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Roswell Daily Record THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

Vol. 120, No. 109 50¢ Daily / $1 Sunday

May 6, 2011

FRIDAY

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INSIDE NEWS

A SAD DAY IN NJ, TOO

TRENTON, N.J. — As mourners filed out of the church, two by two, the organist struck up an unusual tune for a funeral: “America the Beautiful.” Outside, military pallbearers in ceremonial dress carried the flagdraped casket of 1st Lt. Omar Vazquez to the waiting hearse, while a dozen retired servicemen saluted, flags in hand. - PAGE B6

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A hero’s farewell

The U.S. Army Honor Guard salutes Pfc. Antonio Stiggins for the final time during funeral services at South Park Cemetery, Thursday.

EMILY RUSSO MILLER RECORD STAFF WRITER A fallen soldier killed in Iraq last month was laid to rest under the sprawling green leaves of Arizona Cypress trees on the north side of South Park Cemetery Thursday afternoon after a memorial service at a local church.

Officials say this was the first New Mexico casualty from Operation New Dawn. A baby wailed during the military funeral as the New Mexico Army National Guard Honor Guard pallbearers in ceremonial dress blues fired three volleys as a salute, and family and friends wiped away tears as the bugler

Mark Wilson Photo

NMMI’S GONZALEZ TAKES 4TH

ALBUQUERQUE—Sometimes things just don’t go the way you expect them to. Like that vacation to Myrtle Beach that you have been looking forward to for a year, but the entire week you're there, it’s cloudy, rainy and windy. But as the saying goes, when life hands you lemons, make lemonade. For NMMI’s Jose Gonzalez, he planned to at least medal .... - PAGE B1

Angel Mayes says her final goodbyes to her son, Pfc. Antonio Stiggins, during funeral services at South Park Cemetery, Thursday. Mark Wilson Photo

Cruz Garcia, a Vietnam Veteran, pays his final respects to fallen comrade Pfc. Antonio Stiggins during funeral services at Christ’s Church, Thursday.

Donna Lucille Clark Melba Ruth Phillips Lillian Fay Shirley Leona Beryl Mayberry - PAGE B6

TODAY’S FORECAST

CLASSIFIEDS..........C1 COMICS.................B5 ENTERTAINMENT.....B7 FINANCIAL .............B4 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........A8 LOTTERIES ............A2 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8

INDEX

“It was beautiful, beautiful,” one woman murmured to her friend while dabbing her eyes with a

tissue. The ceremonial funeral

Mark Wilson Photo

The faithful gather outside the Chaves County Courthouse to participate in the 2011 National Day of Prayer, Thursday.

See FAREWELL, Page A3

Hundreds of Roswell citizens gathered for a day of prayer, music and fellowship on the steps of the Chaves County Courthouse, for National Day of Prayer, Thursday. “I appreciate the National Day of Prayer. It was a blessing to me,” Sam Salcido, Roswell resident, said. “I felt that people are concerned with what’s going on, especially praising God. God is the one that’s holding the United States together.”

Capt. Beau Perez, of The Salvation Army, also commented on the observance. “It’s wonderful to see the city represented — everyone all together here at the National Day of Prayer. It does my heart good,” Perez said. “Prayer is the hand that moves the world. Our nation really needs God’s hand. Our city needs prayer, our county needs prayer. I’m very glad that we’re out here praying today.” Ceremonies were led by the Rev. Melvin Suttle, pastor of Roswell First Assembly of God, who read a

proclamation issued by President Barack Obama declaring May 5 National Day of Prayer. Mayor Del Jurney was also on hand to read a proclamation delcaring May 5 National Day of Prayer in Roswell. During observances, community leaders, elected officials and local clergy prayed for different entities and various issues affecting the city. Chaves County Commissioner Greg Nibert delivered one of those prayers, in which he said,

For Obama, the day was about the importance of being in New York in the aftermath of the successful raid to find and kill bin Laden, the al-Qaida leader. Obama addressed families who have watched and wondered for nearly a decade whether the government would track down its most infamous enemy. On this special ground, Obama never mentioned bin Laden’s name.

Still, this was where the terrorist inflicted his greatest damage on a similarly sunny day in 2001 when hijacked airliners were crashed into the World Trade Center. Nearly 200 other people died when a third airliner hit the Pentagon — Vice President Joe Biden led a ceremony there on Thursday, and Bush Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld attended — and others were killed when yet

a fourth plane crashed in Pennsylvania. Enthusiastic, emotional New Yorkers waited on streets to see the president, but there were few displays like the more raucous exuberance of a few days earlier. There were happy faces, shouts of “USA! USA!” and flags waved in the crowd, but there also was heavy security and most people

JONATHAN ENTZMINGER RECORD STAFF WRITER

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sounded Taps and gave a final, crisp, white-gloved salute to the flag-draped casket.

Hundreds gather for National Day of Prayer

TODAY’S • • • •

Mark Wilson Photo

Obama in NY: We never forget, we mean what we say

NEW YORK (AP) — Solemnly honoring victims of the Sept. 11 terror attacks, President Barack Obama hugged survivors, thanked the heroes of one of the nation’s darkest days and declared Thursday that the killing of Osama bin Laden after all these years was an American message to the world: “When we say we will never forget, we mean what we say.” On a brilliant blue-sky

day, one of reflection more than celebration, Obama of fered New Yorkers a moment of their own. Standing at the gritty construction site of ground zero, where the towers fell and a memorial now rises, the president laid a wreath of red, white and blue flowers for the nearly 3,000 who died as he marked a turning point for the nation and this city of steely resilience.

See PRAYER, Page A3

See OBAMA, Page A3


A2 Friday, May 6, 2011

GENERAL

Democrats object to governor’s Medicaid plan

SANTA FE (AP) — Democratic lawmakers and social services advocates say Republican Gov. Susana Martinez’s administration is moving too quickly with a possible overhaul of Medicaid, which provides health care for a fourth of New Mexico’s population. “Our whole health care system in New Mexico is highly dependent on Medicaid dollars,” Ruth Hoffman, director of Lutheran Advocacy Ministry in New Mexico, said Thursday. “So whatever is done will have a major impact not only on the people who qualify for the services and really depend on Medicaid, but for everybody else.” The Human Services

Department hopes next week to select a contractor from two finalists to develop a plan for revamping Medicaid, which provides health care for the poor, disabled and children without health insurance. About 556,000 New Mexicans are covered, with 60 percent of them children. In requesting proposals from contractors in late March, the department said New Mexico is like other states in facing the challenge of rising Medicaid enrollment during a time of tight budgets. Close to $4 billion in state and federal money was allocated for the program this year. That’s up from about $2.5 billion in 2006.

“New Mexico’s Medicaid program as it is today is simply not sustainable,” the agency said in a document for potential bidders. “The department’s top priority for Medicaid is to reinvent and transfor m the program so that it is robust and sustainable for years to come. The document said the program must become more cost-ef fective, and enrollees must share more responsibility for the cost of their health care while having more opportunities to make choices about it. Democrats in the Legislature complain that the Martinez administration didn’t alert them during this year’s legislative ses-

$8,000 for Working Mothers

Jonathan Entzminger Photo

Children and staff from Working Mothers Day Nursery and members of the Roswell Community League gather in front of a portable classroom, Thursday, as the league presents the nursery with a check for $8,000.

Hundreds missing in tornado’s aftermath

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) — Where is Johnnie Brown’s sister? Or the friend Billie Sue Hall talked to every day? A week after tornadoes ripped neighborhoods to shreds across the South, there still are no answers. It’s unclear how many people are missing across the seven states where 329 deaths have been reported. There are 25 unaccounted for in Tuscaloosa alone, the mayor says, but that number could be off because of the chaos the stor m left behind. Cadaver dog teams across the region are scouring the debris to uncover whatever tragedies may remain, and even bad news would be comforting to anguished families. Tracy Sargent’s dog team took just minutes to do what humans searching for hours could not: Locate the body of a University of Alabama student in a maze of twisted trees and debris. The young man’s father was there when the body was found in Tuscaloosa this week. “(The father) went over there and bent over and touched his son and started talking to him,” Sargent said. “And he hugged him, started crying, and told him that he loved him and that he would miss him.” Efforts to pin down the number of missing have been complicated by factors including multiple reports of the same missing person, or survivors who found shelter without conROSWELL DAILY RECORD

tacting friends who reached out to police. Sometimes the police have only a first name. Alabama of ficials are declining to say how many people could be missing statewide, and are now even keeping mum about the state’s official death toll as it re-examines the tally. They reduced the figure from 250 to 236 on Monday after accounting for a gruesome fact of the stor m: Some victims had been counted more than once because parts of their bodies were found in more than one place. The work of finding answers for families of the missing falls largely on the search and rescue teams combing the ruins of entire communities that were ripped from their foundations and thrown across hollows and hills on April 27. On Thursday, the National Weather Service upgraded one of the tor nadoes that hit Mississippi to the most powerful category: an EF-5, with winds topping 200 mph. Another Mississippi tornado in last week’s outbreak had already been classified as an EF-5. This is the first time on record

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ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — New Mexico is parched, but some state leaders gathered Thursday in front of the ponds at Albuquerque’s T ingley Beach to remind outdoor lovers that there’s still plenty of water in the state to enjoy, so they should get out this summer. The state’s top water official, State Engineer John D’Antonio, has statistics to back up the visible remnants of the drought: dry clumps of grass, the low flows of the Rio Grande and other rivers and the state’s shrunken reservoirs. “We’re struggling all over the state, and the farther south you go the more difficult it is. We’re concerned about reservoir levels, but we want to make sure people understand that recreation is still OK,” he said. The first three months of the year have marked the second driest start to any year on record for New Mexico. And because of dismal snowpack levels, runof f around the state is below normal. For example, the Rio Grande’s flow is about half of nor mal and has already peaked for the year. Many rivers around the state did not peak at all, officials said. One bright spot is that the beach is bigger at Elephant Butte Lake State Park, one of the top summer hot spots, they said. The lake’s level is lower than it has been in years past, but it has more than 11,000 sur face acres of water to accommodate boaters during the holiday weekends, said Tommy

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Mutz, state parks director. Reservoirs in northern New Mexico fared better. Most of them are expected to be at least 70 percent full by the summer. In an effort to encourage people to visit New Mexico’s lakes and parks, Tourism Secretary Monique Jacobson issued a challenge Thursday to New Mexicans to “keep it local” and spend the summer in the state. “New Mexico has so much to see and so many hidden treasures,” she said. New Mexico’s forests have often been an option for people looking to get out of the summer heat, but the dry conditions have taken their toll there as well. Managers of the Lincoln National Forest in southeaster n New Mexico are making plans to close the forest to public use beginning May 12. They’re blaming extremely dry conditions.

At least two other national forests have imposed various stages of fire restrictions, and the New Mexico State Forestry Division has enacted restrictions across all but parts of four northern counties. State Forester Tony Delfin said more than 400 fires have charred about 315,000 acres in New Mexico so far this year. “The very recent return of cooler weather and limited moisture has given us and firefighters around the state a much needed break,” he said. “However, the ef fect of this recent weather is very short term at best and our fire danger remains high to extreme. ... It’s vital that we be careful with any use of fire.” D’Antonio said New Mexico will have to wait on Mother Nature for some help. The hope is that the summer monsoon season will loosen the drought’s grip on New Mexico, he said.

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ALAMOGORDO (AP) — The Lincoln National Forest in southern New Mexico will close to the public starting May 12. Officials blame extremely dry conditions for the decision. Forest Supervisor Robert Trujillo says campfire and smoking restrictions have minimized the number of fires, but officials cannot afford the risk of any human-caused fires. He says there’s not only the risk of fires to communities and resources, but also potential difficulties in evacuating people from remote areas in a fire. U.S. Forest Service officials say other forests in the state are in various stages of fire restrictions. Officials say full closures were also imposed on the Lincoln in 2006 and 2008. Forest Service spokesman Mark Chavez says the Cibola National Forest in central New Mexico had closures in 2002, 2004 and 2006.

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The federal government mandates basic Medicaid coverage, but states can of fer more services and broaden eligibility. New Mexico likely will have to obtain federal approval for a “waiver” if it wants to significantly overhaul the program. However, it’s uncertain whether the governor will attempt to administratively implement far -reaching Medicaid changes through rules and regulations rather than going to the Legislature for approval. Darnell said it’s “very premature” to talk about that, and he won’t indicate what approach the gover nor plans to take. However, rules changes require a public comment period.

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make a decision,” Jennings said in an interview. “You have all these people whose livelihoods are being affected. Are we going to listen to them later? To me, I just think you listen to them early.” A spokesman for the governor, Scott Darnell, said legislators and the public will have a chance to weigh in after the contractor’s selection. “We are at the beginning of a process that simply starts the discussion and dialogue over how we can best protect Medicaid to ensure its sustainability. We intend to bring all stakeholders to the table for the discussion, including the Legislature,” Darnell said in a statement.

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that two EF-5 twisters hit Mississippi on the same day, and the first time it’s happened to any U.S. state since a pair hit Kansas in 1990. In Tuscaloosa, officials say at least 41 people were killed when an EF-4 tornado with winds up to 190 mph mowed down some of the city’s most densely populated neighborhoods. The twister was so powerful that searchers have had trouble even knowing where to look. The body of the college student found this week, for instance, was about 300 yards from his home, which the tornado reduced to a concrete slab. Tuscaloosa Fire Chief Alan Martin said that despite multiple sweeps, not a single neighborhood or community hammered by the stor m had been searched thoroughly enough to eliminate it from the grids used by teams to plot their work. In Tuscaloosa alone, officials say, more than two dozen dog teams are searching a debris field that stretches for miles, and still more could arrive.

sion about a possible Medicaid overhaul. The department’s plan for quickly selecting a contractor makes “legislative involvement almost an afterthought,” Sen. Dede Feldman of Albuquerque, vice chairwoman of a committee that deals with health care, said in a letter sent this week to the agency’s Cabinet secretary. Senate President Pro Tem Tim Jennings, of Roswell, objects that the public, Medicaid recipients and lawmakers won’t have a chance to comment about possible program changes before a contractor is picked by the department. “In a democracy, you listen to the people before you

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GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Farewell

Continued from Page A1

honored Roswell-born Pfc. Antonio Stiggins, 25, one of two soldiers who died April 22 from an IED attack in Numaniyah, Iraq. The bereaved sat under a green-and-white canopy in folding chairs fighting back tears as 1st Ar my Division West commanding general, Maj. Gen. Charles Anderson, knelt on one knee and presented folded flags to Stiggins’ mother Angel Mayes, and father Luke Stiggins. “Thank you,” Luke mouthed to the general. The Patriot Guard Riders, who surrounded the clearing hoisting American flags alongside the Roswell Veterans Honor Guard, presented Mayes and Stiggins with a plaque, while Blue and Gold Star mothers of fered the grieving couple a yellow rose and other memorabilia. “We have walked this walk she is walking today,” Hiltrud Ridenour, president of the Rio Grande Valley Chapter Blue Star Mothers, of Albuquerque, said. Veterans from all over the state came to the funeral to pay their respects and to perform a flag line outside the

Christ’s Church for the memorial service. Most haled from Ruidoso, Clovis, Carlsbad, Albuquerque and Artesia, according to MaryAnn Murphy, one of the three ride captains for the local Patriot Guard Riders. “Tony is a hero,” Murphy said. “He is a hero, and he deserves the respect.” “It’s important that we take care of our guys coming home,” Deb Robinson, of Albuquerque, added. Friends and family hugged after the funeral and shared stories about Stiggins, who grew up in Roswell before moving to Las Cruces and later enlisting in the Army in Rio Rancho in January 2010. The Rev. Harry Tackett, of Christ’s Church, said Stiggins will be remembered for his sense of humor and his ability to make people laugh. Tackett recalled that once he danced on top of a table at a Hawaiian wedding wearing the grass table skirt, and another time he hid chalk erasers from his teacher at school. During the service, Anderson read aloud from letters written by soldiers who served with Stiggins in the F T roop, 2nd Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment.

“Antonio was the comic relief, always with a sense of humor,” Anderson read from one letter. “We’re going to miss you, brother. You’ll always be one of us,” another letter read. Luke Stiggins previously told the Daily Record that his son died doing what he loved. “He always had a smile,” Luke Stiggins said in an interview earlier this week. “There wasn’t anything you could throw at him that he wouldn’t take on,” Mayes said in the same interview. “And with a sense of humor, I must add.” At the end of the memorial service, Staf f Sgt. Williams read the U.S. Army Cavalry poem, “Fiddler’s Green.” He read, “Halfway down the trail to hell, in a shady meadow green, are the souls of dead troopers camped near a good oldtime canteen, and this eter nal resting place is known as Fiddler’s Green.” Stiggins was the seventh Roswell native to be killed in action in Iraq since 2002, according to the New Mexico Department of Veteran Services website, and the 75th New Mexico casualty of the global war on terror in Iraq and Afghanistan. Family and friends say

he received his basic training at Ft. Knox, Ky., as a cavalry scout. His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star (posthumous), Purple Heart

the same car over and over again, and the car doesn’t exist. We follow through, getting the IEP, and then we can issue an arrest warrant,” said Hiatt. RPD notified the police department in the criminal’s state of residence. The other state, though, did not wish to extradite because it had several warrants for the same suspect for crimes, some for more serious crimes than the one CID was investigating. The other state wanted to press charges in the state of origin. “In cases of identity theft

where the IRS is involved, we work with the IRS,” said Hiatt. CID will contact the police department in the other state where the crime has been committed. The respective police department will go to the place of business where the money was earned. Usually, the suspect has resigned because he has been alerted. “We find that the person has quit the previous day. The suspect was notified by the IRS for not filing all their income just like the victim was,” said Hiatt. One of the two detectives

Friday, May 6, 2011

A3

Mark Wilson Photo

Angel Mayes receives the flag during funeral services for her son, Pfc. Antonio Stiggins, at South Park Cemetery, Thursday. (posthumous), Army Good Conduct Medal (posthumous), National Defense Service Medal, Iraq Campaign Medal with bronze star, Global War on Terror-

ism Service Medal, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon, Combat Action Badge and Expert Marksmanship (Rifle).

White-collar crimes present unique challenges for CID JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

White-collar crimes present unique challenges for members of the Criminal Investigation Division. Search warrants for white-collar crime are not issued to search a place, such as home, rather they are issued to search a “thing,” bank accounts, credit card companies and accounts. “We fax to get information all the time,” Sgt. Erik Hiatt, head of CID, said. Internet fraud presents

Obama

Continued from Page A1

were cordoned off blocks from where the president could be seen. Referring to the daring U.S. raid to take down bin Laden in Pakistan, Obama said of all those who died on Sept. 11: “It says we keep them in our hearts. We haven’t forgotten.” Days after the attacks, President George W. Bush stood here with firefighters and a bullhorn. There was a different feel a decade later as another president paid his respects. Obama

Prayer

Continued from Page A1

“We have the priviledge as Americans to pray.” Nibert also indicated that the county commission passed a proclamation declaring May 5 National Day of Prayer hours before the city’s observance. Thursday’s ceremonies included musical selections by Caleb Pack, accompanied by praise and worship leaders from Gateway Christian Church, and two vocal selections by fifth-

additional complications. “The detectives do all the tracking on the Internet, but often the cases are dead ends because the case comes from outside the U.S. — from Nigeria, the Dominican Republic or Jamaica — where we have no jurisdiction. People are not very happy about that,” he said. If the case originates inside the U.S., often it’s local, and the individual knows the suspect. It’s a family member or friend, said Hiatt. “There’s a guy on the Internet who keeps selling

met with firefighters, then police, before having a solemn moment at ground zero and meeting privately with families of those who died. “This is a symbolic site of the extraordinary sacrifice that was made on that terrible day,” the president said at Engine 54, Ladder 4, Battalion 9. The firehouse in New York’s theater district lost 15 firefighters on 9/11. The fire crews gave him hearty applause. Obama said the American pursuit of the terrorist leader “sent a message around the world but also sent a message here back and sixth-graders from Gateway Christian School. The National Day of Prayer is an annual observance held on the first Thursday of May. It was created in 1952 by a joint resolution of the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Harry S. Truman.

j.entzminger@roswell-record.com

home that when we say we will never forget, we mean what we say, that our commitment to making sure that justice is done is something that transcended politics, transcended party.” Bin Laden was shot dead in a raid on his Pakistan compound early Monday in Pakistan, the result of years of painstaking intelligence work and a covert military mission in which none of the U.S. commandos was killed. The president closed his eyes and clasped his hands at the outdoor memorial where the twin towers of the World T rade Center once dominated the Manhattan skyline. Sixty stories high. Mammoth fountains and reflecting pools mark the footprints of the fallen towers. Now the nearby skyline is filled with construction machinery. The emerging skyscraper is informally known as Freedom Tower. Obama spoke with children who lost parents and

adults who lost spouses. As he bowed his head, a jetliner screamed by, far overhead. The president also peppered his brief comments with reminders of the challenges ahead, and his call for a new spirit of national unity. It wasn’t a moment for celebrating the military operation that killed bin Laden; that may come Friday, when the president visits Fort Campbell, Ky., home to the Ar my unit involved in transporting Navy SEALS in and out of bin Laden’s compound. White House officials said Obama intended to privately thank participants in the raid. Obama said Thursday he hoped the results of the raid on bin Laden’s compound showed that “we did what we said we were going to do, and that Americans, even in the midst of tragedy, will come together, across the years, across politics, across party, across administrations, to

will also work check bounce back. “Weekly we can get a packet from the district attorney’s office of 50 to 100 cases. We generally deal with the more high-dollar ones,” said Hiatt. Some of the more recent cases solved include: •Rhonda Lankin, 55. with 26 counts of passing worthless checks. The total amount of checks cashed were in excess of $4,000. •On Feb. 2, Kitty Smith was charged with 46 counts of issuing worthless checks for the amount of $11,000. This single arrest

make sure that justice is done.” Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who led the city in the days after the attacks, joined Obama during the day. Obama invited Bush to join him Thursday in New York, but the former president declined. Obama’s visit came as new details emerged of the operation on bin Laden’s Pakistan compound. A senior defense official said Thursday that only one of the five people killed in the raid was armed and fired a shot — an account that differed from original administration portrayals of an intense firefight. The White House also now says bin Laden was unar med when he was shot, after officials initially said the terrorist was holding a gun or even firing.

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cleared four separate fraud cases. •In January, Joe Maner, 40, was arrested on 37 counts of passing nearly $4,000 of worthless checks. Public Information Officer Travis Holley had some advice for people to avoid becoming a victim in the first place. •If you haven’t entered a contest, you can’t win one. •If someone has a large amount of money to give you, then they don’t need any of yours. •If it seems too good to be true, hit delete.

j.palmer@roswell-record.com

Obama also addressed bin Laden’s burial at sea, saying in an interview with CBS’ “60 Minutes,” “Frankly, we took more care on this than, obviously, bin Laden took when he killed 3,000 people.” Such details perhaps mattered little to New Yorkers who suf fered most grievously in the attacks and are now deeply gratified to see bin Laden’s demise. Ahead of Obama’s arrival, Deanne McDonald stood at the northeast corner of the World Trade Center site waving an American flag in each hand and shouting “Obama got Osama! Obama got Osama!” “God bless the Navy SEALS,” said McDonald, 38, from Brooklyn.


A4 Friday, May 6, 2011

OPINION

Presidential, Senate races start to get interesting SANTA FE — Several months ago, I wrote a column on how states get their shapes, concentrating on New Mexico and its neighbors, which ended up with most of New Mexico’s original territory. Recently a reader, who lives in Tucson and Santa Fe, sent me a list of how states got their names, which he thought carried some interesting messages. I agree. Almost half our states, 23, have Indian names, despite the fact that 49 of the states tried to wipe every Indian off the face of the planet. New Mexico is the only state where original Indian structures remain, although we weren’t really model newcomers. At least we didn’t try to annihilate them. Our name was Spanish and then Mexican. The names of 23 states come from the following tribes: Creek, Aleut, Pima, Souix (5 states), Mohican, Algonquin, Hawaiian,

EDITORIAL

JAY MILLER

INSIDE THE CAPITOL

Iriquois, Cheppawa and Oto. Twelve states used English words, five used Spanish, two used Mexican words (New Mexico and Texas — although Tejas Anglicized the spelling and pronunciation — two used French and one used Dutch. The state of Washington chose the only truly American word. And it appears that Idaho made up its own name. This is being written from Hawaii where economic devastation has hit about as badly as anywhere. Their public employees are about as heavily unionized as in any state. Yet they

Roswell Daily Record

haven’t complained much about big salary and benefit cuts the past two years. Teachers have been furloughed 17 days this year. Next year, they are talking about another 17 days but teachers will have to come to work even if they aren’t getting paid. “But what’s to worry about as long as the surf’s up,” I guess they must be saying. “We know there’s an economic problem. And we don’t have to go out and demonstrate in order to keep warm.” Yes, life is more laid back here. Hawaiians have other ways of dealing with budget deficits. First, they have no law or constitutional provision prohibiting budget deficits. And second, they can always increase the car rental fee a little more and reduce the deficit that way. Hawaii also is very casual in its attire. Today is “Wear Jeans for Japan Day.” No excuse is too small, although Hawaiians have

felt very touched by the Japanese disaster. Many Japanese now live on the island. The islands felt very little effect from the tsunami. I wrote about New Mexico’s open U.S. Senate race several days ago. Since then, there have been changes. State Auditor Hector Balderas is definitely in the race. He could be a factor. Blogger Joe Monahan wonders if his shaved head will be a factor. Monahan notes that no successful statewide candidate has sported such a look. Could it hurt him in a race against Rep. Martin Heinrich, who was voted as one of the 50 Biggest Hunks on Capitol Hill? Polls have shown that good looks do attract votes. But then we can all name some notable exceptions, especially in the U.S. Congress. That brings me to wonder about President Barack Obama’s hairstyle. I think it is too short for our president. My wife says it

is stylish. I wonder if it was a political decision by a candidate trying to make race less of a factor. That’s a sore point in Hawaii where the locals are pretty proud of their president. But the long form didn’t stop the conspiracy theories of those who already were birthers. It’s obviously a fake. It is just amazing the gall of this man who wants to prove he was born in Hawaii, they say. What Hawaiians want to know is who and where are these “people” Donald Trump has down in Hawaii investigating the birth certificate. And what is it they found that “you wouldn’t believe.” Now would seem to be a very good time to release that information because it appears the president got the jump on him, they say. (Write to Jay Miller at 3 La Tusa, Santa Fe, NM 87505; by fax at 984-0982; or by e-mail at insidethecapitol@hotmail.com)

National Opinion Tornado relief

The city of Tuscaloosa has grabbed national headlines and received visits from dignitaries — and the not so dignified — since the storm. The more rural parts of west Alabama that were thrashed by tornadoes also need our help. We are glad to see they have not been forgotten. Rescue and relief workers, along with volunteers, have been busy ensuring that more lives are not lost and that basic needs are met. Some of the surrounding counties that were hit by some of the 23 tornadoes that struck statewide are not faring so well. The strongest of the twisters was rated EF5 — the most powerful designation, with 200 mph winds — and killed 26 people on its 132 mile path from Marion County into Tennessee. Assistance is pouring in from across the nation. Some of that is finding its way across the rural swaths of west Alabama, but we hope that the large agencies and federal officials are looking at the broader picture to make sure resources are distributed where they are needed most. Likewise, we encourage volunteer groups in Tuscaloosa to reach out to our neighbors. The scale of destruction in the city of Tuscaloosa and eastward ... is mind-boggling, and creates challenges of its own. However, for each family that has been affected, the pain is personal. The opportunity for each of us to help is equally within reach. Guest Editorial The Tuscaloosa (Ala.) News

Federal debt

A recent Associated Press story by Tom Raum paints a frightening picture of what would happen if Congress doesn’t raise the debt ceiling in mid-May and opts to start defaulting on its debt. The words “financial panic” got our attention, as did the conclusion: “The impact would start slowly, but then build mightily until the damage would be so dire that few political leaders or economists even want to contemplate it.” Some in Congress do contemplate it, though, and they are adamant that lawmakers should cut federal spending drastically rather than raise the debt ceiling. Few still believe the U.S. can continue its current fiscal course of outrageous budget deficits and a national debt that’s threatening our collective economic futures. But this is not the time to use the debt ceiling as a hostage to force through an agenda. And it’s not likely that lawmakers can find enough cuts in the budget — not without doing serious damage to a still-fragile economy — to avoid bumping up against the ceiling. Holding the nation’s financial obligations and credibility hostage is the wrong way to go. Guest Editorial Loveland (Colo.) Daily Reporter-Herald DEAR DR. GOTT: I read your column every day in my local Arkansas paper. Your recent column talked about the antioxidant vitamins C and E; however, nothing was mentioned about the most powerful one of all — glutathione — that we were born with and decreases with age. Can you discuss this little-talked-about antioxidant? DEAR READER: Glutathione is reported to be the body’s master antioxidant. It is produced in the liver and plays an important role in metabolism. It is composed of cysteine, glutamic acid and glyceine, and is purported to help human cells function normally. It is found naturally in numerous meats, eggs, fruits

U.S. Shariah infiltrations (Part 3 of 3) Five years ago, Donald Van Duyn, then the deputy assistant director of the FBI’s counterterrorism division, warned us: “Islamic radicalization ... (exists) nationwide. Key to the success of stopping the spread of radicalization is identifying patter ns and trends in the early stages.” Van Duyn was exactly right. In Part 2, I showed five examples of Shariah infiltration in U.S. domestic violence, jurisprudence, commerce and government access and legislation. As you read these next five points of evidence in my top 10, ask yourself: Are there any “patter ns and trends”

Doonesbury

ASK DR. GOTT UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

and vegetables, such as asparagus, broccoli, avocado and spinach, unprocessed whey protein and milk thistle; however, the absorption rate of glutathione from all food sources in the gastrointestinal tract of humans is apparently low. It has been used for the treatment of heavy-metal poisoning, to increase the effec-

CHUCK NORRIS

SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

emerging here, as well? 5) We should not be naive to foreign Islamic extremists’ work within our country — a vast network that the FBI has documented well. Just one example of a bubble that surfaced from that underground network occurred during the raid and seizure of secret doc-

tiveness of drugs for chemotherapy given for breast cancer, in lowering blood pressure in patients diagnosed with diabetes, for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and a great deal more. Research projects for ALS, cancer, cystic fibrosis, asthma and a number of other conditions are under way with this antioxidant to investigate its potential for boosting the immune system, improving longevity, reduce chances for developing cancer, improving mental, heart and lung function, and increasing energy. While marketed as a nutritional supplement, there is little documentation to support the theory it actually increases levels within cells. In fact, in

uments at the Annandale, Va., house of one extremist leader, Ismail Selim Elbarasse. As documented in P. David Gaubatz and Paul Sperry’s investigative expose, “Muslim Mafia,” one letter found there was written by Mohammed Akram Adlouni, a Muslim Brotherhood boss. It described the plans for U.S. takeover and replacing the Constitution with Shariah. Under the heading “The role of the Muslim Brother in North America,” it states: “The Ikhwan must understand that their work in America is a kind of grand jihad in eliminating and destroying the

human studies, oral doses had minimal effect in raising blood levels. Supplemental vitamin C is reported more effective in increasing intracellular glutathione than the supplement is. Levels within the human body decrease with age, presumably at a rate of 1 percent per year after the age of 20. I’m not sure that I will rush out to my local pharmacy in the rain today for a bottle of glutathione, but never say never. DEAR DR. GOTT: I’m an 87-year-old woman with a circle about the size of a quarter on my right thigh, about four inches above my knee. All the See GOTT, Page A5

Western civilization from within, and ‘sabotaging’ its miserable house by the hands of believers, so that it is eliminated and Allah’s religion is made victorious over all other religions.” 4) To win that internal war, extremists recruit not only adults but also youths within the U.S. The Muslim American Society, which the Chicago Tribune linked to the Muslim Brotherhood, is an example. Seven years ago, a Tribune report documented how “over the past 40 years, small

25 YEARS AGO

See NORRIS, Page A5

May 6, 1986 • Sgt. Randy L. Osterhout, son of Carroll L. Osterhout of Roswell, has been awarded the Army Achievement Medal at Fort Bragg in Fayetteville, N.C. • Airman John C. Maples, son of Mr. and Mrs. Othel L. Maples of Roswell, was graduated recently from the Air Force inventory management course at Lowry Air Force Base in Denver. Maples is a 1982 graduate of Goddard High School. • Airman Angela D. McFadin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daryl McFadin of Roswell, was graduated recently from the Air Force communications operations specialist course at Goodfellow Air Force Base in San Angelo, T exas. McFadin is a 1985 graduate of Roswell High School.


Roswell Daily Record

LETTERS

The hunting public has spoken

Dear Editor: The “Southeast” is home to some of the best big game hunting in New Mexico and consequently attracts a great number of hunters from all areas of the state. It is an experience to be anywhere on Main Street, be it Artesia, Roswell, Carlsbad, Alamogordo and Ruidoso, starting on the first of September and just be amazed to see camper after camper full of hunters headed to the hills, and every one of them with a gleam in their eye. What is even better for all these towns, is lots of these hunters stopping at many of the eating places and the local business and buying all those last-minute items. Did I say there are lots and lots of hunters that come to southeast New Mexico? The following is an interesting issue that directly affects all those hunters and the businesses which profit from those hunters. In the 2011 regular session of the Legislature, Sen. George Munoz from Gallup had listened to constant complaints from resident hunters about not being able to draw a big game permit. Has that ever happened to you? Senator Munoz presented SB196 which was to raise the quota of available Big Game permits to New Mexico residents up to 90 percent from 78 percent. Most other western states already designate 90 percent of all tags to their residents! This 90 percent figure was reduced to 84 percent due to opponents of SB196. With the help of New Mexico Wildlife Federation, United Bowhunters of New Mexico and several other organizations and clubs plus thousands of resident hunters making calls and emails to their respective representatives and senators, SB196 was passed by the Senate 38-3 and the House also passed it 45-21. After thousands more calls and emails to Governor Martinez, she listened to the people, and signed SB196 into law on April 8, 2011. The people have indeed spoken. Now, comes the interesting tidbit to this story that all hunters need to not forget when we go to vote again. As I stated earlier, the Senate passed SB196 on their final vote with only 3 votes against the bill. The senator from District 41 ( Jal) was the lone “nay” from the southeast! On the House side, the final vote on SB196 had 21 representatives voting

Norris

Continued from Page A4

groups of devout Muslim men have gathered in homes in U.S. cities to ... (address) their ultimate goal, one so controversial that it is a key reason they have operated in secrecy: to create Muslim states overseas and, they hope, someday in America as well.” It went on to say that MAS “spending often is aimed at schools, teachers and children. ... The group has conducted teacher training programs, issued curriculum guides and established youth centers. ... Part of the Chicago chapter’s Web site is devoted to teens. It includes reading materials that say Muslims have a duty to help form Islamic governments worldwide and should be prepared to take up arms to do so.” 3) There’s no mystery that radical Islamists use the freedoms in our Constitution to expand the influence of Shariah. However, another key for the Muslim Brotherhood in North America and other extremist groups to engage in their “grand jihad ... from within” is capitalizing on the proliferation of our politically correct culture, especially the fad of condemning the Christian right while condoning Islamic fundamentalism. Political correctness is the cultural petri dish in which Shariah is accepted and developed. In “Muslim Mafia,” Frank Gaffney, head of the Center for Security Policy, explains it this way: The Muslim Brotherhood’s “object is to establish, initially, a separate society for Muslims within that of their host nations in which non-Muslims are the majority. This is accomplished by insinuating preferential arrangements for Muslims — religious accommodations, their own legal code and courts (that is, Shariah), territorial ‘no-go’ zones, and assorted political benefits. Initially, these seem modest and unthreatening. Separate rules governing dress codes. Accommodations in public spaces for

Gott

Continued from Page A4

skin around it is very smooth, but it is rough to the touch and appears to be flaking. Sometimes it is pale pink; other times it is an angry, dark pink. Occasionally, it itches. Neosporin and other creams don’t help. Can you? DEAR READER: I don’t know without seeing it, but my first thought is eczema or psoriasis. My recommendation is that you see your primary-care physician or a dermatologist for a diagnosis. Once the lesion is examined, appropriate

OPINION II against this very important statewide issue and especially so to this area we live in. Of the 12 house districts that make up the “southeast quadrant” of New Mexico, only two representatives, Mr. George Dodge from Santa Rosa and Mr. Zachary J. Cook from Ruidoso, chose to listen to their constituents and vote for SB196! The people had spoken, but Representative Dodge and Representative Cook were the only ones that listened. More than half of the 21 representatives that voted against SB196 are from southeast New Mexico! You make that call. The voting results are available at www.nmlegis.gov and I’m betting if she/he receives enough requests, your friendly editor will publish those figures so you can see if you were represented. The following are facts and figures published by NMWF on what SB196 will do for New Mexico residents starting in 2012. SB196 will give resident hunters 84 percent of every hunt code, up from 78 percent. In addition, residents will get all elk licenses in state wildlife management areas, plus all cow elk licenses statewide. Unguided nonresidents get 6 percent of licenses. The remaining 10 percent of licenses are set aside for non residents required to hire a New Mexico guide. SB196 also reduces general hunting and Deer license fees by $5 and requires every hunter who applies for a Big Game Draw or over the counter big game license to purchase a general hunting and fishing license — a provision common in most western states. In this day and age, the voting public has had it’s fill with legislators that do not listen and fail to vote according to what the majority of the people want. On a statewide level, the majority of New Mexico residents wanted this to pass. This is evidenced by how the majority of our elected officials voted. Most of them did listen! Politics on the national level is an absolute eye opener every day because those citizens have “remembered” and they voted by those memories. We can all keep improving our lives and our children’s future as long as we remember how we were represented and vote accordingly every chance we get. Thank you for your time. Joe Rivera Artesia the practice of a single religion. Latitude to deny service or handling of certain products in deference to religious sensibilities. Organized labor contracts that substitute Muslim holy days for Labor Day, etcetera.” 2) From our counties to the corridors of Washington, our politically correct culture has ushered in a host of politically correct politicians and judges who are legislating and advocating proIslamic culture and practices. Last year, The New York Times even published a multi-page report titled “White House Quietly Courts Muslims in U.S.” In Part 1, I mentioned President Barack Obama’s adviser on Muslim affairs, Dalia Mogahed, who advocated Shariah on a British television show. In February 2010, President Obama appointed Rashad Hussain to serve as his special envoy to the Organization of the Islamic Conference, an intergovernmental body of 56 Muslim countries. Where is the same treatment from this White House for any other religion? 1) There is no greater proponent of the partnership of America and Islam (and therefore Shariah) than President Obama himself. I’m not saying he is a Muslim, but he is a Muslim advocate and apologist. He said it himself. He declared his explicit mission in Cairo in June 2009 for the whole world to hear, vowing to establish “a new beginning between the United States and Muslims around the world. ... That experience guides my conviction that partnership between America and Islam must be based on what Islam is, not what it isn’t. And I consider it part of my responsibility as president of the United States to fight against negative stereotypes of Islam wherever they appear.” Have you ever heard a president talk about “partnership between America and Islam” and a presidential responsibility to “fight” for Islam? Or are we naive enough to believe that Obama’s “fight” never will entail an advocacy for Shariah? © 2011 Chuck Norris medication can be prescribed. While you are waiting for your appointment, be sure to keep your skin moistened. Treat the area with a petroleum-based product. If you bathe in a tub instead of shower, add Epsom salts or bath oil to the water. Dr. Peter H. Gott is a retired physician and the author of several books, including “Live Longer, Live Better,” “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Diet” and “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Cookbook,” which are available at most bookstores or online. His website is www.AskDrGottMD.com.

Friday, May 6, 2011

A5


Female migraine sufferers are at risk A6 Friday, May 6, 2011

LOCAL

ENMMC STAFF ARTICLE

More than 28 million people suffer migraines, and more women are affected than men lending new credence to the old line, “not tonight dear; I have a headache.” Three out of four migraine suf ferers are women, according to the National Women’s Health Information Center of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Migraine headaches can be very painful and debilitating, and can af fect quality of life. Recent research reveals that migraines can affect your heart, as well. A migraine can last anywhere from four hours to three days. Forty percent of women with migraines have at least one migraine each month, and one quarter suffer four or more attacks per month, according to the National Headache Foundation. It’s thought that hormones are the reason migraines more often affect women than men, and the demographics of migraine sufferers support that reasoning: most migraines are diagnosed in women between the ages of 25 and 45. After menopause, the frequency of migraines begins to decline. Beyond the immediate pain and inconvenience of migraines, long-term damage to your health is also a concern. Women with a history of migraines are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, according to recent industry studies. A women’s health study at Harvard University Medical School’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital tracked the relationship between genetic background, migraine headaches and heart disease in more than 25,000 women over age 45. Researchers found a link between migraines and heart disease for women who experienced

migraines with aura. An “aura” is a migraine symptom, usually a warning sign that precedes the migraine and consists of various visual cues – spots, wavy lines or flashing lights – or a prickly, numb feeling in the hands. The study found that those women who possessed a variant of a gene that plays a role in making an enzyme that helps process amino acids, were more likely to experience vascular events such as a migraine with aura. The gene variant is carried by 11 percent of the population. Study results were published in the June 24, 2009, issue of Neurology. Over a 12-year follow-up period, 625 women experienced a heart-related event such as heart attack or stroke. Women who tended to experience migraines with aura had double the risk, and those with both migraines with aura and the gene variant had three times the risk of heart attack or stroke. Other lifestyle factors such as smoking or taking birth control pills increased the risk further. Women who reported migraines with aura had other well-known risk factors for heart disease and stroke, as well. Members of this group were 40 to 60 percent more likely to have high cholesterol and 70 percent more likely to have high blood pressure. Migraine headaches don’t top the list of health issues

Roswell Daily Record

to watch for, such as better known cardiovascular risk factors like high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking and obesity; however, women with migraines should be aware of their known cardiovascular risk factors. If you suffer from migraines or you would like to talk with a doctor about your heart health and heart disease risk, contact Cardiovascular Associates of Roswell, 6240400 for an appointment today. To learn more about migraines and cardiovascular disease, visit www.enmmc.com. This health information is brought to you by the caring team at Eastern New Mexico Medical Center, dedicated to your good health. Is it a Migraine? If you haven’t previously been diagnosed with a migraine, sometimes it’s hard to know what symptoms to look for. Typical migraine symptoms can include: Pounding headache • • Nausea • Vomiting • Extreme sensitivity to light and sound • Loss of appetite • Sensations of being very warm or cold • Paleness • Fatigue • Dizziness • Blurred vision • Diarrhea • Fever

For a handy checklist and comparison of migraine and tension headache symptoms, visit the National Wo m e n ’ s H e a l t h I n f o r m a t i o n C e n t e r o f t h e U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f Health and Human Services at http://www.womenshealth.gov/FAQ/migraine.cfm.

Cahoon Park closes for weekend Special meeting in Ruidoso Today Cahoon Park Will be closed to the public after 5:00 p.m. tonight May 6 through Monday morning May 9, 2011. The park will be closed due to the set up and tear down for the Party on the River/Fiesta del Rio Celebrations. For more infor mation contact the Roswell Parks Department at 624-6720.

The Gig

The Gig Honoring Our Lord Jesus Christ hosted by the Salvation Army tonight at 7 p.m. at the Chaves County Courthouse lawn. For more information call 622-8700

and game booths by area non-profit organizations. For more information contact Joe Vargas at 624-6720 ext. 14.

Habitat for Humanity of Roswell is starting the eleventh house May 7 at 7 a.m. at 1208 E. Beech. Lunch will be provided. Please come and help for as much time as you can lend. For more information call 624-2138

The Diabetes Support Group meets the second Monday of every month and the guest speaker this month will be Jimmy Masters, Health Education Specialist from the NM Department of Health. The meeting will be held May 9, 6p.m at St Mark's Evangelical Lutheran Church at 2911 North Main behind the church at the fellowship hall. For more information call Julie Morrow at 347-2409 ext. 6222.

Habitat for Humanity

Party on the River/ Fiesta del Rio 2011

The Roswell Parks and Recreation Department along with their many cosponsors have set the weekend for May 78, 2011 The outdoor festival will be held in Roswell's Cahoon Park and will be from 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Saturday and 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Sunday. Nashville Recording Star - Chris Young will be headlining entertainment starting on Sat. 7:30pm. Also Tejano music with Sunny Ozuna. The "Party" will also include a festival atmosphere with food

NMMI tours NYC

The Diabetes Group

Support

Roswell Community Band

The Roswell Community Band and the Roswell Community Chorale will be presenting their spring concert May 9, at 7 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center at ENMU-R. The concert is free to the public and are encouraged to attend. For more information call Len Cheney at 622-2695.

Courtesy Photo

The group is the New Mexico Military Institute Cadet Concert Choir during their recent tour of the New York City area. The choir, considered “Musical Ambassadors” of NMMI, performed at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and on the USS Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum in Manhattan.

RUIDOSO — The village of Ruidoso has called a special meeting of the governing body of the Village of Ruidoso for today, May 6, at 10 a.m. The meeting will be held at the village of Ruidoso Administrative Center Council Chambers, 313 Cree Meadows Drive. For more information call Irma Devine at 575-258-4343

CAPITAN — Capitan will host the ninth annual Smokey Bear Days celebration May 6 through 7. The celebration will include a parade, chainsaw carving competition, an antique and custom car show and free live entertainment. Arts and crafts booths will be open and later in the evening an old fashioned street dance. Free to the public. For more information on Smokey Bear Days, call 575-354-2748.

TAOS — Taos, New Mexico is celebrating “World Labyrinth Day” on Saturday, May 7, The Guided Labyrinth T ours event begins at 8:30 a.m. at Kit Carson Park. The tour will consist of six area labyrinths, including transportation, labyrinth walking, and lunch. Cost it $60 all inclusive. For more information, contact John Acker at 575-613-0249 LAS CRUCES- The New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum will celebrate an old, historical tradition with the annual Blessing of the Fields on May 13.

The colorful, music-filled procession around the museum's campus to bless the animals, orchards and vineyard will be led by Bishop Ricardo Ramirez. The procession begins about 10 a.m. For more infor mation call Craig Massey (575) 522-4100, ext. 101

ODESSA, TX- The Ellen Noël Art Museum presents a special May workshop for adults. On Saturday, May 14, from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., a Random Acts of Art class is being offered in conjunction with the current exhibition, Sculpture by Steve Teeters. Artist Steve Teeters will instruct students on how to use unique assemblage techniques to produce sculpture made from found objects. Class enrollment is limited: first-come first-served by advance registration only. The $75 registration fee includes all class supplies and lunch. Payment is due at the time of enrollment. Registration may be made at the Ellen Noël Art Museum Administrative Office, between 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Registration forms can be found at www.noelartmuseum.org. 4909 University Blvd., Odessa, Texas.

Tree peonies get a bad rap

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS I wouldn’t say the flowers of tree peonies those “other” peonies prepare you for the flowery show of the more common herbaceous peonies that come soon after. No, with quivering golden stamens enveloped in dish-size whorls of silky white, pink, red, lavender or yellow petals, tree peony blossoms catapult you into peonydom. Later, catch your breath with the herbaceous ones. Every third garden, it seems, has herbaceous peonies, but you could go from one end of any town to the other and never see a tree peony. Their scarcity is due at least in part to some myths and prejudices that tree peonies have picked up during their thousand-plus years of cultivation. MYTHS NUMBER ONE AND TWO The first myth is in the name: Tree peonies are not trees. Yes, they are woody, but multi-stemmed and usually no more than a few feet high and wide. Eventually, a tree peony may reach 6 feet in height, but that could take decades. And that’s hardly a tree; hardly even a large shrub. But it does highlight a possible prejudice against planting tree peonies; they are slow growing. It’s also a fact that tree peonies are pricey. Eighty-five dollars would not be considered expensive for a tree peony a mere foot high. And you don’t have to look hard to find plants selling for a few hundred dollars each. One reason for this cost is that tree peonies are sometimes propagated by being grafted upon roots of herbaceous peonies, and 50 percent success in grafting is considered acceptable. No matter how a plant is propagated, it takes three or four years before it’s large enough to sell. Spectacular blossoms, of course, also figure into pricing. A couple of years ago, when a local nursery was offering tree peonies in 1-gallon pots for only $10 each, I snatched one up. At that price, slow growth would be tolerable. And I was curious about how slowly they actually grow — and how fast I could make one grow. MYTH NUMBER THREE Rumor also has it that tree peonies are difficult to

grow. They hail from the dry mountains of western Asia, so abhor “wet feet.” And whether or not the plants dislike being buffeted by wind, such conditions would surely and quickly fray the splashy blooms. I found an almost perfect location for my plant: the slight raised bed that borders my terrace and is protected to the north by a brick wall. My plant flowered the first spring after I planted it three blossoms, I think. And it grew. Those blossoms formed at the ends of shoots that each were about 18 inches long, making me hopeful that slow growth was a myth. But here’s the rub: Those shoots die back to some degree each winter. Still, a foot or so survives. A foot or so of growth each year is not too slow, and the plants allegedly pick up speed with age. THE TRAVELS OF TREE PEONIES Tree peonies made their way from China to Japan in the 7th century as medicinal plants, then again in the 17th century, this time as ornamental plants. Japanese breeders developed tree peonies that were quicker growing initially, at least quicker than the Chinese hybrids, but lacked their fragrance and fully double blooms. In the last hundred years, American and European breeders got into the act, so now there are hundreds and hundreds of varieties, many of them available from specialty nurseries such as Brothers Herbs and Peonies (www.treony.com), Cricket Hill Garden (www.treepeony.com) and Reath’s Nursery (www.reathsnursery.com). My bargain plant was evidently a Japanese hybrid. The blossoms lack fragrance and the plant did not come with a name like “Honeydew from Heaven” or “Coiled Dragon in a Mist Grasping Purple Pearl.” Although tree peonies like to bask in abundant sunlight, the blossoms last longer if shaded. In China, individual plants in bloom are temporarily shaded beneath paper umbrellas, an amenity my tree peony thus far lacks. Despite these deficiencies, my plant is glorious in bloom, and a first step into the world of those “other peonies.”


Roswell Daily Record

Friday, May 6, 2011

A7

“Hometown Proud”

Mother’s Are Heaven Sent Mother’s are like flowers, each uniquely beautiful in her own way, designed by God to bloom wherever she is placed. The Lord created Mother’s to be Heavens scent, a reflection of His beauty spreading His fragrance throughout our world. The Heart of God can be seen in each of the flowers and is reflected in a Mothers heart!

Paula J. Fox

Lawrence Brothers IGA would like to wish the Mothers in Roswell and the surrounding area, a blessed and wonderful Mother’s Day

FREE Carnations to the first 100 Mothers on Sunday.

FREE Wrapped Rose With any floral purchase of $25.00 or more

Below are just some of the great specials you will find MAY 6-8, 2011 at our Roswell Store Only while supplies last.

5

VALUE PACK BONELESS

RIB EYE STEAKS

$ 29 LB.

82

FRESH SWEET

EAR CORN

$

FOR

4

8 PACK

1

CRYOVAC BRISKET

$ 29

$ 99

LB.

LB.

1

GALLON HOMO/2%/SKIM

BROTHERS BEST MILK

$ 99

3 10

24 PACK

BOUNTY BASIC PAPER TOWELS NESTLE DRINKING WATER

$ 99

5

PRIME RIB ROAST

WHILE QUANTITIES LAST

$

FOR

1

12 PACK 12OZ CANS

BEST CHOICE SOFT DRINKS

$ 99

3 10

Asst. ½ Gallon

BLUE BELL ICE CREAM

9

$

FOR

12PACKS BOTTLES/CANS CORONA REG & LIGHT, DOS EQUIS, MODELO, TECATE

$

99

Don’t Forget Our Convenient 900 W. Second St Roswell, NM Drive-Thru Window In Our Pharmacy Hours: Sun. - Thurs. 7am till 9pm Fri. & Sat. 7am till 10 pm

EVERY TUESDAY IS “BANANA TUESDAY” 3 LBS. FOR $1

Pharmacy Hours: 9am-6pm Mon-Fri • 9am-1pm Sat Closed Sundays


A8 Friday, May 6, 2011

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Sunshine; breezy, warmer

Mainly clear

Saturday

Sunday

Sunshine

Tuesday

Monday

Mostly sunny

Very windy; mostly sunny

Mostly sunny and breezy

Wednesday

Mostly sunny and breezy

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Thursday

Mostly sunny

High 90°

Low 50°

99°/51°

98°/53°

94°/53°

89°/52°

88°/52°

84°/55°

W at 10-20 mph POP: 0%

NE at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

NE at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

SSE at 8-16 mph POP: 5%

SE at 10-20 mph POP: 0%

E at 8-16 mph POP: 5%

N at 10-20 mph POP: 5%

W at 10-20 mph POP: 10%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 5 p.m. Thursday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 78°/50° Normal high/low ............... 83°/50° Record high ............. 101° in 2000 Record low ................. 39° in 2001 Humidity at noon ................... 20%

Farmington 81/40

Clayton 86/48

Raton 81/35

Precipitation 24 hours ending 5 p.m. Thu. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date ......................... Normal year to date .............

0.00” 0.00” 0.15” 0.09” 1.88”

Santa Fe 79/40

Gallup 77/31

Tucumcari 90/51

Albuquerque 83/52

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 88/51

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading 55 0-50

51-100

Good

Moderate

Source: EPA

101-150

Ruidoso 83/57

151+

Unhealthy Unhealthy sensitive

T or C 87/54

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Sat. The Moon Today Sat. First

Rise Set 6:06 a.m. 7:44 p.m. 6:05 a.m. 7:45 p.m. Rise Set 8:29 a.m. 11:09 p.m. 9:27 a.m. 11:56 p.m. Full

Last

May 10 May 17 May 24

New

Jun 1

Alamogordo 90/45

Silver City 88/50

Hobbs 91/54

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2011

ARIES (March 21-April 19)  Keep talks moving. You might not be comfortable with everything you YOUR HOROSCOPE are hearing. You might wonder if another choice would be better. Realize what is going on with others before you make a financial decision. Tonight: Hang out with a friend, but make it an easy night. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  Be aware of where you are coming from financially. You might be overly tired and withdrawn. Be willing to say “no” to a money offer. Others know that you are authentic and cannot be bought. Tonight: Your treat. Let the good times roll. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)  You are all smiles and take a leap of faith. Nevertheless, a meeting defines your decisions. You now know which way to go. Understanding evolves to a different level. Be willing to back up your words with actions. Tonight: Living in the moment. CANCER (June 21-July 22)  Know that you are best off holding your opinions back. Words come forward

Another finalist bounced from ‘American Idol’

Leave your mark

Carlsbad 93/51

Las Cruces 91/52

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diffi- JACQUELINE cult BIGAR

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jacob Lusk is out of air on “American Idol.” The booming 23-year-old vocalist from Compton, Calif., was revealed to have received the fewest viewer votes on the Fox talent contest Thursday. A day earlier, he had unsuccessfully attempted both parts of “No Air,” the duet of Jordin Sparks and Chris Brown, and a tender rendition of “Love Hurts,” the classic tune made famous by Nazareth and Roy Orbison. “I got to share a little bit with America, and I think America’s fallen in love with me,” said Lusk after his elimination. “Now I can go and put out that goodfeeling R&B music that reminds you of Luther (Vandross) or those great old singers.” A tearful Lauren Alaina, the soaring 16-year -old songstress of Rossville, Ga., joined Lusk as one of the bottom two vote-getters.

ROSWELL 90/50

Despite her position, Alania impressed the “Idol” judges with her performances of Carrie Underwood’s “Flat on the Floor” and The Righteous Brothers’ “Unchained Melody” on Wednesday’s installment of current and classic tunes. “Jacob had a rough night last night,” said “Idol” mentor and Interscope Records chief Jimmy Iovine. “I think his nerves are getting the best of him.” Besides Alaina, the other remaining finalists are over -the-top 22-year -old rocker James Durbin of Santa Cruz, Calif.; deepvoiced 17-year-old country crooner Scotty McCreery of Garner, N.C.; and bluesey 20-year -old singer Haley Reinhart, of Wheeling, Ill. The singers will return to the stage next week with another finalist dismissed next Thursday. The 10th season “Idol” champion is scheduled to be crowned on the May 26 finale.

Volunteer

Regional Cities Today Sat. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

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90/45/s 83/52/s 68/29/s 93/53/pc 93/51/pc 72/35/s 86/48/s 72/41/s 88/51/s 92/45/s 82/51/s 81/40/s 77/31/s 91/54/s 91/52/s 78/39/s 74/44/s 88/46/s 92/57/s 89/49/s 77/33/s 81/35/s 65/32/s 90/50/s 83/57/s 79/40/s 88/50/s 87/54/s 90/51/s 80/45/s

89/44/s 83/52/s 70/31/s 104/57/s 100/56/s 72/28/s 83/46/s 72/27/s 91/50/s 92/47/s 82/51/s 82/39/s 76/33/s 101/53/s 93/53/s 81/42/s 75/35/s 88/53/s 95/55/s 91/50/s 77/35/s 82/36/s 66/27/s 99/51/s 85/54/s 82/40/s 89/49/s 88/52/s 92/48/s 81/38/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

that might be irritating but force some type of internalization. You might wonder about the strength of your reaction. Tonight: Know what you want. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  You might be a lot happier with a personal matter than you originally thought you’d be. Making a decision could lead to substantial discomfort. Realize what a friendship has to offer. Now ask yourself if the friendship is worth it. Tonight: Lots of fun early on. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)    Tension builds, whether you’re conscious of it or not. This situation could change radically if you relax and try another approach. Sometimes a partner is rather assertive. Be willing to be more creative, empathetic and direct. Tonight: A late meeting could dissolve into a fun happening. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)      Your mind is everywhere but present in the moment. Strange things happen when you become too lodged in reverie. Optimism seems to surround you, encouraging you to clear out a problem with a key person. Become more vested in what is happening. Tonight: Split from the tried-andtrue as soon as you can. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  Your fun nature seems to separate those who have a lot to offer from those who are just riding your coattails. Your effectiveness is tested to the max, forcing your hand. Do you want or need a different approach? Tonight: Visit over

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

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Today

Sat.

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56/39/pc 74/53/s 70/44/pc 70/49/pc 72/48/t 68/48/pc 62/44/sh 83/65/s 82/42/s 63/47/sh 91/59/s 86/74/s 85/64/s 66/51/sh 76/56/s 95/70/s 76/57/pc 87/58/s

55/39/pc 81/59/s 74/48/pc 62/50/c 77/53/s 68/46/r 62/48/pc 86/71/s 81/46/s 62/48/r 93/59/s 87/74/pc 84/68/pc 66/52/t 71/52/t 93/67/s 70/56/pc 94/55/s

86/72/t 88/62/s 67/48/pc 82/61/s 71/52/s 77/53/s 86/63/pc 71/52/s 99/68/s 64/44/t 63/48/c 73/49/t 69/56/s 72/51/pc 67/58/pc 57/46/sh 96/60/s 72/52/pc

86/73/t 97/65/s 66/47/sh 84/65/pc 69/54/pc 72/48/pc 88/63/pc 71/54/pc 98/69/s 64/50/pc 60/47/r 79/54/s 73/54/t 76/49/s 66/58/pc 58/43/r 95/60/s 72/55/pc

U.S. Extremes

Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 102°....... Palm Springs, Calif. Low: 10°........Berthoud Pass, Colo.

High: 86°............................Deming Low: 16°.........................Angel Fire

National Cities Seattle 57/46 Billings 62/39

Minneapolis 67/48 Detroit 63/47

San Francisco 62/50

Chicago 68/48 Washington 72/52

Denver 82/42

Kansas City 76/56

Los Angeles 76/57

Atlanta 74/53

El Paso 91/59

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Houston 85/64

Miami 86/72

Fronts Cold

-10s

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-0s

New York 71/52

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Ice

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munchies; the rest just happens. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)  Listen to what is being said, whether you agree or not. You are full of fun and energy. You are very lucky, and you make excellent choices. You seem to be able to handle nearly anything. Look at a situation as you would another person. Tonight: Chat over dinner. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  You have a lot to do, and you accomplish it quickly. Maintain your sense of humor. Realize what is happening behind the scenes. In a meeting in the evening, you see a situation differently because of a discussion. Tonight: So many people and so much to do. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  Take off early. Your perspective is subject to change if you imagine what it’s like to be someone else. Re-evaluate certain issues. Be imaginative with a child. Tonight: If you get tired early, just say so. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)  If you can, work from home, or take a day off. You need a change of pace and will be much happier if you do. Realize what is happening within a relationship. Tap into your sense of humor. Tonight: Christen the weekend well. BORN TODAY Actor George Clooney (1961), former British Prime Minister Tony Blair (1953), actor, director Orson Welles (1915)


Friday, May 6, 2011 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 28

LOCAL SCHEDULE FRIDAY MAY 6 H.S. BASEBALL 3 p.m. Class 4A first round • Valencia at Goddard H.S. SOFTBALL District 4-4A round robin At Artesia 3 p.m. • Artesia vs. Goddard 5 p.m. • Goddard vs. Roswell 7 p.m. • Artesia vs. Roswell H.S. TENNIS NMAA Team State Championships 8 a.m. • 4A Boys — Goddard vs. Santa Teresa, at Sierra Vista West Tennis Complex 1:30 p.m. • 1A/2A/3A Boys — NMMI vs. Taos, at Albuquerque Academy 4:30 p.m. • 4A Girls — Goddard vs. Albuquerque Academy, at Sierra Vista West Tennis Complex H.S. TRACK & FIELD 9 a.m. • Dexter, Gateway Chr., Hagerman, Lake Arthur, Valley Chr. at NMAA State Championship, at Albuquerque 3 p.m. • Goddard, Roswell at District 4-4A Championships, at the Wool Bowl

LOCAL BRIEFS ALL SAINTS GOLF TOURNEY SET FOR MAY 21

The All Saints Catholic School golf tournament will be held on May 21 at Spring River Golf Course. The tournament will have 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. shotgun start times. The fee is $60 per golfer and includes green fees, cart fees, two mulligans and lunch. The registration deadline is May 10. For more information, call Richard Anglada at 637-0412 or All Saints Catholic School at 627-5744.

SPORTS Roswell Daily Record

LAWRENCE FOSTER RECORD SPORTS REPORTER

ALBUQUERQUE — As a freshman last year, Goddard’s Gabby Joyce experienced quite a high at the state tennis tour nament, teaming up with Halie Harton to claim the Class 4A Doubles State Title. While Joyce was obviously happy with the title, all it did was whet her appetite for medals and she wanted to win one herself. Fast forward a year and the sophomore now has a new medal to hang next to the one from 2010. Joyce won two of three matches on the second day of the Class 4A Girls Singles Tour nament and took home third place. “I have been saying ever since I won first place with Halie that I wanted my own by myself,” she beamed after claiming her medal. “It was pretty special in my sophomore year to get it. It was definitely tougher, but I am glad I still came home with a medal. Now I have two more years to claim first place.” Joyce’s day started off with a match against Far mington’s Danielle Nguyen. Joyce made quick work of Nguyen, winning 6-3, 6-2. The second set was particularly impressive as Joyce nailed 10 winners, while Nguyen had none. In the semifinals, Joyce fell to the No. 2 seeded Ksenia Bosnia, 75, 6-2. The loss in the semis put Joyce in the third-place match where she faced off with a familiar foe, St. Pius X’s Taylor Roach. At the state team tournament

last year, a day after Harton and Joyce won their doubles crown, Roach beat Joyce in straight sets. At the start of their third-place match, it appeared that Roach would repeat that feat as she held a 5-2 lead. On the side change, Goddard coach Becky Joyce met with Gabby and told her to play her game. “I told her to play her game,” Coach Joyce said. “She has some things that she focuses on during a game and I just kind of reminded her of those things.” The meeting worked as Gabby held her serve to close to 5-3. Gabby broke Roach’s next service game and held on to hers to knot the set at five. Roach was able to hold on to her ensuing serve to take a 6-5 lead. On Gabby’s next service game, she built up a 40-15 lead, but a double fault and error from the baseline, drove the game to deuce. Roach had the first two advantages, but Gabby used a monster first serve to bring the match back to deuce each time. When Gabby got her first advantage, she sent the first set to a tiebreaker with an ace. The tie-breaker wasn’t close as Joyce won all seven points to take the first set. The second set was even closer as neither girl could build a lead bigger than two. Roach had that two-game lead at 4-2, but Gabby once again battled back to take a 5-4 lead. Roach was able to break Gabby’s serve and hold on to hers

E-mail: sports@roswell-record.com

Lawrence Foster Photo

Goddard’s Gabby Joyce hammers a serve during her win over Farmington’s Danielle Nguyen at the NMAA Class 4A Girls Singles Tournament, Thursday. Joyce went on to win a bronze medal at the event.

NMMI’s Garza, Estrella win bronze medals See JOYCE, Page B3

LAWRENCE FOSTER RECORD SPORTS REPORTER

• More briefs on B2

NA T I O N A L BRIEFS LAWSUIT FILED IN 2009 COLLAPSE OF PRACTICE FACILITY

DALLAS (AP) — A Dallas Cowboys spokeswoman who says she was hurt when the team’s practice facility collapsed during a 2009 storm has filed a lawsuit. A Dallas Cowboys spokeswoman claims in a lawsuit that she suffered undisclosed injuries when the team’s practice facility collapsed two years ago. Jancy Briles, a member of the team’s public relations staff and the daughter of Baylor football coach Art Briles, is suing companies involved in building or designing the steel and fabric structure. The lawsuit, filed April 29, contends that Briles should recover damages for suffering “serious, disabling and permanent injuries.” The defendants include Summit Structures LLC of Allentown, Pa., and its Canadian parent, Cover-All Building Systems Inc. Cover-All was dissolved after filing for bankruptcy in March 2010. The Cowboys were conducting a rookie minicamp when the 88,000-squarefoot building fell in a wind storm on May 2, 2009. The National Institute of Standards and Technology concluded that the structure should have been able to withstand the wind gusts, which were between 55 mph and 65 mph.

B

Joyce brings home bronze in singles Section

Lawrence Foster Photo

NMMI’s Jerry Estrella, right, and Jorge Garza, left, show off their bronze medals while posing for a picture with Colt coach Jim Kelly, Thursday. The Colt duo won 6-2, 6-2 in the third-place match to secure the medals at the NMAA Class 1A/2A/3A Boys Doubles Tournament.

ALBUQUERQUE — A pro-Lovington crowd. A team that just a week ago beat them. The combination of those two things and the pressure of the third-place match of the Class 1A/2A/3A Boys Doubles Tournament could have done in NMMI’s Jorge Garza and Jerry Estrella. The Colt duo rose to the challenge, however, and beat Lovington’s Jacey Kidd and Jacob Lovelace, 6-2, 63 to claim the bronze medal. NMMI coach Jim Kelly said that he was proud of the two. “They went in and and they finished third, which I was proud of, especially after coming off the defeat

they had earlier to them,” he said. “We played them three times and it has been a contested match each time. We just took care of business.” NMMI’s other doubles team of Maricio Moncada and Luis Zaragoza lost in the second round, 7-6, 6-1. In singles action, the Colts’ Frederico Sanchez fell to Mike Atkins, 6-0, 6-1.

Goddard

ALBUQUERQUE — The Goddard boys tennis team started the second day of the Class 4A Doubles Tournament with two teams left. After the first round of Day 2, however, both teams were eliminated. The first Rocket team ousted was the fourth-seed-

Gonzalez finishes fourth at NMAA state tourney LAWRENCE FOSTER RECORD SPORTS REPORTER

Lawrence Foster Photo

NMMI’s Jose Gonzalez hits a backhand return during his win over Bosque Prep’s Adam Loredo, Thursday.

ALBUQUERQUE — Sometimes things just don’t go the way you expect them to. Like that vacation to Myrtle Beach that you have been looking forward to for a year, but the entire week you’re there, it’s cloudy, rainy and windy. But as the saying goes, when life hands you lemons, make lemonade. For NMMI’s Jose Gonzalez, he planned to at least medal at the Class 1A/2A/3A Boys Singles Tournament on Thursday, if not win the entire thing. Unfortunately for Gonzalez, his lemon was a fourth-place finish, but you wouldn’t have known it by his on-court behavior. While other competitors were throwing rackets, hats and profanities, Gonzalez, save for the occasional shout of ecstacy, was calm, cool and collected, even when things weren’t going his way. The day did start off in his favor as he won a tight battle with Bosque’s Adam Loredo, 6-4, 6-4. Gonzalez started the match off fast, winning the first game without allowing a point.

See STATE, Page B3

He proceeded to take three of the first four games of the set, but Loredo battled back to take the next three and a 4-3 lead. Gonzalez knotted the game by breaking Loredo’s serve without losing a point. With that momentum, he went on to take the next two games and the first set. The second set was almost a complete 180 of the first set. Loredo won three of the first four games of the second set, but this time it was Gonzalez battling back to take a 4-3 lead. Loredo was able to hold on to his serve, tying the game at four, but Gonzalez cruised through the final two games, to take the match. In the semifinals, Gonzalez squared off against Robertson’s Emilio Gomez, the No. 2 seed. Gomez and Gonzalez had played two times previous to Thursday’s matchup, with Gomez taking both matches. From the start it was apparent that Gomez was going to be almost unbeatable: He had less than 10 unforced errors and his court coverage would make Rafael Nadal blush. Gomez cruised to a 6-1, 6-3 victory and See GONZALEZ, Page B2


B2 Friday, May 6, 2011

SPORTS

Joyful Victory leads talented Kentucky Oaks field LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Larry Jones tried the retirement thing. Didn’t take. Oh, he did all the things he’d put off for decades while training horses everywhere from Arkansas to Kentucky to Delaware. He hopped on his lawnmower. He took a few naps on his couch. He hung out with his grandkids. He got healthy. Yet Jones never really left the game following his abrupt departure 18 months ago. He spent a few hours each morning at the barns watching wife Cindy handle their talented stable. “Once she turned her back, though, I was out the door,” Jones said with a laugh. That is, until Cindy told him he’d spent too much

LOCAL BRIEFS ALIEN CITY GIRLS FASTPITCH TO HOLD SIGN-UPS

The Alien City Girls Fastpitch Softball League will be holding five sign-ups at the Wool Bowl Complex. Sign-ups will be held on May 7 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The cost is $30 per player and the league is open to players ages 6-14. For more information, call 6240043 or 317-5448.

PARTY ON THE RIVER EVENTS ACCEPTING REGISTRATIONS

The Roswell Adult and Senior Center and the Roswell Parks and Recreation Department are currently accepting registrations for two different events that will be held at Party on the River. Registrations for the fiesta and powder puff tugs of war, which will be held on May 7 at Cahoon Park, will be accepted through May 6 at 5 p.m. The registration fee is $100 per team. For more information, call 624-6718.

WALKER AVIATION GOLF TOURNEY IS SATURDAY, MAY 14

The Walker Aviation Museum Foundation golf tournament will be held on Saturday, May 14, at the NMMI Golf Course. The tournament is a four-person scramble and will begin with a shotgun start at 8 a.m. The cost is $60 per player. Entry forms can be picked up at the NMMI Golf Course pro shop. For more information, call Dee Rogers at 626-4531, Bob Pottle at 420-9664 or Bob Serrano at 505-414-8100.

18TH ANNUAL RACE FOR THE ZOO IS MAY 21

The 18th annual Roswell Runners Club Race for the Zoo will be held on Saturday, May 21, at 8 a.m. at the Spring River Zoo. The event will consist of a 2mile walk, a 5k run, a 10k walk and a 10k run. The entry fee is $15. For more information, call Bob Edwards at 624-6720.

SUPER SUMMER SOCCER SERIES TO ACCEPT REGISTRATIONS

The Yucca Recreation Center’s 5-on-5 and Pee-Wee Super Summer Soccer Series will be taking registrations from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, until May 22. Registration is $30 per player. For more information, call 6246719.

ELKS FOR VETS GOLF TOURNEY TO BE HELD JUNE 4

The annual Elks for Veterans charity golf tournament will be held on June 4 at the NMMI Golf Course. The four-person scramble will begin with an 8 a.m. shotgun start. The cost is $60 per player or $240 per team. The field is limited to the first 24 paid teams. For more information, call Brady Crump at 622-6033.

FIRST TEE TO HOLD YOUTH SUMMER CAMPS

The First Tee of The Pecos Valley is currently accepting reservations for its annual Youth Golf & Life Skills Summer Camps, which are held at the NMMI Golf Course. The cost is $75 and includes breakfast and lunch each day. For more information or to reserve a spot, call 623-4444.

time on the recliner and it was time to get back to work. Standing outside his barn at Churchill Downs on Thursday morning, Jones acknowledges he didn’t so much retire as take a muchneeded break. “It’s good to be back,” Jones said. “I feel better now. I feel better than I have in 15-20 years.” Of course, having a racing roster filled with horses like Joyful Victory tends to help. The 3-year -old filly will start from the rail as the 5-2 favorite for Friday’s $1 million Kentucky Oaks, the female version of the Kentucky Derby. Joyful Victory is 2-for-2 since moving to Jones’ barn, winning the Honeybee and Fantasy Stakes by a com-

Baseball

Major League Baseball At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press American League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L New York . . . . . . . . . .17 12 Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .17 14 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .14 16 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .14 17 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .14 17 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .21 9 Kansas City . . . . . . . .17 14 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .15 17 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .11 18 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .11 21 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Los Angeles . . . . . . . .18 14 Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 15 Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .16 16 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .15 17

Pct GB .586 — .548 1 .467 3 1⁄2 .452 4 .452 4

Pct GB .700 — .548 4 1⁄2 .469 7 .379 9 1⁄2 .344 11

Pct .563 .531 .500 .469

GB — 1 2 3

Wednesday’s Games Minnesota 3, Chicago White Sox 2 Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 2 Detroit 4, N.Y. Yankees 0 L.A. Angels 5, Boston 3, 13 innings Baltimore 3, Kansas City 2 Oakland 3, Cleveland 1 Texas 5, Seattle 2 Thursday’s Games Detroit 6, N.Y. Yankees 3 Tampa Bay 3, Toronto 1 L.A. Angels 11, Boston 0 Kansas City 9, Baltimore 1 Cleveland 4, Oakland 3, 12 innings Seattle 3, Texas 1 Friday’s Games Tampa Bay (Shields 2-1) at Baltimore (Britton 5-1), 5:05 p.m. Detroit (Coke 1-4) at Toronto (Litsch 2-2), 5:07 p.m. Minnesota (S.Baker 1-2) at Boston (Wakefield 0-0), 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Nova 2-2) at Texas (Harrison 3-3), 6:05 p.m. Oakland (G.Gonzalez 3-2) at Kansas City (O’Sullivan 1-1), 6:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 5-0) at L.A. Angels (Chatwood 2-1), 8:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Humber 2-3) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 3-2), 8:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Minnesota at Boston, 11:10 a.m. Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 11:10 a.m. Detroit at Toronto, 2:07 p.m. Oakland at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Texas, 6:05 p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Seattle, 7:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Detroit at Toronto, 11:07 a.m. Minnesota at Boston, 11:35 a.m. Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 11:35 a.m. N.Y. Yankees at Texas, 12:05 p.m. Oakland at Kansas City, 12:10 p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 1:35 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Seattle, 2:10 p.m.

National League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Philadelphia . . . . . . . .21 Florida . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Washington . . . . . . . .14 New York . . . . . . . . . .13 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .18 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .16 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . .15 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .14 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .13 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .12 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Colorado . . . . . . . . . .18 San Francisco . . . . . .15 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .15 Arizona . . . . . . . . . . .13 San Diego . . . . . . . . .12

L 9 11 15 17 18 L 14 15 16 16 18 19

L 10 16 17 16 19

Pct GB .700 — .633 2 1 .545 4 ⁄2 .452 7 1⁄2 .419 8 1⁄2 Pct .563 .516 .484 .467 .419 .387

GB — 1 1⁄2 1 2 ⁄2 3 4 1⁄2 5 1⁄2

Pct GB .643 — .484 4 1⁄2 .469 5 .448 5 1⁄2 .387 7 1⁄2

Wednesday’s Games Cincinnati 3, Houston 2 Chicago Cubs 5, L.A. Dodgers 1 Atlanta 8, Milwaukee 3, 1st game Pittsburgh 7, San Diego 4 Philadelphia 7, Washington 4 San Francisco 2, N.Y. Mets 0 Atlanta 8, Milwaukee 0, 2nd game Florida 8, St. Louis 7 Colorado 6, Arizona 4 Thursday’s Games Cincinnati 10, Houston 4 N.Y. Mets 5, San Francisco 2 St. Louis 6, Florida 3 Philadelphia 7, Washington 3 Atlanta 2, Milwaukee 1 Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m. Friday’s Games Cincinnati (Volquez 2-1) at Chicago Cubs (Garza 1-3), 12:20 p.m. Atlanta (D.Lowe 2-3) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 2-2), 5:05 p.m. Houston (W.Rodriguez 1-3) at Pittsburgh (Maholm 1-4), 5:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 3-2) at N.Y. Mets

TV SPORTSWATCH

bined 15 3⁄4 lengths. She’s done it so easily for jockey Mike Smith — who rode retired superstar mare Zenyatta — Jones says Joyful Victory reminds him of Eight Belles. The massive gray filly finished second in the 2008 Derby but was euthanized moments after hitting the wire when she broke both of her front legs while galloping out. Her death thrust Jones into an uncomfortable spotlight as animal rights groups questioned the need to run a filly against the boys. The ensuing success of Zenyatta and Rachel Alexandra — who won consecutive Horse of the Year Awards after beating the guys — quieted any discussion of safety issues but Jones took the (Niese 1-4), 5:10 p.m. Washington (Zimmermann 2-4) at Florida (Nolasco 3-0), 5:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Wolf 3-2) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 3-0), 6:15 p.m. Arizona (Galarraga 3-2) at San Diego (Stauffer 0-1), 8:05 p.m. Colorado (Jimenez 0-2) at San Francisco (Cain 2-2), 8:15 p.m. Saturday’s Games Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 11:10 a.m. Milwaukee at St. Louis, 2:10 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 5:05 p.m. Houston at Pittsburgh, 5:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 5:10 p.m. Washington at Florida, 5:10 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 6:35 p.m. Colorado at San Francisco, 7:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets, 11:10 a.m. Washington at Florida, 11:10 a.m. Houston at Pittsburgh, 11:35 a.m. Milwaukee at St. Louis, 12:15 p.m. Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs, 12:20 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 2:05 p.m. Colorado at San Francisco, 2:05 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 6:05 p.m.

Basketball

NBA Playoff Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlanta 1, Chicago 1 Monday, May 2: Atlanta 103, Chicago 95 Wednesday, May 4: Chicago 86, Atlanta 73 Friday, May 6: at Atlanta, 5 p.m. Sunday, May 8: at Atlanta, 6 p.m. Tueseday, May 10: at Chicago, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, May 12: at Atlanta, TBA x-Sunday, May 15: at Chicago, TBA Miami 2, Boston 0 Sunday, May 1: Miami 99, Boston 90 Tuesday, May 3: Miami 102, Boston 91 Saturday, May 7: at Boston, 6 p.m. Monday, May 9: at Boston, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 11: at Miami, 5 p.m. x-Friday, May 13: at Boston, TBA x-Monday, May 16: at Miami, 6 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE Dallas 2, L.A. Lakers 0 Monday, May 2: Dallas 96, L.A. Lakers 94 Wednesday, May 4: Dallas 93, L.A. Lakers 81 Friday, May 6: at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, May 8: at Dallas, 1:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 10: at L.A. Lakers, 7 or 8:30 p.m. x-Thursday, May 12: at Dallas, TBA x-Sunday, May 15: at L.A. Lakers, 1:30 p.m. Memphis 1, Oklahoma City 1 Sunday, May 1: Memphis 114, Oklahoma City 101 Tuesday, May 3: Oklahoma City 111, Memphis 102 Saturday, May 7: at Memphis, 3 p.m. Monday, May 9: at Memphis, 7:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 11: at Oklahoma City, 6 or 7:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 13: at Memphis, TBA x-Sunday, May 15: at Oklahoma City, TBA

Golf

Wells Fargo Championship Scores By The Associated Press Thursday At Quail Hollow Club Charlotte, N.C. Purse: $6.5 million Yardage: 7,469; Par 72 (36-36) First Round Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32-32 — Jonathan Byrd . . . . . . . . . . .33-33 — David Toms . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-33 — Lucas Glover . . . . . . . . . . . .32-35 — Pat Perez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-34 — Stuart Appleby . . . . . . . . . . .32-36 — Carl Pettersson . . . . . . . . . .34-34 — Rickie Fowler . . . . . . . . . . . .32-36 — Vijay Singh . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-35 — Jim Herman . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-34 — Brandt Jobe . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — Padraig Harrington . . . . . . .34-35 — Sergio Garcia . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — Ryan Moore . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — Kevin Na . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-34 — Ryuji Imada . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-36 — Phil Mickelson . . . . . . . . . . .35-34 — Chez Reavie . . . . . . . . . . . .35-34 — Billy Mayfair . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-33 — Josh Teater . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — Bobby Gates . . . . . . . . . . . .35-34 — Martin Kaymer . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — Anthony Kim . . . . . . . . . . . .33-37 — Steve Marino . . . . . . . . . . . .36-34 — Jeff Overton . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-34 — Brian Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — Tim Herron . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — Mathew Goggin . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — Webb Simpson . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — Davis Love III . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — J.B. Holmes . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-37 — D.J. Trahan . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — Paul Goydos . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — Matt Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — Fabian Gomez . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — Scott Stallings . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 —

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Friday, May 6 AUTO RACING 5 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, practice for Turkish Grand Prix, at Istanbul 9:30 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Southern 500, at Darlington, S.C. Noon SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, “Happy Hour Series,” final practice for Southern 500, at Darlington, S.C.

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Roswell Daily Record

criticism personally. He returned to the Derby in 2009 with Friesan Fire, who went off as the favorite only to slide all the way to 18th. Six months later Jones stepped away citing emotional strain. Now he’s re-energized. “I don’t look any better, but I feel better,” he said with a laugh. His sabbatical helped him realize he wasn’t quite ready to give up the kind of success he’d worked so hard to achieve. It took him more than 20 years to get to the top of the heap. Leaving just seemed silly. Though he has slimmed down his operation. He has less than 60 horses in training now compared to over 100 two years ago. It has allowed him to give his hors-

es more personal attention and let him be more choosy about who he hops on. “I don’t want to be a racing manager,” Jones said. “A lot of trainers are fine with that and do a good job with it but that’s not me and I realized I wasn’t happy doing it.” He’s only truly happy when he’s working on his horses, and he thinks he has something special in Joyful Victory. He sees more than a passing resemblance between Joyful Victory and Eight Belles. Joyful Victory, like Eight Belles, is gray and, like Eight Belles, seems to be at home on the dirt under the twin spires. “It’s uncanny how much they are like each other,” said Jones, who won the Oaks in 2008 with Proud

SCOREBOARD

Cameron Tringale . . . . . . . .33-37 D.A. Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34 Stewart Cink . . . . . . . . . . . .34-37 Jason Bohn . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-38 Alex Cejka . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Andres Romero . . . . . . . . . .34-37 Scott Gutschewski . . . . . . . .35-36 Jarrod Lyle . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35 Tag Ridings . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Boo Weekley . . . . . . . . . . . .34-37 Justin Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-37 Marc Turnesa . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35 Bo Van Pelt . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Chad Campbell . . . . . . . . . .36-35 Michael Putnam . . . . . . . . . .34-37 Steven Bowditch . . . . . . . . .31-40 Bubba Watson . . . . . . . . . . .38-34 Jim Furyk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37 Rory Sabbatini . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 Troy Matteson . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 Robert Garrigus . . . . . . . . . .35-37 Arjun Atwal . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-38 Joe Ogilvie . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 Edoardo Molinari . . . . . . . . .34-38 Michael Connell . . . . . . . . . .35-37 Kent Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 Charles Warren . . . . . . . . . .34-38 Chris Stroud . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-38 Gary Woodland . . . . . . . . . .39-33 Dustin Johnson . . . . . . . . . .33-39 Hunter Mahan . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 Robert Allenby . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 Charley Hoffman . . . . . . . . .36-36 Joe Durant . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 Hunter Haas . . . . . . . . . . . .39-33 Kyle Stanley . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37 Charles Howell III . . . . . . . .39-34 J.J. Henry . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36 Fredrik Jacobson . . . . . . . . .34-39 Zach Johnson . . . . . . . . . . .37-36 Trevor Immelman . . . . . . . . .35-38 Heath Slocum . . . . . . . . . . .36-37 John Rollins . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37 Marc Leishman . . . . . . . . . .34-39 Steve Flesch . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37 Peter Tomasulo . . . . . . . . . .38-35 Bio Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37 George McNeill . . . . . . . . . .35-38 Johnson Wagner . . . . . . . . .36-37 Nathan Green . . . . . . . . . . .34-39 Bill Lunde . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-40 Kevin Chappell . . . . . . . . . .36-37 D.J. Brigman . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36 Michael Thompson . . . . . . .35-38 Billy Horschel . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36 David Mathis . . . . . . . . . . . .35-38 John Senden . . . . . . . . . . . .39-35 James Driscoll . . . . . . . . . . .38-36 Vaughn Taylor . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 William McGirt . . . . . . . . . . .37-37 Keegan Bradley . . . . . . . . . .38-36 Justin Hicks . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-36 Nate Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 Dean Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . .37-37 Mark Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 Rocco Mediate . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 Greg Chalmers . . . . . . . . . .36-38 Tommy Gainey . . . . . . . . . . .39-35 Richard S. Johnson . . . . . . .35-39 Kevin Sutherland . . . . . . . . .35-39 Ben Curtis . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-39 Jeff Maggert . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-37 Rich Beem . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-38 David Duval . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-38 Paul Stankowski . . . . . . . . .38-37 Joseph Bramlett . . . . . . . . . .39-36 Rory McIlroy . . . . . . . . . . . .37-38 Robert Karlsson . . . . . . . . . .39-36 Alex Prugh . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-42 Jimmy Walker . . . . . . . . . . .38-37 Bryce Molder . . . . . . . . . . . .36-39 Jhonattan Vegas . . . . . . . . .35-40 Camilo Villegas . . . . . . . . . .36-39

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Gonzalez

Continued from Page B1

NMMI coach Jim Kelly said that it is hard to beat a player that is that dialed in. “This is the third time (Jose) has played (Gomez) and the outcome has been the same every time,” he said. “They always have a good match, but it is tough to beat a guy when he has single digit unforced errors and chases everything down. The only thing you can do is hope that you can hang in

1:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, pole qualifying for Royal Purple 200, at Darlington, S.C. 3 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying for Southern 500, at Darlington, S.C. 5:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Royal Purple 200, at Darlington, S.C. BOXING 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Junior lightweights, Gilberto Sanchez-Leon (29-9-2) vs. Diego Magdaleno (18-0-0), at Las Vegas GOLF 7 a.m.

Cameron Beckman . . . . . . .36-39 Henrik Stenson . . . . . . . . . .36-39 Brendon de Jonge . . . . . . . .38-37 Shaun Micheel . . . . . . . . . . .37-38 Sunghoon Kang . . . . . . . . . .35-40 Lanto Griffin . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-39 Tim Petrovic . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-38 Chad Collins . . . . . . . . . . . .36-40 Kris Blanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-38 J.P. Hayes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-37 Nick Watney . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-37 Derek Lamely . . . . . . . . . . .41-35 Blake Adams . . . . . . . . . . . .38-39 Brendan Steele . . . . . . . . . .37-40 Brad Faxon . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-40 Ben Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40-37 Sam Saunders . . . . . . . . . . .40-37 Colt Knost . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41-36 Zack Miller . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42-35 Ricky Barnes . . . . . . . . . . . .39-38 Willie Wood . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-41 Kyle Thompson . . . . . . . . . .37-40 Troy Merritt . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-41 Garrett Willis . . . . . . . . . . . .40-38 Martin Laird . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-39 Daniel Summerhays . . . . . .38-40 Bryan Bigley . . . . . . . . . . . .40-38 Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-40 Paul Casey . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-40 David Hearn . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-41 Matt Bettencourt . . . . . . . . .41-38 Kevin Kisner . . . . . . . . . . . .41-38 Kevin Stadler . . . . . . . . . . . .40-40 Chris DiMarco . . . . . . . . . . .39-41 Jim Renner . . . . . . . . . . . . .40-40 Jeff Klauk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41-39 Todd Camplin . . . . . . . . . . . .43-40

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Horse Racing Kentucky Derby Notebook

MAKING HISTORY: Kathleen O’Connell and Kathy Ritvo will both try to become the first woman to saddle a Kentucky Derby winner. O’Connell sends out Watch Me Go, a 501 shot from post No. 20, while Ritvo trains Mucho Macho Man, a 12-1 shot from post No. 13. For O’Connell, it has been a long, hard journey to her first Derby. “I feel like I’ve been a trailblazer since time began, to be honest with you,” said O’Connell, who began her career at now defunct Detroit Race Course. “I’ve been on the track since 1970. My first license said ‘exercise boy’ because there wasn’t even a category to check for a girl.” A Derby win would fulfill a longtime dream. “Whether I was a man or woman, it would be an awesome feeling,” O’Connell said. For any women who want to follow her path, O’Connell said: “It’s a tough business, but in any walk of life or any occupation, perseverance and patience are the two most notable things.” Watch Me Go earned his way here with a victory in the Tampa Bay Derby. DREAM BET: Rico Flores has his own theory on how to place a winning bet on the wide-open Derby. “You can just take five names, tape ‘em to a wall and throw a dart at it,” the Chicago businessman said, laughing. If the dart lands in the right spot, Flores could be a very rich man. He will place the bet of a lifetime Saturday after winning the Derby Dream Bet Sweepstakes sponsored by Churchill Downs and CNBC. The contest allows

there and wear him down to where he is not able to get to all of those shots.” The loss put Gonzalez into the third-place match, where he took on Sandia Prep’s Mike Atkins. Atkins took the first set 6-3 and won the second set 6-0. Kelly said that he was not dissapointed in Gonzalez. “I am sure Jose is disappointed,” he said. “But I wouldn’t use the word from a coach’s standpoint. The kid has had back problems all year, but has played through

TGC — European PGA Tour, Open de Espana, second round, at Barcelona, Spain 11 a.m. TGC — Champions Tour, The Tradition, second round, at Birmingham, Ala. 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Wells Fargo Championship, second round, at Charlotte, N.C. HORSE RACING 3 p.m. VERSUS — NTRA, Kentucky Oaks, at Louisville, Ky. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 12:10 p.m. WGN — Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs 5 p.m.

Spell. Beating the rest of the 13horse field in the 1 1⁄8-mile race, however, won’t be easy. The Oaks is filled with a number of live shots, including Her Smile, owned by celebrity chef Bobby Flay. Flay purchased Her Smile following a second-place finish in the Comely Stakes and sent her to trainer Todd Pletcher. Flay won the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies Turf last year with More Than Real. He called it the biggest win he’s had in horse racing. Donning the lilies with an Oaks victory would almost certainly trump it. Her Smile will start from the seventh post with Garrett Gomez in the saddle. “We’re hoping for lightning to strike twice,” Flay said. Flores to place a $100,000 wager on one horse to win the Derby. Last year Houston-area software designer Glen Fullerton decided to put the money on Super Saver and walked away with $900,000 after jockey Calvin Borel guided the colt to victory.

Transactions

Thursday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX—Recalled RHP Scott Atchison from Pawtucket (IL). Selected the contract of LHP Rich Hill from Pawtucket. Placed RHP Bobby Jenks and RHP Dan Wheeler on the 15-day DL, Jenks retroactive to May 2. TEXAS RANGERS—Announced RHP Ramon Aguero cleared waivers and been assigned outright to Frisco (PCL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Activated RHP Aaron Heilman from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Barry Enright to Reno (PCL). CINCINNATI REDS—Activated RHP Homer Bailey from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Jordan Smith to Louisville (IL). HOUSTON ASTROS—Placed RHP Brandon Lyon on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Jose Valdez from Oklahoma City (PCL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Optioned RHP Sean Green to Nashville (IL). Recalled RHP Mike McClendon from Nashville. NEW YORK METS—Activated OF Jason Bay from paternity leave. Optioned OF Lucas Duda to Buffalo (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA—Suspended L.A. Lakers F Ron Artest for one game without pay for swinging his arm and striking the face of the Dallas G J.J. Barea in a game on May 4. SOCCER U.S. SOCCER FEDERATION—Named Tab Ramos coach for the Under-20 soccer team on a two-game trip to France this month. Major League Soccer FC DALLAS—Waived D Kyle Davies. COLLEGE CALIFORNIA—Named Danna Durante women’s gymnastics coach. NEWPORT—Named CHRISTOPHER Adam Braithwaite football defensive coordinator. CONNECTICUT—Announced sophomore G-F Jamal Coombs-McDaniel will transfer. DELAWARE—Named Chelsea Cipriani assistant field hockey coach. GEORGIA TECH—Named Billy Schmidt men’s assistant basketball coach and Amir Abdur-Rahim director of player development. HIGH POINT—Named Ahmad Dorsett men’s assistant basketball coach. ILLINOIS STATE—Named Lauren Hutchcraft assistant director for athletic communications, effective May 16. IONA—Named Eugene Marshall, Jr. athletics director, effective June 1. MARYLAND—Announced the retirement of men’s basketball coach Gary Williams. MONTANA—Announced freshman basketball G Vaughn Autry has been granted a release from his scholarship and will transfer. SACRED HEART—Announced wrestling coach Casey Brewster will not return for the 2011-12 season. ST. JOSEPH’S, L.I.—Named Mike Petre women’s basketball coach. TOLEDO—Promoted men’s assistant basketball coach Angres Thorpe to men’s associate head coach. UC DAVIS—Named Jim Les men’s basketball coach.

it. That is not taking anything away from the other players, though.” Kelly also said that while getting individual medals is nice, the Colts came to state with the goal of finishing their unbeaten season with a state title. “This is individual and if they were to win here it would be a bonus,” he said. “We are really here for the team event. Hopefully we will have a better showing tomorrow and come away more successful than we were today.” l.foster@roswell-record.com

MLB — Regional coverage, Atlanta at Philadelphia or L.A. Dodgers at N.Y. Mets NBA BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN — Playoffs, conference semifinals, Game 3, Chicago at Atlanta 7:30 p.m. ESPN — Playoffs, conference semifinals, Game 3, L.A. Lakers at Dallas NHL HOCKEY 5 p.m. VERSUS — Playoffs, conference semifinals, Game 4, San Jose at Detroit 7:30 p.m. VERSUS — Playoffs, conference semifinals, Game 4, Philadelphia at Boston (joined in progress)


Roswell Daily Record

State

Luck wins silver

SPORTS

Continued from Page B1

Courtesy Photo

Taylor-Anne Luck, 9, took second at the Level 6 New Mexico State Gymnastic Championships held in Albuquerque in February. Luck is a 4th-grader at Military Heights Elementary School and has been in competitive gymnastics at the Ruidoso Gymnastics Academy for the past four years.

ed duo of Andrew Wiser and David Sweet. Wiser and Sweet had been rolling over opponents recently, but they lost in straight sets to Albuquerque Academy’s Achuyt Warrier and Mason Mellott, 6-1, 6-1. Rocket coach Joe Harton said that Wiser and Sweet played conservative and, before they knew it, they had lost. “I wouldn’t say I was shocked,” he said. “I was just disappointed in how they finished up the last two sets. They just got on a kind of roll of being a bit too conservative and it kind of got away from them. It snowballed and before they knew it, it was over.” Goddard’s other doubles team of Tristan Collar and Konnor Kundomal seemed poised to advance to the semis after winning the first set 6-3 and going up 4-1 in the second against Belen’s Leonardo Bettini and Taylor Williams. The Rockets proceeded to lose 11 of the final 12 games. Harton said that Collar’s

and Kundomal’s inexperience with pressure situations like that led to the loss. “I think more than anything, they were just in uncharted territory for them as far as experience,” he said. “They went in there and were playing really good and everything was clicking. Then it starts getting a little tighter and maybe a shot didn’t fall here or their opponent hit a shot and the pressure starts building on them. “It got to them, but it isn’t their fault. They just have to get to that point where they have been in those presssure situations before and learn how to handle it better.”

Roswell

ALBUQUERQUE — Roswell’s Freddie Romero dropped a hard-fought, three-set thriller to St. Pius X’s Devin Roach in the second round of the Class 4A Boys Singles Tournament on Thursday. Romero dropped the first set 6-3, but battled back to take the second set, 7-6. In the rubber set, Romero had a 5-4 lead, but Roach battled back to take the final set, 7-5.

Friday, May 6, 2011

Coyote coach Kelly McDonald said that it was a typical Freddie Romero match. “That is typical of a Freddie Romero match right there: Not giving up in adverse situations,” he said. “The effort he showed and the skills that he has worked on for four years showed up and the match could have went either way. If those two kids play 10 times, they each win five.” Roswell’s other competitor was Mary Romero, who fell in the second round of the singles tournament to top-seeded Tori Merrion of Farmington, 6-0, 6-0. McDonald said that the score wasn’t indicative of how the match went. “She got off to a fast start today and was up 40-0 in the first game,” he said. “But (Tori) is the No. 1 seed for a reason. She just plays flawless tennis. She had eight unforced errors in the whole match and just one double fault. The score says 6-0, 6-0, but there were marathon points and several times it went to deuce. It’s not that Mary didn’t play well, because she did. It was just an unfavorable matchup.”

Joyce

B3

Continued from Page B1

to take a 6-5 lead. Gabby didn’t flinch at the quick momentum shift as she held on to her serve to force another tiebreaker. This one wouldn’t be as easy as the first set, as Roach twice held the lead, but Gabby won the final four points to take the set and the match. Coach Joyce said that it was exciting for Gabby to see all of her hard work pay off. “How exciting: You are a freshman and you win state in doubles and then you get third in singles this year,” she said. “We can only look forward to bigger and better things this year and the year after. We are real happy that Gabby has worked real hard and it is nice to see some fruits for all that labor.”

New ailment leaves Uncle Mo’s start in question

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — To go or not to go. Uncle Mo’s connections still weren’t saying whether the talented colt will run in Saturday’s Kentucky Derby. The sleek bay colt was recovering from a stomach ailment, but looked good as he galloped over the Churchill Downs track on Thursday, though appearances could be deceiving. Uncle Mo looks about as exotic as his name — average size, with no distinguishing marks like the white splash on Zenyatta’s forehead. But his power is apparent as soon as he starts running. Last year’s juvenile champion, Uncle Mo is the 9-2 second choice behind 41 early favorite Dialed In. Owner Mike Repole anxiously awaited results from the latest vet exam, and promised to end the drama by announcing a decision Friday. “If he’s not what we deem to be 100 percent tomorrow, he’s not going to be 100 percent on Saturday,” he said. Repole said he won’t sacrifice Uncle Mo’s health to satisfy his 30-year dream of having a horse in America’s greatest race. Either way, he won’t be shut out. He has Stay Thirsty in the full field of 20 horses. Still, the fast-talking Queens native, who got rich selling his Vitaminwater company to Coca-Cola, doesn’t want to leave his best horse in the barn. “It’s tough,” he said. “Racing needs superstars and if he’s 100 percent,

l.foster@roswell-record.com

Exercise rider Hector Ramos takes Kentucky Derby entrant Uncle Mo for a workout at Churchill Downs, Thursday.

Uncle Mo could be that superstar.” He sure looked it after winning last year’s Breeders’ Cup Juvenile on the same Churchill Downs track and taking a perfect record into the Wood Memorial. There, Uncle Mo led the field with a quartermile to go, but two horses passed him and he finished third by a length. Afterward, Uncle Mo’s appetite fell off and raised suspi-

cions. An exam turned up the stomach problem. Outwardly, Uncle Mo looks as healthy as, well, a horse. Internally, no one’s sure exactly what’s going on. That’s the quandary. Uncle Mo could be fine. Or Repole and trainer Todd Pletcher could be risking a repeat of the Wood Memorial. “If he runs and he runs seventh, Todd and I will look at each other and

guess he wasn’t 100 percent,” Repole said. “If he runs and he wins by seven lengths, we can look at each other and say ‘Wow, we’re geniuses.”‘ Count three-time Derby winner Bob Baffert among those who discount Uncle Mo’s bellyache. “From what I’ve seen visually, there’s nothing there that tells me the horse isn’t ready to run,” the trainer of Midnight

AP Photo

Interlude said. “He’s a good horse, I’m not believing that crap.” Pletcher wasn’t talking Thursday. But he’s said Uncle Mo responded well to treatment and his appetite has returned. Repole said he’s gone off much of his medication. “We got to listen to what Uncle Mo is telling us,” Repole said, “and he’s telling us he’s getting better. He’s telling us he’s pro-

l.foster@roswell-record.com

gressing. “If the three vets say,’yes’ and Todd says,’no,’ the answer is ‘no,’ “ he added. It’s not as easy or obvious a call as last year, when Pletcher’s can’t-miss horse, Eskendereya, dropped out at the start of Derby week with a career -ending leg injury. Or in 2009, when Derby favorite I Want Revenge was scratched on the morning of the race with a bad ankle. “I’ve seen this movie. Everyone else has seen this movie,” Repole said. “It’s a horrible movie and I don’t want to play a major role in it, either.” Neither does jockey John Velazquez, who is still searching for his Derby win after 12 tries. “If he’s right, I don’t think he can be beaten,” Velazquez said. “I’m expecting a big race, nothing else.” The ultimate decision on Uncle Mo might fall to Velazquez. If the colt doesn’t feel right warming up, Velazquez has the obligation to notify the track veterinarians that Uncle Mo isn’t ready to run 1 1 ⁄ 4 miles. Of course, it may not come to that if Friday’s decision is no go. If Uncle Mo doesn’t make the Derby, it’s possible he could turn up in the Preakness on May 21. If not, Repole said he’ll wait until Saratoga in July. “I want this horse to be the best horse in the country and not just for me, but for racing,” he said.

Maryland basketball coach Gary Williams retires

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) — After sweating through crisp white shirts and expensive suits for more than three decades, Maryland basketball coach Gary Williams is finally ready to take it easy. Williams announced his retirement Thursday, saying “it’s the right time” for him to end a career in which he led his alma mater to the 2002 national championship. Williams coached for 33 years, the last 22 at Maryland, where he played as a guard from 1964-67. “My entire career has been an unbelievable blessing. I am fiercely proud of the program we have built here,” Williams said. “I couldn’t have asked any more from my players, my assistant coaches, the great Maryland fans and this great university. Together, we did something very special here.” His career record is 668-380, including 461-252 at Maryland. Under his direction, the Terrapins went to the NCAA tournament 14 times, won or shared three Atlantic Coast Conference titles and reached the Final Four twice. Williams was a fiery competitor who despised losing and loved the challenge of competing against the best teams in the nation — including Duke, which usually got the best of him. But the Terrapins never went down without a fight, and

rarely did Williams ever take a seat on the bench. His frenzied style, and his propensity to sweat on the sideline more than his players, was as much a part of his legend as wins and losses. “I love Gary. What he has done for Maryland and for college basketball is remarkable,” Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski said. “He is one of the great coaches of all time. He is a coaches’ coach and an ultimate competitor. His retirement is a big loss for the ACC and for college basketball.” Williams, 66, arrived at Maryland in 1989, when the program was still struggling under the weight of NCAA violations. The Terps endured two straight losing seasons before reaching the NCAA tournament for the first time under his direction in 1994, and he never had another sub.500 season the rest of the way. “Gary Williams is a legend,” Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson said. “His accomplishments on the court have earned him a place among the elite in college basketball history. But Gary’s legacy here at Maryland goes far beyond basketball. From his philanthropic efforts to his tireless work with fans and alumni to his impact with our students, Gary has left an indelible mark of excellence on this university.” Since 2004, Williams has served as the

AP Photo

In this Jan. 9 file photo, Maryland coach Gary Williams watches his team play Duke. The university announced Thursday that Williams is retiring after a 33-year career, the last 22 at his alma mater.

scholarship co-chair for Great Expectations, Maryland’s $1 billion fundraising campaign. His efforts on behalf of Maryland students have helped raise over $240 million for scholarships at the school. The retirement announcement comes

one season after the Terrapins endured a 19-14 record and missed both the NCAA tournament and the NIT. Also, on Wednesday, standout center Jordan Williams formally entered the NBA draft with two years of eligibility left.


B4 Friday, May 6, 2011

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg Discover .24f 24.01 -.04 Disney .40f 42.69 +.07 A-B-C Dominos ... u21.30 +2.10 ABB Ltd 1.12e 25.79 -.72 DEmmett .40 19.95 -.25 1.10 65.16 +.01 ACE Ltd 1.32e u66.80 +.33 Dover AES Corp ... 12.93 -.12 DowChm 1.00f 39.23 -.41 AFLAC 1.20 55.17 -.34 DuPont 1.64 53.87 -.64 AK Steel .20 15.09 -.38 DukeEngy .98 18.72 -.13 AMR ... 6.61 +.46 Dynegy rs ... 6.22 -.23 ... 27.00 -.37 AT&T Inc 1.72 31.22 -.57 EMC Cp AbtLab 1.92f 52.57 -.37 EOG Res .64 104.35 -1.93 ... 2.85 +.04 AberFitc .70 u73.28 +2.59 EKodak Accenture .90 54.93 -.98 Eaton s 1.36 51.55 -.38 AMD ... 8.87 +.08 ElPasoCp .04 18.50 +.20 Aeropostl ... d21.29 -4.20 EldorGld g .10f 16.11 -.56 .60f 41.80 +.56 EmersonEl 1.38 55.03 -.81 Aetna Agilent ... 49.17 -.33 EnCana g .80 32.13 -.49 Agnico g .64 62.95 -1.57 EndvSilv g ... 8.62 -1.37 AlbertoC n .34 37.47 +.11 ENSCO 1.40 54.50 -.27 AlcatelLuc ... 6.26 +.06 EsteeLdr .75f u97.00 +1.19 ... 34.40 -4.65 Alcoa .12 17.01 -.46 EtfSilver Allergan .20 81.54 -.33 ExcoRes .16 20.29 -.06 Allstate .84f 33.42 -.56 Exelon 2.10 41.11 -.63 AlphaNRs ... 51.73 -1.18 ExxonMbl 1.88f 82.62 -2.19 Altria 1.52 26.68 -.17 FMC Tch s ... 42.65 -.80 AmBev s 1.16e 32.07 +.60 FedExCp .48 95.29 +2.65 AMovilL .52e 52.25 -.45 FstHorizon .04 10.94 -.26 AmAxle ... 11.87 +.12 FMajSilv g ... 16.83 -1.45 AEagleOut.44a 14.79 -.92 FirstEngy 2.20 41.24 -.61 ... 15.08 -.07 AEP 1.84 36.66 +.02 FordM .72 49.52 -.18 ForestLab ... 34.20 -.17 AmExp ... 30.05 -.93 AmIntlGrp ... 30.79 -.85 ForestOil ... 5.76 -.45 AmTower ... 52.96 +1.22 Fortress Anadarko .36 74.30 -1.78 FMCG s 1.00a 49.85 -1.29 FrontierCm .75 8.37 +.13 AnglogldA .20e 45.77 -2.22 ABInBev 1.16e 59.67 -1.31 FrontierOil .24a 25.83 +.71 Annaly 2.62e 17.94 +.01 G-H-I .60 122.84 -3.77 Apache ... 5.16 -.31 ArcelorMit .75 35.09 -1.01 GMX Rs SA .29e 10.93 -.09 Gafisa ArchCoal .44f 30.97 -.76 ArchDan .64 34.08 -.64 GameStop ... 25.87 +.19 .92 28.71 -1.61 GamGld g ... 9.54 -.51 Avon BB&T Cp .64f 26.66 -.05 Gannett .16 15.24 -.40 .45f 22.93 -.20 BHP BillLt1.82e 93.55 -2.72 Gap BP PLC .42e 43.48 -.90 GenDynam1.88f 73.69 -.02 BPZ Res ... 3.97 -.08 GenElec .60f 19.90 -.37 BRFBrasil .18e 19.00 -.12 GenGrPr n .40 16.07 -.04 .60 69.74 -2.33 GenMills s 1.12 38.41 -.40 BakrHu BcoBrades .81r 19.02 -.08 GenMot n ... 32.02 -1.02 BcoSantSA.79e 11.88 -.40 GenOn En ... 3.71 -.11 BcoSBrasil .70e 11.19 +.11 Genworth ... 11.63 -.44 ... 33.35 -2.94 BkofAm .04 12.30 -.19 GaGulf BkNYMel .52f 28.55 -.20 Gerdau .25e d10.54 -.61 Barclay .36e 18.16 -.68 GolLinhas .12e 13.71 +.31 Bar iPVix rs ... 25.35 +.70 GoldFLtd .19e 15.90 -.76 BarnesNob ... 12.71 +.70 Goldcrp g .41 48.72 -2.06 BarrickG .48 46.83 -1.28 GoldmanS 1.40 150.41 -1.11 1.24 57.29 -.75 Goodyear ... 17.46 -.13 Baxter BeazerHm ... 4.20 -.05 GraphPkg ... u5.51 +.22 BerkH B ... 79.66 -1.92 HCA Hld n ... u34.34 +.79 BestBuy .60 30.91 -.40 HCP Inc 1.92 38.12 -.07 BigLots ... 39.36 -1.25 HSBC 1.80e 53.16 -.82 Blackstone .40 17.75 -.50 Hallibrtn .36 46.85 -.50 BlockHR .60 17.20 +.23 HarleyD .50f 36.99 +.22 Boeing 1.68 78.45 -.39 HarmonyG.07e 13.70 -.73 Boise Inc .80e 8.28 +.03 HarrisCorp 1.00 47.64 -.89 BostonSci ... 7.56 -.18 HartfdFn .40f 27.10 -.95 ... 11.31 +.30 BoydGm ... 9.69 +.05 HltMgmt ... 7.98 -.33 BrMySq 1.32 28.49 -.22 HeclaM BrkfldPrp .56 19.39 -.09 HelmPayne .24 58.43 +.06 ... 16.75 +.15 CB REllis ... 26.53 +.23 Hertz .40 76.52 -.91 .40f 26.70 -.51 Hess CBS B .04 u47.18 +1.26 HewlettP .32 40.80 -.14 CIGNA CMS Eng .84 19.83 -.07 HomeDp 1.00f 37.01 -.18 CNO Fincl ... 7.78 +.06 HonwllIntl 1.33 60.15 -.17 1.44f 77.83 +.96 HostHotls .08f 17.24 +.25 CSX CVS Care .50 36.79 +.67 Huntsmn .40 19.97 +.48 CablvsnNY .50 33.91 -1.36 IAMGld g .08f 19.70 -.89 Cameco g .40f 28.58 -.69 ION Geoph ... 10.08 -.72 Cameron ... 48.21 -.49 iShGold s ... 14.38 -.43 CdnNRs gs .36 42.67 -1.47 iSAstla .82e 26.41 -.41 CapOne .20 53.14 -.03 iShBraz 2.53e 72.85 -.53 .50e 32.04 -.72 CapitlSrce .04 6.34 -.16 iSCan CardnlHlth .86f u44.64 +.08 iShEMU .95e 40.02 -1.16 ... 33.85 -.64 iShGer .29e 27.53 -.69 CarMax Carnival 1.00 40.94 +2.04 iSh HK .45e 18.88 -.09 Caterpillar 1.76 109.39 -1.38 iShJapn .14e 10.46 -.08 Celanese .24f 48.63 +1.51 iSh Kor .44e 66.17 -.74 .43t 7.97 -.01 iShMex .54e 60.58 -.59 Cemex CenterPnt .79 u18.60 +.11 iShSing .43e 13.71 -.15 CntryLink 2.90 40.48 +.11 iSPacxJpn1.56e 48.04 -.60 ChesEng .30 30.86 +.13 iSTaiwn .29e 15.68 +.05 Chevron 3.12f 102.62 -2.06 iSh UK .43e 18.20 -.44 Chimera .66e 3.94 -.06 iShSilver ... 33.72 -4.55 ChinaUni .23e 19.99 +.26 iShChina25.63e 43.35 -.36 Citigrp ... 4.48 -.04 iSSP500 2.46e 134.13 -1.15 CliffsNRs .56 88.01 +.46 iShEMkts .64e 47.63 -.46 CloudPeak ... 19.59 -.59 iShB20 T 3.99e 95.49 +.90 CocaCola 1.88 66.70 -.76 iS Eafe 1.42e 61.57 -1.24 CocaCE .52f 27.44 -.81 iSR1KV 1.25e 68.97 -.66 ... 27.15 -1.34 iSR1KG .76e 61.17 -.44 Coeur ColgPal 2.32f 84.90 -.75 iSR2KV 1.24e 73.90 -.37 Comerica .40 37.54 -.29 iSR2KG .53e 94.21 -.45 Con-Way .40 u39.54 +1.94 iShR2K .89e 82.83 -.38 ConAgra .92 25.07 -.44 iShREst 1.98e 61.31 -.09 1.36 57.40 -.36 ConchoRes ... 94.00 -3.53 ITW ConocPhil 2.64f 71.97 -1.68 IngerRd .48f 49.25 -.65 3.00f 168.46 -2.16 ConsolEngy .40 49.00 -2.03 IBM ... u14.45 -.02 ConstellEn .96 35.66 -.56 Intl Coal Corning .20 20.11 -.28 IntlGame .24 17.73 +.20 ... 8.60 -.16 IntPap 1.05f 31.33 -.34 Cott Cp Covidien .80 54.58 -.40 Interpublic .24 11.22 -.05 Cummins 1.05 115.89 +3.23 Invesco .49f 24.14 -.43 ItauUnibH .67e 22.21 -.01 D-E-F J-K-L DCT Indl .28 5.73 +.07 DR Horton .15 12.05 +.06 JPMorgCh1.00f 45.17 -.33 .28 20.47 +.98 DanaHldg ... 17.88 +.13 Jabil Danaher s .08 54.14 -.85 JohnJn 2.28f 65.01 -.66 ... 11.21 +.10 JohnsnCtl .64 39.47 -.23 DeanFds 1.40 91.54 -1.49 JnprNtwk ... 37.54 +.25 Deere DeltaAir ... 11.22 +.75 KB Home .25 12.03 +.36 .68e 17.65 -.15 DenburyR ... 20.74 -.15 KKR n ... 20.86 +.09 DBGoldDS ... 7.12 +.38 KT Corp DevelDiv .16f 14.53 -.14 Kellogg 1.62 56.55 -.21 ... 16.30 -.49 DevonE .68f 83.46 -1.50 KeyEngy DiaOffs .50a 69.88 -.84 Keycorp .04 8.50 -.13 .72 19.34 -.06 DiamRk .32 11.00 +.02 Kimco DrSCBr rs ... 36.27 +.53 Kinross g .10 14.78 -.73 1.00 52.79 -.56 DirFnBr rs ... 41.55 +1.28 Kohls 1.16 33.39 -.46 DirLCBr rs ... 34.53 +.82 Kraft .42 24.30 +.14 DrxEMBull .84e 38.31 -1.37 Kroger DrxEBear rs ... 15.78 +.94 LDK Solar ... 10.17 -.25 Corp ... 7.30 -.02 LSI DrxFnBull ... 28.94 -.94 ... 42.68 +.15 DirxSCBull ... 83.42 -1.16 LVSands LeeEnt ... 1.17 +.15 DirxEnBull.05e 72.71 -4.99 Name

Name Sell Chg Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.72 -.20 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.67 -.19 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.57 -.06 GrowthI 27.32 -.20 Ultra 24.07 -.15 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.10 -.11 AMutlA p 26.84 -.22 BalA p 18.82 -.11 BondA p 12.36 +.02 CapIBA p 52.30 -.39 CapWGA p37.95 -.45 CapWA p 21.09 -.09 EupacA p 43.71 -.49 FdInvA p 39.07 -.41 GovtA p 14.04 +.03 GwthA p 32.10 -.27 HI TrA p 11.59 -.01 IncoA p 17.49 -.12 IntBdA p 13.51 +.01 IntlGrIncA p33.36 -.34 ICAA p 29.58 -.31 NEcoA p 26.94 -.10 N PerA p 30.21 -.31 NwWrldA 55.71 -.42 SmCpA p 40.34 -.32 TxExA p 11.94 +.04 WshA p 29.09 -.30 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.86 -.50 IntEqII I r 12.75 -.21 Artisan Funds: Intl 23.40 -.34 IntlVal r 28.59 -.37 MidCap 36.25 +.01 MidCapVal22.44 -.07 SCapVal 18.05 -.07

Baron Funds: Growth 55.49 -.40 SmallCap 25.99 -.09 Bernstein Fds: 13.95 +.03 IntDur DivMu 14.41 +.02 TxMgdIntl 16.06 -.37 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.67 -.21 GlAlA r 20.23 -.23 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.85 -.22 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.71 -.21 GlbAlloc r 20.34 -.23 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 56.85 -.21 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 64.85 -.02 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 31.06 -.18 DivEqInc 10.70 -.10 5.10 +.01 DivrBd Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 32.10 -.19 AcornIntZ 42.27 -.57 LgCapGr 13.81 -.06 ValRestr 52.01 -.43 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.37 -.46 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n11.86 -.23 USCorEq1 n11.78-.07 USCorEq2 n11.73-.08 DWS Invest S: MgdMuni S 8.75 +.03 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.88 -.36 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 36.28 -.37 NYVen C 34.61 -.35

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: chg.

-.80 -1.08 -1.12 -1.33 -1.38 -1.05 -1.20 -1.00 -1.10

-.65 -1.17 -1.40 -1.52 -1.50 -.70

+.97 +.27 +.40 -.12 +.15 +.38 +.05 +.40 -.35 -.10 +.50 +.20

25.85 -.21 18.72 +.20 38.19 +.07 40.42 +.10 29.78 -.54 3.48 -.31 25.76 ... 41.65 -1.18

M-N-0

... 9.63 +.06 MBIA MEMC ... 11.09 -.27 MF Global ... 7.91 -.18 MFA Fncl .94 8.10 -.01 ... 8.35 -.15 MGIC MGM Rsts ... 14.32 +.10 .20 u26.35 +.95 Macys Manitowoc .08 19.61 -.40 Manulife g .52 17.22 -.29 MarathonO1.00 49.55 -2.00 MktVGold .40e 56.11 -2.23 MktVRus .18e 37.37 -1.16 MktVJrGld2.93e 35.79 -2.15 MktV Agri .33e 53.94 -.65 MarIntA .35 35.51 +.44 MarshM .84 29.73 -.64 MarshIls .04 7.81 -.14 .30 13.19 -.13 Masco McDrmInt s ... 21.68 -.08 McDnlds 2.44 78.60 -.47 McMoRn ... 16.60 -.51 ... 25.42 -.35 Mechel MedcoHlth ... 62.00 +.19 Medtrnic .90 42.24 -.07 .48 u32.04 +4.10 MensW Merck 1.52 36.25 -.31 .74 44.75 -1.40 MetLife MetroPCS ... 17.71 -.14 MobileTele1.06e 20.66 -.25 Molycorp n ... 68.46 -3.55 Monsanto 1.12 64.79 -.37 MorgStan .20 25.14 -.26 Mosaic .20 70.16 -.69 MotrlaSol n ... 45.32 +.60 MotrlaMo n ... 24.98 +.92 MurphO 1.10 68.57 -4.67 NRG Egy ... 23.72 -.09 Nabors ... 27.64 -.59 NBkGreece.29e 1.48 -.04 NOilVarco .44 68.70 -1.22 NatSemi .40 24.20 ... ... 9.30 ... NetQin n NY CmtyB 1.00 16.26 -.24 NY Times ... 8.23 +.22 NewellRub .20 18.77 +.12 NewmtM .80f 54.69 -1.74 Nexen g .20 24.57 -1.28 NiSource .92 19.55 -.27 NobleCorp1.06e 39.64 -.69 NokiaCp .55e 8.47 -.13 Nordstrm .92f 47.50 -.50 NorflkSo 1.60 72.22 -.09 Novartis 2.53e 59.56 -.79 Nucor 1.45 44.70 -.65 OcciPet 1.84 105.96 -2.93 OfficeDpt ... 4.20 +.02 OfficeMax ... d9.07 -.14 OilSvHT 2.36e 148.07 -2.42

P-Q-R

PG&E Cp 1.82 45.91 +.36 PMI Grp ... d1.75 -.27 1.40f 62.50 -1.01 PNC PPL Corp 1.40 27.39 -.17 ParkerHan1.48f 89.12 -.86 PatriotCoal ... 23.62 -.71 PeabdyE .34 61.75 -2.27 PennWst g 1.08 23.58 +.05 Penney .80 37.46 -1.96 PepsiCo 2.06f 68.83 -1.00 Petrohawk ... 24.14 +.10 PetrbrsA 1.34e 30.57 -1.26 Petrobras 1.34e 34.48 -1.23 .80 20.39 -.25 Pfizer PhilipMor 2.56 68.39 -.96 ... 11.59 +.02 Pier 1 PioNtrl .08 88.71 -3.62 ... 35.50 -.04 PlainsEx Polypore ... u65.88 +10.51 Potash s .28f 52.27 -1.15 PwshDB ... 28.69 -2.06 PS Agri ... 32.38 -.80 PS USDBull ... 21.27 +.31 PrideIntl ... 41.37 -.21 ProShtS&P ... 40.79 +.34 PrUShS&P ... 20.52 +.34 PrUlShDow ... 17.00 +.34 ProUltQQQ ... 92.44 -1.13 PrUShQQQ rs... 49.24 +.51 ProUltSP .39e 54.02 -.96 ProUShL20 ... 34.11 -.67 ProUltSOG ... 29.77 +1.18 ProUltO&G.21e 53.96 -2.26 ProUltR2K .01e 47.55 -.41 ProUSSP500 ... 15.47 +.40 ProUSSlv rs ... 24.34 +4.89 PrUltCrde rs ... 47.8410.51 PrUShCrde rs... 46.55 +7.16 ProSUltSilv ... 179.3454.86 ProUShEuro ... 16.87 +.64 ProctGam 2.10f 65.88 -.59 ProgsvCp 1.40e 21.57 -.28 ProLogis .45 16.06 +.14 ProUSR2K rs ... 42.80 +.41 ProvEn g .54 8.96 -.34 Prudentl 1.15f 62.99 +.56 1.37 32.05 -.29 PSEG PulteGrp ... 8.02 +.02 QuantaSvc ... 19.33 +.21 QntmDSS ... 2.84 -.11 QksilvRes ... 13.79 -.26 RadianGrp .01 5.68 -.22 Ralcorp ... u90.20 +2.81 RangeRs .16 52.08 -1.38 RegionsFn .04 7.11 -.26 ReneSola ... 8.22 -.02 Renren n ... d16.87 -1.14 RepubSvc .80 31.59 -.22 RioTinto 1.08e 66.74 -2.13 RiteAid ... 1.14 -.02 Rowan ... 37.59 -.33 RylCarb ... 41.96 +2.65 RoyDShllA 3.36 72.84 -2.61

S-T-U

SLM Cp .40 16.21 -.13 SpdrDJIA 3.00e 125.64 -1.33 SpdrGold ... 143.47 -4.26 S&P500ETF2.34e133.611.22 SpdrHome .31e 18.70 +.12 SpdrKbwBk.15e 25.19 -.36 SpdrLehHY4.38e 40.49 -.14 SpdrRetl .50e 52.60 -.02 SpdrOGEx .49e 57.29 -1.25 SpdrMetM .41e 70.41 -1.56 Safeway .48 24.27 +.28 Saks ... 11.27 -.31 SandRdge ... 10.67 -.33 Sanofi 1.63e 39.31 -1.27 SaraLee .46 19.28 +.14 Schlmbrg 1.00 82.84 -1.95 Schwab .24 17.82 -.06 ScrippsNet .30 50.04 -.98 SeadrillLtd2.74e 32.38 -1.21 SemiHTr .57e 36.38 +.14 SiderurNac.81e 14.29 -1.00 SilvWhtn g .12 35.15 -1.98 SilvrcpM g .08 10.77 -1.13 SimpsnM .50 26.36 -.60 SouthnCo 1.89f 39.29 -.23 SthnCopper1.83e35.19 -1.15 SwstAirl .02 11.91 +.27 SwstnEngy ... 41.81 -.42 SpectraEn 1.04 27.63 -.50 SpiritAero ... 23.76 -.50 SprintNex ... 5.19 -.08 SprottSilv ... 15.19 -1.82 SprottGold ... 12.46 -.53 SP Matls 1.23e 39.03 -.47 SP HlthC .61e 35.25 -.23 SP CnSt .81e 31.36 -.24 SP Consum.56e 40.26 -.11 SP Engy 1.05e 74.47 -1.58 SPDR Fncl .16e 16.03 -.21 SP Inds .64e 37.74 -.18 SP Tech .33e 26.43 -.14 SP Util 1.31e 33.10 -.24 StanBlkDk 1.64 74.00 +1.72 StarwdHtl .30f 58.60 +.81 Statoil ASA1.10e 26.09 -1.21 StillwtrM ... 19.60 -.84 StratHotels ... 6.72 +.20 Suncor gs .44f 40.95 -2.62 Sunoco .60 40.06 -.47 ... 8.35 +.12 Suntech SunTrst .04 28.02 -.44 Supvalu .35 10.53 +.08 ... 37.46 +1.72 SwftEng Synovus .04 2.46 -.04 1.04 28.65 -.45 Sysco TE Connect .64 36.26 +.65 TJX .76f 53.37 +.11 TaiwSemi .47e 13.55 +.11 ... 5.10 -.08 Talbots TalismE g .27f 21.58 -.42 Target 1.00 50.34 +1.14 TataMotors.32e 25.37 -.42 TeckRes g .60 49.41 -2.40 TelefEsp s1.98e 24.87 -.90 TenetHlth ... 6.47 +.20 Teradata ... 52.95 -1.04 Teradyn ... 15.94 +.04 ... 24.27 -.62 Tesoro .52 35.02 +.20 TexInst .08 24.71 -.23 Textron ThermoFis ... 59.72 -.73 Thermon n ... 12.28 ... ThomCrk g ... 11.22 -.47 3M Co 2.20f 94.92 -1.28 Timberlnd ... 30.6510.92 TimeWarn .94 36.01 -.48 TitanMet ... 19.13 -.66 Total SA 3.16e 59.65 -2.40 Transocn .79e 68.77 +.31 Travelers 1.64f 63.00 -.54 TycoIntl 1.00 48.83 +.15 Tyson .16 19.22 -.15 UBS AG ... 19.20 -.58 UDR .74 25.70 +.24 US Airwy ... 9.82 +.52 US Gold ... 7.53 -.56 UltraPt g ... 47.47 -.32 UnilevNV 1.17e 32.37 -.64 Unilever 1.17e 32.01 -.62 UnionPac 1.52 101.71 +1.15 UtdContl ... 25.79 +1.40 UtdMicro .08e 2.77 +.01 UPS B 2.08 73.96 -.29 US Bancrp .50f 25.20 -.34 US NGs rs ... 10.99 -.79 US OilFd ... 39.32 -3.94 USSteel .20 46.12 -.68 UtdTech 1.92f 88.53 -.85 UtdhlthGp .50 49.58 +.02 UnumGrp .37 26.01 -.52

V-W-X-Y-Z

VOC ETr n ... 21.00 ... Vale SA .90e 30.91 +.01 Vale SA pf .90e 27.64 +.09 ValeantPh .38a 49.10 +.11 ValeroE .20 26.31 -.38 VangEmg .82e 48.09 -.51 VeriFone ... 49.10 +.12 VerizonCm 1.95 37.12 -.55 ViacomB .60 50.27 -.05 VimpelCm .80e 14.00 -.14 Visa .60 78.70 -1.07 VishayInt ... 16.53 -.10 Vonage ... 4.89 +.12 VulcanM 1.00 41.38 -2.82 Wabash ... 10.24 +.23 WalMart 1.46f 55.07 -.30 Walgrn .70 42.50 -.28 WalterEn .50 126.58 -.61 WsteMInc 1.36f 38.57 -.49 WeathfIntl ... 19.93 -.27 WellPoint 1.00 u77.49 +.29 WellsFargo .48f 28.13 -.65 ... 37.67 -.33 WDigital WstnRefin ... 15.53 +.20 WstnUnion .28 20.64 -.10 .60 22.10 -.02 Weyerh WhitingPt s ... 61.97 -2.08 WmsCos .50 30.76 -.62 WT India .15e 23.35 -.15 XL Grp .44f 23.35 -.24

Delaware Invest A: 12.70 -.02 Indepn n 25.77 -.12 StrInA Diver Inc p 9.35 ... Fidelity Advisor I: IntBd n 10.70 +.02 Dimensional Fds: NwInsgtI n 20.96 -.17 IntmMu n 10.12 +.02 EmMCrEq n22.29 -.23 Fidelity Freedom: IntlDisc n 34.41 -.65 EmMktV 36.17 -.42 FF2010 n 14.17 -.10 InvGrBd n 11.58 +.03 IntSmVa n 18.28 -.32 FF2015 n 11.83 -.09 InvGB n 7.53 +.02 LargeCo 10.54 -.10 FF2020 n 14.43 -.13 LgCapVal 12.26 -.12 USLgVa n 21.84 -.20 FF2020K 13.81 -.13 LatAm 56.78 -.52 US Micro n14.50 -.06 FF2025 n 12.09 -.13 LevCoStk n30.69 +.07 US Small n22.83 -.07 FF2025K 14.07 -.15 LowP r n 41.68 -.22 US SmVa 27.01 -.10 FF2030 n 14.46 -.17 LowPriK r 41.68 -.22 IntlSmCo n18.06 -.31 FF2030K 14.29 -.16 Magelln n 74.98 -.47 Fixd n 10.35 ... FF2035 n 12.07 -.16 MagellanK 74.94 -.47 IntVa n 19.41 -.43 FF2040 n 8.44 -.11 MidCap n 30.83 -.19 Glb5FxInc n11.09 +.01 Fidelity Invest: MuniInc n 12.43 +.04 2YGlFxd n 10.19 ... AllSectEq 13.13 -.12 NwMkt r n 15.80 ... Dodge&Cox: AMgr50 n 16.02 -.09 OTC n 60.48 -.30 Balanced 74.54 -.42 AMgr20 r n13.10 -.02 Income 13.48 +.02 Balanc n 19.10 -.09 100Index 9.25 -.11 IntlStk 37.63 -.51 BalancedK19.10 -.09 Ovrsea n 34.14 -.63 Stock 115.74 -.97 BlueChGr n48.21 -.29 Puritn n 18.78 -.10 RealE n 28.44 -.02 DoubleLine Funds: Canada n 59.39-1.22 TRBd I 11.06 ... CapAp n 26.73 -.11 SCmdtyStrt n12.45.67 Dreyfus: CpInc r n 9.87 -.02 41.04 -.52 Contra n 70.69 -.61 SrsIntGrw 11.76 -.22 Aprec Eaton Vance A: ContraK 70.69 -.61 SrsIntVal 10.60 -.22 LgCpVal 18.80 -.21 DisEq n 24.28 -.21 SrInvGrdF 11.58 +.02 Eaton Vance I: DivIntl n 31.55 -.59 STBF n 8.51 +.01 FltgRt 9.10 ... DivrsIntK r 31.54 -.58 SmllCpS r n21.29 +.12 GblMacAbR10.19 -.03 DivGth n 30.04 -.26 StratInc n 11.36 -.02 LgCapVal 18.86 -.21 EmrMk n 26.55 -.30 StrReRt r 9.89 -.13 FMI Funds: Eq Inc n 47.12 -.50 TotalBd n 10.91 +.02 LgCap p 16.67 -.12 EQII n 19.43 -.21 USBI n 11.47 +.03 FPA Funds: Fidel n 34.62 -.29 Value n 73.67 -.54 NwInc 10.88 ... FltRateHi r n9.90 ... Fidelity Selects: FPACres n28.35 -.11 GNMA n 11.63 +.03 Gold r n 47.72-1.78 Fairholme 33.88 -.19 GovtInc 10.53 +.02 Fidelity Spartan: Federated Instl: GroCo n 90.49 -.43 ExtMkIn n 40.53 -.15 KaufmnR 5.73 -.03 GroInc n 19.38 -.20 500IdxInv n47.31 -.43 GrowthCoK90.48 -.43 IntlInxInv n37.23 -.70 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.75 -.17 HighInc r n 9.23 ... TotMktInv n38.85 -.31

CATTLE/HOGS Open high low settle CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jun 11 110.05 111.15 108.62 109.75 Aug 11 112.25 113.42 110.75 111.87 Oct 11 117.40 118.47 115.90 117.10 Dec 11 118.85 120.47 117.85 118.87 Feb 12 119.45 119.90 118.60 119.17 Apr 12 121.30 121.30 119.60 120.20 Jun 12 118.00 118.00 117.20 117.20 Aug 12 117.20 117.30 117.20 117.20 Oct 12 118.80 118.80 118.80 118.80 Last spot N/A Est. sales 14919. Wed’s Sales: 51,996 Wed’s open int: 355341, up +536 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 11 128.77 129.17 127.87 128.62 Aug 11 132.00 132.70 131.30 131.75 Sep 11 133.00 133.00 132.75 132.80 Oct 11 133.25 133.70 132.70 133.00 Nov 11 132.50 133.60 132.50 133.00 Jan 12 132.40 132.40 132.40 132.40 Mar 12 132.80 Apr 12 134.25 Last spot N/A Est. sales 4482. Wed’s Sales: 3,959 Wed’s open int: 41817, off -36 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 11 90.00 91.70 90.00 91.57 Jun 11 92.65 93.27 91.35 92.42 Jul 11 93.60 93.85 92.02 93.27 Aug 11 94.62 95.30 93.60 94.20 Oct 11 86.80 87.90 86.35 86.92 Dec 11 83.70 84.80 83.50 84.15 Feb 12 85.40 85.90 84.90 85.45 Apr 12 86.80 86.80 86.00 86.80 May 12 91.00 91.00 90.80 91.00 Jun 12 92.60 93.25 92.60 92.70 Jul 12 92.00 92.00 92.00 92.00 Aug 12 89.75 90.00 89.75 90.00 Last spot N/A

LeggPlat 1.08 LennarA .16 1.96 LillyEli Limited .80f .20 LincNat LloydBkg ... .44 Lowes LyonBas A .10e

FINANCIAL

Est. sales 15266. Wed’s Sales: 45,860 Wed’s open int: 220422, off -1149 PORK BELLIES 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 11 126.50 Jul 11 121.00 Aug 11 106.50 Feb 12 120.00 Mar 12 120.50 Last spot N/A Wed’s Sales: Wed’s open int: , unch

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high low settle COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 11 168.95 170.99 165.20 165.36 Jul 11 147.83 151.50 144.51 146.86 Oct 11 137.00 137.01 135.00 135.37 Dec 11 123.51 125.59 121.20 122.08 Mar 12 116.00 116.40 114.37 114.80 May 12 109.50 109.50 108.96 109.05 Jul 12 106.25 106.25 105.70 106.02 Oct 12 98.33 Dec 12 98.75 99.00 97.60 97.60 Mar 13 99.22 Last spot N/A Est. sales 20029. Wed’s Sales: 10,479 Wed’s open int: 149712, up +328

chg.

-7.83 -4.65 -3.22 -3.51 -3.63 -3.28 -2.60 -2.60 -2.60 -2.58

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 11 724 741 718 722ø Jul 11 750ø 780fl 748ø 754 Sep 11 797ü 822ø 791ü 797ü Dec 11 843 866ü 835 841ø

chg.

-18ø -18 -16ø -12fl

Roswell Daily Record

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

AMEX

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg Citigrp 2575574 4.48 -.04 iShSilver 2374974 33.72 -4.55 S&P500ETF1935119133.611.22 BkofAm 1255437 12.30 -.19

Name Vol (00) CFCda g 114219 NovaGld g 86080 NwGold g 64851 GoldStr g 63243 NthnO&G 48208

Last 19.95 10.84 9.51 2.80 19.80

Name Last Chg ProUSSlv rs 24.34 +4.89 Polypore 65.88+10.51 PrUShCrde rs46.55 +7.16 PSCrudeDS 47.16 +6.48 CrwfdA 4.10 +.53

%Chg +25.1 +19.0 +18.2 +15.9

Name Bacterin n HeraldNB SuprmInd Express-1 WellsGard

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg +.48 +13.7 Kendle 14.98 +5.48 +.25 +11.4 eOnComm 2.10 +.67 +.25 +9.6 BluDolp rs 6.64 +1.20 +.12 +5.5 Gibraltar 13.24 +2.31 +.10 +5.2 OptiBk rsh 2.66 +.43

Name Last Chg Timberlnd 30.65-10.92 Goldcp wt 2.93 -1.02 ProSUltSilv 179.34-54.86 PrUltCrde rs 47.84-10.51 FaOilBlSPBr 22.67 -4.61

%Chg -26.3 -25.8 -23.4 -18.0 -16.9

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

1,172 1,910 77 3,159 99 33 4,713,599,339

52-Week High Low 12,876.00 9,614.32 5,565.78 3,872.64 434.61 346.95 8,718.25 6,355.83 2,490.51 1,689.19 2,887.75 2,061.14 1,370.58 1,010.91 14,562.01 15.80 868.57 587.66

Name

Div

Last 3.98 2.45 2.85 2.29 2.02

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

169 302 31 502 6 9Lows 169,035,84436

INDEXES

Last 12,584.17 5,454.12 427.91 8,397.40 2,363.18 2,814.72 1,335.10 14,148.08 829.24

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

Net Chg -139.41 +61.41 -3.03 -109.21 -40.07 -13.51 -12.22 -116.09 -3.66

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

22

%Chg +57.7 +46.9 +22.1 +21.1

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

PE Last

Chg -.01 +.11 -.32 +.01 -.27

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg InstFnMkts 3.70 -.59 -13.8 SinoCEn rs 2.59 -.91 -26.0 MinesMgt 2.28 -.26 -10.2 SavientPh 8.57 -2.51 -22.7 Richmnt g 7.15 -.81 -10.2 SmithMicro 5.66 -1.60 -22.0 B&HO 3.04 -.34 -10.1 UnionDrll 9.61 -2.10 -17.9 Minefnd g 13.95 -1.53 -9.9 GloblInd 7.27 -1.50 -17.1

Chg

.04

Chevron

3.12f

10 102.62 -2.06

CocaCola

1.88

13

66.70 -.76

Disney

.40f

19

42.69 +.07

EOG Res

.64

HewlettP

Name Vol (00) Last SiriusXM 977023 2.12 926320 23.61 Intel PwShs QQQ67296158.28 Cisco 666473 17.48 Microsoft 545410 25.79

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

BkofAm

FordM

Chg -1.97 -1.05 -.48 -.05 -.85

12.30 -.19

YTD %Chg Name

Div

-7.8 ONEOK Pt

989 1,580 144 2,713 47 48 2,180,627,636

% Chg -1.10 +1.14 -.70 -1.28 -1.67 -.48 -.91 -.81 -.44

YTD 52-wk % Chg % Chg +8.69 +19.62 +6.80 +23.62 +5.66 +15.02 +5.44 +19.76 +7.01 +30.43 +6.10 +21.34 +6.16 +18.34 +5.90 +19.66 +5.82 +23.36ntl

PE Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

4.60f

20

82.79 -.02

+4.1

+12.5 PNM Res

.50

28

15.25 -.12

+17.1

+1.4 PepsiCo

2.06f

18

68.83 -1.00

+5.4

+13.8 Pfizer

.80

19

20.39 -.25

+16.4 -8.2

... 104.35 -1.93

+14.2 SwstAirl

.02

20

11.91 +.27

...

7

15.08 -.07

-10.2 TexInst

.52

13

35.02 +.20

+7.8

.32

10

40.80 -.14

.94

15

36.01 -.48

+11.9

-3.1 TimeWarn

HollyCp

.60

28

53.74 +1.51

+31.8 TriContl

.28e

...

14.82 -.19

+7.7

Intel

.72

11

23.61 +.11

+12.3 WalMart

1.46f

13

55.07 -.30

+2.1

IBM

3.00f

14 168.46 -2.16

+14.8 WashFed

.24

13

15.52 -.29

-8.3

Merck

1.52

16

.48f

12

28.13 -.65

-9.2

24.25 -.22

+3.0

Microsoft

.64

36.25 -.31

+.6 WellsFargo

HOW TO READ THE MARKET IN REVIEW 6

25.79 -.27

-7.6 XcelEngy

1.01

15

Here are the 525 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 400 most active on the Nasdaq National Markets and 100 most active on American Stock Exchange. Mutual funds are 450 largest. Stocks in bold changed 5 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letters’ list. AAR .48 12.88 # Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock, based on latest quar- ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 ACM Op .80 7.25 # terly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise footnoted. ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. ACMSp .96 7.50 # Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... mark. Fund Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold. Chg: Daily net change in the NAV.

AAL Mutual: Bond p 9.49 -.01

Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

MUTUAL FUNDS

Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 38.09 -.18 Goldman Sachs Inst: GrOppt 25.93 -.03 7.48 ... HiYield MidCapV 38.41 -.19 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.33 ... CapApInst 39.10 -.28 IntlInv t 63.83-1.37 Intl r 64.50-1.38 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.53 -.29 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI n 35.57 -.29 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 44.52 -.36 Div&Gr 20.88 -.23 Advisers 20.28 -.12 TotRetBd 11.21 +.03 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.27 +.05 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r17.64 -.15 Invesco Funds A: CapGro 14.18 -.08 Chart p 17.30 -.11 CmstkA 16.91 -.18 9.02 -.07 EqIncA GrIncA p 20.39 -.23 HYMuA 8.92 +.04 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 25.18 -.28 AssetStA p25.98 -.28 AssetStrI r 26.21 -.29 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.57 +.02 JPMorgan R Cl: ShtDurBd 11.00 ... JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd n 11.56 +.01

Mar 12 875fl 897 867fl 873ü -15 May 12 890ø 910 881fl 886ø -14ø Jul 12 882 900fl 873ü 883ø -9ü Sep 12 893 903ø 885ü 892fl -8ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 171884. Wed’s Sales: 68,978 Wed’s open int: 457245, off -3202 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 11 707ø 733ø 699 705 -21ø Jul 11 708ü 737ø 701 708fl -20fl Sep 11 689 710 677ü 687fl -15fl Dec 11 653 671 640ø 655fl -9ø Mar 12 663ø 681 654ü 666ø -9ø May 12 672ü 687fl 664fl 674ø -9ø Jul 12 678ø 696 668ü 680fl -10ü Sep 12 620 628ü 619fl 623fl -7 Last spot N/A Est. sales 560441. Wed’s Sales: 222,223 Wed’s open int: 1493241, up +621 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 11 337 337 325 325 -12 Jul 11 336fl 353ü 330 334 -12 Sep 11 343fl 350 338ü 342 -12 Dec 11 354 364ø 349fl 352 -12 Mar 12 374 374 365 365 -12 May 12 384 384 373 373 -11 Jul 12 391 391 381 381 -10 Last spot N/A Est. sales 2339. Wed’s Sales: 1,202 Wed’s open int: 12815, off -235 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 11 1318ü 1354 1309 1319fl -30fl Jul 11 1313fl 1361ø 1310 1321fl -30ü Aug 11 1318ü 1358 1308ü 1320fl -30 Sep 11 1310 1349 1298fl 1312fl -30fl Nov 11 1304 1347fl 1292 1306fl -31fl Jan 12 1313fl 1352 1300ø 1314fl -31fl Mar 12 1314ø 1350 1310 1315fl -30ø May 12 1312ø 1350 1299ü 1312ø -29fl Jul 12 1312ø 1350 1302ü 1316fl -28fl Aug 12 1343ø 1343ø 1314ü 1314ü -29ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 316912. Wed’s Sales: 102,245 Wed’s open int: 569812, off -1693

HighYld n 8.39 ... IntmTFBd n10.92 +.02 ShtDurBd n11.00 ... USLCCrPls n21.60.26 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r49.14 -.43 PrkMCVal T24.09 -.17 Twenty T 67.20 -.70 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 12.97 -.12 LSBalanc 13.50 -.07 LSGrwth 13.52 -.10 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p26.45.17 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.75 -.04 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p22.13 -.04 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p15.21 +.06 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.69 -.21 SmCap 29.39 -.19 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.93 -.05 StrInc C 15.59 -.05 LSBondR 14.87 -.05 StrIncA 15.51 -.05 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.50 -.02 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 12.09 -.12 BdDebA p 8.09 -.01 ShDurIncA p4.63 +.01 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t4.65 ... MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.70 -.07 ValueA 24.37 -.21

FUTURES

MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.49 -.21 MFS Funds Instl: IntlEq n 19.35 -.27 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 6.01 ... Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.32 -.14 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv18.37 -.07 PacTgrInv 23.78 -.13 MergerFd 16.24 -.02 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.53 +.02 TotRtBdI 10.53 +.02 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 14.58 -.25 MCapGrI 41.25 -.28 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.84 -.22 GlbDiscZ 31.23 -.23 QuestZ 18.74 -.10 SharesZ 22.15 -.12 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 49.62 -.40 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 51.38 -.42 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.54 ... MMIntEq r 10.26 -.15 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 29.21 -.13 20.62 -.23 Intl I r Oakmark r 44.69 -.30 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.18 -.05 GlbSMdCap16.50-.16 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 45.65 -.47 DvMktA p 35.82 -.43 GlobA p 65.92 -.70

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

chg.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Jun 11 101.77 109.38 98.25 99.80 -9.44 Jul 11 102.35 109.85 98.78 100.34 -9.39 Aug 11 102.59 110.10 99.12 100.64 -9.36 Sep 11 102.61 110.27 99.35 100.85 -9.32 Oct 11 102.31 109.94 99.48 100.92 -9.29 Nov 11 102.27 109.93 99.48 100.96 -9.28 Dec 11 102.99 110.42 99.42 101.00 -9.26 Jan 12 101.49 108.59 99.41 100.93 -9.25 Feb 12 102.32 109.71 99.30 100.81 -9.25 Mar 12 102.00 107.30 99.50 100.69 -9.25 Apr 12 108.50 108.50 100.57 100.57 -9.23 May 12 99.15 106.08 98.91 100.42 -9.22 Jun 12 102.30 108.94 98.86 100.27 -9.20 Jul 12 102.95 102.95 99.98 99.98 -9.16 Aug 12 99.67 -9.12 Sep 12 103.60 103.60 99.41 99.41 -9.08 Oct 12 99.23 -9.04 Nov 12 99.11 -8.99 Dec 12 101.04 108.00 97.50 99.05 -8.96 Jan 13 98.74 -8.90 Feb 13 98.46 -8.84 Mar 13 98.20 -8.78 Apr 13 97.98 -8.72 Last spot N/A Est. sales 1108915. Wed’s Sales: 610,259 Wed’s open int: 1630319, up +5991 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Jun 11 3.1533 3.3500 3.0600 3.0954 -.2271 Jul 11 3.0815 3.2670 2.9885 3.0228 -.2352 Aug 11 3.0214 3.1670 2.9326 2.9686 -.2391 Sep 11 2.9614 3.1671 2.8894 2.9256 -.2403 Oct 11 2.7818 2.9991 2.7395 2.7624 -.2410 Nov 11 2.7491 2.8856 2.7155 2.7244 -.2409 Dec 11 2.7635 2.9486 2.6707 2.7087 -.2401 Jan 12 2.7350 2.8532 2.6729 2.7084 -.2396 Feb 12 2.7209 -.2393 Mar 12 2.7334 -.2391 Apr 12 2.8465 -.2390

GblStrIncA 4.44 ... Gold p 45.15-1.97 IntBdA p 6.71 -.07 MnStFdA 33.51 -.28 Oppenheimer Roch: RoMu A p 14.96 +.06 RcNtMuA 6.62 +.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 35.46 -.43 IntlBdY 6.71 -.06 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.02 ... PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r10.96 -.09 AllAsset 12.58 -.07 ComodRR 9.35 -.48 DevLcMk r 11.07 -.12 11.63 ... DivInc 9.53 ... HiYld InvGrCp 10.77 +.01 LowDu 10.50 -.01 RealRtnI 11.72 -.03 ShortT 9.91 -.01 TotRt 11.02 ... PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.50 -.01 RealRtA p 11.72 -.03 TotRtA 11.02 ... PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.02 ... PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.02 ... PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.02 ... Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n 27.96 -.23 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 47.99 -.54 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 42.90 -.36

LawsnSft ... 11.06 -.03 LeapWirlss ... 16.54 +1.47 LegacyRes2.12f 28.31 -2.02 Level3 ... 1.59 -.03 LibGlobA ... 45.70 +.19 LibtyMIntA ... 17.53 -.21 ... 54.71 -.79 LifeTech LimelghtN ... 6.38 +.12 LinearTch .96 34.63 +.07 LinnEngy 2.64 36.66 -1.35 Logitech ... 13.25 -.23 lululemn g ... 93.99 +.76

M-N-0

MIPS Tech ... 8.02 -.02 MaidenH .28 7.70 +.46 MAKO Srg ... 24.07 -1.08 ... 4.36 -.01 MannKd ... 14.57 -.43 MarvellT Masimo .75e 31.29 -.68 Mattel .92 26.64 -.11 MaximIntg .84 27.46 +.50 MedAssets ... 15.33 -.67 MelcoCrwn ... 10.50 +.53 MentorGr ... 14.31 +.18 MercadoL .32 88.90 +3.13 Microchp 1.38 40.54 -.11 Micromet ... 6.29 -.22 MicronT ... 10.91 +.17 Microsoft .64 25.79 -.27 Micrvisn ... 1.36 +.01 Millicom 6.00e 104.00 -1.35 Molex .80f 27.46 +.56 Momenta ... 18.25 +.07 Motricity n ... 10.34 -.65 Mylan ... 24.04 -.04 ... 22.55 +.17 MyriadG ... 43.26 +.95 NII Hldg NPS Phm ... 9.70 -.29 NXP Sem n ... 31.00 -.81 NasdOMX ... 26.51 -.08 NektarTh ... 10.07 +.02 NetLogicM ... 38.77 +.19 NetApp ... 51.50 -.38 ... 230.31 +1.12 Netflix NetSpend n ... 10.71 -.60 NewsCpA .15 17.35 +.01 NewsCpB .15 18.21 -.34 NorTrst 1.12 48.63 -.53 NwstBcsh .44f 12.24 -.06 NovaMeas ... 10.30 +.47 Novlus ... 35.42 +2.49 NuVasive ... 30.66 +.06 NuanceCm ... 19.89 -.16 Nvidia ... 18.66 +.01 NxStageMd ... 20.29 -.14 OReillyAu ... 59.87 +.22 ... 10.35 -.24 Oclaro OmniVisn h ... 32.44 +.52 OnSmcnd ... 11.02 +.74 OnyxPh ... 38.31 +1.03 OpenTable ... 90.98 +1.63 Opnext ... 2.06 +.01 Oracle .24f 34.67 -.58

P-Q-R

PDL Bio .60 6.48 +.02 PF Chng .96e 40.34 +1.65 PMC Sra ... 7.65 -.07 Paccar .48a 52.70 -.58 PaetecHld ... 3.50 +.24 PanASlv .10 32.93 -1.60 ParamTc h ... 22.50 -.31 Parexel ... 23.82 +.26 PattUTI .20 28.04 -.38 Paychex 1.24 32.16 -.57 PeopUtdF .63f 13.50 -.29 Perrigo .28 86.00 -.97 PetsMart .50 42.11 -.19 Polycom ... 58.09 +1.38 Popular ... 3.10 -.06 Power-One ... 7.93 +.15 PwShs QQQ.39e 58.28 -.32 ... 4.30 -.10 Powrwav PriceTR 1.24f 62.47 -.31 priceline ... 533.97 -3.59 PrUPShQQQ ... 24.09 +.35 ProspctCap1.21 11.79 -.12 ... 21.55 -.48 QIAGEN QiaoXing ... 1.93 -.14 QlikTech n ... 30.00 +.09 Qlogic ... 18.00 +.44 Qualcom .86f 56.13 +.05 ... 22.00 -.44 QuestSft Questcor ... 20.09 +.56 QuinStreet ... 19.61 +1.78 ... 6.04 -.05 RF MicD RAM Engy ... 1.73 -.19 Randgold .20 79.37 -3.76 Rdiff.cm ... 12.59 -1.29 RegncyEn 1.78 25.99 -.19 Regenrn ... 47.05 -.95 RepubAir ... 4.91 +.17 RschMotn ... 47.29 -.08 RexEnergy ... 11.92 -.30

RosettaR ... 39.27 -.30 RossStrs .88f u78.55 +5.10 Rovi Corp ... 47.90 +.72 RoyGld .44 57.16 -1.43

S-T-U

... u7.14 +.53 S1 Corp SBA Com ... 38.08 +.32 SEI Inv .20 22.35 -.08 ... 20.20 +.01 STEC ... 47.34 +.11 SanDisk ... 2.47 -.02 Sanofi rt Santarus ... 3.03 -.10 Sapient ... 11.97 -.28 SavientPh ... d8.57 -2.51 Savvis ... 39.18 -.02 SeagateT .72 17.10 -.21 SeattGen ... 16.43 -.28 SelCmfrt ... 16.56 +.38 Sequenom ... 6.68 -.11 ShoreTel ... u11.14 +.45 Shutterfly ... 54.62 -1.90 ... 10.82 -.13 SierraWr ... 6.22 -.28 SifyTech SigaTech h ... 13.31 -.66 SilicGrIn ... u22.05 +1.56 SilicnImg ... 8.06 +.19 Slcnware .41e 6.74 +.10 SilvStd g ... 29.34 -1.83 ... 122.26 +3.50 Sina SinoCEn rs ... 2.59 -.91 SiriusXM ... u2.12 -.01 Sky-mobi n ... 13.91 -.22 SkywksSol ... 29.82 +.32 SmithMicro ... d5.66 -1.60 ... 91.49 -1.29 Sohu.cm SonicCorp ... 11.40 -.15 Sonus ... 2.98 -.01 ... 8.02 -.56 SpectPh Spreadtrm ... 22.02 +.76 Staples .40f 20.92 -.05 StarScient ... 3.74 -.02 Starbucks .52 36.50 -.07 StlDynam .40f 17.14 -.22 SuccessF ... 32.81 +.12 SunPowerA ... 21.50 +.05 SunPwr B ... 21.32 +.13 SusqBnc .08f 9.24 +.04 SwisherH n ... 6.69 +.05 Symantec ... 19.25 -.29 SynthEngy ... 2.98 +.18 TD Ameritr .20 20.90 -.30 THQ ... 4.35 -.07 tw telecom ... 21.74 -.37 TakeTwo ... 15.67 +.14 TalecrisBio ... 27.30 -.21 Tekelec ... 8.25 +.10 Tellabs .08 4.68 -.06 TeslaMot n ... 26.44 -.25 TevaPhrm .78e 47.25 -.03 TexRdhse .32 16.10 +.64 Thoratec ... 31.82 -.18 TibcoSft ... 27.56 -.11 TiVo Inc ... 9.37 +.04 Travelzoo ... 74.55 -.48 TrimbleN ... 44.00 +3.51 ... 12.68 +.05 TriQuint 21Vianet n ... d13.50 -1.09 USA Tech h ... 2.48 -.11 UtdCBksGa ... 2.31 -.03 UtdOnln .40 6.25 -.16 UnivDisp ... 52.57 +.94 UrbanOut ... 31.55 -.57

V-W-X-Y-Z

ValueClick ... 17.97 -.08 VarianSemi ... 61.20 -.16 VeecoInst ... 49.66 -.30 Verisign 5.75e 34.64 +1.18 ... 34.16 +.56 Verisk VertxPh ... 53.19 -2.12 VirgnMda h .16 u31.01 +.12 ViroPhrm ... 18.63 +.24 Vivus ... 7.76 -.26 Vodafone 1.33e 27.93 -.27 Volcano ... u27.91 +1.53 WarnerCh s8.50e22.19 -.49 WashFed .24 15.52 -.29 WetSeal ... 4.40 +.09 WholeFd .40 59.95 +.21 Windstrm 1.00 12.72 -.50 Winn-Dixie ... 6.84 -.07 WrightM ... 15.28 -1.05 2.00f 143.69 +.56 Wynn XenoPort ... 7.00 -.68 .76f u35.61 +.46 Xilinx YRC Ww rs ... 1.35 +.11 Yahoo ... 18.43 +.23 ... 5.20 -.24 Yongye ZST Digtl ... 3.73 +.26 Zalicus ... 2.34 -.24 ZionBcp .04 23.94 -.41

AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg Crossh g rs ... Crystallx g ... AbdAsPac .42 6.98 -.18 DejourE g ... AdeonaPh ... .96 -.05 DenisnM g ... ... 2.58 -.01 EV LtdDur 1.25 Adventrx AlexcoR g ... 8.15 -.77 ExeterR gs ... AlldNevG ... 34.81 -1.76 GabGldNR 1.68 AlmadnM g ... 3.85 -.41 GascoEngy ... AmApparel ... 1.02 -.26 Gastar grs ... AntaresP ... 1.67 -.03 GenMoly ... ArcadiaRs ... .13 +.00 GoldResrc .31e Augusta g ... 4.38 -.20 GoldStr g ... Aurizon g ... 5.74 -.37 GranTrra g ... AvalRare n ... 8.13 -.67 GrtBasG g ... Banro g ... 3.47 -.03 GtPanSilv g ... BarcUBS36 ... 48.25 -2.79 Hyperdyn ... BarcGSOil ... 25.99 -2.67 ImpOil gs .44 BioTime ... 6.04 -.50 InovioPhm ... Brigus grs ... 1.39 -.06 InstFnMkts .20 CAMAC En ... 1.33 -.06 IntTower g ... ... .44 -.04 KodiakO g ... CanoPet CelSci ... .70 +.03 LongweiPI ... CFCda g .01 19.95 -1.97 LucasEngy ... CheniereEn ... 7.78 -.43 MAG Slv g ... ChinaShen ... 4.25 -.27 MadCatz g ... ... ClaudeR g ... 2.09 -.17 Metalico Name

Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. d – New 52- CaGrp 14.47 -.03 wk low during trading day. g – Dividend in Canadian $. Stock price in U.S.$. n – MuBd 10.43 -.01 New issue in past 52 wks. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. s – Split SmCoSt 9.73 -.05 or stock dividend of 25 pct or more in last 52 wks. Div begins with date of split or stock dividend. u – New 52-wk high during trading day. v – Trading halted on primary market. Unless noted, dividend rates are annual disbursements based on last declaration. pf – Preferred. pp – Holder owes installment(s) of purchase price. rt – Rights. un – Units. wd – When distributed. wi – When issued. wt – Warrants. ww – With warrants. xw – Without warrants. Dividend Footnotes: a – Also extra or extras. b – Annual rate plus stock dividend. c – Liquidating dividend. e – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos. f – Annual rate, increased on last declaration. i – Declared or paid after stock dividend or split. j – Paid this year, dividend omitted, deferred or no action taken at last meeting. k – Declared or paid this year, accumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m – Annual rate, reduced on last declaration. p – Init div, annual rate unknown. r – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos plus stock dividend. t – Paid in stock in last 12 mos, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or distribution date. x – Ex-dividend or ex-rights. y – Ex-dividend and sales in full. z – Sales in full. vj – In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such companies. • Most active stocks above must be worth $1 and gainers/losers $2. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Wednesday’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv n47.31-.43 TotMktAd r n38.85-.32 First Eagle: 48.83 -.43 GlblA OverseasA23.69 -.19 Frank/Temp Frnk A: CalTFA p 6.71 +.03 FedTFA p 11.54 +.05 FoundAl p 11.26 -.09 GrwthA p 47.37 -.22 HYTFA p 9.74 +.04 IncomA p 2.27 -.01 NYTFA p 11.34 +.04 RisDvA p 35.25 -.22 USGovA p 6.78 +.01 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv n13.80 -.10 IncmeAd 2.26 -.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.29 -.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.97 -.11 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.67 -.11 GlBd A p 13.84 -.10 GrwthA p 19.53 -.24 WorldA p 15.98 -.19 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.87 -.10 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 42.55 -.32 GMO Trust III: Quality 21.47 -.23 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 23.49 -.47 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 15.17 -.15 IntlCorEq 31.10 -.59 Quality 21.48 -.23

... 20.67 +.06 Div Last Chg Crocs Ctrip.com ... 47.01 +.79 A-B-C ... 34.39 +.65 CubistPh ... 20.93 +.65 ASML Hld .58e 41.12 -.51 CypSemi ATP O&G ... 16.24 +.29 D-E-F ... 1.68 +.01 AVI Bio AXT Inc ... 7.92 -.08 DG FastCh ... 33.98 -3.03 ... 5.35 +.82 AcadiaPh ... 2.25 -.03 DUSA ... 15.88 +.04 ... 4.67 -.24 Dell Inc Achillion ... 38.05 -1.39 AcmePkt ... 76.35 +1.76 Dndreon AcordaTh ... 23.93 -3.23 Dentsply .20 38.05 +.43 ... 14.90 -1.52 ActivsBliz .17f 11.26 -.06 DexCom AdobeSy ... 32.94 -.28 DirecTV A ... u48.29 -.21 Adtran .36 41.45 +1.08 DiscCm A ... 44.15 -.05 AdvEnId ... 14.78 +.16 DishNetwk ... 29.28 +.54 AEterna g ... 2.15 -.14 DonlleyRR 1.04 18.93 -.51 ... 4.56 +.01 Affymetrix ... 5.88 +.23 DryShips ... d1.39 -.15 ETrade rs ... 15.87 -.18 AgFeed ... 32.68 -.33 AkamaiT ... 35.17 +.82 eBay AlaskCom .86 9.04 +.10 EagleBulk ... d3.09 -.02 AllscriptH ... 21.31 -.12 ErthLink .20 8.15 +.11 AlteraCp lf .24 48.00 +.65 ElectArts ... u21.68 +1.76 Amazon ... 197.11 -2.86 Emcore lf ... 2.48 -.01 ACapAgy 5.60e 29.46 +.22 EndoPhrm ... 40.09 -.13 ... d2.13 -.12 AmCapLtd ... 10.37 -.18 Ener1 AmerMed ... 29.72 -.02 EngyConv ... d1.81 -.05 ... 8.61 +.14 ... 12.25 +.88 Entegris AmSupr Amgen ... 57.42 -.26 EntropCom ... 9.14 +.05 ... 12.46 -.03 AmkorT lf ... 6.50 +.01 EpicorSft ... 99.19 +1.77 ... 13.17 -.04 Equinix Amylin Anadigc ... 3.06 -.01 EricsnTel .37e 14.78 -.28 ... 10.71 -.41 ... 41.29 +1.13 Exelixis Ancestry A123 Sys ... 5.68 +.05 ExideTc wt ... .00 +.00 ApolloGrp ... 40.16 -.04 Expedia .28 24.73 +.01 ApolloInv 1.12 11.38 -.18 ExpdIntl .50f 53.07 +.27 Apple Inc ... 346.75 -2.82 ExtrmNet ... 3.18 +.07 ApldMatl .32f 14.96 -.13 F5 Netwks ... 100.49 +.77 ... 10.06 -.04 FLIR Sys .24 34.36 -.12 AMCC Approach ... 23.00 -.44 Fastenal 1.04f 65.92 -.30 ArenaPhm ... 1.29 -.06 FifthThird .24f 12.82 -.33 ... 25.32 +.01 AresCap 1.40 16.93 -.20 Finisar .20 21.39 -.10 ... 8.49 +.39 FinLine AriadP ... 33.21 +.82 FstNiagara .64 14.06 -.16 Ariba Inc ... 127.91 +1.60 ArkBest .12 23.69 +1.27 FstSolar ... 61.49 -.31 ArmHld .09e 27.51 -1.11 Fiserv ... 6.95 +.10 Arris ... 11.29 +.09 Flextrn FocusMda ... 36.10 +.55 ArubaNet ... 31.88 +.29 ... 46.19 +2.02 AsiaInfoL ... 20.14 +.10 Fortinet AspenTech ... 15.44 +.59 FosterWhl ... 33.58 -.28 ... 1.50 -.13 Atmel ... 14.43 -.32 FuelCell Autodesk ... 43.43 -.32 FultonFncl .16f 11.48 -.24 AutoData 1.44 53.54 -.77 G-H-I AvanirPhm ... 4.06 -.19 ... 10.51 +.04 AvisBudg ... 18.25 -.24 GT Solar ... 34.99 -.29 Garmin ... 1.94 -.05 Axcelis ... 4.83 +.01 BE Aero ... 36.71 +.78 GeronCp BGC Ptrs .68f 8.79 -.37 GileadSci ... 40.62 -.71 ... 7.27 -1.50 BMC Sft ... u51.26 +2.19 GloblInd BebeStrs .10a 6.92 +.32 GluMobile ... 3.95 -.10 Google ... 534.27 -1.52 ... 55.74 +.21 BedBath ... 2.93 +.05 BiogenIdc ... 95.47 -1.01 GulfRes GulfportE ... 26.64 -2.11 BioSante ... 2.35 +.07 BioScrip ... 6.35 -.25 HanmiFncl ... 1.25 -.02 ... 45.66 -1.93 HansenMed ... 3.08 +.02 Blkboard BlueCoat ... 25.37 -2.17 HansenNat ... 61.94 -.80 ... 27.59 -.91 HanwhaSol ... 5.91 -.17 BrigExp Broadcom .36 33.85 -1.01 HarbinElec ... 18.38 +.11 BrcdeCm ... 6.15 +.01 Harmonic ... 7.87 +.04 BroncoDrl ... 10.95 -.02 Hasbro 1.20f 47.30 -.18 Bucyrus .10 91.40 -.06 HercOffsh ... 5.91 -.12 ... 22.25 -.18 CA Inc .16 24.37 -.11 Hologic CH Robins 1.16 79.26 +.41 HotTopic .28 7.30 +.78 CTC Media.76e 20.00 ... HudsCity .32m 9.50 -.11 ... 27.55 -.56 CadencePh ... 7.84 -.46 HumGen Cadence ... 10.08 -.16 HuntBnk .04 6.65 -.11 CapProd .93 9.97 -1.06 iGateCorp .15e 17.81 +1.00 ... 4.77 -.17 CapFdF rs .30a 11.00 -.01 IdenixPh ... 69.43 -1.05 CpstnTrb h ... 1.75 -.06 Illumina Incyte ... 19.06 -.29 CareerEd ... 23.13 +1.60 ... 7.60 +.08 Carrizo ... 34.47 -1.69 Infinera CaviumNet ... 44.81 +.50 InfosysT 1.35e 63.30 -.68 ... 4.98 -.01 Cbeyond ... 14.23 +1.24 InspPhar ... 7.90 +.03 CeleraGrp ... 8.05 -.01 IntgDv .72 u23.61 +.11 Intel Celgene ... 58.85 -2.10 .40 44.63 +.12 CentEuro ... 11.06 -.12 InterDig CentAl ... 16.27 -.25 InterMune ... 42.23 -.39 .48 14.93 +.18 ... 79.74 -.11 Intersil Cephln ... 53.98 -.57 ChkPoint ... 53.70 -.37 Intuit Cheesecake ... 30.17 +.70 J-K-L CienaCorp ... 27.48 +.34 ... 6.11 -.03 Cintas .49f 30.41 -.67 JA Solar ... 16.15 -.06 JDS Uniph ... 21.38 +1.38 Cirrus Cisco .24 17.48 +.01 JackInBox ... 20.02 -.02 ... 81.10 +.51 JamesRiv ... 22.36 -.63 CitrixSys CleanEngy ... 15.18 -.43 JazzPhrm ... 29.83 +.19 ... 5.96 +.06 Clearwire ... 4.83 -.29 JetBlue CognizTech ... 76.52 -.75 JoyGlbl .70 89.78 -4.91 Coinstar ... 52.73 -.05 KLA Tnc 1.00 44.52 +.69 ... 14.98 +5.48 ColumLabs ... 3.17 -.23 Kendle Comcast .45f 25.56 -.40 KratosDef ... 12.63 -.95 Comc spcl .45f 24.07 -.31 Ku6Media ... 5.79 -.22 ... u11.45 +.80 Compuwre ... 11.13 -.05 Kulicke ... 4.08 -.11 LamResrch ... 47.56 +.19 CorinthC LamarAdv ... 29.59 +.84 Costco .96f 79.61 -.53 ... 6.79 ... Cree Inc ... 39.41 -.14 Lattice

Name

Price Funds: BlChip n 40.37 -.24 CapApp n 21.52 -.16 EmMktS n 35.12 -.32 EqInc n 24.95 -.29 EqIndex n 36.00 -.33 Growth n 33.80 -.19 HiYield n 6.99 ... IntlBond n 10.40 -.09 Intl G&I 14.37 -.26 IntlStk n 14.80 -.20 MidCap n 63.40 -.17 MCapVal n25.26 -.10 N Asia n 19.56 -.11 New Era n 53.36-1.18 N Horiz n 36.93 -.12 N Inc n 9.59 +.02 R2010 n 16.08 -.09 R2015 n 12.50 -.08 R2020 n 17.32 -.12 R2025 n 12.71 -.09 R2030 n 18.27 -.15 R2035 n 12.95 -.11 R2040 n 18.43 -.16 ShtBd n 4.87 +.01 SmCpStk n37.22 -.14 SmCapVal n38.01-.19 SpecGr n 18.76 -.17 SpecIn n 12.67 -.02 Value n 25.03 -.27 Principal Inv: LT2020In 12.31 -.08 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.48 ... MultiCpGr 53.93 -.21 VoyA p 24.29 -.18 Royce Funds: LwPrSkSv r18.94 -.29 PennMuI r 12.51 -.09 PremierI r 22.19 -.28 TotRetI r 13.86 -.07

May 12 2.8449 Jun 12 3.0621 3.0621 2.8289 2.8289 Jul 12 2.8079 Aug 12 2.7814 Sep 12 2.7499 Oct 12 2.6199 Nov 12 2.5899 Dec 12 2.6740 2.6740 2.5759 2.5759 Jan 13 2.5769 Feb 13 2.5824 Mar 13 2.5879 Apr 13 2.6834 Last spot N/A Est. sales 181977. Wed’s Sales: 183,865 Wed’s open int: 304128, up +2915 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Jun 11 4.303 4.572 4.205 4.261 Jul 11 4.373 4.638 4.276 4.331 Aug 11 4.418 4.678 4.323 4.376 Sep 11 4.440 4.699 4.343 4.396 Oct 11 4.482 4.736 4.388 4.438 Nov 11 4.634 4.855 4.540 4.594 Dec 11 4.853 5.075 4.788 4.815 Jan 12 4.971 5.204 4.925 4.935 Feb 12 4.955 5.170 4.900 4.919 Mar 12 4.884 5.110 4.830 4.852 Apr 12 4.751 4.932 4.680 4.723 May 12 4.758 4.937 4.732 4.743 Jun 12 4.790 4.988 4.766 4.781 Jul 12 4.852 4.992 4.824 4.826 Aug 12 5.047 5.047 4.830 4.855 Sep 12 4.872 4.954 4.830 4.867 Oct 12 4.922 5.107 4.914 4.921 Nov 12 5.060 5.238 5.060 5.073 Dec 12 5.302 5.457 5.295 5.295 Jan 13 5.583 5.583 5.420 5.427 Feb 13 5.391 Mar 13 5.323 5.323 5.316 5.316 Apr 13 5.097 5.101 5.097 5.101 May 13 5.107 5.115 5.087 5.111 Jun 13 5.188 5.188 5.118 5.144 Jul 13 5.175 5.187 5.175 5.187 Aug 13 5.210 5.214 5.210 5.214 Last spot N/A Est. sales 463948. Wed’s Sales: 316,850 Wed’s open int: 1004801, up +1380

.78 -.02 .13 -.00 .37 -.00 2.18 -.14 16.12 -.07 d4.70 -.36 18.00 -.63 .39 ... 4.14 -.06 4.29 -.07 26.54 -1.12 2.80 -.05 6.95 -.17 2.26 -.13 3.22 -.22 3.32 -.29 48.38 -1.48 .91 +.06 d3.70 -.59 8.40 -.43 6.08 -.20 1.63 -.07 2.60 ... 11.00 -.09 1.74 -.06 5.78 -.12

MdwGold g MincoG g Minefnd g MinesMgt NeoStem Neoprobe Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NA Pall g NDynMn g NthnO&G NthgtM g NovaGld g Oilsands g OpkoHlth ParaG&S PhrmAth PionDrill PolyMet g Quepasa RadientPh RareEle g Rentech RexahnPh Richmnt g

Schwab Funds: ITGrAdm n10.01 +.03 1000Inv r 39.75 -.33 LtdTrAd n 11.04 ... S&P Sel 20.89 -.19 LTGrAdml n9.60 +.07 Scout Funds: LT Adml n 10.79 +.03 34.23 -.53 MCpAdml n100.00Intl Selected Funds: .30 AmShD 43.30 -.43 MorgAdm n59.67 -.30 AmShS p 43.29 -.42 MuHYAdm n10.17+.03 Sequoia n 143.88 -.45 PrmCap r n72.83 -.38 ReitAdm r n86.42 -.09 St FarmAssoc: Gwth 56.07 -.79 STsyAdml n10.73 +.01 STBdAdml n10.59+.01 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 21.62 -.36 ShtTrAd n 15.89 ... STFdAd n 10.82 +.01 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 52.54 -.47 STIGrAd n 10.79 +.01 SmCAdm n37.53 -.15 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 30.09 -.27 TtlBAdml n10.71 +.03 IntValue I 30.76 -.27 TStkAdm n33.65 -.27 ValAdml n 22.29 -.23 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.93 -.19 WellslAdm n54.75-.12 WelltnAdm n56.43-.42 VALIC : StkIdx 26.46 -.24 Windsor n 48.43 -.39 WdsrIIAd n49.17 -.45 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml n 22.36 -.08 Vanguard Fds: CAITAdm n10.88 +.03 AssetA n 26.01 -.17 CpOpAdl n81.43 +.03 DivdGro n 15.39 -.14 EMAdmr r n40.18 -.44 Energy n 70.00-1.73 Energy n 131.45-3.24 Explr n 79.45 -.12 ExplAdml n73.97 -.11 GNMA n 10.88 +.02 ExtdAdm n44.51 -.15 GlobEq n 19.00 -.24 HYCorp n 5.86 ... 500Adml n123.14HlthCre n 137.33 -.58 1.12 GNMA Ad n10.88 +.02 InflaPro n 13.52 -.02 GrwAdm n 33.42 -.22 IntlGr n 20.25 -.36 HlthCr n 57.95 -.25 IntlVal n 33.32 -.57 HiYldCp n 5.86 ... ITIGrade n 10.01 +.03 InfProAd n 26.56 -.04 LifeCon n 16.93 -.06 ITBdAdml n11.34 +.04 LifeGro n 23.30 -.20 ITsryAdml n11.45 +.03 LifeMod n 20.52 -.12 IntGrAdm n64.46-1.14 LTIGrade n 9.60 +.07 ITAdml n 13.45 +.03 Morg n 19.24 -.10

-.2385 -.2380 -.2375 -.2365 -.2360 -.2355 -.2350 -.2345 -.2345 -.2345 -.2345 -.2345

-.316 -.313 -.311 -.310 -.307 -.286 -.277 -.277 -.270 -.260 -.237 -.229 -.224 -.220 -.216 -.214 -.214 -.198 -.186 -.180 -.179 -.172 -.145 -.145 -.142 -.139 -.137

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

1.79 -.18 2.01 -.20 13.95 -1.53 2.28 -.26 1.76 +.06 4.40 -.28 5.30 -.44 .06 +.02 9.51 -.48 5.55 -.29 11.71 -.86 19.80 -.85 2.67 -.12 10.84 -1.05 .40 -.01 3.70 -.06 2.67 -.13 3.70 -.14 12.18 -1.17 1.81 -.03 7.42 -.56 .38 -.01 13.08 -.51 1.00 -.01 1.17 +.01 7.15 -.81

Rubicon g ... SamsO&G ... SeabGld g ... SilverBull ... TanzRy g ... Taseko ... ... Tengsco TimberlnR ... TrnsatlPet ... TriValley ... TriangPet ... US Geoth ... ... Uluru Ur-Energy ... Uranerz ... UraniumEn ... VantageDrl ... VantDrl wt ... VirnetX .50e VistaGold ... VoyagerOG ... WhitestR n 1.14 WT DrfChn.15e YM Bio g ...

MuInt n 13.45 +.03 PrecMtls r n26.00 -.61 PrmcpCor n14.73 -.08 Prmcp r n 70.17 -.37 SelValu r n20.25 -.05 STAR n 20.06 -.10 STIGrade n10.79 +.01 StratEq n 20.33 -.02 TgtRetInc n11.64 -.03 TgRe2010 n23.29-.09 TgtRe2015 n12.99.07 TgRe2020 n23.18-.14 TgtRe2025 n13.27.10 TgRe2030 n22.87-.18 TgtRe2035 n13.85.12 TgtRe2040 n22.74.22 TgtRe2045 n14.29.13 Wellsly n 22.60 -.04 Welltn n 32.67 -.24 Wndsr n 14.35 -.12 WndsII n 27.70 -.25 Vanguard Idx Fds: DvMkInPl r n110.002.17 TotIntAdm r n27.47.48 TotIntlInst r n109.901.93 500 n 123.12-1.12 DevMkt n 10.64 -.21 EMkt n 30.56 -.34 Extend n 44.47 -.15 Growth n 33.41 -.23 MidCap n 22.02 -.07 SmCap n 37.48 -.15 SmlCpGth n24.04 -.09

4.49 -.21 2.82 -.03 29.92 -1.11 .82 -.05 6.50 -.10 4.96 +.01 .84 -.02 .92 -.05 2.33 +.03 .65 -.05 6.58 -.32 .91 -.07 .06 -.01 1.49 -.12 2.64 -.20 3.20 -.07 1.65 +.02 .00 ... 22.69 -.21 2.91 -.06 3.30 -.20 12.04 -.53 25.59 -.07 3.04 -.02

SmlCpVl n 16.97 -.07 STBnd n 10.59 +.01 TotBnd n 10.71 +.03 TotlIntl n 16.42 -.29 TotStk n 33.64 -.26 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n 22.36 -.08 DevMkInst n10.56-.20 ExtIn n 44.51 -.15 FTAllWldI r n97.941.75 GrwthIst n 33.42 -.22 InfProInst n10.82 -.01 InstIdx n 122.28-1.11 InsPl n 122.29-1.11 InsTStPlus n30.43-.24 MidCpIst n 22.09 -.07 SCInst n 37.53 -.15 TBIst n 10.71 +.03 TSInst n 33.65 -.27 ValueIst n 22.29 -.23 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl n 101.71 -.93 MidCpIdx n31.56 -.09 STBdIdx n 10.59 +.01 TotBdSgl n10.71 +.03 TotStkSgl n32.48 -.25 Waddell & Reed Adv: AssetS p 9.93 -.11 Western Asset: CorePlus I 10.99 +.03 Yacktman Funds: Fund p 17.91 -.12

METALS NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Thu. Aluminum -$1.2486 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$4.1597 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $4.0000 N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Lead - $2518.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.0033 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1511.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1480.90 troy oz., NY Merc spot Thu. Silver - $36.570 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $36.231 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Platinum -$1803.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1778.20 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. n.q.-not quoted, n.a.-not available r-revised


Roswell Daily Record

COMICS

Garfield

Jumble

Family Circus

Beetle Bailey

DEAR ABBY: My husband, “James,” constantly tells me he loves me, but I don’t think I love him. I’m sure most women would love having a man tell them he loves them all the time, but it drives me up a wall. If I walk into a room, James says he loves me. If I leave the room, he says it again. The words have lost their meaning for me, but if I don’t respond in kind, James thinks I’m mad at him. I am emotionally exhausted from having to constantly reassure him. If I try to discuss anything serious, he cries, and that just turns my stomach. I’m not an uncaring, unfeeling person. I’m very emotional, but when a man cries it makes me uncomfortable. Please don’t suggest counseling. James is a pastor who would want to go to a Christian counselor. That makes me uneasy because he knows all the ones around here. We don’t have much money and no insurance. If I ask for a divorce, it will end his career. Divorce is not an option for many people, but I don’t want to wake up one morning and realize I have lived my entire life putting myself second. Abby, when is it OK to say this isn’t working?

MISERABLE IN THE MIDWEST

DEAR MISERABLE: Say it now, while there may still be a chance to save your marriage. It is crucial that you find the money you need for nondenominational couples

HINTS

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE Dear Heloise:

I just heard a story of another infant forgotten and left in a parked car all day, with TRAG-

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

therapy with a licensed professional. Your husband needs to overcome insecurities that may stem from the fact that he feels you becoming increasingly distant, or that may have originated in his youth. And you need to control the impulse to shut down when your husband expresses emotions that make you uncomfortable. Everyone has strengths and weaknesses. Understanding and accepting what the weaknesses are can be powerful tools in overcoming each other’s shortcomings. Whether your marriage can be resuscitated (or not) will depend upon whether the two of you are capable of working this through. I wish you luck, because of how much each of you has to lose if it fails.



DEAR ABBY: A woman with whom I have become good friends over the past year lost a son 10 years ago, and is estranged from her adult daughter. I would like to acknowledge her in some way on Mother’s Day because I don’t

IC RESULTS! Solution: Pair your purse with the diaper bag, placing both on the front seat by you or both on the back seat next to your infant. Grandma in San Antonio Sadly, this happens more than it should (more than one child a month in the United States dies from being left in a vehicle) because a routine was changed, the other parent took the child or picked him or her up, and the child was left unintentionally in the vehicle.

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

think her daughter will. Would it be appropriate to send her a card and/or flowers? KATHY IN WISCONSIN

DEAR KATHY: Unless your friend is an older mentor, I would refrain from sending a card with a Mother’s Day motif. But a card telling her you’re thinking of her — or what a valued friend she is — might be nice. Or a phone call. Ditto with the flowers.

Hagar the Horrible



DEAR ABBY: I am an over-50 “cougar” who has a boyfriend who’s not happy with my looks. He loves all the other aspects of our relationship, but he wants me thinner and prettier. I’ll never look 30 again. What do you think I should do? BARB IN RENO

DEAR BARB: Change boyfriends. If yours doesn’t like you the way you are, face it — your romance is on the downhill slide. Of course you’ll never look 30 again. But what’s important is how you feel about yourself. My answer might be different had you said YOU wanted to be thinner because YOU thought it would make you more attractive. Please give this some serious thought while you still have a healthy level of self-esteem — because the longer you’re with this man, the more it will be eroded.

Even if it only gets hot occasionally where you live, this awful situation can happen to anyone. The inside of a closed vehicle (even with the windows open slightly and parked in the shade) can quickly turn into an oven, and babies, small children and pets cannot regulate their body temperature the way adults can.

Please stop and think! Put your purse, diaper bag, briefcase, etc., in the back with the baby to alert you. Or place something unusual — a beach ball, a stuffed animal, a box of tissues — on the front seat next to you to remind you. Or post a sticky note on the dashboard.

You think it will never happen to you or your family, but I can assure you that the families who have suffered this type of horrific event thought it would never happen to them.



Heloise

Blondie

Zits

Snuffy Smith

Dilbert

Dear Heloise:

I went to get my recipe for your general cleaning solution but couldn’t find it. It called for water, nonsudsing ammonia, rubbing alcohol and a small amount of dishwashing detergent; however, I don’t remember the amounts. Would you please provide that information to me? Thank you in advance. Sandra, via email

Easy to do, and a real moneysaver, too. Just pour 1/2 cup nonsudsing ammonia, 1/2 cup rubbing alcohol and 1 teaspoon dishwashing liquid into a bucket and fill with water to the 1gallon mark.

The Wizard of Id

Wear rubber gloves when working with this solution or anything containing ammonia. NOTE: NEVER mix ammonia with bleach or any cleanser containing bleach.

This good all-purpose cleaner is safe for most surfaces.



Heloise

Dear Heloise:

I have found that I can recycle salad-dressing bottles as vases when I make giveaway bouquets. The bottles work wonderfully, and the receiver is always happy to get flowers. A Reader, via e-mail

For Better or For Worse

Friday, May 6, 2011

B5


B6 Friday, May 6, 2011 OBITUARIES

OBITUARIES/RECORDS to take care of her family and many others. She was a blessing to all who knew her. We welcome family and loved ones to honor the life and legacies that is Donna Clark. Memorial services will be held at 4 p.m., Tuesday, May 10, 2011, at Central Nazarene Church, 801 E. Country Club Road.

Donna Lucille Clark

Donna Lucille Clark passed away April 29, 2011. She was born Sept. 14, 1953, in Wickenburg, Ariz. She was the daughter of Edward and Dorthy Churchhill. In honor of the life of Donna L. Clark, she is survived by her husband Jack R. Clark Sr.; sons, W.H. Sparkman IV, Jack R. Clark Jr. and James William Clark, all of Roswell; sister Carol Hearde, of Florida; brothers, Bill Burge and David Burge, of Arizona; and three grandchildren, Katie Benjamin, Stormy Sparkman and Owen R. Swarengin. She was preceded in death by her father Edward Churchhill; her mother Dorthy Burge and dad Bill Burge; and her sister Linda Churchhill, of Arizona. Donna was a solid foundation to her loved ones. She went above and beyond

Melba Ruth Phillips

Funeral services are scheduled for 10 a.m., Monday, May 9, 2011, at LaGrone Funeral Chapel for Melba Ruth Phillips, 87, of Roswell, who passed away on May 4, 2011. The Rev. Phil Grassie, of Westside Church of Christ in Artesia, will officiate. Visitation will be Saturday, May 7, 2011, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday, May 8, 2011, from 12 to 7 p.m., at LaGrone Funeral Chapel. Melba was born on April 18, 1924, in Roswell, to

Coleman and Elberta Robinson, who preceded her in death. She was predeceased also by her husband Cecil Phillips; a brother, Coleman Robinson; and a great-grandchild, Gage Phillips. Melba is survived by a son Brian Phillips and his wife Debbie, of Roswell; daughter Tina Williams and her husband Bill, of Roswell; brothers, Bob Robinson and his wife Beth, of Roswell, and Bill Robinson, of Eunice; sisters, Emma Williams and her husband Percy, of Roswell, and Catherine Melton and her husband John, of Roswell; five grandchildren, Rhonda Riali, Jim Phillips, Gary Phillips, Emily Williams and Luke Williams; and eight great-grandchildren. Melba was of the Baptist faith. Melba’s family homesteaded on the Caprock. She attended Tatum High School and played saxophone in the school band. In 1949, she married Cecil Phillips in Yuma, Ariz. They resided in California for several years before returning to Roswell. Melba worked for First National Bank, which became United New Mexico and then Wells Fargo, and retired after 35 years. She enjoyed working in her yard and bowling. She bowled with the United New Mexico team for many years and after retirement continued to bowl with the senior

league. Melba loved her family and lived a long healthy life. She is missed. Friends may pay respects online at lagronefuneralchapels.com. Arrangements are under the direction of LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Roswell Daily Record dietician. Survivors include a son Eugene Shirley and his wife Carolyn, of Roswell; a granddaughter Paula Almond; and three greatgrandsons, Alvin Carl Almond Jr. and wife Amy, David Almond and Stephen Almond, all of Roswell; and two great-great-grandchildren, Jordan Chester and Gabby Chester. She is also survived by several nieces and nephews. Friends may pay respects online at lagronefuneralchapels.com. Arrangements are under the direction of LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Lillian Fay Shirley

Services are scheduled for Lillian Fay Shirley, 96, of Roswell, at 10 a.m., Saturday, May 7, 2011, at the First United Pentecostal Church. The Revs. Alvin Almond Sr. and Alvin Almond Jr. will conduct the service. Interment will follow in South Park Cemetery. Lillian was born Oct. 28, 1914, in Carthage, Texas, to James Richmond and Hannah Muse Sisk. Her husband Alvie Shirley preceded her in death. She was a member of the United Pentecostal Church. Before her retirement, she worked as a

Leona Beryl Mayberry

AR TESIA — Memorial services are scheduled at 10 a.m., Saturday, May. 7, 2011, at First Baptist Church in Hagerman, for Leona Beryl Mayberry, of Hagerman. Mrs. Mayberry, 83, died Wednesday, May 4, 2011,

at Heartland Nursing Center in Artesia. The Rev. Bob Maples will officiate at the services. Cremation has taken place under the direction of Terpening & Son Mortuary. Leona was born Nov. 12, 1927, in Hager man, the daughter of Alpha Feelings Deason and Lenora Alpha (Connell) Deason. She was a lifelong area resident. On Nov. 20, 1947, she was married to Thurman Mayberry in Roswell. She was a bank teller and a member of First Baptist Church of Hagerman, and active at the Hagerman Senior Center. She was preceded in death by her parents, and sisters Ruth, Lorene and Aline. Survivors include her husband Thurman Mayberry of the family home; sons, Don Mayberry and wife Erma, of Artesia, and Ron Mayberry and wife Michelle, of Hagerman; sister Alice Alsup and husband Jim, of Artesia; two grandchildren, Donna Mayberry, of Artesia, and Landon Mayberry, of Portales; three great-grandchildren, Catlin, Zane and Addyson; and several nieces and nephews including Larry Alsup and Cindy Blake. Arrangements have been entrusted to Terpening & Son Mortuary. Please express condolences at artesiafunerals.com.

Families mourn US troops amid swirl of emotions THE ASSOCIATED PRESS RECORD STAFF REPORTS

TRENTON, N.J. — As mourners filed out of the church, two by two, the organist struck up an unusual tune for a funeral: “America the Beautiful.” Outside, military pallbearers in ceremonial dress carried the flagdraped casket of 1st Lt. Omar Vazquez to the waiting hearse, while a dozen retired servicemen saluted, flags in hand. About 60 miles away, President Barack Obama was laying a wreath at ground zero — another dramatic moment in a week of celebration and somber reflection that began with news of the death of Osama bin Laden. Families and friends of U.S. troops recently killed in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan face a swirl of emotions as they bury their dead while the nation marks the killing of the terrorist mastermind of 9/11. “I was angry at first, because he didn’t get to see what he was actually fighting for,” said Vazquez’s cousin Marilyn Rodriguez. Vazquez was killed by an improvised explosive device on April 22 in Iraq — nine days before Navy SEALs stormed a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. Family members said the 25-year-old officer from Trenton had known since he was a little boy that he wanted to serve in the Army and defend his country from people like bin Laden. Sitting in the back pews of the Catholic church, under a golden inscription reading “The Lord is Here — He is Calling You,” a soldier who served with Vasquez

reflected on the many funerals he’s attended for friends killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. “It’s the only time I wear this uniform,” said Sgt. Andrew Soto, who served with Vasquez for about three years when Vasquez was a cadet. Soto said this funeral was different because Vasquez died while the military is preparing to begin withdrawing troops from Afghanistan. But he said the knowledge that bin Laden is no longer a threat was helping him heal. “My first thought was, ‘My friend died, but almost at the same time, we got the person we were fighting to get,’” Soto said. “If he was here now, he’d be smiling.” In Roswell, N.M., Thursday, mour ners gathered to bid farewell to and honor the service of Pfc. Antonio Stiggins, 25, who was killed in the same incident that took Vasquez’s life. In the hours after Americans learned that the nation’s archenemy had been killed, crowds outside the White House and throughout New York City erupted in patriotic fervor, chanting “U-S-A” and singing the national anthem. Students at many college campuses around the nation also rushed outdoors to celebrate. The rejoicing seemed entirely appropriate to Willie Ransom, whose son was one of nine Americans gunned down April 27 by a disgruntled Afghan pilot at an airport in Kabul, Afghanistan. Capt. Charles Ransom was assigned to help train the Afghan National Security Forces. His funeral is scheduled for

PUBLIC RECORDS

Marriage Licenses May 3 Ralph J. Espinosa, 46, and Donita J. Brown, 32, both of Roswell. May 4 Alberto A. Silva Jr., 25, and Lisa Jaramillo, 24, both of Roswell.

Accidents May 4 10:09 a.m. — Country Club Road and Kentucky Avenue; drivers — Joann Nunez, 73, and Thomas Gomez, 70, both of Roswell. 11:36 a.m. — Country Club Road and Kentucky Avenue; drivers — Aileen Gonzalez, 24, and Jo A. Garibay, 21, both of Roswell. 12:20 p.m. — Wyoming Avenue and McGaffey Street; drivers — Felicia Luna Salazar, 38, and Jennifer Weber, 26, both of Roswell.

today in his hometown of Midlothian, Va. “I think it’s wonderful people celebrate, but the bottom line is somebody had to make the ultimate sacrifice to get this man,” Ransom said. “The same people who destroyed him, some of their buddies had to die, too.” In Arizona, personnel at Luke Air Force Base were preparing for the arrival of the body of Lt. Col. Frank D. “Bruiser” Bryant. The 37-year-old from Knoxville, Tenn., was killed in the same attack as Ransom. The base will hold a memorial service for Bryant on Monday before his body is interred at Arlington National Cemetery. “Bruiser was a legitimate, fullup American hero,” said Major Stephen Anderson, who served as a flight instructor with Bryant for about three years. “He was a poster child for what it means to be a man, a good leader, a great fighter pilot and a great instructor.” Speaking by telephone from Sheppard Air Force Base near Wichita Falls, Texas, Anderson said he felt a flood of relief when he learned his fellow troops had killed the man who embodied everything the United States went to war to stop. He said Bryant would have viewed bin Laden’s killing as “achievement of a national objective” — and that Bryant was exceedingly proud to be defending American freedom. “Osama’s death was bought with the blood of Bruiser,” said Anderson. He added that, of fered the choice between the two, “I think I’d rather have my friend back.”

AP Photo

A U.S. Army honor guard removes casket of 1st Lt. Omar J. Vazquez following a service for the soldier, who was killed April 22, 2011, during a mission in southern Iraq.

Last World War I combat vet dies in Australia

SYDNEY (AP) — Claude Stanley Choules, the last known combat veteran of World War I, died Thursday at a nursing home in the Western Australia city of Perth, his family said. He was 110. “We all loved him,” his 84-year -old daughter Daphne Edinger told The Associated Press. “It’s going to be sad to think of him not being here any longer, but that’s the way things go.” Beloved for his wry sense of humor and humble nature, the British-born Choules — nicknamed “Chuckles” by his com-

rades in the Australian Navy — never liked to fuss over his achievements, which included a 41-year military career and the publication of his first book at the age of 108. He usually told the curious that the secret to a long life was simply to “keep breathing.” Sometimes, he chalked up his longevity to cod liver oil. But his children say in his heart, he believed it was the love of his family that kept him going for so many years. “His family was the most important thing in his life,” his other daughter, Anne

G e t C l a s s i fi e d

Pow, told the AP in a March 2010 interview. “It was a good way to grow up, you know. Very reassuring.” Choules and another Briton, Florence Green, became the last known surviving World War I service members after the death of American Frank Buckles in February, according to the Order of the First World War, a U.S.-based group that tracks veterans. Choules was the last known surviving combatant of the war. Green, who turned 110 in February, served as a waitress in the Women’s Royal Air Force.

AP Photo

Claude Choules, 1936.


ENTERTAINMENT

B7

‘Gypsy’ playwright Arthur Laurents dies in NYC Roswell Daily Record

NEW YORK (AP) — Arthur Laurents, the director, playwright and screenwriter who wrote such enduring stage musicals as “West Side Story” and “Gypsy,” as well as the movie classics “Rope” and “The Way We Were,” died Thursday. He was 93. Laurents died at his home in Manhattan from complications of pneumonia, said his agent, Jonathan Lomma. Laurents had an extensive career in radio and in Hollywood, but it was on Broadway where he had his biggest successes — particularly with two musicals many consider to be among the finest ever written. And Laurents provided the book — or story — for both of them. “West Side Story,” which opened on Broadway in 1957, transformed Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” into musical theater. It had pulsating, jazz-flecked music by Leonard Bernstein and galvanizing direction and choreography by Jerome Robbins. Robbins also directed and choreographed “Gypsy,” based on the memoirs of stripper Gypsy Rose Lee. The 1959 musical, with a score by Jule Styne and Stephen Sondheim, told the story of Rose, a domineering stage mother who pushed her daughter into show business. As Rose, Ethel Merman had the greatest triumph of her career. “Gypsy” has been successfully revived four times on Broadway, first in 1974 with Angela Lansbury as Rose, then with Tyne Daly in 1989 (Laurents directed both of them) and Bernadette Peters in 2003. Laurents was back as director for the 2008 Broadway version, with Patti LuPone as Rose. The production won Tonys for LuPone and two featured, or supporting, performers. Laurents was nominated for best director but did not win. In 2009, Laurents directed a revised version of “West Side Story,” giving the show a new dose of realism by having much of the dialogue in Spanish. His credits as a stage director also include “I Can Get It For You Wholesale,” best remembered as the musical which introduced a 19-year-old Barbra Streisand to Broadway in 1962, and “La Cage

Friday, May 6, 2011

AP Photo

In this Dec. 28, 1964, photo, composer Richard Rodgers, at the piano, his new collaborator, lyricist Stephen Sondheim, right, and playwright Arthur Laurents are shown as they begin work on the new musical "Do I Hear a Waltz?" in New York, The musical is being adapted from Laurents' book "Summertime." Arthur Laurents, the director, playwright and screenwriter who wrote such enduring stage musicals as "West Side Story" and "Gypsy," as well as the movie classics "Rope" and "The Way We Were," has died. He was 93.

Aux Folles” (1983), the smash Jerry Herman musical that ran for four years. Laurents was a short, compact man with a trim fighter’s build and a direct manner of speaking. He was known for saying exactly what was on his mind. Laurents was born in Brooklyn, the son of an attorney. He attended Cornell University and after graduation began writing radio plays including scripts for such popular series as “Dr. Christian” and “The Thin Man.” While serving in the army during World War II, Laurents wrote

military training films as well scripts for such radio programs as “Army Service Forces Present” and “Assignment Home.” His wartime experiences led to his first Broadway play, “Home of the Brave,” which opened in December 1945. The military drama, which dealt with antiSemitism, had a short run but later was made into a wellreceived movie in which the theme was changed to racial rather than religious prejudice. In Hollywood after the war, Laurents wrote or co-wrote scripts for such films as “Rope” (1948), Alfred

Hitchcock’s masterful take on the Leopold-Loeb murder case; an uncredited contribution to “The Snake Pit” (1948), a look at mental illness underlined by Olivia de Havilland’s harrowing lead performance; “Caught” (1949), Max Ophuls’ love triangle melodrama starring James Mason, Barbara Bel Geddes and Robert Ryan, and “Anna Lucasta,” (1949) an allwhite version of the black stage hit about a Brooklyn prostitute. Laurents returned to the New York theater in 1950 with “The Bird Cage,“ a drama about a nightclub owner. It quickly flopped

despite a cast that included Melvyn Douglas and Maureen Stapleton. Two years later, Laurents had one of his biggest successes, “The T ime of the Cuckoo,” a rueful comedy about a lonely spinster who finds romance in Venice with an already married Italian shopkeeper. “Cuckoo” provided Shirley Booth with one of her best stage roles and was later made into the movie “Summertime,” starring Katharine Hepburn. In 1966, Laurents reworked “Cuckoo” as a musical. Retitled “Do I Hear A Waltz?”, it had music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Sondheim. The following year, he wrote the book for the musical “Hallelujah, Baby!” The show, starring Leslie Uggams and with a score by Styne, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, won the best-musical Tony Award in 1968. Laurents’ biggest film successes occurred in the 1970s, first as screenwriter for “The Way We Were,” the 1973 movie starring Streisand and Robert Redford who played lovers pulled apart by the ideological conflicts of the McCarthy period of the late 1940s and ‘50s. He also wrote the script for “The Turning Point,” a 1977 film starring Shirley MacLaine and Anne Bancroft as two former dancers still enmeshed in a personal rivalry. Other movies with screenplays by Laurents include “Anastasia” (1956) and the unsuccessful “Bonjour Tristesse” (1958), based on the novel by Francoise Sagan. Laurents was not immune to stage failure either. “Anyone Can Whistle,” his 1964 collaboration with Sondheim, lasted only nine performance on Broadway. Yet thanks to its original cast recording featuring Angela Lansbury and Lee Remick, the show developed a cult following among musical-theater buffs. In 1991, Laurents directed the musical “Nick and Nora,” which he called “the biggest and most public flop of my career.” Based on Dashiell Hammett’s famous “Thin Man” detective couple, Nick and Nora Charles, the show played nearly two months of preview performances before finally opening — and closing — in less than a week.

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B8 Friday, May 6, 2011

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CLASSIFIEDS

Section

C

National exhibit suggests art for anxious America Friday, May 6, 2011

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Suggesting art as therapy for an anxious America, a national project kicking off this week aims to get people talking about the country with the help of myriad forms of creative expression, from oil paintings and etchings, film and poetry to food and conversation. “America: Now and Here,” which begins its inaugural three-week run Friday in Kanas City before heading to Detroit and Chicago, is centered on the theme of America since Sept. 11, 2001. It started as an idea several years ago when painter and sculptor Eric Fischl became discouraged by the rancor that marked his discussions with family and friends. The talks “turned unsettled so very quickly, no

Roswell Daily Record

matter what we were talking about,” the New Yorkbased artist said. “Everything immediately turned to anxiety.” That acrimony also seemed to extend to the nation as a whole, he said, and while it’s “not some reflex of Americans to turn to their artists and say, ’Can you help us out with this by giving us some art,’” Fischl felt art had a role in bringing the conversation back to more civil tones. Results of that effort will be on display in Kansas City’s Crossroads district, an area near downtown filled with restaurants and galleries, including the Leedy-Voulkos gallery, where much of the event is centered. The two-room gallery features several works, including an American flag etching by renown

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painter Jasper Johns, and large wall sections containing a 540-line collaborative poem, or “renga,” that begins with a piece from poet Robert Pinsky. Also on display will be work from about 100 local artists who contributed plays, poetry, paintings and puppet shows. In Detroit, Chicago and wherever the project goes next, local artists will be included to create “focus, a local voice that gets heard on a national stage,” Fischl said. Events in Kansas City run the gamut, including workshops on hip hop music and comic books, surprise per for mances from area actors, gallery shows and even a lunch with farmers, restaurateurs and members of food policy organizations. Another will be a discussion of Ameri-

can art with Fischl and Julian Zugazagoitia, new director of the city’s Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Participants will be able to create their own art at several events, most of which are free. “I want us to use art as another language, that is to say dif ferent from the media and different from religion. Use the language and experience that art provides as a way of trying to change the conversation in this country,” Fischl said. “The thing about art is it’s something that is nuanced, and I’d say anything but black and white. It insists on interpretation. “So it’s all about people connecting to each other through their interpretations.” Fischl reached out to artists and pitched the idea

city, town or military base, and “like a transformer” open to become a mobile art gallery with an adjoining event space, Fischl said. The trucks are scheduled to begin rolling next year. Kansas City was selected as the opening venue in part because it was the first city to “step up to the plate to say we want you here and have been actively raising money,” Fischl said. The area, home to the beginning of the Oregon Trail, “also has this great tradition of journeys starting off from there,” he said. “We feel that it’s time for another great journey that will inspire and influence Americans as individuals and as our society,” project director Dorothy Dunn added. “And this one is to be led by America’s artists.”

as a catalyst for a dialogue about the U.S. He thought it would be difficult to get artists to donate pieces, but when he asked them to create or contribute work specifically about America since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, most of them gladly obliged. Other contributors include painter Robert Rauschenberg, playwright Edward Albee and performance artist Laurie Anderson. “What I was really turning to them for was to share their insight, wisdom and talent,” Fischl said. “Pretty much everybody who hears about this really wanted it to happen.” The vision for “America: Now and Here” is for artwork to be put on specially outfitted trucks that travel the country and park in a

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Hardcover Fiction

1. “The Sixth Man” by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing) 2. “The Land of Painted Caves: A Novel” by Jean M. Auel (Crown) 3. “Bel Air Dead” by Stuart Woods (Putnam) 4. “A Turn in the Road” by Debbie Macomber (Mira) 5. “The Fifth Witness” by Michael Connelly (Little, Brown) 6. “Born of Shadows” by Sherrilyn Kenyon (Grand Central) 7. “I’ll Walk Alone” by Mary Higgins Clark (Simon & Schuster) 8. “Chasing Fire” by Nora Roberts (Putnam Adult) 9. “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest” by Stieg Larsson (Knopf) 10. “She Walks in Beauty” by Selected by Caroline Kennedy (Voice) 11. “Save Me” by Lisa Scottoline (St. Martin’s Press) 12. “44 Charles Street” by Danielle Steel (Delacorte) 13. “The Paris Wife: A Novel” by Paula McLain (Ballantine Books) 14. “Sing You Home: A Novel” by Jodi Picoult (Atria) 15. “The Lost Fleet: Dreadnaught” by Jack Campbell (Ace)

Hardcover Nonfiction

1. “Bossypants” by Tina Fey (Reagan Arthur) 2. “The Dukan Diet” by Pierre Dukan (Crown Archetype) 3. “20 Years Younger” by Bob Greene (Little, Brown) 4. “Stories I Only Tell My Friends” by Rob Lowe (Holt) 5. “Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption” by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House) 6. “Kaboom!” by Darell Hammond (Rodale) 7. “The 17 Day Diet: A Doctor’s Plan Design for Rapid Results” by Dr. Mike Moreno (Free Press) 8. “Liberty Defined” by Ron Paul (Grand Central Publishing) 9. “Love Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived” by Rob Bell (HarperOne) 10. “My Father’s Daughter: Delicious, Easy Recipes Celebrating Family & Togetherness” by Gwineth Paltrow and Mario Batali (Grand Central Publishing) 11. “The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement” by David Brooks (Random House) 12. “Onward” by Howard Schultz (Rodale Press) 13. “The Wizard of Lies” by Diana B. Henriques (Times Books) 14. “I’m All Over That: And Other Confessions” by Shirley MacLaine (Atria) 15. “Hitman” by Howie Carr (Forge)

Mass Market Paperbacks

1. “Water for Elephants: A Novel” by Sara Gruen (Algonquin) 2. “Savage Nature” by Christine Feehan (Jove) 3. “Worth Dying For” by Lee Child (Dell) 4. “Moonlight Cove” by Sheryl Woods (Mira) 5. “Game of Thrones” by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 6. “The Search” by Nora Roberts (Jove) 7. “Chasing The Night” by Iris Johansen (St. Martin’s) 8. “Something Borrowed” by Emily Griffin (St. Martin’s) 9. “Storm Prey” by John Sandford (Berkley) 10. “Any Man of Mine” by Rachel Gibson (Avon) 11. “That Perfect Someone” by Johanna Lindsay (Pocket) 12. “The Burning Wire” by Jeffery Deaver (Pocket) 13. “Robert Ludlum’s The Bourne Objective” by Eric Van Lustbader (Vision) 14. “Dangerous in Diamonds” Madeline Hunter (Jove) 15. “Hannah’s List” by Debbie Macomber (Mira)

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Final Price

2011 FORD F150 Super Crew 4x4 XLT #110216

2011 FORD F250 4x4 Styleside #110161

2011 FORD F250 4x4 Crew Cab

$ -

41,595 2,865 1,500 1,000 1,000

$ -

45,395 3,280 1,500 1,000 1,000

$35,230

MSRP Roswell Ford Savings Retail Customer Cash Ford CreditBonus Cash Retail Bonus Cash

Final Price

38,860 2,873 500 1,000 1,000 1,000

$32,487

MSRP Roswell Ford Savings Retail Customer Cash Ford Credit Bonus Cash Retail Bonus Cash

Final Price

35,655 2,447 500 1,000 1,000 1,000

$29,708

MSRP $ Roswell Ford Savings Retail Customer Cash Promotional Retail Customer Cash XLT Retail Bonus Customer Cash Ford CreditBonus Cash -

Final Price

#110152

$ -

MSRP $ 27,500 Roswell Ford Savings - 1,512 Retail Customer Cash - 1,500 Retail Bonus Customer Cash - 1,000 Promotional Retail Bonus Customer Cash - 1,000 Trade-in Assistance Bonus CustomerCash - 1,000

Trade Paperbacks

1. “Heaven is for Real: A Little Boy’s Astounding Story of His Trip to Heaven and Back” by Todd Burpo, Sonja Burpo, Colton Burpo and Lynn Vincent (Thomas Nelson) 2. “Water for Elephants: A Novel” by Sara Gruen (Algonquin) 3. “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam Adult) 4. “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot (Broadway) 5. “A Visit from the Goon Squad” by Jennifer Egan (Anchor) 6. “The 9th Judgment” by James Patterson (Grand Central Publishing) 7. “The Internet Is a Playground” by David Throne (Tarcher) 8. “Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen” by Christopher McDougall (Vintage) 9. “Cutting for Stone” by Abraham Verghese (Vintage) 10. “Something Borrowed” by Emily Griffin (St. Martin’s Griffin) 11. “The Art of Racing in the Rain: A Novel” by Garth Stein (Harper) 12. “Inside of a Dog” by Alexandra Horowitz (Scribner) 13. “A game of Thrones” by George R.R. Martin (Bantam) 14. “Have a Little Faith: A True Story” by Mitch Albom (Hyperion) 15. “The Happiness Project” by Gretchen Rubin (Harper)

MSRP Roswell Ford Savings Retail Customer Cash Retail Bonus Cash Promotional Retail Bonus

$38,615

Hurry, these trucks are one of a kind and subject to prior sale! Prices do not include tax, registration and dealer service transfer fee. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only and may not represent the actual vehicles. Not responsible for typographical errors.

ROSWELL FORD

821 N. MAIN ST. OPEN: MON.-FRI. 8AM - 7PM, SAT. 8AM - 5PM SALES: 623-3673 SERVICE DEPT.: 623-1031

Toll-free: 877-624-3673

www.roswellford.com


C2 Friday, May 6, 2011

CLASSIFIEDS/ENTERTAINMENT

Roswell Daily Record

Salutes mark bluesman Robert Johnson’s centennial

GREENWOOD, Miss. (AP) — When bluesman Robert Johnson died broke and all but unknown in a tiny Mississippi crossroads town, he was buried in a homemade coffin and an unmarked grave. Yet, a century after he came into this world, his eerie blues still influence artists from Eric Clapton to John Mayer, and his legacy continues to be celebrated. His posthumous CD sales number well over a million. His name moves merchandise. To mark Johnson’s centennial, Sony Music Entertainment has re-released his recordings in “Robert Johnson: The Complete Original Masters — Centennial Edition,” which includes replicas of his original singles and a 1997 documentary. He’s also being recognized this week at the Blues Music Awards in Memphis, Tenn. Delaware-based Dogfish Head Craft Brewery has created a wicked concoction, “Hellhound On My Ale,” a title that’s a nod to one of Johnson’s songs. “I’m amazed by it after all these years,” Steven Johnson said of his grandfather’s musical legacy. “It seems like it just passed down from generation to generation.” Steven Johnson will be part of a big party that begins Thursday in Greenwood, the small Mississippi Delta town, where Johnson had been playing his music on a street corner shortly before his death. The free celebration will feature an art exhibit, tours of Johnson’s haunts and other historic blues sites, as well as live music Friday and Saturday from Bobby Rush, The Cedric Burnside Project, Keb’ Mo’, Alvin Youngblood Hart and others. The event is sponsored by the Greenwood Convention and Visitors Bureau. Steven Johnson, who’s also a minister and plays his grandfather’s music onstage, will deliver a sermon Sunday inspired by the myth that Robert Johnson stood at a Delta crossroads at midnight and sold his soul to the devil in return for his talent. He will preach it at Little Zion Missionary Baptist Church, where

Legals

---------------------------------------Publish May 6, 13, 2011

STATE OF NEW MEXICO FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT CHAVES COUNTY No. PB-2011-35

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: E. MARIE DUNCAN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS

SUE G. TROUBLEFIELD, been appointed having personal representative of the Estate. of E. MARIE DUNCAN, deceased. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this Notice, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the Personal Representative C/O Loralee D. Hunt, Esq., 116 E. Country Club Rd., Roswell, New Mexico 88201, or filed with the Fifth Judicial District Court of Chaves County, New Mexico. Dated: 3rd day of May, 2011.

s/Sue G. Troublefield, Personal Representative

GARAGE SALES

DON ’T’ MISS A SALE BY MISSING THE 2:00 PM DEADLINE FOR PLACING YOUR ADS

001. North

3005 N. Washington, Friday afternoon 4-7pm. Books, paintings, furniture, dishes, etc. 2307 N. Davis, Fri-Sat, 7am-2pm. 3 Family sale: Household items, clothes for every age, furniture, baby clothes & much more.

002. Northeast 3016 Bandolina Sat. 7a-? Movies, books, fax machine, Xbox, knick knacks

20 LA Paz Saturday 8-2 Lots of good clean items, dishes, cook books, clothes, shoes, TV, bedspread & much more. Don’t miss this one!

Johnson is thought to be buried, although there are two other reputed gravesites in the area. The Robert Johnson Blues Foundation has other events planned throughout the year, including an international salute to Johnson May 13-17 in Lyon, France. Robert Leroy Johnson was born May 8, 1911, in Hazlehurst, Miss. For years after Johnson’s death, little was known about his life. With the scant details, the enduring mystery of the crossroads legend and the handful of powerful recorded songs, Johnson slipped into myth. Few are still alive who knew him, save the nearly 96-year-old bluesman Honeyboy Edwards, who was unable to give an interview. “Of course, he died when he was 27. He didn’t give a whole lot of people much of a chance to get to know him,” said Steve LaVere, a blues historian and Grammywinning record producer who once held the publishing rights to Johnson’s music. LaVere’s website, Delta Haze, has a biography of Johnson’s life culled over the years from interviews of musicians, friends and relatives of the bluesman. “Johnny Shines said he was

002. Northeast

311 E. Mescalero, Thur-Sat, 7-2. 2 griils, futon, toddler bed, shoes, baby items, jewelry. 903 N. Edgewood, Saturday @ 8:00am.

EAST 19TH St (before Redbridge in Barn), Sat, 8am-? Home decor, furniture, women, men, children & baby clothing & accessories, movies, games, toys. Some things brand new.

003. East

304 E. Ballard, Sat. only, 7am2pm. Clothes, queen mattres, bakers rack, tires, knick knacks, much more.

004. Southeast

204 E. Mt. View Rd., Saturday, 7am. RV hitch, tow dolly, car parts, household.

005. South

102 W. Byrne Fri. 8am 2 dinettes, tv’s Dell laptop 600, Google E-Pad Android, designer clothes & shoes some toddler & lots of misc. 503 Greenbriar Fri. & Sat. Big family sale. Furniture, lots of baby items, clothes, & tools come by to see all the good stuff, lots more.

3414 S. Union, Fri-Sat, 7am. Moving Sale: Kitchen table & chairs, washer, dryer, stove, many household goods, many 45 & 33’s records, collectibles, clothes, tools, power wheels, bikes, TVs, much more. 4 Party garage sale.

503 & 505 W. Mt. View Rd Fri. & Sat. 7-3 Two family sale. Washers & dryers, tools, guitars, furniture, new portable massage table, Hovearound scooter, lots of misc. 2800 EMERALD Dr., Saturday @ 7am.

ONE STOP Thrift Shop 711 S. Main - Close out sale - Last day of business this Saturday! Everything goes, glass display case, jewelry displays, large magazine rack, clothes racks, cash register, furniture, side by side refrigerator, TVs, all clothes 50 cents each, purses, shoes, movies, books, treadmill & so much more! You can even make an offer to buy out everything! Sat. 10-4.

005. South

HUGE GARAGE Sale Saturday 7am Midway Family Church 63 Yakima Rd. new Dexter Hwy. For more info. 3475309 1615 S. Stanton, Fri-Sat, 7am-5pm. Brand new clothing & used, also some tools, toys, clothing racks, a set of 18” rims & tires & much more different items. Come by & see! 101 E. 6th St. Dexter Saturday 7am-2pm. Very large 5 family yard Sale. King sized bedspreads, decorating items, nice plus size clothing, blankets, pillows, books, toys, purses, bathroom sets, baby items, boys clothes, shoes, dishes, videos, stuffed animals, picture frames, vases, some Christmas items. Teenage girl clothes. Everythig

priced to sell.

006. Southwest

307 S. Union (behind Guys & Dolls), Thurs-Sat, 7am-4pm. Moving & Retirement Sale. Washer, dryer, furniture, electronics, tools, camping equip, too much to list.

PUBLIC AUCTION

SECURITY SELF STORAGE 906 WEST MCGAFFEY ROSWELL, NM 88203 575-622-0000 SATURDAY, May 7, 2011 at 906 West McGaffey. Starts at 10 am. Bidders are bidding on entire contents of a unit. At this time, we have 5 units for sale. Units will be opened one at a time for your inspection and written bids. Bids will be collected and highest bidder will be announced at each unit. If awarded highest bid, you must make payment in full at end of auction and empty ALL contents by 6 pm on Saturday, May 14th. Please park outside gate. This sale is to satisfy the lien for the storage of said household goods, wares and merchandise together with incidental and proper charges pertaining thereto, including the reasonable expenses of this sale, as allowed by the state of NM.

Manager/Security Self Storage

very quiet, very much to himself. Robert Lockwood said he was a strange person. If you know any real artistic people, they think a whole lot and they just don’t express themselves a lot except through their art,” said LaVere, who’s curating the exhibit at Cottonlandia. Eric Clapton described the power of Johnson’s music in his autobiography. “At first the music almost repelled me, it was so intense, and this man made no attempt to sugarcoat what he was trying to say or play. It was hard-core, more than anything I had ever heard. After a few listenings, I realized that on some level, I had found the master, and that following this man’s example would be my life’s work,” Clapton wrote. The Rolling Stones’ Keith Richard told The Associated Press in 2008 that Johnson was so deft that when he first heard the bluesman’s solo guitar work, he thought two people were playing. LaVere credits Johnson’s talent not to a soul-selling crossroads deal, but to a self-imposed apprenticeship under another little-known musician, Ike Zimmerman. “Ike showed him how to play and Ike was a studied musician.

006. Southwest

ESTATE SALE 1910 S. Richardson, May 7, Sat., 8am2pm. Coach, oak wash stand, TVs, mirrors, trunks, bed, mattress, art, glassware, Franciscan dishes, books, lamps, liens, & lots more! Cash only & no early birds. 1204 W. Hobbs, Thurs-Sun, 9-5. Furniture, tools, collectibles, much more. 906 AVENIDA Del Sumbre, Sat., 8-4. Appl., kids clothes, furniture, & misc. 50 RIDGECREST Dr., Sat., 5/7/11, 8-12. Variety misc. 917 W Forest Sat. 7am-? Furniture, clothes, baby, junior, boys, shoes, bikes, and more 607 S. Adams (off Washington St.), Saturday, 7a-3p. Dishes, blankets, bedding bar stools, end tables, microwave table, shoe rack, pictures, recliner, dining room table w/6 chairs, shoes, kid puzzles, misc. items. SPECIAL OLYMPIC Back Yard Sale: Home interior, musical carousels, Elvis, furniture, clothes, puzzles, books, etc. 605 S. Kentucky. Enter through left side gate, up the driveway. Saturday, May 7th from 8am-12 noon. 1504 S. Union Sat. 8am Big Sale table, chair, entertainment center, TV, baby swing, & walker, jewelry, clothing, shoes & misc. 600 S. Heights Friday 8-12 Garage Sale. Clothes, misc., TV’s, camper shell 406 S. Birch, Fri-Sun., 6:30-5pm. Toys, clothes, tools, misc.

902 AVENIDA Manana, Fri. & Sat. 7a-12. Household & childrens things, lots of stuff. 514 S. Fir Fri. & Sat. 7am-? Cribs, highchairs, clothing and much more. 1012 W. Deming (side driveway), Sat., 8am. Bikes, furniture, home accessories. 1619 W. Juniper Sat. 7-? Huge moving sale couch stove, 2 desks, trampoline & much more. 208-9006

They used to spend all night knees to knees, and Ike would teach him how to sing and present himself,” LaVere said. “He left the blues early on and became a sanctified preacher and died in Los Angeles in 1965.” Glimpses of Johnson’s life can be found at the exhibit, including aged photographs of Johnson’s second wife, Callie Craft, and one of his girlfriends, Willie Mae Cross Powell, who’s mentioned in Johnson’s tune, “Love in Vain Blues.” A copy of the scrap of linen where Johnson may have scribbled his last words is under glass. It reads in part, “I know that my redeemer liveth and he will call me from the grave.” During his lifetime, Robert Johnson’s best-known song, “Terraplane Blues,” sold only a few thousand copies. After Columbia Records, one of Sony’s labels, released a two-CD Robert Johnson box-set in 1990, it sold over 1 million copies and snagged a Grammy Award. Thirty-one gold records for Johnson’s music, recorded by him and other artists, are part of the display. This year, John Mayer was nominated for a 2010 Grammy Award for his cover of Johnson’s “Crossroads.” In Greenwood, Baptist Town is

006. Southwest 1001 S. Washington, Fri-Sat, 7:30-? A little bit of everything.

007. West

FINAL MOVING sale 123 Mistico Lane (Buena Vida Subdivision) Hwy 70 & Tierra Grande (follow signs) Fri-Sat, 7am-7pm. Bikes, motorcycle, spray washer, rocking chair, knives/watches, camping gear; ski’s/snowboards; books; leather coats; military jackets; art/dvds/cds, electronics, sporting goods; power tools; houseware; cookie jars, dolls, lawnmowers, fishing, banjo, guitar, plumbing snake, carpet shampooer, GPS paintball guns, 7HP Robin motor. Directions 575-444-7061

007. West

2710 W. Highland Rd. Fri. 7am to 2pm. Hundreds of great items for sale.

008. Northwest

1822 N. Maryland, Fri-Sat, 6am6pm. HUGE sale! Appliances, tools, furniture, toys, clothes for everyone, electronics, home furnishings & more! CHURCH RUMMAGE Sale 1400 N. Washington, Friday 9am-3pm, Saturday 8am-3pm.

Legals

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Publish May 6, 2011 CALL FOR BIDS

Notice is hereby given by the Board of Education of the Roswell Independent School District of Roswell, New Mexico that sealed Bids for the furnishing of the following services will be received by Veronica Salazar in the Business Office, 300 N. Kentucky, Suite 203, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, until May 24, 2011 @ 2:00 pm Bid # 11-25 Tree Trimming and Removal Specifications and instructions for bids may be obtained from the above office. The Board of Education reserves the right to reject all bids and to waive technicalities and irregularities. /s/Milburn Dolen Milburn Dolen, President Board of Education

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Publish May 6, 2011 NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that a regular meeting of the Board of Education of the Roswell Independent School District, Roswell, New Mexico will be held at the Administrative and Educational Services Complex, Board Room, on the 10th day of May, 2011 at the hour of 6:00 p.m. for the purpose of discussing and taking action upon items on the agenda for such meeting. Copies of the agenda will be available to the public at the office of the Superintendent, 300 North Kentucky, Roswell, New Mexico at least twenty-four (24) hours prior to the meeting. Individuals with disabilities who need any form of auxiliary aid to attend or participate in this meeting, please contact the Superintendent of Schools at 627-2511 at least three working days prior to the meeting. Upon request, public documents will be provided in the accessible form necessary to the individual requesting the particular auxiliary aid. Board members may meet in executive session to discuss negotiations and limited personnel matters prior to and/or after the meeting. /s/ Mackenzie Hunt Mackenzie Hunt President Board of Education

the poverty-plagued neighborhood where Johnson once played. It’s a few miles from where he’s believed to have been poisoned by either a jealous man or a woman scorned. Sylvester Hoover, a neighborhood blues historian and tour guide, likes to point to the now vacant lot where Johnson briefly lived and where he’d play guitar on Saturday mornings and draw a crowd. Hoover theorizes Johnson was poisoned by a jealous woman, not a jealous husband. “A man from the Delta would’ve shot him, not give him poison,” Hoover said. Robert Johnson’s drink was whiskey, but today his name will be associated with beer. “Hellhound On My Ale,” hits shelves this week in 25 states, but not Mississippi. Its alcohol content is too strong to sell there. Sam Calagione, president of Dogfish Brewery, said he believes Johnson continues to be underappreciated. “I think there are blues historians and aficionados who recognize his place in the firmament, but I think there are music lovers today who might love Jack White or Keith Richards and not recognize they owe a debt to Robert Johnson,” he said.

008. Northwest 1816 W. 3rd St. Sat. 7am5pm furniture, tools, clothing, many odds & ends. Alien statues 1820 N. Cambridge, FriSat, 8-5. Tools, TV stand, mens shirts & pants, plants, boys & girls pants & coats, swamp cooler. Cars for sale: 2000 Saturn, 3dr, (2)‘95 Ford Taurus, drums & lots more. #11 VICTORIA Court Saturday 7am-12pm 1307 W. 3rd, Saturday, 7am-2pm. Full bed, gas heater, clothes, misc.

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice

PAY CASH all day long for household items. Top prices paid for furniture, antiques, appliances, collectibles, tools, saddles, plus everything else from A to Z, including personal estates. 627-2033 or 623-6608 FOOD ADDICTS Anonymous 12 step fellowship offering freedom from eating disorders. Meeting on Thursdays at 7pm, 313 W. Country Club Rd. #5. For more information call 575-9108178

Legals

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Publish April 22, 29, May 6, 2011

NOTICE is hereby given that on March 25, 2011, the Town of Dexter, c/o David White, Mayor, P.O. Box 249, Dexter, New Mexico 88230-0249, filed application No. RA-583-A POD3 with the STATE ENGINEER for permit to change location of well by ceasing the diversion of up to 565.2 acre-feet per annum of artesian ground water from artesian well No. RA-583-A located in the SW1/4SW1/4SW1/4 of Section 17, Township 13 South, Range 26 East, N.M.P.M.

The applicant proposes to drill a replacement well approximately 1000 feet in depth and 13 3/8 inches in diameter at a point in the SW1/4SW1/4SW1/4 of Section 17, Township 13 South, Range 26 East, N.M.P.M., for the continued diversion of 565.2 acre-feet per annum of artesian ground water for Municipal purposes with the Town of Dexter Municipal Water System. The applicant wishes to not plug the current well for potential emergency/backup use for the Town of Dexter.

The proposed replacement well will be located within 100 feet of the existing well. The well will be drilled, equipped and put into use pursuant to Section 72-12-22 NMSA. The well will be constructed to the State Engineer’s artesian Well Specifications described in Section 19.27.4.31, NMAC.

The above described points of diversion are located near the intersection of Caddo and Lincoln Roads, Chaves County, New Mexico.

Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (legible, signed, and include the writer’s complete name and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment you must specifically identify your water rights; and/or (2) Public welfare/conservation of water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must show you will be substantially affected. The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with John R. D’Antonio, Jr., P.E., State Engineer, 1900 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, within ten (10) days after the date of last publication of this Notice. Facsimiles (fax) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is sent within 24-hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protest can be faxed to Office of the State Engineer, (575) 623-8559. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with Sections 72-2-16, 72-5-6, and 72-12-3.


Roswell Daily Record 025. Lost and Found

“REWARD” LOST 4/28/11, female, Fawn T-Cup Chihuahua, green collar, vicinity of Cottonwood/Atkinson. 625-0677 FOUND 5/3/11, boxer mix, rust color w/white paws, choke chain, female. At dog pound, has until 5/10/11.

INSTRUCTION

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

AVON, Buy or Sell. Pay down your bills. Start your own business for $10. Call Sandy 317-5079 ISR.

PULLING UNIT Operator, and CDL Driver. Please apply at the local unemployment office or at 1007 W. Main St., Artesia, NM.

DOMINO'S PIZZA is now hiring drivers. Earn up to $13 per hour. Apply online today at careers.dominos.com

NOW HIRING experienced grill cooks, fry cooks, broiler cooks & preps. Full & part time available. Apply in person only, M-F, 11am-4pm. No phone calls. Cattleman’s Steak & Seafood, 2010 S. Main.

Maintenance Technician

045. Employment Opportunities

RECEPTIONIST NEEDED for busy eye care office. Applicant must have a likable, outgoing, and optimistic personality. Should be able to deal with a steady flow of patients in a kind, caring, and compassionate manner. Must have a proven track record of loyalty and stability with previous employers. Qualifications should include experience answering a multi-line telephone, working one-on-one with a large number of patients/customers, experience with office management software, acquainted with basics of insurance filing and reimbursement, and experience asking for and receiving payments. Preferred qualifications include filing medical claims, reconciling and entering insurance payments, and making patient appointments. Please send your resume c/o Roswell Daily Record, P.O. Box 1897, Unit 263, Roswell, NM 88202.

Villas of Briar Ridge has an immediate opening for an experienced Maintenance Technician. Responsibilities will include resident maintenance requests, preparing apartments for move in and helping to maintain the grounds and common areas. Candidates must have a working knowledge of appliance repair, HVAC, electrical, plumbing, carpentry, painting and drywall repair. Applicants must pass a bachground check, drug screen and have a valid driver's license and auto insurance. Please email resume to briarridge@cableone.net or fax to 575-623-1067. Equal Opportunity Employer.

BUSY OFFICE seeking part time receptionist. Must be reliable flexible, friendly and able to multi-task. Must be able to work weekends & evenings. If interested please bring resume and 3 references to 1010 N. Virginia ask for Jacque no phone calls. Dexter Consolidated Schools NOTICE OF VACANCY

WAREHOUSE/DELIVERY Local chemical company looking for individual to assist in manufacturing, warehouse, delivery of our products. Prior experience in manufacturing, warehousing, and delivery. Excellent Computer skills MS office, SAP Commercial driving experience, Class A with Hazardous Endorsement, Clean driving record. Send Resume and DMV printout to: Human Resources PO Box 1454 Roswell, NM 88202-1454

Available: Position Elementary School Principal for the 2011-2012 school year. Must meet New Mexico licensure requirements. Applications are available in the Human Department, Resources P.O. Box 159, Dexter, NM 88230 or on our website www.dexterdemons.org. For further information or inquiries contact Patricia Parsons, Superintendent, 1-575-734-5420 ext 310 or by email at parsonsp@dexterdemons.org. Application deadline: Until The Dexter filled. Consolidated School District is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, national origin, religion, age, sex, marital status or disability in compliance with federal and state laws.

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

LOS PASITOS Learning Center currently has a Daycare Teacher position open for the infant room. Position requires a professional appearance, a love for children, a high school graduate with at least 45 hours course training, and must be a team player. Bilingual a plus; salary based on experience and drug test required. Please bring current resume with completed application, police background check, and driving record. Come join the Tobosa Team. Closing date 05/13/2011 or until position is filled. Apply @ 110 E. Summit or call 575-624-1025. (EEOC Employer) ABLE TO TRAVEL. Hiring 8 People. No Experience Necessary. Transportation & Lodging Furnished. Paid Training. Work and Travel Entire USA. Start Today! www.protekchemical.com 208-590-0365 Hampton Inn & SuitesPart time- Front Desk Agent Are you always helping people? Are you the best at follow through? Do people call you an over achiever? If the answer is “YES” then you maybe the person we’re looking for to join our team. As a Front Desk Agent, your regular tasks will include guest interaction and satisfaction. Guest check-in and checkout and making reservations. The ideal candidate will have a strong attention for detail, previous customer service experience and the ability and flexibility to work holidays and weekends. No Phone Calls. Please apply in person before May 13, 2011. METER TECHNICIAN

Central Valley Electric Cooperative has an opening for a full-time Meter Technician. For a complete position description and application form, go to our website at www.cvecoop.org and click on the employment tab. Application forms may also be obtained at our offices located at 1505 N. 13th Street in Artesia, NM. LOOKING FOR a medical records clerk and an experienced Medical Office Manager. Please mail resume to PO Box 1617, Roswell, NM 88202.

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Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

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LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.roswell-record.com Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

TADPOLES DAYCARE is now accepting applications for full time teachers. Please apply at 2205 N. Atkinson, Monday through Friday 7am to 6pm. Must have a clean background check and be willing to undergo random drug testing. MEDICAL OFFICE Billing: Full-time 8-5 M-F. Experience with medical insurance billing, payment posting, CPT and ICDcoding preferred. Insurance contracting a plus. Competitive salary and full benefits including health insurance, 401K, and profit sharing. Preemployment testing will be conducted. Send cover letter with resume and three references to medicalbillingroswell@gmai l.com. Applicants will be held in strictest confidence. CABLE ONE, a subsidiary of the Washington Post, has an immediate opening for Senior Field Maintenance Technician. The position offers an excellent career opportunity in a company with Fortune 500 ownership and recently voted a top five best place to work in cable by Cable World Magazine. Benefits include: Paid vacation, flex days and holidays, medical and dental insurance, plus 401K and Pension Plan. Also receive FREE digital cable, high-speed Internet and phone service. Performs construction and reconstruction of cable plant. Perform signal leakage detection and correction. Must be able to operate power tools and hand tools safely. Work in all seasons and regularly scheduled weekends. Performs after hours network stand-by, troubleshooting and repair. Must be able to operate a Bucket Truck. Salary is dependent on experience. Applicants must possess a valid drivers license and clean driving and background record. Cable One is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please apply at 2005 S. Main. No phone calls please. SOS STAFFING is hiring for Class A CDL drivers & diesel mechanics for permanent positions. Must have good background & driving record & posses ability to pass drug & functional capacity testing. Competitive wages. Please email resume & current phone number to dept251@sosstaffing.com Call 575-625-1136 or come into office at 315 W. 2nd St. to schedule interview.

045. Employment Opportunities

SALES REP. Position Available For Building Material Supplier In Roswell Excellent Retiree or Student Position - 1 Hour Per Week @ $240.00 / Month - Please Fax or Email Resume To: John Tuckness @ 830-964-3682 or johnt@southwest moulding.com SUMMER WORK Great Pay Immediate FT/PT openings Customer Sales/Svc, no exp. nec, conditions apply. All ages 17+, 575-627-0447 FACILITY MAINTENANCE Supervisor: Responsible for the supervision of the facilities maintenance department in compliance with government and management directives while providing for the safety and welfare of students, staff and the facilities. Must have high school diploma or equivalent with three years of work experience in operating property facilities, grounds and equipment maintenance and construction/renovation project management; two of which must be in supervisory capacity; Familiarization with building systems (electrical, mechanical, HVAC, etc.). Valid driver's license with an acceptable driving record required; must pass a background check. Salary begins at $33,000.00. Applications are Accepted Online Only! Apply online at: www.chugachjobs.com Deadline to apply is: May 11, 2011 An Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F, D/V CHANGE A LIFE Be a Comfort Keeper We are hiring experienced caregivers to work days or week-ends. Earn a competitive wage for something you already enjoy doing. We provide non medical assistance to seniors in their homes in Roswell & Artesia. Call Carol at 6249999 or come to 1410 S. Main St. Roswell to apply. www.BeAComfortkeeper.com HIRING DELIVERY driver & experienced cook. Accepting resumes only at 100 S. Richardson between 2-4pm Mon-Fri.

BURRITOS AND More now hiring. Apply after 1 o’clock Monday through Friday. ROONEY MOON Broadcasting in Clovis, NM has an immediate opening for an account executive. The successful candidate will have some radio experience, and will take over an active sales list. For details and an interview appointment, call sales manager Steve Rooney at 575-359-1759. Rooney Moon Broadcasting is an equal opportunity employer. RUIDOSO FINANCIAL Institution needing a Branch Manager and Two Part-Time Tellers. Requires basic computer skills, must be detail oriented and have excellent customer service skills, banking experience preferred. Company offers excellent work environment, salary based on skills and experience. Part-time positions do not have paid benefits. Please fax cover letter, resume’, and three references to: 575-622-2340 or mail to HR Dept., 2514 N. Main Street, Roswell, NM 88201. RUIDOSO FEDERAL CREDIT UNION opening June 2011. UPS STORE requires retail experience, outstanding customer service skills and a willingness to work hard, competitive wage plus incentives. Submit resume to job.theupsstore@gmail.com

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS We are currently seeking experienced accountants to join our team of dedicated professionals. Responsibilities include: Audit, review and compilation engagements. Financial statement preparation. Complex audits for clients in a variety of industries. Government and ERISA audits. Review and preparation of tax returns. Tax planning. Tax research. Tax compliance. Requirements: Bachelor's degree in Accounting. CPA licensure or CPA candidate. Recent public accounting experience. Minimum 3 years experience. We offer a competitive salary, benefits and a generous 401k. To apply send resume and cover letter to jobs@acgnm.com or fax to 505.348.9085. NO PHONE CALL OR WALK INS ACCEPTED. OPEN POSITION for Leasing Agent and administrative work at Southbrook Apartments. Email letter of interest to openposition@ southbrook.net or drop your letter of interest to office at 1901 S. Main. No phone calls please.

Friday, May 6, 2011

045. Employment Opportunities

Dennis the Menace

C3

LAKEVIEW CHRISTIAN Home in Carlsbad, NM is in search of a full-time COTA. Must be NM certified and able to pass a background check. If interested please contact Cory or Marti at 575- 887- 3947. MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTIONIST position part-time; could lead to more. Serious inquiries only. MUST have experience and have excellent grammar and typing skills. Great for a supplemental income. Must be able to work daytime between 9 to 5. Please send resumes to PO Box 1897 Unit 266, Roswell, NM 88202.

ELITE FITNESS LLC, Roswell's Premier Fitness Facility, has immediate openings for Front Desk/Customer Service Rep. Duties include but are not limited to, cash handling, reporting, cleaning, answering phones, and general office duties. Maturity, Professionalism, and Integrity are a must. Experience is not. We will train. Salary commensurate with experience. Please forward resume with cover letter to: Brian Maynard, General Manager. 2101 N. Atkinson, Roswell, NM 88201. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE… Elite Fitness, LLC is an EOE. SELF-STORAGE FACILITY seeking full-time Employee. Capable of Lawn maintenance, Cleaning empty units, hauling trash, Etc. Must be computer Literate and people friendly. Hours will vary Monday thru Friday. Saturdays are mandatory from 9-5:30 p.m. If interested please send resume to: PO Box 1897 Unit 246, Roswell, NM 88202 STEWART INDUSTRIES requires carpenter with structural knowledge for construction of shipping containers. Please apply at 605 E Challenger, Roswell, NM 88203 IN-HOME SIDING and window sales. Must be trained and experienced in sales. Call Graig 575-6310599.

SEEKING MOTIVATED cosmetologist to run a new spa. Send resume and letter of interest to socoruiz5040@gmail.com by 5/12/11.

DRIVERS Come join our team! Coastal Transport is seeking Drivers with Class (A) CDL. Must be 23 yrs old (X) Endorsement with 1 yr experience, excellent pay, home everyday! Paid Vacation, saftey bonus, company paid life inc. We provide state of the art training program. $2000 sign on bonus. For more information call 1-877-2977300 or 575-748-8808 between 8am & 4pm, Monday-Friday. CANDLEWOOD SUITES Part time Houseman/Maintenance. Some holidays & weekends required. Some experience preferred. Apply in person at 4 Military Heights Dr. CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE/ROUT E DRIVER Requisition Number103026

High School Diploma/GED, experience with Route Sales desired, ability to work directly with our customers, build relationships with our customers by providing resolution to problems and/or complaints, conduct customer satisfaction reviews, clean driving record, ability to lift up to 50 lbs, and ability to pass a Department of Transportation Drug Screen and physical. Competitive salary and benefits. Application available at 515 N. Virginia, Roswell, NM 88201 from 05/6/2011 to 05/12/2011. EOE EMPLOYER

CANDLEWOOD SUITES Part time Night Auditor Some holidays & weekends required. Customer service experience preferred. Apply in person at 4 Military Heights Dr. FARMER BROS. Co. hiring Sales Support/Warehouse person in Roswell, NM. Customer Service, route delivery experience a plus. Good DMV, ability to lift 50 lbs and Diploma/GED required. Excellent pay and benefits. EOE. Fax: (310) 787-5302.

SERVICES

105. Childcare

NEED CHILD care? Find the widest range of available childcare for your children and their needs. 1-800691-9067 or www.newmexic okids.org. You may also call us; Family Resource & Referral 6229000 and we can help you navigate the system.

140. Cleaning JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252

HOUSE/OFFICE Cleaning low prices. Excellent work call anytime. 575-973-2649 575-973-3592 HOUSEKEEPING- Home and/or office. Honest & dependable. 575-749-4900 or 575-578-1447 SUNSHINE WINDOW Service. We do Windows Brite. Free estimates. Commercial and residential. 575-626-5458 or 575-626-5153. SUNSHINE WINDOW Service. We do Windows Brite. Free estimates. Commercial and residential. 575-626-5458 or 575-626-5153. HOUSE CLEANER, reliable, honest, 22 yrs. exp. 623-8563 NEEDED HOUSEKEEPER with the ability to prepare various breakfast. Call 6228615

185. Electrical BIG HORN Electric Professional work, affordable price. 575-317-8345 NM Lic#367662.

ALLIANCE ELECTRIC Any size electrical job. Lic#367386. 575-840-7937

195. Elderly Care

DEPENDABLE PRIVATE Caregiver to the rescue, reasonable rates, certified to give meds, will take to appts., excellent refer. yrs. of exp. Tina 420-8877

200. Fencing

Fence Restoration, new installs, fast quote, lic#367947. BBB Member. 575840-8395 M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

225. General Construction

Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, doors, windows, tile work. Lic., Insured/Bonded. 575-802-5995 Dean TEE TIME Construction Commercial/Residential Construction - Spray foam insulation, framing, cement, roofing, drywalln painting, New Construction of Homes, Additions, Remodeling, and Metal Buildings. Licensed & Bonded. Call 575-626-9686

235. Hauling

Will Haul away anything, storage, storage building & etc. 575-914-0864 PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

CALL BOB lawn mowing, trash hauling, clean-up, reasonable prices. 575-420-2670 ORTEGA’S LAWN Mowing, rototilling, pressure washing, landscaping, sprinkler repairs, etc! Call James 575-444-8555, Connie 575-444-8519 Free Estimates WILL MOW lawn at price you choose. Also do odd jobs, sprinkler maintenance. 347-5648 or 626-0518 Greenscapes Sprinkler Systems Lawn mowing, field mowing, gravel, sodhydro seed, pruning, tilling, For dependable & reliable service call 622-2633 or 910-0150. WEEKEND WARRIOR Lawn Service mowing, property cleanup, residential rain gutter cleaning, and much more 575-626-6121

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Roswell Lawn Service mow trim pruning & general cleanup rototill 444-7652. LAWN MOWING Best prices Call 623-3709 or cell 910-3787 Better Lawn Care Mowing, Weed Eating and Edging. Prices Starting at $15.00. Call for Free Estimates. Jeremy 575637-6761. COACHES MOWING & yard work. Will do just about anything. Just give me a call 575-910-0683. Gonzales Enterprises We specialize in sprinklers, landscaping, sod, reseeding, fencing, flagstone paving stones, trees, odd jobs. Just ask, we may do it. 575-3178053 Mow Grass, Trim Bushes, Flower Beds, Clean Ups, Pull Weed, Leaf Raking, Pecan pick up, tree pruning, rock yards. 9105247 Pedro or Virginia 623-1826

Yard work, clean-ups, lawns. Handyman svc. Mon-Thur. after 4pm David 637-9580, Danny 626-0755 FIRE SEASON - Tractor mowing, lawn care, handyman jobs. Honest, reliable & dependable. Call Paul 575-208-2864. AFFORDABLE LAWN service. Commercial & residential. For free estimates call Junior 3174737. WE WORK Cut Lawns Lots - Trees - Haul & rototilling. Will 317-7402 Brush Hog, posthole auger box blade/light tractor work reasonable rates 444-6224 CHAVEZ SPRINKLER CO. COMPLETE LANDSCAPING AND SPRINKLER SYSTEM & REPAIRS, ROCK WORK, TREES, SHRUBS, TRACTOR & DUMP TRUCK WORK. FREE ESTIMATES. CALL HECTOR 420-3167

285. Miscellaneous Services

THE NEW MEXICO SEED LOAN PROGRAM is available to small businesses owned by individuals with diabilities and provides low interest loans for the purchase of equipment and related supplies needed to expand or start a business. Contact the New Mexico Seed Loan Program at 1-800-8662253 or www.nmseedloans.org for more information. A low interest loan program of DVR State of New Mexico.

305. Computers

PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER services at affordable prices. Call (575)3179930.

310. Painting/ Decorating

Quality Painting! Interior, Exterior at prices you can afford. Mike 910-7012 TIME TO PAINT? Quality interior and exterior painting at affordable prices. Call 637-9108.

312. Patio Covers

M.G. HORIZONS Patio covers, concrete, decks & awnings Lic. 623-1991.

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 625-9924 / 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing Need A Roof?

Call R & R Construction 18 years in Roswell. 622-0072


C4 Friday, May 6, 2011 350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 6264079 or 622-2552. RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397 www.rancheroswelding.com

395. Stucco Plastering

RWC Lath and Stucco. Insurance. Hector (575)9108397 www.rancheroswelding.com

405. TractorWork

LANGFORD TRACTOR work. Septic tanks installed/inspected. Blade work and backhoe work. Gravel, topsoil. 623-1407. RWC Bobcat and Dump Works. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397. www.rancheroswelding.com

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 SUPERIOR SERVICES parking lot, landscaping, tree, service 20 yrs experience. 575-420-1873

435. Welding

WELD ANYTHING ranch pipe, or repair and etc. 575-914-0864 RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insurance.

www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397

WELDING SERVICES: Fabrication & repair. Call 575-420-4403 or 575910-3856.

FINANCIAL

485. Business Opportunities

FOR SALE FENCED COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 210x115 w/3200 SQFT SHOP & OFFICE IN & OUTSIDE PARKING. 100 N. PINE. CALL 575-910-2070.

PROFITABLE NEW MEXICO BUSINESSES for sale by Owners. Many Types, Sizes, Locations, Terms. $25K to $15M. Other States Available. Affliliated Business Consultants 1-800-617-4204 www.BizSale.com DO YOU earn $800 in a day? Your Own Local Candy Route! 25 Machines and Candy All for $9995. 877-915-8222 All Major Credit Cards Accepted! TIRED OF living paycheck to paycheck? Call me to show you how to build residual income. Leave your contact info. 623-0459

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale 323 E Hervey: 4br, 2ba - 2000 sq ft home w/upstairs bedroom &balcony. Remodeled kitchen w/marble countertops & stainless steel appliances, ceramic tile throughout the house, whirpool & double sink in master bathroom $102,000w/owner finance w/20% down. 626-9593

1413 E Hoagland: 2br,1 ba, & laundry room. Large lot w/fenced yard. Storage shed & covered carport. New paint & flooring. $52,000 - 626-9593

Reduced for quick sale $98,000, Brokers welcome. #3 Forest Dr. 2050 square feet. 4 Bedroom, 1 3/4 bath. Esquibel Real Estate. 575-6267550 CISCO

3/1, NEWLY remodeled, large backyard, near Goddard & Wool Bowl. 626-1019 or 625-0605 BEAUTIFUL 2004, 2 story mountain home in upper canyon, Ruidoso, NM. 3br 2 full baths, 3 decks, new furnishings, backyard. $299,000. 626-2249 ENCHANTED HILLS 902 Mason Dr., Very Quiet Street, 3br, 2307 sqft. $184,000, $27k recent imp. 625-1772 or 208-0525 TOWNHOUSE, 1400 sqft, 2br, 2ba, laundry room/study, new roof, cedar fence, stucco, porch, tile & carpet. Refinished kitchen & bath cabinets & new paint throughout, washer & dryer. Large corner lot. Call 575-491-4235 3Br 2Ba, $100k; 4br 1ba, $60k; 624-1331 for appt, MTh 8am-4pm BY OWNER: 3/2/2, brick home; FP, Del Norte schools; quiet cul-de-sac location; 1825 sqft; $174,500, no Realtor calls please. 2 Jardin Court full hook up for 35’ motor home in grassed backyard. 6238779 for appointment. FOR SALE By Owner: North Springs, 2614 N. Pennsylvania, $116,000, 2br, 2ba, 1750 sqft, new appliances, 623-6748 or 626-3141.

490. Homes For Sale FOR SALE/LEASE to own 1500+ SF 3 br, 1.5 ba. w/ref. air, $50k lease to own. $600 mo. 406 S. Sequoia. 626-9814 PROPERTY AUCTION Open House: #2 Gaye Drive Sunday, May 8th 1-3pm. Details @ wildwestauctions.com or 623-7355 2 STORY, 4br, 2.5ba, large rooms, basement, shop, $119k. 626-5715 1816 N. Michigan, $4500 dn, $600 mo, ready now. Leave message, 623-0459

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

6 PLUS acres in Buena Vida subdivision w/electricity, in phase 1 w/beautiful view. Possible owner financing. 6269686 Small Farm, 6 acres, irrigation, 4+br, 2 & 3/4 ba., central air, FP, 2 out buildings, porches, barn, much more $279,500. 425-864-5483 5 ACRES, $25K as is, septic system, 3809 Zinnia, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 BUENA VIDA 1 5 + ac., $42,000; 7.5 + ac., $47,000. Ready for your dream home. Well & electricity. Wise Choice RE, 575-625-6935 & 575317-1605. Call Ruth, Owner/Broker. Will finance. RUIDOSO, NM AREA – 3 acres w/city water and city maintained roads near small fishing pond and golf course. Only $17,900. Financing avail. Call NMRS 1-866-906-2857. NEW MEXICO LAND SALE. 40 acre tracts from $42,500. Over 7000’ elevation, treed, county road, utilities, great views, elk country, peace and quiet. NMWP 575-773-4996 LENDER SALE. 40 Acres $39,900. Spellbinding views of snow capped mountains! Adjacent to National Forest. Maintained all weather roads w/electric. Close to Ruidoso. Financing available. Call NMRS 888-676-6979.

500. Businesses for Sale

Business Or lot for sale 410 S. Main for more info call 623-9772 or 420-9072

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

PRIME NORTH Main St. property for sale. Professional office ready, 2800 sf, lots of parking, $375,000. If interested send letter to PO Box 1897 Unit 264, Roswell, NM 88202. Restaurant bldg, $275K cash/trade for Ruidoso prprty, M-Th 8-4 624-1331

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

1994 FLEETWOOD doublewide, 28x52, 3br, 2ba in Carlsbad. Has appliances except refrigerator. Has fireplace, needs some paint, otherwise very nice. Selling cheap, $19,900. Must be moved. 575622-0035. D01090 2004 Fleetwood, 16x60, 2br/2ba, like new, all appliances, also awnings both sides, setup in adult park, north side. Priced to sell. 575-622-0035. D01090 WE BUY used mobile homes. Single & double wides. 575-622-0035 D01090. 1995FLEETWOOD 14x60, 1br, 1ba, needs little touchup. Setup in park in Clovis, can be moved. 575-6220035 D01090. FIXER UPPER mobile home on 5 acres. South of Roswell Call 575-444-8217

520. Lots for Sale

OWNER FINANCING for a limited time. Ready to build 5 acre lots w/ great views & good covenants. Located 9 miles West of Roswell @ the Club House Banquet Facility. Free land maps and at entrance. 575-623-1800. www.BuenaVidaLand.com Mobile Home Lot size 60x134 $18,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. We Take Visa and Mastercard! 420-1352. HAGERMAN LOTS for sale. York Avenue, Posey subdivision, 1 block from Hagerman schools, $5000. 420-1352 COURT ORDERED Sale! 2704 S. Lea, asking $6k, 5 acres - 30 Townsend Tr. Lot 9, Cielo Vista Subdivision, has well, electric, great view of city, $55K. Call Jim 910-7969.

520. Lots for Sale

PREMIUM 5 Acre tracts, Owner will finance with 10% down, New Construction only (no mobile homes), , Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd. between Country Club & Berrendo Rd. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-4337

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1 OR 2bd, furnishedunfurnished, all bills pd, no pets, no smoking, no HUD 623-6281 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. Town Plaza Apartments Utilities paid - Gas and Water. New Owners, friendly new managers. New Remodeled EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs/downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Seniors 55yrs plus, law enforcement & military will receive discount. No HUD. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 2nd year, 1 free month rent PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHAN TED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. EFFICIENCY 1 br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. EFFICIENCY 2 BR, downtown, clean, water paid. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD Call 623-8377 1&2Bd, wtr pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331 COMFORTABLE, SPACIOUS, clean, newly painted, 2br 1ba apt., $600, water, gas paid, 1114 S. Kentucky, 910-0851. 2 BR, 1 bath, stove & refrigerator. Call 910-8170. 7 1/2 Fieldcrest 1br, dbl car garage, patio & bistro set included. Will negotiate fee. Close to school & park. 317-3236 LARGE 1 bedroom apartment. References and background check required. Washer and Dryer hookups. Private parking. 420-0100 VERY SMALL 1 bedroom w/large fenced in yard. $325 mo., $200 dep. 6259208 All Bills Paid 1 br $500 2 br $600, 3 br $700 mo., ref air, new carpet, new paint/tile. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

CLEAN, REMODELED, 2br homes North of 2nd St. Treeshaded yards, some fenced, beautifully furnished, $750-$900 mo. Call Brenda 626-6286. FLETC READY or traveling nurse. Excellent schools & North Roswell location. Lg. beautifully furnished 3 bd, 2 ba, 2 car garage w/ opener. LR Dining, Den w/ gas fire; many new amenities including Lg HD TV, washer/dryer, BBQ, furnished covered patio & fenced yard. All utilities paid, premium cable, HS wireless Internet, garden. No Pets or smokers. 575420-6703 or 661-343-6002

FLETC Homes for rent. Long & short term rentals. 5 minutes from FLETC. Brand new & beautiful! Visit our website: www.lgrentalhomes.com or Call 420-0519 or 910-7670 FLETC RENTALS Available. Refrigerated air, pool table, wireless internet, grill, pets ok. Call 575-317-3159 or 575626-5742. NEED A furnished home at a reasonable rental rate? Drive by 2604 Gaye Dr. Approx. 3,000 sqft, unique home. Call Sherlea Taylor, 575-420-1978 or 575-6242219 for details. NOW AVAILABLE 2/2/1 CAR GARAGE. Fullyfurnished, all electric, newer duplex with all amenities. Xeriscape landscaping, fenced backyard, quiet, near shopping + schools. For showing call Eliot. 575-5780617

CLASSIFIEDS

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

Executive 3br 2ba 2800 ft. dual AC, fenced, $1400m $1400dep. 627-9942 TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 3 BR 1.5 bath no Hud/pets $875 mo. $600 dep. avail. 6/1/11. 420-5930. 3BR/2BA, FR, LR, DR, Fireplace, 2 car gar, Lg yard, no pets or HUD, $975mo, $600dep, 2200 Palomar Dr. 910-7969. 1415 W. Tilden, 2br, stove, ref., $500 mo, plus dep, no pets or HUD, must have references. You pay bills. Call 625-0512. 2&3 Bd, 1&2 Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331 2 NEW townhouses for rent: 1st & last mo. $800/$900, 2100 & 2102 Clover Lane. For Sale or Rent: 706 Adams, 3/2/1. Will sell on contract. 6227010 2501, 03, 05 S. Lea, 3br 2ba, new construction, no smokers/pets, $1000 plus $500 dep. 575-317-4050 3BR, 1BA, $250 dep., $600 mo., no utilities paid. 575578-0971 3br 1ba. ref air, fenced yard 1 car 91 Lighthall RIAC $650m.$650 dep 627-9942 3 BR, 2 ba, carport, fenced yard, close to schools, stove, frig, ref air, newly painted, $900/mo, $450/dep. 1604 S. Washington. 622-3250 LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com! PRIVATE, QUIET, small 2br house, suitable for couple, single. Adjacent workshop available, E. Charleston, near Mt. View School. $450 mo. 575520-0305 3BEDROOM / 2BATH 1730 N. Delaware Ave, $600/mo $600/dep. Call 575-420-6396. 2BR 1 bath $450 mo. $150 dep. No Hud. 420-5604 FOR RENT or sale: Remodeled 3 br, 1 bath, large fenced back yard. Carport. $700 mo. 1st and last month deposit. 6259004 3BR, 2BA, $800 per mo, $800 dep, no HUD. 1514 W. Albuquerque. 420-0744

580. Office or Business Places FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 4202546. STOREFRONT 2500 sqft 3106 N. Main $1200 mo. $1200 dep. 627-9942

STOREFRONT 500 sqft utilities pd. 2102 S. Main $550m $550dep. 627-9942

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

NEED FURNITURE? Shop Blair’s Trading Post for the best prices in town for your household items. We buy & sell furniture, appliances, home decor, collectibles, electronics, saddles, jewelry, tools, fishing & camping items, movies plus everything else from A-Z. Including many hard to find items. Serving Roswell for 40 years. Open daily 9-5. Accept Visa & MC. 5611 Hummingbird Ln. 627-2033 Power wheelchair, hospital bed, commode chair, lift chair. 622-7638

PAINTING FOR sale Tedrows $100 each, Tedrow Vintage print framed, rare $200. 5788558 Smith & Wesson .38 spl. hammerless $275 Sony touchscreen Dvd camcorder $200 John 3176599 REPAIRING AND buying riding lawn mowers. 9108166 30” SONY TV w/stand, Rudolph Wurlitzer piano (excellent cond.), Bakers Rack w/wicker baskets. 624-0962

2 Well functioning window a/c units $100 ea. Pair of matching oak bar stools in good cond.. $35 ea. lve. mesg. 623-0302/626-0030 HUGE VINYL record collection w/phonoplayer. Over 200 records, make offer. 623-2538 KENMORE WASHER & dryer matched set $200. Nice electric dryers $60 to $90 626-7470

EXCELLENT AREA 3/2/2 fireplace, appliances, 866 Swinging Spear $975+ bills $500 dep. 575-623-7377 or 575-626-3932

LARGE OUTSIDE pond & pump rock fountain, 2 huge aloe vera plants, elec. dryer 623-1507

555. Mobile Homes for Rent 2BR, 1BA mobile home, $500mo/$400dep. Call 6233105.

558. Roommates Wanted

Near FLETC, 1br avail, references & background check. 575-650-3071

560. Sleeping Rooms

SINGLE PERSON sleeping rooms private entry & deck. 3/4 ba. All bills pd. Inquire 105 N. Missouri

569. Mobile Home Spaces/Lots

EASY LIVING community - 1337 McCall Loop, Roswell. Long term RV’s welcome. 624-2436

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places

OFFICE SPACE for Rent. Prime downtown area, 2,061 sq.ft. Please call 622-8711. 3000 sqft office space available,14 private offices 2 restrooms, 1 conference room, break room former doctors office. 2110 S. Main, $2500 mo. 626-7488 or 420-1352

Alfalfa Hay- sm. bales, oat hay & sudan all grades $6.00-$9.00 per bale. Big bales $110-$195 ea. Firewood. 8:00-5:30 MonSat.1:00-5:00 Sun. Graves Farm & Garden 622-1889 Credit Cards Accepted

720. Livestock & Supplies

MINIATURE HORSES for sale. 575-420-7714 leave message

745. Pets for Sale

Small Upright dresser $75, office desk w/hutch locks white $150, cabinet insert for oven cherry $100. 623-5880 NICE & clean- 8’ Sealy sofa, 1930s Duncan Phyfe sofa, chair/ottoman. 575-937-8658

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

PAY CASH all day long for household items. Top prices paid for furniture, antiques, appliances, collectibles, tools, saddles, plus everything else from A to Z, including personal estates. 627-2033 or 623-6608 INSTANT CASH for unwanted & broken gold & silver jewelry. 578-0805. WE BUY Scrap batteries $4.00 back, 311 S. Virginia. 622-4160

WANTED TO buy Grandpa’s tackle box, pre 1950s, lures, reels, rods, photographs. Highest retail cash paid by collector. 575354-0365

632. Art For Sale

HENRIETTE WYETH 16x14 c1949 oil appraised @ 40K dunlaplawoffice @cableone.net

700. Building Materials

STEEL BUILDINGS Huge Savings/Factory Deals 38x50 Reg. $25,300 Now $17,800, 50x96 Reg. $53,800 Now $39,800 www.utilityking.com Source#1CC 866-609-4321

745. Pets for Sale

T-CUP MALTI-POO, male, 3 mos old, shots done, tons of coat, baby doll face, litter box trained, $500. 575257-0808 FREE TO good home only going to be large mixed breed smart female puppy 623-1507

RECREATIONAL

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

REG. MINIATURE Pinscher’s, only 2F left, ready now. Call 317-4189.

FOR SALE: Beautiful Pomeranian puppies. 575420-2164

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

BMW, 1997, 73k miles, great shape, $9500. Call 575-3175925.

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. Your dealer of choice. Sales, parts, service, consignments, purchases, propane, dump station. 2900 West Second. 6221751, 1-800-929 0046 1989 CRUISEMASTER Motorhome, 30’, dual air, engine & generator rebuilt, $7500. 575-317-3159

790. Autos for Sale

2007 MAZDA Miata Touring low miles beautiful condition. 840-7627

2002 VTX 1800R 12k miles. Must See. 575-623-3374

4 FEMALE Pugs w/no shots ready to go. 575420-5697

TRANSPORTATION

2004 BMW Z4 Roadster 3.0 Mileage 32,575 black asking $17,450, will accept $9k in cash and trade of another vehicle for difference. Absolutely beautiful vehicle. For more info call 637-9641 after 5:00 PM.

14.5 BAYLINER Bass trophy boat with trailer $1900. 505-301-0824 from 8am-7pm

PUPPY LOVE Grooming Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also - 575-420-6655

2005 KEYSTONE lite wt trailer, 18ft, nice, fully self contained, $7500. 6236105

2003 FORD Mustang GT, 5 spd, leather, 50k miles, $9500. 575-317-3159

770. Boats and Accessories

WANT Pekingese male to breed w/my female Pekingese, 626-6211.

CHIHUAHUAS FOR sale, 3M, 2F, $100 each. Ask me about them. 840-9037

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

YORKIE PUPPIES great Mother’s Day gift AKC 1 male small, fully weaned, shots current, 14 wks old 622-8888 leave message.

FREE CATS! Older cats, some spayed, neutered, shy now but will be friendly, all need good homes. 626-4708.

REACH OVER 500,000 READERS in more than 30 newspapers across the state for one low price. Contact your local newspaper’s classified department or visit nmpress.org for details.

REFRIGERATOR, LARGE 3 door, see working, large wheelchair. 622-7638

Small home 1 person. $250, $200dep. wtr pd. 107 S. Lea in back 317-4307

715. Hay and Feed Sale

Riding mower $550, 42” cut 22 HP, top cond., call M-Th 8am-4pm 624-1331

3BR, 1 3/4ba, ref air/central heat, $675mo, $500dep. 1613 S. Penn. 420-5111.

300 W. 9th 2 br, 2 ba, laundry room 910-4225

Roswell Daily Record

1983 Jeep J-10 p/u, 4 whl drive, 360 engine excellent cond. $3000 Call 626-7506 2006 FORD F250, excellent cond., ext. cab, $10,500, 626-7488.

796. SUVS

1999 GREEN Ford Expedition 142k miles XLT 4WD $4999. 575-910-1988

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

005 010 015 020 025

Announcements Special Notice Card of Thanks Personals/Special Transportation Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted 045 050 055 060

Employment

Employment Opportunities Salesperson/Agents Employment Agencies Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 441 445 450

Window Repair Window Cleaning Wrought Iron Services Wanted

455 456 460 465

Money: Loan/Borrow Credit Cards Insurance Co. Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale Investment: Stocks/Sale Mortgages for Sale Mortgages Wanted Business Opportunities

470 475 480 485

Financial

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


Roswell Daily Record

CLASSIFIEDS

Friday, May 6, 2011

C5


C6 Friday, May 6, 2011

CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record

05-06-2011  

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