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Roswell Daily Record THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

Vol. 122, No. 95 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

INSIDE NEWS

NEW YORK (AP) — A rare earnings miss for IBM tugged the Dow Jones industrial average lower on Friday, while the rest of the market headed toward slight gains after a turbulent week. Quarterly earnings for the country’s largest provider of computer services fell short of forecasts for the first time since 2005. IBM said delays in closing several large ... - PAGE B5

SATURDAY

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Bomb suspect captured

WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) — A 19-year -old Massachusetts college student wanted in the Boston Marathon bombing was captured hiding out in a boat parked in a backyard Friday and his older brother lay dead in a furious 24hour drama that transfixed the nation and paralyzed the Boston area with fear.

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The bloody endgame came four days after the bombing and just a day after the FBI released surveillance-camera images of two young men suspected of planting the pressurecooker explosives that

ripped through the crowd at the marathon finish line, killing three people and wounding more than 180.

The two men were identified by authorities and relatives as ethnic Chechens from southern Russia who had been in the U.S. for about a decade and were believed to be living in Cambridge, Mass. But investigators gave no details on the motive for the bombing. Early Friday mor ning, 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev was killed in a ferocious gun battle and car chase during which he and

his younger brother hurled explosives at police from a stolen car, authorities said. The younger brother managed to escape. During the getaway attempt, the brothers killed an MIT policeman and severely wounded another officer, authorities said. After a tense, all-day manhunt and house-tohouse search by thousands of SWAT team officers with rifles and armored vehicles, Dzhokhar Tsar naev was cornered in a homeowner’s yard, where he exchanged See BOMB, Page A3

AP Photo

People cheer passing police after the arrest of a suspect of the Boston Marathon bombings in Watertown, Mass., Friday.

There’s always Time for CASA Kids ILISSA GILMORE RECORD STAFF WRITER

TOP 5 WEB For The Past 24 Hours

• Curtis fire doused; residents feared worst • Dexter High kids get brutal lesson • Standoff ends peacefully • Detention centers get $5M for renovations • Bulldogs take two from Rockets

INSIDE SPORTS

Mark Wilson Photo

Gabriella Sing exits a photo booth with her 1-month-old brother Nicky during the 11th annual CASA Make Time for Kids, Friday, at the Roswell Convention Center.

ENGELHARD HEADED TO ADAMS STATE Few, if any, prep golfers in the state of New Mexico work harder at the game than Goddard senior Emilee Engelhard. She’s constantly on the course, on the range or on the putting green working at improving her skills. The hard work has translated into two district individual titles and two appearances on the all-state team. On Friday, it translated into a full-ride scholarship to Adams State University in Alamosa, Colo. - PAGE B1

TODAY’S OBITUARIES • Clarabel Tanner • Judy Hale • Horace Edward Tays - PAGE A5

HIGH ...83˚ LOW ....47˚

TODAY’S FORECAST

Members of the Roswell community packed the city’s Convention and Civic Center Friday night to help the Chaves County CASA program raise funds during the annual Make Time for Kids clock auction. The brainchild of Dr. Mike Taylor, of Taylor Orthodontics, the event benefits CASA’s services and featured more than 200 one-of-a-kind clocks made by artisans, crafters and community members. Taylor said every year the community’s reaction to the event has been “pretty phenomenal.” “CASA has so much support,” he said. “This event makes everyone feel welcome and there’s just an outpouring of generosity from the community. Even when the economy was really tight, it was still See CASA, Page A3

James M. Hudson takes Hospice more than ‘end of life care’ 5th District Court bench

Courtesy Photo

Judge James M. Hudson

JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

More than 150 people squeezed into Courtroom 1 inside the Chaves County District Court, Friday, to

witness the formal investiture of Judge James M. Hudson, who is taking over for late Judge Ralph D. Shamas. Many had traveled a distance to attend the event. His sister came from Nevada. District Court judges and Appeals Court judges arrived from Eddy and Lea counties and from Carlsbad. Hudson told the Daily Record, “I am extremely honored to have been appointed by Gov. Susana Martinez as 5th District Court judge. I am grateful for her confidence in my ability to serve in this important position. I have a great example to follow the in late Honorable Ralph Shamas. Now, as I take the See HUDSON, Page A3

AMY VOGELSANG RECORD STAFF WRITER

Hospice is a program that is often misunderstood, but the staff at VistaCare Hospice is attempting to debunk myths and reveal that hospice is not just “end of life care” but a community to help individuals and their families with a final journey, said Chaplain Cecil Kimberlin and social worker Bev Bucklew. Started in 1995, VistaCare Hospice, 400 N. Pennsylvania Ave., is a leading hospice provider in 14 states, and according to their website, their goal is to meet spiritual, physical and emotional needs of all patients. “The definition of hospice, as I see it, is if a dis-

Amy Vogelsang Photo

VistaCare volunteers do everything from office work to visiting patients. Pictured from left to right: Norma Hannah, Kathy Rumbaugh, Sally Pretti, Durema Kestner, Lisa Ballard, Penny Briseno, Dennis Pollock, Lynn Moore, Cecil Kimberlin, June Stanley, Marilyn Briseno, the Rev. Bob Tally and Twilla Barnett. Not pictured: Nina Morales, Anna Pollock, Geri Toro, Chris Clemenza, Mildred Plato and Connie Holston.

ease follows its normal course, you will die in six months,” Bucklew said. “But rarely do diseases

follow a normal course.” And not only have peoSee HOSPICE, Page A2

Hispano Chamber president Romo Villegas enjoys community involvement JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

CLASSIFIEDS..........B6 COMICS.................B4 FINANCIAL .............B5 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........A8 LOTTERIES ............A2 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8

INDEX

Romo Villegas

Family, service and community provide a foundation for life for Hispano Chamber of Commerce president Romo Villegas. He says his six-year-old son, Dominic, a big motivator. “My son and I buy bundles of gloves and hats every Christmas, and we will go out and pass them around to the homeless. It’s part of teaching him to give back to the community.” The Villegas family Christmas tradition also includes taking his son to Ruidoso to cut down the Christmas tree. Villegas was born in Las Cruces and came to Roswell with his family when he was two years old. He attended El Capitan Elementary,

Sierra Middle School and Goddard High School, graduating in 1989. Villegas was involved in sports in high school and remains so to this day. The entire family enjoys sports. “My son and I snow ski and water ski. My son wants to learn racquetball. My wife of 19 years, LaDawn ran in track during high school.” Villegas is a member of the Noon Optimists. He is on the board of the S.O.Y. Mariachi. He coaches golf and Little League baseball. He

is involved in the HOSTS program. “It stands for Help One Student To Succeed.” He goes into Washington Elementary every Thursday and reads to first-grade students from 8:15 - 8:45 a.m. “It’s great for the students.” He referred to children as the hope of future. “It’s all about the children. Anything I can do, in some small part, to give them a See SPOTLIGHT, Page A2


A2 Saturday, April 20, 2013

GENERAL

Gov names insurance regulator panelists SANTA FE (AP) — Health care and insurance industry officials and a state legislator were named by Gov. Susana Martinez on Friday to a panel that will select New Mexico’s newly independent insurance regulator. A nine-member committee will name the superintendent of insurance to run an independent regulatory office starting in July. The Public Regulation Commission currently picks the insurance superintendent, who oversees insurance prices and policies. The governor appointed: •Republican Rep. Zach Cook, a Ruidoso lawyer. •Babette Saenz, who is academic dean at Southwest Acupuncture College in Albuquerque. •Gabriel Parra of Albuquerque, a lawyer for Presbyterian Healthcare Services. •Norm Becker, president and CEO of New Mexico MutualVoters approved a constitutional amendment to establish an independent insurance regulator, removing those opera-

tions from the five-member elected PRC. The Legislative Council, a group made up of House and Senate leaders and rank-and-file lawmakers, will appoint four members of the selection committee. A member is ninth appointed by others on the panel. The council meets later this month and could make its appointments then. A new state law requires lawmakers and the gover nor to each appoint two members representing the insurance industry and two members representing consumers. The Legislature approved a measure this year to implement the constitutional amendment and establish the committee that will pick the insurance superintendent, who can be removed by the panel for incompetence, willful neglect of duty or malfeasance in office. The insurance superintendent initially will serve a ter m expiring Dec. 31, 2015, and then the regulator will be appointed by the panel to four-year terms.

Perps nick game, purse, Bible

•Police were called to the 1400 block of South Garden Avenue, Thursday, after subjects entered two vehicles. From one they took a video game valued at $135; from the second, a purse and a Bible. •Police were dispatched to the 3400 block of South Union Avenue, Thursday. When officers arrived, they found that someone had cut the lock on a garage and took four window air conditioning units, two large and two small, valued at $900. •Police responded to a call in the 1800 block of South Pennsylvania

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Avenue, Thursday, where subjects gained access to a vehicle through an unsecured window and removed some tools, a pair of binoculars and jumper cables. The losses were estimated at $170. Anyone having information about these or any other crimes is asked to contact Crime Stoppers, 888-594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward.

CORRECTION

Friday’s story about the Chaves County Board of Commissioners incorrectly stated that Commissioner Kim Chesser said two Southwestern gray wolves had already been re-released into the wild. Chesser said the wolves have not yet been released, though there have been indications of plans to release them later this month. The Record regrets the error.

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Roswell Daily Record

Texas town grieves for dead first-responders WEST, Texas (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Buck Uptmor didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to go to West Fertilizer Co. when the fire started. He wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a firefighter like his brother and cousin, who raced toward the plant. But a ranch of horses next to the flames needed to be moved to safety. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He went to help a friend,â&#x20AC;? said Joyce Marek, Uptmorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aunt. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And then it blew.â&#x20AC;? Two days after the fertilizer facility exploded in a blinding fireball, authorities announced Friday that they had recovered 14 bodies, confirming for the first time an exact number of people killed. Grieving relatives filed into a church of fering comfort for families, as volunteers nearby handed out food to those still unable to return to homes damaged by the massive blast. Ten of the dead were first-responders â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including five from the West Volunteer Fire Department and four emergency medics, West Mayor Tommy Muska said. The dead included Uptmor and Joey Pustejovsky, the city secretary

Hospice

Continued from Page A1

ple receiving VistaCare Hospice care lived for more than six months, some have lived for three years or longer or even â&#x20AC;&#x153;graduatedâ&#x20AC;? and left hospice care, said staf f worker April Meagher. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the end of the road, â&#x20AC;&#x153; Meagher said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But when they come in their symptoms improve because they receive proper care.â&#x20AC;? One man even wanted a T-shirt proclaiming: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I graduated from VistaCare Hospice,â&#x20AC;? Kimberlin said. The relationships staff builds with each other as well as with patients and their families is the most rewarding part of the job, said Chaplain Herb Gage. Bucklew once worked with a lady who had no friends or family and was â&#x20AC;&#x153;rude and hostile to all of us,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I finally found out that she liked dominoes. So I spent the last year playing dominoes with her. And about three days before she died, she asked if I would play dominoes with her, and I was able to be there with her for most of her last three days.â&#x20AC;? These rewarding relationships, though, are also the hardest part of

who doubled as a member of the West Volunteer Fire Department. A captain of the Dallas Fire Department who was off-duty at the time but responded to the fire to help also died. The explosion was strong enough to register as a small earthquake and could be heard for many miles across the Texas prairie. It demolished nearly everything for several blocks around the plant. More than 200 people were hurt, and Muska said five first-responders were among those who remained hospitalized Friday. The first-responders â&#x20AC;&#x153;knew it was dangerous. They knew that thing could go up at any time,â&#x20AC;? said Ronnie Sykora, who was Pustejovskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deacon at St. Mary of the Assumption Catholic Church. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But they also knew that if they could extinguish that fire before it went up, that they could save tens of lives, hundreds of lives. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why they were in there.â&#x20AC;? Following a tour of the rubble Friday, Gov. Rick Perry told reporters the search-and-rescue phase

the job. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s emotionally draining,â&#x20AC;? Kimberlin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saying goodbye (is hard). In one way or another you get attached to patients. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the loss of a friend.â&#x20AC;? In order to help with the grief VistaCare Hospice is presenting â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moving On,â&#x20AC;? a bereavement support group for anyone in the community, whether involved with hospice or not. Unlike many other hospice programs, VistaCare has depth, Bucklew said. Not only do they have nurses, but also family physicians, chaplains, social workers, bereavement coordinators and volunteers. The volunteers are another aspect that distinguishes Vista Care from other hospice programs. The local volunteers do everything from fixing patientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; porches and bringing flowers to patients, to sitting with people who canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be alone and helping with office paperwork. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our volunteers do excellent, excellent service,â&#x20AC;? Meagher said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They go above and beyond. â&#x20AC;&#x153; Ultimately, hospice is not just a place to go before dying, but a family and support group. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here to walk those family members home,â&#x20AC;? Kimberlin said.

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for anyone still trapped was largely finished. He said the state would offer help to the 29-member local fire department that had been â&#x20AC;&#x153;basically wiped out.â&#x20AC;? In a town of just 2,800 people, everyone here knew someone affected by the explosion. Officials offered reassurances Friday about the 60 or so people listed as unaccounted for after the blast. McLennan County Judge Scott Felton said many people on the list probably lost their homes and have simply been difficult to locate since the Wednesday evening accident. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to eliminate 99 percentâ&#x20AC;? of those listed, he said. The fertilizer facility stores and distributes anhydrous ammonia, a fertilizer that can be injected into soil. It also mixes other fertilizers. Plant owner Donald Adair released a statement saying he never would forget the â&#x20AC;&#x153;selfless sacrifice of first-responders who died trying to protect all of us.â&#x20AC;? One of the plant

Spotlight Continued from Page A1

better skills.â&#x20AC;? Villegas service to his community began in 1993 when he went into the Army. He did two tours of duty in Saudi Arabia and left the military in 1997. He attended New Mexico State University on the GI Bill and received a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in criminal justice. He worked for DoĂąa Ana County Detention Center for a year as he studied for his degree. He was employed in state government. He retur ned to Roswell and eventually applied for a federal job. Villegas started his own insurance agency, Romo Villegas Insurance, 416 N. Richardson, and began pursuing other interests formerly denied him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While working for state and federal government, I was not allowed to get involved in politics.â&#x20AC;? He agreed with the policy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important for a government official to be neutral.â&#x20AC;? It is a policy he maintains to this day with the Hispano Chamber of Commerce. Villegas became president in 2012. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We try to keep the (Hispano) Chamber nonpartisan.â&#x20AC;? According to Villegas, the primary purpose of the HCOC is to promote small

employees also was killed responding to the fire, Adair said.

Federal investigators and the state fire marshalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of fice began inspecting the blast site Friday to collect evidence that may point to a cause.

Franceska Perot, a spokeswoman for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, said Friday evening that investigators still were combing through debris and would continue today.

Residents cannot return to their homes until investigators are finished, Perot said. She did not have a timetable on when that might be.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re moving as fast as we can,â&#x20AC;? Perot said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want them working at night because things can be missed.â&#x20AC;?

Texas Sens. John Cor nyn and Ted Cruz, who toured the town Friday, said they would wait for more infor mation about the explosion before considering whether there should be more regulation of anhydrous ammonia.

businesses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Both Chambers do that, but we serve a different demographic, but we encourage everybody to be members of both.â&#x20AC;?

Currently Villegas is taking the Leadership Roswell course with the Roswell Chamber of Commerce. He is enjoying the course and will complete it in May. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We went to the dairy, the university (ENMU-R) and the (Chaves County) Detention Center. My hatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s off to the guys of Probation and Parole. They are doing a great job.â&#x20AC;?

The group also went up to Santa Fe for the start of the new session, where Villegas and the other participants got a chance to talk to the state representatives and Senators.

Villegas views his work with both Chambers as investment in Roswell and the future, providing a strong community to hand to do the young. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all part of giving back to the community. We want our small businesses here to succeed.â&#x20AC;?

In the future, he plans to start working with veterans, particularly the homeless. He spoke of the high rate of homelessness among former armed forces personnel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would like to support our local veterans, especially our new vets coming out of Iraq.â&#x20AC;? j.palmer@rdrnews.com

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Ready to do the Lordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work Eager to help anyone in need Devoted to her family Radiant with her beautiful smile Owned her responsibilities Strength, wisdon and courage Endless love she has given to her family Forever in our hearts. We Love You Mom. Miss your beautiful smile. 6/2/29-4/20/12 Roswell Daily Record

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Roswell Daily Record

Bomb

Continued from Page A1

gunfire with police while holed up in a boat, authorities said. He was taken away on a stretcher and was hospitalized in serious condition with unspecified injuries, police said. Police said three other people were taken into custody for questioning at an off-campus housing complex at the University of the Massachusetts at Dartmouth where the younger man may have lived. Up until the younger man’s capture, it was looking like a grim day for police. As night fell, they announced that they were scaling back the hunt and lifting the stay-indoors order across Boston and some of its suburbs because they had come up empty-handed. But then a break came in a Watertown neighborhood when a homeowner saw blood on his boat, pulled back the tarp and saw the bloody suspect inside, police said. The search for the younger brother all but paralyzed the Boston area for much of the day. Officials shut down all mass transit, including Amtrak trains to New York, advised businesses not to open, and warned close to 1 million people in the entire city and some of its suburbs to stay inside and unlock

CASA

Continued from Page A1

a good year for fundraising.”

Taylor said designing clocks allowed all kinds of people to get involved and be creative. The silent auction featured clocks made using everything imaginable — fire extinguishers, tree bark, teddy bears, Gar field comic strips and even a coffeepot from 1912.

Artist Agnes Bonham’s Day of the Dead-inspired clock “Til You Are Blue in the Face,” featured a mask based on an imprint of her daughter’s face.

Hudson

Continued from Page A1

Bench, I look forward to the opportunity to serve in the 5th Judicial District.” Hudson has been a practicing attorney since 1984 when he became a part of Hinkle Hensley Shanor & Martin, L.L.P. Partner Richard E. Olson spoke first, telling the crowd that he had worked with Hudson since 1984. “When he moved to Roswell, I gave him the moniker Jim Bob, so he had a name that allowed him to fit into Roswell culture. I believe he was the first man in Chaves County to wear Spandex.” On a more serious note, Olson said, “I and my partners feel a great sense of loss. ... We have come to rely on his wisdom, and we feel a sense of joy that his wisdom will now be present in District Court.” Fellow Roswell attorney Kelly Cassels offered his condolences to Olson, saying, “I’ll help with your bail hearing.” He then directed his comments to the group. “Really, Jim looks great in Spandex.” Drew Cloutier of the New Mexico State Bar quipped, “Jim is a humble man, he has a lot to be humble about.” After the gentle ribbing, Hudson thanked his former law partners, was sworn in

their doors only for uniformed police. Authorities said the man dubbed Suspect No. 1 — the one in sunglasses and a dark baseball cap in the surveillance-camera pictures — was Tamerlan Tsarnaev, while Suspect No. 2, the one in a white baseball cap worn backward, was his younger brother. Exactly how the long night of crime began was unclear. But police said the brothers carjacked a man in a Mercedes-Benz in Cambridge, just across the Charles River from Boston, released him then unharmed at a gas station. They also shot to death a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer, 26-year -old Sean Collier, while he was responding to a report of a disturbance, investigators said. The search for the Mercedes led to a chase that ended in Watertown, where authorities said the suspects threw explosive devices from the car and exchanged gunfire with police. A transit police officer, 33-year -old Richard Donohue, was shot and critically wounded, authorities said. Some 200 spent shells were found afterward. Dzhokhar Tsar naev somehow slipped away. He ran over his already wounded brother as he fled, according to two law enforcement officials who spoke on condition of In addition, a live auction featured artwork as well as luxurious and recreational items and activities with auctioneers Larry Hobson and Shawn Hall breathlessly calling for bids. Attendees also could enter raf fles for baskets stuf fed with goodies from Maker’s Mark Whiskey, Chi Hair products and Coca-Cola. All items came from donations of community members and organizations, said CASA Executive Director Carrie-Leigh Cloutier. “CASA is so grateful to this community,” she said, noting that this year the event saw a record number of donations and attendees. and given his robes. Hudson has many years of experience. He attended the University of Notre Dame in 1980 and graduated from the University of New Mexico School of Law in 1984. His credentials include court admissions in New Mexico, Texas, U.S. District Courts in both New Mexico and Texas, Federal Claims Courts, along with 10th Circuit and Federal Circuit Court of Appeals. “What I bring to the office is a breadth of experience. I did primarily civil litigation, commercial property claims, employment litigation, civil rights, property disputes and estate litigation. This has given me the opportunity to work in a lot of different courts, such as federal court in Washington, D.C. ... My experience has also given me the chance to see dif ferent judges in action and observe how they operate,” Hudson said. He expressed his appreciation of his predecessor. “I have big shoes to fill in Ralph Shamas.” The event was also attended by Shamas’ wife Elizabeth Shamas. Hudson has already has taken over Shamas’ docket after taking the oath of office on April 1. He said the 5th District Court has presented him with an interesting mix of law. “The criminal has its own procedures, civil law has it own

GENERAL

anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the investigation. At some point, he abandoned his car and ran away. Tamerlan Tsarnaev died at a Boston hospital after suffering what doctors said were multiple gunshot wounds and a possible blast injury. The brothers had built an arsenal of pipe bombs, grenades and improvised explosive devices and used some of the weapons in trying to make their getaway, said Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger, D-Md., a member of the House Intelligence Committee. Tamerlan Tsarnaev had studied accounting as a part-time student at Bunker Hill Community College in Boston for three semesters from 2006 to 2008, the school said. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was registered as a student at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Students said he was on campus this week after the Boston Marathon bombing. The campus closed down Friday along with colleges around the Boston area. The city of Cambridge announced two years ago that it had awarded a $2,500 scholarship to him. At the time, he was a senior at Cambridge Rindge & Latin School, a highly regarded public school whose alumni include Matt Damon, Ben Affleck and NBA Hall of Famer Patrick Ewing. For more than 25 years, the non-profit has worked to repair the lives of high-risk, abused and neglected children and provides resources that enable them to lead safe, healthy lives. Since the recession, the organization has seen a number of funding cuts, Cloutier said, but the event will help CASA continue to provide services for more than 1,400 children. “Thank you for supporting our kids,” she told the crowd. “They really need it.” For more information about CASA, call 6250112 or visit casakids. org.

igilmore@rdrnews.com

procedures and family law has its own procedures. I’m enjoying the challenge.” He sees his new offices as an extension of the law, where he said he is always learning. “It is viewed from a dif ferent perspective. There’s a sense of accomplishment. Suddenly you’re a judge and you’re starting a new, long journey.” Hudson is also trained mediator and lectures on issues of oil and gas acquisitions, joint operating agreements and employment interviews. Hudson is religious man. He quoted Leviticus after the ceremony. He teaches Bible classes and is involved in Student Community Bible Study as regional director of the Nation Servant Team. Hudson is also a member of the Founding Commission of Valley Christian Academy. A long-time member of the Chamber of Commerce, he became the first vice president of the Commerce Executive Committee in 2012. Hudson is a devoted cyclist, hence, the repeated reference to Spandex. He is a proud father and his daughters held the Bible as he took his oath of office. He spoke with affection of his girls. “I have two daughters, one 22 and one 18. They are the joy of my life.”

j.palmer@rdrnews.com

Saturday, April 20, 2013

A3


A4 Saturday, April 20, 2013

OPINION

Roswell Daily Record

Women leaders, it’s time to make history—again

When Margaret Thatcher died recently, it was shocking to realize that she became Great Britain’s first female prime minister almost 34 years ago. Today, 17 nations, from Brazil and Bangladesh to Liberia and Lithuania, are led by women. South Korea swore in its first female president, Park Geunhye, in February. But in the United States, we’re still waiting. That’s why Hillary Clinton’s possible bid for the White House in 2016 is already stirring so much speculation. When she ran against Barack Obama in 2008, they were both aiming to become the first non-white male to run the country. But only one could succeed. Now it’s time for the other barrier to fall. Now it’s time for a woman president, and not just on TV (Geena Davis played President Mackenzie Allen in the short-lived series “Commander in Chief” several years ago). Many of Clinton’s close friends think she shares that

sense of history and will try again. “I think she wants very much to see a woman president in her lifetime,” one of her chief advisers, Harold Ickes, told the New York Times. “If you look at the landscape right now, there’s only one person who has a real shot at that.” While we strongly endorse the idea of a woman in the Oval Office, it doesn’t have to be Hillary. She’d be 69 when she moved in, and since we’re both about that age right now, we’re painfully aware of the flaws and frailties that come with longevity. More seriously, she’s lived a public life for many years, she’s served her country well, and she has a right to say no. But don’t bet on it. For one thing, Ickes is correct. No other woman seems ready to make a serious run. Among the Democrats, younger senators like Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota (52) and Kirsten Gillibrand of New York (46) have bright futures but low national profiles. The only Demo-

cratic woman holding a governor’s chair, New Hampshire’s Maggie Hassan, took office in January. Republicans have more female bench strength, starting with Governors Nikki Haley of South Carolina and Susana Martinez of New Mexico. But the GOP is still suffering from Sarah Syndrome, a political malady caused when a youthful woman governor is pushed ahead before she’s ready. Clinton would make a much better candidate the second time around. In 2008, she was still defined as Bill Clinton’s wife. After four years as secretary of state, she has largely shed that baggage and emerged as a strong, independent figure in her own right. In a recent Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll, her favorability rating was 69 percent. Obama adviser David Plouffe, who helped engineer her defeat five years ago, recently called her “by far the most interesting candidate and probably the strongest candidate” in the field.

In 2008, Clinton ran a top-down campaign while Obama ran one from the bottom up. Plouffe & Co. understood the primary system far better than Team Hillary and encouraged volunteers to organize themselves in every state. One example of the result: Obama clobbered Clinton in Idaho, winning 15 delegates to her 3. Hillary won Ohio by 9 points, but her marginal advantage in delegates was less than Obama’s in Idaho, 74 to 67. The Clintonistas won’t make that same mistake again. A political action committee called Ready for Hillary is already organizing on the Obama model: raising money, creating social networks and gathering email addresses and phone numbers of potential supporters. The group’s communications director, Seth Bringman, boasted earlier this month that it “has been expanding its social media base at the rate of one new person every 14 seconds.” ABC says Hillary’s Facebook fan club exceeds 100,000 and 55,000

follow her on Twitter. A Quinnipiac poll has her leading New Jersey Governor Chris Christie by 7 points and Senator Marco Rubio of Florida by twice that amount. So is she a lock? Of course not. Clinton remains a highly polarizing figure who can organize opponents as well as supporters. After all, she did lose in 2008 and still has to prove she can connect on a personal level with the suburban swing voters who decide national elections. But Maggie Thatcher was actually a latecomer. Sirimavo Bandaranaike first led Sri Lanka in 1960; Indira Gandhi became prime minister of India in 1966; Golda Meir took power in Israel three years later. Barack Obama’s daughters are growing up with a president who shares their color but not their gender. It’s time to make history. Again. (Steve and Cokie Roberts can be contacted by email at stevecokie@gmail.com.)

EDITORIAL

Gun vote was a beginning, not an end

When President Barack Obama on Thursday in Boston referred to “small, stunted individuals who would destroy instead of build,” he was talking about terrorists. He was talking about the person or people who planted the two bombs that destroyed the pure joy of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing three, injuring dozens, jarring the national consciousness. But the president could just as easily have been talking about the cowards in the U.S. Senate who the day before killed what was at most a minimalist attempt to bring some level of sanity to the nation’s gun debate. Had the traditional rules of parliamentary procedure been in place, the Senate actually would have passed a bill to expand gun background checks to include online sales and gun shows. The proposal, among the weakest of possible gun control proposals, was supported by a clear majority, 54-46. But because Senate leaders had to agree to a 60vote threshold just to get Republicans to allow the measure to come to the floor, it failed. Here’s the most important element of that vote: It didn’t fail after a long debate. It didn’t fail on its merits. It failed because Republicans — most of them anyway — were more interested in lying about the bill than passing sound public policy. Here’s Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri, for instance, talking about his no vote on Fox News: “It potentially could lead to a gun registry.” That, to borrow one of Obama’s words from his angry Wednesday speech, is just a lie. There is nothing in the background check bill that would, potentially or otherwise, create a gun registry. There is nothing in the bill that would do anything to diminish Second Amendment rights to “keep and bear arms.” There is nothing in the bill that is worth a no vote unless you are a fully owned subsidiary of the National Rifle Association. Blunt is. He even voted against allowing the gun control legislation to be debated. So are most of the other Republicans who voted against the bill and the four Democrats who joined them. Three of the four are up for re-election next yea They’re cowards. All of them. Their no votes are not the biggest problem. The fact that they won’t debate the issue on its merits and invent straw men to obfuscate their true intentions is the bigger issue. This is what is wrong with the Senate, what’s wrong with Congress, what’s wrong with America. It’s bigger than guns, or immigration, or debt ceilings. We have become so afraid to call a lie a lie (and we include ourselves in that), that “spin” has become an accepted part of the political process. Enough is enough. The Greek philosopher Plato told us that, “The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men.” In other words, we deserve the Congress we’re stuck with. For too long, the great American middle has ceded the playing field. It’s time to take it back. It’s time to rally behind Democrats like Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri and Republicans like Sen. Mark Kirk of Illinois, who took courageous votes on the background check legislation, standing with the 91 percent of Americans who believe it’s reasonable to check gun buyers for felony or mental health backgrounds that might disqualify them from ownership. As former Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords wrote in the New York Times on Thursday, the nation should “not rest until we have righted the wrong these senators have done.” What those senators did was small. It was stunted. It destroyed the hope of victims of Newtown and Aurora that our broken Congress can ever break out of its dysfunction and serve a needy nation. Wednesday’s vote wasn’t the end. It was the beginning. It was a reset of the national debate. It’s time for a new beginning, and Obama has to lead us there. He’ll need moms. He’ll need sons and daughters. He’ll need politicians unafraid of the next election. “We’ll pick ourselves up,” the president told Bostonians on Thursday. “We’ll keep going. We’ll finish the race.” The St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The dangers of having sympathy for the Devil As this column has been reporting, there is a growing movement in America to “reform” the nation’s tough laws against drug dealing. The pressure is coming primarily from liberal and libertarian groups who see the use of narcotics as a personal choice, something that freedom should allow. That opinion is fallacious in the extreme because of the public safety issue involved. In 2010, more than 38,000 people died in the USA from drug overdoses — far more than have been killed in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars combined. If you combine two

Doonesbury

DEAR DOCTOR K: These days everything in the supermarket claims to contain whole grains, from sugary cereals to my favorite chips. How do I know which foods are healthy whole grains? DEAR READER: “Whole grain” has become a healthyeating buzz-phrase, and food companies aren’t shy about using it. But some of the products we buy may not deliver the healthful wholegrain goodness we’re expecting. And if sugary cereals can tout themselves as a wholegrain food, there’s something amiss. Wheat, rice, barley and oats are all grains used to create bread, cereals and pasta. If those grains are processed

BILL O’REILLY SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

years’ worth of drug overdoses, you get more deaths than occurred during the Vietnam War. The Department of Health estimates that an astounding 22 million Americans, ages 12 and older, currently need rehabilitation for substance

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

heavily before the bread, cereals or pasta are made (such as in white bread or white rice) they’re called “refined” grains. The processing that leads to refined grains removes fiber — and iron and B vitamins — from the grain. If you see the term “enriched grains” on a package, it means the fiber is still gone, but some iron and B vitamins

abuse. Also, a variety of studies say that up to 70 percent of all child abuse and neglect cases are caused by parents who are involved with drugs. Still think drug abuse is a victimless crime? The pro-drug people often point to alcohol to make their legalization case. Why should one intoxicating agent be legal while another is not? But everybody knows you can have a beer or a glass of wine without losing sobriety, right? The sole reason for ingesting narcotics is to alter consciousness. It is the apple compared to the booze orange.

Comparing drugs to alcohol is an invalid comparison. People who sell drugs such as cocaine, meth, heroin and other opiates are certainly committing a violent act. They are delivering an agent of destruction to another person. Not everyone who uses hard drugs becomes addicted, but millions do. There is a reason certain substances are categorized as “dangerous drugs.” But to hear the pro-drug people tell it, the pushers are victims because some of them are drug addicted themselves. I guess when you become an

have been added back. So what’s the best way to identify a healthful wholegrain food? Use the 10:1 rule: For every 10 grams of carbohydrate, there should be at least one gram of fiber. Why a ratio of 10-to-1? That’s about the ratio of carbohydrate to fiber in a genuine whole grain — unprocessed wheat. Let’s say the Nutrition Facts label on a package shows that one serving of a whole-grain roll has 23 grams of carbohydrate. Divide that by 10 to get 2.3. It also has 5 grams of dietary fiber, which is bigger than 2.3. That signals a healthful whole-grain food. (I’ve put a sample Nutrition Facts label, along with an explanation of how to calcu-

late the carbohydrate-to-fiber ratio, on my website, AskDoctorK.com.) Intact grains — wheat berries, oat berries, brown rice and quinoa, for example — are the best source of whole grains. Ground whole grains come next, as long as they still deliver a good dose of fiber. To find those, use the 10:1 carbohydrate-to-fiber rule. What’s the good of eating whole grains? Because they have more vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Even more important, they are digested more slowly. When you eat a refined grain, there is a sudden surge of sugar in your

See O’REILLY, Page A5

See DR. K, Page A5


OPINION/OBITUARIES/NATION

Roswell Daily Record

OBITUARIES

Clarabel Tanner

Judy Hale

Services are pending at LaGrone Funeral Chapel for Judy Hale, 66, of Roswell, who passed away on April 17, 2013. A complete announcement will be made when arrangements are finalized. Condolences can be offered online at lagronefuneralchapels.com. Arrangements are under the personal directions of the professionals at LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

A funeral service is scheduled for 10 a.m., Saturday, April 20, 2013, at Ballard Chapel, for Clarabel Tanner, 94, who passed away on Sunday, April 14, 2013, in Florida. The Rev. Dr. Doug Mills of First United Methodist Church will be officiating with burial to follow in South Park Cemetery. Clarabel was born Sept. 30, 1918, in Kansas City, Mo., to James Elbert Weir and Mary Brevard Dunson. Her parents preceded her in death. Those left to cherish her memory are her sons, Richard Tanner, of Dallas, and Robert Tanner, of Atlanta; her daughter, Virginia Tanner, of Miami; her nephew John Camp, of Albuquerque; two grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. Clarabel graduated from University of Southern California, and received her master’s degree in library science in 1963. She later received her Ph.D. in library science from Texas Christian University. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at ballardfuneralhome.com.

O’Reilly

Horace Edward Tays

1934-2013 LOS LUNAS — Ed was born in Roswell, on May 15, 1934, where he grew up and went to school. He passed away on April 18, 2013. He served in the U.S. Navy from May 1953 until June 1956, when he was released to inactive duty until June 1960, when he was honorably discharged. He was awarded the National Defense Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, and the Korean Service Medal while he served in the Navy. Ed worked at Glover Packing Co. upon his return from service. He then worked for the USDA as a meat compliance of ficer until his retirement. The family moved around the country for his job with the USDA until finally settling in

being sentenced to decades in the slammer, cocaine use dropped 71 percent.

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addict you get a get-out-of-jail-free card. Don’t blame drug users for stealing, dealing or mugging. They shouldn’t be held accountable for criminal behavior, because they have a disease! In one of the most absurd things I’ve seen in a long time, celebrities including Will Smith, Cameron Diaz, Jamie Foxx, Kim Kardashian and Jim Carrey signed a letter to President Obama asking him to “address the increased incarceration rates for nonviolent crimes.” Nonviolent crimes? Are you kidding me? Ask a parent whose son or daughter is in the cemetery because of an overdose whether drug pushers are committing “nonviolent” crimes. Since the U.S. began sentencing drug dealers to major prison time (circa 1979), the country’s violent crime rate has fallen more than 32 percent. Once vicious crack cocaine traffickers began

Dr. K

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blood. That stresses your pancreas, which has a hard time making enough insulin to drive all of the sugar into your cells for energy. The excess sugar gets turned into fat. In fact, people who eat lots of refined grains and few whole grains are more likely to become obese and to develop

25 YEARS AGO

Bosque Farms. After moving to Bosque Farms, Ed became a member of the Bosque Far ms Citizens Patrol, Roadrunner Riding Club and the Bosque Farms Rodeo Association. Ed married the love of his life Patricia Ann (Dyson) Tays on Aug. 22, 1956, and from this union three children were born: Lori Ann (John) Bell, Krista Kay Tays and Stanley Edward (Julie) Tays. He is also survived by five grandchildren: Amanda Kaye (Joe) Norine, Philip Edward (Brandy) Durbin, Alyssia Marie Tays, Stanley Patrick Tays and Hunter Edward Tays. Great-grandchildren: Garret Michael Norine, Wyatt Raymond Norine. Cheyann Marie Durbin, T rinity Leeann Durbin, Colton Philip Durbin, Gaige Brennan Tays and Connor Patrick Tays. Ed is survived by sisters Juanita Garrett and Nor man Evans, brother Tommy Dean Tays and sister-in-law Shirley Tays. Ed was preceded in death by his mother Maude Tays Ross, father Moma Duke Tays, step-father Bud Ross, brothers Stanley Tays and James Duke Tays and sister, Dorothy Stof f. Ed’s greatest joys in life were his family, hunting, fishing, working in his yard and spending time with his grandchildren and his great-grandchildren. He was adored by numerous friends and acquaintances who had the privilege to be included in his life. He touched the lives of everyone he met. A Celebration of Life will be announced and held at a later date. Please visit the online guest register for Mr. Tays at riversidefunerals.com. Arrangements entrusted to Riverside Funeral Home of Los Lunas, 820 Main St NE, Los Lunas, NM 505565-1700.

April 20, 1987 Two Roswell girls have been accepted to compete in pageants to be held in Santa Fe, Friday and Saturday. Nicole Danielle Farmer, 5, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Farmer of Roswell, a preschool student at Central Day Care, has been named a state finalist in the Miss American Princess Pageant. Miss Farmer is also the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. G.S. Farmer and Mr. and Mrs. Dan Baiza of Roswell. Kim Winnie, 17, daughter of Paul Winnie of Roswell and Carol Winnie of Roswell has been accepted as a state finalist in the Miss New Mexico American Coed Pageant. Miss Winnie is a junior at Goddard High School. She is involved in student government, is a member of the Honor Society, Drama Club, French Club, and Varsity Club.

But now the Hollywood pinheads and many other Americans want those tough mandatory sentences repealed.

That is sympathy for the devil. But we are living in strange times. Let’s hope Kim Kardashian isn’t appointed attorney general.

Veteran TV news anchor Bill O’Reilly is host of the Fox News show “The O’Reilly Factor” and author of the book “Pinheads and Patriots: Where You Stand in the Age of Obama.” To find out more about Bill O’Reilly, and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate web page at creators.com. This column originates on the website billoreilly.com. Copyright 2013 BillOReilly.com

diabetes and heart disease. People who eat mainly whole grains and keep their total calories in check are more likely to lose weight. I’m not preaching; I’m giving you advice proven to improve your health. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)

BRIDGE WINNERS

The Pecos Valley Duplicate Bridge Club has announced its winners for the week of March 31 - April 6. Monday, April 1; 3 tables First place overall winners were Rose Caldwell and Claribel Marshall; in second Mary Ann Bosch and Nancy Lynd. Saturday, April 10; 3.5 tables First place overall winners were James Valdez and Loy Valdez; in second Pat Davidson and Idamaye Sanders; in third Claribel Marshall and Judy Farley. Anyone interested in playing duplicate bridge is invited to call Arthur Brown at 627-2268.

Ge t Cla ssified

Saturday, April 20, 2013

A5

Simpson and Bowles offer modified budget plan WASHINGTON (AP) — The chairmen of President Barack Obama’s 2010 fiscal commission are wading back into Washington’s budget wars with a revised, somewhat milder plan to rein in intractable federal deficits. The plan released Thursday by and former Sen. Alan Simpson, RWyo., and former Clinton White House chief of staff Erskine Bowles would lop more than $5 trillion from deficits over the upcoming decade when combined with the deficit-cutting steps enacted in fits and starts since his 2010 proposal. It’s unclear what impact the updated plan will have on a capital that’s bitterly split over taxes, spending and government debt. The initial Simpson-Bowles plan won warm reviews from deficit hawks but got a chilly reception from Obama and much of the rest of official Washington for its tough mix of tax increases and cuts to benefits programs like Medicare and Social Security. The revised plan by Simpson and Bowles reveals a familiar mix of revenue collected by cleansing the tax code of deductions, cutting agency budgets and curbing the growth of Social Security and Medicare. It would set a top tax rate of 28 percent, paid for by repealing many itemized deductions, limiting the mortgage interest deduction and would gradually phase out the generous tax break for employer subsidized health care. Simpson and Bowles would add $2.5 trillion in new deficit cuts over 2014-2023 on top of about $2.7 trillion estimated to have already been enacted through cuts to agency budgets and January’s tax

increase on wealthier earners. It assumes $1.2 trillion in across-theboard spending cuts imposed for the failure of Washington to replace them are repealed. The revised blueprint arrives as Washington is familiarly gridlocked over the budget. January’s tax deal has stiffened GOP resolve against further tax increases. Obama’s recently unveiled plan for lower inflation increases for Social Security recipients — an idea embraced by Bowles and Simpson — has landed with a thud among most Democrats. Obama and the top GOP negotiator, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, stopped talking after failed talks in 2011 and late last year. It’s commonly assumed that the need this summer for must-pass legislation to increase the government’s borrowing cap will draw the weary combatants back into negotiations. The revised SimpsonBowles plan proposes more than $700 billion in increased taxes over the coming 10 years on top of the $600 billion-plus signed by Obama in January, another $600 billion or so in cuts to Medicare, and deeper cuts to domestic agencies and the Pentagon than proposed by the president. Simpson and Bowles believe it’s crucial to get the gover nment’s debt below 70 percent of the size of the economy, something that Obama’s budget fails to do. Obama and Boehner have twice seemed close to a budget bargain, but Boehner walked away from the talks both times after detecting resistance from top Republicans. “The last two years have been marked by fisbrinksmanship,” cal Simpson and Bowles said in a statement. “Instead

of enacting a comprehensive deficit reduction plan ... policymakers have jumped from crisis to crisis, waiting until the last moment to do the bare minimum to avoid catastrophe.”

The original SimpsonBowles plan arrived in late 2010 after midterm elections in which Republicans took back the House. The new version contains smaller tax increases than called for in the original plan and added greater protections for low-income seniors under plans to curb Social Security cost-of-living increases.

The new plan calls for $385 billion in cuts in agency budgets passed by Congress each year, with more than half coming from the Pentagon.

“We are bearing a disproportionate responsibility for global world peace and I don’t think we can afford to be the world’s policeman,” Bowles said.

It would also gradually increase the Medicare eligibility from 65 to 67, an idea vehemently opposed by Democratic supporters of the program. But the duo believes that seniors need to contribute more toward the benefits they receive from the government.

“Sixty percent of the nation’s budget in some way is going to people over 60,” Simpson said Friday.

The duo would cut $585 billion from healthcare spending, including requiring more affluent seniors pay more for their Medicare benefits, an idea that has backing by both Democrats and Republicans but has never come to pass. They would also cut farm subsidies significantly more than either Republicans controlling the House or the Democratic-led Senate.

S u p p o r t t h e U n i t e d Wa y


CHURCHDEVOTIONAL&DIRECTORY

A6 Saturday, April 20, 2013

CHURCH

Roswell Daily Record

This Devotional & Directory is made possible by those businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services.

Siavash Karimian, MD, ABFM Diplomate American Board of Family Medicine

Clinical Assistant Professor UNM School of Medicine Steve Smith, PA-C Dr. Siamak Karimian, MD, FACC, FACP Stephen Janway, CNP At Roswell MediCo Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Walk-ins Welcome “We take our time to listen and provide quality health care.”

1621 North Washington Avenue Corner of 17th

Phone 575-625-8430 “Please call me Dr. K”

The Perfect Word of God

Proverbs 30:5-6 “Every word of God is tested; He is a shield to those who take refuge in Him. Do not add to His words, or He will reprove you, and you will be proved a liar.” NASB

There are so many things that cannot be trusted now days. And there are not many things that are perfect “just as is”. But the Word of God stands the test of time, and proves to be a safe haven for us; the Word can be trusted! Before we make a purchase, there is a process of quality assurance. They will test the product to ensure it was built properly. The Word of God has been tested and it is the perfect place of safety. It does not need to be added to, because God’s quality assurance test has been completed in His Son, Jesus Christ. If we add to it, or try and make it say something it was never meant to; correction is made by Him, and He proves to be the trustworthy One! God bless you Roswell! - Chris Mullennix, Calvary Baptist Church ANGLICAN

ST. FRANCIS ANGELICAN CHURCH (@ Church of God Seventh Day) 18th & Kansas, 420-3573, Bob Jordan Min.; W.S. 10:00 a.m., Wed. 6:00 pm ST. STEPHEN’S 101 S. Lea; 910-9706; Fr. Bob Tally, Min; W.S. 9:00 a.m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD

In-Home Care for Seniors 624-9999

"A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another, even as I have loved you, that you also love one another.” John 13:34

FIRST BAPTIST OF DEXTER 101 W. 3rd St., Dexter, 7345673, Jackie Thomas, Min., S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

GALILEE BAPTIST 513 E. Matthews St., 6628534, W.W. Green, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. HIGHLAND BAPTIST 2001 S. Lea, 622-9980, Rev. Wayne Brazil, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m. Wed. 6:00 p.m.

WASHINGTON AVE. BAPTIST 1400 North Washington Ave., 840-1144, Randy Reeves, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

SPANISH CHURCH OF CHRIST Mulberry & Buena Vista, Joe Villa, Min. W.S. 9:30 a.m. & 6 p.m.,

CATHOLIC

CHURCH OF GOD

ASSUMPTION CATHOLIC 2808 N. Kentucky, 622-9895, Joe Pacquing, Min. Masses: Sat. Mass 9:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.; Sun. Mass 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.; Mon-Fri Mass 12:10 p.m.;

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD, 1224 W. Country Club, 622IGLESIA BAUTISTA EL 2171, Melvin Suttle, Min. S.S. IMMACULATE CALVARIO 600 E. Tilden, 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & CONCEPTION PARISH 623-8135, Roberto Mancillas, 6:00 pm., Wed. 7:00 pm. Dexter, Deacon Jesus Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 Herrera, Min. Sat. Mass a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. MIDWAY ASSEMBLY OF 6 p.m., Sun. Mass 11 a.m. GOD 63 Yakima Rd., 347MIDWAY BAPTIST 134 5309, S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE Yakima Rd., Leo Pennington, Lake Arthur, Sun. Mass 8 a.m. a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & TEMPLO BETAL ST. CATHERINE’S Hagerman, 7 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. ASSEMBLY OF GOD 221 E. Sun. Mass 9:30 a.m. Jefferson, 623-6852, Paul & MORNING STAR BAPTIST Toni Herrera, Mins. ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC 1513 Mulberry Ave., W.F. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. 506 S. Lincoln, 622-3531, Wagoner, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; Fr. Gonzalo Moreno, O.F.M. Tues. & Wed. 6 p.m. W.S. 11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. Pastor; Sat. English Mass Wed. 7:30 p.m. TEMPLO LA HERMOSA 5:30 p.m., Spanish Mass FIRST SPANISH 7 p.m.; Sun. English Mass MOUNTAIN VIEW BAPTIST ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1305 10 a.m., Spanish Mass 206 E. Charleston, 622-1019, South Garden, 625-0885, 8 a.m. & 12 Noon. Jack Ferguson, Interim Min. Oscar Guerrero, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Tues. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & 5 ST. PETER CATHOLIC p.m. Wed. 6:00 p.m. & Wed. 7 p.m. 805 S. Main, 622-5092, Fr. Charlie Martinez, O.F.M. Min.; MT. GILEAD MISSIONARY Sat. Mass 6 p.m. Sun. BAPTIST BAPTIST 700 E. Summit, Mass 8 a..m. & 11 a.m. 623-0292 Pastor Allen. S.S. ADVENTURE BIBLE 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:00a.m. CHURCH 1905 S. Main St., CHURCH OF Butch Neal & Tim Arlet, Mins. PRIMERA BAPTIST 417 East CHRIST S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. Wildy, 623-5420 S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST 1500 BERRENDO BAPTIST 400 W. Wed. 7 p.m. S. Elm, 622-4675; John Early Berrendo Rd., 622-1372, Troy Cannon, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; Grant, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; ROSWELL BAPTIST W.S. 10 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. TEMPLE 700 E. Berrendo, Bill 6 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m. Whitehead, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 am. & 6 pm Wed. 7 p.m. CHURCH OF CHRIST 1512 BETHEL BAPTIST N. Garden South Main St., 622-4426 & East Country Club Rd., 622TABERNACLE BAPTIST S.S. 10:30 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m., 8182 Richard Grisham, Min. Wed. 6:30 p.m. 115 W. 11th, 622-7912, S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:40 S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & CHURCH OF CHRIST 700 W. a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. Country Club Road, 622BYKOTA BAPTIST 2106 E. THE FRIENDSHIP MISSION- 1350, Doug Austin, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & Pine Lodge Rd., 622-3399 ARY BAPTIST 1220 Johnson 5 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m. Don Johnson, Min. S.S. St., 623-6484, Michael K. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & Shelton, Sr., Min.S.S. CHURCH OF CHRIST West 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Alameda & Balsam, 622-5562 Wed.7 p.m. W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., 2nd CALVARY BAPTIST 1009 W. Sun. 1:30 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m. Alameda, Chris Mullennix, TRINIDAD COMMUNITY Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; BAPTIST 1707 W. Juniper. CHURCH OF CHRIST 200 S. W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 6 p.m. Union, Suite C, 347-2628; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. S.S. 10 a.m.;W.S. 11 a.m. & Wed. 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. 5 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST 500 N. VICTORY BAPTIST 1601 W. IGLESIA DE CRISTO Pennsylvania, 623-2640; Matt McGaffey, 622-0114, Dan 801 N. Washington, Horario Brooks, Min., S.S. 9:30 a.m.; Holt, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. de Servicios: domingo 9:30 W.S. 11:00 a.m. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. & 11:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., miercoles 6 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST - HAGERMAN WARE TABERNACLE 211 N. Cambridge, Hagerman, MISSIONARY BAPTIST 900 SPANISH CHURCH OF Herb Gage, Min.; S.S. 9:45 E. Deming, 622-0546, Richard CHRIST 3501 W. College, a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Gorham, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; 622-3618 S.S. 9:30 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. W.S. 10 & 11 a.m., W.S. 10:30 a.m. & Wed. 6 p.m. 6 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m.

Wed. 6 p.m.

HOPE FAMILY CHURCH OF GOD 2600 S. Union, Raye Miller, Min., W.S. 10:30 a.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m., Thurs. Youth 6 p.m. NEW COVENANT FELLOWSHIP CHURCH OF GOD 2200 N. Garden, 624-1958,S.S. 9:30 a.m. W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST

IMMANUEL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 1000 N. Union, 622-6352, Louis Accardi, Min., S.S. 10:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:30 a.m.; Wed. 6 p.m.

ST. PAUL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 321 E. McGaffey, 623-1568, Joe L. Dawson, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m., Tues. & Fri. 8 p.m.

EPISCOPAL ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL 505 N. Penn., 622-1353, Father Dale Plummer, Min.; Principal Service. 9 a.m. 11:00 a.m.; in church Wed. 7 a.m. in the prayer garden. www.standrewsroswell.org

JEHOVAH’S

WITNESSES

Kingdom Halls 205 W. Gayle

Mesa Park Cong. Sun. 10 a.m.; Tues. 7 p.m.

Buena Visa Cong. (Spanish) Sun. 1:30 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

1718 N. Atkinson

Mountain View Cong

Sun. 1 p.m.; Wed. 7:30 p.m.

Spring River Cong. Sun. 10 a.m.; Tues 7:30 p.m.

1421 S. Garden

Rio Pecos Cong. Sun. 10 am; Thurs. 7 p.m.

Dexter- 411 S. Lincoln

Dexter Cong. Sun. 10 a.m.; Thurs. 7 p.m.

For changes or corrections on church listings contact Sandra at 622-7710 Ext. 209 or email sandra@rdrnews.com

For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God. Romans 3:23


CHURCHDEVOTIONAL&DIRECTORY CHURCH

Roswell Daily Record

Saturday, April 20, 2013

A7

This Devotional & Directory is made possible by those businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services. JEWISH

CONGREGATIONAL B’NAI ISRAEL 712 N. Washington, 622-7295, W.S. 2nd & 4th Fri. 7 p.m.

LUTHERAN

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN 1405 N. Sycamore at College, 622-2853Daniel Praeuner, Min., S.S. 10:20 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m.

REDEEMER LUTHERAN 2525 N. Spruce Ave., 6277157; W.S. 10 a.m.

ST. MARK EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 2911 N. Main St., 623-0519, Larry Sydow, Min.; S.S. 9:15 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m.

METHODIST

ALDERSGATE UNITED METHODIST 915 W 19th St, 625-2855, Jim Bignell, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m.

DEXTER UNITED METHODIST 112 W. 3rd St., Dexter, 734-6529, Jim Bignell, Min. S.S. 9:30a.m.; W.S. 11:00 a.m. FIRST UNITED METHODIST 200 N. Pennsylvania, 6221881 Rev. W. Douglas Mills, PhD, Min.; S.S.9:15 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m.

TRINITY UNITED METHODIST 1413 S. Union, 622-0119, Pastor Glenn Thyrion, Min.; S.S. 10 a.m.; WS. 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.

MORMON

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 2201 West Country Club Rd. First Ward: Hank Malcom, Bishop 623-2777; W.S. 9 a.m.; S.S. 10:10 a.m.

Second Ward: Jeff Savage, Bishop, 623-4492 W.S. 11 a.m.; S.S. 12:10 p.m. 3ra Rama (en Español): Presidente McClellan; W.S. 2:15 p.m.; S.S. 12:15 p.m.

NAZARENE

CENTRAL CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 901 E. Country Club, 420-2907 Randy Elftman, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 501 N. Sycamore, 624-2614; Dr. J. Vaughn Gossman, Min.; S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m. THE NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1019 S Lea; 623-0201; Hector Torres, Min.; S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Spanish Service 12:30 p.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY OF THE FAITH IN JESUS CHRIST 1721 N. Maryland, 624-2728, Ismael Chavarria, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Thurs. 7 p.m. APOSTOLIC BIBLE 2529 West Alameda, 625-8779, Rod Foster, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

APOSTOLIC FAMILY WORSHIP CENTER 1103 N Union; Joel Martinez, Min., 627-2258; W.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL 602 S. Mississippi, 347-2514, J.E. Shirley, Min. W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

GOD’S MESSENGER 3303 W Alameda; 625-0190; R. Dixon, Sr., Min.; S.S. 8:45 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. Noon HOUSE OF PRAYER 412 E. Matthews, 746-6699, Mike Valverde, Min. W.S. 5 p.m. Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST

BEULAH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST 106 S. Michigan Ave., 243-6203; Alex Horton, Min. Sat. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m. IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL 7 DIA 500 S. Cedar, 910-6527, Noel Dominguez, Min. Sat. S.S. 11 a.m.; W.S. 9:30 a.m. Wed. 7 p.m. ROSWELL ENGLISH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Jaffa & S. Union, 623-4636, Ken Davis,Min. Sat. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 am. Wed. 7 p.m.

OTHER

ADVENTURE BIBLE CHURCH 1905 S. Main St., Butch Neal & Tim Arlet, Mins. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. ALBUQUERQUE/ ROSWELL FAMILY 501 Cagua S.E., 266-4468, Fritz Schneider, Min.

IGLESIA DE DIOS 317 East Wildy, 627-6596, Daniel Madrid, Min., Domingos: Escuela Dominical 10 a.m., Servicio Evg. 5 p.m. Martes: Oracion y Estudio 7 p.m., Jueves: Servicio Dept. 7 p.m.

BEOD MOED HEBRAIC BIBLE CENTER 928 W. McGaffey, 840-6120, Sat. Hebraic Dance 1 p.m.; Torah Study 2 p.m.; Wed. Pray & Dance Practice 6 p.m.

NEW APOSTOLIC 813 N. Richardson, Ste. A, W.S. 10 a.m.

CHRIST’S CHURCH 2200 N. Sycamore, 623-4110 S.S. 8:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:00 am.

LIFE MINISTRIES FOURSQUARE CHURCH 409 W. 16th, 622-3383; Wayne & Janice Snow, Mins.; W.S. 10:30 am,Wed. 7:00 p.m.

TRINITY APOSTOLIC FAITH N. Washington & 17th St., W.S. 11 a.m.

TRINITY HOUSE OF PRAISE PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD 510 S. Montana, 623-2710, Bobby Barnett, Min. W.S. 9:45 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 400 W. 3rd St., 622-4910, Sam Lanham, Int. Min. S.S. 8:30 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. 24-Hr Daily Inspiration Hotline 622-4923

REDEEMER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP PCA 1500 S. Main, 622-2392, Timothy J Hammons, Min.; S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m.

IGLESIA PRESBITERIANA HISPANA 2801 W. 4th St., 622-0756, Adam Soliz, Min. W.S. 11 a.m. WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN 2801 W. 4th St., 622-2801; Rev. Randy Nolen, Min.; S.S. 10:45 a.m.; W.S. 9:30 a.m.

CALVARY CHAPEL OF ROSWELL 2901 W. 4th, 623-8072, W.S. 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

CHRISTIAN COWBOY FELLOWSHIP 3103 W. Alameda John Sturza, 6250255, 2nd and last Friday

IGLESIA DE DIOS DE LA PROFECIA 2322 N. Sherman; 505-610-6094 505-507-1254 Ministros Nicolás & Yolanda Limón. Servicio dominical 11 a.m. miércoles y viernes 7 p.m. CHURCH OF GOD 7TH DAY 1722 N. Kansas, 6237295, Sat. W.S. 9:45 a.m. THE DOOR 129 E. 3rd St. 575-495-9813; David Solano, Min.; W.S. 10:30 am & 6 pm. Wed. 7 pm CHURCH ON THE MOVE 901 W. Brasher Rd., 6227011, Troy Smothermon, Min. W.S. 9 & 11 a.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH PCA 1500 S Main 622-2392. Timothy Hammond Mins.: S.S 9 a.m. W.S 10:15 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

GATEWAY 1900 Sycamore Ave., 623-8670, Rick Rapp, Min. W.S. 10:30 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. GRACE COMMUNITY 935 W. Mescalero, 623-5438 Rick Hale,Min.; W.S. 9 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. H.I.S. HOUSE 300 W. 3rd, Dexter, 734-6873 Ron & Jeri Fuller, Mins. W.S. 10 a.m. Wed.6 p.m. NARROW WAY 2200 N. Sycamore, 623-2511, Lyman Graham, Min. W.S. 2 p.m.

“Where Love is Felt”

• Elderly Care • Assisted Living

(575)625-9145 2210 East Pinelodge Rd.

www.heartfeltmanor.com

ORTHODOX BAHA’I FAITH obfusa@rt66.com 622-5729

ROSWELL CHRISTIAN OUTREACH MINISTRIES 101 S. Sunset; Joe Diaz, Min. W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.

ROSWELL PRAYER CENTER 622-4111/317-3867; Sat. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Weekdays 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., 6 p..m. to 9 p.m.

SALVATION ARMY 612 W. College, 622-8700 Beau & Mandy Perez, Mins. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m.; Prayer Meeting, Tues. 7 p.m. THE UNITED CHURCH OF ROSWELL 417 E. Wildy; W.S. 9 am Bob Maples, Pastor

UNITY OF ONE CHURCH 704 E. Mescalero, 6221185, Seferino Chavez, Min., W.S. 10 am, Bible Study Thurs. 7 p.m. WASHINGTON CHAPEL CHRISTIAN 110 S. Michigan St., 623-3511 Rev. Abukusumo, Min.; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

WAYMAKER 202 S. Sunset, 627-9190 Mike & Twyla Knowlton, Mins.; W.S. 10 a.m.; J12 (8-12 yr. olds) 4 p.m.; Revolution Youth Service 6 p.m.; Wed. Core Home Groups 7 p.m.

Wakefield Oil Co., Inc. Wendell Wakefield

We don’t want you to give us your business, we want the chance to earn your business.

Charles A. Shannon, RPh

700 N. Union Roswell, NM 88201

n

NEW LIFE CHURCH OF ROSWELL 1800 W. Bland, 622-2989, Barbara Norfor, Min.; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

Roswell (575) 622-1900 Artesia (575) 746-1700 Fax (575) 625-1900 120 N. Garden, Roswell, NM 88203

311 S. Virginia PO Box 1108 Roswell, NM 88202 1-800-657-6242 575-622-4160 Fax: 575-623-1456

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Manor, Inc.

575-622-6571 Fax 575-623-3801 1-800-377-9881

WAL#MART STORES, INC. 4500 N. Main Roswell, NM

575-623-2062 • FAX 575-623-8704


A8 Saturday, April 20, 2013

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Sunny and warmer

Clear

Sunday

Mostly sunny

Monday

Tuesday

Mostly sunny

Wednesday

Partly sunny and pleasant

Sunny; breezy, pleasant

Thursday

Mostly sunny and warmer

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Friday

Partly sunny

High 83°

Low 47°

86°/52°

86°/47°

68°/43°

73°/47°

82°/51°

86°/48°

WSW at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

SE at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

SSE at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

NW at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

NW at 8-16 mph POP: 5%

WSW at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

WNW at 6-12 mph POP: 10%

SSE at 8-16 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Friday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 69°/31° Normal high/low ............... 78°/46° Record high ............... 93° in 1961 Record low ................. 29° in 1920 Humidity at noon .................. 10%

Farmington 67/33

Clayton 65/36

Raton 59/29

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Fri. .. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date .......................... Normal year to date .............

0.00" trace 0.33" 0.44" 1.64"

Santa Fe 66/35

Gallup 64/31

Tucumcari 73/41

Albuquerque 72/43

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 74/41

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 66/46

T or C 78/49

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Sun. The Moon Today Sun. Full

Apr 25

Rise 6:22 a.m. 6:21 a.m. Rise 2:35 p.m. 3:34 p.m. Last

May 2

New

May 9

Set 7:32 p.m. 7:33 p.m. Set 2:57 a.m. 3:31 a.m. First

May 17

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH A child entices you into a fun game. You might be startled by some of the insights you have and/or hear when in the company of this child. Use care with spending, and count your change! Go out to a ballgame or try to squeeze in some exercise. Tonight: Your time to treat. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH If you consider how you felt several weeks ago as opposed to now, it will feel like you’re comparing night and day. Your energy level revs up. Understand that you need to figure out an outlet for this energy; otherwise, you could become accidentprone. Tonight: Take a walk. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH A friend could trigger an unexpected insight. Be careful with your anger for the next few

Alamogordo 77/45

Silver City 75/44

ROSWELL 83/47 Carlsbad 86/49

Hobbs 80/45

Las Cruces 78/49

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE

weeks. Work on expressing it in an appropriate way. If you hold your feelings in, they could backfire. Visit with a neighbor, and catch up on his or her news. Tonight: At home. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You could be exhausted by recent events. A parent or boss surprises you. Just when you think you understand someone, he or she will surprise you. A friend could be unusually assertive. This person really wants confirmation and your company. Tonight: Plan on joining friends. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Be aware of your time, your limitations and your agenda. Sometimes you have to please yourself.

You could be taken aback by news and want to head in a different direction. Be careful not to stumble into a disagreement. Tonight: Make sure wherever you are, there is music! VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH You might want to change gyms, get a new look or visit with a relative. Make today about you. You will feel much better than you have in a while as a result. Reach out to a friend you might have been avoiding. Tonight: Dance up a storm. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Others are overly af fectionate. You might think that this behavior is cute, or you could think that it’s aggravating.

Rush jams into R&R HOF

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Rush fans can relax. The band is now officially in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The Canadian rockers were welcomed into the musical fraternity at Thursday’s 28th annual induction ceremony by the Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl and Taylor Hawkins. At the beginning of the Nokia Theatre event, the audience was already administering a standing ovation to the group. “We’ve been saying for a long time that this wasn’t a big deal,” drummer-lyricist Neil Peart told the crowd, most of whom came out to specifically support the band. “It turns out, it kind of is.” Rush gained entry following its first appearance on the ballot after repeatedly being left off the list since gaining eligibility in 1998, to the great consternation of the legion of Rush fans who cried bias against progressive rock. The long wait didn’t seem to matter at Thursday’s star-studded concert event, which ran over five hours. Peart, lead singer Geddy Lee and guitarist Alex Lifeson made up for lost time by launching into a rambunctious rendition of “Tom Sawyer” in front of the more than 7,000 attendees. Rush was among this year’s eight eclectic inductees, which also included fellow classic rockers Heart, singer-songwriter Randy Newman, rap group Public Enemy, disco queen Donna Summer, bluesman Albert King, and producers Quincy Jones and Lou Adler. For Heart, entering the hall of fame isn’t just about

music. “Our long and winding road has always been about the magical power of love and the enduring strength of family,” said Nancy Wilson. “We came from an era when women normally did not rock and women were not expected to be leaders.” Wilson, her sister, Nancy, and their band mates celebrated their induction with lively per formances of “Crazy for You,” “Dreamboat Annie” and “Barracuda.” Adler was inducted by comedy duo Richard “Cheech” Marin and Tommy Chong before being serenad-

ed by Carole King with “So Far Away.” Jack Nicholson was among Adler’s fans in the audience who lavished the producer-mogul a standing ovation. With his guitar around his neck, John Mayer inducted the late King before joining Gary Clark Jr. for Kingtinged jam session. “Albert King is why guitarface was invented,” joked Mayer. Newman — joined by Jackson Browne, John Fogerty and Tom Petty — kicked off the Los Angeles ceremony with a performance of his classic “I Love L.A.”

Regional Cities Today Sun. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

77/45/s 72/43/s 55/23/s 84/49/s 86/49/s 54/25/pc 65/36/s 57/30/s 74/41/s 81/43/s 70/41/s 67/33/s 64/31/s 80/45/s 78/49/s 63/32/s 61/35/s 74/42/s 79/47/s 75/41/s 64/29/s 59/29/s 53/24/s 83/47/s 66/46/s 66/35/s 75/44/s 78/49/s 73/41/s 64/36/s

79/46/s 75/46/pc 58/28/pc 87/52/s 88/55/s 58/28/pc 70/40/pc 61/35/s 78/49/pc 83/51/s 74/45/pc 70/38/s 69/35/s 81/48/s 84/55/s 66/39/pc 65/40/pc 77/47/s 83/52/s 78/47/s 67/37/s 67/33/pc 56/28/pc 86/52/s 71/49/s 69/41/pc 79/47/s 82/54/s 78/46/pc 68/42/pc

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

Understand that you are not going to change this person’s behavior. A partner or close associate could unleash his or her temper on you. Tonight: Make it early. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You know that others are observing you, and you might feel as if you must make a good impression. You can’t change the way others judge you — everyone has a different bias. A partner might be jealous, and you are likely to hear about it. Tonight: Do your thing. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) HHH Reconsider a choice you made about an upcoming trip or vacation. You’ll seek out new information in an attempt to

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Sun.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

47/30/s 68/46/s 62/36/pc 58/38/r 66/41/s 47/34/pc 46/30/pc 72/49/s 57/34/pc 48/31/pc 80/54/s 84/68/sh 73/51/s 52/34/s 63/47/pc 83/63/s 81/58/s 76/45/s

46/30/s 68/47/s 59/37/s 53/35/s 66/40/s 59/43/pc 53/40/pc 73/57/pc 63/32/pc 54/35/pc 85/59/s 83/69/sh 75/58/pc 60/42/pc 64/48/t 87/66/s 76/56/pc 81/49/s

U.S. Extremes

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Sun.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

86/73/t 77/49/s 40/35/pc 70/55/s 60/38/pc 58/44/pc 75/63/t 62/38/pc 91/65/s 51/28/pc 59/44/pc 66/41/pc 59/43/pc 57/41/pc 74/55/s 56/43/pc 86/54/s 62/41/pc

85/72/t 84/57/s 49/43/sn 75/57/s 56/42/s 66/46/t 81/64/t 58/40/s 92/65/s 59/37/s 60/38/pc 64/44/s 66/47/pc 63/38/s 68/57/pc 56/39/pc 90/57/s 60/41/s

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 93° ......... Ocotillo Wells, Calif. Low: 1° .......... Monarch Pass, Colo.

High: 72° ..........................Carlsbad Low: 3° ........................... Angel Fire

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

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Showers T-storms

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expand your thinking. Some of you might meet a foreigner at this moment in time. Your energy draws others toward you. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) HHHHH Share your thoughts and feelings with a dear friend or loved one. Understand what needs to happen in order to move a project forward. Your drive and creativity are high, and they’ll help you find a path where few would even believe possible. Tonight: Express your earthier qualities. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) HHHHH Listen to news more openly. Emphasize your long-term goals, and focus on what you need to accomplish. Toss

50s

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Flurries

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Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

yourself into a project. You might see a situation differently from a roommate or loved one. Tonight: Order pizza, and enjoy catching up with a friend. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You could be racing through a lot of work. Complete as much as you can, but recognize that you might be accidentprone if you rush. If you can delegate, do. Be sensitive to alternatives. Schedule some time with a special person in your life. Tonight: Choose something fun.

BORN TODAY Actor George Takei (1937), jazz vibraphonist Lionel Hampton (1908), painter Joan Miro (1893)

WELCOMES

Krista Brown

Certified Nurse Practitioner To Our Family of Medical Providers

Now accepting: Lovelace, Presbyterian, Care Improvement Plus, OMNI/IMS & Cigna.

Will be accepting others insurance plans in the near future.

To schedule an appointment with Krista call 575-627-9500 402 W. Country Club www.kymeramedical.com


Registration ends in

15 days

Saturday, April 20, 2013 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

SPORTS

HOSTED BY THE ROSWELL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & BENEFITTING THE UNITED WAY OF CHAVES COUNTY

Register online at roswellgridiron.com

Memorial Day Weekend May 24, 25 & 26

Roswell Daily Record

Section

B

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

Engelhard inks with Adams State Grizzlies KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

Few, if any, prep golfers in the state of New Mexico work harder at the game than Goddard senior Emilee Engelhard. She’s constantly on the course, on the range or on the putting green working at improving her skills. The hard work has translated into two district individual titles and two appearances on the allstate team. On Friday, it translated into a full-ride scholarship to Adams State University in Alamosa, Colo. “It’s really satisfying,” Engelhard said about the satisfaction she feels from seeing her hard work pay off. “I didn’t really expect to play college golf. But, when the opportunity came up and I got to a certain point in my game, then I started getting colleges calling me

and e-mails. That felt really good.” Engelhard visited Adams State recently for a tryout and was offered a scholarship almost immediately by Grizzlies coach Adam Jardon. Engelhard, who plans to study business and currently carries a 3.8 gradepoint average, said she liked just about everything about the NCAA Division II school, which competes in the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference. “I really like the school. The campus is really cool and there’s just lots of stuff to do,” she said. “It’s a small town, but it’s a college town. I really like the coach and I like the girls I met. It was just all of those things combined to make it a good fit.” Her father, Jim, who you’ll routinely see by See INKS, Page B3

Kevin J. Keller Photo

Goddard’s Emilee Engelhard, front row second from left, signs her national letter of intent to continue her academic and athletic career at Adams State University on Friday. Joining Emilee as she signed were, front row from left, her father, Jim, her mother, Pam, her sister Madison and her sister Rachel Veitch; back row, Goddard athletic coordinator Michelle Edgett, teammates Sara Cain, Marissa Alexander, Mariah Sandoval, Danika Gomillion, Stephanie Lopez and Goddard girls golf coach Fernando Sosa.

Local Briefs

WHITEHAIR SIGNS WITH UTEP

GHS sweeps doubleheader

NMMI Sports Press Photo

NMMI freshman Naomi Whitehair, center, flanked by Institute volleyball coaches Pam Grano, left, and Shelby Forchtner signs her national letter of intent to continue her academic and athletic career at UTEP on Tuesday. Whitehair played one year at the Institute, recording 262 digs, 86 kills and 21 aces for the Broncos. The defensive specialist, who carries a 3.67 grade-point average, plans to major in pre-nursing and possibly minor in biology at UTEP.

MORIAR TY — The Goddard softball team snapped a six-game losing skid on Friday by sweeping a pair from Moriarty. The streak-snapper was a 10-6 win in Game 1, followed by a 14-4 five-inning victory in the nightcap. In Game 1, Goddard (7-13) took advantage in the first inning and cruised to a victory over the Pintos. Danielle Hubbard started things off with a double in the game’s second at-bat and then scored with two outs when Hayley McFadin singled into center. Katie Shanor followed with a two-run dinger to left on the fifth pitch of the next at-bat. Goddard extended its lead to 8-1 in the third with a five-run inning. Kaitlyn Renteria led off the inning with a home run. Chastity Urban scored on a Teryn Lem single, McFadin scored on an Ashley Sommerville single, and Lem and Sommerville scored on a Mileena Sanchez single. Goddard added runs in the fifth and the sixth to push the lead to 10-1 before Moriarty’s big seventh. The Pintos seemed poised to rally, scoring five runs with one out. See BRIEFS, Page B3

Red Sox, Bruins postpone games during manhunt

BOSTON (AP) — The Red Sox and Bruins postponed their games Friday as authorities searched for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings, virtually shutting the city down. The teams announced about four hours before their night games were scheduled to start that they were scratched. Police identified two suspects in Monday’s explosions that killed three people and wounded more than 180. One man was killed during a shootout with police and the other was in cus-

tody Friday night after a police effort that dragged through the day, Boston police said. Authorities in Boston suspended all mass transit, used by many fans to get to games, and told people throughout Boston and some of its suburbs to stay inside for much of Friday as the hunt for Suspect No. 2 went on. Trains were finally allowed to run again after 6 p.m. No makeup date was announced for the opener of the Red Sox three-game series against the Kansas City Royals

LOCAL SCHEDULE

scheduled at Fenway Park. Saturday’s game, set to start at 1:35 p.m., was still on. The NHL game at TD Garden between the Bruins and the Pittsburgh Penguins, two of the top four teams in the Eastern Conference, was tentatively rescheduled for Saturday at 12:30 p.m. A final decision on whether it would be played was to be made by four hours before faceoff, the Bruins said. Saturday night’s originally scheduled See GAMES, Page B3

SCORECENTER COLLEGE BASEBALL

PREP SOFTBALL

• NMMI, Valley Chr. at Ruidoso Inv., 9 a.m.

NMMI 5, Western Texas 2 Western Texas 12, NMMI 7

PREP BASEBALL

WOMEN’S TRACK & FIELD

PREP BASEBALL

Goddard 10, Moriarty 6 Goddard 14, Moriarty 4, 5 inn. Portales JV at Dexter, n/a

• Artesia at Goddard, 11 a.m. (DH) • NMMI at Ruidoso, 11 a.m. (DH) • Eunice at Dexter, 1 p.m. (DH)

• NMMI at Glendale Inv., 10 a.m.

Capitan 11, Gateway Chr. 5 Carlsbad 10, Roswell 0, 5 inn.

COLLEGE BASEBALL

PREP TRACK & FIELD

• NMMI at Western Texas, 11 a.m. (DH)

AP Photo

PLAYER

OF THE

DAY

KAITLYN RENTERIA

Goddard Rockets • Renteria carried Goddard’s offense on Friday, helping the Rockets sweep Moriarty. Renteria accounted for 11 total bases, six RBIs and four runs in the doubleheader, going 1 for 4 with a solo home run in Game 1, a 10-6 win, and 4 for 4 with three doubles in Game 2, a 14-4 five-inning win.


B2 Saturday, April 20, 2013

SPORTS

Roswell Daily Record

Time for sports to help us heal again

In so many ways, sports can bring out the worst in us. The corruption. The greed. The destructive belief that winning isn’t just the only thing, but something that must be achieved no matter the cost. Then, there are times like these. While Boston was locked down Friday, as authorities hunted for a suspect in the deadly bombing at what was supposed to be a joyous 26.2-mile run through the city’s streets, we’ve already seen the cathartic effect of something so mundane as a hockey game. Thousands of strangers, singing along in unison to the national anthem, when the Bruins took the ice just two nights after those cowards killed three innocent people at the Boston Marathon — one of them an 8year-old child — and ripped off the legs of others. Did anyone who saw that rendition of “The Star-Spangled Banner” not, at the very least, dab at their eyes for a moment, a sense of pride and defiance bubbling up in their chest? Sports gives us our sense of community in times of grief. It’s like our collective couch, helping to soothe our national pain. “What people look for in sports in a moment of crisis is a sense of

LPGA

LPGA-Lotte Championship Scores By The Associated Press Friday At Ko Olina Golf Club Course Kapolei, Hawaii Purse: $1.7 million Yardage: 6,383; Par: 72 Third Round a-denotes amateur Suzann Pettersen . . . . . . .65-69-68— Hee Kyung Seo . . . . . . . . .65-72-66— Ai Miyazato . . . . . . . . . . . .67-68-70— Hyo Joo Kim . . . . . . . . . . .66-71-69— Lizette Salas . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-67— Ariya Jutanugarn . . . . . . . .64-75-68— Stacy Lewis . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-69— Jessica Korda . . . . . . . . . .72-70-66— Inbee Park . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-67— Jodi Ewart Shadoff . . . . . .72-68-68— Beatriz Recari . . . . . . . . . .67-70-72— Hee Young Park . . . . . . . .69-72-69— I.K. Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-70— Se Ri Pak . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-69-71— Na Yeon Choi . . . . . . . . . .70-74-67— Danielle Kang . . . . . . . . . .66-76-69— Paola Moreno . . . . . . . . . .72-70-69— Caroline Hedwall . . . . . . . .69-72-70— Jane Park . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-74-70— So Yeon Ryu . . . . . . . . . . .67-72-72— Meena Lee . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-69— a-Lydia Ko . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-70— Brittany Lincicome . . . . . . .72-70-70— Morgan Pressel . . . . . . . . .70-73-70— Giulia Sergas . . . . . . . . . .72-71-70— Karrie Webb . . . . . . . . . . .69-74-70— Vicky Hurst . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-72— Karine Icher . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-72— Shanshan Feng . . . . . . . . .70-70-73— Pornanong Phatlum . . . . .70-70-73— Haeji Kang . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-74— Danah Bordner . . . . . . . . .70-76-68— Paula Creamer . . . . . . . . .71-72-71— Yani Tseng . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-71— Alison Walshe . . . . . . . . . .71-72-71— Sandra Gal . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-72— Mina Harigae . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-73— Gerina Piller . . . . . . . . . . .67-74-73— Jane Rah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-72-75— Michelle Wie . . . . . . . . . . .70-76-69— Kristy McPherson . . . . . . .71-74-70— Azahara Munoz . . . . . . . . .72-73-70— Dori Carter . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-71— Mika Miyazato . . . . . . . . . .71-73-71— Carlota Ciganda . . . . . . . .71-71-73— Anna Nordqvist . . . . . . . . .71-71-73— Christina Kim . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-75— Eun-Hee Ji . . . . . . . . . . . .70-76-70— Lisa McCloskey . . . . . . . . .70-76-70— Mo Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75-71— Belen Mozo . . . . . . . . . . . .71-74-71— Jennifer Rosales . . . . . . . .70-75-71— Pernilla Lindberg . . . . . . . .71-73-72— Christel Boeljon . . . . . . . . .71-73-73— Jeong Jang . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-73— Chella Choi . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-75— Nicole Castrale . . . . . . . . .70-71-76— Brittany Lang . . . . . . . . . . .69-77-72— Sarah Jane Smith . . . . . . .75-70-73— Katherine Hull-Kirk . . . . . .70-74-74— Victoria Tanco . . . . . . . . . .74-70-74— Amanda Blumenherst . . . .72-71-75— Julia Boland . . . . . . . . . . .68-75-75— Rebecca Lee-Bentham . . .67-76-75— Taylore Karle . . . . . . . . . . .73-73-73— Julieta Granada . . . . . . . . .71-74-74— Sara Maude Juneau . . . . .70-75-74— Natalie Gulbis . . . . . . . . . .70-74-75— Seon Hwa Lee . . . . . . . . .70-74-75— Austin Ernst . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70-80— Angela Stanford . . . . . . . .71-73-76— Irene Cho . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73-77— Jennifer Song . . . . . . . . . .72-74-77— Ryann O’Toole . . . . . . . . .73-71-79— Lindsey Wright . . . . . . . . .71-75-78— Sun Young Yoo . . . . . . . . .70-76-78— Kris Tamulis . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73-81—

MLB

American League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .11 4 New York . . . . . . . . . .9 6 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .8 7 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .7 10 Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .6 10 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 6 Kansas City . . . . . . . .8 6 Minnesota . . . . . . . . . .6 7 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .7 9 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .5 10 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .12 5 Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 6 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .7 11 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .5 11 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .4 10

202 203 205 206 207 207 207 208 208 208 209 210 210 210 211 211 211 211 211 211 212 212 212 213 213 213 213 213 213 213 213 214 214 214 214 214 214 214 214 215 215 215 215 215 215 215 215 216 216 216 216 216 216 217 217 217 217 218 218 218 218 218 218 218 219 219 219 219 219 219 220 221 223 223 224 224 227

Pct GB .733 — .600 2 .533 3 .412 5 .375 5 1⁄2

Pct GB .600 — 1⁄2 .571 .462 2 .438 2 1⁄2 .333 4 Pct .706 .625 .389 .313 .286

GB — 1 1⁄2 1 5 ⁄2 6 1⁄2 6 1⁄2

Thursday’s Games Chicago Cubs 6, Texas 2 Seattle 2, Detroit 0 Arizona 6, N.Y. Yankees 2, 12 innings Boston 6, Cleveland 3 Baltimore 10, Tampa Bay 6, 10 innings Toronto 3, Chicago White Sox 1 Friday’s Games L.A. Dodgers at Baltimore, ppd., rain N.Y. Yankees 9, Toronto 4 Tampa Bay 8, Oakland 3 Kansas City at Boston, ppd., local manhunt Texas 7, Seattle 0 Houston 3, Cleveland 2 Minnesota at Chicago, ppd., conditions Detroit at L.A. Angels, 8:05 p.m. Saturday’s Games

PAUL

AP Photo

NEWBERRY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

security,” said John Smith, who teaches classes on the history of sports and its impact on society at Georgia Tech. “You’re going to games with people who are going through the same thing you are. There’s kind of a safety there. It feels good to have a sense of normalcy.” We’ve seen it many times before. After the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, baseball carried on with President Roosevelt’s blessing and helped deflect a nation’s attention from the horrors of World War II. After the 9-11 terrorist attacks, the games we play sent a resolute message that a nation would not give in to anyone’s despicable agenda. And now, in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings, we’ll again call on sports to help bring out the best in us. Rest assured, it’s up to the task. “Sports really are the most visible place where people can come

L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 2-1) at Baltimore (W.Chen 0-2), 11:05 a.m., 1st game N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 2-1) at Toronto (Buehrle 1-0), 11:07 a.m. Kansas City (Shields 1-2) at Boston (Buchholz 3-0), 11:10 a.m. Detroit (Porcello 0-1) at L.A. Angels (Richards 0-0), 1:05 p.m. Minnesota (Worley 0-2) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy 2-1), 1:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Beckett 0-2) at Baltimore (W.Chen 0-2), 5:05 p.m., 2nd game Cleveland (Kazmir 0-0) at Houston (Humber 0-3), 5:10 p.m. Oakland (Parker 0-2) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 0-1), 5:10 p.m. Seattle (Maurer 1-2) at Texas (Tepesch 1-1), 6:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games N.Y. Yankees at Toronto, 11:07 a.m. Kansas City at Boston, 11:35 a.m. L.A. Dodgers at Baltimore, 11:35 a.m. Oakland at Tampa Bay, 11:40 a.m. Cleveland at Houston, 12:10 p.m. Minnesota at Chicago White Sox, 12:10 p.m. Seattle at Texas, 1:05 p.m. Detroit at L.A. Angels, 1:35 p.m.

National League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .13 3 Washington . . . . . . . . .9 7 New York . . . . . . . . . .8 7 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .7 10 Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 13 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .9 7 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .9 8 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . .8 8 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . . .7 8 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .5 10 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Colorado . . . . . . . . . .12 4 Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . .9 7 San Francisco . . . . . . .9 7 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .7 8 San Diego . . . . . . . . . .5 10

Pct GB .813 — .563 4 .533 4 1⁄2 1 .412 6 ⁄2 .235 9 1⁄2

Pct GB .563 — 1⁄2 .529 .500 1 .467 1 1⁄2 .333 3 1⁄2

Pct GB .750 — .563 3 .563 3 .467 4 1⁄2 .333 6 1⁄2

Thursday’s Games Milwaukee 7, San Francisco 2 Chicago Cubs 6, Texas 2 Colorado 11, N.Y. Mets 3 Arizona 6, N.Y. Yankees 2, 12 innings Atlanta 6, Pittsburgh 4 St. Louis 4, Philadelphia 3 Cincinnati 11, Miami 1 Friday’s Games Pittsburgh 6, Atlanta 0 Philadelphia 8, St. Louis 2, 7 innings L.A. Dodgers at Baltimore, ppd., rain Miami 2, Cincinnati 1 N.Y. Mets 7, Washington 1 Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 4 Colorado 3, Arizona 1 San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Saturday’s Games L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 2-1) at Baltimore (Hammel 2-1), 11:05 a.m., 1st game Miami (LeBlanc 0-3) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 21), 11:10 a.m. Washington (G.Gonzalez 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Hefner 0-2), 1:05 p.m. Atlanta (Maholm 3-0) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 1-2), 5:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Beckett 0-2) at Baltimore (W.Chen 0-2), 5:05 p.m., 2nd game St. Louis (Lynn 2-0) at Philadelphia (Lee 20), 5:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 0-2) at Milwaukee (Burgos 0-0), 5:10 p.m. Arizona (Cahill 0-2) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 1-1), 6:10 p.m. San Diego (Richard 0-1) at San Francisco (Lincecum 1-0), 7:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Miami at Cincinnati, 11:10 a.m. Washington at N.Y. Mets, 11:10 a.m. Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 11:35 a.m. L.A. Dodgers at Baltimore, 11:35 a.m. Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 12:10 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 2:05 p.m. Arizona at Colorado, 2:10 p.m. St. Louis at Philadelphia, 6:05 p.m.

NBA

NBA Playoff Glance The Associated Press All Times Mountain FIRST ROUND (x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Milwaukee vs. Miami Sunday, April 21: at Miami, 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 23: at Miami, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, April 25: at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Sunday, April 28: at Milwaukee, 1:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 30: at Miami, TBD x-Thursday, May 2: at Milwaukee, TBD x-Saturday, May 4: at Miami, TBD Boston vs. New York Saturday, April 20: at New York, 1 p.m. Tuesday, April 23: at New York, 6 p.m. Friday, April 26: at Boston, 6 p.m. Sunday, April 28: at Boston, 11 a.m. x-Wednesday, May 1: at New York, TBD x-Friday, May 3: at Boston, TBD x-Sunday, May 5: at New York, TBD Atlanta vs. Indiana Sunday, April 21: at Indiana, 11 a.m. Wednesday, April 24: at Indiana, 5:30 p.m. Saturday, April 27: at Atlanta, 5 p.m. Monday, April 29: at Atlanta, TBD x-Wednesday, May 1: at Indiana, TBD x-Friday, May 3: at Atlanta, TBD x-Sunday, May 5: at Indiana, TBD Chicago vs. Brooklyn

together outside of churches,” Smith said. “And, let’s face it, arenas are bigger than most churches. I can think of no other place where so many people come out to show their support for people who are grieving, who have lost something, who are going through tragedy. The stadium is

a place of congregation.” Boston’s grieving is still in the early stages. That was quite apparent Friday when much of the city was brought to a halt by the search for one person. The Red Sox were forced to postpone the opener of their series the Kansas City Royals

SCOREBOARD

Saturday, April 20: at Brooklyn, 6 p.m. Monday, April 22: at Brooklyn, 6 p.m. Thursday, April 25: at Chicago, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, April 27: at Chicago, noon x-Monday, April 29: at Brooklyn, TBD x-Thursday, May 2: at Chicago, TBD x-Saturday, May 4: at Brooklyn, TBD

WESTERN CONFERENCE Oklahoma City vs. Houston Sunday, April 21: at Oklahoma City, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 24: at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Saturday, April 27: at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 29: at Houston, TBD x-Wednesday, May 1: at Oklahoma City, TBD x-Friday, May 3: at Houston, TBD x-Sunday, May 5: at Oklahoma City, TBD San Antonio vs. L.A. Lakers Sunday, April 21: at San Antonio, 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 24: at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 26: at L.A. Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Sunday, April 28: at L.A. Lakers, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 30: at San Antonio, TBD x-Thursday, May 2: at L.A. Lakers, TBD x-Saturday, May 4: at San Antonio, TBD Denver vs. Golden State Saturday, April 20: at Denver, 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 23: at Denver, 8:30 p.m. Friday, April 26: at Golden State, 8:30 p.m. Sunday, April 28: at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 30: at Denver, TBD x-Thursday, May 2: at Golden State, TBD x-Saturday, May 4: at Denver, TBD L.A. Clippers vs. Memphis Saturday, April 20: at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m. Monday, April 22: at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m. Thursday, April 25: at Memphis, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 27: at Memphis, 2:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 30: at L.A. Clippers, TBD x-Friday, May 3: at Memphis, TBD x-Sunday, May 5: at L.A. Clippers, TBD

PGA

RBC Heritage Scores By The Associated Press Friday At Harbour Town Golf Links Hilton Head, S.C. Purse: $5.8 million Yardage: 7,101; Par: 71 Second Round 17 players failed to finish the round because of rain Kevin Streelman . . . . . . . . .66-70 — 136 Charley Hoffman . . . . . . . . .66-70 — 136 Steve LeBrun . . . . . . . . . . . .68-68 — 136 Luke Donald . . . . . . . . . . . .69-68 — 137 Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-69 — 137 Johnson Wagner . . . . . . . . .67-71 — 138 Rory Sabbatini . . . . . . . . . . .69-69 — 138 Graeme McDowell . . . . . . . .71-67 — 138 D.H. Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68 — 138 Pat Perez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70 — 138 Stuart Appleby . . . . . . . . . . .70-68 — 138 Marc Leishman . . . . . . . . . .67-71 — 138 Martin Kaymer . . . . . . . . . . .69-70 — 139 Tim Clark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71 — 139 Billy Horschel . . . . . . . . . . . .71-68 — 139 Richard H. Lee . . . . . . . . . . .68-71 — 139 Jordan Spieth . . . . . . . . . . .70-69 — 139 Brendon de Jonge . . . . . . . .70-69 — 139 Justin Hicks . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70 — 139 Darron Stiles . . . . . . . . . . . .70-69 — 139 Webb Simpson . . . . . . . . . .68-71 — 139 Stewart Cink . . . . . . . . . . . .70-69 — 139 Ted Potter, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71 — 139 William McGirt . . . . . . . . . . .70-70 — 140 Ken Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70 — 140 Scott Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68 — 140 Jason Dufner . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69 — 140 Ryo Ishikawa . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72 — 140 Brad Fritsch . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69 — 140 Justin Bolli . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72 — 140 Scott Langley . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69 — 140 Jason Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-73 — 140 Chris Stroud . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70 — 140 Brian Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-75 — 140 Will Claxton . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73 — 141 Robert Garrigus . . . . . . . . . .70-71 — 141 Gary Woodland . . . . . . . . . .68-73 — 141 Jonathan Byrd . . . . . . . . . . .71-70 — 141 Tim Herron . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70 — 141 Nicholas Thompson . . . . . . .70-71 — 141 Chez Reavie . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71 — 141 Jin Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-68 — 141 Bo Van Pelt . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73 — 141 K.J. Choi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71 — 141 Jerry Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72 — 141 Sang-Moon Bae . . . . . . . . . .70-71 — 141 Aaron Baddeley . . . . . . . . . .70-72 — 142 Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69 — 142 Justin Leonard . . . . . . . . . . .74-68 — 142 Matt Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-67 — 142 Josh Teater . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71 — 142 Jim Furyk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72 — 142 Brian Gay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71 — 142 Troy Matteson . . . . . . . . . . .71-71 — 142 Patrick Reed . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72 — 143 Russell Henley . . . . . . . . . . .73-70 — 143 Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73 — 143 Jonas Blixt . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-70 — 143 Jeff Klauk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71 — 143 Jeff Maggert . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72 — 143 Bob Estes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73 — 143 Kevin Stadler . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71 — 143 Carl Pettersson . . . . . . . . . .68-75 — 143 Tommy Gainey . . . . . . . . . . .70-73 — 143 Glen Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-75 — 143 Jason Kokrak . . . . . . . . . . . .76-68 — 144 Ricky Barnes . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74 — 144 David Hearn . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-70 — 144 Brandt Jobe . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-75 — 144 James Hahn . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73 — 144 James Driscoll . . . . . . . . . . .74-70 — 144 Hunter Mahan . . . . . . . . . . .68-76 — 144

Mark Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-75 Michael Bradley . . . . . . . . . .73-71 Matt Every . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71 Boo Weekley . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73 Brian Harman . . . . . . . . . . .71-73 Trevor Immelman . . . . . . . . .72-72 Ben Crane . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74 Brandt Snedeker . . . . . . . . .73-71 Zach Johnson . . . . . . . . . . .72-72 Jason Bohn . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72 Greg Owen . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-69 Brian Stuard . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-70 Steve Marino . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72 Harris English . . . . . . . . . . .70-75 Steven Bowditch . . . . . . . . .74-71 Alistair Presnell . . . . . . . . . .73-72 Scott Stallings . . . . . . . . . . .75-70 Vijay Singh . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73 Kyle Stanley . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73 Ernie Els . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73 Charles Howell III . . . . . . . .74-72 Erik Compton . . . . . . . . . . . .70-76 Luke Guthrie . . . . . . . . . . . .72-74 Bryce Molder . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73 Michael Thompson . . . . . . .72-74 Kevin Chappell . . . . . . . . . .72-74 Daniel Summerhays . . . . . .71-75 Graham DeLaet . . . . . . . . . .74-73 Dicky Pride . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-74 Scott Verplank . . . . . . . . . . .76-71 David Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-75 Hunter Haas . . . . . . . . . . . .71-76 Stephen Ames . . . . . . . . . . .74-73 Charlie Wi . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-75 Shawn Stefani . . . . . . . . . . .70-78 Bud Cauley . . . . . . . . . . . . .78-70 John Rollins . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-75 David Mathis . . . . . . . . . . . .71-77 Colt Knost . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-73 John Mallinger . . . . . . . . . . .73-75 Joey Snyder III . . . . . . . . . . .75-74 Lucas Glover . . . . . . . . . . . .70-79 Robert Allenby . . . . . . . . . . .76-73 Richard Sterne . . . . . . . . . . .77-73 Seung-Yul Noh . . . . . . . . . .75-75 Jamie Donaldson . . . . . . . . .74-76 Roberto Castro . . . . . . . . . .74-76 Ross Fisher . . . . . . . . . . . . .77-74 Sean O’Hair . . . . . . . . . . . . .79-72 John Daly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-81

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 145 145 145 145 145 145 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 148 148 148 148 148 148 149 149 149 150 150 150 150 151 151 152

because the city’s transportation system was shut down and people were urged to stay home, all in hopes of flushing out the 19year -old suspect. The Bruins, after playing Wednesday, called

David Lingmerth . . . . . . . . .75-77 — 152 Ben Kohles . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-79 — 152 Tag Ridings . . . . . . . . . . . . .85-72 — 157 Peter Hanson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-WD Greg Chalmers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-WD

Transactions

Friday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Reinstated DH David Ortiz from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Jackie Bradley Jr. to Pawtucket (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS — Transferred RHP Matt Albers from the family medical emergency list to the restricted list. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Placed 3B Alberto Callaspo on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 12. Recalled RHP Michael Kohn from Salt Lake (PCL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Optioned OF Shane Peterson to Sacramento (PCL). Reinstated 1B Brandon Moss from the paternity list. National League CHICAGO CUBS — Assigned 2B Brent Lillibridge outright to Iowa (PCL). Claimed OF Julio Borbon off waivers from Texas. Designated INF Alberto Gonzalez for assignment. COLORADO ROCKIES—Recalled LHP Josh Outman from Colorado Springs (PCL). Optioned RHP Chris Volstad to Colorado Springs. MIAMI MARLINS — Designated RHP John Maine for assignment. Recalled RHP Tom Koehler from New Orleans (PCL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Sent SS Jeff Bianchi to Nashville (PCL) for a rehab assignment. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Recalled LHP Joe Savery from Lehigh Valley (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER — Assigned F Perry Jones and Gs Jeremy Lamb and DeAndre Liggins to Tulsa (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO BEARS — Signed PK Austin Signor to a three-year contract. DALLAS COWBOYS — Signed S Danny McCray. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Re-signed RB

See HEAL, Page B3 Chris Ivory to a one-year contract. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Re-signed PK Steven Hauschka. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Recalled G Igor Bobkov from Norfolk (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Reassigned Fs Willie Coetzee, Andrej Nestrasil and Trevor Parkes, D Max Nicastro and G Jordan Pearce fromi Toledo (ECHL) to Grand Rapids (AHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS — Assigned RW Tyler Toffoli to Manchester (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Recalled Fs Daniel Bang and Kevin Henderson from Milwaukee (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Agreed to terms with F Joey Diamond on a one-year, entry-level contract. HORSE RACING NEW YORK RACING ASSOCIATION — Named Eric Wing director of communications and media relations. SOCCER Major League Soccer MONTREAL IMPACT — Acquired F Daniele Paponi on loan from Bologna FC (Italy-Serie A). SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC—Signed F Will Bates. COLLEGE METRO ATLANTIC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE — Announced it will add field hockey as an associate sport beginning with the 2013-14 academic year. CAMPBELL — Named Peter Thomas men’s assistant basketball coach. DUKE — Signed women’s basketball coach Joanne McCallie to a contract extension through the 2018-19 season. GONZAGA — Announced C Kelly Olynyk will enter the NBA draft. LENOIR-RHYNE — Fired men’s baseball coach Paul Knight. Announced the resignation of director of men’s and women’s tennis Bobby McKee. LOYOLA OF CHICAGO — Announced it is moving to the Missouri Valley Conference beginning with the fall 2013 semester. MINNESOTA STATE MANKATO — Named Brian Bahl women’s soccer coach. NEW MEXICO — Named Lamont Smith men’s associate head basketball coach. RUTGERS — Suspended men’s lacrosse coach Brian Brecht pending an investigation into allegations of verbal abuse.

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SPORTS

Roswell Daily Record

Third Round

Roswell native Gerina Piller on the LPGA Tour PLACE

Hubbard forced a pop out for the second out and finished off the win by striking out Amanda Gonzales. Hubbard got the win, pitching a complete game while giving up six runs on five hits and striking out 13. Hubbard, McFadin, Lem and Sanchez each had two hits. Lem, Sanchez and Shanor each drove in two runs. In Game 2, Goddard again jumped ahead early with two first-inning runs and never looked back. Renteria led off with a double and Hubbard switched places with her with a double on the next at-bat to give Goddard a 1-0 lead. Two batters later, Hubbard scored on an error. In the next inning, Goddard

Inks

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loaded the bases for Renteria, who cleared them with a threeRBI double into left to make it 50. Renteria’s third double of the game in the fourth plated Rebekka Franco, igniting a four -run inning that put Goddard up 9-1. Goddard tacked on five more in the fifth to kick in the mercy rule. Renteria finished the game 4 for 4 with five RBIs and three runs scored. Hubbard went 2 for 4 with three RBIs, McFadin was 3 for 4 with three RBIs and Kyla Casaus finished 3 for 3 with a run scored. Jacelyn Reyes picked up the win for Goddard after allowing four runs on eight hits and striking out two in five innings of work.

Prep baseball

Carlsbad 10, Roswell 0 CARLSBAD — The Cavemen scored at least one run in every

Emilee’s side on the golf course, said it was great to see his daughter’s dedication to golf pay off in such a big way. “It’s great. She’s put so much work into it. She’s worked hard academically and she’s a good student. And she’s worked hard at her golf game,” he said. “When your kids do well ... that makes you feel like you accomplished something as a parent. More importantly, besides the pride you feel, you feel for your child because she’s accomplishing something that she’s dreamed about doing. “When a kid accomplishes a dream or achieves a dream, that makes all the work you put into it as a parent worthwhile.” Emilee’s mother, Pam, a self-proclaimed

Games

game between the Buf falo Sabres and Penguins in Pittsburgh was rescheduled for Tuesday night. “We totally understand the situation and (are) respectful of that,” Penguins general manager Ray Shero said. “Hopefully, (we) have a chance to play tomorrow if that’s the case, but, again, the safety of the people of Boston, the city of Boston is most important for everybody.” Capacity at Fenway Park, about one mile from the finish line, is 37,493 for night games. Capacity at TD Garden is 17,565. With fans advised to stay home and police devoted to the manhunt, the decision to postpone was easy. Red Sox spokesman Kevin Gregg said the Royals have been in town since Wednesday night and spent their off day in the city on Thursday. The Royals are staying at the Westin Copley Place hotel, about a block from the marathon finish line. “We’ve been told not to go outside. We’ve been told the hotel has been locked down, although I’ve seen a handful of people moving around,” Royals vice president Mike Swanson said earlier Friday. “The streets are just, wow. It’s numbingly quiet

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Saturday, April 20 AUTO RACING 5 a.m. NBCSN — Formula One, qualifying for Bahrain Grand Prix, at Sakhir, Bahrain 8 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for STP 400, at Kansas City, Kan. 9 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, pole qualifying for SFP 250, at Kansas City, Kan. 10:30 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, “Happy Hour Series,” final practice for STP 400, at Kansas City, Kan.

TOTAL TO PAR

T-32nd -2

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TV SPORTSWATCH

B3

PILLER’S PROFESSION

Briefs

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Saturday, April 20, 2013

THIS WEEK’S STOP: LPGA LOTTE CHAMPIONSHIP ROUND SCORE

73

inning except the fourth en route to a five-inning victory over the Coyotes at the Caveman Corral on Friday. The Cavemen scored four times in the first, twice in the second, once in the third and thrice in the fifth to earn the win. Roswell had just three hits in the loss — one each from Luis Vale, Niguel Rubio and Jeremy Seabrease. John Amador was saddled with the loss after surrendering seven runs on six hits and walking five in 2 1⁄3 innings. Capitan 11, Gateway Chr. 5 Capitan broke a 2-2 tie with a seven-run sixth to pull away for a win over Gateway Christian in a District 4-1A showdown on Friday. Capitan led 2-0 going to the bottom of the fourth, but Gateway (7-6) scored once in the fourth and the fifth innings to knot the game at 2.

“behind the scenes mom,” said it’s going to be difficult to send Emilee off, but that she knows her daughter is ready for it. “Oh dear, it’s going to be difficult,” Pam said. “But, she’s ready and that’s what counts. She’s ready to go and that’s the most important thing.” Emilee is just the latest in a long line of exceptional female golfers to come out of Goddard High School, a group that includes a World Golf Hall of Famer (Nancy Lopez) and a touring pro currently ranked in the top 25 on the LPGA Money List (Gerina Piller). “It’s really good. I really like golfing for this school,” Emilee said about the tradition at Goddard. “All the girls are really supportive of me. Even if I have a bad day, they pick me up. ... I really want to follow in the footsteps of (Lopez and Piller) and become a professional and get to that level.” kjkeller@rdrnews.com

for a noon hour in Boston.” The Bruins also announced that the sale of playoff tickets, scheduled to start at 11 a.m. Friday, has been put off until 11 a.m. Monday. The New England Patriots postponed for the second time a news conference with director of player personnel Nick Caserio about next week’s NFL draft. The news conference originally had been scheduled for Tuesday but was postponed after the bombings. It has been rescheduled for Monday. The suspension of Amtrak train service forced the New England Revolution to change plans and travel by bus Friday morning to their game against the New York Red Bulls scheduled Saturday night at Red Bull Stadium in Harrison, N.J. Boston College canceled all home athletic events for Saturday, including the annual spring football game. Also postponed was the National Women’s Soccer League game on Saturday between the Boston Breakers and FC Kansas City in Overland Park, Kan. No makeup date was announced. The decision was based on “increased security measures that have impacted travel from the area,” NWSL executive director Cheryl Bailey said. The league also said it would conduct a moment of silence before the national anthem at

Noon SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, SFP 250, at Kansas City, Kan. 2:30 p.m. SPEED — Rolex Sports Car Series, Road Atlanta, at Braselton, Ga. 3 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, qualifying for FourWide Nationals, at Concord, N.C. (same-day tape) 4 p.m. NBCSN — IRL, IndyCar, pole qualifying for Grand Prix of Long Beach, at Long Beach, Calif. (same-day tape) BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN2 — Nike Hoop Summit, United States Junior Team vs. World Select Team, at Portland, Ore. BOXING 2 p.m. NBC — Heavyweights, Tyson Fury (20-0-0) vs. Steve Cunningham (25-5-

two games this weekend. Even before the manhunt, the bombings resulted in two major pro sports games in Boston being scratched — the Bruins against the Ottawa Senators last Monday night and the Indiana Pacers against the Celtics on Tuesday night. The Bruins game was rescheduled for April 28. The Celtics game was canceled outright, and the NBA’s regular season ended on Wednesday. The Celtics are scheduled to begin the first round of the playof fs Saturday in New York against the Knicks. The Bruins resumed play on Wednesday night amid tightened security at home against the Sabres. Fans were checked with wands and cars were subject to random searches as they entered the TD Garden underground garage. Before the game, there was a moment of silence, a slideshow of marathon scenes on the video scoreboard above center ice and a stirring rendition of the national anthem, which was started by long-time Bruins vocalist Rene Rancourt. He sang a few lines then gestured for the fans to join in — which they did. After the game, players gathered at center ice and raised their sticks in a salute to the fans who had chanted “U.S.A.” and “We are Boston.”

0), at New York 8 p.m. SHO — Omar Figueroa (20-0-1) vs. Abner Cotto (16-0-0), for vacant WBC Silver lightweight title; WBC champion Canelo Alvarez (41-0-1) vs. WBA champion Austin Trout (26-0-0), for WBC/WBA super welterweight titles, at San Antonio COLLEGE BASEBALL 11:30 a.m. FSN — Rice at Houston COLLEGE FOOTBALL 11 a.m. NBCSN — Intrasquad, Notre Dame Blue-Gold Game, at South Bend, Ind. EXTREME SPORTS 9 a.m. ESPN — X Games, at Foz Do Iguacu, Brazil 7 p.m. ESPN2 — X Games, at Foz Do Iguacu, Brazil

Hole Par Score

ROUND SCORECARD

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 5 4 4 3 5 4 4 3 4 36 5 4 4 2 5 4 4 2 4 34

Eagles: 0 Birdies: 3 Fairways hit: 6 of 14

Capitan’s big sixth gave the Tigers the lead and they would add two more in the seventh to seal the deal. Gateway’s seventh-inning rally produced three runs, but ended when Anthony Sanchez popped out to second. Jacob Moody took the loss, allowing seven runs on six hits while walking six in 5 1⁄3 innings. At the plate, Moody and Andrew Meeks each had two hits for the Warriors. Meeks also drove in two runs.

College baseball

NMMI 5-7, Western Texas 2-12 SNYDER, Texas — NMMI split a pair with Western Texas on Friday, winning the first game before falling in the nightcap. In Game 1, NMMI scored four times in the sixth inning to overcome a 1-0 deficit en route to a victory over the Westerners. Tyler Gibson earned the win for

Heal

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off their contest against the Pittsburgh Penguins. But, very shortly, the games will resume in Beantown, perhaps as soon as Saturday. A city, a nation, a world will be the better for it. “We’re all looking forward to the next home game at Fenway Park,” Smith said. While we’re at it, here’s hoping the impact of this terrible week will be more lasting than past tragedies. Sports fans — short for fanatics, as we’ve seen far too many times — should use this as another learning moment, an opportunity to permanently tone down the hateful rhetoric that too often rules in our stadiums, on sports talk radio, and throughout the Internet. There’s nothing wrong with being a passionate supporter of the home team, as long as everyone remembers it’s just a game. Frankly, we’re not holding our breath on that one. Memories fade. The vitriol returns. But maybe, just maybe, the next time a Yankees fan wants to pour a beer over the head of a Red Sox rival — or vice versa — there will be a flicker of how they came together in the wake of 9-11, how they were united again after the Boston Marathon tragedy. That’s the most amazing thing about sports. Roosevelt recognized the importance of baseball after America was plunged into a world at war. The easier path would’ve been to shut down, as many of the world’s top sporting events did at the time. The Indianapolis 500 wasn’t held from 1942-45. The Olympics were called off in both 1940 and ‘44. The Masters was canceled the last three years of the war. But, when baseball Commissioner Kennesaw Mountain Landis went to the president for guidance on what course the national pastime should

GOLF 7 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Open de Espana, third round, at Valencia, Spain (same-day tape) 11 a.m. TGC — PGA Tour, The Heritage, third round, at Hilton Head Island, S.C. 1 p.m. CBS — PGA Tour, The Heritage, third round, at Hilton Head Island, S.C. TGC — Champions Tour, Greater Gwinnett Championship, second round, at Duluth, Ga. 4:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA, LOTTE Championship, final round, at Kapolei, Hawaii MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 12:30 p.m. FOX — Regional coverage, Washington at N.Y. Mets, Detroit at L.A. Angels, or Minnesota at Chicago White Sox

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total 4 4 3 5 5 4 3 4 4 36 72 4 5 4 6 4 4 4 4 4 39 73

Pars: 11 Bogeys: 4 Greens hit: 11 of 18

Others: 0 Putts: 30

the Broncos after allowing two runs on three hits and striking out eight in six innings of work. Zach Habarka came on in the seventh to get the save. Austin Grier was the lone Bronco to record a multi-hit game, going 3 for 4 with a double and two singles. He also scored two of NMMI’s five runs. Six other Broncos had one hit, including Correy Davis, who drove in a pair of runs. In Game 2, NMMI was in control 5-2 going to the bottom of the fourth, but the Westerners plated six runs and never gave the lead back. Justice Boldin was saddled with the loss. He gave up eight runs on eight hits in 3 1 ⁄ 3 innings. Angel Peguero and Habarka each had three hits in the second game. Caleb Mitchell and Davis added two hits apiece. Davis again drove in a pair for the Broncos. take, Roosevelt responded with his famous “green light letter.” “I honestly feel that it would be best for the country to keep baseball going,” Roosevelt wrote. Of course, there have been times when the games should not have gone on. NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle decided to let teams play the Sunday after President Kennedy was assassinated. The decision was roundly criticized as insensitive to a grieving nation and would go down as the worst call of Rozelle’s long, successful career. In 1972, Inter national Olympic Committee President Avery Brundage thought he was doing the right thing by ordering the Munich Games to carry on after a horrific terrorist attack wiped out the Israeli team. He couldn’t have been more wrong. But, when handled with sensitivity, the decision on whether to play or not to play can have a profoundly positive impact. After the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on New York and Washington, the NFL, Major League Baseball and college football all shut down for a week, a call that was undoubtedly influenced by Rozelle’s misstep nearly four decades earlier. When the games resumed, it wasn’t just the right thing to do, but downright necessary to help the nation start moving forward again. Ten days after the attack, baseball returned to New York with a poignant game at Shea Stadium. More than 41,000 turned out to watch the Mets beat the Atlanta Braves, essentially thumbing the Big Apple’s nose at the terrorists. “This is the way life gets back to normalcy,” then-New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani said at the time. “You can’t just concentrate on the tragedy.” Boston has already received a dose of that healing salve. It needs a lot more. We’ll all be the better for it.

5 p.m. MLB — Regional coverage, St. Louis at Philadelphia or Atlanta at Pittsburgh MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 6 p.m. FOX — UFC, welterweights, Dan Hardy (27-8-0) vs. Matt Brown (18-110); lightweights, Nate Diaz (16-8-0) vs. Josh Thomson (19-5-1); heavyweights, Frank Mir (16-6-0) vs. Daniel Cormier (11-0-0); champion Benson Henderson (17-2-0) vs. Gilbert Melendez (21-2-0), for lightweight title, at San Jose, Calif. MOTORSPORTS 7 p.m. SPEED — MotoGP World Championship, qualifying for Grand Prix of the Americas, at Austin, Texas (sameday tape) NBA BASKETBALL 1 p.m.

ABC — Playoffs, first round, Game 1, Boston at New York 3:30 p.m. ESPN — Playoffs, first round, Game 1, Golden State at Denver 6 p.m. ESPN — Playoffs, first round, Game 1, Chicago at Brooklyn 8:30 p.m. ESPN — Playoffs, first round, Game 1, Memphis at L.A. Clippers NHL HOCKEY 5 p.m. NBCSN — Washington at Montreal SOCCER 7:55 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Arsenal at Fulham 8:30 p.m. NBCSN — MLS, Kansas City at Los Angeles


B4 Saturday, April 20, 2013

am going to lose her. Can you help me? SAD IN BUFFALO

DEAR ABBY

DEAR SAD: You are obviously doing well in your ESL studies, and for that I congratulate you. Because you and Vanessa no longer live close does not mean that you can’t still be friends. Although she has moved to a different geographical location, you can maintain a friendship because she is as near as your phone or computer. Because you want to still be a part of her life, keep her updated on what is going on in your life and ask her to do the same. That is the way long-distance relationships are maintained, and some of them have been known to last a lifetime. HHHHH

UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: I am a 16-year-old girl from Serbia. I have been in U.S. for two years and I’m studying English in an ESL class. I read your column and could use some help to solve my problem because I am very upset. I have known my best friend, “Vanessa,” for a year and a half. She is my age and we were very close. She had to leave school because her family moved. I can’t visit her because she is too far away. I cried because I don’t know if she is going to remember me or if she is going to forget all about me. I’m so afraid I

DEAR ABBY: I have been dating my boyfriend, “Adam,” for three years. Although we are young, we are serious about our relationship. Not too long after we started dating, Adam began

COMICS

staying over at my house on most weekends. I live with my mom, who is 47. For the past year when Adam comes to visit, my mom has been coming out of her bedroom in her bra and panties, for the most part exposed. She also makes flirtatious comments to Adam that I feel are completely inappropriate. I have tried talking to her about it, letting her know how uncomfortable Adam and I and some of my friends are about it. I hoped she would understand, but she continues with the flirting and underdressing. What can I do about this? I’m desperate to try anything. DESPERATE IN MAINE DEAR DESPERATE: You may be desperate, but not as desperate as it appears your mother is for attention. Because talking to her hasn’t helped, accept that she is not going to change her behavior. Have Adam stay over less often. When you meet with your friends, do it at someone else’s house. And if you can afford to move elsewhere,

you should consider it. HHHHH DEAR ABBY: I am a single mother of a 12year-old boy. Three or four of his friends are constantly over at our house, and I feel obligated to feed and/or entertain them. Their parents don’t send money for their meals and often don’t even call to check on them, so they are left spending the night here. I don’t mind the boys staying with us, but I don’t think I should be expected to pay for their food and fun or feel guilty if my son and I eat and they don’t. Any suggestions? SINGLE MOM IN THE SOUTH DEAR SINGLE MOM: Call the boys’ parents and have a friendly chat with them. I agree that the current situation isn’t fair to you, and because the boys are at your home so often, their parents should be chipping in. Alternatively, start sending the boys home at dinner time.

The Wizard of Id

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

MISLIE TORRAY “

Yesterday’s

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

-

A:

Blondie

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

PUCOH

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

FROM HELOISE

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

LABEZ

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Family Circus

(Answers Monday) TROLL ABRUPT ABACUS Jumbles: DUNCE Answer: When he proposed that there were oceans on the moon, some people thought it was — “LUNA-SEA”

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Dear Heloise: I love my GRANITE COUNTERTOPS. However, I don’t know how to clean/disinfect them without using chemical-based commercial cleaners. I use vinegar to clean/disinfect the sink, stove and other appliances. Can I use vinegar on granite, or is there another natural product I can use? Lois McNamara, Cedar Grove, N.J.

This is an often-asked question, and it may be a hard one (pun intended) to answer. There is much conflicting information about how to clean and “sanitize” granite countertops. So, it is best to check with the manufacturer or the installer of your granite to see what is suggested. The most important thing to remember when you start thinking about cleaning or disinfecting granite is that many cleaners might damage granite. Don’t use abrasive cleaners or anything with a high acid content (like grout, tile, toilet, etc.). Also, when you spill something on the granite countertop, wipe it up as soon as possible to keep it from staining. You usually are safe with a drop or two of mild dish soap on a damp sponge. Wipe the surface, rinse with water and wipe dry. Heloise

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

HHHHH

Dear Readers: Miriam Brown of Benton, Maine, sent a photo of her large black cat sitting up and begging for his food. To see the black cat, visit www.Heloise.com and click on “Pets.” Heloise

HHHHH

Dear Heloise: I broke a bone in my foot, causing me to have to wear “the boot.” I’m an outside person, and it has been awful trying to keep the boot clean so I can wear it in the house. To make it “waterproof,” my husband and I took a dog-food bag, cut off the top, and I put my foot/boot inside. He folded the bag around the boot, took the leftover top part and doubled the bottom of the boot before wrapping it with duct tape. FYI: A regular plastic bag won’t work, as it tears because the boot is so hard. Kathy Erwin, Cooper, Texas

As one who has worn “the boot” for a broken toe (for several weeks), I know what you mean! A health note from me about wearing a “walking cast,” aka the boot: Be SURE that the heel on the other foot is the same height as the one on the boot! If not, you are walking like Popeye, and it can permanently affect your gait! Heloise P.S.: Ask your physician about this!

HHHHH

Dear Heloise: To avoid waste and practice good nutrition, I use a large-mesh sieve to remove the “fines” from cereal; they become my breading for salmon croquettes, chicken, etc. Sometimes I mix it with a bit of cornmeal or flour, depending on what I’m frying. It’s important that the cereal not have much, if any, sugar or sugar substitutes! — A Reader, via email

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Roswell Daily Record


FINANCIAL

Roswell Daily Record

Saturday, April 20, 2013

B5

Judges’ lawsuit: Disability system ‘in crisis’

WASHINGTON (AP) — Social Security’s disability program is overwhelmed by so many claims that judges sometimes award benefits they might otherwise deny just to keep up with the flow of cases, according to a lawsuit filed by the judges themselves. The Social Security Administration says the agency’s administrative law judges should decide 500 to 700 disability cases a year. The agency calls the standard a productivity goal, but the lawsuit claims it is an illegal quota that requires judges to decide an average of more than two cases per workday. “When the goals are too high, the easy way out is to pay the case,” said Randall Frye, president of the Association of Administrative Law Judges and a judge in Charlotte, N.C. “Paying the case is a decision that might be three pages long. When you deny benefits, it’s usually a 15- or 20-

page denial that takes a lot more time and effort.” The lawsuit raises serious questions about the integrity of the disability hearing process by the very people in charge of running it. It comes as the disability program faces serious financial problems. The disability program’s trust fund will run out of money in 2016, according to projections by Social Security’s trustees. At that point, the system will collect only enough money in payroll taxes to pay 79 percent of benefits. That would trigger an automatic 21 percent cut in benefits. Congress could redirect money from Social Security’s much bigger retirement program to shore up the disability program, as it did in 1994. But that would worsen the finances of the retirement program, which is facing its own long-term financial problems. The lawsuit was filed by the

judges’ union and three judges on Thursday in federal court in Chicago. It names the agency and Acting Social Security Commissioner Carolyn Colvin as defendants. Colvin took over in February after Commissioner Michael Astrue’s six-year term expired. The union announced the lawsuit at a press conference Friday in Washington. A Social Security spokesman declined to comment. In an interview, Astrue disputed the union’s claims. “What’s really happening here is that the judges’ union doesn’t want accountability of its members and it’s been trying to sell this story to the media and to the Congress and to the agency for a very long time,” Astrue said. “And no one’s buying it because it’s not true, and no federal judge is going to buy this story, either.” “There are a very small number of malcontents who want to litigate or put political pressure on

Disability claims also typically increase when the economy sours. Some people who manage to work despite their disabilities get laid off and apply for benefits, while others apply out of economic desperation.

the agency rather than do their work,” Astrue said. The union represents 1,400 administrative law judges. The judges are hired by the agency but are supposed to act independently when they decide cases. More than 30 federal agencies employ administrative law judges, mainly to settle disputes between the agencies and people who are affected by agency decisions. The Social Security Administration employs the most judges, about 1,500. The lawsuit filed by their union describes the disability program as “a system in crisis.” About 3.2 million people applied for disability benefits last year, a 25 percent increase from a decade before. Claims have increased in part because of aging baby boomers. As people get older, they become more prone to disabilities.

When people apply for Social Security disability benefits, their cases are initially reviewed by state offices, which reject most claims. If your claim is rejected, you can appeal to an administrative law judge. But the hearing process takes an average of 373 days — a little more than a year — according to agency statistics.

Astrue said the average processing time for a hearing peaked at 542 days shortly after he took over the agency. He said public outcry over the backlog led him to adopt productivity standards in 2007, which helped reduce the wait time.

Oil ends week S&P 500 up after rough week slightly higher

The price of oil rose above $88 a barrel on Friday as traders cautiously returned to commodity markets following sharp sell-offs this week. Benchmark crude for May delivery rose 28 cents to finish at $88.01 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Crude has lost about $9 a barrel since the beginning of the month, as various reports highlighted slower growth in China and still-sluggish growth in the U.S. and elsewhere, while oil supplies remained high. At the same time investors sold off gold, silver and other commodities, and looked to the stock market for better returns. The stock market had a volatile week as many of those investors bought and sold shares, looking to consolidate their positions. Analysts said relatively low prices for oil and a weaker dollar rekindled interest among buyers. “Crude oil prices rebounded and climbed higher on Friday ... supported by a weaker U.S. dollar and a strong rebound in the global equity markets and increased risk appetite,” said a note from Sucden Financial Research in London. A weaker dollar makes crude cheaper — and a more attractive investment — for traders using other currencies. Prices were also supported by the possibility that oilproducing countries could reduce output. Some of the members of OPEC — which includes some the world’s leading oil exporters like Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Venezuela and Nigeria — have said that $100 a barrel is a “reasonable” price for both producers and consumers. In London Brent crude, which is used to price oil used by many U.S. refiners, rose 52 cents to end at $99.65 on the ICE Futures exchange.

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Apr 13 125.95 126.37 125.67 126.35 Jun 13 121.20 121.50 120.75 121.30 Aug 13 121.65 121.92 121.15 121.62 Oct 13 125.27 125.50 124.77 125.10 Dec 13 126.72 126.82 126.17 126.60 Feb 14 127.35 127.45 126.87 127.27 Apr 14 128.37 128.42 127.95 128.22 Jun 14 123.90 123.90 123.90 123.90 Last spot N/A Est. sales 30346. Thu’s Sales: 47,023 Thu’s open int: 322433, up +537 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Apr 13 134.02 134.32 133.52 134.02 May 13 139.30 139.62 138.37 139.20 Aug 13 146.90 146.90 145.50 146.05 Sep 13 148.55 148.60 147.80 148.45 Oct 13 150.10 150.15 149.32 150.07 Nov 13 150.17 150.70 149.90 150.65 Jan 14 149.57 149.62 149.00 149.30 Mar 14 150.50 150.50 150.50 150.50 Last spot N/A Est. sales 9090. Thu’s Sales: 8,347 Thu’s open int: 38376, up +637 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 13 87.85 87.92 87.30 87.85 Jun 13 90.57 90.67 89.85 90.20 Jul 13 91.00 91.00 90.10 90.27 Aug 13 90.70 90.75 89.82 90.00 Oct 13 81.30 81.30 80.50 80.57 Dec 13 78.70 78.70 77.75 77.90 Feb 14 80.95 81.12 80.55 80.95 Apr 14 82.80 83.00 82.60 82.95 May 14 87.90 88.00 87.85 88.00 Jun 14 89.60 89.95 89.40 89.95 Jul 14 89.00 Aug 14 88.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 25485. Thu’s Sales: 29,845 Thu’s open int: 225185, up +2080

chg.

+.15 -.07 -.15 -.45 -.37 -.30 -.38 -.35

-.43 -.85 -1.12 -.77 -.53 -.55 -.60 -.40

-.10 -.40 -.53 -.55 -.53 -.60 -.20 +.05 +.08

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

chg.

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 13 83.51 84.09 83.12 83.48 Jul 13 85.42 86.15 85.11 85.36 Sep 13 85.17 Oct 13 85.48 85.48 85.26 85.26 Dec 13 85.08 86.10 85.05 85.17 Mar 14 85.16 85.86 84.98 85.13 May 14 85.13 Jul 14 85.18 Oct 14 84.41 Dec 14 82.50 82.67 82.50 82.67 Mar 15 82.82 May 15 83.05 Jul 15 83.30 Oct 15 83.20 Dec 15 83.10 Mar 16 83.10 Last spot N/A Est. sales 18633. Thu’s Sales: 23,634 Thu’s open int: 177834, off -3180

-.12 +.09 +.35 +.09 +.15 +.26 +.32 +.30 +.28 +.28 +.28 +.28 +.28 +.28 +.28

Sep 14 752ü 753 752ü 753 Dec 14 763fl 763fl 760fl 761ü Mar 15 766fl 766fl 766fl 766fl May 15 767 767 767 767 Jul 15 741ø 741ø 739ü 739ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 178961. Thu’s Sales: 82,220 Thu’s open int: 436766, off -762 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 13 645ü 652fl 642fl 652 Jul 13 629fl 636 627 633 Sep 13 566 573ø 562fl 572 Dec 13 541 549 536ü 547 Mar 14 551 559 547 557ü May 14 558ü 567 556 565 Jul 14 563ø 572ø 560 570fl Sep 14 542 548ü 542 547ü Dec 14 545fl 552fl 543ø 550ø Mar 15 555fl 556fl 555fl 556fl May 15 554ø 557ø 554ø 557ø Jul 15 555ü 558ü 555ü 558ü Sep 15 540ü 543ü 540ü 543ü Dec 15 531ü 537 531 536fl Jul 16 546ø 552 546ø 552 Dec 16 515 518 515 518 Last spot N/A Est. sales 400658. Thu’s Sales: 326,054 Thu’s open int: 1261903, off -6169 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 13 387ü 392 379fl 392 Jul 13 379ü 383 373 383 Sep 13 369 369 368ü 368ü Dec 13 365ü 365ü 363ø 364ü Mar 14 370 370 368fl 368fl May 14 370 370 368fl 368fl Jul 14 385 385 383fl 383fl Sep 14 366 366 364fl 364fl Dec 14 366 366 364fl 364fl Mar 15 366 366 364fl 364fl Jul 15 366 366 364fl 364fl Sep 15 366 366 364fl 364fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 2595. Thu’s Sales: 1,298 Thu’s open int: 9066, off -112 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 13 1430ø 1441 1422 1428ü Jul 13 1390 1400ø 1380 1382ø Aug 13 1340fl 1346 1326ü 1328ø Sep 13 1269ü 1274 1256ü 1258ü Nov 13 1223ø 1228ø 1211fl 1213 Jan 14 1231 1235 1220 1220fl Mar 14 1240ø 1241ø 1226fl 1227fl May 14 1244ø 1244ø 1232 1233 Jul 14 1252 1252 1239fl 1239fl Aug 14 1247 1247 1237ü 1237ü Sep 14 1234fl 1234fl 1225 1225 Nov 14 1228 1234 1220 1220 Jan 15 1228ü 1228ü 1217ü 1217ü Mar 15 1225fl 1225fl 1213ø 1213ø May 15 1217ü 1217ü 1210ø 1210ø Jul 15 1224 1224 1214ü 1214ü Aug 15 1217ü 1217ü 1208 1208 Sep 15 1211 1211 1201fl 1201fl Nov 15 1201 1201 1191fl 1191fl Jul 16 1194fl 1194fl 1185ø 1185ø Nov 16 1168 1168 1158fl 1158fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 277060. Thu’s Sales: 222,461 Thu’s open int: 557632, off -6010

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 13 704ü 711fl 697fl 709 Jul 13 708 714 700 711ø Sep 13 715 720ü 707 718 Dec 13 727fl 734 721 731ø Mar 14 741fl 746 734ü 744ø May 14 744ü 750ü 741ø 748fl Jul 14 746ø 751fl 741fl 748fl

chg.

+6ü +4fl +4ü +4 +4 +3ø +1

Brett Leach Financial Consultant

NEW YORK (AP) — A rare earnings miss for IBM tugged the Dow Jones industrial average lower on Friday, while the rest of the market headed toward slight gains after a turbulent week. Quarterly earnings for the country’s largest provider of computer services fell short of forecasts for the first time since 2005. IBM said delays in closing several large software and mainframe computer deals hindered sales. Shortly after 1 p.m. Eastern time, the Dow Jones industrial average was down 34 points to 14,503, a slip of 0.2 percent. IBM, which posted results late Thursday, led the average lower, falling eight percent to $191.08. Traders, like everyone else, were following the news out of Boston, where police were hunting for one of two brothers suspected in Monday’s Boston Marathon bombings. One brother was killed in a gun battle with police overnight. But the news had no impact on markets, traders said. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose eight points to 1,550, up 0.6 percent. The Nasdaq composite index gained 30 points to 3,197, up almost 1 percent. For the week, both the S&P 500 and the Dow have lost more than 2 percent. “Compared to the rest of the

FUTURES

+fl +ø

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: +3 Open high

+7ø +3ü +5ü +5fl +5ø +5ø +6 +4 +3ü +3ü +3 +3 +3 +5ø +5ø +5ø

+3ø +3fl -1 -1ü -1ü -1ü -1ü -1ü -1ü -1ü -1ü -1ü

-2ü -7ø -10ø -10 -10ø -10ü -9ø -9ü -9fl -9fl -9fl -10ü -11 -12ü -6fl -9ü -9ü -9ü -9ü -9ü -9ü

low

settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. May 13 88.37 88.79 87.56 88.01 Jun 13 88.64 89.06 87.82 88.27 Jul 13 88.76 89.27 88.05 88.48 Aug 13 88.84 89.30 88.11 88.54 Sep 13 88.50 89.15 81.30 88.43 Oct 13 88.58 88.58 87.85 88.16 Nov 13 88.21 88.24 87.50 87.82 Dec 13 83.90 88.00 83.90 87.47 Jan 14 87.42 87.42 87.01 87.11 Feb 14 86.66 87.16 86.66 86.80 Mar 14 87.00 87.04 86.45 86.53 Apr 14 86.60 86.60 86.20 86.28 May 14 86.06 Jun 14 86.18 86.39 85.73 85.85 Jul 14 85.61 Aug 14 85.39 Sep 14 85.51 85.53 85.19 85.19 Oct 14 84.71 85.01 84.71 85.01 Nov 14 84.59 84.87 84.59 84.87 Dec 14 85.05 85.25 84.63 84.78 Jan 15 84.57 Feb 15 84.37 Mar 15 84.20 Apr 15 84.04 May 15 83.90 Jun 15 83.79 Last spot N/A Est. sales 419731. Thu’s Sales: 772,647 Thu’s open int: 1764412, up +7945 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon May 13 2.7590 2.7850 2.7517 2.7724 Jun 13 2.7563 2.7755 2.7458 2.7614 Jul 13 2.7350 2.7500 2.7233 2.7356 Aug 13 2.7018 2.7150 2.6900 2.7009 Sep 13 2.6700 2.6750 2.6495 2.6605 Oct 13 2.5196 2.5226 2.5020 2.5105 Nov 13 2.4870 2.4919 2.4737 2.4796 Dec 13 2.4564 2.4750 2.4539 2.4617 Jan 14 2.4612 2.4650 2.4515 2.4567 Feb 14 2.4596 2.4602 2.4596 2.4602

chg.

+.28 +.27 +.28 +.29 +.29 +.30 +.31 +.32 +.32 +.32 +.32 +.31 +.30 +.29 +.29 +.30 +.30 +.30 +.30 +.31 +.31 +.31 +.31 +.31 +.31 +.31

+.0169 +.0131 +.0095 +.0057 +.0033 +.0040 +.0045 +.0042 +.0035 +.0030

week, it looks like we’re going to slide into the weekend on a quiet note,” said Jim Baird, Partner and Chief Investment Officer for Plante Moran Financial Advisors By many measures, the financial markets have endured a turbulent five days. AP Photo News that economic growth Trader Gregory Rowe calls out an order on the floor of the had slowed in New York Stock Exchange Friday. China set of f a plunge in commodity prices on $787.98 after its quarterly profit Monday, leading the stock market beat Wall Street’s estimates. The to its worst day of the year. Gold leader in Internet search boosted dropped below $1,400 an ounce for prices for ads distributed to smartphones and tablet computers. the first time in two years. Most big corporations have manThe stock market bounced back aged to beat analysts’ low expectathe next day, then fell again on Wednesday, the third worst day for tions for first-quarter profits. Of the 104 companies that tur ned in the stock market this year. In other Friday trading, Microsoft results through Friday morning, 70 gained 3 percent to $29.77, coun- have trumped forecasts, according tering IBM’s weight on the Dow. The to S&P Capital IQ. software giant reported earnings Analysts estimate that earnings late Thursday that beat analysts’ for companies in the S&P 500 estimates and showed solid results inched up just 2 percent over the from its Office, software tools and previous year, a slowdown from the Xbox divisions. 7.7 percent rise in the fourth quarGoogle’s stock rose 3 percent to ter of 2012.

Mar 14 2.4699 2.4699 2.4692 2.4692 Apr 14 2.6472 2.6472 2.6377 2.6377 May 14 2.6307 Jun 14 2.6142 Jul 14 2.5897 Aug 14 2.5612 Sep 14 2.5247 Oct 14 2.3957 Nov 14 2.3697 Dec 14 2.3522 Jan 15 2.3562 Feb 15 2.3676 Mar 15 2.3816 Apr 15 2.5116 May 15 2.5141 Jun 15 2.4991 Last spot N/A Est. sales 108377. Thu’s Sales: 149,938 Thu’s open int: 305003, off -2601 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu May 13 4.418 4.420 4.363 4.408 Jun 13 4.445 4.450 4.391 4.437 Jul 13 4.480 4.500 4.433 4.479 Aug 13 4.494 4.507 4.451 4.500 Sep 13 4.487 4.500 4.438 4.483 Oct 13 4.480 4.500 4.439 4.484 Nov 13 4.535 4.548 4.500 4.545 Dec 13 4.672 4.689 4.500 4.685 Jan 14 4.750 4.763 4.750 4.763 Feb 14 4.711 Mar 14 4.576 4.609 4.576 4.609 Apr 14 4.228 May 14 4.149 4.220 4.149 4.215 Jun 14 4.177 4.235 4.172 4.235 Jul 14 4.265 Aug 14 4.237 4.282 4.234 4.282 Sep 14 4.242 4.280 4.242 4.280 Oct 14 4.260 4.304 4.260 4.304 Nov 14 4.348 4.371 4.348 4.371 Dec 14 4.530 4.557 4.515 4.557 Jan 15 4.600 4.645 4.600 4.645 Feb 15 4.628 Mar 15 4.548 Apr 15 4.187 4.230 4.187 4.230 May 15 4.237 Jun 15 4.220 4.261 4.220 4.261 Last spot N/A Est. sales 258412. Thu’s Sales: 666,421 Thu’s open int: 1594382, up +25346

+.0020 +.0015 +.0015 +.0020 +.0025 +.0030 +.0035 +.0005 +.0005 +.0005 +.0005 +.0005 +.0005 +.0005 +.0005 +.0005

+.007 +.005 +.006 +.008 +.006 +.005 +.005 +.009 +.004 +.005 +.009 +.040 +.040 +.039 +.039 +.040 +.040 +.040 +.039 +.037 +.037 +.037 +.036 +.030 +.030 +.030

METALS

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Fri. Aluminum -$0.8500 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.1580 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.1515 N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Lead - $1997.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8352 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1405.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1395.30 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri. Silver - $23.190 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $22.955 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Platinum -$1430.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1423.30 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

ANNUITIES • STOCKS • BONDS MUTUAL FUNDS 2724 Wilshire Blvd. • Suite 101 Roswell, NM 88201 • 575-627-1000 • swst.com

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NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name

MARKET SUMMARY AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Vol (00) Last Chg Name

Last 2.18 7.15 2.37 26.40 10.92

+.22 -.92 -.02 -1.60

Vol (00) 54649 NwGold g 49042 NovaGld g 35318 CheniereEn 32951 AlldNevG 26831

Chg +2.36 +5.25 +3.07 +2.46 +4.87

%Chg +40.5 +16.0 +14.8 +14.5 +11.5

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Rentech 2.18 +.23 +11.8 VertxPh Alteva 11.03 +1.11 +11.2 Novadaq g ASpecRlty 2.30 +.23 +11.1 Overstk AskanoG g 2.54 +.23 +10.0 Healthwys TwoHrb wt 2.14 +.17 +8.6 NetElem n

Name Last Chg Coeur wt 3.65 -.85 PrUVxST rs 7.33 -1.23 CSVS2xVx rs 3.26 -.45 IBM 190.00-17.15 BiPNick 19.57 -1.73

%Chg -18.9 -14.4 -12.1 -8.3 -8.1

Name AMCON MagHR pfE MGT Cap ContMatls ParkCity

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

2,212 844 101 3,157 170 28

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

S&P500ETF 1278811155.48 +1.34 Rentech

BkofAm 1163985 GenElec 1022165 SprintNex 987942 BariPVix rs 612446

11.66 21.75 7.17 20.44

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name HomexDev RestorHw n DB AgriSh CapOne wt Celanese

Last 8.18 38.00 23.79 19.51 47.10

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

Volume

Name

Div

AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola s Disney EOG Res EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

1.80 .80 .04 1.94f 3.60 1.12f .75f .75f 3.58 2.28 .40 .58f 1.20f .90 3.40 2.44

Last 69.11 19.42 3.74 15.27 5.01

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg

31 38.28 +.54 12 55.87 +1.69 27 11.66 +.22 17 87.96 +1.84 9 115.90 +.31 22 42.66 +.56 20 61.56 +1.57 54 113.44 -1.87 11 48.20 +.53 9 87.45 +.83 10 12.93 +.18 ... 19.56 -.65 6 49.92 +1.42 11 22.44 +.20 13 190.00 -17.15 23 84.49 +1.31

Last Chg 85.60+32.73 12.73 +2.51 18.73 +3.03 12.89 +1.87 3.19 +.39

250 160 35 445 2 9

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

DIARY

73,339,130 Volume

INDEXES

Last 14,547.51 6,034.14 528.03 8,994.12 2,329.45 3,206.06 1,555.25 16,393.64 912.50

YTD %Chg Name +13.6 +20.6 +.4 +16.7 +7.2 +17.7 +23.6 -6.1 +12.3 +1.0 -.2 +37.3 +7.2 +8.8 -.8 +20.5

%Chg +61.9 +24.5 +19.3 +17.0 +13.9

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Net Chg +10.37 +89.98 +7.06 +72.95 +14.91 +39.70 +13.64 +159.38 +10.99

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Last

Chg +.98 -.55 -.12 +.20 +.92

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg -7.27 -9.5 AcaciaTc 21.49 -8.08 -27.3 -1.93 -9.0 SyngyP un 13.50 -4.00 -22.9 -.29 -7.2 PRGX Glbl 5.24 -.00 -16.0 -1.16 -7.1 AirMethd s 39.76 -6.14 -13.4 -.38 -7.1 Virco 2.17 -.32 -12.9

DIARY

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

PE

Name Vol (00) Last Microsoft 899967 29.77 Dell Inc 805881 13.40 Cisco 463036 20.46 Intel 443352 22.44 PwShs QQQ36825568.09

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

3,479,252,538 Volume

52-Week High Low 14,887.51 12,035.09 6,291.65 4,795.28 524.35 435.57 9,256.13 7,222.88 2,509.57 2,164.87 3,306.95 2,726.68 1,597.35 1,266.74 16,845.78 13,248.92 954.00 729.75

Chg +.23 +.36 +.02 +.48 +.29

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 n SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

1,677 774 86 2,537 63 45

1,660,295,978

% Chg +.07 +1.51 +1.36 +.82 +.64 +1.25 +.88 +.98 +1.22

YTD % Chg +11.01 +13.71 +16.54 +6.52 -1.11 +6.18 +9.05 +9.33 +7.44

52-wk % Chg +11.65 +15.28 +14.60 +12.07 -3.64 +6.85 +12.82 +13.15 +13.49

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

1.72 .92 2.86f .66f 2.15 .96f 1.25f .04 1.12 1.60f .69e 2.06 1.88f .36f 1.00f 1.08

22 15 18 18 21 16 9 24 22 19 ... ... 16 12 10 17

47.49 29.77 55.72 23.48 82.77 31.06 57.84 13.34 34.25 59.75 17.48 52.25 78.29 16.20 36.69 31.08

+.93 +.98 +1.41 +.49 +1.52 +.47 +.61 +.36 +.33 +1.28 +.18 +1.34 +1.13 +.16 +.42 +.60

+16.0 +11.4 +3.2 +14.5 +21.0 +23.8 +8.9 +30.3 +10.9 +24.9 +8.9 +20.8 +14.7 -4.0 +7.3 +16.4

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


B6 Saturday, April 20, 2013

005. South

006. Southwest

26 NEISS Pl, Fri-Sat, 6:30am-? Clothes, shoes, blankets, toys, movies, tools.

617 W. Redwood, Friday-Saturday, 8am-?

GARAGE SALES

002. Northeast 210 E. 3rd, April 18-20, 9am-1pm. Doors & Stove. Lots of great stuff!! 4501 Ranchito Dr (1 mi. E. of Mall off E. Pine Lodge, Sat., 7-2. Household, sports equip., furniture. 103 CALLE del Sol, Sat., 6am. Moving Sale. Washer, dryer, lots electronics.

CLASSIFIEDS

CLOSING OUT Business sale, 410 S. Main, Fri-Sat, 8am-? 3 party sale. 49 W. Wells, Sat-Sun, 8am-4pm. Big yard sale. Clothes, misc. 1605 S. Washington, Sat only. 7-? HUGE SALE! Lots of misc.

006. Southwest

2319 N.SHERMAN Saturday 7-? Huge yard sale. 5 SUMMERWiND Pl. (Briar Ridge) Sat., 7am-11. Tons of boys/girls clothes, toys, wood swing/playset, new poker table and more.

2404 PALOMAR Dr., Sat., 7am-noon. Clothes, crafts, houseware & misc.

004. Southeast

206 CODDINGTON Rd. Fri-Sun. Crafts, glass ware, clothing, jewelry.

210 E. Conner, Saturday 7am-? TV, treadmill, window A/C toddler bed, boy toddler clothes & misc.

1511 W. TILDEN MULTI-FAMILY SALE. FRI-SUN, 8-? DRUM SET, WEAVING LOOM, MUCH MORE. MOVING SALE 333 W. Brasher Rd #106, Fri&Sat, 8-5, No early sales! Shed, tools, small appliances, dishes, pots & pans, 2TV’s, some furniture, 12 place settings good china, etc.

705 S. Missouri Moving Sale Sat. 7am

Legals -----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish April 20, 2013 CALL FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given by the Board of Education of the Roswell Independent School District of Roswell, New Mexico that sealed Bids for the furnishing of the following services will be received by Veronica Salazar in the Business Office, 300 N. Kentucky, Suite 203, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, until May 21, 2011 @ 2:00 pm BID # 13-16 Food BID # 13-17 Non-Food BID # 13-18 Produce BID # 13-19 Bread BID # 13-20 Milk Specifications and instructions for bids may be obtained from the above office. The Board of Education reserves the right to reject all bids and to waive technicalities and irregularities. /s/ Pauline Ponce Pauline Ponce, President Board of Education

INSTRUCTION EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

310 1/2 W. Wildy, Sat & Sun, 8am-? Huge sale! Furniture too much to list!!

007. West

APRIL 19,20,21ST. 801 W. Poe. 6am-3pm, in backyard. SAT/SUN, 7:30-2 507 W. 17th. Lots of misc.

008. Northwest FREE GARAGE “sale”7-10a.m. Saturday, April, 20, at Christ’s Church, 2200 N. Sycamore Ave. Everything is free, but please only take what you need. Free drinks and snacks while supplies last. For details call 623-4110. No dealers please. SATURDAY, APRIL 20. 7:00a.m.-12:00. 701 West Mescalero Rd. 2 golf pull carts, women’s golf clubs, leaf blower, charcoal grill, clothes, dishes, lots more. 1308 N. Missouri. Big, Big sale, Fri/Sat only, 8-? Scooter, bikes, music equip, furniture, appliances, & much more.

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice

I BUY gold jewelry & pay high prices. Broken is okay. Call Ted, 578-0805.

025. Lost and Found

ENGLISH BULL terrier. Solid white freckled rt. ear rt. eye. Gateway church area. 626-3034/623-5880 BLACK MALE cat missing from Sunrise St. (neighborhood behind Tia Juana’s) since April 14th. Please call if you have any info at 914-5973. Reward offered! 3YR OLD male golden retriever, lost on East Sky Loop. Reward! 578-0093 or 940-902-5517

TEMPORARY FARM Labor: M&D Inc., Dexter, NM, has 2 positions for custom harvesting; 6 mos. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days appropriate driver’s license with airbrake endorsement to drive grain & transporter trucks; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $9.73/hr up to $2000/mo. depending on location; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 2/25/13 – 12/25/13. Apply at nearest NM Workforce Office with Job Order 252451 or call 575-420-0728. PINK SLIPPER Gentleman’s Club of Artesia is now hiring dancers. Must be 18 years old, no experience necessary. Apply in person at 6110 7 Rivers Hwy or call 505-402-6777. FOREMAN NEEDED for utility work and backhoe operators must have prior utility experience. Please call 505-250-2467 or apply in person at 1303 E. McGaffey, Kelly Cable. Accounting Manager/Controller Medium Size Company, in the Artesia-Carlsbad area, has an opening for a full-time accounting manager/controller. Accounting degree with 3 to 5 years experience required. Agricultural and Oil & Gas experience desirable, bilingual is a plus. Please send resume to: Accountant, PO Box 690, Artesia, NM 88211 CUSTOMER SERVICE JFA Distributing in Roswell NM, is looking to fill 5 entry level positions in customer service. Training is provided & starts soon so we MUST get these positions filled. Starts at $1600mo per agreement. If you are interested (575)578-4817. NOW TAKING applications for CNA’s for part time. Might be a great second job. Come by 217A N. Main for applications.

DO YOU want a job? Do you want to be a caregiver to the elderly? Now taking applications for caregivers who can provide loving care to the elderly. Must be able to work some weekends, pass drug testing, have a phone and transportation. Come by 217A N. Main and fill out application.

CAN YOU multi-task effectively? Looking for officer personnel with experience at answering phone, great computer skills. Must work well with people. Must be able to pay attention to detail and multi-task efficiently. Send resume to PO Box 1897, Unit #342, Roswell, NM 88202. BILLY RAYS is now taking applications for kitchen help/cook. 118 E. 3rd. No phone calls.

Receptionist Wanted. 15 or more years experience wanted. Email resume to ramcorinc@earthlink.net or fax to (520)888-4574

Program Manager for facilities needed. At least 10 years of experience. Email resume to ramcorinc@earthlink.net or fax to (520)888-4574 REGISTERED NURSE Counseling Associates, Inc. is currently hiring a registered nurse. Applicants must hold a valid New Mexico License. Experience with psychiatric clients preferred. Bilingual (English/Spanish) a plus. This is a 40 hour per week position with no late nights, no week-ends and paid holidays. Great Fringe benefits. If interested please email resume to sylviaorosco@cai-nm.com or send to address down below: Counseling Associates, Inc. Attention: Sylvia Orosco PO Box 1978 Roswell, NM 88202 If you need further information, please contact Sylvia Orosco at (575)623-1480 ext. 1058

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish April 20, 27, May 5, 2013

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Publish April 20, 27, May 4, 2013

Notice Steve Harris, Chaves County Treasurer, reminds Chaves County residents that the second half of 2012 property taxes are due April 10, 2013, and will become delinquent May 11, 2013. To avoid interest and penalty, second half taxes must be paid by May 10, 2013. Make checks payable to:

045. Employment Opportunities

Chaves County Treasurer P.O. Box 1772 Roswell, NM 88202-1772

Payments may also be made in person at the Chaves County Administrative Center, #1 St. Mary’s Place, Suite 200. The treasurer’s Office also has a “mail drop box”. The driveway on the East end of the parking lot is for the Treasurer’s mail drop box. For further information call 624-6618.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish April 20, 2013 CALL FOR BIDS (Bid #12-11) - 510 E. Tilden St., Roswell, NM 88203 The Southwestern Regional Housing and CDC will accept sealed bids for the repair of One (1) single family housing unit included in the Southwestern Regional Housing and Community Development Corporation’s 2012 House by House, Housing Rehabilitation Loan Program. All eligible licensed, LEAD BASED CERTIFIED, insured and bonded General Building Contractors interested in bidding on these projects may acquire bid forms and job specifications from Bill Trueax at Southwestern Regional Housing and CDC satellite office, located at 915 Grape, T or C, NM 87901 or Olivia Gilmore at our main office, at 109 E. Pine St. in Deming, NM. You may also call (575) 621-3801 to find out our Roswell location or to have The Bid package Emailed to you. Attendance to a pre-bid walk thru of Bid #12-11 is required in order for a bid to be accepted. Date and time of this walk thru is Monday, April 29, 2013 at 1:00 P.M. If unable to attend at this time please call to set up another time. Bids will be accepted in the office of the Southwestern Regional Housing and Community Development Corporation until 2:00 P.M. Monday, May 6, 2013 at which time they will be publicly opened and read. The Southwestern Regional Housing and Community Development Corporation reserves the right to reject any or all bids and waive all formalities. /s/William Trueax Southwestern Regional Housing Rehab Manager

NOTICE is hereby given that on April 1, 2013, City of Roswell, P.O. Box 1838, Roswell, New Mexico 88202-1838; filed Application No. RA-98 et al into RA-1334-B-B & RA-1526 Comb (T) with the STATE ENGINEER for permit to temporarily change location of well, place and purpose of use of 2,000.0 acre-feet per annum (consumptive irrigation requirement) of artesian groundwater by ceasing the diversion of said waters from the following described artesian wells: WELL NUMBER RA-98-S RA-2925 RA-681 RA-977-C RA-1350 & RA-1823 RA-98-S-2 RA-98-S-3

SUBDIVISION SECTION SW1/4NE1/4SE1/4 06 NE1/4NE1/4SE1/4 08 NE1/4SE1/4NW1/4 16 SW1/4NW1/4NW1/4 17 SE1/4NE1/4NW1/4 08 NE1/4SE1/4NE1/4 18 SE1/4NE1/4SE1/4 17

TOWNSHIP RANGE 11 S. 24 E. 11 S. 24 E. 11 S. 24 E. 11 S. 24 E. 11 S. 24 E. 11 S. 24 E. 11 S. 24 E.

Said water rights are presently authorized for municipal purposes within the City of Roswell’s Municipal Water System. The applicant proposes to temporarily commence the diversion of said 2,000.0 acre-feet (consumptive irrigation requirement) of artesian groundwater to be diverted from the following described artesian well: WELL NUMBER RA-1334-B-B-S RA-1334-B-B RA-1334-B-B-S-2 RA-1526-S RA-1526

SUBDIVISION SW1/4SE1/4NW1/4 SW1/4NW1/4SW1/4 SW1/4NW1/4SW1/4 NW1/4NW1/4SW1/4 SW1/4NW1/4SW1/4

SECTION 26 26 26 35 35

TOWNSHIP 11 S. 11 S. 11 S. 11 S. 11 S.

RANGE 24 E. 24 E. 24 E. 24 E. 24 E.

for the irrigation of 458.0 acres of land and commercial purposes at Leprino Food Plant described as follows: SUBDIVISION Part of W1/2 Part of W1/2

SECTION 26 26

TOWNSHIP 11 S. 11 S.

RANGE 24 E. 24 E.)

ACRES 148.0 310.0 458.0

This is a temporary application for the remaining four years of the current five year accounting period, with all rights to revert back to the original points of diversion, place and purpose of use on or before October 31, 2016, subject to an earlier reversion by written request of the applicant. The applicant requests that return flow credit be allowed for the effluent water that is used for irrigation purposes. The above described move-from points of diversion and places of use are located within the City of Roswell. The above described move-to points of diversion and places of use are located southeast of the City of Roswell, at the Leprino Food Plant. All are located in Chaves County, New Mexico. Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (objection must be legible, signed, and include the writer’s complete name, phone number and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment, you must specifically identify your water rights*; and/or (2) Public Welfare/Conservation of Water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must show how you will be substantially and specifically affected. The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with the State Engineer, 1900 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, within ten (10) days after the date of the last publication of this Notice. Facsimiles (faxes) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is hand-delivered or mailed and postmarked within 24-hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protests can be faxed to the Office of the State Engineer, (575) 623-8559. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 72 NMSA 1978.

Roswell Daily Record

045. Employment Opportunities

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

Commercial & Residential projects is accepting applications for: •JP Journeyman Plumber •JSM Journeyman Sheet Metal Installer •JR HVAC Technician •Mechanical Trade Apprentices •Temporary Summer Laborers Online: www.rhoadsco.com In Person: 107 E. 6th St, Roswell, NM EYE TECH Part time, will train. Send resume to PO Box 8244 Roswell, NM 88202. Medical Careers begin here – Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer and Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 877-495-3099 www.CenturaOnline.com Sierra Machinery, Inc. a full line distributor for heavy construction and mining equipment has the following position open: WAREHOUSE/PARTS DELIVERY Sierra offers excellent pay and benefits, training opportunities, and a brand new facility on 7179 Roswell Hwy. in Artesia, NM. To apply send your resume to 915-772-1964; or, apply in person at the address above. THE PEPSI Beverages Company of Roswell, NM has IMMEDIATE openings for: Driver & Relief Driver Full-time Day Shift Please review the detailed job descriptions, requirements, and apply online at www.pepsibeveragesjobs.com PBC is an Equal Opportunity Employer BOOTH RENTALS available, $250a mo. Please leave message 578-1603 with contact info. The New Mexico Youth Challenge Academy is seeking qualified individuals to fill two contract cadre positions. Applicants must have a minimum of two years experience working with youth 16-18 years of age, have a high school diploma or GED, valid driver's license and be willing to work shift work, holidays and weekends. Interested persons should submit a resume to CPT Chris Lara, 131 Earl Cummings Loop or contact him at 575.347.7601, Christopher.lara@roswell.e nmu.edu. FORREST TIRE Company of Roswell looking for salesman. Competitive pay, 401K. For more info, call 623-2090. BOOST MOBILE coming to Roswell. Hiring managers, assistant managers, and sales reps. Please email resume to: melissa@ my-mobileaddiction.com HOUSEKEEPING & Maintenance jobs for TownePlace Suites. Must be available to work holidays & weekends. Please pick up applications at Fairfield Inn & Suites. 1201 N. Main St. EXPERIENCED SHOP WELDER WANTED. Apply in person at Key’s Drilling & Pump Service, 1012 E. 2nd, Roswell.

045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

COCKTAIL WAITRESS wanted, experience with training to be a bartender. Apply at 2000 N. Main.

License Electrician Needed (Roswell) Master/Journeyman Electricians (State Licensed) Electrical Contractor seeking a certified, dependable Master/Journeyman electrician with 5 + years' experience in Commercial and Industrial. Drug testing is required and a good driving record is required. We offer excellent benefits. Please NO phone calls. Please email resume and cover letter and attach your current Journeyman's Electrician card. careers@system3inc.com We are an Equal OpportunityEmployer.

BEALLS NOW hiring part time Sales Associate. 1yr experience preferred, but willing to train the right candidate. Only professional in appearance need apply. ATTN: COMPUTER WORK Work form anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 Part Time to $7,500/mo. Full Time. Training provided. www.WorkServices6.com DRIVER NEEDED Class A or B CDL with clear driving record, local route, competitive pay, 401K, insurance and paid time off. Call 800-658-2673 or 806-293-4431 FRONT DESK manager needed weekdays, for handling phone lines, scheduling patients, & insurance verification for medical practice. Apply at 800 W. 2nd St. BI-LINGUAL FRONT desk position, open immediately, good communication & people skills, computer knowledgeable, able to multi task, have own car & valid driver license, must pass background check. Send resume with references to DTB P.O. Box 3915 Roswell NM, 88202

SERVICE COORDINATOR HDFS had an immediate opening for a Services Coordinator to manage a caseload of 20+ consumers in the Roswell and Hobbs community. Responsibilities include support and supervision of providers, and customer service to consumers, providers, guardians and case managers. The Service Coordinator will oversee the implementation of ISP, provide pre-service and in-service training. Home visits are required to evaluate quality of service, monitor documentation and participate in quality assurance activities, such as, Incident Management, Health and Safety and/or Human Rights committees and unit utilization. Bachelor's degree and 1 year direct experience in DD Waiver preferred. Must be highly organized and posses excellent writing and communication skills. Salary of $28 K and excellent benefit package including 3 weeks of vacation and health benefits included. Send cover letter and resume to asalmon@highdesertfs.com

ADMIRAL BEVERAGE is hiring CDL driver position must be filled immediately, and only serious prospects need apply. Must have clean driving record. Great benefits, excellent pay, group health insurance. Apply online at www.admiralbeverage.com SUPERVISORY POSITION Available at Bealls. Must have at least 2yr retail management experience. Professional appearance a must. Must be able to pass drug screening, & willing to relocate. Please bring in resume. CLINICAL THERAPIST Counseling Associates, Inc., a well established, progressive community mental health center, seeking to fill above position. Position requires Master's Degree from accredited university. Must have a New Mexico license; requires experience in demonstrated assessment, counseling, documentation and cultural competency skills. Bilingual (English/Spanish) a plus. Excellent fringe benefits include: health insurance, retirement plan, and vacation package. Salary DOE. An EOE. Open until filled. Send resume to: Counseling Associates, Inc. ATTN: Ann Anderson PO Box 1978 Roswell, New Mexico 88202 If you need further assistance, please contact Ann Anderson at (575)623-1480 ext. 1003 or at ann.anderson@ cai-nm.com

EXPERIENCED FLORAL MANAGER MUST HAVE AT LEAST 3 YEARS OF DESIGN EXPERIENCE. FULL TIME POSITION. GREAT ENVIRONMENT & ATMOSPHERE. PAY BASED ON EXPERIENCE.. EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT, 401K, INSURANCE BENEFITS, VACATION PAY. MUST BE ABLE TO WORK WEEKENDS & HOLIDAYS. REQUIRED TO TAKE DRUG TEST. APPLY AT LAWRENCE BROTHERS IGA, 900 W. 2ND STREET, ROSWELL, NM. ESTABLISHED LAW Firm seeking experienced Paralegal/Legal Assistant. B.A. or paralegal certification preferred. Salary negotiable d/o/e. Benefits include 401K, and medical insurance. Submit resume to PO Box 1897 Unit #344, Roswell, NM 88202. BURRITO EXPRESS in need of ladies with strong work ethic to make tortillas & other kitchen help. Cashiers needed as well. Apply at South & East stores. Hiring Full & part time drivers for non-emergency medical transportation services. Candidates must have a minimum of 5 yrs driving experience, a clean driving record for past 3 yrs, and no criminal offenses. Company benefits are available after introductory period. For more information call Safe Ride Services at 575-524-1875.

HELP-New Mexico is seeking an individual for the position of Employment Community Specialist to administer the NFJP/CSBG Migrant Programs in Roswell. Duties: Eligibility determination for persons applying for grant services; addressing clients expressed needs; monitoring services; face to face interviews, contact with educational institutions & businesses. Implement training, job placement. Experience: 1 year in social service delivery; job development & placement, outreach. Requirements: AA degree desirable, bilingual English/Spanish, good computer skills, record keeping skills, ability to interpret and implement government regulations. F/T position, 40 hrs/wk, Mon thru Fri. Salary $12/hour. Must have own reliable transportation, valid New Mexico driver's license and be over age 21. Fax resume with cover letter to: (505) 265-3433 or email to miriam@helpnm.com by COB 04/26/2013. We are EOE and a Drug Free workplace. www.helpnm.com Exciting new company We have the following positions open •Customer service •Appointment setting •Management opportunities 1600/month per agreement Call our office to day to set up an appointment (575) 578-4817 GUARDSMARK The nation’s leader in security is hiring security officers. No experience required, but customer service skills a must. Must be HS Grad/GED & 21 yrs. EOE Benefits: Free Medical/Life Ins. Uniforms/Tuition Assistance. Starting Pay $9.00hr. Apply by calling 505-830-2700 Tues-Fri. 9am-6pm.

JFA Distributing LLC •Management opportunity •Paid vacations •Training Provided 1600/month per agreement

(575) 578-4817


Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities WE CAN’T keep up with the demand! We need to increase our Sales team NOW! Our Roswell manufactured home sales office is seeking high energy individuals who are self-motivated with the desire to help individuals with their manufactured home purchasing needs. Candidates must possess a strong computer background, some organizational skills, the ability to learn and ENTHUSIASM. We offer competitive wages, advancement opportunities, excellent working conditions, and a comprehensive package. Bilingual is a plus. Please contact Jeff Mott at 575-623-6820

SERVICES

080. Alterations

195. Elderly Care

225. General Construction

ELDERLY, Temporarily disabled, long term assistant? At home housewife looking for new clients who need living assistance. Light housekeeping, yard maintenance, errands & appointment transport. Clean, reliable, honest, reasonable rates. Call Meta 575-626-9682.

Olaguez Construction: Free estimates, complete remodeling including plumbing, additions, tile, sheds, concrete, fence, roof, stucco, windows, painting, & doors. Guaranteed Work. 910-7035 Miguel.

CARING, RELIABLE, & experienced Home Health Aid. Looking to take care of your loved one. 420-5467

200. Fencing

230. General Repair

“Big E’s” Handyman/Maint Services Quality work. Reasonable rates. Free est. Senior disc. 914-6025

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100

I DO cement jobs as in driveways, sidewalks & footings. 420-9986

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

235. Hauling

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

220. Furniture Repair

RITZY RAGS Alterations. Mon-Thurs, 12-5pm, by appt. only. Susan at 420-6242.

WE BUILD and repair furniture. 840-7849 or 626-8466

105. Childcare

LITTLE LAMBS Learning Center, 2708 N. Main is accepting new enrollment ages 6wks-12yrs old. Under new management. For info call 575-625-8422.

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 HOUSEKEEPING/OFFICE CLEANING services. Over 20yrs exp. 625-1478 SUNSHINE WINDOW Service Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458

225. General Construction Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

Double J. Construction of Roswell, LLC, license & bonded. Re-build, re-do or All New! Need help? No job too big/small. 25 yrs. exp. Qualified in framing, trim carpentry, on-site custom cabinets, painting, sheet rock, drywall, doors & windows. FREE est. Call Jerry 910-6898 or 622-8682

Spring Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242.

TIME FOR Spring preparations is here & so is Dirt Cheap Landscaping. Seasonal specials available for sprinkler repair, tilling, garden planning, tree trimming, & more. Call Jon Likens for your free estimate! Senior & Veteran Discounts. 347-8611 WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Lawn & field mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming - Rock installation & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121.

CLASSIFIEDS

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

LAWN MOWING, landscaping, yard cutting, tree’s cut down. Call 910-2033 Emerald Landscaping Lawn & sprinkler installation, sprinkler repair, sod, gravel, lawn maintenance. Maintenance/Free Estimates/accept credit cards. Lic#89265. Call: Aaron, 575-910-0150 or Chris, 420-3945 Mow lawns, pickup trash, & clean-up jobs. 308-1227 PET WASTE REMOVAL Call Canine Clean-up, 420-4669. Mow Grass, Trim Bushes, Clean Ups, Hauling Trash Leaf Raking, flower beds, tree pruning, rock yards & rototilling, pick up pecans. Repair sprinklers & fences. 347-8156, 347-8157 Pedro “Big E’s” Landscaping & Yardwork mow, trim, prune property clean-up, sprinkler sys. senior disc. 914-6025 Better Lawn Care Mowing, weed eating, edging & bush trimming. Prices Start at $20. Call for Free Est. Jeremy 575-914-8118. Handyman Service, plumbing specialty, free estimates, no job too small. 637-1678

285. Miscellaneous Services

HIGHSPEED INTERNET EVERYWHERE By Satellite! Speeds up to 12mbps! (200x faster than dial-up.) Starting at $49.95/mo. CALL NOW & GO FAST! 1-888-719-0630 SAVE $$$ on AUTO INSURANCE from the major names you know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call READY FOR MY QUOTE now! CALL 1-888-719-6435 SAVE ON Cable TVInternet-Digital PhoneSatellite. You`ve Got A Choice! Options from ALL major service providers. Call us to learn more! CALL Today. 888-706-8846 ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFERERS with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP Replacement Supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call, 866-938-5101. Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-661-3783, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575)-622-7710 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

MEDICAL ALERT for Seniors - 24/7 monitoring. FREE Equipment. FREE Shipping. Nationwide Service. $29.95/Month CALL Medical Guardian Today 888-416-2099 Chico’s Fun Bus to Laughlin, NV. June 30 July 3, $178/person, incl. room. Call 755-2283

310. Painting/ Decorating

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. RRP Certified. Call 637-9108.

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: o

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Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

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350. Roofing

GUTTERS For All Your Rain Gutter Needs! Call WH Seamless Aluminum Gutter Systems, LLC. Locally owned. Free estimates. 575-626-0229. Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

410. Tree Service

500. Businesses for Sale

QuickCut Tree Services Best prices, great clean-up. Call for free estimates, 575-208-8963.

BUISNESS FOR sale well established, parking lot cleaning, 575-420-1873

Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

FINANCIAL

485. Business Opportunities BEAUTY OR wellness. Buy outright or partnership with 10k investment. Please leave message 317-7532

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217

400. Tax Service

ANAYA Gross Receipts Consulting & Tax Service. Contact us to Anayalate your tax problems. Over 25 yrs. exp. Personal & Business. Compare our prices/we e-file. 575-623-1513

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185

Dennis the Menace

B7

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

COMMERCIAL BUILDING, 1310 S. Main $1200/mo. Country 3BD/2BA mobile. $550mo. Al 703-0420

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale As Is: 2 for 1: 3br/2ba, corner home, + 1br, 1/2ba , separate unit, 519 S. Pinon Ave, Sierra & El Cap. schools, $130k. 622-7010 FSBO 607 Fulkerson, $125k, 3br, 1 3/4ba, 1 car gar, 1500sqft, heat pump w/ref. air, good con. Owner fin. not avail. 624-0274 FSBO: Duplex condo, great investment, each unit 2br/1ba, 1 car garage, $129,500. Very nice home, 3br/1ba, 3.5 car garage, $89,500. 575-626-0229 FSBO: 4/2/2, lg kitchen, great area. 2 Isla Ct. No Owner Financing 317-8131 FSBO: 816 Trailing Heart, 1745 sqft, 3/2/2, 2 living areas, wood stove, hot tub, office, air cond. garage & storage building, heating & cooling sys. less than 10 yrs, $147k, prequalified buyers only. 575-626-0926 FSBO NEAR CAHOON PARK 2br, 1ba, hardwood floor, new tiled kitchen floor, ss appliances, large fenced landscaped yard w/sprinklers. 1211 W. Highland. $85k below recent appraisal. Call 575-973-1332 575-973-0951 FSBO NEAR CAHOON PARK, 2br, 1ba, ? studio, hardwood floors, large fenced yard, 705 N. Kansas. $79k. Call 575-973-1332, 575-973-0951 FSBO DUPLEX $1500 month income, completely furnished for short term or long term rentals. $85k, below appraisal. Call 575-973-1332, 575-973-0951 Custom Home in NE Roswell. 5 acres, rare city water, well, private subdivision, built 2010. 2,334 square feet. $273,500. Call 914-2005 or visit 3304YoungPlace.com FOR SALE by Owner Beautiful 2000 sqft home in Historical District, 4br/2ba, 2 heat pumps, wood floors, 2 fireplaces, large backyard, 10x20 workshop, 507 N. Lea. 575-625-2474 OWNER FINANCED or get your own financing Lg. 2200sf, 4BD3/BA 2 living areas you can rent one if desired, many updates, nice area 1514 S. Kansas. $135k $10k down. 622-6786. FSBO 4/2.5/2, 1/2 acre, owner financing, $280k, 2808 Sydney. 625-1843 FSBO 13&15 I Street. 4BD, lg living/dining rooms. Call owner at 637-8945. 2707 GAYE Dr. $284k. 4000+sqft. of living area. 4BD/3.5BA/2 car garage. Living room w/fireplace, dining room, study, eat in kitchen w/bar, lg. laundry room w/storage. 40% finished basement w/fireplace. Lg. backyard w/shed for yard equip. Call 626-8295 for appt. 713 N. Richardson, fixer upper ,rock house. 4br/1ba, 1700sqft. $30,000. 626-5423 {{{SOLD}}}} SMALL 2BD fixer upper, $5000 OBO. (575)607-6849 1307 TAYLOR, 3/2/2, 1666 sqft, large yard, $144,000. Call 575-910-3428 for appt.

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

395. Stucco Plastering

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991

Saturday, April 20, 2013

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale LENDER SALE 40 acres, $29,900. Spellbinding views of snow-capped mountains! Adjacent to National Forest. Maintained all weather roads with electric. Close to Ruidoso. Financing available. Call NMRS 866-906-2857.

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


B8 Saturday, April 20, 2013 505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

TOWNHOME LOTS 33 at Briar Ridge. Gas, electric & water to the lots, $60,000. Call John Grieves at 575-626-7813, Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 622-0875.

515. Mobile Homes - Sale 1981 BREC 14x68, 2br/2ba, inside renovated, new floors/plumbing, FP, $18k obo. In Artesia, needs to be moved. 505-225-6585 GREAT FIRST home or income property, 14x60 Fleetwood home, 2br/1ba, wood flooring throughout, new kitchen cabinets, stove & fridge, $10,900. Home must be moved. 575-623-1864 or 626-7453 FOR RENT or Sale by Owner. Fabulous 1982 Ridgemont mobile home, 2br/2ba w/a 11x31 add-on & all hardwood floor interior. Home has covered patio, carport & 2 storage sheds; all appliances included. Located at 410 E. 23rd Space 31. Call 505-366-1142 to view listing. IN SENIOR Park, 55+, 2001 Solitaire, 18x76, all appliances, updated kitchen, wood floors. 3br/2ba, 2 covered decks, carport, 2 sheds, 1 workbench, $44,500. 623-9216 or 626-0959

520. Lots for Sale

5 ACRE lot w/wonderful view of city & sunrises. Includes pipe fence, gate, well, electricity, & gravel road, $55K, 954-261-5800 PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352. 3 OFFICES & Large lot for sale or lease. 410 S. Main 420-9072 or 623-9051 5 to 10 Acre lots in NE Roswell with city water, power, internet. 60K-110K. McPhersonLand.com LAST LOT available on Prestigious Diamond A Drive. Over 1/2 acre. 626-4113 or 626-4213 ENCHANTED HILLS 906 &1/2 Mason, $15k 317-3703 or 317-7119

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 Roswell Apartment 1700 Pontiac Dr. spacious 2br, 1ba, $600 mo + dep. stove/fridge, extra storage water paid. 626-864-3461 EFF, 1BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377 EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. Spacious 2br/1ba, Extra storage. Water & gas pd. $595. 910-0851, 626-2401. 1114 S. Kentucky 2BR 1ba, w/d hookups, all bills pd $550 mo, $500/DD 207 W Mathews 317-9375 STUDIO FRIGE/STOVE. $300mo $200 Maria 317-5958 BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $571, 3br/2ba, $625, 5br/2ba $746, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge. -1bd, quiet area, laundry room, central air/ht, new carpet, 2550 Bent Tree Rd. $520/mo + dep. 1br Duplex w/ carport & storage. $425 mo + dep. 2207-A W. Juniper call Ben 317-6408.

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

{{ RENTED OUT IN JUST 3 DAYS }} fully furnished 2-3br, 1 3/4ba, 1 car gar., all utilities pd, no HUD or pets,

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 2BD/1BA $750MO. $500 dep. Dogs allowed. No HUD. 317-6169

2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 NO PETS or HUD. 3/1.5, $900, $700 dep 2/2/1 $950, $700 dep. 575-420-5930 3/1/1 FOR small family, 6 month lease, background check required, no HUD or Pets, 623-0316, lv msg 108 Lighthall, 3br/1ba, ref air, fnced yard, $700/mo, $700/dep. 627-9942 400 1/2 E 5th 1 bedroom stove, refrig., water paid, $350 mo. $300 dep. No HUD & No Pets. 910-9648 3BR/2BA, $650/DEP, $825/mo, 1108 S. Missouri. Call Julie 505-220-0617. TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 2BR/1BA w/carport $525mo $275 dep. No HUD 420-5604 SMALL HOUSE, $300/mo, $200/dep,For one person 1008 W. 11th. 317-4307

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

DISH NETWORK Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels FREE for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL - 877-867-1441

BEAUTIFUL MINK Stole for sale. Call 622-5397.

BLACK FRIGIDARE smooth top 30in. Electric Range. Like new, $400. 623-0512 or 626-5833 HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE. Dinning room set w/ 6 chairs & China cabinet, game table w/4 chairs, matching couch/chair, twin beds, 3 desks, 3 section entertainment center/ book shelves, queen bed w/wood headboard. Call after 2pm 317-7912 HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE. Dinning room set w/ 6 chairs & China cabinet, game table w/4 chairs, matching couch/chair, twin beds, 3 desks, 3 section entertainment center/ book shelves, queen bed w/wood headboard. Call after 2pm 317-7912 JOSIE’S ANTIQUES, collectibles, Folk Art & more. Stop & shop at 1600 E. 2nd, Thurs-Sat, 10am-5pm. WASHER & dryer, white, 4yrs old, $300. Call 623-0043. REFRIG. GOOD working con. $300. Kitchen shelf w/wine rack $75. Desk 66X30” w/2 cabinet drawers $40. Baby stroller $20. 623-1231 THE TREASURE Chest A must see place. Sofas, furnace, child drums, recliner, table & chairs, more furniture, dryer, antiques, thrifts, housewares, piano. 1204 W. Hobbs, 914-1855, Weds-Sat, 10-5.

4BD/2BA LG. laundry rm. $750mo, $400dep. After 6pm 208-9596 No HUD

6ft Charbroiler, $750, located at 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 626-7488 or 420-1352.

2BR, $550/mo, $500/dep, no pets, no HUD. 575-317-7373

GAS COOK stove $135, Refrigerator w/ice & water dispenser $235. 622-6786

EXECUTIVE HOME, 205 Pima 4/3/2 $1700/mo. Call American Realty 623-9711

MONTAGUE 6 burner commercial stove, $1400, located at 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 626-7488 or 420-1352.

1600 S. Michigan $700mo $600dep. 3BD/2BA Utilities not included. 578-8198. 2BD $550MO $500 dep. Utilities not included. 578-8198.

CLASSIFIEDS

STEAM TABLE portable concession, stainless steel w/2 bread or chip warmer drawers, $650, located at 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 626-7488 or 420-1352.

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

TOP PRICES paid for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We buy compete household & estates. 623-0136 or 627-2033

I BUY gold jewelry & pay high prices. Broken is okay. Call Ted, 578-0805. Strong need for vegetable & fruit juicer. Leave phone number at 575-457-2020. I AM interested in buying bedroom and living room furniture, washer/dryer, refrigerator, & gas stove. 317-6285

630. Auction Sales

ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER JOBS in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper to place your ad or log onto www.nmpress.org for more information.

635. Good things to Eat

745. Pets for Sale

FARM FRESH eggs for sale, $3/dz. 719-850-0670

GERMAN SHORT hair male dog. Neutered, red, $100. 626-6368

720. Livestock & Supplies 6 DUCKS, $5 each. Call Wesley at 910-3317.

745. Pets for Sale

3BD/2BA, SINGLE garage, FP, Fenced yard across from the Adult Center. $825+ utilities. 505-553-1871 2BB/1BA 10FT ceilings, quiet area, $750mo/ $500dep. 317-4373

558. Roommates Wanted

WANTED: FT emplyd female to share my house in a quiet, safe area. All utilities pd, $425/mo. Joann, 575-420-8333.

RECREATIONAL

770. Boats and Accessories 14ft FAST tracker boat w/tilt trailer, swivel back seats, Minnkota trolling motor. 575-365-5166, 575-365-2244

775. Motorcycles & Scooters ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM JACK RUSSELL male terriers, 2 all white, 2 tri color. 10wks old 420-9486.

FREE TO good home, 3 cats who have lost their Grandma. Call Laura 317-2571 PUPPY LOVE Grooming & Boarding - Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also 575-420-6655

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

790. Autos for Sale 2005 LINCOLN Town car, $5500 OBO. In very good condition. 513-8894

1983 CASITA CT trailer, excellent cond., heater, a/c, full bathroom, propane, sleeps 2 comfortable, asking $5000. 575-840-4713

2005 TOYOTA Camry, 137k miles, 4 cyl., 4dr, auto, runs good, asking $6500 OBO. 703-4025

2001 SOUTHWIND RV 36’. V10, 2 slides, low mileage. $43k 624-0697.

2004 FORD Taurus wag, loaded, LM, recent repairs. Exc con. $6000 626-0934

TRANSPORTATION

1970 FORD Mustang, 302 auto, hood scoop, sun roof, all black, asking $8250 OBO. 575-703-4025

790. Autos for Sale

1995 TOYOTA, fully quipped, 5 spd, perfect shape, $3200. 515 W. Hickory, 623-7008

2003 HARLEY Davidson Sportster, with screaming eagle kit. Low miles, excellent condition, lots of extras. $4950. 420-1352 No calls after 8pm.

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com

2005 36ft Georgetown RV, V-10, Ford engine, 2 slides, low miles, non smoker, no pets, many upgrades, selling due to health, $49,500. 505-379-5939 or 575-623-9352

1970 CHEVY truck, long bed, fleet side, v8 automatic, ac, 910-3082.

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

2008 FORD F150, 4X4, 111k miles, $6500. If interested please call Lonnie at 626-9908.

1999 F150, Ext. Cab, 4X4. Low miles & extras. $6800 505-350-2134

796. SUVS

1997 FORD Aerostar, 3rd seat, excellent condition. $3450. 1401 Old Dexter HYW. 420-1352

2001 FORD Expedition, 4 wheel drive, excellent cond., $3500. 420-1352

Roswell Daily Record

5

Consignment Auction, This Saturday, April 20, 9am, 5505 N. Main St., Roswell. Call now to consign your items, 575-627-6717. tlcauction.com

635. Good things to Eat

Red Chile pods, local pinto beans, mountain apples, peanuts, cucumbers, all kinds of squash, onions, garlic, jalapenos, bell peppers, frozen green chile, sweet corn and many more vegetables. Accepting credit and debit cards and EBT. GRAVES FARM, 622-1889, open 8:30-5:30pm Mon-Sat, 1-5pm on Sunday.

$

cord Roswell Daily Re S.COM

RDRNEW 575-677-7710 •

Roswell Daily Re

cord 575-677-7710 • RDRNEWS.COM

00

GARAGE & YARD SALE KITS To make your sale more sucessful!

1802 N. Maryland, 2 br, 1 ba, stove & new ref., W/D hookups, $525 monthly, plus dep., No Pets, No HUD. References and Rental History required. Call 578-3034 1516 N. Pontiac, 2 br, 1 ba, near parks, new stove & new ref., W/D hookups, hardwood floors, completely remodeled, fenced yard, very clean and cute, $625 monthly, plus dep., No large dogs (small or medium okay), No HUD. References and Rental History required. Call 578-3034

Roswell Daily Record

+ Tax

Includes: • 3 Signs • Pricing Stickers • Yard Sale Tips

AT ROSWELL FORD ALL NEW VEHICLES ARE

$300

Over Invoice

HERE ARE SOME EXAMPLES OF WHAT YOU CAN SAVE!

580. Office or Business Places OFFICE BUILDING for lease now, located at 200 W. Hobbs St. This building can be sub-divided if needed call Diane at 623-4553 ext. 1 for more information or to set up an appointment to view the building. Office Space For Lease. Excellent Down Town Location. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities. Building Located 200 West 1st. Suite 300 Petrolium Building. Deposit & 1st month rent free. Please call 622-5385 or come by. FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546.

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed! Pwr wheelchair, lift chair, walker, commode chair, hospital bed. 622-7638

2012 Ford Expedition 4x4 Limited

2013 Ford Fusion SE

Total savings of

Total To otal savi savings ing gs of

$2,706

$7,781

2012 Ford F20 Crew Cab 4x4 XLT Powerstroke

Total savings of

$8,910

Total savings are a combination of Roswell Ford discounts and rebates that apply.

TRUCK SALE! This year featuring our

2013 F150 FX2 SuperCrew

0% APR ** for 60 months vailable! available!

with four full-size doors and room for the whole family! FX Plus package, rear view camera, reverse sensing system, power sliding rear window, running boards, tilt/telescope steering, 6-way power driver seat, SYNC, towing package with sway control and brake controller, Eco-Boost engine, much more!

$36,260

*

You save over $6,500! * MSRP $42,815 less $3055 Roswell oswell Fo Ford r Savings Savings, gs $ $2500 2500 R Retail etailil C Customer ustom mer Ca m C Cash ash sh and d $1000 $1000 Fo $1 F Ford ord d Cre C Credit r dit red diiitt Bon d B Bonus onus Ca Cash. ash ** 0% APR with approved credit in lieu of Retail Customer Cash and Ford Credit Bonus Cash.

ROSWELL FORD Se habla espanol

821 N. MAIN ST. OPEN: MON. - FRI. 8AM - 7PM, SAT. 8AM - 5PM TOLL-FREE: 877-624-3673 SERVICE DEPT: 623-1031

www.roswellford.com


Roswell Daily Record 04-20-13  

Roswell Daily Record

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