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Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 123, No. 85 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

April 8, 2014

www.rdrnews.com

TUESDAY

City hires new planning director; still no attorney JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

The city has hired a familiar face to take the helm of its planning department beginning next month. But, four key positions will be left open and may be difficult to fill. Marlin Johnson, former Chaves County director of planning and zoning, will boomerang back to Roswell to become the city’s planning and support services director beginning May 1.

“I think his background and experience are well suited for the program,” said City Manager Larry Fry. “I think Marlin has a lot of experience that will be useful for the city, when you look at what he’s done.” The city received 21 applications for the planning position after former director Michael Vickers left Jan. 17 to take a position for a private contracting firm in Lubbock. Johnson left Chaves

County last year. In August of last year, he started work as the city planner for Scottsbluff, Neb., where he was earning $58,000. While in Scottsbluff, his time was split between that city and the city of Alliance. He also worked on the region’s effort to promote an expressway as part of a Ports to Plains Highway effort. Johnson started work in Pennington County, S.D., as an environmental technician, then served as the

Wheatland and Platte County planning director before moving to Chaves County, according to an article in the Star Herald. Since leaving Chaves County, Johnson has spent time in Nebraska and California, Fry said. The city advertised a salary range for the position from $48,601 to $62,029. The director’s duties will include a variety of community development matters, including municipal

AP Photo

This March 26, 2014, file photo shows House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio speaking during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Capping a three-month struggle, the Senate closed in Monday on passage of election-year legislation to restore jobless benefits for the long-term unemployed that expired late last year.

Senate OKs bill to restore jobless benefits WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate voted 59-38 Monday to resurrect federal jobless benefits for the long-ter m unemployed, and a small band of

Republican supporters swiftly appealed to a reluctant Speaker John Boehner to permit election-year action in the House as well.

Steps are needed “to restore unemployment benefits to struggling Americans,” seven House Republicans wrote Boehner and Majority Leader

Eric Cantor of Virginia. They released their letter as the Senate was bestowing its widely expected See SENATE, Page A3

property and grant administration, code enforcement, demographic considerations, economics, traffic, public safety and other community needs. The turnaround time to fill the planning director’s chair was speedy in comparison to other positions. The city has been less successful in finding a city attorney, for instance. Councilors decided in October to stop contracting with outside attorney Barbara Patterson and hire in-

house counsel. Since then, the city formally advertised twice and will launch a third attempt in the next few days. The city received three applications. Patterson was one of the applicants. In the interim, the city contracted to pay Patterson $12,784 a month, plus incidentals. Her contract initially ended Dec. 31 but was extended periodically. That extension ended

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — As hundreds of people packed Albuquerque City Hall to voice their concerns Monday, the U.S. Department of Justice says it’s ready to release its findings from a civil investigation into the city’s embattled police department. The agency has been investigating Albuquerque police for more than a year, looking into complaints of civil rights violations and allegations of excessive use of force. The findings will be released Thursday. On Monday night, the City Council cleared the agenda to hear from the public. Some drew cheers when they said the protests over police force would grow louder until changes are made. Others said Albuquerque has become an embarrassment. Demonstrators have flooded the streets in recent weeks in protest of the police department’s use of force, including the shooting of homeless camper James Boyd in the Albuquerque foothills following

a long standoff with officers. City Council President Ken Sanchez said more police of ficers will be assigned to Monday’s meeting to prepare for the crowds. If any safety issues arise, Sanchez said he will adjourn the meeting early. Sanchez and other council members are weighing future legislation to address police oversight and whether the council should have authority over hiring the police chief or creating a commission that would oversee daily operations within the department. “We need to make some dramatic changes,” Sanchez told the Albuquerque Journal. “We’re confronting a crisis situation at this time.” Councilman Brad Winter said he wants to hear from the public. “I think a lot of the councilors are frustrated, and I think every one of them is really looking at what they can do to fix the problem,” he said.

DOJ to release findings of APD review Thursday

See CITY, Page A3

Berrendo students to Supreme Court rejects appeal in gay bias case throw out the first pitches for Isotopes

A couple of Roswell children will receive a special honor from the Albuquerque Isotopes on Friday.

Kendal Sanders, 13, and Nathaniel Tavarez, 12, will throw out the ceremonial first pitches at the beginning of the season opener as the Isotopes host the Tacoma Rainiers to launch its 2014 season. Both Sanders and Tavarez were wounded ear-

lier this year when another student opened fire at Berrendo Middle School. They are both now home and recovering from their injuries with hope of coming back to school in the fall. The children will be greeted on the field by Hall of Fame Manager Tommy Lasorda and Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry, who

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court rejected an appeal Monday from a studio that refused to photograph a lesbian couple’s commitment ceremony, letting stand a New Mexico high court ruling that helped spur a national debate over gay rights and religious freedom.

The justices left in place a unanimous state Supreme Court ruling last year that said Elane Photography violated New Mexico’s Human Rights Act by refusing to photograph the same-sex ceremony “in the same way as if it had refused to photograph a wedding between people of different races.” Elane Photography co-owner Elaine Huguenin said taking the photos for Vanessa Willock and her partner would violate her religious

beliefs. She said she also has a right of artistic expression under the First Amendment that allows her to choose what pictures to take, or refrain from taking. She was ordered to pay more than $7,000 in attorneys’ fees, which Willock waived. The case has been cited as lawmakers in other states have proposed legislation exempting people from such lawsuits if doing business with same-sex couples violates their religious beliefs. Arizona passed such a law this year, but Republican Gov. Jan Brewer vetoed it under pressure and blistering criticism from major corporations and political leaders from both parties. Similar religious-protection legislation has also been introduced

around the country. And eight states, Alabama, Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, Montana, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Virginia, had asked the high court to hear the case so lawmakers would have guidance in considering such measures.

Russell Moore, president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, said “at issue is the fundamental question of whether the state can pretend to be a god over the conscience.”

The American Civil Liberties Union countered that regardless of personal beliefs, “every business has to play by the same rules to protect customers from discrimination in the marketplace.”

Major survey confirms gains in health insurance sign-ups

WASHINGTON (AP) — A growing share of Americans got health insurance as sign-up season for President Barack Obama’s health care law came to a close last month, a major survey released Monday has found. The Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index provides independent validation for White House claims that the law is expanding access, particularly for working people with no coverage on the job. But the improvement, while

See ISOTOPES, Page A3

substantial, doesn’t appear as large as some of the numbers claimed by the law’s supporters.

Gallup found that the share of adults without health insurance shrank from 17.1 percent at the end of last year to 15.6 percent for the first three months of 2014.

The decline of 1.5 percentage points would translate roughly to more than 3.5 million people gaining coverage. The trend accelerated as the March 31 enrollment deadline

HIGH 77 LOW 46

TODAY’S FORECAST

loomed.

“The Affordable Care Act, commonly referred to as ‘Obamacare,’ appears to be accomplishing its goal of increasing the percentage of Americans with health insurance,” said Gallup’s analysis of the findings.

The survey is important because it combines the quick turnaround of media polls with extensive outreach usually seen in government research. Gallup interviewed more than 43,500 adults, or more than 40 times the number • MARIE COLEY ATKINSON MIDDLETON • DeNio, Steve E.

in a typical national media poll.

Coming a week after the close of the health care law’s first enrollment season, Gallup’s numbers suggest a more modest impact on coverage than statistics cited by the Obama administration. The administration says more than 7 million have signed up for subsidized private plans through new insurance markets. Additionally, 3 million previously uninsured people gained coverage through the law’s

TODAY’S OBITUARIES PAGE A6

Medicaid expansion.

Millions more remain potentially eligible for marketplace coverage under various extensions issued by the administration. White House senior adviser Dan Pfeiffer said this weekend on CBS that 200,000 people who had started applications but weren’t able to finish by the deadline got signed up later in the week. However, the administration’s numbers are not comparable with Gallup’s.

CLASSIFIEDS ..........B6 COMICS .................B5 ENTERTAINMENT .....A8 FINANCIAL ..............B4

INDEX GENERAL ...............A2

HOROSCOPES .........B6 LOTTERIES .............A2

OPINION .................A4

SPORTS .................B1

WEATHER ..............A8


A2 Tuesday, April 8, 2014

GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Army: Fort Hood Police arrest man for failure suspect Lopez had to register as sex offender requested leave The Roswell Police Department responded to 36 incident reports over the weekend. The incidents included, but were not limited to burglary, embezzlement, and shoplifting, and 24 individuals were arrested. Some of the charges included battery, probation violation, and eluding. Multiple accidents also occurred; no major injuries were reported. Roswell Police arrested a man on charges of eluding an officer and failure to register as a sex offender on Sunday. While on patrol on Sunday, a Roswell of ficer observed a man, known to be wanted by the police, driving a vehicle on the 600 block of South Union. The officer attempted to conduct a traffic stop, but the man, identified as Rudy Carrasco, 37, attempted to elude the officer. Carrasco was later found in a house on the 600 block of South Union hiding in a pile of dirty

laundry. Subsequently, Carrasco was arrested and taken to the Chaves County Detention Center. Carrasco was charged with eluding, as well as failure to pay child support and failure to register as a sex offender, according to police.

Woman fails to return rental car

One incident report filed over the weekend involves embezzlement of a vehicle. A woman rented a vehicle from a vehicle rental company and failed to return it. She may be facing embezzlement charges. Another report filed stated as a woman was pulling weeds from her property she found a man’s bank card. The found property was locat-

STATE BRIEFS

NM handles jobless claims faster, calls longer

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The state agency that handles New Mexicans’ claims for unemployment claims is processing claims faster but taking longer to help people calling on the phone. A Legislative Finance Committee report card says the Department of Workforce Solutions issued determinations for 76 percent of eligible claims within 21 days during the last three months of 2013. The Albuquerque Journal reports that’s up from 55 percent in the previous three months. Meanwhile it took an average of 68 minutes for a caller to complete a transaction with the department’s call center during October, November and December. That’s up from 44.5 minutes in the previous three months. The department cites calls related to the partial federal government shutdown, seasonable agricultural workers and the end of extended federal jobless benefits on Dec. 31.

Think tank ranks New Mexico tax burden 37th

SANTA FE (AP) — A national report ranks New Mexico 37th in the country for combined state and local taxes paid by its residents. The conservative-leaning Tax Foundation said in a study released last week that New Mexicans paid 8.6 percent of their per -capita income in taxes to state and local governments in the 2011 fiscal year. That’s lower than the national average of 9.8 percent. The tax burden of New Mexicans has been dropping — from 8.7 per-

ed on the 1600 block of West McGaffey Street.

Shoplifters steal steaks

A shoplifting occurred at a local grocery store on the 800 block of West Hobbs Street. The perpetrators stole approximately $60 worth of steaks. For additional information regarding the incidents mentioned, as well as other incidents, arrests, and accidents, visit the website roswellpolice.com and click the “P2C� link.

Combined force stops 27 DWI drivers

Officers from the New Mexico State Police, Roswell Police Department, Chaves County Sheriffs Office, Depart-

cent in 2010, 8.8 percent in 2009 and 9.4 percent in 2008. New Mexico ranked 40th in 2010. New York had the highest tax burden at 12.6 percent and Wyoming was the lowest at 6.9 percent. The study measures taxes paid by individuals and businesses in their home states and directly or indirectly in other states.

Audit cites deficiencies in New Mexico labs

SANTA FE (AP) — A new federal audit has found Los Alamos and Sandia national laboratories failed to monitor nuclear weapons designs as well as the reliability of parts being used to build them, the Albuquerque Journal reported Sunday. The U.S. Department of Energy Inspector General’s report states both sites could not consistently locate drawings for nuclear weapons and components in official repositories, according to the Journal. In the March 26 report, officials said they were concer ned about incorrect parts being used for nuclear weapons. Without safeguard and proper information, the National Nuclear Security Administration “loses confidence in its nuclear weapons stockpile,� officials said. A NNSA spokesman declined comment when reached by the Journal on Friday. But the agency previously said in a written response that it wasn’t disputing any findings and is agreeing to the report’s recommendations. The report cites several examples including when 11 nuclear warheads damaged during production were sent

ment of Public Safety Special Investigations Division and District Attorney’s Office conducted a two-night criminal impact operation Friday and Saturday nights. The operation focused on saturating areas of the city that have been plagued by crimes in recent months. The combined effort of all participating law enforcement agencies resulted in the arrests of 27 people (six of which were arrested for Driving While Intoxicated) and recovery of one stolen vehicle. Due to the success of this operation, more will be planned in the future in hopes of improving quality of life for the citizens of Roswell and Chaves County. Anyone with information regarding these or any other crimes is urged to contact the Roswell Police Department at 624-6770 or Crime Stoppers at 1888-594-8477.

to the Navy in 2010 and had to be returned.

Albuquerque to collect items for homeless students

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Albuquerque officials are setting out to help students living in the city without a home. Various city and county officials will announce a first-ever drive geared toward homeless students Thursday morning at a news conference at Albuquerque Ambulance. Albuquerque Fire Department spokeswoman Melissa Romero says city and county public safety agencies are asking for donations for students through a “Sirens for Homeless Students� drive.

Contamination found in northwestern NM rivers

FARMINGTON (AP) — Bacteria from human waste may be entering several northwestern New Mexico rivers from septic systems or illegal dumping, according to unexpected preliminary results from an environmental group’s testing. The San Juan Watershed Group collected the samples in 2013 in the Animas, La Plata and San Juan rivers in Colorado and in New Mexico, the Daily Times reported. Tests for E. coli in water in Colorado met state standards, but tests conducted at New Mexico sites in the Farmington area were positive for human bacteria found in feces. Watershed group coordinator David Tomko said that indicates contamination is occurring downstream in New Mexico.

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FORT HOOD, Texas (AP) — Army investigators on Monday released a more detailed timeline of last week’s fatal shootings at Fort Hood, describing an eight-minute rampage in which the suspect fired 35 shots over an area spanning the equivalent of two city blocks. Three people were killed and 16 others wounded in the shooting spree before the suspect, Spc. Ivan Lopez, killed himself, authorities said. During a news conference Monday, Ar my spokesman Chris Grey said the shootings at the Texas post followed an argument related to Lopez’s request for taking leave, but he didn’t indicate whether it was granted or describe circumstances behind the request. A spokesman for Lopez’s family said last week that Lopez was upset he was granted only a 24-hour leave to attend his mother’s funeral in November. That leave was then extended to two days. The shooting spree Wednesday ended when Lopez killed himself with his .45-caliber pistol after confronting a female military police officer, who Grey said fired once at Lopez but didn’t strike him. Providing the most detail yet about the second mass shooting at Fort Hood in five years, Grey mapped out how Lopez opened fire in the building where the argument began before leaving and driving away, shooting at times from his car. The three who died were gunned down in separate locations.

SENIOR CIRCLE TO CELEBRATE ANNIVERSARY

Senior Circle members will celebrate the 15th anniversary of Senior Circle at 3 p.m. on Wednesday. The Senior Circle will hold its monthly birthday party on Wednesday and Senior Circle volunteers are especially encouraged to attend as it will be National Volunteer Week and a special recognition is planned. There will be refreshments and door prizes and a special prize for the winner of the newsletter's “Where Is This?� contest. The Senior Circle is located at Wilshire Center, 2801 N. Main St., next door to Family Dollar. Senior Circle is a resource of Eastern New Mexico Medical Center. For more information, call 623-2311.

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Grey said Lopez first killed one soldier and wounded 10 others in the first building — the dead being one of the men Lopez had argued with moments earlier. Lopez then drove to a motor pool area where the Army truck driver was assigned and worked, killing another, Grey said. The last place Lopez entered was a block away at a medical building, Grey said, walking inside and killing a soldier behind the desk. “At this point we do not know why he entered that building, and we may never know why,� Grey said. In all, investigators say Lopez fired more than 35 shots. Authorities said 11 of 16 injured have returned to duty. Three soldiers who remain at nearby Scott & White Hospital, where the most critically injured were taken, were listed in fair condition Monday. President Barack Obama is scheduled to attend a memorial service Wednesday at Fort Hood. Authorities said transportation arrangements for the three dead are being finalized for their funerals. In another attack at the base in 2009, 13 people were killed by Army psychiatrist Nidal Hasan, who had said he was angry about being deployed to Afghanistan and wanted to protect Islamic and Taliban leaders from U.S. troops. Lopez did a short stint in Iraq in 2011 and told medical personnel he had suffered a traumatic brain injury.

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GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

City

Continued from Page A1

March 31 and was not renewed, Fry said. Patterson has also withdrawn her application, he said. “We’re still working on that at this point,” Fry said. “Meanwhile, we don’t have a city attorney in place.” The city would like to continue working with Patterson but needs to ensure all procurement requirements are met with the contract, Fry said. The two applicants are still in the running, but the city would like to search for more candidates, Fry said. The city received feedback from the community that it may not have advertised widely enough for the position. “We want to make sure we have the widest pool of candidates to draw from,” Fry said. “Those two are still being considered. I would have hoped we would have gotten more applicants initially. It is what it is. But we continue to work within the process to obtain the best candidate we can.” The job posting lists the salary range for the position at $75,397-$96,227. The city is also in the process of trying to find directors for Public Works and Parks and Recreation. Applicants for the Public Works department are being interviewed, Fry said.

Isotopes

Continued from Page A1

will be in attendance for the ceremonies. The Albuquerque Isotopes is a Triple-A affiliate of the Los Angeles Dodgers. Albuquerque Isotopes General Manager John Traub said the students’ presence at the event will

The city continues to struggle to fill the top spot for Parks and Recreation. “That’s been quite a process,” Fry said. “We’ve had that position vacant for over a year now. We’ve offered it to three different applicants during that time. We have another applicant coming soon. Human Resources is making the arrangements. We’ve done a telephone interview and trying to set up a visit.” City Human Resources Director Sheila Nunez was out of the of fice and unavailable Monday to answer specific questions about the staff openings. In a related matter, Nunez has submitted her resignation. “We’ve opened (Nunez’s) position and are accepting applications at this point,” Fry said. “Certainly, human resources is an important role for us.” Councilors will hear a full briefing on the new hire and other staff openings during their regular meeting Thursday night. “We’ve got to do something different,” said Mayor Dennis Kintigh. “It’s a huge issue, and very important. I want to do it with the whole council, so the whole council will hear from Larry and we can have a discussion in public.” make this year’s home opener even more meaningful. “Every Home Opener is special,” T raub said. “But having Kendal and Nathaniel here will be especially moving for our fans. “We are thrilled that their recoveries are coming along and that we can be a small part of their healing process.”

Senate

Continued from Page A1

approval on the legislation. Despite the appeal, the bill’s prospects are cloudy at best, given widespread opposition among conservative lawmakers and outside groups and Boehner’s unwillingness to allow it to the floor without changes that Republicans say would enhance job creation. The Senate vote itself, seven months before congressional elections, capped a bruising threemonth struggle. Fifty-one Democrats, two independents and six Republicans voted for approval. The bill was the first major piece of legislation that Democrats sent to the floor of the Senate when Congress convened early in the year, the linchpin of a broader campaign-season agenda meant to showcase concern for men and women who are doing poorly in an era of economic disparity between rich and

poor. In the months since, the Democrats have alter nately pummeled Republicans for holding up passage and made concessions in an effort to gain support from enough GOP lawmakers to overcome a filibuster. Chief among those concessions was an agreement to pay the $9.6 billion cost of the fivemonth bill by making offsetting spending cuts elsewhere in the budget. The White Housebacked measure would retroactively restore benefits that were cut off in late December, and maintain them through the end of May. Officials say as many as 2.3 million jobless workers have been denied assistance since the law expired late last year. If renewed, the aid would total about $256 weekly, and in most cases go to men and women who have been of f the job for longer than six months.

Happy 42nd Anniversary

Sub hunts for source of ‘pings’ in plane search

The chief coordinator of the Joint Agency Coordination Center, retired Chief Air Marshall Angus Houston, shows a map to the media during a press conference about the ongoing search operations for wreckage and debris of missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in Perth, Australia, Monday.

PERTH, Australia (AP) — Search crews were for the first time sending a sub deep into the Indian Ocean to try and deter mine whether faint sounds detected by equipment on board an Australian ship are from the missing Malaysia Airlines plane’s black boxes, Australia’s acting prime minister said Tuesday. Warren T russ, Australia’s acting prime minister while Tony Abbott is overseas, said the crew on board the Ocean Shield will launch the underwater vehicle, the Bluefin 21 autonomous sub, on Tuesday. The unmanned miniature sub can create a sonar map of the area to chart any debris on the sea floor. If it maps out a debris field, the crew will replace the sonar system with a camera unit to photograph any wreckage. Angus Houston, who is heading the search, said Monday that the Ocean Shield, which is towing

sophisticated U.S. Navy listening equipment, detected late Saturday and early Sunday two distinct, long-lasting sounds underwater that are consistent with the pings from an aircraft’s “black boxes” — the flight data and cockpit voice recorders. Houston dubbed the find “a most promising lead” in the monthlong hunt for clues to the plane’s fate, but warned it could take days to determine whether the sounds were connected to Flight 370. Crews have been trying to re-locate the sounds since Sunday, but have thus far had no luck, Truss said. “Today is another critical day as we try and reconnect with the signals that perhaps have been emanating from the black box flight recorder of the MH370,” he said. “The connections two days ago were obviously a time of great hope that there had been a significant break-

through and it was disappointing that we were unable to repeat that experience yesterday.” T russ said the crew would use the sub Tuesday to examine the water in the search area in the hopes of another breakthrough. Finding the black boxes is key to unraveling what happened to Flight 370, because they contain flight data and cockpit voice recordings that could explain why the plane veered so far off-course during its flight from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to Beijing on March 8. But time was running out to find the devices, whose locator beacons have a battery life of about a month. Tuesday marks exactly one month since the plane vanished. “Everyone’s anxious about the life of the batteries on the black box flight recorders,” T russ said. “Sometimes they go on for many, many weeks longer

than they’re mandated to operate for — we hope that’ll be the case in this instance. But clearly there is an aura of urgency about the investigation.” The first sound picked up by the equipment on board the Ocean Shield lasted two hours and 20 minutes before it was lost, Houston said. The ship then turned around and picked up a signal again — this time recording two distinct “pinger returns” that lasted 13 minutes. “Significantly, this would be consistent with transmissions from both the flight data recorder and the cockpit voice recorder,” Houston said. The black boxes normally emit a frequency of 37.5 kilohertz, and the signals picked up by the Ocean Shield were both 33.3 kilohertz, U.S. Navy Capt. Mark Matthews said. But the manufacturer indicated the frequency of black boxes can drift in older equipment.

End of Windows XP support spells trouble for some

NEW YORK (AP) — Microsoft will end support for the persistently popular Windows XP on Tuesday, and the move could put everything from the operations of heavy industry to the identities of everyday people in danger. An estimated 30 percent of computers being used by businesses and consumers around the world are still running the 12-year-old operating system. “What once was considered lowhanging fruit by hackers now has a big neon bull’s eye on it,” says Patrick Thomas, a security consultant at the San Jose, Calif.-based firm Neohapsis. Microsoft has released a handful of Windows operating systems since 2001, but XP’s popularity and the durability of the computers it was installed on kept it around longer than expected. Analysts say that if a PC is more than five years old, chances are

Nicole McWilliams Agent/Owner

it’s running XP. While users can still run XP after Tuesday, Microsoft says it will no longer provide security updates, issue fixes to non-security related problems or offer online technical content updates. The company is discontinuing XP to focus on maintaining its newer operating systems, the core programs that run personal computers. The Redmond, Wash.-based company says it will provide anti-malwarerelated updates through July 14, 2015, but warns that the tweaks could be of limited help on an outdated operating system. Most industry experts say they recognize that the time for Microsoft to end support for such a dated system has come, but the move poses both security and operational risks for the remaining users. In addition to home

computers, XP is used to run everything from water treatment facilities and power plants to small businesses like doctor’s offices. Thomas says XP appealed to a wide variety of people and businesses that saw it as a reliable workhorse and many chose to stick with it instead of upgrading to Windows Vista, Windows 7 or 8.

Thomas notes that companies generally resist change because they don’t like risk. As a result, businesses most likely to still be using XP include banks and financial services companies, along with health care providers. He also pointed to schools from the university level down, saying that they often don’t have enough money to fund equipment upgrades.

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Grisham and gridlock A4 Tuesday, April 8, 2014

This could be the worst time in all its history to be a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. More than half of the House’s time is spent – wasted – not on the substance of issues but on wrangling about procedural matters, said Democratic Congresswoman Michelle Lujan Grisham, speaking last week to a hometown audience of supporters. Very little real work is getting done, and summer recess is coming up soon. Like every other member of the U.S. House, Grisham will be home this summer campaigning for re-election – as will New Mexico’s other members of the U.S. House of Representatives, Democrat Ben Ray Lujan and Republican Steve Pearce. The Washington pundits have ranked all of

OPINION

MERILEE

DANNEMANN

TRIPLE SPACED

New Mexico’s districts as safe seats with the incumbents highly favored to win re-election. But Grisham takes nothing for granted. Because of national interest in our gover nor’s race, she’s assuming the state will be bombarded with big national Republican money. Calling Grisham a bundle of energy is probably cliché by now. It’s an apt description for a woman who is short, bouncy and so energetic she could be speak-

Roswell Daily Record

ing from a trampoline. I can imagine her striding down hallways in the Capitol and cornering adversarial members twice her size. She explains the term “regular order.” It means the normal rules of procedure under which bills are supposed to be debated and voted upon. The House is not doing anything under regular order these days, she says. All bills are processed under special orders. Only Republican bills get to the floor for a vote, and once they reach the floor, no amendments are allowed. There is no debate. No debate means Republicans can’t debate their colleagues’ bills either. They have to be in lock step all the time, which means individual thought is stifled, or – just as sinister – that amend-

ments have to be worked out by private, back-room deal making. Americans have spent a century fighting for open debate of legislation, but the old smoke-filled rooms are back. Grisham describes the latest shenanigan, a vote held a few days ago. With almost no warning and very few members on the floor, the speaker suspended the rules, called for an immediate voice vote and pronounced the bill passed. That was how the House passed the so-called “Doc Fix.” Every year this postpones the effect of a law that would make drastic cuts in doctors’ reimbursements under Medicare. It’s what Congress does because it can’t agree on a permanent solution. It’s done by a trick because it couldn’t be passed by regular order.

Grisham points to two sources for optimism. The first is women members of the House. She says the female members of both parties got together and worked out a compromise to end the recent federal government shutdown. The second reason for optimism is her fellow Congressional freshmen. Grisham says the newest members are frustrated with the stalemate, meeting together and finding common ground. She expects several bipartisan jobs bills to be rolled out later this year. I hope she’s right. Right now America is ungovernable. That is unfathomably scary. It’s been said recently that you can’t expect Congress to get anything done in an election year.

See DANNEMANN, Page A5

EDITORIAL

CEO leaves big questions

about GM unanswered

Mary Barra’s reception this week before Congress was a lot chillier than during the General Motors CEO’s previous visit to Capitol Hill.

In January, Ms. Barra was a guest of first lady Michelle Obama at the president’s State of the Union address. The president hailed “the daughter of a steelworker” for rising to become the first female CEO of a major automaker.

The steelworker’s daughter didn’t get the same love during her appearances this week before the House energy and commerce subcommittee on oversight and investigations, followed by the Senate subcommittee on consumer protection.

That’s because of recent disquieting revelations that GM for years knowingly installed a defective ignition switch in its Chevrolet Cobalt, Pontiac Solstice and Saturn Ion models that is linked to 31 crashes and 13 fatalities, and have led to a belated recall of 2.6 million cars.

Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., a former prosecutor, accused the nation’s largest automaker of “a culture of coverup.” Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., a former state attorney general, told Ms. Barra, “I don’t see this as anything but criminal.”

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., also a for mer state attor ney general, took umbrage at GM’s recall notice, which advised Cobalt owners that their vehicles “are safe to drive as long as they remove extra items on their key chains.”

Ms. Barra, who has held GM’s top job only since December, repeatedly told lawmakers that she is boss of the “new GM.”

It is a different company, she suggested, than the old GM, which knew about the deadly defective part in its cars all the way back in 2001, which could have replaced the defective part for no more $5 per recalled car, which chose not to do so for reasons not entirely clear and which kept the information hush-hush until this year.

Ms. Barra was asked if her predecessor as CEO, Dan Akerson, knew that the company had installed a defective part that caused cars to shut down unexpectedly and kept their airbags from deploying. “Not to my knowledge,” she told lawmakers.

She also claimed ignorance that GM secretly changed the part in 2006 to fix the ignition switch problem without also changing the part number (making it appear the part had not changed).

And she told lawmakers that neither she nor other senior executives at GM (that she knew of) were aware until recently that their company settled a civil lawsuit last year in which a lead switch engineer swore in a court deposition that he knew of no changes in the part.

The question we’d like to see answered is whether GM knew about its defective ignition switch — and the financial liability it represented — when the automaker went through bankruptcy in 2009, a process that shielded it from legal liability for prebankruptcy transgressions.

We’d also like to know if GM execs knew about the issue with its defective ignition switch — and covered it up from federal regulators — when it petitioned the Obama administration for a taxpayer bailout.

That the taxpayers lost $10 billion on the $50 billion “investment” the president made in GM was bad enough. If it amounted to a reward for corporate malfeasance that led to the deaths of at least 13 victims, it is an outrage for which those who played a knowing role should face criminal charges. REPRINTED FROM THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

Former lobbyist guts campaign finance reform JON CONASON CREATORS SYNDICATE

For a large and bipartisan majority of Americans, the increasing power of money in politics is deeply troubling. But not for the conservative majority of the United States Supreme Court, whose members appear to regard the dollar’s domination of democracy as an inevitable consequence of constitutional freedom -and anyway, not a matter of grave concern. Expressed in their decisions on campaign finance, which continued last week to dismantle decades of refor m in the McCutcheon case, the court’s right wing sees little risk of corruption and little need to regulate the flamboyant spending of billionaires. Based on the behavior of certain conservative justices, such as Antonin Scalia, Clarence Thomas, and Samuel Alito — who flout the rules that govern partisan behavior among lower-court judges — it is easy to regard their rulings as partisan cynicism. But there is also an element of willful naivete when the conservatives claim, for instance,

that influence-seeking donations will be exposed by the instant transparency of publication on the Internet. Any reporter who has covered elections can attest that there are dozens of ways for wealthy donors to avoid public scrutiny until it is much too late to matter. But if right-wingers like Scalia and Thomas are simply pursuing ideological objectives, what about Anthony Kennedy, the Ronald Reagan appointee from California who is sometimes viewed as a moderating influence and a “swing vote”? On the issue of campaign finance, Kennedy has marched along with the majority, seeming just as fervent in his urge to destroy every regulation and protection against the “malefactors of great wealth” erected since the days of Theodore Roosevelt. It was Kennedy who wrote the majority opinion in Citizens United, which dismissed the notion that corruption will arise from unlimited political campaign contributions because all such money will be disclosed. “Citizens can see whether elected officials are

‘in the pocket’ of so-called moneyed interests ... and disclosure permits citizens and shareholders to react to the speech of corporate entities in a proper way,” he wrote. “This transparency enables the electorate to make informed decisions and give proper weight to different speakers and messages.” Yet if any Supreme Court justice knows how ridiculous that sounds, it must be Kennedy — whose own background as a corporate lobbyist and son of a lobbyist has been forgotten in nearly three decades since his Senate confirmation in 1987. Yes, Kennedy was a respected appellate court judge before Reagan appointed him to the high court. But before that, he grew up and then worked as an attor ney in Sacramento, Calif., where his father became a “legendary” lobbyist in a state capital renowned as “freewheeling” (a polite term that means “routinely corrupt”). His father, Anthony “Bud” Kennedy, was a backslapping, hard-drinking partner in a powerful lobbying law firm run by one Arthur “Artie” Samish, the “secret

boss of California” who finally went to prison on tax charges in the mid-1950s, while young Tony was studying to enter law school. Samish liked to brag that he had amassed more power than anyone else in the state, including the governor, that he could buy any legislator with “a baked potato, a bottle, or a broad,” and that he could “unelect” any lawmaker who didn’t vote his way. The major clients of Samish and Kennedy were racing, entertainment and liquor interests, notably Schenley Industries, then owned and run by J. Edgar Hoover’s mobbed-up pal Lewis Rosenstiel. When Bud Kennedy died suddenly in 1963, young Tony was only two years out of law school. But he went into the family business and inherited his late father’s clientele. While Kennedy always insisted that lobbying was only a “sideline” in his law practice, his billings were substantial — the equivalent of hundreds of thousands or more in today’s dollars. In 1974, he pushed through a

the time I had a “healthy tan.” Like many people in Southern California, I looked “simply maahvelous.” Many skin cancers later, I realize that a “healthy tan” can have unhealthy consequences. Why don’t I have the attitude: “The damage is already done, so why should I bother about protecting myself from sun exposure now?” The reason is simple: The past damage has made my skin even more vulnerable to cancer from new sun damage. Besides protecting yourself from the sun, to minimize existing wrinkles and age spots, consider dermal fillers and neuromodulators. Neuromodulators (Botox, Dysport, Xeomin) are injections

that relax the muscles that create the appearance of wrinkles when you smile, frown or laugh. These products diminish frown lines and forehead lines and sometimes crow’s feet. Dermal fillers are injections that plump up sagging areas of skin. Dermal fillers are often used to soften the “laugh lines” that run from the side of the nose down to the mouth. Often the two treatments are used together to enhance and prolong their effects. Both techniques are safe, with few side effects. To keep seeing results, however, you’ll need to return for repeat sessions. You mentioned cost, and these treatments can be pricey.

Protect your skin to prevent future sun damage

DEAR DOCTOR K: I’m in my 60s and already have a lot of wrinkles. What can a dermatologist do for me that will make a difference but not be hugely expensive? DEAR READER: Age isn’t kind to skin. Years of sun exposure leave their mark in the form of fine lines, wrinkles and discoloration. I spoke to my colleague Dr. Kenneth Arndt, clinical professor of dermatology at Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He assured me that some of the damage can be reversed. The first step is to slow the pace of further damage. Do this by staying out of the sun and by wearing adequate sun protection whenever you are outside. Completely cover exposed

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

skin using a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or higher. And wear sunprotective clothing and a widebrimmed hat. If you think this sounds like preaching, at least I practice what I preach. I was raised in Los Angeles and spent nearly every weekend of my life from the ages of 3 to 19 at the beach — without sunscreen. Most of

See CONASON, Page A5

See DR. K, Page A5


LOCAL

A5

Library to present Fort Stanton living history Roswell Daily Record

LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

Journey back in time as the Fort Stanton Garrison presents a historic summary of Fort Stanton from the 1800s to the present. The Fort Stanton Garrison is a living history organization of men and women dressed in full Civil War unifor ms and Victorian ladies’ fashions who portray life at Fort Stanton. Their presentation will be held at the Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania, on Saturday at 2 p.m. They will exhibit a selection of the weaponry and attire used during the pre-Civil War, Civil War and Indians Wars era including those from the Infantry, Cavalry and Artillery. A pictorial PowerPoint presentation, complete with commentary, will cover the structures, battles and weaponry. The group salutes Fort Stanton’s 159 years of history ranging from its initial creation as a military garrison to its significance as the first tuberculosis hospital in the state, to an internment camp for German seaman during World War II. The program will close with a question and answer session. All ages will enjoy this free living history lesson.

Book talk

While it is not a living history lesson, aliens are known to make appearances in Roswell and around the world. Aliens appear in an abundance of movies, novels, and non-fiction books published each year. Robert Briggs, circulation department supervisor, explores library resources with an alien theme. The DVD, Alien Nation, is an older science fiction crime film

that explores murder and discrimination. A star-faring race of sentient beings that resemble humans, save for bald and spotted heads, land on Earth seeking refuge. Being highly adaptable, they integrate with human society, but not without facing prejudice from people who believe that the newcomers don’t belong. Detective Sykes is involved in a shoot-out with a group of newcomer criminals that ends in the death of his partner; so he feels that his prejudices are validated. However, when a newcomer is promoted to detective, Sykes volunteers to become his partner, hoping that the newcomer detective may have insight that would help him track down the people responsible for his partner’s death. This movie mixes police action with science fiction that is likely to please fans of both genres. Brian Yanksy’s “Alien Invasion and Other Inconveniences” is a young adult - teen paperback. Jesse’s worst day of his life is about to get even worse. He is in class when the Sanginians, a formidable race of aliens, quietly take over the Earth. Most humans simply fall asleep and never wake up. Fortunately for Jesse, he has latent telepathic abilities that make him useful to the alien overlords. Unfortunately, this also means that he’s a perfect candidate for enslavement and he and other people with similar powers are taken as slaves. Jesse meets a girl in his dreams who somehow is able to

give him information regarding the aliens. This encourages Jesse and, with help from his friends, he plans an escape. Yansky offers a funny, grim novel packed with everything sci-fi fans love: aliens, humor, action, and a healthy dose of triumph. The of Lord characterization Vertenomous is oddly humanizing, especially considering that he almost wipes out civilization. John Scalzi’s “Fuzzy Nation” is a slightly different take on the alien invasion genre. Humans are the aliens who take over another planet. Jack Holloway is contracted to a mining company and is stationed on a planet light years away from Earth. After he accidentally blows up a cliff side and uncovers a wealth of gemstones, he is certain that he has hit the jackpot. However, when Jack arrives back at his cabin, it has been invaded by fuzzy, bipedal and vaguely feline critters. This is an estate-authorized reboot of H. Beam Piper’s Hugonominated 1962 classic “Little Fuzzy.” Scalzi’s remake is fast and funny, combining currentday corporate concerns with the classic story. Some of the more interesting parts of this book take place in the courtroom. While the courts try to decide whether or not the fuzzies meet the criteria for sapient life, ZaraCorp is fighting for its license to mine on the planet.

What’s happening?

This week is Spring Break for the public schools and all kids are invited to come down to the library for the story and craft hours. Children attending the story portion of the programs are invited to enjoy the related crafts.

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

All materials are provided for the crafts; however, children must arrive in the first 15 minutes of the program to participate in the crafts. The stories and crafts may vary between programs and the quantities of some craft items may be limited. Trees will be celebrated during the Wednesday story times beginning at 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. The morning program focuses on material for younger children and will include songs and movement activities. The afternoon program is aimed at older children. The books might feature “Cat in the Tree,” “By the Baobab Tree”, “On the Forest Floor” or “The Man Who Lived in a Hollow T ree.” Precut paper leaves will be available for crafts such as decorating a picture frame to hold a picture of your “friendship tree,” making a headband hat or constructing a tree from a drawn outline of a child’s arm. ‘Let’s Go to the Circus’ is the theme of the 2 p.m. Saturday story time. The books could highlight “T runks and Tails,” “Funny Business,” “Snappy Sounds Circus,” “Wolf Won’t Bite,” “To The Big Top” or “Skippyjon Hones Cirque de Ole.” Fun crafts might involve coloring and folding a set of circus performers and circus ring, making a clown face mask or creating a monkey cup-hugger toy. National Library Week begins on Sunday and features contests, classes and giveaways. Teens, ages 13-18, will have an opportunity to prep for prom on Monday, April 14. Girls embrace hair and makeup ideas with Tasha Gonzales from Headz Up while Christi or Dani from Beall’s will teach guys to tie a bowtie. As technolo-

Roswell celebrates Arbor Day this weekend

Arbor Day comes to Roswell this Friday and Saturday. On Friday, there will be an Arbor Day tree planting, dedicated to John Merchant, at 11:30 a.m. on Friday, in the Missouri Avenue Park, located at 102 N. Missouri Ave. On Saturday, Keep Roswell Beautiful, along with the City of Roswell Parks Department, Spring River Park and Zoo and Friends of the Zoo, will distribute more than 600 free tree seedlings to encourage tree planting, landscaping and beautification as part of Roswell’s celebration of Arbor Day from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m at Spring River Park and Zoo, located at 1306 E. College Boulevard, next to the Zoo Concession. Community members will have the opportunity to select seedlings from a variety of 13 dif ferent tree seedling species including Afganistan Pine, Arizona Sycamore, Arizona Walnut, Austrian Pine, Bigtooth Maple, Desert Willow, Scots Pine (Scotch Pine), Eastern Red cedar, Gambel Oak, Lacebark Elm, Pinon Pine, Rio Grande Cottonwood, and Rocky Mountain

Juniper. All of the trees are well suited to the arid Roswell climate and are low water users. Residents are entitled to two free tree seedlings per person, while supplies last, and on a first- come, first-serve basis. Keep Roswell Beautiful members may receive two additional seedlings with presentation of their membership cards. Recipients must complete a short registration for m before receiving seedlings. The tree seedlings were purchased in partnership by Keep Roswell Beautiful and the City Parks Department, via a grant from New Mexico Clean & Beautiful, a segment of the New Mexico Tourism Department as part of the National Great American Cleanup campaign — the nation’s largest community improvement program. The community is invited to attend the 2014 Arbor Day Tree Planting, dedicated to and in memory of John Merchant, on Friday, April 11, 11:30 a.m. at Missouri Avenue Park, located at 102 N. Missouri Avenue. The 2014 Arbor Day Tree is a Chokecherry selected by Ken Smith, City Parks

superintendent, also paid for by Keep Roswell Beautiful via a grant awarded from NM Clean & Beautiful. The event will include a proclamation reading by Mayor Dennis Kintigh, a presentation by the Keep Roswell Beautiful board of directors and refreshments. Everyone is invited to help plant the tree and tie a blue ribbon on the tree to represent a favorite memory of John Merchant. The first Arbor Day was coordinated by J. Sterling Morton in 1872 and was observed with the planting of more than a million trees in Nebraska. Roswell has been celebrating Arbor Day for more than 20 years with the help of Keep Roswell Beautiful, the Spring River Zoo and City Parks Department and is the only city in the state of New Mexico to receive the Tree City USA award for 24 consecutive years. Additionally, there will be a short program, including a proclamation reading by Mayor Dennis Kintigh, on Saturday beginning at 9:30 a.m. at the Spring River Park and Zoo. Other presentations during the program will include the Roswell Job

Corps, Honor Guard, the national anthem, sung by Natasha Mackey, city councilor and Keep Roswell Beautiful board secretary, representatives from the state Forestry Division, and awards presentations to the City of Roswell and the Roswell Parks Department for the 24th Tree City USA Award. Following the program, educational presentations including tree climbing, pruning, landscaping, seedling planting and care will be made by City Parks Department staff, state Forestry Division and the Chaves County Masters Gardener’s Program; along with Fire Safety from the Bureau of Land Management with Smokey Bear.

The New Mexico Military Institute Chapel Program will present a special Palm Sunday musical celebration during its regular Protestant Chapel Service at 8:30 a.m. on Sunday, April 13, in Alumni Memorial Chapel. The NMMI Protestant Palm Sunday service will feature cadet and faculty/staff choral ensembles performing seasonal musical literature. Maj. Dan Musgrave, NMMI chaplain, will officiate over the service’s proceedings. The NMMI Concert Choir, Vocal Ensemble, and Faculty/Staff Chorale will be led by Lt. Col. Steve Thorp, director of choirs at NMMI. In the Christian calendar

year Palm Sunday is the Sunday before Easter, sixth and last Sunday in Lent, and the first day of Holy Week. It celebrates Jesus Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem prior to his crucifixion. According to the Gospels, crowds lined the streets and placed palm branches and robes in his path shouting “Hosanna! Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord.” The various NMMI ensembles will present special musical selections during the course of the service which are based upon these New Testament scriptures. The NMMI choral music program is composed of high school and junior college cadets from a variety of

backgrounds and levels of musical experience. Each group’s goal is to strive to develop each individual ensemble member’s musical potential while providing ample opportunities for performance participation, academic growth, and the development of leadership skills. The Concert Choir, the Institute’s select large choral ensemble, performs a variety of musical styles for campus, community, and regional events. This group has performed for two U.S. presidents and a Supreme Court justice; at Disneyland, Sea World, and Six Flags theme parks; at the United States Air Force Academy, United States

Naval Academy, U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Military Academy Chapels; and at various military installations.

These experts will also be available to answer questions about how to care for seedlings and how to pick the right tree species for property needs. Participants are encouraged to take advantage of photo opportunities with KRB’s mascot “ROZ, the Recycling Alien” and Smokey Bear.

For more infor mation, call Keep Roswell Beautiful at 637-6224.

NMMI to present Palm Sunday musical celebration

Leave your mark

Volunteer

The Vocal Ensemble is a select small group composed of some of the most skilled singers in Concert Choir who have an interest in performing various popular styles. The Faculty/Staff Chorale is comprised of adult singers who are associated with the NMMI workplace. The public is invited. For more information contact Chaplain Dan Musgrave at 624-8211 or Lt. Col. Steve Thorp at 624-8443.

gy progresses, so does the library’s collection of materials and the need to teach users to take advantage of the technology. On April 15, a Boot Camp for downloading 3M E-books will be held at 6 p.m. Contact the library in advance to register. Do you have a question about getting library books on your tablet or eReader? Stop by on April 17, between 3-5p.m. for a one-on-one question and answer session with a trained librarian.

The Summer Reading Adventure held in June and July is for all ages. As an incentive to read books from the library, prizes may be selected based on the number of hours spent enjoying books. The children’s librarian is looking for volunteers, 16 or older, to aid in the program by manning the prize cart and other activities. In addition, donations of new or gently used toys, books, movies, etc. are needed for prizes.

Books Again

The $5 Bag Sale at Books Again Used Book Store will continue though this week and provides a bonanza of books and other materials waiting to be selected. Come by to shop for your personal library or to give as a gift to family and friends. One bag may not be enough, but there is no limit to the number of $5 bags, so buy as many as you need to hold your treasures. Books Again, 404 W. Second, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday through Saturday. The store is operated by Friends of the Library volunteers and all proceeds are used to benefit the Library. Parking is located behind the store.

Conason Continued from Page A4

bill for Capitol Records that saved the company (and cost the state) millions in sales taxes.

How did he do it? The same way that special interests work their will today -- by doling out huge wads of cash to lawmakers on behalf of his clients. The single largest recipient of Kennedy lobbying largesse, according to the Los Angeles Times, was a legislator who introduced a bill to benefit the opticians lobby that Kennedy himself had drafted (it passed). He gave that guy alone

Dannemann Continued from Page A4

That’s every other year. And you can’t expect Congress to get anything done in a non-election year because the next year will be an election year. And you can’t expect Congress to get anything done in the second term of a president or the last two years of the first term of a president. What’s left? When Grisham first ran for Congress, I hoped that

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

For example, Botox injections range from $300 to $700 per session. If this is out of your budget, consider these options: Chemical peels use chemicals such as glycolic acid to strip away the outer layer of damaged skin. A glycolic acid peel can cost as little as $80, but it needs to be repeated every few weeks or months to continue showing an effect. Microdermabrasion uses tiny exfoliating crystals to

about $6,500 in campaign contributions over six years, or roughly $40,000 in today’s dollars.

So if anybody on the court knows how the political and legislative process is greased in this country, that would be Justice Kennedy. After all, he was reared in the game. And it shouldn’t deceive anyone when he sounds as if he doesn’t understand how things work or who wins in that perverse process — and how everyone else loses. To find out more about Joe Conason, visit the Creators Syndicate website at creators.com. Copyright Creators.Com

2014

if she won, she’d make use of her in-depth understanding of health care issues. She can’t do that – and neither can all the other members who arrived in Washington with expertise and energy – until the insane and self-destructive gridlock is broken. I hope her optimism is justified. Contact Merilee Dannemann through triplespacedagain.com.

buff off the top layer of skin and reveal the smoother surface below. Although the technique is different from a chemical peel, the results are similar. The cost is around $100.

(Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)


A6 Tuesday, April 8, 2014

OBITUARIES

Roswell Daily Record

Iconic Hollywood actor Mickey Rooney dies at 93 LOS ANGELES (AP) — Mickey Rooney’s approach to life was simple: “Let’s put on a show!” He spent nine decades doing it, on the big screen, on television, on stage and in his extravagant personal life. A superstar in his youth, Rooney was Hollywood’s top box-office draw in the late 1930s to early 1940s. He epitomized the “show” part of show business, even if the business end sometimes failed him amid money troubles and a seesaw of career tailspins and revivals. Pint-sized, precocious, impish, irrepressible — perhaps hardy is the mostsuitable adjective for Rooney, a perennial comeback artist whose early blockbuster success as the vexing but wholesome Andy Hardy and as Judy Garland’s musical comrade in arms was bookended 70 years later with roles in “Night at the Museum” and “The Muppets.” Rooney died Sunday at age 93 surrounded by family at his North Hollywood home, police said. The Los Angeles County Coroner’s office said Rooney died a natural death. There were no further details immediately available on the cause of death, but Rooney did attend Vanity Fair’s Oscar party last month, where he posed for photos with other veteran stars and seemed fine. He was also shooting a movie at the time of his death, “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,” with Margaret O’Brien. “Mickey was somebody

that everybody loved, but to me he was part of the family,” Liza Minnelli posted on her Facebook page. “He was one of a kind, and will be admired and respected always.” He was nominated for four Academy Awards over a four -decade span and received two special Oscars for film achievements, won an Emmy for his TV movie “Bill” and had a Tony nomination for his Broadway smash “Sugar Babies.” “I loved working with Mickey on ‘Sugar Babies.’ He was very professional, his stories were priceless and I love them all ... each and every one. We laughed all the time,” Carol Channing said. A small man physically, Rooney was prodigious in talent, scope, ambition and appetite. He sang and danced, played roles both serious and silly, wrote memoirs, a novel, movie scripts and plays and married eight times, siring 11 children. His first marriage — to the glamorous, and taller, Ava Gardner — lasted only a year. But a fond recollection from Rooney years later — “I’m 5 feet 3, but I was 6 feet 4 when I married Ava” — summed up the man’s passion and capacity for life. Rooney began as a toddler in his parents’ vaudeville act in the 1920s. He was barely six when he first appeared on screen, playing a midget in the 1926 silent comedy short “Not to Be Trusted,” and he was still at it more than 80 years later, working inces-

santly as he racked up about 250 screen credits in a career unrivaled for length and variety. “I always say, ‘Don’t retire — inspire,”‘ Rooney said in an interview with The Associated Press in March 2008. “There’s a lot to be done.” This from a man who did more than just about anyone in Hollywood and outlasted pretty much everyone from old Hollywood. Rooney was among the last survivors of the studio era, which his career predated, most notably with the lead in a series of “Mickey McGuire” kid comedy shorts from the late 1920s to early ‘30s that were meant to rival Hal Roach’s “Our Gang” flicks. After signing with MGM in 1934, Rooney landed his first big role playing Clark Gable’s character as a boy in “Manhattan Melodrama.” A year later, still only in his mid-teens, Rooney was doing Shakespeare, playing an exuberant Puck in Max Reinhardt’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” which also featured James Cagney and Olivia de Havilland. Then came Andy Hardy in the 1937 comedy “A Family Affair,” a role he would reprise in 15 more feature films over the next two decades. Centered on a kindly small-town judge (Lionel Barrymore) who delivers character-building homilies to troublesome son Andy, it was pure corn, but it turned out to be golden corn for MGM, becoming a runaway success with audiences.

AP Photos

Above: Entertainer Mickey Rooney is shown in this May 1987 file photo. Rooney, a Hollywood legend whose career spanned more than 80 years, has died. He was 93. Los Angeles Police Commander Andrew Smith said that Rooney was with his family when he died Sunday at his North Hollywood home. Left: In this March 19, 1957, file photo, actor, singer and dancer Mickey Rooney, wearing spats and a pinstriped suit, performs a dance routine during rehearsal for the television show “George M. Cohan Story” in Hollywood, Calif.

Peaches Geldof dies unexpectedly at 25 Journalist, NABJ co-founder Charles Stone Jr. dies at 89

LONDON (AP) — Model and media personality Peaches Geldof, the second daughter of Irish singer Bob Geldof and member of a talented, troubled family who grew up in the glare of Britain’s tabloid press, was found dead Monday at age 25. There was no immediate word on the cause of Geldof’s death at her home in Wrotham, Kent, southeast England, but police called it “unexplained and sudden.” In a family statement, Bob Geldof said: “Peaches has died. We are beyond pain.” Peaches Geldof had acknowledged using drugs in the past but said in a 2009 interview that she had quit. The news of her death came as a shock to Britain’s entertainment and fashion circles, where Geldof had been active as a model, television presenter and fashion writer. She was a frequent attendee at fashion shows in London and New York, and was

OBITUARIES

Marie Coley Atkinson Middleton

Marie Coley was bor n January 23, 1924, to Charlie Hubbard Coley and Elizabeth Spann Coley in Mount Pleasant, Texas. Her family moved to Huntsville, Texas, in 1937. Marie graduated from Huntsville High School in 1942 and attended Sam Houston State Teacher’s

anguished statement Monday from the family about her death.

“She was the wildest, funniest, cleverest, wittiest and the most bonkers of all of us,” he wrote. “Writing ‘was’ destroys me afresh. What a beautiful child. How is this possible that we will not see her again? How is that bearable? We loved her and will cherish her forever.”

AP Photo

In this Thursday, May 21, 2009, file photo, British socialite Peaches Geldof arrives for the amfAR Cinema Against AIDS benefit at the Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc, during the 62nd Cannes International film festival, in Antibes, southern France.

photographed just last week at a London show for the Tesco brand F&F.

Geldof was only 11 when her mother, television presenter Paula Yates, died of a drug overdose in 2000, and those who knew her said it hit her extremely

College, majoring in music and English. While in college, she sang in a women’s quartet that performed at one of Billy Graham’s first crusades in San Antonio, Texas. In 1946, she married Lester Herbert Atkinson at the First Baptist Church in Huntsville, Texas. They were the parents of two children, Linda and Herbert. Lester died in 1987. In 1990 Marie married Major General James Benjamin (J.B.) Middleton (ret.). J.B. died in 2002. In 2007, Marie moved from her home in Huntsville to The Hallmark in Houston, Texas. Marie’s true love throughout her life was her Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, whom she came to know personally at age eleven. She was a gifted coloratura soprano, and served her Lord in the choir of the First Baptist Church

hard. Her last message on Twitter came on Sunday, when she posted a photograph of herself as a toddler next to her mother along with the caption: “Me and my mum.” Her father issued an

of Huntsville for more than fifty years. She sang innumerable solos for weddings, funerals and Sunday services. Among her favorites were “The Holy City,” “I’d Rather Have Jesus,” and “O Holy Night.” Marie passed out of this life on April 4, 2014. She was preceded in death by her parents, her husbands and brothers Harold Coley and Kenneth Coley. She is survived by her brother Billy Coley and wife Rose Sowell Coley of Huntsville, Texas; her daughter Linda Atkinson West and husband Cliff M. West Jr. of Houston, Texas; her son Herb Atkinson and wife Marla Farris Atkinson of Roswell, New Mexico; granddaughter Elizabeth Marie Atkinson Ryan and husband Zach R yan of Roswell, New Mexico; granddaughter Mindy Elaine Atkinson Tanner and husband Adam Tanner

The statement was signed by Bob, Jeanne (his partner), Peaches’ sisters Fifi and Pixie and her halfsister Tiger Geldof.

Kent police declined to name Geldof, but when asked about her death they said in a statement that officers were called to a house near Wrotham following a report of concern for a woman’s welfare Monday afternoon. They said the 25-year -old woman was pronounced dead by emergency officers and that the death was being treated as “unexplained and sudden.”

of Roswell, New Mexico; and great-granddaughter Isabelle Marie R yan of Roswell, New Mexico. Marie is also survived by stepgrandchildren Les West Adams and husband Robert Adams of Montgomery, Texas; Mary West Horlock of Houston, Texas; and Clifton Merrell West, III of Willis, Texas; stepgreatgrandchildren Taren Lee Adams of College Station, Texas; Hunter West Adams of Huntsville, Texas; Katherine Elizabeth Horlock of Houston, Texas. Family will receive friends Tuesday, April 8, 2014, from 5 to 7 p.m. at Sam Houston Memorial Funeral Home in Huntsville, Texas. Service will be held Wednesday, April 9, 2014, at 2 p.m. at Sam Houston Memorial Funeral Home in Huntsville, Texas. Interment will follow service at Adickes Addition of Oak-

CHAPEL HILL (AP) — Longtime jour nalist and educator Charles Sumner “Chuck” Stone Jr., one of the founders of the National Association of Black Journalists, has died. He was 89. Allegra Stone said that her father died Sunday at an assisted living facility in Chapel Hill, N.C. He’d been a journalism professor at the University of North Carolina for 14 years starting in 1991. Many who helped launch the NABJ credited Stone as the driving force behind its founding, said the association’s current president Bob Butler. “Chuck chaired the first meeting and became the first president. He provided the rudder that steered NABJ at a time when being a member was not always easy. Some employers back then told members to

choose between their jobs and NABJ,” Butler said in a news release.

After serving as a Tuskegee Airman in World War II, Stone was a writer and editor at influential black publications in New York, Washington and Chicago through the early 1960s, using his writing to urge the Kennedy administration to advance the cause of civil rights. Subsequently, he served as an adviser to U.S. Rep. Adam Clayton Powell of New York.

His reputation grew after he was hired as the first black columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News, where he worked as a columnist and editor from 1972 to 1991. He was known for being outspoken on discrimination, police brutality and racism.

wood Cemetery in Huntsville, Texas. The family requests that memorial donations be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, The First Baptist Church of Huntsville, Texas, or the charity of your choice. Memorial condolences may be left for the family at www.shmfh.com.

DeNio, Steve — Services are pending at LaGrone Funeral Chapel for Steve E. DeNio, age 59, of Roswell, who passed away on April 5, 2014. A complete announcement will be made once arrangements have been finalized. Condolences can be made online at lagronefuneralchapels.com

Arrangements are under the direction and personal care of LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

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A8 Tuesday, April 8, 2014

ENTERTAINMENT / WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Sunny and pleasant

Clear

Wednesday

Warmer

National Cities

Thursday

Friday

Partly sunny and warm

Warm with clouds and sun

Saturday

Clouds and limited sun

Sunday

Times of clouds and sun

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Sunny and pleasant

High 77°

Low 46°

89°/50°

91°/50°

84°/51°

82°/51°

77°/43°

72°/38°

NW at 6-12 mph POP: 0%

SW at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

SSW at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

WNW at 8-16 mph POP: 5%

SW at 10-20 mph POP: 5%

WSW at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

NNW at 8-16 mph POP: 15%

N at 10-20 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 69°/45° Normal high/low ............... 75°/42° Record high ............... 94° in 1989 Record low ................. 24° in 1939 Humidity at noon .................. 26%

Farmington 72/37

Clayton 68/41

Raton 68/31

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Mon. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date .......................... Normal year to date .............

trace trace 0.11" 0.30" 1.42"

Santa Fe 70/39

Gallup 69/32

Tucumcari 73/46

Albuquerque 75/49

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 71/42

Moderate Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 66/49

T or C 77/49

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed.

Rise 6:37 a.m. 6:36 a.m. Rise 1:37 p.m. 2:30 p.m.

Set 7:23 p.m. 7:24 p.m. Set 2:34 a.m. 3:11 a.m.

Roswell Daily Record

Alamogordo 75/47

Silver City 75/42

ROSWELL 77/46 Carlsbad 78/45

Hobbs 75/46

Las Cruces 76/50

Regional Cities Today Wed. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

75/47/s 75/49/s 60/28/s 78/49/s 78/45/s 62/31/s 68/41/s 60/36/s 71/42/s 79/44/s 74/48/s 72/37/s 69/32/s 75/46/s 76/50/s 68/38/s 67/40/s 77/46/s 74/48/s 72/42/s 69/32/s 68/31/s 57/31/s 77/46/s 66/49/s 70/39/s 75/42/s 77/49/s 73/46/s 70/41/s

81/45/s 80/52/s 63/32/s 89/54/s 88/51/s 65/29/s 80/47/s 66/28/s 82/46/s 84/48/s 79/51/s 76/42/s 74/35/s 86/49/s 86/55/s 74/42/s 71/38/s 82/54/s 85/49/s 83/46/s 71/34/s 77/37/s 60/28/s 89/50/s 75/52/s 74/40/s 81/49/s 82/54/s 87/44/s 74/38/s

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

32/18/sf 63/48/c 69/41/pc 63/40/r 65/47/c 52/30/c 49/33/c 74/48/s 70/39/s 53/32/c 76/53/s 80/68/s 74/46/pc 54/34/c 57/37/pc 87/67/s 90/60/s 75/45/s

34/18/pc 65/43/s 60/34/pc 54/34/pc 68/38/pc 60/41/s 50/35/pc 78/56/s 78/41/s 56/38/pc 87/59/s 81/69/s 78/51/s 58/41/s 74/51/s 88/68/pc 84/56/pc 84/50/s

U.S. Extremes

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

89/65/t 77/49/s 51/37/c 69/52/t 67/42/pc 58/35/pc 79/57/t 68/42/pc 95/67/s 56/35/c 67/47/pc 65/46/c 56/38/c 72/50/s 82/60/s 62/43/c 90/58/s 67/45/pc

78/64/pc 87/56/s 70/47/s 68/51/s 58/38/pc 74/50/s 73/55/pc 60/38/pc 95/71/pc 54/35/pc 59/41/pc 66/39/pc 64/47/s 78/49/c 77/58/pc 57/41/pc 92/61/s 62/41/pc

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 96° ...........Death Valley, Calif. Low: 3° .......Lake Yellowstone, Wyo.

High: 77° ............................Deming Low: 13° ......................... Angel Fire

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

George Strait wins Entertainer of the Year award Full

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George Strait won his second entertainer of the year — 25 years after he won his first — and Miranda Lambert and Keith Urban teamed up to earn top honors Sunday night at a jam-packed Academy of Country Music Awards that had a little something for everyone. Strait’s victory was not unexpected. He’s a few months from retiring from the road and won the same trophy at the rival Country Music Association Awards five months ago. But the ACMs entertainer award is fan-voted and some wondered if Strait’s older fan base might vote. “I’ve always said I have the best fans in the world,” Strait told the crowd. “I heard this was a fan-voted thing, so I rest my case.” No one will begrudge Strait the win, including co-hosts Blake Shelton and Luke Bryan, who were also nominated in the category with Lambert and Taylor Swift. “Our hero,” Shelton said in a genuine moment. “Our

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hero won tonight!” Until that point Bryan and Shelton had overshadowed much of the ceremony, held in Las Vegas. Urban and Lambert tied for the most trophies but it was Lambert’s husband, Shelton, and Bryan who were on a winning streak. They deftly stole the show with a mix of selfdeprecating, celebrityskewering jokes and two performances apiece. And as Shelton noted, he also gets to share Lambert’s bed. “Honestly, I think we’re the biggest celebrities in the room,” Shelton said during the show’s funniest moment — a recreation of Ellen DeGeneres’ selfie moment at the Oscars — and it may just be true. Shelton is the star of “The Voice” and a platinum-selling hitmaker with 11 straight No. 1s. Bryan is the reigning entertainer of the year, and both were up for that award again this year with Lambert, Taylor Swift and George Strait, the genre’s top stars.

Hulk Hogan hosts ‘WrestleMania XXX’ NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The Hulkster showed he can host, 30 years later. Three decades after he took part in the first “WrestleMania” at Madison Square Garden, Hulk Hogan presided over the 30th version of World Wrestling Entertainment’s signature event at the Superdome. The 60-year-old sported a sleeveless red T -shirt that showcased his stillconsiderable pythons, and a red bandanna with “Hulkamania” on it in bright yellow letters. “This all started with me and Mr. T,” Hogan said. Vince McMahon had the vision to make this entertainment as big as he did,” Hogan said. “Fast forward to 30 years later and now I’m the host? I would have never believed that 30 years later I would still be here and people would be treating me in New Orleans like I’m still the champion.” The man who helped popularize the athletic spectacle when he bodyslammed all 500plus pounds of Andre the Giant was there with a microphone in his hand, overseeing the mayhem for 75,000-plus fans, and countless more watching on TV.

And what a scene it was. Cesaro won the Battle Royal — named for Andre the Giant this year for the first time — by heaving the sizeable Big Show over the top rope. In the night’s shocker Brock Lesnar defeated The Undertaker, ending his 21-consecutive match Wrestlemania winning streak. In other events, The Shield also beat the team of the New Age Outlaws and Kane in a six-man tag team match and A.J. Lee defending the WWE Divas Championship. John Cena got his second consecutive WrestleMania victory with a defeat of Bray Wyatt. WWE superstar Triple H, McMahon’s son in law, was defeated by crowd favorite Daniel Bryan in opening match of WrestleMania 30. Hogan was joined in the opening by a pair of other WWE legends in “The Rock” Dwayne Johnson and “Stone Cold” Steve Austin — who ribbed him for flubbing the name of the stadium. The event was shown on the fledgling WWE Network by-subscription streaming service, which launched Feb. 24.

They zinged Eric Church over the likelihood of finding marijuana in his dressing room, poked fun at Britney Spears (who perfor ms on the Las Vegas strip) and ribbed Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, in the audience, about his team’s disappointing playof f record (Shelton and Bryan announced the 50th edition of the ACM Awards will be held at the Dallas Cowboys’ AT&T Stadium next year). Each per for med twice with Shelton offering a subdued but powerful version of his song “My Eyes,” playing an acoustic guitar while seated with Gwen Sebastian at his side, before returning flanked by Shakira on their duet “Medicine.” Bryan performed “Play It Again” while standing on a revolving replica of a vinyl album, then teamed with vocal duo of the year winner Florida Georgia Line on “This is How We Roll.” Lambert did her best to upstage her husband, who gave her a peck on the forehead after she won single

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

record of the year for “Mama’s Broken Heart,” cowritten by Kacey Musgraves. Lambert also won her fifth straight female vocalist of the year award. “I was just hanging out with (presenter) T risha Yearwood back there, holy crap, and I was standing next to Sheryl Crow, a complete and utter rock star,” Lambert said of Crow, a fellow nominee. She also spoke about others in the category: “Kacey Musgraves, I grew up with her. She wrote the single of the year this year. And Carrie Underwood’s my buddy, y’all, and she’s a phenomenon. I can’t believe it, I’m so grateful and humbled. I love my job.” Lambert teamed with Urban to win vocal event of the year for their “We Were Us” collaboration for which Urban won trophies as producer and per for mer. Urban won video of the year with Tim McGraw and Taylor Swift for “Highway Don’t Care.” The three wins Sunday night gave Lambert 18 trophies at the ACM

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AP Photo

George Strait holds up his Academy of Country Music Entertainer of the Year award, Sunday.

Awards since she first won best new female artist in 2006. She followed up her single record of the year win with a performance of her song “Automatic.” Musgraves won album of the year for “Same Trailer Different Park” two months after taking the Grammy

Comedian John Pinette dead at 50 PITTSBURGH (AP) — John Pinette, the chubby stand-up comedian who portrayed a hapless carjacking victim in the final episode of “Seinfeld,” has died. He was 50. Pinette died of natural causes Saturday at a hotel in Pittsburgh, the Allegheny County Medical Examiner’s office said Sunday evening. Pinette’s agent confirmed his death. The portly Pinette was a self-deprecating presence on stage, frequently discussing his weight on stand-up specials “Show Me the Buffett,” “I’m Starvin’!” and “Still Hungry.” Pinette had been working on another stand-up project when he died, his agent, Nick Nuciforo, said. “He should be celebrated for the amazing comedian he was,” Nuciforo said.

40s

The Boston native appeared in movies including “The Punisher” and had a trio of stand-up shows released on DVD but was perhaps best known as the portly carjacking victim whose plight lands the “Seinfeld” stars before a judge for failing to help under a “good Samaritan” law. Pinette also appeared in the television series “Parker Lewis Can’t Lose.” Pinette also appeared on state in a national tour of “Hairspray” as Edna Turnblad, the mother of the play’s heroine. The medical examiner’s office said no autopsy was performed and Pinette’s own physician signed off on the cause of death. Pinette had been preparing for a stand-up tour of the U.S. and Canada, Nuciforo said.

for country album of the year. Lee Brice’s song “I Drive Your T ruck” won song of the year and Justin Moore won new artist of the year. It’s one of two fanvoted awards along with top honor entertainer of the year. The Band Perry won vocal group of the year and Jason Aldean — a target of his good friend Bryan and Shelton — won his second straight male vocalist of the year award. “This is really unexpected,” a black-hatted Aldean told the crowd. “It was a shock last year to win it and even a bigger shock this year, I think. ... It’s been one hell of a ride, so I hope it doesn’t end any time soon.”

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Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Roswell Daily Record

HUSKY HIGH

Days left to register

CONNECTICUT WINS NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — No conference wanted them. Several teammates and their coach left them. The NCAA kept them out for a year. UConn won it all anyway. Shabazz Napier turned in another all-court masterpiece Monday night to lift the Huskies to a 60-54 win over Kentucky’s freshmen and a national title hardly anyone saw coming. Napier had 22 points, six rebounds and three assists, and his partner in defensive lock-down, Ryan Boatright, finished with 14 points. Napier kneeled down and put his forehead to the court for a long while after the buzzer sounded. The senior guard was wiping back tears when he cut down the net. “You’re looking at the hungry Huskies,” Napier told the crowd and TV audience. “Ladies and gentlemen, this is what happens when you banned us.” Yes, it is only a short year since the Huskies were barred from March Madness because of grade problems. That stoked a fire no one could put out in 2014. UConn (32-8) never trailed. The Huskies led by as many as 15 in the first half and watched the Wildcats (29-11) trim the deficit to one with 8:13 left. But Aaron Harrison, Kentucky’s big-moment shooter in the last three games, missed a 3-pointer from the left See UCONN, Page B3

AP Photos

Rockies rock White Sox 8-1 NATIONAL LEAGUE

Colorado’s Carlos Gonzalez hits a solo home run during his team’s win, Monday.

LOCAL SCHEDULE — TUESDAY, APRIL 8 — • Clovis at Goddard (DH), 1 p.m. • NMMI at Texico (DH), 4 p.m. PREP BASEBALL

• NMMI at NJCAA State Championship, Split Rail Golf Club, Aledo, Texas, 8 a.m. MEN’S GOLF

• Moriarty at Goddard (DH), 3 p.m. • Dexter at Jal, 4 p.m. • Roswell at Artesia, 6 p.m. PREP SOFTBALL

AP Photo

DENVER (AP) — Jordan Lyles pitched effectively into the seventh inning in his Coors Field debut for the Rockies, added a career -best three hits and drove in two runs in Colorado’s 81 win over the Chicago White Sox on Monday night. Carlos Gonzalez and Troy Tulowitzki homered for the Rockies, who beat the White Sox for the second time in six tries in Denver. L yles (2-0) scattered five hits, walked two and struck out four in 6 2/3 innings. He left after giving up Alexei Ramirez’s RBI double and then walking Tyler Flowers in the seventh. Right-hander Adam Ottavino came in and struck out Dayan Viciedo. Lyles joined the Rockies from Houston in a trade for Dexter Fowler last winter. While with the Astros, he made just one appearance at Coors Field, receiving a fiveinning no-decision on May 28, 2012, when he collected a single in two at-bats and scored a run. The last Colorado pitcher to go 3 for 3 was lefty Brian Bohanon against the Dodgers on July 20, 2001.

See ROCKIES, Page B3

SPOTLIGHT 1935 — Gene Sarazen gets a double eagle on the 15th hole to erase Craig Wood’s threestroke lead and goes on to win the Masters. 1971 — The first legal off-track betting (OTB) system in the United States opens in New York City. 1974 — In the home opener in Atlanta, Hank Aaron breaks Babe Ruth’s career record by hitting his 715th home run, connecting off Al

AP Photo

Lexi Thompson holds up the trophy after winning the Kraft Nabisco Championship, Sunday.

Lexi’s major moment

RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. (AP) — Lexi Thompson went after it at the Kraft Nabisco Championship, smashing driver on every hole she could. Michelle Wie reined in her power, hitting conservative fairway-metal stingers and only occasionally letting loose with the driver. Thompson ended up cannonballing into Poppie’s Pond late Sunday afternoon in the traditional victory leap, while Wie was left to wonder about her strategy. “I play this course very aggressively,” the 19-yearold Thompson said. “I didn’t want to change the way I played the last few days because my driver won’t get me in any trouble on a lot of the holes. So, laying back wouldn’t really make sense.

ON

“The greens were a little fir mer, so even with a wedge in your hand you had to play for quite a bit of bounce out. I figured the closer I could get, even if I was in the rough, I could get it pretty close to the hole.” Thompson birdied four of the first nine holes to open a five-stroke lead and parred the final nine for a 4-under 68 for a threestroke victory over Wie. “This is what I’ve worked so hard for,” Thompson said. “This was one of my goals coming into the year, to win a major. I’ve always seen myself winning a Kraft Nabisco. It’s such a huge honor with all the history behind the tournament.” See MAJOR, Page B3

SPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN ... Downing of Los Angeles in the fourth inning. 1975 — Frank Robinson, the first black manager in the majors, debuts as player-manager for the Cleveland Indians. Robinson hits a home run in his first at-bat to help beat the Yankees 5-3. 2001 — Tiger Woods claims the greatest feat in modern golf by winning the Masters, giving him a clean sweep of the four professional majors in a span of 294 days. Woods, with his

winning score of 16-under 272, sweeps the majors with a combined score of 65-under. 2006 — Wisconsin wins its sixth NCAA ice hockey title and first since 1990 with a 2-1 victory over Boston College. 2009 — The Cleveland Cavaliers become the first team in NBA history to have two 15game winning streaks at home in the same season by beating Washington 98-86.


B2 Tuesday, April 8, 2014

College basketball

NCAA Men’s National Championship No. 7 UConn 60, No. 8 Kentucky 54 Kentucky (29-11) — Young 5-13 8-9 20, Aa. Harrison 3-7 0-1 7, An. Harrison 3-9 0-0 8, Randle 3-7 4-7 10, Johnson 2-5 1-4 5, Lee 0-0 0-0 0, Poythress 2-5 0-1 4, Hawkins 0-0 0-2 0. Totals 18-46 13-24 54. UConn (32-8) — Nolan 0-3 0-0 0, Daniels 4-14 0-0 8, Giffey 3-7 2-2 10, Boatright 5-6 4-4 14, Napier 8-16 2-2 22, Samuel 1-1 0-0 2, Kromah 1-4 2-2 4, Brimah 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 22-53 10-10 60. Halftime—UConn 35-31. 3-Point Goals—Kentucky 5-16 (An. Harrison 2-4, Young 2-5, Aa. Harrison 1-5, Poythress 0-2), UConn 6-19 (Napier 4-9, Giffey 2-4, Boatright 0-1, Kromah 0-1, Daniels 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Kentucky 33 (Young 7), UConn 34 (Daniels, Kromah, Napier 6). Assists—Kentucky 11 (An. Harrison 5), UConn 8 (Boatright, Napier 3). Total Fouls���Kentucky 10, UConn 17. A— 79,238.

LPGA

LPGA Money Leaders By The Associated Press Through April 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Trn 1. Karrie Webb . . . . . . . . . .6 2. Anna Nordqvist . . . . . . . .6 3. Lexi Thompson . . . . . . . .7 4. Stacy Lewis . . . . . . . . . . .7 5. Paula Creamer . . . . . . . .7 6. Azahara Munoz . . . . . . . .7 7. Michelle Wie . . . . . . . . . .6 8. Chella Choi . . . . . . . . . . .7 9. Inbee Park . . . . . . . . . . . .5 10. Jessica Korda . . . . . . . .6 11. Lizette Salas . . . . . . . . .6 12. Lydia Ko . . . . . . . . . . . .7 13. Cristie Kerr . . . . . . . . . .5 14. Se Ri Pak . . . . . . . . . . .6 15. Morgan Pressel . . . . . . .7 16. Gerina Piller . . . . . . . . .7 17. Amy Yang . . . . . . . . . . .6 18. Catriona Matthew . . . . .6 19. Angela Stanford . . . . . . .6 20. Pornanong Phatlum . . .7 21. Na Yeon Choi . . . . . . . .6 22. So Yeon Ryu . . . . . . . . .5 23. Jenny Shin . . . . . . . . . .6 24. Mirim Lee . . . . . . . . . . .5 25. Karine Icher . . . . . . . . . .7 26. Eun-Hee Ji . . . . . . . . . .6 27. Shanshan Feng . . . . . . .5 28. Sandra Gal . . . . . . . . . .7 29. Suzann Pettersen . . . . .4 30. Julieta Granada . . . . . . .7 31. Hee Young Park . . . . . .7 32. Caroline Masson . . . . . .7 33. Giulia Sergas . . . . . . . . .6 34. P.K. Kongkraphan . . . . .6 35. Mi Hyang Lee . . . . . . . .5 36. Yani Tseng . . . . . . . . . . .6 37. Meena Lee . . . . . . . . . .6 38. Caroline Hedwall . . . . . .5 39. Jodi Ewart Shadoff . . . .6 40. Amelia Lewis . . . . . . . . .4 41. Brittany Lang . . . . . . . . .6 42. Sun Young Yoo . . . . . . .6 43. Mariajo Uribe . . . . . . . . .6 44. Tiffany Joh . . . . . . . . . . .5 45. Pernilla Lindberg . . . . . .6 46. Brittany Lincicome . . . . .7 47. Mo Martin . . . . . . . . . . .7 48. Dewi Claire Schreefel . .6 49. Mina Harigae . . . . . . . . .6 50. Haru Nomura . . . . . . . . .5 51. Dori Carter . . . . . . . . . . .4 52. Christel Boeljon . . . . . . .5 53. Ayako Uehara . . . . . . . .7 54. Christina Kim . . . . . . . . .3 55. Jenny Suh . . . . . . . . . . .4 56. Ai Miyazato . . . . . . . . . .6 57. Haeji Kang . . . . . . . . . . .5 58. Thidapa Suwannapura .6

Golf scores

Money $568,052 $526,301 $491,885 $475,425 $401,300 $365,527 $361,555 $292,234 $281,574 $280,195 $252,524 $224,011 $218,762 $190,154 $181,804 $181,546 $158,669 $152,822 $138,653 $137,317 $137,030 $131,807 $129,770 $128,027 $125,056 $121,935 $120,130 $110,451 $103,776 $100,127 $89,375 $80,079 $68,894 $66,604 $64,291 $63,439 $58,856 $57,918 $57,606 $55,561 $54,361 $53,241 $48,326 $48,240 $48,014 $47,490 $47,174 $45,605 $41,841 $41,777 $41,763 $41,688 $41,460 $40,015 $39,583 $39,140 $38,033 $35,125

SPORTS

59. Candie Kung . . . . . . . . .7 60. Hee-Won Han . . . . . . . .3 61. Carlota Ciganda . . . . . .6 62. Hee Kyung Seo . . . . . . .5 63. Alison Walshe . . . . . . . .7 64. Ilhee Lee . . . . . . . . . . . .6 65. Moriya Jutanugarn . . . .7 66. Ji Young Oh . . . . . . . . . .5 67. Nicole Castrale . . . . . . .5 68. Danielle Kang . . . . . . . .6 69. I.K. Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 70. Jennifer Johnson . . . . . .6 71. Jee Young Lee . . . . . . .3 72. Katherine Kirk . . . . . . . .7 73. Laura Diaz . . . . . . . . . . .3 74. Line Vedel . . . . . . . . . . .5 75. Paz Echeverria . . . . . . .4 76. Mika Miyazato . . . . . . . .4 77. Belen Mozo . . . . . . . . . .4 78. Laura Davies . . . . . . . . .3 79. Perrine Delacour . . . . . .4 80. Sarah Jane Smith . . . . .4 81. Brooke Pancake . . . . . .3 82. Kristy McPherson . . . . .4 83. Becky Morgan . . . . . . . .4 84. Sandra Changkija . . . . .4 85. Austin Ernst . . . . . . . . . .5 86. Jaye Marie Green . . . . .5 87. Sarah Kemp . . . . . . . . .2 88. Rebecca Lee-Bentham .5 89. Katie Futcher . . . . . . . . .4 90. Lindsey Wright . . . . . . .4 91. Alena Sharp . . . . . . . . . .4 92. Victoria Elizabeth . . . . .4 93. Seon Hwa Lee . . . . . . .3 94. Hannah Jun Medlock . .4 95. Kelly Tan . . . . . . . . . . . .4 96. Beatriz Recari . . . . . . . .6 97. Sydnee Michaels . . . . . .4 98. Amy Anderson . . . . . . . .4 99. Ashleigh Simon . . . . . . .3 100. Marina Alex . . . . . . . . .4

MLB

American League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W New York . . . . . . . . . .4 Tampa Bay . . . . . . . . .4 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Baltimore . . . . . . . . . .2 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .3 Kansas City . . . . . . . .3 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .3 Minnesota . . . . . . . . . .3 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Oakland . . . . . . . . . . .4 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .3 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .3 Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

L 3 4 4 4 5

L 1 3 3 4 4

L 2 3 4 4 4

$34,840 $31,931 $30,895 $30,315 $28,628 $27,955 $26,990 $26,746 $26,512 $26,392 $25,838 $24,740 $24,289 $23,920 $23,346 $22,864 $22,008 $20,843 $20,666 $20,276 $20,110 $20,065 $19,807 $18,511 $18,180 $18,132 $17,945 $17,402 $17,171 $17,020 $16,971 $16,195 $15,220 $14,251 $14,078 $12,891 $12,688 $12,659 $11,864 $11,589 $10,960 $10,020

Pct .571 .500 .429 .429 .286

GB — 1⁄2 1 1 2

Pct GB .800 — .500 1 1⁄2 1 .500 1 ⁄2 .429 2 .429 2

Pct GB .667 — 1⁄2 .571 .429 1 1⁄2 .429 1 1⁄2 .429 1 1⁄2

Sunday’s Games Minnesota 10, Cleveland 7 N.Y. Yankees 6, Toronto 4 Baltimore 3, Detroit 1 Milwaukee 4, Boston 0 Texas 3, Tampa Bay 0 Chicago White Sox 5, Kansas City 1 Houston 7, L.A. Angels 4 Oakland 6, Seattle 3 Monday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 4, Baltimore 2 L.A. Angels 9, Houston 1 Oakland 8, Minnesota 3 San Diego at Cleveland, ppd., rain Boston 5, Texas 1 Kansas City 4, Tampa Bay 2 Colorado 8, Chicago White Sox 1 Tuesday’s Games Baltimore (W.Chen 0-1) at N.Y. Yankees

PGA-Shell Houston Open Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At The Golf Club of Houston Humble, Texas Purse: $6.4 million Yardage: 7,441; Par: 72 Final (x-won on first playoff hole) x-Matt Jones (500), $1,152,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-68-71-66 — 273 Matt Kuchar (300), $691,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-67-68-72 — 273 Sergio Garcia (190), $435,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-65-73-70 — 275 Cameron Tringale (135), $307,200 . . . . . . . . . . .68-68-69-71 — 276 Shawn Stefani (110), $256,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-69-73-69 — 278 Rickie Fowler (100), $230,400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-68-71 — 279 Brice Garnett (80), $186,240 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-72-69 — 280 Retief Goosen (80), $186,240 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-71-70 — 280 Russell Henley (80), $186,240 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-72-66 — 280 Rory McIlroy (80), $186,240 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-74-65 — 280 Ryan Palmer (80), $186,240 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68-73-69 — 280 Erik Compton (59), $125,440 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-73-73-69 — 281 Ben Curtis (59), $125,440 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-70-71-73 — 281 J.B. Holmes (59), $125,440 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-73-71-71 — 281 Phil Mickelson (59), $125,440 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70-72-71 — 281 Chris Stroud (59), $125,440 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-71-70 — 281 Martin Flores (54), $99,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-72-70 — 282 Lee Westwood (54), $99,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-71-69 — 282 Jonathan Byrd (50), $77,568 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-74-73-68 — 283 Graham DeLaet (50), $77,568 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-72-70 — 283 Jason Gore (50), $77,568 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-74-71 — 283 Freddie Jacobson (50), $77,568 . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-74-69 — 283 Charl Schwartzel (50), $77,568 . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-75-70-71 — 283 Luke Donald (44), $50,651 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-71-71 — 284 Michael Putnam (44), $50,651 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-73-71 — 284 Jim Renner (44), $50,651 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-72-74-72 — 284 Steve Stricker (44), $50,651 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-69-76-71 — 284 Nicholas Thompson (44), $50,651 . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-74-70 — 284 Jimmy Walker (44), $50,651 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-65-77-71 — 284 Andres Romero (44), $50,651 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-69-70-73 — 284 Kevin Chappell (38), $37,952 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-76-66 — 285 Jon Curran, $37,952 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-69-75 — 285 Ryo Ishikawa (38), $37,952 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-74-71-71 — 285 Hunter Mahan (38), $37,952 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-71-73 — 285 Carl Pettersson (38), $37,952 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-74-72-70 — 285 James Hahn (35), $32,960 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-73-70 — 286 Brendon de Jonge (32), $28,160 . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73-72-71 — 287 Bill Haas (32), $28,160 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-74-76-72 — 287 Charley Hoffman (32), $28,160 . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-76-78-68 — 287 John Huh (32), $28,160 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-72-73 — 287 Jeff Overton (32), $28,160 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-74-71 — 287 David Toms (32), $28,160 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-75-70 — 287 Ricky Barnes (23), $18,374 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73-74-71 — 288 Keegan Bradley (23), $18,374 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-77-73-72 — 288 Angel Cabrera (23), $18,374 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73-75-72 — 288 Ben Crane (23), $18,374 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74-72-72 — 288 Brian Gay (23), $18,374 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-71-76 — 288 Justin Hicks (23), $18,374 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-73-74-74 — 288 Jeff Maggert (23), $18,374 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73-74-72 — 288 Brendon Todd (23), $18,374 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-74-73-72 — 288 Camilo Villegas (23), $18,374 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-73-73-75 — 288 Ernie Els (23), $18,374 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-76-74-70 — 288 Hudson Swafford (23), $18,374 . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74-76-68 — 288 John Mallinger (16), $14,656 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-75-70 — 289 John Merrick (16), $14,656 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-68-75-72 — 289 Kyle Stanley (16), $14,656 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-74-74-72 — 289 Henrik Stenson (16), $14,656 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-76-70 — 289 Stewart Cink (12), $14,208 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-75-74-74 — 290 Harrison Frazar (12), $14,208 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-76-72 — 290 Brian Harman (12), $14,208 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-74-75 — 290 Robert Garrigus (9), $13,760 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-73-75 — 291 Davis Love III (9), $13,760 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73-78-72 — 291 Webb Simpson (9), $13,760 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73-73-77 — 291 Michael Thompson (9), $13,760 . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-73-77-74 — 291 Chris Kirk (5), $13,312 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-74-75-75 — 292 Justin Leonard (5), $13,312 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-81-70 — 292 John Rollins (5), $13,312 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-76-72-76 — 292 Kevin Kisner (3), $13,056 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-81-71 — 293 Greg Chalmers (2), $12,864 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-74-75-76 — 294 Tommy Gainey (2), $12,864 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-77-74 — 294 Tyrone Van Aswegen (1), $12,672 . . . . . . . . . . .71-73-74-77 — 295 J.J. Henry (1), $12,480 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-78-75 — 296 Jhonnattan Vegas (1), $12,480 . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-75-76-78 — 296 Stephen Ames (1), $12,224 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-78-76 — 297 Bubba Dickerson, $12,224 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-70-74-79 — 297 Roberto Castro (1), $12,032 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-83-73 — 299

SCOREBOARD

(Nova 1-0), 11:05 a.m. Texas (M.Perez 0-0) at Boston (Doubront 10), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (T.Ross 0-1) at Cleveland (Kluber 0-1), 5:05 p.m. Houston (Oberholtzer 0-1) at Toronto (Buehrle 1-0), 5:07 p.m. Tampa Bay (Archer 1-0) at Kansas City (Ventura 0-0), 6:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Quintana 0-0) at Colorado (Morales 0-0), 6:40 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Haren 1-0), 8:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (H.Santiago 0-1) at Seattle (Paxton 1-0), 8:10 p.m. Wednesday’s Games San Diego at Cleveland, 10:05 a.m., 1st game Oakland at Minnesota, 11:10 a.m. Tampa Bay at Kansas City, 12:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Colorado, 1:10 p.m. San Diego at Cleveland, 1:35 p.m., 2nd game Texas at Boston, 2:05 p.m. Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees, 5:05 p.m. Houston at Toronto, 5:07 p.m. Detroit at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Seattle, 8:10 p.m.

National League At A Glance All Times Mountain By The Associated Press East Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Washington . . . . . . . . .4 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .3 New York . . . . . . . . . .2 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Milwaukee . . . . . . . . . .4 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . .4 St. Louis . . . . . . . . . . .4 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .2 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .2 West Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W San Francisco . . . . . . .5 Los Angeles . . . . . . . .5 Colorado . . . . . . . . . . .4 San Diego . . . . . . . . . .2 Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . .2

L 2 2 2 3 4

Pct GB .714 — 1⁄2 .667 1⁄2 .667 .500 1 1⁄2 .333 2 1⁄2

L 2 3 4 4 7

Pct GB .714 — 1⁄2 .625 .500 1 1⁄2 .333 2 1⁄2 .222 4

L 2 2 3 4 5

Pct GB .667 — .667 — 1⁄2 .571 .333 2 .286 2 1⁄2

Sunday’s Games Cincinnati 2, N.Y. Mets 1 San Diego 4, Miami 2 Washington 2, Atlanta 1 Milwaukee 4, Boston 0 Pittsburgh 2, St. Louis 1 Chicago Cubs 8, Philadelphia 3 Arizona 5, Colorado 3 L.A. Dodgers 6, San Francisco 2 Monday’s Games Milwaukee at Philadelphia, ppd., rain St. Louis 5, Cincinnati 3 San Diego at Cleveland, ppd., rain Colorado 8, Chicago White Sox 1 Tuesday’s Games Milwaukee (Lohse 0-1) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-0), 2:05 p.m. Arizona (Cahill 0-2) at San Francisco (Hudson 1-0), 2:35 p.m. Miami (H.Alvarez 0-1) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 1-0), 5:05 p.m. San Diego (T.Ross 0-1) at Cleveland (Kluber 0-1), 5:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Colon 0-1) at Atlanta (Harang 10), 5:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 0-0) at Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 0-0), 6:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Bailey 0-1) at St. Louis (Lynn 10), 6:15 p.m.

LPGA-Kraft Nabisco Championship Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At Mission Hills Country Club, Dinah Shore Tournament Course Rancho Mirage, Calif. Purse: $2 million Yardage: 6,738; Par: 72 Final (a-amateur) Lexi Thompson, $300,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-64-69-68 — 274 Michelle Wie, $187,584 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-68-71 — 277 Stacy Lewis, $136,079 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-70-69-69 — 281 Cristie Kerr, $94,998 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70-71-72 — 282 Se Ri Pak, $94,998 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-70-71-74 — 282 Shanshan Feng, $69,323 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-73-72-72 — 283 Azahara Munoz, $51,522 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-70-72 — 284 Angela Stanford, $51,522 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-69-72 — 284 Charley Hull, $51,522 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-66-76 — 284 Amy Yang, $41,594 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73-71-73 — 285 Caroline Masson, $33,911 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72-72-69 — 286 Morgan Pressel, $33,911 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-75-71 — 286 Karrie Webb, $33,911 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-70-70-73 — 286 Gerina Piller, $33,911 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77-65-70-74 — 286 Catriona Matthew, $33,911 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-70-76 — 286 Mi Hyang Lee, $24,289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-72-71 — 287 Na Yeon Choi, $24,289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-72-72 — 287 Tiffany Joh, $24,289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75-70-72 — 287 Christina Kim, $24,289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-72-72 — 287 Anna Nordqvist, $24,289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-74-73 — 287 Jee Young Lee, $24,289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-75-67-74 — 287 Jiyai Shin, $24,289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73-70-75 — 287 Chella Choi, $24,289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-69-76 — 287 Jessica Korda, $20,335 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73-71-71 — 288 x-Minjee Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-68-73-72 — 288 x-Brooke M. Henderson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77-68-70-74 — 289 Hee Young Park, $19,257 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-71-74 — 289 Mirim Lee, $19,257 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-70-76 — 289 x-Alison Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-74-70-71 — 290 Giulia Sergas, $17,125 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-74-72-71 — 290 Eun-Hee Ji, $17,125 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-73-69-74 — 290 Lydia Ko, $17,125 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-70-73-74 — 290 Mo Martin, $17,125 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-68-74-75 — 290 Paula Creamer, $14,583 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-74-74-71 — 291 Sandra Gal, $14,583 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-77-72 — 291 Mariajo Uribe, $14,583 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-74-73 — 291 Pernilla Lindberg, $14,583 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-74-69-75 — 291 Inbee Park, $13,146 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-70-73-75 — 292 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $11,180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-70-73-74 — 293 I.K. Kim, $11,180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-73-72-74 — 293 Jenny Shin, $11,180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-73-70-76 — 293 Thidapa Suwannapura, $11,180 . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72-72-76 — 293 Alison Walshe, $11,180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-74-70-76 — 293 P.K. Kongkraphan, $11,180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-74-68-77 — 293 Pornanong Phatlum, $11,180 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73-72-77 — 293 Karine Icher, $8,909 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-72-72-75 — 294 Jimin Kang, $8,909 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-69-74-75 — 294 x-Lilia Vu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73-73-75 — 294 Ilhee Lee, $8,909 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78-69-70-77 — 294 So Yeon Ryu, $8,909 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-75-77 — 294 x-Su-Hyun Oh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-74-73-74 — 295 Nicole Castral, $7,805e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73-74-77 — 295 Austin Ernst, $7,805 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-74-72-78 — 295 Haeji Kang, $7,805 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74-71-80 — 295 Christel Boeljon, $6,881 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72-78-73 — 296 Meena Lee, $6,881 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-74-75-73 — 296 Ha Na Jang, $6,881 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73-71-79 — 296 Sun Young Yoo, $6,881 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-72-71-79 — 296 Brittany Lincicome, $6,265 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77-72-76-72 — 297 Sakura Yokomine, $6,265 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-70-77-75 — 297 Danielle Kang, $5,751 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-73-73-76 — 298 Carlota Ciganda, $5,751 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-79-77 — 298 Sei Young Kim, $5,751 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-70-76-77 — 298 Haru Nomura, $5,170 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-72-75-77 — 299 Caroline Hedwall, $5,170 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-74-76-78 — 299 Juli Inkster, $5,170 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-70-73-80 — 299 Mina Harigae, $4,775 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-72-77-75 — 300 Ai Miyazato, $4,775 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77-71-76-76 — 300 Hee-Won Han, $4,775 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-73-75-77 — 300 Jennifer Rosales, $4,775 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-74-76-81 — 300 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $4,468 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-74-75-77 — 301 Candie Kung, $4,468 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-70-76-81 — 301 x-Angel Yin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-79-75-80 — 302

Chicago White Sox (Quintana 0-0) at Colorado (Morales 0-0), 6:40 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 0-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Haren 1-0), 8:10 p.m. Wednesday’s Games San Diego at Cleveland, 10:05 a.m., 1st game Cincinnati at St. Louis, 11:45 a.m. Chicago White Sox at Colorado, 1:10 p.m. San Diego at Cleveland, 1:35 p.m., 2nd game Miami at Washington, 5:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 5:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, 5:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 6:05 p.m. Detroit at L.A. Dodgers, 8:10 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 8:15 p.m.

NBA

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct x-Toronto . . . . . . . . . .45 32 .584 x-Brooklyn . . . . . . . . .42 34 .553 New York . . . . . . . . . .33 45 .423 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .23 54 .299 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .17 60 .221 Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct y-Miami . . . . . . . . . . .53 23 .697 x-Washington . . . . . . .40 37 .519 x-Charlotte . . . . . . . . .39 38 .506 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .34 42 .447 Orlando . . . . . . . . . . .22 55 .286 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct y-Indiana . . . . . . . . . .53 25 .679 x-Chicago . . . . . . . . .45 32 .584 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .31 47 .397 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .28 49 .364 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .14 63 .182

GB — 2 1⁄2 1 12 ⁄2 22 28

GB — 13 1⁄2 1 14 ⁄2 19 31 1⁄2

GB — 7 1⁄2 22 24 1⁄2 1 38 ⁄2

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB y-San Antonio . . . . . .60 17 .779 — x-Houston . . . . . . . . .51 25 .671 8 1⁄2 1 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 31 .603 13 ⁄2 Memphis . . . . . . . . . .45 32 .584 15 28 New Orleans . . . . . . .32 45 .416 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB y-Oklahoma City . . . .55 21 .724 — x-Portland . . . . . . . . .50 28 .641 6 17 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .38 38 .500 1 Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .33 44 .429 22 ⁄2 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 53 .312 31 1⁄2 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB y-L.A. Clippers . . . . . .55 23 .705 — Golden State . . . . . . .48 29 .623 6 1⁄2 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . .46 31 .597 8 1⁄2 Sacramento . . . . . . . .27 50 .351 27 1⁄2 L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . .25 52 .325 29 1⁄2 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division

Sunday’s Games Miami 102, New York 91 L.A. Clippers 120, L.A. Lakers 97 Dallas 93, Sacramento 91 Atlanta 107, Indiana 88 Houston 130, Denver 125, OT San Antonio 112, Memphis 92 Phoenix 122, Oklahoma City 115 Golden State 130, Utah 102 Portland 100, New Orleans 94 Monday’s Games No games scheduled Tuesday’s Games Detroit at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m. San Antonio at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Brooklyn at Miami, 6 p.m. Dallas at Utah, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 8 p.m. Houston at L.A. Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Brooklyn at Orlando, 5 p.m. Charlotte at Washington, 5 p.m. Detroit at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at Toronto, 5 p.m. Boston at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Indiana at Milwaukee, 6 p.m. Miami at Memphis, 6 p.m. Phoenix at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Houston at Denver, 7 p.m. Sacramento at Portland, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m.

NHL

National Hockey League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Boston . . . . .78 53 18 7 113 251 167 x-Montreal . . . .79 45 27 7 97 212 199 x-Tampa Bay . .78 42 27 9 93 229 211 Detroit . . . . . . .78 37 27 14 88 211 222 Toronto . . . . . .79 38 33 8 84 229 248 Ottawa . . . . . .78 33 31 14 80 226 261 Florida . . . . . . .79 28 43 8 64 188 258 Buffalo . . . . . . .78 21 48 9 51 150 234 Metropolitan Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Pittsburgh . . .79 50 24 5 105 240 197 x-N.Y. Rangers 79 43 31 5 91 212 190

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Tuesday, April 8 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 11 a.m. MLB — Baltimore at N.Y. Yankees 8 p.m. MLB — L.A. Angels at Seattle NBA 6 p.m. TNT — Brooklyn at Miami 8:30 p.m. TNT — Houston at L.A. Lakers NHL 6 p.m. NBCSN — Washington at St. Louis SOCCER 12:30 p.m. FS1 — UEFA Champions League, quarterfinal, second leg, Paris at Chelsea 1 a.m. FS1 — UEFA Champions League, quarterfinal, second leg, Real Madrid at Dortmund (delayed tape) WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m. ESPN — NCAA Division I tournament, national championship, Connecticut vs. Notre Dame, at Nashville, Tenn.

Roswell Daily Record Philadelphia . .78 Columbus . . . .78 New Jersey . . .79 Washington . . .78 Carolina . . . . .78 N.Y. Islanders .78

40 40 34 35 34 31

29 31 29 30 33 36

9 7 16 13 11 11

89 87 84 83 79 73

220 220 219 207 191 201 222 236 196 215 215 258

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-St. Louis . . . .78 52 19 7 111 245 177 x-Colorado . . .78 50 21 7 107 239 209 x-Chicago . . . .79 45 19 15 105 259 207 Minnesota . . . .79 41 26 12 94 196 194 Dallas . . . . . . .78 38 29 11 87 227 221 Nashville . . . . .78 35 32 11 81 198 231 Winnipeg . . . . .80 35 35 10 80 220 233 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Anaheim . . . .79 51 20 8 110 254 202 x-San Jose . . .79 49 21 9 107 239 192 x-Los Angeles .79 45 28 6 96 197 166 Phoenix . . . . . .78 36 28 14 86 209 221 Vancouver . . . .79 35 33 11 81 187 213 Calgary . . . . . .79 34 38 7 75 201 228 Edmonton . . . .79 28 42 9 65 197 261 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference

Sunday’s Games Pittsburgh 3, Colorado 2, SO Chicago 4, St. Louis 2 Florida 3, Dallas 2 Columbus 4, N.Y. Islanders 0 Philadelphia 5, Buffalo 2 Edmonton 4, Anaheim 2 Monday’s Games Calgary 1, New Jersey 0 Minnesota 1, Winnipeg 0 Anaheim 3, Vancouver 0 Tuesday’s Games Detroit at Buffalo, 5 p.m. Ottawa at N.Y. Islanders, 5 p.m. Carolina at N.Y. Rangers, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Columbus, 5 p.m. Toronto at Tampa Bay, 5:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Florida, 5:30 p.m. Washington at St. Louis, 6 p.m. Boston at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Nashville at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Colorado at Edmonton, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Montreal at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Detroit at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Columbus at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Calgary, 8 p.m. San Jose at Anaheim, 8:30 p.m.

PGA

PGA Tour FedExCup Leaders By The Associated Press Through April 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Points Money 1. Jimmy Walker . . . . . .1,966 $3,991,071 2. Patrick Reed . . . . . . .1,343 $3,023,091 3. Dustin Johnson . . . .1,334 $3,346,150 4. Harris English . . . . . .1,253 $2,535,303 5. Bubba Watson . . . . .1,240 $2,913,007 6. Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . .1,060 $2,036,336 7. Zach Johnson . . . . . .1,031 $2,087,693 8. Matt Every . . . . . . . . . .994 $1,992,626 9. Webb Simpson . . . . . .971 $2,089,776 10. Ryan Moore . . . . . . . .902 $2,086,504 11. Will MacKenzie . . . . .880 $1,782,250 12. Jordan Spieth . . . . . .845 $1,829,223 13. Kevin Na . . . . . . . . . .834 $1,606,652 14. Kevin Stadler . . . . . . .827 $1,674,152 15. Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . .821 $1,735,107 16. Matt Jones . . . . . . . . .798 $1,605,598 17. Graham DeLaet . . . . .777 $1,716,734 18. John Senden . . . . . . .764 $1,452,464 19. Ryan Palmer . . . . . . .747 $1,466,356 20. Jason Day . . . . . . . . .720 $1,909,200 21. Keegan Bradley . . . . .719 $1,443,715 22. Brian Stuard . . . . . . .696 $1,298,185 23. Russell Henley . . . . .694 $1,444,194 24. Gary Woodland . . . . .677 $1,424,810 25. Charles Howell III . . .644 $1,190,178 26. Russell Knox . . . . . . .637 $980,121 27. Chesson Hadley . . . .620 $1,214,506 28. Ryo Ishikawa . . . . . . .616 $1,163,632 29. Steven Bowditch . . . .612 $1,265,396 30. Charley Hoffman . . . .595 $1,078,257 31. Chris Stroud . . . . . . .594 $1,188,447 32. Sergio Garcia . . . . . .592 $1,367,867 33. Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . .578 $1,038,393 34. Scott Stallings . . . . . .575 $1,195,200 35. Daniel Summerhays .572 $1,003,950 36. Pat Perez . . . . . . . . .566 $1,144,584 37. Graeme McDowell . . .550 $1,281,350 38. Brendon Todd . . . . . .540 $827,663 39. Jason Kokrak . . . . . .529 $902,675 40. Cameron Tringale . . .516 $882,750 41. Jason Bohn . . . . . . . .508 $949,014 42. Brian Harman . . . . . .490 $876,847 43. Hideki Matsuyama . . .480 $889,288 44. Rory McIlroy . . . . . . .477 $1,040,740 45. George McNeill . . . . .475 $889,750 46. Rickie Fowler . . . . . . .469 $1,125,230 47. Jerry Kelly . . . . . . . . .449 $885,391 48. Hunter Mahan . . . . . .441 $878,548 49. Adam Scott . . . . . . . .438 $910,150 50. Ian Poulter . . . . . . . . .435 $1,047,684 51. Scott Brown . . . . . . . .432 $727,900 52. Vijay Singh . . . . . . . .425 $703,538 53. Robert Garrigus . . . . .419 $613,933 54. Freddie Jacobson . . .408 $762,635 55. Justin Leonard . . . . . .407 $692,943 56. Justin Hicks . . . . . . . .399 $585,951 57. Brendan Steele . . . . .394 $668,390 58. Jason Dufner . . . . . . .389 $785,249 59. K.J. Choi . . . . . . . . . .386 $728,043 60. Jeff Overton . . . . . . . .380 $648,070 61. Marc Leishman . . . . .378 $724,969 62. Billy Horschel . . . . . .368 $691,697 63. Kevin Streelman . . . .357 $657,163 64. Seung-Yul Noh . . . . .353 $459,773 65. Briny Baird . . . . . . . . .350 $577,763 66. Luke Guthrie . . . . . . .347 $495,260 67. Brian Gay . . . . . . . . .345 $551,439 68. Luke Donald . . . . . . .340 $646,251 69. Scott Langley . . . . . .331 $593,674 70. David Hearn . . . . . . .329 $522,323 71. Bryce Molder . . . . . . .327 $637,009 72. Stuart Appleby . . . . . .326 $500,767 73. Jim Furyk . . . . . . . . . .324 $678,887 74. Tim Clark . . . . . . . . . .318 $580,228 75. Erik Compton . . . . . .317 $550,567 76. Boo Weekley . . . . . . .307 $446,976 77. Ernie Els . . . . . . . . . .306 $748,795 78. James Driscoll . . . . . .304 $343,780 79. Kevin Chappell . . . . .302 $354,147 80. Phil Mickelson . . . . . .296 $490,862 81. Camilo Villegas . . . . .296 $293,470 82. Carl Pettersson . . . . .294 $466,630 83. Justin Rose . . . . . . . .292 $634,479 84. Jim Renner . . . . . . . .289 $631,451 85. William McGirt . . . . . .288 $437,729 86. Brice Garnett . . . . . . .285 $412,409 87. Charl Schwartzel . . . .282 $595,818 88. Michael Thompson . .282 $431,778 89. Rory Sabbatini . . . . . .273 $469,607 90. Brian Davis . . . . . . . .269 $353,748 91. Danny Lee . . . . . . . . .266 $461,245 92. Chad Collins . . . . . . .266 $359,017 93. Trevor Immelman . . .265 $366,313 94. Michael Putnam . . . .264 $262,138 95. Aaron Baddeley . . . . .261 $480,565 96. Brandt Snedeker . . . .261 $583,080 97. Morgan Hoffmann . . .258 $331,091 98. Billy Hurley III . . . . . .256 $440,551 99. Henrik Stenson . . . . .252 $498,623 100. Jonas Blixt . . . . . . . .251 $411,180 101. Sang-Moon Bae . . . .246 $396,969 102. Martin Flores . . . . . .244 $407,500 103. Retief Goosen . . . . .238 $415,396 104. Brendon de Jonge . .237 $323,064 105. Greg Chalmers . . . . .232 $379,811 106. J.B. Holmes . . . . . . .231 $398,090 107. John Merrick . . . . . . .230 $304,912 108. James Hahn . . . . . . .227 $229,095 109. Ben Martin . . . . . . . .226 $370,980 110. Richard H. Lee . . . . .224 $395,069 111. Josh Teater . . . . . . . .224 $221,338 112. Lee Westwood . . . . .216 $373,875 113. Ricky Barnes . . . . . .214 $286,612 114. Spencer Levin . . . . . .213 $241,060

115. Tim Wilkinson . . . . . .209 116. Nick Watney . . . . . . .209 117. Charlie Beljan . . . . . .208 118. J.J. Henry . . . . . . . . .201 119. Tyrone Van Aswegen 199 120. Andrew Loupe . . . . .198 121. David Lingmerth . . . .198 122. Jhonnattan Vegas . .195 123. Wes Roach . . . . . . . .195 124. Ken Duke . . . . . . . . .195 125. Hudson Swafford . . .192 126. Stewart Cink . . . . . . .189 127. Louis Oosthuizen . . .189 128. Sean O’Hair . . . . . . .188 129. Martin Laird . . . . . . .187 130. Roberto Castro . . . . .186 131. Robert Allenby . . . . .181 132. Ben Crane . . . . . . . .179 133. G. Fndz-Castano . . .177 134. Nicholas Thompson .176 135. Ben Curtis . . . . . . . .171 136. David Toms . . . . . . . .169 137. John Huh . . . . . . . . .165 138. Jason Gore . . . . . . . .164 139. Jonathan Byrd . . . . .163 140. Charlie Wi . . . . . . . . .159 141. Andres Romero . . . .159 142. Bo Van Pelt . . . . . . .157 143. Andrew Svoboda . . .149 144. Peter Hanson . . . . . .147 145. Geoff Ogilvy . . . . . . .145 146. Troy Matteson . . . . .144 146. Ted Potter, Jr. . . . . . .144 148. Y.E. Yang . . . . . . . . .142 149. Robert Streb . . . . . . .139 150. John Rollins . . . . . . .137

Transactions

$430,316 $264,650 $342,698 $273,756 $211,703 $396,660 $299,186 $240,369 $299,090 $340,170 $239,748 $315,837 $437,000 $305,816 $259,662 $272,550 $223,630 $280,571 $264,067 $193,987 $241,759 $228,035 $183,595 $259,557 $249,535 $220,233 $203,451 $216,697 $183,740 $218,628 $241,021 $246,484 $147,363 $161,864 $210,206 $155,823

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Acquired RHP Preston Guilmet from Cleveland for OF Torsten Boss, and optioned him to Norfolk (IL). Transferred OF Nolan Reimold to the 60-day DL. BOSTON RED SOX — Signed INF Ryan Roberts. Optioned INF Brock Holt to Pawtucket (IL). Transferred RHP Steven Wright to the 60-day DL. CLEVELAND INDIANS — Traded LHP Colt Hynes to the L.A. Dodgers for RHP Duke von Schamann. Promoted Court Berry-Tripp to assistant director of baseball information. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Placed LHP Tim Collins and LHP Francisley Bueno on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Michael Mariot and LHP Donnie Joseph from Omaha (PCL). MINNESOTA TWINS — Placed INF-OF Jason Bartlett on the 15-day DL. Recalled C-OF Chris Herrmann from Rochester (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES — Traded INF Eduardo Nunez to Minnesota for LHP Miguel Sulbaran. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Optioned RHP Evan Scribner to Sacramento (PCL). Reinstated RHP Ryan Cook from the 15-day DL. Sent OF Craig Gentry to Sacramento (PCL) for a rehab assignment. TEXAS RANGERS — Placed LHP Joe Saunders on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Saturday. Recalled RHP Daniel McCutchen from Frisco (Texas). National League CINCINNATI REDS — Reinstated C Devin Mesoraco from the 15-day DL. Optioned C Tucker Barnhart to Louisville (IL). COLORADO ROCKIES — Optioned OF Corey Dickerson to Colorado Springs (PCL). Reinstated LHP Boone Logan from the 15day DL. LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Designated OF Mike Baxter for assignment. Optioned RHP Colt Hynes to Albuquerque (PCL). Sent RHP Chad Billingsley to Rancho Cucamonga (Cal) for a rehab assignment. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHICAGO BULLS — Signed G-F Ronnie Brewer for the remainder of the season. PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Signed G-F Adonis Thomas to a 10-day contract. FOOTBALL National Football League CAROLINA PANTHERS — Signed WR Jason Avant to a one-year contract. DETROIT LIONS — Signed CB Cassius Vaughn to a one-year contract. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS —Retained S Rafael Bush by matching the offer from Atlanta. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Signed S Major Wright and WR Lavelle Hawkins. Released LB Marvin Booker. TENNESSEE TITANS — Waived DE Adewale Ojomo. Canadian Football League B.C. LIONS — Signed QB Steven Jyles. WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Named Cory McDiarmid linebackers coach. Signed DL-LB Louie Richardson and RB Nic Grigsby. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL — Suspended Philadelphia F Zac Rinaldo four games for an illegal check to the head of Buffalo D Chad Ruhwedel during an April 6 game. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Recalled F Jack Skille from Springfield (AHL). FLORIDA PANTHERS — Recalled F Drew Shore from San Antonio (AHL). Reassigned F Bobby Butler to San Antonio. NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Reassigned F Colton Sissons to Milwaukee (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Recalled F Brett Gallant from Bridgeport (AHL) on an emergency basis. Returned F Johan Sundstrom to Bridgeport. NEW YORK RANGERS — Recalled F Jesper Fast from Hartford (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES — Signed D Justin Hache to a three-year entry-level contract. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Promoted chief operating officer Steve Griggs to president. Signed vice president and general manager Steve Yzerman to a four-year contract extension. WINNIPEG JETS — Called up F Carl Klingberg from the St. John’s (AHL). MOTORSPORTS WATKINS GLEN INTERNATIONAL — Named Jeff Nelson corporate sales executive. COLLEGE ARIZONA STATE — Announced Eric Musselman, men’s associate head basketball coach, is leaving the program to pursue other opportunities. AUBURN — Named Chuck Person men’s assistant basketball coach. CAMPBELL — Named Ed Joyce men’s assistant soccer coach. FLORIDA ATLANTIC — Named Michael Curry men’s basketball coach. INDIANA STATE — Named Jeff Mills defensive line coach. IOWA STATE — Announced men’s junior basketball C Percy Gibson is transferring following the end of the spring semester. MANHATTAN — Named Matt Grady men’s interim basketball coach until men’s basketball coach Steve Masiello receives his degree from the University of Kentucky. MARQUETTE — Named Chris Carrawell men’s assistant basketball coach. MINNESOTA — Named Marlene Stollings women’s basketball coach. MISSOURI — Suspended WR Dorial Green-Beckham indefinitely. OKLAHOMA STATE — Announced junior G Marcus Smart will enter the NBA draft.


SPORTS

Major

Continued from Page B1

Wie birdied the final hole for a 71. She used her driver only four times, choosing to hit fairway woods on the other 10 driving holes — leaving her as much as 60 yards behind Thompson. When both hit 3-woods, Thompson also had the advantage. “I stuck with my game plan and I think it was the right play,” Wie said. “Who knows? In hindsight you would do something here or do something there, make a putt there. That’s the way golf is. I just couldn’t get anything going today.” Thompson finished at 14under 274 at Mission Hills for her fourth LPGA Tour victory. She opened with a 73, shot a tournament-best 64 on Friday and had a 69 on Saturday to tie for the lead with Wie at 10 under. The 6-foot Florida player had only one bogey — when

she missed a 3-footer on the par-5 18th Saturday — in her last 55 holes. “When I had a bad hole, I’d just fight right back,” Thompson said. “Or if I hit a bad shot, just know that I can get it up-and-down or get it on the green.” Five years after she first played the event as a 14year-old amateur, Thompson became the secondyoungest major winner at 19 years, 1 month, 27 days. Morgan Pressel set the mark in 2007 at Mission Hills at 18 years, 10 months, 9 days. “It has been an honor to play at this tournament so many years,” Thompson said. “Only being 19 and to win it is the biggest honor ever.” Thompson has three victories in her last 12 starts, winning in Malaysia and Mexico late last season. She also won the 2011 Navistar LPGA at 16 to become the youngest winner in tour history, a mark

broken by Lydia Ko in the 2012 Canadian Women’s Open. “I’m really looking forward to the future,” Thompson said. The 24-year-old Wie won the last of her two tour titles in 2010. “I’m just proud of myself for how the week went,” Wie said. Thompson hammered a drive 40 yards past Wie’s 3wood on the par-4 opening hole and took the lead with a 15-foot birdie putt. Wie pulled even with a birdie on the par -5 second, then bogeyed the par-4 third — missing from 6 feet after leaving a chip short. Thompson birdied Nos. 4 and 5. She hit a 3-wood 30 yards past Wie’s 3-wood and made a 12-foot putt on the par-4 fourth, and holed a 5-footer on the par -3 fifth. Thompson picked up another stroke on the par-3 eighth when Wie missed a 2-foot par putt, and pushed

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

B3

ROSWELL NATIVE GERINA PILLER ON THE LPGA TOUR

PILLER’S

PROFESSION

74 T-11th -2

KRAFT NABISCO CHAMPIONSHIP

ROUND SCORE

Hole Par Score

PLACE

TOTAL TO PAR

ROUND SCORECARD

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total 4 5 4 4 3 4 4 3 5 36 4 5 4 4 3 4 4 3 5 36 72 4 4 4 5 3 4 4 4 4 36 5 4 3 3 5 5 4 4 5 38 74

HKPCN

Roswell Daily Record

Eagles: 0 Birdies: 5 Pars: 7 Bogeys: 5 Others: 1 Fairways hit: 7 of 14 Greens hit: 12 of 18 Putts: 32

her lead to five with an 8foot birdie putt on the par5 ninth. Wie birdied the first two holes where she used her driver, hitting it past Thompson on Nos. 2 and 11 — both par 5s. Wie also hit driver on the par -4 13th, setting up a wedge

that she hit to 4 feet. But she left the birdie putt short to remain four strokes back. “I think it got to a point where I just tried too hard,” Wie said. Wie cut it to three on No. 14, holing a 12-footer, but dropped a stroke on the

17th. “Lexi played amazing,” Wie said. “She played probably the best I’ve ever seen her play. She hit the ball so well. ... It was just hard to catch up to her all day.” Stacy Lewis, the 2011 winner, had a 67 to finish third at 7 under.

MLB: Red Sox snap slide with win over Rangers

BOSTON (AP) — John Lackey pitched seven strong innings, Jackie Bradley Jr. singled in two runs and the Boston Red Sox snapped a three-game losing streak with a 5-1 win over the Texas Rangers on Monday night. The Red Sox never lost more than three straight last year when they won the World Series. They avoided dropping their first four home games for the first time since 1984. Lackey (2-0) allowed an unearned run and five hits in seven innings five days after giving up two runs over six innings in a 6-2 win at Baltimore. Chris Capuano pitched the eighth and Koji Uehara escaped a second-and-third jam in the ninth in a non-save situation. Tanner Scheppers (0-1) allowed Bradley’s run-scoring hits in the second and fourth, and Boston added three runs in the eighth. Bradley, Mike Napoli and A.J. Pierzynski each had three singles for the Red Sox. Boston took a 1-0 lead in the second on an RBI single by Bradley after singles by Xander Bogaerts and Pierzynski. Texas tied it in the fourth on singles by Adrian Beltre and Alex Rios, a passed ball and a sacrifice fly by Mitch Moreland. Bradley came through again in the fourth with another run-scoring single after Pierzynski singled and went to third on a single by Jonathan Herrera. The Red Sox stranded runners at second and third in the fifth after Napoli and Grady Sizemore singled and both advanced on a passed ball. Pierzynski ended the inning by striking out. Then the Rangers left runners at second and third with a chance to tie the game in the seventh. The threat ended when J.P. Arencibia grounded out to second as Lackey pounded his glove while walking off the mound after facing his final batter. But the Red Sox wasted a chance to extend their lead in the seventh when Bogaerts struck out with runners at second and third and two outs against Seth Rosin.

UConn

Continued from Page B1

corner that would’ve given the ‘Cats the lead. Kentucky never got closer. One key difference in a six-point loss: Kentucky’s 11 missed free throws — a flashback of sorts for coach John Calipari, whose Memphis team blew a late lead against Kansas after missing multiple free throws in the 2008 final. The Wildcats went 13 for 24. UConn went 10 for 10, including Lasan Kromah’s two to seal the game with 25.1 seconds left. “We had our chances to win,” Calipari said. “We’re missing shots, we’re missing free throws. We just didn’t have enough.” In all, Calipari’s One and Doners got outdone by a more fundamentally sound, more-seasoned group that came into this tournament a seventh-seeded afterthought but walked away with the program’s fourth national title since 1999. They were the highest seed to win it all since Rollie Massimino’s eighthseeded Villanova squad in 1985. Napier and Boatright now go down with Kemba Walker, Emeka Okafor, Richard Hamilton and all those other UConn champs. This adds to the school’s titles in 1999, 2004 and 2011. This one was, by far, the most unexpected. A short year ago, UConn was preparing for its first season in the new American Athletic Conference after being booted from the Big East and not welcomed by any of the socalled power conferences. Longtime coach Jim Calhoun left because of

Rockies

Continued from Page B1

Chicago right-hander Felipe Paulino (0-1) allowed six ear ned runs on nine hits and four walks in 4 1/3 innings in his return to Coors Field, where he pitched for the Rockies in 2011 before being plagued

Boston reached Rosin for three runs in the eighth when Pierzynski singled, went to second on a walk to Herrera and scored when Bradley bunted for a single and first baseman Prince Fielder threw wildly for an error. The other runs scored on a single by Daniel Nava and a fielder’s choice groundout by Dustin Pedroia.

Yankees 4, Orioles 2 NEW YORK (AP) — Derek Jeter gave Yangervis Solarte some assistance with Yankee Stadium tradition, then the rookie helped make the captain a winner in his final home opener Monday as New York beat the Baltimore Orioles. Jeter doubled high off the left-field wall and scored on Jacoby Ellsbury’s single in the fifth. Hiroki Kuroda (1-1) went 6 1⁄3 sharp innings in the Yankees’ 112th opener in New York. Jeter was cheered every step of the way by an adoring crowd of 48,142, even when his double-play grounder back to Ubaldo Jimenez (0-2) scored Solarte for the first run. Playing in his first game in the Bronx, Solarte needed Jeter to tell him to wave to the Bleacher Creatures when they chanted his name during pregame roll call. Shawn Kelley pitched a perfect ninth for his first career save. After the game, the Yankees said closer David Robertson would be put on the disabled list with a strained groin. Royals 4, Rays 2 KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Jason Vargas took a shutout into the ninth inning, Alcides Escobar hit a three-run double and Kansas City beat Tampa Bay in a game that included two significant injuries. Rays starter Matt Moore (0-2) came out in the fifth inning with a sore left elbow. The All-Star lefty grimaced after throwing a pitch to Norichika Aoki and was immediately removed by manager Joe Maddon. Two innings later, Royals second baseman Omar Infante was hit in the face by a pitch from reliever Heath Bell.

health problems. And most damaging — the NCAA ban triggered an exodus of five key players to the NBA or other schools. Napier stuck around. So did Boatright. And Calhoun’s replacement, Kevin Ollie, figured out how to make their grit, court sense and loyalty, pay off. “It’s not about going to the next level, it’s not about going to the pros, but playing for your university, playing for your teammates,” Niels Giffey said. “And I’m so proud of all the guys on this team that stuck with this team.” They were one step ahead of Kentucky all night, holding off furious rally after furious rally. Kentucky’s biggest push started when James Young (20 points, seven rebounds) posterized Amida Brimah with a monster dunk to start a three-point play and trigger an 8-0 run. In the middle of that, Boatright, who shut down Harrison’s twin brother, Andrew, most of the night, twisted his left ankle while receiving an innocuous-looking pass from Napier. He called a timeout. Got it worked on and came back out. “I’ve got a lot of heart and I wasn’t coming out,” Boatright said. “We put in too much work all year for me to give up on an ankle sprain.” Napier and Giffey made 3s on UConn’s two possessions after the timeout, and that one-point lead was back up to five — fairly comfortable by this tight, taut, buzzerbeating tournament’s standards. The big question in Kentucky is what will happen to all those freshmen. Julius Randle (10 points, six rebounds) is a lottery pick if he

by arm troubles the last two years. Gonzalez, who has hit safely in each of the Rockies’ eight games so far, lined a fastball over the right field wall in the first inning for his third homer of the season. Lyles helped his own cause with a double into left-center an inning later that scored D.J. LeMahieu from first

leaves for the NBA. Young and the Harrison brothers could be firstrounders. The big question is whether they’ll want to leave on this note. “I think all these kids are coming back, so I think we should be good,” Calipari deadpanned, getting big laughs. He called his group the most coachable bunch he’s ever had. They were preseason No. 1, a huge disappointment through much of this season, then came on just in time for a run to the final. But they got outdone by a team on a different sort of mission — a team led by Napier, who stuck with the program even though he knew the 2012-13 season was for nothing but fun. Oh, what fun this was, though. Napier was named the Final Four’s Most Outstanding Player and he earned it on both ends of the court, keeping a hand in Aaron Harrison’s face most of the night and holding him to a 3-for -7, sevenpoint, no-damage night. He could also shoot it a bit — including a 3-pointer in the first half when UConn was having trouble dissecting the Kentucky zone. The shot came from about 30 feet, right in front of the edge of the Final Four logo at Center Court, or, as Dick Vitale put it: “He shot that one from Fort Worth.” They felt it back in Storrs, where they could be celebrating another title shortly. The UConn women play for the national title Tuesday. If they win, it will be the first sweep of the titles since 2004. The last school to do it: UConn, of course.

base for a 2-0 lead. The Rockies loaded the bases in the third and Wilin Rosario bounced an infield single off Paulino. But he escaped further damage by striking out Nolan Arenado and getting LeMahieu to fly out to shallow left. Colorado loaded the bases again in the fifth and LeMahieu’s single just over the glove of second base-

man Marcus Semien made it 4-0 and chased Paulino. Lyles, who singled leading off the fourth, greeted right-hander Daniel Webb with a line-drive RBI single up the middle to make it 50, and Charlie Blackmon followed with a sacrifice fly. Tulowitzki opened the sixth with a solo shot to right-center off Webb for his first homer of the year.

Infante also left the game, walking off under his own power with two trainers. Infante, struck on the left cheek, was spitting blood and had blood on his forehead as trainers held a towel to his face. Vargas (1-0) allowed four hits in eight-plus innings, lowering his ERA to 1.20 in two starts. He lost his shutout bid when Ben Zobrist homered on his second pitch in the ninth. Greg Holland earned his third save, but not before giving up an RBI single to pinch-hitter Matt Joyce. Escobar was 1 for 19 before his bases-loaded double off the left field wall with two outs in the seventh. Evan Longoria had three hits for the Rays, who have lost seven straight at Kauffman Stadium.

Angels 9, Astros 1 HOUSTON (AP) — C.J. Wilson pitched eight solid innings, Howie Kendrick and Raul Ibanez each drove in three runs and the Los Angeles Angels beat the Houston Astros. The Angels took three of four from Houston after starting the season 0-3. Kole Calhoun homered off Houston starter Jarred Cosart (1-1). Wilson (1-1) yielded four hits and a run while fanning seven.

Athletics 8, Twins 3 MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Yoenis Cespedes proved he can play through a hurting right heel, giving Scott Kazmir and the Oakland Athletics a spark with a pair of RBIs that helped spoil Minnesota’s home opener. Cespedes has been hobbling around the last few days with the injury, but the team wasn’t worried enough about it to hold him out of the lineup. The Cuban slugger hit a double in the second inning for the first run against Kevin Correia (0-1) and later had a sacrifice fly. Moss added a two-run single in the third and Derek Norris homered in the sixth. Kazmir (2-0) allowed three runs and six hits.

NATIONAL LEAGUE Cardinals 5, Reds 3 ST. LOUIS (AP) — Michael Wacha outpitched Tony Cingrani in a rematch of young power arms and the St. Louis Cardinals got a three-run double from Yadier Molina in the first inning, beating the Cincinnati Reds 5-3 in their home opener Monday. A standing-room crowd of 47,492, the largest at 9-yearold Busch Stadium, braved daylong rain and temperatures in the 40s to greet the National League champions and take a look at the new Ballpark Village. Hundreds milled about the attached complex, which features five sports bars and rooftop seating. The Cardinals bunched three hits and a walk over the first five hitters to take the early lead against Cingrani (0-1), who allowed two hits in seven scoreless innings six days earlier against St. Louis at home. Matt Holliday and Allen Craig added RBIs in the seventh. The 22-year-old Wacha (1-0) hadn’t allowed a run in 21 career innings against the Reds before back-to-back doubles by Brayan Pena and pinch-hitter Roger Bernadina in the fifth. The NL championship series MVP benefited from two double-play balls in six stingy innings and has permitted one run in 13 2⁄3 innings his first two starts.

Demons sweep DH The Dexter softball registered a sweep of the Goddard JV team on Monday, improving to 10-4 on the year. The Demons won Game 1 11-0 in five innings and triumphed 11-3 in Game 2 to complete the sweep. In Game 1, the Demons won a shortened af fair behind Bryana Munoz. The eighth-grader pitched a gem in the circle, sprinkling two hits over five innings and striking out seven to get the shutout victory. She also drove in two runs to help her own cause. The Demons scored six times in the second, then added two in the third and three in the fifth to get the win.

Kali Crandall had three RBIs for the Demons. In Game 2, Crandall, another eighth-grader, was the ace in the circle. She allowed just three hits over seven innings of work and struck out 13 Rockets to claim the victory. Dexter went up 3-0 in the fourth, before Goddard made it 3-2 with a pair in the bottom half of the same inning. Both teams scored once in the sixth before Dexter pulled away by striking for seven in the top of the seventh. Ariana Chavez was a per fect 4 for 4 at the dish, including a solo home run. Kassandra Madrid drove in two runs for Dexter.


B4 Tuesday, April 8, 2014

FINANCIAL / SPORTS

The perfect title game: UConn vs. Notre Dame

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Women’s basketball came away a winner Sunday night. After a seasonlong buildup, the NCAA tournament will be decided by the per fect championship game. The undefeated titans of the sport this season will meet Tuesday night in a historic championship game when UConn plays Notre Dame. It will mark the first time in NCAA basketball history that unbeaten teams will play for a title when the former Big East rivals face each other. “It is pretty amazing,” Irish coach Muffet McGraw told The Associated Press after her team beat Maryland 87-61. “So many of the media and fans have been looking at this all season long. It’s great that we’ve made it this far. “Both of us remaining undefeated. See who the best team is.” Said UConn guard From Moriah Jefferson: “Now we can finally talk about it. That has been the talk of this whole tournament and I guess it is finally here.” The teams didn’t play during the regular season this year for the first time since 1995 as Notre Dame moved to the ACC. That helped set up the championship showdown that will put the sport in the spot-

No. 1 Connecticut Huskies

Coach: Geno Auriemma

4 Moriah Jefferson 11 Briana Pulido 12 Saniya Chong 13 Brianna Banks 14 Bria Hartley

Player Stewart Hartley Mosqueda-Lewis Dolson Jefferson Tuck Chong Stokes Banks Lawlor Pulido UCONN Opponents Player Stewart Hartley Mosqueda-Lewis Dolson Jefferson Tuck Chong Stokes Banks Lawlor Pulido UCONN Opponents

G-GS 39-39 39-39 27-25 39-39 39-39 8-0 38-4 38-2 36-8 30-0 27-0 39 39 Off 87 26 47 80 32 11 16 85 20 1 2 461 483

Min 1182 1245 778 1254 1149 116 664 710 526 114 62 — — Def 228 116 98 275 99 8 53 185 37 9 7 1201 828

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Apr 14 143.42 143.42 127.82 143.02 Jun 14 134.92 135.15 134.35 134.92 Aug 14 132.27 132.82 131.95 132.67 Oct 14 136.97 137.57 136.65 137.50 Dec 14 138.90 139.70 138.80 139.65 Feb 15 139.90 140.35 139.70 140.35 Apr 15 140.17 140.60 140.00 140.60 Jun 15 133.80 Aug 15 132.75 Last spot N/A Est. sales 30287. Fri’s Sales: 74,357 Fri’s open int: 356576, off -21344 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Apr 14 177.65 177.65 177.00 177.50 May 14 178.57 178.90 177.52 178.85 Aug 14 179.92 180.65 179.22 180.50 Sep 14 179.92 180.67 179.12 180.65 Oct 14 180.05 180.52 179.40 180.50 Nov 14 179.17 180.10 178.70 179.90 Jan 15 175.97 177.05 175.50 177.05 Mar 15 173.97 174.00 173.50 174.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 7118. Fri’s Sales: 7,940 Fri’s open int: 47596, off -463 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Apr 14 123.47 125.60 123.10 125.02 May 14 119.30 120.90 117.60 120.75 Jun 14 120.02 121.92 119.87 121.67 Jul 14 117.40 119.35 117.17 118.55 Aug 14 116.80 118.40 116.80 117.90 Oct 14 100.25 102.15 80.00 102.15 Dec 14 89.12 90.80 89.00 90.65 Feb 15 86.60 87.10 86.60 87.07 Apr 15 85.50 85.50 85.50 85.50 May 15 89.00 Jun 15 90.75 90.75 90.75 90.75 Jul 15 90.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 35981. Fri’s Sales: 41,823 Fri’s open int: 275258, off -1551341fl

chg.

-.03 +.12 +.40 +.60 +.80 +.55 +.40

-.20 +.33 +.28 +.48 +.38 +.30 +1.05

+1.87 +.25 +1.12 +1.00 +.75 +1.00 +1.55 +.57 +.25 +.25

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 14 92.25 92.86 90.53 90.62 Jul 14 92.41 93.07 91.13 91.17 Oct 14 81.16 Dec 14 80.00 80.14 79.40 79.84 Mar 15 79.97 80.02 79.47 79.81 May 15 80.03 80.04 79.99 79.99 Jul 15 79.95 80.02 79.65 80.02 Oct 15 79.85 Dec 15 79.20 Mar 16 79.34 May 16 79.48 Jul 16 79.56 Oct 16 79.64 Dec 16 79.65 Mar 17 79.81 Last spot N/A Est. sales 31238. Fri’s Sales: 24,618 Fri’s open int: 184587, up +1043

chg.

-1.78 -1.50 -.79 -.08 -.04 +.03 +.12 +.14 +.11 +.11 +.11 +.11 +.11 +.11 +.11

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 14 670ü 679ø 665ø 676ü Jul 14 677ø 685fl 672ü 683ø Sep 14 687fl 694 681ø 692fl Dec 14 699ø 707ü 695ü 706ü Mar 15 712fl 718 707fl 718 May 15 720ü 725fl 720ü 725fl Jul 15 710 720 708ø 719ü

chg.

+6ø +7 +7ø +8 +9 +9ü +7ø

Pos G G G G G

Tot 315 142 145 355 131 19 69 270 57 10 9 1662 1311

Ht 5-7 5-7 5-8 5-9 5-8

Yr So So Fr Jr Sr

20 Tierney Lawlor

G

30 Breanna Stewart

F

23 Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis

F

31 Stefanie Dolson

41 Kiah Stokes

Avg FG-FGA Pct 30.3 281-571 .492 31.9 236-496 .476 28.8 131-280 .468 32.2 199-354 .562 29.5 155-265 .585 14.5 24-49 .490 17.5 60-143 .420 18.7 68-113 .602 14.6 48-102 .471 3.8 12-29 .414 2.3 3-12 .250 — 1217-2414 .504 — 730-2363 .309 Avg PF DQ 8.1 61 0 3.6 56 0 5.4 41 0 9.1 89 0 3.4 60 1 2.4 9 0 1.8 33 0 7.1 57 0 1.6 42 1 0.3 9 0 0.3 2 0 42.6 459 2 33.6 616 -

Sep 15 718 722fl 718 722fl Dec 15 721 730ü 721 730ü Mar 16 725ü 732ø 725ü 732ø May 16 715 721 715 721 Jul 16 681fl 689ü 681fl 689ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 141963. Fri’s Sales: 117,433 Fri’s open int: 382487, up +6901 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 14 500ü 502ø 494ø 499ü Jul 14 506 508 500ü 505ü Sep 14 505 507fl 500ø 505ø Dec 14 505fl 508 500ü 505ø Mar 15 511fl 514ø 506fl 512 May 15 515fl 519 512 516fl Jul 15 520ü 522ø 515 520 Sep 15 505fl 505fl 505 505 Dec 15 496ø 497ø 491ü 496ü Mar 16 501 502fl 501 502fl May 16 506ü 506fl 506ü 506fl Jul 16 508 508fl 508 508fl Sep 16 492ø 493ø 492ø 493ø Dec 16 486ü 488fl 486ü 488fl Jul 17 500ø 501ø 500ø 501ø Dec 17 470 471 470 471 Last spot N/A Est. sales 367776. Fri’s Sales: 248,782 Fri’s open int: 1392021, up +5210 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 14 414 423fl 412ü 419 Jul 14 368ø 374fl 362ø 362ø Sep 14 354ü 354ü 351fl 351fl Dec 14 348fl 350 340ø 340ø Mar 15 344ø 344ø 339 339 May 15 347ü 347ü 341fl 341fl Jul 15 347ü 347ü 341fl 341fl Sep 15 347ü 347ü 341fl 341fl Dec 15 347ü 347ü 341fl 341fl Mar 16 347ü 347ü 341fl 341fl Jul 16 348ü 348ü 342fl 342fl Sep 16 348ü 348ü 342fl 342fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 1380. Fri’s Sales: 408 Fri’s open int: 9031, off -44 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 14 1472ü 1479ø 1459ø 1464ü Jul 14 1453ø 1460fl 1442ø 1448ü Aug 14 1374 1382ø 1366ø 1372fl Sep 14 1256ü 1264ø 1249fl 1257 Nov 14 1206ø 1212 1199ø 1208ü Jan 15 1210ø 1216 1204ü 1213ü Mar 15 1214fl 1220 1210 1216fl May 15 1223ü 1223ü 1213ü 1220ø Jul 15 1227fl 1227fl 1219 1225ø Aug 15 1199 1205 1199 1205 Sep 15 1182fl 1182fl 1177 1177 Nov 15 1172 1174ø 1163ü 1169 Jan 16 1162ü 1168 1162ü 1168 Mar 16 1165fl 1165fl 1164ø 1164ø May 16 1164fl 1164fl 1163ø 1163ø Jul 16 1168ø 1168ø 1160fl 1160fl Aug 16 1160 1160 1158fl 1158fl Sep 16 1136 1136 1134fl 1134fl Nov 16 1106 1107 1105 1105fl Jul 17 1113ø 1113ø 1112ü 1112ü Nov 17 1090ø 1090ø 1089ü 1089ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 170230. Fri’s Sales: 148,149 Fri’s open int: 635387, off -5849

3P-3PA 48-138 80-215 64-153 8-27 33-78 7-17 30-93 0-0 13-44 8-19 0-2 291-786 173-661 A TO 118 65 170 80 70 34 128 101 188 65 8 11 60 27 32 34 45 27 3 3 3 1 825 456 371 654

FUTURES +7fl +7ü +7ü +7ü +7ø

C

Pct .348 .372 .418 .296 .423 .412 .323 — .295 .421 .000 .370 .262 BS 108 2 5 90 9 1 8 89 6 0 0 318 86

+8ü -3 -2ø -5ø -5ø -5ø -5ø -5ø -5ø -5ø -5ø -5ø

-9ø -6fl -1fl -ü -ü -ü -1 -1 -1fl -2ø -1ü -1ü -1ü -1ü -1ü -1ü -1ü -1ü

Fr

6-4

So

6-3

Jr

6-0 6-5

FT-FTA 146-187 82-118 30-33 75-95 53-69 5-9 33-40 35-47 19-29 1-4 0-2 479-633 222-339 ST Pts 63 756 67 634 18 356 40 481 104 396 4 60 24 183 12 171 34 128 2 33 2 6 370 3204 211 1855

settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. May 14 100.91 101.32 99.92 100.44 Jun 14 100.27 100.64 99.29 99.78 Jul 14 99.45 99.80 98.55 99.03 Aug 14 98.56 98.83 97.70 98.18 Sep 14 97.61 97.93 96.81 97.32 Oct 14 96.78 96.86 96.00 96.44 Nov 14 95.86 95.96 95.18 95.59 Dec 14 94.99 95.26 94.24 94.79 Jan 15 93.84 94.21 93.51 93.94 Feb 15 93.14 Mar 15 92.36 92.70 92.04 92.43 Apr 15 91.45 91.77 91.25 91.77 May 15 91.21 Jun 15 90.64 90.95 90.15 90.67 Jul 15 90.04 Aug 15 89.48 Sep 15 88.90 89.02 88.90 89.02 Oct 15 88.58 Nov 15 88.22 Dec 15 88.06 88.18 87.45 87.89 Jan 16 87.40 87.40 87.30 87.40 Feb 16 86.84 86.94 86.84 86.94 Mar 16 86.40 86.51 86.40 86.51 Apr 16 86.12 May 16 85.83 Jun 16 85.65 85.65 85.59 85.59 Last spot N/A Est. sales 562064. Fri’s Sales: 457,648 Fri’s open int: 1662364, up +6894 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon May 14 2.9313 2.9461 2.8946 2.9260 Jun 14 2.9068 2.9188 2.8716 2.9005 Jul 14 2.8550 2.8848 2.8411 2.8683 Aug 14 2.8214 2.8482 2.8066 2.8327 Sep 14 2.7746 2.8055 2.7671 2.7927 Oct 14 2.6270 2.6504 2.6171 2.6405 Nov 14 2.5865 2.6110 2.5800 2.6014 Dec 14 2.5595 2.5821 2.5503 2.5753 Jan 15 2.5557 2.5626 2.5410 2.5626 Feb 15 2.5621

3 Whitney Holloway 5 Kristina Nelson 12 Taya Reimer 15 Lindsay Allen 21 Kayla McBride

Sr

Pct .781 .695 .909 .789 .768 .556 .825 .745 .655 .250 .000 .757 .655 Avg 19.4 16.3 13.2 12.3 10.2 7.5 4.8 4.5 3.6 1.1 0.2 82.2 47.6

OIL/GASOLINE/NG low

Coach: Muffet McGraw

Jr

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

-2ø -2ü -1ø -1ü -1 -1ü -2 -fl -ü +1 +ø +fl +1 +2ø +1 +1

C

5-7

chg.

-.70 -.68 -.59 -.52 -.45 -.38 -.34 -.30 -.24 -.18 -.14 -.12 -.10 -.10 -.10 -.11 -.12 -.13 -.14 -.15 -.15 -.14 -.13 -.13 -.13 -.12

-.0053 -.0063 -.0066 -.0068 -.0062 -.0074 -.0074 -.0072 -.0067 -.0061

Player Loyd McBride Achonwa Mabrey Reimer Allen Cable Braker Wright Nelson Holloway Huffman Thompson NOTRE DAME Opponents Player Loyd McBride Achonwa Mabrey Reimer Allen Cable Braker Wright Nelson Holloway Huffman Thompson NOTRE DAME Opponents

No. 1 Notre Dame Fighting Irish

G-GS 36-36 37-37 33-33 37-1 37-5 37-37 36-0 36-36 35-0 31-0 31-0 31-0 16-0 37 37 Off 95 43 70 4 63 10 33 83 34 9 1 22 6 530 464

Mar 15 2.5492 2.5725 2.5492 2.5725 Apr 15 2.7175 2.7410 2.7175 2.7410 May 15 2.7375 Jun 15 2.7200 Jul 15 2.6965 Aug 15 2.6700 Sep 15 2.6380 Oct 15 2.4980 Nov 15 2.4620 Dec 15 2.4375 Jan 16 2.4375 Feb 16 2.4395 Mar 16 2.4495 Apr 16 2.5745 May 16 2.5745 Jun 16 2.5645 Last spot N/A Est. sales 132930. Fri’s Sales: 133,652 Fri’s open int: 288308, up +1624 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu May 14 4.443 4.528 4.430 4.476 Jun 14 4.471 4.553 4.458 4.502 Jul 14 4.506 4.590 4.497 4.540 Aug 14 4.522 4.584 4.522 4.538 Sep 14 4.503 4.558 4.500 4.516 Oct 14 4.512 4.568 4.512 4.526 Nov 14 4.556 4.612 4.556 4.573 Dec 14 4.704 4.720 4.671 4.683 Jan 15 4.776 4.800 4.754 4.763 Feb 15 4.731 4.756 4.723 4.723 Mar 15 4.605 4.648 4.605 4.619 Apr 15 4.145 4.150 4.125 4.138 May 15 4.103 4.111 4.095 4.108 Jun 15 4.123 4.128 4.110 4.122 Jul 15 4.151 4.151 4.148 4.148 Aug 15 4.144 4.147 4.130 4.140 Sep 15 4.115 4.127 4.113 4.116 Oct 15 4.134 4.136 4.132 4.136 Nov 15 4.175 4.176 4.175 4.176 Dec 15 4.309 4.314 4.305 4.310 Jan 16 4.428 4.440 4.428 4.440 Feb 16 4.405 4.417 4.405 4.417 Mar 16 4.345 4.357 4.345 4.357 Apr 16 4.075 4.085 4.075 4.085 May 16 4.091 Jun 16 4.106 Last spot N/A Est. sales 256039. Fri’s Sales: 149,974 Fri’s open int: 1113091, up +8392

METALS

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Mon. Aluminum -$0.8209 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.0285 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.0635 N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Lead - $2046.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9064 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1299.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1298.00 troy oz., NY Merc spot Mon. Silver - $19.875 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $19.891 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Platinum -$1435.00 troy oz., Handy & Harman. Platinum -$1426.30 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

convincing 87-61 victory over Maryland behind 28 points from senior AllAmerican Kayla McBride. Notre Dame played without senior Natalie Achonwa, who suf fered a tor n ACL in the regional final victory over Baylor. Even without their star forward, the Irish dominated the Terrapins on the boards, outrebounding them in record fashion. Notre Dame had a 50-21 rebounding advantage, including a 19-4 mark on the offensive end. It was the widest rebounding margin ever in a Final Four game, shattering the previous mark of 19 set by Louisiana Tech in 1989. Maryland broke the national semifinals record for fewest rebounds in a game of 25 set by Minnesota in 2004. They’ll need a similar effort against UConn and its imposing front line of Breanna Stewart and Stefanie Dolson. The Huskies got off to a sluggish start against Stanford before taking control in the second half in a 7556 victory. They probably can’t afford the same thing to happen for a fourth straight game if they hope to win that record title.

sons ago. Auriemma has never lost a championship game. Notre Dame will be trying for its second national championship. The Irish have had chances lately to win their first title since 2001, advancing to the national semifinals in four straight seasons. They lost in the championship game twice during that span. They advanced to Tuesday night’s game with a

ping Notre Dame in the Final Four last season en route to the school’s eighth national championship. A UConn victory Tuesday night will be a record ninth for Auriemma, breaking a tie with Pat Summitt for most all-time in the women’s game. It will also cap the fifth perfect season for the Huskies and make them only the second team ever to go 40-0, joining Baylor which did it two sea-

how hard it’s to do for one team much less two.” Notre Dame (37-0) is one of the rare teams that has had success against the Huskies in recent history, winning seven of the past nine meetings, including beating UConn twice in the national semifinals. McGraw drew attention to that fact during the tournament selection show. The Huskies (39-0) won the last one though, top-

light. “It looked to me like as the season went on it almost looked like it was inevitable to happen,” UConn coach Geno Auriemma said. “It was supposed to happen. Our sport doesn’t have enough significant moments. ... To have the spotlight on Tuesday on two teams that one is going to lose for the first time this year, it’s pretty remarkable when you think

Roswell Daily Record

Min 1069 1080 838 736 702 988 521 610 313 128 147 225 43 — — Def 138 152 185 45 108 77 90 88 27 21 12 20 7 1046 743

-.0050 -.0040 -.0033 -.0026 -.0026 -.0026 -.0026 -.0026 -.0026 -.0026 -.0026 -.0026 -.0026 -.0026 -.0026 -.0026

+.037 +.035 +.034 +.033 +.033 +.032 +.031 +.027 +.027 +.027 +.024 +.015 +.015 +.012 +.012 +.013 +.013 +.013 +.013 +.012 +.012 +.012 +.011 +.011 +.004 +.004

Pos Ht G 5-4 F 6-3 F 6-3 G 5-7 G 5-11

Tot 233 195 255 49 171 87 123 171 61 30 13 42 13 1576 1207

22 Madison Cable 23 Michaela Mabrey 24 Hannah Huffman 32 Jewell Loyd 34 Markisha Wright 35 Diamond Thompson 44 Ariel Braker

Yr Jr Fr Fr Fr Sr

Avg FG-FGA Pct 29.7 263-501 .525 29.2 251-539 .466 25.4 193-316 .611 19.9 111-252 .440 19.0 102-204 .500 26.7 76-150 .507 14.5 71-136 .522 16.9 51-97 .526 8.9 30-52 .577 4.1 28-50 .560 4.7 13-29 .448 7.3 12-29 .414 2.7 4-6 .667 — 1205-2361 .510 — 851-2271 .375 Avg PF DQ 6.5 50 0 5.3 53 0 7.7 74 0 1.3 43 0 4.6 88 2 2.4 80 0 3.4 35 0 4.8 56 0 1.7 35 0 1.0 39 1 0.4 14 0 1.4 22 0 0.8 10 0 42.6 599 3 32.6 722 20

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name

3P-3PA 33-84 39-106 0-0 70-165 0-0 15-40 25-53 0-0 0-0 0-0 2-5 0-1 0-0 184-454 150-530 A TO 77 64 144 78 91 90 81 51 60 64 145 66 36 21 47 27 15 20 7 17 29 15 18 15 0 6 750 539 427 660

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Vol (00) Last Chg Name

Vol (00) 177766 InovioPhm 99002 CheniereEn 85712 AlldNevG 54198 RexahnPh 30339

Last 3.16 2.96 55.03 4.09 1.18

S&P500ETF1308202184.34 -2.06 IsoRay

BkofAm 1269633 16.38 iShR2K 641531112.82 SPDR Fncl 586099 21.83 iShEMkts 576987 41.48

-.34 -1.67 -.34 +.18

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name HarvNRes PetrbrsA EKodak wt DrxBrzBull IRSA

Last 4.21 14.83 19.32 22.70 12.07

Pct .393 .368 — .424 — .375 .472 — — — .400 .000 — .405 .283 BS 17 6 39 4 49 9 6 14 3 3 0 2 3 155 111

MARKET SUMMARY AMEX

G G G G F C F

Chg +.13 -.18 +.23 -.25 -.02

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Jr So So So Jr Fr Sr

FT-FTA 115-142 107-121 105-148 24-33 72-102 66-81 35-44 47-65 24-34 9-17 7-15 8-17 0-0 619-819 411-598 ST Pts 57 674 47 648 34 491 33 316 25 276 47 233 24 202 45 149 14 84 1 65 10 35 9 32 0 8 346 3213 290 2263

Pct .810 .884 .709 .727 .706 .815 .795 .723 .706 .529 .467 .471 — .756 .687 Avg 18.7 17.5 14.9 8.5 7.5 6.3 5.6 4.1 2.4 2.1 1.1 1.0 0.5 86.8 61.2

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Facebook 1061453 56.95 SiriusXM 801658 3.12 PwShs QQQ76277485.55 MicronT 633280 21.71 Zynga 626713 4.19

Chg +.20 -.08 -.82 -.87 -.01

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name +.53 +14.4 SuprmInd 8.22 +.61 +8.0 Vocus +1.11 +8.1 Enservco 2.44 +.12 +5.2 AgiosPh n +1.41 +7.9 SL Ind 26.79 +1.17 +4.6 UBIC n +1.65 +7.8 IsoRay 3.16 +.13 +4.3 Questcor +.84 +7.5 Neuralstem 4.35 +.17 +4.1 CarolTrBk

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

5-11 5-10 5-9 5-10 6-2 6-4 6-1

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Last Chg 17.92 +5.74 45.35 +9.87 8.45 +1.39 80.58+12.71 5.20 +.60

%Chg +47.1 +27.8 +19.7 +18.7 +13.0

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg PumaBiotc 86.94-19.47 -18.3 IGI Labs 4.88 -.59 -10.8 InfoSonic h 2.85 -.53 -15.7 WldW Ent 23.90 -4.12 -14.7 Skyline 5.66 -.62 -9.8 AquinoxP n 9.90 -1.79 -15.3 GrayTvA 7.90 -1.04 -11.6 22ndCentry 3.00 -.31 -9.4 LibVentB h 122.15-21.70 -15.1 Luxoft n 32.44 -3.85 -10.6 AvalonHld 4.95 -.44 -8.2 OhrPhm rs 12.03 -1.91 -13.7 ChiNBorun 2.68 -.29 -9.8 OrionEngy 6.11 -.52 -7.8 CathGn wt 6.96 -1.04 -13.0

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

DIARY

Volume

Div

AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola Disney EOG Res s EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

3,718,417,023 Volume

52-Week High Low 16,631.63 14,434.43 7,715.91 5,878.12 537.98 462.66 11,334.65 8,814.76 2,585.34 2,186.97 4,371.71 3,154.96 1,897.28 1,536.03 20,257.19 16,177.06 1,212.82 898.40

Name

866 2,250 98 3,214 27 21

1.84 .90 .20f 2.92f 4.00 1.22f .86f .50f 3.68f 2.52 .50f .64f 1.20a .90 3.80 2.64

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

INDEXES

Last 16,245.87 7,467.99 529.65 10,407.42 2,538.25 4,079.75 1,845.04 19,637.27 1,135.78

Net Chg -166.84 -102.77 -1.96 -109.63 -22.23 -47.98 -20.05 -240.33 -17.60

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Last

Chg

11 35.49 -.06 14 72.90 -1.33 16 16.38 -.34 21 125.59 -1.79 11 117.34 -1.46 20 38.62 +.40 22 79.13 -1.30 24 97.93 -1.84 ... 54.02 -.44 10 96.78 -.58 9 15.94 -.19 12 32.70 +.06 13 47.80 -.13 14 26.49 +.33 13 194.52 +2.75 20 97.89 -.53

DIARY

133,424,668 Volume

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

PE

145 270 23 438 5 5

YTD %Chg Name +.9 +6.3 +5.2 -8.0 -6.1 -6.5 +3.6 +16.7 -5.6 -4.4 +3.3 +16.9 -3.8 +2.0 +3.7 +6.9

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

615 1,995 127 2,737 24 83

2,495,141,096

% Chg -1.02 -1.36 -.37 -1.04 -.87 -1.16 -1.08 -1.21 -1.53

YTD % Chg -2.00 +.91 +7.97 +.07 +4.62 -2.32 -.18 -.35 -2.39

52-wk % Chg +11.17 +22.60 +2.20 +14.98 +6.24 +26.61 +18.04 +19.07 +21.93

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

1.76 1.12 2.92f .74 2.27 1.04f 1.56 .16 1.20 1.27f .65e 2.12 1.92f .40 1.20 1.20f

38 15 23 20 20 16 13 21 26 17 ... 12 16 15 13 16

55.19 -.93 39.80 -.07 54.80 -.32 26.94 +.11 83.91 +1.32 31.20 -.96 77.95 -1.62 23.43 -.38 46.25 -.09 64.79 -1.72 19.85 -.16 48.12 +.08 77.31 ... 22.38 -.27 48.66 -.90 30.53 -.13

+10.3 +6.4 +4.1 +11.7 +1.2 +1.9 +1.1 +24.4 +5.3 -7.1 -.7 -2.1 -1.8 -3.9 +7.2 +9.37

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


Roswell Daily Record

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: My mother committed suicide when I was a child. She was severely depressed, and although she sought professional help, the worst happened. When conversing with acquaintances, the subject often turns to family, and I will say that my mother “passed away” when I was young. Most of the time they proceed to ask me how she died. Abby, this is a personal family matter. I do not wish to reveal what really happened. I usually reply that she was very ill, but some nosy people persist in pressing for more information. How should I respond

without being rude? LOYAL OHIO READER

DEAR READER: You’re under no obligation to reveal personal information that makes you uncomfortable. Simply say, “That’s a very personal question, and I’d rather not discuss it.” Then change the subject. ##### DEAR ABBY: Since when has it been considered OK for women to be in men’s dressing rooms in department stores? I have seen a lot of this during the last year. I’m not a prude, and I understand that most men change in private booths, shielded from view of strangers. Still, I am disturbed when I come out of the smaller booth and find women hanging around in the dressing room. In many cases, I have heard women actually IN the booths with men who are getting dressed, giggling — or, even more annoying, shouting out orders about sizes, styles, etc. Men are not allowed in women’s dressing rooms. When I have expressed my con-

COMICS

cern to salesclerks, they look at me like I’m crazy. Am I the only one who thinks women do not belong in men’s dressing rooms? CIVILIZED SHOPPER

DEAR SHOPPER: I don’t know how long it has been between shopping trips for you, but your thinking is outdated. Today some stores have unisex dressing rooms, and men’s and women’s departments employ both male and female sales associates. It is not unusual for couples to shop together — and if something doesn’t fit, for the spouse to go and find something in the correct size. While you may not be the only one who thinks women don’t belong in men’s dressing rooms, I believe you are in the minority. ##### DEAR ABBY: I’m a 46-year-old female cancer survivor. My hair used to be long, thick and naturally wavy. Because of the high-dose chemotherapy and radiation to treat my lymphoma, I lost all my hair. It has grown back, but it’s thin, spotty and ugly. I have

tried everything on the market, including foams, sprays, expensive hair clubs, etc., but nothing has worked. Recently I started wearing a wig. It is natural-looking and stylish, and I feel confident again. I get lots of compliments on the cut and color. My question is, when people ask who my stylist is, I’m not sure how to answer. I have been referring them to a friend who is a stylist, but I feel dishonest. However, I don’t want to reveal my secret. What would you do? UNDER THE RUG IN CALIFORNIA

Family Circus

DEAR UNDER THE RUG: Talk to the person who styles your wig for you and explain that you are receiving many compliments. Ask if you can refer other clients — but express that if you do, you would like the fact that you wear a wig kept strictly confidential. That’s how I’d handle it. Hairdressers are privy to secrets of all kinds, and they’re very good at keeping them (with rare exceptions).

The Wizard of Id

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE Dear Readers: Many of you wrote in about the column regarding whether you should SIGN THE BACK OF YOUR CREDIT CARD. Most of you do not sign the back, and instead write “Check ID” on it. However, the credit-card companies state that you should sign. Here are some of your comments:

Vel W., via email, said, “I worked in a bank for 12 years and always advised my clients to sign, because while someone in possession of their card could practice their signature if it’s signed, without a signature, they can sign your name themselves and then match it EVERY time.”

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Todd D., via email, said, “It has been my experience that the post office will not accept a credit card that has not been signed.” (Heloise here: This is true! However, you can use a debit card without signature by using the personal identification number, or PIN).” Ed K. in Texas wrote: “I never sign the back of my cards, but instead, I clearly print ‘REQUEST ID.’ Occasionally, a merchant actually looks at the back and does.” Heloise

#####

Dear Heloise: I recently broke my right wrist (and I’m right-handed). I found that a piece of the rubber strips used to keep throw rugs from slipping is great on the kitchen counter for one-handed opening of previously opened jars and bottles. It also kept my coffee mug from sliding while filling and stirring. I keep a long strip on the counter while my husband is at work, and then move it out of the way when he gets home. I even have used the long strips on my clothes dryer to keep the detergent and other bottles from traveling. Lois H. in Virginia Dear Heloise: I don’t like picking up my dog’s little presents that he leaves for me. I normally pick them up with a paper towel. Is there any other way of picking up this waste? A Reader, via email I have a couple of hints for you to try. There are plastic “doggie do” bags made for picking up the waste of not just dogs, but other animals as well (like the cat box). A lot of readers also use plastic newspaper bags. Place one over your hand, pick up the waste and then toss in the garbage. Or you may want to try a longhandled scooper, available at pet stores, made to clean up the waste. This can be washed off as needed, and you don’t even need to bend over to use it. Heloise

#####

Dear Heloise: I had no idea what to do with my makeup brushes that were just thrown in a drawer. That is, until I found an old toothbrush holder I had stuck in a closet. The toothbrush holder now holds the makeup brushes perfectly, while keeping them within easy reach on the counter. Jessica H. in Tennessee

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

B5


B6 Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19)  You’ll see a definite improvement from yesterday, as far as people’s moods go. You are capable of unusual understanding, so use those skills today to help someone get past a restriction. This person will not be able to thank you enough. Tonight: Ever playful. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  Stay on top of a domestic matter, regardless of what happens. You could feel overburdened by an offer that actually could be more of a problem than a solution. You could have difficulty telling the other party “No thank you.” Start practicing. Tonight: Happy at home. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)  Handle a situation before it gets too overwhelming. You have a lot to do, but know that a partner will lend a hand. Express your determination by tapping into your ingenuity. Be more forthright with a child or new friend. Tonight: Out and about. CANCER (June 21-July 22)  Be aware of the costs of proceeding as you have been. Someone you care about finally will share why he or she is so irritable. You might want to express your understanding, even though you have much more to say. Avoid pushing this person away. Tonight: Out shopping. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  You beam and draw positive results, especially with a legal or travel matter. Someone at a distance could play a significant role in

Legals

Notice to Creditors... Publish April 1, 8, 2014

STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE PROBATE COURT CHAVES COUNTY

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Lois Parsons, DEM. CEASED. No.9187

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of this estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two (2) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned personal representative at the address listed below, or filed with the Probate Court of Chaves County, New Mexico, located at the following address: #1 St. Mary’s Place, Roswell, NM 88203. Dated March 27, 2014

/s/Ted D. Parsons 6309 Sagehill Ct. NW Albuquerque, NM 87102 505-301-5064

Legals

Dissolution of Marriage Publish April 1, 8, 15, 2014

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO Maria Lourdes Muniz Petitioner, vs.

Ramon Muniz Respondent.

Case#DM-2014-146

CLASSIFIEDS JACQUELINE BIGAR

008. Northwest BOOKS AGAIN, $5 bag sale, March 28-April 12, 404 W. 2nd St. Tue-Sat. 10-4pm

ANNOUNCEMENTS

LOST SMALL black and white chihuahua answers to the name of Penny. In area of N. Mississippi or around Sams Clubs. Please call 317-8919 FOUND DOG vicinity of E. Alameda. Call to describe, 575-623-1838.

GARAGE SALES

006. Southwest

HUGE INDOOR ESTATE SALE for Troy & Marlene Carolton, Thursday 9-6pm, 2208 S. Washington. Sewing & Serger Machines, Cutting Mats, Lots of Sewing Notions, Fabric & Books, Queen & Full Bdrm Sets, Dinette Set, Rocking Chairs, Cedar Chest, Grandmother Clock, Peter Hurd Print, Upright Freezer, Fridge, Stove, Washer & Dryer, Kitchen Items, Linens, Lawn Mower & Tools. Too Much To List! Wild West Auctions, 623-7355.

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

TWO LOST Cats. Feb. 19th at 29 W. Eyman. $600 Reward per cat. Cali, Princess: Long hair black & white w/white paws, chin & stomach, Calico with a brown & black patch over each eye. Both are Polydactyl (7 Toes) w/sagging stomachs.

INSTRUCTION

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant!NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC Train gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-888-926-6073

GREETINGS:

By:/s/Maureen J. Nelson

FOUND CHIHUAHUA Mix, brown & white, blue collar, male. Call 575-420-7258.

030. Education & Instructions

STATE OF NEW MEXICO TO:

KENNON CROWHURST Clerk of the District Court

025. Lost and Found

025. Lost and Found

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

Petitioner’s Address is: 5620 Kincaid Rd. Roswell, NM 88203

YOUR HOROSCOPE

upcoming plans. You might be feistier than you realize. Be careful with a domestic issue. Tonight: Do what makes you happy. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)  You might feel a little down or taken aback by a situation that surrounds you. One-on-one relating could provide important information that will allow you to make a better decision. Do not fight about a financial issue; instead, find a way to solve it. Tonight: Visit over dinner. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)  You might want to defer to others with a personal matter right now, especially if your temper is short. Realize what is going on with your long-term goals. Use caution with money commitments. Tonight: Have a quiet chat with a close friend. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  You could be concerned about a boss or parent. You often worry about this person’s judgment. Know that you can’t change the path that he or she is on. Express your

RE: DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE

Notice is hereby given you that an action has been brought in the District Court of Chaves County, No. DM-14-146 in which Maria Lourdes Muniz is the Petitioner, and you are the Respondent, requesting a Dissolution of Marriage. Unless you enter an appearance in said cause on or before May 26, 2014, judgment will be rendered in said cause against you by default.

Roswell Daily Record acceptance, and hopefully the same attitude will be extended to you. Tonight: Count on a late night. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)  Reach out to someone at a distance who helps you relax and adds to your creativity. Be more forthright with how you handle a personal situation. Detach and worry less about others’ reactions. Tonight: Relax to great music. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  You could see a situation arise with a partner that involves money and choices. You might feel confused about your direction and your needs. Ask questions, and you will find direction and clarity. The other party will give you powerful feedback. Tonight: Dinner for two. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  You’ll find others to be quite sure of themselves as they approach you. One-on-one relating will provide you with important information, as long as you can detach. Try to see the big picture. Investigate alternatives that surround a purchase. Tonight: Sort through offers. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)  You have a lot to get done, and you will achieve the results you want. You could be taken aback by what a partner says, but make a point of not focusing on his or her mood. Your natural charisma will speak to others. Tonight: Put your feet up. BORN TODAY Actress Patricia Arquette (1968), former Secretary-General of the United Nations Kofi Annan (1938), former First Lady Betty Ford (1918)

045. Employment Opportunities

NEED CASH? Be your own boss & build your business at Blairs Monterey indoor market at 1400 W. 2nd. Booths start at $75/mo. Call 623-0136 LOOKING FOR a direct support staff, and RN nurse in Ruidoso & Alamogordo area. Please call 575-541-0623 for more information PARALEGAL NEEDED. Please send resume to PO Box 3220, Roswell, NM 88202. Salary DOE ROUTE DRIVER for Local delivery. CDL with Hazmat Endorsement required. Apply in person, 6462 S.E. Main hwy 285. Mon - Fri, 7 - 4:30. DRIVER NEEDED Class A or B CDL with clear driving record, local route, competitive pay, 401K, insurance and paid time off. Call 800-658-2673 or 806-293-4431

045. Employment Opportunities HERE'S A JOB THAT IS FULFILLING IN MORE WAYS THAN ONE

Are you interested in making a difference in someone's life? We are looking for caring & reliable individuals to help care for our clients. Whether you are providing companionship, help around the house, preparing a meal, or personal care, you work in an intimate one-to-one setting with individuals who are in great need of support.

Comfort Keepers is pursuing experienced caregivers to work in the Roswell, Dexter, Hagerman and Artesia areas. We offer flexible schedules both part time and full time with competitive pay. Stop by our Roswell office at: 1410 South Main to visit with us today or call Kim at 575-624-9999 for more information.

Legals

Application No. RA-1717-POD3...

WITH OUR growth, We need HELP Reservations specialist Experienced Housekeeper, Handy Man APPLY READY TO WORK. 2803 w 2nd St. Roswell No calls

Publish April 1, 8, 15, 2014

NOTICE is hereby given that on March 20, 2014, Town of Dexter, P.O. Box 249, Dexter, New Mexico 88230, c/o Hennighausen & Olsen, LLP, P.O. Box 1415, Roswell, New Mexico 88202; filed Application No. RA-1717-POD3 with the STATE ENGINEER for permit to change location of well, by ceasing the use of shallow well No. RA-1717-S located at a point in the NW1/4SW1/4NE1/4 of Section 17, Township 13 South, Range 26 East, N.M.P.M.

The applicant proposes to drill a replacement well approximately 175 feet in depth and 12 1/4 inches in diameter located at a point in which the NW1/4SW1/4NE1/4 of Section 17, Township 13 South, Range 26 East, N.M.P.M., for the continued diversion of up to 1187.0 acre-feet per annum (187.0 acre-feet per annum CIR) of shallow groundwater for recreational purposes at Lake Van located in Section 17, Township 13 South, Range 26 East N.M.P.M.

The applicant states; “The Town of Dexter utilizes well No. RA-1717-S to pump water into Lake Van. The well has sanded in and the applicant wishes to drill a shallow replacement well within 100 feet of the original well pursuant to Article 2 of the Rules and Regulation and Section 72-12-22 NMSA (1978)” The existing & proposed points of diversion are located approximately 1/2 mile east of the Town of Dexter, Chaves County, New Mexico.

Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (objection must be legible, signed, and include the writer's complete name, phone number and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment, you must specifically identify your water rights*; and/or (2) Public Welfare/Conservation of Water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must show how you will be substantially and specifically affected. The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with the State Engineer, 1900 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, within ten (10) days after the date of the last publication of this Notice. Facsimiles (faxes) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is hand-delivered or mailed and postmarked within 24-hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protests can be faxed to the Office of the State Engineer, (575) 623-8559. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 72 NMSA 1978.

Legals

Request for Proposals... Publish April 8, 2014

CHAVES COUNTY GOVERNMENT REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

The Board of Chaves County Commissioners, pursuant to and in compliance with NM State Procurement Code, hereby invites qualification based sealed proposals for the following: RFP-14-2

Audit Services

Proposals for the item listed above will be accepted until April 18, 2014 at 2:00 PM. Specifications can be obtained online by going to www.chaves.nm.us and clicking on “Active Bids and RFPs” or by contacting the Chaves County Purchasing office at (575) 624-6615. All openings are public and are held at the Chaves County Administrative Center, #1 St. Mary's Place, Roswell, New Mexico, 88203. Tammy Brisco West Chaves County Purchasing Director (575) 624-6615 purchasing@co.chaves.nm.us

045. Employment Opportunities The Roswell Daily Record Circulation Department is currently accepting applications for the position of:

DISTRICT MANAGER

Basic Job Duties include: Carrier recruitment & supervision, delivery of routes when necessary, proficient phone skills and taking charge of customer issues as well as other office duties & responsibilites. Motivation to work with or without direct supervision, professional communication skills and an ambitious attitude a plus!! Bilingual prefered but not required. Must have valid driver’s license and insurance. Basic or advanced computer skills appreciated. Must be neat in appearance and work with a businesslike attitude. Experience in Circulation desired however training will be provided. All interested applicants can send, drop off or email your complete application & resume with references to: The Roswell Daily Record 2301 N. Main Roswell, NM 88201 - OR E-mail jdishman@rdrnews.com No Phone Call Please! Interviews will be not be held until all applications & resumes have been reviewed. “Don’t call us we’ll call YOU”

EOE. Background Check & Drug Testing will be conducted during the hiring process. Position will remain open until filled. TIRE TECH & light automotive position available. Must have own tools and 1-2 years experience. Good driving record required. Apply in person at 101 S. Main TEMPORARY FARM Labor: Five Star Dairy, Amherst, TX, has 5 positions for corn & livestock; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.86/hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 3/15/14 – 12/15/14. Apply at nearest NM Workforce Office with Job Order TX6926370 or call 505-383-2721.


Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities

OPTOMETRIC OFFICE seeking receptionist for a 1/2 day/afternoon position. Duties include: answering phone, making appointments, checking in/out patients and general clerical duties. PO Box 1897, Unit #366 Roswell, NM 88202 Registered Nursing at Corizon...

No Nights, Weekends or Holidays!

Corizon, a provider of health services for the New Mexico Department of Corrections, has an excellent Full Time, DAY opportunity for experienced RNs at Roswell Correctional Center in Hagerman. Corizon offers competitive rates and comprehensive benefits with the opportunity to learn a growing specialty!

DENTAL ASSISTANT

CORIZON, a provider of health services for the New Mexico Department of Corrections, has an excellent eight (8) hours per week opportunity on DAYS at Roswell Correctional Center in Hagerman. Candidates must possess a Dental Assistant, CPR and AED certification. For further info: Chrystal Whitney, Administrator 575-625-3184 Chrystal.whitney@ corizonhealth.com EOE/AAP/DTR

BUSY LOCALLY owned medical office, seeking CNA or CMA. Please mail resume and references to PO Box 1555 Roswell, NM 88202 or fax to 1-866-244-0149.

045. Employment Opportunities

RESTAURANT/BAR MANAGER needed salary DOE please send resumes to roswell.restaurant. manager@gmail.com INSIDE SALES position. Must have knowledge of fittings, pipe, valves, and etc. Please apply at NM Workforce.

OPPORTUNITIES ARE available for experienced child care providers who are committed to providing quality care to infants and preschool children. Please pick up an application at: Working Mothers’ Day Nursery, 500 E. Bland, Roswell, NM 88203. EOE FAMILY PRACTICE seeking an energetic, friendly, and outgoing front desk receptionist and MA with experience. You must be able to work under pressure, multi-task, and be well organized. Serious Inquires only bring your resume w/ references to 111 W. Hobbs St. Bilingual is a plus.

For more info, contact Chrystal Whitney, Administrator 575-625-3184 or Chrystal.whitney@ corizonhealth.com EOE/AAP/DTR Need extra cash? Part Time Available!

045. Employment Opportunities

BRADY INDUSTRIES, LLC has a Sales Representative opening, responsible for all sales activity in assigned accounts or regions, manage quality and consistency of product and service delivery, while maintaining a high level of visibility with their accounts. To apply, please submit your resume to hr_recruiting@ bradyindustries.com. (575)885-0715 LEARN TO drive in 5 short weeks. Artesia Training Academy has new classes forming. CDL Class A with endorsements. VA approved. 20 years of service to South East New Mexico. Call for more information 575-748-9766 or 1-888-586-0144 visit us at www.artesiatraining.com or visit us on Facebook.

IMMEDIATE OPENING Roswell Electrical contractor actively seeking Journeyman or 2 yr. Apprentice. Please send resume and references to PO BOX 1897 Unit # 373 Roswell, NM 88202

PEPPERS GRILL & BAR is accepting applications for potential openings. Applications available between 2:00-4:00 pm, 500 N. Main THE HOLIDAY Inn Express & Suites is located at 2300 N Main Street. Our hotel is looking for a friendly and professional Guest service Representative to join our busy team. Ideally you will have at least one year of experience in a hotel front desk environment, be able to demonstrate initiative and deliver great service. please apply in person M-F 9am to 3pm.

Tobosa Developmental Services is seeking a Medical Support Staff. Must have medical background and experience working in medical office. Please submit current resume with completed application, high school diploma, police background check, and driving record to Tobosa Developmental Services, 110 E. Summit, Roswell, NM. 88203 or call (575)624-1025. Salary is negotiable based on experience and education level. Application open until position is filled.

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575)-622-7710 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM MONDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR Excellent Opportunity Management Position Experienced/Bilingual preferred for Full Time. Reliable, outgoing person in a professional office. Strong customer skills & attention to details. Must have reliable transportation, valid driver’s license & auto insurance. Mon-Fri 40 hours/week. Send resume to PO Box 5847, Hobbs, NM 88240.

MJG CORPORATION is accepting applications for an energetic part-time secretary. Must have at least 1 year experience and have knowledge of windows operating systems. Please pick up application at MJG Corporation, 204 W. 4th St. Roswell, NM 88201 or fax work history to 575-623-3075 Attn: Gary. The Roswell Daily Record is currently accepting applications for a reporter. Must be a good writer and speller. Send resume to: Roswell Daily Record, Attn: C Fischer PO Box 1897, Roswell, NM or emailed to cfischer@rdrnews.com No phone calls, please.

BEALLS NOW HIRING Cosmetics and Sales Associates. Apply online at www.stagestoresinc.com/c areer.search

045. Employment Opportunities

Automotive Technician needed. Must have at least 5 years of verifiable dealership or independent experience. Apply in person only at Desert Sun Chrysler, 1309 SE Main. Tobosa Developmental Services is currently seeking Direct Care Support Staff for the Residential Department. Experience with developmentally disabled preferred but not required. Please submit current resume with completed application, police background check, copy of High School Diploma and driving record at 110 E. Summit, Roswell, NM 88203 or call (575)624-1025. Salary is negotiable based on experience and education level. Applications open until positions are filled. EOE

Lea County seeks Assistant Finance Director licensed as a Certified Public Accountant with 2-5 years of governmental accounting/auditing experience. Assistant Finance Director will assist with supervision and management of the Finance Department which includes payroll, accounts payable, contracts, procurement, grants, utilities, indigent claims and departmental clerical functions. The Assistant Finance Director will assist in coordinating overall budget preparation, assist all departments with budget preparation and assist with coordinating and supervising information for County audits and audit processes. Duties are not limited to those set forth above. Complete job description can be found at www.leacounty.net. Please forward resume and salary requirements to: Lea County Human Resources 100 N Main, Suite 4 Lovington, NM 88260

LINE TECH/RAMP AGENT Full time: perform fueling and deicing of aircrafts, tow aircraft to hangar, drive heavy equipment as needed, lift at least 45 lbs., greet crew and passengers, load and unload cargo on and off aircraft, transport cargo between terminal and aircraft, grounds keeping, other duties as assigned. High school diploma and valid driver's license with good record, excellent customer service skills, previous aviation preferred, must be available to work flexible hours including weekends and holidays if needed, pass background check and drug test. Please apply online at www.avflight.com . EEO/AA HOSPITALITY POSITION Available. Must be 21 or older. Must be energetic, motivated and personable. Part Time / Full Time Available. Please email resume to josh@thelibertyinc.com to schedule interview. No phone calls. General Maintenance position available. Please apply at Dairy Queen, 1900 N. Main St.

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

SOLITAIRE HOMES Sales Person Wanted to join our team! No experience necessary, will train. Bilingual a plus. Apply at 4001 W 2nd st Roswell, NM 88201

Requirements are: •ASE Certified •Must be able to pass a background check •Must have a valid Driver's License

MEDICAL OFFICE Transcription/Case Entry: Full Time M-F 9am-6pm. Excellent grammar, punctuation, spelling, and communication skills mandatory. Typing and grammar testing will be conducted. Please send cover letter with resume and three references to roswellscript@gmail.com

Weekends and Evenings Off, Paid Holidays and Vacations, Competitive Benefit Package Pay depends on Experience

Apply at the Department of Workforce Solutions

FIELD TECHNICIAN needed immediately. Construction materials testing, certifications and experience preferred. Position requires work in a materials testing lab and in the field. Must have a valid driver’s license and needs to communicate well with clients and public. Please send cover letter, along with resume to Human Resources, PO Box 2565, Roswell, NM 88202-2565. Interviews will be made by appointment only. No phone calls please. READER/DRIVER A public service agency in Roswell is recruiting for two individuals to perform a variety of duties for staff and clients with disabilities. Duties include driving agency vehicle, reading, phone answering, filing, and other clerical work. Approximately 24 hours per week. $10-12 hourly with benefits negotiable. Status is "at will." Occasional overnight travel required. Closing date is April 10. Submit cover letter and resume to driver2522@gmail.com. AMERIPRIDE LINEN Requisition#107232 Stockroom Clerk

Stockroom Clerk needed: High School diploma or GED. Must be able to pass drug test. You must apply online. Ameripride.com, click on career opportunities under quick links and follow the steps or any job websites on line. April 4, 2014 to April 11, 2014 Competitive salary and benefits. No phone calls will be accepted. AA/EEO EMPLOYEE M/F/D/V

FULL-TIME KENNEL position opened, 32-40 hours, Mon-Fri in a busy veterinarian clinic. Please send resume to PO Box 1897, Unit 377, Roswell, NM 88202. LEGAL/LAW ENFORCEMENT NAVY RESERVE Serve part-time. Elite training. Great pay & benefits. Sign-on bonus up to $20K. Travel. Call Mon-Fri (800) 354-9627

NOW HIRING!

Explore the career possibilities at PepsiCo, the world’s second largest food and beverage company. Our main businesses – Quaker, Tropicana, Gatorade, Frito-Lay and Pepsi-Cola – make hundreds of enjoyable foods and beverages that are loved throughout the world. We’re offering competitive compensation, excellent benefits, and a team oriented environment. Our location in Roswell, NM has immediate Full Time and Part Time openings and is actively recruiting for the Following positions:

PT Merchandiser for the Carlsbad/Artesia area PT Merchandiser for the Roswell area Relief Driver (CDL Required) Bulk Driver (CDL Required) Bay Delivery Driver (CDL Required) Fleet Mechanic

PepsiCo is an Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V

Apply online at www.pepsijobs.com

Dennis the Menace

B7

THE ROSWELL Daily Record is now accepting applications for the full time position of: OUTSIDE SALES The ideal candidate must possess excellent customer service skills, superior organizational skills and be a self-starter with a strong work ethic. This is a full time position with a great benefit package. Interested applicants please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Angie Love, 2301 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88201 or e-mail to: addirector@rdrnews.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!

DRIVE-AWAY ACROSS the USA even if you don’t own a car. 22 Pickup Locations. Call 866-764-1601 or www.qualitydriveaway.com

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

045. Employment Opportunities

American Federal Contractors at FLETC Artesia, NM is seeking qualified Applicants for a Vehicle Mechanic

BIG D’S is accepting resumes for Delivery Driver, Cooks, & Cashiers. Bring resume to 505 N. Main St. ASSISTANT FINANCE DIRECTOR

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT For Appointment coordination, Event and meeting planning,Make travel arrangements,Pick up dry cleaning, Banking, Must possess a valid driver’s license, send your resume and salary expectations to: joy.pet@aol.com CDL DRIVERS Wanted: Regional Routes, home weekends, competitive pay. Must have current physical and clean MVR. Positions to fill immediately. Call 575-461-4221, 1-800-750-4221 or email: jimhayes66@ qwestoffice.net HELP WANTED!! MAKE $1000 Weekly Mailing brochures From home! Helping Home Workers Since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! Small registration fee required. Start Immediately! www.localmailers.net NOW HIRING Apprentice Electricians. Apply in person at 512 S. Main 401 (k), insurance, paid vacation/holidays. MAMA TUCKER’S is hiring for a part-time person for dishwasher, janitorial and light maintenance. Apply at 3109 N. Main between 9:00am- and 1:00pm Mon-Sat. No phone calls please DONOR RECRUITMENT REPRESENTATIVE, FT, ROSWELL, NM. Schedule blood drives w/i center. Directs, trains, and motivates volunteer blood drive coordinators and committee mbrs. Develops new donor sources. Maintains ongoing public and media relations pgrm. Develops annual recruitment plan. Prepare, assess and respond to monthly forecast info. Develop and maintain donor recognition prgrms. Follows established sales/recruitment process (including projection accuracy). Maintains and ensures accuracy and timeliness of acct info. Builds relationships with external depts and internal staff. Communicates effectively. Represents company through personal contacts, public speaking and educational presentations. Varied hours & workdays. Requirements: Relevant Bachelor's degree or equiv combination of educ and exp, Valid in–state driver’s license, 1-year related exp preferred, Effective oral and written comm skills, Sales/territory management skills, Self-motivated and a self-starter with good organization skills, Ability to work flexible hrs incl wkends/evenings, Provide own vehicle for transportation, Proficient computer skills. Exc benefits. Send resume/application by 4/18/14 to Lori Schmittle, United Blood Services, 1515 University Blvd. NE, ABQ, NM 87102; email UBSNMJobs@ bloodsystems.org. List Reference #212-1225-2014-0003. Pre-employment background and drug screening required. United Blood Services is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, or protected veteran status.

045. Employment Opportunities

The Roswell Job Corps Center has a full time Medical Records/Property Clerk vacancy. The person will work part time in the Wellness Clinic with some hours in the Property department. The Medical Records Clerk will assist the Dentist one day a week so someone with a Dental Assistant credential will be a great candidate for this position. The minimum qualifications is a High School diploma or GED, training in general office work and basic knowledge and understanding of the medical/health field. The candidate must have a current valid drivers’ license. The position is full time with benefits, salary starts at $11.00/hour. Send a resume and a copy of your credential to gonzalez.mary@ jobcorps.org. Deadline to apply is April 9, 2014. Career Opportunities, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V. NOW HIRING SALES CONSULTANTS – Roswell Honda is seeking friendly, motivated, well organized professionals to join our skillful team. You will receive paid training from top leaders in our organization. We offer an excellent benefit package including, HEALTH, VISION, DENTAL, 401K and PAID VACATION. No experience required. All applicants must pass a drug test. Apply in person. Roswell Honda 2177 W. 2nd St. Ask for Mikey. NOW HIRING shift and assistant managers at Dairy Queen, 1900 N. Main St. Please ask for Jackie. NEEDED...“FLOOR” person for janitorial service. Evenings & weekends. Exp. only. 622-3314 6 Temporary Workers HILL COUNTRY BLUEBONNET RANCH Roland Villarreal 2894 Hwy 3235 Leaky Texas 78873 Occupation: Farm workers, Farm, Ranch and Animals 05/26/2014 - 03/26/2015 Pay rate $10.86 per hour Farm workers Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. All tools, supplies, equipment and housing will be Provided at no cost to the worker. Duties seasonal duties includes herding cattle ,weighing, castrating, branding using brands, loading animals on truck, or enclosures. Transportation and subsistence expense reimbursed. Interested applicants can send resumes nearest State Workforce Agency office (512)475-2571 using job listing TX2748700. SALES PERSON needed at Samon’s, 1412 W. 2nd. No Phone Calls. Full Time, 40 hrs plus work on weekends. Must be able to lift 100 lbs. Must pass drug & background check. Start $8.00/hr plus commission. ADMIRAL BEVERAGE is hiring CDL driver position must be filled immediately, and only serious prospects need apply. Great benefits, excellent pay, group health insurance. Apply online at www.admiralbeverage.com

SERVICES

135. Ceramic Tile

CERAMIC TILE Do you need to tile your floor? Here in Roswell, Ben does it for you. From $295 ONLY per room. It includes everything. I also do small plumbing jobs. 505-990-1628 or 575-910-3467 (cell)

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252

140. Cleaning

SUNSHINE WINDOW Services. Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458

200. Fencing

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100 M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

BUILDING OR Mending Fences, Long or Short. Tall or Small. Reasonable Rates, Free Est. & Senior Discounts. 575-840-8369. Metal, wood, chain link & block.

225. General Construction

SWAMP COOLER TIME HANDYMAN SERVICES specialized in small and large home projects, one call does it all. Estimates 637-0255 Olaguez Construction: Free estimates, complete remodeling including plumbing, additions, tile, sheds, concrete, fence, roof, stucco, windows, painting, & doors. Guaranteed Work. 910-7035 Miguel.

HOME REPAIRS No Job to Small. Reasonable Rates. 575-317-2357 Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

DANIEL MONTOYA Construction. From New Construction to Small Additions. Licensed, Bonded, Free Est. 575-840-8639

230. General Repair

HANDYMAN General Repair 317-2137 or 317-2138 35 yrs experience HOME REPAIR & improvements, roofs, drywall, ceiling fans, etc. 575-808-6745 or 575-405-9161

235. Hauling

RWC. BACKHOE, skid steer, dump truck, bom lift, services. Insured. Call Hector 575-910-8397. PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

240. Horseshoeing

HORSESHOES & FUN Come join us for a game of horseshoes every Saturday. 575-317-3698

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Landscaping, mowing, trimming, & trees cut down. sprinklers, etc. 420-0965 Spring Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242. Garcia’s Lawn Service, sprinklers & much more at low price. 914-0803. WILL MOW grass at price you choose, also do odd jobs. 575-347-5648 or 626-0518 Yard work, clean-ups, lawns. Handyman svc. David 637-9580.

RETIRED GUYS will mow, trim & edge yards. Reasonable! Call Charlie & Mike. 910-1358 or 622-7852 WE WORK Yard & alley cutting, garden rototilling, hauling. Call Will at 317-7402 or 317-2573.

BUDGET LAWN cleaning & basic cleanup. 420-4375 or 910-0685 LIGHTHOUSE LAWN-SERVICE affordable basic lawn care. No job too big or small, we do it all! Free estimates, call 575-921-5671 Mow Grass, Trim Bushes, Clean Ups, Hauling Trash Leaf Raking, flower beds, tree pruning, rock yards & rototilling, pick up pecans, concrete jobs, repair sprinklers & fences. 347-8156, 347-8157 Pedro


B8 Tuesday, April 8, 2014 270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Dirt & Tractor Work. Clean fill dirt, dirt cheap. Mowing of lots or acres. Post hole drilling. Scraping & leveling. Free Estimates. 840-8639. MR. GREEN THUMB

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 TREE TRIMMING and removal, free estimates, super clean up, 840-9105 Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

Front and Back Standard size yard $40. Alley Cleaning $20. 575-420-4696 Emerald Landscaping Lawn & sprinkler installation, sprinkler repair, sod, gravel, lawn maintenance. Maintenance/Free Estimates/accept credit cards. Lic#89265. Call: Aaron, 575-910-0150 or Chris, 420-3945

285. Miscellaneous Services

Extreme Inflatables Come try our Bungee Run. Spring Break Special. April 8th-13th. Parking area between Big Lots & Zen Diner, 2513 N. Main. POOL TABLE repairs/recovering. Reasonable rates. 575-650-2591 Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-661-3783, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping. WERE YOU IMPLANTED WITH A ST. JUDE RIATA DEFIBRILLATOR LEAD WIRE between June 2001 and December 2010? Have you had this lead replaced, capped or did you receive shocks from the lead? You may be entitled to compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727

310. Painting/ Decorating EXTERIOR/INTERIOR, INSURED. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. Call 637-9108.

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insuranced. Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale FSBO, 3/2/1 Great Condition, lots of features & extras, $91,000. 622-1204

ELIDA, S Main St. 2bd/1ba single family, nice .25acre lot lease or cash Call for details 855-664-8357 409 LA Fonda clean 3br/2ba, 1 car gar., nice house move-in ready $124k no owner financing, Realtors welcome, will pay standard commission. Call 627-7595. FSBO: 2BR/1BA, ref. air, 1005 S. Plains Park, $52,000, no owner finance. 2Bd $85K w/house in bk & 3Bd $65K, fncd yrds, call M-Th 8a-noon, 624-1331 $82,000, 2br/1ba, beautiful brick home, huge fenced yard, garage, w/d, wood floors, 706 S. Michigan. Avail. Now. Owner finance. 480-392-8550, $711/mo, $2550 down. 3BR, 1 3/4ba, north part of town, 3110 N. Bandolina, all new carpet, paint & roof, 2 blks from swimming pool. Priced to sell, $108,000. Bank financing or owner will finance w/minimum $30k down. 622-5031 or 420-1022 FSBO 3BD/2BA 1730N. Delaware, large rooms. 909-657-7611 5BR, 3BA, 6 acres, water rights, $13k down; $1398 per month, 575-973-2353 Immaculate Custom home in Briar Ridge, 3 yrs old, 3br/2ba, 81 Bent Tree Rd., $130,900. 831-915-0226 COUNTRY HOME, 3br/2ba, 2 living areas, big kitchen & master suite, many updates, 626-8533.

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552. RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

395. Stucco Plastering

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991 RWC Lath and Stucco. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

400. Tax Service

REDUCE YOUR Past Tax Bill by as much as 75 Percent. Stop Levies, Liens and Wage Garnishments. Call The Tax DR Now to see if you Qualify 1-800-912-0758 ARE YOU in BIG trouble with the IRS? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Seen on CNN. A BBB. Call 1-800-921-5512

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

5 ACRES 62 E Orchard Pk Rd $19,000 interesados al 910-0644 5 ACRES land for sale in Roswell NM. A beautiful corner lot property for sale, Covenants agreements, located at South Brown Road and Thunderbird Asking price $25,000 Negotiable, make an offer. Phone nmber to call 915-503-3326

500. Businesses for Sale SELF STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE, 104 UNITS, PLUS EXCESS LAND, SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY. 317-0029

510. Resort-Out of Town

ADVERTISE YOUR VACATION PROPERTY, to more than 284,000 New Mexico newspaper readers. Your 25-word classified ad will appear in 32 newspapers around the state for only $100. Call this newspaper for more details or visit www.nmpress.org for more info.

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

TRIPLE WIDE 1978 in excellent shape with all new flooring, window coverings, paint, very spacious 1500 Sq ft, 2bd/2ba in North Senior Park $38,500 OBO 575-626-5167

520. Lots for Sale

PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352. 2 ADJOINING mobile home lots zoned for doublewides bearing pecan trees at 707 & 709 E. 3rd $12k owner financing with $2k down call Trina Brown at McDaniel Home Solutions 420-8797.

521. Cemetery Lots

South Park, Block 58, Row M, Space 23, 24, 25 & 26. $1450 each or $5750 for all four. 575-420-8704

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. Town Plaza Apartments NO HUD ACCEPTED ALL UTILITIES PAID Friendly managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs & downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944. ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. SPRING SPECIAL Convenient location close to shopping area, clean 2 Lg bdrs, Lvng room. extra storage, laundry facilities, only $575 wtr and gs pd. 910-7076 or 910-0851

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX Announcements 005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found Instruction 030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted Employment 045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F Services 070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare

110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair

225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets

CLASSIFIEDS

540. Apartments Unfurnished

EFF, 1,2 BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377 305-C W. Deming, 1br, ref. air, appliances, utilities pd., $500/mo, $300/dep. 575-623-7678 1 & 2br, all bills pd., $475/mo, 2br wtr pd, $600/mo, 625-0079

Very nice 2br/1.5ba, Apartment. North location, garage, $800/mo, $400/dep, 1 yr lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535.

LARGE 2BD/2BA duplex, 610 A. N. Lea 1 car gar. All electric wtr pd, w/d hookup. stove, refrig, no Hud or pets. $750mo, $450dep. 622-6158

1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $592, 3br/2ba, $674, 5br/2ba $812, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge.

HISTORIC DISTRICT 213 N. Washington, 1br duplex, hardwood floors, wtr pd, W/D, 575-937-8658 Century 21 Home Planning 3117 N Main, 575-622-0021 NEW!!! 3200 N Atkinson Ave 3 Bed 2 Bath 1100 Sqft $1100 2 Bed 2 Bath 1000 Sqft $1000 Stop by to reserve one Today!

1203 W. Hobbs, 2br/1ba, laundry room, all appliances, wtr pd, no pets or HUD. Call 910-6161. 1700 N. Pontiac Dr. 2br/ 1ba, w/d hookup stove & fridge, heating air, water paid. 1-626-864-3461

SPACIOUS 2BR/2BA, fenced yard, outside pets ok. w/d hookups, $650/mo, $500/dep. 910-0827

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281

LUXURY 2BD/2BA 2 car garage, all utilities pd, really nice! $1250mo $1250dep. 3 months lease minimum. 2-3bd 1&3/4ba 1 car garage all bills paid, $1000mo $1000dep 575-626-4666 or 575-622-4470

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 LOVELY 3BD 2ba, dbl garage at 3015 Alhambra. Furnished, incl. 2 TVs, water and landscaping paid. Call Ranchline Taylor & Taylor Realtors 624-2219 or 420-1978 for details and showing.

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 3br/1ba, fenced bkyrd, w/d hkp, 5 blocks from Monterrey Elem. 625-9004 2BD/1BA W/D hookup, fenced yard, No pets no hud. Call for appt. 575-626-5791

CHARMING 2-2 home near Cahoon Pk Hardwoods W/Dryer, carport. $800mo. & gas/elect. 626-6286 3/2/1, 703 Adams Dr. $900/mo, $400/dep, No Pets/Smoking, 575-910-1605.

3001 N. Washington 3bd/2ba 2 living areas, 2 car garage, fenced backyard $1500 Rent $1000 Security dep. NO PETS. All Appliances included 622-5113

320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished VERY NICE large 2br, 2 ba, dbl car gar, all electric, quiet area, $1000 mo, 3004 Alhambra, 622-1430, 622-0974

3BR/2BA, FENCED front & backyard, w/d hookup, $700/mo, $600/dep, No HUD, 311 S. Sycamore. Call or text 575-420-1418 3br 1 3/4 ba, close to Goddard High on Del Norte Dr. ref. air, single car gar. $875/mo. $500/dep. Terry 420-5111 3BR/1BA in Hagerman, $600/mo, $600/dep, remodeled, 1st & last months rent. 575-361-0048

2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 BIG 2BR 73 Brewer Place $500/mo, $400/dep. 575-420-0179 1003 E. Hendricks, 1br, $325/mo, $150/dep, no pets, you pay bills, 575-578-0971

510 S. Fir 3bd/1b carport w/d hook ups near schools, $750 mo. $500 dep. 575-444-8318 Century 21 Home Planning 3117 N Main, 575-622-0021 *NEWLY REMODELED* 401 Mission Arch 3 bed 2 bath Furnished- $2200 Unfurnished- $1400 838 Broken Arrow 4 bed 2 bath $1400

HUD OK, 2br/1ba, stove, fridge, fenced yard 23 W. Byrne, $600mo, $350/dep. Call 575-703-4025. 3BR/1BA, $950/MO, $500/dep, at the Base, HUD accepted, 420-1352.

XNICE, 1 bdr, appliances, wtr pd, no pets 910-9357

RENT TO own, nice 1br, $500/mo, 1st & last months rent, nice storage building, 575-622-6786. {{{RENTED}}} 309 E. Poe, new carpet & paint, $600/mo, $600/dep, wtr pd

2BR/1BA, $550/MO, 1210 N. Kansas, carport, central air, $400/dep, 317-4307. 1BD 1BA accepting Hud, No w/d hookup, 306 Monksdale. 910-1316

4BR/1.5BA, 2 living areas, close to Valley View school, $1000/mo, $800/dep. 575-637-1149

4BR 695+250, 1br 350+150, 1br ut. pd. 550+200 Call 575703-0420 CUTE 1BR, newly remodeled, $475/mo, $475/dep, quiet area. 910-0827 {{{RENTED}}} 3br/1ba, $700/mo, $700/dep + utilities.

3 BR, 1 bath, appliances fenced yard, w/d hookups. 910-8170 or 840-4333

580. Office or Business Places 200 S. Union. Two suites, approximately 1200 sqft and 810 sqft. Great location. Will remodel to suit tenant. Call Jan at 625-2222.

311-313 W. 2nd, 1800 sqft. Call John Grieves, PELR at 575-626-7813.

FOR LEASE, space in Sunwest Centre Office Complex at 500 N. Main St. Various size spaces. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. High floor space available for larger tenants. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 575-623-1652 or mobile 575-420-2546 MAIN ST. storefront, 2200+sqft, $1200/dep, $1200/mo. 627-9942

FOR LEASE 3500 Sq. Ft. Excellent location, $1200 mo. $1200 dep. 1 yr lease required. 200 E. College, Call 317-5841 or 317-5796

435 Welding 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted Financial 455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities Real Estate 490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer

Roswell Daily Record MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

NEED FURNITURE Shop Blair’s for the best prices on used furniture, beds, dressers, table & chairs, living room sets, patio sets, bookshelves, appliances, antiques, collectibles, home decor & housewares, saddles, tools, movies, plus lots more. Open daily 9-5, closes Wed. 627-2033 FAST TREES Grow 6-10 ft yearly $17.00 +. fasttrees.com or 509-447-4181

Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed! Commode chair, Invacare patient lifter, walker, elevated toilet seat, 622-7638. MOVING!! Treadmill Misc. furn. wedding gown, dish washer more!! 495-1839 BROTHER SEWING machine in cabinet $25. Homelite chain saw $40, Callaway Fusion look a like golf clubs $25, golf bag $10, misc. golf clubs make offer. 625-9819 Unique doll houses for sale. Fashion dolls also for sale. To view call 627-3279 21 SETS Steal shelving 87 H x 36 W x 24 D 5 Shelves per unit $ 60 each or $ 1,000 for all Also have a 31 ft 1988 Winnebago Motor Home It runs and looks great 82 year old Grandpa giving up his toy $5,000 or OBO Call 625-1589

FRESH EGGS for sale, farm free range chickens $3 a dozen. 719-850-0670 BUNDLE AND SAVE! DIRECTV, INTERNET& PHONE From $69.99/mo. Free 3-Months of HBO, starz, SHOWTIME & CINEMAX FREE GENIE 4-Room Upgrade LOCK IN 2 YR Savings Call 1-800-264-0340 REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!* Get a whole-home Satellite system installed at NO COST and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to new callers, SO CALL NOW 1-800-719-8092 SHARI`S BERRIES - Order Mouthwatering Gifts for any Occasion! SAVE 20 percent on qualifying orders over $29! Fresh Dipped Berries starting at $19.99! Visit www.berries.com/big or Call 1-800-406-5015 DIRECTTV - 2 Year Savings Event! Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS of savings and a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-264-0340 ENJOY 100 percent guaranteed, delivered?to-the-door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 74 percent PLUS 4 FREE Burgers - The Family Value Combo - ONLY $39.99. ORDER Today 1-800-773-3095 Use code 49381JVZ or www.OmahaSteaks.com/ osmb12 DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-315-7043 2007 HURRICANE Fun Deck 198 REF: 19' Deck boat seats 9, bimini top, fish finder, AM/FM/CD w/4 speakers, transom livewell, Yamaha 150 4-stroke outboard w/electric start & hydraulic steering, 176.3 hours. Lifejackets, skis & tubes included. NADA suggested list $21,626 asking $16,000. Artesia (575) 308-6173.

530 Real Estate Wanted Rentals 535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent Merchandise 605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales,

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

Store Displays, peg board and wire racks for sale Call 575-420-5808 or 626-4410 Power wheelchair, hospital bed, grab bars, bath transfer bench. 622-7638

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous TOP DOLLAR Paid for furniture, collectibles, appliances, antiques, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We pay cash with same day removal of all items. Compete/partial households & personal estates welcome. 623-0136 or 910-6031

ESTATE SETTLEMENT Never throw ANYTHING away before calling us! Our services include Auctions (our facility or yours), Tagged Estate Sales, Complete/Partial Buy-Outs & Real Estate Auctions, Firearms, Jewelry & Collectibles. Prompt removal of entire households and property cleanouts. Whether you need to sell a few items or an entire estate check with us and we will do our best to beat any offer you receive. Call today to find out how our experience can help you get more $$. Wild West Auctions, LLC 623-7355 or 840-8401

630. Auction Sales

Consignment Auction We are accepting Equipment, Automobiles, Farm Equipment, Trailers, Large Machinery & Tools to be included in our large SURPLUS AUCTION on April 26th. Deadline April 23rd. Wild West Auctions 623-7355. ADVERTISE YOUR AUCTION in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper for more details. Or log onto www.nmpress.org for a list of participating newspapers.

635. Good things to Eat

FARM FRESH chicken eggs, $2.50 per dozen. Araucana chicken hatching eggs, $4 per dozen. Fresh cracked pecans, $7 lb. 575-624-0898 FROZEN GREEN Chile, dried red chile & chile powder, local pinto beans, peanuts & pecan, ristras, jams & jellies, fountain drinks, fresh eggs, Alfalfa Hay, Wheat, Sudan & Oat hay, small & large bales, we accept credit cards & EBT. GRAVES FARM 622-1889

715. Hay and Feed Sale #1 Sorgum bales 4x8, $120, Call Janet at 575-626-0159

745. Pets for Sale

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM SMART Heeler pups available Now. 575-420-7258 FREE KITTENS Call 520-508-6735

Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale

745. Pets for Sale

Jack Russel & Rat Terr. mix pups 1st & 2nd shots, dewormed, small relocation fee. 623-8631 . 578-0730 or 317-7024 HUSKY MALAMUTE puppies, 1F, 4M, 11 wks, shots, gorgeous markings, $100-$200. 575-291-9453 FREE DOGS & puppies 1804 N. Missouri

RECREATIONAL

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

2007 HARLEY Davidson Sportster 1200 custom, fuel injected, only 5k miles, forward controls, removable Harley windshield, $5500, excellent condition, 420-1352

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com 2000 A/C motor van; self contained; 27,000 miles; 575-626-4138 $25,000 LANDS TRUCK camper 2000 model 11 1/5 ft long, clean, many extras. $9500. 575-258-5050 5TH WHEEL, 25’ w one slide. 2007 Laredo in excellent condition. $18,500. 973-0227 or 622-1215 2004 24ft Nomad travel trailer, excellent condiiton, $9500 OBO. 626-0387 FOR SALE Starcraft 9 1/2 foot pick up slide in pop up camper, in very good condition, AC, heater, stove bathroom, ref. $3000 OBO. 734-0532

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

Tired of the Hassle In Trading Or Selling Your Car or Truck? Economy Motors Will Either Purchase Your Vehicle Or Consign It For Sale At No Cost To You!! Call Or Come By For Details. Economy Motors 2506 N. Main Roswell, NM 88201 625-2440 •18 Years In Business •Family Owned & Operated •Licensed, Bonded & Insured 2009 HONDA Civic Coupe EX automatic moon roof, new AC, wired for Sirius/XM portable, clean. $9900. 575-317-3430

796. SUVS

WELL MAINTAINED Dependable clean ‘99 Suburban. $4500. 626-1721

810. Auto Parts & Accessories JEEP SOFT Top with doors. New in Box will fit 2 door, Jeep Wrangler, 2007 -2014. Vent Shades and Slush Mats. Call Dan 622-7533 ONE SET of gold 13” knock-offs rims & tires, $200 or trade. 317-8387

720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale Recreational 750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted Transportation 790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


04 08 14 Roswell Daily Record