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Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 120, No. 241 50¢ Daily / $1 Sunday

INSIDE NEWS

District Attorney for the 5th District Janetta Hicks and U.S. Attorney Kenneth Gonzales announced, Wednesday, that Assistant District Attorney Donald F. Moore Jr., has been appointed to serve as a special assistant to the U.S. Attorney’s Office. Hicks said that the negoNEW YORK (AP) — Their chief target is Wall Street, but many of the demonstrators in New York and across the U.S. are also thoroughly disgusted with Washington, blaming politicians of both parties for policies they say protect corporate America at the expense of the middle class. “At this point I don’t see any difference .... - PAGE A6

October 7, 2011

Moore tapped for US Attorney’s Office JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

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tiations started in April. The Memorandum of Understanding between the two was signed on Sept. 3. The MOU will allow the of fices to share funding and resources. Moore, who worked as ADA in Hobbs before he came to Roswell, had to undergo an extensive background check to get approval. He will split his time between the federal

and district prosecutors. “We get half and the state gets half,” said Gonzales. The situation was described as a win-win situation for both state and federal governments, with Moore assisting in cases from all across southeast New Mexico. Among his first assignments will be the prosecution of the most

The rides are all sorts of fun

See MOORE, Page A3

SMART/PSN MEETS JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

The Roswell-Chaves County SMART/PSN held a strategic planning meeting, at the Chaves County Sherif f’s Of fice, on Wednesday after noon. SMART is an acronym for State, Metropolitan Area,

WEB

For The Past 24 Hours

• Family argument turns violent • RPD executes warrants ... • Blessing of Animals set for Sunday • Roswell wins rain soaked rivalry, 1-0 • Coyote girls down Rockets

INSIDE SPORTS

Mark Wilson Photo

Carnival rides on the midway light up under the setting sun Wednesday evening at the Eastern New Mexico State Fair.

Passing is the most overlooked and under-appreciated part of volleyball— it’s like volleyball’s equivalent of dribbling. If you can do it well, no one notices, but, if you do it poorly, it sticks out like a sore thumb. The Clovis Wildcats covered both ends of that spectrum on Thursday — they couldn’t pass the ball in the first two sets, but did it to near perfection in the final three sets. - PAGE B1

TODAY’S OBITUARIES

There are no obituaries today, Oct. 7, 2011.

HIGH ...84˚ LOW ....48˚

TODAY’S FORECAST

CLASSIFIEDS..........B5 COMICS.................B3 ENTERTAINMENT.....B8 FINANCIAL .............B4 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........B8 LOTTERIES ............A2 NATION .................A6 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8

INDEX

Their overall goal is to reduce violent crime in Roswell, with specific

President tells GOP: Act on jobs

TOP 5

WILDCATS TAKE 5-SET WIN OVER COYOTES

Rural and T ribal, while PSN stands for Project Safe Neighborhoods. The group formed during the planning stages for the Sept. 22 raids.

See SMART, Page A3

WASHINGTON (AP) — A combative President Barack Obama challenged a divided Congress on Thursday to unite behind his jobs bill or get ready to be run “out of town” by angry voters. Hoping to use public frustration and economic worry as leverage, he called his proposal an insurance plan against a painful return to recession. In a press conference long on restatements of his ideas, Obama laid bare the dynamic that now is Washington: The era of compromise is over. Frustrated over getting nowhere with Republicans, Obama demanded that they explain themselves to the country and promised to keep “hammering away until something gets done.” Despite Obama’s taunts, Republicans showed no signs of switching positions. Instead, they pressed for a symbolic vote so they could oppose the bill the president submitted three weeks ago. They also predicted they would prevail next week when Democrats try to advance a reworked version, which Obama supports, with a tax on millionaires. Lamenting political gamesmanship, Obama defended his own tactic of campaigning for a jobs bill that appears to have no chance of passing as it is. When asked about his willingness to negotiate to help the millions of unemployed, he said he had gone out of his way every time with Republicans, to little avail.

Roswell man dead D’Antonio on drought, settlements after high-speed chase JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

A high-speed chase ended in the death of a Roswell man, Robert Vigil, 28. The chase began around 6:45 p.m., Wednesday, on North Atkinson Avenue near the intersection of Country Club Road, when the Roswell Police Department received a call about a man driving erratically. The Chaves County Sheriff’s Office picked up pursuit as the driver left the city limits. “When you head north on

Atkinson, the road dead ends. He went through the barricade into the river bed. The police followed,” said Sherif f Rob Coon. “Both the truck and the police vehicle got stuck in the river bed. His (Vigil’s) vehicle was four -wheel drive so he got loose, but PD had to call for assistance.” According to Coon, the driver continued along the river bed heading toward the Roswell Mall. “He got to the region of the homeless camp near the mall and he

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Dif ficult. That’s how many describe the job of managing water resources in a state where lingering drought is shrinking reservoirs and tur ning landscapes crunchy brown. As New Mexico’s top water official, State Engineer John D’Antonio has grown accustomed to the challenges that come from not having enough water to go around. In fact, he said seven of his nine years as state engineer have been dry. “I can sit here for a couple of hours and tell you about all of the

issues in the state. They’re huge and they’re going to be more challenging as the population increases and as we see less and less precipitation and war ming temperatures,” he said. But soon, D’Antonio won’t have to make the tough decisions. He’s calling it quits. It’s not because the battles are contentious or the days in the office are long. It’s because he’s been in limbo for the last nine months, waiting for Gov. Susana Martinez to decide who will hold the position in her administration.

See JOBS, Page A3

The state engineer oversees the measurement, appropriation and distribution of New Mexico’s water, making it a key position in the droughtridden state. The state engineer also protects New Mexico’s rights on rivers and streams that cross state boundaries. Reflecting on his tenure, he said he’s pleased his of fice has been able to develop tools that will help the state as it faces more dry conditions. “I know we’re in a lot better shape today than

See WATER, Page A3

State’s Van of Enchantment brings Route 66 exhibit to Roswell JULIA BERGMAN RECORD STAFF WRITER

A mobile museum of the New Mexico state museum system, which was ranked sixth on the list of “True West Museums of the Year,” in T rue West magazine’s September issue, made a stop at the New Mexico Department of Transportation in Roswell Thursday afternoon. T raveling more than 15,000 miles a year and reaching 20,000 to 25,000 people a year, the Van of Enchantment, an educational program on behalf of the Statewide Outreach Department within the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, is currently

See CHASE, Page A3

driving around the state displaying the last exhibit of a three-part series titled, “The History of Travel in New Mexico.” New Mexico has the most museums per capita, according to Jamie Brytowski, Cultural Af fairs outreach coordinator. It also has six state monuments. “New Mexico has had some real trailblazing outreach of various types and this is still one of them,” Brytowski said. A 14-year -old program, the Van of Enchantment, the only mobile museum in the state, tours New Mexico carrying artifacts and materials from state museums and monuments, and is funded by grants. The

van has spent the past three years displaying “The History of T ravel in New Mexico,” a three-part exhibition to the public. The first exhibit in the series, “Trails and Tales,” focused on the Chaco Roads, the El Camino Real, and the Old Spanish Trail. The second, “Riding the Rails,” explored the history of transportation in the state by examining the Santa Fe T rail and railroads. The final exhibit, which is currently being displayed, is “Road Trips,” which explores Route 66 in New Mexico. “Road Trips,” which the van started presenting in See VAN, Page A3

Mark Wilson Photo

The Van of Enchantment rolled into Roswell for a day Thursday, giving visitors a chance to visit the only traveling museum in the state.


A2 Friday, October 7, 2011

GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Julia Bergman Photo

Adam Brown, and his Grand Champion dairy heifer at the ENMSF, Wednesday.

Adam Brown’s heifer named Grand Champ JULIA BERGMAN RECORD STAFF WRITER

From 60 heifers, to 14, to 1. An unnamed heifer shown by Goddard High student Adam Brown, 15, became the Grand Champion of the 2011 Easter n New Mexico State Fair Dairy Heifer Show, Wednesday. There were seven different classes of heifers, which were judged based on dairy and milk production, ranging from youngest to oldest. The first- and second-place winner of each class competed for the titles of Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion. Brown, who has showed since age 9, has been in possession of his heifer for around six months. A member of 4-H and Goddard FFA, Brown has always only shown heifers. He spent many

hours of his days throughout the past year working with his heifer, mainly washing and walking her. He chooses to show heifers over other animals because, “I live on a dairy and it’s fun,” he said. He also enjoys following in his father’s footsteps, who showed heifers before him. “It builds good character and teaches them to win and lose,” Brown’s father Robert said. His mother Lori added, “It teaches them values and good work ethic.” Robert said Adam would work with the heifer a couple of times a week throughout the year, and then three to four hours every day two to three months before the start of the fair. Goddard High student AJ Vaz, 16, won Reserve Grand Champion for his heifer Jolly. j.bergman@roswell-record.com

Accidental gunshot wound

Police were called to Eastern New Mexico Medical Center, 405 W. Country Club Road, Wednesday, after a person was admitted for treatment of a gunshot wound. The 28-year -old victim from Alamogordo stated that the shooting took place between Roswell and Ruidoso, when he picked up a gun someone had given to him and it went off accidentally, hitting him in the foot.

Aggravated assault

Police were dispatched to Albertson’s, 1010 S. Main St., Wednesday. The victim reported that one of two men pulled a gun on him. He further noted that he had texted a friend to meet him in the Albertson’s parking lot. When he arrived he saw a vehicle, which he believed to be hers. He approached the vehicle and found two men pulling on ski masks. After one of the subjects pulled a gun, the victim drove around the parking lot, honking his horn, trying to get someone’s attention. When he got close to the

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entrance, he escaped into the store. The vehicle containing the men was described as a 1996 flat black Chevy Blazer.

Burglary

Police were called to 1611 S. Monroe Avenue, Wednesday, for a burglary in progress. The subjects escaped with a Lenox Sound System CD player, a white Westinghouse television, a Philips Magnavox television, a Sharp television and a Magic Chef microwave. No values were provided in the police report. Anyone having information on these or any other crimes should contact Crime Stoppers, 888594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward.

Vanessa Kahin Photo

Kelsi-Ann Woodburn, 16, of Artesia, with her Grand Champion Market Steer, Rambo, on Thursday.

Kelsi-Ann Woodburn’s Rambo top Market Steer VANESSA KAHIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Rambo annihilated the competition — without weapons, headbands or catchphrases — during the Eastern New Mexico State Fair’s market steer show, Thursday. The Grand Champion Steer was handled by 16-year -old Kelsi-Ann Woodburn from Artesia. Woodburn is active in Future Farmers of America and Chaparral 4-H Club. Rambo won first in his class at the Eddy County Fair and third in his class at the New Mexico State Fair. Still, the teen said she felt “crazy” about the win at ENMSF. “I was really hoping for it, but I didn’t know if I’d get it,” Woodburn said. Despite the tough sounding name, Woodbur n said Rambo is afraid of the show stick many handlers use to move the animals or rub their stomachs to calm them. She said this was one of the greatest challenges of working with Rambo, who was skittish to be around other handlers who had show sticks. “You just have to know the calf,” Woodburn said. “You have to really work with (steers).” The daughter of John and Jodi Woodbur n, Kelsi-Ann said Rambo got his name the first day she spent some real time with him. She was warned the calf was tem-

peramental, but realized just how much when she saw how rambunctious he behaved. Rambo, from rambunctious, stuck. Another member of FFA and Chaparral 4-H Club won Reserve Grand Champion in the Market Steer Show. Aubrey Brandenberger, 12, of Corona, is the daugher of Alena and Jeff Brandenberger, and has been showing steers for four years. She is similar to Woodburn in one more way. The steer she showed on Thursday has a curious name that he got early on — Wyoming, the state where he was purchased. Aubrey is methodical and eloquent when it comes to her approach for caring for steers. “It comes in stages,” she said of how to work with a steer. “The first stage is, you halter break him. … Most (steers) aren’t used to walking with a lead. “Then, you have to gain a little trust,” she said. From that point on, the handler should work the steer according to the type of fair the steer will attend. Aubrey said some fairs allow hair on the steers. Some, like the ENMSF, prefer steers be “slick” or without hair. Despite all the steps in caring for a steer, Aubrey wouldn’t have it any other way. “It takes work, but it’s fun,” she said. v.kahin@roswell-record.com

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Kaly Cone, 13, of Dora, with her “triple crown” breeding heifer, Pumpkin, at the Eastern New Mexico State Fair, Thursday.

Kaly Cone’s Pumpkin Grand Champion Breeding Heifer With a string of awards behind her, winning Grand Champion Breeding Heifer at the Easter n New Mexico State Fair, Thursday, was a piece of cake — or rather a piece of pie — for a sweet-natured heifer named Pumpkin. The breeding heifer from Dora was awarded Champion at the New Mexico State Fair and the Roosevelt County Fair earlier this year. “She’s won every show in New Mexico,” said Mike Cone, father of 13year-old Kaly Cone, who showed Pumpkin during the competition. Although it is not an official title for animals that win at three dif ferent fairs, Mike Cone likes to call Pumpkin a “triple crown.”

Kaly prefers to call her heifer Pumpkin, because “her head is shaped like a pumpkin,” she said with a chuckle. Mike Cone said his daughter does not always show heifers. She often shows — and wins — with steers. “This year just happened to be one of those years that we had a heifer,” Mike Cone said. The family, which includes mother Karen Cone, lives on a far m and ranch. Kaly is a member of Future Farmers of America and Arch 4-H Club. The eighth-grader said she does not have a specific strategy when it comes to raising steers and heifers, but did confess she “works with them every day.”

Gerald Sentell, 40, is wanted on a federal warrant for distribution of methamphetamine. He is described as 6 feet, 2 inches tall, weight 190 pounds, with blue eyes and brown hair. Anyone having information on the whereabouts of Gerald Sentell should contact Crime Stoppers, 888-594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward. All seats before 6 PM $6.00 (Excludes 3D) (*) No Pass or Discount MATINEES INDICATED BY( )SAT & SUN

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GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Moore

Continued from Page A1

recent Roswell drug sting where 84 warrants were issued and a total of 76 people facing state and federal drug traf ficking charges were rounded up. Gonzales said that the U.S. Attorney’s offices will be pursuing more firearm cases. “The advantage is in terms of sentencing.” He explained that in the federal system, the sentences tend to be stiffer, without parole or time off for good

SMART

Continued from Page A1

objectives to suppress gang activity, reduce gun violence and reduce drug trafficking. The meeting was attended by representatives from

Jobs

Continued from Page A1

“The question, then, is, will Congress do something?” the president said. “If Congress does something, then I can’t run against a do-nothing Congress. If Congress does nothing, then it’s not a matter of me running

Chase

Continued from Page A1

hit one of the tents. He hit one lady, bumped her, but luckily no one was injured.” The driver left the river bed near the mall and drove through the parking

Van

Continued from Page A1

the spring, shows the impact and importance of Route 66 on the day-to-day lives of New Mexicans, using Santa Rosa as a case study. “There’s a state pride about Route 66 that you may not find as prevalent in some of the other states,” Susi Wolf, a traveling educator for the van, said. Equipped with a recreated diner, replicas of artifacts such as a Phillips 66 gas tank and a Kodak Brownie camera, as well as loads of information about the highway and the affect it had on transportation, local businesses and everyday New Mexicans, the van is free to the public. Wolf said they even created a menu with diner lingo for children featuring sayings such as “Give me two cows and make ’em cry,” (two hamburgers with onions), and a soda jerk. Wolf has noticed generational bonding as a result of the exhibit. “[For] kids their exposure to Route 66 has been through the movie Cars, and when they come through with parents, and especially grandpar-

behavior. “We have some tools in our tool box that the states don’t have.” Gonzales cited drug sentencing as an example. “For 50 grams of methamphetamine possession, the offender can get over 10 years, with five years for gun charge.” Hicks said, “The maximum sentence in New Mexico for drug trafficking is nine years, with parole, it amounts to 4.5 years. Meanwhile the sentence for a felon in possession (of a firear m) is five years, although the average sentence served is 18 months.”

all area law enforcement agencies. Mayor Del Jurney and City Administrator Larry Fry represented city interests. Steven Wolfe represented The Roswell Safe Coalition. District Attorney Janetta Hicks and ADA Donald Moore are also part of the committee in this coopera-

Roswell may see other changes as a result of the new spirit of cooperation. “I’ve talked to several of the federal judges up in Albuquerque and they would be willing to travel down to try cases in Roswell,” said Gonzales. Speaking of the most recent drug raids, he said, “Our goal was to do something immediately for the safety of Roswell.” However, Gonzales indicated that more raids could come in the future. “We’re going to be aggressively pursuing any person who doesn’t take the safety of tive effort of state, local and federal government. The group plans to apply for, and in some instances already has applied for, grants to obtain the funds to reach their goals. Richard Lucero of The Roswell Safe Coalition is in charge of the media fund-

$

ing for a billboard campaign. The Roswell Independent School District is participating in the crime prevention portion, which U.S. Attor ney Kenneth Gonzales emphasized was one of the major components of SMART for a Safer Roswell.

cycle.” He expressed his excitement about his expanded role in prosecution. “I look forward to all the opportunities. This is an opportunity not only for Roswell, but also for all of southeast New Mexico.” Moore said, “The federal system is friendlier to the prosecution.” Hicks described the advantages for the 5th District as “sharing jurisdiction and resources. He (Gonzales) has national resources behind him.” The MOU will last for a Gonzales praised the work that has been done so far. “I appreciate how everybody has taken to this collaborative effort.” He pointed out that crime was “bigger than the PD, the DA or the SO. It is bigger than the U.S. Attorney’s office....”

year and could be extended. “In 12 months, he (Moore) will know and understand both state and federal systems,” said Hicks. The funds from the White House Offices of National Drug Control Policy High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area will cover a portion of Moore’s salary. His new post is a part of the new federal-state SMAR T program with its threepronged approach of law enforcement, prevention and prosecution. j.palmer@roswell-record.com

Another part of the effort is to create a comprehensive re-entry program. “As you know many criminals are coming out of institutions and breaking laws almost the same day they are released,” Gonzales said.

j.palmer@roswell-record.com

tle homework assignment” and “go ask Republicans what their jobs plan is.” The political positioning came with the American economy weakening and at a risk of sinking as a consequence of Europe’s debt crisis. Nearly one-third of the unemployed people in the United States — almost 4.5 million people — have been out of work for a year

or more. It is likely Congress will eventually pass Obama’s proposal to extend and expand the Social Security payroll tax cuts that took effect on Jan. 1, the costliest part of the overall jobs plan. Other elements could also clear Congress by the end of the year, including a renewal of unemployment benefits.

Yet Republicans strongly oppose Obama’s proposed spending and also are against raising taxes — on anyone. Giving a bit of ground on his own plan, Obama endorsed a new proposal by Senate Democrats to tax millionaires — not households making $250,000 or more — to pay for his jobs program. About 392,000 house-

holds would get hit by the Senate Democrats’ proposed 5.6 percent tax on income above $1 million, according to an analysis by the Tax Policy Center, a Washington think tank. In 2013, the first year the tax would take ef fect, those households would see their taxes increase by an average of $110,500, according to the analysis

lot. “One of our deputies picked him up. He actually stopped for our deputy, and he waited until she got out of the car before he took off,” said Coon. The deputy followed as Vigil ran the red light at Pine Lodge Road and Main Street. “By the time he reached Charlie’s Restau-

rant, he was going between 100 and 105 miles an hour,” Coon said. During the course of the pursuit, Vigil ran people off the road. He crossed the median, causing other drivers to take evasive action. “He hit the guard rail at mile marker 117, two miles north of the overpass,” said

Coon. The Sheriff said that Vigil slammed into the guard rail so hard that he knocked the radio out of the dash. “The vehicle rolled, splitting in two, with the chassis, engine, transmission and bed separating from the cab. The driver was ejected on the second roll.”

Vigil was pronounced dead at the scene of the crash by Deputy OMI Jesse Davis. The State Police ruled that “the contributing factors to this crash are high speed, reckless driving and failure to utilize seatbelt.” Coon noted, “In all, the chase covered 2 miles, and

lasted only 4 minutes, with the original call coming in at 6:45 and pursuit ending at 6:49. He could have killed all those people, the people at the homeless camp, the woman he bumped and all the people on 285.”

j.palmer@roswell-record.com

ents, this is their own personal history, and they’re explaining things and talking to the children. Familial bonding is bridging the gap with these generations. It’s kind of incredible.” Brytowski said many who visit the van share their personal stories and memories of Route 66, “One of the fun things is when we’re distributing history, or talking about history, or bringing historical information, is people from every little town will bring us their local historical information. This exhibit is in living memory of a lot of folks. So they bring us their stories. It’s been fabulous.” The van will travel to all of the NMDOT regional offices. It also travels to schools, library youth programs, and town fiestas. It spent five days at the State Fair and stopped in Lincoln in July for Old Lincoln Days. Although the van is open to people of all ages and travels statewide, it mainly presents to schools. Brytowski said many of the schools in the state are unable to make it for an overnight field trip to the state’s museums. “So this is just a fabulous way to bring stuff to schools,” she said.

A lot of the items on the van are not priceless, which means kids, “can flap the flaps, and button the buttons, and try ’em on and goof around,” Brytowski said. The van also provides curricula for educators. The van will go to Helena, Mont., for the Mountain Plains Museums Association Annual Conference to represent all New Mexico museums and to show other states how to establish their own mobile museum. “Sometimes people think all that expensive stuff is up in Santa Fe. It’s not like that. We have this information and stories to share, and here’s a way to do it. And it belongs to all of New Mexico.” The New Mexico Department of T ransportation, and New Mexico History Museum and the Museum Resources Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs funded the exhibition.

work his office has done to help settle three decadeslong Native American water rights disputes. But not everyone is happy with D’Antonio. There are tensions with water users in the lower Rio Grande and in northwestern New Mexico, and his of fice is involved in numerous state and federal lawsuits. Next month, a fight over the active management initiative is headed to the state Supreme Court. The legal battles aren’t surprising given the contentious nature of water rights allocation in the West. Mixing politics with water

management is dangerous and can lead to unfair deter minations that inevitably benefit one group at the detriment of another, he said. “We just shouldn’t have that, especially in Western water law,” he said. As for the future and the next state engineer, D’Antonio said the biggest problem aside from staf fing vacancies and reduced budgets will be the drought. Forecasters are expecting below-average precipitation this winter and the state’s reservoirs are already low.

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Roswell seriously.” “In this state, in southeast New Mexico, we have a great relationship with the federal government. ... My policy is anything that facilitates cooperation with the federal government,” said Hicks. Gonzales agreed. “We got great chemistry going here. Enforcement is the key ... but we need to prevent crime in the first place ... focus on the kids to keep them from using and from joining gangs.” Moore referred to this phase of the program as “breaking the generational

A3

against them. I think the American people will run them out of town, because they are frustrated.” Obama conceded that voters have grown deeply exasperated and cynical, and he put the responsibility largely on Congress as unresponsive to public opinion. At one point Obama even told his media questioners to accept a “lit-

j.bergman@roswell-record.com

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Friday, October 7, 2011

Water

Continued from Page A1

we were eight or nine years ago because now we have water masters out in the field, we have water meters and measuring devices and we can have an idea of whether we’re 20 percent short in any given basin,” he said. The state also has a database filled with water rights information. It’s part of his Active Water Resource Management initiative, which aims to keep junior water rights holders from being cut of f when supplies are low. He’s also proud of the

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A4 Friday, October 7, 2011

OPINION

Catching up on the rest of the news in the state

SANTA FE — Currently there is a lull in the redistricting battle as lawyers file challenges with the courts. Expect many lawyers and many suits because the state is obligated to pay their fees regardless of what they charge. Courts will have to wait for Gov. Susana Martinez’s action on redistricting bills before swinging into action. Then they will move as quickly as possible since candidates already can start circulating nominating petitions. Now that Public Regulation Commissioner Jerome Block Jr. has agreed to resign, the only major action remaining on that matter will be Gov. Martinez’s appointment of a replacement. Applications for the position were closed two days ago. So with those two big issues briefly lying dormant, we can talk about other matters of interest in New Mexico politics for a few days. Where’s Bill Richardson? The question is asked frequently now

EDITORIAL

JAY MILLER

INSIDE THE CAPITOL

that the former governor is out of the headlines. Richardson hasn’t been kicking back as much as he talked about before leaving office last Dec. 31. He has kept a small staff and is bouncing around speaking and looking for gigs as a consultant. He recently landed a spot at the James A. Baker Institute, at Rice University, in Houston, Texas, as a fellow in Latin American affairs. Baker was a top adviser to President George W. Bush and headed the legal team that halted the recount of Florida votes in 2000. It may not have been intentional but before Richardson was gover-

Roswell Daily Record

nor, he was associated with the Kissinger firm in Washington, D.C. Kissinger was a top hand at the White House in the Nixon administration. That is bipartisanship for you. Former New Mexico Gov. Gary Johnson is having a heck of a time getting his presidential campaign noticed. Fox News has given him some air time and invited him to the Florida debate. Johnson was mainly ignored by the moderator in that debate. His speaking skills and debate skills are not exciting but he vows to keep going. It still is unclear whether Johnson will be invited to any more debates. It is likely the national GOP hierarchy would prefer not to have him around because they find some of his libertarian views embarrassing. He wants us to get out of all our wars — Iraq, Afghanistan, drugs — and is close to the position of Texas governors on immigration. What is it about New Mexico

governors who can win by big margins in the state but can’t capture the imagination of voters elsewhere? Is it because they still have trouble remembering New Mexico is a state? Is it because the word “Mexico” in our name makes us seem too foreign? Probably not. President Obama overcame both those factors. Evidently we just haven’t found anyone who is quite ready for prime time yet. Four years ago, Americans seemed to forget that governors tend to make better presidents. They have had experience turning dreams into reality and they have a feel for guiding us through crises. The way candidates keep flaming out of the GOP presidential race, Johnson’s endurance and perseverance could leave him as the last candidate standing. We haven’t said much about the 1st Congressional District race in the Albuquerque area to fill the

spot left by Rep. Martin Heinrich who is moving up to run for the Senate seat being vacated by the retiring Jeff Bingaman. On the Democratic side are state Sen. Eric Griego, who got in the race early and is capturing the liberal vote, former Albuquerque Mayor Martin Chavez, who should attract the more conservative vote and County Commissioner Michelle Lujan Grisham, who is in the middle. Lujan Grisham hasn’t picked up much of a base yet but could end up being a factor. On the GOP side, are conservative City Councilor Dan Lewis and moderate former state Rep. Janice Arnold-Jones. Jon Barela, who carried the flag for Republicans four years ago, may stay in his state Economic Development Department post. (Write to Jay Miller at 3 La Tusa, Santa Fe, NM 87505; by fax at 984-0982; or by e-mail at insidethecapitol@hotmail.com)

National Opinion Congress

Most members of Congress were probably high achievers in school. But, as a group, they have a serious deadline problem. Congress’ inability to get things done — and done on time — is creating grave risks for the country. The nation teetered on the brink of default in early August because Democrats and Republicans couldn’t agree on whether to raise the debt ceiling. At the last minute, they brokered a deal — but one that largely postponed the problem. Just eight weeks later, Washington’s procrastinating again. The Senate approved a stopgap spending bill that would keep the government open until mid-November. For a while, it looked as though even that wouldn’t get done because of a battle over how to fund federal disaster relief. Even in normal times, Congress has a hard time meeting deadlines. The nonpartisan No Labels group released a report showing that only twice in the last 25 years has Capitol Hill passed all its yearly spending bills on time. But these aren’t normal times. The failure to govern carries greater risks now. As the folks at No Labels put it, “Missed deadlines and petty arguments are unacceptable for elected officials tasked with pulling our nation out of an economic crisis.” The stakes are high for Congress in November. Not only must lawmakers finalize those appropriation bills for 2012, but the debt supercommittee must approve an additional $1.5 trillion in savings by Nov. 23. If the bipartisan group, created in August as part of the debt ceiling compromise, can’t come to agreement, automatic cuts will be triggered across parts of the government. Like all Americans, we expect robust debates. But leaders must do more than preen off talking points. They need to govern. Guest Editorial The Dallas Morning News

China

China is undeniably manipulating its currency. Countries around the world, including the United States, are losing jobs because their manufacturing industries cannot compete with artificially cheap Chinese goods. For the good of the world economy, and its own long-term economic development, China should stop. Still, a Senate bill, with strong bipartisan support, to punish countries that manipulate their currencies is a bad idea. It could do even more damage to the American economy if — as is all too likely — China decides to retaliate. Stiff retaliatory tariffs or other punishments are also very unlikely to persuade Beijing to swiftly abandon a policy that has been at the core of its economic strategy for two decades. Instead, it could add an explosive new conflict to an already heavy list of bilateral frictions. The Senate bill is intended to limit the executive branch’s discretion. It would require the Treasury Department to identify countries whose currencies were grossly misaligned — with China everyone’s favorite culprit. If Beijing persisted, Washington would be required — with a delimited presidential waiver — to stop spending federal dollars on Chinese goods, and consider the renminbi’s undervaluation in antidumping cases against Chinese imports. The Treasury Department would also be required to ask the Federal Reserve to consider acting in currency markets to counteract the undervaluation of China’s currency. Given Beijing’s history of meeting fire with fire, many experts fear that China would retaliate on other fronts, like dragging its feet on customs inspections of American imports, opening new antidumping investigations against American goods or slowing its promised efforts to halt the stealing of American intellectual property. Beijing is not immune to pressure. But the Senate bill is too blunt an instrument. Guest Editorial The New York Times

Time to stop Obama’s shenanigans The White House’s buzz words for the propaganda campaign to raise taxes on the wealthiest Americans and corporations are “pay their fair share.” But is President Barack Obama’s pitch reflecting honest economic inequity or more dishonest spin from his bag of duck-’n’-weave political manipulations? This year alone, nearly every member and minion of this administration (including the mainstream media) has regurgitated “pay their fair share” like cows chewing cud. They have done so to prompt Americans to feel that the

Doonesbury

DEAR DOCTOR K: I am in my mid-30s and like to run for exercise. The problem is that I have creaky knees. I haven’t experienced pain yet, but my husband thinks I’m wearing my knees out and that I’ll give myself arthritis. Is this possible? Should I give up on vigorous exercise? DEAR READER: When I was little, my father often told me to “slow down or you’ll wear out your joints.” (I guess I was a little hyperactive.) A lot of people — like your husband and like my father — think that our joints are like car

CHUCK NORRIS

SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

wealthy are getting a free ride regarding taxation while lower- and middle-class folks pay their societal ticket. Here is a small set of examples of recent quotes from a single page of entries on the White House website (italics added): — From a Sept. 19 state-

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

tires. Which is to say, they believe using them wears them out, and the more you use them, the faster they’ll need to be replaced. While this may be true for tires, the same cannot be said for your joints. For example, I had a joint wear out in my right hip. My hip bone was rubbing against my thigh

ment from the White House’s Office of the Press Secretary concerning the “Fact Sheet: Living Within Our Means and Investing in the Future — The President’s Plan for Economic Growth and Deficit Reduction”: “asking the wealthiest Americans and biggest corporations to pay their fair share.” — From a Sept. 20 White House Rural Council blog post, titled “Lessons from the Farm to Strengthen America,” written by Tom Vilsack, the secretary of agriculture: “The President’s plan ... will (maintain) a strong safety net and (create) a better market for

bone, and it hurt. Of course, every time we stand up, walk or run, we are putting pressure on the hip joint. But we’re putting pressure on both hip joints, since we’re using two legs. Yet my left hip was completely normal. I got a right hip replacement, and the pain has been gone ever since. Many of my patients are like me: just one bad hip or knee. So it’s not as simple as saying you wear out your joints by using them. The risk factors that actually lead to arthritis See DR. K, Page A5

our agricultural goods. And it sets us on a path to compete by asking everyone to pay their fair share.” — From an Aug. 4 post on the White House blog, titled “All About the So-Called ‘Super Committee’” and created by Jon Carson, who is the director of the White House Office of Public Engagement: “asking millionaires and billionaires to pay their fair share.” — From the July 9 “Statement from White House Communications Director Dan

25 YEARS AGO

See NORRIS, Page A5

Oct. 7, 1986 • Navy Capt. Jerome A. Peschka Jr., formerly of Roswell, has graduated from the Naval War College. Peschka completed the recent 10-month course during which he studied strategy and policy, defense economics and decision making and deployment of naval forces. He attended seminars, lectures and prepared research projects to complete the requirements for graduation, which prepares him for future assignments. Peschka is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jerome A. Peschka Sr. of Roswell. Peschka holds a bachelor’s degree in science from Oregon State University, which he earned in 1965, and a master’s degree in science from the Naval Postgraduate School at Monterrey, Calif., which he obtained in 1973. He joined the Navy in 1963.


LOCAL

Roswell Daily Record

A5

NM Film office announces statewide film industry Town Halls

SANTA FE—The New Mexico Film Office today announced a series of Town Hall meetings scheduled to take place across the state, beginning with Southern New Mexico in October. Director Nick Maniatis will discuss the state of the New Mexico film industry – including an update about 2011 legislation, the outlook going forward, and opportunities and training available to New Mexicans. The meetings are also intended to provide an open forum for

the new director to learn about educational programs, film-related businesses, and issues of concern for each community. The Town Halls are free and open to all, including students, local filmmakers, businesses and the general public. The first three Town Hall meetings will take place October 17, 18 and 19 in Las Cruces, Ruidoso and Roswell, respectively. The New Mexico Film Office will take questions from the audience and will collabo-

rate with local chambers of commerce and schools in conducting these events. “We are working to make sure that New Mexicans across the state have a chance to be a part of this exciting and growing industry,” said Nick Maniatis, director of the New Mexico Film Of fice. “Through these town halls, we are reaching out to residents around New Mexico to create a dialogue about how we can help each other in representing our communities.”

ENMU-R gets new GEAR UP grant ENMU-R has received a $1,380,800 Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) grant from the U.S. Department of Education. ENMU-R is the only applicant awarded a GEAR UP grant from New Mexico. The grant will be funded at the same level for the next seven years, ending September 25, 2018. The grant is one of 66 state and partnership grants awarded to colleges and universities nationwide totaling $177.4 million. The funds will assist some 275,000 at-risk students to prepare for college and receive the support they need to achieve success in postsecondary ENMU-R education. received its first GEAR UP grant in 2005. “Our most recent GEAR UP grant has helped open a door for so many students in Chaves County who may not have been able to envision a path to college otherwise,” said Steve Markl, current

GEAR UP director. “GEAR UP encourages students to embrace the idea of a college degree as a personal goal and prepares them academically for success in reaching that goal. We are so appreciative of the many local businesses and other community partners who have made a sincere commitment to our new grant and choose to support the future of the Chaves County education enterprise.” ENMU-R received one of the 47 partnership grants totaling $100.1 million in 24 states. Both state and partnership grants are competitive six or seven-year matching grant programs that target entire grades of students, partner with local organizations and businesses, and include matching local contributions and in-kind services. Grantees serve an entire group of students, usually beginning no later than seventh grade, and follow them throughout

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

are advanced age, obesity, a family history of arthritis, injury (especially a fracture that involves the joint), and rheumatoid arthritis or another type of chronic joint inflammation. So, although it’s clear that running stresses the knees, ankles and other joints that bear weight, research doesn’t clearly show that running is bad for the joints. In fact, our muscles actually protect our joints by reducing some of the pressure on them. Not exercising regularly can weaken the muscles and thereby make the joints more prone to damage. That said, a sudden, severe injury (a fracture or ligament tear) could cause cartilage damage that can lead to osteoarthritis. Or a muscle injury can weaken a muscle that helps to protect a joint. I tell my patients to start an exercise program gradually, and to back off

The first series of these meetings will take place in Las Cruces, Ruidoso and Roswell. The Roswell meeting will be at the Roswell Chamber of Commerce Oct. 19, at 5;30 p.m. For more information call 623-5695. “We have a strong and vibrant independent film industry throughout the state, with a top-notch digital media circuit in Southern New Mexico. We look forward to learning more about their work and supporting their efforts in any

Friday, October 7, 2011

way we can,” said T rish Lopez of the NM Film Office. There is no RSVP necessary to attend any of the Town Hall meetings and the NM Film Office encourages the surrounding communities to come out and participate in the discussion. The expected time frame for each is approximately two hours with Q and A. Future Town Hall meetings will be scheduled in other cities in early 2012. The New Mexico Film Office conducts regu-

lar visits to communities across New Mexico each year during conferences, seminars, and as part of its annual tour of winning films through its NM Filmmakers Showcases.

For more information on the 2011 Film Industry Town Hall meetings and other NM Film Of fice announcements, please visit nmfilm.com or call 505-476-5611.

The First Tee receives donation

high school.

Partnership projects must include at least one low-income middle school, one college or university, and two community or business organizations. Partners work together to provide students and their families with a range of support services needed to prepare for college, including mentoring, counseling, tutoring, and summer programs to succeed in higher level math and other gateway college preparatory courses, as well as information about college and financial aid options.

The grant at ENMU-R will allow the campus to implement an early intervention program, targeting sixth and seventh grade students in Chaves County. The program will include tutoring, mentoring, and after school programs for students at risk of dropping out of school. Activities will also involve parents.

if they feel pain during or after exercise. A joint will tell you if it is under excessive stress while you exercise, by causing you pain. Listen to your joints. If running ever hurts, try swimming or biking instead. So why did one of my hips go bad, but the other didn’t? I had an injury to the main muscle in my right thigh when I was a teenager. That muscle has never been as strong since. Years of jogging on asphalt probably put too much stress on my right hip. I should have stopped jogging when my right hip started to hurt, but I didn’t. Yes, doctors can make dumb mistakes. Bottom line: You can’t “use up” your joints by using them. In fact, moving is better than not moving — for your joints and for your overall health. Dr. K o m a r o ff i s a p h y s i c i a n a n d professor at Harvard Medical School. Go to his website to send questions a n d g e t a d d i t i o n a l infor mation: www.AskDoctorK.com.

Courtesy Photo

The Bank of America Charitable Foundation, Inc. has donated $2,500 to The First Tee of the Pecos Valley. The Bank of America Charitable Foundation is providing support to organizations like The First Tee of the Pecos Valley which provide opportunity and improve lives in our communities, a key of BOA's strategy for building communities that truly make a difference.

Norris

Continued from Page A4

Pfeiffer on Budget Negotiations”: “We need a balanced approach that asks the very wealthiest and special interests to pay their fair share as well, and we believe the American people agree.” — From an April 13 statement by Mary Kay Henry, president of the Service Employees International Union, given immediately after Obama delivered a speech on deficit reduction: “Giveaways to millionaires must come to an end. We simply cannot afford them. ... All taxpayers must pay their fair share.” (Interesting how Henry’s statement got posted on the White House blog. Maybe readers can email my statements here to the White House and my article will be posted, too!) Neither those citations nor the host of others on other pages of the White House website include the myriad presidential mentions, from the heartland of America to congressional corridors and prime-time television speeches. With all those Washington insiders spouting that “pay their fair share” verbiage, the majority of corporations and wealthy Americans must be dodging their “fair share” of tax dues, right? Well, The Associated Press recently ran a fact check on the Obama administration’s accuracy in calculating tax brackets. Here are three key facts: 1) According to the Congressional Budget Office, the 10 percent of households with the highest incomes pay more than half of federal taxes. And they pay more than 70 percent of federal income taxes. “Pay their fair share”? 2) The Tax Policy Center, a Washington think tank, reports that in 2011, households making more than $1 million will pay an average of 29.1 percent of their income in federal taxes. In com-

parison, households making between $50,000 and $75,000 will pay an average of 15 percent of their income in federal taxes. Lower -income households will pay even less. “Pay their fair share”? 3) In 2009, the Internal Revenue Service reported that 1,470 tax returns were filed by those whose households earned more than $1 million and didn’t pay federal taxes. But that is less than 1 percent of the nearly 237,000 households that earned more than $1 million that year. In comparison, the Tax Policy Center estimates that a staggering 46 percent of Americans will pay no federal taxes in 2011, and most of them are low- and middle-income families. “Pay their fair share”? If the Obama administration wants to go after those who don’t “pay their fair share” of taxes, then it should hunt down the remaining 45 percent of federal tax evaders. Even better, why not just dump the current tax code and implement the FairTax plan (or an equivalent flat tax), which would lower the tax rate of most honest taxpaying Americans and rope in the 45 percent who are dodging federal taxes altogether. Combined with lowering America’s corporate tax rate (the second-highest in the world, at 38 percent) to the average European rate — 25 percent — our country would not only experience the return of corporations and productivity to American soil and subsequently increase the domestic job market but also put more money into the pockets of Americans to rebuild our economy and even give the feds more funds to lower our national debt. It’s time Americans told the White House to stop its “pay their fair share” shenanigans. As you yourself said, Mr. President, in the Rose Garden a few weeks ago, “this is not class warfare; it’s math.” © 2011 Chuck Norris

GRAND OPENING 1400 W. 2nd St. #N Roswell, NM 88203

FRIDAY Oct. 7th 2-7 pm

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A6 Friday, October 7, 2011

NATION

Senate postpones final vote on China currency

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Senate vote to impose sanctions on China for its unfair currency practices was put off Thursday, delayed by the partisan divisions that have come to characterize this Congress. The bill, which makes it easier to raise tariffs against Chinese goods if China keeps its currency undervalued, is now set for a likely vote Tuesday, when it is expected to pass with bipartisan support. But partisanship ruled the day Thursday when Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Republican leader Mitch McConnell couldn’t agree on what amendments would be allowed, and Democrats used their majority powers to push through a rule change that restricts the offering of non-relevant amendments to legislation. The China currency legislation, years in the making, reflects frustration at the failures by the Obama administrations and past presidents to change Chinese policy through diplomacy, and the Chinese economic onslaught that saw the trade deficit with China hit $273 billion last year. It is aimed at the practice of keeping the yuan, the Chinese currency, undervalued against the dollar, making Chinese

exports cheaper and U.S. products sold in China more expensive. Economists say the yuan is 25 percent to 30 percent undervalued, with some putting the figure as high as 40 percent, giving Chinese producers a significant advantage against American competitors. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., cited estimates that China has cost the U.S. some 2 million manufacturing jobs in the past decade and that the advantage Chinese producers have because of the undervalued currency could prove devastating as China prepares to enter world markets in commercial aircraft and automobiles. “We cannot continue to let China flaunt the rules,” Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said. If action isn’t taken, “we may never recover as a country. This is serious stuff.” The legislation, even if it passes the Senate, is still a long way from becoming law. House supporters of a similar bill say they have 225 co-sponsors, enough to pass it, but Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, doesn’t like it and could prevent it from reaching the floor for a vote. He said this week that it was “pretty dangerous” to tell another country how to set its monetary policy.

Roswell Daily Record

The White House has remained noncommittal, but has emphasized the importance of working through diplomatic and international channels rather than challenging the Chinese with unilateral action that could result in retaliation from the Chinese. President Barack Obama said at a news conference Thursday that it was “indisputable” that the Chinese “intervene heavily in the currency markets.” He said China “has been very aggressive in gaming the trading system to its advantage and to the disadvantage of other countries, particularly the United States.” He said the Senate bill was an effort to get at these practices, but he stressed that whatever tools are put in place must adhere to international treaties and obligations. But the legislation has bipartisan backing from senators responding to popular resentment to the way China has come to dominate U.S. markets and driven American manufacturers out of business. The Alliance for American Manufacturing, a labor-management partnership that supports the bill, cites figures that a 28.5 percent appreciation of the yuan would create up to 2.25 million American jobs and reduce the

annual trade deficit by $190.5 billion. The legislation is widely opposed by larger companies and groups that do business with China, which warn that Beijing would retaliate against American companies, initiating a trade war. “Unilateral action by the United States will only serve to increase trade tensions and negatively impact the U.S. economic recovery during this fragile period in the global economy,” Bruce Josten of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce wrote senators this week. Erin Ennis, vice president of the U.S.-China Business Council, said the Chinese could also react in more subtle ways, such as choosing European over American aircraft and picking fewer American companies for Chinese government procurement contracts. She also questioned whether a fairer currency rate would bring jobs back to the U.S., saying that lower-wage countries such as Vietnam or Bangladesh would move in if Chinese goods become more expensive. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu said in a statement this week that the bill violated World Trade Organization rules “and seriously disturbed China-U.S. trade and economic

relations.” But Sen. Sherrod Brown, DOhio, a chief sponsor of the legislation, said it was unlikely China would start a trade war. “You don’t initiate a trade war if you are China. ... We’re their biggest customer. They have way more to lose than we do if they initiate a trade war.” Regardless of the outcome of the currency legislation, the debate gave senators an opportunity to vent on a long list of Chinese practices that impede U.S. sales to that country, including violation of intellectual property rights, technology theft, cyber espionage and Chinese government subsidies to domestic industries. Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman John Kerry, DMass., said it was “an important debate because I think China needs to carefully think about and process the substance of what people are saying here on the floor of the United States Senate.” He added, “I don’t think that we’re here to rupture that relationship. I think we’re here to send a message to the Chinese about the urgent need to repair it.”

Wall Street protesters fed up with both parties NEW YORK (AP) — Their chief target is Wall Street, but many of the demonstrators in New York and across the U.S. are also thoroughly disgusted with Washington, blaming politicians of both parties for policies they say protect corporate America at the expense of the middle class. “At this point I don’t see any dif ference between George Bush and Obama. The middle class is a lot worse than when Obama was elected,” said John Penley, an unemployed legal worker from Brooklyn. The Occupy Wall Street movement, which began last month with a small number of young people pitching a tent in front of the New York Stock Exchange, has expanded nationally and drawn a wide variety of activists, including union members and laid-of f workers. Demonstrators marched Thursday in Philadelphia, Salt Lake City, Los Angeles and Anchorage, Alaska, carrying signs with slogans such as “Get money out of politics” and “I can’t afford a lobbyist.”

The protests are in some ways the liberal flip side of the tea party movement, which was launched in 2009 in a populist reaction against the bank and auto bailouts and the $787 billion economic stimulus plan. But while tea party eventually activists became a crucial part of the Republican coalition, the Occupy Wall Street protesters are cutting President Barack Obama little slack. They say Obama failed to crack down on the banks after the 2008 mortgage meltdown and financial crisis. “He could have taken a much more populist, aggressive stance at the beginning against Wall Street bonuses, and exacting certain change from bailing out the banks,” said Michael Kazin, a Georgetown University history professor and author of “American Dreamers,” a history of the left. “But ultimately, the economy has not gotten much better, and that’s underscored the frustration on both the right and the left.” Obama on Thursday

acknowledged the economic insecurities fueling the nearly 3-week-old Wall Street protests. But he pinned responsibility on the financial industry and on congressional Republicans he says have blocked his efforts to kick-start job growth. “I think people are frustrated and the protesters are giving voice to a more broad-based frustration about how our financial system works,” he said at a nationally televised press conference. “The American people understand that not everybody has been following the rules, that Wall Street is an example of that ... and that’s going to express itself politically in 2012 and beyond.” The president has been pushing for a $443 billion jobs plan to be paid for in part through a tax on the wealthy. Republicans have resisted such tax increases. GOP presidential candidates Mitt Romney and Herman Cain have criticized the anti-Wall Street protests. All the Republican contenders have also pushed back against the demonization of Wall

AP Photo

Linda Wiener, right, of Vancouver, Wash., helps carry a large “We the Corporations” canvas through Pennsylvania Avenue, part of Occupy DC activities in Washington, Thursday.

Street. They accuse the Obama administration of setting regulatory policies that have stifled job creation and say his health care overhaul will prevent many businesses from hiring new workers. In Zuccotti Park, the center of the Occupy Wall Street protests in New York, activists expressed deep frustration with the political gridlock in Washington. While some blamed Republicans for

blocking reform, others singled out Obama. “His message is that he’s sticking to the party line, which is ‘we are taking care of the situation.’ But he’s not proposing any solutions,” said Thorin Caristo, an antiques store owner from Plainfield, Conn. But Robert Ar now, a retired real estate worker, said the Republicans need to tell their congressional leaders, “You’re standing

in the way of change.” Quayzy Cayusso, a Web designer, didn’t watch Obama’s press conference even though it was broadcast on TV monitors at the protest site in New York. “He’s a cool president, but he was given a hard task,” Cayusso said. “He should get some gratitude for what he’s done so far, but he’s been overlooking jobs and not putting much effort into that until now.”

NMPRC member Jerome Block Jr. to resign today

www.rfal.org

The Gallery

SANTA FE (AP) — Public Regulation Commissioner Jerome Block Jr. will step down from his $90,000-ayear job today, a little more than a week after he pleaded guilty to felony charges over the misuse of taxpayer money. Block’s r esignation becomes ef fective at 3 p.m., today, which is payday for members of the PRC and its commissioners. The Espanola Democrat submitted a letter of resignation to the PRC chairman on Thursday, just a day after Gov. Susana Martinez criticized Block for waiting so long to resign after appearing in court to accept a plea deal

with prosecutors. Block continued to earn his government salary — $3,461 every two weeks — until officially resigning. Under the plea agreement, Block had until Oct. 13 to resign. “It has truly been a pleasure serving the people of New Mexico and the PRC,” Block said in his resignation letter. A replacement for Block will be appointed by the Republican governor and will serve the remainder of his term through 2012. Block, 34, pleaded guilty last Wednesday to charges including fraudulent use of a state-issued cr edit card, and he is to appear in court later to plead

guilty to other felonies for violating campaigning finance laws when he ran for office in 2008. Under a plea deal with the attor ney general’s office, Block is expected to avoid prison time if h e successfully completes a court-supervised treatment pr ogram for an addiction to prescription painkillers. PRC Chair man Pat Lyons said in a statement, “while we hope he gets the help and support he needs during this trying time, the citizens of New Mexico deserve a commission that is 100 percent focused on the r egulatory matters before it.” Block’s legal problems

The Featured Artists at The Gallery for October are Geneva Bailey and Aria Finch. Aria is well known as the founder and manager of the Roswell Museum and Arts Center’s Ceramic Department and for her internationally recognized designs in pottery and sculpture. Geneva began her pottery career ago at the Roswell Museum and Art Center. She remarks that over the years she’s come to realize that “I am a functional potter, and I make no excuses. I love bowls. The curve at the hip that fits the hand and that subtle flair at the lip. For me, bowls are the perfect art form. I always find time for sculpture, but my feet are firmly rooted in bowls. “

Please join us for their Artist’s Reception on Sunday October 9, from 1:00 to 4:00 PM .Their exhibit continues October 1-31, 2011

are the latest scandal to engulf the five-member PRC, which regulates utilities, telecommunications, insurance and motor carriers such as ambulances, moving vans and taxis. Last year, PRC member Carol Sloan was removed by the state Supr eme Court after she was convicted of felonies and refused to step down. A deputy insurance superintendent at the PRC was

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Monday through Saturday 10:30 AM to 4:30 PM 107 East 5th Street Roswell, NM 88201 575.625.5263

However, the turmoil at the PRC has stirr ed a debate over whether minimum educational and professional experience qualifications should be r equir ed of PRC candidates and whether the commission should be streamlined, with some of its duties transferred to other gover nment agencies.

Friday Night October 7th 6: 30 - 8: 00 pm Pearson Auditorium FREE T EVEN

Sponsored in part by the Xcel Energy Foundation

convicted in 2008 for coercing insurance companies to donate money to charity in exchange for reducing regulatory fines. “Unfortunately, the allegations surrounding former Commissioner Block overshadowed the important work this commission is tasked to perform,” said L yons. “We now look forwar d to continuing our efforts without this unfortunate distraction.”

Carol Kessler

live performance as

Emily Dickinson

Headquarters Live, The NMMI Jazz Band

Sponsored by The High Plains Writing Project, Roswell Reads, NEA, The Big Read


Roswell Daily Record

Friday, October 7, 2011

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A8 Friday, October 7, 2011

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Clouds and sun; breezy

A t-storm in spots early

Saturday

Partly sunny

Sunday

Monday

Partly sunny and breezy

Times of clouds and sun

Tuesday

Bright and sunny

Wednesday

Bright and sunny

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Thursday

Bright and sunny

High 84°

Low 48°

74°/46°

69°/46°

73°/48°

80°/51°

82°/49°

82°/53°

S at 12-25 mph POP: 10%

SSE at 10-20 mph POP: 40%

SSW at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

NNE at 4-8 mph POP: 0%

WSW at 10-20 mph POP: 0%

S at 8-16 mph POP: 5%

SSW at 8-16 mph POP: 5%

NW at 8-16 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 5 p.m. Thursday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 89°/55° Normal high/low ............... 79°/50° Record high ............... 93° in 2007 Record low ................. 35° in 1961 Humidity at noon ................... 24%

Farmington 54/34

Clayton 70/41

Raton 64/33

Precipitation 24 hours ending 5 p.m. Thu. 0.00” Month to date ....................... 0.20” Normal month to date .......... 0.25” Year to date ......................... 3.24” Normal year to date ........... 10.53”

Santa Fe 57/34

Gallup 52/27 Albuquerque 62/40

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Tucumcari 75/45 Clovis 76/43

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading 38 0-50

51-100

Good

Moderate

Source: EPA

101-150

151+

Unhealthy Unhealthy sensitive

T or C 69/44

Ruidoso 63/45

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Sat. The Moon Today Sat. Full

Oct 11

Rise 6:56 a.m. 6:57 a.m. Rise 4:09 p.m. 4:38 p.m. Last

Oct 19

New

Oct 26

Set 6:35 p.m. 6:34 p.m. Set 2:58 a.m. 3:54 a.m. First

Nov 2

Alamogordo 78/46

Silver City 64/42

ROSWELL 84/48 Carlsbad 90/56

Hobbs 83/49

Las Cruces 71/49

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2011

Regional Cities Today Sat. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

78/46/pc 62/40/t 50/25/pc 89/54/pc 90/56/pc 50/27/t 70/41/pc 57/33/pc 76/43/t 71/42/pc 61/39/t 54/34/t 52/27/t 83/49/t 71/49/pc 60/34/pc 52/32/t 65/41/t 82/53/pc 76/47/t 53/29/t 64/33/pc 50/27/c 84/48/pc 63/45/pc 57/34/t 64/42/t 69/44/t 75/45/pc 57/36/t

69/44/s 62/45/s 54/27/pc 78/51/pc 82/53/t 56/26/pc 61/36/t 56/25/s 68/40/t 68/45/s 61/44/s 61/38/s 59/30/s 77/41/t 65/51/s 61/29/s 57/31/s 69/46/s 78/50/t 72/40/t 60/31/s 60/29/pc 51/25/sh 74/46/pc 59/37/s 61/36/s 65/43/s 65/44/s 71/39/t 63/34/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Sat.

Today

Sat.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

48/38/c 80/56/s 70/46/s 61/50/s 76/46/s 80/57/s 78/53/s 89/72/pc 60/37/pc 77/55/s 79/52/pc 86/75/pc 90/72/pc 84/57/s 86/60/pc 68/59/pc 74/57/s 79/55/t

47/36/pc 75/56/pc 76/50/s 75/60/s 74/52/s 79/57/s 78/54/s 88/68/pc 56/33/sh 77/57/s 71/51/s 86/75/pc 88/72/t 82/56/s 84/61/pc 76/62/s 82/62/s 73/47/t

87/76/pc 86/61/t 84/62/t 85/70/pc 69/54/s 84/61/t 86/70/pc 70/49/s 76/62/pc 78/49/s 64/49/c 78/48/s 87/59/s 52/41/c 68/59/s 60/48/c 71/50/pc 74/51/s

86/77/t 76/55/t 74/56/pc 84/71/pc 76/62/s 79/56/t 82/69/t 76/54/s 84/64/s 80/51/s 66/52/pc 78/50/s 86/59/s 58/42/pc 74/63/s 61/48/pc 79/58/s 76/55/s

U.S. Extremes

Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 100°................. Pecos, Texas Low: 21°...........Saranac Lake, N.Y.

High: 93°..........................Carlsbad Low: 37°.........................Angel Fire

National Cities Seattle 60/48 Billings 64/42

Minneapolis 84/62 New York 69/54

Detroit 77/55 Chicago 80/57

San Francisco 67/52

Los Angeles 74/57

Atlanta 80/56

El Paso 79/52

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Houston 90/72

Miami 87/76

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Washington 74/51

Kansas City 86/60

Denver 60/37

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Actor Charles Napier dies at 75

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (AP) — His granite jaw, toothy grin and steely stare were the tools that made Charles Napier one of the most recognizable actors movie and TV audiences never heard of. From the dim-witted country music star John Belushi flimflammed in “The Blues Brothers” movie to the scheming military intelligence officer who matched wits with Sylvester Stallone in “Rambo: First Blood II,” Napier appeared in scores of films and TV shows in a career spanning more than 40 years. He died Wednesday at age 75 at Bakersfield Memorial Hospital, his longtime friend Dennis Wilson told the Bakersfield Californian. The cause of death was not given. The actor, whose earliest roles included a memorable turn as a hippie wanderer searching for paradise in a classic 1960s “Star Trek” episode, continued to work until shortly before his death. He had a voice role in the animated series “Archer” earlier this year. In recent years he was a sheriff in an episode of “Monk,” a father on “Curb Your Enthusiasm” and a security guard on the children’s show “Ned’s Declassified School Survival Guide.” His voice was also heard on several episodes of “The Simpsons” as Officer Krackney and other characters. His favorite role was as the judge in “Philadelphia,” the 1993 film that won Tom Hanks a best actor Oscar as an attorney stricken with HIV. His stock in trade, however, was playing steely eyed tough guys in films like “The Silence of the Lambs” and even comedies like “The Blues Brothers,” in which he famously threatened to knock out Belushi’s teeth for asking to see his musician’s union card. “I always felt I played myself or some kind of version of myself,” Napier told the Bakersfield Californian earlier this year. “If you think about it, old actors probably don’t even have a self.”

PHARMACY

COME MEET OUR TEAM! “Hometown Proud”

WE STILL BELIEVE IN THAT OLD FASHION SERVICE WITH A BOB BELL

Pharmacist in Charge Over 43 Years Experience

Don’t r u o t forge u r h t e driv

☺ OUR TEAM OF TECHNICIANS Loretta, Ericka Debbie & Bob

FAST... FRIENDLY SERVICE EVERYDAY

! E $20 ONE TIME LAWRENCE BROTHERS GIFT CARD* E R F when you transfer your prescriptions to Lawrence Brothers Pharmacy from any other pharmacy.

HOURS OF OPERATION 9AM-6PM MON-FRI • 9AM-1PM SAT 900 W. 2ND STREET ROSWELL, NM 88201

*Excludes pharmacy purchases

Ice

90s 100s 110s


Friday, October 7, 2011 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 28

LOCAL SCHEDULE FRIDAY OCTOBER 7

SPORTS Roswell Daily Record

H.S. FOOTBALL 7 p.m. • Dexter at Tucumcari • Springer at Gateway Chr. • Goddard at Carlsbad • Hagerman at Mescalero Apache • Elida at Lake Arthur • Estancia at NMMI • Moriarty at Roswell

SP OR TS SHORTS NMMI CLUB CHAMPIONSHIP IS OCT. 8-9

The NMMI Golf Course club championship will be held on Oct. 8-9 at NMMI Golf Course. The tournament is open to all Institute Golf Association members. The cost is $25 plus the 9hole play rate for members. For more information on the tournament or on how to join the IGA, call the course at 6226033.

• More shorts on B2

BRIEFS BIG 12 EXTENDS INVITE TO TCU

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — After more than a year of watching their league get picked apart, leaders of Big 12 Conference finally made a proactive move Thursday by voting to add TCU as early as next season. It was the first aggressive act by a league desperate to secure its membership amid dramatic shifts in conference affiliation. And if the Horned Frogs join the Big 12, it would be another sharp blow to the Big East, which was expecting to welcome TCU next season. TCU Chancellor Victor Boschini Jr. suggested TCU is all but ready to join the Big 12. "These discussions with the Big 12 have huge implications for TCU," Boschini said. "It will allow us to return to old rivalries, something our fans and others have been advocating for years. As always, we must consider what's best for TCU and our studentathletes in this ever-changing landscape of collegiate athletics. We look forward to continuing these discussions with the Big 12." TCU, which is leaving the Mountain West Conference, has a rising football program that won the Rose Bowl last season and will play in a sparkling new stadium next year. TCU also was a member of the old Southwest Conference that once included current Big 12 members Texas, Texas Tech and Baylor. "We're proud that TCU has been invited to join the Big 12," said Texas athletic director DeLoss Dodds, who touted their academic and athletics success as an "excellent fit" for the Big 12. "Their close proximity to all conference institutions makes for a comfortable travel situation." TCU's move to the Big East, announced nearly a year ago, was supposed to be about stability and being in a conference with automatic access into the BCS. But Syracuse and Pittsburgh recently stunned the Big East by announcing plans to leave for the Atlantic Coast Conference. Without them, and without more changes, there will be only six other football teams in the Big East before TCU gets there next season.

Lawrence Foster Photo

Roswell’s Alexis Florez, second from left, tips the ball over the net while DaSean Varnado looks on during their match with Clovis on Thursday.

E-mail: sports@roswell-record.com

Passing is the most overlooked and under-appreciated part of volleyball— it’s like volleyball’s equivalent of dribbling. If you can do it well, no one notices, but, if you do it poorly, it sticks out like a sore thumb. The Clovis Wildcats covered both ends of that spectrum on Thursday — they couldn’t pass the ball in the first two sets, but did it to near perfection in the final three sets. And that’s exactly how Clovis climbed out of a 2-0 hole and beat host Roswell at the Coyote Den in five sets, 15-25, 21-25, 25-16, 25-21, 15-8. “I think the pressure right now got to us. Eventually, once we settled down and realized that it’s just any other gym, the girls started passing ball and doing what they do,”said Clovis coach Gabriel Apodaca. “We have some good (defensive specialists) back there that I think really stepped up and made some good passes. When we get good passes, we can run a good offense.” Clovis’ quick turnaround in the passing game was at its most evident in the fifth set. The Wildcats scored 10 of

their 15 points in the game with their offense, including nine on kills. They built a 5-2 lead with four offensive points and a block, but Roswell closed to within one at 6-5 by winning three of the next four points. Clovis pulled away, though. The Wildcats won the next three points, including kills from sophomore hitter Sydney Romero and senior hitter Kirsti Shough, to go up 9-5. Roswell (8-5) did win the next two points, but won just one more after that on a Clovis attack error. The Wildcats got another kill from Shough, two from Kaleigh Mitchell and one from Paige Gardner, and with a Roswell attack error, led 14-8. On match point, the two teams battled at the net four different times, but Clovis finally got the point it needed when Marika Trujillo tried to send a free ball over her head and across the court. It landed well out and Clovis celebrated. “We were celebrating there in that locker room,” Apodaca said. “(Roswell coach) Bobby Bates does a great job with the Roswell High team. “It’s great to come back

against any team when you’re down 2-0, but against a quality team, that just makes it that much more rewarding.” Roswell built that 2-0 lead behind some solid offensive play in the first two sets, including a lopsided win in the first set. The Coyotes led by as many as 10 in the first set and, after Clovis closed to within 19-15, a Rikki Ornelas kill gave Roswell a side out and brought Emily Ellington to the service line. She served the game out for a Coyote win thanks to a pair of kills from Alexis Florez and one DaSean Varnado. The Coyotes went up 5-0 in the second set and never trailed en route to a fourpoint win. After that, though, the Wildcats made few mistakes in the passing game, which pushed them to a ninepoint win in the third set and a four-point win in the fourth set. “I’ll give them credit. I thought they started passing the ball better, but, at the same time, we didn’t serve as aggressive as we did in the first two games,” said Bates about the loss. “We backed off and played a little bit more safe.”

Matador defense. “Arizona Wester n is a really good football team,” Lynn said about the Matadors. “They’re big up front, they run the ball well and in scoring defense, they’re No. 2 in the nation. “They’re a good football team and they deserve that No. 2 ranking.” The Arizona Western (50, 3-0) ground attack is eighth in the nation in rushing yards per game and is led by the tandem of Damien Williams and

J.C. Baker. “(Williams) is the fastest and also the str ongest back we’ve seen all year,” L ynn said about the duo. “Then they roll in (Baker), who is a little bit smaller and kind of a changeup back. He’s a good player too.” Williams leads the team in rushing with 838 yards and 11 touchdowns on 96 carries this year and Baker has 316 yards and four scor es on 41 attempts.

“Their running backs are what make them go offensively,” L ynn added. Under center, Cameron Coffman calls the signals for the Matadors. On the year, he’s 47 of 84 for 767 yards, eight TDs and an interception. As good as the Matador offense is, the defense is better. The unit is allowing just 10 points and 138.8 yards

KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL TBA • NMMI vs. TBA at Air Force Tri Tournament, at Colorado Springs, Colo.

NA T I O N A L

B

Clovis passes Roswell for five-set win Section

Eyes of the nation focused on Yuma, Ariz. KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

The eyes of the nation when it comes to NJCAA football will be trained on Yuma, Ariz., on Saturday. That’s when the 13thranked New Mexico Military Institute Broncos visit Veterans Memorial Stadium to take on Wester n States Football League foe and second-ranked Arizona Wester n in one of only two NJCAA matchups this week that featur es two ranked teams. “It means a lot to us as a pr ogram, just for the fact that we need to see where we’re at in regards to everyone else in the nation,” said Bronco coach Josh L ynn about facing the No. 2 Matadors. “It’s kind of a stepping-stone game and one that will tell us if we should be up there in the national rankings. “Another thing too, I think it’s good for our conference. There was a lot of emphasis put on the (Southwest Junior College Football Conference) last

Broncos on the air The New Mexico Military Institute Bronco football game against Arizona Western College will be broadcasted on the NMMI athletics website and iHigh.com this weekend. The broadcast will be available on the NMMI athletics website at nmmi.edu/athletics or on the iHigh website at ihigh.com/nmmi. Roswell Daily Record Sports Editor Kevin J. Keller will provide play-by-play alongside color commentator and NMMI Sports Information Director Geoff Gunn.

year, but the Wester n States Football League is just as good as that conference over there.” The Broncos (5-0, 2-0 WSFL) — who will be without 21 players, including five starters, due to suspensions stemming from an incident during their win over Glendale — will have their hands full with Arizona Western for a multitude of reasons. At the top of the list of r easons is the Matador gr ound game and the

Hagerman downs Gateway Chr. in three

HAGERMAN — The Hagerman girls volleyball team improved to 2-0 in District 7-1A with a threegame win over Gateway Christian on Thursday. The Bobcats took Game 1 25-8 and won Game 2 2518. The score of the final game wasn’t available at press time. Taylor Hamill led Hagerman with six digs and four kills, while Brieanna Olivas chipped in with five kills. Bobcat coach Kate DeHoyos said that Hagerman played better than they did on Tuesday. “We played a lot better tonight than we did on

See RHS, Page B2

Tuesday,” she said. “Our passing and serve-receive was extremely good. So, overall I was extremely happy with how our girls played.” Lori Gossett collected five digs for Hagerman.

Detroit advances to ALCS NEW YORK (AP) — The Detroit Tigers survived a tense trip back to Bronx, with Jose Valverde and the bullpen holding on time and time again to beat the New York Yankees 3-2 Thursday night to win the deciding Game 5 of their AL playof f series. Don Kelly and Delmon Young hit consecutive home runs in the first inning, then Doug Fister and the Tigers spent the rest of a thrilling game trying to preserve their lead. They did — barely — and advanced to the AL

championship series against Texas. Joaquin Benoit followed Max Scherzer in the seventh and walked Mark Teixeira with the bases loaded, pulling the Yankees within a run. Benoit struck out Nick Swisher with a 95 mph fastball to keep the lead. After Brett Gardner singled with two outs in the eighth, Derek Jeter flied out to Kelly just in front of the right-field wall. Valverde pitched the ninth for his second save of the series, remaining perfect in 51 chances this year. After Valverde

See NMMI, Page B2

struck out Alex Rodriguez to end it, the Tigers’ closer crouched and pumped both arms as his teammates ran out to celebrate. Detroit won its first allor -nothing postseason game since beating St. Louis in Game 7 of the 1968 World Series. With the Tigers vying for their first World Series title since 1984, ace Justin Verlander will start the ALCS opener at Texas on Saturday night against the Rangers’ C.J. Wilson. While the Yankees led See ALCS, Page B2


B2 Friday, October 7, 2011

SPORTS

DEXTER AT TUCUMCARI Rattlers Stadium (Tucumcari), 7 p.m. Records: Dexter 1-5; Tucumcari 4-2 Last week: Dexter lost to Santa Rosa, 46-0; Tucumcari lost to Eunice, 60-30 Coaches: Dexter, Frank Sandoval; Tucumcari, Wayne Ferguson Last year: Tucumcari won, 40-0 Coach Lynn’s key for the Demons The Rattlers are scoring points. That’s about all I know about them. I have never met coach Ferguson and I am not sure what he does, offensively or defensively. What I do know is that they are scoring. It will be important for Dexter to play good defense and tackle well, no matter what Tucumcari is doing on offense.

a sophomore. Like Jim Bradley used to say, “You can plan on losing one game for every sophomore you have to play.” It will be important for the Rockets to get after Holcomb. 2. I think the wild card in this game will be the two running backs. Carlsbad is a spread offense, but they have a really good running back in Eric Galindo. I think that if David Anaya out-performs Galindo, Goddard should win.

HAGERMAN AT MESCALERO APACHE

Chiefs Stadium (Mescalero), 7 p.m. Records: Hager man 0-6; Mescalero Apache 3-3 Last week: Hagerman lost to Texico, 470; Mescalero Apache beat Questa, 38-14 Coaches: Hagerman, Casey Crandall; Mescalero Apache, Godfrey Rey Cordova Last year: Did not play (Hagerman won 53-6 in 2009) Coach Lynn’s keys for the Bobcats 1. Do not take Mescalero lightly. I really believe that Hagerman is the better team and should win, but when you’ve had the kind of season Hagerman has had, you can’t take anyone lightly. 2. Play with confidence and get after the Chiefs as soon as they get off the bus. From the opening kickoff, the Bobcats need to establish the tone and really get after the Chiefs. They haven’t played the kind of schedule the Bobcats have and are not as tough. Don’t give the Chiefs the belief that they can win.

SPRINGER AT GATEWAY CHRISTIAN

Warrior Stadium (Roswell), 7 p.m. Records: Springer 2-4; Gateway Christian 5-1 Last week: Springer lost to Melrose, 7626; Gateway Christian beat Menaul, 52-0 Coaches: Springer, Amadeo Soto; Gateway Christian, Shaun Wigley Last year: Gateway Christian won, 48-0 Coach Lynn’s key for the Warriors It’s the same as it was last week; play the way you’re capable of playing. Don’t look ahead to next week. Go out, take care of business and don’t get anyone hurt.

GODDARD AT CARLSBAD Ralph Bowyer Stadium (Carlsbad), 7 p.m. Records: Goddard 5-0; Carlsbad 6-0 Last week: Goddard beat Clovis, 29-28; Carlsbad beat Albuquerque, 55-0 Coaches: Goddard, Sam Jernigan; Carlsbad, Ron Arrington Last year: Goddard won, 27-7 Coach Lynn’s keys for the Rockets 1. The Cavemen is a spread offense, but they are not scoring a lot of points in the games where they are not much better than the opposing team. They are nothing the Rockets haven’t seen this year. It will be important for the Rockets to pressure the passer. Rodney Holcomb may be the best sophomore in the state, but he is still

NMMI

Continued from Page B1

per game and has recorded four TDs on the season. “We’re going to go in ther e and do what we do,” said Lynn about his team’s of fensive game plan against the Matador defense. “I’m not ever going to say that someone can’t stop us because it is

Football

National Football League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain AMERICAN CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Buffalo . . . . . . . . .3 1 0 .750 New England . . .3 1 0 .750 N.Y. Jets . . . . . . .2 2 0 .500 Miami . . . . . . . . .0 4 0 .000 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Houston . . . . . . .3 1 0 .750 Tennessee . . . . .3 1 0 .750 Jacksonville . . . .1 3 0 .250 Indianapolis . . . . .0 4 0 .000 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Baltimore . . . . . . .3 1 0 .750 Cincinnati . . . . . .2 2 0 .500 Cleveland . . . . . .2 2 0 .500 Pittsburgh . . . . . .2 2 0 .500 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct San Diego . . . . . .3 1 0 .750 Oakland . . . . . . .2 2 0 .500 Denver . . . . . . . .1 3 0 .250 Kansas City . . . .1 3 0 .250

PF 133 135 100 69

PF 107 88 39 63 PF 119 80 74 64 PF 91 111 81 49

PA 96 98 95 104

PA 70 56 85 108

PA 57 74 93 72

PA 85 113 111 126

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF PA Washington . . . . .3 1 0 .750 83 63 N.Y. Giants . . . . .3 1 0 .750 102 87

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Friday, Oct. 7 AUTO RACING 10:30 a.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Hollywood Casino 400, at Kansas City, Kan. Noon ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, practice for Kansas Lottery 300, at Kansas City, Kan. 2 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, practice for Kansas Lottery 300, at Kansas City, Kan. 3 p.m. ESPN2 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying for Hollywood Casino 400, at Kansas City, Kan. 6:30 p.m. SPEED — ARCA, Kansas Lottery 98.9, at Kansas City, Kan. 11 p.m. SPEED — Formula One, qualifying for Japanese Grand Prix, at Suzuka, Japan BOXING 9 p.m. SHO — Junior middleweights, Jermell Charlo (15-0-0) vs. Francisco Santana (12-2-1); lightweights, Sharif Bogere (20-0-0) vs. Francisco Contreras (16-0-0), at Las Vegas COLLEGE FOOTBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Boise St. at Fresno St.

ELIDA AT LAKE ARTHUR Panthers Stadium (Lake Arthur), 7 p.m. Records: Elida 0-5 (0-0 District 2-6M); Lake Arthur 4-2 (0-0) Last week: Elida lost to San Jon 44-14 on Sept. 23; Lake Arthur lost to Loraine (Texas), 45-24 Coaches: Elida, Clayton Ferguson; Lake Arthur, Jose Cruz Porras

football and somebody is going to have a good game plan. But, we just have made adjustments to whatever they’re doing and just take what the defense is giving us.” Accor ding to L ynn, ther e ar e four critical keys for the Broncos this week. “No. 1, we have to stop the run. We have to slow their offense,” he said. “Another thing, our of fense has to match Dallas . . . . . . . . .2 Philadelphia . . . .1 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Tampa Bay . . . . .3 New Orleans . . . .3 Atlanta . . . . . . . . .2 Carolina . . . . . . .1 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Green Bay . . . . .4 Detroit . . . . . . . . .4 Chicago . . . . . . . .2 Minnesota . . . . . .0 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W San Francisco . . .3 Seattle . . . . . . . . .1 Arizona . . . . . . . .1 St. Louis . . . . . . .0

2 3

L 1 1 2 3

L 0 0 2 4

L 1 3 3 4

0 .500 99 101 0 .250 101 101

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .750 .750 .500 .250

PF 84 127 90 89

T Pct PF 0 1.000 148 0 1.000 135 0 .500 94 0 .000 77

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .750 .250 .250 .000

PA 77 98 105 102 PA 97 76 98 96

PF PA 94 75 58 97 86 87 46 113

Sunday, Oct. 9 Arizona at Minnesota, 11 a.m. Oakland at Houston, 11 a.m. Kansas City at Indianapolis, 11 a.m. Philadelphia at Buffalo, 11 a.m. New Orleans at Carolina, 11 a.m. Cincinnati at Jacksonville, 11 a.m. Tennessee at Pittsburgh, 11 a.m. Seattle at N.Y. Giants, 11 a.m. Tampa Bay at San Francisco, 2:05 p.m. San Diego at Denver, 2:15 p.m. N.Y. Jets at New England, 2:15 p.m. Green Bay at Atlanta, 6:20 p.m. Open: Baltimore, Cleveland, Dallas, Miami, St. Louis, Washington Monday, Oct. 10 Chicago at Detroit, 8:30 p.m.

GOLF 7 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Madrid Masters, second round, at Alcala de Henares, Spain 12:30 p.m. TGC — LPGA, Hana Bank Championship, first round, at Incheon, South Korea (same-day tape) 3 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Frys.com Open, second round, at San Martin, Calif. 6:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Insperity Championship, first round, at The Woodlands, Texas (same-day tape) HORSE RACING 3 p.m. VERSUS — NTRA, Alcibiades Stakes and Phoenix Stakes, at Lexington, Ky. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 3 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, National League Division Series, Game 5, Arizona at Milwaukee 6:30 p.m. TBS — Playoffs, National League Division Series, Game 5, St. Louis at Philadelphia NHL HOCKEY 11 a.m. VERSUS — N.Y. Rangers vs. Los Angeles, at Stockholm WNBA BASKETBALL 6 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, finals, Game 3, Minnesota at Atlanta

their defense. We have to go in there and we have to establish what we do offensively. “Another key component is that David Vega has to have a good game. We have to be able to pr otect him. The last thing, and I know I say this every week, is special teams. In a game like this, if somebody slips up on special teams, it can cost you.”

Roswell Daily Record

Last year: Lake Arthur won, 34-25 Coach Lynn’s key for the Panthers Play the way you’re capable of playing and this one will be over early.

ESTANCIA AT NMMI COLTS

Colt Field (Roswell), 7 p.m. Records: Estancia 2-4; NMMI 3-3 Last week: Estancia lost to Socorro, 416; NMMI beat Capitan, 40-22 Coaches: Estancia, Dusty Giles; NMMI, Randy Montoya Last year: Estancia won, 27-6 Coach Lynn’s keys for the Colts 1. The Tigers and Colts both have new coaches and I really don’t know a lot about Estancia. With that said, I think it will be important for the Colts to play good fundamental football, like they have in their wins. They can’t turn the ball over and need to tackle well. 2. Don’t judge Estancia by its record. I would be willing to bet that most 2A schools would struggle with the schedule the Tigers have played. The Colts need to be ready to play and can’t come out flat.

MORIARTY AT ROSWELL Wool Bowl (Roswell), 7 p.m. Records: Moriarty 5-1; Roswell 4-2 Last week: Moriarty beat West Mesa, 2821; Roswell beat Santa Teresa, 49-12 Coaches: Moriarty, Bob Allcorn; Roswell, Robert Arreola Last year: Moriarty won, 21-14 Coach Lynn’s keys for the Coyotes 1. This could be a shootout. Moriarty is averaging 42 points per game and has scored 50 or more three times. I have known coach Allcorn for a while — his son was a great player for me at NMMI — and he will do it on the ground as much as possible, while Roswell is doing it through the air. In a game like this, the turnovers prove to be the deciding factor. Roswell needs to take care of the ball.

RHS

Continued from Page B1

Bates also added that momentum played a big part in the loss. “Momentum is the biggest part of this game,” he said. “You get it and you keep it going, it works out for you. If it’s on the other side, you have to get it back. “It’s just one little thing after another. When we

SCOREBOARD

kjkeller@roswell-record.com

Hank Williams Jr. out on Monday Night Football

BRISTOL, Conn. (AP) — Are you ready for some football? Hank Williams Jr. isn’t anymore. The country singer and ESPN each took credit for the decision Thursday morning to no longer use his classic intro to “Monday Night Football.” The network had pulled the song from the game earlier this week after Williams made an analogy to Adolf Hitler in discussing President Barack Obama on Fox News on Monday morning. “After reading hundreds of e-mails, I have made MY decision,” Williams said in a statement to the Associated Press. “By pulling my opening Oct 3rd, You (ESPN) stepped on the Toes of The First Amendment Freedom of Speech, so therefore Me, My Song, and All My Rowdy Friends are OUT OF HERE. It’s been a great run.” But ESPN’s statement said: “We have decided to part ways with Hank Williams Jr. We appreciate his contributions over the past years. The success of Monday Night Football has always been about the games and that will continue.” The network said it informed Williams of the move Thursday morning. Regardless of whose decision it was, one of sports’ and entertainment’s most visible partnerships is over. The song had been a “Monday Night Football” staple since 1989 and survived the game’s switch of networks from ABC to cable a few years ago. The song is based on Williams’ hit “All My Rowdy Friends Are Coming Over Tonight.” The lyrics were changed each week to reflect the night’s game. ESPN will no longer have access to the music or words because Williams owns the publishing rights, the master recordings and the song. Williams’ statement on “Fox & Friends” comparing a golf game between Obama and Republican Rep. John Boehner to an outing featuring Hitler and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu went viral after ESPN

announced it would pull the intro late that afternoon. Among Williams’ defenders were Whoopi Goldberg and Joy Behar of “The View,” who have a very different political viewpoint from the conservative Williams, but often are called out for their own comments. “Those among us who are without sin, cast the first stone,” Goldberg said.

Transactions

Thursday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Named Robin Ventura manager and agreed to terms with him on a multiyear contract. National League COLORADO ROCKIES — Assigned RHP Matt Daley, RHP Jim Miller, RHP Greg Reynolds, RHP Cory Riordan, INF Kevin Kouzmanoff and C Jose Morales outright off the 40-man roster. Kouzmanoff accepted free agency. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS — Named Chad Bergman trainer and JoHan Wang director of athletic performance.

JEFF LYNN FORMER NMMI BRONCO FOOTBALL COACH

2. It seems to me that coach Faith has his defense coming on at just the right time. The last few weeks, the Coyote defense has played extremely well. That will need to continue Friday night for the Coyotes to win.

SATURDAY’S GAME

————————————————————

NMMI BRONCOS AT ARIZONA WESTERN

Veterans Memorial Stadium (Yuma, Ariz.), 8 p.m. Records: NMMI 5-0 (2-0 WSFL); Arizona Western 5-0 (3-0) Last week: NMMI beat Mesa, 55-23; Arizona Western beat Pima, 58-14 Coaches: NMMI, Josh L ynn; Arizona Western, Tom Minnick Last year: Arizona Western won, 28-25 Coach Lynn’s keys for the Broncos 1. The Broncos will have to be plus in the turnover margin. They need to force turnovers with their defense and take care of the ball with their offense. 2. Special teams play will be crucial to the Broncos’ success. If the Broncos have an Achilles’ heel, it is their kick coverage teams. They really need to play well when they punt and kickoff. 3. I think the Broncos need to try to shorten the game. Any time a team is playing a team that is better physically and ranked higher, as a coach, you want to get the game to the fourth quarter as quickly as possible with a shot to win. If the Broncos can get the game to the fourth quarter with a shot to win, all the pressure will be on the Matadors. Pressure makes teams do funny things.

make a bad play, instead of getting our heads up and focusing on the next point, we keep worrying about the last one.” For Roswell, Ornelas and Trujillo each had 15 kills and Ellington added seven. For Clovis, Gardner had 14 kills, Mitchell and Alek Mendoza had seven kills each, Romero had six kills and Shough had five kills. kjkeller@roswell-record.com

UTAH JAZZ — Named Sidney Lowe assistant coach. FOOTBALL National Football League DETROIT LIONS — Signed S Vincent Fuller. Released G Jacques McClendon. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Signed WR Mike Thomas to a three-year contract extension. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Placed QB Chad Henne on injured reserve. Signed QB Sage Rosenfels. ST. LOUIS RAMS — Placed CB Bradley Fletcher and WR Danny Amendola on injured reserve. HOCKEY National Hockey League BUFFALO SABRES — Signed F Riley Boychuk and F Jonathan Parker to threeyear, entry-level contracts. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS — Recalled F Brandon Pirri from Rockford (AHL). COLLEGE AUBURN — Named Lauren Longbotham Meisner women’s tennis coach. COLORADO — Suspended DB Josh Moten, DB Ayodeji Olatoye, DB Parker Orms, DB Paul Vigo and LB Liloa Nobriga indefinitely for violating unspecified team rules. JOHN JAY — Announced the addition of a men’s volleyball program to begin play this academic year. Named Brittany Fout men’s volleyball coach in addition to her duties as women’s volleyball coach. MANHATTAN — Named Elvys Quezada assistant baseball coach and athletics department operations manager. SOUTH ALABAMA — Named David Barnett assistant track and field and cross country coach.

ALCS

Continued from Page B1

the AL with 97 wins during the regular season, the early exit in the first round and second straight season without a World Series title will set off a restless offseason search for more starting pitching and offense.

SPORTS SHORTS SALVATION ARMY GOLF OUTING SET FOR OCT. 15

The Salvation Army golf tournament, in conjunction with Character Counts! of Chaves County, will be held on Oct. 15 at NMMI Golf Course. Registration begins at 7 a.m. on the day of the tournament and a shotgun start is slated for 8 a.m. The format for the tournament is a three-person scramble. The cost is $60, which includes green fees, cart fees, lunch and breakfast. Entry forms are available at NMMI Golf Course and completed forms can be dropped off at the course or mailed to P.O. Box 897, Roswell, 88202. For more information, call Bart Hoffman at 622-8700 or 626-2874.

CHISUM CHALLENGE Friday & Saturday 7 pm

oping Team R ght i Wed. N

ENMS Fairgrounds

FRIDAY NIGHT

Chisum Shoot Out Thurs. Night

Wild Cow Milking ~ Trailer Loading Stray Gathering

15 teams in each event ~ Childrens Events

SATURDAY NIGHT

Some of the Top 5 Teams ~ Wild Cow Milking best broncs in the world Trailer Loading ~ Stray Gathering NFR Quality

40 Bronc Riders

Top 10 riders to short go $5000 added money

10/12

$10.00 Adults .00 5 Kids $ der n U 6& FREE

GET INTO FAIR FREE AFTER THE RODEO ChavesCountyRodeo.com

Lots O f Prizes


Roswell Daily Record

very honest, but that’s no longer the case. How can I help him when his mother isn’t making an effort? NANNY WHO CARES IN TEXAS

DEAR ABBY

DEAR NANNY: Your employer seems to be clueless. What makes her think her son will get into college if he’s spending his high school years stoned on weed? And for t h a t m a t t e r, w h e n h e grows bored with grass, what makes her think he won’t go on to “experiment” with stronger illegal substances? Hiding her head in the sand is not the answer. Where is the boy’s father? If the mother isn’t up to the task of keeping her son on the straight and narrow, the father should be informed about

UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: I have worked as a nanny for many years for a divorced professional woman. She has a son and a daughter. The son, now 15, is smoking pot. I told his mom, but she’s ignoring the problem. She said: “He’s just experimenting. I want him to get it out of his system before he enters college.” I love this child, and I feel helpless. He knows better. The boy used to be

Jumble

COMICS

what’s going on. #####

DEAR ABBY: My mother and “Simon,” the man I consider my father, married when I was a toddler. Simon adopted me when I was in grade school. Most people believe he’s my natural father, including my siblings. (I have no contact with or memory of my biological father.) Last month at my brother’s wedding, a guest commented to Dad about how much we look alike. Simon r e s p o n d e d w i t h , “ We l l , that would be tough.” The guest replied, “Oh, she isn’t yours?” and he said no. I was extremely hurt by his response. This has left me wondering if he feels differently about me than my sisters and broth-

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

KPLAO

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

LGPTIE BOBARS Answer: Yesterday’s

DEAR FEELING EXCLUDED: Chalk it up to thoughtlessness on Simon’s part. You became “his” when he adopted you. What he was focused on at the wedding was the question of biological relatedness, and I’m sure he didn’t mean to slight you. Because this has troubled you enough to write to me, discuss it with your father and tell him how it made you feel, and give him a chance to explain.

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

FROM HELOISE

Dear Heloise: When I LIGHT CANDLES in my home, I immediately go to the front door and hang a dishtowel on the doorknob. It is a reminder to extinguish all candles before leaving the house. I also use candles only in glass containers. Flo C., Baton Rouge, La.

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) JUDGE FORBID IRONIC Jumbles: HOBBY Answer: How she felt after spraying the lawn for insects — GRUBBY

TODAY’S CROSSWORD Today’s Crossword Puzzle PUZZLE 51 Before, in comACROSS bos 1 Deadly 7 Candle drippings 52 Caution 53 Noodle concoc10 Group knowltion (2 wds.) edge 56 Get pooped out 14 Smart 57 Hot time in Que15 Lime cooler bec 16 Rara — 58 Slushy beverage 17 Hong Kong 62 Unlucky time dwelling 63 Hearing aid? 18 Enjoyment 64 Budgetary 19 Small change 65 Robin’s resi20 Lawn decoradence tion (2 wds.) 66 House buzzer 23 Pandemonium 67 James Doohan 26 Hgt. role 27 “Sour grapes” coiner DOWN 28 Plows into 1 Flour sack abbr. 29 Comic Louis — 2 Historical time 30 Website clutter 3 Jaunty cap 31 IOC member 4 Safari sights 32 Scary yell 5 Writer — Nin 33 Honey sources 6 Gayle’s sis 37 Geol. formation 38 Versatile vehicle 7 Hedge 8 Man or stallion 39 Turkish title 9 Lawless role 40 Tampa Bay pro 10 Most frilly 41 Like Fidel 11 Home appli43 Domino dot ances 44 Poetic tribute 12 Fab Four mem45 Build on to ber 46 Hirt and Pacino 13 Block, legally 47 Tied 21 Won the fight 48 Dog owner’s 22 Reckless purchase

Family Circus

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

XNENA

ers. Nothing has been said since, and I feel I should let it go. Should I say something to my dad or just chalk it up to a stressful day for all of us? FEELING EXCLUDED IN OHIO

PREVIOUS PUZZLE SOLVED

10-7-11

23 24 25 29 30 32 33 34 35 36 42 46

© 2011 UFS, Dist. by Univ. Uclick for UFS

Ant’s morsel Hurry-scurry Fridge maker Made mention of Auspices Gautama — Mediterranean port Overhead Not as civil Fragrance Least thoughtout Major highway

47 Border town (2 wds.) 48 Caesar’s tongue 49 Drop syllables 50 “— moi de deluge” 51 Corolla part 52 Mr. Goldfinger 54 Complaint 55 Switch positions 59 Interest amt. 60 Apply makeup 61 England’s Isle of

Flo, an interesting way to signal to yourself, as long as you are “clued” when you leave. There have been far too many house fires and deaths caused by candles left burning. NEVER, ever, ever go to sleep with candles still burning. Battery-operated candles also are a good safety option — there’s no flame, and they aren’t very expensive. Heloise

Blondie

Dilbert

#####

Dear Heloise: For many years, I have saved buttons of all sizes, colors and shapes, and made of many different materials. Do you or any of your readers know what to do with them? Marie in Alabama

Marie, old buttons are wonderful! Antique or specialty buttons may be worth something — look at them carefully. Check with a seamstress, an antiques dealer or an arts group to get information for a new home for the buttons. If you think yours may have value, check with an antiques dealer. Here are some ideas for buttons from Heloise Central: jewelry and craft projects, teaching young people to sew, and attaching to hidden areas of a garment for emergency use. Readers, how do you use old buttons? Drop an email to Heloise(at)Heloise.com; fax to 210-435-6473 (HELOISE); or send a note to Heloise, P.O. Box 795000, San Antonio, TX 78279-5000. Please put “Button” in the email subject line or on the envelope. Heloise

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

#####

The Wizard of Id

Dear Readers: Did you know that heartworm disease has been reported in all 50 states, according to the American Heartworm Society? Pets need treatment even in WINTER! Heartworms can rapidly multiply, and the parasites can be deadly. Where do they come from? They are transmitted by mosquitoes. How can you tell if your pet has heartworm disease? It may be hard in the early stages, but as the disease progresses, you will notice your pet being extraordinarily tired, having trouble breathing and losing weight. Talk to your veterinarian immediately. A blood test will tell you if the animal has heartworm disease. Heartworm is preventable. There are chewable pills available that will save your pets from this horrible death in the first place. The pills are given once a month, year -round, and are available from your veterinarian. Heloise

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Friday, October 7, 2011

B3


B4 Friday, October 7, 2011

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg Discover .24 23.99 +1.00 Disney .40f 32.03 +.52 A-B-C DowChm 1.00 25.32 +.82 ABB Ltd .64e 17.75 +.69 DuPont 1.64 41.86 +.65 AES Corp ... 10.16 +.40 DukeEngy 1.00f 19.60 +.11 AFLAC 1.20 38.23 +.81 DukeRlty .68 10.26 +.33 ... 3.65 -.12 AK Steel .20 6.97 +.20 Dynegy AMR ... 2.45 ... ECDang n ... 5.72 +.79 ... 22.32 +.71 AT&T Inc 1.72 28.41 +.10 EMC Cp AbtLab 1.92 51.18 +.07 EOG Res .64 78.54 +1.74 Accenture 1.35f 55.30 +.45 EastChm s1.04f 35.91 +.34 ... 1.45 +.23 AMD ... 4.85 +.02 EKodak Aeropostl ... 11.94 +.23 Eaton s 1.36 38.99 +1.45 .70 50.09 -.53 Aetna .60 35.50 +.24 Ecolab Agilent ... 33.54 +1.42 EdisonInt 1.28 37.46 +1.19 AlcatelLuc ... 2.67 +.01 ElPasoCp .04 18.40 +.48 ... 10.70 +.47 Alcoa .12 9.88 +.51 Elan AllegTch .72 38.18 +2.78 EldorGld g .12f 17.12 +.34 Allstate .84 24.55 +.41 Embraer .72e 25.63 +1.12 AlphaNRs ... 19.17 -.53 EmersonEl 1.38 44.50 +1.23 Altria 1.64f 26.95 +.45 EnCana g .80 19.90 +1.03 AmBev s 1.16e 31.99 +.61 EndvSilv g ... 9.49 +.69 AMovilL s .41e 21.73 +.08 ENSCO 1.40 41.77 +.97 AEagleOut .44a 12.16 +.15 EqtyRsd 1.47e 53.47 +1.77 AEP 1.84 37.62 +.58 Exelon 2.10 41.24 +.51 AmExp .72 44.43 +1.02 ExxonMbl 1.88 73.89 -.06 AmIntlGrp ... 22.02 +.66 FedExCp .52 72.20 +1.79 AmTower ... 55.59 +.53 FstHorizon .04 6.31 +.22 Ameriprise .92 40.71 +1.66 FirstEngy 2.20 43.69 +.29 AmeriBrgn .46f 36.10 -.28 FootLockr .66 21.45 +.97 ... 10.99 +.43 Anadarko .36 66.48 +1.00 FordM AnalogDev 1.00 33.93 +.48 ForestLab ... 31.88 +.70 Ann Inc ... 22.97 +.36 ForestOil s ... 10.71 +.15 Annaly 2.59e 16.06 +.38 FBHmSc n ... 12.76 +.56 Aon Corp .60 43.98 +.71 FMCG s 1.00a 34.88 +.46 Apache .60 86.23 +3.33 FrontierCm .75 5.92 +.05 ArcelorMit .75 17.77 +.91 G-H-I ArchCoal .44 15.76 +.05 ArchDan .64 25.91 +.74 Gafisa SA .29e 6.04 +.29 ArmourRsd1.32m6.98 +.47 GameStop ... 24.06 +.19 AuRico g ... 9.82 +.32 Gannett .32f 10.45 -.01 .45 17.26 +.34 Avon .92 20.42 +.75 Gap BB&T Cp .64a 21.88 +.88 GenElec .60 15.53 +.26 BHP BillLt2.02e 71.79 +2.43 GenGrPr n .40 12.19 +.75 BP PLC 1.68 36.78 +.08 GenMari h ... .18 +.02 BakrHu .60 49.55 +.74 GenMills 1.22 38.17 +.23 BcoBrades .80r 15.76 +.68 GenMot n ... 22.35 +.08 BcoSantSA.82e 8.47 +.23 GenOn En ... 2.67 +.06 BcoSBrasil1.65e 7.53 +.46 Genworth ... 5.51 +.17 BkofAm .04 6.28 +.51 Gerdau .25e 7.53 +.52 BkNYMel .52 18.34 +.06 GlaxoSKln2.17e 42.37 +.54 Barclay .36e 10.61 +.75 GolLinhas .12e 6.43 +.65 Bar iPVix rs ... 49.38 -.88 GoldFLtd .24e 15.18 +.25 BarrickG .48 47.72 +1.45 Goldcrp g .41 47.37 +1.77 Baxter 1.24 55.23 +.78 GoldmanS 1.40 97.93 +3.64 BerkH B ... 73.63 +.40 Goodrich 1.16 120.63 +.31 BestBuy .64 24.26 +1.10 Goodyear ... 10.73 +.48 Blackstone .40 13.33 +.90 HCP Inc 1.92 35.78 +.76 BlockHR .60 13.86 +.16 HSBC 1.90e 39.49 +1.78 Boeing 1.68 61.48 +1.52 Hallibrtn .36 34.45 +2.07 BostonSci ... 5.64 -.05 HarmonyG .08e 11.98 -.20 BoydGm ... 5.68 +.61 HartfdFn .40 17.66 +.71 ... 7.17 +.43 BrMySq 1.32 32.45 +.05 HltMgmt ... 5.70 +.24 BrkfldOfPr .56 13.69 +.30 HeclaM ... 13.88 +.24 CBRE Grp ... 14.39 +.55 HelixEn CBS B .40 21.69 +.84 HelmPayne .28 42.26 -.56 ... 9.46 +.47 CF Inds 1.60f 142.74 +9.20 Hertz .40 54.69 +1.23 CIGNA .04 42.43 +.83 Hess HewlettP .48 25.05 +1.19 CMS Eng .84 19.74 +.25 CNO Fincl ... 5.43 +.04 HollyFrt s .35f 29.83 +2.05 CSX s .48 20.21 +.58 HomeDp 1.00 33.38 +.55 CVR Engy ... 22.96 +1.51 HonwllIntl 1.33 45.06 +.69 CVS Care .50 33.75 +.48 HorizLns h ... d.31 -.10 Calpine ... 13.97 +.26 HostHotls .16f 10.89 +.34 Cameco g .40 19.71 +.64 Huntsmn .40 9.56 +.34 Cameron ... 46.42 +2.73 IAMGld g .20f 19.50 +.61 CampSp 1.16 32.64 +.10 ICICI Bk .63e 33.61 +1.06 ... 7.68 +.45 CdnNRs gs .36 30.27 +.73 ING CapOne .20 40.62 +1.20 ION Geoph ... 5.35 +.49 ... 16.09 +.10 CapitlSrce .04 6.31 +.17 iShGold CardnlHlth .86 39.98 -.47 iSAstla 1.06e 21.30 +.89 CarMax ... 25.07 +1.03 iShBraz 3.42e 54.80 +2.61 Carnival 1.00 31.83 +1.08 iShGer .67e 19.12 +.72 Caterpillar 1.84f 77.09 +2.83 iSh HK .42e 14.68 +.41 Celanese .24f 36.82 +3.10 iShJapn .17e 9.43 +.05 ... 2.95 +.03 iSh Kor .50e 48.62 +1.47 Cemex CenterPnt .79 20.13 +.42 iShMex .71e 50.78 +1.18 CntryLink 2.90 32.28 +.04 iSTaiwn .29e 12.33 +.23 ChesEng .35 25.91 +.52 iShSilver ... 31.20 +1.54 Chevron 3.12 94.61 -.05 iShChina25.85e 31.44 +.44 Chicos .20 12.29 +.59 iSSP500 2.45e 116.90 +2.10 Chimera .57e 2.73 +.16 iShEMkts .84e 36.88 +1.18 1.56 60.78 +.47 iShSPLatA1.10e 40.57 +1.44 Chubb Citigrp rs .04 26.02 +1.31 iShB20 T 3.94e 119.12 -2.24 CliffsNRs 1.12f 58.89 +1.53 iS Eafe 1.68e 49.32 +1.29 Coach .90 56.78 +3.53 iSR1KG .78e 54.24 +.99 CocaCola 1.88 65.39 -.14 iSRus1K 1.27e 64.45 +1.22 CocaCE .52 24.29 +.63 iShR2K 1.02e 67.14 +1.46 Coeur ... 22.45 +.84 iShREst 2.18e 51.00 +1.37 ColgPal 2.32 90.19 +.69 iShBasM 1.18e 60.32 +1.29 1.44f 43.85 +1.00 Comerica .40 24.93 +1.08 ITW CompPrdS ... 20.53 +.94 IngerRd .48 28.08 +.24 3.00 181.69 +4.84 ConAgra .96f 24.97 +.54 IBM ConocPhil 2.64 64.35 +.42 IntlGame .24 15.53 +.90 1.05 24.49 +.44 ConsolEngy .40 36.91 +1.05 IntPap ConstellA ... 20.40 +1.68 Interpublic .24 7.79 +.18 .49 16.87 +.46 ConstellEn .96 36.80 +.43 Invesco Cnvrgys ... 9.30 +.26 InvMtgCap3.74e 14.28 +.33 Corning .30f 13.50 +.90 IronMtn 1.00 29.46 -.39 Covidien .90f 44.12 +.44 ItauUnibH .84e 16.62 +.87 CSVelIVSt s ... 5.83 +.11 IvanhM g 1.48e 16.91 +1.94 Cummins 1.60f 90.02 +1.70 J-K-L D-E-F JPMorgCh1.00 32.38 +1.54 .28 18.87 +.17 DCT Indl .28 4.26 +.15 Jabil DDR Corp .24f 11.05 +.36 JanusCap .20 6.07 +.11 DR Horton .15 9.32 +.13 Jefferies .30 12.66 +.21 DanaHldg ... 12.06 +.42 JohnJn 2.28 62.81 +.46 Danaher .10f 42.66 +.94 JohnsnCtl .64 28.96 +.98 Deere 1.64 66.57 +.41 JnprNtwk ... 19.43 +.27 DeltaAir ... 7.78 +.35 KB Home .25 6.32 +.24 ... 10.08 +.44 DenburyR ... 11.92 +.77 KeyEngy DeutschBk1.07e 37.00 +1.07 Keycorp .12 6.55 +.46 DBGoldDS ... 5.10 -.07 KimbClk 2.80 70.98 +.64 .72 15.05 +.42 DevonE .68 57.76 +1.42 Kimco DrxTcBull .84e 34.38 +1.74 Kinross g .12f 14.15 +.37 DrSCBr rs ... 44.25 -3.31 KnghtCap ... 12.86 -.17 DirFnBr rs ... 58.35 -5.93 KodiakO g ... 4.85 +.22 1.00 50.08 +.57 DirLCBr rs ... 41.89 -2.48 Kohls 1.16 33.56 +.67 DrxEMBull1.10e 15.00 +1.36 Kraft Kroger .46f 22.78 +.64 DrxEnBear ... 19.45 -1.06 DirEMBear ... 28.07 -3.20 LDK Solar ... 3.65 +.35 LSI Corp ... 5.46 +.12 DrxFnBull ... 11.51 +.95 ... 41.87 +1.79 DirxSCBull ... 36.74 +2.27 LVSands DirxLCBull ... 50.35 +2.75 LeggMason .32 26.51 +.80 DirxEnBull ... 35.45 +1.76 LennarA .16 14.31 +.49 Name

Name Sell Chg Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 17.52 +.39 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.61 +.38 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.74 +.09 GrowthI 23.91 +.44 InfAdjBd 12.87 -.03 Ultra 21.65 +.46 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.71 +.31 AMutlA p 24.03 +.33 BalA p 17.30 +.19 BondA p 12.43 -.02 CapIBA p 47.45 +.59 CapWGA p31.05 +.67 CapWA p 20.48 +.04 EupacA p 34.84 +.77 FdInvA p 33.04 +.66 GovtA p 14.63 -.04 GwthA p 27.52 +.54 HI TrA p 10.21 +.09 IncoA p 15.80 +.18 IntBdA p 13.58 -.02 IntlGrIncA p27.38 +.66 ICAA p 25.48 +.44 NEcoA p 22.92 +.47 N PerA p 25.50 +.52 NwWrldA 45.39+1.07 STBFA p 10.08 ... SmCpA p 31.95 +.75 TxExA p 12.25 -.08 WshA p 26.13 +.37 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 23.44 +.64 IntEqII I r 9.77 +.27 Artisan Funds: Intl 19.05 +.76 IntlVal r 24.02 +.53 MidCap 32.61 +.93

MidCapVal19.58 +.34 SCapVal 14.98 +.37 Baron Funds: Growth 47.54+1.10 SmallCap 21.57 +.44 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.12 ... DivMu 14.51 -.04 TxMgdIntl 12.74 +.36 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.79 +.27 GlAlA r 18.01 +.27 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 16.78 +.25 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.83 +.27 GlbAlloc r 18.10 +.27 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 47.26+1.03 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 54.15+1.45 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 25.91 +.67 DivEqInc 8.84 +.19 DivrBd 5.10 -.01 TxEA p 13.36 -.06 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 26.76 +.69 AcornIntZ 33.94 +.87 LgCapGr 11.85 +.26 ValRestr 41.25+1.08 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.31 +.13 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n 9.24 +.26 USCorEq1 n9.94 +.21 USCorEq2 n9.72 +.21 DWS Invest S: MgdMuni S 8.91 -.04 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 30.06 +.61

LillyEli 1.96 37.23 +.20 Limited .80a 40.59 +.31 LincNat .20 15.85 +.57 LizClaib ... 4.63 +.22 LloydBkg ... 2.17 +.15 Lorillard 5.20 115.13 +3.15 Lowes .56 20.24 +.50 LyonBas A.80f 27.39 +1.30

M-N-0

MBIA ... 8.27 +.39 MEMC ... 5.71 +.21 MF Global ... 4.22 +.12 MFA Fncl 1.00 6.46 +.11 MGIC ... 2.17 +.33 MGM Rsts ... 9.48 +.75 Macys .40 26.44 +.27 MagHRes ... 3.14 -.06 Manitowoc .08 7.66 +.52 Manulife g .52 11.82 +.34 MarathnO s .60 23.20 +.56 MarathP n .80 33.29 +1.81 MktVGold .40e 56.27 +1.38 MktVRus .18e 25.91 +1.34 MktVJrGld2.93e 29.54 +1.32 MarIntA .40 28.78 +.60 MarshM .88 27.17 +.13 Masco .30 7.82 +.08 McDrmInt ... 12.90 -.45 McDnlds 2.80f 87.11 +1.28 McKesson .80 70.08 -.18 ... 10.61 +.98 Mechel MedcoHlth ... 48.96 +3.31 Medtrnic .97 32.74 +.48 Merck 1.52 31.42 -.04 Meritor ... 8.31 +.63 MetLife .74 30.69 +1.49 MetroPCS ... 8.60 +.30 MobileTele1.06e 13.18 +.18 Molycorp ... 36.45 +4.19 Monsanto1.20f 71.29 +5.04 MonstrWw ... 8.05 +.65 MorgStan .20 15.18 +.70 Mosaic .20 53.30 +1.12 MotrlaSol n .88 44.28 +1.34 MotrlaMo n ... 37.92 +.17 NRG Egy ... 20.83 +.32 NV Energy .48 14.79 +.51 NYSE Eur 1.20 24.45 +.20 Nabors ... 14.05 +.63 NalcoHld .14 35.53 -.26 NOilVarco .44 59.47 +4.36 Navistar ... 33.60 +.57 NwOriEd s ... 27.44 +2.02 NY CmtyB 1.00 12.54 +.37 NY Times ... 6.75 +.76 NewfldExp ... 42.35 +1.09 NewmtM 1.20f 64.06 +1.05 Nexen g .20 15.85 -.12 NikeB 1.24 89.28 +1.48 NobleCorp .53e 30.00 +1.13 NokiaCp .55e 5.92 +.34 Nordstrm .92 48.00 -.22 NorflkSo 1.72f 65.45 +2.13 NoestUt 1.10 31.94 +.85 NorthropG 2.00 52.29 +.53 Nucor 1.45 33.83 +.76 OcciPet 1.84 78.56 +2.84 OfficeDpt ... 2.13 +.15 OilSvHT 1.58e 111.26 +4.37 Omncre .16 24.60 +1.85 Omnicom 1.00 39.07 +.34

P-Q-R

PG&E Cp 1.82 42.99 +1.60 PMI Gp h ... .24 +.04 PNC 1.40 49.27 +2.06 PPL Corp 1.40 27.93 +.48 PatriotCoal ... 10.02 +.44 PeabdyE .34 35.77 +.09 Penney .80 28.42 +.78 PepsiCo 2.06 60.57 +.28 PetrbrsA 1.34e 21.54 +1.25 Petrobras1.26e 23.33 +1.36 Pfizer .80 18.23 +.25 PhilipMor 3.08f 64.58 +1.29 PinnclEnt ... 9.14 +.30 PitnyBw 1.48 19.97 +.31 PlainsEx ... 24.50 +.87 Potash s .28 46.49 +1.74 PS USDBull ... 22.21 -.14 PrecDrill ... 9.38 +.28 PrinFncl .55f 23.72 +.80 ProLogis 1.12 24.48 +1.27 ProShtS&P ... 44.62 -.84 PrUShS&P ... 23.87 -.93 PrUlShDow ... 19.54 -.67 ProUltQQQ ... 78.17 +2.50 PrUShQQQ rs... 50.26 -1.73 ProUltSP .31e 40.14 +1.39 PrUShtFn rs ... 77.88 -5.04 ProUShL20 ... 19.79 +.73 ProUltSRE ... 16.87 -.99 ProUltSOG ... 35.57 -1.37 ProUltSBM ... 24.29 -1.12 ProUltFin .15e 39.24 +2.22 ProUltO&G.06e 35.71 +1.28 ProShtR2K ... 34.01 -.78 ProUltR2K ... 29.52 +1.23 ProUSSP500 ... 18.57 -1.03 PrUltSP500 s.03e49.54+2.54 ProUSSlv rs ... 13.99 -1.90 PrUltCrde rs ... 29.50 +1.96 ProUShEuro ... 19.09 -.30 ProctGam 2.10 63.61 +.27 ProgsvCp 1.40e 18.55 +.39 ProUSR2K rs ... 52.32 -2.41 Prudentl 1.15f 48.27 +1.41 PSEG 1.37 32.56 +.59 PulteGrp ... 4.03 +.11 QEP Res .08 28.49 +.15 QuantaSvc ... 19.63 +.67 QksilvRes ... 7.82 +.33 RadianGrp .01 2.33 +.25 RadioShk .25 12.64 +.70 RangeRs .16 60.71 +.53 RegionsFn .04 3.66 +.33 ReneSola ... 1.94 +.30 Renren n ... 5.49 +.47 ReynAm s 2.12 38.60 +.76 RioTinto 1.17e 48.07 +2.56 RiteAid ... 1.02 +.03 Rowan ... 31.49 +.95 RylCarb .40 22.06 +.74 RoyDShllB 3.36 63.49 +.34 RoyDShllA 3.36 63.28 +.70

Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 30.43 +.61 NYVen C 28.90 +.58 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.21 ... Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq n16.75 +.48 EmMktV 25.81 +.80 IntSmVa n 13.99 +.39 LargeCo 9.19 +.16 USLgVa n 17.61 +.41 US Small n18.70 +.43 US SmVa 21.24 +.52 IntlSmCo n14.23 +.35 Fixd n 10.35 ... IntVa n 14.85 +.42 Glb5FxInc n11.26 -.01 2YGlFxd n 10.23 ... Dodge&Cox: Balanced 64.24+1.10 Income 13.16 -.02 IntlStk 29.56 +.87 Stock 95.34+2.17 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.21 ... TRBd N p 11.21 ... Dreyfus: Aprec 37.59 +.48 DreihsAcInc 9.90 +.06 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 15.92 +.30 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.60 +.01 GblMacAbR9.84 -.01 LgCapVal 15.96 +.30 FMI Funds: LgCap p n 14.77 +.25 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.73 ... FPACres n25.61 +.36 Fairholme 24.52 +.88

CATTLE/HOGS NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high low settle chg. CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 122.50 122.50 122.00 122.35 -.45 Dec 11 122.30 122.75 121.75 122.40 -.25 Feb 12 123.45 123.45 122.85 123.22 -.28 Apr 12 126.32 126.50 125.55 126.45 +.30 Jun 12 123.30 123.85 123.00 123.85 +.23 Aug 12 122.55 122.85 122.30 122.85 +.03 Oct 12 124.55 125.00 124.35 125.00 +.48 Dec 12 125.90 126.20 125.90 126.20 +.40 Feb 13 127.00 127.00 127.00 127.00 +.75 Last spot N/A Est. sales 11091. Wed’s Sales: 39,943 Wed’s open int: 340868, up +469 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 139.10 139.45 138.65 139.10 -.25 Nov 11 141.50 141.97 140.87 141.57 -.18 Jan 12 144.22 144.40 143.55 144.37 Mar 12 144.50 144.75 144.05 144.75 -.10 Apr 12 144.85 145.15 144.50 145.15 -.30 May 12 145.25 145.25 145.10 145.25 -.35 Aug 12 146.30 146.30 146.20 146.22 -.45 Sep 12 146.70 Last spot N/A Est. sales 2513. Wed’s Sales: 4,465 Wed’s open int: 34802, up +79 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 94.35 94.90 94.25 94.75 +1.08 Dec 11 88.80 89.37 87.92 89.22 +.80 Feb 12 91.55 91.62 90.42 91.52 +.50 Apr 12 93.82 93.95 92.92 93.90 +.53

FINANCIAL S-T-U

SLM Cp .40 12.87 +.67 SpdrDJIA 3.14e 111.09 +1.81 SpdrGold ... 160.49 +1.03 SP Mid 1.64e 147.46 +3.45 S&P500ETF2.46e116.49 +2.07 SpdrHome .31e 14.06 +.40 SpdrKbwBk.26e 18.46 +.79 SpdrLehHY4.28e 36.10 +.59 SpdrKbw RB.40e 20.95 +.63 SpdrRetl .49e 48.63 +1.14 SpdrOGEx .50e 44.90 +.93 SpdrMetM .42e 47.52 +1.05 Safeway .58 17.94 +.52 StJude .84 37.54 +.40 Saks ... 9.46 +.52 Salesforce ... 122.00 +4.75 SandRdge ... 6.14 +.19 Sanofi 1.82e 33.34 +.53 SaraLee .46 16.49 +.29 Schlmbrg 1.00 63.89 +2.31 Schwab .24 12.04 +.28 SeadrillLtd3.03e 27.98 +1.03 SemiHTr .64e 28.38 +.36 SiderurNac.81e 8.00 +.47 SilvWhtn g .12 31.12 +1.78 SilvrcpM g .08 8.40 +.48 SimonProp 3.20 112.56 +3.16 SouthnCo 1.89 42.05 +.72 SthnCopper2.19e27.05 +.66 SwstAirl .02 7.86 +.29 SwstnEngy ... 35.34 +.09 SpectraEn 1.04 25.51 +.52 SprintNex ... 3.01 +.15 SprottSilv ... 15.11 +1.05 SP Matls .82e 31.60 +.78 SP HlthC .64e 31.93 +.38 SP CnSt .85e 29.90 +.35 SP Consum.61e 36.38 +.83 SP Engy 1.08e 61.66 +1.14 SPDR Fncl .20e 12.27 +.37 SP Inds .69e 30.41 +.60 SP Tech .36e 24.39 +.36 SP Util 1.36e 33.26 +.58 StarwdHtl .30f 41.49 +1.58 StateStr .72 32.62 +.15 Statoil ASA1.10e 22.26 +.23 StillwtrM ... 8.70 +.14 Stryker .72 47.82 +.19 Suncor gs .44 27.65 +1.23 Suntech ... 2.55 +.17 SunTrst .20f 19.13 +1.15 SupEnrgy ... 28.29 +2.58 Supvalu .35 7.51 +.42 Synovus .04 1.15 +.09 Sysco 1.04 25.78 +.31 TECO .85 17.25 +.16 TJX .76 55.60 -.79 TaiwSemi .52e 11.83 +.01 TalismE g .27 12.02 +.68 Target 1.20 51.91 +2.15 TeckRes g .60 33.99 +1.57 TelefEsp s1.98e 20.11 +.59 TelMexL .83e 15.37 +.10 Tenaris .68e 27.79 +1.10 TenetHlth ... 4.30 +.30 Teradyn ... 12.14 +.50 Terex ... 12.06 +.90 Tesoro ... 23.09 +1.14 TexInst .68f 28.32 +.12 Textron .08 18.47 +.44 ThermoFis ... 53.67 +.85 ThomCrk g ... 7.13 +.50 3M Co 2.20 74.65 +2.12 Tiffany 1.16 66.58 +4.00 TimeWarn .94 31.29 +.35 TollBros ... 15.27 +.23 Total SA 2.38e 46.31 +1.49 Transocn .79e 47.38 +1.76 Travelers 1.64 50.19 +.62 TrinaSolar ... 8.08 +.55 TwoHrbInv1.60e 9.13 +.38 TycoIntl 1.00 42.03 +.96 Tyson .16 17.50 +.26 UBS AG ... 12.03 +.47 US Airwy ... 5.35 +.18 US Gold ... 3.98 +.12 UnilevNV 1.21e 32.15 +.79 UnionPac 1.90 89.53 +3.10 UtdContl ... 19.52 +.51 UPS B 2.08 66.52 +.95 UtdRentals ... 20.04 +1.14 US Bancrp .50 24.00 +.55 US NGs rs ... d8.82 +.07 US OilFd ... 31.98 +1.14 USSteel .20 23.10 +.62 UtdTech 1.92 70.98 +1.37 UtdhlthGp .65 44.94 +.49 UnumGrp .42 22.39 +.72

V-W-X-Y-Z

Vale SA 1.14e Vale SA pf1.14e ValeroE .20 VangREIT1.96e VangEmg .82e VerizonCm2.00f ViacomB 1.00 Visa .60 WaddellR .80 WalMart 1.46 Walgrn .90f WalterEn .50 WsteMInc 1.36 WeathfIntl ... WellPoint 1.00 WellsFargo .48 Wendys Co .08 WDigital ... WstnRefin ... WstnUnion .32 Weyerh .60 WhitingPt s ... WmsCos 1.00f WiscEn s 1.04 WT India .18e XL Grp .44 XcelEngy 1.04 Xerox .17 Yamana g .18 YingliGrn ... Youku n ... YumBrnds 1.14f

23.87 +1.02 22.16 +1.02 20.29 +.68 51.32 +1.37 37.48 +1.21 35.91 +.14 40.42 +1.25 87.13 +2.14 24.96 -.30 52.75 +.10 33.37 +.34 63.06 +1.76 33.09 +.45 13.22 +.42 64.96 +1.01 25.37 +.87 4.65 +.12 27.48 +.53 14.52 +.74 15.67 +.39 16.47 +.67 37.00 +.97 25.44 +.69 31.48 +.85 18.49 +.33 19.37 +.59 24.66 +.52 7.20 +.07 14.19 +.46 3.72 -.01 19.18 +2.70 49.33 +1.21

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

AMEX

+.45 +.33 +.50 +.25 -.20 -.40

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high low settle COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 102.25 Dec 11 102.83 103.50 101.65 102.73 Mar 12 99.96 100.25 98.87 99.75 May 12 98.84 99.05 97.96 98.79 Jul 12 96.92 97.95 96.92 97.63 Oct 12 96.44 Dec 12 93.98 Mar 13 94.55 May 13 95.35 Jul 13 94.83 Last spot N/A Est. sales 7272. Wed’s Sales: 9,780 Wed’s open int: 152631, up +773

chg.

-.50 +.43 +.32 +.60 +.78 +.76 +.76 +.76 +.76 +.76

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 11 626 639fl 615 616 Mar 12 654fl 674 651ü 652ø May 12 679ø 697ø 675fl 677ü

chg.

-9ü -7ø -8

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 3259192 6.28 +.51 S&P500ETF2330601116.49 +2.07 SPDR Fncl1318282 12.27 +.37 iShEMkts 1279769 36.88 +1.18

Name Vol (00) GrtBasG g 52974 NwGold g 45305 NthgtM g 40543 NA Pall g 32687 GoldStr g 31579

Name ETr2xCldC MGIC SunTr wtA Youku n DrxRsaBull

Last 27.45 2.17 3.35 19.18 10.89

Name ExtorreG g NA Pall g QuestRM g MastechH Geokinetics

Name DrxRsaBear ProUSSlv rs NeoPhoto n DirLatBear DrxAgBear

Last Chg 66.27-13.02 13.99 -1.90 5.88 -.77 24.45 -3.13 46.94 -5.94

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg %Chg +4.45 +19.3 +.33 +17.9 +.49 +17.1 +2.70 +16.4 +1.53+16.394

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

2,607 469 47 3,123 6 209 4,961,515,519

52-Week High Low 12,876.00 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 449.09 381.99 8,718.25 6,414.89 2,490.51 1,941.99 2,887.75 2,298.89 1,370.58 1,074.77 14,562.01 11,208.42 868.57 601.71

Name

%Chg -16.4 -12.0 -11.6 -11.3 -11.2

Div

Last 1.57 11.38 3.58 2.57 1.93

Chg +.03 +.54 +.13 +.43 +.04

Name Vol (00) Last SiriusXM 819104 1.51 Level3 800736 1.61 Cisco 711173 16.75 PwShs QQQ66680454.43 Intel 575992 22.03

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Last 7.34 2.57 2.53 2.99 2.26

Chg +1.34 +.43 +.36 +.39 +.28

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

%Chg +22.3 +20.1 +16.6 +15.0 +14.1

Name Last Chg %Chg Tegal rs 2.15 +.60 +38.7 RIT Tech 3.90 +.84 +27.5 TxCapB wt 14.23 +2.56 +21.9 Vitran g 4.69 +.84 +21.8 Gentiva h 3.72 +.59 +18.8

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Last Name WetSeal 4.05 FstUtdCp 3.18 MidPenn 6.99 MisnNEn h 3.12 IndiCmtyB 14.03

Chg %Chg -.58 -12.5 -.45 -12.4 -.76 -9.8 -.34 -9.8 -1.42 -9.2

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

1,926 589 122 2,637 9 49 2,206,439,227

DIARY

DIARY

321 129 32 482 1 10ws 88,488,905227

INDEXES

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 11,123.33 4,422.35 430.03 6,997.64 2,110.65 2,506.82 1,164.97 12,213.94 673.80

Net Chg +183.38 +93.79 +7.76 +153.48 +52.58 +46.31 +20.94 +235.98 +15.69

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

PE Last

Chg +.05 +.09 +.59 +.90 +.18

Last Chg %Chg Name ContMatls 12.04 -.96 -7.4 PyramidOil 3.43 -.22 -6.0 PHC Inc 2.15 -.10 -4.4 CagleA 3.55 -.15 -4.1 WellsGard 2.25 -.09 -3.89

Chg

YTD %Chg Name

Div

% Chg +1.68 +2.17 +1.84 +2.24 +2.56 +1.88 +1.83 +1.97 +2.38

YTD 52-wk % Chg % Chg -3.92 +1.60 -13.40 -3.37 +6.18 +6.92 -12.13 -5.76 -4.43 +3.14 -5.51 +5.17 -7.37 +.60 -8.58 +.25 -14.02 -1.52l

PE Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

BkofAm

.04

...

6.28 +.51

-52.9 Oneok Pt s

2.34f

20

45.89 +.66

+15.4

Chevron

3.12

8

94.61 -.05

+3.7 PNM Res

.50

33

16.59 +.03

+27.4

CocaCola

1.88

13

65.39 -.14

-.6 PepsiCo

2.06

15

60.57 +.28

-7.3

Disney

.40f

14

32.03 +.52

-14.6 Pfizer

.80

12

18.23 +.25

+4.1

EOG Res

.64

46

78.54 +1.74

-14.1 SwstAirl

.02

12

7.86 +.29

-39.4

...

5

10.99 +.43

-34.5 TexInst

.68f

11

28.32 +.12

-12.9

HewlettP

.48

6

25.05 +1.19

-40.5 TimeWarn

.94

13

31.29 +.35

-2.7

HollyFrt s

.35f

15

29.83 +2.05

+46.3 TriContl

.31e

...

13.16 +.34

-4.4

Intel

.84

10

22.03 +.18

+4.8 WalMart

1.46

12

52.75 +.10

-2.2

IBM

3.00

15 181.69 +4.84

+23.8 WashFed

.24

16

13.50 +.56

-20.2

Merck

1.52

12

31.42 -.04

-12.8 WellsFargo

.48

10

25.37 +.87

-18.1

Microsoft

.80f

10

26.34 +.45

-5.6 XcelEngy

1.04

15

24.66 +.52

+4.7

FordM

HOW TO READ THE MARKET IN REVIEW

Here are the 525 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 400 most active on the Nasdaq National Markets and 100 most active on American Stock Exchange. Mutual funds are 450 largest. Stocks in bold changed 5 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letters’ list. AAR .48 12.88 # Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock, based on latest quar- ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 Op .80 7.25 # ACM terly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise footnoted. ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. ACMSp .96 7.50 # Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... mark. Fund Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold. Chg: Daily net change in the NAV.

AAL Mutual: Bond p 9.49 -.01

Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. d – New 52- CaGrp 14.47 -.03 wk low during trading day. g – Dividend in Canadian $. Stock price in U.S.$. n – MuBd 10.43 -.01 New issue in past 52 wks. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. s – Split SmCoSt 9.73 -.05 or stock dividend of 25 pct or more in last 52 wks. Div begins with date of split or stock dividend. u – New 52-wk high during trading day. v – Trading halted on primary market. Unless noted, dividend rates are annual disbursements based on last declaration. pf – Preferred. pp – Holder owes installment(s) of purchase price. rt – Rights. un – Units. wd – When distributed. wi – When issued. wt – Warrants. ww – With warrants. xw – Without warrants. Dividend Footnotes: a – Also extra or extras. b – Annual rate plus stock dividend. c – Liquidating dividend. e – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos. f – Annual rate, increased on last declaration. i – Declared or paid after stock dividend or split. j – Paid this year, dividend omitted, deferred or no action taken at last meeting. k – Declared or paid this year, accumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m – Annual rate, reduced on last declaration. p – Init div, annual rate unknown. r – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos plus stock dividend. t – Paid in stock in last 12 mos, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or distribution date. x – Ex-dividend or ex-rights. y – Ex-dividend and sales in full. z – Sales in full. vj – In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such companies. • Most active stocks above must be worth $1 and gainers/losers $2. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Wednesday’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

MUTUAL FUNDS

Federated Instl: HighYld n 7.39 +.07 GNMA n 11.84 -.03 TotMktInv n33.78 +.65 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 10.86 +.33 IntmTFBd n11.03 -.04 TotRetBd 11.29 -.04 GovtInc 10.83 -.04 Fidelity Spart Adv: StrValDvIS 4.53 +.05 GroCo n 80.49+1.95 500IdxAdv n41.47+.75 Quality 20.45 +.29 ShtDurBd n10.97 -.01 USLCCrPls n18.64 Fidelity Advisor A: GroInc n 16.73 +.32 TotMktAd r n33.79+.66 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 31.14 +.83 +.33 NwInsgh p 18.73 +.32 GrowthCoK80.53 First Eagle: Goldman Sachs Inst: StrInA 12.11 +.04 +1.96 Janus T Shrs: 44.74 +.60 GlblA 6.55 +.06 BalancdT 23.69 +.34 HighInc r n 8.19 +.09 OverseasA21.43 +.28 HiYield Fidelity Advisor I: MidCapV 31.45 +.84 OvrseasT r35.05+1.23 NwInsgtI n 18.94 +.32 Indepn n 20.89 +.66 Forum Funds: PrkMCVal T20.58 +.40 IntBd n 10.80 -.02 AbsStrI r 11.02 -.01 Harbor Funds: Fidelity Freedom: Bond 12.01 -.01 Twenty T 58.32+1.60 FF2010 n 13.03 +.14 IntmMu n 10.26 -.03 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FF2015 n 10.86 +.11 IntlDisc n 27.49 +.70 CalTFA p 6.96 -.03 CapApInst 35.67 +.80 John Hancock Cl 1: FF2015K 12.06 +.13 InvGrBd n 11.82 -.03 FedTFA p 11.96 -.05 IntlInv t 51.22+1.55 LSAggr 10.87 +.23 51.84+1.57 LSBalanc 11.90 +.16 FF2020 n 13.02 +.17 InvGB n 7.64 -.03 FoundAl p 9.44 +.18 Intl r LSGrwth 11.60 +.21 FF2020K 12.31 +.16 LgCapVal 9.94 +.21 GrwthA p 41.76 +.75 Hartford Fds A: FF2025 n 10.68 +.16 LowP r n 33.55 +.65 HYTFA p 10.11 -.04 CpAppA p 28.07 +.69 LSModer 12.01 +.10 Lazard Instl: FF2025K 12.27 +.19 LowPriK r 33.54 +.66 IncomA p 1.96 +.03 Hartford Fds Y: FF2030 n 12.68 +.21 Magelln n 60.41+1.25 NYTFA p 11.66 -.04 CapAppI n 28.13 +.69 EmgMktI 17.54 +.50 Lazard Open: FF2030K 12.36 +.20 MidCap n 25.21 +.61 RisDvA p 32.23 +.37 Hartford HLS IA : FF2035 n 10.37 +.19 MuniInc n 12.79 -.05 StratInc p 9.91 +.06 CapApp 35.67 +.88 EmgMkO p17.89 +.52 FF2040 n 7.23 +.14 NwMkt r n 15.39 +.11 USGovA p 6.88 -.02 Div&Gr 18.12 +.33 Legg Mason A: FF2040K 12.32 +.23 OTC n 53.43+1.19 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: TotRetBd 11.43 -.03 WAMgMu p15.91 -.07 100Index 8.26 +.13 GlbBdAdv n12.68 +.07 Hussman Funds: Longleaf Partners: Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.31 +.22 Puritn n 17.05 +.20 IncmeAd 1.95 +.03 StrGrowth 13.11 -.06 Partners 25.58 +.47 IVA Funds: Loomis Sayles: AMgr50 n 14.65 +.16 PuritanK 17.05 +.20 Frank/Temp Frnk C: AMgr20 r n12.68 +.05 SCmdtyStrt n9.11 +.15 IncomC t 1.98 +.03 Wldwide I r16.09 +.19 LSBondI 13.85 +.07 StrInc C 14.34 +.12 Balanc n 17.55 +.19 SrsIntGrw 9.71 +.25 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: Invesco Funds A: BalancedK17.56 +.20 SrsIntVal 8.07 +.20 SharesA 18.53 +.33 Chart p 15.43 +.27 LSBondR 13.80 +.08 BlueChGr n40.78 +.85 SrInvGrdF 11.82 -.03 Frank/Temp Temp A: CmstkA 14.14 +.27 StrIncA 14.26 +.12 7.84 +.10 Loomis Sayles Inv: Canada n 49.15+1.47 StIntMu n 10.71 -.01 ForgnA p 6.06 +.16 EqIncA CapAp n 23.55 +.50 STBF n 8.48 ... GlBd A p 12.72 +.07 GrIncA p 17.16 +.31 InvGrBdY 12.01 +.01 CpInc r n 8.40 +.08 StratInc n 10.83 +.04 GrwthA p 15.91 +.40 HYMuA 9.28 -.03 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 9.70 +.21 Contra n 63.91+1.11 StrReRt r 9.30 +.07 WorldA p 13.41 +.33 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 21.16 +.72 BdDebA p 7.26 +.06 ContraK 63.94+1.11 TotalBd n 10.96 -.02 Frank/Temp Tmp USBI n 11.75 -.04 B&C: AssetStA p21.89 +.74 ShDurIncA p4.49 ... DisEq n 20.31 +.47 DivIntl n 25.28 +.60 Value n 59.03+1.47 GlBdC p 12.74 +.07 AssetStrI r 22.11 +.75 Lord Abbett C: GE Elfun S&S: JPMorgan A Class: ShDurIncC t4.52 ... DivrsIntK r 25.29 +.60 Fidelity Selects: DivGth n 24.17 +.60 Gold r n 46.35+1.30 S&S PM 36.60 +.83 CoreBd A 11.82 -.02 Lord Abbett F: GMO Trust III: JPMorgan R Cl: ShtDurInco 4.48 ... Eq Inc n 38.31 +.85 Fidelity Spartan: EQII n 15.80 +.36 ExtMkIn n 33.27 +.83 Quality 20.44 +.29 ShtDurBd 10.98 ... MFS Funds A: Fidel n 29.82 +.54 500IdxInv n41.47 +.75 GMO Trust IV: JPMorgan Sel Cls: TotRA 13.41 +.14 FltRateHi r n9.40 +.02 IntlInxInv n30.25 +.80 IntlIntrVl 19.09 +.46 CoreBd n 11.81 -.02 ValueA 20.77 +.39

May 12 97.00 97.60 96.97 97.60 Jun 12 99.20 99.77 99.12 99.70 Jul 12 97.55 98.40 97.55 98.20 Aug 12 95.85 96.50 95.70 96.40 Oct 12 84.10 84.10 83.70 84.00 Dec 12 80.15 80.15 79.80 79.80 Feb 13 80.90 Last spot N/A Est. sales 7778. Wed’s Sales: 45,453 Wed’s open int: 264640, up +4410

Roswell Daily Record

FUTURES

Jul 12 692fl 711 688 689 Sep 12 710fl 722 707ü 707ü Dec 12 738 749fl 730 731 Mar 13 765ø 765ø 747 747 Last spot N/A Est. sales 131298. Wed’s Sales: 66,298 Wed’s open int: 417754, off -2512 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 11 605ø 617 604 605ø Mar 12 619 629ø 617 618ü May 12 625ø 636 623fl 625ø Jul 12 631fl 641 628ø 630 Sep 12 600fl 608ø 598 599ü Dec 12 576ü 582 570fl 575 Mar 13 586 592 584 586ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 453554. Wed’s Sales: 228,776 Wed’s open int: 1201799, off -859 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 11 322 329 322 324ø Mar 12 335 339fl 333 335ø May 12 341 341ø 339 341ø Jul 12 348 348 347ø 347ø Sep 12 354 354 353ø 353ø Dec 12 342 342 342 342 Mar 13 348ø 348ø 348 348 Last spot N/A Est. sales 1241. Wed’s Sales: 984 Wed’s open int: 15763, up +343 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Nov 11 1150 1182fl 1150 1163fl Jan 12 1172 1194fl 1170ø 1175fl Mar 12 1185 1204 1180 1185 May 12 1198ü 1211ø 1188ø 1193fl Jul 12 1206ø 1219ø 1196 1201fl Aug 12 1200 1200 1199ø 1199ø Sep 12 1200 1200 1190 1190 Nov 12 1189fl 1201 1180ø 1182fl Jan 13 1198ü 1204fl 1191ø 1191ø Mar 13 1199ü 1199ü 1197ü 1197ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 344294. Wed’s Sales: 202,863 Wed’s open int: 569968, off -3601

-9fl -9 -6fl -7ü

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

-ø -fl +1fl +1fl

-ø -ø -ø -ø -ø -ø

+ü -ü +ø -ø -ü -2 -2 -2

MFS Funds I: ValueI 20.86 +.40 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.57 +.03 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.18 +.20 MergerFd n 15.65 +.08 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.41 -.01 TotRtBdI 10.40 -.02 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 34.67 +.86 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 25.76 +.49 GlbDiscZ 26.13 +.50 QuestZ 15.93 +.21 SharesZ 18.71 +.33 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 44.43 +.88 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 45.96 +.92 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 6.60 ... Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.13 +.37 Intl I r 16.64 +.47 Oakmark 39.11 +.73 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 6.93 +.05 GlbSMdCap13.33+.29 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 29.37 +.84 GlobA p 53.65+1.55 GblStrIncA 4.03 +.02 IntBdA p 6.33 +.04 MnStFdA 30.01 +.55 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.27 -.01 RoMu A p 15.75 -.08 RcNtMuA 6.81 -.03

low settle

chg.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Nov 11 81.66 82.90 79.08 82.59 +2.91 Dec 11 81.85 83.09 79.24 82.80 +2.97 Jan 12 81.93 83.16 79.36 82.93 +2.97 Feb 12 82.27 83.27 79.55 83.09 +2.98 Mar 12 82.18 83.38 79.75 83.24 +2.97 Apr 12 83.33 83.39 79.96 83.39 +2.96 May 12 83.50 83.60 80.09 83.56 +2.94 Jun 12 83.18 83.89 80.26 83.75 +2.91 Jul 12 83.92 84.01 80.59 83.95 +2.89 Aug 12 82.33 84.13 81.29 84.13 +2.85 Sep 12 82.93 84.34 80.90 84.34 +2.82 Oct 12 84.65 84.65 81.69 84.59 +2.79 Nov 12 82.01 84.88 81.80 84.88 +2.76 Dec 12 84.41 85.33 81.79 85.19 +2.72 Jan 13 85.32 +2.68 Feb 13 85.43 +2.63 Mar 13 85.55 +2.58 Apr 13 85.66 +2.52 May 13 85.74 +2.44 Jun 13 85.80 85.85 85.80 85.85 +2.41 Jul 13 85.96 +2.37 Aug 13 86.08 +2.34 Sep 13 86.20 +2.30 Oct 13 86.38 +2.27 Last spot N/A Est. sales 805072. Wed’s Sales: 648,839 Wed’s open int: 1429545, off -2238 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Nov 11 2.6527 2.6917 2.4900 2.6860 +.1168 Dec 11 2.5742 2.6129 2.4958 2.6085 +.1011 Jan 12 2.5345 2.5677 2.4587 2.5630 +.0867 Feb 12 2.5253 2.5484 2.4476 2.5443 +.0787 Mar 12 2.5343 2.5443 2.4504 2.5422 +.0748 Apr 12 2.6300 2.6452 2.5817 2.6447 +.0727 May 12 2.6216 2.6419 2.5666 2.6393 +.0705 Jun 12 2.6100 2.6298 2.5341 2.6276 +.0678 Jul 12 2.5818 2.6093 2.5818 2.6093 +.0660 Aug 12 2.5896 +.0639

Div Last Chg Comc spcl .45 21.93 +.49 Compuwre ... 7.87 +.19 A-B-C Comtech 1.10f 30.90 +2.70 ... 40.94 +.64 ACMoore lf ... 1.50 +.01 Copart ... 1.67 +.03 ASML Hld .58e 35.58 +.65 CorinthC .96 79.20 -1.05 ATP O&G ... 8.00 +.51 Costco ... 26.36 +.74 AVI Bio ... 1.04 ... Cree Inc ... 25.84 +1.52 AcadiaPh ... 1.02 -.01 Crocs AcmePkt ... 40.42 -.04 Ctrip.com ... 35.25 +1.82 CubistPh ... 36.84 +.78 AcordaTh ... 21.91 +1.57 ... 2.80 +.03 ActivsBliz .17f 12.57 +.42 CumMed Cyclacel h ... .45 +.01 AdobeSy ... 25.33 +.66 AdolorCp ... 1.53 -.02 CypSemi .36 15.08 ... Adtran .36 29.07 +.96 D-E-F AEterna g ... 1.55 +.02 ... 15.55 +.17 Affymetrix ... 5.69 +.21 Dell Inc ... 9.27 +.27 AgFeed ... .61 +.19 Dndreon AkamaiT ... 22.88 +.53 Dentsply .20 31.75 +1.06 Akorn ... 7.77 +.19 DirecTV A ... 42.89 +1.01 Alkermes ... 14.91 +.31 DiscCm A ... 38.60 +.65 AllosThera ... 1.76 +.06 DishNetwk ... 25.06 +.14 AllscriptH ... 17.62 +.01 DonlleyRR 1.04 14.35 +.56 AlteraCp lf .32f 32.95 +.27 DrmWksA ... 18.33 +.16 Amarin ... 9.20 +.83 DryShips .12t 2.39 +.30 ... 8.86 +.38 Amazon ... 221.51 +2.01 E-Trade ... 31.44 +.91 Amedisys ... 12.65 +.44 eBay EagleBulk ... 1.41 +.09 ACapAgy 5.60e 27.04 +.73 AmCapLtd ... 6.83 +.33 ErthLink .20 6.39 +.14 AmSupr ... 4.13 +.25 EstWstBcp .20 15.86 +.84 Amgen 1.12 56.83 +.90 ElectArts ... 22.56 +1.60 AmkorT lf ... 4.77 +.20 Emcore lf ... 1.05 +.04 Amylin ... 9.65 +.52 EndoPhrm ... 28.69 +1.14 AnadysP h ... 1.00 +.06 Ener1 hlf ... .39 +.02 Ancestry ... 24.89 +.74 EngyCnv h ... .50 +.02 ... 23.46 +.97 Ansys ... 48.63 -.02 EngyXXI ... 7.20 +.21 A123 Sys ... 3.43 -.10 Entegris EntropCom ... 4.44 +.18 ApolloGrp ... 43.06 +.84 ... 91.53 +.05 ApolloInv 1.12 7.65 +.20 Equinix Apple Inc ... 377.37 -.88 EricsnTel .37e 10.31 +.75 ... 5.96 +.30 ApldMatl .32 10.75 +.17 Exelixis ArenaPhm ... 1.36 ... Expedia .28 27.15 +1.22 ExpdIntl .50f 42.74 +1.34 AresCap 1.40 13.94 +.28 AriadP ... 9.35 +.08 F5 Netwks ... 85.75 +3.18 FLIR Sys .24 26.49 +.44 Ariba Inc ... 29.85 +.49 ArmHld .15e 26.06 +.34 FifthThird .32f 11.11 +.49 Arris ... 11.26 +.33 FinclEngin ... 18.20 -.12 ... 20.46 +.98 ArubaNet ... 23.51 +.68 Finisar .20 20.84 +.68 AsiaInfoL ... 8.76 +.73 FinLine FstNiagara .64 9.41 +.42 AspenTech ... 15.82 +.07 ... 64.73 +3.86 AsscdBanc .04 10.25 +.37 FstSolar Atmel ... 8.55 +.26 FstMerit .64 12.67 +.31 ... 53.56 +.65 Autodesk ... 27.99 +.78 Fiserv ... 6.04 +.09 AutoData 1.44 48.79 +.64 Flextrn FocusMda ... 22.81 +1.52 Auxilium ... 14.33 -.04 AvagoTch .44f 32.95 +.34 Fossil Inc ... 85.35 +2.16 AvanirPhm ... 2.92 +.04 FosterWhl ... 20.10 +.93 ... .97 +.07 AvisBudg ... 10.27 +.49 FuelCell BE Aero ... 32.33 +1.16 FultonFncl .20 8.23 +.23 BGC Ptrs .68 6.55 +.30 G-H-I BMC Sft ... 40.84 +.83 BeacnRfg ... 16.79 +.39 GT AdvTc ... 8.64 +.68 BebeStrs .10 6.71 -.28 Garmin 2.00e 32.46 -.19 BedBath ... 57.49 +1.80 Gentiva h ... 3.72 +.59 BiogenIdc ... 99.41 +.70 GeronCp ... 2.15 +.11 BioMarin ... u33.47 +.90 GileadSci ... 39.65 +.50 BioSante ... 2.38 +.09 GlacierBc .52 10.52 +.47 ... 7.92 ... BonTon .20 4.70 -.25 GloblInd BrigExp ... 26.25 +.25 GlbSpcMet .20f 15.38 +.07 GluMobile ... 2.34 -.04 Brightpnt ... 9.86 ... Broadcom .36 35.35 +.53 GolarLNG 1.10f 31.70 +1.47 ... 514.71 Broadwd h ... .38 +.05 Google BrcdeCm ... 4.67 +.19 +10.01 BrukerCp ... 13.69 +.26 GulfportE ... 23.43 +.34 CA Inc .20 20.72 +.43 HSN Inc .50 32.59 +.25 CH Robins 1.16 71.53 +.94 HanmiFncl ... .93 +.06 CVB Fncl .34 8.39 +.20 HansenNat ... 84.30 +1.01 Cadence ... 9.52 +.18 HanwhaSol ... 2.32 +.14 CaliperLSc ... 10.47 +.03 HarbinElec ... 21.76 +.09 CdnSolar ... 3.83 +.18 Hasbro 1.20 33.51 -.04 CapFdF rs .30a 10.75 +.08 HrtlndEx .08 14.29 +.14 CpstnTrb h ... 1.06 +.05 HelenTroy ... 26.51 -1.66 CareerEd ... 15.07 +.94 HercOffsh ... 2.88 +.07 ... 15.21 +.16 Carrizo ... 21.44 +.99 Hologic Cavium ... 31.01 +1.84 Home Inns ... 28.41 +2.37 Celgene ... 63.35 -.73 HudsCity .32 5.85 +.24 ... 12.76 +.33 CentEuro ... 6.88 +.40 HumGen .52 38.35 +.90 CEurMed ... 8.49 +.71 HuntJB CentAl ... 9.28 +.30 HuntBnk .16f 5.26 +.29 ... 38.27 +.59 Cephln ... u81.16 +.16 IAC Inter Cepheid ... 40.81 +.15 iSh ACWI 1.02e 40.44 +.92 IconixBr ... 16.20 +.64 ChrmSh ... 2.75 -.09 ... 39.93 -.08 ChartInds ... 46.07 +3.49 Illumina ChkPoint ... 56.45 +2.39 ImpaxLabs ... 19.65 +.86 ... 16.00 +.83 ChildPlace ... 48.71 +.24 Incyte ... 8.10 +.31 CienaCorp ... 11.95 +.58 Infinera ... 43.24 +1.22 Informat CinnFin 1.61f 27.01 +.23 Cintas .49f 28.50 +.39 Infosys 1.35e 52.65 +1.23 ... 5.46 +.18 Cirrus ... 16.07 +.66 IntgDv .84 22.03 +.18 Cisco .24 16.75 +.59 Intel .40 48.65 -1.11 CitrixSys ... 55.64 -.32 InterDig .08 12.48 +.24 CleanEngy ... 10.42 +.12 Intrface Clearwire ... 2.05 -.05 InterMune ... 22.69 +1.34 Intersil .48 11.07 +.13 CognizTech ... 65.96 +2.19 .60 48.77 +1.53 Coinstar ... 47.46 +1.71 Intuit Comcast .45 22.09 +.46 IridiumCm ... 5.96 +.02

... 7.17 +.31 Qualcom .86 50.87 +.10 Questcor ... 31.27 +1.94 RF MicD ... 6.64 +.14 ... 15.61 +.12 JA Solar ... 2.08 +.19 Rambus JDS Uniph ... 10.15 +.28 Randgold .20 98.95 +1.85 ... 64.73 +5.55 JamesRiv ... 7.77 +.26 Regenrn JetBlue ... 3.86 +.07 RentACt .64 28.83 +.61 JoyGlbl .70 69.32 +2.97 RschMotn ... 24.42 +.83 KLA Tnc 1.40f 40.08 -.07 RetOpp wt ... .62 -.03 Kulicke ... 8.32 +.39 RexEnergy ... 11.79 -.19 LKQ Corp ... 27.01 +1.03 RosettaR ... 36.89 +.28 LamResrch ... 40.75 +.78 RossStrs .88 80.76 +2.52 LamarAdv ... 18.77 +.95 Rovi Corp ... 44.80 +1.39 .44 64.46 +.48 Lattice ... 5.50 +.02 RoyGld LeapWirlss ... 6.30 +.05 S-T-U Level3 ... 1.61 +.09 LexiPhrm ... 1.04 +.07 S1 Corp ... 9.40 +.03 LibGlobA ... 35.97 +2.54 SBA Com ... 35.20 +.71 LibtyIntA ... 15.20 +.50 SEI Inv .24f 15.13 +.18 LifeTech ... 39.38 +.40 STEC ... 10.49 +.25 LifePtH ... 35.64 +1.41 SVB FnGp ... 40.41 +1.96 LimelghtN ... 2.52 +.15 SalixPhm ... 31.40 +1.39 LinearTch .96 29.38 +.13 SanDisk ... 43.65 +.86 LinnEngy 2.76f 35.29 +.86 SangBio ... 3.24 -.21 Logitech ... 8.56 +.26 Sanmina ... 7.64 +.23 Sapient .35e 10.18 +.28 M-N-0 SavientPh ... 3.94 +.08 MIPS Tech ... 5.28 +.11 SciGames ... 7.40 +.22 MAKO Srg ... 37.09 +2.16 SeagateT .72 10.72 +.56 MarinaBio ... .15 +.01 SeattGen ... u21.41 +.66 MarvellT ... 15.43 +.43 SelCmfrt ... 14.83 +.88 Mattel .92 26.59 +.25 Sequenom ... 5.50 +.36 MaximIntg .88f 23.77 +.22 SvcSourc n ... 13.35 +.45 MediCo ... 17.55 +.24 ShandaGm ... 4.10 -.04 MelcoCrwn ... 9.56 +1.21 Shutterfly ... 42.84 +2.91 ... 2.97 -.04 MentorGr ... 9.90 +.35 SifyTech ... 6.17 +.10 MergeHlth ... 6.11 +.11 SilicnImg Microchp 1.39f 33.29 +.63 Slcnware .28e 4.86 -.06 ... 18.84 +.57 Micromet ... 4.89 +.02 SilvStd g ... 78.78 +2.21 MicronT ... 4.96 +.01 Sina ... 1.51 +.05 Microsoft .80f 26.34 +.45 SiriusXM Molex .80 21.43 +.69 SkywksSol ... 19.33 -.01 Momenta ... 12.47 +.35 SodaStrm n ... 35.78 +2.95 Motricity ... 1.53 -.02 Sohu.cm ... 56.08 +3.38 ... 2.21 +.02 Move Inc ... 1.48 +.01 Sonus Mylan ... 17.54 +.70 Spreadtrm .20 19.05 -.02 .40 14.32 +.48 NETgear ... 28.54 +.83 Staples NII Hldg ... 26.19 -.02 StarScient ... 2.70 +.13 NPS Phm ... 7.16 +.27 Starbucks .52 38.50 +.45 NXP Semi ... 15.53 +.59 StlDynam .40 10.95 +.13 NasdOMX ... 24.44 +.57 SunHlth n ... 2.53 +.23 NatPenn .12f 7.60 +.14 SunPowerA ... 8.43 +.65 NektarTh ... 4.79 +.17 SusqBnc .08 5.95 +.28 NetLogicM ... 48.15 -.12 Symantec ... 17.12 +.55 NetApp ... 37.34 +1.11 Synaptics ... 26.37 +.74 Netease ... 41.30 +2.70 Synopsys ... 25.30 +.72 Netflix ... 123.24 +3.48 TD Ameritr .20 15.47 +.40 ... 1.56 +.04 NewsCpA .19f 15.97 -.01 THQ NewsCpB .19f 16.02 +.02 TakeTwo ... 14.09 +.87 ... 6.61 +.16 NorTrst 1.12 36.71 +.34 Tekelec .08 4.22 +.04 NwstBcsh .44 12.33 +.26 Tellabs ... .49 +.02 Novlus ... 29.05 +.48 Tengion NuVasive ... 17.32 +.26 TeslaMot ... 26.96 +1.59 NuanceCm ... 21.90 +1.78 TevaPhrm .87e 37.58 +.37 Nvidia ... 13.89 +.53 TexRdhse .32 12.96 -.26 ... 24.16 +.40 NxStageMd ... 21.19 +.44 TibcoSft ... 9.66 +.24 OReillyAu ... 67.57 +.66 TiVo Inc ... 5.76 +.19 Oclaro ... 3.61 -.03 TriQuint OmniVisn ... 16.32 -.73 UTStarcm ... .96 +.03 OnSmcnd ... 7.28 +.06 UltaSalon ... 66.61 -.07 OnyxPh ... 34.12 +1.14 Umpqua .28f 9.76 +.37 OpenTable ... 49.13 +2.93 UtdTherap ... 37.95 +.10 ... 46.73 +1.38 Opnext ... 1.19 +.03 UnivDisp OptimerPh ... 14.43 +.82 UrbanOut ... 24.06 +.57 Oracle .24 30.07 +.56

PDL Bio .60 5.63 ... PF Chng .96e 27.42 -.18 PMC Sra ... 6.44 +.06 PSS Wrld ... 20.17 +.19 Paccar .72f 36.52 +.92 PaetecHld ... 5.37 +.23 PanASlv .10 27.55 +.98 ParamTch ... 16.51 +.54 Patterson .48 28.74 +.41 PattUTI .20 17.06 -.42 Paychex 1.24 26.77 +.53 PeopUtdF .63 11.88 +.32 PerfectWld ... 12.43 +.68 .50 9.55 +.31 PetMed PetsMart .56 41.38 +.17 PharmPdt .60 32.26 +.36 Popular ... 1.48 +.05 Power-One ... 5.05 +.44 PwShs QQQ.41e 54.43 +.90 Powrwav ... 1.55 +.04 PriceTR 1.24 50.40 +1.36 priceline ... 469.56 +23.89 PrUPShQQQ ... 23.66 -1.26 ProspctCap1.22f 8.71 +.26 QIAGEN ... 13.40 +.29 QlikTech ... 22.41 -.78 Qlogic ... 13.48 +.50

VCA Ant ... 15.82 +.43 VarianSemi ... 61.40 +.55 VeecoInst ... 26.76 -.21 VBradley n ... 37.07 +2.40 Verisign 5.75e 29.81 +.24 VertxPh ... 44.63 -.49 VirgnMda h .16 24.55 +.82 ViroPhrm ... 19.15 +.47 VistaPrt ... 27.90 +1.57 Vivus ... 8.32 +.13 Vodafone 1.45e 26.57 +.25 WarnerCh ... 15.23 +1.32 WashFed .24 13.50 +.56 WebMD ... 29.93 +2.89 WstptInn g ... 28.25 +1.47 WetSeal ... 4.05 -.58 WholeFd .40 67.34 +2.12 Windstrm 1.00 11.33 +.09 Winn-Dixie ... 6.04 +.31 2.00 132.58 Wynn +12.64 Xilinx .76 28.69 +.41 YRC rsh ... .06 +.02 Yahoo ... 15.65 -.27 Yandex n ... 20.18 +.33 Zagg ... 12.19 +1.20 ZionBcp .04 15.88 +1.09 Zix Corp ... 2.81 +.12 Zumiez ... 21.06 +2.27

Name

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Name

Isis

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V-W-X-Y-Z

P-Q-R

AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg ClaudeR g ... ClghGlbOp 1.08 6.58 +.09 CrSuiHiY .32 .91 +.07 DejourE g ... 7.03 +.57 DenisnM g ... 37.29 +.74 EV LtdDur 1.25 .84 +.09 EnovaSys ... 2.22 -.06 EntreeGold ... 3.35 +.37 ExeterR gs ... 5.39 +.19 ExtorreG g ... 3.01 +.21 FrkStPrp .76 2.88 +.10 GabGldNR 1.68 3.98 +.21 GascoEngy ... 42.74 +.67 Gastar grs ... 20.84 +.77 GenMoly ... 9.78 -.11 Geokinetics ... 1.17 +.02 GoldResrc .60 87.59 +1.52 GoldenMin ... .72 +.02 GoldStr g ... d.12 ... GranTrra g ... .13 -.01 GrtBasG g ... .30 +.01 GtPanSilv g ... 21.38 +.60 Hemisphrx ... 4.64 +.15 ImpOil gs .44 2.04 +.07 InovioPhm ... 1.45 +.22 IntTower g ...

AbdAsPac .42 Adventrx ... AlexcoR g ... AlldNevG ... AmApparel ... AntaresP ... Augusta g ... Aurizon g ... AvalRare n ... Ballanty ... Banro g ... BarcUBS36 ... BarcGSOil ... BlkMunvst .71 Brigus grs ... BritATob 3.86e CAMAC En ... CanoPet ... CardiumTh ... CelSci ... CFCda g .01 CheniereEn ... ChinNEPet ... ChinaShen ...

Oppenheimer Y: CapApp 19.24 ... Russell Funds S: DevMktY 29.12 +.84 EmMktB 12.26 ... StratBd 10.88 -.02 IntlBdY 6.33 +.04 EmMktS n 27.69 +.96 Schwab Funds: PIMCO Admin PIMS: EqInc 20.97 ... 1000Inv r 34.71 +.66 TotRtAd 10.72 -.02 EqIndex n 31.40 +.57 S&P Sel 18.42 +.33 PIMCO Instl PIMS: Growth n 29.99 +.65 Scout Funds: 27.37 +.73 AlAsetAut r10.12 +.10 HlthSci n 31.29 +.75 Intl AllAsset 11.53 +.10 HiYield 6.04 ... Selected Funds: ComodRR 7.52 +.12 IntlBond 9.97 ... AmShD 36.44 +.70 10.94 +.04 Intl G&I 11.52 +.34 Sequoia n 132.19+1.74 DivInc EmgMkCur10.10 +.08 IntlStk n 12.12 +.40 TCW Funds: EmMkBd 10.85 +.07 MidCap n 54.10+1.18 TotRetBdI 9.85 -.02 FltInc r 8.07 +.07 MCapVal n21.22 +.41 Templeton Instit: HiYld 8.50 +.08 N Asia n 16.25 +.43 ForEqS 17.11 +.46 InvGrCp 10.36 -.02 New Era n 41.92+1.21 Third Avenue Fds: LowDu 10.26 ... N Horiz n 32.71 +.85 ValueInst 39.61+1.19 RealRet 12.77 -.08 N Inc 9.64 ... Thornburg Fds: RealRtnI 12.03 -.03 OverS SF r n7.31 +.21 IntValA p 23.25 +.65 ShortT 9.75 ... R2010 14.53 ... IncBuildC p17.36 +.25 TotRt 10.72 -.02 IntValue I 23.76 +.66 TR II 10.40 -.03 R2015 11.10 ... Tweedy Browne: R2020 15.14 ... TRIII 9.43 -.01 R2025 10.96 ... GblValue 21.71 +.49 PIMCO Funds A: USAA Group: LwDurA 10.26 ... R2030 15.56 ... Inco 12.98 -.02 RealRtA p 12.03 -.03 R2035 10.92 ... TxEIt 13.04 -.04 TotRtA 10.72 -.02 R2040 15.51 ... VALIC : ShtBd 4.81 ... PIMCO Funds C: StkIdx 23.28 +.42 TotRtC t 10.72 -.02 SmCpStk n31.02 +.82 Vanguard Admiral: SmCapVal n32.35+.65 PIMCO Funds D: BalAdml n 20.70 +.21 TRtn p 10.72 -.02 SpecGr 15.67 ... CAITAdm n11.09 -.04 SpecIn 11.91 ... CpOpAdl n68.29+1.57 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.72 -.02 Value n 21.04 +.46 EMAdmr r n30.91 +.88 Principal Inv: Parnassus Funds: Energy n 107.33+2.46 EqtyInco n 24.81 +.38 LT2020In 10.92 +.18 ExtdAdm n36.48 +.91 Putnam Funds A: Perm Port Funds: 500Adml n107.36 Permannt 46.39 +.47 GrInA p 11.75 +.26 +1.94 Royce Funds: Pioneer Funds A: GNMA Ad n11.12 -.03 PionFdA p 36.15 +.72 LwPrSkSv r15.24 +.38 GrwAdm n 29.80 +.59 PennMuI r 10.33 +.22 HlthCr n 53.68 +.52 Price Funds: Balance 17.99 ... PremierI r 18.88 +.41 HiYldCp n 5.38 +.04 BlChip n 36.39 +.77 TotRetI r 11.82 +.20 InfProAd n 27.62 -.06

Sep 12 2.5679 Oct 12 2.4483 Nov 12 2.4280 Dec 12 2.4147 2.4220 2.3695 2.4220 Jan 13 2.4230 Feb 13 2.4320 Mar 13 2.4415 Apr 13 2.5485 May 13 2.5550 Jun 13 2.5430 Jul 13 2.5240 Aug 13 2.5050 Sep 13 2.4839 Oct 13 2.3719 Last spot N/A Est. sales 166718. Wed’s Sales: 125,724 Wed’s open int: 270724, off -623 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Nov 11 3.561 3.640 3.512 3.598 Dec 11 3.883 3.945 3.841 3.916 Jan 12 4.056 4.106 4.009 4.091 Feb 12 4.079 4.120 4.037 4.113 Mar 12 4.045 4.084 4.000 4.080 Apr 12 4.030 4.075 3.990 4.067 May 12 4.064 4.106 4.028 4.099 Jun 12 4.099 4.140 4.065 4.138 Jul 12 4.165 4.181 4.112 4.181 Aug 12 4.179 4.204 4.140 4.204 Sep 12 4.179 4.204 4.137 4.204 Oct 12 4.208 4.245 4.175 4.238 Nov 12 4.354 4.392 4.329 4.386 Dec 12 4.646 4.680 4.625 4.674 Jan 13 4.792 4.824 4.775 4.818 Feb 13 4.782 4.794 4.750 4.794 Mar 13 4.734 4.734 4.685 4.730 Apr 13 4.610 4.611 4.575 4.611 May 13 4.610 4.629 4.588 4.629 Jun 13 4.638 4.660 4.619 4.658 Jul 13 4.661 4.700 4.661 4.700 Aug 13 4.683 4.717 4.683 4.717 Sep 13 4.686 4.723 4.686 4.723 Oct 13 4.715 4.750 4.715 4.750 Nov 13 4.840 4.874 4.840 4.874 Last spot N/A Est. sales 371870. Wed’s Sales: 289,100 Wed’s open int: 951554, up +12844

+.0617 +.0603 +.0590 +.0575 +.0575 +.0575 +.0575 +.0575 +.0575 +.0575 +.0575 +.0575 +.0575 +.0575

+.028 +.032 +.033 +.034 +.031 +.031 +.031 +.031 +.030 +.030 +.029 +.026 +.016 +.011 +.010 +.010 +.010 +.011 +.011 +.011 +.011 +.011 +.011 +.011 +.005

1.72 +.02 10.54 +.15 2.76 +.05 .29 +.02 1.12 +.06 14.41 +.24 d.27 -.12 1.59 +.22 3.80 +.08 7.34 +1.34 11.65 +.22 14.55 +.49 .20 +.02 3.10 +.17 2.77 +.03 2.26 +.28 19.25 +.62 7.65 +.38 1.93 +.04 4.92 +.15 1.57 +.03 2.49 +.19 .29 ... 37.46 +1.67 .62 +.07 4.94 +.24

ITBdAdml n11.73 -.06 ITsryAdml n12.07 -.06 IntGrAdm n51.78+1.72 ITAdml n 13.69 -.05 ITGrAdm n 9.95 -.03 LtdTrAd n 11.07 -.02 LTGrAdml n10.09 -.13 LT Adml n 11.10 -.05 MCpAdml n83.48 +1.97 MuHYAdm n10.50-.04 PrmCap r n63.20+1.22 ReitAdm r n72.84 +1.97 STsyAdml n10.82 -.01 STBdAdml n10.64 ... ShtTrAd n 15.91 ... STFdAd n 10.91 -.01 STIGrAd n 10.62 -.01 SmCAdm n30.74 +.77 TxMCap r n58.41 +1.12 TtlBAdml n10.96 -.05 TStkAdm n28.98 +.56 WellslAdm n52.94+.14 WelltnAdm n51.29+.54 Windsor n 40.13 +.86 WdsrIIAd n42.30 +.91 Vanguard Fds: AssetA n 22.91 +.24 DivdGro n 14.20 +.19 Energy n 57.14+1.31 Explr n 65.78+1.66 GNMA n 11.12 -.03 GlobEq n 15.60 +.37 HYCorp n 5.38 +.04 HlthCre n 127.18+1.23 InflaPro n 14.06 -.04 IntlGr n 16.26 +.54 IntlVal n 26.76 +.76 ITIGrade n 9.95 -.03

5.36 1.45 1.53 .90 1.49 .04 .67 4.15 5.06 2.02 14.64 .73 3.06 3.47 5.40 11.38 2.57 6.84 19.16 3.58 7.02 .21 2.49 1.86 7.90 1.23

+.51 +.18 +.04 -.01 +.31 -.00 +.02 +.10 +.28 +.08 +.57 +.01 +.05 +.12 +.23 +.54 +.43 +.39 -.55 +.13 +.18 +.00 +.13 ... +.33 ...

LifeCon n 15.82 +.12 LifeGro n 20.29 +.34 LifeMod n 18.60 +.22 LTIGrade n10.09 -.13 Morg n 16.69 +.37 MuInt n 13.69 -.05 MuLtd n 11.07 -.02 PrecMtls r n22.14 +1.06 PrmcpCor n12.86 +.26 Prmcp r n 60.88+1.19 SelValu r n17.14 +.43 STAR n 18.19 +.24 STIGrade n10.62 -.01 TgtRetInc n11.31 +.06 TgRe2010 n22.17+.19 TgtRe2015 n12.08 +.14 TgRe2020 n21.18+.28 TgtRe2025 n11.93 +.18 TgRe2030 n20.25+.34 TgtRe2035 n12.06 +.22 TgtRe2040 n19.74 +.38 TgtRe2045 n12.40 +.24 Wellsly n 21.85 +.05 Welltn n 29.70 +.32 Wndsr n 11.89 +.25 WndsII n 23.83 +.51 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r n22.06 +.60 TotIntlInst r n88.25 +2.37 TotIntlIP r n88.27+2.37 500 n 107.35+1.94 Growth n 29.80 +.58 MidCap n 18.37 +.43

3.57 +.41 2.53 +.36 5.19 +.55 .92 +.04 1.00 +.02 9.58 +.15 3.47 +.18 2.23 +.12 3.65 +.09 2.95 +.22 .68 +.08 .81 -.01 3.52 +.25 .17 +.02 3.75 +.01 .90 +.05 1.46 +.06 2.74 +.10 1.22 +.02 15.80 +.02 3.52 +.12 23.95 +1.53 9.04 -.09 1.74 +.12

SmCap n 30.68 +.77 SmlCpGth n19.70 +.50 SmlCpVl n 13.87 +.35 STBnd n 10.64 ... TotBnd n 10.96 -.05 TotlIntl n 13.18 +.35 TotStk n 28.98 +.57 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n 20.70 +.21 DevMkInst n8.62 +.23 ExtIn n 36.48 +.91 FTAllWldI r n78.75 +2.15 GrwthIst n 29.80 +.59 InfProInst n11.25 -.03 InstIdx n 106.64+1.93 InsPl n 106.64+1.92 InsTStPlus n26.22+.51 MidCpIst n 18.44 +.43 SCInst n 30.74 +.77 TBIst n 10.96 -.05 TSInst n 28.98 +.56 ValueIst n 18.80 +.33 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl n 88.68+1.60 MidCpIdx n26.34 +.62 STBdIdx n 10.64 ... TotBdSgl n10.96 -.05 TotStkSgl n27.97 +.54 Western Asset: CorePlus I 10.97 -.01 Yacktman Funds: Fund p n 16.60 +.19 Focused n 17.81 +.19

METALS NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Thu. Aluminum -$0.9667 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.1115 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $3.2390 N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Lead - $1945.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8302 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1635.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1651.90 troy oz., NY Merc spot Thu. Silver - $31.680 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $31.970 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Platinum -$1495.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1503.80 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised


CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record

Legals

---------------------------------Publish Oct. 7, 14, 2011

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF IRIS MOORE FOR ANN CHANGE OF NAME CV-2011-739

NOTICE OF PETITION TO CHANGE NAME

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that IRIS ANN MOORE, a resident of the City of Roswell, County of Chaves, State of New Mexico, and over the age of fourteen years, has filed a Petition to Change Name in the Fifth Judicial District Court of Chaves County, and that this Petition will be heard before the Honorable Steven L. Bell, District Judge, on the 21st day of November, 2011, at the hour of 9 a.m., at the Chaves County Court House, Roswell, New Mexico.

Respectfully Submitted, s/IRIS ANN MOORE Petitioner, pro se 1502 South Pennsylvania Roswell, New Mexico 88203 (575) 637-0024

WITNESS my hand and seal. District Court Clerk By: s/Maureen J. Nelson Deputy

Legals

---------------------------------Publish Sept. 23, 30, Oct. 7, 2011

STATE OF NEW MEXCOUNTY OF ICO CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT No. DM-2010-274

IN THE MATTER OF THE KINSHIP GUARDIANSHIP OF ACADIA WAGNER, born 10/3/2004; JAXON WARFORD, born 10/10/2008. NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

TO: Deland Potts Mary McPherson has filed suit against you for kinship guardianship of your child, Acadia Wagner, born: 10/3/2004. You are required to file a written answer to the for Kinship Petition Guardianship within thirty days of the date of the last publication in this newspaper and serve a copy on Ms. McPherson’s attorney. If you do not file a written answer within thirty (30) days, a default judgment may be rendered against you. The attorney for Mary McPherson is:

Brett A. Schneider 215 W. Third Street, Suite A Roswell, NM 88201 (575) 624-000- phone (575) 623-8179- fax

GARAGE SALES 001. North

601 MIMOSA Dr. Sat. & Sun. 8am-? Clothes, furniture, toys & more. 607 N. Ohio Sat. 7am-? Lots of misc. furniture, clothes.

002. Northeast

613 TWIN Diamond Rd. Sat. 6:30-1pm Futon, coffee lend tables, appliances, men L-XL clothing, ladies M-L clothing, decor, dishes. ENMMC SENIOR Circle garage sale Saturday, October 8, from 8 a.m. to noon at its facility in the Wilshire Center, 2801 N. Main St., next door to Family Dollar. More than 30 participants and everything from books to puzzles to clothes to collectibles including Delft, furniture. Senior Circle office closed Friday afternoon to prepare for sale. For information, call 623-2311. 5601 OCOTILLO Ave. Sat. 7a-1p Misc. items, just past truck stop, right on Tamarack, left on Ocotillo.

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 6, 7, 9, 2011 SOUTHEAST NM COMMUNITY ACTION CORPORATION HEAD START PROGRAM Mental Health Consultant

Southeast NM Community Action Corporation Head Start Program is soliciting sealed proposals for a Mental Health Consultant for the 2011/2012 school year.

Specifics and service description for proposal can be acquired by calling Mary A. Perry or Alicia Flores at Artesia Head Start (575) 748-1141. Proposals must be all inclusive of the specifics and service description.

Sealed proposals must be received by October 20, 2011 by 10:00 a.m. Mail proposals to SNMCAC Head Start Program, Attention: Mary A. Perry, Head Start Director, PO Box 37, Artesia, NM 88211-0037, or 504 W. Gage Street, Artesia, NM 88210. Proposals submitted after the due date/time will not be accepted.

The SNMCAC Head Start Program reserves the right to reject any or all proposals or to waive any technicality. -----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 7, 2011 NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that a regular meeting of the Board of Education of the Roswell Independent School District, Roswell, New Mexico will be held at the Administrative and Educational Services Complex, Board Room, on the 11th day of October, 2011 at the hour of 6:00 p.m. for the purpose of discussing and taking action upon items on the agenda for such meeting. Copies of the agenda will be available to the public at the office of the Superintendent, 300 North Kentucky, Roswell, New Mexico at least twenty-four (4) hours prior to the meeting. Individuals with disabilities who need any form of auxiliary aid to attend or participate in this meeting, please contact the Superintendent of Schools at 627-2511 at least three working days prior to the meeting. Upon request, public documents will be provided in the accessible form necessary to the individual requesting the particular auxiliary aid. Board members may meet in executive session to discuss negotiations and limited personnel matters prior to and/or after the meeting.

/s/ Mackenzie Hunt Mackenzie Hunt President Board of Education

002. Northeast

GARAGE SALE: Sat. Oct 8 (7a-3p) 4 Garden Place (across from Del Norte Elem). Dining Table, 2 Roll Away Beds, Day Bed/Trundle, Chase Lounge, Dressers, washer/dryer. 4 Large Propane Heaters, TV's, video games, Lots of household appliances, kids clothes, dishes, toys, bike and LOTS OF GREAT STUFF IN GOOD CONDITION. 575-208-8787 1404 W 7th Sat. 8-11:30 Piano, china hutch, washers, dryers, antiques, collectibles, china sets, deer & antelope mounts clothing shoes, books, ceramics, greenware, paints & much more. 3113 MESA Verde Sat. 7-2 Marble pub table w/4 chairs matching bar w/2 stools, dorm fridge, Bose surround power washer, lots of misc. 3204 W 8th Sat. 6am Clothes, shoes, house decor, patio table & furniture 903 N Atkinson Fri. & Sat. 8a-? Giant patio sale, furniture, ladies clothes, books, loads of misc.

003. East

302 E. Bland Fri. & Sat. Bedspreads, clothes, shoes, & lots of nick nacks 1402 Skidmore Rd Sat. 9-? 3 family huge yard sale clothes, tools lots of misc.

004. Southeast

319 E. Poe St. Sat. 8am-? Three family yard sale. Something for everyone. 1401 E Hoagland Fri. & Sat. 8-6 Instruments music accordion, heaters lots of everything. 207 E. McCune Sat. & Sun. 7-5 Big screen TV, furn. car, computers, lots of stuff

005. South

2300 S. Washington Sat. 8am Numerous new items. Too many to list.

006. Southwest 708 W Hendricks Fri. & Sat. 8-1 electric dryer, picnic table, jeans & misc.

006. Southwest

111 1/2 S. Missouri in alley Sat. 8-2 Tools, furniture, kitchen items, seasonal decor, something for every1 1204 W Hobbs Fri. & Sat. 9-5 Metates, pet wood, furniture, kitchenware dryer, dishwashers items too numerous to name 914-1855 1505 Madison Sat. 7am Name brand clothing, crib, high chair, stroller, carseat, total gym, dvd’s Ab circle, toys; Dora playhouse Xbox 360 games etc. No checks 411 S. Fir Sat. no sales before 8am. Yard sale. Misc. items, good condition. 1413 S. Union Trinity UMC Day School is liquidating games, toys, and furniure. Saturday 10am-12pm

1604 S. MISSOURI Sat. 72pm Camping equip. pet carrier, car carrier, pots, pans, dishes, clothes, garden tools, elect. tools, misc.

007. West

2108 WEST First St. Saturday 8am

008. Northwest

3012 N. Washington Sat. 9am-2pm Sun. 1-4 This is not an Auction! All items are tagged and priced! Oval Ethan Allen pedestal dining table & six pub chairs, large Ethan Allen sideboard/Welsh dresser matching server w/flip tops & lower storage, service for 8 Bavaria China, Circa 1920, Cambridge rock crystal stemmed goblets, canister set, glass party/salad plates, new turbo cooker, food processor, electric slicing knife, silver plate serving pieces signed & numbered art prints, lefton kitty teapot, kayson’s china, huge set lefton fruit plates, painted red 9 drawer chest cardinal Christmas dishes, vintage wrought iron lamps, twin size maple bed, complete, beautiful dark wood, carved king bed with night stands & dresser, Ethan Allen coffee table & end tables; huge chrome arc light 60’s bookcase headboard with dresser Southwest style pottery floor lamp & table lamp hat racks, white oak glider chair, oak oval pedestal breakfast room table w/lion’s paw feet & 6 Wind-

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 7, 14, 21, 2011

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO ANDREW FELIPE GAMBOA, Plaintiff,

v.

No. CV-2011-703

VENERANDA LORNSITA G. STOGDEN a/k/a BENERANDO LORNSITA G. STOGDEN if living, and if deceased, all Unknown Heirs and all Unknown Claimants of Interest Claiming by through or under VENERANDA LORNSITA G. STODGEN; FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CHAVES COUNTY, N.A.; and/or, Persons Claiming Any Interest in the Premises Adverse to Plaintiff, Defendants. NOTICE OF SUIT

STATE OF NEW MEXICO to: the above-named Defendants, VENERANDA LORNSITA G. STOGDEN a/k/a BENERANDO LORNSITA G. STOGDEN if living, and if deceased, all Unknown Heirs and all Unknown Claimants of Interest Claiming by through or under VENERANDA LORNSITA G. STODGEN; and/or, Persons Claiming Any Interest in the Premises Adverse to Plaintiff.

GREETINGS: You are hereby notified that the above-named Plaintiff has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled case and cause, the general object thereof being to foreclose a mortgage on property located at: Lot 1 in Block B of the Redivision of Block 11 of South Highlands, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the official plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk’s office on July 13, 1909, and recorded in Book A of the Plat Records at page 140. The property is also known as 420 E. Jefferson, Roswell, New Mexico.

Unless you serve a pleading or motion in response to the complaint in said cause on or before thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, judgment by default will be entered against you. Respectfully submitted:

MARION J. CRAIG III Attorney At Law, LLC

Issued by:

_____________________________ Marion J. Craig III PO Box 1436 Roswell, New Mexico 88202-1436 575-622-1106 Attorney for Pioneer Bank

WITNESS the Honorable Charles C. Currier, District Judge of said Court of the State of New Mexico, and Seal of the District Court of said County, this 4th day of October, 2011. (SEAL)

CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT

By:____________________ Deputy

Friday, October 7, 2011

008. Northwest

sor chairs, lots of nice Christmas decor, like new lazy boy recliner only used 6 months, nice collection of kachinas, 8” to 16” novels, novels & more novels! 70’s turquoise & white pottery set, VCR tapes, CD’s cassettes & 8 tracks irons & ironing board, luggage, small TV, vintage cell phones incl. bag phones, new & used light fixtures, tire chains, new & used lawn edgers, hand & electric tools; metal detector, play pen, high chair, walker, infant seat & changing table, CB; CD player; Walkman, A Huge Sale! We accept cash & credit cards. 1723 N Kansas Sat. 6am-1pm Collectibles, dishes, decor, clothing.

705 GOLONDRINA Sat. 8am Home decor, kitchen items, linens, clothes.

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice

NEW MEXICO 4-H Foundation is hosting a sporting clays shoot, Saturday, October 15, 2011, at the Eddy County Shooting Range Association, at 131 N. Firehouse Road Cottonwood, NM. $100 per shooter/100 clays. Lunch provided. All funds raised will benefit the 4-H Foundation, in supporting the 4-H youth of NM. Contact: Jimmie C. Hall at 505-394-6178 or 505-681-4255, fax: 505-294-3343, email: jimmiehall@aol.com

025. Lost and Found

Found Male Chihuahua in vicinity of 1100 block of East First Street. 623-5240 FOUND IN Petco parking lot 1 Yellow Cur & 1 red St. Bernard were taken to Animal Control contact 624-6722

LOST FEMALE Hound dog brown in valley view area. Contact Animal Control.

INSTRUCTION

030. Education & Instructions

ALLIED HEALTH career training- Attend college 100% online . Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

Opening for Office Assistant. Microsoft Office Program a must. Other duties will include ten key, filing, answering phones & other misc. duties. Email resumes to rskippermjg@ qwestoffice.net or Fax to 575-623-3075

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish Sept. 16, 23, 30, October 7, 2011

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

No. D-504-CV-2011-00225

PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION, vs.

Plaintiff,

JOSE F. FELIU SR. A/K/A JOSE F. FELIU, FRANCES FELIU, DAMARIS SIERRA, ESQUIPULA SIERRA, AND UNKNOWN TENANT (REAL NAME UNKNOWN), Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that on October 12, 2011, at the hour of 11:30 am the undersigned Special Master, or his designee, will, at the West steps entrance of the Chaves County Courthouse, at 400 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88202, sell all of the rights, title and interest of the above-named Defendants, in and to the hereinafter described real estate to the highest bidder for cash. The property to be sold is located at 807 West Albuquerque Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88203, (if there is a conflict between the legal description and the street address, the legal description shall control) and is more particularly described as follows: The East 68 feet of Lots 5 & 6, Block 13 of Pauly Addition, in the City of Roswell, County of CHAVES and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat recorded August 16, 1985 in Plat Book A, Page, 28, Real Property Records of CHAVES County, New Mexico,

including any improvements, fixtures, and attachments, such as, but not limited to, mobile homes. Subject to all taxes, utility liens and other restrictions and easements of record, and subject to a one (1) month right of redemption by the Defendants upon entry of an order approving sale. The foregoing sale will be made to satisfy an in rem foreclosure judgment rendered by this Court in the above-entitled and numbered cause on August 29, 2011, being an action to foreclose a mortgage on the above-described property. The Plaintiff’s in rem judgment is $65,840.00, and the same bears interest at the rate of 7.1190% per annum, which accrues at the rate of $12.84 per diem, commencing on July 2, 2011, with the Court reserving entry of final in rem judgment as to said Defendants Jose F. Feliu Sr. and Frances Feliu for the amount due after foreclosure sale, for costs and attorney’s fees, plus interest as may be assessed by the Court. The Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale all of its in rem judgment amount and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its in rem judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. The sale may be postponed and rescheduled at the discretion of the Special Master. The Court’s decree, having duly appointed its Special Master to advertise and immediately offer for sale the subject real estate and to apply the proceeds of sale, first to the costs of sale and the Special Master’s fees, then to pay the above-described in rem judgment, interest, and costs of sale, and to pay unto the registry of the Court any balance remaining to satisfy future adjudication of priority mortgage holders; NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that in the event that said property is not sooner redeemed, the undersigned will as set forth above, offer for sale and sell to the highest bidder for cash or equivalent, the lands and improvements described above for the purpose of satisfying, in the adjudged order of priorities, the in rem judgment described herein and decree of foreclosure together with any additional costs and attorney’s fees, costs of advertisement and publication, a reasonable receiver and Special Master’s fee to be fixed by the Court. The total amount of the in rem judgment due is $65,840.00, plus interest to and including date of sale of $1,322.52 for a total in rem judgment plus interest of $67,162.52. Sale is subject to the entry of an order of the Court approving the terms and conditions of this sale. W. SCOTT BRAND, Special Master 7430 Washington Street NE Albuquerque, NM 87109 Telephone: (505) 433-4576 Facsimile: (505) 433-4577 E-mail: scott@ancillaryls.com

045. Employment Opportunities

Encompass Home Health is hiring fulltime OT/PT/RN/LPN and a PRN CNA. If you are interested please apply online at www.ehhi.com or contact Caroline Florence at 866-719-3444. COMFORT KEEPERS

Are you a compassionate, caring person? Do you have experience in personal care? Being a Comfort Keeper may be the opportunity for you! To learn what becoming a Comfort Keeper is all about, call us at: 575-624-9999. Apply in person at: 1410 South Main Street, Roswell, NM. BUSY OFFICE seeking full time receptionist with computer skills. Must be reliable, friendly, able to multi-task and work with the public. Please send resume to PO Box 1897, Unit 280, Roswell, NM 88202. Don’t be fooled by out of state schools. Artesia Training Academy Class A & B CDL training. Call ATA for more information 1-888-586-0144 artesiatraining@pvtn.net

B5

045. Employment Opportunities

ROSWELL BASED oil & gas company looking for a detail oriented accountant to be responsible for accounts payable, accounts receivable and revenue distribution for multiple companies as well as various other accounting projects and office duties as needed. · Oil and gas experience preferred. · Payroll and Financial Statement preparation experience a plus. · Strong analytical, communication (written and verbal) and organizational skills needed. · Must be proficient with Microsoft Excel, Word and QuickBooks. · Possess the aptitude to effectively learn companyspecific accounting systems. Competitive salary and excellent benefits package offered. Send resume to: PO Box 1897, Unit 281, Roswell, NM 88202 COMFORT KEEPERS is currently seeking experienced Housekeepers. To learn more about our opportunities, apply in person at: 1410 S. Main St., Roswell, NM.

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 7, 14, 21, 28, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF Chaves FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

Case No. D-504-CV-2011-00568

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC. FKA NORWEST MORTGAGE, INC., v.

Plaintiff,

GERARD C. LOWE, VANNESA BURGETTE LOWE, U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION ND AND MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. (SOLELY AS A NOMINEE FOR LENDER AND LENDER'S SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS), Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on November 2, 2011 at 11:00 AM, the West steps entrance of the Chaves County Courthouse, 400 N. Virginia, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the above-named defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State: THE NORTH 25 FEET OF LOT 10 AND THE SOUTH 25 FEET OF LOT 11 IN BLOCK 60 OF WEST SIDE ADDITION, IN THE CITY OF ROSWELL, COUNTY OF CHAVES AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT FILED IN THE CHAVES COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE ON JANUARY 1, 1891 AND RECORDED IN BOOK A OF PLAT RECORDS, AT PAGE 4.

The address of the real property is 1307 N. Kentucky Avenue, Roswell, NM 88201. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on September 20, 2011 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $35,683.83 plus interest from August 23, 2011 to the date of sale at the rate of 8.750% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master's fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff's costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder's funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption.

NM11-00366_FC01

______________________ Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group 20 First Plaza NW, Suite #20 Albuquerque, NM 87102


B6 Friday, October 7, 2011 045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

PART-TIME RECEPTIONIST: Immediate opening 25-30 hours per week. Send resume to PO Box 1897, Unit 217, Roswell, NM 88202. DRIVERS Coastal Transport is hiring Drivers at our Satellite Terminal in Roswell with Class (A) CDL. (X) Endorsement Must be 23 yrs Old with 1 Yr Tractor Trailer experience. Home every day! Scheduled Days Off, $2000 sign on bonus. For more Information call 1-877-297-7300 2408 N. Industrial Artesia, NM.

Avon, Buy/Sell. Christmas around the corner. $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR EASTERN NEW MEXICO UNIVERSITY: Assistant Professor of English: Writing. Jobs located in Portales, NM. Job announcement/online application: www.agency.governmentjobs. com/enmu

575-562-2115 AAA/EO/ Title IX Employer.

DRIVERS WANTED for medical courier positions. Positions starts at $8 per hour. Applicants must have excellent driving record. Send a copy of driving record and resume to PO Box 716 Roswell, NM 88202.

Opportunities available in Forensic Healthcare for LTN and EMT’s at Chaves County Detention Center. Various shifts, Full & Part time positions available. Apply 3701 S. Atkinson, Roswell.

FRONT DESK and housekeepers needed. Apply in person at 2803 W. 2nd, Roadway Inn.

ROSWELL INDEPENDENT oil & gas company looking for accountant. Position will include accounts payable, accounts receivable, joint interest payable, revenue distribution, monthly bookkeeping and financial statements. • Must be proficient in Microsoft Excel and Word. • The successful candidate will be organized with strong oral and written communication skills. Analytical skills are a must. • Must be detailed oriented. • Oil and gas experience a plus. Competitive salary and benefits package available with this growing company. Submit resume to Oil & Gas Accountant, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, NM 88202-1897. Unit #282.

BEST WESTERN Sally Port is now hiring for Bartender & Cocktail waitresses. Exp. preferred. Please apply at 2000 N. Main, no phone calls.

DRIVERS needed in Hobbs, Artesia, and Carlsbad - CDL with Tanker Endorsement and good driving record required. Competitive salary and benefits. EEO. Apply at Standard Energy Services: • HOBBS - 816 W. County Road, Hobbs, NM; 575-393-8352 • CARLSBAD - 1708 E. Green, Carlsbad, NM; 575-234-2872 • ARTESIA - Call Brad @ 575-631-5927

Best Western Sally Port is now hiring for Maintenance. Experience preferred but not necessary. Please apply within 2000 N. Main, no phone calls.

045. Employment Opportunities

THE ROSWELL Daily Record is now accepting applications for the position of: OUTSIDE SALES The ideal candidate must possess excellent customer service skills, superior organizational skills and a strong work ethic. Experience or background in advertising also helpful. Must be computer literate. This is a full time position. Interested Applicants please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Kim Gordon, 2301 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88201 or e-mail to: kim.gordon@ roswell-record.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! SERIOUS PEOPLE wanted to Work From Home using a computer Up to $1500-$5000 PT/FT Free info www.DreamAAAglobal.com HIRING FOR Housekeeping, PT, also FT. $7.50/hr. Budget Inn North, 2101 N. Main St. For Information call 623-6050 ROSWELL HYUNDAI is NOW HIRING due to MILLION DOLLAR RENOVATION - Roswell Hyundai is expanding and we are in immediate need of salespeople. Applicants should be courteous professionals and have an outgoing personality. We hire for attitude and train for skill. Experience preferred, not required. We offer an excellent benefit package including HEALTH, DENTAL, VISION, 401k and PAID VACATION. We are an EOE; all applicants must pass a drug test. Please apply in person at Roswell Hyundai 1909 W. 2nd St. Ask for Jacob.

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575) 622-7710 #45 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SATURDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

Full Time Sales Representative. The Las Vegas Optic is seeking applications for a full time position in sales. Successful candidates must have good people skills as well as the ability to sell advertising and help business grow, Experience isn't a requirement but a plus in consideration. Resumes should be mailed to the attention of Vincent Chavez, Optic advertising manager, PO BOX 2670, Las Vegas, NM 87701, or e-mail to vchavez@lasvegasoptic.com

Service Technicians Needed!!!

*Relocation assistance available

Pay Rate: $25+/Flat Rate

We offer: * The highest pay in the industry * Unbelievable benefits package * A huge sign on bonus * Paid training * State of the art work facility * The ability to design your own work schedule Email your resume to mluna@lithia.com If you have any questions, contact Mike at 361-960-7878

DEPUTY SHERIFF The Chaves County Sheriff’s Office is accepting applications for the position of Deputy Sheriff. Entry Salary Range: $15.20 to $17.09/hr DOQ. Current top out rate is $22.13. Benefits include: 20 year retirement @ 70% , medical and dental insurance, uniforms, weapons and take home vehicle. Applicants must be 21 yoa, a US Citizen, HS Graduate or GED, in good physical and mental condition. Must be a New Mexico State certified Peace Officer or become one within one year. Valid NM driver’s license, good driving record and no felony convictions. Applicants will be subject to criminal history and background checks, written exam and oral interview, pre-employment drug screen, physical and psychological testing. Qualified applicants will be notified of test dates. Required application forms are available at the County’s Job Posting Board located in the west wing of the County Administrative Center or by accessing the web site at www.co.chaves.nm.us. Applications may be returned to the County Manager’s Suite #180, Chaves County Administrative Center, #1 St. Mary’s PL, Roswell, NM 88203 or mailed by closing date to Human Resources, PO Box 1817, Roswell, NM 88202-1817. Applications will be accepted until 5:00 PM. Monday, October 31, 2011. EOE. PART TIME, 32 hours maximum Rental Car Customer Service and Counter Sales person, also for car wash person. Must have above average computer skills, be outgoing and friendly. Honesty, neat appearance and dependability a must. All applicants must be drug free and have a clean driving record. All applications must be complete with references, addresses, dates, and telephone numbers in order to be considered. Pick up application at Avis Car Rental Counter on East end of Roswell Airport. 24 TEMPORARY Workers Venegas Shearing Fermin Venegas 4327 N. Hwy 1053 Fort Stockton Texas 79735 Occupation: Farm workers , Farm & Ranch Animals 11/14/2011-09/14/2012 Pay rate $9.65 per hour to $ 11.13 per hour or Applicable piece rate depending on crop activity Farm workers Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. All tools, supplies, equipment and housing will be provided at no cost to the worker. Duties: Shearing Sheep, caring for wool by placing in fiber bags ect. . Transportation and subsistence expense reimbursed interested applicants can send resumes nearest State Workforce Agency office using job listing number TX4846157

NOW HIRING IN (Location) Roswell Schwan’s Home Service, Inc.

POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

Route Sales Representative s #OMPETITIvE #OMPENSATION Package with Base Wage, #OMMISSION AND )NCENTIves s 0RE ESTAblished and Growing #USTOMER "ASE /PTIONS s 3ALES AND -ANAGEMENT Training s Paid Vacation s 2ETIREMENT 3avings Program s %MPLoyEE $ISCOUNT ON #OMPAnY 0RODUCTS

For immediate consideration apply online at www.schwansjobs.com EOE © 2011 Schwan’s Home Service, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

045. Employment Opportunities

BIG D’S hiring for a cashier & professional cook. Resumes only accepted between 2-4pm. Weekends & holidays off. Dedicated, smart & hardworking individuals only need apply. 2 TEMPORARY Workers Pierce Ranch Joey Pierce 2083 Farm Rd. Ozona Texas 76943 Occupation: Farm workers ,Farm & Ranch Animals 11/14/2011-09/14/2012 Pay rate $9.65 per hour Farm workers Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. All tools, supplies, equipment and housing will be provided at no cost to the worker. Duties: Cattle Working grazing, castrating, branding ect. Transportation and subsistence expense reimbursed interested applicants can send resumes nearest State Workforce Agency office using job listing number TX4846006 BEAUTY BAR Advisor Aggressive selling skills professional appearance able to perform make-overs Thur.-Sat. 20 hrs Plus addtional floor sales hrs. Apply in person at Bealls. SODEXO IS seeking a motivated Food Service Supervisor for New Mexico Military Institute. This is a 7 days a week operation serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Responsibilities will include; supervision of day-to-day activities of subordinates, assigns responsibility for specific work or functional activities, ensures a safe working environment and monitors employee productivity. The ability to communicate in Spanish would assist in managing the workforce at this location. Strong customer service skills a must. Interested parties please submit resume with cover letter to New Mexico Military Institute - Bates Hall, no later than October 12, 2011. Sodexo values workforce diversity. EOE, M/F/D/V. MEDICAL OFFICE POSITION:

KYMERA Independent Physicians

Full Time Medical Office Manager Medical Billing-Coding 2 yrs exp.; communication, critical thinking & people skills required. Knowledge of EMR systems and accounting IT Support: FT - Associates Degree in Technology or equivalent exp. Entry Level Certifications/Licenses. Ability to work independently.

Medical Assistant: PT-1-2 yrs. Exp in medical office. Applicant must possess the ability to work with multiple patients in a high volume office setting, chart prep, & Ability to multi-task. EMR exp. a plus Certification preferred. Receptionist & Scheduling Clerk: PT-1-2 yrs. exp working in medical setting. Must possess customer service and computer skills with the ability to multi-task in a fast paced environment.

EMT-1: PT - to work in our Urgent Care setting, must have the ability to multi-task in a fast paced environment. EMT I license preferred. Please fax resume with cover letter to: (575) 624-7532

$300+ WKLY residential house cleaner, office is in Cumming, GA. Call 678-513-4844

SERVICES

075. Air Conditioning

Affordable Refrigerated conditioning heat pumps evap coolers furnaces, duct work & installations 317-4147

100. Babysitting Stay at home grandmother. Special 1st wk $50 ea. child, open 7-5:30, M-F, 625-9572

105. Childcare

NEED CHILD care? Find the widest range of available childcare for your children and their needs. 1-800-691-9067 or www.newmexic okids.org. You may also call us; Family Resource & Referral 622-9000 and we can help you navigate the system.

Roswell Daily Record

105. Childcare

LICENSED CHILDCARE Provider, affordable. Call j575-420-4582

Dennis the Menace

State certified 13 yrs exp. all ages, reasonable rates state & private 626-1093

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 I CLEAN homes & offices at a very reasonable price. Call 626-2587.

150. Concrete

Slabs, patios, sidewalks, curbing, Rodriguez Const. Since 1974 Lic. 22689. Call 420-0100

185. Electrical

BIG HORN Electric Professional work, affordable price. 575-317-8345 NM Lic#367662. ALLIANCE ELECTRIC Any size electrical job. Lic#367386. 575-840-7937

195. Elderly Care

DEPENDABLE PRIVATE Caregiver to the rescue, yrs. of exp. Tina 420-8877

200. Fencing

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100 M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

210. Firewood/Coal FIREWOOD FOR sale. Juniper or Pinon. 575-444-6520

Cordova Chimney Sweep. 623-5255 or 910-7552

220. Furniture Repair

REPAIR & Refinish furniture & build furniture. Southwest Woods. 1727 SE Main. 623-0729 or 626-8466 Hrs 7-3pm. Call before you come in case he’s out running errands. www.southwestwoods furniture.com. Firewood available.

225. General Construction

Renovation projects? Need help? No job too big/small. 25 yrs. exp. Qualified in framing, trim carpentry, on-site custom cabinets, painting, sheet rock, drywall, doors, & windows. FREE est. Call Jerry Martin at 910-6898 or 622-8682 Leave Message. HARVEST BUILDERS All types of construction. Lic/Bonded 575-910-3000

230. General Repair

CARPENTRY, DRY wall, painting & concrete. We guarantee. 626-2050

232. Chimney Sweep

CHIMNEY SWEEP Have your woodstove or fireplace inspected and cleaned. Dust free Guarantee. 36 years Experience, Licensed, Insured. Bulldog Janitorial Services 575-308-9988

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Basic Lawn mowing, yard clean-up, weedeating small tree trimming. 317-2242 Greenscapes Sprinkler Systems Lawn mowing, field mowing, gravel, sod-hydro seed, pruning, tilling, For dependable & reliable service call 622-2633 or 910-0150. WEEKEND WARRIOR Lawn Service mowing, property cleanup, residential rain gutter cleaning, and much more 575-626-6121 Gardening & much more. Best prices. Call 623-3709 910-3787

The Roswell Chamber of Commerce is hiring for Executive Director, the ideal candidate will be a self motivated individual that has the background of strong leadership and management. This person will have oversight of the physical plant, must maintain positive community relations, increase membership and represent the Chamber in a professional manner at all functions and public events. The Executive Director will be responsible for the financial state of the Chamber therefore a strong background in budget is crucial. Awareness of Legislative and Governmental issues affecting business is ideal. The candidate should have a positive attitude about Roswell, possess excellent communication skills, manage their times, and maintain a professional relationship with staff and the Board of Directors. This individual should have an empowered attitude of problem solving. Accepting resumes until October 7, 2011. Please send resume to the Roswell Daily Record, Post Office Box 279, Roswell, NM 88202.

285. Miscellaneous Services

THE NEW MEXICO SEED LOAN PROGRAM is available to small businesses owned by individuals with disabilities and provides low interest loans for the purchase of equipment and related supplies needed to expand or start a business. Contact the New Mexico Seed Loan Program at 1-855-891-8295 or www.nmseedloans.org for more information. A low interest loan program of DVR State of New Mexico.

310. Painting/ Decorating

Quality Painting! Interior, Exterior at prices you can afford. Mike 910-7012 PAINT CONTRACTOR Interior/Exterior, remodels or new construction. Call Nathan 914-0083 Licensed/ Bonded & Insured. WILL PAINT your home and do interior/exterior repairs, if needed. 914-1464 TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting at affordable prices. Call 637-9108.

312. Patio Covers

M.G. HORIZONS Patio covers, concrete, decks & awnings Lic. 623-1991.

316. Pet Services

Jacque’S PET SERVICES. has a new location. Boarding now available. 1002 E. 2nd.575-622-4002. TOO POOPED to scoop? Call CCS at 420-4669 with 15% senior discount.

330. Plumbing

Plumber Needs Work. Steve’s Plumbing & Heating. 28 yrs exp. 622-9326 PLUMAIR, REASONABLE repairs. Plumbing, heating, cooling, new construction, heatpumps. NM Lic. 27043. Call 317-4147 or 623-0770.

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 625-9924 / 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552. REASONABLE REMODELING Contractor Specializing on kitchen & bathrooms. New Additions & Roofing. NM Lic. 27043. 317-4147.

350. Roofing

RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397 www.rancheroswelding.com

Having trouble w/your roof? Flat, shingle roofs, painting. Lic. Contract work guaranteed insurance claims welcome 623-0010

395. Stucco Plastering

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217 For stucco traditional or synthetic, also block, brick & stone work. Rodriguez Const. 420-0100 RWC Lath and Stucco. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397

www.rancheroswelding.com

405. TractorWork

RWC Bobcat and Dump Works. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397. www.rancheroswelding.com

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 Allen’s Tree Srvc. The oldest tree service in Roswell. Million $ ins. 626-1835 Collins Tree Service Professional Tree Trimming, Removal & Stump grinding. Fully insured. Certified Line Clearance Arborist. Call 575-308-1902

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insurance.

www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale 3107 Futura, 3 bed 1 3/4 ba. 2 car garage. Ex. cond. w/lots of updates 622-7703

4Bd 1Ba, new paint, carpet, doors, fncd yrd, $60k M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 FSBO: 3 or 4br/4ba, 3.5 car garage, 10 acres, 40X75 shop 1/2ba, see at www.forsalebyowner.com listing #23362953 3 BR 1 ba at the base $42,500 owner financing with $5k down 420-1352 WELL SEASONED Real Estate contracts. Will trade for houses. Wesley Hay 623-6165 3BR, 1 ba $55k inside remodeled. Please call 575-405-9075 OPEN HOUSE Oct. 8th 8am-noon 4/3/2, 2 master suites 601 Mimosa, asking $199,500 obo. 317-0177

$265,000 1912 W 4th St. 2600 sf home built 2005 3 br 2 full ba. Close to Spring River Golf Course For appointment call 622-7046

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

5 ACRES, $25K as is, septic system, 3809 Zinnia, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 1 LOT w/utilities, 806 Lusk, asking price $16,500. 10 acres of Roswell, very nice, asking $11,500 OBO. 575-637-4960 LENDER SALE. 40 Acres -$39,900. Spellbinding views of snow capped mountains! Adjacent to National Forest. Maintained all weather roads w/electric. Close to Ruidoso. Financing available. Call NMRS 888-676-6979.

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

Main & Poe, 4550 sf $275k cash/trade for Ruidoso prprty, M-Th 624-1331

510. Resort-Out of Town ADVERTISE YOUR VACATION PROPERTY, to more than 288,000 New Mexico newspaper readers. Your 25-word classified ad will appear in 33 newspapers around the state for only $100. Call this newspaper for more details or visit www.nmpress.org for more details.


Roswell Daily Record 515. Mobile Homes - Sale

2002 16X74 Fleetwood 12x12 workshop 12x20 storage building. Lg. 2 car carport. In excellent cond. Spring River Estates, 1000 E. College #38 622-7703 WE BUY used mobile homes. Single & Double wides. 575-622-0035. D01090 2001 OAKWOOD 14x80 3/2 200 Gavalin Canyon Rd #54 Ruidoso, N.Mex. Fixer upper needs repairs & cleaning. Fixed up would raise retail price a bunch. Selling cheap $12,500 as is Call 575-622-0035 D01090 2br/2ba, Appliances, partially furnished, carport, storage, deck, $8K. 623-3149

520. Lots for Sale

OWNER FINANCING for a limited time. Ready to build 5 acre lots w/ great views & good covenants. Located 9 miles West of Roswell @ the Club House Banquet Facility. Free land maps and at entrance. 575-623-1800. www.BuenaVidaLand.com COURT ORDERED Sale! 2704 S. Lea, asking $6k, 5 acres - 30 Townsend Tr. Lot 9, Cielo Vista Subdivision, has well, electric, great view of city, $49,999. Call Jim 910-7969. HAGERMAN LOTS for sale. York Avenue, Posey subdivision, 1 block from Hagerman schools, $5000. Not zoned for mobile home. 420-1352 Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 60x134 $18,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. We Take Visa and Mastercard! 420-1352. PREMIUM 5 Acre tracts, Owner will finance with 10% down, New Construction only (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd. between Country Club & Berrendo Rd. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-4337 20 Acres adjacent to Adobe Mesa subdivision (near 6 mile hill) Prime for developer $185k. Chris 317-3245

521. Cemetery Lots

CEMETERY LOT 53, Row B, 34 for sale, $750. Call 623-2602.

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. Town Plaza Apartments Utilities paid - Gas and Water. New Owners, friendly new managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs/downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Seniors 55yrs plus, law enforcement & military will receive discount. No HUD. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 2nd year, 1 free month rent ALL BILLS PAID 1 br $530 2 br $630, 3br/2ba $730 mo., ref air, new carpet, new paint/tile. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. EFFICIENCY 2 BR, downtown, clean, water paid. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD Call 623-8377 EFFICIENCY 1 br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. 1br/1ba, wtr pd, quiet area, HUD ok. $350/mo, $200 dep. 625-9208 after 5pm 1&2Br, wtr pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 2 BR, 1 bath, stove & refrigerator. Call 910-8170.

540. Apartments Unfurnished

1BR, Ctrl Air, appliances, laundry facility, quiet. $495/mo + Dep. 2550 Bent Tree. 317-6408. Beautiful 2 BR water paid no pets/smoking, laundry facility. Centrally located in Roswell. Contact John 622-5630 or 910-1648.

2 BR, 1 bath, stove & refrigerator. Call 910-8170.

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

FLETC Townhome furnished, 2br/2ba, 1car garage, ref air, washer & dryer, secluded area, conveniently close to ENMMC & Roswell Regional, 575-910-1605 2/2.5, CONDO in Ruidoso Downs, $1000mo/$500dep. Fully furnished. 910-1300

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 400 1/2 E 5th 1 bedroom stove, refrig., water paid, $325 mo. $200 dep. No HUD & No Pets. 910-9648 706 W. 10th, 3br, ref air, stove, refrig, w/d hookups, no pets/HUD, $700/mo, $600/dep. 914-5402 2&3 Bd, 1&2 Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 1,2,3,4 br $300+ remodeled Al 703-0420, Santiago 202-4702 rent or sale #15 Reynolds Place newly remodeled 2br 1ba., fenced laundry room, enclosed garage, culdesac, $600 + dep. 623-2607, 914-0685. 3BR, central ht/air, no HUD, $725/mo, $500/dep, 910 Davidson Dr. 420-6396 SW, 700 S. Heights, 3br + office or 4th bdrm, 1-3/4 bath, lots of storage. New kitchen & appliances washer/dryer, fridge, stove, dishwasher. All flooring new - ceramic tile & carpet. $950 + dep. No smoking or HUD. Call 317-1672 or 630-222-8544 CLEAN 2BR, 303 S. Missouri, $500 + dep. all bills pd , no pets, no HUD. 626-2190

3br/1ba. ref air, fenced yard 1 car, 69 Lighthall RIAC, $650m,$650/dep 627-9942 201 W. Summit, 3br/2ba, carport & storage, completely remodeled, stove, refrig., ref. air, w/d hookup, no pets or HUD, $900/mo, $600/dep, 914-5402 303 OAKWOOD, N-Roswell 3br/2ba, stove, frig, DW, fresh paint, storage building, garage, fenced yard, covered patio, $900/mo, $450/dep. 622-3250 1421 S. Poplar, 3br/2ba, no pets or HUD, $575/mo, $350/dep. 623-1806 3br, $650/$500dep, No pets or HUD. 914-0101

2607 W. Alameda, 1br/1ba, ref air, w/d hookups, $475/mo, $475 DD, 575-317-6479 Private Room w/bath kitchen & washer/dryer privileges Hagerman area $100 per week 637-6520 LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com! 710 S. Wyoming Apt. A, 2BR, Appl. $500/m, $400 dep., water paid. Call 625-1952 NICE 2BR house, all bills paid. Call 317-1212 or 622-9011. 1514 W. Albuquerque, 3br/2ba, $800/dep, $800/mo. 420-0744 2BR 1BA newly remodeled $575 mo. $300 dep. no HUD/pets. 420-5604 2BR/2BA, GARAGE, townhouse, no HUD or pets, $925/mo, $625/dep. 420-5930 3BR, 1 3/4ba, w/garage, $600/dep, $900/mo, no HUD or pets. 420-5930 QUIET PRIVATE small 2br suitable for couple, single. Safe area near Mt. View school. E. Charleston Rd. $480mo $300dp adjacent workshop available. 575-520-0305

1/1 Duplex $400 mo. water pd. Quiet street great area. 2203 W. Juniper. 317-6408 3BR 1.5 bath clean, quiet, safe neighborhood. Has washer & dryer. 420-8706

VERY NICE JUST REMODELED LARGE 3BR, 1212 N. WASHINGTON. 623-8240

100 S. Kansas, 2br, big storage, remodeled, no pets, HUD, $590. 626-9530

Very nice condo 2br 1 bath duplex 1 car garage No Hud or smoking, small pets ok, $675 mo. 626-0229

3BR/1BA, central air/heat, 1st & last $800/mo, $800/dep, 701 S. Montana. Call for appt. 575-420-6396

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 1611 N. Ohio clean 2 br 1 ba, w/d hookups fenced backyard, ref. air carport $675 mo. $675 dd 575-317-6479

555. Mobile Homes for Rent

1207 E Alameda, 2 BR 1 BA, $525 month (HUD accepted) Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604 2BR, $400/MO, $200/dep. Call 914-2533

558. Roommates Wanted

SOUTH AREA 2 rooms and full bath $400 mo. must be full time employed. Free cable 575-420-8333

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places OFFICE SPACE for Rent. Prime downtown area, 2,061 sq.ft. Please call 622-8711. Office space: newly remodeled, 750 sf $800, 350sf $400 all bills paid 622-2564 FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546. 2108 S. Main, storefront, 1200sf, $500/$500dep. Call Don or Barbara 627-9942 Prime office space, 5000 sq ft. lease all or part, janitorial and on-site maintenance included. Historic building located in quiet, tree shaded, park-like setting. See at 400 E. College 420-9970 or 622-8500

585. Warehouse and Storage WAREHOUSE ONLY 9000 SF partial a/c & heat, security alarmed, 2 garage doors, 2 standard entry doors, $1000 mo. 2001 S. Main behind Family Furniture 575-937-0889 or 575-257-0888

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

NEED FURNITURE? Shop Blair’s Trading Post for the best prices in town for your household items. We buy & sell furniture, appliances, home decor, collectibles, electronics, saddles, jewelry, tools, fishing & camping items, movies plus everything else from A-Z. Including many hard to find items. Serving Roswell for 40 years. Open daily 9-5. Accept Visa & MC. 5611 Hummingbird Ln. 627-2033 LIFT CHAIR, power wheelchair, walker, grab bars, hospital bed, 622-7638 HORIZON EGS Eliptical $150, Weider Pro weight bench w/olympic bars & weights $200. 626-4789 Commercial Leaf Vacuum, like new, Billy Goat Professional Brand. 626-5193 MOVING SALE 24” RCA color TV, $50, 3 drawer desk, $20; slow cooker, $15, heavy glass container, blender $20, books 15¢ or 25¢; new waffle maker $20, crochet items: lap robe $15, 14” square pillows $10; pot holders $5/pairs; much more, even free stuff. Call 575-208-8568 for directions to apartment. 300 lb std wght set- parabody bench LAT mach. leg curl ext. mach. 2 bars 1 set dumbells $400 626-9868 Moving sale, by appt. only 627-7223 for your personal tour. Quality in every room. THE TREASURE Chest just in Cambridge, Vaseline, carnival glass, Jadite, unbelievable selection China cabinets, furniture thrifts. We haggle American Pickers welcome. 1204 W. Hobbs 914-1855 Wed. Sat. 10-5 BUNK BED clean $125 obo. Call 622-0363 or 575-914-0765 BEAUTIFUL SOLID wood dining table w/4 chairs, full size cherry wood antique bed/frame, king mattress, springs/frame, solid wood triple dresser w/mirror, new twin mattress & springs, still in plastic full size brass bed/frame, 1950’s chrome dining table w/6 chairs, 1940’s refridgerator works well, Call 622-3069 before 5pm or 623-1309 after 5pm and weekends. 6 MONTH old GE washer perfect condition $200 OBO. 575-914-5791

CLASSIFIEDS

611. Garage Sales Business SOUTHWEST SELF-STORAGE

Corner of Brasher and S. Sunset Multiple unit auction, containing general household goods, to be held Saturday,

Oct. 8, 2011 9:00 am to 9:30 am

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd Gold & Silver Cash. Don’t be fooled. Compare prices. Private collector pays more money for your jewelry. 7 days a week 578-0805

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

PAY CASH for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles. Entire households & estates welcome. Call 627-2033 or 623-6608. WILL BUY your unwanted washing machines. 626-7470 WE BUY junk batteries, automotive & industrial. $4.00 each, 311 S. Virginia. 622-4160

635. Good things to Eat

FARM FRESH eggs - free range $2.50 dz, duck eggs $5.00 dz. 624-0898 GRAVES FARM: Green chile and roasting, okra, squash, cucumbers, eggplant, jalapenos, yellow hots, cayenne, zaranos, fresh red chile, ristras, apples, pears, red chile pods & powder, garlic, pinto beans. 622-1889 Mon-Sat 8-5:30, Sun 1-5. Accept EBT, credit cards & debit. HOBSON GARDEN: Still roasting our famous GREEN CHILE! Fresh tomatoes ocra & eggplant. New: pumpkins, fall squash, pimentos, fresh ristras & specialty chile’s Hob stock is coming soon. Mon-Sat 9-5:30, Sun 1-5. 3656 E. Hobson Road 622-7289.

665. Musical Merchandise Alvarez Electric Acoustic guitar $150 & Cort M200 blue electric guitar w/Peavey amp $150. 910-6123

700. Building Materials

STEEL BUILDINGS Reduced Factory Inventory 30x36 -- Reg $12,300 Now $9,970 36x58 -- Reg $20,300 Now $16,930 48x96 -- Reg $42,400 Now $36,200 Source # 1CC 866-609-4321

Friday, October 7, 2011

745. Pets for Sale

PUPPY LOVE Grooming Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also - 575-420-6655 AKC PAPILLON puppies health guaranteed $350-$400 575-626-9813 K-9 FOR sale: 1M $300, 2F $350 each. For more info call 623-3258. HUSKY PUPPIES 2 females, 1 male. 840-6294 Chinese Pugs 6 wks old Call 575-914-0357. Norwegian Elkhounds, 6 wks old 3 males, 1 female. Call 914-0083.

FREE DOGS to good home! 575-910-3579

RECREATIONAL 765. Guns & Ammunition

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

2003 HONDA fourtrax 350 4 wheeler, elec shift, great recreational or hunting 4 wheeler, $2750 OBO. 910-6001 2004 POLARIS Trail Boss 330cc 4x2 automatic $1000. 575-623-1458

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com 1988 HITCHHIKER 5th wheel 27 ft very clean $4k. 575-626-8182 2002 28FT Jayco Eagle Summit 5th wheel, large slide, very good condition, asking $12k. For more info call 575-354-7058 in Capitan.

Left handed browning 7mm rifle w/scope, strap & case. $600 575-623-5908

1985 SOUTHWIND motorhome $2800. Call 626-3070 or 840-5224

RUGER GP 100 .357 Magnum $350 575-623-1458

2000 COLEMAN pop-up camper, ac, furnace frig, slide-out dinette excellent cond. 625-0248, 420-9944

775. Motorcycles & Scooters BMW ‘99 K12 LT custom ultimate tour bike, stereo, CB, CD, tape intercom, 33k miles, $5750 OBO. 910-6001

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

2006 CHEVY Cobalt 88k mi. excellent cond. $5250 420-1352

B7

790. Autos for Sale

PRISTINE LUXURY sports, 2010 Jaguar XF Premium, 11K, Claret exterior, leather pearl interior, 5.0 LV8 gas 380hp assymbled in Castle Bromwich, Birmingham, UK, 6 spd, automatic torque convertor lock-up, B&W 14 speaker surround sound, $45K. 575-840-9318 2000 CADILLAC STS, 64k miles, $6500. 637-8861 1995 C-4 Corvette Coupe 139k miles good condition $8,000 Firm 575-627-6275 1989 FORD Box Truck Lift Gate, $2500, 1204 W. Hobbs. 914-1855

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2006 FORD F250, excellent cond., ext. cab, $9,950. 626-7488.

796. SUVS

‘01 Honda Passport EX, 4 wheel drive, sunroof, luggage rack, tow package, leather interior, good tires & battery, service records, 94k miles, $6800.317-2350 2002 ENVOY SLT 82k mi. $7000, sunroof, leather. Call 317-4024

810. Auto Parts & Accessories

4 EAGLE LS tires asking $200. 575-578-8248 Less than 100 miles wear & tear. 454/351 Windsor engines w/transmissions $1200 ea. obo. 609-760-0919


B8 Friday, October 7, 2011

ENTERTAINMENT

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1Difficult

ARIES(March 21-April 19) ★★★★ Use the daylight hours to initiate, complete and clean of f your desk. You will feel in the pink. Allow yourself to enjoy the moment. The actual experience could be less than the fantasy. Tonight: Where you want to be. TAURUS(April 20-May 20) ★★★ Assume more responsibility, especially if you want to clear your desk and mind by the end of the day. Schedule a late lunch meeting, and go right into the weekend. Tonight: Where the fun is. GEMINI(May 21-June 20) ★★★★ Examine an idea from dif ferent perspectives. You might be surprised by what you see. Reframe a situation several different ways, and your perspective also will change. Tonight: Check in with an older relative. CANCER(June 21-July 22) ★★★★ Each person yo u r u n i n to s e em s t o want your entire attention an d f o cu s. You mi g ht wa nt t o g iv e t h e m j us t t h a t , a s y o u c ou l d b e courting flak otherwise. E x p r e s s y o ur c a r i n g thr ough understanding and walking in another person’s shoes. Tonight: Follow the music. LEO(July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ Funnel your creativity. Let your wor d choice demonstrate your imagination. Others appreciate when you flow in this manner. Strive for strong interactions and a better sense of well-being with key figures. Tonight: Single out a special person. VIRGO(Aug. 23-Sept. 2 2 ) ★ ★ ★ ★ Stay even with the knowledge that this, too, will end. Think “weekend.” Don’t start a way-out diet without checking in with a doctor first. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. Find favorite people. LIBRA(Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Expr ess your unique opinions. Open and authentic people

appreciate this exchange. Use care with someone you put on a pedestal. Should this person fall down, appreciate who put him or her there. You only have yourself to blame. T onight: Only do what is relaxing. SCORPIO(Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★ If you can take the day off and stay close to home, do. You will be mor e content. Do know that a family member or roommate might be feeding you a bigfish tale. Maintain a sense of humor, and you will be much happier. T onight: Let your hair down. SAGITTARIUS(Nov. 22D e c . 2 1 ) ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ T ry another approach or do something very differently. You laugh, and another person relaxes. Look at the power you have. Keep communication flowing, understanding what will happen in the long run. Tonight: Mosey on home. CAPRICORN(Dec. 22Jan. 19) ★★★★ Holding yourself back could take mor e ef fort than it’s worth. Know when to call a spade a spade. Sometimes letting go is healthy for everyone involved. Your imagination heads in a new dir ection once you complete a pr oject. T onight: A for ce to be dealt with. AQUARIUS(Jan. 20Feb. 18) ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ You are a bundle of energy and difficult to stop. You want to complete some matters and toss yourself into the weekend. Your ability to communicate needs to come out. T onight: All smiles. PISCES(Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★ Keep your dealings low-key and behind the scenes. Not everyone needs to know what you are thinking. If you have a hunch, sometimes it is better to allow a situation to play out. Be more open and forthright. Tonight: Make the most of the moment. BORN TODAY Actress June Allyson (1917), Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin (1952), entertainment judge Simon Cowell (1959)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A coroner’s investigator acknowledged Thursday that she made mistakes while collecting medications and other evidence from Michael Jackson’s bedroom after he died, but she minimized the issues by saying no investigation is perfect. Investigator Elissa Fleak was aggressively crossexamined by defense attorney Ed Chernoff as he tried to expose flaws in the way medical evidence was handled by authorities in the case against Dr. Conrad Murray. Chernoff pointed to pictures that he said indicated things had been moved in the room. The images showed an IV pole and saline bag in two different locations. A bottle of medicine Fleak said she had found on the floor was photographed on a nightstand. In addition, Cher nof f said Fleak didn’t note that she had found a bottle of the power ful anesthetic propofol inside an IV bag until March 2011, nearly two years after the singer’s death. “Would you agree with me that you made a substantial number of mis-

takes in your investigation?” Chernoff asked. “No,” Fleak said. Jurors at times leaned forward to look at the photos projected on a large screen. Some took notes on the testimony. Deputy District Attorney David Walgren attempted to minimize the missteps. “Ms. Fleak, did you conduct a perfect investigation in this case?” he asked. “No,” she said. “Have you ever conducted a perfect investigation?” Walgren asked. “No,” said the witness. “Are there always things you would have done differently in hindsight?’ he asked. “Yes,” Fleak replied, saying she had tried to be as accurate and truthful as possible. Fleak was assigned to the investigation on June 25, 2009, when Jackson died and she went to his rented mansion to collect evidence. Four days later, after Murray, the singer’s personal physician, had talked to police, she returned to follow leads the doctor had provided, including a description of medications hidden in a closet.

Jackson death investigator acknowledges mistakes

Roswell Daily Record


10-07-11 PAPER