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SANTA FE (AP) — A former Santa Fe police detective who is fighting to get his job back has provided more details about what he maintains was a federal investigation that targeted Santa Fe’s city manager and a state official. James Vigil told reporters Wednesday during a press conference ... - PAGE A7

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

Irene tightens aim on East Coast

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BUXTON, N.C. (AP) — A monstrous Hurricane Irene tightened its aim on the Easter n Seaboard on Thursday, threatening 65 million people along a shore-hugging path from North Carolina to New England. One of the nation’s top experts called it his “nightmare” scenario. The Category 3 stor m with winds of 115 mph — the threshold for a major hurricane — would be the strongest to strike the East Coast in seven years, and people were already getting

August 26, 2011

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out of the way. Tens of thousands fled North Carolina beach towns, farmers pulled up their crops, and the Navy ordered ships to sea so they could endure the punishing wind and waves in open water. All eyes were on Irene’s projected path, which showed it bringing misery to every city along the I-95 corridor, including Washington, New York and Boston. The former chief of the National Hurricane Center called it one of his

three worst possible situations. “One of my greatest nightmares was having a major hurricane go up the whole Northeast Coast,” Max Mayfield, the center’s retired director, told The Associated Press. He said the damage will probably climb into billions of dollars. “This is going to have an impact on the United States economy.” The head of the Federal Emergency Management See IRENE, Page A3

Madsen trial vacated AP Photo

Hurricane Irene moves over the Bahama Islands, Thursday.

JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

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• Gov: Capping tax doesn’t make sense • Third Valero suspect surrenders • ENMU-R plane is finally unveiled • Rio Rancho: Testing Goddard in Week 1 • Gateway Christian gets a measuring ...

INSIDE SPORTS

Mark Wilson Photo

Lack of rainfall distresses Bitter Lake Severe drought conditions in southeastern New Mexico have affected Bitter Lake National Wildlife Refuge where water levels are extremely low.

EMILY RUSSO MILLER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Bitter Lake National Wildlife Refuge in north Roswell is known as an oasis in the desert, pro-

GHS DOWNS NMMI

In the Goddard and NMMI boys soccer season openers, both teams struggled to find the back of the net and as a result, both teams entered their matchup on Thursday 0-1. While the Colts’ offensive woes continued, the Rockets netted two goals in a 2-0 victory. Early and often both squads had opportunities to draw first blood, but some nifty saves and bad touches elongated both teams’ offensive ineptitude. In the second minute, NMMI’s Angel Reyes had an open look in front of the goal, - PAGE B1

TODAY’S OBITUARIES

• Alfredo Caballero • John W. Hall - PAGE A7

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CLASSIFIEDS..........B6 COMICS.................B4 FINANCIAL .............B5 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........A8 LOTTERIES ............A2 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 STATE ...................A7 WEATHER ..............A8

INDEX

viding vital wetlands in an arid environment to thousands of migratory birds and endangered species and plants. But the oasis is drying up due to exceptional

drought conditions, the worst drought category possible, that still persist in southeast New Mexico, Bitter Lake biologist Jeffrey Sanchez said in an interview Thursday after-

noon. Wetlands are at an alltime low capacity, just below 50 percent, and the refuge has received a mere 1/2 of an inch of See BITTER, Page A3

The trial for Jeannie Madsen was vacated, Thursday, following a last minute settlement. The trial was still listed on the docket. At least one of the witnesses, a Roswell police officer, never received notification of the cancellation. According to the District Attorney’s office, the trial was still on the schedule as of 5 p.m., Wednesday. The case stems from an incident in which Police Detective Jeannie Madsen, an 11-year veteran, was arrested following an altercation. The incident took place in January. According to the criminal complaint filed in Magistrate Court, husband Eric Madsen said he and his wife got into a verbal argument, and “she kicked him and struck him, causing bruises and scrapes.”

State jet sells for $2.5M RFD moves fence; damages pipe

SANTA FE (AP) — Republican Gov. Susana Martinez waved goodbye Thursday to a state-owned jet she calls the “ultimate symbol of waste and excess.” Her administration sold the plane for $2.5 million. Martinez presented keys to the aircraft to the new owners, a retired couple from Anchorage, Alaska, at a ceremony at Santa Fe’s municipal airport. “Last year when I was running for governor, I not only promised taxpayers that I would not use this state jet as a personal air taxi, I promised New Mexicans across the state that I would get rid of this symbol of greed and excess in state government. And today, I make good on that promise,” Martinez said. The new owners, Robert

and Linda Felland, stood next to the governor at the airport news conference — the jet as a backdrop with a large “SOLD” sign affixed to it. “I hear it is a sweet ride but I will just have to take their word for it,” Martinez said. The couple and their pilots later took off for Wisconsin, where they also maintain a home. Martinez waved at the couple as the plane headed toward a runway. The twin-engine business jet, a Cessna Citation Bravo, was purchased new in 2005 by Democratic Gov. Bill Richardson’s administration for $5.5 million. Richardson was a frequent flier on the jet, but MarSee JET, Page A3

EMILY RUSSO MILLER RECORD STAFF WRITER

A natural gas leak in Melendez Park in southwest Roswell Thursday morning forced the evacuation of about 20 residences, a preschool and several businesses. New Mexico Gas Company contained the leak within an hour after Fire Department personnel accidently damaged a 2inch natural gas distribuMark Wilson Photo tion pipeline in the park, A gas leak forced evacuations and the closure of South which is located directly Garden Avenue at the intersection of East McGaffey behind Roswell Fire Sta- Street, Thursday morning. tion No. 2 at the intersection of South Garden and operating a Bobcat to tion, said Roswell Fire Avenue and East dig post holes since they Department Division McGaffey Street. Chief Devin Graham. Firefighters were relo- had just finished building cating a fence in the park an addition to the fire staSee RFD Page A2

Esperanza provides help for young victims JULIA BERGMAN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Inside a quaint, blue house on a quiet Roswell street, an organization called Esperanza House Inc. offers young abuse victims a welcome alternative to being investigated within the walls of an intimidating government building: a child-friendly environment, complete with toys and soft furnishings, where speciallytrained interviewers wearing ordinary clothes are available to talk to young victims. “It is much easier

for a child to come to a home than a police station,” says Mandy Airhart, victim services coordinator and a forensic interviewer at Esperanza House. “It is easier for them to talk to someone in plain clothes, someone specifically trained to talk to children.” Founded 20 years ago, the mission of the organization is “to provide comprehensive and compassionate care to victims of child abuse and sexual assault,” says Mike Turner, director of Esperanza

See MADSEN, Page A3

Roswell businesses will need 443 workers in next 12 months JULIA BERGMAN RECORD STAFF WRITER

House. Prior to his employment at the organization, Turner worked as a detective at the Roswell Sheriff’s Office, where he saw first-hand many of the cases that the Esperanza House handles. While working as a detective, Turner was asked to be a member of the founding board of direcSee ESPERANZA, Page A3

In its presentation to the City Council and Mayor Del Jurney Thursday night, the Economic Development Committee said Roswell will have a workforce need for 443 employees, including both skilled and general laborers, over the next 12 months. The EDC discussed local expansions occurring in the community responsible for creating this workforce need, the challenges and opportunities Roswell faces, as well as

EDC’s goals for the upcoming year. “We always talk about this in the office. Everybody wants to see that big win, the 200 jobs coming in; if we can’t fill that 443 employees it does us no good to bring in a brand new company that needs to fill 200 jobs. So that’s why we harp so heavily on the retension and extension side, taking care of our locals,” said Jessica Armendariz, EDC project manager. See WORKERS, Page A2


A2 Friday, August 26, 2011

GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Census: NM families changing

Single-vehicle accident

Emily Russo Miller Photo

A 19-year-old female driver lost control of her vehicle around 9:40 a.m., Thursday, on US285, and flipped her 2004 Pontiac Grand Am across the highway median and two lanes of traffic. New Mexico Police Officer Buddy Haider said the cause of the crash is unknown, but alcohol and drugs were not a factor. The driver, who was the sole occupant of the car, was wearing her seatbelt. She complained of minor back and neck injuries, and was transported to an area hospital by ambulance for observation.

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — New U.S. Census Bureau figures show the traditional definition of a family in New Mexico is changing, and some social advocacy groups are pointing to recent economic pressures as one possible reason. The Census Bureau on Thursday released a detailed breakdown of the state’s population based on age, sex and race along with details about the more than 791,000 households that were counted. It’s clear the number of households across New Mexico grew as the population expanded to more than 2 million over the past decade, but what’s different is the makeup of those households. The number of families headed by women with no husband present grew nearly five times faster over the past decade than the number of families that included a married couple, according to the figures. Still, married couples made up about 45 percent of households. That’s about 5 percent less than a decade ago. Nonfamily households also increased by nearly 29 percent from 2000 to 2010, while the number of family households saw an 11 percent jump. So what changed over the past decade?

Workers

Continued from Page A1

Ten local companies will be expanding their operations within the next 12 months. Each of these plans to increase the number of employees. The greatest projection of employees will come from Dean Baldwin Aircraft Painting, currently employing 185 workers. The company plans to increase its workforce to between 265 and 285. Aersale will also see a considerable rise in employees, projecting an increase from 116 to 300. The company has an immediate need for 60 airframe and powerplant mechanics. This need will receive significant help due to a change in the certification

Dominic Larez, 17, is wanted for the Aug. 7 shooting of Arthur Baca, 23. The incident occurred in the 300 block of East Summit Street. Larez is described as 5 feet, 8 inches tall, 160 pounds, with black hair and brown eyes. Anyone with information on Larez’s whereabouts should call Crime Stoppers at 1-888-594 TIPS (8477). Callers remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

Perps pirate Red Cross donations jar Police were called to Long John Silver’s, 1802 S. Main St., Wednesday, after two subjects stole the “tip jar” placed on the counter to accept donations for the American Red Cross.

Agency assist

Police were called to the 300 block of East Hammond Street, Wednesday, by the U.S. Probation Service after officers found a

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Burglary

Police were dispatched to the 2000 block of South Missouri Avenue, Wednesday, where subjects gained entry to the home through an unlocked door and

removed an Xbox 360, five games and a tool box containing tools. Missing items were valued at $460. Anyone having information on these or any other crimes should contact Crime Stoppers, 888594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward.

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Vaporous gas spewed and hissed from the pipeline for about a half an hour after it was damaged at 9:48 a.m., prompting worries that it could explode if there were a source of ignition and air. Natural gas doesn’t explode on its own. Roswell Police Department evacuated about 20 homes within a four-block radius, including portions of East Jef ferson, East Reed and East McGaffey streets and South Garden Avenue. They also evacuated Roswell Head Start Center 2, Roswell Humane Society and Roswell Animal Control, all located on East

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Advocacy groups that help low-income families, the homeless and others are grappling with that very question, but some experts say recent economic turmoil could be partly to blame. Before Thursday, Kim Posich, executive director of the New Mexico Center on Law and Poverty, said he had only anecdotal evidence that the makeup of New Mexico’s families was changing. “We are seeing it,” he said. “The economic pressures of not being able to make it, of being out of work, of not being able to make the house payment, of losing homes, of having to move — all the different ways that people are dealing with the kinds of financial pressures that this recession has added on top of what they already face are breaking families up.” He pointed to a case one of his staff members was working on just the other day. A man who had been working in the dairies in New Mexico all of his life was injured on the job. His wife was working three jobs to make up for the lost income. They had children and they were slowly seeing their assets being eaten away. The recession hit, the wife lost her supplemental period for A&P mechanics at Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell. Dr. John Madden, ENMU-R president, said that the curriculum has a 40-hour a week class schedule, allowing students to complete the requirements for a Certificate of Completion in only 14.5 months. The class is full for the first time in 10 years, and there is a waiting list to get in, he said. Bob Darnell, EDC executive director noted, “We have a great workforce but I don’t think they know about the opportunities out there. There are about 900 jobs going back into Roswell and Chaves County, these are listed jobs within the workforce. We have 2,000 people unemployed and 1,000 jobs. There is a disconnect somewhere, so we

McGaffey Street. Animals were not evacuated. Several spa stores and Sun Country Food Market and Fina gas station were also evacuated. The evacuation was lifted within the hour, Graham said. Permanent repairs on the gas pipeline were completed by day’s end, according to New Mexico Gas Company spokeswoman Monica Hussey. Roswell and Chaves County emergency manager Teresa Barncastle said the city was well prepared for the gas leak, and responded properly and in accordance with the Chaves County Emergency Operations Plan. That plan, which outlines communication and evacuation orders as well as a chain of command, was established in

Roswell Daily Record

jobs and the couple eventually divorced, Posich said. A “serious strain” is what Posich said some families are facing. The census numbers reflect only what has already happened, so some advocates are worried that many New Mexicans are still scrambling as the economy sputters along. The census figures also show owner -occupied homes numbered more than a half-million in 2010, an increase of about 14 percent over the past decade. Meanwhile, the number of occupied rental units grew by more than one-fifth during the same period. What’s not included is the number of people who have had their homes foreclosed in recent years or those who have been forced to move because their rental properties were turned over to banks. Gov. Susana Martinez announced earlier this month that she would use leftover federal stimulus money to help low-income families buy clothing for their school age children. She also wants lawmakers to address a lack of funding for New Mexico’s supplemental food stamp program during the upcoming special session.

need to do a better job of mentioning these. Not all of these are fantastic jobs or high-paying jobs, but many of them are skilled jobs that need to be filled by local individuals.” Roswell’s abundant water supply, industrial park expansion, and transportation expansion were discussed as the leading opportunities for the city. Jurney particularly emphasized the importance of the city’s water supply, stating Roswell needs to “utilize the water we have for economic development. Talking about the assets of this community, we know we’ve got great skies, we’ve got low cost of living, we’ve got good people, we’ve got an air center, you guys, we got water, too.”

jbergman@roswell-record.com

the 1990s and is updated each year. New Mexico State Police, Chaves County Sheriff’s Of fice, Roswell Police Department and Roswell Fire Department all responded to the scene. Hussey said it was unknown how much gas leaked during the incident, and that no customers lost gas service. She noted natural gas leaks have occurred in Roswell before, usually as a result of construction and excavation activity. “We are trained to respond to that,” Hussey said. New Mexico Gas Company serves about 15,000 people in the greater Roswell area. emiller@roswell-record.com

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Roswell Daily Record

Irene

Continued from Page A1

Agency said damages could exceed most previous storms because so many people live along the East Coast and property values are high. “We’ve got a lot more people that are potentially in the path of this stor m,” FEMA Director Craig Fugate said in an interview with The Associated Press. “This is one of the largest populations that will be

Bitter

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rain since the beginning of the year, drastically low compared to its usual lush 12 inches of rainfall per year, Sanchez said. “It is the driest year so far, and it shows in the wetlands,” Sanchez said. “I haven't seen any documentation of the wetlands being this dry in the past.” The first seven months of 2011 have been the driest start to any year on record for New Mexico, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric’s National Weather Service Of fice, and through August, about 47 percent of the state remains in exceptional drought. The

Madsen

Continued from Page A1

Jeannie Madsen was placed on paid administrative leave the same day she was arrested. Eric Madsen was placed on paid leave the following day. In February, city officials confirmed that Eric Madsen had been fired. Since then, Jeannie Madsen returned to the RPD, working in the Dispatch Center.

Jet

Continued from Page A1

tinez never used it. The jet was sold through a broker, who will receive a commission of 2 percent of the purchase price — $50,200. Since Martinez took

Esperanza Continued from Page A1

tors for the Esperanza House. Believing in the Esperanza House and its mission, Tur ner left the sheriff’s office in 1996 and started at Esperanza House as a forensic interviewer. He became director eight months later. In Turner’s experience as a detective, the process of interviewing an abuse victim was not well-geared toward children. A child was subject to multiple interviews, first being brought to Turner’s office

S uppo rt the U n i t e d Wa y

impacted by one storm at one time.” Irene is massive, with tropical-force winds extending almost twice as far as normal, about the same size as Katrina, which devastated New Orleans in 2005. The governors of North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New York and New Jersey declared emergencies to free up resources, and authorities all the way to New England urged residents in low-lying areas to gather supplies and learn the way to a safe statewide average precipitation has only been 42 percent of normal through July 2011. Sanchez says the lack of monsoons has also taken its toll of the refuge, since they usually help replenish the wetlands to full capacity. “We really depend on the monsoon season to fill up those wetlands,” he said. “The wetlands are also fed by spring water, but you only have so much spring flow coming into the wetland areas. Therefore with the extreme heat and evaporation, we lose a lot of that water to evaporation, so we can’t really fill a wetland and provide for plants and other animals that we normally do.” The biggest threat of the No information is available about the basis upon which the trial was vacated, beyond the legal definition. To vacate a court order or judgment means to cancel it or render it null and void. According to the website New Mexico Case Lookup, an order was filed late Wednesday, suspending criminal proceedings with the defendant who has been accepted into the PreProsecution Diversion Program. office in January, the jet remained grounded except for routine maintenance. With the jet’s sale, New Mexico will have two planes in its fleet available for travel by government of ficials: a 2006 Beechcraft King Air and a 1983 Gulfstream Turbo Commander, both five-seat for investigation. Afterwards, the New Mexico Children Youth and Families Department would do its own investigation. “A child was coming to a government building and was interviewed by someone not professionally trained to interview children. The child had to tell their story over and over again,” Turner says. Now, children are referred to Esperanza House by the CYFD or law enforcement, and forensic interviews are conducted. These interviews help to serve the needs of all the agencies involved in the

GENERAL

location. Irene is expected to come ashore Saturday in North Carolina with 115 mph winds and a storm surge of 5 to 10 feet. It could dump a foot of rain, with as much as 15 inches falling in some places along the coast and around Chesapeake Bay. With heavy rain and storm surge predicted for the nation’s capital, organizers postponed Sunday’s dedication of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial on the National Mall. Scientists predict Irene will then chug up the coast.

Some forecasts showed it taking dead aim at New York City, with its eye passing over Brooklyn and Manhattan before weakening and trudging through New England. If the storm strikes New York, it will probably be a Category 1 or 2, depending on its exact track, hurricane specialist John Cangialosi said. Hurricanes are rare in the Northeast because the region’s cooler seas tend to weaken stor ms as they approach, and they have to take a narrow track to

dry weather? Loss of endangered species that the refuge houses, like the Pecos puzzle sunflower, which is protected by the Endangered Species Act. “That species requires a wet zone — really moist soil — and without water we don’t have that zone, that wet zone, for those species to actually come up and provide feed for the pollen,” he said. Also threatened are the thousands of migratory birds, including sandhill cranes and waterfowl, that stop at the refuge each fall to roost. Sandhill cranes, which begin to trickle into the refuge now, but peak in numbers as high as 28,000 in late October, require two to five inches of water to stand in as

they roost to protect themselves from ground predators. “If we don’t have enough water in the wetlands, there’s going to be less opportunity for birds to feed and actually stay here,” he said. “And they’ll have to migrate farther south where there’s a better food source for them.” Fish that live in the wetlands become stranded in puddles when water levels are down, Sanchez said, though predatory birds benefit from that. “In some cases we’ll salvage those fish and move them to other areas, and sometimes, we don’t get there in time,” he said. “It’s actually a natural thing where waiting birds, like herons, will come in

The purpose of the PreProsecution Diversion Act [31-16A-1 to 31-16-A-8 NMSA] is to remove people from the criminal justice system who are amenable to rehabilitation and unlikely to commit future offenses. The defendant, Jeannie Madsen, will be placed on probation. If she fails to comply with the ter ms of probation, the charges of battery on a household member could be filed against her a second time.

The Diversion program is designed to provide services to assist the individual in avoiding future criminal activity and to conserve community and criminal justice resources. As of Monday’s pre-trial hearing, defense attorney S. Douglas Jones Witt and Special Prosecutor Scot Key were still bargaining over the terms of the agreement. Witt said, then, there were still three key points on the table: The right to carry firear m; going to South

turboprops. The Cessna features seven leather seats in the main cabin. The jet can fly at more than 450 mph and go from Santa Fe to Hobbs in about 45 minutes, a trip that can take more than five hours by car. Martinez said the state’s twin-engine King

Air can reach Hobbs in a little more than an hour and it costs half as much to operate as the jet. It’s estimated the state will save nearly $500,000 a year it would have spent on fuel and maintenance for the jet. Martinez said the jet wasn’t practical in New Mexico because it was

investigation by conducting one interview and lessening the trauma on the child. “A really good interview makes a criminal case better. It allows us to seek the truth of what happened and potentially take a criminal off the street,” Airhart says. Young persons ranging in age from 3 to 18 are interviewed during this stage, although Airhart says they will interview those who are older if they have developmental delays that would benefit from this type of environment. Ninety percent of the forensic interviews conducted at the

Esperanza House are with sexual abuse victims, Turner says. These victims also have a specific program focused towards them entitled The Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner project. Highly trained nurses examine victims and collect and document evidence of sexual assault. These nurses will also provide expert testimony for a case, if need be. As opposed to a nurse in the emergency room whose priority is often a patient in a life-or -death situation, Turner says victims who go through the SANE program are seen right away, and at

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Friday, August 26, 2011 strike New York without first hitting other parts of the coast and weakening there. Still, strong storms have been known to unleash serious damage in an urban environment already surrounded by water. A September 1821 hurricane raised tides by 13 feet in an hour and flooded all of Manhattan south of Canal Street — an area that now includes the nation’s financial capital. An infamous 1938 storm dubbed the Long Island Express came ashore about and feed on them.” Amphibians, frogs and toads will have a difficult time finding a place to breed and lay their eggs. “Without any rainstorms, that’s going to be minimal this year unless we get a stor m come through,” Sanchez said. And even fewer dragonflies are expected to arrive, though plenty will, at the upcoming Dragonfly Festival the refuge hosts each September. Sanchez says that the refuge does not have the ability to re-route water from the Pecos River to the wetlands, and there’s not enough water to impound from spring flows to the wetlands. Typically, Sanchez says he’ll move water from one unit to the New Mexico Correctional Center; and face-to-face meetings between husband and wife. Magistrate Judge Martha M. Proctor from Carrizozo was unavailable to clarify if an agreement had been reached on these three points and if so what the terms were. The Daily Record attempted to call the special prosecutor in Las Cruces and was informed that he was in court. When asked how he could be in designed for long-distance travel rather than short trips within the state. Felland, 72, is chairman of the board of Dicom Corp., a printing and publishing company based in Madison, Wis. The couple plan to use the jet for personal travel, including visiting children their own convenience by a nurse whose focus is entirely on them. A key component to the SANE project is victim advocates, who are specifically trained and focus on any additional needs of the victim. They set up counseling, keep follow-up appointments with a medical provider, and deal with needs associated with lack of shelter and lack of transportation. The SANE program is largely supported by the United Way. An agency of the United Way for the larger part of its 20 years in service, Esperanza House has

A3

75 miles east of the city and then hit New England, killing 700 people and leaving 63,000 homeless. The Navy ordered many of its ships at Norfolk Naval Station out to sea to wait out the storm, including the aircraft carrier USS Dwight Eisenhower, as well as destroyers and submarines. In a normal hurricane, tropical storm-force winds extend about 150 miles from the eye. Irene’s winds extend nearly 250 miles. next to ensure there’s enough water in each wetland unit. There will be enough water “for when the shore birds come,” though, he noted. The last rainfall that produced more than one inch of water occurred on Oct. 23 last year. All Sanchez can do, he says, is cross his fingers and hope for rain. “We usually require a good downpour to actually hold water,” he said. “A rainstorm that produces more than one inch is something that we hope for in these wetlands.” emiller@roswell-record.com

court if the Roswell trial, which he was supposed to attend, had been vacated, the Record was forwarded to voice mail. Witt, likewise, was unavailable to comment. The Roswell Police Department was unwilling to discuss what was referred to as a “personnel matter.” Sources were unwilling to say if Jeannie Madsen will be reinstated as detective or remain in dispatch. j.palmer@roswell-record.com

and grandchildren in Minnesota, Kansas and Washington state. The plane will be based in Anchorage. He has owned a singleengine turboprop plane but said his wife didn’t like using it over the Gulf of Alaska. established a very positive relationship with the United Way, says Turner. “The community has been very good to us through its United Way donations,” he says. Contributions from the United Way make up 20 percent of Esperanza House’s budget. The organization lost crucial funding from the state level due to the current economic climate. “That’s where United Way steps in. They are the ones that keep us going, that allow us to keep our doors open.” jbergman@roswell-record.com


Texas gets different rules than New Mexico A4 Friday, August 26, 2011

OPINION

SANTA FE — Texas has done it to us again. The state has enjoyed bullying us ever since it came into existence. This time it involves playing by different rules for the collection on drought insurance. Last year, as the effects of drought became very obvious, the U.S. Department of Agriculture began touting a new drought insurance policy. Ranchers in New Mexico and Texas jumped at the opportunity. Sure enough, both states are experiencing the worst droughts in recorded history. Texas ranchers have received $65 million in payments. New Mexico ranchers have received $2,000 for the $1.5 million they paid in premiums. The Agriculture Department says New Mexico’s problem is that pinons, junipers, cactus and snake weed that still are living count against us even though cows don’t eat them. So in Texas, the lack of rainfall qualifies ranchers for tens of millions in drought payments, while

EDITORIAL

JAY MILLER

INSIDE THE CAPITOL

New Mexico ranchers qualify for a pittance. The difference seems to be that New Mexico ranchers insured themselves against a decline in vegetation greenness. It wasn’t drought insurance. Except New Mexico ranchers insist it was called drought insurance when they bought it. On the surface, this may appear to be ineptness on the part of the U.S. Agriculture Department. And some of that likely is involved. But it also has a lot to do with Texas having a congressional delegation many times the size of New Mexico’s delegation. With 32 House members and

Roswell Daily Record

two senators, Texas can pound the Agriculture Department for a favorable interpretation of the rules. With three House members and two senators, New Mexico is in a considerably weaker position. We’ve also talked about New Mexico’s seniority problem after the retirement of Sen. Pete Domenici and the resignation of all three House members in order to vie for his seat. Sen. Jeff Bingaman and his 29 years of experience is all we have left. The combined experience of the other four members of our delegation hardly totals 10 years. That leaves Bingaman to fight the fight. Bingaman is chairman of the Senate Energy Committee, but in this situation it doesn’t carry the clout of former Rep. Joe Skeen who as chairman of the House Appropriations Committee’s subcommittee on Agriculture, could promise to take a close look at the Agriculture Department’s budget. Anyway, we are accustomed to

getting knocked around by Texas. In the matter of Rio Grande water, New Mexico’s allotment always has been unfairly low. New Mexico farmers complain about having to conserve every drop of water they can, while Texas farmers flood their crops to the point water runs over the roads. This may be a long, sad story. Scientists tell us we could be in for a 30 to 40 year mega-drought and Texas isn’t going to do anything to help its poor New Mexico neighbor despite Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s “miracle economy” and his close connection with the Almighty. Texas began its efforts to dominate New Mexico back in 1841, when it invaded us from the east. Fortunately they never had seen mountains so they crumbled after hitting Anton Chico. They were marched barefoot to Mexico City. The next invasion was from the south in 1862. The Texans did well as long as they stuck to the Rio Grande. But when they veered

east at Santa Fe to take the supply depot at Fort Union, they ran into mountains again. After we destroyed their supplies and killed their mules, we lent them shovels to bury their dead and sent them packing back down the Rio Grande. That experience convinced Texans they weren’t fighters so they resorted to being politicians. When New Mexico finally became a state, Texas required that we accept an incorrect boundary survey, which gave Texas an extra half-million acres. A few years ago, then-Land Commissioner Patrick Lyons challenged the Texas land commissioner to a quick-draw contest with the stakes supposedly being that disputed 500,000 acres. Lyons says the Texan cheated. (Write to Jay Miller at 3 La Tusa, Santa Fe, NM 87505; by fax at 984-0982; or by e-mail at insidethecapitol@hotmail.com)

National Opinion Health care reform

If America were really on board with the health care reform act passed by Congress, state government officials around the country would be busily working on the thousands of details necessary to implement the landmark piece of legislation. They would be comparing notes with their peers in other states on the nuances of this and that interpretation of the mammoth bill. They would be deeply engaged with various stake-holder groups. Instead, the country seems to be in a state of limbo, while lawsuits challenging the heart of the law work their way toward an anticipated ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court. Five Republican governors and one Democratic governor signed laws making it illegal to mandate anyone within their borders to purchase health insurance, according to stateline.org. The constitutionality of that requirement is the key legal issue headed for the nation’s top court. Only 10 states actually have passed laws to create the exchanges, according to stateline.org. The scanty groundwork and the minimal networking do not inspire confidence. If the law is declared constitutional, most states will be forced to do a lot of catch-up. Guest Editorial Lincoln (Neb.) Journal Star

Millions missing in Afghanistan

What’s $360 million? In the context of the U.S. military budget, maybe it’s not much. For the Taliban, it’s a windfall. The Associated Press reported recently that $360 million in American money meant to support reconstruction in Afghanistan was lost to “the Taliban, criminals and power brokers with ties to both.” It was the U.S. military itself that determined the money had been lost. The Taliban, the brutal, reactionary insurgent movement that’s fighting Americans to reclaim control of Afghanistan, is commonly perceived as a ragtag band of zealots not unfamiliar with cave living. Just an extra million dollars could help it greatly. Millions and millions of dollars could promise success in multiple offensive operations. That the U.S. inadvertently gave our enemy such financial assistance is a sign of an administrative breakdown on an infuriating scale. And it’s hardly the first instance of fundmanagement ineptitude in Middle East war zones. The image of wayward shrinkwrapped cart loads of cash will be an enduring symbol of American folly in Iraq. There’s still $6.6 billion of American money unaccounted for in that country. Members of Congress try to outdo each other denouncing wasteful spending on domestic programs, yet many billions of dollars have slipped from their control in a land full of enemies. They must face the families of fallen service members with the knowledge that American money may well have helped support attacks against Americans. Guest Editorial Loveland (Colo.) Reporter-Herald

DEAR DR. GOTT: My 30year-old son is a hypochondriac — healthy and strong, but always taking a special supplement or treatment for something. He recently went on a candida diet just when there was a series of family events and a lot of meals out of the home. He just wanted his candida foods. It was so uncomfortable for the hostesses and restaurants we visited. Is this something to be concerned about? DEAR READER: Candida diets are designed to focus on healing yeast infections from the inside out, strengthen the immune system and eliminate Candida albicans overgrowth from one’s system. This diet recognizes that some symp-

Obama smuggling guns and registering yours President Barack Obama wants you to believe that America’s Founding Fathers were in error when they gave citizens the right to bear arms. The Obama administration and even its Mexican counterpart have manipulated public opinion to believe that the cartel drug wars are being fueled largely by American guns. In support of that spin, they are trying to impose a new regulation that requires licensed firearms dealers in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California to report to the federal government whenever someone buys from them more than one

Doonesbury

ASK DR. GOTT UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

toms of yeast infection can be cleared rather quickly, while the process of eliminating all Candida albicans cells from the body can take months and may be followed by a lifetime of following this diet. There are hundreds of versions of this new diet available on the Internet, some reported as not being worth the time even to consider. Users are

CHUCK NORRIS

SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

semiautomatic rifle with certain characteristics. Obama’s Department of Justice essentially is amending the Second Amendment by changing the rules for gun sales in border states. While working under the guise of stopping illegal contraband and fighting drug cartels, the

cautioned about being wary of plans that offer a miracle and are too good to be true because they really are. There are six- and seven-step programs, some for women and others for men. Some come with lifetime updates; others are reported to contain faulty information. I recommend that your son eat healthful, balanced meals, exercise, get adequate rest, and forget this so-called cure. If he truly is a hypochondriac, he may benefit from counseling. DEAR DR. GOTT: Could you please write about normal pressure hydrocephalus? I heard from a colleague that his mother, diagnosed with dementia, incontinence and

White House in reality is further imposing its gun control agenda on the American public through back-door rulemaking. This is just one more example of the feds exceeding their powers and avoiding congressional permission. It is also another showing of complete disregard for the Constitution. Based upon those illegalities, Wayne LaPierre — my friend and the CEO of the National Rifle Association — disclosed on Fox News recently that the NRA filed a lawsuit against the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to issue an injunction

weak knees, was instead diagnosed with this. She went to the Mayo Clinic and had a shunt put in her head to relieve the pressure on her brain. Subsequently, all the negative symptoms were alleviated, and she could resume fairly normal independent living. The Internet says this condition is often misidentified as dementia. What say you? DEAR READER: Nor mal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is defined as an abnor mal increase in cerebrospinal fluid in the cavities of the brain. The condition occurs because the brain does not reabsorb the fluid, which normally cirSee GOTT, Page A5

barring enforcement of the rule. And with NRA support, the U.S. House has voted to withhold funding for the enforcement of the new regulation. As LaPierre wrote in his weekly commentary last week, “the cartels run a $40 billion enterprise ... but the (Obama) administration wants the public to believe that it’s going to disarm cartels with a form? Who is the president kidding?” Doesn’t Obama know that restricting the right to bear arms primarily ties the hands

25 YEARS AGO

See NORRIS, Page A5

Aug. 26, 1986 • The fourth annual St. Mary’s Charity Invitational will be named this year for Esther Kelly of East Grand Plains — marking the first time the board of directors of St. Mary’s Regional Health Center has selected a woman for the honor. A mother of four, grandmother of 11 and the widow of oilman and Kennedy administration appointee John M. Kelly, Mrs. Kelly is being honored for her role as community benefactor and also for her lifelong role as a traditional woman whose life has centered on her family. Mrs. Kelly has a record of commitment to her community that goes back many years. She was a founding member of the St. Peter Catholic School ParentTeacher Association and also the St. Peter Catholic Church Auxiliary and was for many years an active member of the American Association of University Women.


OPINION II

Roswell Daily Record

LETTERS

The reason for the season

Dear Editor: I am writing in response to the insert in the Roswell Daily Record of the 2011-2012 RISD school calendar. To my astonishment for the time period of Dec. 23, 2011, through Jan. 6, 2012, was the term “Winter Break” instead of “Christmas Break.” You know Jesus is the reason for the season! Same goes for April 6, 2012, was the term “Spring Holiday” instead of “Good Friday”— again having to do with Jesus! I called the RISD administration office and asked why they had changed Christmas to winter break and Good Friday to spring holiday even though I knew the answer. An associate of RISD reported that they were being “politically correct,” that they had kept all the national holidays like Thanksgiving the same (instead of using the term Fall Holiday). I guess RISD doesn’t consider Christmas and Good Friday national holidays. The RISD associate also mentioned the ACLU (avoiding lawsuits) as a factor. Fear of lawyers should not be a cause to change our beliefs. Regar dless of what people/politicians believe, the USA is a Christian nation “In God We Trust.” Being “politically correct” is going to destroy our country and I am alarmed that the superintendent and the Roswell School Board allowed these changes to take place. What is next? The Pledge of Allegiance, taking “under God” out of what the kids recited every

Norris

Continued from Page A4

of good guys while the bad guys purchase them from a host of illegal sources? And what part of “shall not be infringed” in the Second Amendment do the feds not understand? Attorney General Eric Holder said the Justice Department will “vigorously oppose” the NRA lawsuit. The fact is, as LaPierre points out, that cartels get their machine guns, grenades, missile launchers and tanks from Central America, South America, Russia, China, international black markets and defectors of the Mexican army. State Department cables, released by WikiLeaks, support that fact. On the one hand, Fox News reported that in 2009-10, more than 20,000 guns recovered in Mexico came from U.S. manufacturers. On the other hand, 75 percent of guns submitted to the U.S. could not be traced to a licensed gun store. But there is one place to which more than 2,000 crime guns could be traced: the federal government. The winner of the “Largest American Supplier of Guns to Mexico” award is actually the Obama administration, via Operation Fast and Furious — a botched, foiled and disastrous sting operation by the ATF’s Phoenix division to uncover a large network of cartellinked gunrunners. During 2009-11, through Operation Fast and Furious, the ATF facilitated the sale of 2,020 firearms to suspected smugglers over 15 months! Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa, ranking Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Rep. Darrell Issa, RCalif., who is chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, have been researching information on the Fast and Furious program for months. Grassley and Issa recently blew the whistle that to-date, “hundreds of these weapons have already been recovered at crime scenes in Mexico.” (Your tax dollars hard at work!) Among the tragic consequences was the murder of U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry, gunned down in the Ari-

Gott

Continued from Page A4

culates around the brain and spinal cord. This causes local pressure and gradual enlargement of the ventricles of the brain. It is a subtle pressure and slow to develop, so the pressure down in the spinal cord, where it is measured during a lumbar puncture/spinal tap, is normal, hence the words “normal pressure.” Causes for this to occur include head trauma, infection, a subarachnoid hemorrhage, tumor, or as a result of surgery. NPH can also occur without any of these factors being the cause. CT, spinal tap, intracranial pressure monitoring and neuropsychological testing will also rule out other conditions and assist a physician in making a proper diagnosis. Treatment at this stage, as you discovered, involves the placement of a shunt in the brain to drain excess fluid into the abdomen, where it is absorbed.

morning. I give the RISD an F+ and will be voting “No!” for the bond on Aug. 30 in protest. The taxes won’t go up if it passes (so they say), but no one mentions property taxes may go down if the bond fails, meaning change in our pocket not change in calendars. Come on Roswell, stand up for your beliefs in our All America city, not “politically correct” city. Sincerely, Rebecca Jones Roswell

Deficit reduction

Dear Editor: All our senators and congressmen are presently in their home states and districts talking about the deficit and plans to reduce Medicare, Social Security and military spending. But no one, in either party, has suggested that the president, senators, congressmen and staff take a 5 percent or 10 percent reduction in their pay to help the poor, Social Security or the military. Instead the president tours in a million-dollar coach and the congressmen and senators get a free flight to their home district to discuss the deficit reduction plan, plus a free flight back to D.C. to vote on their plan or Obama's plan that he will introduce after Labor Day. How lucky for the people who are going to suf fer the reduction in their paydays. James Perkowski Roswell zona desert last December. Two AK-47 semiautomatic rifles found at the scene were traced directly to the Fast and Furious sting. As far as the Obama administration’s culpability goes, The Washington Times reported that Sen. John Cor nyn, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, “noted that Acting ATF Director Kenneth Melson told congressional investigators the agency’s senior leadership would have preferred to cooperate more with the congressional investigation of the operation, but Justice Department officials directed ATF not to respond and took full control of replying to briefing and document requests from Congress.” To add insult to injury, the ATF recently promoted three key Operation Fast and Furious supervisors, who allowed firearms to be illegally trafficked across the U.S. border into Mexico, to new management jobs in Washington! The truth is that the Obama administration is involved right now in a monumental cover-up regarding its criminally handing over thousands of firearms to gunrunners and smugglers. And to duck and dodge its responsibility for those illegalities by now coming across as the vanguard of gun control by cracking down on the sale of two guns to an American at one time is preposterous hypocrisy. Moreover, to unilaterally mandate this new federal rule so close to the Fast and Furious debacle is more than coincidental, especially in light of the fact that the administration tabled the proposed regulation in January because it was “not an emergency.” The only thing that has changed is the embarrassing revelation of the ATF disaster. The Obama administration is trying to not only eliminate our Second Amendment rights but also demonize good, law-abiding American gun dealers and citizens in California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. It is not only smuggling its guns but also trying to take ours. And I, for one, am not going to sit back and just watch it happen. God, guns and guts made America. Let’s keep all three. © 2011 Chuck Norris Symptoms of NPH commonly worsen over time without treatment. Early diagnosis with the placement of a shunt will allow an individual to lead a relatively normal life. The symptoms can be difficult for a doctor to sort through, as some mimic dementia, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases. Because of this, NPH was often misdiagnosed and could have remained untreated; however, in September 2005 an international team of scientists developed guidelines that have helped physicians rule out other disorders with similar symptoms and properly diagnose NPH. Ongoing research focuses on improving diagnostic techniques, discovering improved treatments and prevention. Dr. Peter H. Gott is a retired physician and the author of several books, including “Live Longer, Live Better,” “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Diet” and “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Cookbook,” which are available at most bookstores or online. His website is www.AskDrGottMD.com.

Friday, August 26, 2011

A5


A6 Friday, August 26, 2011

LOCAL

Roswell: Focal point of recently published novel Neosho, MO - Robert M. Roberts didn’t realize when he visited Roswell, that the book he was writing would begin to take on “a life of its own.” After visiting the UFO Museum, I began to formulate some new ideas that took the storyline of my novel down a new path. His recently published thriller, entitled “The Monkey Toy,” presents a different perspective of the mystery surround-

ing the 1947 Roswell incident. The story begins during the Korean War, when a Navy pilot collides with an unknown aircraft. A deadly component from the crash lands on a remote island beach, and remains there until it is discovered decades later. The story rapidly progresses to present day, when U.S. Navy sailor Randy Farren finds the round, rose-colored

object on an uninhabited Korean island, and begins experiencing headaches, hallucinations, and nightmares. This thriller follows the journey of the mysterious object, and explores the effects it has on everyone who tries to possess it. Insanity, murder, government conspiracies, and hints of humor and romance are all included in this race against time,

Beginning the 54th year of instruction, ENMU-R kicked off the fall semester with an in-service meeting for staf f and faculty on Aug. 19. A number of employees were recognized for their dedication and years of service. Bob Cates, president of the ENMU-R Foundation, presented the 2011 Kosa Merit Awards to Darlene Klassen, mathematics instructor and Jesse Davis, emergency medical services instructor. The award, instituted by the Kosa family in 1970, recognizes academic and vocational faculty for excellence in teaching and service to the institution. Chosen by their peers, the honorees receive an engraved plaque and a stipend of $300. Several employees were also recognized with certificates and pins for their years of service. • Five years: Mary Weber, administrative assistant III, special services; Angie Wellman Bersane,

academic advisor; ChrisAnne Bell, administrative assistant III, emergency medical services; Vanessa Hendrix, cashier, business office; Jesse Davis, emergency medical services instructor; Craig Collins, foundation coordinator; Tracy Steenholdt, dual credit coordinator; Christopher Meeks, student development coordinator; Caleb Cain, heating, ventilation, air conditioning, refrigeration technology instructor; Dallas Jeffers-Pollei, humanities and theatre instructor; Rodney Ray, emergency medical services instructor and paramedic coordinator • Ten years: Peter Stover, special services deputy director; Rhonda Crocker, institutional research assistant; Val Hays, library assistant IV; Toni Gomez, assistant, accounts receivable; Bibian Ponce, custodian; William Suggs, director, Center for Workforce and Community Development; Charles Kindley, network administrator; Lor-

raine Miller, computer applications and support instructor; David Partain, aviation maintenance technology instructor; Teresa Rhodes, engineering and design technology and industrial engineering technology instructor; Hilda Pacheco-Peeples, assistant director, adult basic education

ENMU-R employees recognized

• Fifteen years: Cheryl Vineyard, medical assisting instructor and director of medical assisting, medical coding, phlebotomy and allied health education • Twenty years: Johnny Gonzales, custodian; M. Elaine Espinosa-Sims, testing services director

• Twenty-five years: Guadalupe Gonzales, carpenter; Frances Dubiel, facilities coordinator; Raymond Torrez, automotive technology instructor • Thirty years: Mary Salyards, adult basic education program assistant

After school program accepting enrollment forms for 2011-2012 Family Resource and Referral’s after school program is currently accepting enrollment forms for the 2011-2012 after achool program. The program is offered at Berrendo, Del Norte, El Capitan, Military Heights, Missouri Avenue, Monterrey, Nancy Lopez, Sunset, Valley View, and Wash-

ington Avenue Elementary schools. It is open to all children ages 5 – 12 and begins when school is dismissed and remains open until 5:30 p.m. each school day. The after school program is licensed by the State of N.M. and provides children with nutritious snacks as well as

fun-filled activities, games, music, art and crafts, and time for homework and relaxing. Fullday programs are offered on many school holidays and teacher development days. For more information please call Family Resource and Referral, Inc. at 623-9438.

Gov. Martinez appoints Roswell man to boards and commissions SANTA FE - Gov. Susana Martinez announced today that she has made appointments to the State Board of Licensure for Professional Engineers and Professional Surveyors, the New Mexico Economic Partnership, the State Workforce Development Board, the New Mexico Athletic Commission, the Gaming Control Board, the Com-

mission for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Persons, the New Mexico Medical Board, and the Municipal Boundary Commission. Gov. Martinez has appointed Joel M. Carson III of Roswell to the New Mexico Economic Partnership. Carson has served as the general counsel for Mack Energy Corporation in Artesia since 2008. Previously,

ROSWELL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The Roswell Chamber of Commerce wants to welcome the newest board of directors. Thank you for serving, we are so excited SUPPORT ROSWELL

RECYCLE

to have you on our team. • Varney Brandt • Xcel Energy • Larry Hobson • Hobson Farms

Carson was a partner with Hinkle, Hensley, Shanor & Martin L.L.P. in Roswell. He also served for two years as a law clerk in the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. Carson holds a B.B.A. from Texas Tech University and a J.D. from the University of New Mexico School of Law.

• Rick Spragins • Comfort Keepers • Josh Ragsdale • Pecos Flavors Winery

as the fate of civilization hangs in the balance. “The city of Roswell,” says Roberts, “has a uniqueness and character that reminds me of the town where I grew up.” A native of Joplin, Mo., Roberts served in the United States Navy and worked as an international salesman which took him to many countries around the world. He drew upon these experiences to create

Roswell Daily Record

storylines and add realism to his book. He is currently working on his next novel, and is in the planning stages of several other books ideas. The Monkey Toy is now available for purchase in paperback format at Amazon.com. The Kindle version will be available soon. In the coming weeks, The Monkey T oy will be available throughout the world to thousands of

online and of fline bookstores and retailers, through their book distributors. You may also be interested in the following links: Author Website: robertsnovels.com Author Blog: http:// robertsnovels.blogspot.com Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/robert mroberts

Billy the Kid and Pat Garrett, living history performance LAS CRUCES- There will be a live, Billy the Kid and Pat Garrett living history performance, Aug. 27, from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m at the N.M. Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum. For more information call 522-4100 PORTALES- The ENMU department of music will present a recital of chamber music for French horn, soprano and piano at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 28, in Buchanan Hall in the music building on the Portales campus. The recital is free and open to the public. For more infor mation, call Kathi Fraze at 562-2377.

PORTALES- The ENMU department of music in Portales is hosting open auditions for the fall musical production of “Into the Woods.” Auditions will be on Tuesday, Aug. 30, beginning at 4:30 p.m. Actors and singers can sign up in a

half-hour time slot on the vocal area notice board or can call Ornellas at 562-2561 or Jason Vest at 562-2371. Leave a message requesting a time and you will be notified. Auditions will take place in Buchanan Hall in the Music Building. All roles are open, including several non-singing roles. Participants should prepare 32 measures of a song (preferably from the musical theatre genre) and a one-minute monologue. An accompanist will be provided, so bring sheet music. The perfor mances will be held Oct. 27-30 in Buchanan Hall. Rehearsals will be held evenings and Saturday mornings. For more information, call Ornellas at 562-2561 or Vest at 562-2371.

LAS CRUCES- Congressman Steve Pearce will host an “Academy Night” for high school

students interested in applying for the service academies. The event will be held Sept. 1, in Hardman Hall Room 106, on the NMSU Campus, from 5-7:30 p.m. For more information, or to RSVP, students are encouraged to contact Rep. Pearce’s office at 522-3260. CLOUDCROFT - The best Labor Day fiesta in the west will be in Cloudcroft, Sept. 2 to 5. A variety of activitieis include a Wild West scavanger hunt, Chuck wagon cooking demonstration, outhouse races, street dance and more. For more information call 682-2733.

Leadership Roswell presents its new class

The 29th Annual Leadership Roswell Class is proud to present this year’s students selected for the 2012 Leadership Roswell Class. The class runs nine months and meets one Friday each month. The program gives participants the opportunity to lear n through workshops, panel discussions and planning committees. There have been over 675 graduates of the program to-date. •Ted Allen; Counseling Associates/Assurance Home, Youth Worker/ Community Support Worker •Brian Bailey; Domino's Pizza, President and CEO •Jim Bethel; Boy Scouts of America, District Director •Shill Breedyk; ENMMC, Assistant Director of Patient Financial Services •Ron Brown; Dean Baldwin Painting, Chief Inspector

•Steve Chambers; ENMU-R, Director of Human Resources •Lisa Chaves; NMMI, Administrative Assistant •Clay Cor n; Chaves County, Deputy Administrator •Stephanie De Los Santos-Amaro; Chaves County Clerk's Office, Bureau of Election Chief •Richard Glenn; Roswell Family Chiropractic and Wellness, Chiropractor •Christopher Gutierrez; City of Roswell Fire Department, Assistant Fire Marshall •Gareth Hansen; Wakefield Oil, Manager •Kim Hoelscher; Pioneer Bank, Assistant Vice President •Sally Knight; All Saints Catholic School,Teacher •Mitch Mitchell; Sanders, Bruin, Coll and Worley, Attorney •Sara Mitchell; Freelance Writer

•Alice Norman; Pathology Consultants of N.M., Director of QA

•Jennifer Nunez; Accounting & Consulting Group, Senior Accountant

•Jef f Ortega; Chaves County, Senior Accountant

•Sashua C. Patton; Alianza of New Mexico, Executive Director

•Manuela Ramirez; 1st American Bank, Operations Officer •Lance Ratcliff; ENMU-R, Dean of Business and Science

•Melinda Robson; Frontier Medical, Physical Therapist

•Brenda Sanchez; Chaves County, Executive Assistant

•Will Sanders; Roswell Regional Hospital, Education Specialist

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STATE/OBITUARIES/RECORDS

Roswell Daily Record

OBITUARIES

I’m on my way to see my surroundings Invade the clouds and see the days burn and fall Asleep like the creativity Discovering the silence in the three-sided box I know, I know I’m resting in the right place After all, I still have respect for the sad

John W. Hall, a lifelong resident of Roswell, passed away to heaven peacefully on Saturday, Aug. 20, 2011, surrounded by his family. He was 83 years old. He was preceded in death by his brother Bill, and his parents John W. and Lillian Martin Hall. Upon graduation from Roswell High School, John enlisted in the U.S. Navy and was stationed in Guam at the close of World War II. After attending the University of New Mexico for two years following his military service, he joined the family business in Roswell, McNally-Hall Motor Company. He and Camille Grantham were married shortly thereafter in 1949, and soon started raising a family at their home on West Country Club Road in Roswell. When he was 27 with two small children and wife at home, he decided to leave the security of the family business for the insurance and financial planning field. He chose Mutual of New York, and spent the next 40 years of his life with that company in Roswell until his retirement in 1994. During a very successful career serving his many friends and clients, he was named MONY’s 1975 Man of the Year, the company’s highest honor. When he was not providing for his family, he was active in giving back to the community, including leader-

ship roles in Chaves County United Way, Chaves County Heart Association, Boy Scouts, Roswell School Board, and elder in the First Presbyterian Church. He served on two bank boards and various civic organizations in Roswell. John loved to go fishing with his fishing buddies and taught everyone in the family how to fly fish. When asked what is the best time to fish, his reply was always the same: “When they are hungry.” He was still working on his golf game and Spanish. He taught us to work hard and always live by the Golden Rule. These lessons are now being passed down to his grandchildren. He was a great teacher and loyal friend. In 1996, he and Verla Seale, of Roswell, were married. Traveling was one of their favorite activities and they took many trips to see family, friends and foreign places for much of the past 15 years. Verla was steadfast and strong in taking care of him for the past few years of his declining health. The family extends special thanks to his faithful caregivers, Cathy Delnobile, Tammy Coleman, Barbara Padilla and the aides at Casa Maria. John is survived by his wife Verla; sons, Brad Hall and wife Mary Joan, of Chesterfield, Mo.; David Hall and wife Dana, of Nederland, Colo.; Bob Hall and wife Pam, of Albuquerque; and daughter Amy Hall Hartman and husband Rome, of Bethesda, Md.; stepchildren, Lisa Schultz and husband Walt, of Amarillo, Texas, and Tanya Landwerlen, of Richardson, Texas; nine grandchildren, five stepgrandchildren and one stepgreat-grandchild will dearly miss their “Papa John.” With God’s grace, we hope to be reunited with you someday in heaven. A memorial service will be held in the First Presbyterian Church, in Roswell. on Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011, at 11 a.m. Private family burial. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made to First Presbyterian Church, 400 W. Third St., Roswell, NM 88201, or a charity of choice. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory.

Aug. 24 7:51 a.m. — Union Avenue and Hobbs Street; drivers — Michael Meyer, 52, and Paula Paschall, 24, both of Roswell. 10:12 a.m. — 2700 N. Main St.; drivers — Tanner Graham, 18, of Roswell, and Jill Garcia, 53, of Artesia. 12:40 a.m. — 500 W. Hobbs St. (parking lot); drivers — Elvia Rosas, 50, and vehicle owned by Joann Gooding, both of

Roswell. 1:42 p.m. — Kentucky Avenue and Deming Street; drivers — Cheryl Gruette, 46, and Tina Johnson, 45, both of Roswell. 2:46 p.m. — Country Club Road and Washington Avenue; drivers — Inez Cortez, 32, and Rex Smith, 83, both of Roswell. Aug. 25 1:52 a.m. — 3101 SE Main St.; drivers — Doratea Salcido, 21, and Steven Peck, 23, both of Roswell.

Alfredo Caballero

Funeral services for Alfredo Caballero, 25, of Roswell, will be held Monday, Aug. 29, 2011, at 10 a.m., at Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home. Burial will follow in South Park Cemetery. Visitation will be Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011, from 1 to 8 p.m., and Sunday, Aug. 28, 2011, from 1 to 8 p.m., at the funeral home. He passed away Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011, in Roswell. Alfredo was born April 20, 1986, in Roswell, to Clementina Torres. He was a loving son, brother, and friend. Those left behind to cherish his memory are his parents Esteban and Cementina Torres; brother Esteban Torres Jr.; sister Valerie Hill and husband Ryan, of Roswell; nieces and nephew, Kailee, Gabby, and Elijah Hill; stepbrother Angel Torres and stepsister Veronica Torres, both of Utah; and numerous aunts, uncles, cousins, and extended family. Pallbearers will be Ryan Hill, Esteban Torres Jr., Miguel Barrera, Ivan Montez, Juan Hernandez and Gabriel Hernandez. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online register book at andersonbethany.com. Arrangements are under the direction of AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory. Asleep like the Rock The good times were not today Maybe when my thoughts were sealed in a bottle When I was the unfortunate example of a crowd that understands the beauty Asleep like the muted They are leaving, yet I have more to Say I don’t want to be found falling short of the attention It’s not my fault

PUBLIC RECORDS

Divorces Final Aug. 18 Virginia Ann Sherman vs Gaylon Ray Sherman Final Aug. 19 Patrick Michael Fox vs Franki Leana Fox Final Aug. 22 Paula Hutchens vs Dennis Ray Hutchens Bryan Benton vs Jerusha Vada Fulton Gilbert Brashear vs Linda C. Mack Accidents Aug. 23 8 p.m. — parked unknown location; vehicle owned by Norma Arellano.

Jobless rate falls to 6.7%

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — New Mexico’s unemployment rate fell for the fifth straight month in July. The New Mexico Department of Workforces Solutions reported Thursday that the unemployment was 6.7 percent, down from 6.8 percent in June and 8.5 percent a year ago. The national unemployment rate dropped to 9.1 percent. July marked the fifth straight monthly decrease in unemployment since the state’s jobless rate peaked at 8.7 percent earlier this year. But the state says the recent declines resulted from workers leaving the labor force, not an increase in employment.

John W. Hall

Roswell Daily Record would like to recognize

Larry G. Marshall Farm Bureau Financial Services, Inc. for his wonderful support to

Newspapers in Education for the 2010-2011 school year.

Larry G. Marshall

120 East 2nd, Dexter, NM 1 Grand Avenue Plaza, Roswell, NM

Call now if you would like to be an NIE supporter for the school of your choice.

A7

Cop names Block; clears Lujan Friday, August 26, 2011

SANTA FE (AP) — A former Santa Fe police detective who is fighting to get his job back has provided more details about what he maintains was a federal investigation that targeted Santa Fe’s city manager and a state official. James Vigil told reporters Wednesday during a press conference at his lawyer’s office that embattled Public Regulation Commissioner Jerome Block Jr. — not U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Lujan,

D-N.M. — was a target of the investigation. At an arbitration hearing for Vigil on Tuesday, Lujan and Santa Fe City Manager Robert Romero were both mentioned as targets of the investigation. Vigil testified about the alleged probe, and Deputy Police Chief Gillian Alessio testified that Vigil once told her that Romero and Lujan were the targets. But Vigil said he never mentioned Lujan. The congressman had called the accusations ridiculous and slanderous. Romero also denied the allegations. Block could not be reached for comment. Vigil said he once received infor mation through informants that Romero and Block had purchased cocaine and that he shared the infor mation with the FBI as part of an undercover investigation. As for Block, Vigil said he

was never able to substantiate the confidential informant’s claim that he sold cocaine to Block, and eventually turned over the case to another detective. Block, a Democrat, is under investigation for possible abuse of a stateissued gasoline card, and the state Court of Appeals has reinstated charges against him for misuse of campaign money from his 2008 race. A district court last year dismissed charges against Block for election law violations. Despite calls for his resignation, including from fellow members of the PRC, Block has said he intends to remain in his job. State lawmakers plan to form a subcommittee during next month’s special legislative session to investigate allegations against Block and recommend whether the full House should consider impeachment.

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — An Albuquerque grand jury Thursday indicted three leaders of an alleged Chinese crime ring on charges they helped secure New Mexico driver’s licenses for more than 60 out-of-state illegal immigrants using fraudulent documents. Gordon Leong, Tin Cheung and Alex Cheung each face 386 counts of fraud, forgery, conspiracy, making false affidavit perjury and altered, forged or fictitious licenses. The three men are accused of running newspaper advertisements in Chinese newspapers in New York, promising New Mexico driver’s licenses for $1,500 each. New Mexico is one of just three states where illegal immigrants can get driver’s licenses. Gov. Susana Martinez, who has been pushing to

repeal the exception, hailed the indictment. The gover nor has said she will put the issue on the agenda for the special session next month. Lawmakers rejected her attempts to repeal the law during the regular session earlier this year. The three men are accused of running the advertisements between March 2009 and November 2010. They leased multiple apartments simultaneously in Albuquerque and secured driver’s licenses for 62 illegal immigrants of Chinese descent, primarily from New York, prosecutors say. Tin and Alex Cheung also notarized residential and lease agreement documents fraudulently for their customers, according to the indictment. The illegal immigrants flew into Albu-

querque from New York, obtained their driver’s permits and left the state, prosecutors said. The ringleaders had the actual licenses mailed to an address in Albuquerque and then forwarded to their clients in New York. The New Mexico Motor Vehicle Division cancelled all the driver’s licenses issued in this case after the arrest of Leong and three of his alleged customers, who prosecutors say flew into New Mexico to pick up their licenses. Fongyee Hiew, Shu Sheng Liu and Sui Lam were indicted on 16 counts each of fraud, forgery, conspiracy, making false affidavit perjury, and altered, forged or fictitious licenses. Arrest warrants have been issued for both T in and Alex Cheung.

Courtesy Photo

Jerome Block Jr.

Grand jury indicts 3 in driver’s license ring


A8 Friday, August 26, 2011

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Mainly clear and warm

Mostly sunny

Saturday

Sunday

Partly sunny

Partly sunny

Monday

Tuesday

A thunderstorm possible

Mostly sunny

Wednesday

Sunshine and hot

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Thursday

A couple of t-showers

High 98°

Low 70°

100°/71°

102°/71°

101°/69°

100°/68°

98°/67°

93°/55°

WSW at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

NNW at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

VAR at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

S at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

NW at 4-8 mph POP: 30%

ESE at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

SSE at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

S at 8-16 mph POP: 60%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 5 p.m. Thursday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Hi/Lo/W

Temperatures High/low ........................... 99°/71° Normal high/low ............... 91°/44° Record high ............. 102° in 2002 Record low ................. 53° in 1897 Humidity at noon ................... 21%

Farmington 91/64

Clayton 95/67

Raton 90/58

Precipitation 24 hours ending 5 p.m. Thu. 0.00” Month to date ....................... 0.71” Normal month to date .......... 2.84” Year to date ......................... 1.73” Normal year to date ........... 14.24”

Santa Fe 90/63

Gallup 87/60

Tucumcari 97/69

Albuquerque 92/71

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 97/66

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading 37 0-50

51-100

Good

Moderate

Source: EPA

101-150

Ruidoso 83/63

151+

Unhealthy Unhealthy sensitive

T or C 91/71

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Sat. The Moon Today Sat. New

Rise 6:28 a.m. 6:29 a.m. Rise 3:42 a.m. 4:48 a.m. First

Aug 28

Sep 4

Regional Cities Today Sat.

Full

Sep 12

Set 7:31 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Set 5:43 p.m. 6:23 p.m. Last

Sep 20

Alamogordo 94/73

Silver City 88/66

ROSWELL 98/70 Carlsbad 98/72

Hobbs 98/71

Las Cruces 94/74

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2011

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diffi- JACQUELINE cult BIGAR

Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

94/73/s 97/73/t 92/71/t 94/71/t 75/47/pc 78/55/t 98/71/s 98/73/pc 98/72/s 99/71/pc 81/52/t 81/52/t 95/67/pc 97/67/pc 74/51/pc 76/53/t 97/66/pc 99/66/s 95/69/t 95/68/t 91/70/t 93/70/t 91/64/t 94/65/t 87/60/t 87/59/t 98/71/s 98/67/s 94/74/t 95/73/t 87/59/pc 89/60/t 82/58/t 83/60/t 93/67/t 94/72/t 96/70/s 98/69/s 97/66/s 98/66/s 84/56/t 86/56/t 90/58/pc 92/58/pc 72/46/pc 74/53/t 98/70/s 100/71/pc 83/63/s 85/65/t 90/63/t 92/62/t 88/66/t 91/67/t 91/71/t 94/70/t 97/69/pc 99/65/pc 89/61/t 90/60/t

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Sat.

Today

Sat.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

90/83/c 100/74/s 82/58/t 96/78/s 86/72/pc 83/68/pc 92/77/c 87/71/pc 111/90/t 80/60/s 86/59/s 90/75/c 87/65/s 94/72/pc 79/70/pc 80/56/s 102/79/t 86/72/t

93/81/pc 100/72/s 77/58/s 94/76/s 78/72/r 83/63/s 96/78/pc 80/70/r 109/90/t 84/64/pc 86/56/pc 84/70/t 87/63/s 95/70/t 79/69/pc 80/55/s 101/79/t 82/70/r

Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

62/51/pc 64/51/sh 95/74/pc 92/68/s 86/70/t 80/70/r 80/67/pc 76/66/r 90/69/c 90/66/pc 81/64/s 81/60/s 78/60/s 80/63/pc 106/79/s 107/77/s 94/64/pc 92/64/t 79/61/s 79/59/pc 95/73/s 95/74/pc 89/74/s 87/73/s 102/73/s 102/73/s 82/63/s 83/61/s 88/68/s 85/65/s 104/89/s 107/90/pc 90/70/pc 90/68/pc 98/69/s 100/70/s

U.S. Extremes (For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 116°............... Needles, Calif. Low: 32°.... Bodie State Park, Calif.

High: 100°........................Carlsbad Low: 42°........................Eagle Nest

National Cities Seattle 80/56 Billings 92/62 Minneapolis 82/58

Denver 94/64

San Francisco 68/56

New York 86/72

Detroit 79/61 Chicago 81/64

Washington 86/72

Kansas City 88/68 Los Angeles 90/70

Atlanta 95/74

El Paso 95/73

IRENE

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Houston 102/73

Miami 90/83

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

willing to talk — finally. Impulsiveness marks your actions. Make it OK to live out your fiery side. Make an adjustment financially, as long as it won’t cause more pressure. Tonight: Go with a great idea.

ARIES (March 21-April 19)     A block could become an opening. Your YOUR HOROSCOPE creativity opens up; nearly anything is possible. The unexpected occurs. Your sixth sense comes through as well. A boss or supervisor could change his or her tune. Tonight: Take a stand, if need be. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  Consider revising your opinions in light of a friend’s surprising statement. Don’t make a big deal out of what you hear. Mull over the pros and cons. A family member or roommate could feel uncomfortable with your willingness to mentally or emotionally “pioneer.” Tonight: Go home first. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)  Your ability to make an impression is enhanced by your willingness to let bygones be bygones. You move forward with electric clarity. A sudden turn is possible. Tonight: Be open to others. CANCER (June 21-July 22)  Your ability to move forward on a key project could make all the difference. Understand the possibilities that present

themselves. You might need to toss out an idea or two in the middle of a discussion in order to get feedback. Tonight: Let go and relax. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  You feel a change in the air. Claim your power. Worry less about other people’s reactions. Listen to your feelings. A promise of newness touched with excitement could be difficult to say no to. Tonight: The world is your oyster. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)  Recently you have felt better and more empowered. Yet you could be out of kilter today. Don’t worry; this low energy and confusion will pass. Trust that this is the downside of feeling great. Just wait for the cycle to swing the other way. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)  You deserve to feel perky and on top of life. Understand what is happening within. Some trepidation might be appropriate. Realize what is behind these feelings, but still remain optimistic and on the bright side. Tonight: Let your popularity speak. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  Reach out for others, knowing how you feel about an important friendship. You could feel pushed. You have more than your fair share of responsibilities to handle right now. A discussion could feel strangely out of kilter. Tonight: Out late. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)  Seek out more information, especially as someone is more than

BEIJING (AP) — China’s Ministry of Culture has ordered music download sites to delete songs by Lady Gaga, Katy Perry, the Backstreet Boys and other pop stars within two weeks or face punishment. The ministry posted a list of 100 songs — including Lady Gaga’s “Judas” and Perry’s “Last Friday

geted. Dozens of Hong Kong and Taiwanese pop songs and a few Western hits were listed as well. The ministry said the rule was meant to preserve China’s “national cultural security.” Sites were told in the Aug. 19 announcement posted to the ministry’s website that they had until

carefully screens the content of imported entertainment content for political messages or commentary that runs contrary to its official line. Foreign music acts in particular are believed to receive special scrutiny after Icelandic singer Bjork shouted “Tibet!” during a 2008 concert in Shanghai

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  Deal directly with a key associate. You might feel a bit awkward as you have this discussion. You might be surprised by an investment or a roommate. You learn more about what you’ve been taking for granted. Tonight: Visit over dinner.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  Others take the lead. You can ask subtle questions when you feel it is appropriate. You will have an opportunity to straighten out a misunderstanding, if not today, in the near future. You will need to get past a grudge or sensitivity. Tonight: Choose your company with care.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)  You might want to revamp your schedule, determining your highest priorities. An insight could stun you. A partner now seems to be able to talk about what is going on. Listen attentively without making too many judgments. Tonight: Get some exercise. BORN TODAY

China bars some Lady Gaga hits from download sites Night” — that had to be purged from the Chinese web because they had never been submitted for mandatory gover nment screening. Six Lady Gaga songs in all were on the list, all from her latest album. The 12-year-old ballad “I Want It That Way” by the Backstreet Boys was also tar-

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Sept. 15 to carry out “selfcorrection” and delete the songs. It said violators would be punished, but didn’t outline the penalties they would face. It didn’t say that the listed songs were objectionable, just that they had not been approved for distribution. The Chinese government

Newspaper editor Ben Bradlee (1921), musician Branford Marsalis (1960), actress Keke Palmer (1993)

after per for ming a song titled “Declare Independence.” China claims Tibet has always been part of its territory, but many Tibetans say the Himalayan region was virtually independent for centuries and that Beijing’s tight control is draining them of their culture and identity.


Friday, August 26, 2011 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 28

LOCAL SCHEDULE FRIDAY AUGUST 26 COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL • See related story on B1 for full schedule GIRLS SOCCER Lady Rocket Invitational 5 p.m. • Goddard vs. Portales 7 p.m. • Roswell vs. Artesia H.S. CROSS COUNTRY Clovis Invitational 3 p.m. • Goddard and Roswell at Clovis Invitational H.S. FOOTBALL 7 p.m. • Texico at Dexter • Mountainair at Gateway Chr. • Rio Rancho at Goddard • Capitan at Hagerman • Vaughn at Lake Arthur • Fort Sumner at NMMI • Roswell at Carlsbad H.S. VOLLEYBALL TBA • Goddard at Franklin Invitational, at El Paso • Hagerman at Clovis Tournament

SP OR TS SHORTS LEFTY’S BRONCO OPEN SET FOR AUG. 27-28

The annual Lefty’s Bronco Open will be held on Aug. 27-28 at NMMI Golf Course. The tournament is played in various twoperson formats and the cost is $300 per team. Entry fee includes green fees for a practice round on Aug. 26 and both tournament days, range balls, food and beverage, and proximity prize entries. The tournament begins at 8 a.m. on each day. For more information, call the course at 622-6033. Entry forms can be picked up at the NMMI Pro Shop.

SPORTS Roswell Daily Record

KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

For one game of the NMMI vs. Gateway Christian volleyball match on Thursday, the Gateway Christian Warriors looked like the much better team and seemed to be cruising to a win over the host Colts. However, you don’t win volleyball matches in Game 1. After a 25-19 Warrior win in Game 1, the Lady Colts rallied for three straight victories in Games 2, 3 and 4 to capture their first win of the season at Cahoon Armory. “I think the girls just started playing together,” said Colt coach Stephanie Schooley about what she thought changed from Game 1 to Game 2 for her team. “They started chasing down every ball, going after everything and trusting each other more. I think that just made the difference.” While NMMI (1-2) picked up its intensity and desire after Game 1, Gateway simply lost it, according to Warrior coach Kerri Pirtle.

E-mail: sports@roswell-record.com

“I think they realized, ‘Oh, we can win a game,’ and they lost the intensity and drive to play every ball,” she said. “That is something we’ve faced in the past, but didn’t have to deal with in the last couple of years. “It’s kind of like an old ghost returning.” The swing in momentum toward the Institute side didn’t happen immediately in Game 2, but it didn’t take long to feel the shift. The Warriors jumped ahead 9-4 in the early stages of the second game and had serve with Sadie Fox. The Warriors weren’t able to capitalize on the side out and NMMI’s MariaLuz Duran delivered an ace on the next serve. That kickstarted a run that saw the Colts win 14 of 21 points to seize an 18-16 lead. Gateway won the next See NMMI, Page B3

NMMI Sports Press

RIGHT: NMMI’s Caitlin Duree, right, records a kill to win the match for the Colts, while Gateway’s Charlee Longmire defends.

Goddard downs NMMI 2-0 for first win LAWRENCE FOSTER RECORD SPORTS REPORTER

VOLLEYBALL SIGN-UPS END AUG. 31

The City of Roswell’s adult co-ed volleyball league will continue registration through Aug. 31. Registration is held at the Yucca Recreation Center. The cost is $130 per team and there is a maximum of 10 players per team. Games start on Sept. 12. For more information, call 624-6719.

• More shorts on B2

NA T I O N A L BRIEFS PATRICK LEAVES INDYCAR, HEADS TO NASCAR

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) — With the not-sosubtle shape of a stock car under cover just in front of her and spotlights glaring in her face, Danica Patrick feigned drama for an announcement everyone already knew was coming. “For breaking news that will shock the world ...,” she said facetiously on Thursday. Peeling the lid off the worst-kept secret in auto racing, Patrick ended months of skirting questions about her future by officially declaring her plans to leave IndyCar in 2012 to race a full Nationwide season for JR Motorsports and a part-time Sprint Cup schedule with StewartHaas Racing. One of the most marketable stars in auto racing, Patrick had been rumored to be headed to NASCAR even before she ran her first stock race, the ARCA series event at Daytona in 2010. That all changed when she signed a contract with GoDaddy.com chairman Bob Parsons in front of TV cameras and a few dozen cheering company employees on Thursday.

B

Colts rally, topple Gateway in four Section

Lawrence Foster Photo

Goddard’s Levi Morales, left, prepares to fire a shot while NMMI’s Nahm Doug Kim, middle, and Bart Orduno-Tirado defend during their game on Thursday at Cielo Grande.

In the Goddard and NMMI boys soccer season openers, both teams struggled to find the back of the net and as a result, both teams entered their matchup on Thursday 0-1. While the Colts’ offensive woes continued, the Rockets netted two goals in a 20 victory. Early and often both squads had opportunities to draw first blood, but some nifty saves and bad touches elongated both teams’ offensive ineptitude. In the second minute, NMMI’s Angel Reyes had an open look in front of the goal, but Goddard’s Jake Maxey came flying in from the side to deflect the shot out of the box. Five minutes later the Rockets’ Levi Morales got behind the Colt defense, but his shot slid just right of the post. Over the next 20 minutes Goddard controlled the

Demons top Capitan Ten teams set for NMMI Classic CAPITAN — The Dexter Demons opened the season on Thursday with a hard-fought, five-game win over the Capitan Tigers. “We struggled a little at first, but rebounded and played r eally well,” said Dexter coach Andy Luikens. “We started making some smart plays after the slow start and we finished strong.” The slow start by the Demons helped Capitan captur e a 25-17 win in Game 1, but Dexter rebounded with wins in both Games 2 and 3. Dexter (1-0) won Game 2 25-18 and Game 3 2517 to get within a game of a match victory. Capitan won Game 4 26-24, but Dexter again answered the Tiger win with a win of its own in Game 5, 15-6. Hannah Manemann led the Demons with 14 kills and three aces and Luikens said it was her play that fueled the Demon victory. “She actually, in Game 1, struggled and had more errors than kills,” the coach said. “I was a little concerned, but she came around. She plays all around, so I don’t know if that messed her up a little bit. “But, she came around and started hitting the ball really well. If she plays well, the rest of the team plays well. Tamara Salas added 15 assists and Ty Payne had six kills for the Demons.

As the junior college volleyball season opens, so comes early-season tournaments for most of the country’s programs. Ten of those programs will converge on the campus of New Mexico Military Institute on Friday and Saturday for the fourth annual NMMI Classic. “The big thing (about the teams in the tournament) is that they are from

all over,” said Br onco coach Shelby Fortchner. “You kind of get a little bit of everybody’s conference, which is helpful in the national polls. “Hutchinson in Kansas is pretty good and Seminole State from Oklahoma has been good the last thr ee or four years. We have some pr etty good teams here.” The tournament will be

See GHS, Page B2

played over two days at the Institute’s Cahoon Armory or Godfrey Athletic Center. Each of the 10 teams at this year’s tournament will play four games. Fortchner said the tournament should give all the coaches involved a good idea on where their team stands early in the year. See CLASSIC, Page B3

Fourth annual NMMI Classic Schedule

Friday, Aug. 26

Saturday, Aug. 27

At Godfrey Athletic Center

At Godfrey Athletic Center

At Cahoon Armory • • • • •

• • • • •

8 a.m. — Ranger vs. Eastern Arizona 10:30 a.m. — Hutchinson vs. South Mountain 1 p.m. — Air Force Prep vs. Frank Phillips 3:30 p.m. — Ranger vs. Yavapai 6 p.m. — NMMI vs. Hutchinson

8 a.m. — NMMI vs. Frank Phillips 10:30 a.m. — Seminole State vs. Yavapai 1 p.m. — Odessa vs. Eastern Arizona 3:30 p.m. — South Mountain vs. Seminole State 6 p.m. — Odessa vs. Air Force Prep

At Cahoon Armory • • • • •

• • • • •

8 a.m. — Seminole State vs. Eastern Arizona 10:30 a.m. — NMMI vs. Yavapai 1 p.m. — Odessa vs. Seminole State 3:30 p.m. — Ranger vs. Air Force Prep 6 p.m. — South Mountain vs. NMMI

8 a.m. — Ranger vs. Frank Phillips 10:30 a.m. — Hutchinson vs. Air Force Prep 1 p.m. — South Mountain vs. Frank Phillips 3:30 p.m. — Hutchinson vs. Eastern Arizona 6 p.m. — Odessa vs. Yavapai


B2 Friday, August 26, 2011

SPORTS

Texico at Dexter

Demons Stadium (Dexter), 7 p.m. Records: Texico 0-0; Dexter 0-0 Coaches: Texico, R yan Autrey; Dexter, Frank Sandoval Last year: Texico won, 14-0 Coach Lynn’s thoughts The Demons and coach Sandoval need to put the memory of last year’s season behind them and need to remember that it wasn’t too long ago that the Demons played for the state championship in two consecutive years. The Texico Wolverines are always a state championship contender in 2A. This game will tell the Demons exactly where they are and where they need to go. They have a full year now in coach Sandoval’s offensive and defensive schemes and I look for the Demons to be much improved in his second year. Coach Lynn’s keys for Dexter 1. Dexter is probably an underdog in this game. Therefore, they will need to be solid defensively and run the ball effectively to have a chance to win the game. 2. Get solid quarterback play. Their top two quarterbacks have been injured, so it will be imperative to get good play out of the position.

Mountainair at Gateway Christian

Warrior Stadium (Roswell), 7 p.m. Records: Mountainair 0-0; Gateway Christian 0-0 Coaches: Mountainair, Robert Zamora; Gateway Christian, Shaun Wigley Last year: Mountainair won, 60-12 Coach Lynn’s keys for Gateway Christian 1. Mason Miller needs to play well. I really think Mountainair will have problems handling his versatility. 2. Open-field tackling for Gateway Christian on defense will need to be solid.

Rio Rancho at Goddard

Wool Bowl (Roswell), 7 p.m. Records: Rio Rancho 0-0; Goddard 0-0

Local

Spring River Senior Golf League Senior Club Championship Flight 1 Ralph Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149 Charley Sparnon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152 Jack Turner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156 Rich Jolly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156 Willie Aldaco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158 Dub Bryan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .161 Butch Harton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164 Ron Chambers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169 John Franks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .173 Flight 2 Larry Reeves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164 Ron Smith Sr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168 David Kaler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169 Will Diaz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176 Henry Rosales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .176 Dick Shangraw . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182 Darryl Hodgson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .182 Jack Cogan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183 Woody Sizemore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .184 Don Peterson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186 Al Dye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187 Flight 3 Bob Tucker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .180 Raymond Hollon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185 Roy Gunn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188 John Donahue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189 Leonard Flores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196 Gene Peterson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .201 Bob Pottle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202 Louis McDonald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204 Doug Combs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Friday, Aug. 26 AUTO RACING 6 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, practice for Grand Prix of Belgium, at Francorchamps, Belgium 7:30 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, final practice for Food City 250, at Bristol, Tenn. (same-day tape) 10 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Irwin Tools Night Race, at Bristol, Tenn. 12:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, “Happy Hour Series,” final practice for Irwin Tools Night Race, at Bristol, Tenn. 1:30 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, pole qualifying for Food City 250, at Bristol, Tenn. 3 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying for Irwin

Coaches: Rio Rancho, David Howes; Goddard, Sam Jernigan Last year: Goddard won, 34-3 Coach Lynn’s keys for Goddard 1. Play Goddard Rocket football. Exhibit toughness, discipline and resolve. I think Goddard has a distinct advantage over Rio Rancho in those intangibles. 2. The offensive and defensive lines are a little inexperienced will have to play well.

Capitan at Hagerman

Bobcats Stadium (Hagerman), 7 p.m. Records: Capitan 0-0; Hagerman 0-0 Coaches: Capitan, Collin Justiss; Hagerman, Casey Crandall Last year: Hagerman won, 41-13 Coach Lynn’s thoughts The Bobcats have a new coach and a lot of new faces. You hate to say that Hagerman may be rebuilding, but with the loss of Isaac Bejarano, Michael Garcia and Ryan Gomez, it may be just that type of year. Hagerman has tough kids and a great tradition of winning. Rebuilding for Hagerman doesn’t mean what it means for other programs. I still look for Hagerman to have a winning season and be a playoff contender. Coach Lynn’s keys for Hagerman 1. Keep it simple. Just play good, solid football, and limit turnovers and big plays. I don’t think Capitan can win this game unless Hagerman gives it to them. 2. They will need good play out of Alejandro Ramos, Edgar Soto and Juan Ramos. 3. They will need good play and leadership out of Frankie Aragonez and Geraldo Chacon.

Vaughn at Lake Arthur

Panthers Stadium (Lake Arthur), 7 p.m. Records: Vaughn 0-0; Lake Arthur 0-0 Coaches: Vaughn, Joe Gauna; Lake Arthur, Jose Cruz Porras Last year: Lake Arthur won, 56-7 Coach Lynn’s thoughts I don’t know much about Vaughn, other

Pct GB .615 — .609 1 .543 9 1⁄2 .508 14 .398 28

Pct GB .546 — .496 6 1⁄2 .492 7 .423 16 1 .412 17 ⁄2

Pct GB .561 — .546 2 .454 14 1 .434 16 ⁄2

Wednesday’s Games Seattle 9, Cleveland 2 Boston 13, Texas 2 Oakland 6, N.Y. Yankees 4, 10 innings Toronto 4, Kansas City 3 Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 2, 10 innings Baltimore 6, Minnesota 1 L.A. Angels 8, Chicago White Sox 0 Thursday’s Games

Tools Night Race, at Bristol, Tenn. 5:30 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Food City 250, at Bristol, Tenn. CYCLING 2 p.m. VERSUS — USA Pro Challenge, stage 4, Avon to Steamboat Springs, Colo. GOLF 7:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Johnnie Walker Championship, second round, at Perthshire, Scotland 11 a.m. TGC — USGA, U.S. Amateur Championship, round of 32 and round of 8 matches at Erin, Wis. 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, The Barclays, second round, at Edison, N.J. 4:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Boeing Classic, first round, at Snoqualmie, Wash. 10 p.m. TGC — LPGA, Canadian Women’s Open, second round,

N.Y. Yankees 22, Oakland 9 Baltimore 6, Minnesota 1 Detroit 2, Tampa Bay 0 Kansas City 9, Toronto 6 Boston 6, Texas 0 Friday’s Games Kansas City (F.Paulino 2-5) at Cleveland (Jimenez 1-1), 5:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 9-10) at Baltimore (Tom.Hunter 2-2), 5:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Shields 11-10) at Toronto (H.Alvarez 0-1), 5:07 p.m. Oakland (G.Gonzalez 10-11) at Boston (Wakefield 6-5), 5:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Haren 13-6) at Texas (D.Holland 11-5), 6:05 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 11-8) at Minnesota (Swarzak 3-3), 6:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Peavy 5-6) at Seattle (Furbush 3-5), 8:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 11:05 a.m., 1st game Tampa Bay at Toronto, 11:07 a.m. Oakland at Boston, 11:10 a.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 2:10 p.m. Kansas City at Cleveland, 5:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 5:05 p.m., 2nd game L.A. Angels at Texas, 6:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Seattle, 8:10 p.m.

at Mirabel, Quebec (same-day tape) MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 6 p.m. MLB — Regional coverage, L.A. Angels at Texas or Pittsburgh at St. Louis WGN — Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee NFL FOOTBALL 6 p.m. CBS — Preseason, Green Bay at Indianapolis PREP FOOTBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Armwood (Fla.) at Bishop Gorman (Nev.) TENNIS 10 a.m. ESPN2 — ATP World Tour, Winston-Salem Open, semifinal, at Winston-Salem, N.C. Noon ESPN2 — WTA, New Haven Open, semifinal, at New Haven, Conn. 5 p.m. ESPN2 — WTA, New Haven Open, semifinal, at New Haven, Conn.

SPORTS SHORTS 3-ON-3 TOURNAMENT SET FOR SEPT. 2

The Roswell Boys & Girls Club will host a 3-on-3 basketball tournament on Friday, Sept. 2, at the Club. The entry fee is $50 per team. For more information, call 623-3196.

YOUTH HOOPS SIGN-UPS START SEPT. 1

The Yucca Recreation Center will begin registration for its youth basketball league on Sept. 1. Registration will continue through Sept. 30. The league is open to children in kindergarten through third grade. Children who wish to play in the league must be of school age by Sept. 1. First-time players are required to bring their birth certificate. The cost for the league is $30 for the first child and $25 for each additional child. For more information, call 624-6719.

than the fact that they were one of only three schools in the entire state to make AYP. I won’t get started on AYP and I am not sure how that helps them against Lake Arthur. Coach Porras down at Lake Arthur is one of the most under-rated coaches in the state and he has done a great job with all the sports at Lake Arthur. Coach Lynn’s keys for Lake Arthur 1. Miguel Rubio will have to play well, but look for Lake Arthur to handle in this matchup. 2. They need to get out quick and not give Vaughn any hope of winning. The longer they allow Vaughn to stay in the game, the harder it will be for the Panthers to prevail.

Fort Sumner at NMMI

Colt Field (Roswell), 7 p.m. Records: Fort Sumner 0-0; NMMI 0-0 Coaches: Fort Sumner, Matt Moyer; NMMI, Randy Montoya Last year: Fort Sumner won, 32-17 Coach Lynn’s thoughts The Colts are always a little bit of an unknown going into the season due to a lot of turnover in students from year-to-year. That will be the case even more so this year as well with the addition of a new head coach. This may actually be a good thing for the Colts as the Foxes may not know what of fensive and defensive schemes to prepare for. The Foxes and coach Moyer are coming off a 1A state championship and have a solid tradition of successful football seasons. Coach Montoya of NMMI is very familiar with Fort Sumner having played them twice last year at Hagerman, with the finale being in the state championship. Coach Lynn’s keys for NMMI 1. Get out fast. With a lot of new faces, it is going to be important for the Colts to experience some success early. 2. Shane Wallace will need to have a good game running the football to control the clock and keep the Foxes off the field.

SCOREBOARD

Baseball

Major League Baseball At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press American League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .80 50 New York . . . . . . . . . .78 50 Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .70 59 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .66 64 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .51 77 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .71 59 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .63 64 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .63 65 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .55 75 Kansas City . . . . . . . .54 77 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 58 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .71 59 Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .59 71 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .56 73

Roswell Daily Record

24TH ANNUAL TURTLE MARATHON IS SEPT. 5

The 24th annual Turtle Marathon and Labor Day 5k will be held on Monday, Sept. 5. The event features a full and half marathon, which begin at 5:30 a.m., and 5k runs and walks, which begin at 8 a.m. For more information, call 624-6720.

14TH ANNUAL LADIES FALL CLASSIC IS SEPT. 9

The 14th annual Ladies Fall Classic Invitational golf tournament will be held on Friday, Sept. 9, at 9 a.m. at Roswell Country Club. The entry fee is $170 per two-person team. Entry fee includes green fees, cart fees and lunch at the awards luncheon. Green fees for a practice round on Sept. 8 are included in the entry fee. To reserve a tee time for the practice round, call the country club

Sunday’s Games Kansas City at Cleveland, 11:05 a.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 11:07 a.m. N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 11:35 a.m. Oakland at Boston, 11:35 a.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 12:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Seattle, 2:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Texas, 6:05 p.m.

National League East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Philadelphia . . . . . . . .83 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Washington . . . . . . . .62 New York . . . . . . . . . .61 Florida . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .78 St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .68 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .64 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . .61 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .57 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .42 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Arizona . . . . . . . . . . .72 San Francisco . . . . . .69 Colorado . . . . . . . . . .63 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .60 San Diego . . . . . . . . .60

L 45 53 67 68 72 L 54 63 66 69 74 88 L 59 61 68 69 71

Pct GB .648 — .598 6 1 .481 21 ⁄2 1 .473 22 ⁄2 .446 26 Pct GB .591 — .519 9 1⁄2 .492 13 .469 16 1 .435 20 ⁄2 .323 35 Pct GB .550 — .531 2 1⁄2 .481 9 .465 11 .458 12

Wednesday’s Games Pittsburgh 2, Milwaukee 0 N.Y. Mets 7, Philadelphia 4 L.A. Dodgers 9, St. Louis 4 Colorado 7, Houston 6, 10 innings Florida 6, Cincinnati 5, 1st game Arizona 4, Washington 2 Cincinnati 3, Florida 2, 2nd game Chicago Cubs 3, Atlanta 2 San Francisco 2, San Diego 1 Thursday’s Games Atlanta 8, Chicago Cubs 3 Arizona 8, Washington 1 Cincinnati at Florida, ppd., rain St. Louis 8, Pittsburgh 4 Houston at San Francisco, 8:15 p.m. Friday’s Games Florida (Hensley 1-5) at Philadelphia (Oswalt 6-7), 5:05 p.m. Atlanta (T.Hudson 13-7) at N.Y. Mets (Capuano 9-11), 5:10 p.m. Washington (Wang 2-2) at Cincinnati (Willis 0-3), 5:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (R.Lopez 4-4) at Milwaukee (Wolf 10-8), 6:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 8-6) at St. Louis (Westbrook 10-7), 6:15 p.m. San Diego (LeBlanc 2-2) at Arizona (Collmenter 7-8), 7:40 p.m.

ON THE AIR

All times Mountain Schedule subject to change Friday, Aug. 26 HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL 6:30 p.m. KEND 106.5 FM — Roswell at Carlsbad 6:45 p.m. KBIM 93.7 FM/910 AM— Rio Rancho at Goddard

3. Get it to the fourth quarter. The Colts will be the best conditioned team in any of the games they play just because of the nature of the school they attend (lots of push-up and early morning runs). If they can get out fast and wear the Foxes down, then they will have a chance to prevail.

Roswell at Carlsbad

Ralph Bowyer Stadium (Carlsbad), 7 p.m. Records: Roswell 0-0; Carlsbad 0-0 Coaches: Roswell, Robert Arreola; Carlsbad, Ron Arrington Last year: Carlsbad won, 34-6 Coach Lynn’s thoughts Coach Arreola enters his fourth season at Roswell and the Coyotes have taken solid steps forward in each of his first two years. He has a solid group of returning skill kids, but the line is a little bit of a question mark. Roswell will go as far as Andrew Aguilar, Jared Vaz, Nathan Lopez and the rest of the offensive and defensive lines will take them. Carlsbad will be a good early season test for the Coyotes. They will see exactly where they are and what they need to improve on. Coach Lynn’s keys for Roswell 1. Roswell is playing a bigger school with more depth on the road and is probably a slight underdog. I think it is important that they make some big plays. Whether it be blocking a punt, returning an interception for a touchdown or having a big play in the passing game, I feel they need a little something to even the playing field. 2. They will need to get after the quarterback. Carlsbad wants to spread you out and throw the ball. If the quarterback from Carlsbad has time to throw, it could be a long night for the Coyotes. 3. Keep the score low; a shoot-out favors Carlsbad. 4. Be consistent on offense. Take care of the ball and keep Carlsbad’s offensipve off the field. James Singleton will have to play well and take care of the ball.

Colorado (Rogers 6-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 7-13), 8:10 p.m. Houston (Happ 4-14) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 7-12), 8:15 p.m. Saturday’s Games Florida at Philadelphia, 11:05 a.m., 1st game Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 2:10 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 2:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 2:10 p.m. Florida at Philadelphia, 5:05 p.m., 2nd game Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m. Washington at Cincinnati, 5:10 p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 6:10 p.m. Houston at San Francisco, 7:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 11:10 a.m. Washington at Cincinnati, 11:10 a.m. Florida at Philadelphia, ppd., rain Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 12:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 12:15 p.m. Houston at San Francisco, 2:05 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 2:10 p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 2:10 p.m.

Football

National Football League Preseason Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain AMERICAN CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Miami . . . . . . . . .2 0 0 1.000 New England . . .2 0 0 1.000 N.Y. Jets . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Buffalo . . . . . . . . .0 2 0 .000 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Houston . . . . . . .2 0 0 1.000 Jacksonville . . . .1 1 0 .500 Tennessee . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Indianapolis . . . . .0 2 0 .000 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Baltimore . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Cleveland . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Pittsburgh . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Cincinnati . . . . . .0 2 0 .000 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Denver . . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 San Diego . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Kansas City . . . .0 2 0 .000 Oakland . . . . . . .0 2 0 .000

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Washington . . . . .2 0 0 1.000 Dallas . . . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 N.Y. Giants . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Philadelphia . . . .1 1 0 .500 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Carolina . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 New Orleans . . . .1 1 0 .500 Tampa Bay . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Atlanta . . . . . . . . .0 2 0 .000 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Detroit . . . . . . . . .2 0 0 1.000 Chicago . . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Green Bay . . . . .1 1 0 .500 Minnesota . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct St. Louis . . . . . . .2 0 0 1.000 Arizona . . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500 San Francisco . . .1 1 0 .500 Seattle . . . . . . . . .1 1 0 .500

PF PA 48 33 78 26 43 27 13 34

PF PA 47 30 27 60 30 20 13 49

PF PA 37 26 55 47 31 30 10 61

PF PA 47 34 37 31 13 56 21 41 PF PA 32 10 31 43 51 33 27 30

PF PA 30 30 38 30 39 31 36 43

PF PA 64 31 23 44 45 47 23 21

PF PA 50 26 44 46 20 27 31 37

Thursday, Aug. 25 Carolina at Cincinnati, 5 p.m. Cleveland at Philadelphia, 5:30 p.m. Washington at Baltimore, 6 p.m.

at 622-2050. For more information, or to register, call Andi Smith at 622-5200 or e-mail asmith@aslaccounting.com.

ELKS FIGHTING CANCER TOURNEY IS SEPT. 17

The third annual Elks Fighting Cancer charity golf tournament will be held Sept. 17 at 8 a.m. at NMMI Golf Course. The cost is $240 per team and the field is limited to the first 24 paid teams. Cost includes breakfast, lunch, range balls, green fees and cart fees. For more information, call 622-6033.

TABOSA GOLF TOURNEY SET FOR SEPT. 24

The Tabosa “Go For The Gold” golf tournament will be held on Saturday, Sept. 24, at Spring River

Friday, Aug. 26 St. Louis at Kansas City, 6 p.m. Green Bay at Indianapolis, 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 27 Jacksonville at Buffalo, 5 p.m. N.Y. Jets at N.Y. Giants, 5 p.m. Miami at Tampa Bay, 5:30 p.m. Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 5:30 p.m. Houston at San Francisco, 6 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Chicago at Tennessee, 6 p.m. New England at Detroit, 6 p.m. Seattle at Denver, 7 p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 8 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 28 New Orleans at Oakland, 6 p.m.

Transactions

Thursday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League DETROIT TIGERS—Placed 1B Miguel Cabrera on the paternity leave list. Recalled C Omir Santos from to Toledo (IL) and optioned him back to Toledo. MINNESOTA TWINS—Placed LHP Francisco Liriano on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Scott Diamond from Rochester (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES—Optioned LHP Aaron Laffey to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Signed 1B Luke Willson. National League PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Optioned INF Pedro Ciriaco and RHP Aaron Thompson to Indianapolis (IL). Activated OF Alex Presley and INF Chase d’Arnaud off the 15-day DL. FOOTBALL National Football League CAROLINA PANTHERS—Claimed DT Kentwan Balmer off waivers from Seattle. Placed CB Cletis Gordon on injured reserve. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Signed TE Anthony Becht. Placed LB Brandon Siler on injured reserve. HOCKEY National Hockey League WINNIPEG JETS—Named Ryan Bowness manager of hockey operations & team services, Rob Milette athletic therapist and Al Pritchard massage therapist. LACROSSE National Lacrosse League MINNESOTA SWARM—Announced assistant coach Joe Sullivan will become associate general manager along with his coaching duties. Named Bob Keast assistant coach and Jake Elliott director of western scouting. MOTOR SPORTS INDYCAR—Fined Will Power $30,000 for making an obscene gesture during the IndyCar race at New Hampshire. COLLEGE LSU—Suspended junior WR Russell Shepard indefinitely for violating NCAA rules by discussing an NCAA inquiry with a teammate. MICHIGAN—Announced freshman TE Chris Barnett has left the football team. MORAVIAN—Named Elizabeth Grumbein and Kaitlin Boerman assistant field hockey coaches. NORTH DAKOTA STATE—Suspended assistant wrestling coach Bret Maughan five days after receiving a drunken driving conviction. SAN JOSE STATE—Promoted Marie Tuite to deputy director of athletics and chief operating officer. ST. EDWARD’S—Named Dave Wood pitching coach. VASSAR—Named Margaret White women’s assistant basketball coach.

Golf Course. The tournament is a three-person scramble based on points per handicap. The cost of the tournament is $75 per player or $225 per team. Individual golfers are encouraged to register. The tournament fee includes drinks, lunch, range balls, green and cart fees, three mulligans per team and more. Proceeds from the tournament will be used to reequip the Los Pasitos Day Care Center. For more information, call 973-4032 or 622-9506.

FIRST TEE SEEKING VOLUNTEERS

The First Tee of the Pecos Valley is currently seeking volunteers. Golf experience is not required to be a volunteer. For more information, call 623-4444.


SPORTS

B3

Cowboys WR Bryant learning to be more of a pro Roswell Daily Record

ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — Dez Bryant is listening. And learning. A month into his second season with the Dallas Cowboys, Bryant has become more than a well-intentioned kid who keeps getting into trouble. He’s becoming more of a professional. He understands what’s required from him and what the consequences are if he doesn’t live up to those requirements. He’s showing up on time for meetings and practices. He knows his playbook and runs crisp routes. The fun part is when the ball comes his way. Big and strong, fast and elusive, Bryant believes he can score every time he touches the ball. “That’s the way you’re supposed to play football,” he says. That’s also why Bryant was so upset with himself early in the last preseason game. Tony Romo threw a simple pass that Bryant had to only squeeze and turn upfield for a first down. Yet Bryant took his eye off the ball, looking for room to run before he actually made the catch. The pass clanked off his hands, sending him to the sideline, seething. His new position coach, Jimmy Robinson, saw the fit and went to defuse it. “Hey,” Robinson told Bryant, “that’s your one drop for the year.” Bryant liked that. Talking about it after the game, he vowed, “It will not happen again.” It’s unrealistic, of course, but it says something about

GHS

the growth and maturity the Cowboys are hoping to see from Bryant, especially after his wayward summer — a dizzying series of incidents involving jewelry, lawsuits, baggy pants and mall security guards — left some wondering whether he’d ever get his act together. Management had enough faith to clear a starting job for him by releasing Roy Williams. They also took the calculated risk of bringing in Robinson as Bryant’s new mentor. The risk was that Bryant had become close with his position coach, Ray Sherman. The calculation was that coach Jason Garrett has known Robinson for more than a decade and was sure he’d be up to the challenge. It helps that Robinson has an impressive list of receivers who have thrived under his tutelage: Marvin Harrison, Andre Rison, Amani Toomer, Ike Hilliard, Joe Horn and the guys from Green Bay who won the Super Bowl last year, with Robinson as part of that staff. Indeed, Robinson and Bryant have hit it off quite well. It’s evident in the way Bryant tries to absorb every piece of advice Robinson shares with him on the practice field. “He wants to be coached, he wants to learn,” Robinson said. “He wants to know exactly what it is that we want him to be doing, that I want him to be doing. I think he’s hungry to learn it and hungry to do it the right way.” His willingness to improve extends off the field, too.

Coaches and teammates are doing all they can to help, first because they genuinely like Bryant, but also because they realize what a huge role he can play on this team. Then again, others have tried to help Bryant before, and it hasn’t always clicked. Maybe now that the stakes are higher, it’s finally happening. “He’s doing a better job with being where he’s supposed to be, on time, and those types of things,” Robinson said. “But it’s a day-to-day process. It does not happen overnight. I don’t expect that it’s gonna. Sometimes you take a couple of steps forward and one step back. So you grab the young man and you hug him and you say, ‘Hey, listen now. This is something you’ve gotta do different. This is where we need to improve.’ You do that day after day after day. You develop that trust, hopefully him in you and then you start to develop it in him.” Tight end Jason Witten sees an improvement, too. Witten said Bryant used to get by on sheer talent, treating practices and games as if he were playing in the backyard. Through nearly a month of training camp, which wrapped up Thursday, Witten was impressed with Bryant “being where he’s supposed to be and doing what he’s supposed to do.” “He’s walked into a situation where he’s taken a lot of responsibility and expectations,” Witten said. “Nobody works harder than him.”

AP Photo

Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Dez Bryant tries to catch a pass under his leg as he warms up, prior to a morning walk-thru practice, Tuesday.

Continued from Page B1

tempo of play, but it continued to miss golden opportunities to score. In the 22nd minute Efrain Morales took a pass from Levi Morales right in front of the box but Efrain’s sliding shot sailed wide right. NMMI’s best chance of the first half came in the 35th minute when Jorge Garza had a breakaway. Garza was able to get behind the Rocket defense and was one-on-one with Goddard goalkeeper Raul Alvidrez. Instead of laying back and letting Garza charge him, Alvidrez ran out to meet Garza and as Garza shot he was able to slide and get his body in front of the ball, preventing a goal. Neither team could score in the first half, but five minutes into the second half, the Rockets took the lead for good. “It was an attack down the right wing,” said Goddard assistant coach Tim Lucas of the Rockets’ first goal. “Levi (Morales) was

NMMI

Continued from Page B1

three points, but NMMI finished the game by winning 7 of 11 to get a 25-23 win. “I can’t name a specific point, but when they started playing together and trusting each other,” said Schooley about when during the second game she felt like

Classic

Continued from Page B1

“You can kind of see where your team stands against national competiton,” she said. “And for us, we get to see the conference teams to see where we stack up and to see where we are at the beginning of the year.” The tour nament opens with two games at 8 a.m. today when Ranger College faces Eastern Arizona College

Lawrence Foster Photo

NMMI’s Jorge Enriquez, right, looks to pass the ball as Goddard’s Grant Speer defends during their game, Thursday. playing the right-midfield and his brother (Efrain Morales) was playing center -forward. Levi played the ball into the right corner and he went for the return pass (from Efrain). Levi took the pass, took

NMMI started taking control of the match. The Institute carried its solid play into Game 3 as well. The Colts jumped out to a 10-5 lead and held the lead through the first 34 points (18-16) before Gateway finally started to climb back into it. Lizzie Worrall delivered five straight service points — the third of four Warrior service games that lasted at Cahoon and NMMI faces Frank Phillips College at the Godfrey. NMMI plays its second game of the day at 6 p.m. against Hutchinson Community College at Cahoon. Games are also set for 10:30 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. today. Saturday’s schedule features games at 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 1 p.m., 3:30 p.m. and 6 p.m.

Friday, August 26, 2011

weren’t able to play either of the Morales brothers on Tuesday because they hadn’t had the required number of practices yet. They clearly add a different offensive dimension for us. As you can see tonight, they can finish.” The Morales brothers may have given Goddard the lead, but Alvidrez and the defense made it last. In the 49th minute Garza had another good look at the goal and fired a shot to the opposite post, but Alvidrez made a fullextension diving save to knock the ball wide of the goal, preserving the Goddard lead. NMMI had two chances in the 68th minute to tie the game, but a breakaway shot by Gerardo Estrella sailed harmlessly wide and another diving save by Alvidrez kept the Colts off the scoreboard. Goddard put the game away in the 74th minute when Tristan Collar scored on a penalty kick to give the Rockets a 2-0 lead. Despite the loss, NMMI coach John Barbour said that he was pleased with his team’s play.

one step around the defender and put it inside the near post.” The goal gave Goddard its first lead of the season. Lucas said that the Morales brothers, who both missed Tuesday’s 2-1

loss to Ruidoso because they didn’t have enough practices, add a different dimension to the Rocket offense. “I think you saw some of it tonight,” he said of Goddard’s offensive play. “We

more than four points in the match — to make it 22-18 in favor of the Warriors. Gateway got it to 23-19, but NMMI’s Summer House served the game out for the Colts with five straight service points for a 25-23 Institute victory. Game 4 played out nearly identical to Games 2 and 3 — NMMI controlled early, Gateway rallied for a lead and NMMI finished it out

strong to get the win. The Colts led 8-5 on the back of a pair of aces from both Caitlin Duree and House, but Gateway followed with a fourth run of four or more service points. Fox did it this time by serving up six in a row, giving the Warriors a 12-8 lead. NMMI battled back to gain a 19-18 lead before Gateway gained the advantage, 2119.

Once again, though, NMMI dominated the late stages. The Colts won six of the match’s final seven points — two on kills by Duree — to secure the win. “I think the girls needed that win to get some confidence, especially after losing the first two matches,” Schooley said. “I think that is going to help us, but we can’t overlook anybody that we are playing. We’ve got to

in the first inning and a two-run drive in the third off Alexi Ogando (12-6), giving him homers on three consecutive swings — including one in the eighth inning of Boston’s 13-2 victory Wednesday night. Gonzalez, who had his 13th career multihomer game, had gone 84 at-bats without a long ball before homering in the first inning of Tuesday night’s 11-5 win. David Ortiz and Jarrod

Saltalamacchia also connected for the Red Sox, who have won six of eight and remain one game ahead of New York in the AL East. The Yankees pounded Oakland 22-9 earlier Thursday. Miller (6-1) struck out six and walked two in his 10th start of the season. The lanky left-hander, who has also pitched in relief twice this season, got the assignment because manager Terry Francona

“We accomplished what we wanted to offensively, with the exception of putting the ball in the back of the net,” he said. “We moved the ball around and got the ball outside a lot. We worked the outsides well and we worked well at getting it inside and getting it back outside as we worked it up the field.” Lucas said that the victory was a team effort. “We played really well tonight and it was a great team effort,” he said. “We didn’t play very well against Ruidoso on Tuesday night and we had a long talk with these guys at practice Wednesday. We worked on a few things and we put them into play tonight. We had some phenomenal play by the goalkeeper to keep us in this thing. “We moved the ball around well. We were unlucky to not score a couple more goals. We hit the woodwork a couple of times, but I’ll take what we can get. I was very pleased with the guys tonight.” l.foster@roswell-record.com

get back to practice and start working on all those things we saw tonight that we need to work on.” Duree finished the game with seven kills and three aces for the Colts, while House had five kills and four aces. Fox led Gateway (0-2) with 10 kills and four aces. kjkeller@roswell-record.com

Gonzalez hits 2 HRs, Red Sox beat Rangers 6-0 ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — Adrian Gonzalez homered twice to give him five in four games, Andrew Miller pitched three-hit ball in a spot start and the Boston Red Sox beat the Texas Rangers 6-0 on Thursday night. Miller threw 6 1-3 impressive innings and the Red Sox took the final three matchups in a fourgame series between AL division leaders. Gonzalez hit a solo shot

pushed right-hander Tim Wakefield back a day, giving the knuckleballer his sixth shot at his 200th victory at home Friday night against Oakland. The Rangers, who have dropped five of six, held a seven-game lead in the AL West over the Los Angeles Angels on Aug. 17. That margin has shrunk to two games entering Friday night’s opener of a threegames series between the teams in Texas.


B4 Friday, August 26, 2011

DEAR ABBY: My husband purchased a bag of individually wrapped frozen chicken breasts during his lunch break. After work, we took our kids to a concert and didn’t return home until 8 p.m. The bag of chicken was in his trunk for seven hours on a hot summer day. My husband thought it was OK to refreeze the meat and feed this to our kids, ages 6 and 2. I adamantly disagreed. What are your thoughts? We’ve had this argument before. NO WAY! IN SAN JOSE

DEAR NO WAY!: Your husband is SERIOUSLY off base. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, “cold food” — such as chicken, fish, raw meat — should be purchased just before leaving the market and the shopper should plan to drive directly home. Always refrigerate perishable food within two hours,

COMICS

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

and when the temperature is above 90 degrees Fahrenheit, it should be refrigerated within one hour! Food left in the car for the length of time your husband did is no longer fit for human consumption and could have made your children seriously ill. Readers, for the answers to food safety questions, the USDA can be contacted on the Internet at AskKaren.gov. Submit a question there and it will be answered. The USDA also has a Meat and Poultry Hotline,

Jumble

(888) 674-6854, which is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. 

DEAR ABBY: My ex-husband and I divorced seven years ago. He has remarried, and I also recently married again. He is still bitter toward me. His emotional abuse was partly to blame for our split, although I was not entirely without fault. I made mistakes, too, which I regret. Two of my children hold me responsible for the divorce and continually throw my mistakes back in my face. I walk on eggshells around them. I have apologized repeatedly and asked their forgiveness. I’m afraid of losing contact with my grandchildren every time one of my kids becomes upset about the past. I have been to counseling, but was told I just have to be

happy with me. Is there a way my children can finally forgive me for the past? I’m not a bad person, just a flawed one.

Family Circus

HUMAN IN ONTARIO, CANADA

DEAR HUMAN:

We’re all flawed, including your children. If they are determined that blame for the divorce falls solely on you, while absolving your emotionally abusive husband, nothing you or I can do will change their minds.

You have paid your therapist good money for the sensible advice you received, so please heed it. The longer you continue to walk on eggshells and tolerate the treatment you are receiving, the longer it will continue. Concentrate on your own life, and far more happiness will result than what you’re experiencing now.

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Dear Heloise: My sister and I recently flew to Arizona. Instead of each taking one small suitcase and paying $25 apiece, we decided to consolidate and take ONE LARGE BAG. To keep things separate, I put all of my clothing into a zippered plastic bag from the purchase of a new pillow. My sister did the same in a plastic bag she had saved. When we got to our destination, we took out our own plastic bags and unpacked our things. Neither of us had to sort through the other’s to find something. It saved time and check-in fees. — Jan, via email Jan, congrats on being so smart! Readers, most airlines limit a checked bag to between 50 and 70 pounds, and there may be height and length limits, too. Be sure to find out beforehand so you aren’t caught off guard! Heloise 

Dear Heloise: In regard to the inquiry about cleaning glass stovetops, my hint is a miracle cleaner for that burned-on gunk. Baking soda: yes, yes, yes, PLUS vinegar! I keep baking soda in a small shaker and sprinkle it over the stovetop, making sure the gunk is covered. I spray vinegar onto the soda, dampening all of the soda, and let sit while doing other chores. I wipe up the soda mixture, and the stove is as good as new. Hope this cheapo solution works as good for others as it has for me! Helen N., Concordia, Kan.

Helen, you’ve hit upon my two favorite cleaners! Wow! I have compiled a collection of my favorite baking-soda hints in a handy pamphlet. If you would like to receive one, send $5 and a long, stamped (64 cents), self-addressed envelope to: Heloise/Baking Soda, P.O. Box 795001, San Antonio, TX 78279-5001. Use vinegar to remove odors from sponges. Heloise 

The Wizard of Id

Dear Heloise: I have found that some hotels do not provide a mat for the tub and shower. When traveling, I cut a piece of rubberized shelf liner about 18 inches long and roll it up and place in the corner of my luggage. I simply roll it out, step on it and shower. It dries quickly, rolls up and on we go. I do not fear slipping unnecessarily. Thanks so much for your hints — I look forward to reading them daily. Pat in Louisiana

Blondie

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Roswell Daily Record


FINANCIAL

Roswell Daily Record

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

Div Last Chg DBGoldDL ... 63.80 +.45 DBGoldDS ... 4.73 -.07 A-B-C DevelDiv .16 10.90 -.47 ABB Ltd .64e 19.96 -.63 DevonE .68 63.41 -1.45 ACE Ltd 1.36e 61.39 -1.20 DiamRk .32 7.29 -.19 AES Corp ... 10.23 -.43 DrSCBr rs ... 51.09 +3.30 AFLAC 1.20 35.26 -1.18 DirFnBr rs ... 61.28 +1.31 AK Steel .20 8.11 -.10 DirLCBr rs ... 45.53 +2.05 AMR ... d3.27 -.10 DrxEMBull1.20e 20.27 -1.30 AOL ... 13.94 +1.13 DrxEnBear ... 19.31 +1.18 AT&T Inc 1.72 29.06 -.37 DirEMBear ... 25.13 +1.38 AU Optron .14e d4.07 -.19 DrxFnBull ... 13.31 -.31 AbtLab 1.92 49.94 -1.17 DirxSCBull ... 39.78 -3.01 AberFitc .70 57.18 -2.06 DirxLCBull .10e 51.23 -2.57 Accenture .90 50.75 -.23 DirxEnBull ... 42.02 -3.06 AMD ... 6.37 +.03 Discover .24 24.40 -.43 .40f 32.01 -.50 Aetna .60 37.39 -.52 Disney Agilent ... 33.03 -.05 DomRescs 1.97 48.94 -.64 AlcatelLuc ... 3.29 -.17 DowChm 1.00f 26.40 -.43 Alcoa .12 11.59 -.28 DuPont 1.64 45.46 -.65 Allergan .20 77.08 -.82 DukeEngy 1.00f 18.56 -.31 Allstate .84 24.43 -.76 DukeRlty .68 10.81 -.43 ... 21.10 -.33 AlphaNRs ... 32.01 -.31 EMC Cp Altria 1.52 26.01 -.46 EOG Res .64 88.26 -1.66 ... 2.67 +.09 AmBev s 1.43e 33.50 -.21 EKodak Ameren 1.54 29.25 -.24 Eaton s 1.36 39.42 -1.28 .70 49.78 +.03 AMovilL s .41e 23.51 -.47 Ecolab AEagleOut .44a 10.17 -.43 EdisonInt 1.28 36.08 -.24 AEP 1.84 37.59 -.62 ElPasoCp .04 17.65 -.35 ... 9.46 -.25 AmExp .72 48.09 +.01 Elan AmIntlGrp ... 23.00 -.55 EldorGld g .12f 18.95 +.34 AmTower ... 50.51 -.99 EmersonEl 1.38 44.46 -1.33 Ameriprise .92 42.19 -.97 EnCana g .80 24.29 -.91 AmeriBrgn .46f 37.58 -.61 EndvSilv g ... 10.95 +.29 Anadarko .36 67.49 -1.23 ENSCO 1.40 43.36 -.43 AnalogDev 1.00 31.79 -.56 EqtyRsd 1.47e 57.93 -1.10 Annaly 2.59e 17.29 -.67 Exelon 2.10 42.30 -.75 ... 17.27 -.76 Anworth 1.00 6.91 -.20 Express Aon Corp .60 45.15 -.23 ExxonMbl 1.88 71.77 -1.77 Apache .60 98.98 -1.48 FMC Tch s ... 40.88 -1.16 ArcelorMit .75 19.98 -.63 FairchldS ... 12.33 -.15 ArchCoal .44 18.41 -.38 FedExCp .52 74.76 -1.84 ArchDan .64 27.65 -.78 FidNatInfo .20 26.97 -.60 ArmourRsd1.44 7.25 -.22 FstHorizon .04 6.65 -.14 AssuredG .18 13.39 +1.30 FirstEngy 2.20 42.73 -.80 AuRico g ... 13.29 +.33 FootLockr .66 19.63 -.37 ... 10.28 -.17 AveryD 1.00 26.92 -.41 FordM Avon .92 21.37 -.36 ForestLab ... 33.14 -.55 ... d17.24 -.80 BB&T Cp .64a 20.34 -.21 ForestOil BHP BillLt1.82e 79.57 -1.38 FMCG s 1.00a 43.50 +.03 BP PLC 1.68 37.47 -2.08 FrontierCm .75 7.21 -.09 BakrHu .60 54.26 -1.77 G-H-I BcoBrades .80r 16.67 -.10 BcoSantSA.82e 8.79 -.13 GameStop ... 22.50 -.85 BcoSBrasil1.65e 8.74 +.12 Gannett .32f 10.24 -.33 .45 16.02 -.36 BkofAm .04 7.65 +.66 Gap BkAm pfH 2.05 23.88 +1.52 GenElec .60f 15.45 -.27 ... 1.23 -.03 GenGrPr n .40 12.80 -.48 BkIrelnd BkNYMel .52 20.03 -.32 GenMills 1.22f 36.59 -.40 Barclay .36e 10.27 +.23 GenMot n ... 22.30 -.07 Bar iPVix rs ... 41.73 +.83 GenOn En ... d2.80 -.11 BarrickG .48 49.99 +1.00 GenuPrt 1.80 51.61 -.73 Baxter 1.24 52.84 -1.40 Genworth ... 6.31 -.24 BeazerHm ... 1.73 +.10 Gerdau .25e 8.11 -.24 BerkH B ... 68.99 -1.76 GlaxoSKln2.17e 41.88 -1.48 BestBuy .64f 24.14 -.91 GoldFLtd .24e 16.01 +.11 Blackstone .40 11.79 -.69 Goldcrp g .41 50.58 +1.14 BlockHR .60 13.55 -.80 GoldmanS 1.40 109.84 -.47 Boeing 1.68 61.10 -.59 Goodyear ... 11.39 -.66 BostonSci ... 6.35 +.03 Guess .80a 31.04 -2.25 Brinker .56 21.79 -1.52 HCP Inc 1.92 35.00 -.41 BrMySq 1.32 28.48 -.43 HSBC 1.90e 41.72 -.74 BrkfldOfPr .56 16.11 -.46 Hallibrtn .36 39.88 -.73 BrownShoe.28 d6.74 -1.09 HarleyD .50f 34.15 -.63 CB REllis ... 13.76 -1.39 HarrisCorp1.12f 36.53 -1.02 CBS B .40 22.66 -.55 HartfdFn .40 16.95 -.51 CF Inds 1.60f 175.17 -.23 HltCrREIT 2.86 47.88 -.52 ... 7.16 -.17 CIGNA .04 44.29 -.57 HltMgmt ... 7.35 +.01 CMS Eng .84 19.16 -.37 HeclaM 1.92f 50.78 -.69 CNO Fincl ... 5.89 -.18 Heinz ... 9.80 -.13 CSX s .48 20.91 -.09 Hertz .40 54.60 -1.60 CVS Care .50 33.97 -.47 Hess CblvsNY s .60 17.01 -.15 HewlettP .48 25.03 -.18 Calpine ... 13.52 -.43 HomeDp 1.00 33.84 -.53 Cameco g .40 22.30 +.09 HonwllIntl 1.33 44.73 -.09 Cameron ... 46.60 -.38 Hormel s .51 26.36 -2.08 CdnNRs gs .36 34.81 -.73 HostHotls .12f 10.62 -.38 CapOne .20 43.38 -.40 Huntsmn .40 12.08 -.11 CapitlSrce .04 5.82 -.29 IAMGld g .20f 20.15 +.43 ... 8.05 -.10 CapsteadM1.64e 12.66 -.24 ING ... 17.28 +.07 CareFusion ... 24.30 -.19 iShGold iSAstla 1.06e 22.90 -.38 Carnival 1.00 30.26 -1.29 Caterpillar 1.84f 83.25 -2.15 iShBraz 3.42e 60.51 -.70 .53e 28.52 -.24 ... 5.07 -.19 iSCan Cemex CenterPnt .79 19.24 -.33 iShGer .67e 20.01 -.69 CntryLink 2.90 34.43 -.44 iSh HK .42e 16.91 -.19 ChesEng .35 29.55 -.63 iShJapn .17e 9.39 -.13 Chevron 3.12 95.96 -1.63 iSh Kor .50e 51.37 -1.28 Chicos .20 12.98 -.33 iSMalas .39e 13.99 -.33 Chimera .62e 2.95 -.05 iShMex .71e 54.76 -1.47 ChinaUni .12e 19.84 +.81 iShSing .50e 12.33 -.15 Chubb 1.56 58.66 -1.73 iSTaiwn .29e 12.98 -.40 ... 40.00 +1.17 Citigrp rs .04 29.83 +1.38 iShSilver Citigp wtB ... .10 +.01 iShChina25.85e 36.63 -.25 CliffsNRs 1.12f 73.66 -1.17 iSSP500 2.45e 116.66 -1.85 Coach .90 51.44 -1.16 iShEMkts .84e 39.84 -.79 CocaCola 1.88 67.97 -1.71 iShB20 T 4.02e 107.43 +1.15 CocaCE .52 25.76 -.85 iS Eafe 1.68e 50.89 -1.26 ColgPal 2.32 86.85 -.45 iSR1KG .77e 53.77 -.92 CollctvBrd ... 12.19 +1.91 iShR2K .94e 67.50 -1.70 Comerica .40 23.41 -.43 iShREst 2.09e 53.85 -1.16 1.44f 43.57 -1.16 CompPrdS ... 26.90 -.63 ITW CompSci .80 28.33 -1.01 IngerRd .48f 29.70 -.40 IBM 3.00 165.58 -1.18 ConAgra .92 23.66 -.38 ConocPhil 2.64 64.78 -1.34 IntlGame .24 14.13 -.35 IntPap 1.05 25.07 -.51 ConsolEngy .40 42.83 +.03 ConEd 2.40 56.18 -.72 Interpublic .24 7.98 -.25 ConstellEn .96 37.10 -.94 Invesco .49f 17.05 -.73 Corning .20 14.02 -.44 InvMtgCap3.94e 16.82 -.73 Covidien .80 50.22 -.97 ItauUnibH .84e 16.47 +.12 CSVS2xVxS ... 57.38 +2.27 J-K-L CSVelIVSt s ... 7.41 -.15 Cummins 1.60f 85.13 -1.45 JPMorgCh 1.00 35.72 -.11 Jabil .28 14.77 -.25 CypSharp 2.40 12.89 -.44 Jaguar g ... 6.16 +.30 D-E-F JanusCap .20 6.59 +.02 DCT Indl .28 4.09 -.17 JohnJn 2.28 64.55 -.98 DR Horton .15 9.61 +.16 JohnsnCtl .64 29.68 -1.27 DanaHldg ... 11.32 -.29 JnprNtwk ... 20.36 -.66 Danaher .08 41.97 -1.25 KB Home .25 5.75 +.34 .73e 11.61 -.06 Darden 1.72f 45.26 -2.20 KKR DeanFds ... 8.05 -.28 Keycorp .12 6.35 -.11 Deere 1.64f 73.06 -2.04 KimbClk 2.80 67.30 -.63 .72 16.60 -.10 DeltaAir ... 6.83 -.42 Kimco DenburyR ... 14.21 -.32 Kinross g .12f 17.06 +.32 KodiakO g ... 5.33 -.12 DeutschBk1.07e 38.91 -.67 Name

Name Sell Chg Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 17.50 -.23 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.60 -.21 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.76 -.07 GrowthI 23.80 -.43 Ultra 21.59 -.40 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.57 -.27 AMutlA p 23.87 -.37 BalA p 17.34 -.17 BondA p 12.49 +.02 CapIBA p 48.40 -.59 CapWGA p32.05 -.53 CapWA p 21.33 -.02 EupacA p 36.65 -.63 FdInvA p 33.46 -.54 GovtA p 14.47 +.02 GwthA p 27.71 -.41 HI TrA p 10.71 ... IncoA p 16.08 -.17 IntBdA p 13.64 +.02 IntlGrIncA p28.74 -.54 ICAA p 25.55 -.37 NEcoA p 23.43 -.37 N PerA p 25.93 -.43 NwWrldA 48.75 -.71 SmCpA p 33.83 -.58 TxExA p 12.26 ... WshA p 26.12 -.44 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 25.83 -.41 IntEqII I r 10.67 -.18 Artisan Funds: Intl 20.22 -.36 IntlVal r 24.39 -.33 MidCap 31.45 -.60 MidCapVal19.31 -.40

Baron Funds: Growth 48.03 -.99 SmallCap 22.02 -.53 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.11 +.01 DivMu 14.68 ... TxMgdIntl 13.41 -.25 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.78 -.23 GlAlA r 18.65 -.15 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.39 -.14 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.82 -.22 GlbAlloc r 18.74 -.15 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 47.66 -.83 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 57.06-1.13 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 25.74 -.61 DivEqInc 8.93 -.13 DivrBd 5.11 +.01 TxEA p 13.35 ... Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 26.58 -.62 AcornIntZ 36.44 -.43 LgCapGr 11.82 -.21 ValRestr 43.64 -.82 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.28 +.06 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq n 9.80 -.14 USCorEq1 n9.92 -.19 USCorEq2 n9.74 -.19 DWS Invest S: MgdMuni S 8.93 ... Davis Funds A: NYVen A 30.98 -.43

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: low settle

chg.

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Aug 11 113.20 114.00 113.05 113.85 +.60 Oct 11 114.32 114.47 113.45 114.10 +.18 Dec 11 116.55 116.82 115.62 116.45 +.30 Feb 12 119.65 120.05 118.70 119.60 +.20 Apr 12 123.55 123.80 122.57 123.67 +.27 Jun 12 121.60 122.40 121.20 122.35 +.58 Aug 12 121.60 122.10 120.90 122.05 +.40 Oct 12 124.20 124.40 124.20 124.40 +.10 Dec 12 124.90 124.90 124.90 124.90 -.30 Last spot N/A Est. sales 6225. Wed’s Sales: 49,308 Wed’s open int: 306088, up +672 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Aug 11 133.52 133.77 133.52 133.67 +.17 Sep 11 131.45 131.70 130.40 131.62 +.07 Oct 11 132.00 132.20 130.95 132.20 +.18 Nov 11 133.10 133.10 132.02 132.90 -.45 Jan 12 134.25 134.30 133.45 134.12 -.20 Mar 12 134.25 134.75 133.70 134.72 +.20 Apr 12 134.50 135.00 134.40 135.00 May 12 134.90 136.00 134.90 136.00 Aug 12 137.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 1016. Wed’s Sales: 8,545 Wed’s open int: 34012, off -147 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 87.32 87.90 86.85 87.22 +.17 Dec 11 84.30 84.57 83.27 84.45 +1.00 Feb 12 86.75 87.50 86.75 87.40 +.95 Apr 12 89.87 89.90 89.25 89.82 +.95

46.41 -1.09 33.61 -.61 22.50 ... 5.96 +.02 6.63 -.10 42.11 -1.49 26.42 -1.04 13.40 +.26 35.89 -.50 35.52 -.21 19.05 -.76 4.70 +.40 1.95 -.02 35.56 -.58 20.11 -.23 30.42 -.37

M-N-0

... 6.90 +.16 MBIA MEMC ... 6.65 -.15 MF Global ... 5.21 -.19 MFA Fncl 1.00f 7.15 -.27 MGIC ... 2.29 +.16 MGM Rsts ... 9.81 -.43 Macys .40f 24.45 -.74 Manitowoc .08 9.52 -.32 Manulife g .52 12.98 -.38 MarathnO s .60 25.19 -.51 MarathP n .80 34.38 -1.45 MktVGold .40e 61.07 +1.11 MktVRus .18e 30.86 -.59 MktVJrGld2.93e 34.74 +.49 MarIntA .40 27.28 -1.16 MarshM .88f 28.69 -.08 Masco .30 7.88 -.11 McDrmInt ... 12.73 -.04 McDnlds 2.44 u88.71 -1.42 McGrwH 1.00 40.30 -1.00 McMoRn ... 11.29 -.38 MedcoHlth ... 52.48 -1.59 Medtrnic .97 33.86 -.35 Merck 1.52 31.86 -.37 MetLife .74 31.53 -1.07 MetroPCS ... 10.44 -.37 MitsuUFJ ... d4.19 -.09 MobileTele1.06e 15.91 -.02 Monsanto 1.20f 69.66 -1.11 MonstrWw ... 7.22 -.34 Moodys .56 29.26 -.63 MorgStan .20 16.77 +.44 .20 66.81 -.64 Mosaic MotrlaSol n .88 40.17 -.25 MotrlaMo n ... 37.85 -.09 NRG Egy ... 21.59 -.72 NV Energy .48 14.35 -.25 NYSE Eur 1.20 26.68 -.60 Nabors ... 17.08 -.25 NOilVarco .44 62.62 -1.77 NatSemi .40 24.80 ... Navistar ... 39.83 -.51 NY CmtyB 1.00 12.23 -.26 NewellRub .32 13.23 -.11 NewmtM 1.20f 60.83 +.57 Nexen g .20 19.85 -.88 NiSource .92 20.40 -.45 NikeB 1.24 83.76 -2.04 NobleCorp .53e 30.17 +.29 NokiaCp .55e 5.89 -.17 Nordstrm .92 39.96 -1.14 NorflkSo 1.72f 64.23 -1.20 NorthropG 2.00 51.24 -.98 Novartis 2.53e 56.24 -1.50 Nucor 1.45 33.24 -.76 OcciPet 1.84 81.28 -1.80 OfficeDpt ... 2.25 -.07 OilSvHT 1.58e 122.12 -2.61 Omnicom 1.00 38.63 -.80 OwensIll ... 17.09 -.34

P-Q-R

PMI Grp ... .23 +.01 PNC 1.40 46.58 -.29 PPL Corp 1.40 27.82 -.27 PatriotCoal ... 13.28 +.05 PeabdyE .34 45.97 +.90 Penney .80 26.18 -.52 PepcoHold 1.08 18.90 -.42 PepsiCo 2.06 63.02 -.68 Petrohawk ... 38.76 +.02 PetrbrsA 1.34e 24.97 -.45 Petrobras 1.28e 27.14 -.60 Pfizer .80 17.96 -.43 PhilipMor 2.56 68.87 -1.27 PitnyBw 1.48 19.01 -.41 PlainsEx ... 27.12 -.42 Potash s .28 54.60 -.76 ... 12.09 -.08 PrecDrill PrinFncl .55f 23.59 -.36 ProLogis 1.12 25.00 -.70 ProShtS&P ... 45.48 +.68 PrUShS&P ... 25.02 +.74 ProUltDow .28e 50.46 -1.56 PrUlShDow ... 20.08 +.58 ProUltQQQ ... 71.39 -2.32 PrUShQQQ rs... 57.25 +1.75 ProUltSP .35e 40.13 -1.21 PrUShtFn rs ... 78.51 +1.22 ProUShL20 ... 25.39 -.54 ProUltSRE ... 16.21 +.68 ProUltFin .05e 42.58 -.61 ProUltR2K .01e 30.30 -1.57 ProUSSP500 ... 20.12 +.84 PrUltSP500 s.05e50.16 -2.40 ProUSSlv rs ... 11.92 -.96 PrUltCrde rs ... 32.19 -.22 ProUltSGld ... 16.74 -.21 ProctGam 2.10 62.53 -.78 ProgsvCp 1.40e 18.19 -.48 ProUSR2K rs ... 56.12 +2.53 Prudentl 1.15f 47.17 -1.21 PSEG 1.37 33.16 -.28 PulteGrp ... 4.24 +.48 QksilvRes ... 8.55 -.50 RadianGrp .01 2.70 +.29 RadioShk .25 11.91 -.57 Raytheon 1.72 40.89 -1.17 RegionsFn .04 4.05 -.11 RepubSvc .88f 29.36 -.31 ReynAm s 2.12 36.25 -.48 RioTinto 1.17e 56.97 -1.29 RiteAid ... 1.01 -.04 Rowan ... 31.83 -.63 RylCarb .40 22.65 -1.22 RoyDShllA 3.36 63.16 -1.73

Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 31.36 -.43 NYVen C 29.82 -.41 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.37 +.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq n18.84 -.36 EmMktV 29.59 -.64 IntSmVa n 14.86 -.15 LargeCo 9.17 -.15 USLgVa n 17.84 -.28 US Micro n11.99 -.32 US Small n18.65 -.49 US SmVa 21.53 -.57 IntlSmCo n15.29 -.15 Fixd n 10.35 ... IntVa n 15.56 -.23 Glb5FxInc n11.43 +.02 2YGlFxd n 10.24 +.01 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 64.93 -.79 Income 13.39 +.02 IntlStk 30.74 -.54 Stock 96.13-1.65 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.21 ... Dreyfus: Aprec 38.07 -.58 DreihsAcInc10.50 +.01 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 16.18 -.25 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.57 ... GblMacAbR10.08 ... LgCapVal 16.23 -.25 FMI Funds: LgCap p n 14.75 -.21 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.84 ... FPACres n25.85 -.24

CATTLE/HOGS Open high

Kohls 1.00 Kraft 1.16 Kroger .42 LDK Solar ... LSI Corp ... LVSands ... LeggMason .32 LennarA .16 LillyEli 1.96 Limited .80a LincNat .20 LizClaib ... LloydBkg ... Loews .25 Lowes .56 LyonBas A .80f

S-T-U

SAIC ... 14.33 -.09 SCANA 1.94 39.08 -.80 SLM Cp .40 13.69 -.18 SpdrDJIA 3.12e 111.26 -1.69 SpdrGold ... 172.36 +.71 SP Mid 1.65e 148.10 -3.16 S&P500ETF2.44e116.281.80 SpdrHome .31e 13.89 +.03 SpdrKbwBk.20e 18.77 ... SpdrLehHY4.28e 37.52 -.35 SpdrKbw RB.37e 20.70 -.46 SpdrRetl .46e 45.73 -1.01 SpdrOGEx .47e 48.95 -1.18 Safeway .58 d16.81 -.31 StJude .84 43.57 -.45 Saks ... 9.04 -.02 Salesforce ... 112.47 -3.95 SandRdge ... 6.54 -.16 Sanofi 1.82e 35.71 -.93 SaraLee .46 17.35 -.32 Schlmbrg 1.00 73.11 -3.12 Schwab .24 11.75 -.41 SeadrillLtd2.89e 29.91 -1.13 SealAir .52 d17.13 -.65 SemiHTr .64e 27.90 -.73 SiderurNac.81e 9.14 -.21 SignetJwlrs .40 36.40 +1.24 SilvWhtn g .12 38.02 +.91 SilvrcpM g .08 7.97 -.13 Solera .40f 54.33 -2.22 SouthnCo 1.89 40.89 -.34 SwstAirl .02 8.12 -.09 SwstnEngy ... 36.40 -.99 SpectraEn 1.04 25.08 -.45 SprintNex ... 3.23 -.22 SprottGold ... 15.26 +.20 SP Matls 1.30e 33.23 -.37 SP HlthC .63e 31.84 -.55 SP CnSt .83e 29.92 -.47 SP Consum.59e 35.38 -.72 SP Engy 1.06e 64.56 -1.39 SPDR Fncl .18e 12.66 -.04 SP Inds .67e 30.30 -.58 SP Tech .35e 23.34 -.34 SP Util 1.33e 33.05 -.55 StarwdHtl .30f 40.67 -2.26 StateStr .72 33.59 -.49 Statoil ASA1.10e 22.76 -.78 Suncor gs .44 29.97 -.74 Sunoco .60 35.43 -.74 SunstnHtl ... 5.23 +.03 Suntech ... 5.07 +.02 SunTrst .20f 18.59 -.04 Supvalu .35 d6.57 -.22 SwiftTrns n ... 8.30 +.34 Synovus .04 1.30 -.06 Sysco 1.04 26.92 -.37 TE Connect .72 28.95 -.68 TJX .76 53.81 -1.87 TaiwSemi .52e 11.35 -.39 TalismE g .27f 15.69 -.58 Target 1.20f 50.30 -.70 TeckRes g .60 39.91 -1.16 TelefEsp s1.98e 20.06 -.59 TenetHlth ... 5.09 -.04 Teradyn ... 11.34 -.13 Tesoro ... 20.94 -.36 TexInst .52 25.31 -.80 Textron .08 15.05 -.72 ThermoFis ... 52.62 -1.04 3M Co 2.20 78.19 -2.10 Tiffany 1.16 63.11 -.56 TimeWarn .94 29.21 -.63 TollBros ... 15.63 +.21 Total SA 2.38e 46.78 -1.38 Transocn .79e 51.47 +.08 Travelers 1.64 d47.99 -1.52 TrinaSolar ... 14.89 +.32 TwoHrbInv1.59e 9.08 -.24 TycoIntl 1.00 39.80 -.34 Tyson .16 16.92 -.47 UBS AG ... 13.84 -.33 UDR .80f 25.08 -.71 US Airwy ... 5.08 -.22 US Gold ... 5.64 +.08 USG ... 8.22 +.37 UnilevNV 1.21e 33.16 -.69 UnionPac 1.90 88.46 -.60 UtdContl ... 17.01 -.51 UPS B 2.08 63.66 -1.16 UtdRentals ... 14.95 +.30 US Bancrp .50 22.35 +.11 US NGs rs ... d9.85 +.07 US OilFd ... 32.97 -.11 USSteel .20 26.51 -.72 UtdTech 1.92 70.75 -.66 UtdhlthGp .65 45.09 -.82 UnumGrp .42f 22.60 -.63

V-W-X-Y-Z

Vale SA 1.14e Vale SA pf1.14e ValeroE .20 VangTSM1.31e VangREIT1.92e VangEmg .82e VerizonCm 1.95 ViacomB 1.00f VimpelCm .80e Visa .60 VMware ... WalMart 1.46f Walgrn .90f WsteMInc 1.36 WeathfIntl ... WellsFargo .48 Wendys Co .08 WDigital ... WstnRefin ... WstnUnion .32f Weyerh .60 2.00 Whrlpl WmsCos .80f WmsSon .68 WillisGp 1.04 WiscEn s 1.04 WT India .15e Wyndham .60 XL Grp .44 XcelEngy 1.04 Xerox .17 Yamana g .18 YingliGrn ...

26.23 -.35 23.90 -.33 20.21 -.25 59.48 -1.01 54.27 -1.03 40.99 -.82 35.77 -.70 43.82 -.90 10.82 -.30 84.11 -2.27 80.18 -2.87 52.70 -.67 34.11 -.22 32.48 -.63 15.20 -.43 24.76 +.33 4.74 -.16 27.61 -.30 16.15 -.02 16.09 -.41 16.24 -.31 56.83 -1.52 24.79 -.76 31.18 +.53 37.29 +.31 30.82 -.67 19.69 -.49 28.79 -1.35 18.85 -.70 24.10 -.30 7.53 -.31 15.53 +.50 5.97 -.15

Friday, August 26, 2011

MARKET SUMMARY

NYSE

AMEX

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 7987305 7.65 +.66 S&P500ETF2717178116.281.80 SPDR Fncl1845936 12.66 -.04 DrxFnBull 930335 13.31 -.31

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) NwGold g 54229 CFCda g 33181 GoldStr g 30415 VirnetX 28717 GrtBasG g 25711

Last 12.76 24.48 2.22 20.50 1.99

Chg +.66 +.56 -.08 +1.40 +.06

Name Vol (00) Last PwShs QQQ82900851.83 SiriusXM 606255 1.69 Cisco 532254 15.08 Intel 505385 19.42 Microsoft 467159 24.57

Chg +.51 +.86 +.41 +.36 +.32

%Chg +27.1 +19.7 +18.5 +14.6 +7.6

Name Sanfilp GulfRes TiVo Inc UnivDisp Tegal rs

Last 8.45 2.09 9.50 46.73 3.00

Chg +1.85 +.36 +1.38 +6.31 +.40

%Chg +28.0 +20.8 +17.0 +15.6 +15.49

Name Last Chg eMagin 3.17 -.34 Argan 10.00 -1.00 Quepasa 4.22 -.36 SynergyRs 3.15 -.25 SbdCp 2200.00-159.05

%Chg -9.7 -9.1 -7.9 -7.4 -6.7

Name LifePrt slf AviatNetw ParkBcp AmIndep Pendrell

Last 6.70 2.47 2.15 5.05 2.29

Chg -1.64 -.50 -.42 -.69 -.31

%Chg -19.7 -16.8 -16.3 -12.0 -11.9

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg Name CollctvBrd 12.19 +1.91 +18.6 Banro wt CrwfdA 5.10 +.69 +15.6 B&HO PulteGrp 4.24 +.48 +12.8 PhrmAth RadianGrp 2.70 +.29 +12.0 Versar BkAm wtA 3.80 +.40 +11.8 Banro g

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name CameltInfo BrownShoe MarineP GlbGeophy LIN TV h

Last 4.15 6.74 5.31 9.66 2.91

Chg -.77 -1.09 -.60 -1.07 -.31

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

715 2,353 78 3,146 13 52 5,071,773,088

52-Week High Low 12,876.00 9,936.62 5,627.85 4,010.52 442.01 381.99 8,718.25 6,594.95 2,490.51 1,830.65 2,887.75 2,099.29 1,370.58 1,039.70 14,562.01 10,877.63 868.57 588.58

Name

%Chg -15.7 -13.9 -10.2 -10.0 -9.6

Div

Last 2.39 5.22 2.63 2.83 4.52

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

161 291 33 485 ... 1063.83 76,013,308015

INDEXES

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 11,149.82 4,343.73 424.55 7,149.67 2,203.45 2,419.63 1,159.27 12,165.60 674.42

Chg

YTD %Chg Name

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

Net Chg -170.89 -84.70 -6.73 -123.46 -44.70 -48.06 -18.33 -211.81 -18.15

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

PE Last

+.30 +.75 +.80 +.65 +.75 +.50 +.05

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high low settle COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 11 105.09 105.09 100.98 102.59 Dec 11 105.61 106.39 101.74 102.99 Mar 12 102.38 103.25 99.00 100.48 May 12 100.05 100.85 98.19 99.57 Jul 12 100.00 100.00 97.33 98.54 Oct 12 98.29 Dec 12 95.50 96.95 95.50 96.51 Mar 13 97.61 May 13 97.21 Jul 13 97.21 Last spot N/A Est. sales 15218. Wed’s Sales: 15,308 Wed’s open int: 146598, up +802

chg.

-2.03 -2.00 -1.49 -1.05 -.98 -.45 -.19 -.19 -.19 -.14

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low settle

chg.

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 11 759 764 734ø 757ü +8 Dec 11 787ø 793 762 787fl +10ø Mar 12 816ü 821fl 791ü 817ø +11ø

Chg -.86 -.06 -.38 -.38 -.33f

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Div

499 2,062 86 2,647 8 63.83 1,762,011,015

% Chg -1.51 -1.91 -1.56 -1.70 -1.99 -1.95 -1.56 -1.71 -2.62

YTD % Chg -3.69 -14.94 +4.83 -10.23 -.22 -8.79 -7.82 -8.94 -13.94

PE Last

Chg

52-wk % Chg +11.66 +6.11 +10.17 +7.27 +18.35 +14.20 +10.70 +10.87 +12.45.

YTD %Chg

BkofAm

.04

...

7.65 +.66

-42.7 Oneok Pt s

2.34f

18

41.50 -.27

+4.4

Chevron

3.12

8

95.96 -1.63

+5.2 PNM Res

.50

29

14.55 -.35

+11.8

CocaCola

1.88

13

67.97 -1.71

+3.3 PepsiCo

2.06

16

63.02 -.68

-3.5

Disney

.40f

14

32.01 -.50

.80

12

17.96 -.43

+2.6

EOG Res

.64

52

88.26 -1.66

-3.4 SwstAirl

.02

12

8.12 -.09

-37.4

...

5

10.28 -.17

-38.8 TexInst

.52

10

25.31 -.80

-22.1

HewlettP

.48

6

25.03 -.18

-40.5 TimeWarn

.94

12

29.21 -.63

-9.2

HollyFront

.70f

16

66.00 -2.04

+61.9 TriContl

.29e

...

13.35 -.13

-3.0

Intel

.84f

9

19.42 -.38

-7.7 WalMart

1.46f

12

52.70 -.67

-2.3

IBM

3.00

13 165.58 -1.18

+12.8 WashFed

.24

17

14.47 -.43

-14.5

Merck

1.52

12

-11.6 WellsFargo

.48

10

24.76 +.33

-20.1

24.10 -.30

+2.3

FordM

Microsoft

.64

31.86 -.37

-14.7 Pfizer

HOW TO READ THE MARKET IN REVIEW 9

24.57 -.33

-12.0 XcelEngy

1.04

15

Here are the 525 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 400 most active on the Nasdaq National Markets and 100 most active on American Stock Exchange. Mutual funds are 450 largest. Stocks in bold changed 5 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letters’ list. AAR .48 12.88 # Div: Current annual dividend rate paid on stock, based on latest quar- ACMIn 1.10 9.75 +.13 # ACM Op .80 7.25 terly or semiannual declaration, unless otherwise footnoted. ACM Sc 1.10 8.50 -.13 Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. ACMSp .96 7.50 # Chg: Loss or gain for the day. No change indicated by ... mark. Fund Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold. Chg: Daily net change in the NAV.

AAL Mutual: Bond p 9.49 -.01

Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. d – New 52- CaGrp 14.47 -.03 wk low during trading day. g – Dividend in Canadian $. Stock price in U.S.$. n – MuBd 10.43 -.01 New issue in past 52 wks. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. s – Split SmCoSt 9.73 -.05 or stock dividend of 25 pct or more in last 52 wks. Div begins with date of split or stock dividend. u – New 52-wk high during trading day. v – Trading halted on primary market. Unless noted, dividend rates are annual disbursements based on last declaration. pf – Preferred. pp – Holder owes installment(s) of purchase price. rt – Rights. un – Units. wd – When distributed. wi – When issued. wt – Warrants. ww – With warrants. xw – Without warrants. Dividend Footnotes: a – Also extra or extras. b – Annual rate plus stock dividend. c – Liquidating dividend. e – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos. f – Annual rate, increased on last declaration. i – Declared or paid after stock dividend or split. j – Paid this year, dividend omitted, deferred or no action taken at last meeting. k – Declared or paid this year, accumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m – Annual rate, reduced on last declaration. p – Init div, annual rate unknown. r – Declared or paid in preceding 12 mos plus stock dividend. t – Paid in stock in last 12 mos, estimated cash value on ex-dividend or distribution date. x – Ex-dividend or ex-rights. y – Ex-dividend and sales in full. z – Sales in full. vj – In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized under the Bankruptcy Act, or securities assumed by such companies. • Most active stocks above must be worth $1 and gainers/losers $2. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Wednesday’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

MUTUAL FUNDS

FUTURES

May 12 826 833 807ø 827ø +10 Jul 12 828ø 833fl 808ü 828ü +7ü Sep 12 838 844ø 827ü 839ü +6 Dec 12 856 862 843ø 856ü +3ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 161213. Wed’s Sales: 82,013 Wed’s open int: 427269, off -4329 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 11 731fl 736 723ø 732ü +ø Dec 11 742 747 734ü 743ø +ø Mar 12 755 758ü 745ü 755 +1 May 12 758 761ø 748fl 758fl +1ø Jul 12 759fl 763 751 760ø +1fl Sep 12 699 700 693ü 699 -1fl Dec 12 655 656ø 647fl 655 +ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 499188. Wed’s Sales: 249,476 Wed’s open int: 1264739, off -485 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 11 368ø 368ø 358 368 +7fl Dec 11 375 378ø 365ø 378 +9fl Mar 12 383ü 388 381ü 388 +9ü May 12 385fl 395 385fl 395 +9ü Jul 12 392 399 392 399 +7 Sep 12 401fl 408fl 401fl 408fl +7 Dec 12 375 382 375 382 +7 Last spot N/A Est. sales 3425. Wed’s Sales: 1,183 Wed’s open int: 14026, up +98 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 11 1386ü 1391ü 1377fl 1386 -ø Nov 11 1392fl 1397fl 1384 1392fl -fl Jan 12 1403ü 1408 1395 1403ü -ø Mar 12 1406 1411 1398ø 1406 +ü May 12 1404 1409ü 1395ø 1404ü +1 Jul 12 1406 1411fl 1399 1406ø +1ø Aug 12 1388 1390 1388 1390 +2 Sep 12 1360ø 1363ø 1360ø 1363ø +3 Nov 12 1340 1342 1327fl 1339fl +5fl Jan 13 1333fl 1343ü 1333fl 1343ü +5ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 231507. Wed’s Sales: 177,178 Wed’s open int: 537441, up +6623

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

D-E-F

Div Last Chg

A-B-C

ASML Hld .58e 33.02 -1.50 ATP O&G ... 12.90 +1.12 Accuray ... 4.54 -.19 AcmePkt ... 41.25 -2.07 ActivsBliz .17f 11.11 -.12 Acxiom ... 9.21 -.46 AdobeSy ... 23.87 -.24 Affymetrix ... 5.02 -.13 AirTrnsp ... 4.99 +.36 AkamaiT ... 20.01 -.65 Akorn ... 7.74 -.29 Alkerm ... 15.47 -.41 AlldHlthcr ... 3.75 ... AllscriptH ... 16.78 +.08 AlteraCp lf .32f 35.03 -.98 Amarin ... 10.09 -.45 Amazon ... 192.03 -1.70 ACapAgy 5.60e 27.76 -.86 AmCapLtd ... 7.86 -.17 AmSupr ... 6.14 -.17 Amgen 1.12 53.46 -.80 AmkorT lf ... 3.93 -.11 Amylin ... 10.10 -.40 Ancestry ... 30.95 -1.38 A123 Sys ... 4.70 +.40 ApolloGrp ... 44.43 -1.84 ApolloInv 1.12 8.28 -.23 Apple Inc ... 373.72 -2.46 ApldMatl .32 10.81 -.55 ArenaPhm ... 1.28 -.02 AresCap 1.40 14.08 -.34 AriadP ... 8.71 -.12 Ariba Inc ... 23.95 -.21 ArmHld .15e 25.48 -1.19 Arris ... 10.08 -.27 ArubaNet ... 17.14 -.65 AsiaInfoL ... 9.48 -.18 AspenTech ... 16.04 -.23 AsscdBanc .04 10.21 -.13 Atmel ... 8.70 -.81 Autodesk ... 25.56 -.91 AutoData 1.44 47.95 -.81 Auxilium ... 17.07 -.19 AvagoTch .36f 30.88 -1.39 AvanirPhm ... 2.64 -.09 AviatNetw ... d2.47 -.50 AvisBudg ... 11.35 -.33 BE Aero ... 32.45 -.95 BGC Ptrs .68 6.00 -.30 BMC Sft ... 38.32 -.98 BeacnRfg ... 17.67 +.57 BedBath ... 53.19 -.51 BiogenIdc ... 90.67 -1.38 BioMarin ... 27.21 -.84 BioSante ... 2.34 -.08 BlueCoat ... 12.80 -.18 BostPrv .04 5.90 +.05 BrigExp ... 26.53 -.68 Broadcom .36 32.69 -.66 BrcdeCm ... 3.48 +.01 BrukerCp ... 13.28 -.31 CA Inc .20 19.53 -.22 CH Robins 1.16 66.31 -1.16 CNinsure ... d10.93 -1.28 CVB Fncl .34 7.98 -.19 Cadence ... 8.61 -.25 CapFdF rs .30a 10.60 -.08 CpstnTrb h ... 1.11 -.07 CareerEd ... 15.70 -.40 Carrizo ... 26.43 -1.42 CathayGen .04 12.12 -.30 Cavium ... 27.74 +1.10 Celgene ... 56.36 -1.45 CentEuro ... 5.45 -.19 CentAl ... 10.70 -.32 Cephln ... 80.49 -.06 ChrmSh ... 2.89 -.09 ChartInds ... 40.53 -2.70 ChkPoint ... 51.58 -1.21 Cheesecake ... 26.13 -1.51 ChildPlace ... 38.77 -1.16 CienaCorp ... d10.45 -.61 CinnFin 1.61f 26.49 -.55 Cintas .49f 29.98 -.50 Cirrus ... 13.95 -.28 Cisco .24 15.08 -.38 CitrixSys ... 53.81 -1.27 CleanEngy ... 13.23 +.40 Clearwire ... 2.99 -.06 CognizTech ... 59.20 -1.22 ColumLabs ... 1.97 -.13 Comcast .45 20.23 -.34 Comc spcl .45 20.04 -.26 Compuwre ... 7.74 -.23 ConcurTch ... 36.87 -1.48 CorinthC ... 1.82 -.08 Costco .96 75.86 -1.63 Cree Inc ... 28.47 -1.01 Crocs ... 26.01 -1.18 CrosstexE .40f 9.50 +.09 Ctrip.com ... 38.50 -.70 CypSemi .36 16.18 -.70

Dell Inc ... Dndreon ... Dentsply .20 Depomed ... DigRiver ... DirecTV A ... DiscCm A ... DiscCm C ... DishNetwk ... DonlleyRR 1.04 DrmWksA ... DryShips ... E-Trade ... eBay ... ErthLink .20 EstWstBcp .20 ElectArts ... EndoPhrm ... Ener1 lf ... EngyConv ... ... EngyXXI Entegris ... EntropCom ... Equinix ... EricsnTel .37e Exelixis ... ExideTc ... Expedia .28 ExpdIntl .50f F5 Netwks ... FLIR Sys .24 FifthThird .24 ... Finisar FinLine .20 FstNiagara .64 FstSolar ... FstMerit .64 Fiserv ... Flextrn ... FocusMda ... Fossil Inc ... FosterWhl ... FuelCell ... FultonFncl .20f

low settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Oct 11 85.58 86.56 83.01 85.30 Nov 11 85.92 86.93 83.41 85.64 Dec 11 86.25 87.34 83.84 86.02 Jan 12 86.55 87.70 84.29 86.44 Feb 12 86.89 88.12 84.80 86.88 Mar 12 87.00 88.56 85.66 87.33 Apr 12 87.73 89.11 85.81 87.79 May 12 88.32 89.47 86.64 88.25 Jun 12 88.77 90.01 86.79 88.70 Jul 12 89.05 89.82 87.44 89.12 Aug 12 89.18 90.57 88.71 89.44 Sep 12 89.71 Oct 12 89.96 Nov 12 90.22 Dec 12 90.26 91.70 88.46 90.49 Jan 13 90.66 Feb 13 90.81 Mar 13 90.98 Apr 13 91.18 May 13 91.33 Jun 13 91.47 Jul 13 91.58 Aug 13 91.66 Last spot N/A Est. sales 605581. Wed’s Sales: 528,667 Wed’s open int: 1464463, off -793 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Sep 11 2.9650 2.9732 2.7900 2.9679 Oct 11 2.8034 2.8086 2.7439 2.8017 Nov 11 2.7447 2.7567 2.6900 2.7429 Dec 11 2.7184 2.7310 2.6629 2.7160 Jan 12 2.7068 2.7203 2.6660 2.7132 Feb 12 2.7190 2.7372 2.6755 2.7195 Mar 12 2.7177 2.7405 2.6938 2.7289 Apr 12 2.8295 2.8370 2.8295 2.8370 May 12 2.8344 Jun 12 2.8253 2.8441 2.7944 2.8247 Jul 12 2.8067

chg.

+.14 +.11 +.08 +.07 +.06 +.06 +.06 +.07 +.08 +.09 +.10 +.12 +.15 +.17 +.19 +.18 +.17 +.16 +.16 +.15 +.15 +.16 +.16

+.0895 +.0459 +.0311 +.0258 +.0225 +.0187 +.0149 +.0114 +.0094 +.0072 +.0068

Intl I r 16.63 -.14 Oakmark 38.49 -.65 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.27 -.06 GlbSMdCap13.74-.22 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 40.15 -.78 DvMktA p 31.01 -.64 GlobA p 54.18-1.08 GblStrIncA x4.20 ... Gold p 47.52 +.86 IntBdA p 6.72 -.02 MnStFdA 29.31 -.45 Oppenheimer Roch: RoMu A p 15.51 ... RcNtMuA 6.83 -.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 30.74 -.63 IntlBdY 6.71 -.03 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.96 +.02 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r10.74 +.02 AllAsset 12.12 +.01 ComodRR 8.91 +.08 DivInc 11.28 ... EmgMkCur10.79 -.01 FltInc r 8.39 ... HiYld 8.83 +.02 InvGrCp 10.55 +.05 LowDu 10.40 +.01 RealRet 12.72 +.15 RealRtnI 12.06 +.08 ShortT 9.81 ... TotRt 10.96 +.02 TR II 10.50 +.03 TRIII 9.61 +.02 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.40 +.01 RealRtA p 12.06 +.08

14.21 -.47 11.79 -.49 33.38 -.35 5.47 -.22 18.71 -.37 41.89 -.99 38.19 -.49 35.67 -.19 21.81 -.43 14.02 -.17 19.72 -.15 2.66 +.01 10.66 -.22 28.33 -.72 7.04 -.09 15.79 -.24 20.40 +.06 30.08 -.79 .35 -.01 .83 +.17 23.88 -.65 6.90 -.20 3.87 -.10 85.06 -2.81 10.52 -.43 6.02 -.26 4.78 -.16 27.23 -.51 42.73 -1.01 71.72 -1.74 23.52 -.45 9.74 -.37 15.72 -1.04 18.59 -.57 10.05 -.09 96.49 +.70 11.86 -.35 53.12 -.88 5.27 -.15 30.66 +.53 91.91 -.81 22.71 -.32 1.15 -.05 8.36 -.17

G-H-I

GT AdvTc ... 10.92 -.95 Garmin 2.00e 31.64 -.52 GeronCp ... 2.42 -.13 GileadSci ... 38.06 -.09 GlacierBc .52 10.99 -.35 GloblInd ... 3.91 -.09 GlbSpcMet .15 14.76 -1.39 GluMobile ... 2.81 -.10 GolarLNG 1.10f 30.97 -.04 Google ... 520.04 -3.25 GulfRes ... 2.09 +.36 GulfportE ... 24.90 -1.25 HansenNat ... 84.51 -1.85 HanwhaSol ... 3.78 +.01 HarbinElec ... 17.10 -.10 Harmonic ... 4.78 -.12 Hasbro 1.20 37.05 -.94 HrtlndEx .08a 14.17 +.06 HSchein ... 62.21 -2.86 HercOffsh ... 3.22 -.12 Hologic ... 15.67 -.51 Home Inns ... 34.99 -.37 HotTopic .28 7.99 +.11 HudsCity .32 5.82 -.21 HumGen ... d12.29 -.97 HuntJB .52 38.46 -.59 HuntBnk .16f 4.83 -.10 ... 37.16 +.43 IAC Inter iSh ACWI 1.02e 41.57 -.75 iShNsdqBio.51e 90.09 -2.12 IconixBr ... 17.91 -1.05 Illumina ... 46.99 -1.20 Imunmd ... 3.69 +.26 ImpaxLabs ... 18.38 -.04 Incyte ... 14.36 -.46 Infinera ... 7.06 -.29 Informat ... 39.78 -1.17 Infosys 1.35e 47.66 -1.85 InsitTc ... 15.00 +.70 IntgDv ... 5.45 -.25 Intel .84f 19.42 -.38 InterDig .40 66.12 -1.81 InterMune ... 22.97 -1.19 Intersil .48 10.60 -.02 Intuit .60 44.62 -1.23

LamarAdv ... Lattice ... LeapWirlss ... Level3 ... LexiPhrm ... LibGlobA ... LibtyMIntA ... LibMCapA ... LifeTech ... LimelghtN ... LinearTch .96 LinnEngy 2.76f Logitech ...

19.40 5.49 8.36 1.71 1.25 35.26 14.56 65.78 38.26 2.14 26.69 36.41 10.71

M-N-0

-.55 -.11 -.52 -.08 -.07 -.15 -.38 +.21 -.27 -.13 -.85 +.18 +.02

MIPS Tech ... 4.90 -.23 MSG ... 22.84 -.37 Magma ... 5.25 -.05 MAKO Srg ... 30.80 -.65 MannKd ... 2.52 -.13 MarinaBio ... .20 -.01 MarvellT ... 12.63 -.44 Mattel .92 25.02 -.43 MaximIntg .88f 22.01 -.66 MelcoCrwn ... 11.49 -.75 MentorGr ... 10.58 -.16 Micrel .16f 9.81 -.04 Microchp 1.39f 31.45 -.29 MicronT ... 5.38 +.08 MicrosSys ... 41.02 -1.07 Microsoft .64 24.57 -.33 Molex .80f 19.63 -.52 MorgHtl ... 6.05 -.05 Motricity ... 2.02 -.04 Move Inc ... 1.49 -.03 Mylan ... 18.27 -.46 NII Hldg ... 35.61 -1.35 NXP Semi ... 16.07 -.59 NasdOMX ... 22.24 -.81 NatPenn .12f 6.74 -.16 NektarTh ... 5.28 -.24 NetLogicM ... 27.61 -.12 NetApp ... 36.85 -1.17 Netflix ... 215.83 -.20 NtScout ... 12.02 -.06 NewsCpA .19f 16.52 -.33 NewsCpB .19f 16.71 -.30 NorTrst 1.12 37.18 -.29 NwstBcsh .44 11.46 -.21 NovtlWrls ... 3.20 -.30 Novlus ... 26.89 -.53 NuanceCm ... 16.85 -.42 Nvidia ... 12.48 -.56 OReillyAu ... 62.93 -1.03 Oclaro ... 3.43 -.23 OmniVisn ... 24.82 -1.00 OnSmcnd ... 7.06 -.04 Oncothyr ... 6.99 -.02 OnyxPh ... 30.81 -.94 OpenTable ... 58.09 -.87 optXprs 4.50e 11.93 -.44 Oracle .24 25.90 -.78 Oritani .40 12.85 +.17

P-Q-R

... JA Solar JDS Uniph ... JackHenry .42 JamesRiv ... JetBlue ... JoyGlbl .70 KLA Tnc 1.40f Kulicke ... LKQ Corp ... LamResrch ...

3.42 -.19 10.57 -.29 27.58 -.18 10.15 +.01 3.97 -.31 73.33 -2.00 34.48 -1.00 8.28 -.31 23.64 -.21 36.38 -1.14

PDL Bio .60 5.70 -.09 PMC Sra ... 5.58 -.18 Paccar .48a 35.36 -1.07 PacerIntl ... 4.12 -.13 PacSunwr ... 1.37 -.10 PaetecHld ... 5.20 -.13 PanASlv .10 31.33 -.19 PaneraBrd ... 107.20 -1.36 ParamTch ... 16.80 -.71 Patterson .48 26.87 -3.04 PattUTI .20 22.77 -.50 Paychex 1.24 25.88 -.44 PnnNGm ... 35.87 -1.98 PeopUtdF .63 10.89 -.22 PerfectWld ... 21.57 +.29 Perrigo .28 90.94 -2.73 PetsMart .56f 40.62 -.69 PhotrIn ... 6.37 -.32 Popular ... 1.94 -.07 Power-One ... 7.25 -.20 PwShs QQQ.42e 51.83 -.86 Powrwav ... 1.49 -.02 PriceTR 1.24 49.44 -.90 priceline ... 483.56 -1.94 PrimoWt n ... 4.93 +.32 PrivateB .04 8.18 -.28 PrUPShQQQ ... 29.12 +1.33 ProspctCap1.22f 8.71 -.01 QIAGEN ... 14.91 -.37 QlikTech ... 23.57 -1.28 ... 12.94 -.32 Qlogic Qualcom .86 46.95 -.98 Questcor ... 26.82 -.30 QuinStreet ... 10.30 -.80 RF MicD ... 5.39 -.18 Rambus ... 10.84 -.57 Randgold .20 104.27 -.56 RealNwk s1.00e 2.10 -.04 Regenrn ... 56.29 -.51 RenaisLrn .32a u15.50 +.98

Div Last Chg DenisnM g ... EV LtdDur 1.25 AbdAsPac .42 7.52 +.02 EVMuniBd .92 Adventrx ... .90 +.03 eMagin ... AlexcoR g ... 7.52 -.02 EntreeGold ... AlldNevG ... 40.34 +.42 ExeterR gs ... AlmadnM g ... 2.94 -.07 Express-1 ... AntaresP ... 2.30 -.10 ExtorreG g ... ArcadiaRs ... .04 -.00 FrkStPrp .76 Aurizon g ... 6.10 +.05 GabGldNR 1.68 AvalRare n ... 4.02 -.10 GascoEngy ... Banro g ... 4.52 +.32 Gastar grs ... BarcUBS36 ... 47.92 +.23 GenMoly ... BarcGSOil ... 21.53 -.07 GoldResrc .60f Brigus grs ... 1.46 +.01 GoldStr g ... BritATob 3.86e 87.19 -2.81 GranTrra g ... CAMAC En ... .80 -.08 GrtBasG g ... CanoPet ... d.22 -.01 GtPanSilv g ... Cardero g ... 1.23 +.09 ImpOil gs .44 CFCda g .01 24.48 +.56 IntTower g ... CentGold g ... 68.27 -.15 LadThalFn ... CheniereEn ... 7.12 -.38 LongweiPI ... ClaudeR g ... 1.94 +.13 MGT Cap ... CrSuiHiY .32 2.83 -.05 MadCatz g ... ... CubicEngy ... .73 +.03 Metalico DejourE g ... .29 -.01 MetroHlth ...

1.40 -.04 14.74 -.15 11.60 -.23 3.17 -.34 d1.73 -.08 4.23 +.06 3.10 +.17 9.56 +.31 12.01 -.36 16.51 -.13 .23 -.00 3.71 -.17 3.63 -.19 21.96 -.34 2.22 -.08 5.67 -.16 1.99 +.06 2.93 -.02 39.54 -1.01 8.30 +.30 1.51 -.05 1.14 ... .05 -.01 .77 -.03 3.85 -.09 4.73 -.26

MdwGold g ... MincoG g ... Minefnd g ... NeoStem ... Neoprobe ... NBRESec .24 Nevsun g .06 NwGold g ... NA Pall g ... NDynMn g ... NthnO&G ... NthgtM g ... NovaGld g ... Oilsands g ... Oilsands rt ... OpkoHlth ... ParaG&S ... PhrmAth ... PionDrill ... PlatGpMet ... PolyMet g ... Procera rs ... Protalix ... Quepasa ... RareEle g ... Rentech ...

J-K-L

RentACt .64f 25.81 +.04 RschMotn ... 28.22 -.35 RightNow ... 27.95 -1.66 RosettaR ... 41.89 -1.82 RossStrs .88 71.76 -2.16 Rovi Corp ... 44.47 -1.22 RoyGld .44 72.39 +3.50 rue21 ... 23.88 -3.09

S-T-U

S1 Corp ... 8.76 -.12 SBA Com ... 35.12 -.86 SEI Inv .24f 16.19 -.31 STEC ... 8.54 -.23 SalixPhm ... 28.27 -.88 SanderFm .68 39.42 -.92 SanDisk ... 33.89 -1.03 Sanmina ... d6.81 -.53 Sanofi rt ... 1.03 ... Sapient .35e 10.03 -.51 SavientPh ... 3.89 -.26 SeagateT .72 10.80 -.18 SeattGen ... 15.62 +.16 SelCmfrt ... 14.16 -.38 Semtech ... 20.70 +.30 Sequenom ... 5.39 -.02 ShandaGm ... 5.37 +.53 Shire .40e 95.13 -1.54 ShoreTel ... 6.24 -.30 SigmaDsg ... d7.76 -.68 SigmaAld .72 59.99 -1.60 SilicnImg ... 4.99 -.21 Slcnware .28e 4.14 -.06 SilvStd g ... 26.67 +.40 Sina ... 93.23 +.86 SiriusXM ... 1.69 -.06 SkywksSol ... 19.46 -.59 SmartM ... 9.23 ... SodaStrm n ... 33.79 -1.12 Sohu.cm ... 73.04 +.13 SonicCorp ... 8.93 -.51 Sonus ... 2.31 -.12 SpectPh ... 8.08 -.17 Spreadtrm .05p 16.76 -.02 Staples .40 14.30 -.23 StarScient ... 3.00 -.11 Starbucks .52 36.42 -.95 StlDynam .40 11.29 -.30 SunHlth n ... 3.75 -.12 SusqBnc .08 6.07 -.21 Symantec ... 15.95 -.43 Synopsys ... 24.68 -.79 TD Ameritr .20 14.36 -.46 tw telecom ... 17.74 -.08 TakeTwo ... 11.75 -.06 Tekelec ... 6.60 -.17 Tellabs .08 3.70 -.16 TeslaMot ... 23.11 -.76 TevaPhrm .87e 38.64 -1.03 TexRdhse .32 13.09 -.60 Thoratec ... 31.29 -.50 TibcoSft ... 19.73 -.53 TiVo Inc ... 9.50 +1.38 TowerGrp .75 22.70 -1.30 TowerSemi ... d.72 -.04 Travelzoo ... 32.82 +.16 TridentM h ... d.39 -.02 TriQuint ... 7.28 -.31 UltaSalon ... 53.48 -.78 Umpqua .20 9.18 -.27 UtdTherap ... 39.30 -.61 UnivDisp ... 46.73 +6.31 UrbanOut ... d24.21 -1.43

V-W-X-Y-Z

VCA Ant ... 17.48 -.61 ValVis A ... 3.27 -.01 ValueClick ... 14.34 -.22 VarianSemi ... 60.70 +.66 VeecoInst ... 34.56 -1.10 Verisign 5.75e 29.86 -.64 Verisk ... 33.32 -.65 VertxPh ... 45.41 -1.12 VirgnMda h .16 23.73 -.45 ViroPhrm ... 18.17 -.34 Vivus ... 7.25 -.22 Vodafone 1.45e 26.53 -1.22 WarnerCh s8.50e16.31 -.61 WebMD ... 32.42 -1.23 WernerEnt .20a 22.48 -.12 WetSeal ... 4.76 -.17 WholeFd .40 58.43 -1.12 Windstrm 1.00 11.99 -.12 Winn-Dixie ... 6.50 +.13 WisdomTr ... u8.61 +.60 Wynn 2.00 137.19 -2.68 Xilinx .76 29.46 -.33 YRC rsh ... .77 +.16 Yahoo ... 12.87 -.28 Yandex n ... 30.50 -.45 Zagg ... 13.94 +.28 ZionBcp .04 15.89 -.43

AMERICAN STOCK EXCHANGE

Name

Ivy Funds: Lord Abbett A: Fairholme 26.00 -.20 Fidel n 30.04 -.44 USBI n 11.72 +.03 Frank/Temp Tmp 9.87 -.14 AssetSC t 22.36 -.36 AffilA p FltRateHi r n9.34 +.01 Value n 59.66-1.12 B&C: Federated Instl: GlBdC p 13.71 -.02 AssetStA p23.11 -.38 BdDebA p 7.51 -.01 KaufmnR 4.69 -.09 GNMA n 11.90 +.01 Fidelity Selects: AssetStrI r 23.34 -.37 ShDurIncA p4.54 ... TotRetBd 11.30 +.02 GovtInc 10.88 +.03 Gold r n 51.09 +.69 GE Elfun S&S: GroCo n 78.85-1.53 Fidelity Spartan: S&S PM 36.76 -.61 JPMorgan A Class: Lord Abbett C: Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 18.73 -.26 GroInc n 16.77 -.23 ExtMkIn n 33.33 -.79 GMO Trust III: CoreBd A 11.83 +.02 ShDurIncC t4.57 ... StrInA 12.44 +.01 GrowthCoK78.88Lord Abbett F: 500IdxInv n41.14 -.65 Quality 20.21 -.35 JPMorgan R Cl: 1.52 Fidelity Advisor I: ShtDurBd 11.03 +.01 ShtDurInco 4.54 ... IntlInxInv n31.51 -.52 GMO Trust IV: NwInsgtI n 18.94 -.26 HighInc r n 8.50 +.02 TotMktInv n33.58 -.58 IntlIntrVl 19.48 -.34 JPMorgan Sel Cls: MFS Funds A: Indepn n 21.44 -.41 Fidelity Spart Adv: Fidelity Freedom: GMO Trust VI: CoreBd n 11.82 +.02 TotRA 13.53 -.12 FF2010 n 13.23 -.06 IntBd n 10.88 +.03 500IdxAdv n41.15-.64 EmgMkts r 12.05 -.19 HighYld n 7.72 +.02 ValueA 20.92 -.29 FF2015 n 11.03 -.06 IntmMu n 10.33 ... TotMktAd r n33.58-.58 Quality 20.22 -.35 IntmTFBd n11.16 ... MFS Funds I: FF2015K 12.25 -.06 IntlDisc n 29.16 -.42 First Eagle: ShtDurBd n11.03 +.01 ValueI 21.02 -.29 Goldman Sachs A: FF2020 n 13.25 -.09 InvGrBd n 11.81 +.03 GlblA MainStay Funds A: 45.15 -.48 MdCVA p 31.22 -.68 USLCCrPls n18.61FF2020K 12.53 -.09 InvGB n 7.65 +.01 OverseasA22.00 -.15 Goldman Sachs Inst: .30 HiYldBA 5.75 +.01 FF2025 n 10.91 -.09 LgCapVal 10.09 -.14 Forum Funds: Manning&Napier Fds: HiYield 6.84 +.02 Janus T Shrs: FF2025K 12.53 -.11 LatAm 51.42 -.64 AbsStrI r 10.99 -.01 MidCapV 31.52 -.68 BalancdT 23.93 -.19 WldOppA 7.65 -.14 FF2030 n 12.96 -.12 LevCoStk n23.81 -.47 Frank/Temp Frnk A: OvrseasT r37.61 -.64 Matthews Asian: Harbor Funds: FF2030K 12.64 -.11 LowP r n 36.01 -.68 CalTFA p 6.94 ... Bond 12.31 +.01 PrkMCVal T20.72 -.35 PacTgrInv 21.84 -.42 FF2035 n 10.64 -.11 LowPriK r 36.02 -.68 FedTFA p 11.93 ... CapApInst 35.03 -.59 Twenty T 58.06-1.16 MergerFd n 15.55 -.02 FF2040 n 7.42 -.08 Magelln n 62.13 -.99 FoundAl p 9.62 -.09 IntlInv t 53.86 -.88 John Hancock Cl 1: Metro West Fds: FF2040K 12.64 -.14 MidCap n 25.17 -.49 Intl r 54.48 -.89 LSAggr 11.04 -.19 TotRetBd 10.47 +.02 MuniInc n 12.78 ... GrwthA p 41.31 -.66 Fidelity Invest: LSBalanc 12.10 -.12 Hartford Fds A: AllSectEq 11.30 -.17 NwMkt r n 15.94 +.02 HYTFA p 10.06 ... CpAppA p 28.52 -.50 LSGrwth 11.76 -.17 TotRtBdI 10.47 +.02 MorganStanley Inst: AMgr50 n 14.79 -.11 OTC n 50.60-1.08 IncomA p 2.04 -.01 Lazard Instl: IntlEqI 12.54 -.26 AMgr20 r n12.75 -.02 100Index 8.21 -.11 NYTFA p 11.64 +.01 Hartford Fds Y: EmgMktI 18.94 -.29 RisDvA p 31.64 -.51 CapAppI n 28.57 -.50 MCapGrI 35.99 -.62 Balanc n 17.54 -.15 Ovrsea n 28.28 -.46 Lazard Open: Mutual Series: BalancedK17.54 -.15 Puritn n 17.13 -.13 StratInc p 10.27 +.01 Hartford HLS IA : EmgMkO p19.32 -.30 USGovA p 6.91 ... CapApp 36.06 -.61 GblDiscA 26.58 -.36 BlueChGr n42.24 -.77 PuritanK 17.12 -.14 GlbDiscZ 26.95 -.36 Canada n 53.65 -.12 RealE n 25.36 -.55 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: Div&Gr 18.01 -.27 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p15.82 +.01 GlbBdAdv n13.64 -.03 TotRetBd 11.39 +.02 QuestZ 16.43 -.19 CapAp n 22.81 -.41 SCmdtyStrt n12.35 IncmeAd 2.03 ... Hussman Funds: SharesZ 19.01 -.28 Longleaf Partners: CpInc r n 8.81 ... +.05 StrGrowth 12.72 -.03 Partners 26.63 -.57 Neuberger&Berm Inv: Contra n 63.80 -.91 SrsIntGrw 10.22 -.16 Frank/Temp Frnk C: SmCap 25.68 -.53 GenesInst 44.22-1.01 ContraK 63.82 -.91 SrsIntVal 8.57 -.12 IncomC t 2.06 ... IVA Funds: Neuberger&Berm Tr: DisEq n 20.41 -.32 SrInvGrdF 11.82 +.03 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: Wldwide I r16.18 -.21 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.37 ... Genesis 45.76-1.04 SharesA 18.83 -.28 Invesco Funds A: DivIntl n 26.81 -.42 StIntMu n 10.82 ... DivrsIntK r 26.81 -.42 STBF n 8.52 ... Frank/Temp Temp A: Chart p 15.37 -.24 StrInc C 14.83 -.03 Northern Funds: DivGth n 24.83 -.43 SmllCpS r n15.52 -.25 ForgnA p 6.29 -.10 CmstkA 14.17 -.21 LSBondR 14.31 -.01 HiYFxInc 6.98 +.01 7.90 -.07 StrIncA 14.75 -.03 MMIntEq r 8.88 ... EmrMk n 22.70 -.37 StratInc n 11.13 +.02 GlBd A p 13.68 -.03 EqIncA Oakmark Funds I: Eq Inc n 38.81 -.47 StrReRt r 9.60 +.01 GrwthA p 16.23 -.25 GrIncA p 17.14 -.25 Loomis Sayles Inv: EQII n 16.01 -.19 TotalBd n 11.01 +.03 WorldA p 13.53 -.20 HYMuA 9.20 ... InvGrBdY 12.42 +.01 EqtyInc r 26.40 -.30

May 12 94.10 94.30 94.10 94.30 Jun 12 95.90 96.50 95.90 96.42 Jul 12 94.50 95.05 94.50 95.00 Aug 12 93.40 93.85 93.35 93.75 Oct 12 83.35 84.00 83.35 84.00 Dec 12 80.10 80.50 80.10 80.50 Feb 13 82.60 82.60 82.60 82.60 Last spot N/A Est. sales 8320. Wed’s Sales: 28,711 Wed’s open int: 253454, up +2100

NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET Name

B5

TotRtA 10.96 +.02 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.96 +.02 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.96 +.02 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.96 +.02 Parnassus Funds: EqtyInco n 24.62 -.36 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.49 -.11 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 36.44 -.66 Price Funds: BlChip n 36.07 -.61 CapApp n 19.34 -.23 EmMktS n 30.25 -.51 EqInc n 21.39 -.33 EqIndex n 31.31 -.49 Growth n 29.72 -.51 HiYield n 6.41 +.01 IntlBond n 10.53 -.03 Intl G&I 11.98 -.22 IntlStk n 12.64 -.23 MidCap n 53.14 -.97 MCapVal n21.22 -.38 N Asia n 17.60 -.26 New Era n 45.03 -.83 N Horiz n 31.67 -.73 N Inc n 9.65 +.01 OverS SF r n7.60 -.15 R2010 n 14.89 -.13 R2015 n 11.40 -.12 R2020 n 15.59 -.18 R2025 n 11.30 -.15 R2030 n 16.07 -.23 R2035 n 11.30 -.17 R2040 n 16.04 -.25 ShtBd n 4.84 ... SmCpStk n30.60 -.74

Aug 12 2.7893 2.7893 2.7867 2.7867 Sep 12 2.7662 Oct 12 2.6472 Nov 12 2.6247 Dec 12 2.6187 Jan 13 2.6237 Feb 13 2.6322 Mar 13 2.6412 Apr 13 2.7487 May 13 2.7556 Jun 13 2.7441 Jul 13 2.7259 Aug 13 2.7077 Last spot N/A Est. sales 182913. Wed’s Sales: 122,643 Wed’s open int: 251774, up +2005 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Sep 11 3.932 3.984 3.870 3.931 Oct 11 3.909 3.958 3.840 3.906 Nov 11 4.020 4.059 3.950 4.025 Dec 11 4.229 4.260 4.151 4.244 Jan 12 4.340 4.361 4.261 4.352 Feb 12 4.331 4.362 4.261 4.354 Mar 12 4.304 4.324 4.229 4.316 Apr 12 4.270 4.299 4.200 4.282 May 12 4.288 4.313 4.233 4.307 Jun 12 4.328 4.356 4.290 4.344 Jul 12 4.373 4.396 4.320 4.387 Aug 12 4.414 4.421 4.360 4.412 Sep 12 4.399 4.423 4.360 4.417 Oct 12 4.435 4.446 4.389 4.444 Nov 12 4.590 4.618 4.550 4.606 Dec 12 4.850 4.868 4.800 4.854 Jan 13 4.970 5.000 4.950 4.986 Feb 13 4.945 4.965 4.937 4.960 Mar 13 4.895 4.904 4.890 4.895 Apr 13 4.757 4.763 4.710 4.757 May 13 4.750 4.780 4.712 4.773 Jun 13 4.800 4.811 4.795 4.803 Jul 13 4.805 4.850 4.805 4.839 Aug 13 4.861 Sep 13 4.870 Oct 13 4.870 4.900 4.870 4.900 Last spot N/A Est. sales 315913. Wed’s Sales: 255,062 Wed’s open int: 996575, off -2015

SmCapVal n32.19-.72 SpecGr n 16.16 -.28 SpecIn n 12.25 -.02 Value n 21.10 -.32 Principal Inv: LT2020In 11.09 -.13 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.04 ... VoyA p 19.29 ... Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.42 -.25 PremierI r 19.10 -.35 TotRetI r 11.91 -.27 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 34.47 -.57 S&P Sel 18.27 -.29 Scout Funds: Intl 28.60 -.57 Selected Funds: AmShD 37.53 -.49 Sequoia n 132.50-1.78 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 17.92 -.33 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 44.92 -.45 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.83 -.17 IncBuildC p17.88 -.16 IntValue I 25.39 -.17 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.12 -.17 VALIC : StkIdx 23.11 -.36 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml n 20.70 -.20 CAITAdm n11.16 ... CpOpAdl n66.79-1.39 EMAdmr r n34.05 -.65 Energy n 113.06-2.63 ExplAdml n60.20-1.35

+.0070 +.0080 +.0085 +.0095 +.0100 +.0100 +.0100 +.0100 +.0100 +.0100 +.0100 +.0100 +.0100

+.009 +.017 +.029 +.041 +.045 +.046 +.042 +.039 +.038 +.038 +.038 +.039 +.037 +.036 +.034 +.033 +.032 +.031 +.031 +.034 +.035 +.035 +.034 +.033 +.034 +.034

ExtdAdm n36.57 -.86 500Adml n107.121.69 GNMA Ad n11.11 ... GrwAdm n 29.50 -.52 HlthCr n 53.54 -.89 HiYldCp n 5.53 +.01 InfProAd n 27.70 +.21 ITBdAdml n11.80 +.05 ITsryAdml n12.05 +.04 IntGrAdm n54.88 -.91 ITAdml n 13.79 ... ITGrAdm n10.09 +.03 LtdTrAd n 11.16 ... LTGrAdml n9.82 +.08 LT Adml n 11.10 ... MCpAdml n83.231.77 MuHYAdm n10.48 ... PrmCap r n62.32-1.11 ReitAdm r n76.881.59 STsyAdml n10.85 +.01 STBdAdml n10.69+.01 ShtTrAd n 15.95 ... STFdAd n 10.94 +.01 STIGrAd n 10.72 +.01 SmCAdm n30.64 -.77 TxMCap r n58.101.00 TtlBAdml n10.94 +.02 TStkAdm n28.95 -.50 WellslAdm n53.31-.22 WelltnAdm n51.44-.46 Windsor n 40.02 -.66 WdsrIIAd n41.97 -.61 Vanguard Fds: AssetA n 22.60 -.29 DivdGro n 13.96 -.21 Energy n 60.20-1.39 Explr n 64.62-1.46

2.42 1.14 15.94 .62 2.96 3.72 6.21 12.76 3.65 9.34 17.83 3.10 9.31 .19 ... 3.91 2.21 2.63 10.83 1.27 1.41 7.52 4.75 4.22 8.16 .83

+.12 -.02 +.54 -.05 +.08 -.04 -.22 +.66 -.09 -.06 -.31 +.09 -.07 +.00 ... +.02 -.10 +.41 -.20 -.02 ... -.54 -.02 -.36 -.17 -.04

Richmnt g ... Rubicon g ... SamsO&G ... SeabGld g ... SilverBull ... TanzRy g ... Taseko ... TimberlnR ... TrnsatlPet ... TravelCtrs ... TriValley ... TriangPet ... UQM Tech ... Ur-Energy ... Uranerz ... UraniumEn ... VantageDrl ... VirnetX ... VistaGold ... VoyagerOG ... WalterInv 2.00 WFAdvInco1.02 WizzardSft ... YM Bio g ...

GNMA n 11.11 ... GlobEq n 16.08 -.27 HYCorp n 5.53 +.01 HlthCre n 126.84-2.11 InflaPro n 14.10 +.10 IntlGr n 17.24 -.28 IntlVal n 27.92 -.41 ITIGrade n 10.09 +.03 LifeCon n 15.91 -.10 LifeGro n 20.44 -.28 LifeMod n 18.66 -.18 LTIGrade n 9.82 +.08 Morg n 16.40 -.31 MuInt n 13.79 ... PrecMtls r n24.67 +.04 PrmcpCor n12.69 -.22 Prmcp r n 60.03-1.07 SelValu r n17.14 -.33 STAR n 18.17 -.17 STIGrade n10.72 +.01 StratEq n 16.98 -.40 TgtRetInc n11.36 -.03 TgRe2010 n22.20-.14 TgtRe2015 n12.12.10 TgRe2020 n21.28-.23 TgtRe2025 n12.02.14 TgRe2030 n20.42-.27 TgtRe2035 n12.19.18 TgtRe2040 n19.95.30 TgtRe2045 n12.53.19 Wellsly n 22.00 -.09 Welltn n 29.78 -.27 Wndsr n 11.86 -.20 WndsII n 23.65 -.34 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r n23.39-

9.42 +.47 3.79 +.05 2.27 -.09 27.89 +.36 .61 -.05 5.72 +.05 3.29 -.01 .77 +.03 1.05 -.05 3.97 -.17 .28 -.01 4.95 +.08 1.81 +.06 1.12 -.07 2.08 -.14 3.25 +.03 1.24 -.02 20.50 +1.40 3.18 +.09 2.48 -.15 23.88 -.51 9.35 +.05 .17 +.01 1.75 -.05

.38 TotIntlInst r n93.591.53 500 n 107.10-1.69 DevMkt n 9.02 -.15 Extend n 36.52 -.86 Growth n 29.49 -.52 MidCap n 18.32 -.39 SmCap n 30.59 -.76 SmlCpGth n19.56 -.49 SmlCpVl n 13.89 -.34 STBnd n 10.69 +.01 TotBnd n 10.94 +.02 TotlIntl n 13.98 -.23 TotStk n 28.94 -.50 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst n 20.70 -.20 DevMkInst n8.95 -.16 ExtIn n 36.57 -.86 FTAllWldI r n83.411.40 GrwthIst n 29.50 -.52 InfProInst n11.28 +.08 InstIdx n 106.39-1.68 InsPl n 106.40-1.68 InsTStPlus n26.19-.45 MidCpIst n 18.39 -.39 SCInst n 30.64 -.77 TBIst n 10.94 +.02 TSInst n 28.96 -.50 ValueIst n 18.95 -.28 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl n 88.48-1.40 MidCpIdx n26.27 -.55 STBdIdx n 10.69 +.01 TotBdSgl n10.94 +.02 TotStkSgl n27.95 -.48 Western Asset: CorePlus I 11.00 +.02 Yacktman Funds: Fund p n 16.55 -.26

METALS NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Thu. Aluminum -$1.0527 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$4.0055 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $4.0790 N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Lead - $2342.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9745 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1729.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1759.80 troy oz., NY Merc spot Thu. Silver - $40.170 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $40.740 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Platinum -$1800.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1822.40 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised


B6 Friday, August 26, 2011

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish August 19, 26, Sept. 2, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff,

THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR LEGATEES OF BEATRICE TORRES AKA BEATRICE TORREZ, DECEASED, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BY AND THROUGH THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT AND THE UNKNOWN SURVIVING SPOUSE OF BEATRICE TORRES AKA BEATRICE TORREZ, IF ANY, Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SUIT STATE OF NEW MEXICO to the above-named Defendant(s) The Unknown Heirs, Devisees, or Legatees of Beatrice Torres aka Beatrice Torrez, deceased and The Unknown Surviving Spouse of Beatrice Torres aka Beatrice Torrez, if any. GREETINGS: You are hereby notified that the above-named Plaintiff has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled Court and cause, the general object thereof being to foreclose a mortgage on property located at 404 South Michigan Ave., Roswell, NM 88203, Chaves County, New Mexico, said property being more particularly described as: LOT 3 IN BLOCK 7 OF SPARKS ADDITION, IN THE CITY OF ROSWELL, COUNTY OF CHAVES AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT FILED IN THE CHAVES COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE OF APRIL 18, 1894 AND RECORDED IN BOOK A OF PLAT RECORDS, AT PAGE 14.

Unless you serve a pleading or motion in response to the complaint in said cause on or before 30 days after the last publication date, judgment by default will be entered against you. Respectfully Submitted, CASTLE STAWIARSKI, LLC

By: __________________________ Elizabeth Mason Keya Koul Steven Lucero 20 First Plaza NW, Suite 602 Albuquerque, NM 87102 Telephone: (505) 848-9500 Fax: (505) 848-9516 Attorney for Plaintiff

WITNESS the Honorable Ralph D. Shamas, District Court Judge, of the Fifth Judicial District Court, Chaves County, New Mexico, this __4__ day of ___August____, 2011. Kennon Crowhurst CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT

By: ______Janet Bloomer_______ Deputy

NM11-00235_FC01

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish August 5, 12, 19, 26, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

BANK OF OKLAHOMA FINANCIAL, N.A., f/k/a BANK OF OKLAHOMA, N.A., vs.

Plaintiff,

Roswell Daily Record

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish August 26, 2011 LEGAL NOTICE

No. D504CV201100482

v.

Legals

CLASSIFIEDS

The Eastern New Mexico University Board of Regents will meet on Wednesday, September 7 at 9:30 a.m. on ENMU-Portales campus in the Regents Room. Regents will act upon business so presented and may meet in the executive session. Agendas for the meetings are available at the President’s Office located in the ENMU-Portales campus Administration Building. The public is invited to attend the regular meeting. Eastern New Mexico University is an EEO/AA institution.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish August 26, 2011 CALL FOR PROPOSALS

September 16, 2011 @ 2:00 pm

RFP # 12-02 For District Wide, Construction, Maintenance, Repair, Installation and Facilities Retrofit Services for Environmental, Fire, Life-Saftey, Security and Security Alert, Lighting and Electrical Systems

Specifications and instructions for proposals may be obtained by contacting Melodie Hebert at (575) 627-2528. The Board of Education reserves the right to reject all proposals and to waive technicalities and irregularities. /s/ Mackenzie Hunt Mackenzie Hunt, President Board of Education

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish August 12, 19, 26, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

Defendant.

NOTICE OF SALE ON FORECLOSURE

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the above-entitled Court, having appointed me or my designee as Special Master in this matter with the power to sell, has ordered me to sell the real property (the "Property") situated in Chaves County, New Mexico, commonly known as 127 Wrangler Road, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, and more particularly described as follows: TRACT 2 OF THE BOWEN BOUNDARY SURVEY PLAT OF A PART OF NW1/4SW1/4 OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 10 SOUTH, RANGE 25 EAST, N.M.P.M., IN THE COUNTY OF CHAVES AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL SURVEY FILED IN THE CHAVES COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE ON SEPTEMBER 08, 2003 AND RECORDED IN BOOK S10 OF SURVEY RECORDS, CHAVES COUNTY, NEW MEXICO AT PAGE 80, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 31; THENCE NORTH 00°10'24” WEST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION 31, A DISTANCE OF 1342.02 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89°59'57” EAST, A DISTANCE OF 725.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 00°00'00” EAST, A DISTANCE OF 303.84 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89°57'44” EAST, A DISTANCE OF 713.61 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 02°24'26” EAST, A DISTANCE OF 303.63 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89°59'57” WEST, A DISTANCE OF 701.12 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AS DESCRIBED IN SURVEY FILED SEPTEMBER 08, 2003 AND RECORDED IN BOOK S10 AT PAGE 80, SURVEY RECORDS, CHAVES COUNTY, NEW MEXICO.

The sale is to begin at of 1:45 p.m. on September 8, 2011, at the Main Entrance of the Chaves County Courthouse, 400 N. Virginia, Roswell, New Mexico, at which time I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in lawful currency of the United States of America, the Property to pay expenses of sale, and to satisfy the Judgment in favor of Bank of Oklahoma Financial, N.A., f/k/a Bank of Oklahoma, N.A. Bank of Oklahoma Financial, N.A., f/k/a Bank of Oklahoma, N.A., was awarded a Judgment on July 26, 2011, in the principal sum of $166,429.68, plus outstanding interest due on the Note through June 30, 2011, in the amount of $10,064.33 and accruing thereafter at the rate of $30.2081 per diem, plus late charges of $225.04, plus escrow advances of $1,501.35, plus fee and cost advances of $1,482.37, plus reasonable attorney's fees incurred by Plaintiff in the sum of $750.00 and costs through July 15, 2011, in the sum of $438.25, with interest on the late charges, escrow advances, fee and cost advances, and attorney's fees and costs of this suit at the rate of 6.625% per annum from date of the entry of the Judgment until paid. The sale is subject to rights and easements of record, to unpaid property taxes and assessments, and to the one (1) month right of redemption in favor of Defendant(s) as specified in the Judgment filed herein. PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS AT SALE ARE ADVISED TO MAKE THEIR OWN EXAMINATION OF TITLE AND THE CONDITION OF THE PROPERTY AND TO CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEY BEFORE BIDDING. FAISAL SUKHYANI Special Master 2222 Parkwest Drive NW Albuquerque, New Mexico 87120-3660 (505)228-8484

Legals

---------------------------------Publish August 12, 19, 26, 2011

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT In the matter of Saul A. Gonzalez Plaintiff/Petitioner vs.

Saul H. Gonzalez Defendant/Respondent.

ROSWELL REGIONAL HOSPITAL, Plaintiff,

Case #DM2011539

MARY H. BACHICHA, Defendant.

GREETINGS:

vs.

No. D-504-CV-2011-286

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF SUIT

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES

TO: The following named defendant against whom substituted service is hereby sought to be obtained: MARY H. BACHICHA. Pursuant to SCRA 1986, 1-004(H), you and each of you, are hereby notified that the above-named Plaintiff has commenced suit against you in the above-entitled court and action, the general object of which is collect money for debt owed to Plaintiff by said Defendant. You are further notified that unless you enter your appearance in said action on or before September 17, 2011, judgment and decree will be rendered against you by default and the relief requested by Plaintiff will be granted and decreed. The name of Plaintiffs’ attorneys are: Garber and Hallmark, P.C., P.O. Box 850, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504-0850. DONE this 2nd day of August, 2011. KENNON CROWHURST CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT CHAVES COUNTY, NEW MEXICO By: Janet Bloomer Deputy Clerk

CV 2011 19

RACHEL KAEHLER, an unmarried woman,

www.rdrnews.com

Notice is hereby given by the Board of Education of the Roswell Independent School District of Roswell, New Mexico that sealed proposals for the furnishing of the following services will be received by Veronica Salazar in the Business Office, 300 N. Kentucky, Suite 203, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, until

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish August 26, Sept. 2, 9, 2011 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDER OF SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-EQ1 ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-EQ1, Plaintiff,

vs.

No. CV 2011-598

TERRY M. KIRBY and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR EQUIFIRST CORPORATION, Defendants.

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF SUIT

TO DEFENDANT TERRY M. KIRBY: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the above-named Plaintiff filed a Complaint for Foreclosure in the above Court on August 5, 2011, against the above-named Defendants. The general object of the Complaint is to foreclose a lien of Plaintiff against certain real property located in Chaves County, New Mexico, commonly known as 700 Broken Arrow Road, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, and more particularly described as follows: LOT 12A OF THE REPLAT OF LOT 12 IN BLOCK 6 OF TIERRA BERRENDA NO. 5 ADDITION, IN THE CITY OF ROSWELL, COUNTY OF CHAVES AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT FILED IN THE CHAVES COUNTY CLERK’S OFFICE ON APRIL 13, 1982 AND RECORDED IN BOOK I OF PLAT RECORDS, AT PAGE 29,

and to foreclose the interests of the above named Defendants and any other parties bound by the notice of lis pendens in the Property, all as more specifically stated in the Complaint filed in this cause of action. FURTHER, the above-named Defendant Terry M. Kirby is hereby notified that he has until thirty (30) days from date of completion of publication of this Notice in which to file an answer or other pleading responsive to the Complaint and should said Defendant choose not to file an answer or other responsive pleading to the Complaint on or before thirty (30) days from date of completion of publication of this Notice, judgment or other appropriate relief may be rendered against the above-named Defendant. Richard M. Leverick of the law firm of Leverick and Musselman, L.L.C., whose address and phone number is 5120 San Francisco Rd. NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87109, (505) 858-3303 is the attorney for the Plaintiff. (SEAL)

KENNON CROWHURST CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: s/ Janet Bloomer Deputy

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

You are hereby notified that a cause of action is being brought against you in the District Court of Chaves County, Cause No. DM2011539, in which Valeria A. Gonzalez, is Plaintiff/Petitioner, the and Saul H. Gonzalez Defendant/Respondent. Unless you enter an appearance in this cause of action n or before the following date of: October 8, 2011, a default judgment may be entered against you. Petitioner/Plaintiff’s dress is: 3467 N. Sycamore Roswell, NM 88201

ad-

Kennon Crowhurst Clerk of the District Court s/Vincent Espinoza Deputy

GARAGE SALES

DON’T MISS A SALE BY MISSING THE 2:00 PM DEADLINE FOR PLACING YOUR ADS

002. Northeast 1 EL Arco Iris, Friday, 8am-? Lots of furniture from old medical office. Responsible for own removal. No early birds please. 903 N. Edgewood, Saturday, 7am. Berrendo turn right to Mission Arch then left to E.C Tucker Ct. Sat. 7 til sold out. Misc. tools, clothes, household items. 3112 LA Tierra Sat. 8am Huge multi-family sale. Something for everyone. No Early Birds! 5 LA Paloma Place Saturday 8am Convertible baby crib, furniture, toddler clothes, electronics, toys & other misc. items. 838 Broken Arrow Sat. 7-12 Moving Sale furniture, electronics, clothes, misc. 1704 E College Sat. 7:30a Huge family garage sale. Lots of girls clothes & misc.

003. East

901 E. Mathews, Sat-Sun 7-3. Baby furniture, clothes & a little bit of everything.

004. Southeast 3103 S. Wyoming Ave. Fri. & Sat. 6am-noon, Garage Sale

105 E. Church, Fri-Sat, 7-? Tires, rings size 20, new stroller, baby seat, clothes, dishes, shoes, purses, linens, comforters, treadmill, furniture.

005. South

2900 S. Largo Dr., Friday-Saturday, 6am.

006. Southwest 504 W. Poe, Fri-Sat, 7am. Many nurses college books, curious kitchen items, mower, saw, more.

006. Southwest

606 W. Deming, Thurs-Sat, 8:30a-? Clothing, women’s access., lots of misc. 1608 S. Lea, Sat. 8-12. Furniture, typewriter, china dills, crafts. No early birds, not our house.

607 S. Lea Fri. & Sat. 7am No early birds. Kids clothes, toys, porch swing, household items, tools, lots of misc. items. 2303 CORNELL Dr. Sat. 7am. Furniture, women & kids clothes & lots of misc!

17 CEDAR Dr, Fri. 8a-12p, Sat. 8a-2p. Washer & dryer, freezer, furnace, stove, patio furniture, furniture, household items & much more.

2803 PRINCETON Dr Sat. 8-Noon Two family Sale. Washer/dryer, TV, car subs & amps, microwave, collectibles, kitchen wear clothing. No early birds!

707 S. Heights, Sat. 7-11am. Home decor, bedding, dishwasher, elliptical fairies, recliner, boys, girls, misses, plus sizes clothing, TVs.

007. West

806 W 8th St. Fri. & Sat. 8-noon. Office equip., misc. household goods. 3202 W 8th St Sat. 7-3 Clothes, shoes, Christmas decor, lots more. 2007 W. 1st, Sat. 7am. Moving Sale. Clothes, household items, recliner, lots of items. 410 S. Sycamore, Sat., 7a-1p. Lil’ of everything.

008. Northwest GARAGE SALE/FLEA Market, Aug. 27, Sat., 7a-1p. 807 N. Missouri, RASC, 40 vendors.

909 N. Ohio (Montana & 9th), Aug. 26-28, 9a-6p. Exceptional in house moving sale. Going back to Europe, must sell everything. Furniture, kitchenware, painting, etc.

1613 N. Delaware, Sat. 7am. TVs, dresser, chairs, women, children clothing. 2811 ONATE, Sat-Sun 7am. 4 wheels & tires 10,5x31.5, Kirby vac., desk chair, white book shelf, kids & adult clothing, luggage, craft supplies, tools, lots of misc. 407 W. 5th, Saturday 8am-noon. 1512 N. Kansas Friday & Saturday Lots of misc.

ANNOUNCEMENTS 025. Lost and Found

LOST SMALL old white poodle w/collar & tags in E. Grand Plains area. Please call 627-5445. FOUND SMALL black female dog vicinity of 2nd & Union. Call Thomas 317-5684. FOUND SMALL female Chihuahua near NMMI, Sat., Aug. 20. Call 317-8915.

BEAUTIFUL LARGE dog found in parking lot of Big Lots. Call 637-0446. My White Victorian table, 2 chairs & bench just walked away from my front yard, Sat., Aug. 20th. If you find them please call 626-0775. FOUND 8/22/11 medium sized dog. Call to identify 505-438-7708

S.O.S TO all dog lovers. Need help to find dog, lost at Casa Maria Rehab while visiting its Best Friend John. Her name is “Go”. To win her trust, say “Hi Go, open car door and say let’s go see John & she’ll get in”. She’s 10yrs old, Heinz 57 medium, 57lbs, black short hair, white whisker on mouth, no collar, face looks like a bear & she is shy. Who finds the dog we want you to reunite them and a donation will be made to Humane Society in finders name. Call Ron or Paula at 627-6202 or 575-551-0155.

INSTRUCTION

030. Education & Instructions

ALLIED HEALTH career training- Attend college 100% online . Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

SEEKING STORE Mgr. and Asst. Store Mgr. for a seasonal Halloween retail store. Prior retail mgmt. exp. is required. Apply on line at www.spirithalloween.com or email resume to spirithalloweenwest@ gmail.com or fax to 512-215-0043. Immediate openings. DRIVERS Coastal Transport is hiring Drivers at our Satellite Terminal in Roswell with Class (A) CDL. (X) Endorsement Must be 23 yrs Old with 1 Yr Tractor Trailer experience. Home every day! Scheduled Days Off, $2000 sign on bonus. For more Information call 1-877-297-7300 2408 N. Industrial Artesia, NM. Opening for Office Assistant. Microsoft Office Program a must. Other duties will include ten key, filing, answering phones & other misc. duties. Email resumes to rskippermjg@ qwestoffice.net or Fax to 575-623-3075 UPS STORE requires retail experience, outstanding customer service skills and a willingness to work hard, competitive wage plus incentives. Submit resume to job.theupsstore@gmail.com

Construction Laborer 6 months experience. Retirement program, paid vacation/holidays, tool allowance. Valid driver license and copy of driving record with application. Pre-employment DT required. 7 Petro Dr. No phone calls. ARBY’S IS now accepting applications for management positions. We have positions for both day and night time positions available. Please apply by calling Gary at 575-622-8711 or send employment history to 575-623-3075. EASTERN NEW MEXICO UNIVERSITY. Support: Groundskeeper I Department Secretary. Professional: Adjunct Faculty – Instructor of mathematics, Adjunct Faculty- Web Design Instructor, Adjunct Faculty – College of Business, Adjunct Faculty – College of Fine Arts, Adjunct Faculty- College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, Adjunct Faculty – College of Education and Technology. Jobs located in Portales, NM Job announcement/online application at: www.agency.governmentjobs.com/enmu 575-562-2115. AA/EO/Title IX Employer Wastewater Treatment Plant Instrument and Electrical Technician Salary $20.48 hourly. Applications will be accepted until 4:00pm on Friday, September 2, 2011. Complete job description and applications at the Village of Ruidoso, 313 Cree Meadows Dr. Ruidoso, NM 88345. Phone 258-4343 or 1-877-700-4343. Fax 258-5848. Website www.ruidoso-nm.gov “Drugfree Workplace” EEOE. Water Distribution and Sewer Collection Manager Salary $54,687 annually ($2,103.35 bi-weekly). Applications will be accepted until 4:00pm on Wednesday, September 7, 2011. Complete job description and applications at the Village of Ruidoso, 313 Cree Meadows Dr. Ruidoso, NM 88345. Phone 258-4343 or 1-877-700-4343. Fax 258-5848. Website www.ruidoso-nm.gov “Drugfree Workplace” EEOE.

045. Employment Opportunities

BURRITOS AND More now hiring. Apply after 1 o’clock Monday through Friday. CDL DRIVERS Wanted: Regional routes, home weekends, competitive pay. Must have current physical and clean MVR. Positions to fill immediately. Call 575-461-4221, 800-750-4221 or Email to: jimhayes66@qwestoffice. net. ADMIRAL BEVERAGE is hiring CDL driver position must be filled immediately, and only serious prospects need apply. Must have clean driving record. Great benefits, excellent pay, group health insurance. 1018 S. Atkinson

NEED FULL time, experienced accounting assistant. Requires Word, Xcel, and attention to detail. Excellent benefits including medical, dental, vision, life, retirement, thrift, etc. Email resume with cover letter and references to nwhittin@bsamail.org or fax to 622-3493. NOW HIRING EXPERIENCED LINE COOKS. Minimum 1yr experience, steady work history, verifiable references and work history. Come to Applebee’s Mon-Friday, 2-4 for application.

BEST WESTERN Sally Port Inn is now hiring for the following positions: Front Desk & Housekeeping. Must be friendly, dependable & a team player. Please apply in person @ 2000 N. Main. No phone calls, ask for Amie. Don’t be fooled by out of state schools. Artesia Training Academy Class A & B CDL training. Call ATA for more information 1-888-586-0144 artesiatraining@pvtn.net

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY

Chaves County is accepting applications for the position of Executive Secretary for the Public Works Department (starting at $9.80/hr. to $11.21/hr. DOQ). Responsible for general secretarial duties, answering multi-line telephone, managing office equipment, distributing mail, and specific administrative projects. Minimum qualifications required: High school diploma or GED; three years experience; up to two years college/48 hours course work can be applied to two years experience. Valid NM driver's license. All applicants for this position will be required to pass a back ground check and will be subject to pre-employment post-offer drug testing. Required application forms are available at the County's Job Posting Board located in the west wing of the County Administrative Center or by accessing the Web Site at www.co.chaves.nm.us/jobs Applications may be returned to the County Manager's Suit #180, Chaves County Administrative Center, #1 St. Mary's Place, Roswell, NM 88203 or mailed by closing date to Human Resources, PO Box 1817, Roswell, NM 88202-1817. Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, August 30, 2011. EOE Certified Phlebotomist part time Mon-Fri mornings. Must be dependable and able to work flexible hours when needed. Fax resume and references to 575-622-2820. CHANGE A Life... Be A Comfort Keeper. We are always looking forward to speaking with experienced caring and compassionate people interested in becoming a Comfort Keeper. We are currently looking for people to provide companionship, housekeeping, meal preparation, grooming and dressing guidance, transportation, and personal care services for our clients. We have positions available in Roswell and Artesia for Daytime and Overnights. Must have a valid drivers license and auto insurance. To learn what becoming a Comfort Keeper is all about, call us at 624-9999 or stop by our office at 1410 South Main to visit with Christina.


Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities

The U.S. Probation Office is accepting applications for an Administrative Assistant to the Probation Officer in Roswell, NM office. Legal experience strongly preferred. View announcement and application instructions at: http://www.nmcourt.fed.us/ web/PBDOCS/pbindex2. html COMFORT SUITES 3610 N. Main now hiring Overnight Audit. Saturday and Sunday. Pick up application 9am-5pm weekdays. No phone calls please. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR of The First Tee of the Pecos Valley. Full time position for a privately funded 501(c)3 organization. This position will oversee the day to day operation of The First Tee program, supervise staff, volunteers & mentors. Will report to a board of directors & work in unison to develop & execute a business and fundraising plan. Must maintain chapter requirements with First Tee national and convey the chapter’s brand image to the public. The position will oversee all financial aspects of the prog ram. Experience with fundraising and resource development, including a proven grant writing and fundraising track record required. Must be experienced in working with children, and a working knowledge of golf is essential. Must be proficient with computers. Prior dealings with NMMI, as well as First Tee experience required. Please send resume to 201 W. 19th Street, 88201. Attention Jerry. The position does not have a benefits package. Call 575-626-1918 for further details. Resumes due by August 30, 2011.

045. Employment Opportunities

HEARTLAND CARE of Artesia is looking for CNAs who would like to make a difference in the lives of our residents and have a strong feeling of affinity with our older citizens. If you are interested in joining an “outstanding team” of nurses and CNAs who provide excellent care to our residents, please come by 1402 Gillchrist and fill out an application or talk to Nancy Trice, RN, Director of Nursing. 575-745-6006

100. Babysitting Stay at home grandmother looking for small kids to love & care for. 625-9572

105. Childcare

NEED CHILD care? Find the widest range of available childcare for your children and their needs. 1-800-691-9067 or www.newmexic okids.org. You may also call us; Family Resource & Referral 622-9000 and we can help you navigate the system. Openings, clean lg. playroom, licensed provider, North, all ages. 420-6803

FARMER’S COUNTRY Market - North Main has immediate openings for clean, friendly, outgoing and honest employees. We need bakery/deli people. Experience is great but will train the right person. We also are looking for an experienced meat cutter. Both openings require working weekends, some evenings and holiday availability. No phone calls please. Apply in person only! LOOKING FOR an experienced auto tech with at least 5 yrs. experience, own hand tools & a professional attitude, foreign & domestic experience a plus, ASE certification a plus. Apply in person @ 101 S. Main. No phone calls please.

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 HOUSE/OFFICE Cleaning low prices. Excellent work call anytime. 575-973-2649 HOUSEKEEPING- Home and/or office. Honest & dependable. 575-749-4900 or 575-578-1447 SUNSHINE WINDOW Service Free estimates. 575-626-545,575-626-5153

SERVICES

075. Air Conditioning

Affordable Refrigerated conditioning heat pumps evap coolers furnaces, duct work & installations 317-4147 SWAMP COOLER service & repair professional & affordable. Free estimates. Frank 624-5370, 637-2211

185. Electrical

BIG HORN Electric Professional work, affordable price. 575-317-8345 NM Lic#367662.

195. Elderly Care

ELDERLY, TEMPORARILY disabled, long term assistant? At home housewife looking for new clients who need living assistance. Light housekeeping, yard maintenance, errands & appointment transport. Clean, reliable, honest, reasonable rates. Call Meta 575-626-9682.

CLASSIFIEDS

195. Elderly Care

DEPENDABLE PRIVATE Caregiver to the rescue, yrs. of exp. Tina 420-8877

Construction or renovation w/20+ yrs exp. Licensed. call 317-3366

200. Fencing

REASONABLE REMODELING Contractor Specializing on kitchen & bathrooms. New Additions & Roofing. NM Lic. 27043. 317-4147.

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991 BUILDING OR Mending Fences, Long or Short. Tall or Small. Reasonable Rates, Free Est. & Senior Discounts. 575-840-8369. Metal, wood, chain link & block.

225. General Construction

Can’t Get to those Renovation projects? Need help? Here I Am! No job too big/small. 25 yrs. exp. Qualified in framing, trim carpentry, painting, sheet rock, drywall, doors, & windows. FREE est. call Jerry Martin at 910-6898 or 622-8682 Leave Message. DANIEL MONTOYA Construction. From New Construction to Small Additions. Licensed, Bonded, Free Est. 575-840-8639 WALTRIP & Sons Const. Remodels, new const., countertops, cabinets, drywall, paint, fences. No job too big or small. Lic#GB9886951, 40yrs exp. 575-622-4431 HARVEST BUILDERS All types of construction. 575-910-3000

230. General Repair

CARPENTRY, DRY wall, painting & concrete. We guarantee. 626-2050

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Greenscapes Sprinkler Systems Lawn mowing, field mowing, gravel, sod-hydro seed, pruning, tilling, For dependable & reliable service call 622-2633 or 910-0150. LAWN SERVICE & much more work at low price. 914-0803. Basic Lawn mowing, yard clean-up, weedeating small tree trimming. 317-2242 WEEKEND WARRIOR Lawn Service mowing, property cleanup, residential rain gutter cleaning, and much more 575-626-6121

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575) 622-7710 #45 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







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Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

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LEGALS

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Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

345. Remodeling

Gonzales Enterprises Sprinkler installation & repairs, rock & grass landscaping, bush hogging, fencing. Just ask, we may do it. 317-8053

310. Painting/ Decorating

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting at affordable prices. Call 637-9108. Professional Painting and Renovation for all of your home needs. Reasonable Rates, Senior discount 317-3366. Quality Painting! Interior, Exterior at prices you can afford. Mike 910-7012

312. Patio Covers

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552. RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397 www.rancheroswelding.com

METAL, SHINGLE or Torch Down. Steep or Flat - New Roofs or Patch Jobs. Daniel Montoya Construction. Free Est., Licensed & Bonded. Great Warranties for Home Owners & Senior Discounts. 575-840-8639

395. Stucco Plastering

RWC Lath and Stucco. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397

www.rancheroswelding.com

405. TractorWork

RWC Bobcat and Dump Works. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397. www.rancheroswelding.com

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 Allen’s Tree Srvc. The oldest tree service in Roswell. Million $ ins. 626-1835 SUPERIOR SERVICES parking lot, landscaping, tree, service 20 yrs experience. 575-420-1873

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insurance.

www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397

Advanced Welding alluminum, stainless, cast iron, carbon steel. Free est. 575-308-4026 advancedcustomweldingllc.com

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale 4Bd 1Ba, new paint, carpet, doors, fncd yrd, $60k M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 TOWNHOUSE, 1400 sqft, 2br/2ba, laundry room/ study, new roof, cedar fence, stucco, porch, tile & carpet. Refinished kitchen, bath cabinets & new paint throughout, w/d. Large corner lot. Call 575-491-4235 WELL SEASONED Real Estate contracts. Will trade for houses. Wesley Hay 623-6165 I BUY houses in Roswell, fast closing, all cash call Ken 806-632-0028. Custom Home immaculate 3205 Dow $225k & Custom builder lot 24k 637-8559 $37,000 PRICE 301 E. Bland, 3 br 1 ba. $2550 dwn $315mo 480-699-1946

M.G. HORIZONS Patio covers, concrete, decks & awnings Lic. 623-1991.

3BR, 2 full ba., huge 2 car garage beautiful lawn. Enchanted Hills 2605 W. 8th St. under $160k great for a new family. (505)795-0007

PLUMAIR, REASONABLE repairs. Plumbing, heating, cooling, new construction, heatpumps. NM Lic. 27043. Call 317-4147 or 623-0770.

SPANISH GATE Townhome, 2br/1ba, immaculate, all appliances, beautiful grounds w/ pool, gated community living, $79,900. Call 307-262-0086

330. Plumbing

345. Remodeling

3 BR 1 ba at the base $42,500 owner financing with $5k down 420-1352

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 625-9924 / 626-4153.

VERY NICE 3/2/2 home on the NE. $6000 down, take over payments, avail. now. Call 575-420-1009 or 575-317-1605.

NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

OPEN HOUSE, 8/28, 4br, 3 full baths, new remodel inside, new stucco outside, inground swimming pool. 511 Mission Arch Dr., 2pm-4pm.

DANIEL MONTOYA Construction. From New Construction to Small Additions. Licensed, Bonded, Free Est. 575-840-8639

FOR SALE By Owner, fixerupper, 3br/1.5ba, Lake Van, as is. Call 622-2169 or 505-205-8856. Priced to sell.

• Regular (full-time) Checker/Drivers • Casual (part-time) Checker/Drivers

ABF Freight System, Inc., a financially stable company with a history of outperforming its competition, has openings for both regular (full-time) and casual (part-time) dockworker/city pickup and delivery drivers at our Roswell facility located at 1100 E. 19th, Roswell, NM 88201. Superior wages (Teamster Union Scale) is offered. Must be at least 21 years of age, have 2 years of verifiable tractor/trailer driving experience, possess a CDL with doubles/triples and hazardous materials endorsements, have a good stable work record, a safe driving record (motor vehicle record and previous employment), ability to pass DOT pre-employment drug screen and meet DOT medical requirements. To apply, please complete the online application for Checker/Driver at www.abf.jobs. If you require accommodation in the application process, please inform us. An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V

Friday, August 26, 2011

490. Homes For Sale

Dennis the Menace

B7

FSBO North Springs, 2614 N. Penn., $112k, 2br, 2ba, 1750 sqft, new appliances, 623-6748 or 626-3141. Priced Reduced 1413 E Hoagland: 2br/1ab laundry room $45,000 626-9593

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

3+ACRES ON East Pine Lodge Rd, $25,000; terms: $2,500 dn, $250 mo. 0% int. (575)361-3083 or 575-887-5915. FOR SALE or Lease: 48.6 acres of shallow water rights with or without land, price is negotiable. Please call Joe at 575-637-5685.

LENDER SALE. 40 Acres -$39,900. Spellbinding views of snow capped mountains! Adjacent to National Forest. Maintained all weather roads w/electric. Close to Ruidoso. Financing available. Call NMRS 888-676-6979. 5 ACRES, $25K as is, septic system, 3809 Zinnia, appt M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 5 PLUS acres Buena Vida $15k. Call 622-1437

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

Restaurant bldg, $275K cash/trade for Ruidoso prprty, M-Th 8-4 624-1331 BY OWNER, 1303 E. McGaffey, 38,000sqft commercial lot, 30x40 metal building, and 30x80 building with three bays & office. 575-420-9286

510. Resort-Out of Town ADVERTISE YOUR VACATION PROPERTY, to more than 288,000 New Mexico newspaper readers. Your 25-word classified ad will appear in 33 newspapers around the state for only $100. Call this newspaper for more details or visit www.nmpress.org for more details.

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

2002 FLEETWOOD mobile home. 2br, 1.5ba, 12x12 storage w/ref. air, 12x20 storage, excellent condition #38 Spring River Estates. 622-7703 WE BUY used mobile homes. Single & double wides. 575-622-0035 D01090.

2004 FLEETWOOD 16x60 two bedroom two bath. Setup in Villa Park #64. Refrigerated air on. Stop by and look. Unlocked during daytime. Very nice. Selling cheap. 575-622-0035. D01090. 2 BR, 2 ba. $22k OBO. See after 1pm at Sunrise Estates Spc 24.

2br/2ba, Appliances, partially furnished, carport, storage, deck, $10k. 623-3149 1995 CAVCO 28x68, 3br/2ba double wide near Alamogordo, NM on 10 acres of land. Land also for sale. Home can be moved. Home like new, selling for $17,900 at present location. Call 575-622-0035 D.O.1090

520. Lots for Sale

OWNER FINANCING for a limited time. Ready to build 5 acre lots w/ great views & good covenants. Located 9 miles West of Roswell @ the Club House Banquet Facility. Free land maps and at entrance. 575-623-1800. www.BuenaVidaLand.com COURT ORDERED Sale! 2704 S. Lea, asking $6k, 5 acres - 30 Townsend Tr. Lot 9, Cielo Vista Subdivision, has well, electric, great view of city, $49,999. Call Jim 910-7969.

Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 60x134 $18,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. We Take Visa and Mastercard! 420-1352.

HAGERMAN LOTS for sale. York Avenue, Posey subdivision, 1 block from Hagerman schools, $5000. Not zoned for mobile home. 420-1352 PREMIUM 5 Acre tracts, Owner will finance with 10% down, New Construction only (no mobile homes), , Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd. between Country Club & Berrendo Rd. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-4337

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. Town Plaza Apartments Utilities paid - Gas and Water. New Owners, friendly new managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs/downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Seniors 55yrs plus, law enforcement & military will receive discount. No HUD. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 2nd year, 1 free month rent VERY NICE 2 br 1 bath duplex 1 car garage No Hud or smoking, small pets ok, $700 mo. 626-0229 ALL BILLS PAID 1 br $530 2 br $630, 3br/2ba $730 mo., ref air, new carpet, new paint/tile. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. 1BR, Ctrl Air, appliances, laundry facility, quiet. $500/mo + Dep. 2550 Bent Tree. 317-6408. EFFICIENCY 2 BR, downtown, clean, water paid. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD Call 623-8377 EFFICIENCY 1 br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. 2BR/1BA, W/D hookups, all bills pd, $575/mo, $300/dd, 207 W. Mathews Apt. C. 317-6479

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

216 E. Pear 2 br 2 bath ref. air garage fenced backyard w/shed call 746-4683 or 308-4026 1516 N. Pontiac, large 2br, 1ba, new stove & ref., w/d hookups, hardwood floors, completely remodeled, very clean and cute, $650 monthly, plus dep., No large dogs, No HUD. References and Rental History required. Call 317-3929 13 ROUHONEN, (NEAR ENMU-R) large 3br, 1ba, new stove, w/d hookups, completely remodeled very clean & cute, $600 mo, plus dep., No HUD. References & rental history required. Call 317-3929. 1400 S. Madison, 2br/1ba, all appliances, 1 car garage, fenced, no smokers, pets, w/fee, no HUD, $750/$500 deposit, no utilities, 575-405-0163 1/1 Duplex $400 mo. water pd. Quiet street great area. 2203 W. Juniper. Call 317-6408 NEAR HOSPITALS 1602 N. Kansas, 2br, 1ba, ref. air, newly remodeled $625/$250 dep. 622-2877 2BR/1BA, 1 car garage, fenced yard, ref. air, 67 Lighthall. $600/mo, $600/dep. 627-9942 REM. 3/2 +1/1, ref. air, $900/mo, sale for $85k w/$8k dn. Al 703-0420 NE 17 Huerta Dr, beautiful 3/2/2, $1400/mo, $1000/dep, no pets, now available. 575-317-1605 BEAUTIFUL 4BR, 2ba, $1250/mo, $1000/dep, 2601 W. 3rd, no smoking, pets or HUD. 626-3816 NMMI AREA, nice 2br for 1 person, laundry rm, fenced, no HUD, $425+dep, 1713 N. Lea. 910-7148 1BR, 1BA, $425/mo, $300/dep. 602A S. Wyoming. Call Julie 505-220-0617.

2BR/1BA, $450/MO, water paid, no pets, 810 S. Atkinson. 624-2436

TWO 3br, $700/$500dep, $650/$500dep. No pets or HUD. 914-0101

2 BDR. No Pets, No HUD, 1702 E. 2nd St. 773-396-6618

2BR, BIG fenced front & backyard, no HUD, 201 S. Sherman, $400/dep, $600/mo. 575-420-1530

REAL NICE Large 3br/1ba, 1212 N. Washington, no HUD. 623-8240

2, 2br, garage, appliances, $600/$650. Al 703-0420, Santiago 202-4702

1 & 2 bedroom apartment. Call 910-8170

3 BDRM 1 3/4 bath house close to Goddard High on Del NOrte Dr. refrigeratd air/central, single car garage $850 mo. $500 dep. Terry 420-5111 avail. 9/1

1&2Bd, wtr pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331 1br/1ba, wtr pd, quiet area, HUD ok. $350/mo, $200 dep. 625-9208 after 5pm

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

FLETC Homes for rent. Long & short term rentals. 5 minutes from FLETC. Brand new & beautiful! Visit our website: www.lgrentalhomes.com or Call 420-0519 or 910-7670

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 2501, 2503, S. Lea, 3br 2ba, new construction, no smokers/pets, $1000 plus $500 dep. 575-317-4050

114 W. Oliver St. 3br/2ba, $950/mo. $500/dep. newly remodeled, new appliances,Granite counter tops, ref. air, sky lights. No smoking/pets! Leroy (702)232-7578 201 W. Summit, 3br/2ba, carport & storage, completely remodeled, stove, refrig., ref. air, w/d hookup, no pets or HUD, $900/mo, $600/dep, 914-5402 LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com! TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262

507 REDWOOD, 3/1 incl. stove, refrig., fresh paint & new carpet. $500 dep., $700 mo., no pets or HUD. 970-946-6575 #15 Reynolds Place newly remodeled 2br 1ba., fenced laundry room with w/d, enclosed garage, culdesac, $600 + dep. No indoor pets. 623-2607, 914-0685. 3 BR, 1.5 baths, stove, fridge, garage, large yard, no pets. $750, $500 dep. 317-6285 2BR, 1BA, 606 A. S. Wyoming $550 mo., $400 dep. Call Julie 505-220-0617. Large 2 br 1 ba 2 car garage, lawns maintained water paid, stove, fridge., washer & dryer, $650/mo. Drive by 813 N. Lea. If interested call 575-653-4654 or 575-973-1332 2br 1ba big fenced backyard no applances $480, $250dep 420-5604 No Hud 3br/2ba/1cg attached, brick home w/newly remodeled kitchen, a/c, new carpet, fireplace, fenced backyard, NE location, 612 E. La Paloma, $950/mo, $950/dep. Tom 317-3447. Between Berrendo & Linda Vista. 3br/2ba, good area. Please call 637-6331 or 637-6361. 2&3 Bd, 1&2 Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, appt M-Th 8-4 624-1331 511 GREENBRIAR, 3/1, W/D hookup, fridge, stove, D/W, fenced yard, carport. No HUD/pets/smoking. $600mo/$350dep. Avail. 9/1. 637-6988


B8 Friday, August 26, 2011 550. Houses for RentUnfurnished Private Room w/bath kitchen & washer/dryer privileges $100 per week 637-6520

Remodeled 3br, 2ba, 408 S. Cypress. $750, $500dep No pets/HUD. 626-3816

555. Mobile Homes for Rent 32’ Travel trailer w/slide out, 12 miles S. of Roswell, $400/mo. 910-0474

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places Office space: 750 sqft, $750/mo, $250/dep. 622-2564

FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546. 900 sqft, one large room, two small rooms, two storage spaces, restroom, central cooling, all carpeted, $550 per month. For appointment call Rex Smith, 1725 SE Main St, 622 6460 or 622-4552

580. Office or Business Places OFFICE SPACE for Rent. Prime downtown area, 2,061 sq.ft. Please call 622-8711.

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

Hospital bed, power wheelchair, bath transfer bench, walker, 622-7638

WAREHOUSE SPACE for rent 766 sqft. Very secure located rear of 1725 SE Main St, $400 per month. For appointment call Rex Smith 622-6460, 622-4552

NEW AIR conditioner, bikes, small collection of knives & swords, & 2 TVs. 623-4295

FOR RENT: 2000sf warehouse & office space available 9/15, $600/mo + half utilities. Call 626-4685 to look at. Office Spaces available starting at $100 per month depending on size. Also warehouse 3616 feet $800 mo. Party and conference rooms available second floor 208 North Main St. secure location. Contact Paula 707-354-2376 2108 S. Main, storefront, 1200sf, $500/$500dep. Call Don or Barbara 627-9942

585. Warehouse and Storage WAREHOUSE 9000 SF partial a/c & heat, security alarmed, 2 garage doors, 2 standard entry doors, $1000 mo. Inquire at 2001 S. Main Family Furniture 575-937-0889 or 575-257-0888

595. Misc. for Rent

MERCHANDISE

TENTS AMY’S Tents for rent, weddings, birthday, parties, open houses or just out of rain or shade. Call 575-973-0964, for sizes & pricing.

Sofa, Armoire, end tables, futon, commercial size bakers racks, clothes racks, old national geographic books, small desk. Lots of clothing (willing to sell for one price). 420-2831 CHINA CABINET w/dishes $500 OBO, TV 53” Mitsubishi $300 OBO. 317-0196 VINTAGE JTM 60W Marshall Combo amp. Marshall 4x12 cabinet. 637-4940 NIKE BLACK & BLUE high heels size 8 never been worn. Call or text for pic 317-6816 ELECTRIC DRYERS, clean and reasonable, warranty. 626-7470. 2 HAIRSTYLIST stations, shampoo sink attached $200-$300 ea. Chely’s Beauty Salon 910-0971

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

005 010 015 020 025

Announcements Special Notice Card of Thanks Personals/Special Transportation Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted 045 050 055 060

Employment

Employment Opportunities Salesperson/Agents Employment Agencies Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 441 445 450

Window Repair Window Cleaning Wrought Iron Services Wanted

455 456 460 465

Money: Loan/Borrow Credit Cards Insurance Co. Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale Investment: Stocks/Sale Mortgages for Sale Mortgages Wanted Business Opportunities

470 475 480 485

Financial

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos

CLASSIFIEDS

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

CASH FOR gold and silver jewelry. Sterling spoons and forks. U.S. Silver coins. Local in Roswell, 578-0805

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

PAY CASH for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles. Entire households & estates welcome. Call 627-2033 or 623-6608. WILL BUY your unwanted washing machines. 626-7470

635. Good things to Eat

SAN PATRICIO Berry Farm. Blackberries & raspberries. You pick or we pick. 575-653-4502 or 575-937-0866 GRAVES FARM: New season picked fresh daily, okra, squash, cucumbers, eggplant, red chile pods & powder, garlic, pinto beans. 622-1889 Mon-Sat 8-5:30, Sun 1-5. Accept EBT, credit cards & debit. HOBSON GARDEN: Now roasting our famous GREEN CHILE! Also available: Jalapenos (green & yellow), bell peppers, dried red chile, okra, squash/zucchini, cucumbers, eggplant, cherry tomatoes, watermelons, honey dews, & cantaloupes. Mon-Sat 8-5:30, Sun 1-5. 3656 E. Hobson Road - 622-7289.

705. Land/Gardening/ Fertilizer HARVEST FARMS Compost Tea for sale. 575-910-3000

720. Livestock & Supplies

STALLS FOR rent, corner of Railroad & E. Berrendo, $50/mo. You feed & clean. Big stalls w/large runs. Call Karen 910-0444. SUPER QUALITY cow calfs pairs. Call 325-234-2315.

745. Pets for Sale

Old Victorian Bulldoggie Pups! 4 wks old, taking deposit. 575-495-1015 GOOD LOOKING mama cat & 4 healthy beautiful kittens. Free & desperately in need of good loving homes. Would make somebody good companions. Come see to appreciate. Open Monday-Friday, 8am-3pm. Closed for lunch, 12:30-1:30pm. 1209 S. Union, Smith Animal Clinic. 623-4100 LOVE LABRADOODLES? Local breeder seeking homes and loving owners for a money making breeding opportunity. Interview and home inspection required. 317-6100 AKC POMS for sale going fast. Call 317-3874

Roswell Daily Record 745. Pets for Sale

CANARIES for sale! 2 Males $80 each, 1 Female $60. 575-578-1009 TINY TOY male Yorkie, 1st shots, registered, $375. Shih Tzu, small, $150. 420-4706 REGISTERED TOY Chihuahuhas, 5wk old males, 1st shots. Call 637-8204. FREE OLDER female Beagle 575-687-4187 or 513-8704 HYBRID MALTESE white & fluffy $500-$800. 308-3017 or text for pic. WHITE FEMALE, 11mos Teacup Chihuahua $200. 575-654-5173 Labrador Retrievers adorable ckc yellow, 3 male & 2 females born 6/20/11 dew claws removed, shots $350. 627-0115 or 317-4603 AKC REG. Yorkie puppies for sale. Call Alex 575-637-9626 1 BLUE male, 1 black female Great Dane pups more info call 626-9000 GREAT DANE puppies for sale. 575-317-4698 or 575-317-0030

RECREATIONAL

760. Hunting & Camping Equipment 4.5mo Pheasant hunting. Club season Oct. to Feb. 15. Call 746-9777.

775. Motorcycles & Scooters 2010 Polaris Sportman 800 like new/50 hrs use, with trailer $6500 231-620-3773

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com 95’ STARCRAFT, Star Lounge XL, Pop-Up Camp Trailer, Great Condition. $2500.00 OBO. Call 575-420-0277.

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

2005 JEEP Wrangler, 37,100 miles, new lift, tires & rims, new stereo system. $13,600. Call 317-6125. 2000 Oldsmobile Alero, 4 door sedan with 18” rims $1500- must see! 626-7732 CLASSIC AUTOS 410 S. Main, 623-9772. Please view all cars at www.classicautos-roswell. blogspot.com ‘05 Chev Avalanche $13,995, ‘04 Chev Tahoe $9895, ‘05 Chev Classic $5995, ‘00 Nissan Frontier $7995, ‘03 Ford Taurus SES $5995, ‘95 Ford Explorer 4x4 $2995, ‘03 Chev Silverado Ext. $8995. ‘95 JEEP Wrangler, 112k, 4cyl, $6800 OBO. 575-840-4439

790. Autos for Sale 2003 FORD F150 Supercab XL 2WD 107,500 miles Maroon $5,500.00

2001 BMW Sedan 330i 145,183 miles White $5,000.00

2002 Toyota 4Runner Utility 4D SR5 2WD Green $8,500.00 2004 Mazda M31 Sedan 4Di $3,500.00

SHOWN AT CARBS-N-TUNES 110 W. ALBUQUERQUE 624-1174

Telco Federal Credit Union 622-4444

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2006 FORD F250, excellent cond., ext. cab, $9,950. 626-7488. 1990 4 speed Chevy 2500 5.7 ltr 223k miles. Starts right up, a/c works. $2350 Call or text (575) 420-2476 1995 FORD XLT F350, 4x4, power stroke, 4dr, $6500. 575-420-3843 ‘98 FREIGHTLINER FL70, Bobtail 24ft box, well maintained, runs great $5500 or best reasonable offer. 231-620-3773 ‘82 Ford pickup, V8, auto, pwr steering/brakes, runs excellent. 347-0260


08-26-11 PAPER