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Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 123, No. 106 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

May 2, 2014

FRIDAY

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Police investigating second homicide in a week RANDAL SEYLER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Roswell Police responded to another homicide Thursday morning — the second homicide within one week. Officers responded to the 1500 block of North Montana around 8:30 a.m. after receiving a report of a dead woman at a residence there. The woman, who was in her 30s, was discovered by a family member, said Sabrina Morales, public information liaison officer with the Roswell Police Department. Morales said the investi-

gation is ongoing, and that the death is being investigated as a homicide. The Roswell detective investigating the murder is busy interviewing people, Morales said. The same detective is also investigating last week’s shooting of 22-year -old Joseph Sanchez. Sanchez was shot on the 5800 block of South Main on April 24. There have been no arrests in that case. The name of the dead woman is being withheld pending notification of the family, Morales said. “You want to make sure all the family is notified, as many

as is possible.”

No further information is available at this time.

If you have information pertaining to this case, you are urged to contact the Roswell Police Department (575-624-6770) or Crime Stoppers (888-5948477) immediately.

Randal Seyler Photo

Roswell Police investigate a possible homicide at a home on the 1500 block of North Montana Avenue on Thursday afternoon. A woman was found dead at the scene by a family member around 8:30 a.m.

City settles free speech lawsuit

Spring singers

Street preachers to receive $97,000 TIMOTHY P. HOWSARE ROSWELL EDITOR

Mark Wilson Photo

The NMMI Vocal Ensemble performs 'Daemon Irrepit Callidus' during the New Mexico Military Institute’s Music Department Annual Spring Concert held Thursday evening at Pearson Auditorium.

The City of Roswell settled its lawsuit Thursday with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of New Mexico. The suit alleges that Roswell police officers repeatedly violated the First Amendment free speech rights of two local street preachers, Joshua and Jeremy De Los Santos. Joshua and Jeremy are brothers and members of the Old Paths Baptist Church in Roswell, where Joshua is the pastor. Jeremy provides religious instruction at the church. Both believe they have a duty to preach the Gospel in public, and both regularly do so, the ACLU said in a released statement. According to the ACLU,

the Roswell Police Department arrested both brothers multiple times for expressing their sincerely held religious beliefs in public, as is their right under the First Amendment. Under the terms of the settlement, the City of Roswell will pay $97,000 in compensatory and punitive damages to the De Los Santos brothers. In the two years preceding the ACLU’s lawsuit, Roswell police of ficers arrested Jeremy De Los Santos five times for preaching in public and arrested Joshua twice for the same activity. In every case, the charges against the plaintiffs were either dropped, dismissed by a

Finance committee OKs City to waive dumping fees until Nov. 1 Lodger’s Tax requests RANDAL SEYLER RECORD STAFF WRITER

The Roswell city finance committee approved a pair of Lodger’s Tax requests on Thursday morning at City Hall for events scheduled this September. The finance committee approved $2,187.50 for the Rio Pecos Kennel Club to cover advertising costs for the club’s upcoming 2014 AKC Dog Show, scheduled for Sept. 9. Sarah Brinegar, treasurer for the Kennel Club, told the committee members that the annual dog show brings people from all over the region to Roswell. “This is our 50th year, I

believe,” Brinegar said, “and people who come to the show also spend the night in hotels, buy gas, dine out here and buy gifts and souvenirs. This event is good for the community.” Brinegar said more people from outside the community participate in the dog show itself, but local residents attend the show and often learn about dog breeds and visit with breeders about various types of dogs. “While the people in Roswell don’t necessarily show their dogs, I am always amazed by the support the local community See COMMITTEE, Page A2

Courtesy Photo

The commencement speaker for the ENMU-R graduation ceremonies on May 9 will be student Emely Stubbs Ponce, a candidate for graduation who will be receiving two associate’s degrees, one in Human Services and one in University Studies. She enrolled as a Presidential Scholar at ENMU-Roswell in the summer of 2012 after graduating from Roswell High School. In addition to her studies, she was active in the Phi Theta Kappa honor society chapter on campus, Alpha Mu Pi. She served as the vice president and also the New Mexico regional Phi Theta Kappa president.

TIMOTHY P. HOWSARE RECORD EDITOR

From now until Nov. 1, owners of dilapidated homes and buildings in Roswell will have 100 percent of their landfill dumping fees waived by the city. The fees usually start at $31 per ton. To be eligible for the waiver, a building owner must first apply to the city for a permit to demolish a structure, which costs $5. Mayor Dennis Kintigh said at a press conference Thursday that when he ran for office he had made a commitment to clean up Roswell. “The time for talk is done. The time for action is today,” he said.

HIGH 77 LOW 51

Mayor Dennis J. Kintigh said he wants to help clean up the city by offering waivers of dumping fees for demolished buildings from now until Nov. 1.

Kintigh said the fee waivers are for any building, “whether it’s a shed or whether it’s a warehouse.” Kintigh emphasized that

free once a demolition permit is obtained. Butts can be contacted at 637-6286. Kintigh said there are a lot of dilapidated structures around town, but rather than punishing owners by condemning their properties, he wants the city to offer them an incentive to remove the unsightly structures on their own. He said the initiative should not only help the overall aesthetics of the community, but also provide relief for those who may not be able to afford the cost of the dumping fees, which can be significant. Kintigh said he hopes See FEES, Page A3

ENMU-Roswell plans graduation ceremonies

Easter n New Mexico University-Roswell will hold two commencement ceremonies on May 9 at the Roswell Convention and Civic Center. The first ceremony will begin at 5 p.m. for those graduation candidates who will receive Certificates of Employability, Certificates of Occupational Training, and Certificates of Completion. New Mexico Youth ChalleNGe graduation candidates will also participate in this ceremony.

TODAY’S FORECAST

Timothy P. Howsare Photo

the program, called Clean and Safe, is “not forever” and will end in six months. He also was clear that it is only for structures within city limits. The are a few stipulations to the program. The disposal waiver only includes structures, and not furniture and fixtures. If those items need to be disposed, fees will be assessed. Old buildings with asbestos insulation must first have the asbestos removed, or abated, before the building can be torn down. Miller Butts, a certified city building official, said his department will do an asbestos inspection for

See LAWSUIT, Page A3

• GLENN BOYD PRAGER

The second ceremony will begin at 7 p.m. for those graduation candidates receiving associate’s degrees. Students receiving both a certificate and an associate degree will participate in the 7 p.m. ceremony. Bachelor’s and master’s degree candidates from ENMU and Master of Social Work degree candidates from NMHU will also participate in the 7 p.m. ceremony. ENMU-Roswell officials say it is necessary to

• ROGER LEE BARNHILL MYRTLE M. BARNHILL

TODAY’S OBITUARIES PAGE A6

AND

schedule two ceremonies due to the large number of graduation candidates participating in this spring’s 61st Commencement Convocation. Nearly 160 students are expected to participate in the first ceremony and about 200 students are expected to participate in the second ceremony. The commencement speaker will be Emely Stubbs Ponce, a candidate for graduation who will be receiving two Associate of Arts degrees, one in

CLASSIFIEDS ..........B5

COMICS .................B4

FINANCIAL ..............B3

Human Services and one in University Studies. On May 8, the Adult Basic Education Department at ENMU-R will hold its 25th annual GED High School Completion Graduation ceremony at 7 p.m. in the Per for ming Arts Center on campus. A reception will follow the ceremony in the Campus Union Building. The featured speaker will be the Honorable Charles C. Currier, District Court judge, 5th Judicial District.

INDEX GENERAL ...............A2 HOROSCOPES .........B5 LOTTERIES .............A2 OPINION .................A4

SPORTS .................B1

WEATHER ..............A8 WORLD ..................A7


A2 Friday, May 2, 2014

GENERAL

Photo Finish

Roswell Daily Record

Armed robbery suspects sought

Courtesy Photo

Artists Tasia Ramage, left, and Aria Finch put the finishing touches on a clay sculpture by Ramage, Finch and artists Sarah McArthur and Megan Heil. The artwork is to be donated to the RMAC Foundation’s Kentucky Derby Party for the silent auction. The annual Kentucky Derby Party will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Saturday at the Roswell Museum and Art Center.

STATE HEALTH EXCHANGE LOOKING AT FINANCING OPTIONS

SANTA FE (AP) — New Mexico’s state-run health insurance exchange wants to hear from the public on how to raise about $24 million annually to pay for operating the online marketplace in the future. Among the options are fees on private insurance companies selling health care policies in the state. Dr. J. R. Damron, the chairman of the exchange’s governing board, said Thursday that no decision will be made for several months on a plan for financing the exchange starting in 2016. “We can’t go to the state for money.

Committee Continued from Page A1

We have to be financially sustainable, and we’re on our own,” Damron said. The board is soliciting public comments through the end of the month. The federal government has provided grants for developing and running exchanges in New Mexico and across the country. Nearly 35,000 New Mexicans have signed up for insurance plans offered by private insurers through the online marketplace, according to figures through mid-April from the state insurance superintendent’s office. In addition to that, about 17,000 individuals signed up for coverage off the

gives to our animal shelters,” Brinegar said. Committee Chair man and City Councilor Caleb Grant asked Brinegar about the Kennel Club’s method of tracking the number of attendees who spent the night in Roswell and who was dining out — information the Occupancy Tax Board requires from events to verify that tourists are actually coming to town for events that receive Lodger’s Tax funding. Brinegar explained that the club had used a check mark method, asking people to indicate their hotel status as they came to the Kennel Club table for a catalog. Committee member and City Councilor Jeanine Best suggested to Brinegar that the Kennel Club contact their online service, Onofri.com, which provides

a registration website for the event and have the required information added to the online registration process. “I don’t think we could get them to do that,” Brinegar said. “I liked to have never got them to give me this,” she said, holding up a piece of paper. “I don’t think we can get them to do anything extra.” “You’re paying them a lot of money,” Best said. “It’s just my opinion, but I think they should be able to do what you ask them.” The committee also approved $5,780 for “Are You Tough Enough For Two?” “Tough Enough” is a combination of a “Color Run” and Roswell’s “Mud, Sweat & Tears” run — a weekend featuring two different types of running events. “Last year, I expected 150

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New Mexico has relied on a federally operated online system for enrolling individuals since October. The state-run exchange handled small businesses but will assume the job of individual enrollment this fall.

In developing a long-term financing plan, Damron said, the exchange doesn’t want to assess fees in such a way that it causes premiums to soar or discourages insurers from offering health plans.

runners for Mud, Sweat & Tears, but I ordered 300 Tshirts just to be safe,” said event planner Barbara Gomez. “We had 450 people come and run.” The Color Run will be held in Cielo Grande Park, while the Mud, Sweat & Tears will be held in the Noon Optimists Park, Gomez said. Both events will be held the same weekend in September, but a date has yet to be set. “This is the second year for the Mud, Sweat & Tears, and some people had asked if we could do a timed run as well, so we are adding the Color Run.” Gomez noted that they would have to come up with another name for the

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timed run, since Color Run is a copyrighted name. The Mud, Sweat & Tears run is an obstacle run through mud, but the event is not timed, meaning you can take as long as you need to complete the course. “I want the other event to be a ‘walk, run or roll’ event, which means you can walk the 5K, or run or push a stroller,” Gomez said. “Also, if you are handicapped and want to participate you can.” Both motions by the finance committee now go before the City Council for final approval. The council will hold its next regular meeting at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 8.

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Phillips

green, late 1990s Dodge extended cab pickup that is registered out of Artesia. David Phillips is described as a white man who is about 6-foot tall, 180 pounds and has blonde hair and blue eyes. The unidentified subject is described as a white man who is roughly 5-foot-6 and weighs about 230 pounds. Both Phillips and the unidentified male subject are believed to be armed and dangerous. If you have any information regarding the whereabouts of David Phillips, or the identity of the third suspect, you are urged to contact the Roswell Police Department at 575-624-6770 or Crime Stoppers at 888-594-8477.

BORDER AGENTS SEIZE HALF MILLION IN DRUGS DEMING (AP) — Border Patrol agents have seized nearly half a million dollars’ worth of marijuana being smuggled across the border into southern New Mexico. Officials say the drugs were found in a five-day span over the last week. On Monday, Deming Border Patrol agents using infrared technology caught two men trying to sneak 94 pounds of marijuana through the brush in their backpacks. Also over the past week, Border Patrol agents assigned to the Lordsburg station discovered multiple bundles of marijuana in four separate incidents. In each case, the subjects carrying the marijuana abandoned their attempts and were tracked walking back into Mexico.

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exchange, such as dealing directly with insurers and their brokers.

The Roswell Police Department is seeking the public’s help in locating two men wanted in connection with an armed robbery. The robbery occurred on April 26 on the 1800 block of South Pennsylvania Avenue. Three men reportedly robbed a man and stole his prescription medication from him. One of the men was identified as Henry Garcia Jr. Garcia tur ned himself in to police on April 29. Two other men are being sought for their involvement in the robbery. One man has been identified as David Phillips, 25. Police believe Phillips may be in the Artesia area. The third man is yet to be identified. The incident does not appear to be a random act of violence. Through the course of the investigation, detectives obtained sufficient probable cause and secured and executed an arrest warrant for Garcia. Another arrest warrant has been secured for Phillips. The vehicle utilized during the crime is described as a dark

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Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice

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GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Lawsuit

Continued from Page A1

court of law or overturned as unconstitutional, according to the press release. The De Los Santos brothers alleged that the Roswell police falsely arrested them without probable cause for exercising their First Amendment right to free speech on public property. The brothers also claim that RPD confiscated phones, cameras, camcorders and a bullhorn — some of which were never returned. Jeremy De Los Santos also claimed that RPD officers used excessive force on two occasions, according to the press release. Mayor Dennis Kintigh said the city agreed to the settlement to avoid further court costs and time spent in court. He said Roswell, along with other municipalities in the state, pay into a statewide insurance fund that pays attorneys fees and court costs when the city is sued. Despite settling the case, Kintigh disagrees that the city ever violated the De Los Santos brothers’ First Amendment rights. “What I will say is they were never arrested for expressing sincerely held religious beliefs,” said Kintigh, who was interim police chief from August 2010 to January 2011. “It was always their conduct in regard to other individuals.” The arrests occurred from April 2010 to July 2011, according to the complaint filed in the U.S. District Court of New Mexico by the ACLU on April 4, 2012. Jeremy De Los Santos said charges were dropped after each arrest except one. “Right before court they would dismiss them,” he said. “In the first arrest, I was found guilty in municipal court but the district court found me not guilty.” Kintigh said that during one of the arrests, the brothers were standing across the street from Church on the Move on West Brasher Road and that an altercation

Fees

Continued from Page A1

the program will save the city the trouble and expense of placing liens on unsightly and unsafe

may have ensued. “They were speaking about members of the church in a derogatory manner,” Kintigh said. Jeremy said he and his brother were former members of the church, but left because they disagreed with the church’s doctrine. Though they were preaching outside of the Church on the Move, Jeremy De Los Santos said he does not recall using a bullhorn. Jeremy De Los Santos was arrested and taken to jail for party to a crime and disturbing lawful assembly. He said that a member of the Roswell City Council, Savino Sanchez Jr., attends the church, and that Sanchez’ son attacked him and Joshua with a baseball bat but was never arrested. Sanchez said he would not comment at this time when contacted by the Record. One or both of the De Los Santos brothers also were arrested while preaching outside of Billy Ray’s Lounge, Old Paths Baptist Church, Cielo Grande Park, the UFO Museum and the Roswell Convention Center. Jeremy De Los Santos said the repeated arrests were a form of harassment. He said expressing religious beliefs can offend other people, but that’s why the Constitution protects speech that may be offensive. “If we’re Christians preaching Christian beliefs, that could be offensive to a Muslim because we are exalting Jesus and not Ali,” he said. Peter Simonsom, executive director of the New Mexico ACLU, called the court settlement a significant victory for free speech. “Police officers may disagree with the content of your speech, but that does not give them the right to arrest you,” he said in the press release. “Today we affirm the right of every person to express their opinions — even unpopular opinions — without fear of arrest or harassment by the government.”

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Kintigh said city staff will be available to answer questions and

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Putin is a bully; make the bully sweat A4 Friday, May 2, 2014

OPINION

Secretary of State John Kerry recently urged Russian leader Vladimir Putin to dial down the confrontation in Ukraine. “If Russia continues in this direction,” Kerry warned, “it will not just be a grave mistake, it will be an expensive mistake.” So far, however, it’s the leaders in Washington, Bonn and Brussels who are making mistakes — not Moscow. President Obama and his allies are not following through on their threats. And their timidity could be both expensive and dangerous. It’s clear by now that Putin is a bully, a bully who pushes others around until someone calls his bluff. But instead of standing up, the West is backing down. The economic sanctions announced by Washington this week are a tap on the shoulder, not even a slap on the wrist: freezing the assets of 17 companies; denying travel visas to seven

COKIE AND STEVEN ROBERTS

SYNDICATED COLUMNISTS

business leaders; blocking the export of militarily useful technology. Russian investors were so relieved that the Moscow stock market actually went up. Even the Obama administration conceded the weakness of its actions. “We don’t expect there to be an immediate change in Russian policy,” a senior of ficial told reporters. Really? If you expect no change, then why bother? All you do is embolden Putin and his surrogate bullies, swaggering around Ukraine in their black ski masks, seizing inter national

monitors, occupying government buildings, raising Russian flags. The Washington Post editorial board got it right: “By choosing not to use the economic weapons at its disposal and broadcasting that restraint to the world, Mr. Obama is telling Mr. Putin as well as other potential aggressors that they continue to have little to fear from the United States.” When Putin has “little to fear,” the fear factor for everybody else shoots up. Sure, Washington is 4,857 miles from Moscow, a long way for a bully to reach. But Riga, the capital of Latvia? It’s 570 miles from the Kremlin. How do you think the Latvians — and the Estonians and the Lithuanians and the Moldovans — are feeling right now? Safe? Reassured? During his recent trip to Asia, the president offered an insight into his foreign policy thinking. “Typically, criticism of our foreign

Roswell Daily Record

policy has been directed at the failure to use military force,” he told a questioner in Manila. “And the question I think I would have is, why is it that everybody is so eager to use military force after we’ve just gone through a decade of war at enormous costs to our troops and to our budget?” Obama is setting up a straw man. Military force should always be a last option, but even his harshest critics are not suggesting that he physically dislodge the Russians from Ukraine. His error is not using the “economic weapons” described by the Post. In this case, traders are more powerful than tanks; investors, more influential than infantry. Putin’s real weakness is the marketplace, not the battlefield. The ruble has lost 7.6 percent of its value against the dollar since the beginning of the year; the Moscow stock market is down 13 percent. Standard and Poor’s, the financial rating

agency, dropped its grade for Russian bonds to one notch above junk status and warned investors that further economic sanctions could “under mine already weakening growth prospects.” In the first three months of the year, $51 billion in capital fled Russia. In a desperate move to block the exits, central bankers in Moscow raised interest rates — twice — to 7.5 percent. To be sure, Obama is restrained by his European allies, whose greater economic stake in Russia makes them more reluctant to confront Putin. American trade with Russia amounts to $26 billion annually, compared to Europe’s $370 billion. Joe Kaeser, the head of giant German company Siemens, actually went to Moscow, met with Putin, took photos with him and

See ROBERTS, Page A5

EDITORIAL

Demand a balanced budget

The U.S. national debt stands at $17.5 trillion. That’s a federal debt of over $50,000 for every man, woman and child in the United States. It’s a staggering number, larger than it’s ever been — and it’s a serious problem.

In Washington, finger-pointing abounds. Republicans blame Democrats for spending too much. Democrats blame Republicans for undertaxing the rich. In truth, everyone is at fault. Over the past 33 years — during which five different presidents have been elected, and each party has had its turn controlling both Congress and the White House — the national debt has doubled four times over.

The truth is clear: The government’s hunger for spending knows no bounds. And, like a teenager maxing out a credit card, the bills have piled up. Debts are stacking on top of debts, and the day of reckoning is soon at hand. Americans need to stop this spend-at-all-costs behavior and demand a balanced federal budget.

This is the key argument of the new book “America’s Fiscal Constitution” by Bill White; it’s a good one. White, a Democrat and a former mayor of Houston, plays no favorites: he lauds former President Dwight D. Eisenhower — a Republican — for refusing to succumb to the temptation of peacetime deficit spending. Similarly, he excoriates the actions of fellow Texan (and Republican) George W. Bush for extending tax cuts while signing nearly every spending bill that crossed his desk, pushing the country into ever-deeper debt.

Though we in Southern California may not notice its effects as readily as, say, a hike in prices at the gas pump, the national debt affects us all, day by day. In fact, rising gas prices can be traced directly to our national debt, which has pushed down the value of the dollar, making goods — like gasoline — far more expensive. Taken a step further, these rising prices push down the standard of living, since our paychecks go less far than they once did. In tur n, this limits our opportunities for investment and economic growth.

Worst of all, the government not only can’t af ford to pay back this massive national IOU — it has no plans to even figure out how to do so. We’re mortgaged to the hilt, and if the USA were a homeowner, the bank would be calling with an eviction notice. Mandating a balanced budget must be a government priority, and with primaries for congressional elections on the horizon, California voters need to make clear that they demand nothing less. As noted in a recent review of his book, White wrote, “The nation’s founders deferred many of their own cherished plans until the nation paid off its debts.” Surely we Americans can ask the same of our elected officials today.

My Granny’s advice for America (Part 1)

A year ago, I wrote a twopart series titled “My Mom’s Advice for America.” Those columns became two of my most read pieces. With both my mother’s 93rd birthday (May 4) and Mother’s Day (May 11) on the horizon, I decided to write a two-part series this year on her mother’s advice for America. Grandmother Scarberry, whom I affectionately always called “Granny” until the day she died, was an inspirational matriarch in the family, especially in my life. Outside of God and my wife, Gena, my mom and Granny were the two bedrocks and influences in my life. There are no greater or more passionate culture warriors that I know of than these three ladies. Their advice for America is the stuf f our republic was founded upon and needs today. I can think of nothing better during this time when we honor motherhood than to echo Granny’s advice, which she lived by example — not just preaching — and my mother, Wilma Norris Knight, recorded in her autobiography, “Acts of Kindness: My

CHUCK NORRIS

SYNDICATED COLUMNIST

Story.” I was rereading her life story and gleaning the wisdom that was so prevalent in my upbringing in rural Wilson, Okla., particularly how my mom and Granny survived and thrived through the Great Depression. As part of the builder generation and greatest generation, respectively, Granny and mom were tough as nails (even at their roughly 5-foot statures). Here is the type of legacy and grit my mom inherited from Granny (from the preface of my mom’s autobiography): “I am ninety-one years old and the only surviving member of a family of eleven. “I was raised in poverty in rural Oklahoma. We even lost our home once to a tornado. “I was supposed to die from a rare illness at eight years of

age, which landed me in a hospital in which I lived for two years, hours away from my family. “At sixteen, I married a man who struggled being a husband and eventually abandoned me to raise our three boys alone. At the same age, I also nearly lost all my sight, and did lose my father (through his sudden passing to heaven). “I’ve been present to help at the deaths of my father, mother, and all my siblings. “I’ve also endured the deaths of my two husbands, a stepson, two grandchildren, and my middle son in the Vietnam War. “Yet my youngest son, Aaron, has become a prolific director, in whose movies and television shows my eldest son, Carlos, has often starred. You might know him better by his stage name, Chuck Norris. “I have twenty-one grandchildren, twenty-three greatgrandchildren, and six greatgreat-grandchildren, so far. “I’ve had over twenty surgeries, including one for breast cancer. “I never graduated from high school. And I don’t have

a degree from an academic institution. But I’m pretty sure I’ve earned a doctorate from the school of hard knocks. “My age is now my resume. My experiences are my credentials. And my beliefs about God and faith come from nine decades of reading the Good Book and practicing its principles.” Mom, Granny and their generations epitomized what it means to be great Americans. We can benefit from their amazing examples if we slow down and take the time to hear their stories and perspectives on life, love and legacy. Enduring hardship was the name of the game back then. There was no prize without perseverance. It’s all still true and necessary today. But in the words of Brooks Hatlen, the elderly convict in “The Shawshank Redemption” who was released from prison at a ripe old age: “The world went and got itself in a big damn hurry.” And with it, our patience and perseverance have waned.

For low back pain, find a mattress that works for you REPRINTED FROM THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

DEAR DOCTOR K: I have chronic low back pain. What type of mattress should I use? DEAR READER: Considering that we spend roughly a third of our lives lying in bed, this is a very good question. And you’d think medical science would have a very good answer. I asked my colleague, Dr. Jeffrey Katz, professor of medicine and orthopedic surgery at Harvard Medical School, for his thoughts. He noted that there’s not a great deal of research on this topic, but a few studies

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

offer some guidance. In the past, doctors often recommended very fir m mattresses for people with back pain. These are sometimes called “orthopedic mattresses” because they

were widely recommended by orthopedic surgeons when I was in medical school. That was at a time when virtually no research had been done on the question. Doctors simply had opinions — sometimes strong opinions. And sometimes the worst kind of strong opinions: wrong strong opinions. Dr. Katz cited one study in which 313 people slept on a medium-firm or firm mattress for three months. Those with the medium-firm mattresses reported less pain when lying in bed as well

as less pain-related disability compared with those with the firm mattresses. Another report surveyed 268 patients with low back pain and found that patients sleeping on orthopedic (very hard) mattresses experienced the poorest sleep quality. But patients experienced no difference in sleep quality between medium and firm mattresses. A softer mattress that confor ms to your body’s natural curves may help your joints align favorably. “Memory foam” mattresses fit this description

well. But you might also sink in so deeply that your joints twist and become painful during the night. Dr. Katz usually advises his patients to try sleeping on many dif ferent mattresses and beds to see which type feels best. For example, if you spend a night at a hotel or someone else’s house, note how you feel after sleeping on the “new” bed. You might also try placing a plywood board under your current mattress to dampen any movement from bedsprings. Or put your mattress on the

See Norris, Page A5

floor to simulate the feeling of a firm bed. Before buying a new bed, go to a mattress showroom and try a variety of different models. Finally, pay attention to your sleeping position. Sleep on your side if you can, and bend your knees toward your chest a bit. Also, choose a pillow that keeps your head level with your spine. Your pillow shouldn’t prop your head up too high or let it droop. You asked what type of mattress is best for people

See DR. K, Page A5


Teen sex: Let’s talk about you and me LOCAL

Roswell Daily Record

I have been talking about teen relationships during the last couple of weeks, and how they have changed over the last few years with the introduction of the internet. Today, I want to shift gears and talk about one topic that resonates with teens — the discussion of sex. I realize that many parents and other adults who read this column may not want to hear what we heard from teens, but the truth is important to make a difference. Data from the NM Department of Health IBIS system shows that the teen pregnancy rate in Chaves County is 36.8/1,000 teens giving us a rating of “Reason for Concern.” Most of the teens that we had talked to had a lot to

say on the subject. When asked if parents had talked to them about having or practicing safe sex, most said that “I never got the talk, so I never knew what to expect.” “They should talk about sex more in the home and high school. Prepare them better.” One teen even said “give them wrappers and pills to stop teen pregnancy.” A teen said “Help them!” Because these days, it is

Friday, May 2, 2014

not “if they’re gonna do it”; it’s “when are they gonna do it and get pregnant in the process?” One teen said, “I never had the talk, but the school actually provided more info about it as a kid than my parents ever have.” Another teen said “I never got the sex talk until after my parents found out I was having sex.” Options for birth control and condoms need to be brought to most teens’ attention. If girls and guys are having sex, they always need to have protected sex; and they need to be checked for sexually transmitted diseases even if they are using protection. For those teens that did have the talk, we heard some basic comments.

Here is what a teen girl had to say: “Yeah, I got the talk multiple times before from my parents which was good, but I felt like the school failed at helping. All I remember from health class was all the gross STDs you could get and to avoid them involved just not having sex at all. Everyone knows with this generation, that’s not going happen.” We found that teens are confused with sex myths with half of them saying it’s OK to do it, and the other half saying it’s not okay. Teens are sometimes clueless on the subject and sometimes embarrassed by it. It needs to be a more serious issue that is talked about more with more resources and help for

ents James and the Giant Peach, with shows at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. at the Ocotillo Performing Arts Center. Tickets are $10 for adults, or $5 for children. For more information, visit artesiaartscouncil.com or call 746-4212.

Carrizozo May 11

Gary Lewis and the Playboys perform May 3

Alto

Gary Lewis and the Playboys

Gary Lewis and the Playboys were “discovered” in 1964 by the famed producer/arranger team of Snuff Garrett and Leon Russell, and with their first single, “This Diamond Ring,” they had a chart-topping record. After their second hit titled “Count Me In” went to number two, Gary and the band proved that they would be a continued success. They followed with more Top 10 songs such as “Save Your Heart For Me,” “Everybody Loves A Clown,” “She’s Just My Style,” “Sure Gonna Miss Her” and scores more. The performance starts at 8 p.m., with a beef and shrimp kebab buffet before the show at 6 p.m. Tickets for the performance are $56 and $59. Pre-show buffet tickets are $20. For more information, call 1-888-818-7872 or visit spencertheater.com.

Norris

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I’m all for the advances of our modern age. But I’m also for slowing down the clock to ponder the powers of yesteryear and the wisdom that can come only from persevering on this planet and graduating from that school of hard knocks. My mom and Granny lived as this adage goes: “An oak tree is nothing more than an acor n that held its ground.” Who can overestimate the value of experience, endurance and legacy or the power of handing those values to the next generation? It’s what America needs more today than anything else. Here are a few excerpts about how Granny instilled her family values in my mom and how we can do that for our kids and grandchildren, too: “Mama, or Ada Agnes Hargrove, was bor n on March 20, 1894, in

Artesia

May 2 Robin Scott

Robin Scott plays Cottonwood Wine and Brewing located at 1 E. Cottonwood Road. from 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. For more information, call 575-365-3141.

Carlsbad May 2, 3 Murder by Natural Causes

The Artesia Arts Council Storytellers Theatre pres-

The final CCT production of the year is no longer a mystery. Well, actually that is exactly what it is. CCT’s own queen of mystery, LaWanda Scholl, directs this stylish and witty suspense play, adapted by Tim Kelly from the original television play. Evening shows are at 7:30 p.m. on May 2 and 3. Tickets are $12 for adults and $6 for students. Come join us as our talented cast presents this witty and thrilling suspense play. For more information on the performance, visit cctinfo.org.

Clarksville, Texas, where she lived out her early years. She attended school there up through the third grade. When she was twelve years old, she had to quit school to help her parents out on the farm. When she was fourteen or fifteen years old, the family moved to Oklahoma. “Early on, people just started calling her Aggie. But later everyone in Wilson would eventually come to know and call her Granny Scarberry. ... “I can still see in my mind’s eye Mama cooking on the large wood cooking stove. That was not the same as the big pot-belly stove, which kept us war m and was my favorite part of our home. “I loved when Mama made a large pot of beans, corn bread, sliced tomatoes and green onions. And she always cooked homemade bread. She also cooked ham, bacon, gravy and eggs. (I’m not crazy about grits. But I love catfish. And I love

fried okra, too.) “In the afternoon when we came home from school, Mama would be there to greet us with her loving smile. The house would be clean, and the aroma of something like homemade bread would be floating from the kitchen. “At supper time, we never ate separate from one another, like it seems so many families do today. We all gathered around the table, held hands and said grace, and then we would pass down our plates to Papa and he would fill them. That was the time we came together and shared stories about the day; it was a way for our family to stay connected. “Even when we were older in Wilson, with families of our own, the whole family would get together once a month. I suppose that I miss that the most. Families don’t seem to do that anymore, but they should.” (Next week, I’ll give even

May 3 Mariachi Tenampa

Mariachi Tenampa plays the Ocotillo Per for ming Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 for 13 and older, or $15 for 12 and under. For more information, visit artesiaartscouncil.com or call 746-4212.

May 10 James and the Giant Peach

Border Baroque On Sunday, May 11, at 3 p.m., Border Baroque of Las Cruces, will present a special Mother’s Day Concert at the Trinity United Methodist Church on 10th at D Avenue in Carrizozo. They will be performing the works of CPE Bach, Vivaldi, Fux, Loillet, J. S Bach and Handel.

Roswell Every Week, Mon - Sat

Lest We Forget: Roswell Army Airfield - The Early Years This Walker Aviation Museum display will remain through the end of the year. This exhibit features a short history of the base and many items from the WWII era, as well as information about the planes that flew at Roswell Army Airfield from 1941-1945. The museum is open from 10 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. For more information, call 347-2464 or visit wafbmuseum.org. more examples of my mom and Granny’s inspirational legacy.)

On Mother’s Day weekend in 2012, my then 91year-old mom was interviewed by our friend Mike Huckabee on his Fox News Channel show, “Huckabee.” If you didn’t catch it, you can still watch the interview on my of ficial website, at http://chucknorris.com, the only place where you can order an autographed copy of my mother’s autobiography, which makes a great Mother’s Day gift. Of course, I’m a bit biased! Happy 93rd birthday, Mom! You’re still an anchor and inspiration for my soul!

(Follow Chuck Norris through his official social media sites, on Twitter @chucknorris and Facebook’s “Official Chuck Norris Page.” He blogs at http://chucknorrisnews.bl ogspot.com.)

Copyright 2014 Chuck Norris

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teens. An equal amount of teens felt that it should be both parents and school taking measures in sex awareness, prevention and practices of safe sex. I grew up in a family where we did not talk about sex or of safe sex practice or any of those topics. I guess that’s what happens when you are raised by a single mother who hoped that I would be asking her those questions. A handful of the teens with whom we talked really wanted to let other peers know facts from myths about sex along with the choices and consequences they make. I hope that the parents who read this will give that talk to your teen even though it may seem outdated. It’s still ideal advice for a young

A5

person’s life.

Here are a couple of resources that may help parents with that talk:

The US Department of Health and Human Services Office of Adolescent Health: hhs.gov/ash/oah/resources - a n d - p u b l i c a tions/info/parents/justfacts/teen-pregnancy.html The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy: thenationalcampaign.org/featured-topics/parents

The Unity Center’s next concert event will be on May 4. The headlining band will be Stanley and the Search. Admission is $2, and show time is 7 p.m.

ENMU-R Community Band presents its Spring Concert

The ENMU-Roswell Community Band will present its Spring Concert on Monday, May 5, at 7 p.m. in the Performing Arts Center on campus. The concert is free and the public is invited to attend. A reception will follow the concert. The band will perform a number of selections including “”Emblem of Unity” composed by J.J.

Roberts

Continued from Page A1

gave him a “vote of conf i d e n c e , ” a s t h e Wa l l Street Jour nal put it. Poor show, Joe. But that’s exactly why Putin is so vulnerable. He needs the West — to buy Russian goods, especially gas and oil; to build Russian infrastructure; to invest in Russian bonds. If he didn’t crave a “vote of confidence” from the head of Siemens, he’d be far more lethal.

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

with low back pain. My basic answer is: Try different types of mattresses and see which seems best for you. You may be thinking: Dr. K spent all those years in medical school so that he could tell me that? But all those years of medical training have taught me one thing: People are dif ferent. Studies tell us what’s

Richards and arranged by Swearingen; “Concertino” by C.M. Von Weber and arranged for band by Alfred Reed featuring Vicki Soliz, clarinet soloist; “Hallelujah” by Leonard Cohen; and “Music of the Beatles” by Michael Sweeney.

The Community Band is always seeking new members. For information, contact John Bitner at ENMURoswell at 575-624-7435.

Obama calls the latest round of sanctions the “next stage in a calibrated effort to change Russia’s behavior.” And rashness can be just as damaging as timidity. But the evidence seems clear: Obama’s calibrations are off-key. Russia’s behavior is not changing. It’s time to tur n up the heat and make the bully sweat. (Steve and Cokie Roberts can be contacted by email at stevecokie@gmail.com.) Copyright 2014 Steven and Cokie Roberts best for the average patient in the study. But like the children of Lake Wobegon, you are certainly not average!

(Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.) Copyright 2014 The President And Fellows Of Harvard College

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A6 Friday, May 2, 2014

NATION/OBITUARIES OBITUARIES

Glenn Boyd Prager

Bundy’s neighbors weary of attention AP Photo

Arden Bundy, son of rancher Cliven Bundy, flies the American flag under the I-15 highway near Bunkerville after the BLM agreed to release his family's cattle on April 12.

BUNKERVILLE, Nev. (AP) — American flags flap in the wind on the two-lane state highway to Cliven Bundy’s ranch. Along the roadside, selfdescribed militia members in camouflage who came to defend him from the federal government lounge and smoke, loaded pistols on their hips. Ten miles from these desert encampments, the telephone is ringing more than usual at the police department in Mesquite, 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas. Travelers from around the country are calling, wondering if it’s safe to pass on Interstate 15, where Bundy and his supporters, some armed

with military-style weapons, faced down federal officials in an April 12 standoff over his cattle grazing on federal land. Police Chief Troy Tanner tells callers it’s safe. But local authorities and Bundy’s neighbors are growing weary of the attention and the unresolved dispute. Since the standof f, Bundy went from being proclaimed a patriot by some for his resistance to a racist for comments he made about blacks being better of f under slavery. “Most of our neighbors have about the same opinions we have. They don’t like it,” said John Booth, a resident of nearby Bunkerville who drove

this week with his wife, Peggie, past the State Route 170 encampments. “But they’re not really going to say anything about it.”

As triple-digit temperatures of a Mojave Desert summer approach, militia members vow to stay and protect Bundy and his family from government police, though it’s unclear what the immediate threat is. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management has halted plans — at least for now — to round up Bundy’s cattle under a court order to remove them from public land and habitat of the desert tortoise.

OIL-TRAIN WRECK BRINGS DEMANDS FOR MORE REGULATION

LYNCHBURG, Va. (AP) — The latest in a string of fiery oil-train wrecks brought renewed demands Thursday that the Obama administration quickly tighten regulations governing the burgeoning practice of transporting highly combustible crude by rail. With production booming in the Bakken oil field along the U.S. northern tier and in Canada, some experts say stronger rules to head off a catastrophe are long overdue. However, drafting and approving new regulations can take months or even years, an elaborate process that involves time to study potential changes and a public comment period before anything is adopted. In the latest crash, a CSX train carrying Bakken crude from North Dakota derailed Wednesday in downtown Lynchburg, sending three tanker cars into the James River and shooting flames and black smoke into the air. No one was injured, but the wreck prompted an evacuation and worried local

residents and officials.

There have been eight other significant accidents in the U.S. and Canada in the past year involving trains hauling crude, and some of them caused considerable damage and deaths, according to the National Transportation Safety Board. Bakken crude ignites more easily than other types.

The NTSB and members of Congress have been urging the T ransportation Department to work swiftly on new standards that would make tanker cars more rugged.

“Everybody is waiting on them and expecting some significant action,” Grady Cothen, a former Federal Railroad Administration official, said after Wednesday’s wreck. “It’s a front-and-center concern on the part of everybody in rail transportation.”

JORGE MENDOZA

Church on the Move Memorial Services Monday, May 5 11:00 AM

JOSEPH SANCHEZ

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3 to an order filled with Crispy fish topped with Chile Mayo Pulled pork topped with Pico de Gallo Grilled Skirt steak topped with homemade Chimichurri sauce

Complementary snackable Chips & Salsa

Specials include buckets of: Dos Equis, Coronitas, Modelo Especial on DRAFT!!

Speciality Drinks include

Sangria’s, Margarita’s, Mojitos Live entertainment by "The Fabulous Pacers" featuring Mariachi and more. See you on the beach…. Monday, May 5th – Music begins at 5pm 625 N. Main (575) 578-1914

Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home & South Park Cemetery Funeral Services Friday, May 2 10:00 AM

GLEN PRAGER

Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home & South Park Cemetery Funeral Services Friday, May 2 2:30 PM

Memorial services for Glenn Boyd Prager, 78, formerly of Roswell, will be held at 2:30 p.m., Friday, May 2, 2014, at AndersonBethany Chapel. Burial will follow at South Park Cemetery. Funeral services were held for Glenn Prager on Monday, April 28, 2014, at Palm Mortuary, 7400 W. Cheyenne in Las Vegas. Pastor Dana Pope from Grace Presbyterian Church officiated. Glenn was born September 18, 1935, in Roswell, NM, to Louis Morris Prager and Rosalee Florence (Speyer) Prager who preceded him in death. He passed on to be with our Lord on Tuesday, April 22, 2014. After graduating from Roswell High School in 1954, he attended Woodbury College in downtown Los Angeles where he earned his BA degree. It is now Woodbury University in Burbank, CA. Glenn was president of Pioneer Specialties of NV Inc. (a specialty advertising business incorporated here in 1988). He was past state vice president of the New Mexico Jaycees. For years he was program director of New Mexico Military Institute, Carlsbad Convention Center and Lubbock Christian

Roswell Daily Record College where he brought in some great entertainers like Paul Harvey, Ray Charles, The Platters, The Kingston T rio, Sammy Smith, Skiles and Henderson and many more. While in Roswell, Glenn formed the Crater Teen Club so the “kids” would have a special place of their own. For recreation, Glenn liked to play poker at The Orleans Club in Las Vegas, NV., especially Omaha. He enjoyed traveling with his family and has covered most of the U.S. by motor home. He also traveled to Europe, Hong Kong and Thailand. Though Glenn suffered many health problems throughout most of his life, he never allowed it to hinder his animated spirit. No matter the situation, Glenn could always turn a frown into a smile. His family is at peace knowing that he went to a better place free of pain and suffering. Those left to cherish his memory are his wife, Sherrill M. Prager; one son, Louis Charles Prager of Amarillo, TX; three daughters, Rose Ann Souza of Tulare, CA, Glendy Schweitzer of New Milford, CT and Angela Prager of San Francisco, CA.; one brother, Bruce Prager of Las Vegas; two grandsons, Matthew Prager of Yuma, AZ, David Prager of Las Vegas; five granddaughters, Rose Maree Souza of Tulare, CA, Jennifer Souza of San Diego, CA, Lauren Hays of Lakeside, CA, Kayanna and Gabrielle Schweitzer of New Milford, CT and 10 great-grandchildren. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online register at andersonbethany.com. Services are under the

direction of AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

Roger Lee Barnhill and Myrtle M. Barnhill

Graveside services for Roger Lee Bar nhill and Myrtle M. Barnhill (Phillips) of San Antonio, TX, will be held on Saturday, May 3, 2014, at South Park Cemetery at 9 a.m. Roger passed away July 20, 2012, and Myrtle passed away January 25, 2014. As per their request, cremation took place and their remains are to be buried in Roswell, NM. Roger was predeceased by his parents Vital Morris Barnhill and Ethel Meredith Thompson Ford. He is survived by his brother Stanley Barnhill of Midland, TX. Myrtle was predeceased by her parents, John Harvey Francis Manly and Iris Ireta Lindstrom; brothers: Orlia, Harvey, Harley, John Jr., William, Frederick, and Theodore Manly; sisters, Evelyn McVey, Ireta Hopson, Venus Turner, Annabelle Moffett and Violet Manly and one daughter Serena Jo Phillips. She is survived by sisters Lillie Gurule, Lamar, CO; Wanda Stanford, Weatherford, TX; Marilyn Bowker (Ronnie), Venus, TX and Brenda Leftwich, Pittsburgh, TX, and numerous nieces and nephews. Roger and Mert are survived by their children, Lorraine Crane (Rob) and Cynthia Holladay (Chris) and Kenneth Bar nhill of Roswell; Lyle Phillips (Virginia) of Carlsbad; Leslie Barnhill, Randall Barnhill, Lor na Bar nhill and Lisa Gamboa of Denver, CO, and 16 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

S u p p o r t t h e U n i t e d Wa y


WORLD

Roswell Daily Record

A7

Heartbreaking video shows teens on sinking ferry SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Soon after the ferry began to tilt, there was nervous laughter, jokes about the Titanic and talk of selfies and Facebook posts from the doomed high school students huddled below deck. But the lighthearted atmosphere soon turned serious as the listing worsened. Fear began building, and one student asked, “Am I really going to die?” The shaky video — at times poignant and heartbreaking as the teens said last words to their loved ones — was found on the cell phone belonging to 17year -old Park Su-hyeon when his body was recovered after the disaster on the morning of April 16 off South Korea. The boy’s father, Park Jong-dae, provided it Thursday to The Associated Press, saying he wanted to show the world the conditions aboard the Sewol as it sank. He earlier

released it to select South Korean media. Information such as video can be recovered from micro SD cards in cell phones even if the device is submerged. More than 300 people are dead or missing in the disaster, which has plunged South Korea into mourning and touched off anger and shame. About 220 bodies, mostly from inside the submerged vessel, have been recovered. More than 80 percent of the victims were students from a high school in Ansan, south of Seoul, on their way to the tourist island of Jeju for a school trip. The group of teens in Park Su-hyeon’s video alternated between bluster, attempts at humor and unmistakable fear. Only one could be seen wearing a life jacket at the beginning of the clips, which started at 8:52 a.m. and ended, with a small break between them, at

9:09 a.m., when everyone appeared to be wearing them. Some of the students struggled as they tried to buckle the life jackets. As the listing worsened, they joked about “final commemorative pictures” and “defying gravity” by trying to walk on the walls. “It’s like we’re becoming the Titanic,” one student said. At 8:53 a.m., less than two minutes into the video and two minutes before a crew member on the bridge made the ferry’s first distress call, one student said: “Am I really going to die?” At the start of the video, a message blared from the ferry’s loudspeakers: “Don’t move away from your places and brace for any possible accidents.” In subsequent announcements, passengers were again told to stay put, even as some questioned whether they

Friday, May 2, 2014

should flee.

The last message from the bridge came at 9:08: “We’re again announcing: For passengers who can wear life vests, please wear them now. Never move away from your places.”

That warning came eight minutes after a Sewol crew member told a marine traffic official, “The body of the ship has tilted, and it’s impossible to move,” according to a transcript of communications with the ferry.

After the passengers were ordered to stay in their cabins, Capt. Lee Joon-seok took at least a half-hour to order an evacuation. It is unclear whether that order was ever relayed to passengers. Lee has said he delayed the evacuation because of worries about sending passengers into cold waters and fast currents before rescuers arrived.

Toronto mayor takes leave, heads to rehab TORONTO (AP) — Toronto Mayor Rob Ford began a leave of absence and headed for a rehab center Thursday, leaving his scandalized city in the dark about his political future after a report surfaced of a second video of him apparently smoking crack cocaine. Ford announced Wednesday that he would take leave for an unspecified amount of time from both his mayoral post and his re-election campaign, but he did not abandon his bid for a second term as mayor of Canada’s second largest city. One of his campaign rivals and other Toronto politicians demanded he resign. Toronto police said

AP Photo

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford leaves his home early Thursday, in Toronto.

they were looking into the new video, which was reported by the Globe and Mail newspaper. A day after announcing his decision, Ford boarded a plane for Chicago headed

for a treatment program that will last at least 30 days, his lawyer Dennis Morris told The Associated Press. Morris declined to say if Chicago was his final desti-

AP Photo

In this April 16 photo taken from the mobile phone of deceased South Korean high school student Park Su-hyeon and released by his father Park Jong-dae, students are shown inside the sinking ferry Sewol on waters near Jindo, South Korea.

VICTIM’S KIDS HOPE ADAMS CHARGED IN MURDER BELFAST, Northern Ireland (AP) — For decades, Helen McKendry has demanded that Sinn Fein chief Gerry Adams come clean about the Irish Republican Army’s abduction, slaying and secret burial of her mother in 1972, and his alleged role as the outlawed group’s Belfast leader who ordered the killing. As detectives interrogated Adams for a second day over the unsolved slaying of the 37-year-old widowed mother of 10, who was falsely branded a British spy, the daughter who led a campaign for the truth says she’s praying for a murder charge. “I’m hoping against hope that he doesn’t walk out free,” McKendry told The Associated Press. “Everybody, the dogs in the street, knew he was the top IRA man in Belfast at that time.” McKendry, alongside her husband Seamus, launched an often-lonely protest campaign in 1995 against Adams’ denial of IRA involvement in the slaying of Jean McConville. On Thursday, the 56-year -old said she found it hard to believe he was finally in custody and facing police questions. Under British anti-terror law, Adams, 65, must be charged or freed by Friday night, unless police seek a judicial extension to his interrogation.

nation. Ford’s family business, Deco Labels and Tags, has a plant in the Chicago area and Rob’s brother Doug has a second home there. The mayor’s brother, Doug Ford, told the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. that Ford would enter a 30day inpatient treatment at one of the best rehab facilities in North America but he declined to name the location. Morris said the 30 days could be extended. On Thursday morning, Ford left his west-end Toronto home in a two carconvoy without answering questions from reporters. His nephew was seen leaving the home with a suitcase.

SneaK PeeK 2014-15

Season

he Ocoti tilllo’ s Biggest Fund Rai aisser of th thee year! in us at th thee Ocoti tilllo Performi minng Arts Center ated at 310 W. Mai ainn St. in Artesia on May 2, 2014. rs d’ oeuvres will be served at 6 pm with a video sentation of th thee upcomi minng 2014-15 season at 7 pm. ou are looking to Sponsor a Show or an event, shing to buy a 2014-15 Golde denn Ticket, or curious about what th thee Ocoti tilllo has plan annned for next ason please attend th thee Sneak Peek on May 2nd. your chance to get in on th thiis information early!!! This is a Free Event!! To R.S.V.P. call 575 746 4212 Inve vest thee Ti Time ime Sav Save ave the Dime ime!! d ll Bi Bi

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Hours 11:00-7:00 pm

Old Timers Balloon Rally Cielo Grande Recreation Area

a Saturday, May 3 - Ocotillo Performing Arts Center 7:30 pm - $25 - 310 W Main St. Artesia, NM 575 - 746 - 4212 - w ww ww.artesiaartscouncil.com

May 3 & 4 - 6:45am Golf Ball Drop Sat. Morning

Sat: Volleyball, Flag Football,Tug, Skateboard Comp, Carnival Sun: Volleyball, Skateboard Comp

$5 Adults Under 5yrs. FREE ($2 donation parking proceeds go to GHS & RHS Band Boosters) No outside drinks food or ice chests allowed No pets & No refunds, No bills larger than $20

SPONSORS: Majestic Communications, Roswell Hispano Chamber of Commerce, Tobosa Developmental Services, Bank of the Southwest, XCEL Energy, Pioneer Bank, ENMU-R Pepsi, Desert Sun Roswell, New Mexico Youth Challenge, Roswell Toyota, Prestige Rentals, Thunderbird Fencing & Comfort Inn & Suites


A8 Friday, May 2, 2014

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Mostly sunny and warmer

Clear

Saturday

Sunny and warmer

Sunday

Monday

Mostly sunny and warm

Partly sunny and warm

Tuesday

Windy in the afternoon

Wednesday

Sunshine and warm

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Thursday

Sunny

High 77°

Low 51°

89°/54°

95°/57°

95°/58°

89°/54°

90°/52°

85°/54°

WSW at 6-12 mph POP: 0%

WNW at 4-8 mph POP: 0%

WNW at 10-20 mph POP: 5%

VAR at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

SE at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

E at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

E at 7-14 mph POP: 10%

E at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Thursday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 68°/46° Normal high/low ............... 81°/50° Record high ............... 97° in 2012 Record low ................. 29° in 1909 Humidity at noon .................. 17%

Farmington 72/42

Clayton 72/46

Raton 69/36

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Thu. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date .......................... Normal year to date .............

0.00" 0.00" 0.03" 0.41" 1.95"

Santa Fe 70/42

Gallup 69/37 Albuquerque 72/52

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Tucumcari 77/49 Clovis 73/46

Moderate Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

T or C 74/51

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Ruidoso 63/48

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Sat. The Moon Today Sat. First

May 6

Rise Set 6:09 a.m. 7:41 p.m. 6:08 a.m. 7:42 p.m. Rise Set 8:52 a.m. 11:03 p.m. 9:43 a.m. 11:49 p.m. Full

Last

New

May 14 May 21 May 28

Alamogordo 72/50

Silver City 71/46

ROSWELL 77/51 Carlsbad 76/50

Hobbs 76/49

Las Cruces 72/53

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

Regional Cities Today Sat. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

72/50/s 72/52/s 58/30/s 76/52/s 76/50/s 62/33/s 72/46/s 56/35/s 73/46/s 75/48/s 71/51/s 72/42/s 69/37/s 76/49/s 72/53/s 66/39/s 66/43/s 75/49/s 76/51/s 75/48/s 68/36/s 69/36/s 57/33/s 77/51/s 63/48/s 70/42/s 71/46/s 74/51/s 77/49/s 69/44/s

83/51/s 80/56/s 66/33/s 88/57/s 89/55/s 68/32/s 83/51/s 66/29/s 85/51/s 84/51/s 79/55/s 79/45/s 76/41/s 87/53/s 84/58/s 76/44/s 73/40/s 84/57/s 86/52/s 85/51/s 74/39/s 79/40/s 64/29/s 89/54/s 74/54/s 77/45/s 80/53/s 83/57/s 88/49/s 76/42/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Sat.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

65/43/s 71/49/pc 68/48/pc 67/48/pc 70/47/pc 59/44/c 56/44/sh 80/53/s 76/44/pc 57/45/sh 73/54/s 87/72/pc 78/54/pc 60/45/c 68/49/s 92/74/s 94/60/s 77/49/s

64/45/s 75/55/s 71/49/pc 67/49/sh 75/49/pc 66/43/pc 62/43/pc 87/60/s 80/48/s 62/42/sh 85/61/s 86/73/s 85/58/s 68/48/pc 76/53/pc 93/76/s 82/58/s 88/53/s

U.S. Extremes

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Sat.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

87/75/pc 77/50/s 58/40/sh 73/57/pc 68/51/pc 72/46/pc 83/68/t 69/50/pc 93/71/s 59/44/c 76/53/pc 70/50/pc 65/49/pc 73/56/s 89/62/s 74/49/pc 86/61/s 70/52/pc

88/71/t 88/57/s 59/39/pc 79/61/s 67/50/pc 71/48/pc 79/60/t 70/51/pc 97/74/s 63/45/sh 63/50/sh 75/52/pc 74/55/pc 83/57/pc 76/62/pc 60/47/sh 93/66/s 73/54/pc

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 100° .......... Chula Vista, Calif. Low: 11° ................. Leadville, Colo.

High: 72° ........................ Glenwood Low: 16° ........................Eagle Nest

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

Please Join Us Sunday, May 4th from 2 pm - 4 pm At t he A s s u r a n c e H o m e 10 0 0 East 18th St. in Roswell

ous m a F d l r o W The ers l g n a r W J g n Fl yi pm 0 3 : 3 m p 0 2 :3

T h a n k Yo u for H elping Us Care for Our Children for the Past 35 Yea r s! w w w.assurancehome.org


2

SHOW ME THE MONEY DIVISION PRESENTED BY SOUTHWEST DAIRY FARMERS, NEW MEXICO MILITARY INSTITUTE, CENTURYLINK & ROSWELL DAILY RECORD

Stevenson 2B powers Rockets past Roswell Days left to register

Friday, May 2, 2014

Roswell Daily Record

KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

Softball is the ultimate small-ball game. Success in softball often stems from the little things like bunts and stolen bases. But the big hit has its place in the game as well. Goddard’s Kristen Stevenson showed that on Thursday. The Rocket junior smoked a pair of two-baggers to the fence, one of which cleared the bases, as Goddard beat Roswell 5-1 in the season finale for both teams. “One of the things that Stevenson’s been doing lately is working on trying

Shawn Naranjo Photo

Goddard’s Kristen Stevenson, left, hits a three-RBI double during the third inning of her team’s win over Roswell, Thursday.

to get through with her bat,” Rocket coach Jay Edgett said about Stevenson afterward. “I had her back up and just said, ‘Hey, have confidence and go ahead and stroke the ball.’ And she got it.” She got every bit of it in the third inning and it proved to be the difference maker. With two outs, the bases loaded and Goddard (13-13, 3-5 District 4-4A) leading 1-0 thanks to an RBI walk by Kaitlyn Renteria, Stevenson stepped to the plate. She drove the first pitch she saw into the gap in left-center field, clearing the bases for a stand-up double that put Goddard ahead 4-0. That was plenty of cushion for Danielle Hubbard. She blanked Roswell through the See DOUBLE, Page B3

BOYS TENNIS

Shawn Naranjo Photo

Roswell’s Deisy Ruiz tries to get to a volley during her win at second singles in Roswell’s victory over Goddard in the District 4-4A Team Championship, Thursday.

Coyote girls triumph

The Roswell girls softball team won its second straight District 4-4A crown on Thursday, beating crosstown rival Goddard 8-1 in the title match. “This was our expectation from the beginning of the year,” Roswell coach Kelly McDonald said after the victory. “We were district champs last year on the girls side and we basically returned all but one person. It was district championship or bust for us.” Roswell cruised to the

Shawn Naranjo Photo

Rocket boys beat Roswell for district crown

Goddard’s Phillip Rowe tries to save a ball with a backhand during the first doubles match, Thursday.

The Goddard boys tennis team captured the District 4-4A championship on Thursday with a 7-2 victory over southside rival Roswell in the title match. “We’re peaking at the right time,”

said Rocket coach Jerry Holm about his team. “And they really stepped up tonight. They probably played as well as they have all season. ... We just looked good all the way around.”

The Rockets swept all three doubles matches and won four of the six singles matches. In singles play, the Rockets won

See BOYS, Page B3

Napravnik chasing history in Derby LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — She started out her career disguising her gender, riding under the initials A.R. Napravnik. In the male-dominated world of horse racing, Anna Rose Napravnik figured she’d have better luck if nobody noticed a woman’s name in the track program. With her red hair tucked under her helmet, she blended in with the male jockeys in their brightly colored silks, white pants and polished black riding boots. Nine years later, Rosie Napravnik is one of the rising stars in the sport, having long ago discarded her ruse. Now the 26-year-old from New Jersey will

try to make history this weekend and become the first woman to ride a Kentucky Derby winner. She’s achieved firsts before. She was the first woman to win the Louisiana Derby, and did it twice. She also was the highest-placing female rider in the Kentucky Derby, finishing fifth last year aboard Mylute. She was the first woman to win a riding title at the Fair Grounds in New Orleans in 2011, with 34 more victories than the runner-up. She was the first woman to win the

COUPON

• Elida at Gateway Chr., 2 p.m. (DH) PREP BASEBALL

• Dexter, Goddard, NMMI, Roswell at Last Chance Open, NMMI Golf Course, 9 a.m.

• NMMI at District 3-1A/3A Team Championship, Lovington, 8 a.m. PREP TENNIS

• Goddard, Roswell at Ross Black Relays, Lovington, 3 p.m. PREP TRACK & FIELD

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Make an appointment today!

Our Service Department will drain and refill the gear oil housed in your vehicle's differential, and inspect gear wear backlash for proper operation. p ope ope at o

LOCAL SCHEDULE

PREP GOLF

AP Photo

Rear Differential Service SPECIAL!

COLLEGE BASEBALL

See GIRLS, Page B3

Jockey Rosie Napravnik, right, works Vicar's in Trouble with a stablemate at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Ky., Saturday

See HISTORY, Page B3

$

win over the Rockets, winning all three doubles matches and five of the six singles matches. At second singles, Deisy Ruiz beat Christina Sartain 6-1, 6-0; at third singles, Ashley Cannon beat Alex Casario 7-5, 6-2; at fourth singles, LaTricia Velasquez beat Noor Osmani 7-5, 6-2; at fifth singles, Dani Contreras beat Jessica Lewis 7-6 (5), 6-3; and at sixth singles, Alicia Romero beat Amanda Jerge 6-0, 6-3.

SPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN ... 1904 — Mrs. Charles Durnell becomes the first woman to in a field of 17. Dust Commander, with Mike Manganello own a Kentucky Derby starter and winner when long shot aboard, wins the race. 2009 — Mine That Bird, ridden by Calvin Borel, stuns the Elwood wins the 30th Run for the Roses. Elwood is also the first Derby winner to be bred by a woman, Mrs. J.B. Prather. field by capturing the Kentucky Derby with a dynamic stretch 1939 — Lou Gehrig of the New York Yankees does not run through the mud at Churchill Downs. Borel finds room play against the Detroit Tigers at Briggs Stadium, ending his along the rail deep in the stretch then pulls away to give the 50-1 long shot one of the biggest upsets in the 135-year hisstreak of 2,130 consecutive games played. 1970 — Diane Crump becomes the first female jockey to tory of the Run for the Roses. Pioneer of the Nile holds off ride in the Kentucky Derby. Her mount, Fathom, finishes 15th Musket Man for second.


B2 Friday, May 2, 2014

SPORTS

Local briefs: Rockets knock off No. 2 Valencia twice

LOS LUNAS — The Goddard baseball won its 19th and 20th games on Thursday with a pair of one-run victories over secondranked Valencia. The third-ranked Rockets won the first game 4-3 and triumphed in the nightcap 2-1 to improve to 20-4 on the year. In Game 1, Josh Wagner was the star at the plate for Goddard. The senior fell a homer shy of the cycle, going 4 for 4 with two

LPGA

singles, a double and a triple. He also drove in two runs for the Rockets during a four -run third that put them ahead for good. Tommy Perea and Taryn Nunez had one RBI apiece in the inning as well. Valencia cut the lead in half in the bottom half of the same inning and got to within one in the fifth, but couldn’t push across the tying run. Cal Villareal picked up the vic-

Perrine Delacour . . . . . . . . . . . .38-35—73 Louise Friberg . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37—73 Karine Icher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37—73 Hannah Jun Medlock . . . . . . . . .38-35—73 Cindy LaCrosse . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-34—73 Pernilla Lindberg . . . . . . . . . . . .39-34—73 Catriona Matthew . . . . . . . . . . .37-36—73 Giulia Molinaro . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-38—73 Ji Young Oh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36—73 Brooke Pancake . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37—73 Jennifer Rosales . . . . . . . . . . . .38-35—73 Alena Sharp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-39—73 Jennifer Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-35—73 Ayako Uehara . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36—73 Caroline Westrup . . . . . . . . . . . .38-35—73 Katie M. Burnett . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-36—74 Irene Coe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38—74 Brianna Do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38—74 Jaye Marie GReen . . . . . . . . . .35-39—74 Mina Harigae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-35—74 Mi Jung Hur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-37—74 Emma Jandel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-37—74 Tiffany Joh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38—74 Hanna Kang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40-34—74 I.K. Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-36—74 Ashley Knoll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38—74 Beatriz Recari . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-35—74 Lizette Salas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38—74 Giulia Sergas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-36—74 Jenny Suh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-36—74 a-Maddie Szeryk . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38—74 Kris Tamulis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-37—74 Mo Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-37—75 Kristy McPherson . . . . . . . . . . .39-36—75 Karin Sjodin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-38—75 Alex Stewart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-37—75

North Texas Shootout Scores The Associated Press Thursday At Las Colinas Country Club Course Irving, Texas Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,410; Par: 71 (36-35) First Round Suzann Pettersen . . . . . . . . . . .33-33—66 Dori Carter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-31—67 Cydney Clanton . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-33—67 Cristie Kerr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-34—67 Christina Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-32—67 Caroline Masson . . . . . . . . . . . .33-34—67 Michelle Wie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-32—67 P.K. Kongkraphan . . . . . . . . . . .35-33—68 Amelia Lewis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-35—68 Xi Yu Lin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-32—68 Chella Choi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-33—69 Jodi Ewart Shadoff . . . . . . . . . .34-35—69 Juli Inkster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-33—69 Lorie Kane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-33—69 Haeji Kang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-33—69 Katherine Kirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-34—69 Mi Hyang Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35—69 Jenny Shin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-34—69 Moira Dunn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35—70 Paz Echeverria . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-34—70 Victoria Elizabeth . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35—70 Natalie Gulbis . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35—70 Felicity Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36—70 Danielle Kang . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36—70 Brittany Lang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36—70 Meena Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-33—70 Megan McChrystal . . . . . . . . . . .38-32—70 Azahara Munoz . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35—70 Haru Nomura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-37—70 Ryann O'Toole . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-34—70 Pornanong Phatlum . . . . . . . . . .34-36—70 Reilley Rankin . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-33—70 Thidapa Suwannapura . . . . . . .35-35—70 Lexi Thompson . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35—70 Sun Young Yoo . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-33—70 Amy Anderson . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36—71 Danah Bordner . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34—71 Silvia Cavalleri . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35—71 Julieta Granada . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-33—71 Jeong Jang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34—71 Jennifer Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35—71 Jimin Kang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36—71 Stacey Keating . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35—71 Sarah Kemp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34—71 Sue Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34—71 Joanna Klatten . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35—71 Jee Young Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34—71 Stacy Lewis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36—71 Sydnee Michaels . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35—71 Paola Moreno . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34—71 Inbee Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36—71 Paula Reto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-37—71 Dewi Claire Schreefel . . . . . . . .33-38—71 Ashleigh Simon . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35—71 Angela Stanford . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34—71 Karen Stupples . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34—71 Jaclyn Sweeney . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36—71 Heather Bowie Young . . . . . . . .38-34—72 Nicole Castrale . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Na Yeon Choi . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Austin Ernst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Maria Hernandez . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35—72 Pat Hurst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-33—72 Nicole Jeray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37—72 Kim Kaufman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35—72 Jessica Korda . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-33—72 Candie Kung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Seon Hwa Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-34—72 Alejandra Llaneza . . . . . . . . . . .38-34—72 Hee Young Park . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Gerina Piller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35—72 Erica Popson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35—72 Morgan Pressel . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Sarah Jane Smith . . . . . . . . . . .37-35—72 Alison Walshe . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Marina Alex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37—73 Anya Alvarez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37—73 Chie Arimura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36—73 Christel Boeljon . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36—73

MLB

American League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L New York . . . . . . . . . .15 12 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .14 12 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .13 15 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .13 16 Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .13 16 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .14 9 Kansas City . . . . . . . .14 13 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .14 15 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .12 14 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .11 17 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .18 10 Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 13 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .14 13 Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .12 14 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .9 19

Pct .556 .538 .464 .448 .448

Pct .609 .519 .483 .462 .393

Pct .643 .536 .519 .462 .321

GB — ½ 2½ 3 3

GB — 2 3 3½ 5½

GB — 3 3½ 5 9

Wednesday’s Games Detroit 5, Chicago White Sox 1 L.A. Angels 7, Cleveland 1 Pittsburgh at Baltimore, ppd., rain Seattle at New York, ppd., rain Tampa Bay at Boston, ppd., rain Oakland 12, Texas 1 L.A. Dodgers 6, Minnesota 4 Kansas City 4, Toronto 2 Washington 7, Houston 0 Thursday’s Games Tampa Bay 2, Boston 1, 1st game L.A. Dodgers 9, Minnesota 4, 1st game Baltimore 5, Pittsburgh 1, 1st game Seattle 4, N.Y. Yankees 2 L.A. Dodgers 4, Minnesota 3, 12 inn., 2nd game Tampa Bay 6, Boston 5, 2nd game Baltimore 6, Pittsburgh 5, 10 inn., 2nd game Toronto 7, Kansas City 3 Friday’s Games Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 2-1) at Cleveland (Salazar 0-3), 5:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 3-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Nuno 0-0), 5:05 p.m.

tory for Goddard, allowing three runs on seven hits and striking out six in a complete-game performance. In Game 2, Goddard bookended its runs to claim another victory. The Rockets took the lead with a run in the first, but Valencia forged a tie by pushing one across in the sixth. Goddard scored again in the top of the seventh for the game-winning run.

Toronto (Morrow 1-2) at Pittsburgh (Cole 22), 5:05 p.m. Oakland (Straily 1-1) at Boston (Buchholz 12), 5:10 p.m. Baltimore (Jimenez 0-4) at Minnesota (Nolasco 2-2), 6:10 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 3-1) at Kansas City (Shields 3-2), 6:10 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 3-1) at Houston (Peacock 0-2), 6:10 p.m. Texas (Lewis 1-1) at L.A. Angels (H.Santiago 0-4), 8:05 p.m. Saturday’s Games Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 11:05 a.m. Oakland at Boston, 11:35 a.m. Baltimore at Minnesota, 12:10 p.m. Seattle at Houston, 2:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 5:05 p.m. Detroit at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 11:05 a.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 11:05 a.m. Oakland at Boston, 11:35 a.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 11:35 a.m. Baltimore at Minnesota, 12:10 p.m. Detroit at Kansas City, 12:10 p.m. Seattle at Houston, 12:10 p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 1:35 p.m.

National League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .17 10 Washington . . . . . . . .16 12 New York . . . . . . . . . .15 12 Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 14 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .13 13 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .20 9 St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .15 14 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .13 15 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . .10 18 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .9 17 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L San Francisco . . . . . .17 11 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .17 12 Colorado . . . . . . . . . .17 13 San Diego . . . . . . . . .13 16 Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . .9 22

Pct .630 .571 .556 .500 .500

Pct .690 .517 .464 .357 .346

Pct .607 .586 .567 .448 .290

GB — 1½ 2 3½ 3½

GB — 5 6½ 9½ 9½

GB — ½ 1 4½ 9½

Wednesday’s Games St. Louis 9, Milwaukee 3 N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, ppd., rain Pittsburgh at Baltimore, ppd., rain Miami 9, Atlanta 3 Chicago Cubs 9, Cincinnati 4 L.A. Dodgers 6, Minnesota 4 Washington 7, Houston 0 Arizona 5, Colorado 4, 10 innings San Francisco 3, San Diego 2 Thursday’s Games L.A. Dodgers 9, Minnesota 4, 1st game Baltimore 5, Pittsburgh 1, 1st game Miami 5, Atlanta 4 L.A. Dodgers 4, Minnesota 3, 12 inn., 2nd game Cincinnati 8, Milwaukee 3 Baltimore 6, Pittsburgh 5, 10 inn., 2nd game Colorado 7, N.Y. Mets 4 Friday’s Games St. Louis (Wainwright 5-1) at Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 1-3), 12:20 p.m. Toronto (Morrow 1-2) at Pittsburgh (Cole 22), 5:05 p.m. Washington (Strasburg 2-2) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 3-2), 5:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Beckett 0-0) at Miami

PILLER’S

PROFESSION NORTH TEXAS LPGA SHOOTOUT

72 T-58th +1

TV SPORTSWATCH

PLACE

TOTAL TO PAR

ROUND SCORECARD

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total 4 4 5 3 4 3 5 4 4 36 5 3 4 3 4 4 4 3 5 35 71 4 3 5 3 4 4 5 4 5 37 4 3 4 3 5 4 4 3 5 37 72

Eagles: 0 Birdies: 2 Pars: 13 Bogeys: 3 Others: 0 Fairways hit: 6 of 13 Greens hit: 14 of 18 Putts: 31

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Friday, May 2 AUTO RACING Noon FS1 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Aaron’s 499, at Talladega, Ala. 1:30 p.m. FS1 — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, “Happy Hour Series,” final practice for Aaron’s 499, at Talladega, Ala. 4:30 p.m. FS1 — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, pole qualifying for Aaron’s 312, at Talladega, Ala. BOXING 8 p.m. FS1 — Featherweights, Jesus Cuellar (28-1-0) vs. Rico Ramos (23-3-0); lightweights, Mickey Bey Jr. (19-1-1) vs. Alan Herrera (32-5-0); light middleweights, Ryan Davis (24-13-3) vs. Ishe Smith (25-6-0) at Las Vegas. GOLF 7 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, The Championship at Laguna National, second round, at Singapore (sameday tape) 10:30 a.m. TGC — LPGA, North Texas Shootout, second round, at Irving, Texas 1 p.m.

FIRST ROUND

Hole Par Score

TGC — PGA Tour, Wells Fargo Championship, second round, at Charlotte, N.C. 5:30 p.m. TGC — Champions Tour, Insperity Invitational, first round, at The Woodlands, Texas (same-day tape) HORSE RACING 1 p.m. NBCSN — Thoroughbreds, Kentucky Oaks, at Louisville, Ky. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 12:15 p.m. MLB — St. Louis at Chicago Cubs 5 p.m. MLB — Regional coverage, Oakland at Boston or Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees NBA BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN2 — Playoffs, first round, Game 6, Toronto at Brooklyn 6 p.m. ESPN — Playoffs, first round, Game 6, San Antonio at Dallas 8:30 p.m. ESPN — Playoffs, first round, Game 6, Houston at Portland NHL HOCKEY 5 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, conference semifinals, Game 1, N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Playoffs, conference semifinals, Game 1, Minnesota at Chicago

Nunez and Perea each had one RBI for the Rockets. Nunez went 2 for 3 with a triple. Wagner picked up the victory, allowing one run on five hits and striking out eight in seven innings of work.

Prep softball

SCOREBOARD

ROSWELL NATIVE GERINA PILLER ON THE LPGA TOUR

ROUND SCORE

Roswell Daily Record

Eunice 3, Dexter 1 DEXTER — The visiting Cardinals broke open a tie game with a

(Koehler 2-2), 5:10 p.m. Milwaukee (W.Peralta 3-1) at Cincinnati (Leake 2-2), 5:10 p.m. San Francisco (Lincecum 1-1) at Atlanta (Minor 0-0), 5:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 1-2) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 2-3), 6:40 p.m. Arizona (Arroyo 1-2) at San Diego (Cashner 2-3), 8:10 p.m. Saturday’s Games St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 11:05 a.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 5:05 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 5:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Miami, 5:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 5:10 p.m. San Francisco at Atlanta, 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 6:10 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 6:40 p.m. Sunday’s Games L.A. Dodgers at Miami, 11:10 a.m. San Francisco at Atlanta, 11:35 a.m. Toronto at Pittsburgh, 11:35 a.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 2:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Cincinnati, 2:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 2:10 p.m. St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 6:05 p.m.

NBA

NBA Playoff Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlanta 3, Indiana 3 April 19: Atlanta 101, Indiana 93 April 22: Indiana 101, Atlanta 85 April 24: Atlanta 98, Indiana 85 April 26: Indiana 91, Atlanta 88 April 28: Atlanta 107, Indiana 97 May 1: Indiana 95, Atlanta 88 May 3: at Indiana, TBD Miami 4, Charlotte 0 April 20: Miami 99, Charlotte 88 April 23: Miami 101, Charlotte 97 April 26: Miami 98, Charlotte 85 April 28: Miami 109, Charlotte 98 Toronto 3, Brooklyn 2 April 19: Brooklyn 94, Toronto 87 April 22: Toronto 100, Brooklyn 95 April 25: Brooklyn 102, Toronto 98 April 27: Toronto 87, Brooklyn 79 April 30: Toronto 115, Brooklyn 113 May 2: at Brooklyn, 5 p.m. x-May 4: at Toronto, TBD Washington 4, Chicago 1 April 20: Washington 102, Chicago 93 April 22: Washington 101, Chicago 99, OT April 25: Chicago 100, Washington 97 April 27: Washington 98, Chicago 89 April 29: Washington 75, Chicago 69

WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio 3, Dallas 2 April 20: San Antonio 90, Dallas 85 April 23: Dallas 113, San Antonio 92 April 26: Dallas 109, San Antonio 108 April 28: San Antonio 93, Dallas 89 April 30: San Antonio 109, Dallas 103 May 2: at Dallas, 6 p.m. x-May 4: at San Antonio, TBD Memphis 3, Oklahoma City 3 April 19: Oklahoma City 100, Memphis 86 April 21: Memphis 111, Oklahoma City 105, OT April 24: Memphis 98, Oklahoma City 95, OT April 26: Oklahoma City 92, Memphis 89, OT April 29: Memphis 100, Oklahoma City 99, OT May 1: Oklahoma City 104, Memphis 84 May 3: at Oklahoma City, TBD L.A. Clippers 3, Golden State 2 April 19: Golden State 109, L.A. Clippers 105 April 21: L.A. Clippers 138, Golden State 98 April 24: L.A. Clippers 98, Golden State 96 April 27: Golden State 118, L.A. Clippers 97 April 29: L.A. Clippers 113, Golden State 103 May 1: at Golden State, 8:30 p.m. x-May 3: at L.A. Clippers, TBD Portland 3, Houston 2 April 20: Portland 122, Houston 120, OT April 23: Portland 112, Houston 105 April 25: Houston 121, Portland 116, OT April 27: Portland 123, Houston 120, OT April 30: Houston 108, Portland 98 May 2: at Portland, 8:30 p.m. x-May 4: at Houston, 1:30 p.m.

NHL

NHL Playoff Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) SECOND ROUND EASTERN CONFERENCE Montreal 1, Boston 0 May 1: Montreal 4, Boston 3, 2OT May 3: at Boston, 10:30 a.m. May 6: at Montreal, 5 p.m. May 8: at Montreal, 5:30 p.m. x-May 10: at Boston, TBD x-May 12: at Montreal, TBD x-May 14: at Boston, TBD N.Y. Rangers vs. Pittsburgh May 2: at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m.

pair of runs in the third to beat Dexter, Thursday. Both teams scored once in the opening inning before Eunice plated the pair in the third that provided the difference. Bryana Munoz took the loss for Dexter. Sandra Madrid drove in Dexter’s lone run in the first. The loss dropped the Demons to 18-7 overall and 1-4 in District 4-2A play.

May 4: at Pittsburgh, 5:30 p.m. May 5: at N.Y. Rangers, 5:30 p.m. May 7: at N.Y. Rangers, 5:30 p.m. x-May 9: at Pittsburgh, TBD x-May 11: at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-May 13: at Pittsburgh, TBD

WESTERN CONFERENCE Minnesota vs. Chicago May 2: at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. May 4: at Chicago, 1 p.m. May 6: at Minnesota, 7 p.m. May 9: at Minnesota, TBD x-May 11: at Chicago, TBD x-May 13: at Minnesota, TBD x-May 15: at Chicago, TBD Los Angeles vs. Anaheim May 3: at Anaheim, 6 p.m. May 5: at Anaheim, 8 p.m. May 8: at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. May 10: at Los Angeles, TBD x-May 12: at Anaheim, TBD x-May 14: at Los Angeles, TBD x-May 16: at Anaheim, TBD

PGA

Wells Fargo Scores The Associated Press Thursday At Quail Hollow Club Course Charlotte, N.C. Purse: $6.9 million Yardage: 7,562; Par: 72 (36-36) First Round Angel Cabrera . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-33—66 Martin Flores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-34—67 Phil Mickelson . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32-35—67 Jonathan Byrd . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-35—68 Stewart Cink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-32—68 Webb Simpson . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-34—68 Shawn Stefani . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-34—69 Vijay Singh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-34—69 Martin Kaymer . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35—69 Kevin Na . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35—69 Charles Howell III . . . . . . . . . . .34-35—69 Rory McIlroy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-33—69 Hideki Matsuyama . . . . . . . . . . .37-32—69 Justin Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-35—69 Martin Laird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-32—69 David Hearn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-36—70 Scott Langley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35—70 Daniel Summerhays . . . . . . . . .35-35—70 J.B. Holmes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-37—70 Brian Harman . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-37—70 Ryan Moore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35—70 Retief Goosen . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-35—70 Jim Renner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34—71 Brice Garnett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-37—71 John Merrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-37—71 Gary Woodland . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35—71 Jonas Blixt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-37—71 Brendon Todd . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36—71 Danny Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36—71 Wes Roach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36—71 Will Wilcox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36—71 Bronson La'Cassie . . . . . . . . . .37-34—71 Bud Cauley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-33—71 Roberto Castro . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-37—71 Michael Thompson . . . . . . . . . .35-36—71 Zach Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34—71 Scott Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36—71 Lee Westwood . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35—71 Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-38—71 Jeff Overton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35—71 Troy Merritt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-35—71 Robert Streb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-36—71 Ben Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-34—71 Brian Stuard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37—72 Stephen Ames . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37—72 Chad Collins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Ricky Barnes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Josh Teater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Kevin Streelman . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Mark Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 D.A. Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35—72 Mike Weir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-34—72 Hunter Mahan . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-34—72 Sang-Moon Bae . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Harrison Frazar . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35—72 Ted Potter, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-35—72 Geoff Ogilvy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Jim Furyk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Brendan Steele . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Padraig Harrington . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 John Peterson . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Billy Hurley III . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-38—72 Kevin Kisner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37—72 Fielding Brewbaker . . . . . . . . . .37-35—72 Andrew Svoboda . . . . . . . . . . . .36-36—72 Dustin Bray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-37—72 Jason Bohn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36—73 Kevin Chappell . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36—73 John Rollins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-39—73 Robert Allenby . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34-39—73 Y.E. Yang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36—73 Charlie Wi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-38—73 Nicholas Thompson . . . . . . . . . .37-36—73 Robert Karlsson . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37—73 Camilo Villegas . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36—73 Pat Perez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36—73 Morgan Hoffmann . . . . . . . . . . .38-35—73 Lee Williams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33-40—73 Kevin Foley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37—73 Michael Putnam . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-35—73 Carl Pettersson . . . . . . . . . . . . .40-33—73 Derek Ernst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-36—73 Kevin Tway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-37—73 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano . . . . . . .37-37—74 Kyle Stanley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40-34—74 Jhonattan Vegas . . . . . . . . . . . .37-37—74 Jimmy Walker . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38—74 Matt Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-37—74 Rickie Fowler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-36—74

Charlie Beljan . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38—74 Jason Gore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38—74 Brian Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38—74 Scott Gardiner . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38—74 Cameron Tringale . . . . . . . . . . .37-37—74 Spencer Levin . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-36—74 Brian Gay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-37—74 Rory Sabbatini . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-39—74 Woody Austin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38—74 Justin Hicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-38—74 James Driscoll . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-37—75 Scott McCarron . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-37—75 Lucas Glover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-37—75 Chesson Hadley . . . . . . . . . . . .39-36—75 Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-40—75 Davis Love III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-37—75 Nick Watney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-38—75 Jamie Donaldson . . . . . . . . . . . .37-38—75 Sean O'Hair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-37—75 Richard H. Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-38—75 Greg Chalmers . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-37—75 Jason Kokrak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-39—75 Will MacKenzie . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-36—75 Ben Crane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-40—75 James Hahn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-39—76 Seung-Yul Noh . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-40—76 Darren Clarke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39-37—76 Jim Herman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40-36—76 Hunter Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36-40—76 Steve Marino . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-39—76 David Lingmerth . . . . . . . . . . . .37-39—76 D.H. Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38-38—76 Tommy Gainey . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35-41—76 Ernie Els . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-39—76 Scott Stallings . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-39—76 Joe Ogilvie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37-39—76

Transactions

Thursday's Sports Transactions The Associated Press BASEBALL Major League Baseball OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER — Suspended free agent RHPs Manuel Montilla and Euris Quezada 50 games each, without pay, for violating the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Activated 3B Manny Machado from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Steve Lombardozzi to Norfolk (IL). Reinstated LHP Troy Patton from the restricted list. Sent RHP Josh Stinson outright to Norfolk. BOSTON RED SOX — Recalled LHP Drake Britton from Pawtucket (IL). MINNESOTA TWINS — Recalled LHP Kris Johnson from Rochester (IL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Recalled OF Anthony Gose from Buffalo (IL). Selected the contract of INF Steve Tolleson from Buffalo. Optioned INF Jonathan Diaz to Buffalo. Designated OF Moises Sierra for assignment. National League CINCINNATI REDS — Placed LHP Tony Cingrani on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Curtis Partch from Louisville (IL). Sent LHP Aroldis Chapman on a rehab assignment to Dayton (MWL). LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Selected the contract of RHP Red Patterson from Albuquerque (PCL). Designated OF Nick Buss for assignment. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Recalled RHP Rob Wooten from Nashville (PCL). Optioned INF-OF Elian Herrera to Nashville. NEW YORK METS — Activated OF Juan Lagares from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Kirk Nieuwenhuis to Las Vegas (PCL). FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS — Signed TE Bear Pascoe. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Signed LB Zac Diles, and QBs Tyler Thigpen and Vince Young. DALLAS COWBOYS — Signed WR LaRon Byrd. DENVER BRONCOS — Exercised their 2015 option on LB Von Miller. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL PLAYERS' ASSOCIATION — Announced the retirement of D Tom Poti. ANAHEIM DUCKS — Reassigned F Rickard Rakell to Norfolk (AHL). LOS ANGELES KINGS — Signed F Brian O'Neill to a two-year contract. NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Acquired the negotiating rights to G Jaroslav Halak from Washington for a 2014 fourth-round draft pick. VANCOUVER CANUCKS — Fired coach John Tortorella and assistant coach Mike Sullivan. COLLEGE GEORGE WASHINGTON — Named Carmen Maciariello men's assistant basketball coach. LOYOLA, NEW ORLEANS — Announced the resignation of men's and women's golf coach Lisa Tinkler. KANSAS — Announced senior basketball G Naadir Tharpe will transfer. MANHATTAN — Named Brianna Gauthier women's assistant basketball coach. MARQUETTE — Named Carolyn Kieger women's basketball coach. MONTANA STATE —Named Nate Harris women's assistant coach. SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI — Named Doc Sadler men's basketball coach. WINSTON-SALEM — Named Tonia Walker athletics director.

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Newspaper advertising. A destination, not a distraction. www.newspapermedia.com


FINANCIAL / SPORTS

Roswell Daily Record

History

Continued from Page B1

Kentucky Oaks, a $1 million race run on Derby eve, and has a strong chance to win it again Friday with early 4-5 favorite Untapable. Her mount in the Derby on Saturday is 20-1 long shot Vicar’s In Trouble. “When I think about the things

Double

Continued from Page B1

I’ve done in my career, it seems like I just started yesterday,” said Napravnik, a winner in her very first race just days after finishing her junior year in high school. “I’ve been in so many different places. I’ve been so lucky to have ridden some of the horses I’ve ridden. It keeps building, and getting better and better and better.” Not much would be better than winning the Derby on her third try.

first five en route to the win. She gave up just two hits, walked eight and struck out seven. “We had a big layoff ... so you know, a little rusty there at the beginning, but she was able to come on,” Edgett said. “She worked out of situations. They got some runners on because of her, but she was able to work her way out. “That just shows her experience as a pitcher.” Roswell’s only run came thanks to a throwing error in the sixth. Monica Bencomo scored from second after an errant throw following MyKaya Olivas’ strikeout. Olivas and Priscilla Lucero had Roswell’s hits. “I’m extremely frustrated. Extremely frustrated. ... We left too many runners on,” Roswell coach Art Sandoval said. “First inning, we had bases loaded. Second, third, I think we had two or three more. We left too many runners on. “We didn’t hit the ball and we didn’t execute the bunt like we were supposed to be.” Olivas took the loss for Roswell (9-17, 2-6). She gave up nine hits and struck out six in seven innings. Both teams will find out their state tournament fate on Sunday. Goddard is assured a spot in the field and could land a firstround home game. Roswell, meanwhile, is squarely on the bubble. Sandoval answered with gusto when asked if he felt like his team belonged in the tournament. “Great question. Absolutely. Absolutely. I’m going to fight like hell to get in. ... My opinion, we’re a 10 seed. I know it sounds bad when you hear 9-17 record, but I think we’re better than any of the 11th through 16th teams. Too bad it’s the end of the season or I’d challenge every one of them right now.”

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jun 14 137.15 139.30 137.05 139.25 Aug 14 136.05 138.70 135.95 138.57 Oct 14 140.10 142.60 140.02 142.55 Dec 14 141.87 144.42 141.67 144.35 Feb 15 143.95 145.45 143.95 145.42 Apr 15 143.55 145.50 143.52 145.50 Jun 15 137.50 137.50 137.50 137.50 Aug 15 136.50 136.50 136.50 136.50 Oct 15 137.50 137.50 137.50 137.50 Last spot N/A Est. sales 88061. Wed’s Sales: 57,721 Wed’s open int: 343727, off -625 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 14 181.30 184.00 181.05 183.95 Aug 14 187.25 190.47 187.25 190.47 Sep 14 189.90 190.97 189.90 190.97 Oct 14 188.00 190.97 188.00 190.97 Nov 14 189.25 190.75 189.25 190.75 Jan 15 186.25 187.25 186.25 187.25 Mar 15 184.00 184.85 184.00 184.85 Apr 15 184.00 185.00 184.00 185.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 11106. Wed’s Sales: 8,552 Wed’s open int: 42942, up +756 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 14 117.62 118.00 116.85 117.37 Jun 14 123.00 123.85 122.15 122.80 Jul 14 122.50 123.22 121.77 122.70 Aug 14 121.87 123.80 121.85 122.90 Oct 14 103.10 104.10 80.00 103.95 Dec 14 92.60 93.45 92.25 93.40 Feb 15 88.30 88.80 88.30 88.80 Apr 15 87.75 87.75 87.75 87.75 May 15 90.25 Jun 15 94.70 94.75 94.70 94.75 Jul 15 92.50 92.50 92.50 92.50 Aug 15 91.75 92.25 91.75 92.25 Last spot N/A Est. sales 42042. Wed’s Sales: 45,183 Wed’s open int: 257229, off -5643

chg.

+2.05 +2.50 +2.15 +2.38 +1.92 +1.68 +1.03 +.80 +.80

+2.75 +3.00 +3.00 +3.00 +3.00 +2.85 +1.78 +2.23

-.30 -.32 +.30 +.95 +1.05 +.90 +.80 +.15 +.15 +.25 +.75

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 14 93.95 94.47 93.00 94.07 Jul 14 94.42 94.53 93.75 94.20 Oct 14 83.60 84.22 83.60 84.22 Dec 14 83.52 83.55 83.04 83.38 Mar 15 82.78 82.78 82.47 82.71 May 15 82.55 82.65 82.47 82.65 Jul 15 82.90 82.90 82.47 82.63 Oct 15 82.45 Dec 15 81.90 81.90 81.73 81.73 Mar 16 81.81 May 16 81.92 Jul 16 81.77 Oct 16 81.83 Dec 16 81.84 Mar 17 82.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 9409. Wed’s Sales: 17,154 Wed’s open int: 184901, up +4767

chg.

-.07 -.09 +.39 -.02 +.02 -.02 +.03 +.04 +.04 +.04 +.04 +.04 +.04 +.04 +.04

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 14 713ü 715fl 695ü 698fl Jul 14 723 724ø 701ü 707ü Sep 14 730ü 732ø 710 716 Dec 14 745 745ü 723 729fl Mar 15 754fl 756ø 734fl 741fl May 15 761 761 745fl 747ü Jul 15 744 748 730fl 735ü

chg.

-14ü -14ü -13fl -13 -12ø -12 -10ø

She’s facing a built-in challenge: Vicar’s In Trouble drew the dreaded No. 1 spot in the starting gate. With 19 horses on his outside fighting to move inside to save ground, he and Napravnik will be under the gun when the gate springs open. “He gets out of that gate fast every single time,” she said. “If I have to ride somebody out of there, I’m glad it’s him.” Amid the hustle of race week,

Friday, May 2, 2014

Napravnik has been doing her homework, using her computer and smart phone to watch replays of previous Derbies. She’s been focused on the horse in the No. 1 position. The rail extends into its path, so horse and rider need to be quick to avoid running into it. Eight horses have won the Derby from the No. 1 post, most recently Ferdinand in 1986. Citation, the 1948 Triple Crown win-

B3

ner, started from there. “It’s probably not as bad as people think it is,” she said. “I think I’ll be able to get Vicar into good position.” Vicar’s In Trouble is owned by Ken and Sarah Ramsey, a Kentucky-based couple who are among the sport’s most successful owners. “Rosie has ridden him in all of his races,” Ken Ramsey said. “She knows what to do.”

NBA: Thunder, Pacers force Game 7s

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Kevin Durant scored 36 points to break out of a slump, and the Oklahoma City Thunder routed the Memphis Grizzlies 104-84 on Thursday night to force a deciding seventh game in the first-round Western Conference series. Russell Westbrook added 25 points for the Thunder, who haven’t been eliminated in the first round of the playoffs since 2010. They took control early with Durant scoring 14 points in the first quarter, led by 15 at halftime and never let Memphis get closer in the second half in the first game in the series ended in regulation since the opener. Durant also had 10 rebounds and made 14 of 15 free throws. Reggie Jackson had 16 points off the bench for the Thunder. Game 7 is Saturday night in Oklahoma City. Marc Gasol had 17 points and Zach Randolph 16 for Memphis. Guard Mike Conley strained his right hamstring, briefly returned and left for good with 8:48 left. Conley went down in the third quarter near midcourt dribbling when Kendrick Perkins reached in for a steal. The Memphis guard returned briefly, but Conley was limping noticeably. With the Thunder in control, Conley went to the locker room again and didn’t return. Durant had to answer questions after the shootaround Thursday about being called “Mr. Unreliable” in a headline in the Oklahoma City newspaper. Durant said he had no problem with the headline and that he just needed to hit shots and be more aggressive. Smiling just before tipoff, Durant did just that as he finished 11 of 23 from the floor. He continued to struggle outside the arc

Boys

Continued from Page B1

at second, third, fourth and fifth. Sanjay Yangalasetty won 7-6 (5), 6-3 over Jesus Atienzo at second singles, Martin Joyce won 62, 6-1 over Steven Gray at third singles, Phillip Rowe won 6-3, 6-1 over Steven Hornik at fourth singles and Alan DeGroot won 6-2, 6-1 over Alex Vasquez at fifth singles. Brighton Pope won 6-3, 4-6, 6-4 at first singles over Casey Conlee and Gilbert Ornelas beat Tyler

FUTURES

Sep 15 736ü 737fl 736ü 737fl -10ø Dec 15 755 756ü 740 744ü -10ø Mar 16 760ü 760ü 747ü 747ü -10ü May 16 758fl 759ø 744ü 744fl -9ü Jul 16 718 718 710ø 710ø -11ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 111868. Wed’s Sales: 96,430 Wed’s open int: 358841, up +2295 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 14 513ü 515fl 501 503ü -10fl Jul 14 518 521 504ø 507 -12 Sep 14 513 515ø 500 502ø -10fl Dec 14 509 511fl 497 499ø -9fl Mar 15 515fl 518fl 505 507ø -9 May 15 522 524 511ø 513fl -8fl Jul 15 526ü 527ø 516ø 519 -8 Sep 15 498 501ø 495 498 -8 Dec 15 501 503ü 491ü 494ø -8ø Mar 16 501 503fl 501 502ø -8fl May 16 514ü 514ü 505ø 505ø -8fl Jul 16 510 510 507 507 -8ø Sep 16 497fl 497fl 491ø 491ø -6ü Dec 16 486 486ø 482 483ø -3ø Jul 17 502ø 502ø 496ü 496ü -6ü Dec 17 471ø 471ø 465ü 465ü -6ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 276628. Wed’s Sales: 204,634 Wed’s open int: 1357555, off -6738 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 14 418ø 423ø 416 418 -ø Jul 14 360ø 360ø 350fl 353 -7ø Sep 14 343ü 343ü 340 340 -3ü Dec 14 337ü 337ü 331 333 -4ü Mar 15 333ü 333ü 330ø 330ø -6 May 15 329 329 327ü 327ü -2 Jul 15 329ü 329ü 327ü 327ü -2 Sep 15 329ü 329ü 327ü 327ü -2 Dec 15 329ü 329ü 327ü 327ü -2 Mar 16 329ü 329ü 327ü 327ü -2 Jul 16 330ü 330ü 328ü 328ü -2 Sep 16 330ü 330ü 328ü 328ü -2 Last spot N/A Est. sales 1012. Wed’s Sales: 493 Wed’s open int: 7284, off -61 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 14 1528 1573 1472ø 1473ø -57ü Jul 14 1510ø 1512 1460 1461 -51fl Aug 14 1439 1439fl 1398ø 1399fl -41 Sep 14 1308fl 1309fl 1279ø 1281ü -29 Nov 14 1245ü 1246fl 1223ü 1225ø -21ü Jan 15 1250ü 1251 1229ü 1231 -21 Mar 15 1254fl 1255 1233 1235 -20fl May 15 1253 1253 1234ø 1238ü -19 Jul 15 1257 1257fl 1237fl 1241ü -19ü Aug 15 1244 1244 1225ü 1225ü -18fl Sep 15 1220fl 1220fl 1202 1202 -18fl Nov 15 1212fl 1214ø 1193 1196ü -19 Jan 16 1215fl 1215fl 1196fl 1196fl -19 Mar 16 1211fl 1211fl 1192fl 1192fl -19 May 16 1210fl 1210fl 1191fl 1191fl -19 Jul 16 1206 1206 1188ø 1188ø -17ø Aug 16 1202 1202 1184ø 1184ø -17ø Sep 16 1164 1164 1146ø 1146ø -17ø Nov 16 1131 1131 1122 1124fl -15 Jul 17 1156ü 1156ü 1141ü 1141ü -15 Nov 17 1100 1100 1085 1085 -15 Last spot N/A Est. sales 196996. Wed’s Sales: 129,206 Wed’s open int: 605923, off -5219

OIL/GASOLINE/NG low

settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Jun 14 99.72 99.89 98.74 99.42 Jul 14 99.09 99.16 98.10 98.75 Aug 14 98.30 98.32 97.30 97.91 Sep 14 97.40 97.42 96.48 97.04 Oct 14 96.49 96.49 95.62 96.19 Nov 14 95.66 95.66 94.76 95.39 Dec 14 94.93 95.00 94.02 94.66 Jan 15 93.38 94.00 93.32 93.90 Feb 15 92.86 93.18 92.68 93.16 Mar 15 92.69 92.69 92.00 92.50 Apr 15 91.38 91.85 91.32 91.85 May 15 90.98 91.26 90.98 91.26 Jun 15 90.88 90.89 90.22 90.72 Jul 15 89.80 90.08 89.80 90.08 Aug 15 88.80 89.47 88.80 89.47 Sep 15 88.45 88.96 88.30 88.96 Oct 15 87.82 88.48 87.82 88.48 Nov 15 87.75 88.11 87.75 88.11 Dec 15 88.12 88.12 87.33 87.78 Jan 16 86.94 87.30 86.94 87.30 Feb 16 86.82 Mar 16 86.37 Apr 16 85.99 May 16 85.72 Jun 16 85.49 Jul 16 85.14 Last spot N/A Est. sales 497592. Wed’s Sales: 575,133 Wed’s open int: 1647200, off -4321 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Jun 14 2.9647 2.9652 2.9212 2.9388 Jul 14 2.9261 2.9261 2.8907 2.9079 Aug 14 2.8861 2.8879 2.8542 2.8707 Sep 14 2.8439 2.8439 2.8101 2.8276 Oct 14 2.6726 2.6726 2.6483 2.6691 Nov 14 2.6062 2.6253 2.6041 2.6241 Dec 14 2.6000 2.6000 2.5744 2.5963 Jan 15 2.5656 2.5835 2.5632 2.5835 Feb 15 2.5684 2.5832 2.5684 2.5832 Mar 15 2.5805 2.5893 2.5805 2.5893

chg.

-.32 -.36 -.37 -.35 -.31 -.28 -.27 -.27 -.28 -.27 -.26 -.26 -.26 -.25 -.25 -.25 -.25 -.25 -.25 -.24 -.23 -.22 -.21 -.20 -.19 -.18

-.0256 -.0205 -.0172 -.0148 -.0100 -.0086 -.0070 -.0062 -.0059 -.0063

in the final minute to wrap things up, finishing with 24 points. Game 7 is Saturday in Indianapolis. Paul George also scored 24 points for the Pacers, making four straight free throws to help finish off the Hawks, trying to become only the sixth No. 8 seed to knock off a No. 1 seed. Atlanta, playing perhaps its biggest home playoff game since the 1980s, looked as if it was on the verge of a huge celebration when the defense sagged and Jeff Teague knocked down a jumper, pushing the home team to an five-point lead with 3:16 to go. But the Pacers showed some of the resolve they’ve been accused of lacking, led by West. After swishing a pair of free throws, he hustled back to swat the ball away from Atlanta’s Pero Antic. Making sure Indiana took advantage of the turnover, West scored again on a jumper from the top of the key. Paul Millsap missed at the other end, and George Hill burst into the lane to drop one in. Just like that, the Pacers were back up 85-84 with 1:58 remaining. Antic tied it for the final time, 85-all, on a free throw with 1:24 remaining. But that was it for the Hawks. West hit another jumper to put the Pacers ahead for good. Then, coming off a timeout, Lou Williams drove under the basket and tried to throw an outlet pass to Teague for a 3-pointer, but the ball went right to George. He was immediately fouled, made both free throws, and Teague missed again for the Hawks after a brilliant night to seal it for the Pacers. Teague scored 29 points but it wasn’t enough.

Pacers 95, Hawks 88 ATLANTA (AP) — David West led Indiana on a 16-4 run to end the game, extending the season for the top-seeded Pacers with a 95-88 victory over the Atlanta Hawks on Thursday night. Trailing 3-2 after losing at home for the second time in the best-of-seven series, Indiana was poised for an early summer when the Hawks pushed out to an 84-79 lead with just over 3 minutes remaining, cheered on by a raucous crowd. But, for the fourth time in this back-andforth affair, the road team won. West seemed to make every big play down the stretch, scoring four straight points and forcing a huge turnover to begin the turnaround. West hit two more baskets

Girls

McKee 3-6, 6-2, 7-6 (3) at sixth singles for Roswell’s two singles victories. In doubles, Conlee and Rowe won 6-3, 6-2 over Pope and Atienzo at first, Yangalasetty and Joyce won 6-1, 6-1 over Gray and Hornik at second, and DeGroot and McKee won 3-6, 6-2, 6-3 over Vasquez and Ornelas at third. “Roswell High, they’re a good team, and for us to pull off a 7-2 win is pretty good,” Holm said afterward. “We’re right where we want to be going into district individuals and heading to the state tournament.”

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

where he missed all six of his attempts. The Grizzlies had a chance to advance to their third semifinal in four years on their own floor. Yet they couldn’t shoot well or match the Thunder’s intensity with a sloppy performance in front of a sellout crowd that tried to energize the Grizzlies. Oklahoma City outrebounded Memphis 47-36 and easily outshot them 49.3 percent (37 of 75) to 37.3 percent (31 of 83). Memphis last led 6-4. A team that thrives off defense, the Grizzlies couldn’t knock down shots even when they managed to get consecutive stops. Durant, who led the NBA with 32 points a game during the regular season, opened the game hitting five of his first seven shots and had 18 by halftime. Westbrook also shot better, though he finished 9 of 21. James Johnson scored 15 points off the bench for Memphis, and Tony Allen added 13.

Apr 15 2.7475 2.7558 2.7475 2.7558 May 15 2.7400 2.7481 2.7400 2.7481 Jun 15 2.7216 Jul 15 2.6934 Aug 15 2.6644 Sep 15 2.6314 Oct 15 2.4909 Nov 15 2.4584 Dec 15 2.4200 2.4356 2.4200 2.4354 Jan 16 2.4354 Feb 16 2.4374 Mar 16 2.4474 Apr 16 2.5799 May 16 2.5799 Jun 16 2.5699 Jul 16 2.5579 Last spot N/A Est. sales 142672. Wed’s Sales: 164,056 Wed’s open int: 312800, off -5803 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Jun 14 4.797 4.823 4.707 4.719 Jul 14 4.821 4.851 4.739 4.750 Aug 14 4.819 4.841 4.737 4.747 Sep 14 4.801 4.817 4.714 4.724 Oct 14 4.801 4.818 4.718 4.729 Nov 14 4.841 4.841 4.759 4.766 Dec 14 4.940 4.951 4.860 4.869 Jan 15 5.002 5.013 4.930 4.939 Feb 15 4.956 4.959 4.886 4.896 Mar 15 4.860 4.860 4.773 4.784 Apr 15 4.219 4.244 4.204 4.221 May 15 4.168 4.191 4.163 4.174 Jun 15 4.180 4.199 4.170 4.189 Jul 15 4.201 4.212 4.201 4.212 Aug 15 4.196 4.207 4.190 4.207 Sep 15 4.181 4.192 4.176 4.191 Oct 15 4.210 4.215 4.201 4.213 Nov 15 4.245 4.267 4.245 4.264 Dec 15 4.402 4.416 4.397 4.411 Jan 16 4.555 4.560 4.549 4.551 Feb 16 4.524 4.537 4.524 4.529 Mar 16 4.466 4.468 4.466 4.468 Apr 16 4.200 4.202 4.186 4.188 May 16 4.205 4.205 4.202 4.202 Jun 16 4.226 Jul 16 4.251 Last spot N/A Est. sales 201235. Wed’s Sales: 197,265 Wed’s open int: 1090651, up +5992

METALS

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Thu. Aluminum -$0.8026 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.0498 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.0290 N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Lead - $2088.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9318 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1278.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1283.10 troy oz., NY Merc spot Thu. Silver - $19.065 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $18.989 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. Platinum -$1412.00 troy oz., Handy & Harman. Platinum -$1427.50 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Thu. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

-.0056 -.0053 -.0043 -.0040 -.0040 -.0045 -.0035 -.0030 -.0025 -.0025 -.0025 -.0025 -.0025 -.0025 -.0025 -.0025

-.096 -.093 -.091 -.089 -.089 -.089 -.086 -.083 -.080 -.072 -.018 -.014 -.011 -.009 -.009 -.008 -.008 -.007 -.005 -.003 -.002 -.001 +.004 +.004 +.004 +.004

Velasquez and Contreras beat Lewis and Jerge 62, 6-1 at third doubles. “We were fortunate enough to nearly go undefeated in district play,” McDonald said. “We beat Goddard 9-0 earlier, beat Artesia 9-0 earlier, and, we did drop one today, but I’m extremely proud of them. “I’m looking forward to taking the team to state next week.”

Continued from Page B1

Goddard’s lone win in singles play came from Brittany Maidment, who beat Jesse Jenning 7-6 (4), 6-0 at first singles. In doubles play, Jennings and Romero beat Maidment and Sartain 46, 6-2, 6-2 at first doubles, Ruiz and Cannon beat Casario and Osmani 6-3, 6-2 at second doubles, and

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last S&P500ETF833233188.33 iShR2K 735690111.94 BkofAm 661509 15.09 RiteAid 646273 7.70 Pfizer 389345 31.15

MARKET SUMMARY

Chg +.01 -.04 -.05 +.40 -.13

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) IsoRay 59336 AlldNevG 33303 SynthBiol 27264 NwGold g 26394 Organovo 23359

Last 2.12 3.25 1.44 5.10 6.07

Chg -.29 -.14 -.01 +.03 +.23

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Facebook 812692 61.15 SiriusXM 621604 3.21 PwShs QQQ35271187.65 SLM Cp 287494 9.02 Microsoft 283685 40.00

Chg +1.37 +.03 +.26 -.18 -.40

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg BldBear 13.63 +2.41 +21.5 SCEd pfB 21.25 +1.26 +6.3 MerrimkP 6.99 +2.60 +59.2 MaxLinear 9.43 +1.56 +19.8 AmpioPhm 6.38 +.29 +4.8 Energous n 13.00 +2.47 +23.5 4.12 +.17 +4.3 ChinaYida 3.72 +.67 +22.0 BioAmb wt 2.19 +.36 +19.7 BovieMed 5.17 +.75 +17.0 WtWatch 23.71 +3.91 +19.7 UnvSecInst 4.39 +.18 +4.2 PacBiosci Meritor 13.95 +2.08 +17.5 PacBkrM g 5.10 +.20 +4.1 CytRx 3.55 +.48 +15.6

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg Emulex 4.96 -2.19 -30.6 MonstrWw 5.66 -1.23 -17.9 SwftEng 10.88 -1.45 -11.8 GnCable 22.97 -2.65 -10.3 Avon 13.72 -1.56 -10.2

Name IsoRay Ever-Glory SagaComm Libbey IGI Labs

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

DIARY

Volume

3,294,794,711 Volume

52-Week High Low 16,631.63 14,551.27 7,774.58 5,952.18 558.29 462.66 11,334.65 8,814.76 2,645.76 2,186.97 4,371.71 3,289.42 1,897.28 1,560.33 20,257.19 16,442.14 1,212.82 924.21

Name AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola Disney EOG Res s EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

1,778 1,338 107 3,223 133 35

Last 2.12 6.75 41.02 24.81 4.73

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg -.29 -12.0 EducMgmt 2.84 -1.13 -.65 -8.8 QuickLog 3.77 -.96 -3.28 -7.4 SilicGrIn 9.96 -2.12 -1.86 -7.0 Stamps.cm 29.12 -5.59 -.30 -6.0 LoJack 4.76 -.91

DIARY

203 188 38 429 5 3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

102,368,513 Volume

INDEXES

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 16,558.87 7,719.02 555.54 10,629.34 2,631.80 4,127.45 1,883.68 19,976.54 1,125.97

Net Chg -21.97 +46.83 +1.96 +2.16 +19.27 +12.89 -.27 +16.70 -.89

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Div

PE

Last

Chg

1.84 .90 .04 2.92 4.28f 1.22f .86f .50f 3.74f 2.76f .50 .64f 1.20a .90 4.40f 2.80f

11 13 20 22 11 22 22 24 ... 11 10 12 14 14 13 19

35.58 -.12 71.44 -.01 15.09 -.05 128.46 -.56 124.94 -.58 40.78 -.01 79.56 +.22 97.12 -.88 55.44 +1.19 101.41 -1.00 15.91 -.24 32.64 -.42 52.30 -.29 26.45 -.24 193.53 -2.94 100.53 -.76

DIARY

YTD %Chg Name +1.2 +4.2 -3.1 -5.9 ... -1.3 +4.1 +15.7 -3.2 +.2 +3.1 +16.7 +5.3 +1.9 +3.2 +9.8

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

%Chg -28.5 -20.3 -17.5 -16.1 -16.0

1,246 1,344 136 2,726 60 70

2,011,572,327

% Chg -.13 +.61 +.35 +.02 +.74 +.31 -.01 +.08 -.08

YTD % Chg -.11 +4.30 +13.24 +2.20 +8.47 -1.18 +1.91 +1.37 -3.24

52-wk % Chg +11.65 +26.67 +4.63 +14.95 +8.74 +23.55 +17.91 +18.57 +19.80

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

1.76 1.12 2.98f .74 2.27 1.04 1.56 .16 1.20 1.27f .65e 2.12 1.92f .40 1.40f 1.20f

39 15 24 20 20 16 16 22 24 15 ... 11 16 14 12 17

59.62 +1.06 40.00 -.40 57.08 +.09 27.77 +.09 85.57 -.32 31.15 -.13 84.05 +.83 24.33 +.16 45.23 -.22 66.87 +.41 20.31 +.02 47.22 +.49 79.70 -.01 21.72 +.14 49.64 ... 31.92 +.05

+19.1 +6.9 +8.4 +15.1 +3.2 +1.7 +9.0 +29.1 +3.0 -4.1 +1.7 -3.9 +1.3 -6.7 +9.3 +14.2

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


B4 Friday, May 2, 2014 DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: My wife and I both served in the military. When she returned from Egypt 19 months ago, she dropped a bomb on me, saying she didn’t want to be married anymore. She said she had settled for second best all her life and that’s what she had done with me. She went on to say she knows there’s someone better than me out there, and she’s going to find him. All the evidence points to an affair, which she denies — constant trips out of town, emails and phone calls. We are now liv-

ing paycheck to paycheck. We have no more savings and I’m paying all the expenses when it comes to the kids. She retired a year ago and refuses to get a job worthy of her experience. The worst part is, our kids have suffered. We have been separated ever since she got back. She says our kids aren’t worth her trying to save our marriage. Our close friends and family are still shocked, but no one more than me. It has been a struggle, which almost caused me to have a breakdown. Everything I do now is to lessen the impact on our kids. What advice can you offer me? TRYING TO COPE IN VIRGINIA DEAR TRYING TO COPE: Please accept my sympathy. Your marriage is over and you have to accept it. If you haven’t consulted a lawyer, you should do it NOW to figure out what your responsibility — and HERS — will be to the

COMICS

children once your divorce is final. They should be cared for by the parent who is willing and able to give them stability, and the lawyer can help you determine this. From your description of your wife, that would be you, while she searches for someone she “deserves.” Personally, I hope she finds him, because the way she has treated you has been brutal.

#####

DEAR ABBY: I’m a student in a community college. I enjoy the diversity of the students here; many are adults who are changing careers or getting the education they’ve always wanted. One woman in my class has a habit of bringing her toddler with her. I understand that sitters can be unreliable and child care is expensive, but this disrupts the class — and I know it distracts the mother, as well. She often has to get up mid-lesson when her child needs to use

the restroom. I don’t want to step on toes or intrude in people’s personal lives, but college is no place for an unruly toddler. How can I handle this? STUDENT IN NEW YORK

Family Circus

DEAR STUDENT: I wholeheartedly agree with you that toddlers do not belong in college lectures where they distract the students. This is something that should be discussed with whomever is conducting the class, and if that doesn’t fix the problem, with the dean. P.S. Some colleges have babysitting facilities on campus.

#####

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

The Wizard of Id

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE Dear Heloise: I was going through my CHILDREN’S CLOTHES and was about to throw out several pairs of pants that had developed holes in the knees, since I didn’t think a thrift store would want clothing with holes. Then I remembered our school nurse lamenting the fact that she never had enough pants to put on the kids at school who had spilled on or soiled their pants and needed a clean pair. She was very happy to accept these pants to keep in the health office for these situations. I would encourage other parents to call their local elementary school to see if they also would be willing to accept clothing donations rather than throwing them out! Carol, via email

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

What a wonderful hint! I’m sure schools could use shirts, too! Call to see if they accept donations like this, or if the school has certain dress codes. They might not be the best, but anything is better than soiled clothes! Heloise ##### SEND A GREAT HINT TO: Heloise P.O. Box 795000 San Antonio, TX 78279-5000 Fax: 1-210-HELOISE Email: Heloise(at)Heloise.com Dear Heloise: The lack of humidity in New Mexico would cause me to have bloody noses and chapped skin. Since we were traveling, I did not have a humidifier, so I had to improvise. I would wet a hand towel, wring it out and hang it in the hotel room. In the morning, the towel would be mostly dry, and I would not have a bloody nose or dry skin. Fernanda, via email I’ve done the very same, but I use a bath towel and drape it over the back of a chair. I know it may look silly, but it sure helps add some moisture to the room. Or fill the tub with about an inch of water, and that helps, too. Heloise ##### Dear Heloise: Place a sheet of white printer paper on the table under your work when replacing a screw on your eyeglasses. The paper “brightens up” your work area. And when you drop that tiny screw the third and fourth time, you’ll see it right away on top of that white paper! F.D. Logan in New Mexico

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Dear Heloise: I clean my walk-in shower stall with a stiff broom. I spray the stall with a cleaner, let it sit awhile, then scrub with the broom. It gets into all the corners and grout lines, and the long handle makes it easy to get all of it standing up. Cecile B., Englewood, Fla.

Dear Heloise: I use paper coffee filters as snack bowls for the grandkids. They also are great for putting hot sausage, bacon and burgers on, because they collect the grease. Then you can just toss them. Carol L. in Virginia Dear Heloise: I think this might be the best gift ever: Give your significant other a really nice card and a kiss. If they don’t like the gift, they can give it back! Judy in Ohio

Zits

Roswell Daily Record


CLASSIFIEDS / HOROSCOPES

Roswell Daily Record

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19)  You might feel overwhelmed by what you think you have to get done. You could work yourself into a tizzy if you are not careful. Do not sit on negativity for too long. Reach out to a friend who offers a different perspective. Tonight: Enjoy some time with your pals. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  A loved one or dear friend could push you too far. This person has a history of giving you the cold shoulder and developing an attitude when you least can handle it. You could be overwhelmed, and your vulnerability might be high. Tonight: Vanish while you can. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)  You are a force to be dealt with, especially when facing a problem. You could feel overworked. You might want to push someone away who is negative. A friend who really cares about you will let you know that he or she supports you. Tonight: TGIF! Get the gang together. CANCER (June 21-July 22)  Let go, and understand what is happening around you. You could be disappointed by a loved one’s response. Do not make a fuss over this issue. Know that an older friend or relative really admires the way you handle situations. Tonight: Hook up with a special person.

Legals

Notice to Bidders... Publish May 2, 2014

NOTICE TO BIDDERS CITY OF ROSWELL

Bid Number: ITB-14-050 Hondo River Bank & Trail Reconstruction A Unit Price Contract

Scope of Work: This project consists of removal and reconstruction of 533 feet of river bank stabilization. Work includes removals of existing bank and trail, excavation, large solid concrete block retaining wall, interlocking articulating concrete block, structural concrete, sidewalk, header curb, wrought iron fence, traffic control and other associated work. ___________________________________________

The City of Roswell requests SEALED BIDS until 2:00 P.M.,ON May 20, 2014, in the Council Chamber at City Hall, Roswell, New Mexico for the above bid. ___________________________________________ +

All bid proposals will be clearly marked on the outside of the sealed envelope with the bid number shown above. FACSIMILE PROPOSALS ARE NOT ACCEPTABLE.

Complete copies of the Plans, Specifications, and Contract Documents may be examined in, and obtained from the office of the City Engineer, 415 N. Richardson Ave, Roswell New Mexico, by any contractor licensed in the State of New Mexico. Any shipping or mailing costs will be the responsibility of the respective contractor and/or bidder. To help the City of Roswell defray printing costs; it is requested that unsuccessful bidders return the bidding documents in usable condition within ten (10) business days after bidding. Project Engineer is Louis Najar, PE, office is 575-637-6281 and email is phone l.najar@roswell-nm.gov All bids received are subject to approval of the City Council at the next regularly scheduled meeting.

Notice is hereby given that the City Council reserves the right to reject any or all bids received in case of ambiguity or lack of clearness, qualifications, references, and the right to determine the best bid, or, to reject the same and to waive irregularities and technicalities. CITY SEAL

/s/ Artie Morrow Purchasing Director

Notice of Suit Pending...

Publish April 25, May 2, 9, 2014

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT PIONEER BANK Plaintiff, v.

D-504-CV-2014-00210

JO LYNNE AFFSPRUNG, NESSELRODT HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING, LLC and WENDELL H. AFFSPRUNG, IF LIVING; IF DECEASED, HIS UNKNOWN HEIRS OR ANY UNKNOWN PERSONS WHO MAY CLAIM A LIEN, INTEREST OR TITLE, ADVERSE TO THE PLAINTIFF Defendants. NOTICE OF SUIT PENDING

To: WENDELL H. AFFSPRUNG, IF LIVING; IF DECEASED, HIS UNKNOWN HEIRS OR ANY UNKNOWN PERSONS WHO MAY CLAIM A LIEN, INTEREST OR TITLE, ADVERSE TO THE PLAINTIFF GREETINGS:

You are hereby notified that there has been filed in the District Court of Chaves County, New Mexico, a certain cause of action wherein, Pioneer Bank is the Plaintiff, and you are one of the Defendants, the same being Cause No. D-504-CV-2014-00210 of the Civil Docket.

The general object of said action is to foreclose Plaintiff's mortgage in and to the following described property: Lot 21 in Block 1 of Swartztrauber's Re-Subdivision of Blocks 3 and 4 of Valley View Addition, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat recorded March 24, 1909 in Plat Book A, Page 132, Plat Records of Chaves County, New Mexico.

TOGETHER WITH that portion of a vacated street lying adjacent to said Lot 21, and more particularly described as follows:

BEGINNING at the Northwest corner of Lot 21; thence West 20 feet along a prolongation of the North line of said Lot 21; thence South 50 feet parallel with the West line of Lot 21; thence East 20 feet to the Southwest corner of Lot 21; thence North along the West line of Lot 21 to the point of beginning. Known also as 1111 S. Missouri Avenue, Roswell, NM 88203.

said lands being more fully described in the Complaint for Foreclosure on file herein.

You are further directed to file with the Court an answer or motion in response to the Complaint for Foreclosure filed in the captioned cause of action within thirty (30) days after publication of this Notice and serve a copy on the Plaintiff as provided in Rule 1-005 NMRA. The name of the attorneys for Plaintiff is Sanders, Bruin, Coll & Worley, P.A. (Steven P. Fisher), P.O. Box 550, Roswell, New Mexico 88202, telephone number 575-622-5440. If you fail to file a timely answer or motion, default judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint for Foreclosure filed in the captioned cause of action. WITNESS my hand and seal of the District Court of Chaves County, New Mexico. DISTRICT COURT CLERK By:/s/ Janet Bloomer Deputy

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  Others like to be with you, but you might not have enough time to accomplish what you want. Retreat in order to get done what you must, and leave some free time for your friends. A call from a loved one at a distance will cheer you up. Tonight: Where the crowds are. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)  Take a stand that is long overdue. You might want to look at a personal matter in a new way. Others might see you as cold or remote. Make an effort later in the day toward a friend or loved one. Once you do, the caring will flow once more. Tonight: Out till the wee hours. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)  Take an overview of what is going on in front of you. You can’t underestimate the importance of a financial matter. You need to have a conversation with a key person who can give you some important information. Tonight: Make a call. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  Others see you as closed-off. Ask yourself why this impression of you exists. You might be in the habit of being overserious and not even realize it. A friend will try to help you loosen up, but first you need to clear the air. Tonight: Enjoy a close conversation with a loved one. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)  Allow others to run the show for now. You might want to take some time off to enjoy yourself. You could see the caring emerge once more in an old relation-

Legals

Request for Proposal... Publish April 23, 25, 27, 30, May 2, 4, 7, 9, 2014 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL

Qualification-based competitive sealed proposals to construct a security fence will be received by Pecos Valley Artesian Conservancy District (hereinafter referred to as “PVACD”), 2303 East Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, for RFP # 2014-002.

PVACD is requesting proposals for the construction of a security fence.

Proposals will be received at PVACD's offices, 2303 East Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, until 4:00 p.m., Friday, June 6, 2014. Submitted proposals shall not be publicly opened. Any proposals received after closing time will be rejected and returned unopened. The fact that a proposal was dispatched will not be considered.

Copies of the Request can be obtained in person at the office of the Superintendent at 2303 East Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, or will be mailed upon written or telephone request to Aron Balok, Superintendent, at 575-622-7000 or may be downloaded at www.pvacd.com under the title RFP # 2014-002. PVACD reserves the right to reject any and/or all proposals and waive all informalities as deemed in the best interest of the District.

Second Amended Notice of Sale...

Publish April 18, 25, May 2, 9, 2014 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

BOKF, N.A., a national banking association dba BANK OF OKLAHOMA as successor by merger to Bank of Oklahoma, N.A., vs.

Plaintiff,

No. D-504-CV-2013-00447

RYAN HUNT, CAROLINE HUNT and NEW MEXICO MORTGAGE FINANCE AUTHORITY, Defendants.

SECOND AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE ON FORECLOSURE

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the above-entitled Court, having appointed me or my designee as Special Master in this matter with the power to sell, has ordered me to sell the real property (the "Property") situated in Chaves County, New Mexico, commonly known as 3113 N. Richardson Avenue, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, and more particularly described as follows: LOT 4, OF BUCHANAN ADDITION, IN THE CITY OF ROSWELL, COUNTY OF CHAVES AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT RECORDED MAY 7, 1958 IN PLAT BOOK C, PAGE 73, REAL PROPERTY RECORDS OF CHAVES COUNTY, NEW MEXICO.

The sale is to begin at 10:45 a.m. on May 22, 2014, outside the front entrance of the Chaves County Courthouse, City of Roswell, County of Chaves, State of New Mexico, at which time I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in lawful currency of the United States of America, the Property to pay expenses of sale, and to satisfy the Judgment granted BOKF, N.A. BOKF, N.A. was awarded a Judgment on December 16, 2013, in the principal sum of $79,687.46, plus outstanding interest due on the Note through November 1, 2013, in the amount of $3,791.80 and accruing thereafter at the rate of $12.47 per diem, plus late charges of $165.18, plus escrow advances for property taxes and insurance of $1,928.41, plus property preservation expenses of $108.00, plus reasonable attorney's fees incurred by Plaintiff through November 1, 2013, in the sum of $950.00, plus costs incurred by Plaintiff through November 1, 2013, in the sum of $681.95, with interest on the aforesaid amounts at the rate of 5.710% per annum from date of Judgment until paid. The sale is subject to rights and easements of record, to unpaid property taxes and assessments, and to the one (1) month right of redemption in favor of the Defendants as specified in the Judgment filed herein. PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS AT THE SALE ARE ADVISED TO MAKE THEIR OWN EXAMINATION OF TITLE AND THE CONDITION OF THE PROPERTY AND TO CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEY BEFORE BIDDING.

/s/ Faisal Sukhyani Special Master 2222 Parkwest Drive, N.W. Albuquerque, New Mexico 87120 (505) 228-8484

Friday, May 2, 2014

ship. Sometimes you are too tired and withdrawn for your own good. Tonight: Out on the town. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  You tend to pick up where others have slacked off. You might not be as sure of yourself as you normally are. Indulge a roommate or loved one later in the day, when you have more time. Make it OK to postpone plans for now. Tonight: Do what is best for you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  Holding you back on a Friday might seem close to impossible, yet a statement by a superior could stop you in your tracks. You understand your priorities and decisions. Make calls, and follow through on what is important to you. Tonight: Go to a favorite spot. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)  Consider your priorities and what works for you. Family and your home life continue to be instrumental to your well-being. Do not minimize a needed expenditure. It is important to indulge yourself a little more than you have in the recent past. Tonight: At home. —Jacqueline Bigar

BORN TODAY Pediatrician Benjamin Spock (1903), journalist Theodor Herzl (1860), soccer player David Beckham (1975)

Legals

Application No. RA-1616-B-POD2... Publish April 25, May 2, 9, 2014

NOTICE is hereby given that on April 7, 2014, Dexter Consolidated Schools, P.O. Box 159, Dexter, New Mexico 88230, c/o Hennighausen & Olsen, LLP, P.O. Box 1415, Roswell, New Mexico 88202; filed Application No. RA-1616-B-POD2 with the STATE ENGINEER for permit to change location of well by ceasing the diversion of 87.3 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, from shallow well No. RA-1616-B & RA-1807 located in the NE1/4SW1/4SW1/4 of Section 8, Township 13 South, Range 26 East, N.M.P.M.

The applicant proposes to drill replacement well No. RA-1616-B-POD2 approximately 180.0 feet in depth and 12.25 inches in diameter at a point in the NE1/4SW1/4SW1/4 of Section 8, Township 13 South, Range 26 East, N.M.P.M., for the continued irrigation of up to 29.1 acres described as follows:

SUBDIVISION Pt. S1/2SE1/4 Pt. SW1/4SW1/4

SECTION 7 8

TOWNSHIP 13 S. 13 S.

RANGE 26 E.) 26 E.)

ACRES

Up to 29.1

The application states; “Dexter Consolidated Schools utilizes shallow well No. RA-1616-B & RA-1807 for the irrigation of the grounds around the School, which include the football field. The well has failed and the applicant wishes to drill a shallow replacement well within 100 feet of the original well pursuant to Article 2 of the Rules and Regulations and Section 72-12-22 NMSA (1978).”

The above described move-from and move-to places of use are located in the Town of Dexter, Chaves County, New Mexico.

Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (legible, signed, and include the writer's complete name and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment you must specifically identify your water rights*; and/or (2) Public welfare/conservation of water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must show you will be substantially and specifically affected. The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with Scott A. Verhines, P.E., State Engineer, 1900 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, within ten (10) days after the date of last publication of this Notice. Facsimiles (fax) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is sent within 24-hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protest can be faxed to Office of the State Engineer, (575) 623-8559. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 72 NMSA 1978.

GARAGE SALES 001. North

LARGE INDOOR ESTATE Sale, Friday 7am. 2515 Mimosa. Entire household items. Must Sell until all sold. Something for everyone!

002. Northeast

GARAGE SALE Sat. 7am -3pm 4501 Ranchito Dr 1 mile east of Mall. 3201 DELICADO, Sat., 7am-noon. 1992 Lincoln Towncar, weight bench, 4x8 utility trailer, golf clubs, Diamondback bicycle, folding poker table, Yashika FRII camera, Folboat vacuum, electric body massager, & misc. GARAGE SALE Sat 7-10am tools and more! 112 Tierra Berrenda

1105 MONTERREY, Saturday, 6:30am. Household items, furniture, clothes & propane grill.

2727 WILSHIRE Blvd, Units 1-90, Thurs-Sat, 8am-2pm. Come out and drive or walk, units 1-90 to see what treasures Wilshire Gardens residents have to offer.

ESTATE SALE 905 E. Pine Lodge Rd. Sat. May 3rd 7-11am. furniture, household items, and misc. BACK YARD SALE Bar equip. mirrors and man cave items. 610 La Fonda Dr Starts Friday May 2 until all is sold. Begins at 7am. Neigborhood garage sale North Sky Loop, Sat May 3rd 7-12. Many homes 2412 N. Prairie St., Saturday, 7am-? Lots of stuff.

14 RIO Bonito Circle Sat. 5/3/14, Quality items, lots of misc.

AVON COLLECTION, camping gear, train set, Xmas & Halloween decor. Sat 7-? 3016 Bandolina 103 TIERRA Berrenda, Saturday, 7am. Pilates machine, bike, 9x12 new carpet, household goods, small furniture. 502 LA Fonda Dr. Sat. Furniture, clothes and much more! 2502 S. Virginia, Saturday-Sunday, 8am-1pm.

B5

002. Northeast SATURDAY-SUNDAY Huge garage sale at the corner of Atkinson & Mimosa, #1211.

413 E. Country Club, Friday-Saturday, 8am-4pm. Huge Yard Sale. 412 N. Orchard, Saturday, 7am-? Fishing equip., tools, household furniture, all must go. 2 FAMILY sale. 814 Broken Arrow, Fri., 8-5:30, Sat., 8-1. Lots of everything. Gift bags for Mom. 910-5529

004. Southeast 325 E. Poe, Fri-Sun, 7am-? Beds, odds & ends.

TOOL SALE 3802 S. Graves Rd. Sat 8-? Electric, refrigeration, plumbing, hardware, parts & tools COUNTRY SALE 3802 S. Graves Sat. 8-2pm. Huge Item List, Cash Only. 2 miles East of Bowling Alley corner of Brasher and Graves Rd. 403 S. Atkinson, Fri-Sat, 7am. A lot of stuff & tamales for sale. 602 E. Albuquerque, Thursday-Saturday, 7am. Clothes, shoes & more. 214 E. Frazier, Sat-Weds. Clothes, appliances, dryer, china, & lots of misc. HUGE YARD Sale! New clothes, shoes, tools, antiques. 512 E. Hendricks. Everything must go. Friday, Saturday, Sunday 7am. BIG YARD Sale 318 S. Beech Sat & Sun YARD SALE Fri & Sat 7am-1pm. 100 S. Atkinson A little bit of everything. 213 E. Poe, Friday-Sunday, 8am. 319 E. Poe, Saturday, 7am. Some furniture. 2 family sale.

005. South

MOVING SALE, Saturday only, cash only, 225 W. Darby Rd, 285 to Darby turn West go to West end of Darby last property on right. Guy stuff too, ‘71 Mustang Mach 1, ‘95 Camero Z28, ‘70 Opal GT, ‘78 Corvette, engine hoist & more. For info on cars, 575-313-0847.

006. Southwest

MOVING SALE Thu-Sat 7am. Info call 626-8466 or 840-7849. Good used furniture, accumulation of 20 yrs & carpenter tools 1015 Rancho Rd. MOVING BACKYARD Sale, 1804 Western Ave., Fri-Sat, 8am-3pm. Go South on Union past Hobbs, turn left on S. Plains Park, right on Western. Paintings, canvases, household goods, small kitchen appliances, TVs, outdoor lounger, furniture, etc., etc., etc. 803 S. Richardson Fri 2nd thru Tues. 6th. Hunting, fishing, camping gear of all kinds & misc. GARAGE SALE 2204 Fulkerson Sat May 3 7am-12pm. Furniture, home interior, clothes, lots of baby items CHURCH RUMMAGE SALE. Nice household misc., furniture, remodel, toys, books, nice clothing and shoes, baked goods, cold waters and sodas. Corner of S. Sycamore and W. Alameda Sat 7-12. Thank you for your support! 704 S. Washington, Fri-Sat, 8am-? A little bit of everything. Fresh popcorn for 75¢ & snow cones for $1. 107 NEWELL, Fri-Sat, 7am-3pm. Sofa sleeper w/chair & ottoman, sofa, loveseat & recliner, Singer sewing machine w/cabinet, desks, chest of drawers, dining room table, twin size bed w/drawers & mattress, coffee table & end tables, small portable fridge, speaker box, speakers & amp, 15” auto DVD player & lots of other stuff. 1200 W. Gayle Fri & Sat. 7am-2pm. No early birds, 5 family yard sale. Wall decor, tables, ceramics, oneida flatware set, complete oneida fine china set complete, reclining chair that vibrates and heats. Computers, stainless steel aluminum double sink, antiques, spell fire card set. Toys, boys new bicycle. Jewelry, shoes; women’s 5/7, lots of clothes; misses, woman 8/2x hand made wedding dress size 10. Tools. Way too much to list, come check it out, new items added Saturday!

006. Southwest

908 AVENIDA Del Sumbre, Saturday, 7am. Clothes & misc. items. 403 W. Wildy St., Saturday, 8am-2pm. Big yard sale. Lots of stuff-great prices. 709 N. Plains Park Dr., Sat., 7am-? Tools, DVDs, Western shirts, boots, chainsaw, yard tools, tables, & misc. 2 FAMILY yard sale, Saturday, 7am-? 1905 S. Heights Dr. Bamboo living room set, toys, nice clothes, purses, shoes, children clothes, lots more, too much to mention. Come see for yourself. 1607 S. Union, Saturday, 8am-1pm. 4 party garage sale. Baby & toddler items, & household misc. 304 S. Evergreen, Saturday, 8am-6pm. 3 FAMILY yard sale, 705 S. Missouri. Men’s & women’s clothes, home decor, dishes. Fri-Sat, 7am

008. Northwest YARD SALE Friday May 2nd 302 W. 9th Apt B. 7am-? A little bit of everything

1108 N. LEA, FRI-SAT, 7-?, Living & bedroom furniture, dishes, utincels, ping pong table, clothes everything must go. FUNDRAISER GARAGE Sale, Burrito sale & Bake Sale & Car wash at Liberty Chiropractic 1500 N. Washington Ave. on Sat. May 3rd from 8:00-12:00. Sending teens from Roswell 1st Church of the Nazarene to San Diego, CA to represent NM in Volleyball, Flag Football, Bible Quizzing and Talent competitions. 2101 W. Country Club, Sat. ONLY. Lots of misc., furniture, electric range. 1001 SAUNDERS (Enchanted Hills), Sat., 7am. Redwood paneling, TVs & stereo, paintings, children’s clothes & toys. MOVING SALE, 2701 Riverside Dr., Fri. 7am-1pm, Fri. 3pm-7pm, Sat. 7am. 8ft ladder, furniture, tools, baker’s rack, antiques, CD player, golf bag & clubs, set of dishes. Treasures of 25 years. 3501 N. Sycamore Sat 7-11am. Toro lawn tractor, furniture, camping stuff, gas grill, household items, many extras. SIR, FOUND glass shelves 623-9258 602 N. Missouri, Backyard, 7am, Sat. ONLY. Pickup tools boxes, doors, cabinets, toilet, vanity, bookshelves, water heater, HD parts/acc., Levi’s. LOTS MORE & Sports car.

ANNOUNCEMENTS 025. Lost and Found

SMALL BLACK dog found in Dexter, call to identify. 575-420-7294

INSTRUCTION

030. Education & Instructions

MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant!NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC Train gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-888-926-6073

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

BEALLS NOW HIRING Cosmetics and Sales Associates. Apply online at www.stagestoresinc.com/c areer.search


B6 Friday, May 2, 2014 045. Employment Opportunities

BIG D’S is accepting resumes for Delivery Driver, Cooks, & Cashiers. Bring resume to 505 N. Main St. General Maintenance position available. Please apply at Dairy Queen, 1900 N. Main St. EXPERIENCED WELDER stainless steel /HVAC tech helper needed, must pass drug screen. 575-626-1234 LOOKING FOR part time night auditor and full time front desk help. Apply at 2000 N. Main. DEPENDABLE HARD working CNAs needed ASAP. AM/PM shift available now. Call 575-746-6117. FARLEY’S NOW HIRING for all positions apply in person between the hours of 2-4pm. 1315 N. Main St. in Roswell, NM PASTA CAFE NOW HIRING for all positions applyin person between the hours of 2-4pm.1208 N. Main St. in Roswell, NM RESTAURANT/BAR MANAGER needed salary DOE please send resumes to roswell.restaurant. manager@gmail.com HELP WANTED Receptionist for dental office. Send resumes to PO Box 1897, Unit 378, Roswell, NM 88202. PVT AND FUEGO WIRELESS

FACILITIES LOCATOR-PVT Responsible for locating fiber optic, copper and CATV coax in the service area for PVT and its subsidiaries.

045. Employment Opportunities

SOLITAIRE HOMES Sales Person Wanted to join our team! No experience necessary, will train. Bilingual a plus. Apply at 4001 W 2nd st Roswell, NM 88201 CATTLE BARON STEAK AND SEAFOOD NOW HIRING for experienced servers apply in person between the hours of 24pm.1113 N. Main in Roswell, NM

GARDEN CREST now has 2 full time positions open. 1 groundsman position and 1 tree climber position. Driver’s license required. Please call 624-1611. NEED CASH? Be your own boss & build your business at Blairs Monterey indoor market at 1400 W. 2nd. Booths start at $75/mo. Call 623-0136

DRIVER NEEDED Class A or B CDL with clear driving record, local route, competitive pay, 401K, insurance and paid time off. Call 800-658-2673 or 806-293-4431 WITH OUR growth, We need HELP Reservations specialist Experienced Housekeeper, Handy Man APPLY READY TO WORK. 2803 w 2nd St. Roswell No calls TIRE TECH & light automotive position available. Must have own tools and 1-2 years experience. Good driving record required. Apply in person at 101 S. Main ADMIRAL BEVERAGE is hiring CDL driver position must be filled immediately, and only serious prospects need apply. Great benefits, excellent pay, group health insurance. Apply online at www.admiralbeverage.com

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

Avon, Buy/Sell. I can help you build your business or team. Sandy 317-5079 ISR

If you can lift 25 lbs and show up on time call 575-578-4817

ROSWELL HONDA seeking experience express technician. Come be a part of a President's award winning team. Full time position. Full benefits including health, dental, 401k. Apply in person. Ask for Chris. 2177 W. 2nd. St.

Roswell Daily Record is now taking applications for Route Delivery. Contact Circulation Department at 575-622-7730. Must have Driver’s License and good driving record.

OPTOMETRIC OFFICE seeking receptionist for a 1/2 day/afternoon position. Duties include: answering phone, making appointments, checking in/out patients and general clerical duties. PO Box 1897, Unit #366 Roswell, NM 88202 Maddy-Tay’s Preschool is now taking job applications. Must be at least 18 years old and have GED or high school diploma. Must have 45 hour certificate or higher education. Experience working in child care is preferred.

CAR RENTAL company has opening for Customer Service, Rental/Sales Agent. Applicant should have professional customer service skills and be dependable. Retirees and Seniors welcome to apply. Apply at Avis Rental Counter inside airport, 8am-1pm. NEED WAREHOUSE Manager/Delivery person. Pick up and deliver materials to various worksites. Must pass background check and have valid driver’s license and be drug free. Must able to lift 50 lbs. Custom Construction & Roofing, LLC, #4 Wool Bowl Circle. Apply in person only.

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

Tobosa Developmental Services is currently seeking Direct Care Support Staff for the Residential Department. Experience with developmentally disabled preferred but not required. Please submit current resume with completed application, police background check, copy of High School Diploma and driving record at 110 E. Summit, Roswell, NM 88203 or call (575)624-1025. Salary is negotiable based on experience and education level. Applications open until positions are filled. EOE

ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN I-PVT Responsible for activities assigned by the Plant Engineering Manager to support construction and other projects. Including but not limited to designing new copper, coax and fiber facilities, use of a GPS and drawing staking sheets with the computer mapping system, deals with various agencies and power companies to obtain right-of-way. Assigns, keeps up and closes out work orders.

CATV SERVICE TECHNICIAN-FUEGO WIRELESS Responsible for CATV and telephone installation along with problem diagnoses to satisfy the customer. Assists in CATV plant design and implementation, and troubleshooting. BUSINESS SERVICES TECHNICIAN-FUEGO WIRELESS Provides business service customers with network, desktop and server administration, including installation, configuration, upgrades, updates and patches to hardware, software and operating systems.

DATA SERVICES TECHNICIAN-FUEGO WIRELESS Designs, implements and maintains customer networks, security camera systems, and analog/VoIP phone systems; provides sales support and assists in administration, implementation, organization, maintenance and troubleshooting the ISP network.

MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS-FUEGO WIRELESS Will set and guide the strategy for all communications, website, and public relations messages and collateral to consistently articulate the mission of the Company. Will work collaboratively with senior leadership to develop and implement communications strategies to broaden the Company's impact and oversee organizational messaging and constituent services. PVT and Fuego Wireless provide a competitive wage and benefits package. Applications may be obtained from www.pvt.com, www.fuegowireless.com, or from PVT Headquarters. Applications and resumes should be sent to HR Dept., Peñasco Valley Telecommunications, 4011 W. Main, Artesia, NM 88210. E-mail to: ritah@pvt.com Fax to: 575.736.1376. Equal Opportunity Employer

Heating and Air Conditioning Co taking applications for service technicians, installers and helpers. Apply in person at 309 N. Virginia The Roswell Daily Record is currently accepting applications for a reporter. Must be a good writer and speller. Send resume to: Roswell Daily Record, Attn: C Fischer PO Box 1897, Roswell, NM or emailed to cfischer@rdrnews.com No phone calls, please. LEARN TO drive in 5 short weeks. Artesia Training Academy has new classes forming. CDL Class A with endorsements. VA approved. 20 years of service to South East New Mexico. Call for more information 575-748-9766 or 1-888-586-0144 visit us at www.artesiatraining.com or visit us on Facebook. GUARDSMARK The nation’s leader in security is hiring security officers. No experience required, but customer service skills a must. Must be HS Grad/GED & 21 yrs. EOE Benefits: Free Life Ins. Uniforms/Tuition Assistance. Starting Pay $9.00hr. Apply by calling 505-830-2700 Tues-Fri. 9am-6pm.

AMERICAN GREETINGS is looking for Retail Greeting Card Merchandisers in Roswell, NM. As a member of our team, you will ensure the greeting card department is merchandised and maintained to provide customers the best selection of cards and product to celebrate life’s events. Join the American Greetings family today by applying online at: WorkatAG.com or call 1.888.323.4192 SOLID WASTE OPERATOR / DRIVER, Salary $14.14 hourly. Applications will be accepted until 4:00pm on Monday, May 12, 2014. Complete job description and applications at the Village of Ruidoso, 313 Cree Meadows Dr. Ruidoso, NM 88345. Phone 258-4343 or 1-877-700-4343. Fax 258-5848. Website www.ruidoso-nm.gov “Drugfree Workplace” EEOE. COMFORT KEEPERS is seeking experienced overnight caregivers to work in the Roswell area. Part time and full time with GREAT PAY. Stop by our Roswell office at: 1410 South Main to visit with us today or call Kim at 575-624-9999 for more information.

SERVICE TECHNICIAN-PVT Responsible for telephone installations, repairs and replacements, installing switching and problem diagnoses to satisfy the members of the Cooperative. This position is based in Hondo, NM.

CONSTRUCTION SPECIALIST-PVT Responsible for construction, repair, replacement and removal of cable and wire facilities; Places buried cable using digging and trenching equipment; installs some aerial cable; installs protectors on customer premises; Operates trucks, trenchers, backhoes and other equipment. This position is based at Headquarters in Artesia.

045. Employment Opportunities

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MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575)-622-7710 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

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Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

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Roswell Daily Record

045. Employment Opportunities HELP WANTED call 575-578-4817

LOAN DEPT. CLERK The Bank of the Southwest is currently seeking qualified candidates to work as a Loan Department Clerk. Responsibilities include: Data entry, loan files management and Compliance documentation. This position will also require cross-training to other department job duties.Requirements: High School Diploma, general knowledge of Microsoft Office programs, ten (10) key calculator, telephone, copier/ scanning equipment. Apply in person at the Bank of the Southwest, 226 N Main St, Roswell, NM by 05/09/14. EEO/AA

DIRECT SERVICE Employee - Job Coach

Provide care and employment support for individuals with developmental disabilities. Must pass a background check, possess a HS diploma/GED and a valid NMDL. Salary DOE and training starts $8.50 $9.50 hour. Benefits available for FT.e. Please apply at 1601 2nd Street, Roswell, NM 88201 between 8-5

BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE Associates, Inc is seeking a part-time and full-time independently licensed therapist such as LPCC, LISW, or LMFT. An ideal person has experience working with children, adolescents, and adults. Competitive pay, an excellent benefits package, admin support, and continuing education reimbursement are offered for the full time position. Those interested please forward resume/ CV with 3 references to Provider Recruitment: 1010 North Virginia Ave, Roswell, NM 88201 or email Jacque Tubbs at jtbma.newmexico@ yahoo.com AMERIPRIDE LINEN Requisition#107337 Production Employee

Production employee needed: High School diploma or GED. Must be able to pass drug test. You must apply online. Ameripride.com, click on career opportunities under quick links and follow the steps or any job websites on line. April 28, 2014 to May 6, 2014 Competitive salary and benefits. No phone calls will be accepted. AA/EEO EMPLOYEE M/F/D/V

COMFORT KEEPERS is pursuing experienced caregivers to work in the Roswell, Dexter, Hagerman and Artesia areas. We offer flexible schedules both part time and full time with competitive pay. Stop by our Roswell office at: 1410 South Main to visit with us today or call Kim at 575-624-9999 for more information.

Dennis the Menace

AmeriPride Linen and Apparel REQUISITION# 107336 CSR position Application open from April 28, 2014 to May 27, 2014. High School Diploma/GED, experience with route sales desired, ability to work directly with customers, build relationship with customers by providing resolutions to problems and complaints, clean driving record, ability to lift up to 50 lbs and pass a Department of Transportation drug test and physical. Competitive salary and benefits. Application must be filled out online at careerbuilders.com EOE EMPLOYEE

045. Employment Opportunities

IT HELPDESK Bank of the Southwest is currently seeking qualified candidates for an IT Helpdesk Position. Primary duties to include, but not limited to: provide technical support to customers and employees, perform general hardware maintenance, ability to install and configure software and basic knowledge of computer/networking concepts. Requirements: Must have a good attitude and intermediate computer skills. Must be detailed oriented with excellent time management and people skills. Two years relevant technical experience and a strong troubleshooting ability preferred. Company offers excellent work environment, salary and benefits. Apply in person at the Bank of the Southwest, 226 N Main St, Roswell, NM by 05/09/14. EEO/AA APPRAISER Chaves County is accepting applications for the position of Appraiser in the County Assessor's office. Entry salary range is ($11.54 - $14.36/hr DOQ). Minimum qualifications: HS diploma or GED, two years' experience in real estate appraisals; some course work in the area of statistics, financial math and computer skills; New Mexico Certified Appraiser certificate beneficial. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to, appraisal of property parcels and manufactured homes including field inspection, data collection and entry, review and analysis of values and sales data, manage inquiries concerning property valuation. Applicant must be able to perform mathematical computations to analyze transactions and perform basic statistical analysis, utilize maps, computer software and cost manuals to value properties, interact with the general public professionally, be detailed oriented and work with maximum accuracy. Knowledge of real estate terminology, reading a tape measure to record dimensions of structures and bilingual helpful.

Chaves County is a drug free employer and offers a competitive benefit package consisting of family, life, vision, and dental insurance plus a retirement plan. All applicants for this position will be required to pass a background check and be subject to a post offer, pre-employment drug test. Required application forms are available at the County's Job Posting Board located in the west wing of the County Administrative Center or by accessing the website at www.co.chaves.nm.us. Applications may be returned to the County Manager's Suite #180, Chaves County Administrative Center, #1 St. Mary's Pl, Roswell, NM 88203 or mailed by closing date to Human Resources, PO Box 1817, Roswell, NM 88202-1817. Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m., Wednesday, May 14, 2014. EOE.

PROPOSAL ANNOUNCEMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

THE ROSWELL Daily Record is now accepting applications for the full time position of: OUTSIDE SALES The ideal candidate must possess excellent customer service skills, superior organizational skills and be a self-starter with a strong work ethic. This is a full time position with a great benefit package. Interested applicants please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Angie Love, 2301 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88201 or e-mail to: addirector@rdrnews.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! The Roswell Job Corps Center is currently recruiting for a Career Counselor, salaried, full time with benefits. Minimum qualifications is a Bachelors Degree in Psychology and one year experience working with youth. Other Bachelor degrees will be accepted with a minimum of 15 credit hours in psychology or social work. A valid drivers license is required. Submit a resume and copies of a transcript and credential to gonzalez.mary@ jobcorps.org or fax to 575-347-7491. COI is An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V.

SERVICES

075. Air Conditioning

SWAMP COOLER service & repair, free estimates. 575-910-4581

105. Childcare

CERTIFIED TEACHER with 6yrs. experience in Elementary Education offering childcare and educational learning environment in her home. 575-936-9466

135. Ceramic Tile

CERAMIC TILE Do you need to tile your floor? Here in Roswell, Ben does it for you. From $295 ONLY per room. It includes everything. I also do small plumbing jobs. 505-990-1628 or 575-910-3467 (cell)

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 CLEAN WHOLE house, windows, carpet cleaning, etc. 420-0965 SUNSHINE WINDOW Services. Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458

200. Fencing

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100 M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

Artesia Special Hospital District Expansion Projects. Sealed proposals are to be delivered to Tammie Chavez at 702 North 13th Street, Artesia, NM 88210 for the project described herein no later than 1:00 p.m. MST on Tuesday May 20, 2014, at which time the public opening and reading of proposals received will begin. The sealed proposals must be marked on the outside "SEALED PROPOSAL ENCLOSED". Delivery of the proposal is the sole responsibility of the Proposer. The proposals will be considered by the Hospital following the opening of the proposals. There will be a mandatory pre-bid conference on Tuesday May 6, 2014 at 10:00 MST at the project site. Proposal documents may be obtained from the Architect as a PDF download or as a paper copy. A $300.00 refundable deposit will be required for each paper copy of Proposal Documents. General Contractors are limited to (2) paper copies and Sub-Contractors to (1) paper copy. Downloadable PDFs may be obtained from the following URL: https://swft.exavault.com/share/view/3duo-bla8dehe A valid email address will be required for download. The Owner will comply with In-State Preference Provisions, as set forth in NMSA §134-2(E). The Owner can only accept proposals from contractors who provide proof of registration with the Labor Relations Division of the Workforce Solutions Department. In addition the New Mexico criminal statutes impose felony/penalties for illegal bribes, gratuities and kickbacks. The Artesia Special Hospital District reserves the right to reject any and all proposals and to waive all formalities. Description of Work: Two additions and extensive renovation of existing hospital for expansion of the kitchen, business offices, and ORs. Architect: Condray Design Group, Inc., 1402 Ave N, Lubbock, TX 79401 ph: (806) 748-6190


Roswell Daily Record 220. Furniture Repair WE BUILD and repair furniture. 840-7849 or 626-8466

225. General Construction

Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

www.senaconstruction.com 575-973-1019

230. General Repair HANDYMAN 35 years experience 575-317-2137

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738 RWC. BACKHOE, skid steer, dump truck, bom lift, services. Insured. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Garcia’s Lawn Service, sprinklers & much more at low price. 914-0803. WE WORK Yard & alley cutting, garden rototilling, hauling. Call Will at 317-7402 or 317-2573. LIGHTHOUSE LAWN-SERVICE affordable basic lawn care. No job too big or small, we do it all! Free estimates, call 575-921-5671 Emerald Landscaping Lawn & sprinkler installation, sprinkler repair, sod, gravel, lawn maintenance. Maintenance/Free Estimates/accept credit cards. Lic#89265. Call: Aaron, 575-910-0150 or Chris, 420-3945 Professional Yard care, trees, lawns, bushes. 575-910-4581 or 420-6921

Lawn and Landscape Maintenance One time or recurring service available 575-973-1019 CHAVEZ SPRINKLER CO. COMPLETE LANDSCAPING AND SPRINKLER SYSTEM & REPAIRS, ROCK WORK, TREES, SHRUBS, TRACTOR & DUMP TRUCK WORK. FREE ESTIMATES. CALL HECTOR 420-3167 Landscaping, mowing, trimming, & trees cut down. sprinklers, etc. 420-0965 or 910-2033.

285. Miscellaneous Services

ENJOY 100 percent guaranteed, delivered? to-the-door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 74 percent PLUS 4 FREE Burgers - The Family Value Combo - ONLY $39.99. ORDER Today 1-800-773-3095 Use code 49381JVZ or www.OmahaSteaks.com/ osmb12 INJURED IN AN AUTO ACCIDENT? Call InjuryFone for a free case evaluation. Never a cost to you. Don`t wait, call now, 1-800-725-4104 DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 800-948-7239

310. Painting/ Decorating

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. Call 637-9108. EXTERIOR/INTERIOR, INSURED. Call Hector 575-910-8397. Quality Painting! Affordable prices, Sr. Discounts. Mike 622-0072

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552. CONCRETE, STUCCO, cabinets, floors, painting, drywall, welding. Call Gerry 575-420-3825

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Professional Roofing, Landscaping, Irrigation, Stucco, Tile, Painting, Concrete and Fence Work (575) 973-1019 Lucero roofing quick service, great looking roofs, call me first 575-208-8963 Licensed & Insured RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

Need A Roof?

Call R & R Construction 23 years in Roswell. 622-0072

395. Stucco Plastering

Yard work, clean-ups, lawns. Handyman svc. David 637-9580.

Stucco, Lath, Synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217

RETIRED GUYS will mow, trim & edge yards. Reasonable! Call Charlie & Mike. 910-1358 or 622-7852

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991

285. Miscellaneous Services

POOL TABLE repairs/recovering. Reasonable rates. 575-650-2591 BUNDLE AND SAVE! DIRECTV, INTERNET& PHONE From $69.99/mo. Free 3-Months of HBO, starz, SHOWTIME & CINEMAX FREE GENIE 4-Room Upgrade LOCK IN 2 YR Savings Call 1-800-264-0340 REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!* Get a whole-home Satellite system installed at NO COST and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to new callers, SO CALL NOW 1-800-719-8092 SHARI`S BERRIES - Order Mouthwatering Gifts for any Occasion! SAVE 20 percent on qualifying orders over $29! Fresh Dipped Berries starting at $19.99! Visit www.berries.com/big or Call 1-800-406-5015 DIRECTTV - 2 Year Savings Event! Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS of savings and a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-264-0340 Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-661-3783, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping. DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-315-7043

405. TractorWork

Tractor work Lots mowed, discing, blading, post holes. 347-0142 or 317-7738

ARE YOU in BIG trouble with the IRS? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Seen on CNN. A BBB. Call 1-800-921-5512 REDUCE YOUR Past Tax Bill by as much as 75 Percent. Stop Levies, Liens and Wage Garnishments. Call The Tax DR Now to see if you Qualify 1-800-912-0758

490. Homes For Sale

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185

TREE TRIMMING, topping, and removal. Professional yard care. 910-4581

BY OWNER: N.E. Roswell 3 Bd, 3 Ba. Lrg corner lot. 2 car gar. Lrg fenced back yard. Court yard; sprinkler sys. Living area w/ fireplace, wet bar, dining room; Kitchen w/ breakfast area, water filtration sys. Laundry room; Sun room w/ skylights; ceiling fans; central air & heat; new carpet & tile floors; storage space, walk-in closets; storage shed. Quiet neighborhood; 575-208-0915

Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

FSBO: 2BR/1BA, ref. air, 1005 S. Plains Park, $52,000, no owner finance.

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insuranced. Hector (575) 910-8397

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME; 5 acres with well overlooking the city; pipe fence and nice entry and drive. $59,000 owner financing available. Sun Country Realty 623-4646 or Lynn 626-7506

QUICKCUT TREE service 575-208-8963 best service beat prices, licensed and insured

435. Welding FINANCIAL

485. Business Opportunities

Subject: City of Carlsbad New Phase 1 - Double Eagle Waterline Owner: City of Carlsbad, New Mexico Bid Date: May 7, 2014 @ 11:00 am local time QUOTES DUE BY 8:00 am local time KEAR Civil Corporation is bidding the above project as a prime contractor and is seeking quotes from qualified subcontractors and vendors, including all certified SB, SDB, WOSB, HUBZONE SB, VOSB and SDVOSB firms. Services and materials we are soliciting for include: pipe, precast concrete and aggregate supply, asphalt paving, jack and bore, electrical, and materials testing . KEAR Civil Corporation intends to conduct itself in “Good Faith” with all firms regarding participation on this project. Bid documents are available via www.arigraphix.com, by contacting KEAR Civil Corporation's Chief Estimator Matt Smith via phone at 623-742-2329, via fax at 623-580-1100, via email at estimating@kearcorp.com

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale

FSBO, 3/2/1 Great Condition, lots of features & extras, $91,000. 622-1204

LOTS OF ROOM inside and out! 3 bdrm 2 & 3.4bath; cozy fireplace; beautiful pool; enclosed patio; DOUBLE LOT for your spring planting and many updates. Priced to sell at $182,900. We need an offer. Trade??? Lynn at Sun Country Realty 623-4646 or 626-7506

2808 N. Elm Ave., near Del Norte Elem. & Goddard Highl; Spacious 1605 sqft living space, 3 lrg bdrms, 1 3/4ba, lrg living rm, dining rm & family rm w/gas logs in fireplace, new carpet throughout, appliances, central ht/air (heat pump), 2 car gar., Home on 1 & 1/2 lots, new fences, sprinkler systems front & back, landscaped yards, $112,500. 575-625-9120 READY AND WAITING for you and your family. LIKE NEW remodel from the ground up. Too much to list. Call about 206 W. Berrendo rd 3 bdrm/ 1&3.4 bath on 1 acre lot. $144,900. Sun Country Realty 623-4646 or Lynn 626-7506

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE:

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

409 LA Fonda clean 3br/2ba, 1 car gar., nice house move-in ready $122k no owner financing. Call 626-0259. 5BD/3BA COUNTRY home, over 2600 Sqft. 2 large master bdr, large cover porch, updated kitchen, wood laminate floors, on 6 acres, trees, MH/RV hookup. Owner can finance with $13,000 down. Negotiable 575-973-2353

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

WAKE UP on 5 acres with view of El Capitan and often antelope grazing nearby. Price reduced to sell at only $24,900 and owner financing available.. Sun Country Realty 575-623-4646

410. Tree Service

RWC Lath and Stucco. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

400. Tax Service

CLASSIFIEDS

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

6534 VINEYARD, 88230, south of Roswell, 38 acres, improved acreage, 220 volt electricity, domestic well, workshop, all fenced, $133,000 obo. Call 575-637-4574. NEED ROOM? 1.7 acres zoned commercial in the county; Berrendo water and domestic well. Fenced, $50,000 Sun Country Realty 623-4646 or Lynn 626-7506 NEW ON the market; 3.5 acre level homesite just off the Relief Route and Cactus. $25,000 some covenants. Can be divided. Sun Country Realty 623-4646 or Lynn 626-7506

MORE FOR YOUR DOLLAR; lovely view; elect close; good road; ready for your home. 6.7 acre site in Buena Vida price reduced to only $29,000. Sun Country Realty 575-623-4646

500. Businesses for Sale NEW SELF STORAGE Facility 104 units, 20% full, serious inquiries only. 575-317-0029

Friday, May 2, 2014

520. Lots for Sale

Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352. 2 ADJOINING mobile home lots zoned for doublewides bearing pecan trees at 707 & 709 E. 3rd $12k owner financing with $2k down call Trina Brown at McDaniel Home Solutions 420-8797. 5 ACRE COUNTRY HOME SITES STARTING AT $20,000 Owner Financing w/$1,000 Down (water well lots excluded) No Qualifying, Good Covenants Buena Vida Land Co. 9 miles west of Roswell 575-623-1800

RENTALS

Profitable established business for sale. Low down, e-z term payments. Serious inquiries only. Call 625-5250, lv msg.

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

EXCELLENT COMMERCIAL LOCATION and affordable. Look at 708 East McGaffey for your business location. Owner financing at $27,500. Sun Country Realty 575-623-4646 or Lynn 575-626-7506 QUALITY COMMERCIAL location on South Main. 168 ft frontage. Realtor owned. Call Sun Country Realty 623-4646 or Lynn 626-7506 PRICE REDUCED ON HIGH TRAFFIC frontage on East McGaffey over 30,000 sq ft zoned light industrial for $30,000. Ask about terms. GOOD INVESTMENT; Call Sun Country Realty 623-4646

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 2BD/1BA APARTMENT for rent $595mo. $400 dep Wtr pd, no pets, 1600 S. Union. 575-639-4114

ADJ Vac Lots For Sale $18K EACH 2306&2308 S Union Ave 310-753-8761

3BR/1BA, $750/MO, $500/dep, at the Base, HUD accepted, 420-1352.

XNICE, 1 bdr, appliances, wtr pd, no pets 910-9357 LARGE 3br/2ba, 912 N. Ohio, $850 + $500/dep, no HUD. 317-4307 3/2/1, 703 Adams Dr. close to RHS/shopping, $900/mo, $500/dep, No Pets/Smoking/HUD 575-910-1605. 20 A Bent tree 2bd/2ba 1 car garage w/d hookup, NE Roswell, directly accross from Golf course, rent $750/$700dep. Call Jim for details 575-910-7969

Sunset Apartments 1601 S. Sunset 623-2494 is currently accepting applicants over 62 yrs old. Studio Apts. Utilities included. Rent based on income.

4BR/2.5BA, BRICK, ref. air/ht, fenced front/back yard, fridge & stove, very private,ample parking, avail. May 1st, $1200/mo, $1000/dep. Lease & references required. 575-420-1474

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

1719 W Walnut Remodeled, 3bd/2ba refrigerated air, w/d hookup, wheelchair accessible, no HUD no pets, $1000mo $700dep. 914-5402 311 W. Wildy duplex, 2/2/1 W/D hookup, stove, frig, d/w. No Hud, Pets/Smokers. $700/mo. 317-2059

LOVELY 3BD 2ba, dbl garage at 3015 Alhambra. Furnished, incl. 2 TVs, water and landscaping paid. Call Ranchline Taylor & Taylor Realtors 624-2219 or 420-1978 for details and showing. 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281

FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944.

EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348.

EFF, 1,2 BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262

2403 S. Sunset, Mountain View Apartments, 2br/1ba, carport, laundry rm, utilities pd, no pets/HUD. 910-6161

ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944

PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848.

520. Lots for Sale

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

CONVENIENT LOCATION close to shopping, quiet area. Spacious 2bd/1b, extra storage, water, gas paid. Senior Discount 1114 S. Kentucky $595 910-7076 or 910-0851

540. Apartments Unfurnished

Town Plaza Apartments NO HUD ACCEPTED ALL UTILITIES PAID Friendly managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs & downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735.

540. Apartments Unfurnished

PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN.

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722.

B7

Working in Roswell? Fully-furnished homes, all sizes, bills paid. 30-day minimum stay. $35-$85/day. WiFi, TVs, washer/dryer, BBQ. www.cozycowboy.com. Call anytime! 575-624-3258, 626-4848.

813 W. 4th, xnice 2br/1.5ba, appliances, 1 year lease, $650/mo, $500/dep. 626-5423 1502 N. Pecan Dr., 3br/1ba, $750/dep, $750/mo, extra clean. Call Ernie 420-0744.

REMODELED 2/1/1 duplex, nice location, w/d hookups, $725mo $500dep. 910-0827 2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

CHARMING 2-2 home near Cahoon Pk Hardwoods W/Dryer, carport. $800mo. & gas/elect. 626-6286

1701 S. Stanton, 4br/2ba, 2 living areas, 1 play room. $900 rent + $900 deposit. WC Property Management. 575-317-1605 1003 E. Hendricks, 1br, $325/mo, $150/dep, no pets, you pay bills, 575-578-0971 1BR, utilities included in rent $525/mo, 1621 1/2 W. Summit. 575-444-9558

CITY OF ROSWELL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

POSITION

DEPARTMENT

Air Center Electrician Airport (Current Journeyman Electrician License Required) Air Center Maintainer (CDL License Required)

Airport

SALARY

Hourly Range: $13.1368-$18.0647 (DOQ)

CLOSING DATE

Until Filled

Starting Rate: $10.2930/hr

Until Filled

Animal Control Officer I

Animal Control

Starting Rate: $10.2930/hr

5/05/14

Museum Attendant II (RFT)

Museum

Starting Rate: $8.8915/hr

5/16/14

Highways and Streets

Starting Rate: 10.8077/hr

Until Filled

Pecos Trails

Starting Rate: $9.8513/hr

Until Filled

Emergency Communications Dispatch Laborer II – Streets

Street Maintainer I (CDL License Required)

Dispatch

Highways & Streets

Transit Vehicle Operator (PT) (CDL License Required)

Starting Rate: $13.4422/hr

Starting Rate: $8.4681/hr

5/16/14 Until Filled

TO APPLY: All applicants must submit an application for each job for which they are applying. Failure to submit a complete application packet and all its requirements will invalidate your application. Application and job description(s) for the above position(s) are available on our website at www.roswell-nm.gov. The City of Roswell offers a competitive benefit package which includes medical, life, vision, dental, and retirement! Completed applications must be received in the Human Resources office by 5:00 p.m. of the closing date to be considered. All positions are subject to pre-employment post offer drug testing. The City of Roswell is an EOE/Drug Free Employer

Roswell Daily Record

5 $ 00 8 $

cord Roswell Daily Re S.COM

RDRNEW 575-622-7710 •

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Roswell Daily Re

cord 575-622-7710 • RDRNEWS.COM

GARAGE & YARD SALE KITS To make your sale more successful!

Includes: • 3 Signs • Pricing Stickers + Tax • Yard Sale Tips Includes: • 6 Signs • Pricing Stickers + Tax • Yard Sale Tips


3BD/1.5BA no hud no pets, $900mo $900dep. Txt or call 575-420-1579 4BD/2BA 2CAR gar. fenced yard, 3115 Futura $1400dep. $1400mo. 627-9942

3br/1ba, washer & dryer, washer/dry included, central ht/air, fenced yard, pets allowed, $725/mo, $725/dep. 575-910-3482.

580. Office or Business Places 200 S. Union. Two suites, approximately 1200 sqft and 810 sqft. Great location. Will remodel to suit tenant. Call Jan at 625-2222.

311-313 W. 2nd, 1800 sqft. Call John Grieves, PELR at 575-626-7813.

MAIN ST. storefront, 2200+sqft, $1200/dep, $1200/mo. 627-9942

500 E. 5th, $500/mo, $300/dep. 323-684-4221

595. Misc. for Rent

SELF STORAGE Units $30 a month, any size available. 575-317-0029

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed! Power wheelchair, hospital bed, lift chair, bath transfer bench. 622-7638

Price reduced, 2 axle flatbed trailer, $1700; 3 axle $2100; John Deere lawnmower, near new, $1000; 5 new prehung 36” doors, $240. 575-416-1454 Invacare patient lifter, walker, bruno wheelchair hoist/loader 622-7638.

NORDICTRACK ELIPTICAL Audio Strider 800, space saver w/ifit $275, excellent cond. 575-317-6560

THE TREASURE Chest Sofas, beds & water bed, dinnette set, curio cabinets, Wurlitzer piano (free deilvery), Carnival glass, kitchen island. New Arrivals. Must come see. 1204 W Hobbs 914-1855 Weds-Sat 10-5 NEED FURNITURE Shop Blair’s for the best prices on used furniture, beds, dressers, table & chairs, living room sets, patio sets, bookshelves, appliances, antiques, collectibles, home decor & housewares, saddles, tools, movies, plus lots more. Open daily 9-5, closes Wed. 627-2033 DORM REFRIGERATOR $50 wheelchair $100 Cain $20 walker $65 622-7638 RIDING LAWN Mower $350 Call 626-9871

GE Harmony Profile washer & dryer, touch screens, great cond., works excellent, $600. Serious inquiries only, 910-6436 or 420-0622. KIMBELL CONSOLE Piano $850. Call 317-4554 NICE CHESTER doors painted white . Call 622-3843

SOFA/LOVE SEAT with double recliners, $400. 575-624-8574

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

ESTATE SETTLEMENT Never throw ANYTHING away before calling us! Our services include Auctions (our facility or yours), Tagged Estate Sales, Complete/Partial Buy-Outs & Real Estate Auctions, Firearms, Jewelry & Collectibles. Prompt removal of entire households and property cleanouts. Whether you need to sell a few items or an entire estate check with us and we will do our best to beat any offer you receive. Call today to find out how our experience can help you get more $$. Wild West Auctions, LLC 623-7355 or 840-8401

LAYING HENS. Will pay $5 for young pullet. Any strain. 623-9952

630. Auction Sales

ADVERTISE YOUR AUCTION in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper for more details. Or log onto www.nmpress.org for a list of participating newspapers.

635. Good things to Eat FARM FRESH eggs free range $2.50 dz. 624-0898

790. Autos for Sale

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

745. Pets for Sale

2003 JAGUAR, $4000, OBO, 505-800-3568

Tired of the Hassle In Trading Or Selling Your Car or Truck? Economy Motors Will Either Purchase Your Vehicle Or Consign It For Sale At No Cost To You!! Call Or Come By For Details. Economy Motors 2506 N. Main Roswell, NM 88201 625-2440 •18 Years In Business •Family Owned & Operated •Licensed, Bonded & Insured 2001 TOYOTA Avalon, white, leather seats, sun roof, $5000 OBO 575-654-4747

10

FRESH VEGGIES & eggs, enchanted attic open 10-4, Weds & Sat. Catch & release fishing, $3 per pole, 1804 E. College. 623-9304

METAL ROOFING, hail damage, R panel, med. blue, light green. 802-3114

1998 Lincoln MK 8 $

REG. OLDE English Bulldog pups, 2M, 3F, $1000 each. 575-910-0111

$

RECREATIONAL 765. Guns & Ammunition

TAURUS PT92, 9mm, combat, matte SS, ammo, extras, $650. Cobra 380 semi-auto, ammo, $170. 575-840-8001

775. Motorcycles & Scooters 2005 HARLEY Fatboy $11000 OBO Exc. Cond. 575-748-5112

03 SUZUKY Bergman 400 low milage reduced price $2500 Call 910-0042 1981 SUZUKI GS 850G, 36k miles, just painted orange, has wind screen & saddle bags, good looking & great running bike, asking $1200 obo. Call Gabe at 575-626-7993.

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com 00162020WINNEBAGO ITASCA 27RC Class A Motor Home, 29,054 miles, NEW condition, 1992 model, 454 Chevy chassis, Michelin tires, completely loaded with generator, roof air, awnings, power steps, hydraulic self-leveling jacks, power step, towing package, air-ride bags, rear/side view cameras, LED TV and DVD player, small inverter for 110V appliances. NEver been stored outside, interior and exterior is like new. Factory plastic still cover the carpet interior floorin. Call 626-6723 $12,500 cash. Stored at 1700 SE Main Street 2013 37FT Monte Carlo 5th wheel, 3 slide, self contained, 2 A/C, washer/dryer many extras will delivered. $31,900 OBO 505-710-0878

‘96 DODGE Ram 1500, 2WD, 184k miles, good condition, $2800. 910-2900

815. Wanted to Buy Autos

WANTED: INEXPENSIVE car or truck for daughter please call 420-5727

#18726

#18500

4,900

2008 Chevy Cobalt

#18861

2006 Chevy Monte Carlo

#18923

$

8,900 2003 Chevy Tahoe

#18960

2006 Ford F-150 Super Cab

#18902

$

$

8,900

9,900

2006 GMC 2500 Ext. Cab $

#18823

9,900

2008 Ford Mustang Conv. $

$

#18968

9,900

2003 GMC Sierra a 1500 Ext. Cab

#18969

9,900

2003 Lincoln Navigator $

#18975

9,900

Se habla espanol

Roswell Daily Record

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

8,900

CHOTTIES (SCOTTISH Terrier & Chihuahua), 6wks old, 4M, $150 each, 575-910-8311. KITTENS $5 each, 2 months old, litter box trained. 575-623-5255

2008 FORD F150, ext cab, heavy duty 4x4, tow package, only 88k miles, $13,850. 420-1352

3,900

$

3 FULL blooded German Shepherds, males. 575-416-0854

‘97 DODGE Dakota pickup, standard, excellent cond., long bed w/bed cover, $3950, owner financing w/$1500 down, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy. 420-1352

,0 0

1995 Mercedes Diesel ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

UNDE 0 d e s U rs Ca

FROZEN GREEN Chile, dried red chile & chile powder, local pinto beans, peanuts & pecan, ristras, jams & jellies, fountain drinks, fresh eggs, Alfalfa Hay, Wheat, Sudan & Oat hay, small & large bales, we accept credit cards & EBT. GRAVES FARM 622-1889

700. Building Materials

790. Autos for Sale

$

OFFICE SPACE available, 400 E. College. 575-622-8500 or 420-9970

TOP DOLLAR Paid for furniture, collectibles, appliances, antiques, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We pay cash with same day removal of all items. Compete/partial households & personal estates welcome. 623-0136 or 910-6031

TRANSPORTATION

R

FOR LEASE, space in Sunwest Centre Office Complex at 500 N. Main St. Various size spaces. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. High floor space available for larger tenants. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 575-623-1652 or mobile 575-420-2546

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

0

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

CLASSIFIEDS

1

B8 Friday, May 2, 2014

Prices do not include tax, registration and dealer service transfer fee. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Pictures are for illustrative purposes only and may not represent the actual vehicles. Not responsible for typographical errors.

821 N. MAIN ST. OPEN: MON. - FRI. 8AM - 7PM, SAT. 8AM - 5PM TOLL-FREE: 877-624-3673 SERVICE DEPT: 623-1031

www.roswellford.com

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


05 02 14 Roswell Daily Record