Page 1

Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 121, No. 290 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

INSIDE NEWS

POPE JOINS TWEETING MASSES VATICAN CITY (AP) — Benedict XVI, the pope known for his hefty volumes of theology and lengthy encyclicals, is now trying brevity — spreading the faith through his own Twitter account. - PAGE A5

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

December 4, 2012

UN pulls from Syria, violence near capital BEIRUT (AP) — Fighting between rebels and government forces raged near the Syrian capital Damascus on forcing an Monday, inbound commercial jet to turn back while the U.N. said it was withdrawing staff because of deteriorating security conditions. Lebanese security officials said Jihad Makdissi, a polished Foreign Ministry spokesman known for defending the regime of President Bashar Assad in fluent English, flew from Beirut to London. But it was not immediately clear whether he had defected.

The fighting over the past few weeks in and around Damascus has been the most serious in the capital

TUESDAY

www.rdrnews.com

since July, when rebels captured several neighborhoods before a swift government counteroffensive swept them out. The spike in violence recently is concentrated in the ring of mostly poor suburbs around Damascus but often bleeds into the capital itself as rebels bring their fight closer to Assad’s seat of power. Assad’s forces have so far repelled major rebel advances on the capital, though their hold may be slipping. “The security situation has become extremely difficult, including in Damascus,” said Radhouane Nouicer, the U.N.’s regional humanitarian coordinator for Syria.

AP Photo

In this citizen journalism image provided by the Homs City Union of The Syrian Revolution, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, Syrian citizens walk in a destroyed street that was attacked by Syrian forces warplanes in Homs province, Syria, Thursday.

Nouicer said the U.N. was withdrawing most of its international staff from Syria due to security

NMMI cadets in their own Olympics

issues, adding that up to one quarter of the 100 international staff working for several U.N. agencies

TOP 5 For The Last 24 Hours

• Murder scene • FBI meets with agencies on Chaves ... • Hispano Chamber billboard welcomes visitors • GHS cruises into 4A title game • Hagerman edges NMMI 63-62

Three positions are open in the school board election, Districts 1, 3 and 5. Two are available in the college board, Districts 2 and 3.

INSIDE SPORTS

Residents can only file for one board position. To qualify, they need to have been a registered voter and resident in the district of the position for which they attempt to file as of Nov. 27.

Mark Wilson Photo

New Mexico Military Institute cadets navigate the obstacle course portion of the Bronco Olympics, Saturday morning.

NEW YORK (AP) — Johnny Manziel and Manti Te’o are in position to make Heisman Trophy history. Manziel, the redshirt freshman quarterback from Texas A&M, and Te’o, Notre Dame’s star ... - PAGE B1

TODAY’S OBITUARIES • Robert Eugene Brown • Arthur Contreras Jr. • Victoria Evans • Elaine Houston • Linda Joy Pechstedt • Raquel Rede - PAGE A7

HIGH ...64˚ LOW ....33˚

TODAY’S FORECAST

CLASSIFIEDS..........B5 COMICS.................B4 ENTERTAINMENT.....A8 FINANCIAL .............B3 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........A8 LOTTERIES ............A2 NATION .................A7 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8

Deadline for school board candidacy approaching

See SYRIA, Page A3

Those looking to run in the upcoming Roswell School and Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell community college board elections must file their candidacy Dec. 18 between the hours of 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the County Clerk’s office, #1 St. Mary’s Place.

WEB

THE HEISMAN FINALISTS ARE ...

could leave by week’s end. There are about 900 more local staff working for the U.N. in Syria, officials said. U.N. teams are also stopping most staff trips outside Damascus. In another sign of deteriorating security, an Egyptian commercial jet aborted a trip to Damascus in midflight because of violence near the airport. The EgyptAir flight from Cairo rerouted about 30 minutes after takeoff because Egyptian officials received word from their counterparts in Damascus that the area near the airport was not safe, Egyptian airport officials said.

New Mexico expects $283M in revenue for next year

SANTA FE (AP) — The Legislature and Gov. Susana Martinez will have slightly more than $280 million to cover budget increases and tax cuts next year under a new revenue forecast outlined Monday to lawmakers. The revenue estimates will serve as the backdrop for financial decision-making for lawmakers when they convene next month for a 60-day legislative session. The state should collect about $5.9 billion in tax revenue in the fiscal year that starts next July, according to projections by administration and legislative economists. That provides a pool of so-called new money of about $283 million, which is enough for about a 5 percent increase in spending next year. That amount represents the difference between current spending and next year’s revenues, and is traditionally considered the money available for budget increases or to offset tax cuts. However, legislative and administration officials say about $72 million of that money will be needed to cover previous commitments to boost state contributions to public employee pensions and to help pay for Medicaid, See REVENUE, Page A3

Unexpected visitor

INDEX

Jessica Palmer Photo

The RDR circulation department had an unusual visitor, Monday, when this English trumpeter flew in the back door. The English trumpeter is a favorite bird among pigeon fanciers in the U.S. The breed is distinguished by the “muff” of feathers on neck and feet. This bird is probably someone’s pet. Attempts to take it outside failed. The pigeon was last seen around 6 p.m. sitting on a stack of newspapers, perhaps catching up on the news.

There is no cost to file and residents should have their driver’s licenses available.

Dec. 18 is the only day to file. The election will be held Feb. 5.

Thomas Martinez, 28, arrested following a recent homicide that left local dead

steps of the front porch, with the head on the porch and feet on the sidewalk.”

JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

The Roswell Police Department secured an arrest warrant for Thomas Martinez, 28, on charges of second-degree murder for the slaying of Arthur Contreras, 22. The homicide occurred Wednesday around 10 p.m. Sgt. Ray Sharp first notified dispatch about shots fired in the area around Bland Street and Pennsylvania Avenue. The RPD then received additional calls about shots fired. Police responded. In the affidavit of criminal

Thomas Martinez

complaint, lead investigator Detective Robert Scribner’s description of the scene in the 200 block of Bland is stark: there was “a body lying across the

The passenger window and rear cargo door on a white SUV parked in the driveway were shattered. A bullet hole penetrated the speedometer. Impact marks were found at the victim’s home on east Bland while five bullets had penetrated a neighboring house. Officials found 24 spent shell casings in the area. Some located on Pennsylvania Avenue north of Bland

See ARREST, Page A3

GOP issues a new ‘fiscal cliff’ offer to Obama

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans put forth a $2.2 trillion “fiscal cliff” counteroffer to President Barack Obama on Monday, calling for raising the eligibility age for Medicare, lowering cost-of-living hikes for Social Security benefits and bringing in $800 billion in higher tax revenue — but not raising rates for the wealthy. The White House declared the Republicans still weren’t ready to “get serious” and again vowed tax rate increases will be in any measure Obama signs to prevent the government from the cliff’s automatic tax hikes and sharp spending cuts. With the clock ticking toward the year-end deadline, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and other Republicans said they were proposing a “reasonable

solution” for negotiations that Boehner says have been going nowhere. Monday’s proposal came in response to Obama’s plan last week to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion over the coming decade but largely exempt Medicare and Social Security from budget cuts. Though the GOP plan proposes to raise $800 billion in higher tax revenue over the same 10 years, it would keep the Bush-era tax cuts — including those for wealthier earners targeted by Obama — in place for now. Dismissing the idea of raising any tax rates, the Republicans said the new revenue would come from closing loopholes and deductions while lowering rates. Boehner called that a “credible plan” and said he hoped the administration

would “respond in a timely and responsible way.” The offer came after the administration urged Republicans to detail their proposal to cut popular benefit programs like Medicare, Social Security and Medicaid. The White House complained the latest offer was still short on details about what loopholes would be closed or deductions eliminated, and it insisted that any compromise include higher tax rates for upperincome earners.

Asked directly whether the country would go over the cliff unless GOP lawmakers backed down, administration officials said yes. Officials said they remained hopeful that scenario could be avoidSee OFFER, Page A3


A2 Tuesday, December 4, 2012

GENERAL

Pope joins tweeting masses with Pontifex handle VATICAN CITY (AP) — Benedict XVI, the pope known for his hefty volumes of theology and lengthy encyclicals, is now trying brevity — spreading the faith through his own Twitter account. The pontiff will tweet in eight languages starting Dec. 12 using his personal handle (at)Pontifex, responding live to questions about faith during his weekly general audience, the Vatican said Monday. Within 10 hours of the Vatican’s announcement, Benedict had already garnered nearly a quarter-million followers on the English version of (at)Pontifex alone, with thousands more following him in the eight other language accounts. All that, and he hadn’t sent a single tweet. He may never hit the 1 billion faithful that the Catholic Church counts around the globe, but he’s odds-on to get 1 million followers by the end of the year, British bookmakers Ladbrokes said. The pope sent his first tweet last year from a generic Vatican account to

AP Photo

In this June 28, 2011, file photo, Pope Benedict XVI touches a touchpad to send a tweet for the launch of the Vatican news information portal "news.va,” at the Vatican.

launch the Holy See’s news information portal, and someone in his name tweeted daily during Lent, part of the Vatican’s efforts to increase the church presence in social media. A personal Twitter account for the 85-year-old Benedict has been the subject of intense speculation ever since, and Monday’s news conference was

packed, a strong indication of the interest it has generated. Greg Burke, the Vatican’s communications adviser, said the handle (at)Pontifex was chosen because it not only means pope in Latin, but also bridge-builder, suggesting unity. How often will the pope tweet? “As often as he wants,” Burke said, though

Roswell Daily Record

he noted somewhat sarcastically that the pope, who still writes longhand, does not check his (nonexistent) Blackberry obsessively during meetings “like the rest of us.” “He’s not that kind of person. He’s not walking around with an iPad. But all the pope’s tweets are the pope’s words,” Burke said. While the pope will push the button himself on Dec. 12, subsequent tweets will be sent by someone in the Vatican’s secretariat of state. They will, however, all be approved by the pope, officials said. “It’s always going to have his engagement and his approval,” said Monsignor Paul Tighe, the No. 2 in the Vatican’s social communications office. “Not physically, but from his mind.” Questions for the inaugural papal tweet can be submitted to (hash)askpontifex, and the pope will likely respond to three to five of those sent from around the world, Burke said. Subsequent tweets are expected to remain spiritual in nature, taken from his teachings or homilies.

By late Monday, many of the questions sent in were jokes and criticism, including of the church sex abuse scandal — tweets the pope will likely never see. Currently a host of Twitter accounts use the pope’s name, purporting to be his personal account. The (at)Pontifex account, however, is certified as the only official papal Twitter feed, Tighe said. Twitter spokeswoman Rachael Horowitz declined to comment on whether the strong interest in the launch of the pope’s handle would break any records, saying Twitter doesn’t track the number of followers for individual account-holders. But she noted in an email that religious content on Twitter “punches above its weight” in terms of interest and engagement. Religious leaders, for example, get one retweet for every 500 followers, whereas a musician gets one for every 30,000 followers. Don’t expect the pope himself to necessarily be retweeting, however. He doesn’t plan to follow anyone other than himself,

simply because it would be impossible to avoid offending people he didn’t follow, Burke said.

Papal tweets will be sent simultaneously in English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, German, Polish and Arabic. Monsignor Claudio Maria Celli, the president of the Vatican’s social communications office, said he hoped to add Chinese.

He stressed that the papal tweets aren’t to be considered infallible teachings, merely “pearls of wisdom” in the pope’s own words.

The Vatican has been increasing its presence in social media, using YouTube channels and Facebook pages for special events and Twitter to engage believers and nonbelievers alike, particularly the young. The Vatican decided against using a personal Facebook page for the pope because they thought it was too personal an interaction and would require more manpower to keep updated.

Local shelter dogs are ‘treated’ to early holiday gifts ILISSA GILMORE RECORD STAFF WRITER

Members of T rinity United Methodist Church delivered handmade dog treats to local animal shelters Monday in an ef fort to show holiday spirit to canines and raise awareness of animal adoption. Rev. Glenn Thyrion said the church participates in a program that provides gifts for children who have parents in jail, but “we didn’t think anyone was doing anything for dogs in ‘doggie jail,’”— or places such as the Roswell Humane Society and Roswell Animal Services. Congregation members and other volunteers listened to Christmas music

as they prepared the dough, made of whole wheat flour, baking powder, peanut butter and chicken broth, for baking. The biscuits were cut into various shapes, including a traditional bone-shape imprinted with the word “Trinity.” Onita Barkley-King, who helped organize the activity, said it was one of the church’s mission projects to “do some good in the community.” “The dogs and cats out there, they’re God’s creatures, too,” she said. The church made close to 600 treats to give to shelters as well as dog owners in the area. Thyrion, who has two rescue dogs, hopes the effort will raise awareness of dog adoption.

“It’s more than about getting a dog a home, it’s about getting that home a dog,” he said. Wearing Santa hats, congregation members brought bags of treats to the Roswell Humane Society and Roswell Animal Services and personally offered them to the dogs. Animal Services kennel manager Tammie McKee said the organization was appreciative of the effort and the church’s interest. In November, the organization took in 563 animals of which 45 were adopted, she said. At the Humane Society, 65 dogs and 25 cats are available for adoption. The center can house close to 1,000 dogs and 400 cats a year. “I think it’s a terrific

Ilissa Gilmore Photo

Pastor Glenn Thyrion (far left) and other members of Trinity United Methodist Church hold puppies at the Roswell Humane Society with manager Carol Rogers (far right.)

thing they’re doing,” said Carol Rogers, Humane Society manager. “Fresh baked cookies—what doggie wouldn’t what that?

Our babies are going to love every bit of that.” For more infor mation on dog and animal adoption, visit Roswell

Humane Society, 703 E. McGaffey St., or Animal Services, 705 E. McGaffey St.

Copper tubing taken Possible person of interest in shooting case in apparent burglary flees police, hides in residence, finally caught JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Burglary

•Police responded to the 100 block of Lighthall Place, Saturday, after subjects entered a storage area and removed copper tubing, 500 feet of no. 14 electric wire, 500 feet of no. 12 electric wire and 100 feet of 12-2 wire. The victim estimated the value of the copper and wire at $1,000. •Police were dispatched to the 300 block of South Evergreen Avenue, Sunday, where the resident found someone attempted to break into her home while she was away. The subjects made a round cut around the screen door latch and handle causing $200 worth of damage. •Police were called to the 500 block of South Sycamore Avenue, Saturday, where subjects stole $600 worth of jewelry from a residence. •Police were called to the 900 block of East Deming Street, Saturday, after subjects entered a residence through a window and took a 40-inch television, an Apple computer and three jars full of change.

Criminal damage

Police were called to the 3000 block of Barcelona Drive, Sunday, after a woman discovered that someone had damaged the door handle on the driver’s side of her 2002 Volkswagen. Anyone having information about these or any other crime is asked to contact Crime Stoppers, 888-594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward.

LOTTERY NUMBERS Roadrunner Cash

2-6-32-33-36 Pick 3 1-3-5

Samuel Duran, 18, was arrested Sunday following a routine traffic stop for a cracked windshield. According to the criminal complaint, it was learned that Duran may be a person of interest in a recent shooting of a female. Court records state that when officers attempted to pull him over, Duran abandoned his vehicle at Forest Street and Grand Avenue and fled on foot. He ran to a home a block away on the 300 block of East Forest Street. Of ficers noticed that Leave your mark

Duran was carrying a “black object” in his waistband. When they arrived at the residence, the officers called for backup. Deputies of the Chaves County Sherif f’s Of fice arrived to assist the Roswell Police Department. Sheriff’s deputies located Duran hiding in the back bedroom. The resident told officials that Duran had given him a gun to hide. The resident said he did not know Duran and he had come into the man’s home without his consent. The resident, confused by the intrusion, said he did not know what to do with the gun, but had finally followed instructions and hid

“Real Estate Corner”

the gun under some clothes. Initially, Duran was charged with an outstanding warrant on failure to meet conditions of probation/parole. He gave officers an Albuquerque address. Investigating Officer Neal Binderman filed an additional complaint against Duran on charges of second-degree felony aggravated burglary since he entered the home without the permission of the resident, third-degree felony tampering with evidence, evading or obstructing an officer and unlawful possession of a firearm. The second warrant was served to Duran at Chaves

Volunteer

SELLING IN A BUYER’S MARKET

By Connie Denio of Roswell 622-7191 or 626-7948 One of our most diffi- pricing. cult situations is sellBe realstic. Don’t ing your house in a overprice your home. buyer’s market (in A Buyer may ask you which many homes to accept a conare for sale and sales tengency for his home are sluggish). Having to sell, or he may ask a skilled Realtor repre- for seller financing. senting you is invalu- Talk to your Realtor able. Good agents and get the facts to understand the market make an informed and can advise you decision. honestly on practical Call Me Today! ©

igilmore@rdrnews.com

Samuel Duran

County Detention Center where he was already being held on a no-bond warrant for failure to comply. j.palmer@rdrnews.com

Ge t Cl a ssif ie d

Roswell Daily Record

USPS No 471-200

News & Business Telephone 622-7710 Circulation Telephone 622-7730

Charles Fischer Publisher

cfischer@rdrnews.com

Andrew Poertner Editor

editor@rdrnews.com

R. Cory Beck Publisher (1987-2006)

Jim Dishman .....................................................Circulation Director jdishman@rdrnews.com

Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice The entire contents of the Roswell Daily Record, including its flag on Page 1, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the Daily Record.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES by carrier delivery in Roswell: $10 per month, payable in advance. Prices may vary in some areas. As a convenience to subscribers, advance payments for home delivery for periods of 3 months to 12 months may be made directly to the Roswell Daily Record. No responsibility for advance payments over 30 days assumed by the company unless paid directly to the Roswell Daily Record. All home carrier subscriptions will continue being delivered past expiration date causing an arrears owed unless the circulation department is contacted and told to stop service prior to expiration. MAIL SUBSCRIPTION RATES: ALL NEW MEXICO 882 ZIP CODES, $12 ONE MONTH, $36 THREE MONTHS, $72 SIX MONTHS, $144 ONE YEAR. All other New Mexico zip codes, $13 one month, $39 three months, $78 six months, $156 one year. All other states in USA, $18 one month, $54 three months, $108 six months, $216 one year. Periodical-postage paid at Roswell, N.M. Postmaster: Please mail change of address to Roswell Daily Record, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202-1897. All postal subscriptions will stop at expiration unless payment is made prior to expiration.


Roswell Daily Record

Syria

Continued from Page A1

EgyptAir canceled all further flights to Syria for Monday and Tuesday and will decide later whether to resume flights later in the week, the officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to reporters. EgyptAir had just resumed flights following a three-day suspension because of violence near the airport. Emirates airlines said on its website that all flights to Syria were suspended “until further notice.” The Britain-based opposition activist group Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the clashes were within three kilometers (2 miles) of the airport, which lies about 25 kilometers (15 miles) southeast of the city center. The state news service reported clashes in an area about 15 kilometers (9 miles) from the airport. It said nothing about flight cancelations. More than 40,000 people have been killed since the Syrian revolt started in March last year. Leaders of Russia — a key supporter of the Assad regime — and opposition ally Turkey discussed disagreements over Syria. After talks in Istanbul, Russian President Vladimir Putin said that the deployment of NATO antiaircraft missiles along the Turkish border could make the conflict worse. “Creating a new potential on the border will not settle the situation but rather exacerbate it,” he said. “Why would we need more shelling on the border?” The two countries are firmly enmeshed in Syria’s conflict, on opposite sides. Russia continues to back Assad, thrice protecting his regime from censure by the U.N. Security Council. Turkey has called for Assad’s ouster and its southern border with Turkey has become a key supply line for rebel forces. Lebanese security officials said Makdissi, the Foreign Ministry spokesman known for defending Assad crackdown on the opposition as necessary military action against “terrorists,” flew from Beirut to London. It was not immediately known whether he had abandoned the regime and he did not respond to phone calls.

Arrest

Continued from Page A1

Street continuing just north of the alley. Casings were also found north of Deming Street. Individuals who live on Bland Street reported a horrific night. People gathered their children— one took their children to the back rooms away from the windows, others pulled their children onto the floor and laid on top of them to protect them from bullets. One said a man in dark clothes came to the house with a rifle, firing repeatedly. Another reported a handgun. Most reported between 15 to 20 shots fired. All statements recorded in the complaint appear to agree that the homicide originated with a long-standing feud between the victim and the alleged shooter, Martinez. According to the family, the initial altercation had to do with a burglary when Martinez accused Contreras of stealing items from his vehicle. Neighbors, who did not know the victim or his family well, said that Martinez would drive by the house daily to taunt Contreras. The homicide followed a series of altercations during the day at Martinez’s place of employment at Auto Zone and

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to brief the media. The U.S. has so far declined to intervene in Syria’s civil war, saying doing so could worsen the conflict. U.S. officials said the White House and its allies are weighing military options to secure Syria’s chemical and biological weapons, after U.S. intelligence reports show the Syrian regime may be readying those weapons and may be desperate enough to use them. President Barack Obama pointedly warned Assad on Monday not to use the weapons. “Today I want to make it absolutely clear to Assad and those under his command: The world is watching,” Obama said in a speech at the National Defense University. “The use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. And if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable.” Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, in Prague for meetings with Czech officials, said she wouldn’t outline any specifics. “But suffice it to say, we are certainly planning to take action if that eventuality were to occur,” Clinton said. Options now being considered range from aerial strikes to limited raids by regional forces to secure the stockpiles, according to one current U.S. official, and one former U.S. official, briefed on the matter. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly. Syria is believed to have several hundred ballistic surface-to-surface missiles capable of carrying chemical warheads, and a U.S. defense official said American and allied intelligence officials have detected activity around more than one of Syria’s chemical weapons sites in the last week. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to reporters about intelligence matters. Syria’s Foreign Ministry said Monday that Syria “will not use chemical weapons — if there are any — against its own people under any circumstances.” later near his Deming Street home. The document states that in the evening witnesses in front of the Martinez household saw a white SUV with a “man hanging out of it.” They heard gunfire. Men who were outside the Martinez residence returned fire. When the police conducted a search of the Martinez residence the next day, they located $1,321 worth of marijuana, or about 36 plants, growing in a basement, along with more than a pound of marijuana. Martinez was charged with possession and distribution of marijuana and arrested at that time on a $75,000 bond. During subsequent interviews, Martinez at first denied having anything to do with the homicide. Later he told detectives that he and his family had been threatened by Contreras, and he “was pushed over the edge.” He admitted to firing two shots at Contreras after Contreras pulled a gun on him. The documents also report that Martinez said to Detective Kim Northcutt that (in the same situation) “even Detective Northcutt would have done the same thing.” Martinez remains at Chaves County Detention Center on a $1 million cash or surety bond.

j.palmer@rdrnews.com

Offer

GENERAL

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Continued from Page A1

ed, saying the president continues to believe that going over the cliff would be damaging to the economy. And they signaled that Obama wouldn’t insist on bringing the top tax rate all the way back to the 39.6 percent rates of the Clinton era. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about internal White House deliberations. “Until the Republicans in Congress are willing to get serious about asking the wealthiest to pay slightly higher tax rates, we won’t be able to achieve a significant, balanced approach to reduce our deficit our nation needs,” White House Communications Director Dan Pfeiffer said in a statement. Boehner saw the situation as just the reverse. “After the election I offered to speed this up by putting revenue on the table and unfortunately the White House responded with their la-la land offer that couldn’t pass the House, couldn’t pass the Senate and it was basically the president’s budget from last February,” he said Monday. The GOP proposal itself revives a host of ideas from failed talks with Obama in the summer of 2011. Then, Obama was willing to discuss politically risky ideas such as raising the eligibility age for Medicare, implementing a new inflation

Revenue

Continued from Page A1

which provides health care to the poor and uninsured children. That would leave slightly more than $200 million to cover spending increases for other programs and services. Public schools account for the largest share of state spending,

Shop New Mexico

YOUR CREDIT

“We want to make you a loan”

(575)624-2929

$200 - $2,000

AP Photo

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., left, and Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., finish a news conference after Senate Democratic leaders met with Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner on the fiscal cliff negotiations, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday. The “fiscal cliff” is a combination of tax increases and spending cuts worth about $670 billion that will take effect at the start of next year unless Congress and the White House agree to postpone or replace them.

adjustment for Social Security cost-of-living adjustments and requiring wealthier Medicare recipients to pay more for their benefits. Monday’s Republican plan contains few specifics and anticipates that myriad details will have to be filled in next year in legislation overhauling the tax code and curbing the growth of benefit programs. Time is growing shorter before the deadline to avert the fiscal cliff, which is a combination of expiring Bush-era tax cuts and automatic, across-theboard spending cuts that are the result of prior failures of Congress and Obama to make a budget deal. Many economists say such a one-two punch could send the fragile economy back into recession.

GOP aides said their plan is based on one presented by Erskine Bowles, cochairman of a deficit commission Obama appointed earlier in his term, in testimony to a special deficit “supercommittee” last year — in effect a milder version of a 2010 Bowles proposal that caused both GOP and Democratic leaders in Congress to recoil. Unlike Bowles’ official 2010 plan, drafted with former GOP Sen. Alan Simpson, the version released Monday drops the earlier endorsement of Obama’s proposal to increase tax rates on family income exceeding $250,000 back to Clinton-era levels, with the top rate jumping from 35 percent to 39.6 percent. Bowles, in a statement, said he was flattered but the GOP plan does not represent his proposal.

about $2 of every $5 in this year’s budget. Tom Clifford, secretary of the Department of Finance and Administration, told the Legislative Finance Committee that the governor will propose tax cuts to the Legislature next year. One possibility is a reduction in the state’s corporate income tax to help promote economic development and job growth.

The state ended the last budget year in June with cash balances of about $755 million — the equivalent of nearly 14 percent of spending. The reserves provide a cushion for the state in case of unexpected financial problems. Administration officials cautioned that the state’s budget and economy face uncertainty because of the negotiations between Congress and President

ROSWELL DAILY RECORD

622-7710

A3

Still, he added, “Every offer put forward brings us closer to a deal, but to reach an agreement, it will be necessary for both sides to move beyond their opening positions.” By GOP math, their plan would produce $2.2 trillion in budget savings over the coming decade: $800 billion in higher taxes, $600 billion in savings from costly health care programs like Medicare, $300 billion from other proposals such as forcing federal workers to contribute more toward their pensions and $300 billion in additional savings from the Pentagon budget and domestic programs funded by Congress each year. Boehner signaled in discussions with Obama in 2011 that he was willing to accept up to $800 billion in higher tax revenues, but his aides maintained that much of that money would have come from so-called dynamic scoring — a conservative approach in which economic growth would have accounted for much of the revenue. Now, Boehner is willing to accept the estimates of official scorekeepers like the Congressional Budget Office, whose models reject dynamic scoring. Under the administration’s math, GOP aides said, the plan represents $4.6 trillion in 10-year savings. That estimate accounts for earlier cuts enacted during last year’s showdown over lifting the government’s borrowing cap and also factors in war savings and lower interest payments on the $16.4 trillion national debt. Barack Obama over how to avoid a “fiscal cliff” of federal spending cuts and tax increases. New Mexico is heavily dependent on federal spending, in part because of military bases as well as Los Alamos and Sandia national laboratories. “There are a lot of risks in this outlook,” Clifford said of the revenue forecast.

S u p p o r t t h e U n i t e d Wa y


A4 Tuesday, December 4, 2012

OPINION

New Mexico lawmakers need to support state’s spaceport LORETTA HALL N.M. NEWS SERVICES

Back in 2006, I heard that New Mexico was going to build a commercial spaceport where tourists could buy a ticket and take a suborbital flight. I was skeptical about its chances to be successful. I’ve changed my mind. Spaceport America is unique, beautiful and well planned. The only thing that might keep it from being a successful economic venture is our reluctance to let it compete. In 2011 and 2012, the Legislature balked at strengthening our informed consent law, as several other states have done for their commercial spaceports. As a result, three companies that might have come to New Mexico went elsewhere. We can’t afford to let that trend continue. Our current law requires spaceflight operators like Virgin

EDITORIAL

Galactic to fully infor m customers about the risks of spaceflight. By accepting those risks, the customers agree not to sue the operator unless it is grossly negligent or willfully disregards their safety. To keep pace with our competitors, we must extend that protection to spacecraft manufacturers and suppliers as well as the operators. Spaceport America is unique, but it is not alone. Eight other commercial spaceports are licensed in this country, and several others are proposed. Texas, Florida, Colorado and Virginia have already broadened their informed consent laws, and California is moving in that direction. Our current law will expire in 2018 unless the Legislature extends it. Texas, Florida, Colorado and Virginia’s have no expiration dates. Our 20-year contract with Virgin Galactic to use Spaceport America gives us some degree of

stability. But Virgin Galactic recently acquired full ownership of The Spaceship Company, which manufactures its spaceships and carrier planes. They have a vested interest in making their vehicles and operations as safe as possible. A flight failure could be devastating to their business. We should show our good faith by providing them a competitive business atmosphere. Virgin Galactic is unique, but it is not alone. XCOR will be flying suborbital passenger flights not long after Virgin Galactic begins operating. Like Virgin, XCOR uses a runway for horizontal takeof fs and landings, but it offers a different customer experience at a lower price. Having XCOR at Spaceport America would have broadened our appeal. But XCOR decided to build a research and development center in Texas and an operations and manufacturing center in Florida instead, because of those

Roswell Daily Record

states’ infor med consent law advantages. New Mexico lost out on 250 new jobs. RocketCrafters moved from Utah to Texas. New Mexico lost out on 1,300 jobs. SpaceX will employ 600 people at the launch site it will build in Texas. Spaceport America offers more than tourist flights. Since 2006, unmanned rockets have carried commercial cargo, student experiments and government payloads on suborbital flights. The frequency of those flights is increasing. Armadillo Aerospace, which tests unmanned rockets at our spaceport, is working toward a tourist-carrying rocket that could operate here as well. Virgin Galactic sells space on its upcoming flights for research as well as tourism. NASA and the Southwest Research Institute have already bought tickets. Virgin Galactic is also developing the capability to launch satellites into

orbit. The Federal Aviation Administration projects a demand for more than 20 commercial satellite launches to lowearth orbit each year. Some of that could happen in New Mexico. Finally, as a tourist destination, Spaceport America is special. Its architecture and location are unparalleled. Besides the people who come to fly into space, some 200,000 visitors a year will come to see the spaceport in operation, according to market analysis. That is an economic potential for the state that we must protect and encourage. The commercial space industry is broad based and growing rapidly. If we want our spaceport to be successful, we have to grow with that industry. Loretta Hall is a freelance writer and the author of the award winning book “Out of This World: New Mexico’s Contributions to Space Travel.” © New Mexico News Services 2012

Stymied about Syria

The Syrian city of Aleppo, Halab in Arabic, centuries ago marked the end of the Silk Road, a trading route through central Asia and Mesopotamia. The city saw a decline, at least in trade, when the Suez Canal was opened in 1869. This was further exacerbated following the fall of the Ottoman Empire after World War I and the emergence of modern-day Turkey. But Aleppo, Syria’s largest city, with a population of 2 million, has always been important, strategically and symbolically. On Nov. 26, rebels battling the regime of President Bashar al-Assad captured a hydroelectric dam on the Euphrates River in northern Syria, reported Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. Loss of the Tishrin dam sharply diminishes the government’s control in Aleppo. The battle for Aleppo is crucial — it may very well determine the victor in the 20month civil war that has killed more than 40,000 people. Rebel control of the city would bring easier access for weapons and fighters coming south from Turkey. However, an Islamist faction within the rebel movement has declared an Islamic state in Aleppo, so pessimism about the future of the region is well founded. “I had projected the rise of uprisings in the Arab countries, but also predicted that, as dictators would fall, there would be a race between Islamists and seculars,” Walid Phares, adviser to House of Representatives’ Anti-Terrorism Caucus, told us. “And that was what happened in Egypt, Tunisia, Yemen and in Libya.” Libya, rapidly becoming a hotbed of Islamism since dictator Moammar Gadhafi was ousted and killed, has erroneously been hailed as a template for Western action regarding Syria, particularly with calls for intervention. “Libya’s jihadists, funded by Gulf petrodollars, have been shipping Libyan weapons via Turkey to Syria’s Salafists. This is creating a radical Islamist force inside Syria,” Mr. Phares told us. “The Obama administration thought that by having Arab allies fund the arming of the opposition and shipping these weapons to Syria’s rebels, the (Assad) regime will crumble without direct U.S. involvement.” Internet and mobile phone communication was cut off last week, according to a global monitoring firm. The doomed governments in Egypt and Libya also shut down Internet service. The West and Israel don’t want the conflict to spread in the region, but options are limited and do not serve Western interests. Military intervention could spark a wider war that embroils Turkey, a member of NATO. It’s clear the United Nations, particularly because of Russian obstinacy, will not act. But backing an opposition coalition that includes radical Islamists could backfire on the U.S. There is no guarantee about where weapons will wind up after the current regime is ousted. Guest Editorial The Orange County Register D E A R D O C T O R K : I’m a 38year-old woman. I recently saw my doctor about a sharp pain that comes and goes in the middle of my chest. She assur es me my heart is healthy. What could be causing my discomfort? DEAR READER: The first thing your doctor worries about if you have chest pain is heart disease, which can be life-threatening. Fortunately, other, less serious conditions cause chest pain more often. But the first thing to be ruled out is heart disease, and it’s good news that it was. So what caused your chest pain? There are many possibilities, but from your brief description I suspect a different culprit: costochondritis, an inflammation of the costochondral joints. These are

Time for Americans to get to know each other MARK SHIELDS CREATORS SYNDICATE

The late Tom Pettit, who covered American politics so well for NBC News from John Kennedy in 1960 to Bill Clinton in 1992, was missed even more during this year’s uninspiring presidential campaign. My personal favorite Tom Pettit professional moment was when he was interviewing Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz, who served in the cabinets of both Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. Secretary Butz, an unrelenting critic of the food stamps program then under his

Doonesbury

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

the joints that join your ribs to your breastbone (sternum). (I’ve put an illustration on my website, AskDoctorK.com.) The main symptom of costochondritis is sharp, stabbing or aching pain along the front edges of the breastbone. The pain may be felt in more than one spot; it may radiate to the back or abdomen or spread down the arm,

department, unloaded on the “greedy” exploiters of food stamps he and his people were chasing down. Pettit asked Butz if he knew anyone who had used food stamps. Butz spoke about how he was no stranger to supermarkets, that he accompanied his wife on the grocery shopping and that he had personally seen people at the checkout counter paying with food stamps. Pettit pressed Butz: Did the secretary know anyone — personally — who depended upon food stamps to feed her children? After an extended silence, the obviously displeased agriculture secretary

one reason why it’s often mistaken for a heart attack. Costochondritis worsens when you move your torso, take deep breaths or cough. Physical exercise can also aggravate it. Costochondritis often results from unusually stressful physical activity or traumatic injury. It can also be caused by r espiratory infections, which can inflame the costochondral joints. Strain from coughing can produce the condition. In most cases, however, there is no obvious cause. To diagnose the condition, your doctor will apply pressure to the joints wher e the ribs meet the br eastbone, in the part of the chest where you feel pain. If that pressure causes pain, and pressure in other areas of the chest

answered the question, “No.” The only thing that followed was the close: “Tom Pettit, NBC News, Washington.” This anecdote reminds me why the military draft between 1940 and 1973 educated so many of us about what it meant to be an American and, more importantly, tells me why in the second decade of the 21st century the United States desperately needs every 18-year-old American to give two years of national service, military or civilian, to their country. First, a personal note: At Parris Island, S.C., in Marine Corps boot camp, for the first

time in my life I slept in the same quarters with AfricanAmericans and took orders, as a matter of course, from African-Americans. In that boot camp platoon, there were six college graduates, four young men who, given the option by juvenile courts, had chosen to enlist rather than have the judge impose a sentence and one of us, who proved to be both a gentle giant and a superb rifleman, who had never gone beyond the eighth grade. We were mostly Catholics from the North or Baptists

away from the joints does not, you probably have costochondritis. Rarely, a joint where a rib meets the breastbone is swollen, warm and red, as well as tender. That’s a sign of an unusual condition called Tietze’s syndrome. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin, ibuprofen and naproxen are usually effective. You can also try pain-relieving cr eams, which you apply directly on your skin. Two types of creams are used most often: those containing aspirin and those containing capsaicin. Cool compresses or heating pads and stretching exercises may help. For women, wearing a special support bra may provide some comfort. See DR. K, Page A5

See SHIELDS, Page A5

25 YEARS AGO

Dec. 4, 1987 • Marcy Mendoza, 6, created a bubble art painting during the Very Special Arts Festival Friday at Sunset Elementary School. Marcy, a first-grader at Sunset, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Mendoza of Roswell. The festival attr acted several hundred first-thro-ugh sixth- graders and special education students in Roswell schools.


LOCAL

A5

Library to host programs featuring holiday themes Roswell Daily Record

LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

Chanukah or Hanukkah, the Jewish festival of rededication, will begin at sunset on Dec. 8 and end at sunset on Dec. 16. Often called the Festival of Lights, the Hanukkah celebration revolves around the kindling of a ninebranched menorah, known in Hebrew as the hanukiah. Jews typically recite blessings during this ritual and display the menorah prominently in a window as a reminder to others of the miracle that inspired the holiday. Monday is the global observance of Human Rights Day. Human rights are interlinked and interdependent rights inherent to all human beings without discrimination by nationality, ethnic origin, sex, religion, language, cast, creed or any other status, as stated by the United Nations. Although, in the U.S., we take human rights for granted, elsewhere, freedom and basic human rights are not assured. One of our human rights is the freedom to read. An old saying goes that one can’t really begin to understand what difficulties a man or woman is going through until one walks in his or her shoes. Through books, a literary walk may provide an understanding of their life. The Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania Ave., offers history and biographies about people, as well as fictional titles that may spark the imagination and opens the door to better understanding.

Book Talk

Audio books are a great way to “read” a book while doing things, like driving long distances, doing

LETTERS

yard work, cleaning the house or exercising. The library is adding new audio books to the adult, teen and children’s collections. Whether you travel or stay at home, check out the “talking books” on CD, audio cassette or Playaway. Deanne Dekle, children’s librarian, has selected titles for your listening pleasure. John Stephens’ “Books of Beginning” series begins with “The Emerald Atlas.” Following their parents’ disappearance, 14year -old Kate and her younger siblings, Emma and Michael, have grown up in a series of orphanages. In their latest abode, the trio discovers a mysterious book and are transported back to an earlier time in which the town is held captive by an evil witch with prophecies, wizards, hidden treasures, an ancient evil, and tantrum-throwing dwarves all making an appearance. In the sequel, “The Fire Chronicle,” the trio is on the run, still hunting for the mysterious “Books of Beginning,” as well as their parents. Kate, carrying the rescued Emerald Atlas, winds up transported back 100 years to New York City. She must find a way to reunite with the others while Michael and Emma must find the “Book of Fire” or risk losing Kate to the past forever. This is a fantasy series which is fastpaced and engaging, with plenty of action, humor and secrets propelling the plot. The perennial favorite “In

The fear factor

Dear Editor: Fear from nuclear power plants is a carry over from its first public use: Hiroshima and Nagasaki. After World War II, the atom bomb was used as a threat in the Cold War until 1986. That was a very unfortunate beginning for the nuclear age because it is actually the safest source of energy for commercial electricity. Today’s fear of nuclear is now on the wrong side of history because it is based on exaggerated political or economic fear and not on actual knowledge of the technology. I pulled a fatality study of all major power generation facilities during a period of time from 1969 to 1996. During this time period there were more than 8,100 deaths in coal accidents, more than 14,000 deaths in oil related accidents, more than 1,500 deaths in natural gas mishaps, more than 2,500 deaths related to LPG, and more than 5,100 deaths from hydro (dams) accidents. During this same period, there were only 28 deaths directly related to a hydrogen explosion at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power plant in Russia. I won’t break this down into deaths per kilowatt because that seems a bit morbid, but I think you get the point. Nuclear is already the safest energy source available and the next generation of reactor plants are even safer yet. There is a valid fear of long-term problems of radiation exposure from a nuclear accident. However, according to SCORCA research studies, the calculated cancer fatality risk is thousands of times lower than the NRC Safety Guidelines and millions of times lower than the general U.S. cancer fatality risk. We are bombarded with radon from the ground and gamma from the sky on a daily basis. We are exposed to radiation from cell phones to bananas. Do you have smoke alarms on your ceilings? It’s there, but it is not dangerous, at least not technically. But leave it to the fear monger; we are screwed if we continue to have efficient nuclear powergenerating facilities on this planet Earth. Bottom line is that only 28 deaths occurred as a direct result of the nuclear plant accident while 31,200 occurred in non-nuclear energy sources during the same time period (with five or more fatalities per accident). Processing hydrocarbons is a dangerous business (ask a local oilman) while nuclear technology is already the safest energy producing environment. Fukushima is the latest nuclear accident (with no direct deaths) and it would have automatically and safely shut down if it were a Thorium Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR). The residents who were evacuated would have been allowed to return to rebuild their lives after the tsunami. Santa Fe has more nature radiation from the skies than was released at Fukushima. Maybe we should evacuate Santa Fe too. TMSRs are the new and improved nuclear power sources of the future. China, India, Japan and a few other countries are investing. Why isn’t the U.S.? If you are interested in what your government has decided to invest in (code for spend), contact your congressman. They will probably not know what a TMSR is, but they will know all about the keystone pipeline. Have you ever asked why there needs to be a

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

Avoid activities that aggravate the symptoms. For example, wearing a sling-style purse or backpack may worsen the pain. With treatment, symptoms should begin to ease within a week. If your pain doesn’t respond to medications and conservative treatment, your doctor may suggest a steroid injection. Even without treat-

ment, most cases go away, although that may take several months. The condition doesn’t cause any long-ter m problems and is unlikely to return. Costochondritis is just one of those minor maladies that plague us but don’t threaten us. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)

Death” romantic suspense series by the J.D. Robb (aka Nora Roberts) features New York City detective Lt. Eve Dallas and her husband, Roarke. The library owns most of the series beginning with “Naked In Death” which is available in print format, as an electronic book and on CD. “Delusion in Death” is her 35th futuristic novel and takes place in 2060. Happy hour in a Manhattan bar becomes a scene of carnage when a potent hallucinogenic-drug mixture, released into the air, causes everyone inside to attack everyone else. While members of the NYPD unit headed by Dallas soon identify the drugs, they can’t stop another incident. With a total of 127 dead and the looming threat of still another incident, Dallas and her colleagues search for connections and motives, with an unexpected assist from the historical knowledge of Roarke’s live-in butler. This is a signature Robb novel with smart police work, help from unlikely sources and just enough romance to keep things steamy. Happily married couple Nick and Amy are preparing for their fifth wedding anniversary when she goes missing in Gillian Flynn’s “Gone Girl.” Nick is instantly the prime suspect and his odd behavior is not convincing anyone otherwise. Juxtaposed with Nick’s first-person narration of events are excerpts from Amy’s diary, which completely contradict Nick’s story and depicts a woman who is afraid of her husband, has recently found out she’s pregnant, and had been looking to buy a gun for protection. In

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

addition, Amy is famous as the model for her parents’ long-running and beloved children’s series “Amazing Amy.” However, what looks like a straight forward case of a husband killing his wife to free himself from a bad marriage morphs into something entirely different. “Gone Girl” is both a compelling thriller and a searing portrait of marriage that contains so many twists and turns that the outcome is impossible to predict.

What’s happening?

Gingerbread and the cold of winter time will be featured during this week’s story and craft hours. The Wednesday programs begin at 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. The Saturday program begins at 2 p.m. The programs are free and children who attend the story portion of the programs are invited to become creative through the related craft session. All materials are provided for the craft sessions. The stories may vary between programs and the quantity of some craft items may be limited. On Wednesday, children will enjoy gingerbread stories that might focus on “The Gingerbread Boy,” “The Library Gingerbread Man,” “Gingerbread Man: Superhero or Cookie Count,” a tasty pop-up counting book that finishes by counting 10 gingerbread windows. The related crafts could feature decorating a gingerbread house picture frame, dressing up a gingerbread man headband hat or assembling a large gingerbread man on a string for fun playtime. “Winter’s Tale” is one of the

separate pipeline for Canada’s oil sands? What is different about that oil? Martin Kral Roswell

Terrible sound system

Dear Editor: The Civic Center sound system (two pair of speakers) is, and has been, pathetic, I’m sure from the time it was constructed. The speakers are 100-150 feet away from the ears of the attendees which guarantees that only a small percentage (if any) of the words are heard. I’ve attended several fundraising events (with mostly seniors with some level of hearing loss) and if it wasn’t for Peppers catering, I’d just send a check to the agency. Tom Blake and Mike Francis (and others I’m sure) are experts in amplified sound and how to operate a mixer board for optimum results for the attendees. The talent is available to rework that building and to stop losing conventions. The new Holiday Inn, I hope, has designed their conference room to incorporate the best sound system, and not just hung some speakers in an out-of-way location. Anyone looking for a conference venue would run — maybe to another town — away from the Civic Center. The Civic Center expansion request is in Santa Fe for funding. If any money becomes available, part of it should absolutely be allotted for a sound system that would allow everyone in the room to clearly hear all words from the stage. If you put a tape recorder on a table farthest from the stage, during an event, you’d not be able to tell what language the speaker was using — it’s that bad. The City Council can fix this. Dave Swink Roswell

Salvation Army and post office

Dear Editor: It is my understanding that community organizations in Roswell have for decades gained public awareness and support by handing out flyers or having a booth on the sidewalk in front of the main post office located on Pennsylvania Avenue. Boy Scouts of America, Johnny Gonzales school supply give away events, Girl Scouts, church activities and various clubs and organizations have all historically enjoyed hosting fundraising efforts at that location. A week or so ago the Salvation Army went to arrange with the local postmaster setting up their traditional fundraising kettles. They were promptly turned away and told that nonprofit and community organizations would no longer be able to solicit support on U.S. Postal Service property. This came as a surprise to the Salvation Army, and Capt. Beau Perez expressed that this would not only hinder traditional fundraising efforts of the Salvation Army, but that of every group that has enjoyed gaining awareness by setting up a booth or handing out flyers there. It has been a strength of Roswell

Shields

Continued from Page A4

from the South. But we also included four Jewish Marines and even a couple of, to the manor born, Episcopalians. After the longest 13 weeks of our lives, we all came to know that while our ancestors may have come to America at different times and in different ships, now we were all in the same boat — and that each of us was an American. The draft — when three out of four male college-graduates as well as high-school graduates served — guaranteed that Americans of all classes, all social strata and all areas of the country would shoulder the responsibility of defending their nation. And that in doing so they would rub shoulders with and — while sharing bunks, a weekend pass and, sometimes, even foxholes — get to know, and to depend upon, other Americans very different from themselves.

stories to be enjoyed during Saturday’s winter time storytime. Other cold weather titles might explore “The Jacket I Wear in the Snow,” “Froggy Gets Dressed,” “Penelope in Winter,” “Frozen Noses” or “Counting on Snow.” There will be winter crafts such as creating a wintery door knob hanger, decorating a mitten magnet bookmark or assembling a movable snowman. All ages are invited to attend the computer classes held tonight at 6 p.m. and on Saturday at 10 a.m. to learn about online resources. For more details, contact the library at 575-622-7101, online or by visiting the library. Mark your calendar for next Tuesday, Dec. 11, at 6:30 p.m. to listen to Andy Mason’s musical program, “A Brief History of Christmas Music.” This is a family friendly Christmas music presentation for all ages.

Books Again

During December, Books Again will be offering a Christmas special sale where readers may buy one book and get one book of equal or lesser value free. The store has fiction from the classics to most genres, along with a wide selection on non-fiction subjects. The prices are approximately one-fourth of the original price. Paperback books are 25 cents each. Books Again, 404 W. Second St., is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. All proceeds are used to benefit the library and the store is operated by Friends of the Library volunteers. Parking is located behind the store.

that people living here have always shown generous support for associations and groups that directly benefit our city. This negative stand by the Roswell post office impacts our entire city, and many smaller organizations would be unable to impact the local postmaster’s decision prohibiting them from raising support at that traditional location. Capt. Perez has examined the rules of the post office as a federal organization and found within their stipulations that community and nonprofit organizations can indeed operate on their property if there is a signed contract in place between the organization and the local U.S. post office. To satisfy that requirement, the Salvation Army has produced a signed contract, but nevertheless the local post office continues to resist allowing the fundraising efforts. The battle is being fought by the Salvation Army, because of their contacts and clout they can fight the battle for the little guys. As members of the city of Roswell we should not lose our sense of belonging and pride for our outstanding local values, and being there for each other, so that God in Christ can be honored in how we treat each other. I applaud the Salvation Army for supporting our sense of community by standing up for our traditions. I would ask that everyone who has an opinion on this to let the postmaster know. Our nation seems to be losing its sense of identity, but as a city we can take a stand, even if it is a small first step! Jeanette Schaffer Roswell

Let ringers return

Dear Editor: I was greatly disappointed to read the article about our postmaster no longer allowing the Salvation Army to ring the bell outside the post office. When a faith-based organization steps up to help meet the needs in our own community, I do not think they should be deprived of the opportunity. I have been there on many occasions. I do not see the bell ringers impeding those wishing to come in and take care of their business at the post office. They are not begging or pursuing people. They are merely standing there ringing a bell. It is every person’s choice whether to give or not. Many people enjoy giving and feel good about helping meet the needs of Roswell citizens who find themselves in an unfortunate situation. I understand that this is one of the most beneficial sites for the receiving of funds for the Salvation Army in Roswell, so obviously there are plenty of people willing to give at this site. In these busy days, many of us want to do something to help others. The convenience of having the opportunity to give to others on my way to take care of my needs is a benefit to me. I would hope that the postmaster would rethink this position. The bell ringers have been at their post for 40 years at the post office. Some regulation from 10 years ago and never imposed until now should be re-thought. I do not believe it applies here. Nancy Wigley Roswell Which brings us back to a variation of Tom Pettit’s great question of Earl Butz: Do you, Mr. Commentator, or do you, Madame Senator, personally know anyone whom your arguments or your votes have sent into combat? Have you attended the funeral of anyone whom you personally knew who was killed in Iraq or Afghanistan? A “Support Our Troops” decal on your SUV or a flag pin in your lapel does not qualify. The American Establishment — political, economic, academic and journalistic — has next to no personal stake in men and women who risk their life and limbs to defend the United States. Our military is increasingly integrated by race and increasingly segregated by class. Tragically, most Americans today only know people exactly like themselves. Universal national service would introduce Americans to each other and to what it means to be a citizen. COPYRIGHT 2012 MARK SHIELDS


A6 Tuesday, December 4, 2012

BUSINESS REVIEW

Roswell Daily Record

Bows & Britches offers high quality children’s and junior clothing and other items at a low cost

The Bows & Britches staff includes (left to right): Darlene, Denise, Samantha and Savannah. (Not pictured are Angela and Jodie.)

Bows & Britches has lots of great selections in every size.

Bows & Britches carries new Boutique style items as well, including, but not limited to: custom-made hair bows, tutus, jewelry, hand bags, wallets and many other great items. Bows & Britches is located at 901 West 2nd Street and they are open from 10:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday; and from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. They are closed Sunday and Monday. They now accept con-

signments only on Tuesday and Wednesday - or Thursdays by appointment. The phone number is 622-5437 for more information or, better yet, drop in and see everything for yourself or visit them on Facebook. Bows & Britches honors American Express, MasterCard, VISA and Discover cards.

Bows & Britches is located at 901 West 2nd Street and they are open from 10:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday; and from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. on Thursday. They now accept consignments only on Tuesday and Wednesday - or Thursdays by appointment. Please call 622-5437 for more information.

Custom bows and other great items are available for order at Bows & Britches.

Bows & Britches, located at 901 West Second, is a consignment store for clothes (for all ages) and infant items. Gregory and Samantha Wagoner have owned Bows & Britches since September, 2011 and they invite you to come in and see all they have in the store. “Business has been going strong since the first day,” Samantha says. Items come in on consignment. Seasonal items are taken in on an 8 week basis and profits are split 50/50 when an

item sells. Moneys earned can be used in the store for credit on merchandise or the cash can be taken by the seller. “At this time exchanges and buyouts are not being made, but as our budget grows we hope to accommodate that in the future,” Samantha says. Sizes accepted are newborn-juniors, misses’ and men’s clothing with shoes also accepted in new and very gently used condition. Toys in working condition are accepted and are very popu-

lar. They also accept infant and children’s furniture, such as beds, cribs (no drop-sides), changing tables, dressers, bouncers, swings and walkers. Unsold items get donated to the Battered Women’s Shelter and Neighborhood Church of the Nazarene (1019 South Lea Avenue) to be added to their clothing closet. Many other charities and organizations have been supported - such as CASA, RYFL, Gateway, Valley Christian School, Hagerman High and many more.

Check out the featured business at www.rdrnews.com - Click on Business Review Harry Allison, Owner Certified in Water Restoration • Professional Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning • Carpet Repairs • Free Estimates • State of the Art Equipment • Tile Cleaning & Sealing 23 Yrs. Field Experience

625-2779

Advertise in the Business Review! Call Today! 622-7710

Residential • Commercial Sales • Installation Senior Discounts

Service on all makes & models • Free Estimates Reliable Service • 24 Hour Emergency Service

Jim McClain 623-0105 or cell: 420-4626

Encore!

Flowers & Gifts

3107 N. Main St. • 627-6300 encoreflowersandgifts.com

POINSETTIAS HAVE ARRIVED,

with more on the way! Come see the NEW COLORS!

Becky Neeley, Designer/Owner

STOP IN AND ENJOY OUR 12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS SPECIAL!

Mon - Fri 9:00 am - 5:30 pm Sat 10 am - 6 pm 317 N. Main 622-5252


NATION/OBITUARIES

Roswell Daily Record

OBITUARIES

Robert Eugene Brown

Memorial services are scheduled for Thursday, Dec. 6, at 1 p.m. at West Main Baptist Church in Artesia for Robert Eugene Brown, formerly of Roswell. Brown, 46, passed away Friday, Nov. 30, 2012, in Odessa, Texas. Jason Kraft and Ricky Ellis will officiate at the services. Robert was born on June 26, 1966, in Roswell, the son of Bettie Bolt. He is survived by his fiancée Rashel Stamps and daughter Randi Lee Brown of the family home; a son Zachariah Eugene Brown of Mesa, Ariz.; a daughter Danielle Marie Brown of Lovington; his mother Bettie Bolt of Mesa, Ariz.; two sisters, Deanna Joseph of Mesa, Ariz., and Esta Brown of Roswell; niece Tina Hernandez Gordon of Mesa, Ariz.; numerous great-nieces and cousins. He was preceded in death by a brother, Charles “Chuck” Brown and a sister Glenda Lee Brown.

Sr. and Virginia Pena in Roswell. He loved to be with his family, he was a very outgoing man. He always joked around, always in a playful mood. He was a great uncle, enjoyed watching movies and playing his PS3. Arthur collected guns, he liked to go to the lakes to target-shoot and loved his dog; was a very giving man. He had many friends and touched so many people, his favorite food was smothered burritos. Arthur loved his mother, sisters and his girlfriend; he made sure they never went without, a great son, brother and boyfriend. We love you “Arthur.” Those left to cherish his memory are his mother Virgie Pena of Roswell; his girlfriend Tiffani Sisneros; his sisters, Virgie M. Pena, Elizabeth Pena, Angelina Najar, Samantha Najar, Anntanette Najar, Sheryl Najar, Alexandra Pena and Sierra Her nandez, all of Roswell; brother -in-law Armando Gonzales; numerous nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles and cousins. He will be missed by all who knew him. Pallbearers will be Armando Gonzales, Tommy Pena, James Pena, Michael Quintana, Juan Meads and Raymond Franco. Honorary pallbearers will be Joe Marquez, Raul Munoz, Manny Duran, Gage, BJ Munoz, Too Short, BJ Marquez, Jerry Najar, Tommy Pena Jr. and Desiree Pena. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories in the online register book at andersonbethany.com. Services are under the direction of AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

Funeral services will be held for Arthur Contreras Jr., 22, of Roswell, at 11 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, at Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home Chapel, with Rev. Lawrence Sanchez officiating. Burial to follow in South Park Cemetery. Arthur passed away on Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2012. Visitation will be from 5-7 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2012, at the funeral home. Arthur was born Nov. 2, 1990, to Arthur Contreras

“I Miss You” I Miss you, I Miss the loud music coming from your room. I Miss the war mth of knowing you’re just a call away. I Miss seeing your big bright smile. I Miss seeing you here and there. I Miss getting kicked out of your room. I Miss cooking you breakfast, lunch and dinner. I Miss hearing you come in at night. I Miss your smell. I Miss you with all my might. I Miss the way we would fight. I Miss my brother, I Miss my son, I Miss my friend, I Miss you, I Love you. And we will see you soon

LOS ANGELES (AP) — NASA’s Curiosity rover has indeed found something in the Martian dirt. But so far, there’s no definitive sign of the chemical ingredients necessary to support life. A scoop of sandy soil analyzed by Curiosity’s sophisticated chemistry laboratory contained water and a mix of chemicals, but not complex carbon-based molecules considered essential for life. That the soil was not more hospitable did not surprise mission scientist Paul Mahaffy since radiation from space can destroy any carbon evidence. “It’s not unexpected necessarily,” said Mahaffy of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, who is in charge of the chemistry experiments. “It’s been exposed to the harsh Martian environment.” The latest findings were presented Monday at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco. The mission managed by the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory is trying to determine whether conditions on Mars could have been favorable for microbes when the red plan-

et was warmer and wetter. Hopes for a “Mars-shaking” discovery peaked two weeks ago after mission chief scientist John Grotzinger told National Public Radio: “This data is gonna be one for the history books. It’s looking really good.” The Internet lit up with excitement. NASA later clarified that Grotzinger was referring generally to the mission and not a specific result. Days before the science gathering, the space agency sought to contain expectations and issued a statement insisting there’d be no big news. So what did Curiosity find after baking the soil and analyzing the resulting gases? Water, sulfur and perchlorate, a highly oxidizing salt that was also detected by one of NASA’s previous spacecraft, the Phoenix lander, in the northern Martian latitudes. “This is typical, ordinary Martian soil,” said mission scientist Ralf Gellert of the University of Guelph in Canada. The rover did detect hints of a simple carbon com-

Arthur Contreras Jr.

again, We Love & Miss you.

“Arthur Joe” If I had just one wish, it would be for a stairway that reached up to Heaven so I could bring you home.

Douglas Evans of Nashville, Tenn.; two daughters, Miriam Evans of Moorefield, W.Va., and Ruth Hultgren of Richmond, Va.; one brother Lee Amos Miller III of Stillwater, Minn.; two sisters, Marsha Smith of Myrtle Beach, S.C., and Susan Wagner of Waldorf, Md.; also, 15 grandchildren. Friends may pay respects online at lagronefuneralchapels.com Arrangements are under the personal direction of the professionals at LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Abingdon, Va.; and Barbie Lindsey and husband Brandy of Phoenix, Ariz.; her father T.W. (Cotton) Baker of Roswell; grandchildren Tommy Dollar, Rusty Brisco, Michael Brisco, Michelle Garcia, Kimberly Gonzales, Lacee Lindsey, Kaden Lindsey and Jarod Candelaria; 12 great-grandchildren and her siblings, Sharon Hillard, Lana VanBlaricon, Dennis (Butch) McClintock, Lyle McClintock and Connie Braden. A special thank you to the staff of Americare Hospice of Phoenix. Lunch will be provided by Midway Family Church, 65 Yakima Rd., for family and friends at 12 p.m. preceding the services.

Victoria Evans

Funeral services will be held on Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2012, at 2 p.m. at Christ’s Church for Victoria M. Evans, age 69, who passed away on Dec. 2, 2012. Inter ment will follow in South Park Cemetery. Rev. Lonnie Owens of Christ’s Church will officiate. Visitation will be held starting at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012. Victoria was born Jan. 8, 1943, in Washington, D.C., to Lee Amos Miller Jr. and Olivia Peek Miller. They have both preceded her in death. She graduated first in her class in both her high school and college class. On July 24, 1965, she married Richard “Dick” Evans in Upper Marlboro, Md. He survives her at the home in Ft. Sumner. Vicki was a dental hygienist for Dental Clinic in Fort Sumner and a member of First United Methodist Church in Fort Sumner. She joined many civic, religious and charitable groups, always rising to leadership positions. Vickie was past president of the Powerhorn Cowbells in New Mexico. Having survived breast cancer, she has been active in the American Cancer Society’s “Relay For Life” functions, speaking before as many as 5,000 in Maryland rallies. She organized a new rally in Fort Sumner, which after three years grew to win recognition as the highest per capita-grossing rally in the Southwest. She followed in her father’s footsteps and was an avid gardener. Vicki is also survived by two sons, Duane Evans of Tallahassee, Fla., and J.

Mars rover Curiosity: No surprise in first soil test

pound, but scientists don’t yet know if it’s native to the planet, came from space or hitchhiked from Earth. Scientists think the best chance of finding complex carbon is at Mount Sharp, a mountain rising three miles from the center of Gale Crater near the Martian equator. Curiosity won’t trek there until early next year. Images from space reveal intriguing layers at the base and many think it’s the ideal place to search for carbon. “The real new science may have to wait until the rover gets to the ancient layered terrain at the base,” said University of Arizona senior research scientist Peter Smith, who is not involved in the latest Mars mission.

NOBLE FINANCE

“We want to make you a loan”

$200 - $2,000 (575)622-0900

Linda Joy Pechstedt

Funeral services for Linda Joy Pechstedt, age 69, will be held Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, at 2 p.m., at Midway Family Church in Midway, with Rev. Danny Sons conducting the services. Interment will follow in South Park Cemetery. Linda passed away at her home on Monday, Nov. 26, 2012, surrounded by her loving family in El Mirage, Ariz. Linda was born on July 27, 1943, in Port Orchard, Wash. She was the first daughter of T.W. (Cotton) and Dorothy E. Baker. Linda had a successful career in lodging and property management industries for 35 years. She had an exceptional ability to take a rundown property and turn it into a thriving business. She was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, daughter and sister. Preceding her in death were her mother Dorothy E. Baker and siblings, Cindy, Larry and Randy McClintock. Survivors include her husband Clyde L. Pechstedt and her loving “babies” Sassy and Molly of the home; daughters, Penny Polak and husband Joe of Dexter; Cathy Pechstedt and husband Casey of Orlando, Fla.; Linda K. Dollar and husband Daniel of Ruidoso; Julie Souverielle and husband Larry of

Raquel Rede

A Rosary for Raquel Rede, 86, who passed away Friday, Nov. 30, 2012, is scheduled at Ballard Chapel on Monday, Dec. 3, 2012, at 7 p.m. Mass is scheduled at St. John’s Catholic Church on Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012, at 2 p.m. Interment will follow in South Park Cemetery. Raquel was born April 9, 1926, in Miami, Ariz., to Catalina Cabrera and Rodrigo Gutierrez who have deceased. She was preceded in death by her husband Jose de la Luz Rede and her daughter Gloria Garcia; her sons, Oscar and Pedro Rede and sister Lydia Avila. Her surviving children are Gustavo Rede, Victor Rede, Guadalupe Garcia, Juven Fierro, Carolina Rede, Pascuala Lazo, Rosario Gonzalez, Raquel Rede, Lorena Loya and many surviving grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild. Surviving brothers and sisters are Emma Sanchez, Ofelia Montanez, Roberto Gutierrez, Armando Gutierrez and Ernesto Gutierrez. Raquel loved her family very much. Her favorite things to do were reading her Bible and gardening.

A7

She loved to crochet, knit, and sew for her family. Her kind and gentle ways and capacity to love made her the special person so many will always remember. Pallbearers are Luis Garcia, Jose Rede, Ezequiel Lazo, Juan Lazo, Alejandro Frierro and Daniel Gonzalez.

“Woman of Strength” A woman who never gave in to pain. You put up a fight, you fought with all your might. We never got along. We never sang to the same damn song. Now I see it was me. How could you love someone so weak? A woman so strong. Your rejection was a simple reflection Of who I had to be. I gave up on life, As you fought to stay alive. Lesson learned. A shameful bow. I see that now. Your eyes have shut. Your soul has won. As mine has come undone. You tried to speak, as I began to freak. Were you saying you love me? Or were you telling me I was weak? Or a simple freak? I hope my words brought you peace. —grandson, Leonel Garcia

“Mujer del Bosque Bonito” Mujer de un mundo perdido Tu fortaleza es unica Descansa mujer descansa Mi abuelita querida Aunque nunca te ame Nunca te odie Luchaste toda una vida Pero ya llego to despedida. Vuela abuela vuela Tu canción a llegado a su fin. Cierro tus ojitos Descansa mujer del bosque bonito Descansa mujer luchadora. —nieto, Leonel Garcia

Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at ballardfuneralhome.com.

Elaine Houston

Services are pending for Elaine Houston, 80, who passed away Saturday, Dec. 1, 2012, in Roswell. A complete announcement will follow when services have been finalized.


A8 Tuesday, December 4, 2012

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Sunny and cooler

Clear

Wednesday

Thursday

Mostly sunny

Friday

Saturday

Partly sunny

Mostly sunny

A full day of sunshine

Sunday

Partial sunshine

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities

Times of clouds and sun

High 64°

Low 33°

72°/35°

77°/41°

78°/37°

75°/41°

75°/39°

64°/22°

WNW at 7-14 mph POP: 0%

N at 3-6 mph POP: 0%

SE at 6-12 mph POP: 0%

WSW at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

NNE at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

ENE at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

ESE at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

NW at 8-16 mph POP: 10%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 75°/39° Normal high/low ............... 57°/28° Record high ............... 80° in 1977 Record low ................... 4° in 1931 Humidity at noon .................. 19%

Farmington 55/29

Clayton 60/34

Raton 56/27

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Mon. 0.00" Month to date ....................... 0.00" Normal month to date .......... 0.06" Year to date .......................... 6.10" Normal year to date ........... 12.35"

Santa Fe 55/31

Gallup 56/23

Tucumcari 62/36

Albuquerque 57/37

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 60/35

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 58/40

T or C 64/39

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed. Last

Dec 6

Rise Set 6:46 a.m. 4:50 p.m. 6:47 a.m. 4:50 p.m. Rise Set 10:28 p.m. 10:52 a.m. 11:27 p.m. 11:26 a.m. New

Dec 13

First

Dec 19

Alamogordo 67/33

Silver City 65/40

Carlsbad 65/37

Hobbs 63/37

Las Cruces 66/39

Full

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2012

Dec 28

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diffi- JACQUELINE cult

BIGAR

ARIES (March 21-April 19)  Express more of your feelings. Someone could respond with total confusion. YOUR HOROSCOPE You might not understand what eludes this person. Consider that it might just be that this person does not know how to take you. Tonight: Let the fun begin. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  You could come across as being irritable or tenacious when you are teasing several friends. Be careful! Someone else might not read this behavior as it is intended. Your actions could be the source of a misunderstanding. Laugh and lighten up. Tonight: Play it low-key, please. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)  You have the ability to express yourself clearly. You can’t seem to get past a hassle or a problem, which is a result of others not understanding you. Invite those who seem confused into a conversation in order to figure out where the mix-up lies. Tonight: Catch up on a friend’s news. CANCER (June 21-July 22)  You will buy a loved one a gift or a token of affection, which could be separate

‘Zero Dark Thirty’ named best film by NY Film Critics NEW YORK (AP) — The New York Film Critics Circle named Kathryn Bigelow’s “Zero Dark Thirty” the best film of 2012, voicing its strong support for the grimly journalistic Osama bin Laden docudrama. Bigelow, whose “Hurt Locker” won best picture at the Academy Awards in 2010, also won best director in the awards announced Monday, and Greg Fraser won for the film’s cinematography. “‘Zero Dark Thirty’ confirms the massive talent of Kathryn Bigelow,” said NYFCC chairman Joshua Rothkopf, a critic for Time Out New York. “‘Zero Dark Thirty’ is a very important movie. It’s not triumphant and it’s still a very significant dramatization of an important event. And we were knocked out by the film.” But the critics group also cast a loud vote for Seven Spielberg’s “Lincoln,” bestowing it with three awards: Daniel DayLewis for best actor, Sally Field for best supporting actress and Tony Kushner for best screenplay. Lewis’ award for his performance as the 16th president is his fifth from the NYFCC. Rachel Weisz ear ned best actress from the critics for her performance in the little-seen “The Deep Blue Sea,” a period drama by the British director Terence Davies. The supporting actor pick went to Matthew McConaughey for his performances as both a Texas district attor ney in Richard Linklater’s

ROSWELL 64/33

“Ber nie” and as a male stripper in Steven Soderberg’s “Magic Mike.” Shut out entirely were awards hopefuls “Les Miserables,” “Argo,” “Silver Linings Playbook” and “The Master.” This year’s Oscar hunt is generally seen as fairly open, with a number of strong contenders. The NYFCC voting could help coalesce support behind “Zero Dark Thirty” and “Lincoln.” Rothkopf, though, said that there was strong passion in voting for several films that didn’t yield an award. Michael Haneke’s Palme d’Or -winning “Amour,” a depiction of an aging married couple, took best foreign language film. Best non-fiction film went to “The Central Park Five,” the documentary about the infamous 1989 New York rape case, co-directed by Ken Burns, his daughter Sarah Bur ns and David McMahon. Best animated film went to Tim Burton’s “Frankenweenie.” The AIDS activism documentary “How to Survive a Plague” was picked as best first feature. The New York Film Critics Circle, a body of 35 New York-based critics founded in 1935, announced their annual vote on Twitter over a period of hours. Awards will be handed out at a ceremony Jan. 7. Next to come in the quickening awards season are the National Board of Review Awards on Wednesday and the Los Angeles Film Critics on Sunday. Golden Globe nominations will be announced Dec. 13.

Regional Cities Today Wed. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Today

Monday

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

67/33/s 57/37/s 50/17/s 65/38/s 65/37/s 51/23/pc 60/34/s 54/33/s 60/35/s 68/36/s 56/36/s 55/29/pc 56/23/s 63/37/s 66/39/s 54/33/s 54/35/s 60/31/s 65/36/s 61/34/s 57/24/s 56/27/s 48/20/s 64/33/s 58/40/s 55/31/s 65/40/s 64/39/s 62/36/s 56/34/s

67/33/s 63/37/s 54/20/s 72/42/s 71/41/s 54/21/s 69/42/pc 55/29/s 67/39/s 69/37/s 61/36/s 60/28/s 63/27/s 68/42/s 67/41/s 66/36/s 58/32/s 64/35/s 68/41/s 67/39/s 62/30/s 69/32/pc 52/19/s 72/35/s 65/44/s 59/31/s 67/41/s 67/40/s 72/41/s 59/32/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

from this person’s Christmas present. Your thoughtfulness makes a big difference, yet there is an element of confusion surrounding this gift. Listen and share openly. Tonight: So what if you overindulge? LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  You experience clarity with your feelings, and it opens you up to new possibilities and exciting changes. Nevertheless, in a discussion about a particular topic today, you might feel as if you are wading in quicksand and that someone is not getting your message. Tonight: All smiles. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)  You might feel as if you are playing a game of “Who’s on first, What’s on second” with someone. You just can’t seem to get clarity, as nearly every question leads to more questions. Say little, and become the observer in order to get more answers. Tonight: Do a vanishing act. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)  You might want to approach a situation in a different way. You’ll deal with others better and will succeed more often if you work within groups. The confusion that mounts will be shortlived. Perhaps someone involved just needs to relax. Tonight: Where your friends are. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  Take a look at the amount of work or errands you need to complete before making other commitments, as enticing as they might be. A long lunch with a loved one could make you very happy. A touch of chaos adds to the day’s intrigue. Relax. Tonight: Could be late.

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

7/1/s 72/57/pc 70/52/s 57/50/c 72/55/s 56/33/pc 58/35/r 70/46/pc 60/37/s 58/32/sh 69/43/s 82/69/sh 78/57/t 58/36/r 60/37/s 69/51/pc 70/54/pc 64/34/s

14/5/s 67/44/sh 57/30/pc 54/32/sh 66/36/sh 39/31/s 40/27/pc 68/48/pc 66/38/pc 38/24/pc 69/44/s 80/68/sh 73/52/pc 45/27/s 58/41/pc 69/48/s 72/56/pc 68/41/s

U.S. Extremes

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

79/64/pc 66/36/s 38/21/pc 76/60/t 64/51/pc 58/30/s 78/57/pc 68/52/pc 79/56/s 66/40/sh 52/45/r 74/56/s 62/39/sh 55/43/pc 67/56/pc 52/42/r 76/50/s 71/53/s

78/66/pc 69/44/s 35/30/pc 71/56/pc 55/32/c 54/38/pc 77/56/pc 57/34/c 80/53/s 43/25/pc 49/38/sh 63/34/sh 54/38/s 52/40/sh 68/55/pc 46/37/sh 79/48/s 60/34/pc

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 88° ..................... Alice, Texas Low: 11° .....Lake Yellowstone, Wyo.

High: 80° ..........................Carlsbad Low: 19° ........................Eagle Nest

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)  You are right in your element and are willing to gain a better sense of what is needed. A partner or an associate might be vested in adding confusion, which makes it necessary and wise to postpone your decision. Look at the big picture. Tonight: Read between the lines. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  Work through and deal with a problem involving a partner. Expressing compassion could be difficult amid all the confusion. You might want to rethink a decision that seems like a good idea. Give yourself time to come up with an adequate conclusion. Tonight: Chat over dinner. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  Defer to someone else, and remain sure of yourself. You want to understand where he or she is coming from. Let this person follow the natural course that is determined by his or her thinking, and both of you will be pleased with the end results. Tonight: Just do not be alone. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)  Pace yourself, and know what your expectations are. A loved one might try to determine exactly what it is that you want. His or her questions make little sense to you. Follow through on what you know to be best, yet be kind to this person. Tonight: Try a relaxing activity.

BORN TODAY Actor Jeff Bridges (1949), rapper Jay-Z (1969), model Tyra Banks (1973)


Tuesday, December 4, 2012 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

LOCAL SCHEDULE TUESDAY DECEMBER 4

HIGH SCHOOL BOYS BASKETBALL 5 p.m. • Gateway Chr. at NMMI 6:30 p.m. • Lake Arthur at Loving 7 p.m. • Carlsbad at Goddard GIRLS BASKETBALL 5 p.m. • Lake Arthur at Loving 6:30 p.m. • Dexter at Tularosa 7 p.m. • Goddard at Carlsbad • Roswell at Hobbs

SCORE CENTER BOYS BASKETBALL Hagerman JV at Lake Arthur, n/a GIRLS BASKETBALL Hagerman at Lake Arthur, n/a Roswell C at NMMI, n/a MEN’S BASKETBALL Top 25 Syracuse 84, E. Michigan 48 San Diego St. 74, Texas Southern 62

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Top 25 Connecticut 63, Maryland 48 Miami (Fla.) 68, Alcorn St. 53 NBA Portland 118, Charlotte 112, OT Detroit 89, Cleveland 79 New Orleans 102, Milwaukee 81 Denver 113, Toronto 110 L.A. Clippers 105, Utah 104 Orlando at Golden State, late NFL Washington 17, N.Y. Giants 16

NATIONAL BRIEFS FULMER HEADED TO HALL OF FAME

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Even after Tennessee fired him in 2008, Phillip Fulmer always assumed he would coach again. “I absolutely did,” Fulmer said. “I totally did. That’s all I’d ever done, and I’d done it very well.” Four years later, Fulmer still hasn’t returned to the sidelines. Though he hasn’t closed the door on the possibility of a comeback, it seems less likely with each passing year. The latest signal of potential closure comes Tuesday when Fulmer is inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, an honor that generally comes after an individual has completed his career. Fulmer will join former Miami coach Jimmy Johnson, former Texas A&M coach R.C. Slocum and 14 former players in getting inducted at a National Football Foundation awards dinner in New York. Coaches must have served at least 10 seasons and 100 games while posting a winning percentage of at least .600 to be considered for the Hall of Fame. Coaches under the age of 70 must have been out of coaching for three years. Fulmer, 62, says it hasn’t sunk in that he’s about to become a Hall of Famer. After all, he’s younger than most of the other Hall of Fame coaches were upon their induction. “I’m graciously accepting it,” Fulmer said, “but I’m too dang young.” The honor has provided him an opportunity to reflect on his career. Fulmer, who lettered as an offensive guard at Tennessee from 1969-71, won nearly three-quarters of his games and posted a 152-52 record at his alma mater. He coached Tennessee’s first three games in 1992 while Johnny Majors recovered from heart surgery, then took over the program for good at the end of the 1992 regular season and remained in place through 2008. Tennessee won at least 10 games in nine of those years, including a 1998 national championship and a 1997 Southeastern Conference title. The Vols finished in the Top 25 in 13 of his 16 full seasons on the job. “The consistency is what we were all about,” Fulmer said. “We tried to surround the team with a family kind of atmosphere. We did it all together - one for all, all for one.”

SPORTS

B

Tide vs. Irish for it all Section

Roswell Daily Record

NEW YORK (AP) — On one side, a blossoming dynasty from the college football capital of the Deep South. On the other, the sport’s most famous team, trying to reclaim its place among the elite. Notre Dame and Alabama bring star power and power football to the BCS championship. The matchup became official Sunday night when the final standings were released and, to no one’s surprise, the Fighting Irish were first and the Crimson Tide was second.

The one bit of drama on college football’s selection Sunday was whether Northern Illinois could be this year’s BCS buster. The Huskies got in, getting a spot in the Orange Bowl against Florida State, taking a bid away from Oklahoma and sparking heated debate about a system that never fails to tick off fans in some way. other BCS The matchups: — Oregon and Kansas State will play in the Fiesta

Bowl. — Wisconsin and Stanford will meet in the Rose Bowl. — Florida and Louisville are set for the Sugar Bowl. As for the main event in the penultimate Bowl Championship Series, there was little controversy about No. 1 Notre Dame against No. 2 Alabama in Miami. “The tradition of Alabama and Notre Dame brings special attention to it, but we’re

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

just trying to be the best team on Monday, Jan. 7,” Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly said Sunday night. “All of that tradition, what’s happened in the past, is not going to help us Jan. 7, but we do respect the traditions.” The Irish clinched their spot a week ago in Los Angeles by completing a perfect season against rival Southern California. Alabama earned its spot Saturday, beating Georgia 32-28 in a thrilling South-

easter n Conference title game. The program that coach Paul Bryant turned into an SEC behemoth in the 1960s and ’70s, winning five national championships and sharing another during his tenure, is again dominating college football with a modern-day version of the Bear leading the way in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Coach Nick Saban and the Crimson T ide are on the verge of one of the great runs in history. Alabama

’Skins eke PREP FOOTBALL out win Dissecting Week 14: One more LANDOVER, Md. (AP) — Robert Grif fin III went down, the ball popped out, and the Washington Redskins scored a touchdown. Look out, New York Giants and the rest of the NFC East. If the rookie quarterback keeps getting those kinds of breaks, it’ll be hard to keep him out of the title hunt for years to come. As it is, RG3 has the Redskins within a game of first place, leading a fourth-quarter rally in a 17-16 Monday night victory over the Giants, giving Washington a threegame winning streak in which it has dispatched division rivals — Philadelphia, Dallas and now New York — one by one. Griffin completed 13 of 21 passes for 163 yards and ran five times for 72 yards, breaking Cam Newton’s NFL record for yards rushing by a rookie quarterback. His top target again was Pierre Garcon, who had eight receptions for 106 yards and a touchdown, showing no signs of the painful toe injury that forced him to miss six of the season’s first nine games. Alfred Morris ran for 124 yards on 22 carries, becoming the second Redskins rookie to run for 1,000 yards. Reggie Brooks had 1,063 in

See BCS, Page B5

KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

One week. That’s all that is left in the 2012 high school football season. But it’s the most important week of the year — championship week. Four champions will be crowned this week and Goddard has the chance to be one of those four. The Rockets are in the state championship game for the sixth time in the past seven seasons and the 13th time in 22 seasons under Sam Jernigan. Think about that for a second, let that statistic sink in. Jer nigan has been the head coach at Goddard for 22 seasons and 13 of those ended with his Rockets playing for the state title. That’s unfathomable. That’s just ridiculous. Lawrence Foster Photo That’s downright amazing, if you ask me. Goddard’s Jake Delamater (32) chases down Belen running back Wyatt Robinson And two of those nine during the Rockets’ win over the Eagles in the state semifinals, Friday. Delamater and the Rockets won 35-7 to advance to the state championship game for the sixth See WEEK 14, Page B2 time in the past seven years. They face No. 2 Los Lunas on Friday for the title.

AND THE HEISMAN TROPHY FINALISTS ARE... Collin Klein, Johnny Manziel & Manti Te’o See REDSKINS, Page B2

NEW YORK (AP) — Johnny Manziel and Manti Te’o are in position to make Heisman Trophy history. Manziel, the redshirt freshman quarterback from Texas A&M, and Te’o, Notre Dame’s star linebacker, along with Kansas State quarterback Collin Klein, were invited Monday to attend the Heisman presentation ceremony. Manziel is the favorite to win college football’s most famous player of the year award on Saturday night in Manhattan. He would be the first freshman to win the Heisman and the first Texas A&M player since halfback John David Crow won the school’s only Heisman in 1957. “I’m overwhelmed by this tremendous honor of representing Texas A&M, the 12th Man and all my teammates in New York,” Manziel said in a statement. “This is a dream come true for me, and I know it’s a credit to all my coaches and teammates. I definitely wouldn’t be a Heisman finalist without my teammates and coaches.” Three sophomores have

AP Photos

won the award (Tim Tebow in 2007, Sam Bradford in 2008 and Mark Ingram in 2009), but the best a firstyear player has ever done is second. Adrian Peterson of Oklahoma finished second to Southern California quarterback Matt Leinart in 2004. Peterson was a true freshman. As a redshirt

freshman, Manziel attended A&M last year and practiced with the team but did not play. Michael Vick of Virginia Tech came in third in 1999 as a redshirt freshman and Herschel Walker was a true freshman for Georgia in 1980 when he finished third in the Heisman balloting.

Nicknamed Johnny Football, Manziel quickly became a national sensation this season, putting up huge numbers in first-year Texas A&M coach Kevin Sumlin’s spread offense. He led the 10th-ranked Aggies to a 10-2 record in their first season in the Southeastern Conference. With a knack for improvi-

sation, Manziel racked up an SEC-record 4,600 yards of total offense, including 1,181 rushing to lead the conference. The 6-foot-1, 200-pound Manziel zoomed to the front of the Heisman race on Nov. 10, when he passed for 253 yards and two touchdowns and ran See HEISMAN, Page B5


B2 Tuesday, December 4, 2012 Week 14 Continued from Page B1

times his teams didn’t play for the title, they were beaten in the semifinals (2005 and 2010). Fifteen trips to at least the semifinals in 22 years. That’s just crazy. Don’t ask Jernigan about any of that, though. He’ll just shrug it off. He won’t even crack the slightest smile about it. In fact, he’ll probably tell you the same thing he tells me — “The past is the past. We just have to focus on the present and how the present will affect the future.” I’ve heard that, or some variation of that, countless times from Jernigan. Maybe he needs to put that on his business card or, better yet, a T-shirt. OK, on to the real business at hand — No. 1 Goddard vs. No. 2 Los Lunas. I’ll be the first to admit that I did not expect the Tigers to make it through their half of the bracket to the state title game. I thought Artesia would get them in the semifinals, then, last week, I said I favored Aztec. But, to the Tigers’ credit, they survived and reached the title game for the first time in school history. And, because of the NMAA’s ludicrous system of determining sites for playoff games, they get

Local

Reindeer Run Results From Saturday, Dec. 1 Men’s 10K run 1. Angel Abeyta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40:28 2. Dustin Ellis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40:40 3. Peter Livingstone . . . . . . . . . . . . .42:34 4. Zachery Sussman . . . . . . . . . . . . .43:43 5. Adrian Olivas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44:03 6. Jim Humphreys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44:35 7. Josh Sanchez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44:46 8. Damian Ogas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45:35 9. Ryan Mahan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45:50 10. Stephen Johnston . . . . . . . . . . . .45:58 11. Kaleb Herrera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46:30 12. Adam Romero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47:09 13. Bob Zettel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48:49 14. Garrett Rorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48:54 15. Adam McCreight . . . . . . . . . . . . .49:46 16. Tom Nobles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50:41 17. Marcos Castillo . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50:52 18. Chuck Dawe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50:57 19. Steve Lamontine . . . . . . . . . . . . .51:02 20. Dennis Parent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51:21 21. Stephen Deutsch . . . . . . . . . . . . .51:27 22. Edward Sanchez . . . . . . . . . . . . .52:17 23. Kenny Ragsdale . . . . . . . . . . . . .52:36 24. Adam Castillo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52:56 25. Lucias Lehr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53:53 26. Sabian Hernandez . . . . . . . . . . .53:54 27. Wayne Sullivan . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55:00 28. Kelly Hobbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56:04 29. Jimmy Waechter . . . . . . . . . . . . .56:52 30. Don Zillman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57:48 31. James Holliday . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58:24 32. Omar Osmani . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58:43 33. Jerry Heck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59:17 34. Fabian Lopez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59:28 35. Tom Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00:44 36. Mike Strum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:01:05 37. Chad Okamoto . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:01:10 38. Jose Jimenez . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:03:45 39. Derreck Jett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:04:33 40. Nathan Maldonado . . . . . . . . . .1:07:58 41. Samuel Hernandez . . . . . . . . .1:10:20 42. Paul Bierwirth . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:13:16 43. Alvin Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:14:45 44. Bill F.M. Owen . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:17:19 45. Dennis Pabst . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:21:00 46. Bjorn Nitmo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:44:59 Jacob Robles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .DNF

Women’s 10K run 1. Mindy Toothman . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40:50 2. Kendra Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47:43 3. Shelly Lackey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52:57 4. Tara Waldrip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53:58 5. Kari Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54:43 6. Kirsten Jett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55:05 7. Kayla Sisneros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55:56 8. Olivia Tafoya . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56:23 9. Sana Osmani . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56:48 10. Marissa Paradiso . . . . . . . . . . . .57:00 11. Deanna Jerge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57:04 12. Ashlie Radimacher . . . . . . . . . . .57:39 13. Bobbi Hestand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58:33 14. Summer O'Brien . . . . . . . . . . . . .58:52 15. Susanna Pesonen . . . . . . . . . . . .58:52 16. Camille Morales . . . . . . . . . . . . .59:12 17. Sheila Enciso-Belloso . . . . . . . . .59:21 18. Toots Hobbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59:27 19. PJ Sullivan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59:54 20. Samantha Holmes . . . . . . . . . .1:00:08 21. Sandra Garnand . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00:40 22. Angela Okamoto . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00:51 23. Montana Paxton . . . . . . . . . . . .1:01:10 24. Cynthia Botello . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:01:42 25. Angela Hawkes . . . . . . . . . . . .1:03:39 26. Amanda McGrath . . . . . . . . . . .1:07:58 27. Josette Salas . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:12:00 28. Sara Gustamantes . . . . . . . . . .1:12:09 29. Becky Nobles . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:13:27 30. Marlou Blankvoort . . . . . . . . . .1:14:07 31. Keri Roden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:21:09 32. Nathalia Chadwick . . . . . . . . . .1:24:10 33. Joan Blodgett . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:42:34 34. Bjork Nitmo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45:00

Men’s 2-mile run 1. Jason Waltmire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11:34 2. Lane Norcross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:35 3. Nick Fox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12:54 4. Shingo Matsubara . . . . . . . . . . . . .14:15 5. Danny Camp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14:22 6. Brad Herndon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14:34

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Tuesday, Dec. 4 MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN — Jimmy V Classic, Texas vs. Georgetown, at New York ESPN2 — Oklahoma at Arkansas NBCSN — Richmond at Old Dominion 7 p.m. ESPN — Jimmy V Classic, NC State vs. UConn, at New York ESPN2 — Northwestern at Baylor NBCSN — Siena at St. Bonaventure SOCCER 12:30 p.m. FSN — UEFA Champions League, Olympiacos vs. Arsenal, at Piraeus, Greece 6 p.m. FSN — UEFA Champions League, Manchester City at Dortmund (same-day tape)

the game at home on Friday at 7 p.m. More about the asinine system later. This should be an intriguing matchup. The Tigers aren’t as run-heavy as say Moriarty or Belen, but they do favor the run over the pass. Goddard’s strength is stopping the run. Well, really, Goddard’s strength is stopping everything. Even passing teams have had little success against the Rocket defense. I say Goddard’s defense cancels out Los Lunas’ offense. It’s about a stalemate. To me, this game gets decided by whether Los Lunas can stop Cody French. My opinion — Los Lunas can’t stop French, or Anthony Ornelas for that matter, and Goddard wins. I know for certain that there is one Valencia County resident in particular who will wholeheartedly disagree. And I’m sure you’ll be able to read his thoughts on the Daily Record website later today.

Asinine

OK, back to the NMAA’s system for determining the sites of playoffs games. I know I’m not alone in thinking that the system currently used is (insert any derogatory adjective here). We’re determining the site of a state championship by the flip of

7. Billy Fox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15:08 8. Aaron Jett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16:42 9. Kelly Owens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17:00 10. Curt Thurston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17:49 11. Trent Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18:36 12. Hector Ramirez . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:01 13. John Jerge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:22 14. Seth Morris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:23 15. James Castle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:45 16. Rod Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20:04 17. Matt Burkhart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20:44 18. Terry Norcross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20:45 19. Nick Blount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21:05 20. Daniel Blount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21:05 21. Matt Ford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21:22 22. Luke Peters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21:27 23. Lucas Ragsdale . . . . . . . . . . . . .21:28 24. Michael Vickers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23:21 25. Marcus Gregory . . . . . . . . . . . . .23:48 26. Owen Gregory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23:49 27. Paul Hoffman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23:52 28. Marcos Munoz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24:11 29. Brent Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25:14 30. Austin Callaway . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25:16 31. Timothy Parnell . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25:54 32. Guy Rand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27:56

Women’s 2-mile run 1. Coley Norcross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13:34 2. Lexi Cassels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14:01 3. Carla Norcross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16:01 4. Gloria Wier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16:42 5. Liana Swarengin . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16:47 6. Sarah Villalpando . . . . . . . . . . . . .17:04 7. Sophia Stangebye . . . . . . . . . . . . .17:12 8. Kendall Norcross . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17:37 9. Noor Osmani . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17:39 10. Elizabeth Hightower . . . . . . . . . .17:42 11. Kate Hammonds . . . . . . . . . . . . .18:08 12. Rachel Cunningham . . . . . . . . . .18:09 13. Tiffany Ligtenberg . . . . . . . . . . . .18:41 14. Catherine Green . . . . . . . . . . . . .18:54 15. Valerie Ramirez . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:01 16. Bitsy Jerge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:13 17. Storrie Morris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:23 18. Amber Holliday . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:44 19. Janice Manning . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:59 20. Janet Morgan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20:37 21. Irina Gorbunova-Ford . . . . . . . . .21:22 22. Jami Ragsdale . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21:28 23. Kelsy Wooten . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21:49 24. Shelby Moss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21:50 25. Lupe Rincon-Garcia . . . . . . . . . .21:53 26. Clarissa Gonzales-Adams . . . . . .22:36 27. Pam Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22:57 28. Elizabeth Hamill . . . . . . . . . . . . .23:19 29. Shannon Vickers . . . . . . . . . . . . .23:19 30. Sallyanna Stangebye . . . . . . . . .23:21 31. Debra Hoffman . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23:30 32. Jeanene Gregory . . . . . . . . . . . .23:49 33. Sadie Hoffman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23:50 34. Elena Harvey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24:10 35. Rosa Estrada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24:27 36. Jessica Lucero . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24:39 37. Danique Blankvoort . . . . . . . . . . .25:24 38. Lisa Robinson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26:00 39. Silvia Flores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27:03 40. Gracie Rand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27:43 41. Margo Rand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27:52 42. Belinda Bierwirth . . . . . . . . . . . . .27:55 43. April Puckett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29:09 44. Carman Harvey . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31:14 45. Vanessa Harvey . . . . . . . . . . . . .31:14 46. Mattie Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36:12 47. Cynthia Lucero . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42:17

Men’s 10K walk 1. Kelly Pope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:23:16 2. Jason Fabry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:29:29 3. Paul Acerra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:31:12

Women’s 10K walk 1. Mandy Owens . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:01:35 2. Paula Willis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:16:36 3. Andrea Matta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:16:46 4. Pat Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:19:24 5. Nancy Fox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:20:05 6. Maria Ogas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:29:15 7. Mona Kirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:29:29 8. Jennifer Peters . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:31:15 9. Ellen Casavantes . . . . . . . . . . . .1:32:01 10. Rita Kane-Doerhoefer . . . . . . .1:32:02 11. Katie Cooper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:32:55 12. Laura King . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:35:14 13. Gloria Matta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40:15

Men’s 2-mile walk 1. Neil Roe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24:16 2. Gary Peters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25:20 3. Marcos Hernandez . . . . . . . . . . . .26:18 4. Bruce Waldrip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26:18 5. Vern Dyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27:18 6. Mike Walsh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28:26 7. Harold Hobson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29:42 8. David Buckingham . . . . . . . . . . . .30:19 9. Lonnie Coots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31:01 10. Clancy Powers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31:50 11. Kevin Powers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33:09 12. Terry Haviland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33:33 13. Robert Willis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36:05 14. Ward Willis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36:07 15. Jason Steed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36:10 16. Edward Salcido . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37:51 17. Tim Raftery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38:27 18. David East . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40:52 19. Cecil Rhodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47:27 20. Toby Appel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48:35

HOLE-IN-ONE Chuck Fowler recorded his first career hole-in-one on the par-3, 135-yard sixth hole at Spring River Golf Course on Nov. 28. Fowler recorded the ace with an 8-hybrid while playing with Dale Frost.

FOWLER

SPORTS

coin? Really? Who thought this up? And how did it ever come to pass that anyone decided that this was a good idea? This really isn’t that difficult of a problem to solve. Solution 1 — All championship games are played at neutral sites. Solution 2 — All championship games are played at one site. Solution 3 — All championship games are played at the home facility of the higher seed. I’m sure the proponents of the current system will argue about some type of financial impact or

Redskins

Roswell Daily Record

Continued from Page B1

1993. Washington also ended a 10game home losing streak in Monday night games, with Griffin again showing his knack for winning on a big stage. The Redskins (6-6) appeared out of the running at 3-6 a month ago, but Washington is proving it can never be counted out when Griffin is on the field. With the Giants (7-5) losing three of four and the Cowboys (6-6) also at .500, the division is up for grabs. Eli Manning completed 20 of 33 passes for 280 yards and a touchdown for the Giants, who had won 26 in a row on the road when holding a halftime

lead. They were ahead 13-10 at the break Monday against the Redskins, but they failed to finish the job for the first time since blowing a 21-0 halftime lead in a 24-21 loss to Tennessee in 2006. Ahmad Bradshaw ran for 103 yards on 24 carries, and Victor Cruz had five catches for 104 yards for the Giants, who were uncharacteristically penaltyprone, getting flagged nine times for 73 yards. The Giants moved the ball well all game, but the drives produced three field goals by Lawrence Tynes and only one touchdown — Manning’s 4-yard pass to Martellus Bennett late in the first half. The game’s final score was Griffin’s 8-yard pass to Garcon early in the fourth quarter, but

SCOREBOARD

21. Ralph Knight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49:46 22.Tim Appel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50:55 23. Tim Covert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51:31 24. Domingo Romero . . . . . . . . . . . .54:55 25. Joe Swinney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55:18 26. Pat Winchester . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:04:33

Women’s 2-mile walk 1. Robin Hughes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23:57 2. Jackie Hewett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25:07 3. Vickie Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26:33 4. Cynthia Youngman . . . . . . . . . . . .27:10 5. Gail Buck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27:12 6. Sadie Vick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27:40 7. Jana Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27:50 8. Anna Pabst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28:34 9. Holley Terry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28:40 10. Greetje Blankvoort . . . . . . . . . . .28:52 11. Donna Ellis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28:55 12. Cynthia Driscoll . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29:37 13. Beverly Coots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29:48 14. Shannon Wooten . . . . . . . . . . . .30:02 15. Kyla Hooten . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30:03 16. Trudy Hale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30:04 17. Ellen Castle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30:22 18. Cindy Wooten . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31:08 19. Patricia Chesser . . . . . . . . . . . . .31:08 20. Kathy Collier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31:16 21. Cristen Haake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31:50 22. Linda Zillman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31:59 23. Heather Youngman . . . . . . . . . . .32:06 24. Ann Driscoll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32:37 25. Kathy Poftel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32:37 26. Nancy Zuber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32:56 27. Kate Hengstenberg . . . . . . . . . . .33:00 28. Carolyn Mitchell . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33:01 29. Lynn Moore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33:03 30. Diane Morgan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33:29 31. Erin Mercer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33:30 32. Nancy Wyatt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33:33 33. Nancy Ramirez . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35:11 34. Tiffany Ramirez . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35:11 35. Sally Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37:24 36. Connie Cruz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37:35 37. Shannon Waddell . . . . . . . . . . . .38:16 38. Heather Wyatt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38:18 39. Kaitlynn Wyatt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38:18 40. Cindy McInnis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40:30 41. Holly Vigil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40:31 42. Tamara Fresquez . . . . . . . . . . . .45:22 43. Paula Camp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45:22

College football

College Football FBS Bowl Glance By The Associated Press Subject to Change All Times Mountain Saturday, Dec. 15 New Mexico Bowl At Albuquerque Nevada (7-5) vs. Arizona (7-5), 11 a.m. (ESPN) Famous Idaho Potato Bowl At Boise, Idaho Toledo (9-3) vs. Utah State (10-2), 2:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Thursday, Dec. 20 Poinsettia Bowl At San Diego San Diego State (9-3) vs. BYU (7-5), 6 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday, Dec. 21 Beef ’O’ Brady’s Bowl At St. Petersburg, Fla. Ball State (9-3) vs. UCF (9-4), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday, Dec. 22 New Orleans Bowl East Carolina (8-4) vs. Louisiana-Lafayette (7-4), 10 a.m. (ESPN) Las Vegas Bowl Boise State (10-2) vs. Washington (7-5), 1:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl At Honolulu SMU (6-6) vs. Fresno State (9-3), 6 p.m. (ESPN)

Wednesday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At Detroit Central Michigan (6-6) vs. Western Kentucky (7-5), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Thursday, Dec. 27 Military Bowl At Washington Bowling Green (8-4) vs. San Jose State (102), 1 p.m. (ESPN) Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C. Duke (6-6) vs. Cincinnati (9-3), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl At San Diego Baylor (7-5) vs. UCLA (9-4), 7:45 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday, Dec. 28 Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La. Louisiana-Monroe (8-4) vs. Ohio (8-4), Noon (ESPN) Russell Athletic Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Virginia Tech (6-6) vs. Rutgers (9-3), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Meineke Car Care Bowl At Houston Minnesota (6-6) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 7 p.m.

(ESPN)

Saturday, Dec. 29 Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, Texas Rice (6-6) vs. Air Force (6-6), 9:45 a.m. (ESPN) Fight Hunger Bowl At San Francisco Arizona State (7-5) vs. Navy (7-4), 1:15 p.m. (ESPN2) Pinstripe Bowl At New York Syracuse (7-5) vs. West Virginia (7-5), 1:15 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl At San Antonio Texas (8-4) vs. Orgeon State (9-3), 4:45 p.m. (ESPN) Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz. Michigan State (6-6) vs. TCU (7-5), 8:15 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Dec. 31 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn. Vanderbilt (8-4) vs. N.C. State (7-5), 10 a.m. (ESPN) Sun Bowl At El Paso, Texas Georgia Tech (6-7) vs. Southern Cal (7-5), Noon (CBS) Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn. Iowa State (6-6) vs. Tulsa (10-3), 1:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl At Atlanta LSU (10-2) vs. Clemson (10-2), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Tuesday, Jan. 1 Heart of Dallas Bowl At Dallas Purdue (6-6) vs. Oklahoma State (7-5), 10 a.m. (ESPNU) Gator Bowl At Jacksonville, Fla. Mississippi State (8-4) vs. Northwestern (93), 10 a.m. (ESPN2) Capital One Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Georgia (11-2) vs. Nebraska (10-3), 11 a.m. (ABC) Outback Bowl At Tampa, Fla. South Carolina (10-2) vs. Michigan (8-4), 11 a.m. (ESPN) Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif. Stanford (11-2) vs. Wisconsin (8-5), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Orange Bowl At Miami Northern Illinois (12-1) vs. Florida State (112), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Wednesday, Jan. 2 Sugar Bowl At New Orleans Florida (11-1) vs. Louisville (10-2), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Thursday, Jan. 3 Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz. Kansas State (11-1) vs. Oregon (11-1), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Friday, Jan. 4 Cotton Bowl At Arlington, Texas Texas A&M (10-2) vs. Oklahoma (10-2), 6 p.m. (FOX)

Saturday, Jan. 5 BBVA Compass Bowl At Birmingham, Ala. Pittsburgh (6-6) vs. Mississippi (6-6), 11 a.m. (ESPN)

Sunday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl At Mobile, Ala. Kent State (11-2) vs. Arkansas State (9-3), 7 p.m. (ESPN)

Monday, Jan. 7 BCS National Championship At Miami Notre Dame (12-0) vs. Alabama (12-1), 6:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Saturday, Jan. 19 East-West Shrine Classic At St. Petersburg, Fla. East vs. West, 2 p.m. (NFLN)

Saturday, Jan. 26 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala. North vs. South, TBA (NFLN)

NBA

tion hubs — Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Roswell. Two years in each city, then they move to the next city in the rotation. In Albuquerque, you have three (soon to be four) suitable facilities — Milne Stadium, Wilson Stadium, University Stadium and the other APS facility. In Las Cruces, you have two suitable facilities — The Field of Dreams and Aggie Memorial Stadium. In Roswell (with Artesia included), you have two suitable facilities — The Wool Bowl and the Bulldog Bowl.

the like, but none of the arguments hold any water. Fans will travel for a championship game, simple as that. Then you’ll get the proponents who argue that there aren’t enough facilities in the state suitable of hosting a title game. Newsflash, most of the facilities being used now for championship games aren’t suitable to hosting a title game. The simplest fix is as follows (and this applies only to 11-man football, for obvious reasons): The title games rotate between the state’s three-largest popula-

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB New York . . . . . . . . . .12 4 .750 — Brooklyn . . . . . . . . . . .11 5 .688 1 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .10 7 .588 2 1⁄2

Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . .7 Orlando . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Washington . . . . . . . . .1 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .8 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . . .8 Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .4

the Redskins’ first touchdown was one of the evening’s crazy moments. On second-and-2 from the New York 28, Griffin ran to his left and was being tackled by Stevie Brown after what would have been a 12-yard gain. But as Griffin fell with his back to the ground, the football popped out, and went right on the fly to Washington receiver Joshua Morgan 3 yards farther upfield. Morgan then ran 13 yards for the score. Redskins linebacker London Fletcher and left tackle Trent Williams, who were limited in practice by injuries Friday and Saturday, both started. The 37year-old Fletcher extended his consecutive games streak to 236 — every game in his 15year NFL career.

8 .529 3 1⁄2 14 .222 9 L 3 5 9 10 13

L 7 8 9 13 14

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Memphis . . . . . . . . . .12 3 San Antonio . . . . . . . .14 4 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .8 8 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 9 New Orleans . . . . . . . .5 11 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Oklahoma City . . . . . .14 4 Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .9 9 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 10 Minnesota . . . . . . . . . .7 8 Portland . . . . . . . . . . .8 10 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L L.A. Clippers . . . . . . .11 6 Golden State . . . . . . .10 6 L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . . .8 9 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . . .7 11 Sacramento . . . . . . . .4 12

Pct .800 .643 .438 .375 .071

GB — 2 1⁄2 5 1⁄2 6 1⁄2 10 1⁄2

Pct GB .533 — 1⁄2 .500 .471 1 .316 4 .222 5 1⁄2 Pct GB 1⁄2 .800 .778 — .500 5 .471 5 1⁄2 .313 8

Pct GB .778 — .500 5 1 .474 5 ⁄2 1 .467 5 ⁄2 .444 6 Pct GB .647 — 1⁄2 .625 .471 3 .389 4 1⁄2 1 .250 6 ⁄2

Sunday’s Games New York 106, Phoenix 99 Orlando 113, L.A. Lakers 103 Monday’s Games Portland 118, Charlotte 112, OT Detroit 89, Cleveland 79 New Orleans 102, Milwaukee 81 Denver 113, Toronto 110 L.A. Clippers 105, Utah 104 Orlando at Golden State, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Minnesota at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Miami at Washington, 5 p.m. Oklahoma City at Brooklyn, 5:30 p.m. Indiana at Chicago, 6 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Houston, 6 p.m. Phoenix at Memphis, 6 p.m. Wednesday’s Games New York at Charlotte, 5 p.m. Portland at Indiana, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 5:30 p.m. Golden State at Detroit, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Denver at Atlanta, 6 p.m. Chicago at Cleveland, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at San Antonio, 6:30 p.m. Orlando at Utah, 7 p.m. Toronto at Sacramento, 8 p.m. Dallas at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m.

NFL

National Football League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain AMERICAN CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct y-New England . .9 3 0 .750 N.Y. Jets . . . . . . .5 7 0 .417 Buffalo . . . . . . . . .5 7 0 .417 Miami . . . . . . . . .5 7 0 .417 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct x-Houston . . . . .11 1 0 .917 Indianapolis . . . . .8 4 0 .667 Tennessee . . . . .4 8 0 .333 Jacksonville . . . .2 10 0 .167 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Baltimore . . . . . . .9 3 0 .750 Pittsburgh . . . . . .7 5 0 .583 Cincinnati . . . . . .7 5 0 .583 Cleveland . . . . . .4 8 0 .333 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct y-Denver . . . . . . .9 3 0 .750 San Diego . . . . . .4 8 0 .333 Oakland . . . . . . .3 9 0 .250 Kansas City . . . .2 10 0 .167

PF 430 228 277 227

PF 351 265 248 206

PF 303 254 302 229

PF 349 258 235 188

PA 260 296 337 249

PA 221 306 359 342

PA 242 230 260 265

PA 244 257 376 322

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF PA N.Y. Giants . . . . .7 5 0 .583 321 243 Washington . . . . .6 6 0 .500 312 301 Dallas . . . . . . . . .6 6 0 .500 280 295 Philadelphia . . . .3 9 0 .250 217 320 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF PA y-Atlanta . . . . . . .11 1 0 .917 317 229 Tampa Bay . . . . .6 6 0 .500 333 285 New Orleans . . . .5 7 0 .417 321 327 Carolina . . . . . . .3 9 0 .250 235 292 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF PA Green Bay . . . . .8 4 0 .667 296 259 Chicago . . . . . . . .8 4 0 .667 294 198 Minnesota . . . . . .6 6 0 .500 262 272 Detroit . . . . . . . . .4 8 0 .333 300 315 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF PA San Francisco . . .8 3 1 .708 289 171 Seattle . . . . . . . . .7 5 0 .583 242 202 St. Louis . . . . . . .5 6 1 .458 221 267 Arizona . . . . . . . .4 8 0 .333 186 234 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division

Thursday’s Game Atlanta 23, New Orleans 13 Sunday’s Games

Seattle 23, Chicago 17, OT Green Bay 23, Minnesota 14 St. Louis 16, San Francisco 13, OT Kansas City 27, Carolina 21 Houston 24, Tennessee 10 N.Y. Jets 7, Arizona 6 Indianapolis 35, Detroit 33 Buffalo 34, Jacksonville 18 New England 23, Miami 16 Denver 31, Tampa Bay 23 Cleveland 20, Oakland 17 Cincinnati 20, San Diego 13 Pittsburgh 23, Baltimore 20 Dallas 38, Philadelphia 33 Monday’s Game Washington 17, N.Y. Giants 16 Thursday, Dec. 6 Denver at Oakland, 6:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 9 Chicago at Minnesota, 11 a.m. Baltimore at Washington, 11 a.m. Kansas City at Cleveland, 11 a.m. San Diego at Pittsburgh, 11 a.m. Tennessee at Indianapolis, 11 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Jacksonville, 11 a.m. Atlanta at Carolina, 11 a.m. Philadelphia at Tampa Bay, 11 a.m. St. Louis at Buffalo, 11 a.m. Dallas at Cincinnati, 11 a.m. Miami at San Francisco, 2:05 p.m. Arizona at Seattle, 2:25 p.m. New Orleans at N.Y. Giants, 2:25 p.m. Detroit at Green Bay, 6:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 10 Houston at New England, 6:30 p.m.

Transactions

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with C Geovany Soto on a one-year contract. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Claimed C Eli Whiteside off waivers from the N.Y. Yankees. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Sold the contract of RHP Brad Bergesen to Chunichi (Central League-Japan). ATLANTA BRAVES — Promoted minor league strength and conditioning coordinator Rick Slate to director of strength and conditioning. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Agreed to terms with RHP Jason Marquis on a one-year contract. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Agreed to terms with LHP Zach Duke on a one-year contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS — Recalled F Terrence Jones from Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS — Released LB Kirk Morrison. CAROLINA PANTHERS — Placed S Sherrod Martin on injured reserve. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Fired defensive line coach Jim Washburn. Named Tommy Brashear defensive line coach. Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS — Signed LB Donovan Richard. TORONTO ARGONAUTS — Signed Marcus Brady offensive coordinator. HOCKEY National Hockey League EDMONTON OILERS — Reassigned RW Toni Rajala from Oklahoma City (AHL) to Stockton (ECHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Reassigned F Jason Clark from Bridgeport (AHL) to Gwinnett (ECHL). ST. LOUIS BLUES — Reassigned F Stefan Della Rovere, F Sebastian Wannstrom and D Brett Ponich from Peoria (AHL) to Evansville (ECHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer D.C. UNITED — Declined options on D Mike Chabala, D Emiliano Dudar, M Stephen King and F Maicon Santos. PORTLAND TIMBERS — Acquired allocation money and homegrown rights to D Bryan Gallego from New York for D Kosuke Kimura and a 2013 second-round draft pick. Declined contract options for M/D Lovel Palmer and D Steve Purdy. REAL SALT LAKE — Traded F Fabian Espindola and D Jamison Olave to New York, and M Will Johnson to Portland for allocation money. SPORTING KANSAS CITY — Traded M Michael Harrington to Portland for allocation money. TORONTO FC — Traded D Aaron Maund to Real Salt Lake for F Justin Braun. VANCOUVER WHITECAPS — Traded M/F Atiba Harris to Colorado for an international roster spot. COLLEGE FLORIDA — Named Joker Phillips receivers coach and recruiting coordinator. IDAHO — Named Paul Petrino football coach. MISSOURI — Announced the resignation of offensive coordinator David Yost. NYU — Named David Lado men’s and women’s assistant track and field coach. REGIS — Named Rob Riley director of athletics. SOUTH CAROLINA — Signed football coach Steve Spurrier to a two-year contract extension through 2017.


FINANCIAL

B3

Storm delays lift already strong US auto sales

Roswell Daily Record

DETROIT (AP) — Superstorm Sandy gave an extra boost to already strong U.S. auto sales last month, although carmakers warned that uncertainty over the “fiscal cliff” could undo some of those gains. Most major companies, from Toyota to Chrysler, posted impressive increases from a year earlier. Only General Motors was left struggling to explain its 3-percent sales gain and large inventory of unsold trucks. Americans were already willing to buy a new car or truck last month because they’re more confident in the economy. Home values are rising, hiring is up and auto financing is readily available. Also, the average age of a vehicle on U.S. roads is approaching a record 11 years, so many people are looking to replace older cars. Sandy just boosted that demand. The storm added 20,000 to 30,000 sales industry wide in November, mostly from people who planned to buy cars during the October storm but had to delay their purchases, Ford estimated. People who need to replace stor m-damaged vehicles are expected to drive sales for several more months. GM estimates that 50,000 to 100,000 vehicles will eventually need to be replaced. November sales, when calculated on an annual basis, are likely to be 15 million or more, the highest rate since March of 2008, according to LMC Automotive, a Detroit-area consulting firm. That’s higher

than the 14.3 million annual rate so far this year, even though November is normally a lackluster month due to cold weather and holiday anticipation. Both GM and Chrysler predicted November sales would run at an annual rate of 15.3 million. If sales end up at 15 million for the year, it would be a vast improvement over the 10.4 million during the recession in 2009. Sales would still fall short of the recent peak of around 17 million in 2005. But the ongoing “fiscal cliff” negotiations between Congress and the White House could still derail the industry’s recovery. The ter m refers to sharp gover nment spending cuts and tax increases scheduled to start Jan. 1 unless an agreement is reached to cut the budget deficit. Economists say that those measures, if implemented, could push the U.S. economy back into a recession. “Exactly how much growth we can expect next year will depend in part on how Congress and the president resolve the fiscal cliff issue,” said Kurt McNeil, GM’s U.S. sales chief. “Markets and consumers hate uncertainty.” McNeil and other GM executives tried to explain the automaker’s disappointing performance. GM’s biggest brand, Chevrolet, reported flat sales over last year despite new products like the Spark minicar. Silverado pickup sales fell 10 percent.

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

GM’s sales have been trailing the industry all year. They were up 4 percent through October, compared to the industry-wide increase of 14 percent. GM said its competitors resorted to higher than usual incentives last month to get rid of 2012 model-year trucks. GM, which had more 2013 trucks on its lots, was only offering an average of $500 per truck, or a third of what others were offering. GM has been trying to hold the line on costly incentives, which can hurt resale value and brand image. “We want to be known for great products, not great incentives,” McNeil said. But some analysts think GM will be forced to offer more deals in December to clear out higher-than-forecast inventory. Asian brands also got a boost from some unusually big discounts, said Jesse Toprak, senior analyst for automotive pricing site TrueCar.com. TrueCar estimated that Hyundai and Kia, which were admonished by the U.S. government in late October for overstating gas mileage, increased incentive spending by nearly 30 percent. Nissan spending was up 45 percent to $4,273 per vehicle, by far the highest incentives in the industry. Toyota said its 17-percent sales increase was partly due to post-Sandy demand. Honda was up 39 percent thanks to strong sales of the new Accord sedan and clearance deals on the outgoing Civic, which

was replaced by a new 2013 Civic at the end of the month. Luxury cars saw their usual yearend surge as holiday commercials started crowding the airwaves. Porsche’s sales rose 71 percent to 3,865, a record month for the automaker. Infiniti, Acura, BMW and Lexus all reported big gains. Edmunds.com analyst Jessica Caldwell said luxury brands have historically targeted their customers at this time of year because of holiday bonuses. That’s no longer a driving factor, she said, but it’s still a good time of year for people to buy 2012 model-year luxury vehicles because dealers are trying to clear them out. Other automakers reporting sales Monday: — Chrysler’s sales were up 14 percent. Ram pickups were up 23 percent, while sales of the Fiat 500 minicar more than doubled. — Hyundai’s sales rose 8 percent, led by the Sonata midsize car and the Elantra compact. TrueCar said Hyundai increased incentives by 30 percent it was admonished by the U.S. government in late October for overstating gas mileage. — Volkswagen’s sales rose 29 percent on the strength of the Passat sedan, which was up 75 percent. — Nissan’s sales climbed 13 percent as sales of its new Pathfinder SUV more than tripled over last year.

CDC says US flu season Judge tosses Asian carp suit; states can amend it starts early, could be bad NEW YORK (AP) — Flu season in the U.S. is off to its earliest start in nearly a decade — and it could be a bad one. Health officials on Monday said suspected flu cases have jumped in five Southern states, and the primary strain circulating tends to make people sicker than other types. It is particularly hard on the elderly. “It looks like it’s shaping up to be a bad flu season, but only time will tell,” said Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The good news is that the nation seems fairly well prepared, Frieden said. More than a third of Americans have been vaccinated, and the vaccine formulated for this year is well-matched to the strains of the virus seen so far, CDC officials said. Higher-than-normal reports of flu have come in from Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee and Texas. An uptick like this usually doesn’t happen until after Christmas. Flu-related hospitalizations are also rising earlier than usual, and there have already been two deaths in children. Hospitals and urgent care centers in northern Alabama have been bustling. “Fortunately, the cases have been relatively mild,” said Dr. Henry Wang, an emergency medicine physician at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Parts of Georgia have seen a boom in traffic, too. It’s not clear why the flu is showing up so early, or how long it will stay. “My advice is: Get the vaccine now,” said Dr. James Steinberg, an Emory University infectious diseases specialist in Atlanta. The last time a conventional flu season started this early was the winter of 2003-04, which proved to be one of the most lethal seasons in the past 35 years, with more than 48,000 deaths. The dominant type of flu back then was the same one seen this year.

FUTURES

CATTLE/HOGS NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 12 126.62 127.00 126.10 127.00 Feb 13 130.37 130.90 129.97 130.77 Apr 13 134.50 134.92 134.20 134.85 Jun 13 130.77 131.45 130.50 131.40 Aug 13 130.02 130.75 129.70 130.75 Oct 13 133.60 134.20 133.35 133.60 Dec 13 134.80 135.20 134.50 134.80 Feb 14 135.60 136.20 135.50 136.20 Apr 14 136.25 Last spot N/A Est. sales 6506. Fri’s Sales: 79,448 Fri’s open int: 339726, up +2924 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. 145.05 145.77 144.85 145.60 Jan 13 Mar 13 147.95 148.37 147.72 148.22 Apr 13 149.70 150.07 149.37 149.82 May 13 151.07 151.85 151.02 151.67 Aug 13 155.75 156.62 155.75 156.60 Sep 13 156.75 157.40 156.75 157.40 Oct 13 157.10 158.15 157.10 158.15 Nov 13 158.40 Last spot N/A Est. sales 538. Fri’s Sales: 5,367 Fri’s open int: 27609, up +958 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 12 84.15 85.05 83.65 83.92 Feb 13 87.12 87.77 85.60 85.67 Apr 13 91.80 92.17 90.47 90.67 May 13 98.50 98.85 98.20 98.50 Jun 13 101.60 101.70 100.90 100.90 Jul 13 101.05 101.10 100.60 100.80 Aug 13 99.25 100.00 99.10 99.15 Oct 13 88.60 88.70 88.30 88.35 Dec 13 84.80 84.90 84.50 84.60 Feb 14 86.30 86.40 86.20 86.20 Apr 14 87.70 Last spot N/A Est. sales 13524. Fri’s Sales: 45,335 Fri’s open int: 248750, up +1545

chg.

+.28 +.37 +.28 +.63 +.63 +.10 -.20 +.10

-.02 -.20 -.10 +.05 +.60 +.30

-.15 -1.25 -1.10 -.35 -.62 -.45 -.85 -.22 -.15 -.05

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 12 73.09 73.30 72.90 72.93 Mar 13 73.96 74.41 73.53 73.98 May 13 74.60 75.00 74.35 74.74 Jul 13 75.04 75.55 74.92 75.18 Sep 13 77.19 Oct 13 77.56 77.56 76.67 76.67 Dec 13 77.15 77.45 76.85 77.19 Mar 14 77.79 May 14 77.39 Jul 14 77.09 Oct 14 79.09 Dec 14 79.33 Mar 15 79.33 May 15 79.33 Jul 15 79.33 Oct 15 79.33 Last spot N/A Est. sales 17612. Fri’s Sales: 16,534 Fri’s open int: 160294, off -334

chg.

+.28 +.07 +.23 +.26 +.12 +.18 +.12 +.12 -.27 -.57 -.57 -.57 -.57 -.57 -.57 -.57

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 12 849 858ø 840ø 842 Mar 13 867 877ü 858ü 860fl May 13 875ø 885 866fl 869ü Jul 13 874 882ü 865fl 868fl Sep 13 886ü 888 874 876ø Dec 13 890fl 897ø 882 884ü Mar 14 899 899 886ü 888ü

May 14 878fl 878fl 877fl 877fl Jul 14 845fl 845fl 840fl 842 Sep 14 846ü 846ü 842ø 842ø Dec 14 853ü 853ü 850ø 850ø Mar 15 847 847 844ü 844ü May 15 847 847 844ü 844ü Jul 15 785 785 782ü 782ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 149684. Fri’s Sales: 148,241 Fri’s open int: 450988, off -9334 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 12 751ü 759 744ü 749 Mar 13 755ø 764 749ø 754fl May 13 755 762ü 748fl 754ü Jul 13 747fl 754ü 742 747 Sep 13 659fl 664fl 656fl 661fl Dec 13 638ü 643 635ø 639fl Mar 14 649 650 644 647ø 653 653 May 14 655 655 Jul 14 658 658 655ü 655fl Sep 14 606ü 610 606ü 610 Dec 14 599fl 601ø 592fl 596ø Jul 15 607ø 607ø 605ü 605ü Dec 15 582ø 582ø 580 581ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 325534. Fri’s Sales: 233,474 Fri’s open int: 1222176, off -7794 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 12 366ü 366fl 365ø 366fl Mar 13 379fl 388 378ü 384ø May 13 383 391 383 389 Jul 13 382ü 388ø 382ü 388ø Sep 13 376ø 382fl 376ø 382fl Dec 13 367ü 373ø 367ü 373ø Mar 14 394 400ü 394 400ü May 14 394 400ü 394 400ü 424ø 430fl 424ø 430fl Jul 14 Sep 14 405ø 411fl 405ø 411fl Jul 15 405ø 411fl 405ø 411fl Sep 15 405ø 411fl 405ø 411fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 2454. Fri’s Sales: 1,961 Fri’s open int: 10000, off -1058 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Jan 13 1442ü 1462fl 1442 1453fl Mar 13 1436ü 1455 1436 1448ü May 13 1414ø 1431 1412fl 1427 Jul 13 1405ü 1420 1402ü 1416fl Aug 13 1379fl 1394ü 1379fl 1392 Sep 13 1348ø 1353ü 1348ø 1353 Nov 13 1308 1320 1306 1317ü Jan 14 1325 1325 1322ü 1322ü Mar 14 1321 1323fl 1321 1323fl May 14 1316 1322ø 1316 1322ø Jul 14 1325fl 1331 1323 1323ø Aug 14 1315ø 1318ü 1315ø 1318ü Sep 14 1304 1306fl 1304 1306fl Nov 14 1282fl 1288ü 1280 1288ü Jan 15 1272ü 1282 1272ü 1282 Mar 15 1266 1275fl 1266 1275fl May 15 1259fl 1269ø 1259fl 1269ø Jul 15 1280ø 1290ü 1280ø 1290ü Aug 15 1274ü 1284 1274ü 1284 Sep 15 1268 1277fl 1268 1277fl Nov 15 1266ø 1270 1266ø 1270 Jul 16 1260ü 1263fl 1260ü 1263fl Nov 16 1253 1256ø 1253 1256ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 289901. Fri’s Sales: 126,676 Fri’s open int: 595841, off -7199

-1 -3fl -3fl -2fl -2fl -2fl -2fl

+1 +2 +2ü +2fl +5 +4ü +4 +3fl +3fl +3fl -2ü -2ü -1fl

+6 +5fl +6ü +6ü +6ü +6ü +6ü +6ü +6ü +6ü +6ü +6ü

+15 +15fl +17ü +16ü +15fl +14fl +12fl +12ü +10 +6ø +2fl +2fl +2fl +9fl +9fl +9fl +9fl +9fl +9fl +9fl +3ø +3ø +3ø

chg.

-2fl -2fl -2fl -1fl -2ü -2ü -2fl

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

chg.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Jan 13 88.85 90.33 88.66 89.09 Feb 13 89.45 90.90 89.24 89.69 Mar 13 90.04 91.53 89.90 90.34 Apr 13 90.80 92.05 90.50 90.92 May 13 91.13 92.37 90.99 91.38 Jun 13 91.28 92.72 91.19 91.72 Jul 13 91.52 92.85 91.38 91.94 Aug 13 92.38 92.94 91.85 92.06 Sep 13 92.00 93.00 91.87 92.14 91.75 92.70 91.75 92.17 Oct 13 Nov 13 92.61 92.63 92.21 92.21 Dec 13 91.73 93.05 91.52 92.21 Jan 14 92.92 92.92 92.09 92.09 Feb 14 91.95 Mar 14 91.81 Apr 14 91.68 May 14 91.56 Jun 14 92.17 92.17 91.00 91.44 Jul 14 91.27 Aug 14 91.50 91.50 91.11 91.11 Sep 14 91.37 91.37 90.80 90.98 Oct 14 91.25 91.25 90.87 90.87 Nov 14 90.79 Dec 14 90.35 91.39 90.12 90.74 Jan 15 90.49 Feb 15 90.25 Last spot N/A Est. sales 421032. Fri’s Sales: 426,847 Fri’s open int: 1551961, up +26049 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Jan 13 2.7274 2.7627 2.7176 2.7265 Feb 13 2.7401 2.7634 2.7175 2.7251 Mar 13 2.7454 2.7810 2.7329 2.7398 Apr 13 2.8982 2.9247 2.8761 2.8844 May 13 2.8847 2.9173 2.8720 2.8793 Jun 13 2.8678 2.8909 2.8474 2.8532 Jul 13 2.8289 2.8527 2.8156 2.8193 Aug 13 2.7821 Sep 13 2.7632 2.7700 2.7400 2.7412 Oct 13 2.6011 2.9125 2.5967 2.5967

+.18 +.20 +.21 +.24 +.26 +.29 +.31 +.33 +.35 +.36 +.37 +.36 +.35 +.35 +.35 +.35 +.34 +.33 +.33 +.32 +.32 +.32 +.32 +.32 +.31 +.30

-.0038 -.0058 -.0082 -.0071 -.0068 -.0063 -.0047 -.0040 -.0041 -.0041

the agencies to do what the states want because federal law requires the corps to keep shipping channels open between Lake Michigan and one of the Chicago waterways — the Des Plaines River — and prohibits constructing dams in any navigable waterway without Congress’ consent. In a written ruling, Tharp said he was “mindful of, and alarmed by, the potentially devastating ecological, environmental, and economic consequences that may result from the establishment of an Asian carp population in the Great Lakes.” But he said the proper way for the states to win approval of separating the waterways is through Congress. Tharp left the door open for further court action, however, saying the states might be able to find other grounds for a nuisance claim that wouldn’t have the effect of asking the corps and city agency to violate federal law. “There may be room in

Nov 13 2.5900 2.5900 2.5686 2.5686 Dec 13 2.5640 2.5832 2.5506 2.5545 Jan 14 2.5501 Feb 14 2.5562 Mar 14 2.5661 Apr 14 2.6941 2.6916 May 14 2.6756 Jun 14 Jul 14 2.6556 Aug 14 2.6371 Sep 14 2.6094 Oct 14 2.4824 Nov 14 2.4544 Dec 14 2.4369 Jan 15 2.4409 Feb 15 2.4479 Last spot N/A Est. sales 87006. Fri’s Sales: 111,744 Fri’s open int: 272081, off -2635 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Jan 13 3.553 3.643 3.526 3.591 Feb 13 3.584 3.666 3.549 3.615 Mar 13 3.573 3.650 3.539 3.603 Apr 13 3.541 3.639 3.540 3.601 May 13 3.580 3.667 3.580 3.640 Jun 13 3.630 3.709 3.630 3.682 Jul 13 3.737 3.752 3.705 3.725 Aug 13 3.746 3.771 3.717 3.746 Sep 13 3.740 3.775 3.733 3.748 Oct 13 3.720 3.810 3.719 3.783 Nov 13 3.865 3.916 3.857 3.892 Dec 13 4.041 4.107 4.041 4.085 4.156 4.209 4.152 4.188 Jan 14 Feb 14 4.180 4.203 4.172 4.184 Mar 14 4.107 4.145 4.100 4.127 Apr 14 3.996 3.996 3.940 3.976 May 14 3.985 Jun 14 4.003 4.007 4.003 4.007 Jul 14 4.020 4.039 4.020 4.039 Aug 14 4.035 4.059 4.032 4.057 Sep 14 4.058 Oct 14 4.082 4.100 4.077 4.094 Nov 14 4.176 Dec 14 4.352 4.358 4.352 4.358 Jan 15 4.459 4.426 4.431 4.426 4.431 Feb 15 Last spot N/A Est. sales 244954. Fri’s Sales: 327,951 Fri’s open int: 1164936, up +2008

-.0046 -.0061 -.0069 -.0090 -.0090 -.0090 -.0090 -.0090 -.0090 -.0090 -.0090 -.0090 -.0090 -.0090 -.0090 -.0090

+.030 +.031 +.030 +.031 +.033 +.032 +.032 +.032 +.032 +.032 +.033 +.032 +.031 +.031 +.032 +.036 +.036 +.035 +.036 +.037 +.036 +.035 +.035 +.035 +.035 +.035

METALS

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Mon. Aluminum -$0.9429 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.6054 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $3.6400 N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Lead - $2554.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9198 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1720.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1719.60 troy oz., NY Merc spot Mon. Silver - $33.720 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $33.681 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Platinum -$1601.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1613.80 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

Martin Financial Services, LLC An independent firm

GRAINS

Open high

CHICAGO (AP) — A federal judge Monday threw out a lawsuit filed by five states that want barriers placed in Chicago-area waterways to prevent Asian carp from invading the Great Lakes, but said he would consider new arguments if the case were filed again. Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Ohio and Pennsylvania claimed that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Chicago’s Metropolitan Water Reclamation District are causing a public nuisance by failing to physically separate a network of rivers and canals from Lake Michigan. Scientists have detected DNA from two types of Asian carp in the waterways, bighead and silver carp. They say if the voracious carp gain a foothold in the Great Lakes, they eventually could out-compete native species and severely damage the region’s $7 billion fishing industry. U.S. District Judge John Tharp said he couldn’t order

RAYMOND JAMES

Jeff Martin

Financial Advisor

Roswell, NM 88201 575-624-8985 • 575-578-2208 (Fax) jeff.martin@raymondjames.com

Securities offered throughout Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC

which the (states) can still maneuver,” he wrote. Joy Yearout, spokeswoman for Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette, said his office had not decided on its next step. “We’re certainly disappointed,” Yearout said. “We’re reviewing the ruling and we will consult with the other states on how to move forward.” The U.S. Department of Justice, which represents the Army corps, had no immediate comment, spokesman Dean Boyd said. Tharp’s decision is the latest legal setback for the five states, which were joined in their suit by the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians. The U.S. Supreme Court has refused their request — four times — to order temporary measures such as closing Chicago shipping locks and installing block nets in the waterways. Asian carp gobble huge amounts of plankton, which are tiny plants and animals

crucial to aquatic food webs. Silver carp are notorious for springing from the water like missiles, sometimes colliding with boaters.

They were imported in the 1970s to cleanse Deep South aquaculture and sewage treatment ponds. Some escaped during floods and have migrated northward in the Mississippi River and its tributaries. They’ve advanced to within 55 miles of Lake Michigan in the Illinois River, which connects with other waters that reach Lake Michigan.

An electric barrier in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal is designed to stop them. But scientists have detected DNA from Asian carp beyond the barrier just a few miles from the lake. The five states contend the only sure way to block the carp’s path is to place dams or other structures in the waters, which Illinois officials say would damage the local economy and cause flooding.

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg S&P500ETF1086145141.45-.71 BkofAm 949176 9.80 -.06 AMD 697358 2.36 +.16 SPDR Fncl 479709 15.70 -.06 FordM 473974 11.41 -.04

Name Vol (00) Neuralstem 43208 CheniereEn 36588 SamsO&G 33331 NwGold g 31298 Vringo 23799

Last Name SequansC 2.30 TCF Fn wt 2.10 ChinaDEd 4.89 Supvalu 2.68 Qihoo360 27.44

Chg +.82 +.41 +.64 +.30 +2.45

Last Chg %Chg Name Name FAB Univ 3.89 +.53 +15.8 RemarkM h LongweiPI 2.78 +.32 +13.0 Cleantch rs Medgenics 8.80 +.62 +7.6 Cyclacel rs SbdCp 2532.98+172.62 +7.3 FFinSvc AlmadnM g 2.93 +.17 +6.2 CarolTrBk

Name Last GlobusMd n 12.14 SunCokeE 14.88 CitiGold8-1410.55 AmrRlty 2.70 Bankrate 11.17

Chg %Chg Name -1.17 -8.8 Aerosonic -1.37 -8.4 BovieMed -.91 -7.9 GoldRsv g -.22 -7.5 PernixTh -.86 -7.1 Augusta g

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

%Chg +55.4 +24.3 +15.1 +12.6 +9.8

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

1,195 1,829 120 3,144 150 10

Volume

Name

Div

AT&T Inc BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola s Disney EOG Res ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn Merck

1.80f .04 1.76 3.60 1.02 .75f .68 2.28 .20 .53 .80f .90 3.40 2.44 1.72f

Name Vol (00) Last Facebook n120084127.04 SiriusXM 554923 2.80 Microsoft 520151 26.43 Dell Inc 494427 10.06 Intel 433971 19.54

Last 3.02 2.63 3.11 7.34 2.34

DIARY

Last 2.14 4.86 6.11 2.16 2.60

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,106 1,366 130 2,602 69 332532.98

68,288,880 Volume

Last 12,965.60 5,061.42 451.04 8,223.54 2,405.60 3,002.20 1,409.46 14,781.65 820.80

1,618,088,227

Net % Chg Chg -59.98 -.46 -57.69 -1.13 -3.08 -.68 -36.90 -.45 +5.94 +.25 -8.04 -.27 -6.72 -.47 -66.41 -.45 -1.12 -.14

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Last

Chg

44 34.14 +.01 26 9.80 -.06 13 74.02 -.26 9 104.66 -1.03 20 37.38 -.54 16 49.29 -.37 26 117.24 -.38 11 87.61 -.53 9 11.41 -.04 ... 12.87 -.12 6 45.35 +.02 9 19.54 -.03 13 189.48 -.59 23 69.65 -.08 20 44.44 +.14

YTD %Chg Name +12.9 +76.3 +.9 -1.6 +6.8 +31.4 +19.0 +3.4 +6.0 -50.0 +93.8 -19.4 +3.0 +6.2 +17.9

%Chg +29.7 +21.5 +18.3 +16.1 +15.6

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

178 266 29 473 13 6

INDEXES

PE

Chg +.49 +.86 +.95 +.30 +.35

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg -.47 -13.4 ReadgIntB 5.64 -1.76 -23.8 -.17 -6.0 Torm rs 3.28 -.82 -19.9 -.19 -5.8 NetElem n 3.62 -.86 -19.2 -.45 -5.8 ChiMobG n 4.00 -.91 -18.6 -.13 -5.3 GeoMet pf 7.61 -1.40 -15.5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Chg -.96 +.04 -.19 +.42 -.03

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

3,027,026,257 Volume

52-Week High Low 13,661.72 11,232.16 5,390.11 4,533.98 499.82 426.30 8,515.60 6,898.18 2,509.57 2,150.17 3,196.93 2,507.72 1,474.51 1,158.67 15,432.54 12,158.94 868.50 677.82

Chg +.24 ... +.11 +.05

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last 1.49 16.80 1.08 10.68 3.38-

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

YTD % Chg +6.12 +.83 -2.94 +9.98 +5.59 +15.24 +12.08 +12.07 +10.78

52-wk % Chg +7.17 +.78 +.79 +9.20 +6.19 +13.04 +12.12 +11.80 +9.88

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

.92 2.74f .58 2.15 .88 .04 .84f 1.04 .50e 2.06f 1.59 .32 .88 1.08

14 16 8 19 15 19 19 17 ... 41 15 13 10 14

26.43 57.58 21.20 69.87 25.09 9.44 29.61 46.80 15.98 44.10 71.34 16.23 32.75 26.94

-.19 -.67 +.07 -.34 +.07 -.09 +.14 -.50 -.06 -.02 -.68 +.16 -.26 -.11

+1.8 -.3 +16.3 +5.3 +15.9 +10.3 +1.7 +29.5 +12.3 +9.9 +19.4 +16.0 +18.8 -2.5

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


B4 Tuesday, December 4, 2012

over trivial matters. We know she’s depressed and has emotional issues, and we suspect she may have a mental illness. She has been suicidal in the past, but now refuses to see her therapist. We’re worried that if we don’t continue serving as her talk therapy — which we find draining — Cara might become so depressed she’ll hurt herself. How do we extricate ourselves from this relationship while still doing the right thing? WORN-OUT BUT WORRIED IN CHICAGO

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: My wife and I have a friend, “Cara,” who lives in another state. It’s not a very reciprocal friendship. Cara calls us frequently, but wants to talk only about her problems, which are never-ending. When she visits, she demands our full attention at all times. Frankly, we find her exhausting and would like to cut her out of our lives. Our worry is that we are some of the few friends Cara has left. She has alienated most of her other friends as well as her parents, sometimes

DEAR WORN-OUT: You and your wife are wellmeaning, but neither of you is qualified to be Cara’s therapist. Allowing her to monopolize your time and sap your energy may momentarily lessen her pain or anxiety, but it hasn’t — and will not — give her the tools she needs to fix what’s wrong.

The Wizard of Id

Jumble

COMICS

You can extricate yourselves by encouraging her to talk to a mental health professional. It doesn’t have to be the therapist she no longer wants to see, but it does need to be someone who has the training to help her. You should also shorten the length of the conversations. This is happening to you because you are allowing it. #####

DEAR ABBY: My husband and I are retired and enjoy going out for a nice dinner occasionally. We go to chain restaurants, hotel restaurants and local dinner establishments. We order lighter meals than we used to, and with the cost of dinners these days we have been finishing our entire meal. Our problem is that again and again, our server makes a comment about our finished plates. It might be, “You were really hungry, I see!” or, “Wow!

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

WREAA

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

NEDLAT MURNEB Print your answer here:

Yesterday’s

Family Circus

DEAR EMBARRASSED: I hope you realize that for many people this would not be a problem. You needn’t be confrontational — all you need to calmly say is, “When you say that, it makes me uncomfortable, so please don’t do it again.” No servers want to offend a guest, and they are not mind readers. However, they are all aware that their tips depend on how their service is regarded by customers — so I’m sure your comment will be taken to heart.

Beetle Bailey

HINTS

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

HATIF

You really enjoyed that!” It is uncomfortable to hear these comments about our eating habits and it spoils our enjoyment. This may be an attempt on their part to be friendly, but we don’t like it. How do we let them know this is crossing the boundaries of professional behavior? EMBARRASSED IN CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) ABOVE TRENCH DECENT Jumbles: EMPTY Answer: Having an extra set of gloves in the glove compartment was — HANDY

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Dear Heloise: Just want to send out a little warning to anyone PICKING UP A PRESCRIPTION: Have your pills counted in front of you. We had a prescription for a narcotic. We were supposed to get 30, and received only 12. Someone enjoyed the rest of ours. Because I had no proof that the pills were missing, the pharmacy got away with this. So from now on, whenever I pick up a prescription, I will have it counted in front of me. Another warning: Don’t be too hasty about paying bills from a medical procedure after you have paid your copay. Several times we have gotten a bill saying our insurance company had paid its part and we owed this amount. When I’ve called, they have told me to disregard this bill. A.C., via email

It’s wise to check the medication to be sure it’s what was prescribed. You always should let the pharmacy know if pills are missing, as a safety measure. Heloise #####

Dear Heloise: If you have problems with the surface of a pie browning too quickly while baking, turn off the oven light! You’d be surprised how this will slow the browning process. Of course, it’s OK to tur n the light on briefly to check the progress of the pie (be sure to use a collar on the pie crust at all times, though). I’d also like to address the problem of “stiff laundry” as a result of line-drying. If you tumble-dry the load of laundry for about a minute in the clothes dryer before hanging it outside on the clothesline, much of the stiffness will be eliminated. Jo in Texas Dear Heloise: I always save the microwave turntable plate! I use it for a work sur face for hot-glue projects. Also, grab and rescue refrigerator or freezer baskets from your broken appliance before they take it away, and use them for sturdy storage. For example, I like to use mine in the pantry for potatoes. Sherry G., Cecil, Ala.

Patricia F. in Huntsville, Ala., sent in this way to use an extra microwave plate. She says: “I use my discarded microwave plate as a cake plate. The edge keeps the icing from getting on the table or counter, and you can serve right from the plate. Also, microwave plates are perfect for serving snacks at a party. The plate rotates, and no one has to reach over the plate. I read your column in The Huntsville (Ala.) T imes daily. Heloise

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Roswell Daily Record


CLASSIFIEDS/SPORTS

Roswell Daily Record

BCS

Continued from Page B1

would become the first team to repeat as champs since the BCS was implemented in 1998, and it would be the 11th time a team has won consecutive AP titles since the poll started in 1936. Alabama is already one of seven programs to repeat. The Tide has done it twice. Notre Dame is another. Alabama also won the 2009 BCS championship under Saban. The last team to win three major national titles in four seasons was Nebraska, which went back-toback in 1994 and ’95 and finished No. 1 in the final coaches’ poll in 1997. In a world full of spread-the-field, hurryup offenses, Alabama is a bastion of traditional football. The Tide put its no-frills muscle on display Saturday, mashing Georgia with 350 yards rushing. Eddie Lacy, listed at a conservative 220 pounds, went for 181 against the Bulldogs to up his season total to 1,182 with 17 touchdowns. Freshman T.J. Yeldon has run for 1,000 yards and scored 12 touchdowns. But this is no 3 yards and a cloud of dust. Both backs average over 6 yards per carry, behind an offensive line anchored by All-American center Barrett Jones, who is nursing a foot injury. And quarterback AJ McCarron has thrown for 26 touchdowns with only three

Heisman Continued from Page B1

for 92 yards as the Aggies upset then-No. 1 Alabama 29-24 in Tuscaloosa. Manziel and Texas A&M will play No. 12 Oklahoma in the Cotton Bowl. Te’o is trying to become the first defense-only player to win the Heisman. The Fighting Irish have seven Heisman winners, tied for the most with Ohio State and Souther n Califor nia, but none since Tim Brown in 1987. Te’o became the face of the No. 1 team in the country and leader of a defense that has been the toughest to score upon in the nation. The senior intercepted seven passes, second-most in the country and tops for a linebacker.

interceptions. The Tide has been more potent offensively this season than last to make up for a defense that has slipped, but only a bit. Alabama leads the nation in total defense (246 yards per game) and is second in points allowed (10.7 per game). Linebackers Adrian Hubbard, Nico Johnson, CJ Mosley and Trey Depriest average 242 pounds. When Brian Kelly was hired at Notre Dame three years ago, he looked at Alabama and the SEC, which has won six straight BCS titles, and decided the Irish needed to play like that. Kelly built his reputation and winning teams at previous stops on fast-paced spread offenses. In South Bend, Ind., he has put the fight back in the Irish, who have won eight AP national titles — only Alabama has as many — but none since 1988. Notre Dame has allowed the fewest touchdowns in the country (10) and is sixth overall in total defense (286 yards per game). “It’s clear that the formation of any great program is going to be on its defense,” Kelly said. “If you play great defense you’ve got a chance. For us to move Notre Dame back into national prominence we had to develop a defense.” The face of the Irish isn’t a strong-armed quarterback or speedy ball carrier. It’s middle linebacker Manti Te’o, a 255-pound offense wrecker with a nose for the ball. The senior has seven interceptions and is a likely Heisman finalist.

He also led the Fighting Irish with 103 tackles, and earlier Monday won the Butkus Award as country’s best linebacker. Te’o and the Irish face No. 2 Alabama in the BCS championship game on Jan. 7 in Miami. Klein would be the first player from Kansas State to win the Heisman. “I’m just honored with this opportunity that the Lord has provided me here at K-State,” Klein said in a statement. “I’m so proud to represent K-State in this because I feel like my road is very synonymous and in line with the K-State way. It has been a process, it has been a journey. There have been a lot of ups and downs, as well as a lot of hard times and growing pains through it. I’m just very proud to represent the K-State family and our

Te’o, along with 300-pound linemen Stephon Tuitt and Louis Nix, have formed a red-zone wall for the Irish. Late goal-line stands highlighted victories against Stanford and USC. “There’s some pretty physical guys that have some great toughness and some great licks,” Saban said in assessing Notre Dame. While nurturing redshirt freshman Everett Golson, Kelly has leaned on Notre Dame’s running game, which averages 202 yards. “This is just a good all-around football team with tremendous balance on offense and a very physical defense,” Saban said. If Notre Dame, making its first appearance in a BCS championship, is going to break the SEC’s strangle hold on the crystal ball trophy, the Irish will try to beat ’Bama at its own game. And Kelly will try to uphold a Notre Dame tradition, by winning a national title in his third season as coach. Frank Leahy, Ara Parseghian, Dan Devine and Lou Holtz all won it all in Year 3 playing in the shadow of the GARAGE SALES Golden Dome. Notre Dame will try to become the 008. Northwest first team since 1507 W. Berrendo, Fri-Sun, 7am-noon. Kitchen, BYU in 1984 to garden, household, knick start the season knack’s & furniture, tons of fun things to peruse unranked and win through! a national title. ANNOUNCEMENTS Expect plenty of fans to be watch-

heart and spirit in this environment.” He seemed to be the front-runner for several weeks until Manziel’s late push. When Klein threw three interceptions in the Wildcats’ late-season loss to Baylor, Manziel moved to the front of the race. Klein is a multitalented quarterback like Manziel, but with a different approach. The 6-5, 226pound senior is a bullish runner who scored 22 touchdowns and threw for 15 more, while leading the seventh-ranked Wildcats (111) to the Big 12 title. Earlier in the day, Klein won the Johnny Unitas Award given to the top upperclassman quarterback in the nation. Klein will finish his Kansas State career against No. 5 Oregon in the Fiesta Bowl.

Landry, Johnny Football in the Cotton

After missing out on the BCS, Big 12 co-champion Oklahoma will instead take on Johnny Football and former conference rival Texas A&M in the Cotton Bowl in Arlington, Texas. The 12th-ranked Sooners (10-2) had their chances of an at-large BCS bid extinguished Sunday when MidAmerican Conference champion Northern Illinois moved up far enough to claim an automatic bid. Instead, they’ll take on Heisman Trophy contender Johnny Manziel and the 10th-ranked Aggies, who had been divisional rivals and yearly opponents for the past 16 seasons before A&M left for the Southeastern Conference. The game will be played Jan. 4 at Dallas Cowboys Stadium. “We hit a home run today,” Cotton Bowl chairman Tommy Bain said. “When our team selection committee met for the first time a few weeks ago, we circled this matchup as the one we most wanted, and the cards fell in our favor today.” The Sooners split the Big 12 title with Kansas State, but the Wildcats got the league’s automatic bid because they won the head-to-head matchup in Norman, Okla., in September. At 11th in the BCS standings, Oklahoma was the highest-ranked eligible team for an at-large bid that got left out of the field. There were four SEC teams stacked in the standings ahead of them, but none — including A&M — could have been picked because Alabama and

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Florida were already representing the conference. With Northern Illinois moving up to 15th — finishing in the top 16 and ahead of all Big Ten and Big East schools to qualify — Oklahoma became available to the Cotton Bowl. It’s the Sooners’ first time playing in the game since beating Arkansas 10-3 in the 2002 game. A&M lost to LSU 41-24 in the 2011 game, two seasons ago. “The Cotton Bowl has long been a marquee postseason destination, and we’re excited about being selected to play there a second time,” coach Bob Stoops said. “Cowboys Stadium is a great venue, and I know Sooner fans will be excited to make the trip to support us.” Bain pointed out that Manziel could potentially be the first Heisman Trophy winner to play in the Cotton Bowl in 14 years — Texas’ Ricky Williams in 1999 is the most recent to do so — and that both programs are finishing strong seasons. But that’s not all. Sumlin was on Stoops’ staff from 2003-07, leaving to become Houston’s head coach after being a co-offensive coordinator at the end of his time with the Sooners. He’s in his first season at Texas A&M and this will be his first chance to coach against his former boss. “Our football team is excited to play another game against a storied program such as Oklahoma. We have been led all year by a great group of seniors and to be rewarded with a great experience like the Cotton Bowl is something they will cherish,” Sumlin said.

ing. With the popularity of both programs, the second-to-last BCS title game is expected to be the highest rated ever. Though it might be hard for many fans to choose. While there are plenty of fans tired of watching the SEC win championships, Notre Dame has always been the program people love to hate. “I don’t know if we picked up any more fans along the way,” Kelly said. In two years, college football switches to a four-team playoff to determine its champion. No doubt fans of Florida (11-1), Oregon (11-1), Stanford (11-2) and Kansas State (11-1) wish they could push the start date up on that, but for the most part there isn’t much griping about this championship matchup. Notre Dame is the only undefeated team that is eligible — thanks to Ohio State’s NCAA sanctions — and Alabama is the champion of the league that has produced the last half-dozen national champs. Roll Tide or return to glory? To be determined in South Florida.

INSTRUCTION

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

FOUND TWO Pugs male and female, vicinity of NE area. Call 625-2460

045. Employment Opportunities

THE ROSWELL Daily Record is now accepting applications for the position of: OUTSIDE SALES The ideal candidate must possess excellent customer service skills, superior organizational skills a self-starter and strong work ethic. Bilingual preferred. Experience or background in advertising also helpful. Must be computer literate. This is a full time position. Interested Applicants please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Vonnie Fischer, 2301 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88201 or e-mail to: addirector@rdrnews.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!

Legals

---------------------------------Pub. Nov. 27, Dec. 4, 2012

STATE OF NEW MEXCOUNTY OF ICO CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Vaitkunas, William Alexander,

025. Lost and Found

LOST BRASS Spittoon w/brass polish & clothes. Last seen at cemetery on 19th St. Please polish and/or return. Call 622-3641.

B5

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

045. Employment Opportunities OPTOMETRIC OFFICE, Receptionist needed- Must be able to multi task and learn all office duties. Must be detailed oriented and be able to complete work as directed. Must be patient service focused & be able and willing to take direction and instruction. Two years receptionist experience. Please send resume to: PO Box 1897, Unit #327 Roswell, NM 88202.

CV-2012-713

NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME

TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, the Petitioner William Alexander Vaitkunas will apply to the Honorable Charles C. Currier, District Judge of the Fifth Judicial District at the Chaves County Courthouse, 400 N. Virginia, in Roswell, New Mexico at 9:00 a.m. on the 7th day of January, 2013 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME from William Alexander Vaitkunas to Desiree Victoria Vaitkunas. Kennon Crowhurst Clerk of the District Court /s/Janet Bloomer Deputy Clerk / Clerk

Submitted by: /s/William Alexander Vaitkunas 26 Carson City Rd Dexter, New Mexico 88230 575-725-4558

045. Employment Opportunities Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR

PERSONAL CARE by Design is taking applications for Caregivers. Must be clean and neat. Must have available some weekends and some nights. Come by 217-A N. Main for application. No phone calls. Must have phone and transportation. SOCIAL WORKER needed part time with a Master’s degree. Equivalent PTO benefits limited. Open Mon-Sat. Off Sundays. Apply on our website: FMCNA.COM


B6 Tuesday, December 4, 2012 045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

DIETITIAN FRESENIUS Medical Care is seeking a Registered Dietitian for their Roswell, NM dialysis center. Responsibilities include comprehensive assessments from which the RD is able to evaluate patient needs and provide detailed education to patient regarding nutritional status. Functions as an active member of the interdisciplinary healthcare team to assist patients to achieve their goals as determined by the patient's physician. Eligible candidates must be a Registered Dietitian as per the Commission on Dietetic Registration and maintain a current state license. Minimum of 1 year experience in clinical nutrition as an RD is required. Previous renal experience preferred. Apply on our website: FMCNA.COM

COMFORT KEEPERS is seeking kind, caring & personable individuals to provide In-Home Care for our senior and elderly clients. We are looking for experienced caregivers and CNA's who can provide Companion/Homemaker services as well as Personal Care Services for our clients. Morning, Overnight and Weekend positions available. Applicants must have a very neat & clean appearance. Full and Part-time positions available. Applicants must have a valid drivers license and auto insurance. References Required. Come join our great team. Apply at: 1410 South Main, Roswell EOE www.comfortkeepers.com

Maddy-Tay’s Preschool has positions available for Lead Teachers. Must have a minimum of an Associates Degree in Child Development or Early Childhood Education. Starting salary is $9.50 per hour with benefits. Applications can be pickedup at 1200 W. Alameda or 102 S. Utah. SOLITAIRE HOMES of Roswell is offering a position in sales. Applications are being accepted in person. No phone calls please. 4001 W. Second St. Roswell, NM 88201. DAIRY QUEEN has positions available for experienced shift leaders. Please apply at 1900 N. Main St., ask for Mark. LOOKING for a challenging field where you can grow your skills and knowledge and gain the satisfaction of helping others in need all while earning a competitive salary and benefits? If so, this is the position for you. Please send resumes to jobs@jjhc.org. A bachelor’s degree is required for this position. Journeyman Plumber Needed. Pay is based on experience. Full time opportunity. Must have a valid driver’s license, pass a drug test, and have references. Please call 622-1949 or email at rpm@plateautel.net for application. PLUMBER’S ASSISTANT Needed. Pay is based on experience. Full time opportunity. Must have a valid driver’s license, pass a drug test, and have references. Please call 622-1949 or email at rpm@plateautel.net for application.

045. Employment Opportunities

QUICKLY EXPANDING company has a great opportunity available for a permanent, full-time, entry-level position. We are looking for an individual who will add value to our flourishing business. Dealership experience helpful but not required. Qualifying candidate must be detail-oriented and possess the ability to work in a fast-paced, team-oriented environment. Strong organizational and prioritizing skills are a plus. We offer an excellent benefit package including HEALTH, DENTAL, VISION, 401k and PAID VACATION. If you have what it takes, apply now! Fax resumes to 575-622-5899 Attn: Office Manager or via email to officemgr@kagnm.com Human Resource, Training, and Labor Specialist Supervisor Department of Transportation District Two

This position will serve as the key resource person for the Human Resources Department in addition to supervising a staff of four. Responsible for all HR functions to include but limited to Employee Benefits, Recruitment, Payroll, Personnel Actions, Disciplinary Actions, Investigations, Grievances, and Collective Bargaining unit activities. Job closes Tuesday, December 4, 2012 To Apply:

www.spo.state.nm.us New Mexico State Personnel website.

For questions or assistance with the application they can contact: Cathy Baker 575-637-7266 or Kelly Starnes 575-637-7263

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

General Maintenance experienced with all type of repairs must pass background check apply at 2000 N. Main. Support Staff/Medical Records Supervisor Counseling Associates, Inc. is seeking responsible qualified individual to fill full time position as a supervisor of Support Staff including front desk staff and medical records. Some client interviewing required. Qualifications: High School diploma, good computer knowledge with data input experience, excellent telephone and people skills, ability to multi-task and one year office experience. One year of supervisory experience required. Bi-lingual, English/Spanish a plus. An EOE. Salary DOE. Excellent Benefits.

Send Resume to: Counseling Associates, Inc. Brenda Delgado HR Manager Brenda.delgado@ cai-nm.com PO Box 1978 Roswell, NM 88202 GUARDSMARK The nation’s leader in security is hiring security officers. No experience required, but customer service skills a must. Must be HS Grad/GED & 21 yrs. EOE Benefits: Free Medical/Life Ins. Uniforms/Tuition Assistance. Starting Pay $9.00hr. Apply by calling 505-830-2700 Tues-Fri. 9am-6pm. Sales Manager, Candlewood Suites, Roswell, NM. Are you a highly independent person? Are you always looking for newer better ways of doing things? Do you always want to get to know people better? If yes, then we are looking for an individual with confidence, a strong work ethic, dedication and a “whatever it takes” attitude to get the job done while maintaining the high standards of excellence for which Candlewood Suites is recognized for. The ideal candidate will have strong communication skills, solid competency in sales and events. Must have a minimum of 2yrs of proven sales experience in relocation and extended stay market segments. Send resume to cwroswellgm@ suncapitalhotels.com Janitorial Person Roswell 5 days per wEEk PT & exp. required. 800-728-1961

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575) 622-7710 #45 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SATURDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

The Roswell Job Corps Center is currently recruiting for a Finance Manager, full time with benefits. Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor's degree and at least 4 years of experience directly related to the duties and responsibilities specified. Preferred Qualifications: * Skill in finance operations of complex organizations * Significant budgeting experience, including planning, forecasting, and strategizing * Significant fiscal management experience * Experience monitoring, analyzing, and forecasting revenue * Accounting proficiency, especially researching and resolving problems * Proficiency in working with multiple computer systems and environments, use of electronic documents, working in various computer programs * Proficiency in Microsoft, especially Excel and Word * Must have extensive proficiency in computer use * Knowledge of internal control policies and procedures, especially those related to budgeting, revenue, purchasing, faculty contracts, payroll, and human resources * Significant contact with other departments and must closely supervise employees. * Skill in the use of data systems for the compilation, analysis, and interpretation of data Interested and qualified individuals are encouraged to apply. For consideration, forward a resume and letter of interest to: gonzalez.mary@jobcorps.org

or fax a copy to 575-347-7491. An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V

BUSY OPTOMETRIST office seeking Full Time Employee. Individual must be dependable, well organized and hard working. Experience and bi-lingual a plus. Please send resume to P.O. Box 1897, Unit 325, Roswell, NM 88202. The Roswell Job Corps Center is currently recruiting for a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN), full time with benefits. The primary functions of this employee are to provide medical, mental, and emotional care to students by assessing their specific needs. Must be a New Mexico State certified Licensed Practical Nurse. Must have at least one year nursing experience, preferably in a hospital or physician’s office. Interested and qualified individuals are encouraged to apply. For consideration, forward a resume and letter of interest to: gonzalez.mary@jobcorps.org

or fax a copy to 575-347-7491. An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V

045. Employment Opportunities

RECEPTIONIST: Office Support Staff with typewriter typing skills, basic computer knowledge, and basic bookkeeping skills. Good working conditions in small office. Pay will be commensurate with qualifications. Send resume to PO Box 1897 Unit 328, Roswell, NM 88202. SPECIALTY HOME INFUSION NURSE, CONTRACT POSITION Seeking a contract Home Infusion Nurse in the Roswell area. Qualifications: RN required. Must possess a valid driver’s license. Must have and maintain CPR, ACLS, and PALS. Must have a minimum of five years’ experience in ER, critical care, or equivalent. Must have excellent customer service and IV skills. Call (831)392-5910, Email resume confidentially at:

SHeuer@InfusionofCare.com

Receptionist/Scheduling Associate for busy Optometric practice. Must be bi-lingual and computer-literate. Experience with medical software helpful. Apply in person, Roswell Vision Source, 200 W. Wilshire, Ste D. No phone calls. We drug test prior to hiring. RENTAL CAR company looking for part time counter sales and rental person. Applicant must have above average computer skills. Must be drug free and have clean driving record. Neat appearance a must. Apply in person at Avis Car Rental, inside airport. No Phone Calls. AIRLINES ARE HIRING – Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified – Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-206-4704.

Roswell Daily Record

045. Employment Opportunities

YOUR BUDGET Cars & Trucks needs a Full Time Mechanic for busy car lot. Ideal candidate should possess experience in big dealership environment. We offer good hours Mon-Fri, 8:00-5:00 and good pay. ASE certifications, good driving record and background check required. Please stop by 1505 W. 2nd St., Roswell. No phone calls please. MOTEL 6 is now accepting applications for front desk. Apply in person at 3307 N. Main. BOOTH RENTAL or private room if you’re a licensed massage therapist, aesthetician or cosmetologist. Call Shangri-La Spa, 575-578-1603. Leave contact information.

SERVICES

080. Alterations

RITZY RAGS Alterations. Call Susan at 420-6242 for all your sewing needs.

105. Childcare

COUNTRY KIDS Family Daycare has openings for 1yr & up. Days, evenings and weekends. 622-0098

140. Cleaning

Will clean your home, low rates, 15 yrs exp. Please call Lisa, 575-910-1620.

232. Chimney Sweep

House cleaning, 12 yrs exp., excellent references, dependable, reasonable prices. 505-480-8097 SUNSHINE WINDOW Service Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458

Plant Operator/ Lab Technician Full Time for asphalt emulsion materials, testing production. Experience preferred but will train. Pay DOE. Must have valid drivers license, pass drug screen & physical. Physical Requirements: Ability to work outdoors, lift up to 50 pounds, and perform work using a full range body motion (stooping and crawling). Subject to on-call and occasional overtime requirements. Apply 8am-1pm at: Western Emulsions 49 East Martin St., Roswell, NM 88203 Email: juan@westernemulsions.com

ATTENTION ROSWELL Have your carpet cleaned for the holidays. Affordable prices & friendly service, 20% Senior discount. Call Nancy, 578-9741.

FIREFIGHTER PAID training to join elite U.S. Navy team. Good pay, medical/dental, promotions, vacation. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri, (800) 354-9627. LIVE-WORK-PARTYPLAY! Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus. Call 1-866-251-0768. 2 TEMPORARY Workers EIEIO Cecil Andrews 20042 Engelmann Lane Manor, TX. 78653 Occupation: Farmworkers , Farm & Ranch Animal 1/14/2013-11/14/2013 Pay rate $10.00 per hour Farm workers Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. All tools, supplies, equipment and housing will be provided at no cost to the worker. Duties: Cattle Worker castrating, branding, weighing catching. Transportation and subsistence expense reimbursed interested applicants can send resumes nearest State Workforce Agency office using job listing number TX6221603

230. General Repair

“Big E’s” Handyman/Maint Services Quality work. Reasonable rates. Free est. Senior disc. 914-6025

I CLEAN houses, 5 yrs exp, responsible person. Martha, 317-6023(english) or 317-5652 (spanish)

Westlake ACE Hardware, one of the largest retailers of home hardware in the U.S., has an immediate opening for a Store (Floor) Manager in our Roswell, NM store. As a member of the store management team, our Floor Manager plays an important role in all aspects of store management. This includes supervising store associates, inventory management, merchandising and most importantly ensuring great customer service. REQUIREMENTS: High school or GED equivalent required. Previous retail management and hardware experience preferred. We offer competitive pay starting at $35,000, bonus eligibility, paid vacations and holidays, a liberal employee discount and other benefits. This salaried position requires the ability to work some evenings and weekends. Please submit your resume via email: resumes@ westlakehardware.com fax to 866-490-0460 or submit application at Westlake Ace Hardware, Roswell NM.

QUICK PRO CLEANING & MAINTENANCE, LLC Licensed, Bonded & Insured Serving Roswell & Artesia 10% Discount for Veterans & Seniors 1-888-467-1913/ www.GoQuickPro.com ** SPECIAL** 3 Hours of Cleaning ONLY $39.99

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252

CLASS A CDL Driver with tanker endorsement, no Hazmat required. Home daily, 575-626-3578

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT NEEDED at Family Owned Service Business Full Time Position, Experience in Accounts Receivable & Microsoft Office. Apply in person at 1206 W. Hobbs.

Dennis the Menace

195. Elderly Care

Private Home care full or part time, good references, 15yrs of exp. 575-840-7309

200. Fencing

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991 Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100

210. Firewood/Coal

JUNIPER, PINON & Ponderosa mix. Cut, split & delivered, $300/cord. 575-973-0373 OAK, JUNIPER cedar mix, Fir and Elm, full or 1/2 cords,well seasoned, delivery available. Open Mon.-Sat., 8:30-5pm, Sun. 1-5pm. Accepting Debit & Credit cards, Graves Farm, 622-1889. SEASONED MOUNTAIN firewood, 626-9803. ELM CUT & split, $65, truck load, you pick up. We also have 2 Chihuahua puppies for $85 each. 575-914-0060. Cordova Chimney Sweep. Time to get ready for winter. 623-5255 or 910-7552

220. Furniture Repair WE BUILD and repair furniture. We also sell firewood. 1727 SE Main, 840-7849 or 626-8466

225. General Construction

Construction, fencing, concrete, sprinklers, landscaping. Call Jose, Licensed & Bonded. 624-8557 or 317-6712. Construction or renovation w/20+ yrs exp. Licensed. Call 317-3366 Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

230. General Repair

Milligan Contracting For quality home improvements call Geary at 578-9353, for references please go to Angie’s List. THE HOLIDAYS have come upon us, let D&B Property Maintenance do any and all your home repairs. We are your property specialist. No jobs too small. One call does it all. Free estimates. 623-8922 HOME SECURITY wright iron window, door, fence, interior/exterior painting & welding & house trimming repair. Call Gilbert’s Painting & Welding, 317-5246

CHIMNEY SWEEP Have your woodstove or fireplace inspected and cleaned. Dust free Guarantee. 38 years Experience, Licensed, Insured. Bulldog Janitorial Services 575-308-9988

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Fall Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242. GARCIA’S LAWN Service & much more work at low price. 914-0803. WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Lawn & field mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming - Rock installation & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121. “Big E’s” Landscaping & Yardwork mow, trim, prune property clean-up reason. rates senior disc. 914-6025

285. Miscellaneous Services

Stylist on the move! I come to you. Full service hair dresser. 626-2010

310. Painting/ Decorating

Painting, Fencing 20% discount through holidays. Mike 622-0072

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

395. Stucco Plastering

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991 STUCCO WIRE w/paper, 100ft rolls, $45 420-1352 or 626-7488

405. TractorWork

ATTACHMENT to do any work. Disc, posthole digger, brush hog, blade, etc. 347-0142 or 575-317-7738

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

FINANCIAL

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-482-3316 www.CenturaOnline.com

FIX your credit, start saving $$$ today. Credit Wright, LLC, 575-973-7097.

PROFLOWERS Send Flowers for Every Occasion! Anniversary, Birthday, Just Because. Starting at just $19.99. Go to

NO SELLING, paid weekly, flexible hours, great extra income, 626-2010.

www.proflowers.com/save

to receive an extra 20 percent off any order over $29.99 or Call 1-877-837-1671.

GET FREE OF CREDIT CARD DEBT NOW! Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 877-639-3441 MEDICAL ALERT for Seniors - 24/7 monitoring. FREE Equipment. FREE Shipping. Nationwide Service. $29.95/Month CALL Medical Guardian Today 888-416-2099 ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare. Get a FREE talking meter and diabetic testing supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, this meter eliminates painful finger pricking! Call 866-406-2158 ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFERERS with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP Replacement Supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 866-938-5101. DIRECTV FOR $29.99/mo for 24 months. Over 140 channels. FREE HD-DVR Upgrade! FREE NFL Sunday Ticket w/CHOICE Package! Call TODAY for details 888-719-9465.

310. Painting/ Decorating

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. RRP Certified. Call 637-9108.

455. Money to Loan/Borrow 485. Business Opportunities REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale 1908 W. 4th St., custom SW style house & detached building, near walking trail, $320,000. 575-317-6974. FSBO: Very nice country home, North of Artesia, 3/2/2, 575-746-7429. Handicap Ready, 2505 S. Lea, 3/2, 1145 sqft, $119,500. Call 623-5310. FSBO: 4/2/2, lg kitchen, great area. 2 Isla Ct. No Owner Financing 317-8131 3br/1ba, fenced yard on quiet street, $65,000. 720-447-6832 or 719-676-2748 FSBO, 1509 S. Pennsylvania, 3/2/1 +1, newer windows, roof, fence, doors, lrg covered patio, updated baths, orig. hardwood floors, $109,000. For appt. call 575-914-1272. ENCHANTED HILLS 3/2.5, 902 Mason Dr., 2307 sqft, Broker listed at $217,000, price reduced $179,500, plus recent 40k remodel. Call 208-0525 or Sun. 2-4. Very low for all brick. A Must See! Very Nice! JUST INSULATED ATTIC! 3019 Futura. 3/2/2. Great Area! For more info visit http://photobucket.com/301 9FuturaDr or call 910-9169. 4BR/2BA, NEWLY remodeled, 2085 sqft, $115,000, 209 W. Forest. 626-9836


Roswell Daily Record 490. Homes For Sale 3br/2ba, den w/FP, large storage rm, extra large 1 car gar., 2 driveways, 1/4 acre fenced, landscaped yard w/sprinklers, dog run, 1 blk from Cahoon Park, swimming pool & walking path, new roof, new central air & furnace, owner will carry $105K, 575-653-4654 or 575-973-1332. 1715 N. Kansas, $35,000 OBO, 2br/1ba. 622-2251 OWNER FINANCED Nice 3br, 2ba, 2106 W. Juniper, central heat, nice inside laundry room fully carpeted built-in range, microwave nice covered back patio, extra large backyard, nice storage shed fenced, under ground sprinklers $99k cash or $110k on contract thru Roswell Escrow 575-622-6786 or 575-420-3637. NE COUNTRY w/wtr rights REC, w/15k dn, NE 5br/2ba $116k; 4br/2ba $98k, seller will pay $3k on buyers cost; 3/2/2, remodeled & updated $166k; 2800 sqft, 4br/2.5ba, 2 car gar, 9.7 acres w/3 acre wtr rights, $200k; 2 well est. small eng. businesses. Homes West Realty at 627-1355. 2-4 BR’s, cash offers, new carpet, paint, etc, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331.

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. Town Plaza Apartments ALL UTILITIES PAID Friendly managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs & downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 2BR/1BA DUPLEX, $450/mo, no pets, 624-2436. PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. EFF, 1BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale 20 ACRES FREE! Buy 40-Get 60 Acres. $0-Down $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS Beautiful Views, West Texas 1-800-343-9444.

NM STATEWIDE REPO LAND SALE December 8, 2012 20 Acres, $15,900, adjacent to national forest, Southwest of Albuquerque; 40 Acres, $29,900 or 30 Acres, $24,900, near Ruidoso, reduced. Beautiful land. Priced for quick sale. Buy for pennies on the dollar. Call NMRS 888-676-6979. STEAL MY 20 ACRES near Ruidoso, $29,900. Municipal water, maintained roads and electric. Won’t last at this price! Call NMRS 866-906-2857.

500. Businesses for Sale PRICE REDUCED Business for sale well established, parking lot cleaning, 575-420-1873

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

Main & Poe, 4600sf, $275K, kit equip, lg lot, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

2005 FLEETWOOD by owner, Senior Park, 3br, 1.5 ba, 12x20 carport, 10x6 storage, ref. air, stove, fridge, washer, dryer, ramp, new hot water tank, $18,000, make offer. 575-626-6790 or 622-3479 WE BUY used mobile homes. Single & Double wides. 575-622-0035. D01090

520. Lots for Sale

ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $536, 2BR $645, 3br/2ba $745mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 Cute 2br/1ba, all electric, w/d hookups, fenced yard, $600/mo, $400/dep. 910-0827 BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $571, 3br/2ba, $625, 5br/2ba $746, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge. 610-B N. Lea, large 2br/2ba, 1 car gar., w/d hkups, fenced yard & patio, total elec., no pets, smoking, or HUD, $700/mo, $450/dep, 622-6158. SUPERIOR CARPET cleaning fast, reliable service. 622-3899 2BR 1ba, w/d hookups, all bills pd $550 mo, $500/DD 207 W Mathews 317-9375 2Bd 1 1/2Ba, $700mo, util pd, No HUD, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 2 BR, 1 bath, stove & refrigerator. Call 840-4333 or 910-8170.

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished North side of town, 3br/2ba, double car garage, furnished or unfurnished. 840-7871.

1&2Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 204 1/2 S. Ohio, small furnished studio for 1. Bills pd, no pets, no HUD. Background check, $400/mo, $200/dep. 623-4416

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 47 Wildy 3br/2ba, lg family room, 1 car garage, DW, REF, Self Cl. stove, W/D, newly remodeled No smoking or HUD, $925 mo + dep. 575-317-1672 or 630-222-8544. 1715 W. Alameda, complete remodeled, 3br/2ba, ref air, w/d hookups, NO pets or HUD, $900/mo, $600/dep, wheelchair accessible & storage. 914-5402.

TWO 5 acre lots, East Grand Plains, $32,500 each or $60,000 for both. Owner financing available. 575-317-6974

413 S. Cypress, remodeled, 2br, ref air, w/d hookups, NO pets or HUD, $600/mo, $500/dep, storage, 914-5402

PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848.

2BR/2BA, GARAGE, A/C, $1000/mo, $600/dep, no HUD or pets. 420-5930

Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $18,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352.

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281

3BR/2BA, CARPORT, $850/mo, $700/dep, NO HUD or PETS, 420-5930. Available Immediately, 3br/2ba, major appliances, 2 car garage w/opener, fireplace, Enchanted Hills, fenced yard, ref. air, $1200 + $900/dep. 575-703-0298 2BR, 1 3/4 bath, basement, refrig. air $650 mo. $500 dep. Terry 420-5111 Remodeled 3br/1ba, North of Roswell, fncd yd, storage shed, covered carport, central HT/AC. NO PETS, SMOKING & NO HUD. wtr pd, All electric w/stove & fridge, laundry room $800/mo, $600/dep. 575-973-0147

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 709 W. Tilden, 2br, ref air, w/d hookups, fridge & stove, $550/mo, $500/dep, no pets or HUD, 914-5402. 1br/1.5ba, Washer, dryer, stove, fridge, central ht/air, $500/mo, $450/dep, no pets, smoking or HUD, 623-7565.

Handicap Ready, 2505 S. Lea, 3br/2ba, no smokers or pets, $1000 mo. plus $600 dep., valid references, NO HUD, 317-4050 Two 3BR $600 & $650 + $250/dep; 1br $350, Al 703-0420, D.R. 703-0421 2br/1ba, 3br/1ba 840-4333 or 910-8170

205 E. 23rd Apt B, 3br 2.5ba, a/c, 1 car garage, fenced yard, $750/mo, $750/DD. 317-6479

LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com!

5 ACRE ranch w/home for rent, 4br,you can bring your own animals. 317-5958

1516 N. Pontiac, 2br, 1ba, near parks, stove & fridge, w/d hookups, tile or hardwood floors, remodeled, fenced yard, very clean and cute, $625 monthly, plus dep., No large dogs (small or medium okay), No HUD. References and Rental History required. Call 578-3034. 2br/1ba, fenced yard, new carpet, $650/mo, $400/dep. 578-9741, Nancy. 1&2Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 2 BR/1 ba, fenced yard, fireplace. 2308 N. Texas, Roswell. $525/mo., $500 deposit. 575-420-5518 or 575-623-1800.

{{{RENTED}}} 409 N. Railroad. 3bd/1ba, stove, refrigerator, no pets, $495/mo, $300/dep.

CLEAN 2BR, 308 W. Albuquerque, $500/mo + dep., no pets or HUD, 626-2190

2BR/1ba, office, $675m w/d hookup $400d No Hud. 1011 N Delaware 317-4307 3BR, 1.5 ba. 2 living areas $750mo $750 dep. 304 E. Conner No Hud/pets, 622-1252 or 420-9549

1303 E. Tilden 2br, 1ba, refrig. air, w/d hookup, fenced yard, $475 mo, $350 dep. no utilities. 624-0233 1802 N. Maryland, 2br, 1 ba, stove & ref., $525 monthly, plus $500 dep., No Pets, No HUD. References and Rental History required. Call 578-3034

2br/1ba, centrally located, $525/mo + bills, call or text 915-255-8335 3BR, W/D hookups, $675/mo, $350/dep, references, no pets. 317-4779 NEWLY REMODELED 4BR, 2 BA. $950m. $600 dep. No pets, no HUD. 403 S. Birch 626-3816

Near Both hospitals.1600 N. Kansas 3br, $850/mo. $300/dep. ,622-2877 or 637-3227 ex 3227

LUXURY 2/2/2, everything included, $1250/mo + dep. 622-4470 or 626-4666

418 W. 17th, 2br/1ba, fridge, stove, 2 car carport, w/d, $575/mo plus all utilities, $575/dep, no pets, Call after 6pm, 627-0890. 1105 W. 14th St. 2br/1ba. $500/mo, $500/dep. 420-3167 or 420-4038

909 S. Atkinson, 1br/1ba, carport, very clean, $500mo/$500dep. No pets. Call 575-420-4801 2BR/1BA, $550/MO, $250/dep, no HUD. 420-5604

3BR, 1 3/4ba. 1 car garage, located in the north part of town, $875/mo, $500/dep. 575-420-6703 3BR 2BA den, 2 dining areas, close to schools. Call 626-8211.

555. Mobile Homes for Rent Beautiful North Sr. Adult Park, very nice, clean, 2br/2ba, fridge, stove, DW, W/D, no smoking, $595/mo includes wtr, 317-6870.

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546.

CLASSIFIEDS

580. Office or Business Places

COMMERCIAL SPACE for lease 105 W. 6th, across from Pepper’s, great location. Contact Chuck at 420-6050 OFFICE SPACE available at Ritter & Co. 400 E. College Call 420-9970 Office 4 Lease 100 S Kentucky @ First St 3750' SQ modern space h/c access 575/623.8331 222 B W. 2nd, office space, $350/mo, wtr pd, 627-9942

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

Power wheelchairs $400-$1200, overbed table $50; hospital bed $250, lift chairs $250-$325. 622-7638 Beautiful, like new sofa set, asking $1000; pool for sale also. 575-623-1773. Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed! Beautiful Tell City solid maple dine set w/6 chairs & hutch, $900. 627-6887 2 NEW 3500lb. torque flex axels with brakes. 4 1/2 inch 5 hole hubs 45° down.

635. Good things to Eat

Red Chile pods, local pinto beans, mountain apples, peanuts, cucumbers, all kinds of squash, onions, garlic, jalapenos, bell peppers, frozen green chile, sweet corn and many more vegetables. Accepting credit and debit cards and EBT. GRAVES FARM, 622-1889, open 8:30-5:30pm Mon-Sat, 1-5pm on Sunday.

640. Household Goods UPRIGHT FREEZER for sale. Call 627-5412.

CHRISTMAS TREES & Gift Barn, TLC, 5600 N. Main, Roswell. Cut &live trees, 575-627-6717. EMERGENCY FOOD! Like your first wife’s cooking, lasts 25 years! Get it before it’s too late. Zia Guns, 1104 E. 2nd. 622-0023 NICE. SMALL. oval shaped drop leaf table, 4 chairs, $65, 623-2442. DISH NETWORK Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels FREE for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL - 877-867-1441 4X4 X 1/8 square tube 10’ long w/base plates 6 at $30 each, great for carport; 4” C Purlin, 12’ length, light rust, $8 each; Miller thunder bolt welder $200; super heavy welding table 34”x60” 5/16” thick top $150. 626-3644 POOL TABLE, Vly couger, new felt & rails, excellent cond., all accessories, $1000 obo. 505-228-1999 LA Z Boy sleeper sofa & sleeper love seat. Like new $650. 624-0274 after 4:30

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

$CASH REWARD$ for Grandpa’s tacklebox. Lures • reels, etc. 575-354-0365 Look at the prices I pay for gold jewelry $18/gram for 14K gold, $13/gram for 10k Also sterling & U.S. Silver coins. Ted, 578-0805 AH NUTS Is now buying pecans!!! Top price paid for large & small lots. 30lb minimum. Call today for appointment, 575-208-9575. WANTED 8FT utility bed & 8 hole Silverado wheels. 624-2961 or 626-6942 WANTED TO buy 308 hunting rifle, reasonably priced 575-626-7170 PAY CASH for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles. Entire households & estates welcome. Call 627-2033 or 623-6608.

625. Antiques ANTIQUE DOLL Only serious inquiries please. 575-623-6964

630. Auction Sales

Consignment Auction, Sat., Dec. 8th, 9am. 5505 N. Main, Roswell, tlcauction.com 627-6717

PICKUP BED trailer 3/4 ton 10 hole wheels heavy duty $850. 626-7488 or 420-1352 5TH WHEEL bed mount hitch $250 626-7488, or 420-1352

660. Stereo/ Phonographs Accessories

Onkyo Stereo System; 6 CD changer, dual cassette amplifier/receiver, & Infinity speakers; $600 obo; 914-8969 after 6pm

715. Hay and Feed Sale

ALFALFA HAY & baled oat, small bale. 3x3 ft medium bales, 4x4 ft lrg bales available. Graves Farm & Garden, 6265 S. Graves Rd., 622-1889, take credit & debit cards.

745. Pets for Sale

790. Autos for Sale

790. Autos for Sale

2001 FORD Explorer XLT, excellent condition, low miles, $4500, owner financing with $1000 down, 420-1352 1992 JAGUAR XJS V-12 55, 200 actual mi. $13k 626-2382 for appt. to see.

2001 IMPALA LS, nice car, 117k miles, $4250. 575-444-8224

1993 CHEVY Corvette, 81k miles, pearl white, excellent condition, new everything, $13,000. 575-746-7695. 1987 LINCOLN automatic AC, V8, $1000, work bench w/vise $55. 973-4472

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

05 Buick Century, auto. new tires, runs good, 105k mi. $4800. 575-626-3067

AKC Norwegian Elkhounds,. 5 females & 1 male. Call 914-0357

T-CUP AND TOY PUPS Chihuahuas $150-500 Pekapoo-Poms $400-500 Morkie-Shihtzu $500 Shihtzu $650 Yorkies $1100-1500 Malty-poos $800 Hybrid Schnauzers $750 Mini Dachshunds $600-650 Morkies $800 Registered, shots, health guaranteed and potty pad trained. PAYMENT PLAN 575-308-3017 txt for pics cingard1@hotmail.com

FREE TO a good home, kittens, tame, litter box trained, 575-416-0952 PUPPY LOVE Grooming & Boarding - Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also 575-420-6655 SCHNOODLE PUPPIES small, non shedding, F, $400; AKC Papillon puppy, M $400. 575-626-9813 BOXER PUPPIES, ready Dec. 15th, asking $250. Call for details, 627-0815 or 914-9187. LOVEABLE SCHNORKIE Puppy, $700, will be ready for Christmas, call 420-2006 for more info.

RECREATIONAL 765. Guns & Ammunition

ALMOST NEW, Vanguard 257 Weatherby mag. w/Leupold rings & mount, $390 or trade for a 20 guage shot gun. 575-626-5808 BOWS, KNIVES, ammo, pepper spray, stun guns, emergency food. Zia Guns, 1104 E, 2nd. 622-0023 BE A star this Christmas, give an AR! Shop at Zia Guns, 1104 E. 2nd. 622-0023 EMERGENCY FOOD! Like your first wife’s cooking, lasts 25 years! Get it before it’s too late. Zia Guns, 1104 E. 2nd. 622-0023

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

2008 Yamaha Raider, 2800 miles, 1900cc, recent service, show run condition, extras, $9000. 575-746-7695

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com

‘96 BUICK Skylark, excellent cond., 80k miles, $2800, owner financing w/$1000 down, 420-1352. ‘08 Pontiac Vibe, 37k miles, good gas mileage, exc. cond, $11k. 625-9819

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

1991 Chevrolet, 3/4 ton pickup w/Kanthiede utility bed, ideal for shop & parts to travel with you. Plenty of power to pull another trailer if needed. Runs good, tires good. Selling cheap. Call 575-622-0035 04 TOYOTA Tundra 98k mi. $12k OBO. 575-420-4145 ‘98 DODGE Quad Cab, Laramie, lthr, low miles, must see! $4800, 575-444-8224 02 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT 4x4, 4dr; tool box/bedliner, exc.cond. 63k mi $10k obo 626-3310 after 6pm VERY CLEAN 2004 Ford F350 Crew cab Lariat 4x4 FX4 6.0 diesel, low miles, see at 4600 S. Main.

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

B7

790. Autos for Sale

2011 NISSAN Xterra, like new, $21,399. 575-513-1944

TRANSPORTATION

KENMORE WASHER & dryer in working condition, $125. Call 575-626-3508.

Beautiful 1/2” oak wood flooring $4 foot 7” baseboard $2.10 foot 626-6205

THE TREASURE Chest new stock, sofas, dresser, table, chairs, dryer, hummels, carnival, depression glass. Wed-Sat 10-5 1204 Hobbs 914-1855, 622-1543

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

650. Washers & Dryers

$1000 obo. 910-1046

ESTATE SALE: 575-626-7912 or 575-622-3796. Dining table 78” 6 chairs $25; full size bed w/storage drawers for frame $150; side by side fridge, ice maker/water $50; refrigerator large top freezer, ice maker $75; freezer $100; sewing machine table $25.

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


B8 Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Roswell Daily Record

CONGRATULATIONS “Hometown Proud”

TO OUR TEAM AT

LAWRENCE BROTHERS IGA!

To be selected as 1 of 7 top IGA stores in the nation is a tremendous honor!

Lawrence Brothers IGA will participate in The International Retailer of the Year contest at the IGA World conference in Chicago, April 13, 2013

I want to personally say Thank You to my terrific team of employees that come in everyday and work very hard to provide a great experience for the Roswell Community! I am very proud of all of them and without them we cannot operate this store! It is exciting to have a team that loves to serve the community. I also want to Thank the Roswell Community for all their support! You make a difference to all of us here at Lawrence Brothers and we truly appreciate your business! Sincerely, Blake Meek, Store Director

This is the last week for your Holiday Cash Cards. Hurry in through Saturday and fill up your cards. You just might be the next $1000, $500 Winner $1000 WINNER

$1000 WINNERS

500

$

WINNERS

500

$

WINNER

29 348 WINNER

$

900 W. Second St Roswell, NM

100

$

WINNERS

500

$

WINNER

Don’t Forget Our Convenient Hours: Sun. - Thurs. 6:30am till 9pm Fri. & Sat. 6:30am - 10pm Drive-Thru Window In Our Pharmacy

EVERY TUESDAY IS “BANANA TUESDAY” 3 LBS. FOR $1 Join us on facebook.com/lawrencebrothersroswell

Pharmacy Hours: Mon-Fri 9am-6pm Sat. 9am-1pm Closed Sundays

12-04-12 PAPER  

12-04-12 PAPER

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you