07 LatAm 56.46 -.81 FoundAl p 11.26 -.06 US Micro n14.60 -.23 FF2025 n 12.02 -.07 LevCoStk n30.66 -.38 GrwthA p 47.50 -.35 US Small n23.01 -.32 FF2025K 13.80 -.08 LowP r n 41.89 -.30 HYTFA p 9.80 +.02 US SmVa 27.00 -.41 FF2030 n 14.38 -.08 LowPriK r 41.89 -.30 IncomA p 2.28 ... IntlSmCo n17.90 -.23 FF2030K 14.01 -.09 Magelln n 74.80 -.76 NYTFA p 11.40 +.02 10.35 ... FF2035 n 12.00 -.08 MagellanK 74.75 -.75 RisDvA p 35.50 -.25 Fixd n IntVa n 19.10 -.33 FF2040 n 8.38 -.06 MidCap n 31.07 -.30 USGovA p 6.80 +.01 Glb5FxInc n11.11 +.01 Fidelity Invest: MuniInc n 12.49 +.02 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: 2YGlFxd n 10.19 ... AllSectEq 13.13 -.12 NwMkt r n 15.85 +.01 GlbBdAdv n13.84 -.04 Dodge&Cox: AMgr50 n 16.01 -.07 OTC n 60.50 -.89 IncmeAd 2.26 -.01 Balanced 74.66 -.47 AMgr20 r n13.08 -.01 100Index 9.24 -.07 Frank/Temp Frnk C: Income 13.50 +.02 Balanc n 19.11 -.09 Ovrsea n 33.68 -.30 IncomC t 2.30 ... IntlStk 36.97 -.54 BalancedK19.11 -.09 Puritn n 18.80 -.09 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: Stock 115.93-1.02 BlueChGr n48.64 -.43 RealE n 28.19 -.30 SharesA 22.10 -.11 DoubleLine Funds: Canada n 59.14 -.44 SCmdtyStrt n12.42 ... Frank/Temp Temp A: TRBd I 11.08 ... CapAp n 26.78 -.24 SrsIntGrw 11.66 -.11 ForgnA p 7.59 -.06 Dreyfus: CpInc r n 9.86 -.02 SrsIntVal 10.40 -.13 GlBd A p 13.88 -.04 41.09 -.26 Contra n 70.90 -.58 SrInvGrdF 11.58 +.02 GrwthA p 19.42 -.14 Aprec Eaton Vance A: ContraK 70.90 -.58 STBF n 8.51 ... WorldA p 15.93 -.09 LgCpVal 18.78 -.17 DisEq n 24.14 -.23 SmllCpS r n21.33 -.28 Frank/Temp Tmp Eaton Vance I: DivIntl n 31.08 -.31 StratInc n 11.34 -.01 B&C: FltgRt 9.10 ... DivrsIntK r 31.07 -.30 StrReRt r 9.86 -.02 GlBdC p 13.90 -.04 GblMacAbR10.20 ... DivGth n 30.06 -.28 TotalBd n 10.91 +.01 GE Elfun S&S: LgCapVal 18.84 -.17 EmrMk n 26.28 -.19 USBI n 11.47 +.02 S&S PM 42.57 -.39 FMI Funds: Eq Inc n 46.90 -.47 Value n 73.80 -.68 GMO Trust III: LgCap p 16.89 -.10 EQII n 19.34 -.19 Fidelity Selects: Quality 21.65 -.11 FPA Funds: Fidel n 34.59 -.33 Gold r n 46.28 -.38 GMO Trust IV: 10.89 ... FltRateHi r n9.89 ... Fidelity Spartan: NwInc IntlIntrVl 23.22 -.31 FPACres n28.41 -.09 GNMA n 11.65 +.02 ExtMkIn n 40.78 -.49 GMO Trust VI: Fairholme 33.28 -.36 GovtInc 10.54 +.02 500IdxInv n47.44 -.39 EmgMkts r 14.88 -.19 Federated Instl: GroCo n 91.36 -.97 IntlInxInv n36.74 -.43 IntlCorEq 30.82 -.39 KaufmnR 5.77 -.06 GroInc n 19.43 -.15 TotMktInv n38.99 -.35 Quality 21.65 -.11 GrowthCoK91.35 -.97 Fidelity Spart Adv: Goldman Sachs A: Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.81 -.17 HighInc r n 9.23 ... 500IdxAdv n47.44-.39 MdCVA p 38.25 -.34

CATTLE/HOGS Open high low settle CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jun 11 109.00 110.40 108.70 109.00 Aug 11 110.65 111.87 110.17 110.55 Oct 11 115.82 116.95 115.22 115.50 Dec 11 117.55 119.25 117.50 117.80 Feb 12 118.25 119.92 118.10 118.40 Apr 12 118.80 120.45 118.72 119.00 Jun 12 115.95 117.25 115.95 116.00 Aug 12 116.45 116.45 115.65 116.00 Oct 12 117.55 117.55 117.20 117.40 Last spot N/A Est. sales 54119. Thu’s Sales: 94,154 Thu’s open int: 348061, off -4345 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 11 128.82 129.90 128.37 128.70 Aug 11 132.60 134.42 132.40 132.45 Sep 11 133.15 134.95 133.00 133.02 Oct 11 133.85 135.50 133.65 133.77 Nov 11 135.15 135.15 133.50 133.80 Jan 12 133.67 133.70 132.90 132.90 Mar 12 133.30 Apr 12 133.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 3810. Thu’s Sales: 7,324 Thu’s open int: 39323, up +209 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 11 92.65 92.85 92.32 92.85 Jun 11 94.50 94.82 93.80 94.55 Jul 11 93.75 94.62 93.30 93.85 Aug 11 94.57 95.27 94.20 94.47 Oct 11 87.62 88.10 87.25 87.75 Dec 11 84.55 84.75 84.07 84.70 Feb 12 85.82 86.15 85.45 86.10 Apr 12 86.75 87.20 86.40 87.10 May 12 90.70 90.70 90.70 90.70 Jun 12 93.00 93.10 92.90 93.10 Jul 12 92.00 92.00 91.40 91.50 Aug 12 90.00 90.00 89.65 89.75 Oct 12 85.00 Last spot N/A

Limited .80f u41.84 -.27 .20 29.79 -.65 LincNat LizClaib ... 6.50 +.02 LloydBkg ... 3.48 -.07 .44 25.76 -.22 Lowes LyonBas A .10e 39.68 -1.65

FINANCIAL

Div Last Chg CrSuiHiY .32 Crystallx g ... 7.16 -.02 DejourE g ... 2.58 -.04 DenisnM g ... 7.90 -.24 ExeterR gs ... 32.23 -.67 FrkStPrp .76 3.99 -.06 GabGldNR 1.68 1.12 -.06 GascoEngy ... d.82 -.06 Gastar grs ... 1.71 -.09 GenMoly ... 5.44 +.04 GoldResrc .31e 7.24 -.40 GoldStr g ... 5.87 -.14 GranTrra g ... 48.23 ... GrtBasG g ... 26.01 +.11 GtPanSilv g ... 5.53 -.38 Hemisphrx ... 1.40 -.02 HooperH ... 1.39 -.12 Hyperdyn ... .42 -.01 ImpOil gs .44 .30 ... InovioPhm ... .67 -.01 IntTower g ... 20.70 +.28 KimberR g ... 7.93 -.18 KodiakO g ... 2.40 -.11 LongweiPI ... 4.08 -.22 LucasEngy ... 2.00 -.04 MadCatz g ...

AbdAsPac .42 Adventrx ... AlexcoR g ... AlldNevG ... AlmadnM g ... AmApparel ... Anooraq g ... AntaresP ... Aurizon g ... AvalRare n ... ... Ballanty BarcUBS36 ... BarcGSOil ... ... BioTime Brigus grs ... CAMAC En ... ... CanoPet CardiumTh ... CelSci ... CFCda g .01 CheniereEn ... ChiGengM ... ChinaShen ... ClaudeR g ...

Gold p 43.93 -.58 CapApp n 21.58 -.11 IntBdA p 6.63 -.04 EmMktS n 34.77 -.32 MnStFdA 33.50 -.20 EqInc n 25.01 -.19 Oppenheimer Roch: EqIndex n 36.10 -.30 RoMu A p 15.06 +.02 Growth n 33.90 -.37 RcNtMuA 6.69 +.01 HiYield n 6.99 ... Oppenheimer Y: IntlBond n 10.27 -.04 DevMktY 35.24 -.30 Intl G&I 14.20 -.18 IntlBdY 6.63 -.04 IntlStk n 14.69 -.14 PIMCO Admin PIMS: MidCap n 63.89 -.72 TotRtAd 11.03 -.01 MCapVal n25.37 -.22 PIMCO Instl PIMS: N Asia n 19.55 -.05 AlAsetAut r10.95 -.02 New Era n 52.41 -.51 AllAsset 12.57 -.03 N Horiz n 37.54 -.35 ComodRR 9.27 ... N Inc n 9.59 +.01 DevLcMk r 10.95 -.08 OverS SF r n8.84 -.11 11.66 ... R2010 n 16.08 -.08 DivInc 9.54 +.01 R2015 n 12.49 -.08 HiYld InvGrCp 10.78 +.01 R2020 n 17.31 -.12 LowDu 10.51 ... R2025 n 12.70 -.10 RealRtnI 11.67 -.01 ShortT 9.92 ... R2030 n 18.26 -.15 TotRt 11.03 -.01 R2035 n 12.94 -.11 R2040 n 18.42 -.17 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.51 ... ShtBd n 4.87 +.01 RealRtA p 11.67 -.01 SmCpStk n37.57 -.46 TotRtA 11.03 -.01 SmCapVal n38.19-.53 SpecGr n 18.76 -.19 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.03 -.01 SpecIn n 12.65 -.01 Value n 24.99 -.22 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.03 -.01 Principal Inv: LT2020In 12.32 -.08 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.03 -.01 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.43 ... Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n 27.90 -.24 MultiCpGr 54.15 -.50 VoyA p 24.20 -.24 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 47.83 -.22 Royce Funds: LwPrSkSv r18.97 -.22 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 43.08 -.41 PennMuI r 12.60 -.14 PremierI r 22.30 -.22 Price Funds: BlChip n 40.49 -.43 TotRetI r 13.97 -.13

Apr 12 2.8959 May 12 2.8929 Jun 12 2.8799 Jul 12 2.8574 Aug 12 2.8289 Sep 12 2.7969 Oct 12 2.6649 Nov 12 2.6339 Dec 12 2.6204 Jan 13 2.6214 Feb 13 2.6269 Mar 13 2.6324 Apr 13 2.7279 May 13 2.7329 Last spot N/A Est. sales 150942. Thu’s Sales: 170,765 Thu’s open int: 282314, up +2741 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Jun 11 4.217 4.273 4.153 4.246 Jul 11 4.282 4.333 4.214 4.311 Aug 11 4.333 4.374 4.261 4.354 Sep 11 4.353 4.400 4.287 4.379 Oct 11 4.400 4.450 4.335 4.428 Nov 11 4.566 4.606 4.511 4.592 Dec 11 4.790 4.825 4.733 4.808 Jan 12 4.901 4.926 4.850 4.923 Feb 12 4.891 4.912 4.840 4.912 Mar 12 4.831 4.871 4.784 4.850 Apr 12 4.713 4.727 4.665 4.719 May 12 4.758 4.761 4.685 4.742 Jun 12 4.737 4.789 4.725 4.781 Jul 12 4.793 4.834 4.793 4.827 Aug 12 4.861 4.861 4.838 4.853 Sep 12 4.868 4.868 4.848 4.862 Oct 12 4.915 4.918 4.878 4.914 Nov 12 5.072 Dec 12 5.270 5.292 5.266 5.292 Jan 13 5.420 Feb 13 5.383 Mar 13 5.312 5.312 5.310 5.310 Apr 13 5.057 5.089 5.040 5.076 May 13 5.080 5.091 5.080 5.091 Jun 13 5.126 Last spot N/A Est. sales 188732. Thu’s Sales: 289,430 Thu’s open int: 966158, off -12997

3.23 .12 .35 2.14 d4.56 13.44 17.69 .37 3.59 4.15 27.00 d2.61 7.28 2.05 3.11 .51 .70 3.32 46.70 .89 8.29 1.25 6.03 1.64 2.64 1.75

-.02 -.00 -.01 +.03 -.09 -.13 -.33 -.01 -.12 -.23 -.06 -.09 -.12 -.06 -.11 +.01 -.08 -.05 -.42 -.02 +.23 -.08 -.14 -.03 +.02 -.04

Metalico MdwGold g Minefnd g MinesMgt NeoStem Neoprobe Nevsun g NDragon NewEnSys NwGold g NA Pall g NDynMn g NthnO&G NthgtM g NovaGld g Oilsands g OpkoHlth ParaG&S PhrmAth PionDrill PolyMet g Procera rs Quepasa RadientPh RareEle g Rentech

Schwab Funds: ITGrAdm n10.01 +.02 1000Inv r 39.88 -.33 LtdTrAd n 11.08 +.01 S&P Sel 20.95 -.17 LTGrAdml n9.55 +.06 Scout Funds: LT Adml n 10.86 +.02 33.63 -.43 MCpAdml n100.90Intl Selected Funds: .87 AmShD 43.38 -.28 MorgAdm n60.12 -.54 AmShS p 43.36 -.28 MuHYAdm n10.23+.01 Sequoia n 145.76-1.12 PrmCap r n73.28 -.69 ReitAdm r n85.74 -.92 St FarmAssoc: Gwth 55.99 -.48 STsyAdml n10.74 +.01 STBdAdml n10.60+.01 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 21.40 -.17 ShtTrAd n 15.90 ... STFdAd n 10.82 ... Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 52.68 +.10 STIGrAd n 10.79 ... SmCAdm n37.77 -.49 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 29.56 -.27 TtlBAdml n10.71 +.02 IntValue I 30.22 -.27 TStkAdm n33.77 -.30 ValAdml n 22.31 -.17 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 25.04 -.02 WellslAdm n54.95-.09 WelltnAdm n56.37-.33 VALIC : StkIdx 26.53 -.22 Windsor n 48.54 -.40 WdsrIIAd n49.24 -.41 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml n 22.41 -.11 Vanguard Fds: CAITAdm n10.93 +.01 AssetA n 26.05 -.19 CpOpAdl n81.74-1.02 DivdGro n 15.53 -.11 EMAdmr r n39.74 -.43 Energy n 68.95 -.65 Energy n 129.48-1.22 Explr n 80.43 -.82 ExplAdml n74.88 -.77 GNMA n 10.90 +.02 ExtdAdm n44.83 -.53 GlobEq n 18.95 -.20 HYCorp n 5.87 ... 500Adml n123.49HlthCre n 139.59 -.46 1.00 GNMA Ad n10.90 +.02 InflaPro n 13.45 ... GrwAdm n 33.61 -.30 IntlGr n 20.01 -.26 HlthCr n 58.91 -.19 IntlVal n 32.94 -.43 HiYldCp n 5.87 ... ITIGrade n 10.01 +.02 InfProAd n 26.42 ... LifeCon n 16.93 -.06 ITBdAdml n11.35 +.02 LifeGro n 23.28 -.19 ITsryAdml n11.47 +.02 LifeMod n 20.51 -.12 IntGrAdm n63.68 -.84 LTIGrade n 9.55 +.06 ITAdml n 13.53 +.02 Morg n 19.38 -.18

+.0266 +.0253 +.0253 +.0253 +.0253 +.0258 +.0263 +.0268 +.0268 +.0268 +.0268 +.0268 +.0268 +.0268

+.052 +.055 +.054 +.054 +.052 +.041 +.034 +.032 +.030 +.028 +.023 +.023 +.023 +.023 +.024 +.024 +.024 +.022 +.017 +.017 +.015 +.015 +.006 +.006 +.006

... 5.81 ... 1.59 ... 12.56 ... 2.18 ... 1.67 ... 4.96 ... 5.43 ... .05 ... d2.68 ... 9.27 ... 3.90 ... 12.02 ... 20.06 ... 2.81 ... 10.34 ... .39 ... 3.74 ... 2.67 ... 3.81 ... 12.36 ... 1.77 ... u11.43 ... 6.12 ... .30 ... 11.82 ... .89

-.12 -.06 -.22 +.01 +.01 +.30 -.19 -.00 -.18 -.18 -.10 +.13 -.13 -.04 -.04 -.01 -.06 -.12 -.10 -.25 -.03 -.77 -.56 -.02 -.44 -.04

RexahnPh ... Richmnt g ... Rubicon g ... SamsO&G ... SeabGld g ... SinoHub ... Solitario ... TanzRy g ... Taseko ... TianyinPh ... TimberlnR ... TrnsatlPet ... ... TriValley US Geoth ... Uluru ... Ur-Energy ... ... Uranerz UraniumEn ... VantageDrl ... VirnetX .50e VistaGold ... WalterInv 2.00 WizzardSft ... YM Bio g ...

MuInt n 13.53 +.02 PrecMtls r n25.58 -.44 PrmcpCor n14.81 -.11 Prmcp r n 70.61 -.66 SelValu r n20.38 -.13 STAR n 20.06 -.10 STIGrade n10.79 ... StratEq n 20.59 -.18 TgtRetInc n11.63 -.03 TgRe2010 n23.27-.09 TgtRe2015 n12.99.06 TgRe2020 n23.17-.14 TgtRe2025 n13.26.10 TgRe2030 n22.85-.18 TgtRe2035 n13.83.12 TgtRe2040 n22.73.20 TgtRe2045 n14.27.13 Wellsly n 22.68 -.03 Welltn n 32.64 -.19 Wndsr n 14.38 -.12 WndsII n 27.74 -.23 Vanguard Idx Fds: DvMkInPl r n108.571.59 TotIntAdm r n27.15.35 TotIntlInst r n108.621.39 500 n 123.47-1.00 DevMkt n 10.50 -.15 EMkt n 30.23 -.32 Extend n 44.79 -.53 Growth n 33.61 -.29 MidCap n 22.22 -.19 SmCap n 37.72 -.49 SmlCpGth n24.29 -.30

1.33 -.03 7.88 +.48 4.50 -.02 2.90 -.05 29.21 -.13 1.69 -.04 3.18 +.10 6.89 +.23 4.95 +.02 2.45 +.20 .88 -.03 d2.30 +.13 .67 -.01 .84 +.01 .06 +.00 1.57 ... 2.93 -.12 3.09 -.12 1.80 +.01 23.62 -1.21 2.79 -.10 17.80 +.20 .18 +.01 3.14 -.02

SmlCpVl n 17.01 -.23 STBnd n 10.60 +.01 TotBnd n 10.71 +.02 TotlIntl n 16.23 -.21 TotStk n 33.76 -.30 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n 22.41 -.11 DevMkInst n10.42-.15 ExtIn n 44.83 -.53 FTAllWldI r n96.721.27 GrwthIst n 33.61 -.30 InfProInst n10.76 ... InstIdx n 122.63 -.99 InsPl n 122.64 -.99 InsTStPlus n30.55-.26 MidCpIst n 22.29 -.19 SCInst n 37.77 -.49 TBIst n 10.71 +.02 TSInst n 33.78 -.29 ValueIst n 22.31 -.17 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl n 102.01 -.82 MidCpIdx n31.84 -.28 STBdIdx n 10.60 +.01 TotBdSgl n10.71 +.02 TotStkSgl n32.60 -.28 Western Asset: CorePlus I 10.99 +.01 Yacktman Funds: Fund p 18.09 -.09

METALS NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Fri. Aluminum -$1.1792 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.8717 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $3.9750 N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Lead - $2271.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9538 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1505.75 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1493.40 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri. Silver - $34.435 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $35.011 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Platinum -$1774.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1769.30 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. n.q.-not quoted, n.a.-not available r-revised


Roswell Daily Record

Saturday, May 14, 2011

A9

BELIEFS ABOUT HEALTHY LIFESTYLE CLASH WITH BEHAVIOR

(NAPSI)—You’re never too young to reduce your risk of stroke-and you may need to start by changing your lifestyle. According to a recent American Stroke Association survey: • Nine out of 10 Americans between ages 18 and 24 believe they’re living healthy lifestyles and want to live well into their late 90s. Yet most eat too much fast food, drink too many alcoholic and sugar-sweetened beverages and engage in other behaviors that could put them at risk for stroke. • Most of those surveyed said they want to maintain quality health throughout their lives. Yet one-third don’t believe engaging in healthy behaviors now could affect their risk for stroke in the future. • Eight in 10 people between ages 25 and 44 years old also believe they’re engaging in healthy lifestyles and hope to live to be 90 and beyond. While they’re more likely to engage in healthy behaviors than 18- to 24-year -olds, they could also improve. “This survey shows the danger-

The investment you make in your health today will have a large payoff as you age.

ous disconnect that many young Americans have about how their behaviors affect their risks for stroke and other cardiovascular diseases,” said Ralph Sacco, M.D., neurologist and president of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. “Starting healthy behaviors at a young age is critical to entering middle age in good shape.” People who make healthy lifestyle choices lower their risk of having a first stroke by as much as 80 percent compared with those who don’t, according to the American Heart Association. Healthy behaviors include eating

a low-fat diet high in fruits and vegetables, drinking alcohol and sugar-sweetened beverages only in moderation, exercising regularly, maintaining a healthy body weight and not smoking. “Young adults need to make a connection between healthy behaviors and a healthy brain and heart,” Sacco said. “People need to think in terms of striving for ideal health as well as surviving and thriving if a stroke occurs. An easier way to remember this is: Strive, Survive, Thrive.” To learn how to strive toward a healthy lifestyle to reduce the risk of stroke, visit My Life Check at www.mylifecheck.heart.org. To survive and thrive, learn the stroke symptoms and other helpful tips by visiting www.StrokeAssociation.org. “TODAY is the FIRST day of the REST of YOUR LIFE!”

Peach Tree Retirement Village • Beautiful Apartments Studio-1&2 Bedroom • Superb Dining • Housekeeping • Transportation • Activities • Bus Tours of the Countryside

Spend your Golden Years with us we know how to treat you! Come on by for a tour and schedule lunch with us, seeing is believing!

1301 W. Country Club Rd. Roswell, NM 88201 575-627-8070

Stop in and see

Sunset Villa Care Center 1515 So. Sunset Ave. Roswell, New Mexico 88203 (575) 623-7097 “Quality Service with A Smile”

Your Choice 365 Program

Our person-centered approach to independence in choices of activities, choose when you eat and wake Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapy. Accommodations to meet your needs. At Casa Maria Health Care Center and Pecos Valley Rehabilitation Suites, our well qualified and educated staff continue and strive to meet your needs. Pecos Valley Rehabilitation Suites has 16 private suites offering Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapy seven days a week. Our state of the art equipment will help your recovery process. Our goal is to get you to the highest level. “Shorter Recovery…. Long Term Success”

1601 South Main Roswell, New Mexico 88203 (575) 623-6008

“Hometown Proud”

BOB BELL

PHARMACY The place where we still believe in

Old Fashion, Fast, Friendly Service With a Smile! ☺

Pharmacy Hours: 9am-6pm Mon-Fri • 9am-1pm Sat Co-payments on all insurances the same as major pharmacy companies. We accept Medicaid, Medicare and most insurance plans

and get your glucose blood test checked free! We Care About You!

HOW TO REDUCE YOUR RISK FOR HEART DISEASE THE NATURAL WAY

Are you one of the millions of people that is suffering from heart disease or even worse? Have already experienced a heart attack.

These days it’s difficult not to meet someone who is either suffering from heart disease, has had a heart attack or has been told they are at risk for heart disease. It’s just about as common as meeting someone with brown hair.

Unfortunately, the media and even may well – meaning doctors are completely misinformed on how to tackle this growing epidemic. It’s the number one killer in the US and plaguing many other countries as well.

What are we to do? The best plan of attack is to combat the risk factors the best we can.

USE THE FOLLOWING TIPS - to get you started on a heart healthy plan:

1. DROP THE SMOKES. Yes, smoking has been shown to be one of the biggest risk factors in heart disease, mainly because of all the toxic chemicals added to cigarettes (not that I’m recommending tobacco or anything.)

2. WALK, WALK, WALK. If finding time for a structured exercise program is just too much of a challenge right now, just start by walking. I have known many people who have strengthened their heart and reversed severe conditions by getting outside and walking. if you can, find a scenic route. There’s nothing more calming than the outdoors. (I highly recommend whistling and singing while you walk. It makes for happy thoughts.)

3. CALM DOWN. By this I mean, don’t stress about the stuff you don’t have to. This is actually a very funny statement coming from me who used to stress about everything! Deadlines, work, family… you name it, I stressed about. Not until I realized that this would kill me no matter how healthy my food was - did I drop the stress and puck up the laughter.

4. DO NOT AND I REPEAT, DO NOT GO ON A LOW-FAT DIET. Your heart condition may get worse in your attempts. Drop the bad fats (like hydrogenated oil and the nasty oil in French Fries and doughnuts) and start eating more healthy fats like coconut oil, olive oil, salmon, walnuts and whole organic eggs.

MEDICARE SUPPLEMENTS Come see us. We will shop for you. Medicare Supplemental Plans Medicare RX Plans Long Term Care Plans 400 N. Pennsylvania Ave., Ste 600

624-1379

(Across from the Post Office)

Nicole McWilliams Agent

www.swickardagency.com

Renee Swickard Agent/Owner

18 years combined experience in Roswell.

“We work for you, the client. We never forget we’re your agent.


A10 Saturday, May 14, 2011

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Mostly sunny and breezy

Mainly clear

Sunday

Monday

Mostly sunny and breezy

Tuesday

Mostly sunny

Wednesday

Mostly sunny and breezy

Mostly sunny and windy

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities

Thursday

Very windy; mostly cloudy

Friday

Times of clouds and sun

High 84°

Low 54°

75°/52°

81°/54°

89°/55°

84°/53°

81°/53°

81°/53°

N at 10-20 mph POP: 5%

NNE at 10-20 mph POP: 10%

NNE at 10-20 mph POP: 10%

NE at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

ENE at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

ENE at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

N at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

E at 4-8 mph POP: 10%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 5 p.m. Friday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 80°/50° Normal high/low ............... 85°/52° Record high ............. 101° in 1996 Record low ................. 40° in 1953 Humidity at noon ................... 23%

Farmington 79/47

Clayton 62/36

Raton 67/40

Precipitation 24 hours ending 5 p.m. Fri. .. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date ......................... Normal year to date .............

0.00” 0.00” 0.47” 0.09” 2.20”

Santa Fe 76/45

Gallup 74/41

Tucumcari 73/46

Albuquerque 80/55

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 70/47

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading 47 0-50

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Good

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101-150

Ruidoso 71/49

151+

Unhealthy Unhealthy sensitive

T or C 85/57

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Rise 5:59 a.m. 5:58 a.m. Rise 5:05 p.m. 6:16 p.m.

Set 7:50 p.m. 7:51 p.m. Set 3:39 a.m. 4:18 a.m.

Alamogordo 87/55

Silver City 81/51

ROSWELL 84/54 Carlsbad 87/59

Hobbs 81/50

Las Cruces 85/58

Regional Cities Today Sun. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

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79/49/s 76/55/s 62/37/s 79/56/s 80/57/s 65/35/s 58/42/pc 68/36/s 62/46/s 86/53/s 75/54/s 80/46/s 72/40/s 79/51/s 86/57/s 60/40/s 66/43/s 82/55/s 79/52/s 71/46/s 72/41/s 59/39/pc 59/35/s 75/52/s 66/45/s 73/46/s 82/52/s 84/55/s 69/44/pc 71/45/s

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55/42/c 72/52/pc 74/56/t 60/55/sh 79/55/t 51/41/r 64/49/t 74/53/pc 59/40/t 62/44/r 87/61/s 87/73/s 79/59/s 69/45/c 55/41/pc 77/62/s 66/53/pc 65/47/s

87/75/t 78/54/s 54/41/sh 82/64/s 65/56/c 58/43/c 91/67/t 68/57/c 94/72/s 76/58/t 66/47/c 82/61/t 60/48/sh 76/54/s 64/57/pc 64/49/c 90/61/s 68/63/sh

88/72/t 74/53/s 61/40/pc 79/62/s 66/58/t 56/38/pc 87/64/t 71/61/t 90/67/s 69/53/t 55/44/sh 80/60/t 60/43/sh 81/45/s 66/56/pc 54/45/r 89/61/s 77/59/t

U.S. Extremes

Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 102°...............Chandler, Ariz. Low: 21°............... Angel Fire, N.M.

High: 85°............................Deming Low: 21°.........................Angel Fire

National Cities Seattle 64/49

Billings 62/37

Minneapolis 54/41

Detroit 71/55

New York 65/56

San Francisco 61/51 Denver 54/35

Kansas City 59/42

Chicago 56/48 Washington 68/63

Los Angeles 67/56

Atlanta 78/55 El Paso 87/64

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Houston 83/55

Miami 87/75

‘Detroit 1-8-7’ producer says show cancelled Full

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DETROIT (AP) — A television crime drama that took its name from and made its home in the Motor City has been cancelled, one of its principals said Friday. “Detroit 1-8-7” Executive Producer David Zabel confirmed to The Associated Press the news of the cancellation, which had been suspected in the weeks since the show’s Detroit-based production wrapped this winter. ABC had no comment Friday. The network will officially unveil

its fall schedule on Tuesday. Zabel and other producers repeatedly made the case to renew the show, most recently meeting with ABC executives this month to discuss ideas for a second season. ABC Entertainment Group President Paul Lee told the Television Critics Association in January that “Detroit 1-8-7” was among a few shows for which ratings, not quality, was an issue.

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Zabel told the AP in March that he hoped ABC would have “the integrity and courage to stick by a show they know is good,” but added that he hoped the studio would be “diligent and crafty enough to find a way to allow us to continue on elsewhere.” He said “1-8-7” would do well on a cable network, citing “Southland,” which is thriving on TNT after being cut by NBC. Still, such a move would be a longshot. He said Friday that the

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“finances don’t make sense especially with things the way they are in Michigan,” referring to the state gover nor’s proposal to change a program that offered some of the most generous film tax credits in the nation. Gov. Rick Snyder proposed a limit of $25 million a year on incentives as part of his budget-savings plan, and the state’s current incentive program for filmmakers is not capped. “There are things that are still

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being explored,” Zabel said. “But we’re almost at the end of the road in terms of options.” “Detroit 1-8-7” was filmed in and around Detroit, and its soundstage was in the city’s enclave of Highland Park. It starred Michael Imperioli and James McDaniel. “My attitude is we spent a year making a good show and having a really cool experience in Detroit,” Zabel said. “I wish it could go on longer.”

Country’s ‘royal couple’ ready to get hitched NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The most anticipated wedding in the country music world this year doesn’t involve a prince or a Middleton. Country’s royal couple, Miranda Lambert and Blake Shelton, are tying the knot Saturday in Texas. “I’m excited to get married,” Lambert told The Associated Press in a recent interview. “It’s been a year almost that we’ve been engaged. So I’m just sort of ready for it to get here.” Lambert has been getting in shape for the big day since before the Country Music Association Awards in November to avoid doing a crash diet. “I’ve sort of been gradually working down, losing some weight and working out,” Lambert said. “I definitely want to be a fit bride. So I’m just trying to keep myself in a good routine, a healthy routine.” Apparently, her cardio includes hunting. Lambert recently posted a picture of a deer meat package on Twitter, writing: “Last thing loaded for the wedding!!! Harvested by....me!!!!!” The couple plans to serve venison at the reception. Lambert also tweeted that

she was getting her nails done and making a final trip to Walmart — all reassuring Shelton she won’t get cold feet. “My hopes for the wedding is that she doesn’t back out, because not only would it break my heart, but it’s going to be a very expensive party to not have at least gotten married there,” he told the AP. “But the music is going to be a lot of fun.” Neal McCoy will be performing, he said. Lambert promised the wedding won’t end like her music video for “White Liar,” in which the bride confronts her cheating husband-to-be during the ceremony and leaves with the best man. “No, I told him, if he wants to dump me at the altar, call me to decide, and we’ll just have a party instead. Like don’t do it at the altar, that’s really bad,” she said, laughing. The only part of the video that will ring true is when her dad walks her down the aisle. Shelton called to ask his permission before he proposed last May near Lambert’s home in Oklahoma. “I don’t think it was a shock to Rick,” Shelton said. “It was just more of an emotional moment for he and I

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diffi- JACQUELINE cult

BIGAR

ARIES (March 21-April 19)     An underlying tone of seriousness flows into whatever you do. You cannot YOUR HOROSCOPE change what is, so make plans carefully. New possibilities surround a relationship later. Worry less about what is happening. Recognize that it is only a passage. Tonight: Listen to a loved one. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  The best ideas could fall apart, as you are tired and dragging. Your sense of humor emerges, allowing greater give-and-take, even in a difficult situation. Make an adjustment for the moment. Understand that you are human. Tonight: Get organized for tomorrow. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)  You might want to be playful and fun, but somehow your jokes fall on a humorless audience. Your fun ideas are received as if you were inviting someone to the morgue. Leave this crowd and go join some friends. They may have a more fun way to live this Sunday! Tonight: Enjoy the moment. CANCER (June 21-July 22)  You have a better

both.” Days later, Shelton was getting ready to celebrate his No. 1 song “Hillbilly Bone” at a party in Nashville when someone delivered a gift basket to his dressing room. The card read: “Congratulations! Happy for you” from another country music power couple: Tim McGraw and Faith Hill. As their relationship blossomed over the past year, so did their careers. Shelton and Lambert are the reigning CMA male and female vocalists of the year. Lambert won a Grammy and multiple trophies at the Academy of Country Music Awards last month in Las Vegas. Shelton hosted the ACMs and was tapped to be a judge on NBC’s high-profile singing competition “The Voice.” Lambert called their success a blessing but said they keep each other grounded. “We’re a really normal couple. We like to back road and hunt and fish. When we’re home, we’re not in that mode. We’re not in work mode, but it’s so great to have success together,” she said. “We’re best friends, and I can’t see myself with anybody else.”

In this Nov. 9, 2010, file photo, recording artists Blake Shelton, left, and Miranda Lambert arrive at the 2010 BMI Country Awards in Nashville, Tenn. Shelton and Lambert will wed on Saturday, May 14, 2011, in Texas.

sense of direction and compassion than in the recent past. Your ability to reconnect and regenerate comes through with a family member who might be depressed. Tonight: Touch base with an older relative. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  Even if you mean to be lighthearted, you come off far more serious than you realize. Keep communication flowing by not commenting so much. It would be best to curl up with a good book or head to the movies. Give yourself a welcome break. Tonight: Catch up on a friend’s news. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)  You could be angry with yourself. Instead, relax and accept what is. You can find many ways to get around this problem. Perhaps you are putting too much emphasis on this issue. Tonight: Buy a treat on the way home. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)  Be willing to experiment and open up a new avenue or path. What you reject in the first half of your day is acceptable and exciting by late afternoon. Give yourself time to mellow out. Tonight: As you like. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  If you are in the mood to vanish, you will be better off for the downtime. Perhaps you need to give some time to feeling sorry for yourself or a little sad. Once you do, you will notice how fast your mood will pass. Keep the socializing to a minimum. No wild parties. Tonight: Vanish while you still can. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)  Stay focused

with an older friend or in an important discussion. This person has a way of changing the topic that you cannot seem to prevent. Look at the issues and ask yourself how important they really are. Tonight: Join friends for dinner. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)     The mere thought of an older relative seems to create pressure in your mind. Don’t allow yourself to tense up, as it is your judgments that are causing this reaction. Let go and handle a responsibility or two. Tonight: Think “tomorrow.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  A difficult call or communication could start the day on a dreary note, where you wonder which way to go. Decide if this event is going to color your day. Opt to go to the movies or a concert where you can relax and let your mind wander. You will be in a good mood before you know it. Tonight: Break from tradition. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)  You could be way past your limit and need to make important decisions. Your way of handling what others think is complicated is your familiarity. If someone becomes quiet or withdrawn, you understand how to handle it. Work with another person’s foibles. Tonight: Say “yes” to an invitation. BORN TODAY Filmmaker George Lucas (1944), singer Bobby Darin (1936), founder of Facebook Mark Zuckerberg (1984)


Saturday, May 14, 2011 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 28

LOCAL SCHEDULE SATURDAY MAY 14 MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7:05 p.m. • Ruidoso at Roswell H.S. TRACK & FIELD 8 a.m. • Goddard, Roswell at NMAA Class 4A State Championships, Albuquerque

LOCAL BRIEFS 18TH ANNUAL RACE FOR THE ZOO IS MAY 21

The 18th annual Roswell Runners Club Race for the Zoo will be held on Saturday, May 21, at 8 a.m. at the Spring River Zoo. The event will consist of a 2mile walk, a 5k run, a 10k walk and a 10k run. The cost is $15. For more information, call Bob Edwards at 624-6720.

BRYNN NAYLOR TOURNEY WILL BE HELD MAY 21-22

The Sunrise Rotary Club’s Brynn Naylor Memorial Tennis Tournament will be held May 21-22 at Cahoon Park. For more information, visit USTA.com or call John Naylor at 627-2342.

• More briefs on B2

NA T I O N A L

SPORTS Roswell Daily Record

LAWRENCE FOSTER RECORD SPORTS REPORTER

Sports fans hear the phrase all the time, “From goat to hero.” Never was the phrase more appropriate than in the Roswell Invaders’ home opener against Ruidoso on Friday night. Invader center fielder Cliff Thomas dropped a potential game-winning fly ball in the top of the ninth, but ended up scoring the winning run in the bottom of the 10th as Roswell downed Ruidoso 65 to improve its record to 12. The Invaders grabbed the lead in the home half of the seventh. With one out, Roswell’s Matt Palko hit a blooper down to left and was able to leg out a double. After Adrian Martinez flew out, Trivon Howard drove in Palko with a single that gave the Invaders a 4-3 lead. Palko pushed the lead to two when he scored on an error by Chris Davis. The score remained 5-3 until the top of the ninth. Ruidoso’s first two batters

of the ninth reached base via a walk and a hit. A sacrifice bunt by Drew Peterson moved the runners over and Davis followed that up with a strikeout that brought the Osos to their final out. Roswell’s Edgar Correa made Ruidoso’s Case Rigby hit a lazy fly ball to center, but Thomas dropped it, which enabled the Osos to tie the game. Neither Roswell or Ruidoso could do anything in its next at bats, but in the bottom of the 10th, Thomas redeemed himself. The Invader inning started with a walk by Jake Bruns, who was replaced by pinch runner Eric Williams. Thomas followed up the walk with a perfectly placed bunt that should have put two on with nobody out, but a baserunning error by Williams got him thrown out at third. Brian Ramirez drew a walk, which brought Troy Frazier to the plate. Roswell put on a hit-andrun and it worked as Frazier See INVADERS, Page B2

E-mail: sports@roswell-record.com

Kevin J. Keller Photo

Roswell leadoff hitter Cliff Thomas finishes his swing and gets ready to leg out a single after recording the Invaders’ first hit at their home park in the bottom of the first inning, Friday. The Invaders won 6-5 in 10 innings for their first win in their debut at Joe Bauman Stadium.

2 locals medal at state

Jurney delivers strike with first pitch

BRIEFS GRIZZLIES FORCE GAME 7 WITH 95-83 VICTORY

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Zach Randolph is doing everything he can to keep the Memphis Grizzlies’ memorable playoff run going as long as possible. Randolph had 30 points and 13 rebounds, and the Grizzlies avoided elimination by beating the Oklahoma City Thunder 9583 Friday night to push their Western Conference semifinal to Game 7. The Grizzlies had never won a game before when facing elimination, but that was back in 2004, 2005 and 2006, when they were swept out of the postseason each of those years. These Grizzlies are having not only the best playoff run in franchise history, but they now have won more games this postseason than any other No. 8 seed from the West. Game 7 will be Sunday in Oklahoma City, with the winner advancing to play the well-rested Dallas Mavericks. O.J. Mayo, who started in place of Sam Young, scored 16 points for Memphis. Mike Conley had 11 points and 12 assists, and Tony Allen added 10 points as the Grizzlies also improved to 5-1 on their home court in this postseason, with a sellout crowd standing for the entire second half cheering to keep this stunning run going at least one more game. Memphis outscored the Thunder 51-29 in the second half and 46-38 in the paint. Russell Westbrook led the Thunder with 27 points, and James Harden had 14. Kevin Durant, the NBA’s leading scorer in the regular season, was held to a postseason-low 11 points.

RECORD STAFF REPORT

Kevin J. Keller Photo

Roswell Mayor Del Jurney, left, delivers a strike to Roswell team president and Pecos League commissioner Andrew Dunn with the ceremonial first pitch before the Invaders’ inaugural home game at Joe Bauman Stadium, Friday.

RECORD STAFF REPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN...

13 days away

See TRACK, Page B2

Dexter softball team loses lead, bounced from state tourney by East Mountain, 12-11

SPORTS

Hike It & Spike It XVI is

Day 1 of the NMAA Class 3A, 4A and 5A State T rack & Field Championship wrapped up on Friday and two local athletes earned medals. Roswell’s Shanice Steenholdt and Shania Hernandez each placed in the top three of the Class 4A girls high jump event with Steenholdt earning a silver medal and Her nandez earning a bronze. Steenholdt’s height tied Los Luna’s Nicole Jenr ette, but after both missed four attempts at 56 and three attempts at 55, Jenr ette clear ed 5-4 again while Steenholdt missed to give the Roswell senior a second-place finish. Hernandez secured her third-place finish by clear-

Rocket run ends at the hands of Piedra Vista

SPOTLIGHT ON 1967 — Mickey Mantle’s 500th home run, off Stu Miller, lifts the New York Yankees to a 6-5 victory over the Baltimore Orioles. 1981 — The Boston Celtics win the NBA championship with a 102-91 victory over the Houston Rockets in Game 6.

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Invaders go 10, win in home debut Section

Angela Greene Photo

Goddard assistant coach Kyle Alsup (23) talks with the Rocket infield during a trip to the mound in Goddard’s loss to Piedra Vista in the Class 4A state semifinals, Friday.

ALBUQUERQUE — The Goddard baseball team’s run through the NMAA Class 4A State Championship came to an abrupt end in the state semifinals on Friday at the hands of the second-seeded Piedra Vista Panthers. The Panthers pounded out 21 runs off of a combination of four Rocket pitchers and handed the sixth-seeded Rockets a 21-10 setback in five innings at Lobo Field on the campus of the University of New Mexico. “There’s a lot of disappointment. We thought we could make a run at it,” said Rocket coach Steve Nunez after the loss. “We just kind of ran into a steamrolling team that could do it all. (Piedra Vista) was a seasoned ballclub that you could tell had been to the state tournament a few times.” The Rockets fell behind in the first inning and never recovered. Piedra Vista pounded out seven runs in the first inning and added four more in the third to take an 11-1 lead on the Rockets. The Goddard bats finally sprung to life

in the bottom of the third with three runs to cut the deficit to seven. However, the Panthers immediately answered with five in the fourth and then added five more in the fifth to widen its lead to 21-6. Goddard plated four more runs in the bottom of the fifth, but it was too little, too late. Brandon Cooper took the loss after allowing five runs on three hits before being pulled in the first inning. Austin Rader came in and gave up six runs, Matt Ramey relieved Rader and gave up five runs and Caelin Wilcox replaced Ramey and gave up five runs. “Pitching was kind of our low point you could say,” Nunez said. “We were trying to spot up as much as we could, but we just couldn’t do it. “(Piedra Vista) is a great hitting team.” Goddard got multi-hit games from Brad Blackwell, Ryan Greene, Nate Guarjardo and Cooper. Cooper was 3 for 3 with a double, two See STATE, Page B2


B2 Saturday, May 14, 2011 Invaders Continued from Page B1

smacked a single to right field that easily plated Thomas. Roswell manager Chris Paterson said that he brought Thomas to Roswell because of the impact he could have. “Cliff is one of those guys that plays the game really hard and really aggressive,” he said. “Sometimes it works out and sometimes it doesn’t. Today it did both. That’s why I brought him here, because he is that type of player that can impact a game for the best. It was scary, but it worked.” Although Roswell collected 15 hits as a team, Paterson was quick to praise his pitching staff. “Correa, Reed Brown and (Brandon) Godfrey all did

State

their parts,” he said. “It was a great job by the bullpen. Brown has ice running through his veins. The game started off with Josh Grady just throwing a gem out there, which we needed as a stopper to get us back in the win column.” More than 500 fans attended Roswell’s first professional baseball home game in 52 years and Paterson said the enthusiasm was great. “It was a great crowd,” he said. “I think we will get just as good of one tomorrow (Saturday) with some of the stuff that was going on today. The crowd was into it the entire game and they loved the lime green jerseys and the lime bases. They were all on our side and that’s what I like to see and hear.” l.foster@roswell-record.com

Continued from Page B1

singles, three RBIs and a run scored and Blackwell was 3 for 4 with a triple, two singles and two runs scored. Greene went 2 for 3 with a double, a single and two runs and Guajardo was 2 for 3 with a double, a single, two RBIs and two runs. Chris Nunez added a two-run triple for the Rockets. “We set our goal for the state championship, we didn’t get there, but the kids put forth a great effort,” Nunez added. “We just didn’t have enough firepower. “We expect to win the blue trophy, that’s any coach’s goal, and yeah, we didn’t get there, but we gave it a pretty darn

LOCAL BRIEFS GOLF TOURNEY FOR PECOS TEEN CENTER IS MAY 21

A golf tournament benefitting Café Cha Cha Cha and the Pecos Valley Teen Center will be held on May 21 at Roswell Country Club. The cost is $60 per player and the deadline to enter is May 20. Registration starts at 6:30 a.m. on the morning of the tournament and the tournament begins at 8 a.m. For more information, call Stephen Deutsch at 734-5797 or 317-2719.

ELKS FOR VETS GOLF TOURNEY TO BE HELD JUNE 4

The annual Elks for Veterans charity golf tournament will be held on June 4 at the NMMI Golf Course. The four-person scramble will begin with an 8 a.m. shotgun start. The cost is $60 per player or $240 per team. The field is limited to the first 24 paid teams. For more information, call Brady Crump at 622-6033.

RAGE IN THE CAGE TOURNEY TO BE HELD JUNE 18

The inaugural Rage in the Cage 3-on-3 basketball tournament will be held on June 18 at Cahoon Park. The entry fee for the tournament is $100 per team. Age divisions are 9-11, 12-14, 15-17 and 18-and-up. All teams are guaranteed three games and a T-shirt. The deadline to enter is June 9. For more information, call Donald Doines at 637-4841 or Ray Baca at 910-2222.

NMMI TO HOST TENNIS CAMP

New Mexico Military Institute men’s tennis coach Gene Hardman will host a summer tennis camp from June 20-23 at the Institute. The morning sessions will be held from 9-11 a.m. and are open to players, ages 8-12. The afternoon session will be held from 24 p.m. and are open to players, ages 13-18. The cost is $10 per session. To sign up or for more information, call Hardman at 624-8281.

FIRST TEE TO HOLD YOUTH SUMMER CAMPS

The First Tee of the Pecos Valley is currently accepting reservations for its annual Youth Golf & Life Skills Summer Camps, which are held at the NMMI Golf Course. The cost is $75 and includes breakfast and lunch each day. The dates of the event are June 6-9 (ages 7-17), June 13-16 (First Tee Participants), June 2023 (ages 5-10), July 11-14 (ages 7-17) and July 18-21 (ages 5-10). For more information or to reserve a spot, call 623-4444.

Roswell pitcher Josh Grady throws the first pitch of the first Invaders game at Joe Bauman Stadium, Friday.

East Mountain 12, Dexter 11 RIO RANCHO — Dexter held an 11-8 lead going to the bottom of the seventh inning, but couldn’t hold on and was bounced from the Class 1A/2A Softball State Championship at Cleveland High School, Friday. The Demons (12-16) fell behind early as the 11th-seeded Timberwolves scored twice in the first and thrice in the third for a 5-0 lead going into the fourth. That’s when Dexter finally put things together. Colorado . . . . . . . . . .20 San Francisco . . . . . .21 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .19 Arizona . . . . . . . . . . .15 San Diego . . . . . . . . .15

Pct GB .605 — .556 2 .474 5 .474 5 .459 5 1⁄2

Pct GB .649 — .538 4 1 .526 4 ⁄2 .410 9 .333 11 1⁄2 Pct GB .538 — 1⁄2 .526 .500 1 1⁄2 .410 5

Thursday’s Games Tampa Bay 7, Cleveland 4 Kansas City 11, N.Y. Yankees 5 Baltimore 2, Seattle 1, 12 innings Friday’s Games Boston 5, N.Y. Yankees 4 Detroit 3, Kansas City 1 Cleveland 5, Seattle 4 Tampa Bay 3, Baltimore 0 Texas 4, L.A. Angels 1 Toronto 2, Minnesota 0 Chicago White Sox 4, Oakland 3 Saturday’s Games Seattle (Bedard 1-4) at Cleveland (White 10), 11:05 a.m. Chicago White Sox (Floyd 4-2) at Oakland (T.Ross 2-2), 2:05 p.m. Baltimore (Bergesen 0-4) at Tampa Bay (W.Davis 4-2), 2:10 p.m. Kansas City (Francis 0-4) at Detroit (Penny 3-3), 2:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Haren 4-2) at Texas (Holland 31), 2:10 p.m. Toronto (Jo-.Reyes 0-3) at Minnesota (Blackburn 2-4), 2:10 p.m. Boston (Beckett 2-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 3-2), 5:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Kansas City at Detroit, 11:05 a.m. Seattle at Cleveland, 11:05 a.m. Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 11:40 a.m. Toronto at Minnesota, 12:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Texas, 1:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Oakland, 2:05 p.m. Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 6:05 p.m. Monday’s Games N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 4:40 p.m. Toronto at Detroit, 5:05 p.m. Baltimore at Boston, 5:10 p.m. Cleveland at Kansas City, 6:10 p.m. Texas at Chicago White Sox, 6:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 8:05 p.m. Minnesota at Seattle, 8:10 p.m. L 12 15 19 20 20

Pct GB .676 — .595 3 .525 5 1⁄2 .474 7 1⁄2 .474 7 1⁄2

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Pct GB .564 — 1⁄2 .553 1 .474 3 ⁄2 .459 4 .447 4 1⁄2 .368 7 1⁄2

TV SPORTSWATCH

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Kevin J. Keller Photo

Softball

Major League Baseball At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press American League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .23 15 New York . . . . . . . . . .20 16 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .18 20 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .18 20 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .17 20 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .24 13 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .21 18 Kansas City . . . . . . . .20 18 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .16 23 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .12 24 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Los Angeles . . . . . . . .21 18 Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 18 Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .19 19 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .16 23

Roswell Daily Record

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good run.” Goddard finished the year 23-7, which is the best mark by any Nunez-coached Rocket squad in his seven years at the helm.

Baseball

National League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Philadelphia . . . . . . . .25 Florida . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .21 New York . . . . . . . . . .18 Washington . . . . . . . .18 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .22 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .21 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . .18 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .17 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .17 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .14 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W

SPORTS

16 17 20 22 23

.556 — .553 — .487 2 1⁄2 .405 5 1⁄2 .395 6

Thursday’s Games St. Louis 9, Chicago Cubs 1 N.Y. Mets 9, Colorado 5 San Francisco 3, Arizona 2 L.A. Dodgers at Pittsburgh, ppd., rain Atlanta 6, Washington 5, 10 innings Friday’s Games Chicago Cubs 11, San Francisco 4 Florida 6, Washington 5, 11 innings Cincinnati 6, St. Louis 5, 10 innings Philadelphia 5, Atlanta 4 N.Y. Mets 6, Houston 4 Milwaukee 5, Pittsburgh 2 Colorado 12, San Diego 7 L.A. Dodgers 4, Arizona 3 Saturday’s Games Florida (Ani.Sanchez 2-1) at Washington (L.Hernandez 3-4), 11:05 a.m. Philadelphia (Blanton 1-1) at Atlanta (Jurrjens 4-0), 11:10 a.m. San Diego (Harang 5-2) at Colorado (Chacin 4-2), 1:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Dickey 1-4) at Houston (Happ 24), 2:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Karstens 2-1) at Milwaukee (Narveson 1-3), 2:10 p.m. St. Louis (McClellan 5-0) at Cincinnati (Cueto 1-0), 2:10 p.m. Arizona (Collmenter 1-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 2-2), 5:10 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 2-0) at Chicago Cubs (D.Davis 0-0), 5:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games St. Louis at Cincinnati, 11:10 a.m. Florida at Washington, 11:35 a.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 11:35 a.m. N.Y. Mets at Houston, 12:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 12:10 p.m. San Francisco at Chicago Cubs, 12:20 p.m. San Diego at Colorado, 1:10 p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 2:10 p.m. Monday’s Games Philadelphia at St. Louis, 5:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Washington, 5:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 5:10 p.m. Florida at N.Y. Mets, 5:10 p.m. Houston at Atlanta, 5:10 p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 6:40 p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 7:40 p.m. Milwaukee at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m.

Golf

The Players Championship Scores By The Associated Press Friday At TPC Sawgrass - Stadium Course Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Purse: $9.5 million Yardage: 7,215; Par 72 Second Round David Toms . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-68 — Nick Watney . . . . . . . . . . . . .64-71 — Graeme McDowell . . . . . . . .67-69 — Steve Stricker . . . . . . . . . . .69-67 — Luke Donald . . . . . . . . . . . .69-67 — Lucas Glover . . . . . . . . . . . .65-71 — Hunter Mahan . . . . . . . . . . .70-67 — Aaron Baddeley . . . . . . . . . .70-67 — J.B. Holmes . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-69 — Davis Love III . . . . . . . . . . . .68-69 — Robert Karlsson . . . . . . . . . .71-67 — Chris Stroud . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-67 — Greg Chalmers . . . . . . . . . .73-65 — Brian Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69 — Rory Sabbatini . . . . . . . . . . .67-71 — K.J. Choi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68 — Jason Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70 — Kevin Streelman . . . . . . . . .70-69 — Paul Goydos . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70 — Jason Dufner . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70 — Martin Kaymer . . . . . . . . . . .67-72 — Justin Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-69 — Jeff Overton . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71 — Mark O’Meara . . . . . . . . . . .66-74 —

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Saturday, May 14 AUTO RACING 8:30 a.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, pole qualifying for 5-Hour Energy 200, at Dover, Del. 10 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying for FedEx 400, at Dover, Del. Noon ESPN — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, 5Hour Energy 200, at Dover, Del. 3 p.m.

134 135 136 136 136 136 137 137 137 137 138 138 138 138 138 138 139 139 139 139 139 139 140 140

ing 5-2. Abbie Goddar d’s Blach finished sixth in the shot put with a throw of 32-11 1 ⁄ 4 and Roswell’s Rikki Ornelas was ninth in the long jump with a distance of 15-9. On the boys side, Roswell’s Malcolm Wiggins and Joey Martinez and Goddard’s Jay English finished fifth, sixth and eighth, respectively, in the high jump. Wiggins and Martinez each clear ed 6-0 and English tied for eighth with four others at 5-8. Goddar d’s Jake Maxey finished tied for ninth in the pole vault

The Demons got five runs in the fourth to tie things up and, after East Mountain got three in the bottom of the fourth, took the lead with four runs in the fifth to make it 9-8. Dexter padded its lead by one in the sixth to make it 10-8 and then grabbed an 11-8 advantage with its final run in the seventh. The Timberwolves answered, though. With two outs in the seventh, East Mountain plated its fourth run of the inning to complete a comeback upset of the seventh-seeded Demons. Jenna Garcia took the loss after coming on in relief of Taylor Miles in the fourth inning. Garcia gave up seven runs on three hits and struck out six. Miles pitched the first three innings and gave up five runs on three hits and

struck out two. Evelyn Dominguez had an RBI double in the fifth and a two-RBI double in the seventh for the Demons at the plate, while Pearl Duran was 2 for 4 with an RBI. “The offense took a while to get started, but when it did, we did great. We just waited too long,” said first-year Demon coach Chanda Crandall. “We let them get that five-run lead on us and it intimidated us. “It just didn’t work out for us. We were winning all the way through that last out. That last pitch drove that last run in and it hurt.” Despite the disappointment, Crandall said she was still proud of her team. “I was proud of them overall. We had a good season.”.

SCOREBOARD

Ryan Moore . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69 Alvaro Quiros . . . . . . . . . . . .67-73 Brian Gay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69 Spencer Levin . . . . . . . . . . .72-69 Rocco Mediate . . . . . . . . . . .72-69 Andres Romero . . . . . . . . . .72-69 Corey Pavin . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-69 Kris Blanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72 Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72 Steve Marino . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72 Ian Poulter . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72 Dustin Johnson . . . . . . . . . .72-70 Phil Mickelson . . . . . . . . . . .71-71 Martin Laird . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70 Retief Goosen . . . . . . . . . . .73-69 Stewart Cink . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72 Matteo Manassero . . . . . . . .72-70 Charlie Wi . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72 Sean O’Hair . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71 Bubba Watson . . . . . . . . . . .76-66 Sergio Garcia . . . . . . . . . . . .74-68 Fredrik Jacobson . . . . . . . . .67-75 Arjun Atwal . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-70 Robert Garrigus . . . . . . . . . .74-69 Trevor Immelman . . . . . . . . .70-73 Charl Schwartzel . . . . . . . . .72-71 Webb Simpson . . . . . . . . . .70-73 Charley Hoffman . . . . . . . . .72-71 Kenny Perry . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71 Hunter Haas . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71 Bryce Molder . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73 Chris Couch . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72 Jerry Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-70 Justin Leonard . . . . . . . . . . .70-73 Robert Allenby . . . . . . . . . . .69-74 Jason Bohn . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73 Chad Campbell . . . . . . . . . .73-71 Keegan Bradley . . . . . . . . . .75-69 Peter Hanson . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72 Ben Curtis . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73 Garrett Willis . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74 Jonathan Byrd . . . . . . . . . . .71-73 Angel Cabrera . . . . . . . . . . .70-74 Ben Crane . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-76 Carl Pettersson . . . . . . . . . .73-71 Zach Johnson . . . . . . . . . . .74-70 Scott Verplank . . . . . . . . . . .73-71 Troy Merritt . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-75 Matt Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72 Kevin Chappell . . . . . . . . . .71-73

Failed to qualify Kevin Stadler . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72 Joe Durant . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72 D.J. Trahan . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-70 Camilo Villegas . . . . . . . . . .74-71 Rickie Fowler . . . . . . . . . . . .77-68 Brandt Jobe . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-70 Y.E. Yang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-76 Heath Slocum . . . . . . . . . . .71-74 Mark Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75 Ernie Els . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-73 Michael Bradley . . . . . . . . . .71-74 Stephen Ames . . . . . . . . . . .77-68 Bo Van Pelt . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-69 Kevin Na . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72 Ryuji Imada . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72 Jimmy Walker . . . . . . . . . . .77-69 David Duval . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-76 Dean Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . .77-69 Ryan Palmer . . . . . . . . . . . .70-76 Gary Woodland . . . . . . . . . .75-71 Francesco Molinari . . . . . . .76-70 J.P. Hayes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73 Shaun Micheel . . . . . . . . . . .71-75 Boo Weekley . . . . . . . . . . . .75-71 Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-72 Paul Casey . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-75 Ross Fisher . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73 Jim Furyk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-76 Brandt Snedeker . . . . . . . . .73-74 Charles Howell III . . . . . . . .73-74 Alex Prugh . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-72 Kevin Sutherland . . . . . . . . .72-75 J.J. Henry . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-73

SPEED — Rolex Sports Car Series, Bosch Engineering 250, at Danville, Va. (same-day tape) 5 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, qualifying for Southern Nationals, at Atlanta (same-day tape) COLLEGE BASEBALL 5:30 p.m. FSN — Baylor at Oklahoma St. COLLEGE SOFTBALL 3 p.m. ESPN2 — Big East Conference, championship game, Syracuse-DePaul winner vs. Notre Dame-Louisville winner, at Louisville, Ky. 6 p.m. ESPN — Southeastern Conference, championship game, Tennessee-Auburn

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140 140 140 141 141 141 141 141 141 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144

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145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 147 147 147 147 147 147

after clearing 11-6, Goddard’s David Strickland was 12th in the long jump with a distance of 19-5 and Roswell’s Gustavo Sierra was 19th in the 1600-meter run with a time of 4 minutes, 37.59 seconds. Individual finals qualifiers were Goddard’s Alysha Bolduc (100 hurdles), Roswell’s Richard Medrano (200) and Martinez (110 hurdles). Local relay teams that qualified for the finals were the Goddard girls 4x100 team, the Roswell boys 4x100, 4x200 and 4x400 teams and the Goddar d boys 1600 sprint medley team. Day 2 of the state meet begins today at 8 a.m.

Derek Lamely . . . . . . . . . . .74-73 Louis Oosthuizen . . . . . . . . .71-76 Vijay Singh . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-72 Nick O’Hern . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-71 Ricky Barnes . . . . . . . . . . . .70-78 D.A. Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-74 Cameron Beckman . . . . . . .72-76 Josh Teater . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-76 Michael Sim . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-72 Blake Adams . . . . . . . . . . . .72-76 Pat Perez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-72 Adam Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-72 John Rollins . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-75 Chad Collins . . . . . . . . . . . .74-74 Tim Petrovic . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-73 Vaughn Taylor . . . . . . . . . . .76-73 Stuart Appleby . . . . . . . . . . .76-73 Johnson Wagner . . . . . . . . .74-75 Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-73 Chris Riley . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-77 Tommy Gainey . . . . . . . . . . .75-74 Anthony Kim . . . . . . . . . . . .74-76 Brendan Steele . . . . . . . . . .78-72 Bill Lunde . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-77 Alex Cejka . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-78 Edoardo Molinari . . . . . . . . .72-78 John Senden . . . . . . . . . . . .76-75 Michael Connell . . . . . . . . . .73-78 Padraig Harrington . . . . . . .73-78 Matt Bettencourt . . . . . . . . .79-74 Troy Matteson . . . . . . . . . . .78-76 Brendon de Jonge . . . . . . . .81-73 Henrik Stenson . . . . . . . . . .79-75 Jhonattan Vegas . . . . . . . . .78-77 Marc Leishman . . . . . . . . . .81-80 Tim Clark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Geoff Ogilvy . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75

Tennis

Venus Williams out of French Open

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147 147 147 147 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 149 149 149 149 149 149 150 150 150 150 150 151 151 151 153 154 154 154 155 161 WD WD

Venus Williams pulled out of the French Open on Friday, 24 hours after her younger sister Serena withdrew, making it the first Grand Slam tournament since 2003 without either Williams. Venus’ agent, Carlos Fleming, wrote in an e-mail to The Associated Press that the seven-time Grand Slam champion notified tournament organizers she wouldn’t compete at Roland Garros, where play starts May 22. The 30-year-old American has been off the tour since January, when she stopped playing only minutes into a match in the third round of the Australian Open because of a hip injury. A left knee injury limited her to just one tournament over the final six months of 2010. Serena pulled out of the French Open on Thursday; she hasn’t entered a tournament since winning her fourth Wimbledon singles championship in early July. A few days later, she cut her foot on glass at a restaurant in Germany, an injury that led to two operations. The second surgery was in October, and she said she spent 10 weeks in a cast and 10 weeks in a walking boot. She returned to practice last month and said Thursday in a statement issued by her agent that she hopes to “be back competing this summer.” The sisters are among the most dynamic and attention-drawing players in tennis history. Both were ranked No. 1 by the WTA, and they own a combined 20 Grand Slam singles titles — 13 for Serena, seven for Venus. They have played each other in eight major finals, including at the 2002 French Open, won by Serena. But a series of health problems has limited them lately, and in this week’s rankings, Serena is 17th, Venus 19th. While the 29-year-old Serena hasn’t point-

winner vs. Georgia-Alabama winner, at Oxford, Miss. GOLF 6 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Iberdrola Open, third round, at Mallorca, Spain Noon NBC — PGA Tour, THE PLAYERS Championship, third round, at Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2 p.m. MLB — Regional coverage, St. Louis at Cincinnati or Kansas City at Detroit 5 p.m. FOX — Regional coverage, Boston at N.Y. Yankees, San Francisco at Chicago Cubs, or Arizona at L.A. Dodgers

ed to a specific target date for her return to action, Venus is entered in a grass-court tournament in Eastbourne, England, that begins June 11. Fleming wrote Friday that Venus “is on track to be ready to play at Wimbledon,” which starts June 20. This French Open will be the third consecutive Grand Slam tournament missed by Serena. Venus, though, had played in the previous 16 in a row, and 30 of the last 32. The only other time both Williams sisters pulled out of one of tennis’ four major tournaments was the 2003 U.S. Open, when Venus had an abdominal injury, and Serena was coming off left knee surgery. Before that, one or the other — and usually both — participated in every Grand Slam tournament since Serena’s first, the 1998 Australian Open.

Transactions

Friday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League DETROIT TIGERS—Placed OF Magglio Ordonez on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 11. Purchased the contract of OF Andy Dirks from Toledo (IL). MINNESOTA TWINS—Reinstated OF Delmon Young from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Rene Tosoni to Rochester (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES—Recalled RHP Hector Noesi from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Optioned RHP Buddy Carlyle to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. SEATTLE MARINERS—Claimed RHP Jeff Gray off waivers from the Chicago White Sox. National League CINCINNATI REDS—Reinstated 3B Scott Rolen from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Chris Valaika to Louisville (IL). COLORADO ROCKIES—Reinstated INF Ty Wigginton from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Ian Stewart to Colorado Springs (PCL). FLORIDA MARLINS—Reinstated RHP Javier Vazquez from the bereavement list and OF Logan Morrison from the 15-day DL. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Purchased the contract of INF Juan Castro from Albuquerque (PCL). Optioned INF Ivan De Jesus to Albuquerque. Transferred C Hector Gimenez to the 60-day DL. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Activated C Carlos Ruiz from the 15-day DL. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association BOSTON CELTICS—Signed coach Doc Rivers to a five-year contract extension. HOCKEY National Hockey League MONTREAL CANADIENS—Signed D Raphael Diaz to a one-year contract. NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Signed F Michael Grabner to a five-year contract. VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Recalled D Chris Tanev, G Eddie Lack, F Sergei Shirokov, F Aaron Volpatti and F Alex Bolduc from Manitoba (AHL). COLLEGE GEORGIA—Named Travis Mays women’s assistant basketball coach. MISSISSIPPI—Named Sergio Rouco men’s assistant basketball coach. MONMOUTH, N.J.—Named Brian Reese, Derrick Phelps and Rick Callahan men’s assistant basketball coaches and Sam Ferry director of men’s basketball operations. OHIO STATE—Reassigned director of football communications Shelly Poe to director of communications for women’s soccer and softball, men’s and women’s swimming and oncampus championships. Reassigned assistant director of athletic communications Jerry Emig to director of football communications. PRINCETON—Named Marcus Jenkins men’s assistant basketball coach and Kendrick Saunders director of men’s basketball operations. SHENANDOAH—Announced the resignation of women’s field hockey coach Lois Bowers.

MEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE 10 a.m. ESPN2 — NCAA Division I, playoffs, first round, Hofstra vs. Johns Hopkins MOTORSPORTS 8 p.m. SPEED — AMA Pro Racing, at Sonoma, Calif. (same-day tape) NHL HOCKEY 6 p.m. VERSUS — Playoffs, conference finals, Game 1, Tampa Bay at Boston SOCCER 5:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Manchester United at Blackburn 9 p.m. ESPN2 — MLS, Portland at Seattle


Roswell Daily Record

COMICS

Garfield

Jumble

Family Circus

Beetle Bailey

DEAR ABBY: From time to time, my husband and I are asked by some friends to dine out with them. However, the wife does some things that make us very uncomfortable. She prides herself on being friendly and outgoing. When we’re in a restaurant, she’ll go from table to table and engage in conversations with people she doesn’t know. She’ll ask where they’re from, what they’ve ordered, etc. Once, she eavesdropped while the people at the next table discussed what they were ordering and gave them her opinion on what they should “really” order. It progressed to her joining them for a short time at their table for further conversation. While I appreciate that she’s trying to impress us, it embarrasses my husband and me. How do we handle the situation without telling her, making her feel bad and putting a strain on our friendship? We don’t enjoy dining out with them like we used to. Are we overreacting, or is this bad manners? MORTIFIED IN SALT LAKE CITY DEAR MORTIFIED: If you and your husband are Dear Heloise:

In The Charlotte (Florida) Sun, an older lady was wondering about available financial help if she ADOPTED A PET. She was concerned that should the pet need medical care, she wouldn’t be able to afford it. She is 70, lonely and yearning for a pet. Here in Charlotte County, Fla., the local pet shelter is asking for foster homes for puppies and kittens, and also for older pets that have had a surgery or are in ill health and need a quiet place to recuperate. They say that kittens and puppies that have been socialized in private homes are much more adoptable.

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

dinner guests, the lady should be devoting her attention to you and not the other diners in the restaurant. To leave you and go table-hopping is rude. However, to call her on it would be equally rude. So, because you don’t enjoy dining out with them the way you used to, do it less often and it will be less upsetting.



DEAR ABBY: How can we convince our married daughter with children to seek a separation or divorce from her husband, who is physically, mentally and economically abusive to her and the kids? We believe she’s suffering from low self-esteem, depression and other issues she can’t resolve with him. She has had to borrow what

HINTS

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

So maybe Annette in Oregon could check with her local pet shelter to see if it has a program like this. The shelter provides all necessary equipment to care for the pet. She could shower all sorts of love on these animals at no cost. Jane in Port Charlotte, Fla.

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

little money we can spare to buy food, school clothing and other basics. Her husband believes she should be working, taking care of an infant and an older child, paying for day care, half the bills and mortgage. Abby, this man has an income in the lower six figures! We suggested therapy, but it was ignored. He blames everything on her. There is so much more to this story, but it would take up 10 of your columns. Please help. DESPERATE DAD IN CALIFORNIA DEAR DESPERATE: A lawyer could point out to your daughter that she lives in a community property state, and half of what her husband has accumulated during the marriage is hers. A social worker could warn her that abuse doesn’t remain static, that it can escalate to violence if it hasn’t already. Statistics could illustrate that men who abuse their wives often go on to abuse their children. There is much that could be done, but not until or unless your daughter is willing to admit to herself that she is the victim of spousal abuse and take action.

Good advice, and I should have thought of it! Thank you for writing this heart hint. Does anyone have other hints for someone who might not be able to have a pet full time? Heloise

Hagar the Horrible

Blondie

Zits



Dear Readers: Judith W. of Flemington, N.J., sent a picture of her gorgeous German shepherd, Annie, cozied up to Judith’s half-Siamese cat, Punim. Both are snuggled on a warm mat on the floor. To see Annie and Punim, along with our other Pet Pals, visit www.Heloise.com and click on “Pets.” Heloise

Snuffy Smith



Dear Readers: If your dog bowl is encrusted with lime-scale buildup, here is an easy fix: Heat some white vinegar and carefully pour it into the bowl. Allow the vinegar to bubble up and eat the lime scale away. If you would like some more helpful, money-saving vinegar hints, I have compiled a collection of my favorite vinegar uses. To receive this pamphlet, send $5 with a long, self-addressed, stamped (61 cents) envelope to: Heloise/Vinegar, P.O. Box 795001, San Antonio, TX 78279-5001. Keep a clearly labeled spray bottle with half vinegar and half water handy. Spray down your counters periodically and wipe to keep ants at bay. Heloise



Dear Heloise: I’d like to add to the dogwalking hints a reader offered. Because dogs “see” the world primarily with their noses, allow them the pleasure of snoop-time. They will enjoy the walk that much more if it’s a stop-and-smell activity. Also, I alternate between several routes. My dogs seem to enjoy the variety as much as I do, and they get to check the latest “news” from different neighborhoods. Rich F. in Youngstown, Ohio

Dear Heloise: I would like to share a timesaver. I have a carport, and the birds love to roost over my car, which causes the bird droppings to drop on my car. What I do is hang up neckties and any kind of belts (to scare away the birds. — Heloise). Really helps, and saves a lot of spot washing. L.F.C. in Indiana

Dilbert

The Wizard of Id

For Better or For Worse

Saturday, May 14, 2011

B3


CHURCHDEVOTIONAL&DIRECTORY

B4 Saturday, May 14, 2011

CHURCH PAGE

Roswell Daily Record

This Devotional & Directory is made possible by those businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services.

THE POWER OF PRAYER

Your prayers may or may not change the world, but they will almost certainly change you. Prayer has a calming as well as an uplifting and reflective effect. Sometimes the time spent in prayer is the only time we have in our busy lives to actually reflect on important aspects of our lives. When our lives are filled with turmoil, asking God for peace can be amazingly effective at quieting our anxieties. And prayers of gratitude remind us how much we have to be thankful for, while letting God know that we are truly grateful. Sometimes we don’t really know how to pray or what to pray for. At those times, a simple prayer may be the best, such as “Lord Jesus, have mercy on me.” Certain times of the day may be more conducive to prayer, such as morning and evening. A prayer of thanksgiving each morning is a great way to start each day, and a prayer of reflection at the end of every day is a good way to reflect on our successes and defeats. But perhaps we should remember the advice of St. Paul, who advised us to pray constantly, keeping God forever in our minds and in our hearts. Rejoice always, pray constantly, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.

ANGLICAN

ST. FRANCIS ANGELICAN CHURCH (@ Church of God Seventh Day) 18th & Kansas, 420-3573, Bob Jordan Min.; W.S. 10:00 a.m., Wed. 6:00 pm ST. STEPHEN’S 1500 S. Main (Chapel @ 1st Christian Church); 9109706; Fr. Bob Tally, Min; W.S. 9:00 a.m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD, 1224 W. Country Club, 622-2171, Melvin Suttle, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 6:00 pm., Wed. 7:00 pm. MIDWAY ASSEMBLY OF GOD 63 Yakima Rd., 3475309, S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m

TEMPLO BETAL ASSEMBLY OF GOD 221 E. Jefferson, 623-6852, Paul & Toni Herrera, Mins. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Tues. & Wed. 6 p.m.

TEMPLO LA HERMOSA FIRST SPANISH ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1305 South Garden, 625-0885, Oscar Guerrero, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Tues. & Wed. 7 p.m.

BAPTIST

BERRENDO BAPTIST 400 W. Berrendo Rd., 6221372, Troy Grant, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

BETHEL BAPTIST N. Garden & East Country Club Rd., 622-8182 Richard Grisham, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:40 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. BYKOTA BAPTIST 2106 E. Pine Lodge Rd., 622-3399 Don Johnson, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

R.S.V. 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18

HIGHLAND BAPTIST 2001 S. Lea, 622-9980, Dr. Ed Meyers, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

IGLESIA BAUTISTA EL CALVARIO 600 E. Tilden, 623-8135, Roberto Mancillas, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. MIDWAY BAPTIST 134 Yakima Rd., Leo Pennington, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 7 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

MORNING STAR BAPTIST 1513 Mulberry Ave., W.F. Wagoner, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. Wed. 7:30 p.m. MOUNTAIN VIEW BAPTIST 206 E. Charleston, 622-1019, Jack Ferguson, Interim Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 6:00 p.m.

MT. GILEAD MISSIONARY BAPTIST 700 E. Summit, 623-0292 Pastor Allen. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:00a.m. PRIMERA BAPTIST 417 East Wildy, 623-5420 S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. PRIMERA IGLESIA BAUTISTA OF DEXTER 388 South Lincoln. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

ROSWELL BAPTIST TEMPLE700 E. Berrendo, Bill Whitehead, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 am. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. SOUTH MANOR BAPTIST 1905 S. Main, 622-6072, Butch Neal, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed 6 p.m. TABERNACLE BAPTIST 115 W. 11th, 622-7912, S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

CALVARY BAPTIST 1009 W. Alameda,Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

THE FRIENDSHIP MISSIONARY BAPTIST 1220 Johnson St., 623-6484, Michael K. Shelton, Sr., Min.S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed.7 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST – HAGERMAN 211 N. Cambridge, Hagerman, S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

VICTORY BAPTIST 1601 W. McGaffey, 622-0114, Dan Holt, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST 500 N. Pennsylvania, 623-2640; Matt Brooks, Min., S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:00 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST OF DEXTER 101 W. 3rd St., Dexter, 734-5673, Jackie Thomas, Min., S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m. GALILEE BAPTIST 513 E. Matthews St., 662-8534, W.W. Green, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.

TRINIDAD COMMUNITY BAPTIST 1707 W. Juniper. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

WARE TABERNACLE MISSIONARY BAPTIST 900 E. Deming, 622-0546, Richard Gorham, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 & 11 a.m., Wed. 6 p.m.

WASHINGTON AVE. BAPTIST 1400 North Washington Ave., 840-1144, Randy Reeves, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION CATHOLIC 2808 N. Kentucky, 6229895, Bill McCann, Min. Masses: Sat. Mass 9:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.; Sun. Mass 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.; Mon-Fri Mass 12:10 p.m.; Thurs Mass 8:30 a.m. NMMI, Sun 5 p.m. IMMACULATE CONCEPTION PARISH Dexter, Sat. Mass 6 p.m., Sun. Mass 11 a.m.

OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE Lake Arthur, Sun. Mass 8 a.m. ST. CATHERINE’S Hagerman, Sun. Mass 9:30 a.m.

ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC 506 S. Lincoln, 622-3531, Juan Antonio Gutierrez, Min.; Sat. English Mass 5:30 p.m., Spanish Mass 7 p.m.; Sun. English Mass 10 a.m., Spanish Mass 8 a.m. & Noon.

ST. PETER CATHOLIC 805 S. Main, 622-5092, Charlie Martinez, Min.; Sat. Mass 6 p.m. Sun. Mass 8 a..m. & 11 a.m.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST, 101 S. Lea; S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m.; wed. 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST 114 E. Hobbs, W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 5 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST 1500 S. Elm, 622-4675; John Early Cannon, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 6 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST 1512 South Main St., 6224426 S.S. 10:30 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m., Wed. 6:30 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST 700 W. Country Club Road, 622-1350, Doug Austin, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & 5 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST West Alameda & Balsam, 622-5562 W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., 2nd Sun. 1:30 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST 200 S. Union, Suite C, 3472628; S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. IGLESIA DE CRISTO 801 N. Washington, Horoaio de Servicios: Domingo 9:30 & 11:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., Miercoles 6 p.m. SPANISH CHURCH OF CHRIST 3501 W. College, 622-3618 S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m.

SPANISH CHURCH OF CHRISTMulberry & Buena Vista, Joe Villa, Min. W.S. 9:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 6 p.m.

Prosthetics

Diabetic Shoes

New Mexico Prosthetic-Orthotic Center, Inc. Adam Dutchover, CPO, FAAOP Certified Orthodtist and Prosthetist 2515 N. Kentucky • 575-623-0344

CHURCH OF GOD NEW COVENANT FELLOWSHIP CHURCH OF GOD 2200 N. Garden, 6241958,S.S. 9:30 a.m. W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST IMMANUEL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 1000 N. Union, 622-6352, Louis Accardi, Min., S.S. 10:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:30 a.m.; Wed. 6 p.m.

ST. PAUL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 321 E. McGaffey, 623-1568, Joe L. Dawson, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m., Tues. & Fri. 8 p.m.

DISCIPLES OF

CHRIST

DISCIPLES OF CHRIST Christian Fellowship, 1413 S. Union, 627-0506, Mark E. Rowland, Int. Min.; W.S. 1:30 pm.

EPISCOPAL

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL 505 N. Penn., 622-1353 Principal Service. 9 a.m. 11:00 a.m.; in church Wed. 7 a.m. in the prayer garden. http://standrews roswell.org

JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES Kingdom Halls 205 W. Gayle

Mesa Park Cong. Sun. 10 am; Tues. 7 p.m. Buena Visa Cong. (Spanish) Sun. 1:30 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

1718 N. Atkinson

Mountain View Cong. Sun. 1 p.m.; Wed. 7:30 p.m. Spring River Cong. Sun. 10 a.m.; Tues 7:30 p.m.

1421 S. Garden

Rio Pecos Cong. Sun. 10 am; Thurs. 7 p.m.

Dexter- 411 S. Lincoln Dexter Cong. Sun. 10 a.m.; Thurs. 7 p.m.

Lic. #365901 575-623-2011

Reading Plumbing Heating & Air Conditioning, Inc. 217 E. McGaffey


CHURCH PAGE

Roswell Daily Record

Saturday, May 14, 2011

S HOP R OSWELL

B5

.J E X B Z  'B NJ M Z  $ I V S D I

CHURCHDEVOTIONAL&DIRECTORY

" 'B NJ M Z  $ I V S D I    3F B D I J O H  0 V U  5P  : P V  8J U I  ( P E  T  -P W F 

1B T U P S  %B O O Z  &   4P O T

This Devotional & Directory is made possible by those businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services. JEWISH

CONGREGATIONAL B’NAI ISRAEL 712 N. Washington, 622-7295, W.S. 2nd & 4th Fri. 7 p.m.

LUTHERAN

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN 1405 N. Sycamore at College, 622-2853Daniel Praeuner, Min., S.S. 10:20 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m.

REDEEMER LUTHERAN 2525 N. Spruce Ave., 6277157; W.S. 10 a.m.

ST. MARK EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 2911 N. Main St., 623-0519, Bill Bruggeman, Min.; S.S. 9:15 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m.

METHODIST

ALDERSGATE UNITED METHODIST 915 W 19th St, 625-2855, Jim Bignell, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m.

DEXTER UNITED METHODIST 112 W. 3rd St., Dexter, 734-6529, Jim Bignell, Min. S.S. 9:30a.m.; W.S. 11:00 a.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST 200 N. Pennsylvania, 6221881 Gorton Smith, Sr., Min.; S.S.9:15 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m.

IGLESIA METHODISTA UNIDA 213 E. Albuquerque; 208-0056, Carlos Espinoza, Min.; W.S. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 6:30 p.m.

TRINITY UNITED METHODIST 1413 S. Union, 622-0119, Ruth Fowler, Min.; S.S. 10 a.m.; WS. 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.

MORMON

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 2201 West Country Club Rd. First Ward: Hank Malcom, Bishop 623-2777; W.S. 9 a.m.; S.S. 10:10 a.m.

Second Ward: Ignacio Luevano, Bishop, 623-4492 W.S. 11 a.m.; S.S. 12:10 p.m. 3ra Rama (en EspaĂąol): Presidente McClellan; W.S. 2:15 p.m.; S.S. 12:15 p.m.

NAZARENE

CENTRAL CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 901 E. Country Club, 420-2907 Randy Elftman, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 501 N. Sycamore, 624-2614; Mike Couch, Int. Min.; S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m.

THE NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1019 S Lea; 623-0201; Hector Torres, Min.; S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Spanish Service 12:30 p.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY OF THE FAITH IN JESUS CHRIST 1721 N. Maryland, 624-2728, Ismael Chavarria, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Thurs. 7 p.m. APOSTOLIC BIBLE 2529 West Alameda, 625-8779, Rod Foster, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

APOSTOLIC FAMILY WORSHIP CENTER 1103 N Union; Joel Martinez, Min., 627-2258; W.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL 602 S. Mississippi, 347-2514, J.E. Shirley, Min. W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. GOD’S MESSENGER 3303 W Alameda; 625-0190; R. Dixon, Sr., Min.; S.S. 8:45 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. Noon HOUSE OF PRAYER 412 E. Matthews, 746-6699, Mike Valverde, Min. W.S. 5 p.m. Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.

IGLESIA DE DIOS 317 East Wildy, 627-6596, Catarino Cedillo, Min. Escuela Dominical 9:45 a.m., Servicio de Domingo por la tarde 5 p.m. Martes: Oracion y Estudio Biblico 7 p.m., Jueves: Servicio Ninos, Jovenes, Damas, Varones 7 p.m. LIFE MINISTRIES FOURSQUARE CHURCH 409 W. 16th, 622-3383; Wayne & Janice Snow, Mins.; W.S. 10:30 am,Wed. 7:00 p.m. NEW APOSTOLIC 813 N. Richardson, Ste. A, W.S. 10 a.m.

NEW LIFE APOSTOLIC 1800 W. Bland, 622-2989, Emnauel Norfor, Min.; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN DEXTER 201 West Fifth St., 734-5797, Stephen C. Deutsch, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN HAGERMAN 310 N. Cambridge, 743-5797 Stephen C. Deutsch, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 9:30a.m.; Mon. 4:30 p.m.

IGLESIA PRESBITERIANA HISPANA 300 North Missouri, 622-0756, Adam Soliz, Min. W.S. 11 a.m.

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN 2801 W. 4th St., 622-2801; Dr. Harry A. Cole, Int. Min..; S.S. 10:45 a.m.; W.S. 9:30 a.m.

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST

BEULAH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST 106 S. Michigan Ave., 243-6203; Alex Horton, Min. Sat. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISLA DEL 7 DIA 500 S. Cedar, 9106527, Noel Dominguez, Min. Sat. S.S. 11 a.m.; W.S. 9:30 a.m. Wed. 7 p.m. ROSWELL ENGLISH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Jaffa & S. Union, 623-4636, Ken Davis,Min. Sat. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 am. Wed. 7 p.m.

OTHER

ALBUQUERQUE/ ROSWELL FAMILY 501 Cagua S.E., 266-4468, Fritz Schneider, Min.

BEOD MOED HEBRAIC BIBLE CENTER 928 W. McGaffey, 840-6120, Sat. Hebraic Dance 1 p.m.; Torah Study 2 p.m.; Wed. Pray & Dance Practice 6 p.m. CALVARY CHAPEL OF ROSWELL 2901 W. 4th, 623-8072, W.S. 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

CHRIST’S CHURCH 2200 N. Sycamore, 623-4110 S.S. 8:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:00 am.

TRINITY APOSTOLIC FAITH 611 W. 17th, 6241910, Frank & Pearl Moser, Min. W.S. 11 a.m.

CHRISTIAN COWBOY FELLOWSHIP 3103 W. Alameda John Sturza, 6250255, 2nd and last Friday

PRESBYTERIAN

THE UNITED CHURCH OF ROSWELL Meeting @ Church Bldg @ 1st & Lea; W.S. 8:30 am Bob Maples, Pastor

TRINITY HOUSE OF PRAISE PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD 510 S. Montana, 623-2710, Bobby Barnett, Min. W.S. 9:45 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 400 W. 3rd St., 622-4910, Hugh Burroughs, Min. S.S. 8:30 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. 24-Hr Daily Inspiration Hotline 623-5439

CHURCH OF GOD 7TH DAY 1722 N. Kansas, 6237295, Sat. W.S. 9:45 a.m.

CHURCH ON THE MOVE 901 W. Brasher Rd., 6227011, Troy Smothermon, Min. W.S. 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN 1500 S. Main, 622-2392, S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m. GATEWAY 1900 Sycamore Ave., 623-8670, Rick Rapp, Min. W.S. 10:30 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. GRACE COMMUNITY 935 W. Mescalero, 623-5438 Rick Hale,Min.; W.S. 9 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. H.I.S. HOUSE 300 W. 3rd, Dexter, 734-6873 Ron & Jeri Fuller, Mins. W.S. 10 a.m. Wed.6 p.m. NARROW WAY 2200 N. Sycamore, 623-2511, Lyman Graham, Min. W.S. 2 p.m. ORTHODOX BAHA’I FAITH obfusa@rt66.com 622-5729 ROSWELL CHRISTIAN OUTREACH MINISTRIES 101 S. Sunset; Joe Diaz, Min. W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m. ROSWELL PRAYER CENTER 622-4111/317-3867; Sat. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Weekdays 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., 6 p..m. to 9 p.m. SALVATION ARMY 612 W. College, 622-8700 Beau & Mandy Perez, Mins. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m.; B.S. Thurs. 6:30 p.m. THE CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY 2322 N. Sherman; Lawrence S. Sanchez, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. THE DOOR 129 E. 3rd St. 781-0360; Gabriel Rubi, Min.; W.S. 10:30 am & 6 pm. Wed. 7 pm WASHINGTON CHAPEL CHRISTIAN 110 S. Michigan St., 623-3511 Rev. Abukusumo, Min.; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. WAYMAKER 202 S. Sunset, 627-9190 Mike & Twyla Knowlton, Mins.; W.S. 10 a.m.; J12 (8-12 yr. olds) 4 p.m.; Revolution Youth Service 6 p.m.; Wed. Core Home Groups 7 p.m.


B6 Saturday, May 14, 2011

CLASSIFIEDS/ENTERTAINMENT

Roswell Daily Record

Is ‘Boston’ Rob cruising to a ‘Survivor’ win? LOS ANGELES (AP) — “Survivor: Redemption Island” should have been subtitled “Survivor: Boston Rob Island” because Rob Mariano, the CBS reality competition’s tell-it-likeit-is veteran schemer, has dominated the Nicaragua-set 22nd edition with both his on-camera swagger and ability to deftly dispatch his opposition on the way to Sunday’s finale. “One man should not have this much power in this game,” the 35-year-old Mariano said in the latest installment while wearing a self-knowing smirk. “Luckily, I’m not an ordinary man.” It’s not shocking considering Mariano has competed on — and lost — “Survivor” more than any other player, never winning the $1 million prize. He debuted on the “Marquesas” season nine years ago as one of the game’s biggest trash talkers, but he was dumped after the tribes merged. Marino later earned a spot on “All-Stars,” where he aligned with “Australian Outback” alum Amber Brkich. Mariano made it to the “AllStars” finale with Brkich, who ultimately bested him by earning just one more vote. It wasn’t a total loss for Mariano. The pair married and now have two daughters. One month after the birth of his first child, Mariano returned to “Survivor” to film the “Heroes vs. Villains” edition. He only managed to make eighth place. “Samoa” bad boy Russell Hantz plotted Mariano’s dismissal, paving the way for this season’s “Redemption Island” showdown. The much ballyhooed bout between the duo, who were sent to opposing tribes of newbies at the start, never sizzled because members of Hantz’s tribe threw a challenge and ousted the double loser for the first time on “Survivor.” Meanwhile, Mariano became the undisputed leader of his Ometepe tribe, persuading his

AP Photo

In this undated publicity image released by CBS, contestant Rob Mariano is shown during the filming of the reality competition series "Survivor: Redemption Island," in Nicaragua. Mariano, the CBS reality competition's tell-it-like-it-is veteran schemer, has dominated the Nicaragua-set 22nd edition with both his on-camera swagger and ability to deftly dispatch his opposition on the way to the finale on Sunday. colleagues to vote out their smartest and strongest tribe mates, then forming an impenetrable alliance that methodically sent each member of the opposing Zapatera tribe packing after they merged. It was an airtight strategy for Mariano but inevitable TV for viewers. “Everyone on that tribe trusted Rob,” said Julie Wolfe, the fourth castaway to be picked off by Mariano’s gang. “He had them all convinced that he was going to take them to the end, and they really believed that. They truly believed that. It was a whole different vibe than on our tribe. We didn’t trust Russell at all. They had much, much more trust in Rob.”

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish April 30, May 7, 14, 21, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT BANK OF OKLAHOMA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs.

CV 2010-1061

JAVIER MARTINEZ-BLANCO, a single man, Defendant.

NOTICE OF SALE ON FORECLOSURE

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the above-entitled Court, having appointed me or my designee as Special Master in this matter with the power to sell, has ordered me to sell the real property (the "Property") situated Chaves County, New Mexico, commonly known as 1607 W. Alameda, Roswell, New Mexico, 88203, and more particularly described as follows: THE EAST 30’ OF LOT 19 AND THE WEST 45’ OF LOT 20, BLOCK 8 OF AMENDED PLAT OF FAIR PARK SUBDIVISION, IN THE CITY OF ROSWELL, COUNTY OF CHAVEZ AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT RECORDED JULY 11, 1946 IN PLAT BOOK B, PAGE 55, REAL PROPERTY RECORDS OF CHAVES COUNTY, NEW MEXICO.

The sale is to begin at 1:45 p.m. on June 2, 2011, outside the front entrance to the Fifth Judicial District Courthouse, City of Roswell, County of Chaves, State of New Mexico, at which time I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in lawful currency of the United States of America, the Property to pay expenses of sale, and to satisfy the Judgment granted to Bank of Oklahoma, N.A. Bank of Oklahoma, N.A., was awarded a Judgment on April 15, 2011, in the principal sum of $79,244.78, plus outstanding interest through April 1, 2011, in the amount of $5,077.60 and accruing daily thereafter at a rate of $15.18 per day, plus late charges of $371.48, plus a FHA premium fee of $64.54, plus fees currently assessed of $9.00, plus escrow advances of $3,165.55, plus attorney's fees through April 1, 2011, in the sum of $950.00 and costs through April 1, 2011, in the sum of $499.94, with interest on the late charges, fees assessed, advance escrow, FHA premium, plus attorney's fees and costs of this suit at the rate of 6.99% per annum from date of the entry of this Judgment until paid. The sale is subject to rights and easements of record, to unpaid property taxes and assessments, and to the one (1) month right of redemption in favor of the Defendant(s) as specified in the Judgment filed herein. __________ Faisal Sukhyani Special Master 2222 Parkwest Drive, N.W. Albuquerque, New Mexico 87120 (505) 228-8484

Legals

---------------------------------Publish May 7, 14, 2011

IN THE PROBATE COURT OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO Cause No. 8877

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF LENORA ROGERS, DECEASED NOTICE TO CREDITORS

PATRICIA J. STRASSLE has been appointed Personal Representative for the Estate of LENORA ROGERS. All persons having claims against this Estate are required to present their claims within two (2) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the Personal Representative in care of Ronald D. Hillman at Hinkle, Hensley, Shanor & Martin, P.O. Box 10, Roswell, New Mexico 88202 or filed with the Probate Court of Chaves County, New Mexico. DATED this 4th day of May, 2011.

s/Patricia J. Strassle, Personal Representative HINKLE, SHANOR L.L.P.

HENSLEY, & MARTIN,

By: s/Ronald D. Hillman P.O. Box 10 Roswell New Mexico 88202 (575) 622-6510 (575) 623-9332 fax Attorneys for the Personal Representative for the Estate of Lenora Rogers, Deceased.

Since devastating the Zapatera tribe, Mariano’s name has not been written down by the remaining contestants at Tribal Council. In fact, it hasn’t even really been uttered as a possibility, from what viewers have been shown. Instead, Mariano cunningly calculated the demise of two allies, including his right-hand man, former NFL player Grant Mattos. “They didn’t know how to play the game without Rob,” said Ralph Kiser, who was eliminated. “They couldn’t talk, even at Tribal Council, without looking to see what expression ‘Boston’ Rob had on his face. That was a shocker. We were all grown-up people there, but it’s like they

Legals

---------------------------------Publish May 7, 14, 21, 2011

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO DM-2011-284

ANDRES ENRIQUE VILLALOBOS Petitioner, vs.

IVONNE ADRIANA VILLALOBOS (FAVELA) Respondent. RE: DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

STATE OF NEW MEXICO TO: GREETINGS: Notice is hereby given you that an action has been brought in the District Court of Chaves County, NO DM-11-284 in which Andres Enrique Villalobos is the Petitioner, and you are the Respondent, requesting a Dissolution of Marriage. Unless you enter an appearance in said cause on or before July 3, 2011, judgment will be rendered in said cause against you by default.

Petitioner’s Address Is: 210 West Bland, Apt #B Roswell, New Mexico 88203 KENNON CROWHURST Clerk of the District Court By: s/Vincent Espinoza

were afraid. I don’t know what the deal was with that.” Despite Mariano’s apparent control over the three other remaining players — wacky former federal agent Phillip Sheppard, beauty queen Ashley Underwood and dancer Natalie Tenerelli — a victory for Mariano won’t necessarily be easy. This season’s twist will allow one of the four eliminated players to return at some point during Sunday’s finale. Each of those folks — dreadlocked Mattos, chiseled former Marine Mike Chiesl and blond college students Andrea Boehlke and Matt Elrod — have a bone to pick with Mariano, especially the religious Elrod,

GARAGE SALES

DO N’T’ MI SS A SALE BY MISSING THE 2:00 PM DEADLINE FOR PLACING YOUR ADS

001. North 1520 N. Michigan Saturday 7am

3107 CIRCLE Diamond Saturday 7am-3pm

002. Northeast ALL OF Northsky Loop, May 14th, 7am-1pm. All kinds of items at homes. 401 N. Atkinson, Friday-Saturday, 8am-3pm. 3201 DELICADO Sat. 7-12 sm. camp trailer, kayaks, ski/bike rack, bedding, wheel chair, office chair, TV, sewing machine & lots of misc. 306 E. Vista Pkwy. MOVING/GARAGE SALE Fri-Sat, 7am-2pm. Solid wood, 8 chair dining set, queen size bedroom with armoire, side tables & lamps. Entertainment center, computer desk, bunkbeds, etc. Info 910-3733. 36 NORTH Sky Loop Sat. 7am-Noon Part of neighborhood sale. Toys, clothes, kitchenware, furniture, art, books, dishes, crystal, china, misc.

002. Northeast 2412 N. Prairie Sat. 6-? Lots of good things Cheap Prices

2709 N. Orchard Sat. 7am BBQ, mower, mens bike & much more. 1904 N. Atkinson, Sat. 8-2. Big Yard Sale 3019 FUTURA Dr, Saturday, May 14th, 7am. Bikes, lots of clothes (children & adult), misc. 2404 ISLER Rd, Sat & Sun 14th-15th. Clothes, dishes & lots more. 317-9826

003. East

408 E 5th St. Friday & Saturday 8-? Tools, home furnishings and misc. 303 E. Second St. Friday & Saturday 7am Misc. and tools.

004. Southeast

805 S. Main St., St. Peters back Parking Lot. Saturday Only 7:30-?. Youth Trip Fund Raiser. Huge Sale golf clubs (ex cond), excersize equip. Too many items too mention. No Junk!

005. South

607 S. Plaza Dr., Saturday, May 14th, 7am-12pm. 202 S. Lea Ave Sat. 8am-2pm Vintage items, furniture, lots more 506 S. Lincoln St. Johns Church Sat. 7:30-3pm Patio sale for Queen Candidates

006. Southwest

308 BROKEN Arrow, Sat., 7:30am-? Backyard Sale: No Early Birds! Furniture, mattress sets, toys, clothes, bedding & more.

1604 S. Missouri, May 14th, 7am-3pm. Guitar case, exercise bike, washer & dryer, pick up tool box, Igloo dog house, tools, stereo, clothes, dishes, patio swing set w/cushion, lots of misc.

504 MISSION Arch, Fri-Sat, 8-2. Furniture, clothes, home decorations, dishes, toys.

406 S. Kentucky, Friday-Saturday, 6am-12pm.

who has spent most of his Redemption Island time praying to God and fighting for chances to return to the game after Mariano put him there. Twice. “It seems like no matter what the situation is on ‘Survivor,’ I have to do the dirty work because everyone else is too stupid to do it,” Mariano said on Wednesday’s episode. If he loses Sunday, it will be Marino’s sixth loss on reality TV. (He also attempted to win two rounds of “The Amazing Race,” including an “All-Star” season, with Brkich.) That just might be a sign that Mariano should retire from “Survivor” — or apply for “Big Brother.”

006. Southwest 608 S. Largo Friday & Saturday 7-12 both days.

3 SUNSET Place, Sat. 8am-2pm. Lots of misc. items. 416 S. Cedar Friday & Saturday 8am-2pm Lots of stuff 79 FITZGERALD, Fri-Sat 7am-3pm. Baby clothes, shoes, baby stuff, fantasy jewelry, ceramic things, many, many things. Little bit of everything.

203 S. Ohio Saturday only 6am-? 901 W. Mathews, Sat., 6am-6pm. Spring Cleaning, swamp cooler, kitchen items, clothes, home furnishings, misc. 1705 W. Summit Friday-Sunday Moving Sale All Must Go! MONDAY NOON- 7pm, Tues. 7am-7pm, Wed. 7am-? Huge multi family sale 506 S. Mississippi

008. Northwest 1006 KINGS Dr, Sat. & Sun. 9a-12p. Misc. household, tools, some camping equipment, clothes, books, ceramics. No Early Birds!!

903 SAUNDERS Dr. (end of 8th in Enchanted Hills), Fri-Sat, May 13-14, 9-4. Moving - must sell: Furniture, electronics, household items, barbeque, washer dryer, and much more. Must see! 3 KENSINGTON Sat. $150 elect. stove, $250 upright freezer, clothes, household, misc. 908 N. Kentucky, Sat. 8am. Decorator items, glassware, household goods, etc. HUGE YARD Sale: 3 families - anything & everything you could want. Fri-Sat, 8am-? New items daily. 1509 N. Montana

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice

007. West

PAY CASH all day long for household items. Top prices paid for furniture, antiques, appliances, collectibles, tools, saddles, plus everything else from A to Z, including personal estates. 627-2033 or 623-6608

4510 W. 2nd, Fri-Sat, 9am-2pm. All kinds of items, bargains galore. Furniture, dishes, collectibles, books, records, old trunks, etc.

WANT TO LEARN

1423 W Alameda Sat. 6:30-12 Two-party sale, crib, changing table, some small furniture, home decor, toys, clothes, womens, mens, kids $3 a bagful

008. Northwest MULTI-FAMILY/ Churchwide Garage Sale/Fundraiser Sat. May 14, 7am-12pm, First Assembly of God, 1224 W. Country Club Rd. Cnr of Montana & Country Club. Lg furniture, appliances, fixtures, kids toys, housewares, etc.

about JESUS?

Come worship with us SATURDAY 10:45am 9:30am SS

Seventh Day Adventist Church 2915 South Union Ave (S. Union and Jaffa), Roswell, NM


Roswell Daily Record INSTRUCTION

015. Personals Special Notice FOOD ADDICTS Anonymous 12 step fellowship offering freedom from eating disorders. Meeting on Thursdays at 7pm, 313 W. Country Club Rd. #5. For more information call 575-910-8178 GLAMOUR GIRL BOUTIQUE

045. Employment Opportunities

030. Education & Instructions

DOMINO'S PIZZA is now hiring drivers. Earn up to $13 per hour. Apply online today at careers.dominos.com

MEDICAL MANAGEMENT Careers start here-Get connected online. Attend college on your own time. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 800-481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com

PULLING UNIT Operator, and CDL Driver. Please apply at the local unemployment office or at 1007 W. Main St., Artesia, NM.

EMPLOYMENT

NOW OPEN 320 N. MAIN ST. Bring in this ad & receive 10% off entire purchase. Fri-Sun

LOOKING FOR a Medical Office Manager, FT, 2-3 yrs supervisory exp, billing experience preferred, good organizational skills. Mail resume to PO Box 1617, Roswell, NM 88202.

045. Employment Opportunities

025. Lost and Found

AVON, Buy or Sell. Pay down your bills. Start your own business for $10. Call Sandy 317-5079 ISR.

LOST; REWARD Boston Terrier, nuetered male, “Bart” or “Weezle Boy”, black brindle/white, missing 5/8/11 - Union & 8th. Please call 840-8828 or 420-9084 Please help get our boy back.

SUMMER WORK Great Pay Immediate FT/PT openings Customer Sales/Svc, no exp. nec, conditions apply. All ages 17+, 575-627-0447

Dexter Consolidated Schools NOTICE OF VACANCY

FOUND 5/11 at corner of Union & 19th: Female Yorkie (?) mix. Collar, but no tags. CALL 840-8065 for more information. FOUND GOLDEN poodle on 4th & Montana. Call Ann 626-2540 FOUND YEAR old wired hair Terrier cross full male white and brown on Montana Noon Opt Little League baseball park. Call to identify 420-8455 FOUND SMALL dog in vicinity of 8th & Montana. Call to describe. 624-1358

Position Available: Elementary School Principal for the 2011-2012 school year. Must meet New Mexico licensure requirements. Applications are available in the Human Resources Department, P.O. Box 159, Dexter, NM 88230 or on our website www.dexterdemons.org. For further information or inquiries contact Patricia Parsons, Superintendent, 1-575-734-5420 ext 310 or by email at parsonsp@dexterdemons.org. Application deadline: Until filled. The Dexter Consolidated School District is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, national origin, religion, age, sex, marital status or disability in compliance with federal and state laws.

BURRITOS AND More now hiring. Apply after 1 o’clock Monday through Friday. CHANGE A LIFE Be a Comfort Keeper We are hiring experienced caregivers to work days or week-ends. Earn a competitive wage for something you already enjoy doing. We provide non medical assistance to seniors in their homes in Roswell & Artesia. Call Carol at 624-9999 or come to 1410 S. Main St. Roswell to apply. www.BeAComfortkeeper.com

HIRING DELIVERY driver & experienced cook. Accepting resumes only at 100 S. Richardson between 2-4pm Mon-Fri.

FOUND SMALL female poodle on 4th & Montana. 626-2540

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

UPS STORE requires retail experience, outstanding customer service skills and a willingness to work hard, competitive wage plus incentives. Submit resume to

RETAIL MERCHANDISER WANTED to service Hallmark Products at the US Post Office and Hastings store located in Roswell, NM. To apply, visit www.hallmark. candidatecare.com

RUIDOSO FINANCIAL Institution needing a Branch Manager and Two Part-Time Tellers. Requires basic computer skills, must be detail oriented and have excellent customer service skills, banking experience preferred. Company offers excellent work environment, salary based on skills and experience. Part-time positions do not have paid benefits. Please fax cover letter, resume’, and three references to: 575-622-2340 or mail to HR Dept., 2514 N. Main Street, Roswell, NM 88201. RUIDOSO FEDERAL CREDIT UNION opening June 2011.

CAREER TECHNICAL Instructor Substitute AutomotiveThe Roswell Job Corps Center is looking for a long-Term substitute for the Automotive Trade. High school or equivalent education and one year of knowledge and experience in the related automotive field. Must have a valid driver's license with an acceptable driving record. Must successfully pass a background check.

job.theupsstore@gmail.com

LAKEVIEW CHRISTIAN Home in Carlsbad, NM is in search of a full-time COTA. Must be NM certified and able to pass a background check. If interested please contact Cory or Marti at 575- 887- 3947. MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTIONIST position part-time; could lead to more. Serious inquiries only. MUST have experience and have excellent grammar and typing skills. Great for a supplemental income. Must be able to work daytime between 9 to 5. Please send resumes to PO Box 1897 Unit 266, Roswell, NM 88202. SELF-STORAGE FACILITY seeking full-time Employee. Capable of Lawn maintenance, Cleaning empty units, hauling trash, Etc. Must be computer Literate and people friendly. Hours will vary Monday thru Friday. Saturdays are mandatory from 9-5:30 p.m. If interested please send resume to: PO Box 1897 Unit 246, Roswell, NM 88202 DRIVERS Come join our team! Coastal Transport is seeking Drivers with Class (A) CDL. Must be 23 yrs old (X) Endorsement with 1 yr experience, excellent pay, home everyday! Paid Vacation, saftey bonus, company paid life inc. We provide state of the art training program. $2000 sign on bonus. For more information call 1-877-297-7300 or 575-748-8808 between 8am & 4pm, Monday-Friday.

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575) 622-7710 #45 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SATURDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

045. Employment Opportunities

L&F DISTRIBUTORS Seeks 2 Receptionists. Ideal candidate will be responsible for answering phones and other office duties as assigned. Candidates must possess effective written and verbal communication skills, be self motivated; detail oriented and have strong work ethics. Apply in person only. 2200 N. Atkinson Ave. Roswell, NM 88201 Equal Opportunity Employer MJG CORPORATION is currently accepting applications for a Maintenance technician. Applicant must have a general knowledge of repairing restaurant equipment such as fryers, toasters, microwaves and meat slicers and basic building repairs. Some travel may be involved. Must have own tools and equipment. Send resume or employment history to 204 W 4th. St. Roswell, NM 88201 or call 575-622-8711. ARBY'S AND Dairy Queen of New Mexico and Texas is currently accepting applications for HVAC Technician and must be able to work on restaurant equipment. We offer: Top Salary and Benefits. Send resume or employment history to 204 W. 4th St. Roswell, New Mexico 88201 or fax to 575-623-3075. INTERIM HEALTHCARE is hiring a PRN/RN with home health care experience in the Roswell area. . Apply online or call Twila to schedule an interview. (877) 389-1300 2200 North Main St., Suite 3, Hilltop Plaza Clovis, NM 88101-3569 Interim HEALTH CARE EOE www. interimhealthcare. com

IMMEDIATE OPENING for CDL & non-CDL drivers, call Connie 626-9155 or Ken 626-0505. L&F DISTRIBUTORS Class A CDL Drivers For Roswell, NM Area L&F Distributors. seeks an Class A CDL Driver for their Roswell, New Mexico facility. Qualified applicant must have good driving record. Current commercial license preferable. Previous experience delivering product a plus. Good communication and customer service skills. Interested applicants apply at:: L&F Distributors 2200 North Atkinson Roswell, NM 88201 575-622-0380 An Equal Opportunity Employer

APPLICATIONS ARE ACCEPTED ONLINE ONLY

View Job Description and Apply online at: www.chugachjobs.com Deadline to apply: Open Until Filled An Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F, D/V SCHLUMBERGER is currently hiring for Class A CDL drivers & diesel mechanics for permanent positions. Must have good background & driving record & posses ability to pass drug & functional capacity testing. Competitive wages. Please contact SOS Staffing and email resume & current phone number to dept251@ sosstaffing.com Call 575-625-1136 or come into office at 315 W. 2nd St. to schedule interview. BUSY OFFICE seeking full time receptionist, computer skills, reliable, friendly, and able to multi-task and work with the public. Send your resume c/o Roswell Daily Record P.O. Box 1897 Unit 267, Roswell, NM 88202. HUMAN RESOURCES Manager Counseling Associates, Inc. is seeking responsible qualified indivudual to fill full time position as a HR Manager. Qualifications: High School diploma, good computer knowledge including, excellent telephone and people skills and 3 years office experience. Bi-lingual, English/Spanish a plus. This position will be 40 hours per week. An EOE. Salary DOE. Send resume to: Counseling Associates, Inc C/O Brenda Delgado PO Box 1978 Roswell, NM 88202 NM DEPARTMENT of Transportation Is now recruiting for the following positions located in Roswell, NM. A/O II District Administrator Ops Manager Responsible for: Budget / Accounting / Purchasing Carpenter- Advanced

Please apply online @ www.spo.state.nm.us If you have any questions or need any additional assistance Please call Becky Aguilar at 575-637-7821 Or email at becky.aguilar@state.nm.us The State of New Mexico Department of Transportation Is an Equal Opportunity Employer

THE DEXTER Post Office has an opening for a Rural Carrier Associate Non-scheduled days: Varies, but works all Saturdays Hours: Average 9 hrs/wk plus additional hours as needed to cover scheduled and unscheduled absences. Additional work may be available at surrounding offices PRN. Salary: $19.45/HR to start Driving Required. You must have a good driving record and be able to provide a reliable vehicle for delivery. You must be capable of learning to drive your vehicle from the right seat. You will be reimbursed for mileage at the standard prevailing rate. Further qualifications and restrictions are available online. This is a NON-CAREER position and earns no benefits. It can possibly transition into a career position. For further information go to USPS.COM and find the link “Rewarding Opportunities; Visit Our Career Center”. All applications must be made online. Posting will be available approximately 5/12-5/26/2011. SEEKING cosmetologist for health spa hourly + commission. Send resume and letter of interest to socoruiz5040@gmail.com by 5/20/11. OPTIONS HOME Care has care giving positions in the Roswell/Hagerman areas. Requirements: reliable vehicle; proof of auto insurance; negative TB test result; able to pass a background criminal check; available weekdays and weekends. Seeking dedicated bilingual caregivers experienced in working with the elderly and/or disabled. Call our JOBLINE: 1-888-573-2646. TAKING APPLICATIONS for PT 4-11pm Concierge positions. Weekends are a must. Serious inquiries only apply @ Peachtree Village, 1301 W. Country Club Rd. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Saturday, May 14, 2011

045. Employment Opportunities

Dennis the Menace

B7

KYMERA

NEW MEDICAL OFFICE POSITIONS:

As a growing Independent Physicians Office, Kymera and is now seeking Qualified Applicants for:

Lab Technologist / CLS PT - Fri PM thru Weekends in Urgent Care Clinic 3-4 yrs exp preferred. Medical Technologist ASEP or equivalent. Ability to work independently. Office Manager: FT - 3-4 yrs supervisory exp in medical office setting. Applicants should demonstrate friendly/outgoing attitude, organization skills, and the ability to work with patients in a medical office setting. Computer Knowledge required. Medical Biller/Coder: FT - 2-4 yrs Medical Billing-Coding exp; communication, critical thinking & people skills required. Knowledge of EMR systems and accounting experience or degree preferred.

Receptionist & Scheduling Clerk FT - exp working in medical clinic setting. Must possess customer service and computer skills and the ability to multitask in a fast-paced work environment. Accountant: FT - 2-4 yrs exp working with medical office accounts. BA in Accounting.

IT Support: PT - Associates Degree in Technology or equivalent exp. Entry Level Certifications/Licenses. Ability to work independently. Please Fax resume with cover letter to: HR Mngr 627-9520

MAINTENANCE TECH needed for small apartment community. Must have experience with cleaning, painting, plumbing, electrical, appliance repair and minor repairs. Knowledge or certification of HVAC is preferable. Must supply own tools. This is a full time position. Submit resume to PO Box 1897 Unit #268 Roswell, NM 88202. VETERINARIAN ASSISTANT Position available at progressive veterinarian facility. Working with dogs, cats, and horses. Must be responsible, multi-tasker with good communication skills. Drop off resume by May 20, 2011 at 1607 Fowler Road. Come be part of the Elite Team! Elite Gymnastics Academy now accepting applications for coaching positions. Experience preferred or athletic background, train in-house. Apply in person at 1315 N. Virginia. 575-622-1511

WE’RE LOOKING for a friendly and professional part time Night Auditor to join our team. In return, the Holiday Inn Express & Suites will give you a competitive wage and bonus program, and opportunities to learn new skills and grow your career. On top of this, you’ll join a great team that makes work fun, so you will feel motivated to come to work every day. If this sounds like the perfect move for you or if you want to find out more pick up an application at 2300 N. Main. THE ROSWELL Daily Record is accepting applications for a part-time typist. Candidates must be able to type quickly and accurately and have a clean driving record and a reliable personal vehicle. Applications are available out 2301 N. Main St.

FULL CHARGE bookkeeper; minimum 10 years experience required. 25-30 hours per week, additional hours may be required. Send resume with references to First Baptist Church, PO Box 1996, Roswell, NM 88202. "LOCAL SOUTHEAST New Mexico business man looking for serious people who want to work from home part time or full time and earn a solid income. We are affiliated with a company that has been in business for 30+ years and business is exploding. Please email us at great_opportunities1@ hotmail.com or call us at 575-308-2995."

SERVICES

075. Air Conditioning

SWAMP COOLER service & repair professional & affordable. Free estimates. Frank 624-5370, 637-2211

100. Babysitting WILL BABYSIT children 2-10yrs old. 625-9572

105. Childcare

NEED CHILD care? Find the widest range of available childcare for your children and their needs. 1-800-691-9067 or www.newmexic okids.org. You may also call us; Family Resource & Referral 622-9000 and we can help you navigate the system.

105. Childcare

NEED DAYCARE? Looking for a warm loving home environment? We are looking for 1 or 2 full time children to join our little group. If this is what you want, call Jan or Verna at 623-3315. References available.

125. Carpet Cleaning

R.B. Carpet Cleaning. Home and Commercial. Free Estimates. Cell 910-0685 or 910-1300

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 HOUSE/OFFICE Cleaning low prices. Excellent work call anytime. 575-973-2649 575-973-3592 SUNSHINE WINDOW Service. We do Windows Brite. Free estimates. Commercial and residential. 575-626-5458 or 575-626-5153. SUNSHINE WINDOW Service. We do Windows Brite. Free estimates. Commercial and residential. 575-626-5458 or 575-626-5153. HOUSE CLEANER, reliable, honest, 22 yrs. exp. 623-8563 LOOKING FOR a house keeper? Look no more. I clean houses, buildings, & offices. Reasonable prices. 575-626-5497 or 575-623-8214 I WILL clean your house or office, good ref., 10 yrs exp. Call Isela 317-7952 House cleaning-fast & reliable, reasonable rates, ref. avail. 575-444-6497 NEEDED HOUSEKEEPER with the ability to prepare various breakfast. Call 622-8615

185. Electrical

BIG HORN Electric Professional work, affordable price. 575-317-8345 NM Lic#367662.

195. Elderly Care

MATURE LADY will help with your loved ones while you work or shop. Light cleaning. 575-914-1610.

200. Fencing

Fence Restoration, new installs, fast quote, lic#367947. BBB Member. 575-840-8395 M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

225. General Construction

TEE TIME Construction Commercial/Residential Construction - Spray foam insulation, framing, cement, roofing, drywalln painting, New Construction of Homes, Additions, Remodeling, and Metal Buildings. Licensed & Bonded. Call 575-626-9686 FOR ALL your construction or renovation needs call 317-3366 licensed contractor with over 20 yrs exp.

235. Hauling

Will Haul away anything, storage, storage building & etc. 575-914-0864 PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Greenscapes Sprinkler Systems Lawn mowing, field mowing, gravel, sod-hydro seed, pruning, tilling, For dependable & reliable service call 622-2633 or 910-0150. WEEKEND WARRIOR Lawn Service mowing, property cleanup, residential rain gutter cleaning, and much more 575-626-6121

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Roswell Lawn Service mow trim pruning & general cleanup rototill 444-7652. LAWN MOWING Best prices Call 623-3709 or cell 910-3787 CALL BOB lawn mowing, trash hauling, clean-up, reasonable prices. 575-420-2670 Better Lawn Care Mowing, Weed Eating and Edging. Prices Starting at $15.00. Call for Free Estimates. Jeremy 575-637-6761. Gonzales Enterprises We specialize in sprinklers, landscaping, sod, reseeding, fencing, flagstone paving stones, trees, odd jobs. Just ask, we may do it. 575-317-8053 Yard work, clean-ups, lawns. Handyman svc. Mon-Thur. after 4pm David 637-9580, Danny 626-0755 WE WORK Cut Lawns Lots - Trees - Haul & rototilling. Will 317-7402 FIRE SEASON - Tractor mowing, lawn care, handyman jobs. Honest, reliable & dependable. Call Paul 575-208-2864. Brush Hog, posthole auger box blade/light tractor work reasonable rates 444-6224 AFFORDABLE LAWN service. Commercial & residential. For free estimates call Junior 317-4737. CHAVEZ SPRINKLER CO. COMPLETE LANDSCAPING AND SPRINKLER SYSTEM & REPAIRS, ROCK WORK, TREES, SHRUBS, TRACTOR & DUMP TRUCK WORK. FREE ESTIMATES. CALL HECTOR 420-3167 ORTEGA’S LAWN Mowing, rototilling, pressure washing, landscaping, sprinkler repairs, etc! Call James 575-444-8555, Connie 575-444-8519 Free Estimates DECORATIVE Concrete Landscape Borders. A decorative concrete border is an attractive, permanent landscape accent. It will not rust like metal, decompose like wood, break like plastic, or move like brick. It is one continuos piece of concrete that can be colored to accent the landscape, and can be stamped with a variety of designs. Call Landscape Borders by Larry at 575-420-6765 for a free estimate. WILL MOW lawn at price you choose. Also do odd jobs, sprinkler maintenance. 347-5648 or 626-0518 “Keep It Clean” Lawn Service & Hauling anything. 623-1578 or 910-2033 LAWN CLEANING & basic cleanup. 910-1300 or 910-0685

285. Miscellaneous Services

THE NEW MEXICO SEED LOAN PROGRAM is available to small businesses owned by individuals with diabilities and provides low interest loans for the purchase of equipment and related supplies needed to expand or start a business. Contact the New Mexico Seed Loan Program at 1-800-866-2253 or www.nmseedloans.org for more information. A low interest loan program of DVR State of New Mexico.

305. Computers PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER services at affordable prices. Call (575)317-9930.

310. Painting/ Decorating

Quality Painting! Interior, Exterior at prices you can afford. Mike 910-7012 TIME TO PAINT? Quality interior and exterior painting at affordable prices. Call 637-9108.

312. Patio Covers

M.G. HORIZONS Patio covers, concrete, decks & awnings Lic. 623-1991.


B8 Saturday, May 14, 2011 345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 625-9924 / 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing Need A Roof?

Call R & R Construction 18 years in Roswell. 622-0072 RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397 www.rancheroswelding.com

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

395. Stucco Plastering

RWC Lath and Stucco. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397

www.rancheroswelding.com

405. TractorWork

RWC Bobcat and Dump Works. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397. www.rancheroswelding.com

LANGFORD TRACTOR work. Septic tanks installed/inspected. Blade work and backhoe work. Gravel, topsoil. 623-1407.

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 SUPERIOR SERVICES parking lot, landscaping, tree, service 20 yrs experience. 575-420-1873 AFFORDABLE, EXPERIENCED, qualify, senior discounts, tree service, free estimate. 575-317-4317

435. Welding

WELD ANYTHING ranch pipe, or repair and etc. 575-914-0864 RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insurance.

www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397

WELDING SERVICES: Fabrication & repair. Call 575-420-4403 or 575-910-3856.

FINANCIAL

485. Business Opportunities

FOR SALE FENCED COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 210x115 w/3200 SQFT SHOP & OFFICE IN & OUTSIDE PARKING. 100 N. PINE. CALL 575-910-2070.

TIRED OF living paycheck to paycheck? Call me to show you how to build residual income. Leave your contact info. 623-0459

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale Reduced for quick sale $98,000, Brokers welcome. #3 Forest Dr. 2050 square feet. 4 Bedroom, 1 3/4 bath. Esquibel Real Estate. 575-626-7550 CISCO

3/1, NEWLY remodeled, large backyard, near Goddard & Wool Bowl. 626-1019 or 625-0605 BEAUTIFUL 2004, 2 story mountain home in upper canyon, Ruidoso, NM. 3br 2 full baths, 3 decks, new furnishings, backyard. $299,000. 626-2249 TOWNHOUSE, 1400 sqft, 2br, 2ba, laundry room/study, new roof, cedar fence, stucco, porch, tile & carpet. Refinished kitchen & bath cabinets & new paint throughout, washer & dryer. Large corner lot. Call 575-491-4235 3Br 2Ba, $100k; 4br 1ba, $60k; 624-1331 for appt, M-Th 8am-4pm FOR SALE By Owner: North Springs, 2614 N. Pennsylvania, $116,000, 2br, 2ba, 1750 sqft, new appliances, 623-6748 or 626-3141. 1816 N. Michigan, $4500 dn, $600 mo, ready now. Leave message, 623-0459 2BR, 1BA large fenced yard, new roof, new paint. 402 E. 23rd 623-5058 FSBO 3BR, 2BA, living room, dining room, & laundry room, brand new stainless steel appliances, including side by side refrigerator, new faux wood blinds, entire bank of south facing windows for winter sun in living area, cathedral ceilings, tile floor w/new carpet in bedroom, new interior & closet doors, carport w/locked storage, landscaped w/sprinklers & fenced yard, 1 block to Roswell High School, $95k. Call 575-653-4654.

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

6 PLUS acres in Buena Vida subdivision w/electricity, in phase 1 w/beautiful view. Possible owner financing. 626-9686 Small Farm, 6 acres, irrigation, 4+br, 2 & 3/4 ba., central air, FP, 2 out buildings, porches, barn, much more $279,500. 425-864-5483 5 ACRES, $25K as is, septic system, 3809 Zinnia, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 BUENA VIDA 1 5 + ac., $42,000; 7.5 + ac., $47,000. Ready for your dream home. Well & electricity. Wise Choice RE, 575-625-6935 & 575-317-1605. Call Ruth, Owner/Broker. Will finance. NEW MEXICO LAND SALE. 40 acre tracts from $42,500. Over 7000’ elevation, treed, county road, utilities, great views, elk country, peace and quiet. NMWP 575-773-4996 RUIDOSO, NM AREA – 3 acres w/city water and city maintained roads near small fishing pond and golf course. Only $17,900. Financing avail. Call NMRS 1-866-906-2857. LENDER SALE. 40 Acres -$39,900. Spellbinding views of snow capped mountains! Adjacent to National Forest. Maintained all weather roads w/electric. Close to Ruidoso. Financing available. Call NMRS 888-676-6979.

500. Businesses for Sale Business Or lot for sale 410 S. Main for more info call 623-9772 or 420-9072

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

PRIME NORTH Main St. property for sale. Professional office ready, 2800 sf, lots of parking, $375,000. If interested send letter to PO Box 1897 Unit 264, Roswell, NM 88202. Restaurant bldg, $275K cash/trade for Ruidoso prprty, M-Th 8-4 624-1331 COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL manufacturing facility and warehouse. South Roswell, for sale or rent. Tom 575-626-5348

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

WE BUY used mobile homes. Single & double wides. 575-622-0035 D01090. 1995FLEETWOOD 14x60, 1br, 1ba, needs little touch-up. Setup in park in Clovis, can be moved. 575-622-0035 D01090.

520. Lots for Sale

OWNER FINANCING for a limited time. Ready to build 5 acre lots w/ great views & good covenants. Located 9 miles West of Roswell @ the Club House Banquet Facility. Free land maps and at entrance. 575-623-1800. www.BuenaVidaLand.com PREMIUM 5 Acre tracts, Owner will finance with 10% down, New Construction only (no mobile homes), , Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd. between Country Club & Berrendo Rd. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-4337 Mobile Home Lot size 60x134 $18,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. We Take Visa and Mastercard! 420-1352. Enchanted Hills on Sanders St. 125x124, $30K obo. No covenants. Call 910-3247 for info. HAGERMAN LOTS for sale. York Avenue, Posey subdivision, 1 block from Hagerman schools, $5000. 420-1352

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1 OR 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, all bills pd, no pets, no smoking, no HUD 623-6281 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722.

540. Apartments Unfurnished

Town Plaza Apartments Utilities paid - Gas and Water. New Owners, friendly new managers. New Remodeled EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs/downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Seniors 55yrs plus, law enforcement & military will receive discount. No HUD. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 2nd year, 1 free month rent EFFICIENCY 1 br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. EFFICIENCY 2 BR, downtown, clean, water paid. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD Call 623-8377 1&2Bd, wtr pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331

VERY SMALL 1 bedroom w/large fenced in yard. $325 mo., $200 dep. 625-9208

All Bills Paid 1 br $500 2 br $600, 3 br $700 mo., ref air, new carpet, new paint/tile. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944

VERY NICE & clean 1 bdrm duplex. $400/mo, $250/dep. 1213 E. 1st. Call 626-3977 or 622-6629 1700 N. Pontiac Dr., Corner of Montana/17th St., 2 BR apt for rent $650, Utilities are included. (626) 864-3461

PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN.

VERY NICE 2 br 1 bath duplex 1 car garage No Hud/pets or smoking. $700 mo. 626-0229 1 BEDROOM apartment. 2 bedroom apartment. Call 910-8170

2/1, $600 mo., $350 dep., wtr pd, no HUD or pets, 302 W. Mescalero. 910-1300

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

FLETC Homes for rent. Long & short term rentals. 5 minutes from FLETC. Brand new & beautiful! Visit our website: www.lgrentalhomes.com or Call 420-0519 or 910-7670 NOW AVAILABLE 2/2/1 CAR GARAGE. Fully-furnished, all electric, newer duplex with all amenities. Xeriscape landscaping, fenced backyard, quiet, near shopping + schools. For showing call Eliot. 575-578-0617

FLETC RENTAL very clean 2bd 2 bath fully furnished home. Surrounded by pecan orchard & alfalfa fields 50 yds to fishing covered parking use of personal gym half way between Roswell & Artesia single-non smoking no pets. 626-2142

TWO LOVELY TOWNHOMES - completely set up for FLETC. Call Sherlea Taylor, 420-1978 or 624-2219 for details on 712 N. Sycamore and 2716 N. Pennsylvania, Unit 47.

CLASSIFIEDS

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished FLETC 2BR, 1ba, newly remodeled, north location. 622-2564 or 626-6110

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 3 BR 1.5 bath no Hud/pets $875 mo. $600 dep. avail. 6/1/11. 420-5930. 1415 W. Tilden, 2br, stove, ref., $500 mo, plus dep, no pets or HUD, must have references. You pay bills. Call 625-0512. 2&3 Bd, 1&2 Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331 2501, 03, 05 S. Lea, 3br 2ba, new construction, no smokers/pets, $1000 plus $500 dep. 575-317-4050 LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com! 3/2/2 @ Broken Arrow Rd., NE Roswell, $1150/mo, $1150/dep. 505-385-5037 300 W. 9th 2 br, 2 ba, laundry room 910-4225 3 BR, 2 ba, carport, fenced yard, close to schools, stove, frig, ref air, newly painted, $900/mo, $450/dep. 1604 S. Washington. 622-3250 Executive 3br 2ba 2800 ft. dual AC, fenced, $1400m $1400dep. 627-9942 FLETC RENTAL, 3br, 1ba, refrig. air, alarm syst., gun safe, new carpet, no smoking or pets. 575-910 0801 1/1 Duplex $400 mo. water pd. Quiet street great area. 2203 W. Juniper. Call 317-6408 3BR, 1BA, 1 car garage, W/D hook-up, backyard, 303 Robin Dr., $625 mo, $300 dep. 420-0341 3/2, nice home, north of town, $875/mo, $500/dep. No HUD. 420-5604 908 S. Michigan corner lot 3br 1 bath, garage, nice quiet street $500 mo. $150 dep. 910-1407 2bd, 1ba $425mo 300 dep ref. no pets, w/d hook ups 317-3222 RUIDOSO CONDO in mnts $100 per nt, 2 pers max, 2 nt min, 624-1331 M-TH 4 BR 2 bath garage fenced yard N. Lea 505-553-1606 806 S. Richardson, 2br, ref air, w/d hookups, no pets, $500/mo, $500/dep, 914-5402 200 W. Mathews, 2br, ref air, w/d hookups, no pets, $550/mo, $500/dep, 914-5402 502 W. Albuquerque, 2br, ref air, w/d hookups, no pets, $450/mo, $450/dep, 914-5402 1005 N. Delaware 2 br, 1 ba. $550 month $300 dep. You pay all bills good rental history req. 578-9668 2BR/1BA W/D, refrig, stove, FP, central heat/air, 603/D S. Penn. $595/mo, $400/dep. 910-7969. 4BR/2BA, LARGE yard, $700/$330dep, 609 S. Kentucky. 317-1371/ 578-9435

560. Sleeping Rooms

SINGLE PERSON sleeping rooms private entry & deck. 3/4 ba. All bills pd. Inquire 105 N. Missouri

569. Mobile Home Spaces/Lots

EASY LIVING community 1337 McCall Loop, Roswell. Long term RV’s welcome. 624-2436

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places OFFICE SPACE for Rent. Prime downtown area, 2,061 sq.ft. Please call 622-8711.

FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546. STOREFRONT 500 sqft utilities pd. 2102 S. Main $550m $550dep. 627-9942 PROFESSIONAL OFFICES. 104 E. Linda Vista,1,600 SF. 7 rooms ,$1,050 per month and 207 N. Union Suite F, 863 SF,5 room office, $550.00. E-Z access and good parking . 420-2100 3000 sqft office space available,14 private offices 2 restrooms, 1 conference room, break room former doctors office. 2110 S. Main, $2500 mo. 626-7488 or 420-1352

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

NEED FURNITURE? Shop Blair’s Trading Post for the best prices in town for your household items. We buy & sell furniture, appliances, home decor, collectibles, electronics, saddles, jewelry, tools, fishing & camping items, movies plus everything else from A-Z. Including many hard to find items. Serving Roswell for 40 years. Open daily 9-5. Accept Visa & MC. 5611 Hummingbird Ln. 627-2033 REACH OVER 500,000 READERS in more than 30 newspapers across the state for one low price. Contact your local newspaper’s classified department or visit nmpress.org for details. PARK BENCH, DVDs, bakers rack, record player, furn, bikes. 622-0280 2 DRYERS @ $150 each, small apartment size fridge $25, 25” TV $100, antique stove $50, elec. cook top $40, kids bikes $50 each. Call 575-703-4025. Twin beds, drop-down desk, love seat, pillows chairs. Call 303-947-7673 COUCH & 2 pillows, match chair & extender, Executive desk, leather chair, misc. chairs, upholstered bench, washer - dryer. Many other items. 578-1084 CRIB $60, futon w/mattress $50, hightop table w/4 chairs $60, oversized love seat & couch $650. 914-1938

Plant Administrative Assistant

Leprino Foods Company, the nation’s premier manufacturer of mozzarella cheese, is currently seeking qualified applicants for the position of Plant Administrative Assistant.

The position reports to the Plant Manager. The Plant Administrative Assistant must be able to perform mathematical functions and be skilled in Microsoft Office suite, GroupWise, etc. The incumbent must be able to read, write and comprehend procedures, which direct the position’s assignments. The position is responsible for printing daily management reports. Attend meetings for support and note taking as assigned. This person organizes Management meetings, or other events that require meals such as exempt personnel training, corporate training meetings, etc. The Plant Administrative Assistant arranges travel activities for current and new exempt personnel. Other assignments as dictated per above activities. The incumbent is responsible to keep and maintain these reports; Plant Manager’s Weekly report, stats package, closing financial reports, minutes of meetings, etc. Leprino Foods Company offers a competitive benefits package that includes health, dental, vision and life insurance; paid vacation, 401K matched retirement program and Profit Sharing retirement program.

If you possess the above qualifications and are eager to work for a stable, growing company, please fax or mail resume to:

Leprino Foods Attn: Loretta Maese 5600 Omaha Road Roswell, NM 88203 Re: Plant Administrative Assistant Fax: (575)347-5201 Leprino Foods in an equal opportunity employer supporting a drug free workplace. M/F/D/V

Roswell Daily Record 605. Miscellaneous for Sale

6-PERSON HOT tub, excellent condition $3500. 575-910-0474 FOR SALE: Sofa $150, sofa bed $150, end tables, lamps, all good condition/clean. Call 622-2123 or 626-4283. LARGE BLUE sectional $300, king sized mattress and box springs set with frame $225, twin bed $60, Armoire by Basset $120, small wood desk with chair $75, side by side fridge $275. 637-9641 18X33 ABOVE ground pool w/pump and sand filter $350. Call 578-0049

WANTING TO BUY LARGE CHEST FREEZER ALSO KITCHEN COUNTER TOPS & CABINETS CALL 420-7199 Lift chair, power wheelchair, hospital bed, commode chair. 622-7638

3500-6500 CFM down draft evaporative coolers 3500-6500 price range $150-$350 626-7488 320 FENCE blocks for sale, buff colored and 7 cubes of red brick. Make offer. 626-6942 4 SALE - Hvy dty Inversion table, sew mach. tbl, 20x23 etched mirror, 20 & 26 boy bike, total gym. 625-0882 after 6pm GOOD CONDITION Kenmore 20 cu. ft. refrigerator $225, Whirlpool washer, dryer match set $200 575-914-9933 PICKERS, VENDORS, or collectors, selling used & collectible furniture. And thousands of other items, will DEAL. 4510 W. 2nd, Roswell. POWER CHAIR 2yrs old like new, 2 new batteries, power cord, horn. 2 speeds slow/fast can be used on the street. Asking for $2k-$1500 cash only No checks. Call Frank C. 627-7124 or Wanda 317-7967 CLASSIC VICTORIAN style sofa & 2 matching settees, like new. $950. Call 623-8742

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd INSTANT CASH for gold and siver jewelry. In Roswell 578-0805

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

PAY CASH all day long for household items. Top prices paid for furniture, antiques, appliances, collectibles, tools, saddles, plus everything else from A to Z, including personal estates. 627-2033 or 623-6608 WANTED TO buy Grandpa’s tackle box, pre 1950s, lures, reels, rods, photographs. Highest retail cash paid by collector. 575-354-0365 MOVABLE STEEL container or storage unit. Call Julie at 505-220-0617 or Brad at 505-239-5747

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

WE BUY Scrap batteries $4.00 back, 311 S. Virginia. 622-4160

WANTING LARGE CHEST FREEZER ALSO KITCHEN COUNTER TOPS & CABINETS. CALL 420-7199 BUYING RIDING lawn mowers, dead or alive. 910-8166 or 910-0730

635. Good things to Eat

RANCH RAISED, natural Angus Beef. No hormones or anti-biotics. Will sell by half or quarter. 575-355-7788

691. Restaurant Equipment REFRIGERATED SANDWICH prep table, $800. 626-7488 6X10 REFRIGERATED walk-in cooler, self contained, $1500. 626-7488 NSF - Refrigerator on wheels $400. Call Jim 910-7969.

700. Building Materials

STEEL BUILDINGS Factory Discounted 27x39 Reg $13,800 Now $9600; 39x60 Reg $26,300 Now $18,800 www.utilityking.com Source: 1CC 866-609-4321

745. Pets for Sale

PUPPY LOVE Grooming Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also - 575-420-6655 REG. MINIATURE Pinscher’s, only 1F left, ready now. Call 317-4189. MINI DASCHUND pups, reg. $350, 308-3017 or 910-4663 text for pics SMALL CHORKIE pup (half cihuhua half yorkie), 1F, 4M, reg. $250, 308-3017 or 910-4663 text for pics T-CUP & toy chihuahuas, $300 & up, reg. 308-3017 or 910-4663 text for pics YORKIE PUPPIES, reg., $500-$800. 308-3017 or 910-4663 text for pics TINY MICRO Yorkie-Poo puppies $800, registered, 1 older boy pup $400, 308-3017 or text for pics. POODLE PUPPIES, 11wks, 1st shots, $250. 627-7567 or 575-637-1110. 5MO Shih Tzu, b/w boy, reg., $300. 308-3017 or 910-4663 text for pics

745. Pets for Sale

SHIH TZU puppies, 8wks old $200. 575-622-6129 2 GREAT Dane merles left 575-752-0447 or 208-8513

RECREATIONAL

775. Motorcycles & Scooters HONDA CR-500, 1986, good cond. $1,200 OBO. 622-1127x11.

2009 ETON scooter $1500 Call 575-317-8083

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. Your dealer of choice. Sales, parts, service, consignments, purchases, propane, dump station. 2900 West Second. 622-1751, 1-800-929 0046 2005 KEYSTONE lite wt trailer, 18ft, nice, fully self contained, $7500. 623-6105 2002 SUNDOWNER 2 Horse Trailer VAL Series, fully enclosed, 40” stalls, straight load, 2 AED3 escape doors, 2 windows in horse area, 2 windows in nose, padded aluminum body dividers, floor mats in horse area, $9,750 OBO. Contact Cheri at 575-622-117 Ext. 11. ‘08 TANGO 5th wheel, 31ft long 1 slide, sleeps 6-8, bunk house, ducted heat/AC, $19,000 OBO. Scott 505-280-7085 or 623-3304. UTILITY TRAILER 4x12, $800. 910-2170

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

2000 MERCURY Grand Marquis, loaded, great shape, $3800 OBO, 624-2961 or 626-6942. ‘03 HUNDAI Elantra, 4cyl, auto, loaded. 624-2961 ‘93 FORD Escort, 4 door blue, dependable, 5 speed, low mileage 76k, new tires, air conditioner, asking $1500 obo. 623-1991 or 637-2891

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2006 FORD F250, excellent cond., ext. cab, $10,500, 626-7488. ‘03 CHEVY Silverado, 2500hd 4x4, 4dr ext. cab, tow pkg., loaded, must sell. 575-937-2338

PEKINGESE PUPPIES for sale. 7wks old, born 3/24/11, females $350, males $300. Call 623-8714.

‘95 CHEVY Z71 4x4, xcab, V8 Silverado shortbed, new tires, paint, 100k miles, $6495. 622-3796 or 626-7912

4MO CHOCO lab, has shots, AKC, $400 obo. 208-9687

1986 CHEVY S10 v-6 pick up needs engine asking $500 call 840-8190

2 FULL blooded Siberian husky pups. 1M, 1F. Female is bi-eyed. Call 575-626-3219 after 3pm or leave message.

FREE CATS! Older cats, some spayed, neutered, shy now but will be friendly, all need good homes. 626-4708.

2010 CHEV 2500 HD 4x4, 2006 Dodge 4 door big horn 4 door 4x4, 1999 Chev Blazer 4x4 4 door. 575-420-1873

796. SUVS

2008 IMMACULATE Hummer H3-leather; sunroof; 40k mi. Call 420-8222

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN ARTESIA, NEW MEXICO

MARKETING ACCOUNTING ANALYST The Marketing Accounting Analyst is responsible for all areas relating to the accounting of Yates marketing operations, marketing accounting and spot marketed gas contracts. The Marketing Accounting Analyst is also responsible for assisting with the implementation of the new Contract Settlement Software. • Minimum of Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting, Finance or Business • At least 2 to 3 years in a supervisory/manager role • Proficient with Microsoft Excel, Access and Word • Proven ability to manage non-negotiable timelines • Strong analytical, communication (written and verbal) and organizational skills • Knowledge and experience of the Oil and Gas industry required • Considerable knowledge of spreadsheets, database software and the automated accounting system; Artesia Software preferred • Flexible team player who thrives in environments requiring ability to effectively prioritize and juggle multiple concurrent projects • Sarbanes-Oxley experience MARKETING REPRESENTATIVE Marketing Representative plays a crucial role in the movement of YPC oil and gas products to marketplace. Marketing Representative will be responsible for trading natural gas and crude oil, developing well connection plans, and scheduling natural gas on pipelines which YPC holds transportation. • • • • • • • • •

College Degree in business or related field is required Ability to handle multiple projects with critical timelines Strong analytical skills Ability to work closely with others to accomplish goals Strong oral and written communication skills Must be competent in Microsoft Office with emphasis on Word and Excel Experience in Quorum Business Solutions software preferred Background in oil and natural gas sales and marketing Legal and contract negotiation experience

Excellent benefits package including: 401(k), Medical & Dental Insurance, Basic & Supplemental Life Insurance, AD&D, Short & Long Term Disability Insurance, AFLAC, Cafeteria Plan, Vacation and Sick Leave. Visit www.yatespetroleum.com to download an application. Please submit resumes to:

Yates Petroleum Corporation P.O. Box 97 Artesia, NM 88211-0097


Roswell Daily Record

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

005 010 015 020 025

Announcements Special Notice Card of Thanks Personals/Special Transportation Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted 045 050 055 060

Employment

Employment Opportunities Salesperson/Agents Employment Agencies Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 441 445 450

Window Repair Window Cleaning Wrought Iron Services Wanted

455 456 460 465

Money: Loan/Borrow Credit Cards Insurance Co. Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale Investment: Stocks/Sale Mortgages for Sale Mortgages Wanted Business Opportunities

470 475 480 485

Financial

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

CLASSIFIEDS

Saturday, May 14, 2011

SUPER SAVER SIX PACK ROSWELL FORD’S

We dare any dealer to even come close to these Six Incredible Offers! 2010 FORD F150 4x2 Reg. Cab #10432

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos

B9

MSRP Roswell Ford Savings Retail Customer Cash Retail Bonus Cash Promotional Retail Bonus

Final Price

201 FORD 2011 Ran Ranger XLT S up Cab Super 4x4 #110081 #1

23,950 770 1,500 1,000 1,000

$19,680

MSRP $ 27,500 Roswell Ford Savings - 1,512 Retail Customer Cash - 1,500 - 1,000 Retail Bonus Customer Cash Promotional Retail Bonus Customer Cash - 1,000 Trade-in Assistance Bonus CustomerCash - 1,000

$21,488

Final Price

2011 FORD F150 Super Crew XLT #110259

$ MSRP Roswell Ford Savings Retail Customer Cash Promotional Retail Customer Cash XLT Retail Bonus Customer Cash Ford CreditBonus Cash -

Final Price

2011 FORD F150 Super Crew 4x4 XLT #110216

2011 FORD F250 4x4 Styleside #110161

2011 FORD F250 4x4 Crew Cab

$ -

41,595 2,865 1,500 1,000 1,000

$ -

45,395 3,280 1,500 1,000 1,000

$35,230

MSRP Roswell Ford Savings Retail Customer Cash Ford CreditBonus Cash Retail Bonus Cash

Final Price

38,860 2,873 500 1,000 1,000 1,000

$32,487

MSRP Roswell Ford Savings Retail Customer Cash Ford Credit Bonus Cash Retail Bonus Cash

Final Price

35,655 2,447 500 1,000 1,000 1,000

$29,708

$ MSRP Roswell Ford Savings Retail Customer Cash Promotional Retail Customer Cash XLT Retail Bonus Customer Cash Ford CreditBonus Cash -

Final Price

#110152

$ -

$38,615

Hurry, these trucks are one of a kind and subject to prior sale! Prices do not include tax, registration and dealer service transfer fee. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only and may not represent the actual vehicles. Not responsible for typographical errors.

ROSWELL FORD

821 N. MAIN ST. OPEN: MON.-FRI. 8AM - 7PM, SAT. 8AM - 5PM SALES: 623-3673 SERVICE DEPT.: 623-1031

Toll-free: 877-624-3673

OPEN HOUSE

www.roswellford.com

Saturday & Sunday 1pm to 4pm

801 SHERRILL LANE OWNERS RELOCATING

Formal living dining room

Vaulted ceiling family room with fireplace

Beautiful recently decorated home. Lots of Light - 4 bdrm - 2.5 Ba - 2 Car Garage Sunken Jetted Tub in Master Bath - New Roof - 2360 Sq. Ft. Enclosed Patio Fence-Office

$228,500.00

Kitchen with breakfast nook

Local (575)910-8365 for more information Faulkner Realty & Builders Inc. (505)450-9028 Gordon Faulkner

Fenced Backyard


B10 Saturday, May 14, 2011

ENTERTAINMENT

Ashton Kutcher lands on ‘Two and a Half Men’

AP Photo

In this Jan. 20, 2011, file photo, actor Ashton Kutcher attends a special screening of "No Strings Attached" in New York.

Roswell Daily Record

believes that “we can fill the stage with laughter that will echo in viewers’ homes. “I can’t replace Charlie Sheen but I’m going to work my ass off to entertain the hell out of people,” Kutcher said. Kutcher’s quote was the only mention of Sheen in Friday’s news release. Warner cut short the show’s eighth season and fired Sheen two months ago following his public implosion through hard partying and angry criticism of show creator Chuck Lorre. “We are so lucky to have someone as talented, joyful and just plain remarkable as Ashton joining our family,” said Lorre, also the show’s executive producer. “Added to that is the deep sigh of relief knowing that our family stays together. If I was any happier, it’d be illegal.” Neither Lorre or CBS executives made themselves available to address what sort of character Kutcher would play or how he would be integrated into a show where Sheen’s character was the comic center, portraying an advertising jingle writer with a playboy lifestyle not unlike the actor’s own. Jon Cryer portrays Sheen’s brother, and Angus T. Jones plays

NEW YORK (AP) — Pressed by a deadline to keep TV’s most popular sitcom alive after it was derailed by Charlie Sheen’s personal troubles, CBS and Warner Bros. Television said Friday that Ashton Kutcher will replace Sheen in “Two and a Half Men.” The show resumes production this summer and will be on CBS’ schedule in the fall, with Kutcher playing a new character, not Sheen’s Charlie Harper. The deal apparently came together quickly, following reports earlier this week that negotiations with film actor Hugh Grant to join the show had fallen through. Kutcher is familiar to television audiences through his role on Fox’s “That 70s Show,” film roles like the romantic comedy “No Strings Attached” and for producing and hosting the prank show “Punk’d.” A deadline on deciding whether the show would continue was looming, with CBS set to unveil its fall schedule to advertisers in New York next Wednesday. Kutcher is not as well known as Sheen but is 12 years younger and has a huge following of fans who check in on his every utterance on Twitter. He said Friday he

Cryer’s son. Sheen offered his replacement a welcome on Friday — sort of. “Kutcher is a sweetheart and a brilliant comedic performer ... Oh, wait, so am I,” Sheen said. “Enjoy the show, America,” he said. “Enjoy seeing a 2.0 in the demo every Monday, WB.” Sheen used TV lingo to predict failure for the revamped “Two and a Half Men.” He referred to a 2.0 Nielsen Co. rating among the 18to-49-year-old demographic that advertisers often seek. This season, “Two and a Half Men” averaged a 4.1 rating in that group. Actually, Kutcher might be expected to have a younger following than Sheen and one which could be curious about his new role. The difficulty might be the older makeup of CBS’ audience in general, more Sheen’s crowd than Kutcher’s. “He’s not a star, I don’t think, the way Charlie Sheen is,” said Brad Adgate, an analyst for the firm Horizon Media. “He’s more like a supporting cast.” Sheen, in his statement, advised Kutcher to “Enjoy planet Chuck ... There is no air, laughter, loyalty or love there.” That’s a reference to his feud with former boss Lorre.

“Hometown Proud”

Friday & Saturday May 14 & 15

1

Roswell store only!

VALUE PACK PORK

$ 89

COUNTRY STYLE RIBS

5

VALUE PACK BONELESS BEEF

SHOULDER ROAST

$ 99

23

Lb.

4QT PAIL

PRICE ICE CREAM

$ 99

69

LARGE DELICIOUS

TANGELOS

¢

LARGE

24

Lb.

SLICING TOMATOES

$

21 Lbs.

ASST. VARIETIES 18OZ

KRAFT BBQ SAUCE

$

Lb.

4LB. BAG

2

While quantities last!

69 FOR

With in store coupon

12CT PKG

IGA GRANULATED SUGAR NATURE’S GRAIN PARTY FLAKE ROLLS

$

FOR

While Supplies Last

900 W. Second St Roswell, NM Hours: Sun. - Thurs. 7am till 9pm Fri. & Sat. 7am till 10 pm

EVERY TUESDAY IS “BANANA TUESDAY” 3 LBS. FOR $1

¢

5

ASST. VARIETIES 20 PACK

COCA COLA PRODUCTS

$ 99

59

WEIGHT WATCHERS

YOGURT

18

30 PACK 12OZ CAN

¢

KEYSTONE LIGHT BEER

$

88

4-ROLL PKG

IGA BATH TISSUE

89

¢

Don’t Forget Our Convenient Drive-Thru Window In Our Pharmacy Pharmacy Hours: 9am-6pm Mon-Fri • 9am-1pm Sat. Closed Sundays


05-14-2011