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Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 122, No. 109 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

INSIDE NEWS

ITALY’S EX-PREMIER DIES AT 94 ROME (AP) — Giulio Andreotti personified the nation he helped shape, the good and the bad. One of Italy’s most important postwar figures, he helped draft the country’s constitution after World War II, served seven times ...

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

May 7, 2013

TUESDAY

www.rdrnews.com

Woman set on fire dies, RPD conducts search JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Detectives from the Roswell Police Department are investigating a homicide after an incident that occurred around 6:45 p.m. Friday, when Lisa Smith, 44, burst from her residence at Mesa Verde Apartments, 502 S. Wyoming Ave., completely engulfed in flames. Two good Samaritans assisted in putting out the fire. Emergency Medical Services responded. They estimated that Smith had bur ns on more than 95

percent of her body. She was transported to a local hospital and then flown to Lubbock, Texas, for treatment. Evidence found at the scene suggests arson. The police believe the victim was deliberately set on fire. The family was notified, Monday, that the victim died, turning a potential arson investigation into a homicide. Charred areas on the outside of the building indicate the intensity of the blaze. A confidential source said that the woman was doused with some sort of accelerant and set on fire.

Another stated she was covered in kerosene. Police investigators are seeking the public’s assistance in locating Patrick Smith, 49, a person of interest. Smith is described as 5 feet 9 inches tall, weight 200 pounds, with brown eyes and a shaved head. Officials think Smith may also have bur ns on his body. Anyone with information on Smith’s whereabouts is urged to contact the Roswell Police Department (575-624-6770), or Crime Stoppers (1-888594-8477). j.palmer@rdrnews.com

Patrick Smith

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TOP 5 WEB

For The Past 24 Hours

• Police seeking info on Herrera • Roswell’s Most Wanted caught • More events at 2013 Party on the River • Old Timers kick off Party for 1st time • Six get bid to boys ...

INSIDE SPORTS

Whimsical UFO crash just north of Roswell Ilissa Gilmore Photo

ILISSA GILMORE RECORD STAFF WRITER

Drivers approaching the city’s northern limits on Hwy 285 will get a glimpse of a close encounter of the

BULLS STUN RUSTY HEAT 93-86 MIAMI (AP) — Nate Robinson was spitting blood in the first half, then delivered the deepest cuts of the night in the final moments. And the Chicago Bulls reminded the Miami Heat that no one in ...

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TODAY’S OBITUARIES

• T.E. Arrington • Don French • Emilia Martinez

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HIGH ...88˚ LOW ....55˚

TODAY’S FORECAST

CLASSIFIEDS..........B6 COMICS.................B4 ENTERTAINMENT.....A8 FINANCIAL .............B5 GENERAL ..............A2 HOROSCOPES ........B6 LOTTERIES ............A2 NATION .................A6 OPINION ................A4 SPORTS ................B1 WEATHER ..............A8

INDEX

Roswell kind. Unveiled Monday, a mural installation by Salinas, Calif.-based artist John Cer ney depicts a rural family welcoming a group of bewildered,

Garrey Carruthers named NMSU president

LAS CRUCES (AP) — Former Republican Gov. Garrey Carruthers was selected Monday as the new president of New Mexico State University. The NMSU Board of Regents voted 3-2 for Carruthers to lead the state’s second-largest four-year university. Carruthers has been dean of NMSU’s College of Business since 2003. He was governor from 1987 to 1990. Carruthers holds a doctorate degree in economics from Iowa State University. He received master’s and bachelor’s degrees from NMSU, and served as an assistant secretary in the U.S. Interior Department from 1981 to 1984. Two regents supported Daniel Howard, who left NMSU in 2008 to become dean of the college of liberal arts and sciences at the University of College at Denver. Howard was a biology professor at NMSU and joined the faculty in 1988. Other finalists were former Texas Tech University President Guy Bailey; former University of Nevada, Las Vegas, President David Ashley; and former Texas A&M University President Elsa Murano. Barbara Couture resigned as NMSU president last fall without explanation after fewer than three years in the job. Former University of Missouri system president Manuel Pacheco has been serving as interim president. NMSU’s main campus has an enrollment of more than 17,000 students and a yearly budget of more than $600 million. The university also has branch campuses in

stranded aliens to Earth. The mother offers a freshly baked pie to a confused, tall, green man as the other aliens look on with similarly alar med expressions.

The humans are a little more curious than concerned. The young daughter stares open-mouthed, as her father smiles and See ART, Page A3

Records: Politico involved in scandal

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Records show that a political figure at the center of a Las Cruces judicial scandal was in regular contact with for mer New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson’s staff to of fer input on appointments to the bench in Dona Ana County. The Albuquerque Journal obtained the emails and a tape-recorded interview under the Inspection of Public Records Request. They suggest that, at the very least, real estate investor Edgar Lopez believed he was the man to see if someone wanted to garner a judicial appointment in Dona Ana County. Lopez emailed Richardson or his staff on at least a dozen occasions to provide local political background infor mation on nominees, according to the records. And over the years, Lopez, a Richardson

Steppin’ out to a Derby party

See SCANDAL, Page A3

Mark Wilson Photo

Aria Finch, right, and Miranda Howe show off their hat finery during the Kentucky Derby Party at the Roswell Museum and Art Center, Saturday.

Israeli airstrikes over Syrian targets loom over US diplomacy See CARRUTHERS, Page A3

WASHINGTON (AP) — Israel’s willingness to hit Syrian targets it sees as threats to its own existence has complicated the Obama administration’s internal debate over arming President Bashar Assad’s foes and may change the way U.S. approaches allies as it tries to boost the rebels, including with possible military aid. As Secretary of State John Kerry flew to Russia on Monday for talks with the Assad regime’s most powerful ally, the administration remained tight-lipped on both Israel’s weekend air strikes and their

implications for Washington decision-making. Israeli warplanes targeted caches of Iranian missiles that were bound for Hezbollah, the Lebanon-based terror group that has threatened Israel. The weapons would have allowed Hezbollah to strike Tel Aviv and as far as southern Israel from inside Lebanese territory. Still, Israel’s actions put Damascus and Moscow on notice that the U.S. and its allies may not wait for an international green light to become more actively engaged. The administration

said last week it was rethinking its opposition to arming the rebels or taking other aggressive steps to turn the tide of the two-year-old civil war toward the rebels.

At the same time, Israeli involvement in the war carries risks. Instead of prodding Russia into calling for Assad’s ouster, it could bring greater Arab sympathy for Assad and prompt deeper involvement from Iran and the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah, actors committed See DIPLOMACY, Page A3

AP Photo

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, right, welcomes Secretary of State John Kerry, left, to his office at the Pentagon, Monday. Hagel invited Kerry to the Pentagon for a working lunch to discuss a range of national security issues.


A2 Tuesday, May 7, 2013

A 21-speed bike is reported stolen

GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Berrendo Elementary raises serious cash for cancer

Larceny

• Police were called to the 1600 block of Pontiac Drive, Friday, where a 21-speed bicycle, valued at $100, was reported stolen. • Police responded to Target, 2725 N. Main St., Friday, after a subject removed a three-pack of golf balls, valued at $47.99 from the shelves and left the store without paying.

Burglary

• Police were dispatched to the 1600 block of West Summit Street, Saturday, where a subject entered a residence and took jewelry, documents, lingerie and office supplies. The missing items were valued at $902. • Police responded to Raintree Apartments, 1200 W. McGaffey St., Saturday. The victim reported that a sliding glass door was found to be partially open. Subjects removed ammunition, jewelry and a tool bag. The losses were estimated at $657. Anyone having information about these or any other crimes is asked to contact Crime Stoppers, 888594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward.

CITY COUNCIL TO MEET THURSDAY

City Council will decide whether to approve two resolutions that would authorize applications for funding from the New Mexico Finance Authority during its monthly meeting Thursday at 7 p.m. at City Hall, 425 N. Richardson Ave. One resolution seeks approval of an application for funds to replace city water lines and valves through the NMFA’s Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund. Another resolution would authorize the city to apply for a loan to purchase police vehicles and related equipment. Council also will consider a resolution to approve a preliminary budget for the city’s 2013-2014 fiscal year. There will also be a public hearing regarding a new club liquor license for The Liberty. Those who would like to speak during the public hearing must sign up prior to the meeting. The full agenda for the meeting is available online at roswell-nm.gov or by calling 624-6700.

CORRECTION

In the May 5 edition of the RDR, in a story about The Old Timers Balloon Rally, Adam Silva was misspelled Adam Silas. The RDR regrets the error.

LOTTERY NUMBERS

1-7-16-25-27 Pick 3 9-6-3

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Berrendo Elementary School teacher Andrea Roybal’s third-grade class recently raised more than $400 for the Pennies for Patients program, which benefits The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. As a whole, the school raised more than $2,000. Roybal said students gave all they could, shaking out piggy banks and shaking down the Tooth Fairy, to raise as much as they could. “It was all them,” she said. “They were so excited to help people. They truly have hearts of gold here. They truly want to make the world a better place.” This Friday, a team of close to 80 people, including school staff members and families, will participate in the Walk for Hope, to honor a student with leukemia. Kindergarten teacher Teresa Andreis said the school’s PTA raised more than $400 for the effort. “We’re trying to teach (students) about reaching out to the community because that’s what leaders do,” she said.

Animal ordinance more strictly enforced JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Officers of Roswell Animal Services will start patrolling area parks and retail outlet parking lots looking for people selling puppies in violation of the new Animal Ordinance, which went into effect on April 27. The ordinance requires a litter permit for owners whose dog or cat has had a litter. The oversight could be costly. “If we find people in violation, they will be cited, and fines can be up (to) $500 for

each violation,” said Animal Control officer David Allen. The litter permit is necessary to sell puppies or kittens. The permit is required to sell them in the paper and the number of the permit must placed in the advertisement. It further states: “Owners can only barter, sell, give away ... puppies or kittens from the applicant’s address as listed on the litter permit.” In other words, the owner’s address. Application for a litter permit must be made within one week of the birth. Each animal within a household

Andrew Poertner Editor

editor@rdrnews.com

R. Cory Beck Publisher (1987-2006)

Jim Dishman .....................................................Circulation Director jdishman@rdrnews.com

Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice The entire contents of the Roswell Daily Record, including its flag on Page 1, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the Daily Record.

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MAIL SUBSCRIPTION RATES: ALL NEW MEXICO 882 ZIP CODES, $12 ONE MONTH, $36 THREE MONTHS, $72 SIX MONTHS, $144 ONE YEAR. All other New Mexico zip codes, $13 one month, $39 three months, $78 six months, $156 one year. All other states in USA, $18 one month, $54 three months, $108 six months, $216 one year. Periodical-postage paid at Roswell, N.M. Postmaster: Please mail change of address to Roswell Daily Record, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202-1897. All postal subscriptions will stop at expiration unless payment is made prior to expiration.

is limited to two litters per year. Those owners whose animals exceed two litters are considered breeders and will be required to obtain not only a business license, but also an employer identification number and a breeder’s permit. According to Animal Services supervisor Joseph Pacheco, the public has been slow in complying to the new ordinance. During the Cinco de Mayo weekend Animal Control officers noticed a number of people selling animals in the Walmart parking lot. Since it

went into effect, only one woman has applied for the multiple animal permit also covered in the ordinance. Several breeders have come in to get a litter permit, only to find that they need a business permit and a breeder’s permit which can be obtained from the Codes Enforcement offices on North Richardson Avenue. “We will be following-up on this and on rabies and city tags,” said Allen. He asked people to compare the $22 cost of rabies/city tags against the $500 fine. j.palmer@rdrnews.com

Train the Trainer program comes to RPL The New Mexico Broadband Program Train-the-Trainer Project will provide a free workshop for trainers of computer and Inter net skills Thursday beginning at 9 a.m. at the Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania Ave.

Roadrunner Cash

Roswell Daily Record

Ilissa Gilmore Photo

This session will offer instruction on how to best deliver training to adult learners in technical areas such as using a computer, searching on the Internet, creating a Face-

book page, or using social media for business marketing and personal communication. The workshop will also provide free instructional materials for all participating trainers, which include curriculum presentations, speaking notes, handouts, and exercises, all of which can be used by participants in their own future training or tutoring sessions. In addition, participants will be

eligible for follow-up support from the New Mexico Broadband Program Train-the-Trainer Project in the form of conferencing sessions and ongoing curriculum development. The class runs until 4 p.m., with a one-hour lunch break. For more information or to register for the workshop, contact Eva Artschwager at 505-660-3434 or email digitaltrainernm@gmail.com.

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GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Art

Continued from Page A1

tips his hat, but loosely holds a rifle by his side, “just in case,” Cerney said. Nearby, another alien holds jumper cables that the family’s son has attached to his truck in an effort to give the spaceship a jump start. Cerney conceived the idea for the quirky scene months ago and decided to donate it to the city. He recently installed the cut-out figures on land owned by the Marley Ranch. Unlike other murals, Cerney prefers to use an area’s actual landscape as a background. The effect creates a threedimensional feel that lends realism to the surreal sight. “It’s a traffic stopper,” said Dorrie Faubus-McCarty, executive director of the Roswell Chamber of Commerce. If the faces of the piece’s mother and father seem familiar, it’s because they are modeled after Faubus-McCarty and Bill Marley of Marley Ranch. In addition to the Chamber of Com-

Carruthers Continued from Page A1

Alamogordo, Carlsbad, Grants and at Dona Ana Community College. Regents chairman Mike Cheney voted for Carruthers, praising his broad experience in government and at the university as a faculty member, a financial donor and a former student. “He represents as many stakeholders as I think we could expect one person to represent,” said Cheney. “I think that he’s a very positive individual who can help lead us into the next few years.” Bailey is an English professor at the University of Alabama and served as its president for about two months, resigning last October because his wife was ill and he needed to help care for her. Bailey was president of Texas Tech for four

Diplomacy Continued from Page A1

as much to preserving Assad as to fighting the Jewish state. Although Israel hasn’t officially acknowledged it carried out the airstrikes, Syrian officials on Monday were blaming Israel, calling it a “declaration of war” that would cause the Jewish state to “suffer.” Russia, alongside China, has blocked U.S.-led efforts three times at the United Nations to pressure Assad into stepping down. Officials said Kerry hopes to change Moscow’s thinking with two new arguments: American threats to arm the Syrian rebels and evidence of chemical weapon attacks by the Assad regime. Kerry, U.S. officials said Monday, hopes that may be enough to persuade Russian President Vladimir Putin to support, or at least not veto, a fresh effort to impose U.N. sanctions on Syria if Assad doesn’t begin transition talks with the opposition. The officials demanded anonymity because they weren’t authorized to speak publicly about the confidential diplomacy. “We have consistently, in our conversations with the Russians and others, pointed clearly to Assad’s behavior as proof that further support for the regime is not in the interest of the Syrian people or in the interest of the countries that have in the past supported Assad,” White House spokesman Jay Carney said. “We have been clear in the past about our disappointment with Russia over their opposition to resolutions at the Security Council with regards to this matter. But this is an ongoing conversation,” he said. U.S. officials said the administration doesn’t believe the weekend activity will force President Barack Obama’s hand, noting that the U.S.’s main concern is the use of chemical weapons by Assad, while Israel’s top concern is conventional weapons falling into the hands of its enemies. The chemical weapons argument is now under surprising attack, with former war crimes prosecutor Carla Del Ponte saying over the weekend she and fellow members of a four-member U.N. human rights panel have indications the nerve agent sarin was used by Syrian rebel forces, but not by government forces. Despite a clarification from the U.N. that it is has not yet made any definitive determination on chemical weapons use, Washington pushed back on Del Ponte’s assertion, saying it’s highly likely that the Assad regime, and not the rebels, has been behind any chemical weapons use in Syria. “We are highly skeptical of suggestions that the opposition could have or did use

merce and Marley Ranch, FaubusMcCarty said organizations such as the UFO Museum, Candlewood Suites, Dean Baldwin Painting, Cattle Baron and Builders Do It Center helped to bring Cerney’s vision to life.

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

Scandal

Continued from Page A1

Cerney specializes in eye-popping spectacles. He is known for creating larger-than-life figures, such as a series of 18-foot tall fieldworkers installed in his home state, honoring the area’s labor force.

Though closer to life-size, the Roswell mural is still sure to grab the attention of passersby, Cerney said.

“They’re shocked a little bit by this,” he said. “This is more, ‘Wow!’”

Solar-powered LED lights on the bottom of the spacecraft add extra wow factor. Running 24 hours a day, the lights will pique interest to the mural at night, Faubus-McCarty said.

“You see the lights at night and it looks like something’s landed,” she said. “But you’re not sure what.” igilmore@rdrnews.com

years before leaving for the post in Alabama. Ashley is an engineering professor at UNLV, and served as its president in 2006-2009. The Nevada Board of Regents demoted Ashley to the faculty after critics called him ineffective. Murano was president of Texas A&M in 2008-2009. She was the first Hispanic and first woman to serve as the school’s president but left the post after a clash with the university system’s chancellor over a highly critical evaluation of her performance. Murano currently is interim director of an international agriculture institute at Texas A&M. Murano was among the finalists for the presidency at the University of New Mexico when Bob Frank was selected for the job last year. UNM is the largest four-year university in New Mexico. chemical weapons,” Carney said. “We find it highly likely that any chemical weapon use that has taken place in Syria was done by the Assad regime. And that remains our position.” The State Department said the administration continues to believe that Syria’s large chemical weapons stockpiles remain securely in the regime’s control. The Obama administration opened the door to new military options in Syria after declaring last week it strongly believed the Assad regime used chemical weapons in two attacks in March. Two days after that announcement, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said arming the Syrian rebels was a policy consideration. Before departing for Russia, Kerry visited the Pentagon for a lunch meeting with Hagel. Defense Department press secretary George Little said he expected Syria to be discussed. Also Monday, the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee called for the U.S. to provide weapons to vetted Syrian rebels. Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., introduced legislation that would allow for arms, military training and non-lethal aid to rebels that meet certain criteria on human rights and don’t have links to terrorism. Until now, U.S. efforts to bolster the rebels’ fighting skills and gather intelligence on the groups operating inside Syria have been limited to small training camps in Jordan, according to two U.S. officials, who weren’t authorized to speak about secret activities and demanded anonymity. There are several options for escalation ranging from arming the rebels to targeted airstrikes and imposing no-fly zones. However, arming the rebels is the most likely escalation, officials said. Officials said targeted strikes are likely to be considered only after uncontested proof emerges of chemical weapons use. And, even the most ardent advocates of U.S. intervention don’t want American military boots on the ground while no-fly zones would demand intensive operations to neutralize Syria’s Russian-supplied air defenses. Although Israel seems to have thwarted those defenses with its weekend strikes, U.S. officials say that maintaining permanent no-fly zones will require far more support than specific actions like the airstrikes. After visiting Moscow for the first time since he became secretary of state, Kerry will travel to Rome for talks with members of the new Italian government as well as Israeli Justice Minister Tzipi Livni and Jordanian Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh to discuss Middle East peace prospects.

AP Photo

Edgar Lopez gestures in the reception area of his offices in Las Cruces on May 19, 2011. Records show that Lopez was in regular contact with former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson's staff to offer input on appointments to the bench in Dona Ana County.

fundraiser and transition team member, repeatedly asked Richardson or his staff for “five minutes” of the governor’s time for unspecified reasons. In one email, he reminded the governor that the nominee he was touting at the time provided the Richardson campaign with free buses for political events. Lopez was never charged with a crime in the bribery case brought by a special prosecutor, Clovis District Attorney Matt Chandler. However, it was the suggestion by then-District Judge Mike Murphy that a potential judicial nominee needed to make contributions to Richardson through Lopez that led to a wider investigation and, ultimately, a grand jury indictment on charges of bribery and witness intimidation against Murphy. When the allegations became public, Richardson, a Democrat who was governor from 2003 to 2011, called them “outrageous and defamatory” and defended his record on judicial appointments. Lopez said in a telephone interview last week that the emails were just “personal recommendations” and that Richardson “made the decisions based on all the information he received.” “The final decision was the governor’s and he made them,” Lopez said. Lopez has maintained that there was no connection between campaign contribu-

tions and judicial appointments. He has also said he never accepted cash contributions for Richardson. The potential nominee, Las Cruces attorney Beverly Singleman, told District Judge Lisa Schultz about Murphy’s advice that she make cash contributions to Lopez on a weekly basis. Schultz confronted Murphy about the allegations and later taped conversations with him in which he discussed making political contributions to get judicial appointments. Schultz was reluctant to lodge a complaint with the Judicial Standards Commission because it was controlled by Richardson appointees. She eventually brought the allegations to then-Dona Ana County District Attorney Susana Martinez, who is now the state’s governor. Martinez, in turn, asked Chandler to be special prosecutor. In an agreement with the Judicial Standards Commission, Murphy resigned from the bench last year for making off-color, anti-Semitic and anti-gay remarks that were taped by Schultz in subsequent conversations between the two. After the scandal came to light, the state Supreme Court tightened rules on the types of political activity judges were allowed to do, including banning direct solicitations of campaign donations for political parties or other candidates.

Mass. funeral director considers offers BOSTON (AP) — A Massachusetts funeral director said Monday he has received burial offers from out-of-state cemeteries for the body of a Boston Marathon bombing suspect who was killed in a gun battle with police, even as Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s mother told him she wants the body returned to Russia. But Worcester funeral home director Peter Stefan said despite the request, he doesn’t think Russia will take Tsarnaev’s body and he is working on other arrangements. He declined to be more specific. Meanwhile, a friend of the surviving suspect in the bombings was released from federal custody Monday amid a swell of support from family and friends, but was under strict house arrest and only allowed to leave his home to meet with lawyers and for true emergencies. Also, the administrator of the One Fund Boston released the protocol for payouts of the fund, with the families of those who lost loved ones and individuals who suffered double amputations or permanent brain damage in the bombings receiving the highest payments. The question of where Tamerlan Tsarnaev will be buried dragged on for another day, and the issue seemed far from resolved. Stefan said he plans to ask for a burial in the city of Cambridge, where Tsarnaev lived. Cambridge has asked him not to do ROSWELL DAILY RECORD

CALL 622-7710

POLLEN COUNT FOR THE WEEK: No pollen counts this week. Too much dust in the air. Mulberry, Cottonwood, Pine Present Low levels of mold seen

so. Cambridge City Manager Robert Healy urged the Tsarnaev family not to make a request. “The difficult and stressful efforts of the citizens of the City of Cambridge to return to a peaceful life would be adversely impacted by the turmoil, protests, and wide spread media presence at such an interment,” Healy said in a statement Sunday. Stefan also said he had out-of-state burial offers but refused to give additional details, adding he was worried protests will rise up at any place that agrees to the burial, as they have at his own funeral home. The founder of the organization that built Colorado’s largest mosque, Sheikh Abu-Omar Almubarac, says he is offering to bury Tsarnaev in a Denver-area Muslim cemetery, as long as family can get the body to Denver. If Russia refuses to accept the body, Cambridge may be forced to take it, said Wake Forest University professor Tanya Marsh, an expert in U.S. law on the disposal of human remains. Such a case would be unprecedented in Massachusetts, she said. She added that even in a country that’s had its share of notorious accused killers, this kind of opposition to a burial is unheard of and is exposing holes in the law, Marsh said.

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A4 Tuesday, May 7, 2013

OPINION

Roswell Daily Record

Compromise created Health Insurance Exchange board—now let it work

We now have a New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange board named by both the governor and the Legislature. Key up the band to play a rousing march. As usual, New Mexico is toward the end of the parade, but we have the luxury of learning from states that have gone before. The board’s job, under the Affordable Care Act, is to set up a marketplace where individuals and businesses can shop for health insurance, compare price and coverage, and purchase plans from private insurers – a kind of Amazon.com for insurance. The painstaking balance of this board and the nature of the exchange are the products of a lot of wrangling. State lawmakers worked on a bill for two years only to have it vetoed by the governor, who took the process away from them.

EDITORIAL

SHERRY ROBINSON ALL SHE WROTE

After a year of unproductive plodding by the administration, the Legislature this year took it back, cast aside two bills and settled on a third, which was a compromise measure. The big issues: Who, exactly, would sit on this board and how would they be chosen? And would the exchange itself be governed by the state or the marketplace? Freshman Sen. Benny Shendo, a Democrat from Jemez Pueblo whose bill won the day, gave the governor and the Legislature six appointees each on the board; the Superintendent of Insurance

is the tie breaker. He also wanted to create a framework that could accommodate change. The gover nor and Republicans thought two other Dem bills gave government too heavy a hand and wanted a market approach. Shendo agreed. While the gover nor heaped praise on her own party and all but ignored Shendo’s major role, let’s acknowledge several facts: Shendo has a business background, he’s no stranger to insurance, and he’s comfortable with a market approach. Also, Sen. Jerry Ortiz y Pino, an Albuquerque liberal whose exchange bill was doomed, handed the baton to Shendo and then helped deflect criticism from the left that they threw out lowincome people and gave industry what it wanted. “This is the start of a process, not the end of it,” said Ortiz y Pino. “We will make sure this doesn’t ignore the consumer. I

fully believe we will revisit the exchange every year for 10 years, and it will evolve. I’m not a great believer in the divine hand of the free market – I can’t believe I’m about to say this – but I do believe in the power of competition to keep prices affordable.” Said Shendo: “We take to heart all the comments. I represent the poorest of the poor. Those folks in my constituency are dear to my heart. We will find a way to help them.” This is why the exchange must of fer a statewide consumer assistance program, consumer complaint and grievance procedures, and alternative dispute resolution. The board can create a Native American Service Center to help with outreach and communications. We should now let the board and the exchange work, but the political climate being what it is, there’s a steady torrent of calamitous predictions in the

media, followed by reassurances from authorities. Most of us are in no position to judge, so we have to remind ourselves that we reached this point because the existing system doesn’t work. When one in five New Mexicans, more than 400,000, lacks insurance, that’s a failed system. When the sickest of the uninsured overload the emergency rooms, that’s a failed system. When you yourself can lose your coverage or be denied coverage for any reason, that’s a failed system. Obamacare may be flawed, but it’s the compromise Washington gave us, and it can be modified. As an expert from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation told lawmakers, “Despite the rhetoric, I can’t find a state where everyone rejects the law.” © New Mexico News Services 2013

Syria, US Move Closer to ‘Red Line’

On April 25, as if the Obama administration did not have enough to worry about, the White House said chemical weapons have been used in the Syrian civil war. The use of sarin nerve gas is a violation of international law. Its usage could mean the United States and allies through the United Nations could get involved in the Syrian struggle, which has raged for two years.

White House officials said they are not sure how the sarin was used. It’s possible the rebels used it. It’s more likely the gas was used by the dictatorial regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, the White House said.

President Barack Obama has said there is a “red line” of violation that will put the United States much closer to assisting the rebels against Assad in a more direct manner than the non-lethal aid we give to them now. The use of chemical weapons challenges international norms supported by the U.S. and the United Nations. President Obama must be cautious as he weighs action against the Syrian regime. War in the Middle East has cost America much blood and treasure since 2001.

An escalation of the war in Syria could put our troops in harm’s way. That’s the bottom line, and it should be the first consideration.

Yet there are other considerations. The U.N. estimated in February that the Syrian war has cost 70,000 Syrians their lives. It is thus dif ficult for the U.S., NATO, the Arab League and the U.N. to stand almost idly by when those entities supported the overthrow of Moammar Gadhafi in Libya in 2011. Gadhafi did not use chemical agents against his own people. The composition of the rebel force in Syria is a roadblock to increased aid. Parts of the Syrian rebel force have been reported to be Muslim radicals -- probably to include elements of al-Qaida.

Supporting factions of this type came back to burn the United States on Sept. 11, 2012, when radicals attacked the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya. Four Americans, including the ambassador, were killed -- long after Gadhafi had been replaced.

Is a politically independent state agency possible? An important piece of your life is about to be determined by a brand new state committee that has received very little attention so far. The Insurance Nominating Committee was created by legislation to appoint the Superintendent of Insurance, who will head a department, which, as of July 1, will no longer be a division of the Public Regulation Commission. Hallelujah! Every one of us, every which way you look, is a captive customer of the insurance industry, and therefore of regulations written and decisions

Doonesbury

MERILEE DANNEMANN

TRIPLE SPACED

made by this department. Let’s hope this committee gives us an honorable and committed superintendent, as free of political influence as it’s possible to be in our system. The change was partly the brainchild of an influential think tank called Think New Mexico, which now writes on

its website that the office “balances the interests of insurance businesses and consumers and insulates insurance regulation from political interference.” Is it possible to use the political system to create an office that will be free of politics? In New Mexico? The legislation attempts to do that. Four members of the ninemember committee are appointed by the governor, four by the Legislative Council (the political parties must be balanced), and the ninth by agreement of the eight. Half of the eight appointees must be from the insurance industry,

and the other half must represent consumers. As the legislation reads, the committee is supposed to appoint a superintendent and then disappear until the job becomes vacant again. The Governor’s Office and the Legislative Council recently announced their appointments to the panel. Now the work starts. The law says the superintendent, once appointed, can be fired only for “incompetence, willful neglect of duty or malfeasance in office,” and only by the committee. Super-

See DANNEMANN, Page A5

But as the U.S., NATO and the U.N. weigh their options, the body count in Syria is growing. And now Assad may have shown true desperation by using sarin gas.

International laws on chemical weapons should mean something. The White House and U.S. allies must now weigh what kind of response is warranted to these events in Syria.

Guest Editorial The Jacksonville Daily News

DEAR DOCTOR K: I’m a healthy young person, but I tend to have a lot of gas, bloating and diarrhea. Could a gluten-free diet help me? DEAR READER: Glutenfree eating is essential for people with celiac disease, which is an intolerance to the protein gluten. This protein is found in grains such as wheat, barley and rye. Gluten gives structure and texture to breads, pastas, cereals and baked goods. It is also used as a flavoring, thickener and stabilizer in foods such as ice cream, sauces and condiments. So gluten is in a lot of foods. About 300,000 Americans are diagnosed with

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

celiac disease. In people with this disease, gluten provokes the immune system to attack the lining of the small intestine. It causes gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, headache, trouble concentrating and fatigue. It also leads to weight loss and malnutrition. For people with celiac disease, following a strict

gluten-free diet is essential. In its most severe for m, celiac disease can cause life-threatening diarrhea and dehydration. Given your symptoms, you should talk to your doctor about getting tested for celiac disease. If you have it, you definitely should be on a gluten-free die. Even five years ago, I would have said there’s no point in your following a gluten-free diet if you don’t test positive for celiac disease. Two million Americans follow a gluten-free diet -- and that’s a lot more than have celiac disease. Many really believe it helps them, and recent studies have found that they may be right.

There now is good evidence for a condition called non-celiac gluten sensitivity. It causes gas, bloating and indigestion, but no intestinal damage. The evidence for non-celiac gluten sensitivity comes from studies of people who believe they have gluten sensitivity. The people have been chosen at random to eat foods containing gluten or not containing gluten -with neither the doctors nor the subjects in the study knowing what they were eating. Those who thought they had symptoms from gluten really did. If you don’t have celiac disease but you have sympSee DR. K, Page A5

25 YEARS AGO

May 7, 1988 Dr. Emmit M. Jennings, 65, of Roswell announced today he is a candidate for Chaves County commissioner, District III, in the June 7 Republican primary. A native New Mexican, Jennings has practiced medicine in Roswell since 1954. Dr. and Mrs. Jennings live in Roswell. They have seven children and eight grandchildren. Jennings is active in community activities and professional organizations. He served as a city councilor from 1960 to ‘64 and from 1968 to ‘71.


LOCAL/GENERAL

A5

Kids, families win at Roswell Public Library Roswell Daily Record

LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

National Family Month is a celebration of family held annually from Mother’s Day to Father’s Day. Families traditionally consist of a mother, a father and their of fspring. These may include adopted, foster or “added on” children. In many cases there are step families and blended families that may be thought of as “yours, mine and ours.” Blended families taken from the child’s perspective includes all of the people that “love me, on my fingers, toes, and beyond.” The extended family adds in grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins. Whatever the kinship, it is the heart connection that defines a family. The first week in May is Kids Win Week, encouraging adults to provide opportunities for children to recognize themselves as capable and as achievers; to bridge the gap between knowledge and success. Kids Win all 52 weeks of the year at the Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania. The services and resources range from books, CDs and DVDs to story and craft hours, special programs and the Summer Reading Program.

What’s Happening?

Mother’s Day will be celebrated during all three story and craft hours this week. The Wednesday story times begin at 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. and at 2 p.m. on Saturday. The books might feature A Mother for Choco, Runaway Bunny, Charlie the Chick, All the Ways I Love You, No T ime for Mother’s Day or The Mother’s

Dannemann Continued from Page A4

ficially, that looks pretty good. It creates a buffer between the superintendent and both the governor and the legislative leadership. We hope that means that neither the governor nor the legislative leadership can exert undue pressure. We are not concerned with only the current governor or this legislative leadership. A new structure has been created. The incoming superintendent’s term will expire at the end of 2015; after that, the law establishes four -year terms. The committee’s first term ends on June 30, 2015; a new committee will have to be named after the 2014 election, to appoint a new superintendent or reappoint one. All kinds of political dynamics are possible. The temptations to rejigger insurance regulation are manifold. We’ve heard about some improprieties, and more have been rumored in political circles. Years ago, I heard a story from a friend in the industry – unproven but credible – about pressure applied to an insurance company by a department employee to pay a possibly bogus claim for

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

toms after consuming gluten, try a gluten-free diet for a brief time to see if you feel better. Many foods now are labeled as being glutenfree. By cutting out glutencontaining foods, you may reduce your fiber intake from whole grains. You may also miss out on vitamins and minerals that you’d normally get from fortified foods. So you might consider contacting a registered dietitian. He or she can help you put together a food plan that has adequate fiber and nutrients. A gluten-free diet based on fruits, vegetables, lean proteins,

Day Sandwich. Children attending the story portion of the program are invited to create craft items to be used as gifts for the special women in their lives. These could include using precut materials for crafts, such as lacing together a magnetic heart picture frame, folding and decorating a gift box or designing a Mother’s Day card. The stories and crafts may vary between programs and the quantities of some craft items may be limited. The “Dig Into Reading” Summer Reading Program will begin in June with special events and activities for children. All ages are invited to register and participate. As an incentive to read, prizes may be selected based on the number of hours spent enjoying books checked out of the library. Deanne Dekle, children’s librarian, is looking for volunteers to help make the program successful. Volunteers must be 16 or older. They might be asked to sign up reading participants or to supervise the prize cart by checking receipts as participants turn in their hours for prizes. They may also be asked to help with craft preparations or straighten up the Malone Room after a story time. This is a fun opportunity and anyone interested in volunteering should come to the Children’s Room and speak to Deanne or Kate.

Book Talk

© New Mexico News Services 2013

nuts, seeds, legumes and whole grains that do not contain gluten, such as brown rice and quinoa, can be quite healthy. For many years, I saw patients who said that they were sensitive to gluten-containing foods. When their tests showed no celiac disease, I told them there was no reason for them to avoid such foods. Guess what? They often didn’t follow my advice -- and they were right. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)

ancient human relative. Coexisting with anatomically modern human beings in Europe for thousands of years, Neanderthals eventually became extinct, leaving Europe to be populated by their cousins. A mapping of the Neanderthal genome shows that moder n human beings share DNA with Neanderthals, suggesting that instead of being killed off; maybe they were absorbed through interbreeding. The discoveries of Neanderthal tools, burial sights, and dwelling areas show that they may have had culture, religion and language. Clive Finlayson’s book, The Humans Who Went Extinct: Why Neanderthals Died Out and We Survived, considers climate, ecology, and migrations of populations, as well as culture and interaction; concluding that the destiny of the Neanderthals was sealed by a major climate change. Linda Goldenberg’s Little People and a Lost World, covers a controversy about a skeleton found in 2003 on Flores Island in Indonesia. Estimated to be about 12,000 years old, the skeleton was thought to be the remains of a child. Further investigation showed that the skeleton was actually that of a grown woman, which raised the question: Was this skeleton just a small human, or did scientists discover another ancestor to human beings. Like all good scientific discoveries, this caused controversy among experts. Though written for children, Little People and a Lost World should be a good read for everybody who finds interest in scientific controversy. Discovering Ardi is a DVD documenting the discovery of a 4.4-millionyear-old hominid, a million years

older than Lucy. The show includes 3D recreations that bring Ardi and her world to life. The NOVA-produced DVD, The Boldest Hoax: the Story of the Piltdown Man, delves into the skullduggery and national pride that led a handful of faked bones to hoodwink a generation of leading scientists. For 40 years, a fossil skull discovered in Piltdown, England, was hailed as the missing link between apes and humans. Then, in 1953, new scientific tests revealed the shocking truth that the “Piltdown Man” was a fake! With more red herrings and false trails than a whodunit mystery, The Boldest Hoax digs into intriguing new clues from archives at the British Natural History Museum. NOVA gets to the bottom of the scientific hoodwinking.

Books Again

Fiction and facts for all members of the family are available to be purchased at Books Again, the used book store located at 404 W. Second. The books are priced to sell and during the special May sale, all fiction books are $1 each. In addition, the chapter books for children and teens and all mass market paperback books will be on sale for 25 cents each. Books not on special sale are still a bargain costing approximately one fourth of the original price. Books Again is open on Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The store is operated by Friends of the Library volunteers and all proceeds are used to benefit the library. Park behind the store and shop for literary bargains.

First inaugural ball held on this day

From the beginning of human

a politically connected individual. I emphasize that the story is old and the employee who allegedly did this is long gone. It’s not hard to imagine similar pressures, not only for claims but for rulings about rates. Big dollars are involved – your dollars and mine. Honorable public servants at every level resist such temptations every day. New Mexico needs an insurance superintendent who understands the industry but is not in its pocket. We need a superintendent who will go after bad guys, no matter which side of the system they’re on – insurance companies, agents, adjusters, lawyers, and – yes – consumers and who knows how to split the difference in approving rates and setting regulatory policies – reasonable for the insurance companies, fair and understandable for consumers. This is not an unrealistic ideal; though the details are specific to this industry, it’s the level of excellence New Mexicans have the right to expect of every department head. Contact Merilee Dannemann through www.triplespacedagain.c om.

existence, families have been a part of the human experience. Robert Briggs, Circulation Department supervisor, ponders library material related to the mysteries and origins of humanity. With the improvement of scientific research methods over the years, along with the discoveries of additional burial sites, cave paintings, tools and other ancient artifacts; knowledge of our ancient history has increased and continues to increase the information on the family of mankind. One fossil discovery transforming archaeological views was Lucy, the 3.2 million year old remains of a hominid that some consider part of a species that was a link between human beings and our ape-like ancestors. Donald Johanson discovered Lucy’s bones in 1974 in a maze of ravines in northern Ethiopia. His book, Lucy’s Legacy: The Quest For Human Origins picks up where his 1981 bestseller, Lucy: The Beginning of Humankind left off. He recounts his discovery of Lucy and his extensive research and findings during the following years, discussing modern theories and controversies about our ancient cousins. He conveys how quickly the field changes with groundbreaking discoveries that have further transformed our understanding. Though the book reads much like a memoir, it is informative and presents the subject matter in a way that nonPh.D.s can understand. In 1981, Johanson founded the Institute of Human Origins, a nonprofit research institution devoted to the study of prehistory. In the DVD, Decoding Neanderthals, scientists from various fields of studies investigate the

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

Today is Tuesday, May 7, the 127th day of 2013. There are 238 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On May 7, 1763, Pontiac, chief of the Ottawa Indians, attempted to lead a sneak attack on British-held Fort Detroit, but was foiled because the British had been tipped off in advance. (The Ottawa Indians and other tribes then launched an all-out war with the British that came to be known as Pontiac’s War.) On this date: In 1789, the first inaugural ball was held in New York in honor of President George Washington and his wife, Martha. In 1824, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125, had its premiere in Vienna. In 1825, composer Antonio Salieri died in Vienna, Austria. In 1833, composer Johannes Brahms was born in Hamburg, Germany. In 1840, composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky was born in Votkinsk, Russia. In 1915, nearly 1,200 people died when a German torpedo sank the British liner RMS Lusitania off the Irish coast. In 1942, U.S. Army Gen. Jonathan Wainwright went on a Manila radio station to announce the Allied surrender of the Philippines to Japanese forces during World War II. In 1945, Germany signed an unconditional surrender at Allied headquarters in Rheims (rams), France, ending its role in World War II. In 1954, the 55-day Battle of Dien Bien Phu in Vietnam ended with Vietnamese insurgents overrunning French forces. In 1963, the United States launched the Telstar 2 communications satellite. In 1975, President Gerald R. Ford formally declared an end to the “Vietnam era.” In Ho Chi Minh City — formerly Saigon — the Viet Cong celebrated its takeover. In 1992, the latest addition to America’s space shuttle fleet, Endeavour, went on its first flight. A 203-year-old proposed constitutional amendment barring Congress from giving itself a midterm pay raise received enough votes for ratification as Michigan became the 38th state to approve it. Ten years ago: President George W. Bush ordered the lifting of sanctions against Iraq, and called on members of the U.N. Security Council to do the same. The White House announced President Bush had chosen New Mexico oilman Colin R. McMillan to be secretary of the Navy and Air Force Secretary James Roche to replace the dismissed secretary of the Army, Thomas White. (However, McMillan died in an apparent suicide in July 2003, while Roche’s nomination languished in Congress before being withdrawn in March 2004.) Five years ago: President George W. Bush, addressing the Council of Americas, said Cuba’s post-Fidel Castro leadership had made only “empty gestures at reform” as he rejected calls for easing U.S. restrictions on the communist island. Dmitry Medvedev was sworn in as Russia’s president. One year ago: Education Secretary Arne Duncan broke ranks with the White House, stating his unequivocal support for same-sex marriage one day after Vice President Joe Biden suggested on NBC that he supported gay marriage as well. Vladimir Putin took the oath of office as Russia’s president in a brief but regal Kremlin ceremony. Today’s Birthdays: Former Sen. Pete Domenici, R-N.M., is 81. Singer Jimmy Ruffin is 74. Actress Robin Strasser is 68. Singer-songwriter Bill Danoff is 67. Rhythm-andblues singer Thelma Houston is 67. Rock musician Bill Kreutzmann (Grateful Dead) is 67. Rock musician Prairie Prince is 63. Movie writer-director Amy Heckerling is 61. Actor Michael E. Knight is 54. Rock musician Phil Campbell (Motorhead) is 52. Country musician Rick Schell is 50. Rock singer-musician Chris O’Connor (Primitive Radio Gods) is 48. Actress Traci Lords is 45. Singer Eagle-Eye Cherry is 42. Actor Breckin Meyer is 39. Rock musician

Former Sen. Pete Domenici, R-N.M., is 81 today.

Courtesy Photo

Matt Helders (Arctic Monkeys) is 27. Actor Taylor Abrahamse is 22.

Thought for Today: “We all live in suspense, from day to day, from hour to hour; in other words, we are the hero of our own story.” — Mary McCarthy, American author (1912-1989).

Presents

20th Annual

Spring River Race for the Zoo

May 11, 2013 8:00 am 10K • 5K • 2 mile

Funded in part by Roswell Lodgers Tax


A6 Tuesday, May 7, 2013

NATION/OBITUARIES

Italy’s ex-premier Giulio Andreotti dies at 94 ROME (AP) — Giulio Andreotti personified the nation he helped shape, the good and the bad. One of Italy’s most important postwar figures, he helped draft the country’s constitution after World War II, served seven times as premier and spent 60 years in Parliament. But the Christian Democrat who was friends with popes and cardinals was also a controversial figure who survived corruption scandals and allegations of aiding the Mafia: Andreotti was accused of exchanging a “kiss of honor” with the mob’s longtime No. 1 boss and was indicted in what was called “the trial of the century” in Palermo. He was eventually cleared, but his legacy was forever marred. Still clinging to his last official title, senator-for-life, Andreotti died Monday at age 94 after an extended period of poor health that included a hospitalization for a heart ailment. Andreotti, a key player in the now-defunct Christian Democratic Party that dominated politics for nearly half a century, helped bring prosperity to what was once one of Europe’s poorest countries. When a corruption scandal flushed out the old political guard in the 1990s, marking the end of the first Italian Republic, he survived. But he lost political clout after he became a senator-for-life in 1991, an appointment that freed him from electoral cycles but also deprived him of capital in the backroom deal-making that helped create his reputation as a Machiavellian politician. And so, Italy entered the so-called second republic, characterized by stalemates and infighting, and dominated by other parties and other men, such as Silvio Berlusconi. Arguably among Italy’s most important statesmen, having also served eight times as defense minister and five times

OBITUARIES

T.E. Arrington

Visitation for T.E. Arrington, 90, of Ruidoso, will be Wednesday, May 8, at LaGrone Funeral Chapel of Ruidoso from 4-6 p.m. Graveside services will be Thursday, May 9, at 11 a.m. at Forest Lawn Cemetery. Mr. Arrington passed

as foreign minister, Andreotti will be buried with a small private Mass, not a state funeral befitting of his contributions to the nation. The choice was made by his family, according to Italian media, and is perhaps a reflection of his mixed legacy. Andreotti’s political career was as varied as it was long, with posts covering everything from cinema to sports. Born in 1919, he once noted that he had outlived two other Italian phenomena that emerged that year: fascism and the precursor of his Christian Democrats, the Italian Popular Party. Andreotti’s rise in the Italian political scene mirrored the rise of Italy, which was emerging from two decades of fascist dictatorship under Benito Mussolini. He joined the conservative Christian Democrats, was part of the assembly that wrote the constitution and was elected to Parliament in 1948. He remained there ever since. He held a series of Cabinet positions after World War II until he became premier for the first time in 1972. Twenty years later, he finished his last stint as premier. By the early 1990s, a vast anti-corruption drive led by Italian prosecutors — the “Clean Hands” probe — swept through parliament and hobbled most political parties. Andreotti’s Christian Democrats were among them, but the scandal did not touch him personally and he managed to stay on as premier until an election in 1992. In 1993, a Mafia informer told prosecutors that Andreotti had been involved in the 1979 slaying of Mino Pecorelli, a muckraking jour nalist killed in a mob-style execution in Rome by four shots from a pistol with a silencer. Pecorelli’s articles had often targeted Andreotti, along with a

away Friday, May 3, 2013, in Roswell. He was born Sept. 19, 1922, in Eva, Ala. He was a member of the Elida Masonic Lodge and the Roswell Elks Lodge. He moved to Ruidoso from Roswell in 1980 and was a retired contractor. Mr. Arrington attended the First Baptist Church in Ruidoso. He married Myrtle Williams on Dec. 24, 1941, in Gadsen, Ala., and she preceded him in death on Sept. 1, 2002.

He is survived by a son Terry E. Arrington of Granbury, Texas; four daughters, Linda J. Hodge of Gaithersburg, Md., Peggy J. Lee of Truth or Consequences, Susan Kay Hair of Midland, Texas, and Pamela Jo Robinson of Ruidoso; nine grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in

range of public figures. Andreotti was sometimes referred to in print as “The Godfather.” The prosecution argued that the Mafia killed Pecorelli at the behest of Andreotti, who allegedly feared the reporter had dug up compromising information. Andreotti has always denied the charges, saying he was targeted by mobsters who were trying to get even for his crackdowns on organized crime. The lengthy case — dubbed by the Italian press “the trial of the century” — resulted in an acquittal in 1999; a shock conviction and a sentence of 24 years in prison by an appeals court in November 2002; and, in the third and final judgment a year later, another acquittal. In a separate case during the same years, Andreotti stood trial in Palermo on charges that he colluded with the Mafia. But he was cleared in that case, too. Andreotti was born to schoolteachers in Rome on Jan. 14, 1919. He earned a law degree at Rome University and became a journalist after graduation. During World War II he worked as a librarian in the Vatican, and it was there that he met several politicians, including Alcide De Gasperi, later one of Italy’s foremost postwar statesmen. At age 35, Andreotti became Italy’s youngest interior minister. It was the beginning of a career during which he navigated the Byzantine world of Italian politics like no other, accumulating power, honors and enemies along the way. Such was his reach that he was sometimes called “Divo Giulio” — a play on his name Giulio and the Latin “Divus Iulius” (or Divine Julius), which was used for Julius Caesar. His critics called him Beelzebub for what they considered his diabolical skills. The one political prize he

death by a grandson Jason Hair. The family has requested memorials to your favorite charity. Condolences may be sent to the family at lagroneruidoso.com.

Don French

Services are pending for Don French, 77, of Roswell, at Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home and Crematory. He passed away on Sunday, May 5, 2013.

Emilia Martinez

Services are pending at Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory for Emilia Martinez, who passed away Sunday, May 5, 2013, in Califor nia. A further announcement will be made once arrangements have been finalized.

Clergy asked to make moral argument on guns WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Joe Biden wants pastors, rabbis and nuns to tell their flocks that enacting gun control is the moral thing to do. But another vote may have to wait until Congress wraps up work on an immigration overhaul. Biden met for two-anda-half hours Monday with more than a dozen leaders from various faith communities — Christian, Jewish, Muslim and Sikh, to name a few. Both Biden and the faith leaders encouraged each other not to give up on what has been an arduous and thus far fruitless effort by Biden and President Barack Obama to pass new gun laws in the wake of December’s schoolhouse shooting in Connecticut. Although momentum on gun control stalled in the Senate last month, Biden has insisted the issue is very much alive, and has been meeting regularly with gun violence victims and law

enforcement to build support for a second go at legislation to expand background checks, improve mental health care and take other steps to reduce gun violence. Monday’s session reflects an attempt to broaden the coalition calling for new gun laws to include a wide array of religious groups — including evangelicals and conservative faith communities. Without naming names, Biden alluded to senators who opposed background checks — the centerpiece of the Obama administration’s push — who have faced a backlash in the weeks since and could possibly be picked off if the issue comes back for a vote. Lingering concer ns from some participants illustrated the ongoing challenge the administration faces in winning support for the proposals, even though Biden and Obama regularly tout polls suggesting they enjoy broad support.

Some participants raised questions about whether background checks could lead to a national gun registry or whether mental health provisions would be used to create a list of individuals permanently banned from obtaining guns.

“There were some very powerful evangelical leaders in the room who needed to be reassured,” said Pastor Michael McBride of the PICO National Network, a faithbased organizing network.

Citing what he described as misinformation from the National Rifle Association and others, Biden said the renewed push for gun control must correct misconceptions about what the proposals do and don’t do, participants said. He asked clergy to keep up the pressure and to reframe the debate for their followers in moral terms.

Roswell Daily Record

AP Photo

In this Friday, Dec. 15, 1995, file photo, former Premier Giulio Andreotti reacts to a question, as he attends a court hearing of his trial, temporarily moved to Rome from Palermo.

never achieved was to become president of the republic, a largely ceremonial but highly regarded office. He came closest in 1992, but his efforts failed amid the “Clean Hands” corruption scandals. A devout Roman Catholic, Andreotti maintained solid ties to the Vatican throughout his political career. His Rome address was close to the centers of political power but also just across the Tiber from St. Peter’s Square. He wrote numerous books, some of them best-sellers, wrote articles for Italian publications and edited the monthly Catholic magazine 30 Gior ni. He was courted on TV shows for his deep knowledge of Italian and

world affairs as well as for his humor. A probing portrait of him in the film “Il Divo” was honored with the Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival in 2008. He even made a guest appearance as himself in the movie, “Il Tassinaro” (”The Taxi Driver”) with the late comedian Alberto Sordi. The Italian Olympic Committee CONI said a moment of silence would be held at all sporting events this week to honor his service as president of the organizing committee of the 1960 Rome Olympics. Andreotti was married to Livia Danese. He is survived by his wife, their four children and their grandchildren.

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BUSINESS REVIEW

Roswell Daily Record

The staff at Paul’s Vet Supply includes (left to right) Paul Bierwirth, Belinda Bierwirth, Nelson Bierwirth and Adrian Ruiz. They are ready to fix you up with whatever you need for your ranch, farm, or for your pets at home. Paul's Veterinary Supply, 2005 S.E. Main St., is one of the largest independent animal health distributors in the United States. Please call 624-2123 for more information.

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

A7

DOOR TECHS, LLC installed these beautiful residential garage doors. You have several door style options and window options on residential doors as you can see in this picture. DOOR TECHS offers outstanding service for all makes and models of garage doors. They offer 24hour emergency service. Please phone 623-0105 for more information.

RDR Business Review Page is a great way to advertise

The Roswell Daily Record’s Business Review Page is a great way for a business to advertise. The Business Review Pages run three times a week, in the Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday papers. There are only a few spots available right now. If you’ve “been thinking about it”, NOW is the time to get your spot before they’re all gone. Your RDR advertising representative can fill you in on the complete details. Please phone or ask them for the information. The basic setup for the Business Review Page is as follows: You sign up and we run your ad on the bottom half of the Business Review Page on it’s assigned day (Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday) each week. We have a maximum of twenty-six ads running per page. After advertising weekly for six months, you will receive a “free feature article” (then another one six months

this feature to be an ideal way for them to advertise economically. They have an ad in the Roswell Daily Record once a week, on their regular day, and then they have a half page write-up with pictures twice a year to tell the story of their business. Please call your Roswell Daily Record advertising representative at 622-7710 for complete information and prices.

TJ’s Soda/Media Blasting & TJ’s Mobile Pressure Washing come to you for cleaning and/or paint removal needs. Left is “Bucket” which has a 34 foot reach for “high” washing needs. Right is“Tank”. Both are equipped with Hot or Cold High Pressure washing units. Phone 575-626-3573 for a free estimate.

after your first free one and another one six months after that) as our “Thank You!” for advertising on the Business Review Page. This six month schedule comes from having up to twenty-six (maximum) advertisers per page and a fifty-two week year. With ads starting as low as $21.43 (including tax) per week, the

Business Review Page is ideal for businesses large and small to obtain effective advertising on a small budget.

The feature article typically uses two or three photographs and the equivalent of two doublespaced typewritten pages of information about your business. It’s an ad that looks like a written story. This info usually consists

of what you have to offer (services and/or product); who you are (history); where you are located; when you are open; and how to get in touch with you. The typical layout can be altered to fit your circumstance. If you want more pictures, we can cut down on the article’s length. We do what ever works best for you.

Bill Flynt is the Business Review Page Editor. Bill takes the photographs and either writes the text (with your input,) or uses an article that you provide for your feature story. We can also use your photographs, if you have ones that you want to use. Many local business owners (like the three pictured here) have found

In this economy you’ve got to advertise to stay in business, and the Roswell Daily Record's Business Review Page is an effective way to do it.

Call now while there are still spaces available. It’s a great deal and you will see more customers coming in the front door of your business when you advertise in the newspaper. Advertising in the Roswell Daily Record works because it is a great way to inform people about your business and what you have to offer. Phone 622-7710.

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A8 Tuesday, May 7, 2013

ENTERTAINMENT / WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Mostly sunny and warmer

Tonight

Partly cloudy

Wednesday

Mostly sunny and breezy

National Cities

Thursday

Friday

Partly sunny

Saturday

Periods of clouds and sun

Chance of a shower

Sunday

Monday

A t-storm in the area

Mostly sunny

High 88°

Low 55°

86°/56°

85°/50°

82°/56°

77°/52°

81°/55°

87°/52°

S at 4-8 mph POP: 0%

SSE at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

S at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

NE at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

ESE at 4-8 mph POP: 25%

NNW at 8-16 mph POP: 30%

WNW at 4-8 mph POP: 40%

SW at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 81°/53° Normal high/low ............... 82°/52° Record high ............. 101° in 2000 Record low ................. 32° in 1917 Humidity at noon .................. 25%

Farmington 71/43

Clayton 78/48

Raton 72/43

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Mon. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date .......................... Normal year to date .............

0.00" 0.00" 0.20" 0.44" 2.12"

Santa Fe 73/41

Gallup 68/39

Tucumcari 84/51

Albuquerque 76/51

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 82/50

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 70/49

T or C 79/53

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed. New

Rise 6:04 a.m. 6:03 a.m. Rise 4:33 a.m. 5:09 a.m. First

Full

Set 7:45 p.m. 7:46 p.m. Set 5:53 p.m. 6:49 p.m. Last

Roswell Daily Record

Alamogordo 83/58

Silver City 76/45

ROSWELL 88/55 Carlsbad 89/60

Hobbs 87/53

Las Cruces 81/54

Regional Cities Today Wed. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

83/58/s 76/51/pc 62/31/pc 88/59/s 89/60/s 62/36/pc 78/48/pc 62/36/s 82/50/pc 80/49/pc 75/50/pc 71/43/pc 68/39/pc 87/53/pc 81/54/s 70/40/pc 68/42/pc 77/50/pc 86/55/pc 83/50/pc 68/40/pc 72/43/pc 61/35/pc 88/55/s 70/49/s 73/41/pc 76/45/pc 79/53/pc 84/51/pc 71/43/pc

78/50/s 72/49/pc 59/30/pc 88/57/s 88/60/s 59/32/pc 77/48/t 60/33/s 81/50/s 78/47/s 71/48/pc 67/42/pc 64/39/pc 85/55/s 79/53/s 67/39/pc 64/39/pc 74/50/pc 86/58/s 82/51/s 61/38/pc 70/39/t 58/30/pc 86/56/s 67/47/s 69/43/pc 72/46/s 77/53/s 83/50/s 68/43/pc

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

48/34/c 68/53/pc 65/57/sh 70/52/pc 65/52/t 71/50/pc 70/54/pc 85/60/s 66/46/pc 74/52/pc 83/61/s 86/67/pc 85/59/s 74/52/pc 75/57/pc 75/59/pc 70/56/sh 86/58/t

52/38/s 77/57/pc 68/55/t 66/55/c 71/53/c 73/52/pc 70/51/pc 88/65/pc 62/44/t 76/51/pc 82/58/s 85/68/pc 85/66/pc 78/54/pc 76/61/t 79/64/s 71/56/pc 89/57/t

U.S. Extremes

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

83/68/s 86/62/pc 75/56/s 80/60/pc 69/55/pc 73/54/pc 81/60/pc 67/56/c 85/64/s 70/55/pc 77/51/pc 68/53/t 75/54/pc 66/48/pc 68/59/sh 76/51/s 84/55/s 62/59/r

85/69/s 89/62/t 75/56/t 83/62/s 64/57/r 76/57/t 85/60/s 69/58/sh 84/66/s 69/51/c 76/48/pc 72/53/t 80/61/pc 69/51/pc 67/59/pc 74/51/pc 80/57/s 69/56/t

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 91° ................... Lowell, Idaho Low: 23° ...................Stanley, Idaho

High: 83° ..........................Carlsbad Low: 27° ......................... Angel Fire

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts

Precipitation

Hemingway items ‘Iron Man 3’ tops weekend with $174.1M go to JFK Library May 9

May 17 May 24 May 31

WASHINGTON (AP) — While most Americans have never seen Ernest Hemingway’s home in Cuba where he wrote some of his most famous books, a set of 2,000 recently digitized records delivered to the United States will give scholars and the public a fuller view of the Nobel Prize-winning novelist’s life. A private U.S. foundation is working with Cuba to preserve more of Hemingway’s papers, books and belongings that have been kept at his home near Havana since he died in 1961. On Monday at the U.S. Capitol, U.S. Rep. James McGovern of Massachusetts and the Bostonbased Finca Vigia Foundation announced that 2,000 digital copies of Hemingway papers and materials will be transferred to Boston’s John F. Kennedy Library. This is the first time anyone in the U.S. has been able to examine these items from the writer’s Cuban estate, Finca Vigia. The records include passports showing Hemingway’s travels and letters commenting on such works as his 1954 Nobel Prize-winning “The Old Man and the Sea.” An earlier digitization effort that opened 3,000 Hemingway files in 2008 uncovered fragments of manuscripts, including an alternate ending to “For Whom the Bell Tolls” and corrected proofs of “The Old Man and the Sea.” The newest trove includes some of Hemingway’s personal correspondence, including a letter that literary critic Malcolm Cowley wrote to Hemingway about the award-winning book. “‘The Old Man and the Sea’ is pretty marvelous,” Cowley wrote. “The old man is marvelous, the sea is, too, and so is the fish.” American poet and writer Archibald MacLeish wrote a telegram in 1940 after the publication of “For Whom the Bell Tolls,” praising Hemingway’s work. “The word great had stopped meaning anything in this language until your book,” MacLeish wrote. “You have given it all its meaning back. I’m proud to have shared any part of your sky.” To the actress Ingrid Bergman, Hemingway typed a confidential note in 1941 saying he wanted her to play a lead role opposite Gary Cooper in a film of “For Whom the Bell Tolls. “There is no one that I would rather see do it, and I have consistently refused all suggestions that I endorse other people for

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013

the role,” he wrote in the note and kept a carbon copy. Jenny Phillips, the granddaughter of Hemingway’s editor, Maxwell Perkins, founded the Finca Vigia Foundation in 2004 after a visit to Havana. She saw Hemingway’s home falling into disrepair and became aware of the many records kept in a damp basement at the estate. She worked to get permission from the U.S. Treasury and State departments to send conservators and archivists to Cuba to help save the literary records and to help train Cuban archivists. The newly digitized files include handwritten letters to his wife, Mary, bar bills, grocery lists, notations of hurricane sightings and handwritten notebooks full of weather observations. It does not include any manuscripts. “This is the flotsam and jetsam of a writer’s life — it’s his life and his work,” Phillips said. “All these bits and pieces get assembled in a big puzzle.” Restoration work continues at Hemingway’s Finca Vigia estate in Cuba. A new building is being constructed with library-quality atmospheric controls to house the writer’s books and original records. Sandra Spanier, a Hemingway researcher and English professor at Penn State, has reviewed the latest release of documents and said they will help biographers and historians create a fuller portrait of Hemingway. “While there’s no one single bombshell document, no long-lost novel to be discovered here, these new details add texture and nuance to our understanding of the man,” she said. “Hemingway was an eyewitness to 20th-century history. His work both reflected his times and, in a way, shaped his times.” The Kennedy Library holds a large Hemingway collection of more than 100,000 pages of writings and 10,000 photographs because Jacqueline Kennedy helped arrange a place for the items.

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$200 - $2,000

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Disney’s Marvel Studios continues to mine precious metal with a $174.1 million opening weekend for “Iron Man 3,” the second-biggest domestic debut ever behind the $200-millionplus launch of “The Avengers” a year ago. The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by Hollywood.com are: 1. “Iron Man 3,” Disney, $174,144,585, 4,253 locations, $40,946 average, $174,144,585, one week. 2. “Pain & Gain,” Paramount, $7,511,315, 3,287 locations, $2,285 average, $33,830,390, two weeks. 3. “42,” War ner Bros., $6,055,327, 3,345 locations, $1,810 average, $78,181,097, four weeks. 4. “Oblivion,” Universal, $5,642,335, 3,430 locations, $1,645 average, $75,814,250, three weeks. 5. “The Croods,” Fox, $4,202,639, 2,915 locations, $1,442 average, $168,720,798, seven weeks. 6. “The Big Wedding,” Lionsgate, $3,881,857, 2,633 locations, $1,474 average, $14,216,422, two weeks. 7. “Mud,” Roadside Attractions, $2,160,319, 576 locations, $3,751 average, $5,168,217, two weeks. 8. “Oz the Great and Powerful,” Disney, $2,113,009, 1,160 locations, $1,822 average, $228,858,941, nine weeks. 9. “Scary Movie 5,” Weinstein Co., $1,441,360, 1,857 locations, $776 average, $29,609,668, four weeks. 10. “The Place Beyond the Pines,” Focus, $1,280,152, 1,162 locations, $1,102 average, $18,676,792, six weeks. 11. “G.I. Joe: Retaliation,” Paramount, $1,270,094, 1,804 locations, $704 average, $118,752,410, six weeks. 12. “Olympus Has Fallen,” FilmDistrict, $1,194,650, 1,632 locations, $732 average,

Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Stationary

10s

Showers T-storms

20s

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

AP Photo

This film publicity image released by Disney-Marvel Studios shows Robert Downey Jr., left, as Tony Stark/Iron Man and Gwyneth Paltrow as Pepper Potts in a scene from “Iron Man 3,” the No. 1 domestic movie over the weekend.

$95,374,529, seven weeks. 13. “Jurassic Park” in 3-D, Universal, $896,750, 980 locations, $915 average, $43,756,735, five weeks. 14. “The Company You Keep,” Sony Pictures Classics, $703,465, 541 locations, $1,300 average, $3,433,182, five weeks. 15. “Evil Dead,” Sony, $614,524, 959 locations, $641 average, $53,200,013, five weeks. 16. “Tyler Perry’s Temptation,” Lionsgate, $411,592, 504 locations, $817 average, $51,365,503, six weeks.

17. “Jack the Giant Slayer,” Warner Bros., $295,425, 335 locations, $882 average, $64,151,565, 10 weeks. 18. “Disconnect,” LD Entertainment, $210,744, 161 locations, $1,309 average, $1,054,974, four weeks. 19. “Identity Thief,” Universal, $204,010, 300 locations, $680 average, $133,454,405, 13 weeks. 20. “Silver Linings Playbook,” Weinstein Co., $198,548, 468 locations, $424 average, $131,703,512, 25 weeks.


4

SPORTS

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Memorial Day Weekend May 24, 25 & 26 EXTENDED

B

Baseball, softball, tennis brackets released days

Tuesday, May 7, 2013 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

ALBUQUERQUE — The New Mexico Activities Association released the state tournament brackets for baseball, softball and tennis on Sunday. The baseball brackets feature three county teams, the softball brackets feature two county teams and the tennis brackets

Roswell Daily Record

feature four county teams.

Baseball

Dexter, Goddard and NMMI all earned bids to the state tournament in baseball. The Rockets received the No. 2 seed in the Class 4A tournament and hosts No. 15 Belen in a best-

of-three series in the first round. First pitch for Game 1 of the series is slated for 4 p.m. at the Launching Pad. The winner of the series faces either No. 7 St. Pius X or No. 10 Deming on May 16 at noon at Eldorado High School in Albuquerque.

Artesia received the No. 12 seed and faces No. 5 Los Lunas in a best-of-three series, beginning Friday at 4 p.m. Dexter and NMMI each earned a spot in the Class 2A tournament. The Demons received the No. 5 seed and hosts No. 12 Texico on

Section

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. The winner then faces the winner of No. 4 Eunice and No. 13 Santa Fe Prep on May 15 at 10 a.m. at Cleveland High School in Rio Rancho. The Institute got the No. 10 seed and travels to face No. 7 See BRACKETS, Page B3

FROM A COYOTE TO A RAVEN

Kevin J. Keller Photo

Roswell senior Emily Ellington, front row center, flanked by her parents, Brent and Dyan Ellington, signs her national letter of intent to attend San Jacinto College in Houston, Monday. Joining the Ellingtons for the signing were, back row from left, grandfather Ron Ellington, grandmother Sharon Ellington, Roswell coach Heather Baca, U.S. Junior National coach Pat Ledezma, grandmother Allene Chaves and Roswell assistant principal Brian Byrd.

Ellington signs with San Jacinto KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

Emily Ellington has spent the past three years of her sporting life solely focused on one sport — volleyball. She’s captained the Roswell

squad, toured domestically and internationally with the U.S. Junior National team, played club volleyball and is currently working with former Olympian Marilyn McReavy Nolen, all in the hopes of landing a scholarship to play at the next level. The dedication paid off in the form of offers from numerous uni-

versities and colleges. On Monday, the 6-foot middle blocker made her official choice, signing a national letter of intent to continue her career at San Jacinto College.

NMMI Sports Press Photo

Stanley cards 78

NMMI’s Matt Stanley hits a putt from just off the 14th green during the District 3-1A/3A Championships, Monday.

New Mexico Military Institute’s Matt Stanley shot a 6-over 78 and finished in a three-way tie for second at the District 31A/3A Championships on Monday at NMMI Golf Course. Stanley shot a 2-over 38 on the front nine with four bogeys, three pars and two birdies, and followed that

with a 4-over 40 on the back nine with five pars and four bogeys. He tied for second with Lovington’s Andrew Homer and Alec Valencia. Lovington’s Zac Lambert, competing as an individual, won the district title by a shot over the trio with a 5-

NBA playoffs: Bulls stun rusty Heat 93-86 in Game 1 MIAMI (AP) — Nate Robinson was spitting blood in the first half, then delivered the deepest cuts of the night in the final moments. And the Chicago Bulls reminded the Miami Heat that no one in the NBA plays them any tougher. Yes, the streakbusters struck again. Robinson scored 27 points, Jimmy Butler added 21 points and a career -hightying 14 rebounds, and the Bulls beat Miami 93-86 on Monday night in Game 1 of the teams’ Eastern Conference semifinal series. The team that snapped Miami’s 27-game winning streak in the regular season — the second-longest in NBA history — found a way to topple the champs again, this time ending a run of 12 straight Heat victories overall. “I’ve played on some tough teams,” Robinson said. “But this one, there’s something a little different, something spe-

cial about this group.” A seven-point deficit midway through the fourth wasn’t enough to doom the Bulls, who finished the game on a 10-0 run in the final 1:59. And to think, the Bulls weren’t anywhere near full strength. Kirk Hinrich was out again with a calf injury. Luol Deng isn’t even expected to rejoin the team until Tuesday, after dealing with an illness apparently so severe that a spinal tap — and other tests since — were needed to rule out things like meningitis. “So proud of my team man, this bed might be good luck after all,” Deng wrote on Twitter after the game, with a photo of him in a hospital bed. Oh, and Derrick Rose remains sidelined, as he’s been since April 2012. No problem. The Heat are 41-3 in their last 44 games — with two of those losses to the

See BULLS, Page B3

• Goddard, Roswell at District 4-4A Championships, at Spring River Golf Course, 1 p.m. • Dexter at Jal, 6 p.m.

AP Photo

RIGHT: Chicago’s Carlos Boozer, right, dunks over Miami’s Dwyane Wade during the Bulls’ win in Game 1 of their series, Monday.

— TUESDAY, MAY 7 —

PREP SOFTBALL

See DISTRICT, Page B3

Bulls, who are now 3-2 against Miami this season. “I think when you’re facing adversity, you have to be mentally tough,” Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau said. “But this is just one game. We have to play a lot better in our next one.” LeBron James got his MVP trophy from Commissioner David Stern before the game, then struggled to a two-point first half before finishing with 24 points, eight rebounds and seven assists for Miami. Dwyane Wade added 14 for the Heat, who had no one else in double figures, finished shooting 40 percent

LOCAL SCHEDULE PREP GOLF

See ELLINGTON, Page B3

PLAYER

OF THE

DAY

San Antonio Spurs • Ginobili struggled from the field throughout the night, but came through in the clutch for the Spurs in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference semifinal series with Golden State on Monday. Ginobili made just one of his first eight attempts from beyond the arc, but, in double overtime with his team trailing 127-126, he knocked down a triple from the left wing to win the game for the Spurs. He also had 11 assists and seven rebounds for the Spurs, who took a 1-0 lead in the series. MANU GINOBILI


B2 Tuesday, May 7, 2013

SPORTS

Derby winner Orb prepares for Preakness run

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Now that Shug McGaughey has won the Kentucky Derby, it’s time for the 62-year-old trainer to go after another race missing from his Hall of Fame resume. Orb will follow up his win at Churchill Downs by running in the Preakness on May 18, giving the colt a shot at the T riple Crown. Orb arrived back at his home base in New York on Sunday, as did McGaughey and jockey Joel Rosario. The trainer was still absorbing what happened a day earlier. The colt extended his winning streak to five races, splashing through the slop to win the Derby by 2 1/4 lengths, giving McGaughey and Rosario their first Derby wins. Orb rallied from 17th and made a sweeping move on the turn for home to win. “It did not matter if it was wet or dry, the best horse won,” rival trainer D. Wayne Lukas said McGaughey has never won the Preakness in two previous attempts. He hasn’t had a horse in the race since 1989, when Easy Goer finished second to Sunday Silence, duplicating their Derby finish that year. For a trainer who has always shown patience with his horses,

Boxing

Manny Pacquiao plans ring return vs. Rios in Macau

Manny Pacquiao will return to the ring Nov. 24 to meet Brandon Rios in a welterweight bout in Macau, the eight-division world champion’s promoter said Monday. Bob Arum told The Associated Press that Pacquiao (54-5-2, 38 KOs) has been focused exclusively on his political career in the Philippines since the congressman’s stunning sixth-round knockout loss to Juan Manuel Marquez last December. Pacquiao has lost two straight fights after a 15-bout winning streak, also dropping a much-disputed decision to Timothy Bradley last summer. “We want to get the people a really good, exciting action fight,” Arum said. “(Rios) is an exciting fighter, so it’s a good matchup.” Although Marquez left him face-down on the canvas in his last bout, the 34-year-old Pacquiao chose Rios (31-1-1, 23 KOs) to be his next opponent because of the former lightweight champion’s hard-hitting, crowdpleasing style.

LPGA

LPGA Money Leaders By The Associated Press Through May 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Trn 1. Inbee Park . . . . . . . . . . . .8 2. Stacy Lewis . . . . . . . . . . .9 3. Suzann Pettersen . . . . . . .8 4. Beatriz Recari . . . . . . . . . .9 5. So Yeon Ryu . . . . . . . . . .8 6. Lizette Salas . . . . . . . . . . .9 7. Cristie Kerr . . . . . . . . . . . .8 8. I.K. Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 9. Na Yeon Choi . . . . . . . . . .8 10. Jiyai Shin . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 11. Paula Creamer . . . . . . . .8 12. Yani Tseng . . . . . . . . . . . .8 13. Caroline Hedwall . . . . . . .9 14. Ai Miyazato . . . . . . . . . . .8

Golf scores

Money $877,770 $685,523 $633,089 $470,111 $385,704 $377,284 $354,506 $352,350 $329,353 $316,848 $243,779 $238,127 $235,972 $230,129

McGaughey is eagerly anticipating the grueling T riple Crown campaign that compresses three races into a five-week span. “I can’t wait to get to the Preakness and do it again,” he said. It’s fitting that Orb is set to run in Baltimore, the hometown of Stuart Janney III. He and coowner Ogden Mills “Dinny” Phipps, who also bred Orb, have never won the Preakness. “The Preakness is important to me. I grew up around it, went there all the time,” Janney said. McGaughey has worked exclusively for Janney and Phipps for years, training the horses they breed. In a sport known for rampant jealousy, there was an outpouring of goodwill for all three men after the Derby. T rainers Todd Pletcher and Chad Brown stopped by to wish McGaughey well, while Lukas and Bob Baffert, who didn’t have a horse in the race, spoke warmly of him, too. “It was a wonderful victory for Stuart Janney and Dinny Phipps. There was a lot of karma there that rewards people that have been great to the sport,” Lukas said. “I saw Dinny before the race and told him that I thought it was

15. Jessica Korda . . . . . . . . .8 16. Angela Stanford . . . . . . . .9 17. Karrie Webb . . . . . . . . . .8 18. Giulia Sergas . . . . . . . . . .9 19. Carlota Ciganda . . . . . . .6 20. Pornanong Phatlum . . . .9 21. Haeji Kang . . . . . . . . . . . .9 22. Moriya Jutanugarn . . . . .9 23. Mo Martin . . . . . . . . . . . .7 24. Shanshan Feng . . . . . . . .7 25. Hee Young Park . . . . . . .8 26. Catriona Matthew . . . . . .7 27. Anna Nordqvist . . . . . . . .9 28. Gerina Piller . . . . . . . . . .9 29. Jodi Ewart Shadoff . . . . .8 30. Chella Choi . . . . . . . . . . .9 31. Hee Kyung Seo . . . . . . . .8 32. Karine Icher . . . . . . . . . . .8 33. Jane Park . . . . . . . . . . . .7 34. Ilhee Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 35. Azahara Munoz . . . . . . . .9 36. Lexi Thompson . . . . . . . .8 37. Jee Young Lee . . . . . . . .7 38. Amy Yang . . . . . . . . . . . .7 39. Sandra Gal . . . . . . . . . . .8 40. Candie Kung . . . . . . . . . .8 41. Danielle Kang . . . . . . . . .9 42. Nicole Castrale . . . . . . . .8 43. Jennifer Johnson . . . . . . .8 44. Brittany Lincicome . . . . . .9 45. Vicky Hurst . . . . . . . . . . .9 46. Se Ri Pak . . . . . . . . . . . .6 47. Alison Walshe . . . . . . . . .7 48. Jenny Shin . . . . . . . . . . .9 49. Stacy Prammanasudh . . .9 50. Christel Boeljon . . . . . . . .7

MLB

American League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .21 11 New York . . . . . . . . . .18 12 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .19 13 Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .14 17 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .12 21

Wells Fargo Championship Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At Quail Hollow Club Charlotte, N.C. Purse: $6.7 million Yardage: 7,492; Par: 72 Final x-won on first playoff hole x-Derek Ernst (500), $1,206,000 . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-72-70 — 280 David Lynn (300), $723,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-68-71-70 — 280 Phil Mickelson (190), $455,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-67-73-73 — 281 Robert Karlsson (123), $294,800 . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-69-72 — 282 Lee Westwood (123), $294,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68-72-72 — 282 Ryan Moore (89), $216,913 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-75-68-73 — 283 Kyle Stanley (89), $216,913 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-68-73-68 — 283 Kevin Streelman (89), $216,913 . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-71-72 — 283 Bo Van Pelt (89), $216,913 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-70-68-71 — 283 Ross Fisher (64), $148,517 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-73-70 — 284 Charles Howell III (64), $148,517 . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-69-71 — 284 Rory McIlroy (64), $148,517 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-73-73 — 284 Vaughn Taylor (64), $148,517 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-71-71 — 284 Brian Harman (64), $148,517 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-71-73 — 284 Nick Watney (64), $148,517 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-70-71-76 — 284 Sergio Garcia (53), $97,150 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-72-73 — 285 D.H. Lee (53), $97,150 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-69-73 — 285 Luke List (53), $97,150 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-75-71-68 — 285 George McNeill (53), $97,150 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-68-72-76 — 285 Henrik Norlander (53), $97,150 . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-70-69-72 — 285 D.A. Points (53), $97,150 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-71-74 — 285 Scott Gardiner (47), $64,320 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-67-76-73 — 286 John Merrick (47), $64,320 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-71-68-73 — 286 John Rollins (47), $64,320 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-74-72-71 — 286 John Senden (47), $64,320 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73-67-76 — 286 Jimmy Walker (47), $64,320 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-73-70 — 286 Robert Allenby (42), $47,570 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-70-71-70 — 287 Brian Davis (42), $47,570 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-74-69-72 — 287 Robert Garrigus (42), $47,570 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-72-75-73 — 287 Lucas Glover (42), $47,570 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-73-75 — 287 Shawn Stefani (42), $47,570 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73-72-73 — 287 Jordan Spieth, $37,073 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-75-73 — 288 Josh Teater (37), $37,073 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-73-71-72 — 288 Pat Perez (37), $37,073 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-69-72-71 — 288 Ted Potter, Jr. (37), $37,073 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-75-72 — 288 Patrick Reed (37), $37,073 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74-73-71 — 288 Webb Simpson (37), $37,073 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74-71-73 — 288 Scott Brown (31), $28,810 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-71-75-69 — 289 Bud Cauley (31), $28,810 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73-73-73 — 289 James Driscoll (31), $28,810 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-73-74 — 289 Martin Flores (31), $28,810 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-72-73 — 289 Geoff Ogilvy (31), $28,810 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-72-71-72 — 289 Brendon de Jonge (25), $20,904 . . . . . . . . . . . .74-71-72-73 — 290 David Hearn (25), $20,904 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-75-74 — 290 Russell Henley (25), $20,904 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-73-77 — 290 Richard H. Lee (25), $20,904 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-70-72-75 — 290 Rod Pampling (25), $20,904 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69-74-78 — 290 Daniel Summerhays (25), $20,904 . . . . . . . . . . .67-73-75-75 — 290 Lee Williams (25), $20,904 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-71-75 — 290 Stuart Appleby (18), $15,829 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-75-74 — 291 Tommy Gainey (18), $15,829 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-72-73-72 — 291 James Hahn (18), $15,829 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-74-72-73 — 291 Ryo Ishikawa (18), $15,829 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73-71-74 — 291 Chris Kirk (18), $15,829 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-72-76 — 291 Jason Kokrak (18), $15,829 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70-73-80 — 291 Nate Smith, $15,829 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-74-77-73 — 291 Peter Tomasulo (18), $15,829 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73-72-75 — 291 Trevor Immelman (12), $14,874 . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-78-72 — 292 Dicky Pride (12), $14,874 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-75-75 — 292 Boo Weekley (12), $14,874 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-75-77-72 — 292 Steven Bowditch (9), $14,405 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-76-73-75 — 293 Will Claxton (9), $14,405 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73-73-74 — 293 Steve Marino (9), $14,405 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-73-77 — 293 Gary Woodland (9), $14,405 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73-74-76 — 293 Roberto Castro (5), $13,936 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73-74-76 — 294 Hunter Haas (5), $13,936 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-71-73-75 — 294 Zach Johnson (5), $13,936 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-77-77 — 294 Brad Fritsch (2), $13,534 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-77-75 — 295 Matteo Manassero, $13,534 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-75-73-76 — 295 Casey Wittenberg (2), $13,534 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-74-77 — 295 Angel Cabrera (1), $13,266 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-75-80 — 297 Luke Guthrie (1), $13,132 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-75-84 — 302 Kingsmill Championship Scores By The Associated Press Sunday

$223,916 $216,289 $213,321 $205,245 $192,212 $189,238 $163,564 $157,432 $148,120 $145,434 $145,307 $142,261 $141,910 $141,905 $131,203 $123,576 $122,014 $120,399 $117,190 $114,645 $112,643 $103,341 $102,445 $100,658 $97,150 $96,722 $96,085 $89,163 $71,993 $68,966 $65,954 $65,309 $63,512 $62,336 $61,774 $57,946

Pct GB .656 — .600 2 .594 2 1 .452 6 ⁄2 .364 9 1⁄2

going to be his turn and I was a little worried.” After watching replays of the Derby, McGaughey was more impressed with Orb. “The maturity he showed yesterday in everything he did, from his Derby day to his experience in the paddock, which was tremendous, going in the post and the way he raced, it was kind of amazing to me,” he said. Orb will see some familiar challengers in the 1 3/16-mile Preakness. Mylute and Oxbow, who finished fifth and sixth in the Derby, along with Will Take Charge (eighth), Itsmyluckyday (15th) and Goldencents (17th) are likely to face off against him again. “As good as he is, if Goldencents rebounds and gets back to his Santa Anita Derby effort, I think we have a chance to be right there,” trainer Doug O’Neill said about his horse. Among the new horses possibly joining the Preakness field are Illinois Derby winner Departing, Sunland Derby winner Govenor Charlie, Southwest runner -up Fear the Kitten and Bellarmine. Lukas, a five-time Preakness winner, thinks the next race will be the toughest for Orb. “If he gets by that, he gets to go

Roswell Daily Record

AP Photo

Kentucky Derby winner Orb munches on some hay in his stall in Barn 41 at Churchill Downs on Sunday. back home to Belmont and run right out of his stall,” he said. Golden Soul, who finished second in the Derby as a 34-1 shot, will likely pass on the Preakness and point toward the Belmont Stakes on June 8, trainer Dallas Stewart said. The final leg of the T riple Crown is where some of Pletcher’s

SCOREBOARD

Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Kansas City . . . . . . . .17 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .15 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .13 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .13 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .18 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .11 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .8

L 11 11 14 15 17

L 12 15 18 20 24

Pct GB .633 — .607 1 1 .517 3 ⁄2 .464 5 .433 6

Pct GB .625 — .545 2 1⁄2 1 .455 5 ⁄2 .355 8 1⁄2 .250 12

Sunday’s Games Minnesota 4, Cleveland 2 Oakland 5, N.Y. Yankees 4 Toronto 10, Seattle 2 Kansas City 6, Chicago White Sox 5, 10 inn. Texas 4, Boston 3 Baltimore 8, L.A. Angels 4 Detroit 9, Houston 0 Tampa Bay 8, Colorado 3 Monday’s Games Chicago White Sox 2, Kansas City 1, 11 inn. Cleveland 7, Oakland 3 Boston 6, Minnesota 5, 11 innings Toronto 8, Tampa Bay 7 Chicago Cubs 9, Texas 2 Tuesday’s Games Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 3-2) at Washington (Zimmermann 5-1), 5:05 p.m. Kansas City (E.Santana 3-1) at Baltimore (W.Chen 2-3), 5:05 p.m. Oakland (Milone 3-3) at Cleveland (McAllister 2-3), 5:05 p.m. Seattle (Harang 1-3) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2), 5:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 4-0), 5:10 p.m. Minnesota (Diamond 2-2) at Boston (Dempster 2-2), 5:10 p.m. Toronto (Happ 2-2) at Tampa Bay

At Kingsmill (River Course) Williamsburg, Va. Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,340; Par: 71 Final (x-won on second round of playoff) x-Cristie Kerr, $195,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-71-66-69 — 272 Suzann Pettersen, $118,649 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-69-68-67 — 272 Ariya Jutanugarn, $76,327 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64-71-73-66 — 274 Ilhee Lee, $76,327 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69-69-67 — 274 Angela Stanford, $48,720 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-68-70-69 — 275 Stacy Lewis, $48,720 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-68-69-70 — 275 Inbee Park, $36,702 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-69-67 — 276 So Yeon Ryu, $32,156 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-73-68 — 279 Gerina Piller, $26,525 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-71-66 — 280 Anna Nordqvist, $26,525 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-70-68 — 280 Sandra Gal, $26,525 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-69-73-70 — 280 Paula Creamer, $20,137 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70-74-68 — 281 Na Yeon Choi, $20,137 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73-70-69 — 281 Amy Yang, $20,137 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-71-69 — 281 Caroline Hedwall, $20,137 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73-70-70 — 281 Katie Burnett, $20,137 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70-71-72 — 281 Alison Walshe, $16,154 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70-74-69 — 282 Chella Choi, $16,154 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73-68-71 — 282 Lizette Salas, $16,154 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-65-74 — 282 Hee Kyung Seo, $14,161 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-74-67 — 283 Giulia Sergas, $14,161 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-68-70-71 — 283 Shanshan Feng, $14,161 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69-73-72 — 283 Jane Park, $14,161 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-72-72 — 283 Julia Boland, $12,180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-70-70 — 284 Yani Tseng, $12,180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-71-72 — 284 Karrie Webb, $12,180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-70-73 — 284 Mo Martin, $12,180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-70-74 — 284 Jee Young Lee, $10,410 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-74-74-69 — 285 Brittany Lincicome, $10,410 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-69-71-70 — 285 Sun Young Yoo, $10,410 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73-69-72 — 285 Jenny Shin, $10,410 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-68-74 — 285 Jiyai Shin, $8,343 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-75-69 — 286 Lisa McCloskey, $8,343 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73-72-72 — 286 Thidapa Suwannapura, $8,343 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73-72-72 — 286 Juli Inkster, $8,343 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69-75-73 — 286 Laura Diaz, $8,343 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75-67-74 — 286 Azahara Munoz, $8,343 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73-71-74 — 286 Irene Cho, $8,343 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-69-72-75 — 286 Beatriz Recari, $6,496 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-72-71 — 287 Christel Boeljon, $6,496 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70-76-72 — 287 Stacy Prammanasudh, $6,496 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-74-72 — 287 Moriya Jutanugarn, $6,496 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-70-70-74 — 287 Lexi Thompson, $6,496 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-71-74 — 287 Meena Lee, $5,619 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-76-73-70 — 288 Daniela Iacobelli, $5,619 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73-71-74 — 288 Mina Harigae, $4,619 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-75-75-70 — 289 Chie Arimura, $4,619 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-70-73-72 — 289 Hee Young Park, $4,619 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-77-72-72 — 289 Sarah Kemp, $4,619 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-74-73-73 — 289 Catriona Matthew, $4,619 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-72-74 — 289 Karen Stupples, $4,619 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-76-74 — 289 Kris Tamulis, $4,619 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-73-74 — 289 Eun-Hee Ji, $4,619 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-72-75 — 289 Ai Miyazato, $4,619 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70-76-75 — 289 Brittany Lang, $3,832 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75-73-72 — 290 Lindsey Wright, $3,832 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73-75-73 — 290 Natalie Gulbis, $3,508 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-73-73-73 — 291 Mindy Kim, $,3508 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-75-74-73 — 291 I.K. Kim, $3,508 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-73-72-74 — 291 Pernilla Lindberg, $3,151 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75-76-71 — 292 Danah Bordner, $3,151 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-76-72 — 292 Maria Hjorth, $3,151 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-76-73 — 292 Paige Mackenzie, $3,151 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-75-74 — 292 Momoko Ueda, $2,891 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72-76-72 — 293 Nicole Jeray, $2,891 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72-73-75 — 293 Sarah Jane Smith, $2,891 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-73-76 — 293 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $2,891 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73-71-78 — 293 Vicky Hurst, $2,696 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73-75-76 — 294 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $2,696 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-78-72-77 — 294 Sandra Changkija, $2,599 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72-77-73 — 295 Rebecca Lee-Bentham, $2,517 . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-81-73 — 296 Candie Kung, $2,517 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73-77-75 — 296 Nicole Castrale, $2,517 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72-75-76 — 296 Reilley Rankin, $2,517 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75-75-76 — 296 Lorie Kane, $2,439 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-76-77-75 — 297 Meaghan Francella, $2,392 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-70-79-75 — 299 Kristy McPherson, $2,392 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-76-79 — 299 Veronica Felibert, $2,347 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-70-75-80 — 300

(Ro.Hernandez 1-4), 5:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 3-0) at Houston (Lyles 0-0), 6:10 p.m. Texas (Grimm 2-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 2-2), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 4-1) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 2-3), 6:40 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Seattle at Pittsburgh, 10:35 p.m. Detroit at Washington, 5:05 p.m. Kansas City at Baltimore, 5:05 p.m. Oakland at Cleveland, 5:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at N.Y. Mets, 5:10 p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 5:10 p.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay, 5:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Houston, 6:10 p.m. Texas at Milwaukee, 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Colorado, 6:40 p.m.

National League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .19 12 Washington . . . . . . . .17 15 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .15 18 New York . . . . . . . . . .12 16 Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 23 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .20 11 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . .17 14 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .18 15 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .14 16 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .12 20 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L San Francisco . . . . . .19 13 Colorado . . . . . . . . . .18 13 Arizona . . . . . . . . . . .17 15 San Diego . . . . . . . . .14 18 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .13 18

Pct GB .613 — .531 2 1⁄2 .455 5 .429 5 1⁄2 .303 10 Pct GB .645 — .548 3 .545 3 .467 5 1⁄2 .375 8 1⁄2

Pct GB .594 — 1⁄2 .581 .531 2 .438 5 1 .419 5 ⁄2

Sunday’s Games Atlanta 9, N.Y. Mets 4 Washington 6, Pittsburgh 2 St. Louis 10, Milwaukee 1 Cincinnati 7, Chicago Cubs 4 Miami 14, Philadelphia 2 San Diego 5, Arizona 1 Tampa Bay 8, Colorado 3 San Francisco 4, L.A. Dodgers 3 Monday’s Games Atlanta 7, Cincinnati 4 Chicago Cubs 9, Texas 2 San Diego 5, Miami 0 Arizona 9, L.A. Dodgers 2 Philadelphia 6, San Francisco 2 Tuesday’s Games Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 3-2) at Washington (Zimmermann 5-1), 5:05 p.m. Seattle (Harang 1-3) at Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-2), 5:05 p.m. Atlanta (Medlen 1-4) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 1-3), 5:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Harvey 4-0), 5:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lynn 5-0) at Chicago Cubs (Wood 2-2), 6:05 p.m. Texas (Grimm 2-1) at Milwaukee (W.Peralta 2-2), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 4-1) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 2-3), 6:40 p.m. Arizona (McCarthy 0-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Beckett 0-4), 8:10 p.m. Miami (Sanabia 2-4) at San Diego (Stults 22), 8:10 p.m. Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 3-1) at San Francisco (Lincecum 2-1), 8:15 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Atlanta at Cincinnati, 10:35 a.m. Seattle at Pittsburgh, 10:35 a.m. St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 12:20 p.m. Miami at San Diego, 1:40 p.m. Philadelphia at San Francisco, 1:45 p.m. Detroit at Washington, 5:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at N.Y. Mets, 5:10 p.m. Texas at Milwaukee, 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Colorado, 6:40 p.m. Arizona at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m.

NBA

NBA Playoff Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Tuesday, May 7 HOCKEY 11 a.m. NBCSN — IIHF World Championship, preliminary round, United States vs. Russia, at Helsinki MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 5 p.m. MLB — Regional coverage, Detroit at Washington or Atlanta at Cincinnati 6 p.m. WGN — St. Louis at Chicago Cubs NBA BASKETBALL 5 p.m. TNT — Playoffs, conference semifinals, Game 2, Indiana at New York 7:30 p.m.

Derby quintet could land, too. Revolutionary, third in the Derby, and Overanalyze (11th) will likely run in the race. Pletcher wasn’t sure about future plans for Palace Malice and Verrazano, whose four-race winning streak ended in the Derby. Charming Kitten will go back to turf races.

(x-if necessary) (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 1, Miami 0 Chicago 93, Miami 86 May 8: at Miami, 5 p.m. May 10: at Chicago, 6 p.m. May 13: at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-May 15: at Miami, TBA x-May 17: at Chicago, TBA x-May 19: at Miami, TBA Indiana 1, New York 0 Indiana 102, New York 95 May 7: at New York, 5 p.m. May 11: at Indiana, 6 p.m. May 14: at Indiana, TBA x-May 16: at New York, 6 p.m. x-May 18: at Indiana, TBA x-May 20 at New York, 6 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 1, Golden State 0 San Antonio 129, Golden State 127, 2OT May 8: at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. May 10: at Golden State, 8:30 p.m. May 12: at Golden State, 1:30 p.m. x-May 14: at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. x-May 16: at Golden State, TBA x-May 19: at San Antonio, TBA Oklahoma City 1, Memphis 0 Oklahoma City 93, Memphis 91 May 7: at Oklahoma City, 7:30 p.m. May 11: at Memphis, 3 p.m. May 13: at Memphis, 7:30 p.m. x-May 15: at Oklahoma City, TBA x-May 17: at Memphis, TBA x-May 19: at Oklahoma City, TBA

NHL

NHL Playoff Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Pittsburgh 2, N.Y. Islanders 1 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Islanders 0 N.Y. Islanders 4, Pittsburgh 3 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Islanders 4, OT May 7: at N.Y. Islanders, 5 p.m. May 9: at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m. x-May 11: at N.Y. Islanders, TBD x-May 12: at Pittsburgh, TBD Ottawa 2, Montreal 1 Ottawa 4, Montreal 2 Montreal 3, Ottawa 1 Ottawa 6, Montreal 1 May 7: at Ottawa, 5 p.m. May 9: at Montreal, 5 p.m. x-May 11: at Ottawa, TBD x-May 12: at Montreal, TBD Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 0 Washington 3, N.Y. Rangers 1 Washington 1, N.Y. Rangers 0, OT May 6: at N.Y. Rangers, 5:30 p.m. May 8: at N.Y. Rangers, 5:30 p.m. x-May 10: at Washington, 5:30 p.m. x-May 12: at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-May 13: at Washington, TBD Boston 1, Toronto 1 Boston 4, Toronto 1 Toronto 4, Boston 2 May 6: at Toronto, 5 p.m. May 8: at Toronto, 5 p.m. May 10: at Boston, 5 p.m. x-May 12: at Toronto, TBD x-May 13: at Boston, TBD

WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 2, Minnesota 1 Chicago 2, Minnesota 1, OT Chicago 5, Minnesota 2 Minnesota 3, Chicago 2, OT May 7 at Minnesota, 7:30 p.m. x-May 9: at Chicago, TBD x-May 11: at Minnesota, TBD x-May 12: at Chicago, TBD Anaheim 2, Detroit 1 Anaheim 3, Detroit 1 Detroit 5, Anaheim 4, OT Anaheim 4, Detroit 0 May 6: at Detroit, 6 p.m. May 8: at Anaheim, 8 p.m. x-May 10: at Detroit, TBD x-May 12: at Anaheim, TBD San Jose 2, Vancouver 0 San Jose 3, Vancouver 1 San Jose 3, Vancouver 2, OT San Jose 5, Vancouver 2 May 7: at San Jose, 8 p.m. x-May 9: at Vancouver, 8 p.m. x-May 11: at San Jose, TBD x-May 13: at Vancouver, TBD St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1

TNT — Playoffs, conference semifinals, Game 2, Memphis at Oklahoma City NHL HOCKEY 5 p.m. CNBC — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, Game 4, Montreal at Ottawa NBCSN — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, Game 4, Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, Game 4, Chicago at Minnesota 8 p.m. CNBC — Playoffs, conference quarterfinals, Game 4, Vancouver at San Jose SOCCER 12:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, West Bromwich at Manchester City

St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1, OT St. Louis 2, Los Angeles 1 Los Angeles 1, St. Louis 0 May 6: at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. May 8: at St. Louis, TBD x-May 10: at Los Angeles, TBD x-May 13: at St. Louis, TBD

Transactions

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Assigned RHP Zach Clark to Bowie (EL). BOSTON RED SOX — Placed RHP Andrew Bailey on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 29. Placed LHP Craig Breslow from the 15day DL. CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Sent OF Dayan Viciedo on a rehab assignment to Charlotte (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS — Sent OF Michael Bourn to Columbus (IL) for a rehab assignment. Placed RHP Vinnie Pestano on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 1. Recalled LHP Nick Hagadone from Columbus (IL). DETROIT TIGERS—Sent LHP Phil Coke on a rehab assignment to Toledo (IL). HOUSTON ASTROS — Designated OFs Rick Ankiel and Fernando Martinez for assignment. Reinstated OF J.D. Martinez from the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of OF Trevor Crowe from Oklahoma City (PCL). Recalled INF/OF Jimmy Paredes from Oklahoma City. Optioned INF Brandon Laird to Oklahoma City. LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Optioned RHP Ryan Brasier to Salt Lake City (PCL). Reinstated RHP Mark Lowe from the 15Day D.L. NEW YORK YANKEES — Assigned RHP Cody Eppley outright to Scranton/WilkesBarre (IL). National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Reinstated C Brian McCann from the 15-day DL. Optioned SS Tyler Pastornicky to Gwinnett (IL). CHICAGO CUBS — Designated RHP Kameron Loe for assignment. Optioned OF Dave Sappelt to Iowa (PCL). Selected the contract of OF Ryan Sweeney from Iowa. Recalled RHP Rafael Dolis from Iowa. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Placed INF Mark Ellis on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 27. Reinstated LHP Chris Capuano from the 15-day DL. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Agreed to terms with LHP Greg Smith on a minor league contract. Placed RHP Roy Halladay on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Joe Savery from Lehigh Valley (IL). ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Optioned OF Jermaine Curtis to Memphis (PCL). SAN DIEGO PADRES — Placed LHP Clayton Richard on the 15-day DL. Reinstated RHP Tyson Ross from the 15-day DL. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Placed LHP Jose Mijares on restricted list. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Retained physical therapist Angela Gordon. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Fined Chicago G Marco Belinelli $15,000 for making an obscene gesture during Saturday’s game. FOOTBALL National Football League JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Signed RB De’Leon Eskridge and DE J.D. Griggs. Waived LB Greg Jones and RB Richard Murphy. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Released P Chris Kluwe and WR Nicholas Edwards. Signed OT Brandon Keith and WR Adam Thielen. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Released RB Quentin Hines and LB Ian Sluss. PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Announced the retirement of special assistant Joe Greene. Signed OT Guy Whimper and LB Terence Garvin. Released C Ivory Wade and DT Anthony Rashad White. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS — Named JoJo Wooden director of player personnel and Kevin Kelly director of college scouting. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Signed G Adam Snyder to a two-year contract. Named Ronald Curry assistant offensive coach. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Signed DT Andre Neblett, WRs Jheranie Boyd and Chris Denton, OT Jace Daniels and LB Ka’lial Glaud. Waived DT Richard Clebert, WR D.J. Monroe and RB Akeem Shavers. Terminated the contractws of G Roger Allen and DE George Selvie. HOCKEY National Hockey League EDMONTON OILERS — Reassigned D Nathan Deck from Oklahoma City (AHL) to Stockton (ECHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS — Recalled G Martin Jones and G Jean-Francois Berube from Ontario (ECHL) MINNESOTA WILD — Recalled D Matt Dumba and F Carson McMillan from Houston (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Signed D Radko Gudas to a three-year contract. TENNIS WORLD TEAM TENNIS — Announced Venus Williams and Andy Roddick are part owners of the league. COLLEGE ARKANSAS — Announced QB Brandon Mitchell, DE Austin Flynn, S Defonta Lowe and RB Keante Minor will transfer. FLORIDA — Announced men’s basketball G-F DeVon Walker will transfer. GEORGE MASON — Named Tajama Abraham Ngongba women’s assistant basketball coach. KANSAS — Named Kale Pick graduate football assistant for offense. MILWAUKEE — Announced the resignation of women’s tennis coach Sean McInerney to take same position at Utah State. ST. CATHERINE — Named Tim Kjar women’s assistant basketball coach.


PILLER’S PROFESSION SPORTS

Roswell Daily Record

Final

T-9th PLACE

from the floor and were outrebounded 46-32. “I’m not stunned,” James said. “This is what the playoffs is all about. We’re going against a really good team.” Miami was outscored 35-24 in the fourth, something that drew the ire of Heat coach Erik Spoelstra afterward. “There’s no excuses,” said Spoelstra, whose team had not played in more than a week. “We’re not making any excuses for time off or anything else.” If anyone could have made excuses, it was Robinson. He needed 10 stitches, five in his lip and five more inside his mouth, to close a nasty cut that came when he dove for a loose ball with

Brackets Continued from Page B1

Pecos on Wednesday at 4 p.m. The winner faces either No. 2 Cobre or No. 15 Monte Del Sol on May 15 at 1 p.m. at Cleveland High School.

Softball

Goddard and Roswell each earned spots in the Class 4A tournament. Goddard received the No. 14 seed and travels to face No. 3 Gallup in the first round on Saturday at 11 a.m. The winner then faces either No. 6 Valencia or No. 11 Farmington at 8 a.m. on May 16 at Cleveland High School. Roswell got the No. 16 seed and travels to face No. 1 Piedra Vista, the seventime defending state champions, in the first round on Saturday at 11 a.m. The winner then faces either No. 8 St. Pius X or No. 9 Miyamura at 8 a.m. on May 16 at Cleveland High School. Artesia received the No. 2 seed and hosts No. 15 Del Norte on Friday at 5:30 p.m. at the Mack Chase Athletic Complex.

Tennis

The Goddard and Roswell boys teams, the Roswell girls team and the NMMI boys team each earned spots in the state team tournament. In the Class 4A boys tournament, Goddard got the No. 5 seed and squares off with No. 4 Piedra Vista on Friday at the Sierra Vista West Tennis Complex in Albuquerque at 2 p.m. Roswell received the No. 8 seed and meets No. 9 Los Alamos at Sierra Vista at 8 a.m. on Friday. The winner then faces No. 1 Albuquerque Academy at 5 p.m. on Friday. In the Class 4A girls tournament, Roswell got the No. 8 seed and squares off against No. 9 Española Valley on Friday at Sierra Vista at 11 a.m. The winner faces No. 1 Farmington at 6:30 p.m. on Friday. Artesia got the No. 10 seed and meets No. 7 Piedra Vista on Friday at Sierra Vista at 11 a.m. In the Class 1A/3A boys tour nament, NMMI received the No. 1 overall seed and meets No. 8 Monte Del Sol on Friday at 1:30 p.m. at Albuquerque Academy. The winner then meets No. 4 Hope Christian or No. 5 Lovington at 9:30 a.m. on Saturday. Nine individuals and

B3

Roswell native Gerina Piller on the LPGA Tour

Bulls

Continued from Page B1

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

James and struck his head on the court late in the first half. And then not only did he play the whole second half, he scored 24 points in those 24 minutes, including the last seven points that finished the job for Chicago. “He was born a scorer,” Miami guard Mario Chalmers said. Joakim Noah scored 13 points and grabbed 11 rebounds for the Bulls, who got 12 from Taj Gibson and 10 from Marco Belinelli. Game 2 is Wednesday night in Miami. “We’re not really a flashy team,” Gibson said. “We like to go out and do our job.” A pair of three-point plays by James — one of them coming when he just broke through a tackle attempt by Butler and muscled the ball to the rim anyway — gave Miami a 76-69 lead midway through the fourth quar-

seven doubles teams from Chaves County qualified for the individual state tournament, which begins on Wednesday. The matchups for the individual tournament are as follows (all matches on Wednesday at the Jerry Cline Tennis Complex in Albuquerque): Class 4A boys singles — Roswell’s Brighton Pope, vs. No. 6 Jack Apodaca (Albuquerque Academy); Goddard’s Casey Conlee, vs. No. 2 Alex Dunning (Albuquerque Academy). Class 4A boys doubles — Goddard’s Sanjay Yangalasetty and Martin Joyce, vs. No. 5 Curtis Hunt and Eli Briody-Pavlik (Farmington); Goddard’s Konnor Kundomal and Derrick Collins (No. 3 seed), vs. Austin Denney and Brandon Adair (Piedra Vista). Class 4A girls singles — Roswell’s Deisy Ruiz, vs. No. 5 Dani Apodaca (Albuquerque Academy); Goddard’s Brittany Maidment, vs. No. 3 Gracie Cummings (St. Pius X); Roswell’s Mariana Flores, vs. No. 2 Paris Corley (Grants). Class 4A girls doubles — Roswell’s LaT ricia Velasquez and Ashley Cannon, vs. No. 8 Krystal Telford and Korrina Labrum (Moriarty); Roswell’s Jesse Jennings and Alicia Romero (No. 7 seed), vs. Sarah Vinsonhaler and Shelby Andersson (Mesilla Valley Christian). Class 1A/3A boys singles — NMMI’s Jose Gonzales (No. 1 seed), vs. winner of No. 8 Will Katzman (Bosque) and Nick Newman (Robertson); NMMI’s Federico Sanchez (No. 2 seed), vs. winner of No. 7 David Atkins (Sandia Prep) and Toby Henson (Raton). Class 1A/3A boys doubles — NMMI’s Jorge Garza and Mauricio Moncada (No. 3 seed), vs. winner of No. 6 Lane Heisy and Blake Howington (Hope Christian) and Tyler Vertovec and Jared Harrison (Raton); NMMI’s Vincenz Forkel and Ricardo Kaufmann (No. 7 seed), vs. Nick Bolden and Daniel Butler (Hope Christian). Class 1A/3A girls singles — NMMI’s Mariah Garcia, vs. No. 5 Mikala Vertovec (Raton); NMMI’s Samantha Ikard, vs. No. 6 Nardos Dawit (Hope Christian). Class 1A/3A girls doubles — NMMI’s Bailey Wohler and Susanna Pesonen (No. 5 seed), vs. Sarah Pyatt and Tegan Whitney (Taos).

-4

TOTAL TO PAR

66

THIS WEEK’S STOP: KINGSMILL CHAMPIONSHIP ROUND SCORE

ter, the biggest deficit Chicago faced all night. The Bulls were undeterred. Coming off a Game 7 road win in Brooklyn two nights earlier just to get into a series with Miami, the Bulls just kept grinding. When Ray Allen made a 3pointer to give Miami an 80-78 lead, Butler came back with one of his own to put the Bulls back on top. When the Heat went up by three after James made a free throw with 2:22 left, Belinelli connected for 3 — on a second-effort possession — to knot the game. Then when Robinson connected on a 20-footer with 1:18 left, the Bulls had the lead and plenty of swagger. Wade missed a 3-pointer on the next possession, Robinson drove the lane and scored with 45.5 seconds left, and suddenly the Bulls were up 90-86. James

Ellington Continued from Page B1

“My sophomore year I decided that I’m going to stick to volleyball,” Ellington said about focusing solely on volleyball. “You just get these feelings, you just know that this is what you want to do.” When the recruiting process began, the decision paid off in spades. She was recruited by more than 100 schools, but narrowed her list to seven — UTEP, New Mexico Highlands, Waldorf, Odessa, Garden City, Trinidad State and San Jacinto. The official visit to San Jacinto, a community college situated in Pasadena, Texas, just outside of Houston, sealed the deal for Ellington.

Hole Par Score

ROUND SCORECARD

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 4 3 5 4 3 4 5 4 4 36 4 2 5 5 2 3 4 4 4 33

Eagles: 0 Birdies: 6 Fairways hit: 13 of 14

Pars: 11 Bogeys: 1 Greens hit: 13 of 18

drove against Butler and tried a 12-footer that missed everything, the Bulls got the rebound, Robinson made a free throw to stretch the lead to five and the stunner was complete. Game 1 to the Bulls. “It’s all about being tough,” said Butler, who played all 48 minutes for the third straight game. “We’re always going to be the underdogs and we take pride in that. Everybody can overlook us, but we feel like we’re good enough to hang with a lot of these teams.” It was a night that started with a celebration, James getting his MVP award from the commissioner. “Thank you so much,” James said. “And let’s get ready to go.” And with that, the game started. Problem was, no one was ready to go. The Heat missed their first

“When I first flew in there, the weather was great, it was a beautiful view and I absolutely loved the coach (Sharon Nelson),” Ellington said. “When it came down to business ... I knew I’d be a better athlete there. “The team was amazing, they’re an amazing group of girls. And they’re just phenomenal players as well. I just knew right away.” Under Nelson, a 1993 Eastern New Mexico grad, San Jacinto has been a perennial contender for the NJCAA championship, reaching the national tournament each of the past eight seasons. The Ravens finished third in the national tournament this past season, fourth in 2011 and were the national runners-up in 2010. The winning tradition played a pivotal role in her decision, Ellington said. Emily’s mother, Dyan, said she

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total 4 4 4 3 4 5 4 3 4 35 71 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 3 4 33 66

Others: 0 Putts: 28

seven shots — maybe rust really was a factor. It was 37-all at the half and James wore twice as many pairs of sneakers in the opening two quarters (two) as he had field goals (one). He had two points at the break, the lowest of his 120-game postseason career, on just 1 for 6 shooting. He opened the second half with a 3-pointer, so the shoes were a quick fix. But the Bulls were in for the long haul, and after James made the consecutive three-point plays to open a seven-point lead, Chicago answered with seven straight points, knotting the game at 76-all when Belinelli made a 3-pointer with just under 5 minutes left. Momentum belonged to Chicago, and soon, so did the game. “It’s just one game,” Belinelli said.

was “extremely proud” to see her daughter’s hard work and dedication pay off. “She’s come a long way over the past four years,” Dyan said. “She’s worked hard over the past four years, and primarily the past two years once she joined USA Volleyball and having that opportunity. “She had to travel by herself to tournaments and she traveled by herself to practice once a week in Artesia. She was willing to go the extra mile to try to reach her goal. ... Now that she has this great opportunity, I know she is just going to set new (goals) and attain those as well, and she’ll continue to be successful.” Emily, who carries a 3.0 gradepoint average, said she plans to study business administration with an emphasis on marketing at San Jacinto.

Ginobili’s triple pushes Spurs to win kjkeller@rdrnews.com

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Manu Ginobili’s 3-pointer from the wing with 1.2 seconds left in double overtime lifted the San Antonio Spurs to a thrilling 129-127 victory over the Golden State Warriors and Stephen Curry’s 44 points in Game 1 of their Western

Conference second round series Monday night. The Spurs trailed by 16 points with 4 minutes left in regulation before going on an 18-2 run to close the fourth quarter and force overtime. They trailed 127-126 with 3.9 sec-

onds left in the second overtime before Ginobili hit his 3-pointer off a cross-court inbounds pass from Kawhi Leonard. Golden State had one final chance but Jarrett Jack’s 3-pointer from the top of the key was off.

NEW YORK (AP) — Derek Stepan and Arron Asham both scored tiebreaking goals in the third period for the New York Rangers in a 4-3 victory over the Washington Capitals in Game 3 on Monday night. The Rangers finally found their offense and got back into their firstround playoff series. New York still trails 2-1 in the Eastern Conference series, with Game 4 here Wednesday night. Stepan gave the Rangers the lead for good with 6:25 remaining when he deftly tipped in a pass in front from Rick Nash. Asham had put New York in front 3-2 at 2:53, but Jay Beagle got the Capitals even again 4:26 later. Derick Brassard had a goal and two assists for the Rangers.

Howard had 31 saves for the Red Wings.

Kings 4, Blues 3 LOS ANGELES (AP) — Anze Kopitar tied it with 12:46 to play, Justin Williams tipped home the go-ahead goal 76 seconds later, and Los Angeles evened its first-round series with St. Louis. Jeff Carter and Dustin Penner also scored for the defending Stanley Cup champions. They erased an early two-goal deficit and a thirdperiod deficit to earn their ninth consecutive home victory since March 23. Jonathan Quick made 19 saves. T.J. Oshie scored his first two playoff goals for the Blues, who had the champs on the brink of serious trouble before Kopitar and Williams beat Brian Elliott, who stopped 25 shots. Game 5 is Wednesday in St. Louis, with Game 6 back at Staples Center on Friday.

NHL playoffs: Rangers top Caps in Game 3

Red Wings 3, Ducks 2, OT DETROIT (AP) — Damien Brunner scored with 4:50 left in overtime, lifting Detroit to a series-evening win over Anaheim. Detroit defenseman Jakub Kindl started the winning sequence, passing the puck from behind Detroit’s net up the ice to Joakim Andersson. He tried to connect with teammate Gustav Nyquist only to have Hiller poke the puck away. Brunner, playing in his first NHL season, was in perfect position in front of the net and swatted in the puck to end the game. Game 5 is Wednesday night in Anaheim and Game 6 is back in the Motor City on Friday night. Matt Beleskey gave the Ducks their first lead 5:07 into the game and David Steckel put them ahead midway through the third period. Hiller, who shut out Detroit in Game 3, stopped the first 32 shots and finished with 46 saves. Jimmy

Bruins 5, Maple Leafs 2 TORONTO (AP) — Boston spoiled the retur n of playof f hockey to Toronto, scoring two quick goals in the second period in a victory over the Maple Leafs. Adam McQuaid, Rich Peverley, Nathan Horton, Daniel Paille and David Krejci, with an empty-net goal with 1:17 remaining, scored for Boston The win came before 19,746 fans inside the Air Canada Centre. Outside, a blue-and-white throng watched on a big screen in Maple Leaf Square as playof f hockey returned to Toronto for the first time since 2004. Game 4 is Wednesday in Toronto, with Boston leading 2-1 in the bestof-seven series.

District

Continued from Page B1

over 77. Lovington took home the team championship with a team aggregate of 317. The Wildcats won the title by 13 strokes over runner-up Portales (330). Dexter finished third with a team aggregate of 420. Jaden Amaro paced the Demons with an 89 after going out in 45 and coming in at 44. Christian Eaker shot 96 (47 on the front, 49 on the back) for Dexter, Jacob Foster carded a 114 (66 and 48) and Jonathon Moore shot 121 (57 and 64).

On the girls side, Lovington won the team title with a team aggregate of 336. Texico was second at 354 and Portales was third at 357. Texico’s Laura McFarden turned in the lowest round of the day for either boys or girls, carding a 4-over 76 to win the individual title. Portales’ Paige Hartman was second with an 80 and Lovington’s Lesley Avila was third with an 81. Dexter’s Natalie Reyes and Mariah Dutchover competed as individuals for the Demons. Reyes carded a 106 (52 on the front and 54 on the back) and Dutchover shot at 115 (55 and 60).


B4 Tuesday, May 7, 2013

way to protect our privacy before claiming the money. I suspect the comments from “Happily’s” co-workers are evidence that unhappily marrieds group together — or enjoy complaining about their spouses. Either way, it’s sad. Studies show that complaining about a spouse significantly decreases one’s satisfaction in a relationship. While we all “vent” from time to time, if talking divorce is your first response to a jackpot win, then you’re in the wrong relationship. IN IT FOR THE LONG HAUL

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: I’m responding to your request for comments about the letter from “Happily Single” (Feb. 13) and whether a divorce would be the first course of action upon winning the lottery. In a community-property state, a divorce AFTER winning wouldn’t legally protect you from having to share the spoils with your soon-to-be (and probably now bitter) ex-spouse. My husband and I have talked at length about what we’d do if either of us won the Powerball jackpots, and no, divorce was NOT on the list. We’d start by consulting a lawyer/financial planner to find a

DEAR IN IT: I hit the jackpot with the huge response I received about that letter. And the majority of readers said they would NOT divorce:

DEAR ABBY: I am a lottery winner, and I feel blessed and proud that I can take care of my wife the way she deserves. Within two minutes of my win I was on the phone with her, telling her to quit her stressful job. We now have a wonderful life, with more than we ever hoped for.

COMICS

SATISFIED IN THE SUNSHINE STATE

DEAR ABBY: I’m single, but that letter didn’t surprise me. I think a lot of people feel they must be married by a certain age, so they end up “settling.” Read some of the crazy lottery winner stories posted online, and you’ll see people trade in their spouses because they feel they can do better or “move up,” kind of like buying a bigger, better house. I’m not saying it’s right, but it happens. CINDY IN ARLINGTON, VA.

DEAR ABBY: If I won the lottery, the first thing I’d do is GET married. We’re waiting so we can afford the nice wedding we both want. STEPHANIE IN SAUGUS, CALIF. DEAR ABBY: The first thing I’d do if I won is pay off all my debts. I’m ALREADY divorced. DIANA IN TEXAS CITY, TEXAS

DEAR ABBY: I wouldn’t consider getting

The Wizard of Id

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

ADOVI

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

GEEREM Print your answer here:

Yesterday’s

DEAR ABBY: I’ve been married for 40 years. If I won I would not divorce. There’s NO WAY I’d want to give him half the money. I would stay married so I could have control over the money he spent. It would make up for all the years that he would pinch my pennies and make me squeeze a nickel till the buffalo pooped. WISHFUL IN OHIO DEAR ABBY: If I were to win the lottery, I would trade all of it just to have one more hug and one more night talking with my wife, who died 16 years ago. Our children were young when she died, and I have tried my best to raise them to be good adults. But my heart still aches over losing her to cancer. I believe all widows and widowers would agree with me on this. TRENT IN OKLAHOMA

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

Blondie

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

-

TEBNIT

Family Circus

FROM HELOISE

©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

SHACO

divorced if I won, but I might finally buy that second husband I’ve been wanting but can’t afford. TACOMA READER

(Answers tomorrow) IGLOO BEWARE SWITCH Jumbles: ICING Answer: He practiced the trumpet for weeks before his band tryout, but on the big day he — BLEW IT

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Dear Heloise: I work in a GROCERY STORE in Little Rock, Ark. I enjoy my job most days, and have worked here for several years. My problem is customers! So many people seem to think the store is their playground. People put fresh produce in the freezer; they put frozen products on shelves, where they melt all over the shelves. Women who are shopping with children are talking on their phones or reading a magazine, and their children are destroying the area. We all pick up things we realize we don’t need, but PLEASE, take them to the front to be put away. I cannot tell you how many products are ruined because of customers’ actions. Store clerks do not set prices. We get yelled at by people about pricing. We put the product on the shelf and help you find it. We don’t make it. How old do you have to be when you get to stop being courteous? I am writing this in hopes that it will make things better for customers and clerks. A Reader, Little Rock, Ark.

Your letter is not the first time this complaint has been voiced through the years. What are people thinking? It’s not your fault about prices or products. So, my dear readers, please try to be civil, courteous and kind. Put any unwanted item back where you found it, or give it to a store employee. Heloise

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

#####

Dear Heloise: Those of us who are nearsighted have a challenge in choosing new eyeglass frames: We cannot really tell how they look on our faces. My solution is to take my digital camera with me and take a photo of myself in the mirror at the optician’s office. I also can capture a side view. Then I can tell how the frames will look on me. Angie in McDonough, Ga. Brilliant! Trying to pick out frames can be a challenge for anyone! Heloise

#####

Dear Heloise: My husband is colorblind, and it is hard for him to distinguish among black, brown and navyblue socks. I separated the socks according to color and placed each group into a gallon freezer bag. I printed a picture of something black, brown and blue, plus typed the color under each picture. Now when my husband or I look for a particular color of sock, it is easy to go to the correct bag and pull out the desired color of socks. Mrs. J. Pope in North Carolina Dear Heloise: Here is what I do when making salad for one. I put all the ingredients except the dressing into a container. When I am ready to have salad, I take out what I want and put the dressing on that portion. That way, the rest of it doesn’t weep. It keeps much longer. A Texas Reader, via email

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Roswell Daily Record


GOP seeks alternative to overtime pay FINANCIAL

Roswell Daily Record

WASHINGTON (AP) — It seems like a simple proposition: give employees who work more than 40 hours a week the option of taking paid time of f instead of overtime pay. The choice already exists in the public sector. Federal and state workers can save earned time off and use it weeks or even months later to attend a parent-teacher conference, care for an elderly parent or deal with home repairs. Republicans in Congress are pushing legislation that would extend that option to the private sector. They say that would bring more flexibility to the workplace and help workers better balance family and career. The push is part of a broader Republican agenda

undertaken by House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., to expand the party’s political appeal to working families. The House is expected to vote on the measure this week, but the Democratic-controlled Senate isn’t likely to take it up. “For some people, time is more valuable than the cash that would be accrued in overtime,” said Rep. Martha Roby, R-Ala., the bill’s chief sponsor. “Why should public-sector employees be given a benefit and the private sector be left out?” But the idea Republicans promote as “pro-worker” is vigorously opposed by worker advocacy groups, labor unions and most Democrats, who claim it’s

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

which requires covered employees to receive timeand-a-half pay for every hour over 40 within a work week. The proposal would allow workers to bank up to 160 hours, or four weeks, of comp time per year that could be used to take time off for any reason. The bill would let an employee decide to cash out comp time at any time, and forbids employers from coercing workers to take comp time instead of cash. Republicans and business groups have tried to pass the plan in some form since the 1990s. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, insists it’s not about reducing wage costs.

push employees to make that choice,” said Jones, who regularly earns overtime pay. “I know how we get taken advantage of and I think this bill will just let employers take even more advantage of us.” But at a hearing on the bill last month, Karen DeLoach, a bookkeeper at a Montgomery, Ala., accounting firm, said she liked the idea of swapping overtime pay for comp time so she could travel with her church on its annual mission trip to Nicaragua. “I would greatly appreciate the option at work to choose between being compensated in dollars or days,” she said. The GOP plan is an effort to change the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938,

in the public sector in 1985 to save federal, state and local governments money, not to give workers greater flexibility, Lichtman said. Many workers in federal and state government are unionized or have civil service protections that give them more leverage in dealing with supervisors, she added. Those safeguards don’t always exist in the private sector, where only about 6.6 percent of employees are union members. Phil Jones, 29, an emergency medical technician in Santa Clara, Calif., said he’s wary of how the measure would be enforced. “Any time there’s a law that will keep extra money in an employer’s bank account, they will try to

really a backdoor way for businesses to skimp on overtime pay. The White House on Monday issued a veto threat, saying the bill under mines the right to overtime pay and doesn’t offer enough protection for workers who may not want to receive compensatory time off in lieu of overtime pay. “This is nothing more than an ef fort to tur n a sow’s ear into a silk purse,” said Judith Lichtman, senior adviser to the National Partnership for Women and Families. She contends the measure would open the door for employers to pressure workers into taking compensatory time of f instead of overtime pay. The program was created

B5

Stocks change little Cranberry farmers struggle as prices drop NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market got off to a quiet start on Monday, following a record-setting week. No major economic reports came out Monday, but a few companies reported earnings. Tyson Foods, the nation’s largest meat-processing company, fell 4 percent, the biggest drop in the Standard & Poor’s 500 index. Tyson’s quarterly net income sank 42 percent as costs for chicken feed rose. The company’s stock lost 94 cents to $24. Companies have reported solid quarterly profits so far this earnings season. Seven of every 10 big companies in the S&P 500 have beat Wall Street’s earnings estimates. But revenue has looked weak. “Yet again, corporations continue to do more with less,” said Dan Veru, the chief investment officer of Palisade Capital Management. Veru said the trend is likely to lead to more mergers in the coming months, as cash-rich companies look for ways to raise their revenue. A wave of mergers could shift the stock market’s rally into a higher gear, he said. Shortly after noon, the Dow Jones industrial average was down 2 points at 14,972. The S&P 500 index edged up three points to 1,617, an increase of 0.2 percent. The Nasdaq composite rose 12 points to 3,390, an increase of 0.4 percent. Six of the 10 industry groups in the S&P 500 crept higher. The stock market cleared new milestones Friday after the government reported that employers added more workers to their payrolls in recent months. The unemployment rate fell to 7.5 percent, the lowest level in four years. The news sent the Dow through the 15,000 mark for the first time, while the S&P 500 closed above 1,600, another first. Among other companies reporting quarterly results on Monday, Sysco posted net income and revenue that fell short of analysts’ estimates. The food distributor’s CEO said the company’s sales were held back by bad weather that made people less willing to spend on meals away from home. Sysco’s stock dropped 1 percent, or 34 cents, to $34.32.

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jun 13 122.30 122.72 121.00 121.30 Aug 13 122.40 122.77 121.05 121.40 Oct 13 125.60 125.85 124.25 124.52 Dec 13 127.07 127.30 125.77 125.95 Feb 14 128.55 128.65 127.55 127.57 Apr 14 129.40 129.40 128.60 128.60 Jun 14 124.80 124.80 124.50 124.50 Last spot N/A Est. sales 66149. Fri’s Sales: 70,756 Fri’s open int: 324609, up +908 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 13 139.25 139.32 138.15 138.40 Aug 13 148.20 148.70 146.92 147.45 Sep 13 149.00 150.05 148.97 149.00 Oct 13 151.85 151.90 150.20 150.75 Nov 13 152.90 152.90 151.85 151.90 Jan 14 152.00 152.45 151.05 151.85 Mar 14 153.00 Apr 14 152.90 Last spot N/A Est. sales 8298. Fri’s Sales: 7,062 Fri’s open int: 34563, off -678 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 13 91.42 91.47 90.90 91.05 Jun 13 92.10 92.67 91.15 91.32 Jul 13 92.25 92.45 91.02 91.25 Aug 13 91.47 91.52 90.05 90.05 Oct 13 81.95 82.12 80.75 80.85 Dec 13 78.80 78.80 77.55 77.60 Feb 14 81.45 81.45 80.35 80.37 Apr 14 83.40 83.40 82.30 82.30 May 14 87.10 87.10 87.10 87.10 Jun 14 90.15 90.15 89.25 89.50 Jul 14 89.00 89.00 88.55 88.55 Aug 14 87.60 88.00 87.60 87.60 Last spot N/A Est. sales 33384. Fri’s Sales: 34,819 Fri’s open int: 234287, off -2187

chg.

-.52 -.57 -.78 -.95 -1.03 -.97 -.75

-.37 -.05 -.35 -.50 -.22 -.35

-.35 -.85 -1.05 -1.45 -1.22 -1.30 -1.18 -1.20 -.40 -.75 -.65 -.60

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 13 85.27 85.80 84.37 85.31 Jul 13 86.54 87.47 86.35 87.39 Sep 13 85.95 Oct 13 85.98 86.27 85.98 86.27 Dec 13 85.00 85.99 84.83 85.95 Mar 14 85.24 85.62 85.20 85.59 May 14 84.95 85.31 84.95 85.31 Jul 14 84.83 85.02 84.83 85.02 Oct 14 84.40 Dec 14 83.83 Mar 15 84.08 May 15 83.98 Jul 15 83.88 Oct 15 83.78 Dec 15 83.68 Mar 16 83.68 Last spot N/A Est. sales 13021. Fri’s Sales: 14,154 Fri’s open int: 168057, up +396

chg.

+.59 +.96 +1.04 +.98 +1.04 +.75 +.68 +.52 +.52 +.35 +.35 +.35 +.35 +.35 +.35 +.35

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 13 701 703ø 690fl 693 Jul 13 713fl 715 700ø 702fl Sep 13 724ü 724ü 710ü 712ø Dec 13 738 739 725fl 728fl Mar 14 750ø 751 740 743 May 14 751ø 755 744ø 749 Jul 14 752 756 746 751fl

chg.

-18ü -18ü -18 -16ø -15ø -13 -10ü

Sep 14 757ø 757ø 751 755ø Dec 14 767ü 767ü 760ü 765fl Mar 15 782ø 782ø 772ü 772ü May 15 783 783 773ü 773ü Jul 15 755ø 762ü 752ø 752ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 197130. Fri’s Sales: 72,481 Fri’s open int: 409153, up +1778 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 13 689 689 675ø 678fl Jul 13 650ø 652 633ü 636ø Sep 13 567 567 555 559fl Dec 13 537fl 542fl 532ü 538ü Mar 14 550 552ø 542ø 548fl May 14 557ø 557ø 551ø 556ø Jul 14 566ü 566ü 559 564 Sep 14 550fl 550fl 544fl 548fl Dec 14 550 551ü 542fl 548 Mar 15 551fl 566ü 551ø 555ü May 15 568ø 568ø 557ø 557ø Jul 15 569ü 569ü 558ü 558ü Sep 15 545 545 534 534 Dec 15 529fl 529fl 525 529fl Jul 16 547fl 547fl 543fl 543fl Dec 16 514ü 514ü 510ü 510ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 434067. Fri’s Sales: 179,883 Fri’s open int: 1139837, off -2920 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 13 420 420 412ø 412ø Jul 13 385fl 386ü 376ü 379 Sep 13 371 371 366ü 366ü Dec 13 360 361fl 359 360 Mar 14 367fl 367fl 361fl 361fl May 14 367fl 367fl 364 364 Jul 14 377ü 377ü 373ø 373ø Sep 14 358ü 358ü 354ø 354ø Dec 14 358ü 358ü 354ø 354ø Mar 15 358ü 358ü 354ø 354ø Jul 15 358ü 358ü 354ø 354ø Sep 15 358ü 358ü 354ø 354ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 982. Fri’s Sales: 360 Fri’s open int: 8825, off -2 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 13 1450ü 1469 1442 1444ø Jul 13 1382fl 1395 1366ü 1369ü Aug 13 1329ü 1340fl 1314 1317 Sep 13 1260ø 1267ü 1247fl 1249fl Nov 13 1215 1223 1204 1207ü Jan 14 1221ü 1230fl 1212ø 1214fl Mar 14 1227fl 1237ø 1218ø 1221ü May 14 1232 1240fl 1224ø 1226fl Jul 14 1235ü 1239fl 1232ø 1234ü Aug 14 1243fl 1243fl 1229fl 1229fl Sep 14 1231ø 1231ø 1217ø 1217ø Nov 14 1218fl 1230 1211fl 1215ü Jan 15 1234ø 1234ø 1220 1220 Mar 15 1230fl 1230fl 1216ü 1216ü May 15 1227fl 1227fl 1213ü 1213ü Jul 15 1231 1231 1216ø 1216ø Aug 15 1224fl 1224fl 1210ü 1210ü Sep 15 1218ø 1218ø 1204 1204 Nov 15 1196 1196 1181ø 1181ø Jul 16 1189fl 1189fl 1175ü 1175ü Nov 16 1163 1163 1148ø 1148ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 196560. Fri’s Sales: 120,206 Fri’s open int: 541640, up +4727

MILWAUKEE (AP) — U.S. cranberry farmers who spent millions of dollars to replant and expand bogs face a financial crisis after a huge harvest in Canada flooded the market and sent prices plummeting. Farmers in Wisconsin, the leading cranberry producer, have been working for years to expand their acreage at the request of Ocean Spray and other processors who expected to see strong growth in overseas sales of juice and sweetened, dried cranberries. Growth has been slower than expected, however, as nations continue to struggle with the Great Recession and its aftermath, said Tom Lochner, executive director of the Wisconsin State Cranberry Growers Association. Growth of 2 percent to 3 percent overseas, coupled with flat demand in the U.S., left farmers with a huge excess of cranberries this fall after an unexpected jump in production in Canada, he said. Farmers who don’t belong to the Ocean Spray cooperative are getting $22 to $28 per 100 pounds for a fall crop that cost them $25 to $30 per 100 pounds to grow, Lochner said. Prices for the 2013 crop could drop as low as $15 to $18 per 100 pounds if nothing is done, he said. “We need to move some fruit,” Lochner said. Ocean Spray cranberry growers earn more because they own the cooperative and share its profits.

FUTURES

-9ø -9fl -10ü -9fl -9fl

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

-20fl -24fl -19ø -15ü -14fl -14fl -14 -10fl -11 -11 -11 -11 -11 -4 -4 -4

-9 -9 -4fl -4 -6 -3fl -3fl -3fl -3fl -3fl -3fl -3fl

-10ø -18 -18ü -16 -14 -14 -14ü -14 -14 -14 -14 -13fl -14ø -14ø -14ø -14ø -14ø -14ø -14ø -14ø -14ø

low

settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Jun 13 95.58 97.17 94.85 96.16 Jul 13 95.77 97.38 95.11 96.39 Aug 13 95.77 97.28 95.09 96.38 Sep 13 95.42 97.00 94.95 96.11 Oct 13 95.00 96.48 94.35 95.67 Nov 13 95.81 95.99 94.05 95.18 Dec 13 93.91 95.50 93.47 94.66 Jan 14 94.85 94.85 93.02 94.13 Feb 14 94.00 94.12 92.73 93.63 Mar 14 93.52 93.52 92.31 93.16 Apr 14 93.01 93.01 91.96 92.70 May 14 92.30 Jun 14 92.65 92.65 91.20 91.96 Jul 14 91.57 Aug 14 91.20 Sep 14 90.84 Oct 14 90.51 Nov 14 90.22 Dec 14 89.66 90.81 89.20 89.98 Jan 15 89.43 89.62 89.43 89.62 Feb 15 88.83 89.29 88.83 89.29 Mar 15 88.97 Apr 15 88.68 May 15 88.42 Jun 15 88.17 88.25 88.17 88.19 Jul 15 87.92 Last spot N/A Est. sales 618598. Fri’s Sales: 690,787 Fri’s open int: 1770424, up +10520 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Jun 13 2.8220 2.8693 2.8051 2.8657 Jul 13 2.8004 2.8527 2.7887 2.8499 Aug 13 2.7967 2.8260 2.7658 2.8242 Sep 13 2.7518 2.7943 2.7350 2.7924 Oct 13 2.6121 2.6505 2.5988 2.6505 Nov 13 2.6049 2.6256 2.5748 2.6243 Dec 13 2.5908 2.6112 2.5614 2.6094 Jan 14 2.5677 2.6049 2.5670 2.6045 Feb 14 2.6083 Mar 14 2.6168

chg.

+.55 +.57 +.64 +.68 +.69 +.69 +.68 +.67 +.65 +.63 +.61 +.59 +.58 +.57 +.56 +.55 +.54 +.53 +.52 +.51 +.50 +.48 +.47 +.45 +.44 +.43

+.0403 +.0427 +.0425 +.0409 +.0404 +.0376 +.0352 +.0336 +.0336 +.0338

Apr 14 2.5900 2.7783 2.5900 2.7783 May 14 2.7708 Jun 14 2.7550 Jul 14 2.7282 Aug 14 2.6977 Sep 14 2.6622 Oct 14 2.5242 Nov 14 2.4972 Dec 14 2.4586 2.4791 2.4586 2.4772 Jan 15 2.4812 Feb 15 2.4926 Mar 15 2.5066 Apr 15 2.6366 May 15 2.6391 Jun 15 2.6241 Jul 15 2.6061 Last spot N/A Est. sales 114597. Fri’s Sales: 131,320 Fri’s open int: 276315, off -990 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Jun 13 4.012 4.056 3.971 4.011 Jul 13 4.073 4.108 4.022 4.064 Aug 13 4.100 4.134 4.053 4.093 Sep 13 4.103 4.130 4.048 4.090 Oct 13 4.107 4.148 4.065 4.109 Nov 13 4.180 4.226 4.150 4.190 Dec 13 4.360 4.388 4.323 4.359 Jan 14 4.417 4.479 4.250 4.443 Feb 14 4.380 4.435 4.250 4.413 Mar 14 4.315 4.375 4.250 4.348 Apr 14 4.075 4.250 4.075 4.131 May 14 4.069 4.250 4.069 4.129 Jun 14 4.097 4.250 4.097 4.155 Jul 14 4.189 4.250 4.163 4.189 Aug 14 4.204 4.250 4.196 4.211 Sep 14 4.197 4.250 4.197 4.210 Oct 14 4.185 4.250 4.185 4.229 Nov 14 4.267 4.304 4.250 4.304 Dec 14 4.439 4.480 4.250 4.480 Jan 15 4.500 4.559 4.500 4.559 Feb 15 4.477 4.541 4.477 4.538 Mar 15 4.444 4.463 4.429 4.460 Apr 15 4.131 4.145 4.120 4.145 May 15 4.110 4.151 4.110 4.148 Jun 15 4.128 4.176 4.128 4.169 Jul 15 4.198 Last spot N/A Est. sales 220984. Fri’s Sales: 263,386 Fri’s open int: 1547357, off -4401

METALS

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Mon. Aluminum -$0.8291 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.2303 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.3100 N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Lead - $1970.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8261 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1466.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1468.10 troy oz., NY Merc spot Mon. Silver - $23.890 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $23.918 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Platinum -$1500.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1507.70 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

GET NOTICED

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575.622.7710

The U.S. Department of Agriculture had predicted the 2012 crop would be worth nearly $48 per 100 pounds. It announced last week that it would buy $5 million worth of cranberry juice concentrate for AP Photo domestic food assistance pro- Miguel Sandel of Middleborough, Mass., rakes cranberries grams. Lochner Oct. 4, 2011, during an afternoon harvest at the Hannula said that will take cranberry bogs in Carver, Mass. 110,000 to 130,000 barrels of cranberries off the water use and increase productivity, market, but it falls short of the said Dawn Gates-Allen, communica500,000 barrels the industry had tions manager for the Cape Cod hoped the government would buy. Cranberry Growers Association. She and her husband replanted a 1 1/2 Each barrel weighs 100 pounds. acre bog in 2009 at a cost of about “It’s a very significant start,” $60,000. Lochner said. Along with putting in new vines, The drop in prices comes after they leveled out the bog, which had many growers invested in replanting sunk over time so that one end was or creating new bogs. 2 feet deeper than the other. That Before the recession, Ocean Spray allows them to use less water. had asked its growers to plant 5,000 “To be sustainable and to be comnew acres in the next five to 10 petitive as a farmer, consumers want years. to know we are doing friendly things Wisconsin and the federal govern- to our land,” Gates-Allen said. ment adjusted their permitting But if cranberries sell at $35 per processes in 2008 to foster that 100 pounds, it will take their small expansion. farm on the border of Freetown and In Massachusetts, growers have Rochester 15 years to make back the been renovating old bogs to reduce investment, Gates-Allen said.

+.0313 +.0308 +.0295 +.0262 +.0237 +.0232 +.0177 +.0157 +.0127 +.0127 +.0127 +.0127 +.0127 +.0127 +.0127 +.0127

-.030 -.029 -.027 -.027 -.026 -.026 -.024 -.022 -.017 -.012 +.024 +.029 +.030 +.031 +.032 +.031 +.032 +.034 +.034 +.033 +.034 +.036 +.040 +.041 +.042 +.041

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

MARKET SUMMARY

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 2577081 12.88 +.64 MBIA 670306 14.29 +4.46 S&P500ETF626498161.78 +.41 FordM 535167 14.09 +.26 AMD 506453 3.61 +.01

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) NA Pall g 103699 CheniereEn 40412 GranTrra g 26447 Rentech 25193 NovaGld g 23320

Last 1.16 29.54 6.15 2.33 2.40

Chg -.20 +.99 +.50 +.01 -.05

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) SiriusXM 494513 Facebook n427540 Microsoft 406748 BMC Sft 338048 Cisco 310155

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last 17.80 14.51 25.97 8.78 22.78

Div

AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola s Disney EOG Res EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

1,818 1,206 142 3,166 308 10

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

3,007,296,482 Volume

52-Week High Low 15,009.59 12,035.09 6,291.65 4,795.28 537.86 435.57 9,369.23 7,222.88 2,509.57 2,164.87 3,388.12 2,726.68 1,618.46 1,266.74 17,073.62 13,248.92 959.55 729.75

Name

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

1.80 .80 .04 1.94 4.00f 1.12 .75f .75 3.58 2.52f .40 .58f 1.20f .90 3.80f 2.64f

Last 15.44 14.73 5.24 12.01 21.98

Chg +4.49 +4.18 +1.18 +2.35 +3.68

%Chg +41.0 +39.6 +29.1 +24.3 +20.1

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg -2.26 -11.3 AskanoG g 2.40 -.13 -5.1 ChinaHGS 10.56 -1.57 -12.9 -1.14 -7.3 SilvrCrst g 2.07 -.11 -5.0 Spherix rs 8.10 -1.17 -12.6 -1.79 -6.4 TanzRy g 2.83 -.15 -5.0 Cyclacel pf 6.80 -.90 -11.7 -.56 -6.0 Ever-Glory 2.11 -.09 -4.1 HimaxTch 6.00 -.61 -9.2 -1.37 -5.7 Aurizon g 3.62 -.14 -3.7 VisChina rs 2.58 -.26 -9.2

DIARY

Volume

Chg +.04 -.74 +.26 ... -.02

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name MBIA 14.29 +4.46 +45.4 ContMatls 18.00 +1.74 +10.7 YRC Wwde BiP GCrb 4.96 +.77 +18.4 GranTrra g 6.15 +.50 +8.8 ArkBest 3.10 +.31 +11.1 Univ Insur 6.77 +.48 +7.6 FstSecGrp Renren 2.74 +.18 +7.0 AmbacF wt USMetlIdx 25.70 +2.38 +10.2 RELM Entravisn 4.43 +.39 +9.7 AvalonHld 3.60 +.21 +6.2 YY Inc n Name TowerIntl PSBMetDS Tredgar OmegaP InergyMid

Last 3.39 27.57 33.75 45.42 20.81

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

INDEXES

Last 14,968.89 6,297.98 522.02 9,348.90 2,430.83 3,392.97 1,617.50 17,072.33 959.80

Chg

28 37.09 -.25 12 58.69 -.31 30 12.88 +.64 18 94.19 +.45 9 123.25 -.24 22 42.08 -.16 21 65.06 +.26 60 126.04 +2.06 11 47.94 +.11 9 90.58 +.56 10 14.09 +.26 ... 20.64 +.01 6 51.73 +1.27 12 23.91 -.05 14 202.78 -1.73 23 84.68 -1.07

YTD %Chg Name +10.0 +26.7 +10.9 +25.0 +14.0 +16.1 +30.7 +4.3 +11.7 +4.7 +8.8 +44.8 +11.1 +16.0 +5.9 +20.8

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

1,463 984 111 2,558 183 14

1,473,315,606

Net % Chg Chg -5.07 -.03 +79.08 +1.27 -7.28 -1.38 +8.43 +.09 -.20 -.01 +14.34 +.42 +3.08 +.19 +42.40 +.25 +5.38 +.56

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Last

DIARY

67,773,047 Volume

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

PE

211 183 50 444 16 7

YTD % Chg +14.23 +18.68 +15.21 +10.72 +3.19 +12.37 +13.41 +13.85 +13.00

52-wk % Chg +15.07 +20.07 +11.67 +17.61 +1.79 +14.71 +18.10 +18.77 +20.91

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

1.72 .92 2.86f .66f 2.27f .96 1.25f .04 1.12 1.15 .69e 2.06 1.88f .36f 1.20f 1.08

21 17 20 18 21 15 8 28 22 19 ... ... 16 13 11 16

44.98 -.69 33.75 +.26 51.19 +.02 23.41 -.43 82.50 -.33 28.72 -.24 63.87 +1.69 14.25 +.18 37.04 +.03 60.64 +.21 18.23 +.13 52.05 -.63 78.83 -.42 17.02 +.02 37.90 +.16 30.68 -.51

+9.9 +26.4 -5.2 +14.1 +20.6 +14.5 +20.3 +39.2 +19.9 +26.8 +13.6 +20.3 +15.5 +.9 +10.9 +14.9

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


B6 Tuesday, May 7, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS / HOROSCOPES

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19)  Optimism beams through your day, but you might wonder where to start. Just dive right in, and you are likely to accomplish a lot. Your ability to home in on a problem and make an adjustment is a prominent feature of your present success. Tonight: As you wish. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  Deferring to others is difficult and somewhat frustrating for you. Give up on the impossible, and recognize that your energy is better placed elsewhere. Stand back and observe; listen to what is not being said. Tonight: Get as much sleep as possible. You will need it soon! GEMINI (May 21-June 20)  You know your priorities. Move quickly in order to secure a long-term desire. Your ability to read between the lines proves to be very important. Use care in how you reveal a strategic insight. Take your time and choose the right words. Tonight: Visit with a friend. CANCER (June 21-July 22)  You might want to consider taking a different path. You know what you want, but your current approach is not working. A meet-

ing reveals support, but also a level of frustration. Use your intuitive abilities to move through a problem. Tonight: Where people are. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  You see the value of getting others’ insight and support in order to help you achieve your long-term goals. Detach and brainstorm more often with people who have controversial views. You will open up many new paths as a result. Tonight: Where the music is. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)  You might want to rethink a personal matter involving your finances and/or a partnership. You could feel as if many opportunities are possible, and you might be right. In fact, a pay raise or promotion could be in the offing. Tonight: Have a longoverdue talk with a loved one. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)  Reach out to someone at a distance whom you care a lot about. The response is likely to be positive. Stay focused on what is happening around you. A few difficult comments are likely to be shared in a discussion with a partner. Tonight: Go along with someone else’s idea. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  You might want to reach out to someone who is very different from you. This person is confident in his or her self-expression, which is nearly the opposite of how you are. If you can learn to respect a different style, you will grow from your interactions. Tonight: On a roll. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)  Everyone likes to be popular, but it could get to be too much for you to handle. Know when to say “enough.” You will be happier, as will they. Live in the moment. You tend to move quickly, so be careful not to make a last-minute mistake. Tonight: Let the good times roll.

Legals

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Publish April 23, 30, May 7, 2013

NOTICE is hereby given that on April 8, 2013, RCMA, LLC, P.O. Box 516, Hagerman, New Mexico 88232, c/o Atkins Engineering Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 3156, Roswell, New Mexico 88202-3156; filed Application No. RA-1323 et al (T) with the STATE ENGINEER for permit to temporarily change place and purpose of use and temporarily supplement the diversion of 333.0 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance of shallow groundwater by commencing the use of existing shallow well No. RA-1323-A-S-2 located in the SW1/4SW1/4NW1/4 of Section 14, Township 14 South, Range 26 East, N.M.P.M.

The applicant proposes to temporarily supplement the existing shallow wells described as follows:

WELL NUMBER RA-1323 RA-1323-S RA-1323-S-2 RA-1344-A RA-1181 RA-1181-S RA-1333-D

SUBDIVISION SECTION SW1/4NW1/4NW1/4 14 SW1/4SW1/4SE1/4 10 NW1/4SW1/4NW1/4 14 SW1/4NW1/4NE1/4 15 S1/2NE1/4NE1/4 10 NW1/4NE1/4NE1/4 10 SW1/4SW1/4SE1/4 03

SUBDIVISION Part of E1/2 Part of NE1/4 Part of W1/2 Part of NW1/4

SECTION 03 10 11 14

TOWNSHIP 14 S. 14 S. 14 S. 14 S. 14 S. 14 S. 14 S.

RANGE 26 E. 26 E. 26 E. 26 E. 26 E. 26 E. 26 E.

The subject water right is presently authorized to be used for the irrigation of 132.65 acres of land described as follows: TOWNSHIP 14 S. 14 S. 14 S. 14 S.

RANGE 26 E.) 26 E.) 26 E.) 26 E.)

ACRES 132.65

The applicant seeks to maintain the right to divert the subject water for the irrigation of the aforesaid acreage and to temporarily add commercial water sales uses in the following described area: Commercial Water Sales Part of

12 S. thru 17 S.

22 E. thru 28 E.

Application is made to temporarily add commercial water sales as a use under RA-1323 et al. In addition, RCMA, LLC has leased the use of shallow well RA-1323-A-S-2 from the Hagerman Municipal School District and seeks to add it as a temporary supplemental well for the life of the lease. Applicant will fallow land in the amount of one acre per 2.1 acre-feet per annum pumped for commercial water sales purposes. The applicant understands that water pumped for irrigation purposes and water pumped for commercial water sales will be metered separately. Applicant understands that the water pumped for commercial water sales will be limited to the consumptive irrigation requirement of 2.1 acre-feet per annum for each fallowed acre, and that no carriage allowance will be allowed for any water diverted for commercial purposes.

Application is made to temporarily reconfigure the water right for the 2012 to 2016 and 2017 to 2021 Water Year, Roswell Basin Accounting Periods.

This is a temporary application that is requested to expire at the end of the Water Year 2021. Upon expiration of the subject permit all rights will revert back to their prior point of diversion and place of use on October 31, 2021, subject to earlier reversion of all or part of the water right by written request of the applicant.

The above described wells and places of use are located north and approximately one mile east of the Town of Hagerman, Chaves County, New Mexico.

Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (objection must be legible, signed, and include the writer's complete name, phone number and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment, you must specifically identify your water rights*; and/or (2) Public Welfare/Conservation of Water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must show how you will be substantially and specifically affected. The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with the State Engineer, 1900 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, within ten (10) days after the date of the last publication of this Notice. Facsimiles (faxes) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is hand-delivered or mailed and postmarked within 24-hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protests can be faxed to the Office of the State Engineer, (575) 623-8559. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 72 NMSA 1978.

Legals

Roswell Daily Record

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  You might be focused on a personal matter right now, but remember that you need to handle other issues as well. Recognize your limits and prioritize. Your demands are only going to become heavier in the next few days. Tonight: Try a quiet night at home. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  Your words bring positive responses, especially from a child or a fun person in your life. You could get bogged down by a domestic situation. Open up to change and more diversity. You might seem to feel as if a close loved one can make a difference. Tonight: Be spontaneous. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)  You could want to head in a new direction, despite what is happening around you. You know what is workable. Share your plan with someone. Though the receiver of this information initially might be upset, he or she will appreciate it later. Tonight: Treat yourself. BORN TODAY Actor John Ingle (1928), poet Robert Browning (1812), former first lady of Argentina Eva Peron (1919)

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish April 30, May 7, 14, 21, 2013

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish April 23, 30, May 7, 2013

BOKF, N.A., a national banking association dba BANK OF OKLAHOMA as successor by merger to Bank of Oklahoma, N.A.,

MANOOCHEHR KHAVARI, Plaintiff,

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

vs.

Plaintiff,

No. D-504-CV-2012-00727 CHASE M. LIVINGSTON and NEW MEXICO MORTGAGE FINANCE AUTHORITY, Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE ON FORECLOSURE

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the above-entitled Court, having appointed me or my designee as Special Master in this matter with the power to sell, has ordered me to sell the real property (the "Property") situated in Chaves County, New Mexico, commonly known as 1210 W. 3rd Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, and more particularly described as follows: THE WEST 7 FEET OF LOT 7 AND ALL OF LOT 8 AND THE EAST 13 FEET OF LOT 9 IN BLOCK 12 OF CENTRAL PARK ADDITION, IN THE CITY OF ROSWELL, COUNTY OF CHAVES AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT FILED IN THE CHAVES COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE ON JANUARY 7, 1930 AND RECORDED IN BOOK A OF PLAT RECORDS, AT PAGES 202-203.

The sale is to begin at 1:00 p.m. on May 30, 2013, outside the front entrance to the Chaves County Courthouse, City of Roswell, County of Chaves, State of New Mexico, at which time I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in lawful currency of the United States of America, the Property to pay expenses of sale, and to satisfy the Judgment granted BOKF, N.A. BOKF, N.A. was awarded a Judgment on April 23, 2013, in the principal sum of $107,089.80, plus outstanding interest due on the Note through January 1, 2013, in the amount of $4,578.12 and accruing thereafter at the rate of $16.72 per diem, plus late charges of $226.77, plus escrow advances of $945.79, plus property preservation costs of $90.00, plus reasonable attorney's fees incurred by Plaintiff through January 1, 2013, in the sum of $950.00, plus costs incurred by Plaintiff through January 1, 2013, in the sum of $367.69, with interest on the aforesaid amounts at the rate of 5.70% per annum from date of Judgment until paid. The sale is subject to rights and easements of record, to unpaid property taxes and assessments, and to the one (1) month right of redemption in favor of the Defendants as specified in the Judgment filed herein.

PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS AT THE SALE ARE ADVISED TO MAKE THEIR OWN EXAMINATION OF TITLE AND THE CONDITION OF THE PROPERTY AND TO CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEY BEFORE BIDDING. /s/ Faisal Sukhyani Special Master 2222 Parkwest Drive, N.W. Albuquerque, New Mexico 87120 (505) 228-8484

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

vs.

GERALD D. CLEMENS and THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF GERALD D. CLEMENS, Defendant.

No. CV-2013-41

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

To: The following-named defendants: Gerald D. Clemens, if living and, if deceased, his unknown heirs

Plaintiff has filed suit against you to quiet title in his name to property commonly known as 102 S. Union, Roswell, NM 88203.

You are required to file a written answer to the lawsuit within thirty days of the date of the last publication in this newspaper and serve a copy on Mr. Khavari’s attorney. If you do not file a written answer within thirty (30) days, a default judgment may be rendered against you. The attorney for Mr. Khavari is:

Brett A. Schneider 205 Park Central East, Suite 417 Springfield, Missouri 65806 (575) 420-1206 - Phone (888) 641-9659 - Fax

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish April 23, 30, May 7, 2013

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

MANOOCHEHR KHAVARI, Plaintiff,

vs.

Legals

---------------------------------Publish May 7, 14, 2013

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE MATTER THE ESTATE OF

OF

NO. PB 2013-22

DOROTHY LOU COPELAND, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the referenced Estate. All perhaving claims sons against the Estate are required to present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or their claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the Personal undersigned Representative or filed with the Chaves County District Court, 400 North Suite 100, Virginia, Roswell, Chaves County, New Mexico 88201. DATED this 2nd day of May, 2013. Thersea Ann Copeland 207 Lando Drive Spotsylvania, VA 22551

No. CV-2013-42

GERALD RIVERA and IRENE RIVERA, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF GERALD RIVERA, and THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF IRENE RIVERA, Defendants.

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

To: The following-named defendants: Gerald Rivera and Irene Rivera, if living, and, if deceased, their unknown heirs. Plaintiff has filed suit against you to quiet title in his name to property commonly known as 411 S. Kansas, Roswell, NM 88203.

You are required to file a written answer to the lawsuit within thirty days of the date of the last publication in this newspaper and serve a copy on Mr. Khavari’s attorney. If you do not file a written answer within thirty (30) days, a default judgment may be rendered against you. The attorney for Mr. Khavari is:

Brett A. Schneider 205 Park Central East, Suite 417 Springfield, Missouri 65806 (575) 420-1205 - Phone (888) 641-9659 - Fax

James W. Mitchell BRUIN, SANDERS, COLL & WORLEY, P.A. Attorneys for the Estate of Dorothy Lou Copeland, deceased P.O. Box 550 Roswell, New Mexico 88202-0550 (575) 622 - 5440


CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record

GARAGE SALES

006. Southwest

803 S. Richardson, Fri-Tues, tents, hunting & fishing camping gear, misc 2602 W. Alameda Friday like new washer, 2 dryers, $150 each, 32” flat screen TV $60, living room, mirror $150. 317-4483

007. West

MAY 4-5. Furniture, clothes, tools, teachers supplies, & lots great misc. Don’t miss this one. 1400 W. 8th St.

ANNOUNCEMENTS 025. Lost and Found

CHIHUAHUA FOUND in the vicinity of 200 block West Bland. 840-7618 Call to identify. FOUND SMALL brown dog in vicinity of Union & 2nd, male, call for more info, 627-7085 or 208-8240. LOST GRAY Tabby cat w/white paws & flea collar, neutered male, W. Pine Lodge Rd. Reward. Call 1-970-426-9474.

025. Lost and Found

LOST: 5/5/13, 2nd & Atkinson, motorcycle tank bag, 432-557-5315. SMALL DOG found in vicinity of Toyota. Black tipped ears & tail, mostly white. Found Saturday morning about 7:30 a.m. Well behaved, sure he’s missing you. 914-8370

INSTRUCTION

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

ADMIRAL BEVERAGE is hiring CDL driver position must be filled immediately, and only serious prospects need apply. Must have clean driving record. Great benefits, excellent pay, group health insurance. Apply online at www.admiralbeverage.com SUPERVISORY POSITION Available at Bealls. Must have at least 2yr retail management experience. Professional appearance a must. Must be able to pass drug screening, & willing to relocate. Please bring in resume.

Commercial & Residential projects is accepting applications for: •JP Journeyman Plumber •JSM Journeyman Sheet Metal Installer •JR HVAC Technician •Mechanical Trade Apprentices •Temporary Summer Laborers

045. Employment Opportunities

BURRITO EXPRESS in need of ladies with strong work ethic to make tortillas & other kitchen help. Cashiers needed as well. Apply at South & East stores. JFA Distributing LLC •Management opportunity •Paid vacations •Training Provided

1600/month per agreement

(575) 578-4817

Medical Office Billing: Full-time 9-6 M-F. Experience with medical insurance billing, payment posting, CPT and ICD-coding preferred. Insurance contracting a plus. Competitive salary and full benefits including health insurance, 401K, and profit sharing. Preemployment testing will be conducted. Send cover letter with resume and three references to medicalbillingroswell@ gmail.com. Applicants will be held in strictest confidence. FRED LOYA Insurance is hiring bilingual customer service representative. High school diploma required. Please apply at 2601-B N Main St.

Online: www.rhoadsco.com In Person: 107 E. 6th St, Roswell, NM

Plant Operator Full Time/Seasonal for asphalt emulsion plant. Loading trucks, batching chemicals, manufacturing materials, testing production. Experience preferred but will train. Pay DOE. Must have valid drivers license, pass drug screen & physical. Physical Requirements: ability to work outdoors, lift up to 50 pounds, and perform work using a full range body motion(stooping and crawling). Subject to on-call and occasional overtime requirements with split shifts. Apply 8am-1pm at: Western Emulsions 49 East Martin St. Roswell, NM 88203 Email:juan@westernemulsions.com

VISIT US ONLINE AT RDRNEWS.COM

ARBYS OF Roswell is now accepting applications for shift and assistant managers and crew members. Please see Jessica only 1013 N. Main. KYMERA

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575)-622-7710 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM MONDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________

NEW MEDICAL OFFICE POSITIONS:

As a growing Independent Physicians Office, Kymera and is now seeking Qualified Applicants for:

Lab Technologist / CLS FT: Mon–Fri with minimal OnCall for weekend Urgent Care Clinic. 3-4 yrs exp preferred. CLIA Qualified Medical Technologist. Working Knowledge of Fed Regs and ability to work independently. Supervisory & Administrative exp req. CFO - Accountant: FT – 4-6 yrs accounting exp. BA in Accounting/ CPA preferred.

Lab Billing Coordinator: FT – Exp in Med Ins Billing & Coding, Patient/Ins collections and computer skills required. Applicants should demonstrate friendly/outgoing attitude, organization skills, and the ability to work with patients in a med office setting. Must be able to work with multiple patients in a high volume lab setting. Knowledge of EMR systems. Quals: Minimum of 2 yrs. Medical Billing exp, knowledge of CPT/ICD9/HCPCS, superb organization, communication and people skills. Please Fax resume with cover letter to: HR Mngr, 627-9520

Roswell Ford Employment Opportunities

!Sales Representatives Looking for Professional Sales Representatives. Training will be included to advance their new career. Great employee benefits. Please call Ray or David to schedule an interview at 575-623-3673.

Administrative Assistant Looking for a full-time position for person with strong computer skills and a willingness to learn new tasks. Apply in person between 9 am and 3 pm at Roswell Ford, 821 North Main, Roswell New Mexico.

Service Technician Seeking a qualified Service Technician. Please apply in person 9am - 3pm Monday - Friday at 821 North Main, Roswell, New Mexico. Ask for Rick Quintero, Service Manager. No phone calls please.

CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions. !"#$%&&'#(&")*%#+(,-)).)*(/%0&%,#1.2

www.roswellford.com

045. Employment Opportunities

Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR WANTED CDL Driver with Tanker Endorsement & HAZMAT if possible. Immediate employment, $15/hr, statewide work, main office in Albuquerque, NM. Drug test required. Call 1-800-821-6120 ask for Mike or call 505-238-6974 & ask for Frank. Driving/Labor work.

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM LOCAL TITLE Company needs Escrow Assistant. individual, Professional effective in dealing with the public, accurate typist and able to organize time and workload. Send resume to PO Box 1476 Roswell, NM 88202

Valley Christian Academy is now taking applications for 1 elementary teacher and 1 Jr/Sr High math & science teacher. Bachelor’s degree required. Strong Christian testimony. Experience preferred. 575-627-1500. 2 Lifeguards needed, 15 yrs old or over. Assistant Manager also needed, 21 yrs old. For more info call 914-0924. A GROWING local insurance office looking for a Customer Service Representative. The position requires excellent communications skills, multi-tasking and must enjoy working with people. Must be professional, organized and a self-starter. Email resume to: resume9393@gmail.com OPENING SOON New Salon & Day Spa now taking applications from motivated cosmetologists, massage therapists aestheticians & nail techs. Please call 575-8407922 for more information or drop in @ 2601-D N. Main St. LOOKING FOR a career opportunity with an unlimited income potential? This position requires a self-motivated, outgoing individual. We are looking for a salesperson that can fit into a high-energy team of insurance professionals. Email resume to: resume9393@gmail.com PART TIME office help needed for a busy and growing company. This may grow to full time in a few months. Applicant must have computer experience, knowledge of office procedures, strong basic math and spelling skills, honest, and dependable. Duties will include answering phones, working with time cards, posting, typing misc. reports, filing, and many other duties that may turn up. Please send resume to PO Box 1897 Unit 345, Roswell, NM 88202. *** SUMMER WORK!!*** $16 Base/Appt. PT/FT Customer Sales/Service. Work in your area. No Experience necessary, Conditions apply, All ages 17+ Call Now 575-208-0135

DENTAL ASSISTANT position available in progressive dental office! Experience/Radiology Certificate preferred. Seeking self-motivated person with a positive attitude. Send resume with cover letter to: P.O. Box 1897 unit 347 Roswell, NM Dean Baldwin Painting, LP Roswell, NM is seeking: A & P Mechanics & QA Inspectors with active A&P license, for permanent/Full Time positions (Day Shift & Night Shift available). Starting pay: $19.00 p/h, or higher depending on exp, we offer great advancement opportunity & excellent benefits. Send resume to: teresac@deanbaldwinpainting.com or fax to 575-347-2589. EOE. FAMILIA DENTAL has a great opportunity for Dental Assistant and Receptionist. Excellent comp. + bonus. Will train if you don’t have dental experience. Send resume to hr@familiadental.com or call 847-241-2044.

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

045. Employment Opportunities

B7

Dennis the Menace

Sierra Machinery, Inc. a full line distributor for heavy construction and mining equipment has the following position open: COUNTER SALES AND WAREHOUSE Sierra offers excellent pay and benefits, training and advancement opportunities; and a brand new facility in Artesia, NM. To apply send your resume to 915-772-1964, or, call Parts Manager at 915-772-0613. Housekeeper and Laundry Staff We are seeking candidates for full-time and part-time Housekeeping/Laundry personnel to perform a variety of cleaning duties to ensure the physical environment meets established standards for cleanliness and sanitation and meet all infection control and safety standards for the facility. Please send resumes to ken.cope@hcsgcorp.com FRESENIUS MEDICAL Care/Southeastern New Mexico Kidney Center is seeking RNs. Full benefits, 401K, medical, vision, dental. PTO after 6 months. Other company benefits. Open Mon-Sat. Off Sundays.12 hour shifts. Competitive pay. Apply online at FMCNA.COM -RESTAURANT MANAGERS-

Our search for the Best of the Best is underway. And our Roswell teams are growing! If you’re an experienced Manager who loves serving people even more than serving great food; if you run a restaurant like it’s your own; … Then we want to meet you…NOW! Proven casual dining, QSR, hotel or retail candidates will be considered. We are seeking proven leaders with a passion for people & hospitality! Email resume to:

Julie.Andrews@brinker.com

Or apply online at: www.brinkerjobs.com We offer highly competitive salary with obtainable bonus potential and benefits within the first 31 days. -EOE-

ROSWELL TOYOTA NOW HIRING Receptionist. Seeking a courteous professional with a drive for success. We offer an excellent benefit package including HEALTH, DENTAL, VISION, 401k and PAID VACATION. No experience required. All applicants must pass a drug test. Apply in person at Roswell Toyota, 2211 W. 2nd. St., Roswell. Please ask for BJ or Chris. DOMINOS Pizza now hiring for drivers and assistant managers apply on line careers.dominos.com CHILI’S GRILL & BAR Now hiring experienced severs & expiditers. Great pay, great benefits, competitive wages, based on experience. Apply online @ brinkerjobs.com ROAD MAINTENANCE I

Chaves County is accepting applications to establish a six month pool of applicants for current and future openings for the position of Road Maintenance I (light road equipment operator). Entry level salary range: $9.80 $11.21/hr D.O.Q. Chaves County offers a competitive benefit package consisting of paid vacation and sick leave, holiday pay, medical, life, disability, vision and dental insurances plus a retirement plan. Position requires 2 years experience operating road construction equipment and a valid Class A CDL. Applicant will not be considered if they have been convicted of DWI within the past three years or do not currently possess a valid Class A CDL. Normal work hours are Monday-Thursday, 6:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Chaves County is a drug free employer. All applicants for this position will be required to pass a background check and will be subject to pre-employment, post-offer drug and physical testing. Required Application forms are available at the County's Job Posting Board located in the west wing of the County Administrative Center, #1 St. Mary's PL, Roswell, NM 88203 or by accessing the County's Web Site at www.co.chaves.nm.us. Applications may be returned to Human Resources, PO Box 1817, Roswell, NM 88202. Applications will be accepted until filled. EOE.

045. Employment Opportunities

IT Specialist (Roswell) IT Specialist-Roswell

Stable and dynamic organization is recruiting an IT Specialist in Roswell. IT Specialist will be responsible for monitoring, developing, testing, maintaining, installing and/or optimizing servers and system management technologies. The IT Specialist will also be responsible creating and maintaining a database for the program and for assessing, troubleshooting and resolving problem associated with the client network, personal computers, copiers, and printers. The position will also provide assistance regarding the use of computer technology on various platforms in hardware, software, printing, installation, applications, and email, provide ongoing maintenance, and perform specialized procedures as needed. Successful candidate should have 2+ years of demonstrated work experience in Level II Help Desk, including current experience in the various information technology fields with hands-on experience working in information technology supporting customers on multiple hardware platforms and experience in the use of various enterprise software packages. Ability to obtain and maintain a government clearance is required. Starting pay is $18.00 per hour. AA/EOE.Drug free work environment. Please send resume and references to tech@excelstaff.com Exciting new company We have the following positions open •Customer service •Appointment setting •Management opportunities 1600/month per agreement Call our office to day to set up an appointment (575) 578-4817

GUARDSMARK The nation’s leader in security is hiring security officers. No experience required, but customer service skills a must. Must be HS Grad/GED & 21 yrs. EOE Benefits: Free Medical/Life Ins. Uniforms/Tuition Assistance. Starting Pay $9.00hr. Apply by calling 505-830-2700 Tues-Fri. 9am-6pm. ROAD CONSTRUCTION

Chaves County is accepting applications for the position of Road Construction. ($8.00/hr). This is a temporary position for summer help not to exceed 6 months applicant must be able to start as soon as possible. Required applications forms are available at the County's Job Posting Board located in the west wing of the County Administrative Center or by accessing the Web Site at www.co.chaves.nm.us/jobs . Applications may be returned to the County Manager's Suite, Suite 180, Chaves County Administrative Center, #1 St Mary's Place, Roswell, NM 88203 or mailed by closing date to Human Resources, PO Box 1817, Roswell, NM 88202. Applications will be accepted until filled. EOE. YATES ENERGY CORPORATION has an immediate openeing for a receptionist. The ideal hire should be profecional, dependable, have a good telephone etiquette, the abbility to multitask and strong computer skills. Accounting and land backgroung desirable. Please email cover letter, resume, and thee refeances to

jprichard@yatesenergy.com. Yates Energy Corporation, PO Box 2323, Roswell, NM 88202.

045. Employment Opportunities

HOUSE KEEPER WANTED: Ours left Roswell. Need responsible, attentive, thorough lady for 1-2 days a week. 310-597-2913 LIVE IN Caregiver wanted, starting at $800mo, with room & board. 623-1802 SOUTHEASTER REMOVAL Service is needing a part time drivers for transporting services. Must provide background and driving record. Only serious inquiries need to apply. 317-8826 BEALLS ASSISTANT MANAGEMENT POSITION AVAILABLE. Full benefit package, must have retail management exp., and must be mobile. POWELL TIRE is currently looking for a full time service truck driver Must have tire experience & a valid drivers license. Please come by 2007 SE Main & fill out application.

SERVICES

080. Alterations

RITZY RAGS Alterations. Mon-Thurs, 12-5pm, by appt. only. Susan at 420-6242.

105. Childcare

CLEAN LICENSED daycare home, all ages, North, reasonable rates 420-6803

125. Carpet Cleaning

R.B. Carpet Cleaning. Home and Commercial. Free Estimates. Cell 910-0685 or 420-4375.

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 BUSY BEE Cleaning Service. Commercial, residential, & rental properties. Call Judi @ 626-4198 SUNSHINE WINDOW Services. Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458

150. Concrete

CONCRETE WORK and stucco. 575-420-3825

185. Electrical

ELECTRICAL SERVICES Meter loops, service upgrades, remodels, additions, service calls. Lowest prices in town. Free estm. Lic#360025. 910-4193

195. Elderly Care

ELDERLY, Temporarily disabled, long term assistant? At home housewife looking for new clients who need living assistance. Light housekeeping, yard maintenance, errands & appointment transport. Clean, reliable, honest, reasonable rates. Call Meta 575-626-9682. LOOKING TO take care of elderly, cleaning, cooking, minimum wage. 622-6254 Private Home care full or part time, good references, 15yrs of exp. 575-910-3280 Will Care for Your Loved One. Ref. avail. Prefer nights. 623-3717

200. Fencing

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100 M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

220. Furniture Repair WE BUILD and repair furniture. 840-7849 or 626-8466


B8 Tuesday, May 7, 2013 225. General Construction

Olaguez Construction: Free estimates, complete remodeling including plumbing, additions, tile, sheds, concrete, fence, roof, stucco, windows, painting, & doors. Guaranteed Work. 910-7035 Miguel.

Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

230. General Repair

“Big E’s” Handyman/Maint Services Quality work. Reasonable rates. Free est. Senior disc. 914-6025

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Spring Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242. Better Lawn Care Mowing, weed eating, edging & bush trimming. Prices Start at $20. Call for Free Est. Jeremy 575-914-8118. WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Lawn & field mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming - Rock installation & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121. Emerald Landscaping Lawn & sprinkler installation, sprinkler repair, sod, gravel, lawn maintenance. Maintenance/Free Estimates/accept credit cards. Lic#89265. Call: Aaron, 575-910-0150 or Chris, 420-3945 LAWN MOWING, landscaping, yard cutting, tree’s cut down. Call 910-2033 Bòidheach Yards and Gardens. Property cleanup & hauling, year round maintenance, landscaping, tree management. You'll love our prices! 578-9404. “Big E’s” Landscaping & Yardwork mow, trim, prune property clean-up, sprinkler sys. senior disc. 914-6025 WILL DO yard work also junk and trast removal. Call Danny 622-5403 or 575-613-5671 LAWN CLEANING & basic cleanup. 420-4375 or 910-0685 LAWN MOWING, best prices in town. 420-9578 or 840-7278 Yard work, clean-ups, lawns. Handyman svc. David 637-9580.

310. Painting/ Decorating

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. RRP Certified. Call 637-9108.

330. Plumbing

Plumber Needs Work. Steve’s Plumbing & Heating. 28 yrs exp. 622-9326

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing

RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397 www.rancheroswelding.com

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

395. Stucco Plastering

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217 RWC Lath and Stucco. Insurance. Hector (575)910-8397

www.rancheroswelding.com

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991

405. TractorWork

TRACTOR FOR hire. Will haul off trash, concrete, mow, till, level off property. 626-3513

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 QuickCut Tree Services Best prices, great clean-up. Call for free estimates, 575-208-8963.

410. Tree Service

Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insurance.

www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale FSBO: 4/2/2, lg kitchen, great area. 2 Isla Ct. No Owner Financing 317-8131

OWNER FINANCED or get your own financing Lg. 2200sf, 4BD3/BA 2 living areas you can rent one if desired, many updates, nice area 1514 S. Kansas. $135k $10k down. 622-6786. 2707 GAYE Dr. $284k. 4000+sqft. of living area. 4BD/3.5BA/2 car garage. Living room w/fireplace, dining room, study, eat in kitchen w/bar, lg. laundry room w/storage. 40% finished basement w/fireplace. Lg. backyard w/shed for yard equip. Call 626-8295 for appt. FRESHLY PAINTED 2br/1ba, living room, kitchen, carport & storage shed. For more info call 627-8745 or 910-2832. 1500 SQFT home on 30 acres in Arabela, NM. 3BD/2BA, appraisal value $388,000. (575)653-4134. {{{RENTED}}} 3BR/1BA, $300/dep, $650/mo, no utilities paid. No pets, HUD maybe, 410 SE. Beech

3br/1ba, newly remodeled, laundry room, kitchen & livingroom, $65k. 840-4589

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

535. Apartments Furnished

1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281 Small Apt. all bills pd, $450 mo/$250dep., no pets/smoking, 1 person or couple only, references 317-9565 after 5pm or 575-808-9690 anytime.

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944

EFF, 1BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377 EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $571, 3br/2ba, $625, 5br/2ba $746, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge.

Town Plaza Apartments NO HUD ACCEPTED ALL UTILITIES PAID Friendly managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs & downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

ROOMY 2BD, 1ba, $650mo, $400dep, water paid, no inside pets, 2409 N. Grand, Sun Country Realty, 623-4646 or Lynn 626-7506

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

SALE OR Rent: Owner finance or your own financing. 3BD/2BA, 2 L areas plus 2nd home 1BD/1BA. Live in one rent the other. 120K w/10K down. 622-7010 519 S. Pinon.

500. Businesses for Sale BUISNESS FOR sale well established, parking lot cleaning, 575-420-1873

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

1981 BREC 14x68, 2br/2ba, inside renovated, new floors/plumbing, FP, $18k obo. In Artesia, needs to be moved. 505-225-6585 18X80 FLEETWOOD Mobile Home. Open kitchen, dining & living room, 3BD 1&3/4BA, master has 5ft walk in shower, large porch w/ ramp. $39900 Call to see. 910-9716 1986 MELODY 2bd/2ba, new steel roof, new sub flooring, $9k OBO. Must be moved. Please leave message, 626-3767.

520. Lots for Sale

5 ACRE lot w/wonderful view of city & sunrises. Includes pipe fence, gate, well, electricity, & gravel road, $55K, 954-261-5800 PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352. CORNER OF DIAMOND A & LATIGO. 188X146 s.f. 626-4113 or 626-4213 Four South Park cemetery lots. Will sell all or two. Call 575-622-4539 for price.

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

2/1, $625/mo., $400/dep., wtr pd, no HUD/pets, 300 W. Mescalero. 910-1300 705 W. 10th, new carpet, fresh paint,1br/1ba, very clean, $500/mo. $500dep. No HUD, no pets, Couple or Single 575-420-4801

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 NO PETS or HUD. 3/1.5, $900, $700 dep 2/2/1 $950, $700 dep. 575-420-5930

2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 703 BROKEN Arrow, 3/2/2, w/d hookups, ref air, landscaped, $1050/mo, $1050/DD. 910-5684 Private Room w/bath, kitchen & washer/dryer privileges $100 per week (575) 420-0853 515 S. Aspen, $550/mo, background check, 2br. 623-2617

3BR 1BA w/d hkp 1003 W. Mathews.$675, $500 dep. No Hud. 317-4307 Clean 2BR, 1527 N. Michigan $500 + Dep. No Pets. No HUD. Call 626-2190 1612 S. Kansas 2br $850mo/ $850dep w/1 year lease agreement. Available 5/2/13. Call 575-420-5495 or 575-420-2990 409 N. Railroad. 3bd/1ba, stove, refrigerator, no pets, $550/mo, $300/dep. 910-9648.

1BR, NO pets or HUD, $475/mo, $450/dep, wtr pd. 317-7373 3107 RADCLIFF, 3br/1.5ba, washer & dryer, newly remodeled kitchen includes dishwasher, $745 + dep., no smoking or HUD, Avail. 6/1. Call 317-1672.

1717 N. Ohio, $700/mo, $700/dep, 3br/1ba, FP, family room. 909-657-7611 3004 N. Delicado, 3br, 2ba, fenced yard, no pets, background check required, $900/mo, $500/dep. 575-441-4739 {{{RENTED}}} 2br/1ba w/carport $475mo, $250dep., No HUD

3202 S. Sunset, 4br/2ba, appliances, fenced backyard, no HUD, no utilities pd, pets w/fee, $1000 mo., $750 dep. 575-405-0163 or email kilok9s@gmail.com

CLASSIFIEDS

558. Roommates Wanted

WANTED: FT emplyd female to share my house in a quiet, safe area. All utilities pd, $425/mo. Joann, 575-420-8333.

580. Office or Business Places FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546.

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

MONTAGUE 6 burner commercial stove w/oven $1250, located at 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 626-7488 or 420-1352. 6ft Charbroiler, $750, located at 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 626-7488 or 420-1352. Manitawac Restaurant size ice machine, 500lb capacity, guaranteed $675, located at 1401 Old Dexter Hwy or 626-7488. 50 PIECE Franciscan dishes. 622-9079 Leave message. Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed! MAYTAG ELECTRIC dryer, $125; Singer automatic sewing machine, $50. 622-6254 IMPORTED LANDSCAPE rock for sale. For delivery only. Any rock you want I can get! No load too small or too big. 626-3513 Pwr wheelchair, lift chair, walker, commode chair, hospital bed. 622-7638 THE TREASURE Chest A must see place. Sofas, recliner, table & chairs, lady head vases, saxophone, furniture, antiques, thrifts, piano. 1204 W. Hobbs, 914-1855, Weds-Sat, 10-5.

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

TOP PRICES paid for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We buy compete household & estates. 623-0136 or 627-2033

635. Good things to Eat

Red Chile pods, local pinto beans, mountain apples, peanuts, cucumbers, all kinds of squash, onions, garlic, jalapenos, bell peppers, frozen green chile, sweet corn and many more vegetables. Accepting credit and debit cards and EBT. GRAVES FARM, 622-1889, open 8:30-5:30pm Mon-Sat, 1-5pm on Sunday.

645. Sewing Machines

FOR SALE, Berina 440 sewing machine & cabinet. Call 622-9142.

745. Pets for Sale

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

T-CUP & TOY PUPPIES Chihuahuas $200-500 Shihtzus $650 Malty-Poos $600-800 Pekapoo-Poms $400 Poodles $500 Schnauzers $650 Pekapoos $800 Yorkie-Poos $800 Morkie/Shihtzus $800 Registered, shots, health guaranteed, POTTY PAD trained. Small deposit will hold. Great PAYMENT PLAN. PAYPAL/Debit Credit cards. Some hypo-allergenic non-shedding. 575-308-3017 txt4 updated pics cingard1@hotmail.com

Roswell Daily Record

745. Pets for Sale

PUPPY LOVE Grooming & Boarding - Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also 575-420-6655 2 MALE Yorkies, AKC, all shots and micro-chips; approx. 5lbs each. Born 04/01/2012. One neutered. $600.00/ea. 623-4082 after 5:00PM, or leave message BEAUTIFUL IRISH setter pups, 2 female & 1 male left, 7 weeks old. 575-302-3485.

RECREATIONAL 750. Sports Equipment

2 TOUR de France bikes, ONCE team valued at $6k each, selling for $2k each, both have record campagnolo. 1 Townie beach bike, valued at $800, selling for $550. 627-7351

765. Guns & Ammunition

7.62X39 FMJ Ammo. Brass Cartridge 1260 Rnds.$750 575-405-1502

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

2009 SUZUKI LT-R450 Quad, low riding hours, new tires, great condition, every scheduled maintenance up to date, $4500 OBO. 420-0431 2007 HD Road King, 15k miles, many extras, beautiful con. $12500 622-1076

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com Southwind 36’ RV, 2001, 2 slides, price reduced, $34k. 575-624-0697

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM 1997 FORD Aerostar, 3rd seat, excellent condition. $3450. 1401 Old Dexter HYW. 420-1352

‘97 Honda Civic, auto, 2dr, AC, new timing belt & wtr pump, $2200. 317-4373 2003 KIA Optima LX, power windows & locks, AC/Heater, new tires & window tint, CD player, 4 cyl. 575-910-1078 99 SUBURBAN, 350 motor changed a yr. ago, in great condition, family truck, $2,900.00, 575-910-2900 1996 Lexus LS400, leather interior, sun roof, excellent condition, $5750. 420-1352 PRICE REDUCED, 1999 GMC Sierra Fully Loaded, semi new rims/ tires, low mi 626-2942 2011 CAMRY XLE, silver, 18.5k miles, moonroof, tinted windows, dashmat. 317-7276 1967 VOLKSWAGON Beetle, all original, new tires, fresh tune-up, excellent condition, good investment, $4950, 623-2206 2004 Ford Taurus, low miles, loaded, exc. records, $5500 obo. 626-0934

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2005 FORD Supercrew XLT Triton, $11K, power windows, lock & seat, fixed running boards, towing package, 4x2. 910-1078 2008 FORD F-250 Superduty Lariat, LOADED, 172k miles, $21,500. 914-0083

796. SUVS

‘97 CHEVY Blazer, auto, 4dr, runs great, good tires, AC, $2900. 317-4373 2004 FORD Expedition, 3rd seat, excellent condition, $4400. 420-1352

810. Auto Parts & Accessories DODGE TRUCK bed cover. 1702 S. Atkinson 420-9633 $450 OBO

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos

Roswell Daily Record 05-07-13  

Roswell Daily Record 05-07-13

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