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Roswell Daily Record

Irene devastates East Coast THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

Vol. 120, No. 208 50¢ Daily / $1 Sunday

INSIDE NEWS

MICHELE BACHMANN LANDS BOOK DEAL NEW YORK (AP) — Michele Bachmann has a book deal. Sentinel, a conservative imprint of Penguin Group (USA), announced Monday that the Republican presidential candidate’s - PAGE B3

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — The full measure of Hurricane Irene’s fury came into focus Monday as the death toll jumped to 38, New England towns battled epic floods and millions faced the dispiriting prospect of several days without electricity. From North Carolina to Maine, communities cleaned up and took stock of the uneven and hard-topredict costs of a stor m that spared the nation’s biggest city a nightmare scenario, only to deliver a historic wallop to towns well inland. In New York City, where people had braced for a disaster-movie scene of water

swirling around skyscrapers, the subways and buses were up and running again in time for the Monday morning commute. And to the surprise of many New Yorkers, things went pretty smoothly. But in New England, landlocked Vermont contended with what its governor called the worst flooding in a century. Streams also raged out of control in upstate New York. In many cases, the moment of maximum danger arrived well after the storm had passed, as rainwater made its way into

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Annemieke Farrow, 33, of Long Beach, Calif., signs her name to a boarded up window on a restaurant, in Alexandria, Va. Businesses in Old Town have a history of flooding from the Potomac River and have taken steps to decrease the impact of Hurricane Irene.

ENMU-R opens disc golf course Herrera See IRENE Page A6

For The Past 24 Hours

INSIDE

TUESDAY

www.rdrnews.com

TOP 5 • Wool Building demolition takes history with it • Job Corps graduates 94 at ENMU-R • Lack of rainfall distresses Bitter Lake • Gov: Capping tax doesn’t make sense • NMMI tops South Mountain in four

August 30, 2011

Mark Wilson Photo

Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell opened its new Disc Golf Course just east of the campus recently.

VANESSA KAHIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Eastern New Mexico

University-Roswell students who want to stay active while they socialize now have a new place to do so.

A brand new disc golf course — located on Martin Street between University Blvd. and Gail Harris Street — is strategically located to attract ENMU-R students. “There’s not much student involvement,” said Maria LeBlanc, ENMU-R college development administrator, of the reason why she created the 9-hole disc golf course. LeBlanc said she hoped to “increase student productivity with outdoor recreation.” The new disc golf course’s location is also meant to give people on the south side of Roswell a place where

they, too, can be active and enjoy the outdoors. Anyone in the community is welcome to check out disc golf items from the Physical Education Center on campus. These materials include three discs, scorecards, and a course map. These materials can be rented for one dollar and must be returned before the PEC closes. LeBlanc acknowledged that perhaps there are people who have their own discs. She said there is no obligation to rent discs from the PEC if one has his or her own.

hearing scheduled JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Assistant District Attorney Debra Hutchins informed the court, Monday, that the State filed amended or alternate charges against Isreal Herrera, 22, on Aug. 24. Currently Herrera is charged with willful and deliberate firstdegree murder after shooting Stephen Foster, 25, in the head on Nov. 22, 2010. Herrera is also facing charges of tampering with evidence after he attempted to dispose of the firearm he had used and with shooting at a motor vehicle. The alternative charges would be

J.O.Y. Center: Bringing joy to the community VANESSA KAHIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

WEEK 1: HERE’S WHAT WE LEARNED Week 1 of the 2011 high school football season wrapped on Friday night and it’s time to take a look at what we learned about the area’s teams... - PAGE B1

TODAY’S OBITUARIES • Robert Lujan * Pablo Romero • Manuel Juarez • Maurine B. Mitchell • Jack K. Nichols • Steven Peck • Donald D. Miller

- PAGE B3

HIGH .102˚ LOW ....70˚

TODAY’S FORECAST

This article is one in a series of stories focusing on local agencies which receive support from the United Way of Chaves County, which is currently conducting its annual fundraising campaign.

With a clever acronym and four locations, the Chaves County J.O.Y. Centers are a source of stability, comfort, and support not only to local senior citizens and their dependents, but also to the community at large. A new complex will soon help the agency continue its mission. There are four J.O.Y. Centers, located in Roswell, Midway, Hager man and Lake Arthur. Soon, there will be a new J.O.Y. Center building in Hagerman. Charlie Phillips, executive director of the Chaves County J.O.Y. Centers, said the new building replaces a complex that is about 70

years old. It was built in the 1940s using barracks from Orchard Park, a former prisoner of war camp. “It was time for a new center,” Phillips said. She said the former center was made of wood and after all these years had settled, so that its floor is uneven. Phillips joked that people could get dizzy walking around the old center. “The old center had a lot of character,” Phillips said. “This (new center) will develop its own character, but it’s still going to be different.” The new building is located just behind the old one, at 505 E. Argyle. The four J.O.Y. Centers offer a variety of programs to keep senior citizens mentally and physically active and healthy. As the name suggests, the centers promote joy —but the acronym is also meant to stand for Just Older Youth. Phillips said one must be “60 or better” to partake in J.O.Y. Center benefits. If one is not quite 60 yet, one

See COURSE Page A6

may still join if he or she is married to someone who is at least 60, or be the legal or financial responsibility of someone who is 60. It’s free to join, although donations are appreciated from those who can afford to give. One of the more prominent forms of assistance the J.O.Y. Centers offer is through the meal program. Phillips said providing good nutrition is perhaps one of the more challenging aspects of her work, but also the most rewarding. Using computer software that determines the nutritional value of foods, Phillips puts together meals and menus that are nutritionally balanced. For example, meals must be between 685-700 calories, and have a predetermined amount of certain nutrients such as vitamins A and C, calcium, fiber, and iron, to name a few. Although meals are required to have certain nutrients in specific amounts, Phillips said these numbers are based

on a weekly average. This allows for chili dogs every now and then, or a taco salad. “I’m constantly looking for new meals,” Phillips said. “We try to have as much variety as we can.” The meals provided are for lunch only, but in some extreme cases, staff can provide a second lunch for a senior who would like to eat the meal for dinner. These lunches can be enjoyed at the J.O.Y. Center, but some are delivered to the homes of seniors who are homebound. Last month, the J.O.Y. Centers provided 3,787 congregate meals throughout the county, while 5,949 meals were delivered. Even when they are just

TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) — Moammar Gadhafi’s wife and three of his children fled Libya to neighboring Algeria on Monday, firm evidence that the longtime leader has lost his grip on the country. Gadhafi’s whereabouts were still unknown and rebels are worried that if he remains in Libya, it will stoke more violence. In Washington, the Obama administration said it has no indication Gadhafi has left the country. Rebels also said one of Gadhafi’s other sons, elite

military commander Khamis, was probably killed in battle. The Algerian Foreign Ministry said in a statement that Gadhafi’s wife Safia, his sons Hannibal and Mohammed, and his daughter Aisha entered the country across the land border. It said Algerian authorities have infor med the United Nations secretary general, the president of the U.N. Security Council, and the head of the Libyan rebels transitional leadership council.

See HERRERA Page A6

delivering a meal, J.O.Y. Center staff looks out for the overall wellbeing of seniors. Phillips said there have been times when, while delivering a meal, a driver discovers a senior that is hurt or otherwise needs medical attention. When this happens, the driver calls the center. Someone will call 911 and the next of kin. A staf f member from the center will drive to the residence so that the driver can continue delivering meals. The staff member will stay with the senior until help arrives. Phillips said that, when necessary, the staff member in this situation might

Gadhafi’s wife, 3 children flee and head to Algeria

CLASSIFIEDS..........B6 COMICS.................B4 ENTERTAINMENT.....A8 FINANCIAL .............B5 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........A8 LOTTERIES ............A2 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8

INDEX

AP Photo

Smoke rises from a pickup truck driven by two pro-Gadhafi soldiers on a reconnaissance mission that came under fire by Libyan rebels on the front line, Monday.

See J.O.Y. Page A6

Ahmed Jibril, an aide to rebel National Transitional Council head Mustafa Abdul-Jalil, said officials would “demand that Algerian authorities hand them over to Libya to be tried before Libyan courts.” Gadhafi’s children played important roles in Libya’s military and economic life. Hannibal headed the maritime transport company; Mohammed the national Olympic committee. Aisha, a lawyer, helped in the defense of toppled Iraqi dictator SadSee GADHAFI Page A6


A2 Tuesday, August 30, 2011

GENERAL

Thieves break and enter homes

Police were dispatched to the 900 block of North Atkinson Avenue, Sunday, after a subject gained entry into a home through the front door, damaging the frame. The victim reported that clothes from the bedroom closet and dresser had been thrown all over the floor. An eyewitness saw someone driving a primer grey pickup near the time of the incident. •Police were called to the 500 block of West Second Street, Sunday. The victim said the house had been burglarized on August 24 when glass windows had been damaged. Replacement costs are estimated at $300. •Police were dispatched to the 1800 block of North Maryland Avenue, Sunday, where the resident found the front door open and a kitchen window shattered.

1986 Chevy Silverado which was for sale for $500. She said she traded a Rugera 10/22 for the vehicle and the seller asked for additional money to cover the trade. When she retur ned to pick up the vehicle, she found that the transmission had been removed and the seats replaced with something old and torn.

Police took a walk-in report of fraud, Friday. The victim stated that she had met the subject in the 5000 block of Calumet, to view a

•Police were called to Big O T ires, 1305 N. Main Street, Sunday, where a subject or subjects had pried open the garage doors and attempted unsuccessfully to pry open a second door. An employee reported that someone had come in to look at the tires and complained because they were too costly. The subject is described as 5 feet 4

inches, 160 pounds, with brown hair and brown eyes. Repairs to the doors were estimated at $1,000. The tires were valued at $300. •Police were dispatched to the 1000 block of Plaza Del Sol, after subjects gained access to a residence by breaking a front window and removed a 17inch silver Dell laptop, 12 T-shirts, 2 pairs of jeans, a long-sleeved Polo shirt, brown shoes and a true religion light. Total value of items taken is estimated $1,650. Anyone having information on these or any other crimes should contact Crime Stoppers, 888594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward.

Ezekial Jamal Warner, 17, was arrested on Sunday for 13 counts of aggravated assault with a deadly, two counts of ar med robbery, one of abandonment or abuse of a child and one count of unlawful possession of handgun. “Around 11 p.m. Saturday, officers responded to West Martin Street near the college where Warner bran-

dished a firear m and threatened to take money and valuables,” said Sgt. James Preston, spokesman for the Roswell Police Department. The incident took place at a party. “He brought a firearm and made everybody empty their pockets,” Preston said. “He got away with $41. He only robbed two people. That’s why

there are two counts of armed robbery.” Preston believes the abuse charges resulted because one of the victims was underage. Warner turned himself in to the police on Sunday. He is being held at Chaves County Juvenile Detention Center.

Fraud

Burglary

Man arrested for aggravated assault

History sought

Jessica Palmer Photo

Roswell Interarts Organization, in conjunction with The Historical Foundation for Southeast New Mexico, prepare to collect memorabilia for New Mexico's upcoming celebration. Interested parties can take their memorabilia to 208 N. Lea Ave. Pictured from left to right: Phelps White, Bonnie Montgomery, Melanie Deason, Melinda Angel Gonzalez and, artist Sue Wink.

STATE BRIEFS

Governor adds

student promotion to session agenda

SANTA FE (AP) — Gov. Martinez wants the Legislature during an upcoming special session to approve a measure to stop promoting public school students who lack basic skills in reading. Martinez said Monday the education measure will be part of the agenda of the session, which is to start

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Under the proposal, third-graders lacking basic reading skills will be held back rather than moving to the next grade. Supporters say students who can’t read by the third grade are at a high risk of later dropping out of school.

The special session is being called for redistricting, but Martinez says there’s enough time for lawmakers to consider other issues.

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Governor gets perfect score on gun test

LAS CRUCES (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez may have a security detail, but she still carries her own gun. And she apparently knows just how to use it. The Las Cruces Sun News reports Martinez received perfect scores on recertification for her concealed-carry permit over the weekend in Las Cruces. Her staff says she

Census: NM ranks 5th in proportion of gay couples ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — New Mexico has the fifthhighest proportion of same-sex couples in the nation and over ten years has seen a 73 percent jump in households identifying as same-sex couples, according to a new analysis of census figures. The report said 9.8 out of every 1,000 New Mexico households are headed by same-sex couples with most located in the northern part of the state. Only Vermont, Massachusetts, California and Oregon had higher proportions of same-sex couples, according to the report by Williams Institute on Sexual Orientation Law, a think tank based at the University of California, Los Angeles. The Eldorado community outside of Santa Fe, the state’s capital, had the highest proportion of same-sex couples of any town or city in the state with nearly 45 out of every 1,000 households reporting to be headed by a same-sex couple. Placitas, a town located just north of Albuquerque and next to the Santa Ana Pueblo Indian Reser-

vation, came in second and reported 26.45 samesex couples per 1,000 households. Most of the same-sex couples — approximately 66 percent — were women, the numbers showed. The report also said that since the 2000 Census that New Mexico saw the number of reported same-sex households jump from about 4,900 to around 7,800. Gary Gates, one of the study’s authors and a demographer who studies sexual orientation and gender identity laws and policy, said New Mexico’s spike is likely a result of increased migration to the state and because more couples are identifying as same-sex households. “New Mexico relative to some other states did in fact have a proportional larger population increase, which could contribute, somewhat, to why it has a higher increase in same-sex couples,” said Gates. “But again I think the bulk of that increase suggests increase acceptance and more people willing to

report.” New Mexico does not allow same-sex couples to legally marry. Gates said there was a 50 percent increase nationally of same-sex couples. Last year’s once-adecade count of the nation’s population represented the first time the Census Bureau encouraged gay, lesbian and bisexual couples who consider themselves spouses to report their marital status as “husband,” or “wife” even if they were not legally married. Couples also had the option of counting themselves as “unmarried partners.” Rodney Felix, 51, editor of gayinsantafe.com, said he wasn’t surprised about the news that New Mexico saw a jump in reported same-sex couples. Felix moved eight years to Santa Fe from the Jersey Shore mainly because the area was gay friendly. “I think what’s shocking for a lot of people,” said Felix, “is that the community is so entrenched with the rest of the community that it’s just life to us.”

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A federal review of the potential environmental ef fects of expanding a coal mining operation on the Navajo reservation will continue uninterrupted after a panel of federal judges dismissed an appeal by the mine operator that tried to stop the assessment. Conservation groups hailed the decision from the three-judge panel with the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver. The ruling prevents BHP Billiton from expanding its operation on tribal land in northwestern New Mexico while federal regulators reassess the effects of the Navajo Mine per mit on the environment and cultural and historic resources in the area. The mine covers thousands of acres and produces coal for the Four Corners Power Plant, one of the largest coal-fired

generating stations in the U.S. The plant, operated by Arizona Public Service Co., provides electricity for customers in New Mexico, Arizona and other parts of the Southwest. BHP Billiton said Monday it was reviewing the court’s decision and that operations were continuing in all areas except the parcel covered by the proposed expansion. “BHP Billiton’s New Mexico coal operations have an overriding commitment to protect and care for the environment,” the company said in a statement, pointing to its reclamation work throughout the region. Mike Eisenfeld of the group San Juan Citizens Alliance said the ruling affirms the responsibility of the U.S. Office of Surface Mining, Reclamation and Enforcement to “properly analyze the significant impacts” of mining on the parcel known

as Area IV North. The San Juan Citizens Alliance and Dine Citizens Against Ruining our Environment sued in 2007, claiming the agency violated federal laws when renewing the mine’s per mit in 2004 and approving a revised permit in 2005. They argue an environmental impact statement needs to be done before the revised permit can be approved. Such a review would require consultation with other federal agencies, including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which manages endangered species in the Four Corners region. The groups’ lawsuit claimed the Office of Surface Mining did not provide adequate public notice and failed to fully analyze potential consequences as required by the National Environmental Policy Act.

Review of Navajo mine moves forward

scored 100 percent with both .38- and .45-caliber handguns.

Martinez spokesman Greg Blair says Martinez was Dona Ana County district attorney and a Republican candidate for governor when she first went through training and qualified to carry a concealed weapon in 2009. Blair says Martinez now has a security detail. But she still chooses to carry a weapon.

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Just as you seek the services of an experienced real estate professional in buying and selling homes and other properties, you should make sure your loan officer or mortgage broker is experienced. How to find someone with experience? Ask your real estate representative. Brokers differ from loan officers in that

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Curry County looking at jail time alternatives

CLOVIS (AP) — It costs so much to house people convicted of petty offenses in Curry County jails that county leaders are taking a more serious look at two alternatives — community service and the decriminalization of traffic offenses.

Jail Administrator Keith Norwood tells the Clovis News Jour nal it’s time Roswell Daily Record

Curry County had a community service or work release program, allowing people to serve their time outside the confines of a jail cell. Norwood is drafting a policy for consideration by county commissioners. It’s the first step toward creating a program he is convinced could solve some overcrowding. Chandler is also championing a new statewide push to decriminalize minor traffic offenses. USPS No 471-200

News & Business Telephone 622-7710 Circulation Telephone 622-7730

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GENERAL

A3

Gov. Martinez to seek road money in special session Roswell Daily Record

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

SANTA FE (AP) — Gov. Susana Martinez’s administration plans to ask the Legislature to provide $41 million for road maintenance across the state to help offset costs the Transportation Department incurred paying its share for the Rail Runner commuter train system. The Republican governor wants lawmakers to provide the money in a capital improvement financing bill during a special legislative session, which is to start next week. The administration developed the request after reviewing the Rail Runner’s long-ter m costs to the

state. A new analysis by the Department of Finance and Administration estimates the commuter rail operation is costing an average of $65 million, with the state picking up the biggest share of that. The largest expense is debt service — averaging nearly $42 million a year for the state — to retire bonds for capital expenses to start the rail service, including locomotives and rail cars. Those costs are similar to the financing charges that homeowners pay on a mortgage. The Rail Runner Express serves an average of about 4,500 one-way riders along

a corridor between Belen and Santa Fe, according to the Rio Metro Regional T ransit District, which oversees operations of the rail system. Scott Dar nell, a spokesman for the governor, said the administration prepared the financial analysis “to gain an accurate understanding of the true costs of the Rail Runner.” The Legislature is expected to consider a more than $200 million package to finance capital improvements across the state. Martinez wants $41 million this year for the Department of Transportation for

road work — an amount nearly equivalent to the Rail Runner debt service. The money for capital improvements will come from the proceeds of bonds backed by severance tax revenues. “Given the significant investment of state road fund dollars to the Rail Runner in recent years, statewide road maintenance has suffered,” Darnell said in a statement. The department is financed separately from the state’s main budget account. The agency gets ear marked revenues, including taxes on gasoline and diesel and fees on

trucking companies. According to the administration, Rail Runner debt service accounts for about 11 percent of the money in the state road fund that is available to the department for its operations and highway projects. Terrence Doyle, director of the Rio Metro transit district, said Monday the rail system had an operating budget of nearly $24 million last year. To include debt service in Rail Runner expenses — as the Martinez administration does in its analysis — magnifies costs in a way that usually isn’t considered when looking at the

price tag of a highway project, he said. Road projects often are described only by their construction costs. The Rail Runner was financed as part of a $1.6 billion transportation bond program approved by the Legislature in 2003 when Democrat Bill Richardson was governor. The Martinez administration estimates the state will pay $834 million in debt service by 2027 on the Rail Runner and that cumulative operating costs will reach nearly $496 million by then.

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Direct U.S. talks with the Taliban had evolved to a substantive negotiation before Afghan of ficials, nervous that the secret and independent talks would undercut President Hamid Karzai, scuttled them, Afghan and U.S. officials told The Associated Press. Featured prominently in the talks was the whereabouts and eventual release of U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl of Hailey, Idaho, who was captured more than two years ago in Afghanistan, easter n according to a senior Western diplomat in the region and a childhood friend of the Taliban negotiator, Tayyab Aga. The U.S. negotiators asked Aga what could be done to gain Bergdahl’s release. The discussion did not get into specifics but Aga discussed the release of Afghan prisoners at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and in Afghanistan at Bagram Air Field. Published reports about the clandestine meetings ended the talks abruptly, and sent Aga into hiding. Collapse of the direct talks between Aga and U.S. officials probably spoiled the best chance yet at Mullah reaching Mohammed Omar, considered the linchpin to ending the Taliban fight against the U.S.-backed government in Afghanistan. The contacts were preliminary but had begun to bear fruit, Afghan and U.S. officials said. Perhaps most important-

ly they offered the tantalizing prospect of a brokered agreement between the U.S. and the Taliban — one that would allow the larger reconciliation of the Taliban into Afghanistan political life to move forward. The United States has not committed to any such deal, but the Taliban wants security assurances from Washington. In a series of interviews with diplomats, current and former Taliban, Afghan government officials and a close childhood friend of Aga, the AP learned Aga is hiding in Europe, and is afraid to return to Pakistan fearing reprisals. A senior U.S. of ficial acknowledged that the talks imploded because of the leak and that Aga, while alive, had disappeared. The U.S. will continue to pursue talks, the official said. Current and former U.S. officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the talks. The U.S. acknowledged the meetings after Karzai, who apparently fears being sidelined by U.S.-Taliban talks, confirmed published accounts about them in June, but has never publicly detailed the content, format or participants. The first was held in late 2010 followed by at least two other meetings in early spring of this year, the former U.S. official said. The sessions were held in Germany and Qatar, the official said. The childhood friend of

Aga’s, who spoke to the AP on condition he not be identified because he feared retaliation, said Aga was in Germany. A diplomat in the region said Aga fled to a European country after his contacts with the United States were revealed. The talks were deliberately revealed by someone in the presidential palace, where Karzai’s of fice is located, said a Western and an Afghan official. The reason was Karzai’s animosity toward the U.S. and fear that any agreement Washington brokered would undermine his authority, they said. The AP sought comment from Karzai’s office but was referred to palace press department spokesman Hamid Elmi, who did not answer his phone during repeated calls. Pakistan had also been kept in the dark about the talks, people knowledgeable about them said. An Afghan official with contacts with the Taliban said the insurgents decided not to tell Pakistan about the meetings with the United States. At the time of the leak, Washington had already offered small concessions as “confidence-building measures,” a former senior U.S. official said. They were aimed at developing a rapport and moving talks forward, said a current U.S. official on condition he not be identified because of the sensitivity of the topic. The concessions included treating the Taliban and alQaida dif ferently under

international sanctions. The Taliban had argued that while al-Qaida is focused on worldwide jihad against the West, Taliban militants have focused on Afghanistan and have shown little interest in attacking targets abroad. Other goodwill gestures that were not made public included Aga’s safe passage to Germany, U.S. officials said. The U.S. also offered assurances that it would not block the Taliban from opening an office in a third country, the official said. Aga slowly established his bona fides with the U.S. officials, who had initial doubts both about his identity and his level of contact and influence with Omar, former and current U.S. official with knowledge of the discussion said. Aga sought the freedom of Taliban fighters in U.S. custody in Guantanamo Bay and Bagram Air Field, north of the Afghan capital where an estimated 600 Afghans are being held. Still at Guantanamo Bay is for mer Taliban Defense Ministry Chief of Staff Mullah Mohammed Fazil, Taliban intelligence official Abdul Haq Wasiq and former Herat governor Mullah Khairullah Khairkhwa. Afghanistan’s High Peace Council tasked by Karzai with finding a negotiated settlement with insurgents has requested Khairkhwa’s release. A for mer U.S. of ficial familiar with the talks said the loss of the Aga contact dismayed and angered the U.S. side, and further erod-

ed thin trust in Karzai. There is a dif ference of opinion among U.S. diplomats, military officials and others about how directly Karzai should be blamed, but several officials agreed that the leak was an attempt to torpedo a diplomatic channel that Karzai and his inner circle worried would sideline and undercut the Afghan leader. As the Afghan war slides into its 10th year and Washington plans to withdraw its combat forces by the end of 2014, a negotiated settlement between the Karzai government and the Taliban has become a stated goal for the United States. It is the centerpiece of efforts by Marc Grossman, the U.S. special envoy to Afghanistan and Pakistan. Karzai has launched a separate peace outreach, with the High Peace Council representing numerous political factions. A member of that High Peace Council, who asked not to be identified by name so he could talk candidly, told the AP that the leaking of the talks reveals the level of mistrust and the lack of coordination among the key players in any eventual peace deal. He said all the key players — the United States, Afghan government, Afghan National Security Council and the High Peace Council — are holding separate and secret talks with their own contacts within the insurgency. The United States, for example, has also held

secret talks with Ibrahim Haqqani, the brother of Jalaluddin Haqqani, who heads the notorious Haqqani network considered by U.S. and NATO troops in Afghanistan to be their biggest threat. That contact was confirmed by of ficials from Pakistan, Afghanistan and the U.S. Karzai met with representatives of wanted rebel leader Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, who is seeking greater involvement at the peace table and direct talks with the United States, said diplomats in the region. A U.S. official familiar with the talks said Kayani made a pitch during his marathon meeting with Kerry that Pakistan take on a far larger role in Afghanistan peacemaking. The United States considers Pakistan an essential part of an eventual deal, but neither the U.S. nor Pakistan trusts the other’s motives in Afghanistan. Meanwhile, an unexpected consequence of attempts to find peace with the Taliban has been the rearming of the so-called Northern Alliance, that represents Afghanistan’s ethnic minorities and who were partnered with the coalition at the outset of Operation Enduring Freedom to topple the Taliban regime. For the warlords that make up the Norther n Alliance, Martine van Bijlert, co-director and cofounder of the Afghan Analyst Network in the capital, Kabul, talk of peace threatens their survival.

U.S. talks with Taliban focus on release of U.S. soldier

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LETTERS


A4 Tuesday, August 30, 2011

OPINION

Governor’s jet gone, but still has political uses

...

There’s something about a jet

The governor won headlines for selling the “ultimate symbol of waste and excess,” an executive jet purchased by her predecessor, for less than half its purchase price. It was an unwise acquisition in the first place, and its fire sale during a recession is questionable, but hey, we’re talking symbols here. As a corporate PR person in the 1970s, it was my responsibility to explain the Lear jet purchased and used by executives of PNM, the state’s biggest utility. Management saw it as a tool. Long before cell phones and laptops, their frequent trips east to raise money meant they were difficult to reach, and the prevailing concern was to minimize their time away. However, the public and media saw it as an unconscionable luxury at a time when rates were ris-

SHERRY ROBINSON

ALL SHE WROTE

ing. Even though the cost was a flyspeck in the bottom line, it just looked bad. This kind of tunnel vision seems to be a weakness in a lot of leaders. For mer Gov. Bill Richardson’s insistence on buying the jet in 2005 over public objections may be seen as an early sign of an otherwise savvy politician’s loss of touch with the people. New Mexico’s $5.5 million 2005 Cessna Citation Bravo was the most expensive state aircraft in the region and the only stateowned jet in the Southwest. Republican radio ads said the

Roswell Daily Record

plane was proof of Richardson’s “lifestyle of the rich and famous.” About that time Alaska Gov. Frank Murkowski, a Republican, dumped his state’s two aging planes and bought a jet, an equally unpopular move. Democrats said Murkowski thought he was too good to ride with the people on Alaska Airlines, according to the Juneau Empire. Both governors argued practicality. Richardson said the jet would be safer, that state agencies would also use the plane. Murkowski argued that Alaska was so large a modern plane was a necessity. Both planes became political baggage. A newcomer named Sarah Palin trounced Murkowski in the Republican primary in 2006 and later tried to sell her state’s jet on eBay. Both planes sold through brokers for less than the asking price. So there’s more than a little

irony in Gov. Susana Martinez selling the jet to an Alaska couple for $2.5 million. Unlike the sale of other state equipment, this one got a ceremony, with the jet in the background sporting a large “SOLD” sign. Martinez reminded the cameras of her campaign promise to unload the thing, assured us she was never a passenger, and gave the purchaser a hug for taking it off her hands. The jet has been more useful to Martinez on the ground than it was to Richardson in the air. During her campaign Martinez pounded her opponent, Lt. Gov. Diane Denish, for using the jet, saying, “Those are wasted dollars that our kids could be benefiting from.” She even had billboards: “Sell the jet!” A simple issue that fits on a billboard, the jet resonated with the public. And it made a great backdrop for the ceremonial handing over of the keys. The for-

mer state jet is now flying the skies of Alaska, but expect to see it again in Martinez’s campaign ads — either for a second term or whatever higher national office she’s being groomed for. As the governor was hugging the jet’s wealthy buyer, state Senate leaders announced an initiative that matters to people — the 38-member, bipartisan Jobs Leadership Team, which will develop recommendations to spur job growth. This follows the announcement of an already developed jobs plan by the Association of Commerce and Industry. Senate Majority Leader Michael Sanchez, a Belen Democrat, did not say what took them so long, but at least they’re focusing on job creation. So the score in that arena is industry, 1; Senate, 1; administration, 0. © New Mexico News Services 2011

EDITORIAL

Big Brothers Big Sisters

The board of directors for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeastern New Mexico is scheduled to meet today, and sour ces inside and outside of the agency indicate the board will vote on whether or not to merge operations with the Santa Fe branch. It is our hope the board will hold off on the vote for just a little longer. We’ve been told our area’s organization has been struggling to make ends meet for a long time. There have been financial dif ficulties and pr oblems retaining staff. It’s been a trying time for many good people who have taken on the responsibility of helping a lot of young people in need of guidance. A merger with Santa Fe would not mean an end to local services. It would reduce staff and local oversight here though. We’ve always maintained local needs are best managed by local people. Our area has specific needs that might not be recognized by people in Santa Fe. Children here would continue to benefit from the insight of local residents who better understand the issues here if a merger is avoided. Rather than voting today to merge with Santa Fe, we would suggest that the board postpone action until the communities in our region are made awar e of the dif ficulties facing Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeastern New Mexico. We recognize this is a difficult request given the long period the chapter has been struggling. Living in limbo worrying all the time about making ends meet is frustrating and tiring. It would be easy to walk away after so much effort just to keep operations barely afloat with no sign of help in the immediate future. However, Roswell and many other communities in southeastern New Mexico possess a great many generous individuals and businesses. If made aware that local contr ol may be lost, we believe there would be a number of donors interested in supporting the local agency. A plea for assistance carried to the public by the media, civic and service organizations and simply by word of mouth might pr oduce astounding results. If it does not, the merger can always be done later. We believe, however, that if Roswell and other nearby communities are made aware of this need, they will respond with the generosity that is a hallmark of southeastern New Mexico.

A New York earthquake state of mind Did you feel it? That was the unexpected question New Yorkers were asking each other. Did you feel the earth move beneath your feet in a city that hasn’t felt an earthquake of this magnitude since 1884? Most of the people in New York have been getting ready to mark an anniversary of something that happened a decade ago but still feels fresh in many minds. Perhaps this earthquake will shake more of us to think critically about what else has happened during the past decade. After looking at the images of post-earthquake damage,

Doonesbury

MARIA HINOJOSA SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

including a chipped Washington Monument, we should all be asking how much of our tax dollars were spent fighting expensive wars overseas when we could have been employing people here to build up our infrastructure, if not our economy and our mood. I heard someone say that in

order to be helped by the United States, you have to be its enemy. Look at all of the infrastructure and construction money poured into Iraq — not that I don’t want to help the decent people of Iraq, but why can’t our leadership see that it makes more sense to build schools here than to bomb schools in Basra and then use our tax dollars to build new ones there? And a decade after 9/11, people are asking less about al-Qaida and more about the nuclear power plants that were in this East Coast earthquake. New York City is only 90 miles from the Indian Point

nuclear power plant. And in Virginia, the epicenter of the quake, the North Anna Nuclear Generating Station, located on a fault line, is only built to withstand a 5.9 to 6.1 magnitude quake. The plant has no seismographs because they were removed after budget cuts. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has ruled it the seventh-most likely to receive damage from an earthquake. And yet House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, whose Virginia district encompasses the epicenter, believes there

See HINOJOSA, Page A5

ROSWELL DAILY RECORD

CALL 622-7710

DEAR DR. GOTT: I am a 59-year -old male. For the last couple of years I have had bouts of lightheadedness that have become progressively worse. I tried eating more often, as that seemed to help a little. My doctor ordered blood work, an EEG and an MRI, and sent me to a specialist, who diagnosed an insulinoma following a CT scan that showed a tumor on the head of my pancreas. What is an insulinoma, and how did I get it? DEAR READER: An insulinoma is a pancreatic tumor. It produces too much insulin, resulting in hyperinsulinemia. This can, in turn, cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

ASK DR. GOTT UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

Insulinomas are rare and typically occur as a single, small tumor in adults but can, very rarely, occur in children. Most (more than 90 percent of all cases) are benign, so there is little risk of malignancy and spread. Symptoms can include tremor, hunger, headache, dizziness, convulsion, confusion, sweating, rapid heart

rate, anxiety, clouded vision, loss of consciousness, behavior changes and, less commonly, weight gain. Treatment is typically surgery. If a single tumor is present, it is removed; however, if more than one is present, part of the pancreas may need to be removed. In severe cases where most of the pancreas is affected, at least 15 percent of the pancreas needs to be left in order for it to continue producing adequate levels of enzymes. In some cases this may mean that not all of the insulinomas are removed. If a tumor isn’t found during surgery or the individual isn’t a candidate for surgery,

the medication diazoxide can be prescribed. It is used to lower insulin production and avoid hypoglycemia. A diuretic is also given to prevent fluid retention. Occasionally, octreotide or lanreotide, another similar medication, may be recommended to lower insulin levels. Most cases are curable with surgery; however, complications can arise in individuals before tumor removal or if the tumor cannot be fully excised. These include the symptoms mentioned above plus seizures, coma and, rarely, death. I cannot say why you See GOTT, Page A5

25 YEARS AGO

Aug. 30, 1986 • Corby S. Carbone, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bob J. Carbone of Roswell, recently completed training in fundamental military skills at the Army ROTC Challenge Camp, formerly basic camp, at Fort Knox. The camp is designed to give college juniors and sophomores who have not taken ROTC courses the chance to enter the program. The camp also qualifies high school graduates for the ROTC program at any of the nation’s six military junior colleges. During the encampment, cadets received training in basic rifle marksmanship, military drill and ceremonies, communications and individual and small unit tactics. Carbone plans to enter the ROTC program this fall at New Mexico Military Institute in Roswell. • Army Chief Warrant Officer Bruce D. Folman, son of Matelda C. Folman of El Paso, recently arrived for duty with the 29th Area Support Group, West Germany. Folman is a maintenance technician. His wife, Louise, is the daughter of Carl M. Lawson of Roswell.


LOCAL

A5

Library offers access to a variety of databases Roswell Daily Record

LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

Monday is Labor Day. The library and the book drop will be closed from 6 p.m. on Sunday until 9 a.m. on Tuesday. September is Library Card Sign-Up Month. The Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania Ave., invites everyone to become a card carrying member of the library. Parents are encouraged to be sure that their children have the most important school supply of all — a library card. Young people under the age of 14 must have a parent or legal guardian sign their application. To obtain a library card, present proof of identity and address at the Circulation Desk. For more information, visit the library, phone 575-622-7101 or go online to www.roswellpubliclibrary.org. Although a library card is not needed to read the newspapers, magazines or books within the library, a card is necessary to check out materials, use the public computers or access the library’s databases from offsite computers.

Book Talk

NoveList, along with Magazine Article Summaries in English and Spanish, Auto Repair Reference Center, Consumer Health Complete and Hobbies & Craft Reference Center, are featured in the EBSCOhost database provided by the library. NoveList provides information on novels by author, title, series, genre, awards, readalikes and other recommendations, as well as including a brief

description and usually a magazine review. It is an excellent way to determine the order in which to read sequels. Deanne Dekle, children’s librarian, explores the wonders of sequels, which continues the story or expands upon issues presented in some previous work. Often the story and characters are so good they can’t be contained in just one book. Her selections are “Overbite” by Meg Cabot and “Uncommon Criminals” by Ally Carter. Meg Cabot has a growing collection of adult novels. Last year’s “Insatiable” features Meena Harper, who discovers that vampires do exist and that Lucien, her new boyfriend, is none other than the son of Dracula himself. In “Overbite,” the story continues with Meena, who is now working for the Vatican’s secret vampire hunting branch, the Palatine. She hasn’t seen Lucien since the Palatine tried to kill him. Fortunately, when she is attacked by a rogue vampire, Lucien comes to her rescue. Now, she must decide between her ex (the vampire) and her hot new coworker, Alaric (the vampire hunter.) Meanwhile, she has to uncover who’s making new vampires in New York City and at the same time figure out what’s going on in New Jersey that’s causing demons to appear out of nowhere! These titles are filled with Cabot’s signature humor.

Ally Carter’s “Heist Society” will be enjoyed by teens and older children. It is available in print, as a “talking book” and as an ebook. Kat Bishop is the daughter of notorious art thieves. She has enrolled in a prestigious boarding school to escape the family business and try to live a normal life. When her father is accused of stealing previously stolen masterpieces, Kat resolves to find the missing paintings and retur n them to their owner. In “Uncommon Criminals,” a feeble, old woman has asked Kat to steal the world famous Cleopatra emerald. The woman has been fighting a court case for years to obtain the emerald but is now forced to resort to illegal measures. Kat manages to do so, only to realize she was double-crossed and has to steal the emerald again and return it to the actual owners. Kat joins with her crew, which includes the handsome, rich W.W. Hale V, her gorgeous cousin Gabriella and a band of misfit boys. Together, they must figure out how to outsmart a worthy opponent, steal the unstealable in front of hundreds of people, all without causing a family rift or getting caught.

What’s Happening?

Dinosaurs in stories and crafts will stomp into the 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Wednesday story times. The stories might feature “Dinosaur Stomp,” “Digging for Dinosaurs,” “If the Dinosaurs Came Back,” “Snappy Little Dinosaurs” or “Flapdoodle Dinosaurs.” Precut craft materials will be provided for those in attendance and may include cre-

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

ating a prehistoric dinosaur scene, assembling a 3-D T -Rex and making a dinosaur mask to wear home. The stories may vary between programs and the quantities of some craft items may be limited. Sunflowers will bloom in stories during the 2 p.m. Saturday story and craft hour. The books could highlight “Life Cycle of a Sunflower,” “Sam Plants a Sunflower,” “Sunflower Sal” or “A Handful of Sunshine.” Precut craft materials will be provided for making a good-smelling sunflower using paper and foam, assembling a pair of “sunflower” sunglasses and crafting a sunflower hat with a paper headband, lots of pretty paper sunflowers and some smiley face suns. The quantities of some craft items may be limited.

Library Databases

In addition to EBSCOhost, the library has other databases. GALE/CENGAGE Databases features InfoTrac, a large group of databases that includes information from reference books as well as from journals, newspapers and magazines. They focus on business, computer history, English and Spanish periodicals, and even e-books. Separate databases are designed to meet the information needs of elementary, middle school/junior high and high school students as well as educators. Kids InfoBits is designed especially for students in kindergarten through grade five. Gale Opposing Viewpoints in Context is for those seeking contextual information and opinions on hundreds of

today’s hottest social issues. The Small Business Resource Center provides users with small business management resources via a combination of periodicals and reference content. From conducting industry research to financial planning, to marketing a product and franchising a business, it provides users with the information they need to succeed. ChiltonLibrary represents the most authoritative automotive repair information available to car owners, covering the most popular vehicles of the past 30 years. “Price It! Antiques & Collectibles” is a database for identifying, researching and pricing art, antiques and collectibles. The ELECTRIC LIBRAR Y accesses a large number of print and electronic sources, with articles from the past happenings to present-day subjects. NEWSBANK offers local, regional and national U.S. newspapers coverage. The LEARNING EXPRESS is for all ages with resources useful at school, at work or in life. Each of the centers offers the practice tests, exercises, skill-building courses, e-books and general information such as the studying for the GED, writing resumes and job searching. MANGO LANGUAGES is an online language-learning system that can help you lear n languages like Spanish, French, Japanese, Brazilian Portuguese, Ger man, Mandarin Chinese, Greek, Italian, Russian and more. Other databases are: ACCELERATED READERS BOOK, A TO Z MAPS ONLINE and FASTWEB, a guide to scholarships.

More school choice a welcome development for students ED FEULNER THE HERITAGE FOUNDATION

We’re used to hearing bad news from the education front — poor test scores, falling literacy, slipping standards. But the new academic year brings a welcome change: school-choice programs have expanded significantly in recent months. Indeed, The Wall Street Journal has already dubbed 2011 “The Year of School Choice.” As of this month, 18 states and Washington, D.C., have policies that support private-school choice. But public-school choice options are also continuing to grow. On top of that, there are millions of children participating in K–12 courses online. Meanwhile, homeschooling and charter schools are becoming more widespread. There are many good public schools across this country, with dedicated teachers who deserve praise. Unfortunately, there are also many bad schools, especially in urban areas. When you consider the damage these institutions inflict — making it nearly impossible for students to learn and fulfill their potential — you realize it’s nothing short of a national crime. That’s why it’s so heartening to see the school-

LETTER POLICY

choice movement gaining ground. It’s encouraging, too, to see this trend crossing the usual red-state/blue-state divide. School choice isn’t spreading in just one region. It’s surging nationwide. Take Ohio. According to a new report from Heritage Foundation education experts Lindsey Burke and Rachel Sheffield, the Buckeye State has four private-school choice programs now — a national first. Before now, Ohio’s Educational Choice Scholarship Program was capped at 14,000 students. Now it’s open to 30,000, and legislators have made it possible for more students to qualify. They’ve also added a program for special-needs students, one that provides up to 90 percent of their state education funding for the school their parents choose. Low-income children are being helped as well, thanks to the Cleveland Scholarship and Tutoring Program. Or look at Minnesota. Residents there can use the K-12 Education Credit Program, which provides tax credits to help cover educational expenses at a school of their choosing, up to 75 percent of the amount spent. Thousands of families have

The Daily Record welcomes and attempts to publish all letters to the editor that meet guidelines. To be published, letters must include the writer’s first and last name, address and telephone number. Addresses and telephone numbers will not be published unless the letter asks for a response. Addresses and telephone numbers are used for verification or to contact the letter writer for more information. All letters except those sent by e-mail must be signed. Letters which are libelous, written in poor taste, promote or attack individual businesses or concern active civil court cases will not be published. Letters must either be typed or written or printed legibly. Because of limited space, letters should not exceed 600 words. Because of the large volume of letters received, those unpublished may not be acknowledged or returned and a maximum of two letters a month will be printed by any individual writer. The Daily Record reserves the right to reject any letter.

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should be less regulation of nuclear power plants and not more. Are we prepared to become another Japan, where the government told its citizens things were safe when it knew they weren’t? The unexpected earthquake took me back to the naivete I had about life a decade ago. I used to feel fearless and invincible and in control. Post-earthquake and post 9/11, I know for certain that our lives can change in an instant, so we must love the moment, love our families and give thanks for

every day. But we must never stop being vigilant and critical of the institutions around us, and never stop demanding that our government serve us well with our tax dollars. We should never give up our voices to question everything at any time, and demand that our elected leaders listen and be held accountable. Maria Hinojosa is an award-winning broadcast journalist. She hosts the Emmy Award-winning “Maria Hinojosa: One-on-One” on PBS, and is the anchor and managing editor of her own NPR show, “Latino USA.” Contact her at mh@futuromediagroup.org. © 2011 by Maria Hinojosa

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been taking advantage of the program, and ensuring a high-quality education for their children. Arizona is another state that’s been helping parents. Gov. Jan Brewer recently signed legislation creating an Education Savings Account program for special-needs students. Under it, Arizona deposits 90 percent of the state per-pupil education funding into a savings account that parents control. They can use it for privateschool tuition, online education, homeschooling, or to save for college. The funds that are unused in one year can be rolled over to the next. Up to 17,000 specialneeds students are expected to be eligible for the program this year. States also have been getting private businesses involved. Rhode Island, for example, has its Corporate Scholarship Tax Credit program. Businesses can get a tax credit worth 75 percent of whatever they contribute to a scholarship-granting organization. Pennsylvania has been doing something similar for the past decade — offering businesses a tax credit to encourage charitable donations that fund tuition scholarships. Perhaps the most hopeful sign occurred

developed the tumor, but I urge you to speak to an endocrinologist and determine if you are eligible for surgery. If not, you should be prescribed one of the above medications to help control your insulin levels and prevent serious adverse reactions. DEAR DR. GOTT: A few years ago I noticed a distinct change of flavors in many of the foods and drinks I consume, especially colas. Those affected products tasted so bad that I had to stop eating or drinking them altogether. I had been using zinc products that claim to shorten colds but had never used the nose sprays; however, when I read about the people who had used the sprays and lost their sense of taste, I stopped using all zinc products. Gradually my sense of taste is returning to normal. I still cannot drink Pepsi, my favorite soda. I hope this can help others who have lost their sense of

here in our nation’s capital: Congress has reauthorized the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program. Despite its popularity and success, the program was being phased out, and President Obama was doing nothing to save it. Now, however, thanks in large measure to House Speaker John Boehner, the program has been restored. In fact, the program’s reauthorization is the only piece of legislation Boehner will sponsor this year — that’s how important the issue is to him. The DCOSP budget went up, too, from $13.2 million to $20 million. Low-income students in elementary grades will receive scholarships worth $8,000. For highschool students, it will be $12,000. There’s still a long way to go, of course. School choice isn’t as widely available as it should be, and teachers’ unions continue to fight it at every step. And although the trend lines are moving in the right direction, we can’t rest until every child has access to the school that best meets his or her needs. Our nation’s future depends on it. Ed Feulner is president of The Heritage Foundation (www.heritage.org).

taste. DEAR READER: Zinc is a metal/mineral that the body requires in order to maintain normal functioning. Most individuals obtain all that they need through diet. In higher-than-recommended doses, zinc is known to cause a metallic taste in the mouth, which can adversely affect the flavors of foods and drinks. Readers who are interested in learning more can order my Health Report “Vitamins and Minerals” by sending a self-addressed, stamped No. 10 envelope and a $2 U.S. check or money order for each report t o D r. P e t e r G o t t , P. O . B o x 4 3 3 , L a k e v i l l e , C T 06039. Be sure to mention the title(s), or print an o r d e r f o r m f r o m my website’s direct link: www.AskDrGottMD.com/order_form.pdf. Dr. Peter H. Gott is a retired physician and the author of several books, including “Live Longer, Live Better,” “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Diet” and “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Cookbook,” which are available at most bookstores or online. His website is www.AskDrGottMD.com.


A6 Tuesday, August 30, 2011 Irene

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rivers and streams and turned them into torrents. Irene dumped up to 11 inches of rain on Vermont and more than 13 in parts of New York. “We were expecting heavy rains,” said Bobbi-Jean Jeun of Clarksville, a hamlet near Albany, N.Y. “We were expecting flooding. We weren’t expecting devastation. It looks like somebody set a bomb off.” Meanwhile, the 11-state death toll, which had stood at 21 as of Sunday night, rose sharply as bodies were pulled from floodwaters and people were electrocuted by downed power lines. The tally of Irene’s destruction mounted, too. An apparently vacant home exploded in an evacuated, flooded area in Pompton Lakes, N.J., early Monday, and firefighters had to battle the flames from a boat. In the Albany, N.Y., suburb of Guilderland, police rescued two people Monday after their car was swept away. Rescuers found them

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Disc golf is just like regular golf, but played without clubs and with flying discs instead of

Herrera

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felony murder as a result of the felony “shooting at a motor vehicle,” along with the tampering with evidence charge. Defense attorney Jesse Cosby told Judge Charles Currier that he had received the amended criminal information, but had

J.O.Y.

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accompany the senior to the hospital or emergency room, just to ensure he or she is not left alone. Aside from its meal program, J.O.Y. Centers promote wellbeing amongst seniors through various forms of recreation. The Roswell center has a billiards room, exercise machines, a variety of games, and weekly programs. There is a writer’s club where writers get to express themselves on

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dam Hussein in the trial that led to his hanging. Ahmed Bani, military spokesman of the council, said he was not surprised to hear Algeria welcomed Gadhafi’s relatives. Throughout the sixmonth Libyan uprising, rebels have accused Algeria of providing Gadhafi with mercenaries to repress the revolt. Over the weekend, the Egyptian news agency MENA, quoting unidentified rebel fighters, reported that six armored Mercedes sedans, possibly carrying Gadhafi’s sons or other top regime figures, had crossed the border at the southwester n Libyan town of Ghadamis into Algeria. Algeria’s Foreign Ministry had denied that report. Bani said Monday that rebel forces may have killed Khamis Gadhafi in a clash Saturday. Rebel clashed with a military convoy near the town of Tarhouna, 50 miles (80 kilometers) southeast of T ripoli, destroying two vehicles in the convoy. The bodies in the cars were bur ned beyond recognition, he said, but

three hours later, clinging to trees along the swollen creek. “It’s going to take time to recover from a storm of this magnitude,” President Barack Obama warned as he promised the government would do everything in its power to help people get back on their feet. For many people, the aftermath could prove more painful than the stor m itself. In North Carolina, where Irene blew ashore along the Outer Banks on Saturday before heading for New York and New England, 1,000 people were still in emergency shelters, awaiting word on their homes. At the same time, nearly 5 million homes and businesses in a dozen states were still without electricity, and utilities warned it might be a week or more before some people got their power back. “Once the refrigerator gets warm, my insulin goes bad. I could go into diabetic shock. It’s kind of scary because we don’t know how long it’s going to be out for,” said Patricia Dillon, a partially paralyzed resident the traditional small, dimpled ball. “Disc golf is an up and coming sport,” LeBlanc said. “It’s a very popular sport (with) the student body.” LeBlanc said the weather in the area is ideal for disc golf and not had time to look at it to see if the alleged events fit the charges. Currier noted that there was a specific case where the charge of “shooting at or from a motor vehicle” was used in charges of felony murder. He then asked how Cosby’s client would plead or if he would “stand mute.” Currier had the clerk to enter a plea of not guilty on the alternate charges.

paper, and share their creations with others. A fitness program, provided through Senior Olympics, is another way for seniors to stay active. “(The program) helps seniors get in shape and stay in shape,” Phillips said. A little music also helps seniors stay in motion. “We tend to have music, especially on Wednesday,” Phillips said. “We do music for dancing.” J.O.Y. Centers also provide for the health of seniors through activities such as flu shot clinics and infor mational services. captured soldiers said they were Khamis Gadhafi’s bodyguards. “We are sure he is dead,” Col. Boujela Issawi, the rebel commander of Tarhouna, told AP. But then he cast some doubt, saying it was possible Gadhafi’s son was pulled alive from the car and taken to Bani Walid, a contested interior area. Rebel leaders have started to set up a new government in the capital Tripoli after their fighters drove Gadhafi’s defenders out over the past week. Gadhafi’s whereabouts are still unknown, however, and people close to him have claimed he is still in the country and leading a fight to hold onto power. The focus of concern is Gadhafi’s hometown of Sirte, his last major stronghold in the country. The town, 250 miles east of Tripoli, is heavily militarized and shows no signs yet of surrendering even though rebels say they are trying to negotiate a bloodless takeover. There was some fighting Monday on the easter n and wester n approaches to Sirte. Some have speculated that Gadhafi and other

GENERAL

of a home for the disabled in Milford, Conn., where the electricity was out and a generator failed. Her voice cracking, she added: “I’m very tired, stressed out, aggravated, scared.” Russ Furlong of Barrington, R.I., ruefully remembered the two weeks he went without power after Hurricane Bob 20 years ago. “Hopefully, we won’t have to wait that long this time,” he said. “Last night we had candles. It was romantic. It was fun. But that feeling doesn’t last too long.” Up and down the Eastern Seaboard, commuters and vacationers found their travel plans scrambled. Airlines warned it would be days before the thousands of passengers stranded by Irene find their way home. Some Amtrak service in the Northeast was suspended. Commuter trains between New Jersey and New York City were not running. Trains between the city and its northern suburbs were also disrupted. Kris and Jennifer Sylvester of Brooklyn sat on a bench in the town center in Woodstock, N.Y.,

with luggage at their feet and their daughters, aged 4 and 9, holding signs reading, “Need a Ride 2 NYC” and “Help Us, No Bus, No Train.” They rode Amtrak out for a long weekend in the country, but were unable to get home. “We’re hoping for anything,” Jennifer Sylvester said. In Vermont, the state’s emergency management headquarters stood empty, evacuated because of river flooding from Irene’s heavy rains. Rescuers used a boat and bucket loaders to pluck seven people from a swamped mobile home park in Lyndonville. In upstate New York, authorities were closely watching major dams holding back drinking water reservoirs. Throughout the region, hundreds of roads were impassable because of flooding or fallen trees, and some bridges had simply given way, including a 156year-old hand-hewn, wooden, covered bridge across Schoharie Creek in Blenheim, N.Y. In all, more than a dozen towns in Vermont and at least three in

that the course needs very little upkeep. This is Roswell’s second disc golf course. The other is an 18-hole course at Enchanted Lands on the northwest side of town. Jim Sexe, civil design-

er for the city of Roswell, helped LeBlanc lay out the course. He said the 18-hole course is both recreational and for advanced players, whereas the one near ENMU-R is “more of a recreational course for

The incident occurred after Foster and his passenger went to Herrera ‘s house. According to the original criminal complaint, Foster got out of the vehicle at Herrera’s house and went to talk to with him. Police asked the witness if “it sounded like there was arguing or if it was a normal conversation.” (The witness) “said at first it did not seem like anything, (but) then he was walking

back to the car....he was not happy.” Court records state that the passenger in the vehicle said Foster was driving away from Herrera ‘s house at 1104 West Walnut St. when she heard “a pop.” Foster went limp and the vehicle drove off the road and crashed into a fence. At the time of the killing, the RPD spokesman Officer Travis Holley said it didn’t “appear to be a random

J.O.Y. Centers also provide transportation and housekeeping services to seniors. The caregivers of seniors also get assistance through the J.O.Y. Centers. Through the J.O.Y. Caregiver Program, provided by the National Family Caregiver Support Program, the centers provide support groups, infor mation on supplemental services, and an adult day care. The day care provides respite for caregivers, while providing seniors with a safe place where they can socialize. Those affiliated with the Chaves County J.O.Y. Centers improve the lives of

senior regime figures may have fled there. A NATO of ficer, who asked not to be identified because of alliance rules, said there was fighting 30 miles (50 kilometers) east of Sirte. He said there are still clashes around Sirte, Bani Walid south of Misrata and Sebha further south. Taking Sirte will mean getting past entrances that are reportedly mined and an elite military unit. Gadhafi’s tribe is the most powerful in the city. Libyans familiar with the coastal city on which Gadhafi has lavished building projects say its first line of defense is a heavily fortified area called the al-Wadi alAhmar, 55 miles (90 kilometers) to the east. France said Monday it was dispatching a team of diplomats to reopen the French embassy there and see how France can aid the city. The European Union also was seizing a foothold in Tripoli. Kristalina Georgieva, European commissioner for international aid, said Monday the EU has opened a humanitarian office to help distribute medical and other emergency aid in the Libyan capital.

other community members — regardless of age — through initiatives such as the Foster Grandparent program and the Senior Companion program. These are volunteer programs for older adults. A foster grandparent works with children who have special needs. Senior companions, on the other hand, serve adults who are home-

Roswell Daily Record New York remained cut off by flooded roads and bridges. Still, there were glimmers of good news. In Pennsylvania, the Delaware River largely remained in its banks, cresting several feet lower than feared. The forecast for flooding on the Mohawk River in New York also eased at Schenectady, N.Y., where officials had worried that high water might threaten the city’s drinking water and sewage treatment plant. Early estimates put Irene’s damage at $7 billion to $10 billion, much smaller than the impact of monster storms such as Hurricane Katrina, which did more than $100 billion in damage. Irene’s effects are small compared to the overall U.S. economy, which produces about $14 trillion of goods and services every year. While hard-hit regions, such as the North Carolina coast, will suffer from lost tourism, rebuilding homes, repairing cars, and fixing streets and bridges should provide a small boost to economy, experts said. Irene was also good for the college.” LeBlanc said an expansion of the ENMUR golf course to an 18hole course might be in the works. Development of other student activities is also on the agenda. act.” During Monday’s hearing, Currier for a status report. Hutchins indicated that the ballistic report had been received. “The difficulty is the toxicology report.” She said she called to check the status and was advised that “the matter was under review.” Cosby reported he had discovered another incident the same night where there was a shooting at Hastings bound, those who may be institutionalized or in some need of assistance, and caregivers who serve their loved ones around the clock. As a member agency of the United Way of Chaves County, the J.O.Y. Centers receive designated funds as well as a portion of the overall funds the UWCC collects. Last year, the

business at Fantastic Kids Toys in New York City, where sales of board games and arts-and-crafts items surged on Friday and Saturday. “People were buying anything to keep their kids busy,” owner Steve Reis said. Many people were surprised by the destruction that Hurricane Irene wrought in communities far inland. But National Weather Service records show that 59 percent of the deaths attributed to hurricanes since the 1970s have been from freshwater flooding. As for why the flooding was so bad this time, Shaun Tanner, a meteorologist with the forecasting service Weather Underground, noted that August had been unusually wet, and Irene’s sheer size meant huge amounts of rain were dumped over a very large area. “More attention should have been paid to the torrential rain that Irene was going to dump not only on coastal areas, but also inland. That was clear several days ahead of time,” Tanner said. For more information about the new disc golf course, call 624-7404. For more information about disc golf in general, visit the Professional Disc Golf Association’s website at pdga.com.

v.kahin@roswell-record.com

that he believed involved the victim, but had been unable to locate the police report. Hutchin also said she filed a motion in limine to prevent certain information from being presented during the trial. The hearing to discuss the motion will be held on Sept. 8. The final pre-trail hearing is set for Sept. 23 with the trial scheduled to start on Sept. 27. J.PALMER@ROSWELL-RECORD.COM

J.O.Y. Centers received $18,600 from the UWCC, which all went toward the meal program. Phillips expressed her gratitude for the chance to provide so many programs to local senior citizens. “It’s something that we’re glad to be able to do for the elders in our community,” she said.

v.kahin@roswell-record.com


BUSINESS REVIEW

Roswell Daily Record

The professional staff at Tascosa Office Machines includes (left to right;) Tracy Cooper, Admin. Asst.; Chris Young, Office Mgr.; Troy Hunter, Tech; Del Carmona, Sales Manager; and Mike Cooper, Tech. (Mike Molgaard, Carlsbad Tech. is not shown.) Give Tascosa a call at 6231206 for more information. Tascosa Office Machines is an authorized Canon® and Sharp® dealer in Roswell, Artesia, Carlsbad, Hobbs and Ruidoso.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

A7

You can call Tascosa Office Machines at 623-1206 for office supplies or go to their web page at: http://tascosaofficemachines.com and click on the “E-STORE” to order any supplies you might need for your office. You can depend on Tascosa Office Machines for quality office supplies with great service and FREE DELIVERY.

Tascosa Office Machines: Since 2004, your local authorized Canon and Sharp dealer - and your best source for office supplies

Tascosa Office Machines knows that for a copier company to succeed, its main priority has to be customer service. With that said, they would like to take this opportunity to thank all their customers new and old. Tascosa celebrated their 6th anniversary in Roswell earlier this month. Del Carmona, Chris Young, Tracy Cooper, Troy Hunter and Mike Cooper invite you to come in and check out their business. "For those of you who have not heard about our business, let us extend our hand and offer you a free evaluation of your office equipment," says Chris Young, Office Manager. "Our rates are very reasonable and our service is THE BEST IN TOWN." Tascosa Office Machines is an authorized Canon®

and Sharp® dealer in Roswell, Artesia, Carlsbad, Hobbs and Ruidoso. They also now have a tech in Carlsbad, Mike Molgaard. Tascosa Office Machines also offers other brands such as Hewlett Packard and Brother. Tascosa sells and services everything from small to large office equipment. They also offer lease and rental contracts. Office Supplies Tascosa has office supplies on the shelf and offers excellent sales, service and products. Office supply orders are generally delivered within 1 to 3 days. Please call for 623-1206 for more information.

furniture including HON®, Performance™ and La-ZBoy® through a catalog. Most furniture orders can be delivered in two weeks or less. For more information, please call 623-1206, or go by and visit with them at 107 West 6th Street. The doors are open for your office needs Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. Please check out Tascosa’s office supply information at http://tascosa officemachines.com and click on the “E-STORE” on the Web, or call the office at the number above for more information.

At

Tascosa,

Tascosa also offers Free Delivery on “Customer Service is Number One.” office supplies!

Tascosa Office Machines is located at 107 West 6th Street, across from Peppers Grill & Bar in downtown Roswell. Please call 623-1206 for more information about anything in this article.

Check out the featured business at www.rdrnews.com - Click on Business Review Tascosa also sells fine

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A8 Tuesday, August 30, 2011

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Partly cloudy

Mostly sunny

Wednesday

Thursday

Mostly sunny

Friday

Sunshine

Partly sunny

Saturday

Mostly sunny and warm

Sunday

Periods of sun, a t-storm

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Monday

Warmer with thunderstorms

High 102°

Low 70°

99°/67°

96°/67°

95°/69°

95°/66°

92°/64°

90°/57°

SE at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

SE at 3-6 mph POP: 10%

SSE at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

SSE at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

WNW at 7-14 mph POP: 0%

SSW at 4-8 mph POP: 25%

NNW at 6-12 mph POP: 55%

NNE at 6-12 mph POP: 65%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 5 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ......................... 101°/75° Normal high/low ............... 89°/61° Record high ............. 101° in 2011 Record low ................. 52° in 1961 Humidity at noon ................... 18%

Farmington 92/62

Clayton 90/65

Raton 88/56

Precipitation 24 hours ending 5 p.m. Mon. 0.00” Month to date ....................... 0.71” Normal month to date .......... 2.74” Year to date ......................... 1.73” Normal year to date ........... 10.25”

Santa Fe 91/59

Gallup 88/57

Tucumcari 97/68

Albuquerque 94/69

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 98/64

Moderate Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading 46 0-50

51-100

Good

Moderate

Source: EPA

101-150

Ruidoso 86/64

151+

Unhealthy Unhealthy sensitive

T or C 94/70

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed. First

Sep 4

Rise 6:31 a.m. 6:31 a.m. Rise 8:16 a.m. 9:26 a.m. Full

Sep 12

Last

Sep 20

Set 7:26 p.m. 7:25 p.m. Set 8:15 p.m. 8:53 p.m. New

Sep 27

Alamogordo 96/74

Silver City 92/66

ROSWELL 102/70 Carlsbad 104/72

Hobbs 102/69

Las Cruces 94/74

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2011

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2So-so; 1-Difficult JACQUELINE

BIGAR ARIES (March 21-April 19) ### Use caution with your finances. What has been fortunate might not be quite as lucky at this point. BrainYOUR HOROSCOPE storm with a trusted friend in order to solidify an idea. The unexpected sheds new light on a partnership. Tonight: Sort through suggestions. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) #### You have become quite intuitive, knowing what works and what doesn’t. Today, you might be more reflective and have a long-overdue talk with someone who dominates your life. Seek out new information. Tonight: Off to the gym. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ##### There could be considerable tension between two different areas of your life. Allow your imagination to seek out unusual answers. You could be surprised and delighted by what you discover. Tonight: Light up your life, as well as a loved one’s. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ### The urge to stay close to home seems to prevent you from getting out the door. Trust your feelings and decide to stay home. The unexpected hits on many sides of your life. Someone you care about is changing before your very eyes. Tonight: Order in. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ### Be aware of the costs of an indulgence. You might have difficulty determining what is a necessity. A boss lets you know how appreciative he or she is. Unexpected developments involve com-

‘The Help’ stays busy with $14.5M weekend

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by Hollywood.com are: 1. “The Help,” Disney, $14,536,118, 2,778 locations, $5,233 average, $96,833,423, three weeks. 2. “Colombiana,” Sony, $10,408,176, 2,614 locations, $3,982 average, $10,408,176, one week. 3. “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” Fox, $8,867,741, 3,346 locations, $2,650 average, $148,674,018, four weeks. 4. “Don’t be Afraid of the Dark,” FilmDistrict, $8,525,728, 2,760 locations, $3,089 average, $8,525,728, one week. 5. “Our Idiot Brother,” Weinstein Co., $7,011,631, 2,555 locations, $2,744 average, $7,011,631, one week. 6. “Spy Kids: All the Time in the World,” Weinstein Co., $6,007,180, 3,305 locations, $1,818 average, $21,990,229, two weeks. 7. “The Smurfs,” Sony, $4,754,766, 2,861 locations, $1,662 average, $125,948,234, five weeks. 8. “Conan the Barbarian,” Lionsgate, $3,185,094, 3,015 locations, $1,056 average, $16,660,669, two weeks. 9. “Crazy, Stupid, Love,” Warner Bros., $3,108,178, 1,577 locations, $1,971 average, $69,732,502, five weeks. 10. “Fright Night,” Disney, $3,103,227, 3,114 locations, $997 average, $14,281,778, two weeks. 11. “30 Minutes or Less,” Sony, $2,687,165, 2,071 locations, $1,298 average, $31,789,438, three weeks. 12. “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2,” Warner Bros., $2,564,370, 1,328 locations, $1,931 average, $370,805,062, seven weeks. 13. “Final Destination 5,” Warner Bros., $2,555,039, 2,085 locations, $1,225 average, $37,914,984, three weeks. 14. “One Day,” Focus, $2,516,061, 1,725 locations, $1,459 average, $9,789,523, two weeks. 15. “Cowboys & Aliens,” Universal, $2,377,475, 1,559 locations, $1,525 average, $93,523,950, five weeks. 16. “Captain America: The First Avenger,” Paramount, $2,248,438, 1,424 locations, $1,579 average, $168,770,306, six weeks. 17. “The Change-Up,” Universal, $1,202,440, 904 locations, $1,330 average, $34,495,575, four weeks. 18. “Midnight in Paris,” Sony Pictures Classics, $743,594, 652 locations, $1,140 average, $51,643,081, 15 weeks. 19. “Transformers: Dark of the Moon,” Paramount, $640,253, 518 locations, $1,236 average, $349,457,208, nine weeks. 20. “Horrible Bosses,” Warner Bros., $639,246, 465 locations, $1,375 average, $113,815,151, eight weeks.

Regional Cities Today Wed. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

96/74/pc 94/69/t 77/46/t 102/72/s 104/72/s 81/49/t 90/65/pc 78/51/pc 98/64/s 96/68/t 93/68/t 92/62/t 88/57/t 102/69/s 94/74/pc 87/58/t 84/58/t 95/67/t 98/67/s 98/64/s 85/54/t 88/56/t 74/46/t 102/70/s 86/64/pc 91/59/t 92/66/t 94/70/t 97/68/pc 89/61/t

97/71/s 92/68/t 79/53/t 99/69/s 100/69/s 81/51/t 96/65/pc 76/50/s 97/64/s 96/69/t 91/67/t 92/63/t 86/58/t 98/64/s 97/72/t 88/58/t 83/56/t 94/69/t 96/65/s 96/64/s 84/56/t 92/56/t 75/50/t 99/67/s 84/60/s 91/60/t 93/67/t 95/70/t 98/64/s 88/58/t

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

munication and mechanical equipment. Tonight: Hanging out. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ##### You smile, and others respond. Intuitively, you make the right move involving someone at a distance, education and/or travel. Don’t be coerced by someone’s neediness or demanding nature. You know what is best for you. Tonight: Your treat. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) #### You might be laid back in the morning, but you know to put your best foot forward in the afternoon. A partner could feel so drawn in that he or she might need to pull back. Stay easy, and think about your long-term desires. Tonight: Whatever knocks your socks off. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ### Use the morning for meetings. By the afternoon, you might want to pull back and come to a new understanding. How you handle a personal matter could impact those involved more than you realize. Think positively. Tonight: Vanish while you can. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) #### You grab the limelight early on today. Express some of the ideas that flash by you during a discussion. Getting feedback could be very positive. The unexpected could impact a budding

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Wed.

Today

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

61/53/sh 92/71/s 82/58/s 80/63/s 88/65/s 78/64/pc 80/58/s 105/82/s 88/61/t 81/59/pc 98/75/pc 87/73/pc 100/77/s 80/64/pc 84/70/t 104/87/s 87/65/pc 102/70/s

59/50/r 90/72/s 84/62/s 79/62/s 88/63/pc 79/67/pc 80/59/pc 101/77/s 96/62/pc 79/61/pc 99/74/s 89/74/s 97/76/s 81/68/pc 90/73/s 101/84/s 81/65/pc 99/67/s

Miami 91/79/t 91/80/t Midland 104/73/s 97/69/s 76/63/pc 76/67/pc Minneapolis 94/78/s 92/78/pc New Orleans New York 82/66/s 84/68/s Omaha 78/65/t 86/69/s Orlando 92/76/t 92/75/t Philadelphia 84/64/s 86/66/s 108/89/s 108/89/pc Phoenix 80/58/s 82/62/s Pittsburgh Portland, OR 71/54/pc 68/52/pc Raleigh 86/65/s 88/64/s St. Louis 82/68/t 92/75/s 94/61/s Salt Lake City 87/66/pc 76/68/pc 75/68/pc San Diego Seattle 67/53/c 66/51/pc Tucson 106/80/pc 103/78/t Washington, DC 84/64/s 85/68/s

U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 112°............... Needles, Calif. Low: 31°.... Bodie State Park, Calif.

High: 102°........................Carlsbad Low: 45°.........................Angel Fire

National Cities Seattle 67/53

Billings 87/59 San Francisco 66/53

Minneapolis 76/63

New York 82/66

Detroit 81/59

Denver 88/61

Chicago 78/64

Washington 84/64

Kansas City 84/70 Los Angeles 87/65

Atlanta 92/71 El Paso 98/75

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Houston 100/77 Miami 91/79

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

friendship. Tonight: Don’t be alone. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ##### You might want to see a situation very differently from in the past. An unexpected insight causes you to regroup. You feel that maintaining a certain demeanor might be important. Tonight: Could be late. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) #### The unanticipated tosses your plans in the air. You might wonder when you can apply more of your adventurous ideas to a situation. The only person holding you back is you. Start exploring an outlet and a situation where you can learn and grow. Tonight: Treat yourself to a midweek movie. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) #### You might not realize how serious a partner could be about doing things his or her way. Challenging this person at the moment would be nothing but a mistake. Allow this person to have the comfort of having it his or her way. Tonight: Say “yes” to an invitation. BORN TODAY Investor Warren Buffett (1930), actress Shirley Booth (1898), journalist, author John Gunther (1901)

THE SENIOR CORNER Everything you always wanted to know about

RETIREMENT LIVING

Email Fredda at: askfredda@yahoo.com your source of retirement living answers.

Beatrice asked: When is the appropriate time to research retirement communities at what age?

I would say the appropriate time is when you feel you are ready to make a decision and move. Many times people wait when their health begins to decline or when a health issue happens and they can no longer live on their own for example they need meal preparation or transportation. Of course, this is the right time but it is also the right time when you retire and are still able to do the normal days agenda without problems you just want to relax and enjoy life instead of worrying about the yard or painting the house. You work all your life and now it is

Primm Drug

& Professional Compounding of Roswell 700 N. Union (575)622-6571

your time, a time to relax and enjoy your retirement. Many people move for the convenience of security when they travel and many move to enjoy the community activities and the companionship of others. If you are retired and just thinking about a retirement community like Peachtree Village call and schedule lunch take a tour and make an informed decision. Remember your “Golden Years” are a time of relaxation and reflection, the time to do what you want and not have the pressure of jobs and family. Happy Retirement! Fredda

Sponsored by:

Peachtree Village Retirement Community 1301 W. Country Club Rd. 575-627-8070 www.peachtreeret.com

900 S.Main Street 575-623-2323 George Stapp, Michael Koonce Tommy Weathers


Tuesday, August 30, 2011 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 28

LOCAL SCHEDULE TUESDAY AUGUST 30 BOYS SOCCER 6 p.m. • Artesia at NMMI • Robertson at Roswell GIRLS SOCCER 5 p.m. • Goddard at Portales 6 p.m. • Chaparral at Roswell H.S. VOLLEYBALL 5:30 p.m. • Clovis Chr. at Lake Arthur • NMMI at Valley Chr. 6:30 p.m. • Dexter at Hagerman 7 p.m. • Clovis at Goddard • Roswell at Portales

SP OR TS SHORTS VOLLEYBALL SIGN-UPS END AUG. 31

The City of Roswell’s adult co-ed volleyball league will continue registration through Aug. 31. Registration is held at the Yucca Recreation Center. The cost is $130 per team and there is a maximum of 10 players per team. Games start on Sept. 12. For more information, call 624-6719.

RTA MEETING SET FOR SEPT. 1

The Roswell Tennis Association’s September board meeting will be held on Thursday, Sept. 1, at 11:30 a.m. at Peppers Grill. All RTA members and others interested in local tennis activities are invited to attend. For more information, call 626-0138.

SPORTS Roswell Daily Record

KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

Week 1 of the 2011 high school football season wrapped on Friday night and it’s time to take a look at what we learned about the area’s teams.

Dexter

We learned two important things about the Demons in Week 1 — they need to find a combination that works on the offensive side of the ball and they need to shore up some things on the defensive side of the ball. The Demons are young and inexperienced, so, for them to be successful this year, they need some of the younger players to step up and fill holes on both sides of the ball. They started Friday’s loss to Texico on a positive note with a long kick retur n, which led to a touchdown that gave Dexter a 6-0 lead. However, they struggled to stop Texico’s offense for the rest of the night and couldn’t seem to find a flow on the offensive side of the ball. If they can find the right combination of skill kids on

Gateway Christian

We learned that the Warriors, despite all the losses to graduation and transfer, are capable of competing for the 8-Man title this season. Mountainair, who beat Gateway Friday, is one of the better teams in the 8Man classification this year. If Gateway can take them to the wire in the season’s first game with a whole host of new starters, the Warriors aren’t far from being a championship-caliber team. They need to find an of fensive weapon other than Mason Miller, though. Miller is a great weapon, but the Warriors need the threat of another weapon to take the heat off their quarterback. If they find that weapon, the Warriors are a threat to Melrose’s throne atop 8Man.

Goddard

In a Week 1 win over Rio Rancho, we learned that the Rockets have a good

WATCH TRACKING GERINA PILLER

BRIEFS TIGER WILL PLAY FRYS.COM OPEN

NORTON, Mass. (AP) — Tiger Woods will play the Frys.com Open in California the first week of October, his first time competing in the PGA Tour’s Fall Series as he tries to get his game ready for the Presidents Cup. The Frys.com Open is Oct. 6-9 at CordeValle Golf Club, about 45 minutes south of his alma mater at Stanford. “I always enjoy competing in my home state, and this tournament fits my schedule perfectly,” Woods said Monday on his website. “I’m looking forward to seeing some old friends.” Woods said a week ago he might add a tournament because of his limited schedule this year brought on by leg injuries. He chose a tournament from the Fall Series that he has never played. The Frys.com Open, in only its fifth year, was one of the more exciting tournaments of the Fall Series last year. Rocco Mediate holed out for eagle in each of the four rounds, including the 17th hole in the final round, for a one-shot win. It also offers a $5 million purse, the richest among events after the FedEx Cup is over. When he plays the Frys.com Open, it will be his first event in six weeks.

Lawrence Foster Photo

Gateway Christian’s Mason Miller (1) falls in behind his blocker, Jacob Moody, as he looks for room to run against the Mountainair defense during the Warriors’ Week 1 loss to the Mustangs. We learned in Week 1 that Gateway Christian is still a contender for the 8-Man championship.

ground attack and that the combination of R yan Greene and David Anaya are, to quote Rocket coach Sam Jer nigan, “pretty stinking good.” OK, we already knew those two things, so Week 1 was more just an affirma-

tion of things we already knew. The Rockets used the threat of Anaya to their advantage in Week 1. Instead of running Anaya 25 or 30 times, they used play-action to set up Greene for the draw.

It worked well and it should continue to work well this year. I don’t think it will shock anybody to know that Goddard is, once again, a serious contender for the 4A crown.

Colts activate Peyton Manning from PUP list

G E R IN A

NA T I O N A L

E-mail: sports@roswell-record.com

offense and shore up the holes in the defense, the possibility of success this year certainly still exists.

• More shorts on B2

MIRABEL, Quebec, Canada — Gerina Piller carded a finalround 69 on Sunday to record her second straight top-20 finish at the LPGA Tour’s Canadian Women’s Open at Hillsdale Golf and Country Club. Piller climbed to 7 under through her opening nine with a 32 on the back side, then got to 8 under with a birdie on her 10th hole of the day. She rolled off seven straight pars from there, but finished her round with a double bogey on No. 9 to fall back to 6 under for the tournament. The Goddard alumna finished tied for 18th and earned $26,024 to move to 59th on the money list. It was her fifth cash in her last seventh start during her rookie year on the Tour. Brittany Lincicome won the tournament at 13 under. Defending champion Michelle Wie and Stacy Lewis finished tied for second at 12 under.

B

Here’s what we learned in Week 1 Section

AP Photo

In this Jan. 8 file photo, Colts quarterback Peyton Manning signals at the line of scrimmage against the Jets. On Monday, Manning was officially activated from the physically unable to perform list by the Colts after an offseason neck surgery.

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Peyton Manning is back. Whether he is ready to play is an open question. The Colts activated Manning from the physically unable to perform list Monday. A few hours later, the four -time MVP pulled on his white No. 18 jersey and a helmet, and jogged onto the practice field, renewing hopes that he might actually play in the season-opener at Houston on Sept. 11 four months after neck surgery. “That’s kind of been my goal all along, trying to get better and I know everybody’s into predictions and everybody wants to have the breaking news,” an upbeat Manning said. “But I just can’t give you any more than what I’m giving you.” What everyone wants to know, of course, is whether Manning will be ready. Nobody, including Manning, will say that yet and he said again that he won’t play in Thursday night’s preseason finale at Cincinnati. Clearly, though, Manning is getting closer. He acknowledged that he is healthy enough right now to take a snap or play a series to keep his consecutive-games streak intact but insists he won’t. “Like I said the other night, I have to be able to competitively play,” he said. “I have

See LEARNED, Page B2

too much respect for football. I’ve got to be able to compete and to help my team win, and that’s what’s fair to the team, fair to myself.” Manning has started 227 consecutive games, including the playoffs, the secondlongest streak in NFL history for quarterbacks behind Brett Favre. Of all the numbers Manning has put up over the years, the streak is the one he has usually said means the most. Manning had been on the PUP since the team’s first training camp practice on Aug. 1 following the May procedure to repair a nerve in his neck. The Colts were facing a Saturday deadline to make the move or Manning would have missed Indy’s first six games. Team officials issued a statement that said Manning would practice on a “scripted” and controlled basis. Coach Jim Caldwell did not elaborate on the plan. “Obviously, he’s been throwing, but nevertheless it’s just going to be in a limited amount,” Caldwell said. “I don’t think it needs a whole lot of explanation, I don’t believe. Scripted means that we kind of know exactly what he’s going to do, prescribed by his rehab specialist and our medical team.”

Warriors Sharapova wins, Kvitova falls at U.S. Open fall in 3 The Gateway Christian volleyball team dropped its third straight match to start the season on Monday, falling in three games to visiting Dora at the Red Rock Warrior Center. The Coyotes picked up the win by winning Game 1 25-15, Game 2 25-14 and Game 3 2510. “Serve-receive is what we struggled with tonight,” said Warrior coach Kerri Pirtle. “We let Dora get long service runs and that really killed us. We just kind of gave up after the first game.” Katie Schultz had two aces for the Warriors (03), while Sadie Fox recorded three kills and a dig, and Julia Harvard and Charlee Longmire each had a block.

Ruidoso JV 25-25-25-25, NMMI 15-18-27-18 The visiting Warriors took the first two games and rallied from a sixpoint deficit in Game 4 to secure a four -game win over the Colts at Godfrey Athletic Center, Monday. Ruisoso handily won the first two games, but NMMI (1-2) answered

See BRIEFS, Page B2

NEW YORK (AP) — Trailing big in the first round of the U.S. Open, Maria Sharapova thought — well, no, she was certain — that she’d pull through if she could push her inexperienced opponent to a third set. And Sharapova was right. Shrieking as loudly as ever, Sharapova came back from a set and a break down against 19-year-old Heather Watson of Britain to win 3-6, 7-5, 6-3 on Monday, improving to 12-0 this year in matches that went the distance. “It’s just a matter of belief within myself, that no matter how well or bad or good I’m playing, or my opponent is playing, I know I can tough it out,” the No. 3-seeded Sharapova said after her 2 1/2hour victory. “No matter what the situation is, I have the belief.” That self-confidence comes not merely from her success in three-setters this season, but also from three Grand Slam titles, including the 2006 U.S. Open. It’s the sort of track record the 102nd-ranked Watson hopes to have one day; Monday’s match was only her fifth at a major tournament. Sharapova won six Grand Slam matches at Wimbledon alone this summer, reaching the final there before losing to Petra Kvitova. Fresh off that tri-

AP Photo

Maria Sharapova returns a shot to Heather Watson during their first-round match at the U.S. Open in New York, Monday. Sharapova won 3-6, 7-5, 6-3 to advance to the second round.

umph, Kvitova — a 21year -old from the Czech Republic seeded No. 5 in Flushing Meadows — failed to follow it up, flopping at the U.S. Open with a 7-6 (3), 6-3 loss to 48th-ranked Alexandra Dulgheru of Romania. Kvitova is the first reigning Wimbledon women’s champion to lose her first match at the U.S. Open in the same season. Only

three times had the Wimbledon winner bowed out as early as the third round in New York: Sharapova in 2004, Conchita Martinez in 1994, and Billie Jean King in 1973. “This is something new for me,” Kvitova said about her new status as Grand Slam champion. “I’ve felt a little pressure.” She was the only seeded woman to exit in the after-

noon session on Day 1 of the year’s last major tournament, joined by No. 15 Viktor Troicki of Serbia, a 3-6, 6-3, 4-6, 7-5, 7-5 loser against Alejandro Falla of Colombia. At night, 2000-01 U.S. Open champion Venus Williams played 91stranked Vesna Dolonts of See OPEN, Page B2


B2 Tuesday, August 30, 2011 Learned

Continued from Page B1

Hagerman

We, along with the Bobcat coaching staff, learned a lot about Hagerman in Week 1, but probably the biggest is that the Bobcats have issues they need to address on defense. Simply put, the Bobcats can’t allow opposing offenses to climb out of doubledigit deficits in the fourth quarter. Scoring 31 points will win you a lot of football games, but giving up 34 will lose you just as many. Hagerman is young and they are dealing with a lot change — both with players and coaches — and they need to be able to rely on the defense to make stops if they want to be successful. A few tweaks on that side and Hagerman should be fine going forward.

Lake Arthur

In Week 1, we lear ned

Baseball

Major League Baseball At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press American League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .82 51 New York . . . . . . . . . .80 52 Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .73 60 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .67 67 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .53 79 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .73 61 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .67 65 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .66 65 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .56 78 Kansas City . . . . . . . .56 79 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 59 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .72 61 Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .60 74 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .56 76 Sunday’s Games Kansas City 2, Cleveland 1 Tampa Bay 12, Toronto 0

Pct GB .617 — .606 1 1⁄2 .549 9 .500 15 1⁄2 .402 28 1⁄2

Pct GB .545 — .508 5 .504 5 1⁄2 .418 17 .415 17 1⁄2 Pct GB .563 — .541 3 1 .448 15 ⁄2 1 .424 18 ⁄2

Golf Scores

that Miguel Rubio, who Panther coach Jose Cruz Porras tagged as his team’s player to watch before the season, is exactly what Porras said. After looking “rusty” to start, the Panthers looked like the Panthers of old, thanks in large part to Rubio, who scored four times and had nearly 200 yards of total offense. With Rubio as the focal point of the offense, kids like Cody and Ty Dalton should be able to shine.

NMMI

Of everything we learned about each team in Week 1, the single biggest “we better fix this and fix it quick” problem belongs to the Institute. That problem is turnovers. Anyone even remotely familiar with football understands the concept of not turning the ball over to the other team. NMMI did that with regularity in Friday’s loss to Fort Sumner and that is not something first-year Baltimore 2, N.Y. Yankees 0, 1st game Oakland at Boston, ppd., hurricane threat Minnesota 11, Detroit 4 Chicago White Sox 9, Seattle 3 N.Y. Yankees 8, Baltimore 3, 2nd game Texas 9, L.A. Angels 5 Monday’s Games Kansas City 9, Detroit 5 N.Y. Yankees 3, Baltimore 2 Cleveland 2, Oakland 1 Toronto 7, Tampa Bay 3 Chicago White Sox 3, Minnesota 0 L.A. Angels at Seattle, 8:10 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Kansas City (Francis 5-14) at Detroit (Fister 6-13), 5:05 p.m. Oakland (Cahill 9-12) at Cleveland (J.Gomez 0-2), 5:05 p.m. Toronto (Cecil 4-7) at Baltimore (Guthrie 616), 5:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 17-7) at Boston (Lackey 12-9), 5:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Hellickson 11-9) at Texas (Feldman 0-0), 6:05 p.m. Minnesota (Swarzak 3-4) at Chicago White Sox (Z.Stewart 1-3), 6:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (J.Williams 1-0) at Seattle (A.Vasquez 1-0), 8:10 p.m.

National League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Philadelphia . . . . . . . .84 46 .646

LPGA-CN Canadian Women’s Open Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At Hillsdale Golf and Country Club Mirabel, Quebec Purse: $2.25 million Yardage: 6,612; Par: 72 Final a-amateur Brittany Lincicome, $337,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-68-69-70 Stacy Lewis, $177,981 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-69-67 Michelle Wie, $177,981 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-69-68-72 Cristie Kerr, $104,478 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-68-69-71 Angela Stanford, $104,478 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-66-72-72 Hee-Won Han, $61,558 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-66-69 Jenny Shin, $61,558 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-70-71-70 Na Yeon Choi, $61,558 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-69-69-72 Jiyai Shin, $61,558 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-67-69-72 Sun Young Yoo, $44,050 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70-71-70 Song-Hee Kim, $44,050 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-68-71-73 Katie Futcher, $36,030 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-71-69 Hee Young Park, $36,030 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-71-70 Jennifer Johnson, $36,030 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-67-68-73 Tiffany Joh, $36,030 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-69-65-76 Becky Morgan, $30,158 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-67-70-75 Ai Miyazato, $30,158 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-68-71-77 Mika Miyazato, $26,024 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-72-69 Gerina Piller, $26,024 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-66-77-69 Morgan Pressel, $26,024 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-70-69 Paula Creamer, $26,024 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-68-72-74 Kris Tamulis, $26,024 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-67-69-74 Amy Hung, $21,197 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-72-69 Seon Hwa Lee, $21,197 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-65-76-71 Mi Hyun Kim, $21,197 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-73-72 Giulia Sergas, $21,197 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-69-72 Sophie Gustafson, $21,197 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-68-74-73 Caroline Hedwall, $21,197 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70-69-75 Pernilla Lindberg, $16,716 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-71-77-71 Kristy McPherson, $16,716 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-70-72 Beatriz Recari, $16,716 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-74-70-72 Yani Tseng, $16,716 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-69-73 Maria Hjorth, $16,716 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-70-75 Anna Nordqvist, $16,716 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-68-75 Azahara Munoz, $13,328 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-72-71

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

275 276 276 277 277 278 278 278 278 279 279 280 280 280 280 281 281 282 282 282 282 282 283 283 283 283 283 283 284 284 284 284 284 284 285

SPORTS SHORTS YOUTH HOOPS SIGN-UPS START SEPT. 1

The Yucca Recreation Center will begin registration for its youth basketball league on Sept. 1. Registration will continue through Sept. 30. The league is open to children in kindergarten through third grade. Children who wish to play in the league must be of school age by Sept. 1. First-time players are required to bring their birth certificate. The cost for the league is $30 for the first child and $25 for each additional child. For more information, call 624-6719.

3-ON-3 TOURNAMENT SET FOR SEPT. 2

The Roswell Boys & Girls Club will host a 3-on-3 basketball tournament on Friday, Sept. 2, at the Club. The entry fee is $50 per team. For more information, call 623-3196.

24TH ANNUAL TURTLE MARATHON IS SEPT. 5

The 24th annual Turtle Marathon and Labor Day 5k will be held on Monday, Sept. 5. The event features a full and half marathon, which begin at 5:30 a.m., and 5k runs and walks, which begin at 8 a.m. For more information, call 624-6720.

14TH ANNUAL LADIES FALL CLASSIC IS SEPT. 9

The 14th annual Ladies Fall Classic Invitational golf tournament will be held on Friday, Sept. 9, at 9 a.m. at Roswell Country Club. The entry fee is $170 per two-person team. Entry fee includes green fees, cart fees and lunch at the awards luncheon. To reserve a tee time for the

GB —

SPORTS

Colt coach Randy Montoya will let linger for very long. If they fix the turnover issue, the Colts can be competitive.

Roswell

We lear ned two big things about Roswell during Friday’s loss to Carlsbad — the Coyotes have a very good offense, but still have some things to fix on the other side of the ball. Their offense put up 24 points against a pretty good defense in a place, Carlsbad’s Ralph Bowyer Stadium, that is infamous for its ability to stymie even the best offenses. The James Singleton-toRichard Medrano connection will create problems for opposing defenses this year. On the other side of the ball, Roswell’s defense needs to get better if the Coyotes are planning on making a run at the district and state titles. The talent is there, it’s just a matter of finding what works.

Open

Continued from Page B1

Russia, before 16-time major winner Roger Federer was to face 54th-ranked Santiago Giraldo of Colombia. Early winners included No. 8 Mardy Fish, who played his first U.S. Open match as the top-seeded American and beat Tobias Kamke 6-2, 6-2, 6-1; No. 9 Tomas Berdych, the 2010 Wimbledon runner-up; No. 13 Richard Gasquet; No. 22 Alexandr Dolgopolov; and No. 27 Marin Cilic, who eliminated 19-year-old American Ryan Harrison 62, 7-5, 7-6 (6). Advancing along with Sharapova to the second round were No. 2 Vera Zvonareva, a finalist last year at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open; 16-year -old Madison Keys of Boca Raton, Fla. — the youngest and, at 455th, lowestranked woman in the draw — who beat 37-year -old Jill Craybas 6-2, 6-4; and No. 12 Agnieszka Radwan-

SCOREBOARD kjkeller@roswell-record.com

Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .79 New York . . . . . . . . . .64 Washington . . . . . . . .62 Florida . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .81 St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .70 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .67 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . .62 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .57 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .45 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Arizona . . . . . . . . . . .75 San Francisco . . . . . .71 Colorado . . . . . . . . . .64 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .62 San Diego . . . . . . . . .60

54 68 70 74

L 54 64 67 72 77 90

L 59 63 70 70 74

.594 6 1⁄2 .485 21 .470 23 1 .444 26 ⁄2 Pct .600 .522 .500 .463 .425 .333

Pct .560 .530 .478 .470 .448

GB — 10 1⁄2 13 1⁄2 18 1⁄2 23 1⁄2 36 GB — 4 11 12 15

Sunday’s Games Cincinnati 5, Washington 4, 14 innings Atlanta at New York, ppd., hurricane threat Florida at Philadelphia, ppd., hurricane threat Milwaukee 3, Chicago Cubs 2

Christina Kim, $13,328 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-70-72 Louise Stahle, $13,328 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-70-72 Na On Min, $13,328 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-72-73 Meena Lee, $13,328 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-66-71-74 Momoko Ueda, $10,843 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-73-72 Jennifer Song, $10,843 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-70-73 Ilhee Lee, $10,843 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-69-75 Natalie Gulbis, $10,843 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-68-77 Catriona Matthew, $10,843 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-68-68-79 Shi Hyun Ahn, $9,092 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73-74-71 Karrie Webb, $9,092 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73-72-72 Jessica Shepley, $9,092 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-70-70-74 Jimin Kang, $9,092 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68-70-79 I.K. Kim, $7,822 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70-76-74 Christel Boeljon, $7,822 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-71-75 Belen Mozo, $7,822 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-71-75 Maude-Aimee Leblanc, $7,822 . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-67-80 Silvia Cavalleri, $6,664 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-75-73-73 Moira Dunn, $6,664 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-68-71-76 Mina Harigae, $6,664 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-67-73-76 Jaclyn Sweeney, $6,664 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-68-72-76 Brittany Lang, $6,664 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-68-73-77 Karen Stupples, $6,664 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-69-73-77 Lindsey Wright, $5,620 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-74-73 Mollie Fankhauser, $5,620 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-72-75 Mariajo Uribe, $5,620 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-73-75 Stacy Prammanasudh, $5,620 . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-70-71-76 Lorie Kane, $5,196 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-74-75 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $5,196 . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-72-76 Laura Davies, $5,196 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-71-77 a-Jisoo Keel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-75-74 Anna Grzebien, $4,970 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-74-76 Janice Moodie, $4,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-76-74 Pornanong Phatlum, $4,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-75-77 Vicky Hurst, $4,537 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-77-74 a-Laetitia Beck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-76-77 Ashli Bunch, $4,537 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-75-77 Amelia Lewis, $4,537 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-71-81 Stephanie Louden, $4,404 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-74-79 Amanda Blumenherst, $4,293 . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-80-77 Samantha Richdale, $4,293 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-73-81-77 Jeehae Lee, $4,293 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-78-78 Lisa Meldrum, $4,186 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-73-86

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285 285 285 285 286 286 286 286 286 287 287 287 287 288 288 288 288 289 289 289 289 289 289 290 290 290 290 291 291 291 292 292 293 293 294 294 294 294 295 297 297 297 299

practice round on Sept. 8, call the country club at 622-2050. For more information, or to register, call Andi Smith at 622-5200 or e-mail asmith@aslaccounting.com.

ELKS FIGHTING CANCER TOURNEY IS SEPT. 17

The third annual Elks Fighting Cancer charity golf tournament will be held Sept. 17 at 8 a.m. at NMMI Golf Course. The cost is $240 per team and the field is limited to the first 24 paid teams. Cost includes breakfast, lunch, range balls, green fees and cart fees. For more information, call 622-6033.

TOBOSA GOLF TOURNEY SET FOR SEPT. 24

The Tobosa “Go For The Gold” golf tournament will be held on Saturday, Sept. 24, at Spring River Golf Course. The tournament is a three-person scramble based on points per handicap. The cost of the tournament is $75 per player or $225 per team. Individual golfers are encouraged to register. The tournament fee includes drinks, lunch, range balls, green and cart fees, three mulligans per team and more. Proceeds from the tournament will be used to reequip the Los Pasitos Day Care Center. For more information, call 973-4032 or 6229506.

FIRST TEE SEEKING VOLUNTEERS

The First Tee of the Pecos Valley is currently seeking volunteers. Golf experience is not required to be a volunteer. For more information, call 623-4444.

St. Louis 7, Pittsburgh 4 Houston 4, San Francisco 3, 11 innings Colorado 7, L.A. Dodgers 6 Arizona 6, San Diego 1 Monday’s Games N.Y. Mets 2, Florida 1, 1st game Philadelphia 3, Cincinnati 2 N.Y. Mets 5, Florida 1, 2nd game Houston 7, Pittsburgh 4 Colorado at Arizona, 7:40 p.m. San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 8:15 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Florida (Vazquez 7-11) at N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 7-10), 5:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Halladay 15-5) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 8-10), 5:10 p.m. Washington (L.Hernandez 7-12) at Atlanta (Jurrjens 13-5), 5:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 9-7) at Houston (Sosa 12), 6:05 p.m. St. Louis (E.Jackson 3-2) at Milwaukee (Marcum 11-4), 6:10 p.m. Colorado (A.Cook 3-7) at Arizona (Miley 11), 7:40 p.m. San Diego (Stauffer 8-10) at L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 10-14), 8:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Garza 6-10) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 10-4), 8:15 p.m.

Football

National Football League Preseason Schedule By The Associated Press All Times Mountain Thursday’s Games Cincinnati 24, Carolina 13 Philadelphia 24, Cleveland 14 Baltimore 34, Washington 31 Friday’s Games St. Louis 14, Kansas City 10 Green Bay 24, Indianapolis 21 Saturday’s Games Buffalo 35, Jacksonville 32, OT Tampa Bay 17, Miami 13 Pittsburgh 34, Atlanta 16 Houston 30, San Francisco 7 Dallas 23, Minnesota 17 Tennessee 14, Chicago 13 Detroit 34, New England 10 Denver 23, Seattle 20 San Diego 34, Arizona 31 Sunday’s Game New Orleans 40, Oakland 20 Monday’s Game N.Y. Jets 17, N.Y. Giants 3 Thursday, Sep. 1 Detroit at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m.

Roswell Daily Record ska of Poland, who beat her younger sister Urszula Radwanska 6-2, 6-3. But surprise 2009 U.S. Open quarter finalist Melanie Oudin of Marietta, Ga., lost 6-0, 7-6 (7) to Romina Oprandi of Italy, falling to 9-29 in 2011. Sharapova was one of the seeded players Oudin stunned during her run two years ago, and for a little more than a set Monday, Watson seemed quite capable of registering another significant surprise. Scrambling along the baseline to get to nearly every ball, Watson forced Sharapova to hit extra shots in order to win a point. And Sharapova, who said she wasn’t able to practice enough over the weekend because of Tropical Storm Irene, kept missing. “There’s no doubt that I wasn’t playing my best tennis,” said Sharapova, who finished with a whopping 58 unforced errors, nearly twice as many as Watson. “She was smart in making

me hit another ball. I was making so many errors out there. She stuck to her game plan; she kept grinding.” “Maria’s a fighter. She’s never going to give up,” said Watson, who got highfives and autograph requests from fans as she left the court. “That’s what makes her a champion. That’s why she’s won this tournament before.”

Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 5 p.m. Baltimore at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m. N.Y. Giants at New England, 5:30 p.m. Dallas at Miami, 5:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Washington, 5:30 p.m. St. Louis at Jacksonville, 5:30 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Jets, 5:30 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 6 p.m. Kansas City at Green Bay, 6 p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Tennessee at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Carolina, 6 p.m. Denver at Arizona, 8 p.m. San Francisco at San Diego, 8 p.m. Friday, Sep. 2 Oakland at Seattle, 8:30 p.m.

Lewis, WR Chris Manno, WR Josue Paul, DB Mario Russell and WR Chandler Williams. MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Waived QB Rhett Bomar, DB Chris Adingupu, DB Simeon Castille, OL Conan Amituanai, TE Ed Barham, K Nate Whitaker, LB Jonathan Gilmore, WR Andre Holmes, LB Kyle O’Donnell and DT Colby Whitlock. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Signed WR Tiquan Underwood and S Ross Ventrone. Released LS Matt Katula, TE Garrett Mills, S James Sanders, CB Jonathan Wilhite, DL Kade Weston, WR Tyree Barnes, WR Darnell Jenkins, DB Malcolm Williams, K Chris Koepplin, DE Clay Nurse and OL Mark Wetterer. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Agreed to terms with QB Michael Vick on a six-year contract. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Traded CB Kelly Jennings to Cincinnati for DT Clinton McDonald. Released WR Chris Carter, CB Jesse Hoffman, LB Neal Howey, G Zach Hurd, WR Brandon Smith, FB Ryan Travis, DT Teryl White and WR Patrick Williams. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Released CB Ashton Youboty, WR Aundrae Allison, CB Vince Anderson, TE Collin Franklin, DE Brandon Gilbeaux, WR Detron Lewis, P Robert Malone, WR Jock Sanders, FB Rendrick Taylor. Waived/Injured G Brandon Carter.

Transactions

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League NEW YORK YANKEES—Activated RHP Freddy Garcia from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Hector Noesi to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Optioned RHP Graham Godfrey to Sacramento (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Activated LHP Brian Tallet from the 15-day DL. National League NEW YORK METS—Activated SS Jose Reyes from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Mike Baxter to Buffalo (IL). PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Activated LHP Cole Hamels from the 15-day DL. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS—Waived-injured WR Max Komar and S Tommy Irvin (ankle). Released FB Charles Ali, WR Daivieun Curry-Chapman, LB Curtis Gatewood, LB Duke Lemmens, OT Erik Mensik and OT Jason Speredon. CHICAGO BEARS—Waived LB Tanner Antle, C J.C. Brignone, DE Vernon Gholston, DT Tank Tyler and QB Trevor Vittatoe. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Waived-injured DT Lolomana Mikaele. DALLAS COWBOYS—Released C Andre Gurode and WR Curtis Clay. DENVER BRONCOS—Released CB Nate Jones, RB C.J. Gable, LB Braxton Kelley, LB Deron Mayo, G Shawn Murphy, OT Curt Porter and DE David Veikune. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Activated QB Peyton Manning from the physically unable to perform list. Signed DB Michael Hamlin. Placed DB Cornelius Brown on waivedinjured list. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Released QB Todd Bouman, LB Gerris Wilkinson and WR Greg Ellingson. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Waived LB Eric Bakhtiari, RB Tervaris Johnson, DB Javes

Briefs

Continued from Page B1

with a Game 3 win to stay in the match. NMMI held a 16-10 lead in Game 4, but the Warriors won 15 of the game’s final 17 points to get the win. “I don’t think my girls played a very good match at all,” said Colt coach Stephanie Schooley. “We had some high points and did a few things OK.”

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press (All times Mountain) Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Tuesday, Aug. 30 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 5 p.m. MLB — Regional coverage, N.Y. Yankees at Boston or Philadelphia at Cincinnati 8:05 p.m. WGN — Chicago Cubs at San Francisco TENNIS 11 a.m. ESPN2 — U.S. Open, first round, at New York 5 p.m. ESPN2 — U.S. Open, first round, at New York


NATION/OBITUARIES

Roswell Daily Record

OBITUARIES

Loving Father

Robert Lujan

It’s true that God takes only the best; our daddy was truly the greatest ever, on Aug. 26, 2011, our Lord, Jesus wrapped his ar m around Robert and carried him home. Robert was a devoted loving father, husband, son, brother and friend. Robert will be missed dearly. Rosary for Robert Lujan will be Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011, at 7 p.m. at St. Peters Catholic Church. Funeral Mass will be celebrated Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011, at 10 a.m. at St. Peter Catholic Church with Father Charlie Martinez officiating. Burial will follow in South Park Cemetery. Robert was born on Dec. 2, 1959, to Martin and Maria Lujan. He married Priscilla in May of 1986; she survives him at the family home. Robert retired from Nova Bus after 25 years. He then acquired his CDL and became a truck driver. Robert is survived by his parents Martin, Maria Lujan, and Elgie Samario; his children, Venus McAlister and husband Delos, Alycia Lujan and fiancé JoeRay Chavez, Desiree Lujan and fiancé Candido Andazola, Robert Lujan Jr. and fiancé Desirae Gibson. He is also survived by his grandchildren, Delos McAlister Jr., Robert McAlister, Adina McAlister, Alyssa Chavez, JoRae Chavez, Candido Andazola Jr., and unbor n Grand babygirl. Also surviving are his sisters Annie Owens, MaryChris Sanchez and husband Albert, Rosa Vallejos, Tina Lujan, Helen Lujan, Angela Archuleta and husband Paul, Elizabeth Lujan, Ramona Trujillo and husband Shannon, Marylou Harvey, Cecelia Samario; brothers Henry Lujan, Marty Lujan, Christopher Lujan, Phillip Romero, Nabor Samario Jr. and his wife Doreen. Also survived by his lifelong best friend Daniel Mendiola, numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by grandparents, father Nabor Samario Sr, brothers Arturo Romero and Richard Lujan, sister

Ernestine Lujan, brotherin-law Leroy Vallejos. Special thanks to Jesse Gomez of ENMMC for caring for our dad with such compassion, Victoria Candelaria from Vista Care for her care and support in our time of need, to Pete for his love, patience, and understanding, to aunt Gloria for her never-ending love and support, and also aunt Becky for everything you do and your love and support. Pallbearers: Delos McAlister, JoeRay Chavez, Candido Andazola, “Little” Albert Vallejos, Daniel Mendiola, and Isaac Archuleta. Honorary pallbearers: Henry Lujan, Marty Lujan, Christopher Lujan, Albert Sanchez, Paul Archuleta, David Sanchez, Roy Page, Manuel Ruiz, Shawn Salas, Max Barraza, Arthur Romero Jr., James Gonzales, Michael Sanchez, Joe Albarez Jr., Benny Jr., Goddaughter Amanda Valdez Salas, Ebony Gonzales, and all nieces and nephews too numerous to name. My Robert it will be so hard to go on without you; I love you so much and miss you. My heart yearns for you. I will not fear when my time comes, for I know I will be with you once more, I look forward to that day. Until then I’ll do as you asked and care for the V,dandan, Lil Robert, ray ray and all the babies. I will find the strength because I know you will watch over me and take care of me as you always have. I love you. Daddy I have no words to say how much I will miss you. You were the best daddy anybody could ask for. I will miss how you would take care of me when I am sick, how you would make me laugh and your never ending-love. I love you. Thank you so much for everything. V Daddy oh how I miss you. You were the best daddy ever. I couldn’t have asked for more. I’m gonna miss how we use to sit outside and look at the stars. I’m gonna miss everything about you. Thank you daddy for everything. Love always Nella. I’ll always love you dad always and forever, your only son Robert Lujan. I’ll miss you dad and you will always be in my heart. Dad I miss you. Will always miss you. Thank you for always understanding. Love you dad. Desiree Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online register book at andersonbethany.com. Services are under the direction of Anderson-

Bethany Funeral Home

and Crematory.

Gilberto Romero, Estevan Romero, twin brothers Jorge Gilberto Romero and Juanito Romero, and sisters Justina R. Segura, Ignacia R. Romero and Andrea R. Salcido. Services will be held Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011, at 12:45 p.m. at the Santa Fe National Cemetery in Santa Fe. Deacon and close friend Frank Pittman will officiate. Arrangements are under the direction of AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online register book at andersonbethany.com .

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Manuel was preceded in death by his parents Merced and Cayetana Juarez, two sons Manuel and Jose Juarez and one daughter Guadalupe Juarez. Pallbearers will be Paul Gonzalez, Wade Juarez, Justin Juarez, Christina Salas, Jessica Gutierrez and Natasha Juarez. Honorary pallbearers will be Pete Jr., Beatrice, Michelle and Jonathan. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online register book at andersonbethany.com. Services are under the direction of AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

Maurine B. Mitchell

Pablo Romero

Pablo Romero, 82, of Roswell, passed away Sunday, Aug. 28, 2011, at his home surrounded by his family. Pablo was born May 20, 1929, to Jose Getrudes Romero and Agueda R. Romero in San Ignacio. He served as a member of the U.S. armed forces, Army Corps of Engineers and was honorably discharged in 1952. He married Teresa Flores while stationed in Camp Carson Colorado. Pablo was a proud, hardworking man, a talented farm-hand who worked for International Harvester Co. for several years where he completed his education in the specialized trade of Farm Tractor Service. After several years of working as a heavy equipment mechanic, Pablo became a successful business owner and continued working until his retirement at age 72. He was a loving husband, father, brother, grandfather, great-grandfather, and friend, and will be deeply missed. Those left to cherish his memory are his wife of 62 years, Teresa Flores Romero; two daughters, Priscilla M. Vigil and Sofia R. Gottlieb; son Max P. Romero and his wife Cecilia, all of Roswell; four grandchildren, Paul Romero and his wife Marisela, Jacklyn Gottlieb, Orlando Romero, and Fabianna Ortega, all of Albuquerque; one great-grandchild, Sidn e y P. R o m e r o , a n d numerous nieces, nephews and extended family who loved him dearly. Pablo was preceded in death by his parents Jose Getrudes Romero and Agueda R. Romero, brothers Eligio R. Romero,

Manuel Juarez

A rosary will be recited for Manuel Juarez, 91, of Hagerman, at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011, at St. Catherine’s Catholic Church in Hagerman. A funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Friday, Sept. 2, 2011, at St. Catherine’s with Father Brian Guerrini officiating. Burial will follow at Hagerman Cemetery. Manuel passed away Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011, at his home surrounded by his loving family. Visitation will be Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011 from 8 a.m. until 8 p.m. and Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011, from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. at Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home. Manuel was born on July 27, 1920, to Merced and Cayetana Juarez in Carlsbad. He worked for Jim and Royce Lankford for 25 plus years. He loved his job and retired over 20 years ago. He loved spending time with his family. He was a man who tried to make everyone happy but he also had the last word. Those left to cherish his memory are his wife of 67 years Francis Juarez, six sons, Joe and his fiancé Cindy, Raymon and his fiancé Donna, Manuel Jr., Danny and his fiancé Pamela, Luz, Eloy and his wife Bea, Pete and his wife Mary: five daughters, Margarita J. Gonzalez and her husband Gilbert, Gloria Acosta and her husband Epimenio, Mary Gutierrez and her husband Joe, Corina O’Neal and Susie Rodriguez: 35 grand-children, 68 great-grand-children and 13 great-greatgrandchildren and his sister Marcella Lopez.

Maurine B. Mitchell passed away in her sleep on Friday, Aug. 19, 2011, at the Mission Arch Care Center, where she was a resident. Mrs. Mitchell was 96 at the time of her death. Born in Amery, Miss., the daughter of Alexander and Margarite Deale, Mrs. Mitchell attended the Arizona State University, where she studied to become a teacher. Mrs. Mitchell moved to Roswell in 1941, after her marriage to Ervin W. Mitchell, who up until his death, led the family business, Mitchell Seed and Grain Company. Mr. Mitchell served in the U.S. Ar my in the Pacific during World War II, and upon his return served in the New Mexico State Legislature. Mr. Mitchell also served on the Board of Regents of the New Mexico Military Institute. Over the years, Mrs. Mitchell was an active volunteer in local community organizations. She served for over a decade as a “Pink Lady” at the Roswell Medical Center. She also did volunteer work at the Roswell Museum and Art Gallery, contributing both time and artwork to the museum’s collection. She was an active supporter of the Roswell Humane Society, and loved animals, especially her dog Sam. During her lifetime, Mrs. Mitchell was an avid traveler and sailed the world with her Aunt Maureen in 1965. She enjoyed the company of her friends and was a skilled hostess, whose talents drew rave reviews from her guests. During her husband’s time in the State Legislature, Mrs. Mitchell served as a hostess to many elected officials, including a number of New Mexico’s governors, as well as other dignitaries visiting Roswell. Mrs. Mitchell was cremated at the AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory and her ashes spread in the mountain of New Mexico, near Alto, in accordance with her wishes. As she described it in her will, she wanted to be

B3

where the beautiful flowers, birds and little animals thrive. Gifts in her memory can be made to either the Roswell Humane Society or the Roswell Museum and Art Center. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online register book at andersonbethany.com. Services are under the direction of AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

Jack K. Nichols

Services are scheduled for 10 a.m., Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011 at LaGrone Funeral Chapel, for Jack K. Nichols, age 86, of Roswell, who passed away at his home, Aug. 28, 2011. The Rev. Ruth Fowler of Trinity United Methodist Church will conduct the service. Inter ment will follow in South Park Cemetery with military honors provided by Roswell Veterans Honor Guard. Jack was born July 16, 1925, in Pauls Valley, Okla., to Robert Lee and Anna P. Jones Nichols. His parents preceded him in death, as well as a brother, Lee Calvin Nichols and a sister, Claudia Stroud. Jack married Margaret (Peggy) A. Cutler on Nov. 24, 1956. She also preceded him in death. Survivors include a nephew, Steve Stroud and his wife Cathy of Gainesville, Texas; greatniece, Katie Jennings and her husband Ben, and two great-great nieces and nephews, Hunter Jennings and Maggie Jennings of Abilene, Texas. Mr. Nichols had been employed as a certified public accountant until his retirement. He served in the U. S. Army Corps on the military police force. Friends may pay respects online at lagronefuneralchapels.com Arrangements are under the direction of LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Steven Peck

Funeral arrangements for Steven Peck, 23, of Roswel,l are under the direction of Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home and Crematory. He passed away Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011, in Lubbock, Texas. A rosary will be recited at 7 p.m., Friday, Sept. 2, 2011, at Assumption Catholic Church and Mass at 9:30 a.m., Saturday, Sept. 3, 2011, at Assumption Catholic Church.

Donald D. Miller

Services are pending at Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory for Donald D. Miller, 83, who passed away Sunday, Aug. 28, 2011, at Eastern New Mexico Medical Center. A further announcement will be made once arrangements have been finalized.

Michele Bachmann memoir coming in November

NEW YORK (AP) — Michele Bachmann has a book deal. Sentinel, a conservative imprint of Penguin Group (USA), announced Monday that the Republican presidential candidate’s memoir will arrive in November and alr eady has been completed. The book, reports of which first circulated in June, is currently untitled. Sentinel declined comment on reports that Wall Street Journal columnist John Fund co-wrote the memoir. As a member of the House of Representatives, Bachmann is not permitted to receive an advance against royalties. According to Sentinel, Bachmann will “share previously untold stories” about her private life, “including her roles as a tax attor ney, a wife, a

mother of five and a foster mother of 23.” Virtually all of the Republicans candidates have published books, a standar d for modern presidential campaigns. “People ar e the most important ingredient in life,” Bachmann said in a statement issued Monday through Sentinel. “I love people, and I care deeply that our nation’s economy turns around so they can r ealize their American dream. This book will help to share my enthusiasm for an energized, pr ogrowth economy, and the life experiences that infor m my optimism for the American people and for American greatness.” Bachmann for mally entered the race to seek the GOP nomination to challenge Pr esident Barack Obama in 2012 in June. By August, she was

celebrating a win in the closely watched Iowa Republican straw poll, a test of str ength in the leadoff caucus state. But Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s decision to join the field has weakened Bachmann’s standing in the polls. She trails Perry and for mer Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, with Texas Rep. Ron Paul also in the race. Doug Sachtleben, a Bachmann spokesman, said the book r ollout shouldn’t detract from her campaign. “Throughout Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, and Florida, the congresswoman has kept a full schedule of meeting and talking with thousands of people, and she will continue with that full campaign schedule all thr ough the days up to and beyond the release of

her memoir,” Sachtleben said. Bachmann’s climb comes barely five years after her arrival in Washington. The outspoken congr esswoman tapped into anger about taxes and government spending that gave rise to the tea party and paired it with a social conservative following she honed in Minnesota. She also has a history of contr oversial r emarks, most recently when she said that Hurricane Irene and last week’s earthquake near Washington were signs that God was unhappy about gover nment spending. Bachmann later explained that she was joking. Now 55, Bachmann did not get her political start until her mid-40s when she won a state Senate seat the year after losing a local school board race.

AP Photo

In this Aug. 26, file photo, presidential candidate U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., speaks to supporters during a campaign stop at Angie's Subs, in Jacksonville Beach, Fla.


B4 Tuesday, August 30, 2011

COMICS

Jumble

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE Dear Heloise: How do I remove scratches from a CD? Marie F., via email

DEAR ABBY

events, I’d have to kindly ask guests to write down their addresses for me to use later for thank-yous. And because it’s being done on paper, it might as well be on the envelopes — a practical, time-saving solution. JENNY IN QUEBEC, CANADA

UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE DEAR ABBY:

DEAR ABBY: “Insulted in Ohio” (July 9) was offended because she’s being asked at bridal and baby showers to address a blank envelope so the honoree can send her a thankyou note. Good heavens, lady, calm down. At a shower, you are celebrating a milestone event in a young woman’s life. Your gift will help her during the next phase of her life. These joyous events can be stressful and require a lot of preparation. I’m sure the hostess’s intent in asking guests to perform this minor task is to ease the honoree’s responsibilities. It also ensures the addresses appear correctly on the envelopes and everyone is accounted for on the gift list. Is that really so “insulting”? “Ohio,” if you feel so imposed-upon being asked do do such a simple thing, may I offer a suggestion? Gift the honoree with your “regrets” and leave your judgmental attitude at home. (I’ll bet you count the days until you’re thanked, too.) GAIL IN NACOGDOCHES, TEXAS DEAR GAIL: Thank-you notes are a hotbutton issue with my readers, and frankly, I am surprised more of you didn’t stick up for “Insulted.” However, I stand firm in my conviction that the more personal the thank-you note (including the envelope), the better. My newspaper readers comment:

DEAR ABBY: With the advent of email, social networking and online invitation sites, mailing addresses are used less often. I’d be hard-pressed to find the street addresses of some of my closest friends and relatives. As part of the younger generation, I’m more comfortable with email. If I were hosting one of these

The Wizard of Id

Family Circus

I’m also from Ohio, and I was insulted, too. It appalled me being asked to address my own future thank-you envelope. And would you like to know the kicker? I never received the envelope or a thank-you after the shower. CARLA T. DEAR ABBY: While the practice does seem a little over the top, there are creative alternatives. At a baby shower, my sisters gave everyone index cards and asked them to write down their name and address and guess the baby’s birth weight and length. The guest who came closest would be mailed a prize. It was a way to ensure I had everyone’s address for thankyou cards. At bridal showers, a blank address book can be passed around for guests to write their contact information. The book is then presented to the bride for her new home. MELANIE IN THE MIDWEST

DEAR ABBY: To save a busy bride or mother-to-be time and effort, addressing my envelope is another “gift” I can give her. All the envelopes could then be placed in a basket, with one being drawn for the “door prize.” LYNN IN DULUTH, MINN. DEAR ABBY: “Insulted” could take one of her return address stickers with her to the shower and place it on the envelope provided. It’s less work. This new party ritual is not the result of poor manners, but a logical change for changing times. NOT A WHINER DOWN SOUTH

DEAR ABBY: The personal message the gift recipient writes on the card is more important than who might have addressed the envelope it came in. ARLENE IN NEW YORK

If they are just light scratches, grab the toothpaste (ordinary white, not gel). Squeeze a small amount onto a clean, lint-free cloth and, starting from the inside and working outward like the spokes of a wheel, apply the toothpaste. Wipe from the inside (center of the CD) out, NEVER back and forth or in a circle. Once you have the CD coated, take a clean, dry part of the cloth to wipe all the toothpaste away (just like you applied it). You can then hold it under running water and dry with a clean cloth. Heloise #####

Dear Heloise: I just spent a week in Maine at a motel for a business trip. While trying to open the coffee package, I could not! Since we can’t have knives or scissors in carry-on bags, I had nothing to start a tear in the package. IDEA! I used the dental-floss cutter in my dental-floss container. It worked like a charm on everything that needed a little help to tear open. Even when I needed to sew on a button, the cutter cut the thread! Nora in San Antonio

Nora, according to the Transportation Security Administration, you can carry metal scissors with pointed tips and blades shorter than 4 inches. But to be on the safe side, carry blunt-nose scissors instead. Heloise

Blondie

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

Hagar the Horrible

#####

Dear Heloise: To get great photos of people, get closer. For kids and especially babies, get on the floor or at their level. Remember, the things that will mean the most in the future are expressions, etc., NOT the clutter of long-forgotten toys or of trying to include feet and every part of a person in your frame. Julie in Arkansas

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Roswell Daily Record


FINANCIAL

Roswell Daily Record

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg DrxFnBull ... 15.36 +1.62 DirxSCBull ... 48.55 +6.08 A-B-C DirxLCBull.10e 58.44 +4.69 ACE Ltd 1.36e 64.71 +2.31 DirxEnBull ... 48.17 +3.96 AES Corp ... 10.87 +.52 Discover .24 25.11 +.32 .40f 33.16 +.76 AFLAC 1.20 37.29 +1.75 Disney AK Steel .20 9.10 +.52 DollarGen ... 33.79 +1.24 AMR ... 3.54 +.28 DomRescs 1.97 48.97 +.51 AOL ... 15.10 +.68 DowChm 1.00f 28.31 +1.49 AT&T Inc 1.72 29.26 +.22 DresserR ... 42.61 +5.10 AU Optron.14e 4.56 +.32 DuPont 1.64 47.50 +1.41 AbtLab 1.92 51.21 +1.06 DukeEngy 1.00f 18.77 +.21 AberFitc .70 63.45 +4.24 DukeRlty .68 11.85 +.81 ... 22.23 +.62 Accenture .90 52.96 +1.36 EMC Cp AMD ... 6.83 +.34 EOG Res .64 91.55 +1.70 EKodak ... 3.04 +.17 Aeropostl ... 11.59 +.52 Aetna .60 39.16 +.93 Eaton s 1.36 42.10 +1.87 .70 52.41 +1.61 Agilent ... 36.72 +1.85 Ecolab AlcatelLuc ... 3.62 +.16 ElPasoCp .04 18.91 +.72 ... 10.13 +.45 Alcoa .12 12.42 +.56 Elan Allstate .84 26.30 +2.06 EldorGld g .12f 19.33 -.17 AlphaNRs ... 34.91 +1.64 EmersonEl 1.38 46.88 +1.47 Altria 1.64f 26.78 +.48 EnCana g .80 24.65 +.33 AmBev s 1.43e 34.33 +1.03 EndvSilv g ... 11.60 +.12 Ameren 1.54 29.94 +.74 ENSCO 1.40 47.54 +1.32 AMovilL s .41e 24.24 +.53 ExcoRes .16 13.20 +.80 AmAxle ... 9.14 +.95 Exelon 2.10 42.95 +.94 AEagleOut.44a 10.89 +.52 ExxonMbl 1.88 74.12 +1.48 AEP 1.84 38.25 +.69 FMC Tch s ... 43.49 +1.85 AmExp .72 48.55 +.07 FedExCp .52 78.75 +3.03 ... 2.75 +.18 AmIntlGrp ... 25.00 +1.74 FelCor AmTower ... 52.24 +.38 FidlNFin .48 16.46 +.51 Ameriprise .92 45.54 +2.09 FstHorizon .04 7.29 +.49 Anadarko .36 71.75 +2.48 FirstEngy 2.20 43.58 +1.05 ... 10.93 +.53 AnalogDev 1.00 33.12 +.74 FordM AnglogldA .22e 44.37 -.48 ForestOil ... 18.80 +.96 Annaly 2.59e 17.71 +.11 FMCG s 1.00a 45.81 +1.28 Apache .60 103.24 +2.95 Freescale n ... 11.08 +.23 ArcelorMit .75 21.12 +.95 FrontierCm .75 7.40 +.18 ArchCoal .44 20.27 +1.28 Frontline 1.20e d6.71 +.23 ArchDan .64 28.74 +.94 G-H-I AssuredG .18 13.96 +.77 ... 2.64 +.15 AuRico g ... 11.35 -2.57 GMX Rs AveryD 1.00 28.80 +1.38 Gafisa SA .29e 9.18 +.33 Avon .92 22.04 +.36 GameStop ... 23.10 +.32 BB&T Cp .64a 21.74 +1.00 Gannett .32f 11.56 +.87 .45 16.74 +.46 BHP BillLt2.02e 84.63 +2.67 Gap BP PLC 1.68 39.25 +1.06 GenElec .60f 16.04 +.50 BakrHu .60 58.79 +2.20 GenGrPr n .40 13.82 +.78 BcoBrades .80r 17.27 +.48 GenMills 1.22f 37.55 +.87 BcoSantSA.82e 9.05 +.26 GenMot n ... 23.79 +.92 BcoSBrasil1.65e 9.18 +.33 GenOn En ... 2.97 +.11 BkofAm .04 8.39 +.63 GenuPrt 1.80 54.31 +1.52 BkIrelnd ... 1.26 +.04 Genworth ... 7.03 +.52 BkNYMel .52 20.86 +.65 Gerdau .25e 8.55 +.28 Barclay .36e 10.87 +.67 GiantIntac .18a 7.80 -.70 Bar iPVix rs ... 38.50 -2.57 GoldFLtd .24e 16.28 ... BarrickG .48 50.21 -.70 Goldcrp g .41 51.55 -.42 Baxter 1.24 55.28 +1.55 GoldmanS 1.40 116.07 +4.32 BeazerHm ... 1.97 +.14 Goodyear ... 12.51 +.70 BerkH B ... 72.60 +2.76 HCA Hld n ... 19.98 +.48 BestBuy .64f 25.43 +.64 HCP Inc 1.92 36.73 +.98 Blackstone .40 13.07 +.75 HSBC 1.90e 42.63 +1.17 BlockHR .60 14.95 +.99 Hallibrtn .36 42.81 +1.35 Boeing 1.68 64.60 +1.80 HarleyD .50f 37.46 +2.22 Boise Inc .80e 6.17 +.47 HarmonyG .08e 13.02 -.24 BostonSci ... 6.64 +.27 HarrisCorp1.12f 39.63 +1.94 BoydGm ... 5.96 +.46 HartfdFn .40 19.42 +2.23 ... 7.74 +.40 BrMySq 1.32 29.29 +.57 HltMgmt BrkfldOfPr .56 16.63 +.49 Heckmann ... 5.66 +.10 HeclaM ... 7.73 +.05 CB REllis ... 14.88 +.71 .24f 3.73 +.04 CBS B .40 24.47 +1.30 Hersha Hertz ... 10.84 +.78 CF Inds 1.60fu188.60+8.25 .40 58.59 +2.89 CNO Fincl ... 6.47 +.46 Hess CSX s .48 21.80 +.47 HewlettP .48 26.12 +1.30 CVR Engy ... u28.13 +1.03 HomeDp 1.00 33.99 -.01 CVS Care .50 35.55 +1.21 HonwllIntl 1.33 47.00 +1.52 CblvsNY s .60 18.01 +.66 HostHotls .12f 11.31 +.69 Calpine ... 14.21 +.51 HovnanE ... 1.68 +.12 Cameron ... 50.58 +1.82 Huntsmn .40 13.19 +.92 CampSp 1.16 31.71 +.79 IAMGld g .20f 20.45 -.12 ... 8.31 +.33 CdnNRs gs .36 36.87 +1.41 ING ... 17.44 -.36 CapOne .20 45.39 +1.16 iShGold CapitlSrce .04 6.12 +.22 iSAstla 1.06e 24.14 +.67 CardnlHlth .86 42.06 +1.02 iShBraz 3.42e 63.25 +1.93 .53e 29.29 +.59 CarMax ... 27.59 +1.46 iSCan Carnival 1.00 32.95 +2.04 iShGer .67e 20.88 +.56 Caterpillar 1.84f 88.15 +2.99 iSh HK .42e 17.32 +.32 Cemex ... 5.34 +.34 iShJapn .17e 9.72 +.13 CenterPnt .79 19.83 +.28 iSh Kor .50e 55.30 +2.24 CntryLink 2.90 35.42 +.98 iSMalas .39e 14.14 +.16 ChesEng .35 31.77 +1.25 iShSing .50e 12.78 +.26 Chevron 3.12 98.74 +1.89 iSTaiwn .29e 13.54 +.37 Chicos .20 13.93 +.53 iSh UK .48e 16.18 +.41 ... 39.72 -.69 Chimera .62e 3.08 +.09 iShSilver Chubb 1.56 62.10 +2.72 iShDJDv 1.80e 50.62 +1.36 37.97 +1.01 iShChina25.85e Citigrp rs .04 31.29 +1.45 CliffsNRs 1.12f 81.22 +4.62 iSSP500 2.45e 121.79 +3.37 Coach .90 55.87 +1.11 iShEMkts .84e 41.83 +1.31 CocaCola 1.88 u69.73 +1.23 iShB20 T 4.02e 106.99 -1.50 CocaCE .52 26.88 +.50 iS Eafe 1.68e 52.92 +1.23 ColgPal 2.32 u89.77 +1.93 iShiBxHYB7.34e 86.75 +.87 CollctvBrd ... 13.36 +.66 iShR2K .94e 72.38 +3.27 Comerica .40 25.22 +1.21 iShREst 2.09e 56.39 +1.74 1.44f 46.45 +1.66 CmtyHlt ... 20.65 +1.26 ITW CompSci .80 30.39 +1.56 IngerRd .48f 32.56 +1.00 3.00 172.62 +3.48 ConAgra .92 24.41 +.50 IBM ConocPhil 2.64 67.78 +2.27 IntlGame .24 15.42 +.74 IntPap 1.05 26.77 +1.09 ConsolEngy .40 44.72 +1.31 ConEd 2.40 56.33 +.74 Interpublic .24 8.66 +.58 ConstellEn .96 38.12 +1.36 Invesco .49f 18.11 +1.03 Corning .20 15.09 +.77 InvMtgCap3.94e 17.65 +.57 Covidien .80 52.00 +1.41 IronMtn 1.00f 32.40 +.83 CSVelIVSt s ... 7.98 +.46 ItauUnibH .84e 17.49 +.55 Cummins 1.60f 90.46 +2.99 J-K-L D-E-F JPMorgCh 1.00 37.64 +1.43 .28 16.51 +1.05 DCT Indl .28 4.49 +.27 Jabil DR Horton .15 10.32 +.64 Jaguar g ... 6.12 -.33 DanaHldg ... 12.77 +1.02 JanusCap .20 7.37 +.60 Danaher .08 44.27 +1.38 JohnJn 2.28 65.86 +1.58 DeanFds ... 8.71 +.36 JohnsnCtl .64 31.52 +1.27 Deere 1.64f 78.91 +2.88 JonesGrp .20 11.44 +.89 DeltaAir ... 7.50 +.38 JnprNtwk ... 21.90 +1.00 DenburyR ... 15.35 +.86 KB Home .25 6.26 +.39 DeutschBk1.07e 40.50 +2.33 Keycorp .12 6.75 +.33 DBGoldDS ... 4.63 +.27 KimbClk 2.80 68.43 +.60 .72 17.25 +.62 DevelDiv .16 11.99 +.64 Kimco DevonE .68 66.01 +1.63 Kinross g .12f 17.40 -.23 DiaOffs .50a 64.24 +2.75 KnghtCap ... 13.01 +.56 DrSCBr rs ... 40.75 -6.84 KodiakO g ... 6.05 +.47 1.00 47.67 +.77 DirFnBr rs ... 52.26 -6.90 Kohls 1.16 34.57 +.62 DirLCBr rs ... 39.46 -3.79 Kraft .42 23.35 +.67 DrxEMBull1.20e 23.36 +2.08 Kroger DrxEnBear ... 16.67 -1.61 LDK Solar ... 6.18 +.34 ... 6.86 +.10 DirEMBear ... 21.53 -2.33 LSI Corp Name

Name Sell Chg Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 18.26 +.56 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.31 +.53 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.98 +.17 GrowthI 24.95 +.66 Ultra 22.73 +.61 American Funds A: AmcpA p 18.33 +.47 AMutlA p 24.67 +.55 BalA p 17.82 +.30 BondA p 12.49 -.02 CapIBA p 49.42 +.65 CapWGA p33.07 +.66 CapWA p 21.42 -.01 EupacA p 37.85 +.75 FdInvA p 34.89 +.91 GovtA p 14.46 -.04 GwthA p 28.94 +.74 HI TrA p 10.73 +.03 IncoA p 16.42 +.24 IntBdA p 13.63 -.02 IntlGrIncA p29.60 +.55 ICAA p 26.51 +.66 NEcoA p 24.39 +.61 N PerA p 26.94 +.59 NwWrldA 50.28+1.00 SmCpA p 35.38+1.01 TxExA p 12.26 ... WshA p 27.02 +.60 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 26.76 +.65 IntEqII I r 11.06 +.28 Artisan Funds: 20.87 +.41 Intl IntlVal r 25.11 +.50 MidCap 33.57+1.19 MidCapVal20.25 +.62

Baron Funds: Growth 51.06+1.78 SmallCap 23.50 +.89 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.09 -.05 DivMu 14.67 -.01 TxMgdIntl 13.82 +.26 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 17.35 +.39 GlAlA r 19.10 +.26 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.80 +.24 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.39 +.40 GlbAlloc r 19.19 +.26 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 50.66+1.66 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 59.70+1.85 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 27.56+1.10 DivEqInc 9.34 +.27 DivrBd 5.10 -.02 TxEA p 13.34 ... Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 28.45+1.13 AcornIntZ 37.77 +.83 LgCapGr 12.58 +.38 ValRestr 45.97+1.55 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.40 +.02 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n10.13 +.22 USCorEq1 n10.47+.36 USCorEq2 n10.30+.37 DWS Invest S: MgdMuni S 8.93 +.01 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 31.98 +.78 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.37 +.79

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: chg.

-.80 -.60 -.35 -.20 -.33 +.02 +.10 +.40

-.28 -.57 -.22 -.30 -.40 -.25 -.60

45.81 +1.98 14.34 +.76 36.99 +1.22 37.72 +1.31 21.00 +1.71 5.18 +.42 2.04 +.11 37.16 +1.28 20.49 +.25 34.69 +2.84

M-N-0

MBIA ... 7.72 +.62 MEMC ... 7.17 +.30 MF Global ... 5.57 +.28 MFA Fncl 1.00f 7.42 +.19 MGIC ... 2.93 +.47 MGM Rsts ... 11.16 +.88 Macys .40 26.03 +1.13 MagHRes ... 4.62 +.43 Manitowoc .08 11.30 +1.12 Manulife g .52 13.60 +.63 MarathnO s .60 26.41 +.52 MarathP n .80 36.00 +1.13 MktVGold .40e 61.95 -.53 MktVRus .18e 32.70 +1.05 MktVJrGld2.93e 36.05 +.14 MktV Agri .33e 51.92 +1.55 MarIntA .40 29.08 +1.56 MarshM .88f 29.74 +.68 Masco .30 8.85 +.80 McDrmInt ... 14.03 +.85 McDnlds 2.44 u90.79 +.86 McGrwH 1.00 42.32 +1.73 MedcoHlth ... 54.85 +1.05 Medtrnic .97 34.79 +.74 Merck 1.52 32.46 +.54 Meritor ... 8.60 +.97 MetLife .74 33.31 +1.85 MetroPCS ... 11.16 +.49 MillerEnR ... 3.65 +1.38 MobileTele1.06e 16.17 +.28 Molycorp ... 53.83 +.85 Monsanto 1.20f 69.78 -.90 MonstrWw ... 8.16 +.61 Moodys .56 30.81 +1.04 MorgStan .20 17.32 +.71 Mosaic .20 72.64 +3.26 MotrlaSol n .88 41.14 +.71 MotrlaMo n ... 37.79 +.07 NRG Egy ... 22.64 +.73 NYSE Eur 1.20 27.93 +.78 Nabors ... 18.51 +.81 NalcoHld .14 36.36 +.84 NBkGreece.29e 1.15 +.32 NOilVarco .44 66.59 +2.86 NatSemi .40 24.88 +.02 NY CmtyB 1.00 13.00 +.50 NY Times ... 8.18 +.87 NewellRub .32 13.61 +.23 NewfldExp ... 49.45 +1.35 NewmtM 1.20f 62.15 -.02 NikeB 1.24 88.54 +2.25 NobleCorp .53e 32.59 +.81 NokiaCp .55e 6.18 +.26 Nordstrm .92 44.70 +2.61 NorflkSo 1.72f 66.46 +1.28 Novartis 2.53e 57.17 +.58 Nucor 1.45 35.71 +1.35 OcciPet 1.84 85.06 +2.97 Och-Ziff 1.08e 11.23 +1.03 OfficeDpt ... 2.54 +.21 OfficeMax ... 6.18 +.50 OilSvHT 1.58e 131.14 +4.70 OldRepub .70 9.90 +.57 OwensIll ... 18.41 +1.04

P-Q-R

PMI Grp ... .28 +.03 PNC 1.40 49.31 +2.47 PPL Corp 1.40 28.48 +.68 PatriotCoal ... 14.69 +.88 PeabdyE .34 48.59 +1.49 Penney .80 27.45 +.76 PepcoHold 1.08 19.29 +.49 PepsiCo 2.06 64.16 +1.00 PetrbrsA 1.34e 26.04 +.77 Petrobras 1.28e 28.57 +.96 Pfizer .80 18.88 +.67 PhilipMor 2.56 70.50 +1.30 PitnyBw 1.48 20.02 +.96 PlainsEx ... 29.61 +1.69 Potash s .28 58.68 +1.66 Praxair 2.00 97.33 +2.94 PrecDrill ... 13.50 +.81 PrinFncl .55f 25.20 +1.53 ProLogis 1.12 26.43 +1.29 ProShtS&P ... 43.52 -1.28 PrUShS&P ... 22.89 -1.39 PrUlShDow ... 18.70 -.86 ProUltQQQ ... 79.20 +4.33 PrUShQQQ rs... 51.34 -3.09 ProUltSP .35e 43.66 +2.38 ProUShL20 ... 25.56 +.71 ProUltFin .05e 46.89 +3.39 ProShtR2K ... 32.36 -1.66 ProUltR2K.01e 34.76 +2.97 ProUSSP500 ... 17.62 -1.62 PrUltSP500 s.05e56.88+4.52 ProUSSlv rs ... 12.10 +.42 PrUltCrde rs ... 34.04 +1.55 ProUltSGld ... 16.41 +.64 ProctGam 2.10 63.09 +.52 ProgsvCp 1.40e 18.89 +.65 ProUSR2K rs... 48.47 -5.00 Prudentl 1.15f 50.16 +2.60 PSEG 1.37 33.74 +.74 PulteGrp ... 4.62 +.14 QuantaSvc ... 18.36 +.24 QksilvRes ... 9.52 +.82 RPC s .32f 24.94 +1.88 RadianGrp .01 3.51 +.55 RadioShk .25 13.13 +.63 Raytheon 1.72 42.57 +.98 RegionsFn .04 4.45 +.33 ReneSola ... 3.64 +.16 Renren n ... 7.34 +.16 RepubSvc .88f 30.50 +.82 ReynAm s 2.12 37.46 +.89 RiteAid ... 1.07 +.04 Rowan ... 34.84 +1.65 RylCarb .40 25.80 +2.19 RoyDShllA 3.36 65.33 +1.11

SpdrDJIA 3.12e 115.14 +2.44 SpdrGold ... 173.89 -3.58 SP Mid 1.65e 157.84 +5.94 S&P500ETF2.44e121.36 +3.39 SpdrHome .31e 15.00 +.69 SpdrKbwBk.20e 19.83 +.84 SpdrLehHY4.28e 38.34 +.48 SpdrLe1-3bll ... 45.86 ... SpdrKbw RB.37e22.10+1.14 SpdrRetl .46e 49.04 +1.92 SpdrOGEx .47e 52.87 +2.43 Safeway .58 17.92 +.84 StJude .84 45.62 +.62 Saks ... 9.74 +.58 Salesforce ... 126.58 +9.08 SandRdge ... 7.35 +.43 Sanofi 1.82e 36.47 +.58 SaraLee .46 18.18 +.62 Schlmbrg 1.00 77.25 +2.41 Schwab .24 12.52 +.51 SeadrillLtd3.03e 31.81 +.83 SealAir .52 17.42 +.40 SemiHTr .64e 29.37 +.93 SiderurNac.81e 9.80 +.46 SilvWhtn g .12 38.95 -.46 SilvrcpM g .08 8.07 -.01 SmithfF ... 21.78 +1.38 SouthnCo 1.89 41.10 +.27 SthnCopper2.19e32.66 +.53 SwstAirl .02 8.68 +.48 SwstnEngy ... 37.98 +1.02 SpectraEn 1.04 25.90 +.55 SprintNex ... 3.46 +.21 SprottGold ... 15.55 -.30 SP Matls 1.30e 34.96 +1.03 SP HlthC .63e 33.06 +.82 SP CnSt .83e 30.71 +.54 SP Consum.59e 37.17 +1.05 SP Engy 1.06e 67.73 +1.92 SPDR Fncl .18e 13.30 +.53 SP Inds .67e 31.91 +.98 SP Tech .35e 24.40 +.60 SP Util 1.33e 33.66 +.66 StdPac ... 2.69 +.20 StarwdHtl .30f 43.48 +2.22 StateStr .72 35.33 +1.29 StillwtrM ... 15.01 +.44 Stryker .72 48.04 +1.87 Suncor gs .44 31.28 +.97 Sunoco .60 36.94 +1.21 SunstnHtl ... 5.62 +.32 SunTrst .20f 19.82 +1.03 Supvalu .35 7.62 +.62 Synovus .04 1.47 +.15 Sysco 1.04 27.95 +.85 TE Connect .72 31.06 +1.40 TJX .76 55.22 +.55 TaiwSemi .52e 12.13 +.32 Target 1.20f 51.34 +.51 TeckRes g .60 42.58 +1.18 TelefEsp s1.98e 20.60 +.52 TempurP ... 58.26 +3.22 TenetHlth ... 5.38 +.25 Teradyn ... 12.31 +.47 Terex ... 15.73 +1.44 Tesoro ... 23.21 +1.03 TexInst .52 26.16 +.64 Textron .08 16.45 +.81 3M Co 2.20 82.10 +2.09 Tiffany 1.16 71.52 +2.51 TimeWarn .94 31.02 +1.34 TitanMet .30 15.41 +1.26 TollBros ... 16.86 +.74 Total SA 2.38e 48.67 +1.42 Transocn .79e 55.11 +1.99 Travelers 1.64 50.75 +2.45 TrinaSolar ... 16.23 +.62 TwoHrbInv1.59e 9.42 +.22 TycoIntl 1.00 41.41 +1.04 Tyson .16 17.52 +.65 UBS AG ... 13.97 +.52 US Airwy ... 5.55 +.29 USG ... 9.68 +1.10 UndrArmr ... 70.11 +2.61 UnilevNV 1.21e 33.66 ... UnionPac 1.90 90.84 +1.77 UtdContl ... 18.59 +.67 UPS B 2.08 66.73 +2.03 UtdRentals ... 17.18 +.97 US Bancrp .50 23.17 +.75 US NGs rs ... d9.67 -.21 US OilFd ... 33.96 +.81 USSteel .20 30.04 +2.49 UtdTech 1.92 73.87 +2.31 UtdhlthGp .65 46.76 +1.04 UnumGrp .42f 23.59 +.84

V-W-X-Y-Z

Vale SA 1.14e Vale SA pf1.14e ValeantPh .38a ValeroE .20 VangTSM1.31e VangREIT1.92e VangEmg .82e VangEur 2.31e Venoco ... VeriFone ... VerizonCm 1.95 ViacomB 1.00f VimpelCm .80e Visa .60 VMware ... WalMart 1.46f Walgrn .90f WsteMInc 1.36 WeathfIntl ... WellPoint 1.00 WellsFargo .48 Wendys Co .08 WstnRefin ... WstnUnion .32f Weyerh .60 Whrlpl 2.00 WmsCos .80f WT India .15e Wyndham .60 XL Grp .44 XcelEngy 1.04 Xerox .17 Yamana g .18 YingliGrn ... S-T-U Youku n ... .40 13.86 +.21 YumBrnds 1.00

SLM Cp

NYVen C 30.78 +.75 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.36 -.03 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq n19.59 +.55 EmMktV 30.79 +.89 IntSmVa n 15.38 +.35 LargeCo 9.58 +.27 USLgVa n 18.79 +.68 US Micro n12.84 +.56 US Small n20.05 +.91 US SmVa 23.20+1.15 IntlSmCo n15.82 +.33 Fixd n 10.35 -.01 IntVa n 16.05 +.36 Glb5FxInc n11.42 -.02 2YGlFxd n 10.24 ... Dodge&Cox: Balanced 67.06+1.51 Income 13.39 -.01 IntlStk 31.85 +.72 Stock 100.40+3.05 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.24 ... Dreyfus: Aprec 39.26 +.79 DreihsAcInc10.54 +.04 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 16.82 +.46 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.57 ... GblMacAbR10.09 ... LgCapVal 16.87 +.46 FMI Funds: LgCap p n 15.29 +.33 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.83 -.01 FPACres n26.48 +.42 Fairholme 27.71+1.39 Federated Instl: KaufmnR 4.93 +.17

CATTLE/HOGS

Open high low settle CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Aug 11 114.35 114.35 113.40 113.50 Oct 11 114.85 115.77 114.50 114.60 Dec 11 116.90 117.70 116.62 116.75 Feb 12 120.27 120.85 119.92 120.20 Apr 12 124.60 125.00 123.92 124.47 Jun 12 123.10 123.40 122.50 123.17 Aug 12 123.00 123.30 123.00 123.00 Oct 12 124.90 125.20 124.90 125.20 Dec 12 125.25 Last spot N/A Est. sales 8232. Fri’s Sales: 45,076 Fri’s open int: 309987, up +1957 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Sep 11 132.35 133.62 132.00 132.32 Oct 11 132.72 134.12 132.10 132.70 Nov 11 134.20 134.60 132.85 133.55 Jan 12 135.55 135.55 134.20 134.72 Mar 12 134.80 135.12 134.80 135.12 Apr 12 135.60 135.80 135.50 135.55 May 12 136.00 136.00 136.00 136.00 Aug 12 137.50 Last spot N/A Est. sales 694. Fri’s Sales: 5,909 Fri’s open int: 31221, off -2596 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 86.50 87.42 86.17 86.40 Dec 11 83.62 84.75 83.47 83.67 Feb 12 88.00 88.10 87.35 87.50 Apr 12 90.60 90.90 90.30 90.40

LVSands ... LennarA .16 LillyEli 1.96 Limited .80a LincNat .20 LizClaib ... LloydBkg ... Loews .25 Lowes .56 LyonBas A.80f

May 12 95.00 95.30 94.80 94.80 Jun 12 97.40 97.55 96.90 97.20 Jul 12 95.85 96.15 95.60 95.80 Aug 12 94.50 94.75 94.50 94.75 Oct 12 84.75 84.80 84.75 84.80 Dec 12 81.50 81.60 81.50 81.60 Feb 13 83.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 7501. Fri’s Sales: 32,978 Fri’s open int: 251150, off -2429

-.10 +.05 +.20 +.25 +.10 +.60

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high low settle COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 103.40 105.41 103.10 104.77 Dec 11 104.13 105.78 103.50 104.92 Mar 12 101.45 102.75 101.15 102.38 May 12 100.73 101.84 100.15 101.17 Jul 12 99.55 100.94 99.34 100.13 Oct 12 98.02 Dec 12 96.85 97.02 96.85 97.02 Mar 13 98.12 May 13 98.02 Jul 13 98.02 Last spot N/A Est. sales 5010. Fri’s Sales: 8,194 Fri’s open int: 146987, off -454

chg.

+.85 +.60 +.50 +.31 +.08 -.78 +.42 +.42 +.42 +.42

GRAINS

Open high

low settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 11 750 771ø 750 757ü Dec 11 791 805ø 791 795 Mar 12 830 833ø 823fl 827fl

chg.

-5 -2 +1ü

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

AMEX

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 3525030 8.39 +.63 S&P500ETF1604869121.36 +3.39 SPDR Fncl 944508 13.30 +.53 iShR2K 499998 72.38 +3.27

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) NthgtM g 375981 NwGold g 47658 Taseko 36757 GoldStr g 28542 CheniereEn 21395

Last 4.03 13.21 3.85 2.41 7.81

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) Chg -2.57 -.66 -6.84 -3.34 -7.05

%Chg -18.5 -15.6 -14.4 -14.2 -12.7

Name AdcareH wt Crexendo SCEd pfC Flanign ASpecRlty

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

2,835 281 37 3,153 31 81 3,657,613,941

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

52-Week High Low 12,876.00 9,936.62 5,627.85 4,010.52 442.01 381.99 8,718.25 6,594.95 2,490.51 1,830.65 2,887.75 2,099.29 1,370.58 1,039.70 14,562.01 10,877.63 868.57 588.58

Last 2.66 4.56 19.77 7.02 14.91

Name Last Chg %Chg 8.20 +2.73 +49.9 CentEuro StarScient 2.59 +.78 +43.1 NtwkEq 2.57 +.53 +26.0 Spire h 2.11 +.43 +25.6 THT HeatT 2.59 +.49 +23.3

%Chg +27.9 +22.1 +18.6 +12.1 +11.7

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg %Chg Name -.29 -9.8 Tufco -.43 -8.6 Virco -1.35 -6.4 Lightbrdge -.34 -4.6 NSecGrp -.54 -3.53 UtdCmtyBc

DIARY

342 124 37 503 6 3ows 114,171,23062

INDEXES

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 11,539.25 4,618.62 432.24 7,450.30 2,276.99 2,562.11 1,210.08 12,760.99 724.65

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume Net Chg +254.71 +158.43 +8.56 +204.48 +44.16 +82.26 +33.28 +385.18 +32.86

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST YTD %Chg Name

Chg +.11 +1.48 +.53 +.59 +.42

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last AuRico g 11.35 Primero g 3.56 DrSCBr rs 40.75 PrUPShR2K 20.16 CSVS2xVxS 48.49

DIARY

Name Vol (00) Last SiriusXM 621806 1.81 PwShs QQQ42775554.61 Intel 399701 20.30 Microsoft 374575 25.84 338975 15.74 Cisco

Chg +.88 -.27 -.01 +.02

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg 4.03 +.88 MillerEnR 3.65 +1.38 +60.8 NthgtM g Venoco 11.76 +2.78 +31.0 Quepasa 5.20 +.94 CameltInfo 5.62 +1.12 +24.9 Innsuites 2.42 +.38 MGIC 2.93 +.47 +19.1 GoldenMin 14.07 +1.52 RadianGrp 3.51 +.55 EllieMae n 5.25 +.55

Div

Last 3.35 2.26 2.70 9.71 5.59

Chg -.55 -.32 -.38 -1.14 -.65

DIARY

%Chg -14.1 -12.4 -12.3 -10.5 -10.4

2,262 338 73 2,673 26 31 1,595,266,362

% Chg +2.26 +3.55 +2.02 +2.82 +1.98 +3.32 +2.83 +3.11 +4.75

PE Last

YTD % Chg -.33 -9.56 +6.73 -6.45 +3.11 -3.42 -3.78 -4.48 -7.53

52-wk % Chg +15.28 +12.34 +11.63 +11.28 +21.11 +20.86 +15.36 +16.05 +20.43..

Chg

YTD %Chg

Name

Div

BkofAm

.04

...

8.39 +.63

-37.1 Oneok Pt s

2.34f

18

43.15 +.89

+8.6

Chevron

3.12

9

98.74 +1.89

+8.2 PNM Res

.50

30

15.19 +.55

+16.7

CocaCola

1.88

14

69.73 +1.23

+6.0 PepsiCo

2.06

16

64.16 +1.00

-1.8

Disney

.40f

14

33.16 +.76

.80

12

18.88 +.67

+7.8

EOG Res

.64

54

91.55 +1.70

+.2 SwstAirl

.02

13

8.68 +.48

-33.1 -19.5

PE Last

Chg

-11.6 Pfizer

...

5

10.93 +.53

-34.9 TexInst

.52

10

26.16 +.64

HewlettP

.48

6

26.12 +1.30

-38.0 TimeWarn

.94

13

31.02 +1.34

-3.6

HollyFront

.70f

18

72.25 +1.57

+77.2 TriContl

.29e

...

13.91 +.38

+1.1

9

20.30 +.53

-3.5 WalMart

1.46f

12

53.19 +.29

-1.4

+17.6 WashFed

.24

18

15.10 +.58

-10.8

.48

10

25.42 +.83

-18.0

24.37 +.35

+3.5

FordM

Intel

.84f

IBM

3.00

Merck

1.52

Microsoft

.64

14 172.62 +3.48 12

32.46 +.54

-9.9 WellsFargo

HOW TO READ THE MARKET IN REVIEW 10

25.84 +.59

-7.4 XcelEngy

1.04

15

Here are the 525 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 400 most active on the Nasdaq National Markets and 100 most active on American Stock Exchange. Mutual funds are 450 largest. Stocks in bold changed 5 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name Div Last Chg (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at Name the beginning of each letters’ list. AAR .48 12.88 # Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock, based on latest quar- ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 ACM Op .80 7.25 # terly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise footnoted. ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. ACMSp .96 7.50 # Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... mark. Fund Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold. Chg: Daily net change in the NAV.

Name Sell AAL Mutual: Bond p 9.49 CaGrp 14.47 MuBd 10.43 SmCoSt 9.73

Chg

-.03 Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. d – New 52-.01 wk low during trading day. g – Dividend in Canadian $. Stock price in U.S.$. n – -.05 New issue in past 52 wks. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. s – Split or stock dividend of 25 pct or more in last 52 wks. Div begins with date of split or stock dividend. u – New 52-wk high during trading day. v – Trading halted on primary market. Unless noted, dividend rates are annual disbursements based on last declaration. pf – Preferred. pp – Holder owes installment(s) of purchase price. rt – Rights. un – Units. wd – When distributed. wi – When issued. wt – Warrants. ww – With warrants. xw – Without warrants. Dividend Footnotes: a – Also extra or extras. b – Annual rate plus stock dividend. c – Liquidating dividend. e – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos. f – Annual rate, increased on last declaration. i – Declared or paid after stock dividend or split. j – Paid this year, dividend omitted, deferred or no action taken at last meeting. k – Declared or paid this year, accumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m – Annual rate, reduced on last declaration. p – Init div, annual rate unknown. r – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos plus stock dividend. t – Paid in stock in last 12 mos, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or distribution date. x – Ex-dividend or ex-rights. y – Ex-dividend and sales in full. z – Sales in full. vj – In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such companies. • Most active stocks above must be worth $1 and gainers/losers $2. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Wednesday’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

TotRetBd 11.29 -.03 GNMA n 11.91 -.02 Value n 62.88+2.18 GovtInc 10.87 -.03 Fidelity Selects: Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.58 +.48 GroCo n 83.58+2.67 Gold r n 51.99 -.17 StrInA 12.48 +.02 GroInc n 17.46 +.46 Fidelity Spartan: GrowthCoK83.61 ExtMkIn n 35.63+1.44 Fidelity Advisor I: 500IdxInv n42.96 NwInsgtI n 19.80 +.49 +2.67 HighInc r n 8.53 +.03 +1.19 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 n 13.48 +.15 Indepn n 22.85 +.78 IntlInxInv n32.40 +.64 FF2015 n 11.25 +.13 IntBd n 10.87 -.02 TotMktInv n35.22 FF2015K 12.49 +.15 IntmMu n 10.33 ... +1.06 FF2020 n 13.56 +.19 IntlDisc n 30.10 +.63 Fidelity Spart Adv: FF2020K 12.83 +.18 InvGrBd n 11.80 -.03 500IdxAdv n42.96 FF2025 n 11.22 +.20 InvGB n 7.64 -.03 +1.18 FF2025K 12.88 +.22 LgCapVal 10.55 +.34 TotMktAd r n35.22 FF2030 n 13.35 +.24 LatAm 53.52+1.59 +1.06 First Eagle: FF2030K 13.01 +.23 LevCoStk n25.47 GlblA 46.32 +.65 FF2035 n 11.00 +.23 +1.04 OverseasA22.38 +.20 LowP r n 37.66+1.09 FF2040 n 7.67 +.16 FF2040K 13.08 +.28 LowPriK r 37.67+1.09 Forum Funds: Magelln n 65.62+2.04 AbsStrI r 10.95 -.02 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.82 +.33 MidCap n 26.73 +.91 Frank/Temp Frnk A: AMgr50 n 15.10 +.18 MuniInc n 12.78 ... CalTFA p 6.94 ... AMgr20 r n12.85 +.05 NwMkt r n 15.97 +.02 FedTFA p 11.93 ... Balanc n 18.04 +.30 OTC n 53.90+1.74 FoundAl p 9.88 +.20 BalancedK18.04 +.30 100Index 8.53 +.21 GrwthA p 43.38+1.21 Ovrsea n 29.28 +.67 HYTFA p 10.05 ... BlueChGr n44.56 Puritn n 17.59 +.28 IncomA p 2.07 +.02 +1.29 Canada n 55.38+1.05 PuritanK 17.59 +.28 NYTFA p 11.63 ... CapAp n 24.07 +.71 RealE n 26.57 +.86 RisDvA p 32.91 +.85 CpInc r n 8.91 +.08 SCmdtyStrt n12.52 - StratInc p 10.31 +.03 USGovA p 6.92 ... Contra n 66.74+1.66 .01 ContraK 66.77+1.66 SrsIntGrw 10.54 +.21 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: DisEq n 21.39 +.65 SrsIntVal 8.83 +.21 GlbBdAdv n13.73 +.04 DivIntl n 27.69 +.60 SrInvGrdF 11.80 -.04 IncmeAd 2.06 +.03 DivrsIntK r 27.69 +.59 StIntMu n 10.82 ... Frank/Temp Frnk C: DivGth n 26.18 +.86 STBF n 8.53 ... IncomC t 2.09 +.03 EmrMk n 23.52 +.67 SmllCpS r n16.75 +.81 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: Eq Inc n 40.47+1.21 StratInc n 11.16 +.01 SharesA 19.50 +.47 EQII n 16.69 +.50 StrReRt r 9.68 +.03 Frank/Temp Temp A: Fidel n 31.35 +.80 TotalBd n 11.00 -.03 ForgnA p 6.43 +.12 FltRateHi r n9.35 +.02 USBI n 11.71 -.03 GlBd A p 13.77 +.04

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday:

-.70 -.90 -.37 -.17

27.59 +.66 25.24 +.68 44.66 +1.90 21.70 +.83 62.36 +1.89 56.81 +1.88 42.94 +1.34 45.74 +1.36 11.76 +2.78 34.94 +1.77 36.14 +.38 47.28 +1.70 11.01 +.27 86.58 +.73 88.50 +3.73 53.19 +.29 35.46 +.95 33.90 +1.56 16.72 +.98 62.42 +1.99 25.42 +.83 4.99 +.24 17.66 +.44 16.49 +.23 17.49 +.49 62.10 +3.37 26.48 +1.26 20.33 +.76 31.47 +1.69 20.60 +1.33 24.37 +.35 8.06 +.34 15.74 -.25 6.39 +.27 25.20 +1.89 54.00 +1.23

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

MUTUAL FUNDS

-.01

Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

GrwthA p 16.74 +.36 WorldA p 13.95 +.29 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.80 +.05 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 38.47+1.07 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.85 +.40 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 20.09 +.42 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.54 +.32 Quality 20.86 +.40 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 32.98+1.22 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.85 +.02 MidCapV 33.30+1.23 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.32 -.01 CapApInst 36.83 +.92 IntlInv t 55.36+1.01 Intl r 56.00+1.02 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 29.88 +.92 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI n 29.93 +.92 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 37.89+1.20 Div&Gr 18.69 +.50 TotRetBd 11.37 -.02 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.65 -.10 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r16.55 +.20 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.00 +.41 CmstkA 14.80 +.44 EqIncA 8.13 +.16 GrIncA p 17.85 +.50

May 12 838ø 841ü 831ü 838fl Jul 12 839fl 844 831 842ü 843ü 852 Sep 12 850ø 852 Dec 12 867 869 857ø 867fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 141132. Fri’s Sales: 100,992 Fri’s open int: 418874, off -9408 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 11 756 765ø 751ø 756ü Dec 11 768 779 765ü 770 Mar 12 780 789 776ø 781fl May 12 786ø 791fl 781 785fl 782ü 787fl Jul 12 787fl 794 Sep 12 716ø 717 710 716ø Dec 12 666 669ø 660fl 666ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 562538. Fri’s Sales: 410,111 Fri’s open int: 1268185, off -640 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 11 383ü 390 377ø 381ø Dec 11 384ø 394ü 382fl 384 Mar 12 397 401ø 393 393 400 400 May 12 405 405 Jul 12 411 411 406 406 Sep 12 417 417 412 412 Dec 12 400 400 395 395 Last spot N/A Est. sales 2122. Fri’s Sales: 1,722 Fri’s open int: 13341, off -618 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 11 1431ø 1438fl 1411ü 1438 Nov 11 1446ø 1447fl 1420ü 1447 Jan 12 1456 1456ø 1429ü 1456 Mar 12 1448ø 1459 1429ü 1457 May 12 1442ø 1453 1426 1450ø Jul 12 1442fl 1452 1429ü 1452 Aug 12 1414 1434 1414 1434 Sep 12 1383 1401 1383 1401 Nov 12 1361 1373 1349ø 1371 Jan 13 1350 1375 1350 1374ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 330698. Fri’s Sales: 210,553 Fri’s open int: 558218, up +17113

+4 +6ø +6ü +7

HYMuA 9.20 ... Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.39 +.56 AssetStA p24.19 +.58 AssetStrI r 24.42 +.58 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.82 -.03 JPMorgan R Cl: ShtDurBd 11.03 ... JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd n 11.82 -.02 HighYld n 7.74 +.02 IntmTFBd n11.16 ... ShtDurBd n11.03 ... USLCCrPls n19.41 +.55 Janus T Shrs: BalancdT 24.53 +.36 OvrseasT r39.20+1.38 PrkMCVal T21.63 +.57 Twenty T 60.96+1.68 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 11.54 +.31 LSBalanc 12.45 +.22 LSGrwth 12.22 +.29 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.65 +.47 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p20.04 +.48 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p15.81 -.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 27.96 +.85 SmCap 27.26+1.21 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.48 +.05 StrInc C 14.99 +.09 LSBondR 14.42 +.04 StrIncA 14.91 +.09 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.46 -.01

FUTURES

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

+3fl +3 +3ø +3fl +3fl +2ø +1

+2ø -4 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5

+23ü +23ø +23ü +24ø +22ø +22 +20 +18 +17fl +17fl

Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.32 +.32 BdDebA p 7.55 +.03 ShDurIncA p4.54 ... Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t4.57 ... Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.54 ... MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.85 +.21 ValueA 21.73 +.57 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.84 +.58 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.75 +.01 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.89 +.17 Matthews Asian: PacTgrInv 22.43 +.42 MergerFd n 15.67 +.07 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.46 -.02 TotRtBdI 10.46 -.02 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 12.87 +.20 MCapGrI 37.95+1.12 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.34 +.57 GlbDiscZ 27.72 +.58 QuestZ 16.86 +.32 SharesZ 19.69 +.48 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 47.03+1.65 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 48.66+1.71 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 6.97 +.01 MMIntEq r 9.03 +.18 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.18 +.52 Intl I r 17.01 +.36

low settle

chg.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Oct 11 87.13 87.62 85.11 87.27 +1.90 Nov 11 87.42 87.89 85.45 87.57 +1.87 Dec 11 87.69 88.22 85.85 87.87 +1.81 Jan 12 88.11 88.55 86.27 88.21 +1.76 Feb 12 88.81 88.87 86.85 88.57 +1.71 Mar 12 88.70 89.29 87.27 88.93 +1.65 Apr 12 89.33 89.51 87.80 89.32 +1.61 May 12 89.44 89.94 89.38 89.71 +1.57 Jun 12 89.88 90.50 88.44 90.08 +1.52 Jul 12 90.36 90.43 90.07 90.43 +1.46 Aug 12 90.61 90.70 90.61 90.68 +1.39 Sep 12 91.14 91.14 90.90 90.90 +1.35 Oct 12 91.10 +1.31 Nov 12 91.30 +1.27 Dec 12 91.23 91.97 90.03 91.51 +1.24 Jan 13 91.62 +1.20 Feb 13 91.73 +1.16 Mar 13 91.87 +1.13 Apr 13 92.04 +1.10 May 13 92.14 +1.05 Jun 13 92.34 92.34 92.05 92.23 +1.00 Jul 13 92.30 +.96 Aug 13 92.34 +.92 Sep 13 92.36 +.87 Last spot N/A Est. sales 376268. Fri’s Sales: 468,231 Fri’s open int: 1482421, up +9283 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Sep 11 2.9290 2.9513 2.8765 2.9064 -.0282 Oct 11 2.7861 2.8112 2.7430 2.7695 -.0165 Nov 11 2.7440 2.7664 2.7060 2.7303 -.0055 Dec 11 2.7257 2.7471 2.6888 2.7139 -.0002 Jan 12 2.7330 2.7406 2.7136 2.7136 +.0016 Feb 12 2.7191 2.7357 2.7191 2.7216 +.0025 Mar 12 2.7295 2.7586 2.7295 2.7329 +.0038 Apr 12 2.8420 +.0033 May 12 2.8395 +.0034 Jun 12 2.8441 2.8561 2.8294 2.8294 +.0029

Oakmark 40.18+1.08 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.39 +.08 GlbSMdCap14.35+.39 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 42.18+1.12 DvMktA p 32.13 +.76 GlobA p 56.47+1.45 GblStrIncA 4.21 +.01 Gold p 48.68 -.09 IntBdA p 6.77 +.02 MnStFdA 30.65 +.85 Oppenheimer Roch: RoMu A p 15.50 -.01 RcNtMuA 6.85 +.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 31.85 +.76 IntlBdY 6.77 +.02 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.96 -.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r10.83 +.04 AllAsset 12.24 +.06 ComodRR 9.01 -.01 DivInc 11.30 +.01 EmgMkCur10.89 +.03 FltInc r 8.42 +.04 HiYld 8.85 +.03 InvGrCp 10.55 -.02 LowDu 10.42 ... RealRet 12.64 -.13 RealRtnI 12.02 -.06 ShortT 9.81 ... TotRt 10.96 -.01 TR II 10.49 -.02 TRIII 9.62 -.01 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.42 ... RealRtA p 12.02 -.06 TotRtA 10.96 -.01

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET

... 31.47 +1.85 Div Last Chg Cree Inc Crocs ... 28.26 +1.18 A-B-C Ctrip.com ... 39.75 +1.25 CubistPh ... 33.59 +1.31 APACC ... 8.47 -.01 ASML Hld .58e 35.80 +1.31 CypSemi .36 16.50 +.51 ATP O&G ... 13.99 +.12 D-E-F AVI Bio ... 1.21 +.05 ... 14.97 +.28 AcmePkt ... 47.97 +2.52 Dell Inc ... 12.25 +.38 ActivsBliz .17f 11.61 +.33 Dndreon Actuate ... 6.58 +.23 Dentsply .20 35.15 +.94 Acxiom ... 10.49 +.75 Depomed ... 6.30 +.58 AdobeSy ... 25.52 +.98 DirecTV A ... 43.57 +1.06 Adtran .36 30.01 +1.36 DiscCm A ... 40.62 +1.10 AdvATech ... 5.99 +.06 DishNetwk ... 23.32 +1.08 AEterna g ... 1.89 +.07 DonlleyRR 1.04 14.89 +.66 Affymetrix ... 5.60 +.27 DrmWksA ... 21.07 +.99 AgFeed ... 1.05 +.02 DryShips ... 3.09 +.36 AirTrnsp ... 5.55 +.19 DurectCp ... 1.77 +.29 AkamaiT ... 21.62 +.98 E-Trade ... 11.42 +.60 Akorn ... 7.76 +.02 eBay ... 30.49 +1.03 AlaskCom .86 7.30 +.13 ErthLink .20 7.33 +.24 Alkerm ... 16.33 +.40 EstWstBcp .20 16.72 +.63 AllscriptH ... 17.54 +.22 ElectArts ... 22.28 +.78 AlteraCp lf .32f 37.46 +1.16 Emcore lf ... 1.80 +.21 Amarin ... 11.23 +.57 EndoPhrm ... 31.45 +.84 Amazon ... 206.53 +7.26 Ener1 lf ... .42 +.07 Amedisys ... 16.82 +.74 EngyConv ... .77 +.02 ACapAgy 5.60e 28.60 +.54 EngyXXI ... 26.24 +1.78 AmCapLtd ... 8.70 +.55 Entegris ... 7.54 +.42 AmSupr ... 6.99 +.59 EntropCom ... 4.43 +.39 Amgen 1.12 54.79 +.71 Equinix ... 92.29 +3.50 AmkorT lf ... 4.20 +.22 EricsnTel .37e 11.15 +.38 Amylin ... 10.78 +.28 Exelixis ... 7.09 +.65 AnadysPh ... .75 +.01 ExideTc ... 5.38 +.49 A123 Sys ... 4.92 +.17 Expedia .28 29.26 +1.23 ApolloGrp ... 46.02 +1.16 ExpdIntl .50f 45.60 +1.75 ApolloInv 1.12 9.12 +.65 F5 Netwks ... 78.72 +3.23 Apple Inc ... 389.97 +6.39 FLIR Sys .24 25.56 +.99 ApldMatl .32 11.39 +.41 FifthThird .24 10.51 +.46 AMCC ... 5.73 +.28 Finisar ... 18.08 +1.27 ArenaPhm ... 1.33 +.03 FstNiagara .64 10.64 +.51 AresCap 1.40 15.12 +.58 FstSolar ... 102.31 +1.60 AriadP ... 9.86 +.61 FstMerit .64 12.49 +.50 Ariba Inc ... 26.84 +1.79 Fiserv ... 55.30 +1.34 ArmHld .15e 26.84 +.56 Flextrn ... 5.80 +.31 Arris ... 10.86 +.59 Fluidigm n ... d12.98 +.51 ArubaNet ... 21.43 +.88 FocusMda ... 32.16 +.84 AsiaInfoL ... 10.05 +.70 Fossil Inc ... 102.37 +7.06 AspenTech ... u17.78 +1.01 FosterWhl ... 24.30 +1.19 AsscdBanc .04 10.80 +.38 FuelCell ... 1.23 +.08 athenahlth ... 58.89 +1.14 FultonFncl .20f 9.33 +.72 Atmel ... 9.20 +.19 Autodesk ... 28.05 +1.42 G-H-I AutoData 1.44 49.40 +.72 GT AdvTc ... 12.27 +.88 AvagoTch .36f 32.85 +1.33 Garmin 2.00e 33.35 +.61 AvanirPhm ... 3.00 +.37 Gentex .48 26.34 +1.04 AviatNetw ... 2.52 ... Gentiva h ... 8.28 +.99 AvisBudg ... 12.61 +.69 GeronCp ... 2.72 +.20 BGC Ptrs .68 6.60 +.42 GileadSci ... 39.79 +1.06 BMC Sft ... 40.77 +1.20 GloblInd ... 4.53 +.58 BeacnRfg ... 19.04 +.86 GlbSpcMet .15 16.08 +.47 BebeStrs .10 7.10 +.53 GluMobile ... 3.28 +.22 BedBath ... 56.99 +2.09 GolarLNG1.10f 31.79 +1.60 BiogenIdc ... 93.89 +1.60 Google ... 539.08 BioSante ... 2.61 +.25 +12.22 Blkboard ... 41.45 -.34 Halozyme ... 6.91 +.16 BlueCoat ... 14.60 +.81 HanmiFncl ... .97 +.05 BrigExp ... 28.61 +.96 HansenMed ... 3.30 +.12 Broadcom .36 34.86 +.95 HansenNat ... u89.03 +4.40 BrcdeCm ... 3.85 +.20 HarbinElec ... 16.39 +1.31 CA Inc .20 20.65 +.73 Harmonic ... 4.92 +.07 CH Robins 1.16 70.47 +2.48 Hasbro 1.20 37.68 +.86 CME Grp 5.60 263.92 HrtlndEx .08a 15.07 +.48 +13.00 HercOffsh ... 3.97 +.22 CNinsure ... 11.61 +.80 Hologic ... 16.69 +.68 Cadence ... 9.26 +.39 HotTopic .28 u8.60 +.47 CapFdF rs .30a 10.86 +.29 HudsCity .32 6.21 +.29 CpstnTrb h ... 1.20 +.07 HumGen ... 13.13 +.50 CareerEd ... 17.15 +.67 HuntJB .52 40.47 +1.09 CaribouC ... 14.29 +.70 HuntBnk .16f 5.12 +.22 Carrizo ... 29.38 +1.67 ... 39.17 +1.16 CathayGen .04 13.12 +.76 IAC Inter ... 19.19 +1.06 Cavium ... 32.23 +2.43 IconixBr Illumina ... 51.67 +2.04 Celgene ... 58.28 +.98 ... 3.90 +.24 CentEuro ... 8.20 +2.73 Imunmd ... 15.31 +.63 Incyte CentAl ... 11.88 +.77 ... 7.70 +.41 Cephln ... 80.64 +.01 Infinera Informat ... 43.70 +2.06 Cepheid ... 36.23 +2.53 ChrmSh ... 3.05 +.08 Infosys 1.35e 51.34 +2.93 ... 17.12 +.55 ChkPoint ... 53.90 +1.00 Insulet ... 5.90 +.30 Cheesecake ... 27.91 +1.12 IntgDv .84f 20.30 +.53 CienaCorp ... 12.13 +1.35 Intel InterDig .40 71.49 +2.43 CinnFin 1.61f 27.62 +1.04 .48 11.13 +.48 Cintas .49f 31.50 +.92 Intersil Intuit .60 48.40 +1.84 Cirrus ... 15.28 +.83 ... 375.86 Cisco .24 15.74 +.42 IntSurg CitrixSys ... 57.73 +2.52 +18.93 ... 7.39 +.27 CleanEngy ... 14.19 +.55 Isis Clearwire ... 2.81 +.11 J-K-L CognizTech ... 63.06 +2.22 ... 3.78 +.18 Comcast .45 21.24 +.67 JA Solar Comc spcl .45 20.98 +.61 JDS Uniph ... 12.28 +1.09 JackHenry .42 29.02 +.73 Compuwre ... 8.41 +.42 CorinthC ... 1.87 -.02 JamesRiv ... 10.91 +.60 JazzPhrm ... 40.00 +1.96 Costco .96 77.79 +.58 ... 4.36 +.29 CowenGp ... 3.46 +.14 JetBlue

Name

Name

JoyGlbl .70 KLA Tnc 1.40f Kulicke ... L&L Engy ... LamResrch ... LamarAdv ... Lattice ... LeapWirlss ... Level3 ... LexiPhrm ... LibGlobA ... LibtyMIntA ... LifeTech ... LimelghtN ... LinearTch .96 LinnEngy 2.76f Lionbrdg ... Logitech ...

80.82 +4.86 36.88 +1.41 9.16 +.51 3.51 +.09 38.74 +1.44 21.12 +.97 5.95 +.33 8.84 +.42 1.88 +.14 1.44 +.13 38.37 +2.37 15.64 +.43 41.11 +1.76 2.48 +.21 28.34 +.93 37.92 +.95 2.89 +.15 11.30 +.53

M-N-0

MIPS Tech ... 5.46 +.33 Magma ... 4.98 +.58 MAKO Srg ... 34.99 +2.57 MannKd ... 2.70 +.14 MarinaBio ... .19 -.01 MarvellT ... 13.16 +.27 Mattel .92 26.37 +1.08 MaximIntg .88f 23.13 +.73 MecoxL n ... 1.85 +.40 MelcoCrwn ... 12.51 +.45 MentorGr ... 11.88 +.67 Microchp 1.39f 33.38 +1.09 MicronT ... 6.15 +.49 MicrosSys ... 46.79 +.84 MicroSemi ... 15.79 +.42 Microsoft .64 25.84 +.59 Molex .80f 21.25 +.96 Momenta ... 17.28 +.93 Motricity ... 2.36 +.37 Move Inc ... 1.67 +.14 Mylan ... 20.04 +.81 NII Hldg ... 37.48 +1.38 NXP Semi ... 17.16 +.64 NasdOMX ... 23.45 +.72 NatPenn .12f 7.33 +.47 NektarTh ... 5.90 +.26 NetLogicM ... 30.10 +1.36 NetApp ... 37.32 +.78 Netflix ... 225.04 +3.15 NewsCpA .19f 17.33 +.46 NewsCpB .19f 17.44 +.43 NorTrst 1.12 38.82 +1.59 NovtlWrls ... 3.40 +.07 Novavax ... 1.68 +.28 Novlus ... 28.47 +1.04 NuVasive ... 22.49 +1.08 NuanceCm ... 18.20 +.73 Nvidia ... 13.36 +.35 OReillyAu ... 65.24 +1.31 Oclaro ... 4.04 +.46 OmniVisn ... 17.27 ... OnSmcnd ... 7.43 +.22 Oncothyr ... 7.63 +.50 OnyxPh ... 33.70 +1.76 OpenTable ... 63.80 +1.87 OpnwvSy ... 1.42 +.05 optXprs 4.50e 12.74 +.52 Oracle .24 27.91 +1.26 Oritani .40 u13.42 +.52

P-Q-R

Questcor RF MicD Rambus Randgold Regenrn RschMotn RexEnergy RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp RoyGld

PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.96 -.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.96 -.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.96 -.01 Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n 25.57 +.66 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 49.25 +.29 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 38.04+1.01 Price Funds: BlChip n 38.00+1.06 CapApp n 19.97 +.42 EmMktS n 31.38 +.79 EqInc n 22.28 +.63 EqIndex n 32.69 +.90 Growth n 31.31 +.89 HiYield n 6.42 +.02 IntlBond n 10.60 ... Intl G&I 12.35 +.24 IntlStk n 13.09 +.29 MidCap n 56.20+1.79 MCapVal n22.28 +.73 N Asia n 18.16 +.39 New Era n 47.53+1.43 N Horiz n 33.86+1.28 N Inc n 9.65 -.02 OverS SF r n7.85 +.16 R2010 n 15.26 +.23 R2015 n 11.74 +.21 R2020 n 16.10 +.32 R2025 n 11.72 +.26 R2030 n 16.71 +.40 R2035 n 11.77 +.30 R2040 n 16.72 +.43 ShtBd n 4.85 ... SmCpStk n32.87+1.44 SmCapVal n34.37 +1.39

Jul 12 2.8098 Aug 12 2.7893 Sep 12 2.7698 Oct 12 2.6533 Nov 12 2.6303 Dec 12 2.6253 Jan 13 2.6303 Feb 13 2.6388 Mar 13 2.6478 Apr 13 2.7553 May 13 2.7622 Jun 13 2.7507 Jul 13 2.7325 Aug 13 2.7143 Sep 13 2.6937 Last spot N/A Est. sales 94741. Fri’s Sales: 147,420 Fri’s open int: 253137, up +805 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Sep 11 3.863 3.931 3.830 3.857 Oct 11 3.840 3.924 3.822 3.830 Nov 11 3.973 4.054 3.952 3.955 Dec 11 4.202 4.280 4.186 4.187 Jan 12 4.321 4.386 4.300 4.301 Feb 12 4.316 4.399 4.306 4.306 Mar 12 4.295 4.350 4.270 4.270 Apr 12 4.260 4.315 4.241 4.241 May 12 4.283 4.343 4.269 4.269 Jun 12 4.324 4.375 4.309 4.309 Jul 12 4.375 4.418 4.355 4.355 Aug 12 4.397 4.445 4.381 4.381 Sep 12 4.396 4.452 4.386 4.386 Oct 12 4.434 4.483 4.413 4.413 Nov 12 4.592 4.647 4.581 4.581 Dec 12 4.851 4.902 4.841 4.841 Jan 13 4.980 5.024 4.973 4.973 Feb 13 4.972 4.990 4.948 4.948 Mar 13 4.895 4.910 4.883 4.883 Apr 13 4.769 4.770 4.744 4.744 May 13 4.781 4.781 4.760 4.760 Jun 13 4.790 Jul 13 4.830 Aug 13 4.852 Last spot N/A Est. sales 210527. Fri’s Sales: 253,067 Fri’s open int: 979228, off -2834

SpecGr n 16.91 +.47 SpecIn n 12.34 +.05 Value n 22.05 +.66 Principal Inv: LT2020In 11.44 +.21 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.03 ... VoyA p 19.40 ... Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.10 +.41 PremierI r 20.23 +.68 TotRetI r 12.60 +.44 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 36.08+1.04 S&P Sel 19.07 +.52 Scout Funds: Intl 29.60 +.68 Selected Funds: AmShD 38.72 +.94 Sequoia n 137.59+3.08 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.35 +.33 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 45.92 +.91 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 25.27 +.33 IncBuildC p18.20 +.28 IntValue I 25.84 +.34 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.44 +.36 VALIC : StkIdx 24.13 +.67 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml n 21.30 +.37 CAITAdm n11.15 -.01 CpOpAdl n70.39+2.14 EMAdmr r n35.57 +1.03 Energy n 118.41+3.31 ExplAdml n64.56+2.70 ExtdAdm n39.13+1.61

+.0015 +.0020 +.0025 +.0042 +.0037 +.0042 +.0042 +.0042 +.0042 +.0042 +.0042 +.0042 +.0042 +.0042 +.0042

-.074 -.082 -.092 -.086 -.085 -.083 -.080 -.076 -.073 -.071 -.069 -.069 -.069 -.069 -.065 -.057 -.057 -.056 -.056 -.052 -.051 -.051 -.047 -.047

.31 +.02 1.67 +.15 15.10 +.24 11.83 +.19 4.20 +.01 3.04 +.04 10.18 -.10 12.85 +.65 16.74 +.27 .24 +.00 4.06 +.26 3.99 +.17 23.27 +1.27 2.41 +.02 6.23 +.39 2.07 -.02 2.94 -.01 .31 +.03 39.95 +.67 .72 +.03 8.31 -.05 1.59 -.01 1.10 +.01 1.87 +.09 10.56 +.65 .07 +.02

... 28.67 +.88 ... 6.08 +.54 ... 11.86 +.68 .20 103.72 -2.64 ... 58.62 +2.81 ... 30.73 +1.55 ... 12.10 +.77 ... 47.28 +3.91 .88 75.51 +1.86 ... 47.42 +1.81 .44 u74.55 -.28

S-T-U

SBA Com ... SEI Inv .24f STEC ... SalixPhm ... SanDisk ... Sanmina ... Sanofi rt ... Santarus ... Sapient .35e SavientPh ... SeagateT .72 SearsHldgs ... SeattGen ... SelCmfrt ... Semtech ... Sequenom ... Shutterfly ... SifyTech ... SilicnImg ... SilcnLab ... Slcnware .28e SilvStd g ... Sina ... Sinclair .48 SiriusXM ... Skullcdy n ... SkywksSol ... SodaStrm n ... Sohu.cm ... Sonus ... SpectPh ... Spreadtrm .05p StaarSur ... Staples .40 StarScient ... Starbucks .52 StlDynam .40 Stereotaxis ... SunHlth n ... SusqBnc .08 SwisherH n ... Symantec ... TD Ameritr .20 TTM Tch ... TakeTwo ... Tellabs .08 TeslaMot ... TevaPhrm .87e TexRdhse .32 TibcoSft ... TiVo Inc ... Travelzoo ... TriQuint ... TrstNY .26 UtdOnln .40 UtdTherap ... UnivDisp ... UrbanOut ...

36.36 +.75 17.06 +.57 9.35 +.68 29.88 +1.12 37.39 +2.59 7.64 +.48 1.05 +.02 3.26 +.15 10.69 +.46 4.17 +.15 11.67 +.58 59.68 +4.01 17.28 +.62 15.67 +.90 23.01 +1.23 6.09 +.36 51.23 +2.39 4.48 +.17 5.35 +.27 34.95 +1.84 4.47 +.19 27.83 +.39 98.00 +.07 8.20 +.58 1.81 +.11 16.01 +.52 20.80 +.91 36.96 +2.33 79.24 +4.04 2.46 +.06 8.78 +.47 17.53 +.11 u8.37 +.12 14.86 +.38 2.59 +.78 38.05 +.66 12.72 +.80 1.08 +.13 4.03 +.19 6.59 +.37 4.18 +.24 16.84 +.46 15.18 +.53 11.21 +.70 12.70 +.62 4.09 +.28 24.71 +.98 40.59 +1.17 14.06 +.60 21.43 +.96 10.64 +.68 36.93 +3.48 8.18 +.51 4.61 +.31 5.44 +.34 40.76 +.69 51.22 -.49 25.46 +.69

V-W-X-Y-Z

PDL Bio .60 5.95 +.20 PMC Sra ... 6.03 +.21 Paccar .48a 38.00 +2.20 PacSunwr ... 1.45 +.04 PaetecHld ... u5.42 +.14 PanASlv .10 32.00 +.25 PaneraBrd ... 115.12 +4.17 ParamTch ... 18.02 +.80 Patterson .48 28.53 +1.28 PattUTI .20 24.50 +.87 Paychex 1.24 26.47 +.24 Pendrell ... 2.56 +.19 PeopUtdF .63 11.45 +.47 PerfectWld ... 21.55 -.32 Perrigo .28 93.61 +1.93 PetsMart .56f 42.64 +1.30 Popular ... 2.07 +.11 Power-One ... 7.79 +.08 PwShs QQQ.42e 54.61 +1.48 Powrwav ... 1.70 +.20 PriceTR 1.24 52.99 +2.30 priceline ... 521.01 +17.54 PrimoWt n ... 5.66 +.47 PrinctnR h ... .20 +.02 PrivateB .04 8.83 +.51 PrUPShQQQ ... 24.69 -2.28 ProspctCap1.22f 9.10 +.31 QIAGEN ... 15.42 +.30 QLT ... 7.20 +.77 QlikTech ... 25.60 +1.15 Qlogic ... 13.82 +.53 Qualcom .86 50.92 +1.98 QuestSft ... 17.33 +.89

ValVis A ... 3.76 +.41 ValueClick ... 15.61 +.82 VarianSemi ... 61.00 +.08 Verisign 5.75e 31.00 +.58 Verisk ... 34.42 +.75 VertxPh ... 43.95 -1.31 Vical ... 3.86 +.63 VirgnMda h .16 25.12 +.85 ViroPhrm ... 19.74 +1.08 Virtusa ... 15.95 +.86 ... 29.21 +1.10 VistaPrt Vivus ... 7.99 +.60 Vodafone 1.45e 26.78 +.37 WarnerCh s8.50e17.29 +.77 WashFed .24 15.10 +.58 WebMD ... 35.20 +2.53 WstptInn g ... 24.88 +1.36 WetSeal ... 5.02 +.06 WholeFd .40 64.29 +3.21 Windstrm 1.00 12.34 +.28 Winn-Dixie ... 7.60 +.99 WisdomTr ... u9.35 +.37 Wynn 2.00 147.11 +6.77 Xilinx .76 31.21 +.97 YRC rsh ... .72 -.05 Yahoo ... 13.68 +.94 Zagg ... 15.01 +.12 Zalicus ... 1.62 +.10 Zhongpin ... 9.07 +.84 ZionBcp .04 17.26 +1.01 ZollMed ... 42.76 +1.27 Zoran ... 8.11 +.22

MadCatz g Metalico MetroHlth MdwGold g MincoG g Minefnd g NeoStem Neoprobe Nevsun g NewEnSys NwGold g NA Pall g NDynMn g NthnO&G NthgtM g NovaGld g Oilsands g Oilsands rt OpkoHlth ParaG&S PhrmAth PionDrill PlatGpMet PolyMet g Procera rs Quepasa

RareEle g ... Rentech ... RevettM rs ... RexahnPh ... Richmnt g ... Rubicon g ... SamsO&G ... SprottRL g .01e TanzRy g ... Taseko ... TrnsatlPet ... TravelCtrs ... TriValley ... TriangPet ... Ur-Energy ... Uranerz ... UraniumEn ... VantageDrl ... VirnetX ... VistaGold ... VoyagerOG ... WalterInv 2.00 WizzardSft ... YM Bio g ...

AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg DejourE g ... DenisnM g ... AbdAsPac .42 7.64 +.08 EV LtdDur 1.25 Adventrx ... .91 +.03 EVMuniBd .92 AlexcoR g ... 7.87 +.12 ExeterR gs ... AlldNevG ... 41.51 -.67 Express-1 ... AlmadnM g ... 3.12 +.02 ExtorreG g ... AntaresP ... 2.46 +.12 FrkStPrp .76 ArcadiaRs ... .04 ... GabGldNR 1.68 Augusta g ... 4.23 +.29 GascoEngy ... Aurizon g ... 6.16 -.05 Gastar grs ... AvalRare n ... 4.32 +.20 GenMoly ... Banro g ... u4.92 +.14 GoldResrc .60f BarcUBS36 ... 48.66 +.04 GoldStr g ... BarcGSOil ... 22.20 +.55 GranTrra g ... Brigus grs ... 1.51 ... GrtBasG g ... CAMAC En ... .84 +.01 GtPanSilv g ... CanoPet ... .23 -.01 Hemisphrx ... CardiumTh ... .20 -.00 ImpOil gs .44 CelSci ... .40 +.02 InovioPhm ... CFCda g .01 24.25 -.73 IntTower g ... CheniereEn ... 7.81 +.41 LadThalFn ... ChinNEPet ... 1.98 +.08 LongweiPI ... ClaudeR g ... 1.93 ... LucasEngy ... CrSuiHiY .32 2.95 +.05 MAG Slv g ... CubicEngy ... .74 +.03 MGT Cap ...

B5

500Adml n111.84 +3.09 GNMA Ad n11.12 -.01 GrwAdm n 30.95 +.83 HlthCr n 55.19+1.06 HiYldCp n 5.54 +.01 InfProAd n 27.59 -.14 ITBdAdml n11.78 -.05 ITsryAdml n12.03 -.04 IntGrAdm n56.92+1.22 ITAdml n 13.79 ... ITGrAdm n10.07 -.03 LtdTrAd n 11.16 ... LTGrAdml n9.79 -.09 LT Adml n 11.10 ... MCpAdml n88.42 +3.16 MuHYAdm n10.48 ... PrmCap r n65.23+1.81 ReitAdm r n80.59 +2.59 STsyAdml n10.85 ... STBdAdml n10.70 ... ShtTrAd n 15.95 ... STFdAd n 10.94 ... STIGrAd n 10.72 ... SmCAdm n32.87+1.42 TxMCap r n60.84 +1.76 TtlBAdml n10.93 -.03 TStkAdm n30.37 +.91 WellslAdm n53.93+.35 WelltnAdm n52.69+.86 Windsor n 41.88+1.32 WdsrIIAd n43.75+1.24 Vanguard Fds: AssetA n 23.48 +.55 DivdGro n 14.44 +.32 Energy n 63.05+1.77 Explr n 69.31+2.90 GNMA n 11.12 -.01

... .80 +.01 ... 4.27 +.20 ... 5.18 +.21 ... 2.45 ... ... 1.24 +.10 ... 15.78 -.14 ... .71 +.04 ... 3.24 +.14 .06 6.55 +.05 ... 1.92 +.12 ... u13.21 -.27 ... 3.89 +.14 ... 10.03 +.29 ... 20.13 +1.22 ... u4.03 +.88 ... 9.90 -.04 ... .19 -.00 ... .00 ... ... 4.14 +.12 ... 2.39 +.01 ... 2.60 +.07 ... 12.50 +1.25 ... 1.28 -.05 ... 1.43 -.01 ... 7.85 +.13 ... 5.20 +.94

GlobEq n 16.72 +.42 HYCorp n 5.54 +.01 HlthCre n 130.75+2.50 InflaPro n 14.04 -.08 IntlGr n 17.88 +.38 IntlVal n 28.79 +.58 ITIGrade n 10.07 -.03 LifeCon n 16.22 +.19 LifeGro n 21.20 +.48 LifeMod n 19.18 +.32 LTIGrade n 9.79 -.09 Morg n 17.34 +.52 MuInt n 13.79 ... PrecMtls r n25.98 +.65 PrmcpCor n13.29 +.37 Prmcp r n 62.84+1.75 SelValu r n18.05 +.59 STAR n 18.69 +.31 STIGrade n10.72 ... StratEq n 18.13 +.70 TgtRetInc n11.50 +.08 TgRe2010 n22.65+.27 TgtRe2015 n12.42 +.18 TgRe2020 n21.90+.39 TgtRe2025 n12.40 +.24 TgRe2030 n21.15+.47 TgtRe2035 n12.66 +.30 TgtRe2040 n20.75 +.51 TgtRe2045 n13.03 +.32 Wellsly n 22.26 +.15 Welltn n 30.51 +.50 Wndsr n 12.41 +.39 WndsII n 24.65 +.70 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r n24.18 +.52

8.51 +.19 .92 +.08 4.68 +.29 .94 -.01 9.46 -.34 4.02 +.06 2.44 +.09 1.59 ... 5.84 +.07 3.85 -.01 1.06 ... 4.54 +.38 .27 -.02 5.43 +.48 1.28 +.07 2.28 +.09 3.35 +.15 1.33 +.08 23.83 +1.99 3.23 -.03 2.75 +.20 24.16 +.11 .17 -.00 1.90 +.09

TotIntlInst r n96.74 +2.08 500 n 111.82+3.09 DevMkt n 9.29 +.18 Extend n 39.08+1.60 Growth n 30.94 +.83 MidCap n 19.46 +.69 SmCap n 32.81+1.42 SmlCpGth n21.08 +.91 SmlCpVl n 14.83 +.65 STBnd n 10.70 ... TotBnd n 10.93 -.03 TotlIntl n 14.45 +.31 TotStk n 30.36 +.92 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n 21.31 +.38 DevMkInst n9.22 +.17 ExtIn n 39.13+1.61 FTAllWldI r n86.22 +1.88 GrwthIst n 30.95 +.83 InfProInst n11.24 -.05 InstIdx n 111.08+3.06 InsPl n 111.09+3.07 InsTStPlus n27.47+.82 MidCpIst n 19.53 +.70 SCInst n 32.87+1.42 TBIst n 10.93 -.03 TSInst n 30.37 +.91 ValueIst n 19.76 +.59 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl n 92.39+2.56 MidCpIdx n27.90+1.00 STBdIdx n 10.70 ... TotBdSgl n10.93 -.03 TotStkSgl n29.31 +.88 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.00 -.02 Yacktman Funds: Fund p n 17.15 +.41

METALS NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Mon. Aluminum -$1.0561 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$4.1230 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $4.0890 N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Lead - $2470.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.0024 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1788.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1788.30 troy oz., NY Merc spot Mon. Silver - $40.740 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $40.541 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Platinum -$1836.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1825.00 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised


B6 Tuesday, August 30, 2011

CLASSIFIEDS

ROSWELL DAILY RECORD CALL 622-7710

Roswell Daily Record

Legals

---------------------------------Publish August 23, 30, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXCOUNTY OF ICO CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Querida & Adelita Ward, A CHILD CV-2011-632

NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME

www.rdrnews.com Legals

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish August 30, 2011

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish August 23, 30, 2011

New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (NMDVR) is holding public hearings to receive comments on proposed changes to the NMDVR Manual of Operating Procedures; specifically: academic training, self-employment, vehicle modifications, transportation and participant financial contribution.

SECURITY SELF STORAGE

PUBLIC NOTICE

Farmington

September 15 9:00 AM San Juan College 4601 College Blvd. Room 7103 Farmington, NM Presenter: John Fullinwider Phone: 505-896-4500 ext. 143 Santa Fe

September 15 9:00 AM DVR State Office Large Conference Room 435 St. Michael’s Drive, Bldg. D Santa Fe, NM Presenter: Alice King Phone: 505-425-9365 Las Vegas

September 16 9:00 AM New Mexico Highlands University Science Annex, Room SCA 215 Presenter: Alice King Phone: 505-425-9365 Roswell

September 15 9:00 AM Roswell DVR Office Conference Room 1014 S. Atkinson Roswell, NM Presenter: Terri Douglass Phone: 575-624-6024 Las Cruces

September 16 9:00 AM Las Cruces DVR Office Conference Room 3381 Del Rey Blvd. Las Cruces, NM Presenters: Shirley Gonzales & Larry Melendez Phone: 575-524-6135 Belen

September 16 9:00 AM Belen DVR Office 911 W. Castillo Belen, NM Presenter: Luanne Templeton Phone: 505-864-1617 Albuquerque

September 15 9:00 AM Southwest Indian Polytechnic Institute Science and Technology Bldg. Auditorium 9169 Coors NW Albuquerque, NM Presenters: Lee Martinez, Reyes Gonzales, Debbie Hambel 505-836-1774

All are welcome to attend and provide comments on the proposed changes. Individuals or organizational representatives may speak and/or submit written comment at the public hearings regarding proposed changes to the State Plans. Proposed changes to the NMDVR Manual of Operating Procedures are available on the DVR website at www.dvrgetsjobs.com under HOT TOPICS. There you will find the proposed revisions to the academic training, self-employment, vehicle modifications, transportation, and participant financial contribution sections of the Manual of Operating Procedures.

The public is also encouraged to make comment regarding the proposed changes at any time. These comments will be considered in finalizing the revisions to the Manual of Operating Procedures. All written comments can be submitted by regular post, fax, or e-mail to:

Rich Smith, PIO Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Office of the Director 435 St. Michael’s Drive, Building D Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 505-954-8571 Fax: 505-954-8562 E-mail: Richard.Smith@state.nm.us

The deadline for submission of written comments is September 30, 2011.

Request for Accommodations: If you need a sign language interpreter, a reader, amplifier, or any other form of auxiliary aid or service to participate in the public hearing, please contact the presenter listed one week prior to the hearing. Insufficient advanced notice of your accommodation request may result in the accommodation request not being met. Public documents can be provided in various accessible forms. For additional information, contact Krista Martinez at 505-954-8500 or 1-800-224-7005.

NOTICE OF SALE TO SATISFY LIEN

906 West McGaffey Roswell, New Mexico 88203 (575) 622-0000 RICK LINARES

THE ABOVE NAMED PERSON IS HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE GOODS, WARES AND MERCHANDISE LEFT BY THEM IN SELF-STORAGE WITH SECURITY SELF STORAGE WILL BE AUCTIONED, SOLD OR DISPOSED OF BY SAID COMPANY IF NOT CLAIMED BY 5:00 PM ON SEPTEMBER 6, 2011. PURPOSE OF THE SALE IS TO SATISFY THE LIEN OF SAID COMPANY FOR STORAGE OF SAID GOODS, WARES AND MERCHANDISE, TOGETHER WITH INCIDENTL AND PROPER CHARGES PERTAINING THERETO, INCLUDING THE REASONABLE EXPENSES OF THIS SALE AS ALLOWED BY LAWS OF THE STATE OF NEW MEXICO. AUCTION WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A LATER DATE.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish August 16, 23, 30, September 6, 2011

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT No. CV-2010-374 CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. ROY M. URQUIDEZ; ROXANN URQUIDEZ; NEW MEXICO EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE FOUNDATION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on September 13, 2011, at the hour of 11:45 a.m., the undersigned Special Master will, at the south door of the Roswell Police Department, 128 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico, sell all the right, title and interest of the above-named Defendants in and to the hereinafter described real estate to the highest bidder for cash. The property to be sold is located at 3115 North Delicado, aka 3115 Delicado Drive, Roswell, and is situate in Chaves County, New Mexico, and is particularly described as follows: THE SOUTH 75 FEET OF LOT 2 IN BLOCK 12 OF LINDA VISTA ESTATES NUMBER TWO, A REDIVISION, IN THE CITY OF ROSWELL, COUNTY OF CHAVES AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT FILED IN THE CHAVES COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE ON JUNE 25, 1958 AND RECORDED IN BOOK C OF PLAT RECORDS, AT PAGE 80 (if there is any discrepancy between the Property address and the legal description, the legal description shall control). THE FOREGOING SALE will be made to satisfy a judgment rendered by the above Court in the above entitled and numbered cause on August 3, 2011, being an action to foreclose a mortgage on the above described property. The Plaintiff's Judgment, which includes interest and costs, is $57,097.50 and the same bears interest at 8.125% per annum from May 1, 2011, to the date of sale. The amount of such interest to the date of sale will be $1,728.58. The Plaintiff and/or its assignees has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. The sale may be postponed and rescheduled at the discretion of the Special Master. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above described real property subject to a one month right of redemption. ______________________________ A.D. Jones, Special Master P.O. Box 1180 Roswell, NM 88202-1180 (575) 622-8432

TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 40-8-1 Sec. 40-8-3 through NMSA 1978, the Petitioner Reyna Garcia will apply to the Honorable Steven L. Bell, District Judge of the Fifth Judicial District at the Chaves County Courthouse, 400 N. Virginia, in Roswell, New Mexico at 9:00 a.m. on the 24th day of Oct., 2011 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME of the CHILD from Querida Adelita Ward to & Querida & Adelita Garcia. Kennon Crowhurst Clerk of the District Court

/s/Katie Espinoza Deputy clerk

Submitted by: Reyna Garcia 1 Oak Dr. Roswell, NM 88203 575-637-1362 ---------------------------------Publish Aug. 30, Sept. 6, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXCOUNTY OF ICO CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Tabitha Rose Lucero, A CHILD CV-2011-641

NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME

TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 40-8-1 Sec. 40-8-3 through NMSA 1978, the Petitioner Deborah Ray Trahan will apply to the Honorable Judge Shamas, District Judge of the Fifth Judicial District at the Chaves County Courthouse, 400 N. Virginia, in Roswell, New Mexico at 8:30 a.m. on the 17th day of October, 2011 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME from of the CHILD from the name of Tabitha Rose Lucero to Tabitha Rose Trahan. Kennon Crowhurst Clerk of the District Court

s/Valerie Miranda Deputy Clerk/Clerk

Submitted by: Deborah Ray Trahan 6 “I” Street Roswell, NM 88203 (575) 208-0309

---------------------------------Publish Aug. 30, Sept. 6, 13, 2011

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO

IN THE MATTER THE ESTATE OF JAMES RYNEAR MORGAN, DECEASED.

OF

No. PB-2011-65

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

JEFFREY M. MORGAN has been appointed personal representative of the estate of James Rynear Morgan, deceased. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the personal representative, c/o Losee, Carson & Haas, P. A., P. O. Box 1720, Artesia, New Mexico, 88211-1720, or filed with the District Court of Eddy County, New Mexico. Dated: August 11, 2011. /s/ Jeffrey M. Morgan

Scott S. Morgan Losee, Carson & Haas, P.A. P. O. Box 1720 Artesia, New Mexico 88211-1720 (575/746-3505)

Attorneys for Personal Representative, Jeffrey M. Morgan

Legals

---------------------------------Publish August 23, 30, 2011

THE PROBATE IN COURT OF CHAVES COUNTY STATE OF NEW MEXICO

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOE BERT RENFRO, JR., DECEASED No. 8901

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the Estate of Joe Bert Renfro, Jr., deceased. All perhaving claims sons against this estate are required to present their claims (i) within two months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or (ii) within two months after the mailing or delivery of this notice, whichever is later, or be forever barred. Barbara D. Renfro 1002 Fern Drive Roswell, NM 88203

GARAGE SALES

DO N’T MI SS A SALE BY MISSING THE 2:00 PM DEADLINE FOR PLACING YOUR ADS

ANNOUNCEMENTS 025. Lost and Found

FOUND 8/22/11 medium sized dog. Call to identify 505-438-7708 BEAUTIFUL LARGE dog found in parking lot of Big Lots. Call 637-0446. S.O.S TO all dog lovers. Need help to find dog, lost at Casa Maria Rehab while visiting its Best Friend John. Her name is “Go”. To win her trust, say “Hi Go, open car door and say let’s go see John & she’ll get in”. She’s 10yrs old, Heinz 57 medium, 57lbs, black short hair, white whisker on mouth, no collar, face looks like a bear & she is shy. Who finds the dog we want you to reunite them and a donation will be made to Humane Society in finders name. Call Ron or Paula at 627-6202 or 575-551-0155. HELP FIND “Button”. He is a white, older mini poodle, 12lbs w/collar & tags. Please call 627-5445 or 840-5800.

INSTRUCTION

030. Education & Instructions

ALLIED HEALTH career training- Attend college 100% online . Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

DRIVERS Coastal Transport is hiring Drivers at our Satellite Terminal in Roswell with Class (A) CDL. (X) Endorsement Must be 23 yrs Old with 1 Yr Tractor Trailer experience. Home every day! Scheduled Days Off, $2000 sign on bonus. For more Information call 1-877-297-7300 2408 N. Industrial Artesia, NM. Opening for Office Assistant. Microsoft Office Program a must. Other duties will include ten key, filing, answering phones & other misc. duties. Email resumes to rskippermjg@ qwestoffice.net or Fax to 575-623-3075 Construction Laborer 6 months experience. Retirement program, paid vacation/holidays, tool allowance. Valid driver license and copy of driving record with application. Pre-employment DT required. 7 Petro Dr. No phone calls. ARBY’S IS now accepting applications for management positions. We have positions for both day and night time positions available. Please apply by calling Gary at 575-622-8711 or send employment history to 575-623-3075. NEED FULL time, experienced accounting assistant. Requires Word, Xcel, and attention to detail. Excellent benefits including medical, dental, vision, life, retirement, thrift, etc. Email resume with cover letter and references to nwhittin@bsamail.org or fax to 622-3493. Don’t be fooled by out of state schools. Artesia Training Academy Class A & B CDL training. Call ATA for more information 1-888-586-0144 artesiatraining@pvtn.net

045. Employment Opportunities

The U.S. Probation Office is accepting applications for an Administrative Assistant to the Probation Officer in Roswell, NM office. Legal experience strongly preferred. View announcement and application instructions at: http://www.nmcourt.fed.us/ web/PBDOCS/pbindex2. html BEST WESTERN Sally Port Inn is now hiring for the following positions: Front Desk & Housekeeping. Must be friendly, dependable & a team player. Please apply in person @ 2000 N. Main. No phone calls, ask for Amie.

CHANGE A Life... Be A Comfort Keeper. We are always looking forward to speaking with experienced caring and compassionate people interested in becoming a Comfort Keeper. We are currently looking for people to provide companionship, housekeeping, meal preparation, grooming and dressing guidance, transportation, and personal care services for our clients. We have positions available in Roswell and Artesia for Daytime and Overnights. Must have a valid drivers license and auto insurance. To learn what becoming a Comfort Keeper is all about, call us at 624-9999 or stop by our office at 1410 South Main to visit with Christina.

HEARTLAND CARE of Artesia is looking for CNAs who would like to make a difference in the lives of our residents and have a strong feeling of affinity with our older citizens. If you are interested in joining an “outstanding team” of nurses and CNAs who provide excellent care to our residents, please come by 1402 Gillchrist and fill out an application or talk to Nancy Trice, RN, Director of Nursing. 575-745-6006 COMFORT SUITES 3610 N. Main now hiring Overnight Audit. Saturday and Sunday. Pick up application 9am-5pm weekdays. No phone calls please. Certified Phlebotomist part time Mon-Fri mornings. Must be dependable and able to work flexible hours when needed. Fax resume and references to 575-622-2820. Customer Service Rep for small Western Company. $7.50 to $10.00/hr. 40hr/week Work from Home. Requirements. Bilingual. Spanish and English Basic Computer Skills, Quiet home based work environment, Available to work weekends. 605-206-0581 Email Resume: steve@ smartsalesandlease.com LOOKING FOR an experienced auto tech with at least 5 yrs. experience, own hand tools & a professional attitude, foreign & domestic experience a plus, ASE certification a plus. Apply in person @ 101 S. Main. No phone calls please. NOW HIRING full-time bookkeeper for payroll and accounts receivable. Experience a plus but can train. Computer experience a must. Serious applicants please send your resume to PO Box 760 Roswell, NM 88202. JANITORIAL COMPANY needing experienced floor care person for nighttime work. Average 55 hours every 2 weeks, starting $9.00 per hour. Must do background check and drug testing. Please call 623-6243. MAYO MARRS Casing Pulling, Inc. is now hiring Full time Diesel Mechanic. Fax applications to 575-736-1578 or email dgarrett@mayomarrs.net Full Charge Bookkeeper A regional CPA firm is seeking an experienced Bookkeeper for it’s Roswell office. Qualified candidates must have a minimum of 5 years FT experience in all aspects of bookkeeping services for external clients. Candidates must posses excellent client service skills, the ability to effectively multitask and meet tight deadlines. Must have strong computer skills and be proficient with MS Office Suite, QuickBooks, Creative Solutions Accounting, Client Bookkeeping Solutions and other accounting software programs. A bachelors degree in business or business related field is preferable. We are a fast growing public accounting firm. We value individual contributions and we want to share our success with you. We allow you the opportunity to be successful. We offer a competitive wage, benefits and a relaxed work environment. Our firm offers audit, tax, accounting and business consulting services to companies of all sizes, government institutions, and individuals. To apply please email your resume and cover letter to jobs@acgnm.com or fax to 505.348.9085. No walk-ins or phone calls will be considered. Please apply as instructed only.

045. Employment Opportunities

HAIR STYLISTS and Nail Techs needed at busy salon. 817-757-3863 FARMER’S COUNTRY Market - North Main has immediate openings for clean, friendly, outgoing and honest employees. We need bakery/deli people. Experience is great but will train the right person. We also are looking for an experienced meat cutter. Both openings require working weekends, some evenings and holiday availability. No phone calls please. Apply in person only! PORTOFINO’S ITALIAN Restaurant is hiring food server for both locations. Apply in person between 2-4pm. Must be 19 or older. No phone calls. 701 S. Main & 1203 W. 2nd St. CAN YOU Open your home and heart to a foster child? FREE TRAINING Tax free compensation Excellent Support. To save a child, pick up an application at 100 S. Kentucky, Roswell, NM 88203. THE ROSWELL Daily Record is now accepting applications for the position of: OUTSIDE SALES The ideal candidate must possess excellent customer service skills, superior organizational skills and a strong work ethic. Experience or background in advertising also helpful. Must be computer literate. This is a full time position. Interested Applicants please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Kim Gordon, 2301 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88201 or e-mail to: kim.gordon@ roswell-record.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! Medical Billing Specialist: Local medical office is seeking Resumes for a Medical billing specialist who has experience with Medicare & insurance billing. Good hours & Good wages, and a Great work environment. Please send Resumes to the following address: PO Box 1897, Roswell, NM 88201 unit 278. SEEKING CURRENTLY licensed Apprentice Appraiser, Licensed Appraiser or Certified Appraiser to service Chaves County. Qualified individuals only. Send resume to appraisalplace@yahoo.com

SERVICES

075. Air Conditioning

Affordable Refrigerated conditioning heat pumps evap coolers furnaces, duct work & installations 317-4147 SWAMP COOLER service & repair professional & affordable. Free estimates. Frank 624-5370, 637-2211

105. Childcare

NEED CHILD care? Find the widest range of available childcare for your children and their needs. 1-800-691-9067 or www.newmexic okids.org. You may also call us; Family Resource & Referral 622-9000 and we can help you navigate the system. Openings, clean lg. playroom, licensed provider, North, all ages. 420-6803

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 HOUSE/OFFICE Cleaning low prices. Excellent work call anytime. 575-973-2649 HOUSEKEEPING- Home and/or office. Honest & dependable. 575-749-4900 or 575-578-1447 SUNSHINE WINDOW Service Free estimates. 575-626-545,575-626-5153

185. Electrical

BIG HORN Electric Professional work, affordable price. 575-317-8345 NM Lic#367662.

195. Elderly Care

DEPENDABLE PRIVATE Caregiver to the rescue, yrs. of exp. Tina 420-8877 ELDERLY, TEMPORARILY disabled, long term assistant? At home housewife looking for new clients who need living assistance. Light housekeeping, yard maintenance, errands & appointment transport. Clean, reliable, honest, reasonable rates. Call Meta 575-626-9682.

200. Fencing

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991 BUILDING OR Mending Fences, Long or Short. Tall or Small. Reasonable Rates, Free Est. & Senior Discounts. 575-840-8369. Metal, wood, chain link & block.


Roswell Daily Record 225. General Construction

Can’t Get to those Renovation projects? Need help? Here I Am! No job too big/small. 25 yrs. exp. Qualified in framing, trim carpentry, painting, sheet rock, drywall, doors, & windows. FREE est. call Jerry Martin at 910-6898 or 622-8682 Leave Message. DANIEL MONTOYA Construction. From New Construction to Small Additions. Licensed, Bonded, Free Est. 575-840-8639 WALTRIP & Sons Const. Remodels, new const., countertops, cabinets, drywall, paint, fences. No job too big or small. Lic#GB9886951, 40yrs exp. 575-622-4431

312. Patio Covers

M.G. HORIZONS Patio covers, concrete, decks & awnings Lic. 623-1991.

LAWN SERVICE & much more work at low price. 914-0803. Basic Lawn mowing, yard clean-up, weedeating small tree trimming. 317-2242 WEEKEND WARRIOR Lawn Service mowing, property cleanup, residential rain gutter cleaning, and much more 575-626-6121 Gonzales Enterprises Sprinkler installation & repairs, rock & grass landscaping, bush hogging, fencing. Just ask, we may do it. 317-8053

330. Plumbing

PLUMAIR, REASONABLE repairs. Plumbing, heating, cooling, new construction, heatpumps. NM Lic. 27043. Call 317-4147 or 623-0770.

345. Remodeling

CARPENTRY, DRY wall, painting & concrete. We guarantee. 626-2050

235. Hauling

Greenscapes Sprinkler Systems Lawn mowing, field mowing, gravel, sod-hydro seed, pruning, tilling, For dependable & reliable service call 622-2633 or 910-0150.

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting at affordable prices. Call 637-9108. Quality Painting! Interior, Exterior at prices you can afford. Mike 910-7012

395. Stucco Plastering

FSBO North Springs, 2614 N. Penn., $112k, 2br, 2ba, 1750 sqft, new appliances, 623-6748 or 626-3141. I BUY houses in Roswell, fast closing, all cash call Ken 806-632-0028.

NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

RWC Bobcat and Dump Works. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397.

3BR, 2 full ba., huge 2 car garage beautiful lawn. Enchanted Hills 2605 W. 8th St. under $160k great for a new family. (505)795-0007

Construction or renovation w/20+ yrs exp. Licensed. call 317-3366 REASONABLE REMODELING Contractor Specializing on kitchen & bathrooms. New Additions & Roofing. NM Lic. 27043. 317-4147. DANIEL MONTOYA Construction. From New Construction to Small Additions. Licensed, Bonded, Free Est. 575-840-8639

350. Roofing

COMPUTER REPAIR, Networking, virus removal. Special senior rates. 575-626-2409

310. Painting/ Decorating

ROOFERS BUR & Single Ply Roofers wanted for prevailing wage projects in the Clovis area. Fill out application at WWRC, Inc., 1716 W. 7th Street, Clovis, NM. EOE

WELL SEASONED Real Estate contracts. Will trade for houses. Wesley Hay 623-6165

www.rancheroswelding.com

305. Computers

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

490. Homes For Sale

$37,000 PRICE 301 E. Bland, 3 br 1 ba. $2550 dwn $315mo 480-699-1946

THE NEW MEXICO SEED LOAN PROGRAM is available to small businesses owned by individuals with disabilities and provides low interest loans for the purchase of equipment and related supplies needed to expand or start a business. Contact the New Mexico Seed Loan Program at 1-855-891-8295 or www.nmseedloans.org for more information. A low interest loan program of DVR State of New Mexico.

230. General Repair

350. Roofing

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 625-9924 / 626-4153.

285. Miscellaneous Services

HARVEST BUILDERS All types of construction. 575-910-3000

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

CLASSIFIEDS

RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397 www.rancheroswelding.com

METAL, SHINGLE or Torch Down. Steep or Flat - New Roofs or Patch Jobs. Daniel Montoya Construction. Free Est., Licensed & Bonded. Great Warranties for Home Owners & Senior Discounts. 575-840-8639

RWC Lath and Stucco. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397

405. TractorWork

www.rancheroswelding.com

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 Allen’s Tree Srvc. The oldest tree service in Roswell. Million $ ins. 626-1835 SUPERIOR SERVICES parking lot, landscaping, tree, service 20 yrs experience. 575-420-1873

Collins Tree Service Professional Tree Trimming, Removal & Stump grinding. Fully insured. Certified Line Clearance Arborist. Call 575-308-1902

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insurance.

www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale TOWNHOUSE, 1400 sqft, 2br/2ba, laundry room/ study, new roof, cedar fence, stucco, porch, tile & carpet. Refinished kitchen, bath cabinets & new paint throughout, w/d. Large corner lot. Call 575-491-4235

SPANISH GATE Townhome, 2br/1ba, immaculate, all appliances, beautiful grounds w/ pool, gated community living, $79,900. Call 307-262-0086 VERY NICE 3/2/2 home on the NE. $6000 down, take over payments, avail. now. Call 575-420-1009 or 575-317-1605. Priced Reduced 1413 E Hoagland: 2br/1ab laundry room $45,000 626-9593

4Bd 1Ba, new paint, carpet, doors, fncd yrd, $60k M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 3/2, Garage, yard, w/d, refrig, FP, stove 1109 S. Wyoming $105,000. 1/1, storage shed, w/d, refrig, stove, 711 W. Hendricks $38, 000. Call Jim 910-7969

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale LENDER SALE. 40 Acres -$39,900. Spellbinding views of snow capped mountains! Adjacent to National Forest. Maintained all weather roads w/electric. Close to Ruidoso. Financing available. Call NMRS 888-676-6979.

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

Dennis the Menace

5 ACRES, $25K as is, septic system, 3809 Zinnia, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

Restaurant bldg, $275K cash/trade for Ruidoso prprty, M-Th 8-4 624-1331

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

WE BUY used mobile homes. Single & double wides. 575-622-0035 D01090. 2004 FLEETWOOD 16x60 two bedroom two bath. Setup in Villa Park #64. Refrigerated air on. Stop by and look. Unlocked during daytime. Very nice. Selling cheap. 575-622-0035. D01090. 2br/2ba, Appliances, partially furnished, carport, storage, deck, $10k. 623-3149 Nice, 2000 16x76 3br/2ba Cavalier. All appliances, will need to move. $22,500 OBO. 575-626-5677 1995 CAVCO 28x68, 3br/2ba double wide near Alamogordo, NM on 10 acres of land. Land also for sale. Home can be moved. Home like new, selling for $17,900 at present location. Call 575-622-0035 D.O.1090

520. Lots for Sale

OWNER FINANCING for a limited time. Ready to build 5 acre lots w/ great views & good covenants. Located 9 miles West of Roswell @ the Club House Banquet Facility. Free land maps and at entrance. 575-623-1800. www.BuenaVidaLand.com COURT ORDERED Sale! 2704 S. Lea, asking $6k, 5 acres - 30 Townsend Tr. Lot 9, Cielo Vista Subdivision, has well, electric, great view of city, $49,999. Call Jim 910-7969.

520. Lots for Sale

Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 60x134 $18,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. We Take Visa and Mastercard! 420-1352. HAGERMAN LOTS for sale. York Avenue, Posey subdivision, 1 block from Hagerman schools, $5000. Not zoned for mobile home. 420-1352 PREMIUM 5 Acre tracts, Owner will finance with 10% down, New Construction only (no mobile homes), , Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd. between Country Club & Berrendo Rd. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-4337 SPACE AT South Park Cemetery Block 54, row C space #9 $900. 420-5456

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331

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ABF Freight System, Inc., a financially stable company with a history of outperforming its competition, has openings for both regular (full-time) and casual (part-time) dockworker/city pickup and delivery drivers at our Roswell facility located at 1100 E. 19th, Roswell, NM 88201. Superior wages (Teamster Union Scale) is offered. Must be at least 21 years of age, have 2 years of verifiable tractor/trailer driving experience, possess a CDL with doubles/triples and hazardous materials endorsements, have a good stable work record, a safe driving record (motor vehicle record and previous employment), ability to pass DOT pre-employment drug screen and meet DOT medical requirements. To apply, please complete the online application for Checker/Driver at www.abf.jobs. If you require accommodation in the application process, please inform us. An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V

B7

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. Town Plaza Apartments Utilities paid - Gas and Water. New Owners, friendly new managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs/downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Seniors 55yrs plus, law enforcement & military will receive discount. No HUD. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 2nd year, 1 free month rent ALL BILLS PAID 1 br $530 2 br $630, 3br/2ba $730 mo., ref air, new carpet, new paint/tile. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN.

EFFICIENCY 1 br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. 1BR, Ctrl Air, appliances, laundry facility, quiet. $500/mo + Dep. 2550 Bent Tree. 317-6408.

Stocker/Cashier

Southwest Cash and Carry Roswell Retail Store Day Shift Part-Time hours Apply on-line at www.shamrockfoods.com EEO/AA Employer

EFFICIENCY 2 BR, downtown, clean, water paid. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD Call 623-8377 2BR/1BA, W/D hookups, all bills pd, $575/mo, $300/dd, 207 W. Mathews Apt. C. 317-6479 2 BDR. No Pets, No HUD, 1702 E. 2nd St. 773-396-6618

2BR/1BA, $450/MO, water paid, no pets, 810 S. Atkinson. 624-2436 1 & 2 bedroom apartment. Call 910-8170 1&2Bd, wtr pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331

1br/1ba, wtr pd, quiet area, HUD ok. $350/mo, $200 dep. 625-9208 after 5pm 2/1, $600 mo, $400 dep. wtr pd, 300 W. Mescalero no Hud or pets. 910-1300 VERY NICE just remodeled Large 3br, 1212 N. Washington. 626-8245 ROSWELL 2 br apartment $600/mo, all utilities paid, fridge, stove 1700 N Pontiac Dr. 626-864-3461

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

FLETC Homes for rent. Long & short term rentals. 5 minutes from FLETC. Brand new & beautiful! Visit our website: www.lgrentalhomes.com or Call 420-0519 or 910-7670 506 N Kentucky #B, 1BR 1BA, $950 month Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 575-622-4604

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 2501, 2503, S. Lea, 3br 2ba, new construction, no smokers/pets, $1000 plus $500 dep. 575-317-4050


B8 Tuesday, August 30, 2011 550. Houses for RentUnfurnished LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com!

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 1516 N. Pontiac, large 2br, 1ba, new stove & ref., w/d hookups, hardwood floors, completely remodeled, very clean and cute, $650 monthly, plus dep., No large dogs, No HUD. References and Rental History required. Call 317-3929 13 ROUHONEN, (NEAR ENMU-R) large 3br, 1ba, new stove, w/d hookups, completely remodeled very clean & cute, $600 mo, plus dep., No HUD. References & rental history required. Call 317-3929. 1400 S. Madison, 2br/1ba, all appliances, 1 car garage, fenced, no smokers, pets, w/fee, no HUD, $750/$500 deposit, no utilities, 575-405-0163 1/1 Duplex $400 mo. water pd. Quiet street great area. 2203 W. Juniper. Call 317-6408 NEAR HOSPITALS 1602 N. Kansas, 2br, 1ba, ref. air, newly remodeled $625/$250 dep. 622-2877 2BR/1BA, 1 car garage, fenced yard, ref. air, 67 Lighthall. $600/mo, $600/dep. 627-9942 REM. 3/2 +1/1, ref. air, $900/mo, sale for $85k w/$8k dn. Al 703-0420 NMMI AREA, nice 2br for 1 person, laundry rm, fenced, no HUD, $425+dep, 1713 N. Lea. 910-7148 BEAUTIFUL 4BR, 2ba, $1250/mo, $1000/dep, 2601 W. 3rd, no smoking, pets or HUD. 626-3816 1BR, 1BA, $425/mo, $300/dep. 602A S. Wyoming. Call Julie 505-220-0617. NE 17 Huerta Dr, beautiful 3/2/2, $1400/mo, $1000/dep, no pets, now available. 575-317-1605 2, 2br, garage, appliances, $600/$650. Al 703-0420, Santiago 202-4702 #15 Reynolds Place newly remodeled 2br 1ba., fenced laundry room with w/d, enclosed garage, culdesac, $600 + dep. No indoor pets. 623-2607, 914-0685. 2BR, 1BA, 606 A. S. Wyoming $550 mo., $400 dep. Call Julie 505-220-0617. 3 BR, 1.5 baths, stove, fridge, garage, large yard, no pets. $750, $500 dep. 317-6285 Between Berrendo & Linda Vista. 3br/2ba, good area. Please call 637-6331 or 637-6361. 3br/2ba townhouse, near shopping & bus, avail. 9/1. 420-8706 or 623-8353. 2&3 Bd, 1&2 Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331 Private Room w/bath kitchen & washer/dryer privileges $100 per week 637-6520 511 GREENBRIAR, 3/1, W/D hookup, fridge, stove, D/W, fenced yard, carport. No HUD/pets/smoking. $600mo/$350dep. Avail. 9/1. 637-6988

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

Remodeled 3br, 2ba, 408 S. Cypress. $750, $500dep No pets/HUD. 626-3816 3/2, GARAGE, yard, w/d, refrig, FP, stove 1109 S. Wyoming $890 dep $500 1/1, storage shed, w/d, refrig, stove, 711 W. Hendricks $495 dep $300 Call Jim 910-7969 SMALL 3BR NW, $625/mo, small 2br SW, $450/mo. No HUd. 317-3103 3BR/1BA, 900 N. Greenwood, carport, fenced backyard, no dogs, $600/mo, $400/dep. 626-4006 71 SW Wells, 2BR 1BA, $350 322 E Bonney, 3BR 1BA, $550 1207 E Alameda, 2BR 1BA, $575 2704 S Washington, 3BR 1BA, $625 507 Aspen, 2BR 1BA, $650 24 A Bent Tree, 2BR 2BA, $700 3101 Vassar, 3BR 1BA, $700 3010 Purdue, 3BR 1BA, $700 601 Moore, 3BR 2BA Office, $1400 2619 Sherrill Lane, 3BR 2BA, $1800

Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 575-622-4604 TWO 3br, $700/$500dep, $650/$500dep. No pets or HUD. 914-0101

555. Mobile Homes for Rent 32’ Travel trailer w/slide out, 12 miles S. of Roswell, $400/mo. 910-0474 2BR $400/MO, $200/dep. 914-2533

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places OFFICE SPACE for Rent. Prime downtown area, 2,061 sq.ft. Please call 622-8711. Office space: 750 sqft, $750/mo, $250/dep. 622-2564 FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546. 900 sqft, one large room, two small rooms, two storage spaces, restroom, central cooling, all carpeted, $550 per month. For appointment call Rex Smith, 1725 SE Main St, 622 6460 or 622-4552 WAREHOUSE SPACE for rent 766 sqft. Very secure located rear of 1725 SE Main St, $400 per month. For appointment call Rex Smith 622-6460, 622-4552 2108 S. Main, storefront, 1200sf, $500/$500dep. Call Don or Barbara 627-9942 Office Spaces available starting at $100 per month depending on size. Also warehouse 3616 feet $800 mo. Party and conference rooms available second floor 208 North Main St. secure location. Contact Paula 707-354-2376

580. Office or Business Places FOR RENT: 2000sf warehouse & office space available 9/15, $600/mo + half utilities. Call 626-4685 to look at.

HIGH PROFILE GROUND FLOOR PROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE-receptionist, utilities and janitorial provided. Reception area, conference room and break room available for use of tenants. High speed cable installed and phone system options available. Plenty of parking in front and back of building. (575) 622-5200 or mandrews@aslaccounting. com, ask for leasing manager. LARGE OFFICE $550 to $1,500 per month, excellent locations 420-2100

585. Warehouse and Storage WAREHOUSE 9000 SF partial a/c & heat, security alarmed, 2 garage doors, 2 standard entry doors, $1000 mo. Inquire at 2001 S. Main Family Furniture 575-937-0889 or 575-257-0888

595. Misc. for Rent

TENTS AMY’S Tents for rent, weddings, birthday, parties, open houses or just out of rain or shade. Call 575-973-0964, for sizes & pricing.

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

Hospital bed, power wheelchair, bath transfer bench, walker, 622-7638 NEW AIR conditioner, bikes, small collection of knives & swords, & 2 TVs. 623-4295 NIKE BLACK & BLUE high heels size 8 never been worn. Call or text for pic 317-6816 ELECTRIC DRYERS, clean and reasonable, warranty. 626-7470. 6PC THOMASVILLE bedroom suit, good condition $500. 622-3778 530 square feet of neutral color ceramic tile for sale includes grout, adhesive and some tools. $750 OBO, Call 910-7674 or 910-9642. 15’ TRAMPOLINE w/enclosure $125 obo, 2-sport Tracker ATVs (power wheels) w/6 volt battery charger, owner’s manual $90 each or will negotiate price for both, 420-2705 GOOD CONDITION 22 cu. ft. frostfree refrigerator $150, upright or chest freezer $150, Kenmore washer/dryer pair $200 914-9933

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd CASH FOR gold and silver jewelry. Sterling spoons and forks. U.S. Silver coins. Local in Roswell, 578-0805

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

PAY CASH for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles. Entire households & estates welcome. Call 627-2033 or 623-6608.

CLASSIFIEDS

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous WILL BUY your unwanted washing machines. 626-7470

630. Auction Sales

ADVERTISE YOUR AUCTION in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper for more details. Or log onto www.nmpress.org for a list of participating newspapers.

635. Good things to Eat

SAN PATRICIO Berry Farm. Blackberries & raspberries. You pick or we pick. 575-653-4502 or 575-937-0866 GRAVES FARM: New season picked fresh daily, okra, squash, cucumbers, eggplant, red chile pods & powder, garlic, pinto beans. 622-1889 Mon-Sat 8-5:30, Sun 1-5. Accept EBT, credit cards & debit. HOBSON GARDEN: Now roasting our famous GREEN CHILE! Also available: Jalapenos (green & yellow), bell peppers, dried red chile, okra, squash/zucchini, cucumbers, eggplant, cherry tomatoes, watermelons, honey dews, & cantaloupes. Mon-Sat 8-5:30, Sun 1-5. 3656 E. Hobson Road - 622-7289.

640. Household Goods

Simmons Beautyrest Twin (extra firm) like new, $250 negotiable. 420-2705

700. Building Materials

STEEL BUILDINGS Huge Savings/Factory Deals. 38x50, 50x96, 63x120, 78x135 Misc. Sizes and material avail. www.sunwardsteel.com Source: 1M2 505-349-0493

705. Land/Gardening/ Fertilizer HARVEST FARMS Compost Tea for sale. 575-910-3000

720. Livestock & Supplies

STALLS FOR rent, corner of Railroad & E. Berrendo, $50/mo. You feed & clean. Big stalls w/large runs. Call Karen 910-0444. SUPER QUALITY cow calfs pairs. Call 325-234-2315.

745. Pets for Sale

Old Victorian Bulldoggie Pups! 4 wks old, taking deposit. 575-495-1015 LOVE LABRADOODLES? Local breeder seeking homes and loving owners for a money making breeding opportunity. Interview and home inspection required. 317-6100 CANARIES for sale! 2 Males $80 each, 1 Female $60. 575-578-1009 AKC POMS for sale going fast. Call 317-3874 AKC REG. Yorkie puppies for sale. Call Alex 575-637-9626 1 BLUE male, 1 black female Great Dane pups more info call 626-9000 GREAT DANE puppies for sale. 575-317-4698 or 575-317-0030

Roswell Daily Record

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

745. Pets for Sale

BOBTAIL KITTENS! 1M, 1F, 8wks old, 1st shots, hand raised. Must be indoor cats only. 626-3596 REGISTERED TOY Chihuahuhas, 5wk old males, 1st shots. Call 637-8204.

RECREATIONAL

760. Hunting & Camping Equipment ELK PERMITS. Ranch only. Unit 37, Either sex, any legal weapon. 10-1-11 thru 12-31-11. Call 505-620-0178

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

2010 NINJA 250R special edition 6500 mi. like new, $3500. Call 575-578-0869 or 626-394-9523

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com 95’ STARCRAFT, Star Lounge XL, Pop-Up Camp Trailer, Great Condition. $2500.00 OBO. Call 575-420-0277. 1985 SOUTHWIND motorhome $3500. Call 626-3070 or 840-5224

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

2003 FORD F150 Supercab XL 2WD 107,500 miles Maroon $5,500.00

2001 BMW Sedan 330i 145,183 miles White $5,000.00

2002 Toyota 4Runner Utility 4D SR5 2WD Green $8,500.00 2004 Mazda M31 Sedan 4Di $3,500.00

SHOWN AT CARBS-N-TUNES 110 W. ALBUQUERQUE 624-1174

Telco Federal Credit Union 622-4444 1996 LINCOLN Town Car V8, 4D Signature, 48k miles. 575-626-5993 2004 350Z convertible silver w/black top 25.7K miles 18” wheels. $18,500. Call 420-2456.

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2006 FORD F250, excellent cond., ext. cab, $9,950. 626-7488. 1995 FORD XLT F350, 4x4, power stroke, 4dr, $6500. 575-420-3843 ‘82 Ford pickup, V8, auto, pwr steering/brakes, runs excellent. 347-0260 2007 FORD Ranger Ext Cab, 6 cyl, camper, 13k miles. 575-626-5993 ‘93 CHEVY pickup V8, runs great, must see. $3900. 910-9648 By Owner 2006 Toyota TRD extended cab low miles 49,500 asking $14,800 622-0032

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted 045 050 055 060

Employment

Employment Opportunities Salesperson/Agents Employment Agencies Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 441 445 450

Window Repair Window Cleaning Wrought Iron Services Wanted

455 456 460 465

Money: Loan/Borrow Credit Cards Insurance Co. Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale Investment: Stocks/Sale Mortgages for Sale Mortgages Wanted Business Opportunities

470 475 480 485

Financial

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


8-30-11 newspaper