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Roswell Daily Record THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

Judge puts hold on Valley Meat

Vol. 122, No. 185 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

INSIDE NEWS

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added 162,000 jobs in July, a modest increase and the fewest since March. At the same time, the unemployment rate fell to a 4 1/2-year low of 7.4 percent... - PAGE B5

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JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

EMPLOYERS ADD 162K JOBS

August 3, 2013

ALBUQUERQUE — A federal judge ruled Friday in favor of animal activists to halt U.S. horse meat slaughter until the USDA completes further environmental analysis. “The injunction is in place as of this moment,” said Chief U.S. District Judge Christina Armijo Friday afternoon. Valley Meat near Roswell will not open Monday, as

planned.

Armijo set a bond hearing Monday for all parties, including attorneys for the plant in Sigourney, Iowa, the Yakama Nation in Washington, and the plaintiffs.

Valley Meat’s attorney, A. Blair Dunn, said he will seek $10 million for the Roswell plant and the plant in Missouri he represents from the plaintiffs to cover financial impacts caused to the companies by the delay.

“It’s what I expected,” Dunn said, following Armijo’s judgment. “(The ruling) is just not supported. We’re going to now focus on how to protect the economic interests of the plant and the economic interest of Roswell in the future.”

The Humane Society of the U.S., Front Range Equine Rescue, and the other plaintiffs, some from Roswell, argued the USDA did not properly carry out a full review of all environmental impacts before issu-

ing a grant of inspection to Valley Meat June 28, and a plant in Iowa a few days later. Specifically, plaintiffs were concer ned about drugs present in race horses. The USDA argued the permit was issued correctly and all permits were compliant with guidelines that considered horse meat inspections.

Lead plaintiff attorney Bruce Wagman argued emotionally about what he called a “shocking display of denial” by the USDA to

Congress: Divided, chaotic — taking a break

Fire doused

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issue the per mits in the past two months. “The defendant decided to leap, rather than look,” Wagner told Armijo. “Shoot now, rather than wait. The environmental harms are great.” Armijo asked Wagman a few times to provide solid evidence. “These are all known facts,” she told Wagman at one point. “What you’re saying here is speculation. See JUDGE, Page A3

WASHINGTON (AP) — The accomplishments are few, the chaos plentiful in the 113th Congress, a discourteous model of divided government now beginning a five-week break. “Have senators sit down and shut up, OK?” Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid blurted out on Thursday as lawmakers milled about noisily at a time Sen. Susan Collins was trying to speak. There was political calculation even in that. Democrats knew the Maine Republican was about rip into her own party’s leadership, and wanted to make sure her indictment could be heard. See CONGRESS, Page A3

N ea rly 70 year s lat er, N Y WWII airman finally home ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — At Melrose Market, the windows facing the street were decorated with American flags and a sign that read: “Thank you and Welcome Home Sgt. Dominick Licari.” Organizations and business owners along Route 5 posted signs in Licari’s honor Friday. The World War II airman died in combat almost 70 years ago in the South Pacific, but his remains were only recently identified. Finally, at just after 9 p.m., he returned home to Frankfort, 70 miles west of Albany. “We just thought it would be a nice tribute for him for giving his life for our country,” said grocery store owner Linda LaValla. “It’s good to know that

they take the time years later to find our servicemen and bring them home. It’s closure for everybody.” Veterans’ groups, businesses and residents along a 10-mile stretch of New York’s Mohawk Valley paid tribute to Licari. Honor guards from Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion chapters were posted along Route 5 as the vehicle procession carrying his casket left the New York State Thruway at Little Falls and traveled to Frankfort, funeral director Vincent Iocovozzi told The Associated Press. A commercial flight carrying his casket arrived at the Albany airport and military pall bearers carried the casket from the

plane to the hearse Friday evening, Iocovozzi said. Licari’s brother, sister and several nieces and nephews were at the airport to accompany his casket back home, with the Patriot Guard motorcycle riders providing an escort, the funeral director said. “There’s only one word that describes this: unbelievable,” said Iocovozzi as he arrived in Frankfort with Licari’s remains. He said hundreds of people lined the streets waving flags, crying and holding signs as they made the jour ney to the funeral home. “He’s a man who has been dead longer than

See AIRMAN, Page A3

AP Photos

Above: An undated photo provided by the Licari family shows World War II airman Sgt. Dominick Licari, right, with other airmen.

Right: An undated photo provided by the family, shows World War II airman Sgt. Dominick Licari, whose remains were identified nearly 70 years after his plane and two others slammed into a remote, junglecovered mountainside in the South Pacific.

Kintigh: Giving the community the help it needs JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

CLASSIFIEDS..........B6 COMICS.................B4 ENTERTAINMENT.....A8 FINANCIAL .............B5 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........A8 LOTTERIES ............A2 NATION..................B3 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8

INDEX

Kintigh

Dennis Kintigh has spent much of his life seeing a side of the Roswell community some people often don’t. Since January, Kintigh has worked for the Chaves County Sheriff’s Department as a detective. He’s currently working one homicide case, burglaries and a rape case. He recalled the story of interviewing a young woman about a case recently. She was in her 30s, addicted to heroin and

living in a hotel. “It’s distressing and tragic that it’s out there. We need to confront issues we’re not confronting. One of those is drug addiction,” he said. “We need to come up with a way to try to deal with the hurting, broken people. “It’s a great community, but it needs some help,” Kintigh said.

The father of two walked away from two engineering degrees and a Master of Science degree in computer science to enter four years of a military space program. He then started working in Los Angeles for the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which brought him and his wife to Roswell from the Washington, D.C.,

field office in 1992. It was then that Kintigh started working with narcotics investigations. “I spent the next 14 and a half years working primarily in drugs,” he said. The Roswell office covered 25,000 miles of southeastern New Mexico territory. After a brief time working in the oil fields, Kintigh entered state politics, serving two terms in the state Legislature. After his last term ended, he asked to be hired as a See SPOTLIGHT, Page A3


GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Judge

Continued from Page A1

This is not the first time a horse slaughterhouse has been inspected.” Wagman contended communities had been ruined in the past where slaughterhouses were located. If Valley Meat opened, he would no longer be able to fish and camp at the stream nearby, he told Armijo. Ar mijo ultimately found the risk to human health and public safety was great enough to warrant a full environmental review. Wagman couldn’t comment following the trial, as he was late for his plane trip to return to San Francisco. Attorney John Boyd, representing the

Spotlight Continued from Page A1

detective. In 2007, he and his wife served as youth pastors at First Baptist Church for 18 months. “It was incredibly rewarding,” he said. “Young people today, I believe, are starving for authenticity. They want people to be upfront and candid.” Between one term of Legislature, Kintigh also served as interim Roswell police chief in the fall of 2010. “We have some incredibly fine police officers,” Kintigh said. “They called me chief and that’s about as biggest an honor as I could get.” Kintigh remembered one nighttime call, when officers were involved in a gunfight and one officer pulled another out of harm’s way. He and the other officers made it a point to present a Medal of Valor to the officer during his shift one night. “It’s amazing the things these guys do,” Kintigh said.

Yakama Nation, said he would prepare additional issues for the next hearing. “Of course, we’re very disappointed in the judge’s ruling,” Boyd said. Boyd argued the Washington confederated tribes and bands had 12,000 feral horses that destroyed the habitat of plants and animals. The tribe had no way of dealing with the horses that were expected to double in numbers in four years, and slaughter was the only solution. “This is a crisis for the Yakama Nation,” Boyd said. New Mexico Attorney General Gary King, who joined with the plaintiffs, said he was pleased with the ruling. “I am pleased the Judge Armijo issued a temporary restraining order … that suspends the grant of inspection for the horse slaughter house operations in Roswell, “ King said. When not working, Kintigh and his wife, Carol, are both avid Crossfit enthusiasts who workout five days a week. The two are part of a local Crossfit Vision gym that is affiliated with a national company. The intensive program is more of a community that promotes overall physical fitness. “It’s amazingly rewarding,” he said. “We’re all together. The community aspect of Crossfit is amazing.” Kintigh’s son-in-law is a Crossfit trainer. “We want to have that quality of life,” he said. Kintigh is also a member of Roswell Rotary. Kintigh still remembers first arriving in Roswell and the sense of community he and Carol felt. When they flew into town, it was late at night, he said. They went to a local diner and they noticed that everyone was staring at them. He realizes now, it’s just the way people treat each other here. “Complete strangers will look at you in the face,” he said. “And that’s what I like.”

Across the Capitol, unsteady bookends tell the story of the House’s first seven months in this two-year term. Internal dissent among Republicans nearly toppled Speaker John Boehner when lawmakers first convened in January. And leadership’s grip is no surer now: A routine spending bill was pulled from the floor this week, two days before the monthlong August break, for fear it would fall in a crossfire between opposing GOP factions. A few weeks earlier, Boehner suggested a new standard for Congress. “We should not be judged on how many new laws we create. We ought to be judged on how many laws that we repeal,” he said as Republicans voted for the 38th and 39th time since 2011 to repeal or otherwise neuter the health care law known as Obamacare. Reaching for a round number, they did it for a 40th time on Friday, although the legislation stands no chance in the Democratic Senate and the GOP has yet to offer the replacement that it pledged three years ago to produce. House Democrats claimed to hate all of this, yet couldn’t get enough. After attacking virtually every move Republicans made for months, they demanded the GOP cancel summer vacation so

Airman

Continued from Page A1

most people have been alive, but he’s a hero coming home,” he said.

Licari was a 31-year-old gunner aboard a two-man Army Air Force A-20 Havoc bomber that crashed into a mountain in Papua New Guinea on March 13, 1944, while retur ning from a bombing raid on a Japanese airfield. The pilot, 2nd Lt. Valorie Pollard of Monterey, Calif., also was killed, along with four airmen in two of the mission’s other A-20s that slammed into the same jungle-covered mountain in bad

Congress could stay in session. The break, Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi said, “shows shocking disregard for the American people and our economy.” To be sure, there have been accomplishments since Congress convened last winter, although two of the more prominent ones merely avoided a meltdown rather than advancing the public’s preferred agenda. A closed-door session helped produce compromise over President Barack Obama’s stalled nominations to administration posts and important boards — avoiding a blow-up that Republicans said would follow if Democrats changed the Senate’s filibuster rules unilaterally. Months earlier, at the urging of their leaders, House Republicans agreed to raise the gover nment’s debt limit rather than push the Treasury to the brink of a first-ever national default. Legislation linking interest rates on student loans to the marketplace passed, and, too, a bill to strengthen the government’s response to crimes against women. Two more measures sent recovery funds to the victims of Superstorm Sandy. Among the 18 other measures signed into law so far: one named a new span over the Mississippi River as the Stan Musial

weather. Licari, one of nine children in his family, was officially declared dead in 1946. Last month, U.S. military officials notified his two surviving siblings that his remains and those of Pollard were found and identified. Licari’s funeral and burial with full military honors are set for Tuesday in Frankfort. Gov. Andrew Cuomo directed lowering flags on state government buildings to half-staff on Tuesday to honor Licari. Pollard’s burial arrange-

Veterans Memorial Bridge, after the late baseball legend. Another renamed a section of the tax code after former Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison of Texas. A third clarified the size of metal blanks to be used by the Baseball Hall of Fame in minting gold and silver commemoratives: a diameter of .85 inches in the case of $5 gold coins, and 1.5 inches for $1 silvers. The Senate passed sweeping immigration legislation to spend billions securing the nation’s borders against illegal entry and creating a path to citizenship for an estimated 11 million immigrants currently in the country unlawfully. The vote was 68-32, with all Democrats and about one-third of Republicans in favor. But House Republicans, many of whom oppose granting citizenship to anyone living in the country illegally, deemed the bill a nonstarter. They intend to have alternative legislation this fall. If it succeeds, that will give the two houses about a year to somehow compromise before Congress’ ter m expires. The Senate approved a bipartisan farm bill that followed customary lines in providing funding simultaneously for growers and for government programs to feed the hungry.

ments are still pending, Pentagon official said. News of Licari’s remains and their impending return to Frankfort has stirred emotions in his hometown and other nearby mill towns lining the western end of the Mohawk River. Veterans, firefighters, law enforcement officers and local residents planned to line Route 5 and salute his procession, said Iocovozzi, a distant relative of the Licari family. “It just brings tears to your eyes,” Iocovozzi said after arriving in Frankfort.

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A2 Saturday, August 3, 2013

GENERAL

Fire at middle school

Roswell Daily Record

Hair that cares

Fire

Police were dispatched to Sidney Guitierrez Middle School, 69 Gail Harris St., around 3 a.m. Thursday, by the Roswell Fire Department for an agency assist after a fire. Some lacquer rags and dry rags were located outside of the building. According to the RFD investigator, it was an exterior fir e and no damage was found inside the building. The case is still under investigation.

Burglary / Criminal Damage

• Police were called to the 1500 block of South Madison Avenue, Thursday. The victim reported $250 worth of items, including a Garmin GPS, a Tasco spotting scope and a Sony digital camera, stolen. • Police were dispatched to the 1500 block of West Greenbriar Street, twice on Thursday. The first report of criminal damage was made around 2:40 p.m., after subjects broke out a window, valued at $200, to the r esidence. The second, about an

attempted theft, was reported around 5 p.m. The victim told of ficials that someone got into a vehicle and cut the ignition wire, as if they were trying to hot wire the car. • Police were called to the 200 block of East Ballard Street, Thursday, after subjects smashed the r ear window on the driver’s side of the vehicle, causing $200 worth of damages, and removed 12-inch speakers and a 1,000-watt amplifier. The missing items were valued at $500.

100 block of East Albuquerque, Thursday, where subjects took a welder, valued at $75, and a generator, valued at $400, from a yard.

• Police received a walkin report from Roswell Job Corps, Tuesday. A representative of the organization stated a drill worth $168 was missing. He could not say if the item was lost or if it had been stolen. • Police were called to the

Anyone having information about these or any other crimes is asked to contact Crime Stoppers, 888-594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward.

Larceny

• Police responded to the 300 block of South Birch Avenue, twice on Thursday, when a resident discovered a Keltec .380 handgun, valued at $300, was missing. The last time the resident had seen the gun was in February. A later search of the home revealed a second firearm was missing, a Savage ARMS FSVR rifle. The rifle was last seen in July.

NM Deputy State Police chief elevated to top job

SANTA FE (AP) — New Mexico State Police Deputy Chief Pete Kassetas was named Friday to take over as head of the statewide law enforcement agency. Kassetas is a 20-year veteran of the State Police and replaces Chief Robert Shilling, who is retiring. Republican Gov. Susana Martinez announced the appointment, saying Kassetas “has an exceptional understanding of law enforcement techniques, departmental objectives, and community outreach.” As chief, Kassetas will be paid about $103,000 a year. Public Safety Secretary Gorden Eden said Capt. Jimmy Glascock and Maj. David Martinez have been promoted to deputy chiefs. Maj. Martinez will oversee

criminal investigations and Glasscock will be responsible for uniform operations, which includes officers who patrol New Mexico’s highways. The gover nor said the three new appointees “will form a strong team to continue the State Police’s proud tradition of service and public safety.” Kassetas joined the State Police in 1993 as a patrol officer and worked his way up through the ranks. The State Police has more than 500 of ficers, with district offices across New Mexico. The gover nor’s of fice made the announcement on Shilling’s last day as chief. The 42-year -old Shilling has said he was retiring based on “family, health and happiness.” He

has served as chief since 2011.

Shilling has recovered from viral encephalitis in late 2010, but the inflammation of the brain left him without a sense of smell or taste. “Chief Shilling’s determination and ability to overcome a challenging personal illness and serve at the highest level of the State Police is admirable and inspiring,” the gover nor said in a statement.

Kassetas became deputy chief in 2011. In previous positions with the agency, Kassetas was a major in the unifor m bureau, a criminal investigator in Farmington, a sergeant in a regional narcotics bureau and a lieutenant in the investigations bureau.

State lottery generates close to $44M for scholarships ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The New Mexico Lottery generated more money for college scholarships in the latest fiscal year as revenues reversed a two-year slide. The lottery said it produced a recordsetting $43.7 million for the scholarship program in the 2013 budget year, up from about $41 million during each of the last two years. Net ticket sales rose almost 6 percent to $141.8 million. Revenues have

declined five out of the last eight years. Lottery officials say revenues grew partly because of Powerball ticket sales. The multi-state lottery game had several large jackpots, including a record $590 million. State law requires at least 30 percent of lottery revenues go to the scholarship program, which covers tuition for New Mexico college students. The program is projected to run short of money in 2014-2015.

Mark Wilson Photo

Mia Avitia, 9, has her Rapunzel-length hair cut by Bu-T-Den stylist Belma Cruz, Friday, as her parents, Edward and Mia, look on and take photos. Mia is donating the hair to Locks of Love, an organization that provides hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children under age 21 who suffer from long-term medical hair loss.

CHAVES COUNTY 4-H & FFA RESULTS Market lamb show

Fine Wool and Western Whiteface 1st place, Destiny Harper, Goddard FFA; 2nd place, Jessica Franklin, Hagerman FFA; 3rd place, Destiny Harper, Goddard FFA.

Fine Wool Mutton Cross Class 1 — 1st place, Hannah Vaz, Roswell FFA; place, Brandi 2nd Richardson, Bar n Buddies; 3rd place, J.C. Wagner, Diamond H. Class 2 — 1st place, Jessi Ber nacchi, Bar n Buddies; 2nd place, Nolan Steen, Goddard FFA; 3rd place, Kirsten Griffin, Diamond H.

Blackface Class 1 — 1st place, Jessica Burson, Goddard FFA; 2nd place, Amber Longoria, Goddard FFA; 3rd place, Abbey Soto, Barn Buddies. Class 2 — 1st place, Hannah Vaz, Roswell FFA; 2nd place, Britt Dixon, Goddard FFA; 3rd place, Addison Jones, Barn Buddies. Class 3 — 1st place, Jessi Ber nacchi, Bar n Buddies; 2nd place, Brandi Richardson, Barn Bud-

LOTTERY NUMBERS

dies; 3rd place, Hannah Vaz, Roswell High.

Class 4 — 1st place, Robert Floyd, Barn Buddies; 2nd place, Destiny Harper, Goddard FFA; 3rd place, Brandi Richardson, Barn Buddies. Class 5 — 1st place, Hannah Vaz, Roswell FFA; 2nd place, Chasen Richardson, Bar n Buddies; 3rd place, Britt Dixon, Goddard FFA. Class 6 — 1st place, Chasen Richardson, Barn Buddies; 2nd place, Jessica Burson, Goddard FFA; 3rd place, Britt Dixon, Goddard FFA. Class 7 — 1st place, Jessica Burson, Goddard FFA; 2nd place, Britt Dixon, Goddard FFA; 3rd place, Hannah Vaz, Roswell FFA.

Mutton Cross Class 1 — 1st place, Jessi Ber nacchi, Bar n Buddies; 2nd place, Nolan Steen, Goddard FFA; 3rd place, Brandi Richardson, Barn Buddies. Class 2 — 1st place, Jessi Ber nacchi, Bar n Buddies; 2nd place, Jessica Franklin, Hager man FFA; 3rd place, Jessi Bernacchi, Barn Buddies.

Dairy heifer show

Class 1 — 1st place, Candace Searcy, Goddard FFA; 2nd place, Elaina Mathews, Shephard’s Flock; 3rd place, Savannah Barnes/Graves, Dexter FFA.

Class 2 — 1st place, Adam Brown, Diamond H; 2nd place, Hannah Vaz, Roswell High; 3rd place, Savannah Barnes/Graves, Dexter FFA.

Class 3 — 1st place, Hannah Vaz, Roswell High; 2nd place, Jaime Best, Barn Buddies; 3rd place, Elaina Mathews, Shephard’s Flock.

Class 4 — 1st place, Mackenzie McGuire, Roswell High; 2nd place, Taylor McGuire, Goddard FFA; 3rd place, Destiny Harper, Goddard FFA.

Class 5 — 1st place, A.J. Vaz, Goddard FFA; 2nd place, Jamie Best, Barn Buddies.

Class 6 — 1st place, Adam Brown, Diamond H; 2nd place, Case Vanderhulst, Goddard FFA; 3rd place, Mackenzie McGuire, Roswell High.

Class 7 — 1st place, A.J. Vaz, Goddard FFA; 2nd place, Josh Beaver, Dexter FFA; 3rd place, Adam Brown.

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Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice The entire contents of the Roswell Daily Record, including its flag on Page 1, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the Daily Record.

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A4 Saturday, August 3, 2013

OPINION

In celebrating New Mexico culture, disconnects abound

The acceptance of “Land of Enchantment” as the best description of New Mexico came slowly and reluctantly. The vagueness of the phrase is the problem for the marketer. Just what is “enchantment?” Recently the Albuquerque Journal asked some state leaders (whatever that means) to consider in 100 words “what it means to be a New Mexican.” The exercise derived in part from the running theme of lousy state leadership from reporter -columnist Win Quigley. A dozen responded, one from the south and one from the semi-north, Espanola. One said little in 279 words. That was Roberta Cooper Ramo, attorney and pillar of the Albuquerque establishment. “Cultural diversity” was the thread connecting the others. Only one got seriously serious, moving beyond the question. That was R. Braiden Trapp, managing editor of the Rio Grande Sun. In exactly

EDITORIAL

HAROLD MORGAN

NEW MEXICO PROGRESS

100 words, Trapp noted elements including that New Mexicans “have a strong sense of three diverse histories; but have no knowledge of those histories.” My kids had one required semester of New Mexico history. In Oklahoma, a place with a much shorter history than New Mexico, I had two comprehensive history units and would have had a third had my parents not decided New Mexico was a much better place. Enchantment lays another attitude across the cultural diversity. A comment in a recent email exchange with an Anglo

Roswell Daily Record

(i.e., neither Native American nor Hispanic) liberal intellectual states it well. This person said, “It may be fair to say that perhaps the pervasive Anglo American (British isles based) standards of economic, social, educational and other measures is one that is basically incompatible with many New Mexicans’ sense of worthwhileness.” Vocabulary of fers the first response to this incredible statement. Just how many New Mexicans’ sense of worthwhileness lies outside the undefined standards? For most of us the standards of our capitalist democracy have to do with a reasonably comfortable life, family and opportunity for children and a functioning community. I learned this lesson by going door to door for political candidates, including myself on one occasion, and listening. Rejecting standards is also

highly hypocritical. My guess is that rejecting standards of economic well being, social interaction and educational attainment comes from being prosperous and well educated. Further, the technology of our society is everywhere. An iPhone is too much for you? OK, but a regular phone is fairly high technology. Communicate only via letters on paper? OK, but the Postal Service likes airplanes for transport. And health care, does the rejection include the high technology of today’s health care? Enough big city liberal intellectuals have rolled into the north to sanctify the purity of the village culture to become a cliché. The objective, however unstated, is to create a rural ghetto of noble peasants. While this cultural diversity is pretty cool, the conceptual dominance ignores science, the world class activity that is the other

big part of the meaning of being a New Mexican. Yet it is science, much of it unique in having to do with national defense and paid for by the federal government, that gets the brunt of complaints about diversifying our economy. Simultaneously the Martinez administration provides “Technology 21,” a new “iteration,” meaning an update of a 2009 “living document” from the Richardson administration that calls itself “a science and technology roadmap for New Mexico’s future.” Disconnects appear. Develop science or don’t. Celebrate culture but dump on the culture business (tourism) as offering little money and no career. And, hey, Albuquerque “leaders,” what about the rest of the state? The growers of cattle and crops. The miners. The pilots at Cannon and Holloman. © New Mexico News Services 2013

National Opinion Truth riles up Venezuela

Facing the Senate Foreign Relations Committee a few days ago, Samantha Power, President Barack Obama’s nominee for ambassador to the United Nations, surely didn’t expect to stir up the proverbial hornet’s nest. Power told the committee that as America’s U.N. envoy, she believed in “contesting” what she described as a “crackdown on civil society being carried out in countries like Cuba, Iran, Russia and Venezuela.” That was truthful, if not exactly an exercise in delicate diplomacy, and it enraged Venezuela President Nicolas Maduro, the hand-picked successor of the late Hugo Chavez, the flamboyantly anti-American socialist. He demanded an apology. Maduro, a former bus driver who was elected in April after Chavez succumbed to cancer, had called for improved relations with Washington. In June his foreign minister, Elias Jaua, met Secretary of State John Kerry, who described their meeting as the “beginning of a good, respectful relationship.” Jaua announced that his government had sent a letter of protest to the American embassy in Caracas. The United States needn’t overreact to Maduro’s bravado, but it needn’t apologize for Power’s accurate characterization of Venezuela. We suspect all this will fade away. Despite the ill will generated by Chavez, the United States remains a critical trading partner for Venezuela. And the United States is a major importer of Venezuela’s major export, oil. Maduro’s tough talk probably is no more than that. In any event, such threats shouldn’t keep American diplomats from calling out oppressive regimes, however thin-skinned they may be. Guest Editorial The Tampa (Fla.) Tribune

Less talk, more action for Obama

President Barack Obama loves to show off his basketball prowess now and then. His favorite move on the court: the pivot. The Wall Street Journal wrote this past week that “President Obama made his fourth or fifth, or maybe it’s the seventh or eighth, pivot to the economy.” By another reporter’s count, the president has pivoted to supposedly make the economy a priority 19 times now. That’s a lot of talk with very little action. If it’s really a priority, why must the topic be pivoted to so much? What it all means to you is that this president is more concerned with using the sputtering economy as a talking point to occasionally change the subject. And to somehow blame Republicans for his record. In short, Barack Obama has seen his track record, and he’s not going to take it anymore! Obama claimed in his latest pivot to the economy that he wants to work with Republicans to get things going. But skipping out of Washington to make empty campaign-style, beat-opponents-over -the-head speeches won’t get the job done on jobs. President, for goodness’ sake, you are term-limited; stop campaigning and start governing! Meet with Congress and find some common ground on the economy. Obamacare is a proven job killer, and the worst of it hasn’t even been implemented. How can it not be a job killer? It disincentivizes business growth and having full-time workers, and is raising the costs of health insurance drastically. It’s so ominous that Obama had to delay full implementation of it until 2015 — and even his hard-left union friends are sending up warning flares about “Obamacare’s” potential to destroy the middle class. Obama’s much-vaunted “economic” speech was more about how to distribute the pie, rather than how to grow it for everyone. Being an inveterate sports fan, you would think the president would appreciate the beauty of a system based on merit and individual ability, achievement and reward. Why is a meritocracy in sports a good thing, but not elsewhere? Guest Editorial The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle

Helping kids have a brighter future As President Obama heads for a nice vacation at Martha’s Vineyard, a place of wealth, I want him to work on a simple math calculation. One of the major themes of the president’s administration is that there is a tremendous problem of “income inequality” in this nation that must be addressed. Obama’s solution is to redistribute income using seizure tactics. His plan is to have the federal government provide subsidies for those with low incomes by taking money from business and the affluent. The problem is that high taxation restrains eco-

Doonesbury

DEAR DOCTOR K: I was just diagnosed with gestational diabetes. What are the risks to my baby? And what do I need to do to keep her safe? DEAR READER: Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that occurs during pregnancy. Normally, the hormone insulin moves sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream into cells that use it for fuel. In gestational diabetes, hormones produced during pregnancy make the body resistant to insulin’s effects. In most pregnant women, the pancreas produces extra insulin to overcome the insulin resistance. In women with gestational diabetes, the

BILL O’REILLY

SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

nomic expansion and inhibits the country from creating new avenues of wealth. If the affluent spend less and business invests less in expansion and development, wages for workers stagnate because there is heavy competition for jobs. The president does not

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

pancreas does not produce enough extra insulin. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream. If your gestational diabetes is not treated carefully, you are at increased risk of high blood pressure and swelling, a condition called pre-eclampsia. And your baby is at higher risk for prematurity, lung problems at birth and still-

seem to understand that. But the core problem of “income inequality” stems from failure to seize opportunity. If an American is insufficiently educated and does not develop useful skills, he or she will not be able to earn much money in the marketplace. And little is being done about that. So here’s the math deal, Mr. President. Right now, approximately 48 percent of American children living in female-headed households are poor. That’s compared to a poverty rate of 11 percent for kids living in a married-couple situation. The out-of-wedlock birth

rate for African-Americans is close to 73 percent. For Hispanics, it’s 53 percent; for whites, 29 percent. And sadly, most of these children are growing up without fathers in the home. So where is the national campaign to discourage women from having babies out of wedlock? Is the Department of Education doing anything about that? The media? Anyone? Back in 1992, then Vice President Dan Quayle derided a TV character named Murphy Brown (played by Candice

birth. To prevent these complications you’ll need to carefully control your blood sugar through the remainder of your pregnancy. You may be able to do this by managing your diet. If diet does not control your blood glucose, your doctor will prescribe insulin. Insulin will not harm your baby as long as you closely monitor your blood sugar to keep it at safe levels. It is really important that your obstetrician follow you and your baby carefully during pregnancy, and during labor and delivery. Gestational diabetes can create complications during delivery. That’s because your baby may be larger than nor-

mal. Why? Because the baby is exposed in the womb to your high sugar levels. If the baby is too big to exit the birth canal, natural childbirth may be difficult. For this reason, many doctors recommend inducing labor or delivering by surgery if you haven’t naturally delivered your baby by 38 weeks. Complications also can affect your baby right after birth. Before delivery, your baby’s pancreas has been making large amounts of insulin because of the high sugar levels in your blood. The minute your baby is bor n, she is disconnected from your blood supply. For a

See O’REILLY, Page A5

See DR. K, Page A5


Increase tree growth with timely pruning LOCAL

Roswell Daily Record

Q. My trees have finally produced leaves on most of the branches. Some branches have no leaves while others have a few leaves. Can I prune these branches now? A. Yes, you can prune away dead branches and weak branches in late spring and summer, but be sure that they are really dead. Summer is the best time to identify dead branches to remove. However, this year many trees were slow to produce their leaves because of drought. Many of the branches on your tree may actually be alive, though they may appear to be dead. You can confirm the status of a branch by looking at the cambium layer just under the bark. If the branch is dead, the cambium will be brown

or gray. A living branch will have a green cambium layer. Cambium is the layer of cells near the outer edge of a branch or twig that are living and actively dividing to for m cells necessary for the transport of water up and down the branch. If the cambium is dead, new cells to carry water upward to the twigs will not be formed. If the cambium has been injured, but not killed, by winter cold or drought there will be fewer cells to transport water upward to support new leave development. This will result in slow development of leaves. This is the reason you should carefully check the status of the cambium before pruning apparently dead, or mostly dead, branches. They may be injured, but not dead.

Four generations

Saturday, August 3, 2013

A5

pruned after dying.

For more gardening information, visit the NMSU Extension publications Web site at http:// aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_h, or to read past articles of Yard and Garden go to http://aces .nmsu.edu/pubs/periodicals.html.

If the whole tree is forming few leaves, a wise gardener may choose not to prune injured branches that are slow to form leaves from the tree. The leaves may be needed to produce food to support recovery from the injury. If the tree has some branches developing leaves normally and other branches that are forming no new leaves and the cambium on those branches is dead, the

branches with dead cambium may be pruned away without doing any harm to the tree. The weaker branches may also be good candidates for pruning, but consider the effect of pruning on the structure and appearance of the tree. Some weak branches may be left to maintain a balanced appearance for the tree. These branches may recover over time, or they may die and can be

Send your gardening questions to Yard and Garden, Attn: Dr. Curtis Smith, NMSU Agricultural Science Center, 1036 Miller Rd. SW, Los Lunas, NM 87031. Curtis W. Smith, Ph.D., is an Extension Horticulture Specialist emeritus with New Mexico State University’s Cooperative Extension Service. NMSU and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating.

The NM Filmmakers Showcase calls for entries SANTA FE—The New Mexico Film Office has announced a call for entries for the 2013 NM Filmmakers Showcase in Albuquerque, Oct. 25-27, at the Guild Cinema (3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106). The Showcase is an annual event featuring a vast range of creative talent of New Mexico residents from around the state.

Courtesy Photo

Four generations of the same family. From left: Donald Adams of Amarillo, Texas; his mother Billie Decker of Roswell, Donald's son Jeremy Adams of Amarillo, Texas and Jeremy's son Jayden Adams of Amarillo, Texas.

BLM has public comment period

ROSWELL—The Bureau of Land Management Roswell Field Of fice has proposed new fees for services at the Rob Jaggers Camping Area located within the Fort Stanton/Snowy River National Conservation Area in Lincoln County. In accordance with the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, the BLM is an authorized agency to charge fees at developed recreation sites that meet the specific criteria. The proposed fees are for electric hookup, water hookup, reservation of the group shelter for exclusive use, and for use of the dump station. Overnight

camping remains free. The collected fees will be used for onsite maintenance, improvements, and volunteer host reimbursement. Fees will be implemented after the six-moth review. The proposed fees are: $5 per day for electric hookup $5 per day for water hookup $25 per day to reserve the group shelter for exclusive use $15 dump station use To ensure that comments will be considered, the BLM must receive written comments on the Draft Business Plan no later than Dec. 15.

You may submit comments related to the Draft Rob Jaggers Camping Area Business Plan by any of the following methods: Email: cjbrown@blm.gov, Fax: 627-0276; Mail: BLM Roswell Field Office, Attention: Chris Brown, 2909 W. Second St., Roswell, NM 88201. Copies of the Draft Rob Jaggers Camping Area Business Plan are available at the Pecos District Office at the above address or online at: blm.gov/nm/roswell.

OSWEGO, N.Y.—The State University of New York at Oswego has awarded Asa' B. Gibbs of Roswell a $31,960 Residential Scholarship. Gibbs has reserved a place in the incoming class for the fall semester. Classes will begin Aug. 26. The Residential Scholarship, which provides $7,990 a year for up to four years, recognizes past academic achievement and potential for success for students attending Oswego from outside New York

state. The awards are part of about $4 million in merit scholarship money offered at SUNY Oswego. These funds are in addition to the more than $80 million in need-based grants, loans, work-study and scholarship awards that SUNY Oswego students receive annually. Admission to SUNY Oswego is competitive. U.S. News Media Group counts SUNY Oswego among the top public regional universities in the North for 2013, and the Princeton Review

includes Oswego in its 2013 college guidebook "The Best Northeastern Colleges," as well as its 2013 list of "best value" colleges and universities nationally. A 152-year-old comprehensive college in the State University of New York system, Oswego enrolls about 8,000 students in its College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; School of Business; School of Communication, Media and the Arts and School of Education. Visit oswego.edu for more information.

This year’s deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 20 at 5 p.m.. Entries postmarked after this date will not be accepted. As the Guild has a limited amount of screen time, film submissions will be accepted on a first come, first served basis. Mailed entries must be postmarked by September 20. Entry forms will be available at The Guild Cinema box of fice and on our website here: nmfilm.com/Filmaker_Pr

ograms.aspx. Dirk Norris, manager of the New Mexico Outreach Programs, said, “We are happy to be able to present the Filmmakers Showcase again this year. And for the first time we are including webisodes as a category. This new genre is an example of new distribution models that are coming into their own.” Other categories include: drama, documentary, animation and experimental films. There is no minimum run time and the maximum run time is two hours. A panel of local film professionals will judge the films in various categories, and winning films will be traveled around the state by the New Mexico Film Office in collaboration with local theatres. “The New Mexico Filmmakers Showcase is a great opportunity for

local filmmakers to have their projects screened for the public,” said Nick Maniatis, Director of the New Mexico Film Office. Meet the filmmakers at an opening night reception at Laru Ni Hati Café (3414 Central Avenue, NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106). The reception will be held on Friday, Oct. 25, from 5-6:30 p.m.

The Showcase is free and open to the public. There is no charge to submit an entry to the Showcase. For further information, contact the NM Film Office Outreach Programs Manage r, D i r k N o r r i s a t t h e NM Film Office: 505476-5671 or by emailing to dirk@nmfilm.com. Information about the New Mexico Film Office can also be accessed at nmfilm.com.

Students receive Rotary scholarships

For more infor mation, contact Chris Brown at 627-0220.

ASA' GIBBS RECEIVES SUNY OSWEGO SCHOLARSHIP

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

brief time, there may be too much insulin in your baby’s blood, given the normal amount of sugar in her blood. As a result, dangerously low blood sugar may result. If necessary, your baby will be given sugar to counteract this. Once the baby is born, the hormones that make the body resistant to insulin go away, and the high blood sugar levels return to normal — until your next pregnancy. However, once you have had gestational diabetes you are also at

increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life. So protect yourself: After your pregnancy, reduce your risk with regular exercise and a reducedcalorie diet. What I’ve written may sound frightening: Gestational diabetes does increase your and your baby’s risk for various health problems. But with careful medical care, and possibly with lifestyle changes, you can protect both yourself and your baby. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)

Courtesy Photo

Cheyenne Hewett, left, and Javier Alvavaz were each presented with a check for $1,500 to go toward their college education at a Roswell Rotary Club meeting on Thursday.

O’Reilly

Continued from Page A4

Bergen) for having a baby outside of marriage. Quayle was mocked unmercifully by the elite media and the salon set. But Quayle was right. According to the U.S. Census, 34 percent of unwed mothers do not work, and that is driving abject poverty. America offers the most people the best opportunity to pursue happiness. That’s why millions of illegal immigrants have poured into the country — most of them poor. They believe they have a shot at improving themselves economically. But children living in poverty without fathers to guide them are at a strong disadvantage in our competitive society.

Obama’s solution is to throw as much money as he can into programs to help these kids. But that will never work. The traditional American family has always been the foundation for success in America. But now it is being destroyed in some precincts. Welfare programs and public schooling will never overcome disadvantage on the home front. It is time for Obama to lead. The way to foster “income equality” is to encourage traditional upbringings and discipline. Just do the math, Mr. President. Veteran TV news anchor Bill O’Reilly is host of the Fox News show “The O’Reilly Factor” and author of the book “Pinheads and Patriots: Where You Stand in the Age of Obama.” © 2013 BillOReilly.com


CHURCH DEVOTIONAL

A6 Saturday, August 3, 2013

CHURCH

AND DIRECTORY

Roswell Daily Record

This Devotional & Directory is made possible by those businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services. QUALITY MEDICAL CARE

Roswell MediCo FAMILY MEDICINE

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BIOIDENTICAL HORMONE THERAPY Tom Wulf, M.D., D.A.B.F.M

M-F 8-5 p.m. Walk-ins & Evening Appointments available 1621 North Washington Avenue Corner of 17th Phone 575-625-8430 www.roswellmedico.com

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Pecos Valley Dairy Sales Inc. 274 E. Darby Road Dexter, New Mexico 88230

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Keeping you rollin’ since 1944

Divine Faithfulness

1 Corinthians 1:9 “God is faithful, through whom you were called into fellowship with His Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.” NASB

So many times, we go through things in life, and we wonder where our true friends are. We question the faithfulness of those around us. Sometimes, it’s not based on anything that someone has done, it’s just where we’re at during that time. I’m so thankful that God is faithful, aren’t you? We don’t ever have to worry about Him letting us down, or question His faithfulness. No matter where we are at in life, we can look to His Son, Jesus Christ and see that God is faithful, no matter what! If God was faithful to give His Son while we were sinners, He will be faithful in our time of need. You may be going through something tough, and you question the faithfulness of those around you. Remember Christ, and you will remember the divine faithfulness of God God bless you Roswell! - Chris Mullennix, Calvary Baptist Church ANGLICAN

ST. STEPHEN’S 101 S. Lea; 910-9706; Fr. Bob Tally, Min; W.S. 9:00 a.m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD, 1224 W. Country Club, 6222171, Melvin Suttle, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 6:00 pm., Wed. 7:00 pm. MIDWAY ASSEMBLY OF GOD 63 Yakima Rd., 3475309, S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m TEMPLO BETAL ASSEMBLY OF GOD 221 E. Jefferson, 623-6852, Paul & Toni Herrera, Mins. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Tues. & Wed. 6 p.m. TEMPLO LA HERMOSA FIRST SPANISH ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1305 South Garden, 625-0885, Oscar Guerrero, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Tues. & Wed. 7 p.m.

Harvard Petroleum Company, LLC

200 East Second Street P.O. Box 936 Roswell, NM 88202-0936 575-623-1581 Fax 575-622-8006

BAPTIST

ADVENTURE BIBLE CHURCH 1905 S. Main St., Butch Neal & Tim Arlet, Mins. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m.

GALILEE BAPTIST 513 E. Matthews St., 6628534, W.W. Green, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. HIGHLAND BAPTIST 2001 S. Lea, 622-9980, Rev. Wayne Brazil, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m. Wed. 6:00 p.m.

IGLESIA BAUTISTA EL CALVARIO 600 E. Tilden, 623-8135, Roberto Mancillas, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. MIDWAY BAPTIST 134 Yakima Rd., Leo Pennington, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 7 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

MORNING STAR BAPTIST 1513 Mulberry Ave., W.F. Wagoner, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. Wed. 7:30 p.m. MOUNTAIN VIEW BAPTIST 206 E. Charleston, 622-1019, Jack Ferguson, Interim Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 6:00 p.m.

MT. GILEAD MISSIONARY BAPTIST 700 E. Summit, 6230292 Pastor Allen. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:00a.m.

PRIMERA BAPTIST 417 East Wildy, 623-5420 S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. BERRENDO BAPTIST 400 W. Berrendo Rd., 622-1372, Troy ROSWELL BAPTIST Grant, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. TEMPLE 700 E. Berrendo, Bill Whitehead, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m. W.S. 11 am. & 6 pm Wed. 7 p.m. BETHEL BAPTIST N. Garden TABERNACLE BAPTIST & East Country Club Rd., 622115 W. 11th, 622-7912, 8182 Richard Grisham, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:40 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. BYKOTA BAPTIST 2106 E. Pine Lodge Rd., 622-3399 Don Johnson, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

CALVARY BAPTIST 1009 W. Alameda, Chris Mullennix, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST 500 N. Pennsylvania, 623-2640; S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:00 a.m.

CATHOLIC

n

“Where Love is Felt”

• Elderly Care • Assisted Living

(575)625-9145 2210 East Pinelodge Rd.

www.heartfeltmanor.com Marybeth Lawrence

VICTORY BAPTIST 1601 W. McGaffey, 622-0114, Dan Holt, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD

ASSUMPTION CATHOLIC 2808 N. Kentucky, 622-9895, Joe Pacquing, Min. Masses: Sat. Mass 9:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.; Sun. Mass 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.; Mon-Fri Mass 12:10 p.m.;

HOPE FAMILY CHURCH OF GOD 2600 S. Union, Raye Miller, Min., W.S. 10:30 a.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m., Thurs. Youth 6 p.m. NEW COVENANT FELLOWSHIP CHURCH OF GOD 2200 N. Garden, 624-1958,S.S. 9:30 a.m. W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION PARISH Dexter, Deacon Jesus Herrera, Min. Sat. Mass 6 p.m., Sun. Mass 11 a.m.

OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE Lake Arthur, Sun. Mass 8 a.m.

ST. CATHERINE’S Hagerman, Sun. Mass 9:30 a.m. ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC 506 S. Lincoln, 622-3531, Fr. Gonzalo Moreno, O.F.M. Pastor; Sat. English Mass 5:30 p.m., Spanish Mass 7 p.m.; Sun. English Mass 10 a.m., Spanish Mass 8 a.m. & 12 Noon.

ST. PETER CATHOLIC 805 S. Main, 622-5092, Fr. Charlie Martinez, O.F.M. Min.; Sat. Mass 6 p.m. Sun. Mass 8 a..m. & 11 a.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST 1500 S. Elm, 622-4675; John Early Cannon, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 6 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST 1512 South Main St., 622-4426 S.S. 10:30 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m., Wed. 6:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST 200 S. Union, Suite C, 347-2628; S.S. 10 a.m.;W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. IGLESIA DE CRISTO 801 N. Washington, Horario de Servicios: domingo 9:30 & 11:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., miercoles 6 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST

IMMANUEL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 1000 N. Union, 622-6352, Louis Accardi, Min., S.S. 10:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:30 a.m.; Wed. 6 p.m. ST. PAUL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 321 E. McGaffey, 623-1568, Joe L. Dawson, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m., Tues. & Fri. 8 p.m.

EPISCOPAL

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL 505 N. Penn., 622-1353, Father Dale Plummer, Min.; Principal Service. 9 a.m. 11:00 a.m.; in church Wed. 7 a.m. in the prayer garden. www.standrewsroswell.org

WAL#MART STORES, INC. 4500 N. Main Roswell, NM

575-623-2062 • FAX 575-623-8704

JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES Kingdom Halls 205 W. Gayle

1421 S. Garden

Dexter- 411 S. Lincoln

Dexter Cong. Sun. 10 a.m.; Thurs. 7 p.m.

Wakefield Oil Co., Inc. Wendell Wakefield

We don’t want you to give us your business, we want the chance to earn your business.

Charles A. Shannon, RPh

700 N. Union Roswell, NM 88201

In-Home Care for Seniors 624-9999

Rio Pecos Cong. Sun. 10 am; Thurs. 7 p.m.

JEWISH WARE TABERNACLE FIRST BAPTIST - HAGERMAN SPANISH CHURCH OF MISSIONARY BAPTIST 900 211 N. Cambridge, Hagerman, CONGREGATIONAL B’NAI CHRIST 3501 W. College, Herb Gage, Min.; S.S. 9:45 E. Deming, 622-0546, Richard ISRAEL 712 N. Washington, 622-3618 S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. Gorham, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. 622-7295, 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. W.S. 10 & 11 a.m., W.S. 2nd & 4th Fri. 7 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. SPANISH CHURCH OF FIRST BAPTIST WASHINGTON AVE. CHRIST Mulberry & Buena For changes or corrections OF DEXTER BAPTIST 1400 North Vista, Joe Villa, Min. W.S. on church listings contact 101 W. 3rd St., Dexter, 734Washington Ave., 840-1144, 9:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., Sandra at 5673, Jackie Thomas, Min., Randy Reeves, Min. S.S. 9:30 Wed. 6 p.m. 622-7710 Ext. 209 or S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 email sandra@rdrnews.com p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

311 S. Virginia PO Box 1108 Roswell, NM 88202 1-800-657-6242 575-622-4160 Fax: 575-623-1456

ph 575-627-8070 fax 575-627-8072

1301 West Country Club Road Roswell, NM 88201 www.PeachtreeRET.com

Mesa Park Cong. CHURCH OF CHRIST 700 W. Sun. 10 a.m.; Tues. 7 p.m. Country Club Road, 622-1350, Buena Visa Cong. (Spanish) Doug Austin, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; Sun. 1:30 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. W.S. 10 a.m. & THE FRIENDSHIP MISSION5 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m. ARY BAPTIST 1220 Johnson 1718 N. Atkinson St., 623-6484, Michael K. Mountain View Cong CHURCH OF CHRIST West Shelton, Sr., Min.S.S. Alameda & Balsam, 622-5562 Sun. 1 p.m.; Wed. 7:30 p.m. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., 2nd Spring River Cong. Wed.7 p.m. Sun. 1:30 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m. Sun. 10 a.m.; Tues 7:30 p.m. TRINIDAD COMMUNITY BAPTIST 1707 W. Juniper. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

n

Manor, Inc.

575-622-6571 Fax 575-623-3801 1-800-377-9881

Raymond E. Bush Manager

622-6308

111 W. Country Club, Roswell NM 88201


CHURCH DEVOTIONAL CHURCH

Roswell Daily Record

AND DIRECTORY

Saturday, August 3, 2013

A7

This Devotional & Directory is made possible by those businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services. LUTHERAN

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN 1405 N. Sycamore at College, 622-2853Daniel Praeuner, Min., S.S. 10:20 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m.

REDEEMER LUTHERAN 2525 N. Spruce Ave., 6277157; W.S. 10 a.m.

ST. MARK EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 2911 N. Main St., 623-0519, Larry Sydow, Min.; S.S. 9:15 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m.

METHODIST

821 N. Main

Roswell, NM

575-623-3673 Service

575-623-1031

Valley Electric Cooperative Central C entral V alley E lectric C ooperative m erss, OOwned wned bbyy our members, memb ccommitted ommitted to to our communities comm o unities sinc ce 1937 19337 since 575-746-3571 AArtesia/Roswell/Dexter rtesia/RRoswell/Dexter Hagerman 575-752-3366 Ha agerman

www.cvecoop.org w ww.cvvecooop.org

Agave Energy Company 6263 N Main St Roswell, NM 88201 (575) 627-8398

ALDERSGATE UNITED METHODIST 915 W 19th St, 625-2855, Jim Bignell, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m.

DEXTER UNITED METHODIST 112 W. 3rd St., Dexter, 734-6529, Jim Bignell, Min. S.S. 9:30a.m.; W.S. 11:00 a.m.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST 200 N. Pennsylvania, 6221881 Rev. W. Douglas Mills, PhD, Min.; S.S.9:15 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m.

TRINITY UNITED METHODIST 1413 S. Union, 622-0119, Pastor Glenn Thyrion, Min.; S.S. 10 a.m.; WS. 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.

MORMON

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 2201 West Country Club Rd. First Ward: Hank Malcom, Bishop 623-2777; W.S. 9 a.m.; S.S. 10:10 a.m.

Second Ward: Jeff Savage, Bishop, 623-4492 W.S. 11 a.m.; S.S. 12:10 p.m.

3ra Rama (en Español): Presidente Cavalcante W.S. 2:15 p.m.; S.S. 12:15 p.m.

NAZARENE

CENTRAL CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 901 E. Country Club, 420-2907 Randy Elftman, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 501 N. Sycamore, 624-2614; Dr. J. Vaughn Gossman, Min.; S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m.

End-of-life care that provides dignity,compassion, and comfort. Our services are 100% paid by Medicare, Medicaid, and most commercial insurances.

(575) 627-1145

THE NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1019 S Lea; 623-0201; Hector Torres, Min.; S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Spanish Service 12:30 p.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY OF THE FAITH IN JESUS CHRIST 1721 N. Maryland, 624-2728, Ismael Chavarria, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Thurs. 7 p.m. APOSTOLIC BIBLE 2529 West Alameda, 625-8779, Rod Foster, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

APOSTOLIC FAMILY WORSHIP CENTER 1103 N Union; Joel Martinez, Min., 627-2258; W.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL 602 S. Mississippi, 347-2514, J.E. Shirley, Min. W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. GOD’S MESSENGER 3303 W Alameda; 625-0190; R. Dixon, Sr., Min.; S.S. 8:45 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. Noon HOUSE OF PRAYER 412 E. Matthews, 746-6699, Mike Valverde, Min. W.S. 5 p.m. Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.

IGLESIA DE DIOS 317 East Wildy, 627-6596, Daniel Madrid, Min., Domingos: Escuela Dominical 10 a.m., Servicio Evg. 5 p.m. Martes: Oracion y Estudio 7 p.m., Jueves: Servicio Dept. 7 p.m. LIFE MINISTRIES FOURSQUARE CHURCH 409 W. 16th, 622-3383; Wayne & Janice Snow, Mins.; W.S. 10:30 am, Wed. 7:00 p.m. NEW APOSTOLIC 813 N. Richardson, Ste. A, W.S. 10 a.m. TRINITY APOSTOLIC FAITH N. Washington & 17th St., W.S. 11 a.m.

TRINITY HOUSE OF PRAISE PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD 510 S. Montana, 623-2710, Bobby Barnett, Min. W.S. 9:45 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 400 W. 3rd St., 622-4910, Sam Lanham, Int. Min. S.S. 8:30 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. 24-Hr Daily Inspiration Hotline 622-4923 REDEEMER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP PCA 900 W. Berrendo, S.S. 9 a.m. W.S. 10:30 a.m.

IGLESIA PRESBITERIANA HISPANA 2801 W. 4th St., 622-0756, Adam Soliz, Min. W.S. 11 a.m.

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN 2801 W. 4th St., 622-2801; Rev. Randy Nolen, Min.; S.S. 10:45 a.m.; W.S. 9:30 a.m.

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST

BEULAH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST 106 S. Michigan Ave., 243-6203; Alex Horton, Min. Sat. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL 7 DIA 500 S. Cedar, 9106527, Noel Dominguez, Min. Sat. S.S. 11 a.m.; W.S. 9:30 a.m. Wed. 7 p.m. ROSWELL ENGLISH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Jaffa & S. Union, 623-4636, Ken Davis,Min. Sat. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 am. Wed. 7 p.m.

OTHER

ADVENTURE BIBLE CHURCH 1905 S. Main St., Butch Neal & Tim Arlet, Mins. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. ALBUQUERQUE/ ROSWELL FAMILY 501 Cagua S.E., 266-4468, Fritz Schneider, Min.

BEOD MOED HEBRAIC BIBLE CENTER 928 W. McGaffey, 840-6120, Sat. Hebraic Dance 1 p.m.; Torah Study 2 p.m.; Wed. Pray & Dance Practice 6 p.m.

CALVARY CHAPEL OF ROSWELL 2901 W. 4th, 623-8072, W.S. 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

CHRIST’S CHURCH 2200 N. Sycamore, 623-4110 S.S. 8:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:00 am. CHRISTIAN COWBOY FELLOWSHIP 3103 W. Alameda John Sturza, 6250255, 2nd and last Friday IGLESIA DE DIOS DE LA PROFECIA 2322 N. Sherman; 505-610-6094 505-507-1254 Ministros Nicolás & Yolanda Limón. Servicio dominical 11 a.m. miércoles y viernes 7 p.m. CHURCH OF GOD 7TH DAY 1722 N. Kansas, 6237295, Sat. W.S. 9:45 a.m. THE DOOR 129 E. 3rd St. 575-495-9813; David Solano, Min.; W.S. 10:30 am & 6 pm. Wed. 7 pm CHURCH ON THE MOVE 901 W. Brasher Rd., 6227011, Troy Smothermon, Min. SS 9 & 10:45am 12:30pm Wed. 7 p.m.

GATEWAY 1900 Sycamore Ave., 623-8670, Rick Rapp, Min. W.S. 10:30 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. GRACE COMMUNITY 935 W. Mescalero, 623-5438 Rick Hale,Min.; W.S. 9 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. H.I.S. HOUSE 300 W. 3rd, Dexter, 734-6873 Ron & Jeri Fuller, Mins. W.S. 10 a.m. Wed.6 p.m. NARROW WAY 2200 N. Sycamore, 623-2511, Lyman Graham, Min. W.S. 2 p.m. NEW LIFE CHURCH OF ROSWELL 1800 W. Bland, 622-2989, Barbara Norfor, Min.; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. ORTHODOX BAHA’I FAITH obfusa@rt66.com 622-5729 ROSWELL CHRISTIAN OUTREACH MINISTRIES 101 S. Sunset; Joe Diaz, Min. W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m. ROSWELL PRAYER CENTER 622-4111/317-3867; Sat. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Weekdays 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., 6 p..m. to 9 p.m. SALVATION ARMY 612 W. College, 622-8700 Beau & Mandy Perez, Mins. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m.; Prayer Meeting, Tues. 7 p.m. THE UNITED CHURCH OF ROSWELL 417 E. Wildy; W.S. 9 am Bob Maples, Pastor UNITY OF ONE CHURCH 704 E. Mescalero, 6221185, Seferino Chavez, Min., W.S. 10 am, Bible Study Thurs. 7 p.m. WASHINGTON CHAPEL CHRISTIAN 110 S. Michigan St., 623-3511 Rev. Abukusumo, Min.; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. WAYMAKER 202 S. Sunset, 627-9190 Mike & Twyla Knowlton, Mins.; W.S. 10 a.m.; J12 (8-12 yr. olds) 4 p.m.; Revolution Youth Service 6 p.m.; Wed. Core Home Groups 7 p.m.

CARR AUTOMOTIVE, INC. 316 E. McGaffey Roswell, NM 575-622-0909 Emergency Calls 625-9007

Jones Witt & Ragsdale

Luke W. Ragsdale Roswell (575) 622-1900 Artesia (575) 746-1700 Fax (575) 625-1900 120 N. Garden, Roswell, NM 88203

Attorney at Law

207 North Washington (575)622-6722 Phone Post Office Box 3220 (575)622-6749 Fax Roswell, NM 88202 luke@ragsdalelawfirm.com

BOWLING FALL LEAGUE REGISTRATION Meetings will start August 23 Leagues will start September 3 101 West Main Street Artesia, New Mexico (575)746-3551 "Serving Your Automotive Needs Since 1925"

Please call for more information 623-8557

DENNIS & PATTY JOHNSON, OWNERS 314 N. Main • Roswell, NM 88201 (575)622-1590 (800)222-1792 Fax (575)623-2307 www.barringersblossomshop.net

"A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another, even as I have loved you, that you also love one another.” John 13:34

Big delays ahead on NY bridge, 1 of busiest in US

FORT LEE, N.J. (AP) — California had its “Carmageddon,” complete with sequel. Now, New York could be staring at its own potential transportation disaster. Officials at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey were hoping for the best Friday as they announced plans to close three of four lanes on the heavily traveled upper deck of the George Washington Bridge to replace sections of the steel beams that support the roadway. The work is expected to last through the end of the year and will be per for med during overnight hours — not that that will be any comfort to the estimated 20,000 vehicles that cross the span during those hours on weeknights, or the 50,000 that cross on weekend nights. The bridge has two levels:

Trucks are restricted to the upper level, which has four lanes in each direction. The lower level has three lanes in each direction and is not part of the current repair project. Crews will cut, remove and replace more than 600 deck panels — steel topped with asphalt — using two large cranes. Delays of 45 to 60 minutes are expected, but that could be an optimistic assessment. A test run two weeks ago produced 90minute-delays, albeit with no public notification, said Port Authority tunnels, bridges and terminals director Cedrick Fulton. “There are going to be delays, no question about it,” Fulton said. “We’re trying to communicate with the public and urge them to change their driving

habits. We’re trying to push as many cars as possible down (to the lower level).” About 300,000 vehicles per day cross the 82-year -old span, which carries Interstate 95 from norther n New Jersey across upper Manhattan and northeast into Connecticut. The upper deck opened in 1931, and the lower deck was added in 1962. About 7 percent of those vehicles travel in the overnight hours during the week and would be affected by the lane closures, Port Authority officials said Friday. That number rises to 17 percent on weekend nights. The $82 million repair will replace the steel beams underlying the upper deck roadway, which were last replaced in the late 1970s. They were designed to have a 20-year life span, but tests

every two years showed they had maintained their integrity, Fulton said. But in recent years, according to bridge chief structural engineer Bernard Yostpille, small cracks had begun to crop up with greater frequency, leading to increasing repairs. The bridge was never in danger from the cracks, said Andrea Giorgi Bocker, engineer of construction for the bridge. The repairs are being funded by phased-in toll increases implemented in 2011 that will ultimately raise cash tolls from $8 to $15. Fulton said one concern is that some motorists won’t take the warnings seriously because a project last year to shore up a structure on the New York side of the bridge led to far shorter delays than were expected.

Two years ago, a weekend-long closure of a portion of Interstate 405 in Los Angeles was dubbed “Carmageddon” but didn’t produce anything resembling the epic traf fic jams that many feared. Another weekend closure last fall didn’t produce “Carmageddon II,” as many motorists stayed off the road. The George Washington Bridge work is to begin Monday at 11 p.m. in the westbound lanes and will shift to the eastbound lanes the following Monday. The Port Authority plans to extend the hours gradually until the closures last from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. on weeknights and 11 p.m. to 9 a.m. on weekends. Work schedules also will be tailored around the New York Yankees’ home games in the Bronx, Port Authority officials said.


A8 Saturday, August 3, 2013

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Partly sunny and hot

Mostly cloudy

Sunday

Monday

Mostly sunny and hot

Tuesday

Partly sunny

Mostly sunny and hot

Wednesday

Partly sunny and hot

Thursday

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities

Mostly sunny and A thundershower in hot spots

High 101°

Low 72°

98°/72°

99°/72°

99°/71°

98°/71°

98°/71°

97°/66°

NNW at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

NNE at 3-6 mph POP: 10%

SSW at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

SSW at 3-6 mph POP: 10%

WSW at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

NW at 4-8 mph POP: 10%

ENE at 4-8 mph POP: 25%

NW at 6-12 mph POP: 40%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Friday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 99°/68° Normal high/low ............... 93°/67° Record high .............. 106° in 2012 Record low ................. 54° in 1897 Humidity at noon .................. 22%

Farmington 91/63

Clayton 91/66

Raton 85/59

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Fri. .. 0.00" Month to date ....................... trace Normal month to date .......... 0.13" Year to date .......................... 3.84" Normal year to date .............. 7.09"

Santa Fe 90/61

Gallup 83/58

Tucumcari 99/70

Albuquerque 91/71

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 97/65

Moderate Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 82/62

T or C 92/69

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Sun. The Moon Today Sun. New

Aug 6

Rise 6:12 a.m. 6:13 a.m. Rise 3:26 a.m. 4:17 a.m. First

Aug 14

Full

Aug 20

Set 7:56 p.m. 7:55 p.m. Set 5:38 p.m. 6:20 p.m.

Alamogordo 97/74

Silver City 88/67

ROSWELL 101/72 Carlsbad 102/74

Hobbs 100/70

Las Cruces 95/71

Last

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013

Aug 28

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diffi- JACQUELINE cult

BIGAR

ARIES (March 21-April 19)  You could be met by some resistance, even if you have good intentions. YOUR HOROSCOPE Focus on your family, specifically one or two individuals. If you have had a lot of difficulty with a particular person lately, today is not the day to smooth things over. Tonight: Stay close to home. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  You could be overwhelmed by everything you want to get done. The good news is that you will enjoy crossing tasks and responsibilities off your to-do list. Someone might be upset if you do not make plans with him or her. Reach out to this person. Tonight: Talk up a storm. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)  Head to a fair or maybe a casino, as you naturally will have a great time around a lot of people. The observer in you will be delighted by the eccentric crowd around you. Keep to your budget, and don’t allow your spending to get out of control. Tonight: Make it your treat. CANCER (June 21-July 22)      You have a warmth about you that few people would think to doubt,

Regional Cities Today Sun. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Today

Sun.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

67/57/r 89/74/pc 85/64/t 82/66/sh 90/69/pc 79/60/pc 76/56/pc 103/80/pc 84/61/t 78/59/pc 97/76/pc 88/75/s 95/76/s 82/60/t 86/65/t 100/81/s 78/64/pc 100/70/s

66/56/r 92/69/t 83/59/pc 78/58/pc 92/63/t 77/59/pc 73/53/pc 103/80/s 87/64/t 73/56/pc 99/78/s 88/73/s 95/76/pc 79/58/pc 81/65/t 101/81/s 80/64/pc 96/71/s

Miami 90/78/pc Midland 101/74/s 78/57/s Minneapolis New Orleans 92/77/t New York 82/68/t 80/62/c Omaha Orlando 92/74/t Philadelphia 85/68/t Phoenix 104/87/pc Pittsburgh 74/58/t Portland, OR 81/60/pc 91/71/pc Raleigh 85/67/t St. Louis Salt Lake City 90/68/pc San Diego 73/65/pc Seattle 77/58/pc Tucson 97/78/t Washington, DC 88/69/t

91/78/t 97/74/s 79/64/pc 92/77/t 80/62/pc 80/65/t 92/75/t 83/61/pc 105/88/s 74/53/pc 87/61/s 91/64/t 82/66/pc 95/69/s 72/65/pc 83/59/s 99/80/t 83/63/pc

Friday

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

97/74/pc 91/71/pc 74/49/t 100/71/pc 102/74/s 78/50/t 91/66/pc 75/56/pc 97/65/pc 95/70/t 90/69/pc 91/63/t 83/58/t 100/70/s 95/71/pc 84/59/t 84/61/pc 94/69/pc 99/70/s 98/66/pc 83/58/t 85/59/t 76/50/t 101/72/pc 82/62/pc 90/61/pc 88/67/t 92/69/t 99/70/pc 87/62/pc

97/73/s 92/70/t 74/51/t 97/71/s 99/72/s 81/50/t 92/66/t 76/56/s 95/67/s 95/71/t 91/70/t 92/62/t 85/58/t 96/70/s 97/73/t 84/57/s 84/61/t 95/71/t 96/71/s 95/67/s 83/57/t 87/58/s 75/50/t 98/72/s 83/61/s 90/61/t 89/65/t 93/66/t 97/69/s 87/62/t

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

as you are so genuine. Your natural charm draws in exactly what you desire. Through a loved one, you could meet someone very interesting who could become a longterm friend. Tonight: Just be yourself. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  Touch base with a loved one with whom you don’t often have time to visit. Taking off for the day together could be immensely rewarding. You even might be tempted to cancel other plans you made for later in the day. Tonight: Remember, you don’t need to share everything! VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)     Once you join friends, whether it’s for a community project or at a ballgame, you will have a great time. You’ll discover a new sense of camaraderie with one of your friends or perhaps someone new. A loved one could become jealous. Tonight: Don’t play into a control game. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)  Know when to defer to an older friend or relative. You could be overwhelmed by everything you want to accomplish, especially when it comes to fulfilling others’ wishes. Listen to news openly, and if you believe someone is wrong, avoid getting into an argument. Tonight: At home. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  Be more forthright when dealing with a sibling or loved one. You might want to rethink a situation more carefully. Your awareness of what is needed probably will not be appreciated by this person. T ry to take a step back and observe more. Tonight: Go where there is great music.

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

U.S. Extremes

Today

Sun.

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 113° ........ Bullhead City, Ariz. Low: 22° .....Bodie State Park, Calif.

High: 102° ......................Tucumcari Low: 48° ........................Eagle Nest

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)  Plan on spending some time with a friend or loved one you have not seen in a while. Whether it’s running errands or seeing a movie together, you will bond on a deep level. Oneon-one time keeps this connection close. Tonight: Say “yes” to a fun invitation. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  For a while, you might be OK with someone stealing the stage, but as the day goes on, you will notice that your temper starts to flare up. Try not to give so much of yourself away, and focus on staying levelheaded. Tonight: Claim responsibility for your share of a problem. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  You have certain plans and projects that you feel you must complete no matter what. To your delight, you will complete them with ease, and you also will be able to fit in some fun shopping or join friends for a spontaneous get-together. Tonight: Choose a favorite stressbuster. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)  Allow more of your creativity to flow. You might not recognize your limitations in a situation involving friends. Do not accept a leadership role, even if it is something as simple as throwing a party. In fact, remain as uninvolved as you can. Tonight: Tap into your imagination. BORN TODAY Business magnate Martha Stewart (1941), NFL quarterback Tom Brady (1977), actor Jay North (1951)

Is DeGeneres part of academy’s push for diversity?

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences isn’t as much of an old-boys’ club as it used to be. The group named two women to prominent positions this week, including Friday’s announcement that Ellen DeGeneres will host the 2014 Oscar show. Earlier in the week, the academy’s board of governors elected Cheryl Boone Isaacs president, the first African-American to hold the post and the first woman in three decades. In June, the organization invited 276 new members to join — 100 more than the previous year and arguably its most diverse slate ever. Could this be in response to the 2012 Los Angeles Times study that stung the academy by pointing out what many suspected: Hollywood’s pre-eminent film organization is a mostly white, male group? “This is all in the shadow of Dawn Hudson’s appointment as C.O.O. last year,” said awards expert Tom O’Neil. “The academy is making an extraordinary

AP Photo

In this April 29, 2013, photo, TV host Ellen DeGeneres arrives at the season 4 premiere of "Arrested Development" in Los Angeles. effort to embrace women and minorities, and be (more) inclusive.” Other industry watchers say these visible appointments are part of the academy’s continuing effort to shed its old-boy image — one that may have been reinforced last year by Seth MacFarlane’s sexist humor and the departure of shortlived Oscar producer Brett Ratner after publicly making homophobic remarks. “If you wanted to pick

somebody that would tacitly or implicitly be an absolute rejection of the bad behavior of the last couple years, what could be a better way to distance yourself from that than to pick the most famous and popular lesbian entertainer in the world?” said Scott Feinberg, an industry analyst for The Hollywood Reporter. Such prominent academy appointments for Hudson, DeGeneres and Boone

www.rdrnews.com

Isaacs send a message to women interested in making movies. “This is the kind of leadership and these are the kinds of examples that stand out for those women who will follow,” said Cathy Schulman, president of Women in Film. “This is what gives people hope and encouragement.” DeGeneres is also a proven commodity. She successfully hosted the Oscars in 2007, drawing almost as many viewers as MacFarlane did last year. “The academy doesn’t want to take any chances with the performance skills of the host,” O’Neil said. “This is a good, smart choice that will put the focus back on the content of the show, rather than will the host crash and

burn.” Craig Zadan and Neil Meron, who produced the 2013 telecast, are returning for next year’s show. O’Neil notes that the veteran producers are also openly gay and vocal supporters of gay rights. DeGeneres, 55, has developed a devoted following with her 10-year -old daytime talk show, which can serve as a built-in platform to promote the Academy Awards. Boone Isaacs, the academy’s new president, is a veteran marketing executive and longtime academy member and governor. “She’s a very worthy candidate regardless of what she looks like,” Feinberg said. “But the fact that she is a relatively younger African-American woman

and that’s the face of the academy, that’s a significant symbolic thing.” For real change, these appointments can’t just be exceptions, Schulman said, but “exceptions converted into the norm.” “Change happens when the numbers increase,” she said. “Change doesn’t happen overnight, but it was long overdue that the academy made some appointments like this.” Among the diverse new members invited to join the academy are Prince, Jennifer Lopez, writer-director Ava DuVernay, Sandra Oh, Paula Patton and songwriter Siedah Garrett. DeGeneres, Boone Isaacs and the Oscar producers were not available to comment on this story.


SPORTS

Saturday, August 3, 2013 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

Section

Roswell Daily Record

FIST PUMPIN’ AT FIRESTONE AKRON, Ohio (AP) — Tiger Woods had a shot at making history with a magical 59. He swore he wasn’t disappointed to come up short. “Disappointed? Absolutely not,” he said. Then he cracked, “A 61’s pretty good. I’m not bummed.” Like a pitcher having to settle for a shutout instead of a perfect game, Woods could console himself by tying his career best and building a seven-shot lead Friday through 36 holes at the Bridgestone Invitational. Pursuing his eighth victory at Firestone Country Club, Woods opened birdie-eagle — stuffing an approach to 3 feet at the first hole and holing a 20-footer for 3 at the par5 second. He had two more birdies on the front nine, and had four in a row to start the back nine in a light rain. Needing to go only 2 under over his last five holes, he missed birdie putts inside 10 feet at 15 and 17. He saved par on the last with a 25-footer after an errant drive and a shot that hit into the trees and ended up in a bare spot short and right of the green. “How about just pleased?” he said, when asked to rate the round. “I’m very happy I was able to post that. I just kept thinking, whatever lead I had, ‘Let’s just keep increasing it.’ It’s at seven now, I believe. So

that’s not too bad after two days.” The 61 — matching his career best at the 1999 Byron Nelson, 2005 Buick Open and on the same Firestone course back in 2000 — left him at 13-under 127. Defending champion Keegan Bradley and Chris Wood, playing the tournament for the first time, were tied for second. They each shot 68. Bradley finished well before Woods, but was asked if it was disheartening to take the lead and then have Woods retake it after the opening two holes. “Tiger, those first couple holes out there are definitely birdie holes, so I’d expect him to do that,” Bradley said. “You know, I hope he doesn’t go too low.” Sorry, Keegan. Woods, a four -time winner this year, needed only 22 putts, eight fewer than he had Thursday in an opening 66. He hit 10 of 14 fairways and was on in regulation on 16 of 18 greens. The next best score on a threatening day with a slate-gray sky and precipitation was a 66. It seemed every fan on the course took notice as Woods started stacking up birdies. The magic number 59 — shot five times on the PGA Tour — dominated conversations. “Oh, they were excited,” Woods said. “You

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could hear it more than feel it. You definitely could hear it. They were into it.” Asked if that kind of electricity helps out a player, he joked, “It’s nice to be playing in front of people who are excited like that, especially people who aren’t yelling just because your ball gets in the air. You know, we are pros.” The last player to shoot 59 in a PGA Tour event was Stuart Appleby in the final round of the Greenbrier Classic in 2010. Al Geiberger was the first in 1977, and Chip Beck, David Duval and Paul Goydos also accomplished the feat. Bill Haas shot a 68 and was tied for fourth at 5 under with Henrik Stenson, who had a 70. Jim Furyk, Luke Donald, Jason Duffner and Bubba Watson were 4 under. There have been 27 rounds of 60 in tour events, including Phil Mickelson this year in the Phoenix Open. In a remarkable career spent in the spotlight, a 59 would have been just another check mark on Woods’ to-do list. Instead, he didn’t think it was even anything special. “(One of my) top 10 rounds?” he said, repeating the question. “I don’t know about that.”

Big 12 unlike the others BIG 12 FOOTBALL

AP Photo

Alex Rodriguez hits a solo home run for the Trenton Thunder during a minor-league game, Friday. An announcement regarding Rodriguez’s suspension is expected Monday.

A-Rod homers, waits on announcement NEW YORK (AP) — Alex Rodriguez was back with the Trenton Thunder on Friday and hit what might be his last home run in a while. With a lengthy suspension looming, the New York Yankees star hit a two-run homer to left in the third inning against the Reading Fightin Phils. Rodriguez is among 14 players facing discipline in Major League Baseball’s Bio-

genesis investigation, and suspensions are expected on Monday — with Rodriguez facing the longest penalty. Coming back from hip surgery and a quadriceps injury, A-Rod was hoping to return to the Yankees for the first time since last October. But he might not get there any time soon because of his alleged connection to the See A-ROD, Page B2

For the first time in three years, the Big 12 Conference has the same teams coming back from the previous season. While the seven-time defending national champion SEC and the Pac-12, among other leagues, have expanded during all the shuffling of conference affiliations the past few summers, the Big 12 has settled into a 10-team league. There is no league championship game in early December to determine the Big 12 champion. Instead, every team plays the other nine league schools in a round-robin schedule that stretches over three full months — from West Virginia going to Oklahoma on Sept. 7, until two final regular-season games Dec. 7. The title is seemingly up for grabs in the league that has lost Projected four teams order of finish and added two since 2010. 1. Oklahoma 2. TCU Consider the 3. Oklahoma State curious case 4. Texas of Texas, 5. Baylor whose coach 6. Kansas State 7. Texas Tech Mack Brown 8. West Virginia responded 9. Iowa State “Who knows?” 10. Kansas when asked

AP Photo

LEFT: Na Yeon Choi putts on the 18th green during the second round of the Women’s British Open, Friday.

— SATURDAY, AUGUST 3 —

• No local games scheduled

The Oklahoma State defense runs onto the field during a recent practice. The Cowboys are picked to finished third in the Big 12 this year. about being picked fourth in the Big 12 preseason poll by media who cover the league and as high as fourth nationally by at least one national magazine. “I do think that we have the most balanced league in the country right now, top to bottom,” Brown said. “Everybody else can beat anybody else in the league on a given day, and that’s not happening across the

country. ... People are confused on who they think may win this conference championship, and that’s a compliment to our league.” Oklahoma State is the media’s choice to win the league this time around. Kansas State and Oklahoma shared the title last year, with the Wildcats getting the league’s See BIG 12, Page B2

Choi grabs lead with 67, Park eight shots back

ST. ANDREWS, Scotland (AP) — Inbee Park caught the bad end of the draw at St. Andrews, made worse by not having her best golf. Before she can think about a chance to make history as the first golfer to win four professional majors in the same season, Park faced a more immediate concern Friday afternoon in the Women’s British Open — how to make up an eight-shot deficit against Na Yeon Choi. “I’m so far back,” Park said after a birdie on the final hole to salvage a 1over 73. “We need some tough conditions.” The last time there was talk about a Grand Slam in this area of Scotland was 11 years ago, across the Firth of Forth at Muirfield, where Tiger Woods was going for the third leg of the slam. A nasty storm that arrived without warning blew him off course to an 81

LOCAL SCHEDULE

AP Photo

in the third round and that was the end of it. This wind at St. Andrews was the strongest of the week, though nothing out of the ordinary. Choi played four groups behind Park and turned in a command performance, making six birdies for a 5under 67 that gave her a one-shot lead over Miki Saiki of Japan going into the weekend. Saiki set the Old Course record for the Women’s British Open with a 66 in the morning, where the only nuisance was a few bursts of showers. Choi’s 67 was 8.4 shots better than the average score of those who played in the afternoon, and one of only three rounds in the 60s. Conditions were so demanding that when Choi was asked to give details of her six birdies, the South Korean couldn’t recall much further back than the 17th hole. “Five hours out there, this kind of weather, it’s hard to remember,” she said. It’s a round Park would like to forget, one that will make her quest even

SPOTLIGHT

ON

SPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN ...

1852 — The first intercollegiate rowing race is held on Lake Winnipesaukee, N.H., where Harvard beats Yale by four lengths on the 2-mile course. 1949 — The National Basketball Association is formed by the merger of the National Basketball League and the Basketball Association of America. 1955 — Scott Frost, driven by Joe O’Brien, wins the Hambletonian at Good Time Park in Goshen, N.Y. He goes on to become the first trotting Triple Crown winner. 1990 — The PGA Tour announces it will not hold tournaments at golf clubs that have all-white memberships or show any other signs of discrimination. 1995 — Jerry Jones, owner of the Dallas Cowboys, signs a controversial 10-year, $25 million deal with Pepsi to make it the official cola of Texas Stadium, despite the

more difficult to add to her trio of majors this year. “A little bit of everything wasn’t working well out there today,” Park said. “I don’t feel like I played horrible today. A little bit unlucky with the draw, not playing in the morning when it’s lovely. But that’s the way it is.” Her problems started on the opening hole, when her approach over the Swilcan Burn rode the wind and bounced beyond the green some 50 feet from the flag. Her chip only got halfway there, and she two-putted for bogey. Park was never under par at any point in her round. A birdie on the sixth was offset by a three-putt bogey on the 10th. A birdie on the 12th was followed by a bogey on the 13th, in part due to a bad break. On the toughest driving hole on the back nine, Park hit her best tee shot — only for it to roll into a sand-filled divot. Her approach came up just short of the green, and she hit putter down the slope and 10 feet past the cup.

NFL’s sponsorship agreement with Coca-Cola. 1996 — Andre Agassi, the Dream Team and the U.S. women’s 400-meter relay team win Olympic gold medals, while the American men’s 400 relay settles for silver. With Carl Lewis idled by a coach’s decision and Leroy Burrell injured, the men’s 400 team is shocked by Canada - the first time the U.S. loses the event at the Olympics. 2003 — Annika Sorenstam completes a career Grand Slam at the Women’s British Open, beating Se Ri Pak by a stroke in a thrilling head-to-head showdown. 2006 — Champ Car driver Cristiano da Matta needs surgery to remove a ruptured blood vessel in his head after his race car collides with a deer that wandered onto the track during a test session at Road America in Elkhart Lake, Wis.


PILLER’S PROFESSION SPORTS

Second Round

B2 Saturday, August 3, 2013

Roswell native Gerina Piller on the LPGA Tour

T-30th -1 PLACE

Big 12

Continued from Page B1

automatic BCS berth because of their head-to-head victory over the Sooners. With Heisman T rophy finalist quarterback Collin Klein gone, KState is a preseason pick to finish in the bottom half of the league — just like the last two years, when the Wildcats instead finished in the top two. “I said last year that, if I were given the opportunity, I would have picked us 99th” K-State coach Bill Snyder said. “As I look at it this year where we stand, I’d probably echo the same thought. It’s precarious trying to make those kinds of decisions as the season gets started.”

— THINGS TO WATCH —

QB QUANDARY: Seven of the 10 teams had senior quarterbacks last season, so change is in the air. One of the most experienced QBs in the league hasn’t even taken a Big 12 snap: Before transferring to Kansas and sitting out last season, junior Jake Heaps started 16 of his 22 games at BYU. Texas junior David Ash has started a league-high 18 games while going through plenty of

LPGA

Women’s British Open Scores By The Associated Press Friday At The Old Course, St. Andrews St. Andrews, Scotland Purse: $2.75 million Yardage: 6,672; Par: 72 Second Round a-amateur Na Yeon Choi . . . . . . . . . . .67-67 Miki Saiki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-66 Morgan Pressel . . . . . . . . . .66-70 Jee Young Lee . . . . . . . . . . .70-67 Suzann Pettersen . . . . . . . .70-67 Nicole Castrale . . . . . . . . . .67-70 Mikaela Parmlid . . . . . . . . . .69-69 Mamiko Higa . . . . . . . . . . . .70-69 Hee Young Park . . . . . . . . .70-69 So Yeon Ryu . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70 Angela Stanford . . . . . . . . . .69-70 Stacy Lewis . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-72 Xi Yu Lin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68 Meena Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69 Jenny Shin . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71 Dori Carter . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72 Paula Creamer . . . . . . . . . .68-72 Lizette Salas . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72 Ryann O’Toole . . . . . . . . . . .67-73 Lee-Anne Pace . . . . . . . . . .70-71 Pernilla Lindberg . . . . . . . . .68-73 Candie Kung . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70 Sun Young Yoo . . . . . . . . . .71-71 Katherine Hull-Kirk . . . . . . . .69-73 Inbee Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73 Mariajo Uribe . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73 Catriona Matthew . . . . . . . .68-74 Eun-Hee Ji . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-75 Sydnee Michaels . . . . . . . . .67-75 Gerina Piller . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69 Christel Boeljon . . . . . . . . . .72-71 Jessica Korda . . . . . . . . . . .72-71 Line Vedel . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71 Natalie Gulbis . . . . . . . . . . .71-72 Jiyai Shin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72 Ashleigh Simon . . . . . . . . . .71-72 Holly Clyburn . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73 I.K. Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73 Brittany Lincicome . . . . . . . .70-73 Linda Wessberg . . . . . . . . . .70-73 Sandra Gal . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-74 Malene Jorgensen . . . . . . . .69-74 Florentyna Parker . . . . . . . .69-74 Marianne Skarpnord . . . . . .69-74 Ayako Uehara . . . . . . . . . . .69-74 a-Georgia Hall . . . . . . . . . . .68-75 Danielle Kang . . . . . . . . . . .68-75 Liz Young . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-75 Michelle Wie . . . . . . . . . . . .74-70 Sarah Kemp . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71 Dewi Claire Schreefel . . . . .73-71 a-Celine Boutier . . . . . . . . . .72-72 Mi Jung Hur . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72 Se Ri Pak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73 Karine Icher . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74 Anna Nordqvist . . . . . . . . . .70-74 a-Emily Taylor . . . . . . . . . . .70-74 Lindsey Wright . . . . . . . . . . .70-74 Mika Miyazato . . . . . . . . . . .74-71 Gwladys Nocera . . . . . . . . .74-71 Moriya Jutanugarn . . . . . . . .72-73 Minea Blomqvist . . . . . . . . .71-74 Moira Dunn . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-74

Roswell Daily Record

ups and downs. TCU senior Casey Pachall has 17 starts, but played only the first four games last season before leaving school for a substance-abuse program. Even Oklahoma State had two freshman quarterbacks who started multiple games last season, and a third who has since left the team. Iowa State provided Sam Richardson a head start, letting him start a couple of games late in his freshman season. SOPHOMORE SEASONS: West Virginia and TCU both had their Big 12 debuts last season, when each were the reigning champs of their previous leagues. Both started the season in the Top 25 and got through September undefeated. But both finished 4-5 in league play, part of a four -team tie for fifth place. “It’s as competitive a conference as there is in college football,” said Mountaineers coach Dana Holgorsen, whose team lost QB Geno Smith and nine other of fensive starters. TCU returns nine starters from a defense that led the Big 12 in total defense — a staple for coach Gary Patterson’s teams through all the conference-hopping the Frogs did after being left out of the original Big 12 lineup in 1996. “I don’t think there’s any magic formula, but you can’t allow offenses to dictate,” he said. SPEED FREAKS: Baylor, Oklaho-

Cristie Kerr . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-74 Thidapa Suwannapura . . . .71-74 Rikako Morita . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75 Shanshan Feng . . . . . . . . . .69-76 a-Lydia Ko . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-76 Hee Kyung Seo . . . . . . . . . .69-76

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

TV SPORTSWATCH

134 135 136 137 137 137 138 139 139 139 139 139 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 141 141 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 145 145 145 145 145

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Saturday, August 3 AUTO RACING 7 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for GoBowling.com 400, at Long Pond, Pa. 8 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, pole qualifying for Pocono Mountains 125, at Long Pond, Pa. 9:30 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, “Happy Hour Series,” final practice for GoBowling.com 400, at Long Pond, Pa. 11 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Truck Series, Pocono Mountains 125, at Long Pond, Pa. 3 p.m. NBCSN — IRL, IndyCar, qualifying for Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio, at Lexington, Ohio (same-day tape) 6 p.m.

TOTAL TO PAR

Failed to make cut Belen Mozo . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-74 Yani Tseng . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-74 Nontaya Srisawang . . . . . . .71-75 Brittany Lang . . . . . . . . . . . .70-76 Katie M. Burnett . . . . . . . . . .69-77 Caroline Hedwall . . . . . . . . .69-77 Amy Yang . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-71 Jennifer Rosales . . . . . . . . .73-74 Jacqui Concolino . . . . . . . . .71-76 Jane Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-76 Alison Walshe . . . . . . . . . . .71-76 Ji Young Oh . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-78 Mi-Jeong Jeon . . . . . . . . . . .67-80 a-Charley Hull . . . . . . . . . . .76-72 Lisa McCloskey . . . . . . . . . .76-72 Giulia Sergas . . . . . . . . . . . .76-72 Mo Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-73 Azahara Munoz . . . . . . . . . .73-75 Margherita Rigon . . . . . . . . .73-75 Laura Davies . . . . . . . . . . . .72-76 Irene Cho . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-77 Chella Choi . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-77 Julieta Granada . . . . . . . . . .71-77 Ai Miyazato . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-79 Camilla Lennarth . . . . . . . . .66-82 Jodi Ewart Shadoff . . . . . . .76-73 Ilhee Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-73 Louise Larsson . . . . . . . . . .74-75 Klara Spilkova . . . . . . . . . . .73-76 Sophie Gustafson . . . . . . . .72-77 Trish Johnson . . . . . . . . . . .72-77 Cindy LaCrosse . . . . . . . . . .72-77 Pornanong Phatlum . . . . . . .72-77 Daniela Holmqvist . . . . . . . .71-78 Caroline Masson . . . . . . . . .76-74 Bree Arthur . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-75 Beth Allen . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-76 Austin Ernst . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-76 Marta Silva . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-76 Karen Stupples . . . . . . . . . .74-76 Karrie Webb . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-76 Sakura Yokomine . . . . . . . . .74-76 Juli Inkster . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-77 Haeji Kang . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-77 Kristy McPherson . . . . . . . .73-77 Katie Futcher . . . . . . . . . . . .72-78 Jeong Jang . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-78 Mina Harigae . . . . . . . . . . . .71-79 a-Amy Boulden . . . . . . . . . .70-80 Carly Booth . . . . . . . . . . . . .78-73 Nikki Campbell . . . . . . . . . . .75-76 Nicole Hage . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-76 Sarah Jane Smith . . . . . . . .75-76 Momoko Ueda . . . . . . . . . . .75-76 Jennifer Johnson . . . . . . . . .74-77 Stacey Keating . . . . . . . . . .74-77 Paola Moreno . . . . . . . . . . .72-79 Laura Diaz . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-80 Whitney Hillier . . . . . . . . . . .75-77 Christina Kim . . . . . . . . . . . .75-77 Lexi Thompson . . . . . . . . . .75-77 Amelia Lewis . . . . . . . . . . . .74-78 Mindy Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-79 Felicity Johnson . . . . . . . . . .76-77 Chie Arimura . . . . . . . . . . . .75-78 Beatriz Recari . . . . . . . . . . .78-76 Becky Morgan . . . . . . . . . . .76-78

— — — — — —

145 145 145 145 145 145

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

146 146 146 146 146 146 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 151 151 151 151 151 151 151 151 151 152 152 152 152 152 153 153 154 154

ESPN — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, U.S. Cellular 250, at Newton, Iowa 8 p.m. ESPN2 — NHRA, qualifying for Northwest Nationals, at Kent, Wash. (same-day tape) BOXING 8:30 p.m. NBCSN — Heavyweights, Tomasz Adamek (48-2-0) vs. Dominick Guinn (34-9-1); cruiserweights, Eddie Chambers (36-3-0) vs. Thabiso Mchunu (12-1-0); middleweights, Curtis Stevens (24-3-0) vs. Saul Roman (37-9-0), at Uncasville, Conn. EXTREME SPORTS Noon ESPN — X Games, at Los Angeles 8:30 p.m. ESPN — X Games, at Los Angeles GOLF 8 a.m. ESPN2 — Women’s British Open Championship, third round, at St. Andrews, Scotland 10 a.m. TGC — PGA Tour-WGC, Bridgestone Invitational, third round, at Akron,

69

THIS WEEK’S STOP: WOMEN’S BRITISH OPEN

ROUND SCORE

ma State and Oklahoma each ran more than 1,000 offensive plays last season, while West Virginia and Texas Tech were within 10 of reaching that plateau. All averaged more than 37 points a game. Expect more of the same up-tempo offense this season. Oklahoma State coach Mike Gundy is talking about going even faster and Oklahoma, even without 50-game quarterback starter Landry Jones, doesn’t anticipate much difference. Texas, which had only 891 offensive snaps, plans for co-offensive coordinator Major Applewhite, the former Longhorns quarterback, to help turn up the tempo there. BACK HOME: Kliff Kingsbury excited Texas Tech fans with his big-passing ways as a quarterback from 1999-2002. Now he’s back in Lubbock as head coach after spending last season as offensive coordinator at Texas A&M , helping tutor Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Johnny Manziel. Kingsbury will be 34 when the season begins, the youngest head coach in any BCS-automatic qualifying conference. Kingsbury joins Oklahoma State’s Mike Gundy as a former standout quarterback now coach at his Big 12 alma mater. Gundy took over as the Cowboys’ head coach 16 years after his last game; Kingsbury is back 11 years later.

Hole Par Score

MLB

American League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .66 45 Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .64 45 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .61 49 New York . . . . . . . . . .56 51 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .50 58 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .62 45 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .60 49 Kansas City . . . . . . . .54 52 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .45 60 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .40 67 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .63 45 Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 49 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .50 59 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .49 58 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .36 71

— — — — — — — —

154 154 155 155 155 156 159 159

Pct GB .595 — .587 1 1 .555 4 ⁄2 .523 8 .463 14 1⁄2

Pct GB .579 — .550 3 1 .509 7 ⁄2 .429 16 .374 22

A-Rod

Pct .583 .550 .459 .458 .336

GB — 3 1⁄2 13 1⁄2 13 1⁄2 26 1⁄2

Thursday’s Games Cleveland 6, Chicago White Sox 1 Kansas City 7, Minnesota 2 Texas 7, Arizona 1 Baltimore 6, Houston 3 Boston 8, Seattle 7 L.A. Angels 8, Toronto 2 Friday’s Games Baltimore 11, Seattle 8 Detroit 2, Chicago White Sox 1 Arizona 7, Boston 6 Miami 10, Cleveland 0 N.Y. Mets 4, Kansas City 2, 11 innings San Francisco 4, Tampa Bay 1 Houston at Minnesota, 6:10 p.m. Texas at Oakland, 8:05 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Angels, 8:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, 8:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Kansas City (B.Chen 4-0) at N.Y. Mets (C.Torres 1-2), 11:10 a.m. Texas (Garza 1-0) at Oakland (J.Parker 66), 2:05 p.m. Seattle (E.Ramirez 2-0) at Baltimore (Feldman 2-2), 5:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 2-8) at Detroit (Scherzer 15-1), 5:08 p.m. Arizona (Corbin 12-2) at Boston (Peavy 84), 5:10 p.m. Cleveland (McAllister 4-6) at Miami

Ohio Noon CBS — PGA Tour-WGC, Bridgestone Invitational, third round, at Akron, Ohio TGC — Web.com Tour, Mylan Classic, third round, at Canonsburg, Pa. 2 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, 3M Championship, second round, at Blaine, Minn. 5 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Reno-Tahoe Open, third round, at Reno, Nev. HORSE RACING 3 p.m. FSN — Thoroughbreds, West Virginia Derby, at Chester, W.Va. NBC — NTRA, Whitney Invitational Handicap, at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1:30 p.m. FOX — Regional coverage, L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs, Texas at Oakland, or Atlanta at Philadelphia 5 p.m. WGN — Chicago White Sox at Detroit MLB — Regional coverage, Arizona

Pct GB .596 — 1 ⁄2 .593 1 .545 5 ⁄2 .450 16 .422 19

Pct GB .546 — .514 3 1⁄2 1 .468 8 ⁄2 .459 9 1⁄2 .454 10

Thursday’s Games Miami 3, N.Y. Mets 0 Texas 7, Arizona 1 San Francisco 2, Philadelphia 1 St. Louis 13, Pittsburgh 0 Atlanta 11, Colorado 2 L.A. Dodgers 6, Chicago Cubs 4 Friday’s Games L.A. Dodgers 6, Chicago Cubs 2 Atlanta 6, Philadelphia 4 Colorado 4, Pittsburgh 2 Arizona 7, Boston 6 Miami 10, Cleveland 0 N.Y. Mets 4, Kansas City 2, 11 innings

at Boston or St. Louis at Cincinnati MOTORSPORTS 1 p.m. NBC — AMA Amateur National Motocross Championship, at Hurricane Mills, Tenn. NFL FOOTBALL 5 p.m. ESPN2 — Ceremony, Pro Football Hall of Fame Induction, at Canton, Ohio SOCCER 4:30 p.m. NBCSN — MLS, New York at Kansas City 6 p.m. FOX — International Champions Cup, semifinal, teams TBD, at Los Angeles TENNIS 1 p.m. ESPN2 — ATP World Tour, Citi Open, semifinal, at Washington 3 p.m. ESPN2 — WTA, Southern California Open, semifinal, at Carlsbad, Calif.

San Francisco 4, Tampa Bay 1 St. Louis 13, Cincinnati 3 Washington 4, Milwaukee 1 N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, 8:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Kansas City (B.Chen 4-0) at N.Y. Mets (C.Torres 1-2), 11:10 a.m. Atlanta (Beachy 0-0) at Philadelphia (Lannan 3-4), 2:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 3-6) at Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 6-9), 2:05 p.m. Colorado (J.De La Rosa 10-5) at Pittsburgh (Liriano 11-4), 5:05 p.m. Arizona (Corbin 12-2) at Boston (Peavy 84), 5:10 p.m. Cleveland (McAllister 4-6) at Miami (Ja.Turner 3-3), 5:10 p.m. San Francisco (Lincecum 5-11) at Tampa Bay (Price 6-5), 5:10 p.m. St. Louis (Westbrook 7-5) at Cincinnati (Cingrani 4-1), 5:10 p.m. Washington (Haren 5-11) at Milwaukee (D.Hand 0-2), 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Nova 4-4) at San Diego (T.Ross 2-4), 6:40 p.m. Sunday’s Games Cleveland at Miami, 11:10 a.m. Kansas City at N.Y. Mets, 11:10 a.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 11:10 a.m. Arizona at Boston, 11:35 a.m. Colorado at Pittsburgh, 11:35 a.m. San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 11:40 a.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 12:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs, 12:20 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, 2:10 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 6:05 p.m. Monday’s Games Atlanta at Washington, 5:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at St. Louis, 5:05 p.m. Milwaukee at San Francisco, 8:15 p.m.

PGA

Bridgestone Invitational Scores By The Associated Press Friday At Firestone Country Club (South) Akron, Ohio Purse: $8.75 million Yardage: 7,400; Par: 70 Second Round Tiger Woods . . . . . . . . . . . .66-61 — Keegan Bradley . . . . . . . . . .66-68 — Chris Wood . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-68 — Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-68 — Henrik Stenson . . . . . . . . . .65-70 — Jim Furyk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-69 — Luke Donald . . . . . . . . . . . .67-69 — Jason Dufner . . . . . . . . . . . .67-69 — Bubba Watson . . . . . . . . . . .67-69 — Kiradech Aphibarnrat . . . . . .69-68 — Richard Sterne . . . . . . . . . . .70-68 — John Merrick . . . . . . . . . . . .72-66 — Steve Stricker . . . . . . . . . . .71-67 — Rickie Fowler . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71 — Harris English . . . . . . . . . . .70-68 — Jamie Donaldson . . . . . . . . .70-69 — Zach Johnson . . . . . . . . . . .69-70 — Webb Simpson . . . . . . . . . .64-75 — Francesco Molinari . . . . . . .70-70 — Angel Cabrera . . . . . . . . . . .72-68 — Paul Casey . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70 — Ryan Moore . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-74 — Hideki Matsuyama . . . . . . . .72-68 — Miguel A. Jimenez . . . . . . . .71-69 — Martin Kaymer . . . . . . . . . . .74-67 — Paul Lawrie . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72 — Rory McIlroy . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71 — Justin Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72 — Matteo Manassero . . . . . . . .71-70 — Dustin Johnson . . . . . . . . . .72-69 — Adam Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-68 — Ian Poulter . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72 — Russell Henley . . . . . . . . . . .72-69 — Richie Ramsay . . . . . . . . . .73-69 — Thorbjorn Olesen . . . . . . . . .73-69 — D.A. Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69 — Brandt Snedeker . . . . . . . . .72-70 — Brian Gay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70 — Graeme McDowell . . . . . . . .71-71 — Nicolas Colsaerts . . . . . . . . .72-70 — Lee Westwood . . . . . . . . . . .71-71 — Peter Hanson . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72 — Ernie Els . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72 — Phil Mickelson . . . . . . . . . . .72-71 — Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71 — Michael Thompson . . . . . . .72-71 — Boo Weekley . . . . . . . . . . . .73-70 — Nick Watney . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72 — Satoshi Kodaira . . . . . . . . . .70-74 — David Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73 — Gonzalo Fdez-Castano . . . .70-74 — Bo Van Pelt . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73 — Carl Pettersson . . . . . . . . . .72-73 — Branden Grace . . . . . . . . . .70-75 — Scott Piercy . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-77 — Jonas Blixt . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75 — Ken Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75 — Tommy Gainey . . . . . . . . . . .74-71 — Mikko Ilonen . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73 — Sang-Moon Bae . . . . . . . . . .73-73 — Jason Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-72 — Sergio Garcia . . . . . . . . . . . .71-76 —

Others: 0 Putts: 32

and has threatened a possible lifetime ban, and negotiations over Rodriguez’s penalty were likely to go through the weekend, with the 38year -old resisting such a lengthy stretch on the sidelines. Baseball’s highest-paid player with a $28 million salary, A-Rod has three law firms working for him — Gordon & Rees; Reed Smith; and Cohen, Weiss & Simon. Rodriguez seemed to be on the verge of rejoining the Yankees before the leg injury last month. New York assigned him to Trenton for two games and has not said where he’ll go afterward. With the Yankees at San Diego through Sunday, it would appear Rodriguez’s first opportunity to rejoin them would be for Monday’s series opener at the Chicago White Sox. It was not clear whether Commissioner Bud Selig would attempt to use provisions of baseball’s labor contract to prevent Rodriguez from playing until arbitrator Fredric Horowitz rules on appeal.

closed anti-aging clinic that’s been accused of distributing banned performanceenhancing drugs. Most targeted players face 50-game bans, including AllStars Nelson Cruz of Texas and Jhonny Peralta of Detroit. Many of the players are expected to follow the example set by Milwaukee’s Ryan Braun last month and accept penalties without a challenge before an arbitrator. Firsttime offenders who challenge suspensions can continue to play until their appeals are decided. “Let’s just get it over with,” Los Angeles Dodgers manager Don Mattingly said. The Yankees expect A-Rod to be accused of recruiting other athletes for the clinic, attempting to obstruct MLB’s investigation, and not being truthful with MLB in the past. has been Baseball attempting to gain a suspension through at least 2014

Pct GB .591 — .486 11 1⁄2 .459 14 1⁄2 .458 14 1⁄2 .398 21

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total 4 3 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 36 72 4 3 4 4 4 5 4 5 4 37 69

Pars: 9 Bogeys: 3 Greens hit: 17 of 18

Continued from Page B1

(Ja.Turner 3-3), 5:10 p.m. Houston (Bedard 3-8) at Minnesota (Gibson 2-3), 5:10 p.m. San Francisco (Lincecum 5-11) at Tampa Bay (Price 6-5), 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Nova 4-4) at San Diego (T.Ross 2-4), 6:40 p.m. Toronto (Rogers 3-5) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 5-5), 7:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 11:08 a.m. Cleveland at Miami, 11:10 a.m. Kansas City at N.Y. Mets, 11:10 a.m. Arizona at Boston, 11:35 a.m. Seattle at Baltimore, 11:35 a.m. San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 11:40 a.m. Houston at Minnesota, 12:10 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Angels, 1:35 p.m. Texas at Oakland, 2:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, 2:10 p.m. Monday’s Games Detroit at Cleveland, 5:05 p.m. Boston at Houston, 6:10 p.m. Minnesota at Kansas City, 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 6:10 p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 8:05 p.m. Toronto at Seattle, 8:10 p.m.

National League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .65 45 Washington . . . . . . . .53 56 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .50 59 New York . . . . . . . . . .49 58 Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 65 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . .65 44 St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .64 44 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .60 50 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .49 60 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .46 63 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Los Angeles . . . . . . . .59 49 Arizona . . . . . . . . . . .56 53 Colorado . . . . . . . . . .52 59 San Diego . . . . . . . . .50 59 San Francisco . . . . . .49 59

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 3 4 36 4 4 3 4 4 3 3 2 5 32

Eagles: 0 Birdies: 6 Fairways hit: 16 of 16

SCOREBOARD

Tania Elosegui . . . . . . . . . . .75-79 Sahra Hassan . . . . . . . . . . .74-80 Carlota Ciganda . . . . . . . . . .74-81 Helen Alfredsson . . . . . . . . .73-82 Veronica Zorzi . . . . . . . . . . .73-82 a-Gabriella Cowley . . . . . . .75-81 a-Sarah-Jane Boyd . . . . . . .77-82 Vicky Hurst . . . . . . . . . . . . .77-82

ROUND SCORECARD

127 134 134 135 135 136 136 136 136 137 138 138 138 138 138 139 139 139 140 140 140 140 140 140 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 143 143 143 143 143 143 144 144 144 144 145 145 145 145 145 145 146 146 146 147

Martin Laird . . . . . . . . . . . . .77-70 Toru Taniguchi . . . . . . . . . . .75-73 Charl Schwartzel . . . . . . . . .74-74 Shane Lowry . . . . . . . . . . . .72-76 Stephen Gallacher . . . . . . . .74-74 Billy Horschel . . . . . . . . . . . .74-74 Derek Ernst . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-76 Kevin Streelman . . . . . . . . .76-73 Brett Rumford . . . . . . . . . . .76-74 Jaco Van Zyl . . . . . . . . . . . .73-82 Daniel Popovic . . . . . . . . . . .79-77

Transactions

— — — — — — — — — — —

147 148 148 148 148 148 149 149 150 155 156

Friday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Placed 2B Brian Roberts on the paternity leave list. Reinstated RHP Steve Johnson from the 15day DL. TEXAS RANGERS — Claimed INF Adam Rosales off waivers from Oakland. Optioned OF Engel Beltre to Round Rock (PCL). National League NEW YORK METS — Selected the contract of LHP Pedro Feliciano from Las Vegas (PCL). Placed LHP Josh Edgin on the 15day DL. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Activated RHP Jared Hughes from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Vic Black to Indianapolis (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association SACRAMENTO KINGS — Named Corliss Williamson assistant coach. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Suspended Baltimore CB Asa Jackson for the first eight games of the 2013 regular season for violating the NFL policy on performance enhancing substances. CHICAGO BEARS — Signed LB Andrew Starks to a three-year contract. Waived K Austin Signor. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed DT Vaughn Meatoga. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Were awarded LS Luke Ingram off waivers from Pittsburgh. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed OL Luke Patterson and OL Brice Schwab. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Signed K Sebastian Janikowski to a four-year contract extension. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Excused WR Riley Cooper from all team activities indefinitely after he was caught on video making a racial slur. HOCKEY National Hockey League PHOENIX COYOTES — Announced today the team renewed their one-year affiliation agreement the Gwinnett (ECHL). SAN JOSE SHARKS — Re-signed F Bracken Kearns to a one-year contract. ST. LOUIS BLUES — Signed D Jay Bouwmeester to a five-year contract extension. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Signed G Kristers Gudlevskis to a three-year contract. SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS — Suspended Real Salt Lake MF Yordany Alvarez three games for a reckless challenge that injured New York MF Tim Cahill in a July 27 game. Suspended Philadelphia MF Keon Daniel one game and fined him an undisclosed amount for an act of violent conduct against Vancouver MF Jun Marques Davidson in a July 27 game. Suspended Colorado D Hendry Thomas one game and fined him an undisclosed amount for a reckless challenge of LA Galaxy MF Hector Jimenez in a July 27 game. Thomas is also suspended one game for yellow card accumulation. FC DALLAS — Loaned F Bradlee Baladez to Fort Lauderdale (NASL). PHILADELPHIA UNION — Signed MF Gilberto dos Santos Souza Junior. SPORTING KANSAS CITY — Signed D Erik Palmer-Brown. COLLEGE ARKANSAS BAPTIST — Announced senior RB Michael Dyer will transfer to Louisville. DUKE—Named Molly O’Brien women’s lacrosse volunteer assistant coach. HAWAII — Fired offensive coordinator Aaron Price. MOUNT OLIVE — Named Allison Young and Matt Parker assistant athletic trainers. OKLAHOMA — Named Ryan Connolly volunteer assistant baseball coach and recruiting coordinator. RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE — Named Kristen Johnson interim women’s volleyball coach. TROY — Promoted Bart Barnes to women’s golf coach. WISCONSIN-OSHKOSH — Named Kelly McNiff women’s assistant basketball coach.


NATION/OBITUARIES/RECORDS

Roswell Daily Record

OBITUARIES

Frank C. Gamboa Jr. Oct. 12,1937 - July 23, 2013

Frank C. Gamboa Jr. passed away peacefully at his home in Colton, Calif. His family was at his side. Frank was born in Roswell to Castulo and Molly Gamboa. He served in the U.S.

Marines and Army. He was married to his wife, Martha, for 48 years. He was employed by Rockwell International for 36 years. He is survived by his four children: Molly Guerrero, Mark, Jerrold and Darryl Gamboa; 12 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; his sister, Mary; and several nieces, nephews and cousins. He is preceded in death by his wife; parents, brother, Joe Gamboa; and sister, Esther Salas. Frank was laid to rest with Martha at Riverside National Cemetery.

Mary Cloe (Merritt) Jackson

Mary Cloe Jackson, 97, passed away peacefully on July 29, 2013, in San Antonio, Texas. She was born on July 10, 1916, in Tokio,

Texas, to James and Ella Merritt. She loved reading, cooking, sewing and travel. Her travels included fishing trips with her late husband, as well as trips to Australia, Hawaii, California, Canada and Colorado with church groups and family. She will be missed by many friends and family who loved her dearly. Services are under the direction of Sunset Northwest Funeral Home, San Antonio, Texas, and Baca Funeral Home, 300 E. Boutz Road, Las Cruces, N.M. Viewing of the body will be on Monday, Aug. 5, from 4-7 p.m., and the funeral service will be the following day, Tuesday, Aug. 6, 10 a.m., at the Baca Funeral Home. Burial will follow at the Hillcrest Memorial Gardens Cemetery on Picacho Avenue.

Mary Cloe was preceded in death by her parents, James & Ella Merritt; her husband, Henry R. Jackson; two sons: Jimmy and Jacky Jackson; three brothers: Lewis, Don and Jack Merritt; and four sisters: Gladys Fisher, Helen Hays and Eloise Drake. She is survived by two daughters: Mary E.J. Collins and husband, Ed, of Le Grange, Texas, and Ella R. Jones and husband, Benny, of San Antonio, Texas; four granddaughters: Kalah Goodman, of Seattle, Jana Stephenson and husband, Kenneth, of Lubbock, Texas, Laura Castille and husband, Steve, of Albuquerque, Susan Backstrom, of Houston; five grandsons: Kyle Goodman, of Houston, Matthew Jackson, of Alamogordo, Tim Jackson and

Saturday, August 3, 2013

wife, Sharon, of Conway, Ark., Tye Rogers and wife, Kelli, of Plainview, Texas, Toby Rogers and wife, Jessica, of Lubbock, Texas; five great-granddaughters: Ginny and Jacky Castille, of Albuquerque, Nici Rogers of Temple, Texas, Kara and Kaitlyn Stephenson, of Lubbock, Texas; eight great-grandsons: Christopher Jackson of Conway, Ark., Dakota and Dusty Jackson, of Alamogordo, Coby, Josh and Zack Rogers, of Lubbock, Texas, Tyler Rogers, of Lubbock, Texas, Aaron Stephenson of Lubbock, Texas.

Donald “Don” Leavell

Services are pending at LaGrone Funeral Chapel for Donald “Don” Leavell, age 81, of Roswell, who passed away Aug. 2, 2013.

B3

A complete announcement will be made when arrangements are finalized. Condolences can be made online at lagronefuneralchapels.com. Arrangements are under the personal directions of the professionals at LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Basilio Castaneda

Services are pending at LaGrone Funeral Chapel for Basilio Castaneda, age 73, of Roswell, who passed away Aug. 2, 2013. A complete announcement will be made when arrangements are finalized. Condolences can be made online at lagronefuneralchapels.com. Arrangements are under the personal directions of the professionals at LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Dems hit GOP on immigration in top critic’s home

AMES, Iowa (AP) — Kicking of f an August of likely intense debate over immigration, the Senate’s second-ranking Democrat traveled to Iowa Friday to rebuke House Republicans who oppose major changes embraced by the Senate. Sen. Richard Durbin’s strategically targeted visit was a fairly small and calm foretaste of planned demonstrations by opponents and supporters of the proposed immigration changes during Congress’ summer recess. The Senate measure would heighten border security and provide a pathway to citizenship for millions of immigrants living here illegally. Durbin, of Illinois, joined Iowa Democratic Sen. Tom Harkin at a forum in a college town represented in Congress by Republican Rep. Steve King. King is among Congress’ fiercest opponents of granting citizenship to immigrants now here illegally. Republican leaders have denounced King’s most inflammatory remarks, but some Democrats depict him as a symbol of widespread GOP resistance. Harkin said Iowans “are compassionate, caring people and we don’t characterize people with hateful, spiteful, degrading language.” King said in a July interview that some Hispanics brought to the country illegally as children become high school valedictorians. But for each of those, he said, “there’s

PUBLIC RECORDS

Marriage Licenses July 18 Jason L. Chavez, 34, and Isabel Guerrero, 28, both of Roswell. July 19 Jack R. Hardcastle, 25, and Marie N. Quintana, 23, both of Roswell. July 22 Sergio A. Carrasco, 26, and Martina Huerta, 44, both of Dexter. Luis A. Gonzalez-Rascon, 24, and Carrie Elizabeth Masters, 18, both of Roswell. Curtis Dean Griffin, 51, and Felicia A. Luna-Salazar, 40, both of Roswell. Fabian R. Gomez, 25, and Michelle A. Sanchez, 25, both of Roswell. July 23 Artemio Ruiz, 36, and Clara Villa, 37, both of Roswell. Edward L. Pharis, 43, and Rhonda L. Gardner, 52, both of Dexter. Douglas W. Tyler, 29, and Vera G. Tice, 28, both of Roswell. July 24 Johnny Gallegos, 44, and Stephanie A. Sanchez, 31, both of Roswell. July 25 Everardo Avalos-Davalos, 47, and Maria I. Ceballos-Aranda, 43, both of Roswell. July 26 Francisco C. Martinez, 32, and T ina M. Barron, 36, both of Roswell. Mathew R. Jaramillo, 28, and Bianca S. Boccelli, 24, both of Roswell. Joshua M. Cox, 23, and Deborah K. Brumlow, 19, both of Roswell. Victor A. Quintana, 23, and Nohemi Moreno, 23, both of Roswell. July 29 Paul S. Rodriguez, 27, and Leonore E. Chavez, 22, both of Roswell. Accidents July 18 1:33 p.m. — Main and McGaffey; drivers — Catarino Anthony Ayala, 28, and Oscar Grajeda, 19, both of Roswell. 5 p.m. — 100 block East Fifth; drivers — vehicle owned by Marissa F. Barrientos, of Roswell,

another 100 out there who weigh 130 pounds, and they’ve got calves the size of cantaloupes because they’re hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert.” Durbin focused on the so-called DREAM Act, which would offer eventual citizenship to some immigrants brought illegally to the U.S. as children. “If we can fix this immigration system, we can build the American economy and we can do the right thing,” Durbin told the Ames gathering. “To suggest these are petty criminals or drug smugglers just doesn’t square with the reality of the DREAM Act.” The forum featured potential DREAM Act beneficiaries. Hector Salamanca, 20, came from Mexico as a child with his parents, who stayed in the United States after their tourist visas expired. His undocumented status made him ineligible to attend a state university or receive government-sponsored grants or loans, he told the audience of about 200. Salamanca said he earned an associate degree at a community college and will attend Drake University. He said he tells Hispanic youths, “Don’t let your undocumented status prevent you from achieving your goals.” Some House Republicans have expressed interest in a version of the

and unknown driver. July 19 12:36 a.m. — 1618 SE Main; drivers — vehicle owned by Martin L. Aguirre, of Roswell, and Jarett R. Young, 17, of Capitan. 4:30 p.m. — East Lewis; drivers — vehicle owned by Orlando Mendoza, and Ron J. Garcia Jr., 36, both of Roswell. 5:30 p.m. — 203 Mescalero parking lot; drivers — vehicle owned by Roman Lariva, of Tinnie, and unknown driver. 5:30 p.m. — 900 W. Second; drivers —Deborah K. Martinez, 45, of Roswell, and unknown driver. July 20 2:29 a.m. — Sycamore and Alameda; drivers — Raudel U. Macias-Massu, 29, of Roswell. 11:38 a.m. — Sunset and Jaffa; drivers — Javier Ledezma, 24, and James E. Pack, 81, both of Roswell. 12 p.m. — Berrendo and Main; drivers — Royce D. Schilling, 48, of Roswell, and Omar R. Dominguez, 35, of Artesia. Unknown time — 324 E. Church; drivers — vehicle owned by Maria E. Vasquez, and Brandon M. Mendoza-Reyes, 18, both of Roswell. July 21 12:37 a.m. — College and Grand; drivers — Priller Fritz, 44, of Merrillville, and unknown driver. 9:17 a.m. — 407 S. Richardson; drivers — vehicle owned by Filimon F. Montoya, of Roswell. 3:37 p.m. — Unknown location; drivers — vehicle owned by Ana K. Velarde, of Roswell, and unknown driver. 9:37 p.m. — 200 block West Berrendo; drivers — Loren B. Bentley, 35, and Kurtis A. Mowbray, 24, both of Roswell. 9:51 p.m. — Main and Second; drivers — Robin Green, 52, of Fort Worth, and vehicle owned by Pedro Medina, of Roswell. July 22 8:46 a.m. — Washington and Poe; drivers — Jennifer Martinez, 25, and Christopher R. Andazola, 27, both of Roswell. 10:53 a.m. — 21st and Main; drivers — Michael Takeo Fujta, 59, of El Cerrito, CA, and Alfonso Eguino-Bobadillo, 20, of Hernan-

AP Photo

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), right, speaks during a forum on immigration as U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) looks on, Friday, in Ames, Iowa.

DREAM Act, although King calls it “backdoor amnesty.” The Obama administration and many activist groups have said they will not settle for the DREAM Act alone. They are pressing the GOP-controlled House to embrace something similar to the Senate bill. Many House Republicans resist the idea.

dez, NM. 12:11 p.m. — Summit and Main; drivers — Amanda R. Hickman, 30, and Guadalupe P. Perales, 58, both of Roswell. 1:56 p.m. — 4500 N. Main; drivers — Marcia M. Tidwell, 59, of Roswell. 2 p.m. — 1200 S. Main; drivers — vehicle owned by Agna D. Bravo, of Far mington, and unknown driver. 2:45 p.m. — Garden and 19th; drivers — Alejandro Ogas, 60, and Lawrence A. Medina, 42, both of Roswell. 5 p.m. — Kansas and Fourth; drivers — vehicle owned by Lime Rock Resources, of Artesia. 5:10 p.m. — Washington and Jaf fa; drivers — Brendon W. Shackelford, 19, and David Evans, 61, both of Roswell. 8:34 p.m. — Main and Mescalero; drivers — Sergio Moya-Sanchez, 20, and William D. Montgomery, 71, both of Roswell. 8:50 p.m. — Lea and Fifth; drivers — Johnny A. Valenzuela, 45, and Nicole M. Gregory, 16, both of Roswell. July 23 12 a.m. — 108 S. Delaware; drivers — vehicle owned by Adan Medina, of Roswell. 12:36 p.m. — McGaffey and Main; drivers — Luiz E. Zavala, 16, and Martha Yates, 87, both of Roswell. 12:54 p.m. — 23rd and Grand; drivers — Roy B. Hampton, 22, of Artesia, and Michael O. Mills, 24, of Roswell. 12:50 p.m. — 1601 E. Bland; drivers — Anna M. Alvarez, 28, and Juan C. Rodriguez, 37, both of Roswell. 6:20 p.m. — Lea and Deming; drivers — vehicle owned by Benjamin Cloutier, and Martin R. Gilliland, 62, both of Roswell. July 24 11:22 a.m. — 1110 S. Main; drivers — Anthony L. Lara, 24, and Chesna Lee Simmons, 84, both of Roswell. 11:54 a.m. — 117 E. 19th; drivers — Aida F. Florez, 59, of Artesia, and Alan Weber, 32, of Clovis. 12:04 p.m. — 2513 W. Second; drivers — Mickey D. Click, 57, and Hyman Derwin, 90, both of

They point to GOP primary voters in their districts who oppose “amnesty” for people here illegally, and who say a Democratic administration can’t be trusted to keep promises to tighten the border with Mexico. Durbin noted that President Barack Obama won re-election with strong backing from Hispanic and Asian-American voters.

Roswell. 3:04 p.m. — 1705 N. Main and 19th; drivers —Joseph O. Lente Jr., 25, and Albert J. Meadows, 16, both of Roswell. 5:47 p.m. — Main and Relief Route; drivers — Jesus RochaGarcia, 53, of Santa Fe, and vehicle owned by Christina Leon, of Dexter. 8:22 p.m. — 4500 N. Main; drivers — Mathew Rogers, 24, and Sabrina M. Montoya, 17, both of Roswell. July 25 7:57 a.m. — 19th and Garden; drivers — Jane E. McClain, 75, and Raul C. Kastner, 31, both of Roswell. 12 p.m. — 2901 N. Main; drivers — vehicle owned by Glen Maynor, of Roswell, and unknown driver. 12:37 p.m. — 500 S. Richardson; drivers — Margaret M. Johnson, 66, and Juan Carlos Gomez, 55, both of Roswell. 2:54 p.m. — Union and Plaza Del Sol; drivers — Maria S. Rincon, 67, and Zachary D. Christensen, 28, both of Roswell. 3:49 p.m. — 1019 S. Main; drivers — vehicle owned by Rita Haner, and David D. Chaves, 18, both of Roswell. 5 p.m. — 4501 N. Main; drivers — vehicle owned by Albert Sais, of Roswell. 9:50 p.m. — Mesa and 21st; drivers — vehicle owned by Mary Ann Wells, of Artesia, and Melvin Young, 67, of Roswell. July 26 6:17 a.m. — 515 N. Main; drivers — vehicle owned by Pecos Trails Transit, and Irvin Marrujo, 63, both of Roswell. 4:16 p.m. — 900 W. Hobbs; drivers — Lawrence C. Barber, 23, of Shiprock, and Bjorn A. Lyrhed, 36, of Roswell. 5 p.m. — McGaffey and Main; drivers — Raul MoralesAragonez, 53, and Barbara Aragonez, 44, both of Dexter. 5 p.m. — Reba D. White, 44, and Taylor M. McGuire, 17, both of Roswell. 9:46 p.m. — Main and Hobson; drivers — William B. Akin, 23, and Jose I. Velez-Munoz, 21, both of Roswell. July 27 4:50 p.m. — Poe and Lea; driv-

ers — Valentin Moreno-Castillo, 55, of Roswell, and Dakota J. Mills, 18, of Lavernia, TX. 5:10 p.m. — Second and Sycamore; drivers — John Adelbert Mills, 49, of Victoria, and Toni Laney, 58, of Roswell. 5:20 p.m. — Main and Berrendo; drivers — Geovany Garcia, 20, and Lee A. Sandles, 38, both of Roswell. July 28 3:55 a.m. — 2601 N. Kentucky; drivers — Erik W. Olson, 24, of Fairbanks, and Lucia Lorena Guerrero, 24, of Roswell. 2:17 p.m. — Grand and Country Club; drivers — vehicle owned by Leona Williams, of Roswell, and unknown driver. 3:40 p.m. — Second and Main; drivers — James B. Stanbrough, 31, and Carla D. Overmier, 36, both of Roswell. 10:48 p.m. — 1500 block West First; drivers — vehicle owned by Valenzuela-Greene, of Roswell, and unknown driver. July 29 11:45 a.m. — 4501 N. Main; drivers — vehicle owned by Rufina Romero, of Roswell. 12:25 p.m. — Main and 21st; drivers — Dale W. Goode, 69, of Dexter, and Terry A. Montgomery, 53, of Roswell. 12:28 p.m. — Summit and Lincoln; drivers — Frank Lindner, 64, and Eleazar E. Sierra, 17, both of Roswell. 12:59 p.m. — Main and 22nd; drivers — Mary Beth Hanagan, 56, and Raymond Donovan Romero, 23, both of Roswell. 1:59 p.m. — Mescalero and Main; drivers — Lucas Herrington, 18, and Margaret J. Melendez, 64, both of Roswell. 4:55 p.m. — Union and Seventh; drivers — Andy J. Montgomery, 22, and Gilbert G. Cordero, 57, both of Roswell. 4:55 p.m. — Union and Seventh; drivers unknown. 5:49 p.m. — Main and Pine Lodge; drivers — Jim B. Sherwood, 39, and Randall K. Kennedy, 37, both of Roswell. Births July 19 Lovelace Regional Hospital — Roswell To Aaron Leeder and Sarah Leeder, a girl.


B4 Saturday, August 3, 2013 DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: I am a 17-year-old girl who lives with my mother and my mother’s boyfriend. This man has changed my world, and not for the better. The one person I ever cared about has practically turned against me. My mom tried killing herself for this man and chose him over me after she was released from the institution. I have been diagnosed with depression and have also tried to kill myself. I also have a habit of cutting myself. I stopped, but lately I have been wanting to start again. The only thing that has held me back is her threats of committing me to an insti-

tution. She threatened my boyfriend with the police if he ever spoke to me again after we broke up. When I confronted her, she insisted that she was right and someday I’d understand. She has turned into this person I hardly know, and it’s because of her boyfriend’s influence. Before, when she was upset she would just not talk to me, but now she calls me the most horrid things and won’t apologize unless someone besides me tells her. I feel so alone. I honestly do want to kill myself, but I haven’t because I know it isn’t the right thing to do, even if it may seem right. I have tried talking to her. She won’t listen to me. What should I do? HOPELESS AND ALONE IN FLORIDA DEAR HOPELESS AND ALONE: Because you honestly do want to harm yourself, contact the doctor who diagnosed you with depression. However, if this is about your mother breaking up your romance by threatening to involve the police, you need to understand that the tactic would

COMICS

not have worked unless he had something to fear. The level of conflict in your home is not healthy. If you are still in school, discuss this with a trusted teacher or school counselor. In one more year you will be 18 and able to make decisions for yourself, but they shouldn’t be based on your mother or her boyfriend. They need to be about what is truly best for you. #####

DEAR ABBY: I hate funerals. My grandfather died when I was 6, and one of my relatives held me over the casket and made me kiss his cold, dead face. It terrified me, and it’s all I can remember of my grandfather. I force myself to recall any of the good times we had together, but that event still taints the good memory. Since then, every funeral I have been to has had the same poisoning effect, no matter what the service was. Funerals are for the living, and I understand that many people feel the need for closure and the sharing of grief to begin healing. But I need to

keep my grief and my faith private in order to heal. I’m sure some people think my not showing up at a service is a sign of disrespect or just not caring. Nothing could be further from the truth. I prefer to remember the good times with the loved one, not the passing. My way of honoring that person is to keep my happy memories untainted. Am I wrong? Selfish or lazy? Weird or crazy? Please let me know because at my age I’m sure more of these events will happen. KEEPING MY DISTANCE IN WASHINGTON STATE

Family Circus

DEAR KEEPING YOUR DISTANCE: You are none of the above. People grieve in different ways. An appropriate way to express your respect for the deceased and your support for the survivors would be to write a condolence letter expressing those feelings and sharing a happy memory with the grieving widow, widower or child. No rule of etiquette demands that you show up to a funeral — unless it happens to be your own.

The Wizard of Id

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE Dear Heloise: I want to tell you how wonderful VINEGAR is. I live where dust settles on everything. My porch floor is stained a dark color, and the dust really shows on it. I take a jug of vinegar and a damp mop, and I pour straight vinegar and mop. The vinegar cleans and shines it all in one. Then I damp-mop it with clean water. I do the same thing to my basement cement floor. Thanks for your vinegar hints. Betty Lee, Bedford, Iowa

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Betty, vinegar can cure almost any problem. It works on many stains, odors, etc. I have a pamphlet that is filled with great ways to use vinegar around your home. It will save you money because you won’t have to buy expensive cleaners; you can just use good ol’ vinegar. To receive a copy of the six-page pamphlet, send $5 and a long, selfaddressed, stamped (66 cents) envelope to: Heloise/Vinegar, P.O. Box 795001, San Antonio, TX 78279-5001. Did you know that vinegar makes cleaning metal miniblinds easier? Just mix a half-cup vinegar with a half-cup hot water. Then put on a cotton glove and dip it into the solution. Wipe both sides of the miniblind slat and rinse with water. The dust and grime will come right off, and they will be just like new. Give it a try! Heloise

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

#####

Dear Heloise: For Christmas, I received a set of hot sauces from someone who knows I love the stuff. One bottle, however, is a sauce made from peppers from India that are supposed to be the world’s hottest. This stuff is really hot! I have found a use for it. We recently had an addition to our household, Romeo, a toy poodle. Although he is only a few months old and weighs just 3.5 pounds, he can do some damage to carpet and upholstered furniture by chewing. Just one drop of the super-hot sauce rubbed on whatever he is chewing stops him immediately. He doesn’t even taste it. A mere sniff stops him. We enjoy your column in The (Baton Rouge, La.) Advocate. Doug Johnson, Denham Springs, La. Dear Readers: Niky O’Neil sent a photo of her “grand dogs,” Anesti and Senja, yellow Lab brothers who are sleeping cuddled against each other. To see the brothers, go to www.Heloise.com and click on “Pets.” Heloise

#####

Dear Heloise: I read the hint about using a garden rake to hold necklaces. I’m glad it works for the reader. But I have a neater closet just using a man’s tie hanger for my necklaces and chains. They come either round, with a handle extended for screwing into a wall, or long, with a center hanger for hanging on the clothes rod. Carol W., Webster, N.Y.

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Roswell Daily Record


FINANCIAL

B5

US employers add 162K jobs; rate falls to 7.4 pct. Roswell Daily Record

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added 162,000 jobs in July, a modest increase and the fewest since March. At the same time, the unemployment rate fell to a 4 1/2-year low of 7.4 percent, a hopeful sign. Unemployment declined from 7.6 percent in June because more Americans found jobs, and others stopped looking and were no longer counted as unemployed. Still, Friday’s report from the Labor Department pointed to a less-than-robust job market. It suggested that the economy’s subpar growth and modest consumer spending are making many businesses cautious about hiring. The government said employers added a combined 26,000 fewer jobs in May and June than it previously estimated. Americans worked fewer hours in July, and their average pay dipped. And many of the jobs employers added last month were for lowerpaying work at stores, bars and restaurants. For the year, job growth has remained steady. The economy has added an average 200,000 jobs a month since January, though the pace has slowed in the past three months to 175,000. Nariman Behravesh, chief economist at IHS Global Insight, called the employment report “slightly negative,” in part because job growth for May and June was revised down. Scott Anderson, chief economist at Bank of the West, said it showed “a mixed labor market picture of continued improvement but at a still frustratingly slow pace.”

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Aug 13 120.80 121.35 120.37 120.65 Oct 13 124.72 125.15 124.10 124.47 Dec 13 127.52 127.75 126.95 127.00 Feb 14 129.05 129.35 128.60 128.90 Apr 14 130.02 130.65 129.65 130.27 Jun 14 125.20 125.75 125.12 125.50 Aug 14 125.55 125.80 125.55 125.75 Last spot N/A Est. sales 94668. Thu’s Sales: 53,155 Thu’s open int: 286953, up +2236 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Aug 13 153.80 154.17 153.20 153.72 Sep 13 157.22 157.72 156.52 157.00 Oct 13 159.10 159.45 158.32 159.15 Nov 13 159.80 160.15 159.25 160.02 Jan 14 159.20 159.20 158.32 158.72 Mar 14 158.60 159.10 158.40 159.10 Apr 14 160.25 May 14 160.00 160.15 159.35 160.15 Last spot N/A Est. sales 11099. Thu’s Sales: 8,206 Thu’s open int: 34725, up +274 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Aug 13 98.52 99.45 98.50 99.25 Oct 13 83.90 84.40 83.80 83.95 Dec 13 80.85 81.30 80.70 80.80 83.02 83.50 82.75 83.32 Feb 14 Apr 14 83.90 84.32 83.82 84.22 May 14 87.47 87.85 87.45 87.85 Jun 14 89.80 90.22 89.70 90.17 Jul 14 88.50 88.75 88.25 88.55 Aug 14 87.20 87.35 87.10 87.25 77.40 77.40 77.40 77.40 Oct 14 Dec 14 74.75 Last spot N/A Est. sales 59728. Thu’s Sales: 35,213 Thu’s open int: 302492, off -34

chg.

-.15 -.03 -.35 -.10 +.22 +.08 -.25

-.03 -.25 -.12 -.23 -.10 -.10 -.05

+.83 +.05 -.10 +.10 +.35 -.07 +.52 +.25

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Sep 13 84.98 Oct 13 85.55 85.73 85.08 85.32 Dec 13 85.30 85.48 84.75 84.98 Mar 14 83.32 83.58 82.85 83.17 May 14 82.27 82.94 82.27 82.76 Jul 14 82.28 82.60 82.18 82.38 Oct 14 78.26 Dec 14 77.99 77.99 77.70 77.82 Mar 15 77.91 May 15 77.91 Jul 15 77.91 Oct 15 77.91 Dec 15 77.91 Mar 16 77.91 May 16 77.91 Last spot N/A Est. sales 9845. Thu’s Sales: 16,553 Thu’s open int: 173066, up +2260

chg.

-.45 -.56 -.45 -.41 -.29 -.22 -.22 -.15 -.15 -.15 -.15 -.15 -.15 -.15 -.15

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 13 660ø 665 660 660ø Dec 13 676 676 672ø 673 Mar 14 681 690 679ø 682ø May 14 687 694ø 687 687ø Jul 14 682fl 688ü 681 682 Sep 14 689 693ü 687ü 687ü Dec 14 696ü 696ü 695ü 695ü

chg.

+2ø +2ø +1ø +ø -fl -1fl -1

the cards.” Still, it’s possible that the lower unemployment rate, along with the hiring gains over the past year, could convince the Fed that the job market is strengthening consistently. “While July itself was a bit disappointing, the Fed will be looking at the cumulative improvement,” said Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist at Capital Economics. “On that score, the unemployment rate has fallen from 8.1 percent last August to 7.4 percent this July, which is a significant improvement.” The decline in unemployment to 7.4 percent was derived from a survey of households, which found that 227,000 more people said they were employed last month. And 37,000 people stopped looking for work and were no longer counted as unemployed. The job gain for the month was calculated from a separate survey of employers. More than half of July’s job gain came from lower-paying industries, extending a trend that is limiting Americans’ incomes and possibly slowing consumer spending. Retailers, for example, added nearly 47,000 jobs — the biggest gain for any industry last month. Restaurants and bars added 38,400. Low-paying industries have accounted for 61 percent of jobs added this year, even though they represent only 39 percent of U.S. jobs overall, according to Labor Department numbers analyzed by Moody’s Analytics. Mid-paying industries have accounted for fewer than 22 percent of the jobs added.

AP Photo

In this July 15 file photo, a woman waits to talk with employers at a job fair for laid-off IBM workers in South Burlington, Vt. The government issued its jobs report for July on Friday.

The reaction from investors was slightly downbeat. The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 17 points in early-afternoon trading, and broader stock indexes also declined. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.62 percent from 2.71 percent. The Federal Reserve will review the July employment data in deciding whether to slow its $85 billion a month in bond purchases in September, as many economists

have predicted it will do. Weaker hiring could make the Fed hold off on any pullback in its bond buying, which has helped keep long-term borrowing costs down. Beth Ann Bovino, senior economist at Standard & Poor’s, said she thinks Friday’s report will make the Fed delay a slowdown in bond buying. “September seems very unlikely now,” she says. “I’m wondering if December is still in

WTO backs US on chicken trade dispute

WASHINGTON (AP) — The World Trade Organization ruled in favor of the U.S. on Friday in a long-standing trade dispute over allegations China unfairly imposed antidumping tariffs that restricted American poultry exports. The U.S. appeal to the WTO dates back to 2011 after China said that America had engaged in dumping and had imposed tariffs on imports of so-called “broiler products,” which include most chicken products with the exception of live chickens. China said U.S. chicken producers benefited from subsidies and were exporting their goods to China at unfairly low prices. Countries are allowed to impose punitive tariffs to offset both practices, but U.S. officials said China did not follow proper procedures when it imposed them in September 2010. The U.S. also said tens of thousands of jobs were affected — China was among the top two markets for U.S. chicken exports before the tariffs. U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman said this was a victory for the U.S. that he hopes will discourage further violations that hurt American exporters.

Saturday, August 3, 2013

Feds and states want Apple to revamp e-book practices NEW YORK (AP) — The Justice Department and 33 state attorneys general on Friday said they want to force Apple to sign contracts with publishers that don’t prevent Apple or other e-book stores from competing on price. A federal judge ruled last month that Apple Inc. colluded with publishers to raise e-book prices. The Cupertino, Calif., company has denied wrongdoing and has said it will appeal the decision. The Justice Department and the attorneys general told the court Friday that they want Apple to tear up its contracts with five e-book publishers and sign new ones that aren’t likely to increase prices. In addition, they want Apple to allow rival e-book

“This decision sends a clear message that the Obama Administration can fight and win for American farmers, businesses, and workers in the global trading system, ensuring that America gets the benefit of the rules and market access we have negotiated in our international trade agreements,” Froman said in a statement. “WTO members must use trade remedies strictly in accordance with their commitments,” he added. U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack said agricultural exports are a strong and growing component of U.S. exports. Farm exports in fiscal year 2012 reached $135.8 billion and supported 1 million American jobs, he said, adding that more than $23 billion worth of those agricultural products went to China alone. The U.S. and China are the world’s largest economies. “But China’s prohibitive duties on broiler products were followed by a steep decline in exports to China - and now we look forward to seeing China’s market for broiler products restored,” Vilsack said in a statement. “This is an important victory today for the U.S. poultry industry, and for American farmers and ranchers.”

Mar 15 704ü 704ü 702ü 702ü May 15 707ø 707ø 703fl 703fl Jul 15 705fl 705fl 702fl 704 Sep 15 705fl 705fl 704 704 Dec 15 714ü 714ü 713ø 713ø Mar 16 714ü 714ü 713ø 713ø May 16 714ü 714ü 713ø 713ø Jul 16 714ü 714ü 713ø 713ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 16488. Thu’s Sales: 140,992 Thu’s open int: 406842, up +1361 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 13 485 485fl 475ø 476 Dec 13 466ø 469fl 463ø 463fl Mar 14 475ø 476ø 475ø 476ø May 14 483ü 484ü 483ü 484ü Jul 14 493ü 496 489 490ü Sep 14 494ø 497 491 492ü Dec 14 498 500 493ü 494ø Mar 15 507ø 508ø 503ø 504 May 15 512fl 514 509 509ü Jul 15 517ü 517ü 513fl 513fl Sep 15 502fl 502fl 499ü 499ü Dec 15 488 490ü 485ø 485fl Jul 16 503ü 503ü 496fl 501 Dec 16 494 494 484fl 489 Last spot N/A Est. sales 22803. Thu’s Sales: 246,646 Thu’s open int: 1167381, up +2497 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 13 339fl 345 337 338fl Dec 13 329ø 333fl 323ø 326ø Mar 14 334ø 338 329ø 332ø May 14 334fl 334fl 332fl 332fl Jul 14 339fl 339fl 337fl 337fl Sep 14 321fl 321fl 319fl 319fl Dec 14 343fl 343fl 341fl 341fl Mar 15 343fl 343fl 341fl 341fl May 15 343fl 343fl 341fl 341fl Jul 15 343fl 343fl 341fl 341fl Sep 15 343fl 343fl 341fl 341fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 784. Thu’s Sales: 1,579 Thu’s open int: 9155, up +134 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Aug 13 1363 1363 1328ø 1331 Sep 13 1237 1247fl 1212fl 1212fl Nov 13 1200 1207 1177ø 1181ø Jan 14 1198 1213ü 1181fl 1187ü Mar 14 1209 1215fl 1184fl 1190 May 14 1200fl 1215 1186 1190ø Jul 14 1205ø 1219fl 1190 1194fl Aug 14 1195fl 1195fl 1185fl 1185fl Sep 14 1181ø 1181ø 1172fl 1172fl Nov 14 1179 1193ø 1163ü 1167ü Jan 15 1182fl 1185 1171 1171 Mar 15 1179 1179 1167ü 1167ü May 15 1173fl 1173fl 1162 1162 Jul 15 1177 1177 1169ø 1169ø Aug 15 1170fl 1170fl 1163ü 1163ü Sep 15 1155ø 1155ø 1148 1148 Nov 15 1133 1133 1120 1120ø Jul 16 1126fl 1126fl 1114ü 1114ü Nov 16 1096ü 1096ü 1083fl 1083fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 24534. Thu’s Sales: 153,385 Thu’s open int: 492413, up +578

FUTURES

-2 -3fl -1fl -1fl -fl -fl -fl -fl

-11ø -3ü -3ü -3ü -3 -2ü -3ø -3ø -3ø -3ø -3ø -2ü -2ü -5

-1 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2

-26fl -21ø -11 -10fl -10fl -10ü -10fl -10 -8fl -11fl -11fl -11fl -11fl -7ø -7ø -7ø -12ø -12ø -12ø

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Sep 13 107.80 108.82 106.45 106.94 Oct 13 106.80 107.85 105.70 106.24 Nov 13 105.30 106.18 104.23 104.76 Dec 13 103.75 104.54 102.71 103.23 Jan 14 102.18 102.93 101.24 101.74 Feb 14 100.77 101.48 99.99 100.37 Mar 14 99.78 100.14 98.84 99.25 Apr 14 98.62 98.64 97.91 98.19 May 14 97.60 97.60 96.98 97.36 Jun 14 97.12 97.31 96.00 96.64 Jul 14 95.87 95.87 95.00 95.84 Aug 14 94.99 95.04 94.79 95.04 Sep 14 94.60 94.60 94.10 94.43 Oct 14 93.87 Nov 14 93.13 93.41 93.13 93.41 Dec 14 93.25 93.59 92.55 92.96 Jan 15 92.12 92.38 92.12 92.38 Feb 15 91.81 Mar 15 91.00 91.24 90.99 91.24 Apr 15 90.72 May 15 90.30 Jun 15 90.05 90.05 89.60 89.95 Jul 15 89.41 Aug 15 88.94 Sep 15 88.51 Last spot N/A Est. sales 504248. Thu’s Sales: 700,506 Thu’s open int: 1861049, up +8504 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Sep 13 3.0245 3.0335 2.9796 2.9947 Oct 13 2.8795 2.8852 2.8416 2.8557 Nov 13 2.8418 2.8418 2.8000 2.8136 Dec 13 2.7941 2.8028 2.7663 2.7816 Jan 14 2.7747 2.7795 2.7489 2.7646 Feb 14 2.7480 2.7609 2.7440 2.7609 Mar 14 2.7580 2.7702 2.7525 2.7702 Apr 14 2.9127 2.9200 2.8985 2.9182 May 14 2.8893 2.9025 2.8893 2.9025 Jun 14 2.8694 2.8750 2.8588 2.8750 Jul 14 2.8365

chg.

-.95 -.69 -.56 -.48 -.39 -.34 -.29 -.25 -.22 -.19 -.15 -.13 -.11 -.11 -.11 -.12 -.11 -.09 -.08 -.07 -.07 -.06 -.05 -.04 -.03

-.0337 -.0272 -.0218 -.0182 -.0153 -.0124 -.0097 -.0058 -.0051 -.0045 -.0040

Aug 14 2.7950 Sep 14 2.7560 Oct 14 2.6130 Nov 14 2.5782 Dec 14 2.5557 Jan 15 2.5572 Feb 15 2.5686 Mar 15 2.5826 Apr 15 2.7126 May 15 2.7151 Jun 15 2.7001 Jul 15 2.6821 Aug 15 2.6631 Sep 15 2.6401 Oct 15 2.5201 Last spot N/A Est. sales 113601. Thu’s Sales: 117,051 Thu’s open int: 270572, up +2566 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Sep 13 3.386 3.407 3.330 3.347 Oct 13 3.410 3.434 3.358 3.375 Nov 13 3.510 3.540 3.468 3.482 Dec 13 3.690 3.718 3.657 3.668 Jan 14 3.782 3.808 3.747 3.758 Feb 14 3.790 3.808 3.750 3.763 Mar 14 3.776 3.781 3.727 3.734 Apr 14 3.708 3.729 3.681 3.684 May 14 3.737 3.746 3.703 3.703 Jun 14 3.773 3.779 3.735 3.735 Jul 14 3.811 3.811 3.769 3.769 Aug 14 3.821 3.826 3.785 3.787 Sep 14 3.830 3.830 3.790 3.790 Oct 14 3.848 3.854 3.810 3.814 Nov 14 3.938 3.938 3.900 3.901 Dec 14 4.102 4.106 4.064 4.067 Jan 15 4.185 4.185 4.150 4.152 Feb 15 4.139 4.145 4.137 4.137 Mar 15 4.090 4.090 4.084 4.084 Apr 15 3.909 3.910 3.902 3.906 May 15 3.919 Jun 15 3.950 3.950 3.946 3.946 Jul 15 3.982 3.982 3.979 3.979 Aug 15 3.996 Sep 15 4.010 4.010 3.996 3.996 Oct 15 4.015 Nov 15 4.089 Last spot N/A Est. sales 177447. Thu’s Sales: 310,122 Thu’s open int: 1362284, off -6697

METALS

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Fri. Aluminum -$0.8057 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.1745 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.1695 N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Lead - $2090.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8266 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1309.25 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1310.60 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri. Silver - $19.910 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $19.903 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Platinum -$1440.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1451.50 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

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ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE CALL TODAY

575.622.7710

-.0038 -.0038 -.0038 -.0038 -.0038 -.0038 -.0038 -.0038 -.0038 -.0038 -.0038 -.0038 -.0038 -.0038 -.0038

-.040 -.040 -.042 -.039 -.040 -.040 -.040 -.041 -.040 -.041 -.041 -.041 -.041 -.041 -.038 -.037 -.037 -.036 -.035 -.033 -.031 -.029 -.028 -.027 -.026 -.026 -.026

ments were designed to encourage price competition and discounting, but that hasn’t happened. The government alleged that the publishers colluded with Apple to move the e-book industry away from the wholesale model employed by Amazon, which had unnerved publishers by selling e-book versions of popular hardcover titles for $9.99 before the April 2010 release of Apple’s iPad. Under its contracts with publishers, Amazon was free to sell books at any price it wanted. Apple instead adopted the “agency” model, under which publishers set the retail price and the store takes a cut. Under that model, the store can’t discount a book.

sellers like Amazon.com Inc. and Barnes & Noble Inc. to provide links inside their iPhone and iPad apps to their own book stores. Apple allows Amazon and Barnes & Noble’s apps to load books that have already been purchased, but doesn’t allow the apps to sell books or link to online bookstores. Apple did not immediately respond to a message seeking comment. The book publishers previously settled the price-fixing charges. They are Hachette, HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster, Holtzbrinck Publishers, doing business as Macmillan, and The Penguin Publishing Co. Ltd., doing business as Penguin Group. The settle-

NYSE

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MARKET SUMMARY

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 795486 14.84 -.11 S&P500ETF767813170.95 +.29 iShEMkts 445693 39.71 -.01 iShJapan 433020 11.71 +.18 Sprint n 418216 6.67 +.298

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Name Vol (00) Organovo 99226 InovioPhm 96804 AlldNevG 37189 NwGold g 37104 Rentech 26374

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last 11.09 37.99 2.57 24.17 9.82

Chg -3.11 -9.04 -.32 -2.98 -1.09

DIARY

Volume

Name AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola s Disney EOG Res EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

Last 3.88 2.08 9.99 2.48 2.73

Name Dell Inc Facebook SiriusXM Intel Microsoft

Vol (00) 749431 710414 407621 354379 282326

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg eMagin 3.01 -.64 Organovo 4.60 -.75 TrioTch 3.21 -.47 SwedLC22 11.50 -1.50 ParkCity 6.92 -.56

1,559 1,494 110 3,163 209 56

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

DIARY

%Chg -17.5 -14.0 -12.8 -11.5 -7.5

193 220 27 440 15 15 Lows

Last 7.34 4.88 3.78 3.47 3.15

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 15,658.36 6,651.69 508.47 9,690.07 2,363.33 3,689.59 1,709.67 18,154.68 1,059.86

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg Name

1.80 .80 .04 1.94 4.00 1.12 .75f .75 3.58 2.52 .40 .58 1.20a .90 3.80 2.64

27 12 27 20 9 21 20 56 11 9 12 ... 5 13 14 21

35.77 63.56 14.84 107.90 124.95 40.22 66.51 153.03 49.74 91.95 17.50 27.00 45.10 23.22 195.16 94.39

+.05 -.17 -.11 +1.20 -1.49 -.35 +1.15 +.96 -1.08 -.78 +.31 +.77 -1.21 +.02 -.65 +.62

+6.1 +37.2 +27.8 +43.2 +15.5 +11.0 +33.6 +26.7 +15.9 +6.2 +35.1 +89.5 -3.1 +12.6 +1.9 +34.7

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

Chg +3.14 +1.87 +1.01 +.82 +.60

%Chg +74.8 +62.1 +36.5 +30.9

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Net Chg +30.34 -18.37 -.59 +16.67 -3.08 +13.85 +2.80 +25.81 -.02

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Div

Chg +.73 +.56 +.06 +.02 +.22

Name Last Chg %Chg BodyCentrl 8.10 -3.86 -32.3 Audience 10.24 -2.35 -18.7 SciQuest 20.64 -4.05 -16.4 ValueClick 21.37 -3.73 -14.9 NwstBio wt 2.00 -.30 -13.0

DIARY

93,486,973122 Volume

INDEXES

Last 13.68 38.05 3.84 23.22 31.89

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg %Chg Name +.28 +7.8 Stereotx rsh +.13 +6.7 Kingtne rs +.63 +6.7 Senomyx +.15 +6.4 SORL +.15 +5.8 AlaskCom

%Chg -21.9 -19.2 -11.1 -11.0 -10.0

3,074,969,089 Volume

52-Week High Low 15,650.69 12,471.49 6,686.86 4,838.10 537.86 435.57 9,695.46 7,710.83 2,509.57 2,186.97 3,678.50 2,810.80 1,707.85 1,343.35 18,141.55 14,036.94 1,060.96 763.55

Chg -.75 +.13 -.37 -.34 -.07

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg Name MV FallAn 40.35+13.25 +48.9 OrionEngy ChinHydro 2.20 +.46 +26.4 InovioPhm ActiveNet 10.33 +2.02 +24.3 OwensRM n MaxLinear 8.01 +1.30 +19.4 Arrhythm Entravisn 6.52 +.98 +17.7 Vicon Name Blyth WtWatch RadioShk MRC Glbl UnvAmr

Last 4.60 2.08 5.91 6.67 2.11

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

1,162 1,324 110 2,596 235 16

1,616,262,122

% Chg +.19 -.28 -.12 +.17 -.13 +.38 +.16 +.14 ...

YTD % Chg +19.49 +25.34 +12.22 +14.76 +.33 +22.19 +19.88 +21.07 +24.78

52-wk % Chg +19.56 +30.78 +3.54 +22.05 -2.52 +24.32 +22.91 +25.44 +34.42

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

1.72 .92 2.88f .66 2.27 .96 1.25 .16 1.12 1.15 .71e 2.06 1.88 .36 1.20 1.12f

26 12 21 20 20 15 8 27 24 20 ... ... 16 17 12 15

48.54 -.04 31.89 +.22 51.02 -.61 24.29 +.53 84.29 +.09 29.37 +.26 58.41 -2.11 14.19 -.01 39.94 +.12 64.29 +1.23 18.84 -.04 50.25 +.24 78.75 +.53 22.49 -.01 44.49 +.23 30.36 +.02

+18.6 +19.4 -5.5 +18.4 +23.2 +17.1 +10.0 +38.6 +29.3 +34.4 +17.4 +16.1 +15.4 +33.3 +30.2 +13.7

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


B6 Saturday, August 3, 2013 Legals

---------------------------------Publish July 13, 20, 27, August 3, 2013

NOTICE OF SALE ON THE FORECLOSURE STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

No.D-504-CV-2012-00591

WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. ESTATE OF FRANK O. ESPINOZA and JANE DOE ESPINOZA, husband and wife; ABC Corporations I-X, XYZ Partnerships I-X, John Does I-X and Jane Does I-X, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF ANY OF THE ABOVE, IF DECEASED, Defendants. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the above-entitled Court, having appointed me or my designee as Special Master in this matter with the power to sell, has ordered me to sell the real property (the “Property”) situated in Chaves County, New Mexico, commonly known as 609 E Forest Street, Roswell, NM 88203, and more particularly described as follows: LOT ELEVEN (11) IN BLOCK ONE (1) OF SOUTHEAST SUBDIVISION, IN THE CITY OF ROSWELL, COUNTY OF CHAVES AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT FILED IN THE CHAVES COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE ON MARCH 16, 1949 AND RECORDED IN BOOK B OF PLAT RECORDS, CHAVES COUNTY, NEW MEXICO, AT PAGE 116. The sale is to begin at 1:30 PM on August 20, 2013, on the front steps of the Fifth Judicial DisCourt, City of trict County of Roswell, Chaves, State of New Mexico, at which time I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in lawful currency of the United States of America, the Property to pay expenses of sale, and to satisfy the Judgment Wells Fargo granted Bank, NA . Wells Fargo Bank, NA was awarded a Judgment on February 5, 2013, in the principal sum of $ 17,616.54, plus outstanding interest on the balance through January 10, 2013, in the amount of $ 1,366.29, plus allowable late charges of $ 117.89, plus tax advance s in the amount of $ 97.09, plus hazard insurance advances in the amount of $ 204.00, plus property inspection s fees in the amount of $ 120.00, plus attorney ' s fees in the amount of $ 985.00 and attorney's costs through January 10, 2013 in the amount of $ 952.32, with interest on the Judgment including late charges, property preservation fees, escrow advances, attorney's fees and costs of this suit at the rate of 7 .00 % per annum through the date of the sale . The total amount due under the Judgment, on the date set forth in the J udgment, was $ 21,459.13 . The amount of interest from January 10, 2013 to the date of the sale will be $913.63 . NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and imconcerned provements with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Wells Fargo Bank, NA and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above described real property subject to a one (1) month right of redemption. PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS AT SALE ARE ADVISED TO MAKE THEIR OWN EXAMINATION OF THE TITLE AND THE CONDITION OF THE PROPERTY AND TO CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEY BEFORE BIDDING. By: Jeffrey Lake, Special Master Southwest Support Group, LLC 20 First Plaza NW, Suite 20 Albuquerque, NM 87102 (505) 767-9444 1 NM-12-517839-JUD IDSPub #0052829 7/11/2013 7/18/2013 7/25/2013 8/1/2013

Legals

Legals

---------------------------------Publish July 27, August 3, 2013

THE PROBATE IN COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ARTHUR L. LeMAY, Deceased. PROBATE NO.9110

Clarena LeMay has been appointed Personal Representative of the Estate of Arthur L. LeMay, deceased. All persons having claims against this estate are required to their claims present within two months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the Personal Representative, c/o Law Offices of R. Matthew Bristol, PO Box Roswell, NM 2929, 88202, or filed with the Chaves County Probate Court, in Roswell, New Mexico.

Respectfully Submitted by: LAW OFFICE OF R. MATTHEW BRISTOL

/s/R. Matthew Bristol PO Box 2929 Roswell,NM 88202-2929 (575) 625-5284 Attorney for Personal Representative ---------------------------------Publish August 3, 10, 2013 STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE PROBATE COURT CHAVES COUNTY

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Adolfo Zavala, DECEASED. Probate: 9107

Dated: July 3, 2013

/s/Reina Valdez 609 S. Plains Park Roswell, NM 88203 575-420-2327

CORNER of 3rd & Virginia, Fri-Sat, 7am-3pm. Electric wheelchair, exercise equip. & lots of automotive stuff.

Probate: 9099

#5 HOLLY Loop, Saturday, 7am-?. Giant sale. Bowflex, fitness flyer, tons of small ladies clothes, shoes, purses, Xbox game & lots more.

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Ruby R. Emerson, DECEASED.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of this estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two (2) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or the claims will forever barred. be Claims must be presented either to the undersigned personal representative at the address listed below, or filed with the Probate Court of Chaves County, New Mexico, located at the following address: #1 St. Mary’s Place, Roswell, NM 88203. Dated: June 12, 2013

/s/Carl C. Emerson 6107 State Road PP Tebbetts, MO (575) 826-5500

---------------------------------Pub. July 27, Aug. 3, 2013 Probate Court, Chaves County, State of NM. RE: Estate of Sam Morley, #9115. Notice to Creditors. Undersigned is Personal Rep. of the estate & creditors & all claimants must present claims w/in 2 months of 1st date above or be barred. S/Andy Morley, 2 Loma Linda Dr., Roswell, NM 88203. Tom Dunlap-Lawyer, 104 N. KY, Roswell, 88203 (575) NM 622-2607, dunlaplaw office@cableone.net

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of this estate/ All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two (2) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned personal representative at the address listed below, or filed with the Probate Court of Chaves County, New Mexico, located at the following address: #1 St. Mary’s Place, Roswell, NM 88203.

002. Northeast

2 PARTY sale, 2406 1/2 B & C N. Grand, Sat., 8am. A little bit of everything.

STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE PROBATE COURT CHAVES COUNTY

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

---------------------------------Publish August 3, 10, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS

---------------------------------Pub. July 27, Aug. 3, 2013 Probate Court, Chaves County, State of NM. RE: Estate of Gary Lynn Hill, #9111. Notice to Creditors. Undersigned is Personal Rep. of the estate & creditors & all claimants must present claims w/in 2 months of 1st date above or be barred. S/Claude L. Hill, 1201 Madrid St., Roswell, NM 88201. Tom Dunlap-Lawyer, 104 N. KY, Roswell, 88203 (575) NM 622-2607, dunlaplaw office@cableone.net

GARAGE SALES

002. Northeast

2509 PARK Dr. Fri-Sat 8-? Full pine bed, linens, walker, cane, books, dishes, pots & pans, tools, boots, shoes, total gym, golf caddie, golf bag, steel pots, & lots of misc. 118 NORTH Wind Loop, Saturday only 7:30-3pm. Lots of misc. items. BIG SALE, 407 La Fonda, Saturday only, 7am. Musical instruments, violins, guitars, Mandolin, Ukulele, Louis LaMuer collection, furniture, household misc., men’s & ladies nice clothes.

312 E. 8th, Friday-Sunday, 7am-1pm. 326 E. 8th, Thursday-Saturday, 8am-? Misc. items. 825 TRAILING Heart, Friday-Saturday, 7am. 2 PARTY garage sale, Fri-Sat, 7am-1pm, 611 Tierra Berrenda. NASCAR collection, washer/dryer, stove, fridge, tools, kids clothes, toys, hockey/ping pong table, playroom table, Gorilla shelving, Janssen piano & much more. 2811 N. Orchard, Saturday, 8am. Lots of restaurant chairs, new twin box springs, TV, bedding, dishes, infant car seat, small stroller, infant clothes, maternity clothes, household & decor items. Ducks Unlimited framed print & more. 102 LINDA Circle, Sat 7-? A little bit of everything, very nice womens clothing, some childrens, kitchen ware, knick knacks. 3504 N. Bandolina, Fri-Sat. 8-4pm. Lots of everything, clothes of every ages seminew, electronics, toys 600 TRAILING Heart, Sat., 7am. Misc. & some construction materials. 824 TRAILING Heart Rd., Fri-Sat, 5:30pm-? Baby & kids clothes, home interior, furniture & much more. 1107 MADRID, Sat. 7-12pm, moving sale, crib, morgan spa works great, lawn mower, clothes, misc. everything must go. 906 BELAIRE Dr. Saturday 7-12.

003. East

3303 E. 2nd, Fri-Sun 7-?, glassware, tools, furniture,, sewing material & new stuff

004. Southeast 219 E. Lewis Fri-Sat 6-1. Antiques, collectibles, & lots miscellaneous

1300 S. Michigan, Fri-Sat, 7AM.Tools, etc. 420 E. Jefferson, Saturday, 8am-? Games, baby stuff, tools, antiques, too much to mention. 403 S. Atkinson, Fri-Sat, 7am. Winter clothes in good condition. A little bit of everything & tamales only on Friday. MULTI FAMILY sale, Sat-Sun only 8-3. Lots of scrubs, dining room table, furniture, toys, clothes, yard tools, misc. To much to mention, come by! 1414 S. Poplar. 203 E. Bonney, Fri-Sat, 6-1pm. Adult & children’s clothes & misc. HUGE 4 family sale. 406 E. Reed, Sat, 7-6pm. Hutch china cabinet, baby items, lots brand name school clothes, new plus sz clothes, lots more!! 1610 S. Cottonwood Sat. 7-1. Household items, electronics, clothes, childrens items, 3ft swimming pool, 1995 Van, & more.

005. South

1406 S. Madison (between Lea & Kentucky), Thurs-Mon. Misc. items.

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish August 3, 10, 2013 Notice of Sale to Satisfy Lien Ramona Barron

The above named persons are hereby notified that the goods/merchandise left by them in South Main Self Storage will be sold by said company at public sale if not claimed by 8-15-2013. The purpose of the sale is to satisfy the lien of said company for storage of goods, together with incidental and proper charges pertaining thereto including the reasonable expenses of the sale all as allowed by the laws of the State of New Mexico. -----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish August 3, 2013 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given pursuant to 22-8-6 NMSA 1978 that the regular meeting of the Board of Education for the Dexter Consolidated School District #6, County of Chaves, State of New Mexico will be on Monday, August 12, 2013 7:00 p.m., MST at the Central Office Board Room, 100 N Lincoln, for the purpose of taking action upon items on the agenda for such meeting. A special board meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m. Board members will meet in executive session for the purpose or discussion of student, personnel, legal and real property issues pursuant to Section 10-15-1NMSA 1978 Open Meetings Act. This is a public hearing and all school patrons are invited to attend. Dexter Consolidated Schools Board of Education Donna Evrage, President

5 PARTY sale, 113 Yakima Rd., Fri. 8am-4pm, Sat. 8am-12pm. Furniture, toys, baby clothes, bikes, tires, rims, tools & much more. 31 B. St., Sat., 7am-5pm. Princess house 50% off, clothes, toys & burritos.

006. Southwest

600 W. Jaffa Fri-Sat 8-1. Beds, dishes, linens, crafts, purses, lots of misc. 2202 BARNETT Dr., Sat., 8am-12pm. Lots of teacher materials, seasonal decor, bookshelves, computer desk, car seats, women’s clothing & misc. 1309 S. Missouri, Thurs-Sat, 7am-? 5 party sale. Men’s, women’s boys & girls clothes of all sizes. Knick knack’s, dryer, bikes, Wii games & misc. items. 801 AVENIDA Del Sumbre, Fri-Sat, 8-4. School uniforms/supplies, misc. items, too much list. 806 W. Summit, Fri-Sat, 8-2. Brand new school shoes & furniture, etc. 2001 S. Sunset L143, Sat., 8am-5pm. Furniture, flower arrangements, kitchenware & other assorted items. 911 W. Mathews, Saturday, 7am. Clothes & much more.

006. Southwest 2200 W. Juniper, Saturday only, 7am-1pm. Furniture, lamps, like new Clarinet perfect for school band, women’s clothes & swimming pool. Backyard Sale, 2706 S. Largo, Fri-Sat, 7am-2pm. Lots of misc., 55” TV.

507 Fulkerson Dr., Fri-Sat, 7am-2pm. Vintage clothes, hats, junk, lawn mower. 6 FAMILY sale, 417 S. Aspen, Fri-Sun, 8am-? Cast iron skillets, shoes, clothes, toys & more. 48 WILDY Dr., Sat 7-12pm, 2 party, tools, excellent children, men, women clothes, furniture, dishware, 1202 Princeton, Sat., 7-? New dishwasher, bedding, iPod dock, DVDs, bikes, lg Little Tykes toy box, ACT & misc books, cultured stone & lots of misc. 2602 W. Alameda, Fri-Sun, 7-3pm, 3 familly sale, new & used clothes, dishes, couches, initial belts, lock caps 1605 S. Washington, Sat., 7am-1pm. Back to school sale. Uniforms & misc. 1213 W. Mathews, Fri-Sat, 7-1pm, TV’s, boys & girls & adult clothing, bikes, tires, DVD players, & more 2 PARTY SALE 3205 Purdue, Saturday, 6AM-12PM. Clothing, dishes, curtains, tool box, & lots of misc., something for everyone. FLEA MARKET Big front/ rear parking lot sale w/thousands of items for sale. Blairs Monterey Flea Market, 1400 W. 2nd, Sat-Sun 9-5pm“free set up” 2 FAMILY Sale!! 317 S. Sequoia. Sat. 7-12.

007. West

MULTI FAMILY SALE Sat., 8-12, 1400 W. 2nd. St. next to Red Cross in the Monterey shopping center. 3 PARTY Sale!! 306 W. McGaffey. Sat 7-12.

008. Northwest HUGE SALE!! 4604 Zuni Dr., Off Pine Lodge Rd. Sat. Aug. 3 only, 7-? Furniture kitchen ware, house hold items, exercise equip., lots more.

MOVING!! 12 VISTA Parkway Cir. Fri-Sun 7-? Furniture, appliances, lots misc. 406 N. Lea, Fri-Sat, 7am-? Appliances, baby stuff, car & truck for sale & lots more. 6 Westminister Ct. (off Onate & Berrendo), Saturday, 7-? Great prices. 1308 Sorrento, Sat., 7am. 3 family. Low prices. Lots of misc., dining set, clothes. 603 Serena Dr., Thurs-Sat, 8am-1pm. Washer, sofas, antique sewing machine. 1808 W.3RD St., Sat. 7am-no early sales, couches, electric dryer, freezer, gas stove,baby girl clothes 0-9 mos, all size adult & children clothing, salon equipment.

ANNOUNCEMENTS 025. Lost and Found

LOST: SUNGLASSES Pink Oakley w/ Pink Harley Davidson cord at Chews West Friday night. Please call 626-2274. Reward. LOST 6 year old Boxer near Berendo middle school, answers to the name Ashley. $100 Reward if found. Call 575-218-2570 or 626-2279. MISSING - "MAYA"; black 45 lb Australian Shepherd/ Blue Healer dog missing from Taylor's home at 1901 S Washington. Name's on collar. A reward is offered call 626-5000. FOUND FULL blood Persian cat. Call 627-6960 & describe. Keep calling until I answer, I am sick & bedridden.

INSTRUCTION

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities CAREGIVERS WANTED for private home care. 3 yrs exp. Must pass background check & have clean driving record. Send resume & references to PO Box 1897, Unit 354, Roswell, NM 88202. HIRING CLASS A CDL Drivers Great opportunity to earn! Be part of a financially solid privately owned company. Seeking Class A CDL Shuttle Delivery Drivers for the Roswell area. Must have CDL A License and at least 1 year of hands-on experience. We offer best in the market incentive based pay plan, benefits including 2 week's vacation after 1 year, 7 paid holidays, and 401K with company match. Don't miss this great opportunity! Apply online at www.shamrockfoods.com EEO/AA SEEKING HVAC helper, must be dependable, reliable, & pass drug screening. 575-626-1234 COMFORT KEEPERS An In-Home Care provider is seeking caregivers to work days, weekends and overnights. Join our team full-time or part-time. If you are a hard worker, care about people and enjoy helping others please stop by our office to inquire about a position. 1410 South Main, Roswell. DRIVER NEEDED Class A or B CDL with clear driving record, local route, competitive pay, 401K, insurance and paid time off. Call 800-658-2673 or 806-293-4431 NEED CASH? Be your own boss & build your business at Blairs Monterey indoor market at 1400 W. 2nd. Booths start at $75 mo. Call 623-0136

SALES MANAGEMENT training program. Huge opportunity for Manager in training. Solitaire homes. (575) 623-6820

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES needed for Roswell area. Excellent communication skills and great attitude required. Food service and sales experience a must. Come be a part of a GREAT TEAM Excellent Benefits MUST APPLY ON LINE at www.shamrockfoods.com EEO/AAP employer EYE TECH Computer & medical skills prefered, but will train the right candidate. Send resume to PO Box 8244 Roswell, NM 88202. Dean Baldwin Painting, LP aircraft strip and paint services, is presently looking to fill the following long term, full-time positions: PAINTERS – Exp in stripping and painting aircraft or vehicles. PAINTER HELPERS – Exp preferred but not required. On the job training available! INSPECTORS – A&P License and NDT exp preferred. A&P MECHANICS – A&P License required and exp as an aircraft mechanic preferred. JFA Distributing LLC •Management opportunity •Paid vacations •Training Provided

1600/month per agreement

(575) 578-4817

Residential/Commercial Carpenter. $20-$30/hr DOE. Must have minimum 5yrs experience, pass pre-employment & random drug screen. Please fax resume to 575-748-2142 or email to sidgiles@gilesinc.net ALL ABOUT SPAS & LEISURE LIVING has an opening for a responsible, self motivated individual to service & repair hot tubs. A general knowledge of plumbing & electrical is helpful. Manufactures training will be provided. If you think you could be a great fit for a career at our company, at 3700 N. Main in Roswell. Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

KRUMLAND AUTO Group has opportunities available for FT entry level clerical positions. Dealership experience helpful but not required. Candidate must be detail oriented and be able to work in a fast paced, team oriented environment. Strong organizational skills are a must. Excellent benefit package including: HEALTH, DENTAL, VISION, 401K and PAID VACATION. Fax resumes to (575) 622-5899 Attn: Office Manager or email to officemgr@kagnm.com

045. Employment Opportunities

PART TIME/ Weekends only, maintenance position. Experience preferred.nApply in person at Hampton Inn, Roswell. GALACTIC SUSHI now hiring servers. Must be 19 or older. Servers permit required. Apply at 4311-C N. Main (next to AT&T). THE DEXTER Police Department is currently accepting applications for a Police Officer. Applicants must be highly motivated, ethical, team oriented drug/substance free and be dedicated to serving the Town of Dexter. Candidates who show potential will undergo an extensive background check which will be followed by an interview for those who qualify. Candidates who are not certified Police Officers with the State of New Mexico upon hire with the Dexter Police Department will be mandated to attend the New Mexico Law Enforcement Academy for certification. Applications will be accepted until August 07, 2013 at 2pm. Please pick up and return completed applications to: Dexter Town Hall 115 E. 2nd Street Dexter, New Mexico

Full TIme Direct Service Employee - Graveyard

We are currently seeking employees to provide care for an individual with developmental disabilities in Roswell on the graveyard shift. Must pass a background check, possess a HS diploma/GED and a valid NMDL. Training will be provided. Benefits including medical, dental and vision are available. Please email

asalmon@highdesertfs.com

or apply at 1601 Second Street, Roswell, NM 88201 PATTERSON LAW FIRM, P.C. is currently seeking a full time LEGAL ASSISTANT to handle abuse/neglect criminal defense, divorce/custody, civil cases. Spanish speaking preferred but not required. Monday through Friday, 35-40 hours per week. Salary range $9.00-$12.00 per hour depending on experience. Candidates must be highly motivated and enjoy working in a fast-paced environment. Send only cover letter with resume to Frank Patterson, PO Box 2424, Roswell, NM 88202. No phone calls and no resumes will be accepted at office. LOAN PROCESSOR Bank of the Southwest is looking to immediately fill the full time position of loan processor. Seeking a qualified candidate with the ability to multi-task. Job duties to include, but not limited to, creating loan documentation in our centralized processing area for eleven branches. The position also requires excellent communication skills, extensive interaction ability, and people skills.

Requirements: Must have a good attitude and basic computer skills. Must be detail oriented with excellent time management. Loan experience a plus. Company offers excellent work environment, salary and benefits. Pre-employment drug test and background screen required. Apply in person with Lisa, by July 31, 2013. Bank of the Southwest, 226 N. Main St., Roswell, NM EOE/AA KYMERA NEW MEDICAL OFFICE POSITIONS: As a growing Independent Physicians Office, Kymera is now seeking Qualified Applicants for: FT RN with 1-2yrs Oncology experience. Benefits available; Health, Dental, Vision, and more. Fax Resume w/ Cover Ltr to: Kymera HR 575-627-9520

AmeriPride Linen and Apparel Services Requisition# 106353 Chief Engineer Position Job description is posted on Career Builders This requisition will run from July 26, 2013 to August 26, 2013 Application must be filled out online at careerbuilders.com THERAPIST GUIDANCE Center of Lea County is accepting applications for licensed therapists. Applicants must be licensed by New Mexico Licensing and Therapy Practice Board. Guidance Center of Lea County has an Exceptional Salary and Benefits package to offer applicants applying for these positions. We offer a great 403 (b) Retirement Plan as well. Bilingual is a preferred but not required. Please contact Kawin Nunnery at 575-393-3168 ext. 265 or email your resume' if you are interested.

045. Employment Opportunities

Applebee’s Bar & Grill is now hiring experienced cooks. Please apply online www.appleamericanjobs.cli ckandhire.net THOUGHT OF driving Big Rigs the oil fields are going strong and Companies are looking for CDL Drivers. In less than 2 months you can have your Class A License and making the money you deserve. Classes are forming now you can call Artesia Training Academy for more information. Or visit our web site. Phone # 575-748-9766. Web site: artesiatrucking@pvtn.net WELLHEAD RESTAURANT/ BREW PUB currently seeking experienced kitchen management & line cooks. Apply in person at 332 W. Main, Artesia. No phone calls please!

A NATIONALLY known brand (Top 15 QSR) is seeking a general manager in Roswell, NM. We are looking for a highly motivated, enthusiastic and energetic person. Must have restaurant management experience. We offer TOP salary and benefits. Email resume/job history to rest-mgr@hotmail.com. WEEKEND FRONT counter help wanted at Mama Tuckers. Weds & Fri afternoons & Sat & Sun from 5am-12:00. Must be dependable & want to work. KYMERA

NEW MEDICAL OFFICE POSITIONS: As a growing Independent Physicians Office, Kymera is now seeking Qualified Applicants for:

Receptionist / Scheduler FT - Customer Service Skills, ability to work with patients in a medical office setting and multi-line telephone experience required. Applicants should demonstrate friendly/outgoing attitude, and organization skills. Fax Resume w/ Cover letter to: 575-627-9520

CAR RENTAL company accepting applications for customer service and counter sales. Applications available at Avis Car Rental Counter, inside airport. PART-TIME CASHIER Stocker Roswell Cash n Carry. Excellent communication skills and great attitude required. Retail experience preferred. Come be a part of a GREAT TEAM MUST APPLY ON LINE at www.shamrockfoods.com EEO/AAP employer

JUST CUTS now hiring full and part time stylist. Call 420-5473 for Anthony. Benefits available.

MAINTENANCE PERSON needed. Full time, HVAC, be knowledgeable in electric & plumbing, heating & cooling, refrigeration. Salary DOE. Taking applications, apply at Petroleum Building, 200 W. 1st, Suite 300. NOW HIRING Assistant Managers at Little Caesar’s. Apply in person, ask for Virginia. No phone calls.

BEALLS NOW HIRING Clinique & Estee Lauder counter managers. Full time, benefits, plus commission. Apply in person.

MEDICAL OFFICE Full time, back office, working with patients and some clerical duties. Must be bilingual. Pick up application at 612 W. 8th. No phone calls please. TEACHING VACANCY Fort Sumner Schools Secondary Art. Coaching an additional asset. Info: nc.ftsumner@gmail.com or swootton@ftsumnerk12.co m; 575-355-2231. EOE.

ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER JOBS in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper to place your ad or log onto www.nmpress.org for more information. INFORMATION EVENT for Owner Operators and Class A-CDL Drivers Tired of being on the road away from your family and friends? Then come visit with our recruiter: Wednesday, August 14th from 10am-2pm Holliday Inn Express 2210 W Pierce St. Carlsbad, NM and Thursday, August 15th from 10am to 2pm Fairfield Inn and Suites 1350 W Joe Harvey Blvd Hobbs, NM Gibson is expanding- adding drivers and Owner Operators in the surrounding area! All positions require a Class A CDL, 2 years driving experience, a clean MVR and a Hazmat and tank endorsement Call Gibson recruiting department for more details 866-687-5281 www.gibsonenergy.com EOE


Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities

150. Concrete

FULL TIME skilled maintenance position. Must have knowledge of electrical, plumbing, swimming pool, drywall repair, painting & grounds maintenance. Apply in person, Candlewood Suites 4 Military Heights. Salary DOE.

Portofinos Restaurant is hiring Servers. Must be able to work any shift. Must be certified to serve alcohol. Pick up application from 3-4pm, Mon-Fri at 1203 W 2nd.

COMFORT KEEPERS provides the kind of in-home care services that help people maintain full and independent lives, all in the comfort and familiar surroundings of their own home. Keep in mind all of our caregivers are thoroughly screened, bonded and insured. It is our goal to provide the most trusted service in Chaves County. We would be happy to arrange a free in home assessment to help you learn more. Before you decide on your home care provider, give us a call at 624-9999. www.comfortkeepers.com

575-355-2231. EOE.

SERVICES

195. Elderly Care

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 SUNSHINE WINDOW Services. Clean windows/outside houses. Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458 HOUSEKEEPING, HOME and/or office. Dependable & reliable. Call for free estimates. 575-626-9784

220. Furniture Repair

200. Fencing

Quality Fence construction. Free estimates: 575-973-1019

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121.

WE BUILD and repair furniture. 840-7849 or 626-8466

185. Electrical

ELECTRICAL SERVICES Meter loops, service upgrades, remodels, additions, service calls. Lowest prices in town. Free estm. Lic#360025. 910-4193

swootton@ftsumnerk12.com

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

CONCRETE DRIVEWAYS, sidewalks, retaining walls and steps. Free estimates: 575-973-1019

ATTENTION DEDICATED & REGIONAL DRIVERS! Averitt Offers Excellent Benefits & Hometime. CDL-A req. 888-362-8608. Recent Grads w/a CDL-A, 1/5/wks. Paid Training. Apply online at AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer.

TEACHING VACANCIES Fort Sumner Schools Social Studies/PECoaching, Elem/Sec teacher, Secretarial, Assistant Principal/Elementary Principal. Info: nc.ftsumner@gmail.com or

200. Fencing

CLASSIFIEDS

225. General Construction

Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050 WE DO concrete, carpentry, drywall, stucco & painting. 420-3825

230. General Repair DRYWALL REPAIRS, carpentry, handyman. 940-781-0004

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Summer Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242. WE WORK All Yard work & hauling. Call Will at 317-7402 Bòidheach Yards and Gardens. Property cleanup & hauling, year round maintenance, landscaping, tree management. You'll love our prices! 578-9404.

PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPING/ Irrigation design and construction. Free estimates: 575-973-1019

Garcia’s Lawn Service, sprinklers & much more at low price. 914-0803. BUDGET LAWN cleaning & basic cleanup. 420-4375 or 910-0685 Yard work, clean-ups, lawns. Handyman svc. David 637-9580. “Big E’s” Landscaping & Yardwork mow, trim, prune property clean-up, sprinkler sys. senior disc. 914-6025 JOHN 3:16 yard work. Call Mel 575-408-9052.

HANDYMAN WILL clean yards, haul trash & more. $10/hr. 637-0220

285. Miscellaneous Services

HELPING HANDS, Honest reliable house keeping. Call 551-8693 or 416-8308 SAVE $$$ on AUTO INSURANCE from the major names you know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call READY FOR MY QUOTE now! CALL 1-888-719-6435 ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFERERS with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP Replacement Supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 1-866-938-5101.

Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-661-3783, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping. SAVE ON Cable TVInternet-Digital PhoneSatellite. You`ve Got A Choice! Options from ALL major service providers. Call us to learn more! CALL Today. 888-706-8846

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

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Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

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MEDICAL ALERT for Seniors - 24/7 monitoring. FREE Equipment. FREE Shipping. Nationwide Service. $29.95/Month CALL Medical Guardian Today 888-416-2099

310. Painting/ Decorating

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. Call 637-9108.

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552. GUTTERS For All Your Rain Gutter Needs! Call WH Seamless Aluminum Gutter Systems, LLC. Locally owned. Free estimates. 575-626-0229.

395. Stucco Plastering

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991

Saturday, August 3, 2013

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

Dennis the Menace

B7

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217

405. TractorWork

Tractor work Lots mowed, discing, blading, post holes. 347-0142 or 317-7738

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835 QuickCut Tree Services Best prices, great clean-up. Call for free estimates, 575-208-8963.

FINANCIAL

485. Business Opportunities

ATTN: COMPUTER WORK. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1500 Part Time to $7500/mo. Full Time. Training provided. www.WorkServices6.com

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale 2BR, ALL new plumbing, new tub, faucets, vanity, kitchen sink & cabinet, newly painted inside/out, all new doors & carpet, $29k, in a decent area, 1609 N. Kansas. 575-347-5648 or 575-626-0518.

OWNER CAN finance or get your own financing. Nice 5br/3ba country home, approx. 2700 sqft, large covered porch, on 6 acres. $35k down, negotiable. See pics at, & click on “contact us” www.firstchoicebeagles.com

575-973-2353

3/BD 1/BA 206 S. Kansas. $45k Rent to own w/5k down, $650mo. 840-9105. Remodeled! LETS TALK! FIXER UPPER, 411 W. Tilden, 2br/1ba, $24,500 obo. 575-840-7568 2BR/1BA, LARGE living room w/laundry room, 409 W. Summit, 912 sqft, gross living area. 806-729-0704 3BR, 1 3/4ba, north part of town, 3110 N. Bandolina, 1 car garage, all new carpet, paint & roof, 2 blks from swimming pool. Priced to sell, $108,000. 622-5031 or 420-1022 FSBO OR Rent. 4BD/2BA, 2100 sqft. $110k, $5k down or rent $900mo $800dep. 607 S. Pine. 317-4824 FSBO: 3BR/2BA on 4 acres, 4110 W. McGaffey. 626-6368 1730 N. Delaware, 3br/2ba, large kitchen. 909-657-7611, Yolanda Archuleta 3br/2ba, approx. 1300 sqft, across from Del Norte Park, newly remodeled, asking $132K, no owner fianancing. 626-9994 2br/1ba, 503 S. Kansas, carport, 2 sheds, large lot, $75k. Owner financing avail. w/$7500 down. Price negotiable. Will discount for cash. 575-973-2353 1717 N. Ohio, 3br/1ba, FP, family room. Central air/heating. Exit Realty Yolanda Archuleta 317-9567 Owner Gerardo Martinez 909-657-7611 3BR/1.5BA, OPEN living room/dining room w/new carpet, 1320 sqft, covered patio, block fence, 113 E. Ballard, $69,000. 444-9558

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

40 acres with electric, between Roswell & Artesia on Cherokee Rd., Lake Arthur, $860/mo, mobile home okay, 480-392-8550

520. Lots for Sale

PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. 5-10 ACRE tracts for sale. Restrictive covenants, gated area, city of Roswell water, electricity & telephone to each lot, NE of Country Club in McPherson Subdivision. For inquiries call, 626-4294 Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352. CORNER OF DIAMOND A & LATIGO. 188ftX146ft. 626-4113 or 626-4213 6.5 ACRES, fenced in, water well, electric, $25,000. 4107 N. Calumet Rd. 575-317-9195 CORNER LOT, 2101 N. Mesa, 80x125, water, sewer, gas, electric, $25k firm. Call 624-0647

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 PRIVATE ROOM w/full bath, NMMI area, $425/mo bills pd, $400/dep, no smokers or pets, 840-6240

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944. EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. Town Plaza Apartments NO HUD ACCEPTED ALL UTILITIES PAID Friendly managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs & downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735.

540. Apartments Unfurnished

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $592, 3br/2ba, $674, 5br/2ba $812, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge.

3/2/2, NE, $1200/mo, $1000/dep, 1 yr lease, 575-637-8458.

EFF, 1BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377

AVAILABLE- 2 bedroom, 2 bath, single garage, water paid. 2905 Aihanibra, Apt.2 and 2504 N. Grand, Apt.A. Call Sherlea Taylor. 575 624 2219 or 575 420 1978. Roswell Apartment 1700 N. Pontiac Dr., 2br/1ba, $600/mo + dep. stove & fridge, w/d hookups, water paid. 626-864-3461 Spacious 2br/2ba, all elec., w/d hkup, $625/mo, $400/dep. 910-0827

NORTH LARGE 2/2, ht pump, W/D hookups, $625, No Pets. 420-8797 Very nice 2br Apartment. 304 W. Mescalero, $625/mo wtr pd, $300/dep. 6 mo. lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535.

1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 2br/1ba, stove & refrigerator. Call 840-4333 or 910-8170.

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished RESTORED 3/BD 2/BA near NMMI huge lvg & bd $1000mo + utl. 626-6286

VERY NICE, all furnished 3br/2ba, dbl. garage at 3015 Alhambra. Equally nice, all furnished 2br/2ba, single garage at 1300 Camino Real, B. Call Sherlea Taylor, 575-420-1978 or 575-624-2219 for details.

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 4BR 4BA 6 acres in city w/country feel, 2 Riverview Circle, $1900 including water. Call 317-1550.

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 2609 W. Alameda, 1br/1ba, w/d hookups, ref air, carport, $475/mo, $475/DD, 575-317-6479. 210 W. 1st, 2br/1ba, $475/mo, $475/DD, wtr pd. 317-6479

3/BD 1/BA w/ option of 4th BD. Fenced yard, No HUD. $500dep. $750mo. 420-8648 FOR SALE or rent, 1108 N. Atkinson, $68,500. $750 rent, $750/dep, 2br/1ba. 840-7568 2br/1ba, $575, 1/bd 1/ba $360 call or text after 5pm, No HUD. 915-255-8335 2 large br, 1ba, carport, no Hud/pets, wtr pd, $600/mo. $600/dep. Call 626-2883.

3/1/1 FOR small family, 6 month lease, background check required, no HUD or Pets, 623-0316, lv msg 2/BD 2/BA $550mo. $400dep. washer/dryer hookup, No HUD 914 N. Ohio. 317-4307

609 S. Kentucky 4br, 2ba, no pets/smoking. NO HUD, $700/mo, $400/dep. Call 317-1371 3 BDRM, 1 ba, fenced bkyrd, w/d hkp, 5 block from Monterey Elem. 625-9004

2BD/1BA Remodeled, no HUD, references required. 622-5539 or 317-4859

616 E. Cherry, 2 Br, fnc yd, w/d hkp, sec.drs, $550/mo, $500/dep. 575-416-0801 1305 W. College, 2/1/1, nice & clean, W/D, fenced, no HUD, $580. 626-9530

2BD/1BA Remodeled, no HUD, references required. 622-5539 or 317-4859

2BB/1BA 10FT ceilings, quiet area, $700mo/ $500dep. 317-4373

3 HOMES 2&3/BD $600, $700, one is 2/BA. AL, 703-0420 DR 703-0421.

2br/1ba washer, dryer, dishwasher, fenced yard, garage, $795/mo, $795/dep. Call 910-3482.

1 & 2br houses, no pets or HUD. 317-7373 1205 W. 13th, 3br/2ba $625/mo. $300/dep. No pets. 575-910-9648

LARGE 3br/2ba, 912 N. Ohio, $850 + $500/dep, no HUD. 317-4307

305 S. Evergreen, 2br/1ba, coverd carport, shed, appliances, fenced yard, $775/$600 dep, pets w/fee, no HUD or utilities pd. 575-405-0163 or kilok9s@gmail.com 2br/1ba cottage located at 811 W. 3rd St. Fenced yard, ref. air, gas stove, fridge, washer & dryer included! $675/mo + $425/dep. You pay utilities. Available now. Call (575)420-6453 to view. 1204 S. Missouri, large 2/3br, garage, 1ba, fenced yard, $700/mo. Call Century 21 at 622-4604.

2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 3/2/1, ref air, no pets or HUD, $850/mo, $700/dep. 575-420-5930

2803 PURDUE, $1000/mo, $1000/dep, 3br/2ba, 1 car gar., fenced yard, central air, min. 1yr lease, 627-9942.

36 H St., $550/mo, $550/dep, 2br/1ba, fenced yard, wtr pd, min. 1yr lease, 627-9942. 710 S. Wyoming Apt. A, x-nice, 2br, appliances, wtr pd, $550/mo, $500/dep. 626-5423

4BR 4BA 6 acres in city w/country feel, 2 Riverview Circle, $1900 including water. Call 317-1550. 1103 MONTERREY 3br, 2ba, 2 living areas, total electric, FP, $1100/mo. $1000/dep 626-5423

Clean 2BR, 1527 N. Michigan $500 + Dep. No Pets. No HUD. Call 626-2190 REMODELED 2BR/2BA, $850/mo, $700/dep, no pets or HUD, 1005 Meadow Ln, 626-3816.

555. Mobile Homes for Rent FOR ADULTS 55 + only, 2/1, stove/frig, SW location, water paid. No pets, $515mo., $300dep. 623-1864 COUNTRY LIVING 2br/2ba, carport/storage, 302 D River Rd., 10 mi. East of Roswell, $550/mo, $550/dep. 575-513-5790.

558. Roommates Wanted

ROOM FOR rent, cable, phone, washer/dryer, $350/mo. 575-578-7004

580. Office or Business Places JUST REMODELED Over 2000sqft, new pluming, electrical, refrig air, wired for individual offices. $2200mo. 626-6765

FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546. AVAILABLE 750 sqft at 2600 N. Main. Call John Grieves, Prudential Enchanted Lands, 575-626-7813.

1200 sqft building, park-like setting, maintenance included, 400 E. College. 420-9970


B8 Saturday, August 3, 2013 580. Office or Business Places

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

110 S. Richardson, 1800 sqft, great downtown property across from Burritos and More. $550/mo, $550/DD. 317-6479.

MATCHING SOFA chair. Rocker recliner all for $500 OBO. 575-910-2591

OFFICE BUILDING & lot for sale or lease, 410 S. Main St., 623-9051 or 420-9072.

DIRECTV - Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call Now! Triple savings! $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!! Start saving today! 1-800-264-0340

600. Wanted to Rent

I AM interested in renting a building for second hand business. Must be reasonable. Call or text 317-6285.

DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-315-7043

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

DOUBLE STROLLER, dog house, gas grill, stove, wed. dress, antiques. 626-2028 or 622-9912.

SHOP BLAIRS! Great deals on used furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, home decor, tools, electronics, movies, music, jewelry & bows, hat & caps, saddles & tac, toys plus much more. We also buy your unwanted items including complete households & estates. Open daily 9-5. 5611 Hummingbird Ln. 627-2033

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed!

CASH FOR Gold! I pay the highest prices for gold jewelry. Also, I pay 50% of blue book for silver dollars. Ted in Roswell 578-0805.

CLASSIFIEDS

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

720. Livestock & Supplies

TOP PRICES paid for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We buy compete household & estates. 623-0136 or 627-2033

I AM interested in buying bedroom, living room & kitchen furniture, working washers/dryers, refrigerators, & stoves. Call or text 317-6285

ALFALFA HAY/2013 Excellent quality, sprayed fertilized, $9.50 small bales. $225 big squares 4x4x8. Roswell 575-323-4722

Horse stalls for rent, large box stalls w/6ft chain link runs. Use of arena & trail course, $50/per mo. You feed & clean. 973-0791. Located corner of East Berrendo & Railroad St. LLAMAS. NEED to get rid of. Make offer. 575-973-0802

745. Pets for Sale

635. Good things to Eat GRAVES FARM Bell peppers, squash - 5 different kinds, sweet corn, onions, green beans & black-eyed peas (call for your bushel order), pinto beans, Armenian cucumbers, peanuts, dried red chile pods. 622-1889, 8:30am-5:30pm, Mon-Sat, Sunday 1pm-5pm.

745. Pets for Sale

AKC GOLDEN Retriever puppies 7wks see mom & dad, $400. (443)616-7492 4 BUCK Rabbits $10 Ea., 1 Breeding Doe $25 25 Laying Hens $10 Ea. 575-625-2544

FULL BLOODED Yorkie & Morkie puppies for sale. Call Jerry, 575-637-9626 AKC GOLDEN Retriever pups, only 2F & 2M left, 8wks, w/1st shots, $500. 208-2027 or 512-636-7569 LLAMAS. NEED to get rid of. Make offer. 575-973-0802

KITTENS TO to be given to a good loving home. For info 627-7085

RECREATIONAL

695. Machinery Tools Farm/Ranch

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

‘06 KAWASAKI Vulcan2050 cc, 4k mile $6000 obo. 623-6999 or 317-3018 2003 YAMAHA 650 V-Star, custom, cover, 2 helmets, $3000 obo. Can be seen at 518 S. Fir. 910-3657

FORKLIFT DREXEL Diesel, 14k lbs., 12 set lift, 2 side shift w/swing, only 1850 hours, $10,850. 575-626-7488

FIND US ON FACEBOOK & FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

SEWING TABLE, older model, 4 draws, knee pedal. 622-8239

CHECK OUR WEB SITE FOR OUR WEEKLY OPEN HOUSES

SATURDAY OPEN HOUSE!

Mobile Restaurant trailer, with all cooking equipment, w/generator. 444-7652 SHOP JOSIE’S Antiques, Collectibles & Folkart, 1600 E. 2nd, Thurs-Sat, 10-6 this week. CALIFORNIA KING size bed for sale, headboard & footboard included, $875. 716-472-3112 or 622-8945

OP

LG washer/dryer set, front loaders, washer need work, asking $350. 317-7532

EN

0 9:3

30 11 :

NEW SHOWER bench & used shower chair & wheel chair. Call 575-623-9517.

HABLAMOS ESPAÑOL!

FEATURED HOMES:

AM

26 LAFAYETTE LP

3 BR, 2 BA, 2 C GARAGE DAVID DUER, 637-5315

PRICE REDUCED!

1202 HALL DR.

#99978 $175,000

3 BR, 2 BA, 2 C GARAGE DAVID DUER, 637-5315

HIS & HER WALK-IN CLOSETS!

At Roswell Ford you’ll save thousands - and the NADA book proves it!

CLEAN TRADE-IN VALUE PRICED!

2008 GMC Denali XL AWD #18507

$21,375

2007 Mercury Mariner Hybrid #18492

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

$ 11,100 - 3,000

$8,100

NADA Clean Trade-In

Lariat 4WD #18476

NADA Retail: $ 35,125 Roswell Ford Savings - 4,000

NADA Clean Trade-In

$31,125

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

$9,050

NADA Clean Trade-In

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

2007 Ford F350 Super Duty Crew Cab XLT 4WD #18222

2013 Ford Mustang Coupe V6

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

NADA Clean Trade-In

$ 21,850 - 3,950

$17,900

2011 Ford F150 Super Cab XLT #18514 NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

NADA Clean Trade-In

$ 27,350 - 4,975

$22,375

#18545

NADA Clean Trade-In

2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid SEL #18536

NADA Clean Trade-In

$ 9,925

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

NADA Clean Trade-In

$ 15,900 - 3,250

$ 12,650

2009 Dodge Ram 2500 Quad Cab SLT 4WD #18422 NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

NADA Clean Trade-In

$ 23,650 - 3,275

$20,375

2011 Ford F250 Crew Cab Lariat 4WD #18392 NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

$ 32,150 - 4,150

$28,000

$ 12,575 - 2,650

2008 Ford F150 Super Cab XLT 4WD #18254

$ 22,225 - 3,200

$19,025

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

NADA Clean Trade-In

$ 15,450 - 3,225

$12,225

NADA Clean Trade-In

#18471

$ 12,175 - 3,125

#18415

$11,825

$38,600

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

#18387

NADA Clean Trade-In

NADA Clean Trade-In

2009 Honda Accord Sedan EX

2010 Ford Focus Sedan SES

$ 14,600 - 2,775

NADA Retail: $43,275 Roswell Ford Savings - 4,675

2001 Ford F350 Super Duty Crew Cab Lariat 4WD #18333

2007 Audi A4 Turbo Sedan NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

2011 Ford F350 Crew Cab

#18399

NADA Retail: $ 25,475 Roswell Ford Savings - 4,100

NADA Clean Trade-In

2012 Chevy Tahoe LS

NADA Clean Trade-In

$46,050 - 4,775

$41,275

* Payments shown with zero down on approved credit for 72 months at 3.9% APR. Prices do not include tax, registration and dealer service transfer fee. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Pictureas are for illustrative purposes only and may not represent the actual vehicles. Not responsible for typographical errors.

ROSWELL FORD

821 N. MAIN ST. OPEN: MON.-FRI. 8AM - 7PM, SAT. 8AM - 5PM Se habla SALES: 623-3673 TOLL-FREE: 877-624-3673 SERVICE DEPT.: 623-1031 espanol

623-3673 • www.roswellford.com

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

790. Autos for Sale

790. Autos for Sale

MAN AND woman Diamondback mountain bike, $200 each. Bike carrier fits rear tire type vehicles, $75. 575-623-0419

2002 GMC Yukon Denali Loaded. Maroon color w/162,000 miles. Excellent Family Vehicle. Must sell . $7500.00 negotiable if really interested. Call 575-626-7030 to view

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

1970 Chevy p.u., new tires & wheels, auto, runs excellent, $2995, must see. 1976 280-Z Coupe, all original new tires, low miles, excellent college car, economical, $2995. 622-2537

2008 CHEVY Trail Blazer LS 4x4, 4dr, loaded excellent condition, $10,950. 420-1352.

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

1984 LINCON towncar, low mileage Call Joe for details. 420-3458. 2011 HYUNDAI Sonata, loaded, 28k mi, extra nice, $13,500. 626-0829 1984 PONTIAC Parisienne, 68k miles, make offer. 575-626-7127 ‘02 Pontiac Montana for sale. $1950. Mileage 193,500. Call 865-919-2049.

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

2006 FORD E350, 15 passenger van, 1 owner, dual air, excellent cond., $7850. 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352. 84’ GMC 1/2 ton- Body Rough, New 350 Crate Motor- Needs paint, rebuilt 350 transmission- excellent work truck, new exhaust, new tires PW PDL No air. $2850. 626-1456 2003 FORD F550 extended cab, 4x4, 7.3 V8 diesel, 1 owner, $10,500, 626-7488. FORD SPORT Trac 2009. Dark copper metallic, limited 4X4, V8 engine, leather, bed cover. Blue ox base plate, remote start 55k miles, one owner. $26,500. 626-7912 1998 CHEVROLET 1500 ext. cab Silverado, air, low miles, 3rd dr. 420-5727 2004 FORD F-150, good cond. 150k mi., $6500 OBO. Call 575-337-1050 or 420-8486

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

#99509 $209,900

411 & 411 ½ S. LEA HOSTESS: THELMA GILLHAM, 420-0372 1 BR. 1 BA, 2 C. GARAGE. Duplex investment property. #99539 $68,000

2000 MERCURY Mystique, $1500 OBO, runs good. Red felt pool table, great cond. w/acces. 910-6220

WWW.CENTURY21HOMEPLANNING.COM

Roswell Daily Record

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 4

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


08 03 13 pages new layout