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Roswell Daily Record

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DOG TRAVELS 500 MILES

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

Vet injured during Oakland protests

Vol. 120, No. 259 50¢ Daily / $1 Sunday

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — A clash between Oakland police and Occupy Wall Street protesters left an Iraq War veteran in critical condition Wednesday after a projectile struck him in a conflict that came as tensions intensified over demonstrators’ encampments across the San Francisco Bay Area. Scott Olsen, 24, suffered a fractured skull Tuesday in a march with other protesters toward City Hall, said Dottie Guy, of the Iraq Veterans Against the War. The demonstrators had been making an attempt to re-establish a presence in the area of a disbanded protesters’ camp when they were met by

October 27, 2011

THURSDAY

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officers in riot gear. Several small skirmishes broke out and officers cleared the area by firing tear gas after police say protesters threw rocks and bottles at them. It’s not known exactly what type of object struck Olsen in the chaos, though Guy’s group alleges it was a police projectile. Multiple attempts to reach Oakland police by The Associated Press were unsuccessful ahead of a late afternoon news conference. Guy said also it wasn’t immediately clear whether Olsen, a network administrator in Daly City, would need surgery.

“It’s still too early to tell,” Guy said. “We’re hoping for the best.” Curt Olsen, a spokesman for Highland Hospital in Oakland, confirmed that the veteran was in critical condition but could not release any more information. The clash Tuesday evening came as officials complained about what they described as deteriorating safety, sanitation and health issues at the dismantled camp. The same concerns were being raised by San Francisco officials who warned protesters Wednesday that they could face arrest if they continue camping in a city plaza. In a letter, Police Chief Greg Suhr said

DETROIT (AP) — Jim Arrighi last saw Petey, his 4year-old Jack Russell terrier, in the backyard of his home in Erin, Tenn. That was in July, and the 73-year-old retired electrician had nearly given up on seeing his pet again when he learned the dog turned up safe about 500 miles away in suburban Detroit. - PAGE A6

WEB

For The Last 24 Hours

• Fatal car crash • Felon with firearm • State honors officers • Murder case • Billboard draws attention Mark Wilson Photo

SPORTS

Wienermobile lands in Roswell

Rebecca Featherstine-Murrell and her daughter, Natalyn, 3, check out the Weinermobile menu during a visit by the Oscar Meyer rolling hot dog, Wednesday morning.

VANESSA KAHIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

BRONCOS TAKE CARE OF BUSINESS The New Mexico Military Institute Bronco volleyball team went into Wednesday’s conference match with Western Texas needing a win to secure at least the No. 2 seed in the Region V tournament and keep hopes alive of a conference title. - PAGE B1

TODAY’S OBITUARIES

• Lloyd Rowin • Christopher Hellums • Frank Jeffery - PAGE A6

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TODAY’S FORECAST

CLASSIFIEDS..........B3 COMICS.................B7 LOCAL ..................A5 FINANCIAL .............B6 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........A8 LOTTERIES ............A2 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8 NATION .................A6

INDEX

RFD union looks to add lieutenants

See PROTESTS, Page A3

JULIA BERGMAN RECORD STAFF WRITER

TOP 5

INSIDE

the protesters could be arrested for violating a variety of city laws against camping, cooking, urinating and littering in public parks. “Existing and ongoing violations make you subject to arrest,” Suhr wrote in the notice, but didn’t say if or when arrests would occur. Police have taken down a previous Occupy San Francisco camp in the Justin Herman Plaza and also cleared another camp outside the Federal Reserve Bank downtown. Olsen, who completed his service last year, participated in the protest

An icon of American good mood food has landed in Roswell. Oscar Mayer’s Wienermobile made one of several scheduled pit stops at the Roswell Public Library, Wednesday. A hot dog-shaped vehicle with California plates that welcome onlookers to RELSHME, the Wienermobile was parked just across the street from the library off of Fourth Street. The Wienermobile is just one of six such vehicles that travels around the continental U.S. spreading what Oscar Mayer proclaims as “good mood” to all. “The Wienermobile is always on the road,” said Yoli Bologna, a “Hotdogger” who drives the Wienermobile along with fellow Hotdogger, Tailgatin’ Traci. Otherwise known as Yoli Borrego and Traci Johnson, respectively, the Hotdoggers are in charge of touring the American Southwest in the Wienermobile. This year marks a special occasion for the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile. The contraption debuted in 1936 — making this its 75th year as one of the food supplier’s witty marketing strategies. The Wiener-

mobile may be as recognizable as catchy jingles that proclaim — and spell — bologna’s first and last name; and another in which a desire to be a hot dog is expressed. To commemorate 75 years, pictures of the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile’s many incarnations over the years were displayed next to the vehicle. Surprised pedestrians ran up to the Wienermobile as the Hotdoggers awaited children to wrap up story time at the library and come have their picture taken next to the vehicle. Some adult visitors stood next to the Wienermobile and, with a childlike smile, had their photograph taken by a Hotdogger. Others took pictures of the iconic vehicle with their cell phones. “Generations ... have grown up with the Wienermobile,” Borrego said. “No matter where (we) go, everyone’s excited to see it.” Some onlookers — especially children — were eager to see what’s inside the huge steel hot dog on wheels. Ironically, it isn’t hot dogs. The Wienermobile is equipped with six mustard and ketchup colored seats, blue sky ceiling art, condiment splattered carpet and a hot dog-shaped dashboard.

Meeting looks at ways to improve tourism

The Wienermobile horn plays the official Wiener Jingle. Although the Wienermobile is not equipped to make and serve food, it can typically be found at events where hot dogs are grilled and sold, such as at fairs, festivals and parades. Despite the fact that there are six Wienermobiles that are in constant motion, few people get to see one, Borrego said. Such was almost the case with Eunice Thaeler. Born the same year as the Wienermobile, Thaeler had never seen the hot dog icon. “I didn’t realize it was real,” Thaeler said. “I’m not sure I even knew (the Wienermobile) traveled around.” Thaeler said she typically spends Wednesday mornings at the library with her granddaughter, 3-year-old Ruby McLean, where both enjoy story time. “This is clever,” Thaeler said, gazing at the Wienermobile with awe. “I hope a lot of people get to see it. .. I hope (Ruby) remembers it.” Borrego and Johnson, both 22 years old, have been traveling since June and will wrap up their Hotdogging days June 2012. Just See WIENERMOBILE, Page A3

The three-member Labor Management Relations Board for the city of Roswell will make a decision concerning the inclusion of Roswell Fire Department lieutenants into a collective bargaining unit by Nov. 19. The board held an all-day hearing Wednesday on the merits of the petition for representation filed by the Roswell Professional Firefighters Local 1249. Dina Holcomb, who is on contract with Management Associates LLC, represented the city during the hearing. Tom Martin, with the law firm Martin, Dugan and Martin in Carlsbad, represented the firefighters. After the hearing, Richard Olson, chairman of the board, said Holcomb and Martin have until Nov. 4 to submit a written conclusion to the board. The board will reconvene and come to a decision within 15

Search finds toxic mix of meth and filth

See UNION, Page A3

JULIA BERGMAN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Detectives served a search warrant at 111 E. Summit St. around 9 a.m. Wednesday looking for stolen property and found much more than they were originally looking for. The detectives found stolen property, a large amount of methamphetamine, along with numerous items used in the distribution of the drug, and five small children living in deplorable conditions, according to a press release from the Roswell Police Department. Four arrests were made on the spot. Those arrested were all adults. Robert Paz was charged with trafficking methamphetamine

Character Counts!

See SEARCH, Page A3

DALE ANN DEFFER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Expanding Roswell’s tourism image was on the agenda at a marketing meeting led by a representative of the Tourism Association of New Mexico and attended by many of the city’s leaders. David Hayduk, who is based in Santa Fe and contracts for the southeast region of New Mexico, spoke about how he has planned to draw tourists to Roswell to see the sites. “Bringing more financial wealth to Roswell” is the impetus, said Hayduk, and “the customer is king.” With this in mind, he said he will be using more and more hi-tech means to show that Roswell and its surroundings are rich in history, have great weather and are unique in many area attractions. Even though the reported UFO crash in 1947 has been the main focus for a number of years, according to Hayduk, there are many more reasons for visitors to New Mexico to include Roswell on their itineraries. Several web pages are being developed, as well as updates to existing sites, including a new Trip Advisory page which will include year-round attractions. All local businesses are invited to advertise on this page and get See TOURISM, Page A3

Mark Wilson Photo

Roswell High School art students apply the finishing touches to a Character Counts! mural to a wall directly across the street from the front entrance of the school, Wednesday.


Martinez takes aim at pollution rules A2 Thursday, October 27, 2011

GENERAL

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Gov. Susana Martinez said Wednesday she is fighting to keep New Mexicans’ electric rates from increasing due to the implementation of what she described as expensive, nonsensical environmental regulations. Speaking to a group of utility shareholders and state lawmakers, Martinez took aim at a recent decision by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that requires new pollution control equipment at one of the largest coal-fired power plants in the Southwest, the San Juan Generating Station in northern New Mexico. She said New Mexico filed a lawsuit against the EPA last week because the agency infringed on the state’s ability to adopt its own

plan for curbing haze-causing pollution at the plant. Martinez also used her address to encourage people to participate in hearings that will begin in two weeks on whether New Mexico should keep in place regulations aimed at trimming greenhouse gas emissions. The governor said the emissions rules and the EPA mandate are expensive and those costs will likely be passed by utilities on to New Mexico ratepayers. Martinez pointed to statistics that show nearly 20 percent of New Mexicans live below the federal poverty level and that more than 80,000 households relied on some form of federal assistance last year. “Adopting meaningless, incredibly expensive and symbolic regula-

tions that only serve to harm New Mexico families and businesses simply does not make sense,” she said. Despite the governor’s goal of creating a regulatory environment aimed at enticing more businesses to expand and relocate to New Mexico, environmental groups have criticized her for attempting to roll back some of the pollution measures adopted in the waning weeks of former Democratic Gov. Bill Richardson’s tenure. The greenhouse gas regulations were approved by the state Environmental Improvement Board last November after more than two years of legal wrangling and public hearings. Martinez said she appointed new board members after taking office

Moving on up

Roswell Daily Record

in January because the board was “stacked with individuals who were more interested in advancing their political ideology than implementing common-sense policies.” The board has scheduled hearings in early November to consider petitions by utilities, the oil and natural gas industry and others that seek to repeal the emissions rules. Appeals are also pending in state appellate court. Environmentalists contend the rules would spur clean energy development in New Mexico and would put the state in a better position if the federal government were to ever develop its own cap and trade regulations. New Mexico’s rules encompass the state Environment Department’s plan for participating in a

regional cap-and-trade program, as well as a statewide cap of greenhouse gas emissions that was initially proposed by the environmental group New Energy Economy. New Energy Economy has argued that the rules were adopted based on scientific and economic merits and should not be repealed. Critics, including the governor, have said the state’s emissions represent only a fraction of the global problem and that the rules create an uneven playing field for New Mexico businesses. Martinez said Wednesday that every regulation the state considers should be based on science and should balance environmental needs with responsible development and economic growth.

Students arrested on drug charges

Several local high school students were involved in drug offenses Friday morning. One Roswell High School student was arrested and charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. Three Goddard High students were arrested and charged with possession of marijuana.

Firearm negligence

Police arrested a man who discharged a firearm in the 700 block of East 23rd Street, late Saturday night. He was charged with unlawful carrying of a deadly weapon, discharging a firearm within city limits and negligent use of a firearm.

Mark Wilson Photo

Johnathon Parnell of Boy Scout Troop 149 updates the United Way sign on the courthouse lawn to indicate a rise to 31 percent in donations totalling $180,637 raised.

PAC alleges governor’s appointee has conflict SANTA FE (AP) — A liberal political group is calling for the resignation of Republican Gov. Susana Martinez’s appointee overseeing charter schools because of an alleged conflict of interest from her previous legal work on behalf of a charter school trade group and individual schools. Michael Corwin, executive director of Independent Source PAC, said Wednesday that Patty Matthews, director of the Options for Parents Office in the Public Education Department, can’t be impartial in handling state agency issues related to charter schools because she and her law firm have done work for

charter schools. “How can she be fair and balanced?” Corwin asked. A spokesman for the department, Larry Behrens, said there’s no conflict of interest because Matthews severed all ties to her former clients before taking the state job. “Patty does not have a financial interest in any New Mexico charter school,” Behrens said in a statement. “Her extensive experience in the charter community should be seen for what it is, an asset.” Charter schools are public schools freed from some traditional educational requirements to help them offer innovative programs.

Charters can be approved by local school boards or the state. Currently, there are 84 charter schools, with 40 authorized by the state. Matthews assumed her state job in July. Part of her duties is to oversee review teams that make recommendations to the Public Education Commission on whether to approve new charter schools. Matthews told the commission last month, when it was considering 21 school applications, that she di not participate in the review, analysis or recommendations of six of the applicants because of her previous legal work on behalf of those who founded the charter schools.

NM chief justice will not step down in Murphy case

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — State Supreme Court Chief Justice Charles Daniels declined Wednesday to recuse himself from a highprofile judicial bribery case, issuing a lengthy order that accused the prosecutor of trying to force jurists off the case with what he knew to be baseless accusations. “Unsupported attacks made on the integrity of judges are not only insufficient to require recusal, they prejudice the administration of justice by causing our citizens to have unjustified doubts about the fairness of their judicial system,” Daniels wrote.

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Special prosecutor Matt Chandler earlier this month sought to have Daniels disqualified from hearing anything related to the prosecution of state District Judge Michael Murphy, who is accused of funneling bribes for judicial appointments by former Gov. Bill Richardson. Chandler argued that Daniels was among those whose names were mentioned in the alleged pay-toplay scheme. He also raised questions about Daniels’ connection to the defense, implying he had questionable conversations with people close to the case, appointed a judge favorable

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to the defense to oversee the grand jury process and publicly disparaged Chandler’s case. In a 40-page order that was accompanied by another 60 pages of supporting evidence, Daniels took on — and denied — each of the allegations. Among the documents was an affidavit from attorney Kirk Chavez, who used to work with Chandler in the 9th Judicial District Attorney’s Office. In that affidavit, dated Oct. 17, Chavez said he and Chandler had “no facts whatsoever, or any evidence of any kind that Chief Justice Daniels had colluded

with (defense attorney Michael) Stout” in the appointment of Judge J.C. Robinson to oversee the grand jury. Still, Chavez said he and Chandler believed “that the accusation of collusion alone would apply enough pressure on the chief justice to withdraw the appointment of Judge Robinson.” Daniels wrote that the accusations were “legally and factually insufficient” to remove Robinson, “and they cannot be allowed to succeed now in removing a duly elected Supreme Court justice from performing his constitutional duties.”

Anyone with information about these or any other crimes is asked to contact Crime Stoppers at 1-888594 TIPS (8477). Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

New program aims to tackle bullying DALE ANN DEFFER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Several concerned community leaders met Tuesday afternoon in the Farmers Insurance lobby to discuss putting a stop to bullying locally by coordinating with area schools programs. In what has become a nationwide issue, teachers, community leaders, doctors, ministers and counselors struggle to overcome this alarming issue. Locally, Bobby Villegas has lit the fire on the burner. Along with Villegas, who will be putting forth his own funds for a hotline for any child to phone from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. daily to be manned by a counselor from Counseling Associates Central Office and coordinated by Ann Anderson, a kick-off is planned for Tuesday, Nov. 1, at the SOY Mariachi Center. Both posters and T-shirts are currently in the works to be given to area schools. Juan Oropesa, executive director of the Hispano Chamber of Commerce, was also in attendance Tuesday and is a major player in helping to stop bullying locally. C.W. Hamilton, learning facilitator at University High School and a liason between school districts and other groups, was also at the meeting and discussed some of the trends that can result

Roswell Daily Record

from bullying in schools. “I have seen cases where kids drop out of school or decide to become home schooled because they can’t stand being attacked,” Hamilton said. He also said many kids just don’t want to tell a teacher or a parent their problem. Mayor Del Jurney, who was also at the meeting, voiced his concern, “I think that bullying is a very real problem. Adults need to address this early on.” New technologies and the Internet, which has developed Cyberbullying, is also adding to this problem. Some students are being attacked on Facebook, My Space or Twitter. “Sometimes a student will make up an account and then attack another student,” Hamilton said. With this new hotline, any student can at least vent and not be afraid of any retaliation. The Save Our Youth Anti-Bullying Hotline phone number is: 575-6277233. After the designated hours, the call will be redirected to 575-623-1480, run by Counseling Associates. The kick-off event will be at the SOY Mariachi Center, 1120 S. Grand St. in Roswell at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday. For more information, call Villegas at 575625-2886 or Oropesa at 575-626-7802. USPS No 471-200

News & Business Telephone 622-7710 Circulation Telephone 622-7730

Charles Fischer Publisher

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Kim Gordon ........................................................Advertising Director kim.gordon@roswell-record.com Jim Dishman .....................................................Circulation Director jdishman@roswell-record.com Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice The entire contents of the Roswell Daily Record, including its flag on Page 1, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the Daily Record.

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GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Union

Continued from Page A1

days of Nov. 4. State law defines the meaning of supervisors, including certain requirements which must be met to be classified as a supervisor. “The issue today was whether or not the lieutenants fell within those requirements or did not fall within those requirements and that is the decision that this board has to make,” Martin said following the hearing. “They’re going to say yes they fall within the requirements of being a supervisor therefore they cannot be a part of the (bargaining) unit. Or no they don’t and so they can be part of the unit.” Assistant City Manager Stacye Hunter expressed the city’s position on why the lieutenants should not be included in the unit after the hearing, “They are supervisors, they’re confidential employees and they are management employees.” Hunter explained by confidential employees she meant lieutenants are privy to personnel matters that are confidential. According to the New Mexico Public Employee Labor Relations Act, “public employees, other than management employees and confidential employees, may form, join or assist a labor organization for the purpose of collective bargaining through representatives chosen by public employees without interference, restraint or coercion and shall have the right to refuse any such activities.” Two lieutenants from the Roswell Fire Department, Eric Mann and Chris Mann; a fire apparatus driver for the Fire Department, Anthony Souza; and Deputy Fire Chief Chad Hamel, as well as Fire Chief James Salas, all served as witnesses during the hearing. Eric Mann is the current president of the Roswell Professional Firefighters Union Local 1249, which is a local chapter of the International Association of Fire Fighters. Union Local 1249 is not recognized by the city of Roswell as a union. “They have asked us to recognize them as the firefighter union and the discussion is which positions will be included in the union,” Hunter said, adding the benefits of the union being recognized by the city of Roswell would be negotiable. According to Hunter, in the previous state law, where there was collective bargaining, lieutenants were part of the bar-

Search

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and possession of drug parapher nalia. Tuf f Brazeal was charged with a failure to pay fines. Alex Sanchez was also charged with a failure to pay fines out of Municipal Court. Angela Rice was charged with failure to appear, failure to pay fines and failure to complete community service. The charges against Brazeal, Sanchez and Rice were from outstanding warrants that hadn’t been served. They were the only warrants that were able to be issued at the time. “The rest of it is in the works,” said Travis Holley, Roswell Police Department public information officer. Detectives had developed enough information to obtain a search warrant looking for stolen property in connection with recent burglaries in the community. Brazeal was the suspect in the case that generated the search warrant. According to Holley, detectives are confident that the property they found will tie Brazeal to recent bur-

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fresh from a stop in the Albuquerque and Santa Fe region, the Wienermobile will visit Graves Family Farm, 6265 Graves Road, for a Halloweenie Roast on Friday, from 6-9:30 p.m.

Tourism

involved. There are also opportunities for both still photographs as well as video. The upcoming Centennial Celebration marking 100 years of New Mexico statehood is going to be huge, Hayduk said. Throughout the state, organizations and attractions are in gear to celebrate the Land of Enchantment’s unique cultural diversity and its early history as well as food, art and entertainment. Albuquerque was featured in the New York

Protests

Continued from Page A1

in Oakland because he felt corporations and banks have too much influence on the government, Guy said. A vigil for him is scheduled to be held Wednesday evening near the Oakland City Hall, she said. Oakland demonstrators vowed on Wednesday to return to their protest site just hours after police

cleared hundreds of people from the streets with tear gas and bean bag rounds. A Twitter feed used by Oakland’s Occupy Wall Street movement called on protesters to return to downtown at 6 p.m. for another round, and some demonstrators vowed to return as soon as possible. Max Alper, 31, a union organizer from Berkeley, gathered with a handful of other protesters Wednesday at the scene of Tuesday

A3

night’s clash. “As soon as these barricades are moved, hundreds of people are going to come back. These actions by police were wrong, but they’re just going to strengthen the movement,” Alper said. Alper was arrested Tuesday morning when he went to witness the police raid on the Occupy Oakland encampment outside City Hall, he said.

j.bergman@roswell-record.com

glaries. “It’s my understanding they (detectives) were successful (in finding the stolen property). They are looking at pursuing burglary warrants for Tuff Brazeal and another individual that was in the residence. They recognized him (Brazeal) off a surveillance video that they had, so there will be additional burglary warrants coming out of this,” he said. Describing the house as disgustingly filthy, Holley said the five children found living in the home were turned over to the New Mexico Children Youth and Families Department. Holley did not specify the age ranges of the children or any medical conditions they may have. He said all the children will be drug tested. “Between the deplorable conditions of the house and the presence of methamphetamine, all the adults in the house will be looking at child abuse charges,” Holley said. There were eight adults present in the house at the time of the search, according to Holley.

Wienermobile

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gaining unit. “They have submitted a petition to be a fire union and we have protested lieutenants being in the union, that’s why they had the hearing today,” Hunter said. The old bargaining law expired on June 30, 1999. “What I understand happened up here is there was in fact a union and collective bargaining agreement for a number of years. When the old Public Employee Bargaining Acts got taken away because it was expired out, for some reason nobody followed up and did anything so you have this gap from approximately 1999 till now that there was no union at the Fire Department,” Martin said. Employees in a bargaining unit can negotiate for a collective bargaining agreement and get the benefits of that status. The inclusion of lieutenants in bargaining units varies throughout the state of New Mexico. According to Martin, lieutenants from the fire department in Carlsbad have been part of a bargaining unit for years, as have the lieutenants in Las Cruces. Yet the fire department lieutenants in Hobbs are not part of a unit. “There are certain levels of supervision that people can engage in that do not disqualify them. There are certain other levels of supervision that would disqualify them. That’s what we’re struggling with. I have seen lieutenants in bargaining units where it does not create a conflict of interest,” Martin said. “The other thing I’ve gleaned out of this that I think is unfortunate but it’s true in a lot of instances when you first start having the union wanting to organize, it is automatically presupposed that there is not going to be a decent working relationship between the union and the city or the union and management. That doesn’t have to be the case.” Generalizing about the desire of a group of employees to become unionized in the public sector, Martin said one of two things, if not both, can be honed in on, “You may have a salary issue question. Another motivation that you oftentimes run into centers in the disciplinary. How is management working with its employees? Is it treating its employees in a way that generates confidence, cooperation, that sort of thing.” He added, “No union ever organized an employer, the employer organizes the union by their conduct.”

Thursday, October 27, 2011

“This was a classic drug house. We’re still trying to sort out who lived there; if they all lived there,“ Holley said, adding, “It’s my understanding from talking to detectives that Robert Paz is the actual owner of house.” Detectives were able to charge Paz on the spot with trafficking methamphetamine given the paraphernalia in conjunction with the amount of methamphetamine found. Holley did not specify the amount of methamphetamine found. Holley expressed his thoughts regarding the conditions inside the residence, and said that regrettably they weren’t the worst he’s ever seen. “You’d like to think that, and it’s not something you see all the time, but unfortunately when you have methamphetamine involved it’s very common,” He said. “The children are the true victims out of a deal like this. Nasty, filthy living conditions, stolen property, that all goes right along with methamphetamine and unfortunately it is not uncommon.”

j.bergman@roswell-record.com

The Wienermobile will also make a pit stop during the Roswell Youth Soccer League Game Day at 1612 W. College Blvd., Saturday, from 7 a.m. to noon. The Wienermobile’s last stop in Roswell will be at Farmers Country Market, 2800 N. Main St., on Sunday, from noon to 5 p.m. V.KAHIN@ROSWELL-RECORD.COM Times travel section last Sunday. For Roswell, the UFO attractions are a primary draw, but other points of interest include the Roswell Symphony Orchestra, Bitter Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Bottomless Lakes State Park, the Spring River Park and Zoo and many others. The idea of putting brochures in local motels and restaurants to advertise these attractions was discussed during the meeting. Also on the agenda was for native New Mexicans to do more traveling within the state rather than going elsewhere, “If you live in New Mexico, visit New Mexico,” was the slogan.

MON.-THURS. 8:00-6:00 FRIDAY 8:00-7:00 SATURDAY 8:00-6:00 SUNDAY 10:00-5:00


A4 Thursday, October 27, 2011

OPINION

Steve Jobs was an example of the free market

The death of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, who was well and justly eulogized in the national media, offers perspective on the meaning of the free market. Jobs became an icon of the free market by creating products that people bought because they wanted them. But many of today’s most attractive opportunities to get rich are not in the free market at all, and this is noteworthy in the national debate on the future of tax policy and the economy. It’s argued that taxes on the wealthy should not be increased because if they keep their money, they will, through the free market, create the jobs. Because that is obviously not working, we are told that they are keeping their money parked on the sidelines only because the regulatory environment is too uncertain to allow them to invest. Both major political parties are responsible for that.

MERILEE

DANNEMANN TRIPLE SPACED

But much of today’s wealth creation is not coming from the free market. This is true in New Mexico more than in most states, with our national laboratories, military bases and the industries that serve them underpinning so much of our economy. But that’s just the beginning. Are you as sick as I am of those obnoxious TV ads for auto insurance? That looks like vigorous free-market competition, except that the market exists only because state law requires all drivers to buy the insurance. Even if the law is unevenly

EDITORIAL

enforced (yes, we know!), this market was made by government. Several lines of insurance are like that. Companies may be competing with each other, but they are selling to consumers who have little or no choice but to buy the product, and the product itself is highly regulated. (I have previously written about New Mexico title insurance.) The recent “pay to play” scandal, involving several billion dollars in public investment funds, reminded us of how a few investment experts get rich advising government on investing taxpayer money. Millions of dollars were paid to agents and marketers to steer New Mexico’s state investment funds to favored firms. Aside from the scandal, the industry regards the size of the fees as legitimate reward for handling that much money — and that much money is commonly found in government funds or other regulated institutional

Roswell Daily Record

funds. An oil man recently told me about an under-reported aspect of New Mexico’s notorious pit rule. The rule imposes new standards for how the pits created by oil drilling must be cleaned up. Did you think the controversy was between the oil industry and environmentalists? Not quite, says my oil man friend. The oil industry’s cost is the disposal industry’s profit. Somebody’s making money from that regulation. And we learned a few weeks ago that the company with the contract for Albuquerque’s red-light camera program was also funding the publicity campaign to continue the program. Professional athletes, admired national symbols of individual achievement, play in taxpayer funded fields and stadiums, with team owners forcing cities to compete for the most lucrative deals, in leagues protected from competition by anti-trust exemptions.

New Mexico’s investments in film industry infrastructure are threatened by more generous subsidies from other states. Much of what is done in America these days in the name of entrepreneurism involves devising clever new ways to make money from opportunities created by government programs, government spending, or government regulations, from school milk programs to highway construction, scientific research and industrial safety. Not exactly the Steve Jobs model. This is not to denigrate the many business people who work hard to provide quality, cost-effective products and services to government or to citizens because of government — or the value of those services themselves. But I wish that when we talk about tax and economic policy, we’d restrain the pious platitudes about the virtues of the free market. © New Mexico News Service 2011

Better things to do

With all of the nation’s other problems having been solved and the U.S. Senate functioning like a Swiss watch, four Democratic U.S. senators have turned their attention to the critical problem of major baseball players who chew or dip tobacco. “When players use smokeless tobacco, they endanger not only their own health, but also the health of millions of children who follow their example,” Sens. Dick Durbin of Illinois, Frank Lautenberg of New Jersey, Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut and Tom Harkin of Iowa wrote last week in a letter to the Major League Players Association. Major League Baseball wants to ban the products, which used to be available free in big-league clubhouses. But the players union thinks it is a matter of individual choice. Health officials say that using smokeless tobacco can be dangerous. And anyone who remembers the 1982 World Series, when Whitey Herzog of the Cardinals and Harvey Kuenn of the Milwaukee Brewers set the all-time record for Most Televised Shots of Spitting Managers, will agree that watching it can be disturbing. But is this really a matter for senatorial attention? Fix the deficit, guys, and campaign finance. Then we’ll talk. Guest Editorial The St. Louis Post Dispatch

LETTERS

Financial and social injustice

Dear Editor: How many American workers could be supported by the average pay of an S&P 500 index company CEO? Large university presidents — 25 U.S. presidents — 28 Nurses — 178 Police officers — 213 Teachers — 225 Firefighters — 252 Minimum wage earners — 753

Fact 1: The billionaire Warren Buffet in a good year can exceed in income the total wages paid in Chaves County by more than 10 fold (population of Chaves County is approximately 65,000 people). Fact 2: Hispanic America is now 18 times poorer than White America (2010 census). Fact 3: 17 million children in America live under food stress. 10 million of these children are subject to severe food stress and do not eat every day. Fact 4: In nearly every social category, America trails the rest of the industrialized world in issues like the cost of education, medical care and child development. In fact the current comparison numbers represent a national disgrace. Conclusion: It is impossible to achieve financial and social justice (equality) in a society where 1 percent of the people own more than 95 percent of the wealth. Jim Osborne Roswell DEAR DOCTOR K: I had my hair chemically straightened six months ago. I love the way it looks, but I’m worried that hairstraightening products may not be safe. I hear they contain formaldehyde. DEAR READER: You’re right to be concerned. Chemical hairstraightening products pose more of a risk than you may think. Hair straighteners are also known as hair relaxers, keratin treatments and hair-smoothing products. They work by breaking and refor ming the chemical bonds in keratin, which is the main protein that gives shape to each hair. During the treatment, the hair -straightening product is applied to your hair and left in

Embracing singleness leaves emptiness

In the cover story of the November Atlantic, Kate Bolick declares her liberation from marriage: “It’s time to embrace new ideas about romance and family — and to acknowledge the end of ‘traditional’ marriage as society’s highest ideal.” The odd thing about “progressive” tropes is their peculiar, static, timeless quality. For progressives, time stands still. Each new generation is posed as poised to break through taboos that, in truth, vanished long ago. The moder n youngish woman like Kate (mateless and childless at 39 years of

Doonesbury

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

place for some time. Afterward your hair is blown dry or ironed. One treatment lasts two to three months. Many hair straighteners contain a chemical called formaldehyde (also known as formalin). This substance is associated with various health problems. The chemical can cause rashes when it comes in contact with

MAGGIE

GALLAGHER COLUMNIST

age) must find a way to view her sexual predicament as a social breakthrough, a revolutionary act, an act of liberation from her mother’s restricted and restrictive norms. “In 1969, when my 25-yearold mother, a college-educated high school teacher, married a

your scalp or the skin of your neck and face. The chemical’s fumes can get in the air, and breathing in that air can cause irritation of your nose, throat and lungs. The symptoms can include breathing difficulties, heaviness in the chest, sore throat, headache, fatigue, and burning eyes, nose and throat. If you have had many hair straightening treatments, and never had these symptoms, you are less likely to ever get them. Formaldehyde can cause cancer in rats. That doesn’t mean it also causes cancer in humans, however. The National Cancer Institute and others have conducted studies of workers who are exposed regularly to for maldehyde fumes. Since formaldehyde is used to preserve

handsome lawyer-to-be, most women her age were doing more or less the same thing. ... She’d never had sex with anyone but my father. Could she have even envisioned herself on a shopping excursion with an ex-lover, never mind one who was getting married while she remained alone?” Kate wonders. Kate is probably the very last generation of (not very) young women who can even imagine themselves re-enacting this fantasy of sex as liberation. She is the very last generation of women whose mothers married young in a world that frowned on pre-

dead bodies, people who work in funeral homes are exposed to the chemical. Some studies have indicated that rates of certain blood cancers and brain cancers may be higher in funeral workers. It’s by no means a proven risk, but there is a reason for people who work with embalming fluid to be concerned. However, I’m not aware of any studies indicating that hairdressers have a higher risk of cancer. And there’s no evidence that people who get their hair straightened every several months have a higher risk of cancer. There’s another concern, too. Hair-straightening products are allowed to contain small concen-

See DR. K, Page A5

marital sex, had children with husbands and — because any actual marriage is finite and human longing is infinite — fantasized a better, bigger life and marriage for their daughters than the humdrum reality of married love. I know. At 51, I’m about a decade older than Kate. My son is just a decade younger. The next generation of Atlantic cover girls on marriage will have mothers who had too much sex before marriage, and perhaps even afterward, who came of age in a society that celebrated casual

See GALLAGHER, Page A5

25 YEARS AGO

Oct. 27, 1986 •Air man Diane R. McClure, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richie E. McClure of Ruidoso, has graduated from Air Force basic training at Lackland Air Force Base. During the six weeks of training the airman studied the Air Force mission, organization and customs and received special training in human relations. • David W. Myers, son of Carol A. Bowman of Albuquerque, and Wesley M. Myers of Artesia, has been promoted to senior airman. Myers is an airborne radar systems specialist at T inker Air Force Base with the 963rd Airbor ne War ning and Control Squadron.


LOCAL

A5

‘Not just for seniors’ – pay attention youngsters! Roswell Daily Record

MARIFRANK DAHARB SENIOR CIRCLE DIRECTOR

All my life I’ve heard “old” people complain about their joints when the weather got cold. Or they predicted rain because of pain in the joints. Well, I guess I’m officially “old” now because even our mild winters are murder—knees, hips, shoulders. The Arthritis Foundation has some questions you young folks can begin asking yourselves to perhaps avoid some of the pain many older people experience: •Are you 45 years old or older? •Have you ever had an injury to your knee severe enough to put you in bed or to cause you to use a cane, crutch or brace, or to require surgery? (How many older folks have complained of old war injuries or football mishaps?!) •Are you more than 10 pounds overweight? •Have you spent more than three hours a day doing heavy physical activities such as bending, lifting or carrying heavy items on a regular basis? •Did you have hip problems that caused you to limp as a child? Give those questions some thought. Some are unavoidable, but if you are overweight, LOSE IT now before it’s too late! Obesity

Dr. K

can cause a lot of other health problems too, but it can really wreak havoc with your joints. The Foundation suggests several ways to help prevent or lessen arthritis symptoms which really can be debilitating. •Quit smoking. Smoking increases the risk of fractures and can reduce bone mass which can lead to osteoporosis. (And of course there are many other good reasons to quit.) •Lose weight. Every extra pound you put on puts four times the stress on your knees. Research has shown that losing as little as 11 pounds may cut your risk of osteoarthritis of the knee by 50 percent. •Eat well. This will not only help you lose weight but can strengthen bones. Boost your calcium intake to help keep your bones sturdy and lower the risk of osteoporosis. There are plenty of sources besides milk, including yogurt, broccoli, kale, figs, salmon and, of course, calcium supplements. •Eat oranges or drink orange juice. Research shows that vitamin C and other antioxidants can reduce your risk of osteoarthritis. •Add color to your diet. Choose fruits and vegetables in a wide range of color to get the maximum nutrients, such as fiber, diseasefighting antioxidants and

Continued from Page A4

trations of formaldehyde (0.2 percent). But several hair-straightening solutions have been found to contain well above the allowable limit. For example, one popular hair-straightening product that advertised itself as “formaldehyde-free” actually contained 6.8 percent to 11.8 percent formaldehyde. If you haven’t had rashes and irritation of your respiratory system from past treatments, there is little reason to stop them — so long as your hairdresser

an abundance of phytochemicals. •Hit the salad bar. Romaine and bibb lettuce, broccoli, spinach, kale or parsley can lessen the amount of bone loss that comes with age thanks to a high calcium count. (Go easy on the dressing!) •Eat more fish. Omega-3 fatty acids, found in coldwater fish such as salmon and mackerel, can help keep your joints healthy. Studies even show they can reduce pain and inflammation of stiff joints. Consider supplementing your diet with fish oil capsules. •Curtail caffeine intake. Studies show that too much caffeine can weaken bones, so try to resist the second and third cups of coffee. •Exercise! Swimming and water exercise may be the best exercise for bad joints, but not everyone has access to a pool. So walk your dog. It will keep your joints moving and your heart pumping and your weight down. Warm up first to give your muscles and joints a chance to ease into it. Wear practical shoes that are flexible, supportive and have square or round-

continues to use the same hair-straightening products. As an alternative, ask your hairdresser if he or she has a hairstraightening liquid that does not include formaldehyde; they do exist. Finally, your hair can be straightened without the use of chemicals by using a flat iron. The downside is that this may damage and dry out your hair if not done carefully. Dr. K o m a r o ff i s a p h y s i c i a n a n d professor at Harvard Medical School. Go to his website to send questions a n d g e t a d d itional infor mation: www.AskDoctorK.com.

Thursday, October 27, 2011

ed toes. A rubber sole will give you more cushion and make sure the shoe is flexible at the ball of your foot. •Monitor how you feel after exercise. If your joints are still hurting, try to lighten up next time. Don’t do too much too fast. •Stretch throughout the day. It will re-energize you and help keep your mus-

Gallagher Continued from Page A4

cles and ligaments flexible and strong. •Do yoga. It hasn’t been the hottest trend for the past 5,000 years for nothing! Yoga keeps your joints strong and your muscles limber, among other benefits. •Consider a brace. Consult your doctor to see if a brace for the elbow, wrist and other joints would help prevent injury and reduce the load on joints. •Don’t stomp your feet. Kickboxing, step aerobics and jogging can be tough on joints. Consider lowimpact activities such as

sex, divorce, unwed-motherhood, abortion. Your mother’s been there, done that. Of course, that will not stop the “progressive” young women from trying to find some way their ongoing sexual perplexities represent a revolutionary advance for women. But because Kate is an honest woman, her essay reads like a dreary slog through the gap between myth and reality of the sexual revolution. Kate goes back to speak to younger women today and is appalled by what she finds among 20-somethings: “Most of them said that though they’d had a lot of sex, none of it was particularly sensual or exciting. It appears the erotic promises of the 1960s sexual revolution have run aground on the shoals of changing sex ratios, where young women and men come together in fumbling, drunken couplings fueled less by lust than by a vague sense of social conformity.” What caused the “de-eroticization of sex,” she wonders. Who exactly are the new enemies of Eros? Sex has been divorced from meaning. Men are not being raised to be good family men, and women are not being raised to appreciate good family men. And men are failing to become the kind of men women want. Porn is available for all as a substitute for life. So Kate, facing a future without chil-

biking and swimming and walking.

•And there’s nothing like a war m bath to soothe aching muscles and joints!

If you think you have arthritis, see your doctor and follow his or her advice. There are medications that can help with the pain. But I’d give some of the above a try! I know a lot of us older folks wish we had done all this years ago. Because a lot of us are starting to do it now, and it sure would have been easier when our bodies were younger!

dren or marriage, wants to celebrate singleness and to kill her youthful idealization. “Everywhere I tur n, I see couples upending existing norms and power structures,” she says, citing a friend who fell in love with her dog walker, a man 12 years younger, with whom she stayed for three years “and are best friends today.” Well, everywhere I turn in Kate’s essay I see women doing the best they can to celebrate the best they feel they can get, and its unbearably sad. The truth is celebrating singleness — i.e., celebrating “not doing something” — makes no sense. Loving is better than not loving. Choosing to love and commit to a husband or a child is a much higher ideal than choosing not to; that’s why it needs to be celebrated and idealized. Of course, not everyone marries or becomes a mother, and of course every human life has other possibilities for meaning, and other forms of love to give. But all of these other loves — the aunt, the grandparent, the best friend — came into being because somewhere some woman gave herself to the independence-shattering act of making a family. The decline of manhood and norms around sex, marriage and family produces for young women what may in fact have to be endured — but celebrated? Not after reading Kate’s essay. Maggie Gallagher is the founder of the National Organization for Marriage and has been a syndicated columnist for 14 years. © 2011 Maggie Gallagher

FREE SYMPHONY CONCERT TICKETS FOR

SENIOR CITIZENS

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2011 • 7:30 P.M.

Soloist: Kirill Gliadkovsky, Pianist NMMI PEARSON AUDITORIUM

The merchants, professional community, and private citizens and others listed below, are sponsoring tickets for each of this season’s Roswell Symphony Orchestra concerts. This gesture is their “thank you” for your patronage and for your support of the City of Roswell and surrounding communities. Tickets are available only by mail. Requests will be honored on a first received, first served, no choice basis. Each pair of tickets will be for adjoining seats. Also note that the tickets are pre-assigned to specific row and seat numbers. Remember sponsors do not have tickets.

Coupon must be mailed with a self-addressed, stamped envelope to:

Filmmaker Mark Mathis will be in attendance for a special Q&A following each show on the 27th

ROSWELL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 1717 WEST 2ND, SUITE 205 ROSWELL NM 88201

COUPONS PRESENTED IN PERSON AT THE RSO OFFICE CANNOT BE HONORED.

FREE TRANSPORTATION WILL BE PROVIDED FOR SENIORS 60+ TO AND FROM THE CONCERT BY CHAVES COUNTY J.O.Y. CENTERS, INC. SEATING IS LIMITED. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON TRANSPORTATION OR TO RESERVE YOUR SEAT PLEASE CALL RUDY GARCIA 575-623-4866.

DIRECTORY OF SPONSORS

Notice: The Roswell Symphony Orchestra is the midst of the 2011-2012 Send a Senior Campaign. The following is a list of last year's contributors. Future ads will be updated with current contributors.

OCT 25 - 27

$6 (2:30, 5:00) and $8 (7:30)

Galaxy 8 Theater 4501 N. Main Roswell, NM

Accounting Services Monteith & Sexe, CPAs, PC Attorneys Sanders, Bruin, Coll & Worley, PA-2 Banks & Savings & Loan Pioneer Bank Brokers - Stocks & Bonds Howard Perry-Merril Lynch Wells Fargo Advisors-Vic Dodson-2 Churches First United Methodist Clothing & Accessories Chewning Footwear Electrical Contractors J&G Electric-2

Food Markets Super Meat Market, Inc.

Insurance & Investments Marlin Wells & Associates Carolyn Mitchell CLU ChFC-New York Life Robert V Ely Insurance Farm Bureau Financial Services Movers & Truck Rentals American Moving & Storage

Oil & Gas Industry Johnson Enterprises-5 Kay McMillan Hinkle Brothers O&G-4 New Mexico Oil Corporation-2 Read & Stevens, Inc. Pharmacy Primm Drug Physicians & Surgeons James A. Boss MD Tres and Kathy Latimer-2 Dr. & Mrs. Wenner Howard L. Smith MD-2 Kymera Independent Physicians SCOR Orthopedic Dr. William Peterson Printers Inkredible Printing Utilities Xcel Energy-2 Friends of Music Cooper Malone-2 Bill & Karen Armstrong Shirley Childress W Gordon Dickinson-2 Mr. & Mrs. Mike Pettit

Robert G. Armstrong-2 Roxanne and Fred Yates Chuck & Candace Russell Mike & Jeanelle McGuire

SENIOR CITIZEN TICKET REQUEST Nov. 5, Concert Please circle “1” or “2” Tickets

________________ NAME ________________ STREET _________________ CITY, STATE, ZIP Enclose a self-addressed, stamped emvelope & mail to: Roswell Symphony Orchestra 1717 W. 2nd Ste . 205 Roswell, NM 88201


A6 Thursday, October 27, 2011

NATION/OBITUARIES/RECORDS

Tenn. dog missing for 3 months turns up in Mich.

AP Photo

Nancy Greiser, of Wayne, Mich., holds Petey during media interviews at the Michigan Humane Society’s Rochester Hills Center for Animal Care in Rochester Hills, Mich. on Tuesday.

OBITUARIES

Lloyd Rowin

Lloyd Rowin was bor n March 26, 1923, in Ellis County, Texas. He passed from this life on Oct. 23, 2011, at Roswell Regional Hospital. A memorial gathering will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 29, 2011, at the family home at 1606 E. College Blvd. Cremation has taken place and his ashes will be scattered in Ruidoso, N.M., where his wife’s ashes were scattered. He was preceded in death by his wife, Vivian Rowin; parents, James and Alma Rowin; and five siblings. Lloyd’s survivors include his daughter, Frances and husband, Tom Santos, of the family home; two granddaughters, Nicole and Shelby Peterson, and grandson Michael Todd Kenneth and family all of Texas. His surviving siblings are Imogene Lee of Roswell; Jimmie Rowin of

PUBLIC RECORDS

Arkansas, Jack Rowin of Manton, Calif., Shirley Meade of Tennessee and Bob Rowin of Casa Grande, Ariz., and also 13 grandchildren. Lloyd went into the Navy in April 1942 and did boot camp in San Diego and served during World War II on transport ships delivering foods to South American countries and once through the Panama Canal delivering beans and bombs to Russia. In the Pacific travels he went to Australia, Guadalcanal and one trip to the Aleutians. His ship was under attack more than once during his time of service. After his discharge he went to work for Ma Bell in their construction department. He spent all of his time in New Mexico upgrading the telephone lines from four or five conversations to 30 to 35 on a line and stringing new lines, mostly in northern New Mexico for the telephone company. Within 20 years all their work was obsolete as the new buried cable for microwave technology came into being and then fiber optic lines. When he retired from the telephone company they had just gotten their first computer. He continued to do contract construction work for the telephone company for 10 more years. He and his wife, Vivian, traveled and enjoyed their grandchildren.

Divorces Filed Oct. 18 Mark Alan Brackeen vs Jacalyn Freeborn Brackeen Michael Crump vs Deborah C. Crump Filed Oct. 19 Yolanda Diaz vs Raul Diaz Final Beverly A. Zamora vs Lazaro B. Zamora Elizabeth Chrisman vs Adam York Chrisman Jessica M. Carrillo vs Paul M. Carrillo Filed Oct. 24 Josefina Franco vs Marquis A. Franco Final Lori L. Morales vs Jacob I. Morales Jose Eduardo Hernandez vs Maria Pastora MartinezGomez

DETROIT (AP) — Jim Arrighi last saw Petey, his 4-yearold Jack Russell terrier, in the backyard of his home in Erin, Tenn. That was in July, and the 73-year-old retired electrician had nearly given up on seeing his pet again when he learned the dog turned up safe about 500 miles away in suburban Detroit. A Michigan Humane Society volunteer was expected to return Petey to Arrighi this morning. “This is just a little town and everybody is buzzing about it,” said Arrighi’s daughter, Tyanne Morrison. Most of Erin’s roughly 7,000 residents know one another, and many of them would recognize Petey, which is why Arrighi, Morrison and their friends suspect he was poochnapped by an out-of-towner. Morrison believes Petey left his yard “and somebody picked him up.” “We searched. We knew someone had gotten him,” she told The Associated Press by phone on Wednesday. “We got on 4-wheelers and went all over the area. There had been some more dogs over the last few months that were missing.” While struggling with the loss of his dog, Arrighi also lost his wife, Juanita, who suffered from pulmonary disease and died Oct. 12. “Since my mother passed away, even I told him ‘why don’t we go to the pound to give a home to a puppy that don’t have a home,”’ Morrison said. Last week, a homeowner in Rochester Hills, about 20 miles north of Detroit, saw Petey in his backyard and took him to a Humane Society animal care center. As it does with every recovered dog and cat, the Michigan Humane Society scanned Petey for an implanted microchip, which led the organization to its owner, spokesman Kevin

His health failed this summer and his daughter and husband moved in with him to care for him. His was a life well lived and he was loved by his family. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballar d Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at www.ballardfuneralhome.com.

Christopher ‘Buddy’ David Hellums

Services are scheduled for 2 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28, 2011, at Christ’s Church for Christopher “Buddy” David Hellums, age 2, of Roswell, who passed away Oct. 25, 2011, in Roswell. Pastors Lonnie Owen and Gerry Chaves of Christ’s Church will conduct the service. Interment will follow at South Park Cemetery.

Buddy was born Nov. 29, 2008, in Roswell to Jared Don Hellums and Rachel Riley. His parents survive him. Christopher experienced more life in his short time on Earth than most do in many years. He was never afraid; his smile was contagious. His love was unconditional and he gave it freely; saying with his arms stretched wide “I love you this much, that’s a whole lot.” Christopher thought every day was his birthday and expected the birthday song daily as well. He knew every piece of equipment on a construction site, how to operate each one, and the bigger the better. Christopher probably skidded into heaven — all the while telling Jesus “faster, faster.” We celebrate his life and thank God for giving him to us. He is also survived by three brothers, Brannon Shelton, Cody Conn and Dusty Conn, all of Roswell; and a sister, Kathryn Hellums of Panama City, Fla. Other survivors include grandparents, Grammy and Granddad, Dorothy and Billy Hellums of Roswell; and grandmother, Sharon Tyler of New York; and great-grandma, Dorothy Sutton of Roswell. He is survived by numerous aunts, uncles, cousins and Nana and Da, Joan and Johnny Young. He was preceded in death by a grandfather, David Riley, and an uncle,

Melenda J. Young-Box vs Jack Box Final Oct. 25 Helen D. Gallegos vs Jose Felix Gallegos

Accidents Oct. 22 10:59 p.m. — North Main Street and Country Club Road; driver — Jose A. Maciel, 20, of Roswell. Unknown time — 4501 N. Main St. parking lot; vehicle owned by Jacki Morris, of Roswell, and unknown driver. Oct. 24 10 a.m. — Garden Avenue and 19th Street; drivers — Crystal Black, 20, of Roswell, and Mac Vigil, of Las Vegas, N.M. 10:11 a.m. — 200 block of North Main Street; drivers — Henry Gish, 53, of Farmington, and Shirley Ulis, 85, of

Roswell Daily Record

Hatman said. Arrighi, who has been staying at Morrison’s home since his wife died, was thrilled to receive the call, she said. “He thinks my mother, who is in heaven, sent the dog back to him,” Morrison said. She said their local veterinarian likely recommended Petey get a microchip. “It was only about $70 total,” Morrison said. “Now, a lot of people are inquiring about it.” In September, an implanted microchip helped an animal control agency in New York City locate the owners of Willow, a calico cat who turned up on a Manhattan street after going missing five years ago in Colorado. The Michigan Humane Society recommends that all pet dogs and cats get microchips implanted, in addition to making sure they have collars and identification tags. “It’s wonderful when we see microchip reunions, including those that seem like miracles,” said Marcelena Mace, shelter manager at the Rochester Hills Center for Animal Care. “It really proves that no matter how far your pet may travel, a microchip can help him find his way home.” Microchips, which also are implanted in pet cats, are about the size of a grain of rice and typically injected near the animal’s shoulder blade, said Adam Goldfarb, director of pet care issues with the Washington, D.C.-based Humane Society of the United States. The chips do not have their own power sources and only can be found and read with a scanner. “In the last few years there has been a real jump in microchip usage, especially in animal shelters,” Goldfarb said. “There are not nearly as many that should be microchipped. Sometimes owners are not great in registering their animals with microchip companies or updating their home information.”

Christain Tyler. Friends may pay their online at respects www.lagronefuneralchapels.com.

Arrangements are under the direction of LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Frank Jeffery

Frank G. Jeffery, 56, of Roswell, passed away Monday, Oct. 24, 2011, in Lubbock, Texas. Services will be held Friday, Oct. 28, 2011, at 2 p.m. at Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home. Kent Eaker will officiate. Viewing will be held Friday, Oct. 28, 2011, at 8 a.m. until service time. Frank was born Nov. 27, 1954, in Ruidoso/Greentree, N.M., to Thomas and Nettie Mae (Christnot) Jeffery. His love, Donna Lucero, spent many wonderful years with him. He lived in Roswell his entire life and was a member of the Church on

the Move. Frank loved to go fishing and ride his Harley Davidson motorcycle. He was a hard working man who was a very caring, kind and loving soul. His dogs, Coco, Runt, Stinky and Chuey, will miss him greatly. Frank is survived by his love, Donna Lucero; son, Michael McCarter; daughter, Angela Sisneros and husband, Matthew; daughter, Veronica Rodriguez and husband, Cruz; sister, Margie Eaker and husband, Kent; sister, Kathy Soliday and husband, Phil; grandchildren, Raymond Gonzales, Christopher Gonzales, Isabel Lucero and Carmen Lucero; and numerous nieces and nephews. Preceding him in death were his parents, Thomas and Nettie Mae step-mother, Jef fery; Bessie Jef fery; brother, Ben Jef fery; and sister, Carol Jeffery. Pallbearers will be John Hopper, William Holladay, Thomas Holladay, Kent Eaker II, James Reid and Billy and Bobby Stotts. Honorary pallbearers will be Bubba, Chris, Isabel and Chris. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories in the online register book at andersonbethany.com. Services are under the direction of Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

Roswell. 11:03 a.m. — 1206 W. Second St.; driver — Stephanie Venegas, 26, of Dexter. 4:11 p.m. — Lea Avenue and Summit Street; drivers — Noel Serrano-Grado, 34, and Michael R. Slape, 19, both of Roswell. 6:57 p.m. — 1200 E. Country Club Road, parked; drivers — vehicle owned by Charlie Francis, of Roswell, and John Miller. Unknown time — backyard of 608 Trailing Heart; drivers — unknown driver. Oct. 25 4:45 p.m. — East 22nd and North Main streets; drivers — Leroy C. Garcia, 57, of Roswell, and Wendy A. Forbes, 31, of Albuquerque.


BUSINESS REVIEW

Roswell Daily Record

Thursday, October 27, 2011

A7

You can help solve Crime in Roswell!!

Steve Wolfe, Chaves County Crime Stoppers Board President, explains the mission of Crime Stoppers at a recent meeting of the Roswell Optimist Club. Crime Stoppers is located in the Roswell SAFE Coalition Building at 426 N. Main Street. Both Crime Stoppers and Neighborhood Watch are located in the building.

Back in the late Eighties, a group of Roswell citizens and law enforcement officers recognized the need for the people of Roswell to participate in the solving of crime in our city. Based on the format which had been established by a police officer named Greg McAleese in Albuquerque, Chaves County Crime Stoppers was formed and in 1991, the program became a recognized nonprofit organization. For several years, Chaves County Crime Stoppers thrived and proved to be a valuable tool to help solve crime in Roswell. Unfortunately, somewhere along the way the program faded away, still existing but with no real activity and no real interest in promoting it. Well, Chaves County Crime Stoppers is back! It's real simple. The Roswell Police Department, New Mexico State Police, Chaves County Sheriff's Office, and other law enforcement agencies simply cannot do it all. They need the help of all citizens of the community to provide many more eyes and ears to solve crime.

Crime Stoppers programs across the nation are varied in many ways, but there is one thing that is always common: the tipsters that make the calls are anonymous! Here in Chaves County, we have chosen to use a call center near Houston, Texas. That call center receives calls exclusively from Crime Stopper programs across the United States. They are intimately familiar with the program, and they know the questions to ask and the information which could solve the crime. Additionally, the call center takes calls 24/7 in Spanish as well as in English. The number to call is 1-888-594-TIPS (8477). A tipster who calls that number can be assured that they will not be recognized. No one in Houston knows the sound of someone's voice in Roswell, New Mexico. If you know about a crime, call the number and you may be eligible to receive an award of up to $1000.00! One of our challenges, as we sought to revitalize the program, has been to make the public fully aware that

Chaves County Crime Stoppers’ web-site is ready to assist you. On the site you can learn more about Crime Stoppers; how to report a crime; and also see wanted fugitives. It is hoped that you will use it as a valuable tool for citizens and law enforcement in the area. For additional information please call Chaves County Crime Stoppers at 622-7233.

Roswell’s Most Wanted: Gregorio Cervantez, 20, is wanted for shooting from a motor vehicle, failure to report to the Chaves County Detention Center, and failure to appear. He is 5’3” tall, weighs 125#, and has brown eyes, and black hair. Anyone having information on Cervantez’s whereabouts should contact Crime Stoppers at 888-594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward. Chaves County Crime Newman Outdoor Stoppers is alive and well. Advertising which very We are glad to have a Crime prominently gives the Stopper billboard from phone number to call.

Additionally, we have a web site. Designed by Juliana Halvorson of GraphMaster, LLC, www.chavescounty crimestoppers.com, is proving to be more and more valuable every day. We frequently update the Wanted Fugitives section of the site and the more that we need to change the photos of the fugitives is a certain indicator of the number of fugitives that have been apprehended! Check it out. Another important recognition factor has been the “Roswell's Most Wanted” feature in the Roswell Daily Record. Fully supported by the Roswell Police Department and orchestrated by the RDR Crime Reporter, Jessica Palmer, many arrests have occurred because of it. Chaves County Crime Stoppers is making an impact on Roswell and Chaves County crime. In less than a year, we have paid more than $5000 to tipsters. Nothing makes this Board of Directors happier than to authorize such awards, which has resulted in more than 14 criminals off the streets!

Today, Chaves County Crime Stoppers is doing well financially. However, in an economy which continues to be somewhat fragile, we are always aware that tougher times could come in the future. Therefore, we will be most grateful if you should choose to make a donation. Please send such gifts to P.O. Box 551, Roswell, NM 88202-0551. We are a bona fide 501(c)(3) organization, authorized by the IRS to accept gifts and financial donations. Thank you!

And remember: 1-888594- T I P S (8477). You could be eligible for an award of up to $1000.00.

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A8 Thursday, October 27, 2011

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Patchy clouds

A little morning rain

Friday

Saturday

Mostly sunny

Sunday

Partly sunny and breezy

Mostly sunny and nice

Monday

Bright sunshine

Tuesday

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Wednesday

Bright and sunny

Plenty of sun

High 56°

Low 40°

62°/38°

74°/45°

77°/41°

76°/45°

82°/48°

76°/34°

WNW at 4-8 mph POP: 55%

VAR at 2-4 mph POP: 0%

W at 4-8 mph POP: 0%

S at 10-20 mph POP: 0%

WNW at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

SSW at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

S at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

NW at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 5 p.m. Wednesday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 75°/53° Normal high/low ............... 72°/43° Record high ............... 88° in 1968 Record low ................. 24° in 1898 Humidity at noon ................... 35%

Farmington 54/29

Clayton 46/30

Raton 44/26

Precipitation 24 hours ending 5 p.m. Wed. 0.00” Month to date ....................... 0.20” Normal month to date .......... 1.07” Year to date ......................... 3.24” Normal year to date ........... 11.53”

Santa Fe 50/33

Gallup 54/25

Tucumcari 46/36

Albuquerque 55/41

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 44/34

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading 73 0-50

51-100

Good

Moderate

Source: EPA

101-150

Ruidoso 50/36

151+

Unhealthy Unhealthy sensitive

T or C 62/41

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Fri. The Moon Today Fri. First

Nov 2

Rise 7:12 a.m. 7:13 a.m. Rise 8:12 a.m. 9:23 a.m. Full

Nov 10

Last

Nov 18

Set 6:12 p.m. 6:11 p.m. Set 6:50 p.m. 7:45 p.m.

Alamogordo 64/39

Silver City 64/42

ROSWELL 56/40 Carlsbad 60/44

Hobbs 54/38

Las Cruces 62/44

New

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2011

Nov 24

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diffi- JACQUELINE cult

BIGAR

ARIES (March 21-April 19)  Remind others of the very fiery and abrupt personality you can maniYOUR HOROSCOPE fest. Allow your creativity to fill in the blanks. A gesture later today could patch up any disagreement. Also allow someone else to demonstrate more creativity. Tonight: Let your hair down. Relax with a loved one. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  If you can stay open to extremely assertive people, you will feel OK by the end of the process. A family member could be difficult beyond what you imagine. Your gentle persuasion will win out. You will be able to be heard, but perhaps not immediately. Tonight: Let another person choose. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)  Your imagination takes another twist or turn. You might feel as if someone doesn’t hear your point of view. As a result, you could lose your temper. You also show the ability to soften an associate’s hard stance. This, too, will pass. Stay centered. Tonight: Make it easy. CANCER (June 21-July 22)  Allow greater cre-

Regional Cities Today Fri. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

64/39/pc 55/41/pc 44/22/pc 56/44/r 60/44/r 50/24/pc 46/30/pc 50/30/pc 44/34/pc 67/42/pc 54/40/pc 54/29/s 54/25/s 54/38/r 62/44/pc 42/27/pc 52/31/pc 57/37/pc 58/39/r 50/34/pc 53/26/pc 44/26/pc 40/24/pc 56/40/r 50/36/pc 50/33/pc 64/42/s 62/41/pc 46/36/pc 53/34/pc

64/40/s 61/42/s 53/23/s 65/45/s 65/43/s 56/22/s 60/34/s 58/20/s 60/36/s 68/42/s 60/41/s 60/31/s 60/26/s 63/34/s 63/47/s 54/33/s 57/27/s 67/43/s 67/39/s 65/36/s 62/28/s 54/26/s 50/20/s 62/38/s 56/39/s 58/35/s 66/43/s 66/43/s 63/35/s 62/31/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

ativity to flow into your work. Be careful with spending, as you could go overboard. Express your caring in a manner in which the other party can hear it. Try to use your imagination and understanding, and this person’s verbal style. Tonight: Having fun. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  Anchor in and get to the bottom of the problem. You could be questioning how to handle your frustration and perhaps anger. You know what is necessary, or so you think. Plan on going down this path solo, if possible. A family member or roommate can be supportive. Tonight: Head home. Put your feet up. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)  Keep talking and opening doors. Suppressing your feelings would be a mistake, as they will come out in some form. Choose to express your discomfort in a manner in which others can respond to. Work on being more expressive and vulnerable. Tonight: Visit over dinner. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)  You will want to make a difference. Others might alternate between coaxing, manipulating and a saccharine attitude. Partially because you are hip, none of this will get past you. Take your time making a decision about how to handle your finances and an investment. Tonight: Tumbling into the weekend spirit. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  You might be causing more problems for yourself than you realize. What you do might be in sharp contrast with what you say. Get feedback, especially if you don’t seem to get the appropri-

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Fri.

Today

Fri.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

38/32/s 75/52/pc 65/42/r 48/36/r 79/52/pc 53/37/pc 48/33/r 56/45/r 50/26/s 52/34/r 66/43/pc 85/72/pc 78/53/t 50/36/pc 54/36/s 65/52/s 80/56/s 44/32/r

39/31/c 61/41/r 58/37/pc 48/34/pc 56/39/r 54/37/pc 49/36/s 64/42/s 57/33/s 52/36/pc 65/45/s 84/72/pc 68/46/pc 56/38/pc 62/34/s 72/56/s 84/56/s 61/38/s

85/76/t 48/35/r 51/35/pc 83/59/pc 56/39/r 54/31/s 87/69/pc 61/39/r 79/58/s 48/30/r 59/40/pc 80/50/pc 58/40/pc 47/30/s 74/56/s 52/39/pc 75/51/s 66/42/r

86/73/t 62/39/s 50/31/pc 71/50/r 51/40/pc 55/29/s 83/69/t 53/39/pc 85/62/s 48/34/pc 60/47/r 52/43/r 60/37/s 53/38/s 77/57/s 54/43/r 80/55/s 54/39/pc

U.S. Extremes

Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 92°...............Edinburg, Texas Low: 6°.....................Stanley, Idaho

High: 82°..........................Carlsbad Low: 34°.........................Angel Fire

National Cities Seattle 52/39

Billings 48/24

Minneapolis 51/35

San Francisco 71/49

Detroit 52/34

New York 56/39

Chicago 53/37

Denver 50/26

Washington 66/42 Kansas City 54/36

Los Angeles 80/56

Atlanta 75/52 El Paso 66/43

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Houston 78/53

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Miami 85/76

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

ate reactions. Tonight: Let your magnetism speak. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)  Rethink a personal matter. Much is going on in your mind, but your ideas might not be ripe. Brainstorm with a trusted friend, and ideas will flourish. What emerges could be one of your best ideas. Tonight: Vanish for a while. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  You might want to rethink a situation involving a meeting, and perhaps a personal wish or goal, with greater care. In a professional matter, you’ll gain support if you explain your case more clearly. A partner or loved one expresses frustration. Tonight: Meet where people are. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  Others think you might be the best person to shoulder a responsibility. Do you have the time? The desire? A partner or set of loved ones could be most upset by your choosing to take on any more. Are you sure this is what you want? Tonight: Burning the candle at both ends. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)  Take an overview and understand what is motivating an associate or someone in your daily life. You might feel frustrated. The smart move is to detach and gain more understanding. Tonight: Put on a favorite piece of music after calling a distant friend.

BORN TODAY Mobster John Gotti (1940), poet Dylan Thomas (1914), singer Scott Weiland (1967)

Writer Isaacson on Steve Jobs: ‘I just listened’ NEW YORK (AP) — Steve Jobs told Walter Isaacson he wanted him to write his biography because he’s good at getting people to talk. Jobs, it turns out, didn’t need much prodding, secretive as he was about both his private life and the company he founded. “I just listened,” said Isaacson, whose book, “Steve Jobs” (Simon & Schuster) went on sale Monday. Jobs, who died Oct. 5 at 56 after a long struggle with pancreatic cancer, was a man full of deep contradictions, a product of 1960s counterculture who went on to found what is now the world’s most valuable technology company, Apple Inc. In an interview with The Associated Press Wednesday, Isaacson said Jobs was a compelling storyteller with “fascinating stories.” Sometimes, the author would hear him tell those tales

two or three times, often with slight variations. But through more than 40 conversations with Jobs, as well as interviews with his family, close friends, co-workers and rivals, Isaacson painted a rich portrait of a complex, sometimes conflicting figure. Isaacson began work on the book in 2009 after Jobs’ wife, Laurene Powell, told him that if he was “ever going to do a book on Steve, you’d better do it now.” It was just after Jobs had taken his second medical leave as CEO of Apple, in January of that year. His third leave, which began in January 2011, would be his final one. “He was not sick through much of this process,” Isaacson said, when asked about what it was like to be working on the book and speaking with Jobs’ family while he was ill. “We took long walks,” he said.

“Every evening, he would have dinner around the kitchen table with his wife and kids. He didn’t go out socializing or to black-tie dinners. He didn’t travel much. Even though he was focused on his work, he was always home for dinner.” Those who see Jobs as the iconic CEO first might be surprised to read about his devotion to his family. It wasn’t always evident. As a young man, Jobs denied paternity of his first daughter, Lisa Brennan-Jobs, for years after Lisa was born in 1978. The two later reconciled. Isaacson said he was most surprised by the intensity of Jobs’ emotions. “Sometimes I’d look up and there would be tears running down his cheek,” Isaacson said. Jobs told him he was always moved by “artistic purity.” Sometimes, it was the design of a

Ice

90s 100s 110s

product, or even the creation of an advertisement that would move him to tears. Other times, it happened as he talked about a person who meant a lot to him. For his 20th wedding anniversary with Powell, Jobs wrote her a letter that he read to Isaacson from his iPhone. By the end, Isaacson said, he was crying uncontrollably. “Years passed, kids came, good times, hard times, but never bad times,” Jobs wrote in the note. “Our love and respect has endured and grown.” Those around Jobs referred to his ability to influence the perception of those around him as his “reality distortion field.” Though on the surface it sounds similar, this was far more complex than someone who is lying or deluding himself. As Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak puts it in the book: “You realize that it can’t

be true, but he somehow makes it true.” The “reality distortion field” was Jobs’ way of getting people to do what they thought was impossible, Isaacson said. An example was how he’d tell an engineer working on the Macintosh that he could save 10 seconds on the time the computer needed to boot up if he just wrote better code. “And the guy would say ‘no you can’t,”’ Isaacson said. Jobs then asked the engineer if he could do it if it would save a life. And so the engineer did; he wrote better code and he shaved not 10 but 28 seconds off the Macintosh’s boot-up time. While writing the book, Isaacson said he came to understand the connection between Jobs’ temperamental behavior and his artistic passion. “I have a strong emotional respect for Steve,” he said.


Thursday, October 27, 2011 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 28

LOCAL SCHEDULE THURSDAY OCTOBER 27 H.S. VOLLEBYALL 6 p.m. • Corona at Lake Arthur • Valley Chr. at Hondo Valley 6:30 p.m. • Loving at Dexter 7 p.m. • Goddard at Roswell

SP OR TS SHORTS LADIES GOLF TOURNEY SET FOR NOV. 5

The annual 2-Lady Fore-play Golf Tournament, in memory of Della Linterman and Oma Stallings, will be held on Saturday, Nov. 5, at NMMI Golf Course at 10 a.m. The cost is $75 per player, which includes breakfast, lunch, green fees, cart fees, range balls and one mulligan per player. The format is a two-woman scramble and the field is limited to the first 30 paid teams. The entry deadline is Oct. 29. For more information, call the course at 622-6033.

• More shorts on B2

NA T I O N A L BRIEFS GRONKOWSKI NEVER INTENDED TO HURT PATS’ REPUTATION

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. (AP) — New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski says he didn't intend to hurt the team's reputation when he posed for photographs with an adult film performer. The performer, BiBi Jones, posted two pictures of her and Gronkowski on her Twitter account on Monday. She was wearing Gronkowski's Patriots jersey in both of them. In one, he was shirtless. They were taken during the Patriots bye last week. Gronkowski, having an outstanding year in his second NFL season, met with team owner Robert Kraft afterward. Gronkowski said Wednesday that being in the pros is a learning process. "I didn't intend anything to hurt the reputation of anyone on the New England Patriots or on behalf of Robert Kraft," he said. "It was just a simple picture and that's all."

SPORTS Roswell Daily Record

E-mail: sports@roswell-record.com

For GHS, it’s just 1 more game Ball control key for Roswell KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

Goddard head football coach Sam Jernigan makes it a point to never make too much of any one football game. And this week’s rivalry game with archrival Roswell is no exception to that. “To us, it’s just one more game and that’s how we want to keep the focus for the kids,” Jernigan said about what the rivalry meant. Despite that, Jernigan is still cognizant of what the Goddard vs. Roswell game means for alumni and fans of both schools. “It’s just kind of bragging rights for here in town,” said Jernigan, who is 15-6 all-time against Roswell. “And that’s all, honestly, it’s just that. “If you’re that kind of a person, a braggart kind of person, I guess it’s a bigger deal to you.” This year, the Rockets (8-0, 1-0 District 4-4A) will face a Roswell squad that is on the upswing after several years of struggling. That upswing has gone hand-inhand with the emergence of Coyote senior quarterback James Singleton. Singleton is both the team’s leading passer and rusher and has helped Roswell (6-2, 0-0) to its best record through eight games since the late ’90s. He’s thrown for 1,820 yards and 17 touchdowns on 106-for -166 passing and has rushed for 573 yards and 12 scores on 102 carries. “I don’t know that you have a

plan to slow anything down,” Jer nigan said about what the Rockets need to do to slow Singleton’s production. “I think you have to react to that given play and that’s what we work on the kids doing; reacting to that given play and minimizing mistakes with their reaction. “If you just wanted to stop that one guy, that would be pretty easy. You’d just go get it. But, there’s going to be that balance of throwing here and there and people catching, so I don’t think there is one thing. I think you have to play 11-man defense.” That balance Jernigan referenced is about two-to-one in favor of the pass with Roswell’s spread offense. Singleton’s receiving weapons in that of fense include seniors Richard Medrano, Jacob Sedillo and Andrew Collier. Medrano is Singleton’s favorite target; he’s caught 43 passes for 946 yards and 12 TDs. Sedillo has 19 catches for 333 yards and Collier has 14 catches for 204 yards. Jer nigan is, and always has been, the type of coach that is focused on making sure his team takes care of the aspects of the game that it can control. One of those aspects is establishing the run game. “Whether you’re playing Roswell High or anybody else, that’s always an important thing,” Jernigan said. “You need to be able to move the ball and that doesn’t depend on one team from the next.

LAWRENCE FOSTER RECORD ASST. SPORTS EDITOR

The best defense, is a good offense. At least that’s what the Roswell football team is hoping in its first district game against Goddard on Friday at 7 p.m. at the Wool Bowl. If the Coyotes need any proof of how important ball security and ball control is, they need only to look to last year’s matchup with the Rockets. In 2010, Goddard forced three Coyote turnovers and turned all three of them into touchdowns. The Coyotes were only able to muster up 126 yards of offense and it was the Rockets who controlled the tempo, piling up more than 200 rushing yards in a 42-0 Goddard win. Roswell coach Robert Arreola said that the key for his team will be to limit the mistakes that cost the Coyotes dearly in last year’s loss. “The key is that we have to take care of the ball,” he said. “We have been stressing taking care of the ball. We can’t have negative plays. Going back and watching last year’s video, we did a lot of that. Goddard does a very good job of capitalizing on people’s mistakes.” Arreola also said that to be successful, Roswell has to stay on schedule in terms of down and distance. “(Not staying on schedule) puts us in situations that we don’t want to be in,” he said. “No one wants to be in second and third and long because you are pretty predictable

when that happens. We want to put ourselves into manageable situations with second and third and shorts. When those things are happening, it is a lot easier to call plays. “We have got to do those types of things to sustain drives and keep the ball away from their offense.” To have the ball control offense they are looking for, the Coyotes will have to establish a running game. James Singleton (102 rushes for 573 yards) George Aho (63 for 618) and Andrew Collier (32 for 214) provide Roswell with numerous options when running the ball. In the passing game, Singleton will have big play potential with Richard Medrano (43 catches for 946 yards), but Arreola said the Rockets do a good job of disguising their coverages. “Just like you have been talking about, Goddard has a pretty physical defense,” he said. “They don’t miss tackles and they do get to the ball. They have some good athletes, and are quick and strong. They do a good job of disguising what they are doing. “They will give you a certain look and then they will play something else. We have got to figure out what they are going to do. Sometimes based on our formations, we feel that they will have to do something and based on that, we will call our plays.” To keep Goddard’s offense off the field, Roswell will have to shut down a high-powered Rocket

Broncos take care of business against WTC in 4 See GHS, Page B2

KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

The New Mexico Military Institute Bronco volleyball team went into Wednesday’s conference match with Western Texas needing a win to secure at least the No. 2 seed in the Region V tournament and keep hopes alive of a conference title. The Broncos didn’t play overly well, but they took care of their business with a four -set victory, 25-22, 28-30, 25-21, 25-21, over the Westerners at Cahoon

SPOTLIGHT ON SPORTS 1967 — New Mexico tight end Emilio Vallez catches 17 passes for 257 yards to tie an NCAA record in a 75-12 rout of Texas-El Paso.

ON THIS DAY IN...

1973 — Four players rush for more than 100 yards as Alabama sets three NCAA records during a 77-6 romp of Virginia Tech. Alabama sets records with 823 yards total offense, 743 yards rushing and four 100-yard rushers. Jim Taylor gains 142 yards, Wilbur Jackson 138, Calvin Culliver 127 and Richard Todd 102. 1990 — Florida State’s Bobby Bowden becomes the 11th major college coach to win 200 games with a 42-3 victory over LSU. 2002 — Emmitt Smith breaks the NFL career rushing yardage record held by the late Walter Payton on an 11-yard run in the fourth quarter. Smith has 109 yards and a touchdown in Dallas’ 17-14 loss to Seattle and ends the game with 16,743 career yards — 17 more than Payton gained. 2007 — Weber State beats Portland State 73-68 to set an NCAA all-division football record for points in a game. Back in 1916, Georgia Tech beat Cumberland 222-0, but that was before the NCAA kept track of records.

B

Goddard vs. Roswell — The rivalry renews Section

Lawrence Foster Photo

LEFT: NMMI’s Pauline Von Dincklage (7) watches her kill during the Broncos’ match with West Texas College, Wednesday.

See RHS, Page B2

Armory. “I think our biggest thing is that (the Wester ners) slowed us way down,” said Bronco coach Shelby Fortchner after the victory. “They went and stood at the service line for five or seven seconds and then served a ball. We’re a fastpaced team. We like to get the ball and serve quick, we like to move quick and we like to be explosive. “That is our MO and (Western Texas coach Sheldon Carvalho) knows that. He tried to slow the game down all night long and it hurt us. It was hard for our kids to refocus after every point.” The Broncos (27-13, 6-3

Game 6 of World Series postponed by rainy forecast

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Game 6 of the World Series was postponed Wednesday because of a wet forecast, delaying the Texas Rangers’ bid to clinch their first championship. Major League Baseball announced the decision about 4 1/2 hours before the Rangers and St. Louis Cardinals were set to play. At the time, no rain had fallen at Busch Stadium, but heavy precipitation was expected. Texas leads the Series 32. Game 6 was rescheduled for Thursday night at 8:05 p.m. EDT. If Game 7 is

necessary, it would be played Friday night. “Because of the forecast, there was no reason to wait any longer,” said Joe Torre, MLB’s executive vice president of baseball operations. Torre said he told managers Ron Washington of See SERIES, Page B2

AP Photo

RIGHT: Workers remove a tarp from the infield at Busch Stadium Wednesday in St. Louis, after officials announced that Game 6 of baseball's World Series is postponed due to rain.

See NMMI, Page B2


B2 Thursday, October 27, 2011

SPORTS

Roswell Daily Record

PIGSKIN PROGNOSTICATIONS

O U R P A N E L O F E X P E R T S P I C K S TH E W I N N E R S O F T H I S W E E K ’ S A R EA F O O T B A L L G A M E S Kevin J. Keller

Lawrence Foster

Sports Editor

Sports Reporter

Game

Cathedral (Texas) at Artesia Eunice at Dexter Roswell at Goddard Hagerman at Cloudcroft NMMI HS at Loving Gateway Christian at Floyd NMMI JC at Phoenix

Last week (Overall)

RHS

Continued from Page B1

offense. On the season, Goddard is averaging 38.6 points per game and are averaging a staggering 247.9 yards on the ground. Arreola said that the key to stopping the Rocket running game is swarming to the ball.

Series

Continued from Page B1

Texas and Tony La Russa of St. Louis on Tuesday that if the forecast didn’t change, baseball would postpone it early. Rain was in “every forecast we had probably for the last three days,” Torre said at a news conference. “They were all consistent there was going to be rain during the game.” Looking at Commissioner Bud Selig, Torre asked: “Do you want to play in rain?” Colby Lewis had been set to start for Texas, with Jaime Garcia ready to go for the Cardinals.

Football

National Football League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain AMERICAN CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct New England . . .5 1 0 .833 Buffalo . . . . . . . . .4 2 0 .667 N.Y. Jets . . . . . . .4 3 0 .571 Miami . . . . . . . . .0 6 0 .000 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Houston . . . . . . .4 3 0 .571 Tennessee . . . . .3 3 0 .500 Jacksonville . . . .2 5 0 .286 Indianapolis . . . . .0 7 0 .000 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Pittsburgh . . . . . .5 2 0 .714 Baltimore . . . . . . .4 2 0 .667 Cincinnati . . . . . .4 2 0 .667 Cleveland . . . . . .3 3 0 .500 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct San Diego . . . . . .4 2 0 .667 Oakland . . . . . . .4 3 0 .571 Kansas City . . . .3 3 0 .500 Denver . . . . . . . .2 4 0 .333

Keller

Artesia Eunice Goddard Hagerman Loving Gateway Chr. NMMI JC

7-0 (63-9)

“The key is that we have to gang tackle and do a good job of tackling,” he said. “Some of those kids are really tough to bring down one-on-one, so we have to have guys swarming to the ball and cleaning up.” The Rockets’ of fense isn’t a one-trick pony however, as quarterback Ryan Greene can beat defense’s through the air if they If anything, the extra day may lead to more intrigue over who might pitch for St. Louis should the Series go to a Game 7 for the first time since 2002. Washington already has said Matt Harrison would start if the Series goes that far. The forecast for Thursday was much better — clear enough with a gametime temperature in the low 50s. Rain has hovered over the majors all year with more than 50 washouts, baseball’s highest total since 1997. This was the first Series rainout since 2008 at Philadelphia. That year, Tampa Bay and the Phillies were tied in the sixth team's support in Toronto

PF 185 188 172 90

PA 135 147 152 146

PF 151 155 137 97

PA 122 83 111 120

PF 182 112 84 111

PF 141 160 105 123

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF N.Y. Giants . . . . .4 2 0 .667 154 Dallas . . . . . . . . .3 3 0 .500 149 Washington . . . . .3 3 0 .500 116 Philadelphia . . . .2 4 0 .333 145 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF New Orleans . . . .5 2 0 .714 239 Atlanta . . . . . . . . .4 3 0 .571 158 Tampa Bay . . . . .4 3 0 .571 131 Carolina . . . . . . .2 5 0 .286 166 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF Green Bay . . . . .7 0 0 1.000 230 Detroit . . . . . . . . .5 2 0 .714 194 Chicago . . . . . . . .4 3 0 .571 170 Minnesota . . . . . .1 6 0 .143 148 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF San Francisco . . .5 1 0 .833 167 Seattle . . . . . . . . .2 4 0 .333 97 Arizona . . . . . . . .1 5 0 .167 116 St. Louis . . . . . . .0 6 0 .000 56

PA 131 135 139 225

PA 136 178 150 155 PA 147 128 116 145

PA 158 163 169 183

PA 141 137 150 178

PA 97 128 153 171

Sunday, Oct. 30 Indianapolis at Tennessee, 11 a.m. New Orleans at St. Louis, 11 a.m. Jacksonville at Houston, 11 a.m. Miami at N.Y. Giants, 11 a.m. Minnesota at Carolina, 11 a.m. Arizona at Baltimore, 11 a.m. Detroit at Denver, 2:05 p.m. Washington vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 2:05 p.m. Cleveland at San Francisco, 2:15 p.m. Cincinnati at Seattle, 2:15 p.m. New England at Pittsburgh, 2:15 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 6:20 p.m. Open: Atlanta, Chicago, Green Bay, N.Y. Jets, Oakland, Tampa Bay Monday, Oct. 31 San Diego at Kansas City, 6:30 p.m.

Bills S Wilson questions

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Thursday, Oct. 27 AUTO RACING 2:30 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, practice for Indian Grand Prix, at Greater Noida, India COLLEGE FOOTBALL 6 p.m. ESPN — Virginia at Miami FSN — Rice at Houston GOLF 7 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Andalucia Masters, first round, at Sotogrande, Spain 12:30 p.m.

ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. (AP) — Buffalo Bills safety George Wilson regards Toronto as a nice and diverse place to visit. Just don't ask him to get excited about playing "home" games there. "It's not a home game," Wilson said before practice Wednesday. Making sure not to knock the city or its residents, Wilson focused his concerns on questioning the loyalty and passion of fans who have attended Buffalo's games at Toronto over the past three years. "Is that a question?" Wilson said, when asked about the support the Bills receive at Toronto's downtown Rogers Centre. "The fan support in Toronto is a night-and-day difference from what we have in Buffalo. For the most part, it's a show. You see just as many jerseys for the opposing teams as you do the Bills. They cheer for any big play regardless of whichever team makes it." Wilson added it's impossible to replicate the raucous environment inside or outside Ralph Wilson Stadium in Orchard Park, and expressed concern over the Bills losing an edge in home-field advantage. "It's definitely not the same hostile environment that teams have to deal with coming into the Ralph out here," he said. "This is no knock on the citizens of Toronto. We know a large percentage of our fan base comes from Canada, and we're appreciative of their support. But at the same time, the environment is just not the same. That's just facts." Wilson went public with his frustrations as the Bills (4-2) come out of their bye week off to prepare to host the Washington Redskins (3-3) in Buffalo's annual regular season game north of the border. Aside from the lack of fan support, Wilson also noted the players pay an additional Canadian tax — over and above a New York state tax — to play in Toronto. The Bills-In-Toronto series is now in its fourth year after the franchise reached a five-year, $78 million pact with Torontobased media and communications giant, Rogers Communication, to play eight games — five regular season and three preseason — in Canada's largest city and financial capital. In becoming the NFL's first team to play annual games outside the United States, the Bills consider the deal as part of the smallmarket franchise's bid to expand its market and draw additional revenue out of Toronto, located about a 90-minute drive from Buffalo. The deal has already paid off for the Bills. They get about $9.75 million per game in Toronto, more than twice than they generate at Ralph Wilson Stadium. The Bills have also reported a large bump in season-ticket sales from fans across the border, who now represent about 15 percent of the team's base. The downside has proven to be a general lack of interest the Bills have received in Toronto. They play in a domed facility that's better suited for baseball, with the stands further removed from the playing field. Overpriced tickets — a majority of them more than $200 — have made it difficult to draw fans to the 54,000-seat facility. And many who have shown up are either NFL fans, who root for other teams, or are there to see the opposing team.

TGC — Nationwide Tour Championship, first round, at Charleston, S.C. 11 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Asia Pacific Classic Malaysia, second round, at Selangor, Malaysia MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 5:30 p.m. FOX — World Series, game 7, Texas at St. Louis (if necessary) PAN AMERICAN GAMES 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Men’s basketball: Brazil vs. United States, at Guadalajara, Mexico RODEO 7 p.m. VERSUS — PBR, World Finals, second round, at Las Vegas

Tim Fuller The Coach

Foster

Artesia Eunice Roswell Hagerman Loving Gateway Chr. NMMI JC

5-2 (56-16)

Fuller

Joe Carpenter

KEND broadcaster

Artesia Eunice Roswell Hagerman Loving Gateway Chr. NMMI JC

6-1 (57-15)

Carpenter

Artesia Eunice Roswell Hagerman Loving Gateway Chr. NMMI JC

7-0 (65-7)

become too aggressive against the run. “Ryan does a good job,” Arreola said regarding the Goddard passing game. “They have some good receivers. When you sit on the run so much, sometimes that tends to get to you. That is one thing they have shown that they can do is throw the ball when they need to.” One advantage the

Rockets have will be that they have had two weeks to rest and prepare for Goddard, while the Rockets are coming off a physical game last week against Artesia. “We feel that it is good for us to have a bye week,” he said. “Some people have dif ferent opinions about bye weeks. Some people don’t like the bye week, but I tend to like it

inning when rain and snow tur ned the field into a quagmire, forcing a suspension. It rained the next day, too, and the game finally resumed two days later, with the Phillies winning to take the crown. Because of the debate about how to handle that situation MLB adopted a rule a few months later mandating that any postseason game stopped in progress would be resumed at the point of suspension, rather than being postponed and starting over. Before that, the previous Series rainout came at Busch Stadium, when Game 4 between Detroit and the Cardinals was pushed back by a day.

A few hundred fans already were milling outside Busch Stadium when the Rangers-Cardinals game was called. The tarp was on the field at the time. Later, about a dozen St. Louis players came out to toss around balls in right field. Bad weather has lingered throughout the big leagues since opening day. Even before that, actually, as the Milwaukee Brewers and Reds worked out in snow flurries a day before their March 31 opener at Cincinnati. Wicked weather intruded earlier in this postseason, too. So did the threat of storms. A game in the AL cham-

SCOREBOARD

Playing under a roof has also neutralized the Bills' home-field advantage when it comes to the elements. That was particularly apparent in 2008. While it was snowing in Buffalo, the Bills were essentially knocked out of playoff contention following a 16-13 loss to the warm-weather Miami Dolphins in the cozy, dry confines of the Rogers Center. The Bills are 0-3 in regular-season games at Toronto, though they've won both preseason games. The series is scheduled to end next year with a preseason and a regular-season game, though both sides have expressed interest in renewing the deal. The NFL also favors the series because it helps the Bills financially while also boosts the league's exposure in Canada. One difference from previous years is that the game Sunday marks the first time the Bills head to Toronto with a winning record. "Every time we've been up there we've lost, now it's a new year and we feel like we can give them a win and something to cheer about and something to love the Bills about," receiver Stevie Johnson said. "This has given us a chance to expand the NFL out in Canada and I believe the fans will be excit-

NMMI

Continued from Page B1

Western Junior College Athletic Conference) were able to refocus when it mattered, though. The most important of those times was in the third set after WTC had just won 30-28 in the second set. NMMI thrice battled out of three-point deficits during the third set, including an 18-15 hole. WTC gave NMMI a side out with a missed serve and Madison White and Amber Miramontez struck down back-to-back kills to tie the set at 18. The Broncos won the next point to go up 19-18, but WTC won the next three for a 21-19 lead. The Westerners would not score again in the set.

ed about it, and cheering on the Bills with how our season is going."

Brady returns to scene of strong game vs. Steelers

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. (AP) — Heinz Field can be an intimidating stadium with screaming fans waving yellow towels while watching one of the best defenses in the NFL. Not to Tom Brady. The New England Patriots quarterback usually quiets the crowd with outstanding performances that have resulted in his 4-1 career mark at the home of the Pittsburgh Steelers. His next visit comes Sunday when the Patriots (5-1) return from a bye while the Steelers (5-2) go for their fourth straight win. “The Steelers are tough to beat at home,” Brady said Wednesday. “The times that we beat them we’ve had to play very, very good games. I think that’s what I’m probably most proud of. Some of our greatest games that we’ve ever played have been against them.” Like last year’s 39-26 win in which an animated Brady yelled at his teammates on

Another missed serve gave NMMI a side out and brought Natalie Williamson to the service line. The Broncos won the next point on a WTC attack error, but the final four points came from NMMI’s offense. White smashed down three kills and Williamson dropped in an ace to complete a six-point run that gave NMMI a 25-21 win in third set and a 2-1 advantage in the match. White, who finished with a team-high 17 kills, was critical to NMMI’s success throughout the night. “She’s being very consistent,” Fortchner said about the Ingram, Texas, product. “She is our one outside hitter who we can count on and have been able to count on the last

SPORTS SHORTS RITTER & COMPANY ROUNDUP IS NOV. 5

The 26th annual Ritter and Company Pecos Valley Roundup, featuring the Bruce Ritter Memorial 20K, will be held on Saturday, Nov. 5, at 8 a.m. at Cahoon Park. The event will also have a 10K run and walk, and a 2-mile run and walk. The entry fee is $15 and packet pickup will be on Friday, Nov. 4, from 4-6 p.m. at the recreation office located at Cahoon Park. There will be awards for the overall champion in each event as well as medals for each age group. Registration on race morning is from 6:30-7:30 a.m. at Cahoon Park.

Geoff Gunn NMMI S.I.D.

Randy Doerhoefer NMMI Asst. Golf Pro

Gunn

Doerhoefer

5-2 (56-16)

7-0 (58-14)

Artesia Eunice Goddard Hagerman NMMI HS Gateway Chr. NMMI JC

Artesia Eunice Goddard Hagerman Loving Floyd NMMI JC

because it gives us a little bit of time to heal and time to prepare. We have watched a lot of video on them and we can feel that it will be to our advantage.” Although Goddard will be favored entering the game, Arreola said that his team is looking forward to the opportunity to play the undefeated Rockets. “The intensity has defi-

Consensus

Artesia 6-0 Eunice 6-0 Tied 3-3 Hagerman 6-0 Loving 5-1 Gateway Chr. 5-1 NMMI JC 6-0

6-0-1 (61-7-4)

nitely picked up from our players this week,” he said. “They are looking forward to the opportunity. We are going in with a little bit of confidence and that is something that we have lacked a little bit in past years. Don’t get me wrong, Goddard is a good football team, but we feel that we are pretty good too.” l.foster@roswell-record.com

pionship series between Detroit and Texas was postponed for a day because of a dicey forecast. The players left Rangers Ballpark and went home — the rain, however, never came. The opener of the AL playof f series between Detroit and New York was halted after 1 1/2 innings by showers that lasted all night. The game at Yankee Stadium was suspended and picked up the next day at the point when it was stopped. The only other suspension in postseason history was that Rays-Phillies game in 2008. Baseball began the playoffs a week earlier this year

than last season, intending to have the World Series conclude before November. MLB also hoped the adjustment could help avoid a chilly finish for the championship. It was in the 40s and raw last week for Game 1. It was in the 70s and clear at Busch Stadium on Tuesday. A perfect night to play, but it was a travel day for Texas and St. Louis. Washington was aware of the shaky forecast. “If it’s possible we can play, of course we want to play. You don’t want to sit down. We’re here to play baseball,” he said Tuesday.

the sideline. The Patriots led only 10-3 at halftime but made it 23-3 after three quarters. Brady finished the game with 30 completions in 43 attempts for 350 yards, three touchdowns, no interceptions and no sacks. Since the Steelers don’t make major changes in a defense that has dominated the NFL for years, might Brady have similar success on Sunday? “It’ll be just like last year?” he said with a smile before shooting down that notion. “We didn’t score much in the first half. ... I think the second half we played a little bit better, but it all comes down to execution.” Brady is 6-1 overall against the Steelers, including playoffs, with 14 touchdown passes and three interceptions. He’s completed at least two-thirds of his passes in six of those games. At Pittsburgh, he’s averaged 22 completions in 31 passes for 263 yards with a total of seven touchdown passes and three interceptions in five games. And he’s won his two playoff games against the Steelers, both at Pittsburgh in the AFC championship games after the 2001 and 2004 seasons. What makes that especially impressive is that the Steelers have the NFL’s best home-field record over the last 40 years through 2010. This year they are first in the league in passing defense and third in overall defense. So what’s Brady’s secret to beating them?

There is none. “It’s just execution,” he said. “It’s guys getting open and us completing (passes). I don’t think there’s (any) special thing we do. There’s no magic dust we put in our cereal in the morning.” Reluctant to emphasize Brady’s success against the Steelers, coach Bill Belichick acknowledged only that “We’ve had our moments against them.” But, he continued, “they’ve had their moments against us. They’re a good football team. They give everybody problems.” Brady’s only loss to the Steelers came on Oct. 31, 2004, ending the Patriots 18game regular-season winning streak. Two of his three career interceptions against Pittsburgh came in that game. The result: Pittsburgh 34, New England 20. “That was a rough day,” Brady said. The crowd was “going crazy. The towels were waving. The fans were really into it. It’s a great stadium. It’s very loud. It’s a very imposing stadium. What makes it the most imposing is the way they play and their physical style.”

eight or nine matches. “She’s just in it. She is there, she sees things well and she’s a great leaper, so she’s over the top of most people. She played really well.” White played a key role in the deciding fourth set as well. After WTC tied the set at 16 on a missed Bronco serve, White spiked down three kills on the next five points, helping put NMMI ahead for good. The Westerners (19-11, 6-3) got within one at 2019, but NMMI won five of the match’s final seven points for a 25-21 win. Kailey Moorhead finished with 16 kills for the Broncos, who close out regular season play with a road date against Odessa on Saturday. kjkeller@roswell-record.com

The 20K run and the 10K walk begin at 8 a.m., while the other races will start at 8:30 a.m. For more information, call the Cahoon recreation department at 624-6720. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Youth ChalleNGe.

B&G CLUB HOOPS LEAGUE

The Roswell Boys & Girls Club is currently accepting registrations for its developmental basketball league. The registration fee is $60. The league has three age groups; 6-7, 8-9 and 10-12. Registration deadline is Nov. 15. For more information, call 623-3196.

GHS

Continued from Page B1

That’s just what you’ve got to do. “If there’s any surprise, it’s what (the opponent) does defensively, so you end up making adjustments off of what you’re seeing right then. “(Roswell) has had some time to work on their wrinkles and they’re, ‘Here’s what we’re going to do for what you’re doing.’ Then it’s about how quickly you can pick that up and get the kids to adjust to it.” Jernigan’s keys to getting a win this week are simple — blocking and tackling. “I know it’s going to sound trite, but blocking and tackling are the two most important things we can do,” Jer nigan said. “Everything else being relative, I think that’s the most important thing we can do.” kjkeller@roswell-record.com

YOUR CREDIT

“We want to make you a loan”

(575)624-2929

$100 - $2,000


CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record

Thursday, October 27, 2011

Legals

---------------------------------Publish Oct. 20, 27, Nov. 3, 2011

STATE OF NEW MEXCOUNTY OF ICO CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

IN THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTION PETITION OF A.W.V. AND RELATING TO S.R.D. THE ADOPTEE CHILD No: SA-2011-1

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ADOPTION PROCEEDING AND HEARING

www.rdrnews.com Legals

GARAGE SALES

NOTICE is hereby given that on October 7, 2011, Larry L. Waggoner, 1900 East Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, c/o Atkins Engineering Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 3156, Roswell, New Mexico 88202-3156 filed Application No. RA-830-B & RA-830-B-A into RA-1818 (T), with STATE ENGINEER for permit to temporarily change location of well and place of use of 40.8 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, of artesian groundwater by temporarily ceasing the diversion of said waters from artesian well RA-830-B located in SW1/4NW1/4NE1/4 of Section 03, Township 11 South, Range 24 East, N.M.P.M, and temporarily severing the aforesaid water right from the irrigation of 13.6 acres of land described as being Part of NW1/4NE1/4 of Section 03, Township 11 South, Range 24 East, N.M.P.M

2512 PARK Dr, Sat., 7a-3p. Don’t miss this one. King & Queen size bed set, household furniture & dining room set, toys, baby clothes, lots of misc.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 20, 27, November 3, 2011

The applicant proposes to temporarily commence the diversion of said 40.8 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, of artesian groundwater from well RA-1818, located in the SW1/4NW1/4NW1/4 of Section 27, Township 10 South, Range 24 East, N.M.P.M, for the irrigation of up to 9.6 acres, described as follows:

SUBDIVISION SECTION Part of E1/2NW1/4NW1/4 & 27 Part of W1/2NE1/4NW1/4

TOWNSHIP

10 S.

RANGE

24 E.

ACRES

9.6

This is a temporary application to transfer 40.8 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance of artesian groundwater rights for a ten year period, being Water Years 2012 through 2021, with all rights to revert to their original point of diversion and place of use on November 1, 2021, subject to an earlier cancellation by the permittee. Upon cancellation or expiration of this permit, the subject water right will revert to the move-from wells and land. The proposal move-from well and places of use are located east of the City of Roswell. The proposal move-to well and lands under this filing are located northeast of the City of Roswell being more particularly described as being south of East Country Club Road and east of North Atkinson Avenue. Both are located in Chaves County, New Mexico.

Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (legible, signed, and include the writer’s complete name and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment you must specifically identify your water rights; and/or (2) Public welfare/conservation of water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must show you will be substantially affected. The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with John R. D’Antonio, Jr., P.E., State Engineer, 1900 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, within ten (10) days after the date of last publication of this Notice. Facsimiles (fax) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is sent within 24-hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protest can be faxed to Office of the State Engineer, (575) 623-8559. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with Sections 72-2-16, 72-5-6, and 72-12-3. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 20, 27, November 3, 2011

NOTICE is hereby given that on October 7, 2011, Herbert D. Miller, Carol Jean Larimore, the Herbert D. Miller Irrevocable Trust and James & Gayle Larimore, attn: Larry Waggoner, 1900 East Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, c/o Atkins Engineering Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 3156, Roswell, New Mexico 88202-3156 filed Application No. RA-220-C & RA-220-D into RA-1220 et al (T), with STATE ENGINEER for permit to temporarily change location of well and place of use of 66.0 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, of artesian groundwater by temporarily ceasing the diversion of said waters from artesian well RA-220 located in SE1/4SW1/4SE1/4 of Section 34, Township 10 South, Range 24 East, N.M.P.M, and temporarily severing the aforesaid water right from the irrigation of 22.0 acres of land described as being Part of E1/2SE1/4 of Section 34, Township 10 South, Range 24 East, N.M.P.M

The applicant proposes to temporarily commence the diversion of said 66.0 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, of artesian groundwater from the following described:

WELL NUMBER RA-1220 RA-1220-S RA-1220-S-2

SUBDIVISION SW1/4NE1/4SE1/4 SE1/4NW1/4SE1/4 SE1/4NW1/4SW1/4

SECTION 34 34 35

TOWNSHIP 10 S. 10 S. 10 S.

for the irrigation (stack) of up to 304.8 acres, described as follows:

SUBDIVISION Part of NW1/4 Part of SW1/4NE1/4 Part of N1/2SW1/4 Part of NW1/4SE1/4 Part of NE1/4 Part of SE1/4

SECTION 35 35 35 35 34 34

TOWNSHIP 10 S. 10 S. 10 S. 10 S. 10 S. 10 S.

RANGE 24 E.) 24 E.) 24 E.) 24 E.) 24 E.) 24 E.)

RANGE 24 E. 24 E. 24 E.

ACRES

304.8

This is a temporary application to transfer 66.0 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance of artesian groundwater rights for a ten year period, being Water Years 2012 through 2021, with all rights to revert to their original point of diversion and place of use on November 1, 2021 or upon written notification of the owners or their agent. Upon cancellation or expiration of this permit, the subject water right will revert to the move-from wells and land.

The above described points of diversion and places of use are located east of North Atkinson Avenue and north of East Second Street (U.S. Highway 380) east of the City of Roswell, Chaves County, New Mexico.

Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (legible, signed, and include the writer’s complete name and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment you must specifically identify your water rights; and/or (2) Public welfare/conservation of water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must show you will be substantially affected. The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with John R. D’Antonio, Jr., P.E., State Engineer, 1900 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, within ten (10) days after the date of last publication of this Notice. Facsimiles (fax) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is sent within 24-hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protest can be faxed to Office of the State Engineer, (575) 623-8559. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with Sections 72-2-16, 72-5-6, and 72-12-3.

001. North

002. Northeast

503 E. 5th, Thursday-Saturday. Misc. items & some furniture. FRI-SAT, 2 party, 1108 E. Malamute, off N. Atkinson between Mall & B.M.S. Rocker, household items & lots more. 306 Broken Arrow (corner Chiquita), Fri. 7am-1pm. Clothes, swimming pool, bikes, ten school desks.

003. East

1600 E. 2nd Thurs, Fri & Sat. 8-5 Sale: Pass Atkinson light, old bottles, glassware, dishes, old sink, quilts, quilt rack, dresses, jeans, M&W, shoes, Xmas, jewelry much more.

Legals

-----------------------------------Pub. Oct. 27, Nov. 3, 2011

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

IN THE MATTER OF THE INTESTACY OF BRADEN FRANK MURPHY, Deceased. No. PB-1150

NOTICE OF HEARING BY PUBLICATION

THE STATE OF NEW MEXICO

TO: ALL UNKNOWN OF BRADEN HEIRS FRANK MURPHY, DECEASED, AND ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS WHO HAVE OR CLAIM ANY INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF BRADEN FRANK MURPHY, DECEASED, OR IN THE MATTER BEING LITIGATED IN THE MENHEREINAFTER TIONED HEARING.

Hearing on the Petition filed by Lacie Shearman, on behalf of her minor child, Blaze A. Lair requesting the Amended Informal Appointment of Personal Representative in Intestacy of Braden Frank Murphy, deceased will be held at the Chaves County Courthouse, Roswell, New Mexico, on December 5, 2011, at 9:00 a.m. Pursuant to NMSA1978, § 45-1-4-01, notice of the time and place of hearing on said Petition is hereby given you by publication, once each week, for two consecutive weeks. WITNESS our hands and seal of this Court. Dated: October 21, 2011

TO: JOHN DOE, BIOLOGICAL FATHER OF S.R.D. BORN ON JULY 5, 1999 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the hearing on the petition for adoption and implied consent on the file in the captioned cause will be held in the Chaves County, New Mexico, 5th Judicial District Court, 400 North Virginia Avenue, Roswell, New Mexico on December 5, 2011 at 8:30 a.m. before the Honorable Judge Ralph D. Shamas, or as soon thereafter as may be heard, wherein the 5th Judicial District Court Judge will determine whether your parental rights of S.R.D., your daughter, will be terminated. At the time of the hearing, the court will further determine whether S.R.D. should be adopted by petitioner in the captioned cause. You are hereby directed to serve a pleading or a motion in response to the Petition for Adoption and Implied Consent within twenty (20) days after the date of last publication hereof, and file the same, all as provided by law. You are notified that, unless you so serve and file a responsive pleading or motion, the petitioner will proceed with a hearing on said Petition at the aforementioned time for the relief demanded in said Petition. If you do not respond, the party petitioning the court may get a Final Decree of Adoption by default against you forever terminating your parent/child relationship with the child which is the subject of said Petition. KENNON CROWHURST DISTRICT COURT CLERK By: s/Cynthia Brackeen

Respectfully submitted by: s/Allen Wayne Vick PO Box 697 Dexter, NM 882230 (575) 637-4305

Legals

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 20, 27, Nov. 3, 2011

NOTICE is hereby given that on September 28, 2011, Bogle Ltd., Company, c/o Stuart Bogle, P.O. Drawer 460, Dexter, New Mexico 88230, c/o Atkins Engineering Associates, Inc. P.O. Box 3156, Roswell, New Mexico 88202-3156, filed Application No. RA-994; RA-657, RA-1353 & RA-1418-Comb with the STATE ENGINEER for permit to combine and commingle 2302.2 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, of artesian and shallow groundwater rights diverted from the following described wells: SUBDIVISION NW1/4NW1/4SW1/4 NW1/4NW1/4NE1/4 NW1/4NW1/4NW1/4 SW1/4SW1/4SW1/4 NW1/4NW1/4SE1/4 SW1/4SW1/4SW1/4 SW1/4SW1/4SW1/4

SECTION 23 24 24 24 23 24 24

TOWNSHIP 13 S. 13 S. 13 S. 13 S. 13 S. 13 S. 13 S.

RANGE 25 E. 25 E. 25 E. 25 E. 25 E. 25 E. 25 E.

SOURCE Artesian Artesian Artesian Artesian Shallow Shallow Shallow

The RA-994 water right is presently authorized to use the aforesaid artesian well RA-994 as its point of diversion for 470.1 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, of artesian ground water used for the irrigation of up to 156.7 acres of land described as being located in the SW1/4 of Section 23, Township 13 South, Range 25 East, N.M.P.M.

The water rights described under State Engineer File No. RA-657, RA-1353 & RA-1418 are authorized to use the aforesaid wells RA-657, RA-657-S, RA-1353, RA-1418, RA-1418-S and RA-1416 as points of diversion of 1832.1 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance of artesian, said source limited to 1388.4 acre-feet per annum plus carriage allowance, and shallow, said source limited to 910.8 acre-feet per annum plus carriage allowance, ground water used for the irrigation of 610.7 acres of land described as follows:

SUBDIVISION Part of N1/2 Part of SW1/4 Part of SE1/4

SECTION 24 24 23

TOWNSHIP 13 S. 13 S. 13 S.

RANGE 25 E. 25 E. 25 E.

ACRES 307.1 155.7 147.9

TOWNSHIP 13 S. 13 S. 13 S.

RANGE 25 E. 25 E. 25 E.

ACRES 304.6 155.7 307.1

The applicant proposes to commence the diversion of said waters from the aforesaid wells for the irrigation of up to 767.4 acres of land described as follows:

SUBDIVISION Part of S1/2 Part of SW1/4 Part of N1/2

SECTION 23 24 24

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 13, 20, 27, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF LEA FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

BOKF, N.A. dba BANK OF OKLAHOMA, N.A., vs.

Plaintiff,

No. CV 2011-645

MOISES ORNELAS, ADRIENNE AGUIRRE and NEW MEXICO MORTGAGE FINANCE AUTHORITY, Defendants.

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF SUIT

TO DEFENDANT MOISES ORNELAS: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the above-named Plaintiff filed a Complaint for Foreclosure in the above Court on July 1, 2011, against the above-named Defendants. The general object of the Complaint is to foreclose a lien of Plaintiff against certain real property located in Lea County, New Mexico, commonly known as 1801 Rose Lane, Hobbs, New Mexico 88240, and more particularly described as follows: LOT ELEVEN (11), BLOCK THIRTY (30), SECOND UNIT OF THE TAYLOR RANCH ADDITION TO THE CITY OF HOBBS, LEA COUNTY, NEW MEXICO,

and to foreclose the interests of the above named Defendants and any other parties bound by the notice of lis pendens in the Property, all as more specifically stated in the Complaint filed in this cause of action. FURTHER, the above-named Defendant Moises Ornelas is hereby notified that he has until thirty (30) days from date of completion of publication of this Notice in which to file an answer or other pleading responsive to the Complaint and should said Defendant choose not to file an answer or other responsive pleading to the Complaint on or before thirty (30) days from date of completion of publication of this Notice, judgment or other ap¬propriate relief may be rendered against the above-named Defendant. Richard M. Leverick of the law firm of Leverick and Musselman, L.L.C., whose address and phone number is 5120 San Francisco Rd. NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87109, (505) 858-3303 is the attorney for the Plaintiff. NELDA CUELLAR CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 20, 27, Nov. 3, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

No. CV-2011-517

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., vs.

Plaintiff,

TROY BARTLETT KINKEAD, aka KINKEAD, and JEWLEE R. KINKEAD,

TROY

B.

Defendants.

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF SUIT

TO: Defendant(s) Jewlee R. Kinkead You are hereby notified that the above_named Plaintiff has filed a civil action against you in the above_entitled Court and cause, the general object thereof being to foreclose a mortgage on property located at 908 West Summit Street, in the City of Roswell, New Mexico, more particularly described as: LOT FIVE (5) in BLOCK TEN (10) of LODEWICK ADDITION, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk's Office on April 10, 1944 and recorded in Book B of Plat Records, Chaves County, New Mexico, at Page 37, and all improvements, including, but not limited to, the manufactured home attached thereto and more particularly described as a YEAR MAKE/MODEL BODY TYPE, VIN VIN, SERIAL NO., License Plate Number LICENSE PLATE NO..

Clerk of the District Court By: Cynthia Brackeen Deputy

WELL NO. RA-994 RA-657 RA-657-S RA-1353 RA-1418 RA-1418-S-2 RA-1416

Legals

B3

Application is made to combine and commingle the artesian water right described under State Engineer File No. RA-994 with the artesian, artesian with shallow supplemental and shallow ground water rights described under previously issued Permits to Combine & Commingle Nos. RA-657, RA-1353 & RA-1418, issued February 28, 1996 and RA-1353, RA-1416 & RA-1418-Comb. Combining the subject water rights and commingling their water will allow Bogle Ltd., Company to operate more efficiently and provide for more flexibility of irrigation operations.

The above described points of diversion and places of use are located one to two miles southwest of the Town of Dexter, Chaves County, New Mexico.

Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (legible, signed, and include the writer’s complete name and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment you must specifically identify your water rights; and/or (2) Public welfare/conservation of water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must show you will be substantially affected. The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with John R. D’Antonio, Jr., P.E., State Engineer, 1900 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, within ten (10) days after the date of last publication of this Notice. Facsimiles (fax) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is sent within 24-hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protest can be faxed to Office of the State Engineer, (575) 623-8559. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with Sections 72-2-16, 72-5-6, and 72-12-3.

That unless you respond to the Complaint within 30 days of completion of publication of this Notice, judgment by default will be entered against you. Name, address, and phone number of Plaintiff's attorney: Susan C. Little & Associates, P.A., 4501 Indian School NE, Suite 101, Post Office Box 3509, Albuquerque, NM 87190-3509, 505-254-7767. WITNESS the Honorable CHARLES C. CURRIER, District Judge of the Fifth Judicial District Court of the State of New Mexico, and the Seal of the District Court of Chaves County, this 14 day of October, 2011. KENNON CROWHURST CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 20, 27, Nov. 3, 10, 2011

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT No. D-504-CV-2010-00510 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. EDWIN D. ABRAMSON; and MAUREEN ABRAMSON, Defendants. FIRST AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on November 15, 2011, at the hour of 11:50 a.m., the undersigned Special Master will, at the south door of the Roswell Police Department, 128 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico, sell all the right, title and interest of the above-named Defendants in and to the hereinafter described real estate to the highest bidder for cash. The property to be sold is located at 1915 Clover, Roswell, and is situate in Chaves County, New Mexico, and is particularly described as follows: Lot 40 of The Meadows First Amended Addition, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat recorded January 19, 1984 in Plat Book J, Page 23, Plat Records of Chaves County, New Mexico. THE FOREGOING SALE will be made to satisfy a judgment rendered by the above Court in the above entitled and numbered cause on May 2, 2011, being an action to foreclose a mortgage on the above described property. The Plaintiff's Judgment, which includes interest and costs, is $148,657.38 and the same bears interest at 6.625% per annum from April 30, 2011, to the date of sale. The amount of such interest to the date of sale will be $5,396.48. The Plaintiff and/or its assignees has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. The sale may be postponed and rescheduled at the discretion of the Special Master. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above described real property subject to a one month right of redemption. ______________________________ A.D. Jones, Special Master P.O. Box 1180 Roswell, NM 88202-1180 (575) 622-8432


B4 Thursday, October 27, 2011

ANNOUNCEMENTS

004. Southeast

1607 S. Beech Thurs. 7-3pm Clothes, and misc.

025. Lost and Found

005. South

2807 LARGO Friday & Saturday, 8am-4pm.

Cockerspaniel missing. Gray & white & answers to “Charlie”, camo collar, 2 different color eyes, 910-1695

006. Southwest 305 S. Hemlock Ave. Fri., Sat. & Sun. 8-12 pm Lots of goodies.

Lost Male English Springer Spaniel near Del Norte Elem., ‘’Max” 910-6313

1403 S. Missouri, Thurs-Sat, 7-2. Bikes, jewelry, bassinet, recliner, baby rocker, stroller, clothes, shoes.

INSTRUCTION

211 S. Ohio, Thurs-Sat, 7:30a-4:30p. Bunk beds, tools, refrigerators, clothes & more. 913 W. Forest St, Fri-Sat, 6am. 20” rims, designer clothes, houseware items.

007. West

1109 NORTH Delaware Fri. & Sat. 8-2 Yard Sale. Kenmore water softener, Tupperware, Christmas decor. & misc. items.

008. Northwest

Everything must go. Furniture, new power chair, handicap equip., kitchen appliances & utilities, vacuums, 201 W. Sherrill Lane, Wildwood Apts. #138, Sat, Oct. 29th & 30th, 7a-4p. 575-973-2495 1407 LATIGO Ln (turn at Sierra Blanca & Montana), Saturday, 8am. Framed art, dishes, decoratives, toys, bikes. 3006 ONATE Rd, Fri, 8-11am. Multi family sale: Furniture, stainless steel dishwasher, tools, toys, adult & children’s clothes, baby items & household items. Cash please.

030. Education & Instructions

ALLIED HEALTH career training- Attend college 100% online . Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

HIGH DESERT Family Services desires to contract with a RN to provide healthcare coordination, health assessments and health - related training to people with developmental disabilities and their staff living in the community. Competitive salary. Email your resume to bsandusky@ highdesertfs.com or fax to 505-797-3956. www.highdesertfs.com.

045. Employment Opportunities SOUTHEAST NM Community Action Corporation Roswell Head Start Program is accepting applications for:

Family Services Assistant ~ $9.74 Teachers ~ $14.03 $20.64 (DOQ) (positions in Artesia, Carlsbad & Roswell) Education Assistant ~ $14.03 - $20.64 (DOQ) (opening in Carlsbad) Teacher Assistant ~ $9.74 Substitutes (Teacher Asst. & Cook Asst.) ~ $8.82

!!! 4 DAY WORK WEEK (Mon-Thurs)!!!

WORK SCHEDULE PER HEAD START CALENDAR REVIEW DEADLINE ~ OCTOBER 31, 2011 POSITION WILL REMAIN OPEN UNTIL FILLED Review job description & work schedule at the Department of Workforce Solutions at 2110 S. Main, Roswell, NM SNMCAC is an EEOE

DOMINO'S PIZZA is now hiring drivers. Earn up to $14 per hour. Apply online today at careers.dominos.com

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

Avon, Buy/Sell. Christmas around the corner. $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR Lone Star Milk Transport currently seeking Full-Time Drivers in the Roswell area. Health, Dental and Life Insurance available. Must pass DOT drug screen & physical. Class A CDL with Tanker Endorsement required. Contact Mary Stevens at 940-378-2520 Ext. 255. Hiring customer service representative at Fred Loya Insurance. Fluent in English and Spanish required. Please apply at 2601 N Main St Suite B. SOUTHEAST NM Community Action Corporation Head Start Site Supervisor Carlsbad NM

FULL TIME POSITION 4 DAY WORK WEEK!!

ATTRACTIVE BENEFIT PACKAGE

~ Position Will Remain Open Until Filled ~

See detailed Job Description ~ Complete/Submit Application at the Local Department of Workforce Solutions SNMCAC is an EEOE

High School Diploma/GED, experience with Route Sales desired, ability to work directly with our customers, build relationships with our customers by providing resolution to problems and/or complaints, conduct customer satisfaction reviews, clean driving record, ability to lift up to 50 lbs, and ability to pass a Department of Transportation Drug Screen and physical. Competitive salary and benefits. Application available at 515 N. Virginia, Roswell, NM 88201 from 10/20/2011 to 12/01/2011.

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575) 622-7710 #45 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SATURDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

FAMILY RESOURCE & Referral seeks energetic and self-motivated individuals to work in our After School Program. 16 hours weekly. Must be at least 18 years old. Previous experience is preferred but not required. Please apply at 118 E. 4th Street or call 623-9438. EOE.

045. Employment Opportunities

Career Opportunites COI/DJI Roswell Job Corps Center

COI and DJI will be operating the Roswell Job Corps Center effective November 1, 2011. We offer a very competitive salary and benefits package for our full time staff and value diversity and creativity in our workforce. We are seeking qualified applicants for the following positions:

Independent Living Advisors (Residential Advisors) – Various shifts are available, including nights, overnights and weekends. Security Officers – Shifts are 3 pm - midnight or 11:30 pm - to 8:30 am

Custodian – Full time day shift Accountant – 4 year Accounting degree required with 2 years experience. QuickBooks experience preferred. Please fax resume to: 575.347.7483 or mail to P.O. Box 5813, Roswell, NM 88202

VETERINARY RECEPTIONIST Must be able to work a full time schedule Monday through Friday starting at 7:45 AM. The following skills are desirable: • Use of type writer & calculator • Handle multi phone lines • Develop appointments • Basic Bookkeeping • Accurate filing • Staying organized • Some knowledge of animals Interested applicants should mail a resume with a hand-written cover letter describing why you might be a good fit for this position. Please send resume to Box PO Box 1897, Unit #285 Roswell, NM 88202-1897. HIRING FOR Assistant General Manager. Please bring resume and apply in person. Hotel experience required. 1201 N. Main CUSTOMER SERVICE Representative. Applicant must be over 21, a mature, non-smoker, with the ability to communicate effectively in the fast paced travel industry. We require a clean MVD record and scheduling flexibility. Generous incentive program based on your ability to sell. Contact Bryan at Hertz Rent a Car, Main Airport Terminal, Roswell International Air Center 8AM - 2PM. Phone calls not accepted.

COI/DJI are Equal Opportunity Employers Operator II

The Chaves County Flood Department is accepting applications for the position of Operator II. Entry Salary Range: $12.10 to $13.51/hr DOQ. Benefits include: retirement, medical and dental insurance. Applicants must have: HS diploma or GED, three years' experience operating heavy equipment, up to two years college/48 hour's course work can be substituted for one year experience. Valid NM Class A driver's license. May allow six (6) months as a condition of employment to obtain a CDL License. Applicants will be subject to criminal history and background checks, pre-employment drug screen and physical testing. Required application forms are available at the County's Job Posting Board located in the west wing of the County Administrative Center or by accessing the web site at www.co.chaves.nm.us. Applications may be returned to the County Manager's Suite #180, Chaves County Administrative Center, #1 St. Mary's PL, Roswell, NM 88203 or mailed by closing date to Human Resources, PO Box 1817, Roswell, NM 88202-1817. Applications will be accepted until 5:00 PM, Friday, November 4, 2011. EOE.

INTERNET DIRECTORY Published every Thursday in the Roswell Daily Record

A C C O U N TA N T S

Andrews, Smith, Lowery & Co., LLC 2724 Wilshire Boulevard • 622-5200

http://www.aslaccounting.com

AU TO

Roswell Ford-Lincoln-Mercury 821 N. Main • 623-3673

http://www.roswellford.com

FINAN CIA L

Pioneer Bank 3000 N. Main • 306 N. Pennsylvania • 300 S. Sunset 3301 N. Main • 2 St. Mary’s Place 624-5200 • 627-4400

FUN ER AL HO MES

Ballard Funeral Home & Crematory 910 S. Main St. • 575-622-1121

R E A L E S TA T E

http://www.pioneerbnk.com

http://www.ballardfuneralhome.com

Alex Pankey 501 N. Main • 1-800-806-7653 • 626-5006 • 622-0875 Kimble Hibbard 501 N. Main • 622-0875 • 420-1194 Taylor & Taylor Realtors, Ltd. 400 W. 2nd St. • 622-1490 Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors 501 N. Main • 622-0875 Ruth E. Wise 614 N. Main • 575-317-1605 • 575-625-6935

Dennis the Menace

ARBY’S IS now accepting applications for management positions. We have positions for both day and night time positions available. Please apply by calling Gary at 575-622-8711 or send employment history to 575-623-3075.

RDRNEWS.COM

• Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

LAW FIRM seeking legal secretary with litigation experience. Salary DOE. Submit resume to PO Box 1995, Roswell, NM 88202.

DAIRY QUEEN has positions available for experienced shift leaders. Please apply at 1900 N. Main St., ask for Mark.

First Review Deadline ~ October 31, 2011

MAddy-tay’s Preschool is now taking job applications. All applicants must have a minimum of a high school diploma, a 45 hour certificate and be at least 18 years of age. Please apply at either of our two locations 102 S. Utah or 1200 W. Alameda.

Merchandising Specialist Needed in Roswell, NM Great Pay! Mileage Reimbursed. Contact Thanh Phan 877-747-4071 ext.1248. Apply: http://tbe.taleo.net/NA4/ats/ careers/requisition.jsp?org =BDSMARKETING&cws=1 &rid=9069

PART TIME front desk position. Phones, filing, scanning, Word, Excel, multiple IT responsibilities. Wage $12-$15 per hour. Please reply by fax, 622-1707.

$14.68 ~ $17.25 per hour (DOQ) 36 hours per week

EOE EMPLOYER

045. Employment Opportunities

Law Office Seeking part time file clerk Must be experienced in WordPerfect or Word and able to multi-task. Send Resume to: Office Manager, PO Box 1897 unit #284, Roswell, NM 88202.

Responsible for providing managerial oversight and direction to the Center Staff, consistent with agency policies and Head Start Program Performance Standards.

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE/ ROUTE DRIVER Requisition Number-103857

Roswell Daily Record

http://www.alexpankey.com

http://www.goroswellhomes.com http://www.sherleataylor.com http://www.findroswellrealestate.com http://www.ruthwise1.com

Bill Davis http://www.billdavis-roswellrealestate.com 501 N. Main St., 575-622-0875, 575-420-6300 Shirley Childress http:\\www.shirleysellsroswell.com 110 E. Country Club • 575-622-7191 • 575-317-4117

To advertise, call the Advertising Department 622-7710 or e-mail: advertising@roswell-record.com

045. Employment Opportunities

Legal Secretary needed for established law firm. Candidate must be able to work independently, multi task in pressure situation, be detailed oriented, and have excellent organizational oral and written communication skills. Minimum typing speed 65 wpm. Legal experience preferred but will train candidate with skills and desire to learn. Competitive salary and benefits. Send resume and salary requirements to PO Box 1897 Box 283 Roswell, NM 88202 TAX CLASS starting soon. Call 575-763-1000 or 575-791-1897 COMFORT KEEPERS Are you a compassionate, caring person? Do you have experience in personal care? Being a Comfort Keeper may be the opportunity for you! To learn what becoming a Comfort Keeper is all about, apply in person at: 1410 South Main Street, Roswell, NM or 502 West Texas. Suite C, Artesia, NM. TEMP POSITION, 2-3 wks, $10/hr, heavy lifting & outside work. Please call TJ, 627-7500 ex 114. WE HAVE built the #1 Radio Station in Southeastern New Mexico, but we need one more person to add to our winning team. We are currently seeking applicants to join the Giant team as our Regional Sales Executive. Begin to make your sales and service expertise work for you, while working for 94.9 The Country Giant. Send resumes to Kevin@kbimradio.com Noalmark Broadcasting is an equal opportunity employer.

SERVICES

105. Childcare

NEED CHILD care? Find the widest range of available childcare for your children and their needs. 1-800-691-9067 or www.newmexic okids.org. You may also call us; Family Resource & Referral 622-9000 and we can help you navigate the system. I BABYSIT in my house Monday through Sunday. Call Ana at 626-2587.

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 Superior home cleaning. Just one call cleans it all. Free estimates. 578-1494 HOUSE & office cleaning at good, cheap price. 973-3592 or 973-2649 I CLEAN homes & offices at a very reasonable price. Call 626-2587.

150. Concrete

ALL TYPES of concrete work. Patios, driveways, sidewalks, etc. 624-7734

185. Electrical

BIG HORN Electric Professional work, affordable price. 575-317-8345 NM Lic#367662.

195. Elderly Care

COMFORT KEEPERS provides in-home care for you or a loved one. Our caregivers are carefully screened, bonded and insured. We take care of all payroll taxes and workers compensation. For more information call @ 624-9999. Serving Chavez County for 10 years. DEPENDABLE PRIVATE Caregiver to the rescue, yrs. of exp. Tina 420-8877 IN HOME caregiver for your loved one. References on request. Libby 317-1264

200. Fencing

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991 ALL TYPES of fencing. Wood, chainlinks, metal, block, etc. 624-7734 Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100

210. Firewood/Coal

Cordova Chimney Sweep. 623-5255 or 910-7552 FIREWOOD FOR sale. Juniper or Pinon. 575-444-6520 or 575-444-7763 PINON/ JUNIPER mix, $250 per cord. 575-973-0373

220. Furniture Repair

REPAIR & Refinish furniture & build furniture. Southwest Woods. 1727 SE Main. 623-0729 or 626-8466 Hrs 7-3pm. Call before you come in case he’s out running errands. www.southwestwoods furniture.com. Firewood available.

225. General Construction

HARVEST BUILDERS All types of construction. Lic/Bonded 575-910-3000 Renovation projects? Need help? No job too big/small. 25 yrs. exp. Qualified in framing, trim carpentry, on-site custom cabinets, painting, sheet rock, drywall, doors, & windows. FREE est. Call Jerry Martin at 910-6898 or 622-8682 Leave Message.

230. General Repair

CARPENTRY, DRY wall, painting & concrete. We guarantee. 626-2050

232. Chimney Sweep

CHIMNEY SWEEP Have your woodstove or fireplace inspected and cleaned. Dust free Guarantee. 36 years Experience, Licensed, Insured. Bulldog Janitorial Services 575-308-9988

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

LAWN SERVICE & much more work at low price. 914-0803. Greenscapes Sprinkler Systems Lawn mowing, field mowing, gravel, sod-hydro seed, pruning, tilling, For dependable & reliable service call 622-2633 or 910-0150. WEEKEND WARRIOR Lawn Service mowing, property cleanup, residential rain gutter cleaning, and much more 575-626-6121 Fall Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242.

305. Computers COMPUTER DR. Computer sick? Dr. Matt, 575-914-8485 or matthewjc@me.com

COMPUTER REPAIR, networking, virus cleanup. 575-626-2409


Roswell Daily Record 310. Painting/ Decorating

Quality Painting! Interior, Exterior at prices you can afford. Mike 910-7012 TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting at affordable prices. Call 637-9108. Paint Contractor Int. & Ext., remodels or new construction. Nathan 914-0083 Lic. Bonded & Insured.

312. Patio Covers

M.G. HORIZONS Patio covers, concrete, decks & awnings Lic. 623-1991. PATIOS, CARPORTS, decks, etc. 624-7734

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 625-9924 / 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing

RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397 www.rancheroswelding.com

Having trouble w/your roof? Flat, shingle roofs, painting. Lic. Contract work guaranteed insurance claims welcome 623-0010 Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

395. Stucco Plastering

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217 RWC Lath and Stucco. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397

www.rancheroswelding.com

NEW STUCCO & repairs, color, coating, etc. 624-7734 For stucco traditional or synthetic, also block, brick & stone work. Rodriguez Const. 420-0100

405. TractorWork

RWC Bobcat and Dump Works. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397. www.rancheroswelding.com

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 Collins Tree Service Professional Tree Trimming, Removal & Stump grinding. Fully insured. Certified Line Clearance Arborist. Call 575-308-1902 Allen’s Tree Srvc. The oldest tree service in Roswell. Million $ ins. 626-1835 TREE SERVICE Cut down any kind of trees. 575-626-8587

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insurance.

www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL

490. Homes For Sale 4Bd 1Ba, 703 E. Grnwd, $60k, cash offers, new carpet, etc. M-Th 624-1311

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

LENDER SALE. 40 Acres -$39,900. Spellbinding views of snow capped mountains! Adjacent to National Forest. Maintained all weather roads w/electric. Close to Ruidoso. Financing available. Call NMRS 888-676-6979. 20-AC. RANCH FORECLOSURES Near Growing El Paso, Texas. Was $16,900 Now $12,900 $0-Down, take over $99/mo. Beautiful views, owner financing FREE Color Brochure. 1-800-755-8953 www.sunsetranches.com 5 ACRES, $25K as is, septic system, 3809 Zinnia, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property PUBLIC AUCTION Saturday, Nov 5th 300. S. Lea Zoned Commercial 2052 S.F., 5 Offices, 2 Bath, Corner Lot, Paved Parking Open House: Sunday, Oct 30th 1-4 PM Terms & Photos @

WILDWESTAUCTIONS.COM

623-7355

Main & Poe, 4550 sf $275k cash/trade for Ruidoso prprty, M-Th 624-1331

510. Resort-Out of Town ADVERTISE YOUR VACATION PROPERTY, to more than 288,000 New Mexico newspaper readers. Your 25-word classified ad will appear in 33 newspapers around the state for only $100. Call this newspaper for more details or visit www.nmpress.org for more details.

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

2001 OAKWOOD 14x80 3/2 200 Gavalin Canyon Rd #54 Ruidoso, N.Mex. Fixer upper needs repairs & cleaning. Fixed up would raise retail price a bunch. Selling cheap $12,500 as is Call 575-622-0035 D01090

520. Lots for Sale

OWNER FINANCING for a limited time. Ready to build 5 acre lots w/ great views & good covenants. Located 9 miles West of Roswell @ the Club House Banquet Facility. Free land maps and at entrance. 575-623-1800. www.BuenaVidaLand.com COURT ORDERED Sale! 2704 S. Lea, asking $6k, - 30 Townsend Tr. Lot 9, 5 acresCielo Vista Subdivision, has well, electric, great view of city, $49,999. Call Jim 910-7969. PREMIUM 5 Acre tracts, Owner will finance with 10% down, New Construction only (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd. between Country Club & Berrendo Rd. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-4337

REAL ESTATE

HAGERMAN LOTS for sale. York Avenue, Posey subdivision, 1 block from Hagerman schools, $5000. Not zoned for mobile home. 420-1352

3 BR 1 ba at the base $42,500 owner financing with $5k down 420-1352

Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 60x134 $18,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. We Take Visa and Mastercard! 420-1352.

490. Homes For Sale

TOWNHOUSE, 1400 sqft, 2br/2ba, laundry room/ study, new roof, cedar fence, stucco, porch, tile & carpet. Refinished kitchen, bath cabinets & new paint throughout, w/d. Large corner lot. Call 575-491-4235 $265,000 1912 W 4th St. 2600 sf home built 2005 3 br 2 full ba. Close to Spring River Golf Course For appointment call 622-7046 FSBO: 1107 & 1109 W. 1st & adjacent lot, $50k. Call Greg 720-404-0467 ON LOT 3, 5br/2ba, 1524 N. Michigan. Call 626-6905. 4/3/2, 2688 sqft, 2 master suites, 601 Mimosa, asking $199,500. Owner may finance, 20% down on appraised value of $215k. Serious inquiries only. 317-0177

BY OWNER 701 Georgia Ave. Country, close to city. 2/1 two fenced lots, open floor plan, raised ceilings, wood floors, oak cabinets, heat pump, sprinklers, 10’x20’ workshop w/carport. Berrendo water. 626-8568 2907 LARGO Dr. Seller needs to sell 3/1.5ba, seller will consider real estate contract (will carry papers). With $10k down. $65,000. Call Ruth at Wise Choice R.E. 575-625-6935 or 317-1605

5 LOTS Sunset Place $12,500 each or $55k for all. Call Dean 317-7232 Enchanted Hills on Sanders St. 125x124, $29,500 obo. No covenants. 910-3247 for info.

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. ALL BILLS PAID 1 br $530 2 br $630, 3br/2ba $730 mo., ref air, new carpet, new paint/tile. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN.

540. Apartments Unfurnished

WILSHIRE GARDENS, a 40+ community has 1 & 2 bedrooms available. Resident pays electric & water. Please call 575-623-3733 or stop by 2727 Wilshire Blvd for application. EFFICIENCY 2 BR, downtown, clean, water paid. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD Call 623-8377 EFFICIENCY 1 br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. LARGE 1 bedroom apartment. References and background check required. Washer and Dryer hookups. Private parking. 420-0100 SPACIOUS 2 BR/1BA. Laundry facilities, extra storage. Water, Gas paid. $575. 910-0851, 626-2401. 1114 S. Kentucky CLEAN 1BR duplex, no smoking/HUD/pets. Mature adults, 1st/last/dep. 420-0720 2BR 1B $450 monthly water paid. No pets 810 1/2 Atkinson 624-2436 2BR/1BA, W/D hookups, all bills pd, 207 W. Mathews, $550/mo, $500/DD. 317-6479 1203 W. Hobbs 2bd 1/ba laundry room, all appl., no pets or HUD. Call 910-6161 1,2 AND 3 bedroom HUD Approved. Call Ronnie 575-694-8077 908 W. 8th #C, 1br, 1ba, all utilities pd., $400 mo., $250 damage dep., background check req. 505-296-4057 306 W Mescalero Rd. North loc., 2br, newly redecorated, wtr pd., stove, refrig., garbage disposal, w/d hookup, no pets/Hud & smoking. Adults preferred. $635/mo 575-317-2059. 1&2Br, wtr pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 Spacious 2/2, all elec., $600/mo, $400/dep, no Hud, w/d hookup 910-0827 3019 N. Richardson -walk 2 Big 5- 1br gas/wtr pd-st/frg $495 No pets 317-1078 2BR, 1Bath Apt, $700, utilities all paid. N. Lea. Also 1br studio, $550/mo, all bills pd. 575-652-9682 Two BR Duplex, Garage, one bath w/washer/dryer hook-ups. New Carpet. One year lease, no pets, smoking or section 8. $625 + DD 809 N. Montana, Apt. B. 505-350-0972. Available November 1st. VERY NICE & clean 1 bdrm, duplex. $425/mo, $250/dep. 1217 E. 1st. Call 626-3977 or 622-6629 1br/1ba, wtr pd, quiet area, HUD ok. $350/mo, $200 dep. 625-9208 after 5pm ROSWELL 2 br apartment $600/mo, all utilities paid, fridge, stove 1700 N Pontiac Dr. 626-864-3461

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished 1BR FULLY furnished w/decorator touches hard wood floors, washer/dryer stove/refrig. all dishes & linen, all utilities including high speed internet, cable, telephone, gas/electric water & alarm system. $750 mo. 575-973-1332 or 575-653-4654 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 201 W. Summit, 3br/2ba, carport & storage, completely remodeled, stove, refrig., ref. air, w/d hookup, no pets or HUD, $900/mo, $600/dep, 914-5402 LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com! 45 A St., RIAC, 2 bdr. duplex, appl., w/d hookups. Background check. No animals, no HUD, wtr pd. $400 mo, $200 dep. 623-4416 #15 REYNOLDS Place, 2br/1ba., enclosed garage, fenced, $600 + dep. 623-2607, 914-0685. TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 REM. 4,3,1 br 1,2ba, rent or sale $350+ Al 703-0420, Santiago 202-4702 Lo Dn 3 br 1ba 715 N. Orchard $700dep $700mo. No HUD or indoor pets 420-0948 2BR/2BA, FENCED yard, in the country, has washer & dryer. 840-4923 2BR/2BA, GARAGE, townhouse, no HUD or pets, $925/mo, $625/dep. 420-5930

CLASSIFIEDS

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 3BR, 1 3/4ba, w/garage, $600/dep, $900/mo, no HUD or pets. 420-5930

1304 HIGHLAND Rd, 3br/1.5ba, carport, stove, refrig, w/d hookup, ref air, fenced yard, no pets or HUD, $900/mo, $700/dep. 317-5285 712 E Third #B, 2BR 1BA, $400 month (HUD ok) 812 W Summit, 2BR 1BA, $600 month 1206 W 11th (avail Nov 1), 3BR 1BA, $750 month 613 Hemlock (avail Nov 1), 3BR 1BA, $800 month 3301 Dow (avail Nov 1), 3BR 2BA, $1600 month Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604 3BR/1BA, WASHER, dryer, refrigerator & stove included, garage, 708 W. Tilden, $725/mo, $400/dep. Call Jim 910-7969. 4BR/2BA, $1000/MO, $600/dep, big backyard, no HUD, 1106 Avenida Del Sumbre. 910-0827 1007 S. Lea, 2br 1ba $650 mo. $330dep, stove/fridge, w/d hookups & basement. 317-1371 706 W. 10th, 3br, ref air, stove, refrig, w/d hookups, no pets/HUD, $700/mo, $600/dep. 914-5402 3br/1ba. w/d hkup, fenced, storage, stove/frig. $500mo $500dep. 636 E. Apple 626-0935 1011 S. Union, 3/2, $675/mo, $600/dep, no pets. Call Ruth at Wise Choice R.E. at 625-6935 or 317-1605 1011 CAMINICITO, 3/2, $900/mo, $900/dep, no pets. Call Ruth at Wise Choice R.E. at 625-6935 or 317-1605 3BR/2BA, 3304 Futura, $900/mo, $900/dep, 420-3167 2&3 Bd, 1&2 Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 FOR RENT/SALE, 2br, 1 3/4ba townhouse in Briar Ridge, garage, unfurnished, $650/mo + utilities. Evenings, 575-623-6132. 3BR/2BA ON 4th St. near Cahoon Park & Washington Ave. Elementary school, pets welcome. Jim 626-5358 2 BDRM, 1 bath, $450 mo., $450 dep., No HUD. Call or text 317-1481 or 624-1989 413 S. Cypress, 2br, w/d hookups, ref air, no pets, no HUD, $550/mo, $500/dep, 575-914-5402 1007 1/2 S. Lea 2br, 1ba, w/d hook-up, wtr pd. $550 mo. $330 dep. 317-1371 100 S. Kansas + 26 A. Street + 1305 W. College, 2br/1ba, storage, 626-9530 Historic District - extra nice 1938SF, 3/1/1, recent remodel -ht pump -$1200 avail. mid Nov. 317-1078

558. Roommates Wanted

SOUTH AREA 2 rooms and full bath $400 mo. must be full time employed. Free cable 575-420-8333

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places OFFICE SPACE for Rent. Prime downtown area, 2,061 sq.ft. Please call 622-8711.

GREAT OFFICE space for rent approx. 2500 sq. ft. on busy intersection, refrig. a/c $800 mo. Call 420-3030 FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546. Office space: newly remodeled, 750 sf $800, 350sf $400 all bills paid 622-2564 TWO BUILDINGS available, approximately 5400 and 4000 square feet. Combination of offices, warehouses, large fenced areas. 1601 & 1603 W. 2nd. 208-8020 500 S Sunset, 1500 sq ft. $750 month Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604

585. Warehouse and Storage WAREHOUSE ONLY 9000 SF partial a/c & heat, security alarmed, 2 garage doors, 2 standard entry doors, $1000 mo. 2001 S. Main behind Family Furniture 575-937-0889 or 575-257-0888

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

NEED FURNITURE? Shop Blair’s Trading Post for the best prices in town for your household items. We buy & sell furniture, appliances, home decor, collectibles, electronics, saddles, jewelry, tools, fishing & camping items, movies plus everything else from A-Z. Including many hard to find items. Serving Roswell for 40 years. Open daily 9-5. Accept Visa & MC. 5611 Hummingbird Ln. 627-2033 Power wheelchair, hospital bed, wheelchair lift, lift chair. 622-7638 VIOLIN AND vending machine for sale. Call for prices. 420-2480. Everything must go. Furniture, new power chair, handicap equip., kitchen appliances & utilities, vacuums, 201 W. Sherrill Lane, Wildwood Apts. #138, Sat, Oct. 29th & 30th, 7a-4p. 575-973-2495 THE TREASURE Chest, 1204 W. Hobbs man land boat load of Barbies new in box, 25% off all Christmas vintage JADITE Carnival, Vaseline, Depression, glass, furniture 914-1855 King sz mattress & box spring $250, queen sz box spring $100, maple dresser w/mirror $150, infant car seat $30, custom fit 1990-2001 4pc Ford Explorer floor mats $60. Jesus 420-7333. Everything in excellent condition. 17” CHROME rims w/33” tires, 2500 or less miles on tires, 5 hole dodges, $750. 623-8922 1947 PIN-UP Calendar by Petty; K.O. Munson’s “Artist’s Sketch Pad” @ 1946-51. Call Ed Kruse 622-5293

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

Thursday, October 27, 2011

745. Pets for Sale

AKC & CKC French Bulldog puppies. Health guaranteed, $1000-$1600 (limited). 575-626-9813 ONE YEAR old cat free to good home. Call 317-7054 PUPPY LOVE Grooming Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also - 575-420-6655 3 MALE Golden Retriever puppies for sale. Registered, 10 wks old, $550 ea. Call 575-420-1150, ask for Cynthia. FREE KITTENS to good home Call 622-8216 after 8:30 PM. 6mo old Cockerspaniel, pure bred, female, needs good home, $175. 317-8078 TAKING DEPOSITS Boxer puppies. 2 white males left. $150. Call 420-5952 HELLO! MY name is April, I’m a Tabaco female. I’ve been fixed, had all my shots, I’m good looking & very friendly. I need a good loving place I can call home. I would make a good companion. Please come see me, I’m at the Humane Society, 703 E. McGaffey. Thanks.

RECREATIONAL

775. Motorcycles & Scooters 06 YAMAHA YZF DIRT BIKE EXCELLENT COND. $2800 OBO. CALL 575-626-6692. IF NO ANSWER LEAVE MESSAGE.

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

2003 YAMAHA FZ1 1000, great shape, asking below book $300, cash only. Hurry, won’t last long. 575-308-1829

625. Antiques

15 PIECES of 1890’s chocolate glass. Leaf bracket pattern, $650 obo. Call 626-7170.

635. Good things to Eat

FARM FRESH eggs - free range $2.50 dz, duck eggs $5.00 dz. 624-0898 GREEN CHILE Season is almost Over!!! Dont wait to long. 1st freeze is just around the corner. www.gravesfarmand garden.com GRAVES FARM: Green chile and roasting, okra, squash, cucumbers, eggplant, jalapenos, yellow hots, cayenne, zaranos, fresh red chile, ristras, apples, pears, red chile pods & powder, garlic, pinto beans. 622-1889 Mon-Sat 8-5:30, Sun 1-5. Accept EBT, credit cards & debit. HOBSON GARDEN: Hobstock-October 29th, our custumer appreciation day. Still roasting our famous GREEN CHILE! Fresh tomatoes ocra & eggplant. New: pumpkins, fall squash, pimentos, fresh ristras & specialty chiles. Mon-Sat 9-5:30, Sun 1-5. 3656 E. Hobson Road 622-7289.

700. Building Materials

STEEL BUILDINGS Reduced Factory Inventory 30x36 - Reg $12,300 Now $9,970 36x58 - Reg $20,300 Now $16,930 48x96 - Reg $42,400 Now $36,200 81x130 - Reg $104,800 Now $89,940 505-349-0493 Source# 1M2

745. Pets for Sale

Norwegian Elkhounds, 6 wks old 3 males, 1 female. Call 914-0083. Chinese Pugs 6 wks old Call 575-914-0357. PUPPIES READY in 3 wks Yorkies & Yorkie mixes, small, beautiful. 575-420-6655 after 5pm

‘93 CHEVY pickup V8, runs great, must see. $3900. 910-9648

2008 TOYOTA Tundra, double cab, excellent condition, $19,500. 626-8632

WELLS CARGO enclosed trailer 16’, elec. brakes, load-leveler hitch. See at 4512 W. 2nd, Roswell. Call Ed 622-5293.

1996 Chevrolet Cheyenne 1500 extended cab pickup w/camper shell call 420-2831 after 5pm on weekdays or anytime on weekends. $3000

790. Autos for Sale

1997 FORD F150 V-8 P/U. 4.5 motor, super-cab; long wheelbase. Great engine; new tires. Approx. 104k mi. Call Ed 622-5293.

TRANSPORTATION

WE BUY cars, vans, pickups and SUVs. Bring by Classic Auto, 410 S. Main. 2003 BMW 5-Series 525i Sedan M Sport, 4door, Titanium Silver color, automatic, navigation, leather seats, moon roof, keyless entry, 6 disc CD player, blue tooth, new tires, $8300 obo, call 625-9500 or 317-3092.

MAMA’S TRUCK, 1988 Chevrolet Silverado, 1 owner, 76,650 miles, excellent condition, $7500. 575-420-1619. ‘99 TAHOE, 170k miles, Vortech new tires, runs good, tan, $4500 cash less. 575-444-9828

COWBOY CAR, navy & silver, Lincoln Towncar, 1995, very clean, leather interior, new front tires, 200k miles, $3000 OBO. 622-8235

810. Auto Parts & Accessories 17” CHROME rims w/33” tires, 2500 or less miles on tires, 5 hole dodges, $750. 623-8922

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

005 010 015 020 025

Announcements Special Notice Card of Thanks Personals/Special Transportation Lost & Found

Instruction

045 050 055 060

WILL BUY your unwanted washing machines. 626-7470

MUST SELL! 2002 Chrysler Town & Country loaded call 720-317-5155

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com

Gold & Silver Cash. Don’t be fooled. Compare prices. Private collector pays more money for your jewelry. 7 days a week 578-0805

WANT TO buy 3 acres of Senior Artesian water rights. Will negotiate price. Call 575-626-2182.

2006 CHEVY Cobalt 88k mi. excellent cond. $5250 420-1352

2004 LINCOLN Aviator, 68,600 miles, $11k, 575-910-0321

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

WE BUY junk batteries, automotive & industrial. $4.00 each, 311 S. Virginia. 622-4160

790. Autos for Sale

Harley Davidson 2003 Centennial year, only 9k mi extremely clean & garage kept, plenty of upgrades $9500 OBO. 420-7935

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

B5

Employment

Employment Opportunities Salesperson/Agents Employment Agencies Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 441 445 450

Window Repair Window Cleaning Wrought Iron Services Wanted

455 456 460 465

Money: Loan/Borrow Credit Cards Insurance Co. Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale Investment: Stocks/Sale Mortgages for Sale Mortgages Wanted Business Opportunities

470 475 480 485

Financial

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


B6 Thursday, October 27, 2011

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg DevonE .68 62.71 +1.11 DrSCBr rs ... 33.22 -1.75 A-B-C DirFnBr rs ... 43.33 -2.38 ACE Ltd 1.36e u71.00 +2.00 DirLCBr rs ... 33.42 -1.16 AES Corp ... 10.96 +.14 DrxEMBull1.10e 19.09 +.99 AFLAC 1.32f 43.03 +1.29 DrxEnBear ... 13.22 -.91 AGCO ... 43.12 +2.16 DirEMBear ... 20.21 -1.18 AK Steel .20 7.52 +.05 DrxFnBull ... 14.05 +.69 ... 2.63 ... DirxSCBull ... 45.26 +2.10 AMR AT&T Inc 1.72 28.75 +.34 DirxEnBull ... 49.06 +3.00 AbtLab 1.92 53.65 +.66 Discover .24 23.30 +.38 .40f 35.05 +.54 Accenture 1.35f 58.21 +.04 Disney AMD ... 5.09 +.19 DomRescs 1.97 51.15 +.45 Aeropostl ... 13.75 -.06 DowChm 1.00 26.89 +.40 Aetna .60 38.90 +.59 DrPepSnap1.28 37.91 -1.43 Agilent ... 35.79 -.14 DuPont 1.64 46.10 +1.16 Agnico g .64 44.91 -.33 DukeEngy 1.00 20.30 +.16 Albemarle .70f 52.72 +1.76 DukeRlty .68 11.75 +.18 ... 23.79 -.08 AlcatelLuc ... 2.73 +.04 EMC Cp Alcoa .12 10.36 +.22 EOG Res .64 87.42 -.10 ... 1.23 -.02 Alere ... 24.18 +3.06 EKodak AllegTch .72 43.66 +3.40 Eaton s 1.36 43.74 +.60 .70 53.55 +.89 Allergan .20 83.74 -3.22 Ecolab .84 26.85 +.35 ElPasoCp .04 u25.50 -.05 Allstate ... 10.86 +.17 AlphaNRs ... 22.88 +.62 Elan Altria 1.64f 27.28 +.28 EldorGld g .12f 18.68 +.31 1.38 47.15 +.63 EmersonEl AmBev s 1.16e 33.81 +.23 AMovilL s .28e 24.56 +.55 EnCana g .80 20.95 +.50 g ... 10.84 +.41 EndvSilv AEagleOut .44a 13.20 +.05 1.88f u38.80 +.15 ENSCO 1.40 49.87 +1.24 AEP AmExp .72 50.45 +1.03 ExcoRes .16 12.99 +1.51 AmIntlGrp ... 25.32 +1.14 Exelon 2.10 42.71 +.40 AmTower ... 55.63 -.32 ExxonMbl 1.88 81.07 +1.63 Ameriprise .92 42.86 +.81 FMC Tch s ... 44.41 -.56 AmeriBrgn .46f 40.90 +1.30 FairchldS ... 14.58 +.77 Anadarko .36 79.01 +1.46 FedExCp .52 81.36 +.64 AnalogDev 1.00 36.18 +.24 FibriaCelu ... 8.32 -.12 Annaly 2.51e 16.67 +.09 FstHorizon .04 6.93 +.20 Anworth .95e 6.40 +.05 FirstEngy 2.20 44.65 -.27 Aon Corp .60 49.72 +.63 FlagstBc h ... .69 -.09 ... 7.08 +1.08 Apache .60 97.36 +2.83 Flotek ... 11.87 -.56 ArcelorMit .75 19.59 +.18 FordM ArchCoal .44 16.87 +.37 FordM wt ... 3.56 -.40 ArchDan .64 28.90 +.75 ForestLab ... 30.82 -.03 AveryD 1.00 25.40 -.87 ForestOil s ... 11.65 +.24 ... 30.62 +1.08 FMCG s 1.00a 39.30 +1.09 Avnet Avon .92 23.01 -.05 FrontierCm .75 6.03 +.08 BB&T Cp .64a 23.13 +.26 G-H-I BHP BillLt2.02e 78.04 +1.53 ... 24.75 -.35 BP PLC 1.68 44.65 +1.13 GNC n Gafisa SA .29e 7.15 +.26 BakrHu .60 56.48 +1.07 BcoBrades .80r 17.56 +.21 GameStop ... 25.04 -.56 BcoSantSA.84e 8.40 +.05 Gannett .32 11.75 +.42 .45 18.64 -.01 BcoSBrasil1.65e 8.69 +.30 Gap BkofAm .04 6.59 +.13 GenDynam1.88 63.89 -1.37 GenElec .60 16.35 +.13 BkNYMel .52 20.96 +.22 Barclay .36e 11.80 +.34 GenGrPr n .40 13.90 -.03 Bar iPVix rs ... 42.03 -1.77 GenMills 1.22 38.99 +.17 .76 d83.40 -4.30 GenMot n ... 24.99 +.13 Bard BarrickG .60f 47.85 +.65 GenOn En ... 2.90 +.12 Baxter 1.24 55.00 +.84 Genworth ... 6.15 +.42 Bemis .96 d28.02 -3.48 Gerdau .25e 8.21 +.25 BerkH B ... 78.02 +2.28 GlaxoSKln2.17e 44.83 +.82 BestBuy .64 26.65 +.60 GoldFLtd .24e 16.98 +.32 Blackstone .40 14.13 +.13 Goldcrp g .41 47.49 -.05 BlockHR .60 14.89 +.34 GoldmanS1.40 106.33 +5.89 Boeing 1.68 66.56 +2.84 Goodyear ... 13.46 +.12 BostonSci ... 5.46 +.04 HCC Ins .62f 28.43 -.89 Brandyw .60 8.67 +.10 HCP Inc 1.92 38.10 +.33 .64f 22.75 -.17 HSBC 1.90e 42.33 +.80 Brinker BrMySq 1.32 32.51 +.40 Hallibrtn .36 35.87 +.75 CBRE Grp ... 15.94 -.15 Harman .30 43.23 +2.14 CBS B .40 25.20 +.57 HartfdFn .40 18.54 +.59 ... 8.78 -.04 CIGNA .04 45.27 +.35 HltMgmt ... u54.20 +.40 CIT Grp ... 35.58 +1.13 HlthSprg ... 5.86 +.17 CMS Eng .84 u20.85 +.11 HeclaM 1.92 53.21 +.56 CNO Fincl ... 6.06 +.41 Heinz ... 11.01 +.12 CSX s .48 21.43 +.26 Hertz .40 60.38 +1.60 CVS Care .50 36.22 +.52 Hess HewlettP .48 25.75 +.70 CblvsNY s .60 17.51 +.02 CabotO&G .12 66.84 +.72 HollyFrt s .35f 30.37 +1.76 CalDive ... 2.02 +.07 HomeDp 1.00 36.55 +.51 Cameco g .40 20.89 +.28 HonwllIntl 1.33 51.40 +.69 ... 29.97 -.35 Cameron ... 51.53 +.67 Hospira CdnNRs gs .36 34.26 +.90 HostHotls .16f 13.73 +.38 CP Rwy g 1.20 59.50 +.95 Huntsmn .40 11.27 +.55 CapOne .20 44.60 +1.19 Hyperdyn ... 4.94 +.29 CapitlSrce .04 6.50 +.25 IAMGld g .20f 21.20 +1.07 ... 8.81 -.07 CardnlHlth .86 44.12 +1.09 ING ... 16.78 +.17 CarMax ... 30.28 -.45 iShGold Carnival 1.00 35.80 +.66 iSAstla 1.06e 23.45 +.33 Caterpillar 1.84 91.57 +1.68 iShBraz 3.42e 59.64 +.97 Celanese .24 42.26 +.92 iShGer .67e 21.19 +.24 ... 3.71 +.11 iSh HK .42e 16.11 +.29 Cemex Cemig pf 1.89e 16.10 +.78 iShJapn .17e 9.56 +.01 CenterPnt .79 21.02 +.11 iSh Kor .50e 54.63 +.33 CntryLink 2.90 34.59 +.47 iShMex .71e 54.34 +1.01 ChesEng .35 28.15 +.84 iSTaiwn .29e 12.95 +.15 ... 32.50 +.07 Chevron 3.12 106.77 +2.27 iShSilver ChicB&I .20 36.34 +1.87 iShChina25.85e 36.13 +1.40 Chicos .20 12.57 -.21 iSSP500 2.45e 124.75 +1.25 Chimera .57e 2.95 +.03 iShEMkts .84e 40.31 +.73 Chubb 1.56 67.94 +.67 iShB20 T 3.94e 114.17 -2.03 Citigrp rs .04 31.15 +.25 iS Eafe 1.68e 52.66 +.71 CliffsNRs 1.12f 62.18 +1.76 iShiBxHYB7.23e 89.08 +.38 Coach .90 62.38 +.82 iShR2K 1.02e 72.59 +1.23 CocaCola 1.88 67.47 +.52 iShREst 2.18e 55.45 +.51 CocaCE .52 25.70 +.64 ITT Corp 1.00 43.54 -.48 1.44f 46.28 +.63 ColgPal 2.32 90.54 +.56 ITW Comerica .40 25.11 +.85 IngerRd .48 30.36 +.74 3.00 181.97 +1.61 CompPrdS ... 30.93 -.09 IBM ConAgra .96f 25.17 +.17 IntlGame .24 16.55 +.20 1.05 26.58 +.30 ConocPhil 2.64 71.89 +1.21 IntPap ConsolEngy .40 41.00 +.24 Interpublic .24 8.60 +.21 .49 19.22 +.42 ConstellA ... 20.05 +.26 Invesco ConstellEn .96 38.22 +.46 InvMtgCap3.74e 15.55 +.20 Corning .30f 14.13 +.41 ItauUnibH .84e 18.61 +.42 CovantaH .30 15.05 +.51 IvanhM g 1.48e 18.04 +.54 Covidien .90f 44.77 -.58 J-K-L CSVS2xVxS ... 51.33 -4.92 CSVelIVSt s ... 6.45 +.24 JPMorgCh 1.00 34.18 +.69 .32f 20.16 +.43 CrwnCstle ... 41.64 -1.51 Jabil Cummins 1.60 94.88 +1.07 Jaguar g ... 4.77 +.39 CurEuro .22e 138.54 +.05 JanusCap .20 6.80 +.30 Jefferies .30 12.85 +.09 D-E-F JohnJn 2.28 64.49 +.80 DCT Indl .28 4.75 +.02 JohnsnCtl .64 32.60 +.22 DR Horton .15 11.32 +.22 JonesGrp .20 11.30 -.68 DanaHldg ... 13.93 +.23 JnprNtwk ... 23.25 +.48 Danaher .10f 47.81 +.39 KB Home .25 7.43 +.23 DeVry .24 38.36 -7.72 Kellogg 1.72f 54.54 +.67 Deere 1.64 73.93 +.81 KeyEngy ... 12.17 +.62 ... 8.56 +.12 Keycorp .12 7.28 +.34 DeltaAir DenburyR ... 15.61 +.28 KimbClk 2.80 70.28 +.73 .72 16.84 +.13 DeutschBk1.07e 40.11 +.67 Kimco DBGoldDS ... 4.65 -.12 KindMor n 1.20 29.66 -.45 Name

Name Sell Chg Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 18.84 +.25 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.85 +.23 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.12 +.08 GrowthI 25.49 +.17 InfAdjBd 12.95 -.03 23.04 +.13 Ultra American Funds A: AmcpA p 18.81 +.22 AMutlA p 25.32 +.21 BalA p 18.14 +.12 BondA p 12.49 -.03 CapIBA p 49.26 +.30 CapWGA p32.97 +.25 CapWA p 20.88 ... EupacA p 37.20 +.30 FdInvA p 35.37 +.33 GovtA p 14.55 -.03 GwthA p 29.24 +.18 HI TrA p 10.77 +.03 IncoA p 16.57 +.11 IntBdA p 13.59 -.02 IntlGrIncA p28.94 +.20 ICAA p 27.07 +.21 NEcoA p 24.41 +.12 N PerA p 27.01 +.15 NwWrldA 48.97 +.44 STBFA p 10.08 ... SmCpA p 34.13 +.32 TxExA p 12.30 +.02 WshA p 27.84 +.28 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 25.02 +.28 IntEqII I r 10.47 +.13 Artisan Funds: Intl 20.69 +.23 IntlVal r 25.69 +.25

MidCap 34.05 +.08 MidCapVal21.00 +.28 Baron Funds: Growth 51.18 +.43 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.05 -.04 DivMu 14.55 +.01 TxMgdIntl 13.73 +.16 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 17.78 +.21 GlAlA r 18.94 +.15 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.64 +.14 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.82 +.21 GlbAlloc r 19.04 +.15 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 49.92 +.07 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 58.96 +.61 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 27.85 +.33 DivEqInc 9.43 +.09 DivrBd 5.11 -.01 TxEA p 13.40 +.01 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 28.77 +.34 AcornIntZ 36.26 +.41 LgCapGr 12.37 +.07 ValRestr 45.21 +.72 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.56 -.09 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n 9.92 +.12 USCorEq1 n10.66+.14 USCorEq2 n10.48+.16 DWS Invest S: MgdMuni S 8.97 +.02 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.48 +.51

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: chg.

-1.05 -1.55 -1.67 -1.55 -1.42 -1.05 -.80 -.90 -.50

+.07 -.10 -.48 -.22 -.25 -.25 -.35 +.40

14.48 +.10 12.67 -.12 6.68 +.24 52.32 -.56 35.02 +.09 23.02 +.10 5.93 +.14 43.47 +1.42 16.95 +.11 16.48 +.49 37.50 +.08 19.48 +.98 u8.06 +.32 76.35 -2.54 21.64 +.13 31.74 +1.01

M-N-0

... 5.88 +.02 MEMC MF Global ... d1.70 -.16 MFA Fncl 1.00 6.74 -.02 MGIC ... 2.37 +.02 MGM Rsts ... 10.79 +.07 Macys .40 30.56 ... Manitowoc .08 10.56 +1.91 Manulife g .52 12.99 +.20 MarathnO s .60 26.34 +.60 MarathP n1.00f 34.73 +1.76 MktVGold .40e 57.97 +.52 MktVRus .18e 30.42 +.99 MktVJrGld2.93e 31.62 +.54 MarIntA .40 31.73 +.62 MarshM .88 30.72 +.69 Masco .30 9.65 +.15 McDnlds 2.80f 91.78 +.01 McGrwH 1.00 43.31 +.08 McKesson .80 81.75 +5.62 McMoRn ... 12.10 +.30 Mechel ... 12.87 +.50 MedcoHlth ... 52.13 +5.19 Medtrnic .97 33.95 +.22 1.52 33.54 +.63 Merck Meredith 1.53f 27.44 +2.55 .74 33.19 +.36 MetLife MetroPCS ... 9.69 +.59 MitsuUFJ ... 4.36 -.01 Monsanto 1.20f 74.22 +1.26 MonstrWw ... 8.91 +.25 Moodys .56 33.67 +1.58 MorgStan .20 16.64 +.12 .20 59.45 +1.61 Mosaic ... 17.35 +1.55 Nabors NBkGreece.29e .55 -.01 NOilVarco .44 69.45 +1.46 NY CmtyB 1.00 12.87 +.25 NewellRub .32 13.51 +.30 NewfldExp ... 38.14 +.95 NewmtM 1.40f 65.79 +.95 Nexen g .20 16.65 +.27 NiSource .92 22.41 -.20 NobleCorp .53e 35.69 +.75 NokiaCp .55e 6.77 +.06 Nordstrm .92 50.46 -.17 NorflkSo 1.72 69.77 +.39 NorthropG 2.00 55.60 -.97 Novartis 2.53e 57.03 +.66 Nucor 1.45 37.21 +.65 OcciPet 1.84 87.20 +2.06 OfficeDpt ... 2.32 +.03 OfficeMax ... 5.27 ... OilSvHT 1.58e 125.98 +3.16 OwensCorn ... 27.24 +2.38 OwensIll ... 19.46 +.31

P-Q-R

PG&E Cp 1.82 42.31 +.09 PNC 1.40 53.89 +.87 PPL Corp 1.40 29.23 +.43 ParkerHan 1.48 78.43 +.88 PatriotCoal ... 10.96 +.40 PeabdyE .34 41.60 +1.94 PennWst g 1.08 17.78 +.35 Penney .80 32.68 -.34 PepsiCo 2.06 62.01 +.19 PetrbrsA 1.34e 23.32 +.48 Petrobras 1.26e 25.13 +.52 Pfizer .80 19.28 +.41 PhilipMor 3.08f 70.80 +1.96 PhilipsEl 1.02e 20.89 +.17 PitnyBw 1.48 20.57 +.18 PlainsEx ... 30.07 +.82 Potash s .28 49.53 +1.04 PS USDBull ... 21.51 -.01 PrecDrill ... 11.83 +.18 PrinFncl .55f 26.37 +1.18 ProLogis 1.12 27.71 +.26 ProShtS&P ... 41.68 -.41 PrUShS&P ... 20.74 -.42 PrUlShDow ... 16.96 -.47 ProUltQQQ ... 86.28 -.25 PrUShQQQ rs... 44.81 +.11 ProUltSP .31e 45.54 +.88 ProUShL20 ... 21.38 +.72 ProUltFin .15e 45.27 +1.42 ProUSSP500 ... 14.92 -.46 PrUltSP500 s.03e59.59 +1.74 ProUSSlv rs ... 12.43 -.06 ProUltSlv s ... 63.92 +.27 ProUShEuro ... 17.82 ... ProctGam 2.10 64.95 +.44 ProgsvCp 1.40e 19.09 +.62 ProUSR2K rs ... 43.56 -1.53 Prudentl 1.15f 53.52 +1.62 PulteGrp ... 4.93 +.12 QEP Res .08 34.00 +2.60 QntmDSS ... 2.20 -.04 QstDiag .68f 56.07 -.43 QksilvRes ... 7.76 +.20 RPC s .40f 17.60 +.38 RadianGrp .01 2.23 -.07 RadioShk .50f 11.70 -1.61 RangeRs .16 70.02 -.35 Raytheon 1.72 42.44 -1.42 RedHat ... 48.23 +1.77 RegionsFn .04 3.84 +.13 RepubSvc .88f 29.27 -.17 ReynAm s 2.12 38.36 +.32 RioTinto 1.17e 53.31 +1.22 RiteAid ... 1.07 +.03 RobtHalf .56 26.58 +1.31 Rowan ... 34.79 +.48 RBScotlnd ... 8.06 +.08 RylCarb .40 28.91 +.97 RoyDShllA 3.36 72.37 +1.13

Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.88 +.51 NYVen C 31.21 +.48 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.29 -.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq n18.39 +.34 EmMktV 28.43 +.56 IntSmVa n 14.93 +.16 LargeCo 9.81 +.11 USLgVa n 19.13 +.31 US Small n20.17 +.38 US SmVa 23.13 +.47 IntlSmCo n15.24 +.15 Fixd n 10.35 ... IntVa n 15.88 +.20 Glb5FxInc n11.28 -.01 2YGlFxd n 10.23 ... Dodge&Cox: Balanced 67.54 +.67 Income 13.34 -.02 IntlStk 31.76 +.45 Stock 101.49+1.39 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.18 ... TRBd N p 11.18 ... Dreyfus: Aprec 40.11 +.46 DreihsAcInc10.29 +.06 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.01 +.21 NatlMunInc 9.30 +.05 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.80 +.01 GblMacAbR9.94 +.01 LgCapVal 17.06 +.21 FMI Funds: LgCap p n 15.68 +.15 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.72 ...

CATTLE/HOGS

Open high low settle CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 121.15 122.55 120.85 121.05 Dec 11 120.45 122.40 120.32 120.42 Feb 12 123.07 124.97 122.97 123.05 Apr 12 126.60 128.10 126.45 126.50 Jun 12 124.70 126.20 124.67 124.75 Aug 12 125.90 125.90 124.85 125.00 Oct 12 128.15 128.15 127.57 127.60 Dec 12 129.00 129.00 128.25 128.50 Feb 13 129.50 129.50 129.20 129.20 Last spot N/A Est. sales 8116. Tue’s Sales: 51,973 Tue’s open int: 336771, off -716 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 139.77 140.02 139.55 139.72 Nov 11 142.05 142.95 141.67 141.70 Jan 12 146.80 147.35 146.25 146.27 Mar 12 147.05 147.97 146.40 146.95 Apr 12 147.95 148.12 147.55 147.75 May 12 147.75 147.80 147.75 147.80 Aug 12 148.40 149.25 148.30 148.75 Sep 12 148.70 148.75 148.32 148.40 Last spot N/A Est. sales 1076. Tue’s Sales: 4,601 Tue’s open int: 36066, off -146 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 11 87.00 87.85 86.85 87.02 Feb 12 89.70 90.82 89.60 89.65 Apr 12 92.27 93.37 92.12 92.42 May 12 98.50 98.50 97.00 97.95

Kinross g .12f KnghtCap ... KodiakO g ... Kohls 1.00 Kraft 1.16 Kroger .46f LSI Corp ... LVSands ... LenderPS .40 LennarA .16 LillyEli 1.96 LincNat .20 LizClaib ... LockhdM 4.00 Lowes .56 LyonBas A .80f

FINANCIAL S-T-U

SLM Cp .40 12.93 +.57 SpdrDJIA 3.23e 118.41 +1.62 SpdrGold ... 167.40 +1.81 SP Mid 1.64e 159.14 +1.99 S&P500ETF2.46e124.30 +1.25 Spdr Div 1.73e 52.84 +.48 SpdrHome .31e 16.38 +.35 SpdrS&PBk.26e 19.50 +.37 SpdrLehHY4.28e 38.70 -.02 SpdrS&P RB.40e 23.17 +.53 SpdrRetl .49e 52.45 +.03 SpdrOGEx .50e 53.26 +1.57 SpdrMetM .42e 52.45 +1.13 Safeway .58 19.20 +.22 StJude .84 40.52 -.14 Salesforce ... 123.56 -6.00 SandRdge ... 7.48 +.25 SaraLee .46 17.61 +.25 Schlmbrg 1.00 69.84 +1.81 Schwab .24 12.18 -.01 SeadrillLtd3.03e 33.51 +.25 .52 17.48 -.13 SealAir SemiHTr .64e 31.44 +.13 SiderurNac.81e 8.72 +.28 SilvWhtn g .12 33.40 +1.19 SilvrcpM g .08 9.55 +.14 SouthnCo 1.89 43.12 ... SthnCopper2.19e29.94 +1.03 SwstAirl .02 8.63 -.09 SwstnEngy ... 41.52 +1.34 SpectraEn 1.12f 28.78 +.63 SprintNex ... 2.51 -.19 SprottGold ... 15.05 +.25 SP Matls .82e 33.90 +.60 SP HlthC .64e 33.37 +.44 SP CnSt .85e 31.19 +.31 SP Consum.61e 38.88 -.15 SP Engy 1.08e 69.47 +1.47 SPDR Fncl .20e 13.25 +.23 SP Inds .69e 32.83 +.23 SP Tech .36e 25.63 +.11 SP Util 1.36e 34.48 +.14 StarwdHtl .30f 49.53 +.61 StateStr .72 38.86 +.11 SuccessF ... 25.71 +.33 Suncor gs .44 31.14 +.50 Suntech ... 2.46 +.22 SunTrst .20f 19.39 +.62 SupEnrgy ... 26.32 -.10 Supvalu .35 8.45 +.39 SwiftTrns n ... 8.70 +.01 Synovus .04 1.40 +.09 Sysco 1.04 26.79 +.05 TE Connect .72 34.71 +.73 .76 58.54 -.57 TJX TaiwSemi .52e 12.25 +.06 TalismE g .27 13.87 +.26 Target 1.20 55.15 +.75 TeckRes g .60 37.04 +1.71 TelefEsp s2.14e 21.25 +.25 Tenaris .68e 31.24 +.32 TenetHlth ... 5.18 +.09 ... 13.65 +.08 Teradyn Terex ... 14.94 +1.07 Tesoro ... 25.10 +1.11 TexInst .68f 31.00 +.03 Textron .08 18.43 -.34 ThermoFis ... d48.36 -4.87 3M Co 2.20 77.02 -.02 TW Cable 1.92 70.63 +.32 TimeWarn .94 34.64 +.63 TollBros ... 18.04 +.26 Total SA 2.38e 52.97 +.77 TotalSys .40f u19.61 +.90 Transocn .79e 56.61 +1.39 Travelers 1.64 57.50 +1.16 TrinaSolar ... 7.40 +.12 Trinity .36 26.92 -.55 TycoIntl 1.00 44.69 -.19 Tyson .16 18.79 +.13 UBS AG ... 12.66 +.09 US Airwy ... 5.66 +.06 US Gold ... 4.38 +.02 USEC ... 2.23 +.13 USG ... 9.69 +.42 UltraPt g ... 31.04 -.10 UndrArmr ... u82.89 +2.74 UnionPac 1.90 97.91 +2.23 ... 20.34 +.33 UtdContl 2.08 69.38 +.03 UPS B UtdRentals ... 23.63 +.11 US Bancrp .50 25.49 +.65 US NGs rs ... 8.68 -.16 US OilFd ... 35.06 -.74 USSteel .20 22.31 -.09 UtdTech 1.92 76.06 +.78 UtdhlthGp .65 48.76 ... UnumGrp .42 24.09 +.51

V-W-X-Y-Z

Valassis ... d18.04 -1.53 Vale SA 1.14e 24.88 +.79 Vale SA pf1.14e 23.18 +.72 ValeroE .20 25.15 +3.31 VanS&P5001.11e56.81 +.54 VangEmg .82e 41.02 +.72 VerizonCm2.00f 36.81 +.62 ViacomB 1.00 43.99 +.92 VimpelCm .79e 11.37 +.45 Visa .88f 92.02 +1.34 VishayInt ... 10.72 +.33 WalMart 1.46 57.37 +.66 Walgrn .90 33.25 -.57 WsteMInc 1.36 34.68 +.80 WeathfIntl ... 15.28 +.61 WellPoint 1.00 69.58 +2.58 WellsFargo .48 25.76 +.21 Wendys Co .08 4.95 +.06 WDigital ... 27.91 +1.55 WstnRefin ... 15.12 +.61 WstnUnion .32 17.25 +.18 .60 17.09 +.17 Weyerh WhitingPt s ... 46.51 +1.62 WmsCos 1.00f 29.85 +.28 WT India .18e 19.32 +.11 Wyndham .60 32.78 +1.29 XL Grp .44 21.94 +.12 XcelEngy 1.04 25.48 +.19 .17 8.20 +.18 Xerox Yamana g .18 14.99 -.53 YingliGrn ... 3.90 +.14 Youku n ... 19.64 -1.26 YumBrnds 1.14f 53.05 +.21

FPACres n26.95 +.12 Fairholme 27.16 +.70 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.30 -.03 StrValDvIS 4.75 +.05 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.86 +.08 StrInA 12.43 ... Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI n 20.09 +.08 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 n 13.50 +.05 FF2010K 12.48 +.05 FF2015 n 11.27 +.05 FF2015K 12.51 +.05 FF2020 n 13.58 +.07 FF2020K 12.84 +.06 FF2025 n 11.22 +.06 FF2025K 12.89 +.08 FF2030 n 13.34 +.08 FF2030K 13.01 +.08 FF2035 n 10.98 +.08 FF2040 n 7.66 +.05 FF2040K 13.06 +.10 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.06 +.12 AMgr50 n 15.13 +.06 AMgr20 r n12.88 +.01 Balanc n 18.21 +.09 BalancedK18.21 +.09 BlueChGr n43.41 +.25 Canada n 51.76 +.72 CapAp n 25.28 +.13 CpInc r n 8.88 +.02 Contra n 67.89 +.29 ContraK 67.93 +.29 DisEq n 21.61 +.29 DivIntl n 27.39 +.26 DivrsIntK r 27.40 +.26 DivGth n 26.16 +.37

Eq Inc n 40.98 +.55 EQII n 16.94 +.23 Fidel n 31.56 +.25 FltRateHi r n9.67 +.01 GNMA n 11.82 -.01 GovtInc 10.76 -.03 GroCo n 85.37 +.62 GroInc n 17.85 +.23 GrowthCoK85.42 +.62 HighInc r n 8.69 +.01 Indepn n 22.80 +.30 IntBd n 10.80 -.04 IntmMu n 10.29 +.01 IntlDisc n 29.59 +.27 InvGrBd n 11.64 -.04 InvGB n 7.64 -.02 LgCapVal 10.63 +.15 LowP r n 36.31 +.40 LowPriK r 36.29 +.40 Magelln n 63.85 +.43 MidCap n 26.58 +.24 MuniInc n 12.83 +.01 NwMkt r n 15.88 +.05 OTC n 56.93 +.40 100Index 8.78 +.09 Puritn n 17.73 +.10 PuritanK 17.73 +.10 RealE n 26.58 +.32 SAllSecEqF12.08 +.12 SCmdtyStrt n9.41 -.07 SrsIntGrw 10.44 +.09 SrsIntVal 8.62 +.07 SrInvGrdF 11.65 -.03 StIntMu n 10.71 ... STBF n 8.49 -.01 StratInc n 11.12 ... StrReRt r 9.51 -.01 TotalBd n 10.89 -.02 USBI n 11.68 -.04 Value n 63.77 +.97

Jun 12 99.80 99.80 98.70 98.95 -1.22 Jul 12 98.40 98.40 97.52 97.90 -.85 Aug 12 96.50 96.50 95.50 95.87 -.93 Oct 12 85.00 85.00 84.15 84.65 -1.00 Dec 12 80.70 80.70 80.40 80.40 -.60 Feb 13 81.50 81.50 81.50 81.50 -.40 Apr 13 82.50 82.50 82.50 82.50 -.30 Last spot N/A Est. sales 6449. Tue’s Sales: 34,796 Tue’s open int: 279577, up +1143

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high low settle COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 11 100.05 100.73 99.48 100.32 Mar 12 98.53 99.12 98.01 98.91 May 12 98.06 98.57 97.50 98.36 Jul 12 97.70 98.03 97.00 97.66 Oct 12 96.51 Dec 12 94.75 94.85 94.00 94.66 Mar 13 95.96 96.29 95.95 95.95 May 13 96.60 96.60 96.55 96.55 Jul 13 96.24 Oct 13 94.53 Last spot N/A Est. sales 11435. Tue’s Sales: 25,631 Tue’s open int: 159357, up +733

chg.

+.64 +.60 +.48 +.15 +.10 +.10 +.20 +.20 +.20 +.20

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high -.83 -1.50 -1.18 -1.15

low settle

chg.

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 11 619 643ü 616ø 619ø -16fl Mar 12 655ø 679 653fl 656ü -16ø May 12 678ø 700 676ü 678fl -16ü

Roswell Daily Record

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

AMEX

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg S&P500ETF2642095124.30 +1.25 BkofAm 1976414 6.59 +.13 FordM 1517725 11.87 -.56 MF Global1355385 1.70 -.16

Name Vol (00) CheniereEn291832 Rentech 152280 NwGold g 60174 GoldStr g 45612 GrtBasG g 36634

Name Last MediaGen 3.45 Manitowoc 10.56 7.08 Flotek ValeroE 25.15 CSVS2xPlat 52.68

Chg +1.01 +1.91 +1.08 +3.31 +6.78

%Chg +41.4 +22.1 +18.0 +15.2 +14.8

Name CheniereEn HallwdGp IncOpR FieldPnt AlmadnM g

Name DeVry RadioShk Bemis DrxRsaBear FordM wt

Chg -7.72 -1.61 -3.48 -4.36 -.40

%Chg -16.8 -12.1 -11.0 -10.6 -10.1

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

Last 38.36 11.70 28.02 36.87 3.56

DIARY

2,454 582 86 3,122 51 16 4,718,292,604

52-Week High Low 12,876.00 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 452.87 381.99 8,718.25 6,414.89 2,490.51 1,941.99 2,887.75 2,298.89 1,370.58 1,074.77 14,562.01 11,208.42 868.57 601.71

Name

Div

Last 10.32 1.42 12.41 2.00 1.54

Chg +4.20 +.22 +.15 -.03 +.05

Name Vol (00) Last PwShs QQQ95177357.27 Microsoft 608178 26.59 Intel 557585 24.70 MicronT 497510 5.47 Cisco 435223 17.61

Chg -.07 -.22 +.07 -.03 -.01..

%Chg +68.6 +17.7 +16.6 +14.0 +12.6

Name Last Chg Lightbrdge 2.84 +.64 FstFHld 6.91 +1.46 Questcor 40.43 +7.13 CT BkTr 7.45 +1.29 PeopBNC 5.19 +.82

%Chg +29.1 +26.8 +21.4 +20.9

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg ExtorreG g 7.44 -1.60 -17.7 FstSecur rs 2.69 -.78 ContMatls 11.12 -1.00 -8.3 HumGen 9.88 -2.85 2.10 -.15 -6.7 Spherix rs 2.14 -.43 HKN WellsGard 2.35 -.13 -5.2 AlbnyMlc 2.99 -.52 2.82 -.15 -5.1 Amazon 198.40-28.75 Accelr8

%Chg -22.5 -22.4 -16.7 -14.8 -12.7

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Last 10.32 12.65 2.11 2.85 2.85

Chg +4.20 +1.90 +.30 +.35 +.32

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

DIARY

290 146 45 481 2 2Lows 126,987,401

INDEXES

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Last 11,869.04 4,809.16 447.61 7,506.15 2,275.71 2,650.67 1,242.00 13,057.68 727.15

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume Net Chg +162.42 +16.17 +2.92 +105.33 +44.04 +12.25 +12.95 +146.66 +13.50

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

PE Last

Chg

YTD %Chg Name

Div

DIARY

1,842 686 105 2,633 35 35ieldPnt 2,089,193,899

% Chg +1.39 +.34 +.66 +1.42 +1.97 +.46 +1.05 +1.14 +1.89

YTD 52-wk % Chg % Chg +2.52 +6.68 -5.83 +1.52 +10.52 +11.11 -5.75 +.34 +3.05 +10.27 -.08 +5.89 -1.24 +5.04 -2.26 +4.68 -7.21 +3.25ontl

PE Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

-50.6 Oneok Pt s

2.34f

22

50.41 +.62

+26.8

+17.0 PNM Res

.50

35

17.92 +.10

+37.6

67.47 +.52

+2.6 PepsiCo

2.06

16

62.01 +.19

-5.1

15

35.05 +.54

-6.6 Pfizer

.80

13

19.28 +.41

+10.1

.64

51

87.42 -.10

-4.4 SwstAirl

.02

39

8.63 -.09

-33.5

...

6

11.87 -.56

-29.3 TexInst

.68f

13

31.00 +.03

-4.6

HewlettP

.48

6

25.75 +.70

-38.8 TimeWarn

.94

14

34.64 +.63

+7.7

HollyFrt s

.35f

15

30.37 +1.76

+49.0 TriContl

.31e

...

14.13 +.19

+2.7

Intel

.84

11

24.70 +.07

+17.5 WalMart

1.46

13

57.37 +.66

+6.4

IBM

3.00

+24.0 WashFed

.24

13

13.25 +.30

-21.7

Merck

1.52

.48

10

25.76 +.21

-16.9

Microsoft

.80f

25.48 +.19

+8.2

BkofAm

.04

Chevron

3.12

CocaCola

1.88

12

Disney

.40f

EOG Res FordM

...

6.59 +.13

9 106.77 +2.27

14 181.97 +1.61 12

33.54 +.63

-6.9 WellsFargo

HOW TO READ THE MARKET IN REVIEW 10

26.59 -.22

-4.7 XcelEngy

1.04

15

Here are the 525 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 400 most active on the Nasdaq National Markets and 100 most active on American Stock Exchange. Mutual funds are 450 largest. Stocks in bold changed 5 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name Div Last Chg (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at Name the beginning of each letters’ list. AAR .48 12.88 # Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock, based on latest quar- ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 ACM Op .80 7.25 # terly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise footnoted. ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. ACMSp .96 7.50 # Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... mark.

Fund Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold. Chg: Daily net change in the NAV.

Name

Div Last Chg

Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. d – New 52wk low during trading day. g – Dividend in Canadian $. Stock price in U.S.$. n – New issue in past 52 wks. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. s – Split or stock dividend of 25 pct or more in last 52 wks. Div begins with date of split or stock dividend. u – New 52-wk high during trading day. v – Trading halted on primary market. Unless noted, dividend rates are annual disbursements based on last declaration. pf – Preferred. pp – Holder owes installment(s) of purchase price. rt – Rights. un – Units. wd – When distributed. wi – When issued. wt – Warrants. ww – With warrants. xw – Without warrants. Dividend Footnotes: a – Also extra or extras. b – Annual rate plus stock dividend. c – Liquidating dividend. e – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos. f – Annual rate, increased on last declaration. i – Declared or paid after stock dividend or split. j – Paid this year, dividend omitted, deferred or no action taken at last meeting. k – Declared or paid this year, accumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m – Annual rate, reduced on last declaration. p – Init div, annual rate unknown. r – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos plus stock dividend. t – Paid in stock in last 12 mos, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or distribution date. x – Ex-dividend or ex-rights. y – Ex-dividend and sales in full. z – Sales in full. vj – In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such companies. • Most active stocks above must be worth $1 and gainers/losers $2. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Wednesday’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend. AAR .48 12.88 # ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 ACM Op .80 7.25 # ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 ACMSp .96 7.50 #

MUTUAL FUNDS

Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

Fidelity Selects: Gold r n 48.27 +.64 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn n 35.91 +.52 500IdxInv n44.00 +.46 IntlInxInv n32.43 +.26 TotMktInv n36.12 +.40 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv n44.00+.46 TotMktAd r n36.13+.41 First Eagle: GlblA 46.86 +.41 OverseasA22.26 +.17 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 11.06 ... Frank/Temp Frnk A: CalTFA p 7.00 +.01 FedTFA p 12.01 +.01 FoundAl p 10.12 +.07 GrwthA p 44.29 +.24 HYTFA p 10.12 +.01 IncomA p 2.10 +.01 NYTFA p 11.71 ... RisDvA p 34.27 +.35 StratInc p 10.28 +.01 USGovA p 6.89 ... Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv n13.00 +.01 IncmeAd 2.09 +.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.12 +.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.69 +.18 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.50 +.01 GlBd A p 13.04 +.01 GrwthA p 17.19 +.10 WorldA p 14.41 +.09 Frank/Temp Tmp

B&C: GlBdC p 13.06 +.01 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 39.12 +.51 GMO Trust III: Quality 21.55 +.20 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 20.24 +.18 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.85 +.24 Quality 21.56 +.21 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 33.62 +.38 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.95 ... MidCapV 33.96 +.38 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.11 ... CapApInst 37.66 +.10 IntlInv t 55.35 +.78 Intl r 56.02 +.79 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 30.30 +.22 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI n 30.37 +.23 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 38.39 +.32 Div&Gr 19.24 +.21 Advisers 19.13 +.07 TotRetBd 11.46 -.02 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.66 -.03 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r16.68 +.09 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.28 +.19 CmstkA 15.18 +.20 EqIncA 8.25 +.07 GrIncA p 18.36 +.21 HYMuA 9.30 +.01

Jul 12 692ø 713ø 690 694ü Sep 12 711fl 734 710 715 732ø Dec 12 732fl 753ø 729 Mar 13 748fl 767ø 748ü 748fl May 13 756 771 756 756ü Jul 13 753ü 753ü 740ø 740ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 154968. Tue’s Sales: 64,183 Tue’s open int: 428942, off -52 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 11 637ø 655ø 633 637ü Mar 12 650ü 666ø 645ü 649ø 651ü 655ü May 12 654 672 Jul 12 657ø 675fl 654fl 658fl Sep 12 617ø 627 614ü 618ü Dec 12 605 611ø 595fl 600ø Mar 13 614ø 614ø 609 611ü May 13 615ü 617fl 615ü 617fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 510915. Tue’s Sales: 211,311 Tue’s open int: 1220762, off -8477 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel 330 Dec 11 332ü 340ü 329 Mar 12 340 350 339 340 May 12 353ø 353ø 346ø 346ø Jul 12 360 360 352ø 352ø Sep 12 366ø 366ø 358ø 358ø 350 350 Dec 12 351 351 Mar 13 361 361 361 361 May 13 367 367 367 367 Jul 13 373 373 373 373 381 381 Sep 13 381 381 Jul 14 418 418 418 418 Sep 14 426 426 426 426 Last spot N/A Est. sales 2866. Tue’s Sales: 1,451 Tue’s open int: 16316, up +36 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Nov 11 1210ø 1233ø 1210 1210ø Jan 12 1219fl 1242 1217 1219fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 376511. Tue’s Sales: 218,079 Tue’s open int: 542926, off -13858

-14 -15 -15fl -15fl -15 -12fl

-13ø -12fl -12ø -12ø -11ø -8 -7fl -7fl

-6ø -7 -7 -7 -8 -1

-15 -14

Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.86 +.35 AssetStA p23.67 +.37 AssetStrI r 23.91 +.38 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.82 -.02 JPMorgan R Cl: ShtDurBd 10.99 -.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd n 11.81 -.03 HighYld n 7.82 +.01 IntmTFBd n11.09 +.02 ShtDurBd n10.99 ... USLCCrPls n20.06 +.23 Janus T Shrs: BalancdT 24.77 +.22 OvrseasT r38.04 +.38 PrkMCVal T21.87 +.21 Twenty T 62.11 +.50 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 11.62 +.13 LSBalanc 12.50 +.08 LSGrwth 12.32 +.12 LSModer 12.48 +.05 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.72 +.23 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p19.08 +.22 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p16.02 +.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 27.95 +.46 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.29 +.01 StrInc C 14.87 +.03 LSBondR 14.23 ... StrIncA 14.79 +.03 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.29 -.01

FUTURES

Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.47 +.15 BdDebA p 7.63 +.01 ShDurIncA p4.53 ... Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t4.56 ... Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.53 ... MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.99 +.08 ValueA 22.23 +.25 MFS Funds I: ValueI 22.33 +.26 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.83 +.01 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.73 +.09 MergerFd n 15.89 +.05 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.42 -.02 TotRtBdI 10.42 -.02 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 13.13 +.17 MCapGrI 36.34 +.14 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.22 +.17 GlbDiscZ 27.62 +.17 QuestZ 16.63 +.13 SharesZ 19.89 +.19 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 47.68 +.69 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 49.31 +.71 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.00 ... Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.46 +.12 Intl I r 17.48 +.08 Oakmark 41.85 +.40

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

chg.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Dec 11 91.56 93.92 90.00 90.20 -2.97 Jan 12 91.42 93.68 89.99 90.18 -2.75 Feb 12 91.42 93.45 89.95 90.15 -2.52 Mar 12 91.31 93.21 89.88 90.08 -2.33 Apr 12 91.20 92.84 89.98 89.98 -2.16 May 12 91.09 92.73 89.89 89.89 -1.98 Jun 12 90.81 92.58 89.60 89.79 -1.83 Jul 12 89.80 92.08 89.70 89.70 -1.72 Aug 12 90.38 91.00 89.60 89.60 -1.62 Sep 12 89.48 91.60 89.48 89.53 -1.54 Oct 12 90.07 92.05 89.49 89.49 -1.45 Nov 12 91.20 91.20 89.48 89.48 -1.39 Dec 12 90.44 92.00 89.26 89.47 -1.34 Jan 13 90.90 90.90 89.36 89.36 -1.30 Feb 13 89.55 89.55 89.21 89.21 -1.27 Mar 13 89.07 -1.22 Apr 13 88.95 -1.16 May 13 88.83 -1.10 Jun 13 88.56 90.45 88.56 88.71 -1.04 Jul 13 88.59 -.99 Aug 13 88.47 -.94 Sep 13 88.36 -.89 Oct 13 88.30 -.85 Nov 13 88.27 -.79 Dec 13 89.20 90.22 88.10 88.26 -.73 Jan 14 88.16 -.71 Feb 14 88.09 -.70 Mar 14 88.02 -.69 Apr 14 87.95 -.68 Last spot N/A Est. sales 771097. Tue’s Sales: 1,064,135 Tue’s open int: 1388897, up +4556 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Nov 11 2.6714 2.9998 2.6469 2.6516 -.0482 Dec 11 2.6466 2.6917 2.6210 2.6253 -.0494 Jan 12 2.6345 2.6647 2.6080 2.6111 -.0474 Feb 12 2.6330 2.6530 2.6017 2.6049 -.0445 Mar 12 2.6353 2.6584 2.6062 2.6075 -.0416

Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.15 +.02 GlbSMdCap14.23+.09 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 31.82 +.51 GlobA p 57.66 +.62 GblStrIncA 4.11 ... IntBdA p 6.47 +.02 MnStFdA 31.83 +.24 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.28 ... RoMu A p 15.81 +.03 RcNtMuA 6.84 +.02 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 31.55 +.51 IntlBdY 6.46 +.01 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.81 -.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r10.58 +.01 AllAsset 11.99 +.02 ComodRR 7.83 -.08 DivInc 11.28 +.01 EmgMkCur10.31 +.01 EmMkBd 11.21 +.01 FltInc r 8.40 +.03 FrgnBd 10.69 +.04 HiYld 9.00 +.01 InvGrCp 10.56 -.02 LowDu 10.31 ... RealRet 12.80 -.04 RealRtnI 12.09 -.02 ShortT 9.77 ... TotRt 10.81 -.01 10.45 -.03 TR II 9.50 -.01 TRIII PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.31 ... RealRtA p 12.09 -.02 TotRtA 10.81 -.01

Name

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET

Name

AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg CognizTech ... 71.09 +.96 Coinstar ... 54.20 +2.12 A-B-C ColdwtrCrk ... 1.01 +.04 ASML Hld .58e 41.04 +.08 Comcast .45 24.80 +.59 ATP O&G ... 10.46 +.23 Comc spcl .45 24.34 +.49 ... 4.02 +.26 Compuwre ... 8.51 +.07 Accuray ... 1.89 +.02 AcmePkt ... d29.55 -1.53 CorinthC .96 83.73 +.50 ActivePwr ... d1.08 +.06 Costco ... 25.31 +.41 ActivsBliz .17f 13.50 -.03 Cree Inc ... 16.45 +.15 Acxiom ... 12.45 +.82 Crocs AdobeSy ... 27.81 -.04 Ctrip.com ... 35.39 +2.12 ... 38.61 -.60 AdolorCp ... 4.47 -.06 CubistPh Adtran .36 31.29 +.61 CypSemi .36 19.09 +.29 AEterna g ... 1.57 -.02 D-E-F Affymetrix ... 5.40 +.04 ... 15.91 +.30 AkamaiT ... 23.78 +.48 Dell Inc ... 9.93 -.29 Akorn ... 9.02 +.14 Dndreon AlaskCom .86 6.32 +.14 Dentsply .20 35.06 +.36 ... 10.18 -.30 AlignTech ... 17.26 -.31 DexCom Alkermes ... 17.11 +.51 DiamondF .18 65.00 +1.24 AllosThera ... 1.50 +.07 DirecTV A ... 47.32 +.30 AllscriptH ... 19.59 -.21 DiscCm A ... 42.05 -.10 AlteraCp lf .32 38.07 -.13 DishNetwk ... 25.98 +.16 Amarin ... 9.32 +.05 DonlleyRR 1.04 15.70 -.18 Amazon ... 198.40 - DrmWksA ... 19.32 +1.01 DryShips .12t 2.60 +.03 28.75 ... 10.65 +.36 ACapAgy 5.60e 28.65 +.11 E-Trade ... 31.08 -.59 AmCapLtd ... 7.53 +.49 eBay AmSupr ... 4.00 +.04 ErthLink .20 6.70 +.16 Amgen 1.12 56.95 +.48 EstWstBcp .20 19.05 +.77 ... 24.39 -.08 AmkorT lf ... 4.88 +.10 ElectArts Amylin ... 11.41 +.08 EndoPhrm ... 30.10 +2.04 Anadigc ... 2.75 +.42 Endologix ... 10.92 +.06 AnadysPh ... 3.67 -.01 Ener1 hlf ... .15 -.11 ... 28.88 +.81 Ancestry ... 24.00 +.09 EngyXXI ... 8.27 +.27 A123 Sys ... 3.38 -.08 Entegris ApolloGrp ... 47.59 +.13 EntropCom ... 5.60 +.02 ... 97.44 +.69 ApolloInv 1.12 7.91 +.16 Equinix Apple Inc ... 400.60 +2.83 EricsnTel .37e 10.24 +.25 ... 7.32 +.04 ApldMatl .32 11.84 +.08 Exelixis ArenaPhm ... 1.39 +.02 Expedia .28 28.17 +.19 AresCap 1.40 15.23 +.36 ExpdIntl .50f 44.73 -.65 AriadP ... 11.39 +.20 F5 Netwks ... 101.26 ... 32.55 ... +12.50 Ariba Inc ... 34.69 -1.15 ArkBest .12 19.79 +1.11 FEI Co ArmHld .15e 27.72 -.27 FLIR Sys .24 26.59 +.22 Arris ... 10.92 -.26 FifthThird .32f 12.00 +.31 ... 18.34 +.83 ArubaNet ... 23.92 +.16 Finisar .20 20.32 -.14 AscenaRtl ... 29.40 +.35 FinLine .04 9.08 -.13 AsscdBanc .04 11.38 +.14 FMidBc athenahlth ... 55.00 -1.72 FstNiagara .64 8.89 +.36 ... 46.11 +2.84 Atmel ... 10.98 -.03 FstSolar Autodesk ... 32.74 +.37 FstMerit .64 13.85 +.71 ... 58.45 +.75 AutoData 1.44 50.82 -1.25 Fiserv ... 6.63 +.01 AvagoTch .44f 33.77 -.67 Flextrn AvanirPhm ... 2.91 +.13 FocusMda ... 24.90 +.57 AviatNetw ... 2.10 +.17 Fossil Inc ... 99.15 +2.29 AvisBudg ... 13.25 +.68 FosterWhl ... 21.43 +.46 ... 1.01 +.04 Axcelis ... 1.38 +.16 FuelCell BE Aero ... 36.41 +.14 FultonFncl .20 9.63 +.08 BGC Ptrs .68 6.83 +.13 G-H-I BMC Sft ... 38.62 -.82 BeacnRfg ... 17.42 +.37 GT AdvTc ... 7.20 +.15 ... 60.94 -.08 Garmin 2.00e 34.70 +.08 BedBath .48 29.75 +.52 BigBandN ... 2.25 +.01 Gentex Gentiva h ... 4.17 +.49 BiogenIdc ...u116.92 GeronCp ... 2.28 +.04 +10.05 BioMarin ... 32.12 -.06 GileadSci ... 41.49 +.43 ... 7.93 +.02 BioSante ... 2.54 +.10 GloblInd .04 7.11 +.26 GlbSpcMet .20f 16.33 -.10 BostPrv BrigExp ... 36.52 +.07 GluMobile ... 3.01 +.10 Broadcom .36 35.75 -.05 GolarLNG 1.10f 38.85 +.68 ... 586.31 +3.15 Broadwd h ... .40 +.01 Google BrcdeCm ... 4.30 +.09 GrWlfRes ... 2.18 -.09 GulfportE ... 31.27 +.42 BrukerCp ... 14.62 -.28 .20 22.02 -.16 Halozyme ... 8.47 +.24 CA Inc CBOE .48f 25.76 +.77 HanmiFncl ... 1.03 +.03 CH Robins1.16 68.75 -6.13 HansenNat ... 83.08 -1.39 CVB Fncl .34 9.48 +.15 HanwhaSol ... 2.03 +.02 Cadence ... 10.30 -.04 HarbinElec ... 22.98 +.08 CaliperLSc ... 10.48 ... Hasbro 1.20 37.17 +1.09 CalumetSp2.00f 18.40 +.08 Healthwys ... 6.49 +.18 CdnSolar ... 3.11 +.01 HrtlndEx .08 13.20 -.90 CpstnTrb h ... 1.05 ... HercOffsh ... 3.76 +.08 ... 15.64 +.09 Carrizo ... 27.05 +1.25 Hologic CathayGen .04 13.79 +.54 HubGroup ... 30.60 -.59 HudsCity .32 5.80 -.23 Cavium ... 32.00 +.61 Celgene ... 66.47 +.58 HumGen ... d9.88 -2.85 .52 41.83 -.01 CentEuro ... 6.43 -.09 HuntJB CEurMed ... 10.80 +.02 HuntBnk .16 5.18 +.17 ... 33.24 +4.94 CentAl ... 9.85 -.31 iRobot ... 18.36 +.39 Cepheid ... 35.53 -.30 IconixBr ... 30.00 -.80 CerusCp ... 2.77 +.09 Illumina ChrmSh ... 3.46 -.03 ImunoGn ... 13.97 +.61 ... 14.41 +.16 ChartInds ... 56.31 +3.22 Incyte ... 7.08 +.07 ChkPoint ... 59.09 +1.14 Infinera Informat ... 43.88 +.22 Cheesecake ... 27.64 -.06 CienaCorp ... 12.41 +.29 Infosys .75e 57.65 +.02 ... 5.96 +.25 IntgDv CinnFin 1.61f 28.98 +.58 .84 24.70 +.07 Cintas .54f 29.51 -.04 Intel Cirrus ... 16.27 +1.38 InteractBrk .40a 14.87 +.23 .40 45.15 -2.10 Cisco .24 17.61 -.01 InterDig CitrixSys ... 64.22 -1.07 InterMune ... 24.59 -.56 Intersil .48 11.69 -.23 CleanEngy ... 11.65 +.37 .60 52.97 -.35 Clearwire ... 1.96 +.32 Intuit

Div Last Chg ChinNEPet ... ClaudeR g ... AbdAsPac .42 7.15 -.02 Contango ... Adventrx ... 1.09 +.02 CrSuiHiY .32 AlexcoR g ... 7.71 +.05 DejourE g ... AlldNevG ... 37.65 +.29 DenisnM g ... AlmadnM g ... 2.85 +.32 EV LtdDur 1.25 AmApparel ... .90 +.03 ExeterR gs ... AmDefense ... .06 -.01 ExtorreG g ... AntaresP ... 2.24 +.01 FrkStPrp .76 Augusta g ... 3.60 +.12 GabGldNR 1.68 Aurizon g ... 5.79 +.05 GascoEngy ... AvalRare n ... 3.21 +.07 Gastar grs ... Bacterin ... 2.94 +.07 GenMoly ... Banro g ... 4.34 +.02 Geokinetics ... BarcGSOil ... 22.98 -.53 GoldResrc .60 Brigus grs ... 1.29 +.01 GoldenMin ... BritATob 3.86e 93.41 +1.96 GoldStr g ... CAMAC En ... .98 +.05 GranTrra g ... CanoPet ... .14 -.00 GrtBasG g ... Cardero g ... .95 +.07 GtPanSilv g ... CardiumTh ... .39 +.03 ImpOil gs .44 ... .39 +.01 InovioPhm ... CelSci CFCda g .01 22.75 +.29 IntTower g ... CheniereEn ... 10.32 +4.20 KeeganR g ... CheniereE 1.70 16.15 +.95 KimberR g ...

PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.81 -.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.81 -.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.81 -.01 Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n 26.04 +.19 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.25 +.32 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 38.64 +.30 Price Funds: BlChip n 38.86 +.14 CapApp n 20.62 +.07 EmMktS n 30.50 +.54 EqInc n 22.81 +.29 EqIndex n 33.49 +.35 Growth n 31.96 +.09 HiYield n 6.49 +.01 IntlBond n 10.31 +.01 Intl G&I 12.44 +.15 IntlStk n 13.22 +.18 MidCap n 57.97 +.51 MCapVal n22.67 +.28 N Asia n 17.61 +.22 New Era n 46.39 +.91 N Horiz n 34.90 +.45 N Inc n 9.64 -.02 OverS SF r n7.88 +.10 R2010 n 15.43 +.10 R2015 n 11.88 +.09 R2020 n 16.31 +.13 R2025 n 11.87 +.10 R2030 n 16.94 +.15 R2035 n 11.94 +.12 R2040 n 16.97 +.16 ShtBd n 4.82 ... SmCpStk n33.62 +.60 SmCapVal n35.07+.66 SpecIn n 12.34 +.02

Apr 12 2.7678 2.7796 2.7387 2.7387 May 12 2.7350 2.7476 2.7332 2.7332 Jun 12 2.7445 2.7543 2.7141 2.7156 Jul 12 2.7017 2.7017 2.6933 2.6933 Aug 12 2.6789 2.6789 2.6672 2.6672 Sep 12 2.6402 Oct 12 2.5137 Nov 12 2.4882 Dec 12 2.5220 2.5220 2.4797 2.4797 Jan 13 2.4802 Feb 13 2.4877 Mar 13 2.4957 Apr 13 2.6017 May 13 2.6077 Last spot N/A Est. sales 124383. Tue’s Sales: 179,954 Tue’s open int: 280564, off -231 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Nov 11 3.578 3.693 3.564 3.590 Dec 11 3.768 3.880 3.756 3.775 Jan 12 3.903 4.005 3.891 3.911 Feb 12 3.920 4.015 3.909 3.928 Mar 12 3.891 3.982 3.878 3.898 Apr 12 3.882 3.971 3.870 3.892 May 12 3.925 4.002 3.905 3.928 Jun 12 3.967 4.042 3.950 3.968 Jul 12 4.004 4.078 3.990 4.014 Aug 12 4.039 4.103 4.022 4.040 Sep 12 4.032 4.106 4.024 4.042 Oct 12 4.071 4.153 4.068 4.080 Nov 12 4.221 4.260 4.208 4.228 Dec 12 4.473 4.547 4.463 4.485 Jan 13 4.619 4.680 4.600 4.627 Feb 13 4.604 4.655 4.604 4.613 Mar 13 4.547 4.600 4.547 4.557 Apr 13 4.442 4.451 4.435 4.449 May 13 4.463 4.467 4.453 4.467 Jun 13 4.483 4.497 4.474 4.497 Jul 13 4.521 4.562 4.520 4.534 Aug 13 4.543 4.554 4.543 4.554 Sep 13 4.552 4.558 4.538 4.558 Oct 13 4.592 Nov 13 4.705 4.715 4.705 4.712 Last spot N/A Est. sales 251781. Tue’s Sales: 265,230 Tue’s open int: 977327, off -11772

2.64 -.09 1.91 -.03 63.65 +1.69 2.96 +.04 .36 -.01 1.57 +.10 14.95 +.16 3.72 +.05 7.44 -1.60 12.22 +.08 15.95 +.24 .20 +.01 3.59 +.17 3.35 +.19 2.37 -.05 20.03 +.10 7.37 -.16 2.00 -.03 6.25 +.05 1.54 +.05 2.42 +.09 41.64 +.98 .66 -.01 5.47 +.10 5.98 -.06 1.29 ...

... 7.96 +.12 PrivateB .04 11.15 +.85 ... 35.73 +3.19 PrUPShQQQ ... 19.79 +.04 ProspctCap1.22 9.58 +.19 J-K-L QIAGEN ... 13.74 +.23 ... 27.26 -.10 JA Solar ... 2.19 ... QlikTech ... 13.55 +.26 JDS Uniph ... 10.62 +.34 Qlogic JamesRiv ... 9.15 +.17 Qualcom .86 51.60 -.72 JetBlue ... 4.42 +.06 Questcor ... u40.43 +7.13 ... 7.60 +.40 .70 87.59 +2.27 RF MicD JoyGlbl ... 17.21 +.34 KIT Digitl ... 8.69 -.28 Rambus ... 57.67 +.58 KLA Tnc 1.40f 45.21 +.39 Regenrn Kulicke ... 9.78 ... RschMotn ... 20.72 -1.55 LKQ Corp ... 28.07 -.40 RightNow ... u43.30 +.01 LamResrch ... 41.67 -.75 RosettaR ... 41.99 +.77 LamarAdv ... 21.28 +.34 RossStrs .88 85.98 -1.67 Lattice ... 6.45 +.20 Rovi Corp ... 48.35 -.21 .44 69.49 +.09 LeapWirlss ... 6.49 +.18 RoyGld LibGlobA ... 41.85 +.47 S-T-U LibtIntA h ... 16.11 +.35 LifeTech ... 40.19 -.29 S1 Corp ... u9.67 +.05 LimelghtN ... 2.71 +.09 SBA Com ... 38.04 -.35 LinearTch .96 32.04 +.63 SEI Inv .24f 15.71 -.07 Logitech ... 9.01 +.27 STEC ... 11.23 +.29 SVB FnGp ... 45.25 +.40 M-N-0 ... 50.31 +.47 SanDisk ... 3.14 -.06 Magma ... 4.91 +.12 SangBio ... 8.43 +.12 MaidenH .32f 7.98 +.17 Sanmina MAKO Srg ... 37.11 -1.26 Sapient .35e 11.89 +.52 MannKd ... 3.06 +.03 SavientPh ... 3.67 -.01 MarinaBio ... .17 -.02 SeagateT .72 16.24 +.63 MarvellT ... 13.66 +.26 SearsHldgs ... 77.17 +2.28 Masimo .75e d20.02 -2.30 SeattGen ... 21.08 +.43 ... 21.19 +.40 Mattel .92 u28.46 +.51 SelCmfrt Mattson ... 1.23 -.17 Sequenom ... 4.54 -.09 MaximIntg .88 26.22 +.31 ShandaGm ... 5.46 +.15 MediCo ... 18.98 +1.27 Shutterfly ... 46.63 -.97 MelcoCrwn ... 10.91 +.43 SigmaAld .72 65.70 -.71 MentorGr ... 10.35 +.11 SilicnImg ... 6.18 -.58 MergeHlth ... 6.71 -.23 SilcnLab ... 40.49 +4.00 Microchp 1.39f 35.21 +.68 Slcnware .28e 5.32 ... ... 18.94 +.89 MicronT ... 5.47 -.03 SilvStd g ... 84.68 -4.05 MicroSemi ... 17.99 +.35 Sina ... 1.79 -.01 Microsoft .80f 26.59 -.22 SiriusXM Molex .80 24.49 +1.19 SkywksSol ... 21.39 +.37 Momenta ... 11.91 -.05 SodaStrm n ... 29.15 -2.62 ... 59.03 +1.16 Motricity ... 1.84 ... Sohu.cm Move Inc ... 1.81 +.07 SonicCorp ... 7.16 +.27 ... 2.20 -.02 Mylan ... 19.56 +1.35 Sonus NIC Inc .25e u14.06 +.66 Sourcefire ... 27.57 -1.29 ... 9.24 +.35 NII Hldg ... 30.48 -.36 SpectPh NPS Phm ... 7.21 +.05 Spreadtrm .20 u25.32 +1.82 .40 14.66 +.19 NXP Semi ... 18.40 +.76 Staples NaraBncp ... 8.31 +.81 StarScient ... 3.02 +.21 NasdOMX ... 24.31 -.14 Starbucks .52 41.40 +.12 NatPenn .16f 8.03 +.38 StlDynam .40 12.48 +.42 NektarTh ... 5.04 +.05 Stratasys ... 28.59 +4.16 NetLogicM ... u49.15 +.05 SunPowerA ... 10.03 +.94 NetApp ... 38.58 +.41 SusqBnc .12f 6.61 +.29 Netease ... 47.78 -.24 Symantec ... 18.49 -.06 Netflix ... 79.40 +2.03 Synaptics ... u33.11 +.54 NewsCpA .19f 16.87 -.01 Synopsys ... 26.55 -.01 NewsCpB .19f 17.17 +.02 TD Ameritr .24f 15.96 +.27 ... 11.23 +.07 NorTrst 1.12 39.85 +.47 TTM Tch NwstBcsh .44 12.33 +.19 TakeTwo ... 15.27 +.05 Novlus ... 32.55 -.20 TechData ... 50.32 +2.41 ... 9.89 +.22 NuVasive ... 17.07 -.02 Tekelec .08 4.18 -.18 NuanceCm ... 25.81 +.34 Tellabs Nvidia ... 14.62 +.17 TevaPhrm .87e 40.28 +1.17 OReillyAu ... u70.20 -.71 TexRdhse .32 14.33 +.24 ... 27.56 +.36 ... 3.54 +.13 TibcoSft Oclaro ... 9.99 +.21 OmniVisn ... 16.85 +.06 TiVo Inc ... 7.17 +.29 OnSmcnd ... 7.34 +.24 TriQuint OnyxPh ... 39.46 +3.44 UltaSalon ... 67.60 -1.00 OpenTable ... 47.82 -3.15 UltimSoft ... u60.25 +8.49 Opnext ... 1.03 +.02 Umpqua .28f 11.07 +.34 ... 36.57 -.17 .24 32.40 +.03 UtdNtrlF Oracle UtdTherap ... 41.48 +.11 P-Q-R ... 46.75 -1.21 UnivDisp PDL Bio .60 5.94 +.17 UrbanOut ... 26.23 +.04 PF Chng .96e 30.15 +.90 V-W-X-Y-Z PMC Sra ... 6.31 +.04 PSS Wrld ... 21.05 -.36 VarianSemi ... u62.78 +.09 Paccar .72f 41.51 +.03 VeecoInst ... 25.47 -.19 PacSunwr ... 1.25 +.08 Verisign 5.75e 30.44 -.32 ... 42.89 -.44 PaetecHld ... 5.40 +.01 VertxPh PanASlv .10 28.77 -.97 VirgnMda h .16 27.89 +.33 ViroPhrm ... 19.96 +.40 PaneraBrd ...u133.64 ... 30.73 -.01 VistaPrt +17.92 ... 8.90 +.35 ParamTch ... 18.07 +.14 Vivus Patterson .48 30.87 +.29 Vodafone 1.45e 28.32 +.45 ... 24.23 -.20 PattUTI .20 20.87 +1.36 Volcano Paychex 1.28f 28.91 +.30 WarnerCh ... 18.17 +.57 PnnNGm ... 36.66 +.21 WashFed .24 13.25 +.30 PeopUtdF .63 12.38 +.25 Websense ... 17.39 -1.95 PetsMart .56 46.59 +.08 WstptInn g ... 29.67 +1.54 ... 4.44 +.02 PharmPdt .60 33.14 +.03 WetSeal PhotrIn ... 6.45 -.02 WholeFd .40 71.05 +.83 Plexus ... 27.90 +.15 Windstrm 1.00 11.90 +.07 Popular ... 1.77 +.03 Wintrust .18 28.63 -.37 2.00 128.01 +4.83 Power-One ... 4.69 -.37 Wynn .76 31.82 +.26 PwShs QQQ.41e 57.27 -.07 Xilinx ... .06 ... Powrwav ... .78 +.03 YRC rsh ... 16.30 +.06 PriceTR 1.24 51.02 -.06 Yahoo priceline ... 495.63 -9.43 Yandex n ... 25.79 +.62 PrimoWt n ... 5.81 +.36 ZionBcp .04 16.92 +.20 Isis Itron

LadThalFn LongweiPI LucasEngy MadCatz g Metalico MetroHlth MdwGold g Minefnd g NeoStem Neoprobe NBRESec Nevsun g NwGold g NA Pall g NDynMn g NthnO&G NovaGld g Oilsands g PHC Inc ParaG&S PhrmAth PionDrill Quaterra g Quepasa QuestRM g RareEle g

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .24 .06 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

1.70 .97 1.84 .84 4.47 6.45 2.29 14.81 .65 2.80 3.80 5.28 12.41 3.19 7.95 22.28 8.39 .25 2.16 2.66 1.76 9.92 .80 3.65 2.83 5.75

+.10 +.04 +.03 +.16 +.09 +.07 +.08 +.31 +.03 +.09 ... +.19 +.15 +.19 +.08 +.96 +.17 +.03 +.11 +.08 +.12 +.79 -.10 +.10 +.03 +.16

Rentech ... RexahnPh ... Richmnt g ... Rubicon g ... SamsO&G ... SeabGld g ... TanzRy g ... ... Taseko TimberlnR ... TrnsatlPet ... TravelCtrs ... TriangPet ... Ur-Energy ... ... Uranerz UraniumEn ... VangTotW .92e VantageDrl ... VirnetX ... VistaGold ... WalterInv .22e WFAdvInco1.02 WizzardSft ... XPO Log rs ... YM Bio g ...

Value n 22.57 +.28 Energy n 121.18+2.58 GNMA n 11.10 -.01 ExplAdml n66.68 +.98 GlobEq n 16.72 +.17 Principal Inv: LT2020In 11.53 +.08 ExtdAdm n39.38 +.58 HYCorp n 5.68 +.01 500Adml n114.52 HlthCre n 132.79+1.41 Putnam Funds A: InflaPro n 14.13 -.03 GrInA p 12.65 +.18 +1.20 IntlGr n 17.60 +.20 -.01 GNMA Ad n11.10 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.14 +.21 GrwAdm n 31.76 +.22 IntlVal n 29.02 +.41 ITIGrade n 10.05 -.04 HlthCr n 56.06 +.60 PremierI r 20.26 +.22 HiYldCp n 5.68 +.01 LifeCon n 16.28 +.05 Russell Funds S: StratBd 10.92 -.02 InfProAd n 27.76 -.05 LifeGro n 21.45 +.19 ITBdAdml n11.75 -.06 LifeMod n 19.40 +.12 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 37.09 +.40 ITsryAdml n12.00 -.05 LTIGrade n10.19 -.10 S&P Sel 19.64 +.20 IntGrAdm n56.05 +.64 Morg n 17.82 +.11 ITAdml n 13.75 +.02 MuInt n 13.75 +.02 Scout Funds: Intl 29.39 +.31 ITGrAdm n10.05 -.04 MuLtd n 11.07 ... LtdTrAd n 11.07 ... PrecMtls r n24.04 +.39 Selected Funds: AmShD 39.40 +.59 LTGrAdml n10.19 -.10 PrmcpCor n13.65 +.08 LT Adml n 11.14 +.01 Prmcp r n 64.85 +.47 Sequoia n 139.36 +.89 MCpAdml n90.01 SelValu r n18.56 +.23 TCW Funds: STAR n 19.08 +.10 +1.00 TotRetBdI 9.81 -.01 MuHYAdm n10.53+.01 STIGrade n10.66 -.01 Templeton Instit: PrmCap r n67.34 +.49 TgtRetInc n11.56 +.02 ForEqS 18.60 +.05 ReitAdm r n79.47 +.81 TgRe2010 n22.91+.09 Third Avenue Fds: STsyAdml n10.81 -.01 TgtRe2015 n12.58 ValueInst 42.56 +.29 STBdAdml n10.65-.01 +.07 Thornburg Fds: ShtTrAd n 15.90 ... TgRe2020 n22.17+.15 IntValA p 25.16 +.05 STFdAd n 10.90 -.02 TgtRe2025 n12.56 IncBuildC p18.08 +.08 STIGrAd n 10.66 -.01 +.10 IntValue I 25.72 +.05 SmCAdm n33.27 +.56 TgRe2030 n21.41+.19 Tweedy Browne: TxMCap r n62.50 +.67 TgtRe2035 n12.82 GblValue 22.65 +.06 TtlBAdml n10.95 -.03 +.13 USAA Group: TStkAdm n30.99 +.35 TgtRe2040 n21.01 13.03 -.02 WellslAdm n54.63+.14 +.21 Inco TxEIt 13.09 +.02 WelltnAdm n53.63+.32 TgtRe2045 n13.20 VALIC : Windsor n 43.37 +.58 +.14 StkIdx 24.83 +.25 WdsrIIAd n45.28 +.59 Wellsly n 22.55 +.06 Vanguard Admiral: Welltn n 31.05 +.19 Vanguard Fds: BalAdml n 21.57 +.12 AssetA n 23.83 +.13 Wndsr n 12.85 +.17 CAITAdm n11.14 +.01 DivdGro n 15.06 +.12 WndsII n 25.51 +.34 CpOpAdl n72.76 +.61 Energy n 64.51+1.37 Vanguard Idx Fds: EMAdmr r n34.09 +.65 Explr n 71.57+1.05 TotIntAdm r n23.75

-.0374 -.0364 -.0351 -.0337 -.0318 -.0306 -.0298 -.0283 -.0275 -.0275 -.0275 -.0275 -.0275 -.0275

-.068 -.077 -.066 -.064 -.061 -.056 -.053 -.052 -.051 -.050 -.049 -.048 -.044 -.042 -.042 -.041 -.041 -.037 -.037 -.037 -.038 -.037 -.036 -.035 -.037

u1.42 1.08 11.95 3.94 2.45 24.23 3.94 3.54 .63 .79 4.71 5.46 1.28 2.08 3.26 45.12 1.35 17.47 3.68 25.94 9.79 .16 11.39 1.71

+.22 -.04 +.67 +.20 -.04 +.04 +.02 +.18 +.05 -.00 +.10 +.08 +.06 +.07 +.17 +.63 +.05 +.46 +.15 +.15 +.09 +.01 +.28 +.02

+.31 TotIntlInst r n95.05 +1.26 TotIntlIP r n95.07+1.26 500 n 114.50+1.19 Growth n 31.76 +.22 MidCap n 19.81 +.22 SmCap n 33.20 +.55 SmlCpGth n21.35 +.37 SmlCpVl n 14.99 +.24 STBnd n 10.65 -.01 TotBnd n 10.95 -.03 TotlIntl n 14.20 +.19 TotStk n 30.98 +.34 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n 21.57 +.12 DevMkInst n9.22 +.10 ExtIn n 39.38 +.58 FTAllWldI r n84.81 +1.14 GrwthIst n 31.76 +.22 InfProInst n11.31 -.02 InstIdx n 113.75+1.18 InsPl n 113.76+1.19 InsTStPlus n28.04+.31 MidCpIst n 19.89 +.22 SCInst n 33.27 +.56 TBIst n 10.95 -.03 TSInst n 30.99 +.34 ValueIst n 20.12 +.29 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl n 94.59 +.98 MidCpIdx n28.40 +.31 STBdIdx n 10.65 -.01 TotBdSgl n10.95 -.03 TotStkSgl n29.91 +.33 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.05 -.02 Yacktman Funds: Fund p n 17.31 +.09 Focused n 18.50 +.08

METALS NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Wed. Aluminum -$0.9956 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.4428 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $3.4880 N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Lead - $1961.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8332 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1715.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1722.70 troy oz., NY Merc spot Wed. Silver - $33.450 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $33.291 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Platinum -$1596.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1594.10 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised


Roswell Daily Record

think about this and question her motives. Does she truly want us to be involved with her and her daughter? Or is this a way to get gifts for her child and her upcoming wedding? I would like to discuss this with her, but I’m hesitant for fear of losing her again. I always wanted a relationship with my daughter. I’m confused and afraid of being hurt again. What can I do? BIRTH MOM IN WISCONSIN

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: Years ago, I placed my daughter for adoption. The circumstances that led me to make the decision were compelling. After 18 years, I was surprised and elated to hear from her. She’s 23, has a child of her own and is engaged to be married. I tried to maintain communication, but she stopped corresponding. After a period of not wanting to talk, she is now trying to get back in touch with me and her siblings. We’re unsure what to

DEAR BIRTH MOM: By all means have a discussion with your daughter, but do it in reference to the fact that you were puzzled and hurt when she suddenly ceased communication with you. Let her explain what led to it. She may have been dealing with mixed emotions, which seems logical to me. Because you want a rela-

Jumble

COMICS

tionship with her, you may have to accept that it will proceed in fits and starts — and may not blossom the way you might wish it to. You’ll know more as you get to know her better. #####

DEAR ABBY: My mom goes overboard with gifts for my two sons when she goes on vacation or when she shops for birthdays and Christmas. I have asked her to scale back and not buy them each a box full of stuff. I tried to be tactful, but she said they “expect” Grandma to give them stuff. The problem is she gives them random things that hold no interest for them. My sons are always kind and thank her, but their rooms are packed full of toys, many never opened, because they have too much stuff. When I asked Mom to just

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

MLIFY

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

DIGION TIRLUA A: Yesterday’s

Family Circus

DEAR TOO MUCH: T ry something like this: “Mom, you are a generous sweetheart, but you are giving them too much stuff. They’re INUNDATED! There are toys in their rooms that have never been opened because they have outgrown them. That’s why this year we are donating the unopened ones to a homeless shelter. It hurts me to see you spend money on items the boys don’t use — so please, cut back on the number of gifts, and before spending your hard-earned money, ask me what they can use.”

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

UHHCN

give the boys a book about the next place she visits, she became defensive. I don’t know how to tell her in a way she’ll understand that she’s wasting her hard-ear ned money on gifts my children won’t use or have no interest in. Can you help me? TOO MUCH STUFF IN IOWA

Dear Readers: A recent letter from a reader about whether it is fair for a guest to ask a hostess to BUY SPECIALTY FOODS really struck a chord with you! Here are just a few comments:

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) DINED DEFIED AURORA Jumbles: LAUGH Answer: He was shocked to see all the zombies — DEAD AHEAD

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Blondie

• Frank from Middletown, N.Y., says: “Guests should offer to bring their own foodstuffs. It’s better to be safe than make someone sick.”

• Gail, via email, says: “My husband has special dietary needs, and I am a vegetarian. I take enough nonperishable food to last until the morning after our arrival. Then we treat our hostess to a shopping trip where we purchase items we need, along with anything our hostess needs. My mother and sister-inlaw enjoy these shopping trips and appreciate our paying for foods and food items that their households will not use after we leave. Finally, in the process, my mother has developed a taste for vegetarian food — so now we have something new to share!” • Betty from Houston says: “If a guest is traveling by airplane or from a great distance, then the hostess should provide all that the guest requires. If the guest is traveling within driving distance, the guest should provide all but perishable items, which the hostess should gladly provide.”

• Laurie from Houston says: “We have a great deal of company. I email the guests, tell them what the basic menu will be and then tell them to bring any other items that they might need for their special needs. “

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

• J. Heim, via email, says: “A guest who needs or wants specialty items should carry them with him or her. An exception might be made for close family members who are houseguests, but they could readily supply their needs via mail or other package delivery.”

• Janet Strand of Tequesta, Fla., says, “I have a small sign that has stood in my kitchen for too many years to count: ‘If we don’t have it — you don’t need it!’”

• Willa from Texas says: “It’s not right for a guest to request special or hard-to-find food items when visiting. This is the most outrageous thing I’ve ever heard! My sister adheres to a vegan diet, but when she visits me, she eats what I put on the table.” Heloise #####

The Wizard of Id

Dear Heloise: An easy way to reach cobwebs from high ceilings: Take a long, foam swimming “noodle” and stick a long, wooden dowel into the hole at one end. Then, with a rubber band, attach a dust rag to the other end of the noodle. It’s lightweight, just flexible enough and reaches “way high up.” Peggy in Hamilton, Ohio

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Thursday, October 27, 2011

B7


B8 Thursday, October 27, 2011

Roswell Daily Record


10-27-11 rdr newspaper