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Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 121, No. 161 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

INSIDE NEWS

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The Fourth of July fireworks show went off with a bang over San Diego Bay. Too big a bang. The Big Bay Boom show that was supposed to wow crowds for 20 minutes lasted only about 20 seconds after a computer mishap caused multiple bulb-shaped explosions on the bay, lighting the night sky over downtown San Diego and filling the air with deafening booms. - PAGE A3

July 6, 2012

FRIDAY

Hiring outlook improves; economy weak

WASHINGTON (AP) — The outlook for the U.S. job market brightened a little Thursday after the government said fewer people applied for unemployment benefits last week and surveys of private companies showed hiring increased in June.

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The economy is still far from healthy. U.S. service companies grew more slowly last month. Retail sales figures were disappointing. And central banks in

Splash dunk

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Europe and China cut their interest rates, an indication that they expect weaker growth ahead.

But despite all the gloom, American factories and service firms kept hiring in June. Economists say that suggests many companies are less worried that the spring slump will endure. Wall Street was mixed in light of the latest economic reports. Stocks fell early but recovered much of their losses by midday. Bad

news from Europe was offset by higher expectations for June job growth, which the government will report on Friday. The economy added an average of just 73,000 jobs a month in April and May. That’s much lower than the 226,000 a month that were added in the first three months of the year. And it’s far too low to reduce the unemployment rate, which See ECONOMY, Page A6

AP Photo

Mitt to open 4 in NM

A shopper walks the aisles of a Chicago Target store on Thursday.

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The Romney campaign is set to begin its push in New Mexico with four new offices throughout the state as it races to catch up with the Obama operation, the Republican National Committee announced Thursday.

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INSIDE SPORTS Mark Wilson Photo

Kids from the Family Resource & Referral’s After School Program beat the heat with a basketball game in the swimming pool at Cahoon Park, Thursday afternoon.

Rick Wiley, national political director of the Republican National Committee, said that the GOP is launching an aggressive effort this weekend to identify potential voters and recruit New Mexico volunteers, especially bilingual ones. Wiley said the New Mexico efforts are part of a national push Saturday across the country aimed at promoting newly anointed offices.

Midwest gets no relief New jobs report looms over from oppressive heat

BACK IN FINALS

WIMBLEDON, England (AP) — Serena Williams wins with so much more than serving, of course. Her groundstrokes are intimidating. Her superb speed and anticipation fuel unparalleled court-covering defense. Her returns are outstanding, too. When that serve is on-target, though, it sure is something special, quite possibly the greatest in the history of women’s tennis. Lashing a tournament-record 24 aces at up to 120 mph, and doing plenty of other things well, too, four-time ... - PAGE B1

TODAY’S • • • •

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Deborah Jo White Hector Omero Castillo Kenetha Diehl Jimmy L. Estrada - PAGE A7

HIGH ...95˚ LOW ....68˚

TODAY’S FORECAST

CLASSIFIEDS..........B5 COMICS.................B3 FINANCIAL .............B4 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........A8 LOTTERIES ............A2 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8 THE WEST ............A3

INDEX

MILWAUKEE (AP) — The temperatures in Casimir Brandon’s basement bedroom grew so stifling that the exhausted Madison man began riding city buses in the morning, from one end of the line to the other, so he could grab a few hours of air -conditioned sleep. Brandon is among those searching for any kind of relief as oppressive heat slams the middle of the country with record temperatures that aren’t going away after the sun goes down. So when the city of Madison transfor med a vacant convention center into a 24-hour cooling center, Brandon jumped at the chance to sleep in comfort. “I had a cot there, but I gave it up to a lady who had a kid,” said Brandon, 56. “But it’s OK. I just lined up six chairs and slept like a baby. I was just so tired from the previous two days that it wasn’t a problem at all.” St. Louis, Milwaukee,

Minneapolis, Chicago and several other Midwest cities already have set record highs this week or are on the verge of doing so. And with even low temperatures setting heat records, residents are left searching for any relief. The National Weather Service issued excessiveheat warnings Thursday for all of Illinois and Indiana, as well as parts of Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Missouri, Kentucky, Ohio and Michigan. Forecasts called for daytime temperatures from the mid- to high 90s into the low 100s. St. Louis hit a record high of 105 on Wednesday and a record low of 83. In Wisconsin, the coolest Milwaukee and Madison got was 81 in the early morning, beating previous low records by 2 and 4 degrees respectively. Temperatures didn’t fall below 79 in Chicago, 78 in Grand Rapids, Mich., and 75 in

JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

from out of town, only Marcantel was willing to be named. For the purposes of this article, the remainder will be referred to by their occupations. These include an undercover agent with the Chaves County Metro Gang Task Force, a student who grew up in gang territory and a criminologist who made a specific study of the local gangs.

See MITT, Page A6

Obama campaign bus trip SANDUSKY, Ohio (AP) — Campaigning by bus through swing state Ohio, President Barack Obama cast his re-election bid as a bet on the American worker Thursday, even as he braced for a Friday unemployment report that will help set battle lines for the hot summer to come. The monthly unemployment numbers could alter or harden voters’ views of Obama’s core re-election argument that he pulled the U.S. back from recession while Republican Mitt Romney embraces policies that led to an economic near-collapse. A weak report could undermine Obama’s position, while improvement could help the president — though concerns about jobs are sure to a major issue through Election Day. Obama tellingly chose to start his summer of

AP Photo

President Barack Obama talks with child at Ziggy’s Pub and Restaurant in Amherst, Ohio, Thursday.

on-the-road campaigning in two political battleground states that have a rosier economic outlook than some parts of the nation. Both Ohio and Pennsylvania had unem-

ployment rates of 7.3 percent in May, well below the national average of 8.2 percent. “This is how summer is

Only 3 ways to get out of gangs: Death, prison, injury

Part 1 of 3 Gangs are fact of life. The numbers appear intimidating until one views the national average. “We have 250 gangs with 78,000 members statewide. This is compared to 33,000 gangs and 1.4 million members nationwide,” said Tamara Marcantel with the New Mexico Gang Task Force in Santa Fe. Of the four people interviewed, three local and one

See HEAT, Page A6

The police agent reported that local gangs are neither as organized nor as competitive as gangs elsewhere. “Guys from the Eastside

gang will attend parties with people from Westside or Southside. It’s not like California, where a member of a gang can be shot for walking down the street in rival territory.”

The student, who grew up in the Eastside gang territory, disagreed. He said as he showed the gang sign, “You could get shot if you didn’t give the right sign.”

He spoke of intimidation and pointed to a map of Roswell. “This is Barria Fruta, and there used to be

quite a few shoot-outs here between them and the Eastside (Chihuahuita) gang.

The criminologist supported the student’s statement. “Some kids have to join a gang for their own safety.

Marcantel acknowledged that New Mexico gangs fought turf wars and often competed in criminal activities. However, she concurred with the local agent, saying they did not have the hard-and-fast hierarchy found in gangs elsewhere.

See OBAMA, Page A6

The criminologist presented another perspective. “These guys are not dumb. They are organized and do have a certain hierarchy. If you want to know who is in charge, you got to ask, ‘Who has the keys?’”

The police agent said the vendettas and drive-by shootings were not associated with gangs, but tended to be more personal, familial revenge reminiscent of the Hatfields and McCoys. According to the See GANGS, Page A6


A2 Friday, July 6, 2012

GENERAL

House Ag Cmte unveils its Aide: Palestinian leader 5-year farm and food bill wants more on Arafat

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Agriculture Committee on Thursday unveiled its approach for a long-term farm and food bill that would reduce spending by $3.5 billion a year, almost half of that coming from cuts in the federal food stamp program. The legislative draft envisions reducing current food stamp spending projections by $1.6 billion a year, four times the amount of cuts incorporated in the fiveyear, half-trillion-dollar far m bill passed by the Senate last month. Food stamps, formally known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, look to be the most contentious issue when the Agriculture Committee begins voting on the bill Wednesday and when the full House begins debating it in the future. Conservatives in the Republican-led House are certain to demand greater cuts in the food stamps program, which makes up about 80 percent of the nearly $100 billion a year in spending under the farm bill. Senate Democrats are equally certain to resist more cuts in a program that now helps feed 46 million people, 1 out of every 7 Americans. The House proposal, like the Senate measure that passed on a bipartisan 6435 vote, also does away with the much-criticized direct payment system whereby farmers get federal assistance even when they don’t plant a crop. Both put greater emphasis on crop insurance to help farmers get through natural disasters and falling prices. The House bill differs, though, in giving farmers a one-time choice between a revenue loss program to cover shallow losses before insurance kicks in and a new target price program to see producers through

deep, multiple-year price declines. The Senate bill contains only the revenue loss program, overriding the objections of Southern rice and peanut growers who have traditionally relied more heavily on price support programs. The two chambers are in a race to reach a compromise before Sept. 30, when the current far m bill expires. House GOP leaders have shown little enthusiasm for taking up the far m bill because of resistance from conservatives to the bill’s price tag, but the Agriculture Committee’s chairman, Rep. Frank Lucas, ROkla., and top Democrat, Rep. Collin Peterson of Minnesota, stressed its importance. Lucas said the bill, the result of two years’ work, “is reform-minded, fiscally responsible policy that is equitable for farmers and ranchers in all regions.” Peterson said that by failing to act before the September deadline, “We jeopardize one of the economic bright spots of our nation’s fragile economy.” The bills, in addition to setting commodity support and nutrition policy, also authorize conservation, trade, foreign food aid, rural development, forestry and energy programs. While the bills cover five years, the Congressional Budget Of fice measures their effects over 10 years, and in that time period the House bill would save taxpayers more than $35 billion, the Senate bill $23 billion. The House savings come from trimming about $14 billion in the commodity support programs, $6 billion by consolidating 23 conservation programs into 13 and $16 billion from food stamps. Savings in the Senate bill are similar for commodities and conservation but $12 billion less from food stamps.

The Senate derives its food stamp savings mainly by cracking down on a practice of some states of giving households as little as $1 a year in heating assistance, even when they don’t have heating bills, to make them eligible for increased food benefits. The House also closes this loophole while restricting a system wherein states can provide food benefits to those whose assets exceed legal limits for food stamps as long as they receive some other welfare benefit. It also ends Agriculture Department bonus payments to states that increase food stamp registrations. “America’s children, seniors and 1.5 million veteran households facing a constant struggle against hunger deserve better from Congress,” Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., who led Senate efforts to block food stamps cuts, said of the House bill. The House measure, like its Senate counterpart, leaves intact a program that protects sugar producers from foreign competition and creates a new subsidized insurance program for cotton. It does not include several amendments attached to the Senate bill, including one that required those getting subsidized crop insurance to comply with conservation requirements and another that reduce by 15 percentage points the share of crop insurance premiums the government pays for farmers with adjusted gross incomes of more than $750,000. Currently the government bears an average 62 percent of crop insurance premiums. The House bill also contains a provision, passed separately by the House last year, that eliminates a requirement that farmers obtain additional pesticide application permits under the Clean Water Act.

RPD arrests, charges Oscar Vargas Oscar Vargas, 17, was arrested on charges of armed robbery, unlawful taking of a motor vehicle, and unlawful possession of handgun by a minor and embezzlement, Thursday. The arrest followed an incident that took place on South Wells Street at 1:05 a.m., Thursday, where the suspect reportedly approached the victim at home and held him at gunpoint, stealing his car and his wallet. According to Sgt. Jim Preston, the Criminal Investigation Division

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detective responded and after reviewing the information connected the case with another earlier case, where the victim loaned Vargas a car that was eventually located in California. This time, of ficers located the vehicle still in Roswell, along with other evidence a few hours later. The Special Operation Response Team executed a search warrant at 33 Kelly Place at noon. The suspect was not present, but of ficials learned that he was located during a traffic stop on

Oscar Vargas

South Main Street. He has been charged and incarcerated at Chaves County Juvenile Detention Center.

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RAMALLAH, West Bank (AP) — Digging up Yasser Arafat’s bones may offer the best shot at learning if the legendary Palestinian leader was poisoned, as many of his old comrades-in-ar ms claim, but Palestinian officials signaled Thursday they’re not rushing into an autopsy. Arafat’s 2004 death remains shrouded in mystery, and this week’s findings by Switzerland’s Institute of Radiation Physics — that belongings linked to Arafat contained an elevated level of a radioactive agent — have revived speculation about foul play. However, the institute said more tests are needed, prompting Arafat’s widow Suha to demand that her husband’s remains, buried under a glass-andstone mausoleum in his former West Bank compound, be exhumed. Arafat’s successor, President Mahmoud Abbas, has agreed to an autopsy in principle, but it seems a final decision will take time. Abbas aide Nimr Hamad said Thursday that a team of experts would first be sent to Europe to learn more from the Swiss institute and from the French military hospital where Arafat died on Nov. 11, 2004. Another possible hurdle is consent by Arafat’s close relatives, particularly his nephew Nasser al-Kidwa, a for mer Palestinian envoy to the United Nations and — as head of the Yasser Arafat Foundation — the custodian of his uncle’s memory. Earlier this week, al-Kidwa seemed cool to the idea of an autopsy, telling the Arab satellite TV station al-Jazeera that he believes the findings by the Swiss institute are sufficient proof of his longstanding claim that Arafat was poisoned. Al-Kidwa has not been reachable for comment since then. Abbas has said he’ll only order an autopsy if the family is on board, but did not define whom he meant. A full-blown investigation could lead to uncomfortable questions for the Palestinian leadership. Fingers have been pointed at Israel, but if an autopsy were to reveal that Arafat were indeed poisoned, the probe would also have to look at Palestinians who had access to him. In the last three years of his life, Arafat was confined by Israel to his walled compound in the city of Ramallah, the Muqata. The Palestinian leader was seen by Israel and the U.S. as an obstacle to peace efforts and a sponsor of attacks that killed hundreds of Israelis. Israel has emphatically denied a role in Arafat’s death. “Israel did not kill him, I say that with certainty,” Dov Weisglas, a high-powered aide to thenIsraeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, told Israel TV on Thursday. Weisglas said that by that time, Arafat had already been marginalized. Israel had many chances over the years to assassinate Arafat, but decided not to, Weisglas added. In the fall of 2004, after the 75-yearold Arafat fell violently ill at his compound, Weisglas was among those negotiating with Palestinian officials over the terms of the besieged leader’s departure for medical treatment abroad. “The man was very, very sick,” Weisglas said of Arafat. He said one of the Palestinian interlocutors warned him at the time that if Arafat died in his compound, “just like for 2,000 years you had to prove you didn’t crucify Jesus, then for another 2,000 years you will have to prove you didn’t kill Arafat.” The former Sharon aide also suggested Arafat may have been killed by a medical mistake at the French military hospital. “What happened in France is they gave him a partial blood infusion,

AP Photo

Yasser Arafat, Oct. 2, 2004.

he recovered, then they gave him a full blood transfusion,” Weisglas said. “That was probably a medical mistake, and he went into shock and never recovered.” Senior French military doctor Denis Gutierrez said Thursday that he cannot comment on such claims because of French medical privacy laws. He said any information about a blood transfusion would be in the medical report that was submitted to Arafat’s family. At the time, French doctors said Arafat died of a massive stroke. According to French medical records, he had suffered inflammation, jaundice and a blood condition known as disseminated intravascular coagulation, or DIC. But the records were inconclusive about what brought about the DIC, which has numerous possible causes, including infections and liver disease. Outside experts who reviewed the available records on behalf of The Associated Press were also unable to pinpoint the underlying cause. The Arafat-linked belongings tested by the Swiss institute were provided by his widow, who is estranged from most of the Palestinian leadership and has lived outside the Palestinian territories since before her husband’s death. Mrs. Arafat has not explained why she waited this long to have the tests done, but was cooperating with Al-Jazeera, which first broadcast the findings on Tuesday. The Swiss institute detected elevated traces of the radioactive substance polonium-210 — extremely lethal in small doses — on Arafat’s belongings, including a toothbrush, a fur hat and underwear. Polonium’s most famous victim is KGB agent-tur ned-Kremlin-critic Alexander Litvinenko, who died in 2006 after losing all his hair and turning blue — symptoms not displayed by Arafat. Derek Hill, a radiological science expert at University College London, has said despite the natural decay of the substance after eight years, an autopsy should be able to tell “with a pretty high confidence” whether Arafat had polonium in his body when he died. Exhuming remains, particularly of a revered leader like Arafat, could potentially offend the sensibilities of ordinary Palestinians, though the top Muslim cleric in the Palestinian territories has said religion would not stand in the way of an autopsy. At the same time, the circle of those seeking a thorough investigation widened, with Tunisia asking the Arab League to hold a ministerial meeting to discuss the circumstances of Arafat’s death. Hanan Ashrawi, a senior PLO official, said Abbas assured her he would cooperate with any investigation. “We want to know. We want closure,” she said. “This was not an ordinary man.” Joining the chorus Thursday was Ismail Haniyeh, prime minister of the Gaza Strip government run by Arafat’s rival, the Islamic militant Hamas. “We support the extraction of the body of the late President Arafat for re-examination in order to discover the elements who facilitated the assassination,” he told an audience in Gaza.

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Lady you’ve been gone 13 ye ars on July 5th. You’ve not been forgot ten. We continue to Love and Miss you. Love, Jacob, Pete, Adrian, Oscar, Easy, Mathew & all the grandkids.

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THE WEST

A3

Milder weather helps SD fireworks malfunction in big, fast, 20-second flash crews in upper Rockies

Roswell Daily Record

tral and southeaster n Montana fanned the blazes earlier this week. The 382-square-mile Ash Creek fire was about 50 percent contained. Some ranches and homes near Ashland remained threatened, and Highway 212 between Ashland and Broadus was still closed. At the 67-square-mile Taylor Creek fire near Ft. Howes, managers worked to connect fire lines dug by local residents. The AP Photo complex also included the Tony Davis, of Franklin, N.C., fishes at Sodergreen Lake as Powerline fire, about 30 smoke from the Squirrel Creek fire billows in the back- miles from Hysham. Fireground east of Laramie, Wyo., Thursday afternoon. fighters contained a late Wednesday run of 400 acres on that blaze. CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) Bow National Forest. In Utah, rain and cooler — Firefighters took Firefighters also report- temperatures helped advantage of a lull in ed progress on a 145- crews hold fire lines on searing heat and shifting square-mile fire sur- the 8,200-acre Shingle winds in Wyoming and rounding Laramie Peak, fire about 30 miles southMontana on Thursday to about 100 miles north- east of Cedar City. The attack wildfires that have west of Cheyenne. fire threatened 550 cabcharred thousands of In southeastern Mon- ins and summer homes in acres and forced dozens tana, more than 1,300 Dixie National Forest. of residents to flee their personnel took advantage Up to a quarter-inch of homes. of calm winds and tem- rain fell on Utah’s largest Temperatures in the peratures in the 80s to wildfire, the 160-squaremid-80s, higher humidity and calm winds aided crews battling the 95square-mile Oil Creek fire just northwest of Newcastle, a town of about 3,500 near northeast Wyoming’s Black Hills. About 25 families were evacuated from Newcastle’s outskirts. The fire was 40 percent contained. In southeast Wyoming, heavy air power, including four large air tankers, helped increase containment of the 16-squareAP Photo mile Squirrel Creek fire to crews continue to battle a wildfire near Alpine, Utah, Air 51 percent. The tankers included two military Wednesday. The fire has charred 2,887 acres and C130s from a fleet that destroyed one barn since it started Tuesday afternoon. was reduced to seven Monday when one make headway on five crashed in South Dako- blazes that officials are mile Clay Springs fire east now managing as one of Delta. The blaze was 64 ta’s Black Hills. wildfire percent contained. 470-square-mile “We really knocked it The National Weather complex so they can for a change, instead of Service said moderate us getting whacked,” said quickly deploy resources temperatures were Larry Helmerick, spokes- among the blazes. expected in Colorado and “Slow and steady. We man at the fire. Authorities planned to allow want the lines to hold,” Wyoming through the more people to return to fire information officer weekend but warned that hot and dry weather was dozens of evacuated sum- Dixie Dies said. High winds and triple- expected to retur n to mer cabins near the Colorado line in Medicine digit temperatures in cen- Montana.

Waldo Canyon: Authorities know where fire started

AP Photo

Iris Johnson and her son Adrian Johnson dig through to salvage items from the remains of their home in the Mountain Shadows neighborhood of Colorado Springs, Colo., Thursday.

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Two people found dead in a home bur ned in the most destructive fire in Colorado history were a couple in their 70s, Colorado Springs police confirmed Thursday. Coroner’s officials identified the victims as William Everett, 74, and his wife, Barbara Everett, 73, police said. The two died in the Waldo Canyon fire, which has bur ned about 28 square miles and has damaged or destroyed almost 350 homes since it started June 23. Many residents who fled the fire have been allowed to return home, and Colorado Springs officials were lifting evacuation orders for 126 more homes Thursday evening. Fire managers hope to have the fire fully

contained today. Authorities said Thursday that they know where the fire started, but they haven’t disclosed where that is or what they think caused the fire. Meanwhile in Larimer County, authorities plan to try to use DNA evidence to officially identify a woman found dead during the High Park wildfire. Investigators believe rancher Linda Steadman was the person found dead inside her cabin but want to verify that with more evidence before closing the case. Steadman’s family said they saw the wildfire consume her cabin June 9. Steadman’s daughter -inlaw told KUSA-TV in Denver last month that other family members were moving cattle when they saw smoke from the fire and

rushed to the ranch but were pushed back by a “fire ball.” In western Colorado, firefighters were battling a wildfire near De Beque that was sparked by lightning and reported Wednesday. It’s burning on about 150 acres on Bureau of Land Management property on Kimball Mountain. Recent rain has helped calm the 38-square-mile Little Sand blaze that’s been burning for nearly two months near Pagosa Springs. Near Mancos, the 15square-mile Weber fire is 90 percent contained and should be fully contained today.

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The Fourth of July fireworks show went off with a bang over San Diego Bay. Too big a bang. The Big Bay Boom show that was supposed to wow crowds for 20 minutes lasted only about 20 seconds after a computer mishap caused multiple bulbshaped explosions on the bay, lighting the night sky over downtown San Diego and filling the air with deafening booms. The show’s producer blamed a “technical glitch” Thursday, saying an error in its computer system caused tens of thousands of fireworks on four barges to go off simultaneously with a single command. “Thank goodness no one was injured. Precautions all worked 100 percent,” said August Santore, partowner of Garden State Fireworks. Garden State Fireworks, based in Millington, N.J., apologized and vowed to determine precisely what went wrong. The 122-yearold company produced hundreds of other shows across the country Wednesday night. Santore said the company felt terrible, but the mood was unforgiving among many of the hundreds of thousands of people who witnessed the explosions before they could get of f their first “ooh” or “ah.” The crowd stood in quiet disbelief, with many wondering what just happened. Word went out on the radio about 20 minutes later that the show was over. “It was like a giant, serious bomb went off,” said Mike Newton, 29, a photographer who watched from a friend’s 28th-floor apartment. “That’s what it looked like and felt like. It hit you right in the chest.” Bre Nelson, a 26-year-old wedding planner, watched from a hillside street packed with “tons and tons of people and cars.” “It was really neat to see the entire sky light up but then we just waited there,” said Nelson. “Everyone was just sitting around.” Crowds had waited hours. The San Diego Trolley was packed, hotel

Friday, July 6, 2012

AP Photo

A malfunction causes the entire Fourth of July fireworks show to go off all at once over San Diego Bay near Coronado Island in San Diego, Wednesday. The Coast Guard says the mishap occurred minutes before the scheduled opening of the Big Bay Boom show. More than 500,000 people witnessed the short-lived spectacle. No injuries were reported.

rooms facing the bay were sold out, and a patriotic score was set to be simulcast on a local radio station. The show was set to stream live on the Web. Instead, the fireworks flop became a hit online by Thursday after noon, received more than 600,000 views on YouTube. Sponsors contributed about $380,000 to host the show, said Sandy Purdon, owner of a bay marina and the chief organizer. The Port of San Diego contributed $145,000 as title sponsor, with hotels and restaurants giving much of the rest. The port district gave an additional $50,000 worth of services, including traffic control, portable toilets and cleanup. The fireworks cost $125,000 and the barges and tugs cost $45,000, Purdon said. After permits, publicity, buses and other costs, there was about $50,000 left, which was earmarked to help young military families though the San Diego Armed Services YMCA. The port district said in a statement that it was “very disappointed” in what it described as an apparent technical error. It was unclear if anyone will get reimbursed. Purdon, who witnessed the explosions from his home with his sponsors, said he

had discussed with Garden State Fireworks the possibility that it foots the bill for next year’s Fourth of July show. Garden State Fireworks has staged pyrotechnic displays for the 1988 Winter Olympics, the Statue of Liberty Bicentennial Celebration and New Year’s Eve in Central Park in New York. “We are a good strong company, and we rely on technology. We’ll take the ridicule as long as no one was injured,” Santore said. The debacle will likely fuel a long-running controversy in San Diego about damage that fireworks displays inflict on marine life. Environmental attor ney Marco Gonzalez has repeatedly challenged shows that take place over water, inviting ire and ridicule from critics including San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders. Gonzalez recently prevailed in court decisions but decided against trying to block this year’s show in La Jolla Cove. Still, organizers of a fireworks show over San Diego’s Lake Murray canceled this year’s show, saying they feared a lawsuit. “The notion that fireworks are critical to Independence Day celebrations has just been blown out of proportion with these large shows,” Gonzalez said.

Bosque fire blamed on fake cigarette CORRALES (AP) — Corrales officials say a fire that burned more than 350 acres of the wooded area along the Rio Grande was most likely sparked by an electronic cigarette. Village Administrator John Avila says an employee apparently dropped the device while patrolling on June 20.

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The employee realized the device was gone after ducking under a tree limb. The fire started soon after. The employee tried to put out the flames, but Avila says the dry brush was quick to ignite. The fire ended up burning on both sides of the river. Police say no charges will be filed because the

cause was ruled accidental.

Avila says the village is handling the case as a personnel matter. He declined to release the employee’s name.

The village is now considering a new ordinance that would prohibit electronic cigarettes in the bosque.


July a happening month in state history A4 Friday, July 6, 2012

SANTA FE — July is a big month in New Mexico history. So as part of our continuing statehood centennial coverage, let’s talk about some of our July happenings. Historian Marc Simmons says New Mexico saw a July 4 celebration in Taos as early as 1825, only four years after opening of the Santa Fe Trail. Simmons says the early traders didn’t have an American flag so they used a flag with the American eagle on it. The Spanish likely recognized it as the Mexican eagle and cheered along, thinking the Americanos were adapting to the new culture amazingly fast. In the July 8, 1947, Roswell Daily Record, the banner headline blared that the Roswell Army Air Force Base had captured a flying saucer. That may be all that happened. Various people reported seeing falling objects, crashes or debris fields but none of it survived. Evidently the Army meticu-

EDITORIAL

OPINION

JAY MILLER

INSIDE THE CAPITOL

lously picked up everything. The following day, Army headquarters declared it was a weather balloon and nothing more was said. But the news release, issued by the base commander, went viral as they say now. Never before or since has a governmental agency announced the capture of a UFO. It was denied by “higher headquarters” the following day but there had to be some reason for the news release. So even though other places in the world have better UFO stories, Roswell always has remained king, drawing many visitors and events. Other New Mexico locations now have their own stories,

Roswell Daily Record

which draw tourists for a UFO tour of New Mexico to visit Socorro, Aztec, Magdalena and Archuleta Mesa, too. Billy the Kid was shot by Pat Garrett on July 14, 1881, in Fort Sumner. That was before statehood but Billy continues to roam the state causing trouble. In the past few years, the Kid has almost been dug up and almost pardoned for killing Sheriff Brady. The latest news about the Kid is that on June 16, someone broke into both Fort Sumner Billy the Kid museums. They were ransacked and weapons were stolen. They also broke into the cage that protects The Kid’s grave. They toppled the large “Billy and Pals” marker, then proceeded to the other graves in the cemetery and toppled, defaced or destroyed them. A $1,000 reward has been offered through Crimestoppers. Several individuals and groups are said to be planning to add to that

amount. According to Tim Sweet at the museum, the cemetery is being put back together. The big marker is back up but there has been some permanent damage to the old sandstone markers, which cannot be fixed. The Trinity explosion occurred on July 16, 1945, on what then was the Alamogordo Bombing Range. It was the first atomic bomb ever detonated. The blast was in the northeast corner of the range near U.S. 380. Scientists had made estimates of how dangerous they thought the blast would be. But no one knew for sure. They took care of their people and special guests. But ranchers in the area were not warned or evacuated. Some from the area showed immediate effects. Others developed cancer in future years. Some reported that government agents checking on them said their reactions were caused by being Hispanic.

Congress has passed laws compensating downwinders in Nevada and Utah from the Nevada atomic tests in the 1950s. But nothing has been done for downwinders of the Trinity test. An organization has been formed called the Tularosa Basin Downwinders Consortium to seek compensation through our congressional delegation. Bills were introduced in both houses of Congress last year. On July 14 this year, The Tularosa Downwinders are holding their third annual luminaria lighting and prayer vigil from 7 to 10 p.m. at the Tularosa Little League Field in cooperation with the Village of Tularosa. A Native American medicine man and other faith healers will participate. Legislators and other dignitaries have been invited. (Write to Jay Miller at 3 La Tusa, Santa Fe, NM 87505; by fax at 984-0982; or by e-mail at insidethecapitol@hotmail.com)

National Opinion Chaotic Pakistan

For years, Pakistan has ignored the Obama administration’s pleas to crack down on militants who cross from Pakistan to attack American forces in Afghanistan. Recent cross-border raids by Taliban militants who kill Pakistani soldiers should give Islamabad a reason to take that complaint more seriously. Recently, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, Pakistan’s army chief of staff, raised the issue in a meeting with Gen. John Allen, the commander of American and NATO forces in Afghanistan. He demanded that NATO go after the militants on the Afghan side of the border, according to Pakistani news reports. General Allen demanded that Pakistan act against Afghan militants given safe haven by its security services, especially the Haqqani network, which is responsible for some of the worst attacks in Kabul. Fighting extremists should be grounds for common cause, but there is no sign that Pakistan’s military leaders get it. Some in Congress want to designate the Haqqanis as a terrorist organization. That would be unwise because such a move could lead to Pakistan’s being designated a terrorist state subject to sanctions and make cooperation even harder. The United States has no choice but to try to work with Pakistan, including the army, when it can. Officials hope the crisis in relations caused by the killing of Osama bin Laden and other events will pass. Meanwhile, they are holding the Pakistanis more at arm’s length and setting narrower goals. After 2001, Pakistan had a chance to develop into a more stable country. It had strong leverage with the United States, which needed help to defeat Al Qaeda and the Taliban in Afghanistan. Pakistan received billions of dollars in aid and the promise of billions more, which Washington has begun to suspend or cancel. But the army continues its double game — accepting money from the Americans while enabling the Afghan Taliban — and the politicians remain paralyzed. Soon, most American troops will be gone from Afghanistan. And Pakistan will find it harder to fend off its enemies, real and perceived. Guest Editorial New York Times

Assad making enemy of neighbor

Syria’s president, Bashar Assad, has likely made a fatal mistake for the future of his regime by alienating Turkey. Early on in the 16-month uprising, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan called on Assad to cease shelling crowded neighborhoods in towns where the rebels had holed up and urged the second-generation dictator to begin instituting needed democratic and economic reforms. Assad ignored him, as he has other national leaders who have offered similar advice. Instead, he stepped up the pace of bloodshed and, with support from Russia and Iran, dug in for the long haul against the rebels. Turkey had been a bystander, reluctantly offering sanctuary to civilian refugees fleeing the fighting in Syria. However, Turkey has increasingly become a place for the rebels to retreat, refit and rearm, as well as a location for their wounded to be treated. It is now openly the headquarters of the umbrella rebel group, the Free Syrian Army. Russia was alarmed enough for the security of one of its few friends in the Mideast to begin readying shipment of a half-billion dollars worth of arms — fighter jets, helicopters, air defense systems to Syria. Those arms suggest the Russians are worried about outside military intervention. But the U.S. and the other Western nations have repeatedly disavowed any intention of intervening in Syria. The real threat, now that Assad has alienated Turkey, is better trained, armed and organized rebel forces operating from sanctuaries along the border. Erdogan said recently, “Turkey will support Syrian people in every way until they get rid of the bloody dictator and his gang.” Sounds like Assad has lost a friend. Guest Editorial The Gleaner, Henderson, Ky.

Obama, SCOTUS, taxes and freedoms

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled to uphold Obamacare’s individual mandate (indictment) to collect more taxes from you and me. President Barack Obama’s taxation shell game, which flies in the face of the freedoms we celebrate this week, is just one more reason his presidency and Obamacare need to be overturned this November. Chief Justice John Roberts wasn’t kidding when he offered the commentary about the court’s ruling: “It is not our job to protect the people from the consequences of their political choices.” Oba-

Doonesbury

DEAR DOCTOR K: I’ll be doing some high-altitude climbing this summer. What can I do to avoid altitude sickness? DEAR READER: A few months ago I faced the same question myself. I was going to be climbing in the mountains of South America. From past experience, I knew I wouldn’t feel very good once I got above 8,000 feet. At higher altitudes, there is less oxygen in the air. At altitudes above 8,000 feet, you may develop uncomfortable or dangerous symptoms. The first and mildest symptoms of altitude sickness are headache, fatigue, diminished appetite (developing sometimes into nausea and vomiting),

CHUCK NORRIS

SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

macare is taxation unleashed! Despite the fact that in 2009, Obama repeatedly denied to ABC News correspondent George Stephanopoulos that Obamacare’s individual mandate was equated with increased taxes, the Supreme Court defined the legislation as just that —

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

feeling lightheaded and unsteady on your feet, and having trouble falling asleep and staying asleep. More severe symptoms — brain and lung symptoms — also can develop at high altitudes. Mild fatigue can turn into extreme fatigue. You can have trouble walking normally. You can become confused and start acting like you’re drunk

more taxation. When Rep. Nancy Pelosi, DCalif., was asked by a reporter whether the financial penalty for not complying with Obamacare’s individual mandate is, in fact, a tax, she retorted: “Call it what you will. ... This is a very good thing for the American people.” Pelosi, who helped Obama ramrod the legislation, and Obama were frolicking like two kids in a candy store when they learned about the hallmark SCOTUS decision. But I doubt that middle-class taxpayers will be so ecstatic when they are footing the bill every year for another social-

even if you haven’t had a drop of alcohol. You can become unusually irritable. If the lungs start filling with fluid from high-altitude sickness, you can become unusually breathless and start coughing for no good reason. The severe brain and lung symptoms can become fatal without treatment. So, you’re smart to be proactive about avoiding altitude sickness. Here’s what I recommend, which is the same advice I followed myself: •Gradual changes in altitude will help your body adapt, so do not increase your altitude by more than 1,000 feet per night. See DR. K, Page A5

ized medicine program. Last week, CNN even confessed: “In 2014, the penalty (for not having medical insurance) will be no more than $285 per family or 1 percent of income, whichever is greater. In 2015, the cap rises to $975 or 2 percent of income. And by 2016, the penalty would be up to $2,085 per family or 2.5 percent of income, whichever is greater.” Bloomberg reported: “Some of the largest levies and fees in the 2010 law take effect in 2013. In all, the law is projected to raise an estimated

See NORRIS, Page A5

25 YEARS AGO

July 6, 1987 • Air man 1st Class Theresa R. Riley, daughter of Dorothy L. Grayham of Artesia, has been decorated with the Air Force Achievement Medal. The medal is awarded to airmen for meritorious service, acts of courage and other accomplishments. Riley is a photoprocessing specialist with the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing, She is a 1980 graduate of Artesia High School.


LOCAL

Roswell Daily Record

Clovis to host first Pure Energy Forum and Expo— early bird registration ends today The Clovis Industrial Development Corp., along with the Clovis/Curry County Chamber of Commerce and the Coalition of Renewable Energy Landowner Associations are pleased to join together to hold the Pure Energy Forum and Expo in Clovis. The event will be held on July 18-19 at the Clovis Civic Center.

The conference agenda includes the following topics: Tres-Amigas Superstation Project, Economic Impact of Wind Energy Development, Working with Military Bases and Wind Energy Development, FERC - Transmission Construction and Planning, What is ERCOT and What Role will ERCOT Play in Projects, Landowner’s Institute Program Update and Overview,

Southwest Power Pool and its Role in Electric Reliability, SWAT in Transmission Renewable Energy and Consumer Rates (NM PRC Chair Patrick Lyons), SacTec Solar (Off Grid Solar Devices), PURPA/LCEC's Generation Plant, and a Broadview Energy Project (Texas/New Mexico) Overview.

T res Amigas, SunZia, and Xcel Energy are some of the companies that will have speakers who will be presenting throughout the day on July 18, discussing upcoming energy projects. Greg Wortham, URENCO, and ITC Great Plains are a few of the speakers who will be presenting information on the economic impact of wind development as well as nuclear power and its future in

electric generation will be topics discussed on July 19.

Event hosts include the Greater Tucumcari Economic Development Corporation, Clovis/Curry County Chamber of Commerce, Coalition of Renewable Landowners Associations, Portales/Roosevelt County Chamber of Commerce and the Clovis Industrial Development Corp. The registration fee for the two days is $50 per person. If you register for the early bird discount rate by July 6. Spouses can attend the event for $20. If you are interested in more details, attending or sponsoring the event, please visit pureenergyexpo.com or call Gene Hendrick at 575-763-6600.

Sale this Saturday to help Mothers of Preschoolers

Garage Sale

MOPS — Mothers of Preschoolers — will be having a garage sale Saturday

Norris

from 7 a.m. to noon at Church on the Move, 901 W. Brasher Road. They will be taking donations for items, as well as of fer a wide selection on sale. Call Andrea at 420-3035 for more information.

Volleyball Camp

The Roswell Parks & Recreation Department is

Continued from Page A4

$813 billion in revenue over 10 years to help pay for the expansion of insurance coverage, according to the Congressional Budget Office. That figure includes penalties under the individual mandate, which the court ruled is constitutional under Congress’ taxing power.” The fact is that behind closed doors with the Supreme Court justices and out of view of the public, the legal teams from the Obama administration pitched Obamacare as a tax. Obama and his legal eagles lied to the public to get the legislation passed on Capitol Hill and then described it as a tax to pass it before SCOTUS. They knew that the court knows that the Constitution gives Congress the power to tax in order to carry out its duties, and that was their ticket to manipulate their way to victory. On March 26, the first day of Obamacare arguments before the Supreme Court, Fox News reported that a top Obama lawyer was chided by the justices for calling the fine for not purchasing insurance both a “penalty” and a “tax.” Even U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli repeatedly used the phrase “tax penalty” to describe noncompliance with the individual mandate. Then Justice Samuel Alito rebuffed, “General Verrilli, today you are arguing that the penalty is not a tax. Tomorrow you are going to be back, and you will be arguing that the penalty is a tax.” Verrilli answered Justice Elena Kagan’s question of whether noncompliance with the individual mandate would result in breaking the law by saying that if people “pay the tax, then they are in compliance with the law.” That reference caught the attention of Justice Stephen Breyer, who interjected, “Why do you keep saying tax?” To require people to pay a penalty for not buying health insurance is a tax. And I vehemently disagree with Pelosi that Obamacare’s new taxes are “a very good thing for the American people” — in or out of a recession — simply because more government regulations and taxation restrict our freedoms and pocketbooks. The actions of Obama’s federal gov-

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

•Each time you increase your altitude by 3,000 feet, spend a second night at this elevation before going farther. •Limit your physical exertion to reasonable levels during your first few days of ascent to altitude. •Drink plenty of fluid during your altitude exposure. •If you develop early signs of altitude sickness, immediately stop ascending, or descend to an elevation where you last felt well. Otherwise, your symptoms may worsen or become deadly. If you have had altitude sickness in the past, talk to your doctor before returning to a high altitude. You may have the option of taking preventive medication. Mild symptoms (particularly sleep disruption, but possibly other symptoms as well) can be limited. Acetazolamide (Diamox, others) or the corti-

sponsoring sports conditioning clinics. The co-ed clinics are open to ages 8 to 14. The Volleyball Camp will be Monday through Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Cost is $25 and will take place at the Yucca Recreation Center, 500 S. Richardson Ave. For more information, call 624-6719.

ernment are diametrically opposed to those of America’s framers, who adopted the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. Thomas Jefferson, who penned the original draft of the Declaration of Independence, wrote roughly 40 years later, in 1816, to Samuel Kercheval: “We must make our election between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we run into such debts as that we must be taxed in our meat and in our drink, in our necessaries and our comforts, in our labors and our amusements, for our callings and our creeds, as the people of England are, our people, like them, must come to labor sixteen hours in the twenty-four, give the earnings of fifteen of these to the gover nment for their debts and daily expenses, and the sixteenth being insufficient to afford us bread, we must live, as they now do, on oatmeal and potatoes; have no time to think, no means of calling the mismanagers to account; but be glad to obtain subsistence by hiring ourselves to rivet their chains on the necks of our fellow-sufferers.” Does that not describe Obama’s fundamental transformation of America to a T? Happy birthday, America! We still are celebrating and fighting for your founding principles and freedoms! Another great summer patriotic gathering is the Patriot Academy, which is a six-day leadership and political training camp for students — from age 16 — and adults, too. Patriot Academy is held each summer in Austin, Texas, and the 2012 session — its 10th anniversary — will be held from July 30 to Aug. 4. Patriot Academy is hosted and sponsored by my friends Rick Green and David Barton from WallBuilders and also is taught by other insightful, inspirational leaders from around the country. Space is limited to only 100 students and 100 adults for the new adult track. For more information or to r egister today, go to http://www.patriotacademy.com. Follow Chuck Norris through his official social media sites, on Twitter @chucknorris and Facebook’s “Official Chuck Norris Page.” He blogs at http://chucknorrisnews.blogspot.com. © 2012 Chuck Norris costeroid dexamethasone can help, but these drugs do not prevent serious forms of altitude sickness. If you previously developed a condition in which fluid entered your lungs at high altitudes, a calcium-channel blocker or long-lasting beta agonist (or both) may be prescribed. Symptoms of altitude sickness can be difficult to recognize in oneself. Keep an eye on your climbing companions and ask them to keep an eye on you. On my recent trip, I did develop mild altitude sickness at 9,000 feet, which became more severe at 11,000 feet. Acetazolamide gave me relief. And I decided that I’ve reached the point in my life when self-preservation trumps my spirit of adventure: I won’t be venturing that high again. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)

Friday, July 6, 2012

A5


A6 Friday, July 6, 2012

Economy Continued from Page A1

rose to 8.2 percent in May. Before Thursday, most economists didn’t expect much change from that pace. They forecast that employers added 90,000 jobs last month, while the unemployment rate didn’t change, according to a survey by Factset. But several sounded slightly more optimistic after seeing a slate of better data. Weekly unemployment benefit applications dropped by 14,000 to a seasonally adjusted 374,000, the Labor Department said Thursday. That’s the fewest since the week of May 19. Payroll provider ADP said businesses added 176,000 jobs last month. That’s better than the revised total of 136,000 jobs it reported for May and, if sustained, would be enough to lower the unemployment rate. Goldman Sachs responded to the better data by raising its forecast to a gain of 125,000 jobs last month, up from its initial prediction of 75,000. Brian Bethune, chief economist for Alpha Economic Foresights LLC, said he expects job growth of 120,000 to 140,000. But he warned that even those figures were too weak to bring down unemployment. Economists typically say it takes at least 125,000 new jobs each month to absorb population growth. The Institute for Supply Management said its index of non-manufacturing sector growth fell last month to 52.1. That’s down from 53.7 in May and the lowest reading since January 2010. Still, any reading above 50 signals growth. The sector has been growing since

Mitt

Continued from Page A1

“We’re testing our staff and testing our voter ID operations,” said Wiley. “We are slowly ramping up.”

The move comes months after as the Obama campaign opened of fices throughout the state, including Albuquerque, Las Cruces, and Las Vegas. President Obama also has visited the state, and First Lady Michelle Obama recently included New Mexico as part of a campaign swing through western states. Wiley said former Mas-

Heat

Continued from Page A1

Indianapolis. Many cities have tried to help by opening cooling centers and extending the hours for their public pools. Compounding the high heat in Michigan was damage wrought by storms. More than 300,000 homes and businesses across the state were without power Thursday. In St. Louis, where three deaths have been blamed on the heat, officials have called about 4,000 residents, many of them elderly or disabled. For those who didn’t answer their phones, officials went out in person to check on them. Dozens of cooling centers have

Gangs

Continued from Page A1

agent, crime, too, was a matter of individual choice rather than specifically gang-related. During a court case tried in November 2011, a gang member testified

December 2009. The report covers a range of businesses, from retail stores and restaurants to health care companies and financial services firms. Even though growth slowed in June, those fir ms increased hiring. An index that measures employment rose in June to 52.3 from 50.8 in May. Earlier in the week, a separate ISM survey of factory activity showed manufacturing shrank in June for the first time since July 2009, one month after the Great Recession ended. Yet that survey also noted that hiring at factories remained at a healthy level. The contrast between the weak readings on overall growth and solid readings on hiring indicates companies aren’t worried about a major slowdown. The ISM reports suggest that fir ms may not view slower output and softer demand “as sufficient to alter hiring plans,” said Michael Gapen, an economist at Barclays Capital. Companies are also planning fewer layoffs, according to a survey by Challenger, Gray & Christmas, a firm that helps find laidoff workers new jobs. U.S. employers announced 37,551 job cuts last month, the fewest in 13 months,the survey said Thursday. Despite recent signs that the economy is slowing, “employers appear reluctant to shed too many workers,” said John Challenger, CEO of the firm. The ADP survey has often deviated sharply from the government report, so economists approached the June results with some caution. The ADP report only covers hiring in the private sector and excludes government job growth. Other economic reports sachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney had to wait to win the GOP nod after the primary before opening New Mexico offices and those in other states. “Does (the Obama campaign) have year head start on us? Yes,” said Wiley. “But we are getting our operations in place.” He said the Romney camp plans to have an army of bilingual volunteers to reach out to New Mexico’s large Hispanic population — an important block in the nation’s most Hispanic state. Campaign officials say they also hope to utilize Gov. Susana Martinez, a Republican and the nation’s first elected Latibeen set up, a charity is providing air conditioners, and a utility-assistance program will help about 1,500 households get caught up on their electric bills. In Chicago, the Shedd Aquarium lost power Thursday as temperatures soared to 103 degrees, a record for July 5. Officials said emergency generators immediately kicked in and the outage never threatened any of animals, but several hundred visitors were sent back out into the heat. Some parents and grandparents in northern Indiana brought children to play on a splash pad at a park in Mishawaka. Some people, particularly in the upper Midwest, said about a gang-related murder that he witnessed. “All I could think was, ‘This is it. My mother was right. She tried to tell me to change.’ But that’s the gang lifestyle. There are only three ways out of a gang: You’re going to end up dead; you’re going to prison; or

Crimestoppers

GENERAL

have been disappointing. Retailers are reporting weak sales for June as worries about the economy and jobs make people pull back on spending. The results raise concerns about Americans’ ability to spend for the back-to-school shopping season. Costco Wholesale Corp. reported a gain below Wall Street expectations. Target Corp. also missed estimates, posting a modest increase. Teen retailer Wet Seal Inc. reported a bigger -thananticipated decline. And Europe’s debt crisis is a constant threat to the U.S. economy. The European Central Bank cut its key interest rate by a quarter-point to a record low 0.75 percent in an effort to boost Europe’s flagging economy. The central bank also cut the rate it pays to commercial banks on over night deposits to zero. That is intended to push banks to lend more rather than hold reserves at the ECB. In addition, Mario Draghi, president of the ECB, said the economy in the 17 nations that use the euro would recover only gradually and the risks “continue to be on the downside.” He also suggested the interest rate cut would only have a limited impact on the economy. Meanwhile, China’s central bank cut a key lending rate for the second time in a month. The world’s second-largest economy is battling its worst economic slump since the 2008 financial crisis. China’s economy expanded at an 8.1 percent annual pace in the first three months of the year, runaway growth in most countries, but the slowest in nearly three years in China. na governor, to reach out to Hispanic independents.

Officials say Romney workers and volunteers will have goals on the number of knocked doors, among other benchmarks.

RNC spokesman Ted Kwong said the campaign is opening up offices in Albuquerque, Las Cruces, Roswell and Farmington. He said the campaign will open more in the coming weeks.

New Mexico is one of several Wester n states that both Republicans and Democrats are focused on winning in November.

they don’t normally need air conditioning in their homes and are trying to get by without buying one. The heat has also taken a toll on agriculture.

Dean Hines, the owner of Hines Ranch Inc. in the western Wisconsin town of Ellsworth, said he found one of his 80 dairy cows dead Thursday, an apparent victim of the heat. He said he was worried about the rest of his herd, in terms of death toll, reproductive consequences and milk production.

“We’re using fans and misters to keep them cool,” he said. “It’s been terrible. When it doesn’t cool down at night, the poor animals don’t have a chance to cool down.” you’re going injured.”

to

be

The criminologist agreed. “The only way to get out of a gang is death, going to prison, or injury. Do you know why injury is a way out? When you get injured you are semiretired.”

j.palmer@rdrnews.com

1-8 88-594 -TIPS

STATE BRIEFS

Water improperly diverted ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The water utility in Albuquerque inadvertently diverted farmers’ irrigation water from the Rio Grande for more than a week in late June and used it for the city’s drinking water supplies. The Albuquerque Journal reports that John Stomp, chief operating officer of the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility, acknowledged the improper diversions and agreed to pay back the farmers. Officials say the problem arose because the Rio Grande is currently so dry that almost all the current flow in the Rio Grande through Albuquerque is water imported from the Colorado River Basin via a series of tunnels beneath the continental divide in souther n Colorado and northern New Mexico. The problem reflects the increasing dif ficulty of managing flows on the river in dry years. Shorter state fair ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — This year’s edition of the New Mexico State Fair is going to be shorter. KOB-TV reports that fair organizers recently announced that the fair is streamlining down to just 12 straight days in September, instead of the 17day stretch. The move comes as fair attendance fell to around 400,000 last year, about 30,000 fewer people than

Obama

Continued from Page A1

supposed to feel,” Obama said, wiping sweat from his face he campaigned under scorching sun for four more years in office. His trip through northern Ohio gave him a postJuly 4 splash of Americana: Main streets and U.S. flags, cornfields and fruit stands, community soccer sign-ups and American Legion halls, small children climbing on fathers’ shoulders to see the president’s bus go by. Obama was greeted kindly wherever he went and bounded through his day, high-fiving the kids and hugging grandmothers. As he kicked off Thursday’s 250-mile trip in Maumee, Ohio, Obama said he had “refused to turn my back on communities like this one.” The president, speaking at an early 19th-century museum complex dotted with red-white-and-blue bunting and American flags, claimed credit for Ohio’s improving economy, especially its rejuvenated automobile industry. The White House said the Obama-backed auto bailout helped dramatically increase sales of Chrysler’s Jeep Wrangler

Roswell Daily Record 2010. Fair managers are hoping the new schedule will pick things up. This year’s fair will start a little later than usual on Sept. 12 and it will close on Sept.23. Unemployment benefits SANTA FE (AP) — The Department of Workforce Solutions says fewer weeks of unemployment benefits will be available to jobless New Mexicans because of a change in federal law. A maximum of 60 weeks of unemployment compensation will be offered effective July 7. That’s down from 73 weeks. The department says some federally funded unemployment benefits are expiring because the state’s three-month average unemployment rate is below 7 percent. A 6 percent rate previously triggered an additional 13 weeks of benefits for jobless workers. The department says New Mexicans who qualified for 73 weeks of benefits before July 7 can continue to receive the payments during a phase-out period. Workers must weekly certify their eligibility. Church fire LOS ALAMOS (AP) — A fire has destroyed a chapel in Los Alamos and caused significant damage to an adjoining main church. The Los Alamos Monitor reports that the cause of Wednesday’s blaze at the New Beginnings Fellow-

ship Assembly of God Church is unknown. Deputy fire chief Justin Grider says the fire is believed to have started inside the chapel. Grider says the fire spread to the hallway separating the main church and the chapel. The main church received smoke damage. There also was an area in the back of the church that burned and received significant smoke damage. No injuries were reported. Inmate dies SANTA FE (AP) — A woman awaiting release from the Santa Fe County jail was found dead in her cell. The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that the cause of death for 33-year -old Eusemia Rodriguez is unknown and under investigation. Authorities say no foul play appears to have been involved in Rodriguez’s death on Wednesday morning. Rodriguez was due to be released Tuesday after her arrest that same day on charges of battery on a household member Victor and Frank Gomez, Rodriguez’s brothers, say they believe their sister had asked for medical attention and did not receive it. When jail authorities went to release Rodriguez, she was unresponsive and not breathing.

and Liberty, made in nearby Toledo. Obama said Ohio’s economic gains could be replicated nationwide. In an economic appeal to working class voters, the president also announced his administration was launching an unfair trade complaint against China with the World T rade Organization. The complaint centers on new Chinese duties on American-made cars that the U.S. contends violate international trade rules. As his day of campaigning stretched into dusk, Obama took a fresh shot at Romney on taxes, saying the Republican’s plan would cut taxes for the wealthy at the expense of education spending and health care for the elderly. And Obama defended his health care overhaul during his first campaign appearance since the law was upheld by the Supreme Court. “The law I passed is here to stay,” he said. “It is going to make the vast majority of Americans more secure.” Friday’s jobs report was on many minds, too. Obama aides have been anxiously awaiting the new numbers, which follow a dismal May report that showed an uptick in

the unemployment rate to 8.2 percent and raised concerns about a further economic slowdown. Obama already faces an uphill battle convincing some voters he is the right steward for the economy. An Associated Press-GfK poll released last month found that more than half of those surveyed, 52 percent, disapproved of his handling of unemployment, compared with 45 percent who approved. The bus trip marked a new phase of Obama’s reelection campaign as he takes a more retail-oriented approach before the September Democratic convention in Charlotte, N.C. Among his events in Ohio Thursday was an ice cream social in Sandusky and remarks in a park in Parma, a suburb of Cleveland. As Obama made his way from Maumee to Sandusky, Ohio, he made an unannounced stop at Kozy Corners, a diner in the town of Oak Harbor, where he greeted the lunchtime crowd. He bought fruit at a roadside stand along the shores of Lake Erie, where he picked up a dozen ears of corn, plus some peaches and cherries. And he drank a beer at a bar in Amherst and chatted with patrons.

Roswell Parks & Recreation Department’s

Yucca Recreation Center 500 S. Richardson

July 9-12 8:30am-12pm

Open to ages 8-14 yrs (Bring snack & water bottle)

$25.00

624-6719

Join Volleyball Coach Monika Trujillo other all star college & high school standouts


NATION/OBITUARIES/RECORDS

Roswell Daily Record

OBITUARIES

Deborah Jo White

Deborah Jo Crawford White, of Roswell, passed away peacefully with her family by her side on Sunday, July 1, 2012, in Lubbock, Texas. She was 44 years old. A memorial service for Debbie will be held at 11a.m., Saturday, July 7, 2012, at Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home Chapel with Cecil Kimberlin officiating. Bor n the baby of the family, Debbie was born on Sept. 12, 1967, in Culver City, Calif., to Frank Sr. and Dotia Jo (Sexton) Crawford. Debbie faced many battles throughout her life; she always was the victor due to her strong will and faith. She was a proud mother of her sons, Jason and Ethan. Debbie would always tell others of how proud they made her. She loved to make crafts, especially scrapbooking, taking care of her plants and cheering for the Minnesota Vikings. Debbie liked to enjoy the outdoors with her late husband George, by going fishing and boating. Playing bingo at the Sertoma Club and playing slot machines with her parents Frank and Jo, brought Debbie happiness. She loved to spend time with her family and never missed a family get together. Working as a cashier at the Brewer Gas Station, Debbie loved meeting and visiting with everyone she helped. Debbie was a genuine friend to all who knew her, her good heart and easy demeanor made her a very lovable person. Debbie will be reunited in

PUBLIC RECORDS

heaven with her husband George White; infant son; Jacob Delano Crawford; and maternal grandparents Tom and Zela Crawford. Those left to cherish Debbie’s memory are sons, Jason Grear, of Houston, and Ethan White, of Kerrville, Texas; parents Frank Sr. and Jo Crawford, of Roswell; siblings, Frank Crawford Jr. (Misty), of Kerrville, and Kelley Crawford (Steve), of Corrales; nephews, Joey Yates (Jenny), of Ft. Carson, Colo., Tyler Crawford, of Maple Valley, Wash., Josh Yates, of Roswell, Tanner Crawford (Tillie), of Roswell, and Andrew Crawford (Charlotte), of Roswell; great-aunt Doris Henderson (Cleo), of Blue Springs, Mo.; aunts, Jean Sexton, of Carson City, Nev., and Mickey Crawford (Craig), of Colorado Springs, Colo.; uncles, Tony Crawford (Sandra), of Rio Rancho, John Sexton (Margie), of Ft. Mojave, Ariz., and Ken Crawford, of Roswell; cousins, Bert Sexton, of Sparks, Nev., John Sexton, of Texas, Susan Sexton, of Missouri, Mike Sexton, of California, Sandie Sexton, of Califor nia, Raychel Brown, of Colorado, Matthew Crawford, of Colorado, Alex Crawford, of Rio Rancho, and Zach Crawford, of Rio Rancho; great-nieces, Makenzie, Marisa and Maci; family friends, Terry and Myrnell Tur ner, of Roswell, and Misty Wood Crawford, of Rio Rancho; and special friends, Cissy Cavin, Jerry Howden and Sammie Marker, all of Roswell. Honorary pallbearers will be “the loves of her life,” Debbie’s nephews, Joey Yates, Tyler Crawford, Josh Yates, Tanner Crawford and Andrew Crawford. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation in Debbie’s memory to The National Kidney Foundation at kidney.org, or the Roswell Humane Society, 703 E. McGaf fey St., Roswell, NM 88203. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories in the online register book at anderson-

Accidents May 15 6:55 p.m. — Kentucky and Deming; driver — Lance Housewright, 22, of Roswell. June 26 1 p.m. — 405 W. Country Club parking lot; drivers — vehicle owned by Ernest Buckham, and Joseph Garner, 23, both of Roswell. July 2 10:13 p.m. — 1315 N. Main parking lot; vehicle owned by Jimmy Montoya, of Roswell, and unknown driver. July 3 10:23 a.m. — Main and Hobbs; drivers — Leslie Romero, 23, and Katrina Artiaga, 19, both of Roswell. 11:46 a.m. — 900 W. Second parking lot; drivers — Delora Par mer, 47, and vehicle owned by Deana Bozarth, both of Roswell. 3:33 p.m. — College and Union; drivers — Elmajean Hoyenga, 92, and Christopher Mendoza, 30, both of Roswell. 10:41 p.m. — Main and 22nd; drivers — Rikki K. Ornelas, 18, and Ronald E. Biggers, 65, both of Roswell.

Roswell Daily Record would like to recognize

Roswell Seed Company

for their wonderful support to

Goddard High School by supporting

Newspapers in Education for the 2011-2012 school year.

115 South Main Roswell, NM 88203

bethany.com. Arrangements are under the direction of Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

Kenetha Diehl

Hector Omero Castillo

Funeral services will be held at Ballard Chapel, Roswell, on Friday, July 6, 2012, at 10 a.m., for Hector Omero Castillo, 57, of Hobbs. Hector passed away Friday, June 29, 2012, in Lubbock, Texas. Officiating will be Hector’s brother, Jose Manuel Castillo. Burial will follow in South Park Cemetery. Hector was born on Feb. 6, 1955, in Sanderson, Texas, to Pablo Castillo and Florentina (Narvaiz) Castillo, who preceded him in death. He worked in the oilfields near Hobbs. Hector is survived by his wife Benita, of Hobbs; sons, Hector Navarette (Stephanie Garcia), of Hobbs, Augustine Castillo, of Midland, Texas, David Castillo, of Roswell; his daughters, Cruz Linda Castillo (Jonathan), of Dumas, Texas, Pricilla Castillo (Rudy Zaragosa), of Amarillo, Texas, and Monica Navarette, of Artesia; brothers, Pablo Castillo, Jose Manuel Castillo and Arthur Castillo, all of Albuquerque, and Gustavo Castillo, of Roswell; and his sister Margarita Castillo, of Albuquerque. Hector was the proud grandfather of 16 grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at ballardfuneralhome.com.

A celebration of the home-going of Kenetha Diehl’s life is scheduled for Saturday, July 7, 2012, at 2 p.m., in the AndersonBethany Funeral Home Chapel with the Rev. Melvin Suttle, of the First Assembly of God Church, officiating. Kenetha passed away July 4, 2012, surrounded by her family. She was 71 years old. Kenetha Noretha Diehl was born in Hazard County, Ky., the daughter of George Oscar Ross and Beatrice Pauline (Mooney) Ross, on Feb. 22, 1941. Kenetha dedicated her life to helping others, and was a CNA for many years. Her other passion was being around people, which she was able to do as a greeter at Walmart until her retirement. Kenetha was a wonderful and caring person, a wife, a mentor, a friend, a loving mother and grandmother and now angel of God, who will be greatly missed by all who knew her. Kenetha is survived by her five children, Pauline Hickey and her husband Dion, of Roswell, Delbert Diehl, of Diboll, Texas, Randy Diehl, of Roswell, Scott Diehl, of Dilley, Texas, and Don Diehl and his wife Tammy, of Kansas; five siblings, Jesse Ross and his wife Fran, of Kentucky, Oscar Ross and his wife Donna, of Michigan, Ed Ross and his wife Diane, of Iowa, Dee Norris and her husband the Rev. Ron, of Missouri, Charlotte Cox and her husband Pastor Roger, of Kentucky; brother in law Robert Wes-

ley, of Amarillo, Texas; 22 grandchildren; 15 greatgrandchildren; and many nephews and nieces, who loved her very much. Preceding Kenetha in death were her parents, husband, two sisters, one grandchild and two greatgrandchildren. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories in the online register book at andersonbethany.com. Arrangements are under the direction of Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

Friday, July 6, 2012

A7

da. He was raised in Roswell, and graduated from Goddard High School in 1973. He received his accounting degree from Eastern New Mexico University.

He came to Carlsbad in 1975, where he was employed as a potash miner, after which he began and successfully completed a career in law enforcement, obtaining certifications in various fields before retiring in 2005. After retirement, he obtained his private investigator license with BMB Protective Services Inc., and also worked part time at Denton-Wood Funeral Home.

He was preceded in death by his grandparents, and his father Guadalupe Estrada.

Jimmy L. Estrada

CARLSBAD — Jimmy L. “Jim” Estrada, 57, of Carlsbad, passed away Monday, July 2, 2012, at Carlsbad Medical Center. Visitation will be from 3 to 7:30 p.m., Friday, July 6, 2012, at Denton-Wood Funeral Home. The family will receive friends from 4 to 6 p.m. A vigil is scheduled for Friday, July 6, 2012, at 7:30 p.m., at Denton-Wood Funeral Home Chapel, 1001 N. Canal St., Carlsbad, with the Rev. Valentine Jankowski, OFM, Conv. officiating. Funeral services are scheduled for Saturday, July 7, 2012, at 2p.m., at Denton-Wood Funeral Home Chapel with Mike Veilleux officiating. Interment will follow in Carlsbad Cemetery. Denton-Wood Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Jimmy L. “Jim” Estrada was born April 25, 1955, in Artesia, to Guadalupe F. and Eva J. (Warner) Estra-

Survivors are his wife Pearlene Estrada, of Carlsbad; children, Tim Estrada and wife Danialle, of Carlsbad, Eva Joy Price, of Sulphur Springs, Texas, Justin Estrada and wife Christa, of Carlsbad, and Michael Estrada, of Albuquerque; grandchildren, Kile, Mikalah, A.J., Mason, Josie, Laken, Mattney, Kilea, Nye, Jackson Wade and Jacie; mother Eva Jane Estrada, of Roswell; sisters, Rachel Aguilar and husband Larry, of Carlsbad; Virginia Cardona and husband Robert, of Roswell; father- and mother -in-law Ray and Goldie Bradshaw, of Carlsbad; brother and sister -in-law Eddie and Betsy Bradshaw, of Keller, Texas; sister-inlaw Caroline Bradshaw, of Carlsbad; and numerous aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins. Pallbearers will be Tim Estrada, Justin Estrada, Jamie Martinez, J.W. Bradshaw, Jacob Laird, Eddie Bradshaw, Sam Dorado, Michael Estrada and Wayland Bradshaw.

Memorial contributions may be made to Shorthorn Little League, P.O. Box 3228, Carlsbad, NM 88220 Condolences may be expressed at dentonwood.com.

US fixed mortgage rates fall to new record lows WASHINGTON (AP) — Fixed U.S. mortgage rates fell again to new record lows, providing prospective buyers with more incentive to brave a modestly recovering housing market. Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday that the average on the 30year loan dropped to 3.62 percent. That’s down from 3.66 percent last week and the lowest since longterm mortgages began in the 1950s. The average rate on the 15-year mortgage, a popular refinancing option, slipped to 2.89 percent, below last week’s previous

record of 2.94 percent. The rate on the 30-year loan has fallen to or matched record low levels in 10 of the past 11 weeks. And it’s been below 4 percent since December. Cheap mortgages have provided a lift to the longsuffering housing market. Sales of new and previously occupied homes are up from the same time last year. Home prices are rising in most markets. And homebuilders are starting more projects and spending at a faster pace. The number of people who signed contracts to buy previously occupied

homes rose in May, matching the fastest pace in two years, the National Association of Realtors reported last week. That suggests Americans are growing more confident in the market. Low rates could also provide some help to the economy if more people refinance. When people refinance at lower rates, they pay less interest on their loans and have more money to spend. Many homeowners use the savings on renovations, furniture, appliances and other improvements, which help drive growth. Still, the pace of home

sales remains well below healthy levels. Many people are still having difficulty qualifying for home loans or can’t afford larger down payments required by banks.

And the sluggish job market could deter some would-be buyers from making a purchase this year. The U.S. economy created only 69,000 jobs in May, the fewest in a year. The unemployment rate rose to 8.2 percent last month, up from 8.1 percent in April.


A8 Friday, July 6, 2012

ENTERTAINMENT / WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Partly sunny and warm

Clear

Saturday

Mostly sunny

National Cities

Sunday

Monday

Partly sunny and warm

Times of clouds and sun

Tuesday

Thunderstorms possible

Wednesday

Partial sunshine

Times of clouds and sun

Low 68°

95°/70°

95°/71°

93°/70°

89°/68°

93°/68°

91°/63°

E at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

NNE at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

NNE at 6-12 mph POP: 0%

WNW at 3-6 mph POP: 10%

NE at 3-6 mph POP: 25%

S at 4-8 mph POP: 35%

SSW at 4-8 mph POP: 10%

SSW at 3-6 mph POP: 15%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 5 p.m. Thursday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 95°/70° Normal high/low ............... 94°/67° Record high ............. 106° in 1971 Record low ................. 53° in 1905 Humidity at noon .................. 26%

Farmington 89/63

Clayton 93/65

Raton 89/57

Precipitation 24 hours ending 5 p.m. Thu. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date .......................... Normal year to date .............

0.00” 0.00” 0.38” 2.05” 5.30”

Santa Fe 87/60

Gallup 82/55

Tucumcari 96/70

Albuquerque 89/67

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 92/66

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 79/58

T or C 88/67

Source: EPA (Forecast) & TCEQ (Yesterday)

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Sat. The Moon Today Sat. Last

Jul 10

Rise Set 5:55 a.m. 8:11 p.m. 5:55 a.m. 8:11 p.m. Rise Set 10:15 p.m. 9:06 a.m. 10:48 p.m. 10:07 a.m. New

Jul 18

First

Jul 26

Full

Aug 1

Alamogordo 92/69

Silver City 85/63

ROSWELL 95/68 Carlsbad 95/69

Hobbs 94/67

Las Cruces 90/71

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2012

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) #### Zero in on what you want. You are full of get-up-and-go when it comes to friends and fun. You don’t need to do much, just be available. Make plans in the near future to see a distant friend or loved one. Tonight: Throw yourself into a fun game or happening. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) #### You know far more than you want to share. Unfortunately, you convey that fact through your facial expressions, which is why someone is hounding you. Laughter surrounds a project that might backfire. Tonight: Tap into someone’s creative mind. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ##### Reach out for someone at a distance. You might want to rethink a gettogether involving a child or loved one. You can work through a sense of heaviness surrounding this person, but you cannot force him or her to change his or her attitude. Just be a role model. Tonight: Practice flirting. CANCER (June 21-July 22) #### Deal with a family member or roommate directly and with a smile. Listen to what is being shared. Although optimism has its role here, understand the negativity of a comment. You do not need to take it on. Tonight: Chats continue. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) #### Others seek you out, though you might want some time to relax and simply be entertained. Seek out a good movie, or go where there is music. You will enjoy yourself and recharge your energy. Return an important call. Tonight: Slow down, if need be. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ### In some form way, you feel restricted. Understand that you might have spread yourself too thin. Do not be concerned with this situation; open up to new possibilities. Honor a change in what you

Death cert: Griffith died of heart attack

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The death certificate for Andy Grif fith says the actor’s death earlier this week was caused by a heart attack. The certificate says the 86-year -old had suffered the attack 24 hours before he died at 7 a.m. Tuesday. It also says he had suffered for years from other illnesses, including coronary artery disease, hyperten-

sion and hyperlipidemia, which can be a form of high cholesterol or high triglycerides. Griffith’s death certificate was filed Thursday with the vital records office in Dare County. It says he’s buried in the Grif fith Family Cemetery in Manteo. Dr. Johnny Farrow of Manteo signed the certificate. Griffith was best known for playing Sherif f Andy Taylor in “The Andy Griffith Show,” which aired from 1960 to 1968. He was born in Mount Airy and lived in Manteo.

Jerry Seinfeld to debut Web series set in cars

NEW YORK (AP) — Jerry Seinfeld is going back on the road. The comedian announced Thursday that he’ll debut the Web series “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee” on July 19. The interview show will feature Seinfeld’s comedian friends as guests. In a teaser video, Seinfeld is shown driving various vintage cars with Larry David, Ricky Gervais, Michael Richards, Alec Baldwin and others. The show is presented by Crackle, the digital network owned by Sony Pictures Entertainment. Recent projects by the

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

92/69/pc 89/67/t 76/45/t 93/69/pc 95/69/pc 79/52/t 93/65/pc 71/49/pc 92/66/pc 90/67/t 88/66/t 89/63/t 82/55/t 94/67/s 90/71/t 83/58/t 82/59/t 91/65/t 93/67/pc 93/65/pc 81/54/t 89/57/pc 73/47/t 95/68/pc 79/58/pc 87/60/t 85/63/t 88/67/t 96/70/pc 85/59/t

93/70/pc 92/69/t 75/51/t 94/71/s 94/71/s 80/56/t 91/63/s 74/52/pc 93/66/s 93/69/t 91/68/t 92/68/t 87/53/t 94/69/s 93/72/pc 84/55/pc 85/62/t 94/66/t 92/70/s 93/65/s 84/57/t 91/60/t 73/53/t 95/70/s 80/57/pc 90/61/t 89/67/t 91/69/t 95/69/s 88/63/t

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

feel like doing. Tonight: Get some extra Z’s. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) #### Defer to others, especially if you seem to be drained or just not up to visiting, entertaining, etc. A child or loved one dominates the scene, and this person knows just what he or she wants. Just let it all happen, and go take a catnap. Tonight: Know that you can say “no.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ### A must appearance and a sense of direction make you very content and happy. Your vision as to what is possible demands that you take the lead. Make it so, if it is important to you. Everyone seems to be playing “follow the leader.” Tonight: Snuggle in. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) #### You might be happiest just fielding calls. You could be dealing with an unhappy friend. The good news is that you manage to lighten up this person’s mood. A meeting could be more important than you realize. Tonight: Hang out. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) #### Your interest in a changeable situation is quite clear. However, one person you deal with, who is instrumental here, could be quite stuck. Honor a change of pace. As a result, you’ll see life with renewed interest. Tonight: Treat yourself. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18) # # # # # You could hear news that makes you feel a little off or sad. You need to honor your feelings, but do not push too hard. Someone shares how deeply he or she feels. Respond accordingly. Realize what is motivating a friend or loved one. Tonight: Reach out for

Entertainment: No Fox News movie NEW YORK (AP) — HBO is dropping its plans to make a film on Roger Ailes and the rise of Fox News Channel. The network had optioned film rights to work by from media writer Gabriel Sherman, who is writing a book on Fox News. But HBO said Thursday that it’s not going forward with those plans, saying it wouldn’t be appropriate considering the network’s ties to Fox competitor CNN. Both HBO and CNN are owned by Time Warner. Until a report on the website Deadline Hollywood on Thursday, it wasn’t even common knowledge that HBO was working on a Fox film. HBO spokesman Jeff Cusson says little work had been done so far.

Regional Cities Today Sat. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

58-year-old Seinfeld include producing the NBC panelstyle reality TV series “The Marriage Ref” and directing Colin Quinn’s Broadway show “Long Story Short.”

Reps confirm Claire Danes is pregnant

NEW YORK (AP) — Claire Danes has some busy months ahead: Not only is her hit TV series “Homeland” returning for its second season in September, but she’s pregnant as well. Danes’ rep, Jodi Gottlieb, confir ms the actress is expecting her first child with husband Hugh Dancy. The news was first reported on People.com. The 33-year -old Danes and 37-year-old Dancy met on the set of the film “Evening” and were married in 2009 in France. The actress first became famous as a teenager on the television drama “My So Called Life,” where she won a Golden Globe Award and was nominated for an Emmy. The show was canceled after its first season but developed a cult following. Dancy will star in the upcoming NBC series “Hannibal,” adapted from the novel “Red Dragon” by Thomas Harris.

Today

Sat.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

65/54/sh 96/75/t 101/79/s 87/74/s 98/72/t 102/80/pc 95/73/s 99/78/s 87/63/t 97/74/s 91/73/t 86/74/pc 93/75/t 103/76/s 101/75/s 102/82/s 75/61/pc 94/69/s

66/51/sh 93/75/t 103/79/s 91/71/t 101/76/s 90/67/t 94/70/t 98/78/s 80/60/t 94/68/t 94/75/pc 85/73/pc 92/75/t 100/72/s 103/71/s 105/86/s 79/61/pc 94/70/s

Thursday

High 95°

Almanac

Roswell Daily Record

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

U.S. Extremes

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sat. Hi/Lo/W

Miami 91/80/t 91/77/t 94/70/s 94/71/s Midland Minneapolis 88/67/t 84/65/t New Orleans 91/77/t 91/76/t New York 92/78/s 98/76/t Omaha 102/75/pc 94/66/pc Orlando 92/74/t 92/74/t Philadelphia 97/76/s 101/77/s 105/86/pc 107/90/pc Phoenix Pittsburgh 98/72/s 96/72/pc Portland, OR 84/59/s 87/61/s 102/76/t 103/76/s Raleigh St. Louis 104/80/s 105/74/s Salt Lake City 88/66/pc 94/70/s 71/64/pc 72/65/pc San Diego Seattle 79/55/s 82/58/s Tucson 98/76/pc 100/78/pc Washington, DC 102/82/s 104/81/s

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 109° ............... Smyrna, Tenn. Low: 32° .....Bodie State Park, Calif.

High: 98° ........................Tucumcari Low: 39° ......................... Angel Fire

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE

someone who is way too quiet. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) #### Listen to what is happening with a key loved one. You might not have realized that this person was so negative. A conversation might be far more important than you think. Listen to what is being said, and notice what isn’t. Tonight: Togetherness is the theme. BORN TODAY Rapper 50 Cent (1975), actor Sylvester Stallone (1946), 14th Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso (1935)


Friday, July 6, 2012 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

LOCAL SCHEDULE FRIDAY JULY 6 MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. • Alpine at Roswell

SC OR E CENTER PECOS LEAGUE Santa Fe 7, Trinidad 5, 10 inn. Las Cruces 2, White Sands 0 Alpine 9, Roswell 6 MLB American League Detroit 7, Minnesota 3 Chicago 2, Texas 1 Cleveland 3, Tampa Bay 1 Kansas City 9, Toronto 6 Baltimore at Los Angeles, late National League Miami 4, Milwaukee 0 Pittsburgh 2, Houston 0 Washington 6, San Francisco 5 Atlanta 7, Chicago 3 New York 6, Philadelphia 5 St. Louis 6, Colorado 2 Los Angeles at Arizona, late Cincinnati at San Diego, late PGA The Greenbrier Classic First-round leaderboard Vijay Singh ......................63 (-7) Jeff Maggert ....................64 (-6) Martin Flores ...................64 (-6) Jonathan Byrd .................64 (-6) J.B. Holmes.....................65 (-5) Webb Simpson................65 (-5) Andres Romero ...............65 (-5) Garth Mulroy ...................65 (-5) Ken Duke ........................66 (-4) Billy Horschel ..................66 (-4) Jerry Kelly .......................66 (-4) Sean O’Hair.....................66 (-4) K.J. Choi..........................66 (-4) Scott Piercy .....................66 (-4) Charley Hoffman .............66 (-4)

NA T I O N A L BRIEFS GREIPEL WINS 2ND STRAIGHT TOUR STAGE

SAINT-QUENTIN, France (AP) — In yet another crash-marred finish, Andre Greipel led a frenzied bunch sprint to the finish to win the fifth stage at the Tour de France on Thursday, the second straight stage won by the German rider. Fabian Cancellara of Switzerland maintained the overall leader’s yellow jersey for a sixth straight day after the mostly flat 122mile trek from Rouen to Saint-Quentin that was almost tailor-made for sprinters except for a slight uphill near the end. The barreling pack overtook three breakaway riders with barely 110 yards left, and Greipel wheeled out in front a split-second ahead of Matt Goss of Australia, who was second, and Juan Jose Hadeo of Argentina, who took third. Britain’s Mark Cavendish was fifth. Like Greipel’s sprint-finish victory a day before, a late crash marred the race, and he counted himself “lucky” to avoid the spill two days in a row. “Somehow I stayed on my bike,” Greipel said. “It was quite a tough finish there ... and it was also luck on our part to catch the breakaway.” The top standings didn’t change: Bradley Wiggins, the leader of Cavendish’s Team Sky, was second overall, seven seconds behind the Swiss leader. Defending champion Cadel Evans of Australia was 17 seconds off the pace in seventh. By holding the lead, Cancellara earned the right to wear the coveted yellow jersey for the 27th time in his career, a record for a rider who has never won the Tour. “When you make history in this kind of way at the Tour, it’s more special,” said Cancellara, a time-trial specialist and the only man in yellow this year after winning Saturday’s prologue.

SPORTS

B

Invaders out of first after loss to Alpine Section

Roswell Daily Record

Roswell let a 3-0 lead slip away and dropped out of first place on Thursday after a 9-6 loss to visiting Alpine at Joe Bauman Stadium. Brian Ramirez put Roswell up 3-0 in the first with a three-run shot to left-center, his third dinger of the year, but Alpine scored the game’s next nine runs en route to a win. Nate Johnson (4-2) lost his second straight start for the Invaders after giving up seven runs on eight hits in seven innings of work. Parker Talbert (2-1) earned the win. He pitched 1 1⁄3 innings of hitless ball in relief. Alpine got on the board for the first time with a pair of runs in the fourth and then forged a tie with another run in the fifth. The game stayed tied until the eighth when Alpine capitalized on

Trio share lead at -3

KOHLER, Wis. (AP) — Although plenty of athletes have used sports to lift themselves up from dif ficult backgrounds, Lizette Salas’ path to the pros isn’t the sort of story that’s often heard in golf. The 22-year old Salas shot a 3-under 69 in the first round of the U.S. Women’s Open on Thursday, grabbing a share of the lead along with fellow Americans Cristie Kerr, the 2007 Open winner, and Brittany Lincicome. Salas is the daughter of Mexican immigrants from Azusa, Calif., a city with a history of gang issues outside Los Angeles. With help from her family, she used golf to earn a scholarship to USC — and now, a spot on the LPGA Tour and a share of the Open lead. With her family on hand to cheer her on this week, Salas sees her play as a tribute to her parents.

three Invaders errors to score six runs for a 9-3 lead. Roswell scored three runs with nobody out in the home half of the ninth, but Matt Petty’s flyout to left ended the rally with the bases loaded. Mike Miller (two singles and a double) had three hits for Roswell, and Josh Cakebread (two singles), Brycen Bell (triple and a single) and Ramirez (home run and a single) each had two hits. Alpine moved into sole possession of first place in the Pecos League standings with the win at 29-15. Roswell fell to 29-17.

Kevin J. Keller Photo

RIGHT: Roswell’s Brian Ramirez connects for a home run during the first inning of the Invaders’ win, Thursday.

Heat meet with Allen

AP Photo

Serena back in the finals

Serena Williams reaches out to hit a shot during her win over Victoria Azarenka in the semifinals at Wimbledon, Thursday. Williams won 6-3, 7-6.

WIMBLEDON, England (AP) — Serena Williams wins with so much more than serving, of course. Her groundstrokes are intimidating. Her superb speed and anticipation fuel unparalleled court-covering defense. Her returns are outstanding, too. When that serve is on-target, though, it sure is something special, quite possibly the greatest in the history of women’s tennis. Lashing a tournament-record 24 aces at up to 120 mph, and doing plenty of other things well, too, four -time Wimbledon champion Williams overpowered No. 2-seeded Victoria Azarenka of Belarus 6-3, 76 (6) Thursday to reach her seventh final at the All England Club. “Isn’t that something?” said

Williams’ father, Richard, after watching his daughter win on Centre Court. “She was really trying, you know? Maybe she was trying to impress the neighbors back home.” On Saturday, the 30-year -old Williams will try to become the first woman at least that age to win a major tournament since Martina Navratilova, who was 33 when she won Wimbledon in 1990. “The older I get, the better I serve, I feel,” Williams said. “I don’t know how it got better. I really don’t know. It’s not like I go home and I work on baskets and baskets of serves. Maybe it’s a natural shot for me.”

Vijay takes lead at Greenbrier See OPEN, Page B5

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

AP Photo

Vijay Singh watches his tee shot on the 14th hole during the first round of The Greenbrier Classic, Thursday.

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.Va. (AP) — Vijay Singh and Jeff Maggert sent reminders that they’re still able to compete with the younger crowd. Singh had his best round in six months, shooting a 7-under 63 on Thursday in the Greenbrier Classic to take a one-stroke lead over Maggert, Jonathan Byrd and Martin Flores — and leave T iger Woods eight shots behind. “Gosh, I don’t know where that came from,” the 49-year -old Singh said. “I’ve been playing pretty good golf for a while, but just never got any scoring going. But today seemed I hit it close and drove the ball really well, hit a lot of greens and made some nice putts.” Last week at the tough layout at Congressional, only seven players posted first-round scores in the 60s. Sixty-two players broke See GREENBRIER, Page B2

See FINALS, Page B5

MIAMI (AP) — Ray Allen seems to be taking a serious look at joining the NBA champion Miami Heat. A person familiar with the situation told The Associated Press that the free agent guard visited the Heat in Miami on Thursday. Allen was planning to remain in South Florida until Friday, according to the person who spoke on condition of anonymity because no details of the meeting were publicly revealed. Miami’s desire to add Allen is no secret. League MVP LeBron James has tweeted about the notion, and posted a doctored-up image of Allen wearing a Heat jersey on his Facebook page earlier this week with the message, “This looks damn good to me.” And Dwyane Wade posted a cryptic message on his Twitter account Wednesday night, saying Thursday would be “a big day” for the Heat. No deal could be finalized until at least July 11 because of the NBA’s moratorium. Allen has spent the last five seasons with the Boston Celtics, who have offered the NBA’s 3-point field goal leader a $12 million, two-year deal. The Heat — who have ousted Boston from the past two NBA postseasons — can only offer Allen the mini mid-level exception, which would pay about $3 million this coming year. Allen averaged 14.2 points for Boston this past season. Allen is coming off surgery to remove bone spurs from his right ankle. But he clearly can still shoot, and made a career-best 45 percent of his attempts from 3point range for the Celtics this past season.

AP Photo

Rangers pitcher Yu Darvish throws a pitch during a game against Oakland on July 1. Darvish earned the final AL All-Star roster spot on Thursday by fan vote.

Darvish, Freese picked

CHICAGO (AP) — Texas Rangers pitcher Yu Darvish was hit by a line drive during one All-Star game in Japan. He’s hoping to avoid that mishap on Tuesday. Darvish and St. Louis Cardinals third baseman

David Freese are headed to the Midsummer Classic after fans voted them into next week’s showcase in Kansas City. “I feel very good,” Darvish See ALL-STAR, Page B2


B2 Friday, July 6, 2012

Greenbrier Continued from Page B1

par Thursday on the Old White TPC course, with the greens far more forgiving than last year when they were reseeded and Scott Stallings won at 10 under. Woods wasn’t one of them. Coming off a victory Sunday in the AT&T National, he struggled with his putter in a 1-over 71 in his final tuneup for the British Open in two weeks. Saying the greens rolled slower than those in his last three tournaments, Woods needed 31 putts on the course he played for the first time Wednesday. “I was a little bit off with my game, and on top of that I didn’t have the speed of these greens at

Pecos League

Pecos League At A Glance All Times Mountain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Alpine . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Roswell . . . . . . . . . . .29 Las Cruces . . . . . . . .28 Trinidad . . . . . . . . . . .20 White Sands . . . . . . .17 Santa Fe . . . . . . . . . .16

L 15 17 19 28 30 30

Pct. GB .659 — .630 1 .596 2 1⁄2 .417 11 .362 13 1⁄2 .348 14

Wednesday’s Games Roswell 18, White Sands 4 Las Cruces 3, Alpine 2, 1st game Alpine 6, Las Cruces 2, 2nd game Thursday’s Games Santa Fe 7, Trinidad 5, 10 innings Las Cruces 2, White Sands 0 Alpine 9, Roswell 6 Friday’s Games Santa Fe at Trinidad, 6 p.m. Alpine at Roswell, 7 p.m. Las Cruces at White Sands, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games Santa Fe at Trinidad, 6 p.m. Alpine at Roswell, 7 p.m. Las Cruces at White Sands, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Game Pecos League All-Star Game, 1 p.m.

LPGA

U.S. Women’s Open Scores By The Associated Press Thursday At Blackwolf Run Championship Course Kohler, Wis. Purse: $3.25 million Yardage: 6 954; Par 72 (36-36) First Round a-denotes amateur Lizette Salas . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — 69 Brittany Lincicome . . . . . . . .35-34 — 69 Cristie Kerr . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-33 — 69 Beatriz Recari . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — 70 Ai Miyazato . . . . . . . . . . . . .32-38 — 70 Lexi Thompson . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — 70 Jennie Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — 70 Meena Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 — 71 Sandra Gal . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 — 71 Inbee Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 — 71 Mika Miyazato . . . . . . . . . . .37-34 — 71 Vicky Hurst . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35 — 71 Na Yeon Choi . . . . . . . . . . .33-38 — 71 Suzann Pettersen . . . . . . . .34-37 — 71 Katie Burnett . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 — 72 Jimin Kang . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 — 72 Wendy Ward . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 — 72 Se Ri Pak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 — 72 Anna Nordqvist . . . . . . . . . .36-36 — 72 Il Hee Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 — 72 Mindy Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37 — 72 Hee Kyung Seo . . . . . . . . . .36-36 — 72 Jennifer Song . . . . . . . . . . .38-34 — 72 Numa Gulyanamitta . . . . . . .37-36 — 73 Gerina Piller . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36 — 73 Cindy LaCrosse . . . . . . . . . .35-38 — 73 Paula Creamer . . . . . . . . . .37-36 — 73 Azahara Munoz . . . . . . . . . .36-37 — 73 Jeong Jang . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-40 — 73 Amy Yang . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37 — 73 Katie Futcher . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37 — 73 Jennifer Gleason . . . . . . . . .35-38 — 73 Dewi Claire Schreefel . . . . .38-35 — 73 Jinyoung Pak . . . . . . . . . . . .35-38 — 73 Brittany Lang . . . . . . . . . . . .35-38 — 73 a-Emma Talley . . . . . . . . . . .37-36 — 73 Nicole Castrale . . . . . . . . . .37-36 — 73 Alison Walshe . . . . . . . . . . .35-39 — 74 Mi Hyang Lee . . . . . . . . . . .38-36 — 74 a-Elisabeth Bernabe . . . . . .38-36 — 74 So Yeon Ryu . . . . . . . . . . . .38-36 — 74 I.K. Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 — 74 Morgan Pressel . . . . . . . . . .37-37 — 74 Shanshan Feng . . . . . . . . . .38-36 — 74 Candie Kung . . . . . . . . . . . .38-36 — 74 a-Katherine Perry . . . . . . . .37-37 — 74 Giulia Sergas . . . . . . . . . . . .39-35 — 74 Brianna Do . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-40 — 74 a-Lydia Ko . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 — 74 Hee Young Park . . . . . . . . .36-38 — 74 Jessica Korda . . . . . . . . . . .35-39 — 74 Michelle Wie . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 — 74 Yani Tseng . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 — 74 Yeon Ju Jung . . . . . . . . . . . .35-39 — 74

All-Star

Continued from Page B1

said Thursday through an interpreter. “I know the way that I got selected was a vote by the fans, so I appreciate all the fans who voted for me. I’m looking forward to it.” Darvish is the eighth Rangers player on the AL team managed by Texas’ Ron Washington. He beat out four other pitchers: Chicago’s Jake Peavy, Baltimore’s Jason Hammel, Kansas City’s Jonathan Broxton and the Angels’ Ernesto Frieri. “It just wasn’t meant to be,” said Peavy, who was supported by an aggressive marketing campaign by the White Sox. “Obviously we knew it’s hard to outvote a country.” Freese emerged from an NL field that included Atlanta outfielder Michael Bourn, Nationals rookie outfielder Bryce Harper and Arizona second baseman Aaron Hill. “I’m happy, I’m thrilled,” Freese said before St. Louis hosted the Rockies on Thursday night. “Thank you Cardi-

all,” said Woods, the tour leader this year with three victories. “I missed literally every single putt high today.” Singh had his best effort since an 8-under 64 in the first round of the Farmers Insurance Open at Torrey Pines in January. Singh is playing in his ninth tournament in 10 weeks with two top-20 finishes in that span. Last week, he also got off to a fast start but shot 81 in the final round and tied for 49th. Something clicked Thursday, when he made six birdies on the back nine, finishing with four straight. “Hopefully it keeps going,” Singh said. “I don’t feel tired. I feel really energized. I’ve been working really hard on my game, so it’s nice to see something happen.”

Ryann O’Toole . . . . . . . . . . .37-38 a-Alison Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-38 Jenny Suh . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-38 Christina Kim . . . . . . . . . . . .39-36 Angela Stanford . . . . . . . . . .37-38 Tiffany Joh . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-37 Kristy McPherson . . . . . . . .40-35 Christel Boeljon . . . . . . . . . .36-39 Cheyenne Woods . . . . . . . .36-39 a-Megan Khang . . . . . . . . . .38-37 Tessa Teachman . . . . . . . . .38-37 a-Jaye Marie Green . . . . . . .36-39 Heather Bowie Young . . . . .38-37 Amanda Blumenherst . . . . .37-38 Paige Mackenzie . . . . . . . . .37-38 Catriona Matthew . . . . . . . .38-37 Katherine Hull . . . . . . . . . . .38-37 Sakura Yokomine . . . . . . . . .37-38 Karrie Webb . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-37 Angela Oh . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-39 Sue Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-38 Haru Nomura . . . . . . . . . . . .39-36 Lorie Kane . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-37 Belen Mozo . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-38 Stacy Prammanasudh . . . . .40-36 Natalie Gulbis . . . . . . . . . . .38-38 Eun-Hee Ji . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-38 a-Hannah O’Sullivan . . . . . .38-38 Hiroko Ayada . . . . . . . . . . . .37-39 a-Jisoo Park . . . . . . . . . . . . .40-36 Kris Tamulis . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-38 a-Doris Chen . . . . . . . . . . . .37-39 Pornanong Phatlum . . . . . . .38-38 Karen Stupples . . . . . . . . . .36-40 Diana Luna . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-37 Jenny Shin . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-39 Sun Young Yoo . . . . . . . . . .37-39 Jennifer Johnson . . . . . . . . .38-38 Carlota Ciganda . . . . . . . . . .37-39 Kelly Jacques . . . . . . . . . . .37-40 Paola Moreno . . . . . . . . . . .38-39 Soo Jin Yang . . . . . . . . . . . .35-42 Maria Hjorth . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-38 Hee Won Han . . . . . . . . . . .37-40 a-Kyung Kim . . . . . . . . . . . .35-42 Momoko Ueda . . . . . . . . . . .38-39 Caroline Hedwall . . . . . . . . .41-36 Stacy Lewis . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-39 Sophie Gustafson . . . . . . . .39-38 Mina Harigae . . . . . . . . . . . .37-40 a-Stephanie Meadow . . . . . .40-37 a-Angel Yin . . . . . . . . . . . . .42-36 Haley Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . .38-40 a-Kelly Shon . . . . . . . . . . . .40-38 a-Brittany Altomare . . . . . . .41-37 Danielle Kang . . . . . . . . . . .37-41 Lee-Anne Pace . . . . . . . . . .37-41 Yukari Baba . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-39 Jamie Hullett . . . . . . . . . . . .39-39 Seon Hwa Lee . . . . . . . . . . .39-39 Mo Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-40 Mina Nakayama . . . . . . . . . .40-38 Kyeong Bae . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-40 Juli Inkster . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-40 Brooke Pancake . . . . . . . . .39-40 a-Lindsey Weaver . . . . . . . .37-42 Veronica Felibert . . . . . . . . .37-42 Melissa Reid . . . . . . . . . . . .40-39 Jihee Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42-37 Cydney Clanton . . . . . . . . . .40-39 Becca Huffer . . . . . . . . . . . .41-38 a-Christine Meier . . . . . . . . .40-40 Jane Rah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-43 a-Moriya Jutanugarn . . . . . .38-42 Reilley Rankin . . . . . . . . . . .40-40 a-Gabriela Lopez . . . . . . . . .38-42 a-Ashley Armstrong . . . . . . .38-42 Mi Jung Hur . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-42 a-Gabriella Dominguez . . . .42-38 a-Annie Park . . . . . . . . . . . .39-42 Victoria Tanco . . . . . . . . . . .43-38 Birdie Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43-38 Julieta Granada . . . . . . . . . .38-43 Aimee Neff . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40-41 Pat Hurst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40-41 Kylene Pulley . . . . . . . . . . . .40-41 a-Jisoo Keel . . . . . . . . . . . . .41-40 Becky Morgan . . . . . . . . . . .39-42 Chella Choi . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-42 Hyun Hwa Sim . . . . . . . . . . .43-38 Isabelle Beisiegel . . . . . . . . .41-40 Katy Harris . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40-42 Anya Sarai Alvarez . . . . . . .40-42 Amy Hung . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42-40 a-Shannon Aubert . . . . . . . .41-41 Lisa Grimes . . . . . . . . . . . . .44-39 Cathryn Bristow . . . . . . . . . .44-39 Lili Alvarez . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45-39

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

nal Nation. Unbelievable support from friends, family and Cardinals fans.” Freese, the World Series and NL championship series MVP last fall, joins teammates Carlos Beltran, Rafael Furcal, Yadier Molina and Lance L ynn on the NL roster. Freese began the day with a .285 batting average, 13 homers and 50 RBIs. “You stack up his numbers and he’s deserving,” St. Louis manager Mike Matheny said. “He made it happen.” Darvish has made a smooth adjustment to the major leagues after the Rangers committed more than $107 million to bring him to the U.S. The 25-year -old righthander got a guaranteed $56 million, six-year contract and Texas also paid a record $51.7 million posting bid to his team in Japan. Darvish responded by going 6-1 with a 2.60 ERA in his first eight starts. The rookie leveled off a bit but is 10-5 with a 3.59 ERA for the only team in the majors with 50 wins.

75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 77 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 78 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 79 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 80 81 81 81 81 81 81 81 81 81 81 81 81 82 82 82 82 83 83 84

SPORTS

Singh earned the last of his 34 PGA Tour wins four years ago and will be eligible to join the Champions Tour in February. Maggert, a year younger than Singh, has had to earn his PGA Tour card through qualifying school in two of the last three years. He hasn’t won since the 2006 St. Jude Classic and missed the cut in more than half his tournaments this year, including last week. Although he feels he has a disadvantage off the tee compared with younger players on the 7,274-yard Old White, Maggert used strong iron play to make four birdies on his front nine. Asked to describe his birdie putts, Maggert joked, “At my age, it’s hard to remember — shortterm memory’s going.” He didn’t need a big measuring

Roswell Daily Record stick — three of his six birdies overall were from less than 10 feet in a bogey-free round. “I feel really comfortable here,” Maggert said. “There’s a lot of guys out here in their 40s, late 40s, that can really play some good golf still. So it’s not surprising to see some of the old guys up on the leaderboard.” Byrd has five career wins and already has five top-10 finishes this year. He hadn’t played since the U.S. Open and fought through a nagging cough to finish birdie-bogey-birdie Thursday. Flores had a rare bogey-free round that was his second best of the year. He spent the majority of 2011 on the Nationwide Tour, now called the Web.com Tour. Playing alongside U.S. Open champ Webb Simpson and Steve Stricker and starting on No. 10,

SCOREBOARD

a-Briana Mao . . . . . . . . . . . .39-46 a-Gigi Stoll . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-47 a-Rinko Mitsunaga . . . . . . . .44-43 a-Samantha S. Marks . . . . .45-42

MLB

American League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L New York . . . . . . . . . .49 32 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .44 37 Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .43 40 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .42 40 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .42 41 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .45 37 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .43 39 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .41 42 Kansas City . . . . . . . .37 44 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .35 47 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 33 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .45 37 Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .41 42 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .35 49

— — — —

85 86 87 87

Pct GB .605 — .543 5 .518 7 .512 7 1⁄2 .506 8

Pct GB .549 — .524 2 1 .494 4 ⁄2 .457 7 1⁄2 .427 10 Pct GB .602 — .549 4 1⁄2 .494 9 .417 15 1⁄2

Wednesday’s Games New York 4, Tampa Bay 3 Oakland 3, Boston 2 Cleveland 12, Los Angeles 3 Baltimore 4, Seattle 2 Detroit 5, Minnesota 1 Toronto 4, Kansas City 1 Chicago 5, Texas 4, 10 innings Thursday’s Games Detroit 7, Minnesota 3 Chicago 2, Texas 1 Cleveland 3, Tampa Bay 1 Kansas City 9, Toronto 6 Baltimore at Los Angeles, 8:05 p.m. Friday’s Games Kansas City (J.Sanchez 1-4) at Detroit (Smyly 3-3), 5:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Cobb 3-5) at Cleveland (Masterson 5-7), 5:05 p.m. New York (Kuroda 8-7) at Boston (Beckett 47), 5:10 p.m. Minnesota (Liriano 2-7) at Texas (M.Perez 1-0), 6:05 p.m. Toronto (Laffey 0-0) at Chicago (Peavy 6-5), 6:10 p.m. Baltimore (Eveland 0-1) at Los Angeles (C.Wilson 9-4), 8:05 p.m. Seattle (Millwood 3-6) at Oakland (Milone 86), 8:05 p.m. Saturday’s Games New York at Boston, 10:35 a.m., 1st game Kansas City at Detroit, 2:05 p.m. Toronto at Chicago, 2:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m. Minnesota at Texas, 5:15 p.m. New York at Boston, 5:15 p.m., 2nd game Baltimore at Los Angeles, 8:05 p.m. Seattle at Oakland, 8:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Kansas City at Detroit, 11:05 a.m. Tampa Bay at Cleveland, 11:05 a.m. Toronto at Chicago, 12:10 p.m. Baltimore at Los Angeles, 1:35 p.m. Seattle at Oakland, 2:05 p.m. Minnesota at Texas, 5:05 p.m. New York at Boston, 6:05 p.m.

National League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Washington . . . . . . . .48 32 New York . . . . . . . . . .45 38 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .43 39 Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 42 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .37 47 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . .46 36 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .44 37 St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .44 39 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .38 44 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .32 51 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .31 51 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Los Angeles . . . . . . . .46 37 San Francisco . . . . . .45 38 Arizona . . . . . . . . . . .39 42 San Diego . . . . . . . . .33 50 Colorado . . . . . . . . . .31 51

Pct GB .600 — .542 4 1⁄2 .524 6 .488 9 .440 13

Pct GB .561 — .543 1 1⁄2 .530 2 1⁄2 .463 8 .386 14 1⁄2 .378 15

Pct GB .554 — .542 1 .481 6 .398 13 .378 14 1⁄2

Wednesday’s Games Washington 9, San Francisco 4 Philadelphia 9, New York 2 Pittsburgh 6, Houston 4 Miami 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings Chicago 5, Atlanta 1 St. Louis 4, Colorado 1 Los Angeles 4, Cincinnati 1 San Diego 8, Arizona 6 Thursday’s Games Miami 4, Milwaukee 0

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Friday, July 6 AUTO RACING 7 a.m. SPEED — Formula One, practice for British Grand Prix, at Towcester, England Noon ESPN2 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, pole qualifying for Subway Jalapeno 250, at Daytona Beach, Fla. 2 p.m. SPEED — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, pole qualifying for Coke Zero 400, at Daytona Beach, Fla. 5:30 p.m. ESPN — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Subway Jalapeno 250, at Daytona Beach, Fla. BOXING 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Featherweights, Cristobal Cruz (39-13-3) vs. Javier Fortuna (19-0-0), at Las Vegas

Pittsburgh 2, Houston 0 Washington 6, San Francisco 5 Atlanta 7, Chicago 3 New York 6, Philadelphia 5 St. Louis 6, Colorado 2 Los Angeles at Arizona, 7:40 p.m. Cincinnati at San Diego, 8:05 p.m. Friday’s Games Atlanta (T.Hudson 6-4) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 2-8), 5:05 p.m. Colorado (D.Pomeranz 0-3) at Washington (Strasburg 9-3), 5:05 p.m. San Francisco (Zito 6-6) at Pittsburgh (Bedard 4-9), 5:05 p.m. Chicago (T.Wood 3-3) at New York (J.Santana 6-4), 5:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Gallardo 6-6) at Houston (Happ 6-8), 6:05 p.m. Miami (Nolasco 7-6) at St. Louis (Westbrook 7-6), 6:15 p.m. Los Angeles (Kershaw 6-4) at Arizona (Collmenter 0-2), 7:40 p.m. Cincinnati (Arroyo 3-5) at San Diego (K.Wells 1-1), 8:05 p.m. Saturday’s Games Colorado at Washington, 2:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Houston, 2:05 p.m. San Francisco at Pittsburgh, 2:05 p.m. Chicago at New York, 2:10 p.m. Miami at St. Louis, 2:10 p.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 5:15 p.m. Cincinnati at San Diego, 8:05 p.m. Los Angeles at Arizona, 8:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Chicago at New York, 11:10 a.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 11:35 a.m. Colorado at Washington, 11:35 a.m. San Francisco at Pittsburgh, 11:35 a.m. Milwaukee at Houston, 12:05 p.m. Miami at St. Louis, 12:15 p.m. Cincinnati at San Diego, 2:05 p.m. Los Angeles at Arizona, 2:10 p.m.

MLB All-Star Game Rosters By The Associated Press July 10 at Kauffman Stadium, Kansas City (x-starter; y-injured, z-voted final spot, will not play) American League Pitchers Ryan Cook, rh, Oakland z-Yu Darvish, rh, Texas Matt Harrison, lh, Texas Felix Hernandez, rh, Seattle Jim Johnson, rh, Baltimore Joe Nathan, rh, Texas Chris Perez, rh, Cleveland David Price, lh, Tampa Bay Fernando, Rodney, rh, Tampa Bay y-CC Sabathia, lh, N.Y. Yankees Chris Sale, lh, Chicago White Sox Justin Verlander, rh, Detroit Jered Weaver, rh, L.A. Angels C.J. Wilson, lh, L.A. Angels Catchers Joe Mauer, Minnesota x-Mike Napoli, Texas Matt Wieters, Baltimore Infielders Elvis Andrus, Texas x-Adrian Beltre, Texas Asdrubal Cabrera, Cleveland Miguel Cabrera, Detroit x-Robinson Cano, N.Y. Yankees x-Prince Fielder, Detroit x-Derek Jeter, New York Ian Kinsley, Texas Paul Konerko, Chicago White Sox Outfielders x-Jose Bautista, Toronto x-Curtis Granderson, New York x-Josh Hamilton, Texas Adam Jones, Baltimore Mike Trout, L.A. Angels Mark Trumbo, L.A. Angels Designated Hitters Billy Butler, Kansas City Adam Dunn, Chicago White Sox x-David Ortiz, Boston

National League Pitchers Matt Cain, rh, San Francisco Aroldis Chapman, lh, Cincinnati R.A. Dickey, rh, N.Y. Mets Gio Gonzalez, lh, Washington Cole Hamels, lh, Philadelphia Joel Hanrahan, rh, Pittsburgh Clayton Kershaw, lh. L.A. Dodgers Craig Kimbrel, rh, Atlanta Lance Lynn, rh, St. Louis Wade Miley, lh, Arizona Jonathan Papelbon, rh, Philadelphia Stephen Strasburg, rh, Washington Houston Street, rh, San Diego Catchers Yadier Molina, St. Louis x-Buster Posey, San Francisco Carlos Ruiz, Philadelphia Infielders Jose Altuve, Houston Starlin Castro, Chicago Cubs Ian Desmond, Washington z-David Freese, St. Louis x-Rafael Furcal, St. Louis Bryan LaHair, Chicago x-Pablo Sandoval, San Francisco x-Dan Uggla, Atlanta

CYCLING 6 a.m. NBCSN — Tour de France, Stage 6, Epernay to Metz, France GOLF 6:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Open de France, second round, at Paris 1 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, The Greenbrier Classic, second round, at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. 2 p.m. ESPN2 — USGA, U.S. Women’s Open, second round, at Kohler, Wis. 5:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, First Tee Open, first round, at Pebble Beach, Calif. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 5 p.m. MLB — Regional coverage, N.Y. Yankees at Boston or Atlanta at Philadelphia TENNIS 6 a.m. ESPN — The Championships, men’s semifinals, at Wimbledon, England

Woods birdied two of his first three holes in his first Greenbrier Classic appearance. On the par -5 17th, he drove into a hazard, took a penalty stroke and three-putted from 20 feet for double bogey. Phil Mickelson matched Woods with a 71. Mickelson vowed to focus more on golf this time after taking advantage of the resort’s numerous amenities with his family last year and missing the cut. “I didn’t play that bad (Thursday),” Mickelson said. “But I made some mistakes there that were just a little sloppy.” Simpson, J.B. Holmes, Andres Romero and Garth Mulroy shot 65. K.J. Choi was among a group of seven at 66. Scott Stallings birdied his final three holes for a 67.

x-Joey Votto, Cincinnati David Wright, N.Y. Mets Outfielders x-Carlos Beltran, St. Louis Ryan Braun, Milwaukee Jay Bruce, Cincinnati x-Melky Cabrera, San Francisco Carlos Gonzalez, Colorado x-Matt Kemp, Los Angeles Andrew McCutchen, Pittsburgh Giancarlo Stanton, Florida

NBA

AP Source: Lin agrees to offer sheet with Rockets

HOUSTON (AP) — A person with knowledge of the deal said Thursday that New York Knicks restricted free-agent guard Jeremy Lin and the Houston Rockets have agreed to terms on a four-year contract offer. The person told The Associated Press on Thursday on condition of anonymity because the team hadn’t officially announced the deal. Lin can sign the offer sheet with Houston on July 11, and the Knicks will then have three days to match the offer. The Knicks have repeatedly said that they plan to keep Lin. The contract is worth $10.2 million over the first two seasons and $9.3 million in each of the last two years. The fourth season is a team option. The person also told the AP that the Rockets traded Kyle Lowry to Toronto on Thursday for a future first-round draft pick with lottery protection and forward Gary Forbes. Lowry averaged 14.3 points and 6.6 assists in 47 games for Houston last season. The Rockets had Lin in training camp, but waived him because they had already had Lowry and Goran Dragic on their roster. Now that they’ve traded Lowry, and with Dragic headed to Phoenix, Houston is trying to get Lin back. Lin was claimed by the Knicks after the Rockets let him go and soon became New York’s starting point guard and “Linsanity” ensued. He averaged 14.6 points, 6.2 assists and 3.1 rebounds in 35 games with 25 starts before his season was cut short because of surgery to repair torn cartilage in his knee. Lin, who went undrafted out of Harvard, became a sensation with a remarkable stretch in February where he scored at least 20 points in nine of 10 games. A high point of that span came when he scored 38 points with seven assists in a 92-85 win over the Lakers on Feb. 10.

PGA

The Greenbrier Classic Scores By The Associated Press Thursday At The Greenbrier Resort, The Old White TPC White sulphur Springs, W.Va. Purse: $6.1 million Yardage: 7,274; Par 70 (34-36) First Round a-denotes amateur Vijay Singh . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-30 — 63 Jeff Maggert . . . . . . . . . . . . .32-32 — 64 Martin Flores . . . . . . . . . . . .31-33 — 64 Jonathan Byrd . . . . . . . . . . .32-32 — 64 J.B. Holmes . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-31 — 65 Webb Simpson . . . . . . . . . .32-33 — 65 Andres Romero . . . . . . . . . .34-31 — 65 Garth Mulroy . . . . . . . . . . . .31-34 — 65 Ken Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31-35 — 66 Billy Horschel . . . . . . . . . . . .32-34 — 66 Jerry Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-33 — 66 Sean O’Hair . . . . . . . . . . . . .31-35 — 66 K.J. Choi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-33 — 66 Scott Piercy . . . . . . . . . . . . .30-36 — 66 Charley Hoffman . . . . . . . . .33-33 — 66 Blake Adams . . . . . . . . . . . .34-33 — 67 Colt Knost . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-34 — 67 Charlie Wi . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-32 — 67 Graham DeLaet . . . . . . . . . .35-32 — 67 Scott Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-33 — 67 Richard H. Lee . . . . . . . . . . .35-32 — 67 Kevin Streelman . . . . . . . . .34-33 — 67 Scott Stallings . . . . . . . . . . .34-33 — 67 Patrick Cantlay . . . . . . . . . .33-34 — 67 a-Justin Thomas . . . . . . . . .32-35 — 67 Greg Owen . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-35 — 68 Daniel Summerhays . . . . . .35-33 — 68 Matt Bettencourt . . . . . . . . .35-33 — 68 Stephen Ames . . . . . . . . . . .32-36 — 68 Keegan Bradley . . . . . . . . . .32-36 — 68 John Daly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32-36 — 68 Seung-Yul Noh . . . . . . . . . .33-35 — 68 Chris DiMarco . . . . . . . . . . .34-34 — 68 Chris Couch . . . . . . . . . . . . .31-37 — 68 John Mallinger . . . . . . . . . . .32-36 — 68 Gavin Coles . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-35 — 68 Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-33 — 68 Johnson Wagner . . . . . . . . .32-36 — 68 Kyle Reifers . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-34 — 68 Fran Quinn . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-35 — 68 D.J. Trahan . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — 69 Daniel Chopra . . . . . . . . . . .33-36 — 69 David Mathis . . . . . . . . . . . .36-33 — 69 Kevin Na . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-36 — 69 Steve Stricker . . . . . . . . . . .35-34 — 69 David Hearn . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — 69 Sang-Moon Bae . . . . . . . . . .35-34 — 69 Hunter Haas . . . . . . . . . . . .33-36 — 69 Shane Bertsch . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — 69 Troy Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — 69 John Merrick . . . . . . . . . . . .35-34 — 69 Kevin Chappell . . . . . . . . . .35-34 — 69 Ricky Barnes . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — 69 Rod Pampling . . . . . . . . . . .33-36 — 69 Bob Estes . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — 69 Davis Love III . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — 69 D.A. Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — 69 Billy Mayfair . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-33 — 69 Brian Harman . . . . . . . . . . .35-34 — 69 Russell Knox . . . . . . . . . . . .36-33 — 69 Tim Petrovic . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — 69 Ted Potter, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35 — 69 Josh Teater . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-33 — 70 Boo Weekley . . . . . . . . . . . .37-33 — 70 Troy Matteson . . . . . . . . . . .32-38 — 70 Tim Herron . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-34 — 70 Heath Slocum . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — 70 Arjun Atwal . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — 70 Gary Woodland . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — 70 Marc Leishman . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — 70 Tom Watson . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — 70 Charles Howell III . . . . . . . .36-34 — 70 Steve Flesch . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — 70 William McGirt . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — 70 Gary Christian . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — 70 Steve Wheatcroft . . . . . . . . .33-37 — 70 Matt Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-37 — 70 Vaughn Taylor . . . . . . . . . . .33-37 — 70 Neal Lancaster . . . . . . . . . .36-34 — 70 Brian Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36 — 70 Kenny Perry . . . . . . . . . . . . .32-38 — 70 Trevor Immelman . . . . . . . . .34-36 — 70 Brian Gay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-34 — 70 Ben Curtis . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — 70 Jeff Overton . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-37 — 70 Charlie Beljan . . . . . . . . . . .36-34 — 70 Brendon Todd . . . . . . . . . . .35-35 — 70 Roland Thatcher . . . . . . . . .33-38 — 71 Mathew Goggin . . . . . . . . . .36-35 — 71

Chris Stroud . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-38 Sung Kang . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Scott Dunlap . . . . . . . . . . . .33-38 J.J. Henry . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Lucas Glover . . . . . . . . . . . .34-37 Brandt Snedeker . . . . . . . . .35-36 Jim Furyk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Tiger Woods . . . . . . . . . . . .34-37 Steven Bowditch . . . . . . . . .32-39 Miguel Angel Carballo . . . . .34-37 Ryuji Imada . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-38 Jason Gore . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34 Pat Perez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34 Cameron Tringale . . . . . . . .35-36 Rory Sabbatini . . . . . . . . . . .36-35 Camilo Villegas . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Dustin Johnson . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Carl Pettersson . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Phil Mickelson . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 John Huh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Daniel Miernicki . . . . . . . . . .36-35 Roberto Castro . . . . . . . . . .35-36 Nathan Green . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 James Driscoll . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 Harris English . . . . . . . . . . .38-34 Danny Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 Robert McClellan . . . . . . . . .35-37 Greg Chalmers . . . . . . . . . .34-38 Patrick Sheehan . . . . . . . . .34-38 Kris Blanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 Harrison Frazar . . . . . . . . . .36-36 Justin Leonard . . . . . . . . . . .34-38 Stuart Appleby . . . . . . . . . . .35-37 John Rollins . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36 Jason Kokrak . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 Erik Compton . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 Jon Mills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35 Kyle Thompson . . . . . . . . . .35-38 Mark Anderson . . . . . . . . . .37-36 Tommy Gainey . . . . . . . . . . .35-38 Nick O’Hern . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36 Marco Dawson . . . . . . . . . . .38-35 Spencer Levin . . . . . . . . . . .37-36 Billy Hurley III . . . . . . . . . . . .35-38 Stephen Gangluff . . . . . . . . .35-38 Will Claxton . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36 Edward Loar . . . . . . . . . . . .35-38 Brendon de Jonge . . . . . . . .38-36 Jimmy Walker . . . . . . . . . . .39-35 Jason Bohn . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 Derek Lamely . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 Jhonattan Vegas . . . . . . . . .36-38 J.J. Killeen . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38 Chris Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . .37-37 Rocco Mediate . . . . . . . . . . .38-37 Cameron Beckman . . . . . . .38-37 Michael Maness . . . . . . . . . .37-38 Garrett Willis . . . . . . . . . . . .36-40 Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-42 Tommy Biershenk . . . . . . . .38-38 Sam Saunders . . . . . . . . . . .37-39 Bobby Gates . . . . . . . . . . . .38-38 Alexandre Rocha . . . . . . . . .37-40 Kevin Kisner . . . . . . . . . . . .37-40 Jamie Lovemark . . . . . . . . .42-37 a-Jess Ferrell . . . . . . . . . . . .40-40 David Hutsell . . . . . . . . . . . .41-40

Transactions

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 75 76 76 76 76 76 77 77 79 80 81

Thursday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Placed RHP Dan Haren is on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Kevin Jepsen from Salt Lake City (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Selected the contract of RHP Sam Dyson from New Hampshire (EL). Cats of the Eastern League (AA). Optioned RHP Scott Richmond to Las Vegas (PCL). National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Placed LHP Jonny Venters on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Luis Avilan from Gwinnett (IL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Placed OF Alex Presley on the 7-day disabled list. Recalled OF Jordy Mercer from Indianapolis (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association INDIANA PACERS—Signed F Miles Plumlee. Women’s National Basketball Association NEW YORK LIBERTY — Signed G-F Katelan Redmon. LOS ANGELES SPARKS—Signed G Andrea Riley. PHOENIX MERCURY — Signed C Lynetta Kizer to a 7-day contract. HOCKEY National Hockey League CALGARY FLAMES—Re-signed F Mikael Backlund to a one-year contract. DETROIT RED WINGS—Named Tom Renney associate coach and agreed to terms on a three-year contract. FLORIDA PANTHERS—Agreed to terms with LW Jean-Francois Jacques on a oneyear contract. MONTREAL CANADIENS—Signed D Frederic St-Denis to one-year contract. NEW YORK RANGERS—Agreed to terms with F Kyle Jean. PHILADELPHIA FLYERS—Signed F Ruslan Fedotenko and D Bruno Gervais. VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Signed D Derek Joslin and D Patrick Mullen. WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Re-signed F Jay Beagle to a three-year contract extension and C Mathieu Perreault to a two-year contract extension. SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS—Suspended Los Angeles Galaxy’s David Beckham one game for kicking a ball at an opponent late in the game at San Jose. PORTLAND TIMBERS—Acquired D Kosuke Kimura from Colorado for allocation money and an international slot. COLLEGE DUKE—Announced sophomore G-F Rodney Hood is transferring to the school from Mississippi State. FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON—Fired women’s soccer coach Renee Montana. Named Marco Masucci women’s interim soccer coach. FRANCIS MARION—Named Reghan Boob athletic trainer. MINNESOTA STATE (MANKATO)—Agreed to terms with softball coach Lori Meyer on a four-year contract extension. PRESBYTERIAN—Named Christy Stegall women’s assistant volleyball coach, Brooks Savage men’s assistant basketball coach, Vashion Johnson assistant softball coach, Sarah Beth Anderson women’s assistant soccer coach and India Elliott women’s assistant basketball coach. SOUTH CAROLINA—Promoted assistant swimming and diving coach Jason Memont to associate head coach. TEXAS-PAN AMERICAN—Promoted Jiovanna Martinez men’s and women’s assistant track & field coach. UC DAVIS—Named Terrance Tumey athletic director. UNLV—Named Joe Spahn and Lisa Childers men’s and women’s swimming and diving assistant coaches.


Roswell Daily Record

always paid my own way. We were together for 22 years, Abby, and now I wish I had every one of them back. Why do old men search for young women to run around with, and why do young women think all old men have money? USED IN THE MIDWEST

DEAR ABBY

DEAR USED: Older men like young women because it helps them forget, for a little while, how old they really are. Also, young women tend to be more naive and less judgmental, assuming that gray temples are a sign of wisdom. They also assume that after decades in the workforce an older man has a sizable nest egg. You are not the only woman who has listened to her heart and made the same mistake twice — or more. Consider yourself ahead of the game because you are not economically dependent on your husband. Take the lessons you have learned, move on and have a happy life. You deserve it. You’ll be fine without this compulsive two-timer. Trust me! #####

UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: My husband, “Albert,” divorced me three years ago. Afterward, I found out he was with a 28-yearold woman he had met in a bar. After she took him for what little money he had, he came crawling back to me. Like a fool, I stupidly took him back because I still had feelings for him. Last week, I caught Albert on the Internet inviting a 23-year-old woman to play bingo over the weekend. Then I discovered another email indicating he had actually met her. I kicked him out, of course. Albert never supported me; I

Jumble

COMICS

DEAR ABBY: Whatever happened to telephone etiquette? We are a busy family and receive many calls from business associates and acquaintances. Abby, they feel free to call at any time, for the most trivial reasons! I guess it’s a reflection of our open-24-hours-aday society, but I consider it very rude. One man, with whom my husband is on a committee, called at 11:30 p.m. When I politely asked him please not to call after 9:30 p.m. in the future, he became indignant! My daughter’s soccer coach made practice-reminder calls at 6 a.m. When we didn’t answer, she left a message on our voicemail, but called again at 6:30 and 6:45 “to be sure we got the message”! I was brought up with the 9-to-9 rule — you shouldn’t call anyone you don’t know well before 9 a.m. or after 9 p.m. Also, polite callers identify themselves upfront, as in, “Hi. This is Joe Smith. May I please speak to Jack?” People call for my husband

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

AGGUE

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

OBYANT Answer: Yesterday’s

DEAR BUSY: I think you’ve done an excellent job of that yourself. Your complaints reflect a general, regrettable decline in good manners and common sense. It’s one of the reasons some people turn off their phones at night, or screen their calls with caller ID and voicemail. Callers should ALWAYS identify themselves. If they don’t, before answering any questions, feel free to say, “May I ask who’s calling?” Never reveal your husband’s work schedule, travel schedule or contact information to anyone unless you know with whom you are speaking.

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

FROM HELOISE

Dear Readers: Many of you wrote in about a recent column concerning recycling OLD KEYS. Here is what some of you said:

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

-

SARATY

Family Circus

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

NODPU

from all over the country. When he’s not in, they often demand to know when he’ll be back, his work schedule, his travel schedule and his contact information without revealing who they are. Abby, please remind these people that they are interrupting someone’s life with a phone call, and a little courtesy would go a long way. BUSY IN NEW HAMPSHIRE

(Answers tomorrow) UNFIT DENOTE AURORA Jumbles: WOUND Answer: After his unsuccessful attempt to steal second, the player was this — DOWN AND OUT

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Blondie

* I once read about a church that needed funds for some project. They formed a “key club.” To join, you had to donate your old keys. They sold them to a scrap-metal business and earned the funds they needed. Carol in Ohio

* The locksmith that I use recycles both the old locks and the keys. Barbara, via email

* Give them to a preschool or kindergarten teacher. They are great for counting, patterning, grouping, comparing — the list goes on and on. Penny in Ohio

* I used them to recognize staff where I work. I used a small label to put each name on a key, then tied the keys with narrow ribbon to a tree-branch centerpiece labeled “Keys to Our Success” for a staffrecognition party. Sondra, via email Thanks for all the great ideas, and keep them coming! If you have other “key” hints, I’d love to hear more! Heloise

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

#####

SEND A GREAT HINT TO: Heloise P.O. Box 795000 San Antonio, TX 78279-5000 Fax: 1-210-HELOISE Email: Heloise(at)Heloise.com

Dear Heloise: While traveling, I couldn’t keep the shades shut in the hotel room. I finally used the pants hanger in the closet to clip the shades closed. Also, after my postcards to friends arrived smeared, I placed clear packing tape over the message portion after I finished writing — clean and legible! Thanks for your great column in the Abilene Reporter-News. Jaide in Abilene, Texas Very inventive hints!

#####

Heloise

Dear Heloise: We did not get a headboard when we purchased our bedroom furniture set. I decided to make my own. I had my husband cut some wood to size for me. I purchased some inexpensive padding and a complementary fabric that I liked. I covered the wood in the padding and then stapled the fabric around it. It turned out great, and the best part is that I made it myself. Janice in Hawaii

The Wizard of Id

Dear Heloise: The simplest and most reliable way of getting books and other items that were loaned out returned is to have a logbook and pen handy. I keep mine in a drawer near the front door. I jot down the person’s name, what was borrowed and the date it was loaned. Sometimes even six months later, I can track down the missing item that was a little overdue and secure its return. Pat G., La Jolla, Calif.

Garfield

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Friday, July 6, 2012

B3


B4 Friday, July 6, 2012

FINANCIAL

European Central Bank cuts rates to new low

FRANKFUR T, Germany (AP) — The European Central Bank cut its benchmark interest rate to a record low Thursday to spark economic growth but gave little sign it would take further action soon to ease Europe’s financial crisis. By cutting its key refinancing rate by a quarter percentage point to 0.75, a move that was widely expected, the ECB sought to give Europe’s sagging economy a lift by making it cheaper for businesses and consumers to borrow. Financial markets were underwhelmed, though, and even ECB President Mario Draghi conceded during a press conference that the impact of the rate cut could be “muted” given the low demand for credit

in the slow economy. Analysts noted that interest rates were already low, that banks remain wary of lending to each other and that businesses and consumers see little reason to take on more debt. In a more surprising move, the ECB also cut the interest rate it pays banks on overnight deposits by a quarter percentage point — to zero. The move could nudge banks to lend more money, rather than sock it away with the ECB and earn no interest. But even that move could have limited ef fect, analysts said, since there are other safe havens for banks to park their money. Draghi said the bank acted in the face of economic pressures being felt by the 17 countries that

NEW YORK (AP) — Retailers could be sweating it out this summer. Shoppers, worried about jobs and the economy, pulled back on spending in June, slowing down sales for many retailers. And that could leave merchants on edge in the coming week, wondering if Americans will spend more once the backto-school season starts in late July. “The consumer is in a watch-and-wait mode,”’

says Arnold Aronson, managing director of retail strategies at consulting firm Kurt Salmon. “She has to be seduced by value.”

Roswell Daily Record

AP Photo

European Central Bank President Mario Draghi arrives for an EU Summit in Brussels on June 28.

use the euro, nearly half of which are in recession. He said there is more the ECB could do to stimulate growth — “we still have all

our artillery ready” — and indicated inflation should remain low, which gave the bank room to reduce rates. But Draghi, who has said

nomic activity. The figures have shown an uneven recovery. Discounters and high-end stores, for example, notched stronger growth last month. But for most, sales were disappointing. Big chains like Costco, Kohl’s and Macy’s, as well as teen retailer The Wet Seal, were among stores whose results fell short of Wall Street expectations. Shoppers are concerned about the struggling econo-

my. Employers have pulled back on hiring. Europe faces a recession and growth has slowed in China. Worries about jobs sent shoppers’ confidence down in June for the fourth straight month. T racy Garza, 41, has been waiting all year for hard evidence that the economy is on solid footing. The San Francisco resident picked up a pair of shoes for $25 at Ross Stores and bought some Blu-ray discs earlier in the year but has held back on buying a laptop for $1,200. “Are you going to spend? Are you going to wait?” says Garza, whose income from freelance writing and Spanish translation has been uneven. “I’m going to wait to get a better idea of where the economy is going.” Overall, the ICSC tally of 23 chain stores nationwide rose only 0.2 percent, a lower pace than the 1.7 percent increase in May. Excluding drug stores, the index was up 2.6 percent, the low end of the 2.5 to 3.3 percent rise the mall group had predicted. That was a sharp slowdown from a 4 percent gain in May.

AP Photo

Shoppers take advantage of discounts at a Target store on Thursday, in Chicago. Shoppers, worried about jobs and the overall economy, pulled back on spending in June, resulting in tepid sales for many retailers.

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Aug 12 119.30 119.80 118.85 119.15 Oct 12 123.40 123.90 122.90 123.55 Dec 12 127.40 128.15 127.10 127.15 Feb 13 129.40 130.75 129.40 129.77 Apr 13 131.60 132.80 131.60 132.40 Jun 13 128.55 129.20 128.55 129.20 Aug 13 128.50 129.05 128.50 129.05 Oct 13 130.90 131.50 130.90 131.50 Dec 13 131.20 131.80 131.20 131.80 Last spot N/A Est. sales 45759. Tue’s Sales: 46,943 Tue’s open int: 314169, off -332 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Aug 12 147.35 147.55 145.32 145.95 Sep 12 151.07 151.07 148.80 149.37 Oct 12 152.50 152.75 150.97 151.50 Nov 12 153.67 153.95 152.45 153.02 Jan 13 154.52 154.90 153.50 154.40 Mar 13 156.00 156.00 155.10 155.15 Apr 13 156.50 156.50 156.50 156.50 May 13 156.80 156.80 156.80 156.80 Last spot N/A Est. sales 1387. Tue’s Sales: 8,945 Tue’s open int: 36145, up +425 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jul 12 96.17 96.67 95.35 95.82 Aug 12 94.12 94.42 92.72 92.87 Oct 12 83.00 83.20 82.10 82.22 Dec 12 80.70 81.15 80.60 80.65 Feb 13 83.32 83.95 83.02 83.80 Apr 13 85.57 86.30 85.17 86.15 May 13 89.80 89.90 89.80 89.90 Jun 13 91.75 92.27 91.75 92.12 Jul 13 90.30 90.40 89.80 90.40 Aug 13 89.20 89.45 89.20 89.45 Oct 13 78.50 78.50 78.50 78.50 Dec 13 74.90 74.90 74.90 74.90 Last spot N/A Est. sales 35784. Tue’s Sales: 38,829 Tue’s open int: 253306, up +1920 14

chg.

-.32 -.10 -.27 +.43 +.70 +.70 +.75 +.80

-1.45 -1.50 -1.20 -1.15 -1.00 -1.15 -.25 -.45

-1.05 -2.00 -.98 -.35 +.50 +.58 +.20 +.32 +.25 +.35 +.20 +.65

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jul 12 70.92 Oct 12 73.05 73.05 70.75 70.77 Dec 12 72.25 72.75 70.31 70.58 Mar 13 73.90 73.90 71.63 71.91 May 13 74.34 74.35 72.50 72.97 Jul 13 75.22 75.22 73.79 73.88 Sep 13 75.79 Oct 13 74.98 Dec 13 77.15 77.15 75.65 75.79 Mar 14 75.59 May 14 75.34 Jul 14 75.44 Oct 14 75.04 Dec 14 75.04 Mar 15 74.99 May 15 74.99 Last spot N/A Est. sales 12906. Tue’s Sales: 12,725 Tue’s open int: 165480, up +723

chg.

-1.83 -2.13 -2.02 -1.88 -1.66 -1.68 -1.83 -1.84 -1.83 -1.83 -1.83 -1.83 -1.83 -1.83 -1.83 -1.83

Dec 13 840 854fl 835 854fl Mar 14 845ü 856ø 839ü 856ø May 14 846ø 858ø 842ü 858ø Jul 14 810 815 798 810 Last spot N/A Est. sales 264456. Tue’s Sales: 109,092 Tue’s open int: 423551, up +6110 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Jul 12 735 776fl 732ø 768 Sep 12 690 714 687 708fl Dec 12 689 713 685ø 708ø Mar 13 696ü 720ü 693 715fl May 13 699 722ø 693ø 717fl Jul 13 702fl 723ø 697ø 718ø Sep 13 634ø 653fl 634ø 653 Dec 13 600 614 599fl 613ü Mar 14 610 620 610 619fl May 14 612ø 624ø 612ø 624ø Jul 14 625 630 625 628fl Sep 14 578fl 589fl 578fl 589fl Dec 14 555 560ø 552 558ü Jul 15 573 576 573 576 Dec 15 550 552 548ø 552 Last spot N/A Est. sales 859221. Tue’s Sales: 282,852 Tue’s open int: 1036438, up +3974 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Jul 12 365 365 356 356 Sep 12 359 367 357 365ü Dec 12 358ü 366ø 356ü 364 Mar 13 370 370 366 367fl May 13 363fl 369fl 363fl 369fl Jul 13 365fl 371fl 365fl 371fl Sep 13 367fl 373fl 367fl 373fl Dec 13 372fl 378fl 372fl 378fl Mar 14 399ø 405ø 399ø 405ø May 14 399ø 405ø 399ø 405ø Jul 14 452 458 452 458 Sep 14 460 466 460 466 Last spot N/A Est. sales 1564. Tue’s Sales: 550 Tue’s open int: 8978, off -20 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Jul 12 1588ø 1644ø 1586fl 1626ø Aug 12 1545ø 1585ø 1544ø 1583 Sep 12 1513 1554ü 1513 1551ø Nov 12 1495 1529 1493 1526ø Jan 13 1492ø 1524ø 1489ø 1523 Mar 13 1454 1474 1449ü 1472fl May 13 1409 1430 1409 1428ü Jul 13 1403fl 1420 1403ø 1419 Aug 13 1387 1398fl 1387 1398fl Sep 13 1348 1351ø 1347ü 1351ø Nov 13 1300ü 1315ü 1300 1315ü Jan 14 1302fl 1322 1302fl 1322 Mar 14 1298fl 1318 1298fl 1318 May 14 1298fl 1318 1298fl 1318 Jul 14 1315ü 1322 1315ü 1322 Aug 14 1297ø 1316fl 1297ø 1316fl Sep 14 1287fl 1307 1287fl 1307 Nov 14 1275 1280 1272 1280 Jul 15 1284ø 1293 1284ø 1293 Nov 15 1244fl 1246ü 1244fl 1246ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 573430. Tue’s Sales: 200,154 Tue’s open int: 775157, up +1737

GRAINS

Open high

low

settle

chg.

+40ü +38fl +33ü +29 +25ø +22ü +20ü

+18ü +17ü +16ü +3ü

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

+49ü +34fl +34 +33ø +31ø +29ø +23ü +15ø +12ø +12 +11 +11 +3 +3 +6

+7ü +14ü +7ü +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6

+54ü +53ø +53ø +51fl +50fl +40ø +28 +28ø +18fl +18fl +19ü +19ü +19ü +19ü +19ü +19ü +19ü +8ø +8ø +1ø

low

settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Aug 12 87.06 873.55 86.50 87.22 Sep 12 87.45 89.33 86.89 87.57 Oct 12 87.54 89.65 87.26 87.94 Nov 12 87.89 90.03 87.65 88.37 Dec 12 88.60 90.36 88.15 88.82 Jan 13 88.95 90.71 88.68 89.26 Feb 13 90.66 91.01 89.01 89.62 Mar 13 89.36 90.89 89.30 89.89 Apr 13 89.38 90.27 89.38 90.04 May 13 90.13 90.28 90.10 90.10 Jun 13 89.35 90.74 89.35 90.11 Jul 13 90.60 90.60 89.69 90.08 Aug 13 89.93 89.99 89.93 89.99 Sep 13 89.88 Oct 13 89.77 Nov 13 89.66 Dec 13 89.08 90.71 88.75 89.57 Jan 14 89.37 Feb 14 89.21 Mar 14 89.05 Apr 14 88.89 May 14 88.72 Jun 14 88.55 Jul 14 88.38 Aug 14 88.22 Last spot N/A Est. sales 653602. Tue’s Sales: 648,233 Tue’s open int: 1432999, up +2809 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Aug 12 2.7091 2.7950 2.6455 2.7648 Sep 12 2.6161 2.6799 2.6053 2.6552 Oct 12 2.4348 2.4857 2.4348 2.4653 Nov 12 2.4228 2.4417 2.4067 2.4244 Dec 12 2.3920 2.4405 2.3800 2.4095 Jan 13 2.3900 2.4180 2.3900 2.4096 Feb 13 2.4377 2.4377 2.4100 2.4194 Mar 13 2.4091 2.4384 2.4091 2.4384 Apr 13 2.5745 2.5850 2.5745 2.5830 May 13 2.5767 Jun 13 2.5500 2.5657 2.5380 2.5594

chg.

-.44 -.46 -.45 -.43 -.40 -.36 -.32 -.28 -.23 -.20 -.18 -.17 -.16 -.14 -.13 -.12 -.11 -.11 -.12 -.13 -.14 -.15 -.16 -.17 -.18

+.0419 +.0249 +.0082 +.0003 -.0021 -.0020 -.0013 +.0017 -.0014 -.0006 -.0003

Jul 13 2.5342 Aug 13 2.5089 Sep 13 2.4803 Oct 13 2.3544 Nov 13 2.3385 Dec 13 2.3294 Jan 14 2.3345 Feb 14 2.3465 Mar 14 2.3605 Apr 14 2.4875 May 14 2.4900 Jun 14 2.4800 Jul 14 2.4660 Aug 14 2.4535 Last spot N/A Est. sales 166443. Tue’s Sales: 119,381 Tue’s open int: 253521, off -8990 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Aug 12 2.930 2.953 2.885 2.945 Sep 12 2.949 2.959 2.899 2.950 Oct 12 2.981 3.014 2.944 2.990 Nov 12 3.225 3.225 3.162 3.209 Dec 12 3.448 3.460 3.404 3.448 Jan 13 3.610 3.610 3.540 3.583 Feb 13 3.585 3.623 3.549 3.593 Mar 13 3.541 3.593 3.520 3.563 Apr 13 3.545 3.545 3.486 3.524 May 13 3.544 3.570 3.510 3.547 Jun 13 3.601 3.601 3.542 3.577 Jul 13 3.621 3.626 3.597 3.624 Aug 13 3.638 3.644 3.609 3.644 Sep 13 3.639 3.646 3.615 3.646 Oct 13 3.682 3.685 3.656 3.685 Nov 13 3.790 3.802 3.786 3.802 Dec 13 4.013 4.013 3.986 4.010 Jan 14 4.121 4.130 4.102 4.123 Feb 14 4.100 4.105 4.085 4.097 Mar 14 4.020 4.020 3.990 4.018 Apr 14 3.847 3.850 3.841 3.844 May 14 3.859 Jun 14 3.883 Jul 14 3.925 Aug 14 3.930 3.945 3.930 3.945 Sep 14 3.945 3.948 3.945 3.948 Oct 14 3.950 3.986 3.950 3.986 Nov 14 4.078 Last spot N/A Est. sales 240468. Tue’s Sales: 244,405 Tue’s open int: 1115630, off -2809

-.0014 -.0035 -.0056 -.0058 -.0060 -.0071 -.0071 -.0071 -.0071 -.0071 -.0071 -.0071 -.0071 -.0071

+.046 +.039 +.035 +.032 +.019 +.017 +.018 +.019 +.016 +.014 +.011 +.011 +.011 +.011 +.011 +.008 +.003 +.002 +.002 +.003 +.003 +.002 +.003 +.003 +.003 +.003 +.003 +.003

METALS

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Thu. Aluminum -$0.8752 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.4903 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $3.4880 N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Lead - $1895.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8602 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1604.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1608.90 troy oz., NY Merc spot Thu. Silver - $27.715 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $27.638 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Platinum -$1470.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1475.00 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

ANNUITIES • STOCKS • BONDS MUTUAL FUNDS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday:

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Jul 12 801 824 793ü 822ø Sep 12 815 840fl 809ü 838 Dec 12 828ø 849ø 823ü 847 Mar 13 840 858ø 834ü 855ø May 13 839 852fl 832ø 852fl Jul 13 827 846fl 822ø 844ü Sep 13 831fl 844fl 825 844fl

FUTURES

Brett Leach Financial Consultant

2724 Wilshire Blvd. • Suite 101 Roswell, NM 88201 • 575-627-1000 • swst.com

1201 Elm Street • Suite 3500 • Dallas TX 75270 • 800-562-8041 • Member: FINRA/SIPC

The leaders agreed to make it easier for troubled countries and banks to receive rescue loans from Europe’s bailout fund and also signaled greater willingness to use emergency funds to purchase government bonds. The goal would be to drive down troubled countries’ borrowing costs. They also agreed to create a single Europewide banking regulator to prevent bank bailouts from wrecking individual countries’ government finances.

Stock markets initially rose after the ECB’s rate announcement, but fell back down as investors worried about a slowdown in the global economy. “Today’s ECB interest rate cut does little to alter the bleak economic outlook,” said Jennifer McKeown, analyst at Capital Economics. She said the ECB is likely to now wait and see how the financial markets

After weak June, retailers to sweat out summer The June results, based on revenue at stores opened at least a year, are considered an indicator of a retailer’s health. Only a small group of chain stores report monthly sales figures. But the results offer a snapshot of consumer spending, which accounts for 70 percent of all eco-

and the economy react to the emergency measures announced by European leaders last week.

Europe’s problems cannot be solved without stronger political and economic ties, offered little hope the bank would take more emergency measures to ease the debt crisis, such as cheap loans for banks. He did, however, indicate the ECB could make it easier for banks to borrow from it by accepting a wider range of collateral.

Draghi welcomed the measures, though they will take some time to put in place.

Oil prices lower following disappointing economic data

NEW YORK (AP) — A slew of disappointing economic news spooked investors Thursday and pushed down the price of oil. Major retailers reported tepid sales in June as consumers cut back on spending. And service companies appeared to be struggling, as growth in that sector last month came at the slowest pace in nearly two and a half years. The U.S. is the world’s biggest consumer of oil. When its economy falters, investors worry about falling demand for petroleum products. “We’re still in uncertain economic waters,” said Gene McGillian, a broker and oil analyst at Tradition Energy. “We need to see consistently better economic news, and there’s a general fear that we’re not going to see that anytime soon.” Benchmark U.S. crude lost 44 cents to end the day at $87.22 per barrel in New York — a slight drop following a jump of nearly $10 a barrel in less than a week. The U.S. Energy Information Administration reported that the nation’s supplies of oil fell by 4.3 million barrels last week. Analysts expected a decline of 2 million barrels, according to Platts, the energyinformation arm of McGraw-Hill Cos. A drop in oil supplies usually pushes prices higher. But analysts pointed out that the U.S. has more oil on hand than in the past 22 years, and crude stocks are almost 12 percent above the five-year average. The country also used less oil and gasoline last week, compared with a year ago. At the pump, retail gasoline prices were flat at a national average of $3.338 per gallon, according to AAA, Wright Express and Oil Price Information Service. Gasoline prices have held steady this week after dropping nearly 60 cents since the first week in April.

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

MARKET SUMMARY

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 1142209 7.82 -.24 S&P500ETF1060092136.79-.62 JPMorgCh 573934 34.38 -1.50 SPDR Fncl 430096 14.59 -.22 SprintNex 414192 3.31 -.16

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) CheniereEn 48916 NovaGld g 32665 NwGold g 23122 YM Bio g 20941 VantageDrl 19093

Last 15.58 5.70 10.15 2.22 1.52

Chg +.02 ... +.08 +.08 +.04

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last SiriusXM 518230 2.09 ArenaPhm 419268 11.35 RschMotn 389024 7.69 PwShs QQQ30969764.93 Microsoft 282257 30.70

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name PatriotCoal 2.26 +.42 +22.8 Medgen wt 6.25 +2.05 +48.8 Micrvis rs ETr2xSSD 25.61 +3.20 +14.3 Medgenics 15.00 +4.51 +43.0 SyngyP un iSoftStone 7.09 +.84 +13.4 NDynMn g 2.80 +.28 +11.1 BostPrv wt 3.30 +.30 +10.0 EntreMed AlxB Inc n 31.16 +3.65 +13.3 Accelr8 GencoShip 3.55 +.39 +12.3 NovaCpp n 2.21 +.17 +8.3 OrchrdSH n

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name AmbwEd CSVInvBrnt CatoCp Feihe Intl MGIC

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last 3.73 63.03 28.39 6.19 2.79

Chg -.91 -7.64 -3.32 -.71 -.29

DIARY

Volume

Name

Div

AT&T Inc BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola Disney EOG Res FordM HewlettP HollyFrt s Intel IBM Merck Microsoft

Name BovieMed MeetMe ImmunoCll AmDGEn Vringo

1,329 1,689 128 3,146 260 6

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

2,955,584,711 Volume

52-Week High Low 13,338.66 10,404.49 5,627.85 3,950.66 486.39 381.99 8,496.42 6,414.89 2,498.89 1,941.99 3,134.17 2,298.89 1,422.38 1,074.77 14,951.57 11,208.42 860.37 601.71

1.76 .04 1.76 3.60f 2.04 .60f .68 .20 .53f .60f .90f 3.40f 1.68 .80

Last 2.43 2.20 3.60 2.28 3.66

DIARY

%Chg +28.3 +25.8 +24.1 +24.0 +21.2

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg -.35 -12.6 CarverB rs 2.69 -.57 -.20 -8.3 SunshHrt n 3.01 -.59 -.24 -6.3 NaturlAlt 5.94 -1.05 -.12 -5.0 Solazyme 12.70 -1.48 -.19 -4.9 MeadeInst 3.37 -.38

%Chg -17.5 -16.4 -15.0 -10.4 -10.1

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

223 208 52 483 21 5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

INDEXES

Last 12,896.67 5,249.12 480.41 7,837.77 2,376.38 2,976.12 1,367.58 14,365.13 817.43

Chg

52 35.77 -.23 ... 7.82 -.24 13 74.44 +.17 8 106.03 -1.34 21 78.45 -.71 17 48.11 -.48 19 92.00 -2.89 6 9.57 -.03 7 20.28 -.08 6 36.70 -.27 11 26.55 -.31 14 195.29 -.64 19 41.63 -.18 11 30.70 -.06

DIARY

YTD %Chg Name +18.3 +40.6 +1.5 -.3 +12.1 +28.3 -6.6 -11.1 -21.3 +56.8 +9.5 +6.2 +10.4 +18.3

Oneok Pt s PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

1,143 1,330 120 2,593 130 17

1,370,694,030

Net % Chg Chg -47.15 -.36 +11.55 +.22 -2.48 -.51 -63.90 -.81 -24.10 -1.00 +.04 ... -6.44 -.47 -52.77 -.37 -1.06 -.13

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Last

Last 2.04 14.47 4.64 2.48 19.10

64,253,561 Volume

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

PE

Chg +.45 +2.97 +.90 +.48 +3.34

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

%Chg -19.6 -10.8 -10.5 -10.3 -9.4

Chg +.05 +1.33 +.34 +.04 -.06

YTD 52-wk % Chg % Chg +5.56 +1.39 +4.57 -6.57 +3.39 +9.48 +4.82 -7.53 +4.30 -1.47 +14.24 +3.60 +8.75 +1.06 +8.91 -.24 +10.33 -4.74

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

2.54f .58f 2.15f .88 .04f .68 1.04 .41e 2.00 1.59 .32 .88 1.08f

15 11 17 14 44 18 14 ... 48 15 14 11 17

55.91 20.05 70.17 22.67 9.15 28.41 38.29 15.50 44.89 71.08 16.83 33.13 28.64

+.21 +.04 -.59 -.20 -.13 -.15 -.55 -.03 -.06 +.33 -.11 -.35 -.08

-3.2 +10.0 +5.8 +4.8 +6.9 -2.4 +5.9 +8.9 +11.9 +18.9 +20.3 +20.2 +3.6

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


Roswell Daily Record

Open

Continued from Page B1

her on this week, Salas sees her play as a tribute to her parents. “My dad still works long hours out on the golf course, my mom also,” Salas said. “So this is just my way of repaying them for all their sacrifice and all their work they’ve done for me.” Third-ranked Ai Miyazato, the Japanese star coming off a victory Sunday in the LPGA T our event in Arkansas, was a stroke back along with 17-year old Lexi Thompson, Jennie Lee and Beatriz Recari. Seven players — including No. 5 Na Yeon Choi and No. 6 Suzann Pettersen — shot 71 in the nearly 100degree heat and high humidity that tur ned Blackwolf Run, a challenging 6,944-yard course in central Wisconsin, into a boiler. Defending champion So Yeon R yu finished with a 74. Se Ri Pak, who won the Open at Blackwolf Run in 1998, shot a 72. Top-ranked Yani Tseng shot a 74. She would become the youngest player to complete a career Grand Slam with a victory this weekend. Michelle Wie also opened

Legals

---------------------------------Pub. June 29, 6, 2012

STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE PROBATE COURT CHAVES COUNTY

IN THE MATTER OF ESTATE OF THE DANNY EAKER, DECEASED. Probate: 8982

Letters of Administration (NO WILL)

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

Notice is now given that Sylvia Eaker (name of personal representative), has been appointed to serve as the personal representative of the estate of Danny Eaker, and has qualified as the decedent’s personal representative by filing with the court a statement of acceptance of the duties of that office.

The personal representative has all of the powers and authorities provided by law and specifically, Section 45-3-715 by NMSA 1978. Issued this 18th day of June 2012. Clerk of the Probate Court By: Rhoda C. Coakley

Deputy Clerk Betty Spear

---------------------------------Pub. July 6, 13, 2012

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES IN THE PROBATE COURT IN THE MATTER THE ESTATE OF VIRGINIA L. LANKFORD Deceased.

OF

PROBATE NO. 8987 NOTICE TO CREDITORS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of this Estate. All persons having claims against this Estate are required to present their claims within two (2) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned Personal Representative’s attorney at the address listed below, or filed with the Probate Court of Chaves County, New Mexico, located at #1 St. Mary’s Place, Roswell, New Mexico 88203.

DATED this 28 day of June 2012.

/s/ Sherryl Lankford Stovall SHERRYL LANKFORD STOVALL Personal Representative of the Estate of Virginia L. Lankford, Deceased.

HENNIGHAUSEN & OLSEN, L.L.P.

By: /s/ Robert J. McCrea Robert J. McCrea Attorney for the Estate of Virginia L. Lankford P.O. Box 1415 Roswell, NM 88202-1415 (575)624-2463 telephone (575)624-2878 facsimile

with a 74, and secondranked Stacy Lewis shot 77. Cheyenne Woods, Tiger Woods’ niece, had a 75. Salas began playing at age 7 thanks in large part to her father, Ramon, who is the head mechanic at a golf course and offered to do odd jobs for a local pro if he was willing to teach Salas how to play. “He didn’t have that much money to pay for lessons because they’re really expensive,” Salas said. “I didn’t have golf shoes. I didn’t know how to dress, nothing like that. They worked out a deal where my dad did handyman favors for them. My dad fixed cars on the side, and that’s how I got started. Just been swinging ever since. Haven’t stopped.” As Salas began playing in tournaments, she and her father would drive long distances and sleep in the car to save money. Even now that Salas is a professional, the family still sometimes travels the country in its high-mileage 2006 Toyota Tacoma. “We like that truck,” Salas said. “It’s red and it has ‘USC dad’ on it. I think it has over 90,000 miles on it. We’ve had some great memories, laughed and shed tears in that truck. And I often slept in it. It’s

GARAGE SALES 001. North

3603 Mission Arch Fri. & Sat. 7-12 Kitchen Aid Artisan mixer, Beaba, baby cook, Kenmore sewing machine, gun locks & cases Harley parts, & clothes, punching bag.

002. Northeast 3013 FUTURA Fri. 3-7 & Sat. 7-3. Treadmill, furniture, and lots more.

503 Park Dr. Sat. only 7-? Dining table, w/6 chairs & buffet, dishes, Schwinn air-dyne bike, dvd’s, lamps, rocker, bikes, room fans, lots more. 1107 E. 19th Fri. 6-5, and Sat. 6-Noon Three family sale. 14 LA Paz Sat. 7-10am Furniture, bedding, suitcases, and lots more! 1 La Paloma Pl. Sat. 7 Lots of household items, furniture, lamps, beds & linens. Girls name brand clothing & shoes. Patio furniture, bbq grill & much more. 312 E. 8th, Fri. 7am-5pm, Sat. 7am-noon. A little bit of everything: Furniture, blankets, clothes, TVs, come check it out. 4 LA Paloma Pl. Fri. & Sat. 7-? Lawnmower, home interior and lots of misc. 3006 FUTURA Dr. Sat. 7-12 Furniture, clothes, electronics, etc. 201 TIERRA Berrenda Dr, Sat, 7am-11am. Estate & garage sale: Lots of items, furniture, household items, much more, bunnies $20 each. 608 E. Mescalero Sat. 7-12 Huge Moving Sale. Furniture, clothing, household items and much more. 3303 ENCANTO Rd, SATURDAY ONLY, 7-12. Table, chairs, dryer, household goods, size 3-5 & 10 women clothes, custom horse saddle $500, 2 sets golf clubs & much more.

003. East

205 E. Summit Fri. & Sat. 7am Clothes, toys, twin bed frame, and etc.

004. Southeast

5903 HUMMINGBIRD Ln, Fri-Sat, 8a-2p. 3 party, 2nd house South of Blair’s. Table & chairs, dishwasher, entertainment center.

005. South

1613 S. Monroe, Fri-Sat, 7am-2pm. Lots of nice things that must go. Kitchen table, coffee table, end tables, 1946 & 1967 Chevy trucks, etc. 302 S. Evergreen Sat. only 7am-? 2 families. All kinds of stuff, Shaper w/door knives

CLASSIFIEDS

been good, it’s been a fun adventure, and just going to keep going and making more experiences.” Salas’ hard work, and the sacrifices her family made, paid off when she ear ned her spot on the LPGA Tour by winning a nine-way, three-hole playoff for the final qualifying spot. “My dad is like, ‘It’s OK, it’s OK.’ But my mom is like, ‘No, no, no, no. You’re going to go out there and you’re going to get that card,”’ Salas said. “And just birdie, birdie, birdie. That 18-footer on the last hole, I knew where I stood. I knew I had to make it. It was probably the slowest putt of my life, but it was great. All the emotions of all the hard work we’ve done as a family and all the sacrifice my dad has done and my mom. It was just a great moment for us.” The other leaders have an edge in terms of experience. Kerr is a 14-time winner on the LPGA tour and the 2007 Open winner. But she was winless in 2011 after winning at least one tournament in each of the previous seven years. The long-hitting Lincicome has five career LPGA tour wins, including a major win in the 209 Kraft Nabisco Championship.

005. South

2800 EMERALD Dr, Fri-Sat, 7-2pm. Furniture, TVs, stove, tools & clothes. 1905 S. Main Sat. only 6am-1pm. Adventure Bible Church Youth are having a huge yard sale. Tons of housewares, books, etc. Fill a bag of clothes for $2. Sizes from newborn to plus including maternity. We have it all! We’d say everything but the kitchen sink, but we have that too. 1905 S. Main - See you there! 1401 S. Stanton, Fri-Sat, 8-5pm. Kitchen goods, household goods, electronics, nursing uniforms, clothes, baby clothes, shoes, etc. 1907 S. Richardson Sat. Moving out - Lots of items left behind. Furniture, kitchen stuff, clothes, baby items.

006. Southwest

509 W. Forrest, Tues, Weds, Thurs, Fri & Sun, 7am-5pm. Clothes, tools & toys. No Saturday sales. ESTATE SALE: Fri-Sat, 7am-2pm, 509 S. Kentucky. Antiques, vintage & collectible items, furniture, home decor, kitchen items & much more. House will go on the market, AS IS. 4br/2.5ba, large yard, $75k. BEHIND 602 S. Lea, in alley, 7am, Fri-Sat? 4 maple bar stools, chest of drawers, exercise bike, misc. from A to Z & more! 1401 SUNSET Pl, Fri-Sat, 8am-12pm. Washer/dryer, TV, baby items, clothing for entire family, toys, household items. 2401 W. Alameda, Sat., 7am-12pm. In house sale, lots to see. 1900 S. Adams Dr., Sat., 7am-3pm. Furniture, milk glassware, collectibles, hospital bed, wheelchairs, walkers, baby stuff & more. 1512 S. Madison Ave, Sat., 6:30-? Costume jewelry, lots of misc., household items. Bring your cash. 419 S. Aspen, Friday, 7am-1pm. 511 CYPRESS, Sat, 7am-? Fishing gear, gas grill, yard tools, clothes all sizes, dishes, too much to list. 1403 S. Madison Ave. Fri. & Sat. 8-4 Clothes, & toys; Misc. items, car CHURCH ON The Move, 901 W. Brasher, Sat., 7am-noon. MOPS garage sale. All profits go to MOPS (Mother of Preschoolers). We have everything to meet your needs! Come check us out!! 1200 W. Gayle (between Union & Sunset), Friday, 7am-2pm. Huge 5 family sale! 1900’s Atlas’, old maps, travel guides, antiques, furniture, dresser, large mirror, nice clothes cheap, lots shoes, leather coats, books; old & new, ceramics, household items, 16” tires, 1983 Camero, 1990 Chevy Suburban, lots more!

006. Southwest 1202 Camino Real Fri. & Sat. 7am-1pm. Yard Sale. Electrical mechanic tools, carpenter tools, freezers, fridge, and hand tools.

1105 PRINCETON Sat. 7-12 Couch, clothes, toys, movies, cds, pac-n-play. 5706 SOUTHEAST Main Fri. & Sat. 8-12 Moving, furniture, household, clothing

007. West

CORNER OF West McGaffey & Sunset Sat. & Sun. 6-5. Cute back 2 school girl clothing AE, Aeropostale, Hollister plus more name brands, XS-S size 3-5 jeans, new shoes, DVD’s, new cross necklaces, new AT&T Go phone couch, TV’s, tires, & msic. items.

008. Northwest

3202 Allison Dr., Saturday, 7a-2p. Craft items, household access. & much more. 606 N. Ohio, Sat-Sun, 7am sharp-2pm. Multifamily sale!! Early birds pay double!! 48 RIVERSIDE, Fri-Sat, 7am-12pm. Clothes, furniture, video games, movies, toys, dishes, shoes. 1103 LeAnn Enchanted Hills Sat. 7:30 am Kids clothes, toys, bikes, shop vac, furniture, TV, porch swing, basketball goal

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice

FOOD ADDICTS Anonymous 12 step fellowship offering freedom from eating disorders. Meetings Mondays & Fridays at 7pm. For more information call 575-910-8178 or 575-910-8179

025. Lost and Found

LOST PUPPY on Sunset & Brasher, 6 mos, tan/white, female, Victorian Bulldog, Reward. Call Edgar, 420-1529. Missing Auburn toy poodle, responds to “Buddy”, $100 reward, 627-6281 or 214-794-9374 FOUND CAR keys on N. Lea, call 575-622-7407. FOUND SWEET black & white, large Border Collie? Call 623-1248 or 622-6510 ask for Toni. YORKIE, FEMALE, 3lbs, silver/blk/brown, very thin, missing from yard at 17th & Atkinson, on Sun. morning. 626-9682 or 626-4984

MISSING DOG This is Nala & she went missing on July 2nd, 2012. Nala is an English Mastiff & 2 yrs old. Nala is fawn/blonde colored & a female. Please contact: Jami Bernacchi at 949-683-8482. I am providing a $500 cash reward for the finding & returning of Nala.

Friday, July 6, 2012

Finals

Continued from Page B1

Her next opponent will be No. 3 Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland, who reached her first Grand Slam final at age 23 by playing steady as can be during a 6-3, 6-4 victory over No. 8 Angelique Kerber of Germany. “After a couple of games, I just relaxed a little bit,” said Radwanska, who made only six unforced errors, one in the second set. “I was really focusing on every point.” Williams won 20 of her 24 service points in the first set, including 17 in a row during one stretch. She didn’t double-fault once, a real accomplishment, given how often she went for corners and lines. She finished with a 45-14 edge in total winners. “I honestly didn’t feel great on my serve today. I really didn’t,” said Williams, who went back on court later Thursday with older sister Venus to reach the doubles semifinals. “I thought my serve was off, and apparently — clearly — it wasn’t, so maybe I should be off a little more.” And this per formance didn’t come against a slouch: Azarenka won the Australian Open in January as part of a 26-0 start to this season, was playing in

025. Lost and Found

$1000 REWARD for information leading to the arrest of people involved in recovery of property stolen from lot behind Roswell Ford on the night of June 19th or morning of June 20th. 1994 Polaris 4x4 400L ATV, red & gray; 2004 Roadrunner trailer, single axle, ramp gate, black, Colorado license, 151VYF; 10 bales of certified weed free straw, has 1 blue string. Contact Roswell Police Dept. with any information.

INSTRUCTION

030. Education & Instructions

STAINED GLASS class for adults. Tools provided, cost is $15.00 for 2 hour class. Tuesday evening 6pm-8pm. Contact Betty, 626-8257.

her third semifinal in the past five major tournaments, and would have returned to No. 1 in the rankings if she had managed to beat Williams. That was not about to happen. Not on this afternoon. Not the way Williams is playing, five weeks after a stunning exit at the French Open, her only first-round loss in 48 Grand Slam appearances. “I’ve been working so hard,” the sixth-seeded American said, “and I really, I really wanted it.” She’s now one win away from a fifth Wimbledon championship, adding to those in 2002-03 and 200910, and 14th Grand Slam singles trophy overall — but first in two years. For her, that’s a long gap. Less than a week after her 2010 title, Williams cut her feet on glass at a restaurant, leading to a series of health problems, including being hospitalized for clots in her lungs, then the removal of a pocket of blood under the skin on her stomach. “Serena is blessed to be here,” Dad said. The hardest part of Radwanska’s day probably came during the postmatch news conference, which was cut short after she was overcome by a coughing fit. She appeared to be OK.

045. Employment Opportunities

Send Resume and DMV printout to: Human Resources PO Box 1454 Roswell, NM 88202-1454

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

Or Fax Resume and DMV printout to: Human Resources 575-347-2319

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

035. MusicDancing Dramatics

BEGINNERS & Intermediate guitar acoustic/electric lessons $20/hr Wed, Thurs, Fri & Sat. evenings. Call after 5pm 575-910-3710 for info & lesson sign up.

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

THE ROSWELL Daily Record is now accepting applications for the position of: OUTSIDE SALES The ideal candidate must possess excellent customer service skills, superior organizational skills a self-starter and strong work ethic. Bilingual preferred. Experience or background in advertising also helpful. Must be computer literate. This is a full time position. Interested Applicants please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Vonnie Fischer, 2301 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88201 or e-mail to: addirector@rdrnews.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! AERSALE is rapidly expanding and seeking talented, motivated and dependable individuals to join AerSale as the leader in global aircraft, engine and material support. AerSale provides great pay and excellent benefits. Current positions open: 3 Warehouse Clerks: 1 year experience in warehouse operations, ability to multi task with strong communication skills, knowledge of MS office, strong data entry skills with high level of accuracy. 2 Parts Material Inspectors: 1 year aviation quality system or inspection experience, ability to multi task with strong communication skills, knowledge of MS office, strong data entry skills with high level of accuracy. 1 Ground Support Equipment Mechanic: 1 year maintenance and/or mechanical experience, experience in preventative maintenance and mechanical diagnosis. Apply in person at: 703 E Challenger

Never before even a semifinalist at any Grand Slam tournament, Radwanska is the first Polish woman to make it to a major title match since Jadwiga Jedrzejowska lost three finals in the 1930s. “I don’t really have anything to lose, so just going to try my best,” said Radwanska, the junior champion at Wimbledon in 2005, and the French Open in 2006. Radwanska, whose younger sister Ursula is ranked 54th, will rise to No. 1 for the first time if she wins Saturday. “If she will play like today,” Kerber said, “I think she has a good chance.” Williams won their two previous encounters in straight sets, but they haven’t played each other since a quarterfinal four years ago at Wimbledon. “She’s going to get every ball back,” Williams said, “so I’ve got to look forward to that.” It’ll be a substantial contrast in styles: Williams’ out-and-out power against Radwanska’s precision. “I have every reason to believe she’ll win,” Richard Williams said about his daughter. There’s no doubt who is favored, especially if Williams keeps serving the way she has been.

045. Employment Opportunities

WAREHOUSE/DELIVERY Local chemical company looking for individual to assist in manufacturing, warehouse, delivery of our products. Prior experience in manufacturing, warehousing, and delivery. Excellent Computer skills MS office, SAP Commercial driving experience, Class A with Hazardous Endorsement, Clean driving record.

B5

Legals

045. Employment Opportunities

ACCOUNTING AND Consulting Group is seeking Staff and Senior level Accountants to join our team of dedicated professionals. You will prepare tax returns and be involved with tax planning, research and compliance. Additionally you will complete audit, review and compilation engagements from start to finish for clients in a variety of industries. We require a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, CPA license or CPA candidate and a minimum 2 years related experience with recent public accounting experience. We are proud to offer our employees competitive salaries and great benefits, including health, life, dental and vision insurance; a generous 401K plan, outstanding continuing education and tuition assistance; business casual dress; and paid time off. If you are the

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Publish June 29, July 6, 13, 2012

NOTICE is hereby given that on May 23, 2012, Wesley Piley, P.O. Box 369, Hagerman, New Mexico 88232, c/o Atkins Engineering Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 3156, Roswell, New Mexico 88202-3156; filed Application No. HC-6, HC-85 & RA-1399 into RA-1918 with the STATE ENGINEER to for permit to use existing shallow well as a supplemental point of diversion for the continued diversion of 120.0 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, of Hagerman Canal and supplemental groundwater rights. Presently the Hagerman Irrigation Company is authorized to use the following surface and supplemental artesian and shallow groundwater points of diversion:

Surface Points of Diversion (Hagerman Irrigation Company) Surface POD # Source Subdivision Section Township Hondo River NE1/4 31 10 S. HC-1 South Spring HC-1 River SE1/4 8 11 S.

Groundwater Points of Diversion (Hagerman Irrigation Company) Source Subdivision Section Township Well Number RA-360 Artesian NE1/4NE1/4 35 10 S. RA-361 Artesian NE1/4SW1/4NE1/4 18 13 S. Shallow NE1/4NE1/4 35 10 S. RA-362, RA-363, and RA-366-Comb RA-364 Artesian SW1/4NW1/4NE1/4 16 11 S. RA-3992 Shallow SW1/4SW1/4SW1/4 35 11 S. RA-3993 Shallow SW1/4SE1/4SE1/4 22 11 S. RA-3994 Shallow NE1/4NE1/4NW1/4 16 11 S. RA-4383 Shallow NW1/4SW1/4SE1/4 7 13 S. RA-5022-X-7 Artesian SE1/4SE1/4 6 13 S. RA-5022-X-9 Artesian NE1/4NE1/4 7 14 S. RA-5022-X-10 Artesian NE1/4NE1/4 31 12 S. RA-5560 Artesian SE1/4SW1/4SE1/4 31 13 S.

Range 25 E.

25 E.

Range 24 E. 26 E. 24 E. 25 E. 25 E. 25 E. 25 E. 26 E. 26 E. 26 E. 26 E. 26 E.

Mr. Piley is authorized to pump supplemental groundwater to supplement the Hagerman Canal source from shallow well No. RA-1399 located in the NW1/4NE1/4NE1/4 OF Section 21, Township 14 South, Range 26 East, N.M.P.M. Said water is used for the irrigation of up to 40.0 acres of land described as follows: SUBDIVISION Part of N1/4SE1/4 and Part of NE1/4SW1/4

SECTION 21

TOWNSHIP 14 S.

RANGE 26 E.

ACRES 40.0

Application is made to use existing well RA-1918 located in the SE1/4NE1/4SW1/4 of Section 21, Township 14 South, Range 26 East, N.M.P.M., as a supplemental well, additional point of diversion, for the aforesaid water rights as described under Permit No. HC-6, HC-85 & RA-1399 issued March 1, 2010. Emergency authorization to immediately commence the use of well RA-1918 is requested pursuant to Section 72-12-24 NMSA (1978).

The above described points of diversion and places of use are located approximately 1 to 1.5 miles south, southwest of the Town of Hagerman, Chaves County, New Mexico.

Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (objection must be legible, signed, and include the writer’s complete name, phone number and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment, you must specifically identify your water rights*; and/or (2) Public Welfare/Conservation of Water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must show how you will be substantially and specifically affected. The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with the State Engineer, 1900 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, within ten (10) days after the date of the last publication of this Notice. Facsimiles (faxes) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is hand-delivered or mailed and postmarked within 24-hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protests can be faxed to the Office of the State Engineer, (575) 623-8559. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 72 NMSA 1978.


B6 Friday, July 6, 2012 045. Employment Opportunities

professional we are seeking, please apply by sending your resume and cover letter to jobs@acgnm.com or fax to 505.348.9085. All inquiries must be made via this posting and not our website. No phone calls or walk-in’s please. Counseling Associates, Inc. is seeking responsible qualified individual to fill full time position as a Billing and Client Enrollment support staff. Duties will include, but not limited to, meeting with clients, gathering billing and client information and authorizations for service. Minimum qualifications: HS diploma, health insurance billing and data input experience, computer knowledge, excellent telephone and people skills. At least two years of office experience, supervisory experience and bilingual a plus. An EOE. Salary DOE. Excellent benefits. Please send resume to: Counseling Associates, Inc., Janet Lopez HR Department, PO Box 1978 Roswell, NM 88202. TELLER Bank of the Southwest is seeking a qualified candidate to fill a fulltime Teller position. Primary duties include, but not limited to: understanding and promoting bank products and services, cash handling and customer service.

Requirements: Must have a good attitude and basic computer skills. Must be detail oriented with excellent time management and people skills. Previous bank experience is preferred. Company offers excellent work environment, salary and benefits. Pre-employment drug test and background screen required. Apply in person with Lisa at the Bank of the Southwest, 226 N Main, Roswell, NM, by July 6, 2012. Drug-Free Workplace and EOE/AA

045. Employment Opportunities

MOTEL 6 is now accepting applications for HVAC exp. maintenance position. Please apply in person at 3307 North Main.

Garden Crest is now accepting applications for groundsman postition. Drivers license required. Call 624-1611

Projectionist Needed 1yr experience or more preferred. Please send resume to stetsonsnell@hotmail.com or 313 Remuda, Clovis NM 88101

FRESENIUS MEDICAL Care/Southeastern New Mexico Kidney Center is seeking a PCT. Full benefits, 401k, medical, vision, dental. PTO after 6 months. Other company benefits. Open Mon-Sat. Off Sundays.12 hour shifts. Competitive pay. Apply in person at 2801 N. Main St. Suite H.

BUSY OPTOMETRIST office seeking Full Time Employee. Individual must be dependable, well organized and hard working. Experience and bi-lingual a plus. Please send resume to P.O. Box 1897, Unit 306, Roswell, NM 88202. AIRLINES ARE HIRING – Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified – Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-886-7324. Mailroom Supervisor Seven-day daily newspaper seeks an energetic, hard working person to manage and lead our mailroom. Ideal person will be mechanically inclined, a team player, and willing to roll up their sleeves and work with our team. Knowledge in the operation of counter/stackers, inserting machines and stitcher/trimmer equipment is a plus. This is a full-time position. Hours of work mainly late afternoon and night shifts. In addition to a competitive salary we offer excellent benefits to those who qualify including medical, dental, vision, flexible spending account, life insurance, 401k, and an opportunity for growth potential. Our concern is for the health and safety of our employees; therefore we offer a smoke-free work environment and conduct pre-employment drug testing. To apply send letter and resume to: Bob Johnson, Production Manager The Daily Times 201 N. Allen Ave / P.O. Box 499 Farmington, NM 87401

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish July 6, 2012 NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that a regular meeting of the Board of Education of the Roswell Independent School District, Roswell, New Mexico will be held at the Administrative and Educational Services Complex, Board Room, on the 10th day of July, 2012 at the hour of 6:00 p.m. for such meeting. Copies of the agenda will be available to the public at the office of the Superintendent, 300 North Kentucky, Roswell, New Mexico at least twenty-four (24) hours prior to the meeting. Individuals with disabilities who need any form of auxiliary aid to attend or participate in this meeting, please contact the Superintendent of Schools at 627-2511 at least three working days prior to the meeting. Upon request, public documents will be provided in the accessible form necessary to the individual requesting the particular auxiliary aid. Board members may meet in executive session to discuss negotiations and limited personnel matters prior to and/or after the meeting. /s/ Mackenzie Hunt Mackenzie Hunt President Board of Education

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish July 6, 13, 20, 2012

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

Case No. D-504-CV-2012-00347 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., v.

Plaintiff,

DELIA E. LEE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BY AND THROUGH THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT AND THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DELIA E. LEE, IF ANY, Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SUIT

STATE OF New Mexico to the above-named Defendants Delia E. Lee and the Unknown Spouse of Delia E. Lee, if any. GREETINGS:

You are hereby notified that the above-named Plaintiff has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled Court and cause, the general object thereof being to foreclose a mortgage on property located at 407 South Sequoia Ave, Roswell, NM 88203, Chaves County, New Mexico, said property being more particularly described as: LOT SEVENTEEN (17) in BLOCK ONE (1) of AMENDED PLAT OF WEST VIEW SUBDIVISION, a Subdivision in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk's Office on June 23, 1953 and recorded in Book B of Plat Records, Chaves County, New Mexico, at page 190.

Unless you serve a pleading or motion in response to the complaint in said cause on or before 30 days after the last publication date, judgment by default will be entered against you. Respectfully Submitted, CASTLE STAWIARSKI, LLC By: /s/ Robert Lara Electronically Filed Elizabeth Mason Keya Koul Steven Lucero Robert Lara 20 First Plaza NW, Suite 602 Albuquerque, NM 87102 Telephone: (505) 848-9500 Fax: (505) 848-9516 Attorney For Plaintiff

WITNESS the Honorable STEVEN L. BELL, DISTRICT COURT JUDGE, of the Fifth Judicial District Court, Chaves County, New Mexico, this 22nd day of June, 2012. Kennon Crowhurst CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: ___Catalina D. Ybarra___ Deputy

NM12-01049_FC01

045. Employment Opportunities

FRESENIUS MEDICAL Care/Southeastern New Mexico Kidney Center is seeking RNs. Full benefits, 401K, medical, vision, dental. PTO after 6 months. Other company benefits. Open Mon-Sat. Off Sundays.12 hour shifts. Competitive pay. Apply online at SMCNA.COM. KYMERA

NEW MEDICAL OFFICE POSITIONS: As a growing Independent Physicians Office, Kymera and is now seeking Qualified Applicants for: IT-3 Qualities: Self-starter w/organization skills and detail oriented; demonstrated troubleshooting capabilities. Education: HS+ exp. in Tech Field or associates Fax Resume w/coversheet to: HR Mngr, 627-9520

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

ATTENTION JOINT & Muscle Pain Sufferers: Clinically proven all-natural supplement helps reduce pain and enhance mobility. Call 888-466-1077 to try Hydraflexin RISK-FREE for 90 days. HUMAN RESOURCE ASSISTANT Dean Baldwin Painting seeking ethical candidate that demonstrates a willingness to work well with others, good attitude, critical thinking and analysis, creative, multi task, organizational skills, technology literate, works well under pressure, can handle long hours only if necessary.

Responsibilities: Under the instruction of the HR manager assist with: new hire, termination, rate changes, vacation, attendance, benefits, and corrective actions. Accurately maintain HR data base & employee files per company, state, and federal guidelines. Education and Experience: One or more years in an HR role. Apt in math. Proficient in Microsoft Outlook, Excel, Word. ADP a Plus. Basic IT

Benefits Package: Competitive salary. Health, dental, vision, life, accident & STD insurance available. Paid vacation, sick and personal days. 401K Retirement Plan. 6 paid Holidays. Email resumes to teresac@ deanbaldwinpainting.com

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish July 6, 2012 NOTICE

Under provisions of the Open Meetings Act of the State of New Mexico, Section 10-15-1 to 10-15-4, NMSA, notice is hereby given that the Board of Education of the Roswell Independent School District will meet in Special Session on Saturday, July 14, 2012, at 8:30 a.m. for the purpose of Superintendent interviews and hiring of the Superintendent. Copies of the agenda will be available to the public at the office of the Superintendent, 300 North Kentucky, Roswell, New Mexico at least twenty-four (24) hours prior to the meeting. Individuals with disabilities who need any form of auxiliary aid to attend or participate in this meeting, please contact the Superintendent of Schools at 627-2511 at least three working days prior to the meeting. Upon request, public documents will be provided in the accessible form necessary to the individual requesting the particular auxiliary aid. Board members will meet in the executive session for Superintendent interviews.

/s/ Mackenzie Hunt Mackenzie Hunt President Board of Education

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish July 6, 13, 20, 2012

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

NO. D-504-CV-2012-00027

WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, v.

Plaintiff,

JEAN HALE, IF LIVING, IF DECEASED, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES OR LEGATEES OF JEAN HALE, DECEASED, PAMELA CHAPMAN, SEAN W. MILLER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JEAN HALE, IF ANY, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PAMELA CHAPMAN, IF ANY AND THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SEAN W. MILLER, IF ANY, Defendant(s).

AMENDED NOTICE OF SUIT

STATE OF NEW MEXICO to the above-named Defendant(s) Jean Hale, if Living, if Deceased, the Unknown Heirs, Devisees or Legatees of Jean Hale, Deceased, Pamela Chapman, Sean W. Miller, The Unknown Spouse of Jean Hale, if any, The Unknown Spouse of Pamela Chapman, if any and The Unknown Spouse of Sean W. Miller, if any. GREETINGS: You are hereby notified that the above-named Plaintiff has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled Court and cause, the general object thereof being to foreclose a mortgage on property located at 3009 Chiquita Lane, Roswell, NM 88201, Chaves County, New Mexico, said property being more particularly described as: The North 13 feet of LOT 12 and all of LOT 13 in BLOCK 14 of Linda Vista Estates No. 3, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk's Office on April 14, 1960 and recorded in Book C of Plat Records, Chaves County, New Mexico, at Page 114 and, TRACT C except the South 297.3 feet of Linda Vista Estates No. 2, a Redivision, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk's Office on June 25, 1958 and recorded in Book C of Plat Records, Chaves County, New Mexico, at Page 80.

Unless you serve a pleading or motion in response to the complaint in said cause on or before 30 days after the last publication date, judgment by default will be entered against you. Respectfully Submitted, CASTLE STAWIARSKI, LLC

By: /s/ Robert Lara Electronically Filed Elizabeth Mason Keya Koul Steven Lucero Robert Lara 20 First Plaza NW, Suite 602 Albuquerque, NM 87102 Telephone: (505) 848-9500 Fax: (505) 848-9516 Attorney for Plaintiff

WITNESS the Honorable STEVEN L. BELL, DISTRICT COURT JUDGE, of the Fifth Judicial District Court, Chaves County, New Mexico, this __22nd_ day of ___June_____, 2012. Kennon Crowhurst CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT

Roswell Daily Record

045. Employment Opportunities

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS FOR ELECTROMECHANICAL TECHNICIANS WE ARE WILLING TO TRAIN VeriFone, Wayne, Gilbarco, Incon Certifications a help but not necessary, Employee Benefits including insurance and retirement. Pay DOE. Must be able to pass a drug test and must have a clean driving record. EOE Please send your resume to Rykin@Cableone.net or you may call 1-800-458-9569 Tobosa Developmental Services currently has a position available for a Certified Dietician/ Nutritionist. This is a part-time position; experience with DD population a plus; salary based on prior experience. Please bring current resume with completed application, police background check and driving record. Closing date: 07/22/2012 or until position is filled. Apply @ 110 E. Summit or contact Alfred at 575-624-1025. EEOC Employer

Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR WE’RE LOOKING for a friendly and professional Assistant Housekeeping Manager to join our team. In return, the Holiday Inn Express & Suites will give you a competitive wage and opportunities to learn new skills and grow your career. Management experience is helpful but not required. You must be able to work weekends and Holidays. If this sounds like the perfect move for you or if you want to find out more pick up an application at 2300 N. Main Street.

DRIVERS (DAY and Night Shifts) in Artesia for Standard Energy Services. CDL with tanker endorsement, and good driving record. Experience preferred. Competitive salary and benefits. Call Brad at 575-631-5927. EEO employer

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish July 6, 13, 20, 2012

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

IN THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTION PETITION OF: MARIA MURILLO and MARCOS MURILLO, Petitioners. D-504-SA-2012-7

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish June 29, July 6, 2012 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF RICHARD G. BEAN, Deceased

No. PB-2009-76

NOTICE OF PETITION FOR FORMAL PROBATE OF WILL, FOR FORMAL APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE, FOR DETERMINATION OF HEIRSHIP AND FOR FORMAL COMPLETE SETTLEMENT OF ESTATE

TO: FIRST AMERICAN BANK IN ROSWELL, AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF RICHARD G. BEAN, DECEASED; MARTHA W. BEAN; MARTHA LEE BEAN; RICHARD G. BEAN, JR.; RICHARD G. BEAN, TAYLOR RHEA BEAN; MORGAN III; ALEXANDER BEAN, A MINOR CHILD, C/O RICHARD G. BEAN, JR., CUSTODIAN; AND ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, INTERESTED PERSONS AND CREDITORS OF RICHARD G. BEAN, DECEASED.

The FIRST AMERICAN BANK IN ROSWELL, Personal Representative of the ESTATE OF RICHARD G. BEAN, Deceased, has filed a Petition for Formal Probate of Will, for Formal Appointment of Personal Representative, for Determination of Heirship and for Formal Complete Settlement of Estate requesting the Court to enter an Order which (1) confirms the previous informal appointment of Petitioner as Personal Representative; (2) formally probates the Decedent’s Last Will and Testament dated July 19, 2002 and all Codicils thereto (First dated March 9, 2005, Second dated November 23, 2005, Third dated August 21, 2007 and Fourth dated September 11, 2007); (3) determines the heirs and devisees of the Decedent; (4) approves the Final Account of Petitioner as filed herein; (5) determines the persons entitled to distribution of the estate of the Decedent; (6) declares that after Petitioner makes the distributions of the estate, this estate is fully settled and discharges Petitioner from further claim or demand of any interested person; and (7) grants such other and further relief as may be proper. Notice is hereby given that a hearing on such Petition will be held at the District Court of Chaves County in Roswell, New Mexico, on Monday, July 16, 2012 beginning at 10:00 a.m. Respectfully submitted,

NOTICE OF PENDENCY

MARK W. TAYLOR & ASSOCIATES, P.C.

To: Luis Javier Gonzales

You are hereby notified that a Petition for Adoption has been filed by the Petitioners in this action seeking Adoption of your biological child, J.A.G. to determine whether Maria Murillo and Marcos Murillo should be granted their Petition for Adoption of J.A.G. The above proceeding could ultimately result in your implied consent to the adoption or the termination of your parental rights. You shall respond to the Petition and be present at the hearing if you intend to contest the adoption of J.A.G. and the failure to so respond shall be treated as a default and your consent to the adoption shall not be required.

SANDERS BRUIN COLL & WORLEY. PA /s/ Ian D. McKelvy, Attorney for Petitioners P.O. Box 550 Roswell, NM 88203 575-622-5440

-----------------------------------------------------------------------June 22, 29, July 6, 13, 2012

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

Case No. D-504-CV-201100510

BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, v.

Plaintiff,

PARISH P. PALMER AND THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PARISH P. PALMER, Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on July 17, 2012 at 1:00 PM, the West steps entrance of the Chaves County Courthouse, 400 N. Virginia, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the above-named defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State: Lot 12, Block 2 of Home Place Addition, in the City of Roswell, County of CHAVES and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat recorded July 3, 1909 In Plat Book A, Page 138, Real Property Records of CHAVES County, New Mexico.

The address of the real property is 209 N Michigan Avenue, Roswell, NM 88201. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on April 19, 2012 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $119,622.48 plus interest from March 21, 2012 to the date of sale at the rate of 7.125% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master's fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff's costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder's funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption.

By: /s/ Catalina D. Ybarra Deputy NM11-02635_FC01

045. Employment Opportunities

NM00-03336_FC01

Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group 20 First Plaza NW, Suite #20 Albuquerque, NM 87102

By:

Mark W. Taylor P.O. Box 898 Roswell, New Mexico 88202-0898 (575) 624-2000 (575) 624-0200 (Facsimile) Attorneys for Personal Representative

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish June 22, 29, July 6, 13, 2012

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

Case No. D-504-CV-2011-00740

GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, v.

Plaintiff,

JOE A. LEYBA AND CHARATY H. LEYBA, Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Special Master will on July 17, 2012 at 1:00 PM, the West steps entrance of the Chaves County Courthouse, 400 N. Virginia, sell and convey to the highest bidder for cash all the right, title, and interest of the above-named defendants in and to the following described real estate located in said County and State: LOT TWO (2) IN BLOCK SIX (6) OF NORTHWOOD ADDITION, IN THE CITY OF ROSWELL, COUNTY OF CHAVES AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT FILED IN THE CHAVES COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE ON OCTOBER 09, 1961 AND RECORDED IN BOOK C OF PLAT RECORDS, CHAVES COUNTY, NEW MEXICO, AT PAGE 161.

The address of the real property is 500 E. La Paloma Lane, Roswell, NM 88201. Plaintiff does not represent or warrant that the stated street address is the street address of the described property; if the street address does not match the legal description, then the property being sold herein is the property more particularly described above, not the property located at the street address; any prospective purchaser at the sale is given notice that it should verify the location and address of the property being sold. Said sale will be made pursuant to the judgment entered on May 9, 2012 in the above entitled and numbered cause, which was a suit to foreclose a mortgage held by the above Plaintiff and wherein Plaintiff was adjudged to have a lien against the above-described real estate in the sum of $128,467.74 plus interest from February 22, 2012 to the date of sale at the rate of 3.750% per annum, the costs of sale, including the Special Master's fee, publication costs, and Plaintiff's costs expended for taxes, insurance, and keeping the property in good repair. Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. At the date and time stated above, the Special Master may postpone the sale to such later date and time as the Special Master may specify. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this sale may be subject to a bankruptcy filing, a pay off, a reinstatement or any other condition that would cause the cancellation of this sale. Further, if any of these conditions exist, at the time of sale, this sale will be null and void, the successful bidder's funds shall be returned, and the Special Master and the mortgagee giving this notice shall not be liable to the successful bidder for any damages. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above-described real property subject to rights of redemption.

NM11-01737_FC01

Jeffrey Lake Special Master Southwest Support Group 20 First Plaza NW, Suite #20 Albuquerque, NM 87102


Roswell Daily Record SERVICES

045. Employment Opportunities

185. Electrical

105. Childcare

BUTCH’S RAT Hole and Anchor Service Artesia Yard. We are seeking CDL drivers with clean driving record. We offer competitive wages, health insurance, dental & vision. Please call Jim at 575-631-4551. MJG CORPORATION is currently accepting applications for HVAC Techs. We offer: Top Salary and Benefits. Send resume or employment history to 204 W. 4th St. Roswell, New Mexico 88201: Call 575-622-8711 or fax to 575-623-3075 email to: mjgcorp@cs.com BUSH APPLIANCE & TV needs appliance delivery person. The position is full-time and requires someone who enjoys meeting new people and working hard. Must have a good driving record with no violations for the last 3 years. Applicants must be able to pass a drug test and back ground check. Stop by 111 W. Country Club Rd in Roswell for application and interviews. Satellite Installation, $1000/wk, company truck, email at surebird@hughes.net L&F DISTRIBUTORS Class A CDL Drivers For Roswell, NM Area Qualified applicant must have good driving record. Current commercial license preferable. Previous experience delivering product a plus. Good communication and customer service skills. Interested applicants apply at: L&F Distributors 2200 North Atkinson Roswell, NM 88201 575-622-0380 An Equal Opportunity Employer

NEED CHILD care? Find the widest range of available childcare for your children and their needs. 1-800-691-9067 or www.newmexic okids.org. You may also call us; Family Resource & Referral 622-9000 and we can help you navigate the system.

125. Carpet Cleaning

BIG HORN Electric Professional work, affordable price. 575-317-8345 NM Lic#367662. ELECTRICAL SERVICES Any size electrical job. Lic#360025. 575-840-7937

200. Fencing

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100

225. General Construction

R.B. Carpet Cleaning. Home and Commercial. Free Estimates. Cell 910-0685 or 910-1300

Double J. Construction of Roswell, LLC, license & bonded. Re-build, re-do or All New! Need help? No job too big/small. 25 yrs. exp. Qualified in framing, trim carpentry, on-site custom cabinets, painting, sheet rock, drywall, doors & windows. FREE est. Call Jerry 910-6898 or 622-8682

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 SUNSHINE WINDOW Service Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458 HOUSE CLEANER, reliable, honest, 22 yrs. exp. 623-8563 HELPING HANDS & Housekeeping. 30 + yrs exp. 575-208-9117

230. General Repair

AFFORDABLE LAWN service. Commercial & residential. For free estimates call Junior 317-4737. Professional Landscaping Rios & Aguilar, Free Est. 420-7038, 208-0850 BASIC LAWN service, property clean-up and much, more Danny 575-420-4385 or 623-1773. GARCIA’S LAWN Mowing, Trimming, Sprinkler Repairs, Trash, much more. Call 575-914-0803. “Big E’s” Landscaping & Yardwork mow, trim, prune property clean-up reason. rates senior disc. 914-6025 WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Lawn & field mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming - Rock installation & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121. Better Lawn Care Mowing, weed eating, edging & bush trimming. Prices Start at $20. Call for Free Est. Jeremy 575-914-8118.

CARPENTRY, DRY wall, painting & concrete. We guarantee. 626-2050

LAWN CLEANING & basic cleanup. 910-1300 or 910-0685

235. Hauling

150. Concrete

Slabs, patios, sidewalks, curbing, Rodriguez Const. Since 1974 Lic. 22689. Call 420-0100

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

“Big E’s” Handyman/Maint Services Quality work. Reasonable rates. Free est. Senior disc. 914-6025

I CLEAN houses & offices. I have references. Call 626-2587.

Running Bear Concrete Construction Foundations, patios, driveways & curbing, Lic: 373219. Call 317-6058 or 575-578-8067

CLASSIFIEDS

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Summer Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242.

285. Miscellaneous Services

AFFORDABLE HEALTH CARE! A Premier Discount Plan. SAVE on medical, dental, vision and prescription drugs for as little as $29.95/month. Enroll today. Call 1-866-507-4631. MEET SINGLES right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now 1-800-932-8369 ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFERERS with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP Replacement Supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 866-938-5101. ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare. Get a FREE talking meter and diabetic testing supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, this meter eliminates painful finger pricking! Call 866-406-2158

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575) 622-7710 #45 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SATURDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. Garage sale ads must be placed in person. We will NOT accept garage sale ads over phone, e-mail, or fax. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $11.25 PCI ________________________________________

Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

SAWMILLS FROM only $3997.00 - MAKE/ SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.co m 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. WIN or Pay Nothing! Start Your Application In Under 60 Seconds. Call Today! Contact Disability Group, Inc. Licensed Attorneys & BBB Accredited. Call 877-738-1851. GET FREE OF CREDIT CARD DEBT NOW! Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 877-639-3441 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-482-3316 www.CenturaOnline.com

294. Musical

VIOLINIST AVAILABLE for performances, $1150 basic fee. 317-6098

310. Painting/ Decorating

Quality Painting! Affordable prices, Sr. Discounts. Mike 622-0072

332. Pool Services

Need help with your pool or pool maintained weekly, bi-weekly or monthly? Call D&B Property Maintenance. (Certified pool Operator) No job too small. One call does it all. 623-8922 Free Estimates

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552. Everything from concrete to roof. Interior & exterior. Low prices in this hard economic times. Jay 420-3825

350. Roofing

Friday, July 6, 2012

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

(2) 5 acre lots, EGP, $32,500 each/$60k both. Terms avail. 575-317-6974 20 ACRES WITH WATER! Near Ruidoso $34,900. New to market, municipal water, maintained roads and electric. Won’t last at this price! Call NMRS 866-906-2857.

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

Main & Poe, 4600 sf $275k, lrg pkg lot, kit equip, call M-F 8a-12p 624-1331

RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397

ADVERTISE YOUR VACATION PROPERTY, to more than 284,000 New Mexico newspaper readers. Your 25-word classified ad will appear in 32 newspapers around the state for only $100. Call this newspaper for more details or visit www.nmpress.org for more details.

www.rancheroswelding.com

395. Stucco Plastering

RWC Lath and Stucco. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397

www.rancheroswelding.com

405. TractorWork

ATTACHMENT to do any work. Disc, posthole digger, brush hog, blade, etc. 347-0142 or 575-317-7738

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insurance.

www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale WELL MAINTAINED, cute 2 bedroom 1 bath North Roswell 575-317-3593

CHEAPER THAN rent Townhouse, 1400 sqft, 2br/2ba, laundry room/ study, new roof, cedar fence, stucco, porch, tile & carpet. Refinished kitchen, bath cabinets & new paint throughout, w/d. Large corner lot. $98,600. Call 575-491-4235 1908 W. 4th, 3br. 2b + 575-317-6974 FSBO: 4/2/2, large kitchen, great neighborhood. 2 Isla Ct. No Owner Financing call-317-8131 4Bd1Ba, 703 E. Grnwd, $60K, new carpet, etc. call M-F 8a-12p. 624-1331. Enchanted Hills 3000+sf, 3 living areas, formal dining, 3br/2ba, 2 car garage, laundry w/huge pantry, kitchen dining, new roof, landscape, $189k, by appointment only 622-6170 {{{SOLD}}} very nice & clean 3br/2ba in nice area, owner will carry w/small down payment, 820 E. 5th, $89K

OEPN HOUSE Sunday from 2-4 MOTIVATED SELLER Move In Ready 209 E. Bonney St. 1849sf brick 4br 2ba, living room, lg. family room w/FP. Open kitchen w/dining area. New carpet & paint. Single car garage. No owner financing 317-5396 or 420-1198

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

510. Resort-Out of Town

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

CLOSE OUT sale on all double wides. DLOO623. 6220 SE Main, 347-2070 WE BUY used mobile homes. Single & Double wides. 575-622-0035. D01090 2002 FLEETWOD 16x74, double carport, 12x12 & 12x20 storage buildings, many extras, 1000 E. College #38, $39,500. 622-7703 PRICE REDUCED 2005 doublewide, 3br/2ba, garden tub, deck & carport, appliances, ceiling fans, in quiet Sr. park, $47,900. Call 627-0840.

520. Lots for Sale

00119342PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $18,000. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352.

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-F 8a-12p 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. 1st MONTH FREE All Bills Paid, Free Cable, 1BR $545 2BR $645, 3br/2ba $745mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281 EFF, 1BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377 EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. ROSWELL 2 br apartment $600/mo, wtr pd, fridge, w/d hookups, stove 1700 N Pontiac Dr. 626-864-3461

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

Do You Own Water Rights? We Buy, Sell, Lease, and Research Water Rights. Lea, Eddy, Chaves and Roosevelt Counties. Call WaterBank 505-843-7643 5 y 10 acres con facilidades de pago, 10 millas al sur Roswell. 910-0644 4.5 ACRES on Brenda Rd, Roswell, $25k, $2500 dn, $250 mo, 0% int. 575-887-5915, 361-3083.

Dennis the Menace

B7

BETTER LIVING w/in reach. 3br/2ba, $616, central h/c, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, pets welcome (restrictions apply), Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge. 305 W. Deming #C 1br, ref air, utilities pd, appliances included, no HUD, $500 mo $300 dep. 623-7678 1 BEDROOM apartment. Call 910-8170 or 840-4333 1&2Bd, wtr pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-F 8a-12p 624-1331 302 W. Mescalero, 2/1, $600/mo, $400/dep, no hud/pets, wtr pd. 910-1300 STUDIO, 1 adult, parking, garden, laundry hookup, references req., NO children, pets or smoking. 420-8201 1BR APT., all bills paid $550/mo, $275/dep, No HUD. 420-5604

540. Apartments Unfurnished

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

314 S. Birch #B & #D, 1BR, 1BA, $425 month 1210 N. Main (eff.), 1BR, 1BA, $450 month Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604

Beautiful Custom home 3br/2ba, $1800/mo, 2900 Onate, across from park. 575-420-6370

LARGE 1&2br, References & background check required. W/D hookups. Private parking. 420-0100

North Large 2/2 $625; North cute 1/1 $495 $300/dep no pets 317-1078

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished Townhouse, 2br/2ba, 1car garage, ref. air, completely furnished. $1000 mo. $300 dep. 575-910-1605 LARGE 3BR 2 bath 2 car garage. Fenced yard. All amenities & utilities paid. Fishing privileges. Nicely furnished. Perfect FLETC. Avail. July 1st. 623-9952 1&2Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-F 8a-12p 624-1331 {{{RENTED}}} NW Roswell all new 2br furnished townhome, 2 car garage, FLETC ready.

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished Large Executive 2bed, w/carport adjoining vacant space. Clean & beautifully decorated. $750mo + utilities. N. Atkinson @ Morningside. Call after 5pm, anytime wknds. 626-6286. 504 W. Albuquerque, 2br, ref air, stove, fridge, w/d hookups, no pets or HUD, $550/mo, $500/dep, 914-5402. TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 309 W. Wildy duplex, 4yrs old, 2/2/1 car gar., W/D hookup, stove, frig, d/w all new. No Hud, Pets/Smokers. $750/mo. 317-2059 303 W. Deming, 3br/1ba, no refrigerator, evap air, carport, no bills pd, no HUD, $700/mo, $500/dep, 623-7678. 3BR/2BA, CARPORT, $900/mo, $700/dep, no HUD or pets, 420-5930. 1,2,3br from $350 +, some utilities. Al 703-0420 or Javier 626-9172. 1ST MONTH free, 3/2/2, stove, fridge, lrg patio, NO pets, 575-914-1285 or 575-914-1284. 409 N. Railroad. 3bd/1ba, stove, refrigerator, no pets, $495/mo, $300/dep. 910-9648. 608 N. Missouri, clean, nice, 2br/1ba, ref air, $850, $500/sec. dep., washer, dryer, stove, fridge included. 627-7595 NICE 3BR/2BA in Enchanted Hills, FP, double garage, avail. mid July, $900/mo, $900/sec. dep. 622-4722 or 937-1183 26 A St. 2 Br - Remodeled. $470/mo, $470/dep, HUD accepted. (575) 626-9530 1&2Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-F 8a-12p 624-1331 LOOKING FOR a place to rent? Let us help you!! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors, 501 N. Main. (575) 624-2262 Stop by to pick up a list of our available rentals or check them out online at www.roswellforrent.com! NICE 2br/1ba home w/stove & fridge, $550 mo. $500 dep. 2308 N. Texas 575-623-1800, 420-5518

EXECUTIVE HOME, 2613 Sherrill Lane, 3/2/2, great house in safe neighborhood., $1600/mo, 420-3486

3br1ba, ref air, fenced yard 1 car 91 Lighthall RIAC $700m.$700 dep 627-9942 1BR/1BA, $425/MO + utilities, $425/dep, 1102 W. 14th St. 627-0890 805 W. 4th, 1br duplex, appliances, wtr pd, 1yr lease, $420/mo, $350/dep. 626-5423 4BR, all bills pd, $950/mo, no HUD. 420-5604 NICE 2BR house, wtr & gas pd, w/d hookups. Call 317-1212 or 622-9011. 1801 WESTERN Ave. 3br 1 3/4 bath. Ref air, all appliances incl. $850 mo. $500 dep. No smoking, references preferred. 420-9565 BIG 2BR 73 Brewer Place $500 mo $300 dep. 578-8198 2704 S. Washington, 3BR, 2BA, $600 month 615 S. Michigan, 2BR, 1BA, $750 month 310 S. Birch, 3BR, 1 1/2BA, $750 month 508 S. Aspen, 3BR, 2BA, $850 month 1312 N. Lea, 3BR, 2BA, $850 month (no smokers) 3102 S. Washington, 3BR, 2BA, $900 month 511 S. Pinon, 3BR, 2BA, $950 month 601 E. Mescalero, 3BR, 2BA, $950 month 2002 S. Richardson, 3BR, 2BA, $1500 month 1111 La Paloma, 4BR, 3BA, $2000 month (New Construction) Century 21 Home Planning, 3117 N Main St, Roswell, 622-4604

555. Mobile Homes for Rent FOR RENT: 1 and 2 bedroom trailers, mobile home lots, RVs welcome. 1200 E. Country Club 623-6660

570. Mobile Home Courts

SOUTH FORK. A 55 & above community w/large quiet and attractive lots for people that care. 624-1742 500 W Brasher Rd.

580. Office or Business Places

OFFICE SPACE for rent, located at 200 E. 4th street, Roswell, NM. Great location and near court house call 575-626-7357, 575-317-6096 or 575-840-7635 FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546. Office space for rent above Roswell Antique Mall. Call Paula 707-354-2376 STOREFRONT, 2102 S. Main, $550/mo, $550/dep, avail. July 1st, 627-9942 FOR LEASE: 110 N. Richardson; 1,950 Sq. Ft. Inside: Large open floor plan that can remain as is or can be customized. Break room with sink, Remodeled in 2009. Contact: Reatltime Realty, LLC. 575-622-3200 Ext 3. 207 N Union Suite A. Level entry & plenty of parking. $550/mo plus utilites. 420-2100

Beautiful 5 Acre Lot Roswell, NM This lot is perfectly located on top of a hill and has fabulous 180 degree views of the city. The night lights, sunrises and moonrises are spectacular from this lot!

The entire lot is fenced in with metal pipe fence and the entrance has a large swing gate. There is a graded road from the entrance to the home site. The slope of the lot is minimal. Electricity and water well are already installed. This lot is ready for a custom home!

Asking price $59k, which is a steal considering the fence, electrical, well, and graded road are included! Call 954-261-5800 Or email jrham111@q.com


B8 Friday, July 6, 2012 580. Office or Business Places GREAT OFFICE location. $450.00 month Plus utilities. Use for business office or medical related business. Ken 420-0005

222 B W. 2nd, office space, $350/mo, wtr pd, 627-9942

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

MAYTAG dishwasher (like new) $200; leather couch (Teal color) flex steel $250; blue recliner Lazyboy $100; Espresso machine w/coffee’s (new) $50. Call 317-2179 ask for Mike. 4x8 shed $550; 8x12 barn shed $1400, both excellent condition. Must sell & be moved by July 13th. 626-0569 or 626-9682

EVER CONSIDER a Reverse Mortgage? At least 62 years old? Stay in your home & increase cash flow! Safe & Effective! Call Now for your FREE DVD! Call Now 877-841-2034 THRILL DAD with 100 percent guaranteed, delivered–to-the-door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 69 percent - PLUS 2 FREE GIFTS - THRILL THE GRILL ONLY $49.99. ORDER Today 1-877-291-6597 or www.OmahaSteaks.com/ family22 use code 45069TVP

DISH NETWORK. Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels FREE for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 877-867-1441 Like new, 20” chrome wheels/tires from Chevy S-10, $1000. 914-1234

COUCH, CHAIR, dining room table w/4 chairs, pwr chair & lift, 623-1819. ASIAN DESIGNED china cabinet, Ornate black lacquer w/beveled glass doors, built in desk, 72” high, 60” in width, $2,650 obo. Call 623-2452 or 520-678-2552

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

RARE, STORY & Clark, maple “organo” console piano - organ, Singer sewing machine, Whirlpool electric stove, Kenwood car stereo w/Sirius, Coach purse, student guitar. 575-914-6053 Wheelchair, walker, shwr chair, bath transfer bench, grab bars. 622-7638 BABY CRIB $30; playpen $30; wood coffee table clock $10. 914-5608 Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed! WEED EATER rototiller, 17” CRT, counter rotating tines, 5 HP briggs & stratton, excellent cond. $450 obo. Small enclosed trailer & large open trailer w/ramp. 317-1051 Dining Table w/6 chairs & buffet, Century dual safe, Schwinn air-dyne bike, dvd’s, room fans, dishes, lamps. 622-0280, 626-4239 GAS COOK stove, gas wall heater, washer, dryer, piano, golf clubs (6 sets, drivers offset), stove 2yrs old. 505-717-8125 The Treasure Chest, Open July 4th. Furniture, thrifts, antiques, everything in between, Carnival, Depression glass, box diggin’ fun. Credit/Debit cards accepted. Wed-Sat, 10-5, 1204 W. Hobbs, 914-1855 or 622-1543

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

PAY CASH for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles. Entire households & estates welcome. Call 627-2033 or 623-6608.

CASH for GOLD & Silver; Rings, bracelets, chains, pendants, charms, medals, forks, spoons and coins. In Roswell, 578-0805 I AM interested in buying furniture, appliances, patio furniture, tools, vehicles, trailers, motorcycles, lawnmowers and lawn equipment. Vehicles must be running. 317-6285 after 5 pm or anytime weekends.

715. Hay and Feed Sale

ALFALFA HAY, small square bales, excellent quality. The Hay Ranch, Roswell, 575-973-2200 ALFALFA HAY & baled oat, small bale. 3x3 ft medium bales, 4x4 ft lrg bales available. Graves Farm & Garden, 6265 S. Graves Rd., 622-1889, take credit & debit cards.

720. Livestock & Supplies

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

745. Pets for Sale

ROTWEILER PUPPIES for sale. Call Richard, 575-317-6045.

BIG TEX trailer bumper pull 7’x16’ $1500 firm 575-910-7100

745. Pets for Sale

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

‘09 H-D Softail custom, 1500 miles, $12,500 OBO. 420-5153 ‘01 Iron Horse, 113 cubic inch SS motor, runs great; ‘09 Suzuki LTR450, great cond., Best offer or possible trade, 420-0431

T-CUP & TOY PUPPIES Registered, shots, potty pad trained, health guarantee & PAYMENT PLAN. CHIHUAHUAS $300-500, YORKIES $800-1200, SHIHTZUS $500, Tiny MALTESE/ CHIHUAHUAS (Mal-chis) $800, YORKIE/ SHIHTZU $500-800, White Female POODLE $350, Chocolate Male SCHNAUZER/ CHIHUAHUA $200, PEKAPOO /SHIHTZU $300, MORKIE male $500, SCHNORKIE female $500 575-308-3017 or text 4 pics CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES $75 & up, reg. & shots, 575-910-1818 or text. Yorkshire Terriers, 10 wks old, UKC reg., tails docked, 626-4313 or 626-8444 BOXOODLES FOR sale, $100, black. 575799-4058

SHEEP FOR sale, mixed breed. Call Bryan at 575-921-5257.

NKC REGISTERED American Bulldog puppies, 3M, shots, $500. Call 734-837-4368, Roswell.

PUPPY LOVE Grooming Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also - 575-420-6655

2005 KAWASAKI VN1500 Bagger FI. 10k mi. Adult owned, $5500, 806-535-0640 2008 Kawasaki ZX-10R 3956 miles, Akrapovic titanium to carbon fiber full exhaust with power commander. Always garage kept & in very good cond. Call 432-254-8853 or 432-254-8854 $7800 OBO.

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

DESIGNER PUPPIES Chotties, 2F, 1M, under 10lbs, $125, 622-6190.

RECREATIONAL 765. Guns & Ammunition

Now Open Rick’s Firearms, 500 S. Sunset, 575-622-3516

Roswell Daily Record 790. Autos for Sale

Tired of the Hassle in trading or selling your car or truck? Economy Motors will either purchase your vehicle or consign it for sale at No Cost To You!! Call or come by for details. Economy Motors 2506 N. Main Roswell, NM 88201 625-2440. * 16 yrs in business * * Family owned & operated * * Licensed, Bonded & Insured *

790. Autos for Sale

2004 350Z convertible silver w/black top 25.75K miles 18” wheels. $17,500. Call 420-2456.

2000 Grand Marquis, 98k, nice road car, $3200 obo. 624-2961 or 626-6942

1994 JEEP Wrangler, black, wide tires, $5500, 575-652-9682

2008 DODGE Dakota SLT, 2WD, 4dr, 59k miles, excellent condition, new tires, $15k obo. Call Robert, 626-3936.

2000 SILVERADO regular cab, 4x2, auto, 4.3, $6200 obo. 624-2961 or 626-9642 95’ CHEVY P/U S-10 LS, 4.3 V-6, automatic, 4x4, ext. cab, bed liner, tool box, AM/FM/Disc, tow pk., 575-578-0290 2000 SILVERADO 1500, ext cab, 180k miles, $5700. 575-652-9682 2000 B3000 Mazda V-6 runs great, $3000. Call 575-652-9682

796. SUVS

‘97 JEEP Cherokee 4x4 standard 5 speed great cond. $3500 575-910-2900

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special Notice 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Garage Sales

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

‘99 Dodge Ram, 5spd, manual trans., new tires & cd player, $2300 obo. 626-0951

2003 DODGE Stratus, V6, 4 door, automatic, 75k mi. 623-3833 make offer.

2002 OLDS Alero, Runs great, 90k miles, $4000, owner financing w/$2000 down, 420-1352

1996 5TH wheel Prowler reduced to $7500. 316 Broken Arrow

TRANSPORTATION

2008 DODGE Caliber SRT4, FAST & FUN, 4 cyl, turbo 6 spd, like new, 1 owner, 25k miles, $17,500. 575-626-9803

CLASSIC ‘80 Cadillac convertible lowrider runs good, needs body work, for more info. Call 623-2601

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com

‘86 BOUNDER 31’ RV, 57k mi., like new inside & out, ready to go, $11K. See at 1613 S. Kentucky (back), 622-4148

790. Autos for Sale

2005 Chevy Classic, garage kept, excellent condition, 107k miles , $5000. 624-1845 or 575-636-0704

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

CHI-PINS, 3F, 6 wks old, very tiny, $175 each, 622-6190.

Wheelchair lift/carrier hospital bed $250; power wheelchair $400; 622-7638 LAZY BOY power recliner, $400. 622-1765

CLASSIFIEDS

001 North 002 Northeast 003 East 004 Southeast 005 South 006 Southwest 007 West 008 Northwest

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 163 Disability Care 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 181 Drywall 185 Electrical 190 Engraving/Commercial Art 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood/Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Water/Well 229 Gutters 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 237 Heating 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 271 Legal Services 273 Bankruptcy 275 Locksmith 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 312 Patio Covers 315 Pest Control 316 Pet Services 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 383 Siding 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 392 Storage Shed 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service

420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 431 Water Wall Services 435 Welding 439 Windows & Doors 440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money to Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

488 Home Inspecitions 490 Homes for Sale 492 Homes for Sale/Rent 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch/Sale 500 Business for Sale 505 Investment Comm. Bus. Prop. 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 521 Cemetery Lots for Sale 525 Building to be Moved 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 552 Rent to Own Houses 555 Mobile Homes for Rent 558 Roommates Wanted 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Places 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 608 Jewelry 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver/Buy 620 Want to Buy – Misc. 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 632 Art for Sale 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computer Equipment 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereo/Phonographs Access 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Farm Equipment 675 Camera/Photo Equipment 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 691 Restaurant Equipment 695 Machinery Tools Farm/Ranch 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock Wanted 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles & Scooters 780 RV’s/Campers Hauling 785 Trailers Wanted 788 Auto Transport

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Pickups/Trucks/Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Auto. Antique/classic 805 Imported Autos 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted to Buy Autos 820 Aircraft Sales/Service

Miscellaneous

9997 Wed/Anniv/Engage 9998 Obituaries

07-06-12 rdr news  

ROSWELL DAILY RECORD

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