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Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 122, No. 269 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

November 9, 2013

Sena apprehended after car chase with NMSP TESS TOWNSEND RECORD STAFF WRITER

He drove over the speed limit in the wrong lane, popped his tire on a curb, then crashed — and he was sober. Jeremy Sena, 26, of Roswell, was arrested after leading New Mexico State Police on a car chase along Second Street, Thursday night. Sena has been charged with reckless driving, driving on a suspended or revoked license and aggra-

vated fleeing of an officer, which is a fourth degree felony, according to a Friday press release from NMSP. At the time of his arrest, Sena was out on bond for armed robbery and assault with intent to commit a violent crime, the release stated. The Roswell Police Department sought Sena for questioning last month with regard to an Oct. 22 shooting. He is currently held without bond at Chaves County Jail. The chase began at 8:58

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p.m. when an NMSP officer observed a silver Cadillac speeding eastbound in the westbound lanes of traffic on Second Street, according to the release. NMSP spokesman Sgt. Emmanuel Gutierrez said he does not know at what speed Sena was traveling when NMSP Officer Marcus Gonzales, the officer primarily involved in chasing Sena, first observed the Cadillac. “I know that at one point, in a residential area, he was going 50 in a 25 mile per hour zone,” said

Gutierrez. NMSP Of ficer Pablo Macias aided in apprehending Sena. NMSP also made use of a helicopter to assist in capturing him. Gutierrez said he did not know why Sena was speeding. “This guy’s a felon so, obviously, he probably didn’t want to go to jail that night,” he commented. The incident lasted over two hours, in which time Sena lost control of his car twice. The first time Sena lost control, he hit a curb and

SATURDAY

popped the rear passenger tire of the car at the corner of Second Street and Lea Avenue, according to the release. The chase continued until Sena crashed the car, Gutierrez said. The release stated that the car was disabled between Lea and Missouri avenues, after which Sena attempted to flee on foot but was quickly apprehended. Gutierrez said Sena was not found to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Sena

RISD on par with state but has room for improvement

TESS TOWNSEND RECORD STAFF WRITER

Medical marijuana laws present dicey situations JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

As the city considers a prohibition on medical marijuana distribution centers, a few hundred cardcarrying medical marijuana patients still live within city limits and grow the product. The New Mexico medical marijuana program’s rules present a few uncertain situations for law enforcement and users. With at least 170 registered cardholders in Chaves County, according to the latest numbers from the New Mexico Department of Health, residents

throughout the city are licensed to have four mature plants at any time, and possess six ounces. Licensed nonprofit producers are limited to 150 total plants. The state keeps the identities and locations of the producers confidential. But because the state keeps all information about licensed card holders, caregivers and nonprofit producers confidential, law enforcement is kept in the dark about which home is legitimately growing the marijuana and which resident is growing it illegally. At least two instances have occurred in Eddy

County when law enforcement searched a home for marijuana, only later to find that the owner was legally licensed by the state, said Cmdr. William Brown, of the Roswell Police Department. The city recently proposed to remove a “special use” designation on commercial districts, so nonprofit distributors could locate within the city. This would allow the distributor to maintain some privacy for security reasons, in accordance to NMDOH’s policy. The Planning and Zoning See LAWS, Page A3

Some judges go for pretty. Some go for a special look. Debra Allen hopes “Macy’s” smooth moves will catch their eye. “What is awesome about her is her gait. She just flows,” Allen said. “She can herd cattle all day long.” With her hands clasping a thick book filled with photos of her champion Australian Shepherd, Allen described the characteristics that have car-

Owner and handler Debra Allen leads Shandon’s The Magic of Macy around a park Friday afternoon.

HIGH 75 LOW 39

TODAY’S FORECAST

See RISD, Page A3

Watch and weave

Mark Wilson Photo

Zelma Wilcox of the Roswell Fiber Craft Guild gives a weaving demonstration to siblings Leena and Braxton Craven during the Pecos Valley Potters’ Guild 32nd Annual Art Sale Fiesta del Arte at the Roswell Convention Center, Friday evening. The event runs today from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Local Australian Shepherd gets national top dog spot JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Jill McLaughlin Photo

Steve Stone Graphic

The New Mexico Public Education Department School District Report Card for the 2012-13 school year shows schools in Roswell are performing at about the state average, according to PED. Results of PED’s A-F grading of districts and schools were released in March. By law, districts must publish the results publicly by Nov. 15. Roswell Independent School District received a grade of “C” for 2012-13. Superintendent Tom Burris said he takes the grading seriously and a C shows room for improvement. He said however, “Our feelings across the board are that our schools are better

ried Macy into a select national winner’s circle that has given them both a chance to compete in Orlando, Fla. The American Kennel Club ranked Macy, officially named “Shandon’s The Magic of Macy,” in October the No. 4 ownerhandled Australian Shepherd in the nation. The top 10 ranked dogs in each breed are invited to compete at the AKC National Owner Handled Series, in conjunction with the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship

TODAY’S OBITUARY PAGE A2

• Chad “Wall-E” Eric Jessup

Dec. 13. “To me, the dream come true would be to go,” Allen said. “Anything that happens when I’m there, is a plus.” Typically, owners who compete nationally hire a handler. Though it’s difficult, Allen does all the work herself. Her children are grown and have moved away to pursue careers after college, giving her a chance to get back into showing dogs as a hobby. A year ago, Allen was asked by a breeder in Lubbock to try Macy out. In

CLASSIFIEDS ..........B6

COMICS .................B5

ENTERTAINMENT .....A8

the ‘70s, she had Great Danes and won a few times, but didn’t go far, she said. So, she gave the shepherd a chance. “I fell in love with her right away,” she said. “I entered her in the puppy show and she just hit it of f. She seems to like doing it. The dog does so well, she shows herself.” Unpacking her leashes Friday afternoon from her car, Macy eagerly clung to her side as she closed the hatch. Her license plate

INDEX GENERAL ...............A2 HOROSCOPES .........A8 LOTTERIES .............A2 OPINION .................A4

See DOG, Page A3

SPORTS .................B1 STOCKS .................B4

WEATHER ..............A8


A2 Saturday, November 9, 2013 OBITUARY

GENERAL/OBITUARY

Jennings retires from Sheriff’s Office JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Chad “Wall-E” Eric Jessup

A funeral service is scheduled at 2 p.m., Monday, Nov. 11, 2013, at Grace Community Church for Chad “Wall-E” Eric Jessup, 37, of Roswell, who passed away on Nov. 6, 2013. Pastor Rick Hale of Grace Community Church will officiate. Chad was born on March 27, 1976, in Roswell, to James Terry Jessup and Marcia Jessup (Woods). He is survived by his parents; son, Justin Ryan Jessup, and mom, Melissa Lopez; brother, Christopher J. Jessup, and wife, Tammy Jessup; loving and devoted partner, Emily Futrell, and daughter, Ali; nieces and nephews: Christopher K. Jessup, Ashley and Cameron Meredith, and Bentley, Mason and Lexis, James Terry Jessup Jr., Melissa and Zachary; uncles: Claude Woods (Penny), David Woods (Linda), Daniel Woods (Sharron); aunts: Sharon Blair (Bob), Jan Gabel (Jim); and numerous loving, wonderful friends. He has been preceded in death by his grandparents: Clevanaugh Woods and Helen, Winslow Jessup and Lucille. Chad was the manager for Lykins Tire in Artesia. He loved the people of Artesia and the ones who came through L ykins T ire. He called them all his friends. Chad was an avid motorcyclist and loved riding with his motorcycle club, The Guerrerros. He thought very highly of all the club members. He considered all the motorcyclists part of his loving family. Rather than dwell on the obstacles that life threw at him, Chad chose to overcome them and live life to the fullest. Chad was a fun, loving young man, who always had a smile. Everyone he met, he considered his family and loved as family. He was a friend to all. He lived life passionately. Chad knew Jesus Christ as his personal savior, knowing firsthand the love, comfort and compassion that only comes from knowing Jesus Christ. Jesus Christ lent Chad to us to experience his love and called him back home on Wednesday evening on Nov. 6, 2013. He will truly be missed by all. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to: Guerrerros Annual Toy Run for CASA. Friends may leave condolences online at lagronefuneralchapels.com. Arrangements are under the personal directions of the professionals at LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

LOTTERY NUMBERS

Roswell Daily Record

The Chaves County Sherif f’s Of fice held a retirement party for Chief Deputy Pat Jennings, Friday, at the Joseph R. Skeen Building. Jennings has been with the SO for nearly 25 years. In all, he’s worked in law enforcement for 37. “I worked in probation and parole for seven years, with the Roswell Police Department for five and I started with Sherif f’s Office in 1989.” He was hired by Sheriff Terrell as chief deputy. Jennings was appointed as sherif f in 1998 and then elected for two fouryear terms and has now worked as chief deputy under Sheriff Rob Coon. In his opening statement, Coon said: “Pat’s the thinker of the department. Pat took his time making his decisions, but they were always good decisions. He’s forgotten more about the Sherif f Department than I’ll ever know.” On a more personal note, Coon admitted that

he hated to see Jennings leave. “I’m glad for him, but it’s a loss for the department.” County Manager Stan Riggs called Jennings a calming, steadying influence for the staff. “I hate to say I’ve he’s seen it all, but he’s seen it all. He’s been through everything in his career. ... He started with pen and paper and now we’ve got computers in the cars and computers.” Lt. Britt Snyder, too, praised the deputy chief. “He’s one of the brightest and most articulate people I know. He’s got a lot of information about what has happened here. I don’t know how we are going to do without him.” Former Sheriff’s Detective Dennis Kintigh noted that Jennings held either the No. 1 or No. 2 post at the SO for more than 20 years. “That’s an incredible amount of stability for any law enforcement officer.” District Attorney Investigator Pat Bar ncastle went to school with Jennings at New Mexico State University. He spoke of

Jessica Palmer Photo

New Roswell Police Chief Phil Smith, left, greets outgoing Chaves County Sheriff Office Chief Deputy Pat Jennings, right, at his retirement party while Sheriff Rob Coon, center, looks on. the legacy that Jennings leaves behind. District Court Judges Fr eddie Romer o and James Hudson also came to wish Jennings farewell. Romero called him a long-time servant of the community. Each person said that Jennings would be missed. Lt. Daniel Ornelas said he hated to see Jennings go. For Jennings, retire-

Couple’s health concerns leave five cats in need of new owners A Gentiva Hospice patient and her husband have run into some hard times, leaving five cats orphaned. The elderly Roswell couple (unnamed to protect their privacy) haven’t had it easy. For a while now, the husband has been under high stress and struggling with his memory. Then, about two weeks ago, his wife was diagnosed with brain cancer. The sudden upheaval forced them to relinquish their five pet cats to the Country Club Animal Hospital. Now, the hospital is looking for loving families to adopt the cats. The oldest at 13 years, 6 months is Sadie, a gray domestic long-haired cat. She is the only longhaired feline; the rest are short-haired. Albert and Annie are both a little more than 9

STATE BRIEFS

Second lawsuit filed over drug searches

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A second lawsuit is accusing southern New Mexico authorities of illegally subjecting drug suspects to invasive body cavity searches.

Albuquerque civil rights attor ney Shannon Kennedy filed the new lawsuit Friday on behalf of Timothy Young, who says he was strip searched in a gas station parking lot, then taken to the hospital for a cavity search. The lawsuit claims the searches were unreasonable, and that the body cavity search was in violation of the search warrant issued.

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A Country Club Animal Hospital worker holds Inky, one of five cats available for adoption.

years old. Albert is black and white and Annie is the color of a tortoise shell. Another black and white feline, Simon, is almost 6 years old, and the youngest, at 4 years, is the male feline Inky. “One of her last wishes is for her kitties to have a good, safe home,” said

Bev Bucklew with Gentiva Hospice. If anyone is interested in adopting the cats, or wants more information, call Bev Bucklew at 806549-3636, thr ough Wednesday. If it is later than Wednesday, call the Country Club Animal Hospital, 301 W. Country Club Rd., at 623-9191.

The Hidalgo County sheriff could not immediately be reached for comment. Kennedy has also filed suit against the department and Deming police on behalf of a Lorsdburg man who was taken to two hospitals and forced to have anal probes, three enemas, two body X-rays and a colonoscopy following a traffic stop.

an Albuquerque business owned by gay marriage opponents violated a state anti-discrimination law in refusing to photograph a same-sex couple’s commitment ceremony.

Business appeals court ruling in gay bias case

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The nation’s highest court is being asked to overturn a New Mexico ruling that

An appeal was filed Friday with the U.S. Supreme Court by a law firm representing Elane Photography. The court is expected to decide in late fall or over the winter whether to hear the case. The New Mexico Supreme Court ruled in August the business’s refusal in 2006 to photograph the ceremony involving two women violated the state’s Human Rights Act.

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POLICE BRIEFS

Homemade firework found at Goddard High

The Roswell Police Department received a tip about a device found at Goddard High School Friday. The device was found to be a homemade firework. No one was injured by the device. Detectives originally thought the device may have been an explosive. The high school was not evacuated. The finding prompted one classroom to be placed on lockdown for interview purposes. The incident is still under investigation. RPD detectives and the New Mexico State Police Explosive Ordnance Disposal team are involved.

Stabbing alleged to have occurred on W. Hendricks St.

The Roswell Police Department is investigating an alleged stabbing that is reported to have occurred Thursday morning. The alleged victim, a 31year-old male, was reported to have been stabbed on the 1700 block of W. Hendricks St. Police were dispatched to the location after receiving the report. The block is mostly residential and is within three blocks of Parkview Early Literacy Center. RPD spokeswoman Sabrina Morales said she does not know who reported the alleged stabbing. She said the victim was taken to a local hospital for treatment. She said she did not know what injuries he had sustained or what condition he was in.

enforcement has rubbed off. The eldest son works with probation and parole in Albuquer que. His youngest is a sergeant with New Mexico State Police stationed in Santa Fe. Retirement from the SO does not mean Jennings will stop working. He already has another job lined up working security at the courts in Roswell’s Federal Building.

Morales said police have no infor mation about a possible suspect, other than that the supposed perpetrator is reported to be male. She said that she is not aware of any witnesses to the incident.

The incident is still under investigation. Police request that anyone with information pertaining to aggravated battery with a knife contact RPD at 6246770 or Crime Stoppers at 1-888-594-8477.

Child hit by vehicle Wednesday

A Friday press release from the Roswell Police Department states that a child was hit by a car Wednesday afternoon on the 600 block of W. Matthews St., a residential area.

RPD spokeswoman Sabrina Morales said a police officer responded at 2:15 p.m. to a report of a 10year-old girl being hit by a car. The girl was then taken to a local hospital for treatment.

Morales said she did not know what injuries the girl sustained or her current condition.

Police did not give a citation to the driver, according to Morales. She also said she did not know the gender of the driver, but said the driver was between 30- and 40-years old.

Police are not currently releasing names in connection with the incident.

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ment is bittersweet. “The Sheriff’s Office has some really quality people. I’ve enjoyed working with the county staff of all the different departments.” Jennings complimented his wife and sons. “My family has been r eally supportive. The boys grew up with the Sheriff’s Office, and my wife, we’ve been through thick and thin together.” His work in law

Jim Dishman .....................................................Circulation Director jdishman@rdrnews.com

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GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

RISD

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than what the grades reflect.” PED bases grades on standardized test scores, attendance rates, student surveys and student learning opportunities, such as programs in which students can earn college credit. Graduation rates are factored into grades of high schools. Improvement over the previous year is a key factor in grades, as is meeting state-designated benchmarks. PED implemented the grading system in 201112 to replace the Adequate Yearly Progress assessment the state previously used in order to adhere to the federal No Child Left Behind Act. PED graded 20 Roswell schools in 2012-13. Grades were given to 19 district schools, plus charter school Sidney Gutierrez Middle School. Parkview Early Literacy Center was not graded. Sidney Gutierrez and Berrendo Middle Schools received A’s. Monterrey Elementary School was the only school in Roswell to fail. PED spokesperson Larry Behrens said an A reflects students are learning and “reaching

Laws

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Committee, however, decided this week not to consider this change and instead prohibit medical marijuana distribution centers in city limits. The ordinance change will now undergo public hearings and further review by the Planning and Zoning Commission, the committee and finally by the City Council in December. City Councilor Savino Sanchez, also a member of the Planning and Zoning Committee, said he couldn’t comment on the issue Friday until he had more information. “It still needs to go through the process, for us to decide what we’re going to do,” Sanchez said. For Councilor Dusty Huckabee, who has suffered from Hepatitis C and a debilitating treatment for the past 15 years, the issue is personal. “I have applied twice and been turned down twice to get medical marijuana,” Huckabee said. “It ought to be made available. People who are growing that stuff are taking one hell of a

vital milestones in preparation for graduation.” He said, “A school getting an F is serious ... If a school isn’t doing well, the students aren’t doing well.” District principals said they use PED’s assessment to determine where schools need improvement. Goddard High Principal Brian Luck said he encourages students to improve their scores on the state Standards Based Assessment test each time they take the test. He said he encourages students to correctly answer on average one additional question per section of the test, which is factored into school grading. Goddard was 0.4 points away an A in 2012-13. Berrendo Elementary Principal Dr. Bea Harris and Monterrey Elementary Principal PJ Garnett said their teachers hold weekly meetings to discuss school data and strategize instruction. Garnett said of Monterrey’s grade, “We were all upset that we made an F. We’re accepting the responsibility for it.” She said external factors also influenced the school’s per for mance. She said that before she left her position as assistant principal at Roswell High to become principal chance. I’m talking about dealers who don’t like them encroaching on their territory.” Huckabee said he doesn’t think the city will allow distribution centers to locate here anytime soon. “There are a lot of smart people around here,” Huckabee said. “I think nobody’s really looked at it. You’ve got to find an answer.” Those who do have a license, also should be aware of several restrictions when purchasing their goods and ferrying it around. According to the state’s regulations on medical marijuana, participants are not exempt from criminal prosecution or civil penalties if they operate a vehicle while under the influence of cannabis. They cannot possess or use the substance in a school bus or public vehicle, on school grounds or property, in the workplace of their employment, at a public park, recreation center, youth center or other public place. Sale, distribution, dispensing or transfer of marijuana to anyone not registered by the NMDOH is illegal. Obtaining or transporting cannabis outside the

Dog

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read, “DOGLOVR.” Once on the grass, it was all business and Allen lead Macy around, practicing movements and the per fect stance. Macy broke away every so often from her serious poses to sneak kisses, but she was dog-tired after all. Allen started working with Macy when she was 10 weeks old. She had to be leash trained on a special grooming table, then learn to stand up and pose. “She loves to show,” Allen said. “She’s magical. She just gets out there and struts her stuff.” Allen usually only attends shows within driving distance. She saves a little money each month and puts it away

of Monterrey in October 2012, the elementary school had gone through five principals within a year and a half. “The consistency for the administration was just not there,” she said. In addition to teacher meetings, Garnett said Monterrey is improving student performance by of fering all students tutoring and incorporating activities such as games into reading and math instruction. Burris said the the success of a school lies in whether staff make students want to learn. He reserved special praise for Pecos Elementary and Roswell High. He said Pecos “is knocking it outside the park,” noting that the school performed the best of all elementary schools in the district on the math section of the SBA test in 2012-13. Roswell High improved from a D to a B between the 2011-12 and 2012-13 school years. “They have a principal [Ruben Bolaños] who inspires kids,” he said. “He walks down the hall and he talks to every one of those kids.” Burris also said the district is doing special work to improve high school graduation rates, which play a key factor in PED grades of high schools. state is in violation of federal law.

Possessing marijuana on federal property, including national parks, federal courthouses and immigration checkpoints is illegal. Possessing more than six ounces of usable marijuana is illegal without NMDOH approval.

The Roswell Police Department requires drivers to present their state identification cards if they are in possession of marijuana. “If it falls within the statutory limits, they are allowed to have it,” Brown said. “We are bound by state law.”

Brown said the department expects those who possess licenses to be well aware of the state regulations.

“Those that have gone to the extent to obtain a license were advised of the laws,” Brown said. “We only require that they follow those laws.”

For more infor mation about the state medical cannabis program and laws related to it, visit nmhealth.org/mcp.

for the events, she said. But after learning recently about Macy’s chance to go to the national competition, she is trying to figure out how to come up with $1,200 to compete. “That’s a long way to go on limited expenses,” Allen said. Allen has a friend in Texas with a dog who placed No. 5. They will share expenses, but she has to pay for entry fees, grooming space fees and other incidentals. “I’m trying to do my end, so we can go,” Allen said. “I just thought maybe I should really try to do this. I don’t know when I will get the opportunity to do this again.” Allen is looking for sponsors to help with the trip. Anyone who is interested in sponsoring Allen can email her at debbieandtom@cableone.net.

Saturday, November 9, 2013

A3


A4 Saturday, November 9, 2013

OPINION

The behavioral health debacle stalks our communities MERILEE DANNEMANN TRIPLE SPACED AGAIN

When Gordon House drove the wrong way on I-40, killing four people, the incident changed New Mexico’s attitude toward drunk driving. The crash, you may remember, was Christmas Eve 1992. The victims were the Cravens family. Mom Melanie and three little daughters were killed; dad Paul survived with severe injuries. New Mexico started toughening its drunk driving laws. While we still have not ended drunk driving accidents and, tragically, have had a few more wrong-way freeway crashes, much progress has been made. Nothing like that followed the John Hyde tragedy. John Hyde got the wrong medication and shot five people to death in 2005. The story unfolded that Hyde, a diagnosed schizophrenic, had been functioning fine for years, taking medica-

EDITORIAL

MERILEE

DANNEMANN TRIPLE SPACED

tion, interacting socially and taking care of his mother. He had a supportive family. Nobody was afraid of him. Then there was a change of doctor, a different diagnosis, and new medication that didn’t work. His condition deteriorated for months. He asked for medical help, and so did family members, many times, before something snapped and five people lost their lives. After the Cravens tragedy, the catalyst for changing drunk driving was Nadine Milford, who lost her grandbabies. Dignified, articulate and photogenic, she stalked the halls of the Roudhouse, followed

Roswell Daily Record

by the media like a rock star, creating the momentum that led to tougher laws. Nothing comparable happened after the Hyde case. Today an unknown number of walking time bombs are roaming New Mexico streets, some showing up in emergency rooms. This is one aftermath of the state’s takeover of behavioral health services. Reports are coming in: treatment disrupted, medications unavailable, mentally unbalanced people with nowhere to go. Sudden withdrawal from psychotropic medication can have drastic effects. The mess was predictable. It was not possible that out-of-state companies could set up shop from scratch and implement a smooth transition in services. Though they inherited the bare bones of the nonprofits they replaced, the logistics were too complicated. Employees did not automatically transition; they had to be hired, if willing. Reportedly, many were not.

Licenses and permits had to be obtained. Clients in shaky mental states had to fill out new paperwork. Because of HIPAA, the federal medical privacy law, files could not simply be transferred. The mess was avoidable. The allegations of fraud and mismanagement (still mostly secret) reportedly involve only a few managers in each organization. Human Services Department spokespersons said they intended to keep the clinical staffs. So why was it necessary to dismantle the companies? HSD could have contacted the boards of directors, demanded suspension of the alleged miscreants, and installed temporary managers. That less disruptive approach would have preserved continuity for the clients. We have to keep asking, why did the state do this? The explanations offered by HSD don’t make sense. We have to ask because as a former district attorney, our governor surely understands the dangers

posed by mentally unstable people who aren’t getting treatment. Behavioral health programs exist not just to help those with mental problems, but to protect their families, their communities, and the rest of us from what they might do. We have to ask because treating behavioral health patients as outpatients is a lot less expensive than sending them to prison and repairing the damage. A social worker I know, who has seen firsthand the influx of behavioral health patients at a local emergency room, predicted there will be suicides. I asked whether there might be murders as well. Will we need another Nadine Milford, another bereaved grandmother with natural media presence and dead children, to lead a crusade to put our behavioral health system back together? I imagine Mrs. Milford would say the price she paid was too high. Contact Merilee Dannemann through triplespacedagain.com.

Paper trails in the IRS scandal

An investigation by the House Ways and Means Committee has turned up the name of the Internal Revenue Service agent who unlawfully leaked the confidential donor list of the National Organization for Marriage, a conservative nonprofit. What remains to be seen is whether the Justice Department will bring felony charges against the IRS lawbreaker, given the announcement this past May by Attorney General Eric Holder that he had ordered a criminal investigation into IRS targeting of conservative groups — like NOM — that applied for tax-exempt status. Mr. Holder followed the lead of President Barack Obama, who was in high dudgeon after a report in May by the T reasury Department’s inspector general confirmed practices by IRS agents that the president characterized as “intolerable and inexcusable,” a sentiment this editorial page shared. “The federal government must conduct itself in a way that’s worthy of the public’s trust,” Mr. Obama stated, “and that’s especially true for the IRS.” The federal tax agency “must apply the law in a fair and impartial way,” he added, “and its employees must act with utmost integrity.” And the findings of Treasury’s inspector general showed “that some of its employees failed that test,” the president concluded. Much to Mr. Obama’s credit, he held accountable certain high-ranking IRS employees who knew about the improper targeting of conservative groups — or should have known — but who failed to do anything about it. That included former acting IRS Commission Steven Miller whose “resignation” was announced by the president in May. It also included Lois Lerner, director of the IRS Exempt Organizations division, who “retired” this past September, even as she continued to stand by her congressional testimony that she had “not broken any laws.” While there may be some dispute as to whether Ms. Lerner broke the law, there is no question in the case of the IRS agent — whose identity has not been publicly disclosed as yet. The information made available thus far raises many ethical questions — about the various parties involved. The unknown IRS agent leaked NOM’s donor list to Matthew Meisel, a former employee of Bain & Company, who, in turn, shared the list with the liberal Human Rights Campaign, an organization whose head at the time was a national co-chair for President Obama’s reelection campaign. Meisel may have had some personal grievance or another with Mitt Romney — a NOM donor — who served as Bain & Company’s interim CEO in the early 1990s. But the Human Rights Campaign used NOM’s supposedly confidential donor list for obvious political purposes, passing it along to the Huffington Post, which published an article attacking the Republican presidential candidate for donations to the conservative nonprofit. In 1958, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled nonprofits like NOM have the constitutionally-protected right to keep both their membership and donor lists private, not the least, the justices held, because disclosure of names could subject donors to retaliation. The IRS agent that leaked NOM’s donor list knowingly and willfully broke longestablished federal law. And for doing so, he or she, should face federal criminal charges.

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Is America becoming a ‘zombie nation?’ When I first heard folks discussing “The Walking Dead,” I thought they were talking about Congress. But no, it was zombies. The undead. Flesh-eating creatures. Bodies that do harm. The nation of Haiti embraced the zombie legend a long time ago. In fact, there’s an old Bela Lugosi movie about that called “White Zombie.” Apparently, in the voodoo culture, you can get a curse put on you and rise from the dead. Or something. This voodoo stuf f is not easy to assess. Way back in the late 1960s, a movie director named

Doonesbury

DEAR DOCTOR K: I know it’s safer for my baby to sleep on his back, but I’m worried he’ll develop flat spots on the back of his head. What can I do to prevent this? DEAR READER: Flat spots on the head are becoming more common in babies. As you suspect, that’s likely because more babies are sleeping on their backs than on their bellies. We want babies to sleep on their backs to decrease the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Since the “Back to Sleep” recommendation went into effect in 1994, the rate of SIDS has dropped by half. But sleeping on the back does put pressure on the back

BILL O’REILLY SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

George Romero put out a film called “Night of the Living Dead.” I remember seeing it and thinking, “What the heck was that?” Romero set his zombie hordes in Pittsburgh, and they ran around cannibalizing Pirates fans. Nobody was quite

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

of a baby’s head. Babies have soft, malleable skulls. This helps them get through the birth canal and allows for the rapid brain growth that happens during infancy. It also makes their skulls sensitive to pressure, especially when that pressure is always in the same place. Flat spots don’t cause brain damage or affect brain func-

sure how these zombies came to be — something about a comet — but they were nasty. They were also slow. If you were in shape, you could taunt the zombies and run away. Of course, there’s always the “I tripped over something” factor, and so many zombie-taunters got their “just desserts,” so to speak. Anyway, now we have a cable TV series that attracted more than 16 million viewers last Sunday: “The Walking Dead.” Most of the viewers were ages 18 to 49. Apparently, younger Americans love this zombie stuff. Earlier this

year, they flocked to see Brad Pitt fight the undead in “World War Z.” I missed the film, but heard it was so intense that Brad’s hair got mussed up on at least three occasions. Zombies generally have bad hair. In fact, their entire grooming routine is sorely lacking because they have no interest in anything other than eating the flesh of human beings. No, you don’t have to be a lawyer to be a zombie. Over the years, horror movies have become increasingly graphic, and the zombie surge exploits that. Vampires

tion. They can, however, lead to teasing if the shape is very abnormal. To prevent flat spots, change the position of your baby’s head throughout the day: — Give your baby “tummy time” when he is awake and being watched. Do this for at least a few minutes a few times a day. — Carry your baby in a sling or other baby carrier to take pressure off his head. — Vary the position of your baby’s head when he is lying down. You may have to literally turn his head so he is facing the other way. If your baby prefers one side to another, position his seat or bassinet during the day so

that the more interesting things to look at are on the less-preferred side. Most flat spots are mild and go away once babies are a little older and spend less time lying down. In severe cases, your pediatrician can prescribe a soft helmet that shields the skull from pressure, allowing the head to grow naturally into a rounder shape. Few parts of our body were built to take constant challenge and pressure. Many parts are always working — like the heart and lungs. However, even they get a bit of a rest at night. And our bones, muscles and joints regularly

See O’REILLY, Page A5

See DR. K, Page A5


LOCAL/FEATURE

A5

Carlsbad Caverns gets a new superintendent Roswell Daily Record

C A RLS B AD— B e in g a native of El Paso, Texas, Dennis Vásquez felt like he came “home” when he moved back to the Chihuahuan desert from the E a st C oas t. V á s q u ez , of S u p e r in te n de nt Gu a d al u pe M o un t a i n s National Park, has accepted a dual-role of managing Guadalupe Mountains National Park and its “sister park,” Carlsbad Caverns National Park, during a 120-day detail that he expects to be “fulfilling and challenging.” Even though Vásquez has visited more than 200 of the 401 national park properties, Carlsbad Caver ns National Park was the first park he visited as a child. He has fond memories of coming to the caverns and touring with his family. “I feel honored to be back in Carlsbad Caverns managing this park wh en t h i s i s w h e r e m y

Paw Prints

l ov e o f n a ti o n al p a r ks started,” he said. “Plus, my br others and father think it’s really special that I’ve returned to the first park we ever visited.” Vásquez has worked in Gu ad a l u p e M ou n t ai n s National Park since 2011, when he came from Washi n g t o n, D . C. , wh e r e h e served as program manager for the National Museum of the American Latin o C o mm i s si o n fo r t wo years. Having spent more than 3 0 y ea r s w i th t h e P a rk Service, Vásquez has held a va r ie t y o f p o si t i o n s, i n c l ud i n g f i v e y ea r s as Superintendent of Brown v . B oa r d o f E d u ca t i on National Historic Site in Kansas. He also served as s u p er i n te n d en t at t w o New Mexico parks, Bandelier National Monument in northern New Mexico, as w e l l as W h i te S a n ds National Monument in the

central part of the state. V ás qu e z wor ke d a s a service wide training manage r a t t he Ho rac e Albright Employee Development Center in Grand Canyon National Park, a trustee at Valles Caldera National Preserve in New Mexico and in West Virginia at a National Park Service Interpretive Media training center, Harper’s Ferry Center. In addition, Vásquez has spent time as c hi ef n at ur alis t i n B ig B en d N at i on al Par k i n T ex as an d a di st r ic t ranger at Sunset Crater Wupatki National Monument in Arizona. V ás qu e z st ar ted h is career as a park ranger, in 1 97 7, at W h i te S an ds National Monument, when he earned his bachelor’s degree in Biological Sciences at the University of T ex as at E l P aso . A ft er n in e y ear s a t W h it e S an ds , h e m oved t o

Courtesy Photo

Check out Sapphire a 12-week-old female Siamese cat currently at the Roswell Humane Society, 703 E. McGaffey St. True to her name and breed, Sapphire has bright, blue eyes and appears to be wearing a brown mask. Come visit this cutie at the Humane Society! For more information, call 622-8950.

O’Reilly

Continued from Page A4

only bite you on the neck. Zombies are buffet people. No limits on the intake. Also, various monsters such as The Wolfman and Frankenstein’s creature often had a soft side. Before Lon Chaney Jr. became a hungry wolf, he confessed to a nice gypsy woman that the whole thing was not his fault, and he regretted ever having to see a full moon. You almost felt sorry for Lon — until, of course, he disassembled some guy walking through a mist-shrouded forest in the middle of nowhere. Zombies could never show a soft side to a gypsy woman. They would eat her before any conversation could start. There is no reasoning with zombies. As our cliche-ridden society says: They are what they are! But we Americans apparently like the zombie culture very much. Somehow, we identify with humans like Brad Pitt slaying as many zombies as possible. By

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

get a break during the day and when we sleep. Bed sores, for example, develop when sick people in bed all day are not turned regularly to put pressure on dif ferent parts of their body. So there are ways to protect the shape of your baby’s head and to prevent flat spots from

the way, that’s legal. Zombies have no protections under the law. And liberal Americans do not object to using heavy weapons to kill the Assault undead. weapons are fine as long as you undergo a background check. But that policy can be waived if the zombies are actually rampaging through your house.

Yosemite National Park in C al if or n ia, wh er e h e bec am e a su per vi sor y par k r a nger, t he n t o Jo sh u a T r ee N at ion al Park, also in California, in the same capacity. “Being in the field is my favorite part of being a r an ger, ” V ás qu e z sai d recently while hiking in Gu ad- al upe N at ion al Park. “I have gained such a full range of experience working for the Park Service and thoroughly enjoy being out in the resource.” Vásquez said he’s really looki ng f or war d t o t h e chance to learn Carlsbad C av er n s N a tion a l P ar k and all it has to offer — above and below ground. “I’m really looking forwar d t o t h e c hal le ng es that managing two parks will bring.” A permanent su p er in t en den t wil l b e chosen from a pool of candidates sometime at the beginning of 2014.

Saturday, November 9, 2013

Vásquez makes his permanent home outside of A lb uqu er qu e w it h h is wife, L y n n . Du r in g h is workweek, he lives in the parks he manages. “I have the best of both

Courtesy Photo

worlds, we have a beautiful home in northern New Mexico, where I will eventually retire, but for now I get t o exp er ien ce t h e majesty of our national parks while I’m working.”

Soldier’s father hopes ‘I Drive Your Truck’ song will comfort RAYNHAM, Mass. (AP) — The Massachusetts father whose story was told in Country Music Association song of the year “I Drive Your Truck” says the song is a tribute to all parents who have lost a child. Paul Monti of Raynham, Mass., spoke Thursday to Boston’s WCVB-TV after the writers of Lee Brice’s recording won the award the previous evening for the song. Writers Jessi A l e x a n d e r, C o n n i e H a r r i n g t o n a n d Jimmy Yeary said they were inspired by Monti driving the pickup truck left behind by his fallen soldier son. Army Sgt. 1st Class Jared Monti, 30, died trying to save a fellow soldier in Afghanistan in 2006. He was awarded the Medal of Honor in a White House ceremony in 2009. “The song is not about the truck. That’s the vehicle. It’s about holding on to something you have lost,” Paul Monti said in an interview with the TV station. “I think the most important thing about last night is how great it was for

all the Gold Star parents in the country and other parents who have lost a child, because we all hold on to something,” Monti said. Monti still drives the 2001 Dodge Ram, with his son’s dog tags and a rosary hanging from the rear-view mirror. The vehicle has 82nd Airbor ne stickers on the back. Monti says he’s replaced the engine and keeps it in good repair, but the inside remains the way his son left it, still carrying his shoes, spare change and a toothbrush. “My boy helped a lot of people when he was alive, but what he is doing now is absolutely amazing,” Monti said. Monti spoke about his son’s truck in a 2011 interview with National Public Radio. He led a successful effort that year to get permission for U.S. flags to be placed on individual graves for Memorial Day and Veterans Day observances at the Bourne National Cemetery, where his son is buried in Massachusetts.

ENMU-R graduates aviation maintenance students

As a positive person, I am not on the zombie bandwagon. Too much angst. I believe that when you die you go either to heaven or hell — not to cable TV. But that’s just me. Millions of my fellow citizens obviously see it differently. To them I say: Boo!

Veteran TV news anchor Bill O’Reilly is host of the Fox News show “The O’Reilly Factor” and author of many books, including the newly released “Killing Jesus.” To find out more about Bill O’Reilly and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit creators.com. This column originates on the website billoreilly.com. COPYRIGHT BillOReilly.com

2013

forming on his soft skull. But whatever you do, keep putting your baby on his back to sleep! It greatly reduces the risk of SIDS. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)

2013 AMT graduates and instructors pose for a group photo.

Fifteen Eastern New Mexico University- Roswell students recently celebrated graduation from the aviation maintenance technology program. The graduates completed the requirements under a revised curriculum for a Certificate of Completion. The 14.5-month program was approved by the Federal Aviation Administration in 2011, making it one of the fastest airframe and powerplant (A and P) certification programs in the country. The classes

and labs were restructured to better meet the needs of students and industry. A group of 10 students will graduate next March and 10 more in the fall of 2014. According to Juan Salmon, AMT director, now that the students have received their certification, they will next take the written exams. “When the student has passed the three exams (General, Airframe, and Powerplant), they must schedule an appointment to get tested for the

LOCAL TAEKWON-DO GROUP FARES WELL IN PORTALES

On Nov. 2, the New Mexico State Yom Chi Taekwon-Do Championships were held at the Eastern New Mexico University Greyhound Arena in Portales. More than 130 competitors from New Mexico, Texas, Colorado, Oklahoma and Kansas competed in the tournament. Dwayne Worley’s Eastern New Mexico Taekwon-Do school from Roswell was represented by six students. The Roswell school did very well at the tournament with every competitor

placing in at least one category. Competing was: Jake Healy, Yellow Belt, 13-16 beginners division, third place in free sparring; Emily Turner, Yellow Belt, 13-16 beginners division, second place in free sparring; Katelyn Graham, Yellow Belt, 10-12 intermediate division, second place in free sparring; Grace Turner, Yellow Belt, 10-12 beginners division, first place in pat-

Courtesy Photo

oral and practical exams. After they have taken the oral and practical exams and pass, they will receive a temporary A and P license that certifies them for working on aircraft. The real FAA issued A and P will come to them in the mail.” ENMU-R’s AMT instructors train students for a successful career in aviation maintenance. The next new class will start in the fall of 2014. For more information, call 6247022 or 1-888-AV8-ENMU.

terns and second place in free sparring; Jessica Sudderth, Blue Belt Red Stripe, first place in intermediate free sparring and third place in advanced free sparring and Bryce Hart, First Degree Black Belt, adult division, second place in Black Belt patterns and third place in Black Belt power breaking. This was an exceptional showing for the Yellow Belt students as this was their first organized competition.


CHURCH DEVOTIONAL

A6 Saturday, November 9, 2013

CHURCH

AND DIRECTORY

Roswell Daily Record

This Devotional & Directory is made possible by those businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services. QUALITY MEDICAL CARE Roswell MediCo

FAMILY MEDICINE Siavash Karimian, M.D., D.A.B.F.M. Babak Shamshirsaz, M.D. Sarah East, PA-C Staci West, ACNP • Stephen Janway, CNP Steven Smith, PA-C Helena Kintonis LPCC (Psychotherapist)

CARDIOLOGY Siamak Karimian, M.D., F.A.C.C., F.A.C.P.

M-F 8-5 p.m. Walk-ins & Evening Appointments available 1621 North Washington Avenue Phone 575-625-8430 www.roswellmedico.com

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Pecos Valley Dairy Sales Inc. 274 E. Darby Road Dexter, New Mexico 88230

(575) 624-2697 (575) 623-1477 Fax

1-800-400-2697

“But one and the same Spirit works all these things, distributing to each one individually just as He wills” 1 Corinthians 12:11

It is amazing to see how the Holy Spirit works in the lives of believers. As a pastor, I have the privilege of seeing Him do some of the most awesome things, things that I would not have believed if you told me. What is the biggest blessing of all is seeing the life changes among the Church. Watching people grow in their faith, being equipped to do the work of the Kingdom individually, but together cooperatively also. We are not all gifted the same way, but we all have the same Holy Spirit leading us. Let’s all try and remember this this week. God bless you Roswell! - Chris Mullennix, Calvary Baptist Church ANGLICAN

ST. STEPHEN’S 101 S. Lea; 910-9706; Fr. Bob Tally, Min; W.S. 9:00 a.m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD

Shaun Ryan, Manager 601 S. Main Street Roswell, New Mexico 88203 Phone (575) 623-2090 • Fax (575) 623-5516 www.forresttire.net

Keeping you rollin’ since 1944

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD, 1224 W. Country Club, 622-2171, Melvin Suttle, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. Wed. 7:00 pm. MIDWAY ASSEMBLY OF GOD 63 Yakima Rd., 3475309, S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m TEMPLO BETAL ASSEMBLY OF GOD 221 E. Jefferson, 623-6852, Paul & Toni Herrera, Mins. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Tues. & Wed. 6 p.m. TEMPLO LA HERMOSA FIRST SPANISH ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1305 South Garden, 625-0885, Oscar Guerrero, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Tues. & Wed. 7 p.m.

Harvard Petroleum Company, LLC

200 East Second Street P.O. Box 936 Roswell, NM 88202-0936 575-623-1581 Fax 575-622-8006

BAPTIST

ADVENTURE BIBLE CHURCH 1905 S. Main St., Butch Neal & Tim Arlet, Mins. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m.

GALILEE BAPTIST 513 E. Matthews St., 6628534, W.W. Green, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. HIGHLAND BAPTIST 2001 S. Lea, 622-9980, Rev. Wayne Brazil, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m. Wed. 6:00 p.m.

IGLESIA BAUTISTA EL CALVARIO 600 E. Tilden, 623-8135, Roberto Mancillas, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. MIDWAY BAPTIST 134 Yakima Rd., Leo Pennington, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 7 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

MORNING STAR BAPTIST 1513 Mulberry Ave., W.F. Wagoner, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. Wed. 7:30 p.m. MOUNTAIN VIEW BAPTIST 206 E. Charleston, 622-1019, S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 6:00 p.m.

MT. GILEAD MISSIONARY BAPTIST 700 E. Summit, 6230292 Pastor Allen. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:00a.m. PRIMERA BAPTIST 417 East Wildy, 623-5420 S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

BERRENDO BAPTIST 400 W. Berrendo Rd., 622-1372, Troy ROSWELL BAPTIST Grant, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; TEMPLE 700 E. Berrendo, Bill W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. Whitehead, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m. W.S. 11 am. & 6 pm Wed. 7 p.m.

BETHEL BAPTIST N. Garden & East Country Club Rd., 6228182 Richard Grisham, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:40 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. BYKOTA BAPTIST 2106 E. Pine Lodge Rd., 622-3399 Don Johnson, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

CALVARY BAPTIST 1009 W. Alameda, Chris Mullennix, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST 500 N. Pennsylvania, 623-2640; S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:00 a.m.

TABERNACLE BAPTIST 115 W. 11th, 622-7912, S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

VICTORY BAPTIST 1601 W. McGaffey, 622-0114, Dan Holt, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

WARE TABERNACLE FIRST BAPTIST - HAGERMAN MISSIONARY BAPTIST 900 211 N. Cambridge, Hagerman, E. Deming, 622-0546, Richard Herb Gage, Min.; S.S. 9:45 Gorham, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. W.S. 10 & 11 a.m., Wed. 7 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST OF DEXTER 101 W. 3rd St., Dexter, 7345673, Jackie Thomas, Min., S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

WASHINGTON AVE. BAPTIST 1400 North Washington Ave., 840-1144, Randy Reeves, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

n

“Where Love is Felt”

• Elderly Care • Assisted Living

(575)625-9145 2210 East Pinelodge Rd.

www.heartfeltmanor.com Marybeth Lawrence

ph 575-627-8070 fax 575-627-8072

1301 West Country Club Road Roswell, NM 88201 www.PeachtreeRET.com

NEW COVENANT FELLOWSHIP CHURCH OF GOD 2200 N. Garden, 624-1958,S.S. 9:30 a.m.

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION CATHOLIC 2808 N. Kentucky, 622-9895, Joe Pacquing, Min. Masses: Sat. Mass 9:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.; Sun. Mass 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.; Mon-Fri Mass 12:10 p.m.;

W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION PARISH Dexter, Deacon Jesus Herrera, Min. Sat. Mass 6 p.m., Sun. Mass 11 a.m.

IMMANUEL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 1000 N. Union, 622-6352, Louis Accardi, Min., S.S. 10:30 a.m.; OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE W.S. 11:30 a.m.; Lake Arthur, Sun. Mass 8 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

ST. CATHERINE’S Hagerman, Sun. Mass 9:30 a.m. ST. PAUL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 321 E. McGaffey, ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC 623-1568, Joe L. Dawson, 506 S. Lincoln, 622-3531, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. Fr. Gonzalo Moreno, O.F.M. 11 a.m., Tues. & Fri. 8 p.m. Pastor; Communion Service Mon 5:30 pm; Daily Mass Tues-Fri 5:30 pm Sat. English EPISCOPAL Mass 5:30 p.m., Spanish Mass 7 p.m.; Sun. English Mass 10 a.m., Spanish Mass ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL 8 a.m. & 12 Noon. 505 N. Penn., 622-1353, Father Dale Plummer, Min.; ST. PETER CATHOLIC 805 S. Main, 622-5092, Fr. Principal Service. 9 a.m. Charlie Martinez, O.F.M. Min.; 11:00 a.m.; in church Sat. Mass 6 p.m. Sun. Wed. 7 a.m. in the Mass 8 a..m. & 11 a.m. prayer garden. www.standrewsroswell.org CHURCH OF

CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST 1500 S. Elm, 622-4675; John Early Cannon, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 6 p.m.

WAL#MART STORES, INC. 4500 N. Main Roswell, NM

575-623-2062 • FAX 575-623-8704

JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES Kingdom Halls 205 W. Gayle

Mesa Park Cong. CHURCH OF CHRIST 1512 South Main St., 622-4426 S.S. Sun. 10 a.m.; Tues. 7 p.m. Buena Visa Cong. (Spanish) 10:30 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m., Wed. 6:30 p.m. Sun. 1:30 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST 700 W. Country Club Road, 622-1350, Doug Austin, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; THE FRIENDSHIP MISSIONW.S. 10 a.m. & 5 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m. ARY BAPTIST 1220 Johnson St., 623-6484, Michael K. CHURCH OF CHRIST West Shelton, Sr., Min.S.S. Alameda & Balsam, 622-5562 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., 2nd Wed.7 p.m. Sun. 1:30 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m. TRINIDAD COMMUNITY BAPTIST 1707 W. Juniper. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

n

Manor, Inc.

CHURCH OF CHRIST 200 S. Union, Suite C, 347-2628; S.S. 10 a.m.;W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. IGLESIA DE CRISTO 801 N. Washington, Horario de Servicios: domingo 9:30 & 11:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., miercoles 6 p.m. SPANISH CHURCH OF CHRIST Mulberry & Buena Vista, W.S. 9:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 6 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD

HOPE FAMILY CHURCH OF GOD 2600 S. Union, Raye Miller, Min., W.S. 10:30 a.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m., Thurs. Youth 6 p.m.

1718 N. Atkinson

Mountain View Cong Sun. 1 p.m.; Wed. 7:30 p.m. Spring River Cong. Sun. 10 a.m.; Tues 7:30 p.m.

1421 S. Garden

Rio Pecos Cong. Sun. 10 am; Thurs. 7 p.m.

Dexter- 411 S. Lincoln

Dexter Cong. Sun. 10 a.m.; Thurs. 7 p.m.

JEWISH CONGREGATIONAL B’NAI ISRAEL 712 N. Washington, 622-7295, W.S. 2nd & 4th Fri. 7 p.m.

LUTHERAN IMMANUEL LUTHERAN 1405 N. Sycamore at College, 6222853Daniel Praeuner, Min., S.S. 10:20 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m.

For changes or corrections on church listings contact Sandra at 622-7710 Ext. 209 or email sandra@rdrnews.com

Wakefield Oil Co., Inc. Wendell Wakefield

311 S. Virginia PO Box 1108 Roswell, NM 88202 1-800-657-6242 575-622-4160 Fax: 575-623-1456

We don’t want you to give us your business, we want the chance to earn your business.

Charles A. Shannon, RPh

700 N. Union Roswell, NM 88201

In-Home Care for Seniors 624-9999

575-622-6571 Fax 575-623-3801 1-800-377-9881

Raymond E. Bush Manager

622-6308

111 W. Country Club, Roswell NM 88201


CHURCH DEVOTIONAL CHURCH

Roswell Daily Record

AND DIRECTORY

Saturday, November 9, 2013

A7

This Devotional & Directory is made possible by those businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services. LUTHERAN

REDEEMER LUTHERAN 2525 N. Spruce Ave., 627-7157; W.S. 10 a.m.

ST. MARK EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 2911 N. Main St., 623-0519, Larry Sydow, Min.; S.S. 9:15 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m.

METHODIST

ALDERSGATE UNITED METHODIST 915 W 19th St, 625-2855, Jim Bignell, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m.

821 N. Main

Roswell, NM

575-623-3673 Service

575-623-1031

Central C entral V Valley alley E Electric lectric C Cooperative ooperative OOwned wned bbyy our members, memb m erss, to our communities comm o unities ccommitted ommitted to sinc ce 1937 19337 since 575-746-3571 AArtesia/Roswell/Dexter rtesia/RRoswell/Dexter 575-752-3366 Ha Hagerman agerman

www.cvecoop.org w ww.cvvecooop.org

Agave Energy Company 6263 N Main St Roswell, NM 88201 (575) 627-8398

DEXTER UNITED METHODIST 112 W. 3rd St., Dexter, 734-6529, Jim Bignell, Min. S.S. 9:30a.m.; W.S. 11:00 a.m.

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 2201 West Country Club Rd.

First Ward: Hank Malcom, Bishop 623-2777; W.S. 9 a.m.; S.S. 10:10 a.m. Second Ward: Jeff Savage, Bishop, 623-4492 W.S. 11 a.m.; S.S. 12:10 p.m.

NAZARENE

CENTRAL CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 901 E. Country Club, 420-2907 Randy Elftman, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 501 N. Sycamore, 624-2614; Dr. J. Vaughn Gossman, Min.; S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m. THE NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1019 S Lea; 6230201; Hector Torres, Min.; S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Spanish Service 12:30 p.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL

(575) 627-1145

APOSTOLIC FAMILY WORSHIP CENTER 1103 N Union; Joel Martinez, Min., 627-2258; W.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL 602 S. Mississippi, 347-2514, J.E. Shirley, Min. W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

GOD’S MESSENGER 108 S. Kansas; 625-0190; R. Dixon, Sr., Min.; S.S. 8:45 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. Noon HOUSE OF PRAYER 412 E. Matthews, 746-6699, Mike Valverde, Min. W.S. 5 p.m. Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST 200 N. Pennsylvania, 6221881 IGLESIA DE DIOS Rev. W. Douglas Mills, PhD, 317 East Wildy, 627-6596, Min.; S.S.9:15 a.m.; Daniel Madrid, Min., domingos: W.S. 10:30 a.m. Escuela Dominical 10 a.m., Servicio Evg. 5 p.m. Martes: TRINITY UNITED Oracion y Estudio 7 p.m., METHODIST 1413 S. Union, jueves: servicio Dept. 7 p.m. 622-0119, Pastor Glenn Thyrion, Min.; S.S. 10 a.m.; LIFE MINISTRIES FOURSQUARE CHURCH 409 WS. 9 a.m. & 11 a.m. W. 16th, 622-3383; Wayne & Janice Snow, Mins.; W.S. 10:30 am, Wed. 7:00 p.m. MORMON

3ra Rama (en Español): Presidente Cavalcante W.S. 2:15 p.m.; S.S. 12:15 p.m.

End-of-life care that provides dignity,compassion, and comfort. Our services are 100% paid by Medicare, Medicaid, and most commercial insurances.

APOSTOLIC BIBLE 2529 West Alameda, 625-8779, Rod Foster, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY OF THE FAITH IN JESUS CHRIST 1721 N. Maryland, 624-2728, Ismael Chavarria, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Thurs. 7 p.m.

NEW APOSTOLIC 813 N. Richardson, Ste. A, W.S. 10 a.m.

TRINITY APOSTOLIC FAITH N. Washington & 17th St., W.S. 11 a.m.

TRINITY HOUSE OF PRAISE

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD 510 S. Montana, 6232710, Bobby Barnett, Min.

W.S. 9:45 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 400 W. 3rd St., 622-4910, Sam Lanham, Int. Min. S.S. 8:30 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. 24-Hr Daily Inspiration Hotline 622-4923 REDEEMER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP PCA 900 W. Berrendo, S.S. 9 a.m. W.S. 10:30 a.m.

IGLESIA PRESBITERIANA HISPANA 2801 W. 4th St., 622-0756, Adam Soliz, Min. W.S. 11 a.m.

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN 2801 W. 4th St., 622-2801; Rev. Randy Nolen, Min.; S.S. 10:45 a.m.; W.S. 9:30 a.m.

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST

BEULAH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST 106 S. Michigan Ave., 2436203; Alex Horton, Min. Sat. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL SEPTIMO DIA 500 S. Cedar, 910-6527, Noel Dominguez, Min. Sat. S.S. 11 a.m.; W.S. 9:30 a.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

ROSWELL ENGLISH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Jaffa & S. Union, 623-4636, Ken Davis,Min. Sat. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 am. Wed. 7 p.m.

0000NARROW WAY 2200 N. Sycamore, 623-2511, Lyman Graham, Min. W.S. 2 p.m. NEW LIFE CHURCH OF ROSWELL

1800 W. Bland, 622-2989, Barbara Norfor,

Min.; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

OTHER

ADVENTURE BIBLE CHURCH 1905 S. Main St., Butch Neal & Tim Arlet, Mins. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. ALBUQUERQUE/ ROSWELL FAMILY 501 Cagua S.E., 266-4468, Fritz Schneider, Min.

BEOD MOED HEBRAIC BIBLE CENTER 928 W. McGaffey, 840-6120, Sat. Hebraic Dance 1 p.m.; Torah Study 2 p.m.; Wed. Pray & Dance Practice 6 p.m. CALVARY CHAPEL OF ROSWELL 2901 W. 4th, 623-8072, W.S. 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m. CHRIST’S CHURCH 2200 N. Sycamore, 623-4110 S.S. 8:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:00 am.

ORTHODOX BAHA’I FAITH obfusa@rt66.com 622-5729 ROSWELL CHRISTIAN

OUTREACH MINISTRIES

101 S. Sunset; Joe Diaz, Min. W.S. 11 a.m.

Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m. ROSWELL PRAYER CENTER 622-4111/317-3867; Sat. 6

p.m. to 9 p.m.; Weekdays 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., 6 p..m. to 9 p.m. SALVATION ARMY

612 W. College, 622-8700

Beau & Mandy Perez, Mins. S.S. 9:30 a.m.;

CHRISTIAN COWBOY FELLOWSHIP 3103 W. Alameda John Sturza, 625-0255, 2nd and last Friday

W.S. 10:45 a.m.; Prayer Meeting,Tues. 7 p.m.

IGLESIA DE DIOS DE LA PROFECIA 2322 N. Sherman; 505-610-6094 505-507-1254 Ministros Nicolás & Yolanda Limón. Servicio dominical 11 a.m. miércoles y viernes 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD 7TH DAY 1722 N. Kansas, 623-7295, Sat. W.S. 9:45 a.m. THE DOOR 129 E. 3rd St. 575-495-9813; David Solano, Min.; W.S. 10:30 am & 6 pm. Wed. 7 pm

THE UNITED CHURCH OF ROSWELL

417 E. Wildy Corner of Garden & Wildy 910-5845 W.S. 9 am Bob Maples, Pastor

UNITY OF ONE CHURCH

704 E. Mescalero, 622-1185, Seferino Chavez, Min., W.S. 10 am,

Bible Study Thurs. 7 p.m.

CHURCH ON THE MOVE 901 W. Brasher Rd., 6227011, Troy Smothermon, Min. SS 9 & 10:45am 12:30pm Wed. 7 p.m. GATEWAY 1900 Sycamore Ave., 623-8670, Rick Rapp, Min. W.S. 10:30 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

WASHINGTON CHAPEL CHRISTIAN

110 S. Michigan St., 623-3511 Rev. Abukusumo, Min.; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

GRACE COMMUNITY 935 W. Mescalero, 623-5438 Rick Hale, Min.; W.S. 9 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. H.I.S. HOUSE 300 W. 3rd, Dexter, 734-6873 Ron & Jeri Fuller, Mins. W.S. 10 a.m. Wed.6 p.m.

WAYMAKER

202 S. Sunset, 627-9190 Mike

& Twyla Knowlton, Mins.; W.S. 10 a.m.; J12 (8-12 yr. olds) 4

p.m.; Revolution Youth Service 6 p.m.; Wed. Core Home Groups 7 p.m.

Jones Witt & Ragsdale

Luke W. Ragsdale Roswell (575) 622-1900 Artesia (575) 746-1700 Fax (575) 625-1900 120 N. Garden, Roswell, NM 88203

Attorney at Law

207 North Washington (575)622-6722 Phone Post Office Box 3220 (575)622-6749 Fax Roswell, NM 88202 luke@ragsdalelawfirm.com

FRIDAY NIGHT

101 West Main Street Artesia, New Mexico (575)746-3551 "Serving Your Automotive Needs Since 1925"

ROCK N’ BOWL 10pm-1am $10 person

575-623-8557

DENNIS & PATTY JOHNSON, OWNERS 314 N. Main • Roswell, NM 88201 (575)622-1590 (800)222-1792 Fax (575)623-2307 www.barringersblossomshop.net

John’s

Out of this World Service in Roswell, NM

COMPUTERS & ACCESSORIES • SALES & SERVICE 1703 N. Garden Fax: 624-0147

575-625-9141

oasis@oasis-computers.net www.oasis-computers.net

CARR AUTOMOTIVE, INC. 316 E. McGaffey Roswell, NM 575-622-0909 Emergency Calls 625-9007


A8 Saturday, November 9, 2013

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

A full day of sunshine

Clear

Sunday

Monday

Mostly sunny

Tuesday

Times of sun and clouds

Wednesday

Not as warm with a shower

Times of clouds and sun

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities

Thursday

Cloudy, a shower possible

Pleasant and warmer

High 75°

Low 39°

73°/40°

75°/42°

65°/38°

57°/37°

60°/38°

70°/35°

W at 12-25 mph POP: 0%

WNW at 12-25 mph POP: 0%

SSW at 6-12 mph POP: 0%

N at 7-14 mph POP: 0%

WSW at 4-8 mph POP: 50%

SSW at 7-14 mph POP: 10%

W at 4-8 mph POP: 30%

S at 8-16 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Friday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 68°/34° Normal high/low ............... 68°/37° Record high ............... 87° in 2012 Record low ................. 18° in 1938 Humidity at noon .................. 27%

Farmington 62/30

Clayton 63/33

Raton 64/25

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Fri. .. 0.00" Month to date ....................... 0.08" Normal month to date .......... 0.20" Year to date .......................... 8.63" Normal year to date ............ 11.89"

Santa Fe 63/32

Gallup 62/25

Tucumcari 70/34

Albuquerque 64/41

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 70/35

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 65/37

T or C 68/41

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Sun. The Moon Today Sun. First

Nov 9

Rise Set 6:24 a.m. 5:00 p.m. 6:25 a.m. 4:59 p.m. Rise Set 12:05 p.m. 11:27 p.m. 12:46 p.m. none Full

Nov 17

Last

Nov 25

Alamogordo 71/39

Silver City 70/40

ROSWELL 75/39 Carlsbad 76/41

Hobbs 77/43

Las Cruces 69/42

New

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013

Dec 2

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diffi- JACQUELINE cult

BIGAR

ARIES (March 21-April 19)  Holding yourself back to stick to the triedand-true would be a mistake. YOUR HOROSCOPE Your significant other might need to join you on an adventure. See different people and experience different cultures. You have a very upbeat quality about you. Tonight: Where the action is. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  Shaking up the status quo could be close to impossible, depending on your interests and the direction you want to head in. Someone you often look to for help seems to be closed down right now. Don’t worry about it. Go off and enjoy yourself. Tonight: A must appearance. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)  You might be in the mood for a spontaneous trip or a visit to someone who lives away from your immediate area. The drive and the change of scenery might be more refreshing than you would think. Tonight: Try a new type of cuisine. CANCER (June 21-July 22)  It seems as if everyone wants quality time with you. Honor your priorities and make some choices. You also might want to use your

Regional Cities Today Sun. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Today

Sun.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

34/34/c 62/42/pc 54/37/s 49/41/pc 60/38/s 58/33/pc 56/40/pc 72/52/pc 63/34/s 56/38/c 72/46/s 85/72/pc 74/53/pc 62/35/s 61/37/s 72/50/s 74/54/s 72/38/s

42/33/sn 69/45/pc 60/36/s 55/36/pc 67/35/s 48/34/s 48/36/pc 72/49/pc 64/38/s 49/33/pc 74/49/pc 84/70/pc 76/54/pc 51/32/s 56/41/s 74/51/pc 75/55/pc 70/45/pc

Friday

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

71/39/s 64/41/s 54/21/s 75/42/s 76/41/s 57/23/s 63/33/s 60/28/s 70/35/s 73/39/s 62/39/s 62/30/s 62/25/s 77/43/s 69/42/s 64/30/s 60/38/s 67/35/s 76/41/s 71/36/s 62/26/s 64/25/s 53/21/s 75/39/s 65/37/s 63/32/s 70/40/s 68/41/s 70/34/s 62/37/s

71/36/pc 64/41/s 56/21/s 72/45/s 75/48/pc 57/23/s 64/39/s 60/35/s 67/42/s 74/41/pc 64/41/s 63/25/s 63/23/s 71/48/pc 71/42/pc 63/35/s 60/39/s 67/35/s 73/49/pc 69/42/s 62/25/s 64/28/s 55/18/s 73/40/s 63/39/s 63/36/s 68/41/pc 69/40/s 70/40/s 63/39/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

diplomatic skills in order to keep the peace. With some careful planning, you might not have to disappoint anyone. Tonight: Be with a favorite person. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  Others come forward with suggestions. Though you might have felt as if you needed to take full responsibility with a project, it becomes apparent that you can step back. Know that you do not need to be the pivotal person. Tonight: Enjoy all the attention. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)  Your efficiency is a desired quality. Others recognize your ability to clear up quite a few problems with ease. It is important to understand your strengths, but you also need to take better care of yourself. Do this by saying “no” once in a while. Tonight: Hang with the gang. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)  Take at least half the day to be frivolous, if not more. Though your levity mixed with your creativity could be a tremendous asset for you at work, it also is a great quality that allows you to have a good time with friends. Tonight: Play the night away. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  If you can hang at home, do. You could be involved with a home project, or perhaps you might decide to clean up a room or two for the upcoming holidays. Some of you might have already started buying your holiday gifts. Tonight: Do your thing. Screen calls. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22- Dec. 21)  Your phone rings as others seek you out. You could have a difficult

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

U.S. Extremes

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Sun.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

83/75/sh 73/46/s 45/27/pc 73/60/c 50/41/pc 57/30/s 80/65/pc 52/42/pc 83/59/s 54/39/pc 52/43/sh 60/40/s 66/40/s 66/39/s 67/54/pc 48/43/sh 81/55/s 57/42/s

84/73/sh 70/50/pc 42/21/pc 75/57/pc 56/39/pc 55/34/s 82/63/pc 58/38/s 85/61/s 48/32/pc 56/44/r 68/37/s 55/39/s 67/40/pc 69/56/pc 51/42/r 83/55/s 60/37/s

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 87° .... West Palm Beach, Fla. Low: 10° ...................Hibbing, Minn.

High: 73° ........................Tucumcari Low: 13° ........................Eagle Nest

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

Precipitation Stationary

0s

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

time saying “no” to invitations. Focus on the people around you. You still might be a little off if you have not yet heard from a special person. Do not stand on ceremony — make the call. Tonight: With friends. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  Honor what is happening. Even if you feel inclined to take a risk, be careful. Can you afford the loss? Don’t get involved in any money risks after noon. Make a phone call to someone you care about who always has good advice. Tonight: Make it your treat. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  You are energized and ready to head right out the door. You might want to make some calls first to check out the lay of the land. You are the sign of friendship, and you can be found visiting with different sets of friends today. Tonight: Whatever knocks your socks off. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)  Know when to take the lead in a strategic situation. On the other hand, you might be happier kicking back and doing more of what you want. A friend’s suggestion might seem off. Be polite, but do what you want. Tonight: You like to be mysterious, don’t you? BORN TODAY Musician John Lennon (1940), former U.S. Sen. Trent Lott (1941), actor Steve Burns (1973)

CMA Awards, fellow stars salute George Strait NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The entertainer of the year trophy at the Country Music Association Awards is one of the most coveted honors in the genre, but sometimes it’s OK to lose — like, say, when George Strait is a nominee. Strait won his third entertainer of the year award and his first since 1990 Wednesday night against country music’s current hitmakers, and there wasn’t a disappointed person in the house. Heck, Blake Shelton — one of five performers with a leading two victories — was excited to lose to the 61-year -old whose popularity defies his age. “That’s how it needs to be because he’s not just entertainer of the year, he’s entertainer of the last three decades, I guess, or four decades,” Shelton said. “I don’t know who’s keeping score. I mean, it’s George Strait. He’s King George. I couldn’t be happier with how this turned out.” Shelton was one of five top winners with two trophies apiece, along with Florida Georgia Line and the trio of Taylor Swift, Tim McGraw and Keith Urban, who won music video and music event of the year for their “Highway Don’t Care” collaboration. Like Strait, Swift also was going for her third entertainer of the year, which would have been a CMA record for a woman. Like Shelton, she couldn’t have cared less when she lost, instead hugging Faith Hill as they cried tears of joy for Strait. She noted they’ve both opened for Strait in their careers and she recounted a story about how Strait and his wife Norma dropped in to one of her first headlining concerts when she was a teenager just to wish her luck. “And that’s the kind of artist he is,” Strait said. “And when you’re that kind of person, and you win something, everybody’s cheering for you and people are crying. And that’s the kind of legacy you want to leave behind. The crowd gave Strait a standing ovation as he made his way to the stage, and stayed standing throughout his speech — which

AP Photo

George Strait poses backstage with the award for entertainer of the year at the 47th annual CMA Awards at Bridgestone Arena on Wednesday, in Nashville, Tenn.

by the usually reclusive Strait’s standards, was long. It wasn’t just a special night for those in the arena. It was also the show’s top trending moment on Facebook. His retirement from the road has gained lots of attention, but Strait isn’t a relic. He remains relevant, recently earning his record 60th No. 1 and signing a five-album deal with Universal Music Nashville that will keep in making records. Backstage he shared with reporters how it has felt as he circles the country on his The Cowboy Rides Away tour, his last. “When I first started out this year, the first few shows, I about lost it every night, you know, leaving the stage ... thinking, This might be the last time I ever play on this stage again,”’ Strait said. He joked he had so much fun, “The cowboy might be riding in again.” Strait’s victory capped a show that was simultaneously focused on the past, present and future. Shelton, his wife Miranda Lambert and Swift all continued winning ways. Shelton took album of the year for “Based on a True Story ...,” and won his fourth male vocalist of the year. Voters

supplied some symmetry when they named Lambert female vocalist of the year, also for the fourth time, tying her with good friend Reba McEntire. It was the third straight year in which Lambert or Shelton were among the top winners, and capped a year in which they were dogged by tabloid stories about their relationship. Lambert said she wasn’t sure why the CMA’s 6,000 voters love the couple so much. “You know, pillow talk, literally, we’re like, ‘Well, our year was last year,”’ Lambert said. “It was great, a great run while we had it. We’ll drink tonight and celebrate all of our friends winning, because literally all of my friends won awards tonight. And that’s what’s great about country music because we are all friends. But I just thank everybody for really understanding that we’re real people and that every time they vote for us and that we stand up there on that stage it’s like it makes our life.” Swift, who performed a somber, acoustic version of her hit “Red” with Vince Gill, Alison Krauss and Sam Bush, won her eighth and ninth CMA trophies before being honored with the

Ice

90s 100s 110s

association’s Pinnacle Award, given to an artist who has taken country to a worldwide audience. The CMA brought a star-studded welcoming group out on stage for Swift that included Strait, Rascal Flatts, McGraw and Hill, Urban and Brad Paisley — all of whom gave Swift a chance to open for them on the road a teenager. A video salute followed with appearances by Justin Timberlake, Julia Roberts, Carly Simon, Ethel Kennedy and Mick Jagger — whose appearance made Swift shout. “You’ve made me feel so special right now, thank you,” Swift said. Voters also cast an eye to the future, handing trophies to young stars Florida Georgia Line and Kacey Musgraves, who was a top nominee with Swift. Florida Georgia Line’s Tyler Hubbard and Brian Kelley scored single and vocal duo of the year. Their quick wins early in the show was more proof the socalled bro country movement is the sound of the moment in mainstream country. FGL kicked off the show performing a fistpumping medley with Luke Bryan, and very quickly returned to the stage to take the trophy for single of the year for their

“Cruise” remix featuring Nelly. They also played the new song “Round Here.” “It’s been a constant thing all year — we’ve been trying to wrap our minds around what’s going on,” Hubbard said of the band’s platinum success backstage. “It’s been a dream come true for us and a huge blessing for us and something we could have never imagined.” Musgraves won the new artist trophy, besting a field that included Florida Georgia Line. With smart songwriting, a progressive bent and a strong sense of self like country’s other top women, Musgraves made an auspicious mainstream country debut this year with her album “Same Trailer Different Park.” She attended with her grandmother. “It’s amazing what 52 weeks can do to a person,” Musgraves said backstage. “... Last year I had really crappy seats. You know, I was just sitting back with my roommate just as a fan. And here I am holding this thing.” Lee Brice’s “I’d Drive Your Truck,” about a fallen soldier whose father still drives his truck, won song of the year, and Little Big Town took its second straight vocal group of the year. Collaboration was the theme of the night as Strait and Alan Jackson joined together to salute the late George Jones with a rendition of “He Stopped Loving Her Today.” Hunter Hayes and Jason Mraz took a tour of the Bridgestone Arena while performing “Everybody’s Got Somebody But Me.” And Zac Brown and his band joined in on a growing hard-rock trend in country as Foo Fighter Dave Grohl played drums for new high-powered song “Day for the Dead.” Eric Church earlier turned things up to 11 with his new song “The Outsiders.” And in one of the night’s most anticipated moments, Kenny Rogers received the CMA’s Willie Nelson lifetime achievement award and was saluted by Jennifer Nettles, Rucker and Rascal Flatts.


PREP FOOTBALL SCOREBOARD

Artesia Del Norte

54 Hondo Valley 74 25 28 Dora

53 Dexter 22 NMMI

SPORTS

Saturday, November 9, 2013 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

Section

Roswell Daily Record

B

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

GODDARD 35 ROSWELL 0 ROCKETS WIN ALIEN CITY ENCOUNTER KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

The longest win streak in the history of the Alien City Encounter got one game longer on Friday at the Wool Bowl. Top-ranked Goddard won the battle for city supremacy for the 13th straight time, blanking Roswell 35-0 to wrap up the District 4-4A championship and, in all likelihood, the No. 1 seed in the upcoming state playoffs. And for the second straight year, it was Dean McDaniel who carried the load for Goddard’s groundand-pound offense. The junior tailback, playing in place of the injured Cody French, ran 26 times for 201 yards and two scores and had a 4-yard receiving score for the Rockets (7-2). “I’m just trying to do my best to fill in for Cody,” said McDaniel, who now has 384

yards and five TDs on 56 carries in two career starts against Roswell. “I’m not the starting running back, but I’ll just do my best every time I get in. I’m just trying to get a ‘W’ for my team and do whatever I can do (to help us do that).” The always stoic Sam Jernigan said McDaniel just did what he usually does. “I thought he ran pretty tough. I thought we missed some blocks up front for him, so that didn’t help him up too much there,” said the 23rd-year coach, who improved to 18-6 all-time against Roswell. “But, he did a pretty good job of picking up the load like he usually does, and he does it with a grin on his face. “I thought he had a pretty decent game.” That pretty decent game was highlighted by a pair of See CITY, Page B3

Shawn Naranjo Photo

RIGHT: Goddard’s Dean McDaniel (21) runs around Roswell’s Jared Perez during their game, Friday. McDaniel rushed for 201 yards and had three total TDs to lead the Rockets.

Roswell: Making history BOYS SOCCER

LAWRENCE FOSTER RECORD ASST. SPORTS EDITOR

Lawrence Foster Photo

Roswell’s Joseph Contreras brings the ball up the field during his team’s win over Los Alamos in the state semifinals, Friday. The Coyotes beat the Hilltoppers 1-0 to advance to the title game for the first time in school history.

ALBUQUERQUE — Eagles fans in the Black Hole last week had no idea that Nick Foles would go all Peyton Manning and tie the league record with seven TD strikes. Likewise, no one knew that Wilt Chamberlain would hit triple digits when he dropped 100 points in a win over the Knicks. Simply, one of the beautiful things about sports is that you usually never know when you will witness history. On Friday, the Roswell boys soccer team had a chance to make history of its own when it took on Los Alamos in a NMAA Class 4A State Championship semifinal match at the APS Soccer Complex. What type of history? Never in school history had a Coyote boys soccer team reached a state title game. With a goal in the 80th minute from their senior captain, the Coyotes etched their place in history as the first Roswell team to reach the title game with a 1-0 win over

See HISTORY, Page B3

LOCAL SCHEDULE — SATURDAY, NOV. 9 — Odessa College Classic • NMMI vs. Cochise, noon

NMAA Class 6-Man semifinal • San Jon at Lake Arthur, 6 p.m.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

PREP FOOTBALL

WSFL Third-place Game At Round Valley Ensphere, Eagar, Ariz. • NMMI vs. Eastern Arizona, 1 p.m.

NMAA Class 4A championship At APS Field 1 • Roswell vs. ABQ Academy, 10:30 a.m.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

BOYS SOCCER

District 7-1A championship • Cloudcroft at Hagerman, 2 p.m. District 4-4A championship • Artesia at Goddard, 7 p.m. PREP VOLLEYBALL

Obeng Asante Photo

Dexter’s Kevin Bonner (7) runs past the diving Dominic Moore during his team’s win over NMMI, Friday. The Demons captured the District 4-2A title with the win.

Demons win district Hondo Valley reaches title game

Dexter scored 27 secondquarter points to pull away from NMMI and win the District 4-2A championship for the second straight season with a 54-28 win on Friday at Colt Field. After a 7-7 deadlock in the first quarter, Israel Gonzalez scored on a 7yard run to put the Demons (8-2, 3-0 district) in front for good. Kyle Bonner hit Gonzalez for an 11-yard score about 5 minutes later and then hit his brother, Kevin, for a 23-yard TD with 2:27 left in the half to make it 28-7. With 1:46 left in the half, Kyle Bonner scored on a 12-yard run to make it 347. NMMI got within 13 early in the fourth quarter, but a pair of Gabino Rodriguez touchdown runs for Dexter

SPOTLIGHT

LOCAL BRIEFS

capped the scoring. Rodriguez finished with 104 yards on eight carries to lead a Dexter of fense that amassed 390 total yards. Jacob Sanchez also cracked the century mark with 101 yards on 10 totes. Kyle Bonner went 8 for 12 for 160 yards and a career -high four touchdowns. For NMMI (5-5, 1-1), Ryan Hargo-Scott ran for 104 yards on 12 carries. Dante Mora had 35 yards and two scores on the ground and threw for 127

ON

See BRIEFS, Page B3

SPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN ... 1912 — The lateral pass is used as an State returns after missing three games offensive weapon for the first time by due to injury and breaks the NCAA Worcester Tech coach William F. Carney. record for touchdowns by a freshman Carney’s team beats Amherst 14-13. with his 20th in a 42-32 win over 1953 — The U.S. Supreme Court Colorado State. rules 7-2 that baseball is not subject to 2002 — Montana matches the NCAA antitrust laws, maintaining the game is a Division I-AA record with its 24th straight sport, not a business. victory, rallying to beat Sacramento 1991 — Marshall Faulk of San Diego State 31-24.


B2 Saturday, November 9, 2013

PILLER’S PROFESSION SPORTS

Roswell Daily Record

First Round

Roswell native Gerina Piller on the LPGA Tour

T-36th E PLACE

72

TOTAL TO PAR

THIS WEEK’S STOP: MIZUNO CLASSIC

ROUND SCORE

Hole Par Score

ROUND SCORECARD

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 5 4 4 4 3 4 5 3 4 36 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 5 35

Eagles: 0 Birdies: 3 Fairways hit: 8 of 14

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total 4 3 4 5 4 4 5 3 4 36 72 4 3 4 5 4 5 5 2 5 37 72

Pars: 12 Bogeys: 3 Greens hit: 13 of 18

Others: 0 Putts: 31

Kirk battles wind, takes lead at McGladrey Classic

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. (AP) — Chris Kirk was at his best when the wind was at its worst Friday in the McGladrey Classic. Kirk rolled in a 40-foot birdie putt from off the green, chipped in from nearly 60 feet for birdie on another hole and wound up with another 4under 66 at Sea Island to take a one-

shot lead going into the weekend. “Definitely shot my score on that back nine,” said Kirk, who started the second round on the back. “I made a pretty easy bogey on No. 10 and it was just kind of like, ‘Yeah, this is going to be a pretty tough day.’ But I didn’t let it bug me.” He followed with five birdies to get

into the lead, and stayed there with a pair of saves — one for bogey on No. 4, another from a plugged lie in the bunker on No. 8. Kirk was at 8-under 132, one shot ahead of Kevin Chappell (68), Webb Simpson (68), John Senden (67) and Briny Baird (70). Eighteen players had to return Saturday morning to finish the round, none closer than three shot of Kirk. Even though he recently moved back to the Atlanta area, Kirk was one of the early PGA Tour pros to settle at Sea Island. This was one time where it paid off. The conditions were cold and blustery, with gusts up to 35 mph, and Kirk was ready for just about anything. “I’ve played this course hundreds of times,” he said. “I’ve seen every wind direction, every wind strength. I’ve seen it blow way harder than that before. You still know how well you’ve

Oyama leads Mizuno Classic SHIMA, Japan (AP) — Japan’s Shiho Oyama shot a 4-under 68 on Friday to take the first-round lead in the Mizuno Classic, the final tournament in the LPGA Tour’s five-event Asian swing. Oyama had six birdies and two bogeys at Kintetsu Kashikojima in the event also sanctioned by the Japan LPGA Tour. “I have been having this neck

Prep football

Da-Ye Na . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35 Kaori Ohe . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35 So Yeon Ryu . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35 Maiko Wakabayashi . . . . . . .35-36 Lala Anai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 Chie Arimura . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 Shanshan Feng . . . . . . . . . .37-35 Natsuka Hori . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 Erika Kikuchi . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 Na Ri Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 Cindy LaCrosse . . . . . . . . . .37-35 Sydnee Michaels . . . . . . . . .36-36 Harukyo Nomura . . . . . . . . .37-35 Gerina Piller . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37 Jenny Shin . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 Karrie Webb . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37 Sakura Yokomine . . . . . . . . .38-34 Yuri Fudoh . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-35 Mina Harigae . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37 Akane Iijima . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37 Lisa McCloskey . . . . . . . . . .37-36 Belen Mozo . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36 Misuzu Narita . . . . . . . . . . . .35-38 Ritsuko Ryu . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37 Miki Saiki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-38 Onnarin Sattayabanphot . . .36-37 Thidapa Suwannapura . . . .37-36 Ayako Uehara . . . . . . . . . . .38-35 Lindsey Wright . . . . . . . . . . .37-36 Irene Cho . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-36 Eun-Hee Ji . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-35 Rikako Morita . . . . . . . . . . . .38-36 Giulia Sergas . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 Yumiko Yoshida . . . . . . . . . .35-39 Christel Boeljon . . . . . . . . . .38-37 Moriya Jutanugarn . . . . . . . .37-38 Haeji Kang . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-38 Hee Young Park . . . . . . . . .38-37 Jane Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-37 Mayu Hattori . . . . . . . . . . . .38-38 Juli Inkster . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-38 Megumi Kido . . . . . . . . . . . .36-40 Candie Kung . . . . . . . . . . . .38-38 Caroline Masson . . . . . . . . .37-39 Miki Sakai . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-40 Mariajo Uribe . . . . . . . . . . . .40-38 Jee Young Lee . . . . . . . . . . .37-42

Friday’s Scores By The Associated Press PREP FOOTBALL Albuquerque Academy 49, Socorro 13 Artesia 53, Del Norte 22 Aztec 32, Kirtland Central 20 Belen 47, Grants 22 Centennial 28, Deming 14 Cibola 38, Volcano Vista 28 Clayton 50, Texico 0 Clovis 66, Carlsbad 39 Dexter 54, NMMI 28 Farmington 21, Piedra Vista 6 Goddard 35, Roswell 0 Hatch Valley 57, Cobre 21 Laguna-Acoma 66, Ramah 0 Lordsburg 47, Mesilla Valley Christian 7 Los Lunas 49, Valencia 21 Mayfield 28, Las Cruces 20 Miyamura 39, Gallup 30 Moriarty 19, St. Pius 0 Navajo Prep 77, Dulce 0 Ruidoso 42, Lovington 0 Sandia 35, La Cueva 7 Santa Fe 46, Capital 22 Santa Rosa 52, Tucumcari 0 Silver 47, Hot Springs 7 Taos 40, Raton 19 Zuni 50, Crownpoint 44 Class 1A Quarterfinals Capitan 22, Fort Sumner 8 Jal 49, Magdalena 8 8-Man Quarterfinals Melrose 40, Carrizozo 12 Tatum 32, Logan 8 6-Man Semifinal Hondo Valley 74, Dora 25

LPGA

Mizuno Classic Scores By The Associated Press Friday At Kintetsu Kashikojima Golf Course Shima, Japan Purse: $1.2 million Yardage: 6,506; Par: 72 (36-36) First Round Shiho Oyama . . . . . . . . . . . .32-36 — Chella Choi . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-34 — Hee-Won Han . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — Eun-Bi Jang . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-33 — Na-Ri Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-34 — Brittany Lincicome . . . . . . . .35-34 — Pernilla Lindberg . . . . . . . . .34-35 — Kaori Nakamura . . . . . . . . . .33-36 — Junko Omote . . . . . . . . . . . .35-34 — Jiyai Shin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — Austin Ernst . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — Asako Fujimoto . . . . . . . . . .36-34 — Mamiko Higa . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — Yuki Ichinose . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — Danielle Kang . . . . . . . . . . .33-37 — Brittany Lang . . . . . . . . . . . .33-37 — Esther Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — Teresa Lu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-33 — Jennifer Rosales . . . . . . . . .34-36 — Yuko Fukuda . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 — Julieta Granada . . . . . . . . . .35-36 — Erina Hara . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 — Vicky Hurst . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35 — Ah-Reum Hwang . . . . . . . . .35-36 — Kumiko Kaneda . . . . . . . . . .35-36 — Christina Kim . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 — Rui Kitada . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 — Rebecca Lee-Bentham . . . .34-37 — Stacy Lewis . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 — Catriona Matthew . . . . . . . .36-35 — Mika Miyazato . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 —

TV SPORTSWATCH

ache that’s been affecting my golf recently,” Oyama said. “But yesterday I had some massage and the pain is gradually fading.” Jiyai Shin, the tournament winner in 2008 and 2010, was a stroke back along with fellow South Korean players Chella Choi, Hee-Won Han, Na-Ri Lee, Eun-Bi Jang,

68 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Saturday, Nov. 9 AUTO RACING 9:30 a.m. FS1 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for AdvoCare 500, at Avondale, Ariz. 10:30 a.m. FS1 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, pole qualifying for ServiceMaster 200, at Avondale, Ariz. 12:30 p.m. FS1 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, “Happy Hour Series,” final practice for AdvoCare 500, at Avondale, Ariz. 2 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, ServiceMaster 200, at Avondale, Ariz. 12:30 a.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, qualifying for Auto Club Finals, at Pomona, Calif. (delayed tape) BOXING 7:30 p.m. HBO — Vanes Martirosyan (33-0-1) vs. Demetrius Andrade (19-0-0), for

NBA

SCOREBOARD

See MIZUNO, Page B2

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Philadelphia . . . . . . . .4 2 .667 New York . . . . . . . . . .2 3 .400 Brooklyn . . . . . . . . . . .2 3 .400 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .2 4 .333 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .2 4 .333 Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 2 .667 Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . .3 3 .500 Orlando . . . . . . . . . . . .3 3 .500 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .2 3 .400 Washington . . . . . . . . .2 3 .400 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . .6 0 1.000 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . . .2 2 .500 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 3 .400 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .2 3 .400 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .2 4 .333 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct San Antonio . . . . . . . .5 1 .833 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .4 2 .667

71 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 75 75 75 76 76 76 76 76 77 78 79

GB — 1 1⁄2 1 1 ⁄2 2 2

GB — 1 1 1 1 ⁄2 1 1⁄2

GB — 3 3 1⁄2 3 1⁄2 4 GB — 1

vacant WBO junior middleweight title; junior featherweights, Nonito Donaire (31-2-0) vs. Vic Darchinyan (39-5-1); champion Roman Martinez (27-1-2) vs. Mikey Garcia (32-0-0), for WBO junior lightweight title, at Corpus Christi, Texas COLLEGE FOOTBALL 10 a.m. ABC — National coverage, Kansas St. at Texas Tech ESPN — Auburn at Tennessee ESPN2 — Penn St. at Minnesota FSN — TCU at Iowa St. 1 p.m. FOX — Southern Cal at California 1:30 p.m. ABC — Nebraska at Michigan or BYU at Wisconsin CBS — National coverage, Mississippi St. at Texas A&M ESPN — Nebraska at Michigan or BYU at Wisconsin NBCSN — James Madison at New Hampshire 1:45 p.m. FSN — Tulsa at East Carolina 2 p.m. FS1 — Kansas at Oklahoma St. NBCSN — Cornell at Dartmouth 5 p.m.

New Orleans . . . . . . . .3 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Memphis . . . . . . . . . . .2 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Oklahoma City . . . . . .4 Minnesota . . . . . . . . . .4 Portland . . . . . . . . . . .3 Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Golden State . . . . . . .4 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . . .4 L.A. Clippers . . . . . . . .3 L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . . .3 Sacramento . . . . . . . .1

See KIRK, Page B2

3 .500 2 3 .500 2 3 .400 2 1⁄2

L 1 2 2 4 6

L 2 2 3 4 4

Pct GB .800 — 1⁄2 .667 .600 1 .200 3 .000 4 1⁄2

Pct GB .667 — .667 — .500 1 .429 1 1⁄2 .200 2 1⁄2

Thursday’s Games Miami 102, L.A. Clippers 97 Denver 109, Atlanta 107 L.A. Lakers 99, Houston 98 Friday’s Games Boston 91, Orlando 89 Philadelphia 94, Cleveland 79 Indiana 91, Toronto 84 Washington 112, Brooklyn 108, OT New York 101, Charlotte 91 Oklahoma City 119, Detroit 110 Chicago 97, Utah 73 Minnesota 116, Dallas 108 New Orleans 96, L.A. Lakers 85 San Antonio 76, Golden State 74 Phoenix 114, Denver 103 Portland 104, Sacramento 91 Saturday’s Games Utah at Toronto, 5 p.m. Indiana at Brooklyn, 5:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Cleveland, 5:30 p.m. Boston at Miami, 5:30 p.m. Orlando at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Houston, 6 p.m. Golden State at Memphis, 6 p.m. Dallas at Milwaukee, 6:30 p.m. Portland at Sacramento, 8 p.m. Sunday’s Games San Antonio at New York, 12 p.m. Washington at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. New Orleans at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Lakers, 9:30 p.m.

NFL

National Football League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain AMERICAN CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct New England . . .7 2 0 .778 N.Y. Jets . . . . . . .5 4 0 .556 Miami . . . . . . . . .4 4 0 .500 Buffalo . . . . . . . . .3 6 0 .333 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Indianapolis . . . . .6 2 0 .750 Tennessee . . . . .4 4 0 .500 Houston . . . . . . .2 6 0 .250 Jacksonville . . . .0 8 0 .000 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Cincinnati . . . . . .6 3 0 .667 Cleveland . . . . . .4 5 0 .444 Baltimore . . . . . . .3 5 0 .375

PF 234 169 174 189

PF 214 173 146 86

PF 217 172 168

PA 175 231 187 236

PA 155 167 221 264

PA 166 197 172

ESPN — Virginia Tech at Miami ESPN2 — Houston at UCF FOX — Texas at West Virginia 6 p.m. CBS — National coverage, LSU at Alabama 6:07 p.m. ABC — Notre Dame at Pittsburgh 8 p.m. ESPN — UCLA at Arizona 8:15 p.m. ESPN2 — Fresno St. at Wyoming GOLF 11 a.m. TGC — PGA Tour, The McGladrey Classic, third round, at St. Simons Island, Ga. 1:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Turkish Airlines Open, final round, at Antalya, Turkey SOCCER 7:55 a.m. NBCSN — Premier League, West Bromwich at Chelsea 10:30 a.m. NBC — Premier League, West Ham at Norwich 12:30 p.m. NBC — MLS, playoffs, conference championships, Leg 1, teams TBD

Pittsburgh . . . . . .2 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Kansas City . . . .9 Denver . . . . . . . .7 San Diego . . . . . .4 Oakland . . . . . . .3

6

L 0 1 4 5

0 .250 156 208

T Pct PF 0 1.000 215 0 .875 343 0 .500 192 0 .375 146

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Dallas . . . . . . . . .5 4 0 Philadelphia . . . .4 5 0 Washington . . . . .3 6 0 N.Y. Giants . . . . .2 6 0 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T New Orleans . . . .6 2 0 Carolina . . . . . . .5 3 0 Atlanta . . . . . . . . .2 6 0 Tampa Bay . . . . .0 8 0 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Detroit . . . . . . . . .5 3 0 Chicago . . . . . . . .5 3 0 Green Bay . . . . .5 3 0 Minnesota . . . . . .2 7 0 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Seattle . . . . . . . . .8 1 0 San Francisco . . .6 2 0 Arizona . . . . . . . .4 4 0 St. Louis . . . . . . .3 6 0

Pct .556 .444 .333 .250

Pct .750 .625 .250 .000

Pct .625 .625 .625 .222

Pct .889 .750 .500 .333

PF 257 225 230 141

PF 216 204 176 124

PF 217 240 232 220

PF 232 218 160 186

PA 111 218 174 199

PA 209 231 287 223

PA 146 106 218 190

PA 197 226 185 279

PA 149 145 174 226

Thursday, Nov. 7 Minnesota 34, Washington 27 Sunday, Nov. 10 Detroit at Chicago, 11 a.m. Philadelphia at Green Bay, 11 a.m. Jacksonville at Tennessee, 11 a.m. Cincinnati at Baltimore, 11 a.m. St. Louis at Indianapolis, 11 a.m. Seattle at Atlanta, 11 a.m. Oakland at N.Y. Giants, 11 a.m. Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 11 a.m. Carolina at San Francisco, 2:05 p.m. Denver at San Diego, 2:25 p.m. Houston at Arizona, 2:25 p.m. Dallas at New Orleans, 6:30 p.m. Open: Cleveland, Kansas City, N.Y. Jets, New England Monday, Nov. 11 Miami at Tampa Bay, 6:40 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14 Indianapolis at Tennessee, 6:25 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17 Baltimore at Chicago, 11 a.m. Oakland at Houston, 11 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 11 a.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 11 a.m. Detroit at Pittsburgh, 11 a.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 11 a.m. Cleveland at Cincinnati, 11 a.m. Arizona at Jacksonville, 11 a.m. San Diego at Miami, 2:05 p.m. Minnesota at Seattle, 2:25 p.m. San Francisco at New Orleans, 2:25 p.m. Green Bay at N.Y. Giants, 2:25 p.m. Kansas City at Denver, 6:30 p.m. Open: Dallas, St. Louis Monday, Nov. 18 New England at Carolina, 6:40 p.m.

NHL

National Hockey League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Tampa Bay . .15 11 4 0 Toronto . . . . .16 11 5 0 Detroit . . . . .17 9 5 3 Boston . . . . .15 9 5 1 Montreal . . . .17 8 8 1 Ottawa . . . . .16 6 6 4 Florida . . . . .16 3 9 4 Buffalo . . . . .19 3 15 1 Metropolitan Division . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pittsburgh . . .16 11 5 0 Washington .16 9 7 0 N.Y. Rangers 16 8 8 0 Carolina . . . .16 6 7 3 N.Y. Islanders16 6 7 3 New Jersey .16 4 7 5 Columbus . . .15 5 10 0 Philadelphia .15 4 10 1

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Colorado . . .15 13 2 0 Chicago . . . .16 10 2 4 St. Louis . . . .14 10 2 2 Minnesota . .17 9 4 4 Nashville . . .16 8 6 2 Dallas . . . . . .16 8 6 2 Winnipeg . . .18 7 9 2 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Anaheim . . . .18 14 3 1 San Jose . . .16 10 2 4 Phoenix . . . .17 11 4 2

Pts 22 22 21 19 17 16 10 7

GFGA 51 37 50 37 43 45 42 29 44 38 50 49 32 57 33 61

Pts 22 18 16 15 15 13 10 9

GFGA 49 38 53 44 35 43 30 45 47 51 30 44 36 44 22 42

Pts 26 24 22 22 18 18 16

GFGA 50 27 56 43 50 33 45 38 37 49 44 47 45 51

Pts 29 24 24

GFGA 63 44 59 36 56 53

AP Photo

Chris Kirk watches his tee shot on the sixth hole during the second round of the McGladrey Classic, Friday. Vancouver . .18 11 5 2 Los Angeles .16 10 6 0 Calgary . . . . .17 6 9 2 Edmonton . . .17 4 11 2 NOTE: Two points for a win, overtime loss.

24 20 14 10 one

52 46 45 40 47 61 42 66 point for

Thursday’s Games Washington 3, Minnesota 2, SO Boston 4, Florida 1 Ottawa 4, Montreal 1 New Jersey 3, Philadelphia 0 Carolina 1, N.Y. Islanders 0 N.Y. Rangers 4, Columbus 2 Dallas 4, Detroit 3, OT Tampa Bay 4, Edmonton 2 St. Louis 3, Calgary 2 Los Angeles 2, Buffalo 0 Vancouver 4, San Jose 2 Friday’s Games Toronto 2, New Jersey 1, SO Winnipeg 5, Nashville 0 Colorado 4, Calgary 2 Anaheim 6, Buffalo 2 Saturday’s Games Edmonton at Philadelphia, 11 a.m. Florida at Ottawa, noon Toronto at Boston, 5 p.m. Tampa Bay at Detroit, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Carolina, 5 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Columbus, 5 p.m. Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 6 p.m. Chicago at Dallas, 6 p.m. Washington at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 8 p.m.

PGA

The McGladrey Classic Scores By The Associated Press Friday At Sea Island Resort (Seaside Course) St. Simons Island, Ga. Purse: $5.5 million Yardage: 7,005; Par: 70 (35-35) Partial Second Round 18 players failed to finish the round Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-66 — 132 Kevin Chappell . . . . . . . . . .65-68 — 133 Briny Baird . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63-70 — 133 Webb Simpson . . . . . . . . . .65-68 — 133 John Senden . . . . . . . . . . . .66-67 — 133 Jason Kokrak . . . . . . . . . . . .69-65 — 134 Scott Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-68 — 134 Ted Potter, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . .67-67 — 134 Tim Clark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-67 — 134 Brian Harman . . . . . . . . . . .67-68 — 135 Matt Every . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-68 — 135 Brian Gay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63-72 — 135 Jonathan Byrd . . . . . . . . . . .66-69 — 135 Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-68 — 136 Will Claxton . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-71 — 136 Kevin Stadler . . . . . . . . . . . .68-68 — 136 Boo Weekley . . . . . . . . . . . .67-69 — 136 D.H. Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-70 — 137 Scott Langley . . . . . . . . . . . .66-71 — 137 Ben Curtis . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-69 — 137 Martin Flores . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68 — 138 George McNeill . . . . . . . . . .62-76 — 138 Harris English . . . . . . . . . . .68-70 — 138 Heath Slocum . . . . . . . . . . .67-71 — 138 Zach Johnson . . . . . . . . . . .70-68 — 138 Stuart Appleby . . . . . . . . . . .68-70 — 138 Trevor Immelman . . . . . . . . .67-72 — 139 Aaron Baddeley . . . . . . . . . .68-71 — 139 Andres Romero . . . . . . . . . .70-69 — 139 Pat Perez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71 — 139 Paul Goydos . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71 — 139 Cameron Tringale . . . . . . . .70-69 — 139 Kyle Stanley . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71 — 139 Rory Sabbatini . . . . . . . . . . .66-73 — 139 Charley Hoffman . . . . . . . . .66-73 — 139 Robert Garrigus . . . . . . . . . .65-74 — 139 Spencer Levin . . . . . . . . . . .69-70 — 139 Darren Clarke . . . . . . . . . . .69-70 — 139 Charles Howell III . . . . . . . .69-70 — 139 Y.E. Yang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71 — 139 Retief Goosen . . . . . . . . . . .68-71 — 139 J.J. Henry . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-72 — 139 Troy Matteson . . . . . . . . . . .71-69 — 140 Russell Henley . . . . . . . . . . .69-71 — 140 Carl Pettersson . . . . . . . . . .66-74 — 140 Scott Piercy . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-73 — 140 Camilo Villegas . . . . . . . . . .66-74 — 140 David Hearn . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-66 — 140 James Hahn . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72 — 141 David Toms . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73 — 141 Justin Leonard . . . . . . . . . . .71-70 — 141 John Rollins . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-76 — 141 Blake Adams . . . . . . . . . . . .73-68 — 141 Danny Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71 — 141 Russell Knox . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71 — 141 Steven Bowditch . . . . . . . . .68-73 — 141 Michael Putnam . . . . . . . . . .68-73 — 141 Erik Compton . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73 — 141 Lucas Glover . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72 — 141 Woody Austin . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73 — 141 Mark Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71 — 141 Mike Weir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71 — 141 Robert Allenby . . . . . . . . . . .67-75 — 142 Kevin Na . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-75 — 142 Luke Guthrie . . . . . . . . . . . .67-75 — 142 Jeff Overton . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73 — 142 Lee Williams . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72 — 142 Chris DiMarco . . . . . . . . . . .71-71 — 142 William McGirt . . . . . . . . . . .69-73 — 142 Freddie Jacobson . . . . . . . .70-72 — 142 Brian Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71 — 142 Vijay Singh . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73 — 142 Jose Coceres . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73 — 142 Hudson Swafford . . . . . . . . .68-75 — 143 Andrew Svoboda . . . . . . . . .68-75 — 143 Jim Herman . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-77 — 143

Mark Calcavecchia . . . . . . .72-71 Joe Durant . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-75 Fred Funk . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72 Sean O’Hair . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72 Ben Crane . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74 Scott Stallings . . . . . . . . . . .68-76 Tommy Gainey . . . . . . . . . . .70-74 Steve Marino . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72 Justin Hicks . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73 John Peterson . . . . . . . . . . .68-76 Harrison Frazar . . . . . . . . . .72-72 Jason Bohn . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-77 Will MacKenzie . . . . . . . . . .66-79 Stewart Cink . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75 James Vargas . . . . . . . . . . .69-76 Chris Stroud . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-73 Stephen Ames . . . . . . . . . . .67-79 Charlie Beljan . . . . . . . . . . .70-76 Scott Verplank . . . . . . . . . . .73-73 James Driscoll . . . . . . . . . . .72-74 Chesson Hadley . . . . . . . . .74-72 Chad Collins . . . . . . . . . . . .72-74 Wes Roach . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-75 David Duval . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-75 Brian Stuard . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-76 Morgan Hoffmann . . . . . . . .72-75 Billy Hurley III . . . . . . . . . . . .77-71 Kevin Tway . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-76 Justin Thomas . . . . . . . . . . .73-75 Brad Fritsch . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-74 Davis Love III . . . . . . . . . . . .75-74 Johnson Wagner . . . . . . . . .71-79 Edward Loar . . . . . . . . . . . .74-77 Hunter Hamrick . . . . . . . . . .73-79 Nicholas Thompson . . . . . . .76-78 Craig Stevens . . . . . . . . . . .75-84

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

143 143 143 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 145 145 145 145 145 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 147 147 148 148 148 148 149 150 151 152 154 159

Leaderboard Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Score Thru F Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-8 17 John Senden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-7 Kevin Chappell . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-7 F Webb Simpson . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-7 F F Briny Baird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-7 Jason Kokrak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-6 F F Tim Clark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-6 F Ted Potter, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-6 Scott Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-6 F Brian Harman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-5 F F Matt Every . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-5 Jonathan Byrd . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-5 17 Seung-yul Noh . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-5 14 F Brian Gay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-5

Transactions

Friday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL National League NEW YORK METS — signed RHP Joel Carreno and INF/OF Anthony Seratelli to minor league contracts. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Suspended Dallas G-F Vince Carter one game throwing an elbow and making contact with the head of Oklahoma City C Steven Adams during Wednesday’s game. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Fined Washington LB London Fletcher and Tennessee DT Jurell Casey $15,750 and Tennessee S Bernard Pollard $10,000 for their actions during last week’s game. BUFFALO BILLS — Released WR Brad Smith from injured reserve. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Placed RB Doug Martin on injured reserve. Signed LB Ka’lial Glaud from the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Assigned G Igor Bobkov and D Stefan Wang from Norfolk (AHL) to Utah (ECHL). DALLAS STARS — Recalled D Aaron Rome from Texas (AHL). Loaned D Kevin Connauton to Texas for a conditioning assignment. DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled C Luke Glendening and D Xavier Ouellet from Grand Rapids (AHL). Assigned D Adam Almquist to Grand Rapids. EDMONTON OILERS — Traded D Ladislav Smid and G Olivier Roy to the Calgary Flames for C Roman Horak and G Laurent Brossoit. FLORIDA PANTHERS — Fired coach Kevin Dineen and assistant coaches Gord Murphy and Craig Ramsey. Named Peter Horachek interim coach and Brian Skrudland and John Madden assistant coaches. MONTREAL CANADIENS — Assigned D Greg Pateryn to Hamilton (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS — Reassigned G Nathan Lawson to Binghamton (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Signed LW Jason Chimera to a two-year contract extension. COLLEGE NCAA — Suspended Rutgers men’s basketball F Junior Etou six games for accepting impermissible benefits from a third party from overseas. CALIFORNIA — Announced sophomore G Kahlil Johnson has left the men’s basketball team. EASTERN MICHIGAN — Fired football coach Ron English. Named Stan Parrish interim coach. MINNESOTA — Suspended C Maurice Walker for six games for a violation of university policy.


Roswell Daily Record

City

Continued from Page B1

second-quarter touchdown runs that all but put the game out of reach. After a scoreless first quarter, Cameron Neff put Goddard on top 6-0 when he capped a 15play, 78-yard drive that at up nearly 8 minutes of game time with a 1-yard touchdown. Less than 4 minutes after that, McDaniel scored on a 40-yard with 6:23 left in the half. Five minutes later, McDaniel was scoring again, this time on a 3yard run on a fourth-down play. Kelsey Cunningham scored on a 1-yard dive midway through the third and Neff hit McDaniel for an aerial score with about 9 minutes left in the fourth to cap the scoring. Roswell threatened in Goddard’s territory just once, on its final drive of the game late in the fourth. The Coyotes had just 64 total yards in the game, 42 of which came on the aforementioned drive. J.J. Fierro led the Coyotes with 29 rushing yards on eight carries. Jacob Miley ran for 20 yards on 14 carries and was 1 for 5 for 7 yards through the air. It was the eighth shutout win by Goddard in the series and

Mizuno

trimmed Roswell’s lead in the series to 30-21-3. “As everyone knows, they are our biggest rival,” McDaniel said. “It’s always nice to beat them. They played good tonight. “Honestly, our line did real good, so I give (the credit) to them.” The loss puts Roswell (6-4) on the bubble when it comes to the playoffs and leaves the Coyotes’ chances in the hands of the selection committee. First-year Coyote coach Jeff L ynn said he thinks his team belongs in the playoffs. “I would think we’re a playoff team. We’ve got five 4A wins and one 5A win,” he said. “I would be really disappointed if we weren’t (selected). There would be some things that were wrong with the whole system if we’re not a playoff team.” Goddard, meanwhile, won the district title for sixth straight year and should be the No. 1 seed in the playof fs for the fourth straight year. McDaniel said the Rockets are just focused on the next game. “We’ve got one game at a time,” he said. “We’ve got playoffs coming up, but we don’t know where everyone is going to be seeded. All we’re worried about is that one game coming up.”

Continued from Page B2

American Brittany Lincicome, Japan’s Junko Omote and Kaori Nakamura and Sweden’s Pernilla Lindberg. Defending champion Stacy Lewis opened with a 71. The American, the top-ranked player in the field at No. 3, has three victories this year. “It was kind of up and down,” Lewis said. “I probably could have played a lot better but I think it could have been worse. I played really tough through a lot of cross winds and I just hung in there all day.” Lincicome had an eagle on the first

SPORTS

Saturday, November 9, 2013

Shawn Naranjo Photo

Roswell quarterback Jacob Miley, center, runs between Rocket defenders Chandler Lessard (2) and Adam Gomez during Goddard’s win in the Alien City Encounter, Friday.

hole before carding four birdies against three bogeys. South Korean star Inbee Park, who leads the money list and player of the year rankings, is sitting out the tournament as is Suzann Pettersen of Norway, who trails Park on both lists. Lewis leads the LPGA Tour in top-10 finishes this season with 16. Her three victories this season include a major championship, and she still has a remote shot at winning the player of the year award with three events remaining. Karrie Webb of Australia, who won here in 2006, was tied for 36th place after an even-par 72.

Kirk

Continued from Page B2

got to play to shoot a good score, but at least there’s no surprises.” He missed his 3-wood ever so slightly into the wind at the start of his round and had to hit hybrid for his second shot. It’s normally a 3wood and a wedge. “I guess that is a little bit of an advantage, just not being shocked by it all,” he said.

History

Continued from Page B1

the Hilltoppers. “It was a relief honestly, because it was a tough game,” Roswell’s Fernando Sanchez said regarding what he felt after his gamewinning goal. “The last time we played them, we won 62. They came to play. They changed up their strategy and it was harder for us to penetrate.” Considering the history made with the victory, it was of little surprise that the Coyotes were emotional following the game. “It is very emotional. Still emotional,” Roswell coach James Vernon said regarding what he was feeling following Sanchez’s goal. “It is about time. It is a long time coming and hopefully we will do it. The guys are pretty pumped up and we will try to get rested up and get ready for (the title game against Albuquerque Academy).” Much like Artesia and Goddard before them, the Hilltoppers decided the best

Chappell had a few surprises, good and bad. He reached the par -5 15th hole in two and felt a gust helped blow his eagle putt into the hole. That was good. But on the par -3 third, aiming at a small tent well right of the green to cope with a strong right-to-left wind, he came up so short of the green that his ball disappeared into a hazard that Chappell didn’t even know existed. That led to a double bogey. “You hit some not-socourse of action was to pack things in on defense and counterattack when the opportunity arose. Even with a prevent defense, the Coyotes were still able to get quality looks at goal. In the ninth and 11th minutes, Ibis Armendariz had two leftfooters that required diving saves from Los Alamos keeper Tyler Mullen. Although the shots weren’t finding the back of the net, Roswell fans had little to worry about because of the way the shots were coming. The Coyotes were getting looks thanks to deft passing and moving without the ball, rather than defensive breakdowns. After a scoreless first half, Roswell continued to put the pressure on the Los Alamos defense and, in the 80th minute, that pressure paid off. “I saw (Los Alamos’ Skylar Veenis) step up and I saw Chris Mesquita running to my right,” Sanchez said describing the gamewinning goal. “I gave him it and asked for it back. He played it perfect. I poked it

John Fox released from hospital Lawrence Foster Photo

Members of the Roswell boys soccer team celebrate after beating Los Alamos 1-0 to reach the program’s first state championship game.

• Bronco coach had aortic valve replaced Monday

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) — John Fox is out of the hospital, and the rest of the Denver Broncos are feeling better as well. “Great news today,” interim coach Jack Del Rio said Friday in announcing Fox’s release from the hospital four days after undergoing heart surgery in Charlotte, N.C. “I know that he’s excited to get out, is one step closer to getting back with us.” Del Rio said Fox was resting at his offseason home in Charlotte, where he’ll continue his recovery and begin cardio rehab soon. Fox had his aortic value replaced at the Carolinas HealthCare System’s Sanger Heart & Vascular Institute in Charlotte on Monday, two days after becoming dizzy while playing golf during the Broncos’ bye. Fox had hoped to put off the procedure until the offseason, but his cardiologist, Dr. Geoff Rose, and heart surgeon, Dr. Mark Stiegel, determined he could no longer push back the surgery after he fell ill over the weekend.

B3

Fox said in a statement released by the team that his recovery is progressing well — “I’m feeling better and stronger each day” — and he’ll continue meeting with his doctors, “who will clear me to return to Denver when the time is right.” He said it’ll be difficult not to be at the game Sunday when the Broncos (7-1) visit the Chargers (4-4). “Although I’m eager to return to coaching, my No. 1 focus is my health. I believe in our players and have full confidence in Jack Del Rio and our staff,” Fox said. “While it’s extremely difficult to be away from the team on Sunday in San Diego, I’ll be cheering them on from home just like the many Broncos fans who have supported me throughout this process.” Players say Fox’s tribulations have galvanized them. “We’re just excited to hear that he’s doing well. He’ll be back soon and we just have to go out there and play through him, play for him,” defensive captain Wesley Woodyard said. “He wants to be here with us. This is his hometown we’re going back to, so it’ll be a big victory if we pull this one off.” Del Rio informed the team of Fox’s release from the hospital Friday morning. “Once you get out of the hospital, that pretty much means that they’re saying

you’re good and the process went well,” cornerback Chris Harris said. Tight end Jacob Tamme said the first step of getting discharged from the hospital is always a big leap. “We know he’s still got a lot of recovery left to do but that’s definitely a great thing,” Tamme said. “I know when you get to go home, that’s always a positive.” Fox will still have input on his team while he’s recovering over the next several weeks. Del Rio said he figures to talk with Fox on the phone “I would think on a daily basis from here on out.” Del Rio, who was head coach of the Jacksonville Jaguars from 2003-11 before rejoining Fox in Denver last year, is keeping his defensive coordinator duties during Fox’s absence. So, he’ll rely heavily on his staff, especially linebackers coach Richard Smith, a former defensive coordinator for the Dolphins and Texans, on game day, when he’ll have to keep his eyes on the field the whole time. That doesn’t mean he won’t go over to his defensive players between series if he has something to say. “Well, I don’t have a restrainer on me,” Del Rio said. “I can walk over to the bench, either bench, at any time.”

per fect shots and get some bad breaks with the wind gusting and you get exposed really quickly,” Chappell said. “I think I was fortunate to come to that realization that there’s some luck involved today and that maybe for a period of time I was one of the luckier guys out here. But that tough stretch in the middle of the round I wasn’t so lucky, and the law of averages, it averaged out.” in front of another defender and I looked right and saw the right side open.” The senior captain’s goal set off a wild celebration by the Coyote players on the field, on the bench and in the bleachers. Although there was 2 minutes of stoppage time, the outcome was all but decided with that goal. Ver non said that his team came to play against the Hilltoppers. “We played hard today. The guys were into it and they weren’t nervous today,” he said. “I thought we controlled most of the match. They didn’t have really any shots on goal, so we played well. “We persevered. We just kept going. We were getting down because we had so many opportunities that weren’t finishing. We just tried to keep them levelheaded.” With a chance to give Roswell its first ever state title in soccer, Sanchez summed up the emotion from his team’s perspective in one sentence: “It is the greatest feeling in the world.”

Briefs

Continued from Page B1

yards and a TD on 6-of-15 passing.

Hondo Valley 74, Dora 25 HONDO — Hondo Valley booked its ticket to the Class 6-Man State Championship Game on Friday with a lopsided win over Dora at Eagles Stadium. The second-seeded Eagles will play in next week’s title game against the winner of today’s other semifinal game between No. 1 Lake Arthur and No. 5 San Jon. No other information was available at press time.

Men’s basketball

NMMI 92, Pima 70 ODESSA, Texas — The NMMI Bronco basketball team picked up its second win of the year on Friday thanks to a big second half against Pima at the Odessa College Classic. The Broncos (2-2) led 41-39 at the half, but broke the game in the second half by outscoring the Aztecs 51-31. Tariq Carey led the Broncos with 20 points. Marcus Roper added 19, Biron Joseph had 17 and Antonio Manns had 14. Weston Zeller came off the bench to score six points and grab five boards.


NBA roundup: George leads Pacers to 6-0 B4 Saturday, November 9, 2013

SPORTS

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Paul George scored 17 of his 23 points in the third quarter and the Indiana Pacers beat the Toronto Raptors 91-84 Friday night to improve to 6-0 and match the best start in franchise history. Roy Hibbert added a seasonhigh 20 points and seven rebounds as the Pacers remained the NBA’s lone undefeated team. Rudy Gay scored a season-high 30 points on 12-of-26 shooting for the Raptors, who lost their third straight to fall to 2-4. Amir Johnson added 12 points and 10 rebounds. The Raptors shot 39.5 percent from the field, becoming the sixth consecutive opponent Indiana has held to 40 percent shooting or worse. The Pacers improved to 6-0 for the first time since the 1970-71, when the club played in the ABA. They rallied from a halftime deficit for the fifth time this season. Indiana overcame 16 turnovers to shoot 46.2 percent.

Knicks 101 Bobcats 91

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Carmelo Anthony had 28 points and eight rebounds, Andrea Bargnani added 25 points and New York spoiled Patrick Ewing’s NBA head coaching debut with a victory over Charlotte. Ewing, who spent 15 seasons with the Knicks as a star center, filled in as Charlotte’s coach after Steve Clifford had a procedure earlier in the day to have two stents placed in his heart. Clifford checked himself into the hospital late Thursday night with chest pain. The Knicks shot 75 percent from the field in the third quarter — including six of seven 3-point attempts — to blow open a tight game and snap a three-game losing skid. Raymond Felton had 15 points for the Knicks (2-3). Kemba Walker scored 25 points for the Bobcats and Gerald Henderson added 18 points and nine rebounds.

Pelicans 96 Lakers 85

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Anthony Davis scored a career -high 32 points, grabbed 12 rebounds and tied a career best with six blocks to lead New Orleans over Los Angeles. Jrue Holiday added 13 points and 13 assists and Eric Gordon scored 16 for the Pelicans, who led most of the way in their second straight win. New Orleans had lost 11 regular-season games in a row to the Lakers. New Orleans broke open a tight contest with a 12-0 run in the final 3:16 that started with Davis’

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 13 131.67 132.50 131.52 132.40 Feb 14 133.52 134.15 133.32 133.95 Apr 14 134.10 134.85 127.82 134.80 128.10 128.80 128.10 128.60 Jun 14 Aug 14 126.95 127.60 126.90 127.32 Oct 14 129.07 129.75 129.07 129.40 130.40 130.75 130.00 130.15 Dec 14 Feb 15 131.50 131.50 130.82 131.15 132.30 132.30 132.00 132.00 Apr 15 Last spot N/A Est. sales 96401. Thu’s Sales: 62,919 Thu’s open int: 329245, up +648 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Nov 13 164.77 165.45 164.25 164.42 Jan 14 165.22 166.20 164.40 164.42 Mar 14 165.00 165.90 164.30 164.32 Apr 14 166.50 166.90 165.62 165.65 May 14 166.87 167.50 166.00 166.02 Aug 14 167.60 168.15 166.60 166.62 167.00 167.05 165.80 166.25 Sep 14 166.02 166.60 166.02 166.25 Oct 14 Last spot N/A Est. sales 14633. Thu’s Sales: 4,850 Thu’s open int: 37244, up +302 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. 87.80 88.52 87.70 88.12 Dec 13 91.67 92.35 82.45 92.07 Feb 14 Apr 14 93.42 93.97 93.30 93.70 May 14 97.72 98.10 97.72 98.05 Jun 14 99.32 99.75 99.07 99.62 Jul 14 97.75 98.00 97.47 97.95 Aug 14 95.22 95.80 95.22 95.75 Oct 14 81.67 81.95 80.00 81.95 Dec 14 77.55 78.00 77.30 77.30 Feb 15 78.97 79.22 78.97 79.00 Apr 15 80.90 81.15 79.90 79.90 Last spot N/A Est. sales 60844. Thu’s Sales: 55,635 Thu’s open int: 292117, off -8431ø

chg.

+.73 +.40 +.60 +.38 +.27 +.33 -.35

-.20 -.70 -.50 -.55 -.55 -.63 -.15

+.57 +.67 +.53 +.60 +.57 +.63 +.50 +.25

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 13 76.75 77.88 75.85 76.88 Mar 14 78.71 79.36 77.84 78.64 May 14 78.94 79.85 78.53 79.33 Jul 14 79.90 80.34 79.29 79.97 Oct 14 76.76 Dec 14 76.80 76.97 76.36 76.59 Mar 15 77.19 May 15 77.44 Jul 15 77.69 Oct 15 77.69 Dec 15 77.69 Mar 16 77.69 May 16 77.69 Jul 16 77.69 Oct 16 77.69 Last spot N/A Est. sales 29910. Thu’s Sales: 32,390 Thu’s open int: 195245, off -763.52

chg.

+.12 -.22 -.19 -.13 -.26 -.39 -.39 -.39 -.39 -.39 -.39 -.39 -.39 -.39 -.39

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 13 653 658ø 644 649fl Mar 14 664ü 669ü 655 661ø May 14 670 675ø 662 668 Jul 14 668ø 674ü 661 668ø Sep 14 678 683 671fl 677ø Dec 14 690ø 695fl 682ø 690

chg.

-3ü -2ü -1fl -ü -ü -ü

Roswell Daily Record

16-foot jumper and included his fast-break two-handed jam, his block of Pau Gasol and his fastbreak layup as he was fouled, the last of which had the crowd on its feet chanting “M-V-P!” Chris Kaman led Los Angeles with 16 points, while Nick Young and Steve Blake each scored 13.

game to overtime, and T revor Ariza hit the go-ahead 3-pointer in the extra period to lift Washington over Brooklyn. Bradley Beal scored 29 points, John Wall had 17 points and 14 assists, and Marcin Gortat had 18 points and 12 rebounds for the Wizards, who nearly held Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce scoreless for the first time since they were rookies in the 1990s. Garnett didn’t score until his 18-footer with 3:40 to play in regulation, and Pierce waited until overtime before hitting a jumper that nearly spurred the Nets to victory. Pierce was a game-time decision to play after missing the morning shootaround with an illness.

Celtics 91 Magic 89

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Brandon Bass had 16 points, including a pair of free-throws in the closing seconds to help Boston hang on to beat Orlando for its second straight win. Trailing by three, the Magic had a chance to tie the game in the final minute, but Arron Afflalo’s jumper came from just a step inside the 3-point line. Avery Bradley added 14 points and eight rebounds for the Celtics. The win extends the Celtics’ win streak over Orlando to nine games. Afflalo led the Magic with 23 points. Nik Vucevic added 14 points and 13 rebounds. The loss ends the Magic’s threegame win streak.

Thunder 119 Pistons 110

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. (AP) — Kevin Durant had 37 points, eight rebounds and seven assists to propel Oklahoma City over Detroit. Rookie Steven Adams played a key role for Oklahoma City, dominating inside when Detroit’s post players were in foul trouble. Adams finished with 17 points and 10 rebounds, while Russell Westbrook scored 20 points despite missing 14 of his 19 fieldgoal attempts. Josh Smith finished with 25 points for Detroit before fouling out, while Greg Monroe (20 points, 15 rebounds) and Brandon Jennings (22 points, 11 assists) added double-doubles.

Timberwolves 116 Mavericks 108

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Kevin Love had 32 points, 15 rebounds and eight assists to lead Minnesota past Dallas. Kevin Martin added 32 points and five rebounds and Corey Brewer scored 17 points to help the T imberwolves snap a twogame skid. Jose Calderon made 6 of 8 3pointers and scored 21 points for the Mavericks. Monta Ellis scored 23 points and Dirk Nowitzki added 14 for Dallas. The Mavericks played without trusted reserve Vince Carter, who was suspended for the game for elbow-

Mar 15 697 698 696 696ü May 15 695 696 695 696 Jul 15 686ø 688fl 685 688fl Sep 15 695ø 695ø 694ü 694ü Dec 15 711 711 705ø 705ø Mar 16 712ü 712ü 710ø 710ø May 16 712ü 712ü 710ø 710ø Jul 16 699 699 697ü 697ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 185824. Thu’s Sales: 140,324 Thu’s open int: 379494, up +6248 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 13 419ø 429ø 415ø 426fl Mar 14 430ø 440fl 426fl 438ø May 14 439ü 449 435ü 447 446 455ø 442ü 453fl Jul 14 Sep 14 452ø 461 448ø 459ø 460fl 469fl 456ø 468ø Dec 14 Mar 15 470 477fl 465fl 477fl May 15 475 482ø 473ü 482ø 478ø 485 474ø 484fl Jul 15 Sep 15 471 478 471 478 Dec 15 474 482ü 471ü 481fl Jul 16 488 492fl 487 492ü 474 482fl 474 482fl Dec 16 Last spot N/A Est. sales 694799. Thu’s Sales: 473,783 Thu’s open int: 1365262, up +13930 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 13 339ü 342fl 333fl 334ø Mar 14 313 318ü 308ø 313fl May 14 307 311 303 307ü Jul 14 306 306 306 306 Sep 14 306fl 306fl 306fl 306fl 311ø 311ø 311ø 311ø Dec 14 Mar 15 311ø 311ø 311ø 311ø May 15 311ø 311ø 311ø 311ø Jul 15 311ø 311ø 311ø 311ø Sep 15 311ø 311ø 311ø 311ø Jul 16 311ø 311ø 311ø 311ø Sep 16 311ø 311ø 311ø 311ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 2146. Thu’s Sales: 1,571 Thu’s open int: 10756, up +187 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Nov 13 1277ü 1306 1274fl 1306 Jan 14 1264ø 1297ø 1261fl 1296 Mar 14 1246 1278ü 1244ü 1276fl May 14 1232 1259 1228ø 1258 Jul 14 1227ü 1254ø 1225 1253ü Aug 14 1214 1236ü 1213fl 1235ü Sep 14 1175ø 1195ü 1172ø 1192ü Nov 14 1145 1166 1140 1161 Jan 15 1153 1169 1150 1166ø Mar 15 1172ø 1172ø 1157ü 1170fl May 15 1157 1174ø 1157 1174ø Jul 15 1167 1180ü 1167 1180ü Aug 15 1157ü 1170ü 1157ü 1170ü Sep 15 1143 1155fl 1143 1155fl Nov 15 1140 1158 1140 1155ü Jul 16 1140fl 1153ø 1140fl 1153ø Nov 16 1125 1137ü 1125 1137ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 286114. Thu’s Sales: 178,307 Thu’s open int: 569882, up +3408

FUTURES

-fl -1ü -1fl -1fl -1fl -1fl

+6ü +7 +7 +7 +6fl +7ü +7ø +7ø +7 +7 +6fl +5fl +7ü

-4ø -fl -fl

+27ü +29ø +28fl +23fl +23 +19fl +15ü +13ø +13ü +13ø +12fl +12fl +13 +12fl +12ø +12fl +11fl

AP Photo

ing Oklahoma City’s Steven Adams on Wednesday.

Suns 114 Nuggets 103

PHOENIX (AP) — Twins Markieff and Marcus Morris made the big shots that helped Phoenix rally from an 11-point deficit late in the third quarter and earn the victory over Denver. Markieff Morris scored 14 of his career -high 28 points in the fourth period. Marcus Morris sank a jumper with 5:13 left that gave the Suns a 100-95 lead after a back-and-forth first part of the quarter. Marcus Morris finished with 11 points and eight rebounds. Miles Plumlee added 18 points and 11 boards as the Suns improved to 4-2. Eric Bledsoe contributed 17 points and nine assists. The Nuggets trailed by as many as 18 points shortly after halftime, but outscored the Suns 4020 behind guard Ty Lawson’s 21 points in the third quarter. Lawson led Denver with 29 points and Jordan Hamilton added 19. The Nuggets dropped to 1-4.

Spurs 76 Warriors 74

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Tony Parker scored 18 points, including the last seven for San Antonio, and the Spurs held on to beat Golden State. Parker missed two free throws with 16.4 seconds remaining that gave Golden State a final chance. Andre Iguodala drove to the basket and tried a layup that rolled off the rim. It was the first game between the teams since the second round of the Western Conference playoffs, which the Spurs won 4-2. Kawhi Leonard added 13 points

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. 94.36 95.00 93.90 94.60 Dec 13 Jan 14 94.78 95.27 94.24 94.95 Feb 14 94.92 95.40 94.41 95.10 94.82 95.34 94.39 95.08 Mar 14 Apr 14 94.60 95.12 94.22 94.88 94.04 94.63 93.91 94.48 May 14 Jun 14 93.79 94.19 93.34 93.98 93.29 93.44 92.93 93.44 Jul 14 Aug 14 92.80 92.91 92.68 92.91 92.29 92.36 92.04 92.36 Sep 14 Oct 14 91.37 91.87 91.31 91.80 Nov 14 90.94 91.36 90.86 91.32 90.88 91.14 90.45 90.92 Dec 14 Jan 15 90.41 Feb 15 89.93 Mar 15 89.46 Apr 15 89.00 88.61 May 15 Jun 15 88.25 88.41 87.99 88.26 Jul 15 87.81 Aug 15 87.41 87.08 Sep 15 86.79 Oct 15 Nov 15 86.52 Dec 15 86.50 86.65 86.04 86.31 Last spot N/A Est. sales 441968. Thu’s Sales: 553,399 Thu’s open int: 1734152, up +4889 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Dec 13 2.5075 2.5679 2.5008 2.5534 Jan 14 2.5022 2.5600 2.4995 2.5463 Feb 14 2.5188 2.5679 2.5109 2.5569 Mar 14 2.5365 2.5870 2.5229 2.5737 Apr 14 2.7129 2.7610 2.7036 2.7488 2.7070 2.7612 2.7070 2.7490 May 14 Jun 14 2.6926 2.7347 2.6923 2.7336 Jul 14 2.6721 2.7195 2.6721 2.7139 Aug 14 2.6589 2.6897 2.6529 2.6897 Sep 14 2.6295 2.6650 2.6295 2.6581

chg.

+.40 +.41 +.44 +.46 +.46 +.43 +.38 +.35 +.33 +.31 +.28 +.24 +.22 +.19 +.15 +.12 +.09 +.05 +.02 -.01 -.03 -.05 -.06 -.08 -.10

+.0503 +.0469 +.0453 +.0443 +.0433 +.0419 +.0410 +.0397 +.0381 +.0351

METALS

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE CALL TODAY

575.622.7710

CHICAGO (AP) — Luol Deng scored 19 points, Carlos Boozer had 18 and Chicago snapped a two-game skid with a win over Utah. Deng added 11 rebounds and Joakim Noah had 14 points and Derrick Rose 12 for the Bulls. Gordon Hayward scored 15 points for the Jazz (0-6), who are off to their worst start since they were in New Orleans in 1974-75, when they lost their first 11 games. The Bulls dominated in the paint, scoring 56 points to 22 for Utah. Overall, Chicago outshot Utah 52.8 percent to 29.8 percent in winning its sixth straight against the Jazz.

for the Spurs, who improved to a conference-best 5-1. Toney Douglas came off the bench to lead Golden State with 20 points. David Lee added 13 and Clay Thompson had 11.

76ers 94 Cavaliers 79

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Evan Turner scored 22 points and grabbed 10 rebounds, Tony Wroten added 18 points and Philadelphia cruised past Cleveland to overshadow the return of Andrew Bynum. Thaddeus Young added 16 points, while James Anderson and Michael Carter-Williams had 11 each for the Sixers, who snapped a two-game losing streak and improved to 4-2. Spencer Hawes scored 10 points. The buzz leading into the game was the return of Bynum, who signed a two-year, $24 million contract with the Cavaliers in July. Bynum had been acquired by the Sixers in a four -team, 12player trade in the summer of 2012. But the two-time All-Star center never played for the Sixers because of bilateral bone bruises in both knees. He played 18 minutes off the bench and finished with four points and five rebounds as the fans cascaded boos toward him every time he touched the ball. Dion Waiters led the Cavaliers with 18 points while Jarrett Jack and C.J. Miles added 13 each.

Trail Blazers104 Kings 91

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Damian Lillard had 22 points, eight rebounds and seven assists and Portland handed Sacramento its fourth straight loss. DeMarcus Cousins almost singlehandedly carried the Kings with 35 points and nine rebounds. Sacramento’s lone win so far this season came in the opener against Denver. LaMarcus Aldridge scored 10 of his 20 points in the fourth quarter for the Blazers, who led 54-49 at the half and by as many as 14 points in the third quarter. It was the first game of a homeand-away back-to-back between the two teams. The Blazers visit Sacramento on Saturday night. Cousins pulled the Kings within 90-84 with a layup in the fourth quarter, but Aldridge countered with a turnaround jumper and six points was the closest Sacramento could come.

Wizards 112 Nets 108, O.T.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nene scored 12 of his 20 points in the final 4 1/2 minutes of the fourth quarter, including a putback with 1.2 seconds to play that sent the

Oct 14 2.5120 2.5310 2.5120 2.5236 2.4824 2.4958 2.4824 2.4958 Nov 14 Dec 14 2.4513 2.4962 2.4513 2.4826 Jan 15 2.4800 2.4860 Feb 15 Mar 15 2.4970 Apr 15 2.6295 2.6295 May 15 Jun 15 2.6140 2.5960 Jul 15 Aug 15 2.5770 Sep 15 2.5540 2.4340 Oct 15 Nov 15 2.4040 Dec 15 2.3840 Last spot N/A Est. sales 118280. Thu’s Sales: 167,530 Thu’s open int: 244509, up +6635 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Dec 13 3.520 3.589 3.510 3.559 Jan 14 3.583 3.640 3.568 3.616 Feb 14 3.584 3.648 3.581 3.624 Mar 14 3.590 3.638 3.569 3.615 Apr 14 3.580 3.616 3.565 3.600 3.633 3.640 3.595 3.626 May 14 3.632 3.675 3.630 3.661 Jun 14 Jul 14 3.672 3.710 3.670 3.699 Aug 14 3.717 3.719 3.693 3.716 3.684 3.716 3.678 3.709 Sep 14 3.710 3.736 3.691 3.724 Oct 14 Nov 14 3.786 3.800 3.759 3.790 Dec 14 3.890 3.936 3.889 3.927 Jan 15 3.977 4.020 3.977 4.006 Feb 15 3.986 4.022 3.986 4.001 Mar 15 3.947 3.976 3.947 3.961 Apr 15 3.810 May 15 3.838 3.839 3.823 3.823 Jun 15 3.835 3.847 3.835 3.847 3.860 3.871 3.860 3.871 Jul 15 3.883 Aug 15 Sep 15 3.881 3.900 3.901 3.900 3.901 Oct 15 Nov 15 3.969 3.970 3.967 3.967 Dec 15 4.110 4.111 4.110 4.111 Last spot N/A Est. sales 211785. Thu’s Sales: 399,001 Thu’s open int: 1276079, off -3825

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Fri. Aluminum -$0.8055 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.2290 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.2530 N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Lead - $2117.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8475 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1285.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1284.50 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri. Silver - $21.345 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $21.307 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Platinum -$1447.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1442.90 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

GET NOTICED

Bulls 97 Jazz 73

Indiana Pacers' Paul George is defended by Toronto Raptors' DeMar DeRozan during the second half, Friday, in Indianapolis.

+.0338 +.0325 +.0313 +.0307 +.0307 +.0307 +.0307 +.0307 +.0307 +.0307 +.0307 +.0307 +.0307 +.0307 +.0307

+.040 +.041 +.040 +.041 +.039 +.039 +.037 +.036 +.038 +.040 +.041 +.040 +.038 +.036 +.035 +.035 +.029 +.029 +.029 +.028 +.028 +.028 +.028 +.028 +.028

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

MARKET SUMMARY AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Vol (00) Last Chg Name BkofAm 1552371 14.32 +.52 S&P500ETF1138901177.29 +2.36 iShEMkts 732257 41.16 -.09 SPDR Fncl 592035 20.86 +.48

Vol (00) Name CheniereEn 59819 NwGold g 39973 AlldNevG 37839 Organovo 29440 NavideaBio 2367

Last Chg %Chg Name SunEdison 12.55 +1.88 +17.6 SunTr wtB 4.95 +.74 +17.6 5.93 +.83 +16.3 VaalcoE EmergBio 20.79 +2.36 +12.8 VoceraCm 16.87 +1.87 +12.5.2

Last Chg Name ComndSec 2.30 +.41 27.13 +3.34 Lannett 55.05 +5.98 AdmRsc OrionEngy 5.40 +.56 TherapMD 4.13 +.40

Last Chg Name NwstBio wt 2.35 +.75 PernixTher 2.81 +.83 31.95 +8.73 Santarus 2.59 +.64 xG Tech n HorizPhm 4.86 +1.12

%Chg +46.9 +41.9 +37.6 +32.8 +29.9

Name Last Chg TremorV n 4.72 -4.54 YuMe n 6.26 -1.53 AVG Tech 16.66 -3.04 CooperTire 23.82 -3.08 JonesGrp 13.50 -1.70

%Chg -49.0 -19.6 -15.4 -11.4 -11.2

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg Medgen wt 2.70 -.25 -8.5 NetSolTch 5.23 -2.25 ImmunoCll 2.44 -.16 -6.2 RocketF n 37.86 -9.49 Teche 47.00 -3.00 -6.0 UniPixel 13.85 -3.33 Aerocntry 19.00 -1.18 -5.8 ChinaHGS 4.30 -.88 SwedLC22 12.60 -.65 -4.91 Ezcorp 11.34 -2.24

%Chg -30.1 -20.0 -19.4 -17.0 -16.5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,778 1,325 71 3,174 117 61

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

Volume

Name AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola Disney EOG Res EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

%Chg +21.7 +14.0 +12.2 +11.6 +10.7

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

3,748,674,599 Volume

52-Week High Low 15,797.68 12,471.49 7,131.80 4,838.10 537.86 435.57 10,127.63 7,841.76 2,471.19 2,186.97 3,966.71 2,810.80 1,775.22 1,343.35 18,928.31 14,036.94 1,123.26 763.55

Last Chg 38.59 +1.25 5.64 +.09 3.97 +.11 8.20 +.37 41.53 +.13

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

DIARY

198 208 24 430 7 5Lows

Name Facebook Groupon Santarus Microsoft SiriusXM

Vol (00) 687979 436962 374944 359612 339975

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 15,761.78 7,017.34 502.46 10,032.13 2,422.98 3,919.23 1,770.61 18,798.63 1,099.97

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Net Chg +167.80 +76.51 -1.10 +107.76 +19.73 +61.90 +23.46 +249.84 +20.88

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg Name

1.80 .80 .04 1.94 4.00 1.12 .75f .75 3.62f 2.52 .40 .58 1.20a .90 3.80 2.64

26 12 19 24 10 21 21 42 10 10 13 ... 8 13 12 21

35.17 63.35 14.32 133.49 121.19 40.05 68.58 170.96 52.68 92.73 16.85 25.94 44.18 24.09 179.99 94.05

+.06 +.79 +.52 +1.98 +1.28 +.22 +1.43 -.62 -.11 +.77 +.30 +.25 +.78 +.03 -.01 +1.36

+4.3 +36.8 +23.3 +77.1 +12.1 +10.5 +37.7 +41.5 +22.7 +7.1 +30.1 +82.0 -5.1 +16.8 -6.0 +34.2

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

Chg -.03 +.61 +8.73 +.28 +.06

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

83,493,485 Volume

INDEXES

Last 47.53 10.11 31.95 37.78 3.66

1,925 637 93 2,655 133 40nEngy

1,920,781,203

% Chg +1.08 +1.10 -.22 +1.09 +.82 +1.60 +1.34 +1.35 +1.94

YTD 52-wk % Chg % Chg +20.28 +22.99 +32.23 +39.84 +10.90 +12.13 +18.81 +24.57 +2.86 +1.58 +29.80 +34.92 +24.15 +28.32 +25.37 +30.21 +29.51 +38.36

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

1.72 1.12f 2.90f .66 2.27 .96 1.56f .16 1.20 1.15 .70e 2.12f 1.88 .40f 1.20 1.12

28 14 23 18 20 16 11 20 27 17 ... 71 15 16 11 15

46.80 +.98 37.78 +.28 52.82 -.11 23.28 +.17 85.85 +.55 31.32 +.41 65.36 +1.52 17.69 +.12 41.98 +.33 67.65 +2.27 19.25 +.18 50.20 +.03 77.96 +.45 22.86 +.69 42.71 +1.00 28.52 -.11

+14.3 +41.4 -2.2 +13.5 +25.5 +24.9 +23.1 +72.8 +35.9 +41.4 +19.9 +16.0 +14.3 +35.5 +25.0 +6.8

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


Roswell Daily Record

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: I’m a single woman who has had a string of unsuccessful relationships. When a man is into me, I’m not into him and vice versa. I know the problem is mostly mine. I’m very independent. I don’t want a man to consume my life — just be a part of it. It seems like the men I date want to smother me. My friends tell me that most women enjoy this. I hate it. I need a certain amount of time

alone. I am attracted to manly men, but the ones who are attracted to me are either emotionally needy or they take longer to get ready to go anywhere than I do. It’s frustrating. I have met some men who would have been wonderful catches, but I felt nothing. I know friendship is the basis of all relationships, but physical attraction is important to me. A relationship won’t work if I can’t bring myself to be intimate with the person. In all my years of dating, I have been in love only twice. Any help would be appreciated. LOST IN WASHINGTON STATE

DEAR LOST: I wish I had a magic lamp that would give you what you’re looking for in a puff of

The Wizard of Id

Jumble

COMICS

smoke, but I don’t. What I can offer is that you need to continue looking for someone who is as independent as you are, so you can find an attractive man whose needs are similar to yours. Some couples find the process of dating a smooth and easy one. For others it’s complicated, but not impossible. I agree that the basis of strong relationships is friendship and compatibility. ##### DEAR ABBY: How does one stop family and old friends from going on and on about their aches, pains, symptoms, conditions, doctor visits and medications in excruciating detail? Aside from my mother (who is 85), I don’t care to hear about this from others. It has taught me a lesson I wish people would

follow: While I do have back issues, I speak of them only to my doctor. I try to be patient, but some folks seem to need someone to vent to. I don’t want to be the one they “tell all” to. I try to tune it out, but I wish there was an easy way to let them know enough is enough. Any ideas on the best way to handle these people? Or am I stuck being a good listener forever? NOBODY’S THERAPIST IN CROFTON, MD.

Family Circus

DEAR NOBODY’S THERAPIST: T ry this: Say, “Really, I’m sorry to hear that.” Then change the subject to something you read in the newspaper, saw on television or that’s happening in your community.

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Dear Readers: Often a dog will chew and swallow something it shouldn’t, and with a little coughing and hacking, it can get the object out. What do you do if a pet is truly CHOKING? You know what to do when a family member or friend is choking, and your precious pooch should be no different. If your dog is choking, use your fingers to feel around its mouth to remove the object. If you can’t remove it, try the Heimlich maneuver. Give your dog sharp blows on the back (between the shoulder blades) with the heel of your hand. If this does not work, stand behind your dog and hold him or her at the waist, place your fist just below the rib cage and give five quick thrusts. Your dog should cough up the object, and you can comfort and soothe him or her. Be sure that even if you remove the object, you take your pet to the vet’s office to check for any internal damage. It’s always better to be safe than sorry! Heloise

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

#####

Dear Readers: Rose Ann Chaffins in Sidney, Ohio, sent in a picture of her cat Trouble sitting in front of the television watching a hockey game. Trouble was a stray she rescued who loved watching sports on TV with her dad. To see Trouble’s picture, go to my website, www.Heloise.com, and click on “Pets.” Heloise

Hagar the Horrible

#####

Dear Heloise: I was searching for my copy of your “recipe” for homemade window cleaner — I couldn’t find it anywhere! Can you please reprint it? Thank you. Donna B., Massillon, Ohio

Donna, this cleaner can be used for windows, and it’s a great homemade solution for mirrors and stainless steel. Mix 1/4 cup nonsudsing ammonia with a gallon of water. Keep this in a clearly labeled spray bottle for easy use. With this solution, make sure to use gloves! For more of Heloise’s Homemade Cleaning Solutions, send $5 and a long, self-addressed, stamped (66 cents) envelope to: Heloise/Cleaners, P.O. Box 795001, San Antonio, TX 78279-5001. For sparkling windows, dry them with newspaper instead of paper towels. It’s eco-friendly and saves money! Heloise

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Saturday, November 9, 2013

B5


B6 Saturday, November 9, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS

Pucci opening boutiques in global fashion capitals

PARIS (AP) — The storied Florentine house of Emilio Pucci, which made colorful, kaleidoscopic prints world-famous and once counted Marilyn Monroe as a top client, is embarking on a new chapter. The house has started an ambitious expansion campaign. It’s opened up boutiques across the world’s fashion capitals, including New York’s Madison Avenue, Rome’s Piazza di Spagna, and now on Paris’ prestigious Avenue Montaigne. Designer Peter Dundas is meanwhile trying to match the momentum by moving the house in a younger direction. But will Pucci, founded by the Italian aristocrat in 1947, succeed in shaking off that love-itor-hate-it retro print that’s garish for some, vibrant for others? “I think that having the strong heritage, yes, it’s sometimes a challenge when you want to move forward,” admitted Dundas in an interview.

Legals

---------------------------------November 2, 9, 2013

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES IN THE PROBATE COURT IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT F. DOVE, Deceased. Probate: 9132

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the ESTATE OF ROBERT F. DOVE Deceased. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims (i) within two (2) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or (ii) within two (2) months after the mailing or delivery of this notice, whichever is later, or be forever barred. /s/Ralph L. Coen 1007 S. Washington Ave. Roswell, NM 88203

GARAGE SALES

002. Northeast

MOVING SALE, 203 Tierra Berrenda Dr., Sat., 8-noon. Furniture, clothing, household, toys, sporting goods. 2 FAMILY garage sale, lots of men’s and women’s clothing, shoes, household items. New items will be available on Saturday. 700 Swinging Spear. Fri-Sat. 8am. 7 DEBORAH Dr., Saturday, 6am-? Women’s & boys clothes, toys, & household items. SENIOR CIRCLE, Wilshire Center, 2801 N. Main St., next door to Family Dollar. Silent Auction and Craft Sale, 8 am- noon Saturday. Auction is in progress and ends 11 am. Saturday. Includes Parisian champagne flutes, a laptop computer, a unique Mexican doll, a Navajo Kachina, a 54-volume set of “Great Books of the Western World,” jewelry, a quilted piece, woodwork, a genuine wool kilt and much more. Crafts include breakfast burritos, muffins, home canned goods including barbecue sauce and mincemeat, homemade soaps and candles, candy, beaded spiders, tutus for children, spice pecans, nature crafts, frozen chili and taco soup, embroidered pillow cases, nutcrackers, pottery, scarves, jewelry, crocheted items, baked goods, ceramics and more. 623-2311 VERY NICE assortment of home goods. Antique mirror, bench and rocker, custom made picture frames. Seasonal items. Lamps, silk tree and flowers. Absolutely no junk. 3905 Futura between Mission Arch and Tierra Berrenda.Sat., Nov 9. 7am. INSIDE SALE, 5507 Gramma (take Sacaton off of N. Main & then Gramma north), Sat., 9am-? Electric fireplace, rocker, fabric, ultra suede, thread, sewing notions, clothes, table, cotton stuffing, audio tapes, DVDs, rugs, & much more. 3504 N. Bandolina, Fri-Sat, 8am. A little bit of everything, toys, electronics, & clothes of all sizes. # 10 North Sky Loop and other homes. Sat., Nov 9th, 7-12pm. LOTS OF everything, and baby items. Sat. 8am-? 608 E. La Paloma.

“But I consider myself lucky. There’s an advantage having this DNA — an opportunity to expand on it,” he added. “The print is still an important part of the collection, but it includes solids and neutrals now,” he added. The tall, energetic 44-year-old is certainly not one to dwell on to the past. Dundas has made a name for himself since taking over the design helm in 2007 — and is known for his red carpet showstoppers and celebrity circles, dressing stars like Gwyneth Paltrow and Jennifer Lopez. Pucci’s glitzy new direction is not everyone’s cup of tea — especially in Paris, widely considered a more demure fashion capital than Milan. (The company’s headquarters are in Florence, with a showroom in Milan.) “The new collections are too bling. I am French. I like the vintage dresses and the timeless

002. Northeast

3211 ALHAMBRA, Sat-Sun . Dishes, clothes, bags, and much more! 1904 N. Atkinson, Sat. only, 8a-2p. Good stuff, misc. items. 2 family sale.

004. Southeast

YARD SALE, Sat., Nov 9, Sun. Nov 10. 1411 S. Jackson

006. Southwest 4 FAMILY yard sale, 706 S. Delaware, Weds-Sat, 8am-4pm.

715 GARDEN Place, Sat., 8am-1pm. Furniture, baby clothesn toys, misc. NOV 9, 8am-12pm, 1000 E. College Trailer Number 30; tools, scrap lumber, 2 space heaters, fishing poles,Oreck vacuum, dishes, upright fan, much, much more. No clothes, Come see!

TOOLS, FURNITURE, Misc., Sat.9th and Sun 10th. 504 S. Spruce BACKYARD SALE, dishes, chairs, misc. Sat. 8-2. 1309 S. Missouri

Pucci style,” said Laetitia Benita, 30, outside Paris’ Pucci store. Chanel’s caustic couturier Karl Lager feld was more harsh: “I think tattoos are horrible. It’s like living in a Pucci dress fulltime.” Lagerfeld’s Chanel boutique stares out almost intimidatingly from across the other side of Avenue Montaigne. But with the new Paris boutique, Pucci, a house that’s particularly popular in Russia, the Middle East and Brazil, will soon find its place on Paris’ snooty fashion radar. The two-level store balances modernity and the house’s rich history. The family headquarters, the 600-year -old Palazzo Pucci in Florence, is evoked in the boutique decor with intricate bronze gilding and with colors on the wall taken from the Renaissance frescos. Elsewhere the Pucci archives are referenced, with the geometric flooring taken from a print called “Tower” and — in a

006. Southwest

COME CHECK it out! Good stuff, Fri-Sat., 2105 Juniper 1406 S. Kentucky, Sat-Sun 8am-3pm.Household items, clothing, toys, furniture,and other various items. GLIDER ROCKER, furniture, remodel materials, household, clothes, toys, books, decor. 1505 W. Albuquerque. Sat. 7am

SAT-SUN. 4606 N. Montana. Antiques and vintage items, tools, furniture, and misc.

008. Northwest

507 S. Spruce, Friday-Saturday, 7am-1pm. Misc. items.

BOOKS AGAIN, $5 bag sale, Nov 1-16, 404 W. 2nd St. T-Sat. 10-4pm

MOVING SALE, Sat.-Sun. Appliances, furniture, and misc. 396 E. Orchard Park Rd. Dexter

GARAGE SALE. 706 W. Hervey Dr. Sat & Sun 8am, lawn mower, tires, tools, furniture, & plants, clothes all size, art, Christmas tree.

56 RAY Place (RIAC) Fri-Sat, 7-?, furniture, clothes, shoes, toys, tools

SALE! 901 W. Alameda. Lawn, patio, furn., baby items, clothes. Sat. 7a

LOTS OF clothes, shoes, jewelry, baby clothes, baby items and toys. Lots of Scentsy product, boating equipment, Christmas decor, furniture, motorcycle ‘07 Yamaha V-Star, TV, shelving, stove, plus much more! Sat. 7am 1604 N. Washington.

004. Southeast

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 19, 26, November 2, 9, 2013

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO BANK OF THE SOUTHWEST, vs.

Plaintiff,

D-504-2013-00089

STEVEN HERNANDEZ, AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF LORAINE R. BROWNING (deceased); ALL KNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, LEGATEES, OF LORAINE R. BROWNING (deceased) and CLYDE O. BROWNING (deceased); ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE PREMISIS DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT; STEVEN HERNANDEZ (tenant); AND JOHN AND JANE DOE (tenant). Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE is hereby given that on November 13th, 2013, at 10.00 a.m., the undersigned Special Master will sell to the highest bidder at the east steps of the Chaves County Courthouse Building located at 400 N. Virginia, Roswell, NM, all Defendant's interest in the real property located at 5011 Meadow Lark Lane in Chaves County, Roswell, New Mexico, and more particularly described as: LOTS FORTY-EIGHT (48), FORTY-NINE (49) AND THE NORTH 45 FEET OF LOT FORTY-SEVEN (47) IN BLOCK (1) OF SIERRA VISTA VILLAGE, IN THE CITY OF ROSWELL, COUNTY OF CHAVES AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO AS SHOWN ON THE OFFCIAL PLAT FILED IN THE CHAVES COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE ON JUNE 28, 1960 AND RECORDED IN BOOK C OF PLAT RECORDS, CHAVES COUNTY, NEW MEXICO, AT PAGE 119.

The sale proceeds will be applied against a Default Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure, Order of Sale and Appointment of Special Master against Defendants, Steven Hernandez, as personal representative of the Estate of Loraine R. Browning (deceased), Steven Hernandez (individually) and John and Jane Doe (tenants), entered on September 26, 2013, in the amount of $19,653.72, with interest accruing at the rate of 8.5% per year ($4.07 per diem) from September 26, 2013; and

The Default Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure, Order of Sale and Appointment of Special Master, may be obtained from either the court clerk or the undersigned Special Master prior to the sale date. Bank of the Southwest, has the right to bid at the sale and to apply its judgment to the purchase price as a credit in lieu of cash. For all other bidders, the sale terms are cash or its equivalent by the close of business on the day of sale. The sale may be postponed and rescheduled at the Special Master's discretion. This property is being sold subject to a one month right of redemption and any property taxes due from 2010 to the present. Prospective purchasers at the sale are advised to make their own examination of title and the condition of the property and consult their own attorney before bidding. _________________________________ Stephen S. Shanor, Special Master 400 Penn Plaza Suite 700 P.O. Box 10 Roswell, NM 88202-0010 (575) 622-6510 (575) 623-9332 Fax

2601 N. Spruce, Sat., 7am. Furniture, clothes, baby and kids items and misc. MOVING SALE, Sat 8-2, furniture, tools, antique items, adj. bed, teak wood wall unit, and much more 2602 N. Kentucky

ANNOUNCEMENTS 025. Lost and Found

FOUND MALE Russian Blue cat. Call 575-637-1270 LOST OLD female siamese cat, poor health, lost by 11th & Lea,small reward. Call 420-6924 LOST MALE yellow Lab w/plaid color collar, lost at Bowling Alley. Reward. 626-7766

INSTRUCTION

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

Roswell Daily Record

bittersweet touch — the signature “Emilio” appearing as an inlay in the style as it appears on the house’s print dresses and soft foulard fabrics. Emilio Pucci died in 1992. His daughter, Laudomia Pucci, took over design in 1992 and remains as image director and vice-president. She spoke fondly of her father’s legacy, and what she sees as a false perception that the house seemed almost fossilized in the past. “Certainly my father’s career was very strong from the early ‘50s to the late ‘70s, and he definitely defined a moment in fashion. We are still defined by that hot pot print,” she said. “Many people who are not so much in the industry sometimes say ‘Pucci is only defined by color and print!’ Oh but there is so much more. We’ve just done a collection in black and white,” she said, pausing. “But at least they know who we are, and

045. Employment Opportunities THOUGHT OF driving Big Rigs the oil fields are going strong and Companies are looking for CDL Drivers. In less than 2 months you can have your Class A License and making the money you deserve. Classes are forming now. Artesia Training Academy is VA approved, you can call Artesia Training Academy for more information. Or visit our web site. Phone # 575-748-9766 or 1-888-586-0144 Web site: www.artesiatraining.com Check us out on Facebook

TAX PROFESSIONALS NEEDED EXTENSIVE training provided Min Starting $13/hr ++ $$ Dec through Feb (or Apr) New retirees, stay at home moms Military/spouses encouraged to apply Professional appearance required Full-time availability please Must pass background check Apply in person at H&R BLOCK 1137 S. Main ST Roswell, NM 88203 M-Th 10am-5pm ROAD MAINTENANCE I Chaves County is accepting applications to establish a six month pool of applicants for current and future openings for the position of Road Maintenance I (light road equipment operator). Entry level salary range: $9.80 $11.21/hr D.O.Q. Chaves County offers a competitive benefit package consisting of paid vacation and sick leave, holiday pay, medical, life, disability, vision and dental insurances plus a retirement plan. Position requires 2 years experience operating road construction equipment and a valid Class A CDL. Applicant will not be considered if they have been convicted of DWI within the past three years or do not currently possess a valid Class A CDL. Normal work hours are Monday-Thursday, 6:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Chaves County is a drug free employer. All applicants for this position will be required to pass a background check and will be subject to pre-employment, post-offer drug and physical testing. Required Application forms are available at the County's Job Posting Board located in the west wing of the County Administrative Center, #1 St. Mary's PL, Roswell, NM 88203 or by accessing the County's Web Site at www.co.chaves.nm.us. Applications may be returned to Human Resources, PO Box 1817, Roswell, NM 88202. Applications will be accepted until filled. EOE.

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish November 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 2013

The New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange (NMHIX) Board of Directors will hold a regular meeting on Friday, November 15, 2013 at 10:00 AM at the Eastern New Mexico University Roswell Campus located at 20 Mathis, OTC 124 in Roswell New Mexico. If an individual with a disability is in need of a reader, amplifier, qualified sign language interpreter, or any other form of auxiliary aid or service to attend or participate in the meeting, please contact the NMHIX office at 1-800-204-4700 prior to the meeting.

The agenda for the meeting shall be available at least seventy two (72) hours before the meeting at (1) the administrative offices of the NMHIX, located at 6301 Indian School Road NE #100, Albuquerque, New Mexico, and (2) on the NMHIX website, http://www.nmhix.com/. Interested persons may also contact the NMHIX at 1-800-204-4700 or by email at lgarcia@nmhix.com for a copy of the agenda.

045. Employment Opportunities

NEW SALON & Day Spa now open, has opening for licensed cosmetologist and licensed massage therapists. Come by 2727 SE Main or call 575-622-0016 NEED CASH? Be your own boss & build your business at Blairs Monterey indoor market at 1400 W. 2nd. Booths start at $75 mo Call 623-0136

AmeriPride Linen and Apparel REQUISITION# 106704 Relief CSR position Application open from October 29, 2013 to November 29, 2013. High School Diploma/GED, experience with route sales desired, ability to work directly with customers, build relationship with customers by providing resolutions to problems and complaints, clean driving record, ability to lift up to 50 lbs and pass a Department of Transportation drug test and physical. Competitive salary and benefits. Application must be filled out online at careerbuilders.com EOE EMPLOYEE

BIG D’S accepting resumes for delivery driver & experienced cook. Resumes only to 505 N. Main

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

HDFS. has an immediate opening for an Administrative Assistant. This position will provide general clerical support in the areas of accounting, payroll, and budget management. Two years general office and one year of accounting experience preferred. Must have excellent customer service, communication and organizational skills and be proficient in MS suite. Submit resumes and cover letter to asalmon@highdesertfs.com

DAY HAB LEAD

HDFS is a leading provider of services for individual with development disabilities under the DD Waiver program. We currently have an opening for a DSE III - Day Hab Lead for our Roswell office. 2 years experience in DD Waiver and supervision desired. Previous experience scheduling community activities with individuals under the dd wavier program required.

that’s something we can build on.” She also spoke openly about the house’s close relationship with Monroe. “When (Emilio Pucci) first introduced the silk jersey, he took the thread and the American buyers said ‘Mr. Pucci, an American lady will never be caught dead in this fabric.’ And actually Marilyn Monroe was in Los Angeles, walked in a store and bought a dress, walked out after taking of f her bra and bumped into Mr. Miller and the rest of the story is pretty obvious,” she said, referring to Monroe’s third husband, playwright Arthur Miller. “They say that she was buried in Pucci,” she added. In recent years she has tried to get a piece of the Monroe history back, by buying back pieces from the blond bombshell’s wardrobe. “I have her knickers in my archives,” she said.

045. Employment Opportunities

FARMER’S COUNTRY Market is seeking to hire a Baker. Experience a plus. Scratch baking an additional plus. Please apply at Farmer’s Country Market located at 800 W. Hobbs St. CRESCENT SERVICES is experiencing exciting growth in the Oilfield Industry and we have positions available in Carlsbad, NM for drivers, experienced Water Transfer candidates, and dedicated people who want to grow with a solid company. You're invited to join us Monday, November 18, 2013 for our Job Fair in Carlsbad. You'll meet the managers and get some great information about the opportunities that we have and you can apply on site. See you Monday, November 18, 2013 from 7am to 7pm. at the Best Western Stevens Inn , 1829 S. Canal St.

TOBOSA DEVELOPMENTAL Services is seeking a Registered Nurse and/or Licensed Practical Nurse. Position is responsible for maintaining the highes level of nursing documentation as guided by best practices for documentation standards by the mainstream healthcare industry and maintaining a flexible case load of low to moderate acuity patients. Experience with developmentally disaled preferred but not required. Please submit current resume with completed application, police background check, and driving record. Apply at Tobosa Developmental Services, 110 E. Summit, Roswell, N.M. 88203 or call (575)624-1025. Salary is negotionable based on experience and educational leel. Applications close November 1, 2013. EOE TOBOSA DEVELOPMENTAL Services is currently seeking Direct Care Support Staff for the Residential Department. Experience with developmentally disabled preferred but not required. Please submit current resume with completed application, police background check, and driving record. Apply at Tobosa Developmental Services, 110 E. Summit, Roswell, NM. 88203 or call (575)624-1025. Salary is negotiable based on experience and education level. Applications open until positions are filled. EOE $1500 SIGN-ON Bonus for experienced CDL-A drivers. Get home often & earn 38 cpm. Excellent benefits & CSA friendly equipment. Call 855-430-8869. Paid training for CDL-A school recent grads and drivers with limited experience. Apply online at AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer.

or apply at 1601 West 2nd Street Roswell, NM.

L&F DISTRIBUTORS Class A CDL Drivers For Roswell, NM Area Qualified applicant must have good driving record. Current commercial license preferable. Previous(575)622-0380 experience delivering product a plus. Good communication and customer service skills. Interested applicants apply at: L&F Distributors 2200 North Atkinson Roswell, NM 88201 575-622-0380 An Equal Opportunity Employer

MEDICAL OFFICE Transcriptionist: Full Time M-F 9am-6pm. Excellent grammar, punctuation, spelling, and communication skills mandatory. Typing and grammar testing will be conducted. Please send cover letter with resume and three references to roswellscript@gmail.com

ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER JOBS in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper to place your ad or log onto www.nmpress.org for more information.

You must be able to pass a background check, have a valid driver's license and reliable transportation. Prefer HS grad/GED and previous experience working with the DD Waiver program. Training provided. Please call, or email for further information. Contact Anne Salmon,

asalmon@highdesertfs.com,

045. Employment Opportunities

ELECTRICIAN CAREERS U.S. NAVY. Paid training, Financial Security, medical/dental, vacation, retirement. HS grads 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (800) 354-9627 SOUTHWEST BEARING is accepting applications for parts counter. Apply at 809 E. McGaffey WE ARE COMFORT KEEPERS EXPERIENCE THE JOYS AND REWARDS Of Being A Comfort Keeper

Quality of life is important to everyone. Helping seniors maintain their independence is what being a Comfort Keeper is all about. We provide many services such as, meal preparation, housekeeping, running errands, medication reminders and personal care. We offer flexible full-time or part-time hours with competitive pay. If you want to learn more about becoming a Comfort Keeper, stop by our office today to learn more. EOE Positions available in Roswell, Carlsbad and Artesia. 1410 S. Main St Roswell, NM 88203 Ph. 575-624-9999

WWW.COMFORTKEEPERS.COM

THE ROSWELL Job Corps Center is accepting applications for a Career Counselor. The position is full time with benefits. Must have a Bachelors degree preferred in psychology or social work. One year counseling experience. Position is available immediately. Do you want to supplement your income? Substitute Instructors are needed, 7:30 am – 4:00 pm. Monday – Friday. A Dental Assistant is needed, Tuesdays from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. Send your resume to gonzalez.mary@jobcorps.org. Or mail to Roswell Job Corps at 57 G. Street, Roswell, NM 88203. Career Opportunities, Inc. is a Equal Opportunity Employer M/F, V/D SEEKING AN administrative assistant; duties will include basic bookkeeping, payroll reporting and general clerical. Must be proficient in Microsoft Word and Excel. Flexible work hours. Please send cover letter, resume and transcripts to John Jerge CPA, PC 101 South Union, Roswell, New Mexico 88203

Westlake ACE Hardware has an immediate opening for a Floor Manager in our Roswell NM store. Our Floor Manager reports to General Manager and plays an important role in all aspects of store management. High school/ GED required. Previous retail management and hardware experience preferred. This salaried position requires the ability to work some evenings and weekends. We offer competitive pay, bonus eligibility, paid vacations and holidays, a liberal employee discount and other benefits. Please submit your resume and salary requirements for consideration. Via email: resumes@ westlakehardware.com Via fax: 866-473-8038


Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities

SHIPPING & Receiving Lead; FT, min 40 hrs/wk with overtime. Shipping & receiving experience required, aviation experience preferred, one year leadership experience required, flexible schedule, must be willing to operate forklift, computer experience required. Drug testing mandatory. E-Verify. Equal opportunity employer offers medical, dental, vision & AFLAC insurance. Fax resumes to 575.347.2085, or email hr@siiair.com ACTIVE COMPANY needs 30 people immediately. Great opportunity for those willing to work and grow with the company. Must be able to start work immediately. *Up to $425-$525 per week earning potential to start per agreement. *Advancement opportunities available within 90 days. 575-578-4817 JOURNEYMAN ELECTRICIAN needed. Must have Valid NM Journeyman License and Valid Driver’s License. Call 575-625-1774 for application information. ENSIGNAL, A premier Verizon Wireless Retailer is seeking motivated, highenergy people to fill communication consultant positions. Successful candidates will possess excellent sales techniques along with strong customer service skills. Knowledge of the wireless industry and one year prior retail sales experience is a plus. Bilingual preferred. Normal retail hours, along with nights and weekend required. Ensignal offers competitive pay, plus commission, monthly contests and discounted mobile services. Apply online at www.ensignal.com.

045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

CAREER CHANGE? J & G Electric is now accepting applications for apprentice electricians. Apply in person at 512 S Main Street. 401K, paid vacations, and insurance.

Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR TEMPORARY FARM Labor: Brady Bee’s & Honey Company, Liberty, TX, has 10 positions for bees & honey; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days; must not have bee or honey related allergies; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.57/hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 12/31/13 – 10/31/14. Apply at nearest NM Workforce Office with Job Order TX6269260 or call 505-383-2721.

Come Grow With Us! As we expand we are looking for front desk applicants who can work flexible schedules and have reliable transportation. Apply in-person @ 2803 W 2nd

SERVICES

080. Alterations

ALTERATIONS & Misc. Sewing - 840-8065.

105. Childcare

DAYCARE has openings for childcare, activities included. Mary 622-7423.

TADPOLES DAYCARE is now looking for energetic people willing to work in our two year old classroom with 10 hour shifts with no conflicting schedules. Also looking for a Part Time teacher to work in our After School Classroom. Must be able to pass drug and background test, and have GED/Diploma. Apply at 2205 N Atkinson. “Overhead Door of Southeastern New Mexico” Has positions open for Commercial & Residential garage door installers and installer trainees. Valid New Mexico drivers’ license with a clean driving record required. We are a drug free work place a pre-employment drug test is required. Apply in person at Overhead Door Co. located at 200 S. Hemlock Avenue, Roswell, NM. Applications are available weekdays 8:00am-12:00 & 1:00 pm 4:30 pm or by appointment.

135. Ceramic Tile

CERAMIC TILE Do you need to tile your floor? Here in Roswell, Ben does it for you. From $295 ONLY per room. It includes everything. I also do small plumbing jobs. 505-990-1628 or 575-359-5504 (cell)

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 SUNSHINE WINDOW Services. Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458 Majesty Cleaning Svc. Residential/Comm., excellent svc., superior cleaning, 26 yrs exp., licensed, bonded & ins. 575-622-3314 anytime

CLASSIFIEDS

140. Cleaning

HOUSEKEEPER, REASONABLE price. Call Betty 575-840-6291

195. Elderly Care

I WILL care for your loved ones. Experienced, references. Days or nights. 623-3717 or 578-1050

200. Fencing

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991 Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100

210. Firewood/Coal MOUNTAIN WOOD for sale, Delivery available. 575-420-5124

SEASONED MOUNTAIN wood. (1) 4’Tx8’Lx1.6’W stack, split & delivered $120. 575-626-9803 GRAVES FARMING Garden, Oak, Fir, Elm, Cedar, Juniper, full or half cord, pick up or delivered. 622-1889. PECAN WOOD delivered & stacked, $250/cord. 575-317-8536

225. General Construction

Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

229. Gutters

We power wash gutters and clean carpets (575) 973-1019

230. General Repair

NEED HOME repairs fixed before the “HOLIDAYS”? D & B Property Maintenance is the answer. Sheetrock, painting, landscaping, flooring, fencing, etc. NO JOB TOO SMALL, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL. Free estimates. Call 575-623-8922. 15% discount with mention of this ad.

Mechanic

Diesel Technician based in Roswell, NM

* Great Pay and Benefits

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

2-5 years diesel tech experience or certification from a Diesel Technician Trade School required. A/C & Brakes Certifications preferred CDL-A preferred Apply on our website

www.ruan.com

For more information call

800-879-7826

Dedicated to Diversity. EOE

232. Chimney Sweep

CHIMNEY SWEEP Have your woodstove, fireplace, or pellet stove inspected and cleaned. Dust free Guarantee. 39 yrs Exp., Licensed, Insured. Bulldog Janitorial Services 575-308-9988

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738 RWC. BACKHOE, skid steer, dump truck, bom lift, services. Insured. Call Hector 575-910-8397. www.rancheroswelding.com

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Bòidheach Yards and Gardens. Property cleanup & hauling, year round maintenance, landscaping, tree management. You'll love our prices! 578-9404. Fall Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242. LANDSCAPE, CUTTING grass, mowing, trimming, cut down trees. 910-2033 WE WORK All Yard work & hauling. Call Will at 317-7402 “Big E’s” Landscaping & Yardwork mow, trim, prune property clean-up, sprinkler sys. senior disc. 914-6025 BUDGET LAWN cleaning & basic cleanup. 420-4375 or 910-0685 Mow Grass, Trim Bushes, Clean Ups, Hauling Trash Leaf Raking, flower beds, tree pruning, rock yards & rototilling, pick up pecans, concrete jobs, repair sprinklers & fences. 347-8156, 347-8157 Pedro

285. Miscellaneous Services

Professional !!!Holiday Lighting!!! Installation and Takedown (575) 973-1019 WRAP UP your Holiday Shopping with 100% guaranteed, delivered–tothe-door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 67% PLUS 4 FREE Burgers - Many Gourmet Favorites ONLY $49.99. ORDER Today 1-800-773-3095 Use Code 49377DLY or www.OmahaSteaks.com/gifts69

STRUGGLING WITH YOUR MORTGAGE AND WORRIED ABOUT FORECLOSURE? REDUCE YOUR MORTGAGE & SAVE MONEY. LEGAL LOAN MODIFICATION SERVICES. FREE CONSULTATION. CALL PREFERRED LAW 1-800-915-0432

Saturday, November 9, 2013

285. Miscellaneous Services

Dennis the Menace

Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-661-3783, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping. SAVE $$$ on AUTO INSURANCE from the major names you know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call READY FOR MY QUOTE now! CALL 1-888-719-6435 SAVE ON Cable TVInternet-Digital PhoneSatellite. You`ve Got A Choice! Options from ALL major service providers. Call us to learn more! CALL Today. 888-706-8846 HELPING HANDS, Honest reliable house keeping. Call 575-551-8693.

310. Painting/ Decorating EXTERIOR/INTERIOR, INSURED. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

www.rancheroswelding.com

330. Plumbing

350. Roofing

RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397 www.rancheroswelding.com

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

395. Stucco Plastering

Plumber Needs Work. Steve’s Plumbing & Heating. 33yrs exp. 622-9326

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217

GAS LINES and plumbing specials, best prices, licensed, 840-9105

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

Spruce Up and Winterize Your Home for the Holidays! We remodel, inside and out (575) 973-1019 Additions, bathroom, kitchen, facia, soffit, window, door replacement. Rodriguez Const. 420-0100 PERFECTION TILERS 575-208-8963, Llicensed & insured. Shower bench, cabinets & tiling. CONCRETE, STUCCO, cabinets, floors, painting, drywall, welding. Call Gerry 575-420-3825

350. Roofing

Professional Roofing, Landscaping, Irrigation, Concrete and Fence Work (575) 973-1019

For stucco traditional or synthetic, also block, brick & stone work. Rodriguez Const. 420-0100 RWC Lath and Stucco. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

www.rancheroswelding.com

405. TractorWork

Tractor work Lots mowed, discing, blading, post holes. 347-0142 or 317-7738

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL, free estimates, super clean up, 840-9105 Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insuranced.

www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale 2BR/1BA, LARGE living room w/laundry room, 409 W. Summit, 912 sqft, gross living area. 806-729-2383 or 575-347-5702

490. Homes For Sale 5BR/3BA, 2 car garage, nestled away on Old Clovis Hwy, or could use as a 3br/3ba w/hobby rooms. Comes w/6 acres & water rights & many trees. Mobile home/RV hookup, outbuildings, sheds, $377k, $35k down. Owner financing available, 575-416-1454 or 575-622-6786 2BR/1BA, CARPORT, storage sheds, $69k w/$5k down or trade for ?? 575-416-1454 or 575-622-6786, owner financing available. FSBO: CUTE, clean, remodeled 2br/1ba, large laundry room, all appliances, washer/dryer & dishwasher included, large fenced front & backyard, $37k OBO. 575-624-1627 for appointment. BRIAR RIDGE custom home, 3yrs old, 3br/2ba, 81 Bent Tree Rd., $132,900. 831-915-0226 BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY home on 5 acres, 5037 W. Berrendo Rd., pictures & information on forsalebyowner.com listing #23966971. Call 575-626-2280. FSBO: WEST side, 407 W. Forest, $39,500, down payment negotiable, 575-623-4893. FSBO: Xnice 3br/1ba, with appliances, 1004 S. Plains Park, $78,500. HOME FOR sale by owner,(OPEN HOUSE SAT. NOV 9 start at 1pm) 216 W. McGaffey St.,Commercial/ Residential, zoned C-2. Priced to sale at $74,900.00; includes LR, / Gas Fireplace, Dining area. 3br/2ba. Great area for business or family dwelling. Has 2-car detached garage, plus pation...... Living Space 1,260 sft. Set on 66’ X 132’ Lot stucco exterior with newly painted trim. Cash or conventional loan. Open House on Saturday November 2nd at 1pm. 2nd575-637-1985 or 575-637-1964

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B8 Saturday, November 9, 2013 490. Homes For Sale 3BR, 1 3/4ba, north part of town, 3110 N. Bandolina, 1 car garage, all new carpet, paint & roof, 2 blks from swimming pool. Priced to sell, $108,000. Owner may finance w/large down payment. 622-5031 or 420-1022

AN UN-NOTICED BARGAIN!!! Roomy 3 bdrm 2 & 3.4 bath; cozy fireplace; beautiful pool; enclosed patio; DOUBLE LOT and many updates. Priced to sell at $188,500. Trade??? Lynn at Sun Country Realty 623-4646 or 626-7506 EASY TO BUY ; seller will help with buyer’s closing costs! Call for details. 3 bedrooms inside this 1500+sq ft home totally redone and just like new! A ONE ACRE lot to shape to your personal taste.. Affordable at only $142,900. Lots of future potential! Sun Country Realty 623-4646 or Lynn 626-7506

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

540. Apartments Unfurnished

FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944. PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. EFF, 1BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377

EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. Very nice 2br/1.5ba, Apartment. North location, garage, $800/mo, $400/dep, 1 yr lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535.

1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 1111 N. Washington 2br/2b. Call 910-4225

NORTH LARGE 2/2, remodeled wood floors, no pets, $695/$400 420-8797

Very nice 2br Apartment. 304 W. Mescalero, $625/mo, wtr pd, $300/dep. 6 mo. lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535.

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

AFFORDABLE RANCHETTE surrounded by “GREEN PASTURES”!! Where you can find more for your money? ONLY $150,000.; 4 bdrm/2&1/2 bath roomy home w. double garage and 5 acres of open country. Perfect for next years 4-H or FFA project. Call nw! Sun Country Realty 575-623-4646 or Lynn 575-626-7506

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

MOVE IN ready! In Sr Park on North side. 3br/2ba, all appliances w/washer & dryer, 12ftx16ft shop built on w/carport & patio, 1995 Oakcreek, 16x80, storage shed in back, asking $40k. 575-910-9716 OPEN HOUSE SUN 1-3 North Senior Park beautiful 2 bd 2 bath spacious triple wide. 1500 sq ft All NEW flooring, fixtures & toilets. Appliances and NEW window coverings included. 626-5353

520. Lots for Sale

Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352. PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. LOT FOR Sale, 52X140, 1824 N. Lea Ave, Call 575-937-4650 or 575-937-3509

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944

BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $592, 3br/2ba, $674, 5br/2ba $812, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge. Town Plaza Apartments NO HUD ACCEPTED ALL UTILITIES PAID Friendly managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs & downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735.

1BD/1BA apartment. Call 910-8170 or 840-4333 Roswell Apartment 1700 N. Pontiac Dr., 2br/1ba, stove & fridge, a/c, heating air, washer/dryer hookup, water paid. 1-626-864-3461

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 AVAILABLE Nov. 1st, $850/mo, $750/dep, 3br/1.5ba, No HUD or pets, 575-420-5930 600 S. Lea, 3br/2ba, ref. air, w/d hookups, no HUD or pets, $750/mo, $600/dep, 914-5402.

34 H St., $550/mo, $550/dep, 2br/1ba, fenced yard, wtr pd, min. 1yr lease, 627-9942. 305 W. Deming, 2br/1ba, utilities pd, ref. air, appliances included, $700/mo, $500/dep. No pets/HUD. 575-623-7678

409 N. Railroad. 3bd/1ba, stove, refrigerator, no pets, $550/mo, $300/dep. 910-9648.

2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 3 BR/1BA, w/garage, located at 45 Kelly Place, Roswell. $700/mo., $500 deposit. 575-420-5516 or 575-623-1800

2br/1ba, $625, $400/dep, no HUD or pets. 300 W. Mescalero. 910-1300

Clean 2BR, 1527 N. Michigan $500 + Dep. No Pets. No HUD. Call 626-2190. 1516 N. Pontiac, 2 br, 1 ba, near parks, new stove & new ref, W/D hookups, hardwood floors, completely remodeled, fenced yard, very clean and cute, $625 monthly, plus dep., No large dogs (small or medium okay), No HUD. References and Rental History required. Call 578-3034

CLASSIFIEDS

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

3107 RADCLIFF, 3br/1.5ba, washer & dryer, newly remodeled kitchen includes dishwasher, $775/mo + dep., no smoking or HUD, Call 915-6498 or 915-6490.

NEED FURNITURE Shop Blair’s for the best prices on used furniture, beds, dressers, table & chairs, living room sets, patio sets, bookshelves, appliances, antiques, collectibles, home decor & housewares, saddles, tools, movies, plus lots more. Open daily 9-5, closes Wed. 623-2033

811 W. 4th, 1br/1ba duplex, appliances, $450/mo, wtr & gas pd, $400/dep. 626-5423

22FT FLATBED trailer, dual axels, choice $2200; overhead camper $300; 5 prehung 30” doors, $45 ea.; antique windows $25 ea., furnaces $100, wallheaters $100; commodes, sinks, choice $25; 2 wood burning heat stoves, $250 each. 416-1454 or 622-6786

2BR/1BA, COMPLETE redone, $700/mo, $600/dep, ref. air, fenced yard & laundry room. 317-4373 Rent/Sale: 3br/2ba, $700; 3br, FP, $600. Al, 703-0420/Diana 420-3495 1618 S. Washington, 2 br/1ba, laundry room, new cabinets, and tile throut the house. Pet ok with none refundable pet deposits. $600mo, $500dep. Call 623-8922

3BR NEAR ENMU-R, #20 Murphy Place, HUD approved, w/garage, ldry rm, new carpet, very clean, $650/mo. 623-6999 or 317-2945 305 S. Evergreen, 2br/1ba, coverd carport, shed, appliances, fenced yard, $750/$500 dep, dogs w/fee, no HUD or utilities pd. 575-405-0163 or kilok9s@gmail.com

555. Mobile Homes for Rent Mobile homes for rent or rent to own, mobile home lots available, RVs welcome. Country Club Mobile Home Manor, 1200 E. Country Club, 623-6660

2 SODA Machines for Sale. Call after 1pm, 575-495-9521 Freezer $100; recliner $60; brand new beach cruiser bike $75; 623-2116 FRONT LOAD frigidaire washer, 3 months old, maytag dryer $600 for both. 623-8922 JANSSEN PIANO, good condition, $500. 626-6240 White side-by-side fridge, white & beige washer & dryer sets, all in good condition. 806-333-8696 or 806-340-4221 Pwr wheelchair, hospital bed, lift chair, Invacare patient lifter. 622-7638

ROOMS FOR rent, nice neighborhood, Call 575-627-5390

580. Office or Business Places FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546. 3500 sqft office building located at 200 W. Hobbs St. Currently set up with reception area, 10 offices and/or examination rooms, storage room, break room, handicap accessible restrooms. Perfect for any type of office or medical facility. Please contact 575-623-4553 to arrange time to show the building.

QUEEN SIZE sofa sleeper $100; king size headboard w/shelves & mirror, $75. 575-208-1438

KENMORE 30” white electric range, self clean, glasstop w/range hood, like new, $300. 575-624-2845

558. Roommates Wanted

700. Building Materials NEW SHIPMENT of bronzed metal roofing. 575-653-4647

705. Land/Gardening/ Fertilizer

QUALITY MOUNTAIN Top soil from Ruidoso now available to Roswell Residents. Please call Guardiola Construction at (575) 937-3015 for pricing and delivery options.

715. Hay and Feed Sale

4x8 SORGUM bales $75 each and 4X8 alfalfa bales $225 each. Call Janet at 575-626-0159. 4x8 SORGUM bales $75 each and 4X8 alfalfa bales $225 each. Call Janet at 575-626-0159. FOR SALE Grass Hay, 623-9037

745. Pets for Sale

KIRBY VACUUM cleaner w/attachments & shampooer & Oreck vacuum cleaner. 624-1614

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

ADVERTISE YOUR AUCTION in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper for more details. Or log onto www.nmpress.org for a list of participating newspapers.

640. Household Goods

GOOD OLD cargated roofing. 575-653-4647

QUIET COUNTRY 2bd, 10 miles East 2nd on River Rd. $550/mo, $550/dep. 575-513-5790

630. Auction Sales

GRAVES FARMING Garden, local pinto beans, Portales peanuts, dried red chili pots, vegetables of all kinds, frozen green chili, roasted in bag. 622-1889. Monday thru Saturday 8:30am-5:30pm, Sunday 1-5pm.

DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-315-7043

3BR/2.5BA, WOOD floors, fireplace, fenced yard, 800 plus utilities, $500 dep. 505-553-1606

AH Nuts will be buying pecans starting December 3rd, check back for location & hours.

635. Good things to Eat

HEAVY DUTY flatbed trailer, 6 brand new tires, $3900. 622-6786 or 575-416-1454

Historic District, 1308 N. Pennsylvania, close to NMMI, 1800sqft, 3/4br, 2/ba, LR has FP, Large country Kitchen/dining. $1350/mo + utilities. 624-1975, Available Nov. 1

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

TOP PRICES paid for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We buy compete household & estates. 623-0136 or 910-6031

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

FREE TO a good home, 8yr old indoor declawed female spayed cat. Please call Connie at 626-9155. German Shepherd 3 female,1 sable, 1mo. 1/2 old. 575-416-0854

FOR LEASE 3500 Sq. Ft. Excellent location, $1200 mo. $1200 dep. 1 yr lease required. 200 E. College, Call 317-5841 or 317-5796

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

Elevated toilet seat, crutches, walker, bath transfer bench. 622-7638

Roswell Daily Record

5 $ 00 8 $

cord Roswell Daily Re S.COM

RDRNEW 575-622-7710 •

00

Roswell Daily Re

cord 575-622-7710 • RDRNEWS.COM

GARAGE & YARD SALE KITS To make your sale more successful!

Includes: • 3 Signs • Pricing Stickers + Tax • Yard Sale Tips Includes: • 6 Signs • Pricing Stickers + Tax • Yard Sale Tips

Roswell Daily Record 745. Pets for Sale

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

FREE KITTENS to good home. Call 840-7017 SCHNORKIE-POO PUPS (designer hybrid schnauzers) All pup shots, registered, non-shedding, hypo-allergenic, $550 PAYMENT PLAN 575-317-0523 TXT pics available

BLUE HEELER puppies and one red. Ready to Go Call 840-4923.

RECREATIONAL 780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com

790. Autos for Sale

‘96 TOYOTA Camry, runs great, $2700. Call 420-9541

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2002 CHEVY Silverado 4.8 motor, 1 owner 94k miles. 420-5503 BUCKET TRUCK, 144k miles, 2 man bucket, 600 lb capacity, 60 ft high lift, $7850, or for rent for $500/day. 626-7488

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

2006 FORD F-150 Lariat 4x4, 4 dr, tan leather, 175k miles, $11,500 OBO. 575-637-0304

5TH WHEEL, 2006 Keystone Laredo $22,995. See at Desert Sun C-D-J at the “Y”

5TH WHEEL, 2009 Keystone Cougar $26,995. See at Desert Sun C-D-J at the “Y”

2000 NISSAN Frontier, Ext. Cab, pick up, 0.4 Cylinder, 120K miles, auto trans. Cruise cntrl., tool box, Exc. Cond. $5,500. 623-8607 2000 DODGE Caravan, 6 Cylander, 7 passengers, 103,600 miles, Exc. Cond. $4,000. 623-8607 1997 FORD F150 Ext. Cab, clean, funs excellent. $3100. 626-4942

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


11 09 13 Roswell Daily Record