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Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 120, No. 27 50¢ Daily / $1 Sunday

INSIDE NEWS

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

TUESDAY

www.rdrnews.com

Lawmakers walk out of House hearing MATTHEW ARCO RECORD STAFF WRITER

NO FORCE AGAINST PROTESTERS

February 1, 2011

A House committee meeting was the site of a partisan altercation on Monday that serves as a reminder of the minority party’s growing voice in the lower house, according to a local representative. Republican lawmakers walked out of the House Energy and Natural Resource Committee’s inaugural meeting of the 60-day session. The event took place after a committee member was told by the Democratic chair man that his questions were out of order. The House Republican caucus

accused the chairman of silencing Rep. Donald Bratton, R-Hobbs, while Chairman Rep. Brian Egolf, D-Santa Fe, said he made his comments because Bratton was simply speaking out of turn. The event, in the evenly-divided, six Democrat and six Republican, member committee, highlights the minority party’s ability to have an even voice in committees where Democrats do not hold a solid majority. “Now, what’s radically different is that without all six of the representatives ... there is no quorum and that committee cannot conduct business,” said Rep. Dennis

Kintigh, R-Roswell, who compared the recent event to similar walkouts in recent years when Republicans didn’t hold as many seats in the House. Kintigh, who serves on the House Energy and Natural Resource Committee and took place in the walkout, said the event was not planned. He questioned Egolf’s intentions of the issues hearing after the presenters picked to address the committee spoke favorably of regulations such as the pit rule. Kintigh said he and fellow Republicans questioned the presenters’ qualifications.

“We got a lecture from an ‘expert’ ... (who) proceeded to give us a big lecture on how good the pit rule is,” he said. “When Rep. Don Bratton tried to make a point about this and he was cut of f by the chairman and, you know what, that was it.” According to the House Republican caucus, Bratton responded by saying, “If it’s out of order to question the credentials of a witness, then I’m wasting my time and the people’s money.” However, Egolf defended his actions by saying that Bratton

Hearing held in Vega case

CAIRO (AP) — Egypt’s military pledged not to fire on protesters in a sign that army support for President Hosni Mubarak may be unraveling on the eve of a major escalation — a push for a million people to take to the streets Tuesday to demand the authoritarian leader’s ouster. - PAGE A2

TOP 5

JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

WEB For The Last 24 Hours

• Jerge crowned Miss Roswell 2011 • Rollover • School board elections • Ezzell pushing self-defense bill • Officials receive courthouse dog training

INSIDE SPORTS A newly installed sign on Southeast Main Street incorrectly spells Chaves County as “Chavez County.”

Matthew Arco Photo

Misspelled sign to be corrected MATTHEW ARCO RECORD STAFF WRITER

DJOKOVIC DOWNS MURRAY MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Novak Djokovic gave his old friend Andy Murray a sympathetic hug and a few consoling words, then got on with the real celebrations. - PAGE B1

TODAY’S OBITUARIES • Mary Jo Lunsford • Sharnene Jay Brooks • Nena Porter • Pamela Harvey • Letha Gonzales • Salvador Barrio Saavedra - PAGE B8

HIGH ...30˚ LOW ....10˚

TODAY’S FORECAST

CLASSIFIEDS..........B5 COMICS.................B3 ENTERTAINMENT.....A8 FINANCIAL .............B4 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........B5 LOTTERIES ............A2 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8 WORLD .................A3

INDEX

See HEARING, Page A6

Sign, sign, everywhere a sign, but to the county’s namesake this one is unkind. Do this, misspell that, can’t you read the sign? Local state Department of Transportation of ficials say a newly installed directional sign containing a typo on Southeast Main Street will soon be corrected. The agency’s District Two office mistakenly spelled Chaves County as “Chavez County” in a sign telling

drivers the direction of the Chaves County Detention Center. “It was a new sign put in last week ... (that) did come out of our sign shop here,” said Manon Arnett, spokeswoman for New Mexico DOT’s District Two office on West Second Street. The facility is one of three in the state that has its own in-house sign shops, she said. The new road sign replaced an outdated wooden sign. “It should have never went up,” Arnett said. “The patrol supervisor said he saw that it was misspelled, but thought it best (to install it tem-

porarily) so they could still have an informational sign up.” Officials plan to build a new sign with the correct spelling in the coming days. The green and white sign is located south of Brasher Road and visible to motorists driving north into Roswell. “It will be corrected by the end of the week,” she said. “It was a mistake, even to put it up.” Costs for road signs run about $10 per square foot, Arnett said. The 2-foot by 3-foot sign will cost about $60 to replace. mattarco@roswell-record.com

A pre-trial conference was held in Judge Charles C. Currier's 5th Judicial District courtroom Monday afternoon for the trial of David Vega. Vega, 47, is accused of killing his son, Christopher Lee Vega , 25, and his son's girlfriend, Alyssa Michelle Montgomery, 31, on May 10. The shooting deaths followed a series of domestic disturbances on May 9. Roswell police officers were called to the home, at 1007 Rancho Road, twice before Vega was arrested around 8:30 p.m. on a petty misdemeanor charge of disorderly house. Vega paid his bond and retur ned home early on May 10. Police were again dispatched to Rancho Road after the nephew called the RPD and reported that shots had been fired. Vega was wounded during a subsequent shoot-out with police, and the bodies of his son and his son’s girlfriend were found upon entering the home. Judge Currier made specific inquiries about the See VEGA, Page A6

Winter storm takes aim at one-third of US School board elections today Voters will head to the polls today to decide who will serve on their respective school boards. Roswell Districts 2 and 4 have five precincts open to cast their ballots and Lake Arthur residents have one precinct location at the Lake Arthur Community Center. Residents of Dexter Consolidated School District No. 8, Hagerman Municipal School District No. 6 and Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell will cast their ballots at the Chaves County Administrative Center. Those residents must vote at 1 St. Mary Place because only one candidate filed a declaration of candidacy for each position needed to be filled.

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — A monster winter storm took aim at a third of the nation Monday, threatening to lay a potentially deadly path of heavy snow and ice from the Rockies to New England, followed by a wave of bitter, bone-rattling cold that could affect tens of millions of people. Cities including St. Louis, Kansas City and Milwaukee could be hardest hit, with expected midweek snowfalls of up to 2 feet and drifts piled 5 to 10 feet. Even hardy Chicago could be in for its third-worst blizzard since record-keeping began. “I wouldn’t want to be on the road in open areas tomorrow night,“ said forecaster Tom Skilling of Chicago television station WGN. ”I don’t think I’d want to be driving in the city either. The fact is people die in these things. They skid off the road and go wandering around in whiteout conditions.“ Warmer areas were not safe, either. The system could spawn tornadoes in parts of the South. While record snowfalls have pounded the Northeast in one of that region’s most brutal winters, the

AP Photo

The Battle Ground Volunteer Fire Department primary response vehicle sits in a ditch with front end damage after a three car accident near Battle Ground, Ind., Monday.

Midwest has been comparatively unscathed, until now.

At Edele and Mertz Hardware just a few blocks from the Anheuser-Busch brewery in St. Louis, customers lined up by 7 a.m. Monday waiting for the store to

open. Snow shovels, ice melt and salt were all big sellers.

transportation of ficials readied street-clearing equipment, and some airlines encouraged travelers to rebook trips leaving from Chicago. Airlines canceled thousands of flights ahead

As the first flakes fell,

See STORM, Page A6

“‘Freaking out’ is a great way of putting it,” employee Steve Edele said. “The icing — that’s what scares people.”


A2 Tuesday, February 1, 2011

GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Man pleads to possessing firearm JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER A Roswell man pleaded guilty in Las Cruces Federal Court on Friday to the charge of felon in possession of a firearm. According to the criminal complaint, Gary Montoya, 27, was pulled over for a traffic stop June 23, 2010, by Roswell Police Detective Michael Stanton. The detective reported that Montoya appeared nervous. A driver’s license check revealed that Montoya’s driver‘s license was suspended. Stanton arrested Montoya for disorderly conduct and unlawful use of a license. During an inventory check before the vehicle was towed, Stanton observed the handgrip of a gun. Montoya, a convicted felon, refused

to answer questions about the gun, saying they could not search the vehicle since it was not his. Stanton obtained a search warrant. The subsequent search yielded a Walter P99 .40-caliber pistol and ammunition. Officials contacted the owner of the vehicle who denied ownership of the gun. A National Criminal Investigation Center check revealed that the gun had been reported as stolen by the Hobbs Police Department. The case was investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and the Roswell Police Department. Further investigation revealed that Montoya had previous arrests for aggravated assault on a police officer, aggravated burglary and possession of marijuana with intent to sell in

December 2004. The sentence was suspended except for one year to be served in the Department of Corrections. In addition, he pleaded no contest to the charges of aggravated burglary and was sentenced to nine years. That sentence, too, was suspended, except for one year to be served in the Department of Corrections. In October 2007, Montoya was charged with possession of cocaine. The 30-month sentence was suspended except for one year to be served in the Department of Corrections. In federal court, Montoya admitted that he possessed a .40-caliber pistol and ammunition during the June 23 traffic stop in Roswell. As a result of the federal charges, Montoya could receive a sentence of up to 10 years in jail and three years’ probation. j.palmer@roswell-record.com

No use of force against protesters promised

CAIRO (AP) — Egypt’s military pledged not to fire on protesters in a sign that army support for President Hosni Mubarak may be unraveling on the eve of a major escalation — a push for a million people to take to the streets Tuesday to demand the authoritarian leader’s ouster. More than 10,000 people beat drums, played music and chanted slogans in Tahrir Square, which has become ground zero of a week of protests demanding an end to Mubarak’s three decades in power. With the organizers’ calling for a “march of a million people,” the vibe in the sprawling plaza — whose name in Arabic means “Liberation” — was of an intensifying feeling that the uprising was nearing a decisive point. “He only needs a push!” was one of the most frequent chants, and a leaflet circulated by some protesters said it was time for the military to choose between Mubarak and the people. The latest gesture by Mubarak aimed at defusing the crisis fell flat. His top ally, the United States, roundly rejected his announcement of a new government Monday that dropped his highly unpopular interior minister, who heads police forces and has been widely denounced by the protesters. The crowds in the streets were equally unimpressed. “It’s almost the same government, as if we are not here, as if we are sheep,” sneered one protester, Khaled Bassyouny, a 30year-old Internet entrepreneur. He said it was time to escalate the marches. “It has to bur n. It has to become ugly. We have to take it to the presidential palace.” Another concession came late Monday, when Vice President Omar Suleiman — appointed by Mubarak only two days earlier — went on state TV to announce the offer of a dialogue with “political forces” for constitutional and legislative reforms. Suleiman did not say what the changes would entail or which groups the government would speak with. Opposition forces have long demanded the lifting of restrictions on who is eligible to run for president to allow a real

Larceny reported

Police were called to the Hampton Court Inn, 3607 N. Main St., on Sunday, where two Dell computers were removed from the Computer Room. An employee reported that she had seen two white males dressed in coveralls inside the room, but didn’t pay much attention because she thought they were workmen.

Burglaries

•Police were dispatched to the 1400 block of South Madison Avenue on Friday, after someone broke into a residence and took a pink bathtub and a tub surround, two light fixtures, a toilet and a shower head. The value of missing items is estimated at $1,350. In addition, damages to the living room rug, the bathroom walls and mirrors were estimated at $5,100. •Police were called to Variety Liquors and Lounge, 1100 W. Second St., on Sunday. The victim reported that he saw three Hispanic males near his vehicle on surveillance camera. He went out to investigate, and the three fled. As the subjects drove away in a GMC Yukon, described as either gold or tan, the victim heard one of the men say, “Shoot him.” He ducked behind a vehicle. Official examination revealed damages to the driver door and passenger window, estimated at $500. •Police received a walk-in report of a vehicle burglary on Saturday. The incident took place on the 2400 block of South Baylor Avenue. The victim said he had left a duffle bag in the bed of his pick up. A Kenwood radio and headset, full-face respirator and cartridges, three pairs of coveralls, a cooler with food and a cowboy jacket were reported stolen. The total value of missing items is estimated at $1,115. •Police were dispatched to the 1800 block of North Kansas Avenue on Friday, after receiving a call about a prowler. The victim went to check her vehicle and discovered that the console cover had been removed and the Panasonic stereo stolen.

Identity theft

Police took a walk-in report of identity theft on Friday. The victim stated that she had received a call from an attorney demanding she repay a loan. The subject had her bank account number and social security number. The victim reported that she had never taken out a loan. Officers advised her to check with her bank to see how this information may have been obtained.

AP Photo

Clergies from Al Azhar Islamic university, one showing his identity card, chant anti-government slogans during a protest in Tahrir, or Liberation, Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Monday. A coalition of opposition groups called for a million people to take to Cairo's streets Tuesday to ratchet up pressure for President Hosni Mubarak to leave.

challenge to the ruling party, as well as measures to ensure elections are fair. A presidential election is scheduled for September. In Washington, White House spokesman Robert Gibbs dismissed the naming of the new government, saying the situation in Egypt calls for action, not appointments. Publicly, the Obama administration has declined to discuss the subject of Mubarak’s future. However, administration officials said Monday that Washington prefers Mubarak not contest the upcoming vote. They spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of diplomacy. The State Department said that a retired senior diplomat — former ambassador to Egypt Frank Wisner — was now on the ground in Cairo and will meet Egyptian officials to urge them to embrace broad economic and political changes that can pave the way for free and fair elections. The ar my statement, aired on state TV, said the power ful military recognizes “the legitimacy of the people’s demands” — the strongest sign yet that it is willing to let the protests continue and even grow as

SUPPORT ROSWELL

RECYCLE

long as they remain peaceful, even if that leads to the fall of Mubarak. If the 82-year-old president, a for mer air force commander, loses the support of the military, it would likely be a fatal blow to his rule. For days, ar my tanks and troops have surrounded Tahrir Square, keeping the protests confined but doing nothing to stop people from joining. Military spokesman Ismail Etman said the military “has not and will not use force against the public” and underlined that “the freedom of peaceful expression is guaranteed for everyone.” He added the caveats, however, that protesters should not commit “any act that destabilizes security of the country” or damage property. Looting that erupted over the weekend across the city of around 18 million eased — but Egyptians endured another day of the virtual halt of normal life, raising fears of damage to the economy if the crisis drags on. Trains stopped running Monday, possibly an attempt by authorities to prevent residents of the provinces from joining protests in the capital. A curfew imposed for a

fourth straight day — starting an hour earlier, at 3 p.m. — was widely ignored. Banks, schools and the stock market in Cairo were closed for the second working day, making cash tight. An unprecedented complete shutdown of the Internet was also in its fourth day. Long lines formed outside bakeries as people tried to replenish their stores of bread. Cairo’s international airport was a scene of chaos as thousands of foreigners sought to flee the unrest, and countries around the world scrambled to send in planes to fly their citizens out.

Incidents of looting continued. In Cairo, soldiers detained about 50 men trying to break into the Egyptian National Museum in a fresh attempt to steal the country’s archaeological treasures, the military said. An attempt to break into an antiquities storehouse at the famed Pharaonic Karnak Temple in the ancient southern city of Luxor was also foiled. The of ficial death toll from the crisis stood at 97, with thousands injured, but reports from witnesses across the country indicated the actual toll was far higher.

“Real Estate Corner”

“HOW TO HELP YOUR AGENT”

by Connie DeNio of Roswell 622-7191 or 626-7948

When selecting a new home, location is paramount. The first step is defining the geographic area in which you are willing to buy. Then list the qualities of a desirable neighborhood, in order of their importance. How far are you willing to travel to work, for shopping, or entertainment? Is access to public transportation important? Traffic patterns may

influence your choice; a quiet, out-of-the-way neighborhood, or quick access to major thoroughfares. If you have children, schools and parks are important. Can they walk to a movie or shops, or will you be the chauffeur? Save time by letting your agent know what’s important to you. ©

Call Me Today!

Anyone having information about these or any other crimes are asked to contact Crime Stoppers 888-594-TIPS (8477). Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

ROUNDHOUSE CONTACT INFORMATION Gov. Susana Martinez 505-476-2200 Office of the Governor 490 Old Santa Fe Trail Room 400 Santa Fe, NM 87501 Lt. Gov. John Sanchez 505-476-2250 New Mexico State Capitol Building Room 417 Santa Fe, NM 87501 All mail addressed to lawmakers should appear as: (Lawmaker’s name) New Mexico State Capitol Building Santa Fe, NM 87501 Sen. Rod Adair (R) District 33 505-986-4385 radair@dfn.com

LOTTERIES

Sen. Tim Jennings (D) District 32 505-986-4733 timothy.jennings@nmlegis.gov

Rep. Nora Espinoza (R) District 59 505-986-4221 noralee@cableone.net Rep. Candy Spence Ezzell(R) District 58 505-986-4450 csecows@aol.com

Rep. Dennis Kintigh (R) District 57 505-986-4453 askdennis@denniskintigh.com Rep. Bob Wooley (R) District 66 505-986-4453 brwooley1@yahoo.com

Pick 3 N.M. 2-1-3

Roadrunner Cash 4-23-31-32-35

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Kim Gordon ........................................................Advertising Director kim.gordon@roswell-record.com Jim Dishman .....................................................Circulation Director jdishman@roswell-record.com Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice The entire contents of the Roswell Daily Record, including its flag on Page 1, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the Daily Record.

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GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Judge: Obama’s health overhaul unconstitutional PENSACOLA, Fla. (AP) — A federal judge in Florida ruled Monday that President Barack Obama’s entire health care overhaul law is unconstitutional, placing even noncontroversial provisions under a cloud in a broad challenge that seems certain to be resolved only by the Supreme Court. Faced with a major legal setback, the White House called the ruling by U.S. District Judge Roger Vinson — in a challenge to the law by 26 of the nation’s 50 states — “a plain case of judicial overreaching.” That echoed language the judge had used to describe the law as an example of Congress overstepping its authority. The Florida judge’s ruling produced an even split in federal court decisions so far on the health care law, mirroring enduring divisions among the public. Two judges had previously upheld the law, both Democratic appointees. A Republican appointee in Virginia had ruled against it. The Justice Department quickly announced it would appeal, and administration officials declared that for now the federal government and the states would proceed without interruption to carry out the law. It seemed evident that only the U.S. Supreme Court could deliver a final verdict on Obama’s historic expansion of health insurance coverage. On Capitol Hill, Republican opponents of the law pledged to redouble pressure for a repeal vote in the Democratic-controlled Senate following House action last month. Nearly all of the states that brought suit in Vinson’s court have GOP attorneys general or governors. Vinson ruled against the overhaul on grounds that Congress exceeded its authority by requiring nearly all Americans to carry health insurance, an idea dating back to Republican proposals from the 1990s but now almost universally rejected by conservatives. His ruling followed the same general reasoning as one last year from the federal judge in Virginia. But where the first judge’s ruling would strike down the insurance requirement and leave the rest of the law in place, Vinson took it much further, invalidating provisions that range from Medicare discounts for seniors with high prescription costs to a change that allows adult children up to age 26 to remain on their parents’ coverage. The central issue remains the constitutionality of the law’s core requirement that Americans carry health insurance except in cases of financial hardship. Starting in 2014, those who

AP Photo

Senior U.S. District Judge Roger Vinson is seen in a May, 2007 photo. Vinson declared the Obama administration's health care overhaul unconstitutional Monday, siding with 26 states that sued to block it.

cannot show they are covered by an employer, government program or their own policy will face fines from the IRS. Opponents say a federal requirement that individuals obtain a specific service — a costly one in the case of health insurance — is unprecedented and oversteps the authority the Constitution gives Congress to regulate interstate commerce. Vinson agreed that lawmakers lack the power to penalize citizens for not doing something. He compared the provision to requiring people to eat healthful food. “Congress could require that people buy and consume broccoli at regular intervals,” he wrote, “Not only because the required purchases will positively impact interstate commerce, but also because people who eat healthier tend to be healthier and are thus more productive and put less of a strain on the health care system.” Defenders of the law said that analogy was flawed. Insurance can’t work if people are allowed to opt out until they need medical attention. Premiums collected from many who are healthy pay the cost of care for those who get sick. Since the uninsured can get treated in the emergency room, deciding not to get coverage has consequences for other people who act prudently and do buy coverage. “The judge’s decision contradicts decades of Supreme Court precedent that support the considered

judgment of the democratically elected branches of government that the act’s individual responsibility provision is necessary to prevent billions of dollars of cost-shifting every year by individuals without insurance who cannot pay for the health care they obtain,” White House adviser Stephanie Cutter wrote in an Internet posting. Vinson, who was appointed to the federal bench by President Ronald Reagan in 1983, said in his 78-page ruling that requiring people to buy health insurance marks a break with the nation’s founding principles. “It is difficult to imagine that a nation which began, at least in part, as the result of opposition to a British mandate giving the East India Company a monopoly and imposing a nominal tax on all tea sold in America would have set out to create a government with the power to force people to buy tea in the first place,” the judge wrote. “If Congress can penalize a passive individual for failing to engage in commerce, the enumeration of powers in the Constitution would have been in vain.” It would be difficult to recognize any limits on federal power, he added. Defenders of the law said the founders couldn’t have envisioned Medicare or Social Security either. Vinson did side with the administration on another major issue in the case, the expansion of Medicaid to cover more low-income people.

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

A3

Immigration questions OK SANTA FE (AP) — Gov. Susana Martinez directed state police on Monday to start asking about the immigration status of people arrested for crimes. The executive order by Martinez rescinds a policy implemented in 2005 by then Gov. Bill Richardson, a Democrat. Richardson’s executive order prohibited state law enforcement from asking about a person’s immigration status only for the purpose of determining whether the individual was in violation of federal immigration laws. “This order takes the handcuffs off of New Mexico’s law enforcement officers in their mission to keep our communities safe,” Martinez said in a statement. “The criminal justice system should have the authority to determine the immigration status of all criminals, regardless of race or ethnicity, and report illegal immigrants who commit crimes to federal authorities.” However, Martinez said law enforcement working for state agencies will continue to be barred from asking about the immigration status of someone who is a crime victim, a witness to a crime or seeking police assistance. Richardson had ordered that in 2005. Scott Darnell, a spokesman for Martinez, said state police will not ask about immigration status of motorists stopped for traffic violations such as speeding. The administration’s policy applies only when someone is arrested for a crime, he said.

Road warning

CLOVIS (AP) — A winter storm is moving into New Mexico, and police are urging drivers to take care. The National Weather Service has winter weather advisories in effect into Wednesday. Clovis Police Capt. Patrick Whitney warns drivers that ice could be hidden beneath a thin layer of snow on the streets. He says drivers need to go slower and keep more distance from other vehicles since ice greatly reduces a vehicle’s abil-

ity to stop and maneuver. Whitney says the only two things that will allow a vehicle to stop safely are time and distance. He says anti-lock brakes and four wheel drive are not replacements. The Santa Fe Office of Emergency Management says the approaching storm is a good reason to update emergency supplies.

Older drivers

SANTA FE (AP) — A New Mexico lawmaker is ready to have a conversation with older drivers about license renewals. Sen. Peter Wirth, D-Santa Fe, has sponsored a measure under which older drivers would face more monitoring of their driving skills and more frequent license-renewal deadlines. The renewals would be free. Wirth’s measure calls for anyone over 75 to undergo tests of reflexes, reaction times, motor skills and coordination with each license renewal. Drivers over 90 would take eye and reflex tests twice a year. After her grandmother and an elderly family friend were in separate, serious car crashes several years ago, Eliza Sultan knew she wanted to do something to strengthen state laws regarding older drivers. In both cases, friends and family members had wanted the accident victims to give up their car keys. But having that conversation proved tough. “It’s one of those conversations that’s really uncomfortable to have,” Sultan said. “It’s their independence and livelihood.” All other drivers must renew every four or eight years, although that changes this summer when a law takes effect under which most people can renew their licenses online or by mail twice — for up to 16 years — without going to an MVD office. Sultan and other members of a task force that included representatives of such entities as the Motor Vehicle Division, the Attorney General’s Office and AARP, agreed a graduated license system is the appropriate way to go.

FREE SYMPHONY CONCERT TICKETS FOR

SENIOR CITIZENS

SATURDAY, FEB. 12, 2011 • 7:30 P.M.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH 935 W. MESCALERO

The merchants, professional community, and private citizens and others listed below, are sponsoring tickets for each of this season’s Roswell Symphony Orchestra concerts. This gesture is their “thank you” for your patronage and for your support of the City of Roswell and surrounding communities. Tickets are available only by mail. Requests will be honored on a first received, first served, no choice basis. Each pair of tickets will be for adjoining seats. Also note that the tickets are pre-assigned to specific row and seat numbers. Remember sponsors do not have tickets.

Coupon must be mailed with a self-addressed, stamped envelope to:

ROSWELL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 1717 WEST 2ND, SUITE 205 ROSWELL NM 88201

COUPONS PRESENTED IN PERSON AT THE RSO OFFICE CANNOT BE HONORED.

FREE TRANSPORTATION WILL BE PROVIDED FOR SENIORS 60+ TO AND FROM THE CONCERT BY CHAVES COUNTY J.O.Y. CENTERS, INC. SEATING IS LIMITED. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON TRANSPORTATION OR TO RESERVE YOUR SEAT PLEASE CALL RUDY GARCIA 575-623-4866.

DIRECTORY OF SPONSORS

Accounting Services Monteith & Sexe, CPAs, PC Attorneys Sanders, Bruin, Coll & Worley, PA-2 Banks & Savings & Loan Pioneer Bank Brokers - Stocks & Bonds Howard Perry-Merril Lynch Wells Fargo Advisors-Vic Dodson-2 Churches First United Methodist Clothing & Accessories Chewning Footwear

Electrical Contractors J&G Electric-2

Food Markets Super Meat Market, Inc.

Insurance & Investments Marlin Wells & Associates Carolyn Mitchell CLU ChFC-New York Life Robert V Ely Insurance Farm Bureau Financial Services Movers & Truck Rentals American Moving & Storage

Oil & Gas Industry Johnson Enterprises-5 Kay McMillan Hinkle Brothers O&G-4 New Mexico Oil Corporation-2 Read & Stevens, Inc. Pharmacy Primm Drug Physicians & Surgeons James A. Boss MD Tres and Kathy Latimer-2 Dr. & Mrs. Wenner Howard L. Smith MD-2 Kymera Independent Physicians SCOR Orthopedic Dr. William Peterson Printers Inkredible Printing Utilities Xcel Energy-2 Friends of Music Cooper Malone-2 Bill & Karen Armstrong Shirley Childress W Gordon Dickinson-2 Mr. & Mrs. Mike Pettit

Robert G. Armstrong-2 Roxanne and Fred Yates Chuck & Candace Russell Mike & Jeanelle McGuire

SENIOR CITIZEN TICKET REQUEST Feb. 12, Concert Please circle “1” or “2” Tickets ________________ NAME ________________ STREET _________________ CITY, STATE, ZIP Enclose a self-addressed, stamped emvelope & mail to: Roswell Symphony Orchestra 1717 W. 2nd Ste . 205 Roswell, NM 88201


A4 Tuesday, February 1, 2011

OPINION

Roswell Daily Record

Rural areas more vulnerable to budget cuts Anybody who thinks the Legislature is only pondering how many pencil pushers to pare from state government should have been around for the first week’s testimony. In many different arenas, it’s clear that some critical services hang in the balance. It’s also clear that cuts will fall heavily on rural areas. Bill Verant, director of the state Financial Institutions Division, worries like a mother hen about his brood of community banks because his division is shorthanded. “I don’t want the feds examining our state banks,” he told the House Appropriations and Finance Committee. “It’s resulted in some arbitrary and capricious orders. We will have a lot of intrusion of federal regulators in the business of New Mexico if we don’t have the (employees). We lost a real asset, in my view” when the FDIC closed Charter

SHERRY ROBINSON ALL SHE WROTE

Bank last year. Verant’s agency regulates 36 state-chartered banks, largely small banks in small towns, and 80 percent of their assets are in commercial real estate lending, which federal regulators think is the bogeyman. There have been abuses in other areas, but not here. Verant fears that if federal bank examiners look at our community banks, there will be more Charters. “They’re treating us like we’re speculators in Phoenix,” he said. The silver-haired Verant looked weary, probably because he knew

his examiners would be closing First Community Bank, another institution sinking in the downturn. Not even the state’s forbearance could save that one. Supreme Court Chief Justice Charles W. Daniels sounded a similar chord: Courts will close if proposed budgets become reality. The judiciary branch made all the easy cuts, then reduced staff and closed some magistrate courts. It still wasn’t enough because the economic downturn has increased court workloads as budgets thinned. Fewer employees mean longer lines in courts. “The reality is that providing justice is personnel intensive,” he said. Furloughs aren’t a solution. “Without people at work, courts have to close, which violates the constitutional obligation to keep the courts open. Furlough closures of backlogged courts don’t save a dime of taxpayer money. Our work just piles up.”

For the courts, it will be a numbers game. Daniels is unlikely to close the crowded, busy city courts, so the rural courts are vulnerable. Then there’s higher education. Current budget proposals would cut a large swath through dualcredit and remedial programs and tuition waivers. And because tuition at two-year schools is far lower than at four-year schools, budget hawks might press them to increase tuition. Proposed cuts furrowed eyebrows among members of the House Education Committee. Rep. Dennis Roch, R-Texico, argued that the low tuition at two-year schools is intended to draw students who might not otherwise think of furthering their education. Rep. Gay Kernan, R-Hobbs, was concerned about the impact of cuts like these on rural students. Said Rep. Sheryl Williams Sta-

pleton, D-Albuquerque, “You might leave money in the classroom, but you won’t have students left in the classroom to teach.” The outlook is especially bleak for capital outlay. Rural areas and tribes are worried that projects previously approved will evaporate. Rep. Sandra Jeff, D-Crownpoint, says rural lawmakers are in a tough position. They understand the need for cuts, and yet their constituents expect them to keep the spigot open. “We spent, spent, spent, and now the rural communities, especially on the reservation, don’t understand that it can be taken back,” she says. “‘They gave it to us,’ they say. I try to fight for them, but I’m in the middle.” This year in the Roundhouse, there will be few easy votes. © New Mexico News Services 2011

EDITORIAL

Composting project trashed

Congressional Republicans already have saved nearly a half-million dollars by eliminating a pet program set up by the House’s previous Democratic leadership. Admittedly it is not much, considering the government’s $1.4 trillion deficit. But even if it is more symbolic than substantive, it’s always good to see wasteful spending reduced. In this case, wasteful spending on waste. Northern California Republican Rep. Dan Lungren has ordered an end to former Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s composting program in the House of Representatives. Apart from the $475,000 that ending the project will save, it points out the persistent problems with the Democratic Party’s reflexive devotion to all things green. Democrats created the composting program as part of Ms. Pelosi’s “Green the Capitol” initiative, replacing Styrofoam and plastic materials in House eating establishments with biodegradable alternatives. The resultant biodegradable waste was shipped to a composting site in Maryland. In analyzing whether to renew the hauling contract, an internal review showed the program fell short of expectations. “I have concluded that it is neither costeffective nor energy-efficient to continue the program,” said Mr. Lungren, chairman of the House Administration Committee. Hauling biodegradable waste to Maryland and the extra electricity used to turn the trash to pulp increased, rather than reduced, energy consumption, he said. An inspector general review found the impact made by the program equivalent to taking just one car a year off the road. “While I am suspending this program because it is costly and increases energy consumption, I would like to assure the House community that this committee will continue to evaluate all components of House operations and will work with the appropriate agencies to incorporate environmentally sustainable practices when feasible,” he said. “When feasible” seems to be a good standard. Clearly, $475,000 a pop to essentially remove one car from the roads is a cost that far exceeds its benefit. The Washington Post reported bipartisan complaints on the Hill about the biodegradable utensils falling apart when people tried to eat with them. We hope Republican stewardship more carefully scrutinizes further efforts to “Green the Capitol” and avoids similar unintended consequences. Guest Editorial The Orange County Register

TODAY IN HISTORY

A decade of observations on Hispanics

Editor’s Note: This is Maria Elena Salinas’ last column.

It all started with the 2000 census. The Latino community was growing by leaps and bounds, and was poised to become the largest minority in the United States. “Who are these people?” some newspapers wanted to know. What are they doing here, where do they come from and what do they want? Thus my syndicated column on “The Americas” was born. I was invited to write a column on the Hispanic community in the U.S. and on Latin

Doonesbury

MARIA ELENA SALINAS SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

American issues. I jumped at the opportunity. Not that I needed any more work than I already had, but to be able to share stories about the trials and tribulations of a community I serve, am a part of and feel I know thoroughly was and is a privilege.

But now it’s time to say goodbye. The reason is simple: After 10 years of writing a weekly column in English and Spanish, I need a break. My day job’s schedule is more demanding, as is my role as a single mother of two teenage daughters. Even though I have spent endless hours doing research and many stressful days trying to make my deadline, I have enjoyed it immensely. My job as a journalist on Univision Network has been my ticket to travel the world and witness history in the making. My column has allowed me to share that expe-

rience with millions of readers. My coverage of issues that affect Latinos has given me the opportunity to take a more in-depth look at the realities they face, some of which are foreign to the average newspaper reader. My keen interest in Latin America has allowed me to share with my readers the complex social and political landscape of the region. I have been able to denounce injustice and corruption, highlight success stories and introduce interesting characters by profiling their lives and contributions.

See SALINAS, Page A5

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Today is Tuesday, Feb. 1, the 32nd day of 2011. There are 333 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight On Feb. 1, 1861, Texas voted to leave the Union, 166-8, at a Secession Convention in Austin. DEAR DR. GOTT: For the past 17 years, within two hours of falling asleep, a painfully stiff lower back would wake me and continually plague me throughout the night. Before this started, I was active -- riding my bike, golfing and exercising regularly. Eventually, I gave up all activity, including my daily 30-minute walk, because the more I moved during the day, the worse the pain became at night. I tried pain pills, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, lidocaine patches, heating pads, ice packs, stretching, walking around, sleeping on the couch and sleeping in a chair. Nothing worked. Sometimes it got so bad I would just stand in the middle of the room crying,

ASK DR. GOTT UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

begging for relief. Orthopedic specialists, physical therapists and chiropractors all examined me. The only diagnosis I received was that I had a form of fibromyalgia. Once again, I asked my family doctor, who is an anti-aging specialist and proponent of alternative medicine, what else she might have in her bag of tricks. She came up with a

supplement called Soft Tissue Support Pak, distributed by Ortho Molecular Products. It is a package of eight supplements designed to repair soft-tissue injury. From the first night I took the supplements, I slept pain-free. I have been taking it for more than two months, and it’s still working. I have also started exercising, bike riding and walking again. It is truly a miracle, in my estimation. I know many people in the Internet chat rooms have the same symptoms I do and can’t find relief. I hope this information is helpful to anyone who may be suffering from a similar torture. It’s a bit costly, between $2 and $3 per nightly package, but it’s more than worth it for a night’s sleep.

Thank you for your column and all the folks it helps, including me. DEAR READER: I was easily able to find Soft Tissue Support Paks by Ortho Molecular Products online. I could not find a package of eight, only nine and 30. According to the website, the product contains vitamins C and B6, calcium, magnesium, turmeric, various enzymes and extracts, and other alternative supplements. The product is fairly expensive. A box of 30 costs about $69, with shipping ranging from free to nearly $50, meaning each pack costs between just over $2 to just under $4. A See GOTT, Page A5

25 YEARS AGO

Feb. 1, 1986 • Billy Willis of Roswell will join 15 other young tennis players for an eight-week tour of England and Europe this summer. Willis, one of only two boys from the United States to qualify for the event, has been playing tennis for only five years. He is currently ranked 19th in the Southwest and third in the Greater El Paso Tennis Association. • Airman 1st Class Sandy A. Jones, son of Edna J. Wood of Roswell, recently completed basic training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. Jones’ wife, Melissa, is the daughter of Marvin R. West, also of Roswell. Jones will remain at Lackland for specialized instruction in the education and training field.


LOCAL

Roswell Daily Record

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

A5

Books offer insights on some popular hobbies LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

Can a groundhog predict the weather? According to folklore, yes. If, on Feb. 2, the groundhog peeps out of his winter quarters and sees his shadow, he pops back for another six week’s nap. However, no shadow will encourage it to leave the burrow, signifying that winter will soon end. If you don’t trust a groundhog, Saturday is National Weatherman's Day, commemorating the birth of John Jeffries, one of America's first weather observers. He began taking daily weather measurements in Boston in 1774 and he took the first balloon observation in 1784. No matter what the weather forecast is, the Roswell Public Library of fers fun and infor mative resources and services to our patrons. To lear n more, either go online to www.roswellpubliclibrary.org or visit the library at 301 N. Pennsylvania Ave.

Book Talk

Hobbies and crafts enrich life and Rosie Klopfer, Interlibrary Loan librarian, has selected practical books on a variety of subjects. For cooking and baking, Annabel Karmel teaches children the skills needed for a lifetime of excellent cooking in “You Can Cook.” Virginia H. Ellison’s “The Winniethe-Pooh Cookbook” contains 50 triedand-true recipes for all ages to enjoy. It has updated recipes to feed the residents of Hundred Acre Woods and all of Pooh’s friends. Adults will relish Mark Bittman’s “The Food Matters Cookbook: 500 Revolu-

LETTERS

tionary Recipes for Better Living” or Ina Garten’s “Barefoot Contessa, How Easy is That?: Fabulous Recipes & Easy Tips.” Weight loss is a popular topic. Liz Vaccariello’s “400 Calorie Fix! The Easy New Rule for Permanent Weight Loss” has no banned ingredients and no magic foods; it just uses the 400 calorie “lens.” The proper clothes may make the body look more alluring so consider Charla Krupp’s “How to Never Look Fat Again: Over 1,000 Ways to Dress Thinner Without Dieting” and Clinton Kelly’s “Oh No She Didn’t: Top 100 Style Mistakes Women Make and How to Avoid Them.” Creative patrons may be interested in sewing, beading and knitting for personal use or for gift giving. Kathy Cano-Murillo’s “Crafty Chica’s Guide to Artful Sewing Fabu-Low-Sew Projects for the Everyday Crafter” showcases 30 projects while touting the benefits of recycling, repurposing and bargain shopping. For jewelry beading enthusiasts, try Juju Vail’s “Creative Beading: Over 60 Original Jewelry Projects and Variations” or Scott David Plumlee’s “Chain and Bead Jewelry Geometric Jewelry Connections: A New Angle on Creating Dimensional Earrings, Bracelets, and Necklaces.” Knitting titles include Julie Turjoman’s “Brave New Knits: 26 Projects and Personalities From the Knitting Blogosphere” in which she shares traditional hand-knitting projects and connection to the knitting community through the Internet. Knitted

Mold at Goddard High

Dear Editor: We feel it is necessary to respond to the Daily Record article addressing the issue of “mold biotoxin illness” at Goddard High School. We are the largest Pediatric practice in Chaves County with eight physicians and two offices. We see a large percentage of the children of Chaves County and count many present and past Goddard High School students among our patients. We have never seen a “mold biotoxin illness” at BCA Medical Associates. We do not feel there is an outbreak of “mold biotoxin illness” in Roswell that is cause for alarm in the community. “Mold illness” has no formal code in the International Classification of Diseases and “mold illness” is not a generally-accepted diagnosis in the medical or scientific community. We are not denying that severe, chronic mold exposure may cause illness — specifically allergic response or pulmonary issues. However, current literature from trusted sources such as the CDC, the Institute of Medicine and the Government Accountability Office Report on Mold states very clearly that mold exposure does not appear to be a substantial hazard. These references do say that more research needs to be performed before specific lab studies and treatment can be recommended or are even necessary: “For the majority of adverse health outcomes related to mold exposure, a higher level of exposure to living molds or a higher concentration of allergens on spores and mycelia results in a greater likelihood of illness. However, no standardized method exists to measure the magnitude of exposure to molds. In addition, data are limited about the relation between the level of exposure to mold and how that causes adverse health effects and how this relation is affected by the interaction between molds and

Gott

Continued from Page A4

box of nine costs just over $29, and shipping ranges from about $10 to $50, with each pack costing between $4 and $9. The top of the website boasts a fairly large badge claiming it is a Better Business Bureauaccredited business. When clicking on this, I traveled to the BBB website, where I found that Doctor’s Choice Inc., of which Ortho Molecular Products is a part, had an A+ rating. (The BBB system ranges from A+ to F.) I was fairly impressed by this, but in trying to learn more about Doctor’s Choice Inc. and its various subsidiaries, I was disappointed. I was able to discern that the company is about 10 years old. (A further look at the BBB page showed

it was established in December 2000.) On the whole, I would not recommend this product, primarily owing to its cost; however, because you have had such success, I suggest you stick with it. I cannot see that the product would be har mful. (It does carry war nings against use during pregnancy or nursing and in those with allergies to pineapple and bromelain.) So, if any of my readers choose to try it, I ask that they send me their results. I will print a follow-up article once I receive sufficient reports. Dr. Peter H. Gott is a retired physician and the author of several books, including “Live Longer, Live Better,” “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Diet” and “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Cookbook,” which are available at most bookstores or online. His website is www.AskDrGottMD.com.

Shop Roswell

lace is the focus of Margaret Stove’s “Wrapped in Lace: Knitted Heirloom Designs from Around the World” and she describes each set of lace techniques, patterns and traditions in-depth and offers spectacular patterns for lace shawls, stoles and scarves. Beautiful stained glass isn’t reserved solely for church windows; it can be used to decorate cabinet doors, patio doors, ceilings, skylights, mirrors, lighting fixtures, garden decorations and much more. Vicki Payne’s “Stained Glass For Dummies” provides basic information. Payne’s “Stained Glass in the Garden” showcases the versatility of glasswork by creating eye-catching flowerpots, lanterns, stepping stones, tabletops, birdbaths, fountains and other attractive accessories.

What’s Happening?

Groundhog Day will be celebrated during the 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Wednesday story and craft hours. During the morning program, kids will enjoy watching as a puppet sings a celebration song to a groundhog puppet friend. Kids will enjoy listening and learning a few things about groundhogs and shadows. The books might include “The Groundhog Day Book of Fun and Facts,” “Gregory’s Shadow” or “Double Trouble Groundhog Day.” For the related crafts, precut materials will be provided to create a groundhog shadow puppet and assemble a Groundhog Day hat. The stories may vary between programs and the quantities of some craft items are limited. Love Bugs will pop up in a book and as a craft during the “Stories of Love” program

other microorganisms and chemicals in the environment.” For the majority of persons, undisturbed mold is not a substantial health hazard. MMWR, Recommendations and Reports, June 9, 2006/ 55(rr08) 1-27 “Mold exposure does not always present a health problem indoors; however, people who are allergic to mold may commonly experience allergic symptoms when exposed to it. Certain people with chronic respiratory disease may have trouble breathing, although mold does not appear to represent a major public health burden in terms of illness and death.” http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/ehhe/about.htm “According to the Institute of Medicine and recent reviews of the scientific literature, further research is required to advance the understanding of the relationships between dampness, indoor mold, and human health. (GAO-08-980 Health Effects of Indoor Mold) Unfortunately, this issue of “mold biotoxin illness” at Goddard High School seems to be clouded. As reported by the Daily Record, and by letters to physicians in the community, Dr. McMahon’s diagnosis and treatment plan for the Goddard “mold patients” is based on the work of Dr. Ritchie C. Shoemaker — a family-practice trained physician from Maryland. Dr. Shoemaker does not have specialized training in infectious disease or mold from an accredited U.S. Medical Residency program. He has not worked with the CDC or nationally acclaimed research facilities. In fact, Dr. Shoemaker received a warning letter from the FDA in 2004 for violation of the Public Health Service Act and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for administration of a veterinary product to human subjects. Additionally, in 2008 the District and Appellate Courts and of Ohio and the Superior Court of the District of Columbia found that Dr. Shoemaker’s expert evidence was not valid and that he was not considered an expert in mold. “The trial court's thorough and well-reasoned analysis

Salinas

Continued from Page A4

It’s been obvious, in my columns, which are the issues I am most passionate about: immigration, education, social injustice and the very contentious topics of politics and religion. To those of you who have praised my column, I thank you for your support. To those, and there are many, who have criticized me and even asked me to go back to my country (I was born in California), I thank you also. Constructive criticism helps me understand other points of view, but frankly it also makes me realize to what extent the Hispanic community in our country is misunderstood and misrepresented. To all the editors who valued my opinion enough to provide space in your oped pages for my column, my sincere appreciation. As I write this farewell column, I am already feeling nostalgic. I have at least 10 issues I’d like to sound off on right now. Yes, the purpose of the column is to

held on Saturday at 2 p.m. As a lead in to Valentine’s Day, the stories will highlight all sorts of love in the books that might include “Love You Little Brother,” “The Quilt Story” or “All the Ways I Love You.” Precut paper and other materials will be provided to decorate a plastic love bug using pipe cleaners, tissue paper and eyes; create an “I Love You” movable heart message and decorate a Valentine’s Day card. The quantities of some craft quantities may be limited.

Books Again

Book lovers will really love the “Sweetheart of a Deal Bag Sale,” which will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, as well as on Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 8 and 9. During this special sale, customers will buy a bag at the door for $5 and can shop until it is filled to the top. From a nostalgic look at old favorites to best selling titles, there are fiction and non-fiction books for all ages. Fictional selections include large print books, mysteries, thrillers, westerns, science fiction, romance, military, humor and classic literature. Nonfiction subjects range from history, biography, cookbooks, diet, exercise, medical, relationships, crafts, travel, poetry, drama, religion, animals and various reference materials. If I did not mention your special interest, take heart because it may be on the shelf just waiting for you. Books Again, 404 W. Second St., is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. It is operated by volunteers from the Friends of the Library and all proceeds are used to benefit the library. Parking is located behind the store.

exposed numerous faults in the principles and methods utilized by Dr. Shoemaker to draw his conclusions.” CASE NO. CA2007-08-090 : O P I N I O N 5/12/2008: FISCHER ATTACHED HOMES, LTD.,et al. The “mold biotoxin illness” diagnosis and recommended treatments by Dr. Shoemaker do not follow the tenets of established, scientific-based medical practice. The lab tests recommended are not based on scientific research that has been peer-reviewed and vetted by valid research studies. There is no supportive data from multiple large, multi-center studies. This treatment is not considered an accepted conventional medical practice in our community or any other in the United States. As physicians, we all must remember the most rigorous science is needed to keep us from reaching false conclusions. While mold-caused illness is a highly controversial subject in this day and age, medical science has not yet established conclusive tests and treatments, or whether those tests and treatments are even necessary. We do wish to reassure the people of Roswell and Chaves County that, despite the reporting in the Daily Record, our large pediatric practice has not seen any “mold-caused illness” present in our patients. As physicians we always strive to “do no harm” and so recommend parents, patients and the community fully evaluate any diagnosis and treatment with regard to both scientific fact and basic common sense. Respectfully, Karen Carson MD, FAAP William Liakos MD, FAAP Beverley Elliott, MD, FACP Abelardo Gardia, MD Rachel Whitlock, DO Fatma Haney MD, FAAP Margarita Macias MD Dan Kowals MD, FAAP inform and educate the reader on the issues that concern and affect the Latino community, as well as some poignant issues in our hemisphere, but it also has given me the opportunity to express my concerns, make observations and, in my own way, give a voice to so many whose stories most likely would not be heard in some parts of the country — in particular, immigrants whose stories get lost in the very negative political discourse that, rather than a debate with multiple points of view, sounds like a monologue in which immigrants are blamed for all the ills of this country. The need to speak out is embedded in me. I will continue writing periodically, with a more flexible schedule. In the not-too-distant future, we could very well meet again in cyberspace or social media. So you can be sure this is not goodbye, just “Hasta pronto.” (Maria Elena Salinas is the author of “I am my Father’s Daughter: Living a Life Without Secrets.” Reach her at www.mariaesalinas.com) © 2011 by Maria Elena Salinas

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A6 Tuesday, February 1, 2011

GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Report: Fla. mom hit daughter before shooting TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — A suburban Florida soccer mom showed signs of trouble in the months before she was accused of killing her two teenage children: Her 16-year-old daughter told authorities in November she had been hit by her mother on two occasions, and troopers investigating a car crash that same month thought the woman’s glassy eyes and “mush mouth” indicated she had been using drugs. However, state investigators found no evidence Julie Powers Schenecker, 50, had abused her children and determined the risk to the children was low, according to one of several reports released Monday. Now, Schenecker is accused of shooting and killing the kids because they were talking back and being “mouthy.” Investigators found her soaked in blood Friday on the back porch of the family’s upscale home. Later that day, at a county jail, Sche-

Hearing

necker shook uncontrollably, her eyes wide. Investigators said 16year -old Calyx and 13year -old Beau had each been shot twice in the head a day earlier — Beau in the family’s car on the way to soccer practice, Calyx in her room as she studied at her computer. Both teens were killed with a .38-caliber pistol, which authorities say Schenecker bought five days earlier. Schenecker was ordered held without bail Monday during a brief court hearing. She did not speak — though she did cry and hold a tissue, her hands bound by handcuffs. She is in the Hillsborough County Jail on two first-degree murder charges. A representative for the public defender’s office declined to comment on the case. Neither Schenecker nor her 48-year-old husband, Parker — an Army intelligence of ficer who was working in the Middle East when the shootings hap-

Continued from Page A1

interrupted another lawmaker who was attempting to ask one of the presenters some questions. “In order to avoid any appearance of being unfair, I call on the members in the order they ask to speak,” Egolf said. “(Bratton) interrupted ... and I said, ‘Rep., I haven’t recognized you for question and Rep. Al Park has the floor, but we’ll come back to you in a minute.’” The chairman said Bratton “threw his pen down and stormed out” and was followed by other Republican lawmakers. “It was pretty sad, really,” he said.

Vega

Continued from Page A1

expected psychiatric evaluation. Vega 's attorney, Jesse R. Cosby, reported in October that he had contracted Samuel Rolls of Santa Fe to do an assessment. “The report will discuss issues of sanity and issues of alcohol and not issues of competence,” Cosby said. Currier asked if Cosby planned to enter an insanity plea. Cosby replied that the plea was possible, but it would depend on the results of the evaluation. Currier cautioned that the prosecutors’ offices would need to have access to the report in order to get an expert of their own. Cosby said he was waiting to receive medical reports on the police officers wounded during the shoot-out. “It (the lack of medical records) would

Storm

Continued from Page A1

of the snow, and legislatures in several states decided to shut down altogether Tuesday or cancel committee meetings The National Weather Service suggested any Green Bay Packers fans planning to drive from Wisconsin to Dallas for the Super Bowl avoid leaving before Wednesday afternoon, when authorities hope to have cleaned up the worst of the mess along the route. A blizzard watch was in effect for Tuesday and Wednesday for southern Wisconsin, northern Illinois and northwest Indiana. Winds could reach up to 60 mph in open areas and near Lake Michigan. In St. Louis and much of Missouri, residents braced for a particularly hazardous mix: up to an inch of ice, followed by 3 to 4 inches of sleet, then perhaps a half-foot of snow or more. To the west in Columbia, Mo., forecasters predicted between 12 inches and 16 inches of snow, prompting the University of Missouri to cancel classes through Tuesday night. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon declared a state of emergency and activated 600 members of the National Guard. In Chicago, forecasters predicted 20 inches of snow. If that holds true, it would be the city’s third-biggest snowstorm, overshadowed only by the 21.6 inches in 1999 and the mother of all Chicago snowstorms, the 23 inches of snow that fell in 1967. Forty-three winter storms have produced 10 inches or more in Chicago since record-keeping began in 1886. Paula Lawson, a 59-year-old community organizer from suburban Glencoe, said she remembered the big storm in

The family moved to Tampa in 2008 when Parker Schenecker was transferred to U.S. Central Command headquarters, which oversees the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and is housed at MacDill Air Force Base. Parker Schenecker has returned from his deployment, and funeral arrangements for his children are still being completed, his family said in a statement Monday. “He is devoted first and foremost to honoring the lives and memory of his beautiful children, Calyx and Beau,” said the statement, which did not mention his wife or the charges against her.

AP Photo

Julie Schenecker appears by video link before Judge Walter Heinrich in court in Hillsborough, Fla., Monday. Police say Schenecker, who authorities say killed her teenage daughter and son, showed signs of drug impairment after a November car crash.

pened — had a criminal record. Parker Schenecker served in Munich from 1986 to 1990; his wife

worked there from 1987 to 1992 as a Russian linguist involved in military intelligence, wrote an author

identifying himself as Parker Schenecker on an online forum for military personnel.

Friends and neighbors recalled a perfect family, whose Facebook photos showed a radiant foursome posing in Santa hats and decked in white near a pier. Calyx loved the Harry Potter series and excelled at cross-country running. Beau played soccer.

But Kintigh said he understands why Bratton was upset. “I understand what Rep. Egolf is saying, but this was an hour-long tirade by an individual who has no background or expertise in oil and gas operations,” Kintigh said. “If this was to be an introduction for new members ... he could very easily have brought in some real experts.” Egolf said the Republicans had enough notice to invite their own speakers. “We let them know last Tuesday that we were going to have this hearing and I told them that they could invite anyone on the planet,” he said. “They chose not to bring anyone at all.”

mattarco@roswell-record.com

not be fatal to the state’s case, since the charge was attempted murder,” Currier said. Both Cosby and Deputy District Attorney Alan Griffin requested the trial be postponed from the currently scheduled date of March 15. Cosby said he had two other jury trials and one nonjury trial in Roswell on the same day and another trial scheduled in Lincoln County. Griffin stated he need more time to prepare. Currier ruled to vacate the pre-trial and trial dates on March 11 and March 15. He scheduled a pre-trial hearing and docket call for March 14, at which time he expects Dr. Roll to testify, telephonically or in person, if no report had been forthcoming. Vega remains in Chaves County Detention Center. j.palmer@roswell-record.com

1967, which “really did stop the world for days.” Will the latest storm do the same? “If we get 20 inches, maybe,” Lawson said at a downtown rail station. “But around here, 12 inches, it doesn’t stop us.” Even when the snow stops falling, the temperature will keep dropping. Bitterly cold temperatures were forecast in the wake of the storm, with wind chills as cold as 40 degrees below zero possible in parts of North Dakota, South Dakota and other areas. In Arkansas, most communities expected lesser amounts of snow, but the weather service warned of severe thunderstor ms that could generate freezing rain, hail and isolated tornadoes. On Monday, freezing drizzle coated roadways across the Plains. Two school buses in the Kansas City, Mo., area slid off icy roads. No one was seriously hurt. A Wisconsin state trooper was struck and seriously hurt while directing traffic around another accident. In Minnesota, the state patrol reported hundreds of crashes statewide, including one that was fatal. Elsewhere, dozens of day care centers and school districts in Kansas and Missouri canceled classes Monday. The 2011 Pork Expo in Peoria, Ill., was rescheduled for the middle of February. Even Missouri’s Department of Transportation — the agency responsible for keeping the state’s highways clear of snow — decided to cancel a commission meeting scheduled for Wednesday in the state capital of Jefferson City. The Oklahoma Blood Institute sought immediate blood donations, saying while its current supply is adequate, it could run low if the storm results in a significant slowdown in donations.

AP Photo

U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano speaks in the Magoffin Auditorium at the University of Texas at El Paso, Texas, Monday.

Napolitano touts safety of US border communities EL PASO, Texas (AP) — Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said Monday that U.S. communities on the border with Mexico are safer than most Americans believe, but also warned Mexican drug cartels they’ll be “met by an overwhelming response” should they move north. Napolitano told an audience at the University of Texas at El Paso — just across the Rio Grande from Ciudad Juarez and the unprecedented wave of drug-fueled violence engulfing it — that it’s “inaccurate to state, as too many have, that the border is overrun with violence and out of control.” “This statement, often made only to score political points, is just plain wrong,” said Napolitano, who was governor of Arizona before being confirmed as Homeland Security secretary in 2009. Napolitano said violent crime has not spiked in U.S. communities across the roughly 2,000-mile border with Mexico. But the secretary also recognized that guarding against spillover from Mexican drug violence is an ongoing concern. “Today I say to the cartels: Don’t even think about bringing your violence and tactics across this border. You will be met by an overwhelming response,” she said. “And we’re going to continue to work with our partners in Mexico to dismantle and defeat you.” Napolitano said the Obama administration has increased the U.S. Border Patrol to more than 20,700 agents, more than double its size in 2004. She also said $600 million in funding signed last year by President Barack Obama will allow authorities to hire 1,000 additional Border Patrol agents and 250 new Customs and Border Protection agents to guard formal MexicoU.S. border crossings. An additional 250 Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents focused on transnational crime, as well as increased unmanned aircraft patrols, also are budgeted. Texas Gov. Rick Perry often slams Washington for not sending enough manpower and money to secure the border state. He said last year that the $600 million was a good start, but not enough. “The federal resources in Texas are woefully inadequate to secure the border with Mexico, and Gov. Perry will continue urging the Obama administration to do its job and protect our citizens from the ruthless

drug cartels,” Perry spokeswoman Katherine Cesinger said in a statement after Napolitano’s speech. “It’s unfortunate that a former border governor, who knows the implications of a porous border, continues to downplay the fact that there is a war waging within a stone’s throw, or for that matter, firing range, from our border communities.” A sluggish U.S. economy has reduced the number of immigrants sneaking into U.S. territory and Napolitano said Border Patrol apprehensions declined 36 percent in the past two years as a result. But she also said U.S. authorities deported 779,000 illegal immigrants nationwide in fiscal years 2009 and 2010, more than ever before.

Last year, about 195,000 deportees were convicted criminals, Napolitano said.

“Let’s stick with the facts and numbers when talking about where we are with the border,” she said.

The statistics out of Juarez are nothing short of astounding. More than 6,000 people in the city have been killed by drug violence in the past two years alone, making it one of the most dangerous places on earth.

About 50 students protested outside the auditorium where Napolitano spoke, demanding justice for women slain in unsolved murders in Juarez, or for an end to the violence there. Others protested increased U.S. efforts to fortify its southern border at the expense of economic opportunity.

Napolitano said “a secure border does not mean a sealed border with no commerce.”

During a 15-minute question-andanswer session with the audience, Napolitano said the U.S. had to do a better job stopping the flow of American guns smuggled south to fuel Mexico’s drug war.

“I’m not here on a victory lap,” she said. “We have more work to do.”

Napolitano’s address was part of a yearlong nationwide campus tour that began last week. She also was heading to Dallas on Monday to discuss Super Bowl-week security ahead of Sunday’s contest between the Packers and Steelers at Cowboy Stadium in Arlington.


BUSINESS REVIEW

Roswell Daily Record

E & C S, Inc. is proud to be able to serve SE New Mexico as a full service Electrical and Controls Contractor. They also install commercial, industrial and residential low voltage communication and sound systems. E & C S can install data cabling for telephone/faxes and computer networks as well as closed circuit TV systems for home/business security. You can reach E & C S Electric at 625-5524 or 317-9609.

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

A7

Savedra’s, at 114 East Bland (at Virginia), offers Poblano dresses and many other items, all imported from Mexico. They have a huge selection of Spanish music on CDs and cassettes, ponchos, serapes, paper mache´ figurines, religious items, Mexican vanilla, tortilla presses and warmers, cast iron skillets and piñatas. Savedra’s is open from 9:30 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday.

RDR Business Review Page is an effective way to advertise Phone Sarah Juarez at 622-7710, ext. 15 for more information

The Roswell Daily Record’s Business Review Page is a great way for a business to advertise. The Business Review Pages run three times a week, with Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday pages. There are a few spots available right now on the Tuesday and Thursday pages. We usually have a “waiting list”. The Daily Record’s Sarah Juarez can fill you in on the complete details. You can phone Sarah at 622-7710 - ext. 15. The basic set-up is as follows: You sign up and we run your ad on the bottom half of the Business Review Page on it’s assigned day (Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday) each week. We have a maximum of twenty-six ads running per page. After advertising weekly for six months, you will receive a ‘free feature article’ (then again six months after your first free one) as your “Thank You!” for using the Business Review Page.

This six month schedule comes from having up to twenty-six advertisers per page (never more) and a fifty-two week year. With ads starting as low as $26.78 (including tax,) per week, the Business Review Page is ideal for businesses large and small to obtain effective advertising on a small budget. The feature article typically uses two photographs and the equivalent of two double-spaced typewritten pages of information on your business. It’s an ad that looks like a written story. This info usually consists of what you have to offer (services and/or product,) who you are (history,) where you are located, when you are open and how to get in touch with you. The typical layout can be altered to fit your circumstance. If you want three pictures (like this page,) we can cut down on the article’s length. We do what ever works best for you. Bill Flynt is the Business Review Page Editor. He takes the photo-

graphs and either writes the text (with your input,) or uses an article that you provide for your feature story. We can also use your photographs, if you desire.

Many local business owners have found this feature to be an ideal way for them to advertise economically. They have an ad in the Roswell Daily Record once a week, on their regular day, and then they have a half page write-up with pictures twice a year to tell the story of their business. Call Sarah Juarez at 622-7710, ext. 15, for complete information and prices.

You’ve got to advertise to stay in business, and the Roswell Daily Record's Business Review Page is an effective way to do it.

Call now while there are spaces available - it is a great way to advertise your business to the people of the Pecos Valley.

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Check out the featured business at www.rdrnews.com - Click on Business Review NEW MEXICO PROSTHETIC-ORTHOTIC CENTER, INC. Locally Owned by Adam Dutchover, C.P.O.

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A8 Tuesday, February 1, 2011

WEATHER

Roswell Daily Record

Gov’t recommends jail for “Survivor” champ Hatch

cials accused Hatch last month of violating the terms of his release by failing to file amended tax returns for the years 2000 and 2001, something he was ordered to do when he was sentenced to prison more than four years ago. A judge agreed that Hatch was in violation but withheld punishment until he could hear more from both sides. Hatch, who owes about $1.7 million in back taxes, has said he didn’t refile his taxes because he has an appeal pending with the U.S. Tax Court.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Reality TV star Richard Hatch, who spent more than three years in prison for tax evasion, should go back behind bars for violating the conditions of his supervised release, federal prosecutors recommended Monday. Hatch was convicted in 2006 of failing to pay taxes on the $1 million prize he won on the debut season of “Survivor,” the CBS reality TV show. He was released from prison in 2009 and placed on a three-year term of supervised release. Federal probation offi-

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SPORTS

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

LOCAL SCHEDULE TUESDAY FEBRUARY 1 HIGH SCHOOL BOYS BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m. • Loving at NMMI • Gateway Christian at Hagerman • Lake Arthur at Hondo Valley 7 p.m. • Goddard at Artesia • Roswell at Ruidoso • Dexter at Eunice HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS BASKETBALL 5 p.m. • Gateway Christian at Hagerman • Lake Arthur at Hondo Valley • Loving at NMMI 5:30 p.m. • Goddard at Artesia • Dexter at Eunice 7 p.m. • Roswell at Portales HIGH SCHOOL WRESTLING 6:30 p.m. • Roswell at Goddard

LOCAL BRIEFS MONTHLY RTA MEETING IS FEB. 3 The Roswell Tennis Association will be holding its monthy meeting on Thursday, Feb. 3, at 11:30 a.m. at Peppers Grill. All RTA members and anyone interested in local tennis are invited to attend. For more information about the RTA, call 623-4033.

RACE FOR BACKPACKS TO BE HELD FEB. 5

Roswell Daily Record

RECORD STAFF REPORT

Getting the first of anything is difficult, whether it be a win or a touchdown. The more time that passes without a win or score, the more it seems as if it will never happen. The NMMI Mens basketball team had started its Wester n Junior College Athletic Conference 0-6 and had lost 15 consecutive WJCAC games overall. On Monday the Broncos snapped that streak with a 66-62 win over Wester n Texas College. Things started well for NMMI and after an A.J. Peralta field goal, the Broncos led 27-20. Over the last few minutes of the first half, however, the Westerners hit two 3pointers and took a 33-29 lead into the break. Wester n stayed hot to open the second half as it scored the first four points

of the half to take a 37-29 lead. Peralta made two free throws to halt the Westerner run and Jon Marsh followed that up with a three to cut the Western lead to 37-34. NMMI was able to take the lead on a Peralta free throw and a Mike Buffalo field goal gave the Broncos a 60-55 cushion. The Broncos were able to get back in the game thanks to their rebounding, free-throw shooting and defense, according to coach Sean Schooley. “I think part of (us getting to the line) was See NMMI, Page B2 Courtesy Photo

NMMI’s Mike Buffalo, right, drives to the basket while Western Texas College’s Malcolm Herron defends during their game, Monday. NMMI won 66-62.

Polamalu named top defensive player Texas cruises

DALLAS (AP) — Now that the voters have chosen Troy Polamalu over Clay Matthews for The Associated Press 2010 NFL Defensive Player of the Year award, the two stars can prove their worth against each other on the field.

In the Super Bowl. Pittsburgh safety Polamalu received 17 votes Monday from a nationwide panel of 50 media members who cover the league, edging Green Bay linebacker Matthews by a hair — two votes.

Despite missing two games, in which Pittsburgh went 1-1, Polamalu became the sixth Steeler to win the award. He had seven interceptions this season along with 63 tackles, but made his mark with big plays. In a late-season victory at Bal-

FIRST TEE FUNDRAISER STARTS FEB. 8

• More briefs on B2

NATIONAL BRIEFS STEELERS ARRIVE IN PLAYFUL MOOD FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Video cameras and cowboy hats were in style as the Pittsburgh Steelers and Green Bay Packers arrived Monday at the Super Bowl. With dozens of fans chanting “Go Pack Go” as the players walked off team buses, the Packers witnessed Super Bowl frenzy for the first time in 13 years. Many of the players carried video cameras or aimed their cell phones at the crowd to take pictures before heading to news conferences. A few of them wore cowboy hats, but none went as far as Steelers veteran receiver Hines Ward. He took the “True Grit” route, decked out in black cowboy hat, black shirt, belt buckle and jeans. Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger held his mobile phone high, taking photos of the six-deep pack of reporters at his podium.

AP Photo

In this Jan. 23 file photo, Pittsburgh Steelers safety Troy Polamalu celebrates after a 24-19 win over the New York Jets in the AFC Championship. Polamalu was named The Associated Press 2010 NFL Defensive Player of the Year, Monday.

timore, his leaping tackle forced a fumble that set up the winning touchdown. That victory catapulted the Steelers to the AFC North title. Now, they are in the Super Bowl for the third time in six seasons, where they face Matthews and the Packers. “I don’t imagine their game plan changing over one player,” Polamalu said. “We don’t single out anybody. Anything we achieve here is done as a team, as a whole.” Added Steelers linebacker James Harrison, who finished third in the balloting with eight votes and won the award two years ago: “Troy brings this defense from a ’C’ defense to an ’A’ defense. He’s someone that you have to account for in the secondary.” So much so that one opponent called the eighthyear pro the NFL’s top player, regardless of position. “With all due respect, I honestly think Troy Polamalu is probably the greatest player I’ve ever played with or even seen play in person,” gushed Jets See POLAMALU, Page B2

COLLEGE STATION, Texas (AP) — Jordan Hamilton scored 20 points and No. 3 Texas rolled to an easy 69-49 win over No. 16 Texas A&M on Monday night, the Longhorns’ first victory in College Station since 2004. Texas never trailed and built a 25-point lead by halftime thanks to hot shooting and their trademark stifling defense. The Aggies outscored the Longhorns by five points in the second half, but the dominant first half kept Texas (19-3, 7-0) undefeated in the Big 12. The Aggies (17-4, 43) have lost three of four in a skid that began when Texas beat them 81-60 in Austin less than two weeks ago to snap a winning 13-game streak. See TEXAS, Page B2

Watson rallies to win at Torrey Pines Djokovic downs Murray SAN DIEGO (AP) — Bubba Watson tempered his celebration when he rolled in a 12-foot birdie putt on the final hole Sunday at Torrey Pines, knowing Phil Mickelson could still make eagle on the par-5 closing hole to catch him. It played out just as Watson imagined, right down to Mickelson’s caddie tending the pin on the eagle attempt. There was just one twist — Mickelson wasn’t anywhere near the green. In a surprising decision that gave way to brief

drama, Mickelson laid up on the 18th hole and had to settle for a birdie when his lob wedge from 72 yards away stopped 4 feet short of the hole. The winner of the Farmers Insurance Open turned out to be Watson, who made clutch putts on the final two holes for a 5-under 67 and was sitting in the scoring trailer at the end, oblivious to how the final hole played out. “I don’t know how close he hit it. I don’t know what he made on the hole,” Watson said. “I just know that I

COMMENT OR IDEA? E-mail • sports@roswell-record.com Twitter • www.twitter.com/rdrsports Phone • 575-622-7710, ext. 28 Fax • 575-625-0421

B

Broncos pick up first conference win

The Boy Scouts Conquistador Council, in conjunction with the Roswell Parks & Recreation Department and the Roswell Runners Club, will hold the inaugural Race for Backpacks on Feb. 5 at Cahoon Park. The event will feature a 5K walk and a 5K run. The entry fee to participate is a school backpack, which will be donated to Chaves County CASA. Race day registration begins at 7:30 a.m. and the race will begin at 9 a.m. For more information, call the Parks & Recreation Department at 624-6720 or Matt Gardner at 623-2627.

The First Tee of the Pecos Valley and Chili’s Bar and Grill will be holding a fundraiser, Feb. 8-10, from 5-10 p.m. Ten percent of the money spent at Chili’s during that time will be donated to the First Tee when a flier is presented. Fliers can be picked up at the First Tee or the NMMI pro shop at 201 W. 19th St.

Section

AP Photo Bubba Watson pitches to the first green of the South Course at Torrey Pines, where he saved par, during the final round of the Farmers Insurance Open, Sunday.

won, because that’s all I was worried about. If he makes it, I’m getting ready for a playoff. So I’m trying not to get too emotional. I realize it’s Phil Mickelson. He can make any shot he wants to.” Just not this one. So ended a bizarre week along the Pacific bluffs. A lefty won at Torrey Pines, just not the one Mickelson’s hometown gallery wanted to see. Mickelson, the ultimate risk-taker of his era, opened himself up to criticism on the final hole because — get this — he played it safe. As for Tiger Woods? His five-tournament winning streak at Torrey Pines ended without hardly anyone noticing. Woods was done some two hours before the finish, and his 75 put him in a tie for 44th. He had never finished outside the top 10 at Torrey Pines, and it was his worst start to his golf season since he turned pro. Mickelson offered no apologies for his decision to lay up. His lie in the left rough looked to be OK, although the grain of the grass was into his ball and he had 228 yards to the flag. A hybrid would have come out heavy and gone into the water. He said his 3-wood would have come out hot and got well over the green, leaving a difficult chip. Mickelson figured his best chance at See WATSON, Page B2

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Novak Djokovic gave his old friend Andy Murray a sympathetic hug and a few consoling words, then got on with the real celebrations. Djokovic walked to the middle of the court, tossed his racket into the crowd, then stripped off his shirt and shoes and hurled them, too.

The 23-year -old Serb had plenty to celebrate after his 6-4, 6-2, 6-3 win over Murray in the Australian Open final on Sunday night. Djokovic’s second Australian title made him only the fourth active player on the men’s tour to win multiple majors. Rafael See OPEN, Page B2

AP Photo Serbia's Novak Djokovic celebrates during his men's singles final win over Andy Murray of Britain at the Australian Open, Sunday.


B2 Tuesday, February 1, 2011 Open

Continued from Page B1

Nadal and Roger Federer have had a lock on the men’s side, winning 21 of the previous 23, while Lleyton Hewitt has two titles — the last coming at Wimbledon in 2002. “It’s been a fantastic tour nament for me,” Djokovic said. “I don’t want to fly up to the sky and say, ‘I am the best,’ or whatever. I cannot compare to Rafa and Roger’s success.” He’s the most successful player so far in 2011, though, and that’s what counts right now. “Certainly this will give me a lot of motivation for the continuation of the season, because to win a Grand Slam at the start of the season is the best start you can ask for,” he said. “It means a world to me. I’m still 23. I still have a lot of time to go.” Top-ranked Nadal came to Australia aiming to win a fourth consecutive major and complete a “Rafa Slam.” He lost in the quarterfinals. Federer came in as the defending champion and lost to Djokovic in the semifinals. The loss for fifth-seeded Murray continued his

LOCAL BRIEFS ENMU-R TO HOST SNOWBALL HOOPS TOURNAMENT The Eastern New Mexico University - Roswell Intramurals department will host the annual 3-on-3 Snowball basketball tournament on Saturday, Feb. 5, at the PE Center on the ENMU-R campus. The fee is $60 per team and each team may have four players. The deadline to enter is Feb. 3. For more information, call 6247338.

RTA VALENTINE TOURNEY SET FOR FEB. 5 The Roswell Tennis Association will hold its annual Valentine Tournament on Feb. 5 at 9 a.m. at the Cahoon Park tennis courts. The competition will be a mixed doubles adult tournament with a round-robin format in two levels. The tournament is open to RTA members and the entry fee is $20 per player. The deadline to enter is Feb. 1. A Valentine dinner for all tournament participants will also be held on the night of the tournament at 6 p.m. at Peppers Grill & Bar. For more information, or to enter the tournament, call Faye Stokes at 622-3889.

LIONS HONDO LITTLE LEAGUE SIGN-UPS START FEB. 5 The Lions Hondo Little League will begin its sign-ups on Feb. 5. Other sign-up dates are: Feb. 12, Feb. 19 and Feb. 26. Sign-ups will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 200 N. Main St. Lions Hondo Little League is for kids ages 4 to 15 and the registration fee is $40. For more information, call Pam at 317-2364 or Sybil at 317-8458.

EASTSIDE LITTLE LEAGUE SIGN-UPS START FEB. 5 The Eastside Little League will begin its sign-ups on Feb. 5. Other sign-up dates are: Feb. 12, Feb. 19 and Feb. 26. Sign-ups will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 200 N. Main St. Eastside Little League is for kids ages 4 to 15. Registration for the little league is $35, while registration for Juniors is $40.

BASEBALL BASICS AND DRILLS CAMP IS FEB. 26, 27 The New Mexico School of Baseball will be holding a pitching, catching and hitting clinic on Feb. 26 and 27. The clinic is for kids ages 8-14 and registration is $65 for both days or $40 for one day. Ages 8-11 will work from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on both days, while ages 12-14 will work from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. The clinic will involve two hours of pitching and catching and an hour will be spent on the basics of hitting. The camp is limited to 35 players per age group.

SPORTS horrible stretch in Grand Slam finals — he hasn’t won a set in three tries, including losses to Federer last year in Australia and at the 2009 U.S. Open. It also extended the long drought for British men at the majors that dates back to Fred Perry’s titles in 1936. Djokovic and Murray have been friends since they started playing each other at age 11 or 12, and often practice against each other. They’re even talking about playing doubles together. “I understand how he feels. It’s his third final and he didn’t get the title,” Djokovic said. “As I said on court, I really have big respect for him and his game, because I think he has everything that it takes to become a Grand Slam champion.” He thinks the pressure on Murray to break the British drought may weigh the Scotsman down. “It is in some ways a mental issue when you are facing a situation, playing the finals of a Grand Slam, being so close to winning a title,” Djokovic said. “Every time you get it there, you know, you want to win it badly, but some things go wrong.

High School

Charlotte at Detroit, 5:30 p.m. Dallas at New York, 5:30 p.m. Memphis at Minnesota, 6 p.m. New Orleans at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Portland at Denver, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Houston at Utah, 7 p.m. Chicago at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m.

Monday’s Scores By The Associated Press Boys Basketball Mora 73, Santa Fe Prep 64

Basketball

Football

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .36 11 .766 New York . . . . . . . . . .25 22 .532 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .21 26 .447 New Jersey . . . . . . . .15 34 .306 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .13 36 .265 Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 14 .708 Orlando . . . . . . . . . . .31 18 .633 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .30 18 .625 Charlotte . . . . . . . . . .20 27 .426 Washington . . . . . . . .13 34 .277 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .33 14 .702 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .19 26 .422 Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . .18 27 .400 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .17 31 .354 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .8 40 .167

GB — 13 14 16 1⁄2 25 1⁄2

Pct .851 .681 .633 .510 .449

GB — 8 10 16 19

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L San Antonio . . . . . . . .40 7 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 15 New Orleans . . . . . . .31 18 Memphis . . . . . . . . . .25 24 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .22 27 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Oklahoma City . . . . . .30 17 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 20 Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .28 20 Portland . . . . . . . . . . .25 22 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .11 36 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . .33 15 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . .22 24 Golden State . . . . . . .20 27 L.A. Clippers . . . . . . .18 28 Sacramento . . . . . . . .12 33

“You’re thinking too much. You’re worrying too much in your head,” he added. “It’s a mental battle, definitely. Bottom line is that this is a very mental sport in the end.” That’s why he took his time to reflect after winning a 38-hit rally in the 10th game with a brilliant backhand that forced an error to set up set point on Murray’s serve. He closed his eyes tightly, clenched his fists and let out a scream of a satisfaction. “Maybe there was a tur ning point in the whole match, that 5-4 game,” Djokovic said. “I was a bit fortunate, kind of anticipated well and read his intentions and played some great shots and great moments.” The first set had gone with serve until then, and Djokovic stepped up his intensity. That was the second in a seven-game winning sequence for Djokovic that took the match from Murray. “It is a big advantage mentally when you are a set up and you are getting to the second set and really going for the shots,” he said. “So it was great.” Murray started to lose focus as the service breaks tallied against him. He didn’t look sharp.

Wintry blast for Super Bowl too early for trouble

GB — 11 15 22 24

GB — 3 1⁄2 4 13 1⁄2 20 1⁄2

Pct GB .638 — .592 2 1 .583 2 ⁄2 .532 5 .234 19

Pct GB .688 — .478 10 1 .426 12 ⁄2 .391 14 .267 19 1⁄2

Sunday’s Games Miami 108, Oklahoma City 103 Boston 109, L.A. Lakers 96 Orlando 103, Cleveland 87 Philadelphia 110, Denver 99 New York 124, Detroit 106 Phoenix 104, New Orleans 102 Golden State 96, Utah 81 Monday’s Games Indiana 104, Toronto 93 New Jersey 115, Denver 99 Miami 117, Cleveland 90 Memphis 100, Orlando 97 Dallas 102, Washington 92 Utah 83, Charlotte 78 Milwaukee at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Washington at New Orleans, 6 p.m. San Antonio at Portland, 8 p.m. Boston at Sacramento, 8 p.m. Houston at L.A. Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Toronto at Atlanta, 5 p.m. Indiana at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at New Jersey, 5 p.m.

TV SPORTSWATCH TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press (All times Mountain) Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Tuesday, Feb. 1 MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN — Purdue at Wisconsin ESPN2 — Baylor at Oklahoma 7 p.m. ESPN — Vanderbilt at Florida NHL HOCKEY 5:30 p.m. VERSUS — Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers 8 p.m. VERSUS — Phoenix at San Jose SOCCER 12:55 p.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Aston Villa at Manchester United

DALLAS (AP) — Packers fans and Steelers supporters should feel right at home if a wintry blast winds up sending wind chill readings below zero during Super Bowl week in Texas. A storm is expected to dump more than a foot of snow on parts of the Midwest and bring freezing rain and bone-chilling cold to parts of Texas on Tuesday and Wednesday. There’s a chance of light snow off and on this week in the Dallas area, which is hosting Sunday’s Super Bowl between Green Bay and Pittsburgh. The hardy Packers may even practice indoors at a local high school this week. Depends on the weather. “Sorry we brought the weather with us,” coach Mike McCarthy said after his team arrived in Dallas. Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers said the team practiced indoors the past few days in Green Bay. He said he hoped the roof of Cowboys Stadium will be closed during the game (it will be). “I’m hoping they put the top on Jerry World, and I think they will,” he said. Game day won’t be that bad. The forecast calls for highs in the low 50s. “If there’s a silver lining, that might be it,” said Tim Smith, a spokesman for American Airlines, primary tenant at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, one of the nation’s busiest. The National Weather Service advised Wisconsin travelers bound for Texas to wait until Wednesday evening, with up to 20 inches of snow forecast for the Milwaukee area. One Packers fan actually moved up his departure. John O’Neill, known as St. Vince because he wears a green bishop’s outfit and a mitre with Vince Lombardi’s face on it to home games, was driving to Dallas this week because of the weather warnings. “If you’re going to make the journey the worst thing you can do is shortchange yourself,” said O’Neill, 58. Don Zuidmulder of Green Bay said he wasn’t worried about weather affecting his flight Thursday. “As long as I have 18 hours I’m going to get there,” said Zuidmulder, 68. “I’ll crawl if I have to.” Weather service meteorologist Jesse Moore said the sharpest cold, driven by northern winds up to 25 mph, will come Wednesday. “I’m keeping my fingers crossed and hoping for the best,” said Tracy Gilmour, spokeswoman for Sundance Square, an outdoor venue in downtown Fort Worth that is one of the broadcasting hubs and just a few blocks from the Steelers’ hotel. “We’re going to keep the party going as best we can.” Most Super Bowl trips are sold in fourday packages, and forecasts for Thursday are better in Texas and the participating cities. One travel agent in Pittsburgh said her agency had no weather-related changes among about 20 bookings because the forecast was good for Thursday, Friday and Saturday, when most clients were leaving. “If that changes, we’re in trouble,” said Nancy Buncher of Gulliver’s Travels. The Texas Department of Transportation brought in extra equipment from around the state for road work, including snow plows that are normally busy in the colder Texas Panhandle, said Val Lopez, an agency spokesman. “It’s really not any different than if we had a hurricane,” Lopez said. “In past years, with hurricanes we’ve been asked to help the coastal areas. This is kind of the reverse of that.”

Browns add 4 assistant coaches

CLEVELAND (AP) — New Browns coach Pat Shurmur has filled out most of his staff, with one notable exception. On Monday, the team announced the hiring of former Miami offensive coordinator Mark Whipple as its quarterbacks coach as well as the additions of Dwaine Board (defensive line), Bill Davis (linebackers), and Mike Wilson (wide receivers) to Shurmur’s staff. Shurmur has yet to select an offensive coordinator, and it’s still not known if he intends to hire one. At his introductory news conference, Shurmur, St. Louis’ offensive coordinator the past two seasons, said he plans to call plays next season. New England was the only NFL team not to have an offensive coordinator last season, and Shurmur may follow the Patriots’ lead — at least for now. Whipple spent the past two seasons with the Hurricanes, but was fired when the school dismissed Randy Shannon before the end of last season. Earlier this month, Whipple nearly received Connecticut’s top job, which went to former Syracuse coach

Watson

Continued from Page B1

eagle was a 64-degree wedge from the fairway, using the bank behind the hole to help feed the ball to the cup. As for his caddie, Jim Mackay, tending the pin on such a long shot? “Obviously, you need to hit a great shot and you need to get some luck to hole one from the fairway,” Mickelson said. “I’m not naive on that. I get it. But I also didn’t want to have something in the way. It’s not like I do it every week. But the last hole of the tournament, I’ve got to make it.” He didn’t, although it was pure entertainment. Mickelson tapped in for birdie and a 69, a score he thought would be enough to win at Torrey Pines for the first time in 10 years. Instead, he found himself chasing Watson and Jhonattan Vegas, the Venezuela rookie who won the Bob Hope Classic last week and had another chance to win until his 5iron on the final hole found the water. “Bubba played some terrific golf,” Mickelson said. “I did what I thought would be enough, and it just wasn’t. Bubba played too good. He made great shot after great shot, and made putt after putt. It was a wonderful round for him.”

Polamalu

Continued from Page B1

receiver Santonio Holmes, who was the MVP of Pittsburgh’s 2009 Super Bowl win over Arizona. “Everybody has their one person they think is the greatest player. In my eyes, I think he’s the greatest player I’ve ever played with.” Polamalu has had better statistical years than 2010, including the 2008 championship season and in 2005, when he had a career -high 91 tackles and three sacks as the Steelers won the title. He hasn’t had any season where he made more big plays than in 2010. That fit perfectly with defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau’s claim that Polamalu is the most versatile defensive back he’s ever worked with. And LeBeau has been involved with the NFL for about a half-century and is in the Hall of Fame. “I know Troy is going to do the right things,” LeBeau said. Matthews did plenty of things correctly in only his second pro season, enough to make the AllPro team thanks to 60

SCOREBOARD

Paul Pasqualoni instead. Before Miami, Whipple was an offensive assistant with the Philadelphia Eagles in 2008, working with Shurmur and Browns general manager Tom Heckert. Whipple also spent three seasons (2004-06) as quarterbacks coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers. Board was Oakland’s defensive line coach in 2009 after spending six seasons with Seattle, where he worked for Browns president Mike Holmgren. Board played most of his pro career with San Francisco and broke into coaching on the 49ers’ staff with Holmgren. This is Davis’ second stint with the Browns. Arizona’s former defensive coordinator was a defensive quality control coach in 1999 with Cleveland under Chris Palmer. Davis’ father, Bill, was a former Browns director of player personnel.

Golf

Farmers Insurane Open Scores By The Associated Press Sunday s-At Torrey Pines South Course; 7,698 yards; Par 72 n-At Torrey Pines North Course; 7,067 yards; Par 72 San Diego Purse: $5.8 million Final Round a-denotes amateur Bubba Watson . . .71s-65n-69s-67 — 272 Phil Mickelson . . .67s-69n-68s-69 — 273 Dustin Johnson . .69s-69n-71s-66 — 275 Jhonattan Vegas .69n-69s-69s-68 — 275 D.A. Points . . . . . .73s-68n-68s-67 — 276 Nick Watney . . . . .70n-73s-72s-63 — 278 Anthony Kim . . . .68n-67s-71s-72 — 278 Hunter Mahan . . .69s-67n-69s-73 — 278 Troy Matteson . . .74s-68n-70s-67 — 279 Marc Leishman . .67n-72s-71s-69 — 279 Brandt Snedeker .70s-69n-70s-70 — 279 Bill Haas . . . . . . .67n-66s-71s-75 — 279 Billy Mayfair . . . . .70s-69n-71s-70 — 280 Charles Howell IIl .71n-68s-73s-69 — 281 Ben Crane . . . . . .70s-66n-74s-71 — 281 Kevin Sutherland .69s-69n-71s-72 — 281 Brendan Steele . .70s-68n-74s-70 — 282 Tom Gillis . . . . . . .72s-70n-69s-71 — 282 David Duval . . . . .70s-70n-71s-71 — 282 Vijay Singh . . . . . .72s-71n-71s-69 — 283 Pat Perez . . . . . . .69n-70s-72s-72 — 283 Joe Durant . . . . . .72n-69s-71s-71 — 283 Spencer Levin . . .71n-71s-69s-72 — 283 Rickie Fowler . . . .65n-71s-73s-74 — 283 Ben Martin . . . . . .68n-72s-73s-71 — 284 Justin Rose . . . . .72s-70n-72s-70 — 284 Keegan Bradley . .67n-74s-70s-73 — 284 Fredrik Jacobson .67n-69s-73s-75 — 284 a-Anthony Paolucc i70s-71n-72s-72 — 285 Bill Lunde . . . . . . .71n-71s-71s-72 — 285 Tim Herron . . . . . .74s-68n-70s-73 — 285 Paul Stankowski .68s-74n-70s-73 — 285 Brandt Jobe . . . . .67n-73s-72s-73 — 285 Zack Miller . . . . . .69n-71s-72s-73 — 285 Chris Couch . . . . .70s-71n-74s-70 — 285 K.J. Choi . . . . . . .72s-69n-74s-70 — 285 Jimmy Walker . . .71n-69s-71s-74 — 285 Garrett Willis . . . .73n-70s-73s-69 — 285 Blake Adams . . . .71n-68s-71s-75 — 285 scott Gutschewski 72n-69s-72s-73 — 286 D.J. Brigman . . . .72n-70s-71s-73 — 286 Richard S. Johnson73s-67n-72s-74 — 286 Martin Piller . . . . .70n-71s-74s-71 — 286 Hunter Haas . . . .70n-70s-73s-74 — 287 Brian Davis . . . . .69s-68n-75s-75 — 287 Camilo Villegas . .69n-70s-75s-73 — 287 Tiger Woods . . . .69n-69s-74s-75 — 287 Chris Kirk . . . . . . .66n-71s-77s-73 — 287 Y.E. Yang . . . . . . .67n-73s-71s-76 — 287 Rory Sabbatini . . .68n-73s-75s-71 — 287 Stewart Cink . . . .70s-70n-74s-74 — 288 Stuart Appleby . . .72s-71n-71s-74 — 288 Kyle Stanley . . . . .68n-72s-72s-76 — 288 Matt Jones . . . . . .68s-72n-75s-73 — 288 David Mathis . . . .68n-73s-74s-73 — 288 Lucas Glover . . . .70s-70n-72s-76 — 288 Sunghoon Kang . .64n-76s-78s-70 — 288 Jamie Lovemark .69s-70n-75s-75 — 289 Charlie Wi . . . . . .71n-72s-71s-75 — 289 Gary Woodland . .71n-69s-76s-73 — 289 Chez Reavie . . . .74s-69n-73s-73 — 289 Jarrod Lyle . . . . . .71n-72s-75s-71 — 289 J.B. Holmes . . . . .72s-67n-75s-76 — 290 Josh Teater . . . . .72s-67n-79s-72 — 290 Bobby Gates . . . .70s-69n-74s-78 — 291 John Daly . . . . . . .67s-69n-76s-79 — 291 Tag Ridings . . . . .71n-68s-75s-77 — 291 Michael Thompson 69s-70n-76s-76 — 291 Fabian Gomez . . .67s-74n-74s-76 — 291 J.J. Henry . . . . . .72s-71n-72s-76 — 291 Greg Chalmers . .72n-71s-69s-80 — 292 Angel Cabrera . . .75s-68n-75s-74 — 292 Cameron Tringale 71s-71n-73s-78 — 293 Paul Goydos . . . .72s-69n-76s-76 — 293 Alex Prugh . . . . . .65n-74s-78s-76 — 293 Steven Bowditch .70n-71s-75s-78 — 294 Jason Gore . . . . .70n-73s-76s-76 — 295 Carl Pettersson . .70n-73s-76s-76 — 295 Mike Weir . . . . . . .72n-70s-78s-75 — 295

Not even Woods knows his progress

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The trouble with being so good for so long is that it makes the bad times look even worse. Tiger Woods never looked worse at Torrey Pines.

One of the more astute assessments about the state of Woods’ golf game came last year at the Australian Masters. He was paired in the third round with Kieran Pratt, a 22-year-old from Melbourne. A longtime observer noted that one player had won 14 majors among 82 titles around the world, the other was making his pro debut, and you couldn’t tell the difference. Pratt shot a 70. Woods had a 71. A new year looked a lot like the old one for Woods. To see him open with a pair of 69s at the Farmers Insurance Open made it appear as though his game was on an upward trend, until recognizing that Anthony Kim was better in each of the two rounds. Woods was outplayed in the next two rounds by two rookies: Jhonattan Vegas, an emerging star on the PGA Tour who showed no effects of a hangover from winning the previous week at the Bob Hope Classic; and Brendan Steele, who grew up in a California town (Hemet) that didn’t even have a golf course. Even more surprising is that it took place at Torrey Pines. No one has had more success on San Diego’s public gem than Woods. He won the Buick Invitational six times, and won the U.S. Open in 2008 on a shattered right leg — and in his first tournament in two months. But his record runs far deeper. He had never finished out of the top 10, and he had never finished more than four shots behind the winner. This isn’t the first time Woods has revamped his swing, either. The first big overhaul was in 1998, and Woods still finished only one shot out of a playoff that year at Torrey Pines. The other reconstruction project was in 2004, and he wound up two shots out of a playoff. This time, he was a whopping 15 shots out of the lead in a tie for 44th. Woods failed to break par only one time on the South Course at Torrey Pines in his first 32 rounds in tour events. He shot 74 on Saturday to fall out of the hunt, and 75 on Sunday to fall into irrelevancy. At least he didn’t finish near the bottom of the pack as he did last summer at Firestone, another course where he has dominated. Woods was flustered when he finished. “Absolutely, absolutely,” he said when asked if he was surprised by his scores. “I started out hitting it pretty good out here this week. I really did. And it progressively got worse. We have some things that we need to work on. Sean (Foley) and I have been talking about it every night. I can do it on the range, but it’s a little different when I’ve got to bring it out here.” Woods said he’s in “the process” of his swing change, whatever that means. When he was changing his swing under Hank Haney, his choice of words was, “I’m close.” But even he’s not sure how close he is. So much more was expected. Woods was coming off a solid tournament two months ago at his Chevron World

Texas

Continued from Page B1

B.J. Holmes had 19 points for Texas A&M. The Longhorns haven’t lost since dropping an 82-81 overtime decision to Connecticut on Jan. 8 and are 7-0 in league play for the first time since 1977-78. Texas made it look easy in this one and even some Texas A&M fans looked to be in awe when Hamilton hit a nifty hook shot from a tough angle that made it 60-36 with about 8 minutes left. Texas harassed the Aggies into their worst shooting performance of the season at just under 31 percent and their 17 field goals were one off their season low.

Roswell Daily Record tackles, 13 1/2 sacks (fourth in league), an interception return for a touchdown and, like Polamalu, a penchant for delivering decisive plays. “Game-changing plays,” Steelers linebacker LaMarr Woodley said with emphasis. “I mean, you look at all the plays T roy’s made — game-changing plays. ... So many game-changing plays to go out there and help win football games. Things that he (does), not only in the secondary — coming up, tackling backs in the backfield. Troy does it all.” Matthews said it would have been a “unique honor” to win in his second year. His goal, he said, is to become “world champions.” Added Matthews: “Despite defensive player of the year, I get the chance to play Sunday for the world championship.” Considered the lesser of three linebackers drafted in the first round in 2009 from Southern California, Matthews has had the biggest impact of that trio. Yes, Brian Cushing was the league’s top defensive rookie in ’09, but he tailed off in 2010 while Matthews was surging. Challenge, where he played great for 54 holes, looked shaky the last 18 and lost in a playoff to U.S. Open champion Graeme McDowell.

Transactions

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Signed RHP Rodrigo Lopez to a minor league contract. CINCINNATI REDS—Agreed to terms with RHP Edinson Volquez on a one-year contract. COLORADO ROCKIES—Agreed to terms with RHP Rafael Betancourt on a multiyear contract. FLORIDA MARLINS—Agreed to terms with INF Greg Dobbs and RHP Shawn Hill on minor league contracts. NEW YORK METS—Agreed to termswith RHP R.A. Dickey on a two-year contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA—Fined Miami G Eddie House $25,000 for making an obscene gesture during a Jan. 30 game against Oklahoma City. FOOTBALL National Football League CINCINNATI BENGALS—Fired offensive coordinator Bob Bratkowski. COLLEGE TEMPLE—Named Chuck Heater defensive coordinator. VANDERBILT—Named Bob Shoop defensive coordinator and safties coach, Brent Pry co-defensive coordinator and linebackers coach, Wesley McGriff defensive backs coach and defensive recruiting coordinator and Sean Spencer defensive line coach.

NMMI

Continued from Page B1

because we rebounded the ball extremely well,” he said. “When you get a lot of offensive rebounds you are going to get some more looks at the freethrow line, because we teach kids to go back up strong with the rebound. I think we out-hustled them a little bit and I think we made some good defensive stops. It is probably the best defensive job we have done. Tonight, my guys did an outstanding job of buying into the defense.” NMMI out-rebounded Western, 44-25 and went to the charity stripe 32 more times than the Westerners. Schooley said his young team bought into the system tonight because the ysaw the light. “They just bought into it tonight,” he said. “When you are playing with a young team and you are trying to sell something and it isn’t working for whatever reason, for a young team it is hard to recover if it isn’t going well. Tonight, I think they saw the light at the end of the tunnel.” Marsh led the Broncos with 22 points, three steals and four rebounds, while Peralta chipped in with 13 points, three rebounds and three blocks.


Roswell Daily Record

COMICS

Garfield

Jumble

Family Circus

Beetle Bailey

DEAR ABBY: As a birth mother, I must respond to the letter from “Her Thankful Son” (Dec. 12). Nearly 26 years ago, I gave up my own son for adoption. It was the most devastatingly painful thing I have ever had to do. But I loved him enough to let him go because I was in no position to raise him myself. To the young man who wrote you, I say: “Thank you” — from me and all the birth mothers who carry holes in our hearts from having to let our children go on to better lives without us. My greatest fear was always that my son would end up hating me and not understand why I let him go. This man’s letter has given me hope. WENDY IN DELAWARE DEAR WENDY: “Her Thankful Son” wrote an open letter to his unknown biological mom, expressing gratitude for the life his adoptive parents have provided. As it did with you, his letter resonated with many of my readers whose lives have been touched by adoption. Read on:

HHHHH DEAR ABBY: When I read the letter from “Thankful Son,” I felt a sense of relief. I had a son when I was 16 and placed him for adoption because I knew I couldn’t give him the life he deserved. I was determined that his adoption would not be in vain and that I would become a better person because of it. I consider myself to be a better mom now because of him. My girls know they have a

HINTS

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

brother out there, but I have explained it’s not for me to seek him. If he wants to find me I would be thrilled, but I realize I gave up my right to him when I made my decision. I have no regrets. I think of him often and wonder if he’s OK. Reading “Thankful’s” letter comforted me. If it is God’s will, I will meet my son one day. I feel he will be proud of me for making something of myself and giving him the opportunity for a successful life. BRENDA IN FLORIDA

DEAR ABBY: I am also an adopted child. From the time I was told at age 7, I wondered who my birth mother was and went through phases of anger and depression. I was blinded by my own ego and did not consider anything about HER life. When I was in my teens, a friend of mine became pregnant and was scared about what she was going to do. I lost touch with her shortly after and don’t know what happened. I have since realized that my friend’s situation could have also been my birth mother’s. It changed my attitude, and I decided I’d like to meet her one day and tell her I care about her.

Dear Heloise:

I e-mailed you about a FEE I was charged, without my realizing it, to use an online service. Here is the follow-up:

I called my credit-card company and said I did not authorize this charge. The company sent a form in the mail stating as such. I signed it and sent it back. About 10 days later, I got

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Several years later I got that opportunity, with help from my adoptive mom and a state agency. Meeting my birth mom and three younger brothers and sister was a very emotional moment for me, and I cherish it to this day. JAY IN MARYLAND DEAR ABBY: You said you hoped “Thankful Son” could meet his birth mother. Why? As an adoptive mom of adult children, I feel just as happy not having the birth parents intervene in our lives. Could I handle it? Of course. If my children had a burning desire to find their birth parents, would it be OK? Absolutely. Am I curious, too? Certainly. But I don’t think you should encourage a search. After all, these people are virtual strangers. They have different values and expectations, which all too often can lead to disappointment. At the very least, it’s a weird experience. I think what adopted children really want to know is why they were given up and if they were loved. The answer to that last question, from this mom, is a resounding YES! THE “REAL” MOM IN MIAMI DEAR “REAL” MOM: Why do I hope “Thankful Son” will one day be reunited with his birth mother? For two reasons: Many times the reunion brings both parent and child a sense of completion. It also provides an opportunity for the child to get a complete family medical history.

Hagar the Horrible

Blondie

Zits

HHHHH a letter from the online service apologizing and refunding the charge. My credit card also refunded the fee. The take-away? READ the fine print of everything you sign up for online, especially if it says it’s free! Chances are it is not free at all, or it is free for a very limited time, like one week or so. And don’t forget about your bank or credit-card company — it usually is more than happy to go to bat for you and resolve these kinds of issues. Consumers have to recognize that we have rights, and we can’t let big companies use misleading advertisements and limited-time, too-good-to-betrue offers. Thank you for this platform to educate the public. A Reader in Texas Chalk up one for the consumer! And good for the companies that stepped up and did the right thing. Heloise

Snuffy Smith

Dilbert

HHHHH Dear Heloise: To steam an unmarked stamp stuck to an envelope: Place a moist napkin under the envelope where the stamp is located and microwave for 4560 seconds. The stamp will peel right off. Have an envelope you want to use immediately? Put the stamp on the new envelope. A Reader in Minnesota Dear Heloise: We have a lot of family heirlooms, so we decided to give them to our kids and grandkids for Christmas and their birthdays every year. We have more stuff than we need anyway, and this way we get to see their excitement when they receive things of ours that they have always wanted. Joan, via e-mail Dear Heloise: I place a tinfoil baking cup in the bottom of my pencil holder; it fits most holders. It is easily changed as often as needed and is very effective, especially if you put pens in the holder. A. Alfano in New Jersey We love this no-mess hint in Heloise Central! Thanks for sharing. Heloise

The Wizard of Id

For Better or For Worse

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

B3


ESTATE SALES ANNOUNCEMENTS TRANSPORTATION GARAGE RECREATIONAL MERCHANDISE EMPLOYMENT INSTRUCTION REAL FINANCIAL SERVICES RENTALS 490. 439. 305. 550. 545. 810. 620. 220. 720. 015. 495. 185. 105. 232. 580. 310. 795. 485. 405. 025. 440. 140. 715. 230. 435. 225. 745. 200. 235. 520. 350. 780. 195. 569. 570. 515. 395. 790. 615. 635. 796. 007. 530. 410. 400. 316. Legals Auto Homes Computers Houses Window Personals Wanted Childcare Electrical Furniture Livestock Acreages/ Painting/ 380. 270. 605. 045. 540. 345. 505. 775. 535. Cleaning Hay 210. Chimney Pickups/ Office TractorLost Business Window Welding Pets General Hauling Elderly Roofing Lots Fencing Mobile Mobile RV’s Stucco Coins, Autos SUVS Tree Good Real West Pet Tax Parts and for & For or for to & Business Rent-Furnished Motorcycles Firewood/Coal Estate Miscellaneous Special & Opportunities Home Homes Employment Construction Trucks/Vans things Gold, Investment/ Remodeling Apartments Sharpening Landscape/ Decorating & Plastering Feed Accessories Campers Services for Service Repair Farms/ Sweep Found Home Doors Supplies Work RentCare Sale Buy Wanted Silver, Sale Courts to Notice Sale -Places Sale Eat& Buy, Miscellaneous Opportunities Ranches/Sale Commercial/ Unfurnished Spaces/Lots Lawnwork Furnished Scooters Hauling for Sell, Sale Trade Business

B4 Tuesday, February 1, 2011

FINANCIAL

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg DirxEnBull.41e u71.17 +5.29 Discover .08 20.59 +.13 A-B-C Disney .40f 38.87 +.02 1.10 64.10 +1.95 ABB Ltd .48e 23.67 -.06 Dover AES Corp ... 12.40 +.03 DowChm .60 35.48 +.42 AFLAC 1.20 57.58 +.59 DuPont 1.64 u50.68 +.39 AK Steel .20 15.90 +.32 DukeEngy .98 17.88 -.08 AMB Pr 1.12 33.55 +.62 DukeRlty .68 13.70 +.08 ... 7.05 -.15 Dynegy rs ... 6.29 +.21 AMR ... 24.89 +.41 AT&T Inc 1.72f 27.52 +.03 EMC Cp AU Optron ... 9.60 +.02 EOG Res .62 106.39 +3.86 ... 3.66 +.02 AbtLab 1.76 45.16 -.33 EKodak 2.72fu107.96+3.70 AberFitc .70 50.41 +2.05 Eaton Accenture .90f 51.47 -.05 EdisonInt 1.28f 36.28 -.03 Adecaog n ... u12.60 +.60 ElPasoCp .04 u15.88 +.42 ... 6.75 -.17 ... 7.83 +.34 Elan AMD Aeropostl s ... 24.12 -.22 EldorGld g .10f 16.12 -.29 EmersonEl1.38f 58.88 +1.92 Aetna .04 32.94 -.01 Agilent ... 41.83 +.85 EnCana g .80 32.27 +.39 Agnico g .64f 68.44 -.68 EqtyRsd 1.47e u54.19 +1.30 Agrium g .11 88.39 +.49 ExcoRes .16 20.08 -.05 AlcatelLuc ... 3.31 ... Exelon 2.10 42.51 +.60 .12 16.57 +.44 ExxonMbl 1.76 u80.68 +1.69 Alcoa Allergan .20 70.61 +1.53 FairchldS ... 17.80 +.19 AldIrish ... d.70 -.04 FamilyDlr .72f 42.48 ... Allstate .80 31.14 -.01 FedExCp .48 90.32 -.16 AlphaNRs ... 53.73 -4.15 FidlNFin .48m 13.45 -.49 Altria 1.52 23.51 -.28 FstHorizon .04 11.33 +.08 AmBev s .99e 26.70 -.35 FirstEngy 2.20 39.12 +.35 ... 29.14 -.37 FlagstB rs ... 1.58 ... Amdocs AMovilL .52e 56.99 +.87 FootLockr .60 17.86 +.09 ... 15.95 -.32 AmAxle ... 14.30 -.22 FordM AEagleOut .44a 14.46 -.10 FordM wt ... 7.30 -.36 1.84 35.68 -.18 ForestLab ... 32.26 +.27 AEP AmExp .72 43.38 -.48 FMCG 2.00a 108.75 +2.58 AmIntlGrp ... 40.35 +.09 FrontierCm .75 9.17 +.10 Anadarko .36 77.08 +2.90 FrontierOil ... u20.80 +1.03 AnalogDev .88 38.83 +.53 Frontline 2.00e 25.93 -1.19 AnglogldA .18e 43.04 -.09 G-H-I Annaly 2.65e 17.83 ... ... 5.22 +.12 .60 119.36 +4.52 GMX Rs Apache ArcelorMit .75 36.48 +.40 GameStop ... 21.07 +.09 ArchCoal .40 34.25 +1.03 Gannett .16 14.74 -.45 .40 19.27 +.07 ArchDan .60 32.67 -.09 Gap AssuredG .18 14.46 +.24 GenDynam1.68 75.40 +1.27 Avon .88 28.31 +.25 GenElec .56f 20.14 -.06 BB&T Cp .60 27.64 +.38 GenGrPr n ... 14.81 +.24 BHP BillLt1.74e 89.03 +1.83 GenMarit .04m 3.06 -.16 BP PLC ... 47.47 +1.26 GenMills s 1.12 34.78 -.16 BPZ Res ... 5.75 +.54 GenMot n ... 36.49 -.11 BakrHu .60 u68.51 +1.22 GenOn En ... 4.14 +.05 BcoBrades .82r 18.92 -.14 Genworth ... 13.57 -.28 BcoSantand.78e 12.24 +.32 Gerdau .32e 13.25 +.43 BcoSBrasil .45e 11.60 -.03 GlaxoSKln2.00e 36.33 -.07 BkofAm .04 13.73 +.13 GoldFLtd .16e 15.87 +.02 BkIrelnd 1.04e 2.07 -.05 Goldcrp g .36 40.21 -.53 BkNYMel .36 31.23 +.35 GoldmanS 1.40 163.62 +1.85 BkAtl A h ... 1.00 -.02 Goodyear ... 11.88 +.22 BankUtd n ... 28.00 -.40 GpTelevisa ... 24.06 +.60 Bar iPVix rs ... 32.03 -.07 HCP Inc 1.92f 37.09 +.54 BarrickG .48 47.51 +.21 Hallibrtn .36 u45.00 +1.12 Baxter 1.24f 48.49 -.11 Hanesbrds ... 23.02 +.49 BerkH B ... 81.75 +.19 HarleyD .40 39.65 +.28 BestBuy .60 34.00 -.11 HarrisCorp 1.00 46.54 +.18 Blackstone .40 15.73 +.15 HartfdFn .20 27.78 +.09 ... 9.10 +.09 BlockHR .60 12.52 +.02 HltMgmt ... 9.00 -.09 Boeing 1.68 69.48 +.25 HeclaM 1.80 47.50 -.12 Boise Inc .40e 8.99 -.02 Heinz ... 14.71 +.29 ... d.73 -.12 Hertz Borders .40 u84.12 +2.61 BostonSci ... 6.98 -.01 Hess BoydGm ... 10.84 ... HewlettP .32 45.69 +.18 Brinker .56 23.53 +.03 HomeDp .95 36.77 +.07 BrMySq 1.32f 25.18 -.61 HonwllIntl 1.33f 56.01 +.69 CB REllis ... 22.19 +.31 HostHotls .04 18.51 +.63 CBS B .20 19.83 +.55 Huntsmn .40 17.41 +.44 .40 135.04 +1.06 IAMGld g .08f 19.02 -.61 CF Inds CIGNA .04 42.02 +.76 ICICI Bk .53e 43.34 +.02 CMS Eng .84 19.50 +.16 iShGold s ... 13.01 -.03 CSX 1.04f 70.60 +1.32 iSAstla .82e 24.87 +.30 CVS Care .50f 34.20 -.60 iShBraz 2.53e 73.20 +.65 .50e 31.29 +.28 Calpine ... 14.27 +.22 iSCan Cameco g .40f u41.47 +1.68 iShGer .29e 25.17 +.17 Cameron ... 53.30 +.82 iSh HK .45e 19.19 +.03 CdnNRs gs .30 44.52 +1.48 iShJapn .14e 10.93 +.01 CapOne .20 48.16 -.08 iSh Kor .39e 61.40 +.04 CardnlHlth .78 41.51 +.44 iSMalas .34e 14.21 +.03 Carnival 1.00f 44.71 +.10 iShMex .54e 60.76 +.63 Caterpillar 1.76 97.01 +1.33 iShSing .43e 13.74 +.01 Cemex .43t 9.47 ... iSPacxJpn1.56e 46.32 +.39 CenovusE .80 u34.61 +1.26 iSTaiwn .29e 15.57 -.02 CenterPnt .79f 16.15 +.12 iSh UK .43e 17.56 +.26 ... 27.39 +.09 CntryLink 2.90 43.24 +.22 iShSilver ChesEng .30 u29.53 +2.20 iShChina25.63e 42.55 +.52 iSSP500 2.36e 129.15 +1.01 Chevron 2.88 u94.93 +1.56 Chicos .16 10.92 -.12 iShEMkts .64e 45.81 +.48 Chimera .69e 4.20 ... iShSPLatA1.18e 51.37 +.71 Citigrp ... 4.82 +.10 iShB20 T 3.86e 91.22 -.70 Citigp wtB ... .25 +.02 iS Eafe 1.42e 59.44 +.51 CliffsNRs .56 85.46 +2.37 iSR1KG .73e 58.65 +.42 Clorox 2.20 62.89 -.90 iShR2K .89e 77.95 +.54 Coach .60 54.09 +1.27 iShREst 1.97e 57.96 +.68 CocaCE .48f 25.16 +.13 iShFnSv .25e 58.97 +.57 1.36 53.49 -1.22 CocaCl 1.76 62.85 +.64 ITW ColgPal 2.12 76.77 -.22 IngerRd .28 47.20 +1.08 ... u19.74 +.48 Comerica .40 38.20 +.21 IngrmM ConAgra .92 22.33 -.11 InterXion n ... 14.10 +.30 2.60 162.00 +2.79 ConocPhil 2.20 u71.46 +.90 IBM ... 9.25 +.39 ConsolEngy .40 49.70 +1.77 Intl Coal Corning .20 u22.21 +.41 IntlGame .24 17.17 -.20 .75f 28.88 +.44 Covidien .80 47.47 +.39 IntPap CrwnCstle ... 42.17 -.88 Interpublic ... 10.69 -.03 .44 24.74 +.08 Cummins 1.05 105.88 +.50 Invesco ItauUnibH .65e 21.50 -.27 D-E-F J-K-L DCT Indl .28 5.54 -.05 DR Horton .15 12.39 -.11 JPMorgCh .20 44.94 +.40 Jabil .28 20.21 +.40 DanaHldg ... 17.92 +.42 Danaher s .08 46.06 +.01 JanusCap .04 12.91 +.24 JohnJn 2.16 59.77 -.24 Darden 1.28 47.11 +1.93 Darling ... 13.55 -.15 JohnsnCtl .64 38.39 +.70 DeanFds ... 10.15 +.12 JnprNtwk ... 37.12 +.84 Deere 1.40f 90.90 +1.99 KB Home .25 14.84 -.12 .23e 14.99 ... DelMnte .36 18.96 +.05 KKR n ... 19.68 -.06 DeltaAir ... 11.67 -.16 KT Corp DenburyR ... u20.35 +1.08 Kellogg 1.62 50.30 -.19 DeutschBk .93e 58.55 -.35 Keycorp .04 8.90 +.11 .72f 18.09 +.26 DevelDiv .16f 13.60 +.06 Kimco DevonE .64 u88.69 +3.56 Kinross g .10 16.64 -.31 Kohls ... 50.78 -.42 DiaOffs .50a 71.71 +1.52 1.16 30.57 +.04 DrSCBear rs ... 15.52 -.31 Kraft .42 21.40 +.11 DrxEBear rs ... d18.06 -1.60 Kroger DirEMBr rs ... 22.48 -.72 LDK Solar ... 12.51 +.23 ... 6.19 +.06 DirFnBear ... 8.57 -.22 LSI Corp ... 46.49 +.89 DrxFBull s ... 29.95 +.73 LVSands DirxSCBull .11e 70.96 +1.35 LennarA .16 19.36 -.30 ... 34.84 -.43 DirxLCBear ... 8.14 -.20 Lexmark Name

Name Sell Chg Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.02 +.15 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.03 +.15 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.25 ... GrowthI 26.20 ... Ultra 22.98 ... American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.27 +.13 AMutlA p 25.76 +.14 BalA p 18.29 +.09 BondA p 12.20 ... CapIBA p 50.03 +.13 CapWGA p36.17 +.15 CapWA p 20.48 +.03 EupacA p 41.56 +.12 FdInvA p 37.54 +.31 GovtA p 13.87 -.03 GwthA p 30.96 +.26 HI TrA p 11.47 ... IncoA p 16.82 +.07 IntBdA p 13.44 -.01 IntlGrIncA p31.36 +.21 ICAA p 28.76 +.18 NEcoA p 25.89 +.14 N PerA p 28.79 +.15 NwWrldA 53.10 +.03 SmCpA p 38.49 +.11 TxExA p 11.66 ... WshA p 27.71 +.19 American Funds B: GrwthB t 30.04 +.26 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.02 +.20 IntlEqA 29.30 +.20 IntEqII I r 12.38 +.09 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.11 +.09 MidCap 33.96 +.43

MidCapVal20.77 +.19 Baron Funds: Growth 51.72 +.46 SmallCap 24.32 +.21 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.76 ... DivMu 14.19 ... TxMgdIntl 15.95 +.11 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 17.80 +.13 GlAlA r 19.51 ... BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.21 ... BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.83 +.13 GlbAlloc r 19.59 ... CGM Funds: Focus n 34.09 +.14 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 53.64 ... Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 60.49 +.85 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.19 +.27 DivEqInc 10.22 ... DivrBd 5.02 ... Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.15 +.29 AcornIntZ 40.64 +.16 ValRestr 50.24 ... Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.33 ... DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n11.55 +.08 USCorEq1 n11.22+.09 USCorEq2 n11.18+.08 DWS Invest S: MgdMuni S 8.54 ... Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.80 +.23

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: chg.

+1.45 +1.28 +1.18 +.95 +.85 +.92 +1.02 +1.20 +.60

+1.78 +1.80 +2.02 +1.47 +1.20 +1.08 +1.25

+1.50 +2.38 +.85 +1.53 +.80 +.22 -.05 -.70 -.67 -1.10 -.30 -.07

34.77 ... 29.24 +.32 28.84 -.23 4.03 +.16 79.60 +1.40 24.80 -.45 35.94 +1.08

M-N-0

MBIA ... 10.70 -.05 MEMC ... 11.09 +.09 MFA Fncl .94f 8.17 -.08 ... 8.39 +.12 MGIC MGM Rsts ... 14.83 +.34 .20 23.15 +.16 Macys Manitowoc .08 13.43 +.05 MarathonO1.00 u45.70 +.94 MktVGold .40e 53.92 -.28 MktVRus .18e 39.09 +.55 MktVJrGld2.93e 34.10 -.53 MarIntA .35f 39.49 +.89 MarshIls .04 6.99 ... .30 13.32 +.03 Masco MasseyEn .24 u62.86 +5.63 McDrmInt s ... 20.78 +.82 McDnlds 2.44 73.67 +.39 McGrwH 1.00f 38.98 +.71 McKesson .72 75.17 +1.02 ... 15.65 +.51 McMoRn MeadJohn .90 57.97 -.34 Mechel ... 31.53 +1.15 MedcoHlth ... 61.02 -.43 Medtrnic .90 38.32 +.27 Merck 1.52 33.17 +.10 MetLife .74 45.77 +.27 MetroPCS ... 12.93 -.23 MobileTel s ... 19.11 -.13 Monsanto 1.12 73.38 +1.84 MonstrWw ... 16.65 +.70 MorgStan .20 29.40 +.36 Mosaic .20 81.04 +1.26 MotrlaSol n ... 38.77 +.81 MotrlaMo n ... 27.87 -1.72 MurphO 1.10 66.30 +.17 NRG Egy ... 20.75 -.24 NV Energy .48f 14.37 ... NYSE Eur 1.20 31.81 -.27 Nabors ... u24.40 +.56 NBkGreece.29e 1.91 +.07 NOilVarco .44f u73.90 +2.44 NatSemi .40 15.16 +.35 NY CmtyB 1.00 18.32 +.05 NY Times ... 10.11 -.42 NewellRub .20 19.25 -.09 NewfldExp ... 73.17 +4.13 NewmtM .60 55.07 +.07 Nexen g .20 25.15 +.89 NextEraEn 2.00 53.46 -.57 NiSource .92 18.62 +.01 NielsenH n ... u26.07 +1.07 NobleCorp .90e 38.25 +.91 NobleEn .72 u91.10 +4.64 NokiaCp .56e 10.70 +.13 Nordstrm .80 41.18 +.27 NorflkSo 1.60f 61.19 +.81 NoestUt 1.03 32.92 +.15 NorthropG 1.88 69.30 +1.72 Novartis 1.99e 55.86 -.06 Nucor 1.45f 45.91 +.81 OcciPet 1.52 96.68 +2.87 OfficeDpt ... 5.25 +.13 OilSvHT 2.40eu153.91+3.50 OldRepub .69 12.23 -.25 OwensIll ... 29.49 -.05

P-Q-R

PMI Grp ... 2.91 ... PNC .40 60.00 -.11 2.20 84.28 +1.05 PPG PPL Corp 1.40 25.79 +.38 PallCorp .70f u55.41 +6.75 PatriotCoal ... 26.17 +.71 PeabdyE .34 63.42 +2.33 Penney .80 32.07 -.22 PepsiCo 1.92 64.31 -.09 Petrohawk ... 20.05 +1.02 PetrbrsA 1.20e 33.25 +.88 Petrobras 1.20e 36.73 +1.32 Pfizer .80f 18.22 +.07 PhilipMor 2.56 57.24 +.64 ... 9.37 -.06 Pier 1 PlainsEx ... u35.40 +1.75 Potash .84f 177.78 +3.62 PwshDB ... u28.53 +.44 PS Agri ... u34.29 +.37 PS USDBull ... 22.36 -.13 PrinFncl .55f 32.77 +.22 ProShtS&P ... 42.82 -.34 PrUShS&P ... 22.66 -.35 ProUltQQQ ... 85.90 +.85 PrUShQQQ ... 10.93 -.12 ProUltSP .43e 50.13 +.70 ProUShL20 ... 39.05 +.52 ProUShtFn ... 14.84 -.27 ProUFin rs .07e 69.30 +1.20 ProUltO&G.23eu52.70 +2.64 ProUSR2K ... 12.54 -.16 ProUSSP500 ... 18.05 -.41 ProUltCrude ... 12.32 +.64 ProUSSlv rs ... 11.48 -.02 ProUShCrude...d10.02 -.61 ProctGam 1.93 63.13 -1.07 ProgsvCp 1.40e 19.81 +.15 ProLogis .45m 14.92 -.29 Prudentl 1.15f 61.51 +.40 PSEG 1.37 32.43 ... PulteGrp ... 7.89 -.19 QntmDSS ... 2.69 -.07 QstDiag .40 56.95 -.41 Questar s .56 17.43 +.22 QksilvRes ... 15.01 +.46 Quiksilvr ... 4.47 +.15 QwestCm .32 7.13 +.08 RAIT Fin .03e 2.53 -.06 RPC s .28f 17.58 +.31 RadianGrp .01 7.18 +.15 RadioShk .25 d15.15 -.05 RangeRs .16 49.87 +2.21 Raytheon 1.50 49.99 +.51 RedHat ... 41.32 +.26 RegionsFn .04 7.10 +.22 ReneSola ... 10.57 +.39 ResMed s ... 31.49 +.41 ResoluteEn ... u18.10 +.67 Resolute wt ... u5.13 +.37 ReynAm s 1.96f 31.81 ...

Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 35.17 +.24 NYVen C 33.64 +.22 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.22 ... Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq n21.46 +.05 EmMktV 35.03 +.14 IntSmVa n 17.56 +.07 LargeCo 10.14 +.08 USLgVa n 20.77 +.18 US Micro n13.62 +.07 US Small n21.38 +.15 US SmVa 25.65 +.17 IntlSmCo n17.39 +.06 10.34 ... Fixd IntVa n 19.16 +.12 Glb5FxInc 10.92 ... 2YGlFxd 10.16 ... Dodge&Cox: Balanced 71.90 +.31 Income 13.28 -.01 IntlStk 35.89 +.11 Stock 111.07 +.66 Dreyfus: Aprec 38.57 +.25 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.46 +.14 NatlMunInc 8.65 -.01 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.07 ... GblMacAbR10.23 ... LgCapVal 18.52 +.14 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.00 +.07 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.89 -.01 FPACres n27.14 +.05 Fairholme 35.01 ... Federated Instl: KaufmnR 5.43 +.03

CATTLE/HOGS

Open high low settle CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 11 109.00 109.50 107.60 108.95 Apr 11 114.32 115.20 112.85 114.05 Jun 11 113.70 115.50 113.70 114.55 Aug 11 114.80 115.50 114.20 114.85 Oct 11 117.27 118.10 116.90 117.52 Dec 11 117.42 118.55 117.42 118.27 Feb 12 117.30 118.20 117.30 118.17 Apr 12 117.50 118.70 117.50 118.70 Jun 12 114.50 114.90 114.50 114.90 Last spot N/A Est. sales 64418. Fri’s Sales: 55,472 Fri’s open int: 360640, up +3620 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Mar 11 126.62 128.40 126.62 128.00 Apr 11 127.60 129.10 127.60 129.07 May 11 128.00 129.60 128.00 129.57 Aug 11 128.90 130.20 128.90 129.97 Sep 11 128.65 129.85 128.65 129.80 Oct 11 128.55 129.70 128.55 129.60 Nov 11 128.30 129.40 128.30 129.40 Jan 12 127.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 872. Fri’s Sales: 4,774 Fri’s open int: 53834, off -532 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 11 87.50 87.60 86.35 87.25 Apr 11 94.50 94.55 92.02 94.00 May 11 98.30 99.20 98.10 99.10 Jun 11 100.77 101.00 99.40 100.95 Jul 11 97.80 98.50 97.52 98.32 Aug 11 96.50 97.40 96.05 97.32 Oct 11 84.85 85.82 84.25 85.65 Dec 11 81.80 81.80 80.65 81.20 Feb 12 83.00 83.00 81.97 82.50 Apr 12 84.00 84.00 83.10 83.10 May 12 87.10 87.10 87.00 87.00 Jun 12 89.40 89.40 89.40 89.40 Last spot N/A

LillyEli 1.96 .80f Limited LincNat .20f LloydBkg ... LockhdM 3.00 Lowes .44 LyonBas A ...

RioTinto s .90e 69.48 +1.45 RiteAid h ... 1.28 +.06 Rowan ... 34.28 -.03 RylCarb ... 44.90 -.65 RoyDShllA3.36eu70.99 +.71

S-T-U

SLM Cp ... 14.41 +.01 SpdrDJIA 2.92e 118.60 +.58 SpdrGold ... 129.87 -.41 SP Mid 1.51e 167.85 +1.30 S&P500ETF2.37e128.68+.96 SpdrHome .33e 17.69 -.12 SpdrKbwBk.13e 26.32 +.28 SpdrLehHY4.68e 40.49 +.26 SpdrRetl .49e 46.43 +.16 SpdrOGEx .20e u56.75 +2.04 SpdrMetM .38e 68.97 +1.36 Safeway .48 20.69 +.18 StJude ... 40.50 -.50 Saks ... 11.72 +.37 Salesforce ... 129.14 -2.47 SandRdge ... 7.44 +.17 Sanofi 1.63e 34.41 +1.06 SaraLee .46 16.97 -.20 Schlmbrg 1.00f u88.99 +2.32 Schwab .24 18.05 +.26 SemiHTr .56e 34.41 +.01 SiderNac s .58e 17.06 +.44 SilvWhtn g ... 30.80 -.69 SmurfStn n ... 37.35 -.02 Solutia ... 23.42 +.22 SouthnCo 1.82 37.62 -.15 SwstAirl .02 11.85 -.08 SwstnEngy ... 39.50 +.71 SpectraEn 1.04f 26.23 +.53 SprintNex ... 4.52 +.07 SP Matls 1.17e 38.44 +.63 SP HlthC .57e 31.68 +.07 SP CnSt .78e 28.88 -.10 SP Consum.49e 37.18 +.08 SP Engy .99e u73.15 +2.04 SPDR Fncl .16e 16.40 +.15 SP Inds .60e 36.24 +.41 SP Tech .32e 25.99 +.16 SP Util 1.27e 31.72 +.07 ... 4.40 -.09 StdPac StanBlkDk 1.36 72.68 -.04 StarwdHtl .30f 58.97 +.53 StarwdPT 1.60f 22.51 +.29 StateStr .04 46.72 +.31 Statoil ASA1.02e 24.42 +.24 StillwtrM ... 21.68 +.09 Suncor gs .40 u41.51 +1.52 Sunoco .60 u42.45 -1.01 Suntech ... 8.49 +.19 .04 30.43 +.85 SunTrst Supvalu .35 7.29 -.09 Synovus .04 2.64 -.14 Sysco 1.04f 29.14 -.05 TAM SA .92e 22.00 -1.44 TECO .82 u18.41 +.16 TJX .60 47.39 -.32 TaiwSemi .47e 13.07 -.04 Talbots ... d5.46 -.51 TalismE g .25 22.92 +.81 Target 1.00 54.83 +.48 TataMotors.32e 24.26 -.45 TeckRes g .60f 60.60 +2.70 TelefEsp s1.75e 25.13 +.37 TenetHlth ... 6.65 -.02 Teradata ... 42.99 +.11 Teradyn ... u16.68 +.45 Tesoro ... 19.25 +.38 TexInst .52 33.91 -.36 Textron .08 26.29 -.03 3M Co 2.10 87.92 +.48 TW Cable 1.92f 67.83 +.71 TimeWarn .85 31.45 -.27 Total SA 3.13e 58.77 +.97 Transocn ... 79.93 +1.08 Travelers 1.44 56.26 +.45 TrinaSolar ... 26.07 +.34 Turkcell .66e 15.46 +.25 TycoElec .64 36.23 +.72 TycoIntl .86e 44.83 +.13 Tyson .16 16.45 -.10 ... 17.96 -.15 UBS AG UDR .74 23.48 +.25 US Airwy ... 9.92 -.24 UnilevNV 1.11e 29.63 +.30 Unilever 1.11e 29.01 +.06 UnionPac 1.52f 94.63 +1.09 UtdContl ... 25.40 -.45 UtdMicro .08e 3.18 +.02 UPS B 1.88 71.62 +.89 US Bancrp .20 27.00 +.20 US NGsFd ... 5.99 +.11 US OilFd ... 38.61 +1.03 USSteel .20 57.67 +1.87 UtdTech 1.70 81.30 -.13 UtdhlthGp .50 41.05 +.12

V-W-X-Y-Z

Vale SA .76e 34.83 +.63 Vale SA pf .76e 30.98 +.63 ValeantPh .38a 36.53 -.56 ValeroE .20 25.36 +.21 VangEmg .82e 46.49 +.48 VangEurPc.90e 36.93 +.35 VerizonCm 1.95 35.62 -.01 ViacomB .60 41.55 +.01 Visa .60 69.85 +.39 VishayInt ... u16.50 +.41 WalMart 1.21 56.07 -.63 Walgrn .70 40.44 +.08 WalterEn .50 130.27 +3.31 WsteMInc 1.36f 37.87 ... WeathfIntl ... 23.72 +.75 WellPoint ... 62.12 -.54 WellsFargo .20 32.42 +.58 WendyArby .08 4.83 +.10 WDigital ... 34.02 +.08 WstnRefin ... u12.18 +.66 WstnUnion .28f 20.28 +.53 Weyerh .60f 23.18 +.51 Whrlpl 1.72 85.50 -4.42 WmsCos .50 26.99 +.39 WT India .15e 23.17 +.33 Wyndham .48 28.13 -.05 XL Grp .40 22.92 +.11 .17 10.62 +.07 Xerox Yamana g .12f 11.30 +.05 YumBrnds 1.00 46.76 +.36

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high low settle COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Mar 11 167.60 168.75 165.46 168.44 May 11 162.42 163.49 160.24 163.18 Jul 11 154.20 155.15 152.15 155.15 Oct 11 130.00 130.00 128.85 128.85 Dec 11 113.95 115.00 112.10 114.20 Mar 12 107.99 108.00 104.80 107.80 May 12 102.34 103.68 102.34 103.20 Jul 12 99.46 99.75 99.46 99.73 Oct 12 92.94 Dec 12 91.50 91.94 91.00 91.94 Last spot N/A Est. sales 21847. Fri’s Sales: 26,842 Fri’s open int: 207249, off -571

chg.

+3.69 +3.69 +4.00 +2.65 +2.24 +2.69 +2.14 +1.47 +.90 +.90

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low settle

chg.

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 11 840 847fl 823 840fl +15 May 11 873ø 877ü 853 870fl +15ü Jul 11 892fl 895fl 872ü 889ø +14fl

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

AMEX

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Vol (00) Last Chg Name Citigrp 3301904 4.82 +.10 FordM 2664697 15.95 -.32 S&P500ETF1310154128.68+.96 BkofAm 1144508 13.73 +.13 iShEMkts 938593 45.81

Vol (00) Name SamsO&G 81171 DenisnM g 62177 NthgtM g 59097 KodiakO g 50092 NovaGld g 47214

Last 2.72 3.75 2.58 6.35 13.29

Chg +.54 +.35 -.04 +.24 -.38

Name Last MS S&P6-1114.19 PallCorp 55.41 CallonP h 8.71 BrkfldH 14.12 IFM Inv 4.85

Name SamsO&G Crossh g rs CheniereEn Barnwell StreamGSv

Chg +.54 +.32 +.97 +.93 +.42

%Chg +24.8 +17.2 +15.3 +14.2 +13.1

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Chg +2.05 +6.75 +1.01 +1.53 +.46

%Chg +16.9 +13.9 +13.1 +12.2 +10.5

Vol (00) Last Name Intel 888537 21.46 SiriusXM 769316 1.62 Microsoft 633880 27.73 PwShs QQQ62282256.00 Cisco 387044 21.15

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

%Chg +34.3 +31.5 +28.0 +23.8

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg NACCO 100.25-10.25 -9.3 ChinaShen 5.66 -.58 -9.3 ChinaMda 17.84 -3.02 Talbots 5.46 -.51 -8.5 Ever-Glory 2.35 -.21 -8.2 Intelliph 3.88 -.59 DrxEBear rs 18.06 -1.60 -8.1 Quepasa 13.25 -.97 -6.8 Rdiff.cm 6.14 -.91 CKanghui n 16.02 -1.35 -7.8 ChaseCorp 15.32 -.87 -5.4 Cherokee 16.03 -2.12 ChinaMM 2.24 -.18 -7.4 CPI Aero 11.89 -.56 -4.5 OvrldSt rsh 2.03 -.24

%Chg -14.5 -13.2 -12.9 -11.7 -10.6

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

DIARY

2,111 905 116 3,132 125 18 4,381,779,713

52-Week High Low 12,020.52 9,614.32 5,256.80 3,742.01 416.47 346.95 8,222.51 6,355.83 2,225.48 1,689.19 2,766.17 2,061.14 1,302.67 1,010.91 13,799.80 10,596.20 807.89 580.49

Name

Div

Last 2.72 2.18 7.31 7.49 3.62

Chg ... ... -.03 +.27 +.22

Chg +2.14 +2.40 +.82 +.44 +4.82

Name Depomed NPS Phm GoodTim rs PeopEduc SenecaB

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

DIARY

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

285 196 31 512 11 3 Lows 140,489,084

INDEXES

Last 11,891.93 5,025.11 409.35 8,139.16 2,172.04 2,700.08 1,286.12 13,617.53 781.25

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

Chg

YTD %Chg Name

DIARY

1,542 1,092 132 2,766 68 38 1,908,957,995

Net % Chg Chg +68.23 +.58 +30.24 +.61 +.41 +.10 +76.52 +.95 +31.75 +1.48 +13.19 +.49 +9.78 +.77 +100.93 +.75 +5.85 +.75

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

PE Last

Last 8.38 10.01 3.75 2.29 27.94

Div

PE Last

YTD % Chg +2.72 -1.60 +1.08 +2.20 -1.65 +1.78 +2.26 +1.93 -.31

52-wk % Chg +16.75 +26.82 +7.41 +16.14 +19.78 +24.36 +18.08 +20.40 +28.23..

Chg

YTD %Chg +1.9

BkofAm

.04

21

13.73 +.13

+2.9 ONEOK Pt

4.56f

24

81.00 +.78

Chevron

2.88

10

94.93 +1.56

+4.0 PNM Res

.50

32

13.03 -.03

+.1

CocaCl

1.76

19

62.85 +.64

-4.4 PepsiCo

1.92

16

64.31 -.09

-1.6

Disney

.40f

19

38.87 +.02

+3.6 Pfizer

.80f

10

18.22 +.07

+4.1

EOG Res

.62

53 106.39 +3.86

-8.7

+16.4 SwstAirl

.02

19

11.85 -.08

...

8

15.95 -.32

-5.0 TexInst

.52

13

33.91 -.36

+4.3

.32

12

45.69 +.18

+8.5 TimeWarn

.85

14

31.45 -.27

-2.2

HollyCp

.60

56

49.07 +2.13

Intel

.72f

11

21.46

FordM HewlettP

...

IBM

2.60

14 162.00 +2.79

Merck

1.52

17

Microsoft

.64

33.17 +.10

+20.4 TriContl

.25e

...

14.04 +.01

+2.0

+2.0 WalMart

1.21

14

56.07 -.63

+4.0

+10.4 WashFed

.24f

14

17.29 +.14

+2.2

.20

15

32.42 +.58

+4.6

23.57 +.02

+.1

-8.0 WellsFargo

HOW TO READ THE MARKET IN REVIEW 7

27.73 -.03

-.7 XcelEngy

1.01

14

Here are the 525 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 400 most active on the Nasdaq National Markets and 100 most active on American Stock Exchange. Mutual funds are 450 largest. Stocks in bold changed 5 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name Div Last Chg (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at Name the beginning of each letters’ list. AAR .48 12.88 # Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock, based on latest quar- ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 ACM Op .80 7.25 # terly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise footnoted. ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. ACMSp .96 7.50 # Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... mark. Fund Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold. Chg: Daily net change in the NAV.

Name

Div Last Chg

Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. d – New 52wk low during trading day. g – Dividend in Canadian $. Stock price in U.S.$. n – New issue in past 52 wks. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. s – Split or stock dividend of 25 pct or more in last 52 wks. Div begins with date of split or stock dividend. u – New 52-wk high during trading day. v – Trading halted on primary market. Unless noted, dividend rates are annual disbursements based on last declaration. pf – Preferred. pp – Holder owes installment(s) of purchase price. rt – Rights. un – Units. wd – When distributed. wi – When issued. wt – Warrants. ww – With warrants. xw – Without warrants. Dividend Footnotes: a – Also extra or extras. b – Annual rate plus stock dividend. c – Liquidating dividend. e – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos. f – Annual rate, increased on last declaration. i – Declared or paid after stock dividend or split. j – Paid this year, dividend omitted, deferred or no action taken at last meeting. k – Declared or paid this year, accumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m – Annual rate, reduced on last declaration. p – Init div, annual rate unknown. r – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos plus stock dividend. t – Paid in stock in last 12 mos, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or distribution date. x – Ex-dividend or ex-rights. y – Ex-dividend and sales in full. z – Sales in full. vj – In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such companies. • Most active stocks above must be worth $1 and gainers/losers $2. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Wednesday’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

TotRetBd 11.15 ... GrowthCoK84.76 +.62 IntlInxInv n36.01 +.16 HighInc r n 9.12 +.01 TotMktInv n37.22 +.29 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.07 +.11 Indepn n 24.65 +.22 Fidelity Spart Adv: StrInA 12.50 +.01 IntBd n 10.59 ... 500IdxAdv n45.54+.35 IntmMu n 9.96 ... TotMktAd r n37.22+.29 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI n 20.26 +.11 IntlDisc n 33.14 +.08 First Eagle: InvGrBd n 11.41 ... GlblA Fidelity Freedom: 46.50 +.02 FF2010 n 13.76 +.06 InvGB n 7.41 ... OverseasA22.56 -.05 FF2015 n 11.49 +.05 LgCapVal 12.12 +.09 Forum Funds: FF2020 n 13.99 +.07 LatAm 56.10 +.39 AbsStrI r 10.90 ... FF2020K 13.38 +.07 LevCoStk n29.15 +.30 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FF2025 n 11.70 +.07 LowP r n 38.89 +.15 CalTFA p 6.57 -.01 FF2030 n 14.00 +.09 LowPriK r 38.87 +.14 FedTFA p 11.23 ... FF2030K 13.82 +.08 Magelln n 72.83 +.37 FoundAl p 10.75 +.03 FF2035 n 11.67 +.07 MagellanK 72.77 +.37 HYTFA p 9.49 ... FF2040 n 8.16 +.06 MidCap n 29.24 +.30 IncomA p 2.23 +.01 MuniInc n 12.12 ... NYTFA p 11.05 ... Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.98 +.09 NwMkt r n 15.45 +.02 StratInc px 10.45 -.05 AMgr50 n 15.62 +.07 OTC n 57.13 +.35 USGovA p 6.74 ... AMgr20 r n12.89 +.03 100Index 8.95 +.05 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: Balanc n 18.54 +.08 Ovrsea n 33.06 +.14 GlbBdAdv p ... ... BalancedK18.54 +.08 Puritn n 18.21 +.10 IncmeAd 2.22 +.01 BlueChGr n46.28 +.41 RealE n 26.54 +.39 Frank/Temp Frnk C: Canada n 58.66 +.59 SCmdtyStrt n12.75 IncomC t 2.25 +.01 CapAp n 25.73 +.17 +.20 CpInc r n 9.67 +.02 SrsIntGrw 11.12 +.07 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: Contra n 68.13 +.39 SrsIntVal 10.41 +.06 SharesA 21.07 +.06 ContraK 68.10 +.39 SrInvGrdF 11.41 ... Frank/Temp Temp A: DisEq n 23.22 +.14 StIntMu n 10.57 ... ForgnA p 7.32 +.02 DivIntl n 30.47 +.18 STBF n 8.48 ... GlBd A p 13.46 +.01 DivrsIntK r 30.45 +.19 SmllCpS r n20.18 +.09 GrwthA p 18.37 +.03 DivGth n 29.13 +.29 StratInc n 11.19 +.01 WorldA p 15.30 +.03 EmrMk n 25.53 -.01 StrReRt r 9.70 +.06 Frank/Temp Tmp Eq Inc n 45.57 +.32 TotalBd n 10.75 -.01 B&C: EQII n 18.80 +.12 USBI n 11.33 ... GlBdC p 13.48 ... Fidel n 32.94 +.33 Value n 70.83 +.59 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 41.45 +.35 FltRateHi r n9.89 ... Fidelity Selects: GNMA n 11.46 -.01 Gold r n 47.06 -.29 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.32 +.06 GovtInc 10.42 -.01 Fidelity Spartan: GroCo n 84.80 +.61 ExtMkIn n 38.63 +.30 GMO Trust IV: GroInc n 18.78 +.18 500IdxInv n45.54 +.35 IntlIntrVl 22.52 +.14

Est. sales 52667. Fri’s Sales: 40,050 Fri’s open int: 238305, up +4410 PORK BELLIES 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 11 110.00 111.00 110.00 111.00 +2.00 Mar 11 111.00 112.00 111.00 112.00 +2.00 May 11 106.70 Jul 11 103.50 Aug 11 102.50 Last spot N/A Fri’s Sales: Fri’s open int: 2, unch

Roswell Daily Record

.48 12.88 # AAR ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 ACM Op .80 7.25 # ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 # ACMSp .96 7.50

MUTUAL FUNDS

Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.53 +.02 IntlCorEq 29.74 +.19 Quality 20.32 +.05 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 36.84 +.37 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.40 ... MidCapV 37.11 +.37 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.15 ... CapApInst 37.07 +.31 IntlInv t 60.82 +.43 Intl r 61.39 +.43 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA pf35.33 ... Hartford Fds C: CapApC tf 31.33 ... Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI f n35.34 ... Hartford HLS IA : CapApp f 43.22 ... Div&Gr f 19.92 ... Advisers f 19.70 ... TotRetBd f 10.94 ... Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.98 -.10 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r16.78 ... Invesco Funds A: CapGro 13.88 +.13 Chart p 16.63 +.07 CmstkA 16.08 ... EqIncA 8.75 ... GrIncA p 19.80 +.14 HYMuA 8.76 ... Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.52 ... AssetStA p24.21 ... AssetStrI r 24.42 ...

Sep 11 910ø 912fl 894ø 907ü Dec 11 921fl 925ø 904ø 919ü Mar 12 931ø 933fl 916 929ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 173349. Fri’s Sales: 96,554 Fri’s open int: 544495, off -1385 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 11 659ø 659ø 642ü 659ø May 11 669 670 652ø 670 Jul 11 671fl 675 657 675 Sep 11 623 626ü 608 626ü Dec 11 590fl 591ü 573ü 591ü Mar 12 599ø 599ø 581ø 599ü May 12 603ø 605ü 587ü 605ü Jul 12 608fl 610fl 592fl 610fl Sep 12 544ø 564ø 544ø 564ü Dec 12 535 536ü 521 536ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 466697. Fri’s Sales: 262,759 Fri’s open int: 1639347, up +5059 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 11 393 396ü 376 396 May 11 401ø 404ü 385 404ü Jul 11 402fl 405fl 390 405fl Sep 11 376fl 376fl 376ø 376ø Dec 11 369 369ü 363 369 Mar 12 373ø 377 373ø 377 May 12 380ø 384 380ø 384 Last spot N/A Est. sales 4244. Fri’s Sales: 2,668 Fri’s open int: 14027, off -7 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 11 1415 1415 1394ø 1413 May 11 1421 1423ü 1405ü 1423ü Jul 11 1426ø 1428ø 1410 1428ø Aug 11 1400 1402ø 1390ø 1402ø Sep 11 1367ø 1370ü 1353 1370ü Nov 11 1337fl 1342 1320 1341 Jan 12 1341 1344 1321fl 1343ü Mar 12 1333ü 1336 1323fl 1335ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 271599. Fri’s Sales: 253,917 Fri’s open int: 662078, up +1482

+13ø +12fl +13

JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.53 ... JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.52 ... HighYld 8.36 ... IntmTFBd 10.73 ... ShtDurBd 10.99 ... USLCCrPls20.80 ... Janus S Shrs: Forty 33.35 ... Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r51.24 ... PrkMCVal T22.87 ... Twenty T 65.63 ... John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 12.36 ... LSBalanc 13.01 ... LSGrwth 12.94 ... Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p24.89 ... Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 20.60 -.02 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p20.98 -.01 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p14.80 -.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 28.37 ... Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.37 ... StrInc C 14.99 ... LSBondR 14.32 ... StrIncA 14.91 ... Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.21 ... Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.87 +.12 BdDebA p 7.94 ... ShDurIncA p4.61 ... Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t4.64 ...

FUTURES

MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.22 ... ValueA 23.31 +.18 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.41 +.17 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.99 ... Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.81 +.07 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv17.82 -.03 PacTgrInv 22.41 -.07 MergerFd 15.93 +.03 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.43 ... TotRtBdI 10.43 ... MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 13.78 +.09 MCapGrI 37.75 +.21 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.70 +.01 GlbDiscZ 30.05 +.01 QuestZ 17.97 +.04 SharesZ 21.23 +.06 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 46.51 +.41 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 48.19 +.42 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.42 ... MMIntEq r 9.90 ... Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.97 ... Intl I r 19.92 +.04 Oakmark r 42.30 +.14 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.83 ... GlbSMdCap15.52+.06 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 44.09 +.40 DvMktA p 34.53 +.09

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

+15ø +15ø +15ü +14ø +14fl +14fl +14ø +14ü +19fl +11fl

+10ø +10ø +8ø +3ø +3ø +3ø +3ø

+15 +15 +15 +16 +17ü +18 +17fl +17

low settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Mar 11 91.70 92.84 88.40 92.19 Apr 11 93.88 94.89 90.89 94.28 May 11 95.47 96.40 92.84 95.82 Jun 11 96.44 97.36 94.11 96.78 Jul 11 97.16 97.93 95.12 97.53 Aug 11 97.88 98.18 95.76 98.05 Sep 11 98.26 98.92 96.09 98.40 Oct 11 98.35 98.73 96.73 98.71 Nov 11 98.96 99.01 97.01 99.01 Dec 11 99.00 99.90 96.91 99.32 Jan 12 99.45 100.06 97.19 99.56 Feb 12 99.27 99.71 97.45 99.71 Mar 12 98.00 99.78 98.00 99.78 Apr 12 99.82 May 12 99.85 Jun 12 100.03 100.13 97.86 99.89 Jul 12 99.83 Aug 12 99.79 Sep 12 99.75 Oct 12 99.73 Nov 12 99.74 Dec 12 99.51 100.16 97.70 99.78 Jan 13 99.66 Feb 13 99.54 Mar 13 99.43 Apr 13 99.32 May 13 99.21 Jun 13 99.10 Jul 13 99.05 Aug 13 99.01 Sep 13 98.97 Oct 13 98.94 Nov 13 98.93 Dec 13 98.65 99.25 97.18 98.92 Last spot N/A Est. sales 995598. Fri’s Sales: 1,472,088 Fri’s open int: 1511565, off -5014 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon

chg.

+2.85 +2.60 +2.39 +2.14 +1.96 +1.86 +1.78 +1.75 +1.70 +1.65 +1.64 +1.65 +1.67 +1.67 +1.67 +1.66 +1.64 +1.64 +1.64 +1.64 +1.65 +1.64 +1.62 +1.60 +1.59 +1.57 +1.55 +1.53 +1.52 +1.50 +1.48 +1.46 +1.44 +1.42

GlobA p 61.95 +.23 GblStrIncA 4.29 ... Gold p 43.83 -.45 IntBdA p 6.45 ... MnStFdA 32.73 +.24 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.18 ... RoMu A p 14.79 -.01 RcNtMuA 6.40 ... Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.16 +.09 IntlBdY 6.44 ... PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.86 ... PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r10.58 ... AllAsset 12.10 ... ComodRR 9.32 ... HiYld 9.43 ... InvGrCp 10.52 ... LowDu 10.41 ... RealRtnI 11.35 ... ShortT 9.89 ... TotRt 10.86 ... TR II 10.40 ... TRIII 9.61 ... PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.41 ... RealRtA p 11.35 ... TotRtA 10.86 ... PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.86 ... PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.86 ... PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.86 ... Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco 27.10 ... Perm Port Funds: Permannt 45.50 +.18

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET

.82 71.84 -.09 Div Last Chg Costco Cree Inc ... 50.49 -.29 A-B-C Crocs ... 16.39 +.08 ASML Hld .54e 42.01 -.07 Ctrip.com ... 41.16 +.51 ... 21.65 +.50 ATP O&G ... 16.96 +.64 CypSemi AVI Bio ... 2.17 +.05 D-E-F Accuray ... 8.56 -.35 ... 13.16 +.01 ... 53.78 +.07 Dell Inc AcmePkt AcordaTh ... d21.95 ... DeltaPtr h ... .72 -.01 ... 35.04 +.15 ActivePwr ... 2.15 -.11 Dndreon ActivsBliz .15 11.29 +.08 Dentsply .20 35.48 -.27 AdobeSy ... 33.05 +.56 Depomed ... u8.38 +2.14 ... 31.74 +.96 Adtran .36 41.13 -.59 DigRiver AdvEnId ... 15.45 +.64 DirecTV A ... 42.39 +.22 AEterna g ... 1.60 -.05 DiscCm A ... 39.00 +.34 AkamaiT ... 48.32 +.57 DiscCm C ... 33.96 +.39 AlignTech ... 20.83 +.48 DishNetwk ... 21.11 +.08 AllosThera ... d3.36 -.12 DonlleyRR 1.04 17.72 ... ... 1.77 -.08 AllscriptH ... 21.11 +.27 drugstre ... 4.82 -.03 AlteraCp lf .24 37.57 +.16 DryShips Amazon ... 169.64 -1.50 ETrade rs ... 16.56 +.21 ... 30.36 +.05 ACapAgy 5.60e 28.69 ... eBay AmCapLtd ... 8.17 +.20 EagleBulk ... 4.09 -.02 AmerMed ... 19.52 -.43 ErthLink .20m 8.53 +.02 ... 27.27 -.12 EstWstBcp .04 21.71 +.15 AmSupr ... 15.59 +.59 Amgen ... 55.08 -.21 ElectArts AmkorT lf ... 8.14 +.14 EndoPhrm ... 33.22 -.31 ... 3.85 ... Ener1 Amylin ... 16.18 -.02 Anadigc ... 6.83 -.17 EngyConv ... 4.08 +.01 ... 7.65 +.38 A123 Sys ... 9.06 +.11 Entegris ApolloGrp ... 41.27 +.25 EntropCom ... 10.97 -.16 ApolloInv 1.12 11.80 +.31 EricsnTel .28e 12.37 +.17 ... 8.67 +.05 Apple Inc ... 339.32 +3.22 Exelixis ApldMatl .28 15.69 -.08 Expedia .28 25.16 +.18 ExpdIntl .40 50.67 +.05 AMCC ... 9.84 +.04 ArenaPhm ... 1.58 -.05 F5 Netwks ... 108.38 -1.20 ... 31.04 +.41 AresCap 1.40 16.79 +.34 FLIR Sys AriadP ... 6.38 +.07 Fastenal 1.00f 58.06 +.30 ... 28.09 +.69 FifthThird .04 14.87 +.23 Ariba Inc ... 33.30 +.94 ArmHld .12e 25.04 +.26 Finisar Arris ... 12.48 +.13 FinLine .20f 15.39 ... .04 11.69 -.09 ArubaNet ... 21.55 +.22 FMidBc AscenaRtl ... 27.11 +.49 FstNiagara .64f 13.88 -.10 ... 154.58 +7.09 AsiaInfoL ... 21.46 +3.05 FstSolar AsscdBanc .04 13.98 +.15 FstMerit .64 18.32 -.15 ... 61.77 +.44 Atheros ... 44.59 +.05 Fiserv ... 7.99 -.07 AtlasEngy ... 44.30 +.27 Flextrn Atmel ... 13.54 -.32 FocusMda ... 24.91 +.74 ... 38.45 +1.50 Autodesk ... 40.68 +.71 Fortinet AutoData 1.44f 47.90 +.01 FosterWhl ... 36.81 +.75 AvagoTch .07p 28.71 +.66 FresKabi rt ... .05 +.01 ... 1.75 -.10 AvanirPhm ... 4.05 +.06 FuelCell AvisBudg ... 13.84 -.09 FultonFncl .12 10.32 -.07 Axcelis ... 3.47 -.02 G-H-I BE Aero ... 38.69 +.45 BGC Ptrs .48e 8.10 +.27 GSI Cmmrc ... 23.04 +.47 ... 11.05 +.17 BMC Sft ... 47.70 +.72 GT Solar BMP Sunst ... 9.94 -.01 Garmin 1.50f 30.83 +.02 .44 32.07 -.15 BannerCp .04 2.36 -.04 Gentex BedBath ... 48.00 -.60 Genzyme ... u73.35 +2.25 ... 4.90 +.18 Biodel ... 2.22 +.07 GeronCp BioFuelEn ... 1.14 -.10 GigaMed ... 1.22 +.08 BiogenIdc ... 65.47 +.39 GileadSci ... 38.38 +.17 ... u8.02 +.37 ... 25.42 -.03 GloblInd BioMarin BioSante ... 1.86 ... GluMobile ... 3.15 +.21 ... 600.36 -.63 BostPrv .04 6.71 -.01 Google BrigExp ... u29.61 +.98 GulfportE ... u23.94 +2.63 Broadcom .32 45.09 +.77 HanmiFncl ... 1.32 -.01 BrcdeCm ... 5.64 +.04 HansenNat ... u56.64 +1.49 CA Inc .16 23.80 +.42 Harmonic ... 8.44 +.29 CH Robins1.16f 77.09 +1.06 Hasbro 1.00 44.09 +.18 CadencePh ... 7.77 +.48 Healthwys ... 11.97 -.39 ... 8.68 +.20 HercOffsh ... 3.31 ... Cadence ... 19.92 ... CdnSolar ... 14.02 +.31 Hologic CapFdF rs .30 12.19 +.35 Home Inns ... 33.73 -1.61 CpstnTrb h ... 1.14 ... HudsCity .60 10.98 +.03 ... 24.26 +.41 CareerEd ... 22.44 -.18 HumGen .48 41.00 -.35 Carrizo ... 33.85 +1.22 HuntJB HuntBnk .04 7.24 +.17 CaviumNet ... 39.54 -.11 ... 28.29 +.12 ... 51.53 +.35 IAC Inter Celgene CentAl ... 14.87 +.58 iShAsiaexJ .97e 61.54 +.39 Cephln ... 59.08 +.75 iShNsdqBio.51e 93.72 +.68 ... 69.34 +.29 CeragonN ... 12.31 -.69 Illumina ... 3.30 +.06 Imax Corp ... 25.59 +.02 CerusCp ... 3.11 +.05 ImpaxLabs ... 23.22 -.17 ChrmSh ... 14.74 +.10 ... 44.55 -1.67 Incyte ChkPoint ... 7.34 -.04 Cheesecake ... 29.51 +.02 Infinera ... 46.40 +.74 ChinaMda ... 17.84 -3.02 Informat CienaCorp ... 22.03 -1.47 InfosysT .90e 67.71 +.09 ... 3.95 +.07 CinnFin 1.60 32.04 -.12 InspPhar ... 6.38 +.10 Cintas .49f 28.06 +.16 IntgDv Intel .72f 21.46 ... Cirrus ... 21.03 +.31 .40 48.15 +.86 Cisco ... 21.15 +.22 InterDig .48 Intersil 15.12 +.36 CitrixSys ... 63.18 -.58 ... 46.93 +.16 CleanEngy ... d11.87 -.10 Intuit Ixia ... 15.73 +.50 Clearwire ... 5.29 ... ClinicData ... u29.74 +2.38 J-K-L CognizTech ... 72.95 +1.32 ... 6.90 +.09 Coinstar ... 41.39 -.10 JA Solar Comcast .38 22.75 -.09 JDS Uniph ... 16.97 +.05 Comc spcl .38 21.44 -.02 JamesRiv ... 22.49 +.25 CommVlt ... 30.89 +.99 JazzPhrm ... 22.36 +.04 ... 6.00 +.12 Compuwre ... 10.72 +.24 JetBlue .70 87.18 +1.83 Conexant ... 2.09 +.04 JoyGlbl CorinthC ... 5.28 -.16 KLA Tnc 1.00 44.08 +.39

Name

Name

... 9.75 Kulicke LamResrch ... 49.89 Lattice ... 6.23 LawsnSft ... 9.40 LeapWirlss ... 13.98 Level3 ... 1.23 LexiPhrm ... 1.69 LibGlobA ... 40.56 LibtyMIntA ... 15.84 LifeTech ... 54.29 LimelghtN ... 6.24 LinearTch .96f 34.79 LinnEngy 2.64 u39.59 ... 18.74 Logitech lululemn g ... 68.68

M-N-0

+.34 +.26 +.09 -.20 +.01 +.06 -.03 -.02 -.01 +.87 -.19 +.21 +.98 -.39 +.07

MIPS Tech ... 12.42 -.28 MagicSft .50e 8.06 -.17 MannKd ... d4.77 -.28 MarvellT ... 19.01 -.15 Masimo 2.75e 29.98 +2.40 Mattel .83f 23.68 +.17 MaximIntg .84 25.82 -.02 Mediacom ... u8.77 +.14 MelcoCrwn ... 7.76 +.29 Methanx .62 27.26 -.31 Microchp 1.38f 36.47 -.42 MicronT ... 10.54 +.17 MicroSemi ... 22.49 +.14 Microsoft .64 27.73 -.03 Mindspeed ... 7.02 -.01 Molex .70f 26.15 +.34 Momenta ... 12.79 +.31 MonPwSys ... d14.67 +.02 Motricity n ... 19.25 -.12 Move Inc ... 2.25 +.13 ... 23.16 +.25 Mylan MyriadG ... 19.96 +.66 NGAS Rs h ... .57 +.01 NII Hldg ... 41.98 -.42 NPS Phm ... u10.01 +2.40 NasdOMX ... 24.48 -.02 NektarTh ... 11.21 -.07 NetLogic s ... 34.86 +.67 ... 54.73 +.70 NetApp Netflix ... 214.08 -3.90 NewsCpA .15 15.02 -.06 NewsCpB .15 16.58 -.12 NorTrst 1.12 51.98 +.29 NwstBcsh .40 11.72 +.01 NovtlWrls ... 7.21 +.06 Novell ... 6.02 +.02 ... 36.07 +.29 Novlus NuanceCm ... 20.33 +.19 Nvidia ... 23.92 +.16 OReillyAu ... 56.83 +.32 Oclaro rs ... 13.88 +.61 OmniVisn ... 25.83 -.18 OnSmcnd ... 11.05 +.12 OplinkC ... u24.78 +1.01 optXprs 4.50e 14.86 +.33 Oracle .20 32.03 +.03 Orexigen ... 9.09 +.77 Oxigene h ... .20 ...

P-Q-R

PDL Bio 1.00e 4.94 +.01 PMC Sra ... 7.82 +.05 Paccar .48a 56.49 +1.67 PacSunwr ... 4.26 -.01 PanASlv .10f 32.81 -.41 ParamTch ... 22.23 +.44 Parexel ... 23.21 +.12 PrtnrCm 3.99e 19.00 -1.04 Patterson .40 33.06 +.08 PattUTI .20 u23.34 +.56 Paychex 1.24 32.00 +.31 PnnNGm ... 35.73 -.65 PeopUtdF .62 12.91 -.05 Perrigo .28 72.72 -.07 PhotrIn ... 6.59 +.05 Polycom ... 43.85 +.40 ... 3.21 +.03 Popular Power-One ... 10.70 +.31 PwShs QQQ.33e 56.00 +.27 ... 3.49 +.03 Powrwav PriceTR 1.08 65.92 +.07 priceline ... 428.52 +3.21 PrUPShQQQ ... 28.40 -.39 ProspctCap1.21 11.45 +.07 QIAGEN ... 18.45 +.32 QiaoXing ... 2.45 -.01 Qlogic ... 17.81 +.16 Qualcom .76 54.13 +.39 QuantFu h ... .45 +.00 ... 15.46 -.18 Questcor RF MicD ... 6.72 -.07 Rambus ... 20.49 -.12 Randgold .17e 76.49 +.06 Rdiff.cm ... 6.14 -.91 RentACt .24 29.74 -.17 RepubAir ... 6.42 +.14 RschMotn ... 59.11 -1.04 RexEnergy ... 12.04 +.48

RosettaR ... u39.95 +2.29 RossStrs .64 65.20 -.26 Rovi Corp ... 61.76 +.79 RubiconTc ... 18.01 -.89

S-T-U

SBA Com ... 40.80 -.15 SEI Inv .20 23.15 +.39 STEC ... 20.49 -.24 SalixPhm ... 40.97 +.47 ... 45.37 -1.43 SanDisk Sanmina ... 15.03 +.16 Sapient .35e 11.95 +.16 SavientPh ... d9.23 -.15 Savvis ... 30.77 +.51 SciGames ... 10.32 +.20 SeagateT ... 14.00 +.20 Sequenom ... 6.85 +.19 ShoreTel ... 7.58 +.31 SifyTech ... 2.33 -.20 SigmaAld .64 63.65 +1.25 SilicnImg ... 6.86 +.07 SilcnLab ... 44.48 +.83 Slcnware .41e 6.93 +.16 ... 23.06 -.23 SilvStd g Sina ... 85.25 +4.57 SiriusXM ... 1.62 ... Sky-mobi n ... u7.21 +.91 SkywksSol ... 31.77 +.44 SmartM ... 6.76 +.19 SodaStrm n ... 42.99 +3.30 Sohu.cm ... 77.58 +3.70 ... 8.48 -.06 Solarfun SonicCorp ... 9.59 -.05 SonicSolu ... 14.59 +.11 Sonus ... 2.75 -.03 ... 6.00 +.03 SpectPh Spreadtrm ... u21.50 +.64 Staples .36 22.31 -.01 StarScient ... 1.58 +.01 Starbucks .52 31.53 -.20 StlDynam .30 18.20 +.11 StemCells ... .93 -.01 Stericycle ... 78.49 +.05 SterlBcsh .06 8.87 ... SuccessF ... 29.12 +.47 SunPowerA ... 13.44 +.23 SuperGen ... 3.01 -.01 SusqBnc .04 9.56 ... Symantec ... 17.61 +.15 Synopsys ... 27.13 +.29 TD Ameritr .20 20.42 +.35 THQ ... 5.81 +.24 TakeTwo ... 12.48 +.07 Tekelec ... 11.48 -.06 Tellabs .08 d5.30 -.08 Terremk ... 18.96 +.04 TeslaMot n ... 24.10 +.09 TesseraT ... 17.32 +.21 TevaPhrm .75e 54.65 -.15 TexRdhse ... 16.62 -.19 Thoratec ... 23.59 +.46 TibcoSft ... 21.98 +.42 TiVo Inc ... 9.67 +.31 TowerSemi ... 1.38 -.02 TransGlb ... 12.15 -1.16 TrimbleN ... u46.08 +1.79 TriQuint ... 13.16 +.29 USA Tech h ... 1.67 -.07 Umpqua .20 10.97 -.15 UtdCBksGa ... 1.70 -.11 UrbanOut ... 33.82 ...

V-W-X-Y-Z

ValueClick ... 14.01 +.26 VarianSemi ... 44.45 +1.24 VeecoInst ... 43.26 +.02 ... d14.22 -1.36 Velti n Verisign 3.00e 33.65 -.10 ... 38.89 -.12 VertxPh VirgnMda h .16 25.16 +.23 ViroPhrm ... 16.40 -.10 VistaPrt ... 50.64 +1.19 Vivus ... 8.95 +.57 Vodafone 1.33e 28.36 +.12 Volcano ... 26.26 -.52 WarnerCh s8.50e23.99 +.53 WarrenRs ... u5.58 +.32 WernerEnt .20a 24.65 +.40 WetSeal ... 3.42 -.11 WhitneyH .04 13.31 -.04 WholeFd .40 51.71 +1.27 Windstrm 1.00 12.81 +.12 Wynn 1.00a 116.33 +1.82 XOMA rs ... 5.49 -.08 Xilinx .64 32.20 +.01 YRC Ww rs ... 4.05 -.10 ... 16.12 +.29 Yahoo Yongye ... 7.10 -.20 Zalicus ... 1.97 ... ZionBcp .04 23.58 +.15 Zoran ... 9.49 -.04

AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg ChinaShen ... 5.66 -.58 ClaudeR g ... 1.89 -.07 AbdAsPac .42 6.67 +.03 CrSuiHiY .32 3.03 +.02 AdeonaPh ... 1.49 +.04 Crossh g rs ... 2.18 +.32 AlexcoR g ... 6.54 -.11 Crystallx g ... .26 -.01 AlldNevG ... 26.44 +.59 CubicEngy ... .89 -.04 AlmadnM g ... 3.82 -.07 DejourE g ... .30 -.00 AmApparel ... 1.03 -.02 DenisnM g ... u3.75 +.35 AntaresP ... 1.55 -.01 EndvSilv g ... 6.17 -.09 ArmourRsd1.44 7.82 ... ExeterR gs ... 5.02 -.11 Aurizon g ... 6.36 +.01 Express-1 ... u3.03 +.11 AvalRare n ... 5.77 -.13 Fronteer g ... 9.86 +.02 Ballanty ... 7.52 +.28 GabGldNR 1.68 18.23 -.29 BarcUBS36 ... 49.54 +.73 GascoEngy ... .51 +.02 BarcGSOil ... 25.44 +.71 Gastar grs ... 4.21 +.09 BrcIndiaTR ... 66.12 +.59 GenMoly ... 5.09 +.03 Brigus grs ... 1.60 ... GoldResrc .21e 22.75 -.65 CAMAC En ... 1.79 -.02 GoldStr g ... 3.69 -.07 ... .38 +.00 GranTrra g ... u9.03 +.48 CanoPet CapGold n ... 4.79 +.05 GrtBasG g ... 2.66 -.03 CelSci ... .69 -.02 GugFront .13e 22.10 -.03 CFCda g .01 18.94 +.08 Hemisphrx ... .49 -.01 CheniereEn ... 7.31 +.97 Hyperdyn ... 4.17 +.26 ChiGengM ... 2.66 +.01 ImpOil gs .44 u44.61 +1.94 ChiMarFd ... 3.95 -.11 InovioPhm ... 1.27 +.03 ChinNEPet ... 5.38 +.06 IntTower g ... 9.21 -.15

Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.54 +.32 Price Funds: BlChip n 38.87 +.35 CapApp 20.59 ... EmMktS n 34.11 +.17 EqInc 24.15 ... EqIndex n 34.66 +.26 Growth 32.38 ... HiYield 6.90 ... IntlBond 9.90 ... Intl G&I 13.70 +.08 IntlStk n 14.24 +.08 LatAm n 53.82 +.70 MidCap n 59.93 +.61 MCapVal 23.94 ... N Asia n 18.58 ... New Era n 53.87+1.13 N Horiz 33.49 ... N Inc 9.48 ... R2010 15.46 ... R2015 11.99 ... R2020 16.58 ... R2025 12.15 ... R2030 17.45 ... R2035 12.35 ... R2040 17.59 ... ShtBd 4.86 ... SmCpStk 34.40 ... SmCapVal35.75 ... SpecGr 17.90 ... SpecIn 12.42 ... Value 23.87 ... Principal Inv: LT2020In 11.79 ... Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.89 +.12 MultiCpGr 51.69 +.38 VoyA p 24.31 +.16 Royce Funds: LwPrSkSv r18.04 +.13

Feb 11 2.4720 2.5025 2.4350 2.4906 Mar 11 2.5040 2.5328 2.4589 2.5001 Apr 11 2.6425 2.6700 2.5927 2.6394 May 11 2.6529 2.6764 2.6074 2.6496 Jun 11 2.6577 2.6795 2.6041 2.6510 Jul 11 2.6516 2.6712 2.6008 2.6450 Aug 11 2.6411 2.6450 2.5983 2.6364 Sep 11 2.6247 2.6300 2.5797 2.6198 Oct 11 2.5140 2.5163 2.4777 2.5163 Nov 11 2.5200 2.5200 2.4991 2.4993 Dec 11 2.5090 2.5166 2.4596 2.4933 Jan 12 2.5040 Feb 12 2.5210 Mar 12 2.5377 Apr 12 2.6497 May 12 2.6577 Jun 12 2.6587 Jul 12 2.6562 Aug 12 2.6457 Sep 12 2.6292 Oct 12 2.5242 Nov 12 2.5097 Dec 12 2.5047 Last spot N/A Est. sales 200205. Fri’s Sales: 107,844 Fri’s open int: 280800, off -2315 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Mar 11 4.324 4.460 4.290 4.420 Apr 11 4.340 4.470 4.305 4.431 May 11 4.380 4.512 4.346 4.470 Jun 11 4.417 4.549 4.389 4.513 Jul 11 4.474 4.590 4.445 4.562 Aug 11 4.521 4.624 4.479 4.588 Sep 11 4.531 4.627 4.484 4.590 Oct 11 4.547 4.667 4.520 4.631 Nov 11 4.716 4.780 4.667 4.768 Dec 11 4.962 5.004 4.903 4.985 Jan 12 5.053 5.121 5.010 5.099 Feb 12 5.054 5.094 4.992 5.074 Mar 12 4.945 5.011 4.910 4.996 Apr 12 4.810 4.827 4.740 4.813 May 12 4.822 4.825 4.790 4.816 Jun 12 4.791 4.841 4.791 4.841 Last spot N/A Est. sales 251028. Fri’s Sales: 177,343 Fri’s open int: 827521, off -5589

IvaxDiag KodiakO g Metalico Metalline MdwGold g MincoG g Minefnd g NeoStem NBRESec Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NA Pall g NDynMn g NthnO&G NthgtM g NovaGld g Oilsands g OpkoHlth ParaG&S PhrmAth PionDrill PlatGpMet PolyMet g ProceraNt Protalix

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .24 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

1.00 -.12 6.35 +.24 5.55 +.18 1.15 +.08 1.26 -.06 2.35 +.11 9.69 +.08 1.43 +.03 4.02 +.05 5.95 -.01 .07 -.00 8.04 -.13 6.54 +.02 18.37 +.07 27.57 +1.34 2.58 -.04 13.29 -.38 .55 -.02 3.90 +.05 3.35 -.04 3.23 +.01 8.86 +.30 2.24 ... 2.05 -.04 .65 +.05 9.73 +.29

PudaCoal ... RadientPh ... RareEle g ... Rentech ... RexahnPh ... Rubicon g ... SamsO&G ... Senesco ... SulphCo ... TanzRy g ... Taseko ... Tengsco ... TimberlnR ... TrnsatlPet ... TriValley ... TwoHrbInv1.48e ... Uluru Ur-Energy ... Uranerz ... UraniumEn ... VantageDrl ... WizzardSft ... YM Bio g ... ZBB Engy ...

PennMuI r 11.77 +.08 IntGrAdm n61.51 +.48 LTIGrade n 9.15 -.05 PremierI r 20.50 +.13 ITAdml n 13.14 ... Morg n 18.42 +.15 TotRetI r 13.20 +.06 ITGrAdm n 9.94 -.02 MuInt n 13.14 ... LtdTrAd n 10.96 ... MuLtd n 10.96 ... Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 38.05 +.29 LTGrAdml n9.15 -.05 PrecMtls r n24.15 +.16 S&P Sel 20.03 +.15 LT Adml n 10.53 ... PrmcpCor n13.98 +.06 MCpAdml n94.27 +.85 Prmcp r n 67.58 +.41 Scout Funds: Intl 32.88 +.31 MuHYAdm n9.94 ... SelValu r n19.20 +.12 PrmCap r n70.12 +.42 STAR n 19.31 +.07 Selected Funds: STIGrade n10.80 ... AmShD 41.95 +.27 ReitAdm r n81.03 StratEq n 18.72 +.13 AmShS p 41.97 +.27 +1.17 Sequoia n 133.77 +.05 STsyAdml n10.70 ... TgtRetInc n11.34 +.01 TgRe2010 n22.50+.05 STBdAdml n10.57-.01 St FarmAssoc: Gwth 53.61 ... ShtTrAd n 15.85 ... TgtRe2015 n12.55 STFdAd n 10.77 -.01 +.04 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.76 +.04 STIGrAd n 10.80 ... TgRe2020 n22.37+.09 SmCAdm n35.08 +.28 TgtRe2025 n12.79 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 52.42 ... TtlBAdml n10.58 -.02 +.06 TStkAdm n32.26 +.24 TgRe2030 n22.00+.12 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 28.22 +.03 ValAdml n 21.39 +.15 TgtRe2035 n13.30 IntValue I 28.85 +.04 WellslAdm n52.92+.02 +.08 WelltnAdm n54.79+.23 TgtRe2040 n21.84 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.97 -.06 Windsor n 47.00 +.40 +.13 WdsrIIAd n46.94 +.30 TgtRe2045 n13.72 VALIC : +.08 25.39 +.20 Vanguard Fds: StkIdx AssetA n 24.84 +.12 Wellsly n 21.84 +.01 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml n 21.67 +.09 CapOpp n 34.00 +.24 Welltn n 31.72 +.13 CAITAdm n10.60 ... DivdGro n 14.68 +.11 Wndsr n 13.93 +.12 CpOpAdl n78.53 +.55 Energy n 69.20+1.84 WndsII n 26.45 +.17 EMAdmr r n38.77 +.10 Explr n 73.72 +.59 Vanguard Idx Fds: Energy n 129.94+3.45 GNMA n 10.73 -.01 TotIntlInst r ... ... ExplAdml n68.61 +.55 GlobEq n 18.13 +.07 500 n 118.55 +.90 ExtdAdm n41.87 +.34 HYCorp n 5.78 ... DevMkt n 10.28 +.07 500Adml n118.57 +.90 HlthCre n 124.30 +.51 EMkt n 29.50 +.07 GNMA Ad n10.73 -.01 InflaPro n 13.00 ... Extend n 41.85 +.34 GrwAdm n 32.20 +.27 IntlGr n 19.33 +.15 Growth n 32.19 +.27 HlthCr n 52.45 +.21 IntlVal n 32.70 +.14 MidCap n 20.77 +.19 HiYldCp n 5.78 ... ITIGrade n 9.94 -.02 SmCap n 35.05 +.29 InfProAd n 25.54 +.01 LifeCon n 16.51 +.04 SmlCpGth n22.15 +.23 ITBdAdml n11.21 -.03 LifeGro n 22.38 +.12 SmlCpVl n 16.11 +.09 ITsryAdml n11.34 -.02 LifeMod n 19.79 +.07 STBnd n 10.57 -.01

+.0338 +.0142 +.0216 +.0228 +.0234 +.0242 +.0255 +.0265 +.0269 +.0278 +.0289 +.0286 +.0281 +.0278 +.0278 +.0278 +.0278 +.0278 +.0278 +.0278 +.0278 +.0278 +.0278

+.097 +.091 +.086 +.088 +.084 +.081 +.079 +.077 +.066 +.055 +.052 +.052 +.056 +.056 +.054 +.054

12.37 .61 12.60 1.23 1.47 4.79 u2.72 .28 .19 6.43 5.64 .89 .88 2.87 .43 10.05 .09 u3.25 5.02 5.23 1.86 .25 2.48 1.15

+.19 -.06 -.35 ... +.01 -.17 +.54 -.02 -.00 -.06 +.03 +.05 -.07 -.04 -.00 -.02 +.00 +.20 +.58 -.02 +.01 -.01 +.03 +.11

TotBnd n 10.58 -.02 TotlIntl n 15.87 +.08 TotStk n 32.25 +.24 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n 21.67 +.09 DevMkInst n10.20+.07 ExtIn n 41.86 +.33 FTAllWldI r n94.58 +.52 GrwthIst n 32.20 +.27 InfProInst n10.40 ... InstIdx n 117.73 +.89 InsPl n 117.74 +.90 InsTStPlus n29.17+.22 MidCpIst n 20.82 +.18 SCInst n 35.08 +.29 TBIst n 10.58 -.02 TSInst n 32.27 +.25 ValueIst n 21.39 +.15 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl n 97.94 +.74 STBdIdx n 10.57 -.01 TotBdSgl n10.58 -.02 TotStkSgl n31.14 +.24 Victory Funds: DvsStA 15.98 +.12 Wells Fargo Adv C: AstAllC t 11.74 ... Western Asset: CorePlus I 10.83 ... Yacktman Funds: Fund p 16.81 ...

METALS NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Mon. Aluminum -$1.1130 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$4.3475 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $4.5510 N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Lead - $2544.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.0409 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1327.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1333.80 troy oz., NY Merc spot Mon. Silver - $28.165 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $28.174 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Platinum -$1782.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1800.90 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. n.q.-not quoted, n.a.-not available r-revised


CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record The Stars Show the Kind of Day You'll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Others, especially a boss or respected authority figure, have great expectations. Can you meet them? Most likely. What is clear is your drive and desire to fulfill this need. Stop. How grounded are these projects? Tonight: Visiting with friends. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Many people have great ideas. You might appreciate all the suggestions. Most of all, talking and sharing open up your mind to new potential and break down, or at least point out, rigid thinking. A friend could reverse his or her stance or plans at the last minute. Tonight: Working late. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH A partner continues to demand a lot of attention. He or she wants to be more a part of the process. This person sometimes feels left out in the cold. As a door opens and new beginnings occur, realize that you might not totally understand his or her sense of isolation. Tonight: Relax with a good game of Scrabble, or do a crossword puzzle. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Deferring to others must get tiring, but you might have little choice ... for now. Unfortunately, those who take the immediate situation as being permanent will find

Legals

---------------------------------------Publish Jan. 25, Feb. 1 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Jamie-Liegh Nichole ItterlyTricarico, A CHILD CV-2011-54 NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME TAKE NOTICE that in with the accordance provisions of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, the Petitioner Ashley Itterly will apply to the Honorable Steven L. Bell, District Judge of the Fifth Judicial District at the Chaves County Courthouse, 400 N. Virginia, in Roswell, New Mexico at 9:00 a.m. on the 14th day of March, 2011 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME of the CHILD from the name of Jamie-Liegh Nichole Itterly-Tricarico to Jamie-Liegh Nichole Luna. Kennon Crowhurst Clerk of the District Court s/Maureen J. Nelson Deputy Clerk/ Clerk Submitted by: /s/Ashley Itterly 1716 N. Kansas Roswell, NM 88203 575-910-2653 ---------------------------------Publish February 1, 8, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES JUDICIAL FIFTH DISTRICT COURT NO. PB-2010-15 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATES OF JAMES MUIR CRAIG, Deceased, & EDNA FAYE CRAIG, Deceased. NOTICE OF HEARING ON PETITION FOR ORDER OF FORMAL PROBATE OF WILL, FORMAL APPOINTMENT OF COPERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND DETERMINATION OF HEIRSHIP

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE out otherwise. A conversation with a key friend is important. This person is asking you to shed some light on a certain issue. Tonight: Share with a partner or best friend. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Completing tasks needs to be highlighted. You will have your share of disruptions, some of which you will welcome. Clearly, someone wants to brainstorm. Be flattered, but make sure you want to indulge in this activity with this person. Tonight: Sigh -- finally. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Your imagination could be funneled into what you are doing, or it could completely distract you from the task at hand. Do work with an unpredictable partner who can be the source of a lot of problems. Tonight: Choose something soothing. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH As you see it, someone might be raining on your parade. You might not be able to focus on what you want until much later. Accept new technology, especially around the workplace. Tonight: Live for the moment. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Restraining yourself from

Legals

---------------------------------Publish Feb. 1, 8, 2011 JUDICIAL FIFTH DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE MATTER OF THE WILL AND LAST TESTAMENT OF Wyatt S. Hedrick, Sr., DECEASED. No. PB-11NOTICE TO 5. CREDITORS The undersigned is Personal of this Representive estate. Creditors of this estate and all claimants of any nature must present their claims within two months after the date of first publication of this notice or forever be barred. S/Wyatt S. Jr. 1028 Hedrick, Quinault El Paso, TX 79912-1223 Tom Dunlap-Lawyer 104 N. Kentucky Ave. Roswell, NM 88203 (575) 622-2607 dunlaplawoffice@cableone.net

---------------------------------Publish Feb. 1, 8, 2011 JUDICIAL FIFTH DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE MATTER OF THE WILL AND LAST TESTAMENT OF Audrey M. Wagner, DECEASED. No. PB-11-4. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The undersigned is Personal Representative of this estate. Creditors of this estate and all claimants of any nature must present their claims within two months after the date of first publication of this notice or forever be barred. s/Donald W. Kopp Box 50533 Midland, TX 78710-0533 Tom Dunlap- Lawyer 104 N. Kentucky Ave. Roswell, NM 88203 (575) 622-2607 dunlaplawoffice@cableone.net

---------------------------------------Publish Feb. 1, 8, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES IN THE PROBATE COURT IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN RAYMOND MORSEY, JR., Deceased No. 8847 NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF NEW MEXICO TO: All unknown persons claiming any lien upon, or right, title or interest in or to the estates of said Decedents. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that John C. Scott and Carolyn Scott have filed a Petition for Order of Formal Probate of Will, Formal Appointment of Co-Personal Representatives and Determination of Heirship. Hearing has been set to consider the Petition on the 28th day of March, 2011, at 9:00 a.m. in the Chaves County District Court, Roswell, New Mexico. Dated this 25th day of January, 2011. DISTRICT COURT CLERK By s/Janet Henry, TCAA

The undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the ESTATE OF JOHN RAYMOND MORSEY, JR., deceased. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims (i) within two months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or (ii) within two months after the mailing or delivery of this notice, whichever is later, or be forever barred. s/DEBRA L. MORSEY 803 Mullis Street Roswell, NM 88201

saying what is on your mind can be costly, especially to your wellbeing. Withholding affects the topic or situation you are dealing with. Try verbalizing more often. No one has to always agree with you! Tonight: Relax at home. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Stay confident, share your ideas and deal with finances or the root of an issue. Be practical yet responsive to others' ideas, even if they are somewhat off-thewall. Separate work from pleasure. Still, a wink goes a long way. Tonight: Out and about. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH You are in your element. Make the first move rather than stand on ceremony. Be open to a very positive change. An unexpected opportunity needs to be greeted, not shunned. Be sure of your finances before accepting any invitations. Tonight: Gather your bills. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HH You might accomplish a lot if you remain behind closed doors. Note a hunch. This one might be worth following through on. Let understanding grow. Share more of your long-term goals with a trusted friend. Tonight: A second wind. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Realize how close you are to succeeding or completing a major project. Meetings are instrumental. Reveal more of your off-beat thinking. Money gains are likely to be heading your way if you dot your i's and cross your t's. Tonight: Time just for you. You deserve it.

ROSWELL DAILY RECORD

CALL 622-7710

GARAGE SALES

DON ’T’ MISS A SALE BY MISSING THE 2:00 PM DEADLINE FOR PLACING YOUR ADS

007. West

GOING OUT of Business Sale Vendor #12 Main St Mkt 1400H Second Street 50% off most items- 20% off Jewelry. 5-Tier Lighted Jewelry case is available end of February 623-3635

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice

PLAZA MOVIE Center, 301 W. McGaffey, 623-4816. Mon-Sat, 2-8pm. New releases every Tuesday. INCOME TAX & Accounting Professionals. Competitive prices and the service you deserve. Bring your taxes to us and enter a chance to win a nice stay in a cabin in Ruidoso, NM. $10 discount on all tax , payroll and accounting preparations. 207 N. Union Suite A 575-625-5223

WE BUY Cars 575-513-2393

025. Lost and Found FOUND SMALL brown female dog by Roswell High 1/18/11. Please call to identify her collar 627-7895 LOST 2 dogs Sycamore/Country Club, F brown lab & F black lab cross. $300 Reward. 6235880 or 626-3034 FOUND FEMALE dog 1/28 near Relief Route & 2nd St. Call to identify 626-4394.

INSTRUCTION EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities DRIVERS Come join our team! Coastal Transport is seeking Drivers with Class (A) CDL. Must be 23 yrs old (X) Endorsement with 1 yr experience, excellent pay, home everyday! Paid Vacation, saftey bonus, company paid life inc. We provide state of the art training program. $2000 sign on bonus. For more information call 1-877-297-7300 or 575-748-8808 between 8am & 4pm, Monday-Friday. COASTAL TRANSPORT is seeking OWNEROPERATORS at least 23 years of age, Class A CDL with X Endorsement and 1 year driving experience. Apply at 2408 N. Industrial, Artesia, NM or call 575748-8808 MAKE EXCELLENT money. Looking for sharp well represented individual to demonstrate a new kind of air cleaner in Roswell & Artesia area. Part time and evenings. Must have reliable car. Call Shawn after 11am 575-446-8571 ADMIRAL BEVERAGE is hiring CDL driver position must be filled immediately, and only serious prospects need apply. Must have clean driving record. Great benefits, excellent pay, group health insurance. 1018 S. Atkinson ACCOUNTING CLERK for auto dealership, excellent benefit package including 401K and Christmas bonus plan. Must be detail oriented, hard working and able to multitask. Fax resumes to 575-622-5899. EEOC BROWN EYED Girl is hiring a full time sales associate. Must be outgoing, friendly, reliable, able and willing to apply makeup, and provide excellent customer service. Please bring resume by store or email to juliebridges98@yahoo.com

045. Employment Opportunities QC/SAFETY MANAGER position open. Must have a minimum 2-3 years Quality Control/Safety background in a Industrial setting. Knowledge of general construction, OSHA, maintenance and custodial is a huge plus. Must be a self starter, work under minimal supervision with the ability to provide accurate and timely reports, interaction with employees and our customer are required on a daily basis. Computer literate, ability to climb, stand, and perform job in hot & cold weather. Please email your resume to esartain@pyramidsvc.com. RECORDS CLERK Chaves County is currently accepting applications for the position of Records Clerk in the Chaves County Adult Detention Facility. (Salary $9.51 - $10.86/hr). Position requires HS diploma or GED and three years experience in office setting, up to 2 years of college/24 hour's course work can be applied to one year experience. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to, maintaining inmate files, arranging transports, receiving and releasing funds for inmate accounts, inmate mail. Must interact with courts, law enforcement, attorneys, and state and federal agencies across the US. Must interact with inmates and the public on a daily basis. Must be able to interact with the public, inmates and staff members in a pleasant manner. Must be proficient in the use of personal computers and have some knowledge of computer network systems. Must be proficient in basic math. Must use multi-line telephone, copy machine, fax, and ten-key calculator and be able to administer independent projects in an efficient manner as assigned. Must be able to meet established deadlines, maintain an acceptable attendance record, and be punctual. Chaves County is a DrugFree employer. Applicants for this position will be required to pass a background check and post-offer drug test. Required application forms are available at the Job Posting Board located at the Chaves County Administrative Center West Wing, #1 St. Mary's Place or by accessing the County's web site at www.co.chaves.nm.us/jobs

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

B5

Smithsonian board seeks changes after video flap WASHINGTON (AP) — The Smithsonian Institution’s governing board on Monday called for changes in how potentially objectionable exhibits are handled while also standing behind the head of the museum complex amid accusations of censorship. Smithsonian Secretary Wayne Clough came under fire after deciding a couple months ago to remove a gay artist’s video that depicted ants crawling on a crucifix in an exhibit at the National Portrait Gallery. The scene angered some in Congress and a Catholic group that called it sacrilegious. The board said it must be prepared to handle museum disputes and guard freedom of curators in the face of political pressure from Congress or other groups. “We’re in the business of often doing exhibits that are about flash points in American history, flash points in American culture, and we have to accept that with that responsibility comes some controversy,” said Patricia Stonesifer, chairwoman of the Smithsonian Board of Regents and former CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. “We don’t want curators or directors or others to think that ‘above all, avoid controversy.”’ The video in question, “A Fire in My Belly,” by the late David Wojnarowicz, explored the subject of AIDS. The artist later died of the disease at age 37 in 1992. The Catholic League called the video sacrilegious. It was among more than 100 pieces in the first major exhibit to explore gay themes

in art history. Other contributing artists are Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Thomas Eakins and Annie Leibovitz. A panel convened to review the handling of the exhibit, “Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture,” included Harvard University professor David Gergen, National Gallery of Art Director Earl A. Powell and Smithsonian regent John McCarter of Chicago’s Field Museum. The panel’s key finding was that unless there is an error, changes should not be made to future exhibits once they are opened without curators, museum directors and leaders from the Smithsonian’s governing board consulting. It also recommended that the Smithsonian seek public input during the planning of potentially objectionable exhibits and engage Congress as well. “There are a number of things that with 20/20 hindsight probably could have been done differently,” McCarter said. He added that he did not believe including the Wojnarowicz video was a mistake, though with more time to explain the context of the crucifix image to critics, “we might have worked through this.” “Representation of the crucifix and the ants had an interpretation to it, I believe in his mind that was not sacrilegious,” McCarter said, noting that the artist was working at the time in Mexico where Christian iconography is often represented in art. “Alternatively, it might have been very deeply religious.”

045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

Completed applications should be returned to Human Resources, PO Box 1817, Roswell, NM 88202. Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, February 2, 2011. EOE.

CRYSTAL FORMAL Wear, LLC is seeking temporary sales consultants with exceptional customer service skills for Feb. Roswell Mall next to Bealls or apply Saturday 2-4pm. nini_bailey@yahoo.com or 4203562

HELENA CHEMICAL Company, a national agricultural-chemical company, has an immediate opening for an experienced truck driver at our Artesia location. This position will make deliveries, utilize a forklift and perform general warehouse duties. Requires a high school diploma or equivalent, CDL with HAZMAT endorsement. We offer an excellent working environment and outstanding compensation and benefits package. For consideration, please apply in person: Helena Chemical Company 504 Lake Arthur Highway Lake Arthur, NM 88253 (575) 365-2148 Pre-employment drug screen required. EOE M/F/V/H

RNs, COME join our team! RN needed for part-time position in the Roswell and Dexter areas to provide supervisory visits, admission and assessments for our VA, PCA clients. Flexible schedules and competitive salary opportunities available. You can e-mail your resume to jorge.garcia@chomecare. com or bring it by at Community Homecare, 813 Richardson St., Roswell, NM. BUSY OFFICE is seeking a part time cleaning person. Must have a valid driver’s license, reliable transportation, and be eligible to work in the United States. If interested, pick up an application at 1010 N. Virginia, Roswell. BOOKKEEPER/ SECRETARY WANTED for Agriculture based business. Must have Quickbook and Inventory knowledge and have a professional appearance. Fax resume to 627-0077 or email vcrd@aol.com. NOW HIRING – Customer Service Specialist. Seeking a courteous professional with an outgoing personality. We offer an excellent benefit package including HEALTH, DENTAL, VISION, 401k and PAID VACATION. No experience required. All applicants must pass a drug test. Apply in person at Roswell Honda, 2177 W. 2nd. Ask for Rick Granado.

EASTERN NEW MEXICO UNIVERSITY: Academic Advisor, Administrative Secretary, Lab Supervisor (computer lab). Jobs are located in Portales, NM. www.enmu.edu/services/hr 575-562-2115. AA/EO/Title IX Employer THE ROSWELL JOB CORPS CENTER is currently taking applications for the following positions: Dental Assistant-PT: Provides general dentistry support for students who require preventative and routine dental maintenance. High school diploma or equivalent required. Must possess Radiology certification in the State of New Mexico. Dental Certification preferred. Starting pay is $12.00/hr. Career Technical Instructor Health Occupations-PT: Certified Licensed Practical Nurse or Registered Nurse with two years experience in the nursing field. Must have a valid driver’s license with an acceptable driving record. Hourly salary is $20.00. Maintenance Technician: Must have a High School Diploma and two years related craft/maintenance experience. Must also have knowledge in the areas of heating/cooling systems, boilers, burners, pumps, electrical circuits, and plumbing, will operate a variety of equipment and power tools. Starting pay is $10.50/hr. Safety Officer/Driver-FT: Responsible for performing alarm and patrol duties in assigned areas to protect life and property. High School Diploma or GED; two years related experience. Must be able to obtain and maintain a commercial driver’s license (CDL) with passenger endorsement. The position pays $10.50 per hour. View Job Description and Apply online at: www.chugachjobs.com Applications will only be accepted online. Deadline to apply: Open Until Filled An Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F, D/V

045. Employment Opportunities DRIVERS (ARTESIA) CDL, tanker endorsement, and good driving record. Competitive salary and benefits. Apply in person at Standard Energy Services (oilfield services). 11376 Lovington Hwy, Artesia, NM. 575-746-6116 EEO Employer.

POSITIONS AT PVT CONSTRUCTION SPECIALIST Responsible for construction, repair, replacement and removal of cable and wire facilities; Places buried cable using digging and trenching equipment; installs some aerial cable; installs protectors on customer premises; Operates trucks, trenchers, backhoes and other equipment. This position is based at Headquarters in Artesia. CATV SERVICE TECHNICIAN Responsible for CATV and Telephone installation along with problem diagnoses to satisfy the PVT customer. Assists in CATV plant design, implementation, organization and troubleshooting. This position is based at Headquarters in Artesia. 700 MHz, WIMAX SECURITIES SERVICE TECHNICIAN Responsible for installing and maintaining residential and business data services in the Artesia market. Requires experience with wireless Internet related software, hardware, processes and security systems. MUST have NM ES-3J or ability to get one. The position is based at Headquarters in Artesia. HONDO SERVICE TECHNICIAN Responsible for telephone, cable and cable modem installations, disconnections, repairs and replacements. This position is required to live in the Hondo Valley. PVT provides a competitive wage and benefits package. Applications may be obtained from www.pvt.com or from Headquarters. Applications and resumes, including wage history, should be sent to H. R. Dept., Peñasco Valley Telecommunications, 4011 W. Main, Artesia, NM 88210. E-mail to: janiceb@pvt.com Fax to: 575.736.1376. Equal Opportunity Employer


B6 Tuesday, February 1, 2011 045. Employment Opportunities

PART-TIME TELLER Bank of the Southwest is looking to immediately fill the position of Part-Time Teller. Job duties to include, but not limited to customer service and cash handling. This part time position does not have paid benefits. Requirements: Must have a good attitude and basic computer skills. Must be detailed oriented with excellent time management skills. 1 year bank experience preferred. Company offers excellent work environment and salary. Background screen required. Apply in person with Lisa at Bank of the Southwest, 226 N Main, Roswell, NM by February 2, 2011. EEO/AA

045. Employment Opportunities

140. Cleaning

AVON, Buy or Sell. Pay down your bills. Start your own business for $10. Call Sandy 317-5079 ISR.

185. Electrical

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252

BIG HORN Electric Professional work, affordable price. 575-317-8345 NM Lic#367662.

ADVANCED HOME Care is hiring for a Certified Home Health Aide. Pay based upon experience. Please call Michelle at 627-6256. Must have reliable vehicle with car insurance, CPR current, pass criminal background check and have current Aide Certification.

BNX ELECTRIC Residential/Commercial, Bonded, Lic#368212, Free Estimates. Se Habla Espanol. Call Benito 6379413 or 317-9259.

195. Elderly Care

SERVICES

105. Childcare

COMFORT KEEPERS NOW HIRING in Roswell & ARTESIA. Seeking SKILLED caregivers for IMMEDIATE work days, evenings and week-ends. Being a caregiver will be the best job you ever had! Call Carol @ 624-9999 and apply at 1410 S. Main St. Roswell or 502 W. Texas, Ste. C Artesia. www.beacomfortkeeper.com ESTABLISHED 19 yr. company seeking traveling sales rep. Gone Mon-Fri. Company pays $910/wk. Call 1-800-225-6368, ext. 333. www.brechtpacific.com

ADVANCED HOME Care. All caregivers are licensed bonded & have passed federal criminal back-ground checks. Loving care since 1994. 6276256

NEED CHILD care? Find the widest range of available childcare for your children and their needs. 1-800691-9067 or www.newmexic okids.org. You may also call us; Family Resource & Referral 6229000 and we can help you navigate the system.

PERSON TO RUN ERRANDS also prepare various breakfasts 6228615

200. Fencing

HOME DAYCARE providing weekend childcare. 626-6203

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

210. Firewood/Coal

WILL DO evening and weekend daycare in my home. Call for more information. 910-0313

140. Cleaning

HOUSEKEEPING - Home and/or office. Honest & dependable. 575-749-4900 or 575-578-1447 RWC Bobcat and Dump Works. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397.

CANDLEWOOD SUITES Full time Night Auditor Some holidays & weekends required. Customer service experience preferred. Apply in person at 4 Military Heights Dr.

HOUSEKEEPER incl. windows & seasonal cleaning wkly, bi., mo. honest & dep. ref. 347-5270 Elizabeth

220. Furniture Repair

350. Roofing

REPAIR & Refinish furniture & build furniture. Southwest Woods. 1727 SE Main. 623-0729 or 626-8466 Hrs 7-3pm. Call before you come in case he’s out running errands. www.southwestwoods furniture.com.

Call R & R Construction 18 years in Roswell. 622-0072

225. General Construction

Carpentry, Drywall, Painting, doors, windows, tile work. Lic., Insured, Bonded. 914-7002 Dean MILLIGAN CONTRACTING Bathroom remodels, painting, tile, home repairs & more. Licensed, bonded & insured. Call Geary at 578-9353. TEE TIME Construction Commercial/Residential Construction - Framing, cement, roofing, drywalln painting, New Construction of Homes, Additions, Remodeling, and Metal Buildings. Licensed & Bonded. Call 575-626-9686 HIGH PLAINS Homes Specialist Stucco, Concrete & All Masonry 575910-2450 Javier Yepis Lic 358142 - Licensed, Bonded & Insured

380. Sharpening

www.rancheroswelding.com

SHARPENING SERVICE Knives & Chainsaws. Professional & affordable. 6245370 or 637-2211

395. Stucco Plastering

RWC Lath and Stucco. Insurance. Hector (575)9108397

400. Tax Service

www.rancheroswelding.com

ANAYA GRC & Tax Services. For all your tax needs. 508 W. 2nd. 623-1513 Our prices are the best in town.

405. TractorWork

LANGFORD TRACTOR work. Septic tanks installed/inspected. Blade work and backhoe work. Gravel, topsoil. 623-1407.

230. General Repair

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 6234185

T-LEVEL CONSTRUCTION Inc. Handyman for a day. Call John for all your misc. repairs. 317-1477

ALLEN’S TREE Service. The oldest tree service in Roswell. Million $ ins. 6261835

ONE CORD of cedar & juniper $150. Call 575-7034025

232. Chimney Sweep

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Will tear down old buildings, barns, haul trash, old farm equipment. 347-0142 or 317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Roswell Lawn Service rake leaves, trim trees, general cleanup, 420-3278 WEEKEND WARRIOR Lawn Service mowing, property cleanup, residential rain gutter cleaning, and much more 575-626-6121

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (505)-622-7710 #45 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

Greenscapes Sprinkler Systems Lawn mowing, field mowing, gravel, sodhydro seed, pruning, tilling, For dependable & reliable service call 622-2633 or 910-0150. NOW ACCEPTING new clients for field mowing, lawn mowing, trash hauling & cleanup. Call 575-420-2670. LAWN SERVICE & much more work at low price. 914-0803 or 914-1375 MOW GRASS, Trim Bushes, Flower Beds, Clean Ups, Pull Weed, Leaf Raking, Pecan pick up, Tree Pruning, Rock Yards. Call Pedro or Virginia 575-9105247 or 623-1826

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: EXPIRES o ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM MONDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS 11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50 Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

www.roswell-record.com

410. Tree Service

LARGE TREES for sale. Limited supply, 12-20ft tall. Cottonwood, Autumn Ash, Sycamore, Honeylocust, Afghan Pine, and Pinon. $300 each. Bar Guitar Growers, 575-653-4140.

435. Welding RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insurance. www.rancheroswelding.com

439. Window & Doors Hector (575) 910-8397

QUALITY VINYL windows white on white $334.00 for basic install does not include travel time. Call for FREE quote ABQ Discount Window at 1-888-885-7301

440. Window Repair

AQUARIUS GLASS For Less. Screens, Patio & Shower Drs., Table Tops & Mirrors. 623-3738. T-LEVEL CONSTRUCTION Inc. Call John 317-1477

FINANCIAL

485. Business Opportunities FOR SALE FENCED COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 210x115 w/3200 SQFT SHOP & OFFICE IN & OUTSIDE PARKING. 100 N. PINE. CALL 575-910-2070. DO YOU earn $800 in a day? Your Own Local Candy Route! 25 Machines and Candy All for $9995. 877-915-8222 All Major Credit Cards Accepted!

REAL ESTATE

305. Computers 490. Homes For Sale PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER services at affordable prices. $30 per hour for a minimum of $90 per computer problem. Call (575)317-9930.

COMPUTER DOCTOR

o

RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397

SEANSONED MOUNTAIN wood $100 1/2 cord. Free delivery/stack. 626-9803.

235. Hauling

o

T-LEVEL CONSTRUCTION Inc. Call John 317-1477

GRAVES FARM oak and elm. Cord and 1/2 cord delivered. 622-1889

CHIMNEY SWEEP Have your woodstove or fireplace inspected and cleaned. Dust free Guarantee. 35 years Experience, Licensed, Insured. Bulldog Janitorial Services 575-308-9988

o

Need A Roof?

VETERAN HANDYMAN can build almost anything. Big/small jobs welcome. Call 505-5548764. Se Habla Espanol.

BIG T’S FIREWOOD seasoned, split, cedar Juniper 225 a cord or 125 a 1/2 575-444-6053

www.rancheroswelding.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Microsoft Certified 50% off any repair (Labor only) 575-208-9348 Call Billy

310. Painting/ Decorating Quality Painting! Interior, Exterior at prices you can afford. Mike 910-7012

316. Pet Services

Canine Cleanup Services. Honest & Reliable. Call 420-4669

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 625-9924 / 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 6264079 or 622-2552.

EQUAL HOUSING NOTICE All real estate advertised in the Roswell Daily Record is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion or sex, family status and handicap or national origin or an intention to make any such preference limitation or discrimination. The Roswell Daily Record will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. ADVERTISE YOUR HOME ALL OVER NEW MEXICO. CALL THE DAILY RECORD FOR DETAILS. 622-7710 OPEN HOUSE Call 6227010/910-6104. 3305 Riverside, 2222 sq. ft., 4/3/2, will negotiate 1% finders fee. 3 BR 1 3/4bath 1239 sq ft. remodeled & updated, lots of potential. $82k 303 S. Balsam Ave. 626-5752 4Bd, 1 Ba, new paint, carpet, doors,fncd yrd, $59,500, M-Th 624-1331 NE 4/5 br 2 living areas over 2400 sq ft, ref air walk to Del Norte Elem. & Goddard High 2715 N Orchard. 575-420-3606 for appt.

Roswell Daily Record

490. Homes For Sale

Dennis the Menace

3303 CHIQUITA Ln., NE Roswell, move-in ready, 3/2/2, 1500 sq. ft., metal roof, large covered porch, shed, newly remodeled kitchen w/stainless appl., newly remodeled bathrooms, new furnace, new central air, new 200 amp electrical service, WD, FP. Seller will pay all closing cost. $139,000. 575-607-5800 1405 S. Madison, 3/1/1, owner will finance. 6268302 or 420-4801 HOUSE FOR sale in Artesia, NM. 190. W. Sears Ave.

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

COUNTRY HOME HORSE PROPERTY W. of Roswell, 5ac, 1800sf home, 4br, 2ba, fl. sz arena w/roping chutes, covered runs, metal barn, tack hse, shop, trees - ready to sell. 623-2538 RUIDOSO, NM AREA – 5 acres w/city water and city maintained roads near small fishing pond and golf course. Only $19,900. Financing avail. Call NMRS 1-866-906-2857.

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

Commercial Property formerly C&J Nursery, 410 S. Sunset, $40k. 317-6099 or 623-1092 INVESTOR’S SPECIAL Serious cash flow. Get started with a small down payment. 6 two bedroom units. Call now for more information 317-6479. Restaurant bldg, $275K cash/trade for Ruidoso prprty, M-Th 624-1331

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

1997 CLATON, 3/2 in adult park, can be moved, nice. Call 575-317-6489. WE BUY used mobile homes. Single & double wides. 575-622-0035 D01090. 1999 FLEETWOOD 16x60 two bedroom one bath. Very nice setup in Clovis. Loaded with appliances also big step and porch. Priced right. Call 575-6220035 D01090

520. Lots for Sale

OWNER FINANCING for a limited time. Ready to build 5 acre lots w/ great views & good covenants. Located 9 miles West of Roswell @ the Club House Banquet Facility. Free land maps and at entrance. 575-623-1800. www.BuenaVidaLand.com Mobile Home Lots for Sale $15,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. We Take Visa and Mastercard! 420-1352. PREMIUM 5 Acre tracts, Owner will finance with 10% down, New Construction only (no mobile homes), , Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd. between Country Club & Berrendo Rd. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 6266791, 626-4337 LAKE VAN Subdivision, last lot for sale. Please call 602-206-3724.

530. Real Estate Wanted

LOCAL FAMILY wanting to buy home. No realtors. Contact us @ carterhomes17@yahoo.com

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 6241331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. Town Plaza Apartments Utilities paid - Gas and Electric. New Owners, friendly new managers. New Remodeled EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs/downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Seniors 55yrs plus, law enforcement & military will receive discount. No HUD. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 2nd year, 1 free month rent

540. Apartments Unfurnished

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

2 BED, 2 ba, 1 car garage, central air, fenced yard, 26-A Bent Tree Rd, $700/mo, $700/dep., 627-9942

NO PETS, No HUD, 3br, $600 mo., $500 dep. 914-0101

PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHAN TED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. FIRST MONTH FREE 1br, 650 sq ft, $380 + elec. Central heating, ref air, new carpet, paint & tile. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 FIRST MONTH FREE All Bills Paid 3br, 2ba, $680 mo., brand new everything. 1br $480. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $559+elec, newly remodeled, only a few apts left, 1br $380, 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 FIRST MONTH FREE 3 bedroom, 2 Bath, 930 sf, $559 plus electric. 502 S. Wyoming. 2 bedroom, 1 bath $480 or 1 bedroom $380. Call 622-4944. EFFICIENCY 2 BR, downtown, clean, water paid. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD Call 623-8377 EFFICIENCY 1 br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. 2 BDR. No Pets, No HUD, 1702 E. 2nd St. 773396-6618 1&2Bd, wtr pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 624-1331 HUD ACCEPTED. Call Ronnie @ 637-6883. 1 BD, all bills pd, no pets, no smoking, no HUD - 6236281 LARGE 1 bedroom apartment. References and background check required. Washer and Dryer hookups. Private parking. 420-0100 1 br, utilities included for $500 mo. $250 deposit. 910-8603

406 W. Tilden, 2br, garage, ht pump, w/d hookups, $600 mo., $500 dep., no pets. 637-8234 502 W. Albuquerque, 2br, ht pump, w/d hookups, $500 mo., $500 dep., no pets. 637-8234 1205 N. Maple, 2br, ht pump, w/d hookups, $550 mo., $500 dep., no pets. 637-8234 TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 409 LA Fonda - Nice and Clean 3 bedroom, 2 bath, one car garage - $1,100 a month. Call 627-7595 or 840-7411. 504 W. Albuquerque, 2br, w/d hookups, heat pump, no pets, $550 mo., $500 dep. 637-8234 4 HOMES - 3-4br, $550mo, sale 45K, 4K dn, $400 mo. Al 575-703-0420, 202-4702 1BR, 1BA, 602 A. S. Wyoming $425 mo., $300 dep. Call Julie 505-2200617. 3 BD/1 ba. 1 car gar. 66 G St., ref air, RIAC $650 mo., $650 dep. 6279942. NICE 2BR w/p & nice 1 br w/p. No Pets No Hud. 9109357 FRESH PAINT, large 2/3br, 1ba, fenced, garage, good area, $750 mo. $400 dep. 1204 S. Missouri. 622-2485 HUD OK 3br, 1b, stove, fridge, fenced yard 36 Langley $650m/$350dep call 575-703-4025 2&3 Bd, 1&2 Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 624-1331 HUD OK 2br, 1b stove, fridge, fenced yard 23 W. Byrne $500m/$350dep call 575-703-4025

ROOMY 2BR, 1ba duplex, $650 mo., $400 dep, wtr pd, no pets, 2409 N. Grand. 626-7506

1614 N. Delaware, 2br, 1ba, attached garage, no pets or HUD, $500 mo., $300 dep. 910-6711

1 BEDROOM apartment. 2 bedroom apartment. Call 910-8170

1103 MONTERREY 3 bedroom, 2 bath 2 living areas, total electric. $1,200 Month. $1,000 Deposit 6251952

UNFURNISHED EFFICIENCY Apartment. Bills paid. Call 317-1212 or 622-9011

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished 2/1, carport, sec. alarm, water, $695/1mo. dep., No HUD, 637-8467 Nice, NMMI area, safe, quiet, homey, updated decor, 2/2 + office, hardwood floors, deco fireplace, gas patio grill, HP internet, LCD TV w/DVD, everything furnished, FLETC ready. 910-7148

3 BR, 1 bath, fenced yard, w&/d hookups. 910-8170 3BR, 1BA, 2car garage home with w/d connections. Corner lot. $700/month plus deposit. References required. (575) 622-6600. NE ROSWELL, 3/2/2, FP, large covered porch, shed, non smoking, no pets, $1200 dep., $1200 mo. Call John @ 575-607-5800. 3BR, 1.5BA, NE neighborhood, $925 mo., $600 dep., no pets or HUD. Avail. 3/1/11. 420-5930

FLETC Homes for rent. Long & short term rentals. 5 minutes from FLETC. Brand new & beautiful! Visit our website: www.lgrentalhomes.com or Call 420-0519 or 910-7670

1006 PLAZA Del Sol, nice, quiet cul de sac, 2br/2ba duplex, garage, covered front porch, FP, w/d hookups, ref. air, fridge, DW, $800/$400 dep. 4205261 text or call for appt.

COUNTRY HOME at 1700 E. Mescalero Rd. Furnished & FLETC ready. 4br, 3ba, sunroom, dbl. garage. Will consider pets. Call Sherlea Taylor, 575624-2219 or 575-420-1978 for details.

2105 W. 1st, very cozy 2br, 1ba, ref. air, new cabinets, covered parking, storage, fenced front & backyard, $600/$300dep. 420-5261 text or call for appt.

WORK CREWS/FLETC Fully- furnished homes everything paid www.cozycowboy.com (575) 624-3258 (575) 626-4822 EXCEPTIONAL 2/2 w/carport, all utilities paid w/security system, furnished w/W&D. $975 mo. NW location Owner/Broker. 626-7663

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

JUST REDUCED now avail. 3br, 2ba, new carpet & tile, $850 mo., $600 dep., no HUD, no pets. 420-5930

4BR, 2BA, 2 living rooms, $875. Also 1br apt., $425. 347-0493 1305 W. College, 2/1/1, w/d, fenced yard, no HUD/pets, $600. 626-9530 2 BEDROOM, 1 Bath, 810 E. Hendricks. 622-6540 LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com! FURNISHED BEDROOM for rent in Artesia. References required 575746-3912


Roswell Daily Record 550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 3 bdrm $650mo 350 dep ref. no pets, w/d hook ups 317-3222 1405 S. Madison, very clean 3/1/1, $750/$750 dep. 420-4801 or 626-8302 3 BDRM, 1 Bath, refrigerated air, remodeled bath, 1 car garage $750 a month, $400 Deposit, 2708 S. Emerald. Avail. first week of February. 420-7735 4 BR, 2 Bath, storage, covered patio, stove, fridge, ref. air, 910-8170 CLEAN 1BR, all bills pd., 607 Woody, $425 + dep, no pets, no HUD. 626-2190. 2 BR 1 3/4 bath heated & cooled basement $650 mo. $500 dep. ref. air & central heat Terry 420-5111 3 BR 1.5 bath stove/fridge $550 mo $300 deposit. 910-9648

569. Mobile Home Spaces/Lots

EASY LIVING community - 1337 McCall Loop, Roswell. Long term RV’s welcome. 624-2436

580. Office or Business Places PROFESSIONAL OFFICE space for rent. 3 suites, ground floor, 1000 sq ft. Call John Grieves @ 626-7813. Prudential Enchanted Lands, REALTORS® 622-0875

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale ROLL ENDS. Use for packing, mulch, art projects and other uses. Buy day old paper by the bundles, also boxes 15x12x10. Roswell Daily Record Circulation Department. 622-7710. NEED FURNITURE? Shop Blair’s Trading Post for the best prices in town for your household items. We buy & sell furniture, appliances, home decor, collectibles, electronics, saddles, jewelry, tools, fishing & camping items, movies plus everything else from A-Z. Including many hard to find items. Serving Roswell for 40 years. Open daily 9-5. Accept Visa & MC. 5611 Hummingbird Ln. 627-2033

570. Mobile Home Courts

Power wheelchair, walker, commode chair, hospital bed, grab bars. 622-7638

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

ANTIQUES, DISHES, cookware, old trunk, cowhide Bernard sofa. By appt. only, 910-0014

580. Office or Business Places

ATTENTION ROCKHOUNDS I have quality rocks and fossils at discount prices. 622-8945

OFFICE SPACE for Rent. Prime downtown area, 2,061 sq.ft. Please call 622-8711.

WULITZER PIANO paid $1000, best reasonable offer. 575-746-7429

EXECUTIVE OFFICE SUITE for lease: Newly decorated, private rest room, covered parking at 1210 North Main. Contact David McGee, Owner / Broker 622-2401

WHIRLPOOL CLOTHES dryer heavy duty, set of Corelle dishes service for 8, recliner, dark teal green, keyboard, stereo eighth track, record player & radio, paintings, glass top kitchen table & 4 chairs & lots more. 623-1176

BEAUTY SHOP for lease, 103 N. Pennsylvania. A/C, plubming & stations ready to go, $595 mo., $500 dep. 575-317-6479 212 W. 1st, office for lease, 1200sqft, A/C, $400 mo., $400 dep. 575-317-6479 STOREFRONT Retail 2500 sqft 58ft frontage at 3106 N Main $1200mo 627-9942 FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 4202546. STOREFRONT/Retail/ 800 sqft 20ft utilities pd. 2102 S. Main $550mo. 627-9942 REMODELED OFFICE building 2ba, 10 rooms, brand new carpet & paint job, avail. right away. Call Gene Ortega @ 505249-8813. GROUND LEVEL office, excellent location, 1,560 sq. ft. $1,050 per month. Water paid 420-2100. STOREFRONT - Retail - Or Customized professional office suite. Everything new inside & out, 105 W. 6th, across from Peppers. 575-420-6050 MULTI-PURPOSE BUILDING. 640 sq. Ft., New floor. Good Visibility. $550.00 per month. Call 420-2100 or 622-7163

FREEZER SIZE of fridge works well $50 OBO. 24 Riverside or 623-0736

Graco Bassinet with storage, converts to playpen $70, Infant carseat up to 32lbs comes with base $50. Both in excellent cond. Call or text 317-6816 DODGE DAKOTA camper shell long bed white very good condition $400. Call 626-3609 or 626-3608 4 PLOTS for sale at South Park Cemetery. Call 575626-4413. REACH OVER 500,000 READERS in more than 30 newspapers across the state for one low price. Contact your local newspaper’s classified department or visit nmpress.org for details.

605. Miscellaneous for Sale BEDROOM SET, girl’s pastel butterfly, 2 twin beds, dresser, mirror, night stand, $350. 575840-8222 SAWMILLSBAND/CHAINSAW cut lumber any dimension, anytime. Build anything from furniture to homes. IN STOCK ready to ship. From $4090.00. www.NorwoodSawmills.co m/300N 1-800-661-7747 DRESSES, BLOUSES, skirts, petticoats & pettipanties, belts, shoes, one used skirt & blouse -color aqua, all medium. 2109 W. Juniper.

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

CLASSIFIEDS

720. Livestock & Supplies

79 HAYNES 4 Horse Trailer w/lg. dressing area gooseneck new tires, floor, brakes, lights, paint. Can be seen at E. 17th off Atkinson 317-4015 A SET of good quality young bred cows. Blacks, reds, and char-x. 325-656-7944

745. Pets for Sale

PUPPY LOVE Grooming Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also - 575-420-6655 FREE CATS! Some older cats, some spayed, neutered, shy now but will be friendly, all need good homes. 626-4708. 1 YR old male Rottweiler $200 call Richard 317-6045 or 347-2051 Old Victorian Bulldogge Pups! Ready 2/14/11 taking deposits 575-495-1015 $50 6MO old Chihuahuas, & Chiapoms, bigger, older puppies, sweet & lovable, registered, 308-3017.

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. Your dealer of choice. Sales, parts, service, consignments, purchases, propane, dump station. 2900 West Second. 6221751, 1-800-929 0046 2003 FLEETWOOD 29’ Class C. 2 slide-outs, low miles. 2006 Jeep Wrangler also avail. as dinghy vehicle. View @ www.RVT.com ad#’s 4636822 & 4636823. 575626-1373

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

FORD CONTOUR 83k miles, runs great, $2850, no financing. 420-1352 Public Auction Saturday, Feb. 5th 2002 Chevy Tahoe 56,000 miles & 2008 Mercury Grand Marquis, LS 33,000 Miles. Super Clean Estate Vehicles. Wild West Auctions, LLC 623-7355 for info.

WE BUY Home furnishings, furniture, appliances, collectibles, tools and everything else from A-Z including personal estates and whole house fulls. 627-2033 or 623- 6608

FREE OLDER adult female Beegles, 687-4187 or 7035893. 4 males Great Dane puppies for Sale. For more info call 626-9000

TOO MANY Autos ‘93 Caddy - ‘99Ford Windstar, $3450, your choice. 575-578-0234 or 210 E. Hendricks. Must see!

WE BUY PECANS Top Prices Paid. Up to $1.80lb. On Grand Ave. between 4th & 5th St. Behind Courthouse.

CHIHUAHUAS: 1 male 2yrs. old, 1 female w/ 2 puppies born on Dec. 29, 2010. 623-0576. Love Birds: Male & female, ready for breading. For more info call: 627-7801. Leave message if no answer, will return call.

1985 MERCEDES Benz, original paint, original leather, Grandpa’s Cream Puff. $3500. 317-3529

SELL THOSE Pecans Haley Farms paying up to $1.75 per pound for your pecans. Monday-Friday 2:00 to 5:00 Sat. 9:00-2:00 5018 W. Country Club Rd. HARD TIMES? Get the most cash for your old & broken gold & silver jewelry. Also, US silver coins. Call Skeets in Roswell, 578-0805. BUYING PECANS N. Main & Berrendo Rd. Mon. & Weds. 575-399-2212 GUITAR WANTED! Local musician will pay up to $12,500 for pre-1975 Gibson, Fender, Martin, Rickenbaker and Gretsch guitars. Fender amplifiers also. Call toll free! 1-(800) 995-1217.

635. Good things to Eat

GRAVES FARM & Garden Frozen green chile, extra hot, regular hot, big Jim & mild. Dried red chile pods. We ship anywhere. 622-1889 hours Mon.-Sat. 8-5:30, Sun.1-5

715. Hay and Feed Sale

Alfalfa Hay- sm. bales, oat hay & sudan all grades $4.50-$9.00 per bale. Big bales $90-$140 ea. Firewood. 8:00-5:30 MonSat.1:00-5:00 Sun. Graves Farm & Garden 622-1889 Credit Cards Accepted

IRISH SETTERS fullblooded champion show $500, 6 males, 3 females born 12/11/10. Select your puppy now. 575-760-3811 AKC LABS for sale, $400 each, 2black, 4choc. Call 575-637-4521.

RECREATIONAL

775. Motorcycles & Scooters 2000 YAMAHA YZF 600R $1,500 for information call 575-840-9609 2003 YAMAHA V-Star Classic 650, black, low mileage, $3200 obo. 575-420-2768 2007 HONDA 450X, low hours, never raced, $3000. 575-444-6085

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2006 FORD F250, excellent cond., ext. cab, $10,800, 6267488. 2006 FORD F350, 4dr, pwr stroke diesel, dual rear wheel 10ft flat bed, excellent cond., $13,800. 626-7488 2003 TAHOE Z71, good condition, high mileage, $10,000 OBO Call 637-2730 2008 TOYOTA Tacoma access cab, 4 cyl, 5 speed, 4x4, 21/25 mpg, 22k miles, 626-9915 or 625-9866. 1980 SILVERADO Short Bed, 4x4, Auto 350. 6275448

796. SUVS

2004 DODGE Durango, 22” rims, 65k mi. good cond. 575624-2283, 317-7703 1997 FORD Expedition. 840-7873

810. Auto Parts & Accessories DODGE DAKOTA camper shell long bed white very good condition $400. Call 626-3609 or 626-3608

Oil & Gas Land Manager

Applications are being accepted for position of Land Manager with an active oil and gas company located in Roswell, NM. Responsibilities include overseeing acquisition of properties, managing all land functions including regulatory issues and supervision of field landmen. Applicants should have extensive experience in land, contracts, regulatory and operations. Qualifications include B.A. degree, or related degree with 10 to 15 years experience as an in-house landman. Submit resume with at least three references to PO Box 1897 Unit 256, Roswell, NM, 88202.

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

B7

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


B8 Tuesday, February 1, 2011 OBITUARIES

Mary Jo Lunsford

A rosary will be recited for Mary Jo Lunsford, 89, of Roswell, at 7 p.m., Monday, Jan. 31, 2011, at Anderson Bethany Funeral Home and Crematory. A funeral Mass will be celebrated at 1 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011, at St. Peter’s Catholic Church with Father Paul Juniet officiating. Burial will follow at South Park Cemetery. Mary passed away, Saturday, Jan. 29, 2011, in the comfort of her home. Mary Jo was born Aug. 2, 1921, to Henry Osbor n Sims and Marry Allie Hughes in Navera County, Texas. She has been an active member of the Roswell community for the past 47 years, as well as an active member of the St. Peter’s Catholic Church. Mary was also a member of the sorority Beta Sigma

NATION/OBITUARIES/RECORDS Phi. She will be greatly missed by all her family and friends. Those left behind to cherish her memory are her daughters: Glenda Ramer of Coos Bay, Ore., Anita Johnson and husband, Terry, of Roswell, Allie Bishop and husband, Curtis, of Gardner, Kan., Sharma Simpson and husband, Ron, of Carlsbad, and Marla Pitman and husband, Frank, of Roswell; sons: Gary Lunsford and wife, Linda, of Pinon, Tom Lunsford and wife, JoAnn, of Topeka, Kan., Mike Lunsford and wife, Elaine, of Westover, Ala., and Larry Lunsford and wife, Freddie, of Buckley, Wash.; 17 grandchildren; 30 greatgrandchildren; sister -inlaw, Flo Lunsford, of Artesia; brother-in-law, Lowell Betow, of Ponca City, Okla.; and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Glen; granddaughter, Tammy Johnson; sisters: Hilda Whitaker, Lonnie Foster and Ozie Barry; and son-in-law, Frank Ramer. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online register book at andersonbethany.com. Services are under the direction of Anderson Bethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

Sharnene Jay Brooks

Services are pending at Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory for Sharnene Jay Brooks 63, who passed away Monday, Jan. 31, 2011, at Eastern New Mexico Medical Center. A further announcement will be made once arrangements have been finalized.

made at www.lagronefuneralchapels .com. Arrangements are under the direction of LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Nena Porter

Services are pending at Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory for Nena Porter 87, who passed away Monday, Jan. 31, 2011, at Villa Del Rey. A further announcement will be made once arrangements have been finalized.

Pamela Harvey

Services are pending at LaGrone Funeral Chapel for Pamela Harvey, age 46, of Roswell, who passed away Jan. 30, 2011. Condolences can be made at www.lagronefuneralchapels .com. Arrangements are under the direction of LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Letha Gonzales

Services are pending at LaGrone Funeral Chapel for Letha Gonzales, age 77, of Dexter, who passed away Jan. 31, 2011. Condolences can be

Salvador Barrio Saavedra

A rosary will be recited for Salvador Barrio Saavedra, 25, of Roswell, at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2011, at Anderson Bethany Funeral Home. A funeral Mass will be celebrated at 10 a.m., Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011, at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church with father Juan Gutierrez O.F.M. officiating. Burial will follow at South Park Cemetery. Salvador passed away Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2011, in Denver, Colo. Salvador was born Sept. 30, 1985, to Sylvester Saavedra and Gloria Herrera Saavedra, in Roswell. He married his wife, Crys-

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tal Saavedra, on Jan. 25, 2011, in Denver, Colo. He enjoyed fixing and cruising his cars and listening to music. He loved to spend time outdoors with his family, hunting and camping. He will be greatly missed by all his family and friends. Almighty Father, eternal God, hear our prayers for your son Salvador whom you have called from this life to yourself. Grant him light, happiness, and peace. Let him pass in safely through the gates of Heaven, and live forever with all your saints in the light you promised to Abraham and to all his descendants in faith. Guard him from all harm and on that great day of resurrection and reward raise him up with all your saints. Pardon his sins and give him eternal life in your kingdom. We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen. Those left behind to cherish his memory are his wife, Crystal Saavedra; daughter, Annizette Saavedra; mom, Gloria Lozano; sisters: Yvonne Saavedra and fiancé, Anthony Gonzales, Dalphina Lozano and fiancé, Mark Sanchez, and Desarie Serna; brothers: Louis Lozano and fiancé, Tiffany Armanderez, and Anthony Saavedra Portillo; nephews: Gabriel, Estevan Louis; nieces: and Raenette, Danielle, Daysha

Marriage Licenses Jan. 31 Raul F. Nima Alcedo, 45, of Clovis and Maria L. Trujillo, 46, of Roswell. Accidents Jan. 28 11:14 a.m. — 2801 N. Main St.; driver — Caryn Lucero, 30, and vehicle owned by Claudia Aranda, both of Roswell. 1:43 p.m. — Main and 19th streets; drivers — Norman L. Daniels, 66, and

AP Photo

In this Dec. 6, 2010, photo, a line worker assembles a Dodge Avenger at the Chrysler Sterling Heights Assembly plant in Sterling Heights, Mich. Chrysler significantly narrowed its fourthquarter net loss Monday, as it continues to recover from bankruptcy.

Chrysler on verge of a profit

DETROIT (AP) — Chrysler was collapsing when Fiat took control of the company just 19 months ago. Now, under the Italian automaker’s detail-driven CEO, Chrysler is on the verge of turning its first quarterly profit since its bankruptcy in 2009. Chrysler Group LLC on Monday said it dramatically narrowed its losses in the fourth quarter and 2010. And it predicted net income of $200 million to $500 million for 2011. Chief Executive Sergio Marchionne has transformed Chrysler by managing its smallest details, even picking the music for company presentations. As a result, Chrysler’s vehicles are starting to look and drive better and its costs are under control. Marchionne, 58, a Canada-educated Italian who quickly replaces executives who don’t deliver, has brought back the speed and drive that Chrysler once had. He pushed engineers and designers to bring out 16 new or revamped models in the past year, including 11 in the fourth quarter alone. Last year at this time, many Chrysler, Dodge and Jeep dealers were wondering if they’d even make it through the year. Sales were down and there were few new products on their lots. The company needed a $12.5 billion bailout from the government to survive in 2009. For years, it piled up debt and produced very

few hit cars. Carl Galeana, who runs dealerships in suburban Detroit, Florida and South Carolina, is impressed with the turnaround that Marchionne engineered. “I think this guy is a visionary. He talks about what he needs to do and he goes out and gets it done.” Of the 16 new or revamped models, five were rebuilt from the ground up in under two years, far faster than the nor mal three or four years. They include the 300 big sedan, the Jeep Grand Cherokee and Dodge Durango SUVs, Dodge Charger muscle car and the Fiat 500 minicar. Marchionne allowed engineers to make big changes, even if they added costs, said Doug Verley, chief engineer of the revamped Chrysler 200 midsize car. Engineers were encouraged to make a case for new technology or designs, something that didn’t happen under Chrysler’s previous owners. As a result, the 200 has new features such as LED headlights and a quieter engine mounting system, a big improvement in quality that its predecessor, the Chrysler Sebring, didn’t have. “The answer used to be no,” Verley said. Along with quality, Marchionne pushed the 200 to come out faster. He personally approved the car’s interior in three days, far faster than the two weeks it took under previous CEOs. Chrysler’s new models,

such as the Jeep Grand Cherokee, could give the company a big boost. Sales of the SUV, which came out in June, rose 70 percent last year.

But while Detroit rivals Ford Motor Co. and General Motors Co. are making profits, Chrysler still hasn’t posted a quarterly net income since leaving bankruptcy in June of 2009. It announced a $199 million loss in the fourth quarter. It also lost $652 million in 2010, although the result was a huge improvement over the staggering $8 billion loss the year before.

Chrysler must be profitable before its stock can be sold to the public, a goal for the end of this year.

Roswell Daily Record and Alexas; grandparents: Lupe Herrera and Albert Delgado, Dora Torres, and Sylvester Saavedra; aunts and uncles: Kathy and Richard Sosa, Willie and Lisa Herrera, Angelina Delgado and Joseph Garcia, and Polly Najar; and numerous cousins, close friends, and his best friend who was like a brother, Chris Phillips.

He was preceded in death by his father, Sylvester (Chevy) Saavedra; grandfather, Willie Herrera; grandparents, Lucy and Victor Lara; grandmothers: Juanita Huerta and Frances Herrera; and great-grandfathers: Louis Huerta and Antonio Herrera.

Pallbearers will be Louis Lozano, Mathew Jaramillo, Vino Sosa, Willie Herrera Sr., Willie Herrera Jr., Anthony Gonzales, Chris Phillips and Cruz Herrera.

Honorary pallbearers will be his nephews and nieces: Israel Herrera, Archie Herrera, Albert Anthony Delgado and Erik “Wedo” Anthony.

Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online register book at andersonbethany.com.

Arrangements are under the direction of Anderson Bethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

Chester Calvert, 52, both of Roswell. 1:55 p.m. — Fifth and Main streets; drivers — Luz Baca-Castor, 42, and Cedric Gomez, 18, both of Roswell. 1:55 p.m. — Fifth and Main streets parking lot; drivers — Cesar Leyva, 18, of Roswell and vehicle owned by city of Roswell. 3:21 p.m. — 805 W. 13th St.; drivers — Loy Morgan, 65, and Julia Jewell, 26, both of Roswell.


02-01-2011