Issuu on Google+

Roswell Daily Record THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

No rest during final campaign hours

Vol. 121, No. 266 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

INSIDE NEWS

VOTERS DEDICATED DESPITE ODDS WASHINGTON (AP) — There’s always grousing about the many people who don’t bother to vote. But look at it the other way: An estimated 133 million Americans will cast ballots in Tuesday’s election. ... - PAGE A3

TOP 5 WEB

For The Past 24 Hours

• Alamo teacher’s aide innocent in student ... • Deputies: NM man on meth stole mom’s ... • Artesia the place to be for balloons and ... • Rockets pound the rock, ’Dogs • Demons win ...

AP Photo

Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney at a Virginia campaign rally at The Patriot Center, George Mason University, in Fairfax, Va., Monday.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The White House the prize, President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney raced through a final full day of campaigning on Monday through Ohio and other battleground states holding the keys to victory in a

tight race. Both promised brighter days ahead for a nation still struggling with a sluggish economy and high joblessness. “Our work is not done yet,” Obama told a cheering crowd of nearly 20,000 in chilly Madison, Wis., imploring his audience to give him another four years. Romney projected optimism as he neared the end of his six-year quest for the presidency. “If you believe we can do better. If you believe America should be on a better course. If you’re tired of being tired ... then I ask you to vote for real change,” he said in a Virginia suburb of the nation’s capital. With many of the late polls in key states tilting slightly against him, he decided to campaign on Election Day in Ohio and Pennsylvania, where he and Republicans made a big, late push. The presidency aside, there are 33 Senate seats on the ballot Tuesday, and according to one Republican official, a growing sense of resignation among his party’s rank and file that Democrats will hold their majority. The situation was reversed in the

House, where Democrats made no claims they were on the verge of victory in pursuit of the 25 seats they need to gain control. National opinion polls in the presidential race made the popular vote a virtual tie. In state-by-state surveys, it appeared Obama held small advantages in Nevada, Ohio, Iowa and Wisconsin — enough to deliver a second term if they endured, but not so significant that they could withstand an Election Day surge by Romney supporters. Both men appealed to an ever smaller universe of undecided voters. More than 30 million absentee or early ballots have been cast, including in excess of 3 million in Florida. The state also had a legal controversy, in the form of a Democratic lawsuit seeking an extension of time for pre-Election Day voting. There were other concerns, logistical rather than legal. Officials in one part of New Jersey delivered voting equipment to emergency shelters so voters displaced by Superstorm Sandy last week could cast ballots. New York City made arrangements for shut-

Housing for Sandy’s victims?

SPORTS

AP Photo

Residents line up for bundles of food at an American Red Cross station in the Coney Island section of Brooklyn, Monday, in New York.

CINCINNATI (AP) — Peyton Manning had no trouble clearing those two interceptions out of his head and leading a fourth-quarter comeback. “I’ve been there before,” the four-time MVP said. And no one’s ever been better at it. - PAGE B1

TODAY’S OBITUARIES • • • •

Bruce Barreras Shirley Ann Cain Isabel Garcia Bill Wiggins

- PAGE A3

HIGH ...77˚ LOW ....41˚

TODAY’S FORECAST

INDEX CLASSIFIEDS..........B5 COMICS.................B3 FINANCIAL .............B4 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........A8 LOTTERIES ............A2 NATION .................A3 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8

TUESDAY

www.rdrnews.com

INSIDE

BRONCOS BEAT CINCY

November 6, 2012

NEW YORK (AP) — Government leaders are turning their attention to the next crisis unfolding in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy: finding housing for potentially tens of thousands of people left homeless. The Federal Emergency Management Agency said it has already dispensed close to $200 million in emergency housing assistance and has put 34,000 people in the New York and New Jersey metropolitan area up in hotels and motels.

But local, state and federal officials have yet to lay out a specific, comprehensive plan for finding them long-term places to live, even as cold weather sets in. And given the scarcity and high cost of housing in the metropolitan area and the lack of open space, it could prove a monumental undertaking. For example, can enough vacant apartments be found? Will the task involve huge, Hurricane Katrina-style encampments of trailer homes? And if so, where will

authorities put the trailers? In stadiums? Parks? Authorities cannot answer those questions yet. “It’s not going to be a simple task. It’s going to be one of the most complicated and long-term recovery efforts in U.S. history,” said Mark Merritt, president of Witt Associates, a Washington crisis management consulting firm founded by former FEMA director James Lee Witt. Tactics that FEMA used in

AP Photo

President Barack Obama at a campaign event at the Fifth Third Arena on the University of Cincinnati campus, Sunday, in Cincinnati.

tle buses to provide transportation for some in hard-hit areas unable to reach their polling places.

Judging from the long early voting lines in some places and the comments made in others, the votSee CAMPAIGN, Page A2

About one-third of NM voters have cast ballots SANTA FE (AP) — Candidates across New Mexico made last-minute appeals to voters Monday, but more than a third of the state’s electorate already had cast ballots on the eve of Election Day. According to the secretary of state’s office, nearly 453,000 New Mexicans had taken advantage of early and absentee voting as of Monday. Democrats accounted for about 219,400 of those voters, or 48 percent, and about 167,500 or 37 percent were Republicans. Nearly 53,000 votes had been cast by independents unaffiliated with a party and more than 12,000 were by voters registered with other parties, such as Libertarians and Greens. In New Mexico, 47 percent of registered voters are Democrats and 32 percent are Republicans. With polls set to open at 7 a.m. Tuesday, candidates and political parties focused on making certain their supporters participated in an election that will decide who controls the White House and Congress, as well as the Legislature and county offices across New Mexico. Republican Gov. Susana Martinez traveled the state with U.S. Senate candidate Heather Wilson, with stops scheduled in Santa Fe, Clovis, Hobbs, Las Cruces, Farmington and Albuquerque. “We have to make sure everybody votes because every vote counts,” Martinez said at a chilly, early morning rally outside the GOP campaign headquarters in Santa Fe. Democrats made similar efforts to woo voters and encourage them to go to the polls. Democratic Sen. Tom Udall joined with Senate nominee Martin Heinrich and congressional candidate Michelle Lujan Grisham for a midday rally targeting students at the University of New Mexico. See VOTING, Page A2

Roswell woman arrested for sex abuse Syrian chaos deepens as JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

A Roswell woman, Beverly Kirkpatrick, 42, was arrested in Artesia, Monday, at Park Junior High School where she works as a science teacher. Numerous charges were filed against her, including five counts of criminal sexual penetration of a minor under the age of 13, five counts of kidnapping and five contributing to the delinquency of a minor, on Friday in Clovis Magistrate Court. The incidents took place out of state in Davenport, Wash. The Sheriff’s Department of Lincoln County, Washington, contacted the Clovis Police who in turn contacted Artesia to make the arrest. According to the affidavit of criminal complaint, the incidents occurred when the victim was a 6-year-old child in foster care with Kirkpatrick and her husband Richard Glascoe. It was the child’s adoptive mother who reported the abuse to the police after the victim told his adoptive mother he was forced at gun point, handcuffed to a wall and threat-

ened by Glascoe. The record states the child was forced to watch as Glascoe abused a 1-year-old girl. At the time, Glascoe and Kirkpatrick were fostering seven children. “The couple were together when the incidents occurred. The charges stem from Clovis and took place between May 7, 2003, and Dec. 28, 2008,” said Sgt. Linell Smith, spokesman for APD. “We believe there were multiple victims of these acts.” The APD was contacted later by Clovis, and patrol and school resource officers were sent to apprehend Kirkpatrick. “Richard Glascoe is currently incarcerated on similar charges,” Smith said. The teacher divorced her husband and assumed a previous name. According to New Mexico Court Case Lookup, Glascoe pleaded guilty to a number of charges in several different lawsuits filed in Clovis, with one case presenting 15 charges of criminal sexual penetration of a minor and criminal sexual contact. In another case heard in 2009, he had been charged with nine counts of CSP and CSC.

See HOUSING, Page A2

rebels, Palestinians fight

BEIRUT (AP) — New chaos engulfed Syria’s civil war as Palestinian supporters and opponents of the embattled regime were swept up Monday in intense fighting in Damascus, while rival rebel groups clashed over control of a Turkish border crossing.

The rare infighting — accompanied by car bombs, airstrikes and artillery shells that killed or maimed dozens of people — heightened fears that if Syrian President Bashar Assad falls, the disparate factions battling the regime will turn on each other.

Beverly Kirkpatrick

Overall, he was named in four cases with more than one charge of CSC/CSP filed during the period of 2007 and 2009. In one, he was accused of intimidation and retaliation of a witness. “Glascoe either pleaded guilty, no contest or was found guilty of the charges,” Smith said. Smith urged members of the public to contact detectives at APD (575-746-500) if they had been victims or witnesses to any other crimes. “Our purpose in releasing this information is not to embarrass the school district, but to find any other potential victims,” said Smith.

j.palmer@rdrnews.com

A suicide bomber detonated his explosives-laden car near an army checkpoint in Hama province, killing 50 soldiers in one of the deadliest single attacks targeting proAssad troops in the 19-month uprising, according to activists. Eleven civilians died when a bomb exploded in a central Damascus neighborhood, state media said, and activists reported at least 20 rebels killed in an air raid on the northern town of Harem. “It’s the worst-case scenario many feared in Syria,” said Fawaz Gerges, director of the Middle East Center at the London School of Economics. “It’s an all-out war.”

The fighting in the capital of Damascus was some of the worst since July, when rebels took over several neighborhoods, only to be bombed out by regime forces days later. Shortly after those battles, rebels moved on Syria’s largest city, Aleppo, and it has become a major front in the civil war since then. The attacks on the two main cities have demonstrated new organization and capabilities of rebel forces as well as a determination to press their uprising despite the deaths of more than 36,000 people in almost 20 months of fighting.

When Syria’s unrest began in March 2011, the country’s half-million Palestinians struggled to stay on the sidelines. But in recent months, many Palestinians started supporting the uprising although they insisted the opposition to the regime should be peaceful.


A2 Tuesday, November 6, 2012

GENERAL

Enticement of a child; vehicle reported stolen found Enticement of a child

Police received a call Friday from a woman who stated that a white male driving a white vehicle with a grey right fender offered money to her children. The incident occurred on Wildy Street on Oct. 26. She did not report it to the police until she saw the car a second time in her neighborhood. The man was described as 40 to 50 years old, having grey hair on the sides, balding on top.

Stolen vehicle

Officers located a white Dodge Ram 3500 dump truck parked on 1 Jerry Smith Circle, northwest of the terminal. The police learned that the vehicle had been reported stolen from Ruidoso. The vehicle was impounded.

Larceny

•Police were dispatched to the 3000 block of North Washington Avenue, Saturday, after $4,500 worth of jewelry was found missing. The police located the suspect and he was arrested. •Police were called to North Beech Avenue, Friday, where the victim’s mother reported that a backpack, an Apple iPhone, books and personal items were stolen from her son at Roswell High, 900 W. Hobbs St. She valued the items at $680.

Breaking and entering

Police were called to the 600 block of Largo Drive, Sunday, after a man tried unsuccessfully to gain entry into a home. Police found the subject and he was arrested on charges of disorderly conduct.

Battery

•Police responded to Peter Piper Pizza. 2601 N. Main St., Saturday, where children were turning the

light in the bathroom off and on. A woman confronted the children who made disparaging remarks to her. When she left the bathroom, angry parents confronted her, a shoving and kicking match ensued and one woman was punched in the face. •Police received a report of battery, Friday, when two men had a disagreement over how to fix a drain at a residence in the 2900 block of North Lea Avenue. The victim was choked and had to be hospitalized due to the severity of his injuries.

Counterfeits

• Police went to Little Caesar’s Pizza, 1320 N. Main St., Saturday, after a subject paid for a pizza with a fake $50 bill. When an employee told the subject the bill was counterfeit, he ran away. • Police took a report from Pioneer Bank on Friday, where they discovered two phony $20 bills from money collected by the Elks Club, 1720 N. Montana Ave., during bingo.

Fraud

Police received a walk-in report of identity theft, Friday. The victim said he had received a collection call for $1,900 debt owed on a TexacoChevron charge card. In addition, he received a call about a $700 debt owed to ATT for a cell phone. The victim stated he did not have a credit card or a cell phone with ATT.

Burglary

•Police were dispatched to the 600

Apprehended

Erica Holguin, 28, who appeared in Roswell Daily Record Most Wanted on Friday, was arrested in the 3000 block of South Union Avenue that same day after a tip was called in to Crime Stoppers. She now faces charges of two counts of fraud over $2,000, but less than $20,000, and identity theft.

AMERICAN SUZUKI FILES FOR BANKRUPTCY

BREA, Calif. (AP) — American Suzuki Motor Corp. on Monday filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and said it will cease selling automobiles in the U.S. as part of a plan to restructure its business. The company, based in Brea, Calif., is the sole distributor of Suzuki Motor Co. vehicles in the continental U.S.

In documents filed with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in the Central District of California, the company estimated that its debts and liabilities range from at least $100 million to as much as $500 million.

It also said it has between 1,000 and 5,000 creditors.

LOTTERY NUMBERS Roadrunner Cash 7-8-20-28-34 Pick 3 0-0-1

NOBLE FINANCE

“We want to make you a loan”

$200 - $2,000 (575)622-0900

ROSA LEE PARHAMS May 27, 1929 to November 6, 2011 The year has flown by and yet it seems like yesterday when you were with us. We miss you so very much and our love for you will never diminish. Our comfort is knowing that you are in Good Hands. Mom, Grandma, Nana, We l o v e y o u . Janet, Ricky, Randy, Curtis and your loving grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and great-great-grandchildren

block of South Kentucky Avenue, Saturday, where subjects entered a home, removed a number of household items and knocked holes in the sheet rock. The losses from the theft and repair costs for the damages were estimated at $4,000. •Police were called to Lawrence Brothers IGA, 900 W. Second St., Saturday, where a subject entered a vehicle and took a cell phone. Officials located the suspect and found the cell phone among other allegedly stolen items in his vehicle. The suspect was arrested.

Arson

Police were dispatched to the 200 block of West Tilden Street, Saturday, to a structure fire. The Roswell Fire Department was called in to investigate. The fire marshall suspects arson.

Criminal damage

Police responded to Sadler and Sons Monuments, 2308 S. Main St., where a head stone was knocked down and broken. This was the second incident of this kind that happened in less than a month. The first incident occurred on Oct. 4.

Arrested

Police arrested one man for battery of a household member Friday around 4:30 p.m. in the 2700 block of South Emerald Avenue. Officials also charged him with burglary for the Motel 6 theft of a cash drawer. The second subject caught on video and featured in the Daily Record remains at large.

Anyone having infor mation about these or any other crime is asked to contact Crime Stoppers, 888-594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward.

Housing

Continued from Page A1

other disasters could be difficult to apply in the city. For example, Merritt said, it’s impossible to set up trailers in people’s driveways if everyone lives in an apartment building, and it’s harder to find space to set up mobile homes. Sandy killed more 100 people in 10 states but vented the worst of its fury on New Jersey and New York. A week after the storm slammed the mid-Atlantic and the Northeast, 1.4 million homes and businesses remained in the dark. Another storm — a nor’easter packing heavy rain and gusts of 50 to 60 mph — was headed for the metropolitan area Wednesday, threatening more flooding and power outages that could undo some of the repairs made in the past few days. With the temperatures dropping into the 30s overnight, people in dark, unheated homes were urged to go to overnight shelters or daytime warming centers. Because so many voters have been displaced by the storm, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued an executive order allowing people to vote in Tuesday’s statewide and presidential elections at any polling place in the state. New Jersey had already taken similar measures. “Just because you are displaced doesn’t mean you are disenfranchised,” Cuomo said. “Compared to what we have had to deal with in the past week, this will be a walk in the park when it comes to voting.” As for long-term housing for the homeless, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said Monday that the government is looking into using everything from hotels and motels to FEMA trailers and prefab homes. “Given the extent of need, no option is off the table,” she said. “All of them will have some place in this puzzle.” Napolitano said the government’s first priority is getting people to a warm place where they can eat a hot meal. Beyond that, the government wants to find housing as close to people’s homes as possible. “Whether we’ll be able to accomplish that, I couldn’t say,” she said. “We’re just now getting a handle on housing.” Officials have yet to even establish the magnitude of the problem. In New York City, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Monday that officials are going door-to-door in hard-hit areas to assess the need for shelter. He said the worst-case estimate is 40,000 people, half of them in public housing. But he said as many as 20,000 will probably get their heat and power back within a few days. Ultimately, the number of people who need housing could be under 10,000, he said. In New Jersey, state officials said they are still trying to figure out how many people will need long-term housing. At least 4,000 residents were in New Jersey shelters. “Real Estate Corner”

“GET IT ON TAPE”

By Connie Denio of Roswell 622-7191 or 626-7948 Space is an imporIf you want to make tant dwelling consid- sure your grand eration, so get it right piano or antique bedbefore you buy. room set will fit in Like beauty, square your new abode, put footage can be in the it on tape before you eye of the beholder. inch your way to a Are the garage and signature. deck considered part Your realtor can of the overall square help you measure the footage? How about rooms and the overall the unfinished base- outside dimensions. ment? Call Me Today! ©

Campaign

Roswell Daily Record

Continued from Page A1

ers were more than ready to have their say. “I watch the news all the time, and I am ready for it to be over,” said Jennifer Walker, 38, of Columbus, Ohio, who said she took time off from work to attend the president’s speech during the day in a show of support. “I feel like he is getting better with the economy. I don’t think it’s hopeless. It takes time.” But Bryan Dobes, 21, a University of Iowa student from suburban Chicago, voted for Romney on Monday and said unemployment and spending have been too high under Obama. “He promised a lot of hope and change, and I’m not seeing it,” he said of the president. “No retreat, no surrender,” sang rock icon Bruce Springsteen, warming up Obama’s crowd on a frosty morning outside the State Capitol in Madison, Wis. The Boss then boarded Air Force One for his first flight. “Pretty cool,” he judged it. Romney had Kid Rock and the Marshall Tucker Band in the wings for his late appearances in Ohio and New Hampshire. “This is it,” the challenger said in a last-minute emailed request for campaign donations. “I will lead us out of this economic crisis by implementing pro-growth policies that will create 12 million new jobs. With your help, I will deliver real change and a real recovery. America will be strong again.” In his longest campaign day, Romney raced from Florida to a pair of speeches in Virginia to Ohio and then an election eve rally in New Hampshire. Obama selected Wisconsin, Ohio and Iowa for his final campaign day, an itinerary that reflected his campaign’s decision to try and erect a Midwestern firewall against Romney’s challenge.

Voting

Continued from Page A1

In Bernalillo County, home to one-third of the state’s electorate, about 182,200 people had cast ballots with early and absentee voting. That represented slightly more than two-fifths of the registered voters in the county. Early voting ended Saturday, but absentee ballots can be returned to election officials up until polls close at 7 p.m. Tuesday. According to the Bernalillo County clerk’s office, 149,277 early votes were cast — up nearly 18 percent from the presidential election four years ago. Democrats accounted for 74,889 of early ballots, 50,722 were from Republicans, and 23,616 were by third-party voters and independents. The clerk’s office said 32,958 absentee ballots had been returned out of 41,123 issued to voters. In 2008, nearly 77,000 absentee ballots were cast by Bernalillo County residents. Statewide, about 519,000 New Mexicans voted before polls opened in 2008, accounting for about three out of every five votes cast in the election. As of Monday, the secretary of state’s office reported about 371,000 people had voted early — up from 347,159 in 2008. There were almost 81,600 absentee ballots cast statewide. Although more absentee ballots could be returned on Election Day, it appeared likely that absentee voting will fall far short of the 172,136 ballots cast four years ago. Bernalillo County Clerk Maggie Toulouse Oliver said it appeared more voters have switched from mail-in absentee balloting and instead took advantage of the convenience of numerous early voting locations. Voting patterns also may have changed because New Mexico wasn’t a battleground state in the presidential election as it was in the past, when campaigns often operated extensive get-out-the-vote efforts with absentee ballots. In San Juan County, usually a GOP stronghold in elections, early voting was up and absentee voting was down from four years ago. San Juan County Clerk Debbie Holmes said there were 22,230 early voters, compared with 18,469 in 2008. Of the 3,591 absentee ballots issued to voters, 3,139 had been returned. In 2008, about 5,800 absentee ballots were cast.

CITY COUNCIL WORKSHOP RESCHEDULED

The City Council’s “What is My Job as a City Councilor” workshop has been rescheduled due to a scheduling conflict involving instructor Randy Van Vleck of the New Mexico Municipal League. The workshop will take place Nov. 15 at 5:30 p.m. in City Hall, 425 N. Richardson Ave.

CORRECTION

The Public Records for Thursday, Nov. 1, listed an incorrect address for Pamela G. Prince. According to Municipal Court, Prince should have been listed as homeless. The Record regrets the error. Roswell Daily Record

USPS No 471-200

News & Business Telephone 622-7710 Circulation Telephone 622-7730

Charles Fischer Publisher

cfischer@roswell-record.com

Andrew Poertner Editor

editor@roswell-record.com

R. Cory Beck Publisher (1987-2006)

Jim Dishman .....................................................Circulation Director jdishman@roswell-record.com

Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice The entire contents of the Roswell Daily Record, including its flag on Page 1, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the Daily Record.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES by carrier delivery in Roswell: $10 per month, payable in advance. Prices may vary in some areas. As a convenience to subscribers, advance payments for home delivery for periods of 3 months to 12 months may be made directly to the Roswell Daily Record. No responsibility for advance payments over 30 days assumed by the company unless paid directly to the Roswell Daily Record. All home carrier subscriptions will continue being delivered past expiration date causing an arrears owed unless the circulation department is contacted and told to stop service prior to expiration. MAIL SUBSCRIPTION RATES: ALL NEW MEXICO 882 ZIP CODES, $12 ONE MONTH, $36 THREE MONTHS, $72 SIX MONTHS, $144 ONE YEAR. All other New Mexico zip codes, $13 one month, $39 three months, $78 six months, $156 one year. All other states in USA, $18 one month, $54 three months, $108 six months, $216 one year. Periodical-postage paid at Roswell, N.M. Postmaster: Please mail change of address to Roswell Daily Record, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202-1897. All postal subscriptions will stop at expiration unless payment is made prior to expiration.


Roswell Daily Record

OBITUARIES

Shirley Ann Cain

A viewing is scheduled for Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012, from 4-6 p.m., at Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home for Shirley Ann Cain, 61, of Roswell, who passed away on Saturday, Nov. 3, 2012, after fighting a long hard battle with cancer. Shirley was born on July 28, 1951, to John and Jewel Ferguson in Carrizozo. She was preceded in death by her parents and three siblings; sister Evelyn Garvey and brothers Johnnie Bragg and George

GENERAL/OBITUARIES/RECORDS Bragg. Shirley is survived by her husband of 23 years, Roger Cain, and her six children; Shanna Rodibaugh and her husband Keith of Pampa, Texas, Danna Schumacher and her husband Mike of Boca Raton, Fla., Jody Scates and her husband Mark of Roswell, Matthew Stone and his wife Debbie of Roswell, Christine Cain of Roswell and Edwin Cain of Roswell. She is survived by two stepdaughters, Charlene Cain of Capitan and Candy Jorgenson of California. She is also survived by 11 grandchildren; Nika Luna, Heidi Rodibaugh, Nathan Rodibaugh, Jonathon Schumacher, Kathryn Schumacher, Emily Schumacher, Teddy Langford, Brittney Scates, Sean Scates, Mary L ynn Stone and Jeremy Cain. Shirley is survived by seven brothers and sisters, Sharon Kay, Jack, Mary, Sarah, Earl, Jim, and Joe. She is also survived by many nieces and nephews. Shirley graduated from Roswell High School in

1969 and joined the Army where she served her country. Upon leaving the Army, she started her family. She always loved and provided for her children to the best of her ability. Shirley enjoyed playing games, collecting music boxes, reading, and spending time with her family and friends. The family would like to say a special thanks to Dr. Badine and staff at Kymera Cancer Center for all their hard work and dedication. Thank you to Dr. A. Feroze for all that she had done for our mom. Also thank you to Anita and staff at VistaCare Hospice for all the care and hard work that you have done for her. The family asks that in lieu of flowers that donations be made to the American Cancer Society. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories in the online register book at andersonbethany.com. Arrangements are under the direction of AndersonBethany Funeral Home and

Crematory.

Isabel S. Garcia

Born March 22, 1928, in San Patricio. She passed away on Oct. 16, 2012, in Tucson, Ariz. Funeral services were held on Monday, Oct. 22, 2012, at 2 p.m. at the Adair Funeral Home, Dodge Chapel in Tucson, Ariz. Living are her beloved family; husband Joe Garcia, daughter Irene and husband; son Michael and wife; daughter Nancy. She

Voters dedicated, despite 1 in millions odds

ilege to participate in it,” said Lanning, the psychology professor.

For many, it’s a family tradition.

Kelvin Lovely’s grandmother always encouraged him to vote, and he took it to heart. The 42-year -old Pensacola, Fla., resident cast his first ballot at 18 and became a regular. “I always want to vote, and I think my vote will have an impact,” Lovely said.

Veronica Padilla of Las Vegas is already stressing the importance to her 13year -old son, five years before he can vote.

AP Photo

This Oct. 31 file photo shows voters arriving and departing during early voting at a polling place at the Wicomico County Youth and Civic Center in Salisbury, Md.

WASHINGTON (AP) — There’s always grousing about the many people who don’t bother to vote. But look at it the other way: An estimated 133 million Americans will cast ballots in Tuesday’s election. Some will persevere despite long lines, pressing personal burdens or the devastation left by Superstorm Sandy. Why do they do it? It’s not because any one voter has much chance of deciding the super -tight contest between President Barack Obama and challenger Mitt Romney. A one-vote win is rare even in local or state races, which attract smaller turnout. The largest numbers of voters — about 6 in 10 eligible adults — come out for presidential years. Yet the presidency’s never turned on just one vote, not even in the 2000 recount that flummoxed Florida. It’s so improbable that some economists and psychologists debate whether voting is a rational act. “There is no question that from a simplistic rational view it doesn’t make sense to vote,” said Kevin Lanning, a political psychologist at Florida

Atlantic University. “Even in Florida I’m more likely to be killed in an auto accident going to the polls than I am to cast the deciding vote in the presidential election.” Still, Lanning is a voter. “I think of it as an awesome responsibility,” he said. Andrew Gelman, a professor of statistics and political science at Columbia University, was coauthor of a study before the 2008 presidential election that found that, on average, a voter had a 1 in 60 million chance of deciding that race. The Electoral College means the odds vary by state. This year’s chances range from roughly 1 in a million (for a voter in the battleground state of Ohio) to essentially zero (in states such as vastly Republican Wyoming or deeply Democratic Vermont). Gelman’s numbers might seem to validate the inertia of the 4 in 10 eligible adults who don’t bother to vote even in presidential years. Yet, Gelman is a voter. “Part of our role as citizens is to vote,” he said. And he says presidential

voting can be a rational investment of time. That’s partly because the outcome affects so many people. It’s like entering a lottery that you almost certainly won’t win, but if you do win, all 315 million Americans share your jackpot — the president you believe will do more for the country. And then there’s the obvious: A democracy relies on its voters, working as a group, to make a decision. If the numbers drop too low, the legitimacy of the system is at risk. Consider midter m congressional elections, when tur nout runs only about 40 percent, or local elections that sometimes dip shockingly low. How seriously Americans take their presidential votes was illustrated this year by the ef fort and time that many devoted to obtaining the photo identification required under new laws in some states. “Every four years we are divided, Republicans and Democrats, by real differences — in what we feel gover nment should be doing and so forth — but we are united in this responsibility to keep America going and the priv-

“I tell him not to just vote for the most popular,” she said. “You have to stand for what you believe.” Tim Farmer, a University of Denver law student, attended a Romney rally one day and an Obama event the next because he feels a responsibility to make the right choice.

“Enough wrong votes,” Farmer said, “and you get the wrong guy elected.”

Adam Brandstetter knows he won’t affect the election’s outcome. His vote is going to long-shot Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson. “It won’t ever matter,” said Brandstetter.

But he enjoys the sense of community on voting days in Crystal Lake, Ill., a far suburb of Chicago. Brandstetter will leave the home office where he works as an investment manager and head for the polling place at the Lutheran church, staffed by some of his older neighbors. “I’ll take a walk over,” he said, “have lunch, see all my senior friends: ‘Haven’t seen you in a while. What have you been up to?”’

It feels good to vote, Brandstetter said, and to make time to appreciate that “we’re in America. We have the freedom to express our views.”

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

had a lot of love for her grandchildren. Isabel’s wishes were to be cremated. Her family who precede her in death are parents Simon and Manuelita Sais, Joaquien Sais, Fred Sais and Ruth Turrieta. Those who are living are Gloria Sais, former wife of Fred Sais “the Frog” and family of Albuquerque; Jose Sais and family; Orlando and Ida Sais and family of Corrales; Albert Sais and family of Roswell; Bea Marquez and family; Priscilla and Joe Gamboa and family and Mary Sais of California and the Turrieta family. Grieve not ... nor speak of me with tears ... but laugh and talk of me as though I were beside you. I loved you all ... “She extends her hand to the poor, yes, she reaches out her hands to the needy. ... She shall rejoice in time to come. She opens her mouth with wisdom, and on her tongue is the law of kindness. She watches over the ways of her household ... Her children rise up and

PUBLIC RECORDS

A3

call her blessed; her husband also, and he praises her. Many daughters have done well, but you excel them all.” Proverbs 31:20-29 Memorial Services will be held Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012, at 5:30 p.m. at St. John’s Catholic Church.

Bill Wiggins

A memorial tribute will be held at a later date for Bill Wiggins, 95, who passed away on Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, in Roswell. Further announcements will be made once arrangements have been finalized. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at ballardfuneralhome.com.

Bruce Barreras

Services are pending for Bruce Barreras, 52, of Roswell, at AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory. He passed away Friday, Nov. 2, 2012.

Municipal Court Oct. 31 Judge Larry Loy Arraignments Possession of marijuana — Amador Peralta, 109 S. Delaware Ave.; fined $229; $229 suspended in lieu of 4 days community service. Drinking in public — Manuel Torrez, 113 W. Chisum; fined $54 one day credit for time served. Disorderly house — Larry Purcell, 901 Davidson; fined $229 and 3 days jail. Possession of marijuana — Richard Proctor, 205 E. Hammond; fined $229 or 4 days jail until paid concurrent with current jail time. Failure to appear on an order to show cause — Federico Perez, 317 Broken Arrow; fined $229. Failure to pay fines — Federico Perez, 317 Broken Arrow; fined $158. Failure to appear on an order to show cause — Federico Perez, 317 Broken Arrow; fined $60. Failure to pay fines — Federico Perez, 317 Broken Arrow; fined $158.

Accidents Nov. 1 9:30 p.m. — 1705 S. Main; drivers — vehicle owned by Hector or Adela Burgarin, of Roswell, and unknown driver. Nov. 2 9:41 a.m. — Virginia Avenue and McGaffey Street; drivers — Ignacio Navarrette, 42, and Walter Pittman, 78, both of Roswell. 5:24 p.m. — Eighth and Golondria; drivers — Heather Garner, 31, and vehicle owned by David Fox, both of Roswell. 11:58 p.m. — Atkinson and Morningside; drivers — William Hatcher, 52, of Roswell. Nov. 3 9:15 a.m. — 23rd and Grand; drivers — Larry Hernandez, 50, and Donald Jolley, 52, both of Roswell. 3:45 p.m. — North Main and East College; drivers — Devene Haynes, 43, of Dexter, and Jerry D. Lewis, 63, of Roswell. 5:09 p.m. — Pear and Garden; drivers — vehicle owned by Kayla Nunez, of Roswell, and unknown driver. 5:23 p.m. — 1705 S. Main St. Kmart; drivers — vehicle owned by Luis Meraz, of Roswell, and unknown driver. 7:14 p.m. — Hobbs and Washington; drivers — Delma Sanchez, 39, of Roswell, and Mark Ramirez, 24, of Dexter. Nov. 4 1 a.m. — Lusk and Union; drivers — Maribel Ochoa, 27, of Roswell. 1:01 a.m. — 104 N. Michigan Ave.; drivers unknown. 1:16 p.m. — West McGaffey (700 block) and South Washington (1300 block); drivers — Eugene Garcia, 48, and Guadalupe Sanchez, 60, both of Roswell. 3:46 p.m. — Main and Tilden; drivers — Daniel R. Andazola, 25, and Raymond Gonzales III, 25, both of Roswell. 6:22 p.m. — 1705 N. Main St. (commercial parking lot); drivers — Jessica Cereceres, 21, of Roswell.

900 West Hobbs St. Movie Show Times: 575-208-2810 Adult

www.iconcinemas.com TICKET PRICES:

$8.50 • Child & Senior: $6.50 Matinees (before 6:00 pm): $6.50 3D Movie Surcharge $2.00 • D-Box Surcharge: $8.00 (after 6:00 pm):

FEATURING ALL YOU CAN EAT POPCORN & ALL YOU CAN DRINK SODA!!! (FREE REFILLS)

CHASING MAVERICKS (PG)

CLOUD ATLAS (R)

(12:30 2:50 5:00) 7:25 9:45

FUN SIZE (PG13)

HERE COMES THE BOOM (PG) (12:50 3:10 5:40) 8:00

SILENT HILL REVELATION (R)

SINISTER (R)

TAKEN 2 (PG13)

WRECK IT RALPH 2D (PG)

WRECK IT RALPH 2D (PG)

WRECK IT RALPH 3D (PG)

1:35

(12:30 3:55) 7:20

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 2D (PG) PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4 (R) (2:00 4:05 6:30) 8:35 (2:05 4:20 6:20) 8:45 ( 12:40 3:00 5:20) 7:45

(12:10 2:20 4:45) 7:10 9:30 (1:10)

(4:20 6:50) 9:15 (12:20)

(2:45 5:10) 7:30 [$2 surcharge]

WRECK IT RALPH 3D (PG) WRECK IT RALPH DBOX (PG) (3:30 5:50) 8:05

(1:10 3:30 5:50) 8:05

SENIOR’S TUESDAY $3.50

[$2 surcharge]

[$8 surcharge]

Any movie all day every Tuesday. Please come in and enjoy our hospitality!


A4 Tuesday, November 6, 2012

OPINION

Park would recognize our nuclear beginnings

In October, the president announced that the home of labor leader Cesar Chavez would be a national monument. A month before, the House defeated Sen. Jeff Bingaman’s measure to create the Manhattan Project National Historical Park. The political gods smiled on Chavez’s California farmhouse and 187 surrounding acres because both parties need to show some love to the nation’s Hispanic people, and creating a monument is a lot easier than passing immigration reform. The A-bomb park, as it was dubbed in headlines, didn’t enjoy that kind of momentum. Co-sponsor Rep. Doc Hastings, R-Washington, promised to try again before year end. I hope he and Sen. Tom Udall take the baton after Bingaman bows out. Although the bill mustered 237 votes in favor to 180 against, it needed a bigger majority. Some members of Congress

EDITORIAL

SHERRY ROBINSON

ALL SHE WROTE

objected to cost, and some apparently agreed with Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich, D-Ohio, who saw the park as a celebration of “ingenuity that was used to put all humanity at risk.” The park doesn’t have to be a money pit. Los Alamos National Laboratory and the community of Los Alamos are well aware of their place in history, and they’ve taken steps to preserve some key resources. The National Park Service wouldn’t have to start from scratch. And a 2009 NPS study concluded it was possible to manage Los Alamos’ landmarks as a

park. Another option is designating the sites as a national heritage area, managed by public-private partnerships, or as national historic sites affiliated with the national parks system. Some structures are already part of a National Historic Landmark District. The park could be done with a modest visitor’s center (the town’s Bradbury Science Museum already offers exhibits) along with self-guided walks. As for Kucinich’s argument, the bomb’s dreadful destructive power and its continued threat are certainly deserving of recognition, so that we remember, reflect and understand. There is ample precedent. The Bosque Redondo Memorial at Fort Sumner State Monument is a handsome, thoughtful, culturally sensitive recognition of a miserable episode in New Mexico history — the forced march and

Roswell Daily Record

containment of some 10,000 Navajos and about 400 Mescalero Apaches at a place on the Pecos River known as the Bosque Redondo. The memorial doesn’t celebrate the army’s failed social experiment. It does honor the memory of the many who died there and teaches about that time in history. Staffers at the monument tell me that Navajos at first didn’t visit. In time, Navajo students would stop on their way to Eastern New Mexico University, and later they brought their elders. In the same vein, the preserved remnants of our frontier forts aren’t a celebration of war, but an honoring of the past. It might surprise critics to know there is interest in these places. In another part of New Mexico, Trinity Site, which launched the nuclear age, draws hundreds of visitors on the two days a year it opens to the public. And 10,000 people a year visit the B Reactor in

Hanford, Wash., which produced plutonium for the first bomb. Visitors come from all 50 states and 39 countries. Parks and monuments don’t have to be quaint or beautiful. They do have to preserve the relics of significant events and people. “The development of the atomic bomb through the Manhattan Project was one of the most transformative events in our nation’s history; it ushered in the atomic age, changed the role of the United States in the world community, and set the stage for the Cold War,” said Herbert Frost, associate director of the Natural Resources Stewardship and Science, during testimony in June. Bingaman said, “While its legacy is complicated, it changed the course of history and is of national and international significance, and for those reasons I believe it is important for future generations to learn from it.” © New Mexico News Services 2012

Political mud obscures the truth

Truth took a holiday this election season as the candidates plumped themselves up and tried to stick a needle in their opponents. Nothing new there, of course. But the hedging, exaggerating, prevaricating and outright lying does seem more pronounced — perhaps because, courtesy of the U.S. Supreme Court, so much more money is available outside the campaigns to put up sleazy advertising. The resulting noise, driven by the political consultants, turns off voters even if they turn off the television — which they should. Take this ad from Mitt Romney, the Republican presidential candidate. The ad claims: “Obama took GM and Chrysler into bankruptcy and sold Chrysler to Italians who are going to build Jeeps in China. Mitt Romney will fight for every American job.” As Glenn Kessler, the fact-checker at The Washington Post, pointed out, it’s usually a sign of a sketchy ad when it’s not announced beforehand. The ad, combined with Romney’s misstatements on the campaign trail, earned him Kessler’s highest dishonor: four Pinocchios. It’s because Chrysler is not “thinking of moving all production to China.” Fiat, which owns a controlling stake in the company, is planning to start building Jeeps in China again. But Chrysler is adding production there and not shifting production from North America. In an unusual move, Chrysler denied the charge in a statement. “Jeep has no intention of shifting production of its Jeep models out of North America to China. It’s simply reviewing the opportunities to return Jeep output to China for the world’s largest auto market,” the statement said. But President Barack Obama’s ads haven’t been much better. One of his ads earned three long noses from Kessler last month. The president’s campaign used a cropped video clip from an older ad to claim that Romney backed a law that outlawed abortion in all instances, even after a rape or incest. Despite Romney’s flip-flops on this issue — and many others — the Republican has said over and over during the 2012 campaign that abortions should be legal in cases of rape, incest and when the mother’s life is in danger. The Romney ad is running in parts of northwestern Ohio — auto country — and he’s obviously targeting some of the few folks in that crucial state who either are still undecided or haven’t voted yet. “I see this more as turnout game than a persuasion ad,” Patrick Haney, a political science professor at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, told The Washington Post. “I take it as an indication that they believe they’re behind ... So they might as well be a little riskier and on the edge.” The Obama ad was a counter to Romney’s earlier gains among female voters. But knowing that there is a strategy behind the ads doesn’t make the ads any easier to take. Which is why we have to sympathize with little Abigael Evans, a Colorado 4-year-old, who started crying after listening to National Public Radio coverage of the campaign in the car on the way home from day care. Her tearful complaint: “I’m tired of Bronco Bamma and Mitt Romney.” Us, too, Abigael. Us, too. Guest Editorial The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel DEAR DOCTOR K: I think I may have a drug problem. But how can I tell if I’m truly addicted? DEAR READER: The world is not divided neatly into those who are “addicts” and those who are not. More and more, doctors are viewing substance use as a spectrum. Imagine that spectrum as a straight, horizontal line. At the left end are people who have do not use potentially addicting substances. Just in from the left end is a group that uses a potentially addicting substance regularly but only in small amounts — and never feels pressure to use that substance. At the extreme right end are people who need to use a

Predictions you can bank on MARK SHIELDS CREATORS SYNDICATE

Because fish have to swim and birds have to fly, those of us lucky enough to spend our time on politics somehow feel we have to predict the winners of national elections. This is the 12th presidential campaign that I have either worked in or covered. What follows is how I try to forecast the winner when a U.S. president is running for re-election. First, I want to know as Election Day approaches how voters feel about conditions in the country. My favorite question is, “Do you think things

Doonesbury

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

potentially addicting substance every day, and do. They do whatever it takes to get that substance. They are addicted to it, and they: — need ever -increasing amounts of the drug in order to get high. — experience unpleasant physical and emotional symptoms when the drug is leaving the body.

are generally headed in the right direction, or do you feel things are off on the wrong track?” Our survey finds that 40 percent of voters say things are headed “in the right direction,” while 48 percent answer things are “off on the wrong track.” Not exactly whistling a happy tune, but not in pessimism’s dark night, either. Second question we need answered: “Do you approve or disapprove of the job (name of the incumbent) is doing as president?” Here, our voters are evenly divided, with 49 percent approving the job the president is doing and 48 percent disapproving.

— use more of a drug or use it for a longer period of time than intended. — are unable to stop using the drug, having repeated, failed attempts to stop or cut down. — spend a lot of time obtaining, thinking about or using the drug. Just in from the right end are those with substance abuse. This is milder than addiction; it describes those who have experienced significant impairment or distress because of their need to use a potentially addicting substance. One or more of the following is also true: — They are failing to fulfill major obligations at home, school or work.

Then, “How would you feel if (incumbent president) were reelected in November — optimistic and confident he would do a good job, satisfied and hopeful that he would do a good job, uncertain and wondering whether he would do a good job or pessimistic and worried that he would do a bad job?” Fifty-one percent of the voters interviewed would feel positive (optimistic and confident or satisfied and hopeful) if the president were to win a second term, while 48 percent would feel negative (uncertain and wondering or pessimistic and worried). Again, almost an

— They have repeatedly used substances when doing so may be physically dangerous. — They have recurrent legal problems as a result of substance use. — They just can’t stop using the substance despite the problems it is causing them. Colleagues of mine at Harvard Medical School think there is yet another group: the “almost addicted.” On the spectrum, this group lies right in the middle. They’re to the right of those who regularly use addicting substances without a problem. And they’re to the left of those with See DR. K, Page A5

equally divided electorate. So, given these numbers, who will win? We already know, because these were the answers given to the Wall Street Journal-NBC News poll in late October of 2004, just before President George W. Bush captured 50.7 percent of the national vote and 286 electoral votes (270 needed to win), with Ohio’s electoral votes providing the margin of victory over Sen. John F. Kerry. The two highly regarded professionals, Democratic pollster Peter D. Hart and Republican

25 YEARS AGO

See SHIELDS, Page A5

Nov. 6, 1987 • Nine prominent alumni of New Mexico Military Institute will be inducted — three posthumously — into the NMMI Hall of Fame during a Homecoming luncheon in Bates Hall on the NMMI campus. Those who will receive the honor, presented by the NMMI Alumni Association, are: Hubert L. Brown, class of 1947; Albert R. Brownfield, class of 1935; Samuel M.C. Goodwin, class of 1937; Thomas J. Quarelli, class of 1955; Dr. Clyde C. Snow, class of 1947; the late Tracy R. Stains, class of 1909; Robert H. Wertheim, class of 1942; the late Brig. Gen. John P. Willey, commandant of cadets at NMMI from 1955 until 1965; and the late Maj. Gen. Coryton M. Woodbury, a World War II hero who remained active in the National Guard for many years and served as city manager of Roswell.


LOCAL

A5

Local author to speak at library on Saturday Roswell Daily Record

LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

Barbara Corn Patterson is a local author with a background in farming, ranching, nursing and world travel. Her newest book, “The Woman On the Table and Other Stories,� features nursing stories that share the important things in medicine and in life, ranging from the violent to the ecstatic to the funny. She will be visiting the Roswell Public Library on Saturday at 2 p.m. to share the stories from her book. Patterson’s writing breathes life into authentic places, plausible situations and provocative characters. Her memoir, “Rock House Ranch� about growing up on a ranch in New Mexico, was published in 2002. Her fiction has appeared in literary magazines and was a runner-up in a Writer’s Digest contest. The public is invited to this free program. Hardback and paperback editions of “The Woman On the Table� will be available for purchase. Sunday is Veterans Day, a time to honor and thank all who serve and have served in the United States Armed Forces. When our military personnel deploy, it affects family, friends, cities and economics. Elmer Davis (1890-1958) was the director of the U.S. Office of War Information during World War II. He reminds us that “This nation will remain the land of the free only so long as it is the home of the brave.�

Book Talk

Rosie Klopfer, Interlibrary Loan and Periodical librarian, shares library books related the crucial role of military families. Siobhan Fallon’s “You Know When the Men are Gone� is a collection of interconnected fictional stories, based on true stories with different characters that take place on all our military bases, relates the experiences of military wives, where the women are linked by absence and a

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

substance abuse. For the almost addicted, substance use: — falls outside normal behavior, but is short of meeting the criteria for addiction or abuse. — causes problems for the person using drugs or for loved ones or other bystanders. — has the potential to progress to a diagnosis of drug abuse or drug dependence ... but even if it doesn’t, it can still cause substantial problems. At my website (AskDoctorK.com), I

pervading fear that they’ll become war widows. Fallon captures the mixed emotions and fears with a gritty realism that is not seen on the news or the movie screens. The wives share a poignant vigil during which they raise children while waiting for their husbands to return. In the title story, a war bride from Serbia finds she can’t cope with the loneliness and her outsider status. The wife in “Inside the Break� realizes that she can’t confront her husband’s probable infidelity with a female soldier in Iraq. In “Remission,� a cancer patient waiting on the results of a crucial test is devastated by the behavior of her teenage daughter. While the trials of adolescence are universal, this story expresses the unique tensions between military parents and children. One of the strongest stories, “You Survived the War, Now Survive the Homecoming,� attests to the chasm separating men who can’t speak about the atrocities they’ve experienced and their wives, who’ve lived with their own terrible burdens. Fallon writes with both grit and grace: her depiction of military life is enlivened by telling details, from the early morning sound of boots stomping down the stairs to the large sign that tallies automobile fatalities of troops returned from Iraq. This book is significant both as war stories and as love stories and is available for checkout in regular print, large print and on CD. Kristin Henderson is the wife of a Navy chaplain. Her non-fiction book “While They’re at War: the True Story of American Families on the Homefront� profiles military families, focusing on two wives coping with life at Fort Bragg. Beth Pratt and Marissa Bootes face

have a list of 20 questions to help you determine if you or a loved one might be almost addicted. It comes from a new book, “Almost Addicted: Is My (or My Loved One’s) Drug Use a Problem?� by Harvard Medical School’s Dr. J. Wesley Boyd and Eric Metcalf, MPH. If you think you may have a problem, try to begin the journey away from drug use. One place to start is with your doctor. He or she can help you find the resources you need to help you quit. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)

VOTE 3&16#*-$"/ REPUBLICAN 705&

#SJOHJOH #BDL .PSBMT &UIJDT *OUFHSJUZ BOE )POFTUZ t t t t t t t t t

.JUU 3PNOFZ )FBUIFS 8JMTPO 4UFWF 1FBSDF 8JMMJBN #VSU $MJČ 1JSUMF $BOEZ 4QFODF &[[FMM 3PCFSU $PSO 1BVM ,FOOFEZ .JMFT )BOJTFF

1SFTJEFOU 64 4FOBUF 64 $POHSFTT /. 4FOBUF %JTU  /. 4FOBUF %JTU /. )PVTF PG 3FQ %JTU  $PVOUZ $PNNJTTJPO %JTU  /. 4VQSFNF $PVSU /. $PVSU PG "QQFBMT

7PUF 3FQVCMJDBO GPS B CFUUFS /FX .FYJDP BOE B CFUUFS "NFSJDB Paid for by the Republican Party of Chaves County, Ryan Breedyk Treasurer

the challenges of their husbands’ first deployment as junior enlisted men. They are full of anxieties while struggling to maintain emotional and financial stability. Marissa became a leader in one of the Army’s Family Readiness Groups, heading up phone trees and organizing girls’ nights out while also managing a job and motherhood. Henderson details the support groups developed to bolster themselves against depression, substance abuse, infidelity, the pressures of single parenthood, suicidal impulses and husbands who return with emotional problems. This powerful, revealing and sometimes painful book offers a look behind the scenes of military families most often seen during tearful good-byes, joyful homecomings and “the occasional yellow-ribbon moment.� At a time when divorce and suicide rates are at record levels in the military, “The Military Marriage Manual: Tactics for Successful Relationships� is an invaluable aid to members of the military, their spouses and families. The book presents advice for couples on a range of issues, including relationships with friends and family, household responsibilities, finances, dealing with tension and conflict, raising a family, domestic violence, deployment and long periods apart, injuries, depression, relocating and much more. This is a comprehensive resource for those who are dealing with the pressures and problems unique to marriage in the military.

Shields

Continued from Page A4

pollster Bill McInturff, who conduct the Wall Street Journal-NBC News poll asked those same questions this October. Here are the big surprises: In 2004, 40 percent of the voters saw things “generally headed in the right direction,� while in October 2012, 41 percent saw the U.S. headed in “right direction.� Then, 49 percent approved of the job the president was doing, while 48 percent disapproved. And at the same point in 2012? You guessed it: 49 percent approved of the job the president was doing, and 48 percent did not. Fifty percent felt positive — either optimistic and confident or satisfied and hopeful — about a President Obama victory. There you have it. My best guess is that the 2012 election results will end up looking an awful lot like the nail-biter presidential contest of 2004, when if John Kerry had just won Ohio and its electoral votes, he would have won the White House. Credit for President Bush’s 2004 Ohio victory has been given to his campaign’s and the Republicans’ superb organiza-

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

What’s Happening?

Hug a Bear and In the Kitchen are the themes for this week’s story and craft hours. The Wednesday storytimes begin at 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. The Saturday program begins at 2 p.m. The programs are free and children who attend the story portion of the programs are invited to become creative through the related craft session. All materials are provided for the craft sessions. The stories may vary between programs and the quantity of some craft items may be limited. Wednesday is Hug a Bear Day with huggable stories that might embrace “The Bear Hug,� “Where’s My Teddy,� “Where Is Alice’s Bear,� “The Teddy Bear’s Picnic,� or “Big Bear Hug.� Precut materials for bear crafts will be available for crafts such as assembling a teddy bear action figure, decorating a teddy bear bookmark or making a teddy bear mask to wear home. Yummy food stories and activities will be enjoyed during Saturday’s In the Kitchen program. Kids will relish stories such as “The Gingerbread Boy,� “The Doorbell Rang,� “Cookie Count,� “My Kitchen,� “Pots and Pans� or “Dancing in the Kitchen.� For crafts, participants might fold a box that looks like a piece of pie, make a cupcake headband hat or decorate a ring with various yummy foods that they “cooked� in the kitchen.

tional operation in identifying the Bush supporters and then making sure they voted. This year, most observers give the organizational edge to President Obama’s side. How many times have we read or heard about the “vaunted Obama ground game?� “Vaunted� — which comes from the Latin vantare, to boast — is one of those words that conveys skepticism or even disbelief, as in, the “home team’s vaunted defense was shredded.� I am not about to bet the rent money on the 2012 election. But I will make one iron-clad prediction. The losing party, regardless of whether it’s the Dems or the GOP, will blame its defeat squarely and entirely on its losing nominee. Mitt Romney would be pilloried for having lacked the common touch and for being inconsistent and contradictory in his beliefs. Barack Obama would forever be blamed for a visionless campaign and for his abysmal performance in the first debate, when he allowed Romney to recast himself from immigrant-hunting, saber-rattling, cut-taxes-on-the-wealthiest Mitt into reasonable-Massachusettsmoderate Mitt. You can take that to the bank. COPYRIGHT 2012 MARK SHIELDS


A6 Tuesday, November 6, 2012

BUSINESS REVIEW

Roswell Daily Record

What happens when you let Farmers insure everything that’s important to you?

The Gina Dwyer Farmers Insurance Agency is located at 101 West 6th Street (across from Peppers Restaurant.) They provide one on one service to their clients, making sure they have appropriate coverage. They also offer auto insurance for your trips into Mexico. They can be reached by phone at 622-3993.

You get it all: Peace of mind and possibly substantial savings. There are many reasons

why people choose Farmers for their Auto, Homeowners and Life insurance. After all, as one of the largest insurance organizations in the United States, with nearly 80 years of experience, Farmers has the resources to help insure your property, vehicles and life with: • More choices to help you get the exact coverage you need • Fast, fair and friendly property and vehicle claim representatives who can be reached 24 hours a day, 7 days a week • “One-stop shopping” for your insurance needs Now, here’s the best reason to choose Farmers for your Auto, Home and Life insurance...

Gina Dwyer (left) consults with client Hope Ramirez about her auto coverage at the Dwyer Farmers Insurance Agency. Hope encourages others to go by and talk to Gina or Micaela for a quote on their home and auto insurance with the possibility of saving a lot of money. Please call 622-3993 for more information.

Enjoy savings potentially worth hundreds of dollars with the Farmers multiple-lines discount advantage

We call it our multiplelines discount. You’ll call it the best thing to happen to your insurance premiums in a long, long time.

Depending on the state where you live, you could save 12 percent or more on your Auto premiums - and 13 percent or more on your Homeowners premiums just for allowing Farmers to insure your family as well as your home and vehicles. It’s not only convenient “one-stop shopping” for your insurance needs... it’s a smart way to get the coverage you

Real people. Real service. Real savings. Real close!

Gina Dwyer, at the Gina Dwyer Farmers Insurance Agency, offers professional insurance guidance with a one on one relationship with all her clients. Gina has 20+ years experience in the insurance industry. Please call 622-3993 for more information.

®

need with substantial savings. It all begins with your personal Farmers agent Your Farmers agent is a well-trained professional who has the resources, experience and knowledge to help you make sure your family’s financial future is secure. Your agent will take the time to listen to your needs and help you choose coverage that’s right for you. If you’d like to have what’s important to you insured by Farmers, call your agent today. You get it all: Peace of mind and possibly substantial savings! The Gina Dwyer Farmers Insurance Agency offers professional insurance guidance with a one on one relationship with all

When you switch to Farmers, you'll get a local, personal agent who knows your area and your neighborhood! Whether you have a simple question, want to adjust your coverage or need help with the claims process, your Farmers agent is your one point of contact who will always be there for you. • No long waits on hold • No complex phone menus • No bouncing you around from one representative or office to another That's why more than 2,600 people switch to Farmers every day: for a better level of service ... and the possibility of saving hundreds of dollars a year! Call Gina Dwyer, your local Farmers agent today at 575-622-3993 for a FREE, no-obligation quote!

their clients. Stop by the office at 101 West 6th Street, (across from Peppers Restaurant) between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday or phone 575622-3993 for more information. Se habla Español.

Micaela “Mica” Navarez invites all her friends and family to come by the Dwyer Farmers Insurance Agency and visit. Let Mica quote your homeowners and auto insurance and see if they can save you any money!

Check out the featured business at www.rdrnews.com - Click on Business Review

Advertise in the Business Review! Call Today! 622-7710

MAKE YOUR CHRISTMAS CARDS W I TH U S Mon - Fri 9:00 am - 5:30 pm Sat 10 am - 6 pm 317 N. Main 622-5252

Encore!

Flowers & Gifts

3107 N. Main St. • 627-6300 encoreflowersandgifts.com

Please Join Us for Our Thanksgiving and Christmas Holiday Open House Sunday, November 11th 1:00PM until 3:00PM

Becky Neeley, Designer/Owner


Roswell Daily Record

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

democratic party chaves county America Needs You Y ou to Vote V ote Democrat! November 6, 2012



Barack Obama



Martin Heinrich

President

US Senate

 Evelyn Madrid Erhard US Congress District 2



Tim T im Jennings

State Senate District 32

 Stephanie DuBois State Senate District 33



Pablo Martinez



Magil Duran

State Reprsentative Disrtict 58 County Commission District 4

Paid for by the Democratic Party of Chaves County - Fred Moran Chairman

A7


A8 Tuesday, November 6, 2012

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Sunny and nice

Clear

Wednesday

Thursday

Mostly sunny

Friday

Partial sunshine

Partly sunny and breezy

Saturday

Windy and not as warm

Sunday

Sunny, windy and cooler

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Monday

Sunny and warmer

High 77°

Low 41°

83°/44°

87°/51°

86°/48°

75°/42°

57°/34°

68°/29°

WNW at 10-20 mph POP: 0%

WNW at 4-8 mph POP: 0%

WSW at 4-8 mph POP: 0%

SSE at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

E at 7-14 mph POP: 0%

S at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

NNW at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

W at 8-16 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 72°/46° Normal high/low ............... 69°/39° Record high ............... 85° in 1945 Record low ................. 20° in 1899 Humidity at noon .................. 21%

Farmington 67/30

Clayton 72/43

Raton 70/32

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Mon. 0.00" Month to date ....................... 0.00" Normal month to date .......... 0.14" Year to date .......................... 6.05" Normal year to date ............ 11.85"

Santa Fe 68/37

Gallup 67/23 Albuquerque 69/43

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Tucumcari 76/43 Clovis 73/42

Moderate Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 69/47

T or C 73/48

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed. Last

Nov 6

Rise Set 6:21 a.m. 5:02 p.m. 6:22 a.m. 5:01 p.m. Rise Set 11:39 p.m. 12:17 p.m. none 12:52 p.m. New

Nov 13

First

Nov 20

Full

Nov 28

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19)  A friend whispers in your ear; listen to what he or she has to say. Others find you to be extraordinarily dynamic. Communication comes to the forefront. You might need to get moving with a key project. Be careful, as you could get mixed messages. Tonight: Have fun wherever you are. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  Keep your home life a priority, and do not let others distract you. Some of you will be involved in real estate, whether it is sprucing up your home or making an investment. Rethink a decision involving a partner. Tonight: Your instincts guide you with a partner. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)  Mercury, your sign’s ruling planet, is about to do a backward jig. As a result, you might sense a difference in your mood and others’ as well. A friend continues to act in the most unexpected manner. Be optimistic about a situation that involves a partner, and put your best foot forward. Tonight: Speak your mind. CANCER (June 21-July 22)  Your more possessive side emerges, despite everything that is going on around you. A boss or someone you look up to could be quite reactive. Be careful with your word choice; many people are oversensitive. You might want to revisit a recent decision involving your daily life. Tonight: Your treat. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  You are full of personality and fun. Others do not know how to take your words and actions. A misunderstanding could happen as a result of their assumptions. Know what you want. Rethink what is going on with a situation that involves a romance and/or a child. Tonight: Let the fun begin. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)  Know when to pull back and simply listen. A partner’s unexpected actions could be problematic. You might feel cranky because of everything you have to deal with. Opportunities occur naturally for you, but you might not be in the mood to jump on them. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)     Emphasize what is important, and follow through accordingly. A meeting provides support as you continue down your chosen path. You might worry too much and wonder what is going on. Also, informa-

YOUR CREDIT

“We want to make you a loan”

(575)624-2929

$200 - $2,000

Alamogordo 75/40

Silver City 74/44

ROSWELL 77/41 Carlsbad 76/44

Hobbs 77/45

Las Cruces 74/44

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2012

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE

tion coming in might not be accurate. Trust your instincts. Tonight: Where friends are. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  Take charge of a situation — don’t act as if you have no choice. You are heading in a new direction despite the comfort of staying in what is known. You might decide that you need feedback from a very gracious partner. Tonight: On top of your game. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)  Listen and reach out to someone at a distance who means a lot to you. Do not stand on ceremony if your calls aren’t returned. You are entering a period when misunderstandings could happen with greater frequency. Tonight: Detach and tap into your imagination. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  Relate on a one-onone level to someone. Listen to what you are saying and also to what is being shared. You could be overwhelmed by everything that is happening around you. Delegate responsibilities to a trusted associate or loved one. Tonight: Make it romantic. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  Give up a need to have power. If you just go along with a situation, you will be much happier. Listen to your instincts regarding a personal matter. Do not test others. Let them run the show and express their true colors. Tonight: Say “yes.” PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)      You could be overwhelmed by everything that is happening in your immediate circle. Start crossing things off your to-do list — it will help eliminate this feeling of heaviness. You will feel better as a result. You also will be able to extend yourself more fully. Tonight: Put your feet up. BORN TODAY Actor Ethan Hawke (1970), actress Sally Fields (1946), actress Lori Singer (1957)

Regional Cities Today Wed. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

75/40/s 69/43/s 64/23/s 76/44/s 76/44/s 63/27/s 72/43/s 62/37/s 73/42/s 77/38/s 68/42/s 67/30/s 67/23/s 77/45/s 74/44/s 69/37/s 65/44/s 72/35/s 78/47/s 75/42/s 68/28/s 70/32/s 60/28/s 77/41/s 69/47/s 68/37/s 74/44/s 73/48/s 76/43/s 68/42/s

78/49/s 72/45/s 62/29/s 82/51/s 83/50/s 63/27/s 77/46/s 61/33/s 77/45/s 80/44/pc 72/44/s 68/33/s 71/33/pc 80/47/s 78/50/pc 72/43/s 67/40/s 74/42/s 80/48/s 79/44/s 70/34/pc 77/35/s 61/28/s 83/44/s 71/50/s 68/39/s 77/49/pc 76/49/pc 83/47/s 69/40/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

26/8/pc 54/41/sh 48/35/pc 45/35/s 52/32/c 44/35/r 46/35/s 72/49/s 70/41/s 47/37/pc 75/51/s 85/73/s 74/47/s 51/37/pc 60/35/pc 79/57/s 88/61/s 77/43/s

24/7/s 58/41/c 46/37/r 47/41/r 58/36/pc 48/35/pc 48/37/c 79/54/s 73/43/pc 50/35/c 78/55/s 85/73/s 77/53/s 50/33/pc 60/40/s 80/60/pc 77/60/s 80/50/s

U.S. Extremes

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

82/61/pc 77/47/s 48/32/sh 67/51/s 46/38/pc 59/30/pc 76/52/t 47/37/pc 90/62/s 47/30/s 64/46/sh 53/36/r 54/37/c 66/44/s 80/59/s 54/45/r 89/54/s 50/37/pc

75/56/s 80/54/s 46/34/pc 69/47/s 43/39/r 58/36/s 70/47/s 43/36/r 88/63/pc 50/32/pc 55/38/sh 57/39/c 55/38/s 67/44/s 73/58/pc 51/39/sh 87/58/pc 48/38/r

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 98° ............... Camarillo, Calif. Low: 11° ................Angel Fire, N.M.

High: 79° ........................ Lordsburg Low: 11° ......................... Angel Fire

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s


Tuesday, November 6, 2012 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

LOCAL SCHEDULE TUESDAY NOVEMBER 6

HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL 6 p.m. District 3-B Tournament • Lake Arthur at Corona • Hondo Valley at Gateway Chr. 7 p.m. District 4-4A Tournament • Roswell at Artesia

SCORE CENTER PREP VOLLEYBALL Hagerman 3, Cloudcroft 2 Lake Arthur 3, Vaughn 1 Hondo Valley 3, Valley Chr. 0 NBA New York 110, Philadelphia 88 Minnesota 107, Brooklyn 96 Miami 124, Phoenix 99 Memphis 103, Utah 94 Dallas 114, Portland 91 San Antonio 101, Indiana 79 Golden State at Sacramento, late Cleveland at L.A. Clippers, late NFL New Orleans 28, Philadelphia 13

NATIONAL BRIEFS

NEW MEMPHIS OWNERS MEET PRESS, FANS

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — The new chairman of the Grizzlies said he “fully understands” that the people of Memphis really own the NBA team, even though he’s the controlling owner. Robert J. Pera is not only saying the right things, he has put it in writing. Pera, who introduced himself to Grizzlies fans Monday morning at FedExForum, agreed to provisions to keep the team in the city for at least 15 years. “Memphis as a city, it’s unbelievable,” Pera said. “The people have been great. I can tell the community is really special, and those two things combined I consider myself very, very fortunate. Probably the luckiest man in the world right now.” Pera and his partners who form Memphis Basketball, LLC, bought the Grizzlies from Michael Heisley for $377 million in a sale finalized last week. The ownership group, along with the team’s new chief executive officer, held the news conference in the lobby of the arena. The event was open to the public and there were even inflatable slides for children on hand for Memphis’ home opener Monday night against the Utah Jazz. “I believe it’s the greatest sport in the world just from a fan perspective, from a player’s perspective,” said the 34-year-old former Apple engineer who started his own communications technology company in 2005 and described himself as an NBA “super fan.” Pera, wearing a dark blazer and black shirt, couldn’t stop smiling sitting at the podium along with Jason Levien, his new CEO and managing partner of Memphis Basketball, LLC. It was Pera’s first public appearance in Memphis since his move to buy the Grizzlies first was announced in June. But he had been very busy behind the scenes working with Levien, Jeffrey Pollack and David Carlock in assembling a group of 22 limited partners including AutoZone founder J.R. “Pitt” Hyde and Memphis businessman Staley Cates. Both were minority owners with Heisley, who brought the Grizzlies to Memphis from Vancouver in 2001. Entertainer and Memphis native Justin Timberlake is part of the ownership group along with a pair of other Memphians: former NBA player Penny Hardaway and Ashley Manning, wife of four-time NFL MVP Peyton Manning.

SPORTS

B

Cowboys stumble, fall to 3-5 Section

Roswell Daily Record

ATLANTA (AP) — For the Cowboys, it must have felt as if the Georgia Dome gave the Atlanta Falcons an overwhelming home-field advantage. For the Falcons, it was the site of another underwhelming narrow victory. Michael Tur ner gave Atlanta its first lead with a 3-yard touchdown run in the fourth quarter, Matt Bryant kicked four field goals and the Falcons beat the Cowboys 19-13 Sunday night to extend their run as the NFL’s only unbeaten team. File this one behind the other close wins at home — by 6 over Denver, by 2 over Carolina and by 3 over Oakland. The Falcons are 8-0, even if some of the uninspiring home wins draw more criti-

cism than praise. “We’re not concer ned with the doubters,” Turner said. “This team’s main focus is coming out and getting a win each game.” Turner had 20 carries for 102 yards and Matt Ryan completed 24 of 34 passes for a season-high 342 yards for the Falcons, who took their first lead with 14:16 left in the game. “There’s a reason they’re undefeated halfway through the season,” Dallas coach Jason Garrett said. “This is a challenging place to play at. I thought we did some good things in the ballgame. They did more good things. We didn’t do enough to win this game in all three phases of our football team.” See STUMBLE, Page B5

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

AP Photo

Cowboys coach Jason Garrett reacts to a play during his team’s loss to the undefeated Falcons, Sunday. Garrett and the Cowboys fell to 3-5 with the loss.

Two get Dissecting Week 10: One left top seed Local Briefs

PREP FOOTBALL

KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

ALBUQUERQUE — Gateway Christian and Hagerman each ear ned No. 1 seeds in the state football playof fs. The NMAA released the Class 8-Man and Class 1A football brackets over the weekend. The Warriors are the top seed in the Class 8-Man bracket and the Bobcats are the top seed in the Class 1A bracket. Gateway will host the winner of No. 4 Foothill and No. 5 Carrizozo next week. Foothill and Carrizozo play this week in the first round. The Warriors (9-1) beat Foothill 44-6 on Sept. 7 and beat Carrizozo 60-6 last week. Tatum earned the No. 2 seed and plays the winner of No. 3 Logan and No. 6 Mountainair next week. Hagerman hosts the winner of No. 4 Fort Sumner and No. 5 Capitan next week. Fort Sumner and Capitan meet this week in See BRIEFS, Page B5

Steve Notz Photo

Goddard defensive tackle David Chavers, left, chases after Artesia quarterback Trevor Eulenbach during the Rockets’ win over the Bulldogs, Friday. Chavers and the Rockets square off with Roswell this week in the final regular season game for both teams.

Who Dat?

Ten weeks down, one to go. That’s right, folks. We are just one week away from the conclusion of the high school football regular season. It seems like just yesterday that we were preparing for the start of the fall sports season and, now, it’s almost over. OK, enough boo-hooing and onto business. It’s Goddard-Roswell week, or as I have dubbed it, The Alien City Encounter. This game has a few pretty important storylines — Goddard’s third straight undefeated season, Roswell’s playoff hopes and a new record in the series. When Goddard completed an undefeated regular season in 2010, it was the first of the kind in the history of the school. The Rockets followed it with another one last season and, with a win on Friday, will have a third straight

See WEEK 10, Page B5

AP Photo

New Orleans’ Jimmy Graham, right, and Chris Ivory celebrate after Ivory scored a touchdown during the Saints’ win over Philadelphia, Monday.

Saints down Eagles

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Drew Brees threw two touchdown passes, extending his NFL r ecor d str eak to 51 games, and Patrick Robinson retur ned an interception 99 yards for a score to lead the New Orleans Saints to a much-needed win, 2813, over Michael Vick and the reeling Philadelphia Eagles on Monday night. The Saints (3-5), who bounced back fr om a dismal 34-14 loss at Denver, also got a 22yar d touchdown run

from Chris Ivory. Br ees finished with 239 yards while completing 21 of 27 passes. Philadelphia (3-5) lost its fourth straight, which is sure to keep the heat on Vick and embattled coach Andy Reid. Vick threw a 77yard touchdown pass to DeSean Jackson in the third quarter, but that was about the only highlight for the visiting team. The Eagles had firstand-goal four times and managed only two field goals by Alex Henery.

AP Photo

Broncos running back Willis McGahee, right, slides past Cincinnati defender Reggie Nelson during the Broncos’ win over the Bengals, Sunday.

Broncos continue rolling, beat Cincy

CINCINNATI (AP) — Peyton Manning had no trouble clearing those two interceptions out of his head and leading a fourth-quarter comeback. “I’ve been there before,” the four-time MVP said. And no one’s ever been better at it. Manning threw for a pair of touchdowns in the fourth quarter Sunday, rallying the Denver Broncos to a 31-23 victory that left him 8-0 against the Cincinnati Bengals, who couldn’t hold on when they thought they might finally have him. Instead, Manning led the 48th game-winning drive of his career, moving ahead of Dan Marino for the NFL record. He completed all six of his passes in the final quarter, when Denver (5-3) got a firsthand idea of

how he responds to the biggest moments. “He is special at it,” coach John Fox said. Especially when he’s playing the Bengals (3-5), who have failed every time they’ve faced him. Manning threw three touchdown passes Sunday, giving him five games against Cincinnati with at least three TDs. His two second-half interceptions — one in the end zone, both by cornerback Terence Newman — helped the Bengals pull ahead 20-17 early in the fourth quarter. “That’s not the scenario we wanted,” Manning said. “Anytime you’re on the road and have a chance to put a team away, you want to do it. You don’t want to give a team a little life, which is what we did.” See ROLLING, Page B5


B2 Tuesday, November 6, 2012 Local

Women’s 20K walk 1. Rita Kane Doerhoefer . . . . . . . .3:05:00 2. Ellen Casavantes . . . . . . . . . . . .3:05:01 3. Joan Blodgett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3:40:41 4. Christine Tellez . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3:45:48 5. Leann Mladek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3:45:50 6. Jody Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3:45:56 7. Bjork Nitmo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3:55:00 Men’s 20K walk 1. Bjorn Nitmo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3:55:01

Women’s 20K run 1. Mindy Toothman . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:23:09 2. Deana Weaver . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:37:11 3. Susie Rand-Weimer . . . . . . . . . .1:40:01 4. D'Nese Fly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:49:26 5. Cinda Olvera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:53:22 6. Shelby Griffin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:53:28 7. Kari Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:54:19 8. Sana Osmani . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:03:21 9. Sara Mitchell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:27:46 10. Kirstie Gutierrez . . . . . . . . . . . .2:52:36

Men’s 20K run 1. Jason Waltmire . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:18:18 2. Jim Humphreys . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:34:31 3. Jacob Robles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:35:12 4. Josh Sanchez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:36:41 5. Eduardo Sanchez . . . . . . . . . . . .1:37:03 6. Jeffrey Ash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:38:27 7. Alex Ruiz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:39:59 8. Kaleb Herrera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40:57 9. Frank Miranda . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40:58 10. Stephen Seitz . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:41:27 11. Bob Zettel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:45:34 12. Adrien Patterson . . . . . . . . . . . .2:03:02 13. Bud Fetterley . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:19:02 14. Mitch Mitchell . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:25:39 15. Ted Williams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:50:48

Men’s 2-mile run 1. Nick Fox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13:04 2. Jonathan Gutierrez . . . . . . . . . . . .13:30 3. Zane Rader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14:52 4. Brad Herndon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14:59 5. Cooper Vaughn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15:01 6. Gus Curnutt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15:47 7. Kelly Owens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17:02 8. John Jerge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17:15 9. Logan Rader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17:18 10. Alex Cox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17:21 11. Curt Thurston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17:45 12. Collin Underation . . . . . . . . . . . . .18:12 13. Todd Miller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18:54 14. Ned Curnutt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:12 15. Nathan Curnutt . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:19 16. Rand French . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:29 17. Alvin Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22:24 18. Paul Whitwam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23:15 19. Reese Melton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23:31 20. Henry Rodriquez . . . . . . . . . . . . .23:53 21. Corey Needham . . . . . . . . . . . . .24:10

Golf scores

SPORTS

22. Dennis Mike Pabst . . . . . . . . . . .24:12 23. Boyd Ritter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44:48

Women’s 2-mile run 1. Sami Soso . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14:57 2. Courtney Villalpando . . . . . . . . . . .15:53 3. Lexi Cassels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15:54 4. Kelsie Nicholson . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17:15 5. Sarah Villalpando . . . . . . . . . . . . .17:25 6. Hannah Olvera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17:52 7. Liana Swarengin . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18:23 8. Kathryn Olvera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:16 9. Terri French . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:44 10. Wendy Vaughn . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19:55 11. Janice Manning . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20:54 12. Agnes Frazier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20:57 13. Janet Morgan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21:09 14. Deanna Curnutt . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21:51 15. Sally McLean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22:06 16. Shelby Moss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23:51 17. Dana Sasser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24:00 18. Sadie Vick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25:02 19. Lupe Rincon-Garcia . . . . . . . . . .25:12 20. Linda Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25:41 21. Hilda Sanchez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31:27 22. Teresa Ritter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44:39

Women’s 2-mile walk 1. Robin Hughes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24:16 2. Jackie Hewett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25:01 3. Kaitlin Baca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26:45 4. Pamela Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26:51 5. Gail Buck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27:06 6. Doris Callaway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27:46 7. Nancy Hildebrandt . . . . . . . . . . . . .28:12 8. Anna Pabst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28:18 9. Donna Ellis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28:44 10. Becky Hochwalt . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30:31 11. Robbin Collins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30:32 12. Pam Stapp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30:33 13. Cindy Wooten . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31:03 14. Jessica Baca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31:37 15. Mary Ritter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31:38 16. Karen Melton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33:50 17. Anne Huff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34:19 18. Zenaida Ritter-Baca . . . . . . . . . .34:44 19. Pam Garlinger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35:24 20. Ann Garlinger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35:26 21. Esmera Gomez . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38:13 22. Charlotte Ennis . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38:47 23. Leslie Lugenbill . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41:04

Men’s 2-mile walk 1. Neil Roe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24:48 2. Dick McLean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27:58 3. Harold Hobson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28:02 4. Bill F.M. Owen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28:12 5. Mike Walsh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29:29 6. Victor Guerrero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33:49 7. Andrew Baca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34:35 8. Philip Baca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34:45 9. Eric Garlinger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35:25 10. Bill Callaway Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35:37 11. Tim Raftery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38:46 12. Ray Gonzales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41:02 13. Ray Melton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41:03

HSBC Champions Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At Mission Hills Golf Club, Olazabal Course Shenzhen, China Purse: $7 million Yardage: 7,301; Par: 72 Final Ian Poulter, $1,200,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-68-65-65 — 267 Jason Dufner, $417,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-66-71-64 — 269 Scott Piercy, $417,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-68-68-65 — 269 Ernie Els, $417,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-63-69-67 — 269 Phil Mickelson, $417,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-69-66-68 — 269 Louis Oosthuizen, $190,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-63-70-72 — 270 Lee Westwood, $190,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-67-61-72 — 270 Adam Scott, $155,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-68-71-67 — 271 Martin Kaymer, $140,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-69-67-68 — 272 Bill Haas, $125,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-67-66-71 — 273 Hiroyuki Fujita, $98,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-67-67-67 — 274 Marcel Siem, $98,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-66-67 — 274 Thorbjorn Olesen, $98,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-65-70-68 — 274 Prom Meesawat, $98,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-70-69-68 — 274 Brandt Snedeker, $98,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-60-71 — 274 Nick Watney, $80,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-69-62 — 275 Carl Pettersson, $80,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68-66-71 — 275 Marc Leishman, $75,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-68-65-70 — 276 Luke Donald, $75,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-68-69-71 — 276 Gaganjeet Bhullar, $75,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-68-63-72 — 276 Thomas Bjorn, $70,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-68-67 — 277 Thongchai Jaidee, $70,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68-69-70 — 277 Keegan Bradley, $67,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-68-68-71 — 278 Wenchong Liang, $62,250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-73-66-68 — 279 Scott Hend, $62,250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74-67-68 — 279 Peter Hanson, $62,250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-71-73-69 — 279 Justin Rose, $62,250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-67-70 — 279 John Senden, $57,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-70-68 — 280 Bernd Wiesberger, $57,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-68-68 — 280 Thomas Aiken, $57,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73-69-70 — 280 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano, $57,500 . . . . . . . . . . . .71-67-69-73 — 280 Shane Lowry, $55,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-68-72-75 — 281 Bubba Watson, $54,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-72-69-75 — 282 Tadahiro Takayama, $52,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-70-71 — 283 Ik-Jae Jang, $52,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-72-72 — 283 Paul Lawrie, $50,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-72-72 — 284 Joost Luiten, $50,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-68-72 — 284 Ashun Wu, $50,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70-71-75 — 284 Thaworn Wiratchant, $47,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-70-73 — 285 Francesco Molinari, $47,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-74-68 — 285 Dustin Johnson, $47,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-68-84-66 — 285 Julien Quesne, $43,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-71-73 — 286 Graeme McDowell, $43,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-75-68-72 — 286 Marcus Fraser, $43,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72-70-71 — 286 Jamie Donaldson, $43,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-74-71-70 — 286 Brendan Jones, $40,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-70-74 — 287 Mark Wilson, $40,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-74-69-71 — 287 Greg Chalmers, $40,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-68-77 — 287 Jeev Milkha Singh, $40,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-73-71 — 287 Rafa Cabrera-Bello, $40,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-69-76-67 — 287 Robert Garrigus, $38,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-68-69-75 — 288 Brad Kennedy, $38,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-77-67-71 — 288 Geoff Ogilvy, $38,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-74-72-67 — 288 Nicolas Colsaerts, $36,750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73-71-72 — 289

SCOREBOARD

14. Troy Evans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48:39 15. Cecil Rhodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50:29 16. Ralph Knight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53:09 17. Eric Bradley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:08:41

Men’s 10K run 1. Ryan Mahan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42:43 2. Francico Olvera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43:24 3. AJ Garcia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44:48 4. Jonathan Sanchez . . . . . . . . . . . .45:23 5. Todd Barela . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46:38 6. Adam Romero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47:56 7. Marcos Castillo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48:14 8. Dennis Parent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48:35 9. Thomas Nobles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48:35 10. Tomas Esparza . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49:27 11. Israel Vasquez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49:55 12. Adam Castillo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52:39 13. Al Berryman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52:41 14. Skyler George . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52:53 15. Enrique Telles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53:59 16. Ernesto Jacobo . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54:33 17. John Lindsey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54:34 18. Justin Gossett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54:55 19. Jarrod Grimm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55:27 20. Rudy Das . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56:25 21. Eric Sasser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56:30 22. Robert Rader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57:05 23. Omar Osmani . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58:32 24. Eric Zottneck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59:29 25. Tom Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00:35 26. Trent Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:02:52

Women’s 10K run 1. Storrie Morris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52:23 2. Shelly Lackey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52:48 3. Tara Waldrip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52:58 4. Christine Bamberg . . . . . . . . . . . .54:28 5. Nicole Carter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54:51 6. Deanna Jerge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55:12 7. Marissa Paradiso . . . . . . . . . . . . .55:15 8. Olivia Tafoya . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55:25 9. Vanessa Harvey . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55:25 10. Kayla Rodriquez . . . . . . . . . . . . .55:40 11. Emily Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56:35 12. Sandra Garnand . . . . . . . . . . . . .57:43 13. Bobbi Hestand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57:52 14. Billi Gossett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58:15 15. Monica Hobbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58:54 16. Denise Telles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59:09 17. Elizabeth Page . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:00:14 18. Robin Needham . . . . . . . . . . . .1:01:49 19. Catherine Green . . . . . . . . . . . .1:02:05 20. Tianna Reta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:03:40 21. Montana Paxton . . . . . . . . . . . .1:04:29 22. Sheila Enciso-Belloso . . . . . . .1:06:36 23. Paola Soriano . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:13:35 24. Victoria Mariscal . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25:03

Han Lee, $36,750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-70-75-71 — 289 George Coetzee, $34,750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-76-68-73 — 290 Robert Allenby, $34,750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-72-69-73 — 290 Garth Mulroy, $34,750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74-73-73 — 290 Hyung-Sung Kim, $34,750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78-70-70-72 — 290 Jaco Van Zyl, $34,750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-75-70-71 — 290 Xin-Jun Zhang, $34,750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-69-76-70 — 290 Danny Willett, $32,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-73-71-73 — 291 Hennie Otto, $32,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-73-71-71 — 291 Branden Grace, $32,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-76-70-70 — 291 Alvaro Quiros, $31,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-76-68-76 — 292 Richie Ramsay, $31,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78-71-72-71 — 292 Kyle Stanley, $31,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79-70-74-69 — 292 Jbe Kruger, $30,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83-72-71-67 — 293 David Lynn, $29,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-69-73-77 — 295 Toshinori Muto, $29,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-71-76-74 — 295 Kenichi Kuboya, $29,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77-83-66-69 — 295 David Lipsky, $27,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78-74-69-76 — 297 Yuta Ikeda, $27,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-82-75 — 297 Robert Rock, $27,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78-70-76-73 — 297 Johnson Wagner, $26,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-74-73-76 — 298 Siddikur Rahman, $26,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77-76-76-72 — 301 Mu Hu, $25,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79-74-79-75 — 307

LPGA-Mizuno Classic Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At Kintetsu Kashikojima Country Club Shima, Japan Purse: , $1.2 million Yardage: 6,506; Par: 72 Final (Partial listing) Stacy Lewis, $180,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-64 — 205 Bo-Mee Lee, $109,523 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-64-72 — 206 Ayako Uehara, $79,451 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-67 — 207 Yani Tseng, $61,461 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-68 — 209 Anna Nordqvist, $38,376 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-67 — 210 Hee Kyung Seo, $38,376 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-68 — 210 Na Yeon Choi, $38,376 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-70 — 210 Jenny Shin, $38,376 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-70 — 210 Chella Choi, $22,822 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-68 — 211 Beatriz Recari, $22,822 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-74-68 — 211 So-Hee Kim, $22,822 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-69 — 211 Karine Icher, $22,822 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-71 — 211 Rikako Morita, $22,822 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68-73 — 211 Amy Yang, $17,429 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-69 — 212 Sakura Yokomine, $17,429 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-70 — 212 Jiyai Shin, $17,429 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73-71 — 212 Akane Iijima, $13,138 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-74-68 — 213 Mika Miyazato, $13,138 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-74-68 — 213 Inbee Park, $13,138 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73-70 — 213 Mariajo Uribe, $13,138 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-70 — 213 Miki Sakai, $13,138 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-71 — 213 Lizette Salas, $13,138 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-71 — 213 Eun-Hee Ji, $13,138 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-72 — 213 Ilhee Lee, $13,138 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-68-72 — 213 Junko Omote, $13,138 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-68-72 — 213 Angela Stanford, $13,138 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-73 — 213 Giulia Sergas, $9,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-70 — 214 Shanshan Feng, $9,999 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73-72 — 214 Notable Gerina Piller, $7,701 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77-70-69 — 216

Women’s 10K walk 1. Andrea Matta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:16:04 2. Pat Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:18:37 3. Nancy Fox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:21:05 4. Sonia Phillips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:23:27 5. Sheila Grimm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25:00 6. Maria Ogas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:26:47 7. Silvia Flores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:31:07 8. Mona Kirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:33:27 9. Tiffany Hale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:33:30 10. Connie Harrell . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:33:41 11. Connie Haskew . . . . . . . . . . . .1:34:33 12. Rebecca Quintero . . . . . . . . . .1:35:09 13. Betty Patton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:35:57 14. Carol Bignell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:40:18 15. Kathy Collier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:41:38 16. Gloria Matta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:41:45 17. Cindy Boswell . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:44:01

Men’s 10K walk 1. Kelly Pope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:24:14 2. Donald Wenner . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:26:46 3. Donald Wenner III . . . . . . . . . . .1:26:48

NBA

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB New York . . . . . . . . . .3 0 1.000 — Brooklyn . . . . . . . . . . .1 1 .500 1 1⁄2 2 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .1 2 .333 2 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .1 2 .333 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .1 2 .333 2 Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB — Orlando . . . . . . . . . . . .2 0 1.000 — Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 1 .750 Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . .1 1 .500 1 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .1 1 .500 1 Washington . . . . . . . . .0 2 .000 2 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB Milwaukee . . . . . . . . . .2 0 1.000 — 1⁄2 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .2 1 .667 Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . .2 2 .500 1 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .1 2 .333 1 1⁄2 1 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 3 .000 2 ⁄2 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L San Antonio . . . . . . . .4 0 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 1 Memphis . . . . . . . . . . .2 1 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .2 1 New Orleans . . . . . . . .2 1 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Minnesota . . . . . . . . . .2 1 Portland . . . . . . . . . . .2 2

Pct GB 1.000 — .750 1 1 .667 1 ⁄2 1 .667 1 ⁄2 .667 1 1⁄2 Pct .667 .500

TV SPORTSWATCH

GB — 1⁄2

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Tuesday, Nov. 6 COLLEGE FOOTBALL 6 p.m. ESPN2 — Ball St. at Toledo SOCCER 12:30 p.m. FSN — UEFA Champions League, Schalke vs. Arsenal, at Gelsenkirchen, Germany 6 p.m. FSN — UEFA Champions League, Ajax at Manchester City

Roswell Daily Record Oklahoma City . . . . . .1 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Golden State . . . . . . .2 L.A. Clippers . . . . . . . .2 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . . .1 L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . . .1 Sacramento . . . . . . . .0

2 .333 1 3 .250 1 1⁄2 3 .000 2

L 1 1 3 3 3

Pct GB .667 — .667 — .250 1 1⁄2 .250 1 1⁄2 .000 2

Sunday’s Games New York 100, Philadelphia 84 Orlando 115, Phoenix 94 Toronto 105, Minnesota 86 Atlanta 104, Oklahoma City 95 L.A. Lakers 108, Detroit 79 Monday’s Games New York 110, Philadelphia 88 Minnesota 107, Brooklyn 96 Miami 124, Phoenix 99 Memphis 103, Utah 94 Dallas 114, Portland 91 San Antonio 101, Indiana 79 Golden State at Sacramento, 8 p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Orlando at Chicago, 6 p.m. Toronto at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Detroit at Denver, 7 p.m.

NFL

National Football League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain AMERICAN CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct New England . . .5 3 0 .625 Miami . . . . . . . . .4 4 0 .500 N.Y. Jets . . . . . . .3 5 0 .375 Buffalo . . . . . . . . .3 5 0 .375 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Houston . . . . . . .7 1 0 .875 Indianapolis . . . . .5 3 0 .625 Tennessee . . . . .3 6 0 .333 Jacksonville . . . .1 7 0 .125 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Baltimore . . . . . . .6 2 0 .750 Pittsburgh . . . . . .5 3 0 .625 Cincinnati . . . . . .3 5 0 .375 Cleveland . . . . . .2 7 0 .222 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Denver . . . . . . . .5 3 0 .625 San Diego . . . . . .4 4 0 .500 Oakland . . . . . . .3 5 0 .375 Kansas City . . . .1 7 0 .125

PF 262 170 168 180

PF 237 159 182 117

PF 199 191 189 169

PF 235 185 171 133

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF N.Y. Giants . . . . .6 3 0 .667 254 Philadelphia . . . .3 5 0 .375 133 Dallas . . . . . . . . .3 5 0 .375 150 Washington . . . . .3 6 0 .333 226 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF Atlanta . . . . . . . . .8 0 0 1.000 220 Tampa Bay . . . . .4 4 0 .500 226 New Orleans . . . .3 5 0 .375 218 Carolina . . . . . . .2 6 0 .250 149 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF Chicago . . . . . . . .7 1 0 .875 236 Green Bay . . . . .6 3 0 .667 239 Minnesota . . . . . .5 4 0 .556 204 Detroit . . . . . . . . .4 4 0 .500 192 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF San Francisco . . .6 2 0 .750 189 Seattle . . . . . . . . .5 4 0 .556 170 Arizona . . . . . . . .4 5 0 .444 144 St. Louis . . . . . . .3 5 0 .375 137

Thursday’s Game San Diego 31, Kansas City 13 Sunday’s Games Green Bay 31, Arizona 17 Chicago 51, Tennessee 20 Houston 21, Buffalo 9 Carolina 21, Washington 13 Detroit 31, Jacksonville 14

Denver 31, Cincinnati 23 Baltimore 25, Cleveland 15 Indianapolis 23, Miami 20 Seattle 30, Minnesota 20 Tampa Bay 42, Oakland 32 Pittsburgh 24, N.Y. Giants 20 Atlanta 19, Dallas 13 Open: N.Y. Jets, New England, San Francisco, St. Louis Monday’s Game New Orleans 28, Philadelphia 13 Thursday, Nov. 8 Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 6:20 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11 Atlanta at New Orleans, 11 a.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 11 a.m. Denver at Carolina, 11 a.m. San Diego at Tampa Bay, 11 a.m. Tennessee at Miami, 11 a.m. Buffalo at New England, 11 a.m. Oakland at Baltimore, 11 a.m. N.Y. Giants at Cincinnati, 11 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Seattle, 2:05 p.m. St. Louis at San Francisco, 2:25 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 2:25 p.m. Houston at Chicago, 6:20 p.m. Open: Arizona, Cleveland, Green Bay, Washington Monday, Nov. 12 Kansas City at Pittsburgh, 6:30 p.m.

Transactions

PA 170 149 200 248

PA 137 191 308 219

PA 176 164 218 211

PA 175 157 229 240 PA 185 183 181 248

PA 143 185 229 180

PA 120 187 197 188

PA 103 154 173 186

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended L.A. Dodgers RHP Jose Dominguez 25 games and free agent RHP Emerson Martinez and free agent SS Luis Valenzuela 50 games for violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BOSTON RED SOX — Agreed to terms with DH David Ortiz on a two-year contract. HOUSTON ASTROS — Named Dennis Martinez bullpen coach and Eduardo Perez bench coach. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Named Terry Bradshaw minor league hitting coordinator, Jose Castro assistant minor league hitting coordinator, Milt Thompson outfield, bunting and baserunning coordinator and Felix Francisco special assignment scout/international and pro scouting. NEW YORK YANKEES — Claimed C Eli Whiteside off waivers from San Francisco. SEATTLE MARINERS — Agreed to terms with LHP Oliver Perez on a one-year contract. National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Named Pat Corrales special assistant to the general manager. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Agreed to terms with RHP Jairo Asencio on a minor league contract. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Promoted assistant hitting coach John Mabry to hitting coach and Memphis (PCL) pitching coach Blaise Ilsley to bullpen coach. FOOTBALL National Football League CAROLINA PANTHERS — Claimed LB Jason Williams off waivers from Philadelphia. Waived CB Ron Parker. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed LB J.K. Schaffer to the practice squad. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Signed OL Steve Vallos. Waived RB Keith Toston. Signed LB Brandon Marshall to the practice squad. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Announced coach Romeo Crennel relieved himself of defensive coordinator duties. Waived CB Stanford Routt. Signed DT Shaun Smith. Named Gary Gibbs defensive coordinator. NEW YORK JETS — Signed LB D.J. Bryant and RB John Griffin to the practice squad. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Traded CB Aqib Talib to New England for a 2013 fourthround draft pick. COLLEGE CAMPBELL — Fired football coach Dale Steele, effective at the end of the season. WASHINGTON STATE — Suspended WR Marquess Wilson indefinitely.

I respectfully espectfull ask for YOUR VOTE in the November 6th election! Vote Early Until November 3rd

Photo by Kim Jew

'HYRWLRQWR6HUYLFH‡$1DPH<RX&DQ7UXVW 'HYRWLRQWR6HU YLFH‡$1DPH< $1DPH<RX&DQ7 RX&DQ7UUXVW RX&DQ7

6HQDWRU%LOO%XUWZLOOEHD),*+7(5 6HQDWRU%LOO%XU 6HQDWRU%LOO%XUWZLOOEHD WZLOOEHD),*+7(5 LQWKH1H Z0H[LFR6HQDWHWRSURPRWH Z0H [LFR6HQDWHWRSURPRWH LQWKH1HZ0H[LFR6HQDWHWRSURPRWH Protection of the Unborn and Soon to be Born A Genuine Opportunity for Our School Children to LEARN and SUCCEED in the Classroom Proper Support for Our VETERANS Predictable Regulatory Climate for Our Energy Industry A Safe and Secure Border Accountability and Honesty in Government Economic FREEDOM and PROSPERITY GUARDING our 2nd Amendment Rights Agricultural Production and Protection for W Water ater Resources Tax Reduction of T ax Burdens on Our Families and Small Businesses Improved Economic Development for RURAL NEW MEXICO 2IÀFH 501 S. S. Florida Ave. Ave. Av Alamogordo, Alamogordo, NM 88310

3KRQH (H) 575 434-6140 (W) 575 434-1414 (C) 575 439-9439

(PDLO bbur bburt@bbiradio.net t@bbiradio.net : :HEVLWH HEVLWH www.bur www www.burtfornmsenate.com .burtfornmsenate.com

Paid for by the Committee to Elect William F F.. Burt to the New Mexico Senate, T Toots oots Green, T Treasurer. reasurer.


Roswell Daily Record DEAR TRACI: You don’t have to say anything clever. What you should do is tell your friend that you were hurt when you saw the items she had requested up for sale on her eBay account. Period. And in the future, be a little less generous about providing stock for her retail venture. #####

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: Over the years, I have seen many letters from soon-to-be-brides asking if they should include their husband’s sister or other female friend in their bridal party, even if they don’t know them. There is a solution. This summer, I was honored to be the best man at the wedding of a close friend. He had a female friend, “Liz,” whom he wanted in the wedding party. Liz didn’t know the bride, so instead of having her be a bridesmaid, Liz was a groomswoman. She stood in photos with the groomsmen, and even wore a matching outfit — a lovely gray dress with a red ribbon to match our gray suits and red ties.

DEAR ABBY: I have a close friend who is obsessed with selling “finds” on eBay. I often give her little items that she has mentioned she liked — or outright asked for. I always thought she wanted to keep them for herself. Recently I saw some of the things I gave her for sale under her eBay account. I am dismayed that she is taking advantage of my generosity to make a few bucks. No, she is not desperate. And no, I don’t feel comfortable saying something unless it’s clever and I won’t appear to be jealous or petty. TRACI IN PENNSYLVANIA

Jumble

COMICS

BEST MAN IN REDMOND, WASH.

DEAR BEST MAN: That is certainly an appropriate solution to something that shouldn’t be a problem in the first place. Women have also occasionally served in the capacity of “best man.” I’m glad you mentioned it. ##### DEAR ABBY: I have seen letters in your column referring to not being invited to children’s birthday parties and the hurt that follows. It’s amazing to me that some adults have also never learned the importance of being sensitive to the feelings of others. We recently moved into an established neighborhood where a group of adults go on trips, out to dinner, etc. I am old enough to realize that my husband and I will not be invited to everything. But I am not “old enough” not to feel a stab of pain and isolation when group plans are discussed in my presence and we are not invited. Somewhere along the line, people need to learn not to discuss group

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

ZEDDO

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

FACETF RERVID Answer here:

Yesterday’s

Family Circus

DEAR NEWCOMER: You’ve said it well. While I don’t think the offenders are being deliberately cruel, if people would think before opening their mouths, a lot of hurt feelings could be avoided. ##### DEAR ABBY: I’m just wondering what you and your readers think about this: If you see your doctor only once a year (or less if you are well), but you have been going to that doctor for five years or so, should that doctor remember you? LOUISE IN ARIZONA

DEAR LOUISE: It depends on the volume of patients the doctor has in his (or her) practice. However, before seeing you, the doctor should certainly familiarize himself (or herself) with your file so you are not being seen “cold.”

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

CHANO

activities in front of those who are not included. No one wants to feel left out. NEWCOMER TO MINNESOTA

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) RELIC APIECE POISON Jumbles: HEAVY Answer: After sinking the shot from off the green, he was — CHIPPER

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Dear Heloise: Some people love their TATTOOS. Others find that a tattoo is an unpleasant reminder of an earlier lifestyle, gang affiliation, love lost — or just plain ugly! What once was a “cool idea” may keep one unemployed or banned from the military if the tattoo is highly visible, especially on the face or neck. People see gang or prison tattoos, and this may cancel out your good qualities. Thanks to your column years ago, I have been able to refer thousands of requests for affordable (nonlaser) tattoo removal to my programs, now in 15 states and five countries. Civic groups, private doctors or religious organizations easily can establish a program, as described on our new website, www.wilkinsontattooremoval.co m. This program “has been a godsend” for people of all ages, as related by one group that has a removal program. Especially for the young man who tried to do job interviews with tattooed eyelids. This is just one of far-toomany comments and examples of how a “bad” tattoo can affect a person’s life. Fax your request for a referral to have a tattoo removed to: Tattoo Removal, 210-495-7145. Please be sure to include your city and state and a return fax or phone number. Dr. Tolbert Wilkinson, San Antonio

Readers, tattoos can be an expression of art, a message or a remembrance of a loved one or an event. I’m not making a judgment call, but merely printing Dr. Wilkinson’s letter. The last time this referral program was printed in my column (many years ago), there was a large response to find out more information about how to have an unwanted tattoo removed. Heloise ##### Dear Heloise: Surround ice cream in your shopping cart with paper towels, toilet tissue and the like. These act as great insulators to keep the good stuff cold. Michael K., via email

The Wizard of Id

Dear Readers: Have you ever watched a cat playing with catnip? It can be quite comical! Not all cats react to catnip, but for those who do like it, they will roll around on the floor in it and really have fun. Related to mint, catnip causes a reaction in the brain when a cat smells it. It is safe for cats, but if your cat is playing with catnip, it’s probably best for solo play. Cats can become very aggressive, so give your cat a few minutes to relax. Catnip is sold loose and in cat toys. To use loose, sprinkle a bit on the floor (yes, it will be messy, and keep away from children), or put some in a sock and tie it off. It is safe if the cat happens to eat some. Heloise

Blondie

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

B3


B4 Tuesday, November 6, 2012

FINANCIAL

US service firms grow more slowly in October

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. service companies grew at a slightly weaker pace in October than September because sales and new orders slowed. But a measure of employment rose, indicating services firms hired more. The Institute for Supply Management said Monday that its index of non-manufacturing activity fell to 54.2. That’s down from a six-month high of 55.1 in September. Any reading above 50 indicates expansion. The report measures growth in a broad range of businesses from retail and construction companies to health care and financial services firms. The industries covered employ about 90 percent of the work force. A gauge of hiring rose to a seven-month high of 54.9. The government said Friday that services firms added 163,000 net jobs in October. It was the best showing since February and represented 95 percent of the jobs created last month. October’s ISM reading matched the 12month average for the index. Overall, 13 industries reported growth and five contracted. The industries reporting the fastest growth were agriculture, construction, management of companies, and finance and insurance; those showing the most contraction were mining and arts and entertainment. A measure of current sales fell to 55.4 after jumping to 59.9 in September. New orders fell, partly because of a decline in

Roswell Daily Record

facturing expanded for a second straight month in October. The sector had contracted from June through August. Jonathan Basile, an economist at Credit Suisse, says the October readings of the manufacturing and non-manufacturing indexes are consistent with an annual growth rate of about 2.3 percent. That would be an improvement from the 2 percent pace in the July-September quarter. Superstorm Sandy could drag on growth in the final three months of the year, economists noted. Still, most expect the impact to be temporary. Hiring and growth should pick up again early next year when homes and businesses damaged by the storm are rebuilt or repaired, they said. The storm had no impact on Monday’s report, the ISM said, because the survey was completed before it made landfall. Employers added 171,000 jobs in October and hiring was also stronger in August and September than first thought, the government said Friday. The unemployment rate rose to 7.9 percent from 7.8 percent in September. The increase mainly reflected the fact that many more people began looking for work last month and not all of them found jobs. Service companies have been a key source of job growth this year. They have created about 90 percent of the net jobs added since January. Still, many of the new service jobs have been low-paying retail and restaurant positions.

AP Photo

In this Oct. 8 file photo, Anthony Cavallo, owner of the restaurant Vintage 50, mounts a potato cutter in his restaurant in Leesburg, Va. U.S. service companies grew at a slightly slower pace in October than September because of a decline in new orders.

tember average of 53.8. “The tentative indication ... is that growth may well be improving,” Joshua Shapiro, chief economist at MFR Inc., said in a note to clients. The ISM reported last week that manu-

export orders. That reflects Europe’s economic slowdown and weaker growth in larger developing countries such as Brazil. Economists said the report still shows there is some momentum in the service sector. October’s reading is above the July-Sep-

Netflix moves to block a hostile takeover Humana posts lower 3rd-quater net income NEW YORK (AP) — Netflix is moving to protect itself against hostile takeovers, less than a week after activist investor Carl Icahn disclosed that he has accumulated a stake of nearly 10 percent in the online video company. Netflix Inc. said Monday that it has adopted a shareholder rights plan, also known as a poison pill. Such a plan is designed to make it difficult or even impossible for someone to take over the company without an agreement from the board. When the provision is triggered, additional shares flood the market and make it prohibitively expensive for a takeover. Netflix said the provision is triggered if a person or group acquires 10 percent of Netflix, or 20 percent in the case of institutional investors, in a deal not approved by the board. The Los Gatos, Calif.-company said that its plan isn’t intended to interfere

CATTLE/HOGS NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 12 125.47 125.92 125.10 125.27 Feb 13 129.02 129.40 128.70 129.00 133.40 133.52 132.90 133.07 Apr 13 Jun 13 129.70 129.80 129.25 129.40 Aug 13 129.45 129.65 129.35 129.40 Oct 13 133.20 133.20 133.00 133.05 Dec 13 134.20 134.50 134.20 134.50 Feb 14 135.00 Apr 14 137.50 Last spot N/A Est. sales 13708. Fri’s Sales: 43,786 Fri’s open int: 315500, up +3972 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Nov 12 144.90 145.10 144.40 144.90 Jan 13 146.80 146.97 145.75 146.77 Mar 13 149.10 149.10 148.32 148.95 Apr 13 150.75 150.75 150.20 150.57 May 13 152.00 152.00 151.45 152.00 Aug 13 155.15 155.15 154.85 155.02 Sep 13 156.00 156.00 156.00 156.00 156.50 Oct 13 Last spot N/A Est. sales 988. Fri’s Sales: 2,726 Fri’s open int: 24955, up +84 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. 77.87 78.02 76.85 76.92 Dec 12 Feb 13 84.00 84.05 82.85 82.95 Apr 13 89.47 89.75 87.95 87.97 May 13 96.65 96.65 96.45 96.45 Jun 13 99.90 99.95 98.10 98.12 99.70 99.75 98.42 98.52 Jul 13 Aug 13 99.30 99.30 97.90 97.90 Oct 13 87.30 88.25 86.90 87.10 Dec 13 84.45 84.45 83.80 83.82 Feb 14 86.30 86.30 86.10 86.10 Apr 14 88.50 Last spot N/A Est. sales 13388. Fri’s Sales: 37,721 Fri’s open int: 217448, off -151

chg.

-.15 -.17 -.30 -.30 -.35 -.35 +.30

+.10 -.07 -.20 -.17 -.48 -.20

-.83 -.95 -1.50 -.75 -1.65 -1.18 -1.25 -1.05 -.83 -.25

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 12 70.32 70.53 69.95 70.40 Mar 13 71.35 71.78 70.94 71.65 May 13 72.60 72.80 72.20 72.75 Jul 13 73.81 73.81 73.11 73.70 Sep 13 75.91 Oct 13 75.31 Dec 13 75.70 76.00 75.19 75.91 Mar 14 76.91 May 14 75.84 Jul 14 74.44 Oct 14 76.19 Dec 14 75.98 Mar 15 75.98 May 15 75.98 Jul 15 75.98 Oct 15 75.98 Last spot N/A Est. sales 19784. Fri’s Sales: 24,013 Fri’s open int: 203568, up +588

chg.

+.05 +.21 +.05 -.09 -.06 -.06 -.06 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 12 866ü 875fl 863ø 866 Mar 13 880fl 889 876fl 879ü May 13 887fl 895 883ø 886ü Jul 13 876fl 880 870ü 874 Sep 13 885 887 878fl 882ü Dec 13 891fl 894fl 886 890ø

chg.

+1ø +fl +fl -1 -fl +fl

AP Photo

In this Oct. 11, 2007, file photo, private equity investor Carl Icahn speaks at the World Business Forum in New York. On Monday, Netflix announced it is moving to protect itself against hostile takeovers, less than a week after Icahn disclosed that he has accumulated a stake of nearly 10 percent in the online video company. with a board-approved transaction. “Adopting a rights plan is a very reasonable thing to do in light of the recent accumulation of a lot of Netflix stock by an activist shareholder,” spokesman Jonathan Friedland said. Icahn disclosed last

Wednesday that he spent $14 billion on his 10 percent stake. The documents he filed didn’t disclose why Icahn and his investment funds have been buying 5.5 million Netflix shares since early September. But it’s likely that he would press Netflix to make dramatic

FUTURES

Mar 14 894fl 897fl 891ü 895 May 14 879fl 881 879fl 881 840 840 828ü 834fl Jul 14 Sep 14 842 842 836ø 836ø Dec 14 848 848 847ü 847ü Mar 15 848 848 841 841 May 15 848 848 841 841 Jul 15 786 786 779 779 Last spot N/A Est. sales 219425. Fri’s Sales: 81,158 Fri’s open int: 465450, off -4 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 12 738ü 745 733 735ø Mar 13 741ü 747ü 735fl 738 May 13 739 743ü 732fl 735ø Jul 13 729ø 735 724ø 726fl Sep 13 655fl 659ü 651 652ø Dec 13 633fl 637 629 631ø 638ü Mar 14 643ü 643ü 636 May 14 644ø 647ø 643fl 643fl Jul 14 649ø 649ø 646ü 646ü Sep 14 605ø 605ø 600ø 600ø Dec 14 600 602 598ø 598fl Jul 15 618ø 618ø 616ü 616ü Dec 15 587ü 587ü 585ø 585fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 424999. Fri’s Sales: 323,959 Fri’s open int: 1292804, off -1428 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 12 367 368 357ø 358 Mar 13 376fl 376fl 367ü 367ü 368 May 13 374ü 374ü 368 374fl 374fl 365ü 365ü Jul 13 Sep 13 371ü 371ü 361fl 361fl Dec 13 362ø 364fl 362ø 364fl Mar 14 390fl 391ø 390fl 391ø May 14 390fl 391ø 390fl 391ø 421ü 422 421ü 422 Jul 14 Sep 14 402ü 403 402ü 403 Jul 15 402ü 403 402ü 403 Sep 15 402ü 403 402ü 403 Last spot N/A Est. sales 3610. Fri’s Sales: 1,980 Fri’s open int: 12435, off -396 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Nov 12 1519ø 1525 1503ø 1504ü Jan 13 1519 1524ü 1502 1503ü Mar 13 1497 1501ü 1481 1482ø May 13 1465 1469fl 1451ü 1456ø Jul 13 1449ø 1455 1434fl 1440ø Aug 13 1419ø 1421ü 1404ü 1407fl Sep 13 1379 1379 1365ü 1366fl Nov 13 1337ü 1346 1328ü 1334ü Jan 14 1343fl 1343fl 1334 1339fl Mar 14 1345ü 1345ü 1343fl 1343fl May 14 1345ü 1345ü 1342ø 1342ø Jul 14 1349 1349 1345ø 1345ø Aug 14 1343fl 1343fl 1340ü 1340ü Sep 14 1334 1334 1330ø 1330ø Nov 14 1301ø 1304 1295 1300ø Jul 15 1303 1303 1302ø 1302ø Nov 15 1289ø 1289ø 1289 1289 Last spot N/A Est. sales 279165. Fri’s Sales: 152,292 Fri’s open int: 632398, off -2250

+1ü +1ü -5ø -5ø -7 -7 -7 -7

-4 -4ø -4 -4 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -2ü -2ü -4ø

-9 -8ø -8ø -9ø -9ø +fl +fl +fl +fl +fl +fl +fl

-22fl -23ø -21ü -14fl -13ø -11ø -6fl -2ü -2ü -2 -2fl -3ø -3ø -3ø -ø -ø -ø

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. 84.65 85.90 84.34 85.65 Dec 12 Jan 13 85.22 88.70 84.87 86.14 85.79 86.96 85.50 86.73 Feb 13 Mar 13 86.40 87.55 86.15 87.34 87.25 88.10 86.81 87.91 Apr 13 May 13 87.83 88.64 87.22 88.41 Jun 13 87.89 89.02 87.53 88.78 Jul 13 87.90 89.23 87.90 89.05 Aug 13 88.80 89.37 88.80 89.20 88.08 89.42 88.08 89.31 Sep 13 Oct 13 88.73 89.42 88.73 89.36 88.99 89.41 88.76 89.41 Nov 13 Dec 13 88.64 89.71 88.22 89.45 Jan 14 89.35 89.24 Feb 14 Mar 14 89.11 Apr 14 88.99 88.17 88.87 88.17 88.87 May 14 88.15 88.79 88.09 88.79 Jun 14 Jul 14 87.94 88.64 87.94 88.64 88.52 Aug 14 Sep 14 88.42 Oct 14 88.35 88.31 Nov 14 Dec 14 87.71 88.32 87.20 88.29 Jan 15 88.09 Feb 15 87.90 Mar 15 87.73 Last spot N/A Est. sales 452157. Fri’s Sales: 648,226 Fri’s open int: 1608686, up +10244 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Dec 12 2.5797 2.6345 2.5524 2.6202 Jan 13 2.5374 2.6129 2.5324 2.6001 Feb 13 2.5543 2.6163 2.5430 2.6066 Mar 13 2.5630 2.6337 2.5622 2.6285 Apr 13 2.7231 2.7873 2.7208 2.7820 May 13 2.7174 2.7763 2.7109 2.7763 Jun 13 2.6950 2.7608 2.6852 2.7511 Jul 13 2.6650 2.7200 2.6550 2.7183

chg.

+.79 +.74 +.73 +.73 +.74 +.76 +.76 +.74 +.74 +.73 +.71 +.70 +.71 +.70 +.70 +.71 +.69 +.69 +.69 +.69 +.69 +.69 +.70 +.69 +.69 +.69 +.68 +.68

+.0466 +.0427 +.0451 +.0476 +.0466 +.0447 +.0430 +.0410

changes to boost its stock price. The company has been stumbling since it raised its U.S. prices by as much as 60 percent last year. That triggered a backlash that resulted in the loss of hundreds of thousands customers and raised concerns on Wall Street that CEO Reed Hastings would have trouble paying for an ambitious plan to expand the company’s service into dozens of other countries. There is some cause for worry. Netflix’s earnings through the first nine months of this year have fallen by 95 percent from last year. The company also issued a fourth-quarter forecast that indicated the company might end up with a loss for the full year. This would be Netflix’s first annual loss in a decade. The rights plan expires on Nov. 2, 2015. In a regulatory filing Monday, Icahn called the adoption of a poison pill without a shareholder vote “an example of poor corporate governance.”

2.6713 2.6829 2.6713 2.6829 Aug 13 2.6025 2.6396 2.6025 2.6396 Sep 13 Oct 13 2.5017 Nov 13 2.4734 2.4128 2.4615 2.4128 2.4603 Dec 13 Jan 14 2.4572 2.4654 Feb 14 Mar 14 2.4753 2.6033 Apr 14 May 14 2.6008 Jun 14 2.5848 Jul 14 2.5648 Aug 14 2.5463 2.5186 Sep 14 Oct 14 2.3916 2.3636 Nov 14 Dec 14 2.3360 2.3400 Jan 15 Feb 15 2.3470 Mar 15 2.3540 2.4540 Apr 15 May 15 2.4565 Last spot N/A Est. sales 113199. Fri’s Sales: 143,841 Fri’s open int: 267989, off -2558 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Dec 12 3.533 3.588 3.506 3.554 3.657 3.710 3.632 3.678 Jan 13 3.655 3.718 3.640 3.683 Feb 13 Mar 13 3.629 3.690 3.619 3.659 Apr 13 3.609 3.670 3.599 3.641 3.651 3.703 3.646 3.677 May 13 Jun 13 3.683 3.742 3.675 3.719 Jul 13 3.738 3.780 3.731 3.761 Aug 13 3.777 3.798 3.758 3.781 Sep 13 3.740 3.806 3.740 3.784 3.804 3.841 3.789 3.821 Oct 13 Nov 13 3.909 3.955 3.909 3.935 Dec 13 4.106 4.149 4.083 4.129 4.231 4.249 4.222 4.231 Jan 14 4.219 4.233 4.216 4.221 Feb 14 Mar 14 4.155 4.158 4.139 4.142 Apr 14 3.981 3.986 3.959 3.967 May 14 3.985 3.989 3.977 3.977 Jun 14 4.004 4.013 4.003 4.003 Jul 14 4.034 Last spot N/A Est. sales 210185. Fri’s Sales: 290,111 Fri’s open int: 1185265, off -2019

METALS

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Mon. Aluminum -$0.8785 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.5222 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $3.4705 N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Lead - $2148.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8395 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1683.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1682.20 troy oz., NY Merc spot Mon. Silver - $31.015 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $31.113 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Platinum -$1551.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1542.70 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

GET NOTICED

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE CALL TODAY

575.622.7710

+.0396 +.0383 +.0386 +.0394 +.0395 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391 +.0391

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Health insurer Humana Inc. said Monday that its third-quarter net income fell 4 percent as more premium dollars from its members went to pay for medical claims, offsetting continued growth in its lucrative Medicare Advantage business. But its earnings still beat analysts’ expectations and the company raised its earnings forecast for the full year. Humana also announced a deal aimed at solidifying its Medicare Advantage business, especially in Florida. And the company said that a top executive being groomed as its next CEO will take over those daily management duties soon. Bruce D. Broussard, the company’s president since last December, will double as chief executive officer effective this coming Jan. 1. Michael B. McCallister, who guided the company’s growth as CEO for 12 years, will become non-executive board chairman. McCallister’s plans to retire as CEO were disclosed a year ago. He said the transition plan has progressed in line with expectations. “Bruce has confirmed our board of directors’ initial confidence in his ability to lead Humana successfully for many years to come,” McCallister said in a conference call with industry analysts. Louisville-based Humana said it has agreed to acquire Metropolitan Health Networks Inc. in a deal aimed at strengthening its Medicare Advantage business, a government-subsidized comprehensive health insurance for seniors. Metropolitan Health coordinates medical care for Medicare Advantage and Medicaid recipients, primarily in the crucial Florida market. Under the agreement, Humana will pay $11.25 per share in cash to acquire Metropolitan Health’s outstanding shares. That part of the deal is worth about $500 million. Humana said it will also assume Metropolitan Health’s debt.

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 1176747 9.75 -.10 S&P500ETF915924141.85 +.29 SPDR Fncl 428504 15.97 -.03 FordM 373084 11.25 +.08 SprintNex 357061 5.75 +.054

Name Vol (00) Vringo 159569 CheniereEn 76713 WalterInv 29784 NwGold g 27540 Rentech 18828

Name NamTai CSVInvCpr EqualEn g HealthNet StratHotels

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Last 3.95 15.76 42.72 10.50 2.77

Chg +1.18 -.42 -3.41 -.28 +.03

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) SiriusXM 557508 Intel 473967 Microsoft 372709 Yahoo 315276 Facebook n308689

Last 2.83 21.84 29.63 17.37 21.25

Chg -.07 -.22 +.13 +.26 +.07

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Last 15.12 56.80 3.59 25.71 6.31

Chg +4.41 +7.80 +.49 +3.03 +.74

%Chg +41.2 +15.9 +15.8 +13.4 +13.3

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg Vringo 3.95 +1.18 +42.6 Novogen rs 2.32 +.81 NovaCpp n 2.90 +.35 +13.7 ICAD rs 3.00 +.85 SalisbryBc 28.25 +2.20 +8.4 BioMarin 49.07+11.66 eMagin 4.80 +.34 +7.6 OceanPw h 2.95 +.55 LongweiPI 2.23 +.15 +7.2 DigitAlly rs 5.24 +.71

Name Last BarcShtC 15.00 FSPBlUSDBr20.74 RadianGrp 4.83 Cemig s 10.25 Nationstr n 30.20

Chg -2.98 -2.74 -.55 -1.06 -2.91

%Chg -16.6 -11.7 -10.2 -9.4 -8.8

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg FAB Univ 3.05 -.36 -10.6 Ebix Inc 19.26 -3.15 -14.1 Aerosonic 3.01 -.28 -8.5 RenewE rs 2.01 -.28 -12.2 IntTower g 2.18 -.18 -7.6 ProsGlRs n 2.10 -.25 -10.6 WalterInv 42.72 -3.41 -7.4 Pharmacyc 51.33 -6.04 -10.5 HMG 5.30 -.32 -5.74 Synacor n 4.87 -.57 -10.5

1,541 1,462 127 3,130 79 34

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

-.002 -.004 -.004 -.005 -.004 -.004 -.004 -.004 -.004 -.004 -.003 -.005 -.007 -.007 -.012 -.013 -.013 -.013 -.013

AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

52-Week High Low 13,661.72 11,231.56 5,390.11 4,531.79 499.82 422.90 8,515.60 6,898.12 2,509.57 2,102.29 3,196.93 2,441.48 1,474.51 1,158.66 15,432.54 12,158.90 868.50 666.16

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

2,862,102,082 Volume

DIARY

187 245 33 465 3 13ows

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,471 970 117 2,558 36 42

79,016,618 Volume

INDEXES

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 13,112.44 5,123.86 462.43 8,240.25 2,371.40 2,999.66 1,417.26 14,829.46 819.54

1,459,256,055

Net % Chg Chg +19.28 +.15 +13.69 +.27 -7.35 -1.56 +5.34 +.06 +12.67 +.54 +17.53 +.59 +3.06 +.22 +34.94 +.24 +5.17 +.63

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Name

Div

PE

Last

Chg

AT&T Inc BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola s Disney EOG Res ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn Merck

1.76 .04 1.76 3.60 1.02 .60f .68 2.28 .20 .53 .80f .90 3.40 2.44 1.68

45 34.83 -.10 26 9.75 -.10 13 70.41 +.36 9 109.19 +.82 19 36.77 -.31 17 50.32 +.46 23 116.81 +1.61 12 90.63 +.36 9 11.25 +.08 5 14.01 +.25 5 38.92 +1.20 10 21.84 -.22 13 194.14 +.71 23 70.79 -.11 21 45.67 -.33

YTD %Chg Name +15.2 +75.4 -4.0 +2.6 +5.1 +34.2 +18.6 +6.9 +4.6 -45.6 +66.3 -9.9 +5.6 +7.9 +21.1

%Chg +53.6 +39.5 +31.2 +22.8 +15.7

Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

YTD % Chg +7.32 +2.08 -.48 +10.21 +4.08 +15.14 +12.70 +12.43 +10.61

52-wk % Chg +8.65 +4.36 +1.99 +8.56 +2.57 +11.29 +12.38 +11.75 +9.97

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

.92f 2.74f .58 2.15 .88 .04 .84f 1.04 .50e 2.06f 1.59 .32 .88 1.08

16 16 8 18 15 18 19 16 ... 41 15 13 11 15

29.63 59.96 21.65 69.00 24.58 9.04 29.47 43.04 16.14 44.20 73.14 16.92 34.02 27.50

+.13 -.16 -.33 -.05 +.03 +.01 +.94 -.32 +.03 -.32 +.37 -.07 +.28 -.40

+14.1 +3.8 +18.8 +4.0 +13.6 +5.6 +1.2 +19.1 +13.4 +10.2 +22.4 +20.9 +23.4 -.5

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


Roswell Daily Record

Stumble

Continued from Page B1

Tony Romo completed 25 of 35 passes for 321 yards for the Cowboys (3-5), who have dropped four of their last five games. They were held to 65 yards rushing, including 39 yards on nine carries by Felix Jones. The Cowboys trailed 16-6 before Romo tried to put together a comeback. He completed all six of his attempts on a big drive that ended with a 21-yard TD strike to Kevin Ogletree. The Falcons then worked the clock, holding the ball for 5 minutes, 4 seconds, leaving only 17 seconds after Bryant’s 32-yard field goal. The Cowboys burned all their timeouts as Ryan kept the Falcons’ offense on the field in the crucial time-consuming drive. Ryan passed to Jacquizz Rodgers for 31 yards and 11 yards on third-down plays. A defensive holding call against cornerback Orlando Scandrick on another third down prolonged the possession. Finally, the Cowboys stopped Turner on a third-down run at the Dallas 14. Romo never attempted a deep pass, though he had only 17 seconds to cover 80 yards. He found Jason Witten for passes of 7 and 11 yards, leaving 9 seconds. He passed to Felix Jones for 8 yards, leaving time for one play from the Cowboys 40. Romo scrambled before passing to Jones, who was dropped near the Atlanta 22 to end the game.

Briefs

Continued from Page B1

the first round. The Bobcats (9-1) beat Capitan 48-6 on Aug. 31 and Fort Sumner 33-0 on Oct. 26. McCurdy got the No. 2 seed and meets the winner of No. 3 Escalante and No. 6 Magdalena next week.

Prep volleyball

Lake Arthur 3, Vaughn 1 LAKE AR THUR — The Panthers advanced in the District 3-B tournament with a four -set victory over Vaughn, Monday. The Panthers (7-12) won the first set 25-23 before Vaughn won the second set 27-25. Lake Arthur answered with 25-19 wins in the third and fourth sets. “(The girls) actually finished a match,” said Panther coach Rebecca Villalva. “Earlier in the season, if we got down by two, we had trouble coming back. But, they did a really good job about staying alive and finishing what they started. “They played really well.” Cristina Caro had five kills and three blocks, Jessica Berrera had five kills, Theresa Salcido had one kill and two block assists, Mayra Davila had two kills and Maria Saenz had a kill.

Hondo Valley 3, Valley Chr. 0 HONDO — The Eagles bounced Valley Christian from the District 3-B tournament on Monday. Hondo won the first set 25-6, the second set 25-9 and the third set 2517. “(The girls) really came alive in the third set, but it was just too late to come alive,” said VCA coach Melissa Verciglio. “They have gotten a great deal of good experience this year and they needed it. “They have really come along. I’m really looking forward to next season.” The Lions finished the season 1-12.

Week 10

CLASSIFIEDS

Continued from Page B1

Now, I can’t talk about the undefeated regular season without talking about the fact that the Rockets have yet to finish a full season unblemished. They got bounced in the semifinals by Artesia two years ago and lost in the final minutes to Aztec in last year’s state championship game. Something tells me that won’t be happening again this year. I think Goddard is a bigger favorite to win the title this year than it was each of the past two seasons. This game actually means more to Roswell, though. In my view, Roswell has to win this game to make the playoffs. A loss leaves the Coyotes at 5-5 and I just don’t think that’s enough to get them an atlarge bid this year. Roswell fans need to be big Deming fans this week. The Coyotes are fighting for the final atlarge spot with Centennial and Los Alamos. Los Alamos is probably the biggest threat of the three because Centennial likely wouldn’t get the nod over Roswell. Centennial squares off with Deming this week and, should the Hawks win, they would win District 3-4A. That would burn up an at-large bid because Deming is a lock regardless of what happens in Week 11. Los Alamos is likely to finish second in its district behind Santa Fe, but the Hilltoppers already have six wins this year. Yes, they have some bad losses, but they still have more wins and finished higher in the district standings than the Coyotes. This is all assuming a Roswell loss,

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 23, 30, Nov. 6, 13, 2012

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT No. D-504-CV-2012-00094 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. dba Citicorp Mortgage, Plaintiff, vs. CRISTEN M. VAN HORN and, if married, JOHN DOE A, (True Name Unknown), her spouse; NEW MEXICO MORTGAGE FINANCE AUTHORITY, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on November 20, 2012, at the hour of 11:45 a.m., the undersigned Special Master will, at the south door of the Roswell Police Department, 128 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico, sell all the right, title and interest of the above-named Defendants in and to the hereinafter described real estate to the highest bidder for cash. The property to be sold is located at 1718 N Ohio Avenue, Roswell, and is situate in Chaves County, New Mexico, and is particularly described as follows: Lot 1, Block 5 of Crescent Heights Subdivision Completed Survey, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat recorded May 9, 1949 in Plat Book B, Page 117, Real Property Records of Chaves County, New Mexico. THE FOREGOING SALE will be made to satisfy a judgment rendered by the above Court in the above entitled and numbered cause on October 5, 2012, being an action to foreclose a mortgage on the above described property. The Plaintiff's Judgment, which includes interest and costs, is $87,927.30 and the same bears interest at 6.100% per annum from August 1, 2012, to the date of sale. The amount of such interest to the date of sale will be $1,645.81. The Plaintiff and/or its assignees has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. The sale may be postponed and rescheduled at the discretion of the Special Master. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above described real property subject to a one month right of redemption. Electronically filed /s/ A.D. Jones A. D. Jones, Special Master P.O. Box 1180 Roswell, NM 88202-1180 (575) 622-8432

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Rolling

though. If Roswell wins, the Coyotes are a lock to make the playoffs. OK, now to the final interesting storyline — We could see a record set on Friday. Goddard has won 11 straight over Roswell dating back to 2002. That is tied for the longest win streak in the history of the series. Roswell won 11 in a row from 1980-89. Should Goddard win, the Rockets, despite trailing 30-20-3 all-time, would own the longest win streak in the history of the series, which dates back to 1965.

Continued from Page B1

In the end, it didn’t matter. Denver has outscored its opponents 103-23 in the final quarter, the biggest point differential in the league. “There’s no panic,” receiver Brandon Stokley said. “That’s what this team is all about.” Manning’s 1-yard touchdown to tight end Joel Dreessen put Denver ahead. After Andy Dalton underthrew a pass that was picked off by Champ Bailey, Manning put it away with a 4yard pass to Eric Decker with 3:36 left. “He’s a great competitor,” Stokley said. “He is who he is, and it’s what I’ve seen from him for 14 years.” Manning was 27 of 35 for 291 yards for a passer rating of 105.8. He came up 9 yards short of tying Steve Young’s NFL record of five straight games with 300 yards and three touchdown passes.

The rest of the story...

Gateway and Hagerman got the seeds they deserved in their playoff brackets. The Warriors are a heavy, heavy favorite to win the 8Man state title this year and, at least based on the seeding, Hagerman is the favorite in 1A. I think Escalante and McCurdy can both test Hagerman, but I like the Bobcats’ chances to bring home the blue trophy. Lake Arthur gets back on the field on Saturday when it hosts NMSD on Saturday at 2 p.m. at Panthers Stadium. The Panthers already own a win over the Roadrunners (56-12 on Sept. 27). I like the Panthers’ chances. kjkeller@rdrnews.com

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 23, 30, Nov. 6, 2012

Ten Furlongs, LLC With respect to its production “50 to 1” (aka Wild Ride) has wrapped principal photography. The Accounting Department will be closing their New Mexico office as of 11/9/12. All outstanding invoices and correspondence after this date should go to the following address: Ten Furlongs, LLC Post Accounting 24900 Paseo Del Rancho Calabasas, CA 91302 50to1post@gmail.com Phone: 424-888-2473 Fax: 505-750-9777

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 23, 30, Nov. 6, 13, 2012

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO BANK OF THE SOUTHWEST, vs.

Plaintiff,

CV-2011-00095

BENJAMIN RAMIREZ AND MONICA L. RAMIREZ; NICOLAS J. ARTINO; and AFFILICATED FOODS, INC., Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE is hereby given that on November 20, 2012, at 10:00 a.m., the undersigned Special Master will sell to the highest bidder at the front steps of the east side of the Fifth Judicial District Court Building, located at 400 N Virginia, Roswell, NM 88202, all Defendants’ interest in the real property located at 808 N. Atkinson in Chaves County, Roswell, New Mexico, and more particularly described as: LOT SIX (6) BLOCK ONE (1) OF WESTOVER SUBDIVISION, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk’s Office on FEBRUARY 13, 1953 and recorded in Book B of Plat Records, Chaves County, New Mexico, at Page 183.

The sale proceeds will be applied against a Default Judgment, Degree of Foreclosure, Order of Sale and Appointment of Special Master against Defendants, BENJAMIN RAMIREZ AND MONICA L. RAMIREZ, entered on October 12, 2012, in the amount of $39,421.27, with interest accruing at the rate of 9.50% per year ($10.26 per diem) from July 20, 2012 until paid in full; and The Default Judgment, Decree of Foreclosure, Order of Sale and Appointment of Special Master may be obtained from either the court clerk or the undersigned Special Master prior to the sale date. BANK OF SOUTHWEST has the right to bid at the sale and to apply its judgment to the purchase price as a credit in lieu of cash. For all other bidders, the sale terms are cash or its equivalent by the close of business on the day of sale. The sale may be postponed and rescheduled at the Special Master’s discretion. This property is being sold subject to a one month right of redemption and any property taxes due from the year 2010 forward. Prospective purchasers are advised to make their own examination of title and the condition of the property and consult their own attorney before bidding. Maryl M. McNally, Special Master Mark Taylor & Associates, PC PO Box 898 Roswell, NM 88202-898 (575) 624-2000 (575) 624-0200 FAX

B5

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 30, Nov. 6, 13, 2012 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF LEA FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

No. D-506-CV-2012-00899

CAROLE JANICE McCOY, BRIAN LYNN McCOY, KEITH ROBERT McCOY, MELISSA LEE McCOY, and JON DEAN McCOY, vs.

Plaintiffs,

GROUP ONE: NONE

GROUP TWO: NONE

GROUP THREE: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE FOLLOWING-NAMED DECEASED PERSONS: ROLAND S. THURMOND, IDA GENORA THURMOND McCOY BRIGGS, ETTA THURMOND PIERCE, MARY ELTON THURMOND MOON PEEK, JESSE CLAUDE McCOY, BEULAH McCOY GARRISON, BERT LEE McCOY, ADA CHRISTINE BRIGGS JOHNSON LIND TAYLOR, MARY ELTON BRIGGS KENNEY, GRACE NAYDENE BRIGGS AUL, CLARA ESTELLE McCOY, BETTY LOU McCOY STEPHENS, ROBERT JOSEPH McCOY, MARY KENNEY TROYKY, NANCY LOU KENNEY CHAMPLIN, WILLIAM JAMES AUL, JR., FRANKLIN D. PIERCE, FRANCES LUCILLE LAWRENCE PIXLEY, SIDNEY F. PIERCE, CLARENCE ADREN PIERCE, JOHN H. MOON, BEULAH LAURA MOON, ERMA LEE GREEN, HAZEL CLAUDIA SMITH,

GROUP FOUR: THE FOLLOWING-NAMED PERSONS, IF LIVING, IF DECEASED, THEIR UNKNOWN HEIRS: MICHAEL McCOY STEPHENS, HEATHER STEPHENS BOLLINGER DAVID, GLORIA JEAN GOODNER JUSTUS, JOAN KENNY NEAL, MICHAEL CHAMPLIN, ERMA LEE BOOTH, JAMES L. GREEN, LARRY LOUTHAIN, GROUP FIVE: AND UNKNOWN CLAIMANTS OF INTEREST WHO MAY CLAIM A LIEN, INTEREST OR TITLE IN THE MINERAL RIGHTS ADVERSE TO THE PLAINTIFFS, Defendants.

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

TO ALL OF THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS:

You are hereby notified that a suit has been filed against you in the said Court and county by Carole Janice McCoy, Brian Lynn McCoy, Keith Robert McCoy, Melissa Lee McCoy and Jon Dean McCoy in which they ask to have the title quieted in their names against the adverse claims of the Defendants to a percentage interest in the mineral rights in the property known as SW / 4 of Section 4 & SE / 4 of Section 5, T15S, R36E, N.M.P.M., Lea County, New Mexico as follows: one-seventy-second (1 / 72) in Carole Janice McCoy and three-two hundred eighty-eighty (3 / 288) each in Brian Lynn McCoy, Keith Robert McCoy, Melissa Lee McCoy, and Jon Dean McCoy. You are further notified that unless you enter or cause to be entered your appearance in the said cause on or before the date of the last of three consecutive weekly publications of this Notice, judgment will be rendered in said cause against you by default, and the relief prayed for will be granted. The name, post office address and telephone number of the attorneys for the Plaintiffs are: Butt, Thornton & Baehr, P.C., Post Office Box 3170, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87190, Attention: Sherrill K. Filter, (505) 884-0777. WITNESS my hand and seal of the District Court of Lea County, New Mexico, on October 22, 2012. COURT SEAL

CLERK OF THE COURT

By /s/ Shannon Dennis


B6 Tuesday, November 6, 2012 Legals

---------------------------------Pub. Nov. 6, 13, 20, 2012 FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO LAURA GARCIA Petitioner,

GARAGE SALES

006. Southwest

JULIO GARCIA Respondent.

1408 W. Tilden, Weds-Sat, 7am-4pm. Tools, ladders, twin bed, furniture, baby items, toys, clothes, bicycles & lots more.

025. Lost and Found

Case# DM-2012-761 Case Assigned To: Freddie J. Romero

RE: DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

FOUND FEMALE Chihuahua near N. Ohio, please call to identify, needs a good home. 575-578-1373

706 S. Delaware, Tues-Sat, 8-4. Everything $1 & under except some furniture.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

vs.

025. Lost and Found

LOST FEMALE full bred Yorkie, vicinity of Barnett & Lea St., has tags w/owner’s name/phone number, has an “S” tattoed on her stomach, $200 REWARD. 420-4993

STILL MISSING male black & white Boston Terrier, one white paw. REWARD. 208-2246 LOST Vicinity of Stacy Dr. & S. Union. male Pug, 2yr old, fawn/black, answers to “Tank”. Last seen Oct. 21 no collar Reward! 914-1565 STOLEN TAN color male Chihuahua vicinity 800 block N. Atkinson. Reward! Call 622-2346

STATE OF NEW MEXICO TO: GREETINGS: Notice is hereby given you that an action has been brought in the District Court of Chaves NO. County, DM-2012-761 in which Laura Garcia is the Petitioner, and you are the Respondent, requesting a Dissolution of Marriage. Unless you enter an appearance in said cause on or before December 31, 2012, judgment will be rendered in said cause against you by default.

INSTRUCTION

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

Petitioner’s Address is: 1101 W. Walnut Street Roswell, New Mexico 88203 KENNON CROWHURST Clerk of the District Court By: /s/Vincent Espinoza

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

THE ROSWELL Daily Record is now accepting applications for the position of: OUTSIDE SALES The ideal candidate must possess excellent customer service skills, superior organizational skills a self-starter and strong work ethic. Bilingual preferred. Experience or background in advertising also helpful. Must be computer literate. This is a full time position. Interested Applicants please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Vonnie Fischer, 2301 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88201 or e-mail to: addirector@rdrnews.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! Medical Office Billing: Full-time 9-6 M-F. Experience with medical insurance billing, payment posting, CPT and ICD-coding preferred. Insurance contracting a plus. Competitive salary and full benefits including health insurance, 401K, and profit sharing. Preemployment testing will be conducted. Send cover letter with resume and three references to medicalbillingroswell@ gmail.com. Applicants will be held in strictest confidence.

Maddy-Tay’s Preschool has positions available for Lead Teachers. Must have a minimum of an Associates Degree in Child Development or Early Childhood Education. Starting salary is $9.50 per hour with benefits. Applications can be pickedup at 1200 W. Alameda or 102 S. Utah. MURPHY EXPRESS Now Hiring Managers Join the Winning Team Starting Pay 34K-38K plus commission. Apply at Murphyusa.com/Careers or contact Raul Tapia 915-401-9714.

AUTO TECHNICIAN We will and can beat any dealership pay plans. A progressive and expanding automotive repair facility is seeking a Class A technician, full or part time position. Seeking an organized, motivated, and cheerful professional who can be productive. Excellent pay plan with benefits and bonuses. Pay based on ability and productivity. Certifications preferred, but will train as needed. Locally owned facility. A $2,000 signing bonus is available. Please fax resume to 575-625-1900 or call 575-626-1900

Construction Positions

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575) 622-7710 #45 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SATURDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

open - concrete finisher, carpenter, carpenter helper, drywall, drywall helper, others. Benefits include retirement program, paid vacation/holidays, tool allowance. Valid driver’s license, MVD driving record, pre-employment DT required. Applications at 7 Petro Dr., Roswell. No Phone Calls Please.

AGAPE HOME Care is looking for the best caregivers in Dexter and Hagerman area. We expect the best and show our appreciation for the best. Apply at 606 W 2nd. St. ARBYS OF Roswell is now accepting applications for store manager. Will negotiate salary (DOE). Please send job history or resume to MJG Corporation, 204 W. 4th St., Roswell, NM 88201. Call 520-979-6880 or email to

gchavesmjg@qwestoffice.net

or fax to 575-623-3075.

045. Employment Opportunities

ADORABLE SALON looking for cosmetologist, great booth rent rates, come and take a look. 575-317-7063. BUSY OPTOMETRIST office seeking Full Time Employee. Individual must be dependable, well organized and hard working. Experience and bi-lingual a plus. Please send resume to P.O. Box 1897, Unit 325, Roswell, NM 88202. Experienced bookkeeper-customer service rep for established insurance agency. Fax resumes to 575-623-5423; drop off at 613 W 2nd St, Ste 5; or email to hedtaylor@msn.com THE ROSWELL Job Corps Center is currently accepting resumes for a part-time Cook. The Cook assists the Food Service Manager in meal preparation to assure adequate meals and performs routine food Service work involving a variety of tasks required to prepare and serve food, as well as the cleaning of equipment and the work areas. A primary function of the Cook is to cook according to designated recipes. A High School diploma or its equivalent is preferred. Must be able to obtain Food Handlers Certificate. Must have previous experience in kitchen work and must read and write English in order to read recipes, menus and simple calculations in order to read measures. Interested and qualified individuals are encouraged to apply. For consideration, forward letter of interest and updated resume to: Mary Gonzalez Human Resources Manager Roswell Job Corps Center 57 G. Street Roswell, NM 88203 Email: gonzalez.mary@ jobcorps.org Facsimile: 575-347-7491

An Equal Opportunity Employer M / F / D / V Excellent Opportunity for a reliable outgoing Assistant Manager in a professional office. Strong customer skills & attention to details required. Must have reliable transportation, valid driver’s license & auto insurance. Benefits include free health insurance, weekends off, plus monthly bonuses, have full time positions available. Bilingual preferred. Drop off resume at 2601 Suite C, N. Main. No Phone Calls. Experienced Waitress needed w/good presentation, bilingual. Alicia’s Restaurant, 914-1159

RENTAL CAR company looking for part time counter sales and rental person. Applicant must have above average computer skills. Must be drug free and have clean driving record. Neat appearance a must. Apply in person at Avis Car Rental, inside airport. No Phone Calls.

DRIVERS (Day and Night) needed for Artesia - CDL, tanker endorsement, and good driving record required. Call Brad at 575-631-5927. Standard Energy Services. EEO Dean Baldwin Painting, LP Roswell, NM is seeking: A & P Mechanics & QA Inspectors with active A&P license, for permanent/Full Time positions (Day Shift & Night Shift available). Starting pay: $19.00 p/h, or higher depending on exp, we offer great advancement opportunity & excellent benefits. Send resume to: teresac@ deanbaldwinpainting.com or fax to 575-347-2589. EOE. GO SHOPPING. GET PAID. Join Today and Become A Secret Shopper In Your Area. To learn more visit http://joinstn.com/ EXP. CLEANING person needed for mornings for Government offices. Must have clean background. Call 210-657-5383.

PECOS VALLEY Regional Education Cooperative (PVREC) #8 is seeking to fill the position of Business Manager/Human Resources Director. This is a full time position that administers the PVREC's computerized financial management system and human resources system. The individual filling this position must possess or be eligible for a New Mexico Public Education Department School Business Official License. A minimum of an Associates Degree in Accounting or a related field with at least 24 hours in accounting or business coursework from an accredited college or university is required. Excellent leadership skills, organizational skills and ability to function in a continuous improvement environment are a must.

We offer competitive pay, great benefits and an excellent work environment. We will accept resumes until filled and the position will start as soon as possible.

If interested please contact or send resume to: PVREC #8 ATTN: Lena Trujillo-Chávez P.O. Box 155 Artesia, NM 88211 lchavez@pvrec8.com (575) 748-6100 Phone (575) 748-6161 Fax

The PVREC #8 is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex religion, age, martial status, disability, handicap or veteran status in employment or the provision of services in accordance with the federal and state laws.

Roswell Daily Record

045. Employment Opportunities

Dennis the Menace

Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR REQUISITION# 105384 Production Worker Must be able to pass drug test. Apply at AmeriPride Linen between 8:00am and 11:00 am at 515 N Virginia, Roswell NM 88201 between November 2, 2012 to November 9, 2012. Competitive salary and benefits. This is for full time position. Application must be filled out at office. No phone calls will be accepted. AA/EEO EMPLOYER M/F/D/V EMT PAID training to join elite U.S. Navy EMTs. Good pay, medical/dental, promotions, $ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (800) 354-9627. Kymera Independent Physicians has an opening for a Full time Scheduler. Ability to work in a medical office with knowledge of Medical terminology or ability to learn quickly. Applicants should demonstrate a friendly / outgoing attitude, organizational skills, be detail oriented and pay attention to accuracy. Customer Service Skills to Schedule all necessary test, referrals and appointments for customers. Please fax resumes to the HR office at 575-627-9520.

A LOCAL company is looking for a clerical person to assist with tracking of shipments, scheduling installations and documentation of work orders. Applicant needs to have good computer software knowledge in common software like excel, word; good verbal and written communication skills; good phone skills. Successful applicant will be trained on specific job requirements and will be able to cross train on other duties within the company. Salary dependent on experience. Please send resume to: PO Box 1897 Unit 326, Roswell, NM 88202. LIVE-WORK-PARTYPLAY! Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus. Call 1-866-251-0768. AIRLINES ARE HIRING – Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified – Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-206-4704. EMTs & certified Medical Assistants needed for Chaves County Detention Center Medical Dept. Night shift, excellent pay & opportunity. Call 575-627-4322 or 575-520-2788 for info. DAYLIGHT DONUTS hiring counter help. Part time may lead to Full Time. 4am-12pm. WORKERS WANTED for carpet restoration. Start Immediately. Great job advancement. Call today, 575-578-4817. WORKERS WANTED for carpet shampooing. $1600/mo guaranteed, must do 3 cleanings a day. Start Immediately. Call now, 575-317-2821. TELLER

Bank of the Southwest is seeking a qualified candidate to fill a fulltime Teller position. Primary duties include, but not limited to: understanding and promoting bank products and services, cash handling and customer service.

Requirements: Must have a good attitude and basic computer skills. Must be detail oriented with excellent time management and people skills. Previous bank experience is preferred. Company offers excellent work environment, salary and benefits. Pre-employment drug test and background screen required. Apply in person with Juan at the Bank of the Southwest, 800 W Hobbs, Roswell, NM, by November13, 2012. Drug-Free Workplace and EOE/AA

SERVICES

080. Alterations

RITZY RAGS Alterations is back in business. Call Susan at 420-6242 for all your sewing needs.

125. Carpet Cleaning

SUPERIOR CARPET cleaning fast, reliable service. 622-3899

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 SUNSHINE WINDOW Service Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458 Will clean your home, low rates, 15 yrs exp. Please call Lisa, 575-910-1620. HOUSE CLEANING For more info call 575-840-8425.

150. Concrete

Running Bear Concrete Foundations, sidewalks, patios & driveways. Lic: 373219. Call 317-6058.

185. Electrical

ELECTRICAL SERVICES Any size electrical job. Lic#360025. 575-840-7937 Licensed Electrician, free estimates, 303-246-4410

195. Elderly Care

Private Home care full or part time, good references, 15yrs of exp. 575-840-7309

200. Fencing

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991 Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100

210. Firewood/Coal

JUNIPER, PINON & Ponderosa mix. Cut, split & delivered, $300/cord. 575-973-0373 Cordova Chimney Sweep. Time to get ready for winter. 623-5255 or 910-7552 SEASONED MOUNTAIN firewood, 575-626-9803.

220. Furniture Repair

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

THE LEAVES are falling so you know who to be calling, Dirt Cheap Landscaping! Raking, trimming, mulching, tree care, sprinkler repair, & much more. Specializing in design, installation, & maintenance for your home or business. Call today for your free estimate. 575-347-8611. Senior & Veteran Discount.

285. Miscellaneous Services

WE WILL pick up pecans on halves. Please call 575-420-2724 GET FREE OF CREDIT CARD DEBT NOW! Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 877-639-3441 ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFERERS with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP Replacement Supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 866-938-5101. PROFLOWERS Send Flowers for Every Occasion! Anniversary, Birthday, Just Because. Starting at just $19.99. Go to

www.proflowers.com/save

to receive an extra 20 percent off any order over $29.99 or Call 1-877-837-1671.

WE BUILD and repair furniture. We also sell firewood. 1727 SE Main, 840-7849 or 626-8466

DIRECTV FOR $29.99/mo for 24 months. Over 140 channels. FREE HD-DVR Upgrade! FREE NFL Sunday Ticket w/CHOICE Package! Call TODAY for details 888-719-9465.

Handyman: Free estimates, complete remodeling including plumbing, additions, tile, roof, stucco, windows & dorrs. Guaranteed Work. 910-7035 Miguel.

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-482-3316 www.CenturaOnline.com

225. General Construction

Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

230. General Repair

THE HOLIDAYS have come upon us, let D&B Property Maintenance do any and all your home repairs. We are your property specialist. No jobs too small. One call does it all. Free estimates. 623-8922 “Big E’s” Handyman/Maint Services Quality work. Reasonable rates. Free est. Senior disc. 914-6025

232. Chimney Sweep

CHIMNEY SWEEP Have your woodstove or fireplace inspected and cleaned. Dust free Guarantee. 38 years Experience, Licensed, Insured. Bulldog Janitorial Services 575-308-9988

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Fall Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242. LANDSCAPING YARD service, tree cut down, and hauling junk. Call 626-8587 LAWN SERVICE & much more work at low price. 914-0803. WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Lawn & field mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming - Rock installation & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121. “Big E’s” Landscaping & Yardwork mow, trim, prune property clean-up reason. rates senior disc. 914-6025 Landscaping, Rock/gravel Specializing in sprinklers, fencing, odd jobs. Gonzales Enterprises 317-8053

MEDICAL ALERT for Seniors - 24/7 monitoring. FREE Equipment. FREE Shipping. Nationwide Service. $29.95/Month CALL Medical Guardian Today 888-416-2099 ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare. Get a FREE talking meter and diabetic testing supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, this meter eliminates painful finger pricking! Call 866-406-2158

310. Painting/ Decorating

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. RRP Certified. Call 637-9108.

332. Pool Services

THE SEASON has come upon us. Let D&B Property Maintenance close your pool for the season. We are your pool service and equipment specialist. Certified pool operator. 623-8922

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. Construction or renovation w/20+ yrs exp. Licensed. Call 317-3366. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

395. Stucco Plastering

STUCCO WIRE w/paper, 100ft rolls, $45 420-1352 or 626-7488

405. TractorWork

ATTACHMENT to do any work. Disc, posthole digger, brush hog, blade, etc. 347-0142 or 575-317-7738


Roswell Daily Record 410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale 1908 W. 4th St., custom SW style house & detached building, near walking trail, $320,000. 575-317-6974. FSBO 1798 sq. ft. 3br 2ba $138k OBO. 1306 Westover Dr. Roswell 88201 Call 626-4617 FSBO: 4/2/2, lg kitchen, great area. 2 Isla Ct. No Owner Financing 317-8131 3019 Futura. 3/2/2. Great Area! For more info visit http://photobucket.com/301 9FuturaDr or call 910-9169. 2505 S. Lea, 3/2, 1145 sqft, 2010 const., $119,500. Call 623-5310. FSBO OR Real Estate contract, 3/2/2, 828 Trailing Heart. 505-554-0469 3br/2ba, fenced yard, 1 car garage, recent medal roof, $10k down, owner financing available, $855/mo plus taxes & insurance, 3010 N. Garden, 575-973-2353. 2-4 BR’s, cash offers, new carpet, paint, etc, call M-F 8a-noon 624-1331. 3 OR 4 br 2ba 2 living areas, all brick, $155k w/$10k down owner financing. Call 575-317-7532 2BR/1BA, call and ask for Rick for info, 575-578-0812. FSBO Charming newly remodeled, 4br, 1ba new air/heat & finished basement, 719-237-4680, 575-578-0617 FSBO: Very nice country home, North of Artesia, 3/2/2, 575-746-7429.

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

TWO 5 acre lots on frontage E. Pine Lodge, 4000 per acre. 622-8507 lv msg

FOR SALE by owner! Beautiful brick country home on Hwy 285 South of Roswell, West of Dexter, 112 Sharon Rd. Open floor plan, 2755 sqft, 3br/2ba, fireplace, all tile floor, radiant floor heating, central vac. system, custom built cabinets, martin windows, 2 car garage, enclosed garden area 45x90, 2 ht pumps, central ht/air, heated & cooled shop, dog pen, big barn, 30x40 carport, shipping container 8x40, 18 pecan trees, love oak, read oak trees, all on 10 acres, $375,000. Also 265 acres for sale surrounding home, $800 an acre. Call 575-626-2249 or 575-734-7437. STEAL MY 20 ACRES near Ruidoso, $29,900. Municipal water, maintained roads and electric. Won’t last at this price! Call NMRS 866-906-2857.

500. Businesses for Sale BUISNESS FOR sale well established, parking lot cleaning, 575-420-1873

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

510. Resort-Out of Town ADVERTISE YOUR VACATION PROPERTY, to more than 284,000 New Mexico newspaper readers. Your 25-word classified ad will appear in 32 newspapers around the state for only $100. Call this newspaper for more details or visit www.nmpress.org for more details.

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

DW MOBILE home, 8 plus rooms, semi furnished, 410 E. 23rd #78. WE BUY used mobile homes. Single & Double wides. 575-622-0035. D01090 ‘95 FLEETWOOD, 2br/2ba, $21,000. 624-1833 $16,900 Brand New Mobile Homes with Warranty! Wholesale Division. Open to the Public. Floorplans, Pictures and Prices: www.TheHomeOutletAZ.com

or call 1-800-887-9359 for FREE brochure.

520. Lots for Sale

PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. TWO 5 acre lots, East Grand Plains, $32,500 each or $60,000 for both. Owner financing available. 575-317-6974 Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $18,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352.

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-F 8a-noon 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. All Bills Paid, Free Cable, 1BR $536, 2BR $645, 3br/2ba $745mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 2BR/1BA DUPLEX, $450/mo, no pets, 624-2436. PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. EFF, 1BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377 SUPERIOR CARPET cleaning fast, reliable service. 622-3899 BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $571, 3br/2ba, $625, 5br/2ba $746, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge. {{{RENTED}}} 1 bedroom apartment. 1&2Bd, wtr pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-F 8a-noon 624-1331 2BR 1ba, w/d hookups, all bills pd $550 mo, $500/DD 207 W Mathews 317-9375 2 BR, 1 bath, stove & refrigerator. Call 840-4333 or 910-8170. Cute 2br/1ba, all electric, w/d hookups, fenced yard, $600/mo, $400/dep. 910-0827 908 W. 8th Apt B, 3bd/2ba, all utl. pd. first month $99 special + dep. bckgrd,credit ck required, no w/d hookup. 505-296-4057

Main & Poe, 4600sf, make cash offers, lrg lot, call M-F 8a-noon 624-1331

Town Plaza Apartments New Owners, friendly new managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs & downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Senior HUD WELCOME. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735.

500 S. Sunset, 1500 SQFT, $750 month Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604

1209 N. Richardson #A, 1BR, 1BA, $550 month Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604

410 S. Main, for sale or lease. 575-623-9772 or 575-420-9072.

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished 1&2Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-F 8a-noon 624-1331

NEED AN extended stay rental, all bills paid? 30 homes $990-$2250/month, pet yards, washers, dryers, everything furnished, credit cards welcome. (575) 624-3258, 626-4822. www.cozycowboy.com Furnished Efficiency $350 mo. $250 dep. Bills pd. No pets. 1/2 people only. 423 E. 5th 622-5301. 904 MULLIS, 4bd, 2ba, new home in Enchanted Hills. $1500 + dep. 575-208-8106

903 S. Wyoming, 2BR, 2BA, $1200 month Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished FARM HOUSE at 1700 E. Mescalero Rd, 3/could be 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, fireplace, double garage. Call Sherlea Taylor, 624-2219 or 420-1978 for details.

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 BE FIRST New Remodel 3br/2ba, lg family room, 1 car garage, DW, REF, Self Cl. stove, W/D, No smoking or HUD, 47 Wildy Dr., $975/mo plus deposit. 575-317-1672 or 630-222-8544. SUPERIOR CARPET cleaning fast, reliable service. 622-3899

1715 W. Alameda, complete remodeled, 3br/2ba, ref air, w/d hookups, NO pets or HUD, $950/mo, $600/dep, avail. Nov. 1st. 914-5402.

413 S. Cypress, remodeled, 2br, ref air, w/d hookups, NO pets or HUD, $600/mo, $500/dep, 914-5402

2505 S. Lea, 3br/2ba, 2010 construction, no smokers or pets, $1000 mo. plus $700 dep., valid references, NO HUD, 317-4050 205 E. 23rd Apt B, 3br 2.5ba, a/c, 1 car garage, fenced yard, $750/mo, $750/DD. 317-6479

1BR, 1BA, w/d hookups, ref. air, 315 S. Birch, $475/$475 dep. 317-6479

LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com! 2br, 1ba, fenced yard, 23 W. Byrne & 65 W. Wells, $500/mo-$600/mo, $350/dep. 575-703-4025

1516 N. Pontiac, 2br, 1ba, near parks, stove & fridge, w/d hookups, tile or hardwood floors, remodeled, fenced yard, very clean and cute, $650 monthly, plus dep., No large dogs (small or medium okay), No HUD. References and Rental History required. Call 317-3929. 2/3 BR $600 + $250 dep. N. Missouri (RIAC), ready for occ. Al-703-0420

GOOD, SAFE, quiet neighborhood, nice, clean, 3br, 1 3/4ba. Call 420-8706. SMALL HOUSE, $300/mo, $200/dep, 1008 W. 11th. 317-4307

GOOD LOCATION Large 2 bedroom - stove included, w/d hookups, $600/mo., $450/dep. HUD ok, no pets. 914-0531 after 5pm {{{RENTED}}} 2414 N. Prairie, mobile home, 3br/1.5ba, $550/mo, $300/dep, no pets. 405 W. Wildy, 2br/1ba, no HUD, pets or smoking, $650/mo. 637-0707 or 623-0655

3BR/2BA, CARPORT, $850/mo, $700/dep, NO HUD or PETS, 420-5930.

1&2Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-F 8a-noon 624-1331 {{{RENTED}}} 2br/1ba, w/d hookups, fenced yard, 638 E. Orange, $500/mo, $500/dep. 4BR, 2ba, storage, stove, fridge. Call 910-8170 or 840-4333

Clean 2BR, 1527 N. Michigan $525 + Dep. No Pets. No HUD. Call 626-2190 1br/1.5ba, Washer, dryer, stove, fridge, central ht/air, $500/mo, $450/dep, no pets, smoking or HUD, 623-7565. 2br/1ba, Fenced, washer, dryer, fridge, new carpet, remodeled, no pets, HUD or smoking, $575/mo, $500/dep, 623-7565.

1504 N. Greenwood first month $99 special + dep. 3br/1ba. background check req’d. 505-296-4057.

2BR, 1 3/4 bath, basement, refrig. air $650 mo. $500 dep. Terry 420-5111

CLASSIFIEDS

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished {{{RENTED}}} 4br/2ba, ref air, Goddard Schools, $1400/mo, $1400/dep, 1yr. lease.

2BR, fenced, stove, fridge. 306 W. Hendricks $500/mo, $500/dep, w/d hookups. 626-0935 {{{RENTED}}} 3br/2ba $625/mo. $300/dep. No pets. 3br/1ba, washer & dryer, fridge & range included, central ht/air, fenced yard, dogs allowed, $725/mo, $725/dep. 575-910-3482.

1207 S. Michigan, 3br, 1 3/4ba, appliances included, w/d hookup, garage, no HUD, $700/mo, $500/dep, 623-7678.

{{{RENTED}}} 2br/1ba, fenced, stove & fridge, central air, w/d hkups, 1 block from new school, $500/mo,$500/dep, no pets or smoking, 603 S. Kansas.

1811 N. Cambridge, 3BR, 2BA, $600 month 310 S. Birch, 3BR, 1.5BA, $700 month (HUD) 1512 N. Ohio, 2BR, 1BA, $750 month 411 S. Kentucky, 3BR, 2BA, $800 month 1512 Albuquerque, 3BR 2BA, $900 month 601 E. Mescalero, 3BR, 2BA, $925 month 709 W. Poe, 3BR, 2BA, $925 month 2211 N. Union, 3BR, 2BA, $1000 month 50 Mark Road, 3BR, 2BA, $1300 month 1109 San Juan, 3BR, 2.5BA, $1800 month Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604 {{{RENTED}}} 2br 1ba lrg. garage $575 $400 dep. No Hud, 1013 N. Delaware. 902 MULLIS, 3bd, 2 ba, new home in Enchanted Hills. $1500 mo. + dep. Call 575-208-8106.

555. Mobile Homes for Rent Mobile homes for rent, sale or rent to own, mobile home lots available, RVs welcome. Country Club Mobile Home Manor, 1200 E. Country Club, 623-6660

558. Roommates Wanted

ROOM TO rent, large furnished master bedroom w/walk-in closet, master bath & cable, must love dogs, $400/mo, $100/dep. 575-637-0293

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546.

Office 4 Lease 100 S Kentucky @ First St 3750' SQ modern space h/c access 575/623.8331 222 B W. 2nd, office space, $350/mo, wtr pd, 627-9942

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

THE TREASURE Chest Rock LP’s, furniture,stoves, chandeliers, hummels, antique fishing lures, carnival, depression glass Christmas. Wed-Sat 10-5 1204 Hobbs 914-1855, 622-1543 DISH NETWORK. Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels FREE for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 877-867-1441

3 TON AC compressor unit, new with warranty $650. Call 626-3644

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

PAY CASH for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles. Entire households & estates welcome. Call 627-2033 or 623-6608. ELECTRIC TREADMILL, smaller size, 623-7678. CASH REWARD for Grandpa’s tacklebox 575-354-0365

635. Good things to Eat

GRAVES FARM: GREEN CHILE NOW HERE, SWEET CORN, squash, cucumbers, jalapenos, yellow hots, watermelons, canteloupe, egg plant, call to order okra, black eyed peas, red chile pods & powder, garlic, pinto beans, sweet corn, fresh fruit from Lucas Farms, peaches & plums. 622-1889 Mon-Sat 8-6:00, Sun 1-5. Accept EBT, credit cards & debit, WIC, Sr. coupons.

640. Household Goods

SLEEPER SOFA $100; swivel rocker $50; upholstered chair $35. 623-5605

665. Musical Merchandise

New Fender Telecaster guitar special edition with case & Frontman amp $650 626-7092

715. Hay and Feed Sale

ALFALFA HAY & baled oat, small bale. 3x3 ft medium bales, 4x4 ft lrg bales available. Graves Farm & Garden, 6265 S. Graves Rd., 622-1889, take credit & debit cards.

720. Livestock & Supplies

4 Heifers, ready for breeding or butchering $3800 or trade for tractor, pecan trees or ?? 575-973-2353

TACK & SADDLE AUCTION Fri. Nov. 16th at the Elks Lodge 1720 N Montana Ave. Roswell, NM Preview 6PM, Starts 7PM Full Ad Online http://j.mp/roswelltack (505) 814-6767 for info

745. Pets for Sale

COMMERCIAL SPACE for lease 105 W. 6th, across from Pepper’s, great location. Contact Chuck at 420-6050

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

NEED FURNITURE? Shop Blair’s Trading Post for the best prices in town on your household items. We buy & sell furniture, appliances, home decor, collectibles, electronics, jewelry & bows, hats, fishing & camping items, movies plus everything else from A-Z. Open daily 9-5. 5611 Hummingbird Ln, 627-2033 BEST DEALS IN TOWN! “Tammy’s Discount Jewelry & more” at Blair’s Monterey Flea Market #19, has a large selection of jewelry & bows at $1.00 each. We sell purses, body jewelry, sunglasses, NFL memorabilia & apparel, smoke pipes plus more, all at great prices, 1400 W. 2nd, 623-0136 3 all steel “L Shaped” office desks; good to excellent condition. 575-623-5422. BROYHILL DININGROOM table, 8 chairs, 2 leaves, paid $3400, in storage, barely used, makes very long table, asking $2800 obo. Have other wooden chairs for sale. 317-1273 Attn. Artists, lots of large, medium, small picture frames for your art. Esol, art books, logan compact matcutter, 4 bladed center masting; real oakwood entertainment center, 4ftx4ft. Call 575-626-0926.

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

T-CUP AND TOY PUPPIES Registered, shots, guaranteed, potty pad trained. GREAT PAYMENT PLAN. Some are Hypoallergenic and Nonshedding. cingard1@hotmail.com 575-308-3017 txt4pics

Pekapoo-Pom - $350-800 Hybrid Shihtzus - $500-600 Chiweenie F - $250 Chihuahuas - $200-500 Dapple Mini Doxies - $650 Malty-Poo - $800 Yorkies - $800-1500 Yorky-Poo - $800A BOSTON TERRIER pups 3F, 2M, for info call 575-937-1351 or 937-1917

PUPPY LOVE Grooming & Boarding - Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also 575-420-6655 GOLDEN RETRIEVER. 3 years old male free to good home. 575-545-1923 HARD TO FIND Pekingese for sale, males $250 & females $275, 5 wks old. 623-8714

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

RECREATIONAL

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

2002 SUZUKI 4 wheeler 4x4, great for hunting, $3000. 626-1131

02 Honda 250 reflex motor scooter only 2k miles like new, $2500 obo. 575-910-8177 or 910-1583 ‘06 KAWASAKI Vulcan2050 cc, 4k mile $6000 obo. 623-6999 or 317-3018

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com RV INSIDE storage, protected by locked gate & locked warehouse with burglar alarm! Call 622-1003 or 575-626-0427.

B7

790. Autos for Sale

1999 CHEVY Malibu, 3100 V-6, loaded, like new, 1 owner, $4500. 444-8224 ‘96 BUICK Skylark, excellent cond., 80k miles, $2800, owner financing w/$1000 down, 420-1352.

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

2000 CHEVY Camaro, excellent condition in & out, 88k miles, glass t-top, V6, $5800 OBO. 626-0229

1970 CHEVROLET Chevelle SS 396/350HP, original, $7400 OBO, email or call for details: gonza9g@msn.com / 505-514-0179. ‘05 NISSAN Murano, 7,000 miles, 1 owner, $11,500. 910-0827 2011 NISSAN Xterra, like new, $21,399. 575-513-1944

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2001 FORD Explorer XLT, excellent condition, low miles, $4500, owner financing with $1000 down, 420-1352

‘94 CHEVY Silverado 4x4, extra cab, runs great, $3700. 626-1131

LINCOLN MARK 8 lowrider $1850 owner financing w/$1k down 1401 Old Dexter Hwy 420-1352

84 CHEVY P.U. 1500 V-8 runs great $1800. Call 575-637-4960


B8 Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Roswell Daily Record

“Hometown Proud”

WOW! WOULD YOU LOOK AT ALL THE PEOPLE WINNING BIG MONEY ONLY AT LAWRENCE BROTHERS IGA

PROMOTION

It is simple! When you buy your groceries we will punch your holiday cash card for what you spend. While you’re shopping look for the special products with bonus punches on them and we will add that amount to your purchase! $1000 WINNER

500 WINNER

$

$1000 WINNERS

500 WINNER

100

$

20 WINNER

20 WINNER

100 WINNER

90 WINNER

20

WINNER

$

WINNER

WINNER

$

$

100

$

$

500 WINNERS

$

29 348 WINNER

72

$

$

WINNER

20

10

CHECK OUT WHAT WE HAVE TO OFFER.... $

$

$

WINNER

ROSWELL STORE ONLY!

$

WINNER

GOOD TUES. 11/6 & WED. 11/7 ONLY

Best Choice asst. 14.5 oz can

FREE Best Choice 10-12lb Turkey

TOMATOES

with the purchase of Delicious Best Choice Spiral Ham at

$

2

C

2 88

99

FOR

LB.

asst varieties

WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

cello

10lb bag

IGA VEGETABLES RUSSET POTATOES

2 88

C

FOR

$ 79

1

900 W. Second St Roswell, NM

LETTUCE

C

99

Don’t Forget Our Convenient Hours: Sun. - Thurs. 6:30am till 9pm Fri. & Sat. 6:30am - 10pm Drive-Thru Window In Our Pharmacy

EVERY TUESDAY IS “BANANA TUESDAY” 3 LBS. FOR $1 Join us on facebook.com/lawrencebrothersroswell

Pharmacy Hours: Mon-Fri 9am-6pm Sat. 9am-1pm Closed Sundays


11-06-12 PAPER