Issuu on Google+

Roswell Daily Record THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

Vol. 122, No. 184 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

INSIDE NEWS

TUSKEGEE AIRMAN DIES IN NM

August 2, 2013

Obama faces NSA surveillance critics

FRIDAY

www.rdrnews.com

WASHINGTON (AP) — Struggling to salvage a massive surveillance program, President Barack Obama faced congressional critics of the National Security Agency’s collection of Americans’ telephone records Thursday as snowballing concerns made new limitations on the intelligence effort appear increasingly likely. Obama and Vice President Joe Biden joined lawmakers on both sides of the issue for an Oval Of fice

meeting designed to stem the bleeding of public support and show Obama was serious about engaging. Among the participants were the NSA’s most vigorous congressional supporters — the top Democrats and Republicans in the House and Senate intelligence panels — alongside its most ster n critics, including Democratic Sens. Ron Wyden of Oregon and Mark Udall of Colorado. The lawmakers departed the rainy White House

grounds without speaking to reporters. But in interviews later, they said there was a consensus that the surveillance efforts are suffering from perception problems that have undercut trust among the American people. “There is openness to making changes,” said Rep. C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger of Maryland, the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee. Sen. Saxby Chambliss of Georgia, top Republican on

the Senate’s intelligence panel and a strong NSA defender, said Obama and the lawmakers didn’t agree to take specific steps but brought up a number of proposals that will be fleshed out over the August congressional recess. “A lot of ideas were thrown out,” Chambliss told The Associated Press. “Nothing was concluded.” Wyden, in an interview, said he and Udall had sought to convince Obama of the urgency of address-

ing rising concer ns. He said he proposed strengthening the gover nment’s ability to get emergency authorization to collect an individual’s phone records, so that pre-emptive collection of everyone’s r ecor ds would no longer be necessary.

“I felt that the president was open to ideas — and we’re going to make sure he has some,” Wyden said after returning to Capitol Hill.

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — John Edward Allen, a New Mexico veteran who served as a Tuskegee Airman during World War II and later earned honors for his Air Force service during the Vietnam War... - PAGE A6

TOP 5 WEB

For the past 24 hours

•.Tires slashed, threats left at Alianza office •.Newest bank scam uses old tactics •.Possible arson at Valley Meat •.1 Dead in Shooting retires from •.Solis Police Department

INSIDE SPORTS

PARK OPENS WITH 69 ST. ANDREWS, Scotland (AP) — Wearing a black rain suit and a soft smile, Inbee Park looked calm as ever standing before the imposing Royal & Ancient clubhouse just moments before she teed off... - PAGE B1

Jill McLaughlin Photos

Above: The Chaves County 4-H and FFA Fair's Pignitary Pig Show contestants broke out the Silly String Thursday. Right: Cally Wood, 8, models an outfit as “Flower” waits during the Wool Lead Thursday. Wood took second place in her age division.

Fashion, fun close out fair day JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Everyone was in for a bit of laughter and good times at the Pignitary Pig Show Thursday afternoon as the Chaves County 4-H and FFA Fair wound down. But if it were a contest for best behaved, the pigs would have won the prize. Luckily for the audience, all rules were broken as costumed characters and their swines entered the ring one-by-one.

Ramos arrested in kidnapping case

TODAY’S OBITUARIES

• Frank C. Gamboa Jr. • Mary Cloe (Merritt) Jackson • Glenda Bee Newton • Maria “Nellie” Manuelita Brady - PAGE A6

HIGH...100˚ LOW ....71˚

TODAY’S FORECAST

CLASSIFIEDS..........B6 COMICS.................B4 ENTERTAINMENT.....A8 FINANCIAL .............B5 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........A8 LOTTERIES ............A2 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8

INDEX

“I thought it was really funny,” said Kirsten Sparkman, who said she tries to see the show every other year. Her favorite was a woman character dressed up as a male county far mer, who brought a lamb instead of a pig. “This is my first year watching the full show,” said her friend Amber Hurst. A Silly String fight broke out. But not before a matador entered with his bucking pig that had a set of

Ramos

JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER The Roswell Police Department arrested the second suspect Thursday in a kidnapping and armed robbery case that occurred on July 5. Bryan Ramos,

21, an employee of the Chaves County Detention Center, is charged with accessory to kidnapping and accessory to ar med robbery. The male victim was found walking south of Hager man. He had been severely beaten. According to the RPD, he had been left to die. The victim was transported to a local hospital and was later flown to Lubbock for further medical treatment. Sgt. Jim Preston said the victim is still being treated for internal injuries as a result of the beating. The affidavit of criminal complaint filed with Magistrate Court reported that at the time of the initial interview, the victim had two

horns attached to its back. All the while, they dodged a male fairy that attempted to leap around every so often. The pigs appeared to bury their snouts in shame. The show is judged and contestants are given prizes. Each character is allowed to answer extracredit questions and could call on the audience for help. The Big Bacon prize was awarded to “Steve Irwin: Crocodile Hunter,” the Lit-

tle Bacon prize was given to “Minion from ‘Despicable Me,’” the Swankiest Swine prize was handed to “T inker Bell” and “Leprechaun;” and the Biggest Ham was given to “Irish Lucky Charms.”

The Wool Lead event preceded the Pignitary Pig Show, and featured girls and a boy, ages 2 to 15. The children wore homemade garments that had to be at least 60 percent wool. They also brought lambs into the show ring.

Do you know this man?

The Roswell Police Department is seeking the assistance from the public to identify this male subject, wearing a red cap, who used a stolen credit card at the Conoco on the corner of Second and Union streets. The subject was seen in the 4-door F-150 truck with a Texas license plate. If anyone can help identify this man, you are urged to contact the RPD (575-624-6770) or Crime Stoppers (1-888-5948477).

Ohio man who kidnapped 3 women gets life in prison CLEVELAND (AP) — Standing before the man who kidnapped her and raped her for a decade, Michelle Knight described how the world had changed in the three months since they last saw each other. The captive, she said, was now free and the oppressor would be locked away forever to “die a little every day.” Ariel Castro’s fate had been deter mined long before he was sentenced Thursday to life in prison

See ARREST, Page A7

plus 1,000 years. But Knight’s words in a crowded courtroom put a final seal on the kidnapping case that horrified the nation and subjected three young women to years of torment in Castro’s ramshackle house. “You took 11 years of my life away and I have got it back,” Knight said. “I spent 11 years in hell. Now your hell is just beginning.” A short time later, the 53-year-old former school bus driver apologized to his

victims briefly in a rambling, defiant statement. He repeatedly blamed his sex addiction, his former wife and others while claiming most of the sex was consensual and that the women were never tortured. “These people are trying to paint me as a monster,” he said. “I’m not a monster. I’m sick.” The sentence was a foregone conclusion after Castro pleaded guilty last week to 937 counts, including

aggravated murder, kidnapping, rape and assault. A deal struck with prosecutors spared him from a possible death sentence for beating and starving Knight until she miscarried. During her statement, Knight was just a few feet from Castro, seeing him for the first time since her rescue in May from the house that Castro turned into a prison with a makeshift alarm system and heavy wooden doors covering the windows.

“I will live on,” she said. “You will die a little every day.”

The three women disappeared separately between 2002 and 2004, when they were 14, 16 and 20 years old. Each had accepted a ride from Castro. They escaped May 6 when Amanda Berry, now 27, broke part of a door to Castro’s house in a tough Cleveland neighborhood and yelled for help. Castro was arrested that evening.


A2 Friday, August 2, 2013

GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Walker and ‘Jack’ take Grand Burson a Grand Champion in Champion in steer competition breeding heifer competition many times you do it, it never gets old. While others are out having fun, I’m in the barn. It’s nice to know all that hard work has paid off.” The Reserve Grand Champion winner was Halle Munson of the Hagerman Valley Rascals. Her steer took first in the Class 1 competition. The daughter of Angel and Cody Munson said this was her first year competing. The steer show had 21 Jessica Palmer Photo entries in four separate Courteney Walker, 16, won Grand Champion for her steer, classes. The winner in the classes 2 and 4 was Jack. Kemp Kuykendall of Godcuit. She has been com- dard FFA. JESSICA PALMER peting in county and RECORD STAFF WRITER Nathan Carr, an extenstate fairs since she was sion agent in Agriculture Courteney Walker of in third grade. Courtney at Texas A&M University, Goddard FFA received has won four steer com- judged both the steer and Grand Champion in the petitions and six in the the heifer competitions. steer competition Thurs- area of goats, sheep and He told the Daily Record day. Her steer, Jack, breeding heifers. what he was looking for weighed in at 1,475 The daughter of Craig in beeves. Attributes that pounds and came in first and Antanya Walker, make a prizewinner during the Class 3 com- Courteney has not include power, balance, petition. become jaded because of bone structure and the The 16-year -old is an her previous successes. “I apparent ratio between old hand on the show cir- love it. No matter how fat and muscle.

Chaves County 4-H & FFA Fair Results

LOTTERY NUMBERS

JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Jessica Burson, 19, won Grand Champion heifer at the Chaves County Fair on Thursday. Earlier this week, Burson received Grand Champion in the lamb competition. Burson is the daughter of Cody and Cheri Burson. Jessica is a member of Goddard FFA and Far m Buddies 4H. She credits her interest in Lowline heifers to her friend Courteney Walker, who took Grand Champion steer, after Jessica and the Walker family attended a show in Houston. “They are like a second family to me.” Jessica said she was excited to have won this show, her first heifer competition. She plans to show her prize-winning L o w l i n e A n g u s h e i f e r, Lucy, in future competitions. The heifer show had a total of nine entries, in two different categories, Hereford heifers and Low-

789'5"2'"3%':&.4%2;'78<'5"2'*$"':&.4%2#;'.3=>'7?9'5"2'*+2%%' "2'@"2%':&.4%2#'52"@'*+%'#.@%'+")#%+"&=6'

Pick 3

ABCD'?EFG'(CA!D'H/I'AD'H,'DCJKCLMC!'F' M12*+'N%2*151N.*%>':2""5'"5'2%#1=%3N%>'2%:"2*'N.2='2%O)12%=6'

4-4-0

'

A&&'=1P1#1"3#'":%3>'Q"2*+>'D")*+'R'S.&&%4' ' TT,&.0'A0%#'9EU'4%.2#'"&='.#'"5''D%:*%@-%2'F'E'7V<TT' M12*+'W%2*151N.*%'"3&4' X.*+1%'YF<EYUV?'''Z).3'UGUEG<V[' W+%%2&%.=130'' !CB\DK!AK\HQ'

7F<<' B12&'@)#*'-%':2%#%3*'5"2')315"2@'51**1306' M12*+'W%2*151N.*%'2%O)12%=' A0%#'9EFG'.#'"5'D%:*%@-%2'F''

! !" "# #$$%%& &! !' '& &$$( () )" "+ +" "! !, , %%' '& &-! !. .' ', , Q QH H^ ^ KK_ _! !` `A A` `B B` `DDKK FF??

FF<<]]<<<< ..66@ @66 EE GG]]<<<< ::66@ @66 KK++%% ! !""##$ $%%&&& L L..&&& L L..1133 W W""))22**

' Z%##1N.'U[?EV<?G' ,13.&'N+%%2'2%01#*2.*1"3#'.*'5""*-.&&' =2.5*#'A)0)#*'G['R'GV'

U]<<EY]<<':6@6'

PUBLIC PROGRAM

NEW MEXICO’S LIVESTOCK HERITAGE Saturday, August 3 2pm at Roswell Public Library 300 N. Pennsylvania Roswell, NM 88201 Refreshments will be provided by the 575.622.7101 Friends of the Roswell Public Library

off WOOD BLINDS

1608 S. Main

*MSRP

MITH PAINT

line heifers, with Lowline heifers broken down into Classes 3 and 4. Justin Armstrong won the Hereford competition. Burson won Class 3. Walker won in Class 4.

“What you are looking at here is the final product, the USDA Prime and USDA Choice. These animals are between 18 to 20 months old. “These kids have owned the animals for about a year and raised them on their own. It is quite an achievement.”

Chaves County Beef Superintendent Benny Wo o t e n e x p l a i n e d t h e of the importance beef/breeding heifers.

**224455&&66""2200

9-11-18-21-22

off SOFT SHADES

Daughter of Cody and Cheri Burson, Jessica Burson (right) received Grand Champion for her Lowline Angus heifer, Lucy.

! !""##$ $%%&&& ( (""))**++ ,,""""**--..&&& //%%..00))%% ! !%%0011##**22..**11""33

Roadrunner Cash

*30% *35%

Jessica Palmer Photo

*65% off VERTICAL BLINDS

THE PROGRAM The slide-illustrated talk covers the amazing four hundred year history of livestock in our state.

*75%

Cattle Sheep Horses & More Historic Photos

off MINI BLINDS

622-2020 Mon-Fri: 7:30 - 5:30 Sat. 8-12

THE BOOK

The talks are based upon the speaker’s new book New Mexico’s Spanish Livestock Heritage: Four Centuries of Animals, Land and People UNMAD Press, 2013

THE SPEAKER

After 28 years in the National Park Service, Bill Dunmire retired as Superintendent of Carlsbad Caverns National Park. He has written six books about New Mexico.

This program is supported by a grant from the New Mexico Humanities Council

Showing films in.... Changes the way you experience movies

100% DIGITAL Dolby Sound Cinema

FIVE 3D SCREENS!

FREE SUMMER SHOWS!

Senior Thursdays! www.allentheatresinc.com Movie Listings 575.623.1010

All seats before 6 PM $6.00 (Excludes 3D) * No Pass or Discount *GROWN UPS 2

(PG13) 12:00 2:15 4:25 6:50 9:15

*THE CONJURING

(R) 11:30 1:55 4:35 7:05 9:35

*2 GUNS

(R) 11:30 1:55 4:25 7:00 9:30

Matinees Daily R.I.P.D 2D

(PG13) 11:45 4:30 9:20

*R.I.P.D. 3D ($2 UPCHARGE) (PG13) 2:10 6:50

*RED 2

*THE SMURFS 2D

(PG13) 11:20 2:00 4:40 7:10 9:40

(PG) 2:00 7:00

*DESPICABLE ME 2 3D

(PG) 11:25 4:35 9:25

*THE SMURFS 3D ($2 UPCHARGE) *THE WOLVERINE 2D (PG13) 3:00 9:20

*THE WOLVERINE 3D($2 UPCHARGE) (PG13) 12:00 6:15

*DESPICABLE ME 2 2D (PG) 2:15 6:50

(PG) 11:45 4:30 ($2 UPCHARGE)

*THE LONE RANGER (PG13) 9:10

FREE SUMMER SHOWS ON TUESDAYS!

9:00 am, 11:20 am & 1:40 pm 8/6/13 - Happy Feet 2 (PG)

Roswell Daily Record

USPS No 471-200

News & Business Telephone 622-7710 Circulation Telephone 622-7730

Charles Fischer Publisher

cfischer@rdrnews.com

Andrew Poertner Editor

editor@rdrnews.com

R. Cory Beck Publisher (1987-2006)

Jim Dishman .....................................................Circulation Director jdishman@rdrnews.com

Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice The entire contents of the Roswell Daily Record, including its flag on Page 1, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the Daily Record.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES by carrier delivery in Roswell: $10 per month, payable in advance. Prices may vary in some areas.

MAIL SUBSCRIPTION RATES: ALL NEW MEXICO 882 ZIP CODES, $12 ONE MONTH, $36 THREE MONTHS, $72 SIX MONTHS, $144 ONE YEAR. All other New Mexico zip codes, $13 one month, $39 three months, $78 six months, $156 one year. All other states in USA, $18 one month, $54 three months, $108 six months, $216 one year. Periodical-postage paid at Roswell, N.M. Postmaster: Please mail change of address to Roswell Daily Record, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202-1897. All postal subscriptions will stop at expiration unless payment is made prior to expiration.


GENERAL

First-timer McCarty wins Broiler Pen grand champ Roswell Daily Record

Jill McLaughlin Photo

Payton McCarty's cage of chickens won Grand Champion Broiler Pen Wednesday at the Chaves County 4-H & FFA Fair.

said. He put them in the barn with a fan and light and fed them a special blend. McCarty said he had to quit leaving the light on because the chickens would eat too much. His parents, Shawna and Matt Miller, said McCarty will go on to the Eastern New Mexico State Fair. “It’s pretty good for the first time ever, “ Matt said. The Gateway Christian fourth-grader said he will save the money he makes from selling his chickens at tonight’s junior livestock sale.

JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Payton First-timer McCarty took home the banner for Grand Champion Broiler Pen for his cage of three chickens Wednesday at the Chaves County 4-H and FFA Fair. It was “a ton” of work, but worth it in the end. “Now it’s time to chill down and eat,” McCarty said. McCarty got the birds when they were a day old, eight weeks ago. They now weight seven pounds, he

McCarty, who plays football and participates in shooting sports, also entered rabbits in this year’s Chaves County 4H and FFA Fair. McKayla Fox took home the prize for Reserve Champion Broiler Pen. She said she was a bit surprised, “I was kinda surprised,” Fox said. “A lot of them lost some of their feathers. I thought they weren’t gonna look so pretty.” Fox, who has competed the past three years, fed her chickens a special broiler feed, she said. She also liked taking care of them. “I liked to wash them,” she said. “I think it’s kind of fun. They’ll splash you.” Fox also entered rabbits this year. She also owns horses and likes to hang out with her friends, she said. The Best of Barn award was given to Cael Alderette, 12, who won with his Sumatra bird. Alderette entered 18 birds this year and one turkey. “I’ve been doing this since I was 6 years old,” he said. “It’s pretty cool. All the ribbons and the money.” Alderette said he has lear ned how to care for chickens, getting unique varieties.

5

Seeded

Watermelons

$ 00 Large

Roasted New Mexico

24

Hatch Green Chile

$

99

30 lb. Raw Weight Select Heats

Brown’s cow a champ dairy heifer JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

ea.

99

Large Cantaloupe Sw e e t

Red Grapes

Adam Brown chose “Sara” for her characteristics. The 17-month-old dairy heifer had the most potential, especially with her straight top and depth of rib, he said. “It’s the same as every year,” Brown said. The selection was key in ear ning Sara a Grand Champion banner and $75 for Brown Wednesday in the dairy heifer contest. Brown, who has participated in competitions for the past eight years, said though his family is in the dairy business, he has other plans. “I plan to ranch,” Brown said. Brown, who plays baseball for Goddard, also had family members at the Chaves County 4-H and FFA Fair. His father, Robert, said he was happy for his son. “It felt great,” Robert Brown said. “He worked very hard. Adam’s grown up on dairy. Our family’s been involved all our lives. All four kids have shown.” His mother, Lori, said Brown selected Sara himself. “He was 25th in the nation in judging in Wisconsin,” Lori said. “We’re really proud of him.” Andrew Vaz, 18, a graduate of Goddard High, took Reserve Grand Champion with “Lucky 7s.” Vaz, whose family owns Vaz Dairy east of Roswell, said he wanted to make a good showing this year. “This is my last show,” Vaz said. “I’m trying to go out with a bang. I’m glad I succeeded.”

¢

Seedless

lb.

Shurfine Wheat Bread

5$

Jill McLaughlin Photo

Adam Brown's cow was awarded the title of grand champion of the Dairy Heifers category at the Chaves County 4-H & FFA Fair Wednesday.

Vaz said he’s enjoyed being around friends and family in competitions during the past nine years. He has enjoyed, “trying to be competitive and trying to have fun at the

A3

Friday, August 2, 2013

FOR

same time,” he said. Vaz will attend Modesto Junior College in California in the fall, where he will study dairy science and management. He hopes to own his own dairy in the future.

1

$ 49

Country Style Pork Ribs Family Pack

Ground Beef

5

24 oz.

Family Pack, Ground Fresh 4 or More Times Daily

1

lb.

$ 99 lb.

ea.

5$

FOR

5

FCM Milk

5

Regular or Low Fat gallon

2$

FOR

Minute Maid Orange Juice

2$

5

Select Varieties, 59 oz.

FOR

99

Whole Chicken

¢

Pilgrim’s

lb.

Oscar Mayer Wieners

3

All Meat Regular or Bun Length, 16 oz.

2$

FOR

!"#$%&'()*'+(!,*"('-./0"! "#$%&''!()*&+&)*&),!-./##'!*($,0(., ! !

123456789:' '

'''''''''''''''''

'

'

'

;581<69:'

'

"#$%!&'()'(!*'+#($(,!-.(/'#'(%'! !0,0)1!234!254!26! 789!:;"<!8#1)!+(=!1>'!?#+$(! 789!@A:<!8#1)!+(=!@'+%>$(,! 789!@BC""<!D011$(,!E1!8FF!@.,'1>'#! !

G.#!$(/.!+(=!1.!#',$)1'#!%+FF!H3IJ33K2!

August 2 3, 2013 IN ROSWELL

600 East 2nd • 800 West Hobbs • 2800 N. Main

Not responsible for typographical or pictorial errors. We reserve the right to limit quantities. While Supplies Last.


Is America repeating the collapse of Rome? A4 Friday, August 2, 2013

Unfortunately, the fall of Rome is a pattern repeated by empires throughout history ... including ours? A group of libertarians gathered in Las Vegas recently for an event called “FreedomFest.” We debated whether America will soon fall, as Rome did. Historian Carl Richard said that today’s America resembles Rome. The Roman Republic had a constitution, but Roman leaders often ignored it. “Marius was elected consul six years in a row, even though under the constitution (he) was term-limited to one year.” Sounds like New York City’s Mayor Bloomberg. “We have presidents of both parties legislating by executive order, saying I’m not going to enforce certain laws because I don’t like them. ... That open flouting of the law is dangerous because law ceases to have meaning. ... I see that today. ... Congress passes huge laws they haven’t even read (as well as) overspending, overtaxing and devaluing the currency.”

EDITORIAL

OPINION

JOHN

STOSSEL SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

The Romans were worse. I object to President Obama’s $100 million dollar trip, but Nero traveled with 1,000 carriages. Tiberius established an “office of imperial pleasures,” which gathered “beautiful boys and girls from all corners of the world” so, as Tacitus put it, the emperor “could defile them.” Emperor Commodus held a show in the Colosseum at which he personally killed five hippos, two elephants, a rhinoceros and a giraffe. To pay for their excesses, emperors devalued the currency. (Doesn’t our Fed do that by buying $2 trillion of government debt?)

Roswell Daily Record

Nero reduced the silver content of coins to 95 percent. Then Trajan reduced it to 85 percent and so on. By the year 300, wheat that once cost eight Roman dollars cost 120,000 Roman dollars. The president of the Foundation for Economic Education, Lawrence Reed, warned that Rome, like America, had an expanding welfare state. It started with “subsidized grain. The government gave it away at half price. But the problem was that they couldn’t stop there ... a man named Claudius ran for Tribune on a platform of free wheat for the masses. And won. It was downhill from there.” Soon, to appease angry voters, emperors gave away or subsidized olive oil, salt and pork. People lined up to get free stuff. Rome’s government, much like ours, wasn’t good at making sure subsidies flowed only to the poor, said Reed: “Anybody could line up to get these goods, which contributed to the ultimate bankruptcy of the Roman state.” As inflation increased, Rome,

much like the U.S. under President Nixon, imposed wage and price controls. When people objected, Emperor Diocletian denounced their “greed,” saying, “Shared humanity urges us to set a limit.” Doesn’t that sound like today’s anti-capitalist politicians? Diocletian was worse than Nixon. Rome enforced controls with the death penalty — and forbid people to change professions. Emperor Constantine decreed that those who broke such rules “be bound with chains and reduced to servile condition.” Eventually, Rome’s empire was so large — and people so resentful of centralized control — that generals in outlying regions began declaring independence from Rome. At FreedomFest, Matt Kibbe, president of the tea party group FreedomWorks, also argued that America could soon collapse like Rome did. “The parallels are quite ominous — the debt, the expansionist foreign policy, the arrogance of executive power taking over our country,”

says Kibbe. “But I do think we have a chance to stop it.” That’s a big difference between today’s America and yesterday’s Rome. We have movements like the tea party and libertarianism and events like FreedomFest that alert people to the danger in imperial Washington and try to fight it. If they can wake the public, we have hope. The triumph of liberty is not inevitable, though. And empires do crumble. Rome’s lasted the longest. The Ottoman Empire lasted 623 years. China’s Song, Qing and Ming dynasties each lasted about 300 years. We’ve lasted just 237 years so far — sometimes behaving like a republic and sometimes an empire. In that time, we’ve accomplished amazing things, but we shouldn’t take our continued success for granted. Freedom and prosperity are not natural. In human history, they’re rare.

Pope stresses humility, helping the poor

Pope Francis cannot be more clear. He wants the faithful to focus less on materialism, more on God and his greatest creation — humanity. No hypocrite, the humble pope has shunned as many grandiose papal amenities as his handlers will allow. He even chose to put his life at risk by refusing to ride in the ultra-high-security popemobile in favor of a humble Fiat with open windows, placing him closer to the people during his visit to Rio De Janeiro. He has asked priests around the globe to give up fancy cars and other flashy possessions and to focus primarily on service to the needy and poor. “He’s used that phrase that we have to get out to the streets, we can’t stay locked up in our sacristies, we can’t be navel-gazing all the time,” said Cardinal Timothy Dolan, Archbishop of New York. It’s an inspiring, heartwar ming and important message, especially for the Catholic Church in the United States. Catholic immigrants from Latin America and other regions are often shocked and put off by the somewhat bureaucratic, impersonal and church-business-first attitude that has crept into so many American churches and episcopates. Most American priests are loving and humble servants of Jesus, men who also devote their lives to the sick and poor. But among them are a few loving servants who wear Rolex YachtMasters and drive cars that better suit Wall Street bankers in mid-life crisis. To those few opulent priests, the Pope is saying “enough.” The church, Pope Francis insists, must devote itself to the poor, the suffering and outcasts of society. This is hardly a new mission. The Catholic Church, beyond question, serves as the single-largest social services organization in the world. It is frightening to imagine society without Catholic Charities, Catholic Relief Services, and the countless soup kitchens, homeless shelters, AIDS hospices, worldwide missionaries, hospitals, schools and universities the church founded and has operated for centuries. Though media obsess when something goes wrong among the ranks of prelates and priests, for every priest-gone-bad are seemingly countless priests, brothers, nuns and devout laity who give their lives to the service of others. More of this charity, which Pope Francis wants to see, can only make the world a better place. Yet Catholics must not quit their day jobs in droves in order to serve the sick, poor and outcasts of society. God provides, but he does so just as he creates. He uses process and time. When God provides medicine and food for the sick and poor, he does so through human intelligence, innovation and productivity. If a priest heeds the pope’s advice and sells a Rolex or a fancy car, giving proceeds to the poor, the providence results only because someone else produced wealth through acts of service and productivity that improved the human condition. Religious charity provides a priceless distribution network that brings care and services to those who cannot help themselves for an infinite assortment of reasons. Some of the sick, needy and poor are born in barren, drought-stricken lands abundant mostly with bugs and disease. Others are born without marketable intelligence or skills, or are harmed by natural or manmade disasters. But charitable distribution, like taxation and government redistribution of wealth, cannot exist in a void of human prosperity. Conversely, human prosperity has no ultimate value in a non-charitable world in which self-interest reigns supreme. Catholics, non-Catholic Christians, Muslims, Jews, atheists and others of all beliefs should support Pope Francis in his worldwide call for a more selfless and charitable world. Guest Editorial The Colorado Springs Gazette

When life hits you like a roundhouse kick

Sometimes life hits you like a roundhouse kick, reminding you about what really matters. That happened to me this past week with the life, bravery and fighting spirit of 35-year-old Jen Bulik. I was just about to continue my series on Thomas Jefferson and public education, when I read Jen’s story. (I’ll pick up that series again in two weeks, after I highlight another amazing story of sacrifice and leadership.) Last December, Jen went to her doctor with a cough, and the young hairdresser was diagnosed with pneumonia. When the cough persisted,

Doonesbury

DEAR DOCTOR K: For years I took antidepressants, but they didn’t really help my depression. Then a new doctor diagnosed me with hypothyroidism. Once I started taking thyroid medication, the depression lifted. What’s the connection? DEAR READER: Hypothyroidism, or an underactive thyroid gland, is one cause of depression. Depression is a condition caused by chemical changes in the brain. Surely life experiences can af fect those chemical changes, making them worse or better. But at its root, depression involves brain chemistry. The chemistry of the brain is also influenced by the chemistry of the blood, since

CHUCK NORRIS

SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

doctors ran more tests and discovered that Jen had stage 4 lung cancer, according to the New York Daily News. After five months of intense treatment, Jen’s doctors had to bring her the unfortunate news that it wasn’t helping and that she had six months to live, at the most. Jen and

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

blood circulates throughout the brain. The thyroid gland, a small, butterfly-shaped structure that sits low in the neck, secretes hormones that regulate the body’s energy. In this way, the thyroid indirectly affects everything from muscles, bones and skin, to the digestive tract, heart and brain. The thyroid, in turn, is reg-

her family were, of course, devastated, and so was her fiance, Jeff Lang. But Jen wasn’t ready to give up. With a positive and hopeful push forward, she let it be known that there was something that she wanted more than anything else: to marry Jeff. So she told her fiance: “Let’s get married. I want to focus on life.” With virtually no time to plan, Jen discarded her dream wedding and settled on a small ceremony in her parents’ backyard, with a few folding tables and a barbecue reception. That’s when Bay Area wed-

ding planner Erica Ota heard of Jen’s situation. Ota decided to call up her reserves and offer Jen the wedding that she had dreamed about since she was a young girl. In just 12 days, Ota recruited more than 30 vendors, who donated about $50,000 worth of products and services, including a jazz band and a parade, which was planned by Jen’s neighbors, according to NBC Bay Area. The reception would be garnished with hundreds of feet of lighting so it would look “like a fantasy land,” Ota

ulated by the pituitary gland. This pea-sized gland hangs down from the bottom part of the brain. When blood levels of thyroid hormones fall, the pituitary gland sends signals to the thyroid, telling it to get to work. In response, the thyroid produces two hormones, T3 and T4. If you have hypothyroidism, however, your thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormones. Blood levels of T3 and T4 remain low. When thyroid hormone levels are low, organs and internal systems slow down, creating a wide range of symptoms. Many of these symptoms — depressed mood, fatigue, weight gain, reduced sexual desire and trouble concentrat-

ing — are also symptoms of depression. Not surprisingly, hypothyroidism is often misdiagnosed as depression. Here’s an example: My wife and I are friends with a couple who about 20 years ago started to have marital troubles. She was moody. Her husband thought she was depressed, and her doctor agreed. They separated. One winter evening she slipped on the ice and broke her ankle. In the emergency room, the orthopedic surgeon took one look at her and asked, “Has your doctor ever said you have an underactive thyroid?” He did the test, confirmed his suspicions, and she

See NORRIS, Page A5

See DR. K, Page A5


LOCAL

Roswell Daily Record

‘The Last Escape of Billy the Kid’ kicks off today in Lincoln

LINCOLN—The annual performances of “The Last Escape of Billy the Kid!” will be held Aug. today, Saturday and Sunday at the Pageant Grounds in Lincoln. Friday and Saturday times are 8:30 p.m. and Sunday performance is at 3 p.m. Advance tickets are on sale. Price for adult (13 years old and older) is $6, children (ages 6-12) get in for $2 and children under five get in for free. To order advance tickets online visit shop.billythekidpageant.org . To order advance tickets by mail, write to Cheri Hobbs, Lincoln Pageant Festivals Corp., PO Box 92, Lincoln, NM, 88338. The fun will also include shops and museums, including the Historical Center and the Courthouse, open from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., and all day food concessions including arts and crafts. On Friday

and Saturday will also feature living history demonstrations throughout town. Sunday events will include the Old Lincoln Days Parade at 11 a.m.

Art & Wine

CLOUDCROFT—Art & Wine in the Cool Pines will take place Saturday from 11 a.m.- 6 p.m. at the Sacramento Mountain Historical Museum in Cloudcroft. The event is $12 in advance and $15 at the door. The event will feature art, wine, food and live music.

Night Out

AR TESIA—The Artesia Police Department is encouraging everyone to participate in this year’s National Night Out Event, set to take place Tuesday from 5:30-10 p.m. at Artesia’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Complex. The free, family event will feature an

CITY REQUESTS RESIDENTS HELP WITH WEEDS

ROSWELL—Recent rains in Roswell have brought more than just water to our community; they have also brought an infestation of weeds. The City of Roswell Code Enforcement Department has experienced a high number of complaints from the overgrown weeds throughout the City. “If residents would spend some extra time to take care of the weeds on their property, we could spend more time trying to enforce other issues in Roswell” stated Mike Mathews, Special Services Administrator for the City of Roswell. Mathews says Code Enforcement Officers have recently been spending the majority of their time addressing the issue of weeds and that there are a large number of properties in violation of the City ordinance that states that owners of the properties should not allow the weeds to grow to more than one foot in height. Weeds are not only unattractive and distract from the aesthetics and beauty of City, but they could have the potential of becoming breeding grounds for mosquitoes and other insects, and could eventually cause health issues such as upper respiratory infections and aggravated allergies. Property owners are urged to eliminate weeds as soon as possible to enable both themselves and their neighbors a better quality of life and to avoid involvement from the City Code Enforcement. Physically able individuals are urged to please try and help their neighbors, especially the elderly, in addressing the weed problem. For more information contact Renee’ Roach, Keep Roswell Beautiful Coordinator, at 637-6224 or Mike Mathews, Code Enforcement Administrator, at 637-6298.

HEALTH FAIR

The annual free Community Health Fair will be held on Saturday at the Roswell Boys and Girls Club, 200 S. Garden Ave., from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Free services offered will include blood sugar screening, cholesterol screening, height and weight checks, blood pressure checks, EKG’s, and BMI. Individuals who want blood sugar screening are encouraged not to eat or drink after midnight on August 2 for best results. Physicians and registered nurses from the community will be available to answer questions and provide counseling services for those who attend. Numerous exhibitors will provide educational and resource information. There are many free items for children, including bike helmets, so plan to attend. Free immunizations for children two months to 18 years old will also be given through by the Roswell Health Office. Please bring shot records for your children. The fair is sponsored by Chaves County Health Planning Council, Eastern New Mexico Medical Center, ENMURoswell, Lovelace Regional Hospital – Roswell, and New Mexico Department of Health. For more information, contact Jane Batson at 624-7233.

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

got the treatment she needed. The couple reunited a few months later. Other symptoms are more typical of either depression or hypothyroidism and can help tell the two conditions apart. (I’ve put a table listing symptoms of each condition, along with symptoms the two conditions share, on my website, AskDoctorK.com.) Hypothyroidism can be confirmed or ruled out with a blood test. Once diagnosed, it is usually treated with a thyroid hor mone pill that restores thyroid hormone levels to normal. As in your case, depres-

sion usually subsides once you start taking this medication. Researchers aren’t entirely sure why there is a link between hypothyroidism and depression. Clearly the low thyroid hormone levels in the blood affect the chemistry in the brain that leads to depression. In fact, doctors sometimes add thyroid medications to antidepressant treatment to improve mood — even in patients who have normal thyroid function. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)

Paw Prints

A5

open dance floor, miniature golf, jolly jumpers, a sand volleyball tournament, live musical entertainment, free food and more. Kids: bring your bikes and join in the Boy Scouts Bike Safety Rodeo! Also, free personal, child, home and neighborhood safety material will be available to the public. Come out and join us!

Tiger Eyes

SANTA FE—Want to see the museum on the big screen? Bring your friends and family and join us for an exclusive screening of “T iger Eyes” (partially filmed at Las Golondrinas) Aug. 16 at 6 p.m, at the Center for Contemporary Arts (CCA, 1050 Old Pecos Trail, Santa Fe). Tickets are $5 and include refreshments and special surprises! There are only 100 tickets available. They will be pre-sold up to the day of the event at Las Golondrinas only. Tickets are available by calling 505-4712261, stopping by the administration building, or by emailing madeline @golondrinas.org. Cash, check or credit card will be accepted. Reception with light fare to follow. Popcorn available to purchase at CCA.

Norris

Courtesy Photo

This is Bell, a 10-week-old female domestic short-haired kitty living at the Roswell Humane Society, 703 E. McGaffey St. The photograph printed here does not do justice to Bell’s beautiful white, black and light brown colors. For more information about Bell, or any other adoptable pet, visit her at the Humane Society or give them a call at 622-8950.

‘THE GUEST’ FILMING IN NEW MEXICO SANTA FE — New Mexico Film Of fice Director Nick Maniatis announced today the production of Snoot Entertainment's “The Guest,” a dramatic thriller starring Dan Stevens (Downtown Abbey). Production started mid-July and will continue through the end of

Continued from Page A4

described. And the tables would be decorated with Jen’s favorites: succulents — beautiful and tough drought-tolerant plants and flowers, just like the fighter she is. Ota explained: “It was my goal for them not to pay a dime. I thought to myself, ‘These people have already suffered enough. Why not be able to give them a gift, a wonderful gift that they and their families will never be able to forget?’” She added: “The thing is they’re such simple people — so positive and so hopeful — and they didn’t ask for anything from anybody. But they deserve this and more. ... They are truly wonderful people with good hearts and good souls.” Jen and Jeff were married July 27 in a fairy tale wedding at a local park, where they exchanged their vows under some beautiful redwood trees. According to the San Jose Mercury News, when they did, they shouted, “I do!” And then St. Gabriel’s Celestial Brass Band led the marital party on a jazz march to Jen’s parents’ backyard, where they celebrated their love and marriage with 120 family members and friends in a dream reception. And they danced into the night under the twinkling of thousands of strung lights and the stars. There are so many amazing and courageous life stories going on right now, I know. But I suppose this one stood out to me because I believe in fighting against all odds and for the things that matter most, such as love, marriage and family. I’m not a theologian. I can’t explain why bad things happen to good people or, for that matter, why good things happen to bad people. (See my good friend Randy Alcorn’s book “If God Is Good: Faith in the Midst of Suffering and Evil” for a surprisingly insightful treatise on that issue and much more. Go to http://www.epm.org.) But this much I know: As my 92-year-old mom wrote in her autobiography, “Acts of Kindness: My Story,” “bad things happen to good people, but good people can survive bad things with God’s help.” As difficult and even cruel as life can be, the truth is that we must strive with hope and optimism until we can no longer. And when we’ve done all we can do, we must remember that our ultimate survival and healing are offered beyond this life with God’s help. Jesus said it this way: “I am the Resurrection and the Life. He (or she) who believes in Me will live even though

Shop Roswell

FREE

Last escape

Friday, August 2, 2013

Health Fair Supporting a Healthy Community!

FREE SERVICES Screenings & Health Info Blood Sugar Testing Blood Pressure Cholesterol Height & Weight Immunizations (2 months – 18 yrs, shot records required) Counseling & Referral Health Information Free Children’s Bike Helmets BMI EKGs

SATURDAY AUGUST 3, 2013 9 AM – 1 PM Roswell Boys and Girls Club

200 South Garden

Aging and Long Term Services ˍ Blue Cross Blue Shield Care Van ˍ Chaves County Maternal Child Health ˍ Chaves County DWI Program ˍ Coordinated Home Health ˍ ENMU-Roswell Community Pharmacy ˍ Eastern New Mexico Medical Center ˍ Eastern NM University-Roswell ˍ Embrace Inc ˍ Forgiven Counseling Services ˍ Frontier Medical ˍ La Casa de Buena Salud ˍ La Familia Mental Health ˍ Lovelace Regional Hospital –Roswell ˍ Molina Healthcare ˍ NMDOH: Children’ s Medical Services, Family Planning, Families First, Emer-

. . .& much more!

gency Preparedness, Healthy Kids Chaves County, Infectious

NOTICE: For best blood sugar test results, no food or drink after midnight on August 2.

Institute ˍ Presbyterian Healthcare ˍ Progressive Residential

kšŒˆšŒSGy–šžŒ““GoŒˆ“›Gv͌ŠŒGMG~pjGGˍ New Mexico Heart

Information: ENMU-Roswell External Affairs 624-7233

Services ˍ RISD School-Based Health Centers ˍ Roswell Fire Department ˍ Senator Martin Heinrich ˍ UnitedHealthcare

August in Moriarty, Edgewood and Estancia. The production will employ approximately 75 New Mexico crew members and 85 principals and background talent. The Guest reunites the creative team behind Lionsgate's upcoming horror film You're Next, with

Adam Wingard directing, Simon Barrett writing, and Keith Calder and Jess Wu producing. “The Guest” is about a family who take in a houseguest who claims to have been friends with their deceased eldest son, but who in fact harbors a sinister past and violent agenda.

he (or she) dies.” His words remind me of a poem titled “What Cancer Can’t Do,” which explains its limitations: “Cancer is so limited. It cannot cripple love. It cannot shatter hope. It cannot corrode faith. It cannot eat away peace. It cannot destroy confidence. It cannot kill friendship. It cannot shut out memories. It cannot silence courage. It cannot invade the soul. It cannot reduce eternal life. It cannot quench the spirit. It cannot lesson the power of the resurrection. Amen — amen.” Two things in particular stand out about Jen’s situation to me. First, as Ota put it, “there are opportunities every day to do extraordinary things for other people.” She said: “This was an opportunity I saw to do something extraordinary for somebody else. So why not?” This story reminds me that we’re created for community. We’re called to be a blessing to others; we shouldn’t be consumed merely with ourselves. Secondly, Jen and Jeff testify to us all about the power of love, courage, faith and never giving up. One of my heroes, John Wayne, put it this way: “Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway.” This young couple epitomizes that bravery in a way that we all should follow. My wife, Gena, and I pray that the weeks and months ahead are truly the best of their lives and relationship despite the obstacles and hardships that they will face. We also in earnest hope and pray that Jen gets her last-minute miracle in this life. But if it awaits her in heaven, then we hope the sunsets that she sees this week on her honeymoon on the California coast are a vivid reminder that they’re only a reflection of those which await her in an eternal home where the sun never stops shining. *** A fund has been set up to help pay for Jen’s medical expenses, as well as to send the newlyweds and their family on a last vacation together to Hawaii. They have about $30,000 of $75,000 needed and roughly a week to raise the remaining amount. To donate, go to https://www.giveforward.com/fundraiser/25q2/jen-swedding-wish-cancer-fund. Follow Chuck Norris through his official social media sites, on Twitter @chucknorris and Facebook’s “Official Chuck Norris Page.” He blogs at http://chucknorrisnews.blogspot.com. © 2013 Chuck Norris


A6 Friday, August 2, 2013 OBITUARIES

Frank C. Gamboa Jr. Oct. 12,1937 - July 23, 2013

Frank C. Gamboa Jr. passed away peacefully at his home in Colton, Calif. His family was at his side. Frank was born in Roswell to Castulo and Molly Gamboa. He served in the U.S. Marines and Army. He was married to his wife, Martha, for 48 years. He was employed by Rockwell International for 36 years. He is survived by his four children: Molly Guerrero, Mark, Jerrold and Darryl Gamboa; 12 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; his sister, Mary; and several nieces, nephews and cousins. He is preceded in death by his wife; parents, brother, Joe Gamboa; and sister, Esther Salas. Frank was laid to rest with Martha at Riverside National Cemetery.

Mary Cloe (Merritt) Jackson

Mary Cloe Jackson, 97, passed away peacefully on July 29, 2013, in San Antonio, Texas. She was born on July 10, 1916, in Tokio, Texas, to James and Ella Merritt. She loved reading, cooking, sewing and travel. Her travels included fishing trips with her late hus-

OBITUARIES band, as well as trips to Australia, Hawaii, California, Canada and Colorado with church groups and family. She will be missed by many friends and family who loved her dearly. Services are under the direction of Sunset Northwest Funeral Home, San Antonio, Texas, and Baca Funeral Home, 300 E. Boutz Road, Las Cruces, N.M. Viewing of the body will be on Monday, Aug. 5, from 4-7 p.m., and the funeral service will be the following day, Tuesday, Aug. 6, 10 a.m., at the Baca Funeral Home. Burial will follow at the Hillcrest Memorial Gardens Cemetery on Picacho Avenue. Mary Cloe was preceded in death by her parents, James & Ella Merritt; her husband, Henry R. Jackson; two sons: Jimmy and Jacky Jackson; three brothers: Lewis, Don and Jack Merritt; and four sisters: Gladys Fisher, Helen Hays and Eloise Drake. She is survived by two daughters: Mary E.J. Collins and husband, Ed, of Le Grange, Texas, and Ella R. Jones and husband, Benny, of San Antonio, Texas; four granddaughters: Kalah Goodman, of Seattle, Jana Stephenson and husband, Kenneth, of Lubbock, Texas, Laura Castille and husband, Steve, of Albuquerque, Susan Backstrom, of Houston; five grandsons: Kyle Goodman, of Houston, Matthew Jackson, of Alamogordo, Tim Jackson and wife, Sharon, of Conway, Ark., Tye Rogers and wife, Kelli, of Plainview, Texas, Toby Rogers and wife, Jessica, of Lubbock, Texas; five great-granddaughters: Ginny and Jacky Castille, of Albuquerque, Nici Rogers of Temple, Texas, Kara and

Memorial services are scheduled for 11 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013, at Adventure Bible Church, formerly South Manor Baptist Church, 1905 S. Main St., for Glenda Bee Newton, who passed away Wednesday, July 31, 2013. Pastor Butch Neal of Adventure Bible Church will officiate. Bor n in Roswell at St. Mary’s Hospital on Aug. 25, 1941, to Glenn and Nona Pickering, she was the only child. Glenn was killed in WWII in 1942. She was raised by her mother and stepfather, Earl Blair, who all preceded her in death. Glenda attended all 12 years of school, graduating from Roswell High in 1959 without missing one day. Glenda married Charles Worrell in 1959, and had two daughters: Deborah L. Worrell Goluska, married to Stan, of Roswell, and Bridgette M. Worrell Betancur,

married to Johnny, of Colorado Springs, Colo. Glenda married Kenneth Newton in 1972. They all survive her. Other survivors are stepdaughter Billie Arens and her husband, Tony, of Eagle River, Ala., and stepdaughter Patricia Medrano of Arizona; grandchildren: J. Nicholas Betancur, of Roswell, Steven W. Goluska, of Las Cruces, Ian Betancur, of Colorado Springs, Colo., Alec Betancur, of Colorado Springs, Colo., Bryce Arens, of Eagle River, Ark., Skyler Arens, of Eagle River, Ark., Michael Medrano of Arizona; great-grandchildren: Dante Aguilar, Sarah Goluska and London Betancur. Glenda had many careers while living in Roswell. Her first job was at Kress Department Store at Christmas time. She also worked in mortgage lending, economic development, and oil and gas. She had her own interior decorating business with home interiors and she ended her working career as a personal coach/trainer and manager at Curves for Women. Community involvement was always important to Glenda. She was an active member of many organizations during her life in Roswell often taking leadership roles. She was involved with the Red Hats as their “Queen Bee” and served on the Chaves County Republican Women board. She was a Sunday School teacher at Adventure Bible Church. Glenda and Ken enjoyed many travels and the friends that they made while attending conventions and conferences. Glenda touched many lives during her 71 years in

Tuskegee Air men were awarded a Congressional Gold Medal in 2007. Upon retiring, the Rio Rancho resident was a sought after speaker around New Mexico and founded in 2000 a local arm for the General Lloyd W. “Fig” Newton Chapter of the Tuskegee Airman. “History speaks for itself,” said Bailey. “He was a role model, not only for African-Americans, but for all Americans in general.” Despite his accomplishments, Allen’s wife, Willie E. Allen, said her husband

rarely talked about them unless he was asked. “I didn’t even know he was a Tuskegee Airman until after we were married,” she said. “When I found out I started reading all about the Tuskegee Airmen. I was so proud of him.” His wife said her husband also hardly talked about the racial discrimination he faced in his early days in the military and refused to carry any anger over it. “That was just not the type of person he was,” Allen said.

Kaitlyn Stephenson, of Lubbock, Texas; eight great-grandsons: Christopher Jackson of Conway, Ark., Dakota and Dusty Jackson, of Alamogordo, Coby, Josh and Zack Rogers, of Lubbock, Texas, Tyler Rogers, of Lubbock, Texas, Aaron Stephenson of Lubbock, Texas.

Glenda Bee Newton

Tuskegee Airman dies at age 84 ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — John Edward Allen, a New Mexico veteran who served as a Tuskegee Air man during World War II and later earned honors for his Air Force service during the Vietnam War, died Tuesday after a long battle with cancer. The NAACP Albuquerque Chapter President Harold Bailey said Allen died from multiple myeloma. He was 84. A long-time resident of New Mexico after retiring, Allen was drafted into the U.S. Army Air Forces right out of high school in Live Oak, Fla., in 1945. At 17,

he was assigned to the 332nd Fighter Wing of the Tuskegee Air men — a group that broke racial barriers in World War II by becoming the first black aviators in the U.S. military.

He did not see combat in World War II but he later received the Air Force Commendation Medal for assisting in de-arming two dozen 500-pound bombs that were dropped from the wing of a B-52 being prepared for a Vietnam War mission. In addition, Allen and about 300 original

Valley Christian Academy

Ask How Your Child Can Receive a Quality, Private, Christian Education For Less than $10.00 a DAY!

YOU HAVE A CHOICE!

Enrolling Now for 2013-2014 School Year

Phone: 627-1500 Address: 1500 S. Main www.valleychristianacademy.org. Roswell Daily Record

Sponsoring Businesses

Roswell Daily Record Roswell. She will be dearly missed by many who called her friend. Special thanks goes to the many friends who brought meals, comfort and prayers during her brief illness. Memorials may be made to the Chaves County Cancer Fund, P.O. Box 193, Roswell, NM 88202-0193; Vista Care Hospice, 400 N. Pennsylvania Ste #500, Roswell, NM 88201; or a charity of your choice. Information and tributes may also be accessed by logging into caringbridge.org/Glenda Newton. Online condolences may also be made at lagronefuneralchapels.com. Arrangements are under the personal directions of the professionals at LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

ating. Burial will follow at South Park Cemetery.

Nellie was born Aug. 14, 1923, in Roswell, to Ignacio and Isabel Salinas Estrada. Her parents preceded her in death. She was also preceded in death by her brothers: Moses Estrada and Raul Salinas; her sonin-law, Rick Griego, and two grandchildren.

Those left to cherish her memory are her sons: Louis Brady and wife, Annie, Roy Andrew Brady and wife, Chris, Lawrence Brady and wife, Dilly, Allen Brady and wife, Nadine, and James Brady; her daughters: Rosalie Quish and husband, Dennis, Judith Otero and husband, Raulie, Sandra Chavez and Jennifer Griego; her sister, Josephine Hernandez and husband, Charles. Also surviving her are fifteen grandchildren, sixteen great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. Nellie was a member of St. John’s Catholic Church. She loved to cook for her children and other family members. She will be dearly missed by her family and all who knew her.

Maria “Nellie” Manuelita Brady

A rosary is scheduled for 7 p.m., Friday, Aug. 2, 2013, at St. John’s Catholic Church for Nellie Brady, 89, who passed away on Tuesday, July 30, 2013, at Mission Arch Care Center surrounded by her family. Mass is scheduled for 10 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013, also at St. John’s Catholic Church with Deacon Ernesto Martinez offici-

The family would like to give a special thanks to Sandra Gonzales for her great loving care. Serving as pallbearers are Louie Brady, Andrew Brady, Lawrence Brady, Allen Brady, James Brady and Dennis Quish. Honorary pallbearers are all of her grandchildren, Raulie Otero and Lorenzo Chavez. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home & Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at ballardfuneralhome.com.

AP Photo

In a Nov. 5, 2012 photo, Tuskegee Airman John Allen, 83, holds a photograph taken when he was in his early 20s. Allen died Tuesday of multiple myeloma. He was 84.


Roswell Daily Record

Much left to be done as Congress heads home

WASHINGTON (AP) — Leaving piles of unfinished business for the fall, Congress began exiting Washington Thursday for a fiveweek vacation with its accomplishments few, its efforts at budgeting in tatters and its collective nerves frayed by months of feuding. The House’s chief accomplishment for the week was a bipartisan Wednesday vote to deal with spiking student loan interest rates, readying that legislation for President Barack Obama’s signature. But that bit of progress came the very day that a Republican strategy of embracing painful automatic budget cuts imploded with the collapse of a major transportation and housing bill. That measure fell victim, top lawmakers said, to opposition from both conservative and more moderate Republicans and laid bare the flaws in the party’s budget strategy, which promised deeper cuts to domestic programs than the rank and file were willing to deliver in votes on funding bills implementing the pledge. Before leaving town, the GOP House prepared its 40th attack on Obama’s signature health care law and slated votes on other legislation aimed at embarrassing the administration and sharpening the party’s political message for encounters back home with constituents. GOP leaders also looked forward to an easier time with two other votes, one to block the Internal Revenue Service from enforcing

PUBLIC RECORDS

Divorces Final Nov. 12, 2010 T if fany Gutierrez vs Erique Gutierrez Filed June 26 Moises Soto vs Dora Soto June 27 Frieda Lente vs Bobby J. Lente Final June 28 Luis Delgado vs Cynthia Delgado Filed July 2 Heriberto Lomeli vs Karina Lomeli Carly R. Warner vs Jay M. Warner Vicky Slinkard Gellatly vs Phillip Peter Gellatly Final Irma Linda Martinez vs Marco Antonio Martinez Angelica M. Deleon vs Dimas Deleon Filed July 3 Velina Sanchez vs Aloysius Joseph Sanchez Final Blanca Grajeola vs Jesus A. Grajeola Tiffany Salcido vs Elias J. Salcido Eileen Marie Perez vs Mario Perez Jr. Andrea L. Lustig vs Eric M. Lustig Filed July 5 Jesus Valdez vs Yolanda

GENERAL/RECORDS

Friday, August 2, 2013

Chaves County 4-H and FFA Fair Results

A7

“Obamacare’s” penalties on people who don’t buy health insurance and another on the “Stop Government Abuse Act,” which among its provisions would allow people to tape record conversations they have with IRS agents and other federal workers.

As the Senate raced out its own doors on Thursday, it confirmed Obama’s nomination of Samantha Power as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. That capped an unusually productive run of advancing administration nominations — but one that came only after majority Democrats threatened to rewrite the rules to take away the GOP’s right to filibuster such nominees.

Senators also held a bipartisan closed-door luncheon in hopes of continuing the fragile sense of comity that has enveloped the chamber since it defused the filibuster battle. But that session came just minutes after Republican Senators banded together to shut down the Democrats’ attempt to advance their own, far more generous version of the transportation and housing bill, which was filled with funding for popular items such as road and bridge repairs and community development grants for local projects,

Republicans united to kill the $54 billion measure, following the instructions of Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. Valdez Filed July 8 Janet Alicia Russell vs Johnnie Brooks Russell, Sr. Final July 10 Gabriel R. Ortega vs Bernadette Ortega Francisco Chontal vs Marisela Serrato Chontal Sara Ann Fleming vs Wesley James Fleming Filed July 11 Gary Sean Boyce vs Jean Chasity Boyce Final Victoria Renee Martin vs Jeffrey Martin Filed July 15 Jesus Quintana vs Benita Quintana Final Tara Leigh Klein vs Evin Klein Filed July 16 Karla J. Gonzalez vs Benito Gonzalez Filed July 17 Yasser A. Saasoon vs Roaa N. Saadoon Final Alondra Sanchez vs Hector Manuel Sanchez Filed July 19 T ina A. Jauregui vs Michael Henry Jauregui Omar Chavez vs Sendy Ontiveros Melissa Clark vs Charles

Arrest

Continued from Page A1

black eyes and several broken bones in his face. The detective also observed scrapes on his back and his knees.

The record states that his assailants had taken him at gun point, pulled him from the vehicle, a

Ray Clark Final July 22 Cynthia Kaye Carroll vs Norman Dean Carroll Enma Aracely Melena vs Rafael Melena Filed July 24 Arlie Alton Cates vs Patricia Kaye Cates Shane A. McMath vs Desiree McMath Final Cynthia Montoya vs Jimmy Montoya Filed July 25 Louis Najar vs Charlotte M. Najar Final July 29 Leonard Ruiz Flores Jr. vs Lacy Rose Flores Ross Allen Willette vs Laura Lee Willette Deborah L ynette Holloway vs Carl Ray Holloway Maria D. Palma vs Ruben Palma Johnny R. Sanchez vs Laura Ann Sanchez Final July 30 Jennifer Lynn Wilkinson vs Skylor Wayne Wilkinson Lawrence J. Mitchell vs Jani Sue Mitchell Chris W. Bixler vs Evelyn L. Bixler Stephanie Leeann McNeil vs Christopher J. McNeil Jisabel Zepeda vs Catali-

Chaves County J.O.Y. Centers & Fraternal Order of Police

Back to School

$5,000

Saturday, August 3 1822 N. Montana in Roswell

Lunch Counter open 11:00 am BINGO at 12:30 pm $25 per person/per seat Tickets NOW at Roswell JOY Center or call 623-4866 / 626-5703

Six Games pay $500 each Two BLACKOUTS $1000 each

Bonanzas F Lightings F Money Trees

2001 red Oldsmobile Alero, began striking him and continued kicking him after he fell to the ground.

The victim told officials that his assailants drove him somewhere near Artesia, but said he had little recall of the event. He noted na Moreno Morales Municipal Court June 26 Judge Larry Loy Arraignments Unsanitary or hazardous premises; solid waste and litter in public places generally — Marvin Nichols, 1317 E. McGaffey; fined $58. Tur ning and stopping movements required and no drivers license — Michael Jaramillo, 410 W. Forest; fined $88 or 1 day in jail, credit for time served. Immediate notice of accidents — Evelyn Peralta, 45 E. Byrne; fined $229. Unlawful use of license — Adam Lara, 316 S. Beech; fined $129 or 4 days in jail, until paid concurrent with Magistrate Court. Failure to appear order to show cause — Felix Rodriguez, 813 E. Hendricks; fined $229. Failure to appear for trial — Amanda Gutierrez, 807 W. Hendricks; fined $229. Careless driving — Amanda Silvas, 323 E. Hervey; fined $29 and deferred for 90 days, not to receive

that the male subjects took his wallet, credit cards and cell phone. Michael “Boonie” Gonzales turned himself in to the police, on June 17, the day his picture appeared as Roswell’s Most Wanted. Gonzales graduated from Job Corps last year. It was the Chaves County Detention Center that alerted the police to Ramos’ potential involvement in the

crime. According to the documentation, court Ramos denied involvement initially, saying he was in another vehicle and, when the beating began, he and friend Boonie “got the f--out of there.” Eventually, he admitted to driving the car, but continues to deny participating in the beating. Ramos was taken to CCDC. His bond is set at $100,000.

any moving citation. Shoplifting under $250 — Nicole Popplewell, 703 E. Third Apt #1; fined $129. July 25 Disorderly house — Santiago Barraza, 3311 Bandalina; fined $129. Possession of drug paraphernalia — Lucia Guerrero, 315 E. Reed; fined $129. Shoplifting under $250 — Chrystina Gonzales, 417 E. Fourth; fined $129. Disorderly house — Errin Bilby, 300 W. Linda Vista #5; fined $129. Reckless driving — Rene Morales, 9 W. Wells; fined $129 and 5 days jail; 5 days jail suspended in lieu of 5 days community service. Two counts shoplifting under $250 — Britney Hand, 101 N. Ohio #B; fined $358 and 5 days jail; $358 and 5 days jail suspended in lieu of 11 days community service. Criminal damage to property — Joseph Leyba, 638 E. Apple; fined $229 and 3 days jail or 7 days jail until paid concurrent. Failure to appear on a hold date and financial

responsibility — Valeri Allrunner, 314 S. Evergrenn; fined $358.

Failure to appear for arraignment and disorderly house — Erika Palomino, 2 Langley Place; fined $358.

Failure to comply with community service — Jose Hernandez, 331 Brasher Space 68; fined $129 and 4 days jail; 4 days jail suspended in lieu of 4 days community service. Failure to pay fines — Jose Her nandez, 331 Brasher Space 68; fined $129.

Failure to appear on a hold date and unlawful use of license — Jose Hernandez, 331 Brasher Space 68; fined $558 and 6 days jail; 6 days jail suspended in lieu of 6 days community service.

Assault — Lorene Craft, unknown location; fined $129; 2 days jail credit for time served.

Possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia — Amanda Arias, 2419 N. Mesa; fined $358.


A8 Friday, August 2, 2013

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Mostly sunny and hot

Mainly clear

Saturday

Sunday

Partly sunny and hot

Monday

Mostly sunny and hot

Partly sunny

Tuesday

Mostly sunny and hot

Wednesday

Mostly sunny and hot

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Thursday Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

A thunderstorm in spots

High 100°

Low 71°

102°/72°

99°/71°

98°/70°

99°/70°

97°/70°

96°/64°

NNW at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

NNW at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

NNW at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

S at 3-6 mph POP: 10%

NE at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

WSW at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

E at 4-8 mph POP: 25%

NW at 7-14 mph POP: 40%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Thursday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Hi/Lo/W

Temperatures High/low ............................ 96°/74° Normal high/low ............... 93°/67° Record high ............. 107° in 1966 Record low ................. 55° in 1925 Humidity at noon .................. 34%

Farmington 89/61

Clayton 95/66

Raton 89/57

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Thu. trace Month to date ....................... trace Normal month to date .......... 0.06" Year to date .......................... 3.84" Normal year to date .............. 7.02"

Santa Fe 89/61

Gallup 82/57

Tucumcari 99/70

Albuquerque 91/69

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 96/66

Moderate Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 84/64

T or C 93/70

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Sat. The Moon Today Sat. New

Aug 6

Rise 6:12 a.m. 6:12 a.m. Rise 2:37 a.m. 3:26 a.m. First

Aug 14

Regional Cities Today Sat.

Full

Aug 20

Set 7:57 p.m. 7:56 p.m. Set 4:54 p.m. 5:38 p.m. Last

Aug 28

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19)  You will accomplish a lot in a small amount of time. You also will be able to straighten out a misunderstanding that could have been a problem. Communication flourishes. Make plans for a late lunch, or take the day off to go on a day adventure. Explore. Tonight: Out and about. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  Finally, you’ll have the energy you have been wishing for. An emotional conversation could remind you to be more expressive than you have been lately. Sometimes you assume that someone else knows how you feel, but perhaps you are wrong. Tonight: Be a little naughty! GEMINI (May 21-June 20)  You might feel as if you have accomplished a lot. Before spending any more

Alamogordo 97/72

Silver City 90/66

ROSWELL 100/71 Carlsbad 101/72

Hobbs 100/71

Las Cruces 96/72

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE

money on a particular venture, consider whether it really will pan out. Do some price comparisons, and then decide whether it is a luxury or a necessity. Be smart. Tonight: Bring your friends together. CANCER (June 21-July 22)  You’ll want to do your own thing, and you have the energy to complete an important task. Do not hold back, and know full well where you are heading with an issue. A

discussion of a sensitive nature would be best postponed until tomorrow. Tonight: Love the one you’re with. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  A meeting could set the tone for the day, as an intuitive response from a friend or an associate will war n you that there might be more going on than meets the eye. Think carefully about what is causing a sense of frustration or possibly anger. Tonight: Accept an invitation to join friends. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)     Honor a sense of responsibility. You know where you are heading and why. Expect a loved one to feel differently from how you do; know that this person won’t hesitate to express those feel-

Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

97/72/pc 99/73/pc 91/69/pc 93/70/pc 74/47/t 77/51/t 100/70/s 100/72/pc 101/72/s 102/72/s 78/50/t 82/51/t 95/66/pc 94/67/pc 77/56/pc 77/55/pc 96/66/s 97/67/pc 95/70/t 96/72/t 89/68/pc 91/68/pc 89/61/t 91/62/t 82/57/t 85/59/t 100/71/s 99/69/s 96/72/pc 97/75/pc 87/59/t 85/60/t 83/62/t 86/60/pc 95/68/pc 95/69/pc 98/70/s 99/70/s 98/67/s 98/67/pc 82/57/t 85/57/t 89/57/t 88/58/t 73/47/t 80/50/t 100/71/s 102/72/pc 84/64/pc 85/61/pc 89/61/t 90/62/pc 90/66/t 89/68/t 93/70/t 93/71/t 99/70/pc 99/69/pc 86/63/t 88/62/pc

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)  You could be dealing with a touchy situation that involves a special person in your life. Realize that you will need to take a stand. Listen and try to understand where this person is coming from. You might choose to say nothing and just observe. Tonight: Togetherness works.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  Rest assured that you’ll have the support you need as you pursue an unusual solution. You could be full of getup-and-go. Listen to news with a more open mind. You’ll be able to see several alternatives and possibly a better course of action. Tonight: Catch up with a dear friend.

away KEEP AT LEAST 10 FEET

71/58/pc 66/57/r 88/71/pc 91/74/pc 87/66/s 85/64/t 83/67/pc 82/66/pc 88/68/pc 89/69/pc 80/66/c 76/60/pc 76/65/pc 78/61/t 102/77/s 102/78/pc 90/63/t 89/61/t 78/63/pc 76/59/pc 97/75/s 99/77/pc 88/75/pc 88/75/pc 98/76/pc 95/76/s 80/68/pc 84/62/t 86/73/r 89/70/t 101/82/s 100/83/s 76/62/pc 78/64/pc 100/72/s 99/71/s

U.S. Extremes

Today Hi/Lo/W

Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Sat. Hi/Lo/W

89/78/t 90/79/pc 101/74/s 100/74/s 80/59/pc 79/60/pc 92/77/pc 91/77/t 84/68/pc 82/68/t 86/69/t 84/67/t 92/74/t 92/75/pc 86/67/s 85/68/t 105/86/t 104/86/pc 78/63/pc 76/61/r 72/58/c 81/59/pc 88/69/pc 91/71/pc 88/74/r 87/70/t 92/65/s 94/68/pc 72/65/pc 72/66/pc 69/56/c 76/56/pc 97/76/t 97/77/pc 86/70/s 86/69/t

State Extremes

High: 115° .........Death Valley, Calif. Low: 33° .....Bodie State Park, Calif.

High: 97° ........................Tucumcari Low: 42° ........................Eagle Nest

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

ings. Sometimes you can’t seem to reach a compromise. Tonight: Run errands first.

Sat. Hi/Lo/W

(For the 48 contiguous states)

Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21)  Others have a way of taking the lead again, but you might decide to undermine their position. The more gently you proceed and the less anger you bring to the situation, the better your success. Tonight: Join your friends for some fun. After all, it is Friday night! CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  Considering everything that you might want to accomplish, it would be wise to put a little more time into a project. A partner could get upset if you’re not free to join him or her. Understand that he or she really would like your company. Tonight: Better late than never. Join friends. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  Tap into your ingenuity to finish a project quick-

from

Almanac

Today Hi/Lo/W

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

ly. You might want to take the day off, or throw a party with friends. Your playful manner attracts many people. What others might not realize is the amount of effort you’ve made to free yourself up. Tonight: Let the good times roll. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)  You still might be a bit nervous. You will relax when you decide to find a way to eliminate some of the stress and tension around you. A partner would be only too happy to help you find the right path. Open up to new ideas — they might work. Tonight: Chill out, then decide. BORN TODAY Actor Peter O’Toole (1932), film executive Jack War ner (1892), co-founder of Broadcast.com Todd Wagner (1960)

LINES overhead

LOOK UP. LOOK OUT.

Overhead power lines can be extremely dangerous and even deadly. Never touch them or allow any object to touch them. Keep yourself and your ladders and equipment at least 10 feet away. If you see lines brought down by weather, call us right away at 1-800-895-1999. In an emergency, call 9-1-1.

xcelenergy.com/Safety

The Salvation Army of Roswell

Our car donation program is now open Your Tax Deductible Donation Helps the Roswell Community. When you donate a car, truck, motorcycle, SUV or RV, we turn what is often a burden to you into a resource that helps those who are in need. Your vehicle donation benefits our community; we accept all vehicles in any condition. Our experienced representatives are available by calling: 575-622-8700

Ice

90s 100s 110s

Learn more about safety at xcelenergy.com/Safety.


SPORTS

Headliners

Friday, August 2, 2013 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

Section

Roswell Daily Record

B

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

Clowney, Manziel headliners in SEC’s bid for No. 8 The players are providing the star power in the Southeastern Conference’s drive for an eighth-straight national title not those millionaire coaches. Hop in the backseat, Nick Saban and Steve Spurrier, and enjoy the ride. There’s plenty of headliners on the field, starting at quarterback with Texas A&M’s Johnny Manziel, Alabama’s AJ McCarron and Georgia’s Aaron Murray plus a bounty of dangerous receivers. Tailbacks Georgia’s Todd Gurley and ‘Bama’s T.J. Yeldon are superb sophomore runners. Defensively, South Carolina end Jadeveon Clowney and Projected Crimson T ide lineorder of finish backer C.J. Mosley EAST lead the way. 1. Georgia That bounty of tal2. South Carolina ent gives the SEC 3. Florida ample hope that the 4. Vanderbilt league can maintain 5. Missouri 6. Tennessee its seven-year grip 7. Kentucky on the BCS title. Manziel, who won WEST the Heisman Trophy 1. Alabama 2. Texas A&M as a freshman, and 3. LSU Clowney are regard4. Mississippi ed as favorites to 5. Auburn claim the league’s 6. Mississippi State 7. Arkansas fifth Heisman in seven years. Title game winner But like Aggies Alabama

coach Kevin Sumlin said of his team, it’s time to “hit the reset button.” Or at least the challengers of Saban and the two-time defending national champion Tide are hoping that button is working. So are the other power conferences, for that matter. Saban’s peers aren’t backing down. LSU’s Les Miles: “I like us in any game.” South Carolina’s Spurrier, in humble-confident mode: “We may fall flat on our face but that’s what we’re going to try to do, try to win the conference.” Win the SEC, and a national title shot seems likely to come. Georgia defensive end Garrison Smith’s take on the SEC: Crystal balls don’t win crystal trophies. “There’s no telling which team is going to come from where with the amount of talent,” Smith said. “Nobody can predict the future.”

— FIVE THINGS TO WATCH —

1, CHASING THE TIDE: Alabama might be the team to beat nationally after claiming three of the past four championships, but navigating the competitive SEC is a challenge for any team. Johnny Manziel and Texas A&M are in pursuit, and so are See SEC, Page B3

AP Photo

Park opens with 69 WOMEN’S BRITISH OPEN

Pressel, Lennarth lead; Roswell’s Piller 8 back

AP Photo

Firestone fits Webb’s eye

Webb Simpson chips to the ninth green during the first round of the Bridgestone Inviational at Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio, Thursday.

Simpson shoots 64 in first Bridgestone round

Gasoline e engines

to go yesterday and told me where to hit it, where the lines were, what clubs to hit,” said Simpson, the 2012 U.S. Open champion. “I didn’t feel like it was my first time because he has so much experience here.” Seven-time Bridgestone winner Tiger Woods did not have to rely so much on the man on his bag, Joe LaCava, while shooting a 66. Woods has 11 top-10 finishes in his 13 starts at the course, so he clearly knows where to go. Still, he needed his counsel from time to time. “I hit a lot of good shots. I had a really See EYE, Page B3

Inbee Park hits her approach shot the second green during the first round of the Women’s British Open, Thursday. Park, who has won the first three majors of the year on the LPGA Tour, is three shots off the lead after the first round. bogeys and one double bogey from a pot bunker on the back nine made her realize there’s a reason no golfer has ever won four majors in a single year. “Felt like a roller coaster today,” Park said. She was only too happy it finally stopped with a 6foot birdie on the 18th hole, ending a slide during which she dropped four shots in a five-hole span.

Pressel, one spot out of making the Solheim Cup team this week, caught a break when the rain and wind never materialized in the after noon. She made seven birdies in a round of 66 that gave her a share of the lead with Lennarth, who birdied the 18th. Stacy Lewis, the former No. 1 player in women’s

See BRITISH, Page B3

Summer Coolant Flush Special!

Includes up to two gallons of coolant & one bottle of additive

89..

$

LOCAL SCHEDULE — FRIDAY, AUGUST 2 —

• No local games scheduled

AP Photo

95

*Limit one per customer. Not valid with any other specials. Offer ends August 8, 2013.

SPOTLIGHT

ON

821 NORTH MAIN • SERVICE DEPT. 623-1031

www.roswellford.com

SPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN ...

1864 — The first Travers Stakes at Saratoga is won by Kentucky. 1912 — John McDermott wins the U.S. Open golf championship for the second straight year with a 294 total. 1952 — Five American boxers win gold medals at the Olympics, marking the first time the U.S. wins the unofficial team title. The five medalists are flyweight Nate Brooks; light welterweight Charley Adkins; middleweight Floyd Patterson; light heavyweight Norvell Lee and heavyweight Eddie Sanders. 1967 — The New Orleans Saints play their first preseason game and lose to the Los Angeles Rams, 77-16. 1979 — New York Yankees catcher Thurman Munson is killed in a plane crash prac-

COUPON

COUPON

AKRON, Ohio (AP) — So much for course knowledge. Webb Simpson, playing his first competitive round at Firestone Country Club, shot a 6-under 64 on Thursday to take a onestroke lead in the Bridgestone Invitational. It all came down to trust. “Well, I knew it all through my caddie (Paul Tesori), who’s been here so many years,” Simpson said. “I just kind of had to listen to him.” Tesori has caddied for years on tour, for Vijay Singh and Jerry Kelly, in addition to being a pro himself. “It’s hard for us players to listen to our caddies, but he basically showed me where

ST. ANDREWS, Scotland (AP) — Wearing a black rain suit and a soft smile, Inbee Park looked calm as ever standing before the imposing Royal & Ancient clubhouse just moments before she teed of f Thursday in the Women’s British Open. Only after her unsteady round of 3-under 69 did Park reveal perhaps the biggest surprise at St. Andrews. She was nervous. “But then once the round started, and especially playing so good in the first few holes, that really gave me a lot of confidence,” Park said. “I didn’t feel much pressure when I was playing during the round. I’m just glad that it’s already started and I got the first round under my belt.” Park wound up three shots behind Morgan Pressel and Camilla Lennarth of Sweden, a solid start to what should be a fascinating week at the home of golf. Her pursuit of history looked more like a highspeed chase when the 25year -old South Korean made six birdies in 10 holes. Three poor tee shots, two three-putt

ticing takeoffs and landings near his Ohio home. 1986 — Jackie Joyner sets the world record in the heptathlon at the U.S. Olympic Festival in Houston with 7,158 points. 2005 — In the largest trade in NBA history, Antoine Walker is dealt from Boston to Miami in a transaction involving five teams and 13 players. The Heat acquire point guard Jason Williams and small forward James Posey from Memphis, while the Grizzlies receive guard Eddie Jones from the Heat. The New Orleans Hornets and Utah Jazz also are involved in the deal. 2012 — Gabby Douglas becomes the third straight American to win gymnastics’ biggest prize when she wins the all-around Olympic title.


PILLER’S PROFESSION

B2 Friday, August 2, 2013

SPORTS

First Round

Roswell native Gerina Piller on the LPGA Tour

T-104th PLACE

Golf

Jacob Solomon leads Junior PGA

POTOMAC FALLS, Va. (AP) — Jacob Solomon took the third-round lead Thursday in the Junior PGA Championship and Abbey Carlson and Kristen Gillman shared the top spot in the girls’ division. The 16-year-old Solomon, from Dublin, Calif., had a 4-under 67 to reach 9-under 204 at Trump National Golf Club Washington, D.C. Tyler McDaniel of Manchester, Ky., was a stroke back after a 65 that tied the male competitive course record. Second-round leader Brad Dalke of Hobart, Okla., was third at 7 under after a 70. The 15-year-old Carlson, from Lake Mary, Fla., had a 69 to match Gillman, also 15, at 4 under. Gillman, from Austin, Texas, shot 70. Amy Lee of Brea, Calif., matched the female competitive course record with a 67 to move into third place at 3 under. Solomon had his third consecutive round in the 60s. “I hit a lot of greens, which gave me a bunch of opportunities to score,” Solomon said. “I didn’t get in too much trouble all day and that was key to my success out there. ... “I do like playing with the lead and I think I will be fine tomorrow. I had three wins last summer, and I had the lead in all of them heading into the final round. I am pretty confident.” McDaniel had six birdies in his bogeyfree round. “Other than the first tee shot and that missed the fairway by 5 yards, I don’t think I hit a shot that I didn’t like today,” McDaniel said. “I had no fear today. I had nothing to lose since I wasn’t leading.” Carlson had a bogey-free round, making a 25-foot birdie putt at the par-3 ninth and a 35-footer on the par-4 16th. “I was really consistent,” Carlson said. “I played well and didn’t make a single bogey. I made some really good par saves on four, five and six, which helped me stay consistent throughout the rest of the round.” Gillman had four birdies and three bogeys in her third straight under-par round. “My ball striking was solid throughout the day and I made a few really good putts,” Gillman said. “I need to hit it well again tomorrow and make a few putts to have a chance. It’s going to be fun.”

LPGA

Women’s British Open Scores By The Associated Press Thursday At The Old Course, St. Andrews St. Andrews, Scotland Purse: $2.75 million Yardage: 6,672; Par: 72 (36-36) First Round a-ametuer Camilla Lennarth . . . . . . . . .33-33 Morgan Pressel . . . . . . . . . .34-32 Nicole Castrale . . . . . . . . . .31-36 Na Yeon Choi . . . . . . . . . . .32-35 Mi-Jeong Jeon . . . . . . . . . . .33-34 Eun-Hee Ji . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31-36 Stacy Lewis . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-31 Sydnee Michaels . . . . . . . . .34-33 Ryann O’Toole . . . . . . . . . . .33-34 Dori Carter . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-33 Paula Creamer . . . . . . . . . .34-34 a-Georgia Hall . . . . . . . . . . .34-34 Danielle Kang . . . . . . . . . . .33-35 Pernilla Lindberg . . . . . . . . .33-35 Catriona Matthew . . . . . . . .33-35 Lizette Salas . . . . . . . . . . . .32-36 Liz Young . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32-36 Katie M. Burnett . . . . . . . . . .30-39 Shanshan Feng . . . . . . . . . .34-35 Sandra Gal . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 Caroline Hedwall . . . . . . . . .35-34 Katherine Hull-Kirk . . . . . . . .34-35 Malene Jorgensen . . . . . . . .36-33 a-Lydia Ko . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-32 Ai Miyazato . . . . . . . . . . . . .32-37 Ji Young Oh . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-32 Inbee Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31-38 Florentyna Parker . . . . . . . .33-36 Mikaela Parmlid . . . . . . . . . .34-35 So Yeon Ryu . . . . . . . . . . . .35-34 Miki Saiki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 Hee Kyung Seo . . . . . . . . . .34-35 Jenny Shin . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 Marianne Skarpnord . . . . . .34-35 Angela Stanford . . . . . . . . . .33-36 Ayako Uehara . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 Mariajo Uribe . . . . . . . . . . . .36-33 a-Amy Boulden . . . . . . . . . .35-35 Holly Clyburn . . . . . . . . . . . .37-33 Mamiko Higa . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 Karine Icher . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 I.K. Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 Brittany Lang . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 Jee Young Lee . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 Brittany Lincicome . . . . . . . .34-36 Rikako Morita . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 Anna Nordqvist . . . . . . . . . .37-33 Lee-Anne Pace . . . . . . . . . .35-35 Hee Young Park . . . . . . . . .34-36 Suzann Pettersen . . . . . . . .34-36 a-Emily Taylor . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 Linda Wessberg . . . . . . . . . .35-35 Lindsey Wright . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 Minea Blomqvist . . . . . . . . .34-37 Irene Cho . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35

Roswell Daily Record

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

TV SPORTSWATCH

66 66 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 68 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 71 71

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Friday, August 2 AUTO RACING 11 a.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for GoBowling.com 400, at Long Pond, Pa. (same-day tape) 1 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying for GoBowling.com 400, at Long Pond, Pa. 3 p.m. SPEED — ARCA, ModSpace 125, at Long Pond, Pa. BOXING 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Featherweights, Javier Fortuna (22-0-0) vs. Luis Franco (111-0), at Miami, Okla. CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE 7 p.m. NBCSN — Hamilton at Edmonton EXTREME SPORTS 7 p.m. ESPN — X Games, at Los Angeles GOLF 7 a.m. ESPN2 — Women’s British Open Championship, second round, at St.

Chella Choi . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-37 Jacqui Concolino . . . . . . . . .35-36 Laura Diaz . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35 Moira Dunn . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Julieta Granada . . . . . . . . . .33-38 Natalie Gulbis . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Mina Harigae . . . . . . . . . . . .33-38 Daniela Holmqvist . . . . . . . .34-37 Cristie Kerr . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Meena Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35 Se Ri Pak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-37 Jane Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-37 Jiyai Shin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35 Ashleigh Simon . . . . . . . . . .34-37 Nontaya Srisawang . . . . . . .34-37 Thidapa Suwannapura . . . .36-35 Alison Walshe . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Sun Young Yoo . . . . . . . . . .34-37 Christel Boeljon . . . . . . . . . .35-37 a-Celine Boutier . . . . . . . . . .33-39 Laura Davies . . . . . . . . . . . .34-38 Katie Futcher . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37 Sophie Gustafson . . . . . . . .36-36 Mi Jung Hur . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37 Jeong Jang . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 Trish Johnson . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 Moriya Jutanugarn . . . . . . . .33-39 Jessica Korda . . . . . . . . . . .34-38 Candie Kung . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 Cindy LaCrosse . . . . . . . . . .35-37 Xi Yu Lin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37 Paola Moreno . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 Belen Mozo . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37 Pornanong Phatlum . . . . . . .34-38 Yani Tseng . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-38 Line Vedel . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-38 Helen Alfredsson . . . . . . . . .38-35 Juli Inkster . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-39 Haeji Kang . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37 Sarah Kemp . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-38 Mindy Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-38 Kristy McPherson . . . . . . . .35-38 Azahara Munoz . . . . . . . . . .35-38 Margherita Rigon . . . . . . . . .35-38 Jennifer Rosales . . . . . . . . .34-39 Dewi Claire Schreefel . . . . .34-39 Klara Spilkova . . . . . . . . . . .35-38 Veronica Zorzi . . . . . . . . . . .37-36 Beth Allen . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-39 Carlota Ciganda . . . . . . . . . .36-38 Austin Ernst . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 Sahra Hassan . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 Jennifer Johnson . . . . . . . . .33-41 Stacey Keating . . . . . . . . . .36-38 Louise Larsson . . . . . . . . . .36-38 Amelia Lewis . . . . . . . . . . . .34-40 Mika Miyazato . . . . . . . . . . .37-37 Gwladys Nocera . . . . . . . . .35-39 Gerina Piller . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 Marta Silva . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-39 Karen Stupples . . . . . . . . . .34-40 Karrie Webb . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-39 Michelle Wie . . . . . . . . . . . .37-37 Sakura Yokomine . . . . . . . . .35-39 Chie Arimura . . . . . . . . . . . .37-38 Bree Arthur . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-37 Nikki Campbell . . . . . . . . . . .36-39 a-Gabriella Cowley . . . . . . .35-40 Tania Elosegui . . . . . . . . . . .35-40 Nicole Hage . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-38 Whitney Hillier . . . . . . . . . . .35-40 Christina Kim . . . . . . . . . . . .38-37 Mo Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-38 Sarah Jane Smith . . . . . . . .35-40 Lexi Thompson . . . . . . . . . .38-37 Momoko Ueda . . . . . . . . . . .37-38 Jodi Ewart Shadoff . . . . . . .37-39 a-Charley Hull . . . . . . . . . . .37-39 Felicity Johnson . . . . . . . . . .36-40 Ilhee Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-40 Caroline Masson . . . . . . . . .36-40 Lisa McCloskey . . . . . . . . . .36-40 Becky Morgan . . . . . . . . . . .37-39 Giulia Sergas . . . . . . . . . . . .39-37 Amy Yang . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-40 a-Sarah-Jane Boyd . . . . . . .36-41 Vicky Hurst . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-41 Carly Booth . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-39 Beatriz Recari . . . . . . . . . . .38-40

MLB

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 77 77 78 78

Darvish Ks 14; Rangers beat Arizona 7-1

ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — Yu Darvish struck out 14, matching the most in his 50 major league starts, and the Texas Rangers hit three solo homers and beat the Arizona Diamondbacks 7-1 in a makeup game on Thursday night. Darvish (10-5) had no walks and scattered five hits while throwing 78 strikes in 111 pitches over seven scoreless innings. It was his major league-leading eighth game this season with at least 10 strikeouts. A.J. Pierzynski, Mitch Moreland and David Murphy all homered off Zeke Spruill (0-1), who went four innings in his first major league start. Those homers all came early for the Rangers, who won their fourth straight game. They were coming off a three-game sweep of the Los Angeles Angels with game-ending homers in each. Darvish struck out 10 of his first 13 batters, marking the 16th time since he joined the Rangers from Japan last season that he fanned at least 10. Dwight Gooden with 20 is the only other pitcher since 1900 with more in his first 50 starts. It was the fourth game this season Darvish reached 14th strikeouts — there are only two other 14-K games in the majors this season. It is the most 14-strikeout games in one season for the Rangers, surpassing Hall

Andrews, Scotland 8 a.m. TGC — Web.com Tour, Mylan Classic, second round, at Canonsburg, Pa. 10 a.m. TGC — Champions Tour, 3M Championship, first round, at Blaine, Minn. Noon TGC — PGA Tour-WGC, Bridgestone Invitational, second round, at Akron, Ohio 5 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Reno-Tahoe Open, second round, at Reno, Nev. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2 p.m. WGN — L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs 5 p.m. MLB — Regional coverage, St. Louis at Cincinnati or Arizona at Boston TENNIS 2 p.m. ESPN2 — ATP World Tour, Citi Open, quarterfinal, at Washington 5 p.m. ESPN2 — ATP World Tour, Citi Open, quarterfinal, at Washington 9 p.m. ESPN2 — WTA, Southern California Open, quarterfinal, at Carlsbad, Calif.

+2

74

THIS WEEK’S STOP: WOMEN’S BRITISH OPEN

TOTAL TO PAR

ROUND SCORE

SCOREBOARD

of Fame pitcher Nolan Ryan’s three in 1990. Over seven seasons in Japan, Darvish had 15 strikeouts three times. The only Arizona starter who didn’t strike out was Cody Ross. Leadoff hitter Gerardo Parra, who had a 10-game interleague hitting streak, and All-Star first baseman Paul Goldschmidt both struck out three times against Darvish. The Diamondbacks scored their only run in the ninth inning on Martin Prado’s RBI single. Pierzynski put the Rangers ahead to stay in the second inning with his 419-foot blast to right, his 12th homer. Moreland hit his 15th homer leading off the third, an inning before Murphy’s 12th. Leonys Martin added a two-run double, though he was thrown out trying to stretch it to a triple, and Pierzynski had a two-run single in the seventh.

American League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .66 44 Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .64 44 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .60 49 New York . . . . . . . . . .56 51 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .50 57 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .61 45 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .60 48 Kansas City . . . . . . . .54 51 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .45 60 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .40 66 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .63 45 Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 49 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .50 58 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .48 58 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .36 71

Pct GB .600 — .593 1 1 .550 5 ⁄2 1 .523 8 ⁄2 .467 14 1⁄2

Pct GB .575 — .556 2 1 .514 6 ⁄2 1 .429 15 ⁄2 .377 21 Pct GB .583 — .550 3 1⁄2 .463 13 .453 14 1 .336 26 ⁄2

Wednesday’s Games Detroit 11, Washington 1 Toronto 5, Oakland 2, 10 innings Cleveland 6, Chicago White Sox 5, 10 inn. Houston 11, Baltimore 0 Arizona 7, Tampa Bay 0 Boston 5, Seattle 4, 15 innings Texas 2, L.A. Angels 1 Kansas City 4, Minnesota 3 N.Y. Yankees 3, L.A. Dodgers 0 Thursday’s Games Cleveland 6, Chicago White Sox 1 Kansas City 7, Minnesota 2 Texas 7, Arizona 1 Baltimore 6, Houston 3 Boston 8, Seattle 7 Toronto at L.A. Angels, 8:05 p.m. Friday’s Games Seattle (Harang 5-9) at Baltimore (Tillman 13-3), 5:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 3-6) at Detroit (Fister 9-5), 5:08 p.m. Arizona (Delgado 3-3) at Boston (Lester 106), 5:10 p.m. Cleveland (U.Jimenez 8-5) at Miami (Fernandez 7-5), 5:10 p.m. Kansas City (W.Davis 5-9) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 7-8), 5:10 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 10-6) at Tampa Bay (Archer 6-3), 5:10 p.m. Houston (Keuchel 5-5) at Minnesota (Deduno 7-4), 6:10 p.m. Texas (Ogando 4-3) at Oakland (Milone 98), 8:05 p.m. Toronto (Redmond 1-1) at L.A. Angels (Hanson 4-2), 8:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 9-9) at San Diego (Cashner 7-5), 8:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Kansas City at N.Y. Mets, 11:10 a.m. Texas at Oakland, 2:05 p.m. Seattle at Baltimore, 5:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 5:08 p.m. Arizona at Boston, 5:10 p.m. Cleveland at Miami, 5:10 p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m. San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, 6:40 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 11:08 a.m. Cleveland at Miami, 11:10 a.m. Kansas City at N.Y. Mets, 11:10 a.m. Arizona at Boston, 11:35 a.m. Seattle at Baltimore, 11:35 a.m. San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 11:40 a.m. Houston at Minnesota, 12:10 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Angels, 1:35 p.m. Texas at Oakland, 2:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, 2:10 p.m.

National League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Washington . . . . . . . .52 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .50 New York . . . . . . . . . .48 Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . .65 St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .63 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .60 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .49 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .46 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Los Angeles . . . . . . . .58 Arizona . . . . . . . . . . .55 Colorado . . . . . . . . . .51 San Diego . . . . . . . . .50 San Francisco . . . . . .48

L 45 56 58 58 65 L 43 44 49 59 62

L 49 53 59 59 59

Pct GB .587 — .481 11 1⁄2 .463 13 1⁄2 .453 14 1⁄2 .393 21 Pct GB .602 — .589 1 1⁄2 .550 5 1⁄2 .454 16 .426 19

Pct GB .542 — .509 3 1⁄2 1 .464 8 ⁄2 .459 9 .449 10

Wednesday’s Games Detroit 11, Washington 1 Cincinnati 4, San Diego 1 San Francisco 9, Philadelphia 2 Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 4 Arizona 7, Tampa Bay 0 Atlanta 9, Colorado 0 Miami 3, N.Y. Mets 2 Chicago Cubs 6, Milwaukee 1 N.Y. Yankees 3, L.A. Dodgers 0 Thursday’s Games Miami 3, N.Y. Mets 0 Texas 7, Arizona 1 San Francisco 2, Philadelphia 1 St. Louis 13, Pittsburgh 0 Atlanta 11, Colorado 2 L.A. Dodgers 6, Chicago Cubs 4 Friday’s Games L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 9-3) at Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 7-7), 2:05 p.m. Atlanta (Medlen 7-10) at Philadelphia (E.Martin 0-0), 5:05 p.m. Colorado (Chacin 9-5) at Pittsburgh (Cole 54), 5:05 p.m. Arizona (Delgado 3-3) at Boston (Lester 106), 5:10 p.m. Cleveland (U.Jimenez 8-5) at Miami (Fernandez 7-5), 5:10 p.m. Kansas City (W.Davis 5-9) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 7-8), 5:10 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 10-6) at Tampa Bay (Archer 6-3), 5:10 p.m. St. Louis (S.Miller 10-7) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 9-8), 5:10 p.m. Washington (Zimmermann 12-6) at Milwaukee (Gorzelanny 2-4), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 9-9) at San Diego (Cashner 7-5), 8:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games Kansas City at N.Y. Mets, 11:10 a.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 2:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs, 2:05 p.m. Colorado at Pittsburgh, 5:05 p.m. Arizona at Boston, 5:10 p.m. Cleveland at Miami, 5:10 p.m. San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 5:10 p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 5:10 p.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, 6:40 p.m. Sunday’s Games Cleveland at Miami, 11:10 a.m. Kansas City at N.Y. Mets, 11:10 a.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 11:10 a.m. Arizona at Boston, 11:35 a.m. Colorado at Pittsburgh, 11:35 a.m. San Francisco at Tampa Bay, 11:40 a.m. Washington at Milwaukee, 12:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Chicago Cubs, 12:20 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, 2:10 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 6:05 p.m.

NFL

Cowboys add offensive linemen after camp setbacks

OXNARD, Calif. (AP) — The Dallas Cowboys are bringing in reinforcements on the offensive line after a couple of training camp setbacks at guard. The Cowboys signed former TCU guard Jeff Olson and former UTEP tackle James Nelson, who went to high school near the team’s camp facility in Oxnard, Calif. Dallas released injured defensive end Cameron Sheffield and cornerback Devin Smith on Thursday. The additions of Olson and Nelson came after Kevin Kowalski sustained a knee bruise on Tuesday and Nate Livings didn’t come out for Thursday’s walkthrough because of knee soreness. Kowalski is expected to miss at least two weeks.

Female official-in-training at Saints camp

METAIRIE, La. (AP) — A woman who could become the NFL’s first female official is training at New Orleans Saints training camp this week. Sarah Thomas, who lives near Jackson,

Hole Par Score

ROUND SCORECARD

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 3 4 36 4 5 4 4 5 3 4 3 4 36

Eagles: 0 Birdies: 1 Fairways hit: 13 of 16

Pars: 14 Bogeys: 3 Greens hit: 14 of 18

Miss., is a former college basketball player who started officiating high school games at age 23 and says she never dreamed then that she could become a candidate to officiate NFL games. Now 40-years old and with three children, she has been officiating college football in Conference USA since 2007, is a member of the NFL’s Officiating Development Program and a finalist to become a permanent NFL official. She arrived at Saints camp Thursday and will train there Friday and during Saturday’s scrimmage.

PGA

Bridgestone Invitational Scores By The Associated Press Thursday At Firestone Country Club (South) Akron, Ohio Purse: $8.75 million Yardage: 7,400; Par: 70 (35-35) First Round Webb Simpson . . . . . . . . . .33-31 — Henrik Stenson . . . . . . . . . .32-33 — Ryan Moore . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-33 — Chris Wood . . . . . . . . . . . . .31-35 — Tiger Woods . . . . . . . . . . . .31-35 — Keegan Bradley . . . . . . . . . .33-33 — Jason Dufner . . . . . . . . . . . .34-33 — Bubba Watson . . . . . . . . . . .32-35 — Rickie Fowler . . . . . . . . . . . .35-32 — Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-34 — Jim Furyk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-34 — Luke Donald . . . . . . . . . . . .31-36 — Scott Piercy . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-33 — Kiradech Aphibarnrat . . . . . .35-34 — Ian Poulter . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-33 — Paul Lawrie . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — Zach Johnson . . . . . . . . . . .33-36 — Justin Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — Harris English . . . . . . . . . . .32-38 — Gonzalo Fdez-Castano . . . .35-35 — Jonas Blixt . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — Ken Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-33 — Peter Hanson . . . . . . . . . . . .33-37 — Richard Sterne . . . . . . . . . . .36-34 — Satoshi Kodaira . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — Francesco Molinari . . . . . . .36-34 — Jamie Donaldson . . . . . . . . .35-35 — Rory McIlroy . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — Paul Casey . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — Branden Grace . . . . . . . . . .38-32 — Matteo Manassero . . . . . . . .35-36 — Nick Watney . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 — Bo Van Pelt . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34 — Graeme McDowell . . . . . . . .37-34 — Lee Westwood . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 — Miguel A. Jimenez . . . . . . . .36-35 — Steve Stricker . . . . . . . . . . .36-35 — Sergio Garcia . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35 — Ernie Els . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-37 — David Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35 — Brian Gay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 — Michael Thompson . . . . . . .35-37 — Shane Lowry . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37 — Hideki Matsuyama . . . . . . . .38-34 — Dustin Johnson . . . . . . . . . .37-35 — Nicolas Colsaerts . . . . . . . . .35-37 — Russell Henley . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 — John Merrick . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37 — Angel Cabrera . . . . . . . . . . .35-37 — Brandt Snedeker . . . . . . . . .37-35 — Phil Mickelson . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 — Carl Pettersson . . . . . . . . . .38-34 — Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-34 — Jaco Van Zyl . . . . . . . . . . . .35-38 — Boo Weekley . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36 — Adam Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36 — Mikko Ilonen . . . . . . . . . . . .38-35 — Derek Ernst . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37 — Richie Ramsay . . . . . . . . . .36-37 — Sang-Moon Bae . . . . . . . . . .39-34 — Thorbjorn Olesen . . . . . . . . .36-37 — D.A. Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37 — Stephen Gallacher . . . . . . . .36-38 — Tommy Gainey . . . . . . . . . . .37-37 — Billy Horschel . . . . . . . . . . . .38-36 — Martin Kaymer . . . . . . . . . . .37-37 — Charl Schwartzel . . . . . . . . .37-37 — Jason Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-36 — Toru Taniguchi . . . . . . . . . . .38-37 — Kevin Streelman . . . . . . . . .37-39 — Brett Rumford . . . . . . . . . . .35-41 — Martin Laird . . . . . . . . . . . . .40-37 — Daniel Popovic . . . . . . . . . . .38-41 —

Transactions

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total 4 3 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 36 72 4 3 4 4 6 4 4 5 4 38 74

64 65 66 66 66 66 67 67 67 67 67 67 68 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 75 76 76 77 79

Thursday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Assigned RHP Jairo Asencio outright to Norfolk (IL). BOSTON RED SOX—Added RHP Jake Peavy to the active roster. Optioned RHP Jose De La Torre to Pawtucket (IL). Recalled RHP Steven Wright from Pawtucket. Optioned RHP Brandon Workman to Pawtucket. HOUSTON ASTROS—Released 1B Carlos Pena. KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Placed INF Chris Getz on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 28. MINNESOTA TWINS—Optioned LHP Scott Diamond and OF Aaron Hicks to Rochester

Others: 0 Putts: 34

(IL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Placed RHP Dustin McGowan on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Tuesday. Reinstated RHP Sergio Santos from the 60-day DL. Transferred RHP Brandon Morrow to the 60-day DL. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Placed C Miguel Montero on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 29. Optioned RHP Chaz Roe to Reno (PCL). Recalled RHP Zeke Spruill from Reno. Selected the contract of C Tuffy Gosewisch from Reno. CINCINNATI REDS—Assigned RHP Greg Reynolds outright to Louisville (IL). COLORADO ROCKIES—Optioned LHP Jeff Francis to Colorado Springs (PCL). Recalled RHP Chad Bettis from Tulsa (Texas). Designated RHP Josh Sullivan for assignment. MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Recalled INF Scooter Gennett from Nashville (PCL). Sent RHP Mark Rogers to the AZL Brewers for a rehab assignment. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Announced the retirement of RHP Brad Lidge. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Reinstated RHP Sean O’Sullivan from paternity leave. Optioned RHP Miles Mikolas to Tucson (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Promoted Mike Rizzo to president of baseball operations and general manager. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MILWAUKEE BUCKS—Signed G Nate Wolters. TORONTO RAPTORS—Signed F Austin Daye. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Suspended Minnesota OT DeMarcus Love first four games of the 2013 regular season for violating the NFL policy on performance enhancing substances. ATLANTA FALCONS—Signed CB Jordan Mabin. Waived CB Saeed Lee. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Released OL Geoff Hangartner. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Acquired OT Jason Weaver off waivers from Tampa Bay. Signed WR Jheranie Boyd. DALLAS COWBOYS—Released DE Cameron Sheffield and CB Devin Smith. Signed G Jeff Olson and OT James Nelson. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Waived G Robert Griffin and LB Scott Lutrus. Signed G Danous Estenor and C Thomas Austin. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Signed CB Kamaal McIlwain and OT Mike Tepper. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Signed DL Travis Chappelear, WR Johnathan Haggerty, WR Lavasier Tuinei and DL Scott Vallone. Released DB Stephon Morris. NEW YORK GIANTS—Placed WR Jeremy Horne on the waived-injured list. Signed WR Julian Talley. NEW YORK JETS—Activated S Rontez Miles from the PUP list. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Waived RB Ray Holley. Waived/injured WR Greg Herd. Claimed WR Perez Ashford off waivers from New England. Signed TE Andrei Lintz. Canadian Football League MONTREAL ALOUETTES—Fired coach Dan Hawkins. Announced general manager Jim Popp will take over coach. WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS—Signed DB David James to the practice roster. SOCCER Major League Soccer SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC—Agreed to terms with MF Shalrie Joseph. National Women’s Soccer League SKY BLUE FC—Signed MF Ashley Nick. COLLEGE SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE— Promoted Charlie Hussey to associate commissioner for SEC Network relations. BENTLEY—Named Matt Curley men’s assistant ice hockey coach. BOWLING GREEN—Named Victoria Chatman assistant track and field coach. GEORGE MASON—Named Ted Nagorsen rowing coach. LA SALLE—Named Shannon Clegg assistant athletic trainer. LIMESTONE—Announced the retirement of softball coach Jimmy Martin. Named Amy Yates softball coach. MOUNT ST. MARY’S—Named Brittany Pinkney women’s assistant basketball coach. NYU—Named Bridgette Ingram men’s and women’s assistant track and field coach. OHIO STATE—Named Gabby Capuzzi women’s assistant lacrosse coach. OHIO WESLEYAN—Named Chelsea Huguenard women’s lacrosse coach. OKLAHOMA STATE—Named Diego Flaquer sprints coach for track and field. PACIFIC—Named Dwight Young men’s assistant basketball coach. SPRING HILL—Named Matt Tanner men’s assistant soccer coach. TEXAS-PAN AMERICAN—Named Brandon Stokes men’s tennis coach. TROY—Promoted Rawia Elsisi to women’s tennis coach. WAKE FOREST—Announced RB Josh Harris is ineligible for his senior season.


Roswell Daily Record

SEC

Continued from Page B1

Georgia, South Carolina and Florida. All four finished last season among the nation’s top nine teams. It’s hard to count out stilltalented LSU, even after 11 underclassmen departed for the NFL. The Crimson Tide, though, remains loaded with talent and has a talented group of tailbacks and receivers to go with the always sturdy defense led by the All-America linebacker Mosley. 2, MADE-FOR-TV GAMES: This list clearly begins with the

Sept. 14 rematch in College Station between Alabama and Texas A&M, the only team to beat the Tide last season. That game was a Heisman moment for Manziel. Alabama gets a bye week to change gears for the no-huddle offense. A week earlier, defending East champion Georgia tries to avenge a 35-7 loss to South Carolina. Florida and LSU, perhaps somewhat overlooked in the preseason, meet on Oct. 12 a year after Will Muschamp’s team managed to end the Tigers’ 18-game regular-season win streak, 14-6. The season gets started Aug. 29 with Mississippi visiting Vander-

SPORTS

Friday, August 2, 2013

B3

Preseason Coaches Poll

The USA Today Top 25 football coaches preseason poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, 2012 records, total points based on 25 points for first place through one point for 25th, and ranking in final 2012 poll: Rank and team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Record Pts Pvs 1. Alabama (58). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-1 1,545 1 2. Ohio State (3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-0 1,427 NR 3. Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1 1,397 2 4. Stanford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2 1,262 6 5. Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2 1,250 4 6. Texas A&M (1). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2 1,215 5 7. South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2 1,136 7 8. Clemson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2 1,047 9 9. Louisville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2 1,010 13 10. Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2 930 10 872 3 11. Notre Dame. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1 12. Florida State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2 844 8 13. LSU. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3 797 12 14. Oklahoma State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5 726 NR 15. Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4 622 18 16. Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3 620 15 17. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5 589 NR 18. Nebraska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-4 426 23 19. Boise State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2 420 14 20. TCU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6 400 NR 21. UCLA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5 202 NR 22. Northwestern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3 186 16 23. Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6 172 NR 24. Southern Cal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6 165 NR 25. Oregon State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4 135 19

Others receiving votes: Kansas State 113; Miami (Fla.) 101; Michigan State 89; Baylor 80; Virginia Tech 65; Fresno State 62; Arizona State 51; Mississippi 32; Vanderbilt 29; Utah State 23; Brigham Young 20; North Carolina 19; Northern Illinois 19; Tulsa 9; Ohio 8; San Jose State 8; Arizona 5; Cincinnati 3; East Carolina 3; Kent State 3; Mississippi State 3; Washington 3; Central Florida 2; Arkansas 1; Arkansas State 1; Rutgers 1; Tennessee 1; Toledo 1.

AP Photo

Reigning Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel and the Texas A&M Aggies are ranked sixth in the preseason coaches poll and picked to finish second in the SEC West behind Alabama by The Associated Press. The Aggies finished 11-2 last year and were the only team to beat Alabama, which went on to beat Notre Dame in the BCS National Championship Game for its second straight title. The SEC has won seven straight national titles. bilt, not ordinarily a scintillating matchup but a chance for both to make an early statement. 3, SEC NEWBIES: Arkansas nabbed a proven winner in Bret Bielemma, Auburn landed offensive whiz Gus Malzahn, Kentucky got a spark with Mark Stoops and Tennessee tur ned to Butch Jones, who is already making waves on the recruiting trail. Now, if only all four of the league’s new head coaches can find a starting quarterback. In the meantime, it’s no coincidence that those teams had the SEC’s four most generous defenses before the bosses made changes at the top. The result: A combined mark of 3-29 in league play, $15 million in buyouts and fresh starts. 4, RISING STOCK: Vanderbilt

is coming off its best record since 1915, going 9-4 two years after a second straight two-win season led to the hiring of James Franklin. Back-to-back bowl games is also a first for the Commodores, who have gone from doormats to respected foe under the ever-confident coach. They’re led by one of the SEC’s top wide receivers in Jordan Matthews. Mississippi’s turnaround in Hugh Freeze’s first season was impressive, too. The Rebels won seven games, including the BBVA Compass Bowl. Freeze then made even bigger waves with a highly touted recruiting class. Back are quarterback Bo Wallace and linebacker Denzel Nkemdiche. 5, YOUTH MOVEMENT: From five-star newcomers to talented players with a year under their

belt, the SEC is full of youngsters with the potential to emerge as stars. Missouri wide receiver and prized 2012 signee Dorial GreenBeckham racked up 21 catches for 267 yards and four touchdowns in the final five games. Alabama’s Yeldon ran for 258 yards in the SEC and BCS championship games plus freshman runner Derrick Henry, linebacker Reuben Foster and tight end O.J. Howard could develop significant roles. Ole Miss defensive end Robert Nkemdiche, defensive tackle Lavon Hooks and wideout Laquon Treadwell are freshmen to watch, along with Florida cornerback Vernon Hargreaves and defensive ends Carl Lawson (Auburn) and Chris Jones (Mississippi State)— among others.

Cowboys counting on Carter, Lee as playmaking pair

OXNARD, Calif. (AP) — Sean Lee dismisses talk of how good the Dallas defense could be if he and Bruce Carter started together at linebacker for a full season. It hasn’t happened yet. So until it does — and until the Cowboys get back to the playoffs — Lee’s not listening. “Until you win a Super Bowl, until you’ve got it on tape week to week, it means nothing,” Lee said. “That’s all hype. If we lean on that hype, we’re never going to be good.” The Cowboys are counting on this playmaking pair to be good. Dallas won three straight games last season when both were sidelined by season-ending injuries — Lee with a badly damaged toe in the sixth game at Carolina and Carter with a dislocated elbow on Thanksgiving against Washington. But the defense ultimately faltered without them. The Cowboys couldn’t stop Drew Brees’ passing game and got run over by Washington rookie Alfred Morris in a pair of season-ending losses that kept them out of the playoffs for the third straight year. Carter and Lee aren’t watching anymore, though. They’re at the center of a defensive makeover that

British

Continued from Page B1

Cowboys linebackers Sean Lee, left, and Bruce Carter participate in drills at the team’s training camp in Oxnard, Calif.

started soon after the season, when the Cowboys fired defensive coordinator Rob R yan and replaced him with Monte Kiffin so they could return to the more linebacker -friendly 4-3 defense after nearly a decade in the 3-4. “When you’re playing the 4-3 defense, those ... (linebackers) are protected a little bit more,” coach Jason Garrett said. “They gotta get to the football

golf, shot 31 on the tougher back nine for a 67 to be part of a large group that included former U.S. Women’s Open champion Na Yeon Choi and Nicole Castrale. Another shot behind were Paula Creamer, Catriona Matthew and Lizette Salas. Those who played early had reason to worry. Lewis was on the 10th tee when she looked over at Park knocking in an 18foot birdie putt, her fifth of the round. Castrale had not yet teed off when her husband saw a leaderboard with Park’s name in a familiar position. “It’s amazing, the fact we all possibly can play with history,” Castrale said. “It’s amazing what she’s done to this point, the composure she has. I don’t know what she shot today, but I’m going

and make plays.” Both have shown they can. Lee has a knack for interceptions, something that was sorely missing last season on a defense that tied a franchise low with seven. Lee has that many in 35 career games, a high number for a linebacker. Carter could have led the Cowboys in tackles last season if he hadn’t been injured. His strength

to guess she’ll be in the mix come Sunday.” If there were nerves on the first tee for Park, she didn’t show it. She opened with a wedge into about 7 feet for birdie, and then she really poured it on with an astounding display of her putting stroke. She rolled in a 30foot birdie putt on No. 3 with perfect pace. She made an 18-foot birdie on No. 4 and a 35-footer on No. 6. It didn’t look as if she would ever miss. Her sixth birdie came at the 10th, when her sand wedge checked up to 5 feet right of the hole. Another birdie. Just like that, there was a feeling of inevitability about this Women’s British Open, much as there was for T iger Woods when he won the British Open for the first time at St. Andrews by eight shots to complete the career Grand Slam in 2000. But not for long.

is speed, and he’ll get his best chance to show it in the new scheme because one of the weakside linebacker’s biggest jobs is running down plays away from him. “I think guys are doing it

Eye

Continued from Page B1

good feel for the distance today, and Joey and I really read the wind right today,” Woods said after his best opening round at the course since another 66 spurred him to a oneshot victory in 2005. “We changed a lot of shots out there, and we both had a really good handle on what we were doing feelwise with the wind.” Henrik Stenson was alone in second with a 65. Defending champion Keegan Bradley, R yan Moore and Chris Wood, another first-time entrant, matched Woods at 66. Simpson had six birdies in an eight-hole span. There was only one glitch.

AP Photos

well,” Carter said. “Coaches kind of introduced us a little slow just to get guys the whole grasp of the whole scheme. Now we’re out here just flying around, getting to the ball.” “I wish I didn’t bogey the last hole,” he said after missing the green on the par 4 and failing to get up and down. “It’s one area I’ve got to get better at. When I’m between clubs, hitting more club and swinging easy is where I’ve been struggling. “You know, there’s always something to work on.” Simpson hasn’t won this season. He called his year “encouraging and frustrating.” “I feel like I’ve let a couple of tour naments go that maybe I should have closed out,” he said. Stenson started out birdie, eagle — hitting his second shot 243 yards on the par-5 hole to inside 4 feet. He slowed down from there, parring every hole except for birdies at the 11th and 12th holes.

Carter and Lee joined the Cowboys a year apart and followed similar paths. Both were second-round draft picks who played quite a bit as rookies but never started. Both earned starting jobs going into their second seasons. When Lee injured his toe last year, Carter took over the defensive play-calling on the field. Even though he missed the final five games, Carter’s first season as a starter did plenty to help him prepare for a leading role. “A whole lot more comfortable,” he said. “The more years you play, the more experience you gain, it just makes the game a lot slower for you. Especially for me, a guy coming off an injury.” Lee has missed at least one game in each of his three seasons after an injury-filled career at Penn State. Last year’s injury — when he got his foot stuck awkwardly in a pile — came after he had a career -high 21 tackles against Seattle and just a week after he tripled his career best in quarterback pressures with six.

He had more problems with his outfit than the course. He was breaking in a new pair of shoes and felt a blister coming on at the turn, so had to switch to an older pair that didn’t necessarily fit with his ensemble. “They might not match the outfit perfectly, but it felt like I had socks on compared to the other ones,” he said, grinning. Woods would have a nice career if only World Golf Championship events, such as the Bridgestone, counted. He won three in a row (19992001) at Firestone, then had three top-five finishes before reeling off victories in his next four appearances (2005-2009), and missing the 2008 tournament while recovering from knee surgery. In 41 WGC starts, he has 32 top-10 finishes.


B4 Friday, August 2, 2013 DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: I have been a lifeguard for more than 30 years, and I continually see parents and other adults putting children in harm’s way. Would you please remind your readers that they need to be vigilant around water? A drowning is nothing like they show in the movies. As you take your family to your favorite swimming hole this summer, please be careful. If your child isn’t a competent swimmer, NEVER allow him or her to go beyond arm’s reach. Never exceed the ratio of two nonswimmers to one adult. If possible, stay where the child can touch the bottom.

If your children can swim and you allow them to go into the pool, lake, ocean without you — ALWAYS WATCH THEM! Yes, lifeguards are observing the swimmers — but no one on this planet will watch your child with the same vigilance that you will. So put down the book, the e-reader, the tablet, the cellphone and ACTIVELY WATCH. If you’re chatting with friends, don’t look at them; watch your child. It can take as few as 10 to 20 seconds for a person to get into trouble and slip without a sound beneath the surface. I guarantee you: Your parent-to-child ratio is lower than that of any lifeguard-toswimmer. LIFEGUARD JOHN IN AUBURN, WASH.

DEAR LIFEGUARD JOHN: Your message is important and timely. Every year we read about families basking in the sun near water, and children who have lost their lives because the person who was supposed to be watching them became momentarily distracted. I agree the best way to protect against tragedies like this is unremitting vigi-

COMICS

lance. Thanks for giving me a chance to say it again. #####

DEAR ABBY: I have a brother-in-law whom I love dearly who lives out of state and stays in our guest room frequently. I try hard to be a thoughtful hostess. When he comes, we spend the first 45 minutes rearranging the guest room furniture because he likes the bed to face west. Currently, it faces north, as do the nightstands and the dresser. I accommodate him, but frankly, it’s getting very old. Am I being nasty to want our furniture arranged the way we’re comfortable? Or must I allow him to rearrange it the way he wants it? He is here for only 24 hours and then leaves. GOOD HOSTESS IN CALIFORNIA DEAR HOSTESS: Your brother-in-law may be a frustrated interior decorator, or want the room to be the way he sleeps at home. A good hostess tries to accommodate the needs of her guests; however, if the furniture in your house has been moved, your brother-in-law

should put it back the way it was before he leaves. #####

Family Circus

DEAR ABBY: Do you or your readers think it’s acceptable for a father to ask his 21year-old college student son whether he and his girlfriend of one year are sexually active? This is his first girlfriend. I am his mother, and I say it’s none of our business. My husband says it’s a reasonable question; he just wants to give him fatherly advice — like “be careful.” MOM IN COLORADO DEAR MOM: Would you still say it’s none of your business if your son made his first girlfriend pregnant? I would, however, caution your husband to be more tactful about how he approaches the subject because a blunt question like the one he’s contemplating could be off-putting. If he has birth control information he wants to impart, a better way to approach it would be to raise the subject without putting his son on the spot.

The Wizard of Id

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Dear Heloise: A reader from Hawaii advised putting keys and change INTO SHOES at the airport X-ray. Please advise your readers not to do this. One of the basic Transportation Security Administration rules is that nothing should be placed inside, under or on top of shoes as they go through the X-ray. This could either obstruct the view or make it seem as if the shoes have been tampered with. While on the subject, please remind your readers of the other rules: * Do not bring liquids over 3.4 ounces into the screening queue (unless it is medicine or necessary for babies). * Take large electronic items out of the carry-on and place each one in a separate bin. * Have your ID and security document in your hand, ready to go, as you enter. * End phone calls prior to entering the screening process. * Do not stop on the other side of the X-ray to reassemble your belongings. If everyone would become more familiar with the rules prior to traveling and follow these hints, the lines would move much faster. A Reader, via email

Thank you for your hints! After contacting the Transportation Security Administration, an employee said that it is not against the rules to place items like keys and change in your shoes while they go through Xray. But it is recommended that you place keys and change in a separate bin, like you stated, so that it doesn’t cause anomalies on the X-ray and require you to go through extra screening. Heloise

#####

SEND A GREAT HINT TO: Heloise P.O. Box 795000 San Antonio, TX 78279-5000 Fax: 1-210-HELOISE Email: Heloise(at)Heloise.com Dear Heloise: Here’s a simple, inexpensive way to help keep your basement cool during the summer. Buy white foam poster boards (available at officesupply stores). Set them on the inside window ledge, propped against the windows that get direct sunlight. They block the heat from the sun, while letting in enough light to see by. They can easily be taken down and put back up as desired. A big help during the hot, hot summer! Gail M., Washington, D.C. Dear Heloise: I am always trying to de-clutter. I have too much stuff and not enough space. When I am watching television or a movie, I will take a drawer or box and go through it. I throw away what I don’t want, make a donation pile and keep what I really need. I don’t get overwhelmed trying to do too much at once, but the house stays clean and organized. Liz in Alabama Have you been peeking in my den? I lay out a newspaper, dump a drawer, go through it, then roll it up with the “toss” items and put it in the trash. Heloise

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Roswell Daily Record


AP Interview: USPS eyes alcohol deliveries FINANCIAL

Roswell Daily Record

WASHINGTON (AP) — Special delivery from the post office — beer, wine and spirits, if Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe has his way. In an interview with The Associated Press, Donahoe said Thursday delivery of alcoholic beverages is on his wish list as the agency considers ways to raise revenue and save money after losing $16 billion last year. He also said he endorses ending most door-to-door and Saturday mail deliveries as a way to help stabilize the service’s finances. Donahoe said delivering alcohol has the potential to raise as much as $50 million a year. He mentioned how customers might want to, for example, mail bottles of wine home when they tour vineyards. Donahoe said his agency has looked at the possibility of using special boxes that would hold two, four or six bottles and ship for a flat-rate anywhere in the country. “There’s a lot of money to be made in beer, wine and spirits,”

Donahoe said. “We’d like to be in that business.” The Postal Service says mailing alcoholic beverages is currently restricted by law. Customers are even told to cover any logos or labels if they use alcoholic beverage boxes for shipments. The agency is also urging changes in how it delivers the mail. A House committee has passed legislation to stabilize the Postal Service’s ailing finances that would cut letter deliveries to five days and phase out door-to-door deliveries over 10 years. The bill does not include a provision to allow the agency to deliver alcohol. The Senate passed a postal reform bill last year that included a provision allowing the agency to deliver alcohol. The bill would require that such shipments would have to comply with any state laws where the shipment originated and was delivered. The measure also said the recipient would have to be at least 21 years old and would need to provide valid, governmentissued photo identification upon

Friday, August 2, 2013

B5

delivery. The agency faces $15 billion in losses this year and is working toward restructuring its retail, delivery and mail processing operations. “We don’t want to take any more debt on,” Donahoe said. “We want to be able to get profitable, pay it down, just like any other business would, so that you stay strong for the future.” The service’s losses are largely due to a decline in mail volume and a congressional requirement that it make advance payments to cover expected health care costs for future retirees. About $11.1 billion of last year’s losses were due to the health care payments. Donahoe said over the last decade, the mail volume at his agency’s trademark blue boxes has dropped 60 percent. “That’s our most profitable mail,” he said. “That will continue to drop off because people pay bills online. And we understand that, it’s easy, it’s free, and so we have to continue to make changes.”

Exxon 2Q profit is lowest since early 2010 Kellogg’s profit rises but cereal struggles NEW YORK (AP) — Exxon Mobil reported its lowest quarterly profit in more than three years, as the oil and gas giant again struggled to boost production and results from its refining operations weakened. Net income fell 57 percent in the second quarter. Exxon said Thursday that it earned $6.86 billion, down from $15.9 billion in the year -ago quarter, which included a gain from the sale of a Japanese lubricants division and other assets. Even without those year -ago gains, Exxon’s net income fell 19 percent. On a per -share basis Exxon earned $1.55. Analysts polled by FactSet expected Exxon to earn $1.90 per share. Exxon shares fell $1.03 to close at $92.72, on a day when 24 of the 30 stocks in the Dow Jones industrial average moved higher. Exxon’s revenue fell 16 percent in the second quarter to $106.47 billion from $127.36 billion a year earlier.

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Aug 13 121.47 121.85 120.70 120.80 Oct 13 125.47 125.87 124.35 124.50 Dec 13 128.27 128.70 127.30 127.35 Feb 14 129.82 130.20 128.85 129.00 130.77 131.10 129.90 130.05 Apr 14 Jun 14 126.20 126.20 125.40 125.42 Aug 14 125.80 126.00 125.80 126.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 79841. Wed’s Sales: 35,494 Wed’s open int: 284717, up +1232 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Aug 13 153.60 154.70 153.50 153.75 Sep 13 156.97 158.25 156.97 157.25 Oct 13 159.00 159.95 158.85 159.27 Nov 13 160.20 160.55 160.12 160.25 Jan 14 159.35 159.90 158.80 158.82 Mar 14 159.72 159.75 159.20 159.20 Apr 14 160.25 May 14 160.20 160.20 160.17 160.20 Last spot N/A Est. sales 11040. Wed’s Sales: 4,202 Wed’s open int: 34451, up +209 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Aug 13 97.75 98.57 97.67 98.42 Oct 13 83.32 84.15 83.27 83.90 Dec 13 80.65 81.00 80.55 80.90 82.80 83.30 82.67 83.22 Feb 14 Apr 14 84.00 84.10 83.70 83.87 88.07 88.07 87.92 87.92 May 14 Jun 14 89.90 89.90 89.40 89.65 Jul 14 88.60 88.60 88.20 88.30 Aug 14 87.60 87.60 87.25 87.25 77.50 77.50 77.40 77.40 Oct 14 Dec 14 74.75 Last spot N/A Est. sales 56348. Wed’s Sales: 37,564 Wed’s open int: 302526, up +1151

chg.

-.65 -.97 -1.02 -.95 -.92 -.68 -.75

+.33 +.28 +.17 +.20 -.33 -.47 -.20

+.85 +.58 +.40 +.27 -.10 -.18 -.35 -.70 -.75 -.30

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Sep 13 85.43 Oct 13 85.38 85.88 85.17 85.88 Dec 13 84.95 85.49 84.34 85.43 Mar 14 83.31 83.63 82.50 83.58 May 14 82.71 83.05 82.02 83.05 Jul 14 82.26 82.60 81.50 82.60 Oct 14 78.48 Dec 14 77.80 77.97 77.60 77.97 Mar 15 78.06 May 15 78.06 Jul 15 78.06 Oct 15 78.06 Dec 15 78.06 Mar 16 78.06 May 16 78.06 Last spot N/A Est. sales 16157. Wed’s Sales: 14,601 Wed’s open int: 170806, up +1428

chg.

+.25 +.25 +.25 +.05 +.07 +.07 +.04 +.19 +.19 +.19 +.19 +.19 +.19 +.19 +.19

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 13 663ø 667ø 648ü 658 Dec 13 676 679fl 661 670ø Mar 14 685fl 689fl 671ø 681 May 14 692fl 695 676fl 687 Jul 14 686ü 690 673ü 682fl Sep 14 692ü 692ü 681ø 689 Dec 14 702 702fl 688ü 696ü

chg.

-6ü -6ø -6fl -6 -6ü -6ü -6ü

NEW YORK (AP) — Kellogg Co.’s profit rose in the latest quarter, but its revenue fell short of expectations as its flagship cereal unit struggled. The maker of Frosted Flakes, Pop Tarts and Eggo waffles said Thursday that items such as frozen breakfast sandwiches and the acquisition of Pringles chips helped lift overall sales for North America. But the U.S. morning foods unit that includes cereals saw a 3.3 percent decline. “The breakfast occasion is growing, but there are a lot more choices. Within that, we need (cereal) to stand for something more clearly,” Kellogg CEO John Bryant said in an interview. The company cut its revenue forecast for the year, citing slower growth in the U.S. and other developed markets, as well as the impact of a stronger dollar. Its stock fell 82 to close at $65.42 Thursday; the shares are up more than 38 percent over the past year. Kellogg has been fighting to get Americans to eat more cereal. General Mills, which makes Cheerios, is facing a similar problem and is deploying a variety of tactics such as marketing children’s cereal to adults by playing on their nostalgia for brands such as Lucky Charms. Despite the challenges, Bryant noted that cereal still accounts for about 30 percent of the breakfast category in the United States and that there’s room to add sales among older people and those who are looking for nutritional benefits. As such, Kellogg recently introduced Raisin Bran with omega-3 and a multigrain version of Special K. Notably, however, Bryant said that its line of Kashi cereals saw volume decline in the quarter, in part because mainstream brands are getting better at touting their health benefits. Bryant noted that the company is also thinking about cereal in different ways. For example, it recently launched a dairy drink under the Kellogg banner that’s positioned as a way to eat cereal on the go. Special K also recently rolled out a hot cereal made with ingredients including quinoa.

AP Photo

This Feb. 27, 2012, file photo shows gas prices at a Pittsburgh Exxon mini-mart. Exxon Mobil Corp. reported quarterly financial results before the market opened on Thursday. Exxon pointed a finger at the global economy, saying growth in the U.S. remained sluggish, the Chinese economy grew slower than expected and Europe remained weak. This helped lower the average price of Brent crude, a

benchmark used to price international oil used by many U.S. refineries, by $10 per barrel compared with last year, Exxon said. Exxon last posted earnings of less than $7 billion the first quarter of 2010, when oil prices averaged

FUTURES

Mar 15 709ü 709ü 704ü 704ü -5 May 15 713 713 707ø 707ø -5ø 708 710fl 700 705fl -5 Jul 15 Sep 15 710fl 710fl 705fl 705fl -5 Dec 15 707ø 714ü 707ø 714ü -4ü Mar 16 718ø 718ø 714ü 714ü -4ü May 16 718ø 718ø 714ü 714ü -4ü Jul 16 718ø 718ø 714ü 714ü -4ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 156133. Wed’s Sales: 147,828 Wed’s open int: 405481, up +462 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 13 499 499fl 486ø 487ø -11ø Dec 13 479 479 464 467 -12 Mar 14 491ø 491ø 476fl 479fl -11fl May 14 499fl 499fl 484fl 487ø -11fl Jul 14 505fl 505fl 490fl 493ü -12ü Sep 14 500fl 500fl 491ø 494ø -10 Dec 14 507 507 493ø 498 -8fl Mar 15 516ü 516ü 504ü 507ø -9 May 15 522 522 512 512fl -9 Jul 15 524 524ü 514ü 517ü -7ø Sep 15 505ü 505ü 500 502fl -2ø Dec 15 488fl 489 483ø 488 -1 Jul 16 504ü 504ü 503ü 503ü -1 Dec 16 489fl 494 489fl 494 +3ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 256549. Wed’s Sales: 231,907 Wed’s open int: 1164884, off -4155 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Sep 13 341 343 338fl 339fl -ø Dec 13 331ø 332 325ü 329ø -2 Mar 14 333 334ø 333 334ø -1ø May 14 336ü 336ü 334fl 334fl -1ø Jul 14 341ü 341ü 339fl 339fl -1ø Sep 14 323ü 323ü 321fl 321fl -1ø Dec 14 345ü 345ü 343fl 343fl -1ø Mar 15 345ü 345ü 343fl 343fl -1ø May 15 345ü 345ü 343fl 343fl -1ø Jul 15 345ü 345ü 343fl 343fl -1ø Sep 15 345ü 345ü 343fl 343fl -1ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 1537. Wed’s Sales: 1,335 Wed’s open int: 9021, up +145 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Aug 13 1371fl 1387 1354ø 1357fl -16ü Sep 13 1247 1252ü 1230ü 1234ü -15ø Nov 13 1202fl 1210fl 1189 1192ø -13fl -13 Jan 14 1208fl 1215ü 1194fl 1198 Mar 14 1208fl 1216 1198 1200fl -12 May 14 1208ü 1216 1197fl 1200fl -12 Jul 14 1219ø 1219ø 1201ü 1205ø -11ø Aug 14 1194 1207 1194 1195fl -11ü Sep 14 1192ø 1192ø 1181ø 1181ø -11 Nov 14 1184 1187ü 1171ø 1179 -7fl Jan 15 1181 1182fl 1181 1182fl -7fl Mar 15 1186fl 1186fl 1179 1179 -7fl May 15 1181ø 1181ø 1173fl 1173fl -7fl Jul 15 1186ø 1186ø 1177 1177 -7ü Aug 15 1178 1178 1170fl 1170fl -7ü Sep 15 1162fl 1162fl 1155ø 1155ø -7ü Nov 15 1138 1138 1133 1133 -5 Jul 16 1131fl 1131fl 1126fl 1126fl -5 Nov 16 1101ü 1101ü 1096ü 1096ü -5 Last spot N/A Est. sales 161875. Wed’s Sales: 115,459 Wed’s open int: 491835, up +1581

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

chg.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Sep 13 105.26 108.06 103.00 107.89 +2.86 Oct 13 104.49 107.96 104.25 106.93 +2.71 Nov 13 103.06 105.36 102.93 105.32 +2.38 Dec 13 101.67 103.73 101.53 103.71 +2.06 Jan 14 100.54 102.18 100.19 102.13 +1.81 Feb 14 99.46 100.72 99.04 100.71 +1.57 Mar 14 98.49 99.56 91.16 99.54 +1.37 Apr 14 97.65 98.44 97.65 98.44 +1.20 May 14 96.46 97.58 96.45 97.58 +1.08 Jun 14 95.80 96.91 95.57 96.83 +1.00 Jul 14 95.66 95.99 95.60 95.99 +.90 Aug 14 94.95 95.17 94.84 95.17 +.76 Sep 14 93.85 94.54 93.85 94.54 +.64 Oct 14 93.89 93.98 93.89 93.98 +.53 93.70 93.70 93.40 93.52 +.45 Nov 14 92.75 93.40 92.43 93.08 +.38 Dec 14 Jan 15 92.55 92.55 92.32 92.49 +.34 Feb 15 91.75 91.90 91.75 91.90 +.30 Mar 15 91.20 91.32 91.20 91.32 +.26 Apr 15 90.60 90.79 90.60 90.79 +.21 May 15 90.27 90.37 90.27 90.37 +.17 Jun 15 89.99 90.04 89.81 90.01 +.15 Jul 15 89.46 +.10 Aug 15 88.89 88.98 88.89 88.98 +.03 Sep 15 88.40 88.54 88.28 88.54 -.04 Last spot N/A Est. sales 686188. Wed’s Sales: 584,700 Wed’s open int: 1852545, up +14722 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Oct 13 2.8463 2.8874 2.8342 2.8829 +.0366 Nov 13 2.7991 2.8363 2.7928 2.8354 +.0375 Dec 13 2.7654 2.8010 2.7538 2.7998 +.0367 Jan 14 2.7410 2.7807 2.7410 2.7799 +.0355 Feb 14 2.7643 2.7733 2.7529 2.7733 +.0341 Mar 14 2.7764 2.7799 2.7622 2.7799 +.0318 Apr 14 2.9164 2.9240 2.9050 2.9240 +.0301 May 14 2.8946 2.9076 2.8936 2.9076 +.0280 Jun 14 2.8686 2.8795 2.8653 2.8795 +.0274 Jul 14 2.8405 +.0265 Aug 14 2.7988 +.0258

$79 per barrel. In this year’s second quarter, prices averaged $94 per barrel. Exxon’s lower earnings reflect higher drilling costs at a time of flat or declining production, analysts said.

Sep 14 2.7598 Oct 14 2.6168 Nov 14 2.5820 Dec 14 2.5478 2.5595 2.5478 2.5595 Jan 15 2.5610 Feb 15 2.5724 Mar 15 2.5864 Apr 15 2.7164 May 15 2.7189 Jun 15 2.7039 Jul 15 2.6859 Aug 15 2.6669 Sep 15 2.6439 Last spot N/A Est. sales 73389. Wed’s Sales: 116,765 Wed’s open int: 268006, off -405 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Sep 13 3.452 3.454 3.341 3.387 Oct 13 3.477 3.479 3.370 3.415 Nov 13 3.573 3.582 3.479 3.524 Dec 13 3.752 3.762 3.664 3.707 Jan 14 3.836 3.851 3.757 3.798 Feb 14 3.840 3.856 3.763 3.803 Mar 14 3.798 3.840 3.737 3.774 Apr 14 3.753 3.840 3.686 3.725 May 14 3.776 3.840 3.710 3.743 Jun 14 3.805 3.840 3.745 3.776 Jul 14 3.836 3.840 3.775 3.810 Aug 14 3.856 3.856 3.790 3.828 Sep 14 3.857 3.857 3.796 3.831 Oct 14 3.885 3.885 3.820 3.855 Nov 14 3.967 3.977 3.840 3.939 Dec 14 4.130 4.130 3.840 4.104 Jan 15 4.170 4.200 4.085 4.189 Feb 15 4.172 4.187 4.085 4.173 Mar 15 4.130 4.132 4.085 4.119 Apr 15 3.966 4.085 3.900 3.939 May 15 3.941 4.085 3.941 3.950 Jun 15 3.993 4.085 3.950 3.975 4.025 4.085 3.979 4.007 Jul 15 4.025 4.085 4.023 4.023 Aug 15 Sep 15 4.085 4.085 4.022 4.022 Oct 15 4.085 4.085 4.041 4.041 Nov 15 4.135 4.302 4.085 4.115 Dec 15 4.085 4.302 4.085 4.287 Jan 16 4.302 4.382 4.302 4.382 Last spot N/A Est. sales 300905. Wed’s Sales: 180,213 Wed’s open int: 1368981, up +68

METALS

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Thu. Aluminum -$0.7855 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.0865 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.1640 N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Lead - $2033.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8132 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1315.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1311.00 troy oz., NY Merc spot Thu. Silver - $19.660 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $19.615 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Platinum -$1445.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1443.80 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

GET NOTICED

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE CALL TODAY

575.622.7710

+.0268 +.0254 +.0246 +.0238 +.0235 +.0235 +.0235 +.0235 +.0235 +.0235 +.0235 +.0235 +.0235

-.059 -.056 -.049 -.045 -.041 -.041 -.039 -.034 -.032 -.033 -.033 -.033 -.033 -.031 -.028 -.026 -.026 -.024 -.023 -.021 -.021 -.021 -.021 -.021 -.021 -.021 -.021 -.016 -.016

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

MARKET SUMMARY AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 1022249 14.95 +.35 S&P500ETF996012170.66+1.95 iShEMkts 736228 39.72 +.71 Sprint n 534907 6.38 +.42 iShJapan 453592 11.53 +.31

Name Vol (00) InovioPhm 121268 Organovo 34473 NwGold g 31054 AlldNevG 25798 BarcGSOil 22776

Name StdRegis rs Modine Yelp HomexDev Renren

Last Chg %Chg 13.80+10.80 +360.5 13.61 +2.61 +23.7 51.50 +9.70 +23.2 2.12 +.39 +22.5 3.98 +.65+19.529

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Fibrocell rs 5.49 +.51 +10.2 QKL Str rs GlobT&T 4.54 +.29 +6.8 Kingtne rs AbdnChile 14.45 +.85 +6.3 ZeltiqAes Oragenics 3.35 +.20 +6.3 Galectin wt TriangPet 7.51 +.41 +5.8 LiveDeal

Name Hangr Inc OrionMar SallyBty GP Strat IFM Invest

Last 31.75 11.01 26.83 23.46 2.47

%Chg -14.0 -12.4 -12.1 -11.2 -10.5

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg StrPathC n 5.67 -.73 -11.4 MedicActn 6.24 -2.95 -32.1 AlldNevG 6.28 -.39 -5.8 Stereotx rsh 4.20 -1.04 -19.8 MGT Cap 4.07 -.25 -5.8 Hydrognc 12.04 -2.94 -19.6 SCEd pfD 22.16 -1.34 -5.7 IridiumCm 6.85 -1.57 -18.6 ParkCity 7.48 -.44 -5.6 Reliv Intl 3.05 -.61 -16.7

1,912 1,191 73 3,176 402 84

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg -5.17 -1.56 -3.68 -2.95 -.29

DIARY

Volume

Name AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola s Disney EOG Res EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

Chg +.20 +.28 -.30 -.39

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Facebook 1042139 Microsoft 419486 Intel 372950 Dell Inc 325136 MicronT 322170

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last 15,628.02 6,670.06 509.06 9,673.39 2,366.41 3,675.74 1,706.87 18,128.87 1,059.88

Net Chg +128.48 +208.26 +5.09 +114.56 +10.02 +49.37 +21.14 +238.26 +14.62

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Div

PE

Last

Chg

1.80 .80 .04 1.94 4.00 1.12 .75f .75 3.58 2.52 .40 .58 1.20a .90 3.80 2.64

27 12 27 19 10 21 20 56 11 9 12 ... 5 13 14 21

35.72 +.45 63.73 -.44 14.95 +.35 106.70 +1.60 126.44 +.55 40.57 +.49 65.36 +.71 152.07 +6.58 50.82 -.35 92.73 -1.02 17.19 +.31 26.23 +.55 46.31 +.76 23.20 -.14 195.81 +.77 93.77 +.27

Last 6.23 3.01 8.47 2.80 3.17

YTD %Chg Name +6.0 +37.6 +28.8 +41.6 +16.9 +11.9 +31.3 +25.9 +18.4 +7.1 +32.7 +84.1 -.5 +12.5 +2.2 +33.8

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

Chg +2.13 +1.00 +2.43 +.60 +.63

DIARY

95,753,802 Volume

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Chg +.69 -.17 -.14 +.29 +.34

%Chg +52.0 +49.8 +40.2 +27.3 +24.8

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

212 207 24 443 17 14

INDEXES

Last 37.49 31.67 23.20 12.96 13.58

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

3,706,135,241 Volume

52-Week High Low 15,634.32 12,471.49 6,608.87 4,838.10 537.86 435.57 9,695.46 7,710.83 2,509.57 2,186.97 3,649.35 2,810.80 1,698.78 1,343.35 18,023.66 14,036.94 1,056.86 763.55

Last 1.95 5.35 7.01 6.28 25.37

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

1,829 698 103 2,630 314 10genics

1,818,529,400

% Chg +.83 +3.22 +1.01 +1.20 +.43 +1.36 +1.25 +1.33 +1.40

YTD % Chg +19.26 +25.69 +12.35 +14.57 +.46 +21.73 +19.68 +20.90 +24.79

52-wk % Chg +21.35 +33.83 +4.83 +24.57 -1.01 +26.32 +25.05 +27.67 +37.90

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

1.72 .92 2.88f .66 2.27 .96 1.25 .16 1.12 1.15 .71e 2.06 1.88 .36 1.20 1.12f

26 12 21 19 20 15 8 27 24 19 ... ... 15 17 12 15

48.58 +.41 31.67 -.17 51.63 +1.45 23.76 +.28 84.20 +.66 29.11 -.12 60.52 -.98 14.20 +.37 39.82 +.64 63.06 +.80 18.88 +.20 50.01 +.53 78.22 +.28 22.50 +.75 44.26 +.76 30.34 +.39

+18.7 +18.6 -4.4 +15.8 +23.0 +16.1 +14.0 +38.7 +28.9 +31.8 +17.6 +15.6 +14.6 +33.4 +29.5 +13.6

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


B6 Friday, August 2, 2013

GARAGE SALES 001. North

FREE SETUP!! Flea Market/Swap Meet, Aug. 3-4, 6am-6pm at Blair’s Monterey Flea Market, rear parking lot, 1400 W. 2nd. Call 623-0136 to reserve a spot.

002. Northeast

2509 PARK Dr. Fri-Sat 8-? Full pine bed, linens, walker, cane, books, dishes, pots & pans, tools, boots, shoes, total gym, golf caddie, golf bag, steel pots, & lots of misc. 304 E. Country Club, backyard, Thur-Fri., 8am-? You have to go through alley. Lots of furniture, treadmill, pool table, refrigerator & much more. 2 PARTY sale, 2406 1/2 B & C N. Grand, Sat., 8am. A little bit of everything. 2 PARTY garage sale, Fri-Sat, 7am-1pm, 611 Tierra Berrenda. NASCAR collection, washer/dryer, stove, fridge, tools, kids clothes, toys, hockey/ping pong table, playroom table, Gorilla shelving, Janssen piano & much more.

CLASSIFIEDS

002. Northeast

BIG SALE, 407 La Fonda, Saturday only, 7am. Musical instruments, violins, guitars, Mandolin, Ukulele, Louis LaMuer collection, furniture, household misc., men’s & ladies nice clothes. CORNER of 3rd & Virginia, Fri-Sat, 7am-3pm. Electric wheelchair, exercise equip. & lots of automotive stuff. 2801 N. Elm, Saturday, 7am-11am. 46” TV, recliner, queen size mattress, home interior frames & pics & many extras. 2811 N. Orchard, Saturday, 8am. Lots of restaurant chairs, new twin box springs, TV, bedding, dishes, infant car seat, small stroller, infant clothes, maternity clothes, household & decor items. Ducks Unlimited framed print & more. 326 E. 8th, Thursday-Saturday, 8am-? Misc. items. 312 E. 8th, Friday-Sunday, 7am-1pm. #5 HOLLY Loop, Saturday, 7am-?. Giant sale. Bowflex, fitness flyer, tons of small ladies clothes, shoes, purses, Xbox game & lots more.

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish August 2, 2013 PUBLIC NOTICE

Ordinance #8 Chaves County Personnel Policy

A public hearing will be held on Thursday, August 15, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. in the Chaves County Commission Chambers located in the Chaves County Administrative Center at #1 St. Mary’s Place to consider revisions to Ordinance #8, Chaves County Personnel Policy. The proposed revisions are available on the Chaves County website and in the Chaves County Clerk’s Office. Stanton L. Riggs County Manager

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish August 2, 2013 PUBLIC NOTICE

Proposed Ordinance O-086 Prohibiting the Importation and Relocations of Prairie Dogs and Other Rodent Pests into or within Chaves County, New Mexico

A public hearing will be held on Thursday, August 15, 2013 at 9:00 a.m. in the Chaves County Commission Chambers located in the Chaves County Administrative Center at #1 St. Mary’s Place to consider Proposed Ordinance O-086. The proposed ordinance is available on the Chaves County website and in the Chaves County Clerk’s Office. Stanton L. Riggs County Manager

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish July 26, August 2, 9, 2013 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

No. D-504-CV-2013-00212

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOAN SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, vs.

Plaintiff,

IGNACIO NAVARRETTE and CELMIRA NAVARRETTE, jointly and severally, Defendants.

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

STATE OF NEW MEXICO to Defendants Ignacio Navarrette & Celmira Navarrette, GREETINGS:

You are hereby notified that Plaintiff Bank of America, N.A., Successor by Merger to Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP (“Plaintiff”,) has filed a civil action against you to foreclose its Mortgage recorded in the Office of the Clerk of Chaves County on March 25, 2009, in Book 637, Page 1182, as Document Number 315330. The property subject to the Mortgage is commonly known as 2310 Cornell Drive, Roswell, New Mexico 88203, and more particularly described as: LOT NINE (9) EXCEPT THE SOUTH 1 FOOT THEREOF IN BLOCK SEVEN (7) OF MESA PARK ADDITION NO. 1, AN ADDITION, IN THE CITY OF ROSWELL, COUNTY OF CHAVES AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT FILED IN THE CHAVES COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE ON JUNE 10, 1959 AND RECORDED IN BOOK C OF PLAT RECORDS, CHAVES COUNTY, NEW MEXICO, AT PAGE 99.

If you do not file a responsive pleading or motion within thirty (30) days of the date of the first publication of this Notice, judgment by default will be entered against you.

Plaintiff's attorney is Scott & Kienzle, P.A. (Jordan M. DeHaan), P.O. Box 587, Albuquerque, NM 87103-0587, 505/246-8600.

WITNESS, the Honorable Freddie J. Romero, District Judge of the Fifth Judicial District Court of the State of New Mexico, and the Seal of the District Court of Chaves County, this 15th day of July, 2013. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT

<SEAL>

By:/s/ Janet Bloomer Deputy Clerk

002. Northeast 825 TRAILING Heart, Friday-Saturday, 7am.

600 TRAILING Heart, Sat., 7am. Misc. & some construction materials.

3504 N. Bandolina, Fri-Sat. 8-4pm. Lots of everything, clothes of every ages seminew, electronics, toys 102 LINDA Circle, Sat 7-? A little bit of everything, very nice womens clothing, some childrens, kitchen ware, knick knacks. 824 TRAILING Heart Rd., Fri-Sat, 5:30pm-? Baby & kids clothes, home interior, furniture & much more.

003. East

3303 E. 2nd, Fri-Sun 7-?, glassware, tools, furniture,, sewing material & new stuff

006. Southwest

2602 W. Alameda, Fri-Sun, 7-3pm, 3 familly sale, new & used clothes, dishes, couches, initial belts, lock caps

1202 Princeton, Sat., 7-? New dishwasher, bedding, iPod dock, DVDs, bikes, lg Little Tykes toy box, ACT & misc books, cultured stone & lots of misc.

48 WILDY Dr., Sat 7-12pm, 2 party, tools, excellent children, men, women clothes, furniture, dishware,

007. West

MULTI FAMILY SALE Sat., 8-12, 1400 W. 2nd. St. next to Red Cross in the Monterey shopping center.

008. Northwest

004. Southeast

HUGE SALE!! 4604 Zuni Dr., Off Pine Lodge Rd. Sat. Aug. 3 only, 7-? Furniture kitchen ware, house hold items, exercise equip., lots more.

1300 S. Michigan, Fri-Sat, 7AM.Tools, etc.

RAC INDOOR Garage Sale, Fri. 5pm-8pm, Sat. 7-Noon, 807 N. Missouri. 40 vendors selling. Information 6246718.

219 E. Lewis Fri-Sat 6-1. Antiques, collectibles, & lots miscellaneous

112 E. Church, Thurs-Fri, 7am-12pm. Lots of misc.

420 E. Jefferson, Saturday, 8am-? Games, baby stuff, tools, antiques, too much to mention. 403 S. Atkinson, Fri-Sat, 7am. Winter clothes in good condition. A little bit of everything & tamales only on Friday.

HUGE 4 family sale. 406 E. Reed, Sat, 7-6pm. Hutch china cabinet, baby items, lots brand name school clothes, new plus sz clothes, lots more!!

MULTI FAMILY sale, Sat-Sun only 8-3. Lots of scrubs, dining room table, furniture, toys, clothes, yard tools, misc. To much to mention, come by! 1414 S. Poplar. 203 E. Bonney, Fri-Sat, 6-1pm. Adult & children’s clothes & misc.

005. South

1406 S. Madison (between Lea & Kentucky), Thurs-Mon. Misc. items. 5 PARTY sale, 113 Yakima Rd., Fri. 8am-4pm, Sat. 8am-12pm. Furniture, toys, baby clothes, bikes, tires, rims, tools & much more. 31 B. St., Sat., 7am-5pm. Princess house 50% off, clothes, toys & burritos.

006. Southwest

600 W. Jaffa Fri-Sat 8-1. Beds, dishes, linens, crafts, purses, lots of misc. 2202 BARNETT Dr., Sat., 8am-12pm. Lots of teacher materials, seasonal decor, bookshelves, computer desk, car seats, women’s clothing & misc.

801 AVENIDA Del Sumbre, Fri-Sat, 8-4. School uniforms/supplies, misc. items, too much list. 2200 W. Juniper, Saturday only, 7am-1pm. Furniture, lamps, like new Clarinet perfect for school band, women’s clothes & swimming pool. Backyard Sale, 2706 S. Largo, Fri-Sat, 7am-2pm. Lots of misc., 55” TV.

2001 S. Sunset L143, Sat., 8am-5pm. Furniture, flower arrangements, kitchenware & other assorted items. 911 W. Mathews, Saturday, 7am. Clothes & much more.

507 Fulkerson Dr., Fri-Sat, 7am-2pm. Vintage clothes, hats, junk, lawn mower. 806 W. Summit, Fri-Sat, 8-2. Brand new school shoes & furniture, etc.

1309 S. Missouri, Thurs-Sat, 7am-? 5 party sale. Men’s, women’s boys & girls clothes of all sizes. Knick knack’s, dryer, bikes, Wii games & misc. items. 1213 W. Mathews, Fri-Sat, 7-1pm, TV’s, boys & girls & adult clothing, bikes, tires, DVD players, & more

2 PARTY SALE 3205 Purdue, Saturday, 6AM-12PM. Clothing, dishes, curtains, tool box, & lots of misc., something for everyone. 6 FAMILY sale, 417 S. Aspen, Fri-Sun, 8am-? Cast iron skillets, shoes, clothes, toys & more.

FLEA MARKET Big front/ rear parking lot sale w/thousands of items for sale. Blairs Monterey Flea Market, 1400 W. 2nd, Sat-Sun 9-5pm“free set up”

MOVING!! 12 VISTA Parkway Cir. Fri-Sun 7-? Furniture, appliances, lots misc.

6 Westminister Ct. (off Onate & Berrendo), Saturday, 7-? Great prices.

1308 Sorrento, Sat., 7am. 3 family. Low prices. Lots of misc., dining set, clothes. 406 N. Lea, Fri-Sat, 7am-? Appliances, baby stuff, car & truck for sale & lots more. 603 Serena Dr., Thurs-Sat, 8am-1pm. Washer, sofas, antique sewing machine.

ANNOUNCEMENTS 025. Lost and Found

FOUND MALE Chihuahua corner of Washington & College. Call 622-0032, 317-6059 or 840-5004 FOUND 3 Horses off Country Club Rd area. Contact 575-840-5374 LOST: SUNGLASSES Pink Oakley w/ Pink Harley Davidson cord at Chews West Friday night. Please call 626-2274. Reward.

HAS SOMEONE tried to sell you a hot laptop? Rick 624-2328 for info leading to retrieval. $100 reward. LOST 6 year old Boxer near Berendo middle school, answers to the name Ashley. $100 Reward if found. Call 575-218-2570 or 626-2279. FOUND FULL blood Persian cat. Call 627-6960 & describe. Keep calling until I answer, I am sick & bedridden.

MISSING - "MAYA"; black 45 lb Australian Shepherd/ Blue Healer dog missing from Taylor's home at 1901 S Washington. Name's on collar. A reward is offered call 626-5000.

INSTRUCTION

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

ACCOUNTING AND Consulting Group is a regional CPA firm that offers audit, tax, accounting and business consulting services. We are currently seeking experienced bookkeepers for our Roswell and Hobbs, NM offices. Qualified candidates must have a minimum of 2 years FT experience in all aspects of bookkeeping services for external clients. Candidates must possess excellent client service skills, the ability to effectively multitask and meet tight deadlines. Must have strong computer skills and be proficient with MS Office

045. Employment Opportunities

Suite, QuickBooks and other accounting software programs. An associate’s degree in business or business related field is preferable but not required. We offer a competitive wage (up to $45,000 per year) plus a full benefits package. To apply please send your resume and cover letter to jobs@acgnm.com CAREGIVERS WANTED for private home care. 3 yrs exp. Must pass background check & have clean driving record. Send resume & references to PO Box 1897, Unit 354, Roswell, NM 88202.

ACCOUNTING AND Consulting Group is a regional CPA firm that offers audit, tax, accounting and business consulting services. We are currently seeking Staff and Senior level Accountants to join our team of dedicated professionals at our offices in Roswell, Carlsbad and Hobbs, NM offices. You will prepare tax returns and be involved with tax planning, research and compliance. We require a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, CPA license or CPA candidate and a minimum 2 years recent public accounting experience. We offer a very competitive salary and full benefits package. To apply please send your resume and cover letter to jobs@acgnm.com SEEKING HVAC helper, must be dependable, reliable, & pass drug screening. 575-626-1234

COMFORT KEEPERS An In-Home Care provider is seeking caregivers to work days, weekends and overnights. Join our team full-time or part-time. If you are a hard worker, care about people and enjoy helping others please stop by our office to inquire about a position. 1410 South Main, Roswell.

FRESENIUS MEDICAL Care/Southeastern New Mexico Kidney Center is seeking RNs. Full benefits, 401K, medical, vision, dental. PTO after 6 months. Other company benefits. Open Mon-Sat. Off Sundays.12 hour shifts. Competitive pay. Apply online at FMCNA.COM

DRIVER NEEDED Class A or B CDL with clear driving record, local route, competitive pay, 401K, insurance and paid time off. Call 800-658-2673 or 806-293-4431 NEED CASH? Be your own boss & build your business at Blairs Monterey indoor market at 1400 W. 2nd. Booths start at $75 mo. Call 623-0136 SALES MANAGEMENT training program. Huge opportunity for Manager in training. Solitaire homes. (575) 623-6820 SOUTHEAST NM Community Action Corporation Roswell Head Start Program is accepting applications for: Teachers ~ $15.12 $21.26 (DOQ) Health Coordinator ~ $13.35

!!! 4 DAY WORK WEEK (Mon-Thurs)!!!

WORK SCHEDULE PER HEAD START CALENDAR REVIEW DEADLINE ~ JULY 30, 2013 POSITION WILL REMAIN OPEN UNTIL FILLED

APPLY AT DEPT. OF WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS AT 2110 S. MAIN, ROSWELL, NM OR Mail application to 1915 San Jose Blvd., Carlsbad, NM 88220 or email to l.duskey@snmcac.com Go to www.snmcac.org to print out application packet. SNMCAC is an EEOE

EYE TECH Computer & medical skills prefered, but will train the right candidate. Send resume to PO Box 8244 Roswell, NM 88202.

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES needed for Roswell area. Excellent communication skills and great attitude required. Food service and sales experience a must. Come be a part of a GREAT TEAM Excellent Benefits MUST APPLY ON LINE at www.shamrockfoods.com EEO/AAP employer

Roswell Daily Record

045. Employment Opportunities

Dean Baldwin Painting, LP aircraft strip and paint services, is presently looking to fill the following long term, full-time positions: PAINTERS – Exp in stripping and painting aircraft or vehicles. PAINTER HELPERS – Exp preferred but not required. On the job training available! INSPECTORS – A&P License and NDT exp preferred. A&P MECHANICS – A&P License required and exp as an aircraft mechanic preferred. NOW TAKING applications for CNA’s. Must be dependable, have transportation & phone. Apply at Frontier Medical, 217A N. Main. No phone calls! FRONT DESK office manager position, Mon-Fri, for busy medical office. Scheduling, data entry, deposits, & office communications are the task required for success. Apply at 800 W. 2nd St. Roswell. Residential/Commercial Carpenter. $20-$30/hr DOE. Must have minimum 5yrs experience, pass pre-employment & random drug screen. Please fax resume to 575-748-2142 or email to sidgiles@gilesinc.net JFA Distributing LLC •Management opportunity •Paid vacations •Training Provided 1600/month per agreement

(575) 578-4817

Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR KRUMLAND AUTO Group has opportunities available for FT entry level clerical positions. Dealership experience helpful but not required. Candidate must be detail oriented and be able to work in a fast paced, team oriented environment. Strong organizational skills are a must. Excellent benefit package including: HEALTH, DENTAL, VISION, 401K and PAID VACATION. Fax resumes to (575) 622-5899 Attn: Office Manager or email to officemgr@kagnm.com ALL ABOUT SPAS & LEISURE LIVING has an opening for a responsible, self motivated individual to service & repair hot tubs. A general knowledge of plumbing & electrical is helpful. Manufactures training will be provided. If you think you could be a great fit for a career at our company, at 3700 N. Main in Roswell. PART TIME/ Weekends only, maintenance position. Experience preferred.nApply in person at Hampton Inn, Roswell. GALACTIC SUSHI now hiring servers. Must be 19 or older. Servers permit required. Apply at 4311-C N. Main (next to AT&T). THE DEXTER Police Department is currently accepting applications for a Police Officer. Applicants must be highly motivated, ethical, team oriented drug/substance free and be dedicated to serving the Town of Dexter. Candidates who show potential will undergo an extensive background check which will be followed by an interview for those who qualify. Candidates who are not certified Police Officers with the State of New Mexico upon hire with the Dexter Police Department will be mandated to attend the New Mexico Law Enforcement Academy for certification. Applications will be accepted until August 07, 2013 at 2pm. Please pick up and return completed applications to: Dexter Town Hall 115 E. 2nd Street Dexter, New Mexico

Full TIme Direct Service Employee - Graveyard

We are currently seeking employees to provide care for an individual with developmental disabilities in Roswell on the graveyard shift. Must pass a background check, possess a HS diploma/GED and a valid NMDL. Training will be provided. Benefits including medical, dental and vision are available. Please email

asalmon@highdesertfs.com

or apply at 1601 Second Street, Roswell, NM 88201

045. Employment Opportunities

HIRING CLASS A CDL Drivers Great opportunity to earn! Be part of a financially solid privately owned company. Seeking Class A CDL Shuttle Delivery Drivers for the Roswell area. Must have CDL A License and at least 1 year of hands-on experience. We offer best in the market incentive based pay plan, benefits including 2 week's vacation after 1 year, 7 paid holidays, and 401K with company match. Don't miss this great opportunity! Apply online at www.shamrockfoods.com EEO/AA LOAN PROCESSOR Bank of the Southwest is looking to immediately fill the full time position of loan processor. Seeking a qualified candidate with the ability to multi-task. Job duties to include, but not limited to, creating loan documentation in our centralized processing area for eleven branches. The position also requires excellent communication skills, extensive interaction ability, and people skills.

Requirements: Must have a good attitude and basic computer skills. Must be detail oriented with excellent time management. Loan experience a plus. Company offers excellent work environment, salary and benefits. Pre-employment drug test and background screen required. Apply in person with Lisa, by July 31, 2013. Bank of the Southwest, 226 N. Main St., Roswell, NM EOE/AA PATTERSON LAW FIRM, P.C. is currently seeking a full time LEGAL ASSISTANT to handle abuse/neglect criminal defense, divorce/custody, civil cases. Spanish speaking preferred but not required. Monday through Friday, 35-40 hours per week. Salary range $9.00-$12.00 per hour depending on experience. Candidates must be highly motivated and enjoy working in a fast-paced environment. Send only cover letter with resume to Frank Patterson, PO Box 2424, Roswell, NM 88202. No phone calls and no resumes will be accepted at office. SOUTHEAST NM Community Action Corporation Head Start Program is accepting applications for: Family Services Assistant ~ $10.03 (Position in Artesia)

!!! 4 DAY WORK WEEK (Mon-Thurs)!!!

WORK SCHEDULE PER HEAD START CALENDAR REVIEW DEADLINE ~ AUGUST 6, 2013 POSITION WILL REMAIN OPEN UNTIL FILLED

APPLY AT DEPT. OF WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS AT 2110 S. MAIN, ROSWELL, NM OR Mail application to 1915 San Jose Blvd., Carlsbad, NM 88220 or email to l.duskey@snmcac.com Go to www.snmcac.org to print out application packet. SNMCAC is an EEOE SOUTHEAST NM Community Action Corporation is accepting applications for:

Roswell Head Start Site Supervisor

Southeast NM Community Action Corporation Head Start Program is searching for a Site Supervisor. This is an exciting opportunity for a qualified individual with supervisory experience and enjoys families and children. Salary range is $29,952 to $38,638 (DOQ) and a 12 month position. An attractive benefit package that includes a 4-day work week (M-Th), paid holidays, medical/LTD/Life insurances, retirement plans, annual and sick leaves, and various training opportunities. REVIEW DEADLINE ~ AUGUST 6, 2013 POSITION WILL REMAIN OPEN UNTIL FILLED

APPLY AT DEPT. OF WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS AT 2110 S. MAIN, ROSWELL, NM OR Mail application to 1915 San Jose Blvd., Carlsbad, NM 88220 or email to l.duskey@snmcac.com Go to www.snmcac.org to print out application packet. SNMCAC is an EEOE

045. Employment Opportunities

Applebee’s Bar & Grill is now hiring experienced cooks. Please apply online www.appleamericanjobs.cli ckandhire.net KYMERA NEW MEDICAL OFFICE POSITIONS: As a growing Independent Physicians Office, Kymera is now seeking Qualified Applicants for: FT RN with 1-2yrs Oncology experience. Benefits available; Health, Dental, Vision, and more. Fax Resume w/ Cover Ltr to: Kymera HR 575-627-9520

THOUGHT OF driving Big Rigs the oil fields are going strong and Companies are looking for CDL Drivers. In less than 2 months you can have your Class A License and making the money you deserve. Classes are forming now you can call Artesia Training Academy for more information. Or visit our web site. Phone # 575-748-9766. Web site: artesiatrucking@pvtn.net AmeriPride Linen and Apparel Services Requisition# 106353 Chief Engineer Position Job description is posted on Career Builders This requisition will run from July 26, 2013 to August 26, 2013 Application must be filled out online at careerbuilders.com

THERAPIST GUIDANCE Center of Lea County is accepting applications for licensed therapists. Applicants must be licensed by New Mexico Licensing and Therapy Practice Board. Guidance Center of Lea County has an Exceptional Salary and Benefits package to offer applicants applying for these positions. We offer a great 403 (b) Retirement Plan as well. Bilingual is a preferred but not required. Please contact Kawin Nunnery at 575-393-3168 ext. 265 or email your resume' if you are interested. PART TIME office, multi tasking, computer literate Microsoft & Quick Books experience preferred. #4 Wool Bowl Circle.

DRIVERS TRANSPORT Griffin Transportation Local Positions -Class A CDL/Hazmat, 2 yrs exp. (tanker preferred), good MVR. Full Benefit Package. Call 806-744-2067 Ask for Transportation Dept. Fax 806-785-4182 Day & Night Shifts Available. WEELHEAD RESTAURANT/ BREW PUB currently seeking experienced kitchen management & line cooks. Apply in person at 332 W. Main, Artesia. No phone calls please!

A NATIONALLY known brand (Top 15 QSR) is seeking a general manager in Roswell, NM. We are looking for a highly motivated, enthusiastic and energetic person. Must have restaurant management experience. We offer TOP salary and benefits. Email resume/job history to rest-mgr@hotmail.com. PART-TIME CASHIER Stocker Roswell Cash n Carry. Excellent communication skills and great attitude required. Retail experience preferred. Come be a part of a GREAT TEAM MUST APPLY ON LINE at www.shamrockfoods.com EEO/AAP employer

CAR RENTAL company accepting applications for customer service and counter sales. Applications available at Avis Car Rental Counter, inside airport. KYMERA

NEW MEDICAL OFFICE POSITIONS: As a growing Independent Physicians Office, Kymera is now seeking Qualified Applicants for:

Receptionist / Scheduler FT - Customer Service Skills, ability to work with patients in a medical office setting and multi-line telephone experience required. Applicants should demonstrate friendly/outgoing attitude, and organization skills. Fax Resume w/ Cover letter to: 575-627-9520


Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities

140. Cleaning

WEEKEND FRONT counter help wanted at Mama Tuckers. Weds & Fri afternoons & Sat & Sun from 5am-12:00. Must be dependable & want to work. FULL TIME skilled maintenance position. Must have knowledge of electrical, plumbing, swimming pool, drywall repair, painting & grounds maintenance. Apply in person, Candlewood Suites 4 Military Heights. Salary DOE. BEALLS NOW HIRING Clinique & Estee Lauder counter managers. Full time, benefits, plus commission. Apply in person.

JUST CUTS now hiring full and part time stylist. Call 420-5473 for Anthony. Benefits available. NOW HIRING Assistant Managers at Little Caesar’s. Apply in person, ask for Virginia. No phone calls.

MEDICAL OFFICE Full time, back office, working with patients and some clerical duties. Must be bilingual. Pick up application at 612 W. 8th. No phone calls please.

SERVICES

140. Cleaning

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

HOUSEKEEPING, HOME and/or office. Dependable & reliable. Call for free estimates. 575-626-9784 SUNSHINE WINDOW Services. Clean windows/outside houses. Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458

Quality Fence construction. Free estimates: 575-973-1019

150. Concrete

220. Furniture Repair WE BUILD and repair furniture. 840-7849 or 626-8466

CONCRETE DRIVEWAYS, sidewalks, retaining walls and steps. Free estimates: 575-973-1019

225. General Construction

185. Electrical

ELECTRICAL SERVICES Meter loops, service upgrades, remodels, additions, service calls. Lowest prices in town. Free estm. Lic#360025. 910-4193

195. Elderly Care

MAINTENANCE PERSON needed. Full time, HVAC, be knowledgeable in electric & plumbing, heating & cooling, refrigeration. Salary DOE. Taking applications, apply at Petroleum Building, 200 W. 1st, Suite 300.

200. Fencing

Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050 WE DO concrete, carpentry, drywall, stucco & painting. 420-3825

COMFORT KEEPERS provides the kind of in-home care services that help people maintain full and independent lives, all in the comfort and familiar surroundings of their own home. Keep in mind all of our caregivers are thoroughly screened, bonded and insured. It is our goal to provide the most trusted service in Chaves County. We would be happy to arrange a free in home assessment to help you learn more. Before you decide on your home care provider, give us a call at 624-9999. www.comfortkeepers.com

CLASSIFIEDS

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Summer Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242. WE WORK All Yard work & hauling. Call Will at 317-7402 WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121.

Bòidheach Yards and Gardens. Property cleanup & hauling, year round maintenance, landscaping, tree management. You'll love our prices! 578-9404.

PROFESSIONAL LANDSCAPING/ Irrigation design and construction. Free estimates: 575-973-1019

Garcia’s Lawn Service, sprinklers & much more at low price. 914-0803. Mow Grass, Trim Bushes, Clean Ups, Hauling Trash Leaf Raking, flower beds, tree pruning, rock yards & rototilling, pick up pecans. Repair sprinklers & fences. 347-8156, 347-8157 Pedro BUDGET LAWN cleaning & basic cleanup. 420-4375 or 910-0685 Yard work, clean-ups, lawns. Handyman svc. David 637-9580.

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252

“Big E’s” Landscaping & Yardwork mow, trim, prune property clean-up, sprinkler sys. senior disc. 914-6025 JOHN 3:16 yard work. Call Mel 575-408-9052.

310. Painting/ Decorating

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. Call 637-9108.

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575)-622-7710 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM MONDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

Friday, August 2, 2013

350. Roofing

490. Homes For Sale

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

FIXER UPPER, 411 W. Tilden, 2br/1ba, $24,500 obo. 575-840-7568

3BR, 1 3/4ba, north part of town, 3110 N. Bandolina, 1 car garage, all new carpet, paint & roof, 2 blks from swimming pool. Priced to sell, $108,000. 622-5031 or 420-1022

GUTTERS For All Your Rain Gutter Needs! Call WH Seamless Aluminum Gutter Systems, LLC. Locally owned. Free estimates. 575-626-0229.

395. Stucco Plastering

FSBO OR Rent. 4BD/2BA, 2100 sqft. $110k, $5k down or rent $900mo $800dep. 607 S. Pine. 317-4824

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991

1730 N. Delaware, 3br/2ba, large kitchen. 909-657-7611, Yolanda Archuleta

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217

2br/1ba, 503 S. Kansas, carport, 2 sheds, large lot, $75k. Owner financing avail. w/$7500 down. Price negotiable. Will discount for cash. 575-973-2353

405. TractorWork

Tractor work Lots mowed, discing, blading, post holes. 347-0142 or 317-7738

410. Tree Service

RENTALS

3br/2ba, approx. 1300 sqft, across from Del Norte Park, newly remodeled, asking $132K, no owner fianancing. 626-9994

535. Apartments Furnished

1717 N. Ohio, 3br/1ba, FP, family room. Central air/heating. Exit Realty Yolanda Archuleta 317-9567 Owner Gerardo Martinez 909-657-7611

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

FSBO: 3BR/2BA on 4 acres, 4110 W. McGaffey. 626-6368

Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722.

3BR/1.5BA, OPEN living room/dining room w/new carpet, 1320 sqft, covered patio, block fence, 113 E. Ballard, $69,000. 444-9558

QuickCut Tree Services Best prices, great clean-up. Call for free estimates, 575-208-8963.

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944

490. Homes For Sale 2BR, ALL new plumbing, new tub, faucets, vanity, kitchen sink & cabinet, newly painted inside/out, all new doors & carpet, $34k, in a decent area, 1609 N. Kansas. 575-347-5648 or 575-626-0518.

OWNER CAN finance or get your own financing. Nice 5br/3ba country home, approx. 2700 sqft, large covered porch, on 6 acres. $35k down, neg. See pics at, & click on “contact us” www.firstchoicebeagles.com

575-973-2353

3/BD 1/BA 206 S. Kansas. $45k Rent to own w/5k down, $650mo. 840-9105. Remodeled! LETS TALK! 2BR/1BA, LARGE living room w/laundry room, 409 W. Summit, 912 sqft, gross living area. 806-729-0704

America’s diner is always open. Now hiring Cooks and Dishwashers, Top Pay, Fast Raises, $100 sign on bonus, Conditions Apply We offer: Meal programs, Vacation, and Insurance Programs. Apply in Person between 2pm - 4pm Must have: Reliable transportation Phone Number Flexible Schedule

Dennis the Menace

PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN.

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944. EFF, 1BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377 EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348.

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN.

40 acres with electric, between Roswell & Artesia on Cherokee Rd., Lake Arthur, $860/mo, mobile home okay, 480-392-8550

520. Lots for Sale

PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. 5-10 ACRE tracts for sale. Restrictive covenants, gated area, city of Roswell water, electricity & telephone to each lot, NE of Country Club in McPherson Subdivision. For inquiries call, 626-4294 Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352. CORNER OF DIAMOND A & LATIGO. 188ftX146ft. 626-4113 or 626-4213 6.5 ACRES, fenced in, water well, electric, $25,000. 4107 N. Calumet Rd. 575-317-9195

BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $592, 3br/2ba, $674, 5br/2ba $812, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge. Town Plaza Apartments NO HUD ACCEPTED ALL UTILITIES PAID Friendly managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs & downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. AVAILABLE- 2 bedroom, 2 bath, single garage, water paid. 2905 Aihanibra, Apt.2 and 2504 N. Grand, Apt.A. Call Sherlea Taylor. 575 624 2219 or 575 420 1978. Roswell Apartment 1700 N. Pontiac Dr., 2br/1ba, $600/mo + dep. stove & fridge, w/d hookups, water paid. 626-864-3461

Roswell Daily Record

5

$

cord Roswell Daily Re S.COM

RDRNEW 575-677-7710 •

B7

540. Apartments Unfurnished

Spacious 2br/2ba, all elec., w/d hkup, $625/mo, $400/dep. 910-0827 VERY NICE & clean 1 bdrm, duplex. $425/mo, $250/dep. 1213 E. 1st. Call 626-3977 or 622-6629 NORTH LARGE 2/2, ht pump, W/D hookups, $625, No Pets. 420-8797 Very nice 2br Apartment. 304 W. Mescalero, $625/mo wtr pd, $300/dep. 6 mo. lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535. 1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 2br/1ba, stove & refrigerator. Call 840-4333 or 910-8170.

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished RESTORED 3/BD 2/BA near NMMI huge lvg & bd $1000mo + utl. 626-6286

VERY NICE, all furnished 3br/2ba, dbl. garage at 3015 Alhambra. Equally nice, all furnished 2br/2ba, single garage at 1300 Camino Real, B. Call Sherlea Taylor, 575-420-1978 or 575-624-2219 for details. 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 4BR 4BA 6 acres in city w/country feel, 2 Riverview Circle, $1900 including water. Call 317-1550.

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 CHARMING HOUSE For Lease. New paint, tile, & carpet. 2bd/2ba, open living/ dining, updated kitchen. 1 large garage, covered patio w/great yard. NO HUD. 2810 N. Orchard, $1200/800. 626-0562 2609 W. Alameda, 1br/1ba, w/d hookups, ref air, carport, $475/mo, $475/DD, 575-317-6479. 210 W. 1st, 2br/1ba, $475/mo, $475/DD, wtr pd. 317-6479 2br/1ba, $575, 1/bd 1/ba $360 call or text after 5pm, No HUD. 915-255-8335 3/BD 1/BA w/ option of 4th BD. Fenced yard, No HUD. $500dep. $750mo. 420-8648 FOR SALE or rent, 1108 N. Atkinson, $68,500. $750 rent, $750/dep, 2br/1ba. 840-7568 2 large br, 1ba, carport, no Hud/pets, wtr pd, $600/mo. $600/dep. Call 626-2883. 3/1/1 FOR small family, 6 month lease, background check required, no HUD or Pets, 623-0316, lv msg 2/BD 2/BA $550mo. $400dep. washer/dryer hookup, No HUD 914 N. Ohio. 317-4307

Roswell Daily Re

cord 575-677-7710 • RDRNEWS.COM

00

GARAGE & YARD SALE KITS To make your sale more successful!

+ Tax

Includes: • 3 Signs • Pricing Stickers • Yard Sale Tips

609 S. Kentucky 4br, 2ba, no pets/smoking. NO HUD, $700/mo, $400/dep. Call 317-1371 1BR, NO pets or HUD, $500/mo, wtr pd, $475/dep. 2/BD $575mo $550dep. 317-7373 2br/1ba, stove, frig, Carport, w/d hookups heat pump. By Cahoon Park. No pets/smoking. References required. $680/mo, $600/dep. 410 N. Kansas Ave. 623-8186 301 W. 5th Dexter. 3 recamaras, 2 banos, aire refrijerado, $750 por mes, $500 deposito disponible. 8-1-13. 910-0644 2BD/1BA Remodeled, no HUD, references required. 622-5539 or 317-4859 616 E. Cherry, 2 Br, fnc yd, w/d hkp, sec.drs, $550/mo, $500/dep. 575-416-0801 2BD/1BA Remodeled, no HUD, references required. 622-5539 or 317-4859


B8 Friday, August 2, 2013 550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

3 BDRM, 1 ba, fenced bkyrd, w/d hkp, 5 block from Monterey Elem. 625-9004

1 & 2br houses, no pets or HUD. 317-7373

710 S. Wyoming Apt. A, x-nice, 2br, appliances, wtr pd, $550/mo, $500/dep. 626-5423

1305 W. College, 2/1/1, nice & clean, W/D, fenced, no HUD, $580. 626-9530

1103 MONTERREY 3br, 2ba, 2 living areas, total electric, FP, $1100/mo. $1000/dep 626-5423

2BB/1BA 10FT ceilings, quiet area, $700mo/ $500dep. 317-4373

4BR 4BA 6 acres in city w/country feel, 2 Riverview Circle, $1900 including water. Call 317-1550.

3 HOMES 2&3/BD $600, $700, one is 2/BA. AL, 703-0420 DR 703-0421.

555. Mobile Homes for Rent

3/2/2, NE, $1200/mo, $1000/dep, 1 yr lease, 575-637-8458.

FOR ADULTS 55 + only, 2/1, stove/frig, SW location, water paid. No pets, $515mo., $300dep. 623-1864

2br/1ba washer, dryer, dishwasher, fenced yard, garage, $795/mo, $795/dep. Call 910-3482. 1205 W. 13th, 3br/2ba $625/mo. $300/dep. No pets. 575-910-9648 CSD Property Mngmt RE/MAX of Roswell csdpm11@gmail.com

COUNTRY LIVING 2br/2ba, carport/storage, 302 D River Rd., 10 mi. East of Roswell, $550/mo, $550/dep. 575-513-5790.

580. Office or Business Places

www.roswellnmhouses.com

575-637-3716 575-622-7191 707 S. Missouri Ave 2/1, Oven, Stove, Newly Remod. $625 Mo $625 Dep 1607 W. Hendricks 3/1,Evap Cooler,Stove $600 Mo $600 Dep 601 W. 17th 2/1, Stove ,Ref, Evap Cooling $585 Mo $585 Dep

AVAILABLE 750 sqft at 2600 N. Main. Call John Grieves, Prudential Enchanted Lands, 575-626-7813.

FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546.

305 S. Evergreen, 2br/1ba, coverd carport, shed, appliances, fenced yard, $775/$600 dep, pets w/fee, no HUD or utilities pd. 575-405-0163 or kilok9s@gmail.com

1200 sqft building, park-like setting, maintenance included, 400 E. College. 420-9970

36 H St., $550/mo, $550/dep, 2br/1ba, fenced yard, wtr pd, min. 1yr lease, 627-9942.

110 S. Richardson, 1800 sqft, great downtown property across from Burritos and More. $550/mo, $550/DD. 317-6479.

2803 PURDUE, $1000/mo, $1000/dep, 3br/2ba, 1 car gar., fenced yard, central air, min. 1yr lease, 627-9942.

OFFICE BUILDING & lot for sale or lease, 410 S. Main St., 623-9051 or 420-9072. CSD Property Mngmt RE/MAX of Roswell csdpm11@gmail.com

3/2/1, ref air, no pets or HUD, $850/mo, $700/dep. 575-420-5930

2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

www.roswellnmhouses.com

575-637-3716 Commercial 6230 N. Main St. Great Office Space loading dock, yard $1500 Mo $1500 Dep 1207 N. Richardson Prof. Office, great location $600 mo/ $600 Dep

1204 S. Missouri, large 2/3br, garage, 1ba, fenced yard, $700/mo. Call Century 21 at 622-4604. LARGE 3br/2ba, 912 N. Ohio, $850 + $500/dep, no HUD. 317-4307

CLASSIFIEDS

580. Office or Business Places

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

JUST REMODELED Over 2000sqft, new pluming, electrical, refrig air, wired for individual offices. $2200mo. 626-6765

UTILITY CAMPER shell w/ladder rack on top, tool door on each side. Fits full size short bed truck. $800 OBO. 420-2588 or 420-3546

600. Wanted to Rent

Horse stalls for rent, large box stalls w/6ft chain link runs. Use of arena & trail course, $50/per mo. You feed & clean. 973-0791. Located corner of East Berrendo & Railroad St.

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

I AM interested in renting a building for second hand business. Must be reasonable. Call or text 317-6285.

745. Pets for Sale

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

SHOP BLAIRS! Great deals on used furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, home decor, tools, electronics, movies, music, jewelry & bows, hat & caps, saddles & tac, toys plus much more. We also buy your unwanted items including complete households & estates. Open daily 9-5. 5611 Hummingbird Ln. 627-2033 Pwr wheelchair, hospital bed, lift chair, Invacare patient lifter. 622-7638

CASH FOR Gold! I pay the highest prices for gold jewelry. Also, I pay 50% of blue book for silver dollars. Ted in Roswell 578-0805.

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

TOP PRICES paid for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We buy compete household & estates. 623-0136 or 627-2033

Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed!

I AM interested in buying bedroom, living room & kitchen furniture, working washers/dryers, refrigerators, & stoves. Call or text 317-6285

SEWING TABLE, older model, 4 draws, knee pedal. 622-8239

GRAVES FARM Bell peppers, squash - 5 different kinds, sweet corn, onions, green beans & black-eyed peas (call for your bushel order), pinto beans, Armenian cucumbers, peanuts, dried red chile pods. 622-1889, 8:30am-5:30pm, Mon-Sat, Sunday 1pm-5pm.

Mobile Restaurant trailer, with all cooking equipment, w/generator. 444-7652 SHOP JOSIE’S Antiques, Collectibles & Folkart, 1600 E. 2nd, Thurs-Sat, 10-6 this week. CALIFORNIA KING size bed for sale, headboard & footboard included, $875. 716-472-3112 or 622-8945 LG washer/dryer set, front loaders, washer need work, asking $350. 317-7532 WOOD ENTERTAINMENT center w/glass door, $55, 4’x8’. Dell computer w/Windows Vista, 6 gigs RAM, $100. Friday, 8am-noon, 215 E. Bonney. 623-1677

720. Livestock & Supplies

635. Good things to Eat

695. Machinery Tools Farm/Ranch FORKLIFT DREXEL Diesel, 14k lbs., 12 set lift, 2 side shift w/swing, only 1850 hours, $10,850. 575-626-7488

720. Livestock & Supplies ALFALFA HAY/2013 Excellent quality, sprayed fertilized, $9.50 small bales. $225 big squares 4x4x8. Roswell 575-323-4722

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

AKC GOLDEN Retriever puppies 7wks see mom & dad, $400. (443)616-7492 4 BUCK Rabbits $10 Ea., 1 Breeding Doe $25 25 Laying Hens $10 Ea. 575-625-2544

FULL BLOODED Yorkie & Morkie puppies for sale. Call Jerry, 575-637-9626 AKC GOLDEN Retriever pups, only 2F & 2M left, 8wks, w/1st shots, $500. 208-2027 or 512-636-7569

RECREATIONAL

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

‘06 KAWASAKI Vulcan2050 cc, 4k mile $6000 obo. 623-6999 or 317-3018 2003 YAMAHA 650 V-Star, custom, cover, 2 helmets, $3000 obo. Can be seen at 518 S. Fir. 910-3657

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com

CLEAN TRADE-IN VALUE PRICED!

AWD #18507

$21,375

2007 Mercury Mariner Hybrid #18492

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

$ 11,100 - 3,000

$8,100

NADA Clean Trade-In

Lariat 4WD #18476

NADA Retail: $ 35,125 Roswell Ford Savings - 4,000

NADA Clean Trade-In

$31,125

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

$9,050

NADA Clean Trade-In

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

2007 Ford F350 Super Duty Crew Cab XLT 4WD #18222

2013 Ford Mustang Coupe V6

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

NADA Clean Trade-In

$ 21,850 - 3,950

$17,900

2011 Ford F150 Super Cab XLT #18514 NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

NADA Clean Trade-In

$ 27,350 - 4,975

$22,375

#18545

NADA Clean Trade-In

2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid SEL #18536

NADA Clean Trade-In

$ 9,925

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

NADA Clean Trade-In

$ 15,900 - 3,250

$ 12,650

2009 Dodge Ram 2500 Quad Cab SLT 4WD #18422 NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

NADA Clean Trade-In

$ 23,650 - 3,275

$20,375

2011 Ford F250 Crew Cab Lariat 4WD #18392 NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

$ 32,150 - 4,150

$28,000

$ 12,575 - 2,650

2008 Ford F150 Super Cab XLT 4WD #18254

$ 22,225 - 3,200

$19,025

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

NADA Clean Trade-In

$ 15,450 - 3,225

$12,225

NADA Clean Trade-In

#18471

$ 12,175 - 3,125

#18415

$11,825

$38,600

NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

#18387

NADA Clean Trade-In

NADA Clean Trade-In

2009 Honda Accord Sedan EX

2010 Ford Focus Sedan SES

$ 14,600 - 2,775

NADA Retail: $43,275 Roswell Ford Savings - 4,675

2001 Ford F350 Super Duty Crew Cab Lariat 4WD #18333

2007 Audi A4 Turbo Sedan NADA Retail Roswell Ford Savings

2011 Ford F350 Crew Cab

#18399

NADA Retail: $ 25,475 Roswell Ford Savings - 4,100

NADA Clean Trade-In

2012 Chevy Tahoe LS

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

CSD Property Mngmt RE/MAX of Roswell csdpm11@gmail.com

www.roswellnmhouses.com

575-637-3716 RV's 2001 - 5th Wheel Cedar Creek, 29 Ft. 2 Slides, Sleeps 4 & up $16000, OBO

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

At Roswell Ford you’ll save thousands - and the NADA book proves it!

2008 GMC Denali XL

Roswell Daily Record

NADA Clean Trade-In

$46,050 - 4,775

$41,275

* Payments shown with zero down on approved credit for 72 months at 3.9% APR. Prices do not include tax, registration and dealer service transfer fee. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Pictureas are for illustrative purposes only and may not represent the actual vehicles. Not responsible for typographical errors.

ROSWELL FORD

821 N. MAIN ST. OPEN: MON.-FRI. 8AM - 7PM, SAT. 8AM - 5PM Se habla SALES: 623-3673 TOLL-FREE: 877-624-3673 SERVICE DEPT.: 623-1031 espanol

623-3673 • www.roswellford.com

790. Autos for Sale

790. Autos for Sale

‘02 Pontiac Montana for sale. $1950. Mileage 193,500. Call 865-919-2049.

2002 GMC Yukon Denali Loaded. Maroon color w/162,000 miles. Excellent Family Vehicle. Must sell . $7500.00 negotiable if really interested. Call 575-626-7030 to view

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2006 FORD E350, 15 passenger van, 1 owner, dual air, excellent cond., $7850. 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352.

2008 CHEVY Trail Blazer LS 4x4, 4dr, loaded excellent condition, $10,950. 420-1352. 1984 LINCON towncar, low mileage Call Joe for details. 420-3458. 1984 PONTIAC Parisienne, 68k miles, make offer. 575-626-7127

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

2011 HYUNDAI Sonata, loaded, 2800 mi, extra nice, $13,500. 626-0829 1970 Chevy p.u., new tires & wheels, auto, runs excellent, $2995, must see. 1976 280-Z Coupe, all original new tires, low miles, excellent college car, economical, $2995. 622-2537

84’ GMC 1/2 ton- Body Rough, New 350 Crate Motor- Needs paint, rebuilt 350 transmission- excellent work truck, new exhaust, new tires PW PDL No air. $2850. 626-1456 1998 CHEVROLET 1500 ext. cab Silverado, air, low miles, 3rd dr. 420-5727 2003 FORD F550 extended cab, 4x4, 7.3 V8 diesel, 1 owner, $10,500, 626-7488. FORD SPORT Trac 2009. Dark copper metallic, limited 4X4, V8 engine, leather, bed cover. Blue ox base plate, remote start 55k miles, one owner. $26,500. 626-7912

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


08 02 13 pages new layout