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Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 123, No. 73 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

March 25, 2014

Latinos being left behind in health overhaul

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation’s largest minority group risks being left behind by President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul. Hispanics account for about one-third of the nation’s uninsured, but they seem to be staying on the sidelines as the White House races to meet a goal of 6 million sign-ups by March 31. Latinos are “not at the table,” says Jane Delgado, president of the National Alliance for Hispanic

Health, a nonpartisan advocacy network. “We are not going to be able to enroll at the levels we should be enrolling at.” That’s a loss both for Latinos who are trying to put down middle-class roots and for the Obama administration, experts say. Hispanics who remain uninsured could face fines, not to mention exposing their families to high medical bills from accidents or unforeseen illness. And the government won’t get the

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full advantage of a group that’s largely young and healthy, helping keep premiums low in the new insurance markets.

“The enrollment rate for Hispanic-Americans seems to be very low, and I would be really concerned about that,” says Brookings Institution health policy expert Mark McClellan. “It is a large population that has a lot to gain ... but they don’t seem to be taking advantage.” McClellan oversaw the rollout of Medicare’s prescription drug benefit

for President George W. Bush. The Obama administration says it has no statistics on the race and ethnicity of those signing up in the insurance exchanges, markets that offer subsidized private coverage in every state. Consumers provide those details voluntarily, so federal officials say any tally would be incomplete and possibly misleading. But concern is showing See OVERHAUL, Page A3

TUESDAY

AP Photo

NMED permit delays dairy manure plant Jane Delgado, president of the National Alliance for Hispanic Health, works in her office in Washington, Monday.

JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Randal Seyler Photo

World War II veteran John Simons Jr., 91, at left, was honored on Monday by the American Legion for his 70 years of continuous service to the organization. Roswell Post 28 Commander Orlando Padilla, center, and Membership Chairperson Nancy Britton visited Simons to make the award presentation.

Vet honored for 70 years in Legion Roswell veteran on Monday for 70 years of continuous membership in the Legion. John Simons Jr., 91, Members of American Legion Post 28 honored a received an award for his lifetime membership in the RANDAL SEYLER RECORD STAFF WRITER

American Legion — a can Legion merits the membership that began honor of being cited as an with Simons’ service in outstanding contributor to World War II. “Such record of consisSee LEGION, Page A3 tent loyalty to the Ameri-

A plant planned in Chaves County designed to turn dairy waste into biofuel has been delayed at least six months after hitting a snag with its state ground water discharge permit. AG Power broke ground in October on its property at Price’s Lane, with plans to begin construction that month. The plant was expected to begin processing manure as early as April. However, the deal hit a setback with its New Mexico Environment Department permit. “The delay has been with the discharge permitting office,” said AG Power President Dewey Vaughn. “It’s nothing we’ve done. It’s a matter of not having enough staff people to do as much workload that they have.” A public notice was post-

ed in the newspaper Sunday, calling for a 30-day public comment period. The company did review and make adjustments to its application in the past few months with NMED staff, Vaughn said. “The clock is now ticking,” Vaughn said. “Sometimes it gets locked into the state bureaucracy.” Once a permit is secured, the company can begin building on its 40-acre site, he said. NMED spokesman Jim Winchester said AG power was delayed due to data gaps in the application. “We sat down with AG Power several times to resolve (the data gaps), which takes time,” Winchester said. “AG Power is satisfied with the outcome and the timeframe works for their funding, anticipated construction, etc.” The published public

County inmate dies NM hunters get big win in federal court while in medical cell JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

A male inmate who was held in a medical cell at Chaves County Adult Detention Center was found dead Monday. Medical personnel tried unsuccessfully to resuscitate the man before sheriff’s deputies arrived, said Sheriff’s Office spokesman Britt Snyder. The man was taken into custody early Saturday, arrested on felony charges. The criminal investigative division secured the scene,

and the Office of Medical Investigators was called. A local investigator was sent to the scene. “The Chaves County Sherif f’s Of fice will be investigating this death,” Snyder said. “We will work closely with the Office of the Medical Investigators and the detention center staff in the coming days. We will release additional details as the investigation allows.” The inmate’s identification will not be released See INMATE, Page A3

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — New Mexico residents now have an advantage over out-of-state hunters when it comes to landing licenses to hunt the state’s bighorn sheep, oryx and ibex thanks to a federal court ruling issued Monday. U.S. District Judge Christina Armijo lifted a long-standing injunction that had prevented the state Game and Fish Department from allocating licenses to hunt the three species based on residency. Armijo, responding to a motion filed by the department, found the injunction was no longer equitable because of changes in the law and court rulings in other states that have backed up quota systems that benefit resident hunters. The injunction stemmed from a legal fight in the 1970s in which David Terk of Texas challenged New

Mexico’s higher fees and lower quotas for nonresident hunters. He claimed his equal protection rights under the U.S. Constitution were violated, which resulted a federal judge prohibiting New Mexico from imposing quotas when it came to bighorn sheep, oryx and ibex. “This is an important decision and a huge win for New Mexico hunters,” said Paul Kienzle, chairman of the New Mexico Game Commission. “It’s been a long fight, but New Mexicans now have a good shot at those quality hunts, as intended by the governor and the state Legislature.” The Game and Fish Department said it will reinstate quotas starting with this year’s draw to give state residents the same advantage they have now when applying for licenses to hunt other big game animals such as deer and elk.

Coast Guard working to reopen shipping channel

GALVESTON, Texas (AP) — As workers in bright yellow suits picked quarter sized “tar balls” out of the sand along Galveston Bay on Monday, strong incoming tides kept washing more ashore. Elsewhere, crews lined up miles of oil booms to keep oil away from the shoreline and bird habitats, two days after a collision in the Houston Ship Channel dumped as many as 170,000 gallons of oil from a barge into the water along the Gulf Coast and shut down one of the

nation’s busiest seaports. With cleanup well under way, the Coast Guard said it hoped to have the channel open to barge traffic as quickly as possible but that more tests were needed to confirm the water and the vessels traveling through the channel were free of oil. The closure stranded some 80 vessels on both sides of the channel. Traffic through the channel includes ships serving refineries key to American oil production. Officials believe most of the oil that spilled Satur-

HIGH 59 LOW 47

TODAY’S FORECAST

See PLANT, Page A3

Currently, residents receive 84 percent of all public licenses issued through drawings. Nonresidents get 6 percent and the rest go to hunters who use outfitters. New Mexico sportsmen’s groups had argued that resident hunters had received as little as 7 percent of some bighorn ram hunts because of the injunction. Despite equal odds for drawing a license to hunt bighorn sheep, oryx and ibex, state officials say nonresidents would often get a disproportionately high number of the licenses because so many of them applied for the limited licenses. According to a court brief filed by the New Mexico Wildlife Federal in support of lifting the injunction, New Mexico residents drew just one of 16 bighorn ram tags in 2012.

day is drifting out of the Houston Ship Channel into the Gulf of Mexico, which should limit the impact on bird habitats around Galveston Bay as well as beaches and fisheries important to tourists. “This spill — I think if we keep our fingers crossed — is not going to have the negative impact that it could have had,” said Jerry Patterson, commissioner of the Texas General Land Of fice, the lead state agency on response to the spill. The best-case scenario is

for most of the slick to remain in the Gulf for at least several days and congeal into small tar balls that wash up farther south on the Texas coast, where they could be picked up and removed, Patterson said. Crews from the General Land Office are monitoring water currents and the movement of the oil, he said.

Parts of Galveston Island, a popular tourist destination due to its beaches and parks, were closed to the public Monday.

A boom and the sand along East Beach are covered in oil Monday, in Galveston, Texas.

• LETHA GENEVA BAUER • CLINTON “DOYLE” HOBBS • IRIS FERN PARNELL

• FRANCES ISAACS • FACUNDO “COONEY” CARRILLO

CLASSIFIEDS ..........B6 COMICS .................B5 ENTERTAINMENT .....A8 FINANCIAL ..............B4

TODAY’S OBITUARIES PAGE A6

AP Photo

INDEX GENERAL ...............A2 HOROSCOPES .........A8 LOTTERIES .............A2 OPINION .................A4

SPORTS .................B1

WEATHER ..............A8 WORLD ..................A6


A2 Tuesday, March 25, 2014

GENERAL

Judge considers $25M Man busted for pot offer for peanut plant ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A federal judge Monday considered whether to allow a bankruptcy trustee to accept a last-minute cash offer for a defunct peanut butter plant in eastern New Mexico. U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge David Thuma presided over a hearing in Albuquerque on whether to invalidate last week’s auction for Sunland Inc., which filed for bankruptcy following a salmonella outbreak that shuttered its operations and prompted a nationwide recall. North Carolina-based Hampton Farms had the winning bid of $20 million. However, just before the auction results were to be finalized during a court hearing Friday, trustee Clarke Coll received a call from Paul Henderson of Canada’s Golden Boy Foods with a $25 million cash offer for the plant. Golden Boy Foods has since transferred that money to a title company and stands

Man arrested on drug charge

ready to purchase the plant.

The judge is considering whether to let the trustee take the higher offer, but it was not immediately clear whether a decision would be made Monday. Coll said the extra $5 million has the potential to result in a payout for unsecured creditors.

Hampton Farms officials, who already operate a peanut shelling and packing company in Portales, told the Albuquerque Journal they intend to reopen the plant.

“We currently produce peanut butter products at two facilities in North Carolina, which are distributed across the entire U.S.,” said Tom Nolan, a company vice president. “The Portales facility would enable Hampton Farms to produce peanut butter in New Mexico, closer to both the source (growers) and our customers in the U.S.”

New Mexico Tech presents STEM Day at ENMU-R

A 25-year -old Roswell man was arrested in connection with marijuana charges following a traffic stop on Saturday. At about 11 p.m., Roswell Police stopped a red 2006 Chevrolet Malibu in the 100 block of North Washington Ave. Police say they discovered 18.2 grams of marijuana in the vehicle during the traffic stop. Joshua A. Whitaker was arrested in connection with a charge of possession of marijuana, according to the report.

Traffic stop leads to arrest

Roswell Police arrested an Albuquerque man for DUI early Saturday morning, according to police reports. Two Roswell of ficers stopped a green 2011 Nissan Ultima at the intersection of West College and Main Street. The driver, Jose E. Benavides, 29, of Albuquerque was arrested in connection with a charge of aggravated driving under the influence of intoxicating liquor, according to reports.

Unlawful use of license

Jill McLaughlin Photo

Professors from New Mexico Tech drew a crowd of students at Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell Monday, presenting a Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Day. The interactive presentations included building and flying water rockets, analyzing drinking water, estimating finances, tree and building heights, and tying each of those together by showcasing mathematics. Dr. Steve Schaffer of New Mexico Tech, who had worked at NASA, said he fell in love with math. "Math is not all that bad," he told the students. "It's actually really powerful stuff. I'll show you how the world works through using math."

STATE BRIEFS

Mayor: Wrong to say Albuquerque shooting justified

ALBUQUERQUE(AP) — Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry says it was wrong for Police Chief Gorden Eden to say officers were justified in killing a homeless camper in the Sandia foothills. And Berry said Monday he wants to bring in outsiders to help investigate. In a rare show of public displeasure with the city’s troubled police department, Berry criticized Albuquerque’s new police chief for making a “premature” judgment about the fatal shooting that left 38-year-old James Boyd dead. Authorities said Boyd died after officers unloaded stun guns, bean bags and six live rounds. Eden said Boyd threatened to kill officers and held onto knives as an unarmed K-9 officer approached him. A helmet camera video showed Boyd gathering his belongings then turning away right before officers fired.

‘Game of Thrones’ to screen early in Santa Fe

SANTA FE (AP) — Santa Fe fans of HBO’s “Game of Thrones” will have a chance to get a sneak peek at the TV show’s April 6 season premiere in English and Spanish, thanks to the

author who started it all. The New Mexican reports that George R.R. Martin, whose “Song of Ice and Fire” book series inspired the show, will offer two free showings Saturday at his Santa Fe theater, Jean Cocteau Cinema. Vince Kadlubeck, a theater spokesman, says Martin wants fellow Santa Fe residents from the Spanishspeaking community to come watch. Officials say only 125 tickets are available. They say the Spanish-language screening, which will have no subtitles, is at 10:30 a.m. and the Englishlanguage one is at 1:30 p.m. Martin bought the theater last year and re-opened it Aug. 9.

Mesita man facing prison for choking, biting woman

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A Mesita man is facing up to 10 years in prison after pleading guilty to assaulting a woman in New Mexico two months ago. Prosecutors say 28-year-old Brian Dyea entered his plea Monday. He was arrested on a criminal complaint alleging that he assaulted a Laguna Pueblo woman by choking and biting her on Jan. 12. Authorities say the woman lost consciousness as a result of the assault. She suffered contusions to

“Real Estate Corner”

PACK BEFORE YOU SHOW

By Connie DeNio of Roswell 622-7191 or 626-7948

It’s a good idea to start packing even before you show your home. Nonessentials from every room can be stored away, giving a clean, uncluttered look. Three bottles of shampoo, and two kinds of bath oil, and before you know it, the bathroom storage looks cramped and inadequate. Even furniture that is not needed every day

may best be stored elsewhere. The desk in the bedroom may suit you fine, but the prospective buyer may see only the lack of open space. The overstuffed chair you love to lounge in may dwarf your family room. Look through your home with a critical eye. If you can live without it, move it out.© Give Me A Call Today!

Roswell Daily Record

On Saturday, Michael J. Montoya, 47, of Roswell, was arrested in connection with a charge of unlawful use of license following a traffic stop on Saturday evening. Montoya was driving a white 2002 Chevrolet Silverado in the 5700 block of South Main Street when he was pulled over by Roswell Police. According to the report, police recovered a Budweiser

her forehead and foot, three bite marks to her left hand and forearm and a sprained wrist. Dyea has been in federal custody since his arrest and remains detained pending his sentencing hearing, which has yet to be scheduled.

N.M. high court to hear DWI case involving officer

SANTA FE (AP) — The New Mexico Supreme Court this week hears arguments on whether a northern New Mexico law enforcement of ficer accused of drunken driving while off duty in 2010 should have to stand trial. Abraham Baca was a New Mexico State Police of ficer when he was arrested. He’s now a Rio Arriba County sheriff’s sergeant. The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that the appeal issue being heard by the state high court centers on whether a trial would subject Baca to double jeopardy, as his defense argues. State prosecutors contend he never had a valid trial and escaped punishment because of incorrect lower court rulings that cut short previous court proceedings against Baca. The Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday.

You are once again invited to the

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Date: Saturday - April 5th, 2014. Time: Doors Open @ 5:00 pm

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For Tickets, buy online @ http://events.rmef.org/!ABM/ Or contact Kathy LaHaye, RMEF Volunteer, by calling 575-622-7700 Early Registration by 4-2-14 Has It’s Benefits!!!!

beer can and a liquor bottle at the scene.

Man arrested on marijuana charge

Roswell Police arrested a Carlsbad man early Sunday following a traffic stop in the 100 block of North Washington Ave. Police say they seized 8.7 grams of marijuana from Freddy C. Olguin, 35, of Carlsbad. Olguin was arrested in connection with a charge of possession of marijuana.

Restraining order violation charged

Roswell Police responded to a report of a temporary restraining order violation on Sunday at noon in the 1200 block of East First Street. Once police arrived, Daniel Joe Munoz, 24, of Roswell, was arrested on charges of contempt of court to wit: violation of family violence act and on a charge of breaking and entering, aggravated stalking and interference with communications, according to the report.

Woman arrested on battery charge

Roswell Police responded to a report of unknown trouble in the 400 block of East Third Street at about 9:21 p.m. on Sunday evening. Once on the scene, police arrested Darlene M. Haines, 47, of Roswell, on a charge of battery against a household member (not aggravated).

Speeding results in

drug bust

On Sunday at about 10:30 p.m., Roswell Police on patrol in the area of McGaf fey and Union streets saw a red 1990 Dodge pickup traveling east on McGaf fey at a high rate of speed.

Upon stopping the pickup, the officer discovered 3.2 grams of marijuana in the vehicle.

Arrested was Blaise A. Windham, 20, of Roswell, in connection with a charge of possession of marijuana.

Expired tag results in arrest

Roswell Police conducted a traf fic stop in the 1100 block of South Kentucky early Monday morning.

The blue 1993 Honda Civic had a registration tag that expired in September, 2013. Police stopped the car at 1:30 a.m. near the intersection of Kentucky and McGaffey, according to the report.

As a result of the stop, police arrested Kevin Luevano, 32, on various charges including failure to pay fines, failure to comply, failure to appear and unlawful use of license.

Anyone having information about these or any other crimes is asked to contact Crime Stoppers 888-594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward.

DOG DIES AFTER FIGHT WITH CANCER SANTA FE (AP) — The Santa Fe Animal Shelter reports the death of an emaciated stray dog whose ups and downs were monitored by thousands of the shelter’s Facebook fans. The death of Raphael on Monday comes two months after the dog was diagnosed with cancer in January. It had arrived at the shelter in October. The dog weighed just about half its nor mal

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weight when it was found abandoned in a Pojoaque neighborhood.

It then regained its weight but the shelter’s medical director, Dr. Jennifer Steketee says the cancer proved too much for Raphael. The shelter says a memorial service will be planned later in the spring and the dog’s ashes will be sprinkled at the shelter’s labyrinth.

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Flood insurance hikes frustrate Bosque Farms GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — In the small village of Bosque Farms that borders the nearly dry Rio Grande south of Albuquerque, home and business owners have shelled out more than $600,000 a year for federally subsidized flood insurance to cover claims that have totaled only $2,192 during the decades-old life of the program. And the rates just keep going up, making it difficult for some residents to pay the premiums — or sell their homes. “It’s tough on qualifying,” said real estate agent Harriet Taylor. “In fact, there’s some loans that won’t even consider a home if it’s in a flood zone.” This year, 275 homeowners in the village of 3,900 people are set to see rate hikes of up to 18 percent a year as the federal government seeks to put the troubled National Flood Insurance Program back on sound financial footing. Policyholders on more than 20 other properties face premium increases of 25 percent per year until they switch to a rate based on the true risk of flooding. The

Legion

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the programs of the American Legion,” according to the award, which was signed by American Legion National Commander Daniel M. Dellinger and National Adjutant Daniel S. Wheeler, as well as local Post Commander Orlando Padilla. “I’ve never met the national commander, I’ve just seen him in the magazines,” Simons joked. Simons served in the Army during World War II. “I was a member of the 29th Infantry Division, and we served in the European theatre,” Simons said. Simons, along with his two brothers, David and Donald, served in the Armed Forces during World War II. Simons and brother David served in the Army, while Donald served in the 4th Division of the Marines. Born in Magdalena, Simons grew up in Artesia, the son of a businessman. “Dad had a grocery store, Joyce Pruitt, which was sort of like a chain back then,” Simons said. “There was a store in Artesia and one in Roswell.” Brothers John and David, serving in the Army in Europe, met while stationed on the continent on a few occasions during the war, Simons said, and both brothers survived the war. Brother Donald served in the Pacific, and he was killed in the battle for Saipan in 1944, Simons said. “It’s just an honor to meet someone with this type of service,” said

Inmate

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until next of kin are notified, Snyder said. The body will be sent to the Office of Medical Investigators in Albuquerque for an autopsy. Chaves County Adult and Juvenile Detention Center Administrator Clay Corn said initial reports indicated the incident did not involve foul play, but that he could not comment on the case until the investigation was complete. The detention center includes a fully staf fed medical ward for its inmates.

changes came under a newly passed national law that aims to cover a $24 billion deficit created by the longrunning discounts and a series of catastrophic storms. President Barack Obama signed the law Friday putting the brakes on a 2012 overhaul that was supposed to end costly government subsidies for flood insurance. But while the law offers instant relief for homeowners hit by premiums that soared by thousands of dollars overnight, for many the reprieve is temporary. The hikes are infuriating to residents in this drought-stricken state, who are already paying what they consider to be unreasonable amounts even though they can’t remember the last time the area had any substantial flooding. “The likelihood of flooding in our community is quite low,” said Mayor Bob Knowlton, whose flood insurance premium went up 13 percent last year, to $1,700. “I believe we are basically subsidizing all of the FEMA payouts back East. Also, my flood insurance premium is about four times higher than my regular homeowners insur-

Padilla, commander of Roswell’s American Legion Post 28. “Not just Mr. Simons, but his whole family served their country in World War II.” Simons wrote a brief introduction to the 29th Infantry Division that he shared with his fellow veterans. The 29th Division spearheaded the landing at Omaha Beach on DDay, fighting its way through France to finally rendezvous with Russians on the Elbe River in Germany. “It was an honor for me to serve in the 175th Regiment of the 29th Division during World War II,” Simons said. Simons presented copies of the book, “29th Let’s Go: A History of the 29th Infantry Division in World War II” by Joseph Ewing to Artesia school libraries and the city library. “I hear the education on World War II is really lacking in schools these days, and I want them to have some history of what it was really like.” The history of the 29th Division traces back to the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, in regiments from Maryland and Virginia. “The division is often referred to as the ‘Blue and Gray Division’ since some of its men fought for the Union Army and some for the Confederate Army during the Civil War,” Simons said. Simons said he enjoyed his many years with the American Legion, and he most enjoyed the youth activities sponsored by the American Legion Post in Artesia when he was serving as post commander. “I am really honored by this award,” he said.

“We’re secondary hospitals now in the jail,” Corn said.

The county is in the process of expanding and renovating the facility.

A major reconstruction is planned for the aging medical area that now cares for inmates by using single cells. The new, moder n eight-bed medical ward will accommodate the needs of sick and mentally-ill patients, who can be exposed to more officer supervised social situations.

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ance for the same amount of coverage. Something is really wrong with this system.” Across New Mexico, more than 4,000 subsidized flood insurance policies will see rate increases. In the Middle Rio Grande Valley, Taylor says, the impact is huge, and growing. “FEMA keeps coming in and making more and more of our county in the flood zone,” she said. “Now almost all of Valencia County is in the flood plain. Everybody has to pay flood insurance. You have seniors on limited income, and in addition to struggling anyway, now they have to pay flood insurance,” Taylor said. “... So it makes it hard. I understand they need funding for other areas, but they are doing this to people who haven’t had any problems.” Still, Taylor understands that doesn’t mean a major flood won’t hit the area someday. “They call it the 100-year flood. They say we are due,” Taylor said. “It just depends on how the rains come, because we have been in such a drought.”

Overhaul

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

A3

GOVERNOR’S DIRECTIVE UPSETS LAWMAKERS

SANTA FE (AP) — Gov. Susana Martinez has clamped down on the Legislature’s watchdog committees in what some lawmakers consider an attempt to limit their oversight of the Republican governor’s agencies. At the direction of the governor, administration agencies are telling the Legislative Finance Committee and the Legislative Education Study Committee that their requests for information must be sent first to the governor’s chief of staff, Keith Gardner, for his approval before the agency will respond. The committees and their staff typically are in direct contact with agencies to seek data and documents. “She’s drawing the battle lines, I guess,” said Rep. Luciano “Lucky” Varela, chair man of the finance committee that oversees budget issues and regularly asks agencies about their spending. Martinez personally called the committee’s staff director, David Abbey, earlier this month to tell him of the new policy.

Varela said the governor’s directive to agencies is an unprecedented move to control the flow of information that the LFC is entitled to under state law.

“To me it was somewhat of a surprise to have a governor call the LFC and say, ‘No more unless I approve it,”’ Varela said.

State law says government agencies shall furnish the LFC with “such documents, materials or information as may be requested by the member of the committee or its director or staff which are not made confidential by law.”

The gover nor’s of fice won’t say whether a specific request from a committee or some other dispute with the Legislature prompted Martinez to implement the policy. Lawmakers, particularly Democrats, have been sharply critical of the administration’s decision to suspend Medicaid payments to more than a dozen mental health providers and replace them with Arizona companies.

Continued from Page A1

through, and it’s coming from the highest levels. “You don’t punish me by not signing up for health care,” Obama told Hispanic audiences during a recent televised town hall. “You’re punishing yourself or your family.” Only last September, three of five Latinos supported the national overhaul, according to the Pew Research Center. Approval dropped sharply during October, as technical problems paralyzed the health care rollout and the Spanish-language version of the HealthCare.gov website. Hispanics are now evenly divided in their views. A big Gallup survey recently showed tepid sign-up progress. While the share of African-Americans who are uninsured dropped by 2.6 percentage points this year, the decline among Hispanics was just 0.8 percentage point. In Califor nia, where Latinos account for 46 percent of those eligible for subsidized coverage through the exchange, they represented 22 percent of those who had enrolled by the end February and had also volunteered their race or ethnicity. The state is scrambling to improve its

Plant

Continued from Page A1

notice starts a comment period when the public can submit comments and r equest a public hearing. If NMED gets requests for a public hearing, Secretary R yan Flynn will determine if “significant public interest” exists to hold a hearing. If a hearing is held, the process will result in a final recommendation by Flynn within 30 days, Winchester said. “The secr etary then has 30 days to approve the (discharge per mit), approve with modification(s) or deny the (discharge per mit),” Win-

AP Photo

This screenshot made Nov. 26, 2013, shows the Department of Health and Human Services' web page for the Spanish language version HealthCare.gov.

numbers in this week’s home stretch. Experts cite overlapping factors behind disappointing Latino sign-ups: — A shortage of in-person helpers to guide consumers. “In our community, trust and confidence is so important — you want to make sure it’s OK before you share all this personal information,” Delgado said. There’s been a lack of “culturally sensitive” outreach to Latinos, added Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Texas. — Fear that applying for health

chester said. If no public comments are received, the permit will be approved. A first of its kind in the state, the pr oject is a partnership between county dairy owners and AG Power. The first phase will include Pirtle Far ms Dairy, Pirtle and Sons No. 2 Dairy, Natur e’s Dairy, Tom Visser Dairy, Arr oyo Dairy, Double Aught Dairy and Three Amigos Dairy. State Sen. Cliff Pirtle, R-Dist.-32, of Pirtle Far ms Dairy, said the far ms have continued nutrient management plans while waiting for the new pr ogram to begin. Pirtle was one of several dignitaries, that

care will bring unwelcome scrutiny from immigration authorities. The health insurance exchanges are only for citizens and legal U.S. residents, but many Hispanic families have mixed immigration status. Some members may be native born, while others might be here illegally. Obama has tried to dispel concerns, saying information on applications will not be shared with immigration authorities.

included Gov. Susana Martinez, who attended the October gr oundbreaking ceremony. “We’ve just been continuing to do what we have been for the last two years,” Pirtle said. “It’s one of those things. It provides a commonsense solution to an issue that most dairymen have to deal with. “It’s pretty sad to see government actually got in the way of something that will actually improve the situation,” Pirtle said. Once operational, the pr ocess will allow manure to enter the company’s facility and be converted to methane gas and eventually compressed to natural gas that can be used by

buses and trucks. The dairies will be connected to AG Power’s plant by undergr ound pipelines. At each dairy, wastewater will be transferred to a 5,000-gallon concrete receiving tank and mixed with manure and heated in a concrete mix tank. The wastewater will then be pumped through a pipeline to lift stations undergr ound to fiberglass tanks. Then, it is pumped to a digester. Wastewater is further pr ocessed to separate solids befor e it is discharged to another holding tank for evaporation with some discharge to 230 acr es of irrigated cropland.


How do you like your water? A4 Tuesday, March 25, 2014

OPINION

Do you drink your tap water? If not, why not? Is fluoride, perhaps, one of your concerns? Many cities add fluoride to their water supply because it strengthens teeth. The controversy is over what else fluoride does that is not so desirable. There’s a fluoride war in Albuquerque right now. The Albuquerque-Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority is proposing to put fluoride back into the water supply after removing it a few years ago. Passions are high. While the Albuquerque issue is local, the fluoride question affects all communities. According to Rudy Blea, of the Office of Oral Health in the state Health Department, the following communities have adjusted water systems to accommodate the appropriate levels of fluoride: Chama, Cimarron, Cuba,

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TRIPLE SPACED

Estancia, Farmington, Los Alamos, Milan, Pecos, Raton, Ruidoso, Santa Fe, Santa Rosa, Springer, Taos, Villanueva, and White Sands. These communities add supplemental fluoride to naturally-occurring fluoride to bring the level up to an accepted standard. Other communities don’t fluoridate, either because naturally occurring fluoride levels are high enough or because they choose not to. Is fluoride a solution to New Mexico’s well-publicized lack of

Roswell Daily Record

access to dental care? That depends whom you ask. Both sides were out in force at a recent hearing of the water board in Albuquerque. Pro-fluoride advocates say, in effect, that fluoride is good for teeth; studies show that in the right quantities it’s not harmful to human health, and our communities have a dental health problem. Watch that “right quantities.” The anti-fluoride argument is more complicated. A few major points: Fluoride is beneficial • when applied topically to teeth – not swallowed. • Fluoride is the only health remedy that is forced on the whole population with no control of dosing. • Fluoride in higher doses is toxic. Among other things, it

reportedly affects the brain and reduces intelligence. • The toxicity is cumulative, may take a long time to build up, and may be complicated by other toxic substances in food and the environment. • If mothers feed powdered formula to their babies, they are overdosing the babies if they mix the for mula with fluoridated water. Both sides cite stacks of studies, some proving fluoride is safe and others proving it isn’t. The most up-to-date studies seem to support the anti-fluoride position, including studies from China that show lower IQ in children exposed to fluoride. So much public comment has poured in that the water board has scheduled a special town hall meeting on the issue, tentatively set for April 9.

After the recent hearing, County Commissioner Art de la Cruz, announced he had already made up his mind. “I cannot support adding fluoride to our water,” he said in a statement. “While there are two sides in this matter, what is clear is that it is not clear. … I would prefer to give free toothpaste to children who cannot afford it than force everyone to ingest fluoride.” Ironically, some authorities believe a substantial percentage of New Mexico residents – numbers unknown – aren’t drinking their local water anyway. They’re drinking bottled water. Even Rudy Blea thinks that. The Office of Oral Health has a number of programs to help lowincome children and adults, including education and dental See DANNEMANN, Page A5

EDITORIAL

There may be nothing that the United States and its allies in the European Union can do to force the Russians to leave Crimea at this point. But they can send a loud message that expanding the invasion beyond this Russian-centric region of Ukraine carries a heavy price. A new round of sanctions imposed Monday on prominent Russian officials is a good way to begin to exact that price in the wake of a bogus election over the weekend on Crimean secession. President Barack Obama signed an executive order freezing the assets and banning visas for a number of Russians who are said to be responsible for seizing Crimea. Several top aides of Russian President Vladimir Putin were on the list, which could grow.

Vice President Joe Biden traveled to Eastern Europe last week to meet with leaders in countries such as Poland and Estonia — countries that feel the most vulnerable to Russian aggression. And Obama himself will be in Europe this week, a trip that was previously scheduled and now likely will focus on the crisis in Ukraine.

The sanctions put in place Monday are designed to hit the people responsible for Russia’s outrageous violation of Ukrainian sovereignty. Among those facing sanctions are Vladislav Surkov, an influential adviser of Putin known as the Kremlin’s “gray cardinal.” Putin himself escaped sanctions — for now.

“We’re making it clear there are consequences for these actions,” Obama said. “The international community will continue to stand together to oppose any violations of Ukrainian sovereignty and territorial integrity.” The move by the United States and EU came after a Russian-backed referendum in Crimea that locals there claimed showed 97% favored breaking away from Ukraine. While there is a large majority of people who consider themselves culturally Russian living in Crimea, the minority Tatars boycotted the vote, knowing as does the rest of the world that it was illegitimate.

A new government in Crimea, meantime, on March 17 declared itself independent, and Putin recognized the region as a “sovereign and independent state” in defiance of the sanctions. Europe has not seen such a hostile redrawing of a nation’s border in years. And it sets a worrisome precedent for other nations with restive minorities within their borders. The Russia invasion came after Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych was deposed in February.

The administration said it was going after three categories of people it believes are responsible for the problems in Ukraine: Russian government officials, those who work in the arms sector and “Russian government cronies,” a senior American official told The New York Times.

The administration is smart to take measured steps to isolate Russia in the world community. There may be retaliation -- the U.S. and companies that do business with the Russians must be prepared for that. But Obama took the best steps available to him to dissuade Putin and his cronies.

“Further provocations will achieve nothing ... except further isolation,” Obama said Monday. Which is as it should be. Obama should be prepared to ratchet up sanctions again if needed. REPRINTED FROM THE

MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL

LETTERS

Dear Sir: Who is surprised by the release of the report from the WIPP operation that reveals a “lack of rigor” in its safety and emergency responses. I don’t know what a “lack of rigor” means but I do know that there has been for many years a lack of concern for public safety in the field of nuclear energy, especially in the management of its highly radioactive and dangerous waste products. The general attitude is always the same — there is no danger — we have everything under control — “Poppa knows best!” This attitude is clearly shown in the recent comments offered the public in the recent spill and contamination there. There is nothing more dangerous and long lasting than radioactive contamination. The public deserves and expects better efforts from the nuclear energy people and not any more of the tired

platitudes so often given by them. William Briney Roswell

Dear Editor: Mr. Watson, Pastor Smothermon did not do anything wrong, and does not deserve how he has been treated by you, as well as many others in this community. He is a man who has a heart to reach people with the love of Jesus. I could not believe your letter saying, “He professes to be a Christian man, but does he really know Jesus Christ and is he walking in his footsteps or running in the opposite direction?” Mr. Watson, my answer to you is yes, he is a Christian man. He is a spirit-filled Christian man who has a heart to reach the lost. He continues to even with people like yourself who come against him and persecute him without cause.

Mr. Watson, isn’t that what was done to Jesus? They crucified an innocent man. This letter you wrote was untrue and uncalled for. Just remember one day we will all have to stand before the Lord and give an account of every idle word spoken. LaDonna Corman Roswell

Dear Mr. Watson: Mr. Watson, I read your letter in the paper this morning. I wanted to address a couple of issues you’ve brought up. To begin I would like to respond in reference to something you’ve said. You’ve questioned whether or not Pastor Smothermon has “used the right arena” to bring change to Roswell. Mr. Watson, in Matthew 22:21, Jesus spoke to the Pharisees as they brought forth an issue in politics. Jesus said, “Give back to Caesar what is Caesar’s and give to God what is God’s.” If

Christians are supposed to stay out of politics then why is our shepherd Jesus Christ involved in politics as shown here in this passage? The word “Christians” is defined as Christ followers. Jesus Christ was a perfect example of how we are supposed to live. In fact you said yourself “Christians should act no dif ferent today.” You are exactly right; we should strive to act just like Jesus did back then. Mr. Watson, if all of the Christians were taken out of politics what kind of governing would take over? It is a common-sense answer. Christians should be rising up against the evil decisions, we should be taking a stand against passive leaders. Pastor Smother mon is doing just that. What good are Christians doing by sitting back in the (pews)? Jesus himself told Peter in Matthew 4:19, “Come, follow me, and I will send you out to fish for

Review your lens options for cataract surgery DEAR DOCTOR K: I’m having cataract surgery in a few weeks. There are so many options for replacement lenses. Which one should I choose? DEAR READER: I can’t tell you which you should choose, since I don’t know the specifics of your cataract. But I can suggest how you should think about several options that your ophthalmologist is likely to discuss with you. First, the basics. A cataract is a clouding of the normally clear lens of the eye. Over time, it can cause a disabling loss of vision. Surgical removal of the clouded lens is the only effective cure for a cataract. In most cases, the surgeon replaces the clouded

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lens with an artificial intraocular lens (IOL). As you noted, there are several options for replacement lenses. The most popular are monofocal IOLs. These lenses are designed to focus at one set distance: far, intermediate or near. (On my website, AskDoctorK.com, I’ve put a figure that illustrates these “zones of vision.”) Standard monofocal IOLs lack the abili-

ty to accommodate. That’s the ability to change focus from near to far and back again. Many people choose a monofocal IOL that allows for clear distance vision after cataract surgery. Other people choose a lens that’s good for reading. Still others choose a lens that focuses about 18 to 36 inches away because they spend a lot of time at a computer, and that’s about how far away the screen is from their eyes. If, like most people, you choose a lens that’s good for distance vision, you probably will need to use reading glasses. And vice versa if you choose a lens that’s good for close vision. If you need cataract surgery

See LETTERS, Page A5

on both eyes, and choose monofocal IOLs but hope to be less dependent on glasses, consider a technique called monovision. Monovision involves implanting an IOL for near vision in one eye and an IOL for far vision in the other eye. For many years I did this -- but with contact lenses, not IOLs (I didn’t have cataracts then). It worked fine for me. Many people find the adjustment to monovision quite challenging, if not impossible. That’s because reducing your binocular vision (your ability to use both eyes together) changes your depth perception. If you are considering monovision, try it See DR. K, Page A5


March is National Color Therapy Month LOCAL

Roswell Daily Record

LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

March is National Color Therapy Month. Color therapy may be as simple as wearing a particular color to feel better about yourself or as complex as decorating the interiors of our homes and work environments. Certain colors can stimulate our senses while others can calm our nerves. For example, exercise is best performed in warm colors, such as reds and oranges, whereas the tranquil blues and greens are ideal for mental concentration. March is also Optimism Month and the use of colors may help us to think positive and be more optimistic. Lucille Ball of “I Love Lucy” TV fame also performed in 72 movies. She advised: “One of the things I learned the hard way was that it doesn’t pay to get discouraged. Keeping busy and making optimism a way of life can restore your faith in yourself.” The Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania, has books and other materials that will add color and optimism to your life. To access the library’s online catalog of materials, renew checked out materials or for a list of resources and services provided by the library, go to the website at www.roswellpubliclibrary.org. For more information on any of these programs or to ask a question; visit the library, phone 575-6227101, or email rplref@roswellpubliclibrary.org using “Question” in the subject line. Check into our online resources and Internet databases. We have links to articles, maps

LETTER POLICY

The Daily Record welcomes and attempts to publish all letters to the editor that meet guidelines. To be published, letters must include the writer’s first and last name, address and telephone number. Addresses and telephone numbers will not be published unless the letter asks for a response. Addresses and telephone numbers are used for verification or to contact the letter writer for more information. All letters except those sent by e-mail must be signed. Letters which are libelous, written in poor

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out with contact lenses before your cataract surgery. Monovision is not an ideal option if you require crisp, detailed vision. One approach is to forgo traditional monofocal IOLs. Instead, consider specialized, nonmonofocal IOLs. There are several options in this category. For example, accommodating IOLs allow you to change focus between middle and distance vision, but they aren’t as reliable for near vision.

electronic newspapers, auto repair manuals, and other websites. The library is open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Monday and Tuesday, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Wednesday through Saturday and from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday. Reference librarians are available to assist patrons in locating the books and information.

Book talk

March is National Craft Month. Rosie Klopfer, interlibrary loan librarian, shares creative books related to improving the looks of our homes and wardrobe. Reupholstered furniture is one way to transform a room with therapeutic colors and fabulous fabric. “Spruce: A Step-by-Step Guide to Upholstery and Design” by Amanda Brown is a gorgeous book illustrated by more than 900 step-by-step photographs to teach the techniques and skills needed to reupholster any piece of furniture to suit your personal style. Whether looking to reupholster a family heirloom or tackle your thrift store find, there are many different reasons why people choose to reupholster over buying new. Some reasons are sentimental, others are related to budget restrictions or the environment, while sometimes a person just gets the urge to makeover the room with a different look. New slip covers can change the mood in any room. Amanda Brown

taste, promote or attack individual businesses or concern active civil court cases will not be published. Letters must either be typed or written or printed legibly.

Because of limited space, letters should not exceed 300 words.

Because of the large volume of letters received, those unpublished may not be acknowledged or returned and a maximum of two letters a month will be printed by any individual writer. The Daily Record reserves the right to reject any letter.

Another option, multifocal IOLs, is similar to bifocals or progressive eyeglasses. These lenses include different areas designed for distance, intermediate and near vision. Just as people with progressive eyeglasses require just one pair of glasses for seeing things at all distances, the same is true with multifocal IOLs.

(Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

offers inspiration from stripping furniture to sewing tips to selecting the fabric. Readers will learn about determining the yardage and print design for the new covers, tying a coil spring and padding the seat and arms. The book is complete with a glossary, resources list, description of tools and a detailed index. Leatrice Eiseman’s Colors for Your Every Mood: Discover Your T rue Decorating Colors offers practical information and fascinating psychological insights for everyone who makes color decisions. Learn which color combinations create calm and soothing moods, which demand drama and excitement or which make a place or a person seem whimsical and carefree. Colors can change a room from formal to romantic, from classic to exotic. The book is complete with two, three, and four-color combinations for a full range of color moods. The psychological, sociological, and historical meaning of each color is then detailed, as is its use in particular rooms. Most of the tips in Nicole Vasbinder’s “Sewing Solutions: Tips and Techniques for the Savvy Sewist” focus on garment sewing, although many are relevant to home decor sewing or quilting. Sewing allows the sewist to select not only the pattern, but also the color and the fabric for their special project. Approximately half of the book is devoted to sewing tools-machines, needles, thread, notions, and rulers, and the other half focuses on common sewing and finishing techniques. The author explains in detail why pressing is so important and the

Letters

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people.” Mr. Watson, it is not the environment of where we fish for people, it is that we leave our nets and follow him. To be quite upfront with your statement, “Jesus Christ knew without a shadow of a doubt that the solution to mankind’s problems lie not in human governments but in what he prayed for — God’s kingdom.” We should not rely on the government; we should rely on God. But, Mr. Watson, this does not mean Christians should stay out of government. In fact, our nation was based upon Christianity and founded by Christians. From George Washington to John Adams, from Thomas Jefferson to John Hancock, from Benjamin Franklin to Samuel Adams, from James Madison to James Monroe, John Quincy Adams, William Penn, Roger Sherman, Benjamin Rush, Alexander Hamilton, and so many more American leaders and founders were Christians. Mr. Watson, the list can go on and on. If Christians were not forced to leave politics years ago, why are we being forced out of them now? Another note on our statement I quoted earlier I would like to mention, how are our prayers to come to pass but just sitting there doing nothing to prepare for them? “God’s kingdom to come on Earth as it is in heaven” is not going to happen by sitting there being passive. For this to come to be we must stand up for God. Mr. Watson, in order for us to reap a harvest we must first sew into it. Lacy N. Corman Roswell

Dannemann Continued from Page A4

services such as sealants. This being New Mexico, the programs are underfunded and don’t reach everyone who

correct fit will make all the difference in your finished endeavor. The glossary of terms, detailed photos and drawing make this a valuable tool for any seamstress. Other titles for the sewist and knitters are: Margaret Rowan’s “Handsewn: the Essential Techniques for Tailoring and Embellishment,” Ann Budd’s “Scarf Style 2: Innovative to Traditional, 26 Fresh Designs to Knit” and Ann Hood’s “Knitting Yarns: Writers on Knitting.”

What’s happening?

Cows and chickens will appear in the books and crafts during this week’s free story and craft hours. Children attending the story portion of the program are invited to enjoy the related crafts. All materials are provided for the crafts; however, children must arrive in the first 15 minutes of the program to participate in the crafts. The stories and crafts may vary between programs and the quantities of some craft items may be limited. Most cows moo, but during the Wednesday cows story and craft hours, one story reveals “The Cow that Went Oink.” Other stories might include “Moo, The Cow Loves Cookies,” “Sixteen Cows” or “Click, Clack, Cows that Type.” The morning program begins at 10 a.m. and features song and movement activities for toddlers and preschool children. The 3:30 p.m. story time is designed for older children and does not include music. The cow crafts could involve assembling a 3-D cow, making a cow jumping over the moon bookmark or creating a

To the Editor: Well, it seems that some recent letters to the editor (Feb. 12 and 13) are making a gang-attack on the doctrine of salvation by grace. To begin, we must ask, “If someone has confessed his sins and asked for forgiveness, how can he know if he is truly on his way to heaven? How many good deeds must he do? Does he know how many ‘brownie points’ he still needs to get to heaven? If today he is saved, might he lose his salvation tomorrow because of some ‘negative brownie points?’” We must look at Isaiah 64:6, “…all our righteous acts are like filthy rags.” We cannot expect God to reward our “filthy rags.” Speaking for myself, many of my good deeds were done for selfish reasons if only for a chance to pat myself on the back. In Luke 23:42-43, the thief on the cross said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” Jesus answered, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise.” Could the thief have amassed sufficient good deeds to qualify for heaven? Concerning the conversation with a Jehovah’s Witness minister mentioned in Rafale Valens’ letter, we must clarify some matters. It was the pastor who said, “You are a student of the Bible, why don’t you join us?” I certainly did not label myself that way. When the question came up about whether the theme of Jesus’ ministry was salvation or the Kingdom, the pastor said that the gospels mention the Kingdom over 100 times. I pointed out that the Bible mentions money more often than love. Jesus spoke more often of hell than heaven. This does not mean that

needs them. The water pipes of ancient Rome’s famous aqueducts were made of lead. Lead is toxic and affects the brain, and some historians think that was the cause of the fall of the Roman Empire. Our

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longhorn steer headband hat. Chickens will be highlighted during the 2 p.m. Saturday story time for all ages. The books could include “The Chick and the Duckling,” “Charlie the Chick,” “If You’re Happy and You Know It,” “I’m Not Reading,” “One Little Chicken” or “Chicken Dance.” The related crafts might be to create a stick puppet hen and rooster with finger puppet chicks or make a hatching egg bookmark. In addition, younger children will craft a magnet fluffy chick while older children will make a pom-pom chick.

Books Again

Spring is here and the Books Again Used Book Store shelves are full and overflowing with books, video cassettes and CDs. Mystery books will be on the special $1 each sale today through Thursday. On Friday, Books Again will have the Spring Cleaning $5 Bag Sale with all materials on sale. The sale will continue through Saturday, April 12. As you enter the store, buy a plastic bag for $5 and fill it full of bargains. There is no limit to the number of bags a reader may purchase. Each bag is only $5. Stop by and shop to update your personal library and to give as gifts to update the personal libraries of family and friends. Books Again, 404 W. Second St., is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday through Saturday. Books Again is operated by Friends of the Library volunteers and all proceeds are used to benefit the library. Parking is located behind the store.

Jesus wants us to be more concerned with money than love. He certainly wants us to go to heaven rather than hell. I also pointed out that without salvation, we will not see the Kingdom of God. Arguing about whether the theme of Jesus’ ministry was salvation or the Kingdom was a word play on the part of the minister. It was something like asking whether the main topic of the magazine Motor Trend is automobiles or engines. Why was I not impressed? We should point out that I gave that Jehovah’s Witness pastor a chronology of the Bible that showed about four thousand years between creation and the birth of Jesus. I also gave him a summary of evidence from science for a young universe. That pastor seems to have totally ignored such data. How can he read the scriptures and conclude that the Bible tells of a universe billions of years old is beyond me. It takes, shall we call it, “scriptural gymnastics” to find millions of years in the “Book of Genesis.” People who insist the Bible describes millions or billions of years are generally trying to compromise with the views of secularists. Mr. Valens’ conclusion that my disagreement with his theology is proof that I place my faith in government can be called “non sequitur,” which means “it does not follow.” We must hope he can find a better way to deal with theological questions than character assassination.

society is experiencing exploding rates of autism, autoimmune diseases and other health conditions we can’t explain. As long as we don’t know, I vote for toothpaste, which we spit out. And more funding for

Russell A. Scott Roswell

oral health programs, and figuring out how to get dental therapists into every community. (Contact Merilee Dannemann through www.triplespacedagain.com.)

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A6 Tuesday, March 25, 2014

OBITUARIES/WORLD

Roswell Daily Record

Malaysia: Missing flight crashed in Indian Ocean KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — It was the unwelcome, anguishing news that families of the missing had dreaded, and when they heard it from Malaysia’s prime minister Monday night there were shrieks and intense heartbreak: The missing Malaysian Airlines flight whose fate was a mystery that consumed the world had crashed into a remote cor ner of the Indian Ocean. The news, based on fresh evidence gleaned from an unprecedented analysis of satellite data, meant it was all but impossible that any of the 239 passengers and crew on board the jetliner could have survived. That realization may help bring some closure to families 17 days after their nightmare began when the Boeing 777 inexplicably disappeared from Asian skies during what was supposed to be a routine over night flight from Malaysia’s capital to Beijing on March 8. But the latest clue is also only a small step toward solving one of the greatest puzzles in aviation history. With the location of Flight 370 itself still unknown — most likely somewhere at the bottom of the sea in a remote part

of the souther n Indian Ocean — profound questions remain unanswered about what brought down the aircraft and why. And the grueling search for the wreckage and the plane’s black boxes could take years. The task, involving a multinational force sweeping a vast region of ocean whose dark floor is up to 7,000 meters (23,000 feet) deep, has been daunting. So much so, that it is also possible that what is left of the plane may never be found. In Beijing, family members who have followed every twist and turn in the search shrieked and sobbed uncontrollably when they heard the news. One woman collapsed and fell on her knees, crying “My son! My son!” Dressed in a black suit, Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak somberly AP Photo announced the news in an A relative of one of the Chinese passengers aboard the Malaysia Airlines, MH370 collapses in grief after being told of the latunexpected late night statement to reporters in est news in Beijing, China, Monday. Kuala Lumpur. The infor- sites,” Najib said. airport to hear the a jacket. Minutes later a blow to us, and it is mation, he said, was “It is therefore with deep announcement. Afterward, middle-aged woman was beyond description.” based on a study of data sadness and regret that I they filed out of a confer- taken out on another, her In Kuala Lumpur, family from a satellite that had must infor m you that, ence room in heart- face ashen and her eyes members also broke down received the final known according to this new wrenching grief. blank and expressionless. in sobs. signals from the plane as data, Flight MH370 ended Medical teams arrived Nan Jinyan, whose Selamat Omar, the it tracked southward. in the souther n Indian with several stretchers brother -in-law Yan Ling father of a 29-year-old aviThe data indicated that Ocean.” and at least one elderly was aboard the flight, said ation engineer who was on the jetliner flew “to a In China’s capital, fami- man was carried out of the she had been prepared for the flight, said: “We accept remote location, far from ly members had been conference room on one of the worst but the the news of the tragedy. It any possible landing called to a hotel near the them, his faced covered by announcement was still “a is fate.”

Western leaders gather in bid to isolate Russia THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Seeking to intensify pressure on Moscow, western powers sought Monday to isolate Russia over its actions in Ukraine, insisting that a planned summit of leading economic powers to be hosted by Vladimir Putin would not go forward. World leaders gathering in the Netherlands were angling for ways to prove Russia would face increasing estrangement from the powerful Group of Eight world powers unless it changes course in Ukraine. British Prime Minister David Cameron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel said a summit scheduled for June in Sochi was now off the table, while the United States warned that Russia’s global standing would continue to deteriorate as the West sought to present a united front against Putin. “As long as the political environ-

OBITUARIES

Letha Geneva Bauer

Memorial services are scheduled at 10:00 a.m. Thursday, March 27, at West Main Baptist Church for Letha Geneva Bauer of Artesia, New Mexico. Mrs. Bauer, 87, died Saturday, March 22, 2014 at her granddaughters home in Artesia. Jason Kraft will officiate at the services. Cremation has taken place under the direction of Terpening & Son Mortuary. “Grandma” was bor n September 27, 1926 in Henrieta Oklahoma; the daughter of Jack Whatley and Martha (Smith) Whatley. She was working for TMC when she met her future husband, Leland Bauer, and they were married on December 25, 1977 in Roswell, N.M. They came to Artesia in March 3, 2006. She was a cook at the detention center and built airplanes in San Diego, Califor nia during World War II. She had attended West Main Baptist Church. Geneva was a member of

ment for the G-8 is not there, as at the moment, there is no G-8 — neither as a concrete summit nor as a format,” Merkel said.

Leaders of the r econstituted Group of Seven — Russia excluded —huddled in an emergency meeting at the Dutch prime minister’s residence to plot a path forward. President Barack Obama’s deputy national security adviser, Ben Rhodes, said the session was aimed at foreshadowing “what economic sanctions Russia will be faced with if it continues down this course.” He said the countries also would discuss assistance for the fledgling Ukrainian government. As long as Putin keeps “flagrantly violating international law,” there’s no reason for the G-7 to engage with Russia, Rhodes said. At the same time, he suggested that the U.S. and other nations were not

the Ladies Auxilary F.O.E. Eagles in Roswell and also Women of the Moose in Artesia. She was preceded in death by her parents and a son J. D. Bristow. Survivors include husband Leland Bauer of the family home; daughters Carol Jean Fine and husband Wimpford of Floyd, N.M., Vickie Lynn Sherrell and husband W.B of Artesia, and Anna L. Kelley of Roswell, N.M.; 8 grandchildren including Troy Fine, Tammy Neel, Paul Fine, Debbie Shearman, Dusty Bristow, Eileen Romines; 23 great-grandchildren; and 8 great-great-grandchildren. Arrangements have been entrusted to Terpening & Son Mortuary. Please express condolences at www.artesiafunerals.com.

Clinton “Doyle” Hobbs

Clinton “Doyle” Hobbs, 75, of Big Spring, TX formerly of Roswell, NM died peacefully in his home,

prepared to formally kick Russia out of the G-8. “The door is open to Russia to de-escalate the situation,” Rhodes said. The delicate diplomacy took place on the sidelines of a long-planned nuclear security summit in The Hague, where the official topic — nuclear terrorism — was quickly overshadowed by the West’s alarm over Russia’s move to annex the Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine. Within hours of arriving Monday mor ning in the Netherlands, Obama’s first stop on a weeklong international trip, the president declared that the U.S. and Europe stand together behind Ukraine as he met with Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte in Amsterdam. “We’re united in imposing a cost on Russia for its actions so far,” Obama said.

Wednesday March 19, 2014. Doyle was bor n December 10, 1938 in Lake Arthur, NM to Clinton and Oleta Hobbs. He married Caroline Franklin December 30, 1955 in Roswell, NM. He is survived by his wife, Caroline and their children. Jerry and Carlon Baker, T im and Marty Helmstetler, David and Lisa Hobbs; 8 grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren; siblings Wesley and Jeanette Hobbs, Barbara and Stanley Griffin, Gary and Lunell Gilley, Barbara Crosby and their extended families. He is preceded in death by his parents and one son, Clinton Doyle “Dusty” Hobbs, Jr. Doyle was a hard working family man who always put the needs of his family first. He loved his wife, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He had a passion for raising Suffolk sheep, loved to laugh and always had a unique nickname for his grandchildren. He will be dearly missed. A private family ceremony will be held in Big Spring, TX. A special thanks to Betty and Jessica of Home Hospice for taking such wonderful care of our Dad in his time of need. In lieu of flowers, Dad asked that donations be sent to the New Mexico Christian Children’s Home, 1356 New Mexico 236, Portales, NM 88130. Myers & Smith Funeral Home; P. O. Box 2760; Big

Spring, TX 79721-2760; 1800-658-6712; 432-2678288; Fax: 432-264-9112

Iris Fern Parnell

Services are pending at Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory for Iris Fer n Par nell, 99, who passed away Sunday, March 23, 2014 in Ruidoso, NM. A further announcement will be made once arrangements have been finalized.

Frances Isaacs

Frances Elizabeth Smith Isaacs went home to be with her Lord and Savior on March 22, 2014. Mrs. Isaacs was born on September 22, 1918 in Wichita Falls, TX to James “Art” Smith and Minnie Ola Smith (neé Potter). Her family, which included three sisters and one brother, moved to Amarillo, TX in 1920 where Mrs. Isaacs attended public schools and graduated from Amarillo High School May 1937. During high school she met and later married C.L. “Jack” Isaacs in 1938. They

PATRICE WYMORE FLYNN DIES AT AGE 87

KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) — Patrice Wymore Flynn, a Hollywood actress and cattle rancher who was the widow of swashbuckling screen legend Errol Flynn, has died at her seaside home in Jamaica. She was 87. On Monday, family spokesman Robb Callahan said Flynn died Saturday at her home in Jamaica’s Portland parish after battling pulmonary disease.

During her film career, she worked alongside actors such as Doris Day, Kirk Douglas and Randolph Scott. She played Frank Sinatra’s girlfriend in the original “Ocean’s 11” in 1960. The Kansas-born actress met her future husband when she was cast as the female lead in the 1950 western “Rocky Mountain.” They spent much of their nine-year marriage in Jamaica. He died in 1959. For decades, Wymore lived on the 2,000-acre Errol Flynn Estates cattle ranch in Jamaica.

were blessed to be married for 51 years. Jack and Frances had three children; Preston, Linda and Jay. In 1952 they moved to Roswell, NM where they lived for over 50 years. During their time in Roswell they were active in the community, devoted members of First United Methodist Church, which they joined in 1958, and the Roswell Masonic Lodge. Mrs. Isaacs was actively involved in Roswell Chapter #10 Order of Eastern Star, Assembly #116 Social Order of Beauceant, Daughters of the Nile and Rainbow Girls. In 1973 Mrs. Isaacs proudly served as Worthy Matron of Eastern Star, in 1983 served as President of Beauceant and in 2000 received her 50 year recognition as a member of Eastern Star. The devotion, love, commitment and dedication to and from her Masonic family are immeasurable. Mrs. Isaacs is survived by her two children Linda Gadberry and husband Bob of Georgetown, TX and Jay Isaacs and wife Nancy of Midland, TX. She is also survived by two sisters Virginia Sprouse and Edna Shelton of Amarillo, TX. Frances was proud of her five grandchildren; Tammy McFarland and husband Eddie of Albuquerque, NM; Russell Isaacs of New York City; Melissa Ramsay and husband Trey of Elgin, TX; Ryan Isaacs and wife Ashley of Ft. Lauderdale, Fl and Lesley Isaacs of Midland, TX. She also enjoyed

being the great-grandmother of her seven great grandchildren; Evinn, Preston, George, Jack, Grace, Craig and Kaylyn.

She was preceded in death by her husband Jack Isaacs, son Preston Isaacs, parents James and Minnie Smith, one sister Audrey and a brother Harold.

Funeral services will be held at 11:00 am MST on Tuesday, March 25, 2014, at LaGrone Funeral Chapel in Roswell, with burial to follow at South Park Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers the family requests that donations in her memory be made to the Roswell Masonic Heritage Fund, 2305 W College Blvd Roswell, NM 88201 or the Manor Park Foundation 2208 N. Loop 250 West Midland, TX 79707.

The family would like to thank the staff at Manor Park, Midland Memorial Hospital, Hospice of Midland and Dr Robert Vogel for their dedication and commitment to our beloved family member.

Facundo “Cooney” Carrillo

Services are pending at Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory for Facundo Carrillo, 71, who passed away Sunday, March 23, 2014 at his home surrounded by his loved ones. A further announcement will be made once arrangements have been finalized.


BUSINESS REVIEW

Roswell Daily Record

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

A7

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A8 Tuesday, March 25, 2014

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Partly sunny and cooler

Tonight

A shower or two late

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Mostly sunny and Abundant sunshine warmer

Saturday

Sunny and pleasant

Sunny and comfortable

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities

Sunday

Monday

Sunny, breezy and warmer

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

A full day of sunshine

High 59°

Low 47°

78°/49°

79°/50°

79°/45°

72°/48°

89°/50°

91°/48°

WNW at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

WSW at 3-6 mph POP: 55%

SE at 7-14 mph POP: 10%

N at 8-16 mph POP: 5%

NE at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

S at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

WSW at 4-8 mph POP: 10%

NNW at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 79°/33° Normal high/low ............... 71°/38° Record high ............... 89° in 1899 Record low ................. 15° in 1898 Humidity at noon .................. 11%

Farmington 66/36

Clayton 57/35

Raton 60/29

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Mon. 0.00" Month to date ....................... 0.05" Normal month to date .......... 0.39" Year to date .......................... 0.07" Normal year to date .............. 1.19"

Santa Fe 64/36

Gallup 65/31

Tucumcari 60/41

Albuquerque 66/45

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 55/38

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 56/38

T or C 70/46

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed. New

Mar 30

Rise 6:55 a.m. 6:54 a.m. Rise 3:04 a.m. 3:52 a.m. First

Apr 7

Full

Apr 15

Set 7:13 p.m. 7:14 p.m. Set 2:01 p.m. 3:07 p.m.

Alamogordo 71/52

Silver City 69/44

Last

Apr 22

ROSWELL 59/47 Carlsbad 63/47

Hobbs 62/43

Las Cruces 71/47

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ### You might think that a partner is overserious and not aware of how you feel. Be careful when handling your hurt and anger. You could feel quite off-kilter. Try to sit on your discontent for a while, and then initiate a discussion in the near future. Tonight: Where the gang is. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) #### You’ll want to break precedent and head in a new direction, but a partner or family member might balk at the idea. This person is more comfortable with the status quo. You could be in a situation where someone might try to test your limits. Tonight: Take the lead. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) #### Deal with a situation directly, and keep in mind that a partner can be demanding. This person might prefer to keep the situation as-is. On the other hand, a loved one is likely to disagree. Tempers could flare, so be careful. Tonight: Try a new type of cuisine. CANCER (June 21-July 22) #### Others tend to come to you with specific demands. You might wonder what is possible under the circumstances. Realize your limits, yet be ready for a fast change. You could find that your enthusiasm turns to anger if your expectations are not met. Tonight: Dinner for two. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ### Get into a project imme-

Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

71/52/pc 66/45/s 54/29/s 61/52/pc 63/47/pc 56/31/s 57/35/s 53/33/pc 55/38/s 73/44/s 65/44/s 66/36/s 65/31/s 62/43/s 71/47/pc 59/34/s 59/36/s 69/43/s 61/42/s 58/39/s 63/35/s 60/29/s 52/32/s 59/47/pc 56/38/pc 64/36/s 69/44/s 70/46/pc 60/41/s 62/37/s

73/54/pc 68/42/s 52/29/s 79/58/pc 81/59/pc 52/32/s 74/40/s 54/25/pc 71/43/s 75/46/s 67/41/s 65/35/s 62/33/s 74/47/sh 74/48/pc 64/40/s 59/32/s 72/43/s 73/52/pc 71/43/s 62/36/s 71/32/s 49/25/s 78/49/s 62/44/s 64/34/s 68/44/s 74/46/s 76/41/s 62/33/s

just there to make you feel good before you go to sleep.” The anti-show biz style pioneered by Letterman isn’t dead, said Robert Thompson, director of the Bleier Center for Television and Popular Culture at Syracuse University. But “it may have run its course to some extent,” he said, and Fallon’s sincerity dilutes the pure snark of Letterman and O’Brien. “Fallon has been able to change the equation,” he said. He’s made his mark despite a more crowded competitive landscape, with O’Brien, Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, Chelsea Handler and Arsenio Hall also mining late-night laughs. During his first month, Fallon generated more than 120 million YouTube views, Twitter mentions and Facebook posts, the research firm RelishMIX said. That’s more than double Kimmel, who had 57 million in the same social media metric. Letterman had 2.3 million. “That lopsidedness is a huge wake-up call to writers, producers of late-night, network marketing departments and other series in all genres that they must ‘feed the beast’ or die,” said Marc Karzen, RelishMIX spokesman. Friday night’s routine with Kevin Bacon revisiting some “Footloose” dance moves quickly caught fire online, and video highlights had been watched 7.3 million times as of early Monday, he said. Aggressive online exposure was a key part of NBC’s launch strategy, which included timing Fallon’s takeover to coincide with heavy viewer interest in the Winter Olympics, Harbert said. The next step is to find ways to make more money off all that online interest, he said. Judging by one of television’s most prominent measuring sticks for likability, Fallon’s success shouldn’t be a surprise. He has a “Q” score of 19 among viewers aged 18 to 34 — which means 19 percent of people familiar with him consider Fallon one of their favorite personalities, said the company Marketing Evaluations Inc., which polled consumers both before and after the “Tonight” takeover. Kimmel’s score was 16 and Letterman’s 11, the company said (an average celebrity “Q” score is 17). Among young men, Fallon’s score shoots up to 24, said company spokesman Henry Schafer. More people that age know who Fallon is than know Letterman, he said.

Wed. Hi/Lo/W

36/17/s 54/27/pc 38/28/sn 37/27/pc 53/26/r 28/14/sf 35/13/sn 64/41/s 58/35/s 33/11/sn 73/48/pc 83/70/s 70/46/s 33/14/sf 40/26/s 84/64/s 70/56/pc 58/45/s

38/20/s 54/36/s 38/26/s 38/23/sn 51/29/s 38/32/pc 26/22/pc 57/56/r 69/35/pc 31/23/pc 77/57/pc 84/70/pc 65/58/sh 39/32/s 60/43/pc 73/57/s 67/55/sh 73/50/r

U.S. Extremes

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

83/59/t 62/49/s 21/10/pc 68/45/s 38/28/sn 37/24/s 75/47/r 38/28/sn 86/59/s 36/15/sn 57/44/r 46/27/r 39/22/s 69/44/s 66/58/pc 55/43/r 81/56/s 39/27/sn

74/64/s 77/54/pc 41/32/pc 61/56/pc 38/25/pc 62/38/pc 67/53/s 38/26/s 82/59/s 31/20/pc 56/43/sh 48/27/s 53/37/pc 59/39/sh 66/58/sh 56/41/sh 80/54/s 42/28/s

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 96° ...........Death Valley, Calif. Low: -27°............ Embarrass, Minn.

High: 79° ............................Roswell Low: 14° ...............................Gallup

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

diately if you have any desire to complete it before the day is over. Mid-afternoon will be the time to network and create more of what you desire. Defer to others as much as you can when dealing with difficult people. Tonight: You flourish around the crowds. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) #### Speak your mind and allow greater give-and-take between you and someone else. You might feel restrained at first, but do whatever it takes to let go and start this process. You could come up with a very dynamic idea that works for both of you. Tonight: Run an errand or two. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) #### You have the foundation for a better situation, yet you seem to be holding back. Check out an emotional investment with care -you will love the results, if you proceed. If you are not able to move forward, you could lose your temper. Tonight: Choose to do something fun. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ##### Seek out a friend or loved one. You might want to reverse direction when you feel pinned down or as if you have no other choice. Listen and think in terms of gains rather than kicking the door down in frustration. Check out an investment with care. Tonight: Head on home. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ### You might feel burdened by someone’s demands, and could be wondering what to do next. If you continue on the path that is not natural for you, you probably won’t be able stay even-tempered. Tempers are likely to flare. Tonight: Out and about. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) #### Be forthright in how you deal with a situation. You could be

Fallon off to fast start NEW YORK (AP) — One month in, NBC’s generational trade of Jay Leno for Jimmy Fallon at the “Tonight” show is succeeding beyond the hopes of executives who engineered it. Fallon’s fast start is clear in television ratings and even more stark in social media metrics. While too early to declare a new king of late-night TV, the transition is a marked change from how badly NBC fumbled the short-lived switch from Leno to Conan O’Brien in 2009. “As a guy who’s been doing this for 36 years, I don’t allow myself to think about this level of success,” said Ted Harbert, NBC broadcasting chairman. NBC had hoped for an increase in young viewers and steeled itself to lose some of Leno’s older fans, but Fallon’s reception was a surprise. When Fallon premiered on “Tonight” during the Olympics, the franchise hit numbers unseen since Johnny Carson’s last week in 1992. Things have settled down but Fallon is still comfortably on top. During the week of March 10-14, Fallon averaged 4.26 million viewers to Jimmy Kimmel’s 2.83 million on ABC and David Letterman’s 2.78 million on CBS, the Nielsen company said. Fallon has consistently topped the 4.1 million viewers that Leno averaged this season before leaving. Fallon’s lead over his rivals is more pronounced among viewers aged 18-to-49, the demographic NBC bases its advertising sales upon. Fallon and NBC embrace the way many early-to-bed consumers experience latenight television these days: by watching clips of a show’s best moments online. The YouTube clip of Fallon and Will Smith acting out the evolution of hip-hop dancing has been seen more than 12.8 million times. Fallon’s lip-sync duel with Paul Rudd on songs by Tina Turner, Foreigner and Queen has nearly 9 million views. Other popular clips show Fallon, singer Idina Menzel and the Roots performing “Let it Go” with children’s instruments and the sliced-and-diced version of newsmen Brian Williams and Lester Holt on “Rapper’s Delight.” Each segment is funny, good-natured and utterly impossible to imagine Fallon’s old-school predecessor doing. “What I notice in people’s reactions is not just that they like the show and think that it’s funny, but they like the feel-good spirit,” Harbert said. “There’s a total absence of snarkiness, of cynicism. It’s

Regional Cities Today Wed.

Today Hi/Lo/W

Cold

Warm

-10s

-0s

Precipitation Stationary

0s

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE

in a conflict with someone with whom you regularly interact. Be careful, as what might appear to be a cushy setup could quickly degenerate. Take no one and nothing for granted. Tonight: Play it nice and easy. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ### Not until later today will you feel at your best. You might wonder what to do if you’re faced with a precarious situation. You’ll know that you want to integrate some innovative change, yet you also might want to play it cool. Tonight: Choose to do something new. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) #### You are past the point of no return. You’ll feel in your mind that you must follow your chosen path. Understand exactly what you are dealing with at the present moment. A partner could be contentious when you least expect it. Tonight: Out with your best friend. BORN TODAY Actress Sarah Jessica Parker (1965), singer/songwriter Elton John (1947), singer Aretha Franklin (1942)

FREE SYMPHONY CONCERT TICKETS

FOR SENIOR CITIZENS (60+) SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 2014 – 7:30 P.M

GUEST ARTIST: WILLIAM KINDERMAN, PIANO NMMI PEARSON AUDITORIUM

The merchants, professional community, and private citizens and others listed below, are sponsoring tickets for each of this season’s Roswell Symphony Orchestra concerts. This gesture is their “thank you” for your patronage and for your support of the City of Roswell and surrounding communities. Tickets are limited and available only by mail. Requests will be honored on a first received, first served, no choice basis. Each pair of tickets will be for adjoining seats. Also note that the tickets are pre-assigned to specific row and seat numbers. Remember sponsors do not have tickets.

Coupon must be mailed with a self-addressed, stamped envelope to:

ROSWELL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 1717 WEST 2ND, SUITE 205 ROSWELL NM 88201

COUPONS PRESENTED IN PERSON AT THE RSO OFFICE CANNOT BE HONORED.

FREE TRANSPORTATION WILL BE PROVIDED FOR SENIORS 60+ TO AND FROM THE CONCERT BY CHAVES COUNTY J.O.Y. CENTERS, INC. SEATING IS LIMITED. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON TRANSPORTATION OR TO RESERVE YOUR SEAT PLEASE CALL BARRY WILKINSON 575-623-4866.

DIRECTORY OF SPONSORS

Notice: The Roswell Symphony Orchestra is in the midst of the 2013-2014 Send a Senior Campaign. The following is a list of some of last year's contributors as well as some current. Future ads will be updated with any changes.

Insurance & Investments Marlin Wells & Associates

Real Estate Kimble Hibbard, Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Charlotte Thompson, Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Carole Schlatter, Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors

Physicians & Surgeons Dr. & Mrs. Donald E. Wenner

Friends of Music The Alcorn Family Shirley C. Childress Xcel Energy

Accounting Services Stacie L. Sexe, CPA

Attorneys Sanders, Bruin, Coll & Worley, PA Tom Dunlap Law Firm

Oil & Gas Industry Armstrong Energy Corporation Johnson Enterprises

“Send a Senior” sponsorships are still being accepted for this season.

SENIOR CITIZEN TICKET REQUEST APRIL 5 CONCERT

Please circle: “1” or “2” tickets / “Balcony” or “Main Floor

NAME

STREET, CITY, STATE, ZIP

Enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope & mail to: Roswell Symphony Orchestra, 1717 W. 2nd, Ste. 205, Roswell, NM 88201


SPORTS

Tuesday, March 25, 2014 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

Section

Roswell Daily Record

B

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

DOIN’ THE ‘DIRTY WORK’ Will Yeguete is Florida’s ‘dirty work guy’

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Will Yeguete is one valuable player for top-seeded Florida. You just have to dig a little deeper than statistics and box scores to see how much he means to the Gators. The 6-foot-8 senior forward from Bordeaux, France, is what coach Billy Donovan calls a “dirty work guy,” doing things in the press and the paint that rarely make headlines or highlight clips. But his tenacity and toughness were on display in the third round of the NCAA tournament Saturday. Yeguete had eight points, four rebounds, an assist, a steal and a blocked shot in the 61-45 win against ninth-seeded Pittsburgh. “He just does so many different things in the press. He’s such a great cover guy with our defense. He’s a great help defender,” Donovan said. “He’s the epitome of a guy that when you look down at

the stat sheet it’s hard to have a level of appreciation for him. ... He really impacts winning. “He impacts the game in a very, very positive way for us, and what he does is really, really rare.” Yeguete and Florida (34-2) retur n to the court Thursday night against fourth-seeded UCLA (28-8) in the South Region semifinals in Memphis, Tenn. It’s another chance for Yeguete to go mostly unnoticed — at least to outsiders. Yeguete has the size and athleticism to play the front of the press, trap all over the court and defend anyone from a guard to a center. And he’s regularly diving on the ground for loose balls, taking charges and willing to sacrifice offensive fame for defensive fortitude. On Monday, he was fittingly wearing a white Gators T -shirt with “Intensity Counts” printed on the front.

His numbers — Yeguete is averaging 4.9 points and 5.1 rebounds — are far less telling. But considering how things went for Yeguete the last two years, just being on the court and contributing on a regular basis are accomplishments. “It’s exciting for me just being able to play, just being able to be out there for the postseason,” Yeguete said. “That’s what I fight for, that’s why I’ve been working every single day.” Yeguete missed the final nine games in 2012 because of a broken right foot, and Florida went 4-5 without him. He was hoping to play had the Gators advanced to the Final Four, but they blew a double-digit lead against Louisville in the regional final.

Eight area Woods still not sure about the Masters players are All-Stars See DIRTY, Page B3

AP Photo

PGA TOUR

WASHINGTON (AP) — Tiger Woods is not sure whether his ailing back will allow him to play in the Masters, which is two weeks away. “For Augusta, it’s actually still a little too soon, to be honest with you,” Woods said Monday at a news conference to announce that Quicken Loans is the new title sponsor of his golf tournament. “That’s kind of the frustrating thing about this.” The Masters is the only major tournament the 38-year-old Woods has never missed. Four of his 14 major championships came at Augusta National, including his first in 1997. He last won the green jacket in 2005. This year’s Masters is April 10-13. Woods is off to the worst start of his 18 years on tour, and he’s been troubled lately by back problems. He stopped playing in the final round at the Honda Classic on March 2 because of what he called back spasms and pain in his lower back. He tried to defend his title the following week at Doral, only for his back to flare up again in the final round, when he shot a 78, the highest Sunday score of his PGA Tour career and his first closing round without a birdie.

See UNSURE, Page B3 AP Photo

Tiger Woods makes a putt during a putting challenge at the Newseum in Washington, Monday. Woods and Quicken Loans CEO Bill Emerson, left, participated in the putting challenge to have the mortgage payments paid for three military families for one month.

Rangers catcher Soto out 10-12 weeks

SURPRISE, Ariz. (AP) — Texas catcher Geovany Soto has a tear in his right knee that will sideline him for 10 to 12 weeks, the latest injury setback for the Rangers. A day after Soto’s knee locked up and forced him to leave a game against San Diego in the second inning, the Rangers said Monday he was out for a while. He will have surgery on Wednesday to repair torn cartilage. On Sunday, the team announced that second baseman Jurickson Profar would miss at least 10 weeks with a torn muscle in his right shoulder. “We’ve lost two everyday players and there is no way to sugarcoat that,” Rangers general manager Jon Daniels said Monday. “It is

what it is. We’ll look towards our depth and see where we go from here.” This will be Soto’s second surgery this spring training. He had a procedure on his left foot on Feb. 22 and had played in only six exhibition games, going 4 for 12. Soto hit .245 in 54 games in 2013 with Texas. “It’s really unfortunate,” Soto said. “I feel devastated, but it’s something I can’t control.” With Soto out, J.P. Arencibia and Robinson Chirinos are the top candidates to start at catcher. Arencibia hit .194 in 138 games last season with Toronto. Chirinos spent most of last season with Triple-A Round Rock, and also hit .179 in 13 games with Texas.

LOCAL SCHEDULE — TUESDAY, MARCH 25 — • Ruidoso at NMMI, 4 p.m. • Roswell at Lovington, 5 p.m. PREP BASEBALL

• Lovington at Dexter, 4 p.m. • Roswell at Hobbs (DH), 4:30 p.m. PREP SOFTBALL

• Roswell at Lovington, 3 p.m. PREP TENNIS

The New Mexico High School Coaches Association released the 2014 North-South All-Star Games rosters last week and eight Chaves County players were named AllStars. Six boys and two girls will represent the county as members of their respective South teams. Goddard’s Josh Wagner, and Roswell’s Cesar Nava and Marquel Warner were tabbed as All-Stars and will represent the South in the 4A/5A boys game. Hagerman’s Jose Bejarano and Jessie Rodriguez will play in the 1A/B boys game, while Dexter’s David Lopez will play in the 2A/3A boys game. On the girls side, Dexter’s Nayely Anderson will play for the South in the 2A/3A game and Hagerman’s Jessica Rodriguez will play in the 1A/B game. Artesia’s Madison Willingham will represent the South in the 4A/5A girls game. The 1A/B and 4A/5A girls games will be played on Friday, June 6, at West Mesa in Albuquerque at 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., respectively. The 2A/3A girls and boys games will be played on Saturday, June 7, at West Mesa at 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., respectively. The 1A/B and 4A/5A boys games will be played on Thursday, July 31, at West Mesa at 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., respectively.

“I haven’t decided yet,” manager Ron Washington said. “Right now I’ve got him and Chirinos.” When asked about Arencibia’s defense, Washington replied, “I haven’t seen a whole lot of Arencibia at his best.” Chirinos has hit .435 in spring training, but has only 23 at-bats. The Rangers continue to explore options to find a replacement for Profar. Texas brought back lefty-hitting See SOTO, Page B3

AP Photo

Rangers catcher Geovany Soto, left, is examined by coaches and trainers during Monday’s spring-training game against the Padres.

SPOTLIGHT 1934 — Horton Smith wins the first Masters golf tournament by one stroke over Craig Wood. 1947 — Holy Cross, led by George Kaftan, beats Oklahoma 58-47 in the NCAA championship. 1958 — Sugar Ray Robinson regains the middleweight title for a record fifth time with a 15-round decision over Carmen Basilio. 1961 — Cincinnati ends Ohio State’s 32-game winning streak with a 70-65 win in the NCAA champi-

ON

SPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN ... onship. In the third-place game, St. Joseph’s beats Utah 127-120 in quadruple-overtime. 1967 — UCLA, led by sophomore Lew Alcindor’s 20 points, beats Dayton 79-64 for the NCAA championship. 1990 — Pat Bradley becomes the first LPGA player to reach $3 million in career earnings with a onestroke victory in the $500,000 Turquoise Classic. Bradley, with career earnings of $3,059,768, makes a

2-foot par putt on the final hole to beat Ayako Okamoto. 1995 — Mike Tyson is released from a Plainfield, Ind., prison after serving three years for rape. 2004 — Auburn’s Fred Bousquet breaks the world record in the 50-meter freestyle at the NCAA men’s swimming and diving championships. Teammate George Bovell of Trinidad & Tobago shatters the world record for the 200 individual medley in 1:53.93.


B2 Tuesday, March 25, 2014

SPORTS

Karrie Webb rallies to win JTBC Founders Cup

LPGA

LPGA Money Leaders By The Associated Press Through March 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Trn 1. Paula Creamer . . . . . . . .5 2. Karrie Webb . . . . . . . . . .4 3. Anna Nordqvist . . . . . . . .4 4. Jessica Korda . . . . . . . . .5 5. Stacy Lewis . . . . . . . . . . .5 6. Azahara Munoz . . . . . . . .5 7. Inbee Park . . . . . . . . . . . .3 8. Chella Choi . . . . . . . . . . .5 9. Michelle Wie . . . . . . . . . .4 10. Morgan Pressel . . . . . . .5 11. Lydia Ko . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 12. Na Yeon Choi . . . . . . . . .4 13. Catriona Matthew . . . . . .4 14. Gerina Piller . . . . . . . . .5 15. Karine Icher . . . . . . . . . .5 16. Suzann Pettersen . . . . . .4 17. Pornanong Phatlum . . . .5 18. Angela Stanford . . . . . . .4 19. Sandra Gal . . . . . . . . . . .5 20. So Yeon Ryu . . . . . . . . .3 21. Jenny Shin . . . . . . . . . . .4 22. Lizette Salas . . . . . . . . . .4 23. Lexi Thompson . . . . . . . .5 24. Julieta Granada . . . . . . .5 25. Yani Tseng . . . . . . . . . . .4 26. Caroline Hedwall . . . . . .3 27. Amelia Lewis . . . . . . . . .2 28. Hee Young Park . . . . . . .5 29. Se Ri Pak . . . . . . . . . . . .4 30. Eun-Hee Ji . . . . . . . . . . .4 31. Brittany Lincicome . . . . .5 32. Brittany Lang . . . . . . . . .4 33. Dewi Claire Schreefel . . .4 34. Christel Boeljon . . . . . . .3 34. P.K. Kongkraphan . . . . . .4 36. Sun Young Yoo . . . . . . . .4 37. Meena Lee . . . . . . . . . . .4 38. Mi Hyang Lee . . . . . . . . .3 39. Jodi Ewart Shadoff . . . . .4 40. Amy Yang . . . . . . . . . . . .4 41. Thidapa Suwannapura . .4 42. Cristie Kerr . . . . . . . . . . .3 43. Shanshan Feng . . . . . . .3 44. Pernilla Lindberg . . . . . .4 45. Giulia Sergas . . . . . . . . .4 46. Caroline Masson . . . . . .5 47. Ayako Uehara . . . . . . . . .5 48. Danielle Kang . . . . . . . . .4 49. Moriya Jutanugarn . . . . .5 50. Perrine Delacour . . . . . .3 51. Jennifer Johnson . . . . . .4 52. Katherine Kirk . . . . . . . . .5 53. Haru Nomura . . . . . . . . .3 54. Jenny Suh . . . . . . . . . . .2 55. Mirim Lee . . . . . . . . . . . .3 56. Carlota Ciganda . . . . . . .4 57. Sandra Changkija . . . . . .3 58. Sarah Kemp . . . . . . . . . .1 59. Candie Kung . . . . . . . . .5 60. Haeji Kang . . . . . . . . . . .3 61. Nicole Castrale . . . . . . . .3 62. Kristy McPherson . . . . . .3 62. Alena Sharp . . . . . . . . . .3 64. Hee Kyung Seo . . . . . . .3

Golf scores

Money $349,132 $294,597 $243,963 $221,904 $206,940 $197,968 $192,410 $165,989 $128,922 $124,705 $116,980 $108,730 $107,294 $97,217 $96,970 $92,352 $88,181 $87,131 $85,995 $80,248 $73,566 $71,784 $67,386 $63,422 $58,745 $52,748 $52,357 $46,237 $44,947 $43,816 $41,225 $38,243 $32,829 $31,543 $31,543 $26,330 $26,042 $25,458 $25,063 $24,300 $23,945 $23,851 $22,388 $22,007 $21,627 $21,302 $21,166 $20,641 $20,427 $20,110 $19,974 $19,909 $19,666 $19,289 $19,120 $18,264 $18,132 $17,171 $15,889 $15,684 $15,658 $15,220 $15,220 $15,199

round. In 2011 in the inaugural tournament, she finished with a 66 for a onestroke victory. Webb also rallied to win the Women’s Australian Open last month and has 41 LPGA Tour victories to match founding player Babe Zaharias for 10th place. Ko, the third-round leader, parred the final three holes to finish a stroke back along with 2013 winner Stacy Lewis, Azahara Munoz, Amy Yang and Mirim Lee. The 16-year-old Ko shot 70. She had a three-stroke lead after birdieing Nos. 2-5, slipped back with bogeys on Nos. 6, 9 and 11 and pulled within one with a birdie on the par-5 15th. Munoz and Yang, playing together in the third-to-last group, missed long birdie putts on 18 and each shot 67. Lee shot 69 in the next group, also missing a long birdie try. That left Ko — and her 25-foot try on the last was just short and right.

65. Line Vedel . . . . . . . . . . .3 66. Alison Walshe . . . . . . . . .5 67. Mina Harigae . . . . . . . . .4 68. Ilhee Lee . . . . . . . . . . . .4 68. Mika Miyazato . . . . . . . .3 70. Sarah Jane Smith . . . . . .3 71. Mariajo Uribe . . . . . . . . .4 72. Tiffany Joh . . . . . . . . . . .3 73. Rebecca Lee-Bentham .3 74. Ai Miyazato . . . . . . . . . . .4 75. Beatriz Recari . . . . . . . . .4 76. Laura Diaz . . . . . . . . . . .1 77. Dori Carter . . . . . . . . . . .2 78. Amy Anderson . . . . . . . .3 78. Becky Morgan . . . . . . . .3 80. Mo Martin . . . . . . . . . . . .5 81. Austin Ernst . . . . . . . . . .3 82. Hannah Jun Medlock . . .3 83. Kelly Tan . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 84. Irene Coe . . . . . . . . . . . .4 85. Lorie Kane . . . . . . . . . . .1 85. Brooke Pancake . . . . . . .2 87. Paz Echeverria . . . . . . . .3 88. Marina Alex . . . . . . . . . .3 88. Lindsey Wright . . . . . . . .2 90. Kathleen Ekey . . . . . . . .3 90. M.J. Hur . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 90. Mindy Kim . . . . . . . . . . .3 90. Erica Popson . . . . . . . . .3 94. Sue Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 94. Sydnee Michaels . . . . . .3 94. Lee-Anne Pace . . . . . . .1 97. Chie Arimura . . . . . . . . .2 98. Jennifer Song . . . . . . . . .2 99. Danah Bordner . . . . . . . .2 99. Seon Hwa Lee . . . . . . . .2

NBA

$14,628 $14,573 $14,286 $14,280 $14,280 $13,853 $13,560 $13,373 $13,009 $12,702 $12,659 $12,386 $11,621 $11,589 $11,589 $10,853 $10,140 $9,193 $9,146 $9,012 $8,847 $8,847 $7,464 $6,322 $6,322 $5,128 $5,128 $5,128 $5,128 $4,984 $4,984 $4,984 $4,367 $4,162 $3,765 $3,765

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .39 30 .565 Brooklyn . . . . . . . . . . .37 32 .536 New York . . . . . . . . . .29 41 .414 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .23 47 .329 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .15 56 .211 Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct x-Miami . . . . . . . . . . .48 21 .696 Washington . . . . . . . .36 34 .514 Charlotte . . . . . . . . . .34 37 .479 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .31 38 .449 Orlando . . . . . . . . . . .19 52 .268 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct x-Indiana . . . . . . . . . .51 20 .718 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .40 31 .563 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .27 44 .380 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .26 44 .371 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .13 58 .183 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct x-San Antonio . . . . . .54 16 .771

PGA-Bay Hill Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At Bay Hill Club and Lodge Course Orlando, Fla. Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,419; Par: 72 Final a-amateur Matt Every (500), $1,116,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70-66-70 — 275 Keegan Bradley (300), $669,600 . . . . . . . . . . . .71-67-66-72 — 276 Adam Scott (190), $421,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62-68-71-76 — 277 Jason Kokrak (135), $297,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-67-73 — 278 Erik Compton (100), $226,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-70-69 — 279 Francesco Molinari, $226,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-70-69-73 — 279 Henrik Stenson (100), $226,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73-69-68 — 279 Ryo Ishikawa (83), $186,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-74-70-71 — 280 Brandt Snedeker (83), $186,000 . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-74-68 — 280 J.B. Holmes (68), $148,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-69-72-73 — 282 Freddie Jacobson (68), $148,800 . . . . . . . . . . . .71-68-70-73 — 282 Graeme McDowell (68), $148,800 . . . . . . . . . . .68-77-67-70 — 282 Sean O’Hair (68), $148,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-75-69-67 — 282 Kevin Chappell (55), $102,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-71-71 — 283 Harris English (55), $102,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-75-68 — 283 Lucas Glover (55), $102,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-74-68-69 — 283 Matt Jones (55), $102,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-69-72 — 283 George McNeill (55), $102,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-69-71 — 283 Kevin Na (55), $102,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-71-71 — 283 Brian Davis (49), $67,167 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74-71-69 — 284 Vijay Singh (49), $67,167 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-73-68-71 — 284 Camilo Villegas (49), $67,167 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73-73-67 — 284 Gary Woodland (49), $67,167 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-70-70 — 284 Ian Poulter (49), $67,167 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-69-76 — 284 Brendan Steele (49), $67,167 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-74-70-72 — 284 Chesson Hadley (43), $45,880 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-68-69-79 — 285 Trevor Immelman (43), $45,880 . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-71-73 — 285 Brooks Koepka, $45,880 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-70-72-69 — 285 Davis Love III (43), $45,880 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73-69-73 — 285 Nicholas Thompson (43), $45,880 . . . . . . . . . . .71-73-71-70 — 285 Retief Goosen (39), $37,588 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75-68-73 — 286 Danny Lee (39), $37,588 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-73-70 — 286 Marc Leishman (39), $37,588 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-74-69-71 — 286 Chris Stroud (39), $37,588 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-72-72 — 286 Aaron Baddeley (33), $28,636 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-70-77 — 287 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano (33), $28,636 . . . . . . . .66-77-74-70 — 287 Luke Guthrie (33), $28,636 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-74-71 — 287 Peter Hanson (33), $28,636 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-69-71-72 — 287 Morgan Hoffmann (33), $28,636 . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-71-78 — 287 Charles Howell III (33), $28,636 . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-72-76 — 287 Bryce Molder (33), $28,636 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-69-74 — 287 Seung-Yul Noh (33), $28,636 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-74-73 — 287 Charlie Beljan (24), $18,476 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-70-74 — 288 Jamie Donaldson, $18,476 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-74-76 — 288 Billy Horschel (24), $18,476 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74-69-75 — 288 Zach Johnson (24), $18,476 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-73-73 — 288 Russell Knox (24), $18,476 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-72-74 — 288 Will MacKenzie (24), $18,476 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-75-72-70 — 288 John Merrick (24), $18,476 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-74-76-73 — 288 Sam Saunders, $18,476 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-71-77 — 288 Jhonattan Vegas (24), $18,476 . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-75-71 — 288 David Hearn (18), $14,539 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-73-74 — 289 David Lingmerth (18), $14,539 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-71-69-74 — 289 Patrick Reed (18), $14,539 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73-70-77 — 289 John Senden (18), $14,539 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-74-71-72 — 289 Jason Bohn (14), $14,012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73-72-72 — 290 Lee Janzen (14), $14,012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-73-74-71 — 290 Cameron Tringale (14), $14,012 . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74-75-71 — 290 a-Zachary Olsen, $0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-72-74 — 290 Briny Baird (9), $13,454 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-74-74 — 291 Paul Casey (9), $13,454 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-79-72-73 — 291 K.J. Choi (9), $13,454 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-76-70-75 — 291 Chris Kirk (9), $13,454 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-72-78 — 291 Ryan Moore (9), $13,454 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-78-73 — 291 Brian Stuard (9), $13,454 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-74-74-71 — 291 Stewart Cink (5), $13,020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-72-79 — 292 Padraig Harrington (3), $12,772 . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-73-80 — 293 Rod Pampling (3), $12,772 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72-71-77 — 293 Pat Perez (3), $12,772 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-70-83 — 293 Woody Austin (1), $12,462 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71-75-76 — 294 Michael Putnam (1), $12,462 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75-74-75 — 294 Greg Owen (1), $12,214 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-69-74-76 — 295 Tim Wilkinson (1), $12,214 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-74-77-73 — 295 Chad Campbell (1), $11,966 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-77-73-77 — 296 Justin Hicks (1), $11,966 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78-68-71-79 — 296 Martin Laird (1), $11,780 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-76-78 — 297

GB — 2 10 1⁄2 16 1⁄2 25

GB — 12 1⁄2 15 17 30

GB — 11 24 24 1⁄2 38 GB —

ROSWELL NATIVE GERINA PILLER ON THE LPGA TOUR

PILLER’S

PROFESSION

Hole Par Score

SCOREBOARD

Houston . . . . . . . . . . .48 22 .686 6 12 Memphis . . . . . . . . . .42 28 .600 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 29 .592 12 1⁄2 New Orleans . . . . . . .30 40 .429 24 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB — Oklahoma City . . . . . .52 18 .743 Portland . . . . . . . . . . .45 26 .634 7 1⁄2 1 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .34 35 .493 17 ⁄2 Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .32 39 .451 20 1⁄2 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 48 .324 29 1⁄2 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB — L.A. Clippers . . . . . . .50 21 .704 Golden State . . . . . . .44 27 .620 6 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . .42 29 .592 8 1 Sacramento . . . . . . . .25 45 .357 24 ⁄2 L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . .23 46 .333 26 x-clinched playoff spot

Sunday’s Games Toronto 96, Atlanta 86 Phoenix 127, Minnesota 120 Denver 105, Washington 102 Sacramento 124, Milwaukee 107 Brooklyn 107, Dallas 104, OT Cleveland 106, New York 100 L.A. Lakers 103, Orlando 94 Monday’s Games Houston 100, Charlotte 89 Miami 93, Portland 91 Phoenix 102, Atlanta 95 Chicago 89, Indiana 77 Oklahoma City 117, Denver 96 Memphis 109, Minnesota 92 New Orleans 109, Brooklyn 104, OT San Antonio 113, Philadelphia 91 Detroit 114, Utah 94 L.A. Clippers 106, Milwaukee 98 Tuesday’s Games Portland at Orlando, 5 p.m. Toronto at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Oklahoma City at Dallas, 6 p.m. New York at L.A. Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Phoenix at Washington, 5 p.m. Brooklyn at Charlotte, 5 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 5:30 p.m. Cleveland at Detroit, 5:30 p.m. Atlanta at Minnesota, 6 p.m. L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Miami at Indiana, 6 p.m. Denver at San Antonio, 6:30 p.m. New York at Sacramento, 8 p.m. Memphis at Utah, 8:30 p.m.

NFL

Ravens, Jets get 4 compensatory picks

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The Baltimore Ravens and New York Jets each will receive

LPGA-JTBC Founders Cup Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge Resort & Spa, Wildfire Golf Club Course Phoenix Purse: $1.5 million Yardage: 6,583; Par: 72 Final Karrie Webb, $225,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-71-69-63 — 269 Stacy Lewis, $85,895 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-71-67-66 — 270 Azahara Munoz, $85,895 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-64-67 — 270 Amy Yang, $85,895 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-69-67-67 — 270 Mirim Lee, $85,895 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64-67-70-69 — 270 Lydia Ko, $85,895 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-66-67-70 — 270 Pornanong Phatlum, $37,956 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-67-66 — 271 So Yeon Ryu, $37,956 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-67-68-68 — 271 Jessica Korda, $37,956 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-66-66-70 — 271 Cristie Kerr, $29,507 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-63-67 — 272 Inbee Park, $29,507 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-69-70-67 — 272 Caroline Masson, $24,866 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-66-66 — 272 Lizette Salas, $24,866 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-67-69-68 — 272 Michelle Wie, $24,866 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-70-67-70 — 272 Hee-Won Han, $20,276 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-71-63 — 274 Jenny Shin, $20,276 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-71-64 — 274 Gerina Piller, $20,276 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-73-67-68 — 274 Laura Davies, $20,276 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-66-69 — 274 Belen Mozo, $17,402 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68-69-68 — 275 Jaye Marie Green, $17,402 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68-67-70 — 275 Paula Creamer, $17,402 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-64-71 — 275 Karine Icher, $14,483 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-70-66 — 276 Eun-Hee Ji, $14,483 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-70-74-66 — 276 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $14,483 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-69-71-69 — 276 Candie Kung, $14,483 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68-68-70 — 276 Morgan Pressel, $14,483 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-72-67-72 — 276 Chella Choi, $14,483 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-66-68-73 — 276 Sun Young Yoo, $14,483 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-65-68-74 — 276 Pernilla Lindberg, $11,424 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-72-73-66 — 277 Katie Futcher, $11,424 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-70-67 — 277 Suzann Pettersen, $11,424 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-70-67 — 277 Brittany Lang, $11,424 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-69-68-68 — 277 Lexi Thompson, $11,424 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69-67-72 — 277 Sandra Gal, $9,873 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-69-69-68 — 278 Lindsey Wright, $9,873 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-69-69 — 278 Jennifer Kirby, $8,236 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-70-69 — 279 Line Vedel, $8,236 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-69-71-69 — 279 Shanshan Feng, $8,236 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-68-70 — 279 Mina Harigae, $8,236 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-69-70 — 279 Mo Martin, $8,236 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-71-70 — 279 Haru Nomura, $8,236 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-71-70 — 279 Hee Kyung Seo, $8,236 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-65-72 — 279 Julieta Granada, $6,563 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-70-70-68 — 280 Moriya Jutanugarn, $6,563 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-69-69 — 280 Ji Young Oh, $6,563 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70-69-72 — 280 Mika Miyazato, $6,563 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-68-73 — 280 Ayako Uehara, $5,750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-71-69 — 281 Meena Lee, $5,750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-72-70 — 281 Jenny Suh, $5,750 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-66-73 — 281 Christina Kim, $4,766 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73-70-70 — 282 Seon Hwa Lee, $4,766 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-69-70-71 — 282 Ai Miyazato, $4,766 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-71-71 — 282 Jennifer Johnson, $4,766 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73-69-72 — 282 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $4,766 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-70-72 — 282 Erica Popson, $4,766 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-68-73 — 282 Heather Bowie Young, $4,766 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70-70-74 — 282 Ilhee Lee, $4,766 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-67-74 — 282 Jeong Jang, $3,698 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-76-67 — 283 Se Ri Pak, $3,698 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-66-72-70 — 283 I.K. Kim, $3,698 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-74-71-71 — 283 Marina Alex, $3,698 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-70-72 — 283 Tiffany Joh, $3,698 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-68-73 — 283 P.K. Kongkraphan, $3,698 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-69-74 — 283 Hannah Jun Medlock, $3,698 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-67-76 — 283 Hee Young Park, $3,698 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-65-69-76 — 283 Kristy McPherson, $3,291 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-73-71 — 284 Victoria Elizabeth, $3,291 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-67-73-73 — 284 Anna Nordqvist, $3,049 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-66-76-71 — 285 Alex Stewart, $3,049 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-74-71 — 285 Sarah Jane Smith, $3,049 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69-75-72 — 285 Nicole Castrale, $3,049 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-72-73 — 285 Becky Morgan, $3,049 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-66-73-73 — 285 Catriona Matthew, $2,912 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-74-75-71 — 286 Alison Walshe, $2,875 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-74-72-75 — 289

68 T-15th -14

ROUND SCORE

JTBC FOUNDERS CUP PLACE

TOTAL TO PAR

ROUND SCORECARD

FINAL

PHOENIX (AP) — When Karrie Webb was asked about all the good young players on the LPGA Tour, the questioner noted that Lydia Ko was 16 and Jessica Korda 21. “I’m not even that added up,” the 39-yearold Australian replied. And to the Hall of Famer’s surprise, when all the math was done Sunday in the JTBC Founders Cup, she was the one posing for pictures with the big trophy. “I didn’t expect to be sitting here at the start of the day,” Webb said. “Even, actually, when I finished the day, I didn’t expect to be sitting here. So I feel a little bit lucky, I guess, to be sitting here. But it doesn’t make it feel any less special.” She took the lead with a course-record 9under 63, then waited 90 minutes to see if anyone could catch her. No one did. “I thought best-case scenario I was in a playoff,” Webb said. For the second time in the event, Webb overcame a six-stroke deficit in the final

Roswell Daily Record

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total 4 5 4 3 5 3 4 4 4 36 4 5 4 4 3 5 4 3 4 36 72 4 5 4 2 5 3 4 4 3 34 3 5 4 3 3 5 4 3 4 34 68

Eagles: 0 Birdies: 4 Pars: 14 Bogeys: 0 Others: 0 Fairways hit: 11 of 14 Greens hit: 15 of 18 Putts: 29

four compensatory picks in this year’s draft for free agents they lost in 2013. Baltimore gets spots in the third, fourth and fifth rounds, with two choices in Round 4. Those slots are 99th, 134th, 138th and 175th. Among the free agents the Ravens lost after winning the 2012 NFL title were Ed Reed, Danell Ellerbe, Paul Kruger and Cary Williams, all key defensive players. The Jets will get slots 139, 209, 210 and 213: a fourth-rounder and three sixthrounders. They lost free agents Dustin Keller, Matt Slauson, Yeremiah Bell, Mike DeVito, Shonn Greene and LaRon Landry. The number of picks a team receives equals the net loss of compensatory free agents up to a maximum of four. The compensatory choices can’t be traded. Houston, Dallas, Atlanta, Pittsburgh and St. Louis each received three compensatory picks. Cincinnati, Green Bay and Detroit got two apiece, while New England, San Francisco and the New York Giants were given one each. In all, 32 choices were awarded for the draft, which begins May 8.

Judge refuses to release Darren Sharper from jail

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A judge in Los Angeles has again refused to release former NFL All-Pro safety Darren Sharper from jail. Sharper is awaiting trial in Los Angeles after pleading not guilty to charges that he raped and drugged two women last year. He was previously released on $1 million bail before being charged in Arizona with similar counts. Now, his lawyers say he should be freed again and kept under house arrest because authorities in Arizona have said they won’t seek his extradition. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Renee Korn rejected that argument on Monday, saying she would wait and see if Arizona does seek extradition. Her ruling came after prosecutors said the Arizona governor’s office is preparing a warrant to extradite Sharper, even though he will first go on trial in Los Angeles. An April 15 hearing was set.

NHL

National Hockey League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-Boston . . . . .72 49 17 6 104 230 153 Tampa Bay . . .72 39 24 9 87 214 193 Montreal . . . . .73 40 26 7 87 188 184 Detroit . . . . . . .71 33 24 14 80 189 200 Toronto . . . . . .73 36 29 8 80 213 226 Ottawa . . . . . .71 29 29 13 71 203 240 Florida . . . . . . .72 26 38 8 60 175 235 Buffalo . . . . . . .71 20 43 8 48 138 210 Metropolitan Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh . . . .71 46 20 5 97 222 177 N.Y. Rangers .73 40 29 4 84 194 178 Philadelphia . .71 38 26 7 83 205 201 Washington . . .72 34 27 11 79 208 213 Columbus . . . .71 36 29 6 78 200 194 New Jersey . . .72 31 28 13 75 175 187 Carolina . . . . .71 31 31 9 71 177 200 N.Y. Islanders .71 27 35 9 63 197 239

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-St. Louis . . . .71 48 16 7 103 228 160 Chicago . . . . . .72 41 16 15 97 240 186 Colorado . . . . .71 44 21 6 94 216 194 Minnesota . . . .72 37 24 11 85 180 178 Dallas . . . . . . .71 34 26 11 79 201 203 Winnipeg . . . . .73 32 32 9 73 202 213 Nashville . . . . .72 31 31 10 72 173 213 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose . . . . .73 46 18 9 101 222 175

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Saturday, Oct. 1 Tuesday, March 25 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 11 a.m. ESPN — Preseason, Atlanta vs. Detroit, at Lakeland, Fla. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN — NIT, quarterfinal, Belmont at Clemson 7 p.m. ESPN — NIT, quarterfinal, Southern Miss at Minnesota NBA 6 p.m. TNT — Oklahoma City at Dallas 8:30 p.m. TNT — New York at L.A. Lakers NHL 5:30 p.m. NBCSN — Detroit at Columbus SOCCER 1:45 p.m. NBCSN — Premier League, Manchester City at Manchester United WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN2 — NCAA Division I tournament, second round, Saint Joseph’s at UConn; Michigan St. at North Carolina; Florida at Penn St.; Texas at Maryland 7:30 p.m. ESPN2 — NCAA Division I tournament, second round, Louisville at Iowa; South Carolina vs. Oregon St., at Seattle; West Virginia at LSU; James Madison at Texas A&M

Anaheim . . . . .71 Los Angeles . .72 Phoenix . . . . . .72 Vancouver . . . .73 Calgary . . . . . .72 Edmonton . . . .72

46 18 7 99 228 180 41 25 6 88 177 151 34 26 12 80 199 205 33 30 10 76 176 196 30 35 7 67 183 211 25 38 9 59 178 236 x-clinched playoff spot

Sunday’s Games N.Y. Islanders 2, Columbus 0 St. Louis 1, Pittsburgh 0 New Jersey 3, Toronto 2 Nashville 2, Chicago 0 Minnesota 4, Detroit 3, OT Vancouver 4, Buffalo 2 Anaheim 6, Florida 2 Monday’s Games Montreal 2, Boston 1, SO Ottawa 4, Tampa Bay 3, SO Calgary 2, San Jose 1, SO N.Y. Rangers 4, Phoenix 3, OT Los Angeles 3, Philadelphia 2 Dallas 2, Winnipeg 1 Tuesday’s Games St. Louis at Toronto, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m. Los Angeles at Washington, 5 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Carolina, 5 p.m. Buffalo at Montreal, 5:30 p.m. Ottawa at Florida, 5:30 p.m. Detroit at Columbus, 5:30 p.m. Dallas at Chicago, 6 p.m. Colorado at Nashville, 6 p.m. San Jose at Edmonton, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Vancouver at Minnesota, 5:30 p.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 6 p.m. Anaheim at Calgary, 8 p.m.

PGA

PGA Tour FedExCup Leaders By The Associated Press Through March 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Points Money 1. Jimmy Walker . . . . . .1,872 $3,861,680 2. Patrick Reed . . . . . . .1,343 $3,023,091 3. Dustin Johnson . . . .1,334 $3,346,150 4. Harris English . . . . . .1,253 $2,535,303 5. Bubba Watson . . . . .1,240 $2,913,007 6. Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . .1,055 $2,023,024 7. Matt Every . . . . . . . . . .994 $1,992,626 8. Webb Simpson . . . . . .962 $2,076,016 9. Zach Johnson . . . . . . .942 $1,886,968 10. Ryan Moore . . . . . . . .902 $2,086,504 11. Kevin Stadler . . . . . . .827 $1,674,152 12. Kevin Na . . . . . . . . . .771 $1,470,252 13. Jordan Spieth . . . . . .770 $1,661,823 14. John Senden . . . . . . .737 $1,430,144 15. Graham DeLaet . . . . .727 $1,639,166 16. Jason Day . . . . . . . . .720 $1,909,200 17. Keegan Bradley . . . . .696 $1,425,341 18. Brian Stuard . . . . . . .696 $1,298,185 19. Gary Woodland . . . . .677 $1,424,810 20. Ryan Palmer . . . . . . .654 $1,266,290 21. Charles Howell III . . .644 $1,190,178 22. Will MacKenzie . . . . .635 $1,236,650 23. Russell Henley . . . . .614 $1,257,954 24. Chesson Hadley . . . .608 $1,200,680 25. Russell Knox . . . . . . .594 $934,241 26. Ryo Ishikawa . . . . . . .578 $1,125,680 27. Scott Stallings . . . . . .575 $1,195,200 28. Graeme McDowell . . .550 $1,281,350 29. Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . .546 $1,010,233 30. Chris Stroud . . . . . . .536 $1,063,007 31. Jason Bohn . . . . . . . .508 $949,014 32. Pat Perez . . . . . . . . .503 $1,008,184 33. Charley Hoffman . . . .500 $913,697 34. Jason Kokrak . . . . . .491 $865,909 35. Hideki Matsuyama . . .480 $889,288 36. George McNeill . . . . .475 $889,750 37. Adam Scott . . . . . . . .438 $910,150 38. Ian Poulter . . . . . . . . .435 $1,047,684 39. Brendon Todd . . . . . .429 $608,564 40. Brian Harman . . . . . .427 $783,899 41. Vijay Singh . . . . . . . .425 $703,538 42. Robert Garrigus . . . . .410 $600,173 43. Hunter Mahan . . . . . .403 $840,596 44. Sergio Garcia . . . . . .402 $932,667 45. Scott Brown . . . . . . . .399 $699,329 46. Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . .398 $771,107 47. Rory McIlroy . . . . . . .397 $854,500 48. Brendan Steele . . . . .394 $668,390 49. Jason Dufner . . . . . . .389 $785,249 50. K.J. Choi . . . . . . . . . .386 $728,043 51. Marc Leishman . . . . .378 $724,969 52. Rickie Fowler . . . . . . .369 $894,830 53. Billy Horschel . . . . . .368 $691,697 54. Justin Leonard . . . . . .364 $642,865 55. Cameron Tringale . . .361 $559,616 56. Jerry Kelly . . . . . . . . .361 $684,666 57. Kevin Streelman . . . .357 $657,163 58. Jeff Overton . . . . . . . .349 $619,910 59. Luke Guthrie . . . . . . .341 $482,240 60. Scott Langley . . . . . .331 $593,674 61. Briny Baird . . . . . . . . .329 $561,829 62. David Hearn . . . . . . .329 $522,323 63. Daniel Summerhays .327 $458,350 64. Bryce Molder . . . . . . .327 $637,009 65. Stuart Appleby . . . . . .326 $488,801 66. Justin Hicks . . . . . . . .320 $455,977 67. Tim Clark . . . . . . . . . .318 $580,228 68. Brian Gay . . . . . . . . .310 $519,239 69. Freddie Jacobson . . .307 $606,327 70. Boo Weekley . . . . . . .307 $446,976 71. James Driscoll . . . . . .304 $343,780 72. Seung-Yul Noh . . . . .303 $381,033 73. Matt Jones . . . . . . . . .298 $453,598 74. Luke Donald . . . . . . .296 $595,600 75. Justin Rose . . . . . . . .292 $634,479 76. Ernie Els . . . . . . . . . .283 $730,421 77. Rory Sabbatini . . . . . .273 $469,607 78. Camilo Villegas . . . . .272 $263,626 79. Danny Lee . . . . . . . . .266 $461,245 80. Kevin Chappell . . . . .264 $316,195 81. Brandt Snedeker . . . .261 $583,080 82. Erik Compton . . . . . .258 $425,127 83. Morgan Hoffmann . . .258 $331,091 84. Aaron Baddeley . . . . .257 $467,855 85. Billy Hurley III . . . . . .256 $440,551 86. Jonas Blixt . . . . . . . . .251 $411,180 87. William McGirt . . . . . .250 $400,963 88. Brian Davis . . . . . . . .248 $337,814 89. Sang-Moon Bae . . . .246 $396,969 90. Jim Renner . . . . . . . .245 $580,800 91. Phil Mickelson . . . . . .238 $365,422 92. Henrik Stenson . . . . .237 $483,967 93. Jim Furyk . . . . . . . . . .235 $478,162 94. Charl Schwartzel . . . .232 $518,250 95. Trevor Immelman . . .227 $329,547 96. Ben Martin . . . . . . . . .226 $370,980 97. Chad Collins . . . . . . .223 $313,137 98. Michael Thompson . .223 $339,278 99. Greg Chalmers . . . . .218 $353,121 100. Richard H. Lee . . . . .216 $381,739 101. John Merrick . . . . . . .214 $279,034 102. Spencer Levin . . . . .213 $241,060 103. Nick Watney . . . . . . .209 $264,650 104. Charlie Beljan . . . . . .207 $330,236 105. Carl Pettersson . . . .206 $349,938 106. Tim Wilkinson . . . . . .201 $416,986 107. J.J. Henry . . . . . . . . .200 $261,276 108. David Lingmerth . . . .198 $299,186 109. Tyrone Van Aswegen 197 $187,561 110. Ken Duke . . . . . . . . .195 $340,170 111. Jhonattan Vegas . . . .194 $227,889 112. Michael Putnam . . . .192 $189,166 113. Josh Teater . . . . . . . .191 $192,766 114. Ricky Barnes . . . . . .191 $268,238

115. Louis Oosthuizen . . .189 116. Sean O’Hair . . . . . . .188 117. Martin Laird . . . . . . . .187 118. Roberto Castro . . . . .185 119. Robert Allenby . . . . .181 120. G. Fdez-Castano . . .177 121. Stewart Cink . . . . . . .177 122. Brendon de Jonge . .173 123. Hudson Swafford . . .169 124. Brice Garnett . . . . . .167 125. J.B. Holmes . . . . . . .166 126. Lee Westwood . . . . .162 127. Charlie Wi . . . . . . . . .158 128. Retief Goosen . . . . .158 129. Ben Crane . . . . . . . .156 130. Peter Hanson . . . . . .147 131. Wes Roach . . . . . . . .145 132. Ted Potter, Jr. . . . . . .144 133. Y.E. Yang . . . . . . . . .142 134. James Hahn . . . . . . .142 135. Martin Flores . . . . . .140 136. Robert Streb . . . . . . .139 137. David Toms . . . . . . . .138 138. Martin Kaymer . . . . .134 139. John Huh . . . . . . . . .133 140. John Rollins . . . . . . .132 141. Woody Austin . . . . . .132 142. Nicholas Thompson .132 143. Scott Piercy . . . . . . .131 144. Jim Herman . . . . . . .130 145. Heath Slocum . . . . . .130 146. Kevin Kisner . . . . . . .128 147. Troy Matteson . . . . .124 148. Davis Love III . . . . . .121 149. Peter Malnati . . . . . .116 149. Kyle Stanley . . . . . . .116

Transactions

$437,000 $305,816 $259,662 $260,518 $223,630 $264,067 $301,629 $266,333 $221,375 $189,403 $259,630 $274,675 $208,267 $229,156 $262,197 $218,628 $220,350 $147,363 $161,864 $117,395 $229,560 $198,240 $199,875 $273,201 $155,435 $142,511 $196,652 $143,336 $249,577 $130,969 $169,988 $143,222 $230,550 $148,959 $189,900 $147,293

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB — Suspended Tampa Bay RHP Alex Colome 50 games after testing positive for Boldenone. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Traded INF Alex Gonzalez to Detroit for INF Steve Lombardozzi. Designated C Johnny Monell for assignment. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with LHP Jose Quintana on a five-year contract. CLEVELAND INDIANS — Optioned RHP Trevor Bauer and RHP C.C. Lee to Columbus (IL). Reassigned INFs David Cooper and Bryan LaHair to minor league camp. Placed OF Michael Bourn on the 15day DL, retroactive to March 21. HOUSTON ASTROS — Optioned RHP Josh Zeid to Oklahoma City (PCL). Reassigned OF Adron Chambers and C Rene Garcia to minor league camp. Released INF Cesar Izturis. KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Optioned OF Jimmy Paredes to Omaha (PCL). Assigned RHP Jon Rauch and C Adam Moore to minor league camp. MINNESOTA TWINS — Optioned RHPs Ryan Pressly and Michael Tonkin and C Chris Herrmann to Rochester (IL). Reassigned LHPs Matt Hoffman and Aaron Thompson, RHP Deolis Guerra, OF Wilkin Ramirez and INFs Doug Bernier and Deibinson Romero to minor league camp. Granted RHP Matt Guerrier his unconditional release. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Optioned OF Anthony Gose to Buffalo (IL). Assigned C Mike Nickeas and INFs Chris Getz and Steve Tolleson to minor league camp. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Optioned LHP Ryan Buchter and OFs Jose Constanza and Joey Terdoslavich to Gwinnett (IL). Reassigned INFs Tyler Greene and Tommy La Stella to Gwinnett. Granted RHP Freddy Garcia his unconditional release. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Waived 1B/3B Juan Francisco for the purpose of giving him his unconditional release. NEW YORK METS — Named Luis Natera assistant hitting coach. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Optioned RHP Jesse Hahn to San Antonio (PCL). Reassigned C Austin Hedges to minor league camp. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Reassigned RHP Blake Treinen to minor league camp. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Signed G Casper Ware to a 10-day contract. Women’s National Basketball Association CONNECTICUT SUN — Signed G Katie Douglas to a two-year contract. FOOTBALL National Football League CINCINNATI BENGALS — Signed CB R.J. Stanford. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Agreed to terms with OL Paul McQuistan. PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Signed LB Arthur Moats to a one-year contract. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Re-signed WR Kassim Osgood to a one-year contract. HOCKEY National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES — Signed D Justin Faulk to a six-year contract extension. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Recalled D Tim Erixon from Springfield (AHL). Returned D Frederic St. Denis on loan to Springfield. DALLAS STARS — Recalled F Dustin Jeffrey from Texas (AHL). Reassigned F Chris Mueller to Texas. DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled LW Mitch Callahan from Grand Rapids (AHL). Assigned C Landon Ferraro to Grand Rapids. FLORIDA PANTHERS — Reassigned LW Garrett Wilson to San Antonio (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS — Reassigned G Andrew Hammond to Binghamton (AHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer COLUMBUS CREW — Announced the resignation of president Mark McCullers, effective April 30. COLLEGE BOWLING GREEN — Named Chris Jans men’s basketball coach. CARSON-NEWMAN — Announced the resignation of men’s golf coach John Minor. DAYTON — Signed men’s basketball coach Archie Miller to a contract extension through the 2018-19 season. MINNESOTA STATE-MANKATO — Named Bryant Black men’s associate head golf coach. PENN — Named M. Grace Calhoun athletic director, effective July 1. WEST VIRGINIA — Announced men’s sophomore basketball G Eron Harris plans to transfer.


Lots of favorites in the Sweet 16 SPORTS

Roswell Daily Record

The Billion Dollar Dream has been over for a while. Most bracket sheets are loaded with red X’s. Still, there is plenty of March Madness ahead of us in the NCAA tournament’s round of 16. You want favorites? Three No. 1s — Florida, Arizona, Virginia — are alive and well after two rounds. You want underdogs? How about three with double-digit seedings — Stanford, a 10, with 11s Dayton and Tennessee. You want a rivalry? It’s tough to beat Kentucky-Louisville. You want rematches? Besides Kentucky-Louisville there is Arizona-San Diego State. You get the point. Four days, 12 games. It’s regional weekend when the Sweet 16 is cut to the Final Four. Enjoy. SOUTH REGIONAL, Memphis, Tenn., Thursday-Saturday. The game that guarantees a winner with a double-digit seeding, Stanford vs. Dayton, will be followed by the overall top seed, Florida, facing a familiar tournament opponent in UCLA. Stanford gets to wear home whites after beating New Mexico and Kansas. The Cardinal are in the round of 16 for the first time since 2008, the last time they were in the tournament. They haven’t given up more than 57 points and they have been great at the free-throw line. Dayton followed the win over Ohio State with a squeaker over Syracuse and the Flyers are in the round of 16 for the first time since 1984. They got here with

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Yeguete faced more adversity last year while dealing with tendinitis in his right knee most of the season. The pain got so intense in early February that he opted to have arthroscopic surgery to remove floating chips and cartilage. He missed six games, wasn’t the same when he returned and ended up needing another surgery after the season. While he seemingly has lost some leaping ability, he’s still been a consistent rebounder and a dependable defender. “It’s hard to find,” Donovan said. “It’s hard to find guys that really kind of hang

two wins by a total of three points and they have yet to break 60, but they have done just enough. Coach Archie Miller couldn’t meet his brother Sean and Arizona until the national semifinals. Florida has lived up to its billing as the overall No. 1 seed. The Gators have increased their winning streak to 28 games with a couple of double-figure victories. This is their fourth straight year in the round of 16, the longest current streak. UCLA won both its games by 17 points and the Bruins have won five straight and seven of eight, including an upset of Arizona. This is their first Sweet 16 appearance since 2008. Florida beat UCLA in the national championship game in 2006 and in the national semifinals the following season. The Gators also eliminated the Bruins in the second round in 2011. WEST REGIONAL, Anaheim, Calif., Thursday-Saturday. This is the closest any of the regions came to having seeds 1-4 advance. Top-seeded Arizona, No. 2 Wisconsin and No. 4 San Diego State are still playing along with seventh-seeded Baylor. Arizona was impressive on defense in dispatching Gonzaga in the third round and the Wildcats are in the round of 16 for the third time in four years. San Diego State finally showed its defensive prowess in a thirdround win over North Dakota State, which had a season-low 44 points. These teams met in San Diego

their hat on being kind of a dirty work guy, and it’s hard sometimes because certainly it doesn’t really give them a lot of headlines. He’s not a headline guy. But he really does a lot for our team.” Yeguete has never gotten a of attention in lot Gainesville. He was born in France, but grew up playing soccer in Ivory Coast. He picked up basketball late and really fell in love with Florida while watching Joakim Noah lead Florida to back-to-back national titles in 2006 and 2007. He moved to Florida Air Academy in Melbourne, Fla., before his junior year of high school and met teammate Scottie Wilbekin while playing Amateur Athletic Union ball. Wilbekin quickly realized

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

on Nov. 14 and Arizona won 6960 behind the 23 points of Nick Johnson. The Wildcats were ranked No. 6 at the time and four weeks later were No. 1, a spot they held for eight weeks. Wisconsin is going from facing one set of highlighter yellow uniforms to another. The Badgers beat Oregon to get to the Sweet 16 after missing to get there last season. Frank Kaminsky, who had 19 points against Oregon, will be in for quite a test against Baylor’s tall, athletic front line. The Bears come in off a 30point demolition of Creighton in which they held Doug McDermott, the nation’s leading scorer, to 15 points. They won’t be able to concentrate on one of the Badgers, who have six players averaging from 13.4 points to 7.9 points. EAST REGIONAL, New York, Friday-Sunday. The NCAA tournament hasn’t been in Madison Square Garden since 1961. One of the teams headed there this week has some great memories already of the building known as “the world’s most famous arena.” Virginia, the quietest of the four No. 1s, played its kind of game — good defense and patient offense — in beating Memphis by 18 points. That got the Cavaliers to the round of 16 for the first time since 1995. They are the sole team remaining from the Atlantic Coast Conference. Michigan State was the nation’s pick for the national championship even if it was a No. 4 seed.

that Yeguete’s game was far from flashy. “He’s been that way since I met him,” Wilbekin said. “He has a knack for it. He gets tough rebounds, gets his hands on tips and has a nose for the ball. He seems to get it when other players wouldn’t. It’s just an attitude. When you have it, you don’t really realize it because it just comes natural. He has it.” Yeguete has no plans to change his style, either — preferring to alter games without necessarily scoring points. “Those plays impact the game and winning,” he said. “I’m not the only one doing those things. ... It’s a whole team effort.”

The injuries are a thing of the past and the Spartans look like the team that held the No. 1 ranking this season. They had their hands full with Harvard in the third round, but pulled away in the final minutes. Third-seeded Iowa State was able to overcome the loss of thirdleading scorer Georges Niang to a broken foot by beating North Carolina in a game that came down to DeAndre Kane’s driving basket with 1.6 seconds to play. The Cyclones, in the regional semifinals for the first time since 2000, are still a team with plenty of scorers. Connecticut won a record seven Big East tournament titles at Madison Square Garden, the last in 2011 when Kemba Walker led them to the national championship. Shabazz Napier was a freshman on that team and he’s doing a solid imitation of Walker as he averaged 24.5 points in the two wins that has the Huskies in the Sweet 16 a year after they weren’t eligible for the tournament over academic sanctions. MIDWEST REGIONAL, Indianapolis, Friday-Saturday. Indianapolis is about to be invaded by people from the commonwealth of Kentucky. Those wearing red are for Louisville, those wearing blue are for the University of Kentucky. There will be fans of Tennessee and Michigan in town, but they will be hard to notice with all those Kentuckians in for a visit. Tennessee, a No. 11 seed, is the third team that played in the

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Then last week, Woods withdrew from the Arnold Palmer Invitational because of persistent back pain. “I’ve had a couple weeks off and getting treatment and just working on trying to get ready for Augusta,” Woods said Monday. “As of right now, it’s still too soon, which is, as I said, pretty frustrating.” This has been the longest sustained problem Woods has had with his lower back. He first showed signs of back pain at Bethpage Black at The Barclays in 2012, which he attributed to a soft bed at his hotel. He felt twinges during the final round of the PGA Championship last year, and when his back bothered him in the final round of The Barclays two weeks later, he said it was unrelat-

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First Four to reach the regional semifinals. The Volunteers have won eight of nine with the only loss to Florida in the SEC tournament. They reached the Sweet 16 with a frontcourt dismantling of Mercer, outrebounding the team that beat Duke 41-19. Second-seeded Michigan is in the round of 16 for the second straight year and the Wolverines are trying to get back to the national championship game where they lost to Louisville. Nik Stauskas led an outside attack that saw Michigan make 14 3pointers in a third-round win over Texas. Kentucky beat Louisville 73-66 just days after Christmas in the schools’ annual meeting. This one is going to be on a higher level as Kentucky’s roster of high school stars meets a Louisville squad that features key players who were on last season’s national championship team. Kentucky, the preseason No. 1, did what no other team could do this season — beat Wichita State. In what has to be the best game of the tour nament so far, the Wildcats played above their years in handing the Shockers their first loss of the season. Louisville is in the round of 16 for the third straight year and the great news for the Cardinals is that Naismith Hall of Fame coach Rick Pitino is 16-0 in the regional semifinals. His team has won 14 of its last 15 games overall and eight straight in the NCAA tournament.

ed. At Monday’s news conference, Woods discussed a deal through 2017 for his tour nament to be called the Quicken Loans National. It will be played June 26-29 at Congressional this year. AT&T was in the final year of its contract as sponsor. The AT&T National began in 2007 with a military theme built around the Fourth of July in the nation’s capital. It has been held at Congressional for all but two years, in 2010 and 2011, as the course prepared to host the U.S. Open. In those years, it was played at Aronimink outside Philadelphia. Congressional is under contract through 2014, and Woods said there will be a vote next week to determine whether the club would host every other year in 2016, 2018 and 2020.

Roswell gets 1st wins Topic: Workplace environment POR TALES — The Roswell baseball team broke its six-game losing skid to start the season on Monday, claiming a pair of wins over Portales at Joe Bauman Stadium. The Coyotes (2-6) won Game 1 9-5 over the visiting Rams and completed the sweep with an 8-7 victory in the nightcap. In Game 1, cleanup hitter Josh Whitt put Roswell on top to stay in the fourth as the Coyotes scored nine runs in their final three turns to get their first win of the season. Whitt doubled home Niguel Rubio and A Garcia with one out to put the Coyotes on top 2-1. Then, in the fifth, Roswell plated five runs to extend its lead to 7-1 behind RBI hits from Rubio, Devin Dubiel, Whitt and Brian Espinoza. Portales scored two in the sixth and two in the seventh, while Roswell plated two in the sixth for the final margin. Bear Kyser earned the win for Roswell, allowing five runs on seven hits while striking out seven in 6 1⁄3 innings. Rubio finished the game 4 for 4 with an RBI and two runs scored. Whitt was 2 for 3 with three RBIs and a run. Brandon Renteria also had two hits. In Game 2, Roswell had to come from behind to get the victory. With Roswell leading 6-5 heading to the seventh, Portales plated two runs to regain the lead. In Roswell’s half of the seventh, Whitt walked and Espinoza reached on an error. Another Ram error then allowed Chris Carpenter to reach and Whitt to score the game-tying run. After Rudy Castillo struck out looking for the inning’s first out,

LOCAL BRIEFS

Espinoza scored the game-winning run on a wild pitch during Kaleb Seabrease’s at-bat. Espinoza picked up the win for the Coyotes after allowing three runs on four hits and striking out three in 2 2⁄3 innings. At the plate, Rubio, Jeremy Seabrease and Rudy Castillo each had one hit. Castillo scored thrice and Espinoza scored twice.

Gateway Chr. 11, Melrose 5 MELROSE — The Warriors fell behind 5-1 through three, but rallied back for a big win over the Buffaloes on Monday. Gateway plated four in the third to close to within 5-4 and then took the lead in the sixth. Jacob Moody and Justin Reynolds scored on a Melrose error and Andrew Meeks scored on an RBI single by Chris Bonham to give the Warriors a 7-5 advantage. Gateway tacked on four more on a Moody grand slam in the seventh to provide the final margin. Moody finished 3 for 5 with four RBIs and three runs scored for the Warriors. He was the lone Warrior with mulitple hits, but seven other Warriors recorded one hit. Scooby Taylor and Caleb Raney each scored twice and Meeks drove in two. Alex King earned the victory, allowing five runs on seven hits and striking out 11 in a complete-game effort.

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Commissioner Roger Goodell says the NFL will meet on April 8 with the players union to discuss improving the workplace environment. In the wake of the Miami Dolphins bullying scandal, league representatives have met with some 40 players in the last three months, as well as with the Dolphins and outside organizations, Goodell said Monday at the NFL owners meetings. The league is trying to get “as much input as possible. It’s more about people understanding the importance of a proper workplace.” Goodell added the focus is on medical evaluations of the players involved, including tackle Jonathan Martin, who left the Dolphins in the middle of last season, saying he was harassed by guard Richie Incognito. Martin was traded to the 49ers earlier this month. An NFL investigation determined Incognito and two other Miami Dolphins offensive linemen engaged in persistent harassment of Martin. Incognito was then suspended and missed the final eight games last season, and he became a free agent when his contract with the Dolphins expired. On Monday, Incognito made a peace offering to Martin via Twitter. Incognito posted: “Call me

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infielder Kensuke Tanaka and started him at second base against Oakland on Monday. The 32-year-old Tanaka had been assigned to the minor league camp on March 17. He

on my cell phone. Love you brother. (Stuff) got crazy but we held it together,” with the hash tags of CALLME and FAMILY. And in another tweet to Martin: “No hard feelings. Let’s just move on :)” Goodell noted that improving the workplace environment involves “a culture change.” He did not address what discipline any of the players face from the league for the bullying. “What we need to do is make sure we have a workplace we are all proud of. This will be an important meeting with the players,” Goodell said. The NFLPA did not immediately return messages seeking comment. Goodell also addressed the absence of Colts owner Jim Irsay, who has entered a treatment facility after police found multiple prescription drugs in his vehicle during a traffic stop earlier this month. The 54-yearold Irsay faces preliminary charges of misdemeanor driving while intoxicated and four felony counts of possession of a controlled substance. “He is seeking help and he’s done that voluntarily,” Goodell said. “To my knowledge, there’s been no formal charges at this point. Obviously any policies or laws that are broken, whether they are (by) commissioner, playhas only 30 at-bats in the majors after playing 13 years in Japan. Another possibility is journeyman Josh Wilson, who is hitting .261 in 21 games. Wilson, like Tanaka, is in camp on a minor league contract. Daniels acknowledged the Rangers have already begun to

er or coach those are subject to discipline.” Irsay is being represented at the meetings by his daughter, Carlie. And Indianapolis’ suggestion that teams be allowed to open or close the stadium roof at halftime to enhance the fan experience has been tabled. League owners will address a myriad of potential rules changes and bylaws adjustments this week, but only approved one item Monday: a one-year extension of the Raiders’ stadium lease in Oakland. Earlier in the day, Raiders owner Mark Davis reiterated, “We’re trying to get something done in Oakland” for a new home. Instant replay, as it usually does, has garnered lots of attention, with the league considering having director of officials Dean Blandino and others consult with referees on replays. Blandino believes such a process could speed up video reviews as well as ensure the calls are correct. “The referee will be the ultimate authority; we’ll consult and come to a consensus,” Blandino said of the proposal, something the NHL does on a smaller scale to great effect, although the final call in hockey comes from the league office. “Our system is more inclusive as to what we look at.”

delve into possibilities outside the organization to strengthen the two positions. The Rangers also said reserve outfielder Engel Beltre will start the season on the disabled list with a fractured right shin.


NBA: Spurs earn 14th consecutive victory B4 Tuesday, March 25, 2014

FINANCIAL / SPORTS

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Austin Daye had 22 points and T im Duncan added 19 as the San Antonio Spurs earned their 14th straight win with a 113-91 victory Monday night that sent the Philadelphia 76ers to their 25th consecutive loss. Philadelphia will face Houston on Thursday with the dubious distinction of being a loss shy of tying the NBA record for consecutive losses set by the Cleveland Cavaliers in 201011. Kawhi Leonard and Patty Mills scored 15 points each and Cory Joseph added 12 for San Antonio, which maintained the league’s best record at 54-16. The Spurs did not play starters Tony Parker, T iago Splitter and Danny Green, but did not need them against the lowly 76ers. Thaddeus Young and Michael Carter -Williams each scored 19 points, Byron Mullens added 15 and Elliot Williams had 14 for Philadelphia (15-56).

Heat 93, Trail Blazers 91 MIAMI (AP) — LeBron James scored 32 points, including a layup with 11.4 seconds left, and Chris Bosh capped his 30th birthday by blocking Damian Lillard’s layup in the final moments as the Miami Heat escaped with a win over the Portland Trail Blazers. Bosh finished with 15 points and Chris Andersen had 13 points and 11 rebounds for Miami, which won for just the fifth time in 12 games. Mario Chalmers added 11 points for the Heat. Lillard led the Blazers with 19

points on 3-for -15 shooting. Mo Williams scored 17, Wes Matthews had 15, Nicolas Batum 11 and Robin Lopez 10 for Portland, which was down 17 with just more than 9 minutes remaining.

Rockets 100, Bobcats 89 CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — James Harden scored 31 points, Dwight Howard had a double-double in his return to the court and the Houston Rockets defeated the Charlotte Bobcats for their fourth straight win. Harden had 14 points in the pivotal third quarter and finished 11-of19 from the field. Terrence Jones added 18 points and seven rebounds in the victory. Howard had missed the previous three games with an ankle injury, but Houston won all three without him by an average of 23 points. He finished with 10 points and 10 rebounds. Kemba Walker had 22 points and Al Jefferson had 20 points and 11 rebounds for Charlotte, which lost for only the second time in 11 games at home.

Suns 102, Hawks 95 ATLANTA (AP) — Eric Bledsoe scored 20 points to lead five Phoenix players in double figures and the Suns won their fourth in a row, beating the Atlanta Hawks to pull even with Dallas for the final playoff spot in the Western Conference. The Suns buried the Hawks from 3-point range, knocking down 12-of24 beyond the arc. Bledsoe made all three of his long-range attempts, while Channing Frye was 4-of-9 to

account for the bulk of his 18 points. Goran Dragic had 19 points, Markieff Morris 17 and Gerald Green 13. Atlanta, trying to hold the eighth spot in the East, lost its third in a row after a season-high five-game winning streak. Paul Millsap and DeMarre Carroll led the Hawks with 19 points apiece.

Bulls 89, Pacers 77 CHICAGO (AP) — Taj Gibson led five players in double figures with 23 points and the Chicago Bulls brushed off a poor offensive first half to rally past the Indiana Pacers. Kirk Hinrich had 18 points on 7for -13 shooting, Mike Dunleavy scored 13, Jimmy Butler 12 and Joakim Noah added 10 points, eight rebounds and eight assists. Gibson, who was 9 for 15 from the field, also had eight rebounds in 32 minutes off the bench. The Bulls (40-31) pulled within two percentage points of Toronto (39-30) for third place in the Eastern Conference. The win also prevented Indiana from clinching the Central Division title on Chicago’s home court. The Pacers are looking to win consecutive division crowns for the second time since joining the NBA (1998-99 and 1999-2000).

Thunder 117, Nuggets 96 OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Kevin Durant had 27 points and eight assists to help the Oklahoma City Thunder defeat the Denver Nuggets. Caron Butler scored 23 points, his highest total since the Thunder added him right after the trade dead-

Roswell Daily Record

down in the third quarter, beating the Brooklyn Nets. Evans scored 14 as New Orleans closed the third period on a 29-10 run to get back in the game. Anthony Morrow, who did not score until the final 2 minutes of regulation, had 11 points the rest of the way as the Pelicans completed their comeback. Morrow hit a 3-pointer to give New Orleans a 106-100 lead in overtime and sealed the victory with another 3 to make it 109-102 with 54.5 seconds left. Paul Pierce had 24 points and Deron Williams 23 for the Nets, who lost for the first time in five games after winning at Dallas in overtime Sunday.

line. Reggie Jackson had 16 points and a career -high 11 assists, and Serge Ibaka added 15 points and seven rebounds for the Thunder, who won their fourth straight. Durant, who was coming off a 51point game against Toronto on Friday, is averaging 37 points during the winning streak. The Thunder sat point guard Russell Westbrook so he could rest his surgically repaired right knee. Ty Lawson scored 25 points for the Nuggets, who had won three of four.

Grizzlies 109, Timberwolves 92 MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Mike Conley had 23 points and six assists, Marc Gasol added 14 and 12 rebounds and the Memphis Grizzlies built an early lead and easily dispatched the short-handed Minnesota Timberwolves. Zach Randolph finished with 17 points for Memphis, while Tayshaun Prince and Ed Davis added 12 points apiece. Mike Miller scored 11 as Memphis won its 10th straight home game. Kevin Love led the Timberwolves with 16 points, but shot 6-of-18 from the field, part of Minnesota shooting 38 percent for the game. Corey Brewer had 15 points and Kevin Martin finished with 13. Gorgui Dieng, in the starting lineup because of injuries on Minnesota’s front line, finished with 11 points and 17 rebounds.

Pistons 114, Jazz 94 SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Andre Drummond had 19 points and 14 rebounds, and the Detroit Pistons shot a season-best 55 percent to blow by the Utah Jazz. Rodney Stuckey scored 19, Greg Monroe had 18 points and 11 rebounds, and Brandon Jennings added 15 points to help the Pistons snap a 14-game road losing streak in the finale of a four -game Western Conference trip. Gordon Hayward scored 32 points — his highest total since he had 37 against Oklahoma City on Jan. 7 — to lead the Jazz, who have lost seven of eight. Detroit went 9 for 17 from 3-point range and ended a five-game losing streak.

Pelicans 109, Nets 104, OT NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Tyreke Evans scored a season-high 33 points and the short-handed New Orleans Pelicans rallied from 22

NCAA Women: DePaul shocks No. 2 Duke to advance

DURHAM, N.C. (AP) — Megan Rogowski scored 22 points and Megan Podkowa added 18 to help DePaul upset Duke 74-65 on Monday night in the second round of the NCAA tournament. Brittany Hrynko added 14 for the seventh-seeded Blue Demons (29-6). They earned their third appearance in the round of 16 by hitting 14 3pointers and forcing second-seeded Duke into 21 turnovers with their high-pressure defense. DePaul will play the James Madison-Texas A&M winner on Saturday in the Lincoln Regional semifinals. Elizabeth Williams scored 12 points, and seniors Haley Peters and Tricia Liston each added 11 in their final game at Cameron Indoor Stadium. Duke (28-7) led for only 12 seconds and became the first top-four seed to lose in the tournament.

BYU 80, Nebraska 76 LOS ANGELES (AP) — Morgan Bailey tied her career high with 18 points, Jennifer Hamson had 15 points and 14 rebounds, and BYU held on to beat Nebraska, advancing to the Sweet 16 of the NCAA women’s tournament for the first time since 2002. Lexi Eaton added 15 points and Xojian Harry hit three 3-pointers in the final eight minutes for the 12thseeded Cougars (28-6), who became just the third No. 12 seed to reach

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Apr 14 144.02 144.50 127.82 144.15 Jun 14 135.90 136.90 135.50 136.42 Aug 14 133.12 134.00 132.85 133.72 Oct 14 137.10 138.40 137.00 138.40 Dec 14 138.52 139.80 138.00 139.57 Feb 15 138.55 139.85 138.50 139.85 Apr 15 138.55 139.80 138.50 139.80 Jun 15 132.10 132.95 132.10 132.95 Aug 15 130.70 130.75 130.70 130.75 Last spot N/A Est. sales 47687. Fri’s Sales: 54,422 Fri’s open int: 372341, up +976 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Mar 14 175.45 176.90 175.32 176.70 Apr 14 175.10 176.30 175.10 176.30 May 14 176.05 177.87 175.95 177.57 Aug 14 177.50 179.17 177.27 178.92 Sep 14 178.50 178.52 176.90 178.52 Oct 14 176.50 178.22 176.50 178.20 Nov 14 175.60 177.00 175.60 177.00 Jan 15 173.30 174.05 173.30 174.05 Last spot N/A Est. sales 5754. Fri’s Sales: 5,898 Fri’s open int: 50235, up +39 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Apr 14 125.75 125.80 123.75 124.65 May 14 126.07 126.07 123.70 124.80 Jun 14 129.75 129.85 127.62 128.20 Jul 14 125.85 126.05 124.47 125.70 Aug 14 126.32 126.45 125.00 125.35 Oct 14 104.27 105.30 80.00 105.25 Dec 14 90.55 91.15 90.30 91.12 Feb 15 87.35 87.92 86.57 87.70 Apr 15 86.30 86.50 86.30 86.50 May 15 89.00 90.50 89.00 90.50 Jun 15 91.40 91.40 91.40 91.40 Jul 15 90.50 90.50 90.50 90.50 Last spot N/A Est. sales 47108. Fri’s Sales: 43,274 Fri’s open int: 291192, up +449

chg.

+.15 +.30 +.22 +.88 +1.00 +.73 +.50 +.95 +.25

+1.68 +1.03 +1.07 +1.02 +1.02 +1.03 +1.00 +.80

-1.02 -1.47 -2.12 -.90 -1.55 +.98 +.47 +.35 +.30 +2.75 +.40 +.25

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. May 14 93.55 93.75 89.84 90.63 Jul 14 92.86 93.00 89.71 90.55 Oct 14 81.25 Dec 14 80.30 80.40 78.78 79.29 Mar 15 80.11 80.15 78.60 79.26 May 15 79.45 79.45 79.16 79.16 Jul 15 79.05 Oct 15 79.00 Dec 15 78.69 Mar 16 78.90 May 16 79.05 Jul 16 79.14 Oct 16 79.24 Dec 16 79.27 Last spot N/A Est. sales 35280. Fri’s Sales: 18,163 Fri’s open int: 186423, up +2650

chg.

-2.68 -2.15 -1.15 -.96 -.70 -.57 -.38 -.34 -.26 -.11 +.11 +.21 +.21

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 14 691fl 718ü 687 714ø Jul 14 693fl 720fl 688fl 716fl Sep 14 702ø 726fl 696ü 723ø Dec 14 711 736ü 705fl 732ø Mar 15 715ø 741ü 715ø 737fl May 15 735ø 735fl 734 734 Jul 15 705 720 703ü 718

chg.

+21ü +21ü +21 +20ø +20ü +17 +14fl

the final 16. They led by 17 points in the first half on the way to their second straight upset. Tear’a Laudermill scored 22 points and Big Ten player of the year Jordan Hooper added 20 points for fourthseeded Nebraska (26-7), which now hosts a regional it won’t be playing in.

NOTRE DAME REGIONAL Notre Dame 84, Arizona State 67 TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Natalie Achonwa had 25 points and 11 rebounds, and top-seeded Notre Dame pulled away in the second half for a victory over ninth-seeded Arizona State. The unbeaten Fighting Irish (34-0) have won their last 15 games by double digits, although the Sun Devils (23-10) kept this one close during a sloppy first half. Deja Mann scored 16 points for Arizona State. Notre Dame led 32-26 at halftime before scoring the first six points of the second. Led by the 6-foot-3 Achonwa, the Irish outscored Arizona State 46-34 in the paint. Kayla McBride had 22 points and nine assists for Notre Dame, which advanced to the Sweet 16 for the 12th time in the last 18 years. Baylor 76, California 56 WACO, Texas (AP) — Odyssey Sims scored 27 points in her final home game and Baylor advanced to its

Sep 15 710 720ü 710 720ü Dec 15 710 728 710 727ø Mar 16 711ø 730 710ø 729ø May 16 718ü 730ü 718ü 730ü Jul 16 675 675 671ü 675 Last spot N/A Est. sales 160857. Fri’s Sales: 92,224 Fri’s open int: 357865, up +2119 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 14 479 491 478ø 490 Jul 14 484ü 495ü 482fl 494ø Sep 14 481 491 480ü 490ø Dec 14 479ø 488ø 478ø 487fl Mar 15 487ø 496 487ü 495ø May 15 493ü 501 493ü 500fl Jul 15 494ø 502fl 494ø 502ø Sep 15 486 489ø 486 489 Dec 15 479 485fl 478 484ø Mar 16 491 494ü 491 491ø May 16 489ø 495ü 489ø 495ü Jul 16 493fl 498 493fl 496fl Sep 16 472fl 477ü 472fl 477ü Dec 16 465ü 467fl 465ü 467ø Jul 17 477fl 482 477fl 482 Dec 17 448fl 453 448fl 453 Last spot N/A Est. sales 216616. Fri’s Sales: 155,263 Fri’s open int: 1319514, off -2944 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 14 415 422ø 415 417ø Jul 14 378fl 380 374 378ø Sep 14 343 345 342 345 Dec 14 330 335fl 330 335fl Mar 15 329 330fl 329 330fl May 15 329ø 335fl 329ø 335fl Jul 15 329ø 335fl 329ø 335fl Sep 15 329ø 335fl 329ø 335fl Dec 15 329ø 335fl 329ø 335fl Mar 16 329ø 335fl 329ø 335fl Jul 16 330ø 336fl 330ø 336fl Sep 16 330ø 336fl 330ø 336fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 1038. Fri’s Sales: 483 Fri’s open int: 9388, off -57 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel May 14 1404ø 1432fl 1393ü 1425ø Jul 14 1378ø 1403fl 1368 1398fl Aug 14 1321 1342fl 1315 1338ü Sep 14 1224ü 1243ü 1224ü 1241ü Nov 14 1174 1186 1168 1184 Jan 15 1176 1189ü 1175ø 1188 Mar 15 1179ø 1192ø 1179ø 1191 May 15 1180ü 1195ü 1180ü 1194 Jul 15 1193ü 1199 1190ø 1198 Aug 15 1171ø 1177ø 1171ø 1177ø Sep 15 1137ü 1144 1137ü 1144 Nov 15 1125 1135 1125 1134ø Jan 16 1127ü 1134ü 1127ü 1134ü Mar 16 1122ü 1129ü 1122ü 1129ü May 16 1124ü 1131ü 1124ü 1131ü Jul 16 1120fl 1127fl 1120fl 1127fl Aug 16 1118fl 1125fl 1118fl 1125fl Sep 16 1094fl 1101fl 1094fl 1101fl Nov 16 1085 1088ü 1085 1088ü Jul 17 1092 1098fl 1092 1098fl Nov 17 1069 1075fl 1069 1075fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 153158. Fri’s Sales: 151,039 Fri’s open int: 627537, off -8922

FUTURES

+14ü +13fl +13ü +12 +5fl

+2ø +5 +8ø +8ü +6ü +6ü +6ü +6ü +6ü +6ü +6ü +6ü

+16fl +16ø +12fl +9ø +6fl +6fl +6 +5ø +6 +6 +6fl +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +6fl +6fl +6fl

Kentucky 64, Syracuse 59 LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) — Bria Goss scored 17 points and third-seeded Kentucky held off No. 6 seed Syracuse. Goss went 11 of 12 from the foul line as the Wildcats (26-8) ground out a victory two days after beating Wright State by 46 points. Syracuse’s physical play and its 2-3 zone defense had a lot to do with disrupting Kentucky’s rhythm and scoring opportunities in a 36-percent shooting performance. The Wildcats offset those struggles with scrappy defense that forced the Orange into 23 turnovers and held them to 33 percent shooting, culminating with a victory that earned Kentucky a berth in the round of 16 of the Notre Dame Regional. Syracuse couldn’t follow up its first-ever NCAA tournament win,

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

+11 +10fl +9ø +7fl +7ø +7ø +8 +6ü +5ü +6 +5fl +4ü +4ø +4ü +4ü +4ü

sixth consecutive NCAA Sweet 16, taking over in the second half for a victory over California. Sims punctuated a game-clinching 13-2 run with a long 3-pointer with 4 1/2 minutes left. Baylor coach Kim Mulkey could only smile even though she appeared to be calling for a different play from the sideline. Sims scored 11 points in that spurt of about 5 minutes that pushed Baylor (31-4) ahead 66-52. Afure Jemerigbe had 17 points and Brittany Boyd 15 for Cal (22-10), a Final Four team last season.

low

settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. May 14 99.49 100.29 99.05 99.60 Jun 14 98.70 99.50 98.29 98.83 Jul 14 97.57 98.54 97.42 97.93 Aug 14 96.70 97.58 96.53 97.01 Sep 14 95.90 96.62 95.70 96.09 Oct 14 94.88 95.65 94.82 95.18 Nov 14 94.04 94.78 94.04 94.34 Dec 14 93.31 94.02 93.21 93.55 Jan 15 92.96 92.97 92.45 92.69 Feb 15 92.24 92.24 91.72 91.87 Mar 15 91.50 91.57 90.97 91.14 Apr 15 90.28 90.87 90.28 90.49 May 15 89.94 Jun 15 89.33 89.75 89.23 89.42 Jul 15 88.80 Aug 15 88.22 Sep 15 87.73 Oct 15 87.27 Nov 15 86.88 Dec 15 86.60 86.94 86.29 86.54 Jan 16 86.06 Feb 16 85.61 Mar 16 85.19 Apr 16 85.00 85.00 84.81 84.81 May 16 84.51 Last spot N/A Est. sales 279341. Fri’s Sales: 392,862 Fri’s open int: 1602386, off -5348 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Apr 14 2.9079 2.9372 2.8830 2.8909 May 14 2.8992 2.9285 2.8781 2.8857 Jun 14 2.8690 2.9001 2.8556 2.8629 Jul 14 2.8379 2.8673 2.8276 2.8347 Aug 14 2.8094 2.8300 2.8018 2.8030 Sep 14 2.7650 2.7903 2.7596 2.7654 Oct 14 2.6320 2.6372 2.6167 2.6211 Nov 14 2.5920 2.5970 2.5779 2.5836 Dec 14 2.5653 2.5714 2.5510 2.5567 Jan 15 2.5541 2.5541 2.5430 2.5430 Feb 15 2.5475 2.5475 2.5422 2.5422

chg.

+.14 +.18 +.18 +.18 +.18 +.18 +.18 +.17 +.16 +.14 +.13 +.13 +.14 +.13 +.13 +.11 +.09 +.07 +.07 +.07 +.06 +.06 +.05 +.04 +.04

-.0170 -.0139 -.0100 -.0066 -.0034 -.0012 +.0031 +.0046 +.0033 +.0019 +.0014

struggling to score after losing star guard Brittney Sykes to a right knee injury on Saturday. Brianna Butler had 15 points for the Orange.

Oklahoma State 73, Purdue 66 Brittney Martin had 20 points and 20 rebounds to lead Oklahoma State past Purdue and into the Sweet 16. The Cowgirls (25-8) won their second straight, ending a 15-game stretch in which they had alternated wins and losses. And it came on a night the fifthseeded Cowgirls lost star point guard Tiffany Bias for nearly 10 minutes in the second half with what appeared to be a left leg or foot injury. Fourth-seed Purdue (22-9) was led by Whitney Bays with 21 points and 13 rebounds. After Bias left, Purdue closed to 52-46, but the Cowgirls regained control with a 9-4 run and never let Purdue get close.

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Mon. Aluminum -$0.7606 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$2.9661 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$2.9895 N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Lead - $2061.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8856 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1310.75 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1311.20 troy oz., NY Merc spot Mon. Silver - $20.070 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $20.043 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Platinum -$1433.00 troy oz., Handy & Harman. Platinum -$1431.20 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

LOUISVILLE REGIONAL Tennessee 67, St. John’s 51 KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Cierra Burdick had 21 points and 11 rebounds as Tennessee relied on its smothering defense to pull away from St. John’s for a victory in the second round of the NCAA tournament. Although St. John’s (23-11) never led, the eighth-seeded Red Storm tied the game 39-39 with 16:59 remaining. St. John’s would score just two more points over the next nine minutes as its hopes for an upset disintegrated. The Red Storm shot 5 of 24 and committed 13 turnovers in the second half. Meighan Simmons scored 17 points as Tennessee (29-5) won for the 15th time in its last 16 games. Isabelle Harrison had 10 points and 11 rebounds. Aliyyah Handford scored 23 for St. John’s.

STANFORD REGIONAL Stanford 63, Florida State 44 AMES, Iowa (AP) — Chiney Ogwumike had 19 points and nine rebounds, and Stanford broke open the game with a 30-2 run spanning the halves in a victory over Florida State in the second round of the NCAA women’s tournament. The second-seeded Cardinal (31-3) won two games in Ames to advance to the regional they’ll host at Maples Pavilion starting Saturday. They’re in

Mar 15 2.5502 Apr 15 2.7132 May 15 2.7067 Jun 15 2.6882 Jul 15 2.6657 Aug 15 2.6402 Sep 15 2.6092 Oct 15 2.4702 Nov 15 2.4347 Dec 15 2.4107 Jan 16 2.4107 Feb 16 2.4127 Mar 16 2.4227 Apr 16 2.5477 May 16 2.5477 Last spot N/A Est. sales 130560. Fri’s Sales: 112,177 Fri’s open int: 288884, off -279 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Apr 14 4.312 4.350 4.262 4.276 May 14 4.297 4.341 4.256 4.272 Jun 14 4.329 4.370 4.290 4.305 Jul 14 4.368 4.404 4.324 4.343 Aug 14 4.370 4.399 4.324 4.341 Sep 14 4.364 4.381 4.307 4.320 Oct 14 4.366 4.393 4.315 4.333 Nov 14 4.429 4.440 4.367 4.382 Dec 14 4.549 4.549 4.492 4.500 Jan 15 4.630 4.630 4.193 4.582 Feb 15 4.570 4.570 4.193 4.543 Mar 15 4.477 4.477 4.193 4.447 Apr 15 4.025 4.193 4.025 4.044 May 15 4.032 4.193 4.004 4.020 Jun 15 4.041 4.193 4.030 4.041 Jul 15 4.052 4.193 4.051 4.072 Aug 15 4.072 4.193 4.068 4.068 Sep 15 4.041 4.193 4.037 4.037 Oct 15 4.054 4.193 4.054 4.056 Nov 15 4.075 4.193 4.073 4.096 Dec 15 4.269 4.269 4.193 4.257 Jan 16 4.402 4.402 4.389 4.389 Feb 16 4.374 4.374 4.364 4.364 Mar 16 4.320 4.320 4.304 4.304 Apr 16 4.063 4.063 4.034 4.034 May 16 4.040 Jun 16 4.058 Last spot N/A Est. sales 201699. Fri’s Sales: 196,828 Fri’s open int: 1158725, off -1383

METALS

the Sweet 16 for the seventh year in a row. The 10th-seeded Seminoles (21-12) struggled to score in both of their two tournament games, following a 55-44 win over Iowa State with another dud. Lili Thompson added 14 points and Bonnie Samuelson had 11 with three 3-pointers. The Cardinal had 17 assists on 22 field goals.

+.0014 +.0014 +.0014 +.0014 +.0014 +.0014 +.0014 +.0014 +.0014 +.0014 +.0014 +.0014 +.0014 +.0014 +.0014

-.037 -.025 -.024 -.024 -.025 -.023 -.022 -.022 -.024 -.024 -.023 -.025 -.015 -.014 -.013 -.012 -.011 -.011 -.010 -.010 -.010 -.010 -.010 -.010 -.010 -.010 -.010

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

MARKET SUMMARY AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 1148002 17.37 -.19 S&P500ETF1112740185.43-.77 iShJapan 740551 10.92 +.04 iShR2K 629896117.26 -1.35 SPDR Fncl 545824 22.39 -.01

Name Vol (00) Intellichk 219591 IsoRay 150866 InovioPhm 93172 AlldNevG 69093 NovaGld g 68734

Name DirGMBear NuSkin DirDGdBr s DB AgriSh MillerEnR

Last Chg 24.75 +4.27 88.66+13.66 23.91 +2.82 29.82 +3.42 5.78 +.58

%Chg +20.8 +18.2 +13.4 +13.0 +11.2

Name Last Versar 4.09 AvalonHld 5.80 PacGE pfI 23.04 NewConcEn 2.12 CKX Lands 16.20

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg +.49 +13.6 Microvisn 2.39 +.37 +18.1 +.39 +7.2 IntrCloud n 8.25 +.90 +12.2 +1.54 +7.2 PeapkGl 22.05 +1.95 +9.7 +.13 +6.3 GuanwRcy 3.61 +.30 +9.1 +.92 +6.0 VertexEn 6.00 +.46 +8.3

Name DirGMnBull DxGldBll rs Coupons n ChinaDEd Lannett

Last 21.88 38.45 23.01 17.13 36.41

%Chg -20.6 -13.6 -12.1 -11.6 -10.6

Name 22ndCentry Servotr TherapMD UQM Tech AskanoG g

Chg -.84 -1.16 -.74 -.27 -.21

1,160 1,955 89 3,204 65 19

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg -5.68 -6.03 -3.16 -2.25 -4.33

DIARY

Volume

Name AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola Disney EOG Res EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

Chg +.50 -.05 -.18 -.38 -.21

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

3,331,700,668 Volume

52-Week High Low 16,588.25 14,382.09 7,627.44 5,878.12 537.86 462.66 11,334.65 8,814.76 2,585.34 2,186.97 4,371.71 3,154.96 1,883.97 1,536.03 20,226.72 16,177.06 1,212.82 898.40

Last 1.63 2.37 3.51 5.11 3.81

Last 2.69 7.56 6.59 2.48 2.05

DIARY

%Chg -23.8 -13.3 -10.1 -9.8 -9.3

157 257 16 430 9 1

Name Vol (00) Last SiriusXM 1356218 3.26 Facebook 849588 64.10 PwShs QQQ71996788.22 Microsoft 447853 40.50 Intel 363897 25.12

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg Aastrom rs 5.08 -1.41 -21.7 IderaPhm 4.79 -1.29 -21.2 ArrowRsh 17.37 -3.33 -16.1 AgiosPh n 37.47 -6.99 -15.7 Dataram 3.30 -.59 -15.2

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 16,276.69 7,510.38 522.78 10,362.06 2,498.95 4,226.39 1,857.44 19,878.32 1,178.23

PE

Last

Chg

1.84f .90 .04 2.92f 4.00 1.22f .86f 1.00f 3.68f 2.52 .50f .64f 1.20a .90 3.80 2.64

10 14 17 21 10 20 22 24 ... 10 9 12 13 13 12 20

34.46 +.16 74.34 -1.37 17.37 -.19 123.42 +.84 115.85 +.22 38.40 -.04 79.49 -.86 189.60 -2.04 53.78 -.32 94.64 +.33 15.39 -.08 31.63 -.32 48.19 -.86 25.12 -.05 188.25 +1.58 95.20 -.73

YTD %Chg Name -2.0 +8.4 +11.6 -9.6 -7.3 -7.0 +4.0 +13.0 -6.1 -6.5 -.3 +13.0 -3.0 -3.2 +.4 +3.9

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

669 1,956 114 2,739 46 36

2,393,119,853

Net % Chg Chg -26.08 -.16 -4.80 -.06 +1.12 +.21 -30.16 -.29 -7.75 -.31 -50.40 -1.18 -9.08 -.49 -128.75 -.64 -15.50 -1.30

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Div

DIARY

219,097,72853 Volume

INDEXES

Chg -.09 -3.14 -.78 +.34 -.05

YTD % Chg -1.81 +1.48 +6.57 -.37 +3.00 +1.19 +.49 +.87 +1.25

52-wk % Chg +12.66 +22.43 +5.26 +14.84 +3.97 +30.63 +19.70 +21.10 +24.57

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

1.76 1.12 2.92f .74 2.27 1.04f 1.56 .16 1.20 1.27f .65e 2.12 1.92f .40 1.20 1.20f

37 15 22 20 19 16 13 21 26 17 ... 12 16 16 13 16

53.78 -.88 40.50 +.34 52.39 -.46 26.70 -.09 81.89 -.25 31.49 -.69 77.42 -.53 23.37 +.19 46.57 -.58 65.33 -1.01 19.89 +.01 47.01 +.10 76.76 +.66 23.75 -.28 48.98 -.14 29.73 +.04

+7.5 +8.3 -.5 +10.7 -1.3 +2.8 +.4 +24.0 +6.1 -6.3 -.5 -4.3 -2.5 +2.0 +7.9 +6.4

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


Roswell Daily Record

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: My daughter is being married soon, and I need some guidance about inviting my aunt and uncle to the wedding. They live about 30 miles from us. We moved to this area four years ago, and we’ve had them over for dinner once and invited them another time. They declined because they were going to be out of town. Abby, they didn’t reciprocate, and in fact, didn’t even invite us to their daughter’s wedding, which hurt us very much. I had always considered myself close to these relatives before we moved here, so their treatment of my family and me

has been painful. My mother is telling me to turn the other cheek despite everything and invite them to my daughter’s wedding. My daughter doesn’t want them to attend and neither does my husband, but Mom is emphatic about inviting them “because they’re family.” I would appreciate your opinion on this, Abby, because I’m between a rock and a hard place, and my emotions are pulling me apart. BETWIXT AND BETWEEN DEAR BETWIXT: The bride’s wishes should prevail. Her happiness on her wedding day is more important than the feelings of relatives who don’t bother with you, her and your family. I have always said that one should never invite guests to a wedding hoping they won’t show up, because they usually do. ##### DEAR ABBY: I have an older friend who is 70. She doesn’t have much money. She was having blood pressure problems, so I ordered a deluxe blood

COMICS

pressure machine for her that cost $160. It wasn’t a birthday gift; I was seriously concerned for her. I learned this week that she “loaned” it to a friend. I wrote her a note and asked her nicely to please get it back because I didn’t buy it for her friend (who has plenty of money), but because I was worried about her health. She is now not speaking to me, and MY blood pressure is going up by the minute because I’m so angry. Was I out of line or is she? HYPER-FURIOUS IN ARIZONA

DEAR HYPER-FURIOUS: Relax. Breathe. What you did was a beautiful and generous gesture, but the blood pressure machine was a GIFT. Once a gift is given, it belongs to the recipient to do with as she (or he) wishes. For you to tell her to ask for it back may have been well-intentioned, but it was the wrong thing to do. ##### DEAR ABBY: I’m an average 17-year-old guy. I love basketball, football and girls. The problem is I’m a player, and

girls say I “use” them. I’m not ready to settle down, and I end up hurting girls and breaking many hearts. How can I cure my player habits and heal some of the hearts I’ve broken? TIRED OF PLAYING

Family Circus

DEAR TIRED OF PLAYING: Apologize to any young woman you have misled. Then ask yourself, “How would I feel if I had been treated this way?” If you practice the Golden Rule — “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” — it will serve you well in most situations. If everyone did this, we could change the name of our planet from Earth to Paradise, and wouldn’t that be heavenly? #####

CONFIDENTIAL TO “STUCK IN DULLSVILLE”: Because you’re convinced your job is a dead end, start sending out resumes. Jack London had this to say about stagnating lives: “I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong time. I shall use my time. ... The proper function of man is to live, not to exist.”

The Wizard of Id

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Dear Readers: If you are buying a new car, be sure to look in the trunk or ask the salesperson, “Does this car come with a SPARE TIRE?” Many cars today are sold without a spare tire (or doughnut), used in case of a flat tire. Instead, there is a mobility kit that has a sealant and compressor for a temporary tire fix. Why do away with the spare tire? Well, automobile manufacturers need to meet government fueleconomy standards, and eliminating the extra weight of the spare tire seems to be the solution at this point. Many newer vehicles (hybrids) have less trunk space, so there is no room for a spare tire. Think about the last time you had to change a flat tire — many things probably have changed since you did this job. If a spare tire is important to you, make sure to ask about it before driving off the lot in a new car. Heloise

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

#####

Dear Heloise: Every time I use my phone, my makeup gets all over it. Can you suggest a way to clean the makeup off without damaging the phone? Shirley in Florida Take a soft cloth, like microfiber (my favorite), and gently wipe the screen and buttons. Wipe up and down, then right to left. If you want to get it cleaned a little better, add a drop of distilled or tap water to the microfiber cloth — again, gently wiping. By cleaning your phone regularly, you can prevent that pesky buildup. Heloise #####

Dear Heloise: While getting my flower cones (for the cemetery) ready, I realized I didn’t have the foam to put inside the cones. I didn’t want to travel 20 minutes to get them, as we live in a small town. So, I went to the dollar store and got the foam noodles kids play with in swimming pools. I got the ones with small holes in the top. I cut them the length of the cones, hot-glued moss on top and stuck in the flowers. Worked like a charm, and a lot cheaper than other foam inserts. Nancy B. in Pennsylvania Dear Heloise: I watch my grandson on a farm. I have some bells left over from a few weddings. When my grandson goes out to play, I clip these bells on the belt loop of his jeans. If I get busy pulling weeds, I still can hear where he is by listening for the bells. He now stands at the door waiting for his bells before we go out. A Reader, via email Dear Heloise: I’ve discovered that flameless pillar candles make wonderful night lights. One pillar candle provides a soft light that is ample when it’s necessary to move around the house at night. Added plus: It’s portable. Laverne S., via email I love these! I have one in my suitcase, and it’s perfect for dark hotel rooms. Heloise

Garfield

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

B5


B6 Tuesday, March 25, 2014

CLASSIFIEDS

Legals

Legals

Notice of Proceeding... Publish March 25, 2014

BEFORE THE NEW MEXICO PUBLIC REGULATION COMMISSION

IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF TEMPO TELECOM, LLC, FOR DESIGNATION AS AN ELIGIBLE TELECOMMUNICATIONS CARRIER IN THE STATE OF NEW MEXICO

) ) ) ) ) )

Case No. 14-00003-UT

NOTICE OF PROCEEDING

NOTICE is hereby given of the following matters pertaining to the above-captioned case pending before the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission (“Commission” or “NMPRC”): On January 8, 2014, Tempo Telecom, LLC (“Tempo”) filed with the Commission a Petition for Designation as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier for Lifeline Services (“Petition”). The Petition was filed pursuant to Section 214(e)(2) of the federal Communications Act of 1934 as amended by the Telecommunications Act of 1996 (“Act”), 47 C.F.R. §§ 54.101-54.422 and Rule 17.11.10.24 of the New Mexico Administrative Code (“NMAC”). The Petition requests that the Commission approve the designation of Tempo as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier (“ETC”) for the limited purpose of providing Lifeline services to qualifying households, in both Tribal and non-Tribal areas of New Mexico. The Petition states that Tempo is seeking ETC designation throughout the Sprint Corporation (“Sprint”) coverage area in New Mexico, identified by maps and a list of exchanges attached to the Petition. The Petition states that Tempo is seeking ETC designation in all areas of New Mexico served by Sprint, including recognized Tribal Lands, but excluding the Mescalero Apache Reservation area. The Petition specifies that Tempo will not seek access to additional funds from either the federal Universal Service Fund (“USF”) or from the New Mexico USF (“NMRUSF”) for the purpose of either participating in the Link-Up program or providing services to high-cost areas. In short, Tempo is seeking approval of its request for ETC designation in its proposed ETC service area for the provision of discounted Lifeline service to qualified low-income customers in New Mexico. According to the Petition, for purposes of providing its prepaid wireless Lifeline and non-Lifeline services, Tempo will resell the wireless services of Sprint, which provides wholesale capacity to many wireless resellers, including other prepaid wireless providers that have been approved for ETC designation by the Commission. The Petition states that Sprint will provide Tempo with wireless network infrastructure and wireless transmission facilities necessary for Tempo to offer service as a Mobile Virtual Network Operator (“MVNO”), akin to other ETC-designated MVNOs in New Mexico. On January 22, 2014, the Commission issued an Order which, among other things, initiated this case to consider Tempo's Petition and designated the undersigned to preside over this proceeding. Further information regarding this case can be obtained by contacting the Commission at the address and telephone number provided below. The Commission has assigned Case No. 14-00003-UT to this proceeding and all inquires or written comments concerning this matter should refer to that docket number. By Order issued in this case on March 14, 2014, the Hearing Examiner has established the following procedural schedule and requirements for this case: A. Any person desiring to intervene to become a party (“intervenor”) to this case must file a motion for leave to intervene in conformity with NMPRC Rules of Procedure 1.2.2.23(A) and 1.2.2.23(B) NMAC on or before April 28, 2014. B. On or before April 16, 2014, 2014, Tempo shall file direct testimony in support of the Petition. C. Any intervenor testimony shall be filed on or before May 19, 2014. D. Telecommunications Bureau Staff (“Staff”) of the Commission's Utility Division shall file direct testimony on or before June 6, 2014. E. Any rebuttal testimony shall be filed on or before June 30, 2014. F. A public hearing in this case shall be held on July 16, 2014 commencing at 9:30 a.m. MDT, and continue as necessary on July 17, 2014 at the Commission's offices in the P.E.R.A. Building, 1120 Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501, for the purpose of hearing and receiving testimony, exhibits, arguments and any other appropriate matters relevant to this proceeding The procedural dates and requirements of this case are subject to further order of the Commission or Hearing Examiner. The Commission's Rules of Procedure, 1.2.2 NMAC (12/14/1998, as amended 9/01/2008), shall apply to this case except as modified by order of the Commission or Hearing Examiner. A copy of the Rules of Procedure may be obtained at official NMAC website, http://www.nmcpr.state.nm.us/nmac/, or from the offices of the Commission at the address set out below. Any interested person may appear at the time and place of hearing and make written or oral comment pursuant to 1.2.2.23(F) NMAC without becoming an intervenor. All such comments shall not be considered as evidence in this case. Written comments, which shall reference NMPRC Case No. 14-00003-UT, also may be sent to the Commission at the following address: New Mexico Public Regulation Commission P.E.R.A. Building 1120 Paseo de Peralta P.O. Box 1269 Santa Fe, NM 87504-1269 Telephone: 1-888-427-5772 Any interested person may examine the Petition and all other pleadings, testimony, exhibits and other documents filed in the public record for this case at the Commission's address set out above. Other procedural details and requirements governing the conduct of this proceeding are set out and can be found in the Procedural Order issued by the Hearing Examiner in this case on March 14, 2014. Interested persons should contact the Commission for confirmation of the hearing date, time, and place since hearings are occasionally rescheduled. ANY PERSON WITH A DISABILITY REQUIRING SPECIAL ASSISTANCE IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING SHOULD CONTACT THE COMMISSION AT LEAST 24 HOURS PRIOR TO THE COMMENCEMENT OF THE HEARING. ISSUED at Santa Fe, New Mexico this 14th day of March 2014. NEW MEXICO PUBLIC REGULATION COMMISSION ___________________________________ Anthony F. Medeiros Hearing Examiner

Roswell Daily Record

Legals

Request for Proposals... Publish March 16, 18, 23, 25, 2014

LEGAL NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS: Competitive sealed proposals for Workforce Investment Act Adult & Dislocated Worker programs are being solicited by the Southwestern Area Workforce Development Board. The selected offeror will be responsible for the provision of Workforce Investment Act services in a seven-county area of Southwest New Mexico. A copy of the Request for Proposals and instructions for submittal may be obtained beginning March 17, 2014 from the procurement manager by calling (575) 740-5381 or by sending an email request to rfp@employnm.com. A PRE-PROPOSAL CONFERENCE is scheduled at 2:00 pm (MDT) on March 27, 2014 at the Mesilla Town Hall located at 2231 Avenida de Mesilla in Mesilla, NM 88046. Extended Submittal Deadline: Sealed proposals will be received no later than 2:00 pm (MDT) on April 29, 2014 at the office of the Procurement Manager, Southwestern Area Workforce Development Board, 600 Hwy 195 Suite C, Elephant Butte, New Mexico 87935 or at P.O. Box 1072, Elephant Butte, NM 87935.

Notice to Vacate...

Publish March 11, 18, 25, April 1, 2014 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

No. D-504-CV-2013-00212

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOAN SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, vs.

Plaintiff,

IGNACIO NAVARRETTE and CELMIRA NAVARRETTE, jointly and severally, Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE is hereby given that on April 16, 2014, at 11:30 a.m., the undersigned Special Master or his agent will sell to the highest bidder at the Chaves County Courthouse all Defendants' interest in the real property located at 2310 Cornell Drive, Roswell, New Mexico 88203 in Chaves County, and more particularly described as: LOT NINE (9) EXCEPT THE SOUTH 1 FOOT THEREOF IN BLOCK SEVEN (7) OF MESA PARK ADDITION NO. 1, AN ADDITION, IN THE CITY OF ROSWELL, COUNTY OF CHAVES AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT FILED IN THE CHAVES COUNTY CLERK'S OFFICE ON JUNE 10, 1959 AND RECORDED IN BOOK C OF PLAT RECORDS, CHAVES COUNTY, NEW MEXICO, AT PAGE 99.

The sale will satisfy all or a portion of an In Rem Judgment entered on October 31, 2013, in the amount of $178,567.35, with interest accruing at 5.500% per year from September 19, 2013, forward.

The Judgment may be obtained from either the court clerk or the undersigned Special Master prior to the sale date. Plaintiff, its investor, assignee, or successor-in-interest has the right to bid at the sale and to apply its judgment or a portion thereof to the purchase price in lieu of cash. For all other bidders, the sale terms are cash or its equivalent by the close of business on the day of sale. The sale may be postponed and rescheduled at the Special Master's discretion. PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS AT SALE ARE ADVISED TO MAKE THEIR OWN EXAMINATION OF THE TITLE AND THE CONDITION OF THE PROPERTY AND TO CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEY BEFORE BIDDING. /s/ Edward S. Little Edward S. Little, Special Master 1509 37th Street SE Rio Rancho, NM 87124 505/328-6269

Notice of Suit... Publish March 11, 18, 25, 2014

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT No. D-504-CV-2014-11

SUNPORT FINANCIAL, LLC, v.

Plaintiff,

REFUGIO DIAZ,

Defendant.

NOTICE OF SUIT

STATE OF NEW MEXICO to the above-named Defendant: GREETINGS:

You are hereby notified that the above-named Plaintiff has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled Court and cause, the general object thereof being a Complaint On A Contract And For Debt And Money Due. That unless you enter your appearance in said cause on or before thirty (30) days after the last date of publication, judgment by default will be entered against you. Name and address of Plaintiff's attorney: LAWRENCE P. ZAMZOK Attorney for Plaintiff 6001 Whiteman Drive NW Albuquerque, NM 87120 (505) 898-6311

WITNESS the Hon. Steven L. Bell, District Judge of the Fifth Judicial District Court of the State of New Mexico, and the Seal of the District Court of Chaves County, this March 3, 2014.

(COURT SEAL)

Kennon Crowhurst Clerk of the District Court Chaves County By:/s/Catalina D. Ybarra Deputy

GARAGE SALES

006. Southwest

ESTATE SALE April 5th 8-5 1506 S. Einsehower Rd. tools, antiques, household items, much much more. Everything must go!

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice

RETIRED MAGISTRATE Judge Gene De Los Santos (known as the compassionate judge) teaches Sunday nights and Wednesday nights at Edgewood Community Church, 337 E. 6th St. here in Roswell, NM. (one block west of north Garden St.) time is 6:00pm. “Come and be blessed” 622-6786 I, WILLIE L. White, will not be responsible for any present & future debts that are not mine.

025. Lost and Found

FOUND VICINITY of 1400 block of W. 7th, black & tan mixed puppy. Please call to describe, 575-623-7701. FOUND GREAT Dane in area of E. McGaffey. Call with description, 626-7790. LOST LARGE black cat, male, neutered, historic area on 3/18. “CHICO” REWARD. 575-625-1824

INSTRUCTION

030. Education & Instructions MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant!NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC Train gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-888-926-6073

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

045. Employment Opportunities

Safe and Stable Families Supervisor

Turquoise Health and Wellness, Inc. is seeking to fill a full-time position as a Safe and Stable Families Supervisor. If you are an energetic person and want a rewarding career in the mental health field, come be a part of our team. This is an in-home service program working with families to improve parenting, life skills, and access to community resources. Master's degree in Social Work, Human Services, Education or related field is required. Must have 7 years experience working with families and 2 of those years must be in a supervisor role. An EOE. Bilingual (English/Spanish) a plus. Pleas send resume to: Turquoise Health and Wellness Attention: Samantha Reed 110 E. Mescalor Rd Roswell, NM 88201 Or sreed@thwnm.org LEARN TO drive in 5 short weeks. Artesia Training Academy has new classes forming. CDL Class A with endorsements. VA approved. 20 years of service to South East New Mexico. Call for more information 575-748-9766 or 1-888-586-0144 visit us at www.artesiatraining.com or visit us on Facebook. Tobosa Developmental Services is currently seeking Direct Care Support Staff for the Residential Department. Experience with developmentally disabled preferred but not required. Please submit current resume with completed application, police background check, copy of High School Diploma and driving record at 110 E. Summit, Roswell, NM 88203 or call (575)624-1025. Salary is negotiable based on experience and education level. Applications open until positions are filled. EOE

Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR OPTOMETRIC OFFICE seeking receptionist for a 1/2 day/afternoon position. Duties include: answering phone, making appointments, checking in/out patients and general clerical duties. PO Box 1897, Unit #366 Roswell, NM 88202

Dean Baldwin Painting, LP aircraft strip and paint services, is presently looking to fill the following long term, full-time positions: PAINTERS – Exp in stripping and painting aircraft or vehicles. PAINTER HELPERS – Exp preferred but not required. On the job training available!


Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

LOOKING FOR a direct support staff, and RN nurse in Ruidoso & Alamogordo area. Please call 575-541-0623 for more information

MJG CORPORATION is currently accepting applications for HVAC Techs. We offer: Top Salary and Benefits. Send resume or employment history to 204 W. 4th St. Roswell, New Mexico 88201: Call 575-622-8711 or fax to 575-623-3075 email to: mjgcorp@cs.com

KYMERA Independent Physicians Roswell, NM

MJG CORPORATION is accepting applications for an energetic part-time secretary. Must have at least 1 year experience and have knowledge of windows operating systems. Please pick up application at MJG Corporation, 204 W. 4th St. Roswell, NM 88201 or fax work history to 575-623-3075 Attn: Gary. MANAGERS/SERVICE ADVISOR A progressive and expanding automotive repair and tire shop is seeking a MATURE Manager/Service Writer. Experience with domestic and foreign autos is preferred. Requires organized, motivated and enthusiastic professional with the ability to communicate with customer and technicians. Excellent Pay Plan with Benefits. Quarterly or semi-annual bonus plan. Compensation will be based on experience and ability. A $3,000 signing bonus is available. Fax resume to 575-625-1900 or call 575-626-1900 PRESTIGE EQUIPMENT RENTALS needs an Entry level office clerk. Full time. Good benefits. Salary depending on experience. Send resume or call for appointment. prestigerentals08@ yahoo.com 575-746-6944. 7183 Roswell Hwy in Artesia.

MEDICAL OFFICE POSITIONS:

As a growing Independent Physicians’ Office, Kymera is seeking Qualified Applicants for: Medical Office Clerk: FT – Reception/Scheduling/Medical Records. Applicants should demonstrate a caring, friendly/ outgoing attitude with customer service & organizational skills. Medical Office experience preferred.

Certified Medical Assistant/ EMT-I / Phlebotomist: FT 1-2 yrs exp working in a med office. Applicants must possess the ability to work with multiple patients in a high-volume office setting; background in chart preparation, EMR knowledge, familiarity with completing injections and drawing lab-work essential. Cert required.

Billing/Coding Specialist: FT – Exp in insurance billing and coding, patient/insurance collections and computer skills required. Knowledge of EMR systems. Quals: Minimum of 2 yrs. medical billing; knowledge of CPT; ICD-9; HCPCS; superb communication and people skills. Please Fax resume with cover letter to: HR Mngr 627-9520

045. Employment Opportunities

WE ARE NOW HIRING! Explore the career possibilities at PepsiCo, the world’s second largest food and beverage company. Our main business Quaker, Tropicana, Gatorade, Frito-Lay and Pepsi-Cola - make hundreds of enjoyable foods and beverage that are loved throughout the world. We’re offering competitive compensation, excellent benefits, and a team oriented environment. Our location in Roswell, NM has immediate Full Time openings and is actively recruiting for the following positions: •Fleet Mechanic

Apply online at: www.pepsijobs.com PepsiCo is an equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V Allstate Security Services is currently seeking motivated and dependable individuals for full time and part time positions. Must be 18 years or older, have reliable transportation, valid drivers license, provide RPD background check, high school diploma or equivalent and be able to pass a drug screen. Please call 575-347-8990 to pick up an application at 1122 S. Union Ave. Drop off your resume in the mail slot any time. You may also e-mail resumes to sales@ allstatesecurityservices.us

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

OPENINGS AVAILABLE NOW Bookkeeper Looking for a hard working individual for bookkeeper position in a fast paced office. Bookkeeping and computer experience is required. Applicants must be able to multi-task, work in all facets of bookkeeping and work with accuracy. Benefits available. Send resume to P.O. Box 1210, Roswell, NM 88202. PEPPERS GRILL & BAR is accepting applications for potential openings. Applications available between 2:00-4:00 pm, 500 N. Main SAFE AND STABLE FAMILIES

Turquoise Health and Wellness, Inc. is seeking to fill a part-time position as a Safe and Stable Families Practitioner. If you are an energetic person and want a rewarding career in the mental health field, come be a part of our team. This is an in-home service program with families to improve parenting, life skills, and access to community resources. Bachelor's degree in Human Services, Education or related field is required. Must have 3 years experience working with families. An EOE. Bilingual (English/Spanish) a plus. Pleas send resume to: Turquoise Health and Wellness Attention: Samantha Reed 110 E. Mescalero Rd Roswell, NM 88201 or sreed@thwnm.org HIRING FOR sales and office clerk up to full time. 2308 S. Main Roswell. Apply in person DRIVER NEEDED Class A or B CDL with clear driving record, local route, competitive pay, 401K, insurance and paid time off. Call 800-658-2673 or 806-293-4431

045. Employment Opportunities

NEED CASH? Be your own boss & build your business at Blairs Monterey indoor market at 1400 W. 2nd. Booths start at $75/mo. Call 623-0136

ALL ABOUT SPAS is accepting applications for a full time Sales Clerk. Great earning potential with opportunity for advancement. Must be able to pass drug screening & background check. Inquire at All About Spas, 3700 N. Main St., Roswell. TANKER DRIVERS Solo/Team: Up to $5,000 Sign-On Bonus! Up to 63cpm plus additional for pump offs, mileage bonuses! 1-year OTR required. Call 888.799.4873 www.oakleytransport.com IMMEDIATE OPENING – EXERCISE RIDER FOR RACE HORSES, experience only, house provided. Must ride flat saddle. Private New Mexico Farm, Tularosa, NM 505-429-4031. HERE'S A JOB THAT IS FULFILLING IN MORE WAYS THAN ONE Are you interested in making a difference in someone's life? We are looking for caring & reliable individuals to help care for our clients. Weather you are providing companionship, help around the house, preparing a meal, or personal care, you work in an intimate one-to-one setting with individuals who are in great need of support.

Comfort Keepers is pursuing experienced caregivers to work in the Roswell, Dexter, Hagerman and Artesia areas. We offer flexible schedules both part time and full time with competitive pay. Stop by our Roswell office at: 1410 South Main to visit with us today or call Kim at 575-624-9999 for more information.

NOW HIRING for part time night audit, experienced required. Please apply at 1201 N. Main st. PARALEGAL NEEDED. Please send resume to PO Box 3220, Roswell, NM 88202. Salary DOE

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575)-622-7710 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







Interim Health Care of Roswell is seeking part time LPN/LVN and part time RN. Please stop by 1210 N. Main, Suite 200, between 8-2, Mon-Fri for application or call 575-625-8885. www.interimhealthcare.com

TWO PT NURSERY WORKERS - Job entails either Wednesday evening or Sunday morning (or both) if needed. Apply at First United Methodist Church - 200 N. Pennsylvania Ave. between 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. Drug and background checks required. 575-622-1881. The Roswell Daily Record is currently accepting applications for a reporter. Must be a good writer and speller. Send resume to: Roswell Daily Record, Attn: C Fischer PO Box 1897, Roswell, NM or emailed to cfischer@rdrnews.com No phone calls, please. FIRST UNITED Methodist Church Roswell has two staff positions available. Half-time children's ministries director and full-time faith development coordinator. Both positions require working with a wide variety of ages. Must be able to work both weekday and weekend hours. Education and experience preferred. Job descriptions available at the FUMC office at 200 N. Pennsylvania Avenue, Roswell, NM. 575-622-1881.

EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM MONDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

DRIVERS (DAY and Night) needed for Artesia – Class A CDL, tanker endorsement, and good driving record required. Apply at 11376 Lovington Hwy, Artesia or call Brad at 575-631-5927. Standard Energy Services. EEO

CAR RENTAL company has opening for Customer Service, Rental/Sales Agent. Applicant should have professional customer service skills and be dependable. Retirees and Seniors welcome to apply. Apply at Avis Rental Counter inside airport, 8am-1pm.

The Holiday Inn Express & Suites is located at 2300 N Main Street. Our hotel is looking for a friendly and professional Guest service Representative to join our busy team. Ideally you will have at least one year of experience in a hotel front desk environment, be able to demonstrate initiative and deliver great service. We are also accepting applications for Housekeeping please apply in person M-F 9am to 3pm. Family Resource & Referral is looking for quality individuals to work the 2014 After School Program. Must be at least 18 years old and enjoy working and playing with school age children. Hours are Monday-Friday, 2:30pm-5:30pm except on Wednesdays 1;30pm-5:30pm. Previous childcare experience is preferred but not required. Please apply at 118 E. 4th St. or call 623-9438. EOE ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER JOBS in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper to place your ad or log onto www.nmpress.org for more information. SIGNET BUILDERS Inc., Ames, IA, seeks 15 temporary farm laborers from 3/25/14 to 5/2/14 near Platteville, CO, for unload materials, lay out lumber, tin sheets, trusses and other components for building livestock confinement structures. Build and erect walls and trusses. Lift tin sheets to roof and sheet walls, install doors and caulk structure. Clean up job sites. Must be able to lift and carry 75lbs/75yrds. Wage is $10.89/hr. Signet Builders Inc. guarantees employment for a total number of work hours equal to at least three-fourths of the workdays from 3/25/14 to 5/2/14. Tools, supplies, and equipment provided by employer at no cost to employee. Housing provided at no cost to all workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the work day. Transportation and subsistence expenses to worksite will be paid by employer. Apply at the nearest office of the state workforce agency; or apply at Ann Armijo, 401 Broadway NE, Albuquerque, NM 87102, (505)383-2721 using job order number CO5745718.

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

045. Employment Opportunities

PRO-X BUILDERS Inc., Sioux Falls, SD, seeks 14 temporary farm laborers from 4/10/14 to 12/1/14 near Elberta, UT, to unload materials, lay out lumber, tin sheets, trusses and other components for building livestock confinement structures. Build and erect walls and trusses. Lift tin sheets to roof and sheet walls, install doors and caulk structure. Clean up job sites. Must be able to lift and carry 75lbs/75yrds. Wage is $10.89/hr. Pro-X Builders Inc. guarantees employment for a total number of work hours equal to at least three-fourths of the workdays from 4/10/14 to 12/1/14. Tools, supplies, and equipment provided by employer at no cost to employee. Housing provided at no cost to all workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the work day. Transportation and subsistence expenses to worksite will be paid by employer. Apply at the nearest office of the state workforce agency; or apply at Ann Armijo, 401 Broadway NE, Albuquerque, NM 87102, (505)383-2721 using job order number UT9476227. CLASS A CDL OTR driver. 38cents/ mile out a week at a time 420-7111 WITH OUR growth, We need HELP Reservations specialist Experienced Housekeeper, Handy Man APPLY READY TO WORK. 2803 w 2nd St. Roswell No calls MAMA TUCKER’S is now hiring for front counter help. Apply at 3109 N Main between the hours of 9:00am and 2:00pm. Mon-Fri. No phone calls. Accountant/Bookkeeper needed for a friendly, growing CPA firm. Duties include general ledger preparation through financial statement presentation. Experience in basic tax return preparation is a plus. Advanced tax return preparation experience is a plus. Experience with QuickBooks, Word and Excel would be helpful, but not required. Flexible hours, pleasant working environment and excellent benefits including medical insurance reimbursement, profit-sharing and pension plan. You will be the fifteenth person in our office family and you will enjoy working with us. Please e-mail your resume or letter of introduction to dsc.classified@gmail.com or mail to DSC, PO Box 2034, Roswell, NM 88202-2034. TIRE TECH & light automotive position available. Must have own tools and 1-2 years experience. Good driving record required. Apply in person at 101 S. Main

P-T CONTRACT work in Chavez or Eddy County for individual with masters degree in counseling or social work. Must be licensed. Flexible hours 10-30per week send resume with references to PO Box 3564 Roswell NM 88202 BUTCH’S RATHOLE & ANCHOR SERVICE Now hiring Class A CDL drivers for Artesia, NM yard. Insurance & 401K. 575-513-1482, Garry. SOLITAIRE HOMES Sales Person Wanted to join our team! No experience necessary, will train. Bilingual a plus. Apply at 4001 W 2nd st Roswell, NM 88201 The Roswell Daily Record Circulation Department is currently accepting applications for the position of:

DISTRICT MANAGER

Basic Job Duties include: Carrier recruitment & supervision, delivery of routes when necessary, proficient phone skills and taking charge of customer issues as well as other office duties & responsibilites. Motivation to work with or without direct supervision, professional communication skills and an ambitious attitude a plus!! Bilingual prefered but not required. Must have valid driver’s license and insurance. Basic or advanced computer skills appreciated. Must be neat in appearance and work with a businesslike attitude. Experience in Circulation desired however training will be provided. All interested applicants can send, drop off or email your complete application & resume with references to: The Roswell Daily Record 2301 N. Main Roswell, NM 88201 - OR E-mail jdishman@rdrnews.com No Phone Call Please! Interviews will be not be held until all applications & resumes have been reviewed. “Don’t call us we’ll call YOU”

EOE. Background Check & Drug Testing will be conducted during the hiring process. Position will remain open until filled.

Dennis the Menace

045. Employment Opportunities

AGAPE HOME Care needs part time dependable caregiver in Hagerman. Apply at 606 W. 2nd. FARMWORKER, 4/27/14-10/1/14, Dennis Schoeling, Alva, OK. 1 temp jobs. Drive trucks/tractors to perform crop raising duties. Field ready equip. Harvest crops. Plant, cultivate crops using tractor drawn machinery. Operate, repair farm implements. 3 mo exp, clean MVR, emplymnt ref, driver's license req’d. $10.86/hr, 3/4 work guarantee, tools/equip/housing provided, trans & subsistence exp reimbursed. Apply at Workforce Solutions, 575-624-6040. Job #OK904962. FARMWORKER, 3/14/14-12/31/14, Wickstrum Harvesting, Westmoreland, KS. 9 temp jobs. Operate harvesting machines to harvest crops in KS/CO. Adjust speed of cutters, blowers, conveyors, & weight of cutting head. Change cutting head for crop. Drive truck to transport produce to storage area. Drive truck to haul harvesting machines b/w work sites. Service machinery/make in-field repairs. $10.89-$13.41/hr, depending on location, 3/4 work guarantee, tools/equip/housing provided, trans & subsistence exp reimbursed. Apply at Workforce Solutions, 575-624-6040. Job #9106294.

B7

230. General Repair

HANDYMAN Tile, drywall, painting, clean up, countertops. Service swam coolers. 317-1566 or 910-5704 HANDYMAN General Repair 317-2137 or 317-2138 35 yrs experience HOME REPAIR & improvements, roofs, drywall, ceiling fans, etc. 575-808-6745 or 575-322-6745

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738 RWC. BACKHOE, skid steer, dump truck, bom lift, services. Insured. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

240. Horseshoeing

HORSESHOES & FUN Come join us for a game of horseshoes every Saturday. 575-317-3698

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Landscaping, mowing, trimming, & trees cut down. sprinklers, etc. 420-0965 Yard work, clean-ups, lawns. Handyman svc. David 637-9580.

SERVICES

075. Air Conditioning

SWAMP COOLER service & repair, free estimates. 624-5370/575-973-1582

Lawn and Landscape Maintenance One time or recurring service available 575-973-1019

080. Alterations

Spring Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242.

105. Childcare

WE WORK Yard & alley cutting, garden rototilling, hauling. Call Will at 317-7402 or 317-2573.

ALTERATIONS & Misc. Sewing - 840-8065. DAYCARE PROVIDER Call 575-291-4635

135. Ceramic Tile

CERAMIC TILE Do you need to tile your floor? Here in Roswell, Ben does it for you. From $295 ONLY per room. It includes everything. I also do small plumbing jobs. 505-990-1628 or 575-910-3467 (cell)

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 SUNSHINE WINDOW Services. Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458

150. Concrete

Running Bear Concrete Foundations, Driveways, Stamping, Sidewalks, Curbing, Stucco. Lic: 373219. Call 317-6058

185. Electrical

ELECTRICAL SERVICES Meter loops, service upgrades, remodels, additions, service calls. Lowest prices in town. Free estm. Lic#360025. 910-4193

200. Fencing

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100 M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

225. General Construction

www.senaconstruction.com 575-973-1019 Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050 SWAMP COOLER TIME HANDYMAN SERVICES specialized in small and large home projects, one call does it all. Estimates 637-0255

WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121. Garcia’s Lawn Service, sprinklers & much more at low price. 914-0803. LIGHTHOUSE LAWN-SERVICE affordable basic lawn care. No job too big or small, we do it all! Free estimates, call 575-921-5671 Emerald Landscaping Lawn & sprinkler installation, sprinkler repair, sod, gravel, lawn maintenance. Maintenance/Free Estimates/accept credit cards. Lic#89265. Call: Aaron, 575-910-0150 or Chris, 420-3945 WILL MOW grass at price you choose, also do odd jobs. 575-347-5648 or 626-0518 Professional Yard care, trees, lawns, bushes. 575-910-4581 or 420-6921

285. Miscellaneous Services

Extreme Inflatables Come try our Bungee Run. Spring Break Special. April 8th-13th. Parking area between Big Lots & Zen Diner, 2513 N. Main. POOL TABLE repairs/recovering. Reasonable rates. 575-650-2591 Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-661-3783, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping. ODD JOBS call Jerry 623-3452

310. Painting/ Decorating

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. Call 637-9108.


B8 Tuesday, March 25, 2014 310. Painting/ Decorating EXTERIOR/INTERIOR, INSURED. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

NEW LIFE CREATIONS & DESIGN •Decorative concrete •Concrete counter top systems • Garage floors •Landscape design 505-720-5922

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Professional Roofing, Landscaping, Irrigation, Stucco, Tile, Painting, Concrete and Fence Work (575) 973-1019 Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552. RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

490. Homes For Sale OWNER CAN finance 2 bd 1 bath. Lots of storage 606 N. Garden and 1210 N. Union 575-622-6786 5br/3ba, north Roswell; $260,000 updated; 2800 sqft; 6 acres, trees, water rights. 575-973-2353 ELIDA, S Main St. 2bd/1ba single family, nice .25acre lot lease or cash Call for details 855-664-8357 409 LA Fonda clean 3br/2ba, 1 car gar., nice house move-in ready $124k no owner financing, Realtors welcome, will pay standard commission. Call 627-7595. FSBO: 2BR/1BA, ref. air, 1005 S. Plains Park, $52,000, no owner finance. 2Bd $85K w/house in bk & 3Bd $65K, fncd yrds, call M-Th 8a-noon, 624-1331 GREAT OPPORTUNITY 3bd/1ba house valued at 90,000 will sell for $60,000 central heating and air, great cond. Call 637-0563 Rent to own 2br, $500/mo, 1st & last mo., 1210 N. Union. 622-6786 or 416-1454 Rent to own 2br, $500/mo, 1st & last mo., 606 N. Garden. 622-6786 or 575-416-1454 Immaculate custom home in Briar Ridge, 3yrs old, 3br/2ba, 81 Bent Tree Rd., $130,900. 831-915-0226

395. Stucco Plastering

RENT TO own, #7 Morningside, completely remodeled, new metal roof & AC/heating, $850/mo, 1st & last month. 622-6786

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991

$82,000, 2br/1ba, beautiful brick home, huge fenced yard, garage, w/d, wood floors, 1706 S. Michigan. Avail. Now. Owner finance. 480-392-8550, $711/mo, $2550 down.

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217

RWC Lath and Stucco. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

400. Tax Service

ANAYA Gross Receipts Consulting & Tax Service. Contact us to Anayalate your tax problems. Over 25 yrs. exp. Personal & Business. Compare our prices/we e-file. 575-623-1513 508 W. 2nd St. I TIN’S Welcome ARE YOU in BIG trouble with the IRS? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Seen on CNN. A BBB. Call 1-800-921-5512 REDUCE YOUR Past Tax Bill by as much as 75 Percent. Stop Levies, Liens and Wage Garnishments. Call The Tax DR Now to see if you Qualify 1-800-912-0758

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 QUICKCUT TREE service 575-208-8963 best service beat prices, licensed and insured TREE TRIMMING and removal, free estimates, super clean up, 840-9105 Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835 TREE TRIMMING, topping, and removal. Professional yard care. 910-4581

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insuranced. Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL

455. Money to Loan/Borrow WE NEED 50K good interest good collateral 622-6786

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale FSBO, 3/2/1 Great Condition, lots of features & extras, $91,000. 622-1204

FSBO- TWO homes on one lot. Great Investment Property, Main house, 3/2, 2 car gar, hard wood floors, 1800 plus sq ft, walk in closets, FP, Ldy rm, Fam rm, Living rm, Central heat & refrigerated air, large yard,-2nd home is a 2/1, 900 + sq ft, lots of upgrades, 909 S. Michigan 711 W. Summit. Do Not Disturb Tenants in 2nd home $155,000 cash or bank loan only Call Jim to see 575-910-7969 Owner finance 2 houses on extra large lot, completely remodeled 3br/2ba, basement, new metal roof, new carpet, ceramic tile, mini blinds, all electric, central ac and heat, rent one or mother-in-law. 135K with $10k down/ negotiable. #7 morning side, payments $950mo. 575-416-1454 or 622-6786

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

5 ACRES 62 E Orchard Pk Rd $19,000 interesados al 910-0644

500. Businesses for Sale

RESTAURANT FOR SALE, owner retiring, good cash flow, serious inquiries only. Call 317-0029 SELF STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE, 104 UNITS, PLUS EXCESS LAND, SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY. 317-0029

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

TRIPLE WIDE 1978 in excellent shape with all new flooring, window coverings, paint, very spacious 1500 Sq ft, 2bd/2ba in North Senior Park $38,500 OBO 575-626-5167 16x60 furnished 2br/2ba, all appliances, $25k, 410 E. 23rd #64. 575-291-5929

520. Lots for Sale

PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352.

521. Cemetery Lots

2 LOTS on Block 55, Row D, Space #33 & #34, $3000 for both. 575-763-9939 South Park, Block 58, Row M, Space 23, 24, 25 & 26. $1450 each or $5750 for all four. 575-420-8704

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

ALHAMBRA APARTMENTS Three bedroom, 2 baths, dbl. garagefurnished. Utilities incl. Available April 1. Two bedroom, 1 bath, water included. Call Sherlea Taylor, 420-1978 or 624-2219 for details.

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 FT emplyd Female to share furnIshed house in quiet-safe area, close to McGaffey & Sunset. utilities pd, $425/mo. 420-8333.

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. Town Plaza Apartments NO HUD ACCEPTED ALL UTILITIES PAID Friendly managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs & downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. Very nice 2br/1.5ba, Apartment. North location, garage, $800/mo, $400/dep, 1 yr lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535. ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944. 1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $592, 3br/2ba, $674, 5br/2ba $812, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge. 306 W Mescalero Rd. 2br, wtr pd., appliances, garbage disposal, w/d hookup, No Pets/Hud & smoking outside, Adults. $625/mo, 575-317-2059. EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. SPRING SPECIAL Convenient location close to shopping area, clean 2 Lg bdrs, Lvng room. extra storage, laundry facilities, only $575 wtr and gs pd. 910-7076 or 910-0851 EFF, 1,2 BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377 SENIOR CITIZEN 4plex unit North near Senior Circle xtra nice 2br 2ba kitchen appliances w/d area ref air carport security bars, $650 wtr pd 317-8854 305-C W. Deming, 1br, ref. air, appliances, utilities pd., $500/mo, $300/dep. 575-623-7678 1700 N. Pontiac Dr. 2br/1ba, stove & fridge, a/c, heating air, water paid. 1-626-864-3461

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 LUXURY 2BD/2BA 2 car garage, all utilities pd, really nice! $1250mo $1250dep. 3 months lease minimum. 575-626-4666 or 575-622-4470 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281 N. OF the Mall, small furnished house, 2br/1ba, washer and dryer, bills pd, carport, maintain yard, no hud no pets, adult property, seniors preferred. $750/mo, $500/dep. 625-0684 or 626-2545.

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

4bd 2ba $1200/mo. $800/dep. No Bills Paid, No Pets, Non-smoking. HUD welcome! (619) 392-9140. 2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 3BR/1BA, $950/MO, $500/dep, at the Base, HUD accepted, 420-1352. NOW AVAILABLE 3/2/1, large fenced yard, $1100 1st/last, $500/dep, pets ok w/dep. 914-8698 or 8695 3/2/1, 703 Adams Dr. Close to shopping, RHS, $1100mo, $300/dep, No Pets/Smoking, 575-910-1605.

CLASSIFIEDS

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 2100 Clover Ln., Handicap accessible 2/2 townhouse, storage, no smoking or pets, $900/mo, $700/dep. 622-7010 or 910-6104 RENT with opt. buy. Near Monterrey Elem. school. 4br/3ba, ref air, FP, den, dining room, large fenced yard, storage room. 625-9004. 61 Bent Tree Rd., 3br/2ba, 2 car gar., $950/mo, $950/dep, no pets/HUD. Call WC Property Management at 57-317-1605. 2BR & 4br homes available, 1 yr lease, no pets, HUD accepted. 619-804-5713 3br/1ba, fenced bkyrd, w/d hkp, 5 blocks from Monterrey Elem. 625-9004 4BD/2.5BA 2 car garage large back yard, 902 N Ohio $1,150mo. $850dep. 575-910-7671 SMALL 1BR compeletly remodeled, $600/mo, utilities pd, #7 1/2 Morningside, 1st & last month. 575-416-1454 Available Immediately 2br/1ba brick duplex. Major appliances, 1 car gar. w/opener, ref. air. W/D hookup w/small backyard. $500/mo, plus utilities, $500/dep. 575-622-4500 or 575-703-0298.

580. Office or Business Places 1139 S. MAIN Over 2200 sqft, all new plumbing, electrical, ref. air, wired for individual offices. $1500/mo. 626-6765 MAIN ST. storefront, 2200+sqft, $1200/dep, $1200/mo. 627-9942 200 S. Union. Two suites, approximately 1200 sqft and 810 sqft. Great location. Will remodel to suit tenant. Call Jan at 625-2222. 311-313 W. 2nd, 1800 sqft. Call John Grieves, PELR at 575-626-7813.

HUGE STORE front & warehouse for lease, 5000 sqft. All new AC, plumbing, electrical. 107 W. 6th. 575-420-6050 STORE FRONT Professional office suite for lease, 2000 sqft, everything new, AC, plumbing, electrical. Will build to suit. Employee parking in rear. 105 W. 6th. 575-420-6050 FOR LEASE, space in Sunwest Centre Office Complex at 500 N. Main St. Various size spaces. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. High floor space available for larger tenants. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 575-623-1652 or mobile 575-420-2546

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

NEED FURNITURE Shop Blair’s for the best prices on used furniture, beds, dressers, table & chairs, living room sets, patio sets, bookshelves, appliances, antiques, collectibles, home decor & housewares, saddles, tools, movies, plus lots more. Open daily 9-5, closes Wed. 627-2033 FAST TREES Grow 6-10 ft yearly $17.00 +. fasttrees.com or 509-447-4181

Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed! Power wheelchair, hospital bed, oxygen cyl. grab bars, lift chair. 622-7638 PIANO, BEDROOM suites, entertainment center, bar stools, Pub table, dining set, misc., tables, decorative shelves, computer desk, microwave cabinet, TVs. 637-8204 4PC. FLEXSTEEL sect. 4 sma. tables. Beveled mirrors 46”x36” $100 36x28 $50. Dorm Refrig. $50. 3 TVs, bedframe $25, computer desk $40, Mat cutter, swivel TV table $40, wheel barrow, mower. 575-973-8934, 623-3284 DIRECTTV - 2 Year Savings Event! Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS of savings and a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-264-0340 DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-315-7043

605. Miscellaneous for Sale MASON & Hamlin piano excellent cond. 575-637-1876

ENJOY 100 percent guaranteed, delivered?to-the-door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 74 percent PLUS 4 FREE Burgers - The Family Value Combo - ONLY $39.99. ORDER Today 1-800-773-3095 Use code 49381JVZ or www.OmahaSteaks.com/ osmb12 SHARI`S BERRIES - Order Mouthwatering Gifts for any Occasion! SAVE 20 percent on qualifying orders over $29! Fresh Dipped Berries starting at $19.99! Visit www.berries.com/big or Call 1-800-406-5015 REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!* Get a whole-home Satellite system installed at NO COST and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to new callers, SO CALL NOW 1-800-719-8092 BUNDLE AND SAVE! DIRECTV, INTERNET& PHONE From $69.99/mo. Free 3-Months of HBO, starz, SHOWTIME & CINEMAX FREE GENIE 4-Room Upgrade LOCK IN 2 YR Savings Call 1-800-264-0340 COMPLETE HAIR salon equipment, four wet stations, four all purpose chairs, three dryer chairs, six mats and one manicure table. Call 575-623-8529 for information BEAUTIFUL 42’’ round, solid Oak table w/12’’ leaf, 1910 Singer tredle sewing machine, Queen head board & rails. 840-4930 or 840-4920

Roswell Daily Record 745. Pets for Sale SMART Heeler pups available Now. 575-420-7258

YORKIE, 6 mos old male, shots, wormed, $200. 918-264-2369 in Roswell

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

2002 COACHMEN motorhome 22ft, good cond. reduced to $16,500. 231-288-0002 -51k miles located in Roswell, NM

RECREATIONAL

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

2007 HARLEY Davidson Sportster 1200 custom, fuel injected, only 5k miles, forward controls, removable Harley windshield, $5500, excellent condition, 420-1352

1997 30FT fifth wheel good condition, 3 slides with apartment size washer and dryer. 575-522-2939

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com 1988 FOOD trailer, fully loaded. $7500 without snow cone machine. 575-703-4988 BOAT & RV STORAGE, secure area, $25/mo. Call 623-4200.

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous TOP DOLLAR Paid for furniture, collectibles, appliances, antiques, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We pay cash with same day removal of all items. Compete/partial households & personal estates welcome. 623-0136 or 910-6031

ESTATE SETTLEMENT Never throw ANYTHING away before calling us! Our services include Auctions (our facility or yours), Tagged Estate Sales, Complete/Partial Buy-Outs & Real Estate Auctions, Firearms, Jewelry & Collectibles. Prompt removal of entire households and property cleanouts. Whether you need to sell a few items or an entire estate check with us and we will do our best to beat any offer you receive. Call today to find out how our experience can help you get more $$. Wild West Auctions, LLC 623-7355 or 840-8401

625. Antiques

FULL SHEET water color original buy Sydney Redfield. “Rainey Season in Picacho” ‘68. $1,500. Will be in Roswell Thursday 27 March to show. 806-239-0805

635. Good things to Eat

FROZEN GREEN Chile, dried red chile & chile powder, local pinto beans, peanuts & pecan, ristras, jams & jellies, fountain drinks, fresh eggs, Alfalfa Hay, Wheat, Sudan & Oat hay, small & large bales, we accept credit cards & EBT. GRAVES FARM 622-1889 FARM FRESH chicken eggs, $2.50 per dozen. Araucana chicken hatching eggs, $4 per dozen. Fresh cracked pecans, $7 lb. 575-624-0898

715. Hay and Feed Sale #1 Sorgum bales 4x8, $120, Call Janet at 575-626-0159

745. Pets for Sale

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

1991 PONTIAC Grand Am needs engine repeair, $300. 626-6182

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

1998 CHEVY Silverado 4x4 6” lift kit, new tires, good condition, nice. 910-4661 or 910-1152

FEMALE POODLE baby face T-cup first shot, Roswell. 575-302-5033

1967 CHEVY completely gone thru, ready to go $4,000 OBO 623-5908 02 FORD F250 SD 4x4 Great condition. $7,900 OBO 575-627-7525 or 575-317-5125 ‘90 FORD F150 King Cab, dependable work truck, new tires, $2300. 622-1431 or 637-0255

796. SUVS

WELL MAINTAINED Dependable clean ‘99 Suburban. $4500. 626-1721

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

Commode chair, Invacare patient lifter, walker, elevated toilet seat, 622-7638.

790. Autos for Sale

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos

03 25 14 Roswell Daily Record  

03 25 14 Roswell Daily Record

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