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Roswell woman shot, killed THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

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STUDENTS LAUNCH EXPERIMENTS

May 21, 2011

Officers process the scene at 2800 W. Fourth St. after the shooting of Victoria Velasquez-Arrias, around 1 p.m. Friday.

The granddaughter of Roswell City Councilor Elena Velasquez was shot and killed, Friday. The Roswell Police Department received a 911 call at 12:45 p.m. about a shooting that took place at an apartment complex, located at 2800 W. Fourth St. Officers secured the area. Emergency Medical Service personnel confirmed the woman to be deceased at the scene.

The case has been ruled a homicide. The victim was later identified as Victoria Velasquez-Arrias, 22. Police sources confirmed that Victoria VelasquezArrias was the granddaughter of Ward V City Councilor Elena Velasquez and current member of the council’s Police Committee. A person of interest was detained by officers as he attempted to flee the scene. Detectives are interviewing

UPHAM (AP) — In the remote desert of southern New Mexico, hundreds of students from across the state, Arizona and Texas gathered at dawn Friday to watch as a rocket whisked a year’s worth of their work into space. The SL-5 rocket lifted off following a bright flash ... - PAGE A6

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high school.” Co-valedictorians William Liakos and Sawyer Wilson, who have remained close friends since second grade, each congratulated their classSee RHS, Page A3

See RPD, Page A3

For The Past 24 Hours

• University High School graduates 74 • Three teens arrested on ‘joy ride’ • County OKs nearly $1 mil emergency purchase for fire trucks • Hatfield builds foster home • Bear season?

SPORTS

Mark Wilson Photo

Bolaños on RHS ’11: A great class Roswell High seniors give and receive their final high school hugs before marching onto the Wool Bowl football field Friday evening for commencement ceremonies.

EMILY RUSSO MILLER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Two valedictorians, 11 sets of twins, 38 honor grads and 259 graduates happily threw their caps up in the air Friday evening after receiving

‘MACHO MAN’ DEAD AT 58

Randy “Macho Man” Savage, the professional wrestler known for his raspy voice, the sunglasses and bandanas he wore in the ring and the young woman named Miss Elizabeth who often accompanied him, died in a car crash Friday in Florida. He was 58. A Florida Highway Patrol crash report said the former wrestler — whose legal name was Randy Mario Poffo — was driving a Jeep Wrangler when he lost control in Pinellas County around 9:25 a.m. The Jeep veered over the raised concrete median - PAGE B1

TODAY’S OBITUARIES • Fred C. Gonzales • Raul Anchondo - PAGE A6

HIGH ...92˚ LOW .....57

TODAY’S FORECAST

their high school diplomas and graduating from Roswell High School. With red and white balloons flying high at the Wool Bowl, the Fighting Coyotes proudly chanted the RHS Alma Mater for the last time.

“Who’s going to deny that we have spirit, that we have passion?” Sara Humaran asked her classmates in her salutatorian address. “I want you guys to have that same spirit and that same passion in everything you do past

RPD seeks info on shooting

At 9:49 p.m., Thursday, officers from the Roswell Police Department were called to Roswell Regional Hospital in reference to a gunshot victim. Raul Anchondo, 43, was pronounced dead by Emergency Department physicians a short time later. Officers determined that the crime scene was the victim’s residence at 109 S. Montana Ave. Officers have yet to determine the time of the actual shooting. “We can assume it was a little before that,” said Holley. Officials from the Technical Services Unit and the Criminal Investigation Division spent the night and most of the day processing the scene of the shooting. According to Public Information Officer Travis Holley, several potential witnesses were interviewed by police, but no motive has been established or sus-

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him, but no charges had been filed as of 5 p.m., Friday. RPD spokesman Officer Travis Holley said, “It is the second shooting in less than 24 hours. We are stretched. Our detectives have been up all night and will spend another night without sleep.” Holley said that officials do not have any information that might link the shootings of Raul Anchondo, Thursday night, and Velasquez-Arrias.

Herrera pre-trials Face to face, Netanyahu to begin July 18 rejects Obama on borders JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

The prosecution filed a motion Friday for a continuance in the trial of Israel Herrera, who is charged with first-degree murder in the Nov. 22 death of Stephen Foster. The 25-year-old was shot in the head while driving a friend's van near the intersection of West Walnut Street and South Ohio Avenue. Herrera, 22, was arrested and charged with murder after he was caught running from the scene.

Assistant District Attorney Debra Hutchins told the court that the state is waiting for ballistics and DNA reports. She expects DNA results in mid-July and the ballistics report sometime in August. Judge Charles C. Currier inquired what DNA samples were being processed. Hutchins replied they awaited DNA matches on the two guns found at the scene. “One was located in the garbage and another under the property. The ballistics See HERRERA, Page A3

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a blunt display of differences, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu rejected the idea of using his country’s 1967 boundaries as the basis for a neighboring Palestinian state on Friday, declaring his objections face-to-face to President Barack Obama who had raised the idea just 24 hours earlier in an effort to revive stalled Mideast peace talks. Though the two leadSee FACE, Page A3

AP Photo

President Barack Obama meets with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, in the Oval Office, Friday.

Freddie Romero’s New Mexico roots go back to Oñate JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

CLASSIFIEDS..........B6 COMICS.................B3 FINANCIAL .............A7 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........A8 LOTTERIES ............A2 NATION .................A6 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8

INDEX

Judge Freddie J. Romero

Freddie J. Romero, 5th District Court judge, is not only one of the pillars of the judicial system in Roswell, his family for med the foundations of New Mexico. The Romero family line is one of the oldest in New Mexico. The Romeros arrived in 1589 with the Oñate Expedition. Romero’s forefather Bartolome Romero left Spain for the New World in 1563. He was married to Luisa Gomez Robledo. They joined Don Juan de Oñate y Salazar after he was ordered by King Philip II to colonize the northern frontier of New Spain in 1595. The expedition began in 1598. They crossed the Rio Grande (Río

del Norte) at the present-day Ciudad Juárez–El Paso in late April. On April 30, 1598, Oñate claimed

1598, near a bluff that still bears the name Robledo. The family continued north with

all of New Mexico beyond the river for Spain. Luisa’s father Pedro Robledo had requested a license to travel to New Spain in 1574, because he was struggling to survive in Spain. Pedro ended his days in New Mexico. He died near Las Cruces, the first Spanish colonist to die in New México. He was buried on May 21,

the colony and were among the founders of San Gabriel de los Caballeros. They stayed in New Mexico, leaving only once from 1680 to 1692 during the Pueblo Revolt. According to family legend, Bartolome’s wife Luisa fought the IndiSee SPOTLIGHT, Page A3


A2 Saturday, May 21, 2011

GENERAL

Jerge plans to win Miss NM Files: Al-Qaida eyed oil pageant with honest rhetoric tankers as bombing targets JONATHAN ENTZMINGER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Deanna Jerge, 17, will be one of the youngest contestants vying for a shot at becoming Miss America, June 19, at the Miss New Mexico pageant. Jerge, of Roswell, has prepared along with Miss Chaves County, T racy Young, by making public appearances at various venues. From Invaders baseball games, to Arbor Day, Jerge can be spotted all around town refining Courtesy Photo her presence in the comMiss Roswell 2011, Deanna Jerge munity. “Arbor Day was aweout. When you’re working It’s pushing yourself to be some because I met so out, you die for that stuff, a better person ... and try many people, that was but you have to say ‘I’ll to be a face for what one of my favorite have fruit instead.’ It’s all they’re trying to camevents,” she said. about wise choices.” paign.” Jerge is grateful for her However, she believes Still, there’s another Miss Roswell experience that her new ways are piece that Jerge will have and the outpouring of important, especially in to tackle: pageant moms support from the commu- concern to raising aware- and their contestant nity and pageant coordi- ness about obesity, which daughters. Jerge and nator, Renee Roach. she says is her second Young got aquainted with “I’ve been to a million platfor m, behind recy- a few last month during a events. People have cling. function for contestants. helped me with my talk“Whenever you apply “We went to the working, the way I present for Miss America ... they shop at the beginning of myself. Renee Roach has ask you to list another April, and I think I met been a driving force platform that you’re inter- every type of girl possibehind me,” she said. ested in. I thought: obesi- ble,” she said. “I met the Jerge, who clearly dis- ty in children. That has party girls, the fun girls, plays confidence and been really important to the mean girls, the girls poise with her speech, me.” that have done the pagalso credits local radio In addition to her eant for four years. We disc jockeys, for helping preparation for the com- met every type possible.” her refine her rhetoric. petition, Jerge has adoptThe pageant mom is “I’m good at talking. My ed a never give up men- well documented and stofavorite part of the com- tality when approaching ries have been captured petition is the interview. her hardest tasks, like on reality television It’s not all about your working out during early shows with similar judgbody and how you look morning hours. ing formulas, like Amerion the outside. It’s about “Health and wellness is ca’s Next Top Model. your inner beauty — your very important to me,” Jerge said that her true beauty, which is on she said. “What really experience as a dancer on the inside.” pushes me is my trainer the Goddard High School She believes that her Lucas. He makes me go dance team will help her voice will help her win work out at 6:30 in the navigate the potentially over judges next month in mor ning. Whenever I aloof and drama-filled Ruidoso. work out it makes me feel competitive field. She “In order to have a suc- better about myself. I’m does not plan on letting cessful interview, you trying to send this mes- anyone push her buttons. need to make a connec- sage to children that they “Being on the dance tion with each of the should also do that.” team is the same exact judges. That’s what I Jerge credits the Miss thing. You learn to have enjoy doing: establishing Roswell pageant for giving dif ferent bonds with a bond between me and her a newfound confi- them. That’s what I’m that person. That’s my dence in her body and taking into the pageant favorite, just because you feeling comfortable in for- I’m going to have patience don’t have to go out in a mal evening wear. with these people and swimsuit or an evening “I’d rather be in my have a good time,” she gown.” sweats and my long, said. The Miss America pag- baggy T -shirt than be in Jerge will compete eant will be judged heels,” she said. “Before alongside 21 women, ages through three main cate- the pageant I wasn’t real- 17 to 24, at the Miss New gories, including health ly confident with my Mexico competition next and fitness, talent and body. It’s hard walking month. She will draw interview. While Jerge around the stage. After from the inspiration of said that she has pre- doing the pageant, it gave friends, family and compared for each category, me a better understand- munity support to get her she has placed more ing of myself. The Miss through the rigor and emphasis on health and Roswell pageant gave me “elegance” of the pageant. a ton of new confidence.” The future University of fitness. Another facet of the New Mexico student also Jerge is not shy about discussing her own bat- Miss America pageant cir- has some advice for tles with junk food, and cuit is representing your- Roswell girls interested in talked about her new eat- self and your city at the the competition. competition, being organing habits. “Patience, discipline, “Eating is really hard ized and executing your dedication and perseverfor me. (I like) junk-food, pitch. ance. That’s all the ingre“You push yourself. In dients you need,” she chips, ice cream, cheeseburgers. During this pag- my opinion, that’s what said. eant I’ve had to cut that Miss America is all about. j.entzminger@roswell-record.com

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Roswell Daily Record

WASHINGTON (AP) — Osama bin Laden’s personal files revealed a brazen idea to hijack oil tankers and blow them up at sea last summer, creating explosions he hoped would rattle the world’s economy and send oil prices skyrocketing, the U.S. said Friday. The newly disclosed plot showed that while bin Laden was always scheming for the next big strike that would kill thousands of Americans, he also believed a relatively simpler attack on the oil industry could create a worldwide panic that would hurt Westerners every time they gassed up their cars. U.S. of ficials said the tanker idea, included in documents found in the compound where bin Laden was killed nearly three weeks ago, was little more than an al-Qaida fantasy. But the FBI and the Homeland Security Department issued a confidential warning to police and the energy industry Thursday. The alert, obtained by The Associated Press, said that al-Qaida had sought information on the size and construction of oil tankers, had decided that spring and summer provided the best weather to approach the ships, had determined that blowing them up would be easiest from the inside and believed an explosion would create an “extreme economic crisis.” Bin Laden’s documents also revealed that in February 2010, the terror group identified New York, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles and Chicago as important cities that should be attacked; and it eyed specific dates, including the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, Christmas, July Fourth and the State of the Union address, according to a similar alert issued Friday, obtained by the AP. There is no information indicating that there are plots involving these cities, dates and tactics under way. “We are not aware of indications of any specific or imminent terrorist attack plotting against the oil and natural gas sector overseas or in the United States,” Homeland Security spokesman Matthew Chan-

dler said in a statement Friday. “However, in 2010 there was continuing interest by members of al-Qaida in targeting oil tankers and commercial oil infrastructure at sea.” With about half the world’s oil supply moving on the water, industry and security experts have warned for years that such an attack would be a jolt to global markets. That’s particularly true if terrorists carried it out in one of the narrow waterways that serve as shipping chokepoints. “You start blowing up oil tankers at sea and you’re going to start closing down shipping lanes,” said Don Borelli, senior vice president of the Sufan Group security firm and a former FBI counterterrorism agent in New York. “It’s going to cause this huge ripple through the economy.” Still, even if al-Qaida were able to blow up one of the supertankers that move oil around the globe, it would barely dent the world’s oil supply, said Jim Ritterbusch, president of Ritterbusch and Associates, who has been trading oil contracts since the futures market opened on the Nymex in 1983. A tanker holds about 2 million barrels, or enough to supply world demand for about a half hour. The terrorist threat to oil infrastructure is nothing new. Members of a British terror cell that hoped to hijack trans-Atlantic airplanes in 2006 had also made plans to attack oil and gas targets in Britain. And al-Qaida’s franchise in Yemen has attacked pipelines. Thurdsay’s alert was significant mostly because it linked the scheme directly to bin Laden, meaning the idea probably has circulated among al-Qaida’s most senior leaders. The government encouraged companies to continue random screening, to warn employees about possible threats and to establish procedures for reporting suspicious activity. But there was no immediate effect on oil markets, and both shippers and security officials said it was business as usual on the water. “This has been a possibil-

ity on everyone’s minds for some time now,” said Bill Box a spokesman for the International Association of Independent Tanker Owners. “Everyone is aware of what might happen.” Shippers have been on particular alert as threats of piracy have increased along the African coast. In 2008, Somali pirates captured the Sirius Star supertanker and held it for ransom. In 2007 the Japanese tanker the Golden Nori was hijacked carrying 40,000 tons of the highly explosive chemical benzene. Intelligence officials initially worried that terrorists might try to crash the boat into an offshore oil platform or use it as a gigantic bomb, but it proved to be another attack by pirates seeking ransom. Then in 2010, two groups of pirates got into a shootout while arguing over the ransom for the Maran Centaurus, threatening to turn the ship into a massive fireball. Pirates have had success with a relatively low-tech strategy. They fire at a ship to get it to slow down, then pull alongside in skif fs. Using lashed-together ladders or grappling hooks, the pirates climb on board with guns. Many ship owners are reluctant to have ar med guards onboard, since the cargo is so flammable that sailors are even forbidden to smoke. Somali pirates take the ships for money. The information taken from bin Laden’s compound after he was killed May 2 suggests al-Qaida was interested in adapting that strategy to terrorize. The U.S. has warned for years that such an attack in a narrow waterway, such as the Strait of Hor muz between Oman and Iran, would immediately send oil prices higher. In Asia, concerns have centered on the continent’s key oil chokepoint, the Strait of Malacca, located between Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. Last year, an Indonesian al-Qaida affiliate set up a training camp at the beginning of the strait, leading to speculation about an attack there and prompting Singapore to issue a warning.

Battery on ball field after game Police received a walk-in report of a battery, Friday, at Noon Optimist baseball field, 1600 N. Montana Ave. The incident occurred after a Little League game. One team chose to stay and continue to play. A member of the opposing team asked if he could join the game. He was grabbed by the shirt and slapped by a member of the other team.

Criminal damage

•Police were called to the Walmart parking lot, 4500 N. Main St., Thursday. The victim wanted to report damages as the result of an

THE SENIOR CORNER Everything you always wanted to know about

RETIREMENT LIVING

Email Fredda at: askfredda@yahoo.com your source of retirement living answers.

Linda Asks: If as you said the pricing should not be much less than other retirement facilities; since the expenses are about the same how can another facility be offering such low prices? Wouldn’t the losses to incur cause them to go bankrupt?

Dear Linda Low prices and move in specials are often a marketing ploy. The idea is to offer you the lower price to entice you to lease, then the price goes up. Often the price goes up rapidly, and the increases in rent often exceed those costs of other facilities to make up the difference. By doing this kind of marketing facilities manage to draw attention to themselves and fill their facility, but then it locks the individuals into contracts that often become to pricy for them to afford and causes another move. This is how the other facilities keep from going bankrupt by offering the same services at a rate that does not need to increase by large amounts to make up for the lower price offered.

Here are some tips. When looking at a facility that is offering low prices, ask to see the contract, and ask specifically when the rent will go up, and what will be the final cost of the rent after the increase has occurred and how often will it increase from that point. Ask how they are managing to keep the doors open if they are charging so much below what other facilities cost, and at what point will the pricing change to meet the needs of the facility. Ask if the price you are initially quoted can be locked in by a contract for a number of years. These things will help weed out the facilities that are truly quoting you the going rate, and the ones that are marketing for your business that will end up costing you in the long run. Remember in most cases you get what you paid for and more than likely it will have many problems you were not told about.

Retirement facilities are supposed to be giving you peace of mind during your golden years, not creating you stress by increasing the costs. If this is going to be the case it may be better for you to choose a facility that costs a little more initially to keep the same price as a constant, rather than to try one that is cheaper that will lead to an increasing debt that you may have to struggle to pay. Normally price increases are yearly and vary from 3% to 5%. Remember prices are up all over, cost of food, cost of transportation and utilities; Even labor costs are higher all these factors increase cost and leaves little to no room for price slashing.

Fredda

accident. When of ficers arrived on the scene, they noted that damage to the driver’s door could not have been caused by a vehicle hitting the car, but by some sort of blunt object. Officials concluded that this was a deliberate act. •Police were dispatched to Wells Fargo Bank, 1401 S. Main St., Thursday, after a woman returned to her vehicle to find the door ajar Roswell Daily Record

and the interior door handle damaged. •Police were dispatched to the 900 block of North Greenwood Avenue, Thursday, where subjects shot out the windows of a truck with a BB gun.

Anyone having information on these or any other crimes should contact Crime Stoppers, 888594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward. USPS No 471-200

News & Business Telephone 622-7710 Circulation Telephone 622-7730

Charles Fischer Publisher

cfischer@roswell-record.com

Andrew Poertner Editor

editor@roswell-record.com

R. Cory Beck Publisher (1987-2006)

Kim Gordon ........................................................Advertising Director kim.gordon@roswell-record.com Jim Dishman .....................................................Circulation Director jdishman@roswell-record.com Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice The entire contents of the Roswell Daily Record, including its flag on Page 1, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the Daily Record.

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GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

RHS

Continued from Page A1

mates and thanked their families and teachers for supporting them in their jour ney through high school. “I’m honored to be here speaking to this truly amazing class of students, as well as the people who took away our cell phones for four years — our

Face

Continued from Page A1

ers, meeting in the Oval Office, found cordial and predictable agreement on the other central element that Obama outlined in his Mideast address Thursday — ironclad Israeli security alongside a Palestinian nation — progress on the bedrock issue of borders seemed as elusive as ever. In his speech, Obama gave unprecedented prominence to a long-held U.S. stand that Israel opposes: A Palestinian state should be shaped around the border lines that existed before the 1967 war in which Israel took control of the West Bank, Gaza and East Jerusalem. An essential part of what Obama proposed was that Israelis and Palestinians would also have to agree to swaps of land to account for Israeli settlements and other current conditions, a point

Herrera

Continued from Page A1

tests are on a projectile recovered that passed through Foster,” Hutchins said. In a previous hearing, Detective Albert Aldana described a casing found in the front yard of the house, a firear m and a magazine located in the garbage can of a nearby home and a rifle that had

Spotlight Continued from Page A1

ans to get her family out during the rebellion. Another name that runs through the Romero family line is Fresquez, Flemish miners who came to New Mexico in the early 1600s. Romero’s great-grandfather was George Kimbrell. Originally from Arkansas, he went to Colorado with the Pike’s Peak gang as part of the gold rush of July 1858. He also worked for the Pony Express and was a scout for Kit Carson. Romero explained that Kimbrell came to Lincoln County in 1863 and landed in the middle of the Lincoln County War. “He was sheriff of Lincoln County after the death of Brady, after Peppin and after Copeland.

RPD

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pects identified. The RPD is seeking infor mation from the public about this case.

teachers and administrators,” Liakos said, prompting laughter from the stands packed with family and friends. Wilson told the crowd it was hard to imagine this moment was finally here, especially amid changes both in and outside of the school. “At Roswell High, we’ve had three different principals, seen fences put up around the school and had Netanyahu failed to mention. “While Israel is prepared to make generous compromises for peace, it cannot go back to the 1967 lines,” Netanyahu declared. “These lines are indefensible.” As they sat together for public comments after their private meeting, Obama sought to put the disagreement in the best light, and in the context of a relationship of two allies — one, however, showing strains of impatience. “...there are some differences between us in the precise formulations and language,” Obama said. “That’s going to happen between friends.” He quickly added in a reassurance to Netanyahu. “What we are in complete accord about is that a true peace can only occur if the ultimate resolution allows Israel to defend itself against threats, and that Israel’s security will remain paramount in U.S. evaluabeen taken apart and placed in the crawl space under the home. Currier granted the motion for continuance. He referred to the pending evidence as critical to the case. Defense attorney Jesse Cosby objected to the delay, especially since he would need time to review the evidence presented to him in disclosure: “I recognize all the difficulties the lab is having, the financial ... Billy the Kid turned himself in to him (Kimbrell).” Kimbrell’s wife came from Manzano. Her family petitioned the territorial government to move into this area after a period of prolonged drought. As sheriff, Kimbrell often judged small claims, assaults and batteries and horse thefts. Judge Romero maintains the historical records of his judgements. Kimbrell eventually became a probate judge. “My great-grandfather (Kimbrell) was very important to the family. In the Lincoln County wars, he was fairly neutral,” said Romero. Kimbrell’s obituary said, “He practiced rigid honesty and he certainly did not like to break his word when once given.” Another of Romero’s foreThey urge anyone with information about this case to contact the Roswell Police Department’s Criminal Investigations Division or Crime Stoppers at 1-888-594TIPS (8477).

S u p p o r t t h e U n i t e d Wa y

to say our goodbyes to some of our most beloved teachers,” he said. “In the outside world, we have a new president, the man responsible for 9/11 is now dead and Brett Favre has finally retired for good ... maybe.” RHS Principal Ruben Bolaños said he was proud of the Class of 2011 for its huge accomplishment, and that the graduates will be remembered for

their extraordinary displays of community service, among other positive achievements. “I’m very proud,” he said. “It’s a great class.” Roswell Independent School District Superintendent Michael Gottlieb said he was honored to participate in the ceremony by presenting the 2011 graduating class before the presentation of diplomas.

tion of any prospective deal.” Obama and Netanyahu showed cordiality before the cameras. The president listened intently, his hand cupping his chin, as Netanyahu spoke passionately about his country’s plight and how the path to peace should run. “Remember that, before 1967, Israel was all of nine miles wide,” Netanyahu said, emphasizing his words with his hands. “It was half the width of the Washington Beltway. And these were not the boundaries of peace; they were the boundaries of repeated wars, because the attack on Israel was so attractive.” Obama, frustrated by Mideast peace talks that have collapsed, is seeking to get both sides to contend with the issues of borders and security. Even progress on those enormous fronts would still leave unsettled the fate of Jerusalem and of Palestinian refugees.

Netanyahu underscored just how difficult that last issue is alone, declaring that Palestinians will not be allowed to settle in Israel as part of any peace plan. “It’s not going to happen. Everybody knows it’s not going to happen,” he said. “And I think it’s time to tell the Palestinians forthrightly it’s not going to happen.” Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat said Netanyahu’s comments with Obama were tantamount to “his total rejection of the Obama vision and speech.” “Without Mr. Netanyahu committing to two states on the 1967 lines, with mutually agreed swaps, he is not a partner to the peace process,” Erekat said. “I think, when President Obama gave him a choice between dictation and negotiations, he chose dictation.” On the border matter, the Obama administration up until now has tried to summarize the positions of

difficulties and the difficulties with personnel.” He asked the court to consider a motion for release or reduction of bond. Currier pointed out that the defendant was only arraigned in District Court in January. “The case had not been pending that long,” he said. “It is a serious charge, with a charge of first-degree murder, and it is a case with considerable

complexity. The state is not dilatory in the accumulating and processing of evidence.” Currier then went on to question Cosby about his previous association with the victim. “Didn’t you represent Foster in a criminal case?” he asked. Cosby said that he could not remember if he represented Foster or Foster’s mother. Currier then asked

bears was Martin Chaves who herded sheep in the Picacho area. He was instrumental in the construction of the town. “He built the first two-story building and the old Picacho Church.” The church is still open with services held a few times a year. Judge Romero continues to contribute to the town and the old church. “Several of us went up to help to replace the floor.” Romero’s family tree also includes diarist August Cline. Cline arrived in Fort Sumner in 1870 during the reservation period after the Long Walk of the Navajo, the forced march from Arizona to eastern New Mexico that occurred in 1864. The judge has one of Cline’s diaries. “It begins in 1874 and recorded events to the end of his life,”

Romero said.“He recorded the year’s first rain, the first snow and when the swallows arrived.” To consolidate years of history in daily remarks within a single book, many comments are brief. Some are a single sentence and reflect the beauty and the simplicity of life in the 19th century. One entry simply states, “The mockingbirds commenced to sing.” Other comments contain jewels. “Mrs. Kimbrell, Mrs. Brockman, Mrs. J. Pablo Romero and Mrs. Samora drunk up two bottles of the best.” It does not indicate what beverage the ladies consumed. Cline is notable for other reasons. He rescued two children from the Apache. “Eugenia Gonzales and an infant brother were kidnapped by the Apache.

Saturday, May 21, 2011

arship, to name a few. “Those are elite scholarships that are not just given to anybody,” Bolaños said proudly. The 2011 Class Motto was “Oh, the places you’ll go,” by Dr. Suess; the Class Flower was the Latin Lady; the Class Colors were escarlata and pearl white; and the Class Song was “How Far We’ve Come,” by Matchbox 20.

“It’s always my greatest honor to make this presentation,” he said with a smile. He noted that several graduates won prestigious scholarships to help pay for college in the fall. One student won a three-year ride to the business school at the University of New Mexico, another earned a Daniels Fund Scholarship and one was the recipient of the Horatio Alger Schol-

emiller@roswell-record.com

each party but had not taken a position itself. Obama’s direct reference to the 1967 borders and land swaps in his speech incensed Israel, adding tension to the atmosphere of Netanyahu’s visit. As Obama pushes for a return to negotiations that he championed prominently last year, that prospect seems bleak. Netanyahu said his nation could not negotiate with a Palestinian unity government that includes the radical Hamas movement, which refuses to recognize Israel’s right to exist. He said that Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas had to choose between continuing the deal with Hamas and making peace with Israel. Hamas spokesman Sami Abu Zuhri said Netanyahu’s rejection of a retur n to 1967 lines was “clear evidence that the negotiations option was a waste of time.”

The comments from Netanyahu and Obama, after a longer-than-scheduled meeting that lasted over an hour -and-a-half, shed little light on how the peace process will advance. The two leaders did not take questions from the press, and White House Press Secretary Jay Carney was unable in a subsequent briefing to point to any concrete signs of progress. Netanyahu is to address Congress on Tuesday to press Israel’s position. On Thursday, Netanyahu was informed shortly before Obama’s speech of its contents by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, according to U.S. officials. Netanyahu sought in vain to get the border language removed from the speech, the officials said. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss a sensitive diplomatic exchange. tim’s mother and are now calling her as a witness.” He advised that he would request a prerelease report before he would consider any bond reduction. Currently Herrera’s bond is set at $500,000 cash surety. The trial is now set for Sept. 27, with pre-trials scheduled on July 18, Aug. 29 and Sept. 23.

about defense’s intention to put the victim’s mother, Dana Dryden, on the list of witnesses. Cosby explained that he needed Dryden to testify about “properties that were purloined by Stephen Foster.” Currier responded, “I find it unusual that you represented the victim, Foster, and now represent the person who is charged with his killing, and may have represented the vic-

j.palmer@roswell-record.com

August Cline heard the story about the little girl and he thought he recognized her. He paid 500 fanegas of corn for her,” said Romero. A fanega is a unit of dry measure in Spanish-speaking countries, equal to 1.58 bushels Still, Judge Romero is modest about his background. “To a great extent my family farmed, ranched and worked for other people.” The Romeros farmed in Lincoln. His great-grandfather did subsistence farming in the Arabella region. He also cut wood and transported it to Roswell to sell. “I asked my grandfather about this. He used to say ‘It took two days to get here and a day-and-a-half to get back.’” Born in Roswell, Judge Romero was raised in

Hondo. “It was a great community to grow up in. Everyone knew each other, helped each other. People were very supportive.” When talking about his choice of careers, he said, “We were asked when we were in eighth grade what we wanted to be. Another student said a lawyer, and I thought it sounded good.” He went to college at NMSU and law school at UNM. He first worked as the city attorney in Albuquerque. He returned to Roswell when he got a job with the Atwood Law Firm where he stayed for 13 years. Then he went to Cusack Jaramillo & Associates. He was appointed as District Court judge in 2005 and elected to the office in 2006. j.palmer@roswell-record.com

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A4 Saturday, May 21, 2011

OPINION

State eases through financial crisis; challenges loom

State government has gotten through its financial crisis reasonably intact. Revenue is showing some growth. There may be a little money left after the 2013 session of the Legislature. Huge challenges loom. This was the overall message from David Abbey, director of the Legislative Finance Committee, to the conference of the New Mexico Tax Research Institute. Abbey spoke in Santa Fe May 12 to about 75 of the state’s tax and policy professionals The general fund picture for the next budget year, fiscal 2012 that begins July 1, Abbey said, is that “we eased out of this difficult period” that began with a $700 million gap between FY 09 appropriations and recurring revenue. The gap went to almost $1 billion for FY 10, the budget year that ended June 30, 2010. The gaps were plugged with federal stimulus money, other state funds and solvency measures that included

EDITORIAL

HAROLD MORGAN

NEW MEXICO PROGRESS

tax increases and spending cuts. The federal stimulus money went almost entirely for public education and Medicaid. “We cut 2,500 jobs over two years, probably without a major impact on provision of goods and services,” Abbey said. The FY 12 budget is balanced at around $5.4 billion, a big change from the past several years when the Legislature would leave the regular session and a spending-revenue gap of hundreds of millions of dollars in place and essentially say, we’ll figure that out later. The general fund is the state’s main pot of

money. T ransportation is not included in the general fund. The FY 12 “budget is essentially the executive recommended spending level,” he said. The FY 12 focus remains on education, health care and the judiciary. Public schools will get $2.365 billion, which is 44 percent of the 5.4 billion appropriated. Higher education will get 13 percent, or $716.5 million. For Medicaid, the appropriation is $960 million, or 18 percent of the total. Everything else will get $1,389.9 billion, or 26 percent. For FY 12, since the FY 09 solvency actions, public school spending is down 8.6 percent. Higher education is down 17 percent and Medicaid is up 1 percent. Abbey observed that “higher education has the wherewithal to raise tuition.” Whether a tuition increase is a tax increase, one will have to ask Gov. Martinez.

Roswell Daily Record

That “everything else” group — economic development, arts, labor, general gover nment administration — is down 17.9 percent, or $303 million, since FY 09. The revenue situation provided a bit of comfort, though not much, and a challenge. The comfort is that revenue through February is up 5.4 percent. More comfort comes from taxable gross receipts, which show “nice year-over-year growth” after no growth or declining for six quarters. One challenge is that current projections suggest a little extra leftover revenue — $153 million — for FY 13. Abbey wondered whether “there is something really strategic we can do” with that money, assuming it appears, instead of frittering it away. Public education presents a bigger challenge. Abbey described student performance

as “pretty pitiful ... a scandal.” For 15 years, schools have had limited oversight. The funding formula encourages gaming the system. Actions are not inappropriate; administrators simply are reacting to the incentives. As one small example, Abbey said high school students taking college classes generate money for both the high school and for the college. Pensions, too, need attention. Public retirees, who can be fairly young, get an annual 3 percent cost of living adjustment forever. A look at the retiree health care system found five spouses of retirees under the age of 25. Speaking of the pension funds, Abbey said, “The Legislature is going to have to deal with these issues over the next few years,” but without additional revenue. In fact, he probably was talking all of state government. © New Mexico News Services 2011

World Opinion The new space race

The historic final launch of Endeavour ... should be a teachable moment for the United States and Canada. The NASA space program is tapped out. Once the final Atlantis flight lifts off in July, American and Canadian astronauts will be reduced to hitchhiking rides with the Russians. Expected to fill the gap in manned space travel is the private sector, making the next decade a true teachable moment as to whether the private sector can pull it off when governments step back. And there is a lot at stake. Today’s technologies — GPS, TV, data networks, phone, weather tracking — are all dependent on privately-owned satellites. When failures happen, shuttle missions send in the repairmen, but who will they send once Endeavour and Atlantis are in permanent dry dock? The Russkies? Then there’s the moon, rich in virtually every mineral essential to our high-tech future, the aptly-named rare earth metals. While it is no small challenge for our private sector, the race to mine the moon is a race that cannot be lost. We must get there first. Guest Editorial The Ottawa Sun, Ontario

Libya’s Moammar Gadhafi

It is entirely coincidental that a day after the prosecutor for the International Criminal Court asked judges to issue a warrant for the arrest of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi for crimes against humanity, the Rwandan chief of staff during that country’s 1994 genocide was jailed ... for his role in its mass killings. The symbolism is very powerful. International justice is not just a pipe dream. The wheels may turn slow — it has taken 17 years to bring Augustin Bizimungu to account — but they turn. The fact that the court that brought Bizimungu to account is different from the one now processing a warrant for Gadhafi’s arrest is incidental. The International Tribunal for Rwanda, set up by the U.N. in 1994 to prosecute crimes during the genocide was based on the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, set up by the U.N. the year before. The ICC was a natural development and continuation of both. International justice may be taking different guises but the objective is the same. For his part, Gadhafi boasts of never leaving, of never being captured, that he will die in Libya. Only the latter is a possibility. The reality, however, is that all too often his promises have been shown to mean nothing. He may yet decide, as Hitler did, that “his” people are not worthy of his leadership. The momentum is building up toward that inevitability. As if in recognition of the way the wind is blowing, his oil minister apparently defected. Other ministers, other foreign governments, will follow. The regime is doomed. Guest Editorial Arab News, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia DEAR DR. GOTT: I have recently been diagnosed with burning-mouth syndrome. What can you tell me about the cause and treatment? I’ve found Breneton on the Internet. Is this a good treatment to try? DEAR READER: Unfortunately, the cause of this condition can’t always be easily determined. It is thought to be related to problems with taste and sensory nerves of the peripheral or central nervous system; or it might be caused by a nutritional deficiency such as vitamin B, folate, iron or zinc. Direct links for the disorder can include an oral yeast infection, anxiety, depression, some medications, an underactive thyroid, reflux, hormonal imbalance or irritation to the mouth. What-

Rethink hydropower, or leave it to the beavers? MARITA NOON ENERGY MAKES AMERICA GREAT INC.

The Mississippi River and its tributaries are spilling over their banks and levees — flooding homes and ruining farmlands. In the recovery, decisions will need to be made about rebuilding or relocating. The 2011 floods are not something new. There were major floods on the Mississippi in the 30s, 70s and 90s. Most of our dams were built between 1930 and 1970 for flood control — man’s attempt to control nature. Politics changed in the 70s. Controlling nature was no longer acceptable. Man protecting

Doonesbury

nature became the mantra. The dams of man (development) were abandoned in favor of the dams of beavers (nature). Since that time there has been an active campaign to tear down the dams and reclaim the rivers. If the dams of man are truly unacceptable, we should not continue to rebuild in floodprone areas. The river would be allowed to retake the land — as it would if humans had never intervened. Roy Dakka, a professor of civil and environmental engineering and director of the Center for Geoinformatics at Louisiana State University, believes nature always wins. He said,

Whatever symptom or symptoms you have can occur every day or may come and ASK DR. go. This condition can last for or may disappear withGOTT years out treatment. Your doctor may choose to order blood tests, cultures to rule out viral/bacterial/yeast allergy testing or UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE infection, even an MRI or CT to rule out ever the cause, the pain can other possible but unidentiaffect your lips, tongue, gums, fied health issues. If you sufinside of your cheeks, roof of fer from dry mouth, a salivary your mouth or all of the test can confirm or rule out a reduction in salivary flow. above. Treatment will depend on Symptoms include numbyour specific symptoms. ness or tingling of the affected Mouthwashes, specific antideportion of your mouth, pain pressants, B vitamins, capthat worsens as the day pro- saicin as a pain reliever or gresses, a loss of taste and dry behavioral therapy might be mouth. You may notice an considered. On the home unpleasant metallic taste. front, experiment with differ-

“We should really be thinking about whether we want to continue to live in really stupid places, because nature is going to exploit our stupidity.” Deeper within the discussion is a question posed by Lazarus Long in the classic 1970s novel “Time Enough for Love” by Robert A. Heinlein: There are hidden contradictions in the minds of people who “love nature” while deploring the “artificialities” with which “man has spoiled ‘Nature.’” The obvious contradiction lies in their choice of words, which imply that man and his artifacts are not part of “nature” — but beavers and their dams are.

ent toothpastes, drink additional fluids, refrain from using tobacco, and avoid foods with cinnamon or mint, as well as those high in acid, such as tomatoes and orange juice. Above all, make an effort to reduce the stress in your life, if appropriate. This might be accomplished with yoga or tai chi. Breneton is a combination of rheum rhabarbarum, Indian olibanum tree, torchwood tree, ginger, operculina turpethum and scammony. My guess is as good as yours whether this will work or not. My guess? No. DEAR DR. GOTT: Can you tell me something about a product called ASEA? It is

See GOTT, Page A5

But the contradictions go deeper than this prima-facie absurdity. In declaring his love for a beaver dam (erected by beavers for beavers’ purposes) and his hatred for dams erected by men (for the purposes of men) the “Naturist” reveals his hatred for his own race — i.e., his own self-hatred. If Lazarus/Heinlein was right and dams built by men for the purposes of men are good, then before rebuilding the levees, dams should be built up river — dams that can generate electricity, control the flow of the river, and divert waters (via pipeline) to regions

25 YEARS AGO

See NOON, Page A5

May 21, 1986 • Aaron Rowher, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joel Rowher, was named student Kiwanian of the Month at Goddard High School. Rowher is a member of the Senior Honor Society, was named outstanding art student his freshman year and outstanding Spanish II student his junior year. He is secretary of the Art Club and a member of the Science and Spanish clubs. He plans on majoring in business at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces. • Roswell Girls Club members have earned awards in the Girls Clubs of America awards competition. Patty Kirksey, daughter of Pat Kirksey, received first place in the Eastman Kodak photography contest; Tonita Nejeres, daughter of Tina Nejeres and John Nejeres; and Jenny Nunez, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Nunez, both received second-place awards in their age category in the Donna Brace Oglivie Writing Awards for the poetry contest.


LOCAL

Story time at the library Roswell Daily Record

The Roswell Public Library at 301 N. Pennsylvania Ave. will be having story time, Duck, Duck, Goose at 2 p.m. and will feature books about these fine-feathered friends including: Nine Ducks Nine and Barnyard Banter plus pop-up books like Is That You, Fred? After the stories, materials will be provided so that the children can make their very own duck and geese crafts! Story time and crafts are free so bring the whole family! For more information call 622-7101. Anyone who needs special assistance should contact the Library 24 hours in advance.

Wings for L.I.F.E.

Wings for L.I.F.E. along with District Court Judge Charles Currier and Freddie Romero presents The Role of Judges, May 22, 6 p.m. at the Roswell Boys and Girls Club, 201 S. Garden. A brisket dinner will also be included. For more information call 317-2042.

Yucca Recreation

The Yucca Recreation Center's Summer Vacation Fun Program is still taking applicants and will be in session from May 23 Aug. 12. The cost of the program is $10 per day and scholarships are available. The program runs from 7:45 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. daily. The Yucca Recreation Center and the Roswell Independent School District's Food Services Department have teamed up to participate in the Summer Lunch Program during June and July. The concession stand is open for lunch and snack time. Events scheduled for the program include exciting field trips, swim team, sports conditioning camps, tumbling, ceramics, crafts, and more. For more information contact the Yucca Recreation Center at 624-6719.

The Roswell Community Band

The Roswell Community Band will begin their summer program May 23, 6 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center at ENMU-R. All adults, high school, and college students home for the summer as well as advanced mid-high band members are welcome. The director will be Mr. Ken Tuttle. For more information contact Len Cheney at 622-2695.

Kids Kollege

ENMU-R will be offering Kids Kollege June 6 through June 23. Registration begins May 23. For registration or information call 624-7049.

Chapter K, P.E.O.

Chapter K, P.E.O will hold its regular

Noon

Continued from Page A4

where the water is needed. If the “Naturists” are right and the dams of man are wrong, then the flood waters should flow unrestrained — retaking man’s creation: houses, businesses and cities. We cannot have it both ways. Reality is that the people who live along the river generally understand and accept the risk. They will rebuild just like they did following the previous floods. Most of the thousands of people displaced, just like those who fled during Katrina, will want to go back home — even if home is a FEMA trailer on the family farm. Humans are not quitters. But, Americans quit building dams. Today dams do more than control flood waters. They can create electricity needed for economic development — overcoming poverty, improving living standards, and attracting foreign investment. Canada has just announced plans for 3,000 megawatts of hydroelectric resources in Quebec. Chile plans to build five new dams with the potential to generate 2.75 gigawatts to help triple its capacity. Both countries cite low-cost energy and jobs as motivators — though both acknowledge opposition from environmental groups. In the U.S., we need the same benefits. We have similar resources. We also have reoccurring floods which need the “dams of man” and we have drought-stricken regions that need water. Sadly, we have the same difficulties. George S. Dunlop, former principal deputy assistant secre-

Gott

Continued from Page A4

supposed to be a cure-all for pain when you take two ounces twice a day. Is this a fad or does it work? The cost is about $1 per ounce. DEAR READER: ASEA is not promoted as a juice, antioxidant or vitamin but as redox-signaling molecules in a bottle. Redoxsignaling molecules are what your body creates in order to support the vital functions of the immune system. Pardon me, but what in the heck does that really mean? The ingredients are sodium and chloride (salt and water)! The product is sold in 32-ounce bottles and promoted as an immune booster. The recommendation is

5:30 p.m. meeting Tuesday, May 24, 2011, at the home of LeNora Correia with Margaret Kincaid, June Emmons and Paula Reed as co-hostesses. The theme of the meeting will be Hoo went to Convention? Report. For more information, please call 622-8965.

ENMMC

ENMMC is offering Exercises for all Ages May 24, 6 to 7 p.m. at the Roswell Museum and Art Center Bassett Auditorium, presented by Curves, Come learn more about exercises that are effective for any age. For more information call 623-2311.

Southeastern New Mexico Feral Hog Symposium

The Southeastern New Mexico Feral Hog Symposium will be May 25, 9 a.m. to noon at the Farm Bureau Building at Eastern New Mexico Fairgrounds. For more information call 622-3210.

Senior Circle

There will be a special stamping class taught by Rosie Spence May 25 at 9:30 a.m. at Senior Circle, 2801 N. Main St. For more information call 623-2311.

Senior Circle

The Senior Circle book club will meet May 25, 2 p.m. at Senior Circle, 2801 N. Main St. For more information call 6232311.

The Christians United for Israel

There will be a “Standing With Israel” city-wide event May 25 at 7 p.m. at Christ's Church, 2200 N. Sycamore Avenue. For more information call 6234110.

ENMMC Auxiliary Scholarship deadline

Applications for the summer 2011 semester are being accepted for the ENMMC Auxiliary scholarship in health care occupations. All applications must be received in the Volunteer Services department by June 1 at 4:30. Current scholarship recipients may reapply. For more information contact Lynda Whalen at 6228170 or JoAnn Nunez at 623-4291. tary of the Army, fought the idea that “un-improved” was always better. He acknowledged that new hydroelectricity in the U.S. is unlikely, in large part, due to the actions of environmental groups. Belief that the dams of beavers are good, while the dams of man are bad, will doom low-land dwellers to face periodic ruin, cost taxpayers billions in unemployment checks, subsidized insurance, and regional restoration (FEMA trailers, levee reconstruction, and reimbursement for those who lost everything while saving more populous areas), and raise gas prices as many refineries are in the flood zone. We could have a win-win. Instead of tearing down flood control dams, they can now be retrofitted using modern technology to generate double our current hydroelectricity capacity — and this is just based on our current dams. Imagine if we could truly harness our clean, renewable hydroelectric resources. We could have the economic development, low-cost energy, and the “dams of man” could control the floodwaters and redirect them — allowing man to benefit. Now that’s smart. Known as the voice for energy, Marita Noon is the executive director at Energy Makes America Great Inc., the advocacy arm of the Citizens’ Alliance for Responsible Energy — working to educate the public and influence policy makers regarding energy, its role in freedom and the American way of life. She is a popular speaker, a frequent guest on television and radio and her commentaries have been published in newspapers, blogs and websites nationwide. For more information, visit www.EnergyMakesAmericaGreat.org. that a person drinks between four and eight ounces about 20 minutes before exercising on an empty stomach. There is no need for a daily dose to keep your redox level high. You can’t overdose on it, and only need to use it when you know you will exercise strenuously. I’m not sure about the pain-relief connection. As long as you asked, I think this is a fad. Stick with a healthful diet, drink adequate fluids to remain hydrated, exercise in an appropriate manner, and save your money. Dr. Peter H. Gott is a retired physician and the author of several books, including “Live Longer, Live Better,” “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Diet” and “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Cookbook,” which are available at most bookstores or online. His website is www.AskDrGottMD.com.

Saturday, May 21, 2011

A5


A6 Saturday, May 21, 2011

NATION/OBITUARIES/RECORDS

Spaceport hosts launch of student experiments

UPHAM (AP) — In the remote desert of southern New Mexico, hundreds of students from across the state, Arizona and Texas gathered at dawn Friday to watch as a rocket whisked a year’s worth of their work into space. The SL-5 rocket lifted off following a bright flash as engineers from UP Aerospace supervised about a mile away from the crowd. At five times the speed of sound, the rocket carried the students’ experiments to a record 73.5 miles high. The high altitude winds turned the contrail into a corkscrew, and the students belted out their approval with a chorus of “cool” and “awesome.” More than two dozen experiments were launched from Spaceport America as part of this year’s annual student launch sponsored by NASA through its Summer of Innovation Program. George Whitesides, president and CEO of Virgin Galactic, the commercial space venture founded by British billionaire Richard Branson, said it’s moments like the rocket launch that capture children’s attention. “We know that as a nation, we need to do a better job of getting our kids excited about science and technology. It’s essential to our future, and I think space still

has a really big role to play in terms of getting kids tied to those subjects,” he said. “We’re probably going to have 500 future astronauts because of this event.” After the payload reached its maximum altitude, a parachute deployed and the experiments were returned to Earth so data could be downloaded by the students. Some experiments were designed to monitor changes in temperature, pressure and radiation. Others challenged the viability of alternative power sources, while one tested whether a cell phone was capable of receiving text messages at the edge of space. Being able to text family and friends will be important once commercial space travel becomes common, according to the excited group of middle school girls from Las Cruces who worked on the project. “We’ve been planning and talking about it a long time,” said Tatiana Prieto, one of the students. “Now we finally saw it go up, and it was like ‘Yeah!”’ Virgin Galactic, the spaceport’s anchor tenant, and the state Spaceport Authority plan to continue working with the New Mexico Space Grant Consortium to find ways to use the spaceport as

a learning center for the region. The $209 million taxpayer financed spaceport is expected to be complete by the end of the year. It’s the world’s first dedicated spaceport, which aims to become ground zero for the burgeoning commercial spaceflight industry. Some estimate Virgin Galactic could begin flights out of the spaceport sometime in 2013, but Whitesides declined Thursday to give any specific dates. He said the company is testing its spacecraft and rocket systems. State officials also want to add to the tenant list companies for other commercial space endeavors, such as research and payload delivery. Spaceport executive director Christine Anderson said she sees potential for many support businesses to spring up around development of the spaceport, resulting in more science and technology jobs. As the students waited for their payload to be returned, Anderson talked about the spaceport and their future. “Dream big, and don’t let anybody tell you that you can’t do something because you can do whatever you set your mind to, and today is a good lesson for that,” Anderson said.

Roswell Daily Record

AP Photo

Students unload the payload section of a rocket that briefly carried more than two dozen science experiments into space after lifting off from Spaceport America’s vertical launch area near Upham, on Friday. Hundreds of students attended the launch as part of NASA’s summer innovation program.

Navajo coal plant focus of congressional hearing FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — The fate of a coal-fired power plant that provides hundreds of jobs to American Indians, yet spews tons of emissions that cloud the view at the Grand Canyon and other parks, is uncertain. The Navajo Generating Station in Page serves as an economic engine that ensures water and power demands are met in major metropolitan areas. Conservationists see it as a health and environmental hazard and want to wean the plant off its reliance to coal in favor of renewable energy. A factor in whether the more than 40-year -old plant survives is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which regulates power plants on tribal lands. The agency is deciding whether to issue pollution controls this summer for the plant, which is one of the biggest sources of nitrogen oxide emissions in the country.

“Our job is to decide, Are the parks adequately protected?” said Colleen McKaughan, associate director of the EPA’s air division in San Francisco. “And if they’re not, does the facility need additional pollution controls?” The role of the plant also has become the focus of a congressional hearing Tuesday in Washington, D.C., that came at the request of Republican Reps. Trent Franks and Paul Gosar, who represent the Hopi and Navajo tribes, respectively. They say requiring pollution controls would force the plant to close and devastate the tribal communities that rely on the jobs and revenue from coal that feeds the plant. “This is a way to highlight the impact that it is having and the lack of common sense that’s being adjudicated when we’re talking about coalfired plants,” Gosar said. Environmentalists see

the hearing as a coordinated attack on the EPA and say the plants owners are creating unnecessary alar m with their doomand-gloom predictions over the EPA’s actions. Nitrogen oxide is only a small part of the issue, and the future could bring regulations for mercury and carbon dioxide, said Vernon Masayesva, a Hopi and director of the Black Mesa Trust. “We should not put our energies into fighting over a visibility issue,” said Masayesva, who’s scheduled to testify Tuesday. “In doing so, were dividing the Navajo people.” The 2,250-megawatt power plant began producing electricity in 1974 and is supplied by coal from Peabody Energy’s Kayenta Mine. Some 1,000 people are employed at the power plant and mine combined, with the majority being American Indians. The plant’s owners are trying to stave of f the

Unemployment falls in 39 states WASHINGTON (AP) — Unemployment rates fell last month in more than three-quarters of the nation’s states, adding to evidence that companies are feeling more confident in the U.S. economy. The Labor Department said Friday that unemployment rates dropped in 39 states in April. It’s the largest number of states to see decrease since November 2003. Rates rose in three states and the District of Columbia. They were unchanged in eight states. Employers added workers in 42 states, the best showing since March 2007 — nine months before the recession start-

PUBLIC RECORDS

Marriage Licenses May 18 Roy V. Long, 18, and Alexis A. McClain, 16, both of Roswell. May 19 Jesus J. Gonzalez, 56, and Guadalupe Anderson, 48, both of Dexter. Alberto G. Serna, 40, of Ruidoso Downs, and Gilda R. Rodriguez-Silva, 33, of Ruidoso. May 20 Jerry O. Twaddle, 31, and Sulma Gauna, 25, both of Roswell. Accidents

ed. Only eight states and the District of Columbia lost jobs last month. Nationally, businesses have added more than 250,000 jobs per month, on average, in the past three months. The unemployment rate has dropped nearly a full percentage point since November. Still, it remains very high at 9 percent. New York added 45,700 jobs in April, the most of any state. It was followed by Texas, which added 32,900 jobs, and Pennsylvania, which gained 23,700 jobs. Michigan lost 10,200 jobs, the largest decline of any state. Minnesota lost 5,200 jobs and South

Carolina shed 3,800 jobs. Nevada reported the biggest monthly drop in unemployment among all states. Despite the decline, unemployment in Nevada was 12.5 percent, the highest in the nation. New Mexico and Oklahoma reported the next biggest monthly decreases. North Dakota had the lowest unemployment rate of any state at 3.3 percent. It has benefited from oil production, which is among the state’s top industries. Other states with low unemployment rates were Nebraska, New Hampshire and South Dakota.

May 19 12:45 p.m. — Kansas Avenue and First Street; drivers — Blanch O. Stephens, 90, and Amanda Lewis, 32, both of Roswell. 1:03 p.m. — North Main Street; driver — Jose Gurrola, 37, of Roswell. 1:22 p.m. — Main and Alameda streets; drivers — Emma E. Rodriguez, 52, and Roy Burlsow, no age given, both of Roswell. 1:46 p.m. — 2600 block North Main Street; drivers — Walton Hughes, 54, of Artesia, and Michael Rus-

sell, 30, of Roswell.

5:51 p.m. — North Main Street and Sherrill Lane; drivers — Sharla Coots, 33, and David Gray, 49, both of Roswell. 8:16 p.m. — Hendricks Street; driver — Jaxmin Molina, 36, of Roswell.

9 p.m. — 1909 W. Second St.; driver — Jesus Sandoval, 42, of Roswell. 9:16 p.m. — Southeast Main Street; drivers — Claudia Morales, 23, and Berny Reyes, 18, both of Roswell.

EPA’s proposals to give themselves more time to secure lease extensions and right-of-way grants that begin expiring in 2019. They contend that a $45 million upgrade of the three 750-megawatt units at the plant, which will include bur ners that reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by 40 percent, or 14,000 tons per year, should be suf ficient to help clear up the haze at the Grand Canyon. Further upgrades could cost $1.1 billion, they say. “That puts the owners in a situation where we’re being asked to make a significant investment with a lot of uncertainty over whether the plant would be able to operate long enough to recover that investment,” said Glen Reeves, manager of power generation for the Salt River Project, which operates the plant. “That’s the tenuous situation we’re in.”

OBITUARIES

Fred C. Gonzales

A rosary will be recited for Fred C. Gonzales, 81, of Roswell, at 7 p.m., Monday, May 23, 2011, at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church. A funeral Mass will be celebrated Tuesday, May 24, 2011, at 10 a.m., at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church with the Rev. Juan Gutierrez, OFM, officiating. Burial will follow in South Park Cemetery. Visitation will be Saturday, May 21, 2011, from 1 to 5 p.m., Sunday, May 22, 2011, from 1 to 8 p.m., and Monday, May 23, 2011, from 8 a.m., until service time. He passed away Thursday, May 19, 2011, in Roswell. Fred was bor n in Roswell, June 18, 1929, to Guadalupe G. Gonzales and Alejandra Car mona Gonzales. He was a member of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church. He loved fishing, camping, working in his yard and treasure hunting. He will be greatly missed by his family and

The EPA must consider the best available retrofit technology, or BAR T, for reducing such emissions, which are expensive selective catalytic converters. If the EPA goes that route, it would set the plants owners on a timeline to install the pollution controls. “We’re definitely for the most stringent air quality measures that can be had,” said Andy Bessler of the Sierra Club. “That’s what BART stands for.” For some, the current situation brings back memories of the Mohave Generating Station, which shut down in 2006 because it needed pollution-control upgrades to comply with a Clean Air Act settlement, a new water supply and pipeline upgrades costing $1.1 billion. But SRP officials say the effects of shutting down Navajo Generating Station would have a farther reach. The power plant provides energy to deliver

close friends. Those left behind to cherish his memory are his sons, Billy Gonzales and Fred L. Gonzales; daughter, Yolanda G. Urias; sister, Estela Ortiz; and numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-greatgrandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; wife Juanita Salazar Gonzales; daughter, Christine Marie Aguilar; sisters, Marie Kirby, Martha Duran and Emma Reyes; brother Guadalupe Gonzales; infant sons, John and Robert Gonzales; and daughters-in-law, Gloria and Andrea Gonzales. Pallbearers will be John Aguilar, Fred Gonzales II, Fabian Gonzales, Alfred Gonzales, Raymond Urias and Daniel Aguilar. Honorary pallbearers will be RhiAnnon Moreno, Pamela Gonzales, Sabrina Sutherland, Thomas Velasco Jr., Geneva Flores and Stephanie Carr. The family would like to give a special “Thank You” to Monica Saavedra, Virginia Saavedra, Michelle Aguilar, Sandra Barrera and Amanda Urias for the love and compassion they have shown the family throughout its loss. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online register book at andersonbethany.com. Arrangements are under the direction of Anderson Bethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

water from the Colorado River to Tucson and Phoenix through a series of canals. Those interested in what becomes of Navajo Generating Station began meeting in January in an effort to come to an agreement on its future. The plan was to give the EPA a proposal by March that the agency could consider in making a decision on pollution controls, but that didn’t happen. At least one Navajo environmental group pulled out of the discussions because it said the talks were a tactic to keep the power plant running and stall the EPA’s actions. Similar groups are pushing a 10-year transition to renewable energy. “That’s a win-win right there,” Masayesva said. The plant’s owners have said they would support a study to see if that’s feasible.

To Those I Love And Those Who Love Me While I am gone release me, let me go. I have so many things to see and do. You mustn’t tie yourself to me with tears. Be happy that we had so many beautiful years. I gave to you my love. You can only guess How much you gave to me in happiness. I thank you for the love you each have shown. But now it’s time I traveled on alone. To grieve for me a while if grieve you must. Then let your grief be comforted by trust, It’s only a while that we must part, To bless the memories within your heart. I won’t be far away, for life goes on, So if you need me, call and I will come, Though you can’t see or touch me, I’ll be near. And if you listen with your heart, You’ll hear all my love around you soft and clear, And then when you must come this way alone, I’ll greet you with a smile and say... “Welcome Home”

Raul Anchondo

Arrangements are pending for Raul Anchondo, 43, of Roswell, at Anderson Bethany Funeral Home and Crematory. He passed away Thursday, May 19, 2011, in Roswell.


FINANCIAL

Roswell Daily Record

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg Discover .24f 24.92 -.76 Disney .40f 41.50 +.12 A-B-C DomRescs 1.97 u48.28 +.08 DowChm 1.00f 36.01 -.84 ABB Ltd 1.12e 26.32 -.16 AES Corp ... 13.02 +.09 DuPont 1.64 52.74 -.69 AFLAC 1.20 49.57 -.79 DukeEngy .98 19.01 -.06 AK Steel .20 14.13 -.24 DukeRlty .68 14.22 -.31 AMR ... 6.66 -.06 Dynegy rs ... 5.95 +.14 AOL ... 19.52 +.38 ECDang n ... 21.07 +.80 ... 28.06 +.07 AT&T Inc 1.72 31.32 -.08 EMC Cp AbtLab 1.92f 53.51 +.09 EOG Res .64 106.85 +.86 ... 3.70 +.02 AberFitc .70 74.22 -1.35 EKodak Accenture .90 57.42 +.48 Eaton s 1.36 50.97 -.41 EatnVan .72 31.39 -.60 AdvAuto .24 63.27 -.22 AMD ... 8.62 -.02 EdisonInt 1.28 39.72 +.67 Aeropostl ... d18.30 -3.04 ElPasoCp .04 19.38 +.29 ... 8.64 +.05 Aetna .60 45.06 -.84 Elan Agilent ... 50.70 -.46 EldorGld g .10f 15.68 +.20 EmersonEl 1.38 54.09 -.52 Agnico g .64 62.55 -.35 AlcatelLuc ... 5.80 -.04 EnCana g .80 33.49 +.63 Alcoa .12 16.26 -.41 EndvSilv g ... 8.83 +.12 AllegTch .72 63.78 -1.56 ENSCO 1.40 55.64 +.19 Allergan .20 83.51 +.01 EqtyRsd 1.47e u59.92 -.43 Allstate .84 32.01 -.44 Exelon 2.10 42.26 +.52 AlphaNRs ... 50.05 -.22 ExxonMbl 1.88f 81.57 -.76 Altria 1.52 27.74 -.24 FMC Tch s ... 42.30 +.23 AmBev s 1.16e 31.10 -.25 FibriaCelu ... 14.73 +.14 Ameren 1.54 30.02 +.31 FirstEngy 2.20 44.76 -.04 .50 67.33 -.46 AMovilL .52e 51.01 +.86 Fluor AmAxle ... 10.78 -.50 FootLockr .66 u25.11 +2.85 ... 15.00 -.12 AEagleOut.44a 13.52 -1.10 FordM AEP 1.84 38.55 +.07 ForestLab ... u35.37 +.09 ... 31.38 -.11 AmExp .72 u51.19 -.63 ForestOil AmIntlGrp ... 30.80 -.04 FMCG s 1.00a 48.38 +.41 AmTower ... 53.64 +1.56 FrontierCm .75 8.81 -.07 Anadarko .36 74.58 +2.94 FrontierOil .24a 28.57 -.43 AnalogDev1.00f 41.80 -.51 G-H-I Ann Inc ... 29.09 -1.11 Annaly 2.62e 18.00 +.06 Gafisa SA .29e 10.35 -.01 .60 123.00 +.15 GameStop ... u27.88 +.56 Apache ArcelorMit .75 32.48 -.84 Gannett .16 14.68 +.03 .45 19.22 -4.07 ArchCoal .44f 29.43 -.02 Gap ArchDan .64 31.26 -.23 GenDynam1.88f 73.03 -.85 GenElec .60f 19.62 -.34 .92 29.98 +.01 Avon BB&T Cp .64f 26.56 -.75 GenGrPr n .40 16.04 -.30 BHP BillLt1.82e 93.18 -.82 GenMarit ... d1.86 +.05 BHPBil plc1.82e 76.55 -.54 GenMills s 1.12 u39.72 -.23 BP PLC .42e 45.00 +1.11 GenMot n ... 31.18 -.29 BakrHu .60 70.12 -.45 GenOn En ... 3.90 +.14 BcoBrades .80r 18.78 -.18 Genworth ... 11.12 -.25 BcoSantSA.79e 11.10 -.45 Gerdau .27e 10.22 -.13 BcoSBrasil .70e 10.84 -.01 GoldFLtd .19e 15.68 +.11 BkofAm .04 11.58 -.11 Goldcrp g .41 48.67 +.31 BkNYMel .52f 28.19 -.51 GoldmanS 1.40 134.99 -4.35 Barclay .36e 17.78 -.31 Goodyear ... 17.57 -.15 Bar iPVix rs ... d22.76 +.22 Guess .80a 41.28 -2.32 BarnesNob ... 18.33 +4.22 HCA Hld n ... 34.63 -.42 BarrickG .48 45.60 +.03 HCP Inc 1.92 36.96 -.21 Baxter 1.24 u60.33 +.11 HSBC 1.80e 51.61 -.41 BerkH B ... 78.72 -.56 Hallibrtn .36 47.18 +.28 BestBuy .60 31.33 -.47 HarleyD .50f 36.56 -.60 BigLots ... 33.55 -.22 HarmonyG .07e 13.48 -.02 Blackstone .40 16.95 -.28 HartfdFn .40 27.09 -.40 ... 11.30 -.01 BlockHR .60 16.33 -.03 HltMgmt ... 8.03 -.02 Boeing 1.68 77.52 -.50 HeclaM 1.80 u53.89 +.04 Boise Inc .80e 8.11 ... Heinz ... 16.02 -.11 BostonSci ... 6.80 -.10 Hertz .40 77.92 -.16 BrMySq 1.32 28.37 -.23 Hess BrkfldOP rt ... .08 -.04 HewlettP .32 d35.98 -.15 CBS B .40f 26.99 -.37 HomeDp 1.00f 37.05 -.34 CF Inds .40 139.06 -2.37 HonwllIntl 1.33 58.99 -.50 CNO Fincl ... 7.60 -.19 HorizLns ... .89 -.07 ... 55.04 +.50 CSX 1.44f 77.40 +.34 Hospira CVS Care .50 38.40 -.03 HostHotls .08f 16.99 -.18 CablvsnNY .60f 34.50 +.42 HovnanE ... 2.62 +.05 CabotO&G .12 54.66 +.59 Huntsmn .40 18.93 ... Calpine ... 15.89 +.04 IAMGld g .08f 20.95 +.29 ... 11.70 -.42 Cameco g .40 27.06 -.35 ING Cameron ... 48.16 +.12 ION Geoph ... 9.61 -.13 CampSp 1.16 35.24 -.10 iShGold s ... 14.79 +.19 CdnNRs gs .36 41.97 +.15 iSAstla .82e 26.62 -.26 CapOne .20 55.07 -1.14 iShBraz 2.53e 71.93 +.02 .50e 32.34 -.13 CapitlSrce .04 6.37 +.14 iSCan CarMax ... 29.39 -.57 iShGer .29e 26.40 -.75 Carnival 1.00 39.56 -.58 iSh HK .45e 19.11 -.19 Caterpillar 1.76 104.33 -.97 iShJapn .14e 10.01 -.11 Cemex .43t 8.27 -.03 iSh Kor .44e 64.25 -.41 CenterPnt .79 18.96 -.04 iSMalas .34e 14.77 -.08 CntryLink 2.90 43.20 -.16 iShMex .54e 61.02 -.07 ChesEng .30 30.62 +.71 iShSing .43e 14.04 -.18 Chevron 3.12f 102.57 -1.30 iSTaiwn .29e 15.34 -.20 ... 34.18 -.08 Chicos .20 14.10 +.10 iShSilver Chimera .66e 3.94 +.03 iShChina25.63e 44.02 -.10 ChinaUni .23e u21.24 +.88 iSSP500 2.46e 134.09 -1.00 ChinaYuch1.50e 21.03 -3.47 iShEMkts .64e 47.07 -.38 Citigrp rs .04 41.02 -.36 iShSPLatA1.18e 50.82 +.09 CliffsNRs .56 86.01 -2.24 iShB20 T 3.99e 95.32 +.05 Coach .90f 59.48 -1.17 iS Eafe 1.42e 60.48 -.87 CocaCola 1.88 68.30 -.16 iShR2K .89e 82.86 -.61 CocaCE .52f u29.47 -.13 iShREst 1.98e 61.03 -.63 1.36 57.09 -.56 Coeur ... 25.26 -.09 ITW CollctvBrd ... 18.43 -.70 IngerRd .48f 49.18 -.88 3.00f 170.16 -.43 Comerica .40 36.47 -.57 IBM ... u14.50 -.01 ComstkRs ... 28.62 +1.66 Intl Coal ConAgra .92 25.52 -.06 IntlGame .24 17.82 -.11 IntPap 1.05f 31.31 -.36 ConocPhil 2.64 72.61 -.09 ConsolEngy .40 49.00 +.29 Interpublic .24 11.89 +.02 .49f 25.00 +.32 Invesco ConstellA ... 21.85 -.50 Corning .20 19.95 -.28 ItauUnibH .67e 21.56 -.22 CorpOffP 1.65 34.15 -.42 J-K-L Cosan Ltd ... 10.98 +.15 Covidien .80 56.91 -.57 JPMorgCh 1.00 43.13 -.87 CrwnCstle ... 41.38 -.08 JPMCh wt ... 14.33 -.55 .28 20.74 -.12 Cummins 1.05 106.41 -3.10 Jabil ... 5.35 +.12 CurEuro .05e 141.03 -1.53 Jaguar g JanusCap .20f 10.20 -.28 D-E-F JohnJn 2.28f 65.69 -.70 DCT Indl .28 5.46 -.02 JohnsnCtl .64 38.35 -.48 DR Horton .15 11.80 +.04 JnprNtwk ... 38.86 -.19 Danaher s .08 54.66 -.56 KB Home .25 11.46 +.18 ... 15.73 -.02 Darden 1.28 51.52 -.51 KeyEngy Darling ... u18.07 +.52 Keycorp .12f 8.40 -.19 .72 18.98 -.44 DeanFds ... 13.36 -.26 Kimco 1.40 84.75 -1.29 Kinross g .10 14.94 +.08 Deere DeltaAir ... 11.51 +.13 KnightTr .24a 17.45 +.13 1.00 54.66 -1.91 DenburyR ... 20.97 -.13 Kohls 1.16 u35.23 +.24 DevonE .68f 82.85 +.32 Kraft .42 24.97 -.51 DicksSptg ... 39.17 +.88 Kroger DrSCBr rs ... 35.78 +.70 LDK Solar ... 7.26 -.95 ... 7.51 +.02 DirFnBr rs ... 43.29 +1.54 LSI Corp ... 41.74 -.23 DirLCBr rs ... 34.33 +.72 LVSands DrxEMBull .84e 36.72 -.96 LenderPS .40 26.43 -1.66 DrxEBear rs ... 15.58 +.08 LennarA .16 17.96 +.04 1.96 38.44 -.27 DrxFnBull ... 27.52 -1.09 LillyEli .80f 39.66 -1.15 DirxSCBull ... 83.20 -1.80 Limited LincNat .20 29.21 -.55 DirxEnBull .05e 72.50 -.34 Name

Name Sell Chg Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.57 -.22 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.53 -.20 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.61 -.05 GrowthI 27.39 -.18 Ultra 24.22 -.16 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.08 -.16 AMutlA p 26.96 -.16 BalA p 18.79 -.12 BondA p 12.37 +.01 CapIBA p 52.43 -.20 CapWGA p37.61 -.28 CapWA p 21.01 -.03 EupacA p 42.90 -.34 FdInvA p 38.96 -.31 GovtA p 14.06 +.01 GwthA p 32.00 -.18 HI TrA p 11.59 ... IncoA p 17.55 -.08 IntBdA p 13.52 ... IntlGrIncA p32.90 -.28 ICAA p 29.37 -.22 NEcoA p 26.99 -.19 N PerA p 29.90 -.23 NwWrldA 55.35 -.25 SmCpA p 39.94 -.18 TxExA p 12.04 ... WshA p 29.22 -.23 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.30 -.24 IntEqII I r 12.51 -.10 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.96 -.24 IntlVal r 28.42 -.18 MidCap 36.83 -.17 MidCapVal22.58 -.11 SCapVal 18.19 -.06

Baron Funds: Growth 55.30 -.33 SmallCap 26.23 -.21 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.97 +.01 DivMu 14.49 ... TxMgdIntl 15.88 -.20 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.71 -.16 GlAlA r 20.09 -.09 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.71 -.09 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.75 -.16 GlbAlloc r 20.19 -.10 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 56.65 -.40 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 64.67 -.77 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 31.12 -.21 DivEqInc 10.65 -.09 DivrBd 5.10 ... Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 32.16 -.22 AcornIntZ 41.92 -.20 LgCapGr 14.03 -.01 ValRestr 52.06 -.19 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.42 +.08 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n11.71 -.12 USCorEq1 n11.78-.09 USCorEq2 n11.73-.09 DWS Invest S: MgdMuni S 8.83 -.01 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 36.03 -.28 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 36.43 -.29 NYVen C 34.74 -.27

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: chg.

+.12 -.82 -.40 -.03 +.20 -.15 -.40 -.15

-.05 -.90 -.73 -.85 -.42 -.75 -.90 -.50

+.65 +.70 +.43 -.02 +.05 +.25 +.08 +.30 +.50

93.09 -1.16 6.63 -.05 3.33 -.12 8.09 -.21 24.46 -.32 40.00 -1.00

M-N-0

MBIA ... 8.71 -.14 MEMC ... 10.30 -.10 MF Global ... 7.45 -.40 MFA Fncl .94 8.14 +.02 MGIC ... 7.45 -.24 MGM Rsts ... 15.38 -.14 Macys .40f 28.63 -.87 Manitowoc .08 17.73 -.25 Manulife g .52 17.97 -.18 MarathonO1.00 51.20 -.72 MktVGold .40e 55.76 +.16 MktVRus .18e 36.94 -.80 MktVJrGld2.93e 36.15 +.68 MktV Agri .33e 53.13 -.57 MarIntA .40f 37.16 +.01 MarshM .88f 30.43 -.07 MarshIls .04 7.98 -.05 Masco .30 14.25 +.44 MasseyEn .24 61.00 +.03 McDrmInt s ... 20.77 +.16 McDnlds 2.44 u82.33 -.18 McKesson .72 85.07 -1.57 McMoRn ... 17.82 +.28 Mechel ... 25.61 -1.09 MedcoHlth ... 64.30 -.35 Medtrnic .90 42.21 -.61 Merck 1.52 37.06 -.32 MetLife .74 44.22 -.97 MetroPCS ... 17.73 -.56 MitsuUFJ ... 4.52 -.10 MobileTele1.06e 19.99 +.35 Molycorp n ... 59.36 -1.16 Monsanto 1.12 66.33 -.26 MonstrWw ... 15.13 +.12 MorgStan .20 23.83 -.47 Mosaic .20 65.42 -.89 Mosaic wi ... 65.50 ... MotrlaMo n ... 24.17 +.21 MurphO 1.10 66.88 -.38 NRG Egy ... u25.27 +.35 NYSE Eur 1.20 35.76 -.06 Nabors ... 26.85 +.02 NBkGreece.29e d1.33 -.03 NOilVarco .44 67.76 -.17 NatSemi .40 24.46 ... NwMtnF n ... 13.00 ... NY Times ... 7.69 -.19 NewellRub .32f 17.86 -.46 NewfldExp ... 74.90 +1.62 NewmtM .80f 54.08 +.02 Nexen g .20 22.89 +.13 NextEraEn2.20f 57.78 -.61 NiSource .92 20.37 -.14 NikeB 1.24 85.05 -1.06 NobleCorp1.06e 41.00 -.02 NokiaCp .55e 8.31 -.24 Nordstrm .92 45.60 -.85 NoAmEn g ... 7.80 +.20 NorthropG 2.00f 64.50 -.66 Nucor 1.45 41.80 -1.04 OcciPet 1.84 100.40 +.02 OfficeDpt ... 4.08 -.05 OfficeMax ... d8.11 -.08 OilSvHT 2.36e 149.02 +.19 Omnicom 1.00f 47.73 -.29 OwensIll ... 31.83 -.85

P-Q-R

PG&E Cp 1.82 44.78 -.31 PMI Grp ... d1.39 -.18 PNC 1.40f 61.67 -1.30 PPL Corp 1.40 u28.28 +.09 ParkerHan1.48f 86.44 -1.36 PatriotCoal ... 22.36 -.60 PeabdyE .34 58.80 -.74 Penney .80 36.10 -1.86 PepsiCo 2.06f 71.30 -.48 Petrohawk ... 25.64 +1.48 PetrbrsA 1.34e 30.23 +.31 Petrobras 1.28e 33.87 +.18 .80 20.69 -.34 Pfizer PhilipMor 2.56 70.19 -.49 Pier 1 ... 11.41 -.03 PioNtrl .08 90.94 -.02 Potash s .28 52.04 -1.50 PwshDB ... 29.35 +.27 PS Agri ... 32.51 -.17 PS USDBull ... 21.65 +.15 PrUShS&P ... 20.48 +.29 ProUltQQQ ... 90.75 -1.40 PrUShQQQ rs... 50.02 +.77 ProUltSP .39e 53.98 -.84 ProUShL20 ... 34.16 -.01 ProUSSP500 ... 15.42 +.33 ProUSSlv rs ... 19.68 +.02 PrUltCrde rs ... 47.90 +1.02 PrUShCrde rs... 44.98 -.98 ProSUltSilv ... 171.94 -1.05 ProUShEuro ... 17.71 +.36 ProctGam 2.10f 67.36 -.10 ProgsvCp 1.40e 21.65 -.13 ProLogis .45 15.80 -.20 ProUSR2K rs ... 42.49 +.58 Prudentl 1.15f 63.61 -1.01 PSEG 1.37 34.11 -.07 PulteGrp ... 7.73 +.16 QuantaSvc ... 19.74 +.09 QksilvRes ... 14.44 +.14 Quiksilvr ... 4.33 -.14 RSC Hldgs ... 12.10 -.17 RadianGrp .01 d4.39 -.29 RadioShk .25 15.83 -.27 RangeRs .16 54.24 +1.79 Raytheon 1.72f 49.45 -.28 RegionsFn .04 6.95 -.15 ReneSola ... 7.25 -.29 Renren n ... 13.00 -.75 RepubSvc .80 32.15 -.79 RioTinto 1.08e 66.59 -.82 RiteAid ... 1.12 -.05 Rowan ... 39.35 +.09 RylCarb ... 40.01 -.04 RoyDShllB 3.36 70.25 -.87 RoyDShllA 3.36 69.64 -.99

SpdrGold ... 147.49 +1.84 SP Mid 1.55e 179.28 -1.38 S&P500ETF2.34e133.611.07 SpdrKbwBk.15e 24.75 -.41 SpdrKbw RB.36e 25.73 -.34 SpdrRetl .50e 52.41 -.91 SpdrOGEx .49e 58.50 +.40 SpdrMetM .41e 68.52 -.55 Safeway .58f 25.20 -.22 StJude .84 50.82 -1.10 Saks ... 11.10 -.18 Salesforce ... 146.61 +10.80 SandRdge ... 10.45 ... Sanofi 1.82e 38.29 -.94 SaraLee .46 19.60 -.06 Schlmbrg 1.00 83.50 -.08 Schwab .24 17.32 -.30 SeadrillLtd2.74e 35.04 +.11 SemiHTr .57e 35.90 -.23 ShawGrp ... 37.32 -1.59 SiderurNac.81e 13.83 -.23 SilvWhtn g .12 35.08 +.38 SilvrcpM g .08 10.24 ... SimonProp 3.20 114.39 -1.85 Solutia ... 24.02 +.30 SouthnCo 1.89f 40.47 -.35 SthnCopper1.83e35.05 -.32 SoUnCo .60 u29.57 +1.22 SwstAirl .02 12.27 -.13 SwstnEngy ... 42.87 +1.00 SpectraEn 1.04 27.39 -.15 SprintNex ... u5.47 +.14 SP Matls 1.23e 38.51 -.39 SP HlthC .61e 36.04 -.30 SP CnSt .81e u32.32 -.10 SP Consum.56e 40.27 -.39 SP Engy 1.05e 74.63 -.09 SPDR Fncl .16e 15.72 -.22 SP Inds .64e 37.37 -.40 SP Tech .33e 26.17 -.15 SP Util 1.31e u34.13 -.04 StarwdHtl .30f 59.21 +.06 StateStr .72f 46.84 -.63 Statoil ASA1.10e 24.76 -.39 ... 18.38 -.06 StillwtrM Stryker .72 63.42 -.58 Suncor gs .44f 40.69 -.21 Sunoco .60 39.83 -.30 Suntech ... 7.70 -.20 SunTrst .04 27.89 -.88 Supvalu .35 10.47 -.53 Synovus .04 2.37 -.03 Sysco 1.04 32.42 -.02 TECO .85f 19.11 +.01 TJX .76f 52.62 +.47 TaiwSemi .47e 13.41 -.04 Talbots ... 4.52 -.50 TalismE g .27f 20.87 +.07 Target 1.00 49.69 -.60 TeckRes g .60 50.00 +.04 TelNorL .52e 16.89 +.23 TelefEsp s1.98e 23.77 -.59 TenetHlth ... 6.28 -.14 Teradyn ... 15.84 -.21 Tesoro ... 23.65 -.42 TexInst .52 35.00 +.03 Textron .08 22.98 -.44 ThermoFis ... 65.18 -.20 ThomCrk g ... 10.62 +.02 3M Co 2.20 93.56 -1.15 Tidwtr 1.00 53.59 +.13 TW Cable 1.92 77.99 +.67 TimeWarn .94 36.79 -.10 TitanMet .30 18.92 -.11 TollBros ... 20.66 +.05 Total SA 3.16e 56.72 -.88 Transocn .79e 69.51 +.45 Travelers 1.64f 62.25 -.56 TrinaSolar ... 21.98 +.14 TycoIntl 1.00 49.24 -.74 Tyson .16 18.76 +.20 UBS AG ... 18.34 -.28 US Airwy ... 10.17 -.15 US Gold ... 6.71 +.15 UltraPt g ... 48.11 +1.52 UnilevNV 1.17e 32.15 -.60 UnionPac 1.90f 101.99 -.80 UtdContl ... 26.50 -.18 UtdMicro .08e 2.60 -.04 UPS B 2.08 74.05 -.25 US Bancrp .50f 25.20 -.61 US NGs rs ... 10.96 +.39 US OilFd ... 39.47 +.40 USSteel .20 44.96 -.48 UtdTech 1.92f 87.50 -.60 UtdhlthGp .50 49.74 -.81 UnumGrp .37 26.72 -.18

V-W-X-Y-Z

Vale SA .90e 30.41 -.04 Vale SA pf .90e 27.37 +.13 ValeantPh .38a 49.52 -.38 ValeroE .20 26.05 -.46 VangEmg .82e 47.71 -.38 ... 46.62 +1.20 VeriFone VerizonCm 1.95 37.15 -.17 ViacomB .60 51.29 -.14 VimpelCm .80e 13.94 -.12 Visa .60 78.23 -1.41 VishayInt ... 16.33 -.08 VMware ... 95.57 +1.68 Vonage ... 4.69 -.06 WalMart 1.46f 55.29 -.19 Walgrn .70 44.37 +.14 WalterEn .50 118.10 -3.17 WsteMInc 1.36 38.87 -.35 WeathfIntl ... 19.71 +.20 WellPoint 1.00 80.53 -1.25 WellsFargo .48f 28.00 -.61 WendyArby .08 4.98 +.03 ... 36.14 -.21 WDigital WstnRefin ... 15.94 -.06 WstnUnion .32f 20.60 -.12 Weyerh .60 21.76 -.07 WhitingPt s ... 65.04 +1.30 WmsCos .50 30.76 +.13 WmsSon .68f 40.06 -1.14 XL Grp .44 23.54 -.20 XcelEngy 1.04f u25.26 +.02 Xerox .17 10.11 -.15 Yamana g .18f 12.07 -.21 S-T-U YingliGrn ... 9.05 -.91 ... 47.75 -1.84 SLM Cp .40 16.34 -.14 Youku n SpdrDJIA 3.04e 124.85 -.91 YumBrnds 1.00 u56.26 -.43

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

AMEX

Est. sales 29455. Thu’s Sales: 43,485 Thu’s open int: 222135, off -3735 PORK BELLIES 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 11 126.50 Jul 11 121.00 Aug 11 106.50 Feb 12 120.00 Mar 12 120.50 Last spot N/A Thu’s Sales: Thu’s open int: , unch

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high low settle chg. COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jul 11 155.64 157.02 150.06 155.61 -.04 Oct 11 130.54 134.11 130.54 134.11 +1.92 Dec 11 119.50 120.24 117.11 119.76 +.57 Mar 12 111.99 112.05 110.12 111.77 +.56 May 12 108.00 108.43 106.30 108.38 +.67 Jul 12 105.23 106.62 105.00 106.56 +.62 Oct 12 100.44 +.84 Dec 12 99.00 100.53 98.30 100.53 +1.25 Mar 13 100.31 100.42 100.31 100.42 +.14 May 13 100.00 100.32 100.00 100.32 -.59 Last spot N/A Est. sales 11272. Thu’s Sales: 14,398 Thu’s open int: 150799, up +179

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Jul 11 779 818ø 779 806ø Sep 11 850 861ü 833fl 849ü Dec 11 894fl 907ø 882ø 893

chg.

-5ø -6 -8

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg S&P500ETF1541712133.611.07 BkofAm 1122497 11.58 -.11 SprintNex 856339 5.47 +.14 SPDR Fncl 670254 15.72 -.22

Name Vol (00) CheniereEn129801 NA Pall g 53973 NwGold g 49947 GoldStr g 35692 GrtBasG g 34172

Name BarnesNob ZaleCp FootLockr ChinaDigtl JPM FTLgC

Last 18.33 4.15 25.11 6.46 38.00

Chg +4.22 +.62 +2.85 +.66 +3.38

%Chg +29.9 +17.6 +12.8 +11.4 +9.8

Name CheniereEn ClaudeR g Tofutti InstFnMkts WstCopp g

Last 10.04 2.17 2.29 3.77 3.48

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg +2.35 +30.6 Opnext 2.60 +.73 +.20 +10.2 HSW Intl h 5.85 +1.25 +.19 +9.0 CellTher rsh 2.08 +.40 +.27 +7.8 RedRobin 35.08 +6.56 +.23 +7.0 Jiayuan n 14.34 +2.34

Name Gap TrnsRty Aeropostl ChinaYuch LDK Solar

Last 19.22 2.28 18.30 21.03 7.26

Chg -4.07 -.45 -3.04 -3.47 -.95

%Chg -17.5 -16.6 -14.2 -14.2 -11.6

Name B&HO AmBiltrt Medgenic n TravelCtrs LucasEngy

Last 4.13 9.25 3.20 5.86 2.70

Chg %Chg -.87 -17.4 -1.08 -10.5 -.29 -8.3 -.53 -8.3 -.22-

Name Last Chg %Chg ArubaNet 27.10 -5.59 -17.1 PlugPwr rs 3.82 -.76 -16.6 ChinaNet 2.18 -.40 -15.5 GulfRes 3.33 -.53 -13.7 AmpioPhm 7.00 -.95 -11.9

1,042 1,993 121 3,156 101 21 3,619,126,617

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

233 231 37 501 8 7Lows 114,614,94295

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

52-Week High Low 12,876.00 9,614.32 5,565.78 3,872.64 441.20 346.95 8,718.25 6,355.83 2,490.51 1,689.19 2,887.75 2,061.14 1,370.58 1,010.91 14,562.01 15.80 868.57 587.66

Last 10.04 3.50 9.41 2.68 1.96

Name Level3 Intel SiriusXM Cisco Microsoft

Chg +2.35 -.23 +.08 +.05 -.10

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 12,512.04 5,448.76 439.82 8,357.53 2,384.92 2,803.32 1,333.27 14,135.09 829.06

%Chg +39.0 +27.2 +23.8 +23.0 +19.5

DIARY

Net Chg -93.28 -30.04 -.10 -70.42 +9.09 -19.99 -10.33 -101.84 -6.10

Div

852 1,724 121 2,697 56 52 1,743,958,195

% Chg -.74 -.55 -.02 -.84 +.38 -.71 -.77 -.72 -.73

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST YTD %Chg Name

Last Chg 1.96 +.11 23.22 -.32 2.22 -.01 16.53 -.13 24.49-.23-

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

INDEXES

Vol (00) 757415 625455 532422 482010 449739

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

YTD 52-wk % Chg % Chg +8.07 +22.75 +6.70 +28.46 +8.60 +21.57 +4.94 +23.35 +7.99 +36.75 +5.67 +25.76 +6.01 +22.58 +5.80 +24.03 +5.79+27.694.4

PE Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

Name

Div

PE Last

BkofAm

.04

21

Chevron

3.12f

10 102.57 -1.30

CocaCola

1.88

14

68.30 -.16

Disney

.40f

18

41.50 +.12

+10.6 Pfizer

.80

EOG Res

.64

... 106.85 +.86

+16.9 SwstAirl

.02

...

7

15.00 -.12

-10.7 TexInst

.52

13

35.00 +.03

+7.7

.32

9

35.98 -.15

-14.5 TimeWarn

.94

16

36.79 -.10

+14.4

FordM HewlettP

Chg

11.58 -.11

-13.2 ONEOK Pt

4.60f

20

83.07 +.47

+4.5

+12.4 PNM Res

.50

20

15.86 -.18

+21.8

+3.8 PepsiCo

2.06f

19

71.30 -.48

+9.1

20

20.69 -.34

+18.2

20

12.27 -.13

-5.5

HollyCp

.60

15

59.37 -1.05

+45.6 TriContl

.28e

...

14.92 -.06

+8.4

Intel

.84f

11

23.22 -.32

+10.4 WalMart

1.46f

13

55.29 -.19

+2.5

IBM

3.00f

14 170.16 -.43

+15.9 WashFed

.24

13

15.56 -.08

-8.0

Merck

1.52

16

.48f

12

28.00 -.61

-9.6

25.26 +.02

+7.3

Microsoft

.64

37.06 -.32

+2.8 WellsFargo

HOW TO READ THE MARKET IN REVIEW 6

24.49 -.23

-12.3 XcelEngy

1.04f

15

Here are the 525 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 400 most active on the Nasdaq National Markets and 100 most active on American Stock Exchange. Mutual funds are 450 largest. Stocks in bold changed 5 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letters’ list. .48 12.88 # AAR Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock, based on latest quar- ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 ACM Op .80 7.25 # terly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise footnoted. ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. ACMSp .96 7.50 # Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... mark.

Fund Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold. Chg: Daily net change in the NAV.

AAL Mutual: Bond p 9.49 -.01

Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

MUTUAL FUNDS

Mar 12 922 936fl 912ø 920ø May 12 929ü 942ø 925ø 927ø Jul 12 922fl 937ø 914 920fl Sep 12 926ü 937 924ø 926 Last spot N/A Est. sales 188649. Thu’s Sales: 117,132 Thu’s open int: 455908, off -2349 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Jul 11 755 765 743ü 759ø Sep 11 716 723 704ü 717ø Dec 11 667 671ø 653ø 666ø Mar 12 675ü 681 663ø 676fl May 12 682 686ø 672 683fl Jul 12 686 694 678ø 688ø Sep 12 620ø 629ø 620ø 629ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 463438. Thu’s Sales: 256,641 Thu’s open int: 1417995, off -1253 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Jul 11 364ø 367ø 361 364 Sep 11 371ø 373ø 369 371ø Dec 11 375ü 378ü 372ø 375ø Mar 12 387 387 387 387 May 12 395 395 395 395 Jul 12 403 403 403 403 Sep 12 411 411 411 411 Last spot N/A Est. sales 992. Thu’s Sales: 753 Thu’s open int: 12275, up +134 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Jul 11 1371 1396 1365 1380ü Aug 11 1378ü 1386fl 1357ø 1371fl Sep 11 1365 1372ü 1349ø 1360ü Nov 11 1353ø 1361 1337ü 1350ø Jan 12 1362ø 1368fl 1346ü 1358fl Mar 12 1361ø 1371fl 1353ü 1361 May 12 1357fl 1366 1345 1355 Jul 12 1357fl 1368ø 1355 1358ü Aug 12 1348ø 1351ø 1348ø 1351ø Sep 12 1323ø 1326ø 1323ø 1326ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 242301. Thu’s Sales: 124,844 Thu’s open int: 549947, up +2252

-9ü -9ø -10ü -11

HighYld n 8.40 ... IntmTFBd n11.00 ... ShtDurBd n11.02 +.01 USLCCrPls n21.47.16 Janus T Shrs: BalancdT 26.32 -.11 OvrseasT r48.80 -.24 PrkMCVal T24.14 -.17 Twenty T 66.99 -.42 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 12.94 -.10 LSBalanc 13.49 -.06 LSGrwth 13.50 -.09 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p26.40.19 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.26 -.10 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p21.63 -.10 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p15.43 ... Longleaf Partners: Partners 31.04 -.11 SmCap 29.91 -.10 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.97 -.01 StrInc C 15.63 -.01 LSBondR 14.91 -.01 StrIncA 15.55 -.02 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.52 ... Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 12.04 -.12 BdDebA p 8.10 -.01 ShDurIncA p4.63 +.01 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t4.65 ... MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.71 -.07

FUTURES

+11ü +6 +4ø +4fl +4fl +4ü +4ø

+fl

+1 -ü -ø -fl +3 +3

ValueA 24.36 -.20 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.47 -.21 MFS Funds Instl: IntlEq n 19.03 -.18 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 6.04 +.01 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.25 -.09 Matthews Asian: PacTgrInv 23.69 +.05 MergerFd 16.26 ... Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.55 +.01 TotRtBdI 10.54 ... MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 14.40 -.14 MCapGrI 41.70 -.06 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.98 -.14 GlbDiscZ 31.38 -.14 QuestZ 18.80 -.05 SharesZ 22.28 -.12 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 50.10 -.33 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 51.87 -.35 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.54 ... MMIntEq r 10.11 -.10 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 29.27 -.11 Intl I r 20.26 -.18 Oakmark r 44.71 -.41 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.19 -.02 GlbSMdCap16.54-.10 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 45.76 -.31 DvMktA p 35.71 -.08 GlobA p 65.26 -.61

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

Div Last Chg Comc spcl .45 23.71 -.18 Compuwre ... 10.87 -.10 A-B-C CorinthC ... 4.10 -.11 .96f u83.40 -.46 ASML Hld .58e 39.56 -.62 Costco ... 42.16 -.14 ATP O&G ... 17.45 +.09 Cree Inc ... 21.48 -.57 AVI Bio ... 1.65 -.08 Crocs Ctrip.com ... 44.80 -.02 Achillion ... 5.57 +.21 ... u35.82 -.16 AcmePkt ... 77.33 -.19 CubistPh Cyclacel ... 1.61 +.04 AcordaTh ... 30.38 +3.67 ActivsBliz .17f 11.60 -.10 CypSemi .36 22.08 -.28 AdobeSy ... 35.31 -.10 D-E-F AEterna g ... 2.25 +.12 ... 16.01 -.33 Affymetrix ... 5.93 -.34 Dell Inc ... 38.98 +.45 AgFeed ... 1.15 -.07 Dndreon AkamaiT ... 34.20 +1.55 Dentsply .20 u39.28 -.81 AlaskCom .86 8.98 +.20 Depomed ... 8.23 +.19 AlignTech ... 23.97 -.24 DirecTV A ... 50.06 -.15 Alkerm ... u18.11 -.02 DiscCm A ... 44.73 -.62 AllosThera ... 2.42 +.01 DishNetwk ... u29.48 -.43 AllscriptH ... 20.06 -.29 DonlleyRR 1.04 20.79 -.13 AlteraCp lf .24 47.77 +.46 DrmWksA ... 24.91 -.58 ... 3.82 -.06 AlterraCap .48 22.76 +.37 DryShips Amazon ... 198.65 -.16 ETrade rs ... 15.60 -.30 eBay ... 32.48 -.42 ACapAgy 5.60e 29.97 +.04 AmCapLtd ... 9.82 -.26 EagleBulk ... d2.61 -.03 AmSupr ... d10.34 -.48 ErthLink .20 7.77 -.03 Amgen ... 60.86 -.18 EstWstBcp .20f 20.22 -.68 ... 23.64 -.14 AmkorT lf ... 6.47 -.16 ElectArts ... 13.69 +.24 Emcore lf ... 2.49 +.08 Amylin Anadigc ... 3.10 +.24 EndoPhrm ... 41.02 -.33 Ansys ... 57.01 -.20 Endologix ... u8.41 +.11 ... d1.23 -.09 A123 Sys ... 5.66 -.16 Ener1 ... 8.73 -.10 ApolloGrp ... 40.97 -.32 Entegris EntropCom ... 8.54 -.05 ApolloInv 1.12 11.19 -.11 Apple Inc ... 335.22 -5.31 EricsnTel .37e 15.05 -.02 ... 11.34 -.35 ApldMatl .32f 14.09 -.24 Exelixis AMCC ... 10.00 ... Expedia .28 27.57 +.32 ArenaPhm ... 1.38 +.10 ExpdIntl .50f 53.00 -.42 AresCap 1.40 16.83 -.17 F5 Netwks ... 106.96 -1.22 AriadP ... 8.76 -.26 FifthThird .24f 12.72 -.28 ... 23.45 -.37 Ariba Inc ... 31.99 +.32 Finisar .20 u22.29 +.64 ArmHld .09e 28.03 -.37 FinLine Arris ... 10.73 -.13 FstNiagara .64 14.23 +.09 ... 126.38 -1.99 ArubaNet ... 27.10 -5.59 FstSolar ... 63.10 -.23 AscenaRtl ... 31.24 -.61 Fiserv Flextrn ... 6.80 +.05 AspenTech ... 16.79 +.05 AsscdBanc .04 14.33 -.09 FocusMda ... 32.98 +.06 ... 9.49 -.04 Atheros ... u44.99 +.32 FormFac Atmel ... 14.32 -.30 FosterWhl ... 33.44 -.75 ... 1.59 -.03 Autodesk ... 42.35 -2.04 FuelCell AutoData 1.44 54.17 -.08 FultonFncl .16f 11.13 -.19 Auxilium ... 21.87 -.32 G-H-I AvagoTch .32f 34.39 -.42 AvanirPhm ... 4.34 -.06 GSI Cmce h ... 29.20 +.01 ... 12.32 -.05 AVEO Ph ... 18.55 +.05 GT Solar ... 34.98 -.24 AvisBudg ... 17.30 -.35 Garmin Axcelis ... 1.77 -.04 GenProbe ... 81.93 -.94 .48f 29.80 -.63 BGC Ptrs .68f 7.85 -.29 Gentex ... 4.65 -.06 BMC Sft ... 54.74 -.23 GeronCp BannerCp .04 2.73 -.01 GileadSci ... 40.98 +.80 Gleacher ... 2.04 +.09 BeacnRfg ... 21.22 +.67 BebeStrs .10a 6.54 -.28 GlobCrsg ... u29.73 +1.99 ... 6.14 +.09 BedBath ... 53.83 -1.08 GloblInd BiogenIdc ... 97.11 +.39 GluMobile ... 3.91 -.22 BioMimetic ... 8.10 +.15 GolarLNG .75r 29.46 +.35 ... 524.03 -7.22 BioSante ... 2.63 +.18 Google ... 3.33 -.53 BrigExp ... 29.80 +.77 GulfRes Broadcom .36 33.51 -.07 GulfportE ... 28.45 -.37 HansenNat ... u69.56 +.62 BrcdeCm ... 6.67 +.41 Bucyrus .10 91.36 -.01 HanwhaSol ... d5.23 -.31 Harmonic ... 7.56 -.10 .20f 23.18 +.15 CA Inc CH Robins 1.16 80.57 -.23 Hasbro 1.20 47.49 -.48 CadencePh ... 8.61 +.70 HercOffsh ... 6.24 -.08 ... u38.99 +1.49 Cadence ... 10.62 -.17 Hibbett ... 21.06 -.36 CapFdF rs .30a 11.83 +.01 Hologic HudsCity .32m 9.20 -.13 CpstnTrb h ... 1.76 -.01 ... 27.44 -.54 Carrizo ... 35.67 +.51 HumGen CaviumNet ... 45.77 -.83 HuntBnk .04 6.37 -.20 ... 35.96 +.91 Celgene ... 60.49 -.38 IAC Inter ... 23.33 -.67 CelldexTh ... 3.54 +.19 IconixBr Illumina ... 72.86 -.03 CentEuro ... 11.78 -.49 CentAl ... 15.42 -.14 ImunoGn ... 12.01 -.72 Imunmd ... 4.00 -.08 Cephln ... 79.73 +.03 ... 18.97 +.03 Cerner ... 123.56 -.65 Incyte ... 7.19 -.06 ... 3.99 -.05 Infinera ChrmSh ... 55.38 +.49 ChartInds ... 46.65 +1.59 Informat ... 55.35 +.52 InfosysT 1.35e 62.91 +.21 ChkPoint ... 8.40 -.09 Cheesecake ... 31.20 -.39 IntgDv .84f 23.22 -.32 ChildPlace ... 50.58 -3.57 Intel ChinaBiot ... 10.03 -.25 InterMune ... 37.86 +.15 .48 14.15 -.14 ChinaTcF ... 5.75 -.41 Intersil ... 54.98 -.92 ChiCache n ... d10.60 -.98 Intuit IstaPh ... 9.68 -.21 CienaCorp ... 26.26 +.06 CinnFin 1.60 30.69 -.31 J-K-L .49f 32.06 -.13 Cintas ... 5.59 -.21 Cirrus ... 15.95 -.07 JA Solar Cisco .24 16.53 -.13 JDS Uniph ... 20.32 -.12 JackInBox ... 22.10 -.17 CitrixSys ... 84.28 +1.24 CleanEngy ... 13.68 -.38 JamesRiv ... 21.06 -.32 ... 6.24 -.11 Clearwire ... 4.52 +.02 JetBlue CognizTech ... 74.05 +.36 Jiayuan n ... u14.34 +2.34 .70 90.35 +.17 Coinstar ... 53.12 +.52 JoyGlbl ColdwtrCrk ... d2.16 -.13 KLA Tnc 1.00 41.20 -.01 ... u32.87 +4.88 ColumLabs ... 3.26 +.04 Kenexa Comcast .45 25.12 -.26 Kirklands ... 13.50 -1.45

Name

low settle

chg.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Jun 11 99.34 99.90 95.99 99.49 +1.05 Jul 11 99.93 100.42 96.35 100.10 +1.17 Aug 11 100.30 100.79 96.75 100.48 +1.16 Sep 11 100.63 101.10 97.13 100.82 +1.15 Oct 11 100.62 101.18 97.60 101.05 +1.12 Nov 11 100.79 101.38 97.69 101.22 +1.10 Dec 11 101.21 101.73 97.77 101.36 +1.08 Jan 12 101.23 101.71 98.39 101.42 +1.08 Feb 12 101.20 101.44 98.42 101.41 +1.08 Mar 12 101.18 101.37 97.99 101.37 +1.09 Apr 12 101.32 101.32 101.31 101.31 +1.09 May 12 101.61 101.61 101.24 101.24 +1.08 Jun 12 101.21 101.36 98.30 101.18 +1.09 Jul 12 101.04 +1.12 Aug 12 100.86 +1.16 Sep 12 100.71 +1.20 Oct 12 100.58 +1.23 Nov 12 100.49 +1.26 Dec 12 100.03 100.76 97.35 100.45 +1.28 Jan 13 100.20 +1.32 Feb 13 99.99 +1.36 Mar 13 99.82 +1.41 Apr 13 99.67 +1.46 May 13 99.53 +1.51 Last spot N/A Est. sales 622410. Thu’s Sales: 618,965 Thu’s open int: 1546119, off -14498 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Jun 11 2.9404 2.9700 2.8563 2.9358 +.0098 Jul 11 2.9259 2.9435 2.8435 2.9203 +.0163 Aug 11 2.9056 2.9194 2.8283 2.9014 +.0170 Sep 11 2.8768 2.8880 2.8079 2.8806 +.0183 Oct 11 2.7492 2.7563 2.6779 2.7533 +.0192 Nov 11 2.7334 2.7334 2.6519 2.7290 +.0204 Dec 11 2.7157 2.7280 2.6388 2.7186 +.0217 Jan 12 2.6801 2.7232 2.6600 2.7232 +.0222 Feb 12 2.7385 +.0225 Mar 12 2.7545 +.0232

GblStrIncA 4.40 ... Gold p 45.09 +.48 IntBdA p 6.65 -.03 MnStFdA 33.45 -.22 Oppenheimer Roch: RoMu A p 15.13 ... RcNtMuA 6.71 ... Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 35.36 -.08 IntlBdY 6.65 -.03 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.04 ... PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r10.98 +.01 AllAsset 12.59 -.01 ComodRR 9.41 +.09 DevLcMk r 11.00 -.04 DivInc 11.68 ... HiYld 9.54 ... InvGrCp 10.79 ... LowDu 10.52 ... RealRtnI 11.64 ... 9.92 ... ShortT TotRt 11.04 ... PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.52 ... RealRtA p 11.64 ... TotRtA 11.04 ... PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.04 ... PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.04 ... PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.04 ... Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n 27.87 -.18 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 47.99 +.03 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 42.97 -.33

KongZhg Ku6Media Kulicke LKQ Corp LamResrch Lattice LawsnSft LeapWirlss Level3 LexiPhrm LibGlobA LibtyMIntA LifeTech LimelghtN LinearTch Logitech lululemn g

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .96 ... ...

6.60 4.80 11.87 26.25 47.19 6.82 11.11 16.00 u1.96 1.51 44.82 17.71 53.98 5.77 34.33 12.94 96.29

M-N-0

+.42 +.16 ... -.19 +.58 -.02 +.01 -.70 +.11 +.01 -.23 -.26 -.60 -.05 -.23 +.17 -.95

MIPS Tech ... 7.80 +.04 MAKO Srg ... u31.98 +1.88 MannKd ... 4.00 -.02 MarinaB rs ... .25 +.02 MarvellT ... 14.34 -.09 Mattel .92 26.69 -.29 MaximIntg .84 27.29 -.17 MelcoCrwn ... 10.31 -.12 Microchp 1.38 39.97 -.11 Micromet ... 6.20 -.16 MicronT ... 10.00 -.17 MicroSemi ... 22.05 -.12 Microsoft .64 24.49 -.23 Millicom 6.00e 108.02 -1.88 Motricity n ... 8.70 -.25 Move Inc ... 2.00 -.06 Mylan ... 23.82 -.26 MyriadG ... 24.98 -.18 NII Hldg ... 41.83 +.09 NPS Phm ... 10.14 +.20 NXP Sem n ... 28.86 +.54 NasdOMX ... 25.50 -.63 NektarTh ... 9.58 -.01 NetLogicM ... 36.28 +.29 NetApp ... 53.70 -.75 Netflix ... 245.90 +3.17 NetSpend n ... d8.28 -.27 NetwkEng ... 1.22 +.02 NewsCpA .15 17.48 -.22 NewsCpB .15 18.42 -.20 NorTrst 1.12 48.93 -.51 Novavax ... 2.40 -.03 Novlus ... 36.54 +.50 NuanceCm ... 21.66 -.17 Nvidia ... 18.09 +.31 OReillyAu ... 57.89 -.70 Oclaro ... 9.63 -.01 OmniVisn h ... 35.54 +.77 OnSmcnd ... 11.29 -.21 OnyxPh ... 43.71 +.22 OpenTable ... 90.14 -1.16 Opnext ... 2.60 +.73 OptimerPh ... 13.93 +.04 Oracle .24f 34.27 -.23 Orexigen ... 2.96 +.01 Oritani s .40 12.71 -.07 Orthovta ... 3.83 ...

P-Q-R

PDL Bio .60 6.63 +.11 PMC Sra ... 8.09 +.06 Paccar .48a 50.55 -.81 PacSunwr ... 3.45 -.08 PaetecHld ... 4.03 +.10 PanASlv .10 32.61 +.18 ParamTc h ... 22.96 -.09 Patterson .48f 35.79 -1.01 PattUTI .20 28.14 ... Paychex 1.24 31.91 -.03 PensonWw ... 3.58 +.08 PeopUtdF .63f 13.41 -.09 PetsMart .50 45.22 -.49 Polycom ... 53.54 -1.55 Popular ... 2.92 -.11 Power-One ... 8.73 -.12 PwShs QQQ.39e 57.77 -.45 Powrwav ... 3.96 +.03 PriceTR 1.24f 62.91 -.82 priceline ... 520.08 -2.02 PrUPShQQQ ... 24.59 +.53 ProspctCap1.21 11.39 -.04 QIAGEN ... 20.05 -.20 QlikTech n ... 31.86 +.04 ... 16.83 -.21 Qlogic Qualcom .86f 57.38 +.08 QuestSft ... 22.81 -.02 ... 21.98 ... Questcor RF MicD ... 5.93 -.16 Rambus ... 14.18 +.18 Randgold .20 77.84 +.83 RedRobin ... u35.08 +6.56 Rdiff.cm ... 11.11 +.24 Regenrn ... 56.91 +2.07 RschMotn ... 43.52 -.71 RexEnergy ... 12.69 +.11 RightNow ... 32.91 +2.37

A7

RossStrs .88 80.79 +.01 Rovi Corp ... 59.19 +.31

S-T-U

SBA Com ... 39.31 +.33 STEC ... 16.42 +1.70 SalixPhm ... 38.90 -.13 SanDisk ... 46.46 -.02 Sanmina ... 10.73 -.15 Sanofi rt ... 2.50 +.01 Sapient ... 14.45 +.05 SavientPh ... d7.94 -.18 Savvis ... 39.28 -.03 SeagateT .72 16.93 +.36 SearsHldgs ... 72.04 -1.82 SeattGen ... u19.02 +.04 SelCmfrt ... 16.30 -.40 Sequenom ... 7.77 -.05 ShandaGm ... 7.15 +.05 SifyTech ... 4.74 ... SigaTech h ... 13.48 -.13 Slcnware .41e 6.61 -.10 SilvStd g ... 28.01 +.12 Sina ... 115.97 -1.42 SinoClnEn ... 2.52 -.16 SiriusXM ... 2.22 -.01 Sky-mobi n ... 10.00 -.98 SkywksSol ... 27.31 -.20 SmartM ... 9.15 -.01 SmartT gn ... d7.06 +.05 SmartHeat ... d1.77 -.08 SodaStrm n ... u55.32 -1.07 Sohu.cm ... 83.09 -1.39 Sonus ... 3.04 +.21 SpectPh ... 8.66 +.75 Spreadtrm ... 19.46 +.08 Staples .40f d16.37 -.23 StarScient ... 4.13 +.07 Starbucks .52 36.61 -.53 StlDynam .40f 16.86 -.24 SuccessF ... 34.34 +.50 SunPowerA ... 21.14 -.16 SunPwr B ... 20.94 -.12 SuperGen ... 2.99 +.24 SwisherH n ... 5.84 -.34 Symantec ... 19.43 -.14 Synopsys ... 27.01 +.20 TD Ameritr .20 21.00 +.06 THQ ... 4.03 -.07 TTM Tch ... 16.94 +.12 tw telecom ... 22.20 -.24 TakeTwo ... 16.88 -.53 Targacept ... 22.22 +.76 Tekelec ... 8.45 -.14 Tellabs .08 4.65 -.05 TeslaMot n ... 27.97 -.23 TevaPhrm .83e 49.87 -.35 Thoratec ... 35.23 -.47 TibcoSft ... 29.39 +.54 TiVo Inc ... 9.47 -.01 TowerSemi ... 1.28 -.01 Travelzoo ... 73.37 +.65 TridentM h ... .94 +.04 TriQuint ... 12.52 -.17 ... 2.09 -.10 UTStrcm UltaSalon ... 52.50 -.95 Umpqua .20 11.56 -.19 UtdOnln .40 5.94 -.11 UtdTherap ... 65.60 +.33 UnivDisp ... 46.38 +.03 UrbanOut ... 31.51 -1.03

V-W-X-Y-Z

VarianSemi ... 61.17 -.04 VeecoInst ... 54.79 -.32 Verigy ... 14.10 ... Verisign 5.75e 37.27 +.01 Verisk ... 34.02 -.70 Vermillion ... 5.27 +.61 VertxPh ... 55.00 +.21 Vical ... 4.17 -.19 ViewPtFn s .20 12.47 -.10 VirgnMda h .16 32.29 -.06 Vivus ... 8.81 +.24 Vodafone 1.44e 28.42 +.11 Volcano ... 29.67 -.09 WarnerCh s8.50e25.00 -.28 WebMD ... 49.19 +.72 WetSeal ... 4.25 -.45 WholeFd .40 60.84 -1.04 WilshBcp ... 3.24 -.01 Windstrm 1.00 13.47 -.08 Winn-Dixie ... 8.95 -.06 Wynn 2.00f 144.98 -2.03 Xilinx .76f 35.77 -.29 YRC Ww rs ... .87 -.04 Yahoo ... 16.30 -.05 Yongye ... 3.72 +.20 Zagg ... 9.00 -.32 Zalicus ... 2.30 -.03 ZionBcp .04 23.31 -.42 Zumiez ... 28.42 +2.13

AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE

Name

Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. d – New 52- CaGrp 14.47 -.03 wk low during trading day. g – Dividend in Canadian $. Stock price in U.S.$. n – MuBd 10.43 -.01 New issue in past 52 wks. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. s – Split SmCoSt 9.73 -.05 or stock dividend of 25 pct or more in last 52 wks. Div begins with date of split or stock dividend. u – New 52-wk high during trading day. v – Trading halted on primary market. Unless noted, dividend rates are annual disbursements based on last declaration. pf – Preferred. pp – Holder owes installment(s) of purchase price. rt – Rights. un – Units. wd – When distributed. wi – When issued. wt – Warrants. ww – With warrants. xw – Without warrants. Dividend Footnotes: a – Also extra or extras. b – Annual rate plus stock dividend. c – Liquidating dividend. e – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos. f – Annual rate, increased on last declaration. i – Declared or paid after stock dividend or split. j – Paid this year, dividend omitted, deferred or no action taken at last meeting. k – Declared or paid this year, accumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m – Annual rate, reduced on last declaration. p – Init div, annual rate unknown. r – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos plus stock dividend. t – Paid in stock in last 12 mos, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or distribution date. x – Ex-dividend or ex-rights. y – Ex-dividend and sales in full. z – Sales in full. vj – In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such companies. • Most active stocks above must be worth $1 and gainers/losers $2. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Wednesday’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Delaware Invest A: Goldman Sachs A: StrInA 12.68 -.01 Indepn n 25.81 -.20 Fidelity Spart Adv: Diver Inc p 9.36 ... Fidelity Advisor I: IntBd n 10.72 +.01 500IdxAdv n47.31-.37 MdCVA p 38.40 -.25 Dimensional Fds: NwInsgtI n 21.00 -.10 IntmMu n 10.17 ... TotMktAd r n38.87-.29 Goldman Sachs Inst: EmMCrEq n21.97 -.10 Fidelity Freedom: GrOppt 26.10 -.12 IntlDisc n 33.71 -.30 First Eagle: EmMktV 35.47 -.20 FF2010 n 14.09 -.04 InvGrBd n 11.59 +.01 GlblA 7.48 ... 48.40 -.15 HiYield IntSmVa n 17.96 -.14 FF2015 n 11.77 -.03 InvGB n 7.54 +.01 OverseasA23.29 -.02 MidCapV 38.73 -.26 LargeCo 10.54 -.08 FF2020 n 14.35 -.05 LgCapVal 12.22 -.10 Frank/Temp Frnk A: Harbor Funds: USLgVa n 21.90 -.15 FF2020K 13.57 -.04 LatAm 56.90 +.04 CalTFA p 6.81 ... Bond 12.37 ... US Micro n14.44 -.09 FF2025 n 12.01 -.05 LevCoStk n30.68 -.24 FedTFA p 11.66 ... CapApInst 39.38 -.22 US Small n22.77 -.17 FF2025K 13.80 -.05 LowP r n 41.59 -.31 FoundAl p 11.26 -.06 IntlInv t 63.16 -.68 US SmVa 26.66 -.22 FF2030 n 14.37 -.06 LowPriK r 41.59 -.31 GrwthA p 47.31 -.29 Intl r 63.82 -.69 IntlSmCo n17.87 -.11 FF2030K 14.00 -.07 Magelln n 74.53 -.40 HYTFA px 9.84 ... Hartford Fds A: Fixd n 10.35 ... FF2035 n 11.99 -.06 MagellanK 74.48 -.40 IncomA p 2.28 ... CpAppA p 35.39 -.28 IntVa n 19.07 -.24 FF2040 n 8.38 -.04 MidCap n 31.00 -.16 NYTFA p 11.44 ... Hartford Fds Y: Glb5FxInc n11.13 +.01 Fidelity Invest: MuniInc n 12.52 ... RisDvA p 35.50 -.24 CapAppI n 35.43 -.28 2YGlFxd n 10.20 ... AllSectEq 13.09 -.11 NwMkt r n 15.90 ... USGovA p 6.82 +.01 Hartford HLS IA : Dodge&Cox: Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: CapApp 44.32 -.33 AMgr50 n 15.99 -.05 Balanced 74.47 -.50 AMgr20 r n13.08 -.01 OTC n 60.24 -.35 GlbBdAdv n13.89 +.03 Div&Gr 20.79 -.18 Income 13.53 +.01 Balanc n 19.09 -.08 100Index 9.20 -.08 IncmeAd 2.26 -.01 Advisers 20.22 -.10 IntlStk 36.95 -.35 BalancedK19.09 -.08 Ovrsea n 33.48 -.36 Frank/Temp Frnk C: TotRetBd 11.24 +.01 Stock 115.44-1.05 BlueChGr n48.53 -.28 Puritn n 18.79 -.09 IncomC t 2.30 ... Hussman Funds: RealE n 28.30 -.35 DoubleLine Funds: Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: StrGrowth 12.36 -.02 Canada n 59.97 -.17 SCmdtyStrt n12.61 TRBd I 11.12 ... CapAp n 26.75 -.21 SharesA 22.09 -.12 IVA Funds: +.12 Dreyfus: Frank/Temp Temp A: Wldwide I r17.43 -.06 CpInc r n 9.84 -.02 41.17 -.27 Contra n 70.83 -.34 SrsIntGrw 11.71 -.10 ForgnA p 7.58 -.05 Invesco Funds A: Aprec Eaton Vance A: ContraK 70.83 -.34 SrsIntVal 10.34 -.13 GlBd A p 13.93 +.03 CapGro 14.30 -.06 LgCpVal 18.78 -.17 DisEq n 24.05 -.24 SrInvGrdF 11.59 +.01 GrwthA p 19.42 -.13 Chart p 17.42 -.10 Eaton Vance I: DivIntl n 30.99 -.26 STBF n 8.52 +.01 WorldA p 15.89 -.12 CmstkA 16.76 -.14 FltgRt 9.09 ... DivrsIntK r 30.98 -.26 SmllCpS r n21.18 -.19 Frank/Temp Tmp EqIncA 9.01 -.04 GblMacAbR10.23 +.02 DivGth n 29.94 -.20 StratInc n 11.35 -.01 B&C: GrIncA p 20.32 -.14 LgCapVal 18.83 -.18 EmrMk n 26.26 -.08 StrReRt r 9.89 ... GlBdC p 13.96 +.03 HYMuA 9.01 ... FMI Funds: Ivy Funds: Eq Inc n 46.81 -.45 TotalBd n 10.92 ... GE Elfun S&S: LgCap p 16.84 -.10 EQII n 19.31 -.18 USBI n 11.48 ... S&S PM 42.43 -.28 AssetSC t 25.04 -.11 Value n 73.64 -.51 FPA Funds: AssetStA p25.84 -.11 GMO Trust III: Fidel n 34.51 -.26 NwInc 10.90 ... FltRateHi r n9.88 ... Fidelity Selects: Quality 21.59 -.16 AssetStrI r 26.08 -.11 FPACres n28.34 -.09 GNMA n 11.67 +.01 Gold r n 47.46 +.16 GMO Trust IV: JPMorgan A Class: Fairholme 32.76 -.49 GovtInc 10.55 +.01 Fidelity Spartan: IntlIntrVl 23.10 -.29 CoreBd A 11.60 +.01 JPMorgan R Cl: Federated Instl: GroCo n 91.39 -.24 ExtMkIn n 40.57 -.25 GMO Trust VI: KaufmnR 5.72 -.04 GroInc n 19.34 -.17 500IdxInv n47.31 -.37 EmgMkts r 14.86 -.10 ShtDurBd 11.02 +.01 GrowthCoK91.38 -.25 IntlInxInv n36.64 -.40 IntlCorEq 30.71 -.37 JPMorgan Sel Cls: Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.79 -.09 HighInc r n 9.21 ... TotMktInv n38.87 -.28 Quality 21.59 -.16 CoreBd n 11.59 +.01

CATTLE/HOGS Open high low settle CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jun 11 105.12 105.45 104.30 104.97 Aug 11 107.55 107.80 106.92 107.10 Oct 11 113.72 114.05 113.10 113.57 Dec 11 116.80 117.05 116.07 116.82 Feb 12 117.80 118.00 117.05 117.90 Apr 12 118.57 118.92 118.07 118.75 Jun 12 115.35 115.92 115.35 115.90 Aug 12 115.55 115.80 115.50 115.80 Oct 12 117.52 117.90 117.42 117.90 Last spot N/A Est. sales 53260. Thu’s Sales: 62,513 Thu’s open int: 344821, off -2450 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 11 125.77 125.97 124.90 125.45 Aug 11 125.75 126.92 125.30 125.75 Sep 11 127.02 128.07 126.52 127.07 Oct 11 127.97 129.05 127.50 128.12 Nov 11 128.27 129.42 128.00 128.75 Jan 12 128.20 128.67 127.40 128.05 Mar 12 128.22 128.75 128.22 128.60 Apr 12 130.00 130.00 130.00 130.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 6491. Thu’s Sales: 7,158 Thu’s open int: 37491, off -850 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jun 11 91.80 92.10 91.12 91.97 Jul 11 91.70 92.40 91.42 92.32 Aug 11 93.05 93.77 92.85 93.50 Oct 11 86.40 87.07 86.20 86.50 Dec 11 83.70 84.50 83.62 84.10 Feb 12 85.50 85.57 85.00 85.35 Apr 12 86.20 86.35 85.82 86.30 May 12 90.00 Jun 12 92.60 92.70 92.35 92.70 Jul 12 91.00 91.00 91.00 91.00 Aug 12 89.70 Oct 12 84.50 Last spot N/A

LinkedIn n ... ... LizClaib LloydBkg ... LaPac ... Lowes .44 LyonBas A .10e

Saturday, May 21, 2011

Div Last Chg CrSuiHiY .32 Crossh g rs ... Crystallx g ... DejourE g ... DenisnM g ... EV LtdDur 1.25 eMagin ... ExeterR gs ... ExtorreG g ... FrkStPrp .76 GabGldNR 1.68 Gastar grs ... GenMoly ... GoldResrc .31e GoldStr g ... GranTrra g ... GrtBasG g ... GtPanSilv g ... Hyperdyn ... ImpOil gs .44 IndiaGC ... InfuSystem ... InovioPhm ... KodiakO g ... LadThalFn ... LucasEngy ...

AbdAsPac .42 7.14 -.02 Accelr8 ... 4.64 +.23 Adventrx ... 2.37 -.07 AlexcoR g ... 7.63 +.17 AlldNevG ... 34.82 +.56 AlmadnM g ... 3.75 +.12 AmApparel ... 1.00 -.04 Anooraq g ... .80 ... AntaresP ... 1.73 -.01 ArcadiaRs ... .13 +.01 Augusta g ... 4.32 +.09 Aurizon g ... 5.74 +.16 AvalRare n ... 7.25 -.09 BarcGSOil ... 26.06 +.31 Brigus grs ... 1.46 +.03 CAMAC En ... 1.35 -.01 CanoPet ... .37 -.01 CardiumTh ... .33 +.01 CelSci ... .60 -.02 CFCda g .01 20.59 +.12 CheniereEn ... u10.04 +2.35 CheniereE 1.70 17.90 +.87 ChinaShen ... 4.08 +.02 ClaudeR g ... 2.17 +.20

Price Funds: BlChip n 40.43 -.30 CapApp n 21.62 -.12 EmMktS n 34.75 -.06 EqInc n 24.98 -.19 EqIndex n 36.00 -.28 Growth n 33.83 -.22 HiYield n 6.99 ... IntlBond n 10.25 -.05 Intl G&I 14.14 -.17 IntlStk n 14.67 -.09 MidCap n 63.69 -.26 MCapVal n25.37 -.18 N Asia n 19.50 -.01 New Era n 53.08 -.07 N Horiz n 37.33 -.19 N Inc n 9.60 +.01 OverS SF r n8.82 -.09 R2010 n 16.07 -.06 R2015 n 12.49 -.06 R2020 n 17.30 -.09 R2025 n 12.69 -.08 R2030 n 18.25 -.11 R2035 n 12.93 -.08 R2040 n 18.40 -.12 ShtBd n 4.87 +.01 SmCpStk n37.43 -.22 SmCapVal n37.93-.28 SpecGr n 18.74 -.13 SpecIn n 12.66 -.01 Value n 25.02 -.19 Principal Inv: LT2020In 12.31 -.07 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.24 -.12 MultiCpGr 53.90 -.36 VoyA p 23.82 -.23 Royce Funds: LwPrSkSv r18.90 -.09 PennMuI r 12.50 -.10 PremierI r 22.08 -.18

Apr 12 2.8709 May 12 2.8694 Jun 12 2.8500 2.8604 2.8500 2.8604 Jul 12 2.8419 Aug 12 2.8159 Sep 12 2.7884 Oct 12 2.6599 Nov 12 2.6309 Dec 12 2.6187 Jan 13 2.6197 Feb 13 2.6252 Mar 13 2.6307 Apr 13 2.7262 May 13 2.7312 Last spot N/A Est. sales 112599. Thu’s Sales: 130,429 Thu’s open int: 280688, up +4450 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Jun 11 4.203 4.266 4.077 4.230 Jul 11 4.260 4.322 4.140 4.290 Aug 11 4.307 4.371 4.192 4.340 Sep 11 4.335 4.403 4.219 4.367 Oct 11 4.380 4.449 4.270 4.414 Nov 11 4.546 4.603 4.443 4.576 Dec 11 4.766 4.826 4.670 4.794 Jan 12 4.880 4.950 4.786 4.911 Feb 12 4.875 4.925 4.780 4.902 Mar 12 4.818 4.857 4.730 4.843 Apr 12 4.695 4.750 4.608 4.709 May 12 4.705 4.770 4.630 4.731 Jun 12 4.801 4.803 4.670 4.771 Jul 12 4.720 4.818 4.720 4.818 Aug 12 4.815 4.859 4.815 4.846 Sep 12 4.810 4.856 4.810 4.856 Oct 12 4.886 4.947 4.843 4.906 Nov 12 4.990 5.064 4.990 5.064 Dec 12 5.269 5.330 5.210 5.284 Jan 13 5.395 5.451 5.365 5.411 Feb 13 5.362 5.410 5.340 5.376 Mar 13 5.284 5.301 5.284 5.301 Apr 13 5.042 5.061 5.042 5.061 May 13 5.011 5.079 5.011 5.079 Jun 13 5.117 Last spot N/A Est. sales 269328. Thu’s Sales: 315,365 Thu’s open int: 947797, up +30

u3.32 .73 d.12 .36 2.03 16.38 6.53 4.72 10.17 13.30 17.93 3.51 4.10 29.55 2.68 7.16 1.96 2.90 4.02 48.03 d.41 2.35 .83 6.35 1.19 2.70

+.03 ... ... +.01 -.05 +.09 -.36 +.12 +.57 -.20 +.08 +.05 +.06 +.57 +.05 -.11 -.10 -.03 +.19 +.18 -.06 -.05 -.03 -.01 -.04 -.22

MGT Cap MadCatz g Metalico MdwGold g Minefnd g Neoprobe Nevsun g NDragon NewEnSys NwGold g NA Pall g NDynMn g NthnO&G NthgtM g NovaBayP NovaGld g Oilsands g OpkoHlth ParaG&S PhrmAth PionDrill PlatGpMet Quepasa RadientPh RareEle g Rentech

TotRetI r 13.89 -.11 ITGrAdm n10.02 +.01 LtdTrAd n 11.09 ... Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 39.76 -.30 LTGrAdml n9.57 ... S&P Sel 20.90 -.16 LT Adml n 10.88 -.01 MCpAdml n100.78Scout Funds: Intl 33.68 -.38 .58 MorgAdm n59.65 -.38 Selected Funds: AmShD 43.54 -.33 MuHYAdm n10.26-.01 AmShS p 43.51 -.33 PrmCap r n73.11 -.48 Sequoia n 143.26-1.03 ReitAdm r n85.991.06 St FarmAssoc: Gwth 55.74 -.41 STsyAdml n10.75 +.01 STBdAdml n10.61+.01 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 21.33 -.20 ShtTrAd n 15.91 ... STFdAd n 10.83 ... Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 52.65 -.06 STIGrAd n 10.79 ... SmCAdm n37.47 -.29 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 29.52 -.19 TtlBAdml n10.72 +.01 IntValue I 30.18 -.20 TStkAdm n33.66 -.25 ValAdml n 22.27 -.19 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 25.00 -.09 WellslAdm n55.08-.13 WelltnAdm n56.29-.30 VALIC : StkIdx 26.46 -.21 Windsor n 48.38 -.38 WdsrIIAd n49.13 -.44 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml n 22.39 -.09 Vanguard Fds: CAITAdm n10.96 -.01 AssetA n 25.99 -.19 CpOpAdl n81.19 -.39 DivdGro n 15.56 -.11 EMAdmr r n39.70 -.19 Energy n 69.83 -.14 Energy n 131.13 -.28 Explr n 79.95 -.40 ExplAdml n74.44 -.37 GNMA n 10.92 +.01 ExtdAdm n44.58 -.28 GlobEq n 18.88 -.16 500Adml n123.14 -.96 HYCorp n 5.87 ... GNMA Ad n10.92 +.01 HlthCre n 139.74 -.86 GrwAdm n 33.51 -.20 InflaPro n 13.42 ... HlthCr n 58.98 -.36 IntlGr n 20.07 -.17 HiYldCp n 5.87 ... IntlVal n 32.79 -.37 InfProAd n 26.36 ... ITIGrade n 10.02 +.01 ITBdAdml n11.37 +.01 LifeCon n 16.93 -.05 ITsryAdml n11.50 +.02 LifeGro n 23.24 -.16 IntGrAdm n63.88 -.56 LifeMod n 20.50 -.10 ITAdml n 13.56 ... LTIGrade n 9.57 ...

+.0235 +.0240 +.0240 +.0245 +.0255 +.0265 +.0280 +.0285 +.0285 +.0285 +.0285 +.0285 +.0285 +.0285

+.136 +.129 +.126 +.123 +.120 +.109 +.101 +.097 +.096 +.092 +.079 +.076 +.077 +.075 +.074 +.074 +.074 +.070 +.065 +.065 +.064 +.060 +.050 +.050 +.050

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

.25 1.74 5.69 1.72 13.06 5.10 6.03 .05 3.40 9.41 3.50 11.34 20.73 2.90 d1.59 10.44 .45 3.75 3.01 3.73 13.15 2.00 7.40 .28 11.73 .99

-.06 -.02 -.09 +.19 +.28 +.07 +.03 +.00 -.25 +.08 -.23 +.17 +.44 +.04 -.09 +.14 +.00 -.05 +.16 +.07 +.16 +.03 -.01 -.03 -.30 -.01

RexahnPh ... Richmnt g ... Rubicon g ... SamsO&G ... SeabGld g ... SinoHub ... SulphCo ... TanzRy g ... Taseko ... TimberlnR ... TrnsatlPet ... TravelCtrs ... TriValley ... TriangPet ... ... Uluru Uranerz ... UraniumEn ... VantageDrl ... VirnetX .50e VistaGold ... VoyagerOG ... WalterInv 2.00 WT DrfChn.15e YM Bio g ...

Morg n 19.23 -.13 MuInt n 13.56 ... PrecMtls r n26.14 -.15 PrmcpCor n14.78 -.09 Prmcp r n 70.44 -.46 SelValu r n20.48 -.15 STAR n 20.04 -.10 STIGrade n10.79 ... StratEq n 20.42 -.15 TgtRetInc n11.63 -.02 TgRe2010 n23.26-.08 TgtRe2015 n12.98.06 TgRe2020 n23.15-.12 TgtRe2025 n13.25.07 TgRe2030 n22.82-.14 TgtRe2035 n13.81.09 TgtRe2040 n22.68.16 TgtRe2045 n14.25.10 Wellsly n 22.73 -.06 Welltn n 32.59 -.17 Wndsr n 14.33 -.12 WndsII n 27.68 -.24 Vanguard Idx Fds: DvMkInPl r n108.371.35 TotIntAdm r n27.13.26 TotIntlInst r n108.551.02 500 n 123.12 -.96 DevMkt n 10.48 -.13 EMkt n 30.20 -.14 Extend n 44.54 -.27 Growth n 33.50 -.20 MidCap n 22.19 -.13 SmCap n 37.42 -.29

1.24 7.62 4.56 2.76 29.54 d1.15 .07 7.04 4.93 .88 2.15 5.86 .69 6.89 .05 2.96 2.75 1.88 23.41 2.92 3.13 17.49 25.49 3.20

-.02 +.06 +.04 -.01 +.46 -.17 +.00 +.13 -.05 +.03 -.05 -.53 +.02 +.30 +.00 +.12 -.01 -.02 +.36 +.13 -.09 -.15 +.04 +.04

SmlCpGth n24.08 -.18 SmlCpVl n 16.88 -.14 STBnd n 10.61 +.01 TotBnd n 10.72 +.01 TotlIntl n 16.22 -.15 TotStk n 33.65 -.25 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n 22.39 -.09 DevMkInst n10.40-.13 ExtIn n 44.58 -.27 FTAllWldI r n96.73.96 GrwthIst n 33.51 -.20 InfProInst n10.74 ... InstIdx n 122.29 -.95 InsPl n 122.29 -.95 InsTStPlus n30.45-.22 MidCpIst n 22.26 -.13 SCInst n 37.47 -.29 TBIst n 10.72 +.01 TSInst n 33.67 -.25 ValueIst n 22.27 -.19 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl n 101.72 -.79 MidCpIdx n31.80 -.19 STBdIdx n 10.61 +.01 TotBdSgl n10.72 +.01 TotStkSgl n32.49 -.24 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.01 +.01 Yacktman Funds: Fund p 18.09 -.12

METALS NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Fri. Aluminum -$1.1407 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$4.0849 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $4.1190 N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Lead - $2455.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9738 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1490.75 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1508.80 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri. Silver - $34.990 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $35.082 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Platinum -$1767.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1769.40 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. n.q.-not quoted, n.a.-not available r-revised


A8 Saturday, May 21, 2011

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Sunny and windy

Tonight

Clear and breezy

Sunday

Monday

Sunny, breezy and warm

Tuesday

Mostly sunny and windy

Wednesday

Sunny and breezy

Sunny and windy

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities

Thursday

Sunny; breezy, pleasant

Mostly sunny

High 92°

Low 57°

94°/57°

93°/55°

92°/57°

87°/53°

86°/56°

93°/68°

ESE at 8-16 mph POP: 0%

SE at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

S at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

NNW at 10-20 mph POP: 5%

NE at 8-16 mph POP: 0%

NE at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

NNE at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

SE at 4-8 mph POP: 10%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 5 p.m. Friday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 79°/52° Normal high/low ............... 87°/55° Record high ............. 101° in 2006 Record low ................. 44° in 1968 Humidity at noon ................... 11%

Farmington 71/45

Clayton 77/48

Raton 71/42

Precipitation 24 hours ending 5 p.m. Fri. .. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date ......................... Normal year to date .............

0.00” 0.00” 0.75” 0.09” 2.48”

Santa Fe 73/42

Gallup 68/42

Tucumcari 84/54

Albuquerque 77/54

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 84/55

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading 68 0-50

51-100

Good

Moderate

Source: EPA

101-150

Ruidoso 71/54

151+

Unhealthy Unhealthy sensitive

T or C 80/57

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Sun. The Moon Today Sun.

Rise Set 5:54 a.m. 7:55 p.m. 5:54 a.m. 7:56 p.m. Rise Set 12:00 a.m. 9:54 a.m. none 10:55 a.m.

Last

New

First

Full

May 24

Jun 1

Jun 8

Jun 15

Alamogordo 83/57

Silver City 79/53

ROSWELL 92/57 Carlsbad 95/60

Hobbs 90/56

Las Cruces 82/59

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2011

Regional Cities Today Sun. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Today

Sun.

Today

Sun.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

62/45/pc 90/69/s 80/58/pc 65/52/t 88/62/s 75/63/t 76/60/pc 88/73/t 72/46/pc 78/60/pc 84/67/s 88/74/s 89/73/pc 82/65/t 81/62/t 88/72/s 71/59/pc 90/59/s

61/46/pc 90/66/s 83/62/pc 58/49/pc 94/63/pc 80/62/t 77/62/t 89/73/t 76/48/pc 81/64/t 91/65/s 87/75/s 89/73/pc 84/67/t 82/65/t 85/69/s 68/55/pc 92/60/s

88/77/s 90/61/s 74/61/t 88/74/s 76/60/t 80/58/t 92/69/t 79/62/t 92/71/s 78/58/pc 65/50/c 85/64/pc 82/68/t 68/52/pc 68/60/pc 63/49/c 87/63/s 82/64/pc

87/78/s 93/65/pc 79/60/t 86/72/pc 65/57/pc 82/62/t 92/69/t 74/59/pc 93/70/s 82/62/t 63/46/c 89/65/s 89/69/t 73/51/t 64/59/r 60/48/c 89/64/s 87/66/pc

Friday

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

83/57/s 77/54/s 59/32/s 96/61/s 95/60/s 64/35/s 77/48/s 64/40/s 84/55/s 83/54/s 76/52/s 71/45/s 68/42/s 90/56/s 82/59/s 72/43/s 68/43/s 80/51/s 87/58/s 85/54/s 66/40/s 71/42/s 55/32/s 92/57/s 71/54/s 73/42/s 79/53/s 80/57/s 84/54/s 74/47/s

84/55/s 80/54/pc 66/35/pc 97/65/s 98/64/s 67/34/pc 85/51/s 69/31/s 89/52/s 87/55/s 79/53/pc 78/47/t 71/43/pc 96/53/s 88/62/s 77/44/s 71/40/pc 85/55/pc 93/61/s 90/52/s 69/41/pc 79/43/s 62/31/pc 94/57/s 77/54/s 78/45/pc 83/54/s 86/59/s 90/51/s 77/43/pc

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

U.S. Extremes

Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 103°................ Laredo, Texas Low: 18°........Berthoud Pass, Colo.

High: 83°..........................Carlsbad Low: 29°...........................Santa Fe

National Cities Seattle 63/49 Billings 60/48

Minneapolis 74/61 New York 76/60

Detroit 78/60 San Francisco 60/49

Chicago 75/63

Denver 72/46

Washington 82/64

Kansas City 81/62

Los Angeles 71/59

Atlanta 90/69 El Paso 84/67

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Houston 89/73

Miami 88/77

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

Precipitation Stationary

0s

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

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ARIES (March 21-April 19)     You meet a responsibility but also season your day with fun. You YOUR HOROSCOPE probably have too many choices for your own good, each one looking better than the last. Be spontaneous. Don’t live in regrets, but in the now. Tonight: Where the action is. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  You simply cannot and will not stay put. You know what you want to do; make it so. Don’t hesitate to take action and move a longdesired project forward. Others discover just how neat this all is. Tonight: Whether you like it or not, you’re in the limelight. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)  Finally, you know what you want and go for it. Have that overdue discussion. Be willing to take a new slant on a situation. With this perspective, you’ll have so many more options. Tonight: Just go with the moment. CANCER (June 21-July 22)  Others do whatever they believe will grab your attention. Be willing to take on a personal matter, with some support from another person. Be more aware of what others expect,

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and you will find there could be fewer problems. Tonight: Snuggle in over dinner. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  Tackle a project early while you have the energy. Know when enough is enough and clear out. You also need a healthy balance of fun and good times. Observe some more, and you will come up with an answer to your question. Tonight: Nap first, then decide. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)  Your very playful manner draws many people closer. You might wonder what is going on with a key loved one who seems to be changing before your very eyes. You know what needs to happen. Evaluate each step toward the main goal. Tonight: Take it moment by moment. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)  Ponder opportunities that you had not even considered before. Someone makes new possibilities a strong likelihood. Honor who you are when dealing with a family member. The more generous of spirit you are, the better the end results will be. Isn’t that what you want? Tonight: Let your hair down. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  Be willing to understand what is happening. That looks like patiently listening to a friend or loved one and helping him or her discuss an emotional topic. You both will feel more complete and clear afterward. Postpone a project. People are more important. Tonight: If you are tired, honor your feelings. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)  Think carefully

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before formally committing to a purchase or a set of interactions. Check both your budget and finances before saying yes. You want to make sure you can follow through. You might go through many more changes than you anticipated. Tonight: Full of lively discussions and exchanges. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  Sometimes you are on such a roll that you might not slow down and stop sufficiently. Understand that a natural limitation is there for a reason. You might need to back off and talk to a roommate or close loved one. You will get more complete answers. Tonight: The going could be expensive. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  You could be overwhelmed by everything that is going on. Under the circumstances, there is nothing wrong with retreating. You might wonder exactly what is needed to make you and others feel better. Don’t hesitate to ask for what is necessary. T ake a nap if you are grouchy — OK? Tonight: Feeling better ... now choose. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)  Use the daylight hours to the max. You could be most surprised by all the opportunities that stream in because of a newfound adaptability, especially with your friends. Honor what is going on behind the scenes later today. Tonight: Vanish with a favorite friend. BORN TODAY Sen. Al Franken (1951), painter Henri Rousseau (1844), singer Ron Isley (1941)

NYC Opera to leave Lincoln Center, cut staff

NEW YORK (AP) — The board of the financially troubled New York City Opera voted Friday to move out of its home at Lincoln Center, cut staff across the board and scale back its per for mance schedule as it fights for its survival. Friday’s move comes as the 68-year -old organization deals with a dwindling endowment, a multimillion-dollar deficit, and contentious negotiations with its union staff. George Steel, the general manager and artistic director of the opera, told The Associated Press on Friday that “the sacrifice will be shared from top to bottom in the company.” Steel said the board’s actions will allow for further growth and he said he felt encouraged by the decision. He said an announcement on a new home would be made in weeks. “This is certainly a serious transition for the opera ... but the thing that makes me optimistic is that I can see a balanced budget model for the company that will provide a

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foundation for sustainable growth.” The New York City Opera is revered as a pillar of American culture that has delivered daring new productions and built the careers of such stars like Placido Domingo, Renee Fleming and Beverly Sills. But for some time, the opera has been struggling. The company’s endowment has dwindled from $55 million to $9 million, according to audits obtained by the AP. And City Opera has put of f announcing its 2011-2012 season as it faces a projected deficit of $5 million. The board chairman last month personally contributed an emergency $2.5 million toward plugging the deficit, company officials said. It is also tussling over a new contract with its singers and production staff. The New York City Opera has been at Lincoln Center, also home to the City Ballet and other artistic organizations, since 1966. “We love Lincoln Center. It’s a wonderful place but the costs of being here is simply too high,” Steel

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said. Lincoln Center spokeswoman Betsy Vorce declined to comment. Alan Gordon, executive director of the American Guild of Musical Artists, which represents singers, dancers, stage directors and stage managers, said the union’s members were “distraught” over the decision. The move may save money but will do little to address the opera’s flagging ticket sales, Gordon said. He blamed Steel’s choices for shows, such as

the recent production of “Siance on a Wet Afternoon.” “He refuses to program any of the big, solid operas that people do go to see,” Gordon said. “If they want to be a regional, part-time, freelance theater, then go with God, but that’s not the world that opera singers work in.” Steel would not say if the new home would be in the same district — or even in Manhattan — but said the board “had an idea” of where it would end up. “I don’t want to get

into the detail of it,” he said. He also would not discuss the ramifications of the move, including whether the opera would be breaking its lease. “We are sitting down with all of the stakeholders to discuss our departure, that means Lincoln Center, that means New York City ... it’s a complicated discussion,” he said. The board adopted a balanced budget Friday, but Steel would not divulge any figures. “It’s significantly smaller

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than what we’re currently having, but it will permit us a tremendous reduction in fixed costs, which means we can put more money on the stage,” he said. The opera also announced plans for next season. Instead of five fullscale opera productions, there would be three, with two smaller-scale productions. Steel said the plan was in keeping with some of the smaller -scale productions the opera has been of fering over the years.

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Saturday, May 21, 2011 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 28

LOCAL SCHEDULE SATURDAY MAY 21 MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2:05 p.m. • Roswell at Alpine (Game 1) 6:05 p.m. • Roswell at Alpine (Game 2)

LOCAL BRIEFS 18TH ANNUAL RACE FOR THE ZOO IS MAY 21

The 18th annual Roswell Runners Club Race for the Zoo will be held on Saturday, May 21, at 8 a.m. at the Spring River Zoo. The event will consist of a 2mile walk, a 5k run, a 10k walk and a 10k run. The cost is $15. For more information, call Bob Edwards at 624-6720.

BRYNN NAYLOR TOURNEY WILL BE HELD MAY 21-22

The Sunrise Rotary Club’s Brynn Naylor Memorial Tennis Tournament will be held May 21-22 at Cahoon Park. For more information, visit USTA.com or call John Naylor at 627-2342.

• More briefs on B2

I N VA D E R S UPDATE

INVADERS FALL 6-3 IN ALPINE

ALPINE, Texas — The Roswell Invaders outhit the host Alpine Cowboys on Friday, but failed to outscore them in a 6-3 loss at Kokernot Field. Alpine jumped ahead 1-0 in the first before Roswell (33) took its first — and only — lead of the game with a pair of runs in the third. Adrian Martinez drove in both runs with an RBI double that scored Brian Ramirez and Troy Frazier. The Roswell lead lasted until the bottom half of the same inning when Alpine plated four. Cody Collins reached on an error to start the inning and scored when Kyle Wells singled. Zach Welch then scored a David Valesente single and Wells and Valesente then scored on a Javier Arrienta single to make it 5-2. Alpine scored once more in the fourth and Roswell got its final run in the seventh to cap the scoring. Nick Shoup took the loss for the Invaders. The Invaders and Cowboys square off again today in a doubleheader. Game 1 is at 2:05 p.m. and Game 2 is at 6:05 p.m.

SPORTS

BALTIMORE (AP) — Animal Kingdom won’t be sneaking up on anyone — even coming from behind. The colt who came out of nowhere to win his first race on dirt in the Kentucky Derby is favored to win the Preakness Stakes on Saturday. “I feel more relaxed than I have all week,” trainer Graham Motion said Friday. “I think I’ve done what I can do and it’s really out of my hands now. The nerve-racking stuff is just getting the training done and just trying to keep things straight.” If Animal Kingdom can repeat his Derby success in the $1 million Preakness, he’ll set himself up for a Triple Crown try in three weeks in the Belmont Stakes. It’s been 33 years since Affirmed swept the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont to become horse racing’s 11th Triple Crown winner. Hall of Fame trainer Nick Zito, who will saddle Dialed In, isn’t ready to anoint Animal Kingdom just yet. “I’ll become a fan of Animal Kingdom if he keeps going on. I’m not saying

Preakness favorite Animal Kingdom, with David Nava aboard, takes a training run on the training track at Fair Hill Training Center in Elkton, Md., Friday. The Kentucky Derby winner is a 2-1 favorite in today’s Preakness Stakes.

Secretariat, Seattle Slew or Spectacular Bid yet,” he said, ticking off the names of previous greats. “He’s done so many things that are so unusual; he just may be a very good horse. Hopefully, our little guy has something to say about it.” Dialed In is the early 9-2

second choice after finishing eighth as the beaten favorite in the Derby. Zito hasn’t lost any confidence in his horse, who rallied late to make up a lot of ground two weeks ago. “I still think, and not because I have him, that he’s still the best 3-year old. That’s my opinion,” he

Randy “Macho Man” Savage, the professional wrestler known for his raspy voice, the sunglasses and bandanas he wore in the ring and the young woman named Miss Elizabeth who often accompanied him, died in a car crash Friday in Florida. He was 58. A Florida Highway Patrol crash report said the former wrestler — whose legal name was Randy Mario Poffo — was driving a Jeep Wrangler when he lost control in Pinellas County around 9:25 a.m. The Jeep veered over the raised concrete median divider, crossed over the eastbound lanes and crashed head-on into a tree. Police said he may have suffered a “medical event” before the accident, but the report did not elaborate, and it said officials would need to perform an autopsy to know for sure. The report said a woman in the vehicle, identified as Barbara L. Poffo, 56, suffered minor injuries. A statement from Stamford, Conn.-based World Wrestling Entertainment said the passenger was the wrestler’s current wife. Both were wearing their seatbelts, according to the police report. “Poffo will be greatly missed by WWE and his fans,” the statement said. Savage was a charismatic wrestler made famous for his “Macho Man” nickname and his “Oooh Yeah!” catchphrase. He was a champion in Vince McMahon’s World Wrestling Federation, and later Ted Turner’s now-defunct World Championship Wrestling.

Poffo was under contract with WWE from 1985 to 1993 and held both the WWE and Intercontinental Championships. “Our sincerest condolences go out to his family and friends. We wish a speedy recovery to his wife,” WWE said. Savage defined the larger-than-life personalities of the 1980s World Wrestling Federation (now WWE). He wore sequined robes bejeweled with “Macho Man” on the back, rainbow-colored cowboy hats and oversized sunglasses, part of a unique look that helped build the WWF into a mainstream phenomenon. For most of his career, his valet, Miss Elizabeth, was by his side. The woman, Elizabeth Hulette, was his real-life wife at the time. They later divorced, and Hulette died in 2003 at 42 in what was later ruled a prescription drug overdose. She was among many performers in the sport to die young. Others include Curt “Mr. Perfect” Hennig, who died of a cocaine overdose in 2003 at 44, and Chris Benoit, who killed his wife and son and then committed suicide in their Georgia home in 2007. Benoit was 40. The WWF made Savage their champion after a win over Ted DiBiase in the main event at WrestleMania in 1988. Savage had not appeared for a major wrestling organization since 2004, when he performed for Total Nonstop Action. He was at times both the most popular

days away

See FAVORITE, Page B2

AP Photo

In this undated publicity image released by WWE, professional wrestler Randy "Macho Man" Savage is shown. Savage, whose legal name is Randy Mario Poffo, died in a car crash in Florida on Friday, according to a Florida Highway Patrol crash report.

Report: Hincapie tells feds Armstrong used PEDs See MACHO, Page B2

ON THIS DAY IN...

6

said. “We’ll see what happens with Animal Kingdom, and there are so many other good horses in the race.” Animal Kingdom will break from the No. 11 post, with Dialed In just inside, in post 10. The biggest question surrounding Animal Kingdom

going into the Derby was whether he could run on dirt. His pedigree suggested he was more of a tur f horse, and he had run four times on synthetics and once on turf leading into the biggest race of his young career. “Running him on the synthetic, it takes away their star power,” trainer Bob Baffert said. “When he got on dirt, he sort of separated himself from the pack. He’s definitely the horse to beat.” Animal Kingdom’s 2 3⁄4length win at Churchill Downs answered the skeptics. He figures to be nearly as fresh as some of his rivals, with the Preakness being just his second race in eight weeks. Still, Animal Kingdom hasn’t scared away the competition. The Preakness attracted a full field of 14 horses for the first time since 2005, including nine that didn’t run in the Derby. “It’s going to be about staying out of trouble, very much like it was in the Derby,” Motion said. “Fourteen horses is a lot of hors-

‘Macho Man’ dead at 58 after car wreck

SPORTS

Hike It & Spike It XVI is

E-mail: sports@roswell-record.com

AP Photo

SPOTLIGHT ON 1977 — Heavily favored Seattle Slew, ridden by Jean Cruguet, wins the Preakness Stakes by 1 1/2 lengths over Iron Constitution, a 31-1 shot. 1979 — The Montreal Canadiens win their 21st Stanley Cup by beating the New York Rangers 4-1 in Game 5. 2005 — Afleet Alex, ridden by Jeremy Rose, regains his footing and his drive after being cut off by Scrappy T in a frightening collision and breezes home to win the Preakness Stakes. Kentucky Derby winner Giacomo finishes third. 2006 — Detroit holds Cleveland to the lowest Game7 point total in NBA history and advances to its fourth straight Eastern Conference final with a 79-61 win over the Cavaliers.

B

Animal Kingdom is the favorite Roswell Daily Record

Section

AP Photo

In this July 17, 2010, file photo, George Hincapie points as he talks to other riders prior to the 13th stage of the Tour de France cycling race in Rodez, France. A report by “60 Minutes” says Hincapie has told federal authorities he saw Armstrong use performance-enhancing drugs.

NEW YORK (AP) — A report by “60 Minutes” says George Hincapie, a longtime member of Lance Armstrong’s inner circle, has told federal authorities he saw the seven-time Tour de France winner use performance-enhancing drugs. A segment of the report aired Friday night on the “CBS Evening News,” one day after it broadcast an interview with another former member of Ar mstrong’s U.S. Postal Service team, Tyler Hamilton, who said he also used PEDs with Armstrong. Hincapie has often been depicted as one of Ar mstrong’s most loyal teammates and was with him for all seven Tour victories. In an interview last year, Armstrong said Hincapie was “like a brother to me.”

Hincapie is among a number of for mer Ar mstrong teammates and employees who have appeared before a federal grand jury in Los Angeles investigating doping in cycling. Hamilton said he testified for six hours before the panel. Ar mstrong has never tested positive and has steadfastly denied doping. Using unidentified sources, “60 Minutes” reported that Hincapie testified that he and Ar mstrong supplied each other with the endurance-boosting substance EPO and discussed having used another banned substance, testosterone, to prepare for races. Citing the ongoing See HINCAPIE, Page B2


B2 Saturday, May 21, 2011 Hincapie Continued from Page B1

investigation, Hincapie declined to be interviewed by “60 Minutes,” which will air its piece on the Armstrong investigation at 7 p.m. EDT Sunday. Reached by The Associated Press at the Tour of California in Solvang, Hincapie

Baseball

Major League Baseball At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press American League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .25 20 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .24 20 New York . . . . . . . . . .23 20 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .22 22 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .19 24 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .27 15 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .22 22 Kansas City . . . . . . . .22 22 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .20 26 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .15 28 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 22 Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .22 22 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .22 23 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .19 24

Pct GB .556 — 1⁄2 .545 .535 1 .500 2 1⁄2 .442 5

Pct GB .643 — .500 6 .500 6 .435 9 .349 12 1⁄2

Pct .511 .500 .489 .442

GB — 1⁄2 1 3

Thursday’s Games Minnesota 11, Oakland 1 Seattle 2, L.A. Angels 1 N.Y. Yankees 13, Baltimore 2 Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 2 Boston 4, Detroit 3 Chicago White Sox 8, Cleveland 2 Kansas City 2, Texas 1, 10 innings Friday’s Games Cleveland 5, Cincinnati 4 Pittsburgh 10, Detroit 1 N.Y. Mets 2, N.Y. Yankees 1 Philadelphia 3, Texas 2 Washington 17, Baltimore 5 Houston 5, Toronto 2 Boston 15, Chicago Cubs 5 Florida 5, Tampa Bay 3 L.A. Dodgers 6, Chicago White Sox 4, 10 innings Kansas City 3, St. Louis 0 Arizona 8, Minnesota 7 Atlanta at L.A. Angels, 8:05 p.m. Seattle at San Diego, 8:05 p.m. Oakland at San Francisco, 8:15 p.m. Saturday’s Games Houston (Myers 1-3) at Toronto (Morrow 22), 11:07 a.m.

Favorite

said he didn’t want to talk about the “60 Minutes” report. “It’s just unfortunate that that’s all people want to talk about now,” he said. “I’m not going to partake in any cycling-bashing. I have done everything to be the best I can be. ... I want the focus on the future of the sport, what it’s done to clean itself up. I believe in cycling and want to supL.A. Dodgers (Garland 1-3) at Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 3-3), 12:10 p.m. St. Louis (Westbrook 3-3) at Kansas City (Adcock 1-0), 12:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Bailey 3-0) at Cleveland (Tomlin 5-1), 2:05 p.m. Washington (Lannan 2-4) at Baltimore (Guthrie 1-6), 2:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 5-3) at Florida (Vazquez 2-4), 2:10 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 6-0) at Pittsburgh (Correia 5-4), 5:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 4-2) at Boston (Aceves 1-0), 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Capuano 3-4) at N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 4-3), 5:10 p.m. Oakland (Anderson 2-3) at San Francisco (Lincecum 3-4), 5:10 p.m. Texas (C.Lewis 4-4) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 2-4), 5:10 p.m. Atlanta (Hanson 5-3) at L.A. Angels (Pineiro 2-0), 8:05 p.m. Seattle (Pineda 5-2) at San Diego (Richard 2-4), 8:05 p.m. Minnesota (S.Baker 2-3) at Arizona (Owings 0-0), 8:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Cincinnati at Cleveland, 11:05 a.m. N.Y. Mets at N.Y. Yankees, 11:05 a.m. Houston at Toronto, 11:07 a.m. Tampa Bay at Florida, 11:10 a.m. Detroit at Pittsburgh, 11:35 a.m. Texas at Philadelphia, 11:35 a.m. Washington at Baltimore, 11:35 a.m. L.A. Dodgers at Chicago White Sox, 12:10 p.m. St. Louis at Kansas City, 12:10 p.m. Atlanta at L.A. Angels, 1:35 p.m. Oakland at San Francisco, 2:05 p.m. Seattle at San Diego, 2:05 p.m. Minnesota at Arizona, 2:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Boston, 6:05 p.m. Monday’s Games Boston at Cleveland, 5:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Detroit, 5:05 p.m. Toronto at N.Y. Yankees, 5:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Texas, 6:05 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 6:10 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 8:05 p.m.

National League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB Philadelphia . . . . . . . .27 17 .614 — Florida . . . . . . . . . . . .25 18 .581 1 1⁄2 3 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .25 21 .543

Continued from Page B1

es to navigate, especially when you’re the one they’re gunning for. The track is possibly a little tighter, the surface is probably a little different from Churchill Downs. My horse has shown he can handle the dirt.” The Preakness has five fewer starters than the Derby, making for less of a cavalry charge in the early going of the 1 316-mile race. “Most of the time all the best horses are running in the Derby,” said Todd Pletcher, who trains newcomer Dance City. “If you have a later developing horse and a fresh horse, it’s doable.”

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Saturday, May 21 AUTO RACING 6 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, qualifying for Spanish Grand Prix, at Barcelona, Spain 9 a.m. VERSUS — IRL, pole qualifying for Indianapolis 500 2:30 p.m. VERSUS — IRL, pole qualifying for Indianapolis 500 3:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, qualifying for Summer Nationals, at Topeka, Kan. (sameday tape) 5 p.m.

LOCAL BRIEFS

PECOS TEEN CENTER TOURNEY IS MAY 21

A golf tournament benefitting Café Cha Cha Cha and the Pecos Valley Teen Center will be held on May 21 at Roswell Country Club. The cost is $60 per player and the deadline to enter is May 20. Registration starts at 6:30 a.m. on the morning of the tournament and the tournament begins at 8 a.m. For more information, call Stephen Deutsch at 734-5797 or 317-2719.

SMS TO HOST VOLLEYBALL CAMP

Sierra Middle School volleyball coaches JuLynn Jones and Cynthia Hernandez will hold a volleyball camp for players entering the 4th-8th grades on May 2326 at Sierra Middle School. The camp runs from 8 a.m. to noon each day. The cost is $30 per player and registrations will be accepted on the first day of the camp. For more information, call Jones at 627-2850.

GHS FUTURE STARS CAMP IS JUNE 1-3

The Goddard girls basketball coaches and players will hold the Goddard girls basketball Future Stars Camp from June 1-3 at Goddard High School.

SPORTS

port it.” Later, Hincapie released a statement through his attorney: “I can confirm to you that I never spoke with ‘60 Minutes.’ I have no idea where they got their information. As I’ve said in the past, I continue to be disappointed that people are talking about the past in cycling instead of the future. As for the substance of anything in the

Roswell Daily Record

‘60 Minutes’ story, I cannot comment on anything relating to the ongoing investigation.” Asked to comment on the newest “60 Minutes” report, Ar mstrong spokesman Mark Fabiani said: “We have no way of knowing what happened in the grand jury and so can’t comment on these anonymously sourced reports.” The Hincapie and Hamil-

SCOREBOARD

New York . . . . . . . . . .22 Washington . . . . . . . .21 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .26 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .25 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .21 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . .21 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .19 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .16 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W San Francisco . . . . . .24 Colorado . . . . . . . . . .23 Arizona . . . . . . . . . . .21 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .21 San Diego . . . . . . . . .19

22 .500 23 .477

L 20 20 23 23 24 29

L 19 19 23 25 25

5 6

Pct GB .565 — 1⁄2 .556 .477 4 .477 4 .442 5 1⁄2 .356 9 1⁄2

Pct GB .558 — 1⁄2 .548 1 .477 3 ⁄2 .457 4 1⁄2 .432 5 1⁄2

Thursday’s Games Pittsburgh 5, Cincinnati 3 N.Y. Mets 1, Washington 0 St. Louis 4, Houston 2 Colorado 7, Philadelphia 1 Chicago Cubs 5, Florida 1 Arizona 2, Atlanta 1 San Diego 1, Milwaukee 0 San Francisco 3, L.A. Dodgers 1 Friday’s Games Cleveland 5, Cincinnati 4 Pittsburgh 10, Detroit 1 N.Y. Mets 2, N.Y. Yankees 1 Philadelphia 3, Texas 2 Washington 17, Baltimore 5 Houston 5, Toronto 2 Boston 15, Chicago Cubs 5 Florida 5, Tampa Bay 3 L.A. Dodgers 6, Chicago White Sox 4, 10 innings Kansas City 3, St. Louis 0 Arizona 8, Minnesota 7 Colorado at Milwaukee, 6:10 p.m. Atlanta at L.A. Angels, 8:05 p.m. Seattle at San Diego, 8:05 p.m. Oakland at San Francisco, 8:15 p.m. Saturday’s Games Houston (Myers 1-3) at Toronto (Morrow 22), 11:07 a.m. L.A. Dodgers (Garland 1-3) at Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 3-3), 12:10 p.m.

Animal Kingdom galloped 1 1⁄2 miles on the synthetic track at Fair Hill Training Center on Friday. He’ll make the one-hour trip to Pimlico by van early Saturday morning. Motion’s stable is based in the Maryland countryside, and he wanted to keep his Derby winner out of the racetrack fray as long as he could. “It’s the first time he’s gone through all this stuff so he’s going to do it his way. I can’t blame him,” said Baffert, a five-time Preakness winner who will saddle Midnight Interlude. After rain much of the week, the forecast calls for sunny skies and highs in the low 80s, ensuring Pimlico’s dirt track will be fast. Post time is 4:18 p.m. MDT.

St. Louis (Westbrook 3-3) at Kansas City (Adcock 1-0), 12:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Bailey 3-0) at Cleveland (Tomlin 5-1), 2:05 p.m. Washington (Lannan 2-4) at Baltimore (Guthrie 1-6), 2:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 5-3) at Florida (Vazquez 2-4), 2:10 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 6-0) at Pittsburgh (Correia 5-4), 5:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 4-2) at Boston (Aceves 1-0), 5:10 p.m. Colorado (Mortensen 1-0) at Milwaukee (Marcum 5-1), 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Capuano 3-4) at N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 4-3), 5:10 p.m. Oakland (Anderson 2-3) at San Francisco (Lincecum 3-4), 5:10 p.m. Texas (C.Lewis 4-4) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 2-4), 5:10 p.m. Atlanta (Hanson 5-3) at L.A. Angels (Pineiro 2-0), 8:05 p.m. Seattle (Pineda 5-2) at San Diego (Richard 2-4), 8:05 p.m. Minnesota (S.Baker 2-3) at Arizona (Owings 0-0), 8:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Cincinnati at Cleveland, 11:05 a.m. N.Y. Mets at N.Y. Yankees, 11:05 a.m. Houston at Toronto, 11:07 a.m. Tampa Bay at Florida, 11:10 a.m. Detroit at Pittsburgh, 11:35 a.m.

Macho

Continued from Page B1

and most hated wrestler in entertainment. His flying elbow off the top rope was mimicked by basement and backyard wrestlers everywhere. Savage made good use of his deep, raspy voice as a corporate pitchman as well, for years ordering Slim Jim fans to “Snap into a Slim Jim!” He’s most known for his legendary rivalries with Hulk Hogan, Ricky Steamboat and Ric Flair. Wrestlers took to Twitter to let fans know Savage won’t be forgotten. “There’s probably five or six of us, with Andre (the Giant) and Hogan and thankfully myself and Flair, that, when their names pop up, even if you’re not a fan, you

ton revelations come a year after Floyd Landis, who had his 2006 Tour title stripped for using steroids, turned the focus of the feds’ cycling investigation onto Ar mstrong, claiming he and Armstrong had both used drugs while on the U.S. Postal team. But while Hamilton and Landis have credibility problems that Armstrong has pointed out — both

cyclists denied using drugs for years before changing their story and implicating Armstrong — there aren’t nearly as many issues with Hincapie. The 37-year -old cyclist from New York has no known positive tests. He was on the Postal team even before Armstrong and, once Armstrong joined it, the two were frequent roommates on the road.

Texas at Philadelphia, 11:35 a.m. Washington at Baltimore, 11:35 a.m. Colorado at Milwaukee, 12:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Chicago White Sox, 12:10 p.m. St. Louis at Kansas City, 12:10 p.m. Atlanta at L.A. Angels, 1:35 p.m. Oakland at San Francisco, 2:05 p.m. Seattle at San Diego, 2:05 p.m. Minnesota at Arizona, 2:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Boston, 6:05 p.m. Monday’s Games Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 5:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Houston, 6:05 p.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 6:10 p.m. St. Louis at San Diego, 8:05 p.m.

on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 18. Optioned INF Luis Valbuena to Columbus (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Placed RHP Brandon McCarthy and RHP Tyson Ross on the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Trystan Magnuson to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled RHP Joey Devine, RHP Fautino De Los Santos and LHP Jerry Blevins from Sacramento. TAMPA BAY RAYS—Reinstated LHP J.P. Howell from the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of OF Justin Ruggiano from Durham. Optioned RHP Rob Delaney to Durham. Designated INF Dan Johnson for assignment. National League COLORADO ROCKIES—Recalled RHP Matt Daley from Colorado Springs (PCL)). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Placed OF Shane Victorino on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Domonic Brown from Lehigh Valley (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS—Named Jerry West advisor to owners Joe Lacob and Peter Guber. HOCKEY National Hockey League NEW YORK RANGERS—Agreed to terms with G Scott Stajcer. PHOENIX COYOTES—Signed C Petteri Nokelainen to a one-year contract. COLLEGE ARKANSAS STATE—Announced junior basketball F Kendrick Washington has transferred from Houston. INDIANA—Announced sophomore F Bobby Capobianco was transferring from the men’s basketball program.

Transactions

Friday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Optioned RHP Chris Jakubauskas and LHP Troy Patton to Norfolk (IL). Selected the contract of 2B Ryan Adams from Norfolk. Recalled OF Nolan Reimold from Norfolk. BOSTON RED SOX—Activated RHP Dan Wheeler from the 15-day DL. Selected INF Drew Sutton from Pawtucket (IL). Optioned RHP Michael Bowden and SS Jose Iglesias to Pawtucket. Designated OF Daniel Nava for assignment. Added LHP Franklin Morales to the active roster. CLEVELAND INDIANS—Recalled OF Ezequiel Carrera and RHP Frank Herrmann from Columbus (IL). Placed DH Travis Hafner

know who in the hell these people are,” said former wrestler and WWE Hall of Famer Dusty Rhodes. “You say, ‘I know this guy. I know Macho Man Randy Savage.’ He was part of that breed. We lost a good one.” Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson hailed Savage as one of his childhood inspirations and heroes, while Mick “Cactus Jack” Foley called Savage “one of my favorite performers.” Hogan said he and Savage had just started talking again after 10 years. “He had so much life in his eyes & in his spirit, I just pray that he’s happy and in a better place and we miss him,” Hogan wrote. While so many personalities who left the WWF for WCW like Hogan, Roddy Piper and Mean Gene Okerlund were wel-

comed back to the company and even inducted into the Hall of Fame, Savage never returned. Rhodes said Savage had prudently saved his money and was content to remain out of the spotlight. “He was a recluse, almost,” Rhodes said by phone. “Whatever he was doing, he wanted that privacy. Yeah, he was out of the picture for 10 years, but he didn’t want to be in the picture.” Savage was a minor league catcher in the 1970s for St. Louis and Cincinnati before turning in the uniform for tights. His father, Angelo Poffo, was a longtime wrestler, and his brother, “Leaping” Lanny Poffo, was also a 1980s WWF mainstay. Condolences from fans poured in to Lanny Poffo’s Facebook page on Friday.

SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, AllStar Race, at Concord, N.C. BOXING 8 p.m. HBO — Light heavyweights, Chad Dawson (29-1-0) vs. Adrian Diaconu (27-20); champion Jean Pascal (26-1-1) vs. Bernard Hopkins (51-5-2), for WBC light heavyweight title, at Montreal 9 p.m. FSN — Welterweights, Alfonso Gomez (22-4-2) vs. Calvin Green (21-5-1), at Cabazon, Calif. COLLEGE BASEBALL 5 p.m. FSN — Texas A&M at Texas COLLEGE SOFTBALL 10 a.m. ESPN — NCAA Division I playoffs, regionals, Site 2/Game 3, teams TBD 12:30 p.m. ESPN — NCAA Division I playoffs,

regionals, Site 2/Game 4, teams TBD 3 p.m. ESPN — NCAA Division I playoffs, regionals, Site 2/Game 5, teams TBD CYCLING 5 p.m. VERSUS — Tour of California, Stage 7, Claremont to Mount Baldy, Calif. GOLF 7 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Volvo World Match Play Championship, third round and quarterfinal matches, at Casares, Spain 11 a.m. TGC — Nationwide Tour, BMW Charity Pro-Am, third round, at Greer, Mill Spring, and Spartanburg, S.C. 1 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, Crowne Plaza Invitational, third round, at Fort Worth, Texas 2:30 p.m.

TGC — LPGA, Sybase Match Play Championship, third round and quarterfinal matches, at Gladstone, N.J. HORSE RACING 12:30 p.m. VERSUS — NTRA, Preakness undercard, at Baltimore 2:30 p.m. NBC — NTRA, Preakness Stakes, at Baltimore MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Noon MLB — Regional coverage, L.A. Dodgers at Chicago White Sox or St. Louis at Kansas City 5 p.m. FOX — Regional coverage, N.Y. Mets at N.Y. Yankees, Chicago Cubs at Boston, Oakland at San Francisco, or Texas at Philadelphia 8 p.m. MLB — Regional coverage, Atlanta at

L.A. Angels or Minnesota at Arizona MEN’S COLLEGE LACROSSE 10 a.m. ESPN2 — NCAA Division I playoffs, quarterfinal, Virginia vs. Cornell, at Hempstead, N.Y. 12:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NCAA Division I playoffs, quarterfinal, Denver vs. John’s Hopkins, at Hempstead, N.Y. NBA BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Playoffs, conference finals, Game 3, Dallas at Oklahoma City NHL HOCKEY 11:30 a.m. NBC — Playoffs, conference finals, Game 4, Boston at Tampa Bay SOCCER 8 p.m. ESPN2 — MLS, Los Angeles at Chivas USA

The camp runs from 8 a.m. to noon each day and is for girls entering 3rd-8th grades. Registration is $25 and begins at 7:30 a.m. on June 1. For more information, call Greg Torres at 627-4859.

team. The field is limited to the first 24 paid teams. For more information, call Brady Crump at 622-6033.

each day and is open to all boys in the 3rd-8th grades. Registration is June 6 from 7:30-8 a.m. Registration is $50 per child or $40 each for two or more from the same family. Each child will get free breakfast and lunch, and a T-shirt. For more information, call Britt Cooper at 637-3252.

For more information, call Donald Doines at 637-4841 or Ray Baca at 9102222.

NMMI BASEBALL TO HOLD TRYOUT

The NMMI Bronco baseball program will hold a tryout for any college-eligible player under the age of 22 on Wednesday, June 1, at NMMI Ballpark. The registration form is available online at the Bronco baseball webpage at www.nmmi.edu/athletics. Registration begins at 9:15 a.m. on the day of the tryout for position players with evaluation running from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Registration for pitchers and catchers begins at 1:15 p.m. with the evaluation running from 2-4:30 p.m. The tryout fee is $25. For more information, call Robert Nordorf at 624-8448 or 494-3264.

ELKS FOR VETS GOLF TOURNEY IS JUNE 4

The annual Elks for Veterans charity golf tournament will be held on June 4 at the NMMI Golf Course. The four-person scramble will begin with an 8 a.m. shotgun start. The cost is $60 per player or $240 per

27TH MILKMAN TRIATHLON TO BE HELD JUNE 4

The 27th annual Milkman Triathlon will be held on Saturday, June 4, at 8 a.m. in Dexter. The triathlon will consist of a 1/2k swim, a 20k bike and a 5k run. The cost is $50 for a solo competitor and $45 for a mixed relay team. There is also a $10 single-event permit fee for entrants who do not hold a USA Triathlon License. Awards will be given for overall placing and also for 16 age groups for both males and females in the solo compeition and overall placing and for six different age groups in the mixed relay competition. The entry deadline is 5 p.m. on June 1. For more information, call Larry Marshall at 734-5415.

RHS BOYS BASKETBALL COYOTE CAMP IS JUNE 6-9

The Roswell boys basketball team will hold its annual basketball camp from June 6-9 at Roswell High School. The camp runs from 8 a.m. to noon

GHS TO HOLD HOOPS CAMP JUNE 13-16

Goddard coach Kevin Jones and the Rocket boys basketball program will hold a basketball camp from June 13-16 at Goddard High School. The camp is for boys and girls who are entering 4th-9th grades. The cost for the camp is $30 for the first child and $20 for each additional child. The camp runs from 8 a.m. to noon every day. For more information, call Jones at 622-4829.

RAGE IN THE CAGE TOURNEY IS JUNE 18

The inaugural Rage in the Cage 3-on3 basketball tournament will be held on June 18 at Cahoon Park. The entry fee for the tournament is $100 per team. Age divisions are 9-11, 12-14, 15-17 and 18-and-up. All teams are guaranteed three games and a Tshirt. The deadline to enter is June 9.

NMMI TO HOST TENNIS CAMP JUNE 20-23

New Mexico Military Institute men’s tennis coach Gene Hardman will host a summer tennis camp from June 20-23 at the Institute. The morning sessions will be held from 9-11 a.m. and are open to players, ages 8-12. The afternoon session will be held from 2-4 p.m. and are open to players, ages 13-18. The cost is $10 per session. To sign up or for more information, call Hardman at 624-8281.

FIRST TEE YOUTH CAMPS START JUNE 6

The First Tee of the Pecos Valley is currently accepting reservations for its annual Youth Golf & Life Skills Summer Camps, which are held at the NMMI Golf Course. The cost is $75 and includes breakfast and lunch each day. The dates of the event are June 6-9 (ages 7-17), June 13-16 (First Tee Participants), June 20-23 (ages 5-10), July 1114 (ages 7-17) and July 18-21 (ages 510). For more information or to reserve a spot, call 623-4444.


Roswell Daily Record

COMICS

Garfield

Jumble

Family Circus

Beetle Bailey

DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend and I will be attending a milestone birthday party for a friend of his. The fiancee of the birthday guy stated on the invitation, “There will be a surprise during the evening.” It has been suggested that a stripper “may” be the surprise. Abby, I realize this might be OK for some people and it’s just for fun, but I’d be uncomfortable if this happens. My boyfriend knows my feelings, but I don’t know if we would risk being ridiculed if we left the party. What should I do if I find myself in this situation? HATE TO BE A PARTY-POOPER

DEAR “PARTY-POOPER”: Contact the birthday guy’s fiancee and ask if what you heard is true. If it is, spare yourself the embarrassment and have your boyfriend attend the party without you. 

DEAR ABBY: When someone has a serious illness or major surgery, everyone thinks to bring food, which is lovely. But I have a better idea. When my friend, who has a young family, was diagnosed with breast cancer, I offered to do her laundry. Her recovery was slow, and the chemo and radiation therapies endless. Three years later, we’re nearing

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

the end of a short and brave life, and I still do their laundry every week. It has been a help to her, and I have grown closer to her and her family. When she’s gone, I will never again do a load of wash without thinking of her. Perhaps your readers can help another family this way. THE LAUNDRY FAIRY, ROCHESTER, MINN. DEAR LAUNDRY FAIRY: The support you have given to that family extends far beyond doing laundry. Your presence over the long haul has, I’m sure, meant much more. Read on for a view from the perspective of a caregiver: 

DEAR ABBY: My wife has dementia. Our children don’t live close by, so I’m her only caregiver. One afternoon a week I hire someone to stay with her so I can grocery shop, do banking and run necessary errands. Neigh-

Dear Heloise:

I was delighted to hear that you share our love of mini schnauzers. Ours, a female named Sammie, passed away recently; she was less than 8 years old. According to our vet, the breed has a genetic tendency toward pancreatitis (irritation and swelling of the pancreas — very painful). It is very likely that FATTY TABLE SCRAPS (like fried chicken nuggets) caused pancreatitis and contributed to her passing. We also did not control how much Sammie ate each day; we just kept her dry-food bowl

HINTS

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

filled. Based on our experience, I would suggest that readers who love their dogs:

1. Discuss their dog breed’s dietary weaknesses, if any, with the vet.

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

bors and friends over the years have offered the standard, “If I can do anything to help, let me know,” but I’m not the type to call and ask, although it would be wonderful to have more hours to myself to do things in a leisurely manner rather than like running a marathon. I know people are busy, but it would be great if some of those who offered help would call occasionally, tell me they have an afternoon or evening free (or even an hour or two) and give me a little breathing room. I don’t begrudge one moment of the time I have spent caring for my wife. She has, for 50 years, been a marvelous wife, a wonderful mother and the center of our family. Whatever I do for her can never repay the comfort, strength and joy she has brought into my life. But I cried (privately) on Christmas Day after the family had finished our gift exchange, because I had no time to go and buy her a gift. Please advise your readers that if the offer of help they extend is real, to please check their schedules, find some time they are willing to give, CALL that friend, neighbor or relative and offer to sit with their loved one. That thoughtful gesture will be appreciated beyond what they could possibly ever imagine. A FRIEND OF YOURS 2. Avoid table scraps, especially those containing fat. 3. Feed their dog only the amount that it needs each day, bearing in mind that a dog’s appetite naturally increases in colder weather. 4. Get a set of blood tests done each year, even if the dog seems healthy, and especially as the dog gets older or seems to slow down. Michael in Colorado Springs, Colo.

Michael, I know your pain of losing a beloved dog. We are on our third mini schnauzer. Yes, they are prone to pancreatitis, as we know well. Cabbie has had three bouts! And our second one, Savvi, had it once. A “guest” had fed her table scraps, even though I had told him not to! You are correct — no high-fat food, EVER! Heloise

Hagar the Horrible

Blondie

Zits

Snuffy Smith



Dear Heloise: The hint about switching dog foods because dogs get bored with the same flavor made me chuckle. We have a basset hound that I don’t think EVER gets bored with her food! She loves to eat! (Heloise caution: You may not be able to do this with all dog breeds, as some have sensitive tummies, and the food change could cause medical issues.) Love your column. Lori from Ohio

Dear Readers: Avalon Ingram in Grapeland, Texas, sent in a picture of her cat, Sandy, sneaking a sip of milk from her granddaughter Teresa’s bottle. Yep, pretty sneaky, Sandy! But Teresa doesn’t seem to mind. To see Sandy and our other Pet Pals, check out www.Heloise.com and click on “Pets.” Heloise

Dilbert

The Wizard of Id



Hi, Heloise: Today you were giving hints on how to get the hair out of a hairbrush and how to clean it. My hint, after years of trying everything else, is: I have a wire brush for my Maltese dog, which does an excellent job of removing his loose hair. I tried using it on my hairbrush, and voila! It took the hair out of every bristle quickly — an excellent job. I removed all of the hair in the hairbrush and ran the brush through the dishwasher, and it came out clean as a whistle. Janet Hiebert, Huntsville, Ala.

For Better or For Worse

Saturday, May 21, 2011

B3


CHURCHDEVOTIONAL&DIRECTORY

B4 Saturday, May 21, 2011

CHURCH PAGE

Roswell Daily Record

This Devotional & Directory is made possible by those businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services.

HOW TO BE A BETTER FRIEND

In his book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” Dale Carnegie gives some very simple and straightforward advice on making friends, namely, “Become genuinely interested in other people.” One easy way to do this is to ask people questions about their interests and concerns. These questions should go beyond superficial questions about their jobs or their education, or how their families are doing, and instead should strive to get to the more interesting kernel of their affairs. A good question about someone’s profession might ask what motivated them to go into their field, or what sort of interesting developments are happening in their field today. People love to talk about themselves and their interests, and by talking less about ourselves and inquiring more about others, we help to build a genuine interest in them. We might find that other people really do have something interesting to tell us. Ralph Waldo Emerson is reputed to have said that “Every man I meet is in some way my superior; and in that I can learn from him.” Whether Emerson actually said this or not, the sentiment is certainly one we all should take to heart. We should listen to our friends and neighbors, and perhaps even to our enemies, and by taking a genuine interest in their lives and their concerns we might just learn a thing or two. We will certainly gain their friendship and affection. Let every man be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to anger, for the anger of a man does not work the righteousness of God.

ANGLICAN

ST. FRANCIS ANGELICAN CHURCH (@ Church of God Seventh Day) 18th & Kansas, 420-3573, Bob Jordan Min.; W.S. 10:00 a.m., Wed. 6:00 pm ST. STEPHEN’S 1500 S. Main (Chapel @ 1st Christian Church); 9109706; Fr. Bob Tally, Min; W.S. 9:00 a.m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD, 1224 W. Country Club, 622-2171, Melvin Suttle, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 6:00 pm., Wed. 7:00 pm. MIDWAY ASSEMBLY OF GOD 63 Yakima Rd., 3475309, S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m

TEMPLO BETAL ASSEMBLY OF GOD 221 E. Jefferson, 623-6852, Paul & Toni Herrera, Mins. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Tues. & Wed. 6 p.m.

TEMPLO LA HERMOSA FIRST SPANISH ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1305 South Garden, 625-0885, Oscar Guerrero, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Tues. & Wed. 7 p.m.

BAPTIST

BERRENDO BAPTIST 400 W. Berrendo Rd., 6221372, Troy Grant, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

BETHEL BAPTIST N. Garden & East Country Club Rd., 622-8182 Richard Grisham, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:40 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. BYKOTA BAPTIST 2106 E. Pine Lodge Rd., 622-3399 Don Johnson, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

R.S.V James 1:19-20

HIGHLAND BAPTIST 2001 S. Lea, 622-9980, Dr. Ed Meyers, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

IGLESIA BAUTISTA EL CALVARIO 600 E. Tilden, 623-8135, Roberto Mancillas, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. MIDWAY BAPTIST 134 Yakima Rd., Leo Pennington, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 7 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

MORNING STAR BAPTIST 1513 Mulberry Ave., W.F. Wagoner, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. Wed. 7:30 p.m. MOUNTAIN VIEW BAPTIST 206 E. Charleston, 622-1019, Jack Ferguson, Interim Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 6:00 p.m.

MT. GILEAD MISSIONARY BAPTIST 700 E. Summit, 623-0292 Pastor Allen. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:00a.m. PRIMERA BAPTIST 417 East Wildy, 623-5420 S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. PRIMERA IGLESIA BAUTISTA OF DEXTER 388 South Lincoln. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

ROSWELL BAPTIST TEMPLE700 E. Berrendo, Bill Whitehead, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 am. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. SOUTH MANOR BAPTIST 1905 S. Main, 622-6072, Butch Neal, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed 6 p.m. TABERNACLE BAPTIST 115 W. 11th, 622-7912, S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

CALVARY BAPTIST 1009 W. Alameda,Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

THE FRIENDSHIP MISSIONARY BAPTIST 1220 Johnson St., 623-6484, Michael K. Shelton, Sr., Min.S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed.7 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST ��� HAGERMAN 211 N. Cambridge, Hagerman, S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

VICTORY BAPTIST 1601 W. McGaffey, 622-0114, Dan Holt, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST 500 N. Pennsylvania, 623-2640; Matt Brooks, Min., S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:00 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST OF DEXTER 101 W. 3rd St., Dexter, 734-5673, Jackie Thomas, Min., S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m. GALILEE BAPTIST 513 E. Matthews St., 662-8534, W.W. Green, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.

TRINIDAD COMMUNITY BAPTIST 1707 W. Juniper. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

WARE TABERNACLE MISSIONARY BAPTIST 900 E. Deming, 622-0546, Richard Gorham, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 & 11 a.m., Wed. 6 p.m.

WASHINGTON AVE. BAPTIST 1400 North Washington Ave., 840-1144, Randy Reeves, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION CATHOLIC 2808 N. Kentucky, 6229895, Bill McCann, Min. Masses: Sat. Mass 9:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.; Sun. Mass 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.; Mon-Fri Mass 12:10 p.m.; IMMACULATE CONCEPTION PARISH Dexter, Sat. Mass 6 p.m., Sun. Mass 11 a.m.

OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE Lake Arthur, Sun. Mass 8 a.m. ST. CATHERINE’S Hagerman, Sun. Mass 9:30 a.m.

ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC 506 S. Lincoln, 622-3531, Juan Antonio Gutierrez, Min.; Sat. English Mass 5:30 p.m., Spanish Mass 7 p.m.; Sun. English Mass 10 a.m., Spanish Mass 8 a.m. & Noon.

ST. PETER CATHOLIC 805 S. Main, 622-5092, Charlie Martinez, Min.; Sat. Mass 6 p.m. Sun. Mass 8 a..m. & 11 a.m.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST, 101 S. Lea; S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m.; wed. 7:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST 114 E. Hobbs, W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 5 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST 1500 S. Elm, 622-4675; John Early Cannon, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 6 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST 1512 South Main St., 6224426 S.S. 10:30 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m., Wed. 6:30 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST 700 W. Country Club Road, 622-1350, Doug Austin, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & 5 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST West Alameda & Balsam, 622-5562 W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., 2nd Sun. 1:30 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST 200 S. Union, Suite C, 3472628; S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. IGLESIA DE CRISTO 801 N. Washington, Horoaio de Servicios: Domingo 9:30 & 11:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., Miercoles 6 p.m. SPANISH CHURCH OF CHRIST 3501 W. College, 622-3618 S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m.

SPANISH CHURCH OF CHRISTMulberry & Buena Vista, Joe Villa, Min. W.S. 9:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 6 p.m.

Prosthetics

Diabetic Shoes

New Mexico Prosthetic-Orthotic Center, Inc. Adam Dutchover, CPO, FAAOP Certified Orthodtist and Prosthetist 2515 N. Kentucky • 575-623-0344

CHURCH OF GOD NEW COVENANT FELLOWSHIP CHURCH OF GOD 2200 N. Garden, 6241958,S.S. 9:30 a.m. W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST IMMANUEL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 1000 N. Union, 622-6352, Louis Accardi, Min., S.S. 10:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:30 a.m.; Wed. 6 p.m.

ST. PAUL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 321 E. McGaffey, 623-1568, Joe L. Dawson, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m., Tues. & Fri. 8 p.m.

DISCIPLES OF

CHRIST

DISCIPLES OF CHRIST Christian Fellowship, 1413 S. Union, 627-0506, Mark E. Rowland, Int. Min.; W.S. 1:30 pm.

EPISCOPAL

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL 505 N. Penn., 622-1353 Principal Service. 9 a.m. 11:00 a.m.; in church Wed. 7 a.m. in the prayer garden. http://standrews roswell.org

JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES Kingdom Halls 205 W. Gayle

Mesa Park Cong. Sun. 10 am; Tues. 7 p.m. Buena Visa Cong. (Spanish) Sun. 1:30 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

1718 N. Atkinson

Mountain View Cong. Sun. 1 p.m.; Wed. 7:30 p.m. Spring River Cong. Sun. 10 a.m.; Tues 7:30 p.m.

1421 S. Garden

Rio Pecos Cong. Sun. 10 am; Thurs. 7 p.m.

Dexter- 411 S. Lincoln Dexter Cong. Sun. 10 a.m.; Thurs. 7 p.m.

Lic. #365901 575-623-2011

Reading Plumbing Heating & Air Conditioning, Inc. 217 E. McGaffey


CHURCH PAGE

Roswell Daily Record

Saturday, May 21, 2011

B5

.J E X B Z  'B NJ M Z  $ I V S D I

'B NJ M Z  $ I V S D I    3F B D I J O H  0 V U  5P  : P V  8J U I  ( P E  T  -P W F  "

1B T U P S  O O Z  &   4P O T %B JEWISH

CONGREGATIONAL B’NAI ISRAEL 712 N. Washington, 622-7295, W.S. 2nd & 4th Fri. 7 p.m.

LUTHERAN

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN 1405 N. Sycamore at College, 622-2853Daniel Praeuner, Min., S.S. 10:20 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m.

REDEEMER LUTHERAN 2525 N. Spruce Ave., 6277157; W.S. 10 a.m.

ST. MARK EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 2911 N. Main St., 623-0519, Bill Bruggeman, Min.; S.S. 9:15 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m.

METHODIST

ALDERSGATE UNITED METHODIST 915 W 19th St, 625-2855, Jim Bignell, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m.

DEXTER UNITED METHODIST 112 W. 3rd St., Dexter, 734-6529, Jim Bignell, Min. S.S. 9:30a.m.; W.S. 11:00 a.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST 200 N. Pennsylvania, 6221881 Gorton Smith, Sr., Min.; S.S.9:15 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m.

IGLESIA METHODISTA UNIDA 213 E. Albuquerque; 208-0056, Carlos Espinoza, Min.; W.S. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 6:30 p.m.

TRINITY UNITED METHODIST 1413 S. Union, 622-0119, Ruth Fowler, Min.; S.S. 10 a.m.; WS. 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.

MORMON

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 2201 West Country Club Rd. First Ward: Hank Malcom, Bishop 623-2777; W.S. 9 a.m.; S.S. 10:10 a.m.

Second Ward: Ignacio Luevano, Bishop, 623-4492 W.S. 11 a.m.; S.S. 12:10 p.m. 3ra Rama (en EspaĂąol): Presidente McClellan; W.S. 2:15 p.m.; S.S. 12:15 p.m.

NAZARENE

CENTRAL CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 901 E. Country Club, 420-2907 Randy Elftman, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 501 N. Sycamore, 624-2614; Mike Couch, Int. Min.; S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m.

THE NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1019 S Lea; 623-0201; Hector Torres, Min.; S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Spanish Service 12:30 p.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY OF THE FAITH IN JESUS CHRIST 1721 N. Maryland, 624-2728, Ismael Chavarria, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Thurs. 7 p.m. APOSTOLIC BIBLE 2529 West Alameda, 625-8779, Rod Foster, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

APOSTOLIC FAMILY WORSHIP CENTER 1103 N Union; Joel Martinez, Min., 627-2258; W.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL 602 S. Mississippi, 347-2514, J.E. Shirley, Min. W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. GOD’S MESSENGER 3303 W Alameda; 625-0190; R. Dixon, Sr., Min.; S.S. 8:45 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. Noon HOUSE OF PRAYER 412 E. Matthews, 746-6699, Mike Valverde, Min. W.S. 5 p.m. Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.

IGLESIA DE DIOS 317 East Wildy, 627-6596, Catarino Cedillo, Min. Escuela Dominical 9:45 a.m., Servicio de Domingo por la tarde 5 p.m. Martes: Oracion y Estudio Biblico 7 p.m., Jueves: Servicio Ninos, Jovenes, Damas, Varones 7 p.m. LIFE MINISTRIES FOURSQUARE CHURCH 409 W. 16th, 622-3383; Wayne & Janice Snow, Mins.; W.S. 10:30 am,Wed. 7:00 p.m. NEW APOSTOLIC 813 N. Richardson, Ste. A, W.S. 10 a.m.

NEW LIFE APOSTOLIC 1800 W. Bland, 622-2989, Emnauel Norfor, Min.; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

TRINITY APOSTOLIC FAITH 611 W. 17th, 6241910, Frank & Pearl Moser, Min. W.S. 11 a.m.

TRINITY HOUSE OF PRAISE PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD 510 S. Montana, 623-2710, Bobby Barnett, Min. W.S. 9:45 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 400 W. 3rd St., 622-4910, Hugh Burroughs, Min. S.S. 8:30 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. 24-Hr Daily Inspiration Hotline 623-5439

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN DEXTER 201 West Fifth St., 734-5797, Stephen C. Deutsch, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN HAGERMAN 310 N. Cambridge, 743-5797 Stephen C. Deutsch, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 9:30a.m.; Mon. 4:30 p.m.

IGLESIA PRESBITERIANA HISPANA 300 North Missouri, 622-0756, Adam Soliz, Min. W.S. 11 a.m.

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN 2801 W. 4th St., 622-2801; Dr. Harry A. Cole, Int. Min..; S.S. 10:45 a.m.; W.S. 9:30 a.m.

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST

BEULAH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST 106 S. Michigan Ave., 243-6203; Alex Horton, Min. Sat. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISLA DEL 7 DIA 500 S. Cedar, 9106527, Noel Dominguez, Min. Sat. S.S. 11 a.m.; W.S. 9:30 a.m. Wed. 7 p.m. ROSWELL ENGLISH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Jaffa & S. Union, 623-4636, Ken Davis,Min. Sat. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 am. Wed. 7 p.m.

OTHER

ALBUQUERQUE/ ROSWELL FAMILY 501 Cagua S.E., 266-4468, Fritz Schneider, Min.

BEOD MOED HEBRAIC BIBLE CENTER 928 W. McGaffey, 840-6120, Sat. Hebraic Dance 1 p.m.; Torah Study 2 p.m.; Wed. Pray & Dance Practice 6 p.m. CALVARY CHAPEL OF ROSWELL 2901 W. 4th, 623-8072, W.S. 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

CHRIST’S CHURCH 2200 N. Sycamore, 623-4110 S.S. 8:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:00 am.

CHRISTIAN COWBOY FELLOWSHIP 3103 W. Alameda John Sturza, 6250255, 2nd and last Friday CHURCH OF GOD 7TH DAY 1722 N. Kansas, 6237295, Sat. W.S. 9:45 a.m.

THE UNITED CHURCH OF ROSWELL Meeting @ Church Bldg @ 1st & Lea; W.S. 8:30 am Bob Maples, Pastor CHURCH ON THE MOVE 901 W. Brasher Rd., 6227011, Troy Smothermon, Min. W.S. 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN 1500 S. Main, 622-2392, S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m. GATEWAY 1900 Sycamore Ave., 623-8670, Rick Rapp, Min. W.S. 10:30 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. GRACE COMMUNITY 935 W. Mescalero, 623-5438 Rick Hale,Min.; W.S. 9 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. H.I.S. HOUSE 300 W. 3rd, Dexter, 734-6873 Ron & Jeri Fuller, Mins. W.S. 10 a.m. Wed.6 p.m. NARROW WAY 2200 N. Sycamore, 623-2511, Lyman Graham, Min. W.S. 2 p.m. ORTHODOX BAHA’I FAITH obfusa@rt66.com 622-5729 ROSWELL CHRISTIAN OUTREACH MINISTRIES 101 S. Sunset; Joe Diaz, Min. W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m. ROSWELL PRAYER CENTER 622-4111/317-3867; Sat. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Weekdays 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., 6 p..m. to 9 p.m. SALVATION ARMY 612 W. College, 622-8700 Beau & Mandy Perez, Mins. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m.; B.S. Thurs. 6:30 p.m. THE CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY 2322 N. Sherman; Lawrence S. Sanchez, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. THE DOOR 129 E. 3rd St. 781-0360; Gabriel Rubi, Min.; W.S. 10:30 am & 6 pm. Wed. 7 pm WASHINGTON CHAPEL CHRISTIAN 110 S. Michigan St., 623-3511 Rev. Abukusumo, Min.; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. WAYMAKER 202 S. Sunset, 627-9190 Mike & Twyla Knowlton, Mins.; W.S. 10 a.m.; J12 (8-12 yr. olds) 4 p.m.; Revolution Youth Service 6 p.m.; Wed. Core Home Groups 7 p.m.


B6 Saturday, May 21, 2011

GARAGE SALES

Legals

DON’T ’ MISS A SALE BY MISSING THE 2:00 PM DEADLINE FOR PLACING YOUR ADS

---------------------------------Publish May 7, 14, 21, 2011

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO DM-2011-284

ANDRES ENRIQUE VILLALOBOS Petitioner, vs.

IVONNE ADRIANA VILLALOBOS (FAVELA) Respondent. RE: DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE

001. North

710 MISSION Arch Dr, Sat. 7am-11am. Double stainless steel sink, baby items, dishes, Hibachi, gas grill, antique twin beds & many other items.

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

STATE OF NEW MEXICO TO: GREETINGS: Notice is hereby given you that an action has been brought in the District Court of Chaves County, NO DM-11-284 in which Andres Enrique Villalobos is the Petitioner, and you are the Respondent, requesting a Dissolution of Marriage. Unless you enter an appearance in said cause on or before July 3, 2011, judgment will be rendered in said cause against you by default.

1718 N. Ohio Sat. 7am Household items, furniture, etc.

002. Northeast 2311 N. Grand Apt B, Fri-Sat 8am-? Rubber stamp/scrapbkg supp., sm. tables, kitchen ware, scrubs, computer acc.

Petitioner’s Address Is: 210 West Bland, Apt #B Roswell, New Mexico 88203 KENNON CROWHURST Clerk of the District Court By: s/Vincent Espinoza

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish May 21, 28, June 4, 11, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF Chaves Fifth Judicial District

Case No. D0504CV200900290

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., v.

Plaintiff,

LOLITA PINEDA, BENEFICIAL NEW MEXICO, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION AND UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LOLITA PINEDA, Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on June 15, 2011 at 11:30 AM, the West steps entrance of the Chaves County Courthouse, 400 N. Virginia, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the above-named defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State: The East forty feet (40') of LOT SIX (6) and the West Seventeen and one half feet (17.5') of LOT FIVE (5) of HINKLE'S REDIVISION OF BLOCK THIRTY-EIGHT (38) OF RIVERSIDE HEIGHTS ADDITION, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk's office on August 4, 1936 and recorded in Book A of Plat Records, Chaves County, New Mexico, at Page 222.

The address of the real property is 1208 Highland Road, Roswell, NM 88201. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on April 13, 2011 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $128,947.65 plus interest from October 30, 2009 to the date of sale at the rate of 6.250% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master's fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff's costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder's funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption. ___________________________ Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group 20 First Plaza NW, Suite #20 Albuquerque, NM 87102 (505) 681-1414; FAX (505) 294-4003

NM00-00765_FC01

002. Northeast

712 NORTH Greenwood Ave. Saturday only 8am-12pm. 3 Family Garage Sale-car luggage rack, clothes, toys, household items & much more 502 BROKEN Arrow Fri.-Sun. 8am No Early Birds! General household. Moving Sale 855 SWINGING Spear Rd, Saturday. Clearance Sale. 3113 Futura Dr. Sat. Only! 7am-3pm No Early Birds. Lots of kids clothing, mens, womens clothing, furniture, 32” TV, shop vac, yard blower, bed frames, head boards, kids toys, Bow-Flex Ultimate system w/attachments & much more. 703 LAFONDA Dr. Huge Saturday garage sale 7-4 Must see. 302 N. Garden Sat. 8am-2pm Tools, fridge, tires much much more.

004. Southeast

4205 S. Graves Sat. 7am EGP garage sale. Leather recliner, coffee tables, kitchen table 6 chairs, double stroller, ent. center, TV, queen size bed mattress, new womens dresses 20x , baby/mens/womens and kids clothes 2306 E. Hobson Rd, Sat-Sun 8-2. Multi family yard sale: Furniture, electronics, weight machine, clothes dryer, toys, clothes of all sizes & lots of misc. 1 block East on Hobson Rd., just off US 285 South.

CLASSIFIEDS

004. Southeast

211 E. Hervey, Sat-Sun 7am-2pm. Hospital bed, weights & weight benches, water bed frame, clothes, toys & much more.

005. South

406 S. Lea Sat. & Sun. 8-5 Antiques, indoor/outdoor furniture, picture frames, collectibles, dishes & glassware, books by Lewis Lamour small hand tools & yard tools & Avon bottles over 35 yrs. old 511 S. Aspen Fri. & Sat. 8-? Huge 2 family sale all must go. No early birds 403 S. Aspen, Friday & Saturday 7am-?

006. Southwest

Roswell Daily Record

006. Southwest

008. Northwest

702 S. Kansas, Fri-Sat, 7am-2pm. Variety of misc. Come find your treasure.

MOVING SALE 2 families: 1734 N. Delaware Ave., Sat-Sun 8am-7pm. Tools, furniture, air compressor, mowers, weed eaters, lawn tools, clothes, pot-pans, riding mower, all kinds of home decor.

906 W. Forest, Sat. 8-12. Household items, toys, high chair, microwave, xmas.

1400 YALE Dr, Sat. 7am. Baby-tot items, clothes, toys & misc. household items. 1015 S. Kentucky Ave. Sat. & Sun. 7:30am-12:30pm Antique bdrm sets, end tables, antiques misc. items. 104 S. Lea (garage behind house) Sat. 8-12. Kitchen table w/4 chairs, other furniture, household items, flat screen TV, patio set w/6 chairs, & lots of misc.

1403 SUNSET Pl. Fri & Sat 7am-??. Furniture, clothing, household items

500 BLOCK of Cypress, Sat., 7am-3pm. Something for everyone. Furniture, dishes, linens, home decor, clothing all sizes. Too much to list.

802 W. Jaffa, Saturday only, 7:30am-12:30pm. Lots of good stuff.

413 W. Wildy, Sat., 7am-12pm. Huge garage sale. Bar stools, coffee & end tables, paintings, kids twin bed, women’s clothes, kids clothes, & lots more.

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish May 21, 28, June 4, 11, 2011

15 CEDAR Dr, Sat. only, 7am-2pm. Household stuff, kids furniture, toys, clothes, tools, something for everyone! Barbie jeep for girls, motorized police car for kids. 935 W. Mescalero, Fri-Sat, 8:30am. Lots of misc. good prices!

1403 SUNSET Pl. Fri & Sat 7am-??. Furniture, clothing, household items

333 W. Brasher, Saturday 8:00-Noon. Community Sale, Town & Country MHP: No Early Birds, household items, women & children’s clothing, scrubs, Christmas items.

906 DAVIDSON Dr, Sat-Sun, 7am-1pm. 2-3 family yard sale: Fencing, motorcycle, household items, baby clothes, etc.

.1100 HALL Sat. 8-1pm Garage Sale Tools, lots of misc.

600 CIELITO, Saturday 7am. Children’s clothes, refrigerator & other appliances, computer desk, TVs, combo bunk bed, bar stools, toys & more.

905 W. Deming Sat. & Sun. 7-5 Household items, furniture.

007. West

1003 HAMILTON Dr, Sat. 8am-2pm. “All Female” shopoholic home, from household to baby items & more good stuff- Has to go! 1003 HAMILTON Sat. 8-2 Huge garage sale with kids items from Dora to Princess stuff. Furniture & name brand items for your girls. Hurry will go fast.

v.

v.

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on June 15, 2011 at 11:30 AM, the West steps entrance of the Chaves County Courthouse, 400 N. Virginia, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the above-named defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State: Lot 5, of Western Meadows Townhomes Summary Plat, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat recorded January 12, 2007 in Plat Book X, Page 80a. Real Property Records of Chaves County, New Mexico.

The address of the real property is 901 South Wyoming Avenue, Roswell, NM 88201. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on April 20, 2011 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $125,452.62 plus interest from March 1, 2011 to the date of sale at the rate of 6.125% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master's fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff's costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder's funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption. ___________________________ Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group 20 First Plaza NW, Suite #20 Albuquerque, NM 87102

NM00-05511_FC01

015. Personals Special Notice

PAY CASH all day long for household items. Top prices paid for furniture, antiques, appliances, collectibles, tools, saddles, plus everything else from A to Z, including personal estates. 627-2033 or 623-6608 FOOD ADDICTS Anonymous 12 step fellowship offering freedom from eating disorders. Meeting on Thursdays at 7pm, 313 W. Country Club Rd. #5. For more information call 575-910-8178

Come worship with us

about JESUS?

SATURDAY 10:45am 9:30am SS

Case No. D-504-CV-201000595 Plaintiff,

MARTIN HORTON; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARTIN HORTON, IF ANY, Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on June 15, 2011 at 11:30 AM, the West steps entrance of the Chaves County Courthouse, 400 N. Virginia, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the above-named defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State: LOT TWELVE (12) IN BLOCK THREE (3) of CRESCENT HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk’s Office on May 9, 1949 and recorded in Book B of Plat Records, Chaves County, New Mexico, at Page 117.

The address of the real property is 1705 N. Delaware Ave, Roswell, NM 88201. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on April 22, 2011 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $74,358.90 plus interest from March 31, 2011 to the date of sale at the rate of 5.875% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master's fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff's costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder's funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption. _________________________ Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group 20 First Plaza NW, Suite #20 Albuquerque, NM 87102

NM00-01449_FC01

025. Lost and Found

REWARD! LOST Dog! German Shepard, Rot mix , blue collar, two tags. Around Cahoon Park. Please call 575-403-7567. BIG REWARD missing Bull Terrier “Spud Mackenzie” Tan & white female Call 575-420-472 or 624-0197 FOUND 5/16/11, youngish medium dog around Country Club/Grand Ave, call to describe. 575-973-7926 FOUND IPOD at Cielo Grande. Call and describe 624-6720. “SKY” A 3yr old Siberian Husky. Lost evening of 5/18/11 about 25 miles outside of Roswell. Wearing blue collar w/tags & a black shock collar. 505-463-0616

INSTRUCTION

030. Education & Instructions

MEDICAL MANAGEMENT Careers start here-Get connected online. Attend college on your own time. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 800-481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com

Seventh Day Adventist Church 2915 South Union Ave (S. Union and Jaffa), Roswell, NM

Legals

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.,

Defendant(s).

ANNOUNCEMENTS

604 W. 11th, Sat. 8am-? Household & baby items, a little bit of everything.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish May 21, 28, June, 4, 11, 2011

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,

EDWIN ABRAMSON AKA EDWIN D. ABRAMSON; MAUREEN ABRAMSON; OCCUPANTS, WHOSE TRUE NAMES ARE UNKNOWN, IF ANY,

3016 N. Richardson, Sat-Sun, 7am-? Household items, TVs, furniture, kids clothing, much more.

WANT TO LEARN

702 Estrellita Dr. Sat. 8am-12pm household items, exercise equip. camping stuff, vintage bike.

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF Chaves Fifth Judicial District

Plaintiff,

1002 HAMILTON Dr. Sat. 7-11 3 family furniture, teacher, baby

2701 RESOLANA Dr. Enchanted Hills Saturday only 7:30am to 5pm

1804 N. Missouri, Fri-Mon. Shelves, VHS movies, what knots, & lots more.

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF Chaves Fifth Judicial District

No. D-504-CV-201000720

008. Northwest

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish May 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 2011

The Town of Dexter is offering for sale the following vehicles: 1989 Chevy Pickup 1995 Ford Pickup 2004 Dodge Intrepid 2002 Chevy Impala 2005 Chevy Impala (wrecked) 1988 Chevy Van

These vehicles are available for inspection by contacting Town Hall at 115 E. Second St., 757-734-5482. Bidders should send written bid(s) in a sealed envelope plainly marked “Vehicle Bid(s) on the outside to Town of Dexter, PO Box 249, Dexter NM 88230 or may hand deliver to Town Hall. Bids will be accepted until 2:00 pm on June 1, 2011. Bids will then be opened and award may be made at the regular Town Council meeting on June 14, 2011 at 6:00 pm. Purchase of any of these vehicles is “AS IS” and final when payment is made. Vehicles must be moved within 24 hours of approved bid. Notice is hereby given that the Town Council reserves the right to reject any or all bids received. Kay Roberts, MMC Municipal Clerk/Treasurer

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish April 30, May 7, 14, 21, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT BANK OF OKLAHOMA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs.

CV 2010-1061

JAVIER MARTINEZ-BLANCO, a single man, Defendant.

NOTICE OF SALE ON FORECLOSURE

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the above-entitled Court, having appointed me or my designee as Special Master in this matter with the power to sell, has ordered me to sell the real property (the "Property") situated Chaves County, New Mexico, commonly known as 1607 W. Alameda, Roswell, New Mexico, 88203, and more particularly described as follows: THE EAST 30’ OF LOT 19 AND THE WEST 45’ OF LOT 20, BLOCK 8 OF AMENDED PLAT OF FAIR PARK SUBDIVISION, IN THE CITY OF ROSWELL, COUNTY OF CHAVEZ AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT RECORDED JULY 11, 1946 IN PLAT BOOK B, PAGE 55, REAL PROPERTY RECORDS OF CHAVES COUNTY, NEW MEXICO.

The sale is to begin at 1:45 p.m. on June 2, 2011, outside the front entrance to the Fifth Judicial District Courthouse, City of Roswell, County of Chaves, State of New Mexico, at which time I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in lawful currency of the United States of America, the Property to pay expenses of sale, and to satisfy the Judgment granted to Bank of Oklahoma, N.A. Bank of Oklahoma, N.A., was awarded a Judgment on April 15, 2011, in the principal sum of $79,244.78, plus outstanding interest through April 1, 2011, in the amount of $5,077.60 and accruing daily thereafter at a rate of $15.18 per day, plus late charges of $371.48, plus a FHA premium fee of $64.54, plus fees currently assessed of $9.00, plus escrow advances of $3,165.55, plus attorney's fees through April 1, 2011, in the sum of $950.00 and costs through April 1, 2011, in the sum of $499.94, with interest on the late charges, fees assessed, advance escrow, FHA premium, plus attorney's fees and costs of this suit at the rate of 6.99% per annum from date of the entry of this Judgment until paid. The sale is subject to rights and easements of record, to unpaid property taxes and assessments, and to the one (1) month right of redemption in favor of the Defendant(s) as specified in the Judgment filed herein. Faisal Sukhyani Special Master 2222 Parkwest Drive, N.W. Albuquerque, New Mexico 87120 (505) 228-8484


Roswell Daily Record 030. Education & Instructions

045. Employment Opportunities

HELP! FORMER teacher will tutor this summer and beyond in reading and basic math. Please call 623-8655.

SUMMER WORK Great Pay Immediate FT/PT openings Customer Sales/Svc, no exp. nec, conditions apply. All ages 17+, 575-627-0447

PULLING UNIT Operator, and CDL Driver. Please apply at the local unemployment office or at 1007 W. Main St., Artesia, NM.

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

DOMINO'S PIZZA is now hiring drivers. Earn up to $13 per hour. Apply online today at careers.dominos.com Dexter Consolidated Schools NOTICE OF VACANCY

045. Employment Opportunities

Position Available: Elementary School Principal for the 2011-2012 school year. Must meet New Mexico licensure requirements. Applications are available in the Human Resources Department, P.O. Box 159, Dexter, NM 88230 or on our website www.dexterdemons.org. For further information or inquiries contact Patricia Parsons, Superintendent, 1-575-734-5420 ext 310 or by email at parsonsp@dexterdemons.org. Application deadline: Until filled. The Dexter Consolidated School District is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, national origin, religion, age, sex, marital status or disability in compliance with federal and state laws.

CHANGE A LIFE Be a Comfort Keeper We are hiring experienced caregivers to work days or week-ends. Earn a competitive wage for something you already enjoy doing. We provide non medical assistance to seniors in their homes in Roswell & Artesia. Call Carol at 624-9999 or come to 1410 S. Main St. Roswell to apply. www.BeAComfortkeeper.com

ARBY'S AND Dairy Queen of New Mexico and Texas is currently accepting applications for HVAC Technician and must be able to work on restaurant equipment. We offer: Top Salary and Benefits. Send resume or employment history to 204 W. 4th St. Roswell, New Mexico 88201 or fax to 575-623-3075. IMMEDIATE OPENING for CDL & non-CDL drivers, call Connie 626-9155 or Ken 626-0505.

DRIVERS Come join our team! Coastal Transport is seeking Drivers with Class (A) CDL. Must be 23 yrs old (X) Endorsement with 1 yr experience, excellent pay, home everyday! Paid Vacation, saftey bonus, company paid life inc. We provide state of the art training program. $2000 sign on bonus. For more information call 1-877-297-7300 or 575-748-8808 between 8am & 4pm, Monday-Friday. MJG CORPORATION is currently accepting applications for a Maintenance technician. Applicant must have a general knowledge of repairing restaurant equipment such as fryers, toasters, microwaves and meat slicers and basic building repairs. Some travel may be involved. Must have own tools and equipment. Send resume or employment history to 204 W 4th. St. Roswell, NM 88201 or call 575-622-8711.

INTERIM HEALTHCARE is hiring a PRN/RN with home health care experience in the Roswell area. . Apply online or call Twila to schedule an interview. (877) 389-1300 2200 North Main St., Suite 3, Hilltop Plaza Clovis, NM 88101-3569 Interim HEALTH CARE EOE www. interimhealthcare. com

SCHLUMBERGER is currently hiring for Class A CDL drivers & diesel mechanics for permanent positions. Must have good background & driving record & posses ability to pass drug & functional capacity testing. Competitive wages. Please contact SOS Staffing and email resume & current phone number to dept251@ sosstaffing.com Call 575-625-1136 or come into office at 315 W. 2nd St. to schedule interview.

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

L&F DISTRIBUTORS Class A CDL Drivers For Roswell, NM Area L&F Distributors. seeks an Class A CDL Driver for their Roswell, New Mexico facility. Qualified applicant must have good driving record. Current commercial license preferable. Previous experience delivering product a plus. Good communication and customer Interested service skills. applicants apply at:: L&F Distributors 2200 North Atkinson Roswell, NM 88201 575-622-0380 An Equal Opportunity Employer

HUMAN RESOURCES Manager Counseling Associates, Inc. is seeking responsible qualified indivudual to fill full time position as a HR Manager. Qualifications: High School diploma, good computer knowledge including, excellent telephone and people skills and 3 years office experience. Bi-lingual, English/Spanish a plus. This position will be 40 hours per week. An EOE. Salary DOE. Send resume to: Counseling Associates, Inc C/O Brenda Delgado PO Box 1978 Roswell, NM 88202 EASTERN NEW MEXICO UNIVERSITY: Support: Student Success, Specialist, Temporary Custodian, Data Clerk, Department Secretary (half time). Professional: Head Baseball Coach, Recruiter, TRIO Professional Intervention Specialist/Technology Coordinator. Jobs in Portales, NM. Job announcement/online application at www.agency.gobernmentjobs.com/enmu . 575-562-2115 AA/EO/Title IX Employer COMPANY DRIVERS (Solos & Hazmat Teams) *GREAT PAY *GREAT MILES *CDL-A REQD We have a variety of Regional, Dedicated and OTR positions available, based on location. Call now: (866)606-6947

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575) 622-7710 #45 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SATURDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

ROSWELL LUMBER Do-it Center is now accepting application for part-time Sales personnel. Applicant must be mature. Bi-lingual a plus. Computer skills required. Knowledge of lumber and areas of home improvement helpful. Must be able to work a varied daytime schedule including Saturdays. Roswell Lumber is proud to reserve Sunday’s for family activities and to offer you a drug free workplace. Apply in person and contact LouAnn at 200 S. Main, Tuesday-Friday between 8:00-10:00am and 2:00-4:00pm to fill out an application. Come be part of the Elite Team! Elite Gymnastics Academy now accepting applications for coaching positions. Experience preferred or athletic background, train in-house. Apply in person at 1315 N. Virginia. 575-622-1511 FULL CHARGE bookkeeper; minimum 10 years experience required. 25-30 hours per week, additional hours may be required. Send resume with references to First Baptist Church, PO Box 1996, Roswell, NM 88202. PHYSICAL THERAPIST Asst. Full-Time Rehab Coordinator opening at SNF near Clovis! Excellent income, rich benefits + annual bonuses up to $6K! Traveler starting June 1 OK too! Call Janelle at SYNERTX 1-888-796-3789. www.synertx.com DRIVERS (Vac Truck) needed in Artesia. CDL, with Tanker Endorsement, and good driving record required. Experience preferred. Competitive salary and benefits. Standard Energy Services. Call Brad at 575-631-5927; 11376 Lovington Hwy, Artesia, NM. EEO employer. IMMEDIATE OPENING for refrigeration technician. Ability to weld or electrical experience a plus. Please send resume to PO Box 236, Dexter, NM 88230. Call 575-734-6666 with any questions.

045. Employment Opportunities BRANCH MANAGER

Bank of the Southwest is seeking a qualified candidate to fill the fulltime position of Branch Manager at our Roswell North branch. Primary duties to include but not limited to: customer service, understanding and promoting bank products and services. Requirements: Must have a good attitude and basic computer skills. Must be detail oriented with excellent time management and people skills. Previous banking and supervisory experience preferred. Bank offers excellent work environment, salary and benefits. Background screen required. Apply in person with John, at Bank of the Southwest, 226 N Main, Roswell, NM 88201, by May 23, 2011. EOE/AA

NEED NEW Mexico License, Electrical Journeyman and Apprentice/Helpers for Artesia area. Fax resume to 505-899-3600 Sliverado Enterprises, Inc. 505-899-3500 SELF-STORAGE FACILITY seeking fulltime Employee. Must be responsible for renting units and computer Literate and people friendly. Hours will vary Monday thru Friday. Saturdays are mandatory from 9-5:30 p.m. If interested please send resume to: PO Box 1897 Unit 246, Roswell, NM 88202 THE ROSWELL JOB CORPS CENTER is currently taking applications for the following positions:

Safety Officer/Driver: Responsible for performing alarm and patrol duties in assigned areas to protect life and property. High School Diploma or GED; two years related experience. Must be able to obtain and maintain a commercial driver's license (CDL) with passenger endorsement. The position pays $10.50 per hour. Career Preparation Counselor: Serve as liaison between the student, center and training partners for the development of employability skills. Bachelor's degree in related field, one or two years related experience and/or training; or equivalent combination of education and experience. Starting salary is $30,000. View Job Description and Apply online at: www.chugachjobs.com Applications will only be accepted online Deadline to apply: Open Until Filled An Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F, D/V WANTED COUNTER Clerk. Apply in person at 512 S. Main St., Roswell. LOAN ADMINISTRATION Other Assets

Bank of the Southwest is accepting applications for Loan Administration Other Assets. Primary duties include the ability to supervise the maintaining and reporting on banks charge offs, repossessions, OREO, bankruptcies, credit life insurance and any forced placed insurance.

Requirements: Must be detailed oriented with excellent time management and supervisory skills with the ability to meet strict deadlines. Must have a great attitude and outstanding computer skills. Knowledge of the court system and banking regulations is a must. Bank offers excellent work environment, salary and benefits. Apply in person with Pam by June 2, 2011. Bank of the Southwest, 226 N. Main St., Roswell, NM 88201. EEO/AA MAINTENANCE TECH needed for small apartment community. Must have experience with cleaning, painting, plumbing, electrical, appliance repair and minor repairs. Knowledge or certification of HVAC is preferable. Must supply own tools. This is a full time position. Submit resume to PO Box 1897 Unit #268 Roswell, NM 88202.

Saturday, May 21, 2011

045. Employment Opportunities

Dennis the Menace

B7

AVON, Buy or Sell. Pay down your bills. Start your own business for $10. Call Sandy 317-5079 ISR. NEW MEXICO Machinery, LLC is a large Farm, Ranch, and Dairy Equipment Sales, Parts and Service Dealership, servicing New Mexico, and West Texas. We offer excellent pay and complete benefits including health insurance, retirement, uniforms, paid holidays and paid vacation. We are accepting resumes for the following positions: • Parts Counter Sales Experience required Salary DOE • Parts Outside Sales Experience preferred Salary DOE Please submit resumes to: New Mexico Machinery, LLC ATTN: Anissa Segura PO Box 1698 Roswell, NM 88202 Or fax to: (575) 622-8093 ATTN: Anissa Segura BABY-SITTER FULL time summer only needed for 3 small children, no smokers. Call 420-3679

SERVICES

075. Air Conditioning

SWAMP COOLER service & repair professional & affordable. Free estimates. Frank 624-5370, 637-2211

100. Babysitting NANNY/AUPAIR -Needed for 3 kids. Car provided. Must have valid license/good record. $580/wk. References. Please respond by e-mail to : lenner@yahoo.com or call 209-565-8033

NEED A Nanny? 24 yr old female looking for summer work. Available May 23rd. Kid person. Texas Tech graduate, Occupational Therapy assistant student. Call 626-5663.

105. Childcare

NEED CHILD care? Find the widest range of available childcare for your children and their needs. 1-800-691-9067 or www.newmexic okids.org. You may also call us; Family Resource & Referral 622-9000 and we can help you navigate the system.

125. Carpet Cleaning

R.B. Carpet Cleaning. Home and Commercial. Free Estimates. Cell 910-0685 or 910-1300

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 HOUSE/OFFICE Cleaning low prices. Excellent work call anytime. 575-973-2649 575-973-3592 SUNSHINE WINDOW Service. We do Windows Brite. Free estimates. Commercial and residential. 575-626-5458 or 575-626-5153. SUNSHINE WINDOW Service. We do Windows Brite. Free estimates. Commercial and residential. 575-626-5458 or 575-626-5153. HOUSE CLEANER, reliable, honest, 22 yrs. exp. 623-8563 House cleaning-fast & reliable, reasonable rates, ref. avail. 575-444-6497

185. Electrical

BIG HORN Electric Professional work, affordable price. 575-317-8345 NM Lic#367662.

200. Fencing

Fence Restoration, new installs, fast quote, lic#367947. BBB Member. 575-840-8395 M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

225. General Construction

TEE TIME Construction Commercial/Residential Construction - Spray foam insulation, framing, cement, roofing, drywalln painting, New Construction of Homes, Additions, Remodeling, and Metal Buildings. Licensed & Bonded. Call 575-626-9686

225. General Construction

FOR ALL your construction or renovation needs call 317-3366 licensed contractor with over 20 yrs exp. Can’t Get to those Renovation projects? Need help? Here I Am! No job too big/small. 25 yrs. exp. Qualified in framing, trim carpentry, painting, sheet rock, drywall, doors, & windows. FREE est. call Jerry Martin at 910-6898 or 622-8682 Leave Message.

235. Hauling

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Decorative Concrete Landscape Borders. A decorative concrete border is an attractive, permanent landscape accent. It will not rust like metal, decompose like wood, break like plastic, or move like brick. It is one continuous piece of concrete that can be colored to accent the landscape, & can be stamped w/a variety of designs. Call Landscape Borders by Larry at 575-420-6765 for a free estimate.

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

LAWNS MOWED and trimmed. Experienced, estimates free. 623-4295

NEED PROFESSIONAL quality laundry/ironing done? Call 575-626-2966

285. Miscellaneous Services

260. Ironing & Washing 270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Better Lawn Care Mowing, Weed Eating and Edging. Prices Starting at $15.00. Call for Free Estimates. Jeremy 575-637-6761. CALL BOB lawn mowing, trash hauling, clean-up, reasonable prices. 575-420-2670 Gonzales Enterprises We specialize in sprinklers, landscaping, sod, reseeding, fencing, flagstone paving stones, trees, odd jobs. Just ask, we may do it. 575-317-8053 Yard work, clean-ups, lawns. Handyman svc. Mon-Thur. after 4pm David 637-9580, Danny 626-0755 AFFORDABLE LAWN service. Commercial & residential. For free estimates call Junior 317-4737. FIRE SEASON - Tractor mowing, lawn care, handyman jobs. Honest, reliable & dependable. Call Paul 575-208-2864. WE WORK Cut Lawns Lots - Trees - Haul & rototilling. Will 317-7402 ORTEGA’S LAWN Mowing, rototilling, pressure washing, striping, fencing, landscaping, sprinkler repairs, reseeding, etc! Call James 575-444-8555, Free Estimates CHAVEZ SPRINKLER CO. COMPLETE LANDSCAPING AND SPRINKLER SYSTEM & REPAIRS, ROCK WORK, TREES, SHRUBS, TRACTOR & DUMP TRUCK WORK. FREE ESTIMATES. CALL HECTOR 420-3167 WILL MOW lawn at price you choose. Also do odd jobs, sprinkler maintenance. 347-5648 or 626-0518 “Keep It Clean” Lawn Service & Hauling anything. 623-1578 or 910-2033 LAWN CLEANING & basic cleanup. 910-1300 or 910-0685 Greenscapes Sprinkler Systems Lawn mowing, field mowing, gravel, sod-hydro seed, pruning, tilling, For dependable & reliable service call 622-2633 or 910-0150. WEEKEND WARRIOR Lawn Service mowing, property cleanup, residential rain gutter cleaning, and much more 575-626-6121

LAWN SERVICE & much more work at low price. 914-0803 or 914-1375

THE NEW MEXICO SEED LOAN PROGRAM is available to small businesses owned by individuals with diabilities and provides low interest loans for the purchase of equipment and related supplies needed to expand or start a business. Contact the New Mexico Seed Loan Program at 1-800-866-2253 or www.nmseedloans.org for more information. A low interest loan program of DVR State of New Mexico. HOME REPAIR, lawn maintenance, painting, etc. Call 444-6497 or 208-9857. HARDWORKER SEEKING supplemental income. After 5 & on weekends. Housesit, mow lawn, run errands, clean house, laundry, etc. References & police report provided. 624-0357

305. Computers PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER services at affordable prices. Call (575)317-9930.

310. Painting/ Decorating

Quality Painting! Interior, Exterior at prices you can afford. Mike 910-7012 TIME TO PAINT? Quality interior and exterior painting at affordable prices. Call 637-9108.

312. Patio Covers

M.G. HORIZONS Patio covers, concrete, decks & awnings Lic. 623-1991.

330. Plumbing

Plumber Needs Work. Steve’s Plumbing & Heating. 28 yrs exp. 622-9326

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 625-9924 / 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing Need A Roof?

Call R & R Construction 18 years in Roswell. 622-0072 RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397 www.rancheroswelding.com

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

395. Stucco Plastering

RWC Lath and Stucco. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397

www.rancheroswelding.com

HI-TECH CONSTRUCTION Complete stucco work, free estimates, professional service at a handyman price. 575-652-9682 HI-TECH CONSTRUCTION All types of remodeling, free estimates. Professional service at a handyman price. 575-652-9682


B8 Saturday, May 21, 2011 405. TractorWork

RWC Bobcat and Dump Works. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397. www.rancheroswelding.com

LANGFORD TRACTOR work. Septic tanks installed/inspected. Blade work and backhoe work. Gravel, topsoil. 623-1407.

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 SUPERIOR SERVICES parking lot, landscaping, tree, service 20 yrs experience. 575-420-1873 Allen’s Tree Srvc. The oldest tree service in Roswell. Million $ ins. 626-1835 AFFORDABLE, EXPERIENCED, qualify, senior discounts, tree service, free estimate. 575-317-4317

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insurance.

www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397

WELDING SERVICES: Fabrication & repair. Call 575-420-4403 or 575-910-3856.

FINANCIAL

485. Business Opportunities

TIRED OF living paycheck to paycheck? Call me to show you how to build residual income. Leave your contact info. 623-0459

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale TOWNHOUSE, 1400 sqft, 2br, 2ba, laundry room/study, new roof, cedar fence, stucco, porch, tile & carpet. Refinished kitchen & bath cabinets & new paint throughout, washer & dryer. Large corner lot. Call 575-491-4235 3Br 2Ba, $100k; 4br 1ba, $60k; 624-1331 for appt, M-Th 8am-4pm FSBO 3BR, 2BA, living room, dining room, & laundry room, brand new stainless steel appliances, including side by side refrigerator, new faux wood blinds, entire bank of south facing windows for winter sun in living area, cathedral ceilings, tile floor w/new carpet in bedroom, new interior & closet doors, carport w/locked storage, landscaped w/sprinklers & fenced yard, 1 block to Roswell High School, $95k. Call 575-653-4654. NEW 3BR, 2 bath ranch located 17 miles north of Artesia and 20 miles south of Roswell, just off Hway 285. Features farmers porch, fireplace, 2x6 walls, 9 foot recessed ceilings, plant shelves, tile floors, custom wood cabinets, stove, dishwasher and built in book case. Situated on 5 acre tract. $149,900. Will consider owner financing. (575) 637-2309. NEW 3BR, 2ba for rent or sale. Rent to own w/small down payment. 623-8240 2BR, 1BA large fenced yard, new roof, large patio cover, new paint. 402 E. 23rd 623-5058

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

5 ACRES, $25K as is, septic system, 3809 Zinnia, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 BUENA VIDA 1 5 + ac., $42,000; 7.5 + ac., $47,000. Ready for your dream home. Well & electricity. Wise Choice RE, 575-625-6935 & 575-317-1605. Call Ruth, Owner/Broker. Will finance. RUIDOSO, NM AREA – 3 acres w/city water and city maintained roads near small fishing pond and golf course. Only $17,900. Financing avail. Call NMRS 1-866-906-2857. LENDER SALE. 40 Acres -$39,900. Spellbinding views of snow capped mountains! Adjacent to National Forest. Maintained all weather roads w/electric. Close to Ruidoso. Financing available. Call NMRS 888-676-6979.

500. Businesses for Sale Business Or lot for sale 410 S. Main for more info call 623-9772 or 420-9072

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

PRIME NORTH Main St. property for sale. Professional office ready, 2800 sf, lots of parking, $375,000. If interested send letter to PO Box 1897 Unit 264, Roswell, NM 88202. Restaurant bldg, $275K cash/trade for Ruidoso prprty, M-Th 8-4 624-1331

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL manufacturing facility and warehouse. South Roswell, for sale or rent. Tom 575-626-5348

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

WE BUY used mobile homes. Single & double wides. 575-622-0035 D01090. SELLING SINGLE wide mobile home, 2br, 2ba. For info call 575-840-7677 or 575-626-2720. 2008 CLAYTON–18X80 2 bdrm, office, 2 full ba, all appliances. Total elec, 50+ only park or can be moved. Space rent $200. 624-1833

520. Lots for Sale

OWNER FINANCING for a limited time. Ready to build 5 acre lots w/ great views & good covenants. Located 9 miles West of Roswell @ the Club House Banquet Facility. Free land maps and at entrance. 575-623-1800. www.BuenaVidaLand.com PREMIUM 5 Acre tracts, Owner will finance with 10% down, New Construction only (no mobile homes), , Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd. between Country Club & Berrendo Rd. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-4337

Mobile Home Lot size 60x134 $18,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. We Take Visa and Mastercard! 420-1352. HAGERMAN LOTS for sale. York Avenue, Posey subdivision, 1 block from Hagerman schools, $5000. 420-1352

FIVE ACRE tracts of land situated 17 mile north of Artesia and 20 miles south of Roswell just off Hway 285. Water and electricity provided. $23,900. Owner financing with $2000 down. (575) 637-2309 Two Side by side in prime area of South Park Cemetery. $2100 Firm. Call 501-915-0182

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry pool, room, playground, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. Town Plaza Apartments Utilities paid - Gas and Water. New Owners, friendly new managers. New Remodeled EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs/downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Seniors 55yrs plus, law enforcement & military will receive discount. No HUD. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 2nd year, 1 free month rent 1&2Bd, wtr pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331

VERY SMALL 1 bedroom w/large fenced in yard. $325 mo., $200 dep. 625-9208

All Bills Paid 1 br $500 2 br $600, 3 br $700 mo., ref air, new carpet, new paint/tile. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944

PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. 1700 N. Pontiac Dr., Corner of Montana/17th St., 2 BR apt for rent $650, Utilities are included. (626) 864-3461

VERY NICE 2 br 1 bath duplex 1 car garage No Hud/pets or smoking. $700 mo. 626-0229

540. Apartments Unfurnished

1 BR, 1 ba, Studio apt., S. Ohio area, $550/month - All bills paid. 575-652-9682 1 BEDROOM apartment, all utilities paid, $600 mo., newly remodeled. 575-652-9682 EFFICIENCY 1 br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. 2/1, $600 mo., $350 dep., wtr pd, no HUD or pets, 302 W. Mescalero. 910-1300

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

FLETC Homes for rent. Long & short term rentals. 5 minutes from FLETC. Brand new & beautiful! Visit our website: www.lgrentalhomes.com or Call 420-0519 or 910-7670 FLETC 2BR, 1ba, newly remodeled, north location. 622-2564 or 626-6110 FLETC RENTAL very clean 2bd 2 bath fully furnished home. Surrounded by pecan orchard & alfalfa fields 50 yds to fishing covered parking use of personal gym half way between Roswell & Artesia single-non smoking no pets. 626-2142 RUIDOSO CONDO in mnts $125 per nt, 2 pers max, 2 nt min, 624-1331 M-TH TWO LOVELY TOWNHOMES - completely set up for FLETC. Call Sherlea Taylor, 420-1978 or 624-2219 for details on 712 N. Sycamore and 2716 N. Pennsylvania, Unit 47. NOW AVAILABLE 2/2/1 FLETC ready all electric, alarm system, newer duplex with all amenities. landscaped, fenced backyard, quiet, near shopping + schools. No Hud. Call Eliot. 575-578-0617 FULLY FURNISHED executive 3 bdrm house North of NMMI golf course near hospital, great school district; cable, high speed internet, plasma big screen, fenced yard, all bills paid for rent Available Now! Call 420-3030

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 3 BR 1.5 bath no Hud/pets $875 mo. $600 dep. 420-5930.

1415 W. Tilden, 2br, stove, ref., $500 mo, plus dep, no pets or HUD, must have references. You pay bills. Call 625-0512. 1/1 Duplex $400 mo. water pd. Quiet street great area. 2207 Juniper call 317-6408 2&3 Bd, 1&2 Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331 2501, 03, 05 S. Lea, 3br 2ba, new construction, no smokers/pets, $1000 plus $500 dep. 575-317-4050 LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com! Executive 3br 2ba 2800 ft. dual AC, fenced, $1400m $1400dep. 627-9942 806 S. Richardson, 2br, ref air, w/d hookups, no pets, $500/mo, $500/dep, 914-5402 502 W. Albuquerque, 2br, ref air, w/d hookups, no pets, $450/mo, $450/dep, 914-5402 1407 S. Mulberry, 2br 1ba $400 + utilities, $300 dep. No pets/smoking leave message manager will return call. 575-808-3015 TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 2 BR, 1 ba. lrg storage partially disability equipped. RIAC area $500 mo. Call 208-9292 for application. 2/2/1 Newer duplex w/alarm system, all electric, fenced backyard. Open concept living. No Hud. 578-0617 3BR 1 ba. 1 car garage partially disability equipped. RIAC area. Call 208-4114 1 BDRM house- 1 person only. $500/mo, $300/dep, bills paid, no pets, no smoking inside. 623-7565 NEW 3BR, 2ba for rent or sale. Rent to own w/small down payment. 623-8240

Comfortable, spacious, clean, 2br 1ba $600, water, gas paid, 1114 S. Kentucky, 910-0851, 626-2401

BEAUTIFUL 3/2/2, NE Roswell, fenced backyard, covered back patio, professionally landscaped, $1200 mo, ref required. 317-6124

EFFICIENCY 2 BR, downtown, clean, water paid. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD Call 623-8377

2BR Duplex, new carpet. 809 N. Montana. 1ba with washer/dryer hookups, single car garage w/opener. No Pets, No Smoking, No Section 8. One year lease $625 + DD. Call 505-299-1122 or 505-350-0973.

1 BDRM, $295/mo, $200/dep. Gas & Water paid, 511 W. Mountainview # 4. Call 317-4307

CLASSIFIEDS

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished GOOD LOCATION large 3 bedrooms 2 bath w/d hook ups, appliances, storage, fenced, ref. air. No pets or HUD $700 mo $500 dep. 914-0531 1711 N. Pontiac, 2br, 1ba, ref. air, newly remodeled fenced yard, near hospital, $775/$250 dep. 910-6162

GODDARD HIGH district. 3br 1 3/4ba, fireplace, den, new carpet & paint, 2 car garage, one year lease, $1000 + DD. 3105 Futura. 505-350-0973 For Rent or sale. Remodeled 3 br 1 ba. large fenced back yard 3 blks from Monterey Elm. school $300 dep. $700 mo. 625-9004 2bd, 1ba $425mo 300 dep ref. no pets, w/d hook ups 317-3222

569. Mobile Home Spaces/Lots

EASY LIVING community 1337 McCall Loop, Roswell. Long term RV’s welcome. 624-2436

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places OFFICE SPACE for Rent. Prime downtown area, 2,061 sq.ft. Please call 622-8711.

STOREFRONT 500 sqft utilities pd. 2102 S. Main $550m $550dep. 627-9942 PROFESSIONAL OFFICES. 104 E. Linda Vista,1,600 SF. 7 rooms ,$1,050 per month and 207 N. Union Suite F, 863 SF,5 room office, $550.00. E-Z access and good parking . 420-2100 3000 sqft office space available,14 private offices 2 restrooms, 1 conference room, break room former doctors office. 2110 S. Main, $2500 mo. 626-7488 or 420-1352 FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546.

FOR RENT 2000 sqft office and warehouse space, 115 E. Albuquerque St, $650 mo. plus utilities. Call 624-0013 or 626-4685.

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

COUCH & 2 pillows, match chair & extender, Executive desk, leather chair, misc. chairs, upholstered bench, washer - dryer. Many other items. 578-1084 CRIB $60, futon w/mattress $50, hightop table w/4 chairs $60, oversized love seat & couch $650. 914-1938 MOVING SALE!!! 910-3247

3500-6500 CFM down draft evaporative coolers 3500-6500 price range $150-$350 626-7488 REACH OVER 500,000 READERS in more than 30 newspapers across the state for one low price. Contact your local newspaper’s classified department or visit nmpress.org for details. Lift chair, power wheelchair, hospital bed, commode chair. 622-7638 CLASSIC VICTORIAN style sofa & 2 matching settees, like new. $950. Call 623-8742

BEAUTIFUL ANTIQUE and primitive pine furniture. Too much for our home. Pine harvest table, glass front kitchen cabinet, and 2-door kitchen cabinet. European buffet, European glass front cabinet, ornate base round table. Priced for quick sale. 575-218-4959. 1/4 TON Electronic hoist $150. Call 622-0674

NEW BABY car seat $30.00, baby bedding & decor, baby swing $25.00, bottle & wipey warmer, & some baby clothes & shoes. 626-3609 if interested.

ENT. CENTER 9 adjustable shelves 6’x6’x21in. deep light oak. Light brown pillow couch w/matching loveseat very good cond. $300 ea. obo. 910-3517 GOOD CONDITION, Kenmore frostfree refrigerator $225, Whirlpool washer/dryer match set $250, new GE profile washer $250. 914-9933 SW Design whitewash finish dining room table w/tile inlay, 4 matching chairs. $250 575-626-8259

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

SCHWINN AIRDYNE AD4 bike excellent condition. $325. 575-623-5605 MODERN RENAISSANCE 6 pc bedroom set king size 2 yrs old excellent cond. $3000. 3 pc living room sectional dark blue 2 yrs old excellent cond. $950, antique Spanish loveseat bench pine great cond. $150, 5 pc dining outdoor set w/umbrella glass top $200. Call 575-613-3397

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd INSTANT CASH for gold and siver jewelry. In Roswell 578-0805

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

PAY CASH all day long for household items. Top prices paid for furniture, antiques, appliances, collectibles, tools, saddles, plus everything else from A to Z, including personal estates. 627-2033 or 623-6608 WE BUY Scrap batteries $4.00 back, 311 S. Virginia. 622-4160 WANTED TO buy Grandpa’s tackle box, pre 1950s, lures, reels, rods, photographs. Highest retail cash paid by collector. 575-354-0365 MOVABLE STEEL container or storage unit. Call Julie at 505-220-0617 or Brad at 505-239-5747

Roswell Daily Record 745. Pets for Sale

BRITTANY SPANIAL puppies born May 1st, orange & white and liver & white. Taking deposits for June 5th delivery. Males $250, Females $350. Jess Rankin 622-6600

760. Hunting & Camping Equipment 20FT LDDER stand, tree clombing stand,, safety belt, 2 wheel game carrier $150. 840-8962

HONDA CR-500, 1986, good cond. $1,200 OBO. 622-1127x11.

‘05 HD ultra, red! Loaded! Under 14k mi - ‘05 Honda GL1800 Trike Beautiful silver! Only 13,440 miles! Extras - 575-420-8707 1994 BMW K1100 LT Cruiser, black w/bags 16,800 actual miles $4800 clean 575-317-4716

691. Restaurant Equipment 6X10 REFRIGERATED walk-in cooler, self contained, $1500. 626-7488

REFRIGERATED SANDWICH prep table, $800. 626-7488

700. Building Materials

STEEL BUILDINGS Factory Discounted 27x39 Reg $13,800 Now $9600; 39x60 Reg $26,300 Now $18,800 www.utilityking.com Source: 1CC 866-609-4321

720. Livestock & Supplies

GIANT SADDLE & TACK AUCTION TUE MAY 24th 7:30 PM CHAVES CTY SHERIFF’S POSE BLDG 1403 E. POE/ROSWELL Huge discounts on quality name brand saddles & tack! Saddles by Billy Cook, Circle T & more! Work and show Gear, Cowhides, decorative items and much more! *Bring your used saddles for trade-in credit. 10% buyers prem Auctioneer: Tommie McDonald TX#8247 Call Bobby (817)235-1757 or Doggie (575)626-4435

745. Pets for Sale

PUPPY LOVE Grooming Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also - 575-420-6655 TINY MICRO Yorkie-Poo puppies $800, registered, 1 older boy pup $400, 308-3017 or text for pics. YORKIE PUPPIES, reg., $500-$800. 308-3017 or 910-4663 text for pics

T-CUP & toy chihuahuas, $300 & up, reg. 308-3017 or 910-4663 text for pics 5MO Shih Tzu, b/w boy, reg., $300. 308-3017 or 910-4663 text for pics

SMALL CHORKIE pup (half cihuhua half yorkie), 1F, 4M, reg. $250, 308-3017 or 910-4663 text for pics MINI DASCHUND pups, reg. $350, 308-3017 or 910-4663 text for pics

POODLE PUPPIES, 11wks, 1st shots, $250. 627-7567 or 575-637-1110. PEKINGESE PUPPIES for sale. 7wks old, born 3/24/11, females $350, males $300. Call 623-8714.

FREE CATS! Older cats, some spayed, neutered, shy now but will be friendly, all need good homes. 626-4708. DARLING LITTLE Weenie dogs. 2m. Looks like paint horses. Papllion pups, 2F, 1-M $350 637-9738 FREE BOTTLE raised kittens to very nice homes. For an appointment call 575-626-7170. GREAT WHITE Pyrenese pups, $200 each here in Roswell. Cell phone 360-581-2306

‘90 CADILLAC Eldorado, silver paint & leather, beautiful car, $3500. 6th & Main

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2006 FORD F250, excellent cond., ext. cab, $10,500, 626-7488. ‘95 CHEVY Z71 4x4, xcab, V8 Silverado shortbed, new tires, paint, 100k miles, $6495. 622-3796 or 626-7912

TRANSPORTATION

770. Boats and Accessories 775. Motorcycles & Scooters

‘91 HONDA Accord, 4dr, auto, runs & drives great, 30mpg, cold ac, body & paint very nice, $2700 obo. 317-4373

2002 SUNDOWNER 2 Horse Trailer VAL Series, fully enclosed, 40” stalls, straight load, 2 AED3 escape doors, 2 windows in horse area, 2 windows in nose, padded aluminum body dividers, floor mats in horse area, $9,750 OBO. Contact Cheri at 575-622-117 Ext. 11.

RECREATIONAL

15FT. FIBERGLASS runabout 75HP. Very nice, lake ready, see at 1001 N. Kentucky.

790. Autos for Sale

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. Your dealer of choice. Sales, parts, service, consignments, purchases, propane, dump station. 2900 West Second. 622-1751, 1-800-929 0046

3 WHITE kittens, blue eyes, just had 1st shots, $20 each. 625-9572

790. Autos for Sale

1964 DODGE Dart, 2 door hardtop, 225 cu in “Slant 6” includes complete 318 cu in engine, (you install), glass all good, body work is done, but does need paint. Interior started but needs finished. Sounds great, runs even better. Mechanically sounds come with extra parts. Reduced for “Quick Sell”. Call Manuel at 575-624-0994 after 5pm or leave message. 2005 WHITE Ford 500 sedan 83k mi new tires leather sunroof CD-6 7800 Call 575-317-5311 1966 FORD Mustang Great Shape 575-420-8650 or 575-624-2065 leave mesg.

2000 650cc V-Star Yamaha $2500 obo. Can see @ 906 Davidson Dr 840-6510

1989 FORD Mustang one owner, needs paint $1500 good second car 623-6340

2010 CHEV 2500 HD 4x4, 2006 Dodge 4 door big horn 4 door 4x4, 1999 Chev Blazer 4x4 4 door. 575-420-1873 1994 CHEVY pickup, V6 engine, $2000. 626-1446 2007 JEEP 4dr, hard top Rubicon, 12,000 miles, 9000lb new warn winch, custom cover, stored inside. See at 3402 W. 8th.

796. SUVS

2008 IMMACULATE Hummer H3-leather; sunroof; 40k mi. Call 420-8222 2007 GOLD Pontiac Aztek, SUV, Awd, power windows & locks, clean, runs great 76,100 miles. Call 575-626-2966 ‘97 FORD Explorer 4x4, very nice, runs good, 189k miles, does need a little TLC, but is still nice vehicle, $2300. 317-4373

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

635. Good things to Eat

RANCH RAISED, natural Angus Beef. No hormones or anti-biotics. Will sell by half or quarter. 575-355-7788

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

005 010 015 020 025

Announcements Special Notice Card of Thanks Personals/Special Transportation Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted 045 050 055 060

Employment

Employment Opportunities Salesperson/Agents Employment Agencies Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 441 445 450

Window Repair Window Cleaning Wrought Iron Services Wanted

455 456 460 465

Money: Loan/Borrow Credit Cards Insurance Co. Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale Investment: Stocks/Sale Mortgages for Sale Mortgages Wanted Business Opportunities

470 475 480 485

Financial

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


05-21-2011