Issuu on Google+

Roswell Daily Record

Adair blasts redistricting plan

Vol. 120, No. 228 50¢ Daily / $1 Sunday

INSIDE NEWS

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

JULIA BERGMAN RECORD STAFF WRITER

KARA KENNEDY LAID TO REST WASHINGTON (AP) — Kara Kennedy, the oldest of three children of the late Sen. Ted Kennedy, was remembered at funeral services Wednesday as a thoughtful friend and devoted mother who had a mischievous side like her father.

The Democrat supported redistricting plan the Senate passed on Monday has the potential to affect representation in Chaves County, and specifically Roswell, if the House and Gov. Susana Martinez approve it. All Republican senators voted against the plan, which passed the Senate on a 27-15 party-line vote. Under the plan, the districts held by Sen. Rod Adair, R-Roswell and Sen. William Burt, R-Alamogordo, would merge. Majority-minority districts, districts constructed to give a racial or language minority population a

Coming soon

September 22, 2011

THURSDAY

www.rdrnews.com

majority, must be protected under federal law, and this mandate affected where certain pairings could be made, according to Senate President Pro Tem Tim Jennings, R-Roswell. Some of the other Senate plans for redistricting changed the percentage of numbers so they were too low in certain majority-minority districts, such as Sen. Carrol Leavell’s, R-Jal, district in Hobbs. “We had to go back and leave Senator Leavell’s district alone, so that necessitated a change where pairings ended up happening. The changes ended up happening in Chaves County and Otero County,” Jennings said. His district is also a majority-minority district. Although a Republican senator

could be lost on the eastern side of the state, Jennings said one would be picked up in Albuquerque. In response to the criticism that rural areas are not adequately represented under the plan, Jennings said, “The problem is the rural areas did not grow. I didn’t set this thing up in terms of one man, one vote. Those changes were set up under the United States government and Constitution. So if you don’t grow, something has to give somewhere. Albuquerque has grown more than the rest of us.” Expressing his belief that he expects the governor to veto the plan, Jennings said, “She threatens if you don’t do away with your leader (Senator Sanchez) then I’ll veto it. That’s like pouring gasoline

- PAGE A6

TOP 5 For The Last 24 Hours

Jesus Avitia Julian Garcia Water pipeline bursts Benny Encinias Guadalupe Castaneda

INSIDE SPORTS Mark Wilson Photo

Bernie Perez of Superior Signs installs “Home of the Whopper” signage to a side entrance at the new Burger King located between Hastings and Walgreens on North Main Street, Wednesday morning. The new restaurant is due to open in the next several weeks.

Dumping of 35 bodies seen as challenge to Zetas BRONCOS LOOK SHAKY The New Mexico Military Institute Bronco volleyball team didn’t look very sharp on Wednesday at Cahoon Armory. The Broncos racked up numerous missed serves, receive errors and attack errors and fell in five sets to Western Junior College Athletic Conference foe Frank Phillips College.

- PAGE B1

TODAY’S OBITUARIES

• Vitalia Gomez • Adriana K. Araujo

- PAGE A6

HIGH ...85˚ LOW ....60˚

TODAY’S FORECAST

CLASSIFIEDS..........B5 COMICS.................B3 NATION .................A6 FINANCIAL .............B4 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........B5 LOTTERIES ............A2 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8 LOCAL ..................A5

INDEX

Mayor says new tax would spur growth

See REDISTRICTING, Page A3

JULIA BERGMAN RECORD STAFF WRITER

WEB

• • • • •

on a fire. We don’t tell her who she can pick.” A strong opponent of the Senate plan, Adair, raised several issues it creates. “It would prevent the expression of a lot of viewpoints, opinions and philosophies that are shared by a very high percentage of New Mexicans,” Adair said. “The plan is designed to skew the debate to the left, into a really narrow range of choices. It’s not really reflective of the diversity of opinion in the state.” The plan gets rid of two Republican senators right away, according to Adair, who said one would lose to

VERACRUZ, Mexico (AP) — A gang known to be aligned with Mexico’s most-wanted drug lord appears to be making a violent challenge to the dominant Zetas Cartel in the Gulf state of Veracruz, dumping 35 bodies on a busy avenue in front of horrified motorists near where the nation’s top prosecutors were about to start a convention. The cartel known as the New Generation unloaded the bound, seminude, tortured bodies during rush hour Tuesday as part of a several-month campaign to take the strategic port of Veracruz now controlled by the Zetas drug gang, an official in the Mexican armed forces told The Associated Press on Wednesday. All 35 victims, who included 12 women and two minors, were linked to the Zetas cartel, said the official, who couldn’t be quoted by name for security reasons. It was the first official acknowledgment of who may have carried out the attack after a banner left at the scene threatened the Zetas and bore the initials “G.N.” A U.S. law enforcement official said the New Generation is believed to be linked to Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, widely considered the world’s wealthiest drug trafficker. But the U.S. official, who also could not be quoted by name for security reasons, said it would be surprising to see heavy involvement in Veracruz by Guzman or his Sinaloa cartel, which is based in the Pacific coast state of the same name on the other side of Mexico.

In an attempt to defy history, Mayor Del Jurney plans to reintroduce the proposal to add a Municipal Infrastructure Gross Receipts Tax to the city’s current growth receipt tax. The proposal for the additional tax has not passed in the past two attempts, and will be part of the city election on March 13. The addition of the tax would result in an increase of the city’s current gross receipts tax, which would shift from 7.125 percent to 7.25 percent or 12.5 cents for every $100 spent. It would apply to all taxable goods, excluding food or medicine, and is projected to create revenues of $1.2 million

Grant helps law enforcement upgrade computer systems JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

The Roswell Police Department announced Wednesday that its grant application to the Justice Assistant Grant had been accepted. The Chaves County Sheriff’s Office and RPD filed jointly for the federal grant designed for use by states and local law enforcement to make improvements. The RPD’s share is $28,606.20, which will be used for computers in officers’ patrol units. The Sheriff’s Office will receive $12,259.80 for in-car computers and tasers. The grant will pay for a small portion of the computer upgrades required by the RPD. With their share of the grant money, the police will be able to purchase nine Panasonic Toughbook laptops, with docking hardware, priced at $3,000 apiece. Installation costs, also covered by the grant, are estimated at $1,606. The Sheriff’s Office will be able to acquire and install four computers for use in their units, at an estimated $2,000 each, along

See TAX, Page A3

with six tasers. The RPD portion of the grant for the new computer equipment is only a part of the computer upgrade needed for the records department and dispatch. The Roswell City Council has already voted on budgeting $515,309 for system upgrades for the fiscal year of 2012. Finance Officer Debra Morsey said the laptops supplied by the JAG will be completely integrated with the planned new system which will allow police officers to communicate with sheriff’s deputies and gain immediate access to records. “The computers will work hand-in-hand with the Sheriff’s Offices, records department and computer-aided dispatch,” said Support Services Commander William Brown. He reported that the new software chosen by RPD to upgrade its system is OSSI Sungard which is designed specifically for law enforcement and government agencies. “The contract was signed by City Administrator Larry Fry last week.”

Fed to shift $400B in holdings to boost economy

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve said Wednesday it will shuffle $400 billion of its portfolio to try to drive down long-term interest rates and get the economy going. But economists doubted it would do much good, the stock market sold off, and the Fed itself was unusually divided over the strategy. The idea is to make mortgages and other major loans cheaper and encourage people and businesses to spend more money — providing a lift to the broader economy, which has slowed sharply more than two years after the Great Recession. But economists pointed out that Americans, still feeling insecure about the future and inclined to save rather than borrow, might not be willing to take on more debt, even at lower rates, or eligible to get it. Others see no reason to jump into the housing market when prices are still falling. “Frankly, I don’t see it having any meaningful impact on the economy,” said Bernard Baumohl, chief global economist with the Economic Out-

look Group. “What the Fed did today was a distraction.” Yields on U.S. government debt were already among the lowest on record, and investors drove them down further after the Fed announcement. The yield on the 10year Treasury bond, an indicator for mortgages and other long-term loans, closed at 1.86 percent, down from 1.93 percent the day before and the lowest since at least 1962. Along with the strategy statement, the Fed gave a stormy overview of the economy — slow growth, high unemployment and a slumping housing market. The Fed has already said it will keep short-term interest rates super-low into 2013, a sign that the central bank was not optimistic about the next two years. Three members of the Federal Open Market Committee, the policymaking arm of the Fed, dissented. There are 10 members in all, including Chairman Ben Bernanke, and See ECONOMY, Page A3

See GRANT, Page A3

AP Photo

A trader signals in the S&P 500 Futures pit at the CME Group in Chicago, Wednesday. The Federal Reserve announced Wednesday it will use more than $400 billion to try to drive down long-term interest rates, make home loans cheaper and invigorate the economy.


A2 Thursday, September 22, 2011

GENERAL

Locals train to help children exposed to drugs VANESSA KAHIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

A new initiative might bring together several agencies to work toward a common goal: helping children who have been taken from homes where they were exposed to drug use or drug manufacturing. Agency representatives who may help with Roswell’s budding Drug Endangered Children’s Coalition met at Grace Community Church, Wednesday, for an all-day training session. The training was meant to expose them to the program and explain the special needs of children taken from environments where illicit drugs can be found. “We’re trying to provide training to properly respond to children found in homes where parents use (or) distribute drugs,” said Rich Rosky, assistant director of training for the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Program. Rosky said Wednesday’s training covered three main concepts: an understanding that children in drug homes are victims; that they must be removed immediately from their home environment; and resources must be provided to the children once they’ve been removed. These resources include a safe environment, a medical evaluation and long-term counseling. Rosky also said parents in drug homes must be forced to face consequences in the form of child endangerment or abuse charges. “We want to hold the parents accountable, but more importantly, criminally responsible,” Rosky said. He said parents in these situations should be mandated to undergo drug treatment, “so we can reunite the family

down the road. “If we can create healthier families and eliminate (drug use) as best we can ... we’re definitely going to end up with less problems and ... safe and healthier kids.” Ron Mullins, an instructor specialist with the Federal Law Enforcement T raining Center in Artesia and a retired state police officer, said he does DECC training around the country. Mullins said DECC has been active in Artesia for about four years. “The coalition works very close with the Artesia Police Department in a multi-disciplinary approach,” he said. Mullins said Child Protective Services, prosecutors and those in the medical field, to name a few, come together to meet the needs of children who have been removed from drug homes. Former Chaves County Commissioner Alice Eppers helped the DECC get started in Roswell. She said members of police departments from surrounding areas — such as Hobbs and Portales — took advantage of the training and attended the event. She said others in attendance included the Roswell Fire Department, the Sheriff’s Office, the Roswell Refuge and members of the Border Patrol, to name a few. “People ... do not realize the drug problem we have,” Eppers said. She said children taken from homes where there is a meth lab are not allowed to take any of their belongings. They must be thoroughly washed, and the clothes they are wearing must be destroyed. Eppers said the horror for a child in such a situation is compounded by the fact that the child is being taken away from his or her parents.

Dwelling invaded, trash searched Police were called to the 400 block of East Wildy, Tuesday, regarding an incident of breaking and entering. The victim woke up and discovered an east-facing door on the residence had been forced. Further investigation revealed the gate had also been forced. The victim reported that someone had gone through the garbage, but nothing was stolen. The victim also noted that this was the second incident of this kind at the residence. Repair costs are estimated at $50.

Auto theft

The police were sent to the 1200 block of Yale Street, Tuesday. The victim reported that he had gone out to dinner and returned home. When he went outside to get something from his vehicle he discover ed it missing. The car is

described as a 2000 Mitsubishi Eclipse.

Counterfeiting

Police received a report Tuesday about a fake $10 bill being used to purchase food at McDonalds, 1804 S. Main St. An employee reported that the suspect drove away in a gold Cadillac.

Found property

A sherif f’s deputy called the RPD, Tuesday, to pick up property found in the 100 block of East McGaffey Street. According to the

report, the subjects had obtained the items by shoplifting. A deputy followed the vehicle, a white Thunderbird, and saw the subjects drop the pr operty. When the driver attempted to turn the car around he crashed into a telephone pole, causing damage to the rear end of the vehicle. Total value of stolen items was estimated at $70. Anyone having information on these or any other crimes should contact Crime Stoppers, 888-594-TIPS (8477). Callers m a y re m a i n a n o n y m o u s a n d could be eligible for a reward.

Man sentenced for meth, firearms Roswell resident William Cadman, 29, was sentenced to 151 months in prison for methamphetamines trafficking and firearms charges in Las Cruces Federal Court, Tuesday. The sentence follows Cadman entering a guilty plea on April 13 to charges of possession of more than 50 grams of methamphetamine, with intent to distribute, and being a felon in possession of firearms and ammunition. The charges stem from an incident which occurred on Dec. 10, 2010. Cadman admitted possessing approximately 71 grams of pure methamphetamine that he intended to distribute and four firearms. Cadman was prohibited from possessing firearms because he had thr ee pr evious convictions for methamphetamine trafficking offenses in the Fifth

LOTTERIES

Powerball 12-47-48-52-55 Power Ball 13

Roadrunner Cash 4-5-6-8-24

NOBLE FINANCE

“We want to make you a loan”

$100 - $2,000 (575)622-0900

Hot Lotto 7-14-28-37-39 Hot Ball 17 Pick 3 5-5-5

District Court. In December, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Chaves County Metro Narcotics Task Force executed two search warrants at Cadman’s residence in Roswell where Cadman’s vehicle was seized. During the searches, law enforcement of ficers located methamphetamine, drug trafficking paraphernalia, a .45 caliber Kahr Arms semi-automatic carbine “Tommy Gun,” two other rifles and a 9 mm handgun. Cadman was arrested that same day and has been in federal custody since that time. The term, 151 months, translated into nearly 13 years in a federal prison. Cadman will continue to be on supervised release for five years after he completes his prison sentence.

ROSWELL DAILY RECORD

CALL 622-7710

SUPPORT ROSWELL

RECYCLE

LOST DOG

“We must save the children,” Eppers said. “If (the DECC) serves one child then we’re (doing) a good job.” Coalition chairwoman Liz Ashby said it was her desire to bring the program — which began in California and now receives national attention — to Roswell. The idea came to her after she decided it was pointless to get her stepchildren —who are grown and well-educated — presents for Christmas as they already have everything they need. Instead, she wanted to donate money to a charitable cause, one that helps children removed from meth homes. “God put it in my heart to help ... children (affected by meth),” Ashby said. She was shocked to see there were no such causes in Roswell. After doing some investigating she came across the Artesia DECC, which she said helped the Roswell coalition get started nine months ago. “It’s a passionate thing for me,” Ashby said of helping children. “The children are ... silent victims.” V.KAHIN@ROSWELL-RECORD.COM

Shoplifters hit Hobby Lobby JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Two subjects got away with $200 to $300 worth of goods from Hobby Lobby, 4501 N. Main St., Tuesday, in what might be viewed as a brazen case of shoplifting. According to Roswell Police Department’s Public Information Officer Travis Holley, the subjects filled a shopping cart with goods that were described as “large household items.” The subjects then preceded to leave the building without paying. Once in the parking lot, they a started loading a vehicle. “When an employee followed the subjects out of the store and asked to see their receipt, they ignored her and continued to load their vehicle,” said Holley. “They didn’t even try to run,” he said. Holley commented that it was a shame because there was very little a lone employee could do in such a case. In a recent seminar about shoplifting held for area shopkeepers at the Roswell Chamber of Commerce, Sgt. Ty Sharpe said merchants should call 911 when a theft occurs. He did not recommend they intervene. “That’s what we’re here for. Your safety is paramount.” He told them during the Loss Prevention seminar that they did not need to wait until something has been stolen. “If it looks suspicious to you, then it’s worth a phone call.” Sharpe said the retailers should take advantage of the criminal trespass laws. “Once the person has been informed of trespass, they cannot return. If they come back a second time, we arrest them.” The Loss Prevention seminars are ongoing. The meetings have been scheduled for the first Tuesday of each month. Interested parties should contact the Chamber of Commerce at 623-5695 for more information. j.palmer@roswell-record.com

Police find guns, other weapons, inside vehicle The Roswell Police Department responded to a dispatch around 11:45 p.m. Tuesday, after receiving a call about a man sighted with a gun. The reporting officer, Scott Hendrix, said he arrived at the scene, on the corner of First Street and Ohio Avenue to find Officer Stephanie Coon covering a total of eight subjects who were lying on the ground. A subsequent search of the vehicle belonging to one of the subjects revealed an AK47 assault rifle with folding stock and a handgun, a Springfield Armory Model

P9. The owner of the vehicle denied that the weapons were his. Officials also located at the scene an AK47 magazine with 17 live rounds, a magazine for the handgun with 11 live rounds, a black folding knife and a wooden baseball bat. When questioned, each of the eight subjects denied ownership of any of the weapons and denied any knowledge of how the weapons had appeared at the scene. According to RPD spokesman Officer Travis Holley, the investigation is ongoing.

Wally Burger

HALF PRICE

625 E. Second Street 622-2300 • 11:00 AM to 6:00 PM

QUARTER POUND

QUALITY RECYCLING

Stop don’t do that, we pay cash for that. Located at South Hwy 285, just past the Bypass on left hand side. Buying cans 65¢ lb., cars starting at $75 going up to $300 each. Metal starting at $90 up to $275 a ton. All original Cadillac convertors starting at $30 & up to $450 each. Copper high as $4 lb. We buy any & all scrap metals. Call anytime, open 7 days a week from 7-5. 575-937-2909. Ask for Donald

Roswell Daily Record

$200 REWARD SHELTY PUPPY BLACK-WHITE-TAN

Lost around Cahoon Park. Please call Tim Daniel 625-1134. Looks like a small collie

WALLY BURGER TODAY ONLY!

Roswell Daily Record

USPS No 471-200

News & Business Telephone 622-7710 Circulation Telephone 622-7730

Charles Fischer Publisher

cfischer@roswell-record.com

Andrew Poertner Editor

editor@roswell-record.com

R. Cory Beck Publisher (1987-2006)

Kim Gordon ........................................................Advertising Director kim.gordon@roswell-record.com Jim Dishman .....................................................Circulation Director jdishman@roswell-record.com Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice The entire contents of the Roswell Daily Record, including its flag on Page 1, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the Daily Record.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES by carrier delivery in Roswell: $10 per month, payable in advance. Prices may vary in some areas. As a convenience to subscribers, advance payments for home delivery for periods of 3 months to 12 months may be made directly to the Roswell Daily Record. No responsibility for advance payments over 30 days assumed by the company unless paid directly to the Roswell Daily Record. All home carrier subscriptions will continue being delivered past expiration date causing an arrears owed unless the circulation department is contacted and told to stop service prior to expiration.

MAIL SUBSCRIPTION RATES: ALL NEW MEXICO 882 ZIP CODES, $12 ONE MONTH, $36 THREE MONTHS, $72 SIX MONTHS, $144 ONE YEAR. All other New Mexico zip codes, $13 one month, $39 three months, $78 six months, $156 one year. All other states in USA, $18 one month, $54 three months, $108 six months, $216 one year. Periodical-postage paid at Roswell, N.M. Postmaster: Please mail change of address to Roswell Daily Record, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202-1897. All postal subscriptions will stop at expiration unless payment is made prior to expiration.


GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Redistricting Continued from Page A1

a Democrat and the other would have to retire in the primaries. This would result in Republicans losing two seats in the Senate, lowering their total to 13. “I think the senators are trying to choose who their voters are, rather than letting voters decide who wins the election,” Adair said. The plan allows for only 40 percent of Senate seats to be won by Republicans, according to Adair. He added that Republicans regularly average 47.5 percent of the

Tax

Continued from Page A1

annually. New Mexico state statute defines how revenues gained from the proposed tax can be used. Economic development issues, assisting a company in relocation and providing some cash for start-up costs, are among the possible uses. Revenues gained from the tax would create an environment that would attract businesses, according to Jurney, adding it is key to the economic development of Roswell. “I envision being able to take that $1.2 million a year and leverage it against sizeable capital improvements to some infrastructure that we need to look at, as well as primarily to the air center,” Jurney said. “And that’s our asset, that’s what we’re wanting to try to push, some multi-million dollar investments out there with hangars, with warehouses, with whatever a business might need in order to expand or to find the space necessary to relocate to Roswell.” The City Council would ultimately decide how the generated revenues would be spent. The money is segregated and accounted for separately from any other funds the city has, according to Larry Fry, city manager for Roswell. “The provisions are outlined in an economic development ordinance, and that’s how the process has to go forward and ultimately gets to the City Council for their decision before any funds are actually expended,” Fry said. “So all of it is done publicly, everyone knows what’s happening. It’s very transparent.” A committee of 13 members of the community has been created in order to “establish strategies and some campaign information, so people have the opportunity to know exactly how the money can and will be used for. And what our intentions are, without being too restrictive, in terms of what our desires are for creating that environment and we’ll let the voters decide,” Jurney said. Charles Fischer, publisher of the Roswell Daily Record, is a member of the committee. The committee will meet this morning to discuss plans for the campaign and strategies involved. Michael Trujillo, president of El Charro Mexican Food, and Bruce Ellis, owner of the Roswell Do It Center, are the co-chairs of the committee. Trujillo said being transparent to the public is key in getting the tax increase to pass. “The last couple of times it failed because we weren’t open enough and we didn’t look at the (economic development) ordinance enough,” he said. “And that’s

Grant

Continued from Page A1

According to Brown, the new system will reduce the amount of air time officers spend on calls and provide information to patrol units which will be accessible through the computer. “Once the system is implemented, 90 percent of our records will be electronic,” Brown said. The process to upgrade the entire system will take some time. Brown estimates

Economy Continued from Page A1

usually no more than two dissent. The three have said the Fed’s policies may be raising the risk of inflation. The stock market fell quickly after the Fed’s announcement, which came just before 2:30 p.m. The Dow Jones industrial average, which was down about 20 points before the statement, finished the day down 283 points, or 2.5 percent. “It’s being viewed as perhaps an admission that

YOUR CREDIT

“We want to make you a loan”

(575)624-2929

$100 - $2,000

vote in the state. “Deciding that it is going to be a 60-40 Senate is really not allowing the voters to have a choice. The viewpoints and opinions of all New Mexicans should be reflected in the Legislature,” he said. Adair went on to state, “The plan not only reflects a partisan gerrymander, it also reflects urban gerrymander. It takes representation from rural New Mexico which is already underrepresented.” Native American rights are also affected by the plan, an issue Adair spoke largely about on the Senate floor. “It also dilutes the Native Americans’ ability to choose a candidate of their choice. It dilutes them by

10 percent in one of their districts. In Senate District 4 specifically, it takes (the percentage) from 68 percent adult Native American, non-Hispanic to 61 percent. It actually reduces their voting strength by 10.3 percent.” Federal guidelines state that percentage must remain at a 65 percent adult voting age population for Native American majority districts. Despite this seeming disadvantage to Native Americans, Adair said, “I was shocked that two Indian senators put the Democratic Party interests above Native American interests. I believe there are Native American representatives on the other side (in the House) who are not going

Thursday, September 22, 2011

A3

to do that. They are not going to be the pawns of the Democratic Party.” Adair equated the plan with the Jim Crow laws, saying, “I think it’s a Democratic Party effort to repeat their Jim Crow laws of the 19th century that they imposed on the South.” Adair said there was every opportunity for both sides to sit down and reach an equitable solution. “We either act like adults, which I’d personally favor, or we act like children who are not going to let anyone else play with the ball. The majority party is not acting like adults.”

j.bergman@roswell-record.com

what we’ve done, we’ve done a lot of things to revise the ordinance to bring it to where everybody trusts us.” The tax would also have a significant impact on current businesses in the city and the community at large, according to Trujillo. “We’re a family. If one business does good, we’re all doing good. That business is not private. They’re hiring people. They’re moving forward and that means those employees are spending here in your restaurant, in your grocery stores, in your clothing stores. They’re all spending the money here,” he said, adding “I think that’s what this tax is going to do, it’s going to bring people into town and help us. Yes, we’re going to spend more here but the doctors will come, the better teachers will come because they see a community that is involved in itself to bring economic development.” Equating the tax increase to the purchase of water rights made by the city in the 1940s and 1950s, Jurney said, “The governing body of the city of Roswell purchased the water rights to help the community in its sustainability and its future growth. I really equate this to that as well. This gives us an opportunity to make sure we can bring prosperity to the community.” Many communities in the area surrounding Roswell already have the tax in place, putting Roswell at a competitive disadvantage when it comes to attracting and retaining businesses, the mayor said. Clovis, Alamogordo, Artesia and Elida are among those communities which have the tax in place. “Obviously just having the money doesn’t solve the problem. It’s got to be the wise and effective use of those funds and the mayor has outlined a lot of the strategy associated with that here,” Fry said. “Roswell has so much to offer that this could make a big difference in how some of these opportunities do either come here or in some cases can grow larger here.” Trujillo correlated the importance of the tax with what’s currently happening in the special session of the New Mexico Legislature concerning redistricting, “We have to be able to provide. If we’re not able to provide, we’re not going to grow. What happened yesterday and the days prior in the paper, we’re going to lose a senator. Why are we losing a senator? Because we didn’t grow. We’re going to lose a representative too because we didn’t grow. That’s voices that we send to Santa Fe to get our stuff that we deserve down here. That’s one less vote for us up there. So we have to look at this as a family thing, because we’re all in this together,” Trujillo said. the transition period will be between 18 to 24 months. “We have to convert data into a different format. We have set up the system to capture the information for federal standards and to capture information for our own needs.” Eventually, patrol officers will be provided on-line with drop boxes which will allow them to input the information. Reports will then be transferred electronically to the records department, which can then be printed out as needed. j.palmer@roswell-record.com

this is a longer-term issue that the U.S. economy is facing and not one that’s going to be solved over a couple of years,” said Oliver Pursche, president of Gary Goldberg Financial Services. The Dow closed at 11,124. It had appeared headed for 13,000 earlier this year, but investors grew worried this summer that a new recession is coming, and stocks have been extremely volatile since late July. Wall Street had expected the Fed move for weeks, and had come to call it Operation Twist. In 1961,

the Fed tried something similar and named it Operation Nudge, the idea being to nudge long-term interest rates lower. Chubby Checker’s dance craze was sweeping the nation in the era of “American Bandstand,” and the name Operation Twist stuck instead. The Fed will sell $400 billion from its holdings of short-term U.S. government debt — Treasury bills and notes that mature in three years or sooner. It will use that money to buy Treasury notes and bonds with maturities of six to 30 years.

INCREDIBLE!!

We st ill ha ve over $ 50 ,0 0 0 in n am e b ra nd furni tu re. S elling for penn ies on the dollar!

DISCOUNT FURNITURE 507 E. 2ND ST., ROSWELL

TUES-FRI 10AM-5PM • SAT 10AM-3PM

MON.-THURS. 8:00-6:00 FRIDAY 8:00-7:00 SATURDAY 8:00-6:00 SUNDAY 10:00-5:00


A4 Thursday, September 22, 2011

OPINION

Grandpa and grandma were illegal. So what! Shortly after the Republican pre-primary nominating convention last year, an old GOP warhorse who had supported someone other than Susana Martinez for their party’s gubernatorial nomination sidled up to me at a local drug store and whispered something about Martinez having relatives who entered this country illegally. The bearer of these tidings is a person who has never been a guest in my home and his “news” was equally uninvited. “So? ...” I responded questioningly. “Just thought you’d want to know,” he said with a wink before trundling over to the cashier. Truth is, I didn’t want to know. Indeed, I really didn’t care. Count me among those who subscribe to the doctrine that a sizeable chunk of Americans descend from long lines of people who settled in this country under dubious legal circumstances or

HAL

RHODES

UPON REFLECTION

who came entirely against their will. And, certainly, the whole lot of them were unwanted by the native inhabitants, whose claim to this land far preceded the newcomers’ from across the seas. So it was rather disconcerting to witness the brouhaha that erupted after Texas-born Gov. Susana Martinez publicly acknowledged that her grandparents came to the U.S. as illegal immigrants. Old campaign trail gossips notwithstanding, it was the Santa Fe New Mexican that nailed it down this July with a report on some 1930 census records listing

Roswell Daily Record

“Martinez’s grandparents, Adolfo and Francisca Martinez as ‘AL’ for ‘alien,’ the census-form indication for ‘all foreign born persons neither naturalized nor having first papers.” By early this month the story had gone national, with extensive coverage in newspapers and news magazines, television and radio, and above all online from the Huffington Post to blogs like addictinginfo.com with headlines proclaiming “Anti-Immigration Republican Governor Admits Her Grandparents Were Illegal Immigrants.” A National Public Radio promo read: “New Mexico Governor reveals Her Grandparents Entered Country Illegally.” But it was an Associated Press report that received the greatest exposure, appearing in major national newspapers from the Washington Post to the Christian Science Monitor. The AP storyline was uncompli-

cated and to the point: “New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez has acknowledged her paternal grandparents came to the U.S. illegally, amid national attention and protest over her ongoing efforts to bar illegal immigrants from getting driver’s licenses.” Predictably, Martinez’s critics seized the opportunity. By week’s end, protestors were arriving at a rally bearing placards reading, “Dear Susana. Do you know your history? Did you forget your roots?” Martinez’s spokesman and other supporters, in turn, reacted defensively to such criticism, even accusing critics of personal attacks on the governor. Perhaps. But lest we forget, it was then-candidate Martinez’s promise to repeal the state law authorizing driver’s licenses for illegal immigrants that emerged as one of the most provocative issues fueling her 2010 campaign. She obviously knew her grand-

parents’ immigration story. She also surely knew that down the road their story would inevitably become public knowledge. In short, it was Martinez who joined the personal to the political in the instance. And with that, she set the stage for a body of criticism waiting to be unleashed when that story became public. It’s sad in a way, because the saga of Adolfo and Francisca Martinez is moving — admirable, even. Allen Sanchez, director of the New Mexico Conference of Catholic Bishops, may have captured it best at a Santa Fe rally when he imagined the governor’s grandparents “wading the waters of the Rio Grande with hopes and dreams of a better life.” Little did they know, he mused, that their granddaughter would one day be governor of New Mexico. “That’s the American dream.” © New Mexico News Services 2011

EDITORIAL

Celebrate diversity working together

Hispanic Heritage Month, which began last week, actually started as a single week in the 1960s under the Johnson administration; it was expanded in 1988 to cover the 30 days between Sept. 15 and Oct. 15. The dates cover independence anniversaries for Mexico, Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua, as well as Columbus Day, which many countries celebrate as the beginning of Latin presence and establishment of Latin American culture in the New World. The great diversity among Hispanic groups is worth noting as we begin to hear more about their increasing share of America’s demographic pie. They are the fastestgrowing ethnic group in the country and in most states. That fact has set off alarms among some people who consider ethnicity important, and it could be one of the motivators for recent efforts to curtail immigration, deny U.S. citizenship to U.S.-born children of foreign nationals and similar measures. We hear complaints that celebrations of Cinco de Mayo or national independence days are proof that Hispanics don’t wish to assimilate in this country, and aren’t simply celebrations of culture like St. Patrick’s Day and Oktoberfest. Such celebrations in no way threaten our national culture; rather, they enrich and strengthen it by showing the diversity of backgrounds we bring together into one nation, a nation where most people and their forefathers came by choice. They came to enjoy freedoms that might not have been available to them in their countries of origin. How wrong it would be to deny our children the very freedoms our parents fought so hard to guarantee. We hope that demographic parity and familiarity will help more people recognize that, no matter what our origins, Americans have similar values and goals. We can all celebrate our backgrounds, while working together to build a better future. Guest Editorial The Orange County Register

TODAY IN HISTORY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Today is Thursday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2011. There are 100 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight On Sept. 22, 1776, during the Revolutionary War, Capt. Nathan Hale, 21, was hanged as a spy by the British in New York. On this date In 1761, Britain’s King George III and his wife, Charlotte, were crowned in Westminster Abbey. In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, declaring all slaves in rebel states should be free as of Jan. 1, 1863. In 1911, pitcher Cy Young, 44, gained his 511th and final career victory as he hurled a 1-0 shutout for the Boston Rustlers against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Forbes Field.

DEAR DR. GOTT: Living in a wooded area, I often get repeated bouts of poison ivy — either from walking in overgrown areas or perhaps from my dog, who always accompanies me. Well, this year is a particularly bad one for me, and I would like your recommendations for how to treat it. I feel my only help at this point is to see my doctor for a prednisone prescription. DEAR READER: I am not prone to poison ivy, oak or sumac, but I have two members of my office staff who are. One has had the problem for years and was treated as a child with pink calamine lotion smeared all over her. The other who

How marriage sunk Devid Weprin Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2011, was a good day for marriage. North Carolina legislators voted to send a marriage amendment to the people of that state in 2012. And in New York, the first clear Democratic casualty of gay marriage emerged: David Weprin. Bob Turner, a Republican whom nobody gave a chance of winning two months ago, is sitting in the seat held by Anthony Weiner, Chuck Schumer and Geraldine Ferraro. Yes, economic collapse was a huge issue. Yes, Obama’s

Doonesbury

ASK DR. GOTT UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

was convinced she had no problems and prided herself on cleaning flowerbeds where poison ivy was known to grow. Well, this year she was quite surprised to get a case that was tough to control. She had it near her eyes, between her fingers, on her ears and in various other locations. She tried some over -the-counter

MAGGIE

GALLAGHER COLUMNIST

disrespect for Israel, which led former New York City mayor Ed Koch to endorse Bob Turner, was another very big deal. Yes, as my colleague and friend Brian Brown put it, “David Weprin was not able to defend himself against his vote to support same-sex mar-

products, gauze pads dipped in alcohol and a host of other things, but found the best thing to be Ivy Wash, which was available at her local independent phar macy. When I looked at the packaging, I noted it contains natural jojoba and glycerin that may have provided the relief in a more soothing manner. One home remedy you might also consider is a paste of white vinegar and baking soda applied to affected areas. My recommendation is that you give one of these two suggestions a try before asking your physician for a steroid.

riage in New York, and his constituents made that clear.” Turner may have personally downplayed the marriage issue to get Koch’s endorsement, but the Orthodox Jewish community decided to send a message of its own. As Village Voice put it: “Despite the economy, (the NY-9 election) has somewhat surprisingly shaped up instead as a referendum on same-sex marriage.” Dov Hikind, another prominent New York Democrat (and a state assemblyman) who crossed party lines to endorse Bob Turner, was crystal clear

Readers who would like related infor mation can order my Health Report “Compelling Home Remedies” by sending a selfaddressed, stamped No. 10 envelope and a $2 U.S. check or money order to Dr. Peter Gott, P.O. Box 433, Lakeville, CT 06039. Be sure to mention the title, or print an order form from my w e b s i t e ’ s d i r e ct link: www.AskDrGottMD.com/or der_form.pdf. DEAR DR. GOTT: I have recently heard several testimonials about ionic silver water used to heal open sores and also having See GOTT, Page A5

25 YEARS AGO

on Weprin’s same-sex marriage vote: “This is an underlying issue that is extremely powerful. ... I can tell you this is a real serious issue among Jews, among Orthodox Jews, among Catholics,” Hikind told The Weekly Standard. Forty Orthodox rabbis in Flatbush went so far as to declare that it is “Assur (forbidden according to Torah law) to vote for, campaign for, fund or otherwise support the campaign of New York State Assemblyman David Weprin.” To answer any lingering

See GALLAGHER, Page A5

Sept. 22, 2011 • Dr. James Lynn Brown of Roswell was granted the doctor of chiropractic medicine degree cum laude during graduation ceremonies recently at Logan College of Chiropractic Medicine in St. Louis. Brown, 38, graduated from high school at New Mexico Military Institute in 1966 and holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology with a minor in biology from New Mexico State University that he received in 1971. Brown was recognized for outstanding academic achievement during seven of his 10 trimesters and graduated eighth in his class of 1986 with cum laude honors and a grade point average of 3.637 on a 4.0 point scale. • Charles A. Joplin, former president of Security National Bank in Roswell, has been named president and chief executive officer of Texas Bank and Trust in Lubbock. The bank is owned by Texplaza Bancshares Inc. Joplin recently resigned as president of Liberty National Bank in Hobbs. A member and former president of the board of regents of New Mexico Military Institute, Joplin said he will maintain his residence in Hobbs.


LOCAL

Roswell Daily Record

A5

To Pee, or Not to Pee? Pelvic prolapse is common and treatable menopause) •Illnesses or diseases such as multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, or a spinal cord injury

BY: JAY BISHOP, DO – EASTERN PLAINS UROLOGY

As women age and experience childbirth, as well as other strenuous physical activities, certain muscle groups aren’t as strong as they used to be. A woman’s pelvic floor – the muscle group responsible for supporting the pelvic organs – can weaken due to aging, injury, physical exertion or certain illnesses, leading to a condition known as pelvic organ prolapse. Healthy pelvic muscles and connective tissue form a sling across the opening of the pelvis, which holds the bladder, urethra, uterus, vagina, small intestine and rectum in place. When these muscles are stretched, weakened or injured, they can no longer support the pelvic organs. Urinary leakage can result. Pelvic organ prolapse refers to the dropping of one or more of these organs from its usual position in a woman’s body, which can result in chronic pain and discomfort, anxiety, incontinence, and possible infection. These organs can descend from their normal location in the abdomen and push or bulge against the walls of the vagina, or, in severe cases, actually protrude from the pelvic area. The condition is common. Health experts esti-

mate that nearly half of all women over age 50 have some type of pelvic organ prolapse, but only a small percentage of af fected women seek medical help, either due to embarrassment or assuming their problem is a natural consequence of aging. The most common causes of pelvic organ prolapse are childbirth, a hysterectomy, or intense physical activity, such as lifelong participation in highimpact sports (involving running or jumping). A woman’s likelihood of developing pelvic organ prolapse also depends on her genetic background

WHAT’S A KEGEL?

If you’ve ever attended an exercise class or had a baby, a health or fitness professional has probably introduced you to your pelvic floor. The pelvic floor consists of the muscles that surround and help hold our pelvic organs – the urethra, bladder, vagina, cervix, small intestine, and rectum – in their proper place. Kegel exercises can help tone and strengthen the muscles surrounding the urethra, vagina and rectum. Kegel exercises are easy to do and can be done anywhere.

RMAC OCTOBER CLASSES The Roswell Museum and Art Center is offering more great opportunities to explore your creativity in a delicious menu of classes for October. Our theme this fall focuses on nature. Intermediate and Advanced Landscape Photography begins Oct. 1 (6 weeks), as does a writing/drawing class, Expressing Art with Prose (3 hours). There are two fused glass classes: Beginning Fused Glass (Exploring Nature in Glass) Oct. 15 and 22, and a more advanced class Exploring Nature through Dimensional Expressions in Glass (October 4-24). You can draw at Bitter Lake

Gott

Continued from Page A4

drinking benefits. Can you enlighten me on the use and safety of this product? DEAR READER: Ionic silver has been used for countless years as the “ultimate” antibiotic, antifungal and antiviral alternative. This natural element is believed to block the respiratory metabolism in bacteria. Viruses are rendered ineffective when silver particles block infection, causing them to be unable to replicate. When it comes to healing wounds, there are dif ferences in silver. Total silver content is actually divided into two forms — ionic silver and silver particles known as colloidal silver. Colloidal silver is most common, but more expensive and less effective than ionic silver water. The daily intake for dietary silver has not been determined, as it is not considered an essential mineral. Studies indicate the average diet contains between 23 and 88 mcg of silver daily. General daily maintenance doses, when taken, are between 1 teaspoon and a maximum

and her own unique anatomy. Women who have weak ligaments are more prone to prolapse problems than those who naturally have stronger ligaments. The condition tends to run in families, and women who have had a vaginal childbirth have a slightly higher risk than women who delivered a baby by cesarean section. Other causes include: • Obesity • Smoking and lung conditions that cause chronic coughing •Occupations that require heavy lifting •Frequent constipation •Age (risk goes up after

Refuge in Experimental Drawing in Nature (Oct. 22 and 23), write Haiku and other short forms of poetry (Oct. 29) or create watercolor Self-Portraits in Landscape (Nov. 5 and 6.) We have scholarships available if you cannot pay for a class for yourself or an older child. For registration, call 624-6744, Ext. 10 or go to roswellmuseum.org for full class descriptions. For scholarship infor mation, call Ellen Moore at 624-6744, Ext. 22. The Roswell Museum is located at 100 W. 11th St., across the parking lot from the Civic Center.

of 1 tablespoon daily; however, these figures vary dramatically. Side effects include a feeling of malaise, mild headache, flu-like symptoms and diarrhea, referred to as part of a “healing crisis.” They are the result of the silver killing of f too many pathogens too fast. Consumption must be daily because the liver filters out silver ions within two days. Ionic silver water is available through the Inter net and of fline, enabling patients and doctors to create specific supplement protocols that should be of great benefit to each individual. But without specific cause, I personally would not endorse taking this supplement. Rather, I would eat wellbalanced meals, get plenty of exercise and forget the whole darned thing, but I’m sure I will be brought to task with this view. Dr. Peter H. Gott is a retired physician and the author of several books, including “Live Longer, Live Better,” “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Diet” and “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Cookbook,” which are available at most bookstores or online. His website is www.AskDrGottMD.com.

Gallagher

Some women do not experience noticeable symptoms in the early stages of prolapse, but as the condition progresses, symptoms can include pressure, fullness or pain in the lower belly or vaginal area; pain in the groin or lower back area; irritation and/or bleeding from exposed skin; stress incontinence (urination during coughing, sneezing or laughing); pain during intercourse; or difficulty with urination or bowel movements. Pelvic organ prolapse is not life-threatening, and treatment varies, depending on a woman’s symptoms, age and childbearing status (i.e., if she has already had or plans to have children). The condition is generally diagnosed through a pelvic exam and medical history, with a focus on past pregnancies, health problems, and level of physical activity or injuries. Lifestyle changes can relieve mild symptoms, and include weight loss, medications, pelvic exercises (i.e., Kegel exercises), and dietary changes. A removable device called a pessary offers a non-surgical solution, and can be inserted

Continued from Page A4

doubters in the mainstream media about the impact of Weprin’s vote for gay marriage, the National Organization for Marriage (of which I’m co-founder) just released results of a flash survey polling 251 likely NY-9 special election voters, who were questioned Monday and Tuesday, that confirms gay marriage played a big role in Weprin’s defeat. These voters opposed gay marriage 50 percent to 38 percent. Those who opposed gay marriage voted for Turner 81 percent to 19 percent. Moreover, among voters who oppose gay marriage, 44 percent said Weprin’s position was a factor in their vote, compared to just 29 percent of the much smaller minority who favor gay marriage in the district. NOM’s survey broke new ground by, for the first time ever, identifying Orthodox Jews as a distinct voting bloc. In NY-9, they constituted 13 percent of the voters, and they broke for Turner 91 percent to 9 percent. (Twenty-nine percent of non-Orthodox Jews also broke party lines to vote for Turner.) David Weprin’s position on same-sex marriage was a specific factor in the voting decision of 72 percent of Orthodox Jews, 29 percent of other Jews, 27 percent of Catholics, and 33 percent of other Christians. “This survey demonstrates what many people have been saying for a long time — David Weprin’s vote in

Thursday, September 22, 2011

How to perform a Kegel exercise:

1) Sit or lie down; squeeze the muscles like you are trying to start and stop your urine stream. You can also try this exercise while urinating. You should feel your pelvic muscles tighten around your urethra and anus. 2) Be sure you are not squeezing your stomach, thigh or buttocks muscles, or holding your breath. 3) Hold the position for up to 10 seconds, then release. 4) Repeat this exercise 10 to 15 times; aim to increase the number of contractions with each exercise session. 5) Try to do Kegel exercises at least three times a day. The more exercises performed, the more helpful they can be. Performed regularly, Kegel exercises can help strengthen the pelvic floor area and prevent incontinence. Source: American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, WebMD.

into the vagina to hold the pelvic organs in place. For more severe symptoms, surgery can repair the supportive tissue around the prolapsed organ. Learn more by visiting enmmc.com, click on “Health Resources” and “Interactive Tools,” and take the Urinary Incontinence Quiz or the Overactive Bladder Quiz. Also, please feel free to contact Dr. Bishop’s office, Eastern Plains Urology, at 6227593. Remember that this

information is not intended to replace the advice of your doctor, but rather to increase awareness and help equip patients with information and facilitate conversations with your physician that will benefit your health.

Sources: American Urogynecologic Society, www.mypelvichealth.org, American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, www.acog.org, National Institutes of Health, nlm.nih.gov, WebMD, webmd.com.

favor of same-sex marriage cost him election to the U.S. House,” said Brian Brown. “Legislators were sold a bill of goods when they were told by Andrew Cuomo, Michael Bloomberg and the Human Rights Campaign that they could redefine marriage and suffer no political consequences.” He has a point: If Andrew Cuomo couldn’t save a Democrat who voted for gay marriage, how effective will he be in protecting the four GOP legislators who betrayed their constituents to vote for it? The majority of Democrats may not break with their party over an issue like gay marriage, but the most important voters are voters newly in motion, particularly core constituents willing to break party lines over a new issue. In NY-9, Orthodox Jews (and possibly Hispanics) played that role, and they broke party lines to protest Democrats’ support for gay marriage. In North Carolina, look for a newly resurgent black church — almost all Democrats — to lead the battle for protecting our marriage tradition against those who dub it hateful, bigoted and discriminatory. Brian Brown draws one very clear message from Tuesday’s election results: “Our message to the rest of the politicians in Albany who voted to redefine marriage is this: ‘You’re next.’” Maggie Gallagher is the founder of the National Organization for Marriage and has been a syndicated columnist for 14 years. © 2011 Maggie Gallagher

Domino’s NEW Gourmet Artisan Pizzas!

1124 South Union

2417 North Main

(575) 622-3030

(575) 623-3030


A6 Thursday, September 22, 2011

NATION/OBITUARIES

Funeral Mass held for Ted Kennedy’s daughter

WASHINGTON (AP) — Kara Kennedy, the oldest of three children of the late Sen. Ted Kennedy, was remembered at funeral services Wednesday as a thoughtful friend and devoted mother who had a mischievous side like her father. During services at Holy Trinity Church in Washington, her brothers remembered her as an avid swimmer and someone who sent cards in the mail with newspaper clippings enclosed rather than emails with attachments. Her brother Patrick Kennedy said he pictured his sister and their father, who died in 2009, sailing off into “the starry skies together.” “Dad now has his first mate, his crew right by his side, helping him along the way,” said Patrick Kennedy, who until recently served as a congressman from Rhode Island. Kara Kennedy died Friday after a workout at a Washington health club. The 51-year-old was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2002 but underwent successful surgery and treatment. Patrick Kennedy said after her death that her cancer treatment left her physically weakened and that her heart gave out. The District of Columbia’s medical examiner has not yet released an of ficial cause of death. Among those attending Wednesday’s funeral were Vice President Joe Biden, Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry, and relatives Caroline Kennedy and Maria Shriver.

AP Photo

Ted Kennedy Jr., front left, is part of the pallbearers who carry the casket of Kara Kennedy after funeral service at Holy Trinity Church in Washington Wednesday. Kara Kennedy was born on Feb. 27, 1960, to Edward and Joan Kennedy, just as her father was on the campaign trail for his brother John F. Kennedy during the presidential primaries. Soon after, in 1962, her father was elected to the Senate, taking the seat that his brother had occupied before winning the presidency. He served longer than all but three senators in history. Though she never sought elected office herself, Kara Kennedy appeared with her

father during his unsuccessful 1980 campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination, and she and her brother Ted Kennedy Jr. helped run the senator’s re-election campaign in 1988. Kara Kennedy’s responsibility during the 1988 campaign was media and messaging, Ted Kennedy Jr. remembered during Wednesday’s services. He said that when poll numbers tightened after Labor Day, others urged their father to “go negative,” but

Developer says 9/11 families needed role in NYC mosque NEW YORK (AP) — The developer of an Islamic cultural center near the site of the terrorist attacks that leveled the World Trade Center says the biggest error on the project was not involving the families of 9/11 victims from the start. “We made incredible mistakes,” Sharif ElGamal told The Associated Press in an interview in his Manhattan office. The Park51 Islamic community center — at 51 Park Place, two blocks from the World T rade Center site — opened to the public Wednesday night with a photo exhibit of New York children representing 160 ethnicities. The Park51 building includes a mosque that has been open for two years. El-Gamal said the overall center is modeled after the Jewish Community Center on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, where he lives. “I wanted my daughter to learn how to swim, so I took her to the JCC,” said the Brooklyn-born Muslim. “And when I walked in, I said, ‘Wow. This is great.”’

Roswell Daily Record

The project has drawn criticism from opponents who say they don’t want a Muslim prayer space near the site of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The center is open to all faiths and will include a 9/11 memorial, El-Gamal said. He called opposition to the center — which prompted one of the most virulent national discussions about Islam and freedom of speech and religion since Sept. 11 — part of a “campaign against Muslims.” Last year, street clashes in view of the trade center site pitted supporters against opponents of the center. When the center was first envisioned, several years ago, activist Daisy Khan and her husband, Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, played a major, vocal role. But they soon left the project because of differences with the developer. El-Gamal, 38, confirmed Wednesday that they parted ways because “we had a different vision.” He declined to elaborate. The couple said they had discussed Park51

PUBLIC RECORDS

Marriage Licenses Sept. 20 Jared R. Olive, 23, of Roswell, and Christina M. Miranda, 24, of Dexter.

Divorces Filed Sept. 9 Sunny Raye Smith vs Raymond Smith Shelli D. Hurst vs Derek W. Hurst Filed Sept. 13 Lisa Valencia vs Brad Valencia Filed Sept. 14 Roberto M. Mayorga vs Olga L. Mayorga Final Jeffe Gendreau vs Elijah Estrada Rebeca Q. Tovar vs Jesus Sandro Montoya Filed Sept. 15 Toni Jean Ingram vs Blain Chester Ingram Final Sept. 19 Jean Simpson vs Darryl Gene Ward Filed Sept. 20 David Clyde Holdridge vs Theresa Torres Mata Holdridge

plans with relatives of 9/11 victims, first responders and others, including the possibility it could become a multi-faith center focusing on religious conflict. But El-Gamal wishes victims’ families had been involved earlier — before the center became a point of contention. “The biggest mistake we made was not to include 9/11 families,” El-Gamal said, noting that the center’s advisory board now includes at least one 9/11 family member. At first, “we didn’t understand that we had a responsibility to discuss our private project with family members that lost loved ones,” he said, and they did not “really connect” with community leaders and activists. But today, “we’re very committed to having them involved in our project. ... We’re really listening.” Pointing to the inclusivity of a center that critics feared would be polarizing, El-Gamal noted that the featured photographer in the “NYChildren” exhibit is Danny Goldfield, who is Jewish.

Final Lisa K. Shipman vs James E. Bunch

Accidents Sept. 20 10:48 a.m. — Mescalero Road and Kentucky Avenue; drivers — Anna Marrujo, 64, and Delores J. Brown, 58, both of Roswell. 11:01 a.m. — 402 W. Country Club Road; drivers — vehicle owned by Betty Carlson, and Clairibel Marshall, 92, both of Roswell. 1:54 p.m. — 2600 W. Second St. (parking lot); drivers — John Woody, 33, of Dexter, and Michael Macias, 17, of Roswell. Fires Sept. 2 9:23 p.m. — 2004 S. Sunset Ave.; building fire. Sept. 8 6:32 p.m. — 1212 S. Avenida Del Sumbre; building fire.

his sister disagreed. “She implored dad to emphasize instead his primary strengths, which were his compassion and his willingness to fight for what he believed in, things that even his political opponents would agree with. She reminded him why he was in political life,” Ted Kennedy Jr. said. The senator won the election by his largest margin ever, Ted Kennedy Jr. said. He credited the achievement to his daughter.

In 2009, as her father was dying of brain cancer, Kara Kennedy accepted the Presidential Medal of Freedom on his behalf during a ceremony at the White House. Ted Kennedy died two weeks later at the age of 77 and was buried at Arlington National Cemetery outside Washington. Kara Kennedy will be buried at a family plot in Holyhood Cemetery in Chestnut Hill, Mass. A graduate of Tufts University, she was a board member for the Edward M.

Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate; director emerita and national trustee of the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation; and a national advisory board member for the National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. She also worked as a filmmaker and television producer, including producing videos for Very Special Arts, an organization founded by her aunt Jean Kennedy Smith. Her best friend Linda Donovan said at Wednesday’s service that she had many great stories about Kara, but none of them were appropriate to tell in church. She said her friend remembered details like “what you liked on your sandwich” as well as “what kind of sandwich your mother liked.” She sent funny and irreverent cards for all occasions from Halloween to Mother’s Day and had a particular penchant for cards featuring senior citizens and nuns. Ted Kennedy Jr. said that when he was a child his sister for years used him “as a chair” when watching television and managed to get out of eating liver their parents required by flushing it down the toilet. Despite growing up in a famous family, she wasn’t impressed by high-powered titles, her brother said. “She was never interested or impressed by someone’s job title,” Ted Kennedy Jr. said. “What mattered to her were two things: your trustworthiness and your loyalty.”

Appeals court rules for Spain in shipwreck case

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — U.S. deep-sea explorers must turn over to the Spanish government 17 tons of silver coins and other treasure recovered from a sunken Spanish galleon in 2007, a federal appeals court ruled Wednesday. But Tampa, Fla.-based Odyssey Marine Exploration has vowed to continue the protracted legal battle over the silver coins and other artifacts that could be worth as much as $500 million. In a statement Wednesday, the company said it would take the next step in the appeals process, requesting a hearing before all the judges of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. That came after a three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit had issued its ruling in a case that could spill over to treasure hunts for years to come. “We are certainly disappointed by the 11th Circuit’s ruling,” said Melinda MacConnel, Odyssey’s vice president and general counsel. “We believe the U.S. Constitution and all other applicable laws give

OBITUARIES

jurisdiction to the U.S. courts to determine the rights of Odyssey, Spain and all other claimants in this case.” Attorneys for Odyssey asked the threejudge panel to overturn a lower court ruling and uphold the “finders keepers” rule that would give the treasure hunters the rights to coins, copper ingots, gold cufflinks and other artifacts salvaged in April 2007 from the galleon found off the coast of Portugal. Spain’s lawyers countered that U.S. courts are obligated by international treaty and maritime law to uphold Spain’s claim to the haul. The ship, called the Nuestra Senora de las Mercedes, was sunk by British warships in the Atlantic in 1804 while sailing back from South America with more than 200 people on board. Odyssey created an international splash in May 2007 when it announced that it had recovered more than 500,000 silver coins and other artifacts from the wreck and flew the treasure back to Tampa.

Vitalia Gomez

Vitalia “Vi” Gomez went home to be with the Lord on Sept. 3. She was born in Tinnie on Nov. 28, 1933, and resided in San Patricio, until 1942 when her family moved to Roswell. She worked at the Chaves County Assessor’s Office from 1955 to 1959, then at the County Clerk’s Office until 1966 and finally worked for Social Services in Roswell until 1970. She then transferred to Social Services in Albuquerque, from where she retired. She resided in Albuquerque until her death. Vi was preceded in death by her parents Florencio and Juaquinita Gomez, brothers Leo and Manuel, sister-in-law Thelma, and nephew Jose. She is survived by sisters Frances Saiz and family and Irene Sanchez and family, both of Glencoe, and brother Isidore Gomez and family of Denver, Colo. A rosary will be held at Sacred Heart Church in Capitan, on Saturday, Sept. 24, 2011, at 10:30 a.m. and a memorial Mass will follow. Burial services will be at the San Patricio cemetery to conclude services.

Adriana K. Araujo

Adriana K. Araujo, 21, of Hobbs, passed away, Monday, Sept. 19, 2011, at her residence. Funeral services will be 11 a.m. Friday, Sept. 23, 2011, at Dexter United Methodist Church in Dexter, N.M., with the Reverends Calvin Hill and Jim Bignell of ficiating. Inter ment will follow at Lake Arthur Cemetery. Ms. Araujo was born on Feb. 26, 1990, in Roswell, N.M., to Car men and Francine T roop Araujo. She graduated from Dexter High School in 2008, sang in the school choir and was a mentor her junior and senior year for the Big

Brother, Big Sister Program. Adriana was attending New Mexico Junior College, loved to read, fish, go camping, listen to music, work sudoku puzzles and was an avid photographer. She was a member of Dexter United Methodist Church and was a member of CCYM. She was preceded in death by her father; grandmother, Frances T roop; and her grandfather, Albert Araujo Sr. Survivors include her mother, Francine Araujo of Hobbs; sisters Frances Medrano of El Paso and Louisa Araujo of Arizona; brother Carlos Araujo of La Mesa, N.M.; grandmother Manuela Araujo of Hobbs; grandfather Adron J. Troop of Hobbs; aunts and uncles Sandra and Bill Randle of La Mesa, Albert and Vergie Araujo of Artesia, Anna Marie and Ralph Ar mijo of Hobbs, David Araujo of Albuquerque and Delia and Saustino Perez of Midland; and numerous cousins. Memorials may be made to Sacramento Methodist Camp, PO Box 8, Sacramento, NM 88347. Services are under the direction of Griffin Funeral Home.


BUSINESS REVIEW

Roswell Daily Record

A7

RDR Business Review Page is a great way to advertise

The Roswell Daily Record’s Business Review Page is a great way for a business to advertise. The Business Review Pages run three times a week, in the Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday papers. There are a few spots available right now on the Tuesday and Thursday pages. We usually have a “waiting list”. The Daily Record’s Sarah Juarez can fill you in on the complete details. Phone Sarah at 622-7710 - ext. 15. • • The basic setup for the Business Review Page is as follows: You sign up and we run your ad on the bottom half of the Business Review Page on it’s assigned day (Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday) each week. We have a maximum of twentysix ads running per page. After advertising weekly for six months, you will receive a “free feature article” (then another one six months after your first free one and another one six months after that) as our “Thank You!” for advertising on the Business Review Page. This six month schedule comes from having up to twenty-six (maximum) advertisers per page and a fifty-two week year.

Carrier Infinity Heating and Cooling was chosen by Consumer Digest as a Best Buy. Carrier's Infinity Air Conditioner can provide exceptional comfort to your new or existing home. Variable capacities provide just the right amount of heating or cooling to control temperature and humidity precisely. Quiet, easy to operate, efficient, outstanding warranties, financing and factory rebates are just a few reasons to choose a Carrier Infinity installed by Southeast New Mexico's only Factory Authorized Carrier Dealer, Rhoads Company call 575-622-4977 for a free estimate. With ads starting as low as $26.78 (including tax,) per week, the Business Review Page is ideal for businesses large and small to obtain effective advertising on a small budget.

The feature article typically uses two photographs and the equivalent of two double-spaced typewritten pages of information about your business. It’s an ad that looks like a written

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Harry Allison owns and operates Allison's Professional Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning. In addition to carpet cleaning, grout sealing and tile and grout cleaning, Allison's specializes in water damage service and restoration. Please call Allison's Professional Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning at 625-2779 for more information.

story. This info usually consists of what you have to offer (services and/or product,) who you are (history,) where you are located, when you are open and how to get in touch with you.

The Davis Team, Bill and Brad Davis, own and operate Prudential Enchanted Lands, REALTORS®. Located at 501 North Main Street in Roswell, Bill and Brad are the top producers in their industry. Phone 622-0875 for more information. Invest in your dream!

The typical layout can be altered to fit your circumstance. If you want more pictures, we can cut down on the article’s length. We do what ever works best for you.

Bill Flynt is the Business Review Page Editor. Bill takes the photographs and either writes the text (with your input,) or uses an article that you provide for your feature story. We can also use your photographs, if you have ones you want to use.

Many local business owners (like the three pictured here) have found this feature to be an ideal way for them to advertise economically. They have an ad in the Roswell Daily Record once a week, on their regular day, and then they have a half page write-up with pictures twice a year to tell

the story of their business. Please call Sarah Juarez at 622-7710, ext. 15, for complete information and prices. In this economy you’ve got to advertise to stay in business, and the Roswell Daily Record's Business Review Page is an effective way to do it. Call now while there are

still spaces available. It’s a

great deal and you will see more customers coming in

the front door of your business. It is a great way to get new people in the door.

Advertising in the Roswell Daily Record works!

Check out the featured business at www.rdrnews.com - Click on Business Review

Advertise in the Business Review!

Call Today 622-7710

for more info.

State of the Art Cancer Care Right Here in Roswell! Dr. Masoud Khorsand Dr. Dany El-Sayah Dr. Edgard Badine

*Experienced Oncology Nurses *Facilitates Second Opinions & Coordinates care with Nationally Recognized Cancer Facilities: Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, AZ MD Anderson Cancer Center, TX

627-9110 407 W Country Club Rd www.kymeramedical.com

Covering southeastern New Mexico including Roswell, Hobbs, Carlsbad Ruidoso, Artesia and Lovington.

Advertise in the Business Review! Call Today! 622-7710

DESIGNER LANCE ANDERSON WITH RUSTY PICKLE COMING SOON!

Mon - Fri 9:00 am - 5:30 pm Sat 10 am - 6 pm 317 N. Main 622-5252

Advertise in the Business Review! Call Today! 622-7710 CHAVES COUNTY

CRIME STOPPERS HAS A NEW NUMBER!

-888-594-TIPS (8477) 1-

Tree Pru n i n g, F eed i n g a n d Rem ov a l .


A8 Thursday, September 22, 2011

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

A stray p.m. t-shower

A t-shower in spots early

Friday

Mostly sunny

Saturday

Sunday

Plenty of sun

Mostly sunny

Monday

Mostly sunny and warm

Tuesday

A p.m. t-storm possible

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Wednesday

Spotty showers

High 77°

Low 58°

85°/59°

91°/58°

94°/58°

90°/59°

87°/58°

86°/59°

NW at 4-8 mph POP: 40%

VAR at 2-4 mph POP: 40%

VAR at 2-4 mph POP: 5%

S at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

SSE at 4-8 mph POP: 0%

SSW at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

SSW at 6-12 mph POP: 30%

WNW at 10-20 mph POP: 60%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 5 p.m. Wednesday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 82°/61° Normal high/low ............... 84°/56° Record high ............... 97° in 1998 Record low ................. 40° in 1913 Humidity at noon ................... 26%

Farmington 79/46

Clayton 74/52

Raton 73/42

Precipitation 24 hours ending 5 p.m. Wed. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date ......................... Normal year to date .............

0.00” 1.30” 1.08” 3.03” 9.82”

Santa Fe 73/49

Gallup 78/40

Tucumcari 75/54

Albuquerque 74/57

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 72/54

Moderate Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading 44 0-50

51-100

Good

Moderate

Source: EPA

101-150

Ruidoso 67/50

151+

Unhealthy Unhealthy sensitive

T or C 82/59

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Fri. The Moon Today Fri. New

Rise 6:46 a.m. 6:46 a.m. Rise 1:24 a.m. 2:27 a.m. First

Full

Set 6:55 p.m. 6:54 p.m. Set 3:34 p.m. 4:14 p.m. Last

Alamogordo 84/59

Silver City 85/56

ROSWELL 77/58 Carlsbad 82/60

Hobbs 78/55

Las Cruces 85/63

Regional Cities Today Fri. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

84/59/pc 74/57/pc 68/36/pc 83/58/pc 82/60/pc 72/39/pc 74/52/pc 68/42/pc 72/54/pc 87/58/s 73/56/pc 79/46/pc 78/40/pc 78/55/c 85/63/pc 68/43/pc 73/47/pc 78/53/pc 81/58/pc 75/55/pc 75/41/pc 73/42/pc 66/35/pc 77/58/pc 67/50/pc 73/49/pc 85/56/s 82/59/pc 75/54/pc 76/49/pc

85/58/s 83/59/s 71/38/s 85/62/s 84/61/s 74/33/s 82/53/s 68/36/pc 82/56/s 85/59/s 82/58/s 82/46/s 77/40/pc 86/55/s 84/65/s 76/44/pc 74/45/pc 85/60/s 86/59/s 84/56/s 76/40/pc 80/43/s 69/36/s 85/59/s 74/54/pc 80/50/pc 83/58/s 83/61/s 86/54/s 79/47/pc

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Fri.

Today

Fri.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

56/45/pc 82/67/t 80/67/t 74/65/sh 84/65/t 62/48/c 70/56/pc 80/64/pc 76/49/pc 69/50/pc 86/66/pc 88/74/s 93/69/pc 68/52/pc 70/50/pc 98/75/s 82/66/pc 70/56/pc

58/46/pc 81/63/t 75/62/t 71/63/r 81/62/t 60/46/c 62/49/r 83/65/s 86/51/s 65/48/c 85/65/s 87/71/pc 91/67/pc 67/48/pc 73/54/s 98/75/s 84/65/pc 83/61/s

89/79/t 76/61/pc 57/39/c 89/72/t 76/68/t 66/45/pc 90/74/pc 81/67/t 104/76/s 75/56/t 82/61/pc 82/69/t 68/48/pc 77/51/s 76/67/pc 76/59/r 97/72/s 82/68/t

90/79/t 82/64/s 64/46/pc 88/70/pc 73/66/t 73/50/s 92/75/t 74/66/t 103/76/s 66/52/t 83/60/pc 82/65/t 71/55/pc 80/55/s 78/66/pc 73/57/pc 95/72/pc 79/67/t

U.S. Extremes

Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 106°....... Palm Springs, Calif. Low: 21°...West Yellowstone, Mont.

High: 91°............................Deming Low: 32°........................Eagle Nest

National Cities Seattle 76/59 Billings 80/54

Minneapolis 57/39 Detroit 69/50

New York 76/68

Chicago 62/48

San Francisco 75/56

Denver 76/49

Los Angeles 82/66

Washington 82/68

Kansas City 70/50

Atlanta 82/67

El Paso 86/66

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Houston 93/69 Miami 89/79

Fronts

Precipitation

After career success, Chenoweth is ready for love

Sep 27

Oct 3

Oct 11

Oct 19

NEW YORK (AP) — Broadway? Check. TV? Check. Films? Check. Music? Books? Check those, too. Professionally speaking, Kristin Chenoweth is at the top of her game. This year alone, in one week, she sang for President Barack Obama, Queen Elizabeth II and Oprah Winfrey, she said in an interview last week with The Associated Press. Recently added to that list was a performance at the Grand Ole Opry, which Chenoweth said tickled her Southern relatives. “If I leave my mark on this world, hopefully people will say, ‘Wow, she did a lot of different things,”’ Chenoweth said. But the one thing the 43-year -old Chenoweth says is missing from her list of accomplishments is finding Mr. Right and set-

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2011

tling down. “I want to be married. I feel finally ready for that,” she said. “Possibly (becoming) a mom someday, even if it’s to animals. My goals might be different than doing all these amazing career things. I think the next chapter will be focusing more on my personal life.” On that note, Chenoweth said she can relate to a song by Dolly Parton called “Sacrifice.” “She talks about how much she’s given up. She’s given up relationships, being home with her family, missing out with her husband, not having a child, all of that I can relate to,” Chenoweth said. “So, maybe this second chapter in my life will be different in that way. But, I’ll always sing. Whoever that man is, He’s got to accept that music is like

Disney hopes game character makes it to the big screen LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Walt Disney Co. has used mobile games to promote its movies, but now it’s trying something new: launching a cuddly character in a game in the hope he makes it to the big screen someday. In a first effort at the new strategy, Disney is launching this week an animated alligator named “Swampy,” whose bizarre quest in the 99cent iPhone game “Where’s My Water?” is to keep clean. The reptile, unlike his in-the-wild counterparts, lives under a big city and mostly hangs around in his bathtub, waiting for iPhone owners to dig a digital trench that allows water to flow into his poorly connected plumbing. Disney Mobile general manager Bart Decrem says one goal of the launch is to incubate

new characters that can cross over into other Disney business units like movies and merchandise. “Maybe five years from now, wouldn’t it be great if there was a movie that started up on the App Store?” Decrem said. He said mobile devices are becoming central to kids’ lives and Disney wants to make sure it is there. “To me, this is where a generation of kids is growing up. And it’s really critical for the success of the company that we be there and telling stories and introducing characters to a new generation of kids,” he said. Disney’s interactive unit has long been a troubled one. Expensive forays into making video games for consoles such as the Xbox and PlayStation 3 have resulted in big losses.

my arms. I can’t live without (them).” latest Chenoweth’s music endeavor is a country music album called “Some Lessons Learned,” released last week. She moved to Nashville for a couple of months to record the album. Chenoweth, who won a Tony in 1999 for “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown,” said there are similarities between country music and theater. “They’re both story and character driven,” she said. “So of course I like both.” Up next for Chenoweth is the TV show “Good Christian Belles.” Think: “Desperate Housewives” but in the Bible Belt. The ABC show, which doesn’t yet have a premiere date, is about five Christian women living in Texas. Chenoweth, a Christian,

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

said there’s a misconception about Christianity: “that we don’t have any problems, we really judge people harshly.” But she said her character is actually the villain on the show. “She’s a very judgmental woman. She stirs it up and then prays for everybody,” Chenoweth said. “So these are the characters I grew up with.” Chenoweth also made waves as April Rhodes, a boozy former glee club star on the hit Fox show “Glee.” The role earned her two Emmy nominations. If she’s invited back and her schedule allows, she said she’d like to reprise the role. “(The character) is a very fun train wreck. Couldn’t be more dissimilar to myself,” she said. “And she likes her box of wine. Who can’t relate to that?”

Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Stationary

10s

Kristin Chenoweth

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

AP Photo


Thursday, September 22, 2011 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 28

LOCAL SCHEDULE THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 22 H.S. CROSS COUNTRY 4 p.m. • Gateway Chr., Goddard, NMMI, Roswell at Roswell City Championships H.S. FOOTBALL 6 p.m. • Dexter at Clovis JV BOYS SOCCER 4 p.m. • Socorro at NMMI GIRLS SOCCER 6 p.m. • Goddard at Carlsbad H.S. VOLLEYBALL 6 p.m. • Eunice at Hagerman 6:30 p.m. • Texico at Dexter • NMMI at Gateway Chr. 6:45 p.m. • Goddard at Clovis

SP OR TS SHORTS TOBOSA GOLF TOURNEY IS SEPT. 24

The Tobosa “Go For The Gold” golf tournament will be held on Saturday, Sept. 24, at Spring River Golf Course. The tournament is a threeperson scramble based on points per handicap. The cost of the tournament is $75 per player or $225 per team. Individual golfers are encouraged to register. The tournament fee includes drinks, lunch, range balls, green and cart fees, three mulligans per team and more. Proceeds from the tournament will be used to re-equip the Los Pasitos Day Care Center. For more information, call 973-4032 or 622-9506.

• More shorts on B2

NA T I O N A L BRIEFS PADRES BLANK ROCKIES, 4-0

DENVER (AP) — Rookie Anthony Bass pitched five solid innings to help the San Diego Padres complete a rare three-game sweep of the Colorado Rockies with a 4-0 win Wednesday in the final game of the season at Coors Field. Bass (2-0) cruised through this game, allowing just two hits and throwing an economical 52 pitches before leaving after a leadoff walk in the sixth. Both of his major league wins have now come at Colorado. Anthony Rizzo and Andy Parrino had RBI singles for the Padres, who earned their first sweep of three or more games in Denver since April 2001. The reeling Rockies have dropped seven straight at home, their longest drought ever at Coors. The team lost nine in a row at home in their inaugural season of 1993 when they played at old Mile High Stadium. Aaron Cook (3-10) settled down after a rough first inning in which he surrendered four runs. He tied a career high with eight strikeouts before being pulled after the fifth in what might have been his last start for the Rockies at home. The sinkerball specialist has had a tough season in the final year of his contract. And given the disappointing season by the Rockies, the team could be looking to drastically shake things up.

SPOTLIGHT ON SPORTS 1905 — Willie Anderson wins the U.S. Open for the fourth time in five years, beating Alex Smith with a 314total.

ON THIS DAY IN...

1911 — Cy Young, 44, beats the Pittsburgh Pirates 1-0 for his 511th and final major league victory. 1969 — San Francisco’s Willie Mays becomes the second major league player to hit 600 homers with a two-run shot off Mike Corkins, giving the Giants a 4-2 victory over the San Diego Padres.

SPORTS

B

Much-improved Rams ready for GHS Roswell Daily Record

Section

E-mail: sports@roswell-record.com

group is experienced. And that now-experienced group is led by running back Colin McAfee and quarterback Phoenix Russell. Russell leads the team in passing yards, rushing yards and total touchdowns. On the year, the senior has 474 yards and seven TDs on 42 carries and 544 yards and six TDs on 36-of-61 passing. “He throws the ball adequately, but I don’t think he’s as good a passer as we’ve seen. He is a quick runner,” Jer nigan said about Russell. “Him and McAfee both are both real quick kids. They’re not blazing fast, but when they get in the hole, they’ve got the ability to put their feet down three or four times and make some cuts. “They dart through that offensive line and into the secondary very quickly. They’re always dangerous to keep drives alive, get first downs and keep the ball out of your hands.”

McAfee, the senior son of Ram coach Mike McAfee, leads the team in carries (70) and is second on the team in rushing yards (411). The Rams will run it about twice as much as they throw it out of their version of the spreadoption offense. When Russell does throw it, he’ll be looking for Brandon Lovato, David Rodriguez and Wyatt

Legler. Lovato leads the receiving corps with 12 catches for 297 yards and four TDs. Rodriguez has nine catches for 123 yards and a TD and Legler has eight grabs for 85 yards and two scores. “They catch the ball well and they run well,” said Jernigan about the receiving corps. “I think most of them are returners, so they know the offense well and

they know what to look for. “They just catch the ball well and they move their bodies well to the ball. Instead of putting the burden on the quarterback to throw a perfect pass, those guys that move to the ball really do help you.” The Rockets (3-0) are coming off a bye week after a down-to-the-wire win

hard. They don’t have elite speed, but they are fast enough. It makes playing defense tough because you have to play everybody. “Every week you have to play a team to have a shot, but when you play a team that can hand the ball to different guys, it is even more important to play as a team. If we line up right, play hard and tackle, I think good things are going to happen. If we don’t do all three of those things, it is going to be a tough night.” Part of the reason for Animas being able to get so many people involved in the offense is its ability to stay balanced on offense and Wigley said that also poses a problem on defense for the Warriors. “(Animas) is going to be tough,” he said. “They are a pretty balanced offense, which always creates more to cover because you have to be good in both your run and pass coverage. They are older and they will be tough. They have lost to some of the good

teams, but just barely. It is going to be a challenge for us.” Defensively, the Panthers tend to send four rushers and drop the other four into coverage, but Wigley said that may change when they play Gateway. “(On defense), they pretty much bring four guys most of the time,” he said. “They don’t do a lot of blitzing usually, but they

may switch it up on us because most of the teams they have played are in tight sets. They are bigger and I would hope that they are weaker against the pass, because we do more of that than we do straight running. Having said that, we run the ball a lot too.” Wigley said the key to picking up the ‘W’ against Animas will be keeping the Panther of fense of f the field.

“(I think the key for us) is to get into a rhythm early on offense and for us to dictate the pace of the game,” he said. “We need to be on the field with our of fense and keep their defense out there. We want to be able to move the ball and not have to play catch up. It is always easier to play defense with a lead. I think that is the key this week.”

KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

NMMI’s Kailey Moorhead (4) tips the ball over the net as Madison White, left, Daniella Montoya look on during their match with Frank Phillips College, Wednesday.

The New Mexico Military Institute Bronco volleyball team didn’t look very sharp on Wednesday at Cahoon Armory. The Broncos racked up numerous missed serves, receive errors and attack errors and fell in five sets to Western Junior College Athletic Conference foe Frank Phillips College. The Plainsmen (11-6, 1-1 WJCAC) won the first set to jump ahead, but had to battle back from a 2-1 deficit to beat the Broncos. In the first set, Frank Phillips never trailed and put together runs of at least three on four different occasions to win going away, 25-18. Offense was the key for the Plainsmen in the first set. They scored 13 of their

25 points with their offense, including four kills from Alyne Bianchi and three kills from Melissa Goncalves. NMMI answered back in the third and fourth sets with a pair of wins to go up 2-1 in the match. The Broncos fell behind 7-6 early, but took control after an Amber Miramontez kill. Kailey Moorhead recorded a block on the next point and then stuck back-to-back attacks for a 10-7 Bronco lead. Miramontez capped the five-point run with an ace to make it 11-7. Frank Phillips took the lead back with a run of six in a row, but NMMI’s offense finally started to show signs of life after that. The Bronco of fense scored nine of the team’s final 11 points to give NMMI a 25-19 win and

knot the match at 1-1. Neither team could pull away in the third set until late when NMMI broke a 15-all tie with three points in a row to take an 18-15 lead. Frank Phillips briefly got to within one on back-toback kills from Jordan Moore and an ace from Goncalves, but the Broncos won four of the final five points for a 25-21 win. The Plainsmen didn’t let the 2-1 deficit affect them, though. They led by as many as eight in the fourth set and closed the set out for a 25-20 win with two straight kills from Moore. Frank Phillips jumped ahead 6-3 in the fifth set and never lost that lead. NMMI tied it at 8-8, but the Plainsmen won three in a row after that.

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas officials said Wednesday they are open to a new revenue-sharing model in the Big 12 and have already suggested that top-level television and cable money be shared equally. But Texas athletic director DeLoss Dodds says Texas doesn’t want to share the money from its Longhorn Network, a 20-year, $300 million deal with ESPN.

Texas President William Powers said creating stability is the top priority for the Big 12. And a day after the Pac-12 said it had no plans to add any Big 12 members, Powers said one way to build stability is to restructure media contracts. “There are methods of doing that, including the way media deals are structured and we’ll be working with our partners in the Big 12 and our media partners

to structure something that has stability,” Powers told reporters at the state Capitol. When pressed on the prospect of revenue sharing, Powers said: “We are open to every idea ... We’ve never said that’s off the table.” About an hour later, Dodds said revenue-sharing offers don’t include sharing the Longhorn Network. The Big 12 agreed to a

13-year television deal with Fox Sports in April worth more than $1 billion. Texas gets a larger share of league media revenue from television contracts than some of the other Big 12 members. The Longhorns also signed a deal with ESPN in January to create the Longhorn Network that launched several weeks ago.

KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

Nearly one year ago to the day, the Portales Rams were mired in a five-game losing streak after Goddard blanked them 42-0 at Greyhounds Stadium in Blackwater Draw. Fast forward a year and the Rams are 3-1 on the strength of back-to-back quality wins over Texico and Raton. On Friday at 7 p.m., the Rams will visit the Wool Bowl with the hopes of avenging last year’s shutout loss to Goddard. “They’re playing good football this year,” said Rocket coach Sam Jernigan about the Rams. “... They’ve got some confidence this year going into (this game). I think they’ll probably be a little bit more excited about coming over here and playing us than maybe they have been the last couple of years.” The Rams were young last year. Now, that young

Warrior defense ready to stop Animas offense LAWRENCE FOSTER RECORD ASST. SPORTS EDITOR

When a team has one or two star players it is fairly easy to draw up a game plan: stop the star players. A team that doesn’t have a go-to guy and spreads the ball out is more difficult to defend because it’s never obvious who will get the ball on a certain play. The Gateway Christian football team will play Animas on Friday at 5 p.m. at Warrior Stadium and the Panthers like to spread around the touches offensively. Warrior coach Shaun Wigley said when defending an of fense that has numerous weapons, it is key for the defensive players to do their job. “It is crucial for everyone to do their job on defense (when you play a team that spreads the ball around),” he said. “What really stuck out to me was that they don’t have one guy to key on. They hand the ball off to four or five dif ferent guys and they all run

See GODDARD, Page B2

Broncos look shaky in 5-set loss to Frank Phillips

NMMI Sports Press

l.foster@roswell-record.com

Texas president says Big 12 money deals can be redone “That’s never been in play, that’s not in play,” Dodds said. He said Big 12 athletic directors more than a month ago approved Texas’ suggestion to equally share network revenue around the league, which is the practice in other leagues. The plan has not been voted on by league presidents, Dodds said. “Those were Texas proposals,” Dodds said.

See NMMI, Page B2

See TEXAS, Page B2


B2 Thursday, September 22, 2011

SPORTS

Roswell Daily Record

PIGSKIN PROGNOSTICATIONS

O U R P A N E L O F E X P E R T S P I C K S TH E W I N N E R S O F T H I S W E E K ’ S A R EA F O O T B A L L G A M E S Kevin J. Keller

Lawrence Foster

Sports Editor

Game

Sports Reporter

Keller

Dexter at Clovis JV Lake Arthur at Dora Animas at Gateway Chr. Artesia at Carlsbad Portales at Goddard Santa Rosa at Hagerman Mesilla Valley Chr. at NMMI HS Roswell at Chaparral Glendale at NMMI JC

Clovis JV Lake Arthur Gateway Chr. Carlsbad Goddard Santa Rosa Mesilla Valley Roswell NMMI JC

Last week (Overall)

Texas

Continued from Page B1

The network created uncertainty in the Big 12 and Texas A&M said it was a big reason why the Aggies will leave the Big 12 by July for the Southeastern Conference if legal issues can be cleared up. Nebraska athletic director Tom Osborne earlier this month said the Big 12’s revenue-sharing plan lends itself to instability as

NMMI

Continued from Page B1

A Moore kill on match point gave FPC a 15-13 win. Moore and Bianchi led FPC with 12 kills each and Goncalves added 10. Grecia Rivera had nine kills and Rebecca Moustapha and Kayla Silva each had five. For the Broncos (16-8, 1-1), Madison White had 16 kills and Moorhead had 12. Natalie Williamson and Miramontez each had nine. kjkeller@roswell-record.com

Baseball

Major League Baseball At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press American League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB x-New York . . . . . . . .95 60 .613 — Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .88 68 .564 7 1⁄2 10 Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .85 70 .548 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .78 77 .503 17 30 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .65 90 .419 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB x-Detroit . . . . . . . . . . .90 65 .581 — Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .76 78 .494 13 1⁄2 14 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .76 79 .490 Kansas City . . . . . . . .68 88 .436 22 1⁄2 1 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .59 95 .383 30 ⁄2 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 65 .578 — Los Angeles . . . . . . . .85 70 .548 4 1⁄2 Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .69 85 .448 20 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .66 89 .426 23 1⁄2 z-clinched playoff berth x-clinched division

Tuesday’s Games Cleveland 4, Chicago White Sox 3, 1st game

Goddard

Continued from Page B1

over Canyon (Texas) on Sept. 9 The week off is something Jer nigan thinks will help his team. “I think it has been beneficial,” he said. “Personally, I don’t much care for open weeks, but

7-0 (27-5)

the Huskers opened their first season in the Big Ten. Each Big Ten school received $22.6 million this year — about twice as much as Nebraska could have expected if it had stayed in the Big 12. Powers said all issues are subject to discussion when talking with other Big 12 schools in the next few days. “A lot of these issues that you hear (about) whether it’s revenue sharing or whatever, we’ve been

The Coach

Foster

Clovis JV Lake Arthur Gateway Chr. Artesia Goddard Santa Rosa Mesilla Valley Roswell NMMI JC

Fuller

Joe Carpenter

KEND broadcaster

Dexter Lake Arthur Gateway Chr. Carlsbad Goddard Santa Rosa Mesilla Valley Roswell NMMI JC

6-1 (25-7)

7-0 (23-9)

Carpenter

Clovis JV Lake Arthur Animas Carlsbad Goddard Santa Rosa Mesilla Valley Roswell NMMI JC

7-0 (28-4)

working on long before,” he said. “We will continue to work on those. I’m not going to prejudge on how those will come out. There are not any preconditions for the conference coming back together. “We want a stable, workable conference going forward,” Powers said. As for bringing in new members, Dodds said he likes the 10-team model the league currently has. He acknowledged the league is considering BYU

as the 10th member once Texas A&M leaves in 2012, but would not reveal any other potential candidates. Texas A&M is pursuing membership in the SEC. While some league members might want to push the number back up to 12, Dodds said he considers a 10-team league “perfect.” “I’ve heard conversations (about adding more teams), but I haven’t heard anyone get up on the table and say we’ve got to do 12,” Dodds said.

requires a long and arduous rehab with no guarantee of success. Nearly two years later, Decker said the injury no longer bothers him physically or mentally. “It’s been night and day for me,” Decker said. “It’s so true that last year my foot was always on my mind and making me think a lot and making me be very cautious. This year, I had a great offseason, didn’t have any pain, didn’t have any pain through the preseason. It helps my confidence, lets me go play football again.” On Sunday, Decker ignited a win over Cincinnati

when he overcame an early fumble to become the first wide receiver in team history to score twice and top 100 yards receiving in his first career start. That followed his 90-yard punt return for a touchdown against Oakland in the opener. His three TDs so far are one more than he had in spot duty his rookie season. Now, it’s easy to see why so many scouts considered him a surefire first-rounder before he got hurt. “Eric is one of those guys that you can tell is just ready to take off and take it to that next level,” quarter-

Geoff Gunn NMMI S.I.D.

Randy Doerhoefer NMMI Asst. Golf Pro

Gunn

Doerhoefer

7-0 (26-6)

6-1 (24-8)

Clovis JV Lake Arthur Gateway Chr. Artesia Goddard Santa Rosa NMMI HS Roswell NMMI JC

Clovis JV Lake Arthur Gateway Chr. Carlsbad Goddard Santa Rosa NMMI HS Roswell NMMI JC

Dodds said he already considers the Aggies members of the SEC. The split threatens the future of the Texas-Texas A&M rivalry beyond 2011. Getting the Aggies into Texas’ nonconference schedule that is already most set for the next few years would be “problematic,” Dodds said. Dodds said Texas and Oklahoma have a good working relationship and will work out any differences to help stabilize the Big 12.

Consensus

Clovis JV 5-1 Lake Arthur 6-0 Gateway Chr. 5-1 Carlsbad 4-2 Goddard 6-0 Santa Rosa 6-0 NMMI HS 4-2 Roswell 6-0 NMMI JC 6-0

7-0-0 (25-4-3)

“It’s not going to be a street fight,” Dodds said. Dodds blamed the nearbreakup of the Big 12 on university governing boards — not Texas’, he said — that wrested control of conference decisions from athletic directors. “People on boards get involved and when they get involved collegiality sometimes stops,” Dodds said. “We’ve got to empower people on the athletics side to put this together and keep it together.”

Broncos’ Decker healthy once again and it shows

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) — At long last, Eric Decker’s left foot is fine and his mind clear. He’s taking passes and punts into the end zone with regularity and showing all 31 other teams what they could have had if they had bet on him like the Denver Broncos did. Decker scared teams away when he missed the last half of his senior season at the University of Minnesota after tearing the ligament that holds the first two toes together in a game against Ohio State in October 2009. Called a Lisfranc injury, it Chicago White Sox 5, Cleveland 4, 2nd game N.Y. Yankees 5, Tampa Bay 0 L.A. Angels 10, Toronto 6 Baltimore 7, Boston 5 Kansas City 10, Detroit 2 Seattle 5, Minnesota 4 Texas 7, Oakland 2 Wednesday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 4, Tampa Bay 2, 1st game Chicago White Sox 8, Cleveland 4 N.Y. Yankees 4, Tampa Bay 2, 2nd game L.A. Angels 7, Toronto 2 Baltimore 6, Boston 4 Detroit 6, Kansas City 3 Seattle 5, Minnesota 4 Texas at Oakland, 8:05 p.m. Thursday’s Games Seattle (Beavan 5-5) at Minnesota (Swarzak 3-7), 11:10 a.m. Texas (C.Lewis 13-10) at Oakland (Cahill 11-14), 1:35 p.m. Baltimore (Britton 10-10) at Detroit (Ja.Turner 0-1), 5:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Humber 9-8) at Cleveland (J.Gomez 4-2), 5:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Niemann 11-7) at N.Y. Yankees (Colon 8-9), 5:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 11-12) at Toronto (H.Alvarez 1-2), 5:07 p.m. Friday’s Games Baltimore at Detroit, 5:05 p.m. Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 5:05 p.m. Minnesota at Cleveland, 5:05 p.m.

you might as well try to make something good out of it. “We had a few dings, bumps and bruises that we’ve been able to get healed up. It just lets us heal up a little bit and work on some things that aren’t necessarily weaknesses, but places we needed to focus on.” kjkeller@roswell-record.com

SPORTS SHORTS LHLL ANNUAL MEETING SET FOR SEPT. 24

The Lions Hondo Little League annual meeting will be held on Sept. 24 at 3 p.m. at the Yucca Recreation Center. For more information, call Pam Boyd at 317-2364.

REGISTRATION FOR TENNIS TOURNEY IS SEPT. 25

Tim Fuller

The 13th annual U.S.T.A. Southeastern New Mexico tennis tournament, which is set to begin on Sept. 30, is still seeking participants. The tournament is held at the Cahoon Park tennis courts. Players wishing to compete in the tournament must be U.S.T.A. members. Memberships can be acquired by calling 800990-8782 or visiting www.usta.com. Entry fees for the tournament are $24 for singles players and $18 each for doubles players. Interested players can enter online at

SCOREBOARD

Toronto at Tampa Bay, 5:10 p.m. Seattle at Texas, 6:05 p.m. Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 6:10 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 8:05 p.m.

National League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W x-Philadelphia . . . . . .98 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .88 Washington . . . . . . . .75 New York . . . . . . . . . .73 Florida . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .91 St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .86 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .76 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .69 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . .69 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .53 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Arizona . . . . . . . . . . .90 San Francisco . . . . . .83 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .77 Colorado . . . . . . . . . .70 San Diego . . . . . . . . .68

L 57 68 79 82 85

L 65 69 80 87 87 102

Pct GB .632 — .564 10 1⁄2 1 .487 22 ⁄2 .471 25 .455 27 1⁄2

Pct GB .583 — .555 4 1⁄2 .487 15 .442 22 .442 22 .342 37 1⁄2

L Pct GB 66 .577 — 71 .539 6 76 .503 11 1⁄2 1 85 .452 19 ⁄2 88 .436 22 x-clinched division

Tuesday’s Games Washington 4, Philadelphia 3, 10 innings, 1st game Washington 3, Philadelphia 0, 2nd game Atlanta 4, Florida 0 Cincinnati 6, Houston 4 Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 1 St. Louis 11, N.Y. Mets 6 San Diego 2, Colorado 1 Pittsburgh 5, Arizona 3 L.A. Dodgers 2, San Francisco 1 Wednesday’s Games Cincinnati 2, Houston 0 Chicago Cubs 7, Milwaukee 1 San Diego 4, Colorado 0 Arizona 8, Pittsburgh 5 Washington 7, Philadelphia 5 Florida 4, Atlanta 0 St. Louis 6, N.Y. Mets 5 San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m.

www.usta.com - tournament #7596007311, or they can mail checks to 1200 W. College Blvd., Roswell, NM 88201. Checks should be made payable to U.S.T.A. Southeastern New Mexico. There will be a tournament party on Oct. 1 at the Elks Lodge. The dinner is free for players and $15 for guests. For more information or to register, call 622-3889.

ENMU-R FOUNDATION GOLF TOURNEY SET FOR OCT. 1

The ninth annual ENMU-Roswell Foundation golf tournament will be held on Saturday, Oct. 1, at 8 a.m. at Spring River Golf Course. The tournament is a four-person scramble and the cost is $75 per player, which includes breakfast, lunch, hats, giveaway prizes, awards and longest drive and proximity awards. Proceeds from the tournament benefit the Foundation’s General Excellence Fund.

Thursday’s Games N.Y. Mets (Capuano 11-12) at St. Louis (Westbrook 12-9), 11:45 a.m. Washington (Peacock 1-0) at Philadelphia (Oswalt 8-9), 5:05 p.m. Colorado (White 2-2) at Houston (Sosa 2-5), 6:05 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 12-12) at L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 12-16), 8:10 p.m. Friday’s Games Atlanta at Washington, 5:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 5:05 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Mets, 5:10 p.m. Colorado at Houston, 6:05 p.m. Florida at Milwaukee, 6:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 6:15 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 7:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 8:05 p.m.

Football

National Football League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain AMERICAN CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Buffalo . . . . . . . . .2 0 0 1.000 New England . . .2 0 0 1.000 N.Y. Jets . . . . . . .2 0 0 1.000 Miami . . . . . . . . .0 2 0 .000 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Houston . . . . . . .2 0 0 1.000 Jacksonville . . . .1 1 0 .500 Tennessee . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Indianapolis . . . . .0 2 0 .000 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Baltimore . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Cincinnati . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Cleveland . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Pittsburgh . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Denver . . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Oakland . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 San Diego . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Kansas City . . . .0 2 0 .000

PF PA 79 42 73 45 59 27 37 61

PF PA 57 20 19 46 40 29 26 61

PF PA 48 33 49 41 44 46 31 35

PF PA 44 45 58 58 45 52 10 89

Team entry forms are available online at roswell.enmu.edu. For more information, or to register over the phone, call Jim Engelhard at 624-7071 or Craig Collins at 624-7304.

SALVATION ARMY GOLF OUTING SET FOR OCT. 15

The Salvation Army golf tournament will be held on Oct. 15 at NMMI Golf Course. Registration begins at 7 a.m. on the day of the tournament and a shotgun start is slated for 8 a.m. The format for the tournament is a threeperson scramble. The cost is $60, which includes green fees, cart fees, lunch and breakfast. Entry forms are available at NMMI Golf Course and completed forms can be dropped off at the course or mailed to P.O. Box 897, Roswell, 88202. For more information, call Bart Hoffman at 622-8700 or 626-2874.

back Kyle Orton said. “He’s a young guy, but (you can see) just how smart he is, the way he can make plays, the way he bounced back after a tough fumble.” Decker was having an outstanding senior season for the Golden Gophers when he got hurt but he never got down and leaned on former Broncos teammate Brandon Stokley, who overcame a similar injury. “Eric’s always been very, very strong, and I think he’s always been very optimistic when it comes to everything and I think he just looked at the injury as a setback,” said Adam Weber, who was NATIONAL CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Washington . . . . .2 0 0 1.000 Dallas . . . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 N.Y. Giants . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Philadelphia . . . .1 1 0 .500 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Atlanta . . . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 New Orleans . . . .1 1 0 .500 Tampa Bay . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Carolina . . . . . . .0 2 0 .000 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Detroit . . . . . . . . .2 0 0 1.000 Green Bay . . . . .2 0 0 1.000 Chicago . . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Minnesota . . . . . .0 2 0 .000 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Arizona . . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 San Francisco . . .1 1 0 .500 St. Louis . . . . . . .0 2 0 .000 Seattle . . . . . . . . .0 2 0 .000

PF PA 50 35 51 51 42 44 62 48

PF PA 47 61 64 55 44 47 44 58

PF PA 75 23 72 57 43 42 37 48

PF PA 49 43 57 44 29 59 17 57

Sunday, Sep. 25 Houston at New Orleans, 11 a.m. Denver at Tennessee, 11 a.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 11 a.m. San Francisco at Cincinnati, 11 a.m. New England at Buffalo, 11 a.m. N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 11 a.m. Miami at Cleveland, 11 a.m. Jacksonville at Carolina, 11 a.m. Kansas City at San Diego, 2:05 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Oakland, 2:05 p.m. Baltimore at St. Louis, 2:05 p.m. Arizona at Seattle, 2:15 p.m. Green Bay at Chicago, 2:15 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 2:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at Indianapolis, 6:20 p.m. Monday, Sep. 26 Washington at Dallas, 6:30 p.m.

Transactions

Wednesday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Agreed to terms with manager Bob Melvin on a three-year contract. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Fired minor

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Thursday, Sept. 22 COLLEGE FOOTBALL 6 p.m. ESPN — N.C. State at Cincinnati GOLF 7 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Austrian Open, first round, at Atzenbrugg, Austria 11 a.m. TGC — PGA Tour, TOUR Championship, first round, at Atlanta 12:30 a.m. TGC — LPGA, The Solheim Cup, first round, at Dunsany, Ireland MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 5 p.m.

his quarterback in college and is now on Denver’s practice squad. “It couldn’t have happened at a worse time, he was having a great senior year and I know a lot of question marks came up when it happened. But he’s remained positive, kept on doing his rehab and I think now he’s reaping the benefits.” Although this year’s lockout kept him out of OTAs and minicamps for the second straight season, Decker worked out with Cardinals receiver Larry Fitzgerald in Phoenix and in Minneapolis. league field coordinator Chad Kreuter. Named Jeff Pico minor league field coordinator and Mel Stottlemyre minor league pitching coordinator. FOOTBALL National Football League GREEN BAY PACKERS—Signed DL Johnny Jones to the practice squad. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Placed RB Jamaal Charles on season-ending injured reserve. Signed WR Jeremy Horne from the practice squad. Signed OL Lucas Patterson to the practice squad. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Placed C Dan Koppen and DL Myron Pryor on injured reserve. Re-signed DL Landon Cohen and DB Phillip Adams. NEW YORK JETS—Signed LB Matthias Berning and WR Scotty McKnight to the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Assigned F Phillip Danault and F Mark McNeill to their junior clubs. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Signed F R.J. Umberger to a five-year contract extension through the 2016-17 season. Released F Wade MacLeod and F Mike Thomas. Assigned F Michael Chaput to Shawinigan (QMJHL), F Boone Jenner to Oshawa (OHL), F Dalton Smith to Ottawa (OHL), F Lukas Sedlak to Chicoutimi (QMJHL), D Brandon Archibald to Saginaw (OHL), D Austin Madaisky to Kamloops (WHL) and G Mathieu Corbeil to Saint John (QMJHL). DETROIT RED WINGS—C Mike Modano announced his retirement. American Hockey League SAN ANTONIO RAMPAGE—Signed C Wacey Rabbit to an AHL contract. ECHL ECHL—Approved the expansion membership application of the San Francisco Bulls. GWINNETT GLADIATORS—Agreed to terms with F Andy Brandt on a one-year contract. READING ROYALS—Agreed to terms with D Ray Macias. Central Hockey League BLOOMINGTON BLAZE—Announced the resignation of general manager Jim Riggs. COLLEGE GEORGETOWN—Named Zach Samol men’s associate head soccer coach. JOHN JAY—Named Chris Weeks women’s tennis coach.

MLB — Regional coverage, Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees or L.A. Angels at Toronto PREP FOOTBALL 5 p.m. FSN — Colerain (Ohio) at Middletown (Ohio) SOCCER 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Women’s national teams, exhibition, U.S. vs. Canada, at Portland, Ore. WNBA BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, conference finals, Game 1, Atlanta at Indiana 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, conference finals, Game 1, Phoenix at Minnesota


Roswell Daily Record

I come to the cemetery to visit with my lost loved ones and tend to their graves. I find it disgusting and disturbing that these folks are using our sacred place for their personal pleasures. Abby, thank you so much for your wisdom on this matter. JEAN C. IN MASSACHUSETTS

DEAR ABBY

DEAR JEAN: Thank you for agreeing with me. However, some readers felt differently, believing that cemeteries are for the living as well as the dead. My newspaper readers comment:

UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: I am writing in response to the letter you printed from “Respectful in Ohio” (July 25). I am so glad you addressed the subject of proper etiquette in cemeteries. The cemetery where my family members are buried has become a playground for the neighbors in the area. When I visit, I see people walking their dogs on and off leashes even though they are aware of the “No Dogs Allowed” signs. Children are bicycling, rollerblading and skateboarding, along with joggers and walkers.

#####

DEAR ABBY: You should know that there is a trend where groups of dog walkers are taking over the care of deteriorating cemeteries. In return for cleaning up, restoring and maintaining graveyards, dog walkers are given permission to walk and run their dogs there. Some readers may find this

Jumble

COMICS

practice disrespectful, but it has resulted in many cemeteries being restored to the beauty and dignity its occupants deserve. CARLA IN VIRGINIA

DEAR ABBY: When I read the letter from “Respectful,” it took me back a few years. As I was mowing in the town cemetery, I went around a gravestone into some tall grass and my mower stalled. When I turned it over to see what I had hit, I found a pair of pantyhose wrapped around the blade of the mower. Apparently, cemeteries are sometimes used as a lover’s lane. I agree with you about practicing good behavior in places like these. But I’ll always laugh recalling what happened to me. I wonder if the lady who forgot her hose that night caught a cold. GROUNDSKEEPER DEAR ABBY: I have to disagree with you

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

MCBUR

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

HNCCEL RMEPIR Answer here: Yesterday’s

Family Circus

Today, some cemeteries even conduct historical and nature tours. While I don’t condone rowdy behavior, it’s wrong to think they are simply for the dead and mourning. Many families of our fallen soldiers go to Arlington Cemetery to picnic and visit their loved ones.

Cemeteries fall into disrepair when they are not active and filled with living hikers, bikers, bird watchers, etc. Let’s encourage people to visit their local cemetery. The alternative is to allow them to go to seed and disappear from our landscape.

HINTS

PATRICK H., OHIO

Beetle Bailey

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

ODAIV

and “Resentful.” One needs to have a historical perspective about cemeteries and their place in our culture. Prior to the advent of public parks in the late 19th century, the only open, park-like setting in most communities was the local cemetery. People would stroll the lawns, picnic and socialize there.

Dear Heloise: I have lived in hurricaneprone areas and used to advise people about preparing emergency kits. One item I suggest is that everyone who may experience power outages stock children’s PAR TY GLOW STICK bracelets in with the supplies.

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) EXACT UNFOLD HAMMER Jumbles: PERCH Answer: He was very nervous after hearing that he would be — “RE-LAX-ED”

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Reasons: 1. Safer than candles, especially for children and elderly. 2. You aren’t using batteries or losing flashlights. They last 24 hours. 3. Inexpensive — you can buy packages of multiple glow sticks at dollar and craft stores. 4. They can substitute for a night light anywhere you need one. 5. You can hang them from chandeliers or light fixtures — almost anywhere. 6. I loop them around every doorknob in the house so I do not injure myself walking through the house, and this makes it easy to find an exit if it is necessary. 7. They store easily and last a long time. But if I don’t use them by late October, I give them to the trick-or-treaters to be safe as they walk the neighborhood, and then I buy myself a new supply. O.M., via email

Blondie

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

I love these and have a supply at our coast house for just the same reason. Heloise

#####

Dear Heloise: Suzy of Colorado Springs, Colo., had a fabulous idea in compiling a three-ring notebook to keep deployed Dad involved in the day-to-day activities and grades of his children (from a previous column — Heloise). But I would add to please consider making a second set in case the binder gets lost. As the daughter of a military dad who spent most of my childhood overseas or at sea, I have treasured the three-ring binder my dad compiled when he was finally stationed stateside. What I didn’t appreciate at the time has since become a loving memory. You can’t put a price on priceless. — Helen in Montclair, Va. Priceless is, well ... priceless! A heart hint for sure. Heloise

Garfield

Hagar the Horrible

#####

The Wizard of Id

Dear Heloise: When it is time to defrost my upright freezer, I remove the frozen food. I take a floor-type fan, place it in front of the freezer and turn it on so the warm air from the room circulates into the freezer. Within one hour, I have my freezer defrosted and all my frozen food back in. I also mark food before putting it in. After cleaning out the freezer and putting the food back in, it is easy to know which things are older than the others, and the items can be placed accordingly. Kathie in Erie, Pa.

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Thursday, September 22, 2011

B3


B4 Thursday, September 22, 2011

FINANCIAL

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

.40f 31.28 -1.03 Div Last Chg Disney DomRescs 1.97 49.89 -.71 A-B-C DEmmett .52 17.27 -.63 ACE Ltd 1.36e 60.24 -3.00 DowChm 1.00 25.54 -1.73 AES Corp ... 10.36 -.36 DuPont 1.64 44.61 -1.35 AFLAC 1.20 33.19 -1.87 DukeEngy 1.00f 19.66 -.09 AK Steel .20 d7.61 -.40 DukeRlty .68 10.76 -.48 ... 21.34 -.47 ... 3.33 -.15 EMC Cp AMR AOL ... 11.77 -2.17 EQT Corp .88 u60.55 -1.31 ... 2.55 -.06 EKodak AT&T Inc 1.72 28.30 -.55 AbtLab 1.92 51.74 -1.03 Eaton s 1.36 d36.21 -2.35 .70 50.23 -1.18 Accenture .90 53.39 -1.03 Ecolab AMD ... 6.48 -.26 ElPasoCp .04 18.42 -.78 ... 9.76 -.22 Aeropostl ... d9.69 -.32 Elan Aetna .60 38.82 -1.69 EldorGld g .12f 20.18 -.36 Agilent ... 32.25 -2.80 EmersonEl 1.38 43.75 -1.80 AlcatelLuc ... 3.11 -.01 EnCana g .80 d21.64 -1.20 Alcoa .12 d10.84 -.41 EndvSilv g ... u12.40 -.21 Allstate .84 d23.09 -1.23 ENSCO 1.40 46.19 -1.56 AlphaNRs ... d22.30 -4.62 EqtyRsd 1.47e 52.33 -3.34 Altria 1.64f 26.12 -.83 ExcoRes .16 d11.70 -.37 AmBev s 1.43e 31.18 -1.24 Exelon 2.10 43.44 -.63 AMovilL s .41e 22.75 -.69 ExxonMbl 1.88 71.97 -2.04 AEagleOut .44a 11.11 -.20 FedExCp .52 72.50 -2.72 1.84 37.45 -.86 FidlNFin .48 15.37 -.56 AEP .72 48.23 -1.04 FstHorizon .04 6.17 -.38 AmExp AmIntlGrp ... 22.95 -1.65 FirstEngy 2.20 45.32 -.70 .50 53.76 -3.40 AmTower ... 54.10 -1.05 Fluor ... 9.97 -.45 Ameriprise .92 41.67 -1.86 FordM ... 31.41 -.97 ForestLab Amphenol .06 42.51 -.36 ... 17.62 -.88 Anadarko .36 72.72 -3.52 ForestOil AnalogDev 1.00 33.24 -.93 FMCG s 1.00a d35.59 -2.96 Annaly 2.59e 17.61 -.51 FrontierCm .75 6.37 -.41 Aon Corp .60 41.13 -1.93 G-H-I .60 d91.35 -3.17 Apache ... 2.20 -.01 ArcelorMit .75 d16.47 -.63 GMX Rs ArchCoal .44 d16.12 -1.90 Gafisa SA .29e d6.76 -.48 ArchDan .64 27.18 -.85 GameStop ... 23.44 -.54 Avon .92 21.01 -.72 Gannett .32f d8.95 -.56 .45 16.19 -.53 BB&T Cp .64a 21.00 -1.19 Gap BHP BillLt2.02e 71.96 -3.63 GenDynam1.88 d57.27 -2.28 BP PLC 1.68 36.90 -1.87 GenElec .60 15.38 -.66 BakrHu .60 54.33 -3.54 GenGrPr n .40 12.24 -.80 BcoBrades .80r d15.68 -.73 GenMills 1.22f 38.44 +.95 BcoSantSA.82e 7.58 -.37 GenMot n ... 21.28 -1.15 BcoSBrasil1.65e d8.07 -.37 GenOn En ... 2.95 -.03 BkofAm .04 6.38 -.52 Genworth ... 5.35 -.36 ... 1.01 -.03 Gerdau .25e 7.83 -.38 BkIrelnd BkNYMel .52 19.12 -1.09 GiantInter s.18a d3.69 -.16 Barclay .36e 9.24 -.36 GlaxoSKln2.17e 40.93 -1.10 Bar iPVix rs ... 45.21 +2.33 GoldFLtd .24e 17.89 +.12 BarrickG .48 53.32 -.67 Goldcrp g .41 51.28 -1.58 1.24 54.56 -1.87 GoldmanS 1.40 d97.86 -4.75 Baxter BerkH B ... 67.22 -2.50 Goodrich 1.16 109.49 -2.33 BestBuy .64 24.12 -.67 Goodyear ... 10.01 -.68 Blackstone .40 12.68 -.47 HCA Hld n ... 19.82 -.08 BlockHR .60 13.16 -.93 HCP Inc 1.92 35.48 -2.07 Boeing 1.68 61.02 -2.54 HSBC 1.90e 39.12 -1.44 BostonSci ... 5.93 -.30 Hallibrtn .36 35.09 -2.89 BrMySq 1.32 u30.95 -.54 HarmonyG .08e 13.28 -.14 CB REllis ... d13.22 -.82 HartfdFn .40 16.57 -1.36 .40 22.73 -1.03 HlthSouth ... 15.02 -1.48 CBS B ... 7.02 -.05 HeclaM CF Inds 1.60f 152.941.92 49.71 -.90 Heinz 10.73 ... 9.87 -.61 .04 43.62 -2.01 Hertz CIGNA .40 56.49 -3.27 CMS Eng .84 20.06 -.41 Hess CNO Fincl ... 5.60 -.13 HewlettP .48 23.98 +1.51 CSX s .48 18.59 -1.64 HollyFrt s .35f 29.64 -1.03 CVS Care .50 35.33 -.48 HomeDp 1.00 33.84 -.97 CabotO&G .12 70.03 -1.37 HonwllIntl 1.33 44.87 -1.88 ... 15.31 -.25 HostHotls .16f 10.83 -.68 Calpine Cameco g .40 d19.93 -.40 Huntsmn .40 11.16 -.84 Cameron ... 47.58 -3.04 IAMGld g .20f 22.59 -.66 CdnNRs gs .36 d31.74 -1.41 ICICI Bk .63e 36.60 -.29 ... 6.52 -.40 CapOne .20 41.39 -1.03 ING ... 17.40 -.22 CapitlSrce .04 6.50 -.28 iShGold CardnlHlth .86 42.65 -1.35 iSAstla 1.06e 21.09 -.80 3.42e 56.20 -2.57 iShBraz CarMax ... 27.43 -.65 Carnival 1.00 32.76 -1.12 iShGer .67e 18.27 -.71 iSh HK .42e d15.57 -.52 Caterpillar1.84f 79.36 -4.30 Celanese .24f 38.87 -4.32 iShJapn .17e 9.46 -.12 ... d3.90 -.27 iSh Kor .50e d49.98 -1.85 Cemex CenterPnt .79 19.36 -.77 iShMex .71e d50.85 -1.96 CntryLink 2.90 33.45 -1.19 iShSing .50e d11.44 -.49 ChesEng .35 29.42 -.99 iSTaiwn .29e d12.60 -.27 ... 38.56 -.27 Chevron 3.12 94.27 -3.52 iShSilver Chicos .20 12.66 -.66 iShChina25.85e d33.67 -1.55 iSSP500 2.45e 117.46 -3.76 Chimera .62e 2.91 -.08 Chubb 1.56 57.55 -2.73 iShEMkts .84e d37.59 -1.45 T 4.02eu118.66+3.80 iShB20 Citigrp rs .04 25.52 -1.41 CliffsNRs 1.12f 61.55 -9.05 iS Eafe 1.68e 48.22 -1.48 .90 56.76 -2.59 iShiBxHYB7.28e 86.15 -.75 Coach CocaCola 1.88 69.28 -1.37 iShR2K .94e 66.59 -2.56 CocaCE .52 25.67 -.96 iShBShtT .10e 110.23 -.01 ... 26.95 -.32 iShREst 2.09e 52.76 -2.65 Coeur 1.44f 43.65 -1.35 ColgPal 2.32 89.99 -3.97 ITW Comerica .40 22.69 -1.80 IngerRd .48f 31.79 -1.41 IBM 3.00 173.02 -1.70 CompPrdS ... 22.74 -2.48 ConAgra .92 23.03 +.04 IntlGame .24 14.58 -.45 1.05 25.97 -1.25 IntPap ConocPhil 2.64 64.95 -2.06 ConsolEngy.40 37.92 -2.45 Interpublic .24 7.67 -.46 ConEd 2.40 57.26 -.84 Invesco .49 16.90 -.94 .20 d12.89 -.53 InvMtgCap3.74ed15.44 -.33 Corning Covidien .80 45.93 -1.54 ItauUnibH .84e d15.54 -.72 CSVS2xVxS ... 65.50 +6.36 IvanhM g 1.48e d16.84 -2.00 CSVelIVSt s ... 6.61 -.39 J-K-L CredSuiss1.40e 24.10 +.03 CrownHold ... 31.29 +.13 JPMorgCh1.00 d30.34 -1.91 .28 16.84 -.45 Cummins 1.60f 91.61 -2.64 Jabil ... 6.38 -.22 CurEuro .19e 135.45 -.74 Jaguar g JanusCap .20 6.16 -.27 D-E-F Jefferies .30 d12.85 -1.10 DCT Indl .28 4.76 -.24 JinkoSolar ... d5.76 -.13 DDR Corp .24f 11.03 -.64 JohnJn 2.28 63.13 -1.09 DR Horton .15 9.65 -.13 JohnsnCtl .64 27.93 -1.47 DanaHldg ... 10.96 -1.02 JnprNtwk ... 19.78 -.36 Danaher .10f 44.78 -1.46 KB Home .25 6.11 -.33 ... 8.25 -.37 KeyEngy ... 10.69 -.94 DeanFds 1.64 72.82 -3.16 Keycorp .12 d5.93 -.41 Deere ... 8.00 -.37 KimbClk 2.80 69.29 -1.16 DeltaAir .72 15.41 -1.19 DenburyR ... d12.99 -.76 Kimco DeutschBk1.07e 31.26 -1.74 Kinross g .12f 17.00 -.65 g ... 6.20 -.16 KodiakO DBGoldDS ... 4.52 +.10 1.00 45.03 -1.82 DevonE .68 61.61 -3.26 Kohls 1.16 34.13 -.39 DrxTcBull .84e 35.33 -1.31 Kraft .46f 21.76 -.65 DrSCBr rs ... 49.85 +5.00 Kroger DirFnBr rs ... 65.60 +8.07 LDK Solar ... d3.69 -.41 Corp ... 6.10 -.18 LSI DirLCBr rs ... 42.89 +3.57 ... 48.22 -.38 DrxEMBull1.10ed16.60-2.08 LVSands DrxEnBear ... 19.76 +2.18 LeggMason.32 25.90 -1.65 DirEMBear ... 28.60 +2.89 LennarA .16 13.90 -.20 1.96 37.11 -.76 DrxFnBull ... 11.50 -1.52 LillyEli DirxSCBull ... 36.89 -4.61 Limited .80a 39.57 -1.67 DirxLCBull ... 51.54 -5.24 LincNat .20 d16.63 -1.53 ... 6.07 -.18 DirxEnBull ... 38.89 -4.85 LizClaib Discover .24 25.34 -1.45 LloydBkg ... 2.13 +.03

Name

Name Sell Chg Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 17.27 -.56 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.37 -.53 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.68 -.18 GrowthI 24.35 -.68 22.06 -.59 Ultra American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.67 -.51 AMutlA p 23.87 -.62 BalA p 17.36 -.36 BondA p 12.59 +.02 CapIBA p 47.27 -.80 CapWGA p30.80 -.84 CapWA p 20.92 -.10 EupacA p 35.05 -.90 FdInvA p 33.21-1.06 GovtA p 14.69 +.06 GwthA p 28.00 -.76 HI TrA p 10.68 -.03 IncoA p 15.84 -.28 IntBdA p 13.67 -.01 IntlGrIncA p27.15 -.67 ICAA p 25.26 -.73 NEcoA p 23.25 -.55 N PerA p 25.74 -.63 NwWrldA 46.78-1.20 STBFA p 10.10 -.01 SmCpA p 33.14 -.83 TxExA p 12.37 +.01 WshA p 26.22 -.79 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 24.61 -.53 IntEqII I r 10.21 -.23 Artisan Funds: Intl 19.20 -.52 IntlVal r 23.42 -.53 MidCap 33.29 -.87 MidCapVal19.31 -.55

Baron Funds: Growth 47.98-1.51 SmallCap 22.15 -.64 Bernstein Fds: 14.27 +.04 IntDur DivMu 14.71 +.01 TxMgdIntl 12.71 -.36 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.71 -.49 GlAlA r 18.38 -.36 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.13 -.34 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.75 -.49 GlbAlloc r 18.47 -.36 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 49.13-1.13 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 55.80-2.97 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 26.10 -.82 DivEqInc 8.83 -.31 DivrBd 5.17 +.02 TxEA p 13.47 +.02 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 26.96 -.84 AcornIntZ 35.32 -.76 LgCapGr 12.38 -.27 ValRestr 41.80-2.14 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.97 -.07 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n 9.23 -.25 USCorEq1 n9.91 -.32 USCorEq2 n9.67 -.33 DWS Invest S: MgdMuni S 9.00 +.01 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 30.38 -.90 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 30.75 -.92

LockhdM 3.00 LaPac ... Lowes .56 LyonBas A.80f

M-N-0

... 6.43 -.42 MEMC MF Global ... d4.62 -.16 MFA Fncl 1.00f 6.87 -.30 ... 2.24 -.09 MGIC MGM Rsts ... 10.81 -.22 .40 26.12 -1.22 Macys MagHRes ... 4.41 -.31 Manitowoc .08 d7.48 -.70 Manulife g .52 d11.82 -.71 MarathnO s .60 23.73 -1.04 MktVGold .40e 64.28 -1.35 MktVRus .18e d28.98 -1.18 MktVJrGld2.93e 35.10 -1.21 .40 27.77 -.84 MarIntA MarshM .88 26.98 -1.06 .30 d7.19 -.42 Masco McDrmInt ... 12.52 -.73 McDnlds 2.44 87.52 -1.79 McGrwH 1.00 43.35 -1.90 McKesson .80 74.88 -2.50 McMoRn ... 11.10 -.57 ... d13.38 -.97 Mechel MedcoHlth ... 49.40 -.85 Medtrnic .97 33.87 -.95 1.52 31.85 -.65 Merck .74 29.03 -2.04 MetLife MetroPCS ... 9.29 -.78 Molycorp ... 39.85 -1.60 Monsanto 1.20f 65.86 -1.85 MonstrWw ... 7.87 -.69 Moodys .56 31.76 -1.11 MorgStan .20 d13.82 -1.30 .20 63.59 -2.45 Mosaic MotrlaSol n .88 43.11 -1.23 MotrlaMo n ... 37.95 +.13 MurphO 1.10 48.03 -2.71 NRG Egy ... 22.37 -.63 NV Energy .48 14.27 -.55 NYSE Eur 1.20 25.70 -.69 Nabors ... d15.63 -1.16 NBkGreece.29e .93 +.04 NOilVarco .44 58.04 -3.65 NatSemi .40 u24.99 +.08 NY CmtyB 1.00 11.87 -.74 NY Times ... d6.18 -.46 Newcastle .60f 4.55 -.35 NewellRub .32 11.96 -.63 NewfldExp ... d44.30 -3.32 NewmtM 1.20f 67.68 -2.22 Nexen g .20 d17.19 -1.11 NiSource .92 21.67 -.84 1.24 85.74 -3.72 NikeB NobleCorp .53e 33.41 -1.09 NobleEn .88f 77.09 -4.26 NokiaCp .55e 5.57 -.32 NorflkSo 1.72f 61.93 -5.61 Novartis 2.53e 54.93 -.45 1.45 32.92 -1.19 Nucor OcciPet 1.84 76.32 -4.46 OfficeDpt ... 2.17 -.10 OilSvHT 1.58e 118.60 -6.72 Omnicom 1.00 37.24 -1.66

P-Q-R

PG&E Cp 1.82 42.41 -.55 1.40 47.69 -2.50 PNC PPL Corp 1.40 28.98 -.29 PatriotCoal ... d10.11 -1.30 PeabdyE .34 d39.96 -2.94 .80 26.29 -.75 Penney PepsiCo 2.06 60.79 +.40 PetrbrsA 1.34e d22.48 -.92 Petrobras 1.26e 24.64 -1.01 Pfizer .80 17.84 -.40 PhilipMor 3.08f 66.80 -1.48 PhilipsEl 1.02e 17.60 -.20 PitnyBw 1.48 19.32 -.52 Potash s .28 50.14 -1.91 PS USDBull ... 22.03 +.17 PrinFncl .55f 23.27 -1.24 ProLogis 1.12 26.69 -1.58 ProShtQQQ ... 32.38 +.56 ProShtS&P ... 44.87 +1.31 PrUShS&P ... 24.26 +1.40 ProUltDow.28e 49.98 -2.78 PrUlShDow ... 19.83 +.97 ProUltQQQ ... 81.38 -2.97 PrUShQQQ rs... 49.19 +1.62 ProUltSP .31e 40.34 -2.66 PrUShtFn rs ... 83.26 +7.24 ProUShL20 ... d20.41 -1.38 ProUltSRE ... 16.46 +1.48 ProUltSOG ... 35.38 +2.59 ProUltSBM ... 23.44 +2.26 ProUltFin .15e 38.20 -3.97 ProUltR2K ... 29.16 -2.35 ProUSSP500 ... 19.09 +1.62 PrUltSP500 s.03e50.43-5.02 ProUSSlv rs ... 12.58 +.16 ProUShEuro ... 18.75 +.20 ProctGam 2.10 63.02 -1.06 ProgsvCp 1.40e 17.28 -.72 ProUSR2K rs... 55.79 +3.87 Prudentl 1.15f 45.73 -3.25 PSEG 1.37 33.82 -.99 PulteGrp ... 4.37 -.14 QuantaSvc ... 18.91 +.01 QksilvRes ... 8.63 -.10 RadianGrp .01 2.51 -.04 RangeRs .16 u67.96 +3.07 Raytheon 1.72 39.81 -1.54 RltyInco 1.74f 33.50 -.93 ... 40.29 +.20 RedHat RegalEnt .84 12.82 -.31 RegionsFn .04 d3.62 -.16 Renren n ... d5.52 +.01 ReynAm s 2.12 37.22 -.81 RioTinto 1.17e d51.29 -3.42 RiteAid ... 1.07 -.04 RylCarb .40 24.37 -.95 RoyDShllA 3.36 63.15 -2.61

S-T-U

SAIC ... 12.53 -.40 SAP AG .82e 50.20 -.39 SLM Cp .40 12.67 -.50 SpdrDJIA 3.14e 110.95 -2.93 SpdrGold ... 173.59 -2.19 SP Mid 1.64e 147.87 -5.42 S&P500ETF2.46e116.63-

NYVen C 29.22 -.87 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.40 ... Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq n17.73 -.48 EmMktV 27.57 -.75 IntSmVa n 14.13 -.36 LargeCo 9.20 -.28 USLgVa n 17.60 -.70 US Micro n11.75 -.40 US Small n18.36 -.68 US SmVa 20.92 -.91 IntlSmCo n14.59 -.34 10.35 -.01 Fixd n IntVa n 14.49 -.43 Glb5FxInc n11.33 -.01 2YGlFxd n 10.23 -.01 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 64.38-1.40 Income 13.52 +.02 28.91 -.81 IntlStk 94.71-2.85 Stock DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.30 ... Dreyfus: Aprec 37.82 -.96 DreihsAcInc10.45 ... Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 15.88 -.54 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.69 ... GblMacAbR9.96 -.04 LgCapVal 15.92 -.55 FMI Funds: LgCap p n 14.62 -.46 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.84 ... FPACres n25.60 -.46 Fairholme 24.81-1.35 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.47 +.05

CATTLE/HOGS NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high low settle chg. CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 119.42 119.72 118.57 119.25 +.55 Dec 11 119.00 119.87 118.50 118.85 -.35 Feb 12 121.70 122.40 121.17 121.67 -.10 Apr 12 126.15 126.50 125.70 125.72 -.30 Jun 12 124.55 124.80 123.60 123.72 -.60 Aug 12 124.50 124.75 124.10 124.30 -.07 Oct 12 126.80 127.00 126.15 126.50 -.10 Dec 12 126.95 Feb 13 127.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 8430. Tue’s Sales: 47,236 Tue’s open int: 329081, up +853 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Sep 11 134.50 134.82 133.85 133.95 -.40 Oct 11 137.50 138.52 136.65 137.50 -.02 Nov 11 140.15 140.80 139.55 139.77 Jan 12 141.50 142.50 140.75 141.40 -.07 Mar 12 142.50 143.10 142.10 142.40 -.02 Apr 12 143.10 143.52 142.45 142.77 +.07 May 12 143.25 144.07 142.85 143.35 +.15 Aug 12 144.65 144.70 144.30 144.70 +.15 Last spot N/A Est. sales 320. Tue’s Sales: 6,208 Tue’s open int: 36068, up +860 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 89.27 89.82 88.55 89.27 +.25 Dec 11 83.97 84.25 82.97 84.10 +1.13 Feb 12 87.75 88.20 87.52 88.10 +.80 Apr 12 91.50 91.85 91.20 91.80 +.50

72.65 -2.79 5.62 -.20 19.18 -.74 28.89 -2.87

3.54 SpdrHome .31e 13.81 -.52 SpdrKbwBk.26e 17.57 -1.05 SpdrLehHY4.23e 37.77 -.33 SpdrKbw RB.40ed19.141.31 SpdrRetl .49e 47.26 -1.73 SpdrOGEx .50e 48.96 -2.13 SpdrMetM .42e d50.52 -2.79 Safeway .58 16.55 -.57 StJude .84 41.12 -2.05 ... 9.37 -.13 Saks Salesforce ... 126.67 -1.74 SandRdge ... 6.76 -.32 Sanofi 1.82e 32.21 -1.04 SaraLee .46 17.11 -.35 Schlmbrg 1.00 65.15 -4.14 Schwab .24 11.26 -.61 SeadrillLtd3.03e 31.32 -.64 SemiHTr .64e 29.91 -.56 SiderurNac.81e 8.83 -.42 SilvWhtn g .12 40.66 -.28 SilvrcpM g .08 7.13 +.11 SimonProp3.20112.50 -7.08 SmithfF ... 18.11 -.70 SouthnCo 1.89 42.52 -.29 SthnCopper2.19e27.93-1.57 SwstAirl .02 8.30 -.19 SwstnEngy ... 38.23 -.47 SpectraEn 1.04 25.11 -.77 SprintNex ... 3.25 -.08 SP Matls .82e 32.09 -1.52 SP HlthC .64e 32.12 -.89 SP CnSt .85e 30.01 -.63 SP Consum.61e 36.29 -1.21 SP Engy 1.08e 62.89 -2.73 SPDR Fncl.20e 11.90 -.62 SP Inds .69e 30.14 -1.30 SP Tech .36e 24.49 -.37 SP Util 1.36e 33.65 -.63 StdPac ... 2.40 -.03 StanBlkDk1.64 d50.91 -3.04 StarwdHtl .30f 42.03 -1.97 StateStr .72 31.48 -1.19 Statoil ASA1.10e 21.77 -.77 StillwtrM ... d10.51 -1.02 Suncor gs .44 d27.95 -1.12 Sunoco .60 34.65 -1.37 SunstnHtl ... 5.46 -.15 Suntech ... d2.92 -.13 SunTrst .20f 17.60 -1.38 Supvalu .35 6.87 -.38 Synovus .04 1.25 -.07 Sysco 1.04 26.51 -.60 TAM SA .72e 19.96 -.61 TCF Fncl .20 d8.97 -.64 TE Connect .72 28.20 -.28 TECO .85 17.40 -.88 TJX .76 56.49 -1.75 TaiwSemi .52e 11.92 -.20 TalismE g .27f d13.67 -.47 1.20 51.43 -.85 Target TeckRes g .60 d33.88 -2.42 TelefEsp s1.98e 18.56 -.54 TempleInld .52 31.32 +.03 Tenaris .68e d27.81 -1.62 TenetHlth ... 4.27 -.19 ... 52.86 +.62 Teradata ... 11.75 -.44 Teradyn ... d11.79 -.89 Terex Tesoro ... 21.47 -.85 TexInst .68f 26.88 -.66 Textron .08 16.93 -.67 ThermoFis ... 51.34 -2.04 3M Co 2.20 76.34 -2.87 TW Cable 1.92 63.83 -1.69 TimeWarn .94 29.99 -1.23 TitanMet .30 15.46 -.24 TollBros ... 15.16 -.84 Total SA 2.38e d43.14 -.93 Transocn .79e 56.30 -1.56 Travelers 1.64 48.19 -2.23 TrinaSolar ... d7.75 -.29 TwoHrbInv1.60e 9.35 -.26 TycoIntl 1.00 43.96 -1.09 .16 16.42 -.41 Tyson UBS AG ... d11.07 -.32 UDR .80f 23.98 -1.65 US Airwy ... 5.85 -.12 ... 32.54 -.48 UltraPt g UnilevNV 1.21e 30.55 -.52 UnionPac 1.90 83.07 -5.31 ... 19.83 -.94 UtdContl UPS B 2.08 64.34 -1.87 US Bancrp .50 22.86 -1.23 US NGs rs ... d9.35 -.16 ... 32.92 -.51 US OilFd USSteel .20 d24.78 -1.58 UtdTech 1.92 74.87 -1.14 UtdhlthGp .65 48.01 -1.82 UnumGrp .42f 21.00 -1.11

V-W-X-Y-Z

Vale SA 1.14e 25.32 -1.43 Vale SA pf1.14e 23.39 -1.30 ValeantPh .38a 37.63 -2.15 ValeroE .20 19.89 -1.09 VlyNBcp .69b d9.91 -.69 VangTSM1.31e 59.81 -2.01 VangREIT1.92e 52.97 -2.95 VangDivAp1.13e 50.24 -1.39 VangEmg .82e d38.68 -1.53 VerizonCm2.00f 35.84 -.57 ViacomB 1.00 45.40 -1.29 VimpelCm .79e 10.24 -.36 Visa .60 91.42 -1.42 VishayInt ... 9.19 -.69 WalMart 1.46 51.32 -.97 Walgrn .90f 36.37 -.72 WalterEn .50 d66.25 -8.75 WsteMInc 1.36 29.62 -1.52 WeathfIntl ... 14.78 -.78 WellsFargo .48 23.71 -.96 Wendys Co .08 4.92 -.09 WDigital ... 27.65 -.67 WstnRefin ... 14.35 -.92 WstnUnion .32 16.04 -.19 .60 16.90 -.61 Weyerh WmsCos 1.00f 26.37 -.49 Wyndham .60 30.90 -1.09 .44 19.03 -.81 XL Grp XcelEngy 1.04 24.86 -.39 Xerox .17 7.49 -.27 Yamana g .18 16.40 -.34 YingliGrn ... 3.39 +.13 ... d16.21 -2.04 Youku n

Roswell Daily Record

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

AMEX

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 3687440 6.38 -.52 S&P500ETF2751280116.633.54 SPDR Fncl1128649 11.90 -.62 iShEMkts 982893 37.59 -1.45

Name Vol (00) NwGold g 38594 NthgtM g 38446 CheniereEn 31724 GoldStr g 30087 NthnO&G 24519

Name DRE Bear DirFnBr rs iP SXR1K C-TrCVOL DrxRsaBear

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Last 13.63 65.60 49.37 58.55 54.47

Last 13.56 3.71 6.44 2.18 21.67

Name Vol (00) Last Chg Oracle 810263 29.54 +1.19 PwShs QQQ73850755.38 -.98 SiriusXM 714557 1.81 +.03 Microsoft 709020 25.99 -.99 Cisco 693308 15.84-

Chg -.17 -.17 -.50 -.10 +.48

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg +1.85 +8.07 +5.86 +6.69 +6.17

%Chg +15.7 +14.0 +13.5 +12.9 +12.8

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg BovieMed 3.09 +.24 +8.4 Orexigen 2.19 +.72 +49.0 Solitario 2.39 +.17 +7.7 FlamelT 5.29 +.82 +18.3 EngySvcs 2.30 +.14 +6.5 Mattersight 5.05 +.62 +14.0 NewEnSys 2.28 +.14 +6.5 Celgene rt 2.05 +.25 +13.9 WellsGard 2.45 +.15 +6.5 JA Solar 2.25 +.25

Name Last Chg TerraNitro 139.00-31.06 AlphaNRs 22.30 -4.62 11.77 -2.17 AOL DrxREBull 43.16 -7.90 Comeric wt 4.80 -.82

%Chg -18.3 -17.2 -15.6 -15.5 -14.6

Name MidsthBcp Geokinetics PionDrill GormanR s Teche

474 2,585 68 3,127 16 284 4,847,481,020

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

52-Week High Low 12,876.00 10,604.07 5,627.85 4,205.13 449.09 381.99 8,718.25 6,839.00 2,490.51 1,984.93 2,887.75 2,316.11 1,370.58 1,101.54 14,562.01 11,570.57 868.57 639.85

Name

Div

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) Last 9.95 2.83 9.59 24.01 29.84

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg %Chg Name Last -1.17 -10.5 Brt&Ktz 7.50 -.29 -9.3 OdysMar 2.16 -.92 -8.8 WestwdOne 2.74 -2.26 -8.6 SpanBdc rs 2.15 -2.48 -7.7 PacBiosci n 4.25

Chg -3.80 -1.08 -.87 -.67 -1.31

151 305 27 483 4 28ws 78,722,492607

438 2,126 88 2,652 10 277s 2,144,243,607

DIARY

INDEXES

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

DIARY

Last 11,124.84 4,281.16 435.74 6,981.33 2,160.96 2,538.19 1,166.76 12,243.97 664.58

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

Net Chg -283.82 -238.06 -7.77 -236.19 -57.95 -52.05 -35.33 -375.93 -25.37

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

PE Last

Chg

YTD %Chg Name

Div

% Chg -2.49 -5.27 -1.75 -3.27 -2.61 -2.01 -2.94 -2.98 -3.68

PE Last

%Chg -33.6 -33.3 -24.1 -23.8 -23.6

YTD 52-wk % Chg % Chg -3.91 +3.59 -16.17 -4.17 +7.59 +9.69 -12.34 -3.18 -2.15 +8.17 -4.32 +8.72 -7.23 +2.86 -8.35 +2.91 -15.19 +1.20

Chg

YTD %Chg

BkofAm

.04

...

6.38 -.52

-52.2 Oneok Pt s

2.34f

19

43.58 -.52

+9.6

Chevron

3.12

8

94.27 -3.52

+3.3 PNM Res

.50

28

14.26 -.62

+9.5

CocaCola

1.88

14

69.28 -1.37

+5.3 PepsiCo

2.06

16

60.79 +.40

-6.9

Disney

.40f

13

31.28 -1.03

.80

12

17.84 -.40

+1.9

EOG Res

.64

49

83.43 -3.69

-8.7 SwstAirl

.02

12

8.30 -.19

-36.1

-16.6 Pfizer

...

5

9.97 -.45

-40.6 TexInst

.68f

10

26.88 -.66

-17.3

HewlettP

.48

6

23.98 +1.51

-43.0 TimeWarn

.94

12

29.99 -1.23

-6.8

HollyFrt s

.35f

15

29.64 -1.03

+45.4 TriContl

.31e

...

13.28 -.39

-3.5

Intel

.84f

10

21.94 -.26

+4.3 WalMart

1.46

12

51.32 -.97

-4.8

IBM

3.00

14 173.02 -1.70

+17.9 WashFed

.24

16

13.75 -.57

-18.7

Merck

1.52

12

-11.6 WellsFargo

.48

9

23.71 -.96

-23.5

Microsoft

.80f

24.86 -.39

+5.6

FordM

31.85 -.65

HOW TO READ THE MARKET IN REVIEW 10

25.99 -.99

-6.9 XcelEngy

1.04

15

Here are the 525 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 400 most active on the Nasdaq National Markets and 100 most active on American Stock Exchange. Mutual funds are 450 largest. Stocks in bold changed 5 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letters’ list. AAR .48 12.88 # Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock, based on latest quar- ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 ACM Op .80 7.25 # terly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise footnoted. ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. ACMSp .96 7.50 # Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... mark. Fund Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold. Chg: Daily net change in the NAV.

AAL Mutual: Bond p 9.49 -.01

Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. d – New 52- CaGrp 14.47 -.03 wk low during trading day. g – Dividend in Canadian $. Stock price in U.S.$. n – MuBd 10.43 -.01 New issue in past 52 wks. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. s – Split SmCoSt 9.73 -.05 or stock dividend of 25 pct or more in last 52 wks. Div begins with date of split or stock dividend. u – New 52-wk high during trading day. v – Trading halted on primary market. Unless noted, dividend rates are annual disbursements based on last declaration. pf – Preferred. pp – Holder owes installment(s) of purchase price. rt – Rights. un – Units. wd – When distributed. wi – When issued. wt – Warrants. ww – With warrants. xw – Without warrants. Dividend Footnotes: a – Also extra or extras. b – Annual rate plus stock dividend. c – Liquidating dividend. e – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos. f – Annual rate, increased on last declaration. i – Declared or paid after stock dividend or split. j – Paid this year, dividend omitted, deferred or no action taken at last meeting. k – Declared or paid this year, accumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m – Annual rate, reduced on last declaration. p – Init div, annual rate unknown. r – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos plus stock dividend. t – Paid in stock in last 12 mos, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or distribution date. x – Ex-dividend or ex-rights. y – Ex-dividend and sales in full. z – Sales in full. vj – In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such companies. • Most active stocks above must be worth $1 and gainers/losers $2. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Wednesday’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

MUTUAL FUNDS

+.35 +.50 +.50 -.05 +.15 +.05 +.05

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 101.29 103.86 101.25 101.27 Dec 11 106.35 106.56 102.75 102.83 Mar 12 103.80 103.89 100.00 100.09 May 12 101.41 102.30 98.91 98.99 Jul 12 101.01 101.01 98.18 98.21 Oct 12 97.64 Dec 12 98.50 98.50 96.10 96.31 Mar 13 98.15 98.15 97.40 97.40 May 13 97.60 Jul 13 97.55 Last spot N/A Est. sales 14526. Tue’s Sales: 11,978 Tue’s open int: 150007, off -1577

chg.

-2.54 -2.58 -2.82 -2.79 -2.71 -1.91 -1.36 -1.10 -1.15 -1.12

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low settle

chg.

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 11 665 683 665 666fl -8 Mar 12 704ü 717fl 701ü 701fl -9fl May 12 731fl 738 721ü 722fl -11ü

FUTURES

Jul 12 738 743ø 726fl 727fl Sep 12 741fl 754fl 741 741ø Dec 12 765ø 773 759ü 760ü Mar 13 783ø 785ø 774ø 774ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 104398. Tue’s Sales: 44,678 Tue’s open int: 417381, up +3217 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 11 685 697ø 685 685fl Mar 12 695 709fl 695 698fl May 12 706ü 717ü 705ø 706ü Jul 12 716 721 708fl 709ø Sep 12 658ø 662ø 646ø 648 Dec 12 624 626fl 616ø 620ü Mar 13 631 634 628ø 628ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 324490. Tue’s Sales: 206,993 Tue’s open int: 1211618, off -1171 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 11 350 353 349 350 Mar 12 360ø 363 360 361 May 12 370 370ü 367 367 Jul 12 372 373 372 373 Sep 12 378ø 379ø 378ø 379ø Dec 12 364 365 364 365 Mar 13 367 368 367 368 Last spot N/A Est. sales 870. Tue’s Sales: 774 Tue’s open int: 13938, off -69 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Nov 11 1322 1345ü 1320 1320ø Jan 12 1330 1356ü 1330 1331ø Mar 12 1338ø 1363ø 1338ü 1338ø May 12 1352 1369 1333 1343ü Jul 12 1359fl 1377 1351 1351ü Aug 12 1358 1358 1342 1342 Sep 12 1339 1339 1324 1324 Nov 12 1320ø 1335ø 1312 1312 Jan 13 1330 1330 1317 1317 Mar 13 1326fl 1326fl 1318fl 1318fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 381602. Tue’s Sales: 143,941 Tue’s open int: 584691, off -3600

-12ü -11ü -11ø -11

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

-4ø -4ü -4ü -4fl -7fl +ø +fl

+1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1

-17ø -17ü -17fl -18ü -17fl -16 -15 -12fl -13 -13ü

low settle

chg.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Nov 11 87.03 87.99 84.65 85.92 -1.00 Dec 11 87.27 88.24 84.91 86.18 -.99 Jan 12 87.59 88.50 85.27 86.46 -.97 Feb 12 87.16 88.69 85.55 86.73 -.95 Mar 12 88.06 88.86 85.87 87.00 -.94 Apr 12 88.10 89.07 86.07 87.28 -.94 May 12 88.39 89.52 86.38 87.58 -.93 Jun 12 88.70 89.85 86.77 87.88 -.93 Jul 12 88.50 89.74 87.02 88.16 -.93 Aug 12 88.30 90.10 88.12 88.39 -.92 Sep 12 89.06 90.03 88.38 88.61 -.91 Oct 12 89.33 89.74 88.80 88.84 -.89 Nov 12 90.58 90.86 89.08 89.08 -.86 Dec 12 90.41 91.17 88.15 89.33 -.84 Jan 13 89.81 89.82 89.46 89.46 -.83 Feb 13 89.57 -.82 Mar 13 89.68 -.81 Apr 13 89.79 -.80 May 13 89.85 -.79 Jun 13 90.54 91.63 89.26 89.89 -.78 Jul 13 89.95 -.78 Aug 13 90.00 -.77 Last spot N/A Est. sales 504017. Tue’s Sales: 484,182 Tue’s open int: 1365197, off -16049 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Oct 11 2.7066 2.8000 2.6400 2.6665 -.0349 Nov 11 2.6967 2.7230 2.6300 2.6564 -.0279 Dec 11 2.6835 2.7074 2.6171 2.6432 -.0264 Jan 12 2.6734 2.7022 2.6143 2.6412 -.0267 Feb 12 2.6795 2.7067 2.6214 2.6474 -.0274 Mar 12 2.6892 2.7142 2.6417 2.6574 -.0281 Apr 12 2.7975 2.8221 2.7389 2.7653 -.0285 May 12 2.8065 2.8177 2.7644 2.7653 -.0284 Jun 12 2.7717 2.8120 2.7400 2.7552 -.0285 Jul 12 2.7096 2.7345 2.7096 2.7345 -.0280 Aug 12 2.7518 2.7527 2.7120 2.7120 -.0265 Sep 12 2.7280 2.7280 2.6885 2.6885 -.0250

... JA Solar JDS Uniph ... JackHenry .42 JkksPac .40 JamesRiv ... JazzPhrm ... JetBlue ... JoyGlbl .70 KLA Tnc 1.40f Kulicke ... LamResrch ... LamarAdv ... Lattice ... LeapWirlss ... ... Level3 LexiPhrm ... LibGlobA ... LibtyMIntA ... LifeTech ... ... LifePtH LimelghtN ... LinearTch .96 ... Logitech

2.25 +.25 12.46 -.60 28.93 -.25 19.82 +.01 d7.74 -1.32 45.98 -.82 4.16 -.19 70.44 -5.43 38.16 -.17 8.28 -.24 38.13 -.83 18.40 -.78 5.44 -.14 8.02 -.11 1.52 -.03 d1.10 -.04 37.98 -.09 16.77 +1.26 38.22 -1.84 34.84 -.24 2.33 -.04 29.24 -.65 8.74 -.14

M-N-0

Qualcom QuestSft Questcor RF MicD Rambus Regenrn RschMotn RexEnergy RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp RoyGld

.86 51.66 -1.45 ... 15.45 -.52 ... 26.63 -1.24 ... 7.15 +.15 ... 13.30 -.06 ... u70.28 +5.93 ... d21.54 -1.19 ... 14.28 -.64 ... 43.01 -1.37 .88 79.73 -1.41 ... 44.33 +.86 .44 u80.72 -1.12

S-T-U

S1 Corp ... 8.79 -.17 SBA Com ... 37.38 -.32 .24f d15.25 -.72 SEI Inv ... 9.62 +.09 STEC SalixPhm ... 26.60 -.91 ... 42.67 +.02 SanDisk ... 7.00 -.13 Sanmina Sanofi rt ... 1.05 -.01 Sapient .35e 10.00 -.43 SavientPh ... 4.18 -.44 SciGames ... 7.32 -.01 SeagateT .72 11.18 -.23 SeattGen ... 20.05 +.38 ... 15.99 -.15 SelCmfrt Sequenom ... 5.55 -.08 SvcSourc n ... 12.80 -1.22 ShandaGm ... 4.95 -.13 ShoreTel ... 5.25 -.38 ... 4.87 -.18 SifyTech SilicnImg ... 6.51 +.46 Slcnware .28e 4.76 -.03 ... 24.99 -1.09 SilvStd g ... 90.02 -2.74 Sina SiriusXM ... 1.81 +.03 SkywksSol ... 21.92 +.35 SodaStrm n ... 40.32 +.34 Sohu.cm ... 60.52 -4.25 ... 2.20 -.18 Sonus ... 8.02 -.37 SpectPh Spreadtrm .05p 21.15 -.59 Staples .40 13.45 -.58 StarScient ... 2.88 -.07 Starbucks .52 39.90 -1.18 StlDynam .40 11.25 -.50 SunPowerA ... d9.55 -.47 SusqBnc .08 d5.64 -.41 Symantec ... 17.03 -.32 Synopsys ... 24.61 -.37 TD Ameritr .20 14.15 -.50 TakeTwo ... 13.24 -.36 .08 4.39 -.11 Tellabs TeslaMot ... 25.85 -.16 TevaPhrm .87e 36.63 +.01 TexRdhse .32 13.46 -.31 Thoratec ... 32.19 +.05 TibcoSft ... 21.39 +.36 TiVo Inc ... 10.25 -.07 TransceptP ... 7.11 +.10 Travelzoo ... 27.87 -.33 ... 34.75 -.44 TrimbleN ... d5.39 -.18 TriQuint Umpqua .28f 8.69 -.66 UtdOnln .40 5.39 -.14 UtdTherap ... 40.19 -2.00 UnivDisp ... 53.01 -2.29 UrbanOut ... 23.79 -.55

MCG Cap .68 4.05 -.20 MIPS Tech ... 5.43 +.02 Magma ... 5.10 -.05 MannKd ... 3.26 -.07 MarinaBio ... .19 -.01 ... 14.86 -.16 MarvellT .92 26.29 -.61 Mattel MaximIntg .88f 24.55 -.20 MelcoCrwn ... 10.31 -.96 Mellanox ... 32.17 +.21 MentorGr ... 9.91 -.01 MergeHlth ... 6.70 -.21 Microchp 1.39f 33.19 -.54 MicronT ... 6.61 -.25 MicroSemi ... 16.68 +.01 Microsoft .80f 25.99 -.99 .80 20.76 -.62 Molex Momenta ... d10.62 -.98 ... 2.01 ... Motricity Move Inc ... 1.65 ... Mylan ... 19.41 -.78 NII Hldg ... d32.74 -1.94 NPS Phm ... 6.33 -.47 NXP Semi ... 17.12 -.81 NasdOMX ... 24.18 -.52 NatPenn .12f 6.83 -.47 NektarTh ... 5.07 -.01 NetLogicM ... 48.16 +.06 ... 35.89 +.63 NetApp Netease ... 43.23 -.45 ...d128.50-1.53 Netflix NewsCpA .19f 16.13 -.70 NewsCpB .19f 16.22 -.68 NorTrst 1.12 34.83 -.81 NwstBcsh .44 11.74 -.41 ... 29.03 -.43 Novlus NuVasive ... d18.65 -2.56 NuanceCm ... 19.22 ... ... 14.47 -.29 Nvidia OReillyAu ... 69.79 -.63 ... 4.11 +.03 Oclaro OmniVisn ... 16.31 +.17 OnSmcnd ... 7.72 -.18 ... 31.75 -1.38 OnyxPh OpenTable ... d48.18 -1.46 OpnwvSy ... 1.80 -.01 OptimerPh ... u16.77 +.65 Oracle .24 29.54 +1.19 V-W-X-Y-Z Orexigen ... 2.19 +.72 Oritani .40 12.83 -.47 VCA Ant ... 16.02 -.64 ... 3.03 -.22 ValVis A P-Q-R ValueClick ... 16.58 -.23 PDL Bio .60 5.58 -.07 VarianSemi ... 62.00 +.16 PMC Sra ... 6.45 +.05 VeecoInst ... d27.00 -1.12 PSS Wrld ... d19.97 -.90 Verisign 5.75e 28.41 -.03 Paccar .72f 35.44 -1.72 Verisk ... 35.00 +.13 PacBiosci n ... d4.25 -1.31 VertxPh ... 53.18 +1.13 PaetecHld ... 5.58 -.15 Vical ... 2.43 -.42 PanASlv .10 32.08 -.41 VirgnMda h .16 24.64 -1.49 ParamTch ... d15.45 -.64 ViroPhrm ... 17.93 -.71 Parexel ... 19.02 -1.24 VistaPrt ... 26.46 +.28 Patterson .48 28.14 -.29 ... 8.60 -.02 Vivus .20 19.54 -1.82 PattUTI Vodafone 1.45e 25.14 -.75 Paychex 1.24 26.38 -.78 PeopUtdF .63 11.58 -.59 WarnerCh ... 15.57 -.60 WashFed .24 13.75 -.57 PerfectWld ... d13.28 -.13 ... d30.00 ... .28 95.89 -1.40 WebMD Perrigo PharmPdt .60 26.37 -.58 WstptInn g ... 30.68 -1.52 ... 4.52 -.27 Popular ... d1.47 -.15 WetSeal Power-One ... d5.48 -.36 WholeFd .40 70.05 -1.95 PwShs QQQ.41e 55.38 -.98 Windstrm 1.00 12.52 -.33 ... 1.46 -.04 Winn-Dixie ... 6.41 -.30 Powrwav ... u18.00 -.01 PriceTR 1.24 48.83 -2.48 WrightM 2.00 147.21 -6.00 priceline ... 531.27 -5.97 Wynn .76 29.24 -.79 PrivateB .04 7.81 -.29 Xilinx ... .07 -.00 PrUPShQQQ ... 23.06 +1.15 YRC rsh ... 13.96 -.40 ProspctCap1.22f 8.45 -.20 Yahoo QIAGEN ... 13.93 -.22 Yandex n ... 27.96 -.65 ... 12.03 -.12 QlikTech ... 23.45 +1.13 Zagg Qlogic ... 13.52 -.30 ZionBcp .04 15.36 -1.02

AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE

Name

Fidelity Advisor A: B&C: GovtInc 10.88 +.03 Fidelity Spartan: AssetStA p23.06 -.47 Lord Abbett F: GlobA p 53.57-1.36 NwInsgh p 19.28 -.44 GroCo n 82.91-1.67 ExtMkIn n 33.40-1.16 GlBdC p 12.93 -.21 AssetStrI r 23.28 -.48 ShtDurInco 4.54 ... GblStrIncA 4.13 -.02 StrInA 12.42 -.03 GroInc n 16.73 -.49 500IdxInv n41.48MFS Funds A: GE Elfun S&S: JPMorgan A Class: Gold p 48.73-1.25 1.26 S&S PM 36.87-1.05 CoreBd A 11.93 +.02 TotRA 13.44 -.24 IntBdA p 6.42 -.07 Fidelity Advisor I: GrowthCoK82.95IntlInxInv n29.82 -.78 GMO Trust III: ValueA 20.64 -.62 MnStFdA 30.08 -.88 NwInsgtI n 19.49 -.45 1.67 JPMorgan Sel Cls: Quality 20.53 -.39 CoreBd n 11.92 +.02 MFS Funds I: HighInc r n 8.57 -.02 TotMktInv n33.81Fidelity Freedom: Oppenheimer Roch: GMO Trust IV: HighYld n 7.75 -.01 ValueI 20.74 -.63 RoMu A p 15.88 +.11 FF2010 n 13.21 -.17 Indepn n 21.85 -.77 1.05 IntlIntrVl 18.62 -.46 IntmTFBd n11.19 ... MainStay Funds A: FF2015 n 11.02 -.14 IntBd n 10.92 ... Fidelity Spart Adv: RcNtMuA 6.93 +.02 ShtDurBd n11.02 -.01 HiYldBA 5.77 ... Oppenheimer Y: GMO Trust VI: FF2015K 12.23 -.16 IntmMu n 10.37 ... 500IdxAdv n41.48Manning&Napier Fds: DevMktY 30.00 -.77 EmgMkts r 11.45 -.32 USLCCrPls n18.70FF2020 n 13.23 -.20 IntlDisc n 27.87 -.79 1.26 WldOppA 7.15 -.20 IntlBdY Quality 20.54 -.39 .60 FF2020K 12.51 -.19 InvGrBd n 11.95 +.03 TotMktAd r n33.816.42 -.06 Matthews Asian: Janus T Shrs: Goldman Sachs A: FF2025 n 10.87 -.20 InvGB n 7.74 +.02 1.06 PIMCO Admin PIMS: MdCVA p 31.28-1.06 BalancdT 24.02 -.39 PacTgrInv 21.12 -.35 TotRtAd 10.94 -.03 FF2025K 12.49 -.22 LgCapVal 9.90 -.34 First Eagle: 44.91 -.75 Goldman Sachs Inst: OvrseasT r35.57-1.18 MergerFd n 15.69 -.03 PIMCO Instl PIMS: FF2030 n 12.91 -.24 LatAm 48.20-1.85 GlblA OverseasA21.59 -.19 HiYield FF2030K 12.58 -.24 LevCoStk n23.576.86 -.01 PrkMCVal T20.61 -.63 Metro West Fds: AlAsetAut r10.49 -.08 Forum Funds: MidCapV 31.59-1.07 Twenty T 59.13-1.51 TotRetBd 10.55 +.02 AllAsset 11.87 -.10 FF2035 n 10.57 -.23 1.06 John Hancock Cl 1: FF2040 n 7.37 -.16 LowP r n 33.62 -.84 AbsStrI r 11.06 +.01 Harbor Funds: TotRtBdI 10.55 +.02 ComodRR 8.24 -.08 FF2040K 12.56 -.28 LowPriK r 33.60 -.84 Frank/Temp Frnk A: 12.29 -.04 LSAggr 11.00 -.30 MorganStanley Inst: Bond DivInc 11.27 -.03 Magelln n 61.95-1.88 CalTFA p 7.03 +.02 CapApInst 36.79 -.85 LSBalanc 12.13 -.21 IntlEqI 11.90 -.38 EmgMkCur10.13 -.17 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.45 -.36 MidCap n 25.57 -.79 FedTFA p 12.05 +.02 IntlInv t 50.42-1.41 LSGrwth 11.75 -.28 MCapGrI 35.86 -.93 EmMkBd 11.16 -.05 Instl: Lazard FoundAl p 9.50 -.19 Intl r 51.01-1.43 AMgr50 n 14.80 -.19 MuniInc n 12.90 +.02 Mutual Series: 8.27 -.04 EmgMktI 18.04 -.56 GblDiscA 25.84 -.47 FltInc r AMgr20 r n12.79 -.05 NwMkt r n 15.78 -.06 GrwthA p 41.76-1.25 Hartford Fds A: 8.87 ... HiYld Balanc n 17.77 -.33 OTC n 54.74-1.03 HYTFA px 10.16 +.02 CpAppA p 28.25 -.88 Lazard Open: GlbDiscZ 26.21 -.48 InvGrCp 10.66 +.02 EmgMkO p18.40 -.57 QuestZ 16.06 -.24 BalancedK17.77 -.33 100Index 8.24 -.23 IncomA p 2.04 -.02 Hartford Fds Y: 10.36 -.03 LowDu Puritn n 17.32 -.28 NYTFA p 11.75 +.02 CapAppI n 28.31 -.88 Legg Mason A: SharesZ 18.79 -.43 BlueChGr n42.22PuritanK 17.32 -.28 RisDvA p 31.76 -.81 Hartford HLS IA : WAMgMu p16.01 +.04 Neuberger&Berm Inv: RealRet 12.95 +.06 1.13 12.17 +.01 RealRtnI GenesInst 44.28-1.34 Canada n 52.17-1.60 RealE n 24.76-1.35 StratInc p 10.19 -.03 CapApp 35.88-1.13 Longleaf Partners: ShortT 9.80 -.01 CapAp n 23.73 -.76 SCmdtyStrt n9.77 -.12 USGovA p 6.95 ... Div&Gr 17.88 -.56 Partners 25.95 -.82 Neuberger&Berm Tr: 10.94 -.03 CpInc r n 8.81 -.07 SrsIntGrw 9.84 -.25 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: TotRetBd 11.57 +.04 Loomis Sayles: Genesis 45.81-1.39 TotRt TR II 10.60 ... LSBondI 14.21 -.08 Northern Funds: Contra n 65.71-1.52 SrsIntVal 8.09 -.21 GlbBdAdv n12.86 -.21 Hussman Funds: 9.60 -.02 ContraK 65.73-1.53 SrInvGrdF 11.95 +.03 IncmeAd 2.02 -.03 StrGrowth 12.88 +.16 StrInc C 14.64 -.13 HiYFxInc 6.98 ... TRIII LSBondR 14.16 -.08 MMIntEq r 8.61 ... PIMCO Funds A: DisEq n 20.22 -.69 StIntMu n 10.81 ... Frank/Temp Frnk C: IVA Funds: LwDurA 10.36 -.03 DivIntl n 25.91 -.68 STBF n 8.51 -.02 IncomC t 2.06 -.02 Wldwide I r15.96 -.26 StrIncA 14.56 -.13 Oakmark Funds I: Loomis Sayles Inv: DivrsIntK r 25.92 -.67 SmllCpS r n15.49 -.65 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: Invesco Funds A: EqtyInc r 26.17 -.59 RealRtA p 12.17 +.01 DivGth n 24.55 -.82 StratInc n 11.11 -.03 SharesA 18.61 -.42 Chart p 15.31 -.42 InvGrBdY 12.37 -.02 Intl I r 15.70 -.31 TotRtA 10.94 -.03 Oakmark 38.82-1.03 PIMCO Funds C: EmrMk n 21.46 -.59 StrReRt r 9.56 -.08 Frank/Temp Temp A: CmstkA 14.05 -.47 Lord Abbett A: TotRtC t 10.94 -.03 Eq Inc n 38.02-1.35 TotalBd n 11.11 +.02 ForgnA p 5.92 -.09 EqIncA 9.69 -.36 Old Westbury Fds: 7.89 -.17 AffilA p EQII n 15.66 -.57 USBI n 11.86 +.03 GlBd A p 12.90 -.21 GrIncA p 17.12 -.54 BdDebA p 7.55 -.02 GlobOpp 7.16 -.08 PIMCO Funds D: Fidel n 30.47 -.87 Value n 58.92-2.19 GrwthA p 15.63 -.37 HYMuA 9.32 +.02 ShDurIncA p4.54 -.01 GlbSMdCap13.42-.36 TRtn p 10.94 -.03 PIMCO Funds P: WorldA p 13.27 -.32 Ivy Funds: FltRateHi r n9.53 ... Fidelity Selects: Lord Abbett C: Oppenheimer A: GNMA n 11.93 +.01 Gold r n 52.80-1.21 Frank/Temp Tmp AssetSC t 22.29 -.46 ShDurIncC t4.57 ... DvMktA p 30.27 -.77 TotRtnP 10.94 -.03

May 12 96.10 96.35 96.10 96.35 Jun 12 98.60 99.05 98.55 98.97 Jul 12 97.60 98.00 97.45 98.00 Aug 12 96.50 96.65 96.40 96.45 Oct 12 86.45 86.60 86.30 86.60 Dec 12 82.60 82.90 82.60 82.60 Feb 13 84.10 84.10 84.10 84.10 Last spot N/A Est. sales 10016. Tue’s Sales: 44,231 Tue’s open int: 246474, up +1727

Div Last Chg CrosstexE .40f 14.24 ... Ctrip.com ... d34.27 -1.71 A-B-C CubistPh ... 34.99 -.31 ... 2.89 -.09 ASML Hld .58e 35.76 +.12 CumMed .36 16.99 -.02 CypSemi ATP O&G ... 10.16 -.54 ... 1.15 -.05 AVI Bio D-E-F ... d3.94 -.18 Accuray ... 14.69 -.19 ... 47.00 +.08 Dell Inc AcmePkt ActivsBliz .17f 11.91 -.17 DemandTc ... 5.61 -.28 ... 10.96 -.09 ... 24.89 +.25 Dndreon AdobeSy Adtran .36 29.58 -1.16 Dentsply .20 32.25 -1.37 AdvATech ... 4.09 -.01 Depomed ... 5.97 -.01 Affymetrix ... 4.91 -.44 DiamondF .18 u91.91 -.56 ... 21.60 -.16 ... 21.36 -.47 DigRiver AkamaiT ... 8.98 -.24 DirecTV A ... 41.61 -2.00 Akorn AllosThera ... 1.83 +.19 DiscCm A ... 39.93 +.19 AllscriptH ... 18.50 -.46 DiscCm C ... 37.94 -.01 AlteraCp lf .32f 36.46 -.93 DishNetwk ... 26.27 -.96 Amarin ... 10.90 +.10 DonlleyRR 1.04 14.10 -.60 ... 231.87 -1.38 DrmWksA ... 18.82 -.49 Amazon ACapAgy 5.60e 27.12 -.54 DryShips .12t 2.92 -.24 ... 28.30 +.32 AmCapLtd ... 8.06 -.53 Dunkin n ... 10.25 -.45 AmSupr ... d4.75 -.27 E-Trade ... 32.24 -.49 Amgen 1.12 56.04 -1.33 eBay AmkorT lf ... 4.63 -.07 ErthLink .20 6.87 -.25 ... 10.34 -.19 EstWstBcp .20 14.84 -1.12 Amylin ... 21.95 -.96 Ancestry ... 26.67 -1.42 ElectArts A123 Sys ... 3.94 -.25 EndoPhrm ... d28.12 -.80 ApolloGrp ... 43.46 -1.72 Ener1 hlf ... d.17 -.03 ApolloInv 1.12 7.51 -.38 EngyConv ... .96 +.16 ... 22.89 -1.08 Apple Inc ... 412.14 -1.31 EngyXXI ... 7.00 -.36 ApldMatl .32 10.85 -.28 Entegris EntropCom ... 4.24 -.27 ... 5.61 +.02 AMCC ... 94.38 -.35 ArenaPhm ... 1.52 +.08 Equinix .37e 10.09 -.31 EricsnTel AresCap 1.40 13.51 -.48 ... 6.03 -.41 ... 9.97 -.27 Exelixis AriadP Ariba Inc ... 30.15 -.41 Expedia .28 28.22 -.65 ArmHld .15e 28.26 -.41 ExpdIntl .50f 42.18 -1.32 ... 10.48 -.48 F5 Netwks ... 76.68 -1.49 Arris ArubaNet ... 19.81 -.80 FLIR Sys .24 26.31 -.82 AscenaRtl ... 25.23 -1.25 FifthThird .32f 9.77 -.61 AsiaInfoL ... d7.92 -.40 FinclEngin ... 18.88 -1.06 ... 20.19 -1.70 AspenTech ... 16.82 -.22 Finisar .20 18.81 -.63 AsscdBanc .04 d9.08 -.65 FinLine .04 d7.51 -.48 FMidBc athenahlth ... 65.88 -2.43 ... d37.65 -5.79 FstNiagara .64 9.75 -.44 AtlasAir ... d73.52 -5.69 ... 9.71 -.37 FstSolar Atmel Autodesk ... 28.56 +.45 FstMerit .64 d10.62 -.75 ... 51.50 -2.03 AutoData 1.44 49.12 -1.60 Fiserv ... 5.76 -.11 Auxilium ... 14.99 -.86 Flextrn AvagoTch .44f 35.98 -.34 FocusMda ... 30.43 -1.08 AvanirPhm ... 2.86 -.02 Fossil Inc ... 97.69 +.61 AvisBudg ... 11.13 -.78 FosterWhl ... d19.92 -1.47 ... 1.08 -.03 ... 1.26 -.02 FuelCell Axcelis ... 32.63 -.86 FultonFncl .20f d7.69 -.54 BE Aero BGC Ptrs .68 6.24 -.16 G-H-I BMC Sft ... 40.86 -.45 BedBath ... 57.48 -1.46 GT AdvTc ... 8.06 -.32 BiogenIdc ... 96.96 -3.30 Gentiva h ... d5.63 -.35 ... d2.29 -.11 BioSante ... 2.60 -.13 GeronCp Blkboard ... 44.31 ... GileadSci ... 39.67 -1.17 BlueCoat ... 15.39 +.07 GlacierBc .52 d9.42 -.58 ... 7.86 +.01 BostPrv .04 5.70 -.50 GloblInd ... 28.31 -.68 GlbSpcMet .20f 15.65 +.40 BrigExp GluMobile ... 3.01 -.04 Broadcom .36 35.25 -.56 BrcdeCm ... 4.13 -.03 GolarLNG 1.10f 34.71 -.82 ... 539.20 -7.43 CA Inc .20 20.78 -.39 Google CBOE .48f 26.38 -.71 GrifolsSA n ... 6.10 -.13 ... 2.82 -.13 CH Robins 1.16 66.46 -2.68 GulfRes CVB Fncl .34 7.68 -.37 GulfportE ... 26.35 -1.25 ... 34.18 +1.03 Cadence ... 9.51 -.06 HSN Inc CaliperLSc ... 10.43 -.01 HancHld .96 26.68 -1.34 ... .85 -.05 HanmiFncl CdnSolar ... 4.48 +.16 CapFdF rs .30a 10.50 -.31 HansenMed ... 3.72 -.46 HansenNat ... u91.01 -.95 CpstnTrb h ... 1.07 -.04 Carrizo ... 25.74 -1.54 HanwhaSol ... d2.53 -.24 ... 33.27 -.63 HarbinElec ... 20.76 -.05 Cavium Celgene ... 63.80 -1.76 Harmonic ... 4.40 -.16 CentEuro ... 6.42 -.44 Hasbro 1.20 34.62 -.73 CentAl ... 9.86 -.71 HrtlndEx .08 13.45 -.49 ... 81.05 ... HercOffsh ... 3.63 -.30 Cephln ... 15.71 -.57 ChrmSh ... 2.77 -.13 Hologic ... 56.36 -.35 HotTopic .28 7.85 +.09 ChkPoint Cheesecake ... 25.58 -.67 HudsCity .32 5.46 -.48 CienaCorp ... 12.04 -.71 HumGen ... 14.58 +1.58 CinnFin 1.61f 25.91 -1.41 HuntJB .52 35.98 -1.99 .49f 29.61 -1.22 HuntBnk .16f 4.66 -.37 Cintas ... 41.25 -.91 ... 15.96 +.26 IAC Inter Cirrus Cisco .24 15.84 -.69 iSh ACWI 1.02e 40.51 -1.20 Illumina ... d41.67 -3.31 ... 55.00 +.16 CitrixSys CleanEngy ... 11.96 -.40 ImpaxLabs ... 20.91 -.14 ... 13.80 -.45 Clearwire ... 2.32 -.14 Incyte ... 7.83 -.37 CognizTech ... 62.85 -1.16 Infinera ... 40.82 +.74 Coinstar ... 42.66 -2.53 Informat 1.35e 49.00 -.95 Infosys ColdwtrCrk ... 1.23 -.17 ... 5.66 -.18 Comcast .45 21.86 -.86 IntgDv .84f 21.94 -.26 Intel Comc spcl .45 21.61 -.79 .40 58.36 -1.04 CommVlt ... 36.90 +.54 InterDig Compuwre ... 7.88 -.31 Intrface .08 11.76 -.75 ConcurTch ... 37.33 -1.17 InterMune ... 22.22 -1.78 .48 10.92 -.22 Copart ... 37.65 -2.18 Intersil .60 47.69 -1.25 CorinthC ... 1.81 -.09 Intuit Costco .96 84.43 -.64 J-K-L ... 31.84 -.99 Cree Inc Crocs ... 26.93 -.99 j2Global .80 29.93 -.32 Name

Div Last Chg DejourE g ... DenisnM g ... 7.38 -.07 EV LtdDur 1.25 1.02 -.09 EVMuniBd .92 8.58 -.35 eMagin ... 43.24 -1.87 EvolPetrol ... 3.33 -.12 ExeterR gs ... .09 -.02 FrkStPrp .76 2.25 -.05 GabGldNR 1.68 6.95 -.09 GascoEngy ... 3.22 -.23 Gastar grs ... 1.02 +.01 GenMoly ... 4.85 -.13 GoldResrc .60f 45.58 -.84 GoldenMin ... 21.51 -.33 GoldStr g ... 1.64 -.03 GranTrra g ... 86.00 -2.90 GrtBasG g ... .72 -.04 GtPanSilv g ... .17 ... Hemisphrx ... .39 ... HstnAEn .02a 25.18 -.20 ImpOil gs .44 6.44 -.50 IntTower g ... 1.12 -.10 KeeganR g ... 2.08 -.14 KimberR g ... 2.23 +.05 LadThalFn ... 55.65 -1.35 LongweiPI ...

AbdAsPac .42 Adventrx ... AlexcoR g ... AlldNevG ... AlmadnM g ... AmDefense ... AntaresP ... Aurizon g ... AvalRare n ... BMB Munai ... Banro g ... BarcUBS36 ... BarcGSOil ... Brigus grs ... BritATob 3.86e CAMAC En ... ... CanoPet ... CelSci CFCda g .01 CheniereEn ... ChiGengM ... ChinaShen ... ClaudeR g ... Contango ...

Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n 24.59 -.58 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.14 -.52 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 36.23-1.26 Price Funds: BlChip n 37.67 -.99 CapApp n 19.44 -.38 EmMktS n 28.86 -.88 EqInc n 21.25 -.68 EqIndex n 31.56 -.96 Growth n 31.02 -.78 HiYield n 6.41 -.01 IntlBond n 10.16 -.08 Intl G&I 11.24 -.31 IntlStk n 12.21 -.36 MidCap n 54.93-1.20 MCapVal n21.27 -.65 N Asia n 16.82 -.40 New Era n 43.79-1.90 N Horiz n 32.58 -.81 9.75 +.03 N Inc n OverS SF r n7.15 -.21 R2010 n 14.86 -.25 R2015 n 11.38 -.22 R2020 n 15.56 -.33 R2025 n 11.28 -.27 R2030 n 16.04 -.41 R2035 n 11.28 -.30 R2040 n 16.01 -.44 ShtBd n 4.84 ... SmCpStk n30.41-1.09 SmCapVal n31.601.16 SpecIn n 12.22 -.05 Value n 20.94 -.71 Principal Inv: LT2020In 11.08 -.23 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 11.64 -.43

Oct 12 2.5705 Nov 12 2.5475 Dec 12 2.5509 2.5750 2.5407 2.5407 Jan 13 2.5417 Feb 13 2.5507 Mar 13 2.5602 Apr 13 2.6672 May 13 2.6737 Jun 13 2.6617 Jul 13 2.6427 Aug 13 2.6237 Last spot N/A Est. sales 130457. Tue’s Sales: 101,390 Tue’s open int: 276096, off -1589 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Oct 11 3.736 3.799 3.710 3.730 Nov 11 3.824 3.886 3.796 3.820 Dec 11 4.103 4.146 4.078 4.099 Jan 12 4.256 4.291 4.233 4.252 Feb 12 4.271 4.309 4.255 4.268 Mar 12 4.250 4.281 4.220 4.238 Apr 12 4.231 4.251 4.214 4.227 May 12 4.271 4.280 4.249 4.262 Jun 12 4.312 4.344 4.295 4.305 Jul 12 4.358 4.366 4.340 4.351 Aug 12 4.384 4.391 4.368 4.376 Sep 12 4.388 4.393 4.369 4.379 Oct 12 4.421 4.428 4.397 4.413 Nov 12 4.578 4.588 4.569 4.576 Dec 12 4.857 4.857 4.830 4.844 Jan 13 4.994 4.996 4.960 4.984 Feb 13 4.966 4.970 4.952 4.959 Mar 13 4.904 4.904 4.894 4.894 Apr 13 4.764 4.764 4.747 4.754 May 13 4.780 4.780 4.772 4.772 Jun 13 4.800 4.806 4.800 4.802 Jul 13 4.843 Aug 13 4.861 4.863 4.861 4.863 Sep 13 4.870 Oct 13 4.880 4.896 4.880 4.896 Nov 13 5.026 Dec 13 5.258 5.260 5.256 5.256 Jan 14 5.380 5.381 5.375 5.381 Last spot N/A Est. sales 332228. Tue’s Sales: 235,942 Tue’s open int: 953117, off -1579

VoyA p 18.88 -.64 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.22 -.35 PremierI r 18.89 -.62 TotRetI r 11.68 -.39 Russell Funds S: StratBd 11.08 +.02 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 34.77-1.06 S&P Sel 18.42 -.55 Scout Funds: Intl 27.22 -.64 Selected Funds: AmShD 36.85-1.06 Sequoia n 132.18-3.20 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 9.97 +.01 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 17.04 -.28 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 41.82-1.42 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 23.95 -.42 IncBuildC p17.48 -.25 IntValue I 24.49 -.43 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 21.61 -.19 USAA Group: 13.20 +.03 Inco VALIC : 23.29 -.71 StkIdx Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml n 20.92 -.36 CAITAdm n11.23 +.01 CpOpAdl n67.67-1.82 EMAdmr r n32.46 -.99 Energy n 109.88-4.45 ExplAdml n61.37-1.98 ExtdAdm n36.59-1.30 500Adml n108.003.26

-.0220 -.0193 -.0189 -.0189 -.0184 -.0179 -.0169 -.0169 -.0169 -.0169 -.0169

-.068 -.065 -.043 -.034 -.035 -.037 -.029 -.025 -.023 -.022 -.022 -.022 -.020 -.019 -.009 -.007 -.007 -.006 -.003 -.002 -.002 -.002 -.001

+.005 +.010 +.010

.29 +.00 d1.36 -.06 15.01 -.06 12.14 -.05 2.76 -.18 7.01 -.11 4.92 -.05 11.60 -.50 16.28 -.21 .23 -.01 3.95 -.33 3.14 -.07 21.60 -.63 11.86 -.27 2.18 -.10 5.57 -.30 2.12 -.12 3.29 -.08 .36 -.01 15.47 -1.04 37.10 -.80 6.92 -.45 8.55 -.58 1.71 +.08 1.52 -.17 1.08 +.01

MadCatz g ... .69 Metalico ... 3.85 MetroHlth ... 4.50 MdwGold g ... 2.77 Minefnd g ... u17.80 NeoStem ... .60 Neoprobe ... 2.86 NBRESec .24 3.60 Nevsun g .06 6.50 NewEnSys ... 2.28 NwGold g ... 13.56 NA Pall g ... 3.14 NDynMn g ... d7.34 NthnO&G ... 21.67 NthgtM g ... 3.71 NovaGld g ... d7.80 Oilsands g ... .21 ParaG&S ... 2.94 PhrmAth ... 2.26 PionDrill ... 9.59 PolyMet g ... 1.39 ... 4.69 Protalix ... 4.06 Quepasa QuestRM g ... d3.20 RareEle g ... 6.69 ... .87 Rentech

GNMA Ad n11.21 +.02 GrwAdm n 30.30 -.82 HlthCr n 53.94-1.25 HiYldCp n 5.61 +.01 InfProAd n 28.03 +.06 ITBdAdml n11.95 +.02 ITsryAdml n12.18 +.01 IntGrAdm n52.69-1.42 ITAdml n 13.87 +.01 ITGrAdm n10.16 +.01 LtdTrAd n 11.16 ... LTGrAdml n10.41 +.21 LT Adml n 11.21 +.02 MCpAdml n84.432.72 MuHYAdm n10.59+.02 PrmCap r n62.77-1.65 ReitAdm r n75.034.12 STsyAdml n10.86 -.01 STBdAdml n10.69-.02 ShtTrAd n 15.94 ... STFdAd n 10.96 ... STIGrAd n 10.70 -.01 SmCAdm n30.52-1.17 TxMCap r n58.531.80 TtlBAdml n11.08 +.04 TStkAdm n29.17 -.91 WellslAdm n53.85-.35 WelltnAdm n51.52-.95 Windsor n 39.98-1.30 WdsrIIAd n41.81-1.30 Vanguard Fds: AssetA n 22.91 -.59 DivdGro n 14.06 -.38 Energy n 58.50-2.37 Explr n 65.87-2.13 GNMA n 11.21 +.02 GlobEq n 15.72 -.44 HYCorp n 5.61 +.01

-.02 -.07 -.08 -.09 -.65 -.04 -.06 -.18 -.30 +.14 -.17 -.18 -.56 +.48 -.17 -.38 -.01 -.05 -.03 -.92 -.06 -.02 -.15 -.22 -.44 -.04

Richmnt g ... 13.09 ... Rubicon g ... 4.34 -.11 SamsO&G ... 2.61 -.05 SeabGld g ... 26.08 -.67 TanzRy g ... 5.57 -.06 Taseko ... d3.02 -.19 TrnsatlPet ... 1.07 +.05 ... .19 -.01 TriValley TriangPet ... 4.65 -.28 Ur-Energy ... 1.05 -.06 Uranerz ... 1.62 -.18 UraniumEn ... 3.01 -.09 VangTotW .92e 42.01 -1.33 VantageDrl ... 1.32 +.01 ... 18.41 -.58 VirnetX VistaGold ... 3.89 +.04 VoyagerOG ... 2.23 +.06 WalterInv .22e 23.02 -1.42 WFAdvInco1.02 9.53 +.03 WT Drf Bz3.24e d24.78 -.90 WizzardSft ... .18 +.00 XPO Log rs ... 8.93 -.47 YM Bio g ... 1.79 -.15 ZBB Engy ... .73 -.02

HlthCre n 127.80-2.95 InflaPro n 14.27 +.03 IntlGr n 16.55 -.45 IntlVal n 26.58 -.73 ITIGrade n 10.16 +.01 LifeCon n 15.96 -.19 LifeGro n 20.35 -.51 LifeMod n 18.68 -.33 LTIGrade n10.41 +.21 Morg n 16.97 -.47 MuInt n 13.87 +.01 MuLtd n 11.16 ... PrecMtls r n24.69 -.94 PrmcpCor n12.77 -.35 Prmcp r n 60.46-1.59 SelValu r n17.28 -.61 STAR n 18.29 -.27 STIGrade n10.70 -.01 StratEq n 17.08 -.67 TgtRetInc n11.44 -.07 TgRe2010 n22.30-.26 TgtRe2015 n12.14.18 TgRe2020 n21.28-.38 TgtRe2025 n11.99.24 TgRe2030 n20.33-.47 TgtRe2035 n12.11.31 TgtRe2040 n19.81.52 TgtRe2045 n12.45.32 Wellsly n 22.22 -.15 Welltn n 29.82 -.56 Wndsr n 11.85 -.38 WndsII n 23.56 -.72 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r n22.22.60 TotIntlInst r n88.89-

2.42 TotIntlIP r n88.91-2.42 500 n 107.96-3.27 Growth n 30.29 -.82 MidCap n 18.58 -.60 SmCap n 30.46-1.17 SmlCpGth n19.73 -.70 SmlCpVl n 13.65 -.57 STBnd n 10.69 -.02 TotBnd n 11.08 +.04 TotlIntl n 13.28 -.36 TotStk n 29.16 -.90 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n 20.92 -.36 DevMkInst n8.47 -.23 ExtIn n 36.59-1.30 FTAllWldI r n78.972.21 GrwthIst n 30.30 -.82 InfProInst n11.42 +.03 InstIdx n 107.26-3.25 InsPl n 107.27-3.25 InsTStPlus n26.39-.82 MidCpIst n 18.65 -.60 SCInst n 30.52-1.17 TBIst n 11.08 +.04 TSInst n 29.18 -.90 ValueIst n 18.77 -.63 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl n 89.21-2.70 MidCpIdx n26.64 -.86 STBdIdx n 10.69 -.02 TotBdSgl n11.08 +.04 TotStkSgl n28.16 -.87 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.13 +.04 Yacktman Funds: Fund p n 16.59 -.37 Focused n 17.77 -.39

METALS NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Wed. Aluminum -$1.0448 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.8086 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $3.7535 N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Lead - $2328.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9470 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1793.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1805.50 troy oz., NY Merc spot Tue. Silver - $40.410 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $40.420 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Platinum -$1780.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1788.20 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised


CLASSIFIEDS/ENTERTAINMENT

Roswell Daily Record The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19)     Your ability to identify with a close friend or loved one could determine the quality of the interaction. You also gain even more insight because of your willingness to read between the lines. Be willing to work with the situation. Tonight: Your fiery spirit returns. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  Stay on top of communication, even if you are taken aback by what you hear. Take your time digesting information until you gain clarity as to what you really have heard. Others seek you out and prove to be full of information. Tonight: Tap into your creativity. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE     Remain sensitive to the costs of a situation or decision. Others appreciate your awareness of the stress they might be under. Be willing to head out alone. A friend exhibits a lot of unpredictability. Tonight: Balance your checkbook. CANCER (June 21-July 22)      You have a style and way of handling issues that allows others to feel comfortable and open. A boss or authority figure acts in a way that might cause you to wonder how well you know him or her! Tonight: Ready to go.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)   Take your time before jumping to a conclusion. A personal matter or an issue in general could have your mind working overtime and might be impacting your decisions and actions right now. Slow down; get feedback. Unexpected news heads your way. Tonight: Nap, then decide. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)     Key into a meeting. Your priorities become clear vis-a-vis the priorities of others. New information comes through a partner, whether in words or in action. Yes, your plate is full. Tonight: Make weekend plans that suit you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)  Take a stand and understand that others might be reactive. You will see their reactions. You can choose not to react so that the focus is on their responses and

Thursday, September 22, 2011

how they might be inappropriate. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)      Reach out for more information. You might not like your knee-jerk reaction, so stop and find out more. Your ability to do that is based on your ability to detach. Take a walk — a change of scenery works. Tonight: Working late. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)      Continue making time for a key person in your life. An unexpected development involving a child or new friendship could force you to stop and think. Remember, people change and are multifaceted. Tonight: Wherever you are, make sure there is music around you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  A boss, parent or another authority figure cannot help but be unpredictable. Listen to what

B5

is revealed, but choose not to react. Take an overview of a conversation. Understand what is happening. Tonight: Make time for a special person. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)     Stay mellow and direct. Others could be unpredictable or could see you as unpredictable. Run your errands, clear out paperwork and start thinking “weekend.” You’ll need a break if you continue to dive into work. Tonight: Retur n calls; make plans. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)     Tap into your creativity, but say “no” to a risk. Even if you can survive the loss if it doesn’t work, is this effort really worth it? Buy a lottery ticket, but keep financial risking to little to nothing. Tonight: Get a good night’s sleep.

Paramount plans $700M revamp of Hollywood lot LOS ANGELES (AP) — Viacom Inc.’s Paramount Pictures movie studio plans to apply to the city of Los Angeles this week for approval of a 25-year, $700 million plan to refurbish the lot in Hollywood it has occupied since 1926. The approval process could take about two years. “For nearly 100 years, Paramount Pictures has made movies that are loved around the world,” CEO Brad Grey said in a statement. “To continue to do that successfully, it is critical that we give our talent and staff the tools and technology they need to remain innovative in our approach to filmmaking.” Paramount is the last major studio still located in the Hollywood district of Los Angeles — others are scattered throughout the area from Culver City to Burbank. It plans to gradually revamp its 62-acre lot by tearing down some build-

ings and constructing new ones, turning surface parking lots into structures and expanding sound-stage space to 383,100 square feet from 362,100 square feet. The aim is to make the cramped lot more efficient, create better traffic flows, allow production offices to be closer to sound stages and make it easier for wardrobe trucks and dressing room trailers to get in and out. Part of the problem with the current lot was that Paramount never fully integrated the former RKO Studios’ Gower lot in the western portion after buying that studio in 1967. So trailers are jammed into small spaces and sometimes must be parked far from the set where their occupants are working. Paramount said the project will create 7,300 jobs and generate $1.1 billion in economic output during construction.

AP Photo

This artist rendition released Wednesday by Paramount Pictures shows the Viacom Inc. Paramount Pictures future sound stage. The movie studio will apply to the city of Los Angeles this week for approval of a 25-year, $700 million plan to refurbish the lot in Hollywood it has occupied since 1926.

Jane Lynch not sure she wants to host Emmys again NEW YORK (AP) — Just days after hosting her first Emmy Awards, actress Jane Lynch says she’s not sure she’d do it again. Lynch said in an interview Wednesday that if she had to decide now, her answer would be no. But she says she had a great time and hadn’t felt “that creative and alive in a long time.” Her Emmy per for mance Sunday received mixed reviews.

The actress is promoting her new memoir, “Happy Accidents,” and “Glee.” Lynch plays glee-club-hating cheerleading coach Sue Sylvester on the hit Fox series, which premiered its third season Tuesday. Lynch says she’s looking forward to spending time with her family now that the Emmys are over. She married Lara Embry last year and is stepmother to Embry’s 9-year-old daughter, Haden.

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish Sept. 22, 29, Oct. 6, 2011

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

No. D-504-CV-201100581

CITIFINANCIAL, INC.,

For Results You Can Measure

Legals

---------------------------------Publish September 15, 22, 2011

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN RE: OF

THE PETITION

Kendra Renee Baum for Jack Devon Hagelstein TO CHANGE HIS NAME TO Devon Isaiah Baum

Case No. CV-2011-687 NOTICE

Kendra Renee Baum for Jack Devon Hagelstein who are residents of Chaves County, his filed a petition in the District Court to change his name to Devon Isaiah Baum. The application will be heard on the 7th day of November, 2011 at 9:00 am, at the Chaves County Courthouse in front of Charles C. Currier.

Try The Classifieds!

/s/Kendra Renee Baum Kendra Renee Baum (Mother) pro se Jack Devon Hagelstein (Minor Child) 6116 1/2 Old Clovis Hwy Roswell, NM 88201 /s/Katie Espinoza Deputy Clerk /s/Katie Espinoza

v.

Plaintiff,

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS AND ROBERT SCOTT JARRETT, Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SUIT STATE OF NEW MEXICO to the above-named Defendant(s) Robert Scott Jarrett. GREETINGS: You are hereby notified that the above-named Plaintiff has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled Court and cause, the general object thereof being to foreclose a mortgage on property located at 1408 Meadow Lane, Roswell, NM 88203, Chaves County, New Mexico, said property being more particularly described as: Lot 9 in Block 3 of Western Meadows Addition No. 2, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat recorded March 7, 1961 in Plat Book C, Page 144, Plat Records of Chaves County, New Mexico.

Unless you serve a pleading or motion in response to the complaint in said cause on or before 30 days after the last publication date, judgment by default will be entered against you. Respectfully Submitted, CASTLE STAWIARSKI, LLC

By: ________________________ Elizabeth Mason Keya Koul Steven Lucero 20 First Plaza NW, Suite 602 Albuquerque, NM 87102 Telephone: (505) 848-9500 Fax: (505) 848-9516 Attorney for Plaintiff

WITNESS the Honorable FREDDIE J. ROMERO, DISTRICT COURT JUDGE, of the Fifth Judicial District Court, Chaves County, New Mexico, this ___8__ day of ____September___, 2011. Kennon Crowhurst CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT

By: ______Catalina D. Ybana_____ Deputy

NM11-00471_FC01

ROSWELL DAILY RECORD

CALL 622-7710 Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish September 22, 2011

Family Resource & Referral, Inc. announces the sponsorship of the Child and Adult Care Food Program. All children in attendance will be offered the same meals with no physical segregation of, or other discriminatory action against any child because of race, color, age, national origin, sex or disability. If you feel you have been discriminated against write immediately to USDA Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Ave., SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). Children who are members of FDPIR food distribution program in Indian reservation or food stamp households are automatically eligible to receive free meal benefits.

Family Resource & Referral anuncia el patrocino del Programa de comida para Ninos y Adultos. Todos los ninos en atenencia seran ofrecidos las mismas comidas sin segregacion fisica, o de otra accion discriminatoria contra cualquier nino por causa de raza, color, edad origen nacional, sexo o la incapacidad. Si usted siente que han discriminado contra de usted, escriba inmediatamente a UADA, Director, Office of Civil Rights Room 326-W, Whitten Building 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 o llame (202) 720-5964 (voice and TDD). Ninos que son miembros de un programa de distribucion de comida de FDPIR en una reservacion de Indios o lugares que reciben estampas de comida son automaticamente elegibles para recibir beneficios de comer gratamente. -----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish September 22, 29, October 6, 2011

NOTICE is hereby given that on September 13, 2011, Ira Lonnie Hendricks and Gennean D. Hendricks, 1007 Meadow Brook, Roswell, New Mexico, 88201, filed Application No. RA-192 POD3 with the STATE ENGINEER for permit to change location of well by ceasing the diversion of up to 248.4 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, of artesian groundwater from artesian well RA-192-S located in the SW1/4NW1/4SW1/4 of Section 2, Township 11 South, Range 24 East, N.M.P.M.

The applicant proposes to drill a replacement well approximately 400 feet in depth and 13 3/8 inches in diameter at a point in the SW1/4NW1/4SW1/4 of Section 2, Township 11 South, Range 24 East N.M.P.M., to commence the diversion of 248.4 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, of artesian groundwater for the continued irrigation of 82.8 acres described as being part of SW1/4 of Section 2, Township 11 South, Range 24 East, N.M.P.M.

The proposed replacement well will be located within 100 feet of the existing well. The well will be drilled, equipped and put into use pursuant to Section 72-12-22 NMSA. The above described points of diversion and place of use are located southeast of the City of Roswell, Chaves County, New Mexico.

Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (legible, signed, and include the writer’s complete name and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment you must specifically identify your water rights; and/or (2) Public welfare/conservation of water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must show you will be substantially affected The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with John R. D’Antonio, Jr., P.E., State Engineer, 1900 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, within ten (10) days after the date of last publication of this Notice. Facsimile (fax) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is sent within 24-hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protest can be faxed to Office of the State Engineer, (575) 623-8559. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with Sections 72-2-16, 72-5-6, and 72-12-3.

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish September 15, 22, 29, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES JUDICIAL FIFTH

THOMAS J. JORDAN, JR. v.

Plaintiff,

DISTRICT

COURT

No. CV-2011-540

THE ESTATE OF GLEN M. MAYNOR, THE ESTATE OF BARBARA MAYNOR, JASON LOPEZ, ASHLEY DUNLAP, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES OR LEGATEES OF GLEN M. MAYNOR, DECEASED, AND THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES OR LEGATEES OF BARBARA MAYNOR, DECEASED, Defendants.

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES OR LEGATEES OF GLEN M. MAYNOR, DECEASED, AND THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES OR LEGATEES OF BARBARA MAYNOR, DECEASED, GREETINGS:

Plaintiff is rightfully the owner and holder in due course of (a) a Promissory Note (the Note) in the principal amount of $19,500.00 dated January 30, 2003 executed and delivered by Glen M. Maynor to the Roswell National Bank, the Roswell, New Mexico division of Portales National Bank, N.A. (RNB); and (b) a Mortgage (the Mortgage) dated January 30, 2003 executed and delivered by Glen M. Maynor to RNB to secure the repayment of the Note. The Mortgage encumbers the following described property in Chaves County, New Mexico: Lot 18 in Block 4 of Country Club Subdivision, in the City of Roswell, as shown on the official Plat thereof on file in the office of the County Clerk of Chaves County, New Mexico on January 6, 1950 and recorded in Plat Book B of the Plat Records at page 124 (the Subject Property).

The Mortgage was recorded on February 4, 2003 at Book 453, Page 1278 of the Chaves County Clerk’s records. Glen M. Maynor failed to make the payments when due as provided in the Note and failed or refused to cure the default after notice from RNB. The unpaid principal balance on the Note is $5469.62. Accrued interest due on the note as of July 12, 2011 is $222.25. Jordan is entitled to judgment foreclosing the interests of any Defendant hereto in the Subject Property and forever barring that interest, and that of any successors, assigns or heirs. You are directed to serve a pleading or Motion in response to the Complaint on file in this cause within thirty (30) days after publication of this Notice and file the same, all as provided by law. You are notified that, unless you so serve and file a responsive pleading or Motion, the Plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. You may obtain a copy of the Complaint by contacting the attorney for the Plaintiff: Kelly Mack Cassels Sanders, Bruin, Coll & Worley, P.A. Post Office Box 550 Roswell, New Mexico 88202-0550 Ph: 575/622-5440

The general object of this cause is to obtain judgment on the Note and to foreclose on the Mortgage. Once this cause has been prosecuted to its end, the interest of all Defendants will be foreclosed and all Defendants will be barred and forever estopped from having or making any claim to the these interests. DATED this 8th day of September, 2011.

CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT OF CHAVES COUNTY By: Janet Bloomer


B6 Thursday, September 22, 2011

INSTRUCTION

002. Northeast

2307 E. 19th Fri. 7am & Sat. 8am Furniture, household items, women, girls & big men’s clothing, toys, books, odds & ends.

004. Southeast

719 E. Alameda, Wed-Fri, 9-5pm. TVs, books, tables, jewelry & more.

030. Education & Instructions

ALLIED HEALTH career training- Attend college 100% online . Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com

EMPLOYMENT

1616 S. Stanton, Thurs-Fri. Multi family sale. Lots of good stuff, new & used.

045. Employment Opportunities

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice

I RICHARD Marr, of 103 S. Kentucky, Roswell, NM will not be responsible for any debts other than those made by me personally, as of September 1, 2011.

025. Lost and Found

GARAGE SALES

DON’T MISS A SALE BY MISSING THE 2:00 PM DEADLINE FOR PLACING YOUR ADS

LOST DOG Small, white Shichi w/brown ears & brown spot on back. Reward! Any info please call 575-420-2481. LIL’ RED is missing! Old 8N tractor w/box blade attached. Taken from 2003 W. 27th. Father/Son project & greatly missed. Have you seen it? $300 REWARD for the return with no questions asked! Call 575-626-2161.

001. North

1210 N. Main Apt. B Sat. 8am-2pm Moving sale (across from Fairfield Inn)

002. Northeast

4505 VERDE Dr., Friday only, 8am-3pm. Benches, 2 swords, dining table & modern table w/4 chairs, jewelry, lawn furniture, new dishwasher & misc. BIG GARAGE Sale. Trailers, golf cart, telescope, power tools, 78 RPM records, much more. Friday 9/30, Saturday 10/1, 7-5 2106 E. College Blvd.

LOST DOG, Butch. Pitbull mix, cinnamon colored w/some white, 8yrs old, male, 70lbs, lost in vicinity of Monterrey School. Reward. 626-6323

Don’t be fooled by out of state schools. Artesia Training Academy Class A & B CDL training. Call ATA for more information 1-888-586-0144 artesiatraining@pvtn.net CHANGE A Life... Be A Comfort Keeper. We are always looking forward to speaking with experienced caring and compassionate people interested in becoming a Comfort Keeper. We are currently looking for people to provide companionship, housekeeping, meal preparation, grooming and dressing guidance, transportation, and personal care services for our clients. We have positions available in Roswell and Artesia for Daytime and Overnights. Must have a valid drivers license and auto insurance. To learn what becoming a Comfort Keeper is all about, call us at 624-9999 or stop by our office at 1410 South Main to visit with Christina.

$1,OOO REWARD offered for return of briefcase and paperwork contents. Lost in vicinity 1000 block of South Wyoming on Sept. 21st. No questions asked. Call 575-626-6957

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

MAYO MARRS Casing Pulling, Inc. is now hiring Full time Diesel Mechanic. Fax applications to 575-736-1578 or email dgarrett@mayomarrs.net Opening for Office Assistant. Microsoft Office Program a must. Other duties will include ten key, filing, answering phones & other misc. duties. Email resumes to rskippermjg@ qwestoffice.net or Fax to 575-623-3075 Avon, Buy/Sell. Christmas around the corner. $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR WELDER NEEDED. Must be experienced. Apply at Keys Drilling & Pump Service Inc. 1012 E. 2nd . Roswell AUTO BODY Man & Painter needed. Copper Mountain Auto Body, Ruidoso, NM. Must have 15 yrs exp. with I-Car certification. 575-257-8434, 630 Hwy 70, Ruidoso, NM 88345. NOW HIRING temporary help for the Eastern New Mexico State Fair. Duties will include bathroom and grounds maintenance. Call Rick for information between 8:00am and 4:00pm, M-F ONLY. 626-4909 Encompass Home Health is hiring fulltime OT/PT/RN/LPN and a PRN CNA. If you are interested please apply online at www.ehhi.com or contact Caroline Florence at 866-719-3444.

NEW MEXICO Texas Coaches is hiring CDL drivers and a part-time bus washer with a CDL. Please call 575-885-8848. Roswell Daily Record Looking for carrier to deliver free publications in the Artesia, Carlsbad, Lovington, Hobbs area. Free publication is every other week! Call 575-622-7710 ext. 40 Roswell Daily Record Looking for carrier to deliver free publication in the Hondo, Capitan, Carrizozo area. Free publication every other week! Call 575-622-7710 ext. 40 THE U.S. Probation Office is accepting applications for an Administrative Assistant to the Probation Officer in Roswell, NM office. Legal experience strongly preferred. View announcement and application instructions at: http://www.nmcourt.fed.us/ web/PBDOCS/pbindex2.ht ml

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575) 622-7710 #45 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SATURDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

045. Employment Opportunities

Seeking PT Contract Administration position duties include bookkeeping, payroll, answering phones. Preferred computer skills, Quickbooks a plus. Fax resume to 575-622-0620.

AUTO APPRAISERS: NOW LOOKING FOR SOME EXPERIENCED APPRAISERS FOR THE ROSWELL AREA. MUST BE COMPUTER LITERATE AND HAVE AT LEAST 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE. PLEASE FAX RESUMES TO 915-629-4048 OR EMAIL

Roswell Daily Record Looking for carrier to deliver free publications in the Ruidoso Downs, Ruidoso, Tularosa, Alamogordo, Cloudcroft area. Free publications is every other week! Call 575-622-7710 Ext. 40

ORAZO@FREDLOYA.COM

ATT MR. RAZO

Peppers Grill & Bar is accepting applications for all positions. Applications available between 2:00 and 4:00 pm, 500 N. Main

EASTERN NEW MEXICO UNIVERSITY: Math Specialist, Financial Aid Specialist, Assistant/Associate Professor of Management, Child Care Inclusion/Program Development Specialist. Jobs in Portales, NM. Job announcement/ online application: www.agency.govern mentjobs.com/enmu ; 575-562-2115. AA/EO/Title IX Employer

COMFORT KEEPERS

Are you a compassionate, caring person? Do you have experience in personal care? Being a Comfort Keeper may be the opportunity for you! To learn what becoming a Comfort Keeper is all about, call us at: 575-624-9999. Apply in person at: 1410 South Main Street, Roswell, NM. Days Inn- Now hiring Front Desk Clerk. Must Be Able To Work All Shifts and Weekends. Please Apply In Person at 1310 N. Main St. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE WANTED: PERSON who wants needs a job and wants to help make my business successful so you can continue to work. Experience is good but not necessary. Apply in person only at Fergie’s Plumbing 109 S. Union.

ARBY’S IS now accepting applications for management positions. We have positions for both day and night time positions available. Please apply by calling Gary at 575-622-8711 or send employment history to 575-623-3075. Full Charge Bookkeeper A regional CPA firm is seeking an experienced Bookkeeper for it’s Roswell office. Qualified candidates must have a minimum of 5 years FT experience in all aspects of bookkeeping services for external clients. Candidates must posses excellent client service skills, the ability to effectively multitask and meet tight deadlines. Must have strong computer skills and be proficient with MS Office Suite, QuickBooks, Creative Solutions Accounting, Client Bookkeeping Solutions and other accounting software programs. A bachelors degree in business or business related field is preferable. We are a fast growing public accounting firm. We value individual contributions and we want to share our success with you. We allow you the opportunity to be successful. We offer a competitive wage, benefits and a relaxed work environment. Our firm offers audit, tax, accounting and business consulting services to companies of all sizes, government institutions, and individuals. To apply please email your resume and cover letter to jobs@acgnm.com or fax to 505.348.9085. No walk-ins or phone calls will be considered. Please apply as instructed only.

BUSY OFFICE seeking full time receptionist with computer skills. Must be reliable, friendly, able to multi-task and work with the public. Please send resume to PO Box 1897, Unit 280, Roswell, NM 88202. PART-TIME PRESCHOOL workers needed to work Sunday’s, Thursday’s & special events. Looking for energetic, flexible people that love kids and Jesus to work 7-12 hours per week. Come by FBC Roswell 500 N. Pennsylvania to get an application. 623-2640 MEDICAL OFFICE POSITION:

KYMERA Independent Physicians

Full Time Medical Office Manager Medical Billing-Coding 2 yrs exp.; communication, critical thinking & people skills required. Knowledge of EMR systems and accounting IT Support: FT - Associates Degree in Technology or equivalent exp. Entry Level Certifications/Licenses. Ability to work independently. Please fax resume with cover letter to: (575) 624-7532

INTERNET DIRECTORY Published every Thursday in the Roswell Daily Record

A C C O U N TA N T S

Andrews, Smith, Lowery & Co., LLC 2724 Wilshire Boulevard • 622-5200

http://www.aslaccounting.com

AU TO

Roswell Ford-Lincoln-Mercury 821 N. Main • 623-3673

http://www.roswellford.com

FINAN CIA L

Pioneer Bank 3000 N. Main • 306 N. Pennsylvania • 300 S. Sunset 3301 N. Main • 2 St. Mary’s Place 624-5200 • 627-4400

FUN ER AL HO MES

Ballard Funeral Home & Crematory 910 S. Main St. • 575-622-1121

R E A L E S TA T E

http://www.pioneerbnk.com

Taylor & Taylor Realtors, Ltd. 400 W. 2nd St. • 622-1490 Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors 501 N. Main • 622-0875 Ruth E. Wise 614 N. Main • 575-317-1605 • 575-625-6935

045. Employment Opportunities

Line Service Technician Salary $13.03 hourly. Applications will be accepted until 4:00pm on Friday, September 30, 2011. Complete job description and applications at the Village of Ruidoso, 313 Cree Meadows Dr. Ruidoso, NM 88345. Phone 258-4343 or 1-877-700-4343. Fax 258-5848. Website www.ruidoso-nm.gov “Drugfree Workplace” EEOE. ADMIRAL BEVERAGE is hiring CDL driver position must be filled immediately, and only serious prospects need apply. Must have clean driving record. Great benefits, excellent pay, group health insurance. 1018 S. Atkinson DAIRY QUEEN has positions available for experienced breakfast cooks. Please apply at 1900 N. Main St., ask for Mark.

SERVICES

075. Air Conditioning

Affordable Refrigerated conditioning heat pumps evap coolers furnaces, duct work & installations 317-4147

100. Babysitting Stay at home grandmother. Special 1st wk $50 ea. child, open 7-5:30, M-F, 625-9572

105. Childcare

NEED CHILD care? Find the widest range of available childcare for your children and their needs. 1-800-691-9067 or www.newmexic okids.org. You may also call us; Family Resource & Referral 622-9000 and we can help you navigate the system. Openings, clean lg. playroom, licensed provider, North, all ages. 420-6803

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 HOUSE/OFFICE Cleaning low prices. Excellent work call anytime. 575-973-2649 AAA Cleaning Service We clean all kinds of homes. 626-8587 Free estimates

HOUSE CLEANER, reliable, honest, 22 yrs. exp. 623-8563

SUNSHINE WINDOW Service Free estimates. 575-626-545,575-626-5153 Honest, Reliable reasonable rates ref. we’re here to help Call Shelly 637-5053

150. Concrete

Slabs, patios, sidewalks, curbing, Rodriguez Const. Since 1974 Lic. 22689. Call 420-0100

http://www.ballardfuneralhome.com

Alex Pankey 501 N. Main • 1-800-806-7653 • 626-5006 • 622-0875 Kimble Hibbard 501 N. Main • 622-0875 • 420-1194

Dennis the Menace

FRED LOYA INSURANCE

RDRNEWS.COM

• Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

045. Employment Opportunities

A RESTAURANT company is accepting applications for a maintenance technician. Applicants must have a general knowledge of repairing restaurant equipment. Send resume or employment history to: Att: Senior Vice President, 204 W 4th St., Roswell, NM 88201 or call 575-622-8711 and ask for Gary only!

OTR AND COTA positions available, Send resume to: Staffing, PO Box 8244 Roswell, NM 88201 or staffing@dfn.com.

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS

Roswell Daily Record

http://www.alexpankey.com

http://www.goroswellhomes.com http://www.sherleataylor.com http://www.findroswellrealestate.com http://www.ruthwise1.com

Bill Davis http://www.billdavis-roswellrealestate.com 501 N. Main St., 575-622-0875, 575-420-6300 Shirley Childress http:\\www.shirleysellsroswell.com 110 E. Country Club • 575-622-7191 • 575-317-4117

To advertise, call the Advertising Department 622-7710 or e-mail: advertising@roswell-record.com

185. Electrical

BIG HORN Electric Professional work, affordable price. 575-317-8345 NM Lic#367662. ALLIANCE ELECTRIC Any size electrical job. Lic#367386. 575-840-7937

195. Elderly Care

DEPENDABLE PRIVATE Caregiver to the rescue, yrs. of exp. Tina 420-8877 COMFORT KEEPERS provides in-home care for you or a loved one. Our caregivers are carefully screened, bonded and insured. We take care of all payroll taxes and workers compensation. For more information call @ 624-9999. Serving Chavez County for 10 years.

200. Fencing

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991 Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100

210. Firewood/Coal

DRY SPLIT pine firewood for sale by the cord or half cord. 575-513-1926

225. General Construction

HARVEST BUILDERS All types of construction. 575-910-3000

230. General Repair

CARPENTRY, DRY wall, painting & concrete. We guarantee. 626-2050 HANDYMAN FENCING, painting, tile, home repairs or remodels. Call Mark 317-6441 Free estimates.

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Gonzales Enterprises Sprinkler installation & repairs, rock & grass landscaping, bush hogging, fencing. Just ask, we may do it. 317-8053 Basic Lawn mowing, yard clean-up, weedeating small tree trimming. 317-2242 Greenscapes Sprinkler Systems Lawn mowing, field mowing, gravel, sod-hydro seed, pruning, tilling, For dependable & reliable service call 622-2633 or 910-0150. WEEKEND WARRIOR Lawn Service mowing, property cleanup, residential rain gutter cleaning, and much more 575-626-6121

285. Miscellaneous Services

THE NEW MEXICO SEED LOAN PROGRAM is available to small businesses owned by individuals with disabilities and provides low interest loans for the purchase of equipment and related supplies needed to expand or start a business. Contact the New Mexico Seed Loan Program at 1-855-891-8295 or www.nmseedloans.org for more information. A low interest loan program of DVR State of New Mexico.


Roswell Daily Record 310. Painting/ Decorating

Quality Painting! Interior, Exterior at prices you can afford. Mike 910-7012 TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting at affordable prices. Call 637-9108. PAINT CONTRACTOR Interior/Exterior, remodels or new construction. Call Nathan 914-0083 Licensed/ Bonded & Insured.

312. Patio Covers

M.G. HORIZONS Patio covers, concrete, decks & awnings Lic. 623-1991.

316. Pet Services

Jacque’S PET SERVICES. has a new location. Boarding now available. 1002 E. 2nd.575-622-4002.

330. Plumbing

PLUMAIR, REASONABLE repairs. Plumbing, heating, cooling, new construction, heatpumps. NM Lic. 27043. Call 317-4147 or 623-0770. Plumber Needs Work. Steve’s Plumbing & Heating. 28 yrs exp. 622-9326

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 625-9924 / 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552. REASONABLE REMODELING Contractor Specializing on kitchen & bathrooms. New Additions & Roofing. NM Lic. 27043. 317-4147.

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

395. Stucco Plastering

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217 For stucco traditional or synthetic, also block, brick & stone work. Rodriguez Const. 420-0100

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 Allen’s Tree Srvc. The oldest tree service in Roswell. Million $ ins. 626-1835 Collins Tree Service Professional Tree Trimming, Removal & Stump grinding. Fully insured. Certified Line Clearance Arborist. Call 575-308-1902

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale TOWNHOUSE, 1400 sqft, 2br/2ba, laundry room/ study, new roof, cedar fence, stucco, porch, tile & carpet. Refinished kitchen, bath cabinets & new paint throughout, w/d. Large corner lot. Call 575-491-4235 Priced Reduced 1413 E Hoagland: 2br/1ab laundry room $45,000 626-9593

4Bd 1Ba, new paint, carpet, doors, fncd yrd, $60k M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 3 BR 1 ba at the base $42,500 owner financing with $5k down 420-1352 WELL SEASONED Real Estate contracts. Will trade for houses. Wesley Hay 623-6165 702 E. Greenwood 1600+ sq. ft. $47k 10% down take over payments. 626-5290 Investment duplex + lots, rent 1; live in 1, 405 S, Richardson $90k. No owner financing. 420-0720 3BR/1.5BA, $5000DN, $550/mo + taxes & insurance, 1900 W. Walnut; on Real Estate contract. 575-973-2353

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale 5 ACRES in Dexter, NM. To inquire, Call 918-644-0934.

LENDER SALE. 40 Acres -$39,900. Spellbinding views of snow capped mountains! Adjacent to National Forest. Maintained all weather roads w/electric. Close to Ruidoso. Financing available. Call NMRS 888-676-6979.

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

5 ACRES, $25K as is, septic system, 3809 Zinnia, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

Main & Poe, 4550 sf $275k cash/trade for Ruidoso prprty, M-Th 624-1331 6-UNIT APTS all brick total elec. room to build more. 420-0100 leave name & number.

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

‘98 Schult 16x72, 3br/2ba. Setup on private lot in Tucumcari. Can be moved. Quality built 6” walls, tape & textured. Does need new paint & some repair. Selling cheap. 575-622-0035, DO1090 2004 FLEETWOOD 16x60, 2br/2ba. Setup in Adult Park Villa #64 in Roswell. Stop by & look, unlocked during day time. Very nice. 575-622-0035, DO1090 1983 14X60 Liberty Mobile Home. Call 317-0495 1998 FLEETWOOD 28x58, 3br/2ba, double wide, deck & carport (#35), excellent condition, must see. 575-317-8827 Nice 2000 Cavalier, 16x86, 3br/2ba, all appliances, $22,500 obo. 626-5677 2br/2ba, Appliances, partially furnished, carport, storage, deck, $9K. 623-3149 PRICE REDUCED 510 E. Deming St., 3br/1.5ba w/lot, $15k firm. 420-1796

520. Lots for Sale

OWNER FINANCING for a limited time. Ready to build 5 acre lots w/ great views & good covenants. Located 9 miles West of Roswell @ the Club House Banquet Facility. Free land maps and at entrance. 575-623-1800. www.BuenaVidaLand.com COURT ORDERED Sale! 2704 S. Lea, asking $6k, 5 acres - 30 Townsend Tr. Lot 9, Cielo Vista Subdivision, has well, electric, great view of city, $49,999. Call Jim 910-7969. Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 60x134 $18,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. We Take Visa and Mastercard! 420-1352. HAGERMAN LOTS for sale. York Avenue, Posey subdivision, 1 block from Hagerman schools, $5000. Not zoned for mobile home. 420-1352 PREMIUM 5 Acre tracts, Owner will finance with 10% down, New Construction only (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd. between Country Club & Berrendo Rd. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-4337 LOTS FOR sale by Del Norte Elem. Also 4 R-3 lots. 420-0100 leave name & number. 1 lot w/utilities, will hold, 18x80 home (#32), Spring River Senior Park. 575-317-8827

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331 In Artesia in pecan orchard- Large room, private bath & entrance, fridge, microwave, wireless internet, utilities, DirecTV, covered parking. $600./mo. Call 575-365-4579. 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. Town Plaza Apartments Utilities paid - Gas and Water. New Owners, friendly new managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs/downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Seniors 55yrs plus, law enforcement & military will receive discount. No HUD. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 2nd year, 1 free month rent

540. Apartments Unfurnished

ALL BILLS PAID 1 br $530 2 br $630, 3br/2ba $730 mo., ref air, new carpet, new paint/tile. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 2Br, Sept Special, $600mo, bills pd, No HUD, No Pets appt M-Th 624-1331 1br/1ba, wtr pd, quiet area, HUD ok. $350/mo, $200 dep. 625-9208 after 5pm VERY NICE 2 br 1 bath duplex 1 car garage No Hud or smoking, small pets ok, $675 mo. 626-0229 PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN.

CLASSIFIEDS

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 1421 S. Poplar, 3br/2ba, no pets or HUD, $575/mo, $350/dep. 623-1806

Childs wood cabinet, perfect Xmas-Birthday gift. 623-1048

1BR FRESHLY painted. Central Air & Heat. Small yard with fence. W/D & D/W, $500 Mo. & Utilities. No pets. Howard @ 637-9992.

BLACK METAL futon bunk bed $150. Call 914-0332

1204 S. Missouri, spacious 2 or 3br, 1ba, good area, close to schools, garage, fenced, freshly painted, $700/mo, $400/dep, no HUD. 622-2485 3BR/2.5BA, $800 + dep., 2007 W. 1st, avail. Oct. 1st. 420-2659 4BR/2BA, $1200/MO, $600/dep, big backyard, no HUD, 1106 Avenida Del Sumbre. 910-0827

SPACIOUS 2BR/1BA apt., convenient location, extra storage, $575/mo, wtr & gas pd., 1114 S. Kentucky.

3br/1.5ba/1car garage, 412 S. Aspen, $700 + $300 dep. 623-8312

2 BR, 1 bath, stove & refrigerator. Call 910-8170.

4BR 2BA NE by schools big bedrooms, walk-in closets, water softner $1150 mo. 1st and last months + $1,000 security dep. Call Tamara 480-295-9633

EFFICIENCY 2 BR, downtown, clean, water paid. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD Call 623-8377

507 REDWOOD, 3/1 incl. stove, refrig., $500 dep., $700 mo., no pets or HUD. 970-946-6575

Cute 1br apt., wtr pd., 105 N. Kentucky B, $365/mo. 626-2401 or 9100851

EFFICIENCY 1 br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. 1 bd apt, quiet neighborhood, Laundry room, central air/heat, approx 800 sqft. Avail. now! 2550 Bent Tree Rd. $495/mo plus dep. Ask about our move-in special. Ben 317-6408 WILSHIRE GARDENS, a 55+ community has 1 & 2 bedrooms available. Resident pays electric & water. Please call 575-623-3733 or stop by 2727 Wilshire Blvd for application. VERY NICE just remodeled Large 3br, 1212 N. Washington. 623-8240 LARGE 1 bedroom apartment. References and background check required. Washer and Dryer hookups. Private parking. 420-0100 2 BR Apartment. North location, bath and 1/2, garage, quiet neighborhood $750 mo. Call 420-4535 1,2 AND 3 bedroom, HUD Approved. Call Ronnie 575-694-8077. 514 S. Sycamore. 3 bd/2 ba. 1 car garage. Laundry room. 910-4225.

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished FLETC 2BR, 1ba, newly remodeled, north location, large backyard w/grass. 622-2564 or 626-6110

2BR EFFICIENCY, older person, no pets, $350/mo, you pay bills. 626-9347

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 2&3 Bd, 1&2 Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331

201 W. Summit, 3br/2ba, carport & storage, completely remodeled, stove, refrig., ref. air, w/d hookup, no pets or HUD, $900/mo, $600/dep, 914-5402 3br 1ba. ref air, fenced yard 1 car 69 Lighthall RIAC $650m.$650 dep 627-9942 LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com! TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 506 N Kentucky #A, EFF 1BA, $450 month (free laundry room) 506 N Kentucky #B, 1BR 1BA, $550 month (free laundry room) 1008 Kings, 2BR 1BA, $550 month 1609 S Richardson, 2BR 1BA, $625 month 812 W Summit, 2BR 1BA, $625 month 2704 S Washington, 3BR 1BA, $600 month 804 Cimarron, 3BR 1BA, $625 month 618 Aspen, 3BR 1BA, $800 month 109 Fairway (Dexter), 4BR 2BA, $1100 month 601 Moore, 3BR 2BA Office, $1400 month 1413 Yucca (Artesia), 2BR 1BA, $675 month Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604 1400 S. Madison, 2br/1ba, new bathroom, refinished hardwood floors, new security doors, 1 car garage, pets w/fee, no HUD/smokers/utilities, $750/$500 dep, 575-405-0163 ENCHANTED HILLS nice 3br, 1 3/4 ba, 2 car garage, avail. end of Oct, $875/mo 622-4722 or 575-937-1183

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

817 ELDORA, 2br, ref air, stove, refrig, w/d hookups, no pets or HUD, $550/mo, $500/dep. 914-5402 1415 W. Tilden, 2br, stove, refrig, $500/mo, $350/dep, no pets/HUD, must have references. 625-0512 902 MULLIS, 3 Bd, 2 ba, new home in Enchanted Hills. $1600 mo. + dep. Call 575-914-8200. 3BR HOUSE, 2br apt, $575 + $475 dep. Call 347-0493. 706 W. 10th, 3br, ref air, stove, refrig, w/d hookups, no pets/HUD, $700/mo, $600/dep. 914-5402 400 1/2 E 5th 1 bedroom stove, refrig., water paid, $325 mo. $200 dep. No HUD & No Pets. 910-9648

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places OFFICE SPACE for Rent. Prime downtown area, 2,061 sq.ft. Please call 622-8711. Office space: newly remodeled, 750 sqft. 622-2564 FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546. HIGH PROFILE GROUND FLOOR PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE-receptionist, utilities and janitorial provided. Reception area, conference room and break room available for use of tenants. High speed cable installed and phone system options available. Plenty of parking in front and back of building. (575) 622-5200 or mandrews@aslaccounting. com, ask for leasing manager. 2108 S. Main, storefront, 1200sf, $500/$500dep. Call Don or Barbara 627-9942 Prime office space, 5000 sq ft. lease all or part, janitorial and on-site maintenance included. Historic building located in quiet, tree shaded, park-like setting. See at 400 E. College 420-9970 or 622-8500

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

LIFT CHAIR, power wheelchair, walker, grab bars, hospital bed, 622-7638 School uniform shirts sh/lg, pants, sz. 6,8,10, many colors, 420-2705 NEED FURNITURE? Shop Blair’s Trading Post for the best prices in town for your household items. We buy & sell furniture, appliances, home decor, collectibles, electronics, saddles, jewelry, tools, fishing & camping items, movies plus everything else from A-Z. Including many hard to find items. Serving Roswell for 40 years. Open daily 9-5. Accept Visa & MC. 5611 Hummingbird Ln. 627-2033 GAS RANGE 3 months old $275. Call 575-725-4778 TODAY All mattress sets at $50-$500 savings. White Mattress Sleep Gallery, 1010 S. Main, Suite 2, 624-1000.

MOVING COMPLETE qs br set $900, sofa $400, dr table $50. 575-623-9992 THE TREASURE Chest Sofas, dressers, furniture, best selection of depression, Carnival, Vaseline glass in Roswell. Wed-Sat, 10-5, 1204 W. Hobbs. 914-1855 HOT TUB for sale as is $1200 OBO. Call 575-626-2203 100” TOW behind finish mower; by Stanley brand, New!! 575-513-1926 Concession trailer 1/2 refurbished out of camping trailer. Fridge, micro, stove included. 575-420-4015 for more details. Located at 2904 E. 2nd. LARGE GUN cabinet 6’ oak table w/6 chairs, arm chair (maple) lg. rug approx 10’x12’ misc. 627-5497 ELECTRIC WHEEL chair, very good condition, can be seen at 6220 SE Main, $2000. 347-2070 ESTATE FURNITRE sale: Roll top oak desk, leather secretary desk, sofa, wing back chairs, recliner, coffee & end tables, dining table w/4 chairs, leafs, filing cabinet, silver serving pieces, bar stools. Call 625-1958 for information and viewing. POWER LIFT chair $50, Venus Phonograph $25, 575-208-0795.

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd CASH FOR gold and silver jewelry. Sterling spoons and forks. U.S. Silver coins. Local in Roswell, 578-0805

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

PAY CASH for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles. Entire households & estates welcome. Call 627-2033 or 623-6608. WILL BUY your unwanted washing machines. 626-7470

630. Auction Sales

ADVERTISE YOUR AUCTION in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper for more details. Or log onto www.nmpress.org for a list of participating newspapers.

635. Good things to Eat

SAN PATRICIO Berry Farm. Blackberries & raspberries. You pick or we pick. 575-653-4502 or 575-937-0866 HOBSON GARDEN: Now roasting our famous GREEN CHILE! Fresh tomatoes. Also available: Jalapenos (green & yellow), bell peppers, dried red chile, okra, squash/zucchini, cucumbers, eggplant, cherry tomatoes, watermelons, honey dews, & cantaloupes. Mon-Sat 8-5:30, Sun 1-5. 3656 E. Hobson Road - 622-7289. FARM FRESH eggs - free range $2.50 dz, duck eggs $5.00 dz. 624-0898 GRAVES FARM: New season picked fresh daily, okra, squash, cucumbers, eggplant, red chile pods & powder, garlic, pinto beans. 622-1889 Mon-Sat 8-5:30, Sun 1-5. Accept EBT, credit cards & debit.

640. Household Goods

REMODELING SALE blue leather sectional sofa-good condition, wood coffee table-almost new w/raised top to eat on w/beautiful leaded glass doors at the bottom, wood end table (square shape) glass top & matching sofa table - rectangular -great condition, brown leather recliner chair - great condition, misc. chairs, cabinets. Call 625-2474 to see items. WHITE ELECTRIC oven, cooktop, dishwasher & black microwave. Little used. Also refrigerator $500 for all. 719-332-3079

670. Farm Equipment

52” TOW behind brush cut mower; by Stanley brand, New!!! 575-513-1926

695. Machinery Tools Farm/Ranch NEW DELTA wood shaper, never used. 420-0100

Thursday, September 22, 2011

705. Land/Gardening/ Fertilizer HARVEST FARMS Compost Tea for sale. 575-910-3000

745. Pets for Sale

CHINESE PUGS ready in 4 weeks. Call 575-914-0357. NORWEGIAN ELKHOUNDS, 3 males, 2 females. Call 914-0083. 3YR OLD Golden Retriever looking for good home. 317-8331

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

775. Motorcycles & Scooters 06 YAMAHA YZF DIRT BIKE EXCELLENT COND. $2800 OBO. CALL 575-626-9962. IF NO ANSWER LEAVE MESSAGE.

‘97 CADILLAC STS new engine 30k miles $5,000 very clean. 505-977-2522 Beautiful ‘99 Taurus SE, auto, PS, PB, low miles, extra clean. 347-0260

2000 Jayco 31’ motorhome low miles 13k great shape. Asking $20k 622-9916 1985 SOUTHWIND motorhome $2800. Call 626-3070 or 840-5224 HUNTERS: 1977 KOMFORT travel trailer, 19.5ft, sleeps 5, self contained, tandem wheels, more. Good condition. $2700 OBO. Roswell 575-973-1685

RECREATIONAL

ELK PERMITS. Ranch only. Unit 37, Either sex, any legal weapon. 10-1-11 thru 12-31-11. Call 505-620-0178

1989 FORD Box Truck Lift Gate, $2500, 1204 W. Hobbs. 914-1855

Utility Trailer two axles electric breaks 16x6 1/2 ft. New floor & new tires. Call 622-6846

2 ADORABLE white/yellow labs. Dew claws removed, shots, CKC reg., 11 wks. 627-0115 or 317-4603

760. Hunting & Camping Equipment

790. Autos for Sale

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com

PUPPY LOVE Grooming Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also - 575-420-6655

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

B7

QUALITY RECYCLING Stop don’t do that, we pay cash for that. Located at South Hwy 285, just past the Bypass on left hand side. Buying cans 65 cents lb., cars starting at $75 going up to $300 each. Metal starting at $90 going up to $275 a ton. All original Cadillac convertors starting at $30 & up to $450 each. Copper high as $4lb. We buy any & all scrap metals. Call anytime, open 7 days a week from 7-5. 575-937-2909. Ask for Donald.

2010 HYUNDAI Genesis Coupe 3.8 grand touring like new $26k 626-6220

2004 CHRYSLER Sebring convertible, auto, fully loaded, 89k miles, super nice & clean, $5500. 317-9586 1999 VOLKSWAGON Jetta VR6, $4800, leather, sun roof, 105k miles, new brakes, 317-1044. 2004 350Z convertible silver w/black top 25.75K miles 18” wheels. $17,500. Call 420-2456.

VERY NICE 2001 Ford Taurus, loaded, V6, a/c, cruise, low mi, $3500 obo 317-3529 1995 LINCOLN Towncar Sedan, clean, $3000. 622-8235

‘85 JEEP Wrangler, camouflaged, perfect hunting rig. Call for more info, 626-6666.

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2006 FORD F250, excellent cond., ext. cab, $9,950. 626-7488. ‘93 CHEVY pickup V8, runs great, must see. $3900. 910-9648

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

005 010 015 020 025

Announcements Special Notice Card of Thanks Personals/Special Transportation Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted 045 050 055 060

Employment

Employment Opportunities Salesperson/Agents Employment Agencies Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 441 445 450

Window Repair Window Cleaning Wrought Iron Services Wanted

455 456 460 465

Money: Loan/Borrow Credit Cards Insurance Co. Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale Investment: Stocks/Sale Mortgages for Sale Mortgages Wanted Business Opportunities

470 475 480 485

Financial

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


B8 Thursday, September 22, 2011

Roswell Daily Record

GETCASH

For Your Old Gold, Silver & Coins! 3 DAYS ONLY!! XXXXX DAYS ONLY: Comfort Suites - Roswell LOCATION NAME 3600 North Main Street HERE

NM State 88201Zip Address LineRoswell, Here, City Sunday, September 25th – Tuesday, September 27th DAY, MONTH - DAY, Open Daily00 - 9:00 am toMONTH 6:00 pm 00

Our Experts Are Authorized To Pay Up To $2 Million For: COINS AND PAPER MONEY • Silver Dollars (pre-1935) • Silver Coins (pre-1964) • Silver Bars • US Gold Coins • Foreign Gold Coins • Gold Bullion Coins • Proof Sets • Mint Sets • Paper Money

SILVER COINS

GOLD COINS

(1860-1957)

)355 #+B '9 &8

• Coin Collections • • • • • • • • • •

Small Or Large Carson City Silver Dollars Indianhead Pennies Investment Coins (from the 70sand 80s) Silver and Gold Coins Wheat Pennies Buffalo Nickels All Older Coins (all kinds) Confederate Paper Money Certified Coins (see ad) Casino Chips

1000% 87 SILVER COINS  7. "5./;

SILVER DOLLARS

Silver Dollars Pay Up To For The Following Rare Dollars '73=/. %=+=/< '</. !/@   '9 &8  

 

   '9 &8 



   '9 &8 



&;+./ 855+;< '9 &8 

 

  '9 &8 

 

   '9 &8  

WE MAKE HOUSE CALLS FOR SCRAP GOLD LARGE COLLECTIONS. COMPLETE SETS PAPER MONEY

(Nevada - 1970s and older) Paying face value or more on chips $25 and under. Also interested in $50 and $100 chips.

WE MAKE HOUSE CALLS ON LARGE COIN COLLECTIONS

JEWELRY â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

(All Time Periods) Wristwatches (see ad) Pocketwatches Silver Jewelry Antique Jewelry Investment Diamonds Cameos (all kinds) Gold and Platinum (see ad) Diamonds Art Deco Jewelry Art Nouveau Items Charm Bracelets (silver and gold) Tiffany and Cartier Items Gold Rings (all kinds) Costume Jewelry (pre-1960, buying only finer items) Beaded Necklaces Crystal and Glass (pre-1960) Victorian Jewelry Class Rings (gold) Rolex and Patek Phillippe Watches Jewelry Boxes From Jewelry Stores Vintage Gold-Filled Jewelry Garnet Jewelry Enamel Items On Gold And Silver Purses (pre-1940) Beaded, Mesh, Plastic Box Dental Gold Bakelite Items Paintings On Porcelain Old Rosaries Music Boxes (pre-1940) Music Boxes Singing Birds (pre-1940)

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ MISCELLANEOUS â&#x20AC;˘ Plantation Workers' Documentation

We Also Buy Partial Sets!

WRIST & POCKET WATCHES Wristwatches and Pocketwatches All Time Periods, All Kinds, All Types Rare Watches Worth A Fortune In Cash! Pay Up To The Following:

$/1>5+; )+=-2/< 

2;8781;+92 )+=-2/<  

$/9/+=371 )+=-2/<  

><3-+5 )+=-2/<  

236371 )+=-2/< 



887 #2+</ )+=-2/<  

%=89@+=-2/< 

'7><>+5 >7-=387  

'7><>+5 3+5

'7><>+5 %2+9/ 

)8;5. &36/ )+=-2/<  

>69 8>; )+=-2/< 

8-=8;< )+=-2/<  

#8-4/=@+=-2/<  

+.3/< )+=-2/<  

 +71/ 

>./6+;< 93:>/=  

+55  

;/3=5371  

+;=3/; 

85>6,><  

8;>6 

3=3<23/6 

(metal, pre-1950)

â&#x20AC;˘ Cast Iron Banks

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

(All Kinds And Time Periods) Silver Jewelry Flatware Sets Single Flatware Items Tea Sets Antique Items

ALL TIME PERIODS, ALL KINDS, ALL TYPES.

and Toys Civil War Items Samurai Swords Historical Documents Famous Autographs (pre-1960) Fountain Pens (1940 and older) Indian Rugs, Pottery and Beadwork Leather Items (pre-1940) Lamps, Signed (Tiffany, Handel, Pairpoint) Stocks And Bonds (pre-1940)

WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE INTERESTED IN ALL YOUR COLLECTIBLE ITEMS!

!/-45+-/< 6,/; =/6< %/=< += #37< 869+-=< 8<+3- =/6< 377+,+; =/6< +;;371<

/@/5;B 8A/< ;86 /@/5;B %=8;/< 9;/   +;-+<3=/ =/6< %35?/; 8A/< +4/53=/ =/6< 5+<< /+./. #>;</< 85.355/. =/6< ;+-/5/=<

(all kinds)

DIAMONDS Cash For Diamonds 1/4 Carat Or Larger

1960 and Older - (Buying only finer quality items) Pay up to $300 for the following:

and Memorabilia (pre-1870)

â&#x20AC;˘

STERLING SILVER GOLD & SILVER

COSTUME JEWELRY

â&#x20AC;˘ Toys And Banks

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

>.5/B  

 8@+;.  8 

5137 

;8.<2+6  

+55/=  

;>/7  

>,/537 

+635=87 

553783<  

7=/;7+=387+5 

>5/< >;1/7<87  

/8>;5=;/

87137/ 

8?+.8 

"6/1+ 

#+=/4 #2355399/  

$85/A 



%/=2 &286+< 

&300+7B  8 

'5B<</ !+;.37 

(+-2/;87  87<=+7=37 

55 "=2/;< 

'73=/. %=+=/< 5B371 +15/7.3+7 /7='9 &8 

37-857 /7=< '9 &8 

>00+58 !3-4/5<'9 &8  

+;,/; 36/< '9 &8  

/;->;B 36/< '9 &8  

%=+7.371 3,/;=B  /7=<'9 &8  

)+54371 3,/;=B  /7=< '9 &8  

8;1+7 855+;<'9 &8  

#/+-/ 855+;<'9 &8  

 9- 866/68;+=3?/ %35?/;'9 &8  

#>;</< +55 437.< 9;/   %=/;5371 =/6< #5+<=3- /@/5;B ;B<=+5 =/6< &8;=83</<2/55 =/6< >005374< $8<+;3/< +7. =-

5+<< /+. !/-45+-/< /<2 #>;</< +;?/. +6/8< $237/<=87/ =/6< 31>;+5 #37< +;7/= /@/5;B )+=-2/< 85. =/6< #5+<=3- 8A #>;</<

FINE JEWELRY We are now buying selected pieces of fine jewelry for a future jewelry museum. All time periods, all kinds, all types. We will pay up to the following for rare or collectible jewelry: %35?/; /@/5;B 

;88-2/<  

#/7.+7=< 

!/-45+-/< 

8-4=+35 $371< 

2+;6 ;+-/5/=<C

+;;371<  

;+-/5/=< 

+6/8< 

(3-=8;3+7 

;= /-8 

7+6/5/.  

>005374<

#37<

85.355/. /@/5;B  

+7. 85./; 

#/+;5 =/6< 

/86/=;3- /<317 

$371  

;= !8>?/+>  

;8<<8?/; $371<  

+?+53/;< 

+;7/= /@/5;B 

+4/53=/ =/6<

3531;// $371< 

58;+5 /<317  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sell it for Cash!â&#x20AC;?

601-572-1241 601-500-0094

RoadShow!

   ONLY!   *COMFORT    SUITES

  - ROSWELL*

    SUNDAY,    SEPT.  25TH    â&#x20AC;&#x201C; TUESDAY,     SEPT. 27TH  3DAYS


9-22-11 newspaper