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Roswell Daily Record

INSIDE NEWS

MATTHEW ARCO RECORD STAFF WRITER

USS NEW MEXICO MODEL ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — During the waning days of World War I, it took the New York Navy Yard just 18 months to build the USS New Mexico, a sleek, 624-footlong battleship ...

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

Local representatives introduce bills

Vol. 120, No. 19 50¢ Daily / $1 Sunday

In the days leading up to the 60-day legislative session and during its first week, local lawmakers introduced a half dozen pieces of legislation that will be up for consideration in the coming weeks. Two members of the state House of Representatives Roswell delegation dropped a total of five bills and one joint House resolution. Also, one state senator introduced a bill. Rep. Dennis Kintigh, R-

The claw

January 22, 2011

SATURDAY

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Roswell, prefiled three bills including a third attempt to eliminate the state’s film subsidies used to lure production companies to New Mexico. His bill, HB 19, comes after Gov. Susana Martinez’s declaration during her State of the State address, to seek reducing the subsidy from 25 percent to 15 percent. “We need to be better stewards of the people’s money and any improvement is good improvement,” he said. “We’re moving in the right direction (and) that’s the idea.” Kintigh also introduced a

bill, HB 20, that would increase the penalty for second-degree murder from 15 to 25 years. The remaining two of Kintigh’s prefiled items deal directly with lawmakers. One bill, HB 18, would require members of the Legislature to increase their contributions to the state’s legislator retirement plan from $500 for each year of credited service to $600. “We’re keeping the same retirement system that exists for legislators, but we’re going to be putting more into the pot,” he said. “Because we’re asking other

people to (contribute more with the current economy), we need to do the same.” The lawmaker also introduced a House joint resolution, HJR 2, that would set term limits for state officials. Senators would be allowed to serve a maximum of three consecutive fouryear terms and House members would be limited to no more than six consecutive two-year terms. “It’s just a concept that I believe in and we need to have this debate,” he said. “Let’s put it out there (and) have this discussion.” Rep. Nora Espinoza intro-

- PAGE A8

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• Committee assignments evening out • Wildlife refuge begins banding ducks • Accused murderer denied bond reduction • Crime stoppers seeking info on criminal damage • Man arrested

INSIDE SPORTS

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Constructors, Inc. workers labor, Friday, on the first phase of a beautification and cleanup project along the Spring River channel next to the Roswell Museum and Art Center between N. Main and N. Richardson streets. The project is in its third week and is expected to be completed in approximately 140 days.

INJURY KNOCKS OUT V. WILLIAMS MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Venus Williams had played 251 Grand Slam matches and never once been forced to retire because ... - PAGE B1

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CLASSIFIEDS..........B7 COMICS.................A9 ENTERTAINMENT...A10 FINANCIAL .............B6 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........B7 LOTTERIES ............A2 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ............A10 WORLD .................A8

INDEX

duced legislation, HB 99, that would allow anesthesiologist assistants to practice alongside anesthesiologists across the state. Under current statute, assistants are only permitted to work at state medical schools. “It’s a total injustice,” Espinoza said. “We’re not changing at all — in any way, fashion or form — what are the supervision requirements. The only thing that we are doing is saying, ‘Allow them to practice anywhere in our state.’”

Giffords moved to Houston

See BILLS, Page A3

HOUSTON (AP) — She heard them, smiled, and tears welled up in her eyes. The caravan carrying Rep. Gabrielle Gif for ds swept past cheering crowds Friday as she left the hospital in Tucson, Ariz., where she dazzled doctors with her recovery fr om being shot in the head two weeks ago, and was moved to Houston for rehabilitation. Childr en sat on their parents’ shoulders as the motorcade passed. Many waved. Others carried signs wishing “Gabby” well. “It was very emotional and very special,” said Dr. Randall Friese, who traveled with Giffords. By Friday after noon, after a 930-plus-mile trip that doctors said went flawlessly, Giffords was in an intensive care unit at

Resonance and Wonder: Curatorial Reflections JONATHAN ENTZMINGER RECORD STAFF WRITER

The Roswell Museum and Arts Center opened its curator’s choice exhibition entitled, Resonance and Wonder: Curatorial Reflections, Friday. “The curator’s choice is an exhibition that was put together by seven of our curatorial staff members,” Rufe said. “Each person addr esses a particular theme or idea that relates to the collection and then they pull particular pieces of the collection from the vault. Some of which, have not been seen for quite some time.” The museum’s curatorial committee includes: Caroline Brooks, Andrew John Cecil, Ellen Moore, Stacie Petersen, Mike Van Raes, Laurie Rufe and

Candace Jordan Russell. Br ooks’ vignette will explor e the poetics of space; Cecil’s vignette will “present an overview of selected artists that utilize the landscape as a vehicle for their own iconoclastic interpretation of the natural and historic environment;” Moore’s vignette examines texture and surface both real and implied; Petersen’s vignette features the medium of block printing; Raes pays homage to artist Richar d Thompson “and a body of work that relates to the immigrant-pilgrim experience;” Rufe’s vignette concentrates on historic and contemporary portrayals of the horse and Russell’s vignette is based on the archives of three creative couples: Howard Cook and Barbara Latham, Peter

See GIFFORDS, Page A3

Hur d and Henriette W yeth, and Robert and Esther Goddard. Visitors will also be able to participate in some “fun interactive” activities. “We’r e going to have some framed activities on the wall relating to different themes expressed in the exhibition; we’re hoping that people ... will make drawings or write a poem or a story related to this activity,” Car oline Brooks, said. “They can take it home or put it up on our r efrigerator [in poetics of space vignette].”

J.ENTZMINGER@ROSWELL-RECORD.COM

Jonathan Entzminger photo

RIGHT: Artwork on display at the Roswell Museum and Arts Center's Resonance and Wonder: Curatorial Reflections exhibit.

Sherry Mumford: Philanthropist, mother, Roswell native JONATHAN ENTZMINGER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Sherry Mumford, a true Roswell native, lives a life of pathos through faith, philanthropy. “I think it’s more rewarding to you, if you have a heart for it,” she said. “United Way is so close to my heart.” As the director of the United Way of Chaves County, she helps delegate funds that are applied to the human interest of children, parents and everyone in between. “[Roswell] would be a lot less happy without the [United Way],” Mumford said. “Children wouldn’t

have anyone to speak for them, who are being abused. There’d be no voice to speak up for them ... no place for victims to go if they’re in domestic violence situations ... no educational classes ... we’d have a much lower quality of community without the services ... children would be out on the streets.” Mumford, a 1976 graduate of Roswell High School, spent her early days on her grandfather’s cotton farm. As a fifth-grader at East Grand Plains Middle School, she worked the Roswell cotton fields in the ’60s and ’70s with her brothers and sisters. Mumford said she remembers

wearing long-sleeve shirts and hats to block the sun away. Before she knew the life of charity, philanthropy, she laid the seeds of the Roswell experience in the cotton fields, as a direct part of the mainstay of the community: agriculture. “It was hard,” Mumford said. “At first, I hated it. It was so hot and dry and you

couldn’t wait to get to the end of the row ... I hated it. By the time I got in high school ... my grandfather was paying us minimum wage ... so [then] I liked it. It was great to see that you made a difference ... helped out the family.” Mumford’s early farming experience parallels her life’s journey and willingness to never give up on her

goals. She demonstrates the strength of many of her past clients at the Roswell Refuge, through her life’s example. As a child who grew up in the latter part of her life without both parents in the home, and later experienced her own divorce, she has a message See MUMFORD, Page A3


A2 Saturday, January 22, 2011

GENERAL

Roswell Commission on Aging discusses lawsuit BY JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

The Roswell Commission on Aging discussed transportation and medical costs at its meeting on Wednesday. Dr. Terry Wilmot reported that he has not received any responses to the on-line transportation survey. He announced he will make paper copies of the survey available for people to complete at the J.O.Y. Center, 1822 N. Montana Ave.; the Senior Circle, 2801 N. Main St. and at Roswell Adult and Senior Center, 807 N. Missouri Ave. Citizens expressed their concerns over the lack of affordable transport to Albuquerque and wondered why

the city didn’t obtain grant money to supplement a shuttle service. Some stated that Galaxy Transportation was too expensive. Tom Dunlap is asking people to contact Sen. Tim Jennings about the monopolies in assisted living centers and nursing homes. He has a pre-printed letter available for interested parties. People can contact him for copies at the Dunlap Law Offices at 622-2607, or via the internet at: dunlaplawoffice@cableone.net. Two members of Tandy Hunt PC law firm came to RCA, Wednesday, to give an update on the class action lawsuit against Eastern New Mexico Medical Center. Attorney Randy Clark

pointed out that they represent the working poor and not the indigent, those people who cannot afford insurance. “These people are not on the government dole. They have jobs,” he said. According to Loralee Hunt, ENMMC has filed more civil lawsuits to collect money than any other single corporate entity in the entire history of New Mexico. They presented charts of charges, which indicated that it costs $35,000 for any patient who is treated for a heart attack at ENMMC. Ruidoso charges $7,000 for treatment of the same condition, while the hospital in Portales charges $5,000. A comparison in charges for the treatment of pneu-

Roswell Daily Record

monia revealed: •ENMMC $35,000 •Portalis $7,000 •Ruidoso $10,000 Clark said that the people covered in the class action suit fall into two categories: those who can claim damages after paying on their bills and those who have been able to pay their bills. Either can receive debt relief. The parent company, Community Health Systems, Inc. based in Tennessee, documented $1.25 billion in charges and $126 million in net income, or profit. Clark said this kind of profiteering has nothing to do with the people employed in the local facility. “The money goes to the corporate offices in Ten-

nessee,” he said. One chart outlined the cycle of charges. Hunt explained that federal money is supposed to be matched by the county with a ratio of three to one. ENMMC donates $6.776 million to the county, which is forwarded to the state and federal government. They then provide $20 million to ENMMC and return the matched amount, about $7 million, to ENMMC. Two million dollars are used on the indigent and the balance goes back to Tennessee. “These are social security funds,” said Hunt. When CHS asked the federal government to drop the lawsuit, Department of Jus-

tice Judge William B. Johnson wrote a 54-page opinion. “They (the government) want the Medicare money back,” Clark said. While Roswell’s working class struggle to pay the inflated bills, the CEO of CHS Inc. makes $18 million a year. In addition to ENMMC, CHS runs hospitals in Alta Vista, Carlsbad, Lea county and Deming, raising health care costs all across New Mexico. He noted that the figures presented at the Wednesday meeting and the court’s rulings are all a matter of public record. j.palmer@roswell-record.com

NEW YORK (AP) — Buoyed by huge election gains for their allies, antiabortion activists head into their annual March for Life rallies sensing a prime opportunity in many states to rein in the broad abortion access established 38 years ago by the Roe v. Wade decision. Foes of abortion gained strength in Congress, among state governors and in many legislatures, raising hopes among social conservatives for a broad surge of anti-abortion bills. “We are seeing a cultural shift toward protecting life and rolling back the tide of unrestricted abortions, said Charmaine Yoest, president of Americans United for Life, in a statement ahead of Saturday’s anniversary of the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

Yoest and her allies have particularly high hopes for three types of bills under consideration in several states: —Measures modeled after a Nebraska law passed last year that outlaws abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy, based on the assertion that fetuses can feel pain after that point. That’s a departure from the standards set by Roe, which allows states to limit abortions when there’s a viable chance the fetus could survive outside the womb, generally between 22 and 24 weeks. —Bills requiring women to have an ultrasound before an abortion. Some versions would also require doctors to describe the ultrasound image of the fetus to the woman. —Laws prohibiting abor-

tion coverage in health insurance plans offered by the new state exchanges that are to commence in 2014 under President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul. Five states passed such measures last year; more may follow suit. In many states, prospects for passage of such measures are bright, although they may face court challenges. NARAL Pro-Choice America, a leading abortion-rights group, said there are now 29 antiabortion gover nors, an increase of eight, including 15 in states where abortion opponents also control both legislative chambers. “In those states in particular, there are almost no pro-choice checks and balances,” said Donna Crane, NARAL’s director of public policy.

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a lawsuit for a for mer Border Patrol agent who claims he was fired — just weeks before his probationary period ended — because he expressed opinions about illegal immigration and drug legalization. The action was filed Thursday in federal court in El Paso, Texas, on behalf of Bryan Gonzalez, who was fired in September 2009. Ramiro Cordero, the Border Patrol’s special operations supervisor in El Paso, declined comment. Cordero said the agency doesn’t discuss pending litigation. Gonzalez said while patrolling near Deming, N.M., in April 2009, he told

a fellow agent during a casual conversation that he believed legalizing drugs would reduce violence in Mexico. Gonzalez, who held dual citizenship in Mexico and the U.S. until he turned 18, also told his colleague he understood the economic factors driving immigrants to cross the border illegally. The lawsuit says word of Gonzalez’s comments spread to his supervisor, who notified agency officials in Washington, D.C. An internal affairs investigation followed, leading to the firing. According to the lawsuit, the termination letter stated that Gonzalez held “personal views that were contrary to the core characteristics of Border Patrol

agents, which are patriotism, dedication and esprit de corps.” Peter Simonson, executive director of the ACLU in New Mexico, called Gonzalez’s firing “an egregious violation” of his First Amendment rights. “We cannot require, nor should we expect uniformity of thought within our law enforcement institutions,” Simonson said in a news release. “Purging the ranks of gover nment employees who fail ‘ideological purity’ tests is about as un-American as it gets.” The lawsuit seeks a declaration by the court that the Border Patrol violated Gonzalez’s right to free speech, along with compensatory and punitive damages.

Frauds, larceny reported Abortion foes upbeat, see chance for tougher curbs Fraud

Police received several walk-in reports of fraud on Thursday. •One individual said that unknown persons had made several withdrawals from his bank account. • A second victim stated that he had gone to the gas company to open an account and was told he already had one. •A third victim reported that her wallet had been removed from her vehicle. Three credit cards, two social security cards and a bank card were missing. A $69.97 charge had been made at two separate locations, and two $85.70 charges were made to Verizon. •A fourth individual said that several charges had been made against her bank account, and one check had been cashed. In total, $1,445

was missing from her account. The balance was zero and several bank charges and penalties incurred. •A fifth person reported a credit check revealed that someone was using her social security number in Austin, Texas.

Larceny

•Police were called to the 200 block of West Summit Street, Thursday, where a motorized threewheeled cycle, worth $600, was stolen. The vehicle was described as a Grubee Starfire, with a Gen II 45 cc gas engine. •Police received a call about a suspicious man walking up the 1100

block of South Richardson Avenue, Thursday. The subject was pushing an Albertsons shopping cart full of Mrs. Bairds bread and trying to sell the bread door to door. When approached, the man ran away. Employees at Albertsons were contacted and discovered that loaves were missing from the store. Police recovered 19 loaves of bread, worth $59.71. Anyone having information about these or any other crimes should call Crime Stoppers 1-888-594-TIPS (8477). Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

Roundhouse contact information ** Lawmakers’ telephone contact information was incorrectly published on Jan. 21. Below is the correct information. The Daily Record apologizes for any inconvenience this may have caused.

Gov. Susana Martinez 505-476-2200 Office of the Governor 490 Old Santa Fe Trail Room 400 Santa Fe, NM 87501 Lt. Gov. John Sanchez 505-476-2250 New Mexico State Capitol Building Room 417

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Rep. Candy Spence Ezzell(R) District 58 505-986-4450 csecows@aol.com Rep. Dennis Kintigh (R) District 57 505-986-4453 askdennis@denniskintigh.com Rep. Bob Wooley (R) District 66 505-986-4453 brwooley1@yahoo.com

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Email Fredda at: askfredda@yahoo.com your source of retirement living answers.

Janette wrote: How do you find the right community for you and what do you look for?

Dear Janette: Picking a retirement community is a very personal choice. You have to first keep in mind that home is where the heart is. When you enter the community, were the people there warm and inviting? Did the staff go out of their way to make you feel at home? Were you provided an opportunity to speak with other retirees that live at the facility, and what did they say about the facility? There are questions that you can ask that will help you establish if the facility is a good personal fit for you. Ask about the activities, what are they and how are they scheduled? Will your interests be considered when planning activities? What kind of transportation is available, and is there additional cost for that transportation? Look at the menu; does the facility cook the kinds of food that will make you feel at home? Eat there at least once without prior reservations, then you get what is normally served and not a special just for you. Look at the visitor policy make sure that your friends and family will be a welcome sight to the facility because they are important to you. Pricing specials are not always what they seem, the cost of running a facility is often not compensated by the introductory price that you are offered. When you are given a price that is much lower than other facilities, be sure that this is not a limited time and that the price is not going to quickly climb out of your range. Paying a little more to start with to keep an even rate may be a better fit financially for you and your family. Keep in mind that the fancier the atmosphere the higher the cost of maintenance. This should correlate equally to the price you are quoted. Choosing a retirement facility is a big decision for you and your loved ones. Pick a place that makes you smile. These are your golden years. The retirement community right for you will be one that you enjoy being there from day to day. A place that you are happy to call your HOME! Fredda

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Roswell Daily Record

Giffords

Continued from Page A1

T exas Medical Center, where a new team of doctors planned to start her therapy immediately. After several days of evaluation, she will be sent to the center’s rehabilitation hospital, TIRR Memorial Hermann. Giffords has “great rehabilitation potential,” said Dr. Gerar do Francisco, chief medical of ficer of Memorial Hermann. “She will keep us busy, and we will keep her busy as well,” he said. The first thing is to deter mine the extent of Giffords’ injuries and the impact on her abilities to move and communicate. She hasn’t spoken yet, and it’s unknown whether she will suffer permanent disabilities. A gunman shot Giffords and 18 other people on Jan. 8 as she met with constituents outside a grocery store in Tucson. Six people died. The suspect in the attack, Jar ed Loughner, 22, is being held in federal custody. Since she was hospitalized at University Medical Center in Tucson, Giffords has made progress nearly every day, with characteristically cautious surgeons calling her improvement remarkable. Each new press conference seemingly yields a few more details about the Gif fords that her family knows. Tracy Culbert, a nurse who accompanied Giffords and the congresswoman’s husband, Houston-based astronaut Mark Kelly, on the flight, described her as

Mumford Continued from Page A1

for youngsters out there dealing with many of the same issues that she has survived. “Whatever is happening

Bills

Continued from Page A1

The local lawmaker is also proposing legislation, HB 100, that would require young students to be proficient in reading by the end of the third grade. Students who don’t meet the standards established by each school district, would be unable to advance to the fourth grade. “The rule of thumb is that from kindergarten to third grade, students are going to learn to read, and from fourth grade to twelfth, they will read to learn,” she said. “If stu-

being captivated by a ring on Culbert’s finger. The nurse took it off and Giffor ds put it on her own hand. “She was taking it of f my hand and I asked if she wanted to see it,” Culbert said. Asked how she felt about leaving Giffords on Friday to retur n to Arizona, Culbert replied, “Do you want me to cry? “She’s a very gentle person,” Culbert said, “and her personality is coming out with her touches, the way she touches us, the way she looks at us, and I am very lucky to know her.” Then, she added: “I have a lot of hope for her, and I know she’s going to do great.” Doctors said Gif for ds will stay in the intensive care unit for now because she has a drain to remove fluid buildup in her brain. She was going to begin rehab immediately, with a session scheduled for Friday afternoon. Because part of her skull was removed during surgery, a specially made helmet was made to protect her brain. Friese said Giffords’ husband asked them to make another one — with the Arizona flag on it. “We immediately got one the next day,” Friese said. Specialists ranging from physical and occupational therapists to speech therapists and psychologists will give a slew of tests to see what she can and cannot do. They’ll deter mine the strength of her legs and her ability to stand and walk; the strength of her ar ms, and whether she in their life right now does not define them,” Mumford said. “It’s not a prediction of whether they’re going to be a failure or success. They need to know in their heart what they want to aspire to ... and not let their circumstances dictate their future. If they have a dents do not learn to read by the third grade, it’s going to be extremely difficult for them to acquire the skills and they will struggle all the way through middle school and high school.” Espinoza serves on the House Education Committee. Sen. Rod Adair introduced a bill, SB 96, that would create a victim notification fund, meant to notify victims of the release of a particular prisoner. Both the House and Senate sessions are slated to reconvene, Monday. mattarco@roswell-record.com

GENERAL

Saturday, January 22, 2011

A3

AP Photo

A police motorcade leads the ambulance carrying U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., away from University Medical Center, Friday, in Tucson, Ariz. Giffords is being transported to a medical facility in Houston.

can brush her teeth or comb her hair; whether she can safely swallow on her own; how well she thinks and communicates — not just her ability to speak, but also to understand and comprehend. While she is moving both ar ms and legs, it’s uncertain how much strength she has on her right side; the bullet passed through the left side of her brain, which controls the right side of the body. Giffords, 40, has some weakness or paralysis on her right side, said Dr. Dong Kim, neurosurgery chief at University of Texas Health. He said she can move her leg, and may be able to support herself,

but “may not be able to move it when she when she wants.” During a half-hour exam, she didn’t move her right arm, but Kim said he was told that she could move it. Gif for ds will stay at Memorial Hermann until she no longer needs 24hour medical care — the average is one to two months. Then she can get up to five hours a day of physical and other rehab therapies as an outpatient. The transfer from Tucson was a major milestone among many that Giffords has already passed. Before they left the hospital, Giffords’ husband tweeted: “GG going to next

dream they need to stick to it. There are going to be bumps in the road, but they can follow their dream.” Mumford says that her personal faith kept her through many years of hard personal trials. She credits church fellowship

for helping her get through life’s messiest trials. Mumford has fond memories of her time at Shady Grove Baptist Church of Roswell, where she attended as a youngster. Today, she attends First Baptist Church. “I grew up Baptist ... [the

2 men rob store

Around 7:30 p.m., Thursday, two Hispanic males robbed the Sun Country convenience store at 2200 S. Sunset Ave. Both men were armed. An undisclosed amount of money and merchandise, including cigarettes, was taken. Detectives are reviewing surveillance tapes and following up on leads, but no suspects have been

phase of her r ecover today. Very grateful to the docs and nurses at UMC, Tucson PD, Sherif fs Dept....Back in Tucson ASAP!” For some along the route to the airport, the sight of her motor cade seemed like a prayer answered. Bundled into an ambulance, Gif for ds slipped away from the hospital, leaving behind the grief and hope embodied in the cards, candles and carnations at a makeshift memorial on the fr ont lawn. Marine veteran Al Garcia waited anxiously along the route to the airport, his Harley Davidson motorcycle at his side. He

wanted to join the back of the caravan to show support for the woman who visited his neighborhood to ask about r esidents’ concerns. “It’s through all of these prayers that she’s leaving in just two weeks,” Garcia said. “The community has just come together so much — all walks of life, no matter what party you belong to,” he said. “They’ve all come together to show their support for her and the other victims of this tragedy.” Moments later, he and a few other veterans joined the caravan.

church] was on White Mill Road ... those were happy memories,” she said, “We still stay in touch [with former members].” Mumford has worked in the non-profit sector for more than 20 years with the MS Society, The Roswell Refuge, and Unit-

ed Way. She is a graduate of Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell. “Life’s not easy, but to know that God’s there looking out for me ... that helps me get through everyday,” Mumford said. j.entzminger@roswell-record.com

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detained at this time. Anyone with information on this or any other crimes is urged to contact the criminal investigations division of the Roswell Police Department, or call Crime Stoppers at 1-888-594TIPS (8477). People who call Crime Stoppers can remain anonymous and may receive a reward.

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SI Z E L ES NA E TO V TO RRO EN W W ID S E

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A4 Saturday, January 22, 2011

OPINION

Small business needs relief from too many rules

Before it vanishes into the vapor, mour ned by almost no one, let me tell you about the Small Business Regulatory Relief Act. Promising title, wasn’t it? It could evaporate this year. It’s named in a long list of things to be repealed in HB 29, the 89page bill that creates the proposed new Department of Commerce. The Small Business Regulatory Relief Act was enacted in 2005 (HB 869; you can read it on the Legislature’s website). The act established the Small Business Regulatory Advisory Commission, which was to review proposed state regulations and comment on the effect of those regulations on small business. But the law had no teeth. The requirement for cooperation by state agencies was so wimpy as to be meaningless — in part because there was no conse-

EDITORIAL

MERILEE

DANNEMANN TRIPLE SPACED

quence for failure by an agency to cooperate. And if the commission identified a problem, there was no requirement for agencies to fix it. In short, the law was designed to fail. These flaws were obvious to me immediately, and I wondered why there was no record of attempts to make the bill stronger. Maybe because the sponsors were the House speaker and the Senate majority leader. As a serious proponent of reducing government brutalization of small business, I was hopeful — but not very.

Roswell Daily Record

Alas, I was right. After it was enacted, I tried several times to find information about the commission and what, if anything, it was doing. It was attached to the Economic Development Department, but I found no mention of it on the department’s Web site. More than a year later, I telephoned the department and talked with a staff member assigned to this commission. I learned that commission members had been appointed, and a couple of meetings had taken place. But nothing of substance had been done. Some time later, I met a commission member. The members, initially committed and enthusiastic, had been forced to spend several meetings trying to figure out how to get the information they needed from state agencies, she said, and never got much past that point. Frustrated members started

missing meetings. Without a quorum the commission couldn’t take official actions. Then members started resigning. This was predictable from the legislation. State agencies often ignore legislative demands to cooperate with each other, and usually they get away with it. This was no exception. The law also says, “By July 1, 2010, each agency shall have reviewed all of its rules ... to determine whether the rules ... should be amended or repealed to minimize the economic impact of the rules on small business ...” Go ask any state agency whether that’s been done. In August 2010, an “administrative procedures task force,” attempting to go over the usual ground in discussing how to make regulations less onerous to small business, mentioned the commission once in its report. It says, “Small Business Regulatory

Advisory committee lacked budget, authority and, ironically, rulemaking authority.” So should we let the poor thing be put out of its misery? I think it should be amended, not repealed. Here’s the gist of an amendment that will make it work. (I’ll volunteer technical details on request.) Part 1: Every state agency shall submit draft rules to the commission, and the commission shall have 30 days to respond. If the commission responds that the rules need amending, the rules shall have no effect or force of law until an acceptable amendment is done. Part 2: Every existing rule enacted by every agency of New Mexico government is subject to review by this commission or it will automatically be repealed by a sunset provision in five years. That’ll fix it. © New Mexico News Services 2011

World Opinion Haiti’s quake anniversary

The numbers coming out of Haiti one year after its nightmarish earthquake are as staggering as they are grim. And the failures are abject. Even before the dust settled, the world knew upward of 200,000 would be dead considering so much of the country had crumbled, but no one would have believed that, a year later, 95 percent of the rubble has yet to be cleared away. How is that possible when more than $5 billion in reconstruction money has been pledged by the international community? Is it because almost two-thirds has never been paid? The stumbling block, without question, is a Haitian government in disarray, with November’s presidential elections so steeped in fraud that investment in Haiti’s future has rightly been frozen in transit. That could change at almost a moment’s notice if outgoing President Rene Preval cedes to international sensibilities by allowing an immediate run-off between the two top contenders, and boots the government’s anointed puppet, Jude Celestin, from the ballot. Otherwise Haiti will be forever entrenched as a lost cause. Guest Editorial The Ottawa Sun, Ontario

Italy’s president

In March 2010, Silvio Berlusconi’s government passed a law designed to protect the self-styled “most persecuted man in all history in the entire world” from prosecution in Italy’s courts. On Jan. 13, the country’s Constitutional Court partially struck down the law. It was right to do so. However, it is a sad measure of the dysfunctional nature of Italian politics that this decision may yet work to the advantage of Berlusconi — and the detriment of his country. Berlusconi’s law of “legitimate impediment” exempted cabinet ministers from appearing in court on the basis that they are too busy. That proposition is an affront to the principle of equality before the law. No one, not even a billionaire media mogul who doubles as prime minister, is above the law. The court has yet to publish the details of its ruling, but should be applauded for upholding this principle. On the political front, the ruling may even — perversely — play into Berlusconi’s hands. He has spent much of his time in office bleating that he is the victim of a conspiracy by left-wing judges to unseat him. In conjunction with an investigation opened on Jan. 14 into claims that Berlusconi abused his office by trying to have a 17-year-old Moroccan nightclub dancer released from prison, the Constitutional Court’s ruling will enable him to sustain this narrative until the next election, which will probably occur this spring. That is a huge shame for Italy. ... the country is likely to be treated to another installment of Berlusconi versus the judiciary. Italy deserves better. Guest Editorial Financial Times, London

DEAR DR. GOTT: I need some information on Rocky Mountain spotted fever. My 47-year -old boyfriend was diagnosed with this in November 2009. He continues to get worse, has a lot of memory loss, poor balance and uses a walker. He still tests positive after all this time. He waited several weeks before getting any help. He had a high fever, was confused, and could not walk. At this point, I called the ambulance and had him taken to the hospital. All the doctors that we have seen during several hospital stays have said that he will never recover. He was given antibiotics at one point, which his doctors called a “big gun” and were the strongest there is. He is depressed, has mood swings, cries a lot, and depends

What was found in the governor’s office Newspapers across New Mexico reported the outgoing governor left a letter on his desk for the incoming governor. It’s a tradition. They all do it. Only here will you get the real scoop. Susana wrote back. Your humble columnist has the only known copy of that letter:

William, I hope you don’t mind my dispensing with the traditional “dear.” I mean, really! Your transitional letter was received and noted. You want me to stop talking trash about your administration. Well,

Doonesbury

ASK DR. GOTT UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

on me 24/7. Around the same time, he also had a staph infection that he got from an open wound. Is there anything I can do to help him? DEAR READER: Let’s start with the staph infection. I cannot determine whether this was related to his symptoms because you did not elaborate on how severe the infection was. Staph bacteria are common and can be

NED

CANTWELL LOOKING ASKANCE

okay, but that’s hardly helpful advice. I am wallowing in a sea of debt. What I really need is a lifeline. Do you know of anyone who wants to buy your Choo Choo? I’m writing, William, to find out about some of the stuff you left in your of fice and

found just about everywhere. Most cases of infection are minor and only affect the skin; however, rarely, the infection can become severe and result in symptoms similar to those your boyfriend experienced (I assume due to his Rocky Mountain spotted fever and not the staph) and may, in some instances, result in life-threatening consequences. T reatment involves antibiotics. In many cases, cultures should be taken to determine which antibiotic will be most effective in eradicating the infection. This is because staph are adaptable. Less than 10 percent of cases can be treated with penicillin, and up to 50 percent of staph found in hospitals is resistant to another common antibiotic, methicillin (referred to

what you want me to do about it. Where should I send the replica of the Oval Office Rug? Helen, the marvelous lady who helps me keep this place tidy, said you would have her drag the heavy thing out of the closet when you were alone some afternoons. She said she would peek in the door to see you leaning back in your recliner, a cigar in your hand, sipping a glass of Merlot, humming along to “Hail to the Chief.” She said you had a wistful smile and a dreamy look on your face. William? You really need to talk to someone about this!

as methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA). Now to the Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Caused by the bacteria Rickettsia rickettsii, this illness is most commonly transmitted by the American dog tick, wood tick or the Lone Star tick. Contrary to popular belief, Rocky Mountain spotted fever is not found only in the Rocky Mountains. The name was given because some of the first identified cases came from the area. In 2002, according to the CDC, North and South Carolina, Oklahoma, Missouri and Arkansas had the most cases reported. North Carolina and Oklahoma alone accounted for 35 percent of all reported cases See GOTT, Page A5

Oh, before I forget. Yesterday’s mail brought a scathing letter from the Billy the Kid Historical Society thanking you for absolutely nothing. They are still mad about your refusing to pardon that scrawny, murderous little weasel. They write, “Mr. Richardson, we discussed possible campaign donations should you again seek office. Please note the enclosed.” If it is all the same to you, William, I am giving their $25 McDonald’s gift card to my hubby. He is more than a little miffed that I sent packing two

See CANTWELL, Page A5

25 YEARS AGO

Jan. 22, 1986 • Kevin Jay Blach recently was awarded his degree at commencement services held at Colorado State University. Blach, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Blach of Roswell, was awarded a doctoral degree in veterinary medicine. • Four Roswell High school students have been named Outstanding Youth of the Year by the Roswell Noon Optimists Club. The honored students were: Christi Graham, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Graham; Daniel Lozano, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Lozano; Henry Mein, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Mein; and Kim Quinn, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Quinn.


OPINION II

Roswell Daily Record

LETTERS

Angel Gala

Dear Editor: The Community Foundation of Chaves County’s Board of Directors, the Angel Gala Committee and I would like to thank all of you who contributed to our eighth annual Angel Gala! We truly appreciate the overwhelming support of the community and all the contributions from area businesses and individuals. Special thanks to Bullock’s Jewelry, Bush Appliance and TV, Aubrey Dunn, John and Claudette Foster, Glenn’s Furniture and Appliance, Hurd-La Rinconada Gallery, Larry’s Gun Shop, Jim and Candy McClelland, Ron and Sally McKay, Ray and Patti Mitcham, Carolyn Mitchell, Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs and Spa, Roswell Livestock and Farm Supply, Securitel, Gary and Marilyn Wagner and Michelle Watts for their extreme generosity in providing our live auction items! Our huge silent auction was full of over 135 beautiful and unique items and I wish I had enough room to thank all of you who so kindly donated to our event! A tremendous thank you to all of our sponsors: Accounting and Consulting Group, Armstrong Energy Corporation, Brown and Brown Insurance, Pete Edmonds, EMG Oil Properties (Eileen Grooms), Featherstone Development Corporation, Peppers Grill and Bar, Pioneer Bank and Xcel Energy for their financial contributions, and to our inkind sponsors: Alpha-Omega Printing, AmeriPride Services, Cable One, Cathy Burch, Down Home Boutique, KOBRTV, Nancy Forrest, Norma Bell, SW Coca-Cola Distributing, The Treasure Chest and Westlake Hardware — all of whom helped make this a fabulous evening! Huge thanks to Adam and Neil Roe, Robert Johnston and the staff of Peppers for the delicious array of fabulous food! Thank you to everyone who attended our event! Special thanks to Bill Owen and Jeff Smith for once again doing such an outstanding job as our emcees and to Aubrey Dunn as our auctioneer. Our thanks also to Robert Castillo with

Cantwell Continued from Page A4

of the three cooks at the Mansion. You’ll remember that under the office window there are those hidden cabinets that blend in so well they are hardly noticeable? I thought those would be an ideal place to store my Sarah Palin posters and other Sarah thingies, but was shocked to find the shelves are still full of box after box of Super Sized Snicker Bars. Did you have an addiction other than one for power, William? This next one is a real puzzle. You left behind in the corner filing cabinet 14 pathetic letters from some strange fellow in Ruidoso. His handwriting is horrible, but his name looks like “Nedward Cantrell.” I guess he wanted a job or something, keeps begging you to appoint him as a “spokesman.” In this one letter he is saying “I am sorry I called you Chubby Cheeks, Mr. Richardson. I really would be a great spokesman. If I could just have a job as spokesman, say, for the New Mexico State Barbershop Commission I bet I would have plenty of time to come over to the Mansion on Saturday mornings to wash your black SUV.”

Gott

Continued from Page A4

between 1993 and 1996. Early symptoms include high fever (102 F or higher), severe headache, chills, abdominal pain, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting and sensitivity to light. As the infection progresses, sufferers may experience diarrhea, restlessness, widespread aches and pains, a red-spotted or blotchy rash on the wrists or ankles, and delirium (restlessness, confusion, possible hallucinations). If treatment is delayed or not sought, Rocky Mountain spotted fever can cause brain damage, shock, gangrene (resulting in amputation of the affected area), meningitis, blood-clotting abnormalities and heart, lung or kidney failure. On rare occasions, it can be fatal. Treatment is fairly straightforward for those who seek and initiate treatment within five days of developing symptoms. For these cases, antibiotic medication, most often doxycycline, is taken for one week to 10 days or until at least three days after the fever and symptoms subside. Because your boyfriend waited so long before seeking help, he may be suffering from permanent damage to his brain and/or other organs. I urge him to be examined by a physician or specialist familiar with Rocky Mountain spotted fever, particularly in cases in which treatment was delayed. He likely needs an extended course of antibiotic thera-

Rock’M Sound and Light for providing the additional lighting. Our little Girl Scout angels were so precious and our gratitude to the Roswell Redcoats who greeted everyone war mly as they arrived. The media support was very much appreciated! Cable One, KBIM Radio, Pecos Valley Broadcasting, the Roswell Daily Record, Roswell Radio and 575 Magazine were wonderful to work with in publicizing our event. Heartfelt thanks to all the Angel Gala Committee members and additional volunteers who gave their time and talent in preparation and during the night of the event: Dr. Judy Armstrong, Sara Ar mstrong, Eileen Grooms, Cathy Burch, Ann Carson, Theresa Delgado, Lennie Her nandez, Sharon Krebbs, Bridget Lara, Esther Lopez, Elaine Mayfield, Candy McClelland, Nicole McWilliams, Brenda Meyer, Bonnie Montgomery, Laurie Rufe (and the RMAC staf f), Steve Smith, Renee Swickard, Alexis Swoboda, Nanette Whittington and Debra Young. The proceeds generated from the Angel Gala will benefit the Community Foundation and our grant program which, since 2003, has awarded over $88,000 to 45 Chaves County nonprofit organizations. Other ways to support the Community Foundation are to become a partner in philanthropy, through your estate planning, setting up an endowment and/or contributing to an existing fund. We’re looking forward to seeing all of you again — mark your calendars for Dec. 6, 2011. Wishing you all a wonder ful New Year! Susie Russell Executive Director Community Foundation of Chaves County Editor’s Note: This letter was submitted several weeks ago, but was held up due to a large backlog of letters and a computer malfunction. We apologize to all letter writers who have had to wait for their letters to appear.

This fellow seems pleasant enough if not particularly bright. I note you didn’t bother to respond. The courtside Los Angeles Lakers ticket stubs autographed by Jack Nicholson? Glad you left them behind. I’ll see what I can get on EBay to help reduce your horrible deficit. I’ve got to close now. Busy, busy, busy here. Just this moment the Fed-Ex guy is handing me a package the staff says needs my attention. Until next time, or more likely, never, Susana M. Martinez Oookay, what’s this now? Wait. Oh, no. It’s a CD from the nutcase in Ruidoso. He’s recorded himself singing to me! No, dear Lord, please, make him stop. “Oh! Susana, “Oh! don’t you cry for me ... “I come from Rueedoser ... “A spokesman sure to be!” Have a nice day.

(On behalf of Nedward Cantrell I would like to apologize to anyone this column has offended. Or bored. ncantwell@bajabb.com.) py. DEAR DR. GOTT: My 16-year-old son gets little almost hard balls in his throat. Yellowish in color, they are usually a little larger than a grain of sand. They are not hard but not soft, either. Today, he choked up one that was larger than usual and pink. Any idea what they could be? DEAR READER: Your son may be experiencing tonsil stones. These are compressed particles of bacteria, food and other debris that get caught in the tonsils. His latest one was pink, suggesting that there was some irritation and mild bleeding into the tonsillar stone. Make an appointment for him with his physician to discuss the situation. Perhaps a referral to an ear-noseand-throat specialist is in order, especially if he has other symptoms such as a sore throat, swollen tonsils, bad breath or difficulty swallowing. Those with minor or no symptoms may not require treatment. For those with associated symptoms, the only surefire treatment for stones that cause problems is removal of the tonsils; however, some patients may respond well to antibiotics. In the meantime, he may wish to try gargling with saltwater in an attempt to remove them. Dr. Peter H. Gott is a retired physician and the author of several books, including “Live Longer, Live Better,” “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Diet” and “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Cookbook,” which are available at most bookstores or online. His website is www.AskDrGottMD.com.

Saturday, January 22, 2011

A5


A6 Saturday, January 22, 2011

OPINION III

Creation versus evolution

scarce resources, austerity and the usual partisan polarization of the short-sighted politicians who have forgotten (if they ever knew) that the primary reason they are in office is to serve the people’s interests, not to succumb to the often unethical pressures brought by lobbyists, special interest groups and influential private citizens looking for narrowly defined favors which are often antithetical to our, the people’s, best interests. Mr. Fox poses questions for the new governor that should be closely monitored as time goes along since none of the long-standing problems iterated above were addressed in any way during the campaign and we have to have some “handle” to gauge her effectiveness (after all, Mr. Fox says, it is “... doubtful that she is adequately prepared to address these long-standing problems given a background largely devoid of governing experience and expertise”) as the state’s “primo” leader. The questions: Whose income and standard of living do you and your party plan to reduce to solve the economic and social problems facing New Mexico? How will you and your administration distribute the benefits and burdens produced by New Mexico’s economy and state government? Who will have to sacrifice in the years ahead in times of continued economic and social crises? Already, Ms. Martinez is shifting away from — backing away — from her campaign promises to not cut education or Medicaid to balance the state’s budget nor to raise taxes in her first year as governor ... prompting comments by the opposition that she does not understand the state budget and the growth of Medicaid since she ignored it during the campaign and ignored offers for a thorough briefing from the Richardson administration. So, we the voting public, need to raise our political antennae and keep a close eye on the social, economic and political policies of this individual as her administration becomes defined and we the people begin to experience all the improvements promised over the airways, in the print media, and face-to-face during election season. Personally I look forward to once and for all having the long-standing social and economic problems of this wonderful state addressed and ameliorated “in the best interests of our citizenry” by this Republican governor whose party believes “no” is always the best answer. Truly, Terry Wilmot Roswell

LETTERS

Dear Editor: The Dec. 4 Record had a letter to the editor concerning evolution that requires comment. The second law of thermodynamics implies much more than “Heat dissipates over time.” Consult any physics textbook. “Physics From the Ground Up” (Carr and Weidman, McGraw Hill, 1971 p. 228) reads, “Any isolated system free to do so will always pass from a more ordered state to a less ordered state until it eventually reaches and remains in the state of maximum possible disorder, which is the state of thermal equilibrium.” How did some molecules assemble themselves into DNA? This question was addressed in an article in the November 1972 issue of “Physics Today,” “Thermodynamics of Evolution.” (Prigogine, Nicolis, Babloyantz, pp 23-28.) The probability that at ordinary temperatures a macroscopic number of molecules is assembled to give rise to the highly ordered structures and to the coordinated functions characterizing living organisms is vanishingly small. The idea of spontaneous genesis of life in its present form is therefore highly improbable even on the scale of billions of years during which it occurred. Notice that on one hand he tells us that the probability of spontaneous genesis of life is “vanishingly small,” (it could not happen) and on the other he says it certainly happened. (“... billions of years during which it occurred.”) He probably believed as did Sir Arthur Keith (1866-1955) “Evolution is unproved and unprovable. We believe it because the only alternative is special creation, and that is unthinkable.” My dictionary defines random as “Without aim or purpose, a roving motion or course without direction.” That means that if no force is directing movement, we have random events. Most evolutionists will say that events in nature are random, but the selecting force is not. Natural selection cannot create. It can only destroy. It might be useful to have a second pair of hands, but if the genes do not appear, it will never happen. We need mutations to change genes. Useful mutations are extremely rare or nonexistent. Why do our many species (which evolutionists say have a common ancestor) have widely varying numbers of chromosomes? Imagine trying to change a Model T Ford into a 2011 Cadillac by changing one part at a time. If 999 of every 1,000 changes make the automobile less efficient, would we ever see a better car? Some systems must be completely changed. A car halfway between a manual transmission and automatic transmission would be useless. An animal halfway between having solid bones and scales and having hollow bones and feathers could not survive on the ground or in the air. Russell Humphries, in his book “Starlight and Time,” explained how distant stars are observed if the universe is young. Time slows down at high speeds and near the center of mass. A clock ticks more slowly at sea level than on a mountain. Our galaxy seems to be near the center of the universe. Everything appears to be moving away from earth. Time is probably moving more rapidly in space than on earth. We should know that if galaxies have been rotating for billions of years, they would have lost their recognizable spiral shape (caused by inner stars moving faster then the outer ones) and would now be a smear of stars. Let us say again, “The question of what happened ‘millions of years ago’ is not truly in the realm of natural science. No repeatable experiment can verify the past, nor can we observe it today.” Evolution and creation are two competing religious philosophies. Some people want to mandate teaching a religion called “evolution” at taxpayer expense. Russell Scott Roswell

Our new governor

Dear Editor: If voting changed anything, they’d make it illegal. — Emma Goldman Read a very interesting Op-Ed in this morning’s press by Richard E. Fox, political science teacher, Central New Mexico Community College, wherein he specifies a list of New Mexico’s social and economic “health” problems. For those who might have overlooked this article, and as a useful tool to assess the effectiveness of our new governor’s coupling of campaign politics with the “substance of governing” this riddled state, I thought it useful to set forth his list of challenges for future reference as “we” voters look forward to the next election cycle. The problems (and these are not all inclusive): poverty, DWI, hunger, high school dropouts, unemployment, underemployment, teen pregnancy, a yawning rich/poor gap, workplace deaths, domestic violence, alcohol and drug abuse, overstretched district attorneys, violent crime, suicide, welfare abuse, tax cheating, thousands without health insurance, gambling addiction, diabetes, a weak secondary and postsecondary education system, the state budget deficit estimated at $400 million, environmental issues, the disgrace of campaign finance, and all of this unfolding in a political and economic environment of deep recession,

TODAY IN HISTORY

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Today is Saturday, Jan. 22, the 22nd day of 2011. There are 343 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight On Jan. 22, 1973, the U.S. Supreme Court, in its Roe v. Wade decision, legalized abortions using a trimester approach. On this date In 1498, during his third voyage to the Western Hemisphere, explorer Christopher Columbus arrived at the present-day Caribbean island of St. Vincent. In 1901, Britain’s Queen Victoria died at age 81. In 1907, the Richard Strauss opera “Salome” made its American debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York; its racy content sparked outrage and forced cancellation of additional performances. In 1917, President Woodrow Wilson pleaded for an end to war in Europe, calling for “peace without victory.” (By April, however, America also was at war.) In 1922, Pope Benedict XV died; he was succeeded by Pius XI. In 1944, during World War II, Allied forces began landing at Anzio, Italy. In 1959, 12 workers were killed in the Knox Mine Disaster in Pennsylvania. In 1973, former President L yndon B. Johnson died at age 64. In 1995, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy died at the Kennedy compound at Hyannis Port,

Doctors leaving city

Dear Editor: I appreciate the frequent communications from Mayor Del Jurney in the Roswell Daily Record. His most recent article “City needs to keep its doctors here” in the Sunday, Jan. 16, 2011, edition, struck a chord with me. For the first 18 years of my life, until I moved away to attend college, I had one family doctor here in Roswell. When I moved back to Roswell in 1990 my wife and I selected a new primary care physician and two years later that doctor delivered our first child. Two years later, that doctor’s replacement delivered our second child; and three years after that, another replacement delivered our third child. Since then, that doctor has left the practice, his PA retired and the physician that came in to take over the practice stayed only a couple of years before bolting to another community. Whoever took over his medical practice moved to a different location so I’m not even sure where our medical records are. We have attempted to find a new primary care physician with not much success. One became unavailable to become a “hospitalist,” another is not renewing his/her contract with the hospital employer, another is not seeing any new patients until June. So now, when I have to fill out forms that ask who our family doctor is, I have to leave it blank or state that “I don’t know.” Mayor, you have not lost your mind, as you quipped in your article; but Roswell is losing our doctors. Like you, I don’t really understand why. You are right to bring attention to this issue. I hope you and your Blue Ribbon Committee will not only gain understanding of this situation, but make some recommendations on how to resolve this issue. Perry Toles Roswell

Death penalty gone wrong

Dear Editor: The other night, I was watching education TV, “Front Line,” and they had a show about a Todd Willingham. He was executed wrongly for supposedly killing his three children by starting a fire. He cried and screamed that he did not do the crime, even after they offered to take the death penalty off the table. He still stated he did not start the fire — he did not do it. Well, to make a long story short, after eight years, he was executed. After his execution, however, it was found he was innocent. But, it was too late for them to find he was innocent because he had already been executed. This is the trouble with the death penalty in our country. They have found more than 300 people on death row who

Mass., at age 104. In 2008, actor Heath Ledger was found dead of an accidental prescription overdose in New York City; he was 28. Ten years ago: On the anniversary of the Supreme Court decision legalizing abortion, President George W. Bush signed a memorandum reinstating full abortion restrictions on U.S. overseas aid. Four of the seven convicts who’d broken out of a Texas prison the previous month were captured southwest of Denver; a fifth inmate killed himself. Five years ago: Evo Morales, Bolivia’s first Indian president, took office with a promise to lift his nation’s struggling indigenous majority out of centuries of poverty and discrimination. The Pittsburgh Steelers won the AFC title game, dismantling the Denver Broncos 34-17. The Seattle Seahawks claimed the NFC title, routing the Carolina Panthers 34-14. One year ago: President Barack Obama tried to revive his battered agenda and rally Democrats with a renewed emphasis on jobs during a town hall meeting in Elyria, Ohio. The “Hope for Haiti Now” telethon raised over $66 million. Conan O’Brien ended his brief tenure on “The Tonight Show” after accepting a $45 million buyout from NBC to leave the show he’d long dreamed of hosting after only seven months. Actress Jean Simmons, 80, died in Santa Monica, Calif.

Roswell Daily Record had no reason to be there because of lack of DNA or the prosecutors didn’t prosecute the case properly, or they would have found out these people who were sentenced to the death penalty were innocent. I feel Texas, which executes more people than any state in the union by far, has executed more innocent people and they are starting to find this out. I do not believe in the death penalty. Some people would say this person did this horrible crime, but if you execute them, you also might execute a bunch of innocent people. If they could figure out a way to execute only the real guilty, that would not be so bad. However, no one can really do that beyond a shadow of a doubt. I say “repeal the death penalty.” Tim W. Daniel (Humanist) Roswell

Why are doctors leaving?

Dear Editor: I read with interest the most recent installment of “From the Mayor’s Desk.” Additionally, the mayor should be congratulated not only on his continued efforts on behalf of the city of Roswell, but also on his insight into a problem not only affecting Roswell, but the nation. That problem being how the practice of medicine has changed in the last decade. The mayor has also astutely avoided being “accusatory” of any medical group or organization in Roswell. Additionally, his plans to appoint a committee to gather information about medical care in the city and then disseminate this information to the public is sorely needed. There are definitely some “misconceptions” on how and why physicians and other health care providers practice in Roswell. This was evident not only in some of the information given to the mayor, but also at the recent “town hall” meeting when there was a crisis about dialysis services being available. While the mayor’s committee is being formed and gathering information, it is important for the Roswell community to remember that which hospital a physician decides to “have privileges” in, is strictly voluntary! If any physician would like to practice at a particular hospital in Roswell, all he/she has to do is submit a “privileging packet” to the credentials committee of the hospital for approval. Hospitals DO NOT have the authority to deny a provider privileges on the basis of “territorial” disputes. On the contrary, health care facilities would welcome qualified physicians to apply for privileges because most of the time it would mean more business. The same goes for physicians leaving the area. The vast majority of the time, the decision to leave the area is personal and voluntary. To verify this point, I looked at the last approximately 25 physicians/podiatrist to leave Eddy and Chaves county hospitals in the last five years, that I had personal knowledge of. Approximately 50 percent left for “professional” reasons (including anything from contract disputes, immigration issues, and/or partner/group dissolution). Another roughly 40 percent left for “family” reasons. (including but not limited to spousal dissatisfaction with the area, illness of a family member, or divorce/separation) Only approximately 8 percent (two physicians) left “involuntarily” (this category includes physicians whose privileges were terminated at a local level, or their license was revoked at the state level). The mayor pointed out another way that medicine has changed in the last decade when he discussed his experience with his parents not being followed by their primary care physician in the hospital. Fortunately or unfortunately, most primary care physicians currently limit their practice to the outpatient setting ( ie, their clinic). When their patients need to come to the hospital, they are admitted and managed by “hospitalist.” This is not only true for Roswell Regional and Eastern New Mexico Medical Center; but also for Carlsbad Medical Center, Lea Regional Medical Center and most hospitals in Albuquerque. Once again, the decision of the primary care physician to have the hospitalist admit and manage his/her patients is strictly voluntary and a personal choice. The medical profession is similar to most other professions in the community. The vast majority of the time, the decision to change jobs and/or move out of the area is a personal and voluntary one. This particular issue may not be one that would be amenable to a committee assignment. Further, once the information is gathered, it may be determined that this situation is not unique to Roswell. That being said, there are still many areas in which the medical care can be improved for the citizens of Roswell as the mayor pointed out. With the dissemination of the information gathered by the mayor’s committee, the Roswell community will be able to make informed decisions and recommendations about their medical care in the future. Clarence Pearson, MD, FACC, FACP Interventional Cardiology Eastern New Mexico Medical Center

(The views expressed are solely those of the author and are not a reflection of views or opinions held by the medical center or the CHS corporation.)


LOCAL

Yucca Porcelain Art Club set to meet Some snow shoveling tips Roswell Daily Record

The Yucca Porcelain Art Club will meet today at the Westminster Presbyterian Church, 2801 W. Fourth St. Visitation starts at 9 a.m., the business meeting at 9:30 a.m. Becky Rasco will be here from Lubbock! She will be teaching painting windmills on porcelain. Becky is a member of the South Plains Club in Lubbock, a past president, a past state president, and an active teacher of weekly classes. For more infor mation, call Pat Davina at 622-3991.

Burleson at library

Donald Burleson will be speaking on his most recent book, “A Capitalist Christmas Carol,” at 2 p.m., today at the Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania Ave. Attendance is free and for more infor mation, please contact the library at 622-7101.

Telephone Pioneers

The Telephone Pioneers Jingle Bob Club will meet at 11:30 a.m., Thursday, Jan. 27, at the Elks Lodge, 1720 N. Montana Ave. For more reservations, call 6223028.

Chapter Z, P.E.O.

Chapter Z, P.E.O., will meet at 1 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 27, in the home of Sharon Butler. Karen Stangebye will be her co-hostess. Sharon and her committee will present a Founder's Day program. For more information, call Sharon at 624-4209, or Karen at 622-3619.

Meet the courthouse dogs

The public is invited to meet courthouse dogs Emma and Molly B, at two different events on Friday, Jan. 28. A legal training course will be held from 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Chaves County Courthouse on the legal issues and protocol of using an assistance dog to help victims from the initial interview through the trial. Courthouse dog Molly B, Seattle prosecutor Ellen O’Neill-Stephens and Celeste Walsen, executive director of Courthouse Dogs, will be in attendance. This course is open to anyone interested.

VISTAS POLICY

We try to publish all infor mation about local events and achievements that we can, given time and space limitations. However, we have no legal or ethical requirement to publish everything we receive. Staff members make the final deter mination on when or if information is published. The Roswell Daily Record reserves the right to reject or edit announcements for any reason. To submit an announcement for publication we require a typewritten, legible press release. The release should contain the date, time, location, subject and any other relevant information. Press releases must include a name and contact information, should we have questions regarding the notice. All e-mailed Around Town, Area Scene and Local Achievement items MUST be sent to the Vistas editor at vistas@roswellrecord.com, at least FIVE days prior to the requested publishing date. Any other announcements of upcoming events must also be e-mailed or delivered to the RDR a minimum of FIVE business days before a desired publication date. Delivery or receipt of an item to the RDR after that time does not guarantee publication by the desired date. We cannot guarantee publication on a specific date. Press releases can be delivered to the RDR offices at 2301 N. Main St. (enter on the south side of the building only), faxed to 575-625-0421 or e-mailed to vistas@roswellrecord.com. E-mails should contain the message in plain text in the body of the message only. The Daily Record now charges for wedding, engagement and anniversary announcements. The charges will be $12 for the first 8 column inches of text and 18 cents a line thereafter. A photo is $5.

Saturday, January 22, 2011

A7

Corral and Roswell Regional Hospital. For more information, call 6238412.

“Grease” auditions

At 4:30 p.m., Emma the CASA dog and Molly B, will be at a public meet and greet at Pecos Flavors Winery, 305 N. Main St. For more infor mation, log onto www.casakids.org, or call 625-0112.

RCLT auditions

Roswell Community Little Theatre will hold auditions for the play “Steel Magnolias” at 7 p.m., Monday, Jan. 31, and Tuesday, Feb. 1, at the RCLT, 1101 N. Virginia Ave. “Steel Magnolias” is a comedy-drama by Robert Harling. The auditions are open to the general public. Needed are six ladies, from ages 19 to 60, for wonderfully funny and challenging parts. Each lady portrays the typical southern woman who is as lovely and appears as fragile, as a magnolia blossom. In addition to onstage roles, off stage help is needed and those interested should also attend the audition. Performance dates are March 2527 and April 1-3. Directing the play is veteran director Vonnie Goss. Any questions may be directed to her at 624-1110.

Souper Bowl

Lend-A-Hand will be taking part in the Souper Bowl of Caring, a nationwide effort to utilize the time leading up to the annual Super Bowl to mobilize people — and youth in particular — to fight hunger and poverty in communities by giving non-perishable food and cash donations to charity. The Souper Bowl fundraiser will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 5, at the First Presbyterian Church, 400 W. Third St. Tickets are available at the door; cost is $20 for adults, $10 for children — soup, bread and desserts from area restaurants such as Martin’s Capitol Cafe, Portofino’s, Golden

The Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell Theatre Department will hold auditions for the spring musical production of “Grease” at 7 p.m., Monday, Feb. 7, and Tuesday, Feb. 8, in the Per forming Arts Center on campus. No advance preparation is needed and you do not have to be an ENMUR student to audition or perform. A large cast of up to 22 members will be selected. Directed by Dallas Jeffers-Pollei, Humanities and Theatre instructor, “Grease” will be presented April 1417. Times and ticket information will be announced at a later date. For more information, call 6247017.

RHS class of 1961

Members of the Roswell High School Class of 1961 are planning their 50th reunion this summer and are looking for classmates who may not know about it. “We’re hoping to contact as many of our classmates as possible,” said Bette (Phillips) Leadingham of Roswell, who is helping to spearhead the reunion, “so that we might have as many there as possible.” The reunion is scheduled Friday and Saturday, July 22-23, with a casual get-together planned at 5 p.m. Friday at the Roswell Country Club, golf Saturday at the New Mexico Military Institute Golf Course and a class picture and dinner at 5 p.m. Saturday at the Country Club. Leadingham is coordinating the three main activities and Linda (Lepard) Weathers, of Roswell, is coordinating the entertainment. A website has been set up with registration information, available at http://roswellhigh1961.net. For more information, classmates may also call Leadingham at 575622-6158 or e-mail her at ed_bette@dfn.com.

This week’s Roswell SAFE Coalition Safety Column is brought to you by ENMR-Plateau and the Roswell SAFE Coalition. OK, already! It hasn’t snowed. So, why in the world would I run a safety column about snow shoveling? Well, it’s really pretty simple. Safety is a 24/7 mindset, a matter of infor mation and preparation and if a safety concern has already happened, then it’s just too late. The good news is that 15 minutes of snow shoveling counts as moderate physical activity according to the Surgeon General’s Report on Physical Activity and Health. We all should aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity of some kind on most days of the week. The bad news is that shoveling snow places many of us at risk for a heart attack. It is an extremely vigorous exercise not only for older people, but for healthy college-age people as well. Be heart-healthy and back-friendly while shoveling this winter with these tips: • If you lead a sedentary lifestyle, have a history of heart trouble, high blood pressure and high cholesterol, you should talk to your doctor before you take on the task of shoveling snow. • Avoid caf feine or nicotine before beginning. • Drink plenty of

water. • Dress in several layers so you can remove a layer as needed. • Spray the snow shovel blade with non-stick cooking spray to help snow slide off easier. • Warm up and stretch the muscles in your ar ms and legs before shoveling. • Pick the right shovel for you. A smaller blade will require you to lift less snow, putting less strain on your body. • Begin shoveling slowly to avoid placing a sudden demand on your heart. Pace yourself. • Protect your back from injury by lifting correctly. Stand with your feet about hip width for balance and keep the shovel close to your body. Bend from the knees, not the back, and tighten your stomach muscles as you lift the snow. • Most importantly — listen to your body. Stop if you feel pain! Thinking about starting a Neighborhood Watch? Call Richard or Steve at 622-7233 for information. And don’t forget, the number for Chaves County Crime Stoppers is 1888-594-TIPS (8477).


A8 Saturday, January 22, 2011

GENERAL/WORLD

USS New Mexico model was a 30-year labor ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — During the waning days of World War I, it took the New York Navy Yard just 18 months to build the USS New Mexico, a sleek, 624foot-long battleship that survived two kamikaze strikes in the Pacific during World War II. In contrast, it’s taken Albuquerque modelers Cecil Whitson and Keith Liotta more than 30 years to complete a model of the ship precisely scaled to 1/96th the size of its namesake — a labor that has lasted about as long as the actual battleship itself. This weekend, the modelers’ painstaking efforts will go on display at the New Mexico History Museum in Santa Fe as part of the museum’s new exhibit, “A Noble Legacy: The USS New Mexico.” It’s an exacting, 7-foot long, 2-foot high, entirely hand-crafted replica of the battleship officially known as the USS New Mexico (BB 40) that is as much a work of art as it is a miniaturized memorial. “Once I saw this thing and realized the scope of it, I was a little overwhelmed,” Liotta said. Every item on the ship, from observation airplanes catapulted from its fantail to its anchor chains, is made by hand from plastic, wood or metal.

The anchor chain, for example, started out as a thin sheet of plastic. “Each link was cut to shape, drilled out, the links split, linked together and glued back together,” Liotta said. “And there’s like 2 feet of it.” Hair-thin wire coils replicate the recoil mechanisms on each of the New Mexico’s 80 tiny anti-aircraft guns. The crane used to retrieve observation planes is reproduced in exact detail, right down to the number and shape of each individual support beam. The model’s genesis rests with Cecil Whitson, a former Sandia National Laboratories engineer, New Mexico history buff and modeling hobbyist who felt compelled to preserve the history of the USS New Mexico which, when construction began on Oct. 14, 1915, was the most advanced battleship in the U.S. fleet. Liotta said Whitson began collecting copies of the ship’s plans in the 1960s. When computer -aided design software became available, Whitson converted the ship’s paper schematics into a digital format that allowed him to determine the exact dimensions of every component of the ship, from its railings to its four, 10-foot diameter propellers. Whitson started building

EREZ CROSSING, Gaza Strip (AP) — Dozens of Palestinians enraged by France’s sympathy for an Israeli soldier held by Gaza militants ambushed the French foreign minister’s motorcade in the Gaza Strip on Friday, pelting it with eggs and hurling a shoe that narrowly missed hitting her. The protesters — relatives of Palestinians held in Israeli jails — accosted the convoy of Foreign Minister Michele Alliot-Marie because they mistakenly believed she had called the captivity of Israeli Sgt. Gilad Schalit a “war crime.” Schalit, 24, is an IsraeliFrench dual national. France has repeatedly called for his release since militants linked to Gaza’s ruling Hamas group seized him in a cross-border raid in June 2006. The demonstrators were lying in wait Friday on the only road leading into Gaza from Israel through the Erez Crossing when AlliotMarie’s motorcade entered. Some jumped on the vehicle and others carried posters bearing her photograph emblazoned with a red no-entry sign and the words, “Get out of Gaza.” Hamas police dispersed the protesters, but others gathered outside a United Nations office in Gaza City that was her first stop in the Palestinian territory, and later followed her to a nearby hospital, pelting her convoy with eggs. AP Television footage showed Alliot-Marie narrowly dodging a shoe thrown by a protester as she climbed into a jeep under heavy guard. The “war crime” remark had actually been made by Schalit’s father after meeting the French minister a day earlier in his campaign to win release of his son. Alliot-Marie — the highest-level French official to visit the Hamas-ruled territory since 2005 — made no public statement Thursday after meeting with the soldier’s parents in Jerusalem. But Noam Schalit said the minister had called on Hamas to let the Red Cross visit his son for the first time, and referred to his capture as a “war crime.” Palestinians linked the comments to Alliot-Marie, provoking the fury of prisoners’ families. Israel holds thousands of Palestinian prisoners in its jails, and

their fate is a hot-button issue in Palestinian society because nearly all families can count members who have served time in Israeli prisons. Hamas spokesman Sami Abu Zuhri said the statements attributed to AlliotMarie reflected a “total bias toward Israel” and ignored the thousands of Palestinians held in Israeli prisons. “They are the true prisoners of war,” he said. After the attack on her convoy, a French foreign ministry spokesman said Alliot-Marie was not the source of the comments. “She is in Gaza today precisely to mark France’s engagement in favor of the Gazan population,” ministry spokesman Bernard Valero said. France’s economic envoy to the Mideast peace process, Valerie Hoffenberg, was struck in the head in the fray and was taken to an Israeli hospital for examination. Speaking after being discharged from Barzilai Medical Center in the southern city of Ashkelon, Hoffenberg said: “There was a lot of people, a lot of violence and I was hit on the head. I don’t know exactly how it happened. ... I started to vomit so I had to get to the hospital.” The hospital’s deputy director, Dr. Ron Lobel, described the injury as “very slight.” France, a former colonial power in the Mideast and North Africa, traditionally has had strong ties with the Arab world. But French President Nicolas Sarkozy has demonstrated greater sympathy for Israel and its analysis of Mideast geopolitics than his predecessor, Jacques Chirac. At a French cultural center in Gaza, Alliot-Marie called for the establishment of a Palestinian state and security for Israel. She also called on Israel to fully lift all restrictions on people and goods coming in and out of Gaza. However, in keeping with the policy of the European Union, which considers Hamas a terrorist organization, Alliot-Marie did not meet with Hamas officials during her half-day visit. In a separate and apparently unrelated development on Friday, Osama bin Laden demanded that France withdraw its troops from Afghanistan in

Roswell Daily Record

In this Jan. 6 file photo, Keith Liotta stands next to the hull of a hand-crafted replica of the USS New Mexico, in Albuquerque.

his model in the late 1970s and worked on it sporadically for more than three decades. After suffering a debilitating stroke in 2004, work on the nearly complete model was dead in the water much to the chagrin of Whitson’s friend and former co-worker, Harry Davidson. Davidson, a walking encyclopedia on aviation history

and the driving force behind the model aircraft displays at the Albuquerque International Sunport, sought out members of Albuquerque Scale Modelers for help in completing Whitson’s project, and soon focused on Navy veteran Liotta. “Initially, I was just giving into Harry so he could quit asking me about it,” Liotta quipped. “I had no idea

what I was getting into. I was thinking I was going to get a model that someone had been working on that you could hold in your hands. I had no idea about the span of time and the history behind the build. But after meeting Cecil and seeing what he had done, I was a believer. I knew then I had to help.” Liotta has been research-

AP Photo

ing, cleaning, painting and assembling the thousands of intricate parts to complete Whitson’s model. The USS New Mexico, the first of two Navy vessels to bear the title, was launched on April 13, 1917, and commissioned May 20, 1918, one month before the signing of the T reaty of Versailles, which marked the end of World War I.

Palestinian protesters confront French FM in Gaza exchange for the release of at least seven French hostages being held by groups associated with alQaida. “The exit of your hostages out of the hands of our brothers depends on the exit of your troops from Afghanistan,” bin Laden said in an audio message broadcast by Al-Jazeera television. France has about 3,850 troops in Afghanistan as part of the NATO mission fighting the Taliban. AP Photo

RIGHT: Palestinian relatives of a prisoners jailed in Israel hold posters as they block the vehicle carrying French Foreign Minister Michele Alliot-Marie as it makes its way into Gaza Strip, on the Palestinian side of the Erez checkpoint in Beit Hanoun, Friday.

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Roswell Daily Record

Jumble

Family Circus

COMICS

Garfield

Beetle Bailey

DEAR ABBY: I have a father who’s always mean to me. He finds reasons to yell at me — for example, the trash isn’t taken out or the dishes aren’t washed. He isn’t involved in my educational life at all. When my teachers request a conference with my parents, he almost never shows up. When I graduated from elementary school and middle school, he didn’t come to either of the ceremonies. I’ll talk to my dad about these things sometimes, and he says he’s sorry and the next day he’ll buy me something to try and make it up to me. He can be really nice when he wants to be, but most of the time he’s a mean person. He is always putting me down, calling me an idiot and saying I’m worthless and a good-for-nothing son. I really want to become friends with my father, but it seems he doesn’t. What can I do? WANTS A FATHER IN SOUTH CAROLINA

DEAR WANTS A FATHER: You may not be the perfect son, but you are NOT good-fornothing, worthless or an idiot. What you have described is sad, because this may be a “parenting technique” your dad learned from his own father. I don’t know whether he’s an alcoholic, a workaholic or what other reasons there may be for his absence and his guilt. But “Father of the Year” he’s not, and if you want a male you can look up to, you will have to find Dear Heloise: How do you safely INTRODUCE A CAT AND A DOG? My daughter’s cat will be with us for a year, since my daughter is leaving for the Middle East soon (military duty). Our dog is 13 and has been around cats, but the kitty has always been an “only child.” Any suggestions you can give will be greatly appreciated. Amelia, via e-mail Amelia, give your daughter a

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

one elsewhere. Talk to your mother about this if you haven’t, and ask her to guide you. You have my sympathy. 

DEAR ABBY: My son and his girlfriend of 13 years, “Liza,” broke up, and my son has moved out of the house they bought together. They still have a lot to settle, but so far, they remain on reasonably good terms. The news of their split has left my wife and me feeling bad. We developed a bond with Liza over the years and we are unsure how to proceed from here. We feel she has become a part of our family, especially since she has no real family of her own. We would like to express our sorrow for their breakup, wish her the best in the future and, perhaps, maintain friendly contact. We do not want to upset our son by doing this. Please advise me on how we should proceed. What is the proper approach for parents and other family members in this situation?

HINTS

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

hug from me. Here are some hints from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE IN OTTAWA DEAR CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE:

You’re asking the wrong person. The person you should discuss this with is your son. While it is understandable that you feel Liza is a member of the family, the truth is she isn’t in the literal sense. The extent to which you keep her in your lives may depend upon the circumstances of the breakup. While the extended family may wish to maintain relationships with her on an individual basis, whether your son would be comfortable having her present during family holidays is yet to be determined.  DEAR ABBY: I am 17. My 15-year-old sister and I know each other’s thoughts and feelings almost as well as our own. Unfortunately, we also know when the other’s funny bone is “tickly” — and it starts a giggling fit. When we start, we can’t stop. We get these fits at the most inappropriate times. We are at our wit’s end. Can you help? GIGGLE GIRLS IN LANCASTER, PA. DEAR GIGGLE GIRLS: Yes. When you know something is funny, but it is inappropriate to start giggling, the two of you should not make eye contact. That will solve your problem.

Animals and our files: * First, be very patient. The cat WON’T be in a hurry to meet the dog; it may take a cat several weeks (if ever) to bond. * It is best to have the dog restrained by a leash or harness for first meetings. The dog may try to bound after the cat. When your dog obeys you, reward him with praise and a treat. * Try not to yell, scold or fuss at the dog. Keeping the mood cheerful will help everyone. * Don’t leave the house unless you keep the animals separate until you are sure they will get along. * Be sure to give the cat attention, when wanted, and let the dog know he is welcome, too. You may have to keep them separate if it does not work out well. Hope these hints make for a smooth adjustment for all. Heloise 

Hagar the Horrible

Blondie

Zits

Snuffy Smith

Dilbert

Dear Readers: Carol Mosley of Springfield, Mo., sent a photo of her white, tan and black cat, Caspurr, sitting way up on top of his scratching post to avoid the snow! To see Caspurr and other Pet Pals, visit www.Heloise.com and click on “Pets.” Heloise  Dear Heloise: One of our family pets is a ferret. One day, our daughter thought that the ferret looked cold and asked for a cloth diaper to place in the ferret’s bed. From that point on, we have always given our ferret a cloth diaper to use as a blanket. Our ferret is always found curled up under her “blanket” when not playing! L.D. in San Antonio

How resourceful! Having had ferrets as pets, I know they do like to curl up under things. Heloise  Hi, Heloise: My playful kittens have a way of knocking the receiver off my thin-style extension phone in the bedroom. Sometimes it is several hours before I discover it. So, I finally came up with the solution. I pull a tube sock over the phone. No more interruptions in phone service, and it’s easy to pull off to use the phone! Betty in Parkersburg, W.Va.

The Wizard of Id

For Better or For Worse

Saturday, January 22, 2011

A9


A10 Saturday, January 22, 2011

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Clear to partly cloudy

Partly sunny and breezy

Sunday

Partly sunny

Monday

Tuesday

Partly sunny

Bright sunshine

Wednesday

Mostly sunny and breezy

Thursday

Bright sunshine

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Friday

Bright sunshine

High 69°

Low 29°

59°/20°

55°/20°

55°/25°

58°/24°

59°/26°

59°/28°

NNW at 3-6 mph POP: 0%

VAR at 2-4 mph POP: 0%

S at 4-8 mph POP: 0%

S at 3-6 mph POP: 0%

SW at 7-14 mph POP: 0%

N at 10-20 mph POP: 0%

NNE at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

SSW at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 5 p.m. Friday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 65°/18° Normal high/low ............... 56°/25° Record high ............... 80° in 1967 Record low ................... 0° in 1966 Humidity at noon ................... 12%

Farmington 46/19

Clayton 54/20

Raton 55/15

Precipitation 24 hours ending 5 p.m. Fri. .. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date ......................... Normal year to date .............

0.00” 0.00” 0.29” 0.00” 0.29”

Santa Fe 50/21

Gallup 50/13

Tucumcari 61/27

Albuquerque 55/26

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 62/22

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading 28 0-50

51-100

Good

Moderate

Source: EPA

101-150

Ruidoso 58/31

151+

Unhealthy Unhealthy sensitive

T or C 60/30

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Sun. The Moon Today Sun. Last

Jan 26

Rise 7:00 a.m. 6:59 a.m. Rise 8:57 p.m. 10:05 p.m. New

Feb 2

First

Feb 11

Set 5:20 p.m. 5:21 p.m. Set 8:39 a.m. 9:14 a.m. Full

Feb 18

Alamogordo 62/26

Silver City 60/31

ROSWELL 69/29 Carlsbad 69/38

Hobbs 66/30

Las Cruces 63/35

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2011

Regional Cities Today Sun. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

62/26/pc 55/26/pc 42/9/pc 71/40/pc 69/38/pc 40/10/pc 54/20/pc 49/22/pc 62/22/pc 63/27/s 54/25/pc 46/19/pc 50/13/s 66/30/s 63/35/s 57/14/pc 44/18/pc 58/23/pc 63/32/s 61/25/pc 49/13/pc 55/15/pc 38/7/pc 69/29/pc 58/31/pc 50/21/pc 60/31/s 60/30/s 61/27/pc 50/22/pc

51/18/s 45/22/pc 35/6/sn 62/27/pc 60/24/pc 36/-1/sn 44/19/pc 39/2/s 49/21/pc 57/18/s 44/21/pc 40/17/pc 42/9/s 57/19/pc 53/24/s 39/18/pc 38/9/pc 51/24/s 59/25/pc 53/21/pc 42/9/s 46/14/pc 32/2/sn 59/20/pc 44/27/pc 42/16/pc 53/24/s 50/23/s 52/20/pc 44/14/pc

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Sun.

Today

Sun.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

25/12/sn 46/27/pc 28/14/s 22/11/s 42/23/pc 17/2/sn 18/11/sn 56/36/s 52/19/c 19/8/sn 64/35/s 81/67/s 60/39/s 25/10/sn 29/15/pc 67/42/s 73/50/s 61/27/s

23/22/sn 51/35/s 30/12/pc 18/0/pc 49/29/s 19/10/c 17/8/pc 55/27/c 45/21/pc 14/8/pc 55/24/s 81/68/s 61/42/sh 23/13/c 21/10/sn 60/39/s 77/50/s 51/23/pc

73/48/c 61/30/s 1/-17/c 53/33/s 20/16/s 22/3/sn 60/37/pc 23/13/s 69/46/s 15/10/c 46/32/pc 37/20/pc 26/11/pc 44/23/sn 65/50/s 47/37/pc 71/38/s 27/17/pc

70/56/s 53/27/pc 8/5/c 61/48/pc 25/5/pc 13/10/sn 62/41/s 27/7/pc 67/42/s 18/3/pc 49/34/pc 45/26/pc 22/18/sn 38/23/s 69/48/pc 49/38/pc 66/37/s 29/17/pc

U.S. Extremes

Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 84°................... Tamiami, Fla. Low: -46° International Falls, Minn.

High: 68°..........................Carlsbad Low: 6°........................... Red River

National Cities Seattle 47/37

Minneapolis 1/-17

Billings 43/19

New York 20/16 Chicago 17/2

San Francisco 63/44

Detroit 19/8

Kansas City 29/15

Denver 52/19

Washington 27/17

Los Angeles 73/50

Atlanta 46/27 El Paso 64/35

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Houston 60/39

Miami 73/48

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

Keith Olbermann gives abrupt goodbye to MSNBC show

NEW YORK (AP) — Keith Olber mann, MSNBC’s most successful and controversial personality for his outspoken liberal prime-time program, gave an abrupt goodbye to viewers and said Friday was his last show. It was not immediately known if he was quitting or fired. Olber mann did not address the question, and MSNBC said only that they and Olbermann had ended their contract. He signed a four-year contract two years ago. “MSNBC thanks Keith for his integral role in MSNBC’s success and we wish him well in his future endeavors,” the network said in a statement. A spokesman said Phil Grif fin, MSNBC’s president, would not comment on Olber mann’s exit. Spokesman Jeremy Gaines would say only that the acquisition of NBC Universal by Comcast, which received regulatory approval this week, had

nothing to do with the decision. Olber mann was suspended without pay from the network for two days in November for donating to three Democratic candidates, which violated NBC News’ policy on political donations. Olber mann complained that he was being punished for mistakenly violating an inconsistently applied rule that he had known nothing about. The host apologized to fans — but not to the network. essentially MSNBC molded the network in Olber mann’s image. His program is MSNBC’s toprated, gaining in viewers after his evolution from a humorous look at the day’s headline into a combatively political show in the latter days of the Bush administration. MSNBC decided that point-of-view programming was the way to go, and hired Rachel Maddow and Lawrence O’Donnell — both occa-

sional subs for Olbermann — to fill out its prime-time lineup. His exit was so sudden that MSNBC didn’t have time to change its ads; a “Lean Forward” promotion for the network featuring Olbermann aired within a half-hour of his final goodbye. Olbermann, before leaving the show with a final signature toss of his script toward the camera, thanked his audience for sticking with him and read a James Thurber poem. “This may be the only television program where the host was much more in awe of the audience than vice versa,” he said. He thanked a series of people, including the late Tim Russert, but pointedly not Griffin or NBC News President Steve Capus. “There were many occasions, particularly in the last 2 1/2 years, where all that surrounded the show — but never the show itself — was just too much

for me,” said Olbermann, whose father died recently. “But your support and loyalty and, if I may use the word, insistence, ultimately require that I keep going. My gratitude to you is boundless.” He said he was grateful to the network that he was given time to sign off, noting that when he left ESPN in the 1990s, he was given 30 seconds — cut in half at the last minute to get in tennis results. But Olber mann was known for a mercurial personality behind the scenes and he was almost fired last year for the political donations. He quit a prime-time show on MSNBC in the late 1990s, complaining that management was making him report too much on President Bill Clinton’s impeachment scandal. He was particularly critical of Fox News Channel and his direct competitor, Bill O’Reilly, frequently naming him his “Worst

Person in the World” in a segment popular with his fans. Bosses at NBC had discussed trying to keep the tone of the vitriol down. Olbermann came in to work after the shooting of Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, airing a special comment in which he promised to tone down inflammatory rhetoric and challenged others to do the same. MSNBC announced that O’Donnell, who had frequently filled in for Olbermann before starting his own 10 p.m. show, will take over Olber mann’s time slot starting Monday. “The Ed Show,” with Ed

Schultz, will move to 10 p.m. Cenk Uygur of the Web show “The Young Turks” will fill Schultz’s vacated 6 p.m. time slot. Olbermann had signed a new four -year contract with MSNBC two years ago. It’s unclear what his plans are now. He could give a boost to struggling CNN’s primetime lineup, but Olbermann would mean CNN would make an abrupt shift in its nonpartisan policy. It was not immediately known how quickly Olbermann could switch to another job if he wanted to; such contract buyouts typically include noncompete clauses.

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Saturday, January 22, 2011

LOCAL SCHEDULE SATURDAY JANUARY 22 HIGH SCHOOL BOYS BASKETBALL 3:30 p.m. • Capitan at NMMI 5 p.m. • Fort Sumner at Dexter 7 p.m. • Goddard at Clovis • Ruidoso at Roswell HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS BASKETBALL 2:30 p.m. • Goddard at Deming 3:30 p.m. • Fort Sumner at Dexter 4 p.m. • Roswell vs. Rio Rancho, at Clovis Tournament HIGH SCHOOL WRESTLING 8 a.m. • Goddard & Roswell at Warrior Classic, at Ruidoso

LOCAL BRIEFS NOLL EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION IS JAN. 25 & 29

The Noon Optimist Little League early-bird registration will be held on Jan. 25 and 29 at center court of the Roswell Mall. The registration on Jan. 25 is from 6-8 p.m. and the registration on Jan. 29 is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The cost is $45 per child. For more information, call 420-8455.

• More briefs on B2

NATIONAL BRIEFS WANNSTEDT HIRED BY BILLS

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — A person familiar with negotiations has told The Associated Press that Dave Wannstedt has agreed to a multiyear deal to become the Buffalo Bills assistant head coach. The person said the deal was reached Friday, and spoke on the condition of anonymity because it had not yet been announced by the Bills. Wannstedt spent the past six years coaching the University of Pittsburgh, where he was forced to resign last month after a 75 campaign. Wannstedt is a defensive specialist and will help oversee a defense that struggled last season.

SPORTS Roswell Daily Record

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Venus Williams had played 251 Grand Slam matches and never once been forced to retire because of injury. It took all of four minutes for that streak to end. The seven-time major winner spent more than 48 hours agonizing over whether she’d be ready for the third round of the Australian Open. She decided to go ahead, hoping enough adrenalin would kick in to allow her to play through the pain. Williams was ailing after her second-round victory, her ability to move severely restricted. Waiting for her in the third round was 30th-seeded Andrea Petkovic. Williams took the court on a cool Friday night at Rod Laver Arena “just hoping for some magic.” The match was over almost before it began.

Williams won just one of the seven points she played before she bent over in pain, clutching her right side. She knew she had to stop. “A lot of times when you play ... you get this adrenalin that blocks pain,” she said. “But I just didn’t get enough of that today. Obviously, I just couldn’t play. I couldn’t move. It was too painful.” The lunge to her right side on the last point aggravated a muscle in her hip that she hurt Wednesday night against Sandra Zahlavova. Her thigh was heavily bandaged when she walked on the court Friday. “The last 48 hours I did as much pain management and recovery that I could. I just hit some balls ... just kind of standing still,” she said. “Just kind of warm-

SPOTLIGHT ON SPORTS 1920 — The New York Yankees announce they will be the first team to wear uniform numbers, according to the player’s position in batting order. 1962 — Bob Feller and Jackie Robinson are elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. Robinson, who had the distinction of becoming the first black to play in the Major League, is also the first to enter the hall. 2006 — Kobe Bryant scores a staggering 81 points — the second-highest total in NBA history — and the Los Angeles Lakers beat the Toronto Raptors 122-104.

ON THIS DAY IN...

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AP Photo

Prep roundup: Coyotes down Santa Fe Indian RECORD STAFF REPORTS

CLOVIS — Shanice Steenholdt scored 27 points and Marika Trujillo buried four 3-pointers for Roswell as the Lady Coyotes captured a 56-45 win over the No. 1 team in 3A, Santa Fe Indian School, on Friday at Rock Staubus Gymnasium. The Coyotes jumped ahead 18-13 after one and led for the rest of the game. Santa Fe Indian cut Roswell’s lead down to three in third quarter, but the Coyotes rattled off a run that put them up by 14 and all but secured the win. “(Santa Fe Indian) got real physical with us and a couple of their kids got into foul trouble,” said Coyote coach Joe Carpenter. “They’re a quality 3A team. In the fourth quar-

See VENUS, Page B2

Venus Williams, right, leaves Rod Laver Arena after retiring in her third-round match with 30thseeded Andrea Petkovic.

ter, I think they just wore out physically.” Steenholdt’s 27-point performance was a season high for the Houston Baptist University recruit. “Other people started going and they had to respect it,” said Carpenter about Steenholdt’s performance. “When they had to respect the other people, it got Shanice freed up a little more. “We were very pleased with her effort.” The win comes just three days after Roswell dropped its second game of the year to Hobbs at the Coyote Den. “We needed to win this game to get our confidence back up,” Carpenter said. “We got shook up a little bit with the Hobbs game. We proba-

bly needed (the loss to Hobbs) and you hate to say that as a coach, but it shook us. “We learned by it and had a couple of good practices and built on it.” Steenholdt’s 27 was a game high for the Coyotes (15-2). Trujillo added 12 on her four treys and Diana Carrillo had nine, including six in the first half.

Jal 66, Hagerman 38 HAGERMAN — The Bobcats dropped their 11th game of the season on Friday, falling to Jal at home to fall to 7-11 on the year. Jal jumped out to an 18-8 lead through one and never let Hagerman back in the game. The Panthers won all four quarters, including the fourth, 19-7, to secure the

win. “They were really tall and one girl in the first quarter had 14 points out of their 18,” said Hagerman coach Casey Crandall. “We’d do a good job of forcing them into a bad shot, but we couldn’t get around them. “The girls played hard. I was extremely happy with the effort.” Shantell Aguilar had 11 points to lead Hagerman. Jessica Rodriguez added 10.

Boys basketball

Roswell 76, Chaparral 44 Roswell ran out to a 24-14 lead after one and never looked back en route to a 32-point victory over Chaparral in a rematch of last year’s

NFL Playoffs: Four teams vying for two spots

See PREPS, Page B2

History: Steelers belong, Jets trying to prove they do

BROWNS HIRE JAURON AS DC

CLEVELAND (AP) — Former NFL head coach Dick Jauron is the new defensive coordinator for the Cleveland Browns. The 60-year-old Jauron is the first hire for Browns coach Pat Shurmur’s staff. Jauron played and coached with Shurmur’s uncle, Fritz, in Green Bay. Jauron spent last season as Philadelphia’s secondary coach. The wellrespected Jauron has previously been a coordinator and was a head coach in Buffalo and Chicago, posting a 60-82 record. The Eagles’ secondary had 23 interceptions, third best in the NFC last season, under Jauron.

B

Venus out in 3rd round Down Under Section

AP Photo

Steelers running back Rashard Mendenhall hauls in a pass during a team practice, Friday.

PITTSBURGH (AP) — History tells us the Pittsburgh Steelers belong. The New York Jets? Not so much. The 2010 season and playoffs, however, have written their own version of history, with a common theme: Anything can happen. It already has to the Jets, who never had won in the Steel City before edging the Steelers 22-17 in December. They also have humbled Peyton Manning and Tom Brady in the playoffs — who does that in consecutive weeks? In a season when both conference title games feature No. 2 seeds and against No. 6s, it’s foolish to discount the Jets in Sunday night’s AFC championship. A franchise that validated the AFL’s talents by winning the Super Bowl in 1969 has not been back since. The Jets played for the conference title in 1982, 1998 and last year. They hadn’t even won postseason games in consecutive years until doing so last season and this. “It’s been a long time for our fans and our franchise,” said defensive end Shaun Ellis, a first-round pick in 2000 and the current player with the longest Jets career. “So for us to be able to get to that point —

Vets relishing another shot at reaching Super Bowl

GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) — To be clear, nobody’s kicking them out the door just yet. Veterans such as Green Bay Packers wide receiver Donald Driver, cornerback Charles Woodson, left tackle Chad Clifton and Chicago Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher will start Sunday’s NFC championship game as cornerstone players for their teams. They believe they have good years left. Still, any player in his 30s without a Super Bowl ring doesn’t have to be told that such opportunities are hard to come by. While a rivalry game with a trip to the Super Bowl at stake doesn’t really need any extra juice, it’s even more urgent for veterans who might never get another shot this good. “I’ve been once, and it was an incredible experience,” Woodson said of the Super Bowl. “It’s been a long time ago, though, now. The thing is, you never know when you’ll get back. You never know if you’ll get there. You never know if you’ll win one. But to have the opportunity, and again, to be one of the final teams trying to get to the Super Bowl, it means a lot.” The 34-year-old Woodson played for the

Oakland Raiders when they were beaten by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the January 2003 Super Bowl. Urlacher and the Bears lost a Super Bowl to Indianapolis in February 2007. Even at age 32, he made it clear this week that he doesn’t think this will be his last shot. “No,” Urlacher said. “I don’t see us getting any worse next year. I think we should get better. You don’t want to say this is your last shot and I’m not saying we should lose. We want to win this game, but I am not in any way thinking this is our last shot. I think we’re a talented football team. We’ll just get better every year.” Even Bears linebacker Lance Briggs, who recently turned 30, was asked if his window might be closing. “I’m 30, I’m not dead,” Briggs said. “I don’t see it that way. I don’t know how many years I’ll get to play, or all of us on the team will get to play, but we’re going to enjoy it. Obviously it’s not easy to get to the Super Bowl so I think that, more than anything else, it’s just not easy. So it’s hard-fought. We haven’t been there in See VETS, Page B2

and not just get there, but get there and win it —would be huge for us. “It’s time.” Naturally, the Steelers say otherwise. Their time for AFC championship games has been frequent: this is No. 15 for Pittsburgh, with a 7-7 split thus far. As for Super Bowls, no franchise owns more than Pittsburgh’s six Lombardi Trophies. The Steelers have won it twice in the last six years, after the 2005 and 2008 seasons. They’re 4-point favorites, and part of the oddsmakers’ belief in them has to stem from their experience at this level. “We have one standard,” coach Mike Tomlin said. “That standard is winning.” Hines Ward has lived up to that standard for 13 seasons, easily the most as a Steeler on the current roster. He has been one of the franchise’s greatest postseason performers and was MVP of the 2006 Super Bowl. He understands fully what has bred success in Pittsburgh, and will continue to do so after he is long gone. “People try to compare this team to the See HISTORY, Page B2

AP Photo

Bears linebacker and Lovington alumnus Brian Urlacher works during a team practice, Friday.


B2 Saturday, January 22, 2011 Venus

Continued from Page B1

ing up standing still and trying to give my best for the match. “I’ve never had to retire from a Grand Slam, especially after working so hard to pull out the match the other day. ... It’s super disappointing because this is just not how I envisioned my Australian Open being.” Things are looking far better for defending champion Roger Federer. The second-seeded Swiss beat Xavier Malisse 6-3, 6-3, 61, a vast improvement on his five-set second-round win over Gilles Simon. Top-seeded Rafael Nadal plays 18-year -old Australian wild card Bernard Tomic on Saturday night. The Spaniard is trying to

Preps

Continued from Page B1

become the first man since Rod Laver in 1969 to hold all four major titles at once. Nadal made a quarterfinal exit in Australia last year, then won the French Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open. No. 8 Andy Roddick overcame a slow start before powering to victory with 32 aces, stopping Robin Haase 2-6, 7-6 (2), 6-2, 6-2. No. 6 Tomas Berdych, No. 9 Fernando Verdasco and No. 19 Stanislas Wawrinka advanced. Wawrinka defeated No. 12 Gael Monfils 7-6 (4), 6-2, 6-3 and will meet Roddick in the next round. No. 3 Novak Djokovic, the 2008 Australian Open champion, was leading Viktor Troicki 6-2 when his Serbian Davis Cup teammate retired because of a stomach muscle strain.

first-round state tournament matchup at the Coyote Den, Friday. “The third quarter was the difference maker,” said Coyote coach Britt Cooper. “We just came out and put them away. It was a good win and now we just get ready for (tonight against Ruidoso).” Deyton DeLaCerda led Roswell (12-3) with 27 points, while Mal-

High School

Friday’s Scores By The Associated Press Boys Basketball Cliff 87, Cobre 36 Clovis Christian 70, Melrose 58 Del Norte 55, Albuquerque Academy 50 Eunice 66, Cloudcroft 63 Gallup 66, Belen 44 Hagerman 83, Jal 48 Menaul 79, Evangel Christian 54 Mesilla Valley Christian 47, Texico 41 Monte del Sol 48, McCurdy 47 Mora 77, Questa 48 Portales 69, NMMI 20 Quemado 73, Mountainair 42 Rio Grande 73, Moriarty 56 Roswell 76, Chaparral 44 Santa Teresa 52, Artesia 50 St. Pius 54, Atrisco 45 Valencia 72, Miyamura 34 Valley 72, Albuquerque High 54 Volcano Vista 70, La Cueva 51 West Mesa 52, Highland 48 POSTPONEMENTS Mesa Vista vs. Pecos, ppd. Girls Basketball Bloomfield 52, Farmington 50 Cibola 52, Moriarty 22 Clovis 57, Rio Rancho 24 Del Norte 45, Albuquerque Academy 44 Dulce 54, Escalante 51 Espanola Valley 53, Capital 37 Grady 49, Roswell JV 43 Hobbs 55, Artesia 30 Hope Christian 58, Sandia Prep 31 Jal 66, Hagerman 38

LOCAL BRIEFS RACE FOR BACKPACKS TO BE HELD FEB. 5

The Boy Scouts Conquistador Council, in conjunction with the Roswell Parks & Recreation Department and the Roswell Runners Club, will hold the inaugural Race for Backpacks on Feb. 5 at Cahoon Park. The event will feature a 5K walk and a 5K run. The entry fee to participate is a school backpack, which will be donated to Chaves County CASA. Race day registration begins at 7:30 a.m. and the race will begin at 9 a.m. For more information, call the Parks & Recreation Department at 624-6720 or Matt Gardner at 623-2627.

ENMU-R TO HOST SNOWBALL HOOPS TOURNAMENT

The Eastern New Mexico University - Roswell Intramurals department will host the annual 3-on-3 Snowball basketball tournament on Saturday, Feb. 5, at the PE Center on the ENMU-R campus. The fee is $60 per team and each team may have four players. The deadline to enter is Feb. 3. For more information, call 6247338.

RTA VALENTINE TOURNEY SET FOR FEB. 5

The Roswell Tennis Association will hold its annual Valentine Tournament on Feb. 5 at 9 a.m. at the Cahoon Park tennis courts. The competition will be a mixed doubles adult tournament with a round-robin format in two levels. The tournament is open to RTA members and the entry fee is $20 per player. The deadline to enter is Feb. 1. A Valentine dinner for all tournament participants will also be held on the night of the tournament at 6 p.m. at Peppers Grill & Bar. For more information, or to enter the tournament, call Faye Stokes at 622-3889.

History

Continued from Page B1

Super Bowl teams we played on, but every team is different,” Ward said. “We’ve got a lot of young guys and a lot of battle-tested guys who have been there. “What this team has that impresses me is the resiliency. To do it the way we have done it, not having Ben (Roethlisberger) for four games (while he was suspended), missing Troy (Polamalu) for two or three games, our offensive line getting hurt. It’s been remarkable to see the guys fill in.” It’s the Steelers way. “It starts up top,” Ward said of ownership, the front office and coaching staff. “The 53-man roster we pick in training camp, we always say it will come down to the

colm Wiggins added 17 and Jonathan Ervin had 12. “I was pretty pleased,” Cooper said. “We played a little up and down, but it’s starting to come around I think.”

Hagerman 83, Jal 48 HAGERMAN — The Bobcats extended their win streak to 19 games on Friday by handily defeating Jal at home. Jal hung around for the first quarter, but Hagerman put the game out of reach in the second

Basketball

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L San Antonio . . . . . . . .37 6 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 15 New Orleans . . . . . . .28 16 Memphis . . . . . . . . . .20 23 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .20 24 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Oklahoma City . . . . . .27 15 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 16 Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .24 17 Portland . . . . . . . . . . .24 20 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .10 33 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . .31 13 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . .20 21 Golden State . . . . . . .18 23 L.A. Clippers . . . . . . .16 26 Sacramento . . . . . . . .9 31

Thursday’s Games Charlotte 100, Philadelphia 97 Chicago 82, Dallas 77 Portland 108, L.A. Clippers 93 Friday’s Games

guys we took back then. And it does.” The Jets aren’t likely to be swayed by the Steelers’ resume of success. They weren’t intimidated by facing the Colts in Indy or the Patriots in Foxborough — not even with the fresh memory of being pummeled 45-3 at Gillette Stadium five weeks earlier. If anything, the Jets should be brimming with confidence that they can match up well with Pittsburgh, get key contributions from their playmakers, and ride off with what truly would be their biggest victory since Joe Namath came through on his guarantee. “We’ve talked about it quite a bit,” said LaDainian Tomlinson, who was with San Diego for the 2007 AFC title game but barely played because of a left knee injury.

quarter by outscoring the Panthers 24-8 to take a 43-22 lead into the break. “We just came out a little sluggish at first, but in the second, we started picking up the intensity and the press started working,” said Bobcat coach Anthony Mestas. “The kids started picking up more confidence offensively as the defense started to work. “I was definitely happy. I was very pleased with the way the team played.”

Wrestling

GB — 11 16 20 1⁄2 1 21 ⁄2

GB — 2 2 1⁄2 12 17

GB — 11 11 1⁄2 14 20 1⁄2

Pct GB .860 — .643 9 1⁄2 .636 9 1⁄2 .465 17 .455 17 1⁄2

Pct GB .643 — 1⁄2 .628 .585 2 1⁄2 .545 4 .233 17 1⁄2

Pct GB .705 — .488 9 1⁄2 1 .439 11 ⁄2 .381 14 .225 20

TV SPORTSWATCH

New Jersey 89, Detroit 74 Orlando 112, Toronto 72 Phoenix 109, Washington 91 New Orleans 100, Atlanta 59 Boston 110, Utah 86 Milwaukee 102, Cleveland 88 Memphis 115, Houston 110 San Antonio 101, New York 92 Sacramento at Golden State, 8:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Denver, 8:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Atlanta at Charlotte, 5 p.m. Dallas at New Jersey, 5 p.m. Boston at Washington, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Detroit, 5:30 p.m. Toronto at Miami, 5:30 p.m. Utah at Philadelphia, 5:30 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 6 p.m. San Antonio at New Orleans, 6 p.m. New York at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Orlando at Houston, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at Milwaukee, 6:30 p.m. Indiana at Portland, 8 p.m. Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m. Sunday’s Game Indiana at Denver, 6 p.m.

Football

NFL Playoff Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 8 Seattle 41, New Orleans 36 N.Y. Jets 17, Indianapolis 16 Sunday, Jan. 9 Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7 Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16

Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 15 Pittsburgh 31, Baltimore 24 Green Bay 48, Atlanta 21 Sunday, Jan. 16 Chicago 35, Seattle 24 N.Y. Jets 28, New England 21

Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 23 Green Bay at Chicago, 1 p.m. (FOX) N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m. (CBS)

Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 30 At Honolulu AFC vs. NFC, 5 p.m. (FOX)

Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 6 At Arlington, Texas AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 4:30

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Saturday, Jan. 22 BOWLING 12:30 p.m. ABC — PBA, Tournament of Champions, at Las Vegas BOXING 8 p.m. FSN — Super featherweights, Diego Magdaleno (17-0-0) vs. Marcos Jimenez, (18-2-0), at Las Vegas COLLEGE FOOTBALL 2 p.m. NFL — East-West Shrine Game, at Orlando, Fla. EXTREME SPORTS 2:30 p.m. NBC — Winter Dew Tour, at Killington, Vt. GOLF 6:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Abu Dhabi Championship, third round, at Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (same-day tape) 2 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Bob Hope Classic, fourth round, at La Quinta, Calif. 5:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Mitsubishi Electric Championship, second round, at Ka’upulehuKona, Hawaii MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 10 a.m. CBS — National coverage, Ohio St. at Illinois ESPN — Villanova at Syracuse 11 a.m. ESPN2 — Ark.-Little Rock at Fla. Atlantic Noon

Continued from Page B1

years. It’s precious.” Until now, Driver and Clifton haven’t been closer than the Packers’ January 2008 NFC championship loss to New York Giants. “It’s always been a dream of mine to get to the Super Bowl,” Driver said. “It’s right in front of me right now, and I think everybody in this locker room believes that it’s right in front of us, and we’ve believed it since March.” Packers coach Mike McCarthy said he sees a unique sense of urgency from Driver and his other veterans. “It’s really Donald all the way down, particularly the players that were here in ’07,” McCarthy said. “You really have an understand-

RUIDOSO — Seven Goddard wrestlers are in the championship semifinals and three others are in the consolation semifinals after the first day of the Warrior Classic on Friday.

Golf

p.m. (FOX)

Bob Hope Classic Scores By The Associated Press Friday At p-PGA West, Arnold Palmer Private Course (6,950 yards) At n-PGA West, Jack Nicklaus Private Course (6,924 yards) At l-La Quinta Country Club (7,060 yards) At s-SilverRock Resort, Palmer Course (7,403 yards) All courses are par 72 La Quinta, Calif. Purse: $5 million Third Round Jhonattan Vegas . . . .64p-67n-67s — 198 Gary Woodland . . . . .65s-69l-64n — 198 Greg Chalmers . . . . . .67n-67p-65l — 199 Martin Laird . . . . . . . .68l-68s-64p — 200 Chris Couch . . . . . . . .67l-65s-69p — 201 Keegan Bradley . . . . .66n-67p-68l — 201 Jeff Overton . . . . . . . .69n-65p-67l — 201 Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . . .69l-68s-64p — 201 Charles Howell III . . . .66n-66p-70l — 202 Jerry Kelly . . . . . . . . .67l-68s-67p — 202 Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . .66s-70l-67n — 203 Alex Cejka . . . . . . . . .69p-67n-67s — 203 Boo Weekley . . . . . . .65p-66n-72s — 203 Ryan Palmer . . . . . . .67l-71s-65p — 203 Jason Gore . . . . . . . .70n-68p-65l — 203 Daniel Summerhays . .69s-66l-68n — 203 Kris Blanks . . . . . . . . .66l-71s-67p — 204 Harrison Frazar . . . . .68s-68l-68n — 204 David Duval . . . . . . . .68s-67l-69n — 204 Justin Leonard . . . . . .69s-71l-64n — 204 Michael Bradley . . . . .68p-69n-67s — 204 Kyle Stanley . . . . . . . .65l-71s-68p — 204 D.J. Trahan . . . . . . . . .71l-68s-65p — 204 Dean Wilson . . . . . . . .69l-68s-67p — 204 Brian Gay . . . . . . . . . .69l-69s-66p — 204 Brian Davis . . . . . . . .67p-66n-71s — 204 Kevin Na . . . . . . . . . . .69l-67s-68p — 204 Webb Simpson . . . . . .68s-69l-67n — 204 Matt Jones . . . . . . . . .67p-71n-66s — 204 Steve Elkington . . . . .68p-69n-67s — 204 Ryuji Imada . . . . . . . .66p-71n-68s — 205 Steve Marino . . . . . . .68l-71s-66p — 205 Kevin Sutherland . . . .68n-69p-68l — 205 Stephen Ames . . . . . .69p-68n-68s — 205 Fredrik Jacobson . . . .65n-70p-70l — 205 Bill Lunde . . . . . . . . . .74p-64n-67s — 205 Peter Tomasulo . . . . .66s-68l-71n — 205 Tim Petrovic . . . . . . . .67p-69n-69s — 205 Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . . .69s-68l-68n — 205 Kevin Chapell . . . . . . .68s-69l-68n — 205 Cameron Tringale . . .67p-67n-71s — 205 Kevin Streelman . . . . .69n-67p-70l — 206 Kevin Stadler . . . . . . .72s-68l-66n — 206 D.A. Points . . . . . . . . .67n-70p-69l — 206

CBS — Regional coverage, Stanford at UCLA or Tennessee at Connecticut ESPN — Kansas St. at Texas A&M 1 p.m. ESPN2 — Temple at Xavier 2 p.m. CBS — National coverage, Texas at Kansas ESPN — Duke at Wake Forest FSN — Arizona St. at Washington VERSUS — New Mexico at UNLV 3 p.m. ESPN2 — Creighton at Missouri St. 4 p.m. ESPN — Kentucky at South Carolina FSN — Oregon at Oregon St. 5 p.m. ESPN2 — Memphis at UAB 7 p.m. ESPN — Michigan St. at Purdue NBA BASKETBALL 6 p.m. WGN — Cleveland at Chicago SOCCER 5:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Liverpool at Wolverhampton TENNIS 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, early round, at Melbourne, Australia 1 a.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, early round, at Melbourne, Australia WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 10 a.m. FSN — Texas A&M at Iowa St. Noon FSN — Nebraska at Kansas St.

Roswell Daily Record

Vets

Isaac Bejarano led Hagerman (19-0) with 33 points and five steals. Michael Garcia added yet another double-double with 19 points and 16 boards. Edward Montoya had 19 points and seven assists.

SCOREBOARD

Kirtland Central 48, Piedra Vista 44 Los Alamos 47, Santa Fe 32 Melrose 80, Clovis Christian 13 Menaul 55, Evangel Christian 23 Pojoaque 56, St. Michael’s 54 Rehoboth 63, Ramah 33 Roswell 56, Santa Fe Indian 45 Santa Fe Prep 47, NMSD 28 St. Pius 57, Atrisco 35 Tatum 71, Loving 34 Zuni 64, Crownpoint 62

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .33 9 .786 New York . . . . . . . . . .22 20 .524 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .17 25 .405 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .13 30 .302 New Jersey . . . . . . . .12 31 .279 Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 13 .698 Orlando . . . . . . . . . . .28 15 .651 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .28 16 .636 Charlotte . . . . . . . . . .17 24 .415 Washington . . . . . . . .12 29 .293 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .29 14 .674 Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . .16 23 .410 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .16 24 .400 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .15 28 .349 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .8 34 .190

SPORTS

ing now of how hard it is to get to this game. I know my first year in the NFL in 1993, we went to the AFC championship game, and you kind of think, ‘Boy, this is great. This is not that big of a deal.’ But it’s such a hard game to get to.” Packers defensive lineman R yan Pickett was a member of the St. Louis Rams when they lost in the Super Bowl to New England in February 2002. He said younger players have asked him and Woodson about their experiences. “We just tell them that it’s the greatest experience that you could ever have,” Pickett said. “It’s so hard to get to where we are right now. We want to keep them focused, but it’s so hard to get to where we are right now. So we have to take advantage of the opportunity.”

Chandler Lessard (112-pound weight class), Ray Anaya (119), Joe Her nandez (145), David Anaya (171), Luis Terrazas (189), Brandon Youngblood (215) and J.T. Menchaca (heavyweight) all advanced to the championship semifinals for the Rockets. Rylin Franco (130), Nolan Bailey (140) and Tony Ramirez (152) are in the consolation semifinals. Roswell is also participating in the event, but no results were available at press time.

Scott McCarron . . . . .70s-70l-66n — Pat Perez . . . . . . . . . .69s-69l-68n — Shaun Micheel . . . . . .66s-72l-68n — Vaughn Taylor . . . . . .71n-66p-69l — David Mathis . . . . . . .70p-70n-66s — Paul Goydos . . . . . . . .68l-72s-67p — Kenny Perry . . . . . . . .67p-69n-71s — Colt Knost . . . . . . . . . .70s-73l-64n — William McGirt . . . . . .70n-70p-67l — Joe Ogilvie . . . . . . . . .67s-74l-66n — Mark Calcavecchia . . .69s-69l-69n — Jeff Klauk . . . . . . . . . .69p-68n-70s — Jesper Parnevik . . . . .73l-70s-65p — Derek Lamely . . . . . .63p-73n-72s — Scott Stallings . . . . . .71n-68p-69l — Michael Putnam . . . . .69n-68p-71l — Zack Miller . . . . . . . . .74l-66s-68p — Blake Adams . . . . . . .70l-69s-69p — Chad Collins . . . . . . .66p-72n-70s — Brandt Jobe . . . . . . . .68s-69l-71n — Steve Flesch . . . . . . .68p-69n-71s — Lee Janzen . . . . . . . .68n-73p-68l — David Toms . . . . . . . .70l-73s-66p — Matt Bettencourt . . . . .69s-74l-66n — Jason Dufner . . . . . . .68s-72l-69n — J.J. Henry . . . . . . . . . .64n-74p-71l — Chris Baryla . . . . . . . .69p-70n-70s — Brendon de Jonge . . .68s-71l-70n — Brandt Snedeker . . . .70p-70n-69s — Hunter Haas . . . . . . . .67n-69p-73l — Marc Turnesa . . . . . . .70l-71s-68p — Bubba Watson . . . . . .66s-71l-72n — Nathan Green . . . . . .68n-74p-67l — Bobby Gates . . . . . . .69n-69p-71l — Paul Stankowski . . . . .69s-70l-71n — John Rollins . . . . . . . .74l-71s-65p — Fabian Gomez . . . . . .67l-77s-66p — Jarrod Lyle . . . . . . . . .70n-72p-68l — Bryce Molder . . . . . . .68l-76s-67p — Bo Van Pelt . . . . . . . .69s-72l-70n — Stewart Cink . . . . . . . .72n-70p-69l — John Senden . . . . . . .66s-68l-77n — Chad Campbell . . . . .69n-72p-70l — Nate Smith . . . . . . . . .72p-69n-70s — Chris Stroud . . . . . . . .70l-68s-73p — Tag Ridings . . . . . . . .73l-71s-67p — Josh Teater . . . . . . . .72p-71n-69s — Nick O’Hern . . . . . . . .68p-74n-70s — Heath Slocum . . . . . .69n-74p-69l — Billy Mayfair . . . . . . . .70l-73s-69p — Roland Thatcher . . . . .70l-71s-71p — Brendan Steele . . . . .67l-71s-74p — Chris DiMarco . . . . . .69n-74p-69l — Mark Wilson . . . . . . . .69l-73s-70p — Spencer Levin . . . . . .69n-74p-70l — Chez Reavie . . . . . . . .73l-67s-73p — Charley Hoffman . . . .68s-72l-73n — Rory Sabbatini . . . . . .70n-66p-77l — Jeff Maggert . . . . . . . .67l-71s-75p — Matt McQuillan . . . . . .65p-76n-73s — Alex Prugh . . . . . . . . .73p-75n-66s — Ben Martin . . . . . . . . .69p-72n-73s — Rod Pampling . . . . . .71p-72n-72s — Kevin Kisner . . . . . . . .72l-71s-72p — J.P. Hayes . . . . . . . . .71n-71p-73l — Troy Matteson . . . . . .72p-74n-69s — Sam Saunders . . . . . .73s-72l-71n — Bio Kim . . . . . . . . . . .71p-76n-69s — Cameron Beckman . .74p-72n-70s — Brad Faxon . . . . . . . . .77s-69l-71n — Martin Piller . . . . . . . .71l-75s-71p — Joe Durant . . . . . . . . .70s-73l-74n — Steve Jones . . . . . . . .74n-74p-69l — Mike Weir . . . . . . . . . .72p-75n-71s — Tommy Gainey . . . . . .70n-74p-74l — Mark Brooks . . . . . . . .69n-76p-75l — Billy Horschel . . . . . . .77s-75l-68n — Garrett Willis . . . . . . .70p-73n-78s — Chris Starkjohann . . .73n-76p-73l —

206 206 206 206 206 207 207 207 207 207 207 207 208 208 208 208 208 208 208 208 208 209 209 209 209 209 209 209 209 209 209 209 209 209 210 210 210 210 211 211 211 211 211 211 211 211 212 212 212 212 212 212 212 212 213 213 213 213 213 214 214 214 215 215 215 215 216 216 216 217 217 217 217 218 218 220 220 221 222

Rich Beem . . . . . . . . .72n-70p-80l — Jamie Lovemark . . . . .72s-75l-76n — Ricky Barnes . . . . . . .65s-70l-WD — Scott Verplank . . . . . .71n-72p-WD —

222 223 WD WD

Transactions

Friday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Extended their player development contract with Portland (EL) for two years through the 2014 season. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Exercised their 2012 contract option on manager Ozzie Guillen. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Agreed to terms with RHP Jonah Bayliss, OF Chris Carter, RHP Dirk Hayhurst, INF Daniel Mayora and INF Ray Olmedo on minor league contracts. National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Agreed to terms with OF Jeremy Reed on a minor league contract. NEW YORK METS — Agreed to terms with LHP Tim Byrdak and RHP Blaine Boyer on minor league contracts. Named Tim Teufel manager, Ricky Bones pitching coach and Mike Easler hitting coach of Buffalo (IL). ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Agreed to terms with INF Nick Punto on a one-year contract. FOOTBALL National Football League CAROLINA PANTHERS — Named Mike Shula quarterbacks coach. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Named Dick Jauron defensive coordinator. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Promoted receivers coach Todd Monken to quarterbacks coach, qualify control coach Johnny Cox to receivers coach and offensive staff assistant Matt Griffin to quality control coach. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Named Ejiro Evero quality control coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL — Fined Los Angeles president and general manager Dean Lombardi $50,000 for comments made following Thursday night’s game against Phoenix. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Assigned C Kyle Wilson to Springfield (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled G Jordan Pearce from Grand Rapids (AHL). Assigned G Joey MacDonald to Grand Rapids. SAN JOSE SHARKS — Called up G J.P. Anderson from Toronto St. Michael’s (OHL) on an emergency basis. WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Assigned D Brian Fahey to Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE DEFIANCE — Named Cary Ossiff assistant track and field coach. EAST CAROLINA — Named Jeff Connors assistant athletic director for strength and conditioning. GEORGIA — Named Josh Brooks assistant athletic director for internal operations and Brad Hutcherson director of football operations. LAKE ERIE — Named Jamie Shadd women’s soccer coach. MISSISSIPPI — Named Keith Burns defensive backs coach. WASHINGTON — Signed football coach Steve Sarkisian to a five-year contract.


NATION/OBITUARIES

Roswell Daily Record

OBITUARIES

It is with grateful hearts that we celebrate the life and death of Charlene Birdwell. Mom began this life’s journey on Sept. 7, 1930, the only child of Maudie and Charlie Smith, in Sweetwater, Texas; and completed it in Big Spring, Texas, on Jan. 20, 2011. While growing up, Mom moved with her parents all over Central and West Texas, and Arizona, finding whatever jobs were to be had. It was at that time that she developed her voracious love of reading. She attended Texas Tech University, where she met “Steve”. She married Harland “Steve” Birdwell in 1949, and later had two children: Cynthia and Scott. They moved from Snyder, Texas, to Lexington, Ky., in 1962, so that

Dad could pursue his studies to be an Episcopal priest. Following seminary, Mom and Dad lived in Colorado City, Texas, Big Spring, Texas, Roswell, Albuquerque, Lubbock, Texas, Abilene, Texas, and finally moved back to Big Spring for the past three and a half years. It was during these years that Mom forged her 2nd love — friendships. She is survived by her husband of 61 years, the Rev. Harland Birdwell; daughter, Cynthia Marshall and husband John, of Big Spring, Texas; son, Scott Birdwell and wife Alison, of Houston; grandchildren: Kristen Elder and husband Richard, of Alexandria, Va., Zac Marshall, of Midland and Colin, Sam and Emma Birdwell, all of Houston; one great-grandchild, Annabell Marshall, of Big Spring, Texas; one beloved dog; one equally beloved cat .... and innumerable books and friends!!!!!! Goodbye, Mom! We love you and pray nothing but peace for you. Funeral services will be conducted on Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2011 at 3 p.m. at St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Big Spring, Texas, with the Right Reverend Scott Mayer, bishop of the Diocese of Northwest

SCHENECTADY, N.Y. (AP) — More than half the nation disapproves of President Barack Obama’s policies to reduce stubbornly high unemployment, a new Associated Press-GfK poll said Friday as Obama refocused his job-creation efforts on a business-friendly vision emphasizing innovation and exports to other countries. Marking the halfway point in his four-year term, the president used a visit to Schenectady, birthplace of the General Electric Co., to declare that his job is “putting our economy into overdrive” and to announce a restructured presidential advisory board stressing increased employment and greater business opportunities abroad. “America’s home to inventors and dreamers and builders and creators,” Obama told workers at G.E.’s 23-acre turbine and generator plant. “You guys are a model of what’s possible.” The trip came as a new AP-GfK poll showed more than half the nation disapproving the way Obama is handling the economy, 53 percent to 47 percent. That’s actually a bit more favorable than two months ago, but those who say they see economic improvement has dropped to just 35 percent from 38 percent in August and 40 percent a year ago.

Lack of hope is greatest with lower -income people and those in the Northeast and the West, signaling potential political trouble spots for Obama’s 2012 reelection campaign. Obama’s New York visit was the first of many treks during the second half of his term that the president is expected to take to put a more hopeful countenance on the economy amid high unemployment — now at 9.4 percent. Yet, while the White House was eager to highlight economic successes such as General Electric, Obama took pains not to oversell an optimistic view to a skeptical public. “It’s a great thing that the economy is growing, but it’s not growing fast enough yet to make up for the damage that was done by the recession,” he said. Overall, 53 percent of Americans approve of how Obama is governing, and that includes a narrow majority of all-important independent voters. The job approval numbers represent a slight uptick from November and come after Obama negotiated with Republicans on a tax package and sought to build bridges with the business community. Displaying stepped-up outreach, Obama on Friday named GE’s chief executive, Jeffrey Immelt, as the head of a Council on Jobs and

Competitiveness. The panel replaces Obama’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board, which had been chaired by former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker. Obama announced late Thursday that Volcker, as expected, was ending his tenure on the panel. Immelt has been an advocate of alternative forms of energy, and the GE facility

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The sole U.S. manufacturer of a key lethal injection drug said Friday it is ending production because of deathpenalty opposition overseas — a move that could delay executions across the United States. Over the past several months, a growing shortage of the drug, sodium thiopental, has forced some states to put executions on hold. And the problem is likely to get worse with the announcement from Hospira Inc. of Lake Forest, Ill. Hospira said it decided in recent months to switch manufacturing from its North Carolina plant to a more modern Hospira factory in Liscate, Italy. But Italian authorities demanded a guarantee the drug would not be used to put inmates to death — an assurance the company said it was not willing to give. “We cannot take the risk that we will be held liable by the Italian authorities if the product is diverted for use

in capital punishment,” Hospira spokesman Dan Rosenberg said. “Exposing our employees or facilities to liability is not a risk we are prepared to take.” Italian Health Ministry officials were not immediately available for comment. All but one of the 35 states that employ lethal injection use sodium thiopental. In nearly every case, they use it as part of a three-drug combination that sedates and paralyzes the inmate and stops the heart. There are other, similar sedatives on the market, but substituting one drug for another would require new laws or lengthy administrative processes in some states, and could also lead to lawsuits from death row. Similarly, switching to another manufacturer could invite lawsuits from inmates demanding proof that the drug will not cause pain in violation of their constitutional protection against cruel and unusual punishment. Hospira is the only

sodium thiopental-maker approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Because of what Hospira described as problems with its raw-material suppliers, sodium thiopental is already scarce in the U.S., and any batches Hospira made before it suspended manufacturing more than a year ago are set to expire this year. In Texas, the nation’s busiest death penalty state, the Department of Criminal Justice said Friday it is exploring the use of another anesthetic. The state has four executions scheduled between now and July but has enough sodium thiopental to carry out only two February executions, spokesman Jason Clark said. Ohio has enough to carry out a Feb. 17 execution but will not comment on its supply after that, or on Hospira’s announcement, said Ohio prisons spokeswoman JoEllen Smith.

Charlene Birdwell

Texas, the Reverend Barbara Kirk-Norris, rector of St. Mary's Episcopal Church and the Reverend Bill Wright, retired priest and close friend, officiating. In lieu of flowers, Mom and family request that all donations go to either your local humane society or to St. Mary’s Episcopal Church Trust Fund, P.O. Box 2949, Big Spring, Texas 79721-2949. Arrangements are under the direction of Nalley-Pickle & Welch Funeral Home & Crematory of Big Spring. Online condolences can be made at: www.npwelch.com

away Jan. 21, 2011, in A further Roswell. announcement will be made once arrangements have been finalized.

Arrangements are pending for Jimmy Cogdill, 82, of Roswell, at Anderson Bethany Funeral Home and Crematory. He passed away Friday, Jan. 21, 2011.

Raymond “Pares” Gonzales

Jimmy Cogdill

Donald Patterson

Arrangements are pending for Donald Patterson, 73, of Roswell at Anderson Bethany Funeral Home and Crematory. He passed away Thursday, January 20, 2011.

Imogene Coats

Services are pending at Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory for Imogene Coats, 85, who passed

A rosary, followed by a memorial Mass is scheduled for 4:30 p.m., Monday, Jan. 24, 2011, at St. John’s Catholic Church, for Raymond Gonzales, 68, who passed away on Jan. 19, 2011, at Roswell Regional Hospital. Fr. Juan Antonio Gutierrez O.F.M. will officiate. Cremation has taken place according to his wishes. Raymond was born April 20, 1942, in Roswell, to Chon and Anita Lopez Gonzales. Both parents preceded him in death. He is also preceded in death by his

Saturday, January 22, 2011

son, Adolph Casillas; daughters: Sonia Casillas, Maria L. Gonzales and Josephina Gonzales; and brother, Chon Gonzales. He is survived by the love of his life and forever soul mate, Diana Casillas; sons: Luis Casillas, of Raton, Raymond J. Gonzales Jr., of Alabama, Brian C. Gonzales, R yan L. Gonzales, Johnny C. Gonzales and Lupito Gonzales; daughters: Lucy Campos and Dolores Canchola, of Austin, Texas, and Maria F. Gonzales; brother, Lupe Franco; sisters: Minda Garza, Gloria Martiniz, Chrystina Montoya, Fina Green and Connie Barrela; grandchildren: Gerald, Mari Chrystina, Daniel, Diana, T ino Destiny, Ar mando, Breanna, Jr., Beams, Savannah, Matti, Jeremey, Anthony, Roy Marissa, Xavier, Angel, Raven and Destiny; and two greatgrandchildren: Amanda and Graiden. Raymond was a lifelong resident of Roswell and was of the Catholic faith. His favorite thing to do was to cruise in his car and spend time in the country. Raymond was a real bargain hunter, he really enjoyed going to thrift stores to find a good deal. He loved to be on the road; he was a truck driver for years. Raymond

B3

would make a trip to Austin every two weeks to see his daughter. The family would like to give special thanks to Dr. El Sayah and his staff, the ICU staff at Roswell Regional Hospital, Dr. Karimian and Dolores for all their special care. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at www.ballardfuneralhome.com . The Broken Chain We little knew that morning that God was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly, in death we do the same. It broke our hearts to lose you, you did not go alone; for part of us went with you, the day God called you home. You left us peaceful memories, your love is still our guide; and though we cannot see you, you are always at our side. Our family chain is broken, and nothing seems the same; but as God calls us one by one, the Chain will link again.

Obama goal: ’Putting the economy into overdrive’

AP Photo

President Barack Obama, accompanied by GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt, left, and Plant Manager Kevin Sharkey, gestures while touring a GE plant in Schenectady, N.Y., Friday.

Obama visited, the company’s largest energy plant, is the future site of GE’s advanced battery manufacturing program. New battery technology has become something of an Obama pet project as a symbol of innovation, clean energy and job creation The trip followed on the heels of a state visit by Chinese President Hu Jintao

that featured announcement of new trade deals worth about $45 billion and vows to ease restrictions on U.S. investments in China. “We want to open up their markets so we have two-way trade, not just one-way trade,” the president said. As Obama made his pitch Friday, the top-ranking African-American in Congress called on the president

to make a more concerted effort to help hard-hit minority communities. Rep. James Clyburn, D-S.C., said the recession had left minorities with extraordinarily high unemployment rates, and he called on Obama to direct at least 10 percent of any recovery efforts into communities that have had 20 percent or higher poverty rates for 30 years.

US company stops making key death penalty drug

AP Photo

In this Nov. 2005 file photo, the death chamber at the Southern Ohio Corrections Facility in Lucasville, Ohio, is shown. The sole U.S. manufacturer of a key lethal injection drug said Friday, that it is ending production because of death-penalty opposition overseas — a move that could delay executions across the United States. The current shortage of the drug in the U.S. has delayed or disrupted executions in Arizona, California, Kentucky, Ohio and Oklahoma.


CHURCHDEVOTIONAL&DIRECTORY

B4 Saturday, January 22, 2011

CHURCH PAGE

Roswell Daily Record

This Devotional & Directory is made possible by those businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services.

SMILE

In the universal language of facial expressions, a smile almost invariably expresses goodwill. A smile tells strangers that we are friendly and confirms to friends and family that they are in our good graces or that we are there to help. It costs nothing and yet confers benefits far beyond the small effort required to turn a frown into a smile. Smiles are contagious, spreading happiness like a beneficial virus. There is even evidence that smiles make their wearers happier, perhaps by supplying the brain with feedback from the face. How it works doesn’t matter; what does matter is that smiling makes us feel happy and makes those around us feel happy too. Call to mind all that you have to be happy about and let yourself smile accordingly. Even better, smile at someone and spread the good feeling. And, if you don’t have much to smile about at the moment, take heart and know that your problems are temporary and that God loves you. The light of the eyes rejoices the heart, and good news refreshes the bones. R.S.V. Proverbs 15:30 ANGLICAN

ST. FRANCIS ANGELICAN CHURCH (@ Church of God Seventh Day) 18th & Kansas, 420-3573, Bob Jordan Min.; W.S. 10:00 a.m., Wed. 6:00 pm ST. STEPHEN’S 1500 S. Main (Chapel @ 1st Christian Church); 9109706; Fr. Bob Tally, Min; W.S. 9:00 a.m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD, 1224 W. Country Club, 622-2171, Melvin Suttle, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 6:00 pm., Wed. 7:00 pm. MIDWAY ASSEMBLY OF GOD 63 Yakima Rd., 3475309, S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m

TEMPLO BETAL ASSEMBLY OF GOD 221 E. Jefferson, 623-6852, Paul & Toni Herrera, Mins. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Tues. & Wed. 6 p.m.

TEMPLO LA HERMOSA FIRST SPANISH ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1305 South Garden, 625-0885, Oscar Guerrero, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Tues. & Wed. 7 p.m.

BAPTIST

BERRENDO BAPTIST 400 W. Berrendo Rd., 6221372, Troy Grant, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

BETHEL BAPTIST N. Garden & East Country Club Rd., 622-8182 Richard Grisham, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:40 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. BYKOTA BAPTIST 2106 E. Pine Lodge Rd., 622-3399 Don Johnson, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m. CALVARY BAPTIST 1009 W. Alameda,Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST 500 N. Pennsylvania, 623-2640; Matt Brooks, Min., S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:00 a.m. FIRST BAPTIST – HAGERMAN 211 N. Cambridge, Hagerman, S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST OF DEXTER 101 W. 3rd St., Dexter, 734-5673, Jackie Thomas, Min., S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m. GALILEE BAPTIST 513 E. Matthews St., 662-8534, W.W. Green, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.

HIGHLAND BAPTIST 2001 S. Lea, 622-9980, Dr. Ed Meyers, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

IGLESIA BAUTISTA EL CALVARIO 600 E. Tilden, 623-8135, Roberto Mancillas, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. MIDWAY BAPTIST 134 Yakima Rd., Leo Pennington, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 7 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

MORNING STAR BAPTIST 1513 Mulberry Ave., W.F. Wagoner, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. Wed. 7:30 p.m. MOUNTAIN VIEW BAPTIST 206 E. Charleston, 622-1019, Richard Smith, Interim Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 6:00 p.m.

MT. GILEAD MISSIONARY BAPTIST 700 E. Summit, 623-0292 Pastor Allen. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:00a.m. PRIMERA BAPTIST 417 East Wildy, 623-5420 S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. PRIMERA IGLESIA BAUTISTA OF DEXTER 388 South Lincoln. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

ROSWELL BAPTIST TEMPLE700 E. Berrendo, Bill Whitehead, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 am. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. SOUTH MANOR BAPTIST 1905 S. Main, 622-6072, Butch Neal, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed 6 p.m. TABERNACLE BAPTIST 115 W. 11th, 622-7912, S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

THE FRIENDSHIP MISSIONARY BAPTIST 1220 Johnson St., 623-6484, Michael K. Shelton, Sr., Min.S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed.7 p.m. TRINIDAD COMMUNITY BAPTIST 1707 W. Juniper. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

VICTORY BAPTIST 1601 W. McGaffey, 622-0114, Dan Holt, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. WARE TABERNACLE MISSIONARY BAPTIST 900 E. Deming, 622-0546, Richard Gorham, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 & 11 a.m., Wed. 6 p.m.

WASHINGTON AVE. BAPTIST 1400 North Washington Ave., 840-1144, Randy Reeves, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION CATHOLIC 2808 N. Kentucky, 6229895, Bill McCann, Min. Masses: Sat. Mass 9:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.; Sun. Mass 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.; Mon-Fri Mass 12:10 p.m.; Thurs Mass 8 a.m. IMMACULATE CONCEPTION PARISH Dexter, Sat. Mass 6 p.m., Sun. Mass 11 a.m.

OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE Lake Arthur, Sun. Mass 8 a.m. ST. CATHERINE’S Hagerman, Sun. Mass 9:30 a.m.

ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC 506 S. Lincoln, 622-3531, Juan Antonio Gutierrez, Min.; Sat. English Mass 5:30 p.m., Spanish Mass 7 p.m.; Sun. English Mass 10 a.m., Spanish Mass 8 a.m. & Noon.

ST. PETER CATHOLIC 805 S. Main, 622-5092, Charlie Martinez, Min.; Sat. Mass 6 p.m. Sun. Mass 8 a..m. & 11 a.m.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST 101 S. Lea, S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m., Wed. 7:30 p.m

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST 114 E. Hobbs, W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 5 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST 1212 N. Richardson, S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 10:50 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST 1500 S. Elm, 622-4675; John Early Cannon, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 6 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST 1512 South Main St., 6224426 S.S. 10:30 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m., Wed. 6:30 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST 700 W. Country Club Road, 622-1350, Doug Austin, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & 5 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST West Alameda & Balsam, 622-5562 W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., 2nd Sun. 1:30 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST 200 S. Union, Suite C, 3472628; S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. IGLESIA DE CRISTO 801 N. Washington, Horoaio de Servicios: Domingo 9:30 & 11:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., Miercoles 6 p.m.

SPANISH CHURCH OF CHRIST 3501 W. College, 622-3618 S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m.

Prosthetics

Diabetic Shoes

New Mexico Prosthetic-Orthotic Center, Inc. Adam Dutchover, CPO, FAAOP Certified Orthodtist and Prosthetist 2515 N. Kentucky • 575-623-0344

SPANISH CHURCH OF CHRISTMulberry & Buena Vista, Joe Villa, Min. W.S. 9:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 6 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD

NEW COVENANT FELLOWSHIP CHURCH OF GOD 2200 N. Garden, 6241958,S.S. 9:30 a.m. W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST IMMANUEL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 1000 N. Union, 622-6352, Louis Accardi, Min., S.S. 10:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:30 a.m.; Wed. 6 p.m.

ST. PAUL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 321 E. McGaffey, 623-1568, Joe L. Dawson, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m., Tues. & Fri. 8 p.m.

DISCIPLES OF

CHRIST

DISCIPLES OF CHRIST Christian Fellowship, 1413 S. Union, 627-0506, Mark E. Rowland, Int. Min.; W.S. 1:30 pm.

EPISCOPAL

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL 505 N. Penn. 622-1353 Father Frank Wilson Min. Principal Service. 9 a.m. 11:00 a.m.; in church Wed. 7 a.m. in the prayer garden. http://standrews roswell.org

JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES Kingdom Halls 205 W. Gayle

Mesa Park Cong. Sun. 10 am; Tues. 7 p.m. Buena Visa Cong. (Spanish) Sun. 1:30 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

1718 N. Atkinson

Mountain View Cong. Sun. 1 p.m.; Wed. 7:30 p.m. Spring River Cong. Sun. 10 a.m.; Tues 7:30 p.m.

1421 S. Garden

Rio Pecos Cong. Sun. 10 am; Thurs. 7 p.m.

Dexter- 411 S. Lincoln Dexter Cong. Sun. 10 a.m.; Thurs. 7 p.m.

Lic. #365901 575-623-2011

Reading Plumbing Heating & Air Conditioning, Inc. 217 E. McGaffey


CHURCH PAGE

Roswell Daily Record

Recipe idea: Corn- and red pepper-stuffed flank steak pinwheels

Start to finish: 45 minutes Servings: 4 For the marinade — 2 tablespoons lime juice; 2 tablespoons tequila; 1 teaspoon salt; 1 teaspoon ground black pepper; 1 clove garlic, chopped; 1 1/2pounds flank steak. For the steak — 2 tablespoons extravirgin olive oil, divided; 1 small red bell pepper, diced; 1 small red onion, diced; 1 bunch scallions, trimmed and finely sliced; 1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced; 1 clove garlic, minced; 1/2 cup fresh breadcrumbs; 1/2 cup frozen corn kernels; 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro; 1 teaspoon ground cumin; 1/2 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste; Ground black pepper, to taste.

In a large bowl, mix together the lime juice, tequila, salt, black pepper and garlic. Set aside. On a work surface, cover the flank steak with plastic wrap. Pound it with a skillet or rolling pin to flatten it into an even thickness, about 1/2 inch. Add steak to marinade, turn to coat, cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare the filling. In a large skillet over medium-high, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil. Add red pepper, onion, scallions and jalapeno. Saute until peppers begin to soften, about 3 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, until lightly colored. Remove the skillet from the heat and stir in the breadcrumbs, corn, cilantro,

Saturday, January 22, 2011

cumin and salt. Let cool completely. Heat the oven to 375 F. Remove steak from marinade. Arrange flat on work surface. Spread cooled pepper mixture evenly over the steak. Starting with a wide edge, roll the steak and stuffing up together. Use 7 lengths of kitchen twine to tie roll around center at even intervals. In a large oven-safe skillet, heat the remaining tablespoon of oil over medium-high. Add the steak roll and sear until browned on all sides, about 1 to 2 minutes per side. Transfer the pan to the oven and roast until it reaches 130 F at the center. Let stand for 10 minutes before slicing into 8 rounds and serving.

ROSWELL DAILY RECORD —

B5

CALL 622-7710

.J E X B Z  'B NJ M Z  $ I V S D I

CHURCHDEVOTIONAL&DIRECTORY

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1B T U P S  %B O O Z  &   4P O T

This Devotional & Directory is made possible by those businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services. JEWISH

CONGREGATIONAL B’NAI ISRAEL 712 N. Washington, 622-7295, W.S. 2nd & 4th Fri. 7 p.m.

LUTHERAN

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN 1405 N. Sycamore at College, 622-2853Daniel Praeuner, Min., S.S. 10:20 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m.

REDEEMER LUTHERAN 2525 N. Spruce Ave., 6277157; W.S. 10 a.m.

ST. MARK EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 2911 N. Main St., 623-0519, Bill Bruggeman, Min.; S.S. 9:15 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m.

METHODIST

ALDERSGATE UNITED METHODIST 915 W 19th St, 625-2855, Jim Bignell, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m.

DEXTER UNITED METHODIST 112 W. 3rd St., Dexter, 734-6529, Jim Bignell, Min. S.S. 9:30a.m.; W.S. 11:00 a.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST 200 N. Pennsylvania, 6221881 Gorton Smith, Sr., Min.; S.S.9:15 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m.

IGLESIA METHODISTA UNIDA 213 E. Albuquerque; Raul Dominguez, Min.; W.S. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 6:30 p.m.

TRINITY UNITED METHODIST 1413 S. Union, 622-0119, Ruth Fowler, Min.; S.S. 10 a.m.; WS. 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.

MORMON

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 2201 West Country Club Rd. First Ward: Hank Malcom, Bishop 623-2777; W.S. 9 a.m.; S.S. 10:10 a.m.

Second Ward: Ignacio Luevano, Bishop, 623-4492 W.S. 11 a.m.; S.S. 12:10 p.m. 3ra Rama (en EspaĂąol): Presidente McClellan; W.S. 2:15 p.m.; S.S. 12:15 p.m.

NAZARENE

CENTRAL CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 901 E. Country Club, 420-2907 Randy Elftman, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 501 N. Sycamore, 624-2614; Mike Couch, Int. Min.; S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m.

THE NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1019 S Lea; 623-0201; Hector Torres, Min.; S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Spanish Service 12:30 p.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY OF THE FAITH IN JESUS CHRIST 1721 N. Maryland, 624-2728, Ismael Chavarria, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Thurs. 7 p.m. APOSTOLIC BIBLE 2529 West Alameda, 625-8779, Rod Foster, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

APOSTOLIC FAMILY WORSHIP CENTER 1103 N Union; Joel Martinez, Min., 627-2258; W.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL 602 S. Mississippi, 347-2514, J.E. Shirley, Min. W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. GOD’S MESSENGER 3303 W Alameda; 625-0190; R. Dixon, Sr., Min.; S.S. 8:45 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. Noon HOUSE OF PRAYER 412 E. Matthews, 746-6699, Mike Valverde, Min. W.S. 5 p.m. Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.

IGLESIA DE DIOS 317 East Wildy, 627-6596, Catarino Cedillo, Min. Escuela Dominical 9:45 a.m., Servicio de Domingo por la tarde 5 p.m. Martes: Oracion y Estudio Biblico 7 p.m., Jueves: Servicio Ninos, Jovenes, Damas, Varones 7 p.m. LIFE MINISTRIES FOURSQUARE CHURCH 409 W. 16th, 622-3383; Wayne & Janice Snow, Mins.; W.S. 10:30 am,Wed. 7:00 p.m. NEW APOSTOLIC 813 N. Richardson, Ste. A, W.S. 10 a.m.

NEW LIFE APOSTOLIC 1800 W. Bland, 622-2989, Emnauel Norfor, Min.; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN DEXTER 201 West Fifth St., 734-5797, Stephen C. Deutsch, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN HAGERMAN 310 N. Cambridge, 743-5797 Stephen C. Deutsch, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 9:30a.m.; Mon. 4:30 p.m.

IGLESIA PRESBITERIANA HISPANA 300 North Missouri, 622-0756, Adam Soliz, Min. W.S. 11 a.m.

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN 2801 W. 4th St., 622-2801; Dr. Harry A. Cole, Int. Min..; S.S. 10:45 a.m.; W.S. 9:30 a.m.

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST

BEULAH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST 106 S. Michigan Ave., 243-6203; Alex Horton, Min. Sat. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISLA DEL 7 DIA 500 S. Cedar, 9106527, Noel Dominguez, Min. Sat. S.S. 11 a.m.; W.S. 9:30 a.m. Wed. 7 p.m. ROSWELL ENGLISH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Jaffa & S. Union, 623-4636, Ken Davis,Min. Sat. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 am. Wed. 7 p.m.

OTHER

ALBUQUERQUE/ ROSWELL FAMILY 501 Cagua S.E., 266-4468, Fritz Schneider, Min.

GRACE COMMUNITY 935 W. Mescalero, 623-5438 Rick Hale,Min.; W.S. 9 a.m. & 10:45 a.m.

GREATER FAITH WORSHIP CENTER 2600 S. Union Ave., 317-7629; Larry D. Mills, Min.; S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m.

H.I.S. HOUSE 300 W. 3rd, Dexter, 734-6873 Ron & Jeri Fuller, Mins. W.S. 10 a.m. Wed.6 p.m.

NARROW WAY 2200 N. Sycamore, 623-2511, Lyman Graham, Min. W.S. 2 p.m. ORTHODOX BAHA’I FAITH obfusa@rt66.com 622-5729 ROSWELL CHRISTIAN OUTREACH MINISTRIES 412 E. Mathews; Joe Diaz, Min. W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.

ROSWELL PRAYER CENTER 622-4111/317-3867; Sat. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Weekdays 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., 6 p..m. to 9 p.m. SALVATION ARMY 612 W. College, 622-8700 Beau & Mandy Perez, Mins. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m.; B.S. Thurs. 6:30 p.m.

THE CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY 2322 N. Sherman; Lawrence S. Sanchez, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

CHRIST’S CHURCH 2200 N. Sycamore, 623-4110 S.S. 8:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:00 am.

WASHINGTON CHAPEL CHRISTIAN 110 S. Michigan St., 623-3511 Rev. Abukusumo, Min.; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

CALVARY CHAPEL OF ROSWELL 2901 W. 4th, 623-8072, W.S. 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

CHRISTIAN COWBOY FELLOWSHIP 3103 W. Alameda John Sturza, 6250255, 2nd and last Friday

PRESBYTERIAN

THE UNITED CHURCH OF ROSWELL 123 W. 3rd. St. Service 10 am Bob Maples, Pastor

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 400 W. 3rd St., 622-4910, Hugh Burroughs, Min. S.S. 8:30 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. 24-Hr Daily Inspiration Hotline 623-5439

GATEWAY 1900 Sycamore Ave., 623-8670, Rick Rapp, Min. W.S. 10:30 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

BEOD MOED HEBRAIC BIBLE CENTER 928 W. McGaffey, 840-6120, Sat. Hebraic Dance 1 p.m.; Torah Study 2 p.m.; Wed. Pray & Dance Practice 6 p.m.

TRINITY APOSTOLIC FAITH 611 W. 17th, 6241910, Frank & Pearl Moser, Min. W.S. 11 a.m.

TRINITY HOUSE OF PRAISE PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD 510 S. Montana, 623-2710, Bobby Barnett, Min. W.S. 9:45 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN 1500 S. Main, 622-2392, S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD 7TH DAY 1722 N. Kansas, 6237295, Sat. W.S. 9:45 a.m.

CHURCH ON THE MOVE 901 W. Brasher Rd., 6227011, Troy Smothermon, Min. W.S. 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

THE DOOR 129 E. 3rd St. 781-0360; Gabriel Rubi, Min.; W.S. 10:30 am & 6 pm. Wed. 7 pm

WAYMAKER 202 S. Sunset, 627-9190 Mike & Twyla Knowlton, Mins.; W.S. 10 a.m.; J12 (8-12 yr. olds) 4 p.m.; Revolution Youth Service 6 p.m.; Wed. Core Home Groups 7 p.m.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST 101 S. Lea, S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m., Wed. 7:30 p.m


B6 Saturday, January 22, 2011

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg DrSCBear rs ... 16.07 +.32 DirEMBr rs ... 21.67 +.68 A-B-C DirFnBear ... 8.57 -.20 ACE Ltd 1.30e 60.51 -.20 DrxFBull s ... 30.10 +.61 AES Corp ... 12.86 -.06 DirxSCBull .11e 69.32 -1.38 AFLAC 1.20 58.11 +.63 DirxLCBear ... 8.27 -.05 AK Steel .20 14.10 -.21 Discover .08 20.47 +.13 .40f 39.74 +.57 AMR ... 7.35 -.18 Disney AT&T Inc 1.72f 28.33 +.10 DollarGen ... 29.41 -.07 Dover 1.10 56.66 -.06 AU Optron ... 9.62 -.28 AbtLab 1.76 47.92 -.04 DowChm .60 34.49 +.20 AbitibiB n ... 27.40 +.96 DrPepSnap1.00 35.18 +.16 Accenture .90f u51.04 -.10 DuPont 1.64 48.35 +.23 AMD ... 7.54 -.48 DukeEngy .98 18.16 +.11 Aetna .04 33.28 +.26 ECDang n ... 30.35 +.39 ... 23.98 +.14 Agilent ... 42.11 -.18 EMC Cp Agnico g .64f 68.38 -1.08 EOG Res .62 101.72 +.36 ... 5.15 -.10 Agrium g .11 88.04 +.42 EKodak 2.32 102.45 +2.24 AirProd 1.96 86.51 -.75 Eaton EdisonInt 1.28f 37.39 -.31 Airgas 1.16f 63.85 +.30 AirTran ... 7.48 +.01 ElPasoCp .04 u14.48 +.37 Elan ... 6.45 -.02 AlcatelLuc ... 3.23 -.01 Alcoa .12 15.79 -.19 EldorGld g .10f 15.99 -.43 AldIrish ... .81 ... EmersonEl1.38f 57.54 +.06 ... 10.93 -.82 Allstate .80 31.35 +.05 Emulex AlphaNRs ... 55.22 -2.46 EnCana g .80 32.23 +.25 ExcoRes .16 19.60 +.13 Altria 1.52 24.09 +.05 AmBev s .99e 27.08 -.20 Exelon 2.10 43.21 -.14 AMovilL .52e 58.37 -.11 ExxonMbl 1.76 u78.98 +1.23 AmAxle ... 14.77 -.07 FairchldS ... 16.24 -.02 AEagleOut .44a 14.51 -.13 FamilyDlr .72f 43.80 -.46 AEP 1.84f 36.44 -.03 FibriaCelu ... 16.27 +.24 AmExp .72 46.00 +.73 FstHorizon .04 11.79 -.20 AIG wt ... 16.00 +.23 FirstEngy 2.20 39.57 +.17 AmIntlGrp ... 43.00 -.18 FlagstB rs ... 1.57 -.04 .50 71.02 +1.12 AmTower ... 50.52 +.20 Fluor ... 17.95 +.17 AmeriBrgn .40f u36.10 +.38 FordM Amphenol .06 53.29 +.89 ForestLab ... 31.66 -.33 ForestOil ... 37.07 -.54 Anadarko .36 77.20 +.87 AnalogDev .88 38.77 -.16 FMCG 2.00a 108.40 -2.50 AnglogldA .18e 44.44 -.17 FrontierCm .75 9.18 +.02 AnnTaylr ... 21.94 -.58 Frontline 2.00e d24.93 -.68 Annaly 2.65e 17.64 +.03 G-H-I Apache .60 125.60 +1.44 ... 5.49 +.37 ArcelorMit .75 36.84 +.99 GMX Rs ArchCoal .40 31.61 -.33 GameStop ... 20.90 -.11 ArchDan .60 33.45 +.06 Gannett .16 14.66 +.11 .40 20.10 -.12 AspenIns .60 29.92 +.80 Gap AssuredG .18 17.06 -.70 GenElec .56f u19.74 +1.31 AstraZen 2.41e 48.10 +1.21 GenGrPr n ... 14.35 -.08 Avon .88 28.72 -.16 GenMarit .04m d2.98 -.19 BB&T Cp .60 28.39 +1.31 GenMills s 1.12 36.48 -.64 BHP BillLt1.74e 88.19 +.11 GenMot n ... 37.24 +.06 BP PLC ... 47.61 +.04 GM cvpfB 2.38 55.50 +.63 BakrHu .60 u58.97 +.46 GenOn En ... 4.25 +.12 BcBilVArg .55e 12.32 +.45 Genworth ... 13.61 +.30 BcoBrades .82r 19.33 -.08 Gerdau .32e 13.68 -.20 BcoSantand.78e 12.39 +.53 GlaxoSKln2.00e 37.35 +.30 BcoSBrasil .45e 12.58 +.28 GoldFLtd .16e 16.38 -.09 BkofAm .04 14.25 -.29 Goldcrp g .36 40.26 -.24 BkIrelnd 1.04e 2.41 +.04 GoldmanS 1.40 166.20 +.51 BkNYMel .36 31.95 +.32 Goodyear ... 11.58 -.17 Barclay .28e 19.33 +.03 HCP Inc 1.86 35.93 -.20 Bar iPVix rs ... 32.23 +.38 Hallibrtn .36 39.19 +.13 BarrickG .48 46.95 -.03 Hanesbrds ... 24.83 -.50 Baxter 1.24f 49.49 -1.06 HarmonyG .07e 10.97 -.12 BeazerHm ... 5.42 -.18 HartfdFn .20 27.87 +.47 ... 8.94 -.31 BerkH B ... 80.45 -.28 HltMgmt ... 8.64 -.31 BestBuy .60 35.11 -.21 HeclaM 1.80 49.20 +.11 Blackstone .40 15.96 +.63 Heinz ... 13.96 +.07 BlockHR .60 13.78 +.57 Hertz .40 78.65 -.79 Boeing 1.68 71.68 +.56 Hess BostonSci ... 7.16 -.11 HewlettP .32 47.23 +.45 BoydGm ... 11.72 +.21 HomeDp .95 36.51 +.02 BrMySq 1.32f 26.06 +.23 HonwllIntl 1.33f 54.49 -.09 BrkfldPrp .56 17.17 -.30 HostHotls .04 18.14 +.16 CB REllis ... u22.59 +.52 Huntsmn .40 16.02 +.01 CBS B .20 u20.70 +.20 IAMGld g .08f 18.84 +.31 CF Inds .40 133.30 -2.53 ICICI Bk .53e 46.01 +.69 ... 10.98 +.37 .04 40.97 +.12 ING CIGNA CMS Eng .84f u19.13 +.01 iShGold s ... 13.13 -.00 CSX 1.04f 67.64 -.10 iSAstla .82e 24.64 -.02 CVS Care .50f 35.41 +.10 iShBraz 2.53e 74.99 -.86 .50e 30.92 +.07 CablvsnNY .50 34.23 +.08 iSCan CabotO&G .12 39.09 +.78 iSh HK .45e 19.62 -.12 Calpine ... 14.25 +.05 iShJapn .14e 10.95 -.11 Cameco g .40f 38.76 +.51 iSh Kor .39e 61.11 -1.19 Cameron ... 50.28 +.08 iShMex .54e 61.81 -.30 CdnNRs gs .30 42.64 +.47 iShSing .43e 13.74 +.03 CapOne .20 u49.17 +1.92 iSTaiwn .29e 15.52 -.12 ... 26.83 -.02 CardnlHlth .78 41.30 +.85 iShSilver CarMax ... 32.44 +.54 iShChina25.63e 43.23 -.38 iSSP500 2.36e 128.85 +.28 Carnival 1.00f 46.12 +.09 Caterpillar 1.76 92.75 -.86 iShEMkts .64e 46.48 -.49 Cemex .43t 10.08 -.13 iShIndones.15e 25.00 -.35 Cemig pf 1.19e 16.43 -.56 iShB20 T 3.86e 91.52 +.72 CenterPnt .79f 15.90 -.04 iS Eafe 1.42e 59.24 +.32 CntryLink 2.90 42.16 -.28 iSR1KV 1.29e 66.21 +.27 ChesEng .30 27.80 -.01 iSR1KG .73e 58.33 -.03 Chevron 2.88 u93.78 +1.07 iShR2K .89e 77.19 -.52 Chicos .16 10.96 +.15 iShREst 1.97e 56.35 +.22 ... 71.73 +2.25 Chimera .69e 4.20 +.06 ITT Ed 1.36 54.71 +.48 ChinaUni .23e u15.67 +.28 ITW Chubb 1.48 57.42 -.63 IngerRd .28 45.62 -.04 2.60u155.50 -.30 Citigrp ... 4.89 +.09 IBM ... 8.25 -.22 CliffsNRs .56 81.66 -2.59 Intl Coal Clorox 2.20 63.74 -.23 IntlGame .24 18.28 -.04 .75f 27.91 +.46 Coach .60 53.00 -.38 IntPap CocaCE .48f 25.00 -.05 Interpublic ... 10.94 +.01 .44 23.92 ... CocaCl 1.76 62.77 -.16 Invesco Coeur ... 22.55 -.62 IronMtn .75f 24.60 +.10 ColgPal 2.12 79.00 +.54 ItauUnibH .65e 22.36 +.08 Comerica .40f 39.50 +.62 IvanhM g 1.48e 25.53 +.24 ... 34.82 -1.04 Ivanhoe rt ... 1.74 +.05 CmtyHlt CompPrdS ... 26.81 -.85 J-K-L ConAgra .92 23.47 +.01 ConocPhil 2.20 67.66 +.45 JPMorgCh .20 45.29 +.54 .28 19.84 -.81 ConsolEngy .40 50.23 -.34 Jabil ConEd 2.38 49.87 -.66 JohnJn 2.16 62.66 -.20 JohnsnCtl .64f 38.52 -.28 Corning .20 19.33 -.05 Covidien .80 47.71 -.06 JonesGrp .20 d12.44 -1.34 Cummins 1.05 105.05 -2.97 JnprNtwk ... 34.87 -.12 CurEuro .01e 135.63 +1.42 KB Home .25 14.79 -.19 Kellogg 1.62 51.95 +.27 D-E-F KeyEngy ... u12.62 -.26 DR Horton .15 12.69 -.22 Keycorp .04 8.78 +.38 DanaHldg ... 17.03 -.34 KimbClk 2.64 64.28 -.26 .72f 17.71 -.03 Danaher s .08 46.30 +.04 Kimco DeanFds ... 10.46 +.60 KingPhrm ... 14.20 +.08 Kinross g .10 16.91 -.11 Deere 1.40f 89.24 -.02 DelMnte .36 18.88 ... KnghtCap ... 13.66 -.58 Kohls ... 51.75 +.45 DeltaAir ... 11.54 -.07 1.16 31.35 +.12 DenburyR ... 18.57 -.28 Kraft .42 21.56 -.03 DeutschBk .93e 60.48 +1.60 Kroger DevonE .64 83.51 +1.18 LDK Solar ... 13.15 +.23 ... 5.76 -.10 Dillards .16 40.73 -1.23 LSI Corp Name

Name Sell Chg Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.07 +.10 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.07 +.09 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.29 +.01 GrowthI 26.23 -.04 Ultra 22.97 -.06 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.18 -.03 AMutlA p 25.69 +.06 BalA p 18.22 +.07 BondA p 12.16 +.02 CapIBA p 50.10 +.19 CapWGA p36.25 +.22 CapWA p 20.42 +.07 EupacA p 41.56 +.13 FdInvA p 37.19 +.13 GovtA p 13.85 +.03 GwthA p 30.79 -.02 HI TrA p 11.42 +.01 IncoA p 16.75 +.07 IntBdA p 13.41 +.01 IntlGrIncA p31.32 +.16 ICAA p 28.68 +.07 NEcoA p 25.89 -.05 N PerA p 28.65 +.06 NwWrldA 53.72 -.10 SmCpA p 38.82 -.02 TxExA p 11.59 +.02 WshA p 27.67 +.08 American Funds B: GrwthB t 29.87 -.02 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 29.83 +.08 IntlEqA 29.11 +.08 IntEqII I r 12.30 +.01 Artisan Funds: 22.10 +.07 Intl IntlVal r 27.31 +.19

MidCap 33.64 -.08 MidCapVal20.53 ... Baron Funds: Growth 50.76 -.20 SmallCap 23.90 +.03 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.71 +.02 DivMu 14.15 ... TxMgdIntl 15.92 +.05 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 17.75 +.06 GlAlA r 19.56 +.03 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.26 +.02 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.78 +.06 GlbAlloc r 19.64 +.02 CGM Funds: Focus n 34.59 -.09 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 53.79 -.14 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 28.86 -.06 DivEqInc 10.23 +.03 DivrBd 5.00 ... Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 29.80 -.07 AcornIntZ 40.71 +.09 ValRestr 50.39 -.02 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.35 +.06 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n11.49 +.04 USCorEq1 n11.15+.01 USCorEq2 n11.11+.01 DWS Invest S: MgdMuni S 8.47 +.02 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.82 +.11 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 35.18 +.11

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: chg.

-.70 -.78 -.05 -.10 -.05 -.02 -.35 +.20

+.05 -.75 -.37 -.60 -.45 -.70 -.55

+.05 -.18 +.57 +.55 +.50 +.77 +.62 +.70 +.60 +.40 +.20 +.55

45.34 34.60 19.47 34.76 28.68 29.01 4.76 4.31 79.22 74.20 9.58 25.01 35.05

M-N-0

-.09 -.20 -.37 +.01 -.39 +.17 -.17 +.07 -.10 -.12 +.32 -.29 -.37

MBIA ... 12.51 +.18 MEMC ... 11.25 -.35 MFA Fncl .94f 8.07 +.08 MGIC ... 9.07 -.13 MGM Rsts ... 15.00 -.33 Macys .20 23.14 -.26 MagHRes ... 7.07 +.01 MarathonO1.00 42.04 +.19 MktVGold .40e 53.94 -.70 MktVRus .18e 39.25 -.20 MktVJrGld2.93e 33.91 -.66 MarIntA .35f 39.81 -.33 MarshM .84 27.60 +.28 MarshIls .04 7.13 +.01 Masco .30 13.28 -.06 MasseyEn .24 52.71 -.87 McDnlds 2.44f 75.01 -.15 McKesson .72 73.21 -.55 McMoRn ... 15.76 -.50 McAfee ... 47.68 ... MedcoHlth ... 63.93 -.21 Medtrnic .90 38.51 +.42 Merck 1.52 33.90 -.15 MetLife .74 46.21 +.70 MetroPCS ... 12.72 +.12 MitsuUFJ ... 5.35 -.12 MobileTel s ... 19.98 -.10 Molycorp n ... 42.99 -2.60 Monsanto 1.12 70.11 +.44 MonstrWw ... 21.42 -.11 Moodys .46f 28.99 -.05 MorgStan .20 30.01 +.99 Mosaic .20 73.20 +.53 MotrlaSol n ... 37.15 +.11 MotrlaMo n ... 34.88 -.17 MuellerWat .07 4.06 -.07 NRG Egy ... 20.61 +.15 NV Energy .48f 14.25 +.06 NYSE Eur 1.20 32.38 +.10 Nabors ... 22.44 +.11 NBkGreece.29e 1.82 -.03 NOilVarco .44f 67.51 -.25 NatSemi .40 14.53 +.16 NY CmtyB 1.00 18.31 +.03 NewellRub .20 17.70 -.07 NewmtM .60 55.84 +.13 Nexen g .20 25.04 +.78 NextEraEn 2.00 54.42 +.17 NiSource .92 18.61 -.01 NobleCorp .90e 37.64 +.07 NokiaCp .56e 10.78 +.30 NordicAm 1.70e d24.46 -1.18 NorflkSo 1.44 63.77 -.41 Novartis 1.99e 56.42 +.17 Nucor 1.45f 44.55 -.07 OcciPet 1.52 97.97 +1.56 OfficeDpt ... 5.60 -.31 OilSvHT 2.40e 142.81 -.73 Omncre .13 25.35 -.34

P-Q-R

PG&E Cp 1.82 46.94 -.06 PMI Grp ... 3.22 +.02 PNC .40 60.83 -.17 PPL Corp 1.40 25.83 -.17 ParkerHan1.16f 86.00 +.49 PatriotCoal ... 23.18 -.47 PeabdyE .34f 58.17 -1.14 PennWst g 1.08 u26.42 +.79 Penney .80 30.34 +.24 PepBoy .12 u14.15 +1.83 PepsiCo 1.92 65.87 -.03 Petrohawk ... 18.45 -.43 PetrbrsA 1.20e 32.81 -.24 Petrobras 1.20e 36.13 -.37 Pfizer .80f 18.36 +.12 PhilipMor 2.56 56.70 +.21 PlainsEx ... 33.16 -.10 Potash .40 164.25 +2.41 PwshDB ... 27.96 +.28 PS Agri ... u33.49 +.33 PS USDBull ... 22.49 -.19 PrideIntl ... 32.63 +.04 PrinFncl .55f 32.36 +.08 PrUShS&P ... 22.79 -.12 ProUltQQQ ... 84.94 -1.29 PrUShQQQ ... 11.10 +.16 ProUltSP .43e 49.95 +.20 ProUShL20 ... 38.98 -.53 ProUShtFn ... 14.81 -.20 ProUFin rs .07e 69.58 +.96 ProUSR2K ... 12.82 +.18 ProUSSP500 ... 18.22 -.13 ProUltCrude ... 11.68 -.04 ProUSSlv rs ... 12.10 -.03 ProctGam 1.93 u65.91 +.11 ProgsvCp 1.16e 19.64 -.33 ProLogis .45m 14.27 -.03 ProvEn g .54 8.16 +.21 Prudentl 1.15f 61.46 +.65 PSEG 1.37 32.46 +.29 PulteGrp ... 8.25 -.13 QuantaSvc ... 21.93 -.31 QntmDSS ... 3.90 -.02 QksilvRes ... 14.77 +.17 QwestCm .32 6.91 -.07 RAIT Fin .03e 2.76 +.14 Rackspace ... 31.21 +1.43 RadianGrp .01 7.86 -.03 RangeRs .16 45.62 -.23 Raytheon 1.50 52.15 -.22 RedHat ... 42.76 -.52 RegionsFn .04 7.40 +.17 ReneSola ... 10.25 -.20 RioTinto s .90e 68.20 -.05 RiteAid h ... 1.00 -.01 RockwlAut 1.40 u74.42 -1.18 RockColl .96 63.71 +.87 Rowan ... 33.49 -.02 RylCarb ... 48.22 +.74

NYVen C 33.66 +.10 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.19 +.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq n21.80 -.13 EmMktV 35.56 -.20 IntSmVa n 17.48 +.06 LargeCo 10.11 +.02 USLgVa n 20.70 +.14 US Micro n13.50 -.06 US Small n21.16 -.13 US SmVa 25.28 -.16 IntlSmCo n17.32 +.02 Fixd n 10.33 ... IntVa n 19.09 +.10 Glb5FxInc n10.88 +.01 2YGlFxd n 10.15 ... Dodge&Cox: Balanced 72.14 +.45 Income 13.26 +.03 IntlStk 36.14 +.21 Stock 111.54 +.88 Dreyfus: Aprec 38.47 +.15 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.49 +.08 NatlMunInc 8.55 +.03 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.05 ... GblMacAbR10.25 -.01 LgCapVal 18.55 +.09 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.04 +.05 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.88 ... FPACres n27.15 +.01 Fairholme 35.75 +.04 Federated Instl: KaufmnR 5.49 -.01 TotRetBd 11.12 +.01

CATTLE/HOGS

Open high low settle CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 11 107.80 109.02 107.75 107.95 Apr 11 112.67 113.85 112.57 112.67 Jun 11 112.67 113.25 112.40 112.62 Aug 11 112.85 113.50 112.70 112.97 Oct 11 115.50 116.10 115.30 115.65 Dec 11 116.05 116.60 115.90 116.30 Feb 12 116.40 116.70 116.10 116.55 Apr 12 117.00 117.00 116.50 117.00 Jun 12 113.70 114.40 113.70 114.40 Last spot N/A Est. sales 64225. Thu’s Sales: 37,925 Thu’s open int: 353242, up +4379 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jan 11 126.20 126.75 125.92 126.35 Mar 11 125.57 126.70 125.52 125.55 Apr 11 126.35 127.22 126.25 126.35 May 11 126.75 127.65 126.70 126.90 Aug 11 127.32 128.35 127.10 127.50 Sep 11 127.25 128.00 127.00 127.30 Oct 11 127.75 127.90 126.75 127.30 Nov 11 127.02 127.25 126.97 127.10 Last spot N/A Est. sales 4197. Thu’s Sales: 6,448 Thu’s open int: 53661, off -50 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 11 80.32 81.17 80.15 80.32 Apr 11 87.05 87.90 86.50 86.57 May 11 94.95 95.25 94.45 95.12 Jun 11 97.60 97.87 97.02 97.52 Jul 11 96.52 96.72 95.80 96.47 Aug 11 95.80 96.02 95.15 95.92 Oct 11 85.80 85.95 85.00 85.87 Dec 11 81.80 81.97 81.05 81.90 Feb 12 82.35 82.85 82.35 82.85 Apr 12 83.50 84.00 83.50 83.90 May 12 86.60 86.70 86.60 86.70 Jun 12 89.15 89.30 89.00 89.30 Last spot N/A

LVSands ... LeggMason .24f LennarA .16 LillyEli 1.96 Limited .60a LincNat .20f LizClaib ... LloydBkg ... LockhdM 3.00f Lorillard 4.50 LaPac ... Lowes .44 LyonBas A ...

FINANCIAL S-T-U

SAIC ... 16.48 +.02 SLM Cp ... 14.08 -.05 SpdrDJIA 2.92eu118.46 +.49 SpdrGold ... 131.03 -.17 SP Mid 1.51e 165.98 -.56 S&P500ETF2.37e128.37+.29 SpdrHome .33e 17.66 -.20 SpdrKbwBk.13e 26.61 +.43 SpdrLehHY4.68e 40.22 +.07 SpdrKbw RB.35e 26.71 +.06 SpdrRetl .49e 46.65 -.31 SpdrOGEx .20e 53.30 -.07 SpdrMetM .38e 65.52 -1.21 Safeway .48 21.02 -.13 StJude ... 42.56 +.36 Salesforce ... 132.24 +.45 SandRdge ... 7.28 -.09 SaraLee .46f u18.70 +.43 Schlmbrg .84 83.48 -1.80 Schwab .24 18.19 -.12 SemiHTr .56e 33.74 -.13 SenHous 1.48 21.78 +.02 SiderNac s .58e 17.47 -.06 SilvWhtn g ... 30.57 -.92 SilvrcpM g .08 10.05 -.25 SmithfF ... 20.72 +.28 SouthnCo 1.82 38.25 -.15 SwstAirl .02 12.57 -.22 SwstnEngy ... 38.17 +.17 SpectraEn 1.04f 25.48 +.17 SprintNex ... 4.31 +.04 SP Matls 1.17e 37.48 -.09 SP HlthC .57e 32.19 +.03 SP CnSt .78e u29.49 +.05 SP Consum.49e 37.82 +.09 SP Engy .99e 70.10 +.37 SPDR Fncl .16e 16.46 +.13 SP Inds .60e 35.90 +.29 SP Tech .32e 25.72 -.15 SP Util 1.27e 31.95 -.03 StarwdHtl .30f 62.00 +.88 StateStr .04 48.25 +.69 StillwtrM ... 21.33 -.26 Stryker .72f 57.65 +.45 Suncor gs .40 38.38 +.60 Sunoco .60 40.94 +.36 Suntech ... 8.94 -.16 SunTrst .04 29.50 +1.63 Supvalu .35 7.33 +.01 SwiftTrns n ... 13.80 +.51 Synovus .04 2.88 -.01 Sysco 1.04f 29.94 -.03 TCF Fncl .20 15.46 +.21 TJX .60 47.23 +.21 TaiwSemi .47e 13.27 +.01 Talbots ... 6.26 +.07 TalismE g .25 22.39 +.44 Target 1.00 55.73 +.18 TataMotors.32e 25.93 -.41 TeckRes g .60f 59.11 -1.38 TelefEsp s1.75e 24.87 +.45 TempurP ... u43.65 +4.25 TenetHlth ... 6.70 -.05 Teradyn ... 13.75 -.11 Terex ... 31.19 +.23 Tesoro ... 18.03 -.03 TexInst .52 33.91 ... Textron .08 u26.63 +.58 ThermoFis ... 55.51 +.22 ThomCrk g ... 13.78 -.36 3M Co 2.10 89.29 +1.25 TimeWarn .85 32.79 +.42 TitanMet ... 17.99 -.43 TollBros ... 20.32 -.38 Total SA 3.13e 58.04 +.92 Transocn ... 78.43 +.06 Travelers 1.44 55.00 +.12 TrinaSolar ... 28.23 +.27 TycoElec .64 36.45 +.43 TycoIntl .86e 44.43 +.44 Tyson .16 17.25 -.05 UBS AG ... 17.71 +.37 US Airwy ... 9.83 -.42 UnilevNV 1.11e 31.14 +.65 UnionPac 1.52f 94.51 -.54 UtdContl ... 23.75 -.43 UtdMicro .08e 3.26 -.03 UPS B 1.88 72.89 +.23 US Bancrp .20 26.96 +.26 US NGsFd ... 6.40 +.03 US OilFd ... 37.51 -.06 USSteel .20 53.29 -.82 UtdTech 1.70 u80.20 +.65 UtdhlthGp .50 40.41 +.10 UnivHlthS .20 42.33 -1.15

V-W-X-Y-Z

Vale SA .76e 35.48 -.19 Vale SA pf .76e 31.43 -.08 ValeantPh .38a 34.99 -.36 ValeroE .20 24.13 +.05 VangEmg .82e 47.16 -.47 VerizonCm 1.95 34.95 +.34 ViacomB .60 u42.28 +.24 VimpelC n .46p 13.76 -.42 Visa .60f 70.15 -.54 VishayInt ... 15.36 +.02 VMware ... 90.66 +1.35 Vonage ... 3.17 -.06 WalMart 1.21 55.73 -.26 Walgrn .70 u41.69 +.08 WalterEn .50 119.99 -6.00 WarnerMus ... 6.01 +1.29 WsteMInc 1.36f u37.43 +.25 WatsnPh ... u54.09 +1.22 WeathfIntl ... 22.44 -.43 WellPoint ... 61.45 -.11 WellsFargo .20 32.51 +.62 WendyArby .08f 4.78 ... WDigital ... 31.51 -.26 WstnRefin ... 10.33 ... WstnUnion .28f 19.31 +.13 Weyerh .60f u22.49 +.89 Whrlpl 1.72 88.45 +1.86 WmsCos .50 26.40 +.28 WT India .15e 24.18 +.17 XL Grp .40 22.69 ... XcelEngy 1.01 23.91 -.05 Xerox .17 11.14 -.01 Yamana g .12f 11.04 -.29 YingliGrn ... 11.33 -.03 YumBrnds 1.00 48.27 -.37 Zimmer ... 56.36 +.52

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high low settle COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Mar 11 156.94 156.94 153.72 156.94 May 11 150.97 151.27 147.74 151.27 Jul 11 144.06 144.36 141.49 144.36 Oct 11 122.78 Dec 11 108.00 109.69 106.16 108.74 Mar 12 103.00 103.91 101.50 102.50 May 12 99.36 Jul 12 98.50 98.50 97.04 97.04 Oct 12 90.04 Dec 12 89.00 90.00 88.39 88.39 \ Last spot N/A Est. sales 11209. Thu’s Sales: 21,096 Thu’s open int: 202815, up +489

chg.

+4.00 +4.00 +4.00 +2.85 +3.04 +2.04 +1.36 +.79 +.79 +.64

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low settle

chg.

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 11 827fl 830 798fl 824ø +21 May 11 853ø 856 827 850ü +18ü Jul 11 870 873ø 846ø 866fl +13ø

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

AMEX

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg Citigrp 6298743 4.89 +.09 BkofAm 2614059 14.25 -.29 GenElec 2054138 19.74 +1.31 S&P500ETF1292517128.37+.29 iShEMkts 815676 46.48 -.49

Name Vol (00) NovaGld g 69591 NA Pall g 63995 NwGold g 52015 KodiakO g 48343 Hyperdyn 40099

Last 12.93 6.82 7.56 5.62 5.50

Chg -.53 -.51 -.42 -.27 +.44

Name Last WarnerMus 6.01 MS S&P6-1112.14 PepBoy 14.15 TempurP 43.65 Reddy Ice 3.69

Chg +1.29 +2.14 +1.83 +4.25 +.33

Name Tofutti AlmadnM g ChiMetRur PernixTh PhrmAth

Chg +.27 +.43 +.39 +.90 +.30

%Chg +13.6 +11.9 +10.0 +9.7 +9.6

Name MarshE rsh StarBuf hlf CleanTech OnlineRes DanversBc

Last 2.90 2.04 5.89 6.07 21.65

Chg +1.08 +.66 +1.55 +1.52 +4.63

%Chg +59.3 +47.7 +35.7 +33.4 +27.2

Name AmbwEd n ML BBIdx11 JonesGrp Wipro s AVangrd

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name -1.94 -16.5 InfuSystem 2.50 -.34 -12.0 ChinaBiot -1.22 -11.1 CPI Aero 12.94 -1.45 -10.1 Intelliph h -1.34 -9.7 VistaGold 2.40 -.24 -9.1 Vivus -1.27 -8.5 iBio 4.72 -.43 -8.3 AcordaTh -.66 -7.5 NA Pall g 6.82 -.51 -7.0 CascdeB rs

Last 14.16 4.86 8.74 23.97 8.30

Chg -3.51 -1.09 -1.69 -3.86 -1.20

%Chg -19.9 -18.3 -16.2 -13.9 -12.6

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

%Chg +27.3 +21.4 +14.9 +10.8 +9.8

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

Last 9.80 9.78 12.44 13.71 8.11

DIARY

1,593 1,435 105 3,133 78 14 4,697,626,295

52-Week High Low 11,861.24 9,614.32 5,256.80 3,742.01 414.93 346.95 8,200.24 6,355.83 2,225.48 1,689.19 2,766.17 2,061.14 1,296.06 1,010.91 13,770.32 10,596.20 807.89 580.49

Name

Div

Name Vol (00) Last Intel 579718 20.82 Microsoft 575043 28.02 MicronT 532556 9.84 PwShs QQQ53199755.68 Cisco 392094 20.73

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Last 2.26 4.03 4.30 10.15 3.42

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

263 219 32 514 7 ...Lows 150,816,18999

INDEXES

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 11,871.84 5,045.62 413.34 8,105.75 2,125.88 2,689.54 1,283.35 13,563.96 773.18

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume Net Chg +49.04 -35.20 -.37 +29.03 -8.91 -14.75 +3.09 +13.54 -4.90

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

PE Last

Chg

YTD %Chg Name

Chg -.13 -.33 +.24 -.43 -

Div

DIARY

1,070 1,553 130 2,753 61 20Th 1,869,277,899

% Chg +.41 -.69 -.09 +.36 -.42 -.55 +.24 +.10 -.63

YTD % Chg +2.54 -1.20 +2.06 +1.78 -3.74 +1.38 +2.04 +1.53 -1.34

PE Last

52-wk % Chg +16.70 +25.98 +7.64 +15.29 +16.79 +21.96 +17.55 +19.52

YTD %Chg

Chg

BkofAm

.04

21

14.25 -.29

+6.8 ONEOK Pt

4.56f

24

80.02 +.59

+.7

Chevron

2.88

11

93.78 +1.07

+2.8 PNM Res

.50

32

13.30 -.08

+2.2

CocaCl

1.76

19

62.77 -.16

-4.6 PepsiCo

1.92

17

65.87 -.03

+.8

Disney

.40f

20

39.74 +.57

+5.9 Pfizer

.80f

10

18.36 +.12

+4.8

EOG Res

.62

51 101.72 +.36

+11.3 SwstAirl

.02

20

12.57 -.22

-3.2

...

9

17.95 +.17

+6.9 TexInst

.52

14

33.91

HewlettP

.32

12

47.23 +.45

+12.2 TimeWarn

.85

15

32.79 +.42

+1.9

HollyCp

.60

48

41.95 +.47

+2.9 TriContl

.25e

...

13.95 +.05

+1.4

Intel

.72f

10

20.82 -.13

-1.0 WalMart

1.21

14

55.73 -.26

+3.3

IBM

2.60

13 155.50 -.30

+6.0 WashFed

.24f

14

17.28

...

+2.1

Merck

1.52

17

-5.9 WellsFargo

.20

15

32.51 +.62

+4.9

23.91 -.05

+1.5

FordM

Microsoft

.64

33.90 -.15

HOW TO READ THE MARKET IN REVIEW 7

28.02 -.33

+.4 XcelEngy

1.01

14

...

+4.3

Here are the 525 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 400 most active on the Nasdaq National Markets and 100 most active on American Stock Exchange. Mutual funds are 450 largest. Stocks in bold changed 5 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name Div Last Chg (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at Name the beginning of each letters’ list. AAR .48 12.88 # Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock, based on latest quar- ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 ACM Op .80 7.25 # terly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise footnoted. ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. ACMSp .96 7.50 # Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... mark.

Fund Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold. Chg: Daily net change in the NAV.

Name

Div Last Chg

AAR

.48 12.88

Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. d – New 52- ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 wk low during trading day. g – Dividend in Canadian $. Stock price in U.S.$. n – ACM Op .80 7.25 # Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 New issue in past 52 wks. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. s – Split ACM ACMSp .96 7.50 # or stock dividend of 25 pct or more in last 52 wks. Div begins with date of split or stock dividend. u – New 52-wk high during trading day. v – Trading halted on primary market. Unless noted, dividend rates are annual disbursements based on last declaration. pf – Preferred. pp – Holder owes installment(s) of purchase price. rt – Rights. un – Units. wd – When distributed. wi – When issued. wt – Warrants. ww – With warrants. xw – Without warrants. Dividend Footnotes: a – Also extra or extras. b – Annual rate plus stock dividend. c – Liquidating dividend. e – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos. f – Annual rate, increased on last declaration. i – Declared or paid after stock dividend or split. j – Paid this year, dividend omitted, deferred or no action taken at last meeting. k – Declared or paid this year, accumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m – Annual rate, reduced on last declaration. p – Init div, annual rate unknown. r – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos plus stock dividend. t – Paid in stock in last 12 mos, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or distribution date. x – Ex-dividend or ex-rights. y – Ex-dividend and sales in full. z – Sales in full. vj – In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such companies. • Most active stocks above must be worth $1 and gainers/losers $2. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Wednesday’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Fidelity Advisor A: HighInc r n 9.08 ... TotMktInv n37.05 +.04 NwInsgh p 20.02 -.08 Indepn n 24.31 -.15 Fidelity Spart Adv: StrInA 12.47 +.02 IntBd n 10.55 +.01 500IdxAdv n45.43+.11 Fidelity Advisor I: IntmMu n 9.92 +.01 TotMktAd r n37.05+.04 NwInsgtI n 20.21 -.08 IntlDisc n 33.07 +.06 First Eagle: InvGrBd n 11.38 +.02 GlblA Fidelity Freedom: 46.34 -.07 FF2010 n 13.70 +.02 InvGB n 7.39 +.02 OverseasA22.47 -.06 FF2015 n 11.44 +.02 LgCapVal 12.10 +.06 Forum Funds: FF2020 n 13.93 +.03 LatAm 57.21 -.23 AbsStrI r 10.92 +.01 FF2020K 13.32 +.02 LevCoStk n28.59 -.09 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FF2025 n 11.65 +.02 LowP r n 38.64 -.05 CalTFA p 6.53 +.02 FF2030 n 13.94 +.03 LowPriK r 38.63 -.04 FedTFA p 11.08 +.04 FF2030K 13.76 +.02 Magelln n 72.14 -.37 FoundAl p 10.71 +.04 FF2035 n 11.62 +.02 MagellanK 72.08 -.37 HYTFA p 9.39 +.03 FF2040 n 8.12 +.01 MidCap n 28.98 -.01 IncomA p 2.22 +.01 MuniInc n 12.02 +.02 NYTFA p 10.89 +.04 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.92 +.03 NwMkt r n 15.60 ... StratInc p 10.46 ... AMgr50 n 15.56 +.03 OTC n 56.62 -.19 USGovA p 6.73 +.01 AMgr20 r n12.85 +.02 100Index 8.96 +.03 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: Balanc n 18.46 +.04 Ovrsea n 32.90 +.19 GlbBdAdv p ... ... BalancedK18.46 +.04 Puritn n 18.11 +.02 IncmeAd 2.20 ... BlueChGr n45.85 -.18 RealE n 25.74 +.08 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.24 +.01 Canada n 57.19 -.35 SCmdtyStrt n12.60 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: CapAp n 25.40 -.04 +.07 CpInc r n 9.59 -.01 SrsIntGrw 11.10 +.03 SharesA 21.08 +.07 Contra n 67.94 -.27 SrsIntVal 10.36 +.06 Frank/Temp Temp A: ContraK 67.92 -.26 SrInvGrdF 11.38 +.02 ForgnA p 7.27 +.08 DisEq n 23.09 +.06 StIntMu n 10.56 ... GlBd A p 13.43 -.01 DivIntl n 30.30 +.10 STBF n 8.46 ... GrwthA p 18.35 +.15 DivrsIntK r 30.28 +.10 SmllCpS r n20.02 -.10 WorldA p 15.29 +.10 DivGth n 28.80 +.04 StratInc n 11.16 +.02 Frank/Temp Tmp EmrMk n 25.98 -.14 StrReRt r 9.61 +.02 B&C: Eq Inc n 45.47 +.30 TotalBd n 10.73 +.02 GlBdC p 13.46 ... EQII n 18.77 +.12 USBI n 11.31 +.02 GE Elfun S&S: Fidel n 32.72 +.04 Value n 69.92 +.16 S&S PM 41.09 +.04 GMO Trust III: FltRateHi r n9.88 ... Fidelity Selects: GNMA n 11.45 +.02 Gold r n 47.21 -.65 Quality 20.44 +.01 GMO Trust IV: GovtInc 10.40 +.02 Fidelity Spartan: GroCo n 84.51 -.37 ExtMkIn n 38.15 -.14 IntlIntrVl 22.46 +.12 GroInc n 18.67 +.02 500IdxInv n45.43 +.11 GMO Trust VI: GrowthCoK84.46 -.38 IntlInxInv n35.92 +.23 EmgMkts r 14.68 -.08

Est. sales 34758. Thu’s Sales: 27,881 Thu’s open int: 219245, up +728 PORK BELLIES 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 11 106.50 106.50 106.00 106.00 Mar 11 107.50 107.50 107.00 107.00 May 11 106.70 Jul 11 103.50 Aug 11 102.50 Last spot N/A Thu’s Sales: Thu’s open int: 2, off -1

Roswell Daily Record

MUTUAL FUNDS

#

Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

IntlCorEq 29.63 +.10 Quality 20.45 +.01 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 36.35 +.01 Goldman Sachs Inst: 7.37 ... HiYield MidCapV 36.62 +.02 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.12 +.02 CapApInst 37.16 -.15 IntlInv t 60.50 +.35 Intl r 61.07 +.36 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.44 +.05 Hartford Fds C: CapApC t 31.44 +.05 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI n 35.46 +.06 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 43.41 +.06 Div&Gr 20.03 +.11 Advisers 19.70 +.06 TotRetBd 10.91 +.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.12 -.05 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r16.82 -.01 Invesco Funds A: CapGro 13.68 -.03 Chart p 16.59 +.01 CmstkA 16.16 +.09 8.79 +.04 EqIncA GrIncA p 19.82 +.12 HYMuA 8.69 +.02 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.52 -.18 AssetStA p24.21 -.18 AssetStrI r 24.42 -.18 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.48 +.02

Sep 11 885 888 863 881fl Dec 11 899ü 902 876ü 896 885ü 904 Mar 12 906 910 Last spot N/A Est. sales 254833. Thu’s Sales: 78,147 Thu’s open int: 510965, up +78 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 11 657 667 650ø 657ü 657 667 May 11 657 677 Jul 11 674 680ø 664ü 671ü Sep 11 624ü 627 612fl 622fl Dec 11 587 590 572 587ü 580ø 595 Mar 12 595ø 598 May 12 600ü 602ø 588 600fl Jul 12 606fl 607ø 591fl 606ü Sep 12 555fl 556 545ü 555ü Dec 12 536fl 539ü 525ü 537ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 648853. Thu’s Sales: 351,930 Thu’s open int: 1614051, up +4025 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 11 387fl 389ø 380 386 394 May 11 395ü 397ü 388 Jul 11 400 400ø 393ü 397 Sep 11 362fl 369 362fl 368 Dec 11 363 363 354ø 361 Mar 12 363ø 370 363ø 370 370ø 377 May 12 370ø 377 Last spot N/A Est. sales 2962. Thu’s Sales: 2,014 Thu’s open int: 13762, off -296 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 11 1412ø 1427 1405 1412ü May 11 1424 1436fl 1415 1422fl Jul 11 1430ø 1443ü 1421ø 1430 Aug 11 1405ü 1415ø 1399ø 1405fl Sep 11 1378 1380 1367fl 1375ø Nov 11 1347 1359ø 1335ü 1348ü Jan 12 1347ø 1361 1339 1350ø Mar 12 1345 1354ø 1336 1343 Last spot N/A Est. sales 410581. Thu’s Sales: 198,384 Thu’s open int: 660339, up +1456

+11ü +11ü +9fl

JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd n 11.47 +.01 HighYld n 8.30 +.01 IntmTFBd n10.68 +.01 ShtDurBd n10.98 +.01 USLCCrPls n21.03 +.05 Janus S Shrs: Forty 33.86 -.10 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r52.31 +.03 PrkMCVal T22.84 -.01 Twenty T 66.68 -.33 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 12.42 ... LSBalanc 13.04 +.01 LSGrwth 12.99 +.01 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p24.73 .09 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.15 -.12 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p21.54 -.12 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p14.65 +.08 Longleaf Partners: Partners 28.72 ... Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.37 +.04 StrInc C 14.98 +.03 LSBondR 14.31 +.03 StrIncA 14.91 +.03 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.15 +.04 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.82 +.07 BdDebA p 7.90 +.01 ShDurIncA p4.61 +.01 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t4.64 +.01

FUTURES

MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.30 +.05 ValueA 23.39 +.10 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.49 +.10 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.96 ... Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.72 +.08 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv18.02 -.08 PacTgrInv 22.82 -.28 MergerFd 15.87 +.01 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.40 +.02 TotRtBdI 10.40 +.02 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 13.79 +.07 MCapGrI 37.76 +.11 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.75 +.10 GlbDiscZ 30.10 +.10 QuestZ 18.03 +.06 SharesZ 21.24 +.07 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 45.66 -.20 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 47.32 -.20 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.39 ... MMIntEq r 9.93 ... Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.97 +.02 Intl I r 19.94 +.11 Oakmark r 42.56 +.14 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.80 ... GlbSMdCap15.48 ... Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 43.67 -.08 DvMktA p 35.21 -.13

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

+3ü +3 +3ü +6ø +11ü +10ø +10ü +10 +8fl +6fl

+4 +4ü +4ü +7ø +6ø +6ø +6ø

-2 -1fl -ü +1 +3ü +6ø +5ø +3ü

low settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Mar 11 89.24 90.22 88.87 89.11 Apr 11 90.74 91.66 90.38 90.63 May 11 92.16 92.91 91.75 92.04 Jun 11 93.18 93.80 92.75 93.07 Jul 11 93.97 94.34 93.60 93.80 Aug 11 94.50 94.55 94.06 94.24 Sep 11 94.85 95.02 94.37 94.58 Oct 11 94.94 95.27 94.71 94.89 Nov 11 95.48 95.49 95.09 95.17 Dec 11 95.55 95.80 94.94 95.43 Jan 12 95.61 95.85 95.34 95.56 Feb 12 95.61 Mar 12 95.65 Apr 12 95.68 May 12 95.72 Jun 12 95.91 95.93 95.66 95.76 Jul 12 95.71 Aug 12 95.67 Sep 12 95.64 Oct 12 95.63 Nov 12 95.63 Dec 12 95.83 95.87 95.05 95.69 Jan 13 95.60 Feb 13 95.51 Mar 13 95.44 Apr 13 95.36 May 13 95.28 Jun 13 95.09 95.21 95.09 95.21 Jul 13 95.19 Aug 13 95.18 Sep 13 95.18 Oct 13 95.19 Nov 13 95.21 Dec 13 95.35 95.35 94.46 95.23 Last spot N/A Est. sales 634021. Thu’s Sales: 955,526 Thu’s open int: 1485345, up +2772 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon

chg.

-.48 -.33 -.14 +.03 +.15 +.20 +.24 +.29 +.34 +.39 +.46 +.50 +.53 +.57 +.61 +.65 +.67 +.70 +.73 +.76 +.79 +.81 +.82 +.83 +.85 +.86 +.87 +.89 +.91 +.93 +.95 +.96 +.98 +.99

GlobA p 61.58 +.24 GblStrIncA 4.29 +.01 Gold p 43.83 -.65 IntBdA p 6.47 +.02 MnStFdA 32.97 -.04 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.15 ... RoMu A p 14.63 +.06 RcNtMuA 6.31 +.03 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.83 -.13 IntlBdY 6.47 +.02 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.84 +.02 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r10.55 +.03 AllAsset 12.08 +.02 ComodRR 9.30 +.07 HiYld 9.40 ... InvGrCp 10.49 +.03 LowDu 10.40 +.01 RealRtnI 11.32 +.03 ShortT 9.88 ... 10.84 +.02 TotRt TR II 10.37 +.02 TRIII 9.58 +.01 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.40 +.01 RealRtA p 11.32 +.03 TotRtA 10.84 +.02 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.84 +.02 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.84 +.02 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.84 +.02 Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n 27.12 ... Perm Port Funds: Permannt 45.05 +.03

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET

.82 72.77 +.41 Div Last Chg Costco Cree Inc ... 51.26 -1.10 A-B-C Crocs ... 15.97 +.39 ASML Hld .27e 38.95 +.38 Ctrip.com ... 43.07 +.27 CubistPh ... 22.21 +1.01 ATP O&G ... 15.64 -.26 ... 2.79 -.04 AVI Bio ... 2.37 +.06 Curis ... 20.25 -.26 AcadiaPh h ... 1.67 +.06 CypSemi AcmePkt ... 54.25 +1.67 Cytokinet ... 1.87 -.09 AcordaTh ... d23.97 -3.86 D-E-F ActivsBliz .15 11.25 -.29 AdobeSy ... 33.27 -.22 DanversBc.16f u21.65 +4.63 Adtran .36 41.32 -.43 Dell Inc ... 13.47 -.13 AEterna g ... 1.55 ... DeltaPtr h ... .79 -.00 Affymax ... 6.99 +.49 Dndreon ... 35.05 -.60 AgFeed ... 2.49 -.01 Dentsply .20 35.84 -.11 AkamaiT ... 48.93 -1.41 Depomed ... 5.81 -.09 AlignTech ... 19.87 -.42 DirecTV A ... 41.85 -.45 Alkerm ... 12.55 -.22 DiscCm A ... 40.04 +.26 AllosThera ... d3.62 +.02 DishNetwk ... 21.61 +.20 AllscriptH ... 20.48 +.13 DonlleyRR 1.04 17.85 +.07 Alphatec ... 2.56 -.05 drugstre ... 2.00 +.02 AlteraCp lf .24 37.13 -.53 DryShips ... 5.00 -.05 Amazon ... 177.42 -4.54 ETrade rs ... 15.92 -.13 ACapAgy 5.60e 28.45 -.18 eBay ... 30.02 -.76 AmCapLtd ... 8.10 +.06 EagleBulk ... 4.62 -.11 AmerMed ... 18.90 -.03 ErthLink .20m 8.63 -.12 AmSupr ... 27.30 -.33 EstWstBcp .04 20.78 +.16 Amgen ... 56.97 -.34 ElectArts ... 15.13 -.63 AmkorT lf ... 7.58 -.20 EFII ... u15.41 +.81 Amylin ... 15.03 +.15 EndoPhrm ... 33.68 -.04 Anadigc ... 7.40 ... Ener1 ... 4.22 ... A123 Sys ... 9.17 -.15 EngyConv ... 4.19 -.06 ApolloGrp ... 42.35 -.88 Entegris ... 7.25 -.02 ApolloInv 1.12 11.72 +.36 EntropCom ... 12.26 -.25 Apple Inc ... 326.72 -5.96 Equinix ... 85.12 -.01 ApldMatl .28 15.01 -.05 EricsnTel .28e 11.79 +.34 ArenaPhm ... 1.90 -.07 Exelixis ... 7.47 +.01 AresCap 1.40 16.20 +.07 ExideTc ... 9.40 -.31 AriadP ... 6.40 +.04 Expedia .28 25.98 -.31 ArmHld .12e 24.84 +.22 ExpdIntl .40 53.44 -.84 Arris ... 12.01 -.14 F5 Netwks ... 109.97 +.82 ArubaNet ... 21.84 -.57 FLIR Sys ... 29.37 +.10 AscenaRtl ... 27.15 +.16 Fastenal 1.00f 59.51 -.37 AsscdBanc .04 14.60 -.17 FifthThird .04 14.60 +.38 Atheros ... 44.53 -.07 Finisar ... 30.91 +.42 AtlasEngy ... 43.96 -.04 FstNiagara .60f 13.84 -.09 Atmel ... 13.64 +.23 FstSolar ... 147.41 +.02 Autodesk ... 41.50 +.19 FstMerit .64 18.98 -.06 AutoData 1.44f u49.04 -.05 Fiserv ... 61.98 +.08 AvagoTch .07p 27.77 +.07 Flextrn ... 8.01 -.21 AvanirPhm ... 4.14 -.06 FocusMda ... 23.77 +.07 AvisBudg ... 13.76 +.07 Fortinet ... 35.09 +.14 Axcelis ... 3.21 ... FosterWhl ... 36.36 -.32 BE Aero ... 38.05 -.57 FresKabi rt ... .04 +.00 BGC Ptrs .48e 8.10 -.14 FuelCell ... 1.92 +.14 BMC Sft ... 47.67 -.60 FultonFncl .12 10.51 -.01 BannerCp .04 2.12 +.09 Fuqi Intl lf ... 5.43 -.26 BedBath ... 48.11 +.12 Biodel ... 2.36 -.02 G-H-I BioFuelEn ... 1.13 ... GSI Cmmrc ... 22.81 -.19 BiogenIdc ... 66.77 -2.01 GT Solar ... u11.68 +.47 BioSante ... 1.85 -.07 Garmin 1.50f 30.79 -.25 BrigExp ... 25.77 -1.20 Gentex .44 30.30 -.37 Broadcom .32 44.51 -.49 Genzyme ... 71.58 -.27 Broadwind ... 1.95 -.04 GeronCp ... 4.76 -.11 BrcdeCm ... 5.65 -.05 GileadSci ... 38.19 +.02 Bucyrus .10 u90.42 +.07 GloblInd ... 7.05 +.05 BuffaloWW ... 42.99 -1.62 GluMobile ... 2.17 +.08 CA Inc .16 25.31 -.15 Google ... 611.83 CH Robins1.16f 77.62 -.18 14.94 CVB Fncl .34 8.49 -.08 HanmiFncl ... 1.12 +.02 CadencePh ... 7.20 -.09 HansenNat ... u55.68 +.66 Cadence ... 8.51 -.05 Harmonic ... 7.95 -.01 CdnSolar ... 14.28 -.48 Hasbro 1.00 44.61 -.05 CapFdF rs ... 11.60 -.06 HercOffsh ... 3.13 ... CpstnTrb h ... 1.14 +.04 Hologic ... 19.22 -.19 CareerEd ... 21.91 +.18 HudsCity .60 d11.25 -.15 CaviumNet ... 39.19 -.44 HughesCm ... u60.86 +9.37 Celgene ... 56.03 -.60 HumGen ... 24.57 -.58 CentAl ... 14.02 -.52 HuntBnk .04 7.02 +.17 Cephln ... 59.64 -.74 IAC Inter ... 28.22 -.17 CerusCp ... 3.55 +.01 iGateCorp .26e 16.07 -.17 ChrmSh ... 3.23 +.06 iShAsiaexJ .97e 62.27 -.81 ChkPoint ... 45.01 -.81 IconixBr ... 20.00 -.39 Cheesecake ... 30.53 +.29 iGo Inc ... 3.50 -.10 ChinaBiot ... 14.16 -3.51 Illumina ... 68.75 -.07 ChinaMda ... 19.65 ... Imax Corp ... 26.36 -.47 ChinaMed ... 12.51 +.12 Imunmd ... 3.53 +.16 CienaCorp ... 23.60 -.50 Incyte ... 14.73 -.51 CinnFin 1.60 31.77 +.01 Infinera ... 9.23 -.27 Cintas .49f 28.89 -.40 Informat ... 41.97 -.43 Cirrus ... 17.40 +.06 Cisco ... 20.73 -.05 InfosysT .90e 70.29 -.38 ... 4.05 -.06 CitrixSys ... 65.23 -.13 InspPhar ... 6.28 -.12 CleanEngy ... d12.98 -.24 IntgDv .72f 20.82 -.13 Clearwire ... 5.51 -.07 Intel InteractBrk1.79e 16.70 -.78 ClinicData ... 15.03 +.19 .40 46.98 -.58 CognizTech ... 73.05 -.56 InterDig InterMune ... 35.09 -.82 Coinstar ... 41.31 -.62 .48 14.38 -.19 Comcast .38 u23.53 +.27 Intersil ... 46.86 -.32 Comc spcl .38 u22.11 +.19 Intuit ... 326.58 Compuwre ... 11.52 -.26 IntSurg +36.75 Conexant ... 2.04 ... ... 9.27 -.31 Copart ... u40.32 +1.07 Isis ... 9.63 +.14 CorinthC ... 5.04 -.05 IsleCapri

Name

Name

J-K-L

JA Solar ... JDS Uniph ... JamesRiv ... JazzPhrm ... JetBlue ... JoyGlbl .70 KLA Tnc 1.00 Kulicke ... L&L Egy n ... Laboph gh ... LamResrch ... Lattice ... LawsnSft ... LeapWirlss ... Level3 ... LexiPhrm ... LibGlobA ... LibtyMIntA ... LifeTech ... LimelghtN ... LinearTch .96f LinnEngy 2.64f Logitech ... lululemn g ...

7.40 -.12 16.02 -.11 21.50 -1.39 22.02 +.30 6.35 -.14 85.77 -1.75 41.83 -.30 8.95 -.17 7.51 -.18 .94 -.02 49.98 -.23 5.61 -.02 9.10 +.03 13.29 +.19 1.13 +.03 1.90 +.04 39.15 +1.19 15.74 -.09 53.98 -.55 6.12 -.15 34.53 -.35 37.98 +.64 18.61 +.09 66.95 -1.00

M-N-0

MIPS Tech ... 15.35 +.03 MannKd ... 5.76 -.41 MarshE rsh ... 2.90 +1.08 MarvellT ... 20.08 -.35 Mattel .83f 23.51 -.25 MaximIntg .84 u26.13 +.53 MedAssets ... 19.88 -.26 MelcoCrwn ... 7.27 +.05 MentorGr ... 12.13 -.08 Methanx .62 29.44 -.03 Microchp 1.38f 36.47 +.06 Micromet ... 6.53 -.46 MicronT ... 9.84 +.24 Microsoft .64 28.02 -.33 Micrvisn ... 1.99 +.02 Molex .70f 24.71 -.12 Momenta ... 15.15 -.34 Motricity n ... 17.50 -1.07 Move Inc ... 2.25 +.06 Mylan ... 23.01 -.40 MyriadG ... 20.83 ... NGAS Rs h ... .58 +.01 NII Hldg ... 41.45 +.16 NPS Phm ... 7.24 -.18 NasdOMX ... 24.30 +.29 NektarTh ... 11.12 -.23 NetLogic s ... 33.19 -.23 NetApp ... 55.77 -.45 Netflix ... 182.09 -2.91 NtScout ... 22.77 +.37 NewsCpA .15 15.32 +.66 NewsCpB .15 16.91 +.56 NorTrst 1.12 52.91 ... NwstBcsh .40 11.99 +.09 NovaMd rs ... 13.19 +.28 Novell ... 5.94 -.01 Novlus ... 34.94 -.44 NuVasive ... 28.05 -.49 NuanceCm ... 19.92 -.07 Nvidia ... 22.22 -.21 OReillyAu ... 57.50 -.38 OmniVisn ... 28.35 -1.23 OnSmcnd ... 10.85 -.22 OnlineRes ... u6.07 +1.52 OnyxPh ... 34.50 -.14 OpenTable ... 74.87 -1.25 OpnwvSy ... 2.10 -.04 Oracle .20 u32.51 +.21 Orexigen ... 8.64 -.40 Oxigene h ... .21 +.01

P-Q-R

QiaoXing ... QlikTech n ... Qlogic ... Qualcom .76 QuantFu h ... RF MicD ... RadntSys ... Randgold .17e Rdiff.cm ... RepubAir ... RschMotn ... RossStrs .64 Rovi Corp ... RoyGld .44f RubiconTc ... Ryanair 2.29p

S-T-U

STEC ... 20.36 -.41 SVB FnGp ... 52.71 -1.61 SalixPhm ... 40.69 -.31 SanDisk ... 49.97 +.02 SangBio ... 7.31 -.28 Sanmina ... 13.62 -.26 SavientPh ... d10.20 -.34 SeagateT ... 13.28 -.03 SearsHldgs ... 74.57 -1.33 SeattGen ... 15.73 ... Semtech ... 21.70 -.45 Sequenom ... 6.76 -.14 SifyTech ... 2.84 -.10 SigaTech h ... 12.34 -.71 SigmaAld .64 63.30 -.28 SilicnImg ... 7.02 -.08 Slcnware .41e 6.51 -.23 SilvStd g ... 22.67 -.40 Sina ... 78.76 -1.17 SiriusXM ... 1.55 +.04 Sky-mobi n ... 6.83 +.78 SkywksSol ... 29.19 -.84 SmartM ... 6.08 +.46 Sohu.cm ... 66.56 -1.95 Solarfun ... 9.01 -.04 SonicSolu ... 14.79 -.01 Sonus ... 2.87 -.08 SpectPh ... 6.36 +.32 Spreadtrm ... 19.01 -.48 Staples .36 23.37 +.12 StarScient ... 1.76 +.08 Starbucks .52 u33.20 +.02 StlDynam .30 17.72 -.22 SterlBcsh .06 u9.30 +.30 SuccessF ... 30.27 -.19 SunPowerA ... 14.05 -.52 SusqBnc .04 10.27 +.35 Symantec ... 17.85 +.04 Synaptics ... 28.55 -3.50 TD Ameritr .20 20.30 -.19 THQ ... 5.61 +.03 TTM Tch ... 16.20 -.49 TakeTwo ... 12.15 -.29 TalecrisBio ... 23.88 +.01 TlCmSys ... 4.17 -.15 Tellabs .08 6.85 +.04 Terremk ... 12.98 -.39 TeslaMot n ... 23.04 +.42 TevaPhrm .75e 52.86 -.79 ThomasPrp ... 3.75 -.30 Thoratec ... 26.30 -.06 TibcoSft ... 21.15 +.21 TiVo Inc ... 9.56 -.06 TowerSemi ... 1.41 -.02 TriQuint ... 13.00 -.10 TuesMrn ... 3.82 -.06 USA Tech h ... 1.66 +.14 Umpqua .20 11.90 -.09 UrbanOut ... 35.03 +.03

V-W-X-Y-Z

PDL Bio 1.00e 4.87 -.24 PMC Sra ... 8.69 -.09 Paccar .48a 55.10 -.10 PacSunwr ... 4.42 -.18 PanASlv .10f 32.93 -1.11 ParamTch ... 23.86 -.19 Parexel ... 20.83 -.41 Parkrvsn h ... .65 +.06 PattUTI .20 20.73 +.18 Paychex 1.24 32.60 +.17 PeopUtdF .62 13.20 -.49 PerfectWld ... 23.89 +.55 Perrigo .28f 70.20 -.98 PharmPdt .60b 29.40 +.07 Pharmasset ... 48.65 +2.22 Plexus ... 27.39 -1.61 Polycom ... u44.08 +5.90 Popular ... 3.22 +.09 Power-One ... 10.74 -.28 PwShs QQQ.33e 55.68 -.43 Powrwav ... 3.56 +.10 PriceTR 1.08 66.25 +.62 priceline ... 425.60 +1.38 ProspctCap1.21 11.37 +.16 QIAGEN ... 18.56 -.27

ValueClick ... 14.37 -.15 VarianSemi ... 40.88 -.09 VeecoInst ... 44.51 -1.46 Verigy ... 12.84 +.11 Verisign 3.00e 32.21 -.48 VertxPh ... 40.06 +.16 VirgnMda h .16 24.93 +.68 ViroPhrm ... 16.69 -.24 Vivus ... 8.74 -1.69 Vodafone 1.33e 28.27 +.25 WarnerCh s8.50e23.68 -.07 WAmBcp 1.44 50.59 -2.80 WstptInn g ... 15.55 -.03 WetSeal ... 3.65 -.02 WhitneyH .04 13.64 +.04 WholeFd .40 51.83 -.43 WilshBcp ... 6.87 +.09 Windstrm 1.00 12.74 -.21 Wynn 1.00a 115.95 -.29 XOMA rs ... 5.82 -.04 Xilinx .64 31.28 +.02 Yahoo ... 15.97 -.26 Zagg ... 8.58 -.32 Zalicus ... 2.01 +.08 ZionBcp .04 24.31 +.57 Zix Corp ... 4.54 +.17

Hyperdyn iBio IndiaGC InovioPhm KodiakO g MadCatz g Metalico Metalline MdwGold g MincoG g Minefnd g Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NA Pall g NDynMn g NthnO&G NthgtM g NovaGld g Oilsands g OpkoHlth ParaG&S PhrmAth ProceraNt PudaCoal Quepasa

RadientPh ... RareEle g ... Rentech ... RexahnPh ... Rubicon g ... SamsO&G ... SeabGld g ... SulphCo ... TanzRy g ... Taseko ... Tengsco ... TimberlnR ... TrnsatlPet ... US Geoth ... Uluru ... Ur-Energy ... Uranerz ... UraniumEn ... VantageDrl ... VirnetX .50e VistaGold ... WizzardSft ... YM Bio g ... ZBB Engy ...

AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg ChinaShen ... CrSuiHiY .32 6.59 -.04 Crossh g rs ... 2.26 -.03 CubicEngy ... 6.04 -.09 Cytomed ... 24.86 +.11 DejourE g ... 4.03 +.43 DenisnM g ... 1.29 -.08 Dreams ... 1.57 ... EVMuniBd .92 .32 +.01 EndvSilv g ... 7.58 -.15 EntreeGold ... 6.30 -.16 FrkStPrp .76 5.43 -.12 Fronteer g ... 3.25 -.18 GabGldNR 1.68 49.01 +.39 GascoEngy ... 24.65 -.04 Gastar grs ... 1.66 +.02 GenMoly ... 12.94 -1.45 Geokinetics ... 1.82 +.02 GoldResrc .18e .39 -.01 GoldStr g ... .74 -.02 GranTrra g ... 18.33 -.18 GrtBasG g ... 6.47 +.01 HQ SustM ... 22.80 +1.24 HearUSA ... 2.93 +.01 Hemisphrx ... 5.86 +.02 HstnAEn .02a

AbdAsPac .42 Advntrx rs ... AlexcoR g ... AlldNevG ... AlmadnM g ... AmApparel ... AntaresP ... ArcadiaRs ... ArmourRsd1.44 Aurizon g ... AvalRare n ... Banro g ... BarcUBS36 ... BarcGSOil ... Brigus grs ... CPI Aero ... CAMAC En ... CardiumTh ... CelSci ... CFCda g .01 CheniereEn ... CheniereE 1.70 ChiGengM ... ChinNEPet ...

Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.61 +.06 Price Funds: BlChip n 38.56 -.20 CapApp n 20.66 +.05 EmMktS n 34.53 -.21 EqInc n 24.29 +.14 EqIndex n 34.58 +.08 Growth n 32.42 -.17 HiYield n 6.87 +.01 IntlBond n 9.89 +.06 Intl G&I 13.70 +.09 IntlStk n 14.26 +.07 LatAm n 54.92 -.37 MidCap n 59.29 -.08 MCapVal n24.06 +.02 N Asia n 18.68 -.19 New Era n 52.09 ... N Horiz n 33.36 -.08 N Inc n 9.46 +.01 R2010 n 15.48 +.02 R2015 n 12.01 +.01 R2020 n 16.63 +.02 R2025 n 12.19 +.01 R2030 n 17.51 +.02 R2035 n 12.40 +.01 R2040 n 17.65 +.01 ShtBd n 4.85 ... SmCpStk n34.17 -.18 SmCapVal n35.63-.22 SpecGr n 17.97 +.01 SpecIn n 12.41 +.03 Value n 24.08 +.14 Principal Inv: LT2020In 11.79 +.02 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.91 +.05 MultiCpGr 51.43 -.13 VoyA p 24.31 -.03 Royce Funds: LwPrSkSv r17.86 -.05

Feb 11 2.4569 2.4738 2.4228 2.4589 Mar 11 2.4749 2.4943 2.4414 2.4785 Apr 11 2.5877 2.6058 2.5565 2.5892 May 11 2.5950 2.6123 2.5688 2.5964 Jun 11 2.5950 2.6119 2.5632 2.5959 Jul 11 2.5890 2.5970 2.5580 2.5890 Aug 11 2.5583 2.5799 2.5537 2.5764 Sep 11 2.5385 2.5607 2.5354 2.5574 Oct 11 2.4551 2.4551 2.4320 2.4505 Nov 11 2.4295 Dec 11 2.3947 2.4215 2.3947 2.4208 Jan 12 2.4311 Last spot N/A Est. sales 101722. Thu’s Sales: 143,438 Thu’s open int: 290082, off -1823 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Feb 11 4.705 4.777 4.644 4.736 Mar 11 4.710 4.776 4.655 4.743 Apr 11 4.690 4.749 4.640 4.720 May 11 4.722 4.777 4.668 4.753 Jun 11 4.758 4.805 4.711 4.787 Jul 11 4.805 4.853 4.751 4.837 Aug 11 4.821 4.880 4.780 4.856 Sep 11 4.824 4.881 4.787 4.856 Oct 11 4.865 4.919 4.833 4.900 Nov 11 5.003 5.042 4.965 5.023 Dec 11 5.211 5.240 5.164 5.219 Jan 12 5.325 5.360 5.290 5.338 Feb 12 5.288 5.310 5.249 5.293 Mar 12 5.180 5.203 5.145 5.190 Apr 12 4.921 4.950 4.890 4.932 May 12 4.923 4.935 4.900 4.933 Jun 12 4.955 4.968 4.927 4.954 Jul 12 4.980 4.989 4.970 4.989 Aug 12 5.000 5.012 4.990 5.012 Sep 12 5.010 5.020 5.000 5.017 Oct 12 5.080 5.080 5.065 5.077 Nov 12 5.197 5.218 5.185 5.205 Dec 12 5.395 5.410 5.366 5.395 Jan 13 5.517 5.517 5.510 5.517 Feb 13 5.475 Mar 13 5.345 Apr 13 5.065 Last spot N/A Est. sales 401230. Thu’s Sales: 475,466 Thu’s open int: 855012, up +7201

6.30 2.98 1.86 1.11 .59 .33 3.41 2.46 10.94 5.72 2.70 14.61 9.27 18.36 .53 4.28 5.63 9.16 25.04 3.68 8.19 2.53 4.21 .57 .51 15.50

-.04 ... -.06 +.08 +.05 -.02 +.14 +.18 +.01 -.17 -.09 -.06 -.22 +.12 +.02 -.13 +.09 -.08 -.47 -.18 -.04 -.01 -.29 +.02 +.01 -.28

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

5.50 4.72 .82 1.30 5.62 .83 5.17 .99 .95 2.10 9.70 5.81 .08 7.56 6.82 17.89 25.80 2.65 12.93 .56 3.48 3.13 3.42 .61 12.42 12.26

+.44 -.43 +.01 -.02 -.27 -.01 -.18 +.01 +.10 +.01 -.24 -.39 -.01 -.42 -.51 -.02 -.57 -.03 -.53 ... -.16 -.02 +.30 +.02 +.14 +.26

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+.0364 +.0364 +.0351 +.0342 +.0332 +.0320 +.0315 +.0302 +.0288 +.0278 +.0276 +.0281

+.041 +.051 +.043 +.046 +.048 +.046 +.040 +.035 +.031 +.021 +.017 +.012 +.010 +.016 +.013 +.013 +.013 +.010 +.009 +.009 +.009 +.007 +.003

+.003 +.013

2.51 +.06 23.17 -1.03 17.37 -.17 51.24 -.10 .46 -.01 7.70 -.18 18.13 +.41 79.53 -.10 8.07 -.06 5.98 -.09 61.55 -.85 64.92 -.14 63.53 -.29 45.71 -.58 19.99 -.85 29.10 -.40

.87 12.95 1.23 1.30 4.82 2.14 27.81 .20 6.23 5.51 .86 .92 3.04 1.35 .10 2.80 4.77 5.34 1.89 12.69 2.40 .26 2.14 1.15

-.01 +.20 -.01 -.04 -.25 +.13 -.49 -.01 -.12 +.01 -.03 -.01 -.08 +.14 +.00 +.06 +.02 +.10 +.01 -.54 -.24 +.02 -.11 -.11

TotlIntl n 15.88 +.04 TotStk n 32.11 +.04 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n 21.59 +.03 DevMkInst n10.17+.06 ExtIn n 41.32 -.14 FTAllWldI r n94.65 +.23 GrwthIst n 32.04 -.08 InfProInst n10.37 +.02 InstIdx n 117.46 +.28 InsPl n 117.47 +.29 InsTStPlus n29.04+.04 MidCpIst n 20.54 -.02 SCInst n 34.62 -.16 TBIst n 10.56 +.01 TSInst n 32.12 +.04 ValueIst n 21.35 +.14 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl n 97.72 +.24 STBdIdx n 10.55 ... TotBdSgl n10.56 +.01 TotStkSgl n31.00 +.04 Victory Funds: DvsStA 15.96 +.04 Wells Fargo Adv C: AstAllC t 11.78 ... Western Asset: CorePlus I 10.80 +.03 Yacktman Funds: Fund p 16.98 +.10

METALS NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Fri. Aluminum -$1.0763 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$4.3017 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $4.3000 N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Lead - $2529.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.0577 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1343.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1341.00 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri. Silver - $27.465 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $27.416 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Platinum -$1819.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1818.80 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. n.q.-not quoted, n.a.-not available r-revised


Scholar brings Sistine Chapel books to light

CLASSIFIEDS/ENTERTAINMENT

Roswell Daily Record

DALLAS (AP) — Forty books once used by popes and other church dignitaries for services in the Sistine Chapel, largely forgotten after they were spirited away from Rome in 1798, are featured in a new exhibit. For its only U.S. stop, the display of the books with vibrant illustrations complementing liturgical writings opens Sunday at the Meadows Museum at Southern Methodist University. “The Lost Manuscripts From the Sistine Chapel: An Epic Journey From Rome to Toledo,” which was on view at the National Library of Spain in Madrid in the fall, will run through April 23 in Dallas before the books, called codices, go back to their respective archives at three libraries in Spain, away from public view. The show is the culmination of more than a decade of research that began when Italian scholar Elena De Laurentiis, while doing research in Spain, happened upon several photographs of the books with a papal seal and wondered how they had made their way to Spain. With a label on the photographs

directing her to the Cathedral of Toledo, her research took her to the mountaintop Spanish city that spreads out with a maze of streets. She found that the archbishop of Toledo — Cardinal Francisco Antonio de Lorenzana y Buitron — had taken the books from Rome as Napoleon’s armies invaded in 1798. He then donated the works to the cathedral’s library, even putting a handwritten note in the books about the rescue. “There’s not a lot known about how he acquired them,” she said through a translator. “In order to save them, he sent them to the cathedral.” While 26 of the books remained at the cathedral’s library, 11 eventually went to a regional library in Toledo and three went to the National Library of Spain. The books, which specifically come from the Sacristy of the Sistine Chapel, have more importance than those held by the Sistine Chapel. Those from the Sistine Sacristy, which is a room where sacred texts are kept, were used by popes and other dignitaries, and had

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diffi- JACQUELINE cult

BIGAR

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EMPLOYMENT

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more intricate designs than those of the Sistine Chapel, which were used by singers, De Laurentiis wrote in a book that accompanies the exhibit. Mark Roglan, director of the Meadows Museum, said that the archbishop’s actions resulted in the works being preserved in their entirety, which stands in contrast to the other known volumes that were cut apart for individual designs or even destroyed. “They are so extraordinary because they are completely preserved,” he said. “It really provides for the first time a sense of how the book was.” Roglan said there are so many exquisite pages in the books, which range in date from the 11th century to the 18th century, that it was often difficult to pick which page to display. The books with liturgical writings, such as blessings and missals, have illustrations in vibrant hues. Scholars and curators agree that De Laurentiis’ work revealed the importance of the books to art history.

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045. Employment Opportunities BIG D’S is taking resumes for cook, cashier & delivery driver. Bring resume to 100 S. Richardson between 2-4pm Mon.-Fri. only.

STOCKHOLM (AP) — Stieg Larsson’s brother has rejected claims by the late crime novelist’s longtime companion that the family is trying to squeeze every penny from Larsson’s posthumous fame. On a talk show to be aired by Swedish Television on Friday, Joakim Larsson says he and his father — who inherited the author’s estate — plan to donate most of the 250 million kronor ($38 million) they’ve earned to date from the popular books to charity. “How much to keep for ourselves? We’ve never even thought about it,” he said. The writer’s companion for three decades, Eva Gabrielsson, wants control of Larsson’s works and says the family is commercializing his legacy for profit. She inherited nothing because they weren’t married and Larsson didn’t

ACCOUNTANT Central Valley Electric Cooperative has an opening for a full-time accountant. A Bachelor's degree in Accounting from an accredited university is required. For a complete position description and application form, go to our website at www.cvecoop.org and click on the employment tab. Application forms also may be obtained at our offices located at 1505 N. 13th Street in Artesia, NM. ACADEMIC ADVISOR: Job is located in Portales, NM. www.enmu.edu/service/hr 575-562-2115 AA/EO/Title IX Employer DRIVER – Drive Knight in 2011! Daily or Weekly Pay, Top equipment, 27 Service Centers, Van and Refrigerated. CDL-A with 3 months OTR experience. 800-414-9569. www.driveknight.com NATIONAL GREETING Card Company needs part-time merchandiser for the Roswell Area! Must have phone and transportation. Respond to: agmerchandisers@yahoo.com. ADMIRAL BEVERAGE is hiring CDL driver position must be filled immediately, and only serious prospects need apply. Must have clean driving record. Great benefits, excellent pay, group health insurance. 1018 S. Atkinson

UPS STORE requires retail experience, outstanding customer service skills and a willingness to work hard, competitive wage plus incentives. Submit resume to job.theupsstore@gmail .com

RELIEF TRUCK DRIVER CDL Class A w/doubles endorsement, clean motor vehicle record, no away time. Semi retired individual with flexible schedule. Call 817-825-1984 CDL DRIVERS wanted. Experienced with belly dumps. Accepting applications at 1905 Old Dexter Hwy.

BORN TODAY Actress Linda Blair (1959), chef Guy Fieri (1968), author Joseph Wambaugh (1937)

185. Electrical

KYMERA Independent Physicians Primary Care Clinic

BNX ELECTRIC Residential/Commercial, Bonded, Lic#368212, Free Estimates. Se Habla Espanol. Call Benito 637-9413 or 317-9259.

Certified Medical Assistant (CMA): FT – 1-2 yrs exp working in a medical office. Applicants must possess the ability to work with multiple patients in a high volume office setting.

Medical Records Clerk: FT – Knowledge of Medical Records, Computer Knowledge and Organizational Skills required. Prior experience working in a medical office. Please fax resume with cover letter to: (575) 627-9520

SERVICES

105. Childcare NEED CHILD care? Find the widest range of available childcare for your children and their needs. 1-800-691-9067 or www.newmexic okids.org. You may also call us; Family Resource & Referral 622-9000 and we can help you navigate the system.

HOME DAYCARE providing weekend childcare. 626-6203 WILL DO evening and weekend daycare in my home. Call for more information. 910-0313

140. Cleaning JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252

HOUSEKEEPING - Home and/or office. Honest & dependable. 575-749-4900 or 575-578-1447 HOUSEKEEPER incl. windows & seasonal cleaning wkly, bi., mo. honest & dep. ref. 347-5270 Elizabeth LOOKING FOR houses to clean, good references. 254-485-1787 HANDICAPPED OR disabled & need someone to clean, cook or run errands. (Avail. wknds). Senior discount- honest & dependable. Call 622-3314

leave a will when he died of a heart attack in 2004. Larsson’s trilogy — “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” “The Girl Who Played with Fire” and “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets’ Nest” — became hugely popular after his death, with around 50 million copies sold worldwide. Gabrielsson holds a fourth, unpublished manuscript, in the series but doesn’t own the rights to it. She refuses to hand it over to Larsson’s family. “They already have so much money. I think there’s a limit somewhere,” she said on the same TV show last week. “How much are you going to scrape from the bottom of the barrel?” Gabrielsson’s own book, describing her life with Stieg Larsson, is going on sale in Sweden this week.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)  Your libido energy switch turns to high through spring. Romance is very likely for those who are young at heart. If attached, the embers of your relationship could become scorching flames. Plan on going away together more often. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  Keep reaching out for someone at a distance. Perhaps an e-mail might work best. Take off and enjoy a movie or a concert, or go to a museum. Note a tendency to want to expand your household in the next few months. Tonight: Let your imagination decide. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  Relate directly to a partner. In fact, investing some time with this person feels right and helps you relax. The bond becomes even stronger. Instead of sitting on your feelings so much, work on expressing them more often. Tonight: Enjoy the one you are with. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)  Defer to a partner. You might not feel comfortable with others presently. Brainstorm with a key associate, especially about a financial matter. You could be amazed at the alternatives that pop up. Decide to take a course to enhance your money knowledge. Tonight: Just not alone.

045. Employment Opportunities MEDICAL OFFICE POSITIONS:

B7

Stieg Larsson’s family retorts in inheritance feud

opportunities might reappear as well. For now, enjoy the people around you. Make a call or two to distant friends and/or loved ones. Tonight: Off to a neighborhood restaurant. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  Check out the cost of fostering a certain attitude or look. With every change, though there is a gain, there also could be a loss. Not all people will respond favorably. Be willing to break precedence in the next few months and become more authentic. Tonight: Your treat. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)  In the next few months, a partner becomes more loving. You might gain financially through others. Some of you might hit the lottery. For now, enjoy your innate charisma, allowing you greater popularity. Make a new friend. Tonight: The action revolves around you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)  Much might seem difficult to attain. If you want to take some downtime or go off on your own, do. Relaxation will be important, as the next months will be busy. If single, you could discover a very special person. If attached, your enjoyment of your sweetie might increase. Tonight: Shh. Don’t tell. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  Zero in on what you want. Wherever you go, people seem to gravitate toward you. Enjoy the present social scene, as you could be very busy in the next few months. Daily life could come with more professional responsibilities. Tonight: Forget tomorrow, live it up!

045. Employment Opportunities

Saturday, January 22, 2011

BIG HORN Electric Professional work, affordable price. 575-317-8345 NM Lic#367662.

195. Elderly Care

WILL CARE for your loved ones. Will cook, light housekeeping, laundry, bathe, 627-6363 good ref. ADVANCED HOME Care. All caregivers are licensed bonded & have passed federal criminal back-ground checks. Loving care since 1994. 627-6256

200. Fencing M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100

210. Firewood/Coal GRAVES FARM oak and elm. Cord and 1/2 cord delivered. 622-1889

FIREWOOD at Discounted prices. Guaranteed. Free del. & split. John 317-4317 FIREWOOD-SPILT, CURED & Delivered. Oak 1 Cord-$280, 1/2 Cord-$160. Elm 1 cord-$190, 1/2 Cord-$115. Discount if Picked up. Credit Cards accepted. Graves Farm 622-1889. SEANSONED MOUNTAIN wood $100 1/2 cord. Free delivery/stack. 626-9803. FIREWOOD Seasoned cedar & juniper: split, stacked & delivered, sale any amount call for pricing. 575-444-6053

220. Furniture Repair REPAIR & Refinish furniture & build furniture. Southwest Woods. 1727 SE Main. 623-0729 or 626-8466 Hrs 7-3pm. Call before you come in case he’s out running errands. www.southwestwoods furniture.com.

225. General Construction

MILLIGAN CONTRACTING Bathroom remodels, painting, tile, home repairs & more. Licensed, bonded & insured. Call Geary at 578-9353. TEE TIME Construction Commercial/Residential Construction - Framing, cement, roofing, drywalln painting, New Construction of Homes, Additions, Remodeling, and Metal Buildings. Licensed & Bonded. Call 575-626-9686 HIGH PLAINS Homes Specialist Stucco, Concrete & All Masonry 575-910-2450 Javier Yepis Lic 358142 - Licensed, Bonded & Insured

230. General Repair T-LEVEL CONSTRUCTION Inc. Handyman for a day. Call John for all your misc. repairs. 317-1477

232. Chimney Sweep CHIMNEY SWEEP Have your woodstove or fireplace inspected and cleaned. Dust free Guarantee. 35 years Experience, Licensed, Insured. Bulldog Janitorial Services 575-308-9988

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Roswell Lawn Service rake leaves, trim trees, general cleanup, 420-3278 LAWN SERVICE & much more work at low price. 914-0803 or 914-1375

305. Computers COMPUTER DOCTOR Microsoft Certified 50% off any repair (Labor only) 575-208-9348 Call Billy

310. Painting/ Decorating Quality Painting! Interior, Exterior at prices you can afford. Mike 910-7012

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING, water damage repairs, drywall, blown shingles, carpentry/license. 25 yrs exp. Call 208-0888

316. Pet Services

Canine Cleanup Services. Honest & Reliable. Call 420-4669

345. Remodeling

235. Hauling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 625-9924/ 626-4153.

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Will tear down old buildings, barns, haul trash, old farm equipment. 347-0142 or 317-7738

WEEKEND WARRIOR Lawn Service mowing, property cleanup, residential rain gutter cleaning, and much more 575-626-6121 Greenscapes Sprinkler Systems Lawn mowing, field mowing, gravel, sod-hydro seed, pruning, tilling, For dependable & reliable service call 622-2633 or 910-0150. COMPLETE LANDSCAPE services and handyman services. John 317-4317 NOW ACCEPTING new clients for field mowing, lawn mowing, trash hauling & cleanup. Call 575-420-2670.

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

Need A Roof?

Call R & R Construction 18 years in Roswell. 622-0072

T-LEVEL CONSTRUCTION Inc. Call John 317-1477

380. Sharpening

SHARPENING SERVICE Knives & Chainsaws. Professional & affordable. 624-5370 or 637-2211


B8 Saturday, January 22, 2011 405. TractorWork

CLASSIFIEDS

485. Business Opportunities

490. Homes For 490. Homes For Sale Sale

DO YOU earn $800 in a day? Your Own Local Candy Route! 25 Machines and Candy All for $9995. 877-915-8222 All Major Credit Cards Accepted!

LANGFORD TRACTOR work. Septic tanks installed/inspected. Blade work and backhoe work. Gravel, topsoil. 623-1407.

410. Tree Service

FSBO 2715 N Orchard beautiful 2 story, 2400 SF 4 br, 2 living areas, office or 5th br, laundry Rm, ref. air. Wonderful neighborhood across from Del Norte Park & Elem. Sch. 2 blks Goddard High a deal at $162k. 420-3606 for appt. to see.

FOR SALE FENCED COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 210x115 w/3200 SQFT SHOP & OFFICE IN & OUTSIDE PARKING. 100 N. PINE. CALL 575-910-2070.

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185

OPEN HOUSE Call 622-7010/910-6104. 3305 Riverside, 2222 sq. ft., 4/3/2, will negotiate 1% finders fee.

REAL ESTATE

ALLEN’S TREE Service. The oldest tree service in Roswell. Million $ ins. 626-1835

402 SPRUCE 4/2, $45.000, owner fin., $450mo. 10% dn., central ht, swamp cooler.626-5290

490. Homes For Sale ADVERTISE YOUR HOME ALL OVER NEW MEXICO. CALL THE DAILY RECORD FOR DETAILS. 622-7710

440. Window Repair AQUARIUS GLASS For Less. Screens, Patio & Shower Drs., Table Tops & Mirrors. 623-3738.

T-LEVEL CONSTRUCTION Inc. Call John 317-1477

FINANCIAL

485. Business Opportunities ARE YOU tired of exchanging your time for money and watching life pass by in an instant? Do you seem to spend more time at your job than at home with your family doing what you actually enjoy? I’m involved in an opportunity that can change that, and give you complete freedom of time. Not to mention, the income potential is outstanding. ACN Independent Representative Ronika Thomas 575-626-9409.

2 HOUSES-2BR/1BA, $60k each , owner will finance w/$6k down. 623-0459 4Bd, 1 Ba, new paint, carpet, doors,fncd yrd, $59,500, M-Th 624-1331

EQUAL HOUSING NOTICE All real estate advertised in the Roswell Daily Record is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion or sex, family status and handicap or national origin or an intention to make any such preference limitation or discrimination. The Roswell Daily Record will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

2 BR 1 bath needs TLC $35,000 1109 W. Hendricks $1500 down $375 per month 622-6786 NEW MEXICO Discount Broker.com Selling a home is expensive-Keep more of your equity by reducing your cost to sell. Ask us how. 627-1355 NORTH cute 3/2 w/carport Neutral tones-Nice carpet Only 109k HISTORIC district-hard wood floors 2/1/1 + office + 2 rooms in basement Very nice Owner/Broker $124,900 OWNER FINANCE 2/1 remodeled New cabinets flooring paint stucco $68k 317-4373/627-1355 COUNTRY ESTATE 6BR/8bathrooms, 8600+SF brick home on 40 acres with pool, guest house, shop, horse pens 1.9M.

3 BR 1 3/4bath 1239 sq ft. remodeled & updated, lots of potential. $82k 303 S. Balsam Ave. 626-5752

Last Price Reduction $99,995, Brokers welcome. #3 Forest Dr. OPEN HOUSE DAILY 1PM TO 6PM, 2050 square feet. 4 Bedroom, 1 3/4 bath. Esquibel Real Estate. 575-626-7550 CISCO 575-312-3529

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale COUNTRY HOME HORSE PROPERTY W. of Roswell, 5ac, 1800sf home, 4br, 2ba, fl. sz arena w/roping chutes, covered runs, metal barn, tack hse, shop, trees - ready to sell. 623-2538

1 BD, all bills pd, no pets, no smoking, no HUD 623-6281

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

2 BED, 2 ba, 1 car garage, central air, fenced yard, 26-A Bent Tree Rd, $700/mo, $700/dep., 627-9942

Restaurant bldg, $275K cash/trade for Ruidoso prprty, M-Th 624-1331

1997 CLATON, 3/2 in adult park, can be moved, nice. Call 575-317-6489. WE BUY used mobile homes. Single & double wides. 575-622-0035 D01090.

1999 FLEETWOOD 16x60 two bedroom one bath. Very nice setup in Clovis. Loaded with appliances also big step and porch. Priced right. Call 575-622-0035 D01090

520. Lots for Sale

OWNER FINANCING for a limited time. Ready to build 5 acre lots w/ great views & good covenants. Located 9 miles West of Roswell @ the Club House Banquet Facility. Free land maps and at entrance. 575-623-1800. www.BuenaVidaLand.com

PREMIUM 5 Acre tracts, Owner will finance with 10% down, New Construction only (no mobile homes), , Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd. between Country Club & Berrendo Rd. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-4337

• Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (505)-622-7710 #45 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

Town Plaza Apartments Utilities paid - Gas and Electric. New Owners, friendly new managers. New Remodeled EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs/downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Seniors 55yrs plus, law enforcement and military will receive discount. No HUD. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 2nd year, 1 free month rent.

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

Mobile Home Lots for Sale $15,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. We Take Visa and Mastercard! 420-1352.

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS

540. Apartments Unfurnished

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished 305 W. Deming alley apartment, 1br, refrig. air, utilities pd., $450 mo, $400 dep. No pets. 623-7678 VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722.

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

1&2Bd, wtr pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 624-1331

PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. BEST VALUE IN TOWN 3br/2ba, $559+elec, newly remodeled, only a few apts left, 1br $380, 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 ALL BILLS PAID 3br, 2ba, $680 mo., brand new everything. 1br $480. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944

1BR, 650 sq ft, $380 + elec. Central heating, ref air, new carpet, paint & tile. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 3 BEDROOM, 2 Bath, 930 sf, $559 plus electric. 502 S. Wyoming. 2 bedroom, 1 bath $480 or 1 bedroom $380. Call 622-4944.

EFFICIENCY 1 br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348.

THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS!! Become the newest member of our proud community. Income qualify, and your rent could be even lower! Efficiency $355, Small One Bedroom $390, Large One Bedroom $400, One Bedroom w/Study $420, Two Bedroom, one Bath $465, Two Bedroom, two Bath $550. All deposits are $200 Saddlecreek Apartments 1901 S. Sunset 622-3042 Set Aside Units for AHDP. saddlecreek@cableone.net LARGE 1 bedroom apartment. References and background check required. Washer and Dryer hookups. Private parking. 420-0100 2 BDR. No Pets, No HUD, 1702 E. 2nd St. 773-396-6618

105 S Ohio, 1br studio apt, all bills pd, $550 mo. 575-652-9682 1BR APT., all bills paid $550, $200 dep. No HUD. 420-5604 1300 CAMINO Real (Sunset & McGaffey) Apt. A, 2br, 2ba, 1 car garage. Senior Complex 55 yrs of age, No pets or smoking. $670 mo., $325 sec/dep. Ranchline Taylor & Taylor 622-1490







540. Apartments Unfurnished

Dennis the Menace

EFFICIENCY 2 BR, downtown, clean, water paid. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD Call 623-8377

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished FLETC Homes for rent. Long & short term rentals. 5 minutes from FLETC. Brand new & beautiful! Visit our website: www.lgrentalhomes.com or Call 420-0519 or 910-7670

2/1, carport, sec. alarm, water, $695/1mo. dep., No HUD, 637-8467

903 S. Wyoming, FLETC READY, 2BR 2BA, all bills paid, $2,310 month, 3305 Trailing Heart, FLETC READY, 3BR 2BA, all bills paid, $2,310 month, 1915 Clover, FLETC READY, 3BR, 2BA, all bills paid, $2,310 month, #4 Jardin, 3BR 2BA, all bills paid, $2,310 month, Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N. Main St, 575-622-4604.

Nice, NMMI area, safe, quiet, homey, updated decor, 2/2 + office, hardwood floors, deco fireplace, gas patio grill, HP internet, LCD TV w/DVD, everything furnished, FLETC ready. 910-7148

30 DEBORAH, partially furnished, 2/3 br, 2ba, all appl. including w/d, large fenced backyard, $850 mo., $1000 dep, wtr pd. 578-1132

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 30D BENT Tree Rd, 2/2/1, FP, $675mo., $500dep. No Smoking, No Pets Katherine (702)232-7735

507 REDWOOD, 3/1 incl. stove, refrig., fresh paint & new carpet. $500 dep., $700 mo., no pets or HUD. 970-946-6575 NOW AVAIL. 3br, 2ba, new carpet & tile, $900 mo., $600 dep., no HUD, no pets. 420-5930

2&3 Bd, 1&2 Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 624-1331 OLDER LADY to share 2br home in Artesia. 575-746-3912

400 1/2 E 5th 1 bedroom stove, refrig., water paid, $325 mo. $200 dep. No HUD & No Pets. 910-9648 LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com! NO PETS, No HUD, 3br, $600 mo., $500 dep. 914-0101

1BR, 12031/2 N. Lea Ave., $450 mo., $400 dep, great quiet neighborhood, wtr pd. 627-3403 1205 N. Maple, 2br, ht pump, w/d hookups, $550 mo., $500 dep., no pets. 637-8234

406 W. Tilden, 2br, garage, ht pump, w/d hookups, $600 mo., $500 dep., no pets. 637-8234 502 W. Albuquerque, 2br, ht pump, w/d hookups, $500 mo., $500 dep., no pets. 637-8234

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

504 W. Albuquerque, 2br, w/d hookups, heat pump, no pets, $550 mo., $500 dep. 637-8234

3 BR, 1 bath, fenced yard, w&/d hookups. 910-8170

200 S. Washington Ave. - 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, detached garage on an extra large lot. $700.00 per month with 1 month security deposit. Renter pays all utilities. No indoor pets, no smokers. Hud accepted. Call 575-317-5322 or 575-625-8627. 409 LA Fonda - Nice and Clean 3 bedroom, 2 bath, one car garage - $1,100 a month. Call 627-7595 or 840-7411. NE TOWNHOUSE 3br 1

3/4 bath fireplace 2 car ga-

rage, 1200 Seville $895 month 420-7380

1105 W. 14th St. 2br/1ba. $500/mth, $500/deposit. Edgar 420-4038, 420-3167 500 S Evergreen, $900 mo, $450 dep. 4 bed/2 ba, lots of storage, central air, stove, fridge, D/W included, close to schools and parks, no hud, 622-3250. 906 W. Deming, 3br, 1ba, stove, fridge, no bills pd, $600 mo., $600 dep. Call 575-624-2464 or 575-317-2483 3 bdrm $650mo 350 dep ref. no pets, w/d hook ups 317-3222 218 E. Hervey 3BR 2BA, $625 month, 322 E. Bonney, 3BR 1BA, $550 month, 43 A Street, 2BR, 1BA, $350 month, 1514 W. Tilden, 2BR, 1BA, $600 month, 314 S. Birch #C, 1BR, 1BA, $400 month, 213 N. Michigan, 2BR, 1BA, $750 month, 314 S. Birch #A, 1BR, 1BA, $550 month, 1310 N. Lea, 3BR, 2BA, $1,400 month, 2301 N. Garden, 3BR, 1BA, $600 month, 2611 N. Kentucky #119, 2BR 2BA, $1,150 month, 1504 Tulane, 3BR, 2BA, $800 month, 505 W. College, 3BA 2.5 BA, $1,200 month, 905 W. Poe, 3BR 2BA, $850 month, 109 Fairway (Dexter), 4BR 2BA, $1200 month. Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N. Main St, 575-622-4604. 4 HOMES - 3-4br, $550mo, sale 45K, 4K dn, $400 mo. Al 575-703-0420, 202-4702 LARGE 3 bedrooms 2 bath w/d hook ups appliances. No pets or HUD $650 mo. $500 dep. 840-8630 or 623-6200 Dan, 914-0531 3/1BA, RIAC, Hud ok, will be avail. in 30 days. 622-1898

At Mission Arch Care and Rehabilitation Center our employees are the heart of the company. In addition, our center has a tenured management team with Rehab Recovery Suites and dedicated Solana (Alzheimer’s) unit. Come see why you’ll want to be part of the family. Contact us today!

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 

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Our center was FIRST in the state in raising money for the Alzheimer’s Memory Walk! Come join our dedicated team!

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Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

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www.roswell-record.com Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

New Mexico Psychiatric Services Inc.

is seeking for a Full Time M.D. Psychiatrist in New Mexico. Must be Board Certified or Board Eligible. Job Description:

• Working in medically underserved area in New Mexico

• Covering In Patient and Out Patient Services with participation in hospital On Call coverage. • Competitive Salary & Benefits

Please send resume to: New Mexico Psychiatric Services Inc. 1700 N Union Roswell, NM 88201

3200 Mission Arch Drive, Roswell   sFAX   mary.lawrie-kopcik@sunh.com %/%$&70sWWWSUNBRIDGEHEALTHCARECOM

FOR RENT EXIT Realty 623-6200

2 bed, 1 bath, $500/mo-712 E 3rd 2 bed, 2 bath, office, $650/mo-609 N Louisiana 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 living areas, 2 car carport, $1050/mo-1906 S Heights 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 living areas, 2 car garage, $1200/mo-208 Pima

30 DEBORAH, partially furnished, 2/3 br, 2ba, all appl. including w/d, large fenced backyard, $850 mo., $1000 dep, wtr pd. 578-1132 3 BD/1 ba. 1 car gar. 66 G St., ref air, RIAC $650 mo., $650 dep. 627-9942.

1305 W. College, 2br, 1ba, garage, all elec., nice & clean, $595. 626-9530 1BR, 1BA, 602 A. S. Wyoming $425 mo., $300 dep. Call Julie 505-220-0617. 3/1/1, storage rm, fenced backyard, 900 N. Greenwood, $550/$300 dep., no pets. 626-4006

NICE 2BR w/p & nice 1 br w/p. No Pets No Hud. 910-9357

FRESH PAINT, large 2/3br, 1ba, fenced, garage, good area, 1204 S. Missouri. 622-2485

569. Mobile Home Spaces/Lots

EASY LIVING community 1337 McCall Loop, Roswell. Long term RV’s welcome. 624-2436

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places OFFICE SPACE for Rent. Prime downtown area, 2,061 sq.ft. Please call 622-8711.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITE for lease: Newly decorated, private rest room, covered parking at 1210 North Main. Contact David McGee, Owner / Broker 622-2401 BEAUTY SHOP for lease, 103 N. Pennsylvania. A/C, plubming & stations ready to go, $595 mo., $500 dep. 575-317-6479

212 W. 1st, office for lease, 1200sqft, A/C, $400 mo., $400 dep. 575-317-6479

STOREFRONT/Retail/ 800 sqft 20ft utilities pd. 2102 S. Main $550mo. 627-9942 FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546.

STOREFRONT Retail 2500 sqft 58ft frontage at 3106 N Main $1200mo 627-9942 REMODELED OFFICE building 2ba, 10 rooms, brand new carpet & paint job, avail. right away. Call Gene Ortega @ 505-249-8813.

STOREFRONT - Retail Or Customized professional office suite. Everything new inside & out, 105 W. 6th, across from Peppers. 575-420-6050

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale ROLL ENDS. Use for packing, mulch, art projects and other uses. Buy day old paper by the bundles, also boxes 15x12x10. Roswell Daily Record Circulation Department. 622-7710.


Roswell Daily Record 605. Miscellaneous for Sale NEED FURNITURE? Shop Blair’s Trading Post for the best prices in town for your household items. We buy & sell furniture, appliances, home decor, collectibles, electronics, saddles, jewelry, tools, fishing & camping items, movies plus everything else from A-Z. Including many hard to find items. Serving Roswell for 40 years. Open daily 9-5. Accept Visa & MC. 5611 Hummingbird Ln. 627-2033

POWER WHEELCHAIR, walker, commode chair, wheelchair lift. 622-7638 ANTIQUES, DISHES, cookware, old trunk, cowhide Bernard sofa. By appt. only, 910-0014 REACH OVER 500,000 READERS in more than 30 newspapers across the state for one low price. Contact your local newspaper’s classified department or visit nmpress.org for details. SAWMILLSBAND/CHAINSAW cut lumber any dimension, anytime. Build anything from furniture to homes. IN STOCK ready to ship. From $4090.00. www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800-661-7747 FRIGIDAIRE 19.8 c.f. side by side refrigerator/freezer, w/ice maker; light brown recliner; Zieman 3 rail motorcycle trailer, radial tires plus spare & rim, excellent condition, pulled very little. (575) 623-9702.

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

ANTIQUE FURNITURE, Singer pedal sewing machine, hall tree, desk, duck decoy, old buttons & misc. Call for appt. 624-7912.

DODGE DAKOTA camper shell long bed white very good condition $400. Also round coffee table cherry oak with glass top and 2 end tables $100 for set. Call 626-3609 or 626-3608

SPRAGUE & Carlton solid maple dining set, 6 chairs w/3 extensions, 50 yrs old in excellent condition $700. 806-647-6098 or 575-653-4182 20X8” IROC Replicas American Racing Alum/Chrome, 5 on 5 Bolt Pattern, very well kept $700. 840-8454 Don.

14” CHAIN saw in good condition $45, including an extra new chain & a complete instruction manual. 623-3122

12 FT. aluminum ramp $1500 display case $100 stereo turntable cabinet $75, scooter power chair under 1 mile $800, lg. freezer $200, 2 wooden shelf $25 ea. recliner $40, glass cabinet $30. 622-2703, 910-3795

WULITZER PIANO paid $1000, best reasonable offer. 575-746-7429

DRESSER & hi-boy, made by Drexel, Hepplewhite style w/curved drawers, gold & white. Appraised at $350, asking $280 for both, as is/where is. Ladies yellow leather golf bag $40, livestock prod w/batteries by Hot Shot, never used, $40. Men’s medium Eddie Bauer outdoor vest, has elastic insert arm holes, brand new condition $35. Power chair used 4 hrs, valued over $4000, asking $1500, neg. 622-6543 ATTENTION ROCKHOUNDS I have quality rocks and fossils at discount prices. 622-8945

3-IN-1 CONVERTIBLE white Baby crib $100, Graco Bassinet with storage, converts to playpen $80, Infant carseat up to 32lbs comes with base $50. All in excellent cond. Call or text 317-6816

FOR SALE 3-4 yr old side by side refrigerator look like stainless steel doors black on sides- ice/water indoor, wine rack, veggie humidity control drawer, meat drawer. Like new? Selling because received free new one? Sells for over $1000. Asking $300 Call Victoria 910-1942

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

005 010 015 020 025

Announcements Special Notice Card of Thanks Personals/Special Transportation Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted 045 050 055 060

Employment

Employment Opportunities Salesperson/Agents Employment Agencies Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 441 445 450

Window Repair Window Cleaning Wrought Iron Services Wanted

455 456 460 465

Money: Loan/Borrow Credit Cards Insurance Co. Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale Investment: Stocks/Sale Mortgages for Sale Mortgages Wanted Business Opportunities

470 475 480 485

Financial

CLASSIFIEDS

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous WE BUY Home furnishings, furniture, appliances, collectibles, tools and everything else from A-Z including personal estates and whole house fulls. 627-2033 or 623- 6608

WE BUY PECANS Top Prices Paid. Up to $1.80 lb. On Grand Ave. between 4th & 5th St. Behind Courthouse. SELL THOSE Pecans Haley Farms paying up to $1.75 per pound for your pecans. Monday-Friday 2:00 to 5:00 Sat. 9:00-2:00 5018 W. Country Club Rd. HARD TIMES? Get the most cash for your old & broken gold & silver jewelry. Also, US silver coins. Call Skeets in Roswell, 578-0805. WILL BUY your good used washers & dryers. 626-7470 BUYING PECANS N. Main & Berrendo Rd. Mon. & Weds. 575-399-2212 GUITAR WANTED! Local musician will pay up to $12,500 for pre-1975 Gibson, Fender, Martin, Rickenbaker and Gretsch guitars. Fender amplifiers also. Call toll free! 1-(800) 995-1217. Tricycle w/basket. Needs to be fairly new & in good shape. 575-840-9930

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

635. Good things to Eat

745. Pets for Sale

GRAVES FARM & Garden Frozen green chile, extra hot, regular hot, big Jim & mild. Dried red chile pods. New crop in January. Convenient store items available. We accept EBT, Credit cards and debit cards, we ship anywhere. 7 1/2 miles South on old Dexter Hwy. 622-1889 hours Monday thru Saturday 8-5:30 Sunday 1-5

665. Musical Merchandise GUITARS FOR SALE!! Fender Stratocaster “Blacktop” w/dual humbuckers $399.00, Fender Standard Stratocaster, white w/SD hotrail pup $450.00, Ibanez SA120, charcoal brown w/SD Hot Rods $350.00. For More Info, Call: 575-910-3729.

715. Hay and Feed Sale Alfalfa Hay- small bales, oat hay & sudan all grades $4.50-$9.50 per bale. Big bales available $110-$140 each. Open 8:00-5:30 MonSat.1:00-5:00 Sunday, Graves Farm & Garden 622-1889 Credit Cards Accepted

745. Pets for Sale

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

FREE CATS! Some older cats, some spayed, neutered, shy now but will be friendly, all need good homes. 626-4708.

1 YR old male Rottweiler $200 call Richard 317-6045 or 347-2051 Old Victorian Bulldogge Pups! Ready 2/14/11 taking deposits 575-495-1015 FULL BLOODED German Shepherd pups 2 males left in Artesia. $300 ea. 308-9013 or 308-9967

CHOTTIES Small (8-10lbs.), fuzzy cuteness $100. 622-6190

$50 6MO old Chihuahuas, & Chiapoms, bigger, older puppies, sweet & lovable, registered, 308-3017.

TINY REGISTERED White Maltese puppy $900, payments & credit card, pics avail., 308-3017 11 MO. old female Blue Heeler. After 4m, (575)635-3016

RECREATIONAL

775. Motorcycles & Scooters 2000 YAMAHA YZF 600R $1,500 for information call 575-840-9609

PUPPY LOVE Grooming Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also - 575-420-6655

790. Autos for Sale

96 OLDS Cutlass only 90k miles nice car $2500 317-3529

1584CC TWIN Cam 96B Engine converted to 103 cubic inches. Vance & Hines Pipes, sounds like thunder. 200mm rear tire, Red & lots of extra chrome. Original mini-ape hangers w/pullback risers for perfect riding position. Boss Throttle Control. 6 speed cruise drive transmission, electronic sequential port fuel injection. Alarm system & trickle charger. 915 original miles, one owner, garage kept! $16,500. (575) 626-6055 or 814 N. Atkinson.

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans 2006 FORD F250, excellent cond., ext. cab, $10,800, 626-7488.

2004 KIA Sedona sliding rear doors, 3rd seat, 84k mi, excellent cond. $3650 w/1k down owner finance. 420-1352 2006 FORD F350, 4dr, pwr stroke diesel, dual rear wheel 10ft flat bed, excellent cond., $13,800. 626-7488

1999 HONDA 4 Trax 300 W-Wench & racks, $2,200. 575-626-9887

FREE OLDER adult female Beegles, 687-4187 or 703-5893.

B9

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

2008 TOYOTA Tacoma access cab, 4 cyl, 5 speed, 4x4, 21/25 mpg, 22k miles, 626-9915 or 625-9866.

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. Your dealer of choice. Sales, parts, service, consignments, purchases, propane, dump station. 2900 West Second. 622-1751, 1-800-929 0046

96 plymouth Grand Voyage $1400 OBO 420-0676 will trade for 4x4 pick-up. 2000 FORD super duty F-350 7.3 diesel DRW. After 5pm call 734-4924 ‘99 FORD F150 V8, 67k miles, heavy duty towing package, battery isolator, trailer brakes, 1301 Bonita Dr. 575-208-0695.

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

796. SUVS

2001 CHEVY Malibu, 96,000 miles, excellent car. Tow equipped. $3500, Blue Ox tow bar & accessories $125. 317-3083

1992 GMC S-10 Blazer, 4x4, V6, auto, 20mpg, good condition, $2300 obo. 623-7208

FORD CONTOUR 83k miles, runs great, $2850, no financing. 420-1352

2004 DODGE Durango, 22” rims, 65k mi. good cond. 575-624-2283, 317-7703

T O D AY AT R O S W E L L F O R D . . .

Fall in love with a new car or truck! These new Ford vehicles are ready for a long term rrelationship! elationship!

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Saturday, January 22, 2011

2011 FORD FIESTA SE #110124

2011 FORD FOCUS SEDAN #110040

Up to 40 mpg. Squeezes every last drop.

Up to 35 mpg. Unlimited fun.

or

MSRP Retail Customer Cash

Final Price

$199 month

$13,995 - 500

$13,495

*

With $1000 down

or

$233 month

MSRP $18,180 Retail Customer Cash - 3,000 College StudentProgram - 500

$14,680

Final Price

*

With $0 down

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos

2011 FORD FUSION SE #110103

2011 FORD ESCAPE XLT #110091

IImpressive mpressive ep power. ower. Great Great economy. economy

High g p performance e o a ce low o impact. pact

MSRP $24,165 Roswell Ford Savings - 950 Retail Customer Cash - 2,000 College StudentProgram - 500

or

$20,715

Final Price

$329 month *

With $0 down

2010 FORD F150 SUPER CREW Strong, S trong, d durable urable a and nd d dependable. ependab

#10437. #104 #1 04377.

MSRP Roswell Ford Savings Retail Customer Cash Ford CreditBonus Cash

$31,185 - 1,130 - 3,000 - 1,000

or

$399 month

$25,555

Final Price

*

With $1000 down

or

$349 month

MSRP $25,170 Roswell Ford Savings - 680 Retail Customer Cash - 2,000 College Student Program - 500

Final Price

$21,990

*

With $0 down

2011 FORD F250 XLT CREW CAB #110104.

Best-in-class horsepower and torque.

MSRP Roswell Ford Savings Retail Customer Cash FordCreditBonus

Final Price

$51,560 - 3,500 - 2,500 - 1,000

Total

$7000

$44,560

Savings!* With $0 down

*Prices and payments based on total of all incentives and programs applied. 2010 F150 Super Crew monthly payments based on 72 months at 5.49% APR with approved credit. All other vehicles based on 72 months at 4.49% APR with approved credit. Prices do not include tax, registration and dealer service transfer fee. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only and may not represent the actual vehicles. Not responsible for typographical errors.

ROSWELL FORD

Toll-free: 877-624-3673

www.roswellford.com llf d

821 N. MAIN ST. OPEN: MON.-FRI. 8AM - 7PM, SAT. 8AM - 5PM SALES: 623-3673 SERVICE DEPT.: 623-1031


B10 Saturday, January 22, 2011

ENTERTAINMENT

Winfrey promises to spill family secret Monday

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Oprah Winfrey has staged many a family reunion on her talk show. But on Monday’s episode, she promises, the drama will be about her. Winfrey told viewers Thursday that she will have a reunion of her own on “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” She wouldn’t say with whom — only that it involves something she’s learned about recently and is known to only a few people close to her. “I thought I’d seen it all. But this, my friends, is the miracle of all miracles,” Winfrey says in a promotional spot for the show. The word “miracle” appears on screen, reinforcing her pronouncement. “I was given some news that

literally shook me to my core. This time, I’m the one being reunited,” she said. “I was keeping a family secret for months, and on Monday you’re going to hear it straight from me.” Her production company, Harpo, declined to provide further details Friday. Given Winfrey’s tangled family history, the possibilities for her reunion are many. She was bor n to unmarried teenagers, Vernon Winfrey and Vernita Lee, and raised at various times by a grandmother, her mother, and her father and stepmother in Mississippi, Wisconsin and T ennessee, according to Winfrey and various biographies. However, Kitty Kelley’s unauthorized 2010 biography of Win-

Roswell Daily Record

Given Winfrey’s tangled family history, the possibilities for her reunion are many. She was born to unmarried teenagers, Vernon Winfrey and Vernita Lee, and raised at various times by a grandmother, her mother, and her father and stepmother in Mississippi, Wisconsin and Tennessee, according to Winfrey and various biographies.

frey alleges that Vernon Winfrey isn’t Oprah’s biological father. Kelley also claims that she discovered the actual father’s identity but was keeping it secret until Winfrey learns the truth herself. As a teenager, Oprah Winfrey gave birth to a son who died shortly afterward. That chapter of her life was revealed after a family member sold the story to a tabloid in 1990, and Winfrey was

said to have felt betrayed. Using her Chicago-based show to disclose a new wrinkle in her personal history allows her to keep other media from getting hold of it first. Winfrey has proved herself a master at milking family reunion drama, celebrity and otherwise, on her syndicated talk show that’s in its 25th and final season. This month, she launched a

cable channel, OWN. She reunited more than 100 members of the Osmonds. She brought together both the screen family from “The Sound of Music” and descendants of the real-life members of the musical Von T rapp family portrayed in the film. After decades apart, singer Seal and his foster sister were reunited on Winfrey’s show. There was also the memorable reunion involving Clemantine and Claire Wamariya, sisters who escaped the Rwandan genocide and later immigrated to America without knowing if their parents had survived. They learned they had, but it wasn’t until they were onstage with Winfrey that the sisters saw their mother and father again.

Plea deals reached in actress sham marriage case

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A Mexican actress has agreed to plead guilty to lying in an immigration proceeding and will avoid a retrial on charges that she

engaged in a sham marriage to remain in the United States. Court records filed in a Los Angeles federal court show that actress Fernan-

da Romero is acknowledging she made a false statement on an immigration form in December 2007. Her husband, Kent Stuart Ross, has also agreed

to plead guilty to falsely stating on immigration forms that he and Romero were living together in 2005 and 2006. Prosecutors are not

seeking jail time. The pair were charged with entering a sham marriage in April and a mistrial was declared in September after jurors reported

problems during deliberations. Romero is best known for her role in the Mexican soap opera “Eternamente Tuya.”

“Hometown Proud”

DON’T MISS OUT ON THESE

GREAT SAVINGS!

SATURDAY-TUESDAY JANUARY 22ND-25TH, 2011

ROSWELL STORE ONLY! WHILE SUPPLIES LAST.

1

VALUE PACK

$ 59

ASSORTED PORK CHOPS

LB.

21

11-15.25OZ CAN

IGA VEGETABLES

$

2

FOR

Corn Green Beans Mixed Vegetables Peas

REGULAR 32 LOADS

ERA 2X DETERGENT

$ 99

88

ROMA TOMATOES

3

¢

LB.

9-ROLL CHARMIN ULTRA BATH TISSUE

$ 99

23

SELECT VARIETIES 64OZ.

SUNNY D PUNCH

900 W. Second St Roswell, NM Hours: Sun. - Thurs. 7am till 9pm Fri. & Sat. 7am till 10 pm

EVERY TUESDAY IS “BANANA TUESDAY” 3 LBS. FOR $1

$

FOR

3

ASST VAR. 14.76OZ-22.63OZ

RED BARON PIZZA

$ 99

55

SELECT VAR.10.3OZ-12.6OZ

JOY OR DAWN DETERGENT

$

24 FOR

SELECT VARIETIES 45OZ TUB

SHEDDS COUNTRY CROCK

$

FOR

Don’t Forget Our Convenient Drive-Thru Window In Our Pharmacy Pharmacy Hours: 9am-6pm Mon-Fri • 9am-1pm Sat. Closed Sundays

01-22-2011  

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