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Roswell Daily Record THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

Vol. 120, No. 220 50¢ Daily / $1 Sunday

INSIDE NEWS

U.S. TROOPS TO BE SPREAD THINNER

September 13, 2011

TUESDAY

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Republicans unhappy with pace of session SANTA FE (AP) — New Mexico’s Legislature entered a second week of a special session Monday with no agreements on redistricting and Republicans fuming over what they consider an unreasonably slow pace of work. House Republicans complained that the Democratic-controlled Legislature isn’t considering other issues, as requested by GOP Gov. Susana Martinez, while redistricting

remains unresolved. “We’re here to do the people’s business. Let’s roll up our sleeves,” Rep. Larry Larranaga, R-Albuquerque, told his colleagues after Republicans briefly delayed ef forts by Democrats to recess a floor session for the day. Democratic leaders have said the Legislature will deal with redistricting first and then decide whether to take up proposals by Martinez, including a politically

charged measure to stop issuing driver’s licenses to illegal immigrants. The governor also has asked legislators to consider proposals to shore up finances of the state’s unemployment program and provide financing for capital improvements across the state. “People are working hard,” House Speaker Ben Lujan, D-Santa Fe, said in an interview. See PACE, Page A6

SPECIAL SESSION: WEEK 2 JULIA BERGMAN RECORD STAFF WRITER

At a cost of $50,000 a day, the fifth legislative day of the special session ended yesterday with little progress made, continuing to fuel the fury that taxpayers’ money is being wasted. Legislators now have less than two weeks left in the session,

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INSIDE SPORTS

Mark Wilson Photo

Terriers vie for approval and bragging rights during the 53rd Annual Rio Pecos Kennel Club AKC All Breed Dog Show Saturday at RIAC Park.

Area dogs compete in Dog Show VANESSA KAHIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

With special primping, yummy treats and all the attention a dog could ask for, canines from near and far proved a dog’s life is the best life at the Rio Pecos Kennel

Club annual AKC all breed Dog Show at the Roswell Industrial Air Center Park, Saturday. Ashbury Bling It On, a 2year -old Shetland sheepdog, stood patiently as her owner Laurel Skalko brushed a mixture of cholesterol and powder on her paws.

“It makes her fur stand out,” Skalko said. “It makes her white (fur) a little bit whiter.” Ashbury is a tri-color sheltie. Skalko, from Peoria, Ariz., brought another sheltie, 4-yearold Grand Champion Mainland See SHOW, Page A6

AGO Roadshow makes a stop LESSONS LEARNED IN WEEK 3 Week 3 is officially in the books and I think this week, more than the last two, really helped to show just where the area’s teams stands. The Demons picked up a good win on Friday over Hagerman and that might be a sign that Frank Sandoval’s philosophy is kicking in with the Demons. - PAGE B1

TODAY’S OBITUARIES • • • •

Salvador Briseno Faydean H. Butts Ethel Ruth Watters Leonard Reese - PAGE B3

HIGH ...96˚ LOW ....64˚

TODAY’S FORECAST

CLASSIFIEDS..........B6 COMICS.................B4 ENTERTAINMENT.....A8 FINANCIAL .............B5 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........A8 LOTTERIES ............A2 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8

INDEX

See SESSION, Page A6

New social security fears

F0RT BRAGG, N.C. (AP) — As the war in Afghanistan winds down, the U.S. soldiers will be spread thinner and must be ready to perform a wider array of missions., the new Army commander in charge of training and providing troops for the wars said Monday. - PAGE A3

• Roswell pays respects to the fallen • We Remember • Downtown comes Alive After Five! • ‘How doth the little busy bee … • NMMI wins thriller, 4843

which is funded for 21 days, to tackle the governor’s full agenda. Rep. Dennis Kintigh, RRoswell, said many bills introduced on the second and third legislative day have been assigned to a committee but those committees have not been scheduled to meet

Jessica Palmer Photo

New Mexico Attorney General Gary King introduced his staff at the Roswell Convention and Civic Center. The AGO gave two presentations at the Civic Center — one on the Open Meetings Act and Inspection of Public Records Act with a second on Meth Awareness and Prevention.

JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

The New Mexico Attor ney General’s AGO Road Show came to the Roswell

Convention and Civic Center, 912 N. Main St., Monday. His presentations on “Sunshine Laws” compliance drew people from the city, the county and the school district. The audience also included representatives from the Dexter School District and members of town government and Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell. City Administrator Larry Fry and City Clerk Dave Kunko attended for the city of Roswell. Others came from further afield, such as gover nment officials from Curry County. One person traveled down fr om Springer in Colfax County, a distance of 245 miles. The two topics under discussion during the 9:30 a.m. talk were the Open Meetings Act and the Inspection of Public Records Act. Attorney General Gary King gave a brief history of the acts fr om their inception in 1942 to their most recent amendments and revisions. “When I was in the legislature, I was not only

Faubus-McCarty to join Daily Record staff EMILY RUSSO MILLER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Roswell Daily Record Publisher Charles Fischer announced Monday that the departing executive director of the Roswell Chamber of Commerce will be the newspaper’s new advertising director. Dorrie Faubus-McCarty, the chamber’s director since July 2009, will begin working at the paper in the near future. She submitted a letter of resignation to the cham-

ber’s executive board earlier this month. “I believe Dorrie is a perfect fit for the future of the Roswell Daily Record,” Fischer said. “She is motivated, outgoing and liked by everyone.” Faubus-McCarty will be replacing Kim Gordon. Fischer credits Gordon for further developing niche publications produced by the paper, such as the Roswell Chamber See MCCARTY, Page A6

See AGO, Page A6

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some Social Security advocates fear that President Barack Obama’s desire to cut taxes supporting the program will undermine its vaunted stature as a selffinancing pension system that provides checks to retirees based on contributions they made while working. For now, though, the administration insists — and many experts agree — that the proposal would have no impact on the program’s financial soundness or ability to pay benefits averaging $1,077 a month to 55 million recipients.. Cutting Social Security taxes is the keystone of Obama’s $447 billion plan to create jobs and leave more cash in people’s pockets, an effort by the president to bolster the ailing economy and his own 2012 re-election prospects. The payroll tax cut — an enlargement of one already in effect this year — would take a $240 billion bite out of Social Security revenues in 2012. Obama would replenish the lost FICA (Federal Insurance Contribution Act) taxes with money from the overall federal budget — keeping Social Security whole but forcing the government to borrow more and further swelling the federal debt.. The problem with Obama’s proposal, critics say, is that propping up Social Security with general funds from the T r easury erodes its See FEARS, Page A6

Remembering Poe Corn

Julia Bergman Photo

A mural at the Roswell Boys and Girls Club in memory of Poe Corn and his dedication to youths in the community.

9/11 memorial opens in New York NEW YORK (AP) — Exactly 10 years ago, ground zero was a smoking, fire-spitting tomb, a ghastly pile of rubble and human remains. On Monday it was a place of serenity — an expanse of trees and water in the middle of a bustling city — as the 9/11 memorial opened to the public. As they walked through a grove of oaks and traced their fingers over the names of the nearly 3,000 dead, visitors were deeply moved by the monument, whose centerpiece is two sunken pools ringed by bronze plaques. About 7,000 people reg-

istered online for free tickets to visit on opening day, and 400,000 are signed up for the coming months, according to the nonprofit organization that oversees the memorial. Many visitors made pencil-and-paper rubbings of the names to take back home. Others sat on benches or clustered for photos. Some people cried; others embraced. Some left flowers or stuffed messages into the letters. The site was opened on Sunday — the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks — to the 9/11

families. Monday marked the first day since the tragedy that ground zero was opened to the public. Security was airporttight, with visitors forced to empty their pockets, go through a metal detector and send their bags through an X-ray machine. The memorial takes visitors on a kind of journey. First they walk through a promenade of more than 200 white oak trees. Then, like hikers coming upon a canyon, they arrive at two 30-foot-deep pits on the exact spots

See MEMORIAL, Page A6


A2 Tuesday, September 13, 2011

GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Thieves steal freon and copper Bears are not endangered Police were called to Roswell High School, 500 W. H o b b s S t . , S u n d a y , after subjects removed the freon from three different freezers. The subjects also stole the copper from one of the units. Cost of repairs and replacement of freon and copper is estimated at $2,700. •Police were dispatched to the 1400 block of South Elm Avenue, Saturday, where the victims reported that subjects stole $5,136 worth of jewelry, miscellaneous clothing and cell phones.

Criminal damage

Police filed an incident report after a vehicle which had been towed rolled of f the tow truck and damaged one of the evidence bays. •Police were dispatched to the 1900 block of South Adams Avenue, Saturday. The victim reported that he heard squealing tires and when he looked out his window

JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

he observed two subjects in a Chevy Suburban pushing his Oldsmobile up his driveway. Investigation revealed tire tracks in the driveway that indicated the car had been pushed nearly three feet into the victim’s home.

Burglary

Police were called to t h e 1 7 0 0 b l o c k o f We s t Juniper Street, Monday, after a victim heard someone inside his home. He went into investigate and found a man inside his living room. The victim confronted the man who jumped out a window and ran. The subject was described as white male, 5-feet, 9-inches tall, weight 160 pounds,

with blond hair.

Incident

Police found a man in the 300 block of East Alameda Str eet, Saturday, who was in the process of tearing down the fence near the bike path. When asked what he was doing it, the subject replied that he was taking down the fence because Jesus had told him to.

Anyone having information on these or any other crimes should contact Crime Stoppers, 888-594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward.

Public Information Officer for New Mexico Game and Fish Marty Frentzel wants to reassure the public that New Mexico has plenty of bears and despite the stress of this year’s drought, heat and wild fire, the population is not endangered. “We have a lot of bears in New Mexico. In 1927, someone did a wildlife study where it was estimated that New Mexico had 750 black bears. In 1960, the bear population had increased to 3,000. Now, we have estimated that New Mexico has between 6,000 to 7,000 black bears.” He admitted the drought and fires were factors which have put the bear population under pressure. New Mexico Game and Fish has done what it can by reseeding those areas destroyed by fire. However, the govern-

ment stance about assisting the bear population is that of noninterference “more than man has already inter fered,” he said. “If the habitat can’t support the bears now, then it can’t in the future. This is nature’s way.” Frentzel could not say if black bears are ranging further in their search for food. “These animals move. They are always on the move. Bears make it to Clovis and Santa Rosa. Some have made it as far as Amarillo. At this time of year, they are stocking up in calories,” he said. Frentzel said he spoke with the department’s bear biologist and the bear population is expanding. “We have had six years of moisture with good reproduction.” He also said that, in Colorado, they are finding that bears are having more triplets due to the high-calorie diet provided by human garbage. “We need to manage our trash better.”

When asked if more bears are making their way into populated areas, Frentzel said, “We don’t have the figures for this year yet, although I can tell you that we are moving as many as five bears a day from Santa Fe. He noted two recent incidents. In one, a school called to report a bear locked up in a storage shed. In a second, Game and Fish removed a bear which was 100 yards from a school. He considers people as part of the problem in drawing bears into towns. “People are leaving their bird feeders out all year round. Bears love that — the nuts and the sugar water. We live in a disposable society and anything that smells like food will attract them.” He said the important message is that the state is not going to lose its bears. “Hopefully this will be temporary.” j.palmer@roswell-record.com

Is the sand dune lizard really an endagered species? EMILY RUSSO MILLER RECORD STAFF WRITER Is the sand dune lizard really an endangered species? Chaves County Commissioners don’t think so, and have recently launched a campaign to prove the lizard’s habitat is not threatened as some groups claim. They met Thursday night with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials to begin to poke holes in the scientific data being used by FWS to study the lizard’s status as a potential candidate species for the federal endangered species list. FWS has until Dec. 14 to decide whether the lizard makes the list, and though the public comment period has already ended, scientific data or studies may still be submitted. Commissioners submitted several reports to FWS for review which challenge whether the lizard is really endangered. One such report, dubbed “The Kintigh Report,” sponsored by local lawmaker Rep. Dennis Kintigh, RRoswell, questioned whether the lizard’s habitat has really decreased by 40 percent, as asserted by the FWS based on a 1982

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study conducted by Dr. Kirk McDaniel, a New Mexico State University professor in the animal and range science department. FSW states that in 1982, there was an estimated one million acres of suitable habitat for the lizard found in New Mexico, but that “today, there is an estimated (600,000 acres) of suitable habitat, a decrease of 40 percent.” Authors of the Kintigh report contacted McDaniel about his study, and were surprised to learn that his survey of acreage of the land addressed just the ecology, distribution and management of selected brush species, not animal or other plant species. “The question concerning the distribution and habitat of the Dunes Sagebrush Lizard is an entirely different question that we never considered or addressed in our reports,” McDaniel wrote in an email response to the Kintigh Report authors. “To determine the distribution and habitat requirement of the dune sagebrush lizard would require a dif ferent and more targeted study. Presumably, the lizard occurs on some of the areas we mapped with shinnery oak, but our acreage estimates

CORRECTIONS

Saturday’s article on Page A2 “Police find body of local artist in park” incorrectly identified the person found as local artist Dawson Napps. The person found was Dawson Napps Jr., the son of the artist. The Record regrets the error.

Sunday’s article on Page A1 “Waymaker sings tribute” incorrectly stated the Roswell Symphony Orchestra participated in the event. Individual members of the RSO performed, but the symphony itself was not involved in the event. The Record regrets the error.

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should in no way be equated to those currently occupied or required by the lizard.” Commissioners also asked FWS to review the so-called “Fitzgerald Report,” compiled by Texas A&M University zoologist Lee A. Fitzgerald, that questions whether lizard populations are negatively affected within oil and gas development sites; as well as a one-page, unsourced document that appears to be field notes that FSW cited as scientific data. Commissioners described that document as “cryptic notes” and unscientific, while another argued that it would not hold up to the requirements in the federal Quality of Information Act. FWS officials at the meeting could not comment on much of the heated discussion because they are prohibited from doing so since the public comment period concluded May 29. However, Wally Murphy, supervisor of the state’s ecological services field offices, and Tom Buckley, public affairs specialist for the southwest region for the Service, said they were happy to accept any scientific data, or critique thereof, that could influence the decision the director of the FWS, head-

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Mark Wilson Photo

Chaves County Commisioner chairman Greg Nibert, flanked by Dan Girand, of Roswell, a member of the Chaves County Public Lands Advisory Committee, to his left, and commissioners Richard Taylor and Kim Chesser to his right, motions to an individual in the audience Thursday evening, during a meeting with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials about the sand dune lizard.

quartered in Washington D.C., has to make by year’s end. The director also has the option of extending the deadline for about 90 days, if new evidence or data is presented before the December deadline. Commissioner chairman Greg Nibert says the county will keep chipping away at the data because commissioners remain unconvinced from existing evidence that the lizard is in fact endangered, or even

missioners assembled a team, headed by “lizard czar” Dan Girand, of Roswell, a member of the Chaves County Public Lands Advisory Committee, to coordinate ef forts to keep the lizard from being listed between Chaves, Lea, Eddy and Roosevelt counties, and five counties in Texas. They recently held two meetings in Artesia, and plan on hosting more in the near future.

emiller@roswell-record.com

STATE BRIEF

ALBUQUERQUE — The Albuquerque Police Department says it’s cracking down on organized groups of thieves. The department announced Monday that it’s forming a new economic crimes section that will be focused on catching thieves who target the same businesses over and over again and then turn a profit by selling the goods online and at flea markets. The section will also include the department’s white collar crimes and pawn shop units. The section will initially consist of six new detectives, a sergeant and a lieutenant. City officials pointed to statistics from the Coalition Against Organized Retail Crime. The group says thieves steal more than $206 million in merchandise from New Mexico retail outlets each year. That accounts for more than $10 million in loss gross receipt taxes.

“Real Estate Corner”

“WHEN REMODELING IS WORTH IT” by Connie DeNio of Roswell 622-7191 or 626-7948

Remodeling your current home may seem like a good idea ... adding an extra bath or bedroom, or modernizing the kitchen. But how can you tell if it's better to move than remodel? One rule of thumb is that if your home is already at the high end of the price range for your neighborhood, moving makes more sense.

threatened. Nibert, and other commissioners, emphasized that they are worried the listing of lizard would kill jobs in the oil and gas industry and devastate the local economy that is dependent on that revenue. They began this latest campaign in the spring after a political rally headlined by U.S. Congressman Steve Pearce, R-Roswell, garnered national attention. Since that time, com-

Estimate the cost of planned improvements. Add fifty percent of that cost to the appraised value of your home. If the new value will put the price over the top ten percent for your neighborhood, think twice before remodeling. You may not be able to recoup your investment when you sell. © Call Me Today!

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GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

A3

Obama adminstration developing Alzheimer’s plan

WASHINGTON (AP) — As her mother’s Alzheimer’s worsened over eight long years, so did Doreen Alfaro’s bills: The walker, then the wheelchair, then the hospital bed, then the diapers — and the caregivers hired for more and more hours a day so Alfaro could go to work and her elderly father could get some rest. Alfaro and her husband sold their California house to raise money for her mother’s final at-home care. Six years later, the 58-year-old Alfaro wonders if she eventually develops Alzheimer’s, too, “what happens to my care? Where will I go?” Dementia is poised to become a defining disease of the rapidly aging population — and a budget-busting one for Medicare, Medicaid and families. Now the Obama administration is developing the first National Alzheimer’s Plan, to combine research aimed at fighting the mind-destroying disease with help that caregivers need to stay afloat. “This is a unique opportunity, maybe an opportunity of a lifetime in a sense, to really have an impact on this disease,” says Dr. Ronald Petersen of the Mayo Clinic, who chairs a committee that later this month begins advising the government on what that plan should include. An estimated 5.4 million have Americans Alzheimer’s or similar dementias. It’s the sixthleading killer. There is no cure; treatments only temporarily ease some symptoms. Barring a research breakthrough, those num-

bers will worsen steadily as the baby boomers gray: By 2050, anywhere from 13 million to 16 million Americans are projected to have Alzheimer’s, costing a $1 trillion in medical and nursing home expenditures. But that’s not the full toll. Sufferers lose the ability to do the simplest activities of daily life and can survive that way for a decade or more, requiring years of care from family, friends or paid caregivers. Already a recent report finds that nearly 15 million people, mostly family members, are providing more than $200 billion worth of unpaid care. Thousands of those caregivers have turned out at public meetings since early August — and at a “telephone town meeting” organized by the Alzheimer’s Association that drew 32,000 people — pleading for a national Alzheimer’s strategy to bring changes. They want primary care doctors trained to diagnose dementia earlier, describing how years of missed symptoms cost them precious time to make plans or seek treatment. They demand to know why the National Institutes of Health spends about six times more on AIDS research than on Alzheimer’s, when there are good drugs to battle back the HIV virus but nothing comparable for dementia. Overwhelmingly, they ask for resources to help Alzheimer’s patients live their last years at home without ruining their caregivers’ own health and finances.

“Either you’re rich and can afford $25 an hour for care at home, or you send him to a facility. We’re in the middle of the road,” says Shirley Rexrode of suburban San Francisco, whose 85-year-old father, Hsien-Wen Li, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s nearly three years ago. Adult day care didn’t work out — even at $90 a day, the only place with an opening couldn’t handle the behaviors of Alzheimer’s. Rexrode’s mother, Li’s primary caregiver, already has suffered some depression. “We just have to muddle through, but we don’t know how long we can,” Rexrode says. And while Medicare will pay for doctor bills and medications, even getting to the doctor can be a hurdle. When her 89-year-old mother with advanced Alzheimer’s developed a urinary tract infection, Susan Lynch couldn’t find a doctor willing to come to her parents’ home in Fall River, Mass. L ynch flew there from her Gaithersburg, Md., home but couldn’t carry her mother down the stairs. A private ambulance service didn’t have an opening for weeks. L ynch wound up calling the town ambulance for a costly but Medicare-covered trip to the emergency room. Federal health officials, who promise a first draft of the national plan by December, say they’re getting the message. “Folks desperately, desperately want to be able to provide the care themselves,” says Donald Moulds, a deputy assistant secretary at the Depart-

Ap Photo

Shou-Mei Li, left, wraps a scarf around her husband Hsien-Wen Li, who is an Alzheimer's patient, as their daughter Shirley Rexrode, right, looks on, at their home in San Francisco, in this photo taken, Sept. 1, 2011. ment of Health and Human Services who oversees the project. “It’s very, very hard work. Figuring out better mechanisms for supporting people who are trying to do that work is, one, the right thing to do.” It also may be cheaper for taxpayers. Nursing homes not only are pricier than at-home care, but many families only can afford them through Medicaid, the health care program for the poor. Another key, Moulds says, is better care coordination as Alzheimer’s complicates the many other health problems of aging. But given the budget crisis, the big question is whether any antiAlzheimer’s strategy can come with enough dollars and other incentives attached to spur true change. “That’s a concern, a very

real one,” says Mayo’s Petersen. The law that requires a national Alzheimer’s plan didn’t set funding, and Moulds is mum on a possible price tag. Almost complete is an inventory of all Alzheimer’s-related research and care reimbursement paid for by the U.S. government, to look for gaps that need filling and possible savings to help pay for them. Other countries including England and Australia — and 25 U.S. states, by Moulds’ count — have developed their own Alzheimer’s plans. But the U.S. is taking a special look at France, where President Nicolas Sarkozy in 2008 pledged to invest 1.6 billion euros, about $2.2 billion, over five years for better diagnosis, research and caregiver support and training.

Sarkozy told an international Alzheimer’s Association meeting in July that he wants to guarantee “that no French family is left without support.” Moulds says it’s too early to know what’s working in France. But U.S. families are telling him that any Alzheimer’s plan must bring better understanding of a disease too often suffered in isolation. “What I want to see is mainly awareness, awareness of this disease and what it does not only to the individual but also to the network of family and friends that are going to care for the person,” says Alfaro, of Aptos, Calif. “It should be as understood as diabetes, and as treatable,” adds Audrey Wiggins of Triangle, Va., whose father has and grandmother died of Alzheimer’s.

U.S. Soldiers to be spread thinner to perform other missions

Gen. David M. Rodriguez salutes the United State flag before he is installed as commander of United State Army Forces Command at Fort Bragg, N.C., Monday, Sept. 12, 2011. ( F0RT BRAGG, N.C. (AP) — As the war in Afghanistan winds down, the U.S. soldiers will be spread thinner and must be ready to per for m a wider array of missions., the new Army commander in charge of training and providing troops for the wars said Monday. Gen. David Rodriguez, who took over as head of U.S. Ar my Forces Command on Monday, said that as troops withdraw

from Afghanistan, one brigade may have to take over where two have been working. And he said they must be trained to coordinate and use the high-tech surveillance, communications, and command and control systems that are flooding into the war zone. “I don’t think we can afford to have a bunch of tailored forces for different things,” Rodriguez said in an interview with The Associated Press just

before he took over his new command. “That’s why we’re going to have to be able to operate across the full spectrum of conflict and use the tools and apply them in the right way.” A veteran of more than 40 months in Afghanistan over the past 4 1/2 years, Rodriguez takes over Forces Command as the Ar my faces a dif ficult future. The Obama administration and a fractious

Congress are wrangling over hundreds of millions of dollars in cuts to the Pentagon budget that could slash programs and force deeper reductions in the size of the ar med forces. Already the Army is set to cut nearly 50,000 soldiers by 2016, trimming the force back to about 520,000. U.S. Army Forces Command, newly located at Fort Bragg, is the largest Ar my command and is responsible for training and preparing soldiers for battle, with deployments to more than 30 nations, including Iraq and Afghanistan. Looking into the future, Rodriguez said he needs to be able to provide the trained and ready forces that commanders at the warfront need to meet a diverse threat. The Army of tomorrow, he said, will have to be more flexible and adapt to many situations, from conventional warfare and deadly counterinsurgency campaigns to training missions that can help an emerging nation learn to protect itself. Any future enemy will

launch a hybrid attack that could involve a host of tactics, including chemical warfare, car bombs and cyberattacks. And the Army’s leaders, he said, will have to adjust and “switch between high tempo offensive operations to a defensive operation to a stability operation to a humanitarian operation.” As Rodriguez assumed his new command, just a few blocks away about 200 82nd Airborne soldiers, weighted down with packs, were saying emotional goodbyes to their families and boarding buses to the airfield, where they would begin their flight to Afghanistan. Speaking at Rodriguez’ assumption of command ceremony, Gen. Ray Odierno, chief of staf f of the Ar my, said that in this time of uncertainty, the U.S. must continue to field the best equipped, best trained and best led force. Odier no said he will be looking to Rodriguez and Forces Command to “move the Ar my forward” and lead it into the future. Soldiers today must be trained not only on how to use their weapons and conduct operations, but

they must also master an ever -expanding array of high-tech intelligence, surveillance, communications and other equipment. That will be particularly important, Rodriguez said, as forces shift to the hotly contested eastern border region of Afghanistan, where the rugged terrain and often isolated tribal communities force a greater reliance on longrange observation, a stronger link between manned and unmanned surveillance equipment and dependence on a fragile human intelligence network. “In my first 20 years in the Army we probably got about 20-30 new systems,” Rodriguez said. “In 15 months (in Afghanistan) when I was a division commander I got 172 new ones.” Rodriguez, who was second in command in Afghanistan, is a 1976 graduate of the U.S. Military Academy. In addition to holding commands at all levels, he also served as the senior military assistant to then-Defense Secretary Robert Gates.

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Dear Fredda, I am concerned about my elderly parents’ Activities of Daily Living, or ADLs, are routine tasks engaged, while tasks like meal preparation, housekeeping, and feel they would be better off living in a retirement required by all of us to get through the day, and often taken and even transportation are taken care of by the community. community with other seniors. However, they are resistfor granted. But ADLs for the elderly can be physically taxAnother benefit of a senior retirement community setting is ant at moving into a retirement community because they ing, from personal hygiene and grooming, standing in the the socialization so seniors are not isolated. The relationfear losing their independence by sacrificing their kitchen preparing meals, to cleaning up, maintaining the ships that blossom include deep friendships to even the lifestyle and freedom. Will they really lose their indehome and yard, and even grocery trips and errands. These occasional romantic bond. Such a social setting allows senpendence? routine tasks can become physically dangerous as well as iors to once again blossom and enjoy the daily interaction of The concern of sacrificing independence by moving into a mentally and physically exhausting to the point where all friendship while pursuing activities of their choosing, and not senior retirement community is probably one of the most energy is expended on maintaining themselves and their those tasks of necessity. common concerns faced by families looking at options for home. That isn’t independence; rather they’ve become a Quite simply, many residents describe their experience of their loved ones. The elderly family member may be afraid slave to their current home and lifestyle. living in a senior retirement community like that of living on a that moving into a senior community will be at the expense of Senior retirement communities provide assistance with cruise ship that never sails, but offers all the amenities of a their sense of independence and freedom. Ironically, what ADLs so residents have time and energy to pursue leisure permanent full-time vacation. happens is just the opposite – when seniors move into a senactivities of their choosing. Diverse socialization opportuniFredda ior community, they often regain their lost independence. ties and activity programs keep residents entertained and If you have questions about senior care or retirement living, contact Fredda Sanders, Community Marketing Director at Peachtree Village at 575-627-8070 or by e-mail at peachtreemkg@islllc.com. Peachtree Village is an Independent Living Community located at 1301 W Country Club Road, Roswell, New Mexico 88201. You can also visit Peachtree Village online at www.peachtreeret.com

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A4 Tuesday, September 13, 2011

OPINION

Roswell Daily Record

Lessons on sharing power the governor should heed

Former Gov. Gary Johnson weighed in on adding more freight to the legislative camel: Gov. Susana Martinez has a right to add whatever she wants to the legislative call, he said, and the Legislature has the right to hear it or not. Understanding what’s going on in Santa Fe requires a swim in the undercurrents. Gov. Susana Martinez hasn’t shed her prosecutor persona and treats all encounters with legislators like a courtroom battle. In the Legislature we have more lawyers who often forget they’re not in court, plus some hardened political players. Neither side negotiates until everybody’s bloodied. The Legislature itself is an institution of tradition, convention and formality, not to mention statutory requirements. Small courtesies lubricate the gears. It has its own tempo and will waltz, even if the governor demands a polka. Lawmakers often say, “There are

SHERRY ROBINSON ALL SHE WROTE

three branches of government.” What they mean is, the governor must share power. If there were a class for new governors, that should be the first lesson. Corollary 1: Don’t blow off leaders of the other branches. Corollary 2: Don’t order them around. Now refresh your memory of redistricting. This is when boundaries in 130 political districts of four elected bodies must be redrawn to reflect population changes. Move a line this way or that, and it can affect many other lines. At play are political futures, community interests, minority vot-

ing rights and the usual tug-ofwar between urban and rural. The colorful maps mask a minefield of tough decisions that will last 10 years and may need to be defended in court, which is why lawmakers don’t want distractions, and no previous governor has added unrelated agenda items. In a speech days before the session began, Martinez blasted Democratic lawmakers for saying they were “too busy to handle 10 simple bills.” The governor, understandably, doesn’t want legislators to think she’s a pushover, and she’s trying to keep campaign promises. But here’s how this plays out. Legislators asked Martinez to schedule the session after Santa Fe Fiestas because the city is crowded, hotel rooms near the capitol are harder to find and more expensive, and their per diem won’t stretch that far. Mar-

tinez scheduled during Fiestas. (Breach of courtesy.) A bipartisan panel wrote the governor a letter asking her to not put any controversial issues on the call. They got no response. (Violation of Corollary 1). She added unrelated issues to a session called for redistricting and wrote a proclamation loaded with campaign rhetoric. (Breach of convention.) Now, some unrelated bills aren’t an unconscionable burden if they’re uncomplicated, enjoy consensus, or could have passed the regular session. The slam dunks are tightening the in-state preference law for business, appropriating money for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, and clarifying provisions of the highwage tax credit. The maybes are allowing local governments to ban fireworks during a drought, changing the way employers pay unemployment insurance premiums, and the $211 capital outlay

bill. Bills to end social promotion of third graders, combine six departments into three, and eliminate immigrant driver’s licenses are DOA because in a short session with skeleton crew that costs taxpayers $50,000 a day, their debate would run up time and costs. When Martinez held a press conference to urge support of the school social-promotion ban, Sen. Mary Jane Garcia, a veteran Dem, was invited to add a good word. Instead she announced her opposition, telling Martinez she didn’t have time to call about her change of heart. Yeah, right. Garcia’s breach of courtesy was payback. Leaders of both chambers began the waltz saying they will tackle redistricting first and get to unrelated business as they have time, a reminder of Lesson 1. The governor can keep demanding a polka, but she would get more done by learning to waltz. © New Mexico News Services 2011

EDITORIAL

War contractors

The bipartisan Commission on Wartime Contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan reported to Congress two weeks ago that in the past nine years, at least $31 billion, and maybe as much as $60 billion, of the $206 billion paid to contractors working for the military, the State Department and the U.S. Agency for International Development has been lost to waste, fraud and abuse. That the commission couldn’t get any closer than $29 billion in its precision speaks to how difficult it is to track. The surprising news is that the report estimates that fraud accounts for only 5 percent to 9 percent of the loss, a mere $10.3 billion to $18.5 billion. This percentage is in line with what fraud costs commercial transactions in the United States. The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners estimates that 7 percent of commercial revenue in the United States is drained away by fraud. Based on current GDP of $15 trillion, that’s more than $1 trillion a year. Thus it would appear that Americans are no more honest than Iraqis or Afghans — maybe even less so, considering that much of the fraud in their countries is perpetrated by Americans. A relative handful of them have been prosecuted, but the cases are tough to make. The bigger failures are waste and abuse, but, as the report makes clear, Americans are responsible for a lot of that, too. Examples range from giant unfinished power plants to the excesses of Halliburton to outof-control private security contractors to — as former State Department Iraq hand Peter Van Buren writes in his book “We Meant Well” — $12,000 worth of computers for a school that not only wasn’t wired for electricity, but had no students or teachers. There’s a business-school lesson in this report: Contracting failure in these two theaters of war are directly related to management and oversight failure. We can’t blame the Iraqis or the Afghans for that. “The volume and complexity of contract actions have overwhelmed the ability of government to plan for, manage and oversee contractors in theater,” the report concludes. Further, the commission reports, the United States spends a lot of money building things and establishing programs that the Iraqi and Afghan governments are unlikely to be able to sustain. The report contains many recommendations for the next “contingency operation.” The recommendations include a lot of people, oversight and enforcement. These aren’t as sexy as precision munitions and SEAL missions, but they save a lot more money. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Contracting Oversight, has been holding widely ignored hearings on these issues for four years. “Now I’ve got a hard number,” she said. “I’m convinced that’s there has been at least $60 billion lost. Nobody can say that’s just change lost in the couch.” “We’ve got to fix this,” McCaskill said. “I’ve supported our mission in Afghanistan, but before we go in anywhere else, we need to ask two things. What is the risk? And what are the prospects for long-term sustainability?” Guest Editorial The St. Louis Post-Dispatch DEAR DR. GOTT: My husband, age 59, recently lost a tooth. He dentist “glued” it back in place with some sort of bonding substance. Since then, the tooth frequently loosens and falls out. My husband now keeps a super glue on hand and reattaches it himself. Around the same time his tooth fell out, he started complaining of pain traveling throughout his body. Sometimes it is in his wrist, which causes swelling, and other times it is in his hips, causing him to shuffle when he walks. Other times, he says he feels it’s in his blood, resulting in an all-over pain. He claims that he will often feel better after physical activity. He

Moving forward toward hope Do you remember that feeling of total unity after Sept. 11? I saw it in New York. I saw it in the tourists from North Carolina who came to show their love for Manhattan and their country. I waved to all the firefighters, not caring who saw my unabashed feelings. I interviewed family members of those who were lost on that day, strangers who, in a matter of an hour or two, seemed to become part of my extended family. I saw what breaking down barriers looks like when people are forced by necessity to look into each other’s eyes

Doonesbury

ASK DR. GOTT UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

takes ibuprofen regularly to control the pain. We thought it might be L yme disease, but now I’m wondering if it may have something to do with the “glue.” He started a new job and will be eligible for health insurance in the fall. He would like to put off seeing a doctor until that time, as he does not want a record of a pre-existing

MARIA HINOJOSA SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

and help, when the color of your skin or your accent or your legal status doesn’t matter because you are all covered in gray dust anyway. At that moment, all you can do is help someone next to you. Human nature can be pushed forward positively through

condition. Thank you for any help you can give us. I am very concerned about him. DEAR READER: Did the dentist give your husband a reason why the tooth fell out? In my experience, healthy adults typically don’t lose teeth without a reason. This can vary from poor oral hygiene to medication side effects. I am not sure the bonding agent the dentist used is to blame; however, given that the tooth falling out and the onset of pain coincided, they may be linked. My first thought when you described your husband’s symptoms was some form of arthritis. If there is a possibility of

fear, too. I am scared, but you are scared. All we have in this loneliest of moments is each other. Immediately after the towers fell, I went to another shore of my humanity, one I didn’t even know existed. That is what shock can do. That was me who felt warm and gushy toward President George W. Bush and Mayor Rudy Giuliani, and who once said I supported racial profiling, who once said that if any American journalist knew where Osama bin Laden was and didn’t reveal it, then he or she should be tried for treason

Lyme, I urge your husband to undergo testing. Lyme is not a self-limiting infection; it will worsen over time and without treatment can cause serious, permanent damage. The sooner the diagnosis is made and treatment is begun, the better. There are far too many individuals suffering the long-lasting effects of undiagnosed L yme simply because they waited to long to see a doctor or, unfortunately, their physicians put of f their symptoms, often claiming, “We don’t have Lyme disease here.” I understand that your husband doesn’t want to have a pre-existing condition listed in his medical records when it See GOTT, Page A5

and sentenced to life. That, too, was fear, and feelings of disempowerment. And they lasted too long. A tragedy can do that. It defines the nation through our shared experience and what it means to be united. How do I measure a decade? Being a journalist, I’ve never made a big issue about it, but I had severe post-traumatic stress disorder after 9/11. There had just been a personal, shocking tragedy in my own life only weeks before 9/11, and being a mom and a

See HINOJOSA, Page A5

25 YEARS AGO

Sept. 13, 1986 • Abel P. Montez of Roswell, a junior at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, has been awarded a $1,500 Gannett Foundation Journalism Scholarship. As a winner in the foundation’s annual national journalism scholarship competition, Montez is one of 54 outstanding young scholars selected from 692 applicants. A total of $96,000 was awarded. Recipients where chosen on the basis of their developing journalistic skills, educational aptitudes and personal qualities. Montez, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs. Amador Montez of Roswell, is a 1984 graduate of Roswell High School. Five entering freshman and 37 other undergraduates, as well as 12 graduate students, earned either full-year or onesemester scholarships.


OPINION II

Roswell Daily Record

LETTERS

Don’t glorify Billy the Kid

Dear Editor: Tragically, New Mexico is nationally ranked seventh per capita in violent crime — many of the victims have been minors. Criminals (e.g. the Memphis Gang) have flocked and are flocking to our state, because in their own words, “New Mexico is soft on crime.” Sadly, our state has a juvenile delinquency, including a gang, problem. Even my own, rural county (Lincoln County) has a gang problem (e.g. the Norteno and Sureno street gangs). As the governor and leader of New Mexico, Gov. Susana Martinez has set a bad example for our youth by implementing the “Catch the Kid” game in honor of the thief and murderer, Billy the Kid. As a former DA, she is hypocritically touting (Tout: “To promote; to glorify”) Billy the Kid; therefore, she is glorifying outlawry, including murder. “One cannot be anticrime and simultaneously be pro-criminal.” Additionally, as a former DA, she should know that you cannot serve a warrant to; arrest, try, jail and/or execute a dead person. Money is the primary reason that Governor Martinez is touting the thief and murderer Billy the Kid. “Avarice usually outweighs morality.” The next time that the governor asks, “Why does our state have a juvenile delinquency, including a gang, problem,” all she has to do is look in the mirror. Per Colin Powell, “Ask not what is wrong with today’s children; ask what is wrong with today’s adults.” Remember, the so-called Kid is touted as an “outlaw” and nothing else. We adults, especially our leaders, must set a proper example for our youth by touting lawful instead of unlawful behavior. There are no issues more important than children issues. They’re even more important than the issuing of drivers licenses to illegal aliens. Hopefully, the governor will become a proper role model and an advocate for our state’s youth. By the way, I’m an agnostic and an unaffiliated voter who voted for Governor Martinez. I’m now having second thoughts. Sincerely, Franklin L. Boren Tinnie

Failing education system

Dear Editor: In response to Mr. Dolen’s letter; I criticized free lunches, uniforms, planners and computers in the classroom not on their individual merits, but because each was sold to the public with the promise that each would be the answer to poor performance by our students and teachers and, of course, such has not been the case. I think this is a valid criticism. And I didn’t speak up when RISD was praised because RISD does not deserve praise. You can spin my letter anyway you want, which is what people do when they try to defend the indefensible, but you can’t spin the r esults. And I would have expected better from someone with your background as a school board member. The bottom line Mr. Dolen is that

Hinojosa Continued from Page A4

New Yorker made me feel vulnerable the way I never felt in the war zones I had reported from. Right after 9/11, I was so scared, so overwhelmed with fear, that I had images of bombs being dropped on our fifth-floor walk-up apartment. I had clear images of planes slamming into buildings. My heart would start racing, and I would start sweating whenever the color -coded security alert was mentioned. The words “Kabul,” “collateral damage” and “Taliban” made me shudder inside. My path to healing, which involved my family, my friends, my healer and holistic doctor and especially my running, gave me perspective and helped me to see how quickly I was willing to “give up” certain freedoms, and even point a finger at unseen enemies. Running long distances everywhere I could — in Central Park, the hills of Connecticut, in Cocoyoc, Mexico, or Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic — saved my life. Running allowed me to physically connect with nature and my strength. Slow-

American Schools are failing in a big way. In the 1960s, America ranked number one among industrialized nations in science and math. We now rank somewhere around 17th and 28th, respectively. This is a major failure. Fifty percent of public school students cannot read or do math at grade level. Over 50 percent of high school graduates must take one or more remedial course when they enter college. The drop-out rate is astronomical. Of 50 states, New Mexico ranks number 42 for quality of education. Pathetic. These are not opinions, but undeniable facts. None of the above mentioned programs have mitigated this in the slightest. Yet you constantly ask for more money to continue them. America spends more per student than any other country in the world and it has gotten us a thirdrate public school system. In fact, there seems to be an inverse r elationship between the amount of money we give you and the results you produce. More money equals poorer performance. Yet you continue to do the same things. Doing the same things and expecting different results is delusional. The end result is that your philosophy of education has sent thou sands of young people into the world with very little education and no marketable skills. Computers in the classroom can’t change that. If you want to give them an edge, teach them to read and do math. There’s no free lunch in the real world. Sincerely, Rick Wolfert Roswell

Three decisions in 30 days

Dear Editor: KOB reported on Aug. 30, 2011, that Governor Martinez has called a 30-day special legislation session for the decennial redistricting. She added two items on the special session agenda. The legislators are being asked to consider eliminating drivers’ licenses for illegal immigrants and elimination of social promotion for third-grade pupils who are not reading at grade level. Senator Garcia stated that the addition of these two topics was unreasonable and could not be decided in the 30-day session. One would assume most legislators have already discussed these items with their constituents or in caucuses, or in one, or more, of the myriad of committees that the Legislature has established. Redistricting is a regular occurrence every 10 years after the census is completed. This issue should be no surprise. The drivers’ license issue has been considered before and is frequently in the news. This issue should be no surprise. Pupils’ performance in reading has been a major topic every year. This issue should be no surprise. It is only logical that each legislator should have a pretty good grasp of the importance of each of these topics. Why should it take 30 days, or as Senator Garcia stated, more than 30 days to make a decision on these three items? There are only three decisions any legislator must make on any of these issues; yea, nay or abstain, Thirty days should be ample time to make a decision. We make multiple decisions daily that ly, I let go of debilitating fear, and the wounds began to heal. It took three long years to be able to look at my diagnosis with any objectivity, and say not “move on,” but rather, I have known PTSD. This has been instructive. How do you define a decade? For this generation, 9/11 has been the defining event. On this anniversary, we need to decide if we come out of this decade of war with more strength than we have fear. I mark this anniversary by consciously choosing to move forward and push beyond the fear of change and difference that our country is still steeped in. I want to stare fear in its face and say: “You had me 10 years ago. I battled you every day. But I am going to defy you.” I will not let fear ruin my hope for this nation, or me as a citizen. Maria Hinojosa is an award-winning broadcast jour nalist. She hosts the Emmy Award-winning “Maria Hinojosa: One-on-One” on PBS, and is the anchor and managing editor of her own NPR show, “Latino USA.” Contact her at mh@futuromediagroup.org. © 2011 by Maria Hinojosa

Suppor t the U n i t e d Wa y

affect our lives, our families, friends and even our communities. Should we expect less from or elected leaders? If the legislators cannot make three decisions in 30 days, there are three questions for the citizenry. 1. Are these legislators up to the task for which they were elected? 2. Are these legislators worth the per diem and perks/benefits they are receiving? 3. Have we elected persons of sufficient competence to determine the legislation that affects all the citizens of New Mexico? Should we continue to bear the consequences of inaction, bur eaucratic stalling, legislative posturing and lack of legislative service? Just imagine if there were an emergency in our state. Could, or would, the legislators be able to make a decision in a timely manner? Our cities and counties need decision makers, not procrastinators, to represent us in Santa Fe. Respectfully, John Lankford Roswell

The National Debt

Dear Editor: Recently, Congressman Steve Peace, representing the Second District of New Mexico, held an open forum at the Roswell Adult Center. Not having been in attendance at the forum, I am limited to responding to a letter to the editor from one who was present. In his letter, a Mr. Osborne accused Congressman Pearce of misleading his constituents by using “fantasy” numbers and not real numbers. He took issue with Congressman Pearce’s assessment that President Obama’s budget, by the White House’s own projections, will accumulate more debt by 2020 than every president – from George Washington to George Bush

LETTER POLICY

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

A5

combined. According to Wikipedia, when Obama took of fice, the national debt was $10.413 trillion, and according to CNN has already increased by $4 trillion during Obama’s first term. Also, in an article carried by the National Crisis Debt group, the Obama Administration’s own projection has estimated the national debt will increase by approximately $6.5 trillion by the end of the president’s first term. If Obama is elected for a second term, and the rate of spending remains the same, by the end of his second term, the national debt will have increased by more than $12 trillion. So using “real” numbers, the debt incurred during Obama’s tenure will exceed the debt of all other administrations combined. Mr. Osbor ne apparently was using “fantasy” numbers when he made the claim that the president offered a $4 trillion debt reduction plan that was rejected by the tea party caucus. That plan, titled “Moment of Truth,” prepared by the 18 member debt-reduction committee, identified $3.89 trillion of cuts in the deficit. However, the plan was never presented to the Congress by the president, because his own party vocifer ously opposed the debt reduction plan since it included projected cuts to Social Security and Medicare. The only plan pertaining to the debt crisis presented to Congress by the president was a bogus budget bill that added $10 trillion in new debt which was unceremoniously rejected in the Senate by a 97-0 vote. To be sure, there is plenty of blame to go around for the uncontrolled growth in our national debt. To reverse this trend, we need to hold our elected of ficials accountable and demand that they balance the budget and significantly reduce the national debt. Ted Traxler Roswell

The Daily Record welcomes and attempts to publish all letters to the editor that meet guidelines. To be published, letters must include the writer’s first and last name, address and telephone number. Addresses and telephone numbers will not be published unless the letter asks for a response. Addresses and telephone numbers are used for verification or to contact the letter writer for more information. All letters except those sent by e-mail must be signed. Letters which are libelous, written in poor taste, promote or attack individual businesses or concern active civil court cases will not be published. Letters must either be typed or written or printed legibly. Because of limited space, letters should not exceed 600 words. Because of the large volume of letters received, those unpublished may not be acknowledged or returned and a maximum of two letters a month will be printed by any individual writer. The Daily Record reserves the right to reject any letter.

Gott

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comes to obtaining new health insurance. However, he isn’t doing himself any favors by waiting. DEAR DR. GOTT: Almost two years ago my husband had a CT of the lungs ordered by his regular physician. His scan showed “multiple lymph nodes” and he was referred to a lung specialist, but he refused to go. He canceled his appointment, and no other follow-up has taken place. My husband is a stubborn man sometimes. What does “multiple lymph nodes” mean? DEAR READER: Lymph nodes are filters within the lymphatic system. Most people are familiar with having “swollen glands” associated with a sore throat. These are, in fact, lymph nodes responding to an infection. These nodes are located throughout the body in the

neck, chest, groin, under the arms and other areas, and can swell in response to bacterial and viral infections, inflammation, certain immune disorders and various forms of cancer. Treatment depends on the cause, but your husband is still without a diagnosis. In most instances infection is the cause; however, your husband must have been having some difficulties for the CT to have been ordered. He is risking his health, and possibly his life, by refusing to see the specialist. Unfortunately, until he consents there is nothing you can do for him. I recommend you try to reason with him and express your concerns; perhaps he will relent. Dr. Peter H. Gott is a retired physician and the author of several books, including “Live Longer, Live Better,” “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Diet” and “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Cookbook,” which are available at most bookstores or online. His website is www.AskDrGottMD.com.


A6 Tuesday, September 13, 2011 Pace

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Much of that work has occurred outside the view of the public in closed-door party caucuses. But Lujan and Senate Majority Leader Michael Sanchez, D-Belen, said there’s no consensus yet on redistricting plans among Democrats, who

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as of yet. “I’m sympathetic to the concept that it takes a while to ramp things up but we’ve gone past that time. Now it’s time for committees to be meeting.” House Speaker Ben Lujan was at the forefront of criticism yesterday for holding up the progress of the session. Speaking candidly, Kintigh disclosed his support of a past coalition effort to overthrow Lujan. Having the power to assign legislators to a committee and to decide which bills those committees will hear, Kintigh said, gives

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Prime Time to the competition. This is Skalko’s first time showing her dogs in Roswell, but she’s no stranger to winning. Grand Champion is in fact a grand champion. Aside from the powder and cholesterol mixture, Skalko said she feeds her dogs

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revered status as a selffunded insurance program in which payroll taxes collected from workers pay benefits for retirees, the disabled and their survivors. The proposal would put Social Security into competition for scarce federal dollars with other programs, leaving it more exposed to budget-cutters. Last year, Social Security’s expenditures were $49 billion more than it collected in taxes, the first time it ran a deficit since 1983. Back then, the deficit prompted a bipartisan commission headed by

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where the World T rade Center’s twin towers stood. Water cascades into the two voids, evoking the dust cloud that accompanied the towers’ fall. The falling water creates a constant whooshing, muffling the noise of the city and nearby construction. Jim Drzewiecki, a retired volunteer firefighter accompanying a current

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of Commerce Relocation and Visitors Guide and the Pecos Dining Guide for Southeaster n New Mexico. Faubus-McCarty says she is looking forward to working at the Daily Record. She will be responsible for all advertising, promotions, marketing, sales and public relations responsibilities, and will be managing a staff of 10 people.

GENERAL

tricting special session lasted 17 days. Legislative redistricting particularly poses thorny decisions for lawmakers because it af fects their home districts and possibly can make it hard for them to win re-election. Boundary changes also can alter the balance of power between Democrats and Republicans by tipping more districts in favor of

Roswell Daily Record

one party’s candidates. In some instances, two legislative incumbents could be paired in a new district, forcing them to run against each other next year if they seek re-election. “At least people are talking to each other,” Sanchez said of the private meetings of Senate Democrats on redistricting. “That’s good when they continue to talk.”

plans. “I think everything will start to move a little quicker,” Sanchez said in an interview. Sanchez said he expected lawmakers to deal first with redistricting of the Public Education Commission, whose 10 elective members can approve the establishment of charter schools. That’s expected to be the least controversial of the

redistricting assignments. Lawmakers also must revise boundaries of congressional, legislative and Public Regulation Commission districts to adjust for population changes during the past decade. The goal is to equalize district populations as much as possible to comply with the legal doctrine of one person, one vote. Ten years ago, a redis-

tions, such as his past role as an FBI special agent, Kintigh said he received the explanation that including him on the judiciary committee would result in over-representation from the Southeastern region of the state. Reaffirming that redistricting was still the top priority at the session, Kintigh emphasized the importance of coming to a decision on the Medicaid bill. “That’s $6 million that would go back to the federal government that we could use in this state. It’s a non-partisan issue, we just need to get it done.” Attributing the slow progression to the Democrats, Rep. Bob Wooley, R-

Roswell, said the party is stalling. “They’re [Democrats] not getting any of the governor’s bills to a committee. They’re waiting until the last minute to use it as a tactic for trading to get redistricting passed the way they want it. They can then trade it with her to get some of her bills passed, that’s my guess. “ Wooley was chosen to be a member of the labor committee, which the driver’s license bill and three others have been assigned to thus far. Rep. Candy Spence Ezzell, R-Roswell, disagrees with the decision made by Lujan to assign the driver’s license bill to the labor committee.

for one dog that prompted Shawna Swanson, of Glendale, Ariz., to show dogs at competitions. Years ago, Swanson had a Rottweiler that died at 8 years old — a relatively young age for the breed — due to genetic defects. “He was a sweet boy that I loved a lot,” Swanson said. “I didn’t want to go through that heartbreak again.” Not wanting to make the same mistake twice, she decided to attend a dog

show in Tucson, Ariz. “I went to a dog show, looking for a well-bred dog,” Swanson said. “I wanted to find a reputable breeder.” She eventually got another dog, a Rottweiler named Legend. When she realized her new puppy had show potential, she became involved in competitions. Now 8 1/2 years old, Legend sat quietly as Swanson helped other dogs prepare to venture out before the judges.

Alan Greenspan to curb benefits, increase FICA taxes and gradually raise the retirement age to push the system back into the black and create a huge reserve for covering benefits of baby boomers who are starting to retire now. The 2008 recession, with a net loss of 6.8 million jobs, and some workers’ decisions to retire early amid the economy’s stubborn softness have reduced the system’s revenues. “ Social Security, created in 1935, pays its beneficiaries from payroll taxes collected from workers and companies and from interest ear ned by the trust fund where those taxes are

deposited. The government collected $638 billion in payroll taxes last year and its trust fund is worth around $2.5 trillion. That $2.5 trillion, though, is not sitting in a gover nment vault. The government has borrowed it, and it’s one big component of the nation’s $14.3 trillion federal debt.. By law, the money is invested in special Treasury bonds — in effect a promise that the government will repay the Social Security system when the money is needed, plus interest. Meanwhile, with the federal budget running annual deficits exceeding $1 trillion, the government uses the trust fund cash

to help pay for all its other programs. Critics say the program’s trust fund is nothing more than a mountain of IOUs, money the cashstrapped gover nment would be hard pressed to repay. Others counter that a federal promise to provide Social Security with cash has always been as good as gold and any politician hedging on the bonds owned by the deeply popular program would do so at his own risk. Obama’s proposal to cut the payroll tax and finance part of Social Security from the overall federal budget has added has added a new twist to the

debate. Obama and Congress agreed in December to cut the 6.2 percent payroll tax that workers pay on their wages to 4.2 percent in 2011 as part of a deal continuing former President George W. Bush’s 2001 and 2003 tax cuts. That cost Social Security $112 billion — money the government is making up by putting an equal amount of additional IOUs in the system’s trust fund. Now Obama is proposing an even costlier plan for 2012. He would halve workers’ payroll taxes from 6.2 percent to 3.1 percent — about $1,500 a year in savings for a family earning $50,000.

Many analysts say that technically it makes little difference whether money going into Social Security’s trust fund comes from the payroll tax or from other government revenue. With next year’s presidential and congressional elections on the horizon, lawmakers remain eager to demonstrate support for the program. Underscoring that sensitivity, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., gave an response last week when asked if there was concern that Obama’s proposal would threaten Social Security’s financial soundness.

team of them from Lancaster, N.Y., said he was trembling as he stood next to the pools. The bronze plates carry the names of the 2,977 people killed in the terrorist attacks in New York, at the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania, plus the names of the six who died in the bombing of the trade center in 1993. The letters have been cut all the way through the metal, with empty space beneath them. Nearby are a half-dozen electronic directories to

help visitors find names, which are grouped not alphabetically but in ways that show the connections between co-workers, firefighters, airplane flight crews and other victims. The memorial’s architect, Michael Arad, said the plaza next to the pools was inspired by gatherings of mourners that he saw in New York’s Washington Square and Union Square after the attacks. There is a separate entrance for 9/11 family members and comrades of the fallen firefighters and

police of ficers. Certain days or hours will be set aside for them to visit privately. Workers are still building the 9/11 museum underneath the memorial. It is scheduled to open in 2012 and will include two of the forklike supports that were left standing when the World T rade Center fell, as well as a stairway that enabled hundreds to escape. Construction also continues next door on 1 World Trade Center, still called by many the Free-

dom Tower, which is more than 80 stories high so far and will be the nation’s tallest building at 1,776 feet. It is one of several new buildings that will eventually surround the memorial. Two World Trade Center will be 1,349 feet high with a diamond-shaped tip and an 80-foot antenna. The 53 stories of 3 World Trade Center will feature crisscross external braces. Admission to the memorial is free, but visitors must obtain passes in advance that allow them

to enter at a specified time. The cost of the memorial and museum has been put at about $700 million. The nonprofit organization that runs the project has raised about $400 million in private donations and is seeking federal funds. Jim Brown lost his brother -in-law, Kevin Bracken, and two other relatives on 9/11. He said he felt cheered after seeing Bracken’s name permanently on the memorial.

hold majorities in the two legislative chambers. A Senate committee began public hearings Monday to review redistricting proposals. A House committee started similar meetings last week and has them scheduled for the remainder of this week. However, no votes have been taken in committees on whether to recommend any specific redistricting too much power to the speaker of the House and that there needs to be more even sharing of authority. Believing there is a fair ness issue at stake, Kintigh stated, “It is like the head coach of the Green Bay Packers picking the starting lineup for the Pittsburgh Steelers.” Kintigh has been assigned to the energy committee and the consumer and public affairs committee, and is the only Republican who was not reassigned to their previous committee. Kintigh, who was assigned to the judiciary committee last year, was replaced by Rep. Cathrynn Brown, R-Carlsbad. Despite his qualificagood food and adds moisture to their coats with water mist. “You never bush a dry dog,” Skalko advised. “You always mist them first, and then brush.” Skalko has a total of four shelties, as well as two cats that the dogs help wash. “If you don’t have a dog or a cat, you just haven’t completed yourself,” she said. “They add so much to your life.” It was the love and grief

“I’m a firm believer of when opportunity knocks, you should answer the door,” she said. “And it knocked.” Before becoming the chamber’s executive director, Faubus-McCarty was in the electronic broadcasting business for 23 years. She was the vice-president and general manager of KBCQ and KCKN radio stations and was general manager of KOBR-TV from 1988 to 1998. She also served as a county commissioner in 2006. emiller@roswell-record.com

G e t C l a s s i fi e d

AGO

Continued from Page A1

the sponsor, but the drafter of the 1992 acts,” said King. He expressed sympathy and understanding for those who found it difficult to keep up with laws. “I r eceived a complaint against me once for violating the acts. You would think if I wrote it I would know it.” He pointed out that the courts are always adding to the interpretation of the laws. He then cited one of its most recent revisions came in June when the New Mexico Supr eme Court upheld the Court of Appeals decision that stated citizen complaints filed

against the police are public r ecor d and must be released upon demand. When it comes to the Open Meetings Act, King noted that violation of the law is a criminal offense. King said that the goal of his office was not only to provide information to ensure compliance, but also to provide arbitration. “If a complaint is registered, we work between the individual and the agency before it becomes necessary to go to court.” King, then, gave a rule of thumb for government officials. “If you don’t want to talk about it openly, then you need to think about what you ar e doing.” Executive Dir ector Sarah Walsh from FOG,

“Union people come and fill up the room so anyone wanting to testify in favor of the bill doesn’t have a chance to have their voice heard. The labor unions are so close in proximity to the state capital, they get there early enough so no one else can get into the room,” Ezzell said. Agreeing with the view expressed by several legislators that the “floor leader is holding things up,” Ezzell cited House Resolution 1, introduced Monday by Rep. Thomas Taylor, RFarmington, which states “Imploring the House of Representatives to work more diligently and expeditiously to consider legislation that has been introElaine Mayfield, co-chairwoman for the event, said there were plenty of local competitors in the show, including Mary Montgomery and her daughter, Taylor, who showed Siberian Huskies. One of their dogs, Kuna, did exceptionally well in his category. “It’s a process of elimination,” Mayfield said. A judge takes measurements of each competing dog, then watches how the dog walks and moves to judge

The Foundation for Open Gover nment, discussed the general issues about the law, what it provides and what it does not. “It gives no pr otection for embarrassing situation and no exemption for “not completed yet.” She referred to openness as an essential part of any representative government. Mona N. Valicenti, assistant attorney general, gave more details and specifics. “The government must pay $100 a day penalty for any delay in providing requested government records to the public.” She elaborated on the redaction of records, such as blacking out social security numbers and birth dates. However when questioned about names,

duced during the first special session of the fiftieth legislature.” Ezzell said the resolution blasted the speaker of the House and the rest of the Democratic party for dragging their feet. Hearing from the majority of her constituents, “Do your job,” and “Speaker Lujan quit dragging the state down again,” Ezzell said she hopes “more people become incensed with what’s going on up here and at the inaction of the Democratic party.” j.bergman@roswell-record.com

the dog’s build. “If the dog is built right, they move right,” Mayfield said. “Every breed has a standard, and that’s the ideal dog.” The best in show for Saturday’s event went to a standard poodle named Hightide Eclipse. Missy Galloway, of Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., owns the poodle. v.kahin@roswell-record.com

she answered the question with a question, “Why would you want to omit a name?” Most audience inquiries dealt with open gover nment meetings and what items can be discussed in closed session wher e it was repeated that openness is the rule. Secrecy is the exception. King provided presentations for schools, including inter net safety at Mountain View Middle School, underage drinking dangers with Century Council also at Mountain View Middle School, and a second pr ogram at the Civic Center about Trainthe-Trainer Meth Awareness and Prevention.

j.palmer@roswell-record.com


Roswell Daily Record

BUSINESS REVIEW

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

A7

Before (left to right), during and after pictures of damage caused by an automobile collision with the building’s metal siding. The wood framing was repaired, reinsulated and metal panels replaced.

Patton Construction Co.: Foundation Repair - Remodeling - Additions You can see from the photos and job histories, that Patton Construction's work is being delivered and enjoyed by many customers in the Roswell and Pecos Valley areas, including: • Remodeling;

• Room additions;

Before (left) and after pictures of a crack in a masonry archway caused by foundation settlement. The masonry arch was resupported with helical steel piers and lifted, closing the crack.

• Stabilizing building foundations utilizing the Fasteel® system of piers and tiebacks - including floor leveling, and foundation and concrete slab repairs;

• Concrete raising and leveling - commonly called or "Mudjacking" "Slabjacking"; • Siding, masonry and concrete;

• Bathroom remodels with special ceramic tile accents; and

• Door and window replacements.

At Patton Const. quality is the number one priority

The company is fully licensed and insured, including worker's compensation and general liability.

Call Patton Construction Company at 622-1622, to discuss your construction needs.

Quality and customer satisfaction are the priorities at Patton Construction, #7 Petro Drive.

Manuel Renteria is pointing to cracks in the masonry caused by foundation settlement. The house will have steel piers placed under the foundation and be resupported closing the gaps. Patton Construction specializes in stabilizing building foundations utilizing the Fasteel® system of piers and tiebacks-including floor leveling and foundation and concrete slab repairs. Please call Patton Construction for more information at 622-1622.

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A8 Tuesday, September 13, 2011

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Partly sunny

Partly cloudy

Wednesday

Partly sunny

Thursday

Friday

A thunderstorm possible

A thunderstorm possible

Saturday

Partly sunny

Sunday

Very warm with sunshine

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Monday

Mostly sunny

High 96°

Low 64°

92°/62°

87°/62°

84°/61°

87°/61°

91°/60°

88°/60°

W at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

NNW at 10-20 mph POP: 10%

NW at 6-12 mph POP: 15%

SE at 4-8 mph POP: 30%

S at 8-16 mph POP: 30%

S at 8-16 mph POP: 5%

S at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

S at 8-16 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 5 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 92°/59° Normal high/low ............... 87°/59° Record high ............... 97° in 1949 Record low ................. 49° in 1975 Humidity at noon ................... 18%

Farmington 79/56

Clayton 81/56

Raton 78/50

Precipitation 24 hours ending 5 p.m. Mon. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date ......................... Normal year to date .............

0.00” 0.23” 0.62” 1.96” 9.36”

Santa Fe 81/55

Gallup 74/51

Tucumcari 86/58

Albuquerque 81/61

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 90/57

Moderate Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading 58 0-50

51-100

Good

Moderate

Source: EPA

101-150

Ruidoso 77/59

151+

Unhealthy Unhealthy sensitive

T or C 84/63

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed. Last

Sep 20

Rise 6:40 a.m. 6:40 a.m. Rise 7:33 p.m. 8:03 p.m. New

Sep 27

First

Oct 3

Set 7:08 p.m. 7:06 p.m. Set 7:49 a.m. 8:43 a.m. Full

Oct 11

Alamogordo 90/65

Silver City 85/59

ROSWELL 96/64 Carlsbad 99/67

Hobbs 96/63

Las Cruces 88/66

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2011

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 30-April 19) HHH You might act in a quirky manner. You wonder which way to go and for what reason. Listen to what is being shared by a boss or parent. He or she is not always this open. Don’t stress out over a misunderstanding. Tonight: All smiles. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Know what is going on behind the scenes. You know much more of what is going on than you realize. You think there is a problem with getting your message understood. Don’t be surprised by a misunderstanding. Tonight: Play it low-key. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You might want to zero in on what is going on with a key partner. A meeting could reveal a lot more than you realize. Recognize what is happening with this person. Though you sometimes don’t like what you are seeing, honor this person’s process. Tonight: Follow the gang. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Recognize that it might be necessary to take the lead in order to continue on your present path. Be careful with a partner who has a strong sense of entitlement. He or she could become quite manipulative. Tonight: Until the wee hours. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You will be challenged to look at the big picture. The unexpected happens out of the blue. Once more, you need to understand what motivates someone. There could be a control issue going on.

Regional Cities Today Wed. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

90/65/pc 81/61/t 65/40/t 100/68/s 99/67/s 70/42/t 81/56/pc 69/46/pc 90/57/pc 89/62/t 80/60/t 79/56/t 74/51/t 96/63/s 88/66/pc 75/51/t 70/47/t 85/58/t 92/63/s 89/57/s 71/48/t 78/50/pc 61/38/t 96/64/pc 77/59/pc 81/55/t 85/59/t 84/63/t 86/58/pc 77/51/t

84/56/pc 82/59/t 65/46/t 99/68/pc 96/72/pc 68/42/t 71/49/pc 68/46/pc 84/55/pc 87/59/t 81/58/t 79/52/t 74/49/t 92/61/pc 88/65/pc 75/46/t 69/50/t 84/61/t 91/66/pc 85/55/pc 71/47/t 73/49/t 62/45/t 92/62/pc 75/55/pc 78/52/t 82/60/t 84/62/t 82/53/pc 75/50/t

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE

Understand what is going on behind the scenes. Tonight: Where there is music. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH You need to get to the bottom of an issue with an associate. This person could act like a wild horse rearing as you try to find solutions. You might not be comfortable with everything that you are hearing. Tonight: With a favorite person. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Defer to others, especially if you cannot handle what they say they want. A personal or domestic matter starts building with importance once more. Others are acting strange and quirky. You aren’t going to change them. Tonight: The only answer is “yes.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Do what you must, but don’t feel as if you have to push someone into following through. Communication could be stilted and involve

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Wed.

Today

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

61/50/sh 87/65/s 86/64/s 82/65/s 89/61/s 70/51/pc 76/54/t 103/74/s 78/51/pc 78/52/t 91/71/pc 87/74/s 100/71/s 80/56/pc 78/56/pc 91/75/t 79/64/pc 92/63/s

61/48/sh 88/68/s 86/64/t 83/61/t 90/61/s 63/45/pc 69/51/pc 102/72/s 61/46/r 68/46/pc 90/67/pc 89/75/s 100/73/s 72/50/pc 69/49/c 90/75/t 79/62/pc 92/59/pc

90/76/t 96/67/s 67/44/pc 91/74/s 84/67/s 75/51/pc 93/71/t 84/67/s 97/78/t 81/62/pc 78/55/s 88/63/s 83/59/pc 74/54/t 73/65/pc 71/54/s 92/72/t 88/67/s

90/77/t 96/67/s 56/38/pc 90/73/s 83/64/t 60/40/c 91/72/s 85/65/t 97/78/t 76/45/pc 75/54/s 90/65/s 72/52/c 78/58/pc 72/66/pc 68/53/s 92/71/t 86/66/t

U.S. Extremes

Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 106°.................. Waco, Texas Low: 30°...................Stanley, Idaho

High: 98°..........................Carlsbad Low: 33°......................... Red River

National Cities Seattle 71/54

Billings 71/46

Minneapolis 67/44 Detroit 78/52 Chicago 70/51

San Francisco 62/54 Denver 78/51

Washington 88/67

Kansas City 78/56

Los Angeles 79/64

Atlanta 87/65

El Paso 91/71

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Houston 100/71

Miami 90/76

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

New York 84/67

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

a power play. Be open to revising your schedule. The unexpected actually opens up a new possibility. Tonight: Off to the gym. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Your natural knee-jerk reaction right now draws admirers, but that is no guarantee it always will. The innate nature of a new friendship or tie could be based on perpetual surprises and changes. The excitement will become the glue. Tonight: Infuse your life with more fun. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Get down to basics concerning a real-estate matter. You might need to check in with family. They could be uneasy with what is going on. In response, you could become very controlling. Relax with the situation. Tonight: Mosey on home. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Listen to news with an open mind. Stay direct, and express your ideas. The unexpected occurs, forcing you to regroup. Your ability to adapt emerges once you get past being a bit stubborn. Tonight: On top of your game. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Be aware of what is going on with your finances. Risk-taking could backfire, so be cautious, or wait until you are sure of yourself. A friend could be pushing your limits. You need to say “enough.” Tonight: Your treat. BORN TODAY Actress Jacqueline Bisset (1944), singer, songwriter Fiona Apple (1977), actor Ben Savage (1980)

Paltrow, Timberlake win creative arts Emmy Awards

LOS ANGELES (AP) — “Boardwalk Empire” captured a leading seven trophies at the creative arts Emmy Awards, with Gwyneth Paltrow and Justin Timberlake earning TV comedy series gueststar honors. Paltrow, recognized for “Glee,” and Timberlake, a winner for hosting “Saturday Night Live,” were noshows at Saturday’s ceremony for technical and other achievements. It preceded the main Sept. 18 Emmy show. “She couldn’t be here because it’s happy hour at the Starlight Room,” presenter and “Community” actress Alison Brie joked about Paltrow’s absence. Timberlake received his award for hosting a “Saturday Night Live” episode and shared in another Emmy for co-writing his opening monologue, in which he crooned about not wanting to sing. “Justin Timberlake really wanted to be here but we said no, they want to see the writers,” “SNL” head writer Seth Myers told the audience. “Boardwalk Empire,” which stars Steve Buscemi as a Prohibition-era politico in Atlantic City, N.J., earned trophies for categories including art direction, picture editing and makeup. Loretta Devine was honored as best guest actress in a drama series for “Grey’s Anatomy,” with Paul McCrane earning the category’s best actor award for “Harry’s Law.” Fired “Two and a Half Men” star Charlie Sheen, the subject of a Comedy Central “roast” taping across town Saturday, was at the ceremony in spirit as his for mer co-star Jon Cryer and series creator Chuck Lorre presented

awards in the casting category. Lorre said he’d been urged to share funny stories about casting, asking Cryer: “What do you think? Got any amusing anecdotes?” “Uh, none that amuses me,” Cryer replied. “Drawing a blank,” Lorre concluded. “America’s Most Wanted” host John Walsh received the Governors Award, and said backstage that he had received offers from Fox, which dropped the show, and CNN to do news commentary. He turned them down. “I said to Fox, all I really want to do is catch bad guys and find missing children,” Walsh said. “This is the only thing I know how to do on television.” HBO earned a leading 15 awards Saturday, followed by PBS with 10, Fox with nine, CBS with seven and NBC with five. ABC won three awards, behind the four each for Discovery Channel and History. Other winners at the creative arts Emmys included: Host, reality or realitycompetition series: Jef f Probst, “Survivor,” CBS. Voice-over performance: Maurice LaMarche, “Futurama: Lrrreconcilable Ndndifferences,” Fox. Reality program: “Deadliest Catch,” Discovery. Commercial: “Bor n of Fire: Chrysler 200.” Animated Program: “Futurama: The Late Philip J. Fry,” Comedy Central. Nonfiction series: “American Masters,” PBS. Writing for a variety, music or comedy series: “64th Annual Tony Awards,” CBS. Music composition for a series (original dramatic score): “American Masters: John Muir In The New World,” PBS.

Music composition for a miniseries, movie or special: “Mildred Pierce: Part Five,” HBO. Choreography (juried award: possibility of more than one award): Two awards, “So You Think You Can Dance,” Fox. Casting for a drama series: “Boardwalk Empire,” HBO. Casting for a miniseries, movie or a special: “Mildred Pierce,” HBO. Casting for a comedy series: “Glee,” Fox. Costumes for a miniseries, movie or a special: “Downton Abbey Part 1 (Masterpiece),” PBS. Costumes for a varietymusic program or a special (more than one award possible): “Gettysburg,” History. Costumes for a series: “The Borgias: Lucrezia’s Wedding,” Showtime.

AP Photo

Seth Meyers, left, Alexi Ashe, center, actor Josh Meyers pose for a photo at the Govenor's Ball after the Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards in Los Angeles, Saturday.


SPORTS

Tuesday, September 13, 2011 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 28

Section

Roswell Daily Record

B

E-mail: sports@roswell-record.com

SCHEDULE

The lessons we learned in Week 3

TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 13

KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

LOCAL

BOYS SOCCER 6 p.m. • Hobbs at Roswell • Goddard at Carlsbad • NMMI at Artesia GIRLS SOCCER 6 p.m. • Carlsbad at Goddard • Roswell at Santa Teresa H.S. VOLLEYBALL 5:30 p.m. • Lake Arthur at NMMI 6:30 p.m. • Roswell at Carlsbad • Valley Chr. at Gateway Chr. 7 p.m. • Hagerman at Dexter • Portales at Goddard

SP OR TS SHORTS ELKS FIGHTING CANCER TOURNEY SET FOR SEPT. 17 The third annual Elks Fighting Cancer charity golf tournament will be held Sept. 17 at 8 a.m. at NMMI Golf Course. The cost is $240 per team and the field is limited to the first 24 paid teams. Cost includes breakfast, lunch, range balls, green fees and cart fees. For more information, call 622-6033.

GUNS AND HOSES SET FOR SEPT. 19 AT GHS

Week 3 is officially in the books and I think this week, more than the last two, really helped to show just where the area’s teams stands.

Dexter

The Demons picked up a good win on Friday over Hagerman and that might be a sign that Frank Sandoval’s philosophy is kicking in with the Demons. Bryant Zavala turned in another solid performance, so Dexter’s run game is on the right track. The defense also played well, which is always a good thing. If the Demons can keep improving every week, they should be in a position to have a good season.

Gateway Christian

Gateway got tested by Logan on Friday, but was able to respond when it mattered. That is a good sign for a young team. Falling behind by two See LESSONS, Page B2

Kevin J. Keller Photo

NMMI’s Shane Wallace (10) gets in behind his wall of blockers, which includes Mario Cuen (7) and Chris Sharfin (25), during a first-quarter kick return in the Colts’ win over Jal, Friday. Wallace returned the kick 89 yards for a score to tie the game at 6-6.

Dirty South wins 2nd straight title

Dexter wins in 3 games

The annual Guns and Hoses and Alumni volleyball games will be held on Monday, Sept. 19, at Goddard High School. The Alumni game is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. and the Guns and Hoses game will follow at 7 p.m. Alumni from Goddard and Roswell interested in playing should contact Sheri Gibson at 840-8180.

DEXTER — Hannah Manemann recorded 13 kills, Lindsay Black added seven and the Dexter Demon volleyball team evened its record at 4-4 with a three-set win over Mescalero Apache, Monday. The Demons won Game 1 25-12, Game 2 25-23 and Game 3 25-18. “We played really well,” Demon coach Andy Luikens said about the win. “We’ve been struggling with errors, hitting errors in particular, but tonight, we had very few. “That was the big difference there. Bryelle Marshall played really good defense and passed the ball really well. I attribute it to good defense on Bryelle’s part and hitters finding the court.” Ty Payne added five kills and two blocks for the Demons and Tamara Salas had 23 assists and three kills.

• More shorts on B2

NATIONAL BRIEFS

Courtesy Photo

DJOKOVIC TOPS NADAL IN 4 SETS TO WIN U.S. OPEN NEW YORK (AP) — Novak Djokovic produced a nearly perfect performance to match his nearly perfect season. Returning brilliantly, swatting winners from all angles, the No. 1-ranked Djokovic held on to beat defending champion Rafael Nadal 6-2, 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-1 on Monday night in a final chock-full of lengthy, mesmerizing points to earn his first U.S. Open title and third Grand Slam trophy of 2011. Djokovic improved to 64-2 with 10 tournament titles in a simply spectacular year, one of the greatest in the history of men’s tennis — or any sport, for that matter. He’s been perfect against No. 2 Nadal, too, going 6-0 head-to-head, all in finals — three on hard courts, including Monday; two on clay; and one on grass at Wimbledon in July. Djokovic also won the Australian Open in January, and is only the sixth man in the 40-plus years of the Open era to collect three major titles in a single season. Nadal did it in 2010, including a victory over Djokovic in the U.S. Open final. But the rematch was more of a mismatch, even if Nadal led 2-0 in each of the first two sets before Djokovic turned things around. Only in the third set did Djokovic really falter for a few moments, getting broken while serving for the match at 6-5, then being outplayed in the tiebreaker. He was treated by a trainer for an aching back three times after that, getting massaged and taking pills to dull the pain. But in the fourth set, Djokovic was in control from the start, breaking in the opening game with a forehand winner, then cruising from there.

Dirty South won its second straight USTA 18U Intermediate Junior Team Tennis Sectional title in El Paso in late August. With the win, Dirty South, an all-star team consisting of players and coaches from Mayfield, Las Cruces and Goddard high schools, qualified for the USTA nationals in Surprise, Ariz., in October. Members of the team are, front row from left, Ryan Maki (Mayfield), Lindsay Harlas (Mayfield), Brooke Coffeen (Mayfield), Gabby Joyce (Goddard); second row, Jon Frederico Vigil (Las Cruces), coach Michael Shemwell (Mayfield), Jeremy Harlas (Mayfield) and Jeff Pfeifer (Las Cruces).

For more on the NFL’s opening week, see Page B6 of today’s Daily Record

AP Photo

Denver’s Kyle Orton (8) is sacked by Oakland defensive tackle Richard Seymour in the fourth quarter of the Raiders’ win over the Broncos, Monday.

Oakland sacks Denver

DENVER (AP) — Sebastian Janikowski tied an NFL record with a 63-yard field goal and the Oakland Raiders beat the Denver Broncos 23-20 Monday night in a chippy and clumsy game between the AFC West rivals. The Raiders (1-0) won in Denver for the fourth straight season in coach Hue Jackson’s NFL head coaching debut, and handed the Broncos (0-1) their first loss in a home opener since 2000. John Fox lost his debut as Denver’s coach, and he lost at least two playmakers in the process. Pass-rusher Elvis Dumervil (shoulder) was relegated to situational duty for three quarters, and perennial Pro Bowl cornerback Champ Bailey injured his left knee making a touchdown-saving tackle of Darren McFadden, who ran 22 times for 150 yards.

NMMI 26-25-20-24-15, Corona 24-22-25-26-11 The Colts avenged an earlier loss to Corona by downing the Cardinals in five games at the Godfrey Athletic Center. The win pushed NMMI’s record to 4-4 on the year.

Patriots open with 38-24 win

MIAMI (AP) — T om Brady threw his first interception since October, so he wasn’t per fect in the New England Patriots’ opener. He was close, though. Brady threw for a teamrecord 517 yards and four touchdowns, including a 99-yarder to Wes Welker, and the reigning AFC East champions started with a victory for the eighth consecutive season Monday night by beating the Miami Dolphins 38-24. Defensive end Jared Odrick picked off a deflected pass to set up a Miami touchdown and end Brady’s NFL-record streak of 358 passes without an interception. Otherwise Brady and the Patriots picked up where they left off last season, when he threw for 36 TDs and his team led the league in scoring. New England totaled 622 yards, the most in franchise history and the most allowed by Miami. Brady, who went 32 for 48, became the 11th quarterback to throw for at least 500 yards. Norm Van Brocklin set the record of 554 yards in 1951. The capper came with 5:44 left and the Patriots leading 31-17. After they stopped Miami on downs at the 1-foot line, Brady lined up in the shotgun on first down and threw from

AP Photo New England wide receiver Wes Welker (83) stiff arms Miami’s Benny Sapp as he breaks away for an NFL record 99-yard touchdown catch during the Patriots’ 38-24 win, Monday.

his end zone to Welker, who had slipped behind Benny Sapp near the 30yard line. Welker caught the pass in stride and sprinted untouched for the score to complete the longest play in Patriots history. Brady also threw touchdown passes on consecutive plays. He hit Aaron Hernandez for a 31-yard score, and when a replay

review deter mined the receiver was down at the 1, Brady threw to him again for a TD on the next play. His other scoring passes covered 10 yards to Rob Gronkowski and 2 yards to Welker. The performance overshadowed Miami’s Chad Henne, who threw for a career-high 416 yards. See PATS, Page B2


B2 Tuesday, September 13, 2011 Lessons

Continued from Page B1

touchdowns early often means disaster for a young team, but the Warriors rallied by Mason Miller and outscored Logan 30-14 the rest of the way. I like that they were able to come back, but, if there’s one thing Gateway can’t allow to happen regularly, it’s falling behind early. A win is a win, though.

Goddard

I really like the statement Goddard made on Friday. The Rockets got into a shootout

Pats

Continued from Page B1

Brady was sacked only once, and good protection gave his receivers plenty of time to work their way open. Newcomer Chad Ochocino had only one catch for 14 yards. But Welker made eight receptions for 160 yards, and tight ends Her nandez and Gronkowski combined for 189 yards on 13 catches. The Dolphins’ defense returned virtually intact from last season and was expected to be the team’s

Baseball

Major League Baseball At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press American League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L New York . . . . . . . . . .89 57 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .85 61 Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .82 64 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .74 73 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .58 88 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .85 62 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .73 73 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .72 72 Kansas City . . . . . . . .62 86 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .59 87 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 64 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .80 67 Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .67 80 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .61 86

Pct GB .610 — .582 4 .562 7 .503 15 1⁄2 .397 31

Pct .578 .500 .500 .419 .404 Pct .565 .544 .456 .415

GB — 11 1⁄2 1 11 ⁄2 23 1⁄2 25 1⁄2 GB — 3 16 22

Sunday's Games Detroit 2, Minnesota 1 Toronto 6, Baltimore 5 Tampa Bay 9, Boston 1 Cleveland 7, Chicago White Sox 3 Texas 8, Oakland 1 N.Y. Yankees 6, L.A. Angels 5 Kansas City 2, Seattle 1 Monday's Games Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 2 Detroit 14, Chicago White Sox 4 Oakland 6, L.A. Angels 3 N.Y. Yankees 9, Seattle 3 Tuesday's Games Tampa Bay (Price 12-12) at Baltimore (Simon 4-8), 3:05 p.m. Toronto (Morrow 9-10) at Boston (Wakefield 6-6), 5:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 11-9) at Texas (M.Harrison 11-9), 6:05 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 22-5) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 12-10), 6:10 p.m. Minnesota (Pavano 8-11) at Kansas City (Chen 10-7), 6:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (J.Williams 3-0) at Oakland (Moscoso 8-8), 8:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 9-11) at Seattle (Furbush 3-8), 8:10 p.m. Wednesday's Games Toronto at Boston, 11:35 a.m. Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 12:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 1:35 p.m. Minnesota at Kansas City, 2:10 p.m. Cleveland at Texas, 5:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Baltimore, 5:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Seattle, 8:10 p.m.

National League The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Philadelphia . . . . . . . .94 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .84 New York . . . . . . . . . .71 Washington . . . . . . . .68 Florida . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .86 St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .79 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .71 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . .67 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .65 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .50 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Arizona . . . . . . . . . . .86 San Francisco . . . . . .77 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .72 Colorado . . . . . . . . . .69 San Diego . . . . . . . . .63

L 50 64 76 77 79

L 62 68 76 80 82 97 L 62 70 74 77 85

Pct GB .653 — .568 12 1 .483 24 ⁄2 .469 26 1⁄2 .459 28 Pct .581 .537 .483 .456 .442 .340

GB — 6 1⁄2 14 1⁄2 18 1⁄2 20 1⁄2 35 1⁄2

Pct GB .581 — .524 8 1⁄2 .493 13 .473 16 .426 23

Sunday's Games Florida 4, Pittsburgh 1 Washington 8, Houston 2 Milwaukee 3, Philadelphia 2 St. Louis 6, Atlanta 3 Colorado 4, Cincinnati 1 San Francisco 8, L.A. Dodgers 1 San Diego 7, Arizona 6 Chicago Cubs 10, N.Y. Mets 6, 11 innings Monday's Games Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 5 Chicago Cubs 12, Cincinnati 8

SPORTS SHORTS

with a high-powered offense and showed that they can, and will, throw the ball to win. Ryan Greene completed nearly 65 percent of his passes, threw three touchdown passes and had more than 250 yards passing. It wasn’t a surprise to me that Goddard has the ability to do that, but I know there are a lot of people across the state that questioned Greene’s ability to win with his arm. Question answered.

Hagerman

The Bobcats’ loss to Dexter I think showed that Hagerman still has a long way to go this season. The Bobcat offensive line was

strength, but Brady riddled them from the start. He completed his first eight passes for 127 yards on the Patriots’ first two possessions, and both ended with TDs. Brady’s first interception since Oct. 17 came early in the third quarter, when he tried to hit Julian Edelman in the flat. Sapp deflected the ball to the 304-pound Odrick, who rumbled 40 yards to the 9. Two plays later, Henne hit Brian Hartline with a 10-yard touchdown pass to make the score 14-all. Brady was so rattled it took him 10 plays to put Florida 5, Atlanta 4, 12 innings Washington 3, N.Y. Mets 2 Houston 5, Philadelphia 1 Arizona 7, L.A. Dodgers 2 San Francisco 8, San Diego 3 Tuesday's Games St. Louis (C.Carpenter 9-9) at Pittsburgh (Karstens 9-8), 5:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Dempster 10-11) at Cincinnati (Leake 11-9), 5:10 p.m. Florida (Hand 1-6) at Atlanta (Minor 5-2), 5:10 p.m. Washington (Wang 2-3) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 12-6), 5:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 14-7) at Houston (Happ 5-15), 6:05 p.m. Colorado (Rogers 6-5) at Milwaukee (Greinke 14-6), 6:10 p.m. Arizona (I.Kennedy 19-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 10-10), 8:10 p.m. San Diego (Luebke 5-9) at San Francisco (Cain 11-10), 8:15 p.m. Wednesday's Games Florida at Atlanta, 10:05 a.m. St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 10:35 a.m. Philadelphia at Houston, 12:05 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 1:45 p.m. Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 5:10 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Mets, 5:10 p.m. Colorado at Milwaukee, 6:10 p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m.

Football

National Football League The Associated Press All Times Mountain AMERICAN CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct New England . . .1 0 0 1.000 Buffalo . . . . . . . . .1 0 0 1.000 N.Y. Jets . . . . . . .1 0 0 1.000 Miami . . . . . . . . .0 1 0 .000 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Houston . . . . . . .1 0 0 1.000 Jacksonville . . . .1 0 0 1.000 Tennessee . . . . .0 1 0 .000 Indianapolis . . . . .0 1 0 .000 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Baltimore . . . . . . .1 0 0 1.000 Cincinnati . . . . . .1 0 0 1.000 Cleveland . . . . . .0 1 0 .000 Pittsburgh . . . . . .0 1 0 .000 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct San Diego . . . . . .1 0 0 1.000 Oakland . . . . . . .1 0 0 1.000 Denver . . . . . . . .0 1 0 .000 Kansas City . . . .0 1 0 .000

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Washington . . . . .1 0 0 1.000 Philadelphia . . . .1 0 0 1.000 Dallas . . . . . . . . .0 1 0 .000 N.Y. Giants . . . . .0 1 0 .000 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct New Orleans . . . .0 1 0 .000 Tampa Bay . . . . .0 1 0 .000 Carolina . . . . . . .0 1 0 .000 Atlanta . . . . . . . . .0 1 0 .000 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Chicago . . . . . . . .1 0 0 1.000 Detroit . . . . . . . . .1 0 0 1.000 Green Bay . . . . .1 0 0 1.000 Minnesota . . . . . .0 1 0 .000 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct San Francisco . . .1 0 0 1.000 Arizona . . . . . . . .1 0 0 1.000 St. Louis . . . . . . .0 1 0 .000 Seattle . . . . . . . . .0 1 0 .000

Thursday's Game Green Bay 42, New Orleans 34 Sunday's Games Chicago 30, Atlanta 12 Buffalo 41, Kansas City 7 Houston 34, Indianapolis 7 Philadelphia 31, St. Louis 13 Detroit 27, Tampa Bay 20 Baltimore 35, Pittsburgh 7 Cincinnati 27, Cleveland 17 Jacksonville 16, Tennessee 14 San Francisco 33, Seattle 17 Arizona 28, Carolina 21 San Diego 24, Minnesota 17

TOUR DE OCHO MILLAS CYCLING EVENT IS SEPT. 17 The inaugural Tour de Ocho Millas will be held on Saturday, Sept. 17, at Bottomless Lakes State Park. All proceeds from the event benefit Reflections & Recovery, a local organization dedicated to helping individuals live free of addictions. To register, or for more information, visit the event website at tourdeochomillas.com.

CHARITY GOLF TOURNEY IS SEPT. 17 AT SPRING RIVER Wells Fargo and the Roswell Regional Hospital will hold their ninth annual charity golf tournament to benefit the United Way of Chaves County on Satur-

PF PA 38 24 41 7 27 24 24 38

PF PA 34 7 16 14 14 16 7 34

PF PA 35 7 27 17 17 27 7 35

PF PA 24 17 23 20 20 23 7 41 PF PA 28 14 31 13 24 27 14 28

PF PA 34 42 20 27 21 28 12 30

PF PA 30 12 27 20 42 34 17 24

PF PA 33 17 28 21 13 31 17 33

SPORTS

pushed around by a smaller, quicker Dexter defense, which doesn’t bode well for Hagerman. Things won’t get any easier this week when they face for mer coach Randy Montoya and his NMMI Colts.

Lake Arthur

Beating Immanuel Christian (Texas) on Saturday should do a lot for a Lake Arthur team that is already good. Miguel Rubio tur ned into another good performance for the Panthers, something that needs to continue to happen throughout the year. Immanuel steamrolled Lake Arthur last year, so getting a win

Roswell Daily Record over the Warriors this year might be a statement that this year’s Panther squad is just as good, if not better, than last year.

NMMI

No team made a bigger statement in Week 3 than the NMMI Colts. They got their first win of the season, beat a quality 1A team in Jal and got a breakout performance from Shane Wallace. More importantly, though, they didn’t turn the ball over and they tackled well. Wallace is a weapon with his legs and arm and Jaeger Strong looked like an unstoppable force on the defensive side.

I liked what I saw from the Colts on Friday.

Roswell

I don’t want to beat the proverbial “dead horse” and talk about the defense again, so I’ll instead talk about James Singleton and Richard Medrano. The duo is emerging as one of the most dangerous aerial duos in the state. Singleton threw for 299 yards on Friday, 194 of which went to Medrano. As long as Singleton doesn’t lock on to Medrano on every play, the Coyotes’ offense should continue to flourish. kjkeller@roswell-record.com

the Pats ahead to stay. They drove 73 yards and scored on his 2-yard pass to Welker. Miami’s problems with Brady were nothing new. He and the Pats beat the Dolphins twice last year while outscoring them 7921. Losing at home was nothing different for the Dolphins, either, who have dropped 10 of their past 11 home games. AP Photo RIGHT: Miami’s Reshad Jones, right, and Benny Sapp, left, tackle New England Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman during their game, Monday.

SCOREBOARD

Washington 28, N.Y. Giants 14 N.Y. Jets 27, Dallas 24 Monday's Games New England 38, Miami 24 Oakland 23, Denver 20 Sunday, Sep. 18 Chicago at New Orleans, 11 a.m. Baltimore at Tennessee, 11 a.m. Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 11 a.m. Kansas City at Detroit, 11 a.m. Jacksonville at N.Y. Jets, 11 a.m. Oakland at Buffalo, 11 a.m. Arizona at Washington, 11 a.m. Seattle at Pittsburgh, 11 a.m. Green Bay at Carolina, 11 a.m. Cleveland at Indianapolis, 11 a.m. Dallas at San Francisco, 2:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Denver, 2:15 p.m. Houston at Miami, 2:15 p.m. San Diego at New England, 2:15 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 6:20 p.m. Monday, Sep. 19 St. Louis at N.Y. Giants, 6:30 p.m.

Cowboys-Jets earns big television rating

NEW YORK (AP) — The Jets’ comeback win over the Cowboys has earned the best preliminary television rating for a Week 1 game on Sunday or Monday night in 15 years. New York’s 27-24 victory Sunday on NBC drew a 16.9 overnight rating and 27 share. It’s also the best “Sunday Night Football” overnight since the package moved to NBC in 2006. A Cowboys-Bears game earned a 20.2/33 on a Monday night on ABC in 1996. Ratings represent the percentage of all homes with televisions tuned into a program. Shares represent the percentage of all homes with TVs in use at the time. Overnight ratings measure the country’s largest markets.

Golf

PGA Tour FedExCup Leaders By The Associated Press Through Sept. 5 Rank Player . . . . . . . .PointsYTD Money 1. Webb Simpson . . . .4,711 $5,301,043 2. Dustin Johnson . . . .3,814 $4,150,841 3. Matt Kuchar . . . . . . .3,124 $3,970,142 4. Luke Donald . . . . . .2,875 $5,034,548 5. Brandt Snedeker . . .2,869 $3,336,895 6. Jason Day . . . . . . . .2,357 $3,670,687 7. Nick Watney . . . . . .2,291 $4,614,229 8. Steve Stricker . . . . .2,205 $3,816,785 9. Chez Reavie . . . . . .2,088 $1,904,267 10. Phil Mickelson . . . .2,040 $3,518,208 11. Gary Woodland . . .1,966 $3,047,016 12. Bubba Watson . . . .1,842 $3,316,797 13. Jonathan Byrd . . . .1,785 $2,740,034 14. Vijay Singh . . . . . .1,778 $2,192,170 15. K.J. Choi . . . . . . . .1,771 $3,808,024 16. Adam Scott . . . . . .1,760 $3,456,797 17. Mark Wilson . . . . .1,748 $2,957,232 18. Hunter Mahan . . . .1,719 $2,612,340 19. Keegan Bradley . . .1,621 $3,432,200 20. David Toms . . . . . .1,595 $3,487,690 21. Charles Howell III .1,577 $2,190,556 22. Bo Van Pelt . . . . . .1,549 $2,086,466 23. Fredrik Jacobson . .1,527 $2,298,725 24. Bill Haas . . . . . . . .1,525 $2,532,637 25. Aaron Baddeley . . .1,467 $2,607,582 26. Rory Sabbatini . . . .1,435 $2,402,975 27. Charl Schwartzel . .1,428 $2,577,358 28. Y.E. Yang . . . . . . . .1,366 $2,023,265 29. Jason Dufner . . . . .1,331 $2,589,460 30. Kyle Stanley . . . . .1,298 $1,348,599 31. Martin Laird . . . . . .1,291 $2,499,089 32. Charley Hoffman . .1,284 $1,428,558 33. Brian Davis . . . . . .1,251 $1,261,609 34. Justin Rose . . . . . .1,248 $1,809,420 35. Jim Furyk . . . . . . . .1,243 $1,373,246 36. Zach Johnson . . . .1,227 $1,834,006 37. Rickie Fowler . . . . .1,208 $2,062,761 38. Steve Marino . . . . .1,204 $1,957,396 39. Ryan Moore . . . . . .1,202 $1,826,906 40. Jerry Kelly . . . . . . .1,188 $1,281,685 41. Spencer Levin . . . .1,185 $1,980,929 42. Brendan Steele . . .1,145 $1,767,952 43. Chris Kirk . . . . . . . .1,144 $1,831,227 44. Robert Karlsson . .1,137 $1,743,815

day, Sept. 17, at Spring River Golf Course. The tournament starts at 8 a.m. and is a four-person scramble. There is a minimum team handicap of 45 and only one person can have a handicap of less than 10. The entry fee is $400 per team, which includes green fees, carts, range balls, two mulligans per player, breakfast, lunch, dinner and more. Interested parties can pick up entry forms at Spring River Golf Course and must be returned no later than noon on Sept. 14. For more information, call 622-4150.

FIRST TEE AFTER-SCHOOL PROGRAM STARTS SEPT. 19 The First Tee of the Pecos Valley will begin new

45. Lucas Glover . . . . .1,118 $1,712,927 46. Scott Stallings . . . .1,080 $1,910,585 47. Camilo Villegas . . .1,057 $953,918 48. Ryan Palmer . . . . .1,057 $1,783,159 49. D.A. Points . . . . . .1,055 $2,006,463 50. Jhonattan Vegas . .1,046 $1,685,294 51. Jimmy Walker . . . .1,027 $1,268,111 52. Carl Pettersson . . .1,021 $1,232,230 53. Sergio Garcia . . . .1,019 $1,362,091 54. Tommy Gainey . . . .999 $1,902,831 55. John Senden . . . . . .974 $1,263,914 56. Sean O’Hair . . . . . .942 $1,383,948 57. Blake Adams . . . . . .935 $1,032,349 58. Chad Campbell . . . .916 $1,017,789 59. Andres Romero . . . .869 $1,295,053 60. Scott Piercy . . . . . . .857 $1,117,104 61. George McNeill . . . .854 $1,412,693 62. Robert Allenby . . . .849 $1,271,101 63. Brandt Jobe . . . . . .838 $1,352,380 64. Brendon de Jonge .837 $1,186,246 $866,088 65. Marc Leishman . . . .814 66. Cameron Tringale . .814 $1,214,505 67. Johnson Wagner . . .802 $1,194,636 $701,672 68. Ernie Els . . . . . . . . .792 69. Geoff Ogilvy . . . . . .789 $1,162,594 $950,554 70. Chris Stroud . . . . . .788 Did not advance to the third playoff event 71. Kevin Na . . . . . . . . .778 $1,467,465 72. Kevin Streelman . . .770 $1,113,080 73. Graeme McDowell .765 $1,088,898 74. Robert Garrigus . . .759 $1,434,117 75. Pat Perez . . . . . . . .751 $1,295,253 76. J.J. Henry . . . . . . . .739 $873,377 77. Harrison Frazar . . . .713 $1,300,047 78. Charlie Wi . . . . . . . .711 $1,056,971 79. Anthony Kim . . . . . .702 $1,085,846 80. Kris Blanks . . . . . . .694 $1,046,977 $736,905 81. Greg Chalmers . . . .692 82. Brian Gay . . . . . . . .685 $1,131,954 83. William McGirt . . . . .674 $427,960 84. Kevin Chappell . . . .673 $1,079,820 $610,948 85. Bill Lunde . . . . . . . .668 86. J.B. Holmes . . . . . .640 $1,398,583 87. Ian Poulter . . . . . . .639 $739,926 88. Trevor Immelman . .638 $780,274 89. Padraig Harrington .625 $802,839 90. Jeff Overton . . . . . .619 $1,145,552 $961,022 91. Ryuji Imada . . . . . . .617 92. John Rollins . . . . . .616 $1,043,456 93. Scott Verplank . . . . .588 $1,194,178 $913,416 94. Chris Couch . . . . . .573 95. Davis Love III . . . . .565 $1,056,300 $862,061 96. Ben Crane . . . . . . . .561 $926,303 97. Ricky Barnes . . . . . .556 98. Stewart Cink . . . . . .556 $909,162 99. Troy Matteson . . . . .547 $930,902 Did not advance to the second playoff event 100. John Merrick . . . . .535 $665,218 101. Bryce Molder . . . . .523 $872,411 102. Josh Teater . . . . . .513 $609,821 103. Hunter Haas . . . . . .499 $926,366 104. Chris DiMarco . . . .499 $740,263 105. Paul Goydos . . . . .474 $1,111,116 $567,596 106. D.J. Trahan . . . . . .474 $629,854 107. Nick O’Hern . . . . . .463 $673,695 108. Matt Bettencourt . .461 $630,389 109. Arjun Atwal . . . . . . .459 $721,998 110. Tim Herron . . . . . . .456 $834,929 111. Michael Bradley . . .454 $780,380 112. Retief Goosen . . . .444 113. Kevin Stadler . . . . .444 $720,994 114. Tom Gillis . . . . . . . .431 $814,147 115. Michael Thompson .413 $631,864 116. Vaughn Taylor . . . .397 $375,256 117. Heath Slocum . . . . .388 $639,717 118. Stuart Appleby . . . .387 $657,150 119. Rod Pampling . . . . .385 $606,048 120. Joe Ogilvie . . . . . . .379 $715,749 121. David Hearn . . . . . .377 $529,388 122. Billy Mayfair . . . . . .353 $538,493 123. James Driscoll . . . .353 $636,035 124. Steve Flesch . . . . .352 $573,005 125. Steven Bowditch . .347 $499,118 126. Justin Leonard . . . .328 $434,562 127. Matt Jones . . . . . . .328 $591,042 128. Tim Petrovic . . . . . .326 $394,709 129. David Mathis . . . . .326 $563,752 130. Cameron Beckman 324 $446,593 131. Dean Wilson . . . . .318 $401,314 132. Tiger Woods . . . . . .318 $629,863 133. Ben Curtis . . . . . . .304 $403,152 134. Alex Cejka . . . . . . .303 $344,902 135. Roland Thatcher . .302 $554,804 136. Michael Putnam . . .300 $398,400 137. Tim Clark . . . . . . . .299 $571,000 138. Stephen Ames . . . .298 $490,062 139. Kent Jones . . . . . . .297 $348,055

140. Chris Riley . . . . . . .292 141. Zack Miller . . . . . . .290 142. Tag Ridings . . . . . .286 143. Jason Bohn . . . . . .284 144. Paul Casey . . . . . .280

$377,454 $418,261 $358,170 $367,816 $460,074

LPGA Money Leaders By The Associated Press Through Sept. 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Trn Money 1. Yani Tseng . . . . . . . . . . .16 $2,116,051 2. Cristie Kerr . . . . . . . . . .16 $1,348,216 3. Stacy Lewis . . . . . . . . . .16 $1,171,422 4. Suzann Pettersen . . . . .14 $1,137,148 5. Brittany Lincicome . . . . .16 $1,003,705 6. Ai Miyazato . . . . . . . . . .14 $898,454 7. Angela Stanford . . . . . .16 $838,689 8. Na Yeon Choi . . . . . . . .15 $738,546 9. Paula Creamer . . . . . . .16 $733,423 10. Karrie Webb . . . . . . . .16 $716,475 11. I.K. Kim . . . . . . . . . . . .14 $692,894 12. Morgan Pressel . . . . . .16 $667,743 13. Amy Yang . . . . . . . . . .16 $656,943 14. Jiyai Shin . . . . . . . . . . .14 $609,415 15. Michelle Wie . . . . . . . .15 $533,846 16. Maria Hjorth . . . . . . . .14 $511,037 17. Hee Kyung Seo . . . . . .15 $508,177 18. Mika Miyazato . . . . . . .15 $491,497 19. Sandra Gal . . . . . . . . .14 $457,558 20. Brittany Lang . . . . . . . .16 $429,120 21. Catriona Matthew . . . .13 $376,594 22. Sun Young Yoo . . . . . .16 $375,082 23. Sophie Gustafson . . . .15 $357,820 24. Anna Nordqvist . . . . . .15 $343,818 25. Inbee Park . . . . . . . . . .12 $331,018 26. Song-Hee Kim . . . . . . .16 $303,691 27. Karen Stupples . . . . . .16 $265,519 28. Katie Futcher . . . . . . . .14 $256,134 29. Meena Lee . . . . . . . . .14 $240,085 30. Hee Young Park . . . . .15 $237,164 31. Se Ri Pak . . . . . . . . . .14 $233,895 32. Mindy Kim . . . . . . . . . .13 $219,786 33. Chella Choi . . . . . . . . .14 $212,261 34. Candie Kung . . . . . . . .15 $205,059 35. Amy Hung . . . . . . . . . .16 $201,167 36. Juli Inkster . . . . . . . . . .16 $201,063 37. Shanshan Feng . . . . . .14 $188,222 38. Beatriz Recari . . . . . . .16 $179,337 39. Azahara Munoz . . . . . .16 $177,082 40. Ryann O’Toole . . . . . . .9 $165,477 41. Vicky Hurst . . . . . . . . .16 $165,362 42. Hee-Won Han . . . . . . .16 $153,046 43. Natalie Gulbis . . . . . . .16 $148,146 44. Stacy Prammanasudh .16 $143,916 45. Eun-Hee Ji . . . . . . . . .14 $135,643 46. Wendy Ward . . . . . . . .16 $135,310 47. Paige Mackenzie . . . . .12 $132,220 48. Kristy McPherson . . . .16 $130,512 49. Pat Hurst . . . . . . . . . . .14 $126,256 50. Jimin Kang . . . . . . . . .16 $122,962 51. Katherine Hull . . . . . . .14 $114,862 52. Momoko Ueda . . . . . . .12 $111,754 53. Mi Hyun Kim . . . . . . . .13 $106,632 54. Pornanong Phatlum . .12 $106,224 55. Mina Harigae . . . . . . . .12 $103,771 56. Cindy LaCrosse . . . . .12 $102,266 57. Tiffany Joh . . . . . . . . . .9 $101,368 $99,364 58. Amanda Blumenherst .16 $95,517 59. Caroline Hedwall . . . . .0 60. Christina Kim . . . . . . . .16 $93,659 $93,000 61. Julieta Granada . . . . . .13 62. Kyeong Bae . . . . . . . .15 $91,700 63. Christel Boeljon . . . . . .9 $90,876 64. Gerina Piller . . . . . . . .10 $89,601 65. Jenny Shin . . . . . . . . .10 $89,413 66. Dewi Claire Schreefel .11 $88,797 67. Leta Lindley . . . . . . . . .11 $86,749 68. Seon Hwa Lee . . . . . .16 $86,438 69. Belen Mozo . . . . . . . . .12 $85,973 70. Jennifer Johnson . . . . .9 $84,809 71. M.J. Hur . . . . . . . . . . .16 $83,373 72. Heather Bowie Young .13 $80,495 73. Kris Tamulis . . . . . . . . .10 $80,401 74. Lindsey Wright . . . . . .14 $75,550 75. Alena Sharp . . . . . . . .15 $71,534 76. Reilley Rankin . . . . . . .12 $70,306 77. Becky Morgan . . . . . . .12 $69,928 78. Marcy Hart . . . . . . . . . .11 $68,369 79. Jennifer Song . . . . . . .13 $68,204 80. Haeji Kang . . . . . . . . .14 $59,410 81. Meaghan Francella . . .13 $58,234 82. Alison Walshe . . . . . . .10 $56,565 83. Karine Icher . . . . . . . . .7 $55,398 84. Jin Young Pak . . . . . . .11 $52,920 85. Sarah Kemp . . . . . . . .12 $52,772 86. Lorie Kane . . . . . . . . . .10 $51,629 87. Sarah Jane Smith . . . .12 $51,070 88. Pernilla Lindberg . . . . .10 $47,666 89. Silvia Cavalleri . . . . . .12 $45,956 90. Jessica Korda . . . . . . .13 $45,763 91. Grace Park . . . . . . . . .13 $45,499 92. Ilhee Lee . . . . . . . . . . .9 $45,449 93. Karin Sjodin . . . . . . . . .11 $44,253 94. Shi Hyun Ahn . . . . . . .10 $43,600

classes for its after-school program on Sept. 19. The program is open to kids, ages 7-17. The cost for the program is $100 and golf clubs are not required to participate. For more information, call 623-4444.

TOBOSA GOLF TOURNEY IS SEPT. 24 The Tobosa “Go For The Gold” golf tournament will be held on Saturday, Sept. 24, at Spring River Golf Course. The tournament is a three-person scramble based on points per handicap. The cost of the tournament is $75 per player or $225 per team. Individual golfers are encouraged to register. The tournament fee includes drinks, lunch, range balls, green

95. Harukyo Nomura . . . . .10 96. Taylor Leon . . . . . . . . . .9 97. Jane Park . . . . . . . . . .12 98. Gwladys Nocera . . . . .14 99. Na On Min . . . . . . . . . .12 100. Stephanie Sherlock . .11

$43,533 $40,633 $39,731 $39,025 $37,349 $35,224

Transactions

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Activated RHP Jason Berken from the 15-day DL. CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Reinstated OF Carlos Quentin from the 15-day DL. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Placed RHP Jon Rauch on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Sept. 5. National League CHICAGO CUBS—Named Julian Green vice president, communications and community affairs. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Named Sarah Farnsworth senior vice president, public affairs. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA—Fined Charlotte owner Michael Jordan an undisclosed amount for making comments about the league’s ongoing collective bargaining process. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS—Signed C Brett Romberg. Waived C Rob Bruggeman. MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Signed C Joe Berger. Waived C Jon Cooper. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Signed RB Ian Johnson to the practice squad. Released RB Xavier Omon. Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS—Signed LB Mark Restelli and DB Ludovic Kashindi. SOCCER Major League Soccer SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC—Signed G Bryan Meredith. Placed MF Michael Seamon on the disabled list. TENNIS United States Tennis Association U.S. OPEN—Announced Referee Brian Earley fined Serena Williams $2,000 following the code violation issued for verbal abuse during the womens singles final. COLLEGE ALABAMA—Named Ken Brown baseball director of operations. BOSTON COLLEGE—Announced offensive coordinator Kevin Rogers will be taking a leave of absence for health reasons and tight ends coach Dave Brock will fill the position. BROWN—Named Ryan Schneider men’s assistant basketball coach. GEORGE WASHINGTON—Named Andrea Giraldo women’s assistant tennis coach. PURCHASE—Named Devon Whalen women’s soccer coach and Stephanie Janasiewicz women’s assistant soccer coach. WINTHROP—Named Greg Adamson assistant strength and conditioning coach.

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Tuesday, Sept. 13 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 6 p.m. MLB — Teams TBA SOCCER 12:30 p.m. FSN — UEFA Champions League, Arsenal at Dortmund 6 p.m. FSN — UEFA Champions League, AC Milan at Barcelona (same-day tape)

and cart fees, three mulligans per team and more. Proceeds from the tournament will be used to reequip the Los Pasitos Day Care Center. For more information, call 973-4032 or 622-9506.

FIRST TEE PROGRAM SEEKING VOLUNTEERS The First Tee of the Pecos Valley is currently seeking volunteers. Golf experience is not required to be a volunteer. For more information, call 6234444.


Roswell Daily Record

OBITUARIES

Salvador Briseno

Salvador Briseno, 41, of Roswell, passed away Sept. 7. A Rosary will be h e l d We d n e s d a y , S e p t . 14, 7 p.m. at Anderson Bethany Funeral Home Chapel. Mass is Thursday, Sept. 15, 10 a.m. at St. John’s Church, burial will follow in South Park Cemetery. Salvador was born April 21, 1970, to Lorenzo and Linda. He enjoyed Golden Gloves Boxing during his youth. Salvador was always ready and willing to help anyone with yard work, construction, or mechanic work. In his free time, Salvador enjoyed barbequing and cooking. He loved music and fishing. Salvador loved his children dearly and will be greatly missed. Preceding Salvador in d e a t h a r e h i s f a t h e r, Larry Briseno, grandmother, Virgina Urban, grandfathers, Willie Albarez and Victor Briseno Sr., stepfather, Roger Montoya, greatMatt g r a n d f a t h e r, Briseno, great-grand-

NATION/OBITUARIES/RECORDS mother, Benita Briseno, and grandparents, Juan and Josefita Farmer. Those left to cherish his memory are mother Linda Montoya and Lee Goddard, of Artesia, six c h i l d r e n ; S a l v a d o r J r. and Melissa, of Washington, Bennie-Ray and Brianna, of Arizona, Isaac of Arizona, Leanna of Arizona, Savannah of Roswell, and Vincent Ramirez of Roswell, the mothers of his children, Brenda Briseno of Arizona, Rene Silva and Romero, of Sylvia R o s w e l l , b r o t h e r, R a y a n d G a y e F a r m e r, s i s ters, Erica Renee and Frank Montoya, of Roswell, and Alice Tavarez, his father that raised him, Raymond F a r m e r, s p e c i a l u n c l e , Billy Albarez, special cousin, Andy Albarez, grandparents, Salvador and Olivia Salgado, Damian, grandson, g r a n d d a u g h t e r, K a m i with one on the way and numerous aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews from California and Roswell. Serving as Pallbearers are Roy Andazola, Roger Andazola, Christopher Andazola, Daniel Andazola, Adam Garcia and Julian Garcia. Please share your memories with the family in the online register book at andersonbethany.com. Arrangements are under the direction of Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home and Cre-

matory.

Faydean H. Butts

A graveside service is scheduled for 3 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 14, at Hager man Cemetery for Faydean H. Butts, 80, who passed away in Roswell on Friday, Sept. 9. Pastor Robert Moore of S. Main St. Church of Christ will be officiating. Faydean will be cremated according to her wishes. Faydean was born Aug. 16, 1931, in Dexter, to Amos and Fay Harbert, who have preceded her in death. She is also preceded in death by one son, Britt Butts. Faydean is survived by daughter Gail Henson, of Roswell; son Rick Coats, of Dexter, along with two sisters, Jimmie Reineck and Kay Grassie, both of Dexter. She is also survived by five grandchildren; Melody Green, L ynn Coats, Cody McCreary, all of Roswell, and Aaron Coats of Dexter, and Colin Butts of Albuquerque; nine great-grandchildren: Arianna Luevano, Abby Tur ner, Analisa Green, Abbygail McCreary, T ristan Green, Connor

Coats, Savannah Duran and Genevieve Duran and two great-great-grandchildren; Allyson Luevano and Dazdyn Luevano. Faydean was a member of the Church of Christ for many years and, in her later years, attended Grace Community Church. She loved her family and was a wonderful “Nonie” to all of her grandchildren. She was an avid reader and always ready to learn something new. She was a kind and generous person and will be missed by all who loved her. In lieu of flowers, the family request that donation be made to New Mexico Children’s Home, 1356 New Mexico 236, Portales, N.M. 88130-9411. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at ballardfuneralhome.com.

Ethel Ruth Watters

SAN ANTONIO — Ethel Ruth Watters was born in Levelland, Texas, on Oct. 23, 1944, to the late Lois Vivian Watters and L.V. Watters. She started at George Washington Carver

School of Levelland along with her sisters, Junie, Elven, Georgia, Velma, and brothers Rufus, and Roland Watters. The Watters family migrated to Roswell in 1955 where Ethel attended Ware’s Tabernacle Baptist Church and Highland Elementary School. She was baptized at Ware’s Tabernacle Baptist Church at an early age.

Ethel graduated from Roswell High School on May 24, 1963. The Watters family attended Friendship while Ethel joined Peoples Baptist Church to assist her brother, the late Pastor Roland Watters. She was a member of the choir, a lead singer, and alto harmonizer; a gift she cultivated in a quartet of family members and friends. Ethel Watters graduated from Barber School in San Antonio where she resided with her sister, Junie Scott. She gave birth to Mark Fitzgerald Webb on Oct. 26, 1964. Ethel returned to Roswell, and secured a job with Levi Strauss for 15 years. She started as a sewing machine operator, became a sewing trainer and was eventually promoted to seamstress supervisor as well as lead quality auditor. In 1977, Ethel returned to San Antonio and continued to work for Levi Strauss. As a member of the Levi Strauss Leadership Program, Ethel travelled to many places, such as San Diego and El Paso. Ethel continued to work at Levi Strauss for 38 years until her retirement in 2004. After her retirement, Ethel attended classes at Palo Alto College in San Antonio, Texas, earning a certificate of completion for

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

B3

business communications on May 7, 2006. Ethel’s son Mark Webb married DeAnsin on May 22, 1987. Her greatest thrill was the birth of her grandchildren, David, on June 12, 1989 and KristiAna, on Nov. 2, 1990. She shared many interests with her grandchildren, including a love of the San Antonio Spurs. Ethel studied the grace of Jesus Christ under the teaching of Joseph Prince. She loved his study of the Hebrew language and how it leads to the grace of the Lord. Ethel had a positive attitude on life and projected that on others. She volunteered with many organizations, including the San Antonio food bank and the Hot Meals Ministry at Corinth Baptist Church. She also made monetary donations to other charity organizations, including the American Red Cross. She is survived by her son, Mark Webb and wife DeAnsin, and her grandchildren, David and KristiAna of Rhome, Texas. Her oldest living sisters are Elven Parker and Georgia Ann Watters, sister-in-law Juanita Watters, all of Roswell; Velma Mollett of Tucson, Ariz.; her brother Rev. Rufus O. Watters of Caldwell, Texas; and a host of nieces and nephews. Services are scheduled at Meadowlawn American Mortuary, 5611 E Houston, San Antonio, Texas 78220.

Leonard Reese

Arrangements are pending for Leonard Reese, 54, of Roswell at AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory. He passed away Saturday, Sept. 10, in Lubbock.

Spy wants return to Cuba after prison, U.S. objects

MIAMI (AP) — A former Cuban intelligence officer convicted of spying in the U.S. wants to return immediately to Cuba upon his release from prison next month, but federal prosecutors insist he must serve an additional three years of probation in this country. Phil Horowitz, attorney for 55-year-old Rene Gonzalez, said Monday he has asked U.S. District Judge Joan Lenard on humanitarian grounds to permit the probation to be served in Cuba. Horowitz noted that Gonzalez’s wife cannot get

a visa to visit him in the U.S. — she was also implicated in the spy ring — and that his two children and parents also live in Cuba. “It’s our view that’s an additional three years of punishment,” Horowitz said. “He has no relatives, no close family in the United States.” Gonzalez, who holds dual U.S.-Cuban citizenship, is set for release Oct. 7 from a federal prison in Marianna, Fla. He has been in custody since the men were arrested 13 years ago Monday. Prosecutors say there is

no legal justification for Gonzalez to return before the three years’ probation is completed. In court papers, they contend that Gonzalez was unrepentant regarding the actions that landed him in prison and a return to Cuba would put him beyond any U.S. supervision. “The modification he seeks is essentially to terminate and eliminate supervised release before it has begun,” said Assistant U.S. Attor ney Caroline Heck Miller in court documents. She added that

Gonzalez could later request permission to visit Cuba. There is no timetable for Lenard to make a decision. Horowitz said Gonzalez’s mother in Cuba has expressed concern that he might be in danger if forced to serve out probation in the Miami area, home to thousands of Cuban exiles who are virulently opposed to the communist government of Raul and Fidel Castro. Gonzalez and the other four men known as the “Cuban Five” were convict-

ed in 2001 of attempting to infiltrate U.S. military installations in South Florida, such as the Miamibased Southern Command headquarters. They also monitored the Miami exiles and tried to place operatives inside the campaigns of anti-Castro politicians. One of the five was also convicted of murder conspiracy in the 1996 shootdown by Cuban fighter jets of planes flown by the “Brothers to the Rescue” organization, which dropped pro-democracy leaflets in Cuba and helped

Cuban migrants seeking to reach U.S. shores.

Marriage Licenses September 9 Juan Carlos Marroquin Ramirez, 39, and Virginia Marroquin Maldonado, 40, both of Argyle, Texas. Christopher Chavez, 27, and Jaime L. Morgan, 21, both of Roswell. Frank B. Montoya, 65, and Lilia Martinez, 64, both of Roswell. Jon M. Huf f, 23, and Tracey M. Young, 22, both of Roswell. Victor Chairez-Hernandez, 20, and Juliet Guzman, 18, both of Roswell.

failure to appear on traffic citation — Gilberto Gonzalez Jr., of 1207 West Hobbs #20; fined $73. No drivers license, window tint and failure to appear on traffic citation — Gilberto Gonzalez Jr., of 1207 West Hobbs #20; fined $177. Possession of drug paraphernalia — Gilberto Gonzalez Jr., of 1207 West Hobbs #20; fined $229. Speeding, no insurance, unlawful use of license and failure to appear on a hold date — Roberto Morales, of 78 East Eyman; fined $646 and 9 days jail; $530 and 9 days jail suspended in lieu of 18 days community service. Failure to pay fines — Roberto Morales, of 78 East Eyman; fined $458. Failure to pay fines — Roberto Morales, of 78 East Eyman; fined $258. Obstructing an officer — Dionna Gutierrez, of 1421 East Hendricks; fined $54. Shoplifting under $250 — Mackenzie Whitcamp, of 1200 West McGaffey #27; fined $129. Obstructing an officer — Angelette Alvarez, of 509 South Ash; fined $54. Possession of drug parapher nalia — Jonathan Ortega, of 1513 West Hendricks; fined $129. September 8 Judge Larry Loy Arraignments Leaving scene of accident; following too closely — Christopher Cabreria, of

218 Onyx; leaving scene of accident- fined $329; following to closely- fined $44. Possession of drug paraphernalia — Joe Castillo, of 214 East Church; fined $129. Dog running at large — Delma Magana-Castillo, of 2322 North Mesa; fined $54. Possession of marijuana; following too closely — Chelsea Orona, of 1722 North Lea; possession of marijuana- fined $529; following to closely- fined $44. Possession of drug paraphernalia — Kristi Smith, of 814 El Dora; fined $129.

Atkinson Avenue and Alameda Street; drivers — Kristal Kuykendall, 28, of Roswell, and Darren T. Maples, 25, of Dexter. 5:55 p.m. — 500 block of South Missouri Avenue; drivers — vehicle owned by Justin Merifield, of Chicago, and Elvia Chacon, 49, of Roswell. September 9 6:40 a.m. — Atkinson Avenue and McGaf fey Street; drivers — Mary Corn, 67, of Roswell. 8:18 a.m. — Berrendo Road and Coronado Road; drivers — Nkemamaka Jennifer Ogbunize, 30, of Owings Mills, Md., and Chrystal Reynolds, 31, of Roswell. 11:00 a.m. — Parked in Albertson’s parking lot; vehicle owned by Veve Bryd, of Roswell, and unknown driver. 12:13 p.m. — Richardson Avenue and Eighth Street; drivers — Brian Williams, 46, and Tenaya Relei, 19, both of Roswell. 1:00 p.m. — Main Street and Robin Street; drivers — Jenna Garcia, 18, of Dexter, and Chasity Shupe, 32, of Roswell. 5:32 p.m. — 806 Barnett Drive; drivers — vehicle owned by Brandon Turrieta, and Laquatta Rightsell, 76, both of Roswell. September 10 10:46 a.m. — 100 block East College Blvd.; Alan R. Jakins, 59, and Michael Allen, 27, both of Roswell. 12:16 p.m. — Wildy Drive

and Richardson Avenue; drivers — Johnny Ibarra, 23, of Albuquerque, and Daniel Gonzales, 21, of Roswell. 12:44 p.m. — 1201 North Main Street; drivers — vehicle owned by Matthew Rohn, of Del Rio, and unknown driver. 1:04 p.m. — South Main Street and West Walnut Street; drivers — Ismael S. Ornelas, 40, and Octavio Olivas, 20, both of Roswell. 1:39 p.m. — 2012 South Main Street; drivers — Perry F. Derold, 66, of Los Banos, Calif. 4:23 p.m. — 500 South Wyoming Avenue; drivers — unknown drivers. 7:40 p.m. — North Union Avenue and Fourth Street; drivers — Allen J. Brady, 54, and Carolyn A. Hardwick, 54, both of Roswell. September 11 5:53 a.m. — Atkinson Avenue and Bland Street; drivers — Gerardo VillarealVenegas, 20, of Roswell. 11:12 a.m. — Parking lot

2010 Southeast Main Street; Debra A. Earl, 51, of Artesia, and Ray G. Llamas, 60, of Roswell. 1:26 p.m. — North Main Street and West Mescalero Road; drivers — Susan Sharp, 56, and Lydia Martinez, 44, both of Roswell. 5:02 p.m. — Atkinson Avenue and Second Street; drivers — Christopher Seabrease, 38, and Jennifer McWhorter, 34, both of Roswell. 6:32 p.m. — 1200 block East Beech Street; drivers — vehicle owned by Louis Valdez, 50, and Robert Leal, 68, both of Roswell. 7:40 p.m. — Atkinson Avenue and Berrendo Road; drivers — Blanquita Alonso, 30, and vehicle owned by Walter Kessler, both of Roswell. 10:12 p.m. — South Plains Park Drive and Adams Avenue; drivers — vehicle owned by Willie De La Cerda, of Roswell, and unknown driver.

PUBLIC RECORD

Municipal Court September 7, 2011 Judge Larry Loy Arraignments Possession of marijuana, possession of paraphernalia and concealing identity — Debbie Salas, of 1812 North Michigan; fined $587; $425 suspended in lieu of 7 days community service. Unlawful use of license and failure to appear on a hold date — Debbie Salas, of 1812 North Michigan; fined $458 and 9 days jail; 9 days jail and $400 suspended in lieu of 16 days community service. Possession of drug parapher nalia and failure to appear for arraignment — Gilberto Gonzalez Jr., of 1207 West Hobbs #20; fined $258 and 5 days jail; 5 days jail suspended in lieu of 5 days community service. No drivers license and

Accidents August 29 11:52 a.m. — Main Street and 19th Street; drivers — Albert Cervantez, 27, of Hagerman, and Pete Degroot, 61, of Roswell. September 8 3:39 a.m. — North Main Street and Wilshire Blvd.; drivers — Landon J. Andrus, 20, of Capitan. 7:55 a.m. — Berrendo Road and North Main Street; drivers — Cynthia Delao, 37, and Julie DillonKing, 40, both of Roswell. 11:20 a.m. — Country Club Road; drivers — Steven J. Montgomery, 17, and Faith J. Simitz, 16, both of Roswell. 1:33 p.m. — 11th Street and Washington Avenue; drivers — Emma Nevarez, 43, and Dora Wilcox, 45, both of Roswell. 5:22 p.m. — South

All five are hailed as heroes in Cuba.

The other four are still appealing their convictions, most recently on grounds that the U.S. paid thousands of dollars to key journalists while the highprofile trial was ongoing. The journalists were paid for appearances on U.S. radio and TV broadcasts to Cuba, even as they continued to do stories for independent media outlets.


B4 Tuesday, September 13, 2011

business class. Her seat in coach is a warning sign: She’ll always be in the back of the plane, the bus or his life. Of course buying business class seats for the two of them is expensive, but if he’s going to take her to his family’s chateau, he should treat her as an equal — or not do it at all. PAUL IN SARATOGA, CALIF.

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR PAUL: I appreciate your viewpoint, one which is shared by many other readers. The responses to that letter were an interesting mix. My newspaper readers comment:

DEAR ABBY: Your response to “Not Ungrateful in San Diego” (July 13) missed the mark. Her boyfriend of eight months is flying in business class to France, but he’s only paying for a coach ticket for her? I was a divorce lawyer for 31 years (now retired), so I know a few things about relationships. While Claude had no obligation to pay her way to France, once he invited her, he displayed a troubling character flaw. If he was going to pay her way, he should have paid for her to sit with him in

DEAR ABBY: “Not Ungrateful” is unbelievable! My long-legged husband cannot sit in coach unless he is in an exit row, and those seats aren’t always easy to get. Because I’m short, I don’t need the extra space and, if I am assigned an exit seat, I gladly give it up to a tall person. That woman will be in France (paid for!) with her boyfriend. I would go in

Jumble

COMICS

the BAGGAGE compartment for such an opportunity. HAPPY TO TRADE PLACES HHHHH

DEAR ABBY: A less-expensive option for longlegged fliers is to buy an extra coach seat. Claude could purchase three seats together. That way he could sit sideways and put items in the central seat. Neither my wife nor I have long legs, but we fly this way for comfort on long flights. STEPHEN IN TUCSON, ARIZ.

DEAR ABBY: When Claude offered to treat her to the trip, he put himself in the role of a “host.” A host does not treat himself to steak while offering hamburger to his guest. I am accompanying my husband on a business trip. His company will pay for him to fly business class and I will purchase a coach ticket for myself. My husband insists on flying coach with me, saying that a gentleman would never fly in a dif-

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

TSIHO

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

OSLSNE CEJOTB Answer: Yesterday’s

Family Circus

DEAR ABBY: My husband always sits in business class while I sit in coach when we travel long distances. He has a back problem and I don’t. Why spend a lot of money on something so fleeting? We have plenty of time together once we arrive at our destination. I have never thought of myself as subservient — just practical. ENJOYS LIFE IN COACH DEAR ABBY: By all means, “Not Ungrateful” should go to France as planned. Her seatmate in coach could be a delightful person — maybe even someone with whom she’d rather spend the rest of her life. Or, he could be someone she’ll meet in France. Life’s little twists and turns can be strange and mysterious, but they lead us to our destiny. BETTIE IN ALBUQUERQUE

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

XEIHL

ferent class than his wife. WE’RE IN IT TOGETHER

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) ADOPT WEASEL PREFER Jumbles: BLURB Answer: The new bakery specialized in these — “PURE BREADS”

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Dear Heloise: An E-READER is a blessing for those of us with low or limited vision. I have seen the expressions on faces and listened to the condescending comments from “book lovers,” including librarians. When I explain the value of the e-reader, there is always an “I didn’t think of that” response. I have been an avid reader from the time I learned to read, and I still do enjoy reading. Unfortunately, I can’t see the regular print in books (or newspapers) without a magnifier. Large-print books from the library are great, but they can be very heavy to hold and therefore make reading a chore. My e-reader weighs 8 ounces, and I can change the font to a very large one. Not all books are digital, but I am rereading H.G. Wells, Steinbeck, Hemingway, etc., and occasionally purchase a best-seller. The reader doesn’t play games or do anything but provide the opportunity to read. Hopefully, your readers will gain appreciation for the device as I have. Jean P., via email Jean, thank you for sharing your positive experience. As a lover of “print” books, I’d never thought of your point of view! Now I know. Heloise

Blondie

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

HHHHH

Dear Heloise: A blank space before “ICE” (“in case of emergency”) will list all the emergency numbers first on a cellphone. Then put A, B, C, etc., to organize the order in which people are to be notified. Patricia in Canada

Garfield

Good safety hint, and thanks for the reminder. Heloise

HHHHH

Dear Readers: There was a lumpy chair mat (goes over carpet and under a rolling chair) in the office. What did Heloise Central do? We put the mat in the hot Texas sun for a few hours to soften it up. Worked great; it’s as good as new! Heloise

Hagar the Horrible

HHHHH

Dear Heloise: While on a recent vacation, I accidentally marked my cloth car seat with ballpoint-pen ink. Since it’s a new vehicle, I was really upset. Then, in a rare moment of creativity, I tried wiping it off using hand sanitizer and a tissue. Voila! It disappeared like magic. I know hand sanitizer is mostly alcohol, so I will always keep it in my handbag. Allene S., Bellville, Texas

The Wizard of Id

How right you are! Most sanitizers list alcohol as the active ingredient. It worked in your case, but other readers should always test a hidden part of the fabric first to be safe. Heloise

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Roswell Daily Record


FINANCIAL

Roswell Daily Record

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg DirxLCBull .10e 51.48 +.96 DirxEnBull ... 42.26 +.46 A-B-C Discover .24 25.03 +1.11 .40f 31.29 +.25 ABB Ltd .64e d17.99 -.10 Disney AES Corp ... 10.40 +.07 DollarGen ... 35.74 +.94 AFLAC 1.20 d34.18 +.35 DomRescs 1.97 47.47 +.28 1.26f d50.20 -1.47 AGCO ... 39.75 -1.24 Dover AK Steel .20 8.17 -.05 DowChm 1.00f d25.76 -.01 DrPepSnap1.28 36.83 -.02 AMR ... 3.27 -.08 AOL ... 14.75 +.03 DuPont 1.64 44.28 -.99 AT&T Inc 1.72 27.88 +.34 DukeEngy 1.00f 18.86 +.31 ... 21.63 +.34 AbtLab 1.92 50.51 +.08 EMC Cp ... 3.05 +.18 Accenture .90 50.02 +.20 EKodak AMD ... 6.71 +.19 Eaton s 1.36 d38.46 -.20 .70 49.77 -.43 Aeropostl ... d10.18 -.03 Ecolab Aetna .60 38.44 +.44 EdisonInt 1.28 35.86 +.50 Agilent ... 33.41 +.05 ElPasoCp .04 18.57 +.33 ... 9.40 -.19 AlcatelLuc ... 3.02 -.09 Elan Alcoa .12 11.55 -.03 EldorGld g .12f 20.50 -.98 Allstate .84 25.27 +.46 EmersonEl 1.38 43.80 +.40 AlphaNRs ... 29.69 -1.12 EnCana g .80 d22.76 -.13 Altria 1.64f 26.54 +.17 EndvSilv g ... 12.52 -.15 AmBev s 1.43e 32.15 -.24 ENSCO 1.40 48.46 -.78 Amerigrp ... 42.37 -2.06 Exelon 2.10 42.44 +.06 AMovilL s .41e 23.30 -.09 ExxonMbl 1.88 71.84 +.83 AEagleOut .44a 10.76 +.06 FairchldS ... 12.33 +.50 AEP 1.84 37.12 +.32 FedExCp .52 73.63 +.23 AmExp .72 47.46 +.18 FstHorizon .04 6.13 -.08 AmIntlGrp ... 23.58 +.22 FMajSilv g ... 20.89 -1.77 AmTower ... 52.30 -.08 FlagstBcp ... .50 -.06 Ameriprise .92 42.02 +.29 FootLockr .66 19.61 -.10 ... 10.11 +.06 AmeriBrgn .46f 38.08 -.32 FordM Anadarko .36 70.31 +.52 ForestLab ... 32.57 -.18 ... 18.60 -.01 AnalogDev 1.00 32.83 +.72 ForestOil ABInBev 1.16e 50.22 -.82 FranceTel2.02e d15.75 -.66 Annaly 2.59e 17.95 +.14 FMCG s 1.00a 41.31 -.68 Aon Corp .60 43.40 -.19 FrontierCm .75 6.94 +.12 Apache .60 d94.65 -.47 G-H-I AptInv .48 26.39 +.33 ... d2.35 -.19 ArcelorMit .75 d17.43 -.33 GMX Rs ArchCoal .44 18.95 -.57 Gafisa SA .29e 8.57 -.22 ArchDan .64 27.02 -.09 GameStop ... 23.22 +.09 ArmourRsd1.44 7.44 +.01 Gannett .32f d9.52 -.32 .45 16.20 +.20 AssuredG .18 11.25 -.10 Gap AuRico g ... 11.40 -.30 GenDynam1.88 58.90 -.10 Avon .92 21.20 +.10 GenElec .60 d15.01 -.08 BB&T Cp .64a 21.33 +.43 GenGrPr n .40 12.28 +.22 BHP BillLt2.02e 76.83 -.34 GenMills 1.22f 37.20 -.32 BP PLC 1.68 36.43 +.43 GenMot n ... 21.87 +.11 BakrHu .60 57.70 +.91 GenOn En ... 3.12 +.05 BallCp s .28 33.73 -.30 Genworth ... 5.82 ... BcBilVArg .59e d7.56 -.06 Gerdau .25e 8.15 -.16 BcoBrades .80r 16.63 -.56 GiantInter s.18a 4.61 -.19 BcoSantSA.82e d7.50 -.37 GlaxoSKln2.17e 40.89 -.18 BcoSBrasil1.65e 8.69 -.22 GoldFLtd .24e 16.61 -.62 BkofAm .04 7.05 +.07 Goldcrp g .41 53.01 -2.26 BkNYMel .52 19.98 +.06 GoldmanS 1.40d102.92 +.67 Barclay .36e d9.18 +.07 Goodyear ... 10.33 -.45 ... 34.29 -1.21 Bar iPVix rs ... 46.25 +.42 vjGrace BarrickG .48 53.33 -1.22 HCA Hld n ... 18.40 +.10 Baxter 1.24 53.30 +.14 HCP Inc 1.92 35.43 +.49 BerkH B ... 69.24 +1.47 HSBC 1.90e d39.42 -.63 BestBuy .64f 24.96 +.46 Hallibrtn .36 39.56 -.10 Blackstone .40 12.31 +.10 HarmonyG.08e 12.87 -.79 BlockHR .60 13.26 +.13 HartfdFn .40 17.18 +.54 Boeing 1.68 62.39 +.60 Heckmann ... 5.47 -.10 ... 7.65 -.12 BostonSci ... 6.22 +.02 HeclaM 1.92 50.14 -.43 Brinker .64f 20.20 +.19 Heinz ... 9.66 -.17 BrMySq 1.32 29.44 +.28 Hertz .40 57.99 +.25 CB REllis ... 14.12 +.07 Hess HewlettP .48 d22.58 +.05 CBS B .40 22.20 +.06 CIGNA .04 43.68 +.80 HollyFrt s .35f 34.67 -.35 HomeDp 1.00 32.35 +.48 CMS Eng .84 19.06 +.25 CNO Fincl ... 5.80 +.09 HonwllIntl 1.33 44.14 -.58 CSX s .48 19.51 -.07 HostHotls .12f 10.75 +.06 CVS Care .50 36.78 +.28 Huntsmn .40 11.50 -.41 CblvsNY s .60 d15.97 -.02 IAMGld g .20f 21.91 -.58 ... d6.27 -.37 CabotO&G .12 69.73 -.46 ING CalDive ... 2.77 +.36 ION Geoph ... 6.12 -.01 ... 17.71 -.41 Calpine ... 14.34 +.43 iShGold Cameco g .40 d20.70 -.64 iSAstla 1.06e 22.24 -.34 Cameron ... 49.30 +1.02 iShBraz 3.42e 59.99 -.98 CdnNRs gs .36 33.88 -.47 iShGer .67e d17.78 -.04 CapOne .20 42.58 +.80 iSh HK .42e 16.58 -.13 CardnlHlth .86 39.93 -.25 iShJapn .17e d9.32 +.09 CarMax ... 26.75 +.43 iSh Kor .50e 52.18 -.01 Carnival 1.00 31.49 +.81 iSMalas .39e 13.74 -.12 Caterpillar 1.84f 83.87 -.09 iShMex .71e 53.54 -.64 Cemex ... d4.86 -.09 iShSing .50e d12.19 -.13 CenterPnt .79 19.54 +.02 iSTaiwn .29e 13.14 +.04 ... 39.14 -1.38 CntryLink 2.90 33.35 +.28 iShSilver ChesEng .35 30.76 +.38 iShChina25.85e 35.79 -.16 Chevron 3.12 95.91 +.72 iSSP500 2.45e 117.06 +.80 Chimera .62e 2.84 ... iShEMkts .84e 39.93 -.08 Chubb 1.56 59.67 +.43 iShB20 T 4.02e 113.83 +.12 Citigrp rs .04 26.96 +.22 iS Eafe 1.68e d48.54 -.21 CliffsNRs 1.12f 75.87 -.76 iSR1KG .77e 54.48 +.33 Coach .90 54.89 +1.25 iSR2KV 1.31e 60.18 +.52 CocaCola 1.88 69.38 +.01 iSR2KG .52e 78.08 +.68 CocaCE .52 25.52 +.18 iShR2K .94e 68.08 +.58 ColgPal 2.32 87.72 -1.24 iShREst 2.09e 54.80 +.17 1.44f 42.36 -.15 Comerica .40 22.70 +.39 ITW ConAgra .92 23.85 +.05 IngerRd .48f 32.68 +.41 IBM 3.00 162.42 +1.05 ConocPhil 2.64 64.24 +.01 ConsolEngy .40 43.23 +.11 IntlGame .24 d14.07 +.11 1.05 25.89 -.28 Corning .20 d13.51 -.07 IntPap Covidien .80 47.54 -.18 Interpublic .24 d7.45 -.04 .49 16.62 +.16 CSVS2xVxS ... 69.25 +1.42 Invesco CSVelIVSt s ... d6.53 -.06 InvMtgCap3.74e 16.22 -.06 CredSuiss1.40e d22.95 +.09 ItauUnibH .84e 16.52 -.59 Cummins 1.60f 87.06 -1.10 J-K-L CurEuro .19e 136.13 +.04 JPMorgCh 1.00 d32.42 +.34 D-E-F Jabil .28 16.03 +.27 DCT Indl .28 4.44 +.01 JanusCap .20 6.51 +.15 63.59 -.05 JohnJn 2.28 DR Horton .15 9.56 -.02 DTE 2.35 49.19 +.72 JohnsnCtl .64 d28.70 -.20 DanaHldg ... 11.64 -.08 JnprNtwk ... 21.74 +.28 Danaher .08 43.57 +.98 KB Home .25 5.68 +.01 ... 12.50 -.18 Darden 1.72f 43.41 +.04 KeyEngy ... 8.22 -.05 Keycorp .12 6.30 +.18 DeanFds Deere 1.64 75.04 -.22 KimbClk 2.80 67.25 +.02 .72 16.26 +.07 DeltaAir ... 7.38 +.20 Kimco DenburyR ... d14.22 +.13 Kinross g .12f 17.16 -.79 DeutschBk1.07ed29.92 -1.22 KodiakO g ... 5.66 -.07 1.00 d43.98 +1.38 DBGoldDS ... 4.37 +.19 Kohls 1.16 34.25 -.26 DevelDiv .16 11.37 +.04 Kraft Kroger .42 21.82 -.20 DevonE .68 63.78 +.59 DrSCBr rs ... 47.32 -1.34 LDK Solar ... 4.92 +.11 ... 6.57 +.02 DirFnBr rs ... 61.22 -2.13 LSI Corp ... 47.54 +.92 DirLCBr rs ... 43.66 -.83 LVSands DrxEMBull1.20ed20.15 -.10 LeggMason .32 26.23 +.21 DrxEnBear ... 18.38 -.24 LennarA .16 13.51 +.03 1.96 36.04 -.09 DirEMBear ... 24.11 +.13 LillyEli DrxFnBull ... 12.40 +.31 Limited .80a 37.13 +.53 .20 d17.98 -.05 DirxSCBull ... 39.77 +.98 LincNat Name

Name Sell Chg Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 17.33 +.11 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.43 +.11 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.75 +.01 GrowthI 24.07 +.13 Ultra 22.00 +.17 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.64 +.11 AMutlA p 23.82 +.11 BalA p 17.39 +.05 BondA p 12.58 -.03 CapIBA p 47.84 -.16 CapWGA p31.09 -.16 CapWA p 21.17 -.08 EupacA p 35.59 -.29 FdInvA p 33.42 +.07 GovtA p 14.61 -.02 GwthA p 27.92 +.10 HI TrA p 10.72 -.07 IncoA p 15.99 -.02 IntBdA p 13.67 -.02 IntlGrIncA p27.67 -.33 ICAA p 25.32 +.11 NEcoA p 23.43 -.03 N PerA p 25.67 -.06 NwWrldA 48.21 -.52 STBFA p 10.11 ... SmCpA p 33.79 -.19 TxExA p 12.35 ... WshA p 26.06 +.13 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 25.18 -.32 IntEqII I r 10.43 -.13 Artisan Funds: Intl 19.55 -.15 IntlVal r 23.36 -.20 MidCap 32.91 +.29

MidCapVal19.38 +.09 Baron Funds: Growth 48.47 +.14 SmallCap 22.23 +.06 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.24 -.04 DivMu 14.73 ... TxMgdIntl 12.81 -.19 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.67 ... GlAlA r 18.59 ... BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.33 ... BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.71 ... GlbAlloc r 18.68 ... Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 49.03 +.34 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 58.06 +.25 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 26.21 +.10 DivEqInc 8.86 +.04 DivrBd 5.16 -.01 TxEA p 13.45 ... Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.06 +.10 AcornIntZ 36.00 -.39 LgCapGr 12.43 +.15 ValRestr 43.17 -.03 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.29 -.04 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n 9.28 -.12 USCorEq1 9.88 ... USCorEq2 9.69 ... DWS Invest S: MgdMuni S 8.98 ... Davis Funds A: NYVen A 30.80 +.08

Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 31.17 +.08 NYVen C 29.63 +.08 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.46 -.03 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq n18.69 -.19 EmMktV 29.16 -.32 IntSmVa n 14.22 -.17 LargeCo 9.09 ... USLgVa 17.70 ... US Micro 11.90 ... US Small 18.62 ... US SmVa 21.40 ... IntlSmCo n14.72 -.18 Fixd n 10.35 -.01 IntVa n 14.45 -.23 Glb5FxInc n11.35 -.02 2YGlFxd n 10.23 -.01 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 64.52 +.23 Income 13.48 -.04 IntlStk 29.25 -.33 Stock 95.02 +.53 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.28 ... Dreyfus: Aprec 37.71 +.09 DreihsAcInc10.51 ... Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 15.95 +.09 Eaton Vance I: 8.66 -.02 FltgRt GblMacAbR10.12 ... LgCapVal 15.99 +.09 FMI Funds: LgCap p n 14.62 +.09 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.84 ... FPACres n25.82 -.05

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 119.17 119.45 118.45 119.40 Dec 11 118.62 119.10 118.22 118.72 Feb 12 122.30 122.50 121.55 122.40 Apr 12 126.32 126.50 125.60 126.37 Jun 12 124.00 124.82 123.90 124.80 Aug 12 124.05 124.65 124.00 124.62 Oct 12 125.65 126.70 125.65 126.70 Dec 12 126.00 126.85 126.00 126.85 Feb 13 126.75 Last spot N/A Est. sales 21695. Fri’s Sales: 102,054 Fri’s open int: 318149, up +1183 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Sep 11 133.60 134.32 133.00 133.40 Oct 11 135.45 136.15 134.45 135.52 Nov 11 136.40 137.22 135.57 136.40 Jan 12 138.10 139.20 138.05 138.77 Mar 12 139.87 140.25 139.00 140.17 Apr 12 140.00 140.25 140.00 140.05 May 12 140.65 140.90 140.65 140.90 Aug 12 142.50 Last spot N/A Est. sales 2899. Fri’s Sales: 9,361 Fri’s open int: 32610, up +210 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 86.65 87.40 86.30 86.67 Dec 11 82.90 83.67 82.62 82.72 Feb 12 89.40 89.40 88.50 88.80 Apr 12 92.35 92.40 91.90 92.35

chg.

+.95 +.47 +.58 +.60 +.65 +.52 +.50 +.15

+.18 +.67 +.73 +.55 +.67 +.53 +.40

1.94 ... SpdrKbwBk.20e 18.38 +.31 72.24 +.67 SpdrLehHY4.23e 37.63 -.11 19.13 +.17 SpdrKbw RB.37e 20.40 +.36 31.42 +.23 SpdrRetl .46e 47.85 +.63 SpdrOGEx .47e 50.69 +.01 M-N-0 SpdrMetM .42e 54.99 -.67 MBIA ... 7.72 +.34 STMicro .40 5.86 +.06 MEMC ... 6.65 +.03 Safeway .58 17.83 -.08 MF Global ... d4.88 -.11 Saks ... 9.65 +.26 MFA Fncl 1.00f 6.98 -.02 SandRdge ... 6.84 -.03 MGIC ... 2.36 -.01 Sanofi 1.82e 32.19 -.51 MGM Rsts ... 10.32 +.24 SaraLee .46 17.17 -.10 Macys .40 25.69 +.52 Schlmbrg 1.00 72.38 +.58 Manitowoc .08 d8.96 -.29 Schwab .24 d11.46 +.19 Manulife g .52 d12.15 -.26 SeadrillLtd3.03e 30.83 -.02 MarathnO s .60 24.39 -.43 SemiHTr .64e 29.13 +.61 MktVGold .40e 63.90 -1.90 SiderurNac.81e 9.10 -.10 MktVRus .18e 31.28 +.21 Siemens 3.72e d89.19 +.81 MktVJrGld2.93e 36.91 -1.36 SilvWhtn g .12 39.34 -.51 MarIntA .40 d26.04 -.04 SilvrcpM g .08 7.84 -.59 MarshM .88f 28.38 -.19 SmithfF ... 19.29 -.16 Masco .30 7.57 -.23 SouthnCo 1.89 41.37 +.63 McDrmInt ... 13.29 +.05 SwstAirl .02 d7.96 -.10 McDnlds 2.44 86.19 +1.16 SwstnEngy ... 35.95 +.04 McGrwH 1.00 40.26 +1.54 SpectraEn 1.04 25.20 +.32 McKesson .80 74.18 +.10 SprintNex ... 3.40 -.05 Mechel ... d15.63 ... SP Matls 1.30e 32.95 -.23 MedcoHlth ... 51.86 +.55 SP HlthC .63e 32.08 +.11 Medtrnic .97 33.58 +.20 SP CnSt .83e 30.03 +.03 Merck 1.52 32.00 +.16 SP Consum.59e 35.84 +.42 MetLife .74 30.30 +.42 SP Engy 1.06e 65.20 +.31 MetroPCS ... 10.44 -.02 SPDR Fncl .18e 12.37 +.14 MobileTele1.06ed14.56 -.04 SP Inds .67e 30.24 +.06 Molycorp ... 52.70 -1.41 SP Tech .35e 23.77 +.28 Monsanto 1.20f 65.87 +.86 SP Util 1.33e 33.07 +.27 MonstrWw ... 8.09 +.18 StanBlkDk 1.64 d54.02 -.89 Moodys .56 29.50 +.53 StarwdHtl .30f 40.64 +1.02 MorgStan .20 d15.05 -.23 StateStr .72 d32.40 +.35 Mosaic .20 69.49 -.48 MotrlaSol n .88 40.82 +.48 Statoil ASA1.10e 22.08 -.18 ... 13.36 -.42 MotrlaMo n ... 37.44 -.06 StillwtrM NV Energy .48 14.13 +.11 Suncor gs .44 d28.79 -.79 Sunoco .60 37.35 +.23 NYSE Eur 1.20 d25.42 -.25 Nabors ... 17.37 +.58 SunstnHtl ... 5.53 -.04 ... d4.01 -.10 NalcoHld .14 35.02 -.31 Suntech NBkGreece.29e d.77 -.06 SunTrst .20f 18.67 +.42 NOilVarco .44 63.27 +.61 Supvalu .35 7.52 +.05 NatSemi .40 24.88 +.03 Synovus .04 1.31 +.01 1.04 d26.80 +.10 NY CmtyB 1.00 12.45 +.57 Sysco NewellRub .32 12.73 -.08 TE Connect .72 27.95 -.14 TJX .76 52.49 +.70 NewfldExp ... 46.30 -1.30 NewmtM 1.20f 64.07 -1.19 TaiwSemi .52e 11.94 +.06 Talbots ... 2.90 +.07 Nexen g .20 19.19 -.31 NiSource .92 21.10 +.08 TalismE g .27f d14.55 -.53 NikeB 1.24 84.36 +1.86 Target 1.20f 50.11 +.09 NobleCorp .53e 33.88 +.04 TataMotors.45e d15.09 -.26 NobleEn .88f 80.59 -1.35 TeckRes g .60 39.47 -1.26 NokiaCp .55e 5.87 -.11 TelefEsp s1.98ed17.80 -.22 Nordstrm .92 45.54 +1.49 TempleInld .52 31.08 +.03 NorflkSo 1.72f 64.76 -.07 Tenaris .68e d29.37 -.16 NorthropG 2.00 52.42 +.61 TenetHlth ... 4.52 -.50 ... 11.82 +.30 Novartis 2.53e 54.61 -.81 Teradyn ... d13.02 -.63 Nucor 1.45 32.95 -.19 Terex ... 23.78 +.33 OcciPet 1.84 79.54 -1.00 Tesoro .52 26.28 +.20 OfficeDpt ... 2.31 -.05 TexInst .08 15.39 +.13 OilSvHT 1.58e 126.48 +1.01 Textron Omnicom 1.00 38.17 +.32 ThermoFis ... 51.09 +.60 ThomCrk g ... 7.67 -.20 OwensIll ... 16.83 +.19 2.20 78.22 +1.57 3M Co P-Q-R TW Cable 1.92 61.63 +.78 PMI Grp ... .20 -.01 TimeWarn .94 29.20 +.31 PNC 1.40 48.17 +1.79 Total SA 2.38e d44.62 -.38 PPL Corp 1.40 27.98 +.03 Transocn .79e 54.95 +.74 PallCorp .70 42.19 -.28 Travelers 1.64 48.96 +.82 ParkerHan 1.48 66.08 -.30 TrinaSolar ... d10.05 -.36 PatriotCoal ... 13.80 -.69 TycoIntl 1.00 40.28 +.60 PeabdyE .34 46.10 -.71 Tyson .16 16.68 -.03 Penney .80 25.82 +.48 UBS AG ... d11.92 +.05 PepsiCo 2.06 d60.14 +.15 US Airwy ... d4.85 -.17 PetrbrsA 1.34e 24.11 -.17 US Gold ... 6.24 +.11 Petrobras 1.26e 26.35 -.19 UnilevNV 1.21e 30.90 -.47 Pfizer .80 18.25 -.04 Unilever 1.21e 31.13 -.47 PhilipMor 2.56 66.02 +.12 UnionPac 1.90 84.29 -.80 PhilipsEl 1.02e d16.97 -.26 UtdContl ... 17.96 +.23 PitnyBw 1.48 19.22 +.15 UtdMicro .19e 1.91 +.02 Potash s .28 56.48 -.98 UPS B 2.08 63.87 -.35 PwshDB ... 29.22 -.07 UtdRentals ... 15.64 -.23 PS USDBull ... 21.92 +.01 US Bancrp .50 22.35 +.35 PrecDrill ... 11.69 -.24 US NGs rs ... 9.84 -.03 PrinFncl .55f 23.42 +.40 US OilFd ... 34.42 +.57 ProLogis 1.12 25.57 -.08 USSteel .20 27.05 -.35 ProShtS&P ... 45.13 -.33 UtdTech 1.92 71.13 +.60 PrUShS&P ... 24.55 -.34 UtdhlthGp .65 46.26 +.74 ProUltDow .28e 49.62 +.61 UnumGrp .42f 22.31 +.24 PrUlShDow ... 20.16 -.25 ProUltQQQ ... 76.84 +1.99 V-W-X-Y-Z PrUShQQQ rs... 52.35 -1.42 Vale SA 1.14e 26.65 -.03 ProUltSP .35e 40.24 +.56 Vale SA pf1.14e 24.45 +.04 PrUShtFn rs ... 78.98 -1.75 ValeantPh .38a 39.52 -1.39 ProUShL20 ... 22.25 -.06 ValeroE .20 22.34 +.02 ProUltSRE ... 15.39 -.12 ProUltSOG ... 33.80 -.37 VangTotBd3.01e 83.63 -.25 ProUltFin .05e 40.97 +.79 VangTSM1.31e 59.87 +.42 ProShtR2K ... 34.24 -.32 VangREIT1.92e 55.24 +.18 ProUltR2K .01e 30.64 +.56 VangEmg .82e 41.00 -.15 ProUSSP500 ... 19.49 -.41 VangEur 2.31e d41.02 -.21 PrUltSP500 s.05e50.13 +.93 VangEAFE .90e d30.74 -.21 ProUSSlv rs ... 12.31 +.80 Ventas 2.30 51.01 +.04 ... 36.14 +.52 ProUltSGld ... 15.68 +.65 VeriFone ProUShEuro ... 18.58 -.01 VerizonCm2.00f 35.25 +.01 ProctGam 2.10 61.83 -.01 ViacomB 1.00 43.88 +.36 ProgsvCp 1.40e 18.24 +.20 VimpelCm .79e 10.26 -.02 .60 87.45 +1.10 ProUSR2K rs ... 53.75 -1.01 Visa Prudentl 1.15f 46.80 +.66 VishayInt ... 10.59 +.08 WalMart 1.46 51.82 +.46 PSEG 1.37 32.66 +.38 .90f 35.66 +.33 PulteGrp ... 4.26 -.04 Walgrn QksilvRes ... 8.66 ... WalterEn .50 85.15 -3.07 RadianGrp .01 2.79 -.05 WsteMInc 1.36 30.83 +.35 Raytheon 1.72 40.94 +.30 WeathfIntl ... 16.13 +.19 RegionsFn .04 3.99 +.02 WellPoint 1.00 63.38 +1.57 RepubSvc .88f 28.27 +.04 WellsFargo .48 24.10 +.58 RioTinto 1.17e 56.15 -.29 Wendys Co .08 4.89 +.07 ... 28.86 +.40 RiteAid ... 1.09 +.02 WDigital RockColl .96 47.74 -.16 WstnUnion .32f d15.79 +.24 Weyerh .60 16.73 -.13 RylCarb .40 23.31 -.35 RoyDShllA 3.36 63.82 ... WmsCos 1.00f 25.86 +.15 WT EmCur .84e d21.95 -.26 S-T-U WT India .15e 19.84 -.23 SAIC ... d12.70 -.06 Wyndham .60 29.79 +.58 .44 19.42 +.17 SAP AG .82e 49.15 -.08 XL Grp SLM Cp .40 13.01 +.30 XcelEngy 1.04 23.97 +.20 .17 d7.52 +.11 SpdrDJIA 3.12e 110.51 +.69 Xerox SpdrGold ... 176.67 -4.03 Yamana g .18 16.54 -.44 SP Mid 1.65e 150.64 +.79 YingliGrn ... d4.28 -.25 S&P500ETF2.44e116.67+.75 YumBrnds 1.00 52.06 +.53 ... 53.72 -.10 SpdrHome .31e 14.00 +.14 Zimmer LloydBkg ... LockhdM 3.00 Lowes .56 LyonBas A .80f

Fairholme 25.66 -.05 Fidel n 30.27 +.13 FltRateHi r n9.47 -.02 Federated Instl: KaufmnR 4.68 -.03 GNMA n 11.92 -.02 TotRetBd 11.44 -.02 GovtInc 10.84 -.02 GroCo n 81.51 +.63 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.05 +.09 GroInc n 16.68 +.08 StrInA 12.46 -.04 GrowthCoK81.54 +.62 HighInc r n 8.54 -.07 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI n 19.26 +.08 Indepn n 21.94 +.07 IntBd n 10.92 -.03 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 n 13.25 -.02 IntmMu n 10.38 ... FF2015 n 11.05 -.02 IntlDisc n 28.19 -.41 FF2015K 12.27 -.01 InvGrBd n 11.91 -.03 FF2020 n 13.27 -.02 InvGB n 7.71 -.02 FF2020K 12.55 -.02 LgCapVal 10.01 +.05 FF2025 n 10.92 -.01 LatAm 50.60 -.82 FF2025K 12.54 -.01 LevCoStk n24.06 +.04 FF2030 n 12.97 -.01 LowP r n 33.86 +.06 FF2030K 12.64 -.01 LowPriK r 33.84 +.06 FF2035 n 10.63 ... Magelln n 62.61 -.02 FF2040 n 7.41 ... MidCap n 25.72 +.13 FF2040K 12.63 ... MuniInc n 12.88 ... NwMkt r n 16.00 -.08 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.41 +.06 OTC n 52.95 +.70 AMgr50 n 14.82 -.03 100Index 8.19 +.06 AMgr20 r n12.78 -.02 Puritn n 17.23 +.02 Balanc n 17.72 +.04 PuritanK 17.23 +.02 BalancedK17.72 +.04 RealE n 25.82 +.09 BlueChGr n41.68 +.34 SCmdtyStrt n10.22 Canada n 53.38 -.88 .03 CapAp n 23.33 +.13 SrsIntGrw 9.91 -.10 CpInc r n 8.84 -.06 SrsIntVal 8.08 -.11 Contra n 64.89 +.31 SrInvGrdF 11.91 -.03 ContraK 64.92 +.31 StIntMu n 10.83 ... 8.52 -.01 DisEq n 20.31 +.09 STBF n DivIntl n 26.05 -.29 SmllCpS r n15.69 +.07 DivrsIntK r 26.05 -.29 StratInc n 11.14 -.04 DivGth n 24.76 +.06 StrReRt r 9.69 -.03 EmrMk n 22.68 -.25 TotalBd n 11.08 -.03 Eq Inc n 38.21 +.21 USBI n 11.82 -.03 EQII n 15.75 +.09 Value n 59.61 +.22

May 12 96.40 96.80 96.40 96.80 Jun 12 99.25 99.35 98.67 99.27 Jul 12 97.75 97.85 97.00 97.70 Aug 12 95.90 96.50 95.90 96.50 Oct 12 86.25 86.60 86.05 86.60 Dec 12 83.05 83.10 83.05 83.10 Feb 13 83.95 84.00 83.95 84.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 12187. Fri’s Sales: 60,234 Fri’s open int: 244170, off -2257

+.20 +.10 +.40 +.53 +.30

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 110.24 110.72 109.86 110.72 Dec 11 112.25 113.25 110.90 112.29 Mar 12 109.10 109.45 107.96 109.21 May 12 107.10 107.25 105.94 106.99 Jul 12 105.20 105.58 104.52 105.33 Oct 12 103.19 Dec 12 98.78 100.00 98.78 99.94 Mar 13 101.60 101.60 100.69 100.69 May 13 100.79 Jul 13 100.29 Last spot N/A Est. sales 8364. Fri’s Sales: 15,192 Fri’s open int: 153520, off -148

chg.

+.42 +.42 +.59 +.53 +.55 +.75 +1.06 +1.06 +1.13 +1.13

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high -.58 -.85 -.70 -.05

low settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 11 698fl 699fl 686 699fl Dec 11 726fl 735 710ü 727ü Mar 12 761ø 767ø 745ø 762ü

chg.

-fl -2ø -2ü

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

AMEX

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 2768402 7.05 +.07 S&P500ETF2761958116.67+.75 GenElec 1552330 15.01 -.08 SPDR Fncl1144296 12.37 +.14 iShR2K 925132 68.08 +.58

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) VantageDrl 93461 NovaGld g 59347 NwGold g 52393 NthgtM g 39817 VistaGold 32775 Last 2.52 4.41 2.05 2.53 4.42

Name Last NBGre pfA 4.50 Sequans n 4.83 ProUMex 29.05 iPInv1-21Vx 10.50 DrxBRICBl 28.43

Chg -.80 -.71 -4.08 -1.45 -3.62

%Chg -15.1 -12.8 -12.3 -12.1 -11.3

Name Banro wt ClaudeR g HaderaPap EngySvcs StreamG un

Last 2.51 2.07 37.45 2.40 2.40

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

1,461 1,579 86 3,126 15 275 4,481,637,479

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

DIARY

52-Week High Low 12,876.00 10,332.40 5,627.85 4,205.13 442.01 381.99 8,718.25 6,839.00 2,490.51 1,930.64 2,887.75 2,206.62 1,370.58 1,091.15 14,562.01 11,444.56 868.57 628.51

Name

Div

Chg +.10 -.51 -.25 -.11 +.71

Name Vol (00) Last GloblInd 721492 7.78 PwShs QQQ61295053.86 SiriusXM 559211 1.67 Microsoft 540351 25.89 Cisco 522207 16.09

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg Name M&F Wld 24.25 +3.88 +19.0 NewConcEn CalDive 2.77 +.36 +14.9 VistaGold MaxLinear 6.33 +.60 +10.5 NevGCas PNC wt 8.92 +.82 +10.1 PHC Inc Inphi n 8.69 +.79 +10.0 OpkoHlth

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Last 1.49 8.65 13.65 3.89 4.41

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg +.60 +31.3 GloblInd 7.78 +2.63 +51.1 +.71 +19.2 NetLogicM 48.12+16.21 +50.8 +.15 +7.9 Lightbrdge 3.17 +.80 +33.8 +.15 +6.3 EssexRent 4.87 +.80 +19.7 +.24 +5.7 Radcom 4.10 +.54

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg %Chg Name -.29 -10.4 BioLnRx n -.22 -9.6 Spherix rs -3.95 -9.5 OakRidgeF -.20 -7.7 CTC Media -.20 -7.7 57StGen un

DIARY

185 254 45 484 2 27Lows 99,763,785457

INDEXES

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 11,061.12 4,361.97 423.43 7,047.12 2,189.54 2,495.09 1,162.27 12,240.72 679.76

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

Chg

YTD %Chg Name

Last 2.75 2.08 2.29 11.70 4.76

Div

Chg -1.19 -.57 -.41 -1.95 -.69

DIARY

%Chg -30.2 -21.5 -15.1 -14.3 -12.7

1,411 1,156 111 2,678 8 247 1,952,345,457

Net % Chg Chg +68.99 +.63 -7.02 -.16 +3.54 +.84 +2.11 +.03 -16.91 -.77 +27.10 +1.10 +8.04 +.70 +81.29 +.67 +5.80 +.86

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

PE Last

Chg +2.63 +.68 -.05 +.15 +.27>

YTD 52-wk % Chg % Chg -4.46 +4.90 -14.58 -1.92 +4.55 +6.90 -11.51 -1.52 -.85 +10.73 -5.95 +9.16 -7.58 +3.60 -8.38 +3.99 -13.26

PE Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

BkofAm

.04

...

7.05 +.07

-47.2 Oneok Pt s

2.34f

19

43.30 +.01

+8.9

Chevron

3.12

8

95.91 +.72

+5.1 PNM Res

.50

28

14.32 +.20

+10.0

CocaCola

1.88

14

69.38 +.01

+5.5 PepsiCo

2.06

15

60.14 +.15

-7.9

Disney

.40f

13

31.29 +.25

.80

12

18.25 -.04

+4.2

-16.6 Pfizer

.64

50

86.11 +.79

-5.8 SwstAirl

.02

12

7.96 -.10

-38.7

...

5

10.11 +.06

-39.8 TexInst

.52

10

26.28 +.20

-19.1

HewlettP

.48

5

22.58 +.05

-46.4 TimeWarn

.94

12

29.20 +.31

-9.2

HollyFrt s

.35f

17

34.67 -.35

+70.1 TriContl

.31e

...

13.21 +.09

-4.0

9

20.28 +.58

EOG Res FordM

Intel

.84f

-3.6 WalMart

1.46

12

51.82 +.46

-3.9

IBM

3.00

13 162.42 +1.05

+10.7 WashFed

.24

17

14.40 +.33

-14.9

Merck

1.52

12

-11.2 WellsFargo

9

24.10 +.58

-22.2

23.97 +.20

+1.8

Microsoft

.64

32.00 +.16

.48

HOW TO READ THE MARKET IN REVIEW 10

25.89 +.15

-7.2 XcelEngy

1.04

14

Here are the 525 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 400 most active on the Nasdaq National Markets and 100 most active on American Stock Exchange. Mutual funds are 450 largest. Stocks in bold changed 5 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name Div Last Chg (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at Name the beginning of each letters’ list. AAR .48 12.88 # Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock, based on latest quar- ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 ACM Op .80 7.25 # terly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise footnoted. ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. ACMSp .96 7.50 # Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... mark. Fund Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold. Chg: Daily net change in the NAV.

Name Sell AAL Mutual: Bond p 9.49 CaGrp 14.47 MuBd 10.43 SmCoSt 9.73

Chg

-.03 Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. d – New 52-.01 wk low during trading day. g – Dividend in Canadian $. Stock price in U.S.$. n – -.05 New issue in past 52 wks. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. s – Split or stock dividend of 25 pct or more in last 52 wks. Div begins with date of split or stock dividend. u – New 52-wk high during trading day. v – Trading halted on primary market. Unless noted, dividend rates are annual disbursements based on last declaration. pf – Preferred. pp – Holder owes installment(s) of purchase price. rt – Rights. un – Units. wd – When distributed. wi – When issued. wt – Warrants. ww – With warrants. xw – Without warrants. Dividend Footnotes: a – Also extra or extras. b – Annual rate plus stock dividend. c – Liquidating dividend. e – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos. f – Annual rate, increased on last declaration. i – Declared or paid after stock dividend or split. j – Paid this year, dividend omitted, deferred or no action taken at last meeting. k – Declared or paid this year, accumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m – Annual rate, reduced on last declaration. p – Init div, annual rate unknown. r – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos plus stock dividend. t – Paid in stock in last 12 mos, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or distribution date. x – Ex-dividend or ex-rights. y – Ex-dividend and sales in full. z – Sales in full. vj – In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such companies. • Most active stocks above must be worth $1 and gainers/losers $2. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Wednesday’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

MUTUAL FUNDS

-.01

Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

Fidelity Selects: Gold r n 53.20-1.43 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn n 33.90 +.20 500IdxInv n41.30 +.29 IntlInxInv n29.79 -.45 TotMktInv n33.79 +.23 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv n41.30+.29 TotMktAd r n33.79+.23 First Eagle: GlblA 44.71 -.24 OverseasA21.44 -.27 Forum Funds: AbsStrI r 10.99 +.02 Frank/Temp Frnk A: CalTFA p 7.00 ... FedTFA p 12.02 +.01 FoundAl p 9.45 -.06 GrwthA p 41.55 +.21 HYTFA p 10.13 -.01 IncomA p 2.03 ... NYTFA p 11.72 +.01 RisDvA p 31.59 +.09 StratInc p 10.26 -.06 USGovA p 6.94 -.01 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv n13.50 -.16 IncmeAd 2.01 -.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.04 -.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 18.59 -.03 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 5.83 -.14 GlBd A p 13.53 -.17 GrwthA p 15.52 -.20 WorldA p 13.21 -.12 Frank/Temp Tmp

B&C: GlBdC p 13.56 -.16 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 36.82 +.19 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.27 +.09 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 18.47 -.23 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.09 -.10 Quality 20.27 +.08 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 31.50 +.13 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.85 -.05 MidCapV 31.81 +.14 Harbor Funds: 12.35 -.03 Bond CapApInst 36.01 +.31 IntlInv t 50.95 -.73 Intl r 51.55 -.73 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 28.29 +.05 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI n 28.34 +.04 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 35.98 +.10 Div&Gr 17.85 +.12 TotRetBd 11.54 -.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.85 -.05 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r15.99 -.05 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.43 +.05 CmstkA 14.15 +.07 EqIncA 7.90 +.02 GrIncA p 17.11 +.11 HYMuA 9.27 -.01

May 12 779 787ü 765 781ü Jul 12 783ø 793fl 769ü 786ø 797ü Sep 12 797ü 800ø 782 Last spot N/A Est. sales 183561. Fri’s Sales: 60,640 Fri’s open int: 401564, up +1814 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 11 730ø 736ø 717 734ü Dec 11 743 748ø 726ü 745ø Mar 12 750 761ü 738fl 758ø May 12 763ü 767fl 745ø 765ø Jul 12 764 771fl 750 770 691fl 705 Sep 12 704ü 708 Last spot N/A Est. sales 500691. Fri’s Sales: 236,262 Fri’s open int: 1225938, up +1676 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 11 348ü 348ü 345 345 338ü 345 Dec 11 344fl 349 Mar 12 355ü 358fl 349 355 May 12 362 363 357 362ø Jul 12 371 371 368ø 368ø 374ø 374ø Sep 12 377 377 Last spot N/A Est. sales 3128. Fri’s Sales: 1,411 Fri’s open int: 13459, up +132 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 11 1388ü 1415 1381ø 1387ø Nov 11 1396fl 1432ü 1388ø 1396 Jan 12 1406ü 1442 1399ø 1406ü Mar 12 1413 1446ø 1406fl 1413 May 12 1415ø 1449 1410 1416 Jul 12 1422ü 1453fl 1417ø 1422ü Aug 12 1436fl 1436fl 1410 1410 Sep 12 1392ü 1397fl 1391ø 1391ø Nov 12 1375fl 1400 1370 1376 Jan 13 1403ø 1403ø 1380ø 1380ø Mar 13 1405 1405 1382ü 1382ü May 13 1403 1403 1381 1381 Jul 13 1406ø 1406ø 1383ø 1383ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 406947. Fri’s Sales: 147,755 Fri’s open int: 606360, up +8559

-2fl -3 -2fl

Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.50 -.20 AssetStA p23.27 -.20 AssetStrI r 23.50 -.20 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.90 -.02 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd n 11.89 -.02 HighYld n 7.71 -.05 IntmTFBd n11.20 ... ShtDurBd n11.02 -.01 USLCCrPls n18.62 +.10 Janus T Shrs: BalancdT 23.99 +.04 OvrseasT r36.99 -.63 PrkMCVal T20.89 +.05 Twenty T 58.21 +.42 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 11.07 +.01 LSBalanc 12.16 -.01 LSGrwth 11.81 +.01 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.89 -.25 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p19.26 -.26 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p15.97 ... Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.32 +.14 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.36 -.06 StrInc C 14.76 -.06 LSBondR 14.30 -.06 StrIncA 14.68 -.07 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.42 -.04 Lord Abbett A: 9.79 +.05 AffilA p BdDebA p 7.54 -.04

FUTURES

ShDurIncA p4.54 -.01 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t4.57 -.01 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.54 -.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.46 +.03 ValueA 20.66 +.11 MFS Funds I: ValueI 20.76 +.11 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.74 -.03 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.22 -.14 Matthews Asian: PacTgrInv 22.24 -.11 MergerFd n 15.66 ... Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.53 -.02 TotRtBdI 10.53 -.02 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 11.93 -.10 MCapGrI 36.60 +.02 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 25.67 -.16 GlbDiscZ 26.04 -.15 QuestZ 16.02 -.02 SharesZ 18.77 -.03 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 44.92 +.16 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 46.47 +.17 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.02 ... MMIntEq r 8.59 ... Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.27 -.01 Intl I r 15.57 -.36 Oakmark 38.44 +.32

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

+8ü +9 +9ü +9fl +10 +5ø

-2fl -3ü -3 -1ø -1ø -1ø

-29 -30fl -30ø -29ø -28ü -27fl -26fl -25 -23ø -23ø -22fl -22 -23

low settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Oct 11 87.67 88.97 85.00 88.19 Nov 11 87.83 89.08 85.17 88.31 Dec 11 87.97 89.30 85.42 88.46 Jan 12 88.07 89.47 85.75 88.64 Feb 12 88.43 89.50 86.05 88.82 Mar 12 88.83 89.62 86.20 89.01 Apr 12 89.59 90.01 86.69 89.21 May 12 89.69 90.05 87.54 89.40 Jun 12 89.24 90.37 87.15 89.58 Jul 12 89.37 89.80 87.43 89.76 Aug 12 90.10 90.10 87.57 89.90 Sep 12 90.12 90.12 88.88 90.03 Oct 12 90.18 Nov 12 90.33 Dec 12 90.25 91.12 88.25 90.50 Jan 13 90.56 Feb 13 90.61 Mar 13 90.67 Apr 13 90.74 May 13 90.76 Jun 13 90.46 90.81 90.46 90.77 Jul 13 90.77 Aug 13 90.76 Sep 13 90.73 Last spot N/A Est. sales 703391. Fri’s Sales: 677,483 Fri’s open int: 1491790, off -10565 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Oct 11 2.7398 2.7767 2.7064 2.7382 Nov 11 2.7132 2.7490 2.6791 2.7114 Dec 11 2.6966 2.7317 2.6617 2.6947 Jan 12 2.6955 2.7224 2.6622 2.6924 Feb 12 2.6861 2.7349 2.6636 2.6987 Mar 12 2.7060 2.7160 2.6813 2.7088 Apr 12 2.8162 2.8226 2.7965 2.8154 May 12 2.8154 2.8167 2.7930 2.8109 Jun 12 2.7997 2.8310 2.7652 2.7969 Jul 12 2.7719

chg.

+.95 +.90 +.78 +.71 +.64 +.58 +.54 +.48 +.41 +.36 +.32 +.28 +.24 +.20 +.17 +.16 +.14 +.13 +.12 +.11 +.10 +.10 +.10 +.10

-.0328 -.0235 -.0194 -.0176 -.0164 -.0151 -.0150 -.0134 -.0124 -.0116

Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.26 -.03 GlbSMdCap13.58-.07 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 31.32 -.34 GlobA p 52.82 +.03 GblStrIncA 4.18 -.03 Gold p 49.80-1.23 IntBdA p 6.58 -.04 MnStFdA 29.56 +.25 Oppenheimer Roch: RoMu A p 15.71 ... RcNtMuA 6.89 ... Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 31.05 -.33 IntlBdY 6.58 -.04 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.99 -.04 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r10.78 -.08 AllAsset 12.17 -.07 ComodRR 8.99 -.09 DivInc 11.34 -.06 EmgMkCur10.47 -.08 EmMkBd 11.32 -.05 FltInc r 8.33 -.04 HiYld 8.83 -.08 InvGrCp 10.65 -.07 LowDu 10.40 -.03 RealRet 12.97 -.07 RealRtnI 12.19 -.06 ShortT 9.81 -.01 TotRt 10.99 -.04 TR II 10.57 -.04 TRIII 9.62 -.04 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.40 -.03 RealRtA p 12.19 -.06 TotRtA 10.99 -.04 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.99 -.04

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET

Div Last Chg CubistPh ... 31.84 -.51 Cyclacel ... d.66 -.07 A-B-C CypSemi .36 15.90 +.36 Cytokinet ... 1.11 -.01 ASML Hld .58e 34.97 +.87 ATP O&G ... 11.69 -.24 D-E-F AVI Bio ... 1.18 ... ... 14.19 +.22 AXT Inc ... 6.83 -.09 Dell Inc ... 11.69 +.29 AcmePkt ... 49.52 +3.93 Dndreon Dentsply .20 32.38 -.10 ActivsBliz .17f 11.49 +.07 ... 19.88 +.09 AdobeSy ... 25.20 +.56 DigRiver AdvATech ... 4.61 -.03 DirecTV A ... 41.51 +.09 AEterna g ... 1.91 -.02 DiscCm A ... 37.78 -.53 Affymetrix ... 5.32 +.01 DiscCm C ... 36.07 -.63 AkamaiT ... 20.91 +.14 DishNetwk ... 24.41 -.01 AlignTech ... d16.42 -.65 DonlleyRR 1.04 13.93 +.08 ... 2.91 -.01 AllosThera ... d1.53 +.09 DryShips ... 10.74 ... AllscriptH ... 17.24 +.14 E-Trade ... 29.42 +.96 AlteraCp lf .32f 36.16 +1.55 eBay Amarin ... 10.55 -.19 ErthLink .20 7.09 +.02 Amazon ... 216.56 +5.17 EstWstBcp .20 15.94 +.45 ... 22.07 +.71 ACapAgy 5.60e 28.98 +.59 ElectArts AmCapLtd ... 8.29 +.17 EndoPhrm ... 29.47 -.32 Ener1 lf ... .35 -.01 AmSupr ... 6.17 +.13 ... 23.18 -.70 Amgen 1.12 54.06 +.01 EngyXXI ... 7.39 +.30 AmkorT lf ... 4.49 +.19 Entegris Amylin ... 10.59 -.04 EntropCom ... 4.66 +.32 ... 90.64 +2.98 Ancestry ... 30.31 -1.69 Equinix A123 Sys ... 4.79 +.09 EricsnTel .37e d9.98 -.42 ... 7.02 +.01 ApolloGrp ... 45.34 -.28 Exelixis ... 4.56 -.08 ApolloInv 1.12 8.76 +.22 ExideTc Apple Inc ... 379.94 +2.46 Expedia .28 29.64 +.51 ApldMatl .32 10.86 +.14 ExpdIntl .50f 41.76 -.30 ... 32.65 +3.25 AMCC ... 5.72 +.40 EZchip ArenaPhm ... 1.27 +.02 F5 Netwks ... 77.52 +2.92 FLIR Sys .24 25.31 +.45 AresCap 1.40 14.27 +.07 AriadP ... 9.72 +.16 FifthThird .24 9.93 +.12 Ariba Inc ... 26.79 +.27 FinclEngin ... 22.00 +.25 ... 20.19 +1.19 ArmHld .15e 27.76 +.30 Finisar .20 19.22 +.25 Arris ... 10.60 +.20 FinLine FstNiagara .64 10.39 +.22 ArubaNet ... 18.72 +.34 ... 86.08 +1.12 AsscdBanc .04 d10.00 +.11 FstSolar FstMerit .64 11.56 +.23 Atmel ... 9.05 +.36 ... d51.86 +.39 Autodesk ... 26.72 +1.31 Fiserv ... 5.51 +.12 AutoData 1.44 48.31 +.69 Flextrn Auxilium ... 16.10 +.39 FocusMda ... 29.22 -.41 AvagoTch .44f 33.53 +1.23 Fossil Inc ... 92.96 -1.04 AvanirPhm ... 2.78 -.03 FosterWhl ... 21.44 -.11 ... 1.19 -.01 AvisBudg ... 11.45 -.29 FuelCell BE Aero ... 31.13 +.44 FultonFncl .20f 8.41 +.23 BGC Ptrs .68 6.48 +.06 G-H-I BMC Sft ... 38.93 +.47 BedBath ... 58.01 +1.72 GT AdvTc ... 11.08 +.15 BiogenIdc ... 91.99 +1.75 Garmin 2.00e 33.37 +.57 .48 24.21 -.14 BioMarin ... 29.88 +.79 Gentex ... 2.43 -.03 BioSante ... 2.77 +.02 GeronCp Blkboard ... 44.17 +.55 GileadSci ... 37.98 +.17 BrigExp ... 28.11 +.03 GlacierBc .52 d10.23 ... ... 7.78 +2.63 Broadcom .36 33.06 -.38 GloblInd BrcdeCm ... 3.98 +.20 GlbSpcMet .15 14.97 -.26 BrukerCp ... 12.86 +.31 GluMobile ... 3.05 ... CA Inc .20 19.92 +.21 GolarLNG 1.10f 31.21 -.19 ... 530.12 +5.27 CBOE .48f 26.30 +.63 Google CH Robins 1.16 66.75 +.20 GrifolsSA n ... 6.42 +.03 CTC Media.91e d11.70 -1.95 HansenMed ... 4.20 +.19 CVB Fncl .34 7.96 +.08 HansenNat ... 86.22 -.24 Cadence ... 9.03 +.14 HanwhaSol ... d3.01 -.03 CaliperLSc ... 10.49 +.04 HarbinElec ... 20.12 +.32 CalumetSp1.98f 17.06 -.34 Harmonic ... d4.54 +.03 CdnSolar ... d5.04 -.24 Hasbro 1.20 35.79 -.49 CapFdF rs .30a 10.51 ... HawHold ... 4.09 +.31 CpstnTrb h ... 1.11 +.04 HrtlndEx .08 14.06 +.09 CareerEd ... 15.36 +.20 HercOffsh ... 4.02 +.08 ... 15.72 -.07 Carrizo ... 27.46 -.04 Hologic Cavium ... 33.10 +2.19 HotTopic .28 7.97 -.01 Celgene ... 60.32 +.55 HudsCity .32 5.76 +.23 ... d11.49 -.02 CentEuro ... 6.16 +.08 HumGen .52 38.14 +.09 CentAl ... 10.87 -.02 HuntJB HuntBnk .16f 4.68 +.08 Cephln ... 80.70 +.09 ... 39.54 +.32 ChrmSh ... d2.43 -.14 IAC Inter iShAsiaexJ1.27ed53.13 -.28 ChkPoint ... 52.00 +.17 Cheesecake ... 26.14 +.54 iSh ACWI 1.02e d40.88 -.02 CienaCorp ... 12.82 +.27 iShNsdqBio.51e 94.63 +.72 ... 17.53 +.35 CinnFin 1.61f 27.08 +.20 IconixBr ... 48.30 -.24 Cintas .49f 30.52 +.36 Illumina ImpaxLabs ... 18.11 -.47 Cirrus ... 14.43 +.26 ... 15.22 -.08 Cisco .24 16.09 +.27 Incyte Infinera ... 7.69 +.47 CitrixSys ... 54.72 +1.14 ... 38.98 +1.74 CleanEngy ... 13.09 -.20 Informat Clearwire ... 2.55 -.09 Infosys 1.35e d47.47 +.30 ... 5.80 +.22 CognizTech ... 61.50 +.71 IntgDv .84f 20.28 +.58 Coinstar ... 43.94 -.14 Intel InteractBrk .40a 14.40 +.11 ColdwtrCrk ... 1.35 +.15 .40 66.46 +2.18 Comcast .45 21.14 +.23 InterDig InterMune ... 26.87 +.79 Comc spcl .45 20.76 +.23 .48 10.66 +.20 CmcBMO .92b 36.63 +.68 Intersil .60 46.80 +.56 CommVlt ... 32.18 +.10 Intuit Compuwre ... 7.82 +.08 InvRlEst .52m 7.75 +.58 ConcurTch ... 38.47 +.30 IridiumCm ... d6.82 +.01 CorinthC ... 1.88 +.01 J-K-L Costco .96 79.72 +.82 ... d2.72 -.13 CrackerB .88 d39.86 +1.87 JA Solar JDS Uniph ... 12.71 +.38 Cree Inc ... 31.99 +.65 Crocs ... 25.63 +.47 JackHenry .42 28.48 +.49 JamesRiv ... 9.81 -.34 CrosstexE .40f 12.79 +.02 Ctrip.com ... 37.74 -.72 JazzPhrm ... 42.99 +1.18

Name

Name

JetBlue ... 4.16 +.14 JoyGlbl .70 76.86 -1.67 KLA Tnc 1.40f 36.41 +.95 Kulicke ... 8.58 +.38 LamResrch ... 37.19 +.01 LamarAdv ... d18.26 -.51 Lattice ... 5.38 +.19 LeapWirlss ... 7.97 +.10 Level3 ... 1.52 -.01 LexiPhrm ... d1.28 +.10 LibGlobA ... 36.20 -.50 LibGlobC ... 34.72 -.48 LibtyMIntA ... 15.88 +.29 LifeTech ... 39.37 +.15 LimelghtN ... 2.30 ... LinearTch .96 28.88 +.75 LinnEngy 2.76f 37.08 -.13 Logitech ... 9.44 -.04

M-N-0

MCG Cap .68 4.38 +.10 MIPS Tech ... 5.49 +.32 Magma ... 5.10 +.12 MAKO Srg ... 34.91 -.52 MannKd ... 3.14 +.19 MarvellT ... 14.39 +.70 Mattel .92 26.22 +.09 MaximIntg .88f 24.00 +.89 MedCath ... 13.33 -.19 MediCo ... 14.82 +.20 MelcoCrwn ... 12.00 -.12 MentorGr ... 10.23 +.08 MercadoL .32 65.97 +.21 MergeHlth ... 6.44 +.14 Microchp 1.39f 32.71 +.65 MicronT ... 6.69 +.34 Microsoft .64 25.89 +.15 Micrvisn ... 1.01 +.14 Molex .80 20.13 +.22 Motricity ... 2.19 +.06 Move Inc ... 1.43 -.15 Mylan ... 19.53 +.17 MyriadG ... 18.53 +.33 NII Hldg ... 35.13 -1.05 NPS Phm ... 6.45 -.24 NXP Semi ... 17.21 +.68 NasdOMX ... 22.82 +.56 NatPenn .12f 6.97 +.27 NektarTh ... 5.06 ... NetLogicM ... u48.12 +16.21 NetApp ... 36.30 +.62 Netease ... 47.32 -.62 Netflix ... 210.05 +6.08 NewsCpA .19f 16.18 +.25 NewsCpB .19f 16.30 +.14 NorTrst 1.12 d35.92 +.41 NwstBcsh .44 12.17 +.32 Novavax ... 1.67 -.04 Novlus ... 28.64 +.52 NuVasive ... d20.61 -.34 NuanceCm ... 17.65 +.52 ... 14.21 +.33 Nvidia OReillyAu ... 66.76 -.53 Oclaro ... 4.18 +.12 OmniVisn ... 17.44 +.31 OnSmcnd ... 7.30 +.13 OpenTable ... d53.54 -1.70 OpnwvSy ... 1.76 -.08 OptimerPh ... 12.79 +.86 Oracle .24 26.75 +.75 Oritani .40 12.90 +.19

P-Q-R

PDL Bio .60 5.70 +.01 PMC Sra ... 6.26 +.29 PSS Wrld ... 21.72 +.15 Paccar .48a 35.57 +.19 PacSunwr ... 1.38 -.02 PaetecHld ... 5.64 +.02 PanASlv .10 32.61 -.94 ParamTch ... d16.20 +.29 Patterson .48 27.17 -.04 PattUTI .20 22.71 +.05 Paychex 1.24 26.19 +.26 Pendrell ... 2.09 ... PnnNGm ... 36.08 +.12 PeopUtdF .63 12.00 +.36 PerfectWld ... 17.69 -1.07 Perrigo .28 90.53 -.36 PetsMart .56f 42.56 +.78 PharmPdt .60 29.66 -1.26 ... 5.90 +.01 PhotrIn Popular ... 1.72 -.07 Power-One ... 6.87 -.02 PwShs QQQ.42e 53.86 +.68 Powrwav ... 1.73 +.09 PriceTR 1.24 49.78 +.66 priceline ... 528.87 +8.12 PrUPShQQQ ... 25.36 -1.02 ProspctCap1.22f 8.59 +.10 QIAGEN ... d13.82 -.05 QlikTech ... 22.90 +.49 Qlogic ... 13.68 +.10 Qualcom .86 51.39 +.99

Questcor RF MicD Rambus Randgold Regenrn RentACt RschMotn RexEnergy RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp RoyGld

B5

... 27.59 -2.08 ... 5.98 +.10 ... 11.37 +.41 .20 108.56 -3.15 ... 65.55 -.07 .64 27.59 +.53 ... 30.17 +.49 ... 13.30 +.05 ... 42.46 +.03 .88 75.79 +1.70 ... 44.16 -.36 .44 80.06 -1.20

S-T-U

SBA Com ... 36.07 -.57 SEI Inv .24f d15.99 +.35 STEC ... 9.50 +.14 SVB FnGp ... 42.79 +.71 SalixPhm ... d27.55 -.23 SanDisk ... 40.02 +1.29 SangBio ... 5.82 +.25 Sanmina ... 6.98 -.05 Sanofi rt ... 1.13 +.07 Sapient .35e 9.90 -.23 SavientPh ... d3.81 +.15 SeagateT .72 11.23 +.05 SeattGen ... 17.53 +.13 SelCmfrt ... 15.08 +.68 Sequenom ... 5.66 +.16 Shire .40e 93.15 -.61 SigmaAld .72 58.77 -.41 SilicGrIn ... 14.17 +.02 SilicnImg ... 5.31 +.09 SilcnLab ... 34.16 +1.19 Slcnware .28e 4.68 +.01 SilvStd g ... 26.79 -2.80 Sina ... 106.73 +2.06 Sinclair .48 7.38 +.20 SiriusXM ... 1.67 -.05 SkywksSol ... 20.28 +.70 SmithWes ... d2.70 -.04 SodaStrm n ... 38.84 +.09 Sohu.cm ... 74.67 -.49 SonicCorp ... 7.80 -.07 Sonus ... 2.25 -.01 SpectPh ... 7.90 -.23 Spreadtrm .05p 20.09 +.21 Staples .40 13.88 +.31 StarScient ... 2.75 +.17 Starbucks .52 37.65 +.34 StlDynam .40 d11.18 -.09 SusqBnc .08 6.10 +.09 Symantec ... 16.25 +.20 Synopsys ... 25.23 +.18 TD Ameritr .20 d13.94 +.18 THQ ... d1.64 -.10 TTM Tch ... 10.66 +.44 TakeTwo ... 13.58 +.14 TechData ... 45.17 +.46 Tekelec ... d6.23 +.08 Tellabs .08 4.08 +.09 TevaPhrm .87e 37.92 -.57 TexRdhse .32 13.61 +.32 TibcoSft ... 20.45 +.52 TitanMach ... 21.28 +.09 TiVo Inc ... 10.75 +.21 TowerSemi ... d.65 -.06 Travelzoo ... 32.10 -.15 TriQuint ... d6.02 -.23 UltaSalon ... u70.93 +2.48 Umpqua .20 9.13 +.19 UtdTherap ... 43.30 +.03 UnivDisp ... 51.23 +1.47 UrbanOut ... 24.85 +.29

V-W-X-Y-Z

VCA Ant ... 16.66 -.22 ValueClick ... 15.26 +.37 VarianSemi ... 61.75 +.10 VeecoInst ... d32.69 +1.26 Velti n ... d6.81 -.93 Verisign 5.75e 29.35 +.32 VertxPh ... 47.78 +1.97 VirgnMda h .16 24.37 -.16 Vivus ... 8.20 -.03 Vodafone 1.45e 25.39 -.38 WarnerCh ... d14.00 -.95 Web.com ... 7.91 -.49 WebMD ... 32.92 -.13 WernerEnt .20a 22.40 -.37 WstptInn g ... 27.68 -.18 WetSeal ... 4.75 +.09 WholeFd .40 65.67 +1.19 Windstrm 1.00 12.51 -.04 Winn-Dixie ... 7.23 +.06 Wynn 2.00 151.72 +3.29 Xilinx .76 30.78 +.77 YRC rsh ... d.40 -.08 Yahoo ... 14.26 -.22 Yandex n ... 29.02 -.91 Zagg ... 13.33 -.69 Zalicus ... 1.36 +.04 ZionBcp .04 16.39 +.26

AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg CubicEngy ... DejourE g ... AbdAsPac .42 7.44 -.05 DenisnM g ... Adventrx ... 1.22 +.16 ExeterR gs ... AlexcoR g ... 8.54 -.57 ExtorreG g ... AlldNevG ... 42.46 -1.25 FT WindEn.06e AntaresP ... 2.28 +.04 FrkStPrp .76 Augusta g ... 3.53 -.16 GabGldNR 1.68 Aurizon g ... 6.56 -.17 GascoEngy ... AvalRare n ... 4.06 -.06 Gastar grs ... Banro g ... 4.74 -.31 GenMoly ... BarcUBS36 ... 48.26 -.08 GoldResrc .60f BarcGSOil ... 22.52 +.39 GoldenMin ... Brigus grs ... 1.65 +.02 GoldStr g ... BritATob 3.86e 86.30 -.43 GranTrra g ... CAMAC En ... d.76 +.04 GrtBasG g ... CanoPet ... .19 -.01 GtPanSilv g ... CardiumTh ... .20 -.01 GugFront .13e CastleBr ... .27 +.01 HstnAEn .02a CelSci ... .39 ... ImpOil gs .44 CFCda g .01 24.31 -.81 IntTower g ... CheniereEn ... 7.04 +.03 IsoRay ... ChinNEPet ... 1.96 -.09 KeeganR g ... ClaudeR g ... 2.07 -.22 KimberR g ... CrSuiHiY .32 2.91 -.03 LadThalFn ... Crossh g rs ... d.60 -.01 LongweiPI ...

PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.99 -.04 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.99 -.04 Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n 24.54 +.08 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.56 -.32 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 36.46 +.20 Price Funds: BlChip n 37.01 +.32 CapApp n 19.38 +.10 EmMktS n 30.54 -.35 EqInc n 21.29 +.12 EqIndex n 31.43 +.22 Growth n 30.51 +.21 HiYield n 6.41 -.04 IntlBond n 10.29 -.03 Intl G&I 11.32 -.13 IntlStk n 12.46 -.14 MidCap n 54.15 +.22 MCapVal n21.51 +.03 N Asia n 17.72 -.12 New Era n 45.68 -.22 N Horiz n 32.43 +.20 N Inc n 9.74 -.02 OverS SF r n7.24 -.06 R2010 n 14.91 ... R2015 n 11.42 ... R2020 n 15.61 +.01 R2025 n 11.32 +.01 R2030 n 16.09 +.01 R2035 n 11.31 +.01 R2040 n 16.06 +.02 ShtBd n 4.84 -.01 SmCpStk n30.91 +.16 SmCapVal n32.22+.16 SpecIn n 12.25 -.03 Value n 21.03 +.12

Aug 12 2.7455 Sep 12 2.7195 Oct 12 2.5975 Nov 12 2.5719 Dec 12 2.5669 Jan 13 2.5684 Feb 13 2.5769 Mar 13 2.5859 Apr 13 2.6934 May 13 2.7003 Last spot N/A Est. sales 121321. Fri’s Sales: 156,717 Fri’s open int: 268736, off -1888 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Oct 11 3.897 3.925 3.826 3.885 Nov 11 3.980 4.008 3.916 3.966 Dec 11 4.191 4.202 4.120 4.172 Jan 12 4.310 4.319 4.236 4.292 Feb 12 4.326 4.331 4.250 4.310 Mar 12 4.298 4.304 4.222 4.285 Apr 12 4.269 4.280 4.200 4.262 May 12 4.291 4.304 4.230 4.290 Jun 12 4.330 4.350 4.279 4.332 Jul 12 4.380 4.391 4.349 4.378 Aug 12 4.405 4.419 4.384 4.406 Sep 12 4.423 4.428 4.385 4.411 Oct 12 4.451 4.462 4.410 4.442 Nov 12 4.615 4.623 4.570 4.607 Dec 12 4.875 4.883 4.840 4.867 Jan 13 5.001 5.015 4.975 5.002 Feb 13 4.950 4.989 4.943 4.978 Mar 13 4.929 5.000 4.912 4.912 Apr 13 4.779 4.785 4.721 4.765 May 13 4.780 4.800 4.779 4.784 Jun 13 4.830 4.830 4.814 4.814 Jul 13 4.861 4.861 4.848 4.853 Aug 13 4.980 4.980 4.873 4.873 Sep 13 4.838 4.879 4.838 4.879 Oct 13 4.868 4.940 4.868 4.905 Nov 13 5.070 5.070 5.038 5.038 Dec 13 5.300 5.300 5.265 5.266 Jan 14 5.385 5.386 5.385 5.386 Feb 14 5.355 5.400 5.354 5.354 Last spot N/A Est. sales 232025. Fri’s Sales: 272,032 Fri’s open int: 969993, off -6823

.78 .29 1.43 5.05 10.48 d8.32 12.04 16.80 .24 4.08 3.63 21.12 12.57 2.48 5.80 2.18 3.30 20.23 19.32 37.76 7.37 1.17 9.18 1.59 1.62 1.06

... -.01 -.06 -.40 -.17 -.06 +.05 -.15 +.00 +.01 +.03 -.44 -.39 -.07 -.05 -.10 -.11 -.36 +.99 -.35 -.37 +.07 +.43 ... +.04 +.03

MadCatz g ... Metalico ... MdwGold g ... Minefnd g ... NeoStem ... Neoprobe ... Nevsun g .06 NwGold g ... NA Pall g ... NDynMn g ... NthnO&G ... NthgtM g ... NovaGld g ... Oilsands g ... OpkoHlth ... ParaG&S ... PhrmAth ... PionDrill ... PlatGpMet ... PolyMet g ... Protalix ... Quepasa ... QuestRM g ... RareEle g ... Rentech ... RexahnPh ...

.74 4.01 2.58 17.34 .64 3.05 6.74 13.65 3.28 9.12 20.07 3.89 8.65 .20 4.42 2.39 2.23 11.15 d1.18 1.63 d4.36 4.29 4.02 8.12 .87 1.15

+.03 +.06 -.15 -.47 -.01 +.10 -.10 -.25 -.12 -.43 +.33 -.11 -.51 -.00 +.24 +.01 -.04 +.07 -.10 -.05 -.23 +.09 -.07 -.10 +.01 ...

Richmnt g ... 11.23 -.89 Rubicon g ... 4.29 +.03 SamsO&G ... 2.39 -.11 SeabGld g ... 27.51 -1.96 TanzRy g ... 5.72 -.07 Taseko ... 3.41 -.15 TimberlnR ... .73 -.07 TrnsatlPet ... 1.09 -.04 TravelCtrs ... 4.26 -.16 TriValley ... .21 +.00 TriangPet ... 4.99 -.15 US Geoth ... .60 ... Ur-Energy ... 1.07 -.03 Uranerz ... 1.98 -.03 UraniumEn ... 3.19 -.05 VangTotW .92e d42.49 -.05 VantageDrl ... 1.49 +.10 VirnetX ... 21.63 +1.01 VistaGold ... u4.41 +.71 VoyagerOG ... 2.40 -.03 WT DrfChn.15e 25.68 -.10 WT Drf Bz3.24e 26.76 -.60 YM Bio g ... 2.00 ... ZBB Engy ... .93 -.03

Principal Inv: Energy n 113.23 -.07 HYCorp n 5.58 -.02 LT2020In 11.12 ... ExplAdml n61.59 +.55 HlthCre n 126.79 +.21 ExtdAdm n37.15 +.21 InflaPro n 14.25 -.05 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 11.72 ... 500Adml n107.51 +.74 IntlGr n 16.75 -.20 VoyA p 19.00 ... GNMA Ad n11.19 -.02 IntlVal n 26.87 -.33 GrwAdm n 29.94 +.21 ITIGrade n 10.16 -.04 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.42 +.03 HlthCr n 53.52 +.09 LifeCon n 15.95 ... PremierI r 19.05 -.02 HiYldCp n 5.58 -.02 LifeGro n 20.38 +.02 TotRetI r 11.88 +.05 InfProAd n 27.99 -.11 LifeMod n 18.67 +.01 ITBdAdml n11.94 -.05 LTIGrade n10.19 -.04 Russell Funds S: StratBd 11.06 -.03 ITsryAdml n12.16 -.03 Morg n 16.78 +.13 IntGrAdm n53.34 -.62 MuInt n 13.88 ... Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 34.68 +.24 ITAdml n 13.88 ... MuLtd n 11.17 ... S&P Sel 18.34 +.13 ITGrAdm n10.16 -.04 PrecMtls r n25.70 -.45 LtdTrAd n 11.17 ... PrmcpCor n12.77 +.06 Scout Funds: 27.18 -.30 LTGrAdml n10.19 -.04 Prmcp r n 60.45 +.26 Intl LT Adml n 11.19 ... SelValu r n17.35 +.10 Selected Funds: AmShD 37.30 +.09 MCpAdml n84.90 +.44 STAR n 18.24 -.01 Sequoia n 131.82 -.02 MuHYAdm n10.56 ... STIGrade n10.71 -.02 PrmCap r n62.76 +.27 StratEq n 17.23 +.08 TCW Funds: ReitAdm r n78.28 +.34 TgtRetInc n11.42 -.01 TotRetBdI 9.95 -.01 STsyAdml n10.86 -.01 TgRe2010 n22.28-.01 Templeton Instit: STBdAdml n10.70-.02 TgtRe2015 n12.14 ... ForEqS 16.81 -.33 ShtTrAd n 15.95 ... TgRe2020 n21.29 ... Third Avenue Fds: STFdAd n 10.95 -.01 TgtRe2025 n12.00 ... ValueInst 43.93 -.09 STIGrAd n 10.71 -.02 TgRe2030 n20.37+.01 Thornburg Fds: SmCAdm n31.09 +.23 TgtRe2035 n12.14 IntValA p 23.79 -.36 TxMCap r n58.39 +.38 +.01 IncBuildC p17.50 -.14 TtlBAdml n11.04 -.02 TgtRe2040 n19.86 IntValue I 24.33 -.37 TStkAdm n29.14 +.20 +.01 Tweedy Browne: WellslAdm n53.60-.04 TgtRe2045 n12.48 GblValue 21.12 -.45 WelltnAdm n51.31+.12 +.01 USAA Group: Windsor n 40.01 +.24 Wellsly n 22.12 -.02 Inco 13.17 -.02 WdsrIIAd n41.80 +.24 Welltn n 29.70 +.06 VALIC : Wndsr n 11.86 +.07 Vanguard Fds: StkIdx 23.19 +.16 AssetA n 22.80 +.13 WndsII n 23.55 +.13 Vanguard Admiral: DivdGro n 13.96 +.06 Vanguard Idx Fds: BalAdml n 20.87 +.07 Energy n 60.28 -.04 TotIntAdm r n22.54 CAITAdm n11.23 ... Explr n 66.11 +.58 .29 CpOpAdl n67.87 +.66 GNMA n 11.19 -.02 TotIntlInst r n90.18 EMAdmr r n34.03 -.44 GlobEq n 15.83 -.07 1.17

-.0108 -.0086 -.0106 -.0106 -.0108 -.0128 -.0128 -.0128 -.0128 -.0128

-.030 -.032 -.024 -.016 -.014 -.013 -.014 -.015 -.015 -.015 -.015 -.015 -.014 -.011 -.009 -.006 -.006 -.004 -.009 -.009 -.009 -.009 -.009 -.009 -.009 -.009 -.006 -.006 -.006

500 n 107.49 +.75 Growth n 29.94 +.22 MidCap n 18.69 +.10 SmCap n 31.03 +.22 SmlCpGth n19.95 +.13 SmlCpVl n 14.01 +.11 STBnd n 10.70 -.02 TotBnd n 11.04 -.02 TotlIntl n 13.47 -.18 TotStk n 29.13 +.20 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n 20.87 +.07 DevMkInst n8.48 -.10 ExtIn n 37.15 +.21 FTAllWldI r n80.23 1.05 GrwthIst n 29.94 +.21 InfProInst n11.40 -.04 InstIdx n 106.79 +.75 InsPl n 106.79 +.74 InsTStPlus n26.36+.18 MidCpIst n 18.76 +.10 SCInst n 31.09 +.22 TBIst n 11.04 -.02 TSInst n 29.14 +.19 ValueIst n 18.87 +.12 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl n 88.81 +.62 MidCpIdx n26.79 +.14 STBdIdx n 10.70 -.02 TotBdSgl n11.04 -.02 TotStkSgl n28.12 +.19 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.10 -.04 Yacktman Funds: Fund p n 16.57 +.09 Focused n 17.76 +.09

METALS NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Mon. Aluminum -$1.0622 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$4.0386 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $3.9505 N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Lead - $2453.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9910 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1834.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1809.90 troy oz., NY Merc spot Mon. Silver - $40.630 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $40.164 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Platinum -$1815.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1809.40 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised


B6 Tuesday, September 13, 2011

SPORTS / CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record

Colts, Steelers among 5 division champs to lose

NFL division winners last season, big losers to open this season. From the AFC, Pittsburgh and Indianapolis were humbled on the road and Kansas City was embarrassed at home. In the NFC, it was Atlanta and Seattle falling short on the road. Where to start? Joe Flacco threw three touchdown passes and Baltimore forced a teamrecord seven turnovers in a 35-7 victory over the Steelers — the defending AFC North champs. It was the most lopsided win in a hotly contested series that began in 1996. “That playoff taste? Now it’s over,” Ravens running back Ray Rice said, referring to the Steelers’ playoff last season. “They beat us in the playoffs, all right. We got that burden off our shoulders, boom, we’re one up on them. That’s how we got to approach this.” Next flop: the Colts. Playing without Peyton Manning for the first time in 228 games, the AFC South champs were no match for the wannabe division winner Houston Texans, losing 34-7. Matt Schaub threw for 220 yards and a TD, and Ben Tate ran for 116 yards and a score in relief of injured Arian Foster as the Texans rolled. Manning’s replacement, Kerry Collins, fumbled on consecutive snaps to set up Houston TDs and it went downhill from there. “This wasn’t the day, obviously, that we’d hoped for, but it’s a long season,” Collins said. “I don’t care what the situation is, we just can’t do those things and expect to have a chance to be in the ball game.” Even at friendly Arrowhead Stadium, the AFC West-winning Chiefs couldn’t handle the Buffalo Bills. R yan Fitzpatrick threw four TD passes and the Bills won 41-7, handing Kansas City its most lopsided season-opening loss ever. “When things started going bad, they just went bad,” Chiefs defensive tackle Kelly Gregg said. “Landslide.” On to the NFC, where the South champion Falcons were no match for the North champion Chicago Bears, losing 30-12. Brian Urlacher had an interception and returned a fumble for a touchdown, Jay Cutler threw for 312 yards and two scores and Chicago sacked Matt Ryan five times. “Disappointed, not discouraged,” Atlanta coach Mike Smith said. “It’s a long season, it’s Week 1. We will work to get this fixed and we will get it fixed.” At San Francisco, Ted Ginn Jr.

Legals

return a kickoff and a punt for touchdowns in a minute’s span late in the fourth quarter to lead the 49ers and new coach Jim Harbaugh to a 33-17 win over NFC West champion Seattle. “It felt really like we were right there to take this game over, and then things just fell apart in the kicking game,” Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said. “Ted Ginn did his stuff and had two great plays and took our chance of coming back in this game away.” In other games, it was the New York Jets 27, Dallas 24; Philadelphia 31, St. Louis 13; Detroit 27, Tampa Bay 20; Cincinnati 27, Cleveland 17; Jacksonville 16, Tennessee 14; Arizona 28, Carolina 21; San Diego 24, Minnesota 17; and Washington 28, New York Giants 14. Teams across the league had tributes in honor of the Sept. 11th anniversary. The Jets and Cowboys capped the night with an emotionally charged pregame show featuring an a capella version of the “Star Spangled Banner” by Lady Antebellum that had a crowd of nearly 80,000 silently listening, many of the fans saluting, some crying. Players from both sides held an American flag that blanketed the field while Lady A sang.

Jets 27, Cowboys 24 At East Rutherford, N.J., Nick Folk kicked a 50-yard field goal with 27 seconds left, giving the Jets a comeback victory. With the game tied at 24, the Cowboys had a chance for a winning drive with 59 seconds left, but Tony Romo was intercepted on the first play by Darrelle Revis, who returned it 20 yards to Dallas’ 34. Four plays later, Folk kicked the go-ahead field goal against his former team. The Jets tied it with 5 minutes left when Isaiah Trufant, promoted from the practice squad Saturday, ran in a blocked punt from 18 yards for a touchdown. Joe McKnight ran up the middle unblocked and got his hands on Mat McBriar’s kick, which bounced right into Trufant’s hands.

Texans 34, Colts 7 At Houston, the 38-year -old Collins fumbled on consecutive snaps that set up Texans touchdowns in the first quarter, and was sacked three times. The Colts mustered only 236 yards and 15 first downs against Houston’s 3-4 defense guided by new coordinator

Legals

Wade Phillips. The Texans sprinted to a 34-0 halftime lead, even with 2010 NFL rushing leader Foster deactivated with a left hamstring injury. Foster ran for 231 yards in the opener against the Colts last year.

Ravens 35, Steelers 7 At Baltimore, Rice ran for 107 yards and scored twice for the Ravens, who bolted to a 14-0 lead in the first quarter and never let up against their bitter rivals. It was a rematch of a second-round playoff matchup last January, when the Steelers rallied to beat Baltimore 31-24. In that game, the Ravens let a 21-7 halftime lead evaporate with three turnovers in the third quarter. This time, the Ravens got three takeaways in the third to turn a 21-7 advantage into a rout. Haloti Ngata caused a fumble and deflected a pass that produced an interception.

Bears 30, Falcons 12 At Chicago, In a matchup of reigning division champions, Urlacher picked off Ryan to set up an early 56-yard TD catch by Matt Forte, and in the third quarter the linebacker picked up a fumble by Ryan and scored from 12 yards to make it 30-6. Cutler completed 22 of 32 passes in his first game at Soldier Field since the Bears’ loss to Green Bay in the NFC title game. Ryan completed 31 of 47 passes for 319 yards.

Eagles 31, Rams 13 At St. Louis, the Eagles had 239 yards rushing and were 8 for 11 on third downs. The defense applied constant pressure and piled up five sacks, two by Justin Babin. Darryl Tapp forced a fumble by Sam Bradford that led to a 56-yard touchdown return by Juqua Parker. Steven Jackson ran for a 47-yard score on the Rams’ first play, but lasted only one more carry before leaving with a right leg injury. Bradford left in the fourth quarter to have X-rays on a finger on his throwing hand. Bills 41, Chiefs 7 At Kansas City, Mo., Fitzpatrick finished with 208 yards passing for the Bills, who hadn’t scored 40 points in an opener since a 40-7 victory over the Los Angeles Rams on Sept. 6, 1992. Fred Jackson added 112 yards

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish Sept. 13, 2011

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish Sept. 13, 2011

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL

CHAVES COUNTY GOVERNMENT INVITATION TO BID

The Village of Ruidoso is requesting Qualification-based competitive sealed proposals to provide services for Automated Statement Processing for the Village of Ruidoso. Sealed Proposals will be received by the Village of Ruidoso, 313 Cree Meadows Dr., Ruidoso, NM 88345.

The Board of Chaves County Commissioners, pursuant to and in compliance with NM State Procurement Code, hereby invites price based sealed bids for the following: ITB-11-5R

Proposals will be received at Village of Ruidoso Purchasing Warehouse located at 311 Center St., Ruidoso, NM 88345 until 4:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday, October 11, 2011. Submitted proposals shall not be publicly opened. Copies of the Request can be obtained in person at the office of the Purchasing Agent at 311 Center St. or will be mailed upon written or telephone request to Eichelberger, Purchasing Agent, at Vicki 575/257-2721. The Village of Ruidoso reserves the right to reject any and/or all proposals and waive all informalities as deemed in the best interest of the Village. Vicki Eichelberger Purchasing Agent Village of Ruidoso -----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish Sept. 13, 2011 NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING AND DIRECTING THE ISSUANCE OF $425,000 GENERAL OBLIGATION SCHOOL BUILDING BONDS OF THE DEXTER CONSOLIDATED SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 8 AND OTHER MATTERS RELATED THERETO Notice is hereby given that the Board of Education of the Dexter Consolidated School District No. 8, County of Chaves, New Mexico, on the 12th day of September, 2011 adopted a resolution authorizing and directing the issuance of $425,000 General Obligation School Building Bonds of said District. The Resolution awards the sale of the bonds to New Mexico Finance Authority; provides for the form of the bonds; fixes the maturities of, and interest rates on the bonds; provides for the levy of taxes to pay the principal of, and interest on, the bonds; makes certain covenants to the bond purchasers; and provides other details concerning the bonds. Complete copies of the Resolution are available for public inspection during normal and regular business hours at the office of the Superintendent, Dexter Consolidated School District No. 8, 100 Lincoln, Dexter, New Mexico. This notice constitutes compliance with Section 6-14-6 NMSA 1978. DATED this 12th day of September, 2011. /s/ Orlando Chavez Secretary, Board of Education

OILS AND LUBRICANTS

Bids and Proposals will be accepted until Thursday September 22, 2011 at 2:00 PM. Specifications can be obtained online through the New Mexico E-Procurement System (NMEPS) at: www.govbids.com (must be a registered vendor) or by contacting the Chaves County Purchasing office at (575) 624-6615. All openings are public and are held at the Chaves County Administrative Center, #1 St. Mary’s Place, Roswell, New Mexico, 88203. Tammy Brisco Chaves County Purchasing Director (575) 624-6615 purchasing@co.chaves.nm.us

Legals

rushing for Buffalo. Matt Cassel threw for 119 yards with a touchdown and interception for Kansas City. It was the most lopsided seasonopening loss in franchise history, and the worst home loss by the Chiefs since a 45-0 defeat against the Pittsburgh Steelers 35 years ago.

Lions 27, Buccaneers 20 At Tampa, Fla., Stafford completed 24 of 33 passes, including TD throws of 36 and 1 yards to Calvin Johnson and 11 yards to Tony Scheffler. The only interception he threw glanced of f the hands of intended receiver Will Heller and was retur ned 28 yards by Aqib Talib for the only touchdown Tampa Bay managed until Josh Freeman threw a 5-yard scoring pass to Mike Williams with less than two minutes to go. Redskins 28, Giants 14 At Landover, Md., Rex Grossman completed 21 of 34 passes for 305 yards and two touchdowns for Washington. Making his first Week 1 start since 2007, Grossman justified — at least for a week — coach Mike Shanahan’s decision to go with the veteran over John Beck after a quarterback competition that lasted the entire preseason. Eli Manning went 18 for 32 for 268 yards for the Giants.

Cardinals 28, Panthers 21 At Glendale, Ariz., Cam Newton’s NFL debut was as magnificent as they come, except for the outcome. Instead, another rookie scored the game winner. Patrick Peterson returned a punt 89 yards for the go-ahead touchdown and Arizona escaped with a win. Newton, the No. 1 draft pick, completed 24 of 37 passes for 422 yards and two touchdowns with one interception, the first rookie to throw for more than 400 yards in his NFL opener.

49ers 33, Seahawks 17 At San Francisco, Ginn returned a kickoff and a punt for touchdowns in a minute’s span late in the fourth quarter, and San Francisco gave Harbaugh a win in his much-hyped NFL debut and renewed coaching rivalry with Carroll. Ginn ran a kickof f back 102 yards moments after the defending

Legals

---------------------------------Publish Aug. 30, Sept. 6, 13, 2011

---------------------------------Pub. Sept. 13, 20, 2011

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO

THE PROBATE IN COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO

IN THE MATTER THE ESTATE OF JAMES RYNEAR MORGAN, DECEASED.

Probate: 8904

OF

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ESTIE MARIE STAMPER, DECEASED.

No. PB-2011-65 NOTICE TO CREDITORS JEFFREY M. MORGAN has been appointed personal representative of the estate of James Rynear Morgan, deceased. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the personal representative, c/o Losee, Carson & Haas, P. A., P. O. Box 1720, Artesia, New Mexico, 88211-1720, or filed with the District Court of Eddy County, New Mexico. Dated: August 11, 2011. /s/ Jeffrey M. Morgan Scott S. Morgan Losee, Carson & Haas, P.A. P. O. Box 1720 Artesia, New Mexico 88211-1720 (575/746-3505) Attorneys for Personal Representative, Jeffrey M. Morgan

NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the Estate of Estie Marie Stamper, deceased. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned Personal Representative, c/o her attorneys, Hinkle, Hensley, Shanor & Martin, L.L.P. (T. Calder Ezzell, Jr.), P.O. box 10, Roswell, New Mexico, 88202, or filed with the Probate Court of Chaves County, P.O. Box 850, Roswell, New Mexico, 88202. DATED 8-30-11. s/Janice Marie Smith, Personal Representative

GARAGE SALES

DO N’T MI SS A SALE BY MISSING THE 2:00 PM DEADLINE FOR PLACING YOUR ADS

NFC West champion Seahawks had closed to 19-17. It was the secondlongest kick return at home and fourth-longest in team history. The 49ers’ Alex Smith was 15 for 20 for 124 yards and ran for a 1yard TD. David Akers kicked four field goals in his first game with San Francisco. New Seattle QB Tarvaris Jackson threw a late 55-yard touchdown pass to Doug Baldwin.

Chargers 24, Vikings 17 At San Diego, Fullback Mike Tolbert’s third touchdown, a 19-yard pass from Philip Rivers with 5:01 to play, lifted San Diego over Adrian Peterson and Minnesota. Rivers rolled left and waited for Tolbert to get open inside the 5yard line, then lobbed the winning pass. Rivers completed 33 of 48 passes for 335 yards and was intercepted twice. Tolbert also scored on a 7-yard run and had a 1-yard TD catch.

Bengals 27, Browns 17 At Cleveland, A.J. Green caught Cleveland’s defense napping for his first career catch, a 41-yard touchdown from backup quarterback Bruce Gradkowski as Cincinnati spoiled the debut of Browns coach Pat Shurmur. Green was left uncovered by the Browns, who were slow coming out of the huddle. All Gradkowski, on in relief of injured rookie Andy Dalton, had to do was lob the ball to Green. The speedy wideout did the rest, scoring with 4:31 left to shock the Browns and their fans, who watched Cleveland fall to 1-12 in season openers since 1999. Colt McCoy threw two TD passes for the Browns.

Jaguars 16, Titans 14 At Jacksonville, Fla., Maurice Jones-Drew scored in his return from knee surgery, and Jacksonville used a flawless start and some clutch plays to hang on for the win. Titans star Chris Johnson, who joined the team a little more than a week ago following a holdout, was pretty much a nonfactor. Johnson ran nine times for 24 yards and caught six passes for 25 yards. Tennessee made it close with a pair of second-half TD passes from Matt Hasselbeck to Kenny Britt. The Titans still had a shot, but Dwight Lowery intercepted Hasselbeck’s deep pass.

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice

NEWSPAPER NOTICE OF FILING Ingalls Holdings, LLC, the licensee of Radio Stations KSFX(FM), 100.5 MHz, KMOU(FM), 104.7 MHz, KBCQ(AM), 1230 kHz, and KBCQ-FM, 97.1 MHz, Roswell, New Mexico, gives notice that on August 30, 2011, an application was filed with the Federal Communications Commission for consent to transfer of control of the licensee of the stations from Trisha Ingalls and David L. Ingalls to Majestic Communications, LLC. The Members and Managers of Majestic Communications, LLC are Anna Maria Matteucci, Ralph L. Matteucci and Sandra J. Matteucci Trust for Chelsi Lee Matteuci, James L. Matteucci and Matteucci Investments, LLC. Trisha Ingalls and David L. Ingalls each holds a 50% Membership Interest in Ingalls Holdings, LLC. A copy of the application and related materials are available for public inspection at the main studio of the stations at 5206 West 2nd Street, Roswell, New Mexico, between the hours of 9:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday.

025. Lost and Found

LOST DOG $150 REWARD. SHELTY PUPPY, BLACK-WHITE-TAN. LOST AROUND CAHOON PARK. PLEASE CALL 625-1134. LOOKS LIKE A SMALL COLLIE. REWARD! Please Help Find “Button”. Small white male poodle, call if seen or rescued 627-5445 or 840-5800.

002. Northeast

FOUND TWO dogs one older Dachsund & 1 brown & white Chihuahua. Call 622-8216 after 8:30pm

2727 N. Wilshire Blvd Units 1-90. Fri-Sat, 8am-2pm. Furniture, pottery, jewelry & much much more! We have a little bit of everything for someone.

$500 REWARD for the return of keys taken in the 2500 block of South Virginia No questions asked. 575-420-4433

INSTRUCTION

030. Education & Instructions ALLIED HEALTH career training- Attend college 100% online . Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD is now accepting applications for the position of: GRAPHIC DESIGNER The ideal candidate will produce print advertising for local accounts. Responsibilities include designing and implementing work of a high visual and conceptual quality that is appropriate to content and intended audience; working directly with sales, clients and design team members. Collaborating with sales staff and clients to identify the client’s needs; effectively communicating design concepts and creative vision to clients and sales staff. Desired Qualifications: • College degree in Graphic Design or Multi-Media Design • 3-5 years design experience or related design discipline • Proven experience with Adobe InDesign, Quark Express PhotoShop, Illustrator, Adobe Acrobat • Proficient in using Mac platform • Proficient in creating all levels of advertisements • Be pro-active and organized, manage work effectively eley under multiple deadlines and handle concurrent projects • Can explain visual concepts to non-visual people and the ability to listen to clients needs • Thrive in a fast-paced team oriented environment • Strong communication skills and organizational skills This is a full-time position. Interested applicants, please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Kim Gordon 2301 N. Main Roswell, NM 88201 Or e-mail to: Kim.gordon@ roswell-record.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!


Roswell Daily Record

For Results You Can Measure

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

MAYO MARRS Casing Pulling, Inc. is now hiring Full time Diesel Mechanic. Fax applications to 575-736-1578 or email dgarrett@mayomarrs.net

Medical Billing Specialist: Local medical office is seeking Resumes for a Medical billing specialist who has experience with Medicare & insurance billing. Good hours & Good wages, and a Great work environment. Please send Resumes to the following address: PO Box 1897, Roswell, NM 88201 unit 278.

HIGH DESERT Family Services desires to contract with a RN to provide healthcare coordination, health assessments and health - related training to people with developmental disabilities and their staff living in the community. Competitive salary. Email your resume to bsandusky@ highdesertfs.com or fax to 505-797-3956. www.highdesertfs.com.

Avon, Buy/Sell. Christmas around the corner. $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR

Hiring customer service representative at Fred Loya Insurance. Fluent in English and Spanish required. Serious applicants please apply at 2601 N Main St Suite B. Don’t be fooled by out of state schools. Artesia Training Academy Class A & B CDL training. Call ATA for more information 1-888-586-0144 artesiatraining@pvtn.net LOOKING FOR an experienced auto tech with at least 5 yrs. experience, own hand tools & a professional attitude, foreign & domestic experience a plus, ASE certification a plus. Apply in person @ 101 S. Main. No phone calls please. MAddy-tay’s Preschool is now taking job applications. All applicants must have a minimum of a high school diploma, a 45 hour certificate and be at least 18 years of age. Please apply at either of our two locations 102 S. Utah or 1200 W. Alameda.

Try The Classifieds!

AUTO TECHNICIAN We will and can beat any dealership pay plans. A progressive and expanding automotive repair facility is seeking a Class A technician, full or part time position. Seeking an organized, motivated, and cheerful professional who can be productive. Excellent pay plan with benefits and bonuses. Pay based on ability and productivity. Certifications preferred, but will train as needed. Locally owned facility. A $2,000 signing bonus is available. Please fax resume to 575-625-1900 or call 575-626-1900 THE ROSWELL Daily Record is now accepting applications for the position of: OUTSIDE SALES The ideal candidate must possess excellent customer service skills, superior organizational skills and a strong work ethic. Experience or background in advertising also helpful. Must be computer literate. This is a full time position. Interested Applicants please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Kim Gordon, 2301 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88201 or e-mail to: kim.gordon@ roswell-record.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!

CHANGE A Life... Be A Comfort Keeper. We are always looking forward to speaking with experienced caring and compassionate people interested in becoming a Comfort Keeper. We are currently looking for people to provide companionship, housekeeping, meal preparation, grooming and dressing guidance, transportation, and personal care services for our clients. We have positions available in Roswell and Artesia for Daytime and Overnights. Must have a valid drivers license and auto insurance. To learn what becoming a Comfort Keeper is all about, call us at 624-9999 or stop by our office at 1410 South Main to visit with Christina. NOW HIRING: Esperanza Developmental Services is hiring for direct support staff and job coaches. Must have a valid New Mexico driver’s license and pass a preemployment drug test. Experience is not necessary but is a plus. Please come by 72 Earl Cummings Loop West in the base to put in your application. Please no phone calls. Looking For Sales Manager who has positive and enthusiastic attitude. Hotel sales background preferred. Send resume to roswellfairfieldinn@gmail.c om interviews will be contacted. JOB OPENING: Assistant Project Manager Entry level position requiring good computer skills and some physical labor. Inquire in person at 512 S. Main. CURRIERS NEEDED for full time positions. Must have great driving record and driving skills. Professional dress is required. Please send resume and driving record to PO Box 716, Roswell, NM 88202-716 Opening for Office Assistant. Microsoft Office Program a must. Other duties will include ten key, filing, answering phones & other misc. duties. Email resumes to rskippermjg@ qwestoffice.net or Fax to 575-623-3075

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575) 622-7710 #45 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

Certified Phlebotomist part time Mon-Fri mornings. Must be dependable and able to work flexible hours when needed. Fax resume and references to 575-622-2820.

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EXPIRES o ________

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WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

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Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

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www.rdrnews.com

jimhayes66@qwestoffice.net.

MOTEL 6 is now accepting applications for an experienced maintenance position. Applications may be picked up at 3307 North Main. PT NURSERY WORKER Must work Wednesday evening, 1 Friday night a month and Sunday morning - Apply at First United Methodist Church - 200 N. Pennsylvania Ave. Between 1:00-4:00 PM. Drug and Background Check Required. WELDER NEEDED. Must be experienced. Apply at Keys Drilling & Pump Service Inc. 1012 E. 2nd . Roswell NEED IN home care assistance must be able to work weekends. Call 623-9045. AUTO BODY Man & Painter needed. Copper Mountain Auto Body, Ruidoso, NM. Must have 15 yrs exp. with I-Car certification. 575-257-8434, 630 Hwy 70, Ruidoso, NM 88345.

SERVICES

100. Babysitting Stay at home grandmother. Special 1st wk $50 ea. child, open 7-5:30, M-F, 625-9572

105. Childcare

NEED CHILD care? Find the widest range of available childcare for your children and their needs. 1-800-691-9067 or www.newmexic okids.org. You may also call us; Family Resource & Referral 622-9000 and we can help you navigate the system. Openings, clean lg. playroom, licensed provider, North, all ages. 420-6803

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 HOUSE/OFFICE Cleaning low prices. Excellent work call anytime. 575-973-2649 AAA Cleaning Service We clean all kinds of homes. 626-8587 Free estimates HOUSE CLEANER, reliable, honest, 22 yrs. exp. 623-8563 SUNSHINE WINDOW Service Free estimates. 575-626-545,575-626-5153

2 PT positions. Must enjoy working with dogs and horses. Will train. Drop resume off at 1607 Fowler by September 14th.

HOUSE CLEANER or care giver. Excellent references affordable Call 637-9166

DEAN BALDWIN Painting has immediate openings for permanent/FT Lic. A & P Mechanics & QA Inspector. Commercial aircraft exp preferred. Excel benefits. EOE. Apps available at 82 W. Earl Cumings Loop or send resume to resumes@deanbaldwinpainting.com or fax 575-347-2589. FRED LOYA INSURANCE

Slabs, patios, sidewalks, curbing, Rodriguez Const. Since 1974 Lic. 22689. Call 420-0100

AUTO APPRAISERS: NOW LOOKING FOR SOME EXPERIENCED APPRAISERS FOR THE ROSWELL AREA. MUST BE COMPUTER LITERATE AND HAVE AT LEAST 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE. PLEASE FAX RESUMES TO 915-629-4048 OR EMAIL

ELDERLY, TEMPORARILY disabled, long term assistant? At home housewife looking for new clients who need living assistance. Light housekeeping, yard maintenance, errands & appointment transport. Clean, reliable, honest, reasonable rates. Call Meta 575-626-9682.

ORAZO@FREDLOYA.COM

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT:

CDL DRIVERS Wanted: Regional routes, home weekends, competitive pay. Must have current physical and clean MVR. Positions to fill immediately. Call 575-461-4221, 800-750-4221 or Email to:

ATT MR. RAZO ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER JOBS in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper to place your ad or log onto www.nmpress.org for more information.

150. Concrete

185. Electrical

BIG HORN Electric Professional work, affordable price. 575-317-8345 NM Lic#367662.

195. Elderly Care

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

225. General Construction HARVEST BUILDERS All types of construction. 575-910-3000

230. General Repair CARPENTRY, DRY wall, painting & concrete. We guarantee. 626-2050

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Greenscapes Sprinkler Systems Lawn mowing, field mowing, gravel, sod-hydro seed, pruning, tilling, For dependable & reliable service call 622-2633 or 910-0150. LAWN SERVICE & much more work at low price. 914-0803. Basic Lawn mowing, yard clean-up, weedeating small tree trimming. 317-2242 WEEKEND WARRIOR Lawn Service mowing, property cleanup, residential rain gutter cleaning, and much more 575-626-6121 Gonzales Enterprises Sprinkler installation & repairs, rock & grass landscaping, bush hogging, fencing. Just ask, we may do it. 317-8053

285. Miscellaneous Services

THE NEW MEXICO SEED LOAN PROGRAM is available to small businesses owned by individuals with disabilities and provides low interest loans for the purchase of equipment and related supplies needed to expand or start a business. Contact the New Mexico Seed Loan Program at 1-855-891-8295 or www.nmseedloans.org for more information. A low interest loan program of DVR State of New Mexico.

310. Painting/ Decorating

Quality Painting! Interior, Exterior at prices you can afford. Mike 910-7012 TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting at affordable prices. Call 637-9108. PAINT CONTRACTOR Interior/Exterior, remodels or new construction. Call Nathan 914-0083 Licensed/ Bonded & Insured.

225. General Construction

Handyman: Free estimates, complete remodeling including plumbing, additions. Guaranteed Work. 910-7035 Miguel.

Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 60x134 $18,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. We Take Visa and Mastercard! 420-1352.

SPANISH GATE Townhome, 2br/1ba, immaculate, all appliances, beautiful grounds w/ pool, gated community living, $79,900. Call 307-262-0086 Priced Reduced 1413 E Hoagland: 2br/1ab laundry room $45,000 626-9593 4Bd 1Ba, new paint, carpet, doors, fncd yrd, $60k M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

3 BR 1 ba at the base $42,500 owner financing with $5k down 420-1352 WELL SEASONED Real Estate contracts. Will trade for houses. Wesley Hay 623-6165 702 E. Greenwood 1600+ sq. ft. $47k 10% down take over payments. 626-5290

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 625-9924 / 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

395. Stucco Plastering

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 Allen’s Tree Srvc. The oldest tree service in Roswell. Million $ ins. 626-1835 Collins Tree Service Professional Tree Trimming, Removal & Stump grinding. Fully insured. Certified Line Clearance Arborist. Call 575-308-1902

FINANCIAL REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale TOWNHOUSE, 1400 sqft, 2br/2ba, laundry room/ study, new roof, cedar fence, stucco, porch, tile & carpet. Refinished kitchen, bath cabinets & new paint throughout, w/d. Large corner lot. Call 575-491-4235

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281

Investment duplex + lots, rent 1; live in 1, 405 S, Richardson $90k. No owner financing. 420-0720

In Artesia in pecan orchard- Large room, private bath & entrance, fridge, microwave, wireless internet, utilities, DirecTV, covered parking. $600./mo. Call 575-365-4579.

FSBO Enchanted Hills, 3br/2ba, 2060sf, Craiglist, $195K, pre-qual. buyers only. 520-904-7442

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

Jacque’S PET SERVICES. has a new location. Boarding now available. 1002 E. 2nd.575-622-4002.

345. Remodeling

PREMIUM 5 Acre tracts, Owner will finance with 10% down, New Construction only (no mobile homes), , Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd. between Country Club & Berrendo Rd. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-4337

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331

LENDER SALE. 40 Acres -$39,900. Spellbinding views of snow capped mountains! Adjacent to National Forest. Maintained all weather roads w/electric. Close to Ruidoso. Financing available. Call NMRS 888-676-6979.

316. Pet Services

HAGERMAN LOTS for sale. York Avenue, Posey subdivision, 1 block from Hagerman schools, $5000. Not zoned for mobile home. 420-1352

VERY NICE 3/2/2 home on the NE. $6000 down, take over payments, avail. now. Call 575-420-1009 or 575-317-1605.

5 ACRES in Dexter, NM. To inquire, Call 918-644-0934.

For stucco traditional or synthetic, also block, brick & stone work. Rodriguez Const. 420-0100

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100

3BR, 2 full ba., huge 2 car garage beautiful lawn. Enchanted Hills 2605 W. 8th St. under $160k great for a new family. (505)795-0007

M.G. HORIZONS Patio covers, concrete, decks & awnings Lic. 623-1991.

COMFORT KEEPERS provides in-home care for you or a loved one. Our caregivers are carefully screened, bonded and insured. We take care of all payroll taxes and workers compensation. For more information call @ 624-9999. Serving Chavez County for 10 years.

200. Fencing

520. Lots for Sale

312. Patio Covers

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

490. Homes For Sale

5 ACRES, $25K as is, septic system, 3809 Zinnia, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

DEPENDABLE PRIVATE Caregiver to the rescue, yrs. of exp. Tina 420-8877

EMT LOOKING to be a personal aid for the elderly or disabled also caregiver. Duties include basic medical care, running errands, dog walking. Asking $15/hr, 2 hr minimum. 626-1396

Dennis the Menace

B7

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

Restaurant bldg, $275K cash/trade for Ruidoso prprty, M-Th 8-4 624-1331

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

1995 CAVCO 28x68, 3br/2ba double wide near Alamogordo, NM on 10 acres of land. Land also for sale. Home can be moved. Home like new, selling for $17,900 at present location. Call 575-622-0035 D.O.1090

MOBILE HOME w/lot, 3br, 1.5ba, $20k. Call Veronica 575-420-1796 ‘98 Schult 16x72, 3br/2ba. Setup on private lot in Tucumcari. Can be moved. Quality built 6” walls, tape & textured. Does need new paint & some repair. Selling cheap. 575-622-0035, DO1090 2004 FLEETWOOD 16x60, 2br/2ba. Setup in Adult Park Villa #64 in Roswell. Stop by & look, unlocked during day time. Very nice. 575-622-0035, DO1090 2br/2ba, Appliances, partially furnished, carport, storage, deck, $9K. 623-3149

520. Lots for Sale

OWNER FINANCING for a limited time. Ready to build 5 acre lots w/ great views & good covenants. Located 9 miles West of Roswell @ the Club House Banquet Facility. Free land maps and at entrance. 575-623-1800. www.BuenaVidaLand.com

COURT ORDERED Sale! 2704 S. Lea, asking $6k, 5 acres - 30 Townsend Tr. Lot 9, Cielo Vista Subdivision, has well, electric, great view of city, $49,999. Call Jim 910-7969.

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. Town Plaza Apartments Utilities paid - Gas and Water. New Owners, friendly new managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs/downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Seniors 55yrs plus, law enforcement & military will receive discount. No HUD. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 2nd year, 1 free month rent ALL BILLS PAID 1 br $530 2 br $630, 3br/2ba $730 mo., ref air, new carpet, new paint/tile. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 EFFICIENCY 1 br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. EFFICIENCY 2 BR, downtown, clean, water paid. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD Call 623-8377 2Br, Sept Special, $600mo, bills pd, No HUD, No Pets appt M-Th 624-1331 1br/1ba, wtr pd, quiet area, HUD ok. $350/mo, $200 dep. 625-9208 after 5pm ROSWELL 2 br apartment $600/mo, all utilities paid, fridge, stove 1700 N Pontiac Dr. 626-864-3461 CLEAN 1BR duplex, no smoking/HUD/pets. Mature adults, 1st/last/dep. 420-0720 VERY NICE 2 br 1 bath duplex 1 car garage No Hud or smoking, small pets ok, $700 mo. 626-0229 2BR W/STOVE, refrig, 617 E. 5th, 317-4103. 1BR/1BA, LIVING room, dining area & kitchen, w/d hookup, stove & fridge included, $400/mo, $400/dep, tenant pays electric, No Pets. Great for a single or couple. Close to downtown. Call 575-626-3040 for showing. PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. 2 BR, 1 Bath Apt, $700, utilities all paid. N. Lea 575-652-9682 VERY NICE just remodeled Large 3br, 1212 N. Washington. 623-8240


B8 Tuesday, September 13, 2011 545. Houses for Rent-Furnished NICE 1BR, 1 person, private setting, $350 + dep., no smoking & pets, wtr pd. 505-264-0974 or 575-622-4889

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 1516 N. Pontiac, large 2br, 1ba, new stove & ref., w/d hookups, hardwood floors, completely remodeled, very clean and cute, $650 monthly, plus dep., No large dogs, No HUD. References and Rental History required. Call 317-3929 2&3 Bd, 1&2 Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331 201 W. Summit, 3br/2ba, carport & storage, completely remodeled, stove, refrig., ref. air, w/d hookup, no pets or HUD, $900/mo, $600/dep, 914-5402 3br 1ba. ref air, fenced yard 1 car 69 Lighthall RIAC $650m.$650 dep 627-9942 1400 S. Madison, 2br/1ba, all appliances, 1 car garage, fenced, no smokers, pets, w/fee, no HUD, $750/$500 deposit, no utilities, 575-405-0163 LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com! 1,2,3BR, $550, $600, will sell, 10% dn. Al 703-0420 or Santiago 202-4702 400 1/2 E 5th 1 bedroom stove, refrig., water paid, $325 mo. $200 dep. No HUD & No Pets. 910-9648 XNICE 1BR w/appliances, w/d hookups, water paid, no pets. 910-9357 2/1, central heat & air, small fenced yard, 200 S. Michigan, $575/mo., + $500 deposit. 575-623-1800 or 420-5516 2br, enclosed garage, appliances included, laundry room, $600 + dep., #15 Reynolds Place 623-2607 or 914-0685. BIG CLEAN 3br, 1 3/4 ba by Roswell High, $950/mo, $950/dep, no HUD. 626-4666 or 622-4470 3br, $700/$500dep, No pets or HUD. 914-0101 1-2 OR 3 bedroom, nice neighborhood, in Historic District, No HUD or pets, non-smoking preferred. Call 575-420-9083 2BR/1BA W/STOVE & frig, big fenced yard, no pets, $500/mo, $250/dep, 1615 S. Monroe. 623-7907 NW 2BR remodeled, jacuzzi tub, fenced front & back, sprinklers, elec. pd, $800/$500. 3br/2ba, cul de sac, ref air, all tile, new elec., $950/$500. 1br/1ba, cul de sac, $650/$300, all bills pd. 317-4373 1BR HOUSE, off N. Union, $350/mo, $200/dep, no HUD, wtr pd. 420-5604 3 BR, 1.5 baths, stove, fridge, garage, large yard, no pets. $750, $500 dep. 317-6285

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

3BR/1.5BA, S. Aspen, $700 + dep. 623-8312

THE TREASURE Chest Reopened. Metates, petrified wood, new selection on Depression, Pink, Red Vasoline glass - all colors, new items, Carnival, incl. Dragon & Lotus, Yellow ware, see Barbie World, thrifts, quilts. 1204 W. Hobbs, 914-1855

3br/2ba townhouse, washer & dryer, safe & quiet. 420-8706 1204 S. Missouri, spacious 2 or 3br, 1ba, good area, close to schools, garage, fenced, freshly painted, $700/mo, $400/dep, no HUD. 622-2485 710 S. Wyoming Apt. A, 2BR, Appl. $500/m, $400 dep., water paid. Call 625-1952 709 W Poe, 3BR 2BA, $900 month 109 Fairway (Dexter), 4BR 2BA, $1100 month Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604 2BR, 1ba, water paid, $500 mo., $300 dep. No Hud. 1009 1/2 S. Lea 317-1371

555. Mobile Homes for Rent 2/1 $250/DEP, $500/mo, wtr pd, fenced yard, dogs ok if house broken. 575-626-1019 or 575-625-0605

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places OFFICE SPACE for Rent. Prime downtown area, 2,061 sq.ft. Please call 622-8711. FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546. 2108 S. Main, storefront, 1200sf, $500/$500dep. Call Don or Barbara 627-9942 Office Spaces available starting at $100 per month depending on size. Also warehouse 3616 feet $800 mo. Party and conference rooms available second floor 208 North Main St. secure location. Contact Paula 707-354-2376 LARGE OFFICE $550 to $1,500 per month, excellent locations 420-2100

585. Warehouse and Storage WAREHOUSE 9000 SF partial a/c & heat, security alarmed, 2 garage doors, 2 standard entry doors, $1000 mo. Inquire at 2001 S. Main Family Furniture 575-937-0889 or 575-257-0888

595. Misc. for Rent

6X10 UTILITY trailer $700. 575-317-7795 2 QUEEN Mattress sets 1 Sealy Posturpedic set & 1 new Corsicana Pillow Top set, also everything for infant daycare. 622-5223 8 RESTAURANT/BAR tables $20 ea. or $125 for all. Kenmore washer & dryer, matched pair $240. Set of 4 factory 16” Pontiac wheels $150 for set. 626-7470 LARGE SCREEN TV, desk, coffee table set, 2 tables, entertainment hutch. Call 420-1854 or 420-1911. Dining table 6 chairs, downdraft swamp cooler, 4-17” Chevy rims, 4-16” Toyota rims brand new, furnance. 400watt champion generator like new, 622-0604 Sectional Maroon in color with 3 recliners & cup holders, swing set 317-4434 GAS BBQ, entertainment unit, girls bedroom furniture, exercise equipment, $20/ea obo. 420-5281 Sofas, Armoire, end tables, coffee tables, futon, commercial jewelry case, old national geographic books, refrigerator, piano small desk. Call weekdays after 5pm 420-2831

HOBSON GARDEN: Now roasting our famous GREEN CHILE! Fresh tomatoes. Also available: Jalapenos (green & yellow), bell peppers, dried red chile, okra, squash/zucchini, cucumbers, eggplant, cherry tomatoes, watermelons, honey dews, & cantaloupes. Mon-Sat 8-5:30, Sun 1-5. 3656 E. Hobson Road - 622-7289. FARM FRESH eggs - free range $2.50 dz, duck eggs $5.00 dz. 624-0898

700. Building Materials

STEEL BUILDINGS Factory Direct Discounted inventory 33x39, 42x57, 54x99, 60x156 Misc. Material Available www.sunwardsteel.com Source # 1M2 505-349-0493

705. Land/Gardening/ Fertilizer HARVEST FARMS Compost Tea for sale. 575-910-3000

745. Pets for Sale FOR SALE Chiapso 8 wk old pups extra ordinarily cute. Call 623-1507

2008 HARLEY Davidson Heritage Softail, 6900-7900 miles, 96 cu. in., 6 spd fuel injected, garage kept, $17,500. 973-8565 or 420-5757

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com 27’ PROWLER Regal 05, super slide, large rear bathroom, walk around queen bed, $18k. 626-3359 PUBLIC AUCTION 300+ Travel Trailers, Camp Houses & Cottages. NO MINIMUM PRICE! Online Bidding Available. Saturday September 17 @ 10am Carencro, LA www.hendersonauctions.com

225-686-2252 Lic #136 1973 CAMPER dual axle, 19ft with A/C, good shape, $1595. 575-626-8773 1985 SOUTHWIND motorhome $3500. Call 626-3070 or 840-5224

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

WILL PAY top dollar for clean cars, vans, P.U. and SUVs. Classic Auto, 410 S. Main. 623-9772

BABY JUNGLE swing $45, baby changing table $25, baby bouncer $25, Eddie Bauer portable changing mat $15, stroller $15. Call 626-5488 or 626-3644

BOXER PUPPIES for sale. 2 females & 2 males. Fawn colored, 1 white female, $200 ea. 420-6633

2004 350Z convertible silver w/black top 25.75K miles 18” wheels. $17,500. Call 420-2456.

GAS RANGE 3 months old $300. Call 575-725-4778

SHIH TZU puppies, 10 wks old, up to date on shots $200 obo. 622-7359

DINETTE TABLE with 6 chairs & freezer. 317-0196

BORDER COLLIES for sale $250. Smart working dogs. 575-472-5311

LEAVING MUST sell Maytag washer & dryer excellent cond. $150 for set. 347-2124 cash only please.

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

CKC YELLOW Labs, 10 wks old, 2 males, 2 females, dew claws removed, shots $350. 627-0115 or 317-4603 NORWEGIAN ELKHOUNDS, 3 males, 2 females. Call 914-0083. CHINESE PUGS ready in 4 weeks. Call 575-914-0357.

RECREATIONAL CASH FOR gold and silver jewelry. Sterling spoons and forks. U.S. Silver coins. Local in Roswell, 578-0805

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

PAY CASH for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles. Entire households & estates welcome. Call 627-2033 or 623-6608.

MERCHANDISE

SEE BARRY’S Sci-Fi movie, TV & advertising collectibles, now in Space 89 Roswell Antiques Mall, 208 N. Main.

51” Magnavox Projection TV, good picture & color, $350. 347-3459 7:30-4PM

GRAVES FARM: New season picked fresh daily, okra, squash, cucumbers, eggplant, red chile pods & powder, garlic, pinto beans. 622-1889 Mon-Sat 8-5:30, Sun 1-5. Accept EBT, credit cards & debit.

625. Antiques

635. Good things to Eat

SAN PATRICIO Berry Farm. Blackberries & raspberries. You pick or we pick. 575-653-4502 or 575-937-0866

765. Guns & Ammunition

WINCHESTER MODEL 70 30-06 cal. comes w/a Simmons scope, rifle sling & 2 rifle cases, $950 OBO. Call for more info 637-9205 ARCHERY SALES & Service now at Zia Guns. Broadheads, sights, arrows, targets, bow cases, guns, ammo, knives, scopes & reloading supplies. 1104 E. 2nd, 622-0023.

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

2005 Vento Triton Scooter, 1863 miles, 60mpg, $1100 obo. 623-8212 2009 KAWASAKI Teryx 4x4, blue, only 51 hrs, great for hunting. 575-370-3899 06 YAMAHA YZF DIRT BIKE EXCELLENT COND. $2800 OBO. CALL 575-626-9962. IF NO ANSWER LEAVE MESSAGE.

Roswell Daily Record

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

‘02 HONDA Civic, 5 spd, new timing belt & wtr pump, runs perfect, $4400. 317-4373

WILL BUY your unwanted washing machines. 626-7470

Hospital bed, power wheelchair, bath transfer bench, walker, 622-7638

635. Good things to Eat

OBEDIENCE CLASSES Dog Obedience Classes to begin September 21. Exp. AKC Trainer. For more information, call 623-9190.

TENTS AMY’S Tents for rent, weddings, birthday, parties, open houses or just out of rain or shade. Call 575-973-0964, for sizes & pricing.

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

CLASSIFIEDS

‘99 CADILLAC Deville, Northstar, 4.6 liter engine, auto, looks & runs great, new battery, recent service, full power & leather, $2500. 317-5214 or 622-4950 2002 MERCURY Sable, nice condition, runs good, needs some minor mechanical work. Asking $3000. 626-0128 Extra Clean ‘08 Dodge Charger all black int. Titanium gray paint V6 great mpg, 89k mi. all hwy, new tires, runs/looks like new $9900 listed below Kelly Blue Book serious callers only. Text or call 626-8969 2002 CHEVY Cavalier, new tires, good condition, $2,995. 575-416-0606

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

1972 CHEVROLET C20 pickup $7000, nice paint, interior, tires & wheels. Serious inquiries only. Call for appointment 622-9312. 1992 TOYOTA Land Cruiser 4x, 156,600 miles, $4500 OBO. 2001 Toyota 4-Runner Limited, new tires, 146k miles, $8000. 626-5988 or 317-8092 2006 FORD F250, excellent cond., ext. cab, $9,950. 626-7488. ‘96 DODGE Ram, ext cab, runs good, $2600. 317-4373 ‘98 FREIGHTLINER FL70, Bobtail 24ft box, well maintained, runs great $5500 or best reasonable offer. 575-578-9600 1998 FORD F-150 $3800 2000 Ford Ranger $2600 both ext. cab 575-652-9682

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted 045 050 055 060

Employment

Employment Opportunities Salesperson/Agents Employment Agencies Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 441 445 450

Window Repair Window Cleaning Wrought Iron Services Wanted

455 456 460 465

Money: Loan/Borrow Credit Cards Insurance Co. Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale Investment: Stocks/Sale Mortgages for Sale Mortgages Wanted Business Opportunities

470 475 480 485

Financial

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos

9-13-11  

9-13-11 Newspaper