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Roswell Daily Record THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

Vol. 120, No. 290 50¢ Daily / $1 Sunday

INSIDE NEWS

FIRST FAMILY LIGHTS TREE

WASHINGTON (AP) — The new National Christmas Tree is settling into its new digs just south of the White House. President Barack Obama and his family officially marked the start of the Christmas season by lighting the tree in a ceremony just after dark Thursday. The 26-foot Colorado blue spruce was planted .... - PAGE A6

TOP 5 WEB

For The Past 24 Hours

• 3 dead in plane crash • RPD didn’t violate man’s rights in stop • Bitter Lake offers Cranes and Cocoa • Herrera’s treys help NMMI pick up win • Prep football: 2011’s final chapter

INSIDE SPORTS

December 2, 2011

Senate rejects extending payroll tax cut

FRIDAY

www.rdrnews.com

AP Photo

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada speaks to reporters about extending the payroll tax cut, on Capitol Hill, Thursday.

Feds delay lizard listing

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Thursday sidetracked rival plans to extend a Social Security payroll tax cut, in dueling votes that pave the way for negotiations on a compromise on a core component of President Barack Obama’s jobs program. First, Republicans defeated Obama’s plan to extend the payroll tax cut through the end of next year while also making it more generous for workers. Minutes later, in a vote that exposed rare divisions among Senate Republicans, more than two dozen of the

GOP’s 47 lawmakers also voted to kill an alternative plan backed by their powleader, Mitch er ful McConnell of Kentucky, to renew an existing 2 percentage point payroll tax cut. Many Republicans and even some Democrats say the payroll tax cut hasn’t worked to boost jobs and is too costly with the federal deficit requiring the government to borrow 36 cents of every dollar it spends. The defeat of the competing plans came as House Speaker John Boehner, ROhio, said for the first time

‘Ready or not, here I come!’

that renewing the payroll tax cut would boost the lagging economy, a view many in his party don’t share. Boehner also promised compromise on a renewal of long-term jobless benefits through the end of 2012. The payroll tax cuts and unemployment benefits are at the center of a costly, politically-charged year-end agenda in which Democrats seem poised to prevail in renewing a tax cut that many Republicans back only reluctantly. But See SENATE, Page A3

JULIA BERGMAN RECORD STAFF RECORD

To allow for additional public comment and discussion, the listing of the dunes sagebrush lizard as an endangered species has been postponed. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced its plan for a 6-month extension of its final determination concerning the listing of the lizard, in a press release dated Dec. 1. On Dec. 5, the Service will publish the extension of its determination in the Federal Register. Immediately following the publication of the announcement, the Service will reopen the comment period for 45 days, according to the press release. Controversy has surrounded the posting of the lizard from elected officials, private entities and members of the oil and gas industry. On Dec. 14, 2010, the Service pub-

Mark Wilson Photo

A duck is less than a quack away from a water landing on the pond at the Spring River Park and Zoo, Thursday morning.

Cops bust major meth ring Agencies offer winter driving tips See LIZARD, Page A3

JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

NMMI GOES BOWLING

It’s that time of year again. Calendars are flipped to the final page of 2011. Everyone is recovering from Thanksgiving feasts and Black Friday mayhem, and Christmas is right around the corner. For the college football fan, this time of year is also exciting because bowl season is nearly here and, for just the second time in the past decade, the NMMI Bronco football team will be bowling. The Broncos will square off against defending national champion Navarro on Saturday in the .... - PAGE B1

TODAY’S OBITUARIES

• Leslie W. Fulton • Carolyn Ann Malone • Coleman Jackson - PAGE A7

HIGH ...46˚ LOW ....40˚

TODAY’S FORECAST

CLASSIFIEDS..........B6 COMICS.................B4 ENTERTAINMENT.....B6 FINANCIAL .............B5 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........A8 LOTTERIES ............A2 NATION .................A6 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8

INDEX

A multi-agency operation dismantled a major drug ring on Wednesday after an Albuquerque federal grand jury issued a two-count indictment against 17 members of a methamphetamine trafficking organization operating in Southeaster n New Mexico. Another three individuals were charged with methamphetamine trafficking in criminal complaints filed on Tuesday.

The sting operation was the result of an investigation that began in February. The investigation was a cooperative ef fort of Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force led by the FBI’s office in Roswell, Drug Enforcement Agency based in El Paso, the Pecos Valley Drug Task Force in Carlsbad with the assistance of the Inter nal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigations Division, the Chaves County Drug Task Force and the U.S. Border Patrol.

DEA Public Information Of ficer Diana Apodaca said the conspiracy crossed international borders. “We have had three takedowns this week in Midland, El Paso and New Mexico.” The amount of methamphetamines seized were what Elizabeth Martinez, of the Department of Justice, called a wholesale quantity, 23 pounds of methamphetamines. “That is the equivalent to 10,000 individual doses, See BUST, Page A3

VANESSA KAHIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Given last winter’s historic deep freeze and current dropping temperatures, government officials want to ensure New Mexicans are as prepared as possible for dangerous road conditions. As the probability of snow and icy conditions increases, the New Mexico Department of Transportation, the Department of

Homeland Security and Emergency Management and the New Mexico State Police have teamed up to ensure New Mexico is not caught off guard this year by extreme weather. According to a press release from the NMDOT, the agency, along with the NMSP and DHSEM is monitoring winter weather situations. All state depart-

Economy improving, Rodrigues addresses CRC meeting but job growth weak

WASHINGTON (AP) — Factories are producing more. Construction is growing. People are buying more cars. The holiday shopping season is off to a strong start. Normally, all that would suggest a bright outlook for the economy. Problem is, employers still aren’t hiring much, the number of people seeking unemployment benefits remains high and Europe’s debt crisis poses a grave threat to the future. Thursday’s mixed economic picture came a day before the government will report on unemployment and job growth for November. That report is expected to show a modest net gain of 125,000 jobs, scarcely enough to keep up with population growth. The unemployment rate is projected to remain 9 percent. Analysts say the economy remains locked in a good-but-hardly-goodenough position: It’s growing consistently, yet too

weakly to induce employers to hire aggressively. For now, factories are expanding. The Institute for Supply Management, a trade group of purchasing managers, says its manufacturing index rose to 52.7 in November, up from 50.8 in October. Any reading above 50 indicates expansion. Factories have grown for 28 straight months. Manufacturers are slightly more hopeful about the next few months because of cheaper raw materials and healthy demand, said Bradley Holcomb, head of the ISM’s survey committee. Still, he said, companies have tempered their outlook because of concerns about whether the economy will grow consistently, uncertainty about federal taxes and regulation and fear that Europe’s debt crisis may trigger a global economic panic. See ECONOMY, Page A3

Mark Wilson Photo

Aladin Rodrigues, the new Roswell Job Corps Center director, and Pam Hess, president of Career Opportunities Inc. attend a Community Relations Council luncheon meeting, Thursday. JULIA BERGMAN RECORD STAFF WRITER

With 39 years of experience at Job Corps centers across the country, Aladin Rodrigues, in his newly appointed role as

center director, will seemingly smoothly transition into his role at the Roswell Job Corps center. Rodrigues introduced himself at a Community Relations Council luncheon meeting, Thursday

See WINTER, Page A3

afternoon. Rodrigues and Pam Hess, Career Opportunities Inc. president, shared their thoughts on the center. COI took over operational responsibilities for the center on Nov. 1. Hess expressed her excitement in COI’s involvement with the center, and highlighted a transfor mation COI helped to accomplish at a Job Corps center in McKinney, Texas. For the past two years, the company has operated the McKinney center, which currently has almost 700 students. When COI first became involved with the center it was ranked “some 60-odd place” out of 122 centers in Job Corps’ national rankings. Now the center is in the 26th position. Rodrigues said currently the main focus at the Roswell center, which currently has 217 students, is securing all stu-

See JOB CORPS, Page A3


A2 Friday, December 2, 2011

GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

County man injured Millennium out of Troops dismantle Chapter 11, current gang’s comm system in home invasion on loan payments JULIA BERGMAN RECORD STAFF WRITER

A Roswell company that went bust in 2008, is staying current in its payments to the city and the State Investment Council. Millennium T ransit Services LLC, went bankrupt after borrowing millions from the state and the city of Roswell. The company largely exited Chapter 11 Bankruptcy protection in early February, after a judge approved its plan of reorganization on Feb. 11. The order came years after the company borrowed $4,320,000 from the New Mexico State Investment Council, the city of Roswell and Pioneer Bank. The city contributed $2,070,000, nearly 48 percent of the

loan amount. According to City Manager Larry Fry, the company has been and continues to be current in its payments. “They are fully current on all of their obligations.” Charles Wollman, communications director for SIC, said the company was current in its payments to the state. “We’re receiving monthly payments not only on the interest but some principal has come back.” He noted the company was making good on its promise. SIC’s mortgage participation on the $4,320,000 loan was $2 million. According to Wollman, currently the company’s outstanding principal is a little less than $1.25 million on that original loan.

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexican army troops dismantled a telecommunications system set up by organized crime in four northern states, authorities said Thursday. The Defense Department said soldiers confiscated 167 antennas and 166 power supplies that gang members used to communicate among themselves and to monitor military movements. The operation also netted more than 1,400 radios and 2,600 cellphones in the border states of Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon and Coahuila and in the state of San Luis Potosi, a statement said. The army hasn’t said which cartel was affected. During the summer, Mexico’s navy dismantled a communication system used by the Zetas cartel in the Gulf state of Veracruz. The Zetas have a strong presence in all four of the states involved in the army’s operation. Elsewhere, soldiers confiscated more than a ton of marijuana hidden in a tractor trailer at one of the international bridges at Nuevo Laredo, across the border from Laredo, Texas. The army arrested the driver. Also on Thursday, the U.S. government delivered inspection technology and a surveillance plane to help Mexico’s navy fight drug cartels. The equipment is part of the Merida Initiative, a program for which the U.S. government has spent $1.4 billion since 2008 in helping Mexico and Central American nations counter drug trafficking.

Homes need money

SANTA FE (AP) — Representatives of New Mexico nursing homes say they need $7 million to $8 million in additional state money to provide for the more than 5,600 individuals currently in their care. The executive director of the New Mexico Health Care Association told lawmakers Wednesday in Santa Fe the industry intends to ask the Legislature for the cash during the

j.bergman@roswell-record.com

upcoming 30-day legislative session. The Santa Fe New Mexican reports the state’s 71 nursing homes are in need of additional state dollars following a reduction in October in what Medicare pays the facilities. Roughly 14 percent of the 5,600 patients in New Mexico’s nursing homes in September were enrolled in the federal health insurance program.

‘Shopper’ leaves store with display camera

Police were called to Walmart, 4500 N. Main St., Wednesday, after a man used a scissors to cut the wires to a camera, which had been placed on display. The subject was wearing black pants and jacket. He ran from the store and drove away in a black Ford truck.

Burglary

•Police were dispatched to the 1100 block of South Washington Avenue, Wednesday, where the victim reported that $1,374 worth of jewelry was taken from a vehicle. •Police were called to the 1400 block of South Kentucky Avenue, Wednesday, after subjects gained entry into a car and removed several items, including an Avon touch screen, two pairs of Oakley sunglasses and a roadside emergency kit. Total value of the miss-

ing items is estimated at $955. •Police responded to a call from Sherwin-Williams, 1720 S. Main St., Wednesday, where subjects threw a steel object through the front plate-glass window and then entered the store. The manager stated that paint brushes, a pressure washer and a paint sprayer were stolen. The items taken were valued at $300. Replacement costs of the window are estimated at $2,000. Anyone having information on these or any other crimes should contact Crime Stoppers, 888594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward.

Daniel Gladu, 29, has a warrant for the unlawful taking of a motor vehicle. He is described as being 5 feet, 10 inches tall, weight 210 pounds, with brown hair and blue eyes. Anyone with information about Gladu’s whereabouts is asked to contact Crime Stoppers at 888594-TIPS (8477).

Police ID crash victims ROSWELL (AP) — Authorities have released the names of two Texans found dead in plane wreckage in New Mexico. New Mexico State Police Lt. Robert McDonald said Thursday that 49-year -old Jerry Don Greene of Snyder, Texas, and 30-year -old Tracy Martinez of San Angelo, Texas, died when the single-engine Cessna 182 they were in crashed about 37 miles west of Roswell. The Federal Aviation Administration initially

reported three people had died. McDonald said there were no survivors. The FAA said the plane was reported missing Tuesday, and search crews found the wreckage Wednesday morning. Of ficials with the National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA continued their investigation Thursday. The plane left Snyder on Saturday apparently headed to Sierra Blanca Regional Airport in Ruidoso. No flight plan was filed.

On Aug. 16, 2011, Torres pleaded guilty to counts 5 through 7 of a 7-count indictment, where he was charged with conspiracy to possess methamphetamine with intent to distribute and distribution of methamphetamine on two occasions. The first four counts — possession with an intent to distribute, carrying firear ms during a drug-related crime and two counts of possession of a firearm after a domestic violence conviction — were dismissed after Torres was sentenced on the first three counts. Co-defendant Montoya, who was charged as a result of the same incidents, pleaded guilty to the same offenses on Dec. 17, 2010. He was sentenced on April 19, 2011, to 10 years in prison, to be followed by five years of supervised release.

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Roswell resident Javier Torres, 28, was sentenced in Las Cruces federal court, Tuesday, to a term of 151 months after his conviction on federal methamphetamine trafficking charges. Torres will serve about 13 years in prison, followed by five years of supervised release. Torres’ conviction stems from his methamphetamine traf ficking activity in Roswell on Nov. 4 and 5, 2009. According to court records, on Nov. 4, 2009, Torres and co-defendant Stanley Montoya, 20, also of Roswell, delivered 41 grams of pure methamphetamine for $3,400 to a confidential informant who was cooperating with the law enforcement officials. The next day, Torres and Montoya sold another 37 grams of pure methamphetamine for $3,200 to an individual cooperating with the government.

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A Chaves County resident was injured during a home invasion on Tuesday. Sheriff’s Office Lt. Daniel Ornelas said the incident occurred on North Redbridge Road in the early evening hours. “A subject knocked on the door and then three subjects forced their way into the man’s home,” Ornelas said. He added that the victim was battered and needed a medical attention for his injuries. The subjects got away with an undisclosed amount of cash and electronics. “After that, a man knocked on the door of a home on West Mescalero and asked to use the resident’s phone because he had car trouble,” he said. The individual noticed two men standing in the shadows. The person refused to open the door. “The men ran back to their car and drove away,” Ornelas said. Ornelas could not say if the two incidents were related. Since these incidents

occurred, the Roswell Police Department has received numerous phone calls asking about home invasions. “The first thing we want to do is dispel the panic and the rumors. We have gotten phone calls about 16 home invasions. Some say there have been up to 24 home invasions,” said Officer Tavis Holley, RPD spokesman. He pointed out there were only the two incidents. “Both were in the county, and none in Roswell.” Of the two, one was “The unsuccessful. homeowner did exactly what you are supposed to do. He didn’t open the door. It doesn’t matter if they say they need help. You can always call the police for them if they need help.” The last confirmed incidence of home invasion occurred in January. Holley concluded that people were safe if they followed one simple rule. “Never, ever, ever, for any reason open the door to anyone if you don’t know them.”

Roswell man gets 13 years on meth conviction

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Roswell Daily Record

Senate

Continued from Page A1

Republicans are insisting — in a switch from last year — that the payroll tax cut and jobless benefits be paid for by cutting spending. The first payroll tax plan to fall was a Democratic measure that was the cen-

Lizard

Continued from Page A1

lished a proposed rule to list the dunes sagebrush lizard as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. The agency held two public meetings in April 2011, in addition to the original comment period associated with the publication of the proposed rule. Tom Buckley, spokesman for the Southwest region of the Service, said the agency had three pos-

Winter

Continued from Page A1

ments are ready to respond if needed. “The historic freezing temperatures last winter season tested NMDOT’s relentless 24/7 operation, in which staff and partners worked tirelessly to keep roadways safe,” said Transportation Secretary Alvin Dominguez in a press release. The press release notes that the NMDOT has prepared for the winter season

Bust

Continued from Page A1

with a street value of $700,000,” she said. Nine people were arrested as a result of the indictment on Wednesday. They are: Michael Roy Sing, 53, Joaquin Estrello, Terry Owens, 51, Chris Grado, 34, of Carlsbad; Monica Grado, 29, and Josh Wallace, 27, of Artesia; Stacy L. Batie, 38, of Hagerman; Martiniano Marin-Robles, 66, of Lake Arthur; and Jerry Plank, 29, of Lovington. The three arrested during the sting operation are Ismael Chavarria, 26, T if fany Flores, 34, and Refugio Reza, 50, all of Artesia. The defendants

Job Corps Continued from Page A1

dent accommodations for the upcoming winter break. Job Corps students are given paid leave to go home during breaks. The center provides transportation for the students, so they can go spend time with their families. “The Job Corps is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, so don’t worry. We’re not sending students out where they can’t have a place to stay. They can always stay at the Job Corps,” Rodrigues said. “While we don’t have a long history here yet, we plan to,” he said. Rodrigues then spoke to the commu-

terpiece of Obama’s jobs package announced in September. It would cut the Social Security payroll tax from 6.2 percent to 3.1 percent next year and also extend the cut to employers, with its hefty $265 billion cost paid for by slapping a 3.25 percent surtax on income exceeding $1 million. Republicans and a handful of Democrats combined sible decisions concerning the lizard: list it; don’t list it; or extend it if there’s enough scientific controversy. Buckley said there was enough scientific controversy to extend the listing. The service will consider and examine comments based on scientific evidence, Buckley said. Rep. Dennis Kintigh, RRoswell, a large advocate for not listing the lizard, said, “I’m glad they did not make the decision to list the lizard. But I’m not sure how much of an improvement the 6 month with more than 700 employees and 500 pieces of equipment available to keep routes clear. Last year, the department spent $7.4 million on snow removal and spread over 62,000 tons of salt. The NMSP has also made special preparations for the approaching winter. “The NMSP districts have coordinated road safety plans with our partners to ensure traffic safety priorities,” stated NMSP Chief Robert Shilling in the press release. He also stressed the need for the common citizen to put forth effort to made their initial appearances in federal court in Roswell. They will remain in federal custody pending detention hearings that will be held in the federal courthouse in Las Cruces later this week. Three of the defendants listed in the indictment, Manuel Fierro-Carrasco Jr., 29, and Tyler Grantham, 26, both of Artesia, and Adrian Garcia, 24, of Canutillo, Texas, were arrested in Artesia on Oct. 31. Law enforcement officials seized approximately seven pounds of methamphetamine from a vehicle driven by Garcia, and $50,000 in cash from Fierro-Carrasco’s residence. Fierro-Carrasco and Garcia are being detained nity members present about their involvement in the center. “I want the members of the community to understand that this is your center. It’s important for you to know that we want to be as transparent as possible with you. That’s why we have meetings like this, Community Relations Council, so that we don’t wait until something serious happens, that’s maybe negative, to call you in and say now we need some help. We want you to know positively, on a regular basis, what we do, and this is one way that we can do that is by having meetings like this,” he said. j.bergman@roswell-record.com

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GENERAL

to kill the measure on a 5149 tally that fell well short of the 60 required under Senate rules. For the first time, a Republican, Susan Collins of Maine, voted to support the millionaires’ surcharge. The White House issued a statement by Obama that accused Republicans of voting to raise taxes on 160 million people because they “refused to ask a few hun-

dred thousand millionaires and billionaires to pay their fair share.” The statement didn’t mention the GOP alternative. In a surprising result, Democrats and more than two dozen Republicans voted 78-20 to kill the $120 billion GOP alternative that would have simply extended the existing 2 percentage point payroll tax cut, financed by freezing federal

delay is. I don’t see anything new coming into the picture. The information is there so I’m a little concerned the service didn’t make the rational decision which would be to not list the lizard.” He cited several extensive and serious reports that have been written opposing the listing, including one he was directly involved with. Seven individuals, including Kintigh, worked on the report which is posted on Artesia’s Chamber of Commerce website, artesi-

achamber.com. The report examines the document, put forth by the Service, concerning the proposed listing. Specifically, the report scrutinizes the impact of oil and gas operations on the lizard population listed in the document. Kintigh said in many cases when the document cited scientific reports, those reports did not support assertions made by the Service. The correlation between the reports and the assertions were, “either ambiguous, unclear or in some cases

ensure everyone’s safety this season. Citizens should have essential supplies ready at home, work, and in their vehicles. Winter stor ms require motorists to drive with extra caution. “With the amount of snow and high winds expected to hit New Mexico motorists should remember to drive with caution, and plan travel accordantly,” Shilling said. Travel safety tips stated through the press release include: •Carry an emergency supply kit in your vehicle

with essential items. Let someone know your destination, your route and when you expect to arrive. •Check road conditions before traveling by visiting the New Mexico Department of T ransportation travel and road advisory website at http:// nmroads.com/ or call 511. •Always wear a safety belt and allow extra time to reach destination. •Put away distractions by not talking or texting on cellular phones. snowplows •Provide enough space to plow and be cautious when passing.

pending trial while Grantham is on conditions of release under pretrial supervision. Three other defendants charged in the indictment, Angel J. Fierro, Jr., 29, and Rodrigo Carrillo-Manriquez, 24, both of Artesia, and Luis Alberto Carrasco, 22, of Canutillo, were arrested on Nov. 10. According to the criminal complaint, the U.S. Border Patrol agents seized approximately nine pounds of methamphetamine on Aug. 25. The drugs were hidden in a sack of horse feed in a horse trailer being pulled by a vehicle driven by Carrillo-Manriquez. The U.S. Border Patrol located the drugs during an inspection at a checkpoint on

U.S. Highway 62/180 between El Paso and Carlsbad. All three are detained pending trial. One person charged in the indictment, Pablo Carrasco, 30, a Mexican national, remains at large. It is believed he has returned to Mexico. Larry D. Cravens, 47, of Artesia, who eluded capture on Wednesday, turned himself in Thursday. According to the indictment, members of the conspiracy smuggled large quantities of methamphetamine from El Paso to Artesia. Angel J. Fierro was charged with a money laundering offense. The indictment seeks forfeiture of $150,000 in profits from the methamphetamine

Economy Continued from Page A1

Concerns about a credit crunch led the Federal Reserve and five other central banks to take coordinated action this week to lower the cost of dollar loans in Europe and elsewhere. The manufacturing survey also showed that new orders and production rose to a seven-month high, but a measure of employment fell as factory hiring slowed from the previous month.

Worker productivity rose in the July-September quarter by the most in 18 months, while labor costs fell. A more productive and cheaper workforce can boost corporate profits. But unless companies see more demand, they’re unlikely to step up hiring. And manufacturers could soon suf fer declining demand overseas. About 20 percent of U.S. exports are shipped to Europe. And most economists expect Europe’s financial crisis to tip that region into recession next year.

Friday, December 2, 2011 workers’ pay through 2015 and reducing the government bureaucracy. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said Republican opponents “insist on helping the very wealthy while turning their back on the middle class,” while another member of the leaderSen. Charles ship, Schumer, D-N.Y., said Republicans were in fullblown retreat just days flat out contradictory.” He cited, as an example, the assertion that oil and gas pipelines through dunes will be detrimental to the lizard. “In fact if you look at the underlying report, it found pipeline trenches to be benefical to the lizards.” County Manager Stan Riggs, said the County Commission is going to resubmit its comments and the information it provided to the agency. “We fully believe the science is not there, the evidence is not there and we’re going to continue full speed. •Provide first responders enough space by moving over one lane. Citizens are reminded to: •Prepare a 72-hour emergency supply kit that includes essential items like non-perishable food, water, blankets, flashlights with extra batteries and emergency contact information. •Stay tuned to local media outlets for the most up-to-date weather conditions and emergency information. •If possible delay travel, and stay inside during a storm. trafficking enterprise. If convicted of the conspiracy charge, each of the 17 defendants charged in the indictment faces a maximum penalty of imprisonment for not less than 10 years up to life, followed by five years of supervised release, and a $10 million fine. In addition, Fierro faces a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison, four years of supervised release and a $500,000 fine if convicted of the money laundering charge. Three of the defendants are alleged to have sold distribution quantities of methamphetamine to undercover agents and confidential informants working with the Pecos Valley Drug Task Force. China, the world’s second-largest economy, is also slowing. Manufacturing in China contracted in November for the first time in nearly three years, according to business surveys released Thursday. Separately, the govern-

A3

after Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., said on “Fox News Sunday” that “the payroll tax holiday has not stimulated job creation. We don’t think that is a good way to do it.” Thursday’s votes indicated there was lots of reluctance among Republicans to renew the costly payroll tax cut, which even some Democrats said hasn’t much helped the economy. This is a very serious issue and the commission and the county and all of Southeastern New Mexico counties take this very seriously. It’s messing with people’s livelihood here.” Written comments must be received by close of business on Jan. 18, 2012. For further information on how and where to submit comments, visit the Service’s Southwest Region website, http:// southwest.fws.gov/. j.bergman@roswell-record.com

•Review the DHSEM Family Preparedness Guide: http://goo.gl/ BEawR For road and travel advisory infor mation, visit http://nmroads.com or call 511. For more information contact Manon Ar nett, NMDOT public information officer at 575-201-8283; Robert McDonald, NMSP public information officer at 505-470-5662; or Nick Piatek, DHSEM public information officer at 505476-0626. v.kahin@roswell-record.com

Flores and Reza also face a penalty from 10 years up to life in prison, five years of supervised release and a $10 million fine, while Chavarria faces a penalty of 20 years imprisonment, three years of supervised release and a $1 million fine. U.S. Attorney Kenneth Gonzales emphasized the importance of the multiagency investigation. “Methamphetamine is ... associated with violent crime and property crime in New Mexico. When we attack methamphetamine trafficking in our communities, we reduce the incidence of other crime that goes hand in hand with drug trafficking.” j.palmer@roswell-record.com

ment said the number of people who applied for unemployment benefits rose last week. The projected job growth in November would mark a slight gain from the previous month, when the economy added just 80,000 jobs.


A4 Friday, December 2, 2011

OPINION

A new slant on Gary Johnson’s run for president

SANTA FE — A recent article in “Outside” magazine provides some new insights into what makes former Gov. Gary Johnson tick and what keeps his presidential campaign from ticking. “Outside” is an international outdoors magazine headquartered in Santa Fe. It celebrates the sort of life that Gary Johnson lives. So who better to get an insight into Johnson and why he can’t get anywhere on the national political scene than a contributing editor from “Outside” magazine? Why is Johnson not succeeding in this political endeavor as he has in so many other facets of his life? The article didn’t say this in so many words but it helped me remember a thought I had formed in my mind years ago and then forgotten. Gary Johnson excels at individual endeavors. He is not a team sports kind of guy. And to be successful in politics, a candidate cannot go it alone. He needs to be one of the boys and acceptable to

EDITORIAL

JAY MILLER

INSIDE THE CAPITOL

the party faithful. Nick Heil, the interviewer for the magazine, notes that Johnson is a person who establishes outrageously ambitious athletic goals for himself and then sets out to methodically accomplish them. In the process he has become what Heil calls a world-class adventure athlete. The character traits associated with his accomplishments — grit, strength, courage and tenacity — are what people would like to see in any leader. But, he says, Johnson doesn’t make good use of that information. Johnson doesn’t talk about what makes him a world-class

adventurer. He would prefer to sell his libertarian ideas, rather than toot his own horn some of the time. Heil asked Johnson if he has considered hiring a media coach. Johnson answered that what people would hear would not be him. It would be someone’s idea of who he should be. Johnson wants to come across as a problem solver — someone who could turn a handyman business into a million-dollar operation. He admits he isn’t good at the showy stuff but he is very good at doing what he sets out to do. That is why Johnson is so frustrated about his inability to crack into the Republican field of candidates that get invitations to the numerous debates being held. Without those debates, he can’t make any headway toward his goal. When he ran for governor of New Mexico in 1994, Johnson was an unknown. But the state was

Roswell Daily Record

small and so was the field of candidates. His opposition was Richard Cheney, a legislative leader; John Dendahl, a businessman, and former Gov. Dave Cargo. As it turned out, the odd man out of that field was Cargo. He was well known but GOP leaders knew “Lonesome Dave” wouldn’t play ball with them. He was a loner, just like Johnson. By investing $500,000 of his own money, Johnson won the primary election. His general election opponent was then-Gov. Bruce King, who was considerably weakened by having to run against both of his former lieutenant governors. Johnson’s Democratic opponent for reelection was Albuquerque Mayor Marty Chavez. Johnson isn’t known as a great debater but he agreed to debate Chavez, a trial lawyer, throughout the state. Johnson did well enough to handily win reelection. Johnson faces a much tougher situation now. If any other Repub-

lican candidate were to be included in the debates, it almost certainly would be Johnson. But he keeps barely losing out. One problem is that television networks usually leave his name off the ballot in their polling. So the Republican Party isn’t completely to blame. Party officials say over 20 candidates have filed for president, some of whom are former governors or members of Congress. But Johnson is disillusioned. Some of the candidates included in the debates aren’t polling any better than he is. He is talking about leaving the Republican Party and seeking the Libertarian nomination. National Libertarian officials were very high on Johnson when he was governor back in 2000. But now, even that would be a fight. (Write to Jay Miller at 3 La Tusa, Santa Fe, NM 87505; by fax at 984-0982; or by e-mail at insidethecapitol@hotmail.com)

National Opinion American Jobs Act

President Barack Obama signed into law provisions of the American Jobs Act to help unemployed veterans. The measures had broad bipartisan support and provide significant tax credits to businesses that hire those who have returned from war; additional credits are given to those who hire “wounded warriors.” At a time when there is little agreement on war policy, the tax code, or how to solve joblessness in the broader population, the passage of this bill — signed just as the supercommittee was throwing in the towel — was a welcome sign that progress is possible. Yet it is also a reminder of how difficult life is for many retur ning troops. The Bureau of Labor Statistics puts the unemployment rate above 12 percent for veterans of recent wars, more than 3 points higher than the civilian market. The new bill, structured to create incentives to businesses willing to hire long-term unemployed veterans, will be paid for by delaying a planned reduction in fees for a Department of Veterans Affairs home-loan program. The bill also will support transition-assistance planning and make it easier for veterans to use their military skills to satisfy state licensing and accreditation requirements that often hinder employment. As calls grow louder for a thorough reform of the federal tax code — and for an elimination of tax credits — the bill for unemployed veterans sends an important message. While some credits are little more than giveaways crafted by lobbyists for favored industries, others are attempts to enlist private businesses in addressing broad public needs. The latter is true here: Retur ning veterans are deserving and struggling, and Congress was right to offer a hand. Guest Editorial The Boston Globe

Egyptian elections

Millions of Egyptians waited in long lines to cast votes for the election of a lower house of the country’s new parliament, even though they don’t know how much power that parliament will have. The voting is one more faltering step toward what we hope — and more importantly, millions of Middle East residents hope — will one day be a region dominated by democracies. The greatest uncertainty in Egypt now involves how much power the country’s military leaders are willing to cede to citizens. There are also concerns the country could be taken over by Islamist leaders who have little sympathy for the rights of those who don’t share their religious views. Egypt’s generals, who worked closely with for mer dictator Hosni Mubarak and assumed control after Mubarak was deposed in February, have said they will not give up authority to the new parliament, even though they authorized these elections. Elections for the upper house of parliament are scheduled for March, with presidential elections expected in mid-2012. As a result of the generals’ intransigence, the mood of Egyptian voters was less jubilant than that of their Tunisian counterparts, who cast ballots in that country’s first free elections a month ago. According to several news accounts, there was black humor among Egyptians waiting to vote, fears that what they were doing would make little difference and concerns they would be electing a puppet parliament that would simply do the military’s bidding. However, the fact that so many Egyptians were willing to endure lengthy waits to cast ballots, despite the uncertainty, demonstrates that they want a real voice in their government and they are not going to give in easily to those who would deny them that voice. Guest Editorial The Daily Sentinel, Grand Junction, Colo.

The Secrets of Soros, Obama, Occupiers (Part 3)

In Part 1, I discussed how the mainstream media, billionaire progressives such as George Soros, the White House and even the Occupy movement are in cahoots with one another. In Part 2, I discussed the Mainstream Media’s maneuvering to coronate their choice for the GOP presidential nomination, Soros’ covert investments in the 2012 presidential election, and Agenda 21’s relation to progressivism and the Occupy movement. Today I will address not only exactly what the goal and meaning of progressives’ “fundamentally transforming the

Doonesbury

DEAR DOCTOR K: I travel a lot for business. Every time I go through an airport security scanner, I wonder how it might be af fecting my health. Are these scanners harmful? Should I avoid them? DEAR READER: There are currently two types of airport scanners in use. Some use non-ionizing radiation; the others use ionizing radiation. Most of the concern about scanners focuses on those that use ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation is the more dangerous kind and is definitely something to worry about.

CHUCK NORRIS

SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

United States of America” are but also what I believe we can do to stop that onslaught from overturning our republic. What is critical to keep in mind is progressives’ goal. It isn’t merely to sustain a Democratic administration and majority or to control the different strata of society, including Main Street and Wall

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

This type of radiation can damage your cells and can also af fect a damaged cell’s ability to repair itself. Ionizing radiation can cause genetic changes that impair your cells’ ability to control their own growth. If the cells start dividing when they shouldn’t, a cancer starts. Lastly, ionizing

Street. It is about the total transformation of the United States. Fellow culture warrior and New York Times best-seller Robert Ringer stated it well: “Whether it’s the Occupy Wall Street protesters, rioters in Greece, public workers defacing the state capitol building in Madison, Wisconsin, or thugs tearing down the city of Oakland, brick by brick, they are all focused on the same objective: equal distribution of wealth and a classless society. They may not use the word communism, but communism is precisely what they yearn for.”

radiation can damage the DNA in your sperm or eggs. This can cause mutations that could affect your future children. Exposure to very high levels of ionizing radiation can cause radiation poisoning and even death. After reading this, you may well ask, “Why would I allow myself to be exposed to ionizing radiation?” My answer is, like most bad things, what matters is how much of it you’re exposed to. So how much radiation is there in an airport scanner, See DR. K, Page A5

The social psychology being used by the progressives and liberal media on many trusting and unsuspecting Americans (including many in the Occupy movement) is nothing short of another play taken straight from Saul Alinsky’s playbook, “Rules for Radicals”: “A Marxist begins with his prime truth that all evils are caused by the exploitation of the proletariat by the capitalists. From this he logically proceeds to the revolution to end capitalism, then into the third stage of reorganization into a new social order or the

See NORRIS, Page A5

25 YEARS AGO

Dec. 2, 1986 • Flora Vista Elementary School has announced that 23 students have been chosen as Falcons of the Month for October 1986. Principal David Gomez said the elite group includes: Sixth grade — Monique Oropesa and Tony Wolf; fifth grade — Theresa Carmona and Robert Stone; fourth grade — Christy Peck and Francisco Salvarrey; third grade — Ibett Flores and Michael Peck; second grade — Julie Bilbado, Abraham Rivera and Vanessa Udero; first grade — Emma Bitz, Enrique Murillo and Niki Tafoya; kindergarten — Cynthia Larios, Priscilla Jaramillo and Vanessa Sanchez; and sportsman of the month — Felicia Rodriguez.


LOCAL

A5

Santa Claus is coming to several New Mexico towns Roswell Daily Record

CLOUDCROFT - Santa will be making appearances throughout the town during December - On Sundays you can find him at the Lodge in Cloudcroft from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., Christmas Eve from 7 p.m to 8 p.m. and Christmas Day from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. The Lodge is located at 601 Corona Place. For more information, call 682-2566 or visit TheLodgeResort.com.

RUIDOSO- Beautifully lit and fantastically festive, the Festival of Lights Parade 2011 brings friends and family together for an evening of twinkling lights, hot chocolate and togetherness in the winter wonderland of Ruidoso. Saturday, streets will start closing at 4:30 p.m. and the parade is at 5:30 p.m. For more information, call 257-7395 or visit ruidosonow.com. ALAMOGORDO- The Parade of Lights 2011 will be Saturday at 5 p.m., and will proceed on 10th street

Norris

from Oregon Avenue west to New York Avenue. For more information, call the Alamogordo Chamber of Commerce at 437-6120 or visit alamogordo.com.

ALTO- “Miracle on 34th Street” is at the Spencer Theater Saturday at 7 p.m. A nice old man who claims to be Kris Kringle is institutionalized as insane, and a young lawyer defends him in court by arguing that the guy really is Santa Claus. In the meantime, two lost souls find each other and a little girl discovers dreams do come true! This musical adaptation of the favorite 1947 holiday tale features a cast of Equity artists with the famed Barter Theatre

Continued from Page A4

dictatorship of the proletariat, and finally the last stage — the political paradise of communism.” Marxist philosopher Antonio Gramsci was famous for his idea of cultural hegemony. Wikipedia defines it as a “philosophic and sociological theory ... that a culturally diverse society can be dominated (ruled) by one social class, by manipulating the societal culture (beliefs, explanations, perceptions, values) so that its rulingclass worldview is imposed as the societal norm, which then is perceived as a universally valid ideology and status quo beneficial to all of society, whilst benefiting only the ruling class.” Ringer noted that in “The Communist Manifesto,” Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels summarized the plan this way: “In short, the Communists everywhere support every revolutionary movement against existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communist revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win. Working men of all countries, unite!” And Vladimir Lenin stressed the importance of this

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

compared to regular X-rays, for example? It would take more than 50 scans at the airport to equal the radiation exposure from a single dental X-ray. And it would take 1,000 scans to equal the exposure from a chest Xray. Suppose you made a back-andforth trip by airplane once every month. At that rate, it would take you two years to accumulate as much radiation as you get from just one dental X-ray, and 40 years to accumulate as much radiation as from just one chest X-ray. Does that put it in perspective? Here’s another perspective. You actually can’t avoid radiation exposure. Just living on Earth exposes us to low levels of ionizing radiation. There are radioactive substances in soil and cosmic rays from outer space. And about those cosmic rays: When you’re in an airplane, 30,000 feet

Company. For more information, visit spencer theater.com.

CLOUDCROFT - Cloudcroft's Second annual Lighted Christmas Parade will take place on Saturday at 7 p.m. on Burro Street. Before the parade, join us for the Christmas Tree Lighting at 6 p.m. between The Burro Street Exchange and the Post Office. There will be shopping until 8 p.m. and hot cocoa to keep you warm! For more information, call the Cloudcroft Chamber of Commerce at 682-2733. AR TESIA- Ocotillo Performing Arts Center presents “Lowe Family Christ-

mas” Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25. For more information, call 746-4212 or visit ArtesiaArtsCouncil.com. ALAMOGORDO- Take a relaxing hayride through a world of holiday lights. Every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday night up to Dec. 25, from 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. Wagons depart Sunset Run Restaurant for a ride among more than 60,000 Christmas lights. Santa Claus will also be on site for photos. There will be holiday craft and food vendors on-site. If you are interested in setting up a light display for your business or organization, please contact us. Cost is $2 for 12 and under, or $5 for 13 and up. For more information, call Eli Levy at 921-3332.

ALTO- This Festival of Lights Event is sponsored by Altrusa Club of Ruidoso. The Christmas Tour of Homes is a self-guided tour designed to raise funds for Low Cost Mammograms in Lincoln County. The tour is

social change: “We say that our morality is wholly subordinated to the interests of the class struggle of the proletariat.” Feel familiar? To progressives, the masses don’t need to understand the principles; they just need to stand up for them. In fact, it’s actually better that they remain ignorant. Alinsky stated it this way: “Here our concern is with the tactic of taking; how the HaveNots can take power away from the Haves.” The truth is that the only way out of this slippery slope is to help educate the masses about the uniqueness of our republic and push back on the tides of progressivism, socialism and communism. That is also why I expanded the paperback version of my New York Times best-seller “Black Belt Patriotism,” which gives America’s Founding Fathers’ solutions for our modern problems. I am a firm believer in studying history. It can help us not to repeat the mistakes of our past and to recognize evil when it surfaces. It is also good to make a habit of educating ourselves and finding answers to what we are facing in America, which Curtis Bowers did in his very insightful documentary “Agenda: Grinding America Down.”

above the Earth, you are exposed to more of them than on the ground. In fact, you are exposed to 100 times more radiation from traveling in an airplane than from the airport scanner. So if the scanner worries you, why are you flying in the first place? My point is not that flying is dangerous. My family and I fly all the time. I’m just trying to put the risk of airport scanners in perspective. So what should you do? I’ll tell you what I do. I don’t worry about airport scanners. I have a hip replacement, so I often set off the alarm. For that reason, I’m always disappointed when I arrive at an airport security area and don’t see a scanner. I much prefer a scanner to a pat-down, in terms of my time and my dignity. In a world full of things to worry about, airport scanners are not on my list. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. Go to his website to send questions and get additional infor mation: www.AskDoctorK.com.)

Friday, December 2, 2011

Sunday from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. and tickets are $20 in advance. After the tour, please visit Casa Feliz and drop your name in the Holiday Box for door prize and enjoy some refreshments. For more information, call Tanya at 336-7473 or visit altrusaruidoso.com /hometour.php CLOUDCROFT The Cloudcroft Community Choir presents “Lead Me Back to Bethlehem” at the Cloudcroft United Methodist Church Sunday at 4 p.m. For more information, contact the Cloudcroft Chamber of Commerce at 6822733. DEXTER- On Monday, the First Presbyterian Church of Dexter, 201 W. Fifth St., will present “A Pastoral Christmas in New Mexico.” The event will feature special music by the Roswell UMC Christmas Ensemble, returning from a recent Carnegie Hall appearance. Prelude begins at 3:15 p.m. Babysitting is

available. Call in advance for details, 734-5797 or 734-5887. PORTALES- There will be a holiday concert on the University Theatre Center mainstage at Eastern New Mexico University, at 6:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 9. Dustin Seifert, instructor of music, will direct 160 students in playing minor alterations; Christmas carols in minor keys. The event will include “The Night Before Christmas” narrated by Michael Shaughnessy and the traditional sing-along, “Sleigh Ride.” The event is free. For more information, contact: Shirlene Peters at 562-2711. ARTESIA- The Quebe Sisters Band will perform at the Ocotillo Performing Arts Center Friday, Dec. 9, at 7:30 p.m. The Quebe Sisters Band plays a refreshing blend of western swing, vintage country, bluegrass, jazz, swing standards and Texas-style fiddling. Tickets are $25. For more information, call 746-4212 or visit ArtesiaArtsCouncil.com.

Thomas Jefferson’s wisdom still points the way out of this mess: “Educate and inform the whole mass of the people. Enable them to see that it is their interest to preserve peace and order, and they will preserve them. And it requires no very high degree of education to convince them of this. They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty.” Ronald Reagan stated it this way: “Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We did not pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected and handed on for them to do the same.” But does that sound like the way of Wall Street occupiers, Soros, Obama and the MSM? While Occupy protesters accuse Wall Street of stealing their pocketbooks, the MSM and progressives are seeking to steal and control the American mind. That’s the real question every American and occupier should be answering: Which do you value more, your money or your brain? Follow Chuck Norris through his official social media sites, on Twitter @chucknorris and Facebook’s “Official Chuck Norris Page.” He blogs at http://chucknorris news.blogspot.com. © 2011 Chuck Norris


A6 Friday, December 2, 2011

NATION

Senate backs military custody of terror suspects

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ignoring a presidential veto threat, the Democratic-controlled Senate moved methodically Thursday to complete a massive defense bill that would deny suspected terrorists, even U.S. citizens seized within the nation’s borders, the right to trial and subject them to indefinite detention. The Senate rejected an effort by Intelligence Committee Chairman Dianne Feinstein to limit a military custody requirement for suspects to those captured outside the United States. The vote was 55-45. Feinstein, D-Calif., said her goal was to ensure “the military won’t be roaming our streets looking for suspected terrorists.” The issue divided Democrats with nine senators, many facing re-election next year, breaking with the leadership and administration to vote against the amendment. Republicans held firm, with only Sens. Rand Paul of Kentucky, Mark Kirk of Illinois and Mike Lee of Utah backing

Feinstein’s effort. Overall, the deficit-driven bill would authorize $662 billion for military personnel, weapons systems, national security programs in the Energy Department and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan in the fiscal year that began Oct. 1. Reflecting a period of austerity and a winding down of decade-old conflicts, the bill is $27 billion less than what President Barack Obama requested and $43 billion less than what Congress gave the Pentagon this year. The Senate pushed to finish the bill by day’s end. Its version must be reconciled with a House-passed measure in the final weeks of the congressional session. In an escalating fight with the White House, the bill would ramp up the role of the military in handling terror suspects. The bill’s language challenges citizens’ rights under the Constitution, tests the boundaries of executive and legislative branch authority

and sets up a showdown with the Democratic commander in chief. It reflects the politically charged dispute over whether to treat suspected terrorists as prisoners of war or criminals. The administration insists that the military, law enforcement and intelligence agents need flexibility in prosecuting the war on terror after they’ve succeeded in killing al-Qaida’s Osama bin Laden and Anwar alAwlaki. In its veto threat, the White House said it cannot accept any legislation that “challenges or constrains the president’s authorities to collect intelligence, incapacitate dangerous terrorists and protect the nation.” Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and FBI Director Robert Mueller have opposed the provisions. Republicans counter that their efforts are necessary to respond to an evolving, post-Sept. 11 threat, and that Obama has failed to produce a consistent policy

NEW YORK (AP) — General Motors will buy Chevrolet Volts back from any owner who is afraid the electric cars will catch fire, the company’s CEO said Thursday. In an exclusive interview with The Associated Press, CEO Dan Akerson insisted that the cars are safe, but said the company will purchase the Volts because it wants to keep customers happy. Three fires have broken out in Volts after side-impact crash tests done by the federal government. Akerson said that if necessary, GM will recall the more than 6,000 Volts now on the road in the U.S. and repair them once the company and federal safety regulators figure out what caused the fires. “If we find that is the solution, we will retrofit every one of them,” Akerson said. “We’ll make it right.” The fires happened seven days to three weeks after tests per for med by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. And GM has said there’s no threat of fires immediately after crashes. GM also has said that no Volts involved in real-world crashes have caught fire. Still, NHTSA has opened an investigation into the fires and has asked other companies that make electric cars for battery testing data. NHTSA said the safe-

ty testing hasn’t raised concerns about electric vehicles other than the Volt. “The fire broke out seven days later. Not seven minutes. Not seven seconds,” Akerson said, adding that the company wants to fix the problem so people continue to have faith in Volts and other advanced technology cars. The company is notified of any Volt crash through its OnStar safety system and dispatches a team with 48 hours to drain the battery, preventing fires, he said. “I think in the interest of General Motors, the industry, the electrification of the car, it’s best to get it right now than when you have — instead of 6,000 — 60,000 or 600,000 cars on the road,” he said. The NHTSA testing, Akerson said, intruded into the Volt’s battery pack by four to five inches, beyond the normal testing standard of about two inches. Then the cars were rotated 360 degrees to simulate a rollover crash. He said anytime there’s a new technology introduced like the Volt, problems will arise. GM is dedicated to fixing them. He conceded that the fires may cause some potential buyers to shy away from the Volt. But he added that GM is trying to get the message out that they happened only after extreme tests. Akerson also stressed that standard gas

engine cars also have problems with fires after crashes. The Volt can go about 35 miles on battery power before a small gasoline generator kicks in to keep the car running. The car can be recharged with a standard home electrical outlet. The Nissan Leaf, a fully electric car and the Volt’s main competitor, has not had any similar fires after crash tests or real-world crashes, Nissan said. The Leaf battery is cooled by air rather than a liquid used to cool the Volt battery. Akerson said investigators are looking at spilled coolant as one possible cause of the fires, although he said the coolant itself did not catch fire. Investigators are looking at everything from circuit boards to the way the battery cells are packaged into the Volt’s larger T -shaped battery pack, he said. Investigators have some promising leads but no conclusions yet, Akerson said. GM doesn’t expect many Volt owners to return their cars, given feedback from customers thus far, said spokesman Rob Peterson. Earlier this week GM offered loaner cars to all Volt owners until the cause of the fires is found and fixed. So far, Akerson said 16 Volt owners have inquired and only two have taken the loaners.

on handling terror suspects. The bill would require military custody of a suspect deemed to be a member of al-Qaida or its affiliates and involved in plotting or committing attacks on the United States. American citizens would be exempt. The bill does allow the executive branch to waive the authority based on national security and hold a suspect in civilian custody. The legislation also would give the government the authority to have the military hold an individual suspected of terrorism indefinitely, without a trial. That provision had no exception for a U.S. citizen. Feinstein offered another amendment, one that would prohibit the indefinite detention of a U.S. citizen without charges or trial. She has said the last time the government held U.S. citizens indefinitely was when Japanese-Americans were inter ned in camps during World War II. Kirk has called the provi-

Roswell Daily Record

sion unconstitutional, violating the Fourth Amendment and the right of individuals to be secure in their homes from unreasonable searches and seizures. Countered Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., “We need the authority to hold those individuals in military custody so we aren’t reading them Miranda rights.” Earlier this week, the Senate resoundingly rejected an ef fort to strip the detainee provisions from the defense bill and instead hold hearings on the issue. The Senate was expected to overwhelmingly approve crippling sanctions on Iran as fears about Tehran developing a nuclear weapon outweighed concerns about driving up oil prices that would hit economically strapped Americans at the gas pump. Last week, the administration announced a new set of penalties against Iran, including identifying for the first time Iran’s entire banking sector as a “primary money laundering

concer n.” This requires increased monitoring by U.S. banks to ensure that they and their foreign affiliates avoid dealing with Iranian financial institutions. But lawmakers pressed ahead with even tougher penalties despite reservations by the administration. Sens. Bob Menendez, DN.J., and Kirk offered an amendment that would target foreign financial institutions that do business with the Central Bank of Iran, barring them from opening or maintaining correspondent operations in the United States. It would apply to foreign central banks only for transactions that involve the sale or purchase of petroleum or petroleum products. The sanctions on petroleum would only apply if the president determines there is a sufficient alternative supply and if the country with jurisdiction over the financial institution has not significantly reduced its purchases of Iranian oil.

GM willing to buy back Volts Retailers: Nov. sales strong

First family lights National Tree

AP Photo

The National Christmas Tree, Thursday.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The new National Christmas Tree is settling into its new digs just south of the White House. President Barack Obama and his family officially marked the start of the Christmas season by lighting the tree in a ceremony just after dark Thursday. The 26-foot Colorado blue spruce was planted in March on the Ellipse, a park that lies between the White House and the National Mall. Strong winds in February toppled the previous tree, which

stood in the park since 1978. In remarks delivered during the treelighting ceremony, Obama urged the crowd to be generous and to help others in need during the holidays. “In this season of hope, let’s help those who need it most: the homeless, the hungry, the sick and shut-in,” he said. “In this season of plenty, let’s reach out to those who struggle to find work or provide for their families.” Obama welcomed troops returning home in time for the holiday, and asked Americans to express their gratitude to service members. “In this season of generosity, let’s give thanks and honor to our troops and our veterans and their families who’ve sacrificed so much for us,” he said. Obama was joined at the ceremony by his wife, Michelle; daughters Sasha and Malia; and mother-in-law Marian Robinson. The first lady read Clement Clarke Moore’s poem “The Night Before Christmas” with Muppet star Kermit the Frog. The lighting ceremony, hosted by TV’s Carson Daly, included performances of Christmas carols and tunes by pop group Big Time Rush, English singer Ellie Goulding, pop band OneRepublic, country singer Rodney Atkins, soul songstress Marsha Ambrosius and the Airmen of Note, a jazz ensemble of the United States Air Force. The ceremony marks the 89th holiday tree lighting. The tradition began with President Calvin Coolidge in 1923.

posted a 4.8 percent gain, above the 3.9 percent increase that Wall Street analysts had expected. The company’s Macy’s chain, which was among the retailers who opened at midnight on Thanksgiving evening, benefited from the earlier opening. “A strong Black Friday punctuated our very positive sales per for mance throughout November,” AP Photo said Terry J. Lundgren, Macy’s chairman, presiA shopper pauses outside a store in the Burlington Mall in dent and chief executive Burlington, Mass., Thursday. in a statement. But not every retailer NEW YORK (AP) — Oh shopping season. Ameriwhat a difference a week- cans spent $52.4 billion had a strong showing in over the weekend, the November. Those targetend can make. Shoppers taking advan- highest total ever record- ing lower and middletage of big discounts and ed during that time, income shoppers face an earlier store hours during according to the National uphill battle to get shopthe start of the holiday Retail Federation. But pers to spend. “The lower -income shopping season last they were lured in by earweekend helped boost lier store hours and deep shoppers are postponing their purchases or were retailers’ revenue for the discounts. The November figures cherry picking the deals,” entire month of Novemoffer a glimpse into what said Walter Loeb, a New ber. Retailers from Macy’s to the holiday season might York-based independent Costco on Thursday be like for retailers, but retail consultant. Target posted a 1.8 perreported monthly revenue they represent only a cent increase, below the at stores open at least a small slice of the retail 2.8 percent gain that Wall year — an indicator of a industry. Dollar stores, home- Street analysts had merchant’s health — that beat Wall Street esti- improvement chains like expected. The discounter mates. The overall tally Best Buy, consumer elec- blamed the month’s perfor the 21 retailers that tronics stores like Home formance in part to lackreported revenue for Depot and even Walmart, luster toy sales. Additionally, the disNovember rose 3.2 per- the world’s largest retailcent, according to the er, don’t report monthly counter told analysts in International Council of revenue. And some big November that Walmart’s chains like Target and holiday layaway program Shopping Centers. November results offer J.C. Penney missed Wall that allows customers to pay-as-they go for certain an important benchmark Street forecasts. Still, retailers can glean gifts, hurt toy sales. Walfor retailers and economists. During the holiday a lot from the numbers. mart also has been heaviFor instance, well- ly pushing low prices in shopping season, merchants can make up to 40 heeled shoppers continue its ad campaign, which percent of their annual to be resilient in the weak likely hurt Target. J.C. Penney, which tarrevenue. The period that economy. Luxury chain runs from November Saks Inc., which operates gets middle-income shopthrough December also Saks Fifth Avenue, fared pers, also reported disapgives valuable insights well, reporting a 9.3 per- pointing results. The into what it takes to get cent increase. That’s bet- retailer said its decision Americans to spend in ter than the 6.1 percent not to open at midnight increase analysts had on Thanksgiving evening the weak economy. hurt revenue on the day The monthly numbers expected. Macy’s, which operates after the holiday, which were boosted by the fourday weekend starting on the Macy’s and upscale set the tone for the Thanksgiving Day, the Bloomingdale’s depart- remainder of the weektraditional kickoff to the ment store chains, also end.

Colo medipot apps stack up

DENVER (AP) — The Colorado Department of Revenue says it has approved 26 of 500 applications to run marijuana dispensaries or marijuana centers. That’s out of an original 818 marijuana center applications. Agency spokeswoman Julie Postlethwait tells the Boulder Daily Camera most of the pending applications are awaiting confirmation of local approval and final inspections.

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NATION/OBITUARIES/RECORDS

Roswell Daily Record

OBITUARIES

Leslie W. Fulton

Leslie W. (Les) Fulton passed away Nov. 28, 2011, in Gooding, Idaho. Les was born in Las Animas, Colo., June 24, 1968. He graduated from University HighRoswell and ITT -Tech in Washington, where he studied drafting and design. Les loved spending time with his wife and children raising their many animals. Les was always involved in their many activities including 4H, archery and hunting. Our son’s love for his family and his faith in God was very strong. He had a strong goal to get his parents to re-dedicate their lives to Jesus Christ and we love him for never giving up. Our son’s granddaughter was the source of many conversations and updates to family and friends. Les is survived by his wife Stefanie; daughters, Morgan, Kyana and Khloe; sons, Aryq, Brady and Malaki; granddaughter, Daschali; parents Francis and Sharon Fulton; grandparents, Rebecca Koehn, and Norm and Karen Montee; and many aunts and uncles in Colorado. He was preceded in death by grandfathers, Leonard Koehn, Harvey Starbuck. A memorial will be held at Mountain View Baptist Church at a later date.

peacefully surrounded by her family Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2011, in Laredo. She was born in Hagerman, N.M., to Walter “Jody” Alton and Mary Aquila Franklin Troublefield. She and her son were baptized together at Robbins Road Church of Christ. Carolyn was a member of Sand Springs Baptist Church. She was past president and member of the Jaycetts, member of Outstanding Women of America and Easter n Star. She was a licensed funeral director. Carolyn was preceded in death by first husband Clarence Dean Walls; brothers, Don Alton Troublefield, David “Tommy” Edward T roublefield, Michael Ray Troublefield and Richard Lee Troublefield; sister Helen Marie T roublefield; and niece, Terri Renee Troublefield. Survivors include husband of eight years Floyd Wayne Malone, of Sulphur Springs; son David Dean Walls and wife Connie, of Athens; daughter Jodi Cherie Walls, of Athens; grandchildren, Michael Walls, of Laredo, David Dean Walls II, of Athens, Kristin Huggins, of Boston, Corby Brown, of Athens; nephews and nieces, Paul Scott Troublefield and wife Sandy, of Laredo, Mary Kathryn Tennison, of Grand Junction, Colo., Margaret Ann Troublefield, of Grand Junction; and two great-grandchildren. Pallbearers will be Michael Walls, David Dean Walls II, Corby Brown, Paul Scott Troublefield, Randy Daniel and Ricky Bussey. Honorary pallbearers will be friends and family. Visitation for family and friends will be 6-8 p.m., Friday, Dec. 3, 2011, at the funeral home. You may sign the guest register or leave a message of condolence for the family at carrolllehr.com.

Coleman Jackson

Carolyn Ann Malone

ATHENS, Texas — Services for Carolyn Ann Walls Malone, of Athens, are scheduled for 2:30 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 4, 2011, at Carroll Lehr Funeral Chapel, with the Rev. Cody Craig officiating. Burial will follow in Athens Cemetery. Carolyn passed away

PUBLIC RECORDS

Accidents Nov. 29 2:05 p.m. — Parking lot 2513 N. Main; vehicle owned by Olga Marroquin, and vehicle owned by Bill or Wanda Whited, both of Roswell. Nov. 30 7:20 a.m. — Main and McGaffey; drivers — Alma Zavala, 36, and Darian

ARTESIA — Services are scheduled at 10 a.m. Monday, Dec. 5, 2011, at First United Methodist Church, for Coleman Floyd Jackson, of Lake Arthur. Mr. Jackson, 76, died Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011, at Casa Maria Nursing Center in Roswell. The Rev. Travis Huston will officiate at the services, with burial at Woodbine Cemetery. Pallbearers will be Steve Kittrell, Michael Health, Gary Anderson, James Partlow, Collin Robertson, and John Jackson. Honorary pallbearers will be all of his friends and local farmers. Visitation will be at Terpening & Son Mortuary, Sunday, Dec. 4, 2011, beginning at 2 p.m.

Rivera, 16, both of Roswell. 1:40 p.m. — Parking lot 2725 N. Main; drivers — vehicle owned by Angela Jenkins or James Chavez, of Roswell, and unknown driver. 4:24 p.m. — Hendricks and Pennsylvania; drivers — Darrell J. Dixon, 36, of Roswell.

Job creation tax credits don’t produce results MOBERLY, Mo. (AP) — Job creation is atop the agenda for President Barack Obama and his Republican challengers, as well as many candidates for state office in 2012. But the experience of state gover nments shows that business incentives don’t always produce the results promised. The number of state business incentive programs has doubled over the past decade, to about

2,000 nationwide. And about two-thirds of the states now provide tax breaks specifically based on new jobs created. There is no nationwide accounting for how many of those incentives succeed or fail. In Texas, biotech firm Lexicon Genetics got $35 million in 2005 to create 1,662 jobs by the end of 2011. But its work force has fallen below 300 and the company has renegotiated its deadline.

Friday, December 2, 2011

A7


A8 Friday, December 2, 2011

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Rain; warmer this evening

Mostly cloudy, a shower

Saturday

A passing shower

Sunday

Monday

Mostly sunny and chilly

Tuesday

A little snow possible

Partly sunny

Wednesday

Sunny and warmer

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Thursday

Sunny

High 46°

Low 40°

53°/25°

46°/28°

46°/21°

46°/23°

62°/30°

68°/24°

S at 8-16 mph POP: 60%

S at 7-14 mph POP: 65%

W at 6-12 mph POP: 55%

SSW at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

N at 4-8 mph POP: 30%

SSW at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

W at 4-8 mph POP: 0%

N at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 5 p.m. Thursday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 53°/34° Normal high/low ............... 58°/29° Record high ............... 77° in 1995 Record low ................. 10° in 1948 Humidity at noon ................... 38%

Farmington 40/27

Clayton 34/21

Raton 36/21

Precipitation 24 hours ending 5 p.m. Thu. 0.00” Month to date ....................... 0.00” Normal month to date .......... 0.02” Year to date ......................... 3.79” Normal year to date ........... 12.29”

Santa Fe 38/24

Gallup 37/22

Tucumcari 34/28

Albuquerque 44/32

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 34/28

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading 72 0-50

51-100

Good

Moderate

Source: EPA

101-150

Ruidoso 43/33

151+

Unhealthy Unhealthy sensitive

T or C 48/35

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Sat. The Moon Today Sat. First

Dec 2

Rise Set 6:44 a.m. 4:50 p.m. 6:45 a.m. 4:50 p.m. Rise Set 12:11 p.m. none 12:40 p.m. 12:31 a.m. Full

Dec 10

Last

Dec 17

New

Dec 24

Alamogordo 55/40

Silver City 47/33

ROSWELL 46/40 Carlsbad 54/47

Hobbs 43/34

Las Cruces 50/40

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2011

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) #### Understand that you might be feeling the undercurrents of other people’s unacknowledged feelings. Others could be acting out. Curb your temper, and establish strong and sturdy limits. You will gain if you can be nonreactive. Can you? Tonight: Maintain an unusually low profile. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ##### Decide what is too much effort and what is reasonable. The problem lies in getting a group consensus. Don’t be surprised to see a couple of people flip their lid on the topic at hand. They feel passionately about the matter. Tonight: Only with pals. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) #### Stay on top of work and demands. Pressure builds between you and others. You might wonder what is enough and when to let others know. Unless you like fireworks, the smart Twin won’t wait until the last minute before his or her fuse blows. Tonight: A must appearance. CANCER (June 21-July 22) #### With as much anger being sprinkled left and right, you could be sarcastic or say something you might regret later. Clear the air as fast as possible. You don’t need a scene. Tonight: A very important talk over dinner. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ##### Deal with people with whom you feel comfortable and from whom you can handle feedback. Anger seems to be the underlying tenet no matter who does what and no matter what others say. Ask yourself if someone is trying to cover something up.

Regional Cities Today Sat. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

55/40/c 44/32/c 34/14/pc 54/47/c 54/47/c 37/18/pc 34/21/c 39/24/c 34/28/sn 52/33/sh 43/31/c 40/27/c 37/22/sn 43/34/c 50/40/sh 32/21/sf 36/21/pc 45/29/c 44/33/c 38/28/sn 39/22/sf 36/21/c 32/13/pc 46/40/c 43/33/c 38/24/c 47/33/sh 48/35/sh 34/28/sn 40/24/pc

53/29/c 39/22/sf 34/6/sn 54/36/c 62/38/c 37/2/sf 34/10/sn 38/6/sn 40/16/c 50/28/pc 38/21/sf 37/17/sf 36/10/sf 53/18/r 50/34/pc 31/6/sn 34/11/sn 48/23/sf 56/28/r 47/16/c 38/12/sf 28/4/sn 33/6/sn 53/25/c 47/20/c 37/15/sn 47/24/c 48/28/c 39/13/c 39/13/sn

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE

Let the cards fall naturally. No heroics. Tonight: Share over dinner. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) #### Others seem to be on the warpath, but perhaps you are really the one sticking the pins in. Let someone know how you feel in a calm, quiet way. Creating uproar won’t result in a positive situation. Take a walk to clear your mind. Tonight: Listen to another version of the same story. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) #### Walk right in. Once you’re energized, you’ll get a lot done. In a sense, by focusing on what you are doing, you are detaching from another situation. You need some distance here. Use your anger to motivate you, but not to cause a problem. Tonight: Squeeze in some exercise. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ##### You leap over hurdles. Your smile lures in whatever you want. A meeting could get a bit rough, as you share hostile words with another person. You know what you want -- what is stopping you? If you are single or attached, romantic thoughts

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Sat.

Today

Sat.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

34/27/sf 64/40/pc 54/32/s 51/34/s 61/35/s 42/31/pc 44/29/pc 60/53/c 34/13/s 39/28/sf 56/41/c 82/70/s 74/58/pc 46/31/pc 40/36/pc 54/41/pc 69/48/pc 40/33/i

35/29/sn 60/43/s 49/34/s 42/38/s 60/35/s 46/34/c 51/38/pc 65/35/r 22/6/sn 45/38/pc 54/32/pc 82/69/s 76/64/pc 51/41/pc 44/20/r 54/41/pc 69/48/s 46/23/r

76/66/pc 50/41/c 34/22/s 67/53/s 53/35/s 38/26/s 73/56/s 54/34/s 59/42/c 44/28/pc 46/29/s 62/34/s 46/37/s 38/22/pc 64/49/pc 44/28/s 56/37/c 56/36/s

78/68/pc 61/26/c 34/16/sn 74/61/s 48/40/s 33/12/sn 77/60/s 49/38/s 60/40/pc 52/35/s 46/28/pc 58/36/s 58/38/sh 33/17/pc 63/45/s 44/28/pc 58/37/pc 50/37/s

U.S. Extremes

Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 84°..............Harlingen, Texas Low: -9° ...West Yellowstone, Mont.

High: 72°............................Deming Low: 14°.........................Angel Fire

National Cities Seattle 44/28 Billings 36/18

Minneapolis 34/22

Detroit 39/28

Chicago 42/31

San Francisco 60/41 Denver 34/13

Washington 56/36

Kansas City 40/36

Los Angeles 69/48

Atlanta 64/40

El Paso 56/41

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Houston 74/58

Miami 76/66

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

New York 53/35

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

could occupy a good part of your day. Tonight: Frisky you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) #### Understand that although you are feeling better than you have in a while, at times you could be caught between a rock and a hard place. Today exemplifies that issue. What determines the quality of the day is how you deal with this pressure. Tonight: Know that others are under the gun, too. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ##### Of all signs, you can mobilize anger and use it to enhance a situation. Do just that, and let others see different ways of expressing rage. Communication flourishes, and what was difficult no longer is. Follow your instincts. Tonight: Meet a friend at a preferred place. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ##### You need to move forward and not get hung up on someone’s disagreeable accusations or feelings. Indicate a willingness to discuss a problem, but not in the manner this person wants. Give this person space. He or she just might be discharging anger on you that belongs to another person. Tonight: Your treat. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) #### You are feeling better than you have in a long time and may make a choice to proceed in a different direction. Others are disagreeable. You might want to settle someone’s issue, if possible; otherwise, give this person a wide berth. Tonight: Your night to howl! BORN TODAY Singer Britney Spears (1981), fashion designer Gianni Versace (1946), actress Lucy Liu (1968)

Michael Jackson’s legacy expected to thrive after trial

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The private world of Michael Jackson, fiercely shielded by the superstar in life, was exposed in the trial of Dr. Conrad Murray. But rather than suffering harm from revelations of drug use, experts say Jackson’s legacy and posthumous earning power will survive any damage done and could actually grow after he was portrayed as a victim of a money-hungry doctor. Jackson died before he could launch a series of highly anticipated comeback concerts in London as he tried to regain the towering status he enjoyed when he released the “Thriller” album in 1983. But his death did breathe new life into record sales and boosted other projects to generate hundreds of millions of dollars for his estate, even as his already tarnished personal life took another hit by revelations about his drug use. Jackson zoomed to the top of the Forbes Magazine list of highest earning dead celebrities and his executors are moving quickly on more projects designed to burnish the performer’s image and expand the inheritance of his three children. A Cirque du Soleil extravaganza, “Michael Jackson: The Immortal World Tour” opens in Las Vegas this weekend, a precursor to a permanent installation at

the Mandalay Bay Hotel, and fans are expected to flock there for a “Fan Fest” exhibit of Jackson memorabilia. After the trial, a judge made it clear that the defense effort to cast Jackson as the villain in the case had been a miserable failure. Murray was convicted of involuntary manslaughter, called a reckless opportunist and sentenced to the maximum four years in prison. Judge Michael Pastor also blasted Murray for experimenting on the pop star with the operating-room anesthetic propofol to help him battle debilitating insomnia, even though the drug was never meant to be used in a private home. Some experts say the revelations made the King of

Pop look more like a regular person coping with a difficult challenge. “In the final analysis, not a lot of damage was done,” Jackson biographer J. Randy Taraborelli said. “I think the trial humanized Michael Jackson. It presented him as a human being with problems.” Taraborelli said the entertainer’s family, fans and

estate executors were concerned before the trial that testimony would paint Jackson as responsible for his own death while resurrecting past accusations of child molestation and bizarre behavior by the King of Pop. The image of Jackson as a caring father had never been illustrated quite so vividly. A probation officer who interviewed Jackson’s mother,

Katherine, said she told him: “Michael Jackson was his children’s world, and their world collapsed when he left.” A leading expert on the licensing and branding of dead celebrities believes the trial engendered so much sympathy for Jackson that in the long run it will eclipse negative fallout from his past.

“I don’t think any tawdry revelations that may have come out of the trial will have any impact on his lasting legacy,” said Martin Cribbs, who is based in New York. “We as a society tend to give everyone a second chance. Michael’s legacy will be like Elvis and the Beatles. It will be his music, his genius. and his charitable works “


Friday, December 2, 2011 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 28

LOCAL SCHEDULE FRIDAY DECEMBER 2 MEN’S BASKETBALL South Plains Invitational 6 p.m. • NMMI vs. Clarendon BOYS BASKETBALL Taos Invitational 7 p.m. • Goddard vs. Taos Texico Invitational 2:30 p.m. • Dexter vs. Melrose Dora Invitational 10:30 a.m. • Gateway Christian vs. Hagerman 7:30 p.m. • NMMI vs. TBD GIRLS BASKETBALL Capital Invitational 10:30 a.m. • Goddard vs. Deming Texico Invitational 2:30 p.m. • Dexter vs. Logan Dora Invitational 9 a.m. • Gateway Christian vs. Hagerman Noon • NMMI vs. Clovis Christian

SP OR TS SHORTS REINDEER RUN SET FOR DEC. 3

The 27th annual Rio Pecos Medical Association Reindeer Run will be held on Saturday, Dec. 3. The event will feature a 10K run and walk and a 2-mile run and walk. Races begin at 9 a.m. Entry fee is $20 and includes sweatpants and a shirt. Packet pickup and registration will be held Dec. 2 from 4-6 p.m. and Dec. 3 from 7-8:30 a.m. at the Civic Center lobby. For more information, call 624-6720. • More shorts on B3

NATIONAL BRIEFS

SHERMAN FIRED AT TEXAS A&M

Texas A&M will enter the Southeastern Conference with a new football coach. Mike Sherman was fired Thursday after the Aggies finished the regular season a disappointing 6-6. Athletic Director Bill Byrne announced the move in a statement. The Aggies, who are leaving the Big 12 for the SEC next season, must now find a replacement to lead the team into their ultra-competitive new league. The school hasn’t named any candidates, but possible replacements could include Houston coach Kevin Sumlin or Louisville coach Charlie Strong. Sumlin, who has led the seventh-ranked Cougars to a 12-0 record, was an assistant at A&M from 200102. Strong also spent time with the Aggies, working as a graduate assistant in 1985. Sherman, 25-25 in four seasons at A&M, had three years remaining on his contract and the buyout will be about $5.8 million. He was given a one-year extension to his original contract in July, but it was never executed. He was hired at the end of the 2007 season three days after Dennis Franchione resigned. His best and only winning season came last year when the Aggies won their last six regular-season games and lost in the Cotton Bowl to finish 9-4.

SPORTS

B

No. 1 vs. No. 2: It doesn’t get any better Section

Roswell Daily Record

E-mail: sports@roswell-record.com

KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

Is there anything better than a No. 1 vs. No. 2 matchup? How about a No. 1 vs. No. 2 matchup in a state championship game? That will be exactly the scenario when the No. 1 Goddard Rockets square of f with the No. 2 Aztec Tigers in the NMAA Class 4A state championship on Saturday at Fred Cook Memorial Stadium in Aztec at 1 p.m. But you wouldn’t know it if you talked to 21st-year Rocket coach Sam Jernigan, who will coach in his 12th state championship as the head coach of the Rockets. “I think it’s just to play football, I really do,” he said about the focus of his team as it prepares to play in the state championship game for the fifth time in the past six seasons. “If you watch the kids and what they’re talking about right now, they’re very well aware of the situation like they were when they played in big games all year long. But, the idea is to play football and, that part of it, is what we’ve taught them will win ballgames for you. Keep your focus on that and not what this game is, just focus on

Who...

No. 1 Goddard (12-0) vs. No. 2 Aztec (12-0)

What...

2011 NMAA Class 4A State Championship

Where...

Fred Cook Memorial Stadium, Aztec

When...

1 p.m., Saturday

On the air...

• Cable One Channel 11 • NMAAFilms.tv • KBIM 93.7 FM, 910 AM and kbimradio.com

Mark Wilson Photo

In this Dec. 6, 2008, file photo, Goddard’s Hobie McClain, left, tackles Aztec’s Trev Hammargren during the 2008 state championship game, which Goddard won 49-45. The two clash for the 2011 title on Saturday at Fred Cook Memorial Stadium in Aztec. football.” The Rockets will have to focus on playing football against an unbeaten Aztec team that features an of fense that is scoring

NMMI bowling in Heart of Texas Bowl LAWRENCE FOSTER RECORD ASST. SPORTS EDITOR

It’s that time of year again. Calendars are flipped to the final page of 2011. Everyone is recovering from Thanksgiving feasts and Black Friday mayhem, and Christmas is right around the corner. For the college football fan, this time of year is also exciting because bowl season is nearly here and, for just the second time in the past decade, the NMMI Bronco football team will be bowling. The Broncos will square of f against defending national champion Navarro

See CHAMPIONSHIP, Page B2

on Saturday in the C.H.A.M.P.S. Heart of Texas Bowl at 1 p.m. at Bulldawg Stadium in Copperas Cove, Texas. For first-year head coach Josh L ynn and his Broncos, the Heart of Texas Bowl is a great opportunity to put NMMI football back on the map. “It is a great opportunity especially at NMMI because they don’t come around often,” he said. “(NMMI) has had an opportunity to go to nine bowl games and (this one) is a really good opportunity for our program.” While bowl games are See BOWL, Page B3

Devilyn Callian Photo

In this Oct. 22 file photo, the New Mexico Military Institute Bronco football team huddles up during pregame before taking the field against Scottsdale. On Saturday, the Broncos will square off with defending NJCAA champion Navarro in the C.H.A.M.P.S. Heart of Texas Bowl in Copperas Cove, Texas.

Who...

No. 12 NMMI vs. No. 6 Navarro

What...

2011 C.H.A.M.P.S. Heart of Texas Bowl

Where...

Bulldawg Stadium, Copperas Cove, Texas

When...

1 p.m., Saturday

On the air...

• iHigh.com/nmmi • KEND 106.5 FM and roswelljackfm.com

Local briefs: Vander Hulst, Salazar lead Rockets to win

TAOS — The No. 1-ranked Goddard boys basketball team upped its record to 2-0 on Thursday behind a pair of 20-point games from its top two scorers. Lane Vander Hulst poured in 25 and Chase Salazar added 23 as the Rockets beat Questa 77-45 at the Taos Invitational. “We played with a lot more intensity tonight,” said Rocket coach Kevin Jones about the win. “We came out, were more aggressive and we were more intense. There was more of a sense of urgency. “We got off to a good start.” That good start led to a 16-9 lead

after one and, after a 27-point second quarter, a 43-15 edge at the break. Erik Johnson added 11 points for Goddard.

Tucumcari 46, Hagerman 38 DORA — The Bobcats built a 3525 lead after three quarters, but Tucumcari held Hagerman to just three fourth-quarter points to rally for a victory at the Dora Invitational, Thursday. The Bobcats trailed 22-19 at the break, but outscored Tucumcari 163 in the third to pull away. The Rattlers forced 13 Bobcat turnovers in

the fourth, though, and rallied for the win by winning the fourth 21-3. “We played a great three quarters, but we didn’t produce points in the second and hardly anything in the fourth,” said Hager man coach Anthony Mestas. “Tucumcari started pressuring us. We’re young and inexperienced and it showed in the fourth quarter.” Jessie Rodriguez had 15 to lead Hagerman (0-1), while Anthony Olivas added 12. Springer 59, Gateway Chr. 30 DORA — Springer jumped out to a 21-4 lead after one quarter and

never looked back in its win over Gateway Christian at the Dora Invitational, Thursday. Springer ballooned its lead to 4610 by the break and Gateway (0-1) was never able to get back into it. “Considering we’ve only had three practices, I thought (the kids) did pretty good,” Warrior coach Troy Grant said. “I saw a lot of good stuff. We just missed a lot of easy buckets that really hurt us.” Andrew Meeks led the Warriors with 13 and Mason Miller chipped in 11. See BRIEFS, Page B3


B2 Friday, December 2, 2011

GODDARD VS. AZTEC SPORTS

12-0

COACH: SAM JERNIGAN DISTRICT 4-4A 21ST SEASON

Roswell Daily Record

COACH: BRAD HIRSCH 12-0 EIGHTH SEASON DISTRICT 1-4A

HOW THEY GOT HERE

2011 NMAA CLASS 4A STATE CHAMPIONSHIP GAME • SATURDAY, DEC. 3, 2011 • 1 P.M. • FRED COOK MEMORIAL STADIUM

GODDARD ROSTER No. 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 12 14 15 16 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 27 28 29 32 33 35 51 52 53 54 55 59 60 62 64 71 73 74 75 77 78 79 80 81 83 85 87 88

Name.................................Year Martin Horton .........................Sr. Narcisco Santillon ...................Sr. Angelo Navarro .......................Sr. Kelsey Cunningham ...........Soph. Xavier Mendoza.......................Jr. Scotty Grantier .......................Sr. Skyler Grantier .......................Jr. Cody French.......................Soph. Enrique Ortiz ..........................Jr. Josh Trujillo ...........................Sr. Junior Chavez ....................Soph. Ryan Greene ...........................Sr. Tommy Perea .....................Soph. Nate Ramirez ..........................Sr. Michael Varela.........................Jr. Anthony Ornelas .....................Jr. Michael Garcia ........................Jr. Fil Gonzales ............................Jr. Tony Ramirez..........................Sr. David Anaya ...........................Sr. Louie Lujan ........................Soph. Josh Quiroz ............................Jr. William Dillon .........................Jr. Jake Delamater .......................Jr. Fabian Soto.............................Jr. Luis Herrera ...........................Sr. Ernest Rangel .........................Sr. Ernest Duncan...................Soph. David Chavers.........................Jr. Chris Chavez...........................Jr. Jacob Letcher .........................Sr. Bryan Corn .............................Sr. Isaac Chavez ......................Soph. Luis Terrazas ..........................Sr. Juan Vidales ...........................Jr. Ian Pollock ..............................Jr. Tristan Price.......................Soph. Andrew Cabello ..................Soph. Kullen Wooton.........................Jr. Eathan Griffen ...................Soph. Justin Jessup.....................Soph. Jacob Boor..............................Sr. Mitch Miller........................Soph. David Strickland .....................Sr. Mitch Weathers ..................Soph. Nik Aston ................................Jr. David Sweet ............................Jr. Garrett Dollar..........................Jr.

Championship Continued from Page B1

nearly 50 points per game and a defense that is allowing just 14.8. “They’re very big and they’re very skilled,” Jer nigan said about the Tigers. “They’re a good-looking football team.” That good-looking football team is led by 6-foot-1, 190-pound junior quarterback Adam Lucero. Lucero, who is in his first year as the team’s starter after taking over for record-breaking T iger quarterback Bryscon King, has thrown for 3,605 yards and 40 touchdowns this year and completes 71.5 percent of his passes. Lucero is an impressive specimen, but his battery mate in the passing game is even more impressive. That battery mate is 6-foot-5, 220pound senior wide receiver Ty Atencio, who leads the team in receiving yards (1,288), receiving touchdowns (23) and catches (79). “He’s a matchup problem, period,” Jernigan said about Atencio. “There’s nothing really you can do about it. The kids are just going to have to hang on and do the best they can with it.” Atencio is the No. 1 option in the passing game, but four other receivers have at least 20 catches and three of those four have at least 300 yards receiving. Derrick Hirsch (6-0, 165, senior) is second on the team catches (71), yards (900) and touchdowns (seven). Brad Hardin (6-1, 205, junior) has 679 yards and three TDs on 35 catches, Josh Martinez (5-7, 145, senior) has 366 yards and three TDs on 20 catches and Bryce Grady (5-8, 170, senior) has 253 yards and one TD on 20 catches. “That is going to be the deal, whether or not we can contain some of that,” Jernigan said about Aztec’s passing attack. “And they run the ball well enough behind that, that you can’t cheat too much. They’ve got you spread out and they run the ball well, it’s a well-balanced attack.” Michael Perry, a 5-foot-10, 195pound junior, and Grady for m the nucleus of Aztec’s ground game. Perry has rushed for 1,355 yards and 15 TDs on 136 carries and Grady has 699 yards and 16 TDs on 78 attempts. “I think they just keep you scattered out,” Jernigan said about the T iger offense as a whole. “They’ve got some really good personnel for one thing and they just keep you scattered out like a lot of the throwing teams do. “They just keep you off balance and

GODDARD

AZTEC ROSTER

AZTEC

The Rockets reached the 4A title game with playoff victories over Moriarty and Artesia. After an opening-round bye, Goddard beat Moriarty 42-21 in the quarterfinals and Artesia 21-10 in the semifinals. The Rockets earned the No. 1 seed in the playoffs after completing their second straight undefeated regular season.

The Tigers reached the 4A title game with playoff victories over Roswell and Valencia. After an opening-round bye, Aztec beat Roswell 35-0 in the quarter finals and Valencia 47-41 in the semifinals. The Tigers earned the No. 2 seed in the playoffs after completing their second straight undefeated regular season.

GODDARD

AZTEC

CHAMPIONSHIP TRADITION

The Rockets are in the state championship game for the fifth in the past six seasons, the 12th time under current head coach Sam Jernigan and the 14th time in school history. The Rockets are 5-6 in title games under Jernigan and 7-6 all-time. Goddard won its seven state championships in 1967, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1997, 2008 and 2009. The Rockets finished as runners-up in 1994, 1998, 1999, 2002, 2006 and 2007.

The Tigers are in the state championship for the fifth time since 2003, the fourth time under current head coach Brad Hirsch and the 13th time in school history. The Tigers are 0-3 in title games under Hirsch and 1-11 all-time. Aztec won its lone state championship in 1953 (Class B) under then-head coach Fred Cook. The Tigers finished as runners-up in 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1968, 1984, 1993, 2003, 2005, 2008 and 2010.

GODDARD

AZTEC

TEAM STATISTICS

2011 STATISTICS

Points for (per game) ...........................461 (38.4) Points against (per game) ....................150 (12.5)

INVIDIDUAL LEADERS Rushing David Anaya Cody French Ryan Greene

Passing Ryan Greene

Receiving Josh Quiroz David Anaya Cody French David Strickland David Sweet

Att. 212 49 113

C/A 70-110

Rec. 20 15 15 7 7

Yds. 2,051 445 399

Yds. 1,223

Yds. 463 299 283 140 102

TD 14

TD 29 6 3

INT 5

TD 4 3 4 1 0

they’ve got a pretty good running game behind (the passing game). I think a lot of it is predicated off their big offensive line. … They’re huge up front and we’re pretty small.” Goddard might be pretty small up front, but they run the ball as well as, if not better than, any team in the state. And anyone who has seen Goddard play knows that the ground assault begins with New Mexico Mr. Football candidate David Anaya, who has rushed for 2,051 yards and 29 touchdowns on 212 carries this season. “I think everyone pretty well knows that David is going to carry the ball,” Jernigan said. “That’s not been any different the past two years. Everybody knows who is going to get the ball and we’ll do everything we can to help him. “He’s done a good job with everybody knowing that for the past two years. We do enough things that keep you busy too, so it’s hard to just look at him. But (getting him going) is going to be a big key is how well does that happen.” The importance of not being onedimensional with the run isn’t lost on Jernigan, though. “I think that’s huge,” he said. “I think that’s what keeps David doing as well as he does is the fact that R yan (Greene) does a good job running and throwing, Cody French does a good job running and throwing and Josh Quiroz does a good job running and catching the ball. “And we feel like the tight ends, while they don’t get a lot of balls, but the ones they get are big when they do. So if you want to leave the tight ends alone, you’ll see, we probably throw them two or three balls a game, but they’re usually first downs. Everything is built that way. If you key on one thing, there are other things that will give you a hard time. And about the time you don’t look at it or you don’t read your keys, that’s the time that we do it.” The Rockets and the Tigers are no strangers to playing each other in the state championship game — they also met in the 2008 title game when Goddard won 49-45 in a wild shootout at the Wool Bowl. Goddard is seeking its eighth state championship in school history and its sixth under Jernigan. Aztec won its lone state championship in 1953 and is playing in its 13th state title game in school history. kjkeller@rdrnews.com

TEAM STATISTICS

Points for (per game) ...........................599 (49.9) Points against (per game) ....................178 (14.8)

INVIDIDUAL LEADERS

Rushing Michael Perry Bryce Grady Adam Lucero

Passing Adam Lucero

Receiving Ty Atencio Derrick Hirsch Brad Hardin Josh Martinez Bryce Grady

Att. 136 78 62

C/A 246-344

Rec. 79 71 35 20 20

Yds. 1,355 699 421

Yds. 3,605

Yds. 1,288 900 679 366 253

TD 40

TD 15 16 6

INT 8

TD 23 7 3 3 1

No. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 34 35 40 41 42 43 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 58 59 60 61 62 65 66 67 70 71 76 77 79 80 81

Name ...................................Year Brett Moss .................................Sr. Bryce Grady...............................Sr. Dakota Rhodes ..........................Jr. Greg Passarelli...........................Sr. Garrett Heyden ..........................Fr. Brad Hardin...............................Jr. Xavier Salazar............................Jr. Jaden Day .................................Fr. Braden Goimarac ..................Soph. Michael Perry.............................Jr. Adam Lucero .............................Jr. Jason Hollingsworth ..................Jr. James Ritter ..............................Sr. Avery Mobley.........................Soph. Dalton Davis..............................Fr. Ty Atencio..................................Sr. Josh Folk...................................Sr. Derrick Hirsch ...........................Sr. Kyle Dodd ..................................Jr. Dakoda Standley .......................Sr. Dylan Stinson .......................Soph. Andrew Pope..............................Jr. Riley Quigley .........................Soph. Justin Hamilton.........................Jr. Josh Martinez............................Sr. Chase Polledo ............................Sr. Noah Frohn ...............................Fr. Carlos Atcitty ........................Soph. Josh Harris................................Fr. Aaron Joe ..................................Sr. Marcus Crawford .......................Fr. Devin Jaramillo .........................Fr. Zach Wilkerson .....................Soph. Mark Ritter ................................Sr. Jonathan Archuleta ...................Sr. Joey Dotson...............................Jr. Rip Watkins ...............................Jr. Jeremy Harris............................Sr. Cory Saxon ................................Sr. Rivver Higgins............................Sr. Kyle Henderson .........................Sr. Thomas Schmidt ...................Soph. Dustin Baker .............................Sr. Jeremy Hathcock.......................Sr. Austin Wagner ...........................Jr. Josh Hathcock ......................Soph. Tyler Lowery ..............................Sr. Colton Weaver .......................Soph. Matt Stalcup .........................Soph. Braddin Bell..........................Soph. Ethan George.............................Sr. Justin Slavey ........................Soph. Brett Donalson......................Soph. Michael Cowden ........................Sr. Nico Hensley .........................Soph. Speedy Hall ...............................Sr. Dana Becker..............................Sr.

ROSWELL DAILY RECORD — CALL 622-7710


SPORTS

Roswell Daily Record

Briefs

Continued from Page B1

Friona (Texas) 45, Dexter 33 TEXICO — The Demons led 129 after one, but Friona outscored Dexter 16-8 in the second en route to a win at the Texico Invitational, Thursday. Dexter dropped to 0-2 with the loss. “The first quarter, we came out pretty good. Our press caused (Friona) a lot of problems today,” said Demon coach James Voight. “Whenever we were in the press and got steals, we could score. But, they were in a 2-3 zone and slowed down the game, and we struggled with it.” Kyle Bonner led Dexter with 11 and David Lopez had eight.

NMMI 52, Elida 47 DORA — The Colts got doubledigit performances from Justin Petross and Greg Lewis and held off Elida for a five-point win at the Dora Invitational, Thursday. “We just came off a big layoff

and they came back in a little better shape than I anticipated,” Colt coach Pilar Carrasco said. “We have some rust to take off our game, but, all in all, I really like the way the team is playing together. “We don’t really have any superstars, but we’re really putting complete team efforts together.” Petross led the Colts (2-0) with 13 points and Lewis poured in 12.

Girls basketball

Santa Fe 66, Goddard 22 SANTA FE — Santa Fe scored 19 points in each of the first two quarters and pulled away for a lopsided win over the Rockets on Thursday at the Capital Invitational. Santa Fe rolled to a 19-10 lead after one and built a 38-14 lead by the break by holding Goddard to four second-quarter points. “I thought we took a big step back today,” said Rocket coach Greg Torres. “After the two games we’ve had this season against

really tough competition, we felt like we were playing against a team today that isn’t anywhere near the same caliber of our previous two opponents. “Maybe we came in with the wrong approach and took them a little light. They hit us in the mouth early and we didn’t respond.” Kristina Perea led the Rockets (0-3) with 11 points and Abbie Blach added six.

Dora 60, Gateway Chr. 19 DORA — The host Coyotes outscored Gateway 17-1 in the first quarter and rolled to a win at the Dora Invitational, Thursday. Dora led 34-5 at the break and 53-14 after three en route to the win. “We’re still without three players, two of which are my point guards,” said Gateway coach Holly Tipton. “We’re still trying to fill some shoes until we get those other girls back and we’re having a rough time of it.” Mercedes Fox led the Warriors (0-2) with nine points and Robre-

Friday, December 2, 2011 na Wade added six.

Springer 52, NMMI 35 DORA — Caitlin Duree scored a game-high 28 points for the Colts, but it wasn’t enough to get by Springer at the Dora Invitational, Thursday. Springer jumped ahead 17-10 through one and NMMI could never rebound. “Caitlin was the only one who played to her potential,” said Colt coach Marisha Olesinski, whose team fell to 1-1 on the year. “We just made too many turnovers. It was turnover after turnover. “We just couldn’t do it tonight. There was no rebounding. We didn’t do much today. It wasn’t a good game overall.”

Tucumcari 51, Hagerman 46 DORA — After falling behind 18-9 after one, Hagerman rallied to close within two at the break, but the Bobcats didn’t have enough to complete the comeback at the Dora Invitational, Thursday. The Bobcats won the second

B3

15-8, but Tucumcari pulled away in the third to take a 39-31 lead going to the fourth en route to the win. “Overall, there was just too many turnovers,” said Bobcat coach Justin Gossett. “The girls are improving, but we just need more practice time.” Brieanna Olivas led Hagerman (0-1) with 14 points, while Shayanna Eubanks added 11 and Taylor Hamill chipped in nine.

Friona (Texas) 56, Dexter 21 TEXICO — Dexter made just eight field goals and shot just 11.3 percent from the field en route to a loss to Friona at the Texico Invitational, Thursday. Friona seized a 10-2 lead after one and led 24-6 at the break. “Our shooting woes continue,” said Demon coach Kim Hamill. “We missed 63 shots. We were 8 for 71 from the field today. It’s hard to win many games when you’re shooting that poorly right now.” Hannah Manemann led the Demons (0-3) with 10 points.

Lynch carries Seahawks to 31-14 win over Eagles

SEATTLE (AP) — Marshawn L ynch loves the prime-time stage, even if he’s rarely given such a spotlight. Seattle’s hard-charging running back bulled through Philadelphia for 148 yards and a pair of first-half David touchdowns, Hawthorne returned the third of Vince Young’s four interceptions 77 yards for a score, and the Seahawks rolled to a 31-14 victory Thursday night that only added to the Eagles’ miserable season. L ynch ran into and escaped from a massive pileup for a 15-yard TD run in the first quarter, then made a quick cut and went back against the flow for a 40yard scoring dash on the first play of the second quarter to give the Seahawks (57) a 14-0 lead. Golden Tate’s 11-yard, toe-tapping touchdown grab along the back edge of the end zone in the third quarter pushed Seattle’s cushion to 17 over the Eagles (4-8). But the Seahawks’ third victory in their last four games wasn’t secured until Hawthorne stepped in front

Preps

Thursday’s Scores By The Associated Press BOYS BASKETBALL EP Hanks, Texas 56, Mayfield 49 Espanola Valley 58, Santa Fe Indian 52 Farmington 49, Albuquerque Academy 46 La Cueva 54, Hope Christian 53 Menaul 57, Reserve 39 Mosquero 55, NMSD 46 Rehoboth 91, Gallup Catholic 65 Rio Grande 63, Del Norte 60 Robertson 80, Escalante 45 Shiprock 73, Ignacio, Colo. 55 Tularosa 55, Silver 47 Valley 47, Sandia 44 Canutillo Tournament EP Faith Christian, Texas 87, Hobbs 51 Santa Teresa 58, Clint, Texas 18 Capital Tournament Valencia 48, Pojoaque 46 Cliff Tournament Cliff 77, Animas 35 Lordsburg 76, Cobre 60 Quemado 55, Lordsburg JV 17 Wagon Mound 57, Duncan, Ariz. 55 Dora Tournament NMMI 52, Elida 47 Springer 59, Gateway Christian 30 Tucumcari 46, Hagerman 38 Taos Tournament Goddard 77, Questa 45 Texico Tournament Friona, Texas 45, Dexter 33 GIRLS BASKETBALL Aztec 61, Crownpoint 44 Belen 33, Moriarty 31 Clovis 72, Winslow, Ariz. 42 Kirtland Central 48, Cleveland 40 Los Alamos 54, Albuquerque Academy 22 Magdalena 60, McCurdy 21 Melrose 71, Logan 32 Piedra Vista 72, Tohatchi 25 Reserve 54, Menaul 39 Roy 37, NMSD 11 Sandia 40, Cibola 22

Bowl

Continued from Page B1

great for a program, the lull between games can make a team rusty. NMMI’s last game was Nov. 12 against Snow, but L ynn said his team returned from Thanksgiving break rested up and has had its best week of practice this year. “Oh yeah, I am (worried about rust),” he said. “Sending those guys home, we believed there might be a little rust, but the good thing is that both teams had to deal with it. (After Thanksgiving break) we have had our best practices of the year. The kids have been

of a swing pass intended for LeSean McCoy and raced untouched in the other direction with 4:24 left. Making his third straight start in place of Michael Vick and his two broken ribs, Young couldn’t find the same magic he did in the 2006 Rose Bowl when he led Texas to an upset of Pete Carroll and USC. Young’s first pass of the night was an awful interception thrown right to Seattle safety Kam Chancellor and nowhere near an Eagles receiver. Young was intercepted in the third quarter as well when a perfect pass deflected off the hands of Riley Cooper and into the hands of cornerback Brandon Browner. Both turnovers led to Seattle touchdowns. Then came a pass for McCoy when Young clearly didn’t see Hawthorne, ruining the Eagles’ last chance to rally. For good measure, Young added one more interception in the final moments, giving him a career-high four picks. Young finished 17 of 29 for 208 yards. McCoy got more chances than he did Capital Tournament Santa Fe 66, Goddard 22 Dora Tournament Dora 60, Gateway Christian 19 Springer 52, NMMI 35 Tucumcari 51, Hagerman 46 Texico Tournament Friona, Texas 56, Dexter 21

Football

National Football League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain AMERICAN CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct New England . . .8 3 0 .727 N.Y. Jets . . . . . . .6 5 0 .545 Buffalo . . . . . . . . .5 6 0 .455 Miami . . . . . . . . .3 8 0 .273 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Houston . . . . . . .8 3 0 .727 Tennessee . . . . .6 5 0 .545 Jacksonville . . . .3 8 0 .273 Indianapolis . . . . .0 11 0 .000 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Baltimore . . . . . . .8 3 0 .727 Pittsburgh . . . . . .8 3 0 .727 Cincinnati . . . . . .7 4 0 .636 Cleveland . . . . . .4 7 0 .364 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Oakland . . . . . . .7 4 0 .636 Denver . . . . . . . .6 5 0 .545 Kansas City . . . .4 7 0 .364 San Diego . . . . . .4 7 0 .364 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Dallas . . . . . . . . .7 4 0 N.Y. Giants . . . . .6 5 0 Washington . . . . .4 7 0

Pct .636 .545 .364

PF 331 256 261 212

PF 293 226 138 150 PF 272 233 259 165

PF 260 221 153 249 PF 270 252 183

PA 223 241 281 206

PA 179 212 200 327 PA 182 188 215 216

PA 274 260 265 275 PA 225 277 222

flying around and I believe that we are kind of fresh.” The Bulldogs are 9-2 and won the Southwest Junior College Football Conference championship game 33-29 over Tyler. Offensively, Navarro likes to run plays with the pistol and establish the run early, according to Lynn. “They are going to be in the pistol offense for most of the game,” he said. “They are going to run inside zones and they are going to run play action. They are going to try to establish their tailback and then everything branches off of that.” On defense, the Bulldogs run a 4-3 defense and L ynn said the strength of the Navarro

last Sunday against New England when he touched the ball just 14 times, a number that drew criticism from Eagles fans believing the leading rusher in the NFL deserved more opportunities. McCoy finished with 84 yards on 17 carries and added another four catches for 49 yards. But he was upstaged by Lynch. For the fourth time in five games, L ynch topped 100 yards — and the one time he didn’t, he finished with 88 yards in a victory over St. Louis. He had 90 yards by halftime on Thursday night, the most first-half yards rushing in his career. He averaged 6.7 yards per carry and almost immediately provided a spark the Seahawks needed on a short week. Following Young’s first interception, Seattle got down to the Eagles 10 on a 26-yard third-down completion from quarterback Tarvaris Jackson to Ben Obomanu. A penalty backed Seattle up 5 yards, but that only provided Lynch more room for theatrics. On first-and-goal at the 15, he ran into a massive

AP Photo

Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch, with ball, breaks away for a touchdown during his team’s win over the Eagles, Thursday. crowd near the 10. He got lost in the pile, wiggled out of the arms of linebacker Jamar Chaney and suddenly burst into the end zone, a run that was reminiscent of his 67-yard, tackle-breaking touchdown gallop in the playoffs last season against

SCOREBOARD

Philadelphia . . . .4 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W New Orleans . . . .8 Atlanta . . . . . . . . .7 Tampa Bay . . . . .4 Carolina . . . . . . .3 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Green Bay . . . . .11 Chicago . . . . . . . .7 Detroit . . . . . . . . .7 Minnesota . . . . . .2 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W San Francisco . . .9 Seattle . . . . . . . . .5 Arizona . . . . . . . .4 St. Louis . . . . . . .2

8

L 3 4 7 8

L 0 4 4 9

L 2 7 7 9

0 .333 271 282

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .727 .636 .364 .273

PF 362 259 199 252

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .818 .417 .364 .182

PF 262 216 213 140

T Pct PF 0 1.000 382 0 .636 288 0 .636 316 0 .182 214

Thursday’s Game Seattle 31, Philadelphia 14 Sunday’s Game Kansas City at Chicago, 11 a.m. Atlanta at Houston, 11 a.m. Denver at Minnesota, 11 a.m. Carolina at Tampa Bay, 11 a.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 11 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Washington, 11 a.m. Oakland at Miami, 11 a.m. Tennessee at Buffalo, 11 a.m. Indianapolis at New England, 11 a.m. Baltimore at Cleveland, 2:05 p.m. St. Louis at San Francisco, 2:15 p.m. Dallas at Arizona, 2:15 p.m. Green Bay at N.Y. Giants, 2:15 p.m. Detroit at New Orleans, 6:20 p.m. Monday’s Game San Diego at Jacksonville, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 8 Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 6:20 p.m.

PA 252 227 291 305

PA 227 232 246 295

PA 161 246 256 270

defense is its swarming mentality. “Navarro runs a 4-3 defense and they play a lot of cover-four,” he said. “They aren’t really flashy on defense, but they are good at what they do. They fly to the football, though. They do that as well as any team we have seen this year.” If the Broncos are to come away from their ninth bowl game with their fifth win, Lynn said it will be thanks to the offensive and defensive lines. “(The key to us winning is that) we have to control the offensive and defensive lines,” he said. “We challenged them and they have responded well.” l.foster@rdrnews.com

Sunday, Dec. 11 New Orleans at Tennessee, 11 a.m. Indianapolis at Baltimore, 11 a.m. Kansas City at N.Y. Jets, 11 a.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 11 a.m. Houston at Cincinnati, 11 a.m. Tampa Bay at Jacksonville, 11 a.m. Atlanta at Carolina, 11 a.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 11 a.m. New England at Washington, 11 a.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 2:05 p.m. Chicago at Denver, 2:05 p.m. Buffalo at San Diego, 2:15 p.m. Oakland at Green Bay, 2:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 6:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 12 St. Louis at Seattle, 6:30 p.m.

West Virginia rallies for share of Big East title

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Tavon Austin returned a kickoff 90 yards for a touchdown, Pat Miller scored on a 52-yard interception return and Tyler Bitancurt kicked a 28-yard field goal as time expired, helping No. 22 West Virginia clinch a share of the Big East championship with a 30-27 victory over South Florida on Thursday night. The Mountaineers (9-3, 5-2) pulled even with Louisville in the conference standings and likely will receive the league’s automatic berth in the Bowl Championship Series if Cincinnati beats Connecticut on Saturday to create a three-way tie for the title. USF (5-7, 1-6) finished its season on a three-game losing streak and failed to qualify for a bowl bid for the first time in seven years. Geno Smith set up Bitancurt’s third field goal of the night with a 26-yard completion to Stedman Bailey on fourth-and-10 from the USF 42. The West Virginia quarterback also led an 11-play, 78-yard drive that Dustin

SPORTS SHORTS

ELKS HOOP SHOOT IS DEC. 3

The local contest for the National Elks Hoop Shoot will be held on Saturday, Dec. 3, at 9 a.m. at the Coyote Den inside Roswell High School. Registration begins at 8 a.m. and the contest is open to boys and girls, ages 8-13. For more information, call Denise Dawson at 637-3200.

FIRST TEE CANDYLAND EVENT IS DEC. 10

The second annual First Tee of the Pecos Valley Candyland girls golf event will be held on Dec. 10 from 10 a.m. to noon at NMMI Golf Course. The cost is $5. For more information or to sign up, call 623-4444.

New Orleans. It was the second-most yards rushing in L ynch’s career, behind the 153 he had in his rookie season with Buffalo against Cincinnati. Tate’s second straight game with a touchdown

grab seemed to wrap up the victory. Tate outdueled a double-team at the back of the end zone and hauled in the toss from Jackson to give Seattle a 24-7 lead. Jackson finished 13 of 16 for 190 yards and a touchdown.

Garrison finished with a 5-yard TD run to make it 20-all with just more than 5 minutes to go. The Mountaineers, who fell behind 27-20 when JaQuez Jenkins returned an interception 24 yards for USF’s last touchdown, began the winning drive from their own 26 after Najee Goode forced a fumble by Bulls quarterback B.J. Daniels. Daniels returned from a shoulder injury to throw for one touchdown and run for another. Jenkins gave the Bulls their only lead of the game. Louisville earned its share of the league title by beating USF last week. The Cardinals hold the tiebreaker over West Virginia if the race ends in a two-way tie, but the Mountaineers likely will receive the coveted BCS berth if Cincinnati beats UConn at home to force a three-way deadlock.

South Florida-Puerto Rico scout, Jim Bryant North Florida-Georgia scout, Kevin Roberson Arizona-New Mexico-ColoradoNevada scout and Jarrett England OhioKentucky-Tennessee scout and Ash Lawson special assignment scout. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Named Rick Sofield manager of West Virginia (SAL), Dave Turgeon manager of State College (NYP) and Larry Sutton and Gera Alvarez managers of the two Pirates entries in the Dominican Summer League. FOOTBALL National Football League MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Waived QB Donovan McNabb. Canadian Football League TORONTO ARGONAUTS — Named Scott Milanovich coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League BOSTON BRUINS — Signed C David Krejci to a three-year contract extension. Assigned F Jordan Caron and D Steve Kampfer to Providence (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled RW Chris Conner from Grand Rapids (AHL). FLORIDA PANTHERS — Recalled C Bracken Kearns from San Antonio (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Recalled D Dylan Reese from Bridgeport (AHL) on an emergency basis. NEW YORK RANGERS — Assigned F Andre Deveaux to Connecticut (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS — Assigned D Matt Carkner to Binghamton (AHL) for conditioning. SOCCER Major League Soccer CHIVAS USA — Declined 2012 contract options on D Andrew Boyens, F Chukwudi Chijindu, M Simon Elliot, D Ante Jazic, G Zach Thornton and D Mariano Trujillo. DC UNITED—Declined to exercise option on F Charlie Davies. NEW ENGLAND REVOLUTION — Resigned G Matt Reis. COLLEGE ARIZONA—Signed Rich Rodriguez, football coach, to a five-year contract. COLORADO STATE — Fired athletic director Paul Kowalczyk. Named Jack Graham athletic director. ST. NORBERT — Announced the resignation of men’s soccer coach Andy Steger. TEXAS A&M—Fired football coach Mike Sherman.

Transactions

Thursday’s Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Traded RHP Randy Henry and player to be named to the Texas Rangers for C Taylor Teagarden. BOSTON RED SOX — Agreed to terms with manager Bobby Valentine on a two-year contract. CLEVELAND INDIANS — Named Phil Clark hitting coach of Columbus (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with RHP Zach Miner, INF Jamie Romak, LHP Marlon Arias, LHP Tommy Hottovy, INF Tony Abreu, INF Eric Duncan and INF Sharlon Schoop on minor league contracts. National League CINCINNATI REDS — Named Rick Sweet minor league catching coordinator and Smokey Garrett part-time hitting instructor. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Agreed to terms wit INF Adam Kennedy on a one-year contract. NEW YORK METS — Promoted Chris Becerra to director of international scouting, Jim D’Aloia to director of professional scouting, Doug Thurman West Coast scouting supervisor, Tim Fortugno professional scout and Hector Rincones to Venezuelan supervisor. Named Ron Romanick minor league pitching coordinator, Tom Clark and Bryn Alderson professional scouts, Mike Silvestri

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Friday, Dec. 2 AUTO RACING 7 p.m. SPEED — Sprint Cup Awards Ceremony, at Las Vegas BOXING 9 p.m. SHO — Super bantamweights, Chris Avalos (19-1-0) vs. Jhonatan Romero (18-0-0); super middleweights, Anthony Dirrell (23-0-0) vs. Renan St-Juste (23-2-0), at Santa Ynez, Calif. COLLEGE FOOTBALL 5 p.m. ESPN2 — Mid-American Conference, championship game, Ohio vs. N. Illinois at Detroit 6 p.m.

FOX — Pac-12 Conference, championship game, UCLA at Oregon GOLF 7 a.m. TGC — Sunshine Tour, Nedbank Challenge, second round, at Sun City, South Africa (same-day tape) 1 p.m. TGC — World Challenge, second round, at Thousand Oaks, Calif. 10 p.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Hong Kong Open, second round MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN — Florida at Syracuse 7 p.m. ESPN — Vanderbilt at Louisville PREP FOOTBALL 6:30 p.m. FSN — Playoffs, Oklahoma Class 4A, championship game, Clinton vs. Wagoner, at Stillwater, Okla.


B4 Friday, December 2, 2011

family’s hopes up. I did talk to one of them and felt reassured at the time, but I still sense that there’s a change in how they perceive me and all of our futures now. How can I undo the damage, knowing I have to make sure I have enough money to live on as well as provide for them when I’m gone? FOOT-IN-MOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: A while back I told my family I was considering downsizing my life and made the big mistake of telling them I want them to eventually have my house. I also revealed the contents of my will. Now I feel exposed, uncomfortable and vulnerable — possibly even a bit paranoid that they might want to have me “six feet under” sooner than I should be. I don’t think I am ready to move yet, but I have gotten my

DEAR F-IN-M: Two of the most sensitive subjects to discuss are death and money, and you deserve praise for having started the conversation. I disagree that making your intentions known instead of having them transmitted during a reading of your will was a mistake. Because you feel there may have been a misunderstanding, call a family meeting and clarify your message. Tell them your health is great, you have no plans to

Jumble

COMICS

move in the near future and plan to live a long and happy life. #####

DEAR ABBY: My mother lives in an assisted living community in the memory care unit. During a recent visit, I became upset because the care staf f addressed my mom as “Granny,” “Grandma,” “Mamma,” etc. Mother struggles with the time of day, the day of the week and sometimes forgets who we are — so I don’t see the benefit of using names other than her own. I think it is disrespectful, unacceptable and unprofessional. When I asked the attendant to please address Mom as “Mrs. Smith” or “Ms. Ann,” she laughed and said, “Granny wouldn’t know who I was talking to if I called her by those names.” My siblings and I took

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

TNOEF

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

EIOCTX ULEEDG Answer: Yesterday’s

Family Circus

DEAR SHE HAS A NAME: Not knowing the national origin of the attendants in your mother’s care unit I can’t be certain, but what you encountered may be a cultural difference. In other cultures, calling someone “Mama,” “Auntie” or “Grandma” is considered respectful. While it made YOU uncomfortable, if it didn’t have that effect on your mother, you should take your cue from the director of the facility. However, because you have for mally requested that your mother be addressed by name, then that is what should be done in the future.

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

LGSIL

this issue to the director, who told us we shouldn’t be hurt and that the staff was showing our mom she is loved. I am interested in knowing your opinion on this matter. SHE HAS A NAME IN GEORGIA

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) PRESS PRANCE ODDITY Jumbles: YAHOO Answer: When he was a boy, the future football star measured his success — IN YARDS

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Dear Readers: Taking a TRIP BY AIR for fun, or during the upcoming holiday season? If you have not flown in a while, here is a question for you: What kind of identification is acceptable at the security line? There are several good choices, according to the Transportation Security Administration (www.tsa.gov). Here are some, but not ALL, of the options: * Driver’s license or state photo identification card * U.S. passport * U.S. military ID * Native American tribal photo ID * Foreign-government-issued passport * Permanent-resident card. Also, did you know that if you don’t have an ID, it doesn’t necessarily mean you won’t be able to fly? If you can provide the TSA some information, it might be able to verify your identity through publicly available computer sites. This is not really a good choice, as it’s going to probably take extra time. Please be prepared when you travel and expect to go through TSA security. Heloise #####

Blondie

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Dear Heloise: I send all my many unwanted coupons to a home for women and children. Most all are used by the women and some shelter workers, too. Thank you. A Reader, Ontario, Canada

Wonderful! Heloise Central checked with a women’s shelter here in San Antonio, and it was very receptive to this hint! Coupons for everyday household and personal grooming items are a great idea. Heloise

Garfield

P.S.: While you are at it, if you have hotel amenities such as shampoo, lotion and mouthwash, pass these along, too. #####

Dear Heloise: This is not a topic that’s ever touched on. With a back problem and getting a little older, to reach my feet to wash them, especially the soles, can be difficult. Using a dedicated dish wand not only holds the soap and gives them a good scrubbing, but the sponge tip is replaceable. This also is great fun for the little ones. Holly K., Fort Worth, Texas

The Wizard of Id

Dear Heloise: I heard this hint the other day. A friend got so tired of trying to find what she was looking for in the freezer that she went to the dollar store and bought a lot of those plastic dollar shoe boxes. She came home and labeled each shoe box: “Pork” and the date, “Chicken” and the date, and “Beef” and the date. They stack great, and no more trying to see what is what. I am going to redo my freezer and stack the boxes. I have a terrible time finding what I am looking for! D.J. in Ohio

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Roswell Daily Record


FINANCIAL

Roswell Daily Record

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg DirxEnBull ... 48.47 -.74 Discover .24 24.04 +.22 A-B-C .60f 35.99 +.14 Disney ABB Ltd .64e 18.68 -.29 DomRescs 1.97 51.35 -.27 ACE Ltd 1.50e 68.60 -.93 DowChm 1.00 27.57 -.14 AES Corp ... 12.11 +.03 DuPont 1.64 47.29 -.43 AFLAC 1.32f 43.04 -.40 DukeEngy 1.00 20.70 -.15 AK Steel .20 8.18 -.28 DukeRlty .68 11.47 -.13 ... 23.17 +.16 ... .33 +.01 EMC Cp vjAMR AT&T Inc 1.72 28.84 -.14 EOG Res .64 102.53 -1.21 ... 1.06 -.02 AU Optron .14e 5.04 +.22 EKodak AbtLab 1.92 54.52 -.03 Eaton s 1.36 44.59 -.32 .80f 55.62 -1.40 Accenture 1.35f 57.97 +.04 Ecolab AMD ... 5.70 +.01 ElPasoCp .04 25.04 +.03 Aeropostl ... 16.19 +.68 EldorGld g .12f 18.19 +.13 Aetna .60 41.68 -.14 EmersonEl1.60f 51.84 -.41 ... 37.82 +.32 EnCana g .80 20.02 -.03 Agilent AlcatelLuc ... 1.64 +.02 ENSCO 1.40 51.85 +.23 .12 9.81 -.21 EqtyRsd 1.47e 54.13 -1.06 Alcoa .84 26.56 -.23 EvergEn h ... .22 -.12 Allstate AlphaNRs ... 23.99 -.01 ExcoRes .16 11.67 -.24 AlpAlerMLP1.00e16.14 +.17 Exelis n .10p 9.15 +.21 1.64f u28.68 -.01 Exelon 2.10 44.05 -.26 Altria ... 21.28 -1.41 AmBev s 1.16e 34.68 +.30 Express AMovilL s .28e 23.53 -.29 ExxonMbl 1.88 79.79 -.65 AEagleOut .44 14.08 +.17 FMC Tch s ... u52.71 +.35 AEP 1.88f 39.62 -.06 FairchldS ... 13.20 +.25 AmExp .72 47.79 -.25 FedExCp .52 82.03 -1.05 AmIntlGrp ... 23.00 -.31 FidNatInfo .20 24.61 +.52 AmTower .35e 58.60 -.40 FstHorizon .04 7.54 -.16 AmeriBrgn .52f 37.24 +.09 FirstEngy 2.20 44.69 +.22 Anadarko .36 80.38 -.89 FootLockr .66 23.88 +.29 ... 10.59 -.01 AnalogDev 1.00 35.21 +.35 FordM AnglogldA .22e 48.42 +.46 ForestOil s ... 15.58 -.46 ABInBev 1.16e 59.81 -.19 FMCG s 1.00a 39.28 -.32 Annaly 2.51e 16.16 +.09 FrontierCm .75 5.64 -.08 Apache .60 98.48 -.96 Fusion-io n ... 31.70 -1.79 .48 21.75 -.03 AptInv G-H-I ArcelorMit .75 19.00 +.11 ... 1.59 +.27 ArchCoal .44 16.19 -.20 GMX Rs ArchDan .70f 30.22 +.10 Gafisa SA .29e 6.31 +.29 ... 23.36 +.24 GameStop AssuredG .18 10.99 +1.29 AuRico g ... 9.77 -.22 Gannett .32 11.26 +.40 .45 18.81 +.12 Avon .92 16.74 -.26 Gap BB&T Cp .64a 23.06 -.11 GenElec .60 15.91 ... BHP BillLt2.02e 74.00 -1.17 GenGrPrp .40 13.95 -.13 BP PLC 1.68 42.75 -.80 GenMills 1.22 39.90 -.05 .60 55.25 +.64 GenMotors ... 20.96 -.33 BakrHu BcoBrades .80r 17.00 +.50 GenOn En ... 2.72 ... BcoSantSA.84e 7.47 -.01 Genworth ... 6.54 -.05 BcoSBrasil1.65e 7.98 +.26 Gerdau .20e 7.74 +.06 .30 d16.36 -7.52 BkofAm .04 5.53 +.09 Gildan BkNYMel .52 19.10 -.36 GlaxoSKln2.12e 44.30 -.18 .24e 17.09 +.15 GoldFLtd Barclay .36e 11.21 -.44 Bar iPVix ... 40.82 -.99 Goldcrp g .41 53.51 -.18 BarnesNob ... 14.59 -2.85 GoldmanS 1.40 94.43 -1.43 BarrickG .60f 52.81 -.07 Goodyear ... 13.92 -.07 Baxter 1.34f 52.13 +.47 GpTelevisa.15e 20.42 -.34 BeazerHm ... 2.30 +.15 Guess .80a 29.61 +1.49 BectDck 1.80f 74.14 +.36 HSBC 1.95e 38.84 -.31 BerkH B ... 77.81 -.95 Hallibrtn .36 36.41 -.39 BestBuy .64 27.07 -.02 Hanesbrds ... 23.20 -1.43 Blackstone .40 14.22 +.49 HartfdFn .40 17.87 +.11 ... 8.11 -.11 BlockHR .60 16.06 +.33 HltMgmt Boeing 1.68 70.98 +2.29 HeclaM .02p 6.23 +.04 Heinz 1.92 52.55 -.10 BorgWarn ... 67.07 +1.15 BostonSci ... 5.90 ... HelmPayne .28 57.85 +.89 ... 11.43 +.12 BrMySq 1.32 32.90 +.18 Hertz .40 59.49 -.73 Brunswick .05 18.29 -.33 Hess CBRE Grp ... 16.50 -.31 HewlettP .48 28.22 +.27 .40 25.42 -.62 HollyFrt s .40f 23.43 +.18 CBS B CF Inds 1.60 146.98 +7.18 HomeDp 1.16f 39.34 +.12 CMS Eng .84 21.12 +.20 HonwllIntl 1.49f 54.17 +.02 ... 28.29 +.10 CNO Fincl ... 6.20 -.12 Hospira CSX s .48 21.73 +.02 HostHotls .16f 14.17 +.02 CVR Engy ... 18.06 -.14 Huntsmn .40 11.07 +.14 CVS Care .50 38.48 -.36 Hyperdyn ... 3.74 +.06 CblvsNY s .60 14.94 -.06 ICICI Bk .63e 29.76 +.65 ... 7.62 -.20 CabotO&G .12 85.78 -2.81 ING CalDive ... 2.20 -.16 ION Geoph ... 5.81 ... ... 17.02 -.04 ... 14.97 -.07 iShGold Calpine Cameron ... 53.81 -.18 iSAstla 1.06e 23.04 -.22 CampSp 1.16 32.53 -.07 iShBraz 3.42e 59.88 +.86 CdnNRs gs .36 37.32 -.02 iShGer .67e 20.44 -.19 CapOne .20 44.75 +.09 iSh HK .42e 15.96 -.03 CapitlSrce .04 6.50 +.05 iShJapn .17e 9.30 -.13 CarMax ... 29.18 +.42 iSh Kor .50e 55.98 -.08 Carnival 1.00 33.04 -.16 iSMalas .39e 13.83 -.21 Caterpillar 1.84 96.82 -1.06 iShMex .71e 54.70 -.33 Cemex ... 4.72 +.06 iShSing .50e 11.69 -.08 Cemig pf 1.89e 17.40 -.15 iSTaiwn .29e 12.49 +.14 CenterPnt .79 19.80 -.10 iSh UK .48e 16.31 -.10 ... 31.86 -.14 CntryLink 2.90 36.93 -.59 iShSilver Cenveo ... 3.17 +.12 iShDJDv 1.84e 52.66 -.17 4.83e 116.46 -.04 iShBTips ChesEng .35 25.30 -.04 Chevron 3.12 101.83 -.99 iShChina25.85e 36.62 +.40 -.04 125.36 iSSP500 2.45e Chicos .20 10.33 -.02 Chimera .57e 2.64 -.03 iShEMkts .84e 39.89 -.12 .04 43.59 -.64 iShB20 T 3.87e 117.00 -.59 Cigna CinciBell ... 2.88 -.06 iShB1-3T .69e 84.50 +.01 Citigrp rs .04 26.99 -.49 iS Eafe 1.68e 50.80 -.44 CliffsNRs 1.12 69.08 +1.27 iSSPMid 1.07e 87.92 -.52 .90 62.69 +.33 iShiBxHYB7.12e 86.43 +.38 Coach CocaCola 1.88 66.83 -.40 iSR1KV 1.37e 62.45 -.18 CocaCE .52 25.81 -.31 iSR1KG .78e 58.31 +.11 ColgPal 2.32 90.11 -1.39 iSR2KV 1.38e 64.56 -.59 Comerica .40 25.14 -.08 iShR2K 1.02e 73.20 -.53 CmclMtls .48 13.90 -.08 iShREst 2.18e 54.58 -.56 1.44 45.12 -.32 CompSci .80 24.72 +.29 ITW ConAgra .96f 25.20 -.06 IngerRd .48 33.43 +.31 3.00 189.45 +1.45 ConocPhil 2.64 71.76 +.44 IBM ConsolEngy .40 40.91 -.73 IntlGame .24 16.89 -.17 1.05 27.82 -.58 Corning .30f 13.47 +.20 IntPap Covidien .90f 46.45 +.90 Interpublic .24 9.52 +.14 .49 20.23 -.02 CSVS2xVxS ... 43.48 -2.05 Invesco CSVelIVSt s ... 5.84 +.13 IronMtn 1.00 29.60 -.77 CredSuiss1.40e 23.75 -.46 ItauUnibH .84e 18.35 +.56 Cummins 1.60 96.32 -.01 IvanhM g 1.48e 21.27 -.29 Name

J-K-L

D-E-F

DDR Corp .32f 11.62 -.07 DR Horton .15 11.93 +.02 DanaHldg ... 12.14 -.32 Danaher .10f 48.41 +.03 Deere 1.64 78.73 -.52 ... 8.52 +.40 DeltaAir DenburyR ... 16.70 -.20 DeutschBk1.07e 38.92 -.36 DevonE .68 65.10 -.36 Dex One h ... 1.64 +.33 DxFnBull rs ... 60.89 -1.15 DrSCBr rs ... 28.78 +.58 DirFnBr rs ... 42.01 +.68 DrxEnBear ... d11.55 +.04 DirxSCBull ... 43.87 -.97 DirxLCBull ... 59.73 -.01

Name Sell Chg Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 18.69 -.07 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.71 -.06 Amer Century Inv: 7.13 -.02 EqInc GrowthI 25.86 +.03 Ultra 23.34 +.07 American Funds A: AmcpA p 18.86 -.02 AMutlA p 25.50 -.06 BalA p 18.16 -.01 BondA p 12.46 ... CapIBA p 49.12 -.09 CapWGA p32.45 -.12 CapWA p 20.57 +.05 EupacA p 36.52 -.13 FdInvA p 35.54 -.01 GovtA p 14.60 -.01 GwthA p 29.32 +.02 HI TrA p 10.58 +.04 IncoA p 16.54 -.02 IntBdA p 13.57 ... IntlGrIncA p28.35 -.12 ICAA p 27.02 -.06 NEcoA p 24.21 +.07 N PerA p 26.87 -.04 NwWrldA 47.97 +.01 STBFA p 10.07 ... SmCpA p 33.77 -.13 TxExA p 12.31 -.01 WshA p 28.05 -.05 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 24.11 -.04 IntEqII I r 10.13 -.02 Artisan Funds: Intl 20.38 -.14 IntlVal r 25.15 -.13 MidCap 34.51 +.03

JPMorgCh 1.00 .32f Jabil JanusCap .20 Jefferies .30 JohnJn 2.28 JohnsnCtl .72f JnprNtwk ... KB Home .25 Kellogg 1.72 ... KeyEngy Keycorp .12 KimbClk 2.80 .76f Kimco KindMor n 1.20 Kinross g .12f KodiakO g ...

MidCapVal21.26 -.04 Baron Funds: Growth 51.25 -.13 SmallCap 22.97 -.14 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.06 -.02 DivMu 14.62 ... TxMgdIntl 13.06 -.10 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 17.87 -.08 GlAlA r 18.83 -.01 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.52 -.01 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.91 -.08 GlbAlloc r 18.93 -.01 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 50.56 +.10 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 58.03 -.69 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 27.70 -.15 DivEqInc 9.39 -.03 DivrBd 4.98 -.01 TxEA p 13.43 ... Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 28.62 -.16 AcornIntZ 35.18 -.11 LgCapGr 12.53 ... ValRestr 45.65 -.12 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.49 -.01 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n 9.51 -.08 USCorEq1 n10.72-.04 USCorEq2 n10.52-.05 DWS Invest S: MgdMuni S 8.94 +.01 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.54 -.09

30.46 20.40 6.34 11.30 64.45 31.10 22.25 7.58 48.98 14.72 7.22 71.30 15.59 30.26 13.97 8.89

-.51 +.13 -.26 -.14 -.27 -.38 -.46 +.23 -.18 -.38 -.07 -.17 -.18 +.76 ... +.01

Kohls 1.00 50.37 -3.43 1.16 u36.50 +.35 Kraft .46f 23.37 +.19 Kroger LDK Solar ... 3.62 +.07 ... 5.70 +.08 LSI Corp ... u11.57 +1.67 LaZBoy LVSands ... 46.69 -.02 LearCorp s .50 40.86 -1.07 LennarA .16 18.45 +.04 LillyEli 1.96 37.64 -.21 Limited .80a 42.61 +.28 LincNat .32f 20.21 +.03 ... 8.11 -.16 LizClaib LloydBkg ... 1.48 -.07 ... 8.18 +.20 LaPac .56 23.87 -.14 Lowes LyonBas A1.00a 32.41 -.26

M-N-0

... 10.21 +.51 MBIA ... 4.17 ... MEMC MFA Fncl 1.00 6.80 -.08 MGIC ... 3.09 +.21 MGM Rsts ... 10.20 -.09 .40 u32.16 -.17 Macys MagHRes ... 4.56 -.25 Manitowoc .08 11.17 +.10 Manulife g .52 10.80 +.03 MarathnO s .60 27.72 -.24 MarathP n 1.00f 33.95 +.56 MktVGold .40e 60.30 -.11 MktVRus .18e 30.80 -.41 MktVJrGld2.93e 30.06 +.02 MarIntA .40 30.58 -.04 MarshM .88 30.37 +.18 Masco .30 9.43 -.15 McDrmInt ... 11.58 +.27 McDnlds 2.80f u95.50 -.02 ... 15.88 -.10 McMoRn Mechel ... 10.99 +.10 MedcoHlth ... 57.29 +.62 Medtrnic .97 36.80 +.37 Merck 1.68f 35.68 -.07 ... 6.14 +.19 Meritor MetLife .74 31.13 -.35 MetroPCS ... 8.30 -.08 MobileTele1.06e 16.63 -.65 ... 33.97 +.12 Molycorp Monsanto 1.20f 73.20 -.25 MonstrWw ... 7.21 -.10 MorgStan .20 14.51 -.28 Mosaic .20 52.77 +.01 MotrlaSol n .88 46.41 -.26 MotrlaMo n ... 38.72 -.28 NRG Egy ... 19.67 -.01 NV Energy .52f 15.39 +.05 ... 17.70 -.24 Nabors NalcoHld .14 38.80 +.05 NOilVarco .48f 71.43 -.27 NatRetPrp 1.54 26.05 -.41 NY CmtyB 1.00 11.83 -.21 NewfldExp ... 45.92 +.12 NewmtM 1.40f 68.81 -.07 Nexen g .20 15.89 -.68 NiSource .92 22.82 -.09 1.44f 95.25 -.57 NikeB NobleCorp .55e 34.73 +.20 NokiaCp .55e 5.67 -.12 Nordstrm .92 47.10 +1.82 NorflkSo 1.72 74.78 -.76 NorthropG 2.00 57.33 +.26 Nucor 1.45 39.47 +.04 OcciPet 1.84 96.83 -2.07 OfficeDpt ... 2.22 -.03 OilSvHT 1.82e 124.90 +.02 OldRepub .70 8.07 -.15 OpkoHlth ... 5.10 +.14 OwensCorn ... 29.06 +.36

P-Q-R

PG&E Cp 1.82 38.52 -.32 1.40 53.47 -.74 PNC PPL Corp 1.40 29.78 -.24 PPL pfU 2.44 56.43 -.58 PatriotCoal ... 10.00 -.41 PeabdyE .34 38.30 -.93 PennWst g 1.08 18.34 +.12 Penney .80 32.22 +.18 PepsiCo 2.06 64.09 +.09 PerkElm .28 18.95 +.03 PetrbrsA 1.34e 25.10 +.03 Petrobras 1.26e 27.30 +.31 Pfizer .80 20.03 -.04 PhilipMor 3.08f u75.69 -.55 Pier 1 ... 13.24 -.35 PitnyBw 1.48 18.45 -.18 Potash s .28 43.51 +.17 PS USDBull ... 22.05 -.01 PrecDrill ... 11.43 -.12 PrinFncl .70f 24.24 +.11 ProLogis 1.12 27.50 -.32 ProShtS&P ... 41.01 +.02 PrUShS&P ... 19.90 -.02 PrUlShDow ... 15.98 ... ProUltQQQ ... 83.97 +1.16 PrUShQQQ rs... 44.35 -.66 ProUltSP .31e 45.55 +.02 ProUShL20 ... 19.75 +.18 PrUPShR2K ... 14.27 +.30 ProUltR2K ... 34.18 -.49 ProUSSP500 ... 13.84 -.01 PrUltSP500 s.03e58.71 -.09 ProUSSlv rs ... 12.16 +.04 ProUltSlv s ... 60.06 -.55 ProUShEuro ... 18.84 -.08 ProctGam 2.10 64.08 -.49 ProgsvCp 1.40e 18.59 -.27 ProUSR2K rs ... 40.39 +.53 ProvEn g .54 u9.83 +.37 Prudentl 1.45f 49.96 -.68 PSEG 1.37 32.65 -.29 PulteGrp ... 6.08 -.03 QuantaSvc ... 20.67 +.08 QksilvRes ... 8.09 -.01 RadianGrp .01 2.35 +.19 RangeRs .16 71.43 -.28 Raytheon 1.72 45.29 -.28 RegionsFn .04 4.12 +.01 Renren n ... 3.66 -.04 ReynAmer2.24f u41.70 -.16 RioTinto 1.17e 52.16 -.91 ... 1.20 -.02 RiteAid ... 33.32 -.59 Rowan RylCarb .40 27.21 -.50

Davis Funds C: NYVen C 31.25 -.09 Davis Funds Y: NYVenY 32.96 -.08 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.27 -.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq n18.15 +.22 EmMktV 27.96 +.41 IntSmVa n 14.22 -.15 LargeCo 9.86 -.01 USLgVa n 19.05 -.08 US Micro n13.02 -.14 US Small n20.30 -.18 US SmVa 23.11 -.23 IntlSmCo n14.57 -.16 Fixd n 10.33 -.01 IntVa n 15.19 -.11 Glb5FxInc n11.15 ... 2YGlFxd n 10.22 ... Dodge&Cox: Balanced 66.98 -.17 Income 13.25 ... 30.61 -.20 IntlStk Stock 100.64 -.34 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I x 11.07 ... TRBd N px11.07 ... Dreyfus: Aprec 40.34 -.13 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 16.89 -.08 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.78 ... GblMacAbR9.89 ... LgCapVal 16.94 -.08 FMI Funds: LgCap p n 15.25 -.04 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.74 +.01

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high low settle chg. CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 11 121.90 122.45 121.47 121.90 +.30 Feb 12 123.70 124.17 123.15 123.72 +.12 Apr 12 126.75 127.10 126.45 126.85 +.15 Jun 12 125.87 126.07 124.95 125.85 +.58 Aug 12 125.40 126.00 125.00 125.90 +.35 Oct 12 128.00 128.25 127.75 128.20 +.03 Dec 12 128.85 128.90 128.50 128.85 -.05 Feb 13 129.25 129.25 129.25 129.25 -.02 Apr 13 129.80 130.10 129.80 130.10 -.10 Last spot N/A Est. sales 16614. Wed’s Sales: 41,597 Wed’s open int: 320433, up +3509 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jan 12 145.95 146.15 145.40 146.10 +.08 Mar 12 148.15 148.55 147.85 148.35 +.18 Apr 12 149.10 149.60 149.00 149.57 +.50 May 12 149.92 150.50 149.70 150.50 +.50 Aug 12 151.30 151.90 151.30 151.90 +.43 Sep 12 152.05 152.25 152.05 152.25 +.25 152.10 Oct 12 Nov 12 152.25 Last spot N/A Est. sales 4378. Wed’s Sales: 4,642 Wed’s open int: 31715, off -45 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 11 87.72 88.47 87.45 87.57 -.60 Feb 12 90.32 91.95 90.25 90.27 -1.30 Apr 12 92.97 93.82 92.75 92.80 -.50 May 12 99.00 99.00 98.30 98.80 -.35 Jun 12 100.20 100.20 99.70 100.02 -.40

S-T-U

SAIC ... 12.15 +.10 SK Tlcm ... 14.83 +.04 SLM Cp .40 12.72 -.16 SpdrDJIA 3.16e 120.13 -.06 SpdrGold ... 169.63 -.50 SP Mid 1.64e 159.91 -1.10 S&P500ETF2.46e124.97-.02 SpdrHome .31e 16.63 +.09 SpdrS&PBk.26e 19.06 -.15 SpdrLehHY4.20e 37.68 +.05 SpdrLe1-3bll ... 45.83 -.01 SpdrS&P RB.39e 23.38 -.22 SpdrRetl .49e 52.00 +.12 SpdrOGEx .50e 54.84 -.33 SpdrMetM .42e 53.83 -.48 Safeway .58 20.07 +.07 StJude .84 38.53 +.09 ... 9.47 -.05 Saks Salesforce ... 118.38 -.04 SandRdge ... 7.50 +.15 Sanofi 1.82e 35.07 +.06 SaraLee .46 19.04 +.08 Schlmbrg 1.00 74.87 -.46 Schwab .24 11.93 -.03 ScorpioTk ... 5.35 -1.31 SemiHTr 2.15e 30.80 +.13 SiderurNac.81e 8.38 +.08 SilvWhtn g .18e 33.71 +.13 SilvrcpM g .10f 7.71 +.08 SouthnCo 1.89 u44.06 +.15 SwstAirl .02 8.33 -.05 SwstnEngy ... 37.90 -.15 SpectraEn 1.12f 29.39 -.03 SprintNex ... 2.70 ... SP Matls .82e 34.30 -.22 SP HlthC .64e 33.93 +.05 SP CnSt .85e 31.85 -.05 SP Consum.61e 38.77 +.03 SP Engy 1.08e 70.48 -.39 SPDR Fncl .20e 12.74 -.07 SP Inds .69e 33.78 -.11 SP Tech .36e 25.76 +.14 SP Util 1.36e 35.11 -.10 StarwdHtl .50f 47.24 -.44 StateStr .72 39.22 -.43 StillwtrM ... 10.72 -.19 Suncor gs .44 30.11 +.09 .60 38.80 -.01 Sunoco Suntech ... 2.43 -.05 SunTrst .20 17.99 -.14 SupEnrgy ... 30.09 +.38 Supvalu .35 7.29 -.06 Synovus .04 1.51 +.02 Sysco 1.08f 28.73 +.19 TCF Fncl .20 9.89 -.17 TE Connect .72 31.28 -.43 .76 u62.56 +.86 TJX TaiwSemi .52e 13.21 +.29 ... d1.62 -.37 Talbots TalismE g .27 13.73 +.13 Target 1.20 52.15 -.55 TataMotors.45e 17.69 +.49 TeckRes g .80f 37.21 +.72 TelefEsp s2.14e 18.66 -.09 Tenaris .68e 37.48 +.20 TenetHlth ... 4.68 +.03 Teradyn ... 13.37 -.09 ... 16.29 +.86 Terex Tesoro ... 24.24 +.35 Texas Inds ... 27.61 +2.28 TexInst .68f 30.21 +.11 Textron .08 19.39 -.04 ThermoFis ... 47.04 -.21 ThomCrk g ... 7.39 +.40 2.20 80.30 -.74 3M Co Tiffany 1.16 66.35 -.69 TW Cable 1.92 60.92 +.44 TimeWarn .94 34.21 -.61 ... 20.26 -.05 TollBros Total SA 2.38e 51.73 -.01 Transocn 3.16 43.71 +.86 Travelers 1.64 55.04 -1.21 TrinaSolar ... 7.90 -.10 TycoIntl 1.00 47.41 -.55 .16 u20.33 +.19 Tyson ... 12.09 -.38 UBS AG US Airwy ... 4.94 +.22 US Gold ... 3.96 -.19 USG ... 10.26 +.47 UnilevNV 1.24e 33.54 -.57 UnionPac 2.40f 102.93 -.48 UtdContl ... 19.12 +1.15 2.08 71.13 -.62 UPS B US Bancrp .50 25.70 -.22 US NGs rs ... 8.02 +.15 US OilFd ... 38.61 -.17 USSteel .20 27.25 -.05 UtdTech 1.92 76.58 -.02 UtdhlthGp .65 48.52 -.25 UnumGrp .42 22.19 -.32

V-W-X-Y-Z

Valassis ... 20.11 +.90 Vale SA 1.76e 23.16 -.09 Vale SA pf1.76e 21.81 -.06 ValeroE .60f 22.12 -.15 VangREIT1.96e 55.47 -.46 VangEmg .82e 40.74 -.08 VangEAFE .90e 32.05 -.33 VerizonCm 2.00 37.77 +.04 VimpelCm .79e 11.82 -.10 Visa .88f u97.76 +.79 WalMart 1.46 58.61 -.29 Walgrn .90 33.88 +.16 WsteMInc 1.36 31.24 -.06 ... 62.83 -1.79 WatsnPh WeathfIntl ... 14.96 -.20 WellPoint 1.00 70.08 -.47 WellsFargo .48 25.64 -.22 Wendys Co .08 5.08 +.12 WDigital ... 29.25 +.18 WstnRefin ... 12.73 +.84 WstnUnion .32 17.43 -.01 Weyerh .60 16.75 -.04 WhitingPt s ... 48.14 +1.63 WmsCos 1.00f 32.41 +.13 WT India .18e 17.57 +.03 Wyndham .60 35.41 -.04 XL Grp .44 20.53 -.09 XcelEngy 1.04 u26.19 -.10 Xerox .17 8.19 +.04 Yamana g .20f 16.81 -.02 YingliGrn ... 4.53 +.21 YumBrnds 1.14 56.29 +.25

FPACres n27.24 -.05 Fairholme 25.01 -.09 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.29 +.01 StrValDvIS 4.71 -.02 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.99 +.03 12.30 +.03 StrInA Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI n 20.23 +.04 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 n 13.47 -.01 FF2010K 12.45 -.01 FF2015 n 11.24 -.01 FF2015K 12.48 -.01 FF2020 n 13.53 -.01 FF2020K 12.80 -.01 FF2025 n 11.17 -.01 FF2025K 12.83 -.01 FF2030 n 13.27 -.01 FF2030K 12.94 -.01 FF2035 n 10.91 -.01 FF2035K 12.93 -.01 FF2040 n 7.61 -.01 FF2040K 12.97 -.02 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.99 -.02 AMgr50 n 15.07 -.01 AMgr20 r n12.85 -.01 Balanc n 18.17 -.02 BalancedK18.17 -.02 BlueChGr n43.27 +.13 Canada n 51.91 -.04 CapAp n 24.74 +.04 CpInc r n 8.67 +.03 Contra n 68.40 +.11 ContraK 68.45 +.11 DisEq n 21.68 -.01 DivIntl n 26.60 -.11 DivrsIntK r 26.62 -.10

Jul 12 98.70 98.90 98.35 98.85 Aug 12 97.55 97.55 97.05 97.30 Oct 12 86.00 86.00 85.25 85.80 Dec 12 81.00 81.00 80.70 80.80 Feb 13 82.10 82.10 81.40 81.80 Apr 13 82.60 82.60 82.40 82.40 Last spot N/A Est. sales 6810. Wed’s Sales: 38,484 Wed’s open int: 269842, up +5611

DivGth n 25.94 -.05 Eq Inc n 40.59 -.14 16.96 -.07 EQII n Fidel n 31.33 ... FltRateHi r n9.63 ... GNMA n 11.86 ... GovtInc 10.82 ... GroCo n 85.40 +.11 GroInc n 17.91 -.04 GrowthCoK85.46 +.11 HighInc r n 8.54 +.04 Indepn n 22.42 +.07 IntBd n 10.80 ... IntmMu n 10.32 ... IntlDisc n 28.50 -.14 InvGrBd n 11.66 ... InvGB n 7.64 ... LgCapVal 10.53 -.04 LevCoStk n25.30 +.01 LowP r n 35.78 -.20 LowPriK r 35.77 -.20 Magelln n 63.49 +.02 MidCap n 26.91 -.05 MuniInc n 12.84 -.01 NwMkt r n 15.89 +.03 OTC n 56.31 +.31 100Index 8.83 -.02 Puritn n 17.68 ... PuritanK 17.68 ... RealE n 26.25 -.35 SAllSecEqF12.01 -.03 SCmdtyStrt n9.30 -.02 SrEmrgMkt15.58 +.13 SrsIntGrw 10.35 -.03 SrsIntVal 8.31 -.06 SrInvGrdF 11.66 ... StIntMu n 10.75 +.01 STBF n 8.49 +.01 SmllCpS r n16.53 -.03 StratInc n 11.00 +.03 TotalBd n 10.88 +.01

-.37 -.62 -.50 -.30 -.40 -.30

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high low settle COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 11 92.00 92.00 90.70 90.70 Mar 12 92.68 92.77 90.83 91.30 May 12 91.81 92.10 90.30 90.99 Jul 12 91.30 91.30 89.70 90.66 Oct 12 90.25 Dec 12 89.27 89.27 88.00 88.83 Mar 13 89.17 89.70 88.89 89.21 May 13 89.46 Jul 13 89.26 Oct 13 88.81 Last spot N/A Est. sales 12483. Wed’s Sales: 16,615 Wed’s open int: 137741, off -473

chg.

+.39 +.39 +.60 +.85 +.77 +.40 +.21 +.11 +.11 +.36

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 11 603 607ø 594 602 Mar 12 610ü 625 605fl 614ü May 12 631 639ü 620ø 632

chg.

+6ü +ü +2

Friday, December 2, 2011

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

AMEX

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 3103409 5.53 +.09 S&P500ETF1607932124.97-.02 SPDR Fncl 674388 12.74 -.07 SprintNex 665995 2.70 ... FordM 610289 10.59 -.010

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) NwGold g 37901 CheniereEn 30197 NovaGld g 26109 GoldStr g 23309 Rentech 18846

Last 11.07 9.82 11.13 2.07 1.45

Chg -.02 -.28 -.36 ... -.049

Name Vol (00) Last SiriusXM 789888 1.88 Intel 490367 24.92 Microsoft 459232 25.28 Yahoo 434332 16.23 PwShs QQQ41815756.78

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name LaZBoy 11.57 +1.67 +16.9 Aerocntry 7.90 +.99 +14.3 CarverB rs Movado 17.83 +2.10 +13.4 LucasEngy 2.25 +.13 +6.1 Radvisn AssuredG 10.99 +1.29 +13.3 ExeterR gs 3.25 +.17 +5.5 Magma GlbShipLs 2.14 +.19 +9.7 TanzRy g 2.88 +.15 +5.5 Codexis NY&Co 2.94 +.26 +9.7- Dreams 2.18 +.11 +5.3 TransceptP

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg Gildan 16.36 -7.52 SemGrp wt 5.74 -1.53 ScorpioTk 5.35 -1.31 BarnesNob 14.59 -2.85 iPSEEmM 111.60-15.60

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

Name StreamGSv Geokinetics OrionEngy Aerosonic ProlorBio

1,196 1,846 99 3,141 103 15 3,777,024,968

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

DIARY

52-Week Low High 12,876.00 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 459.94 381.99 8,718.25 6,414.89 2,490.51 1,941.99 2,887.75 2,298.89 1,370.58 1,074.77 14,562.01 11,208.42 868.57 601.71

Name

Div

BkofAm

.04

Chevron

3.12

CocaCola

1.88

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

%Chg -31.5 -21.0 -19.7 -16.3 -12.3

DIARY

Last 12,020.03 4,909.10 448.07 7,450.43 2,265.53 2,626.20 1,244.58 13,071.87 730.75

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume Net Chg -25.65 -37.07 -.77 -34.07 -11.36 +5.86 -2.38 -29.34 -6.67

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

PE Last ...

Chg

5.53 +.09

8 101.83 -.99 12

66.83 -.40

.60f

14

EOG Res

.64

26 102.53 -1.21

35.99 +.14

YTD %Chg Name

Div

-58.5 Oneok Pt s

Chg +6.45 +1.64 +1.41 +1.05 +1.51

%Chg +105.7 +34.2 +24.7 +21.8 +21.7

Name Last Chg %Chg PointrTel 3.60 -.64 -15.1 CaroBkHld 2.57 -.41 -13.8 UTiWrldwd 13.51 -2.05 -13.2 Finisar 16.12 -2.32 -12.6 KewnSc 8.31 -1.18 -12.4

210 245 31 486 11 7ows 75,230,158070

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 12.55 6.43 7.13 5.87 8.48

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg %Chg -.36 -11.7 -.18 -7.1 -.20 -6.9 -.21 -6.8 -.29 -6.71.7

INDEXES

Disney

FordM

Last 2.73 2.36 2.70 2.88 4.07

Chg +.08 +.01 -.30 +.52 +.39

DIARY

922 1,594 114 2,630 39 52 1,776,262,070

% Chg -.21 -.75 -.17 -.46 -.50 +.22 -.19 -.22 -.90

YTD 52-wk % Chg % Chg +3.82 +5.79 -3.87 -2.55 +10.64 +12.67 -6.45 -3.39 +2.59 +8.32 -1.01 +1.82 -1.04 +1.89 -2.16 +.89 -6.75 -2.72.61

Chg

YTD %Chg

51.38 +.82

+29.3

PE Last

2.38f

19

+11.6 PNM Res

.50

41

18.66 -.45

+43.3

+1.6 PepsiCo

2.06

16

64.09 +.09

-1.9

-4.1 Pfizer

.80

13

20.03 -.04

+14.4

+12.2 SwstAirl

.02

38

8.33 -.05

-35.8 -7.0

...

5

10.59 -.01

-36.9 TexInst

.68f

13

30.21 +.11

HewlettP

.48

7

28.22 +.27

-33.0 TimeWarn

.94

13

34.21 -.61

+6.3

HollyFrt s

.40f

5

23.43 +.18

+14.9 TriContl

.31e

...

14.11 +.12

+2.5

Intel

.84

11

24.92 +.01

+18.5 WalMart

1.46

13

58.61 -.29

IBM

3.00

15 189.45 +1.45

+29.1 WashFed

.24

13

13.01

Merck

1.68f

13

Microsoft

.80f

35.68 -.07

-1.0 WellsFargo

.48

9

HOW TO READ THE MARKET IN REVIEW 9

25.28 -.30

-9.4 XcelEngy

1.04

15

+8.7

...

-23.1

25.64 -.22

-17.3

26.19 -.10

+11.2

Here are the 525 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 400 most active on the Nasdaq National Markets and 100 most active on American Stock Exchange. Mutual funds are 450 largest. Stocks in bold changed 5 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name Div Last Chg (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at Name the beginning of each letters’ list. AAR .48 12.88 # Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock, based on latest quar- ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 ACM Op .80 7.25 # terly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise footnoted. ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. ACMSp .96 7.50 # Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... mark. Fund Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold. Chg: Daily net change in the NAV.

Name Sell AAL Mutual: Bond p 9.49 CaGrp 14.47 MuBd 10.43 SmCoSt 9.73

Chg

-.03 Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. d – New 52-.01 wk low during trading day. g – Dividend in Canadian $. Stock price in U.S.$. n – -.05 New issue in past 52 wks. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. s – Split or stock dividend of 25 pct or more in last 52 wks. Div begins with date of split or stock dividend. u – New 52-wk high during trading day. v – Trading halted on primary market. Unless noted, dividend rates are annual disbursements based on last declaration. pf – Preferred. pp – Holder owes installment(s) of purchase price. rt – Rights. un – Units. wd – When distributed. wi – When issued. wt – Warrants. ww – With warrants. xw – Without warrants. Dividend Footnotes: a – Also extra or extras. b – Annual rate plus stock dividend. c – Liquidating dividend. e – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos. f – Annual rate, increased on last declaration. i – Declared or paid after stock dividend or split. j – Paid this year, dividend omitted, deferred or no action taken at last meeting. k – Declared or paid this year, accumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m – Annual rate, reduced on last declaration. p – Init div, annual rate unknown. r – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos plus stock dividend. t – Paid in stock in last 12 mos, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or distribution date. x – Ex-dividend or ex-rights. y – Ex-dividend and sales in full. z – Sales in full. vj – In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such companies. • Most active stocks above must be worth $1 and gainers/losers $2. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Wednesday’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

MUTUAL FUNDS

-.01

Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

USBI n 11.69 ... Value n 63.56 -.25 Fidelity Selects: Gold r n 49.72 -.12 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn n 36.08 -.19 500IdxInv n44.22 -.08 IntlInxInv n31.25 -.20 TotMktInv n36.30 -.09 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv n44.22-.08 TotMktAd r n36.31-.09 First Eagle: 46.52 -.13 GlblA OverseasA21.85 -.11 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.06 +.01 Frank/Temp Frnk A: CalTFA px 6.98 -.03 FedTFA px11.95 -.05 FoundAl p 10.00 -.01 GrwthA px 44.81 -.21 HYTFA p 10.12 ... IncomA px 2.05 -.01 NYTFA px 11.65 -.05 RisDvA px 34.16 -.53 StratInc p 10.06 +.02 USGovA px 6.89 -.03 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv n12.77 +.08 IncmeAd x 2.04 -.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC tx 2.07 -.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.73 -.05 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.28 -.01 GlBd A p 12.81 +.08 GrwthA p 16.78 -.03 WorldA p 14.13 ...

Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 12.83 +.08 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 39.32 ... GMO Trust III: Quality 21.82 -.01 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 19.37 -.12 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.78 +.09 Quality 21.83 -.01 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 33.64 -.14 Goldman Sachs Inst: 6.82 +.02 HiYield MidCapV 34.00 -.14 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.09 ... CapApInst 37.83 +.12 IntlInv t 54.01 -.19 Intl r 54.69 -.18 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 29.47 +.05 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI n 29.54 +.04 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 37.76 +.02 Div&Gr 19.24 -.09 TotRetBd 11.47 -.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.80 +.01 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r16.55 -.05 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.25 -.05 CmstkA 14.96 -.09 EqIncA 8.18 -.02 GrIncA p 18.16 -.08 HYMuA 9.27 +.01

Jul 12 643 650fl 632ü 645ø +3ø Sep 12 661fl 664fl 651 664fl +3ø 671ø 685ü +5ü Dec 12 683 690 Mar 13 702ø 704ü 691ü 701fl +5ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 144094. Wed’s Sales: 164,081 Wed’s open int: 368824, off -351 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel 590fl 594fl -6ø Dec 11 595ü 606 Mar 12 601 612ø 597ø 601ø -6ø May 12 609ü 619ü 605 609ü -6 Jul 12 614 623 609ø 614ü -4ø Sep 12 574ø 578ü 570ø 574fl Dec 12 554 557 548fl 554ü +2ü Mar 13 563ø 566ø 561ø 566ü +2ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 468369. Wed’s Sales: 520,560 Wed’s open int: 1154141, off -2801 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 11 321 344fl 321 322 -21fl Mar 12 321 322ø 310 320 May 12 319 319 311 316fl -ü 316fl 316fl -3ü Jul 12 328 328 Sep 12 322ü 322ü 320ø 320ø -1fl Dec 12 331fl 331fl 330 330 -1fl Mar 13 342fl 342fl 341 341 -1fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 1500. Wed’s Sales: 3,028 Wed’s open int: 13398, off -656 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Jan 12 1128 1143fl 1116ü 1128 -3ü Mar 12 1138ø 1153 1126ø 1138ø -2ø -2 May 12 1149 1162ø 1137 1149 Jul 12 1154 1171ø 1146fl 1158fl -1 Aug 12 1165ø 1165ø 1150ø 1158ø -ü Sep 12 1151ü 1152ü 1151ü 1152ü +1 Nov 12 1143 1158ø 1137 1149 +2ü Jan 13 1167ø 1167ø 1151ø 1158fl +2ø Mar 13 1158ü 1167ü 1158ü 1167ü +2ø May 13 1162 1171 1162 1171 +2ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 409591. Wed’s Sales: 349,390 Wed’s open int: 525284, up +2543

Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.86 -.02 AssetStA p23.68 -.02 AssetStrI r 23.93 -.02 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.79 -.01 JPMorgan Select: USEquity n 9.99 -.02 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd n 11.78 -.01 HighYld n 7.67 +.02 IntmTFBd n11.12 +.01 ShtDurBd n10.97 ... USLCCrPls n20.01 .08 Janus T Shrs: BalancdT 24.83 ... OvrseasT r36.74 +.53 PrkMCVal T21.99 -.10 Twenty T 61.18 +.13 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 11.56 -.02 LSBalanc 12.45 -.01 LSGrwth 12.26 -.01 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.68 +.07 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p15.98 +.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.65 -.09 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.98 +.02 StrInc C 14.50 +.01 LSBondR 13.92 +.02 StrIncA 14.42 +.01 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY x12.04 -.04 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.41 -.05 BdDebA p 7.54 +.01

FUTURES

ShDurIncA p4.53 ... Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t4.55 ... Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.52 ... MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.92 -.06 ValueA 22.27 -.11 MFS Funds I: ValueI 22.37 -.11 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.73 +.01 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.45 -.02 MergerFd n 15.99 ... Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.37 -.01 TotRtBdI 10.37 -.01 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 36.21 -.04 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.24 -.10 GlbDiscZ 27.64 -.10 QuestZ 16.73 -.04 SharesZ 19.93 -.05 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 48.72 -.22 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 50.37 -.23 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 6.91 ... Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.94 -.04 Intl I r 16.79 -.13 Oakmark 41.71 -.07 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.05 +.01 GlbSMdCap14.11-.06 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 30.99 -.01

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

chg.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Jan 12 99.76 101.17 98.87 100.20 -.16 Feb 12 99.79 101.21 98.96 100.33 -.13 Mar 12 99.86 101.29 99.03 100.45 -.10 Apr 12 99.82 101.12 99.05 100.49 -.07 May 12 99.83 100.88 98.98 100.42 -.03 Jun 12 99.66 100.84 98.79 100.23 +.02 Jul 12 99.84 100.08 98.63 99.97 +.10 Aug 12 99.60 99.95 98.35 99.68 +.19 Sep 12 98.69 99.40 97.88 99.39 +.27 Oct 12 98.43 99.10 97.77 99.10 +.36 Nov 12 98.54 98.85 97.53 98.85 +.45 Dec 12 97.84 98.82 96.95 98.58 +.51 Jan 13 98.18 +.56 Feb 13 97.75 +.62 Mar 13 97.20 97.34 97.20 97.34 +.68 Apr 13 96.94 +.72 May 13 96.55 +.76 Jun 13 96.31 96.31 95.00 96.19 +.80 Jul 13 95.81 +.84 Aug 13 95.46 +.88 Sep 13 95.12 +.91 Oct 13 94.86 +.95 Nov 13 94.62 +.99 Dec 13 93.46 94.61 92.80 94.42 +1.02 Last spot N/A Est. sales 516299. Wed’s Sales: 1,183,305 Wed’s open int: 1303490, up +978 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Jan 12 2.5481 2.6186 2.5264 2.5579 -.0005 Feb 12 2.5645 2.6131 2.5419 2.5725 -.0019 Mar 12 2.5814 2.6228 2.5628 2.5912 -.0027 Apr 12 2.7268 2.7599 2.7078 2.7379 -.0023 May 12 2.7369 2.7563 2.7227 2.7376 -.0025 Jun 12 2.7095 2.7438 2.6932 2.7218 -.0002 Jul 12 2.6998 2.7197 2.6979 2.6996 +.0018 Aug 12 2.6721 2.6760 2.6710 2.6760 +.0037 Sep 12 2.6455 2.6490 2.6442 2.6490 +.0040 Oct 12 2.5190 2.5234 2.5190 2.5234 +.0049

GlobA p 55.92 -.24 GblStrIncA 4.05 ... IntBdA p 6.31 +.02 MnStFdA 31.75 -.02 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.29 ... RoMu A p 15.62 ... RcNtMuA 6.70 ... Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 30.74 -.01 6.31 +.02 IntlBdY PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.79 +.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r10.51 ... AllAsset 11.92 ... ComodRR 7.81 -.01 DivInc 11.18 +.01 EmgMkCur10.12 +.04 EmMkBd 11.21 +.03 FltInc r 8.28 +.03 8.85 +.03 HiYld InvGrCp 10.51 +.01 LowDu 10.30 ... RealRtnI 12.18 ... ShortT 9.76 ... TotRt 10.79 +.01 TR II 10.45 ... TRIII 9.49 ... PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.30 ... RealRtA p 12.18 ... TotRtA 10.79 +.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.79 +.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.79 +.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.79 +.01

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET

... 24.83 -.05 Div Last Chg Cree Inc Crocs ... 15.44 -.07 A-B-C Ctrip.com ... 26.52 -.68 ... 38.44 -.13 ASML Hld .58e 39.33 -.20 CubistPh ATP O&G ... 7.51 +.17 CypSemi .36 18.86 -.21 Achillion ... 6.90 +.25 D-E-F ... 33.79 +.36 AcmePkt ... 15.80 +.04 ActivePwr ... .65 -.05 Dell Inc ... 8.76 +.12 ActivsBliz .17f 12.41 -.01 Dndreon AdobeSy ... 27.14 -.28 Dentsply .22f 36.13 +.02 AdvATch lf ... 5.75 +.01 Depomed ... 4.93 +.06 AEterna g ... 1.61 +.01 DiamondF .18 29.50 +1.75 Affymax ... 5.13 -.14 DigitalGen ... 11.96 +.36 Affymetrix ... 4.36 -.16 DirecTV A ... 47.87 +.65 ... 29.16 +.25 DiscCm A ... 41.18 -.80 AkamaiT Akorn ... u10.85 +.09 DishNetwk2.00e 24.58 +.01 ... .99 -.01 DonlleyRR 1.04 14.78 -.24 Alexza AlignTech ... 24.50 ... DrmWksA ... 17.91 -.66 AllosThera ... 1.36 +.03 DryShips .12t 2.50 +.25 ... 1.30 -.12 AllscriptH ... 19.43 -.03 DyaxCp ... 8.90 -.28 AlteraCp lf .32 37.55 -.12 E-Trade ... 29.68 +.09 AlterraCap .56 22.65 -.30 eBay Amarin ... 7.43 +.45 ErthLink .20 6.26 -.04 Amazon ... 197.13 +4.84 EstWstBcp .20 19.15 -.42 ... 23.33 +.14 ACapAgy 5.60e 28.53 -.16 ElectArts AmCapLtd ... 7.03 +.06 EndoPhrm ... 34.15 -.08 AmSupr ... 4.15 +.18 EngyCnv h ... .32 -.01 ... 31.15 -.29 Amgen 1.12 58.00 +.09 EngyXXI ... 8.45 +.02 AmkorT lf ... 4.47 +.03 Entegris ... 5.42 +.44 EntropCom Amylin ... 10.87 +.07 Ancestry ... 23.30 -.41 EnzonPhar ... 6.95 -.12 ... 101.99 +1.97 A123 Sys ... 2.27 -.21 Equinix ApolloGrp ... 48.87 +.39 EricsnTel .37e 10.44 -.19 ApolloInv 1.12 7.19 -.02 Exelixis .10p 4.54 -.07 ... 2.75 -.01 Apple Inc ... 387.93 +5.73 ExideTc ApldMatl .32 10.77 -.01 Expedia .28 28.03 +.22 ExpdIntl .50 42.20 -1.31 AMCC ... 7.30 -.16 Approach ... 30.89 -.39 F5 Netwks ... 111.07 -1.96 ArenaPhm ... 1.63 +.05 FLIR Sys .24 26.65 -.21 ... 2.97 +.37 AresCap 1.44f 15.51 -.05 FSI Intl AriadP ... 12.31 +.22 FiberTwr lf ... d.22 -.04 9.69 -.09 FifthStFin1.15m ArmHld .15e 28.09 -.18 ... d2.11 ... FifthThird .32f 11.95 -.14 ArrayBio ... 16.12 -2.32 Finisar Arris ... 10.64 -.11 ArubaNet ... 21.21 +.11 FstNiagara .64 8.67 -.13 ... 47.55 -.31 AscenaRtl ... 27.52 ... FstSolar AsiaInfoL ... 8.73 -.01 FstMerit .64 14.24 -.37 ... 57.45 -.21 AsscdBanc .04 10.35 -.05 Fiserv ... 5.91 -.06 Atmel ... 8.84 -.03 Flextrn Autodesk ... 34.27 +.20 FocusMda ... 19.71 +1.19 AutoData 1.58f 51.50 +.41 Fossil Inc ... 88.58 -1.01 ... 16.94 -.49 FosterWhl ... 18.51 -.04 Auxilium AvagoTch .44f 29.91 -.01 FultonFncl .20 9.26 -.10 AvanirPhm ... 2.33 -.13 G-H-I AvisBudg ... 11.78 -.02 BBCN Bcp ... 9.27 -.10 GT AdvTc ... 8.16 +.44 .48 30.53 +1.05 BE Aero ... 38.92 -.03 Gentex BGC Ptrs .68 6.18 -.14 Gentiva h ... 5.96 +.14 ... 1.76 +.09 GeronCp BMC Sft ... 35.29 -.37 BedBath ... 60.11 -.40 GileadSci ... 39.67 -.18 GloblInd ... 8.01 +.03 BiogenIdc ... 116.48 +1.53 BioMarin ... 35.07 +.45 Globalstr h ... .40 -.04 BioSante ... 2.48 +.08 GlbSpcMet .20f 14.63 -.30 BlueCoat ... 18.16 +.16 GluMobile ... 3.43 +.34 ... 613.77 BonTon .20 3.15 +.52 Google BreitBurn 1.74f 18.09 -.41 +14.38 BrigExp ... 36.48 +.05 GrifolsSA n .55t 5.18 +.15 Broadcom .36 30.64 +.29 Groupon n ... 18.95 +1.45 Broadwd h ... .62 -.04 GulfportE ... 33.00 +1.25 BrcdeCm ... 5.37 -.01 HanmiFncl ... .87 -.01 BrukerCp ... 13.00 +.48 HanwhaSol ... 1.47 +.03 CA Inc .20 21.20 ... Harmonic ... 5.33 -.04 CBOE .48 27.02 +.10 HarrisInt h ... .60 +.01 CH Robins 1.16 67.65 -.86 Hasbro 1.20 35.40 -.41 ... 5.94 -.01 Cadence ... 10.76 -.18 HawHold CdnSolar ... 3.12 +.21 HercOffsh ... 3.85 -.04 ... 17.55 -.06 CpstnTrb h ... 1.00 -.04 Hologic CareerEd ... 7.24 +.18 HomeAw n ... 25.98 -.18 ... 28.32 -.14 HudsCity .32 5.61 +.02 Carrizo ... 7.51 -.16 Cavium ... 32.99 +.35 HumGen .52 45.47 -.25 Celgene ... 62.76 -.32 HuntJB CentEuro ... 4.75 +.16 HuntBnk .16 5.18 -.07 CentAl ... 9.51 -.12 IAC Inter .48 42.18 +.30 Changyou ... 26.62 +1.65 IPG Photon ... 40.57 +2.24 ChrmSh ... 4.23 +.35 iSh ACWI 1.02e 42.91 -.14 ... 16.72 -.54 ChkPoint ... 54.98 -.36 IconixBr ... 7.60 ... Cheesecake ... 28.53 +.17 IdenixPh ... 27.94 +.12 ChinaMed ... 3.42 +.10 Illumina CienaCorp ... 12.05 -.06 ImperlSgr ... 5.14 +.72 ... 14.44 +.67 CinnFin 1.61f 29.00 -.65 Incyte ... 6.74 -.16 .54f 30.22 -.18 Infinera Cintas ... 45.21 +.26 Informat Cirrus ... 16.39 +.10 .24 18.58 -.06 Infosys .75e 52.41 +.79 Cisco ... 5.79 -.01 ... 71.35 -.04 IntgDv CitrixSys .84 24.92 +.01 CleanEngy ... 12.94 -.16 Intel .40 43.83 -.13 Clearwire ... 2.03 +.25 InterDig CognizTech ... 67.59 +.24 InterMune ... 18.40 +.24 .48 10.82 +.19 Coinstar ... 41.70 -.99 Intersil .60 52.92 -.32 ColdwtrCrk ... .92 +.06 Intuit Comcast .45 22.57 -.10 J-K-L Comc spcl .45 22.38 +.02 Compuwre ... 8.27 +.01 j2Global .82f 26.97 -.14 ... 1.87 +.04 Comverse ... 6.54 -.01 JA Solar CorinthC ... 2.65 +.02 JDS Uniph ... 10.81 -.17 .96 u87.09 +1.79 JamesRiv ... 8.23 -.06 Costco

Name

Name

JazzPhrm ... 38.74 -.88 ... 4.30 +.18 JetBlue JoyGlbl .70 91.29 +.19 ... 8.99 +.07 KIT Digitl KLA Tnc 1.40 47.23 +1.13 KratosDef ... 6.01 +1.01 ... 9.06 -.04 Kulicke LKQ Corp ... u29.84 -.69 LamResrch ... 41.64 +.87 ... 6.97 +.08 Lattice LeapWirlss ... 8.75 -.32 LibGlobA ... 40.07 +.68 LibCapA ... 75.22 -1.06 LibtIntA h ... 16.03 -.23 LifeTech ... 39.17 +.44 LimelghtN ... 3.01 -.07 LinearTch .96 30.73 +.10 LinnEngy 2.76 36.65 +.24

M-N-0

Magal ... u5.08 +.86 Magma ... 7.13 +1.41 MAKO Srg ... 30.04 +1.24 MannKd ... 3.09 +.03 MarinaBio ... .15 -.00 ... 13.86 -.26 MarvellT .92 28.73 -.08 Mattel MaximIntg .88 25.65 ... ... 18.70 -.21 MediCo Medivation ... u46.22 +.27 MelcoCrwn ... 9.93 +.01 MentorGr ... 12.93 +.19 Microchp 1.39f 34.86 -.05 Micromet ... 6.35 +.22 ... 5.89 -.10 MicronT MicroSemi ... 17.95 +.19 Microsoft .80f 25.28 -.30 Micrvisn h ... .44 -.01 ModusLink ... 4.41 +.06 Molex .80 24.70 -.24 Momenta ... 16.25 +1.21 Move rs ... 6.37 -.13 ... 19.69 +.16 Mylan ... 22.71 -.30 NII Hldg NPS Phm ... 5.63 -.05 NXP Semi ... 17.08 +.19 NasdOMX ... 26.10 -.15 NatPenn .16f 8.21 -.12 NatusMed ... 8.33 -.04 NektarTh ... 4.92 -.08 NetLogicM ... 49.34 -.08 ... 36.92 +.09 NetApp ... 46.40 +1.31 Netease Netflix ... 67.17 +2.64 ... 2.87 ... Netlist NetSpend ... 6.85 +.54 NewsCpA .19f 17.56 +.12 NewsCpB .19f 17.86 +.01 NorTrst 1.12 37.33 -.30 Novlus ... 34.92 +.30 NuanceCm ... 24.29 -.29 ... 15.82 +.19 Nvidia OReillyAu ... 77.70 +.46 ... 2.85 -.26 Oclaro OmniVisn ... 11.46 +.67 OnSmcnd ... 8.01 +.48 ... 44.26 +.16 OnyxPh OpenTable ... 36.24 +.87 .24 31.67 +.32 Oracle

P-Q-R

PDL Bio .60 6.34 -.06 PMC Sra ... 5.44 -.15 PSS Wrld ... 24.08 -.30 Paccar .72f 40.35 -.22 PacSunwr ... 1.31 -.08 PanASlv .10 25.48 -.39 ParamTch ... 20.63 -.20 Patterson .48 30.55 +.38 .20 20.91 -.11 PattUTI Paychex 1.28f 29.17 +.06 PeopUtdF .63 12.51 +.06 PerryEllis ... 14.63 +.33 PetSmart .56 47.85 -.40 Popular ... 1.49 ... Power-One ... 4.21 -.05 PwShs QQQ.41e 56.78 +.39 Powrwv rs ... 2.19 -.13 PriceTR 1.24 56.58 -.18 ... 488.43 +2.54 priceline PrimoWtr ... 3.09 +.02 PrUPShQQQ ... 19.26 -.48 ProspctCap1.22 9.20 -.08 QIAGEN ... 14.90 -.01 QlikTech ... 28.18 +.81 ... 14.86 -.06 Qlogic Qualcom .86 54.73 -.07 QuestSft ... 18.40 +.33 Questcor ... 43.63 -1.32 ... 6.18 -.05 RF MicD Rambus ... 7.94 -.04 Regenrn ... 60.21 +.79 RschMotn ... 18.58 +.72 RetailOpp .48f 11.17 -.61 RexEnergy ... 15.50 -.65

RightNow ... 42.90 -.02 RosettaR ... 53.35 -.99 RossStrs .88 u92.28 +3.19 Rovi Corp ... 27.50 -.25 RoyGld .60f 80.10 -1.35 rue21 ... 23.72 -.32

S-T-U

... 9.69 -.05 S1 Corp SBA Com ... 40.82 -.07 .24f 16.71 -.09 SEI Inv STEC ... 9.19 +.07 SalixPhm ... 43.51 -.63 ... 49.86 +.55 SanDisk Sanmina ... 8.57 +.10 ... 1.30 ... Sanofi rt Sapient .35e 12.07 -.21 SavientPh ... 2.29 -.22 SeagateT .72 17.40 +.30 SearsHldgs ... 57.48 -2.85 SeattGen ... 16.44 -.19 ... 19.31 +.78 SelCmfrt Semtech ... 23.89 +.69 Sequenom ... 4.14 -.04 Shutterfly ... d27.56 +.48 SigmaDsg ... d6.50 -.48 SigmaAld .72 64.71 -.10 Slcnware .28e 4.68 +.09 SilvStd g ... 14.59 -.12 Sina ... 66.41 +.33 SiriusXM ... 1.88 +.08 SkywksSol ... 16.16 -.15 SodaStrm ... 30.15 +.30 ... 50.40 +.96 Sohu.cm ... 2.56 -.05 Sonus ... u14.21 +.36 SpectPh Spreadtrm .20 25.49 +.74 .40 14.32 -.09 Staples StarScient ... 2.60 -.04 Starbucks .68f 43.59 +.11 StlDynam .40 13.19 +.01 SteinMrt .50e 6.46 -.11 StewEnt .14 6.21 -.01 StoneMor 2.34 d23.59 -1.69 SunPower ... 7.38 -.44 support.cm ... 2.10 +.05 SusqBnc .12f 7.96 +.04 Symantec ... 16.24 -.11 Synopsys ... 27.50 -.47 TD Ameritr .24f 16.11 -.18 ... 1.63 -.07 THQ TakeTwo ... 13.82 -.13 Tekelec ... 10.99 -.03 Tellabs .08 3.93 -.04 TennCB lfh ... d.07 -.01 TeslaMot ... 32.60 -.14 TesseraTch ... 17.06 -.29 TevaPhrm .90e 39.74 +.13 TexRdhse .32 13.80 +.41 ... 27.23 -.17 TibcoSft TiVo Inc ... 9.86 -.02 TransceptP ... 8.48 +1.51 TridentM h ... .23 -.03 ... 4.58 +.21 TriQuint UTStarcm ... 1.27 -.08 UTiWrldwd .06 13.51 -2.05 UltaSalon ... 68.49 -1.14 Umpqua .28f 12.30 -.20 UtdOnln .40 5.32 +.04 UtdTherap ... 41.54 +.63 UnivDisp ... 40.25 +1.29 UrbanOut ... 27.40 +.42

V-W-X-Y-Z

... 19.91 +.25 VCA Ant ValueClick ... 15.40 -.06 VeecoInst ... 25.14 +.25 Verisign 5.75e 33.87 +.29 ... u38.75 -.53 Verisk ... 29.39 +.40 VertxPh ViacomB 1.00 43.12 -1.64 Vical ... 4.59 +.18 VirgnMda h .16 22.53 +.37 ViroPhrm ... u23.76 -.25 ... 10.50 +.37 Vivus Vodafone 2.10e 27.20 +.05 WarnerCh ... 16.11 +.39 WashFed .24 13.01 ... ... 36.04 -.18 WebMD WstptInn g ... 29.11 +1.44 ... 3.50 +.05 WetSeal WholeFd .56f 67.85 -.25 Windstrm 1.00 11.69 -.07 Winn-Dixie ... 5.26 -.27 Woodward .28 40.00 -2.34 Wynn 2.00a 118.96 -1.60 Xilinx .76 33.06 +.35 YRC rsh ... .03 ... ... 16.23 +.52 Yahoo Yandex n ... 21.92 -.06 ZionBcp .04 15.90 -.19 Zipcar n ... d14.79 -1.17 Zoltek ... 9.07 +.86

AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg CrSuiHiY .32 Crossh g rs ... AbdAsPac .42 6.95 -.04 CubicEngy ... AdeonaPh ... .98 +.02 DejourE g ... Adventrx ... .62 -.00 DenisnM g ... AlexcoR g ... 6.84 +.07 EV LtdDur 1.25 AlldNevG ... 34.49 -1.40 EvolPetrol ... AmApparel ... .55 +.03 ExeterR gs ... AntaresP ... 2.59 -.03 FrkStPrp .76 Armour wt ... .01 -.00 GabGldNR 1.68 Aurizon g ... 5.95 -.15 GascoEngy ... AvalRare n ... 3.24 -.10 Gastar grs ... ... 3.88 ... GenMoly Banro g ... BarcUBS36 ... 43.61 -.24 GoldResrc .60 BarcGSOil ... 25.49 -.08 GoldenMin ... Brigus grs ... 1.30 -.04 GoldStr g ... BritATob 3.86e 92.58 -.57 GranTrra g ... CAMAC En ... 1.11 +.11 GrtBasG g ... ... .14 +.08 GtPanSilv g ... CanoPet CardiumTh ... .33 -.00 HstnAEn .02a CelSci ... d.29 -.01 ImpOil gs .44 CFCda g .01 22.20 -.13 IndiaGC ... CheniereEn ... 9.82 -.28 InovioPhm ... CheniereE 1.70 15.94 -.30 IntTower g ... ClaudeR g ... 1.83 -.12 KeeganR g ... ClghGlbOp 1.08 10.79 +.09 LadThalFn ...

Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n 26.09 -.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.08 -.17 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 38.74 -.16 Price Funds: BlChip n 39.22 +.15 CapApp n 20.73 -.06 EmMktS n 30.19 +.28 EqInc n 22.67 -.09 EqIndex n 33.65 -.07 Growth n 32.29 +.15 HiYield n 6.38 +.02 InstlCpG 16.46 +.07 IntlBond n 9.99 +.04 Intl G&I 12.02 -.09 IntlStk n 12.90 -.01 MidCap n 58.24 -.14 MCapVal n22.39 -.10 N Asia n 17.48 +.10 New Era n 46.31 -.13 N Horiz n 35.76 -.07 9.64 ... N Inc n OverS SF r n7.62 -.05 R2010 n 15.39 -.01 R2015 n 11.84 -.01 R2020 n 16.25 -.02 R2025 n 11.82 -.01 R2030 n 16.87 -.02 R2035 n 11.89 -.01 R2040 n 16.90 -.02 ShtBd n 4.81 ... SmCpStk n34.10 -.29 SmCapVal n35.35-.43 SpecIn n 12.23 +.01 Value n 22.49 -.10 Principal Inv: LT2020In 11.49 -.02 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.60 -.05

Nov 12 2.4920 2.5039 2.4920 2.4976 Dec 12 2.4907 2.5022 2.4564 2.4875 Jan 13 2.4821 Feb 13 2.4876 Mar 13 2.4921 Apr 13 2.5921 May 13 2.5936 Jun 13 2.5756 Jul 13 2.5551 Aug 13 2.5346 Sep 13 2.5121 Oct 13 2.3961 Nov 13 2.3756 Dec 13 2.3400 2.3626 2.3400 2.3626 Last spot N/A Est. sales 121258. Wed’s Sales: 190,378 Wed’s open int: 265043, off -1223 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Jan 12 3.612 3.689 3.541 3.648 Feb 12 3.641 3.711 3.572 3.675 Mar 12 3.643 3.711 3.576 3.680 Apr 12 3.684 3.740 3.615 3.710 May 12 3.714 3.777 3.658 3.746 Jun 12 3.757 3.812 3.700 3.786 Jul 12 3.810 3.868 3.753 3.839 Aug 12 3.838 3.893 3.781 3.869 Sep 12 3.867 3.895 3.783 3.872 Oct 12 3.881 3.933 3.820 3.909 Nov 12 4.018 4.065 3.965 4.046 Dec 12 4.316 4.341 4.250 4.324 Jan 13 4.430 4.468 4.373 4.452 Feb 13 4.430 4.459 4.367 4.437 Mar 13 4.370 4.384 4.321 4.384 Apr 13 4.278 4.290 4.225 4.290 May 13 4.255 4.312 4.255 4.309 Jun 13 4.286 4.339 4.286 4.339 Jul 13 4.329 4.380 4.329 4.380 Aug 13 4.376 4.398 4.347 4.398 Sep 13 4.365 4.420 4.340 4.401 Oct 13 4.430 4.437 4.371 4.437 Nov 13 4.510 4.544 4.510 4.544 Dec 13 4.750 4.771 4.730 4.771 Jan 14 4.824 4.878 4.824 4.878 Last spot N/A Est. sales 370321. Wed’s Sales: 514,730 Wed’s open int: 954405, off -690

2.90 .39 .58 .32 1.45 14.92 7.25 3.25 10.65 15.97 .17 3.37 3.26 20.78 6.81 2.07 6.23 .94 2.26 14.05 42.81 .31 d.45 4.86 4.37 2.25

-.02 +.02 +.04 -.01 +.02 -.03 -.05 +.17 -.26 +.34 -.01 +.17 -.09 +.62 -.07 ... -.15 +.01 -.02 +.04 +.07 -.03 -.07 -.17 +.18 -.10

LongweiPI ... LucasEngy ... MadCatz g ... MdwGold g ... Minefnd g ... MinesMgt ... NeoStem ... Neoprobe ... Nevsun g .10f NewEnSys ... NwGold g ... ... NA Pall g NthnO&G ... NovaGld g ... ParaG&S ... PhrmAth ... PionDrill ... PolyMet g ... Procera rs ... Quaterra g ... QuestRM g ... RareEle g ... ... Rentech Richmnt g ... Rubicon g ... SamsO&G ...

1.47 2.25 .58 2.38 12.03 2.40 .51 2.36 6.02 d.60 11.07 3.17 24.64 11.13 2.63 1.21 10.90 1.25 16.48 .74 3.07 5.36 1.45 11.88 3.65 1.87

+.09 +.13 -.01 +.02 +.04 -.01 +.01 -.12 +.13 -.06 -.02 +.01 +.15 -.36 -.01 -.07 -.08 +.06 +.39 +.02 -.02 -.11 -.04 -.06 +.10 +.24

B5

SeabGld g ... Senesco ... SprottRL g .01e T3 Motn rs ... TanzRy g ... ... Taseko TrnsatlPet ... ... TriValley TriangPet ... Tucows g ... Univ Insur .32m Ur-Energy ... ... Uranerz UraniumEn ... VangTotW .92e VantageDrl ... ... VirnetX VistaGold ... VoyagerOG ... WalterInv .22e WFAdvInco1.02 ... Xfone YM Bio g ... ZBB Engy ...

22.31 .28 1.51 .47 2.88 3.09 1.25 .18 5.70 .75 3.40 1.01 1.88 2.89 44.47 1.21 19.54 3.63 2.48 22.20 9.72 .68 1.38 .55

-.48 +.05 -.07 +.03 +.15 +.02 ... +.00 -.05 -.01 -.06 -.08 -.05 -.16 -.20 +.01 -.30 +.02 -.07 -.16 -.02 +.08 +.11 -.01

VoyA p 20.23 +.05 GNMA Ad n11.15 -.01 IntlGr n 17.21 +.02 500 n 115.07 -.21 GrwAdm n 32.12 +.01 IntlVal n 28.19 -.06 Growth n 32.12 +.02 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.16 -.09 HlthCr n 55.88 -.11 ITIGrade n 9.97 +.01 MidCap n 19.92 -.02 PremierI r 20.39 -.19 HiYldCp n 5.58 +.01 LifeCon n 16.29 -.02 SmCap n 33.44 -.26 TotRetI r 12.71 -.09 InfProAd n 28.10 -.02 LifeGro n 21.36 -.05 SmlCpGth n21.55 -.14 ITBdAdml n11.74 +.01 LifeMod n 19.37 -.03 Russell Funds S: SmlCpVl n 15.06 -.14 StratBd 10.91 -.01 ITsryAdml n12.08 ... LTIGrade n10.03 -.02 IntGrAdm n54.83 +.07 Morg n 17.90 +.04 STBnd n 10.64 ... Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 37.26 -.08 ITAdml n 13.80 ... MuInt n 13.80 ... TotBnd n 10.95 -.01 S&P Sel 19.74 -.03 ITGrAdm n 9.97 +.01 PrecMtls r n23.83 -.33 TotlIntl n 13.78 -.05 LtdTrAd n 11.10 ... PrmcpCor n13.65 +.02 TotStk n 31.13 -.08 Scout Funds: Intl 28.73 -.16 LTGrAdml n10.03 -.02 Prmcp r n 64.94 +.11 Vanguard Instl Fds: LT Adml n 11.15 ... SelValu r n18.72 -.10 BalInst n 21.68 -.03 Selected Funds: AmShD 39.50 -.09 MCpAdml n90.53 -.07 STAR n 19.01 -.02 DevMkInst n8.89 -.06 Sequoia n 144.25 -.24 MuHYAdm n10.55 ... STIGrade n10.62 ... ExtIn n 39.61 -.22 PrmCap r n67.43 +.12 StratEq n 18.54 -.06 TCW Funds: FTAllWldI r n82.47 TotRetBdI 9.69 -.01 ReitAdm r n78.40 -.97 TgtRetInc n11.60 -.01 .21 STsyAdml n10.83 ... TgRe2010 n22.95-.03 Templeton Instit: STBdAdml n10.64 ... TgtRe2015 n12.57 - GrwthIst n 32.12 +.01 ForEqS 18.19 +.02 ShtTrAd n 15.90 ... .02 InfProInst n11.45 ... Third Avenue Fds: STFdAd n 10.92 ... TgRe2020 n22.14-.04 InstIdx n 114.33 -.22 ValueInst 41.68 +.20 STIGrAd n 10.62 ... TgtRe2025 n12.53 - InsPl n 114.34 -.21 Thornburg Fds: SmCAdm n33.51 -.26 .02 IntValA p 24.65 -.02 TxMCap r n62.87 -.12 TgRe2030 n21.34-.05 InsTStPlus n28.18-.07 IncBuildC p17.79 -.06 TtlBAdml n10.95 -.01 TgtRe2035 n12.77 - MidCpIst n 20.00 -.01 SCInst n 33.51 -.26 IntValue I 25.20 -.03 TStkAdm n31.14 -.08 .03 Tweedy Browne: WellslAdm n54.70-.02 TgtRe2040 n20.92 - TBIst n 10.95 -.01 TSInst n 31.15 -.07 GblValue 22.45 -.07 WelltnAdm n53.51-.17 .05 USAA Group: Windsor n 42.96 -.19 TgtRe2045 n13.14 - ValueIst n 20.07 -.08 Inco 13.00 -.01 WdsrIIAd n45.47 -.14 .03 Vanguard Signal: VALIC : Wellsly n 22.58 ... 500Sgl n 95.07 -.18 Vanguard Fds: StkIdx 24.95 -.05 AssetA n 23.93 -.04 Welltn n 30.98 -.10 MidCpIdx n28.57 -.02 Vanguard Admiral: DivdGro n 15.25 -.05 Wndsr n 12.73 -.05 STBdIdx n 10.64 ... BalAdml n 21.68 -.03 Energy n 65.03 -.42 WndsII n 25.61 -.08 TotBdSgl n10.95 -.01 CAITAdm n11.18 ... EqInc n 21.35 -.07 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStkSgl n30.06 -.07 CpOpAdl n72.35 +.20 Explr n 71.72 -.34 MidCpIstPl n98.65-.08 EMAdmr r n33.89 +.36 GNMA n 11.15 -.01 TotIntAdm r n23.05 - Western Asset: CorePlus I 10.99 -.01 Energy n 122.17 -.78 GlobEq n 16.45 -.04 .08 ExplAdml n66.84 -.31 HYCorp n 5.58 +.01 TotIntlInst r n92.26 - Yacktman Funds: Fund p n 17.44 -.02 ExtdAdm n39.61 -.22 HlthCre n 132.37 -.27 .30 500Adml n115.09 -.22 InflaPro n 14.31 ... TotIntlIP r n92.28 -.31 Focused n 18.64 -.03

+.0059 +.0064 +.0070 +.0070 +.0070 +.0070 +.0070 +.0070 +.0070 +.0070 +.0070 +.0070 +.0070 +.0070

+.098 +.097 +.099 +.094 +.088 +.084 +.084 +.085 +.086 +.087 +.082 +.072 +.069 +.068 +.067 +.063 +.062 +.062 +.062 +.062 +.062 +.062 +.059 +.056 +.054

METALS NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Thu. Aluminum -$0.8967 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.3589 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $3.5220 N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Lead - $1985.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8812 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1752.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1735.30 troy oz., NY Merc spot Thu. Silver - $32.930 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $32.695 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Platinum -$1561.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1557.20 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised


B6 Friday, December 2, 2011

ENTERTAINMENT / CLASSIFIEDS

Kanye gets 7 Grammy noms; Adele, Mars, Foos get 6

It was Adele’s year, and when the Grammy Awards are revealed next February, it very well may be her night. But on Wednesday night, the British songstress shared in the Grammy nominations glory. While she was nominated for six trophies, including album of the year for “21” and record and song of the year for her bitter groove “Rolling in the Deep,” Bruno Mars and the Foo Fighters also received six each, and it was Kanye West who was the night’s top leader, with seven nominations. West was nominated for song of the year for his allstar anthem “All of the Lights,” which featured everyone from Rihanna to Elton John. But even though the album from which it came, “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy,” heralded an epic album by critics when it was released last year, it was not featured in the best album category (so far, no obligatory West rant has surfaced in response). Bon Iver, the folky indie rock act that was a key part of “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy” and received a popularity boost from its association with Kanye, was one of the night’s big winners, receiving four nominations, including for best artist, and song and record of the year for “Holocene.” And last year’s critical dar-

GARAGE SALES 001. North

901 N. Beech, Viernes y Sabado, 7a-2p. Vamos a tener de todo mucha ropa de temporada.

004. Southeast 314 E. Church, Fri-Mon, 11a-4p. Lots & lots of household goods. Priced to sell.

006. Southwest

3103 S. Lea (inside sale), Thurs-Fri, 8am. Grand kids sale: Lots of glass items & 2 fountains, linen. 50 WILDY, Saturday, 7:00am. 4 Family Sale.

007. West

HUGE ESTATE SALE 308 N. Missouri Sat. 7-3 Goodies Galore & Tons of Unique Treasures. Everything must go!

JUDGE SNEAD & Family Estate Sale Friday, Dec 2nd 7-3 308 N. Missouri Antique & Vintage Furniture, Huge Selection of Costume & Rhinestone Jewelry, Vintage Toys in Original Boxes, Lots Of Antique & Vintage Books, Persian Wool Area Rugs, Several Nice China Sets, Over 50 Pcs American Fostoria & Other Fine Crystal Items, Beautiful Silver Punch Bowl Set, Original Artwork, Many Collectibles, Wedding Dresses, Vintage Hats & Purses, Lots of Christmas Items, Appliances, TV’s, Records, plus much more! Cash Only.

1002 DE Bremond, Fri. 8-3pm, Sat. 7-3pm. Clothes, toys, bikes, shoes.

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice

HAPPY KIDS CHRISTMAS COLORING CONTEST – “Navidad Colorear Concurso.” Go to www.HappyTales Publishing.com download pictures, color, mail by December 10th. Three Prizes per age group. Enter Today!

025. Lost and Found

FOUND SIAMESE cat 2 wks ago in vicinity of Albertson’s. Call 622-3936 FOUND BLACK & white kitten South end of Roswell. Call 840-9100 (Rhonda) to describe. LOST FEMALE 6 mo old boxer, brown, brindle w/pink collar. Finder will be rewarded. 910-2431

INSTRUCTION

030. Education & Instructions

ALLIED HEALTH career training- Attend college 100% online . Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com

lings, Mumford & Sons, were once again nominated, receiving among their bids for song and record of the year for “The Cave.” Other multiple nominees were Lady Gaga, Nicki Minaj, Lil Wayne, Radiohead, and dubstep artist Skrillex, who landed a bid for best new artist among his surprising five nominations. Among the evening’s biggest eye-openers were the artists not mentioned in certain categories. Taylor Swift, who won best album in 2010 for “Fearless” and was considered to be a key favorite for her multiplatinum “Speak Now,” only got her three nominations in the country fields, and Tony Bennett, who had a feelgood story as his “Duets II” album made him the oldest act to debut an album at No. 1 at age 85, was not nominated for album of the year, as some critics had predicted. West’s joint album with Jay-Z, “Watch the Throne,” was also ignored for best album. Mars, who like Adele was nominated in all the top three categories — record, album and song of the year — was estatic about his night. He was nominated for song and record of the year for “Grenade,” album for “Doo-Wops & Hooligans,” and best pop solo performance, among other bids.

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

SRHCDC IS seeking to hire a Certified Weatherization Technician. Annual salary between $30,000 to $45,000, based on experience and qualifications. Please forward resumes to Southwestern Regional Housing and Community Development Corporation, attention Veronika Molina, 109 E. Pine Street, Suite 5, Deming, NM 88030. SOUTHEAST NM Community Action Corporation Head Start Site Supervisor Carlsbad NM

Responsible for providing managerial oversight and direction to the Center Staff, consistent with agency policies and Head Start Program Performance Standards.

$14.68 ~ $17.25 per hour (DOQ) 36 hours per week FULL TIME POSITION 4 DAY WORK WEEK!!

ATTRACTIVE BENEFIT PACKAGE First Review Deadline ~ December 5, 2011 ~ Position Will Remain Open Until Filled ~

See detailed Job Description ~ Complete/Submit Application at the Local Department of Workforce Solutions SNMCAC is an EEOE

ACCOUNTANT - Begin your public accounting career with us! Immediate opening for entry level Staff Accountant with regional public accounting firm. Bachelor in Accounting required. Must possess strong computer skills. Strong analytical, organizational and communication skills required. Competitive salary/benefits, plus opportunities for personal/professional growth. Submit resume/transcripts by FAX: 575-748-3244; by mail: Staff Accountant, P.O. Box 1323, Artesia, NM 88211-1323; or e-mail to artesiapic@sproles.com.

ACCOUNTANT - Immediate opening for Tax Accountant with regional public accounting firm. Bachelor in Accounting required, CPA a plus. Minimum of 3 to 5 years experience in tax accounting and return preparation. Proficiency in computer skills a must (Excel, Word, Windows). Strong analytical, organizational, and communication skills required. Competitive salary/benefits package, plus great opportunities for personal/professional growth. Submit resume by FAX: 575-748-3244; by mail: Staff Accountant, P.O. Box 1323, Artesia, NM 88211-1323; or e-mail to artesiapic@sproles.com.

“It feels incredible. Me and these guys, we locked ourselves in the studio not too far from here and worked on this album, especially ‘Grenade.’ That’s the song we worked the hardest on. That’s like our trophy right there. Of all the songs we’ve been fortunate enough to be a part of this year, we were most proud of that one,” Mars said after the nominations, some of which were announced in Los Angeles at the Nokia Theatre as part of the Recording Academy’s hour-long concert nominations special. Mars, who was part of the CBS special, along with Rihanna, Lady Gaga, The Band Perry and others, also got key nominations last year. But he said of awards: “I’m trying to get used to it. It’s hard for me, because Adele is incredible. Kanye West is incredible. All these people are just incredible and they all offer something different, so the fact that this album got recognized and is being categorized alongside these acts, that’s the craziest part, because I’m a fan of all of this music.” The academy seemed to be fans of a wide variety of music as well. The top categories honored rap, pop, indie music, folk and dance. Adele’s “21” is the year’s top-selling album with more than 4.5 million albums sold, and the singer-song-

045. Employment Opportunities

Avon, Buy/Sell. Christmas around the corner. $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR Busy Medical office seeking CMA MUST HAVE 2 years experience and strong background in medical field. Applicant must be able to work under pressure, multi-task, be a team player and have and excellent attitude. Bilingual is a must. Serious inquires only. Please e-mail your resume to bianca@roswellmedical.com

No Phone Calls Please.

IMMEDIATE OPENING FOR a part-time or full-time Nurse Practitioner or Physician Assistant for a busy practice in Roswell, NM. Please contact Aracely Perez at 575-625-8430

SOLITAIRE HOMES of Roswell is offering a position in sales. Applications are being accepted in person. No phone calls please. 4001 W. Second St. Roswell, NM 88201. ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER JOBS in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper to place your ad or log onto www.nmpress.org for more information.

THE ROSWELL Daily Record is now accepting applications for the position of: OUTSIDE SALES The ideal candidate must possess excellent customer service skills, superior organizational skills a self-starter and strong work ethic. Experience or background in advertising also helpful. Must be computer literate. This is a full time position. Interested Applicants please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Charles Fischer, 2301 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88201 or e-mail to: cfischer@ roswell-record.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! DOMINO'S PIZZA is now hiring drivers and Assistant Managers. Earn up to $14 per hour. Apply online today at careers.dominos.com Line Service Technician, Salary $13.03 hourly. Applications will be accepted until 4:00pm on Thursday, December 8, 2011. Complete job description and applications at the Village of Ruidoso, 313 Cree Meadows Dr. Ruidoso, NM 88345. Phone 258-4343 or 1-877-700-4343. Fax 258-5848. Website www.ruidoso-nm.gov “Drugfree Workplace” EEOE.

Airport Operations Supervisor Salary $1,390.62 Bi-Weekly. Applications will be accepted until 4:00pm on Friday, December 9, 2011. Complete job description and applications at the Village of Ruidoso, 313 Cree Meadows Dr. Ruidoso, NM 88345. Phone 258-4343 or 1-877-700-4343. Fax 258-5848. Website www.ruidoso-nm.gov “Drugfree Workplace” EEOE.

045. Employment Opportunities

DRIVERS Coastal Transport is hiring Drivers at our Satellite Terminal in Roswell with Class (A) CDL. (X) Endorsement Must be 23 yrs Old with 1 Yr Tractor Trailer experience. Home every day! Scheduled Days Off, $2000 sign on bonus. For more Information call 1-877-297-7300 2408 N. Industrial Artesia, NM. COTA/L Part time position available. Please submit resume at 304 N. Richardson. SOUTHEAST NM Community Action Corporation Roswell Head Start Program is accepting applications for:

writer’s mournful postbreakup album produced smash hits like the torch ballad “Someone Like You.” Besides “21,” the best album candidates inclduded Lady Gaga; Gaga garnered her third straight nod in the category for “Born This Way,” while veteran rockers the Foo Fighters were nominated for “Wasting Light,” along with Mars’ debut album, and Rihanna’s steamy dance album “Loud.” For record of the year, besides Bon Iver, Adele, Mars and Mumford & Sons, Katy Perry’s inspirational anthem “Firework” got a nod. The category looked virtually the same for song of the year, with “Firework” being replaced by West’s “All of the Lights.” Unlike the past two years, which saw Swift and fellow country act Lady Antebellum soar in the general categories, the only country act that got a mainstream nomination was the country sibling act The Band Perry. Best known for their poignant ballad “If I Die Young,” they got a nomination for best new artist. Their competition also includes Bon Iver, Jay-Z rap protigi J. Cole, Skrillex and rapper-singer Minaj. “It’s been an amazing evening,” said lead singer Kimberly Perry. “We got the good news yesterday that our debut album went platinum, it was certified yester-

045. Employment Opportunities

COMFORT KEEPERS A non-medical in-home care agency is seeking mature, dependable people to fill open positions caring for the elderly. If you would enjoy providing companionship, preparing meals, housekeeping, personal care and shopping for our clients then we want to hear from you. Applicants must have very neat, clean appearance, possess a valid driver’s license and auto insurance. Must have Caregiving or CNA experience and be available evenings and weekends. Apply in person at: 1410 South Main, Roswell.

AP Photo

In this May 21 file photo, Kanye West performs at Mawazine Festival in Rabat, Morocco. West was nominated for seven Grammy Awards, Wednesday. day, to so follow it with a nomination tonight is phenomenal. We’re just in the clouds, absolutely.” The 54th Grammys will be held Feb. 12 in Los Angeles. The ceremony will mark the first since the academy shaved its categories from 109 to 78 this year, amid some protest. Some of the more niched categories, like best Zydeco or Cajun music album, were eliminated. In addition, men and

045. Employment Opportunities

The Sidney Gutierrez Middle School in Roswell, New Mexico, a public charter school, is looking to fill the following staff positions for the 2011-2012 school year: (1) a part-time math teacher and; (2) a part-time spanish teacher. The teacher must have appropriate NM State Teaching Certification or be eligible for licensure waivers. Please send a letter of interest and resume to P.O. Box 1674, Roswell, New Mexico 88202 on or before December 19, 2011. For additional information, please contact, Mr. Joe Andreis at 347-9703.

Legals

Teachers ~ $14.03 $20.64 (DOQ) (positions in Artesia)

!!! 4 DAY WORK WEEK (Mon-Thurs)!!!

WORK SCHEDULE PER HEAD START CALENDAR REVIEW DEADLINE ~ DECEMBER 12, 2011 POSITION WILL REMAIN OPEN UNTIL FILLED

Review job description & work schedule at the Department of Workforce Solutions at 2110 S. Main, Roswell, NM

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish December 2, 2011

The Board of Regents of New Mexico Military Institute will meet in open session at 1:00 P.M., Wednesday, 14 December, 2011 in McNally Conference Room on the second floor of Lusk Hall. This meeting is held for the purpose of discussing and deciding on an agenda items that include: Approval of Graduates. The agenda is subject to change until 24 hours prior to the meeting. An agenda will be available 24 hours prior to the meeting at the Superintendent’s Office located on the second floor of Lusk Hall. Every effort will be made to ensure that the meeting is held at a facility that is fully accessible to persons with mobility disabilities. Those who plan to attend the meeting and will need assistance or other special facilities relating to a disability should contact Colonel Frank Coggins, Chief of Staff, 505-624-8003, or CW3 Carl Hansen, Marketing Director, 505-624-8011 at least 48 hours prior to the meeting date.

Legals

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Publish Nov. 18, 25, Dec. 2, 2011

NOTICE is hereby given that on October 31, 2011, Hobson Farms, Inc., 6291 Hummingbird Lane, Roswell, New Mexico 88203 filed Application No. RA-1507 & RA-1515 et al with the STATE ENGINEER for permit to combine underground water rights consisting of a total of 658.5 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, of shallow groundwater diverted from the following described wells:

WELL NO. RA-1507 RA-1515 RA-1515-S

SUBDIVISION SW1/4NE1/4NE1/4 NE1/4NE1/4NW1/4 SE1/4NE1/4SE1/4

SECTION 31 36 36

TOWNSHIP 11 S. 11 S. 11 S.

RANGE 25 E. 24 E. 24 E.

SOURCE Shallow Shallow Shallow

Water rights under State Engineer file No. RA-1507 is presently authorized to use shallow well RA-1507 for the diversion of up to 124.2 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance of shallow groundwater, for the irrigation of up to 41.4 acres described as being Part of the NE1/4 Section 31, Township 11 South, Range 25 East, N.M.P.M.

Water rights under State Engineer file No. RA-1515 are presently authorized to use shallow wells RA-1515 & RA-1515-S for the diversion of up to 534.3 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance of shallow groundwater, for the irrigation of up to 178.1 acres of land described as followed:

SUBDIVISION Part of N1/2 Part of S1/2 Total

SECTION 36 36

TOWNSHIP 11 S. 11 S.

RANGE 24 E. 24 E.

Roswell Daily Record

ACRES 133.1 45.0 178.1

Application is made to combine the shallow groundwater rights described under State Engineer File No. RA-1507 Smith Farm Unit with the shallow groundwater rights described under State Engineer File No. RA-1515 et al the Home Place Farm Unit owned by Hobson Farms Inc. The combine will allow for more efficient farming practices on the 219.50 acres of irrigated land and allow the applicant greater flexibility during the irrigation operations.

The proposed move-from well and place of use is located near the intersection of Hobson Road and Hummingbird Lane. The proposed move-to wells and place of use are located near the intersection of Hobson Road and State Road 2. Both are located within the City of Roswell, Chaves County, New Mexico.

Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (legible, signed, and include the writer’s complete name and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment you must specifically identify your water rights; and/or (2) Public welfare/conservation of water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must show you will be substantially affected. The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with John R. D’Antonio, Jr., P.E., State Engineer, 1900 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, within ten (10) days after the date of last publication of this Notice. Facsimiles (fax) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is sent within 24-hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protest can be faxed to Office of the State Engineer, (575) 623-8559. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with Sections 72-2-16, 72-5-6, and 72-12-3.

women now compete together in vocal categories for pop, R&B and country, instead of having separate categories for each sex. This year, the category is best pop solo performance and Bruno Mars is the only man nominated for “Grenade.” His competition includes Adele for “Someone Like You,” Lady Gaga for “You and I,” Pink for “(Expletive) Perfect” and Perry for “Firework.”

045. Employment Opportunities

BEAUTY BAR Advisor Aggressive selling skills professional appearance able to perform make-overs Thur.-Sat. 15 hrs Plus addtional floor sales hrs. Apply in person at Bealls.

045. Employment Opportunities

Journeyman Electrician Accepting confidential applications for Industrial, Commercial & Agricultural experience preferred. Will consider all applications. Pay DOE plus Benefits. 575-734-5111

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish Nov.11, 18, 25, Dec. 2, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT Case No. CV-2010-967

LAND HOLDING, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, Plaintiff,

v.

No. CV-2010-967

ROSWELL NEW MEXICO ASSOCIATES, LLC, a Michigan limited liability company, THIEF RIVER FALLS MINNESOTA ASSOCIATES, LLC, a Michigan limited liability company, SCS ASSOCIATES, LLC, a Michigan limited liability company, KENNETH S. KLEIN and CYNTHIA R. KLEIN, Defendants.

NOTICE OF SPECIAL MASTER’S SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on December 8, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. the undersigned Special Master, or his designee, will, on the front steps of the Fifth Judicial District Courthouse, 400 N. Virginia, Roswell, New Mexico, sell and convey all of the rights, title and interest of the above-named Defendants, in and to the hereinafter described real estate to the highest bidder for cash in lawful currency of the United States of America. The sale may be postponed and rescheduled at the discretion of the Special Master. The property to be sold is located at Blue Mountain Road and North Main Street, Roswell, New Mexico, 88201, being tax parcel number 10-24332, (if there is a conflict between the legal description and the street address or tax parcel number, the legal description shall control) and is more particularly described as follows: Lot five (5) Sam's Club Subdivision, in the City of Roswell, County of CHAVES and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk's Office on May 19, 2005 and recorded in Book X of Plat Records, CHAVES County, New Mexico, at Page 50B,

including any improvements, fixtures, and attachments. The property will be sold “as is,” without warranties, express or implied, subject to all taxes, utility liens and other restrictions and easements of record, and subject to a one (1) month right of redemption by the Defendants upon entry of an order approving sale. The foregoing sale will be made to satisfy a judgment in favor of the Plaintiff, Land Holding, LLC, rendered by this Court in the above-entitled and numbered cause on September 7, 2011, being an action to foreclose a mortgage on the above-described property. The judgment in favor of the Plaintiff is $2,622,071.39, and the same bears interest at the rate of 4% above a fluctuating “prime rate” per annum, commencing on July 19, 2011. The property will be sold to the highest bidder for cash in lawful currency of the United States of America. In payment of a bid, the Special Master will accept only cash or a bank cashier's check issued by a federally chartered and insured bank or a New Mexico state chartered and federally insured bank or savings and loan association. The cash or cashier's check from the successful bidder must be received by the Special Master no later than 2:00 p.m. on the date of the Special Master's sale.

Plaintiff may bid and purchase the property at the Special Master's sale, may bid all or a portion of its judgment in lieu of cash towards the purchase price and may submit its bid verbally or in writing.

Proceeds of the sale will be distributed first to the Special Master to satisfy his fees, costs and expenses, and then to payment of the above-referenced judgment owing to the Plaintiff. Any excess proceeds will be distributed pursuant to further order of the Court. MARION “JIMMY” CRAIG III, Special Master P.O. Box 1436 Roswell, New Mexico 88202-1436 Telephone: (575) 622-1106


Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

CAREER TECHNICAL Education Manager The primary function of this position is to plan, direct and administer the Applied ACT/WBL programs and coordinate the total activity. The CTE Manager will ascertain that students are equipped with the educational development, technical training skills and attitudes necessary for employability through the Job Corps program. A college degree and three years experience as an instructor and at least one year as a supervisor or administrator. Must have a valid state drivers license. Driver’s Education Instructor Instructor is to provide eligible students with skills and attitudes needed to obtain a state issued driver’s license, primarily through the use of the states Department of Public Safety’s Drivers Handbook. Must maintain student records and utilize a variety of teaching techniques and learning activities. The instructor must have a four-year college degree, as well as State certification and the Continuing Education Course as required by the State for those providing driver’s education instruction. Prior experience teaching in the public schools or other educational institutions is desirable.

PRODUCTION WORKERS#103982

Production workers needed. Must be able to pass drug test. Apply at AmeriPride Services between 8:00am and 11:00am 12/01 thru 12/07 at 515 N. Virginia, Roswell NM 88201. Temporary position for two to three months!

AA/EEO Employer M/F/D/V

I NEED a driver with CDL license. Call 575-623-3259 GATEWAY CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL is currently taking applications for part time teachers. We’re looking for Christian workers with high-energy and good people skills who love children. A GED or higher is needed, and experience working with children is also a requirement. Apply at 1900 N. Sycamore, no phone calls please.

Please submit a resume to Roswell Job Corps Center, 57 G Street, Roswell, NM 88203. Or email a resume to

gonzalez.mary@jobcorps.org

BUSY OPTOMETRIST office seeking Full Time Employee. Individual must be dependable, well organized and hard working. Experience and bi-lingual a plus. Please send resume to P.O. Box 1897, Unit 288, Roswell, NM 88202.

Career Opportunities, Inc is a EEO/AD/DV employer.

CURRENTLY LOOKING for a Medical Assistant Hours: Monday to Friday. Education and Qualifications: - Associates, Medical Assistant, or C.N.A Certification - At least 1 year working in a medical office - Ability to handle time sensitive issues, multitask, excellent customer services skills, and a team player attitude is a must. Please fax your resume to 575-622-1143 Attention Human Resources

045. Employment Opportunities

AIRLINES ARE HIRING – Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified – Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-886-7324. FRESENIUS MEDICAL Care/Southeastern New Mexico Kidney Center is seeking a PCT. Full benefits, 401k, medical, vision, dental. PTO after 6 months. Other company benefits. Open Mon-Sat. Off Sundays.12 hour shifts. Competitive pay. Apply in person at 2801 N. Main St. Suite H. FRESENIUS MEDICAL Care/Southeastern New Mexico Kidney Center is seeking RNs. Full benefits, 401K, medical, vision, dental. PTO after 6 months. Other company benefits. Open Mon-Sat. Off Sundays.12 hour shifts. Competitive pay. Apply in person at 2801 N. Main St. Suite H. KBIM RADIO is seeking part time board operator. Experience helpful but will train. Contact Gary Lee at 575-623-9100.

TEMPORARY FARM Labor: Liberty Honey Farms, Liberty, TX, has 18 positions for bees & honey; 3 mos. experience required as a beekeeper; may not have bee, pollen or honey related allergies, must be able to obtain clean driver’s license in 30 days following hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.57 up to $11.52/hr depending on location; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 1/15/12 – 11/15/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX8162335.

CLASSIFIEDS

SERVICES

105. Childcare

NEED CHILD care? Find the widest range of available childcare for your children and their needs. 1-800-691-9067 or www.newmexic okids.org. You may also call us; Family Resource & Referral 622-9000 and we can help you navigate the system.

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 HOUSE & office cleaning at good, cheap price. 973-3592 or 973-2649 SUNSHINE WINDOW Service Free estimates. 575-626-545,575-626-5153

150. Concrete

ALL TYPES of concrete work. Patios, driveways, sidewalks, etc. 624-7734

185. Electrical

BIG HORN Electric Professional work, affordable price. 575-317-8345 NM Lic#367662.

195. Elderly Care

DEPENDABLE PRIVATE Caregiver to the rescue, yrs. of exp. Tina 420-8877

200. Fencing

ALL TYPES of fencing. Wood, chainlinks, metal, block, etc. 624-7734 M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

210. Firewood/Coal

SEANSONED FIREWOOD delivered & stacked. 626-9803. FIREWOOD -$125 per cord Saturday only by appointment mixed hardwoods 624-1611 Cash only. PINON/ JUNIPER mix, $250 per cord. 575-973-0373 4 CORDS Cedar-Pinon mix $240 a cord, $125 a half. Split, delivered & stacked. 625-0105

220. Furniture Repair

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575) 622-7710 #45 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE

REPAIR & Refinish furniture & build furniture. Southwest Woods. 1727 SE Main. 623-0729 or 626-8466 Hrs 7-3pm. Call before you come in case he’s out running errands. Firewood available.

225. General Construction

MILLIGAN CONTRACTING Quality service for all your home improvement needs. Free Est. I show up & on time. Call Geary at 575-578-9353 Renovation projects? Need help? No job too big/small. 25 yrs. exp. Qualified in framing, trim carpentry, on-site custom cabinets, painting, sheet rock, drywall, doors, & windows. FREE est. Call Jerry Martin at 910-6898 or 622-8682 Leave Message. HARVEST BUILDERS All types of construction. Lic/Bonded 575-910-3000

230. General Repair

CARPENTRY, DRY wall, painting & concrete. We guarantee. 626-2050

232. Chimney Sweep

CHIMNEY SWEEP Have your woodstove or fireplace inspected and cleaned. Dust free Guarantee. 36 years Experience, Licensed, Insured. Bulldog Janitorial Services 575-308-9988

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Greenscapes Sprinkler Systems Lawn mowing, field mowing, gravel, sod-hydro seed, pruning, tilling, For dependable & reliable service call 622-2633 or 910-0150. Fall Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242. LAWN SERVICE & much more work at low price. 914-0803. Gonzales Enterprises Winter weatherization, leaf raking, sprinklers, landscaping, shrub & tree trimming, odd jobs. 575-317-8053 WEEKEND WARRIOR Lawn Service mowing, property cleanup, residential rain gutter cleaning, and much more 575-626-6121

310. Painting/ Decorating

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting at affordable prices. Call 637-9108. Paint Contractor Int. & Ext., remodels or new construction. Nathan 914-0083 Lic. Bonded & Insured.

312. Patio Covers

PATIOS, CARPORTS, decks, etc. 624-7734

316. Pet Services

Jacque’S PET SERVICES. 1002 E. 2nd. 622-4002. Boarding available. ARE YOU tired of being over charged for pet grooming? I am Jennifer and have relocated to 1301 E. 2nd. Call for appt 420-5806 or 623-1177 over 2 years experience.

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 625-9924 / 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

393. Storage Sheds

M.G. HORIZONS Build on site anysize storage shed. 623-1991.

395. Stucco Plastering

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217 NEW STUCCO & repairs, color, coating, etc. 624-7734

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 Allen’s Tree Srvc. 10% Christmas discount. Million $ insurance. 626-1835

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale TOWNHOUSE, 1400 sqft, 2br/2ba, laundry room/ study, new roof, cedar fence, stucco, porch, tile & carpet. Refinished kitchen, bath cabinets & new paint throughout, w/d. Large corner lot. Call 575-491-4235

To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SATURDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

Crewman/SR Job ID 1475 Roswell, NM NMGC has a position for a Crewman/Sr. Successful candidate and position level will be based on experience. Successful candidate provides labor support for gas distribution/transmission, construction, maintenance, installation and emergency response. Preferences: backhoe, leak survey, meter reading, construction experience, and strong computer skills a plus. Must be able to obtain a CDL within six months of hire. Must have a high school diploma or GED with experience commensurate with the position level and an acceptable driving record. To be considered go to the careers page at www.nmgco.com and review the position descriptions, register, upload a resume, apply and answer all posting questions. You must complete the online application process no later than December 7, 2011 to be considered.

New Mexico Gas Company is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. Women, minorities, disabled individuals and veterans are encouraged to apply.

Friday, December 2, 2011

490. Homes For Sale

Dennis the Menace

B7

FSBO: 1107 & 1109 W. 1st & adjacent lot, $59k. Call Greg 720-404-0467 3BR, 1 ba $55k inside remodeled. Please call 575-405-9075

FIXER UPPER for sale, $18,500 OBO, located at 413 S. Hemlock. Serious buyers please call 575-495-9521.

4Bd 1Ba, 703 E. Grnwd, $60k, cash offers, new carpet, etc. M-Th 624-1311 BEAUTIFUL, SPACIOUS, modern home in NW area, 2400 sqft, 3br/2ba, 905 Sherrill Ln, $244,900. 575-208-8018

606 N. Garden, needs work, small 2br/1ba, $7000 OBO. 575-693-8659. Dos recamaras chicas, un bano, require reparacion. 3 BR 1 ba at the base $42,500 owner financing with $5k down 420-1352

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

5 ACRES, $25K as is, septic system, 3809 Zinnia, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

FOR SALE: 4000sf metal building (near downtown area) w/warehouse, 2 offices, 2 bathrooms. Call 626-4685 for info. Main & Poe, 4600 sf $275k cash/trade for Ruidoso prprty, M-Th 624-1331

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

2002 FLEETWOOD, double carport, 2 storage buildings, 1000 E. College #38. 622-7703 NICE 14x72 Cameo + extras, in adult park, $35k. $5k down, $300/mo + $195 lot rent. 622-6786

520. Lots for Sale

PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan land West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848.

RENTALS

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. Clean 1br duplex, no pets, smoking or HUD. Mature adults. 405 S. Richardson $450 $450dep 420-0720 WILSHIRE GARDENS, a 40+ community has 1br for $625/mo & 2br for $725/mo available. Resident pays electric & water. Move-in special: Half off this month only. Please call 575-623-3733 or stop by 2727 Wilshire Blvd for application. Town Plaza Apartments Utilities paid - Gas and Water. New Owners, friendly new managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs/downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Seniors 55yrs plus, law enforcement & military will receive discount. No HUD. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 2nd year, 1 free month rent

540. Apartments Unfurnished

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

LARGE 1 bedroom apartment. References and background check required. Washer and Dryer hookups. Private parking. 420-0100

2BR/1BA, STOVE, refrig, w/d hookup, wtr pd, adults only, no pets. 317-2248

1&2Br, wtr pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

Spacious 2/2, all elec., $600/mo, $400/dep, no Hud, w/d hookup, Big yard, outside pets ok. 910-0827 2301 N. Grand, 2br, 1.5ba, 1car garage & laundry room. 910-4225. 1 & 2br, all bills pd, incl. $575/mo, w/d hookup. 2br wtr pd, $400/mo. 347-0493 2 BR Apartment. North location, bath and 1/2, garage, quiet neighborhood $750 mo. Call 420-4535 2BR/1BA, W/D hookups, all bills pd, 207 W. Mathews, $550/mo, $500/DD. 317-6479 ROSWELL 2 br apartment $600/mo, all utilities paid, fridge, w/d hookups, stove 1700 N Pontiac Dr. 626-864-3461 110 W Alameda #B, 1BR 1BA, $350 month, water paid. Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

FLETC Homes for rent. Long & short term rentals. 5 minutes from FLETC. Brand new & beautiful! Visit our website: www.lgrentalhomes.com or Call 420-0519. NW ROSWELL all new 2br furnished townhome, 2 car garage, FLETC ready. 575-420-0519 SHORT TERM OR LONG TERM RENTAL. 1br fully furnished w/decorator touches hard wood floors, washer/dryer stove/refrig. all dishes & linen, all utilities including high speed internet, cable, telephone, gas/electric water & alarm system. $750 mo. 575-973-1332 or 575-653-4654

5404 CACTUS Ave, North of Mall, clean sm. furnished 2br/1ba, W/D, utilities pd, yard care, carport, couple or single, no HUD, no pets, $700/mo, $500/dep. 625-0684 or 626-2545 FLETC READY 2518 Mimosa Dr. 3 br, 2 ba. double car garage, $2000 rent including all services 578-0161 or 840-7871 FLETC 1br 1ba carport, new furniture. You’ll love it. 575-420-4801 or 626-8302

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

3/1 Includes stove, ref., w/d, garage, nice yard, central heat/air, no HUD, $775/mo, $450/dep. 2/1, includes stove, ref, w/d, fireplace, central heat/air, no HUD, $590/mo, $400/dep. Call Jim 910-7969.

PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN.

400 E 5th 1 bedroom stove, refrig., water paid, $325 mo. $200 dep. 910-9648

EFFICIENCY 2 BR, downtown, clean, water paid. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD Call 623-8377

1415 W. Tilden, 2br, stove, refrig, $500/mo, $300/dep, no pets/HUD, must have references. 625-0512

EFFICIENCY 1 br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348.

ALL BILLS PAID 1 br $530 2 br $630, 3br/2ba $730 mo., ref air, new carpet, new paint/tile. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 Large, very nice 1br duplex, 108 W. 13th, avail. 12/4, no pets, no smokers, $825/mo , includes utilities, w/d, carport w/storage, $300/dep. For application call 623-4589. 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262

Private Room w/bath kitchen & washer/dryer privileges $100 per week 637-6520 REMODELED 3 br, 2 ba. $850 mo, $600 deposit. 703 Fruitland, No Pets, No HUD. 626-3816 1204 S. Missouri, spacious 2 or 3br, 1ba, good area, close to schools, garage, fenced, freshly painted, $700/mo, $400/dep, no HUD. 622-2485

1br/1ba, wtr pd, quiet area, HUD ok. $350/mo, $200 dep. 625-9208 after 5pm

VERY NICE North 2br mobile home, central ht, ref air, all appliances, $600 + no pets. 910-9357

North 2/2 remodeled, ht pump, stv, frg, DW, laundry rm, no pets, $595. 317-1078

2503, S. Lea, 3br/2ba, new construction, no smokers or pets, $1000 plus $500 dep. 575-317-4050

2br/1ba, stove, refrig., w/d hookup, wtr pd, no pets. 317-2248

2BR1BA, 2 pers, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

2004 W. Juniper, 3br/2ba, appliances, utility room, 1 car garage w/opener, large backyard, $900 plus utiities, $750/dep. 575-703-0298 or 575-624-2774

1007 1/2 S. Lea, 2br/1ba, house in back w/d hook-up, wtr pd. $500/mo. $330/dep. 317-1371 3/2, $650/mo, $500/dep, avail. 12/1. Call 575-420-3290 or 420-2537 304 S Evergreen 3br/1ba. w/d hkup, carport $550mo. no Hud/pets. 626-9347

1100 S. Washington clean 4br, 1 3/4ba, no HUD/pets, $750 mo, $750 dep. 575-937-1798 3BR HOUSE, 2br apt, $600/mo + $300 dep. Call 347-0493.

3/1/1, refrigerated air, $750/mo, $400/dep, 2708 S. Emerald. Avail. 12/1. No indoor pets. HUD accepted. 420-7735 CLEAN 2BDRM 1 bath, garage, appliances and yard. $650+ dep. 6 mon. lease. No HUD. Available Dec 1, 2011. Taking apps 626-2156. 3BR/1.5BA, $600/MO, $600/dep, 1730 N. Delaware, 420-6396. 2 BDRM $500/mo, $400/dep. No Pets, No HUD. Call 914-0101

CLEAN 2BR/1BA, fenced, storage, carport, W/D, $600 + dep. & utilities. 637-6934, 637-6958 3 RECAMARAS, 2 banos, refrigerador y estufa, excelentes condiciones, 300 $ deposito, 750 $ por mes. En Dexter 910-0644 2BR 107 S. Delaware. stove, refrig, wtr pd, $150/dep, Call 622-8697 or 575-495-9364.

105 S. Delaware, 2br, stove, refrig, wtr pd, $150/dep. Call 622-8697 or 575-495-9364.

Executive home NW, 602 Trailing Heart, 4br/2ba, garage, appliances, fenced yard, patio, wood stove, mature landscaping, pets w/fee, no HUD/smokers, $1300/mo, $650/dep, 575-405-0163 LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com!

601 W 17th, 2BR 1BA, $475 month 1207 E Alameda, 2BR 1BA, $500 month (HUD ok) 812 W Summit, 2BR 1BA, $550 month 1204 Beloit, 3BR 1BA, $650 month 1013 W Poe, 2BR 2BA, $725 month 1206 W 11th, 3BR 1BA, $750 month 613 S. Hemlock, 3BR 1BA, $800 month 3203 Delicado, 3BR 2BA, $900 month 95 B Bent Tree, 3BR 2BA, $1100 month 613 Twin Diamond, 3BR 2BA, $1100 month 91 A Bent Tree, 2BR 2BA, $1200 month 3301 Dow, 3BR 2BA, $1400 month 4803 Old Clovis Hwy, 5BR 3BA, $1500 month 4802 Paul, 3BR 2BA, $1700 mo (pool) Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604 1 BDRM house- 1 person only. $500/mo, $300/dep, bills paid, no pets, no smoking inside. 623-7565

555. Mobile Homes for Rent 2br/1ba, appliances furnished, no pets, references required, 902 1/2 E. Charleston Rd., $575/mo, $25 discount w/prompt payment, utilities pd, 1st mo. rent + $200 cleaning dep. 627-5399


B8 Friday, December 2, 2011 558. Roommates Wanted

Nice quiet neighborhood by Roswell High. 609-760-0919

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places FOR RENT: 2000sf warehouse & office space available 12/16, $575/mo. Call 626-4685 to look at. Office space: newly remodeled, 750 sf $800, 350sf $400 all bills paid 622-2564

TWO BUILDINGS available, approximately 5400 and 4000 square feet. Combination of offices, warehouses, large fenced areas. 1601 & 1603 W. 2nd. 208-8020

FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546.

Professional office 4 rent, 111 S. Kentucky @ Walnut St.,150 or 185sq. 623-8331 Beautiful suite includes waiting room, kitchen area, new carpet & paint, utilities & janitorial paid. 317-8717

580. Office or Business Places

GREAT OFFICE space for rent approx. 2500 sq. ft. on busy intersection, $750/mo. Call 420-3030 500 S Sunset, 1500 sq ft. $750 month. Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604

585. Warehouse and Storage WAREHOUSE ONLY 9000 SF partial a/c & heat, security alarmed, 2 garage doors, 2 standard entry doors, $1000 mo. 2001 S. Main behind Family Furniture 575-937-0889 or 575-257-0888 Storage Buildings: 8x8 - $45/mo, 8x12 $58/mo. Rent to own. Affordable Portables, 4718 W. 2nd, 575-420-1274, 575-637-4972

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

Power wheelchair, hospital bed, wheelchair lift, lift chair. 622-7638 Carrier wheelchair, receiver hitch type, pwr wheelchair, tilt & recline, heavy duty. 622-7638

JOHN DEERE LA130 tractor/mower 48” deck like new-used one season $1800 OBO. 624-7837 3 MO. old refrig., window, AC, rocking chair w/foot stool. Call 505-358-1149 or 575-623-8396

GENTLY USED just tuned motor scooter, book $1100, sell $600. 208-0795

THE TREASURE Chest, 1204 W. Hobbs. Collectors Paradice, price friendly. Vintage Depression, Carnival glass antiques, new toys, thrift furniture, Christmas. You want it we got it. Come see. 914-1855

COMPRESSOR WITH 3 nail guns $200, Router with bits $75, both new. John Deere mower $1200. Call 578-9353

NEED FURNITURE? Shop Blair’s Trading Post for the best prices in town for your household items. We buy & sell furniture, appliances, home decor, collectibles, electronics, saddles, jewelry, tools, fishing & camping items, movies plus everything else from A-Z. Including many hard to find items. Serving Roswell for 40 years. Open daily 9-5. Accept Visa & MC. 5611 Hummingbird Ln. 627-2033

Announcements Special Notice Card of Thanks Personals/Special Transportation Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted 045 050 055 060

Employment

Employment Opportunities Salesperson/Agents Employment Agencies Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

FOR SALE really nice Lazy Boy couch, glasstop dinette w/4 chairs, Lazy Boy chair w/ottoman & a nice TV. 622-1011 NEW 20 gal. pressure tank for well. 914-1855 FOR XMAS Man cave, big tetris arcade machine $300. 208-0795 ‘08 Kenmore ultrasoft water softner, brand new, factory sealed, $350 obo. 622-5544 Unique Christmas Gifts Attention Rockhounds quality rocks and fossils at discount prices. 622-8945 QUEEN 5 piece bedroom set $700. Call 575-627-0802.

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

440 441 445 450

Window Repair Window Cleaning Wrought Iron Services Wanted

455 456 460 465

Money: Loan/Borrow Credit Cards Insurance Co. Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale Investment: Stocks/Sale Mortgages for Sale Mortgages Wanted Business Opportunities

470 475 480 485

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

CASH FOR gold and silver jewelry, and silverware. 578-0805

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

005 010 015 020 025

CLASSIFIEDS

Financial

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos

PAY CASH for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles. Entire households & estates welcome. Call 627-2033 or 623-6608.

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous WE BUY junk batteries, automotive & industrial. $4.00 each, 311 S. Virginia. 622-4160 WE BUY pecans up to $2.50 lb. Call today, 575-208-9575.

640. Household Goods SOFA SLEEPER & reclining love seat, excellent condition $325. 317-9536

700. Building Materials

STEEL BUILDINGS Reduced Factory Inventory 30x36 - Reg $12,300 Now $9,970 36x58 - Reg $20,300 Now $16,930 48x96 - Reg $42,400 Now $36,200 81x130 - Reg $104,800 Now $89,940 505-349-0493 Source# 1M2 Buildings: 18x26 $2850. 24x31 - $4560. 30x40 - $8345. (Financing) Affordable Portables, 4718 W. 2nd, 575-420-1274, 575-637-4972

720. Livestock & Supplies

Horse Gear: Parelli Cradle Bridle, barely used, $150. Other used English and Western bridles from $15. Professionals Choice neoprene cinches, like new, quilted horse blanket, never used, $50. Used 72” Baker blanket in good shape, $15. 622-6419, evenings

Roswell Daily Record 745. Pets for Sale

AKC/CKC French Bulldog puppies $1000-$1100. 575-626-9813 PUPPY LOVE Grooming Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also - 575-420-6655 IRISH SETTER pups born 8-9-11. Call 575-760-3811 in Roswell. ROTT PUPPIES for sale $150. 575-910-1873 NKC American Bulldog puppies, shots, $500. 734-837-4368, Roswell. Tiny black/white party poodle male pup. Shots, papers potty pad trained $550 txt 4 pics 575-308-3017 2 RED female mini dashsunds 5 mos. old shots/papers $150 575-308-3017 or text for pics.

765. Guns & Ammunition

TARUS 357 Mag beautiful chrome, Tarus 9mm automatic stainless 347-0260

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

1998 YAMAHA Roya Star1300, 18K miles, excellent condition, $4000. Call 623-1458. 2005 HD Road King Classic, 18k miles, extras inc., $12,500 BBB. 627-7611

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

MALTESE PUPS white & fluffy also Malty-poos shots/papers potty pad trained $800 payment plan 575-308-3017 text for pics

‘08 CHEVY AVEO LS clean, great mileage, 5 spd, 44k miles, $6900. Call 575-626-9803

PITBULL pups for sale. Parvol shots & dewormed. Looking for a good home. 914-5253

2004 350Z convertible silver w/black top 25.75K miles 18” wheels. $17,500. Call 420-2456.

RECREATIONAL

760. Hunting & Camping Equipment MODEL 70 7mm WSM, ammo inc., new 3x9 scope $350. 627-7611

‘84 CAMARO Z28, custom wheels, rebuilt engine, $2100 OBO. 626-5450 2009 PONTIAC G5, 21,000 pampered miles, 36mpg, 4 cylinder/automatic, A/C, ABS brakes, power windows/locks, Alloy wheels, extra clean & nice, $11,950. 317-4590

790. Autos for Sale

2002 HONDA, CRV 4x4 new tires. $8500 Roswell 575-623-1264

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

1999 DODGE 1500, red, extended cab, 5.4 liter V8, body good, new water pump, new radiator, AC works, cracked block, parts or whole truck, price negotiable. 626-2429, asking $1500. HARLEY DAVIDSON lowrider, 2007, 11k miles, new tires, custom rims, security, $9000. Call 910-8206. ‘76 CHEVY 3/4 ton, 4 spd sound work truck, $1600 OBO. See at 1700 blk S. Monroe St. Call 840-8454. BRIGHT YELLOW 2003 Chevy S10 extended cab, 4X4. 104k miles. 4.3 ltr. V6. Priced well below book. Asking $7500, but will negotiate. White, 2011 1500 Chevy Crew Cab; all leather; 4X4; Z71 6.2ltr V8; 6600 miles. Lost job, cant’t handle the payments. Like new truck at a discounted price….. original price was $41k-asking $38,500 but will negotiateCall 575-622-8594. Leave message if no answer.

796. SUVS

2000 Expedition, low mileage, clean interior, leather seats & is in very good condition, $6800. 623-8732

815. Wanted to Buy Autos

JUNK CAR removal Avoid city code fines. We pay cash. 575-915-6744

12-02-11 RDR NEWS  

ROSWELL DAILY RECORD NEWS