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Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 123, No. 127 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

Veterans, fallen heroes honored at local services BY TIMOTHY P. HOWSARE RECORD EDITOR

Two services were held back-to-back in Roswell Monday morning to honor veterans and fallen heroes. At 8 a.m., a prayer breakfast was held at the Roswell Elks Lodge No. 969 at which a remembrance was given for prisoners of war and those missing in action. A small table with a single chair and a lit candle was set up in front of the podium, which Scott Montgomery, leading knight of the Elks Lodge, said symbolized POWs and MIAs. The guest speaker was Mayor Dennis Kintigh. He commented on the irony of politicians, like himself, being called upon to speak at Memorial Day events. He said politicians are always asking for something, whether it be votes or money. Kintigh said if it wasn’t for the sacrifices of veterans and active service personnel, elected officials would not even have the right to address a gathering of people as he was doing at the Elks Lodge. Tom Blake sang the national anthem and led a

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

May 27, 2014

TUESDAY

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sing-along of several other patriotic songs. Blake also performed at the Memorial Day ceremony held at 10 a.m. at South Park Cemetery, singing to recorded tracks instead of accompanying himself on guitar. He could be seen in the minutes leading up to the 10 o’clock hour hastily setting up sound equipment. “I’m mostly running the PA at this one,” he told the Daily Record reporter. Blake said it can be a bit frantic when he has to per for m at two events back-to-back, but was nonetheless exuberant in his performance of “God Bless the USA.” The guest speaker at the 10 a.m. ceremony was John Taylor, a local veterans’ advocate who writes a weekly column on veterans’ issues for the Daily Record. Taylor was born in New Mexico, attended the Virginia Military Academy and then moved back to New Mexico. A Vietnam veteran, TayTimothy P. Howsare Photos lor served as an airborne ranger with the 101st and Top: The colors are posted by the Roswell Veterans Honor Guard during a Memorial Day ceremony held Monday by American Legion Post No. 28 at South Park Cemetery. Above left: About 100 motorcyclists rode in a procession from downtown Roswell 82nd Airborne. to the cemetery. Above right: The ceremony was a time for prayer and reflection. The four wreaths in the picture were each placed on symbolic graves for the American Legion, Disabled Veterans of America, Military Order of the Purple Heart and the See VETERANS, Page A3 Veterans of Foreign Wars.

Cadets achieve officer rank

BY TIMOTHY P. HOWSARE RECORD EDITOR

Mary Morgan Photo

Family of cadet Jonathan Touchet pin his stripes at the commissioning ceremony Friday at Pearson Hall.

Twenty-four for mer cadets at New Mexico Military Institute can now rightfully say their top boss is the commander-in-chief of the United States. An Army ROTC Commissioning Ceremony was held Friday morning at Pearson Auditorium on the NMMI campus. Upon completion of their two-year cadet program, the young men and women were sworn in as second lieutenants in the U.S. Army. The commissioning address was given by Maj. Gen. James B. Laster, a Marine officer and NMMI alumni who serves at the

Special Operations Command headquartered at MacDill Air Force near Tampa, Fla. Rather than addressing the crowd from the podium, Laster spoke from the auditorium floor so he could be closer to the cadets. Although he chose the Marine option, Laster said the Army school training he received at NMMI was essential to his career as an officer. “I am proud of both the Marines and the Army,” he said. He told the cadets they now have an “awesome responsibility” to be leaders. He said every morning during his briefings in

Tampa he hears just how the world is a dangerous place. Although al-Qaeda has been weakened to the point it is now on “life support,” he said, there are still other threats to our nation’s security. “The Ukraine-Russia conflict was a strategic surprise,” he said. “It’s a dangerous world. You have been commissioned by the president to make sure our military is led.” He then thanked the parents of the cadets. “Your cadet didn’t just arrive here,” he said. “You gave them a solid foundation.” See CADETS, Page A3

Carlsbad man killed ‘EnhanceFitness’ keeps seniors moving in two-vehicle crash STAFF REPORT

A 38-year -old Carlsbad man died Saturday morning when he was ejected from his pickup truck after colliding with a commercial truck in Lea County. Chad Pennington was airlifted to Lea Regional Medical Center, where he succumbed to his injuries, according to the New Mexico State Police. The driver of the commercial truck, Refugio Soto-Ochoa, 47, of El Paso, was not injured in this crash. At approximately 11:18 a.m., of ficers from the State Police responded to the scene of a two-vehicle crash at the intersection of US Highway 62/180 and

New Mexico State Road 176. It was reported one subject had been ejected and severely injured. Initial investigation by the State Police determined a 2008 Mack commercial truck driven by Soto-Ochoa was traveling westbound on US Highway 62/180. During this time, a 2013 Chevrolet pickup driven by Pennington was stopped on New Mexico Road 176 attempting to turn westbound onto US Highway 62/180. As Soto-Ochoa approached the intersection, Pennington failed to yield the right of way, driving directly in the path of the Mack truck. The trucks See CRASH, Page A3

HIGH 92 LOW 62

TODAY’S FORECAST

BY RANDAL SEYLER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Seniors at the J.O.Y. Center are dancing, stretching and moving for fitness, and the cost of the class is nothing, thanks to the New Mexico Senior Olympics and the “EnhanceFitness” exercise program. “EnhanceFitness” is an evidence-based program for older adults that focuses on stretching, flexibility, balance, low impact aerobics and strength training exercise, said instructor Jan Melton. “The only requirement is that you be at least 50 years old,” Melton said. “The class is open to men and women.” Classes meet at 2 p.m. three times per week, on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays at the J.O.Y. Center. Each ses-

sion is one hour. “The exercises are done at the level of the participant,” Melton said. “If you need to sit in a chair and just do the ar ms, then that is fine.” The fitness program has been very successful, Melton said, and the program requires a fitness test of participants before they begin exercising. Four months later, the fitness test is re-administered so improvement in the participants’ fitness can be measured. The program is so successful, the National Senior Game Association recently recognized the “EnhanceFitness” program as the national winner of its Innovative Program Award. “The Aging and LongTerm Services Department is committed to supporting

THERE ARE NO OBITUARIES FOR TODAY. TO SEE INFORMATION ON UPCOMING FUNERAL SERVICES, SEE PAGE A6. TODAY’S OBITUARIES

Randal Seyler Photo

Enhance Fit instructor Jan Melton leads her class through the aerobics exercises at the J.O.Y. Center in Roswell on Thursday. The free fitness class is designed for people over 50 who want to improve their fitness level.

programs, such as ‘EnhanceFitness,’ that provide seniors an opportunity to remain physically active,” said Cabinet Secretary Gino Rinaldi. “Seniors who are physically active are often able to CLASSIFIEDS ..........B6

COMICS .................B5

ENTERTAINMENT .....A8

live fuller, more independent lives.” Rosa Valadez, one of the “EnhanceFitness” students at the J.O.Y. Center, said she has lost 60 See FITNESS, Page A3

INDEX GENERAL ...............A2

HOROSCOPES .........A8 LOTTERIES .............A2

OPINION .................A4

SPORTS .................B1

WEATHER ..............A8


A2 Tuesday, May 27, 2014

GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Special Services teaches more than just job skills RANDAL SEYLER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Several things make the Eastern New Mexico University Special Services Occupational Training Program unique, but the most obvious advantage of the program is the passion for the students’ success found in the faculty. “Every person with a disability needs to know that they also have abilities, and capabilities,” says Leah Lucier, interim deputy director of the program. The Special Services Occupational Training Program is one of a handful of specialized programs in the U.S., and the three-semester certificate curriculum teaches students with various disabilities not only job skills, but also independence. “The friendships the students develop here, and the self-advocacy that we teach, I believe those are traits that really set us apart,” said program director Sigrid Webb. “The change you see in the students, from when they first arrive here all shy and quiet, to when they graduate and you can’t get them to be quiet, is really amazing,” said Lucier. Lucier said the program not only offers students job skills, it also offers dormitories, which makes the ENMU-R program unique in the nation. Lucier, whose son has Down syndrome, said she went to graduate school to study special education after her son was born. Advocating for disabled students is more than just a job for her. Likewise, Webb spent more than a decade working for the departments of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services in Texas, Miss., and New Mexico before coming to ENMU-R six years ago. Lucier came to ENMU-R just over a year ago, relocating from the Boston area, where she worked for the New England Center for Children. “We have students from all over the region and from across the U.S.,” Webb said. “We have even had two international students.” The Special Services program began 25 years ago with 10 students and just a few instructors, Webb said, but now the program averages 70 students per year and there are 16 instructors teaching a variety of job skills and life skills to students with handicaps ranging from simple learning disorders to autism, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, and Fragile X syndrome. “Because of the wide range of abilities,

Courtesy photo

Leah Lucier, at left, interim deputy director of the Special Services program at ENMU-R, and Sigrid Webb, director of the program, oversee the occupational training program which averages about 70 students each year for the three-semester course.

we keep our classes down to eight students per class,” Webb said. “We don’t really think of the students as having disabilities as much as they have abilities,” Lucier said. “Everyone has different abilities, and we work with our students to develop their abilities.” The program offers occupational training such as auto mechanics, food services, child care attendant, office skills, veterinary assistant, laboratory animal caretaker, welding and refrigeration/air conditioning tech. The students also take four core classes which help teach independent learning and conflict resolution skills. The students are also required to take adaptive P.E. classes, Webb said. “There is a physiology component to the P.E. classes where the students learn about their bodies,” Webb said. “The purpose of the core classes is to teach students the skills they need to be independent — dietary habits, shopping, laundry — as they are also learning their job skills.” The certificate requires the students to complete 45 credit hours in three semesters — fall, spring and summer. The latest group of students will graduate on

NEW MEXICO OVERHAULING 10 BRIDGES THIS YEAR SANTA FE (AP) — The state of N e w M e x i c o i s o v e rh a u l i n g 1 0 structurally deficient bridges this year and has plans to replace three dozen bridges next year. The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that 55 bridges out of almost 3,000 state-owned bridges are due for preventive maintenance, such as replacing deck joints, deck sealing and painting. Nearly 300 more bridges around New Mexico were listed as structurally deficient in the 2013 National Bridge Inventory, and it will cost millions of dollars to fix them all. Many are more than half-a-century old or have to carry a lot more vehicle traffic than they did when they were built. Like the rest of the country, New Mexico is faced with repairing aging transportation

structures at the same time that budgets are decreasing and the number of drivers is increasing. A structurally deficient bridge doesn’t mean it’s ready to collapse, but it does have load-bearing featur es that have deteriorated to poor condition. The state regularly inspects bridges, and when one is determined to be critically unsafe, either a weight limit is imposed on vehicles crossing the structure or it is closed. Over the last 20 years, the state has saved money by better maintaining its bridges. At some point, even maintenance isn’t enough and bridges need to be replaced, like the Airport Road bridge north of Las Vegas, New Mexico, that spans Interstate 25. “It was determined that the cost of maintaining the bridge was no

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longer

Courtesy Photo

Leah Lucier, interim deputy director of the Special Services Occupational Training Program at ENMU-R, says, “Every person with a disability needs to know that they also have abilities and capabilities.”

July 24, and next year’s students will report for their training in August. The ENMU-R program also offers a second-year program with advanced core classes and a second occupational certificate for students who want more training. “The second-year program not only allows the students to build on their core skills classes, but the second occupational certificate can make them more employable,” Lucier said. “A student who has a certificate in the veterinary assistant program might get a second certificate in office skills so they can work on the desk and in the office as well as in the back with the animals.” The students graduating from the Special Services program have an 83 percent employment rate upon leaving ENMU-R, Webb said, and the program boasts a 93 percent graduation rate. “We don’t lose too many students from the program,” Lucier said.

cost-effective,

and

a

replacement project has been

awarded,” said Melissa Dosher,

spokeswoman for the New Mexico Department of Transportation.

State-owned bridges or those

important to the interlinked

national highway system are

inspected every two years.

In 2015, the department plans to

replace three dozen bridges and do major rehabilitation work or widen

another 14 bridges. Four bridges in Santa Fe County, all on N.M.

14, are scheduled for replacement in 2015.

US PLANTS PREPARE FOR LONG-

TERM NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE WATERFORD, Conn. (AP) — Nuclear power plants across the United States are building or expanding storage facilities to hold their spent fuel — radioactive waste that by now was supposed to be on its way to a national dump.

The steel and concrete containers used to store the waste on-site were envisioned as only a short-term solution when introduced in the 1980s. Now they are the subject of reviews by industry and government to deter mine how they might hold up — if needed — for decades or longer.

its nuclear waste, the Millstone Power Station overlooking Long Island Sound is sealing it up in massive steel canisters on what used to be a parking lot. The storage pad, first built in 2005, was recently expanded to make room for seven times as many canisters filled with spent fuel.

Dan Steward, the first selectman in Water ford, which hosts Millstone, said he raises the issue every chance he can with Connecticut’s congressional members.

With nowhere else to put

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The program is in the process of receiving a $100,000 culinary kitchen, which Webb said was a dream come true for the program. “We have to thank Gov. Susana Martinez for supporting us; she got us the grant for the kitchen,” Webb said. “We are so excited about that addition to our program.” Lucier said the program hopes to add a third-year training program in the future, allowing students to go even further in their education. “We also have students who complete our program and then go on to receive their associate degrees,” Webb said. “Ultimately, it is seeing the students develop and come out of their shells that really keeps me motivated,” Lucier said. “We want the students to develop that self-advocacy, that ability to speak up for themselves — because if they don’t speak up for themselves, then who will?”

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Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice

The entire contents of the Roswell Daily Record, including its flag on Page 1, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the Daily Record. SUBSCRIPTION RATES by carrier delivery in Roswell: $11 per month, payable in advance. Prices may vary in some areas.

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GENERAL

A3

Four times the fun

Roswell Daily Record

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Archibeque, wife share journey as new parents of quadruplets SUBMITTED

Timothy P. Howsare Photo

Local veterans’ advocate John Taylor, who himself received two Purple Hearts during his tour of duty in Vietnam, was the guest speaker Friday at a memorial service held for veterans and fallen heroes at South Park Cemetery.

Veterans Continued from Page A1

He was awarded two Purple Hearts. “I was standing up twice when I should have been laying down,” Taylor told the Daily Record after the ceremony. He spoke on the importance of free speech in America. He said one day during the Vietnam War, he was watching the “Mike Douglas Show,” and Jane Fonda happened to be a guest. Fonda, who actively protested the war, went on and on bashing America’s involvement in the

war and called the soldiers “baby killers.” The other guest seated with Douglas and Fonda was Otto Preminger. Preminger, a theater and film director who died in 1986, was a Russian Jew who had immigrated to America. Taylor said Preminger sat quietly as Fonda spoke, then at the end of her diatribe said, “Young lady, if you had just said what you said in Russia you would have been shot.” Taylor emphasized that veterans protect the

rights of even those who speak against them. He then commented on the current controversy over excessive, and sometimes fatal, waiting times for veterans to receive health care through Veterans Affairs. According to sources who spoke to CNN, at least 40 American veterans died in Phoenix while waiting for care at the VA. “We as veterans have to ban together and forget our petty little dif ferences,” Taylor said. “We have 40 dead and have to stand up and speak out.”

Cadets

Continued from Page A1

He encouraged the new officers to get to know personally each of the soldiers they lead. “Know their names, know their background, know their family and know their strengths and weaknesses,” he said. Then he spoke about leading by example and the importance integrity. “When the shots start to fire, all their eyes will be upon you.” He told the new officers to never allow

Fitness

Continued from Page A1

pounds since beginning the exercise class two years ago.

“It has really changed my life,” Valadez said. She was diabetic before starting the class, but now she no longer needs her medications.

Melton said students are encouraged to do other types of exercise during the week as well as attend the “EnhanceFitness” classes. “We want them to keep

anyone to talk them into doing something that isn’t right. “Do what’s right when no one is watching,” he said. After Laster spoke, family members of the cadets were brought onto the stage to pin the bars on their cadet’s uniform. Each of the NMMI cadets gave his or her first salute to a serving or retired officer, ceremoniously promoting them to the rank of officer. active and healthy,” she said. May is Older Americans Month, which this year is focusing on injury prevention, including falls prevention. “EnhanceFitness” includes strength training and dynamic and static balance exercises, all of which are important in preventing falls, Melton said. Bob Johnson, another student at the J.O.Y. Center, said he lost 30 pounds over 18 months of attending “EnhanceFitness” classes. “It’s hard to keep up with these women,” Johnson said, jokingly. “They can really shake a leg.”

Crash

Continued from Page A1

collided and Pennington was ejected from his Chevy truck. The contributing factors identified in this crash are failure to yield the right of

way and failure to utilize safety restraints, according to state police. Alcohol was not a contributing factor.

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When Roswell native Adam Archibeque and his wife, Misty, found out last summer they were expecting, they had no idea just how extraordinary their parenthood journey would be. On Jan. 25 of this year — at just 28 weeks gestation — Misty went into labor, welcoming their new bundle of joy. And another. And another. And another! That’s right, Adam and Misty became the proud parents of quadruplets. Early births are common with higher-order multiple and the births, Archibeque quads were delivered at Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston, Texas, 14 weeks early by cesarean, just minutes apart: • Daniel Wyatt was born at 7:14 p.m., weighing two pounds, 15 ounces. • Evelyn Marie was second, also at 7:14 p.m., weighing two pounds, 14 ounces. • Waylon Thomas was third at 7:16 p.m., weighing, 3 pounds. • Last was little Ellie Dawn, also at 7:16 p.m., weighing 2 pounds, 3 ounces. As one might expect, delivery that early required some special care, and the babies spent 52 days in the neo-natal intensive care unit (NICU) of Texas Children’s, growing strong enough to eat and breathe on their own. On March 17, all four babies went home, and that was when the real fun began. Living close to family

Courtesy Photo

From left, Waylon, Daniel, Ellie and Evelyn, the quadruplets born to Adam and Misty Archibeque. Adam is a Roswell High School graduate.

has provided extra help as Misty and Adam adjust to their new normal. Even so, sleep has become a rare commodity for the new parents. The babies eat every three hours around the clock, so there is little time for rest. The average day consists of 32 bottles (and at least as many bottle washings), 4 quarts of formula, 40 diapers and one normalsized package of baby wipes. Bath time looks like an assembly line as Adam handles the bathing duties, then hands off to Misty for putting on lotion, diapering and dressing each of the babies. And then there are the endless loads of laundry to be washed — baby clothes, blankets, burp cloths, bibs – the poor washing machine gets about as much rest as Mom and Dad do. Tasks that used to be mundane, such as grocery shopping, can now be an ordeal as they try to

accomplish errands in record time between feedings.

“Routine is very important in our lives,” said Misty. “Otherwise, it would be impossible to accomplish feeding everyone along with the long list of other jobs that have to be done. It’s amazing how being as little as 30 minutes off schedule can completely disrupt our day.” Life has forever changed for the Archibeques, but the adventure is just beginning. The new normal of doing everything times four is one that will continue for many years.

The couple currently resides in Round Top, Texas, Misty’s hometown next door to grandparents Lloyd and Marie Nelius. Grandparents Randy and Dawn Archibeque still reside in Roswell. You can follow their journey at lotsobabylane.blogspot.com.

DAR donates books

Jeff Tucker Photo

Genora Canon, regent of the Roswell chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, recently presented a copy of Rush Limbaugh's "Rush Revere and the Brave Pilgrims: Time-Travel Adventures with Exceptional Americans" to Washington Avenue Elementary School librarian Gloria Lucero. Also pictured is school principal Ron Tidmore. Canon, also the vice regent of the state Daughters of the American Revolution, said a copy of each of the books was being given to every elementary school in Roswell. "Our purpose is the preservation of history, as well as education," Canon said. She said copies of Dr. Walter Earl Pittman's "New Mexico and the Civil War" were being donated by the DAR to all of Roswell's middle and high schools. "A lot of people don't know the Civil War took place in New Mexico," Canon said. "Quite a lot of the Civil War took place here — more battles than people would think."


Greener across the Colorado border A4 Tuesday, May 27, 2014

BY BOB HAGAN NEW MEXICO NEWS SERVICES

The Greener Side is in a prefab metal building that looks something like a failed truckers’ pornstop, just off the interstate outside Pueblo, Colo. There’s no billboard and only the adjacent greenhouse, surrounded by a chain-link fence topped with strands of barbed wire, tips off the astute shopper that this is the first legal retailer of “recreational” marijuana north of Uruguay. Half the cars in the parking lot are from out of state, mostly from Oklahoma, T exas and Kansas. A security guard swipes my New Mexico license through a card reader, confirming that I’m legally eligible to buy up to

OPINION

one-quarter ounce of marijuana for my personal use, and I join the line of customers inside. With its cheap paneling and hard plastic chairs, the tiny anteroom resembles a cut-rate dentist’s waiting room, but the atmosphere is much more cheerful. For about half the customers this is a first-time experience, and everybody is studying the menu on the wall and discussing the pros and cons of the various strains on offer. T ed and Marge (names changed to protect two nice people who are about to smuggle a half-ounce of marijuana across three state lines) are youngish retirees winding up a two-week road trip from Minnesota. Marge always wanted to see the Grand Canyon, Ted explains, and they were both tired of the cold and

snow, “so we just took off.” Now they’re stopping on their way home for one last adventure. Even medical marijuana is illegal back in Minnesota, Ted says. Her aunt had cancer, and her sons had to go out and buy it on the street, Marge confides. “It helped her a lot with the chemo.” In Colorado, pot sells legally for $130 to $140 a quarter ounce, including about $20 in state and local tax (there’s no federal tax, since Prez Choom and his posse in Washington, like Japanese soldiers isolated on some Pacific Island after World War II, are still stubbornly waging the War on Drugs). The clerk weighs your purchase and drops it in a little white paper bag. As I drove away I did some rough math in my head. If each

Roswell Daily Record

of those little bags represents $20 in taxes, and this place is serving 20 to 30 customers an hour on a weekday afternoon, that’s conservatively $20,000 in tax revenue every week, or about $1 million a year — half of it out of the pockets of non-residents. Plus the jobs: the security guard and sales clerks, accountant and general manager, the people tending plants out in the greenhouse. The economic impact ripples out through the local motels and restaurants as well. Why is New Mexico not in this business? Are we afraid Ted and Marge are going to get crazy on “reefer” and go on a Bonnie-and-Clydestyle rampage across Kansas? More likely they’re going to check into a local “pot-friendly”

motel, get high, and try to recapture their lost youth with some wild middle-aged sex. Then they’ll fall asleep watching cable TV. Is that such a bad thing? If you think legalization will make it easier for kids to buy dope, you don’t have enough teenagers in your life. If they’re honest with you, they’ll tell you illegal pot is easier to come by than legal but highly regulated beer or tobacco in New Mexico. Are we so committed to this failed 40-year crusade that we’re willing to soldier on, even when our neighbors are conceding defeat – and making a buck in the process? Here’s my suggestion to the Economic Development and Tourism Department: Make New Mexico’s new motto, “We have a spaceport! Let’s Get High!”

EDITORIAL

Jay Nixon and the summer of 100 vetoes “We’ve made too many compromises already, too many retreats. They invade our space, and we fall back. They assimilate entire worlds, and we fall back. Not again. The line must be drawn here! This far, no further! And I will make them pay for what they’ve done!” — Capt. Jean-Luc Picard, “Star Trek: First Contact” A year ago, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer gave her veto pen a workout. Her fellow Republicans who dominate that state’s Legislature were refusing her request to pass a Medicaid expansion bill, bringing with it billions of dollars in federal investment. So she issued an ultimatum. She told the Legislature to stop sending her bills until they passed Medicaid expansion. They didn’t listen. So on May 23, she vetoed every bill that was sent to her that day, including at least a couple of them that she supported. It’s time for Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon to make like Capt. Picard and make them pay for what they’ve done. He should channel his inner Jan Brewer. The Missouri Legislature finished its work last week without even seriously debating a Medicaid expansion plan that is being pushed by Mr. Nixon, by the state’s Chamber of Commerce, by Democrats, by key Republicans including Sen. Ryan Silvey, R-Kansas City, and Rep. Jay Barnes, R-Jefferson City. Failing to expand Medicaid will have a disastrous effect on the state’s health care industry and overall economy. Hundreds of lives will continue to be lost because too few poor Missourians have reasonable access to health care coverage. But key Republican leaders refuse to budge. They think that passing Medicaid expansion, as 26 other states have, is giving in to Obamacare. Mr. Nixon will soon have on his desk 176 bills passed by the Legislature, as well as the budget bills. Here’s what he should do: Veto nearly all of them. Sign the budget, but line-item veto every corporate handout and special-interest freebie. Sign the legislation that helps children, like the bill that adds pre-K funding for troubled school districts, or the bill that reduces the wait for access to the state’s Children’s Health Insurance Program. But everything else goes. Even if you like it, or unions like it, or your key supporters like it. Prove that you’ve got as much courage as Ms. Brewer, who, by the way, won her battle. Now Arizona’s working poor have access to health care insurance. Missourians are waiting at the emergency room door. Mr. Nixon owns much of the blame for this problem. Yes, the GOP has nearly a veto-proof majority. Yes, big donors and far-right voters have encouraged the trend toward dangerous, extremist legislation. Moderating this trend is hard. But Mr. Nixon barely even tried. When he ran for governor in 2008, and re-election in 2012, and, during much of his time in the Governor’s Mansion, he’s followed a bunker mentality that belies his previous reputation as a hard-charging attorney general who stood up for the little guy. During that 2008 election, he advocated reversing the damaging Medicaid cuts enacted by Gov. Matt Blunt and his fellow Republicans in 2005. It was a strong campaign issue for him. But when the Legislature pushed back, the issue died without a whimper. The gover nor has since been accused by both Republicans and Democrats, most notably Rep. Chris Kelly, D-Columbia, of being disengaged from discussions with lawmakers. He has run the executive branch in the same way, making it next to impossible for lawmakers, reporters or citizens to access necessary public information. REPRINTED FROM THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

In VA scandal, accountability for all — including Congress While Congress eagerly prepares its latest political stunt — a resolution to oust Gen. Eric Shinseki as Veterans Affairs Secretary — individual members might consider their own responsibility for the scandalous inadequacy of veterans’ health care. Unlike most of them, especially on the Republican side, Shinseki opposed the incompetent war plans of the George W. Bush administration that left so many American service men and women grievously wounded. And unlike most of them, especially on the Republican side, Shinseki has done much to reduce the backlog of veterans seeking care, despite the congressional failure to provide sufficient funding. Anyone paying attention

JOE

CONASON SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

knows by now that those secret waiting lists at VA facilities — which may have led to the premature deaths of scores of injured veterans — are a direct consequence of policy decisions made in the White House years before President Barack Obama got there. The misguided invasion of Iraq — carried out with insufficient numbers of troops shielded by insufficient armor — led directly to thousands of new cases of traumatic brain

injury, post-traumatic stress disorder, and other physical and mental disabilities requiring speedy treatment. A substantial portion of the estimated $ 3 trillion price of that war is represented by the cost of decent care for veterans. But even as the war raged on, the Bush administration and Republicans in Congress repeatedly refused to appropriate sufficient funding for veterans’ health care. This financial stinginess toward vets was consistent with Bush’s refusal to take any steps to pay for his expensive war (and decision to protect his skewed tax cuts instead). As Alec MacGillis pointed out this week in the New Republic, legislators who voted for war while opposing

expansion of the VA are hypocrites, particularly when they claim to care about veterans. So are the Republican governors who refuse to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, which keeps hundreds of thousands of impoverished vets from getting health care. Breaking down the voting record, year after year, the pattern along party lines is clear: Republicans regularly propose cuts in VA funding and oppose increases sponsored by Democrats — a pattern that extends back to the first years of the Iraq and Afghan conflicts and continues to this day. As recently as last February, Senate Republicans filibustered a Democratic bill that would have added

paign that resulted in the murders of more than 10,000 people in Argentina. A new word, “disappearance,” was added to the lexicon of international law and concentration camps and secret detention centers proliferated in Argentina, all created with one single purpose: to eliminate political opposition to the regime of Rafael Videla. More specifically, Operation Condor referred to the process of secret arrest, torture and interrogation of suspects, followed by execution and secret disposal of their bodies — often in crematoriums, in mass graves or dumped out at sea from army helicopters. When Argentina was awarded the World Cup, the military junta saw it as an opportunity to portray the brutal regime in a good light on the world stage. Money was pumped in, money that the country could ill-afford.

Most telling of the true nature of the regime was the construction of huge concrete walls, dubbed “The Misery Walls” that were put up to cover the nation’s slums. Worst of all was that the junta increased the list of “disappeared” to the rate of 200 per day. The World Cup ran in spite of the campaign of terror. Some, me included, would argue that it ran in order to hide and legitimize a state-sponsored terrorist campaign. According to delisted documents, interviews and books written on the matter (I highly recommend Marguerite Feitlowitz’s excellent book, “Argentina and the Legacies of Torture”), life in the torture camps became, well, even more surreal during the games. Argentina is just as crazy

Murder, torture, soccer: The 1978 World Cup’s dreadful legacy

As the countdown to the 2014 World Cup in Brazil goes from weeks to days, it’s been impossible for me to ignore ghosts from the past. Cities across Brazil were wracked by protests again last Friday as citizens try to bring attention to the injustices they feel surround World Cup construction. But, regardless of how loud the protests become, FIFA will find a way to avoid serious problems because, well, World Cups have always been good at avoiding controversies … with one memorable exception. Fans call soccer “the beautiful game,” and there is no uglier stain on it than when Argentina won the 1978 World Cup. They did it on home turf and, to this day, if you ask most Argentines, they will say that it was one of the proudest moments in the nation’s history.

BRUNO

BALTODANO POLITICAL COLUMNIST

But that World Cup was held during the “Dirty War,” when tens of thousands of left-wing political activists in Argentina were “disappeared” and thousands more were held in torture camps. Argentina in 1978 must be understood from within the context of the Cold War and, most importantly, of Operation Condor — one of the lowest points in the history of humankind. Operation Condor was the code name for a genocidal cam-

See CONASON, Page A5

See BALTODANO, Page A5


Celebrate the vitality of seniors in May LOCAL

Roswell Daily Record

BY LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

May is Older Americans Month, celebrating the vitality and aspirations of older adults and their contributions to our communities. Older Americans are influential members of society, sharing essential talents, wisdom, and life experiences with their families, friends, neighbors and organizations. The 2014 theme is “Safe Today. Healthy Tomorrow.” By taking control of their safety, older Americans can live longer, healthier lives. Many continue to work in the second half of their life. Of course earning money may be the major reason, but they may also be seeking greater personal meaning and social impact. For some people, this involves a new job or starting a new business based on a hobby or recreational pursuit. George Burns, American comedian, award-winning actor and best-selling writer, who worked until shortly before his death at the age of 100, stated: “I’d rather be a failure at something I love than a success at something I hate.” George’s career spanned vaudeville, radio and television; most including Gracie Allen, his co-star and wife. He was 79 when he began a film career. He authored 10 books and at the age of 92, he wrote “Gracie: A Love Story.” Many authors began writing late in life. Laura Ingalls Wilder was in her mid-60s when she wrote “Little House in the Big Wood”; the first of “Little House” series of books for children. Frank McCourt was in his mid60s when he published “Angela’s Ashes,” a tragicomic memoir for which he won the Pulitzer Prize.

The Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania Ave., has these books, plus a plethora of additional titles and subjects to aid the aged. The catalog of materials may be accessed at the library or online at roswellpubliclibrary.org. The website also features the library’s resources and services, a monthly calendar of events and Internet databases. Reference librarians are available to assist patrons in locating the books and information. One of the joys of working with books is connecting people and books.

Book talk

Gabrielle Zevin’s “The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry” captures the joy of a bookseller connecting people and books. Each chapter begins with the title of a short story or book in which Fikry describes what he likes or dislikes about the book or author. This in turn, introduces the characters by what they read. Debra Thomas, technical services supervisor, shares the following that is a love letter to the joys of reading. A.J. Fikry has decided that his life has become a meaningless, glaring example of everything that can go wrong to an ordinary person on any given day. Stark and unfiltered, much like an expanse of gray concrete simmering in the glaring rays of a noon-day sun, his life after death is not to be desired. Granted, the death was his wife’s, not his, but that can be worse, can’t it? After his beloved Nic’s death, A. J.’s inter-

est in his Victorian cottage bookstore falters under his undemanding ownership. As a young man trying to deal with a new chapter of his life, he ritually, once a week or so, imbibes the spirits until he really doesn’t remember anything. It is during one of these “episodes” that he unlocks a climate-controlled glass display case. He removes Edgar Allan Poe’s “Tamerlane,” props it up across the table so he can see it, and proceeds to drink himself into oblivion. The book was a copy of the first thing written by an 18-year-old Edgar Allan Poe, and had an estimated value of $400,000. Finding it missing when he awoke the following morning did not bolster Mr. Fikry’s shaky confidence in life. Unlikely things happen, though, and the benefits of newly formed alliances and clear -cut wake-up calls make the unwilling gentleman become slightly more enamored of daily living. Then begins another chapter of his life which descends into the unexpected with the arrival of Maya, age 25 months, sitting abandoned in the middle of his bookstore holding a copy of “Where the Wild Things Are.” The baby immediately steals A.J.’s heart and unleashes a dramatic transformation. As we follow the chapters of his life, we find that sometimes the things we thought were the most important in life can lead us to even more complex dimensions of love, friendship, acceptance and the awareness that we actually lived our lives instead of just fading away. We remain as ink on the pages of a book which is dogeared, slightly tattered, chocolate and coffee-stained, sometimes

Conason

LETTERS

Continued from Page A1

Dear Editor, Every day we are exposed to chemicals linked to cancer, infertility, autism, asthma and other diseases. Chemicals that did not exist when our grandparents were kids are now in our paints, our furniture, and our cleaning supplies. Yet, no one requires the chemicals used to make those products are safe. How is this possible? The answer lies in the failure of America’s main chemical safety law, the Toxic Substances Control Act, which has not been updated since President Ford signed it into law in 1976. The law is so weak that our government cannot even ban known cancer-causing chemicals like asbestos. Fortunately, there is bipartisan effort behind a new bill in Congress to update the chemical law. The bill needs substantial improvement if it is to get the job done, but we are asking our members of Congress do what it takes to protect our families. We should not have to wonder if the products we use every day are safe. Even Washington should understand that. And do not get me started on the WIPP fiasco. This will be my next letter to the editor. Sally Jo Davis Roswell

Dear Editor, Today I happen to run an errand for my wife on the north side of Roswell. As always, when I am near Sam’s/Murphy’s, I always top off the pickup or our car. It brought back memories of the days where there was a monopoly, price gouging and price fixing in our city. The price that I paid Sam’s today was $3.359 per gallon, I noticed the price at the “convenience location” at $3.599 difference of .24 cents per gallon. The farther that I drove south the higher the price. Brought memories when Roswell prices were 20 to 30 cents per gallon higher than the national average. I remember writing then-Attorney General Tom Udall of the state of New Mexico about the price we had to pay. His long full-page answer in part stated that areas in N.M. were controlled by monopolies for some reason or another he failed to sign the letter that he had written me. When I wrote him back asking are monopolies illegal, he did not answer my question. He has gone to greater level now, as the senator for our state, he and his fellow Democrats are trying to allow the United Nations get involved with our Article 2 of the Constitution. Folks, it is time for term limits; the people in office will not allow this to happen. We should demand that term limits be put in place. The Democrats and Republicans always state the “AMERICAN PEOPLE” demand! You can rest assured that both parties are party first, then we do not come in a close second. The Roswell Daily Record will only allow one letter per person per month. Bear with me, I have been watching the local candidates that are running for whatever office in the Republican primary. Some, when I read their qualifications, are a blast. One of the sheriff candidates, if elected, the rumor mill tells me that we have a sheriff Andy Taylor of Mayberry, N.C., by law he cannot carry a side arm. Another’s claims many years on the mounted patrol. A judge candidate claims to have served as an Eagle Scout and Scout leader. I guess when you are a community leader and become president of the United States, all bets are off. Phil Pantuso Roswell

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

$20 billion in VA funding over the next decade and would have built at least 26 new VA health care facilities. The Republicans killed that bill because Democratic leaders refused to add an amendment on Iran sanctions — designed to scuttle the ongoing nuclear negotiations — and because they just don’t want to spend more money on vets. Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent who chairs the Veterans’ Affairs Committee, noted that the costs of the expansion bill could be covered by savings from the end of troop deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan. But with cruel

Baltodano Continued from Page A1

even tear-stained, but still there, and still worthwhile.

What’s happening?

School is out for the summer and the Summer Reading Adventure “Fizz, Boom, Read” is about the vast subject of science and robots. Registration for the Sumer Reading Adventure begins on June 1. All ages, from children to teens to adults may join in the fun. This week’s story times are a pre-summer reading adventure. Children will enjoy the “Dig, Plant, Read” and “Gardening” story and craft hours. All materials are provided for the related crafts; however, children must arrive in the first 15 minutes of the programs to participate in the craft sessions. The stories and crafts may vary between programs and the quantities of some craft items may be limited. “Sun, Seed, Soil” will be the theme of Traci Curry’s program when she visits the library for the Wednesday story times beginning at 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Traci Curry is with New Mexico Farm Bureau and is the director of the New Mexico Ag in the Classroom program. Her presentation shares information about growing the food we eat and the science of agriculture. This program is well suited for school age children and their caregivers. Following the program, participants will receive handouts and a simple craft to take home. Seating is limited and is provided on a “first come, first served” basis. Gardening will be the topic of the 2 p.m. Saturday story time and kids could hear “Muncha, Muncha, Muncha”; “Planting a Rainbow”; “Five Sweet Strawberries”; “Wiggle and Waggle”; “Up,

irony, according to the Washington Post, “Republicans indicated that they prefer to dedicate the savings (of redeployment) toward deficit reduction” rather than improved services. What those who have served should get is the kind of care that has made the VA among the most successful health systems in the world (for those who can access its services). Instead they will get political swaggering, as members of Congress seek to score points against Obama by attacking Shinseki, and dogmatic opportunism, as right-wing ideologues insist

about futból as Brazil so, on the days when Argentina was playing, the torturers not only stopped their daily routine but gave the prisoners a special treat: they could raise the blindfolds (tabiques) that they wore 24-hours-aday over their eyes up to their foreheads, this allowed them to watch the games and root for the national team, sitting right next to their torturers. Some of the people that survived the camps tell stories of how some were taken out of their camps and driven to local bars, to watch the game and root for their homeland, rooting along with their jailers and torturers who, once the game was over, would go back to applying electrical shocks or whatever the day’s routine called for. So, as we gear up for the start of the World Cup next month, that particular snapshot of world history, the 1972 World Cup under the Dirty War,

Shop the classifieds

Down, and Around” or ask the question “How Does Your Garden Grow?” Precut paper and other materials will be provided for the related crafts, such as making a flower magnet, assembling a “magic” bean growing cup or decorating a garden “hat.” The theft and misuse of personal information is the fastest growing financial crime in the U.S. Frank Mulholland will be visiting the library next Tuesday at 6 p.m. to present a free program about fraud. He is a former special agent of the NM Insurance Fraud Bureau who now works for the New Mexico Securities Division.

Books Again

Books Again Used Books Store, 404 W. Second St., has shelves full of books, many of them are old favorites by popular authors. The fiction for recreational reading includes classics, mystery, western, science fiction, military, history, thrillers, humor, religion, etc. During June’s special sale, fiction titles may be bought for $1 each. This includes titles for teens, adults and children; however children’s picture books are $3 each. There are also non-fiction subject to be explored that are priced at approximately one-fourth of the original price. Books Again is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday through Saturday. The store is operated by Friends of the Library volunteers and all proceeds are used to benefit the library. Parking is located behind the store.

the VA is just another biggovernment program to cut or even abolish. The Republicans who are susceptible to such proposals should be very careful, lest they arouse the anger of the normally conservative American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars, whose leaders react with anger and outrage to the idea of privatization. As American Legion commander Dan Dellinger said in congressional testimony last week, his organization overwhelmingly “finds that veterans are extremely satisfied with their health care team and medical providers.”

reminds me that soccer is sometimes more than just a beautiful game, more than just a spinning ball propelled by über-talented multi-millionaires. Sometimes, as it will happen in Brazil, the tournament helps to mask the uglier side of politics in the host nation. There is a book called “How Soccer Explains the World,” written by Franklin Foer that makes the argument that soccer fans are passionate about the “beautiful game” because it appeals to our inner tribal tendencies and allows us to safely release the hooligan within each of us. That may very well be the case. But I will never forget that the 1972 World Cup, the first one I ever saw in a color TV, gave us a glimpse of the uglier side of sports — namely, how it can be exploited by an evil regime to bedazzle the world at large with an image of a peaceful, tolerant nation (if you want

A5

Let’s not be distracted by the usual spurious assaults on “government health care.” And let’s not be misled by Washington’s loudmouths and poseurs — the warmongers who never face up to the price of their bloody enthusiasm in lives and treasure. When politicians demand accountability from their betters, including a war hero like Shinseki, let’s remember that they should be held accountable, too. To find out more about Joe Conason, visit the Creators Syndicate website at creators.com.

another example, just think of Adolf Hitler and the Munich Olympics Games of 1936.) Having said all of that, I must let my inner “tribal man” out for just a moment. I have to say, the United States got totally shafted. We were pooled into a group with Germany, Portugal and Ghana, the dreaded “Group of Death.” I would call it an injustice but, I’m still hopeful for our chances to make it to the next round. I will be rooting loudly for the red, blue and white, I hope you do, too. Bruno Baltodano, a resident of Pampa, Texas, is a faculty adjunct at Clarendon College and the host of “Revolutionary Hour,” a radio show about political songs on High Plains Public Radio. He teaches college courses on Global Politics, American Government and Terrorism.

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*Julie Stiles Lyn (USPTA pro) 317-6316 *Kelly McDonaldd (RHS Tennis coach) 317-7789 Session 1: June 2-June 12 $35 Session 2: June 16-June 26 $35 Session 3: July 3-July 10 $35

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A6 Tuesday, May 27, 2014

NATION

Roswell Daily Record

Obama leads country in celebrating Memorial Day WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama led the nation in commemorating Memorial Day, declaring the United States has reached “a pivotal moment” in Afghanistan with the end of war approaching. Obama, who returned just hours earlier from a surprise visit with U.S. tr oops at Bagram Air Field in Afghanistan, paid tribute to those lost in battle ther e and elsewhere over history. He called them “patriots who made the ultimate sacrifice” for their country. “Early this morning, I fr om r etur ned Afghanistan,” Obama told the audience of several thousand people. “Yesterday, I visited with some of our men and women serving there — 7,000 miles fr om home. For mor e than 12 years, men and women like those I met

with have borne the burden of our nation’s security. Now, because of their profound sacrifice, because of the progress they have made, we’re at a pivotal moment.” “Our troops are coming home. By the end of this year, our war in Afghanistan will finally come to end,” the president said to applause. “And yester day at Bagram, and here today at Arlington, we pay tribute to the nearly 2,200 American patriots who’ve made the ultimate sacrifice in Afghanistan. We will honor them, always.” Obama has said it was likely that a small contingent of U.S. forces would stay behind for counterterrorism missions, as well as to train Afghan security forces. The president made a fleeting reference to the widening scandal involv-

ing reports of poor performance by the Department of Veterans Affairs, which is facing allegations of delayed tr eatments, and even deaths in Arizona. “As we’ve been reminded in recent days — we must do mor e to keep faith with our veterans and their families, and ensure they get the care and benefits and opportunities that they’ve earned and that they deserve,” said the president. “These Americans have done their duty,” Obama said. “They ask nothing more than that our country does ours — now and for decades to come,” he added, drawing mor e applause. Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki, a retired Army general, was among those attending the ceremony. Lawmakers from both parties have

AP Photo

President Barack Obama speaks at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., Monday.

for policy pr essed changes and better management at the department. The Arlington remembrance was duplicated in villages, towns, cities and counties across the coun-

California’s flawed water system can’t track usage AP Photo

In this May 2 photo, farmworkers plant tomato sprouts in Yuba City, Calif.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Call them the fortunate ones: Nearly 4,000 California companies, farms and others are allowed to use free water with little oversight when the state is so bone dry that deliveries to nearly everyone else have been severely slashed. Their special status dates back to claims made more than a century ago when water was plentiful. But in the third year of a drought that has ravaged California, these “senior rights holders” dominated by corporations and agricultural concerns are not obliged to conserve water. Nobody knows how much water they actually use, though it amounts to trillions of gallons each year, according to a review of their own reports by The Associated Press. Together, they hold more than half the rights to rivers and streams in Cal-

ifornia. The AP found the state’s system is based on selfreported, incomplete records riddled with errors and years out of date; some appear to be using far less water than records would indicate. “We really don’t know how much water they’ve actually diverted,” said Bob Rinker, a manager in the State Water Resources Control Board’s water rights division. With a burgeoning population and projections of heightened climate-related impacts on snowpack and other water supplies, the antiquated system blunts California’s ability to move water where it is most needed. When gold miners flocked to the West in the 1800s, the state drafted laws that rewarded those who first staked claims on the region’s abundant rivers and streams.

Today, Califor nia still relies on that honor system, even during drought. The system’s inequities are particularly evident in California’s arid Central Valley. “In a good year we wouldn’t be able to stand here unless we got wet. This year it won’t produce anything,” said secondgeneration rice farmer Al Montna as he knelt in the dust, pulling apart dirt clods on the 1,800 acres he left idle because of scarce water. About 35 miles north, fourth-generation rice far mer Josh Sheppard had more than enough water, thanks to his water district’s superior rights to Feather River water dating to the late 1800s. “No one thinks of it when there’s ample water and plenty to go around, but in these times of tightness it is a very contentious resource that

gets fought over,” Sheppard said, standing next to his flooded fields.

To find out how many entities hold these superior rights and how much water they use, the AP obtained the water board’s database for 2010 — the last complete year of water usage reports — and interviewed state officials and dozens of landowners. The state only collects the records every three years on a staggered basis, meaning its information is always out of date.

Tom Howard, the board’s executive director, acknowledged the state should get a better handle on water use. “Anything to improve the information we have would help,” he said, citing the need for annual reporting of usage and real time stream flow data.

String of legal wins bolsters same-sex marriage

WASHINGTON (AP) — One after another and in sometimes evocative language, judges appointed by Republican and Democratic presidents are declaring it’s too late to turn back on the topic of same-sex marriage. The unbroken string of state and federal court rulings in support of gay and lesbian unions takes in every region of the country, including states of the Confederacy, and brings to 26 states where same-sex couples can get married or a judge has ruled they ought to be allowed. It also may have pushed gay marriage to a legal tipping point, where the cause has won such wide-ranging approval that it will be hard for the Supreme Court to rule against it. The court rulings and the meas-

ured response of even elected officials who oppose same-sex marriage may be especially important for justices who have worried about acting too quickly to impose samesex marriage nationwide. The latest ruling, in Pennsylvania, was followed quickly by word from Republican Gov. Tom Corbett that he would not appeal and instead let the decision take effect. Corbett, who opposes gay and lesbian marriage, is facing a tough campaign for re-election this year. “We are a better people than what these laws represent, and it is time to discard them into the ash heap of history,” U.S. District Judge John E. Jones III wrote last week about the Pennsylvania marriage law.

Gay marriage opponents say they expect more of a mixed record in the courts by the time the Supreme Court gets involved, and they take issue with the notion that U.S. public opinion has shifted as dramatically as many polls show.

All the rulin gs came after the Supreme Court decision last June that struck down part of a federal anti-gay marriage law but did not apply to bans that wer e then in place in roughly three dozen states. Judges, though, have had no trouble extending the high court’s ruling in U.S. v. Windsor to prohibit states from discriminating against same-sex couples who want to wed.

try. There was a holiday weekend reunion of some of the last surviving members of the Tuskegee Air men in upstate New York. Mor e than 3,000 volunteers placed flags at the graves of 120,000 vet-

erans at the Florida National Cemetery. And in Mississippi, the annual Vicksburg Memorial Day parade was being accompanied by a wreath-laying ceremony at Vicksburg National Cemetery.

Medicaid surge triggers concerns WASHINGTON (AP) — From California to Rhode Island, states are confronting new concerns that their Medicaid costs will rise as a result of the federal health care law. That’s likely to revive the debate about how federal decisions can saddle states with unanticipated expenses. Before President Barack Obama’s law expanded Medicaid eligibility, millions of people who were already entitled to its safety-net coverage were not enrolled. Those same people are now signing up in unexpectedly high numbers, partly because of publicity about getting insured under the law. For states red or blue, the catch is that they must use more of their own money to cover this particular group. In California, Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown’s recent budget projected an additional $1.2 billion spending on Medi-Cal, the state’s version of Medicaid, due in part to surging numbers. State officials say about 300,000 more already-eligible Californians are expected to enroll than was estimated last fall. “Our policy goal is to get people covered, so in that sense it’s a success,” said state legislator Richard Pan, a Democrat who heads the California State Assembly’s health committee. “We are going to have to deal with

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how to support the success.” Online exchanges that offer subsidized private insurance are just one part of the health care law’s push to expand coverage. The other part is Medicaid, and it has two components. First, the law allows states to expand Medicaid eligibility to people with incomes up to 138 percent of the federal poverty line, about $16,100 for an individual. Washington pays the entire cost for that group through 2016, gradually phasing down to a 90 percent share. About half the states have accepted the offer to expand coverage in this way. But whether or not a state expands Medicaid, all states are on the hook for a significantly bigger share of costs when it comes to people who were Medicaid-eligible under previous law. The federal government’s share for this group averages about 60 percent nationally. In California, it’s about a 50-50 split, so for each previously eligible resident who signs up, the state has to pony up half the cost. There could be many reasons why people didn’t sign up in the past. They may have simply been unaware. Some may not have needed coverage. Others see a social stigma attached to the program for those with the lowest incomes.


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Roswell Daily Record

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

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A8 Tuesday, May 27, 2014

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Sunny and warmer A star-studded sky

Wednesday

Mostly sunny

Thursday

Friday

Clouds and sun

A thunderstorm around

Saturday

Very warm with some sun

Sunday

Sunlit, breezy and hot

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Monday

Sunshine; breezy, hot

High 92°

Low 62°

93°/65°

92°/67°

92°/66°

95°/66°

97°/64°

96°/71°

NE at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

ENE at 3-6 mph POP: 0%

E at 3-6 mph POP: 0%

S at 3-6 mph POP: 0%

SSE at 6-12 mph POP: 40%

S at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

NNW at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

SE at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 81°/56° Normal high/low ............... 89°/58° Record high ............. 106° in 1896 Record low ................. 36° in 1913 Humidity at noon .................. 40%

Farmington 87/54

Clayton 84/54

Raton 81/46

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Mon. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date .......................... Normal year to date .............

trace 4.45" 1.03" 4.86" 2.95"

Santa Fe 83/53

Gallup 82/45

Tucumcari 87/59

Albuquerque 86/63

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 85/58

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 78/60

T or C 90/64

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed. New

May 28

Rise 5:51 a.m. 5:51 a.m. Rise 5:10 a.m. 5:55 a.m. First

Jun 5

Full

Jun 12

Set 7:59 p.m. 8:00 p.m. Set 7:08 p.m. 8:04 p.m. Last

Jun 19

Alamogordo 92/66

Silver City 88/59

ROSWELL 92/62 Carlsbad 94/65

Hobbs 91/62

Las Cruces 92/67

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) #### You might feel strongly about a financial matter, and you’ll want to let everyone else know. No one will question your direction. You will be greeted with a sigh of relief once you explain your logic. A family member is likely to go overboard. Tonight: Order in. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ##### You’ll be flying high and enjoying it. Look around to see if a grouchy friend or loved one is tagging along behind you. Your positive, optimistic smile allows others to relax and become more authentic. Tonight: Hang out with a dear pal, neighbor or relative. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ### Your instincts will guide you with spending, price comparison and negotiation. Be sure to keep your budget in mind, even though you won’t want to. If you have been feeling unusually tired and withdrawn, you might want to consider scheduling a checkup. Tonight: Pace yourself. CANCER (June 21-July 22) #### Zero in on what you want and what you feel is most important for the majority. You could overthink an emotional issue or a problem with a child or loved one. Your positive attitude will help you to get past a bump or hassle. Tonight: Enjoy the moment. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) # # # # You will have an opportunity to take the lead on an important project that you care a lot about. Your sense of humor allows greater flexibility in what quickly could evolve into a difficult and touchy situation. Your instincts will carry you far. Tonight: In the limelight. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) #### Keep reaching out to someone at a distance. You could feel intimidated if

cent Asian and 13 percent Hispanic. The attention “Days of Futur e Past” dir ector Bryan Singer received due to a sexual assault lawsuit didn’t keep fans away from theaters this weekend. “We didn’t really anticipate that it would,” said Chris Aronson, president of domestic distribution for Fox. “It really shouldn’t have an impact on audiences and seeing this movie. The audience reactions on a global basis are extraordinarily high, the best of any of our ‘X-Men’ films.” Globally, “Days of Future Past” earned $282 million with $171 million of that total gained from the international sales in 119 countries, all of which had the “X-Men” film ranked No. 1. The projected worldwide box office cume of “Days of Future Past” through Monday is an astounding $302 million. Warner Bros. sci-fi monster smash “Godzilla” dr opped to No. 2, but landed solidly with $39.4 million from Thursday to Monday. The Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore-led comedy “Blended” held the third-place spot with an $18.2 million debut. It’s not a great start for the duo whose previous teamups included “The Wedding Singer” and “50 First Dates.” Both films grossed over $80 million domestically. “Neighbors” and “The Amazing Spider -Man 2” rounded out the top five

Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

92/66/s 86/63/pc 69/38/pc 92/67/s 94/65/s 76/43/pc 84/54/pc 72/45/s 85/58/s 93/62/s 85/62/pc 87/54/pc 82/45/pc 91/62/s 92/67/s 78/49/pc 80/53/pc 89/59/pc 90/61/s 87/58/s 82/46/pc 81/46/pc 69/40/pc 92/62/s 78/60/s 83/53/pc 88/59/s 90/64/s 87/59/s 82/55/pc

93/67/s 90/67/s 72/48/t 92/68/s 94/67/s 79/44/pc 88/57/s 75/47/s 89/60/s 96/66/pc 88/66/s 89/60/pc 85/54/pc 93/62/s 96/72/s 80/51/pc 81/54/pc 92/67/s 92/64/s 90/60/s 83/52/pc 83/51/s 72/47/t 93/65/s 80/58/s 86/57/pc 91/64/pc 92/67/pc 92/59/s 84/55/pc

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE

you don’t get a hold of this person within a certain number of phone calls. You might want to try a different approach. A friend will lend a hand and come through for you. Tonight: Find an expert. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) #### Relate to a partner or associate directly about an issue surrounding funds. This person needs to know how you feel; saying nothing or copping an attitude will not be as powerful. He or she needs to know where you are coming from. Tonight: Togetherness works. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ##### You might want to have a long-overdue conversation with several colleagues. Unless you convene a meeting with the people involved, you will not see this talk happen. T ake responsibility for what you desire, and make it so. Tonight: Be entertained. Try a movie. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21) ### You have a lot of ground to cover. You can succeed if you focus on each task at hand. A partner will pitch in and help if you delegate some of your responsi-

‘X-Men’ tops at the box office

LOS ANGELES (AP) — “X-Men: Days of Future Past” is projected to be the fifth-best Memorial Day holiday weekend debut in box office history over a four -day period, just behind “Fast & Furious 6” and above “The Hangover 2.” The seventh installment in the “X-Men” franchise ear ned $111 million, according to studio estimates on Monday. Fox updated its holiday weekend projection, taking it up slightly from $91 million to $91.4 million. 2006’s “X-Men: The Last Stand” is still the highest domestic opener of the series, gaining $123 million when it debuted over the Memorial holiday. “Days of Futur e Past,” starring a solid cast including Hugh Jackman, Jennifer Lawrence, Halle Berry, Michael Fassbender, James McA voy, Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellen, Peter Dinklage and Ellen Page, is now the second-highest “X-Men” debut. “We were hoping to get a $100 million in four days and we hoped to broaden the movie out to a more general audience, which has come to fruition from a gender standpoint, age standpoint and race standpoint,” said Spencer Klein, senior vice president general sales manager for Fox. The diverse domestic “XMen” audience was 56 percent male and 44 percent female. Racially, 53 percent of the audience was white, 20 per cent African-American, 14 per-

Regional Cities Today Wed.

earning $17.2 million and $10 million, respectively. The four -day Memorial weekend is estimated to generate nearly $230 million, which is down approximately 27 percent from last year’s holiday weekend gross of $314.2 million. —————— Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Tuesday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, accor ding to Rentrak. Where available, latest international numbers ar e also included. Final domestic figures will be released on Tuesday. 1.”X-Men: Days of Future Past,” $111 million ($171 million international). 2.”Godzilla,” $39.4 million. 3.”Blended,” $18.2 million. 4.”Neighbors,” $17.2 million. 5.”The Amazing SpiderMan 2,” $10 million. 6.”Million Dollar Arm,” $9 million. 7.”The Other Woman,” $5 million. 8.”Rio 2,” $3.3 million. 9.”Chef,” $3 million. 10.”Heaven Is for Real,” $2.8 million.

YOUR CREDIT

“We want to make you a loan”

(575)624-2929

$200 - $2,000

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

57/48/r 57/50/sh 86/68/pc 86/66/pc 86/66/t 77/62/t 67/49/sh 59/47/c 88/64/pc 90/64/t 81/58/t 72/58/t 79/62/t 74/60/t 80/66/r 84/69/t 82/56/pc 90/57/pc 80/63/t 77/58/pc 93/72/s 96/74/s 86/75/s 86/75/s 84/70/t 85/68/t 84/65/pc 81/66/t 83/66/t 83/63/t 102/83/s 101/80/pc 80/62/pc 80/60/pc 86/61/pc 89/63/s

U.S. Extremes

Today Hi/Lo/W

Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Miami 87/76/s 86/76/pc Midland 91/62/s 92/64/s 85/64/t 85/64/pc Minneapolis New Orleans 85/71/t 83/69/t New York 84/60/t 66/53/sh 86/64/t 87/63/t Omaha Orlando 90/69/t 90/70/t Philadelphia 85/68/t 73/56/t 106/84/s 107/82/pc Phoenix Pittsburgh 79/64/t 79/61/t Portland, OR 70/50/c 64/50/t 88/66/t 90/67/t Raleigh St. Louis 89/68/t 86/69/t Salt Lake City 87/64/s 95/64/s San Diego 73/66/pc 72/65/pc Seattle 67/49/c 62/49/t Tucson 100/74/s 102/78/pc Washington, DC 87/70/t 80/63/t

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 116° .........Death Valley, Calif. Low: 26° ................. Leadville, Colo.

High: 88° ........................ Lordsburg Low: 30° ..............................Chama

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

bilities. Curb a tendency to be so critical of yourself. Tonight: Head home, but make sure to squeeze in some exercise first. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) #### You’ll put in a major effort at a meeting to present others with the options as you see them. You will anticipate a certain amount of feedback, but what you end up hearing might be totally unexpected. Go with the moment, and know your limits. Tonight: Go for naughty. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) #### You might want to reconsider an offer involving property. You could feel overburdened by your options and not know which way to go. Lighten up the moment with your sense of humor. A childlike energy will emerge later today, when you finally feel free. Tonight: In the moment. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) #### You might want to ask more questions about a matter that surrounds your personal life. Let your ingenuity lead the way to the right path for you, and hopefully for others as well. A friend is likely to wonder what is going on with you. Tonight: Express your caring. BORN TODAY Former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger (1923), gunfighter James Butler Hickok (1837), actor Vincent Price (1911)


SPORTS

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

Section

Roswell Daily Record

B

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

BLACKOUT TAKES THE MONEY KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

Black Jackson and Fred McDonald both made multiple proclamations on Facebook that Blackout would win the Show Me The Money championship at the 19th annual Hike It & Spike It flag football tournament. On Sunday after noon, they made good on those proclamations. The duo led the Dallas-based squad to the Show Me The Money title for the second time in five years with a 32-7 win over defending champion Goose Crew in the title game. The first play of the championship game was a Blackout touchdown and the rout was on from there.

Ramonce Taylor hit McDonald on a go route down the sideline on the game’s first play to make it 6-0. After a turnover on downs by Goose Crew, Jackson hit Taylor for a touchdown on the fourth play of Blackout’s drive to make it 12-0. Goose Crew got their lone score on the next possession when Jorge Cascudo hit Jorge Pena to make it 12-7. Blackout sandwiched a pair of TDs around a Goose Crew turnover on downs on its next two drives. Jackson hit Dee Washington for the first of those two scores. Taylor scored the second off a lateral from George Thompson, helping Blackout take a 25-7 lead into halftime.

Out of the break, Goose Crew turned it over on downs when McDonald batted down a pass on third down to set up Blackout’s game-winning drive. Taylor took it down to the 1yard line off a Jackson pass and Washington put Blackout a PAT away from the title with a jumping grab in the end zone from Jackson to make it 31-7. On the PAT, Jackson flipped it to Will Cole just inside the pylon

to clinch the mercy-rule victory and set off a wild Blackout celebration. Blackout ran through the tournament undefeated, finishing 6-0 to claim the $10,000 first-place prize. They beat the Hounds 19-0 in the first round, Dream Team 3225 in the second round, Truth 39-12 in the championship quar-

Shawn Naranjo Photos

ABOVE: Blackout poses with Show Me The Money sponsors as well as Miss Teen New Mexico, Miss Roswell and Miss Southern New Mexico after winning the champiSee HISI, Page B3 onship of the showcase division at the 19th annual Hike It & Spike It flag football tournament on Sunday afternoon at Cielo Grande. FAR LEFT: Blackout’s Fred McDonald hauls in a pass on his way to a touchdown on the first play of the championship game, Sunday.

LEFT: Blackout’s Black Jackson slips away from Goose Crew’s Michael Ramos as he looks for an open receiver during the championship game, Sunday.

Heat take command of East finals NBA PLAYOFFS

AP Photo

Texas’ Chris Gimenez, left, begins his slide past Minnesota Twins catcher Kurt Suzuki to score on a Leonys Martin double in the eighth inning of the Rangers’ win, Monday.

Rangers top Twins 7-2

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — After a rough first two innings, Nick Tepesch settled down and cruised through another quality outing to help the Texas Rangers stay hot. Tepesch won his second consecutive start, Elvis Andrus and Chris Gimenez each had two RBIs, and the Rangers beat the Minnesota Twins 7-2 on Monday afternoon. Tepesch (2-0) gave up both his runs in the first two innings before lasting 6 2⁄3. He struck out four to win consecutive starts for the first time in his career. “That’s one of the things that made me successful

today, to be able to put the first two innings behind me,” Tepesch said. “Treat each inning as a new inning.” Alex Rios added two more hits and now has six straight multi-hit games. The Rangers have won three straight and five of six after a rough start to the season. “Early in the season everything didn’t go the way we wanted it to,” Andrus said. “At the same time, we still trust in each other and we knew there’s a lot of baseball left. Everyone is feeling well right now as a team.” Trevor Plouffe homered See RANGERS, Page B3

LOCAL SCHEDULE — TUESDAY, MAY 27 — • Roswell at Taos, 7 p.m. PECOS LEAGUE

MIAMI (AP) — LeBron James had 32 points and 10 rebounds, Chris Bosh added 25 points and the Miami Heat moved one win away from a return trip to the NBA Finals with a 102-90 win over the Indiana Pacers on Monday night. Dwyane Wade scored 15 points for the Heat, who have won three of the first four games in the Eastern Conference finals. They can win the East for a fourth straight season with a win at Indiana on Wednesday night. Miami led wire-to-wire, opening up as much as a 23-point lead in the final quarter. Paul George scored 23 points and David West added 20 points and 12 rebounds for the Pacers, who got 15 points from George Hill. But Lance Stephenson was held to nine and Roy Hibbert was scoreless in 22 minutes for Indiana. The Pacers won two elimination games in the first round against Atlanta, and need to win three more if their yearlong plan of topping Miami as kings of the East is going to become reality. The odds are obviously stacked against them. See HEAT, Page B3

AP Photo

Miami’s Ray Allen, left, is fouled by Indiana’s Roy Hibbert during their game, Monday.

SPOTLIGHT 1873 — Survivor is the winner of the first Preakness Stakes. 1968 — “Papa Bear” George Halas retires as head coach of the Chicago Bears. 1972 — Mark Donohue wins the Indianapolis 500 over two-time defending champion Al Unser with a record average speed of 162.962 mph. 1981 — Willie Shoemaker wins his 8,000th race and then three more. Shoemaker gets the milestone

ON

SPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN ... on top of War Allied in the first race at Hollywood Park. 1981 — Julius Erving of the Philadelphia 76ers is named the NBA’s Most Valuable Player, making him the only player to win MVP honors in both the NBA and the ABA. 1982 — The Los Angeles Lakers, despite an 11day layoff, beat Philadelphia 124-117 in Game 1 of the NBA Finals for their ninth consecutive victory. The

nine straight wins sets the NBA record for consecutive wins during one postseason. 1998 — In one of the biggest upsets in Grand Slam history, Pete Sampras is ousted at the French Open by 21-year-old Ramon Delgado of Paraguay, ranked 97th in the world, 7-6 (8-6), 6-3, 6-4. 2004 — Brad Richards’ goal in Tampa Bay’s 4-1 victory over Calgary is the game-winner — his recordtying sixth of the postseason.


B2 Tuesday, May 27, 2014 Pecos League

Pecos League At A Glance All times Mountain Northern Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Santa Fe . . . . . . . . . . .8 Raton . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Trinidad . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Taos . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Las Vegas . . . . . . . . . .3 Southern Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Alpine . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Roswell . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Douglas . . . . . . . . . . .5 Bisbee . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 White Sands . . . . . . . .3

L 4 5 5 8 9

L 3 4 5 5 6

Pct GB .667 — .545 1 1⁄2 .500 2 .273 4 1⁄2 .250 5 Pct GB .750 — 1⁄2 .692 .500 3 .375 4 .333 4 1⁄2

May 25 Las Vegas 8, Raton 6 Roswell 4, Santa Fe 2 Trinidad 12, Taos 8 Douglas 11, White Sands 4 Alpine 14, Bisbee 5 May 26 Las Vegas 2, Trinidad 0, susp., rain, 2nd inn. Raton 7, Santa Fe 6 Roswell 7, Taos 4 Douglas at Bisbee, 7 p.m. May 27 Trinidad at Las Vegas, 6 p.m. Santa Fe at Raton, 6 p.m. Roswell at Taos, 7 p.m. White Sands at Alpine, 7 p.m. Bisbee at Douglas, 7 p.m. May 28 Las Vegas at Trinidad, 6 p.m. Raton at Santa Fe, 6 p.m. Bisbee at Douglas, 7 p.m. White Sands at Alpine, 7 p.m. Douglas at Bisbee, 7 p.m. Roswell at Taos, 7 p.m. May 29 White Sands at Alpine, 1 p.m. Raton at Santa Fe, 6 p.m. Las Vegas at Trinidad, 6 p.m. Roswell at Taos, 7 p.m. White Sands at Alpine, 7 p.m. May 30 Las Vegas at Santa Fe, 6 p.m. Taos at Trinidad, 6 p.m. Raton at Roswell, 7 p.m. Douglas at Alpine, 7 p.m. White Sands at Bisbee, 7 p.m. May 31 Las Vegas at Santa Fe, 6 p.m. Taos at Trinidad, 6 p.m. Raton at Roswell, 6 p.m. White Sands at Bisbee, 7 p.m. Douglas at Alpine, 7 p.m. June 1 Las Vegas at Santa Fe, 6 p.m. Raton at Roswell, 7 p.m. Douglas at Alpine, 7 p.m. White Sands at Bisbee, 7 p.m. Trinidad at Taos, 7 p.m.

Basketball

Thousands attend service for coach Don Meyer

ABERDEEN, S.D. (AP) — Thousands gathered on the campus of Northern State University in South Dakota on Saturday for a memorial service to honor longtime college basketball coach Don Meyer, whose friends said his legacy of compassion for others would surpass even his accomplishments on the court. Meyer, one of the winningest coaches in college basketball history, died Sunday of cancer at his home in Aberdeen, South Dakota. He was 69. He led his teams into the playoffs 19 times and compiled a 923-324 record during his 38-year career, most of which he spent at Lipscomb in Tennessee and at Northern State. The native of Wayne, Nebraska, overcame a near-fatal car accident in 2008 before closing out his career after the 2010 season at Northern State with a 13-14 record — only his fourth losing season. Mark Ovenden, a local sportscaster and friend of Meyer’s, opened the service. He, and everyone else who spoke, focused on Meyer’s role as a mentor to those around him. “Don was a great coach — we know that. His accomplishments have been well documented. But he was even better at the things that most of us didn’t notice in life: living the right way; doing things the right way,” Ovenden said. Meyer’s former players talked about how their coach had helped shape their lives when they were young and how he continued to do so, even as they got older and had children of their own. “What do we do now?” asked Brett Newton, who played for Meyer at Northern State for four years. “We live our lives as an example of what he was.” Craig Nelson, who played for Meyer from 2003-2008 at Northern State, said the thousands who came to honor Meyer were there because of more than just his coaching record. “I would argue a Division II basketball coach would not garner this type of celebration just for being a basketball coach,” he said. The public memorial service was held on the gym floor of the Barnett Center, where Northern State hosts its basketball games. A second service will be held June 1 at Lipscomb University in Nashville, Tennessee, where Meyer also coached.

College football Huskies offer football class for female fans

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — UConn’s football program is offering a clinic to teach its female fans more about the game. The “Women’s Football 101 Clinic,” was proposed by head coach Bob Diaco and is scheduled for June 25 at the school’s training facility in Storrs. Spokesman Mike Enright said it is not intended to be condescending and will offer women a chance to learn everything from the basic fundamentals of the game to its finer intricacies. “It’s just meant to be a fun-filled thing,” Enright said. “We understand that many of these women may know more about the game than a lot of men. This is something that fans from those with virtually no knowledge of the game to a very intricate knowledge of the game can get something from.” The program includes a meet-and-greet with the coaching staff and a social hour with a cash bar. The participants also will take the field and do some light drills with the staff and players. Enright said it’s something other schools have done and UConn believes can help expand its fan base.

LPGA

LPGA Money Leaders By The Associated Press Through May 25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Trn 1. Stacy Lewis . . . . . . . . . .11 2. Michelle Wie . . . . . . . . .10 3. Anna Nordqvist . . . . . . .10 4. Lexi Thompson . . . . . . .10 5. Karrie Webb . . . . . . . . . .9 6. Lydia Ko . . . . . . . . . . . .10 7. Inbee Park . . . . . . . . . . . .9 8. Jessica Korda . . . . . . . .10 9. Lizette Salas . . . . . . . . .10 10. Azahara Munoz . . . . . .12 11. Paula Creamer . . . . . . .11 12. Chella Choi . . . . . . . . .12 13. Jenny Shin . . . . . . . . . .11 14. Cristie Kerr . . . . . . . . . .9 15. Angela Stanford . . . . . .10 16. So Yeon Ryu . . . . . . . . .9 17. Catriona Matthew . . . . .9 18. Se Ri Pak . . . . . . . . . .10 19. Na Yeon Choi . . . . . . .10 20. Shanshan Feng . . . . . . .7 21. Pornanong Phatlum . .12 22. Eun-Hee Ji . . . . . . . . . .11 23. Gerina Piller . . . . . . . .11 24. Morgan Pressel . . . . . .11 25. Meena Lee . . . . . . . . .11 26. Karine Icher . . . . . . . . .10 27. Suzann Pettersen . . . . .8 28. Amy Yang . . . . . . . . . . .9

Money $877,756 $808,782 $663,466 $648,099 $589,473 $554,044 $488,111 $485,632 $470,615 $451,753 $432,776 $400,854 $339,140 $329,239 $307,731 $279,140 $240,717 $237,938 $233,031 $221,836 $219,043 $205,344 $204,262 $199,681 $198,653 $182,565 $181,320 $178,631

SPORTS

29. Julieta Granada . . . . . .11 30. Yani Tseng . . . . . . . . . .10 31. Sandra Gal . . . . . . . . .10 32. Mirim Lee . . . . . . . . . . .8 33. Hee Young Park . . . . .12 34. Sarah Jane Smith . . . . .9 35. Brittany Lang . . . . . . . .11 36. Haru Nomura . . . . . . . .10 37. Mi Hyang Lee . . . . . . .10 38. P.K. Kongkraphan . . . .11 39. Caroline Masson . . . . .12 40. Line Vedel . . . . . . . . . . .8 41. Jodi Ewart Shadoff . . .10 42. Mina Harigae . . . . . . . .11 43. Christina Kim . . . . . . . . .8 44. Thidapa Suwannapura 11 45. Katherine Kirk . . . . . . .12 46. Dewi Claire Schreefel .10 47. Dori Carter . . . . . . . . . . .8 48. Jennifer Johnson . . . . .10 49. Sun Young Yoo . . . . . .11 50. Tiffany Joh . . . . . . . . . .10

Men’s golf

$166,324 $165,282 $151,431 $141,010 $135,782 $131,771 $127,109 $125,963 $119,048 $117,288 $115,681 $112,754 $108,347 $107,396 $106,804 $102,007 $97,015 $90,936 $90,898 $90,188 $89,747 $87,263

Stanford’s Wilson wins NCAA golf title

HUTCHINSON, Kan. (AP) — Stanford golfer Cameron Wilson kept his cool after he missed a big putt in the third round of the NCAA tournament. His positive attitude paid off in a big way. Wilson won the national title when he birdied the third hole of a playoff against Georgia Tech’s Ollie Schniederjans, helping Stanford to the top score in team qualifying on Monday. “I think he was maybe the most overlooked player here,” Cardinal coach Conrad Ray said. “He’s had a great year. He’s a ballstriker, and if you want to find a ball-striker’s paradise, it’s Prairie Dunes.” Wilson bogeyed the final hole of his round, leading to the playoff with Schniederjans. But he managed to focus on the bigger picture on the big day. “The sun was setting, the fescue looked green everywhere, there’s (American) flags everywhere and Ollie is a friend,” Wilson said. “I was just thinking it was all really cool.” Wilson’s winning birdie came at the par-5 17th. Stanford led team qualifying with a score of 13 under, securing the top seed for Tuesday morning’s match-play quarterfinals. Alabama and LSU tied for second at 4 under and were the only other teams to break par. Wilson began the day in first place at 6 under. He had a one stroke lead over teammate Patrick Rodgers, who was looking to break Tiger Woods’ school record for victories in a season. But Rodgers bogeyed three straight holes, starting at 12. The left-handed Wilson was steady in shooting an even-par 70. After a bogey at 3 and birdie at 5, he parred 10 straight holes. Wilson just missed on birdie putts on Nos. 11, 15 and 16, but he insisted he never grew frustrated. “I was a little unlucky,” he said, “but those are all tough holes so par is a good score.” Schniederjans pulled even with a birdie on 17. His third round featured six birdies, two bogeys and a double bogey. “It was a terrible double on 5 and then I three-putted 9,” he said. “But I just stayed focused on the next hole.” Wilson’s approach shot from 135 yards on No. 18 was short — “The rough grabbed by club,” he said — and he could not convert the par opportunity. Wilson and Schniederjans returned to No. 18 to start the playoff. Both reached the green in two, and Wilson had a birdie putt slide by the hole. Then on No. 10, it was Schniederjans’ turn to face a birdie putt for the victory. “It was just a tough putt to read, especially with the shadows,” Schniederjans said. “I hit it right where I wanted. Just a tough read.” On No. 17, Schniederjans pulled his drive into the tall native grass left of the fairway. “An awful lie,” he said. “I basically swung my 8-iron as hard as I could. I was very happy to hit it down the fairway.” Wilson’s third shot, a wedge from about 40 yards short of the steeply elevated green, was key. It took two skips and stopped 7 feet below the hole. “That’s a shot I like,” he said, “a shot I work on all the time.” And this time, he made the putt that secured the title. “I was a little nervous,” he said, “but more than anything I was really excited.”

MLB

American League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .30 22 New York . . . . . . . . . .27 23 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .26 23 Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .23 29 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .21 29 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .28 19 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .26 27 Kansas City . . . . . . . .24 26 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .23 25 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .24 28 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .31 20 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .28 22 Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 25 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .25 25 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .20 32

Pct GB .577 — .540 2 1 .531 2 ⁄2 .442 7 .420 8

Pct GB .596 — .491 5 .480 5 1⁄2 .479 5 1⁄2 .462 6 1⁄2

Pct GB .608 — .560 2 1⁄2 .510 5 .500 5 1⁄2 .385 11 1⁄2

Sunday’s Games Toronto 3, Oakland 1 Texas 12, Detroit 4 Baltimore 4, Cleveland 2 Tampa Bay 8, Boston 5 N.Y. Yankees 7, Chicago White Sox 1 L.A. Angels 4, Kansas City 3 San Francisco 8, Minnesota 1 Houston 4, Seattle 1 Monday’s Games Boston 8, Atlanta 6 Baltimore 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings Chicago White Sox 6, Cleveland 2

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Tuesday, May 27 GOLF 3 p.m. TGC — NCAA, Division I playoffs, match play semifinals, at Hutchinson, Kan. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 5 p.m. ESPN — Boston at Atlanta 8 p.m. ESPN — Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers NBA BASKETBALL 7 p.m. TNT — Playoffs, conference finals, Game 4, San Antonio at Oklahoma City NHL HOCKEY 6 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, conference finals, N.Y. Rangers at Montreal SOCCER 5:45 p.m. ESPN2 — MLS, New York at Kansas City 7:55 p.m. ESPN2 — Men’s national teams, exhibition, United States vs. Azerbaijan, at San Francisco TENNIS 3 a.m. ESPN2 — French Open, second round, at Paris

SCOREBOARD

Texas 7, Minnesota 2 Oakland 10, Detroit 0 Seattle 5, L.A. Angels 1 N.Y. Yankees 6, St. Louis 4, 12 innings Toronto 10, Tampa Bay 5 Houston 9, Kansas City 2 Tuesday’s Games Tampa Bay (Cobb 1-1) at Toronto (Buehrle 8-1), 5:07 p.m. Boston (Lester 4-6) at Atlanta (Harang 4-4), 5:10 p.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 5-2) at Milwaukee (Garza 2-4), 6:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 2-3) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 4-0), 6:10 p.m. Houston (McHugh 2-3) at Kansas City (Guthrie 2-3), 6:10 p.m. Texas (Darvish 4-2) at Minnesota (P.Hughes 5-1), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 1-1) at St. Louis (Lynn 5-2), 6:15 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 6-1) at Oakland (Gray 51), 8:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Weaver 5-3) at Seattle (Elias 33), 8:10 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Houston at Kansas City, 12:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 5:07 p.m. Atlanta at Boston, 5:10 p.m. Baltimore at Milwaukee, 6:10 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 6:10 p.m. Texas at Minnesota, 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at St. Louis, 6:15 p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 8:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 8:10 p.m.

National League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .28 22 Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 25 Washington . . . . . . . .25 26 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .22 26 New York . . . . . . . . . .22 28 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .30 22 St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .28 23 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . .23 27 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .22 27 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .19 30 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L San Francisco . . . . . .32 19 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .28 24 Colorado . . . . . . . . . .27 24 San Diego . . . . . . . . .23 29 Arizona . . . . . . . . . . .21 32

Pct GB .560 — .519 2 1 .490 3 ⁄2 .458 5 .440 6

Pct GB .577 — .549 1 1⁄2 .460 6 .449 6 1⁄2 1 .388 9 ⁄2

Pct GB .627 — .538 4 1⁄2 .529 5 .442 9 1⁄2 .396 12

Sunday’s Games Arizona 2, N.Y. Mets 1, 1st game Milwaukee 7, Miami 1 L.A. Dodgers 6, Philadelphia 0 Washington 5, Pittsburgh 2 San Francisco 8, Minnesota 1 San Diego 4, Chicago Cubs 3 N.Y. Mets 4, Arizona 2, 2nd game Atlanta 7, Colorado 0 St. Louis 4, Cincinnati 0 Monday’s Games Boston 8, Atlanta 6 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Mets 3 Miami 3, Washington 2 Baltimore 7, Milwaukee 6, 10 innings Chicago Cubs 8, San Francisco 4 N.Y. Yankees 6, St. Louis 4, 12 innings Philadelphia 9, Colorado 0 L.A. Dodgers 4, Cincinnati 3 Arizona 7, San Diego 5 Tuesday’s Games Colorado (J.De La Rosa 5-3) at Philadelphia (Hamels 1-2), 5:05 p.m. Miami (H.Alvarez 2-3) at Washington (Treinen 0-2), 5:05 p.m. Boston (Lester 4-6) at Atlanta (Harang 4-4), 5:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Volquez 2-4) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 3-3), 5:10 p.m. Baltimore (W.Chen 5-2) at Milwaukee (Garza 2-4), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Phelps 1-1) at St. Louis (Lynn 5-2), 6:15 p.m. San Diego (Stults 2-5) at Arizona (Miley 35), 7:40 p.m. Cincinnati (Simon 6-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 7-1), 8:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 1-0) at San Francisco (Hudson 4-2), 8:15 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Pittsburgh at N.Y. Mets, 11:10 a.m. Chicago Cubs at San Francisco, 1:45 p.m. Colorado at Philadelphia, 5:05 p.m.

Golf scores

Miami at Washington, 5:05 p.m. Atlanta at Boston, 5:10 p.m. Baltimore at Milwaukee, 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at St. Louis, 6:15 p.m. San Diego at Arizona, 7:40 p.m. Cincinnati at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m.

NASCAR

NASCAR Sprint Cup Leaders By The Associated Press Through May 25 Points 1, Jeff Gordon, 432. 2, Matt Kenseth, 421. 3, Kyle Busch, 408. 4, Carl Edwards, 408. 5, Dale Earnhardt Jr., 394. 6, Jimmie Johnson, 388. 7, Joey Logano, 378. 8, Brian Vickers, 365. 9, Brad Keselowski, 361. 10, Ryan Newman, 361. 11, Greg Biffle, 351. 12, Kevin Harvick, 345. 13, Kyle Larson, 344. 14, Denny Hamlin, 340. 15, Austin Dillon, 334. 16, Paul Menard, 328. 17, Kasey Kahne, 324. 18, A J Allmendinger, 314. 19, Aric Almirola, 312. 20, Clint Bowyer, 309. Money 1, Dale Earnhardt Jr., $3,155,674. 2, Brad Keselowski, $2,971,705. 3, Jamie McMurray, $2,907,065. 4, Jeff Gordon, 5, Jimmie Johnson, $2,879,056. $2,817,431. 6, Denny Hamlin, $2,700,486. 7, Kevin Harvick, $2,686,110. 8, Joey Logano, $2,684,341. 9, Matt Kenseth, $2,565,120. 10, Kyle Busch, $2,497,233. 11, Greg Biffle, $2,174,619. 12, Paul Menard, $2,094,323. 13, Brian Vickers, $2,039,684. 14, Austin Dillon, $2,028,917. 15, Carl Edwards, $2,010,329. 16, Clint Bowyer, $1,984,788. 17, Tony Stewart, $1,961,850. 18, Ricky Stenhouse Jr., $1,936,600. 19, Kyle Larson, $1,898,485. 20, Aric Almirola, $1,838,072.

NBA

NBA Playoff Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Miami 3, Indiana 1 May 18: Indiana 107, Miami 96 May 20: Miami 87, Indiana 83 May 24: Miami 99, Indiana 87 May 26: Miami 102, Indiana 90 May 28: at Indiana, 6:30 p.m. x-May 30: at Miami, 6:30 p.m. x-June 1: at Indiana, 6:30 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 2, Oklahoma City 1 May 19: San Antonio 122, Oklahoma City 105 May 21: San Antonio 112, Oklahoma City 77 May 25: Oklahoma City 106, San Antonio 97 May 27: at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. May 29: at San Antonio, 7 p.m. x-May 31: at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m. x-June 2: at San Antonio, 7 p.m.

NFL

Redskins promote Bruce Allen to president, GM

ASHBURN, Va. (AP) — Bruce Allen is now officially upgraded to president and general manager of the Washington Redskins. Previously, Allen held the GM title but was an executive vice president. In a press release issued by the team on Monday, owner Dan Snyder says “I think the world of Bruce Allen and giving him both titles is appropriate.” Allen was hired by the Redskins in December 2009, after spending time with the Buccaneers and Raiders in the NFL, as well as USFL clubs. Last week, Allen said in a letter to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid that the team’s nickname is “respectful” toward Native Americans. That followed half the U.S. Senate publicly urging NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell to change the club’s name, saying it is a racist slur.

NHL

NHL Playoff Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) CONFERENCE FINALS

PGA-Colonial Scores The Associated Press Sunday At Colonial Country Club Fort Worth, Texas Purse: $6.4 million Yardage: 7,204; Par: 70 Final (x-won on third playoff hole) x-Adam Scott (500), $1,152,000 . . . . . . . 71-68-66-66—271 Jason Dufner (300), $691,200 . . . . . . . . 67-69-69-66—271 Freddie Jacobson (163), $371,200 . . . . . 67-71-67-67—272 Nicholas Thompson (163), $371,200 . . . 69-68-69-66—272 David Lingmerth (93), $216,960 . . . . . . . 72-69-66-66—273 Ryan Palmer (93), $216,960 . . . . . . . . . . 69-69-68-67—273 John Senden (93), $216,960. . . . . . . . . . 71-68-66-68—273 Brendon Todd (93), $216,960 . . . . . . . . . 69-69-67-68—273 David Toms (93), $216,960 . . . . . . . . . . . 72-66-65-70—273 Kevin Chappell (68), $153,600 . . . . . . . . 68-73-63-70—274 Hideki Matsuyama (68), $153,600 . . . . . 69-70-64-71—274 Michael Thompson (68), $153,600 . . . . . 73-66-69-66—274 Jimmy Walker (68), $153,600 . . . . . . . . . 67-68-69-70—274 Brian Davis (54), $102,400 . . . . . . . . . . . 68-67-70-70—275 Graham DeLaet (54), $102,400 . . . . . . . 69-70-68-68—275 Dustin Johnson (54), $102,400 . . . . . . . . 65-70-74-66—275 Chris Kirk (54), $102,400 . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-64-67-71—275 Jordan Spieth (54), $102,400 . . . . . . . . . 67-69-70-69—275 Chris Stroud (54), $102,400 . . . . . . . . . . 70-64-69-72—275 Bo Van Pelt (54), $102,400 . . . . . . . . . . . 67-68-70-70—275 Bud Cauley (46), $58,453 . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-69-69-68—276 David Hearn (46), $58,453 . . . . . . . . . . . 67-69-74-66—276 George McNeill (46), $58,453 . . . . . . . . . 68-72-68-68—276 Tim Clark (46), $58,453. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67-68-69-72—276 Bill Haas (46), $58,453 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-68-69-69—276 Russell Knox (46), $58,453. . . . . . . . . . . 71-70-66-69—276 Marc Leishman (46), $58,453 . . . . . . . . . 69-68-67-72—276 Ben Martin (46), $58,453 . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-68-69-69—276 William McGirt (46), $58,453. . . . . . . . . . 72-67-67-70—276 Chad Campbell (38), $37,200 . . . . . . . . . 69-66-68-74—277 Brendon de Jonge (38), $37,200 . . . . . . 70-68-70-69—277 Harris English (38), $37,200 . . . . . . . . . . 66-70-73-68—277 Brice Garnett (38), $37,200. . . . . . . . . . . 67-66-74-70—277 Brian Harman (38), $37,200 . . . . . . . . . . 69-67-68-73—277 Billy Hurley III (38), $37,200 . . . . . . . . . . 71-67-70-69—277 Martin Laird (38), $37,200. . . . . . . . . . . . 70-69-69-69—277 Heath Slocum (38), $37,200 . . . . . . . . . . 69-69-69-70—277 Robert Allenby (30), $26,240 . . . . . . . . . 68-70-68-72—278 Jerry Kelly (30), $26,240 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-71-69-68—278 Danny Lee (30), $26,240 . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-69-68-70—278 Louis Oosthuizen (30), $26,240 . . . . . . . 72-68-67-71—278 Michael Putnam (30), $26,240 . . . . . . . . 70-71-68-69—278 Robert Streb (30), $26,240 . . . . . . . . . . . 66-68-74-70—278 Josh Teater (30), $26,240 . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-71-70-69—278 Trevor Immelman (24), $18,304 . . . . . . . 69-71-68-71—279 Matt Jones (24), $18,304 . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-67-73-69—279 Andrew Loupe (24), $18,304. . . . . . . . . . 75-65-68-71—279 Bryce Molder (24), $18,304. . . . . . . . . . . 70-70-67-72—279 Jeff Overton (24), $18,304 . . . . . . . . . . . 70-71-70-68—279 Brandt Snedeker (24), $18,304. . . . . . . . 70-66-73-70—279 Jim Furyk (18), $15,061 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-69-71-71—280 Daniel Summerhays (18), $15,061 . . . . . 69-71-73-67—280 Aaron Baddeley (18), $15,061 . . . . . . . . 68-67-71-74—280 Ken Duke (18), $15,061 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67-72-69-72—280 Charley Hoffman (18), $15,061. . . . . . . . 70-68-69-73—280 Tim Wilkinson (18), $15,061 . . . . . . . . . . 66-71-69-74—280 Brian Gay (13), $14,336 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-69-72-69—281 J.J. Henry (13), $14,336 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-70-68-73—281 Justin Leonard (13), $14,336 . . . . . . . . . 69-72-70-70—281 Ricky Barnes (10), $13,952. . . . . . . . . . . 68-71-73-70—282 Steve Flesch (10), $13,952 . . . . . . . . . . . 71-70-69-72—282 Hunter Mahan (10), $13,952 . . . . . . . . . . 66-71-70-75—282 Jeff Curl, $13,440 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-69-71-72—283 Tim Herron (6), $13,440 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-69-71-71—283 Sean O’Hair (6), $13,440 . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-69-70-75—283 John Rollins (6), $13,440 . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-72-69-73—283 Cameron Tringale (6), $13,440 . . . . . . . . 70-70-67-76—283 Scott Langley (3), $12,992 . . . . . . . . . . . 71-70-74-69—284 Kyle Stanley (3), $12,992 . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-68-73-70—284 Jonathan Byrd (1), $12,672. . . . . . . . . . . 70-70-73-72—285 Davis Love III (1), $12,672 . . . . . . . . . . . 72-69-74-70—285 Vijay Singh (1), $12,672 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-73-69-75—285 Zach Johnson (1), $12,416 . . . . . . . . . . . 70-71-69-76—286 Briny Baird (1), $12,288 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-70-72-74—287 Boo Weekley (1), $12,160. . . . . . . . . . . . 71-69-74-74—288

Roswell Daily Record EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers 3, Montreal 1 May 17: N.Y. Rangers 7, Montreal 2 May 19: N.Y. Rangers 3, Montreal 1 May 22: Montreal 3, N.Y. Rangers 2, OT May 25: N.Y. Rangers 3, Montreal 3, OT May 27: at Montreal, 6 p.m. x-May 29: at N.Y. Rangers, 6 p.m. x-May 31: at Montreal, 6 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE Los Angeles 2, Chicago 1 May 18: Chicago 3, Los Angeles 1 May 21: Los Angeles 6, Chicago 2 May 24: Los Angeles 4, Chicago 3 May 26: at Los Angeles, 7 p.m. May 28: at Chicago, 6 p.m. x-May 30: at Los Angeles, 7 p.m. x-June 1: at Chicago, 6 p.m.

PGA

PGA Tour FedExCup Leaders By The Associated Press Through May 25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Points Money 1. Jimmy Walker . . . . . .2,239 $4,722,075 2. Bubba Watson . . . . .1,858 $4,557,079 3. Matt Kuchar . . . . . . .1,571 $3,464,302 4. Dustin Johnson . . . .1,481 $3,678,413 5. Jordan Spieth . . . . . .1,393 $3,304,226 6. Patrick Reed . . . . . . .1,364 $3,038,426 7. Harris English . . . . . .1,327 $2,606,972 8. Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . .1,306 $2,511,293 9. Brendon Todd . . . . . .1,162 $2,309,823 10. Zach Johnson . . . . .1,138 $2,303,003 11. Jim Furyk . . . . . . . .1,117 $2,854,698 12. John Senden . . . . .1,080 $2,163,404 13. Matt Every . . . . . . .1,051 $2,102,826 14. Adam Scott . . . . . . .1,025 $2,248,650 15. Webb Simpson . . . .1,001 $2,118,756 16. Ryan Moore . . . . . . . .995 $2,245,980 17. Graham DeLaet . . . . .954 $2,071,196 18. Kevin Stadler . . . . . . .936 $1,931,352 19. Gary Woodland . . . . .928 $2,029,249 20. Kevin Na . . . . . . . . . .914 $1,734,628 21. Martin Kaymer . . . . . .909 $2,318,602 22. Charles Howell III . . .904 $1,724,465 23. Ryan Palmer . . . . . . .897 $1,769,371 24. Will MacKenzie . . . . .880 $1,782,250 25. Matt Jones . . . . . . . . .874 $1,759,235 26. Seung-Yul Noh . . . . .854 $1,703,173 27. Brian Stuard . . . . . . .853 $1,653,919 28. J.B. Holmes . . . . . . . .845 $1,865,322 29. Keegan Bradley . . . . .838 $1,684,860 30. Sergio Garcia . . . . . .802 $2,047,867 31. Russell Knox . . . . . . .793 $1,247,924 32. Russell Henley . . . . .786 $1,635,328 33. Charley Hoffman . . . .769 $1,402,719 34. Jason Day . . . . . . . . .769 $2,010,360 35. Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . .739 $1,288,368 36. Rory McIlroy . . . . . . .732 $1,787,840 37. Jason Dufner . . . . . . .726 $1,517,848 38. Daniel Summerhays .700 $1,204,253 39. Justin Rose . . . . . . . .675 $1,696,179 40. Steven Bowditch . . . .673 $1,356,069 41. Chris Stroud . . . . . . .670 $1,324,082 42. Luke Donald . . . . . . .669 $1,310,651 43. Ryo Ishikawa . . . . . . .668 $1,252,374 44. Pat Perez . . . . . . . . .660 $1,265,150 45. Brian Harman . . . . . .658 $1,159,394 46. Chesson Hadley . . . .649 $1,237,706 47. Jason Bohn . . . . . . . .643 $1,280,214 48. Marc Leishman . . . . .633 $1,279,622 49. Jason Kokrak . . . . . .632 $1,071,033 50. Hideki Matsuyama . . .625 $1,167,868 51. Freddie Jacobson . . .617 $1,199,235 52. Rickie Fowler . . . . . . .615 $1,514,610 53. Graeme McDowell . . .605 $1,358,530 54. George McNeill . . . . .584 $1,135,703 55. Cameron Tringale . . .584 $1,009,694 56. Scott Brown . . . . . . . .583 $1,009,907 57. Scott Stallings . . . . . .580 $1,216,000 58. Robert Garrigus . . . . .558 $917,446 59. Jeff Overton . . . . . . . .539 $1,010,374 60. Rory Sabbatini . . . . . .534 $985,677 61. Vijay Singh . . . . . . . .533 $841,635 62. David Hearn . . . . . . .526 $945,423 63. K.J. Choi . . . . . . . . . .522 $998,612 64. Jonas Blixt . . . . . . . . .522 $1,222,080 65. Jerry Kelly . . . . . . . . .516 $946,100 66. Hunter Mahan . . . . . .513 $975,743 67. Ben Martin . . . . . . . . .509 $901,476 68. Kevin Chappell . . . . .508 $766,733 69. Ian Poulter . . . . . . . . .489 $1,169,644 70. Brendan Steele . . . . .487 $793,473 71. Justin Hicks . . . . . . . .481 $758,284 72. Martin Flores . . . . . . .477 $931,430 73. Boo Weekley . . . . . . .467 $778,861 74. Robert Streb . . . . . . .459 $893,003 75. Kevin Streelman . . . .456 $825,439 76. Erik Compton . . . . . .454 $863,233 77. Justin Leonard . . . . . .448 $745,279 78. Billy Horschel . . . . . .443 $813,413 79. Brendon de Jonge . . .441 $704,484 80. Stuart Appleby . . . . . .438 $727,967 81. Scott Langley . . . . . .428 $711,596 82. Charl Schwartzel . . . .420 $876,371 83. Andrew Svoboda . . . .419 $803,001 84. Michael Thompson . .417 $757,950 85. Brian Davis . . . . . . . .417 $737,310

LPGA-Airbus Classic Scores The Associated Press Sunday At Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, Magnolia Grove, The Crossings Mobile, Ala. Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,584; Par: 72 Final Jessica Korda, $195,000. . . . . . . . . . . . . 67-67-69-65—268 Anna Nordqvist, $120,962. . . . . . . . . . . . 68-66-66-69—269 Charley Hull, $70,089 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65-67-71-67—270 Michelle Wie, $70,089 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-66-66-67—270 Catriona Matthew, $70,089 . . . . . . . . . . . 64-67-70-69—270 Jenny Shin, $44,703 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67-68-69-67—271 Lexi Thompson, $33,224. . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-65-71-66—272 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $33,224 . . . . . . . . . . 69-67-68-68—272 Eun-Hee Ji, $33,224 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66-70-68-68—272 Brittany Lincicome, $24,139 . . . . . . . . . . 69-69-69-66—273 Belen Mozo, $24,139 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-68-67-68—273 So Yeon Ryu, $24,139 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-67-67-69—273 Stacy Lewis, $24,139 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66-70-66-71—273 Chella Choi, $20,398. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-68-71-66—274 Carlota Ciganda, $17,748 . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-69-69-66—276 Paula Creamer, $17,748 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-71-66-68—276 Julieta Granada, $17,748 . . . . . . . . . . . . 67-70-71-68—276 Jennifer Johnson, $17,748 . . . . . . . . . . . 71-69-68-68—276 Hannah Jun Medlock, $14,182 . . . . . . . . 73-66-71-67—277 Paz Echeverria, $14,182 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-71-67-69—277 Xi Yu Lin, $14,182 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-68-71-69—277 Pornanong Phatlum, $14,182 . . . . . . . . . 69-68-71-69—277 Se Ri Pak, $14,182 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67-69-71-70—277 Haru Nomura, $14,182 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-65-70-71—277 Paola Moreno, $14,182 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-71-66-72—277 Kelly Tan, $10,646. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-70-71-66—278 Ariya Jutanugarn, $10,646 . . . . . . . . . . . 70-71-69-68—278 Karine Icher, $10,646 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-69-69-69—278 Na Yeon Choi, $10,646 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-69-69-71—278 Hee Young Park, $10,646 . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-66-73-71—278 Christina Kim, $10,646 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-66-70-72—278 Katherine Kirk, $10,646. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-67-68-73—278 Suzann Pettersen, $10,646. . . . . . . . . . . 66-70-69-73—278 Pernilla Lindberg, $8,146 . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-70-70-68—279 Azahara Munoz, $8,146 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-72-70-68—279 Jennifer Song, $8,146 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-70-71-70—279 Mina Harigae, $8,146 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-66-69-71—279 Brittany Lang, $8,146 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-70-69-72—279 Sarah Kemp, $6,755 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-69-72-67—280 Thidapa Suwannapura, $6,755 . . . . . . . . 72-69-72-67—280 Felicity Johnson, $6,755 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-67-75-69—280 Meena Lee, $6,755 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-70-69-69—280 Chie Arimura, $5,642. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-67-72-69—281 Nicole Castrale, $5,642 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67-73-71-70—281 Jennifer Kirby, $5,642 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-68-74-70—281 Dori Carter, $5,642 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-68-72-71—281 Moira Dunn, $5,642. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67-70-73-71—281 Sydnee Michaels, $4,532 . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-72-70-70—282 Perrine Delacour, $4,532. . . . . . . . . . . . . 68-73-70-71—282 Moriya Jutanugarn, $4,532 . . . . . . . . . . . 73-69-69-71—282 Mi Hyang Lee, $4,532 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-69-70-71—282 Karrie Webb, $4,532 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-69-71-71—282 Katie M. Burnett, $4,532 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-70-68-72—282 Ashleigh Simon, $4,532 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-70-67-73—282 Jaye Marie Green, $3,775. . . . . . . . . . . . 71-71-74-67—283 Lindsey Wright, $3,775 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-72-70-71—283 Brooke Pancake, $3,775 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-68-71-72—283 Jacqui Concolino, $3,775 . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-71-69-73—283 Veronica Felibert, $3,444 . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-70-68-74—284 Lisa McCloskey, $3,279 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74-68-73-70—285 Giulia Sergas, $3,279 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-68-72-72—285 Katy Harris, $3,146 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-70-73-71—286 Reilley Rankin, $3,146 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-71-72-72—286 Ilhee Lee, $3,013. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-69-75-72—287 Jenny Suh, $3,013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-72-73-73—287 Sandra Changkija, $2,881. . . . . . . . . . . . 70-72-73-73—288 Becky Morgan, $2,881 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75-67-73-73—288 Jane Rah, $2,781 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-71-72-76—289 Tiffany Joh, $2,715 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-71-75-74—291 Jaclyn Sweeney, $2,649 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-70-77-78—295

Senior PGA Championship Scores The Associated Press Sunday At Harbor Shores Golf Course

86. Lee Westwood . . . . .410 87. William McGirt . . . . . .409 88. Nicholas Thompson .396 89. Morgan Hoffmann . . .395 90. Tim Clark . . . . . . . . . .392 91. Billy Hurley III . . . . . .384 92. John Huh . . . . . . . . . .381 93. Brice Garnett . . . . . . .376 94. Brian Gay . . . . . . . . .374 95. Mike Weir . . . . . . . . .370 96. Bryce Molder . . . . . . .369 97. Briny Baird . . . . . . . . .366 98. Phil Mickelson . . . . . .361 99. Danny Lee . . . . . . . . .360 100. Retief Goosen . . . . .354 101. David Toms . . . . . . . .351 102. Luke Guthrie . . . . . . .349 103. Robert Allenby . . . . .348 104. Henrik Stenson . . . . .346 105. Kevin Kisner . . . . . . .339 106. Camilo Villegas . . . . .338 107. Ernie Els . . . . . . . . . .337 108. Brandt Snedeker . . .335 109. James Hahn . . . . . . .334 110. Stewart Cink . . . . . . .330 111. Michael Putnam . . . .328 112. Louis Oosthuizen . . .326 113. Ricky Barnes . . . . . .323 114. Carl Pettersson . . . . .320 115. Bo Van Pelt . . . . . . . .318 116. Aaron Baddeley . . . .317 117. Sang-Moon Bae . . . .312 118. Greg Chalmers . . . . .310 119. James Driscoll . . . . .310 120. Tim Wilkinson . . . . . .296 121. Jim Renner . . . . . . . .294 122. Chad Collins . . . . . . .291 123. David Lingmerth . . . .291 124. Trevor Immelman . . .289 125. Charlie Beljan . . . . . .288 126. John Merrick . . . . . . .283 127. Paul Casey . . . . . . . .280 128. Josh Teater . . . . . . . .270 129. Richard H. Lee . . . . .266 130. Roberto Castro . . . . .266 131. G. Fndz-Castano . . .263 132. Martin Laird . . . . . . .262 133. Andrew Loupe . . . . .257 134. Jonathan Byrd . . . . .257 135. Tyrone Van Aswegen 252 136. Ken Duke . . . . . . . . .248 137. Wes Roach . . . . . . . .247 138. Geoff Ogilvy . . . . . . .246 139. J.J. Henry . . . . . . . . .243 140. Spencer Levin . . . . .241 141. Peter Hanson . . . . . .241 142. Nick Watney . . . . . . .234 143. Charlie Wi . . . . . . . . .230 144. Andres Romero . . . .230 145. Sean O’Hair . . . . . . .228 146. Shawn Stefani . . . . .225 147. Ted Potter, Jr. . . . . . .214 148. Ben Crane . . . . . . . .210 149. Y.E. Yang . . . . . . . . .209 150. Jhonattan Vegas . . .196

Transactions

$988,375 $652,782 $675,387 $597,260 $661,882 $624,374 $639,445 $518,711 $593,154 $836,614 $672,639 $616,316 $649,562 $558,357 $559,955 $594,647 $521,302 $405,984 $699,873 $550,088 $337,260 $801,294 $677,035 $503,011 $573,138 $326,052 $688,720 $396,674 $503,200 $458,162 $539,571 $477,135 $474,651 $358,339 $537,553 $672,792 $380,097 $516,146 $395,695 $513,051 $396,385 $517,536 $289,827 $450,338 $472,650 $381,993 $336,969 $445,776 $417,426 $311,753 $398,878 $371,663 $437,457 $340,741 $264,260 $398,631 $305,270 $294,963 $288,586 $352,059 $451,943 $239,638 $310,974 $237,565 $253,065

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Recalled C Ryan Lavarnway from Pawtucket (IL). Optioned RHP Alex Wilson to Pawtucket. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Activated 2B Omar Infante off the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Casey Coleman to Omaha (PCL). MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Called up INF Irving Falu from Nashville (PCL). Optioned RHP Jimmy Nelson to Nashville. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Placed OF Brandon Guyer on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Alex Colome from Charlotte (FSL). National League CHICAGO CUBS — Activated OF Justin Ruggiano from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Ryan Kalish to Iowa (PCL). NEW YORK METS — Fired hitting coach Dave Hudgens. Released RHP Jose Valverde. Placed OF Eric Young Jr. on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 25. Recalled OF Matt den Dekker from Las Vegas (PCL). FOOTBALL National Football League WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Promoted Bruce Allen to president and general manager. Canadien Football League WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS —Signed LB Jesse Briggs and DB Derek Jones. Arena Football League ORLANDO PREDATORS — Acquired DL T.J. Fatinikun from Portland to complete an earlier trade. HOCKEY National Hockey League BUFFALO SABRES — Signed F Nicolas Deslauriers to a two-year contract. WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Promoted Brian MacLellan to senior vice president and general manager. Named Barry Trotz coach.

Benton Harbor, Mich. Purse: TBA ($2 million in 2013) Yardage: 6,852; Par: 71 Final Colin Montgomerie (756), $378,000 . . . . 69-69-68-65—271 Tom Watson (454), $227,000 . . . . . . . . . 70-68-72-65—275 Jay Haas (244), $121,500. . . . . . . . . . . . 69-71-70-67—277 Bernhard Langer (244), $121,500. . . . . . 70-68-69-70—277 Mark Brooks (136), $68,000 . . . . . . . . . . 68-71-74-65—278 Bart Bryant (136), $68,000 . . . . . . . . . . . 71-67-70-70—278 Joe Durant (136), $68,000 . . . . . . . . . . . 65-75-74-64—278 David Frost (136), $68,000 . . . . . . . . . . . 72-69-69-68—278 Marco Dawson (102), $51,000 . . . . . . . . 72-72-64-71—279 Jeff Maggert (102), $51,000 . . . . . . . . . . 69-72-72-66—279 Kiyoshi Murota (102), $51,000 . . . . . . . . 73-65-70-71—279 Russ Cochran (0), $43,000 . . . . . . . . . . . 70-69-72-69—280 Steve Pate (0), $38,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-67-72-70—281 Kenny Perry (0), $38,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-75-66-70—281 Stephen Ames (0), $28,167 . . . . . . . . . . 71-68-72-71—282 Mark Calcavecchia (0), $28,167 . . . . . . . 71-72-69-70—282 Bill Glasson (0), $28,167. . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-76-68-69—282 Mike Goodes (0), $28,167. . . . . . . . . . . . 70-74-73-65—282 Peter Senior (0), $28,167 . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-73-71-68—282 Jeff Sluman (0), $28,167. . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-72-67-70—282 John Cook (0), $19,500. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-72-68-73—283 Gary Hallberg (0), $19,500 . . . . . . . . . . . 70-70-70-73—283 Scott Simpson (0), $19,500. . . . . . . . . . . 71-69-72-71—283 Joey Sindelar (0), $19,500 . . . . . . . . . . . 69-72-72-70—283 Greg Bruckner (0), $15,300 . . . . . . . . . . 69-71-73-71—284 Dan Forsman (0), $15,300 . . . . . . . . . . . 66-73-75-70—284 Carl Mason (0), $15,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-71-70-70—284 Gene Sauers (0), $15,300. . . . . . . . . . . . 73-73-68-70—284 Duffy Waldorf (0), $15,300 . . . . . . . . . . . 70-70-72-72—284 Jim Carter (0), $12,833 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-71-68-74—285 Steve Lowery (0), $12,833 . . . . . . . . . . . 69-73-71-72—285 John Riegger (0), $12,833 . . . . . . . . . . . 78-67-70-70—285 Bobby Clampett (0), $10,600 . . . . . . . . . 74-72-70-71—287 Bob Friend (0), $10,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-72-69-74—287 Kohki Idoki (0), $10,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76-70-70-71—287 Nick Job (0), $10,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69-76-68-74—287 Craig W. Thomas (0), $10,600 . . . . . . . . 71-74-70-72—287 Steen Tinning (0), $10,600 . . . . . . . . . . . 72-66-74-75—287 Joe Daley (0), $7,667 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-74-73-69—288 Frank Esposito, Jr. (0), $7,667 . . . . . . . . 69-73-74-72—288 Brad Faxon (0), $7,667 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67-74-73-74—288 Anders Forsbrand (0), $7,667 . . . . . . . . . 69-73-71-75—288 Fred Funk (0), $7,667 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-73-73-69—288 Jeff Hart (0), $7,667 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77-67-71-73—288 P.H. Horgan III (0), $7,667 . . . . . . . . . . . 68-75-78-67—288 Sonny Skinner (0), $7,667 . . . . . . . . . . . 72-73-70-73—288 Willie Wood (0), $7,667. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-72-71-74—288 Billy Andrade (0), $5,329. . . . . . . . . . . . . 75-70-73-71—289 Brian Henninger (0), $5,329 . . . . . . . . . . 74-71-73-71—289 Tom Lehman (0), $5,329 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-75-74-70—289 James Mason (0), $5,329 . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-72-71-73—289 Mark McNulty (0), $5,329 . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-74-69-76—289 Andy Oldcorn (0), $5,329 . . . . . . . . . . . . 74-72-73-70—289 Wes Short, Jr. (0), $5,329 . . . . . . . . . . . . 74-70-71-74—289 Chip Beck (0), $4,650 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-74-71-73—290 Roger Chapman (0), $4,650 . . . . . . . . . . 71-72-74-73—290 Todd McCorkle (0), $4,650 . . . . . . . . . . . 69-76-74-71—290 Tom Pernice Jr. (0), $4,650 . . . . . . . . . . . 72-70-72-76—290 Michael Allen (0), $4,350. . . . . . . . . . . . . 78-68-72-73—291 Don Berry (0), $4,350 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-73-69-76—291 Philip Golding (0), $4,350 . . . . . . . . . . . . 70-73-73-75—291 Mark Mouland (0), $4,350 . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-75-75-70—291 Esteban Toledo (0), $4,350 . . . . . . . . . . . 72-74-74-71—291 Bob Gilder (0), $4,150. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-73-72-74—292 Ronan Rafferty (0), $4,150 . . . . . . . . . . . 75-71-75-71—292 Craig Stevens (0), $4,150 . . . . . . . . . . . . 71-74-71-76—292 Hale Irwin (0), $4,038 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75-70-74-74—293 Tim Parun (0), $4,038 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-73-75-73—293 David J. Russell (0), $4,038 . . . . . . . . . . 72-73-79-69—293 Gary Wolstenholme (0), $4,038 . . . . . . . 72-70-76-75—293 Tracy Phillips (0), $3,963. . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-72-78-72—294 Stuart L. Smith (0), $3,963 . . . . . . . . . . . 71-75-73-75—294 Jon Corliss (0), $3,913 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76-70-76-73—295 Bobby Wadkins (0), $3,913 . . . . . . . . . . . 71-75-75-74—295 Mark Wiebe (0), $3,875. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73-73-76-74—296 Angel Franco (0), $3,850 . . . . . . . . . . . . 72-74-76-75—297 Rick Fehr (0), $3,825 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75-70-76-77—298 Bruce Fleisher (0), $3,800. . . . . . . . . . . . 72-73-79-76—300


SPORTS

Roswell Daily Record

HISI

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

B3

Continued from Page B1

terfinals, Heat 25-12 in the championship semifinals and Wet N Dirty 32-7 in the championship bracket final before the win over Goose Crew in the title game. It was the third appearance by Blackout in the title game in five years. They won the title in 2010 by beating Rage and finished second to the Penguins in 2012. Goose Crew, out of Miami, was in the championship game for the third time in four years. They won the title last year over OutKast and won the 2011 crown by beating Skin. Goose Crew reached the title game out of the consolation bracket after falling in their first game on Saturday. On Sunday, Goose Crew beat the Freaks 25-0, Dream Team 26-24, Heat 36-20, OutKast 36-7 and Wet N Dirty 27-25. Jacksonville, Fla.-based Wet N Dirty finished third. Defending runner-up OutKast was fourth, and Yikes and Heat tied for fifth. This year’s tournament attracted nearly 600 teams and approximately 4,000 players to Roswell, making it the largest in the event’s history. Record inter n Brian DeGruchy contributed to this report.

Shawn Naranjo Photo

Blackout’s Fred McDonald, right, slips past the outstretched arm of Goose Crew’s Michael Ramos (99) during the championship game of the Show Me The Money division at the 19th annual Hike It & Spike It flag football tournament, Sunday. Blackout beat Goose Crew 32-7 to win the championship for the second time in five years.

Hunter-Reay holds off Castroneves to win Indy 500

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — R yan Hunter-Reay peeked around Helio Castroneves, then reversed course and dipped inside for a daredevil pass and the lead in the Indianapolis 500. Castroneves charged back to the front, winning a drag race down the frontstretch at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. And then, in a stirring wheel-to-wheel battle between a pair of bright yellow cars, Hunter-Reay seized the lead once more Sunday as the drivers hurtled across the Yard of Bricks with a single, 2.5-mile lap remaining. With nobody in front of him, Hunter-Reay used the entire track to keep Castroneves in his rearview mirror. He nipped him at the line by less than half a car length, denying his Brazilian rival a chance at history Sunday and becoming the first American in eight years to win the Indy 500. “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing” had lived up to its nickname. “This race was ridiculously close and competitive,” Hunter -Reay said. “Just glad I picked the right time to go.” The finish was well worth the wait — to the fans who watched 150 laps of caution-free racing, to the drivers who bided their time unsure of when they should charge to the front and to HunterReay, who finally got to drink the celebratory milk in his seventh try. He beat Castroneves by just 0.060 seconds — only the 1992 race had a closer finish when Al Unser Jr. beat Scott Goodyear by 0.043 seconds. “I’m a proud American boy, that’s for sure,” Hunter-Reay said in Victory Lane before he was joined by his wife and son. “I’ve watched this race since I was sitting in diapers on the floor in front of the TV. My son did it today. He

Rangers

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and Eduardo Escobar had two hits and an RBI for the Twins, who have lost four in a row since climbing two games over .500 on May 21. After Kevin Correia (26) set down nine straight, Roughned Odor and Shin-Soo Choo lined back-to-back two-out singles in the fifth. Andrus followed with a double to the gap in left-center that scored both runners and broke a 2-all tie. “It’s two-out hits. That’s been the theme this season,” Correia said. “That one pitch or two pitches a game, you make that one pitch and it’s a world of difference.” Gimenez made it 6-2 with a two-run double down the line in left in the eighth off reliever Jared Burton and Texas was on its way to another win. “We just got off to a bad start,” Texas manager Ron Washington said. “I’m so happy that we’re finally putting it together as a group.” Minnesota had its opening day outfield back together for the first time since the first week of the

Ryan Hunter-Reay celebrates after winning the Indianapolis 500, Sunday. watched me here. I’m thrilled. This is American history, this race. This is American tradition.” He was serenaded by chants of “USA! USA!” as he made his way around the post-race celebrations. He was joined by son Ryden, born shortly after Hunter-Reay’s 2012 IndyCar championship and wearing a miniature version of his father’s firesuit as his parents kissed the bricks. Castroneves, trying to become the fourth driver to win a fourth Indianapolis 500, settled for second. He needed several moments to compose himself, slumped in his car, head down and helmet on. The Brazilian said a caution with 10 laps to go broke his rhythm as

season. Josh Willingham and Oswaldo Arcia were activated from the disabled list after Sunday’s game and started alongside center-fielder Aaron Hicks. But the re-enforcements weren’t enough to overcome Tepesch, who didn’t allow a runner past second base after the second inning. Twins manager Ron Gardenhire knows it might take a few more atbats before Willingham and Arcia are able to help lift Minnesota’s struggling offense. “That can be a huge part of it, driving the baseball and let them get a few at-bats here,” Gardenhire said. “It takes a little time, a little different pitching up here than down there.” Tepesch dominated Triple-A Round Rock after getting demoted in spring training and has a 2.95 ERA in three big-league starts since being recalled May 14. “He’s shown these three starts what he’s capable of doing,” Washington said. “But you can’t hang your hat on a couple of outings. If he’s around here healthy, he’s going to get many outings. I just want him to be consistent.”

red flag came out so track workers could clean debris and repair a track wall. “It was a great fight,” he smiled. “I tell you what, I was having a great time. Unfortunately, second. It’s good, but second sucks, you know what I mean?” Marco Andretti finished third and Carlos Munoz was fourth as Andretti Autosport had three cars in the top four, as well as the winner. Kurt Busch, also in a Honda for Andretti, finished sixth in his first race of the day. He left immediately for a flight after the race and arrived about an hour later in North Carolina for Sunday night’s Coca-Cola 600, where his attempt

Heat

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When holding a 3-1 lead, Miami is 8-0 in Game 5s over the past four postseasons. Much as he did Sunday, Indiana coach Frank Vogel used the big brother-little brother analogy with his team, trying any way to urge the Pacers to break through against the team that has ended their season in each of the past two years. “He’s got to make a decision at some point in his life, that no matter what, we’re not going to lose this fight anymore,” Vogel said, likening the Pacers to the little brother in that scenario. “We’re at that point.” The fight isn’t over. But it was awfully one-sided for long stretches of Game 4. “You can never get too high, you can never get too low in the postseason,” James said. “You’ve got to stay even-keeled. You got to try to get better every single day, every single game improve. “When you do that and you go out and play the type of game that you’re capable of playing, you can be satisfied with the results and that’s what we’ve built over the years.” Miami outscored Indiana 31-20 in the third quarter and increased the lead to 23 in the fourth before the Pacers used a 15-3 run to make things rather interesting. Stephenson had a layup with 3:20 left that would have gotten Indiana within nine — but it was waved off after he

AP Photo

to become the second driver to complete 1,100 miles in both races on the same day ended when his car blew an engine late. Busch ended up completing about 907 miles. “All in all, I’m very pleased. I cannot believe the execution of this team,” Busch said before hustling away for a helicopter ride to his waiting plane. “I tried to enjoy it. My throat’s real dry because I was smiling the whole time and the fresh air was coming in my mouth.” Marco Andretti appeared to have a shot at the win, but after the final restart he never could mix it up with Hunter-Reay and Castroneves as the two leaders

was called for fouling Wade on his way to the basket. Stephenson scored with 1:31 left to make it 99-90, but James snuffed out any comeback hopes right there. His three-point play nine seconds later pushed the lead back to 12, and the Heat were moments away from a 3-1 lead. Miami was without Chris Andersen, inactive because of a bruised left thigh. The Heat also tweaked their starting lineup, with Rashard Lewis in and Udonis Haslem out. “We have high-quality NBA professionals on our team that can sit all year and when their number is called they can come in and produce,” James said. Bosh scored the game’s first eight points, making a pair of 3-pointers and ending a series-long funk. He had scored exactly nine points in each of the first three games of these East finals and was held under 10 points in each of his last seven playoff games against Indiana. But he came out flying, and probably not coincidentally, the Heat finally had a good start. “I felt that was going to happen today,” James said. “I told him he (was) going to have a great game, and we got of f to a fast start because of him.” They won the first quarter for the first time in the series, going up 2719 and helped in part by a late 3pointer from Shane Battier — with replays showing Vogel moved down the sideline toward the Heat forward as he shot from near the Indiana bench.

swapped position four times in the final five laps. So certain his son would be a contender for the victory Sunday, Michael Andretti was just as thrilled with Hunter-Reay’s win. “Ryan’s just been a huge part of our team, a great guy, a friend,” said Michael Andretti, who won for the third time as a team owner. “He deserves it. He deserves to have his face on that trophy. If it couldn’t be Marco, he’s the next guy I wanted.” A year ago, Hunter -Reay was passed for the lead with three laps remaining and went on to finish third as the race finished under caution. He was leading Sunday and had control of the race until Townsend Bell’s crash brought out the red flag. Hunter-Reay figured he was a sitting duck as the leader, his chances over. “I can’t get a break,” he lamented on his team radio. But after swapping the lead with Castroneves three times, including a dramatic inside move in Turn 3, Hunter-Reay made the final and decisive pass as the two cars took the white flag. “At the end of the day there’s stupid and bravery, and I think we were right there on the edge, both of us,” Castroneves said. “I’m glad we both come out in a good way. I’m sad it did not come out the way I wanted.” The race went a record 150 laps without a caution as the pace zipped along and Busch at one point had no worries at all about getting to North Carolina in time for NASCAR’s longest event of the year. Then a Charlie Kimball spin brought out the first yellow, a crash by Scott Dixon led to a second caution and a risky threewide move on the next restart caused pole-sitter Ed Carpenter and James Hinchcliffe to wreck.

Nothing was to Indiana’s liking. Hibbert and Stephenson combined for zero points and six fouls in the half. The Heat didn’t have a turnover until the second quarter. Miami shot 10 more free throws in the half. Bosh and James combined for 32 points. And despite it all, the Pacers were down only 49-44 at halftime. After getting hand-checked eight times by Hill on a play late in the half, James went down the lane for a reverse dunk while getting fouled to put Miami up by 10. But the Pacers answered, a 3pointer by George just before the break getting them within five and sealing a half that could have been much worse. If there was any doubt, Miami erased it quickly after halftime. James scored five points in a 7-0 spurt to open the second half, and the Heat were on their way. NOTES: It was the 74th playoff game where James had at least 25 points, five rebounds and five assists, passing Michael Jordan for the most in NBA history. ... George passed Reggie Miller for the highest scoring single-season (including playoffs) by a player in Pacers history. Miller had 2,078 in 1989-90; George entered Game 4 with 2,077 points. ... Wednesday will be Indiana’s 100th game of the season. Only two other Pacers teams have logged that many; they played 105 in 1999-2000 and 100 last season.


B4 Tuesday, May 27, 2014

SPORTS

Johnson gets first win of year in Coca-Cola 600

CONCORD, N.C. (AP) — About the only one not worried about Jimmie Johnson’s victory drought this season was the Sprint Cup defending champion. After his dominating show this weekend at Charlotte Motor Speedway, Johnson gave his competitors plenty to worry about. Johnson reached Victory Lane for the first time this season at the Coca-Cola 600, finishing off a dominating week at a track many have called “Jimmie’s House.” “It’s great to win, but believe me, and I promise you, all the hype and all the concer n and worry, that was elsewhere. That wasn’t in my head,” Johnson said. Now, Johnson can think about his record-breaking seventh Cup

win at Charlotte, about his 13th straight NASCAR season with a victory or about his fourth 600 victory to trail only Darrell Waltrip’s five in the series’ longest race. And maybe throw a scare into opponents that Johnson’s run at top isn’t over yet. “They know we are awake,” Johnson said. “Hopefully, the 48 is heading that way and we can give other people something to think about.” This time, Johnson swept past Matt Kenseth nine laps from the end and was never pressured after that. Johnson earned the pole Thursday night, was strong at practice Saturday and led 165 of 400 laps Sunday. Kevin Harvick, who led 100 laps, was second. Kenseth finished third with Carl Edwards

fourth. Jamie McMurray, the AllStar race winner last weekend at the track, was fifth. Kurt Busch’s attempt at motorsports history ended with 129 laps to go when he blew an engine. Busch finished sixth in the Indianapolis 500, but could not complete the 600 and become just the second racer ever — Tony Stewart was the first — to navigate all 1,100 miles on auto racing’s biggest weekend. Harvick had won two of the past three 600s and led 100 laps this time. He fell back in the latter stages as he dealt with car problems and could not get back to the front. “We needed a 700-mile race to get back to where we needed to be,” Harvick said. Brad Keselowski held the lead

Roswell Daily Record

and appeared to have out-pitted Johnson’s No. 48 group with a final stop 55 laps from the end. But a vibration in the Penske machine sent Keselowski back to the pits and a lap down. Much of the pre-race attention was centered on whether Busch or points leader Jef f Gordon would make it to the starting line. Busch because of his 850-mile trek South from Indiana and Gordon because of back spasms that cropped up Thursday after qualifying and were still severe enough Saturday for him to leave the track early after just a few laps of practice. But both were there when the green flag dropped, although Busch’s arrival was far more dramatic with the helicopter circling the track and landing on the

infield close to the start-finish line about an hour before the race began. Gordon maintained his points lead by 11 over second-place Kenseth. Danica Patrick had hopes of a strong showing after qualifying fourth, her best starting spot of the season. But like Busch, she too, was out early with a blown engine 119 laps from the end. She was 39th, her poorest finish in three 600s. Dale Earnhardt Jr. came into this one with seven top 10s in 11 races and the hope he could finally win a points race at his beloved home track. He led 13 laps late in the race before he had engine problems as well and faded from contention. He ended 19th.

MLB: Blue Jays win seventh straight behind Encarnacion

TORONTO (AP) — Edwin Encarnacion hit his 13th home run in May, Dioner Navarro and Steve Tolleson added back-to-back shots and the Toronto Blue Jays won their seventh straight game Monday, beating the Tampa Bay Rays 10-5. Melky Cabrera had three hits and three RBIs as the AL East-leading Blue Jays won for the 12th time in 14 games. Toronto has hit at least one home run in nine straight games and leads the majors with 73 this season, including an ML-best 41 in May. David DeJesus, Desmond Jennings and James Loney all hit solo homers for the Rays, whose season-high four-game winning streak was snapped. Drew Hutchison wasn’t at his best, but benefited from strong run support to win his career-best third straight start. Hutchison (4-3) allowed five runs and seven hits in five innings, matched a seasonworst with four walks and struck out none. Athletics 10, Tigers 0 OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Kyle Blanks homered in his home debut at the Coliseum and Derek Norris capped Oakland’s fivehomer day with a grand slam and the Athletics snapped a season-long four-game losing streak with a win over Detroit. Yoenis Cespedes, Brandon Moss and Josh Donaldson also homered. Tommy Milone (3-3) allowed four hits in 6 2⁄3 scoreless innings. He is 3-0 with a 1.03 ERA in his past four starts. The A’s got four solo homers against Drew Smyly (2-3) to win the first meeting of the season against the team that eliminated them in Game 5 of the division series the past two postseasons.

Astros 9, Royals 2 KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — George Springer homered in his fourth straight game and went 4 for 4 with three RBIs and scored five runs in Houston’s victory over Kansas City. The Astros have won three straight, matching their longest winning streak this season, and snapped a six-game losing streak to the Royals. Springer led off the eighth with a home run off Louis Coleman, his fifth homer in four games. He is the first Houston rookie to homer in four straight games. Lance Berkman was the last Astro to homer in four straight games, July 4-8, 2010. Springer also had two doubles and became the first Astro to score five runs in a game since Cody Ransom on Sept. 24, 2007, against St. Louis. Springer extended his hitting streak to eight games, and is 8 for 16 with 11 RBIs and 10 runs in the past five games. Scott Feldman (3-2) held the Royals to two runs and eight hits over six innings. Royals rookie starter Yordano Ventura was led off the field by a trainer in the third inning after experiencing discomfort in his elbow. The hard-throwing right-hander is scheduled for a MRI on Tuesday. Ventura (2-5) went 2 2⁄3 innings, allowing five runs and seven hits and three walks.

Mariners 5, Angels 1 SEATTLE (AP) — Chris Young pitched shutout ball until Albert Pujols homered in the seventh inning, Robinson Cano had three hits and two RBIs to raise his average to .332, and the Seattle Mariners beat the Los Angeles Angels. Young (4-2) kept the Angels hitless until Kole Calhoun singled with one out in the sixth. An inning later, Pujols hit his 506th career home run, pulling within three of Gary Sheffield for 24th on baseball’s all-time homer list. The Mariners scored five times in the first two innings off Tyler Skaggs (4-2). Three of the runs were unearned runs. White Sox 6, Indians 2 CHICAGO (AP) — Conor Gillaspie hit three doubles while going 4 for 4, Dayan Viciedo had a three-run homer and the Chicago White Sox beat Cleveland. Gillaspie scored twice and drove in a run. He became the first White Sox player with three doubles in a game since Paul Konerko on May 26, 2012, against the Indians. Viciedo connected in the third inning against Josh Tomlin (3-2). Jose Quintana (3-4) pitched six effective innings. Scott Downs got four outs for his first save.

NATIONAL LEAGUE Red Sox 8, Braves 6 ATLANTA (AP) — David Ortiz homered and drove in four runs as the Boston Red Sox ended their 10-game losing streak, rallying from a five-run deficit to defeat the Atlanta Braves Monday. The defending World Series champions trailed 6-1 after the fourth inning of the interleague matchup, with starter Clay Buch-

holz walking a career -high eight in only three-plus innings. But Ortiz tied it by hitting a three-run homer off Ervin Santana in the fifth. With Red Sox fans at Turner Field chanting “Papi! Papi!” the World Series MVP then gave Boston the lead with a bases-loaded sacrifice fly off Ian Thomas (1-2) in the seventh. Following pregame declarations of confidence from manager John Farrell and general manager Ben Cherington, the Red Sox came back to end their worst skid since an 11-game slide in 1994.

Dodgers 4, Reds 3 LOS ANGELES (AP) — Hyun-Jin Ryu took a perfect game into the eighth inning — one day after teammate Josh Beckett threw a nohitter — and Los Angeles held on to beat Cincinnati. The Reds hit only three balls out of the infield before Todd Frazier’s leadoff double in the eighth. That followed a three-run seventh by the Dodgers in which Ryu ran the bases and scored. The left-hander from South Korea came close to making the Dodgers the first team in major league history with consecutive no-hitters. Beckett won 6-0 in Philadelphia on Sunday. Los Angeles pitchers tossed a club-record 17 straight hitless innings dating to Saturday, when Paul Maholm got it started against the Phillies. Cincinnati scored three times in the eighth, but right fielder Yasiel Puig made a key defensive play when he cut off Billy Hamilton’s two-run double in the gap. The relay home held Skip Schumaker at third, and Kenley Jansen struck out Brandon Phillips with the bases loaded to preserve a 4-3 lead. Jansen also worked the ninth, retiring Devin Mesoraco with two on for his 15th save. Ryu (5-2) was charged with three runs and three hits in 7 1⁄3 innings, improving to 6-0 in six starts against the Reds. He struck out seven and walked none while winning for the first time at Dodger Stadium this season. Johnny Cueto (4-4) allowed four hits and four runs — one earned — in 6 1⁄3 innings. Yankees 6, Cardinals 4, 12 inn. ST. LOUIS (AP) — Brian Roberts hit a tiebreaking single in a three-run 12th inning after Brett Gardner’s leaping catch at the left-field fence kept New York alive in the 11th. Pinch-hitter Alfonso Soriano and Brendan Ryan each added an RBI for the Yankees, who took the opener of a three-game interleague series for their third straight win. Alfredo Aceves (1-2) worked two scoreless innings and David Robertson earned his 11th save in 12 chances. Jon Jay had an RBI double in the 12th for the Cardinals, who lost for the third time in 12 games. A standing-room crowd of 47,311, the

third-largest at 9-year-old Busch Stadium, showed up to see an opponent making only its second appearance in St. Louis since losing to the Cardinals in the 1964 World Series. Cardinals pitchers retired 20 of 21 batters before the 12th, when Randy Choate (0-2) faced five batters and four reached safely.

Cubs 8, Giants 4 SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Jeff Samardzija struck out a season-high 10 for his first win since last August, snapping a 16-start winless streak for Chicago. Samardzija (1-4) allowed six hits and walked none in seven-plus innings. He also had an RBI double during a three-run fourth. The right-hander entered with six no-decisions in his first 10 outings this year despite leading the majors with a 1.46 ERA. Nate Schierholtz hit his first home run of the season, and Darwin Barney drove in two runs to help the Cubs come back from a 3-1 deficit. Pablo Sandoval homered and drove in three runs for the Giants, who had won four in a row. Yusmeiro Petit (3-2) gave up four runs and six hits in five innings while filling in for injured starter Matt Cain.

Pirates 5, Mets 3 NEW YORK (AP) — Gaby Sanchez tagged the Mets again, hitting a tiebreaking single in the ninth inning and a pinch-hit homer in the eighth that sparked Pittsburgh’s comefrom-behind victory. The Mets announced after the game that they had fired hitting coach Dave Hudgens. They also cut reliever Jose Valverde, who gave up Sanchez’s go-ahead hit. Sanchez upped his average against the Mets to .324 and has 34 RBIs against New York, his best totals against any NL team. He homered off Scott Rice while hitting for Ike Davis, who was making his return to Citi Field after being traded to the Pirates in midApril. Valverde (1-1) was booed off the field after allowing pinch-hitter Jose Tabata’s tying single in the eighth. Valverde returned for the ninth and was even worse. Tony Watson (5-0) pitched an inning for the win. Mark Melancon got his 10th save.

Marlins 3, Nationals 2 WASHINGTON (AP) — Giancarlo Stanton hit his NL-leading 15th home run and also doubled and singled in his latest power performance for Miami at Nationals Park. Stanton doubled and scored in the first inning, then launched a long two-run homer in the third. Stanton is hitting .333 (43 for 129) with 14 home runs and 27 RBIs in Washington since his career began in 2010. He has homered at Nationals Park more than any other visiting player during that time. The Marlins improved to 7-17 on the road;

they’re 20-8 at home. Nathan Eovaldi (4-2) pitched 6 1⁄3 innings, giving up two runs and three hits. Steve Cishek worked the ninth for his 11th save. Adam LaRoche homered for the Nationals, who had won 12 of their last 13 against Miami at home. Tanner Roark (3-3) went seven innings.

Phillies 9, Rockies 0 PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Ryan Howard had five RBIs and Kyle Kendrick pitched into the seventh inning to snap his 10-game losing streak for Philadelphia. A day after Dodgers right-hander Josh Beckett threw a no-hitter against the Phillies, leadoff man Ben Revere started with a single for the first of Philadelphia’s 12 hits. Kendrick (1-5) allowed six hits over 6 2⁄3 innings to earn his first win since last Aug. 6, a span of 16 winless starts. His best performance in a while came against the top offense in the majors. The Rockies are first in runs (262) and batting average (.291). Jhoulys Chacin (0-4) gave up four runs and seven hits in five-plus innings. He has lost five straight decisions dating to last season.

Orioles 7, Brewers 6, 10 inn. MILWAUKEE (AP) — Jonathan Schoop hit two home runs and newly acquired Nick Hundley singled in the go-ahead run in the 10th inning to lift Baltimore to victory in the interleague contest. Down 6-4 with two outs in the ninth, the Orioles rallied off Milwaukee closer Francisco Rodriguez. Schoop’s second homer cut it to one. After pinch-hitter Delmon Young singled, Nick Markakis hit a game-tying double. With two outs in the 10th, J.J. Hardy doubled off Rob Wooten (1-2) and scored on Hundley’s single. Darren O’Day (2-0) pitched a scoreless inning of relief to get the win. Zach Britton pitched out of trouble in the 10th, to record his third save in three opportunities.

Diamondbacks 7, Padres 5 PHOENIX (AP) — A.J. Pollock hit a two-run homer on the first pitch he saw with two outs in the ninth inning to give Arizona a victory over San Diego. Cliff Pennington was hit by a pitch and pinch-hitter Eric Chavez hit into a fielder’s choice ahead of Pollock’s shot to center off Kevin Quackenbush (0-1). Yonder Alonso homered and Everth Cabrera launched a three-run shot off starter Brandon McCarthy in the fifth to give the Padres a 4-2 lead. Brad Ziegler (1-1) pitched two scoreless innings for the win.

Golf capsules: Scott captures win at Colonial FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Adam Scott made a 7-foot birdie putt on the third hole of a playoff Sunday to end his first week as the world’s No. 1 player with a victory at Colonial. Jason Dufner, who made a 25-foot birdie putt on No. 18 in regulation, slid a 40-footer past when he and Scott played the 18th hole for the second time during the playoff. Scott then made the 7footer for his 11th PGA Tour victory. The major champions parred No. 18 to start the playoff, then matched birdies at the 17th hole. Dufner, who won the PGA Championship last year, hit his approach pin high on 17 to 4½ feet, but 2013 Masters champ Scott drained a 14-foot birdie before Dufner putted. Dufner and Scott both shot 4-under 66 to finish at 9 under, the highest winning score at Colonial since 1999. Scott replaced the injured Tiger Woods at the top of the ranking last Monday and will stay No. 1. Scott had to be in the top 13 at Colonial after

Henrik Stenson finished in a five-way tie for seventh place in the BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth. The win at Hogan’s Alley, which comes with $1,152,000 and a plaid jacket, made Scott the first player to win all four PGA Tour events in Texas. He is the 15th to win both the Byron Nelson Championship (2008) and the Colonial in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. Nicholas Thompson and Freddie Jacobson tied for third at 8 under. Thompson shot 66, a stroke better than Jacobson.

Airbus LPGA Classic MOBILE, Ala. (AP) — Jessica Korda won the Airbus LPGA Classic for her second victory of the year, birdieing four of the last five holes to break out of a tight pack. Korda made a breaking 15foot birdie putt on the par-4 18th for a 7-under 65 and a one-stroke victory over Anna Nordqvist. Also the winner in the season-opening event in the Bahamas, Korda played the back nine in 6-under 30 to finish at 20-under 268 on

The Crossings course. Nordqvist also birdied the 18th and finished with a 69. Michelle Wie, 18-year -old Charley Hull and 44-year-old Catriona Matthew tied for third at 18 under. Wie and Hull shot 67, and Matthew had a 69. Second-ranked Stacy Lewis had a 71 to tie for 10th at 15 under. She needed a solo third or higher to take the top spot in the world from Inbee Park.

BMW PGA Championship VIRGINIA WATER, England (AP) — Rory McIlroy won the BMW PGA Championship, overcoming a seven-stroke deficit with a 6-under 66 for his first victory of the year. McIlroy had only one victory — in the Australian Open in December — in 18 months. He finished at 14-under 274 at Wentworth for a one-stroke victory over Ireland’s Shane Lowry (68). England’s Luke Donald (70) and Denmark’s Thomas Bjorn (75) tied for third at 12 under. Bjorn took a five-stroke lead into the round.

McIlroy won four days after the 25-year -old Norther n Irishman confir med the breakdown in his relationship with Danish tennis star Caroline Wozniacki.

Senior PGA Championship BENTON HARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Colin Montgomerie won the Senior PGA Championship, finishing with a 6under 65 for a four-stroke victory over 64-year -old Tom Watson. It marked Montgomerie’s first victory as senior, his first win in seven years and his first in an official event in the United States. He also claimed a senior major in his fifth attempt, something he didn’t accomplish in 71 majors in his regular tour days. The 51-year -old Scot finished at 13-under 261 at Harbor Shores. The victory was his first since he took the 2007 European Open for his 31st European Tour title. Watson also closed with a 65.


Roswell Daily Record

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: I’m a 32-year-old woman who is HIV-positive. My colleague — who is unaware of my status — recently introduced me to a relative of hers who is also lonely and looking for someone to settle down with. We “clicked” and seem to complement each other in every way, although we haven’t had any sexual encounter. My fear is, how do I disclose my status without being rejected? He seems to have big plans for us, which include settling down and having kids in the future. I am also worried that he might be angry with

my colleague and not believe that she is unaware of my status. Please help me get out of this dilemma. IN A SPOT IN SOUTH AFRICA

DEAR IN A SPOT: I’ll try, but there are no guarantees. Much depends upon the strength of this man’s feelings for you. It is very important that you have a frank discussion with him before the relationship goes any further. The fact that you are HIV-positive may be problematic, but it does not mean you cannot have a family together if you wish in the future. Medications and other medical interventions can help keep the virus from being transmitted to your children, and condoms can protect your partner. If you are upfront about your status, the chances are better that he will believe you when you tell him his relative was not aware that you have HIV when you were introduced. In a case like this, honesty is the best policy. #####

COMICS

DEAR ABBY: I have three grown sons, all educated, married and successful. Their wives are the daughters I never had, and I treasure them and their children. I’m blessed with three perfect grandchildren under the age of 5. The pr oblem is my sons. Although I raised them carefully with love, they are like teenagers. They constantly denigrate and fight with each other, and measure my time with them on a competitive scale. I no longer want to be involved with their bickering. Their dad, from whom I am separated, is not involved. This has created a sad cloud in my otherwise sunny life. I need some advice. TIED IN KNOTS IN INDIANAPOLIS DEAR TIED IN KNOTS: Have you told your sons how uncomfortable their sibling quibbling makes you? If you haven’t, you should. And if that doesn’t improve the situation, I suggest

you see them separately. And if that causes pr oblems, please don’t make it YOUR problem. #####

Family Circus

DEAR ABBY: Over the past 10 years or so, I have noticed a vast increase in people who talk while they are yawning. These “yawn-talkers” are not only rude, but also almost impossible to understand. I wouldn’t normally care, except that a lot of people do it where I work. Is it OK to tell them to stop yawn-talking? Or would I be the rude one in the scenario? WIDE AWAKE IN PENNSYLVANIA

DEAR WIDE AWAKE: It wouldn’t be rude to ask someone to repeat the statement because you wer e unable to understand what the person was trying to say. And, by the way, polite folks cover their mouths when they yawn to avoid spraying saliva on the person in front of them.

The Wizard of Id

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Dear Readers: How often does your cellphone ring, but you don’t recognize the number? Does it ring once but hang up before you answer? Before you call the number back, know that you could be the next victim of the one-ring CELLPHONE SCAM, according to the Federal Trade Commission. This scam counts on your curiosity, expecting you to call back the number to find out who called. As soon as you call the number, you are put on hold and charged international phone rates and by-minute rates. So, resist the urge to call back or even answer an unfamiliar number. Keep a close eye on your monthly phone bill! Heloise

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

#####

Dear Heloise: When painting a room with a roller, often you want to do a second coat, and that means waiting a good 12 hours or until the next day. Rather than cleaning the roller, we roll it out well, then wrap it in plastic wrap and put it into the freezer. The next day, we take it out to thaw and repaint the wall. We’ve never had a problem, because it works really well. Sally B. in Washington Dear Heloise: After numerous moves in our younger days, my husband and I developed a hint that really helps when moving from one home to another. I always had one large box that I labeled “Open Me First — Kitchen.” In it, I had the coffee maker, coffee, creamer, granola bars, paper plates, drink cups, a roll of paper towels, a set of sheets for the bed, towels for the bathroom, toilet paper and toiletries. I even put sleepwear and a change of clothes in the box, so no matter how late we finished moving in, we could shower and get a good night’s sleep. We can then have coffee and a light breakfast before we start on all the other unpacking the next day. Jude E. in Texas Dear Heloise: When sewing, I put one of the advertising magnets that come on the front of phone books under the ar m of my sewing machine, with the magnet side up, to the right of the needle and footplate. When you take out the pins as you sew, just put them on the magnet, and they will stay put until you can place them back in a box. Saves you from finding them on the floor with your bare feet! If you are working with one of the newer machines, be sure the magnet won’t interfere with the computers. Sharon B. in Pennsylvania Dear Heloise: If you are having trouble filling a double-sided medicine pillbox, you can use a large bag clip. With the lids fully open on both sides, slide the clip over the two rows of lids. After the pillboxes have been filled, remove the clip and close the lids. Ralph M. in Ohio

Garfield

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

B5


B6 Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Legals

Legals

Notice of Suit...

___________________________________________

___________________________________________

Publish May 13, 20, 27, 2014

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

No. D-504-CV-2013-00448

CITIFINANCIAL, INC., v.

Plaintiff,

MARJORIE J. SCARBROUGH, IF LIVING, IF DECEASED, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR LEGATEES OF MARJORIE J. SCARBROUGH, DECEASED, BENEFICIAL NEW MEXICO, INC. D/B/A BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE CO., THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARJORIE J. SCARBROUGH, DECEASED AND DEWEY D. HAMRICK, Defendants.

NOTICE OF SUIT

STATE OF NEW MEXICO to the above-named Defendants Marjorie J. Scarbrough, if living, if deceased, The Unknown Heirs, Devisees, or Legatees of Marjorie J. Scarbrough, deceased, The Unknown Spouse of Marjorie J. Scarbrough. GREETINGS:

You are hereby notified that the above-named Plaintiff has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled Court and cause, the general object thereof being to foreclose a mortgage on property located at 306 South Brown Rd, Roswell, NM 88201, Chaves County, New Mexico, said property being more particularly described as: Lots Sixteen, Seventeen, Eighteen, Nineteen and Twenty (16, 17, 18, 19 and 20) in Block Four (4) of Lynndale Heights, in the County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the official plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk's office on July 3, 1951 and recorded in Book B of plat records, Chaves County, New Mexico, at page 154.

Unless you serve a pleading or motion in response to the complaint in said cause on or before 30 days after the last publication date, judgment by default will be entered against you. THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC By: /s/ __Steven J. Lucero__ Electronically Filed Steven J. Lucero 20 First Plaza NW, Suite 602 Albuquerque, NM 87102 Telephone: (505) 848-9500 Fax: (505) 848-9516 Attorney for Plaintiff NM13-01724_FC01

Legals

Notice of Sale... Publish May 20, 27, June 3, 10, 2014

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

No. D-504-CV-2013-00697

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., vs.

CLASSIFIEDS

Plaintiff,

TERRILL D. LUGINBILL A/K/A TERRILL DUANE LUGINBILL, SANDRA S. LUGINBILL A/K/A SANDRA SUE LUGINBILL, AND CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that on June 18, 2014, at the hour of 11:30 am the undersigned Special Master, or her designee, will, at the west steps entrance of the Chaves County Courthouse, at Fifth Judicial District Court, 400 North Virginia Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88202, sell all of the rights, title and interest of the above-named Defendants, in and to the hereinafter described real estate to the highest bidder for cash. The property to be sold is located at 8 Jardin Court, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, (if there is a conflict between the legal description and the street address, the legal description shall control) and is more particularly described as follows: LOT 34 OF LINDA VISTA EAST SUBDIVISION, IN THE CITY OF ROSWELL, COUNTY OF CHAVES AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT FILED IN THE CHAVES COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE ON JANUARY 10, 1983 AND RECORDED IN BOOK 1 OF PLAT RECORDS, AT PAGE 18,

including any improvements, fixtures, and attachments, such as, but not limited to, mobile homes. Subject to all taxes, utility liens and other restrictions and easements of record, and subject to a one (1) month right of redemption by the Defendants upon entry of an order approving sale. The foregoing sale will be made to satisfy an in rem foreclosure judgment rendered by this Court in the above-entitled and numbered cause on May 5, 2014, being an action to foreclose a mortgage on the above-described property. The Plaintiff's judgment is $173,850.95, and the same bears interest at the rate of 5.8750% per annum, which accrues at the rate of $27.98 per diem, commencing on March 18, 2014, with the Court reserving entry of final judgment as to said Defendants Terrill D. Luginbill and Sandra S. Luginbill for the amount due after foreclosure sale, for costs and attorney fees, plus interest as may be assessed by the Court. The Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale all of its judgment amount and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. The sale may be postponed and rescheduled at the discretion of the Special Master. The Court's decree, having duly appointed its Special Master to advertise and immediately offer for sale the subject real estate and to apply the proceeds of sale, first to the costs of sale and the Special Master's fees, then to pay the above-described judgment, interest, and costs of sale, and to pay unto the registry of the Court any balance remaining to satisfy future adjudication of priority mortgage holders; NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that in the event that said property is not sooner redeemed, the undersigned will as set forth above, offer for sale and sell to the highest bidder for cash or equivalent, the lands and improvements described above for the purpose of satisfying, in the adjudged order of priorities, the judgment described herein and decree of foreclosure together with any additional costs and attorney fees, costs of advertisement and publication, a reasonable receiver and Special Master's fee to be fixed by the Court. The total amount of the judgment due is $173,850.95, plus interest to and including date of sale of $2,602.14 for a total judgment plus interest of $176,453.09. Sale is subject to the entry of an order of the Court approving the terms and conditions of this sale. Witness my hand this 9th day of May, 2014.

/s/ Bernadette F. Gutierrez _______________ BERNADETTE F. GUTIERREZ, Special Master PO Box 91988 Albuquerque, NM 87199-1988 Telephone: (505) 433-4576 Facsimile: (505) 433-4577 E-mail: bernadette@ancillaryls.com

Public Auction...

Publish May 20, 27, 2014

Notice is hereby given that on June 5th, 2014 The U-Haul Co of New Mexico, will be offering for sale under the Statutory Lien Process, by public auction the following storage units. The goods to be sold are generally described as household goods. The terms of the sale will be cash only. U-Haul Co of New Mexico reserves the right to refuse any and all bids. The sale will be at Roswell U-Haul moving &Storage, 1309 South Virginia Roswell NM Storage Room: Contracted to: Lst Known Address Storage Room: Contracted to: Last Known address: Storage Room: Contracted to: Lst Known Address: Storage Room: Contracted to: Last Known address: Storage Room: Contracted to: Las Known Address:

107 Carmen E Loya 1605 S Jackson Roswell NM 88203

189 Tommy G Glass 1337 McCall Loop Trailer 78 Roswell NM 88203

207 Martin J. Molina 4302 Caulmet Rd. Roswell NM 88201

233 Maria Matta 1411 W Tilden Roswell NM 88203

245 Nicole Sanders 1 La Paloma Lane Roswell NM 88201

___________________________________________

First Amended Notice of Sale...

Publish May 20, 27, June 3, 10, 2014 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

No. D-504-CV-2010-00556

BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP, vs.

Plaintiff,

MARIA G. RAMIREZ, and if married, JOHN DOE A, (true name unknown), her spouse; and WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Successor by merger to Wells Fargo Financial Bank, Defendants.

FIRST AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on June 17, 2014, at the hour of 11:45 a.m., the undersigned Special Master will, at the south door of the Roswell Police Department, 128 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico, sell all the right, title and interest of the above-named Defendants in and to the hereinafter described real estate to the highest bidder for cash. The property to be sold is located at 112 South Pennsylvania Avenue, Roswell, and is situate in Chaves County, New Mexico, and is particularly described as follows: Lot 7 and the South 5 feet of Lot 6 in Block 47 of West Side Addition, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk's Office of January 1, 1891 and recorded in Book A of Plat Records, at Page 4.

THE FOREGOING SALE will be made to satisfy a judgment rendered by the above Court in the above entitled and numbered cause on July 27, 2011, being an action to foreclose a mortgage on the above described property. The Plaintiff's Judgment, which includes interest and costs, is $176,453.41 and the same bears interest at 6.0000% per annum from July 30, 2011, to the date of sale. The amount of such interest to the date of sale will be $30,572.35. The Plaintiff and/or its assignees has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. The sale may be postponed and rescheduled at the discretion of the Special Master. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Plaintiff and its attorneys disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property subject to, the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above described real property subject to a one month right of redemption. Electronically signed /s/ AD Jones AD Jones, Special Master P.O. Box 1180 Roswell, NM 88202-1180 (575) 622-8432

Roswell Daily Record Legals

__________________________________________________________________

HC-60 & RA-1368...

Publish May 13, 20, 27, 2014

NOTICE is hereby given that on May 5, 2014, Grassie Farms Inc. c/o Earl Grassie, 686 East Ojibwa Road, Dexter, New Mexico; filed Application No. HC-60 & RA-1368 et al, HC-82-A, HC-1, RA-5581 & RA-1419-A-A-Comb-A with the STATE ENGINEER for permit to combine and commingle 1,971.21 acre feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, where applicable, of Hagerman Canal (surface, shallow and artesian groundwater) and shallow and artesian groundwater diverted from the following described wells:

WELL NO. RA-1368 RA-1368-S RA-1368-S-2 RA-1368-S-3 RA-1368-S-5 RA-1368-S-6 RA-5154 RA-1418-A-A-S RA-10616

SUBDIVISION SW1/4SW1/4NW1/4 NW1/4NE1/4NE1/4 SW1/4NE1/4NE1/4 SW1/4NW1/4SW1/4 SW1/4NE1/4NE1/4 W1/2NW1/4 NW1/4SW1/4NW1/4 SW1/4SW1/4SW1/4 W1/2SW1/4NW1/4

SECTION 27 28 28 27 28 27 27 27 27

TOWNSHIP 13 S. 13 S. 13 S. 13 S. 13 S. 13 S. 13 S. 13 S. 13 S.

RANGE 26 E. 26 E. 26 E. 26 E. 26 E. 26 E. 26 E. 26 E. 26 E.

For the continued irrigation of up to 657.07 acres of land described as follows:

SUBDIVISION Part of W1/2 Part Part of E1/2NW1/4 Part of SW1/4NW1/4 Part of NE1/4NE1/4 Part of S1/2SE1/4 Part of S1/2S1/2

SECTION 26 27 26 27 28 27 27

TOWNSHIP 13 S. 13 S. 13 S. 13 S. 13 S. 13 S. 13 S.

RANGE 26E. 26E. 26E. 26E. 26E. 26E. 26E.

ACRES 85.10 384.90 35.10 8.10 37.80 26.87 79.20 657.07

Application is made to permanently combine and commingle the surface and groundwater rights described under State Engineer File Nos. HC-60 & RA-1368 et al, HC-82-A, HC-1, RA-5581 & RA-1419-A-A-Comb-A.

The above described points of diversion and places of use are located approximately 3 miles north of the Town of Hagerman, Chaves County, New Mexico.

Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (objection must be legible, signed, and include the writer's complete name, phone number and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment, you must specifically identify your water rights*; and/or (2) Public Welfare/Conservation of Water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must show how you will be substantially and specifically affected. The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with the State Engineer, 1900 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, within ten (10) days after the date of the last publication of this Notice. Facsimiles (faxes) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is hand-delivered or mailed and postmarked within 24-hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protests can be faxed to the Office of the State Engineer, (575) 623-8559. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 72 NMSA 1978.

Legals

____________________

Change of Name...

Publish 2014

May

20,

27,

5th JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES

IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Stephane Jo Gross,

GARAGE SALES

ANNOUNCEMENTS 025. Lost and Found

LIZZY IS LOST! Black and tan small Terrier mix, curly tail, lost in area of Cahoon Park. Please call 971-219-8896 REWARD!

Case No. CV-2014-246

NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME

TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 40-8-1 Sec. 40-8-3 through NMSA 1978, the PetiStephanie Jo tioner Gross will apply to the Honorable Charles C. Currier, District Judge of the 5th Judicial District at the Chaves County Courthouse at Roswell, New Mexico at 9:00 a.m. on the 14th day of July, 2014 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME from Stephane Jo Gross to Stephanie Jo Davis. KENNON CROWHURST District Court Clerk

By:/s/Sharon Lara Deputy Court Clerk Submitted By: /s/Stephanie Jo Gross Petitioner, Pro Se

LOST FEMALE German Shepherd, 10 mos. old, E. Grand Plains area. Generous reward for return. 505-239-3604

IF YOU see Sochi, Please Call 575-317-3905 Reward $100 FOUND LARGE dog, female, 19th St and Union area, Call to describe. 910-3949 LOST FORD keys, please return to Ford Dealership, Attention Charles.

INSTRUCTION

030. Education & Instructions

MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC Train gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-888-926-6073

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM CERTIFIED PATROL OFFICERS, Salary $20.41 – 25.62 hourly. Applications will be accepted until 4:00pm on Friday, May 30, 2014. Complete job description and applications at the Village of Ruidoso, 313 Cree Meadows Dr. Ruidoso, NM 88345. Phone 258-4343 or 1-877-700-4343. Fax 258-5848. Website www.ruidoso-nm.gov “Drugfree Workplace” EEOE.

045. Employment Opportunities

AmeriPride Linen and Apparel REQUISITION# 107336 CSR position Application open from April 28, 2014 to May 27, 2014. High School Diploma/GED, experience with route sales desired, ability to work directly with customers, build relationship with customers by providing resolutions to problems and complaints, clean driving record, ability to lift up to 50 lbs and pass a Department of Transportation drug test and physical. Competitive salary and benefits. Application must be filled out online at careerbuilders.com EOE EMPLOYEE

Roswell Daily Record is now taking applications for Route Delivery. Contact Circulation Department at 575-622-7730. Must have Driver’s License and good driving record. THE ROSWELL Daily Record is now accepting applications for the full time position of: OUTSIDE SALES The ideal candidate must possess excellent customer service skills, superior organizational skills and be a self-starter with a strong work ethic. This is a full time position with a great benefit package. Interested applicants please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Angie Love, 2301 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88201 or e-mail to: addirector@rdrnews.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! Tobosa Developmental Services is currently seeking Direct Care Support Staff for the Residential Department. Experience with developmentally disabled preferred but not required. Please submit current resume with completed application, police background check, copy of High School Diploma and driving record at 110 E. Summit, Roswell, NM 88203 or call (575)624-1025. Salary is negotiable based on experience and education level. Applications open until positions are filled. EOE NOW HIRING CDL Drivers for transport vacuum and kill truck in Loco Hills, NM area. Experience needed but not required. For more information call 575-677-3371.

045. Employment Opportunities

NEED CASH? Be your own boss & build your business at Blairs Monterey indoor market at 1400 W. 2nd. Booths start at $75/mo. Call 623-0136 THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD is currently accepting applications for the position of Pressman. This is a Part-time graveyard position, with weekend shifts. Applicants should be flexible with their schedule. For more information, and an application, please stop by the Roswell Daily Record Monday thru Friday 8am - 5pm.

No Phone Calls Accepted.

The Roswell Daily Record Circulation Department is currently accepting applications for the position of:

DISTRICT MANAGER

Basic Job Duties include: Carrier recruitment & supervision, delivery of routes when necessary, proficient phone skills and taking charge of customer issues as well as other office duties & responsibilites. Motivation to work with or without direct supervision, professional communication skills and an ambitious attitude a plus!! Bilingual prefered but not required. Must have valid driver’s license and insurance. Basic or advanced computer skills appreciated. Must be neat in appearance and work with a businesslike attitude. Experience in Circulation desired however training will be provided. All interested applicants can send, drop off or email your complete application & resume with references to: The Roswell Daily Record 2301 N. Main Roswell, NM 88201 - OR E-mail jdishman@rdrnews.com No Phone Call Please! Interviews will be not be held until all applications & resumes have been reviewed. “Don’t call us we’ll call YOU”

EOE. Background Check & Drug Testing will be conducted during the hiring process. Position will remain open until filled. LIVING STONE Associates. is offering a challenging position where your administrative skills and experience of accounting can affect the ability of an organization to exceed their goals and objectives. P/T •Extra income + Flexible schedule •Must have positive personality •Be Efficient and Dedicated

forward your resume to : livingstoneassociatesgrp@ gmail.com for consideration. Avon, Buy/Sell. I can help you build your business or team. Sandy 317-5079 ISR OPTOMETRIC OFFICE seeking receptionist for a 1/2 day/afternoon position. Duties include: answering phone, making appointments, checking in/out patients and general clerical duties. PO Box 1897, Unit #366 Roswell, NM 88202 L&F DISTRIBUTORS Seeks Delivery Driver Assistants Previous experience delivering product a plus. Good communication and customer service skills. Interested applicants apply at: L&F Distributors 2200 North Atkinson Roswell, NM 88201 575-622-0380 An Equal Opportunity employer

NEEDED DELIVERY Driver Monday through Friday. Driver must furnish own truck. For Details call 575-390-6226. THE TOWN of Dexter is currently accepting application for Life Guards during the summer month. Applicants must be at least 16 years of age and have Life Guard Certification with CPR and First Aid Certificates. Applicants must be highly motivated ethical, team oriented drug/substance free and be dedicated to serving the Town of Dexter. Please pick up and return completed applications at: Dexter Town Hall 115 E. 2nd Street Dexter, New Mexico 88230. Application will be accepted till May 30, 2014 @3pm The Town of Dexter is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a Drug/Alcohol-Free Environment.


Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities

IMMEDIATE OPENING Roswell Electrical contractor taking applications for Journeyman or 2yr Apprentices. Valid drivers license required. Apply in person at 309 N Virginia On-Site Safety Professional (Vaughn, NM) SEMA Construction Inc., a heavy highway contractor, has started a new project in Vaughn, NM located 40 miles south of Santa Rosa. There is an immediate opening for an On-Site Safety Professional.

The position requires safety experience and familiarity with highway and bridge construction; OSHA 1926 Standards; roadway and railroad worker protection regulations; and safety standards for heavy equipment, crane, trench excavation operations, and fall protection requirements. Applicant must also be experienced and self motivated. SEMA offers competitive wages and benefits to all employees as well as housing possibilities depending on location.

To apply, fax resume to 303-627-2626 or visit our website at www.sema construction.com to complete a online application. SEMA Construction is an Equal Opportunity Employer. The Roswell Daily Record is currently accepting applications for a reporter. Must be a good writer and speller. Send resume to: Roswell Daily Record, Attn: C Fischer PO Box 1897, Roswell, NM or emailed to cfischer@rdrnews.com No phone calls, please.

045. Employment Opportunities

NOW HIRING part time sales representative Tues-Thru. Apply at Marriott of Fairfield Inn and Suites 1201 N. Main Heavy Equipment Operators (Vaughn, NM) SEMA Construction Inc., a heavy highway contractor, has started a new project in Vaughn, NM located 40 miles south of Santa Rosa. There are immediate openings for Heavy Equipment Operators. Applicant must be experienced and self motivated. SEMA offers competitive wages and benefits to all employees as well as housing possibilities depending on location. To apply, fax resume to 303-627-7533 or visit our website at www.sema construction.com to complete a online application. SEMA Construction is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

TRUCK DRIVERS (Vaughn, NM) SEMA Construction Inc., a heavy highway contractor, has started a new project in Vaughn, NM located 40 miles south of Santa Rosa. There are immediate openings for Truck Drivers with a CDL Class A license & Tanker endorsement. Applicant must be experienced and self motivated. Some travel may be required. SEMA offers competitive wages and benefits to all employees as well as housing possibilities depending on location. To apply, fax resume to 303-627-2626 or visit our website at www.sema construction.com to complete a online application. SEMA Construction is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

045. Employment Opportunities

ADMIRAL BEVERAGE is hiring CDL driver position must be filled immediately, and only serious prospects need apply. Great benefits, excellent pay, group health insurance. Apply online at www.admiralbeverage.com HIRING IMMEDIATELY for Pool Manager and Lifeguards in the Roswell area. We offer flexible schedules and great rates. Please apply online at www.usamanagement.com or call to 877-248-1USA of you have any questions! KRUMLAND AUTO Group is seeking a Human Resources Assistant. You’ll assist in hiring, record keeping, employee benefits and other employee relations. Qualifications: A degree in HR or business would be preferred, but not required. Courteous and professional English written and verbal skills, ability to speak and write Spanish is a plus. Strong organizational skills to manage multiple and changing priorities with accuracy. Strong self-motivation and ability to work independently. Commitment to following policies and procedures and maintain confidentiality. Advanced computer skills in Microsoft Word, Excel and Outlook. Must pass a background screening, drug screening and have an acceptable driving record. This is a full time position, Monday thru Friday. Pay based on experience and level of college degree, if any. Employment benefits include Health, Dental and Vision Insurance are available. 401k plan with company match. Paid vacation and Christmas bonus. EOE. Please submit your resume with cover letter to mholstun@kagnm.com or Fax to 575-624-5988

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

LEARN TO drive in 5 short weeks. Artesia Training Academy has new classes forming. CDL Class A with endorsements. VA approved. 20 years of service to South East New Mexico. Call for more information 575-748-9766 or 1-888-586-0144 visit us at www.artesiatraining.com or visit us on Facebook. NEED AN individual with a great attention and care to detail. Working in a laboratory environment to receive in all specimens from courier and delivery services and in the process ensure all patient identification is verified at each step, and specimen media as well as all accompanying paperwork is labeled and distributed properly for further processing. roswell accessioning@gmail.com HEAVY EQUIPMENT operator Class A CDL 622-6983 Leave message

DRIVER NEEDED Class A or B CDL with clear driving record, local route, competitive pay, 401K, insurance and paid time off. Call 800-658-2673 or 806-293-4431 EXPERIENCED WELDER stainless steel /HVAC tech helper needed, must pass drug screen. 575-626-1234 LOOKING FOR a new and exciting career where you can change lives and launch careers? Then consider joining the forces at Roswell Job Corps Center.

RJCC has a great job opportunity for an Independent Living Manager Candidate will manage and plan all residential living operations during all shifts in dorm setting. Qualifications: A minimum of an Associates Degree and two years experience working with youth. Valid driver’s license and good driving record. Submit resume to aranda.irma@jobcorps.org or fax to 575-347.7497 COMFORT KEEPERS is pursuing experienced caregivers to work in the Roswell, Dexter, Hagerman and Artesia areas. We offer flexible schedules both part time and full time with competitive pay. Stop by our Roswell office at: 1410 South Main to visit with us today or call Kim at 575-624-9999 for more information.

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575)-622-7710 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







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Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

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KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS seeks qualified candidates to fill the position of Field Agent in South Eastern NM. For more info nmknights.com or call 877-830-5770 EXPERIENCED PART TIME BOOKKEEPER desired for law firm. Applicant must have payroll/gross receipts/ unemployment tax reporting, general ledger/accounting and Quickbooks experience and must be of high character; organized; detail-oriented; hard-working; and self-motivated. Salary DOE. Submit confidential letter of application, resume, salary requirements and history and reference contact information to roswelllaw00@gmail.com or P.O. Box 1897, Unit # 382 Roswell, NM 88202. Southwestern Wireless, Inc. has openings in the following positions: •Internet Technician •Shipping and receiving clerk •Two-Way Radio Technician •Tower technician Applicants must be self-motivated and willing to work occasional long hours. You must have a valid driver’s license, a clean driving record and pass a drug test. Positions are full time. Mail resumes to Southwestern Wireless, Inc., PO Box 2528, Roswell, NM 88202 or e-mail to melenda@swwmail.net

THE PECOS Valley Regional Education Cooperative #8 is in search of a part time and/or full time Reading Specialist to serve as a Reading Coach for our member districts in South Eastern NM. Applicant should have the minimum of Bachelors Degree, Reading Certified, NM Public Education License. Applicant must be willing to travel to our member districts and work in cooperation with educational teams. Please contact David Willden, Executive Director of the PVREC #8 at (575) 748-6100 or by e-mail at dwillden@pvrec8.com.

045. Employment Opportunities

L&F DISTRIBUTORS Class A CDL Drivers For Roswell, NM Area Qualified applicant must have good driving record. Current commercial license preferable. Previous experience delivering product a plus. Good communication and customer service skills. Interested applicants apply at: L&F Distributors 2200 North Atkinson Roswell, NM 88201 575-622-0380 An Equal Opportunity Employer PART TIME Secretary with QuickBooks knowledge and experience. Please apply in person at 1605 N. Garden with resume. EOE

ELWOOD STAFFING is currently seeking a reliable and hardworking employee with a strong communication icustomer service, organization and computer skills for a staffing manager position. Position is full time and offers PTO, great benefits and competitive pay. Candidates will be required to pass preemployment background and drug test upon offer of employment. To be considered for this position please send resume and professional reference information to karamia.victoria@ elwoodstaffing.com. No phone calls please. SUMMER HELP Receptionist, part-time, 12:30pm-5pm. Apply at Keys Drilling & Pump, 1012 E. 2nd St.

BUTCH’S RATHOLE & ANCHOR SERVICE Now hiring Drilling Assistants, Class A CDL required, for Artesia, NM yard. Insurance & 401K. 575-513-1482, Garry. COMFORT KEEPERS is seeking experienced overnight caregivers to work in the Roswell and Artesia area. Part time and full time with GREAT PAY. Stop by our Roswell office at: 1410 South Main to visit with us today or call Kim at 575-624-9999 for more information.

NOW HIRING Commercial and Residential garage door installers and installer trainees. Valid New Mexico drivers’ license with a clean driving record required. We are a drug free work place and a employment drug test is required. Apply in person at Overhead Door Co. located at 200 S. Hemlock Avenue, Roswell, NM. Applications are available weekdays 8:00am-12:00pm & 1:00pm-4:30pm or by appointment. Dexter Consolidated Schools Notice of Vacancy High School Principal Open Until Filled Please apply at www.dexterdemons.org for more information contact Beth /Human Resources 734-5420 ext #319 benedictb@ dexterdemons.org

General Maintenance Experienced with all type of repairs, must pass background check. Apply at Best Western, 2000 N. Main. Looiking for CNA/HHA. Come by 906 W. Alameda or email rachel.peralta@ chomecare.com The Town of Dexter is accepting applications for a full-time position within the Public Works Department (Water/Sewer/Street/Park & Recreation). Salary: $10.50 per hour.

Qualifications: HS diploma or equivalent; valid NM Driver’s License. Applicant must have the ability to interact with co-workers and public in a friendly, professional manner; physical ability to safely and effectively perform required duties; must be able to operate light/medium equipment, must work well under limited supervision; must live in or be willing to relocate to the immediate Dexter area.

Applications may be picked up and returned to Dexter Town Hall, 15 E. Second Street, Dexter, NM.

Applications will be accepted until June 2, 2014 @ 3:00 pm. The Town of Dexter is an EOE and a Drug/Alcohol-free environment. All applicants must sign a Drug/Alcohol Test Consent form. No phone calls.

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

045. Employment Opportunities

Dennis the Menace

B7

HOLIDAY INN is seeking Sales Manager & Maintenance person, experienced required. Apply in person at 3620 N. Main St. No phone calls please. EXPERIENCED LEGAL ASSISTANT or PARALEGAL desired for law firm. Successful applicant will possess high character and be always pleasant; organized; detail-oriented; self-motivated; possessing excellent computer, interpersonal, typing, transcription, phone, legal research and writing skills; able to work well under pressure in a busy team work environment; exemplary in document and pleading drafting, client communication, research and general attorney support; and desirous of being part of a team of dedicated professionals. Competitive salary DOE. Submit confidential letter of application, resume, salary requirements and history and reference contact information to roswelllaw00@gmail.com or P.O. Box 1897, Unit #381 Roswell, NM 88202 THE HOLIDAY Inn Express located at 2300 N. Main is looking for a part time breakfast bar attendant. Must work weekends. Please apply in person.

New Mexico Machinery, LLC is a large Farm, Ranch, and Dairy Equipment Sales, Parts and Service Dealership, servicing New Mexico, and West Texas. We offer excellent pay and complete benefits including health insurance, retirement, uniforms, paid holidays and paid vacation. We are accepting resumes for the following positions: Parts Counter Sales Experience required. Must be able to lift & move up to 75lbs. Salary DOE, Mechanical knowledge is a plus. Diesel/Ag Mechanic 5 years experience preferred, Salary DOE. Must provide own personal tools. CDL preferred but not required. Please submit resumes to: New Mexico Machinery, LLC ATTN: Anissa Segura PO Box 1698 Roswell, NM 88202 Or submit to anissajsegura@ nmmachinery.com

Career Opportunities, Inc. is recruiting for a Food Service Manager for the Roswell Job Corps Center. The manager will plan, direct and coordinate the preparation of all the food served at the Center in accordance with safety and health regulations to include the HEALS program; will supervise a crew of six employees; will have budget, purchasing food and equipment, and inventory responsibilities. Candidate must have a High School diploma, a Food Handlers Certificate, and completion of a recognized culinary arts or food service training course. The position is full time with benefits. Resumes and credentials can be sent to gonzalez.mary@ jobcorps.org or faxed to 575-347-7491. An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V. ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER JOBS in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper to place your ad or log onto www.nmpress.org for more information.

Drivers Prime, Inc. Company Drivers & Independent Contractors for Refrigerated, Tanker & Flatbed NEEDED! Plenty of Freight & Great Pay! Start with Prime Today! Call 800-277-0212 or apply online at driveforprime.com Donor Care Specialist I 1 Part-Time position 212-1225-2014-0004 Roswell, NM

Under direct supervision, this position is responsible for performing all duties related to the efficient, safe, and compliant collection of blood and blood products. Works collaboratively as a member of the team and in alignment with the values of the organization. Work hours: Varied hours and workdays, includes weekends and occasional overtime. Previous Phlebotomy experience and customer service experience preferred. Required: High school diploma or GED. Excellent benefits. Send resume and/or application by 06/06/14 to Lori Schmittle, 1515 University Blvd. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87102; email LSchmittle@ bloodsystems.org. List Reference #212-1225-2014-0004. United Blood Services is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, or protected veteran status. CONSTRUCTION NAVY RESERVE. Serve part-time. Elite training. Great pay & benefits. Sign-on bonus up to $20K. Retirement. Call Mon-Fri (800) 354-9627

045. Employment Opportunities

THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD is currently accepting applications for a sports editor. Job requirements include coverage of local sports teams and events, writing sports columns, laying out pages for sports sections and supervising stringers. Send resume, writing clips and page design samples to editor@rdrnews.com. Submissions can be mailed to: Roswell Daily Record, Attn: Tim Howsare, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell Daily Record, NM, 88202. No phone calls please.

DRIVERS (ARTESIA) – Class A CDL, tanker endorsement, and good driving record required. Apply at Standard Energy Services, 11376 Lovington Hwy, Artesia or call Larry at 575-390-3517. EEO PART-TIME TELLER Bank of the Southwest is looking to immediately fill the position of Part-Time Teller. Job duties to include, but not limited to customer service and cash handling. This part time position does not have paid benefits. Requirements: Must have a good attitude and basic computer skills. Must be detailed oriented with excellent time management skills. 1 year bank experience preferred. Company offers excellent work environment and salary. Pre-employment drug test and background screen required. Apply in person at Bank of the Southwest, 226 N Main, Roswell NM by Friday, May 30th, 2014. EEO/AA GUARDSMARK The nation’s leader in security is hiring security officers. No experience required, but customer service skills a must. Must be HS Grad/GED & 21 yrs. EOE Benefits: Free Life Ins. Uniforms/Tuition Assistance. Starting Pay $9.00hr. Apply by calling 505-830-2700 Tues-Fri. 9am-6pm.

SERVICES

105. Childcare

CHILDCARE/ PRESCHOOL offered in my home. Certified teacher and mom 575-936-9466 FUN SUMMER PROGRAM VALLEY CHRISTIAN ACADEMY BEGINS JUNE 2ND 627-1500

140. Cleaning

225. General Construction

SWAMP COOLER TIME HANDYMAN SERVICES specialized in small and large home projects, one call does it all. Estimates 637-0255

www.senaconstruction.com 575-973-1019 HOME REPAIRS No Job to Small/Large Reasonable Rates. 575-317-2357

230. General Repair

HANDYMAN SERVICE Minor remodeling & repair, minor concrete work, any other work needed. Call Dave at 575-626-0408.

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738 RWC. BACKHOE, skid steer, dump truck, bom lift, services. Insured. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

269. Excavating

RWC EXCAVATION services for all your excavation needs Call Hector 575-910-8397

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Summer Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242. BULLSEYE LAWN Service Senior Discounts. Call Joseph at 317-2242. WE WORK Yard & alley cutting, garden rototilling, hauling. Call Will at 317-7402 or 317-2573. Garcia’s Lawn Service, sprinklers & much more at low price. 914-0803. LIGHTHOUSE LAWN-SERVICE affordable basic lawn care. No job too big or small, we do it all! Free estimates, call 575-921-5671 Emerald Landscaping Lawn & sprinkler installation, sprinkler repair, sod, gravel, lawn maintenance. Maintenance/Free Estimates/accept credit cards. Lic#89265. Call: Aaron, 575-910-0150 or Chris, 420-3945

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 SUNSHINE WINDOW Services. Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458 Heavenly Housekeeping Professional, trustworthy and affordable. 575-936-9466 HOUSEKEEPING SERVICE Home/Office Free Estimates Affordable 317-2357

150. Concrete

Running Bear Concrete Foundations, Driveways, Stamping, Sidewalks, Curbing, Stucco. Lic: 373219. Call 317-6058

195. Elderly Care

I WILL care for your loved ones- day, night, possible live in. 623-3717, 291-5362

200. Fencing

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100

220. Furniture Repair WE BUILD and repair furniture. 840-7849 or 626-8466

225. General Construction

Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

Lawn and Landscape Maintenance One time or recurring service available 575-973-1019 CHAVEZ SPRINKLER CO. COMPLETE LANDSCAPING AND SPRINKLER SYSTEM & REPAIRS, ROCK WORK, TREES, SHRUBS, TRACTOR & DUMP TRUCK WORK. FREE ESTIMATES. CALL HECTOR 420-3167 Yard work, clean-ups, lawns. Handyman svc. David 637-9580.

285. Miscellaneous Services

BUNDLE AND SAVE! DIRECTV, INTERNET& PHONE From $69.99/mo. Free 3-Months of HBO, starz, SHOWTIME & CINEMAX FREE GENIE 4-Room Upgrade LOCK IN 2 YR Savings Call 1-800-264-0340 DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 800-948-7239 INJURED IN AN AUTO ACCIDENT? Call InjuryFone for a free case evaluation. Never a cost to you. Don`t wait, call now, 1-800-725-4104


B8 Tuesday, May 27, 2014 285. Miscellaneous Services

IF YOU USED THE BLOOD THINNER PRADAXA and suffered internal bleeding, hemorrhaging, required hospitalization or a loved one died while taking Pradaxa between October 2010 and the present. You may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles H. Johnson 1-800-535-5727 Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-661-3783, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping. DIRECTTV - 2 Year Savings Event! Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS of savings and a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-264-0340 DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-315-7043 ENJOY 100 percent guaranteed, delivered? to-the-door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 74 percent PLUS 4 FREE Burgers - The Family Value Combo - ONLY $39.99. ORDER Today 1-800-773-3095 Use code 49381JVZ or www.OmahaSteaks.com/ osmb12 SHARI`S BERRIES Order Mouthwatering Gifts for any Occasion! SAVE 20 percent on qualifying orders over $29! Fresh Dipped Berries starting at $19.99! Visit www.berries.com/big or Call 1-800-406-5015 REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!* Get a whole-home Satellite system installed at NO COST and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to new callers, SO CALL NOW 1-800-719-8092

300. Oil Field Services

RWC BACKHOB & Dump truck services Call Hector 575-910-8397

310. Painting/ Decorating

Quality Painting! Affordable prices, Sr. Discounts. Mike 622-0072 TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. Call 637-9108. EXTERIOR/INTERIOR, INSURED. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

Need A Roof?

Call R & R Construction 23 years in Roswell. 622-0072

350. Roofing

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Professional Roofing, Landscaping, Irrigation, Stucco, Tile, Painting, Concrete and Fence Work (575) 973-1019 RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

395. Stucco Plastering

Stucco, Lath, Synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217

400. Tax Service

ARE YOU in BIG trouble with the IRS? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Seen on CNN. A BBB. Call 1-800-921-5512 REDUCE YOUR Past Tax Bill by as much as 75 Percent. Stop Levies, Liens and Wage Garnishments. Call The Tax DR Now to see if you Qualify 1-800-912-0758

405. TractorWork

490. Homes For Sale 409 LA Fonda clean 3br/2ba, 1 car gar., nice house move-in ready $122k no owner financing. Call 626-0259.

RECENTLY UPDATED paint, carpet, non-smoked, wtr softener, fenced, laundry room, 3/2 home. Great neighborhood/ school district. $139K, 39 Lost Trail, 707-694-4382 3br/1.5ba, OWNER finance with 20% down, $83K. Call or text 575-420-1579. REMODELED 2BR/1BA, efficiency apart in back, $48k, owner financing. 575-291-4556 IMMACULATE CUSTOM home in Briar Ridge, 3br/2ba, 81 Bent Tree Rd., $130,900. 831-915-0226 OWNER WILLING to carry, 2br/2ba, 1101 N. Kentucky, $8k-$10k down. Call 444-6231.

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

Tractor work Lots mowed, discing, blading, post holes. 347-0142 or 317-7738

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 THE TREE DAWG Tree pruning, removal, & reviving expert. 12 yrs exp., Free Est. 420-5004 Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insuranced. Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL

485. Business Opportunities

Profitable Grocery Store For sale or lease to own. Fresh produce and meat no gas. Sales $1,500,000+ net $100,000+ SE NM Great opportunity Contact: kow67@pvtn.net

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale PUBLISHER’S NOTICE:

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale FOR SALE 17.5 acres owner financing 575-910-3199

500. Businesses for Sale NEW SELF STORAGE Facility 104 units, 20% full, serious inquiries only. 575-317-0029

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

TAKE OVER payments with a small down payment 333 W. Brasher Rd. space 101 call 505-426-6173

520. Lots for Sale

PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848.

CLASSIFIEDS

520. Lots for Sale

2 BUILDING lots: 1200 W. Stone $9k, 2 blks W. of N. Union; 33 W. Wells, $7k, terms. 575- 416-1454 or 622-6786. Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352. VACANT LOT, 1107 sqft, owner selling $9,000. 575-291-4556

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 2BR/2BA TOWNHOUSE, over 2000 sqft w/garage, washer & dryer, fenced yard, $1050/mo + dep. 2500 Bent Tree. Call for more info at 317-6408.

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944. ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 Town Plaza Apartments NO HUD ACCEPTED ALL UTILITIES PAID Friendly managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs & downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. CONVENIENT LOCATION close to shopping, quiet area. Spacious 2bd/1b, extra storage, water, gas paid. Senior Discount 1114 S. Kentucky $595 910-7076 or 910-0851 1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 1br/1ba, has stove, wtr pd, HUD ok. $425/mo, $200 dep. 625-9208 207 W. Mathews, 2br, $550, remodeled, wtr/gas pd, 626-5290 5pm-7pm. PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. 1 BD apt on 1st or 2nd floor, large bedroom, balcony over golf green, nice location & quiet area. Central cooling/heating, located at 2550 Bent Tree Apt B. $495/$520 per month plus deposit. Call 317-6408 EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. EFF, 1,2 BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377 2/1, fenced yard, w/d hookups, $600/mo, $400/dep, outside pets ok. 910-0827

540. Apartments Unfurnished

1300 CAMINO Real, 2 apartments available. 1br & 2br. Call Sherlea Taylor at 420-1978 or 624-2219. 205 S. Ohio, 1br, $475/mo, $300/dep, no pets, bills pd. 420-0939 or 578-8173

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 3br/1.5ba, 1 car gar., 3017 Delicado, $1100/mo, No HUD. 637-4248.

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

CHARMING 2-2 home near Cahoon Pk Hardwoods W/Dryer, carport. $800mo. & gas/elect. 626-6286 2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 3BD/1.5BA no hud no pets, $900mo $900dep. Txt or call 575-420-1579 4BD/2BA 2CAR gar. fenced yard, 3115 Futura $1400dep. $1400mo. 627-9942

40acres for your Mobile Home, pets, horses, & livestock, $102,600 priced $4, 550down, $900monthly payment, 8248 Cherokee Rd, Lake Arthur,NM (between Roswell/Artesia) Water, sewer, elec. 480-392-8550 3/2/2, LARGE patio, 2 pecan trees, wtr pd, no pets. Call for appointment, 575-626-5791.

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262

2bd/1ba central air, $600mo $500dep. 1003 W. Summit 317-4307 3BR/1BA, $800/MO, $600/dep, No Pets or HUD, 509 Redwood. 626-3816 3BD + garage 650+200 Bills pd, 1br part furnish. Country 650+200. Al 575-703-0420

TOWNHOUSE, 2BD/2BA ref.air, clean, quiet area, 34 D Bent Tree $800/mo, $400/dep 575-910-1605

SMALL 1BR house, utilities pd, $550/mo, 1st/last month rent. 575-416-1454 or 622-6786. 1BR FOR rent, HUD okay. 575-444-9558 HOUSE FOR rent 2bd $600mo $400dep. 637-2191

Looking for a roommate, house furnished , $650/mo, 200 E. Country Club #6. 575-626-2842

Peace & Quiet by park 2605 W. 3rd 2bd, 1b, w detached garage. Utility/ office, w/d hookup, ref. air $750 mo., $750 dep. Call 575-258-9977 or 575-420-7709 Current credit report & ref. required. 1502 N. Pecan Dr., 3br/1ba, $700/dep, $700/mo, extra clean. No Hud. Ernie 420-0744. 1007 1/2 S. Lea, 2br/1ba, w/d hookup, wtr pd, $550/mo, $430/dep. 317-1371 No smoking or No Hud

2BR/2BA TOWNHOUSE, w/d hookups, 1 car garage, quiet neighborhood, No smoking or pets, $750/mo, $750/dep. 622-0195 or 910-5778

Roswell Daily Record 550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

3BR/2BA, SINGLE garage, fenced backyard, total elec., outside city, $1000/mo, deposit may be required. 575-626-0732 901 N. Plains Park, 3br, 1 3/4ba, fenced backyard, recent new flooring & interior paint, $700/mo with deposit. 622-3168 or 626-2077

909 W. 14th, 1br, ref. air, fridge & stove, no pets or HUD, $400/mo, $400/dep. 575-914-5402

1006 PLAZA Del Sol, nice, quiet cul de sac, 2br/2ba duplex, garage, covered front porch, FP, w/d hookups, ref. air, fridge, DW, $850/$600 dep. 420-5261 text or call for appt. 1111 N. Washington #13, 2br/2ba, detached laundry room. 910-4225

580. Office or Business Places OFFICE SPACE available, 400 E. College. 575-622-8500 or 420-9970 MAIN ST. storefront, 2200+sqft, $1200/dep, $1200/mo. 627-9942 200 S. Union. Two suites, approximately 1200 sqft and 810 sqft. Great location. Will remodel to suit tenant. Call Jan at 625-2222.

(2) COMMERCIAL stores and storage space for rent. Great location, 1723 SE Main, 623-3738.

311-313 W. 2nd, 1800 sqft. Call John Grieves, PELR at 575-626-7813. FOR LEASE, space in Sunwest Centre Office Complex at 500 N. Main St. Various size spaces. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. High floor space available for larger tenants. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 575-623-1652 or mobile 575-420-2546

595. Misc. for Rent

SELF STORAGE Units $30 a month, any size available. 575-317-0029

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

NEED FURNITURE Shop Blair’s for the best prices on used furniture, beds, dressers, table & chairs, living room sets, patio sets, bookshelves, appliances, antiques, collectibles, home decor & housewares, saddles, tools, movies, plus lots more. Open daily 9-5, closes Wed. 627-2033

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

25 FT flat bed trailer, 2 axle, $1700; 3 axle, $2100. 575-416-1454 or 622-6786 CPAP BREATHING unit, bath tfr bench, and large wheelchair. 575-622-7638 Invacare patient lifter, walker, bruno wheelchair hoist/loader 622-7638. THE TREASURE Chest Bed frames Alien light globes from Main Street, dresser + chest set, kids books free, amazing deals. 1204 W Hobbs 914-1855 Weds-Sat 10-5

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous TOP DOLLAR Paid for furniture, collectibles, appliances, antiques, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We pay cash with same day removal of all items. Compete/partial households & personal estates welcome. 623-0136 or 910-6031

ESTATE SETTLEMENT Never throw ANYTHING away before calling us! Our services include Auctions (our facility or yours), Tagged Estate Sales, Complete/Partial Buy-Outs & Real Estate Auctions, Firearms, Jewelry & Collectibles. Prompt removal of entire households and property cleanouts. Whether you need to sell a few items or an entire estate check with us and we will do our best to beat any offer you receive. Call today to find out how our experience can help you get more $$. Wild West Auctions, LLC 623-7355 or 840-8401

635. Good things to Eat

FROZEN GREEN Chile, dried red chile & chile powder, local pinto beans, peanuts & pecan, ristras, jams & jellies, fountain drinks, fresh eggs, Alfalfa Hay, Wheat, Sudan & Oat hay, small & large bales, we accept credit cards & EBT. GRAVES FARM 622-1889

715. Hay and Feed Sale

2 STRING alfalfa bale $10 each, 4x8 oat bales $145 each. 4X8 alfalfa bales $220 Janet 626-0159

745. Pets for Sale

Power wheelchair, hospital bed, shower chair, dorm refrigerator. 622-7638 Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed! LINDA VISTA Pool Stock for Sale 575-317-6989

EXECUTIVE BONDED BL Leather chair $75. Beadside/Elevated toilet seat $50 Folding Walker $25, Shower Chair $35 623-8607

(6) 32” interior doors w/frame & hardware, $150; kitchen metal cabinets, complete top & bottom w/sink, $200. 626-4153

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

NKC AMERICAN bull dog puppies for sale $800. For more info please call 626-6121 Permit # 14-001 LEFTOVER EASTER Bunnies, $10.00 each. Call 575-420-6565. FREE KITTENS litter box trained ready to go. Call 626-3596.

RECREATIONAL 765. Guns & Ammunition

SMITH-WESSON 38 special revolver, match gun serious inquirers 317-8387

770. Boats and Accessories 1958 DORSETT 16’ fiber glass, 2 seat Runabout, 75HP, very nice, $2500. 575-622-8002

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

‘02 KAWK Vulcan 750 17,200 miles, $1,800 OBO not running. Call 420-5114

2013 HONDA F6B, 3yrs unltd mi. warranty, sell or trade. Segundo, 317-0643 HONDA REFLEX 250cc scooter, red, only 2300 miles, $2300. 317-0643

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com LIKE NEW 2004 Hitchhiker Champagne 5th wheel, 36’, 3 slides, 12’ awning, a/c, central heat, many extras, $50k. 575-644-2139

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

Tired of the Hassle In Trading Or Selling Your Car or Truck? Economy Motors Will Either Purchase Your Vehicle Or Consign It For Sale At No Cost To You!! Call Or Come By For Details. Economy Motors 2506 N. Main Roswell, NM 88201 625-2440 •18 Years In Business •Family Owned & Operated •Licensed, Bonded & Insured 2012 T. Corolla Sports Auto Fwd. 4 cyl. 4 door, 31,300 miles. Exc. Cond. $16,500 623-8607 1997 CHEVY Blazer , see as is 575-840-4686 for more information 2009 CHEVY Cobalt, 57k miles, a/c, pwr steering, excellent running condition, $5500. 432-212-0393

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2002 DODGE Caravan, good condition, well maintained, more info, 444-9558 ‘96 DODGE Ram 1500, 2WD, 184k miles, good condition, very clean truck, $2800. 910-2900

05 27 14 Roswell Daily Record  

05 27 14 Roswell Daily Record

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