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Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 123, No. 55 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

March 4, 2014

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TUESDAY

Gov. signs aircraft sales tax elimination into law JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

AerSale Inc. at Roswell International Air Center hosted Gov. Susana Martinez Monday as she signed into law legislation that will eliminate sales tax on commercial and military aircraft. The law will remove the 7 percent gross receipts tax on the sale of commercial and military aircraft and do away with the tax on any maintenance, refurbishing, remodeling or other work done on the planes. The elimination of sales tax, to take effect July 1, is expected to bring 125 jobs to Roswell and have a direct impact of more than $5 million in the next five years. “The aviation industry is an integral part of New

Mexico’s economy,” Martinez said. “Signing today’s bill is a great start and will ensure that we remain competitive with our neighboring states.” Martinez spoke well of local legislators, who attended the event, for knowing “exactly what to do.” “I don’t have to fight the Legislature from Roswell. They’re with me all the way,” Martinez said. The bill “levels the playing field” for the aviation industry, Martinez said. AerSale and Stewart Industries are two major companies that operate from RIAC. “The word is out already,” said John Mulcahy, executive director of the Roswell-Chaves County Economic Development Corporation. “People can bring an aircraft here,

have it fixed here and now sell it here, and they don’t have to fly it away. That’s an important factor to be able to do it all here.” County Commissioner James Duffey said the new law should be a good thing for the county. “I think it’s great,” Duffey said. “It’s going to create … more jobs here in our community, so hopefully it’s a good thing.” State Rep. Bob Wooley, R-Dist. 66, ushered the bill through the 30-day session. “This is a very historic day I think for Roswell,” Wooley said. “The Lord blessed us and everything fell into place. We got it through.” The state Taxation and Revenue Department reported that there would

Randal Seyler Photos

Above: Gov. Susana Martinez, seated, signs House Bill 24 while state officials and company officers look on, Monday, at the AerSale facility in Roswell. The bill provides for a gross receipts tax reduction on the sales of aircraft within New Mexico. Left: Martinez visits with members of the Roswell Chamber of Commerce Redcoats at the facility.

Farmers prep for irrigation season

See AIRCRAFT, Page A3

Picking up pesky phragmites

Mark Wilson Photo

Roswell Job Corps Home Builders Institute students assist Friends of Bitter Lake volunteers and refuge employees in removing phragmites from the vicinity of Bitter Creek, Thursday. Phragmites are a non-native, invasive perennial plant that choke waterways and are a threat to several endangered species at the refuge.

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — With the growing season appr oaching and the dr ought continuing to bear down on New Mexico, one of the state’s major irrigation districts said Monday it is getting ready to prime its canals. Officials with the Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District gather ed along one of their major channels as water rushed past to discuss what might be in store for some 11,000 farmers in the valley who depend on the irrigation system. Derrick Lente, chairman of the district’s board of directors, said the district is expecting to have more water than it did last year at this time, and it should be enough to get farmers through spring and early summer. “We’re going to do our best to stretch the season the entir e way,” Lente said. “If we manage it the

right way, we can do it. But the wild card is Mother Natur e, and ther e’s nothing we can do about that.”

The state’s irrigation districts depend heavily on snowpack in the northern mountains and runof f captured during monsoon season. But the state has been struggling through consecutive years of severe drought, and this winter has been one of the driest on record. Still, irrigation officials in the Middle Rio Grande Valley and elsewhere in New Mexico say the watering season is looking more pr omising thanks to record rainfall that helped to replenish reservoirs last fall.

And if the spring runoff pans out, Lente said the Middle Rio Grande district could have about 60,000 acre-feet of water to distribute this year.

Supreme Court passes CYFD seeks foster families in Chaves County on immigration debate

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A f o r me r P en ns y lv a n ia c o al t o w n a nd a D al l a s suburb lost a lengthy batt le t o e n act an ti -i m m igrant laws Monday when the U.S. Supreme Court d e cl in ed t o h e a r t h ei r appeals. The high court has held since 2012 that immigration issues are largely a matter for federal agenc ie s, n ot l o cal g ov e r nments, to regulate. T h e r u l in g M o n da y involved efforts by the city of Hazleton, in northeaste r n P en n s yl va n ia , a n d Farmers Branch, Texas, to enfor ce housing and employment rules aimed at people in the country illegally, a strategy copied by dozens of other cities that faulted federal efforts to control immigration. “ I t h i n k t h in g s l o ok really different now than it did when we initiated this case. Cities are not lo o k in g t o g o dow n t h e

road that Hazleton went down,” said lawyer Omar J ad wa t o f t h e A C L U ’s Immigration Rights Proje c t , w h o s u cc es s f ul l y a rg u ed t h e ca s e i n t h e U.S. appeals court. “What w e ’ r e s ee i n g o n t h e ground is much more that cities and states are looking at ways to integrate i m m i g ra n t s i n t o t he i r communities ... and not ways to exclude people, or criminalize them.”

Hazleton had passed the first local laws in 2006 to address concerns over an influx of immigrants. The laws sought to fine landlords who rented to people living in the country illegally, deny business permits to companies that g a v e t h e m j o bs , a n d required prospective tenants to register with City Hall and pay for a rental permit. However, the laws were never enacted amid the court challenges.

HIGH 70 LOW 46

TODAY’S FORECAST

RANDAL SEYLER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Chaves County needs foster families for local children, and potential foster parents can come to an informational meeting today, said Renee Fitts, statewide recruitment manager for the New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department. There will be an informational meeting at 6 p.m. today at the CYFD office, located at No. 4 Grand Avenue Plaza in Roswell, Fitts said. The meeting will provide families with information about foster and adoptive parenting, and is for anyone interested in becoming a licensed foster and/or adoptive parent with the CYFD. “There are about 80 children in Chaves County in need of foster homes,” said Fitts, who works out of the Roswell CYFD office. “The age group 6 to 14 is the biggest group we have in need of homes, with 29

• Allie Inez Crandall Durham • Tessamarie Karma Anderson • Marilynn Florence Openshaw

children in that age group.” There are 25 children aged 0-2 needing foster homes, and 18 children aged 3-5 in need of foster homes. The smallest age group is 15-17, with eight children waiting for homes. As of January 2014, there were close to 2,000 New Mexico children in foster care. “When we don’t have enough homes in Chaves County, then we have to move these children to where there is an available home,” Fitts said. “We try to stay within the Chaves, Eddy counties area, but sometimes we don’t have a choice.” When children are placed outside of the county, it not only affects the ability of the children to visit with their birth families, it also means the case workers are traveling far and wide keeping in touch with the children. “Our goal is re-unification with the birth families

TODAY’S OBITUARIES PAGE A6

Randal Seyler Photo

Renee Fitts, statewide recruitment manager for the New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department, discusses foster parent training Monday at the CYFD office in Roswell.

when that is possible, and we try to keep siblings together whenever possible,” Fitts said.

However, having a shortage of foster homes in Chaves County means families and siblings are sometimes separated. “Not only does it mean we are taking these children from their families, we are also taking them

CLASSIFIEDS ..........B6 COMICS .................B5 ENTERTAINMENT .....B4 FINANCIAL ..............B4

from their friends, their school they love — even the cafeteria lady who gives them extra cookies,” Fitts said.

Often, the children are already dealing with traumatic events in their lives, and the extra stress of separation from their family and friends just aggra-

INDEX GENERAL ...............A2

HOROSCOPES .........A8 LOTTERIES .............A2

See CYFD, Page A3 OPINION .................A4

SPORTS .................B1

WEATHER ..............A8


A2 Tuesday, March 4, 2014

GENERAL

Roswell Association of Realtors congratulates 2013’s top producers

Front row, left to right: Larry Fresquez, Jen Gallagher, Starla Nunez, Cherri Snyder and Ruth Wise. Row 2: Betty Miles, Melodi Salas, Diana Bergman, Joyce Barger, Lana Reese, Yolanda Archuleta, Lety Lopez, Dean Day, Paula Grieves and Gen Outland. Row 3: James Dodson, Shirley Childress, Roberta Hayes, Cheryle Pattison, Leo Armstrong, Cyloma Durham-Waggoner, Charlotte Thompson, Esther Purkey, Rocky Langley, Lynn Graves, Jesse McDaniel and Leesa Chesser. Row 4: Julie King, Brad Davis, Kim Hibbard, David Duer, Jim Moore, Riley Armstrong and Dan Coleman. Not pictured: Bill Davis, Penny Bevers, Connie DeNio, Lori Berry, Linda Kirk, Lorin Sanders, Alex Pankey, Sherlea Taylor and Paul Taylor III.

STATE BRIEFS

Request to oust judge from slaughter suit denied

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The New Mexico Supreme Court is refusing to bar a District Court judge from handling a lawsuit against a proposed horse slaughterhouse in Roswell. The Albuquerque Journal reports that an order by a three-justice panel of the state high court denies Valley Meat’s request to have District Judge Matthew Wilson removed from the case. The request alleges there’s an appearance of impropriety and a lack of impartiality by Wilson because of posts on his campaign website by other people commenting on the horse slaughter case. The lawsuit by state Attorney General Gary King seeks a permanent order blocking horse slaughter in New Mexico. The resumption of commercial horse slaughter in the United States has been blocked by a new federal budget measure that withholds money for required federal inspections.

Highlands mistakenly stuck with $54K gas bill

LAS VEGAS (AP) — New Mexico Highlands University is getting a refund after a software error led to the school being overcharged by more than $54,000. The Las Vegas Optic reports that the school located in Las Vegas was overbilled for natural gas it receives from the city’s distribution system. School of ficials say a software conversion for four meters was transferred incorrectly, leading to the

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campus being charged $54,113. Because of the large amount, university officials wanted a refund instead of account credit. City workers learned of the mistake Jan. 9. Ken Garcia, city utilities director, had to formally request the refund from the Las Vegas City Council at a meeting Tuesday. The council unanimously approved the adjustment. The university’s monthly gas utility bill is normally between $8,000 and $10,000.

Architect resigns from Farmington school project

FARMINGTON (AP) — Plans to build a new high school in Farmington are at a standstill after the architecture firm overseeing the project abruptly quit. The Daily Times reports that Greer Stafford/SJCF Architecture resigned from the $62 million project. The Farmington Municipal School District Board of Education accepted the resignation during a meeting Thursday. Scott Stafford, the firm’s president, says the resignation was the result of a disagreement with district officials that couldn’t be overcome. School district officials declined to comment, citing confidentiality agreements. Ted Lasiewicz, the district’s chief of operations, says the new Farmington High School will be completed by the end of 2016. Lasiewicz says the firm is still involved with other district projects and will continue to work with them in

the future.

Ban on texting while driving to become law

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A proposal to ban texting while driving in New Mexico has become a state law. Gov. Susana Martinez signed the bill Sunday afternoon while at the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator in Albuquerque. The proposal will prohibit drivers from sending or reading text messages and emails, or making Internet searches from smartphones or other hand-held wireless devices. There would be a $25 fine for a first violation and $50 for subsequent violations. The bill would make exceptions for situations such as summoning medical or other emergency aid. Forty-one other states ban texting by all drivers. New Mexico already prohibits texting for teenage drivers with a learner’s or provisional license.

Pecan harvest shatters expectations

LAS CRUCES (AP) — New Mexico pecan growers reported this month that they are seeing their largest crop in years. Farmers initially estimated the state’s winter harvest was 60 million pounds of in-shell pecans. But growers say a breakdown of how much has been purchased indicates a haul of 75 million pounds, the Las Cruces Sun-News said. “Our production was big, extra-big,” said grower

Dave Slagle, who farms in Leasburg north of Las Cruces. Farmers and experts say that if the figure holds steady, the haul will be the state’s largest of the last 10 years. According U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates, New Mexico’s last big pecan crop was 74 million pounds in 2007. Growers say the feat is surprising because last year was considered the worst river-water irrigation year in a century. Many credit increasing groundwater for helping. Several far mers said trees that were planted in the past 15 years are now hitting their stride. The more recently planted trees are starting to increase their production levels, said Phil Arnold, a Las Cruces pecan buyer and farmer. It takes typically about eight years for a tree’s production to reach a peak. “I think a lot of that was due to the input that was from the younger orchards,” he said of the unexpected crop size. “We’re seeing the overall tonnage starting to increase a little bit.” The Dona Ana County area also got a boost from heavier summer monsoon rains last year, Ar nold added. Groundwater can cause salts to build up, affecting crop growth. “That rainwater actually helped flush a lot of those salts out of the soil,” he said.

Roswell Daily Record

Police arrest 39 over weekend Roswell Police Department officers responded to 50 incidents, 13 traffic accidents, and arrested a total of 39 individuals (34 adults and five juveniles) — another busy weekend for officers. Eleven reports of residential and vehicle burglary were filed with the police over the weekend. Thousands of dollars’ worth of items were stolen. Some reports contained information regarding windows that were broken in order for the perpetrator to gain access, causing hundreds of dollars in damages. Other reports showed no sign of forced entry.

Fences, windows damaged by vandals

Individual community members filed seven reports of criminal damage with officers. A chain link fence sustained damage consistent with that of a vehicle hitting it on the 500 block of Cypress Avenue, causing approximately $500 in damages. Residences and vehicles sustained window damage on the 700 block of North Missouri Avenue, the 100 block of North Delaware, the 900 block of North Michigan, the 3200 block of North Kentucky, and the 700 block of North Kentucky; resulting in thousands of dollars in damages. None of the incidents involving window damages appear to be related. A fence was kicked down on Tucker Court. The estimated damage to the fence is $150.

Police respond to fraud complaints

Five reports of fraud were filed with the RPD from Feb. 28, through March 2. One incident involved a company that

CORRECTION

The cutline for a photo from the All Saints Mardi Gras celebration that ran on page A1 of the Sunday, March 2, edition mis-identified the man in the tall felt hat as Albert Torrez. His name is Albert Arias. The Record regrets the error.

contacted a woman and claimed she owed money on a loan. The woman believed she had been a victim of identity theft due to her purse and contents being stolen. Another report stated a woman’s H&R block card had been utilized to obtain goods fraudulently. Two reports filed on Saturday by two separate people stated their bank accounts had fraudulent transactions on the accounts.

Counterfeit money reported

Another report of fraud involved counter feit money. A man attempted to pay for goods at a local convenience store with counterfeit money. When the cashier explained it could not be accepted, the man then paid with his debit card.

Handguns, vehicle stolen

Nine reports of larceny were filed. These reports include larceny, larceny of vehicle, and shopliftings. According to one report, two handguns were stolen from an individual — possibly by a person the individual knew. The estimated value of the handguns is $400. Out of five shopliftings, five people were arrested; two being juveniles. One report of larceny stated a vehicle was taken by someone the vehicle owner knew. The vehicle was later found, but was missing approximately $1,000 worth of items, including a GPS unit. Anyone with information regarding these crimes or any other is urged to contact the Roswell Police Department at 624-6770 or Crime Stoppers 1-888594-8477.

LOTTERY NUMBERS Roadrunner Cash 7-10-17-35-37 Pick 3 4-8-6

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“TWO-IN-ONE LOANS”

By Connie DeNio of Roswell 622-7191 or 626-7948 We live in a time of right Realtor is a big increasing options and help too). alternatives for home An intriguing financbuyers, especially first ing category is called a timers. Take the case of first time homebuyer the single person with a loan. It enables a buyer stable job, an excep- to purchase a home at a tional history as a reli- rate usually less than able renter and a stellar typical loans, based on credit rating. All this family size and income person needs is the right limits. There may be property, the right help available for closopportunity and the ing costs as well. © right financing, (the Call Me Today!

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Jim Dishman .....................................................Circulation Director jdishman@rdrnews.com Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice

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GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Blacklisted film gets atonement ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A 1954 movie about a real-life miners’ strike that was blacklisted during the Red Scare is being celebrated in New Mexico as the 60th anniversary of the film approaches. “Salt of the Earth” was blacklisted in the U.S. during Cold War retribution against Communist filmmakers and gained an underground following more than a decade later when it was finally shown. The story was told through the eyes of a female character named Esperanza as Mexican-American miners barred by federal law from striking against a zinc company were replaced on the picket lines by their wives. It became a feminist and

Aircraft

Continued from Page A1

be minimal loss of any current tax revenue as a result of the passage of the measure, according to its fiscal impact report.

According to industry representatives, airplanes that are maintained and repaired instate are flown outside of New Mexico for sale to avoid paying the state’s gross receipts tax. “It’s going to remove the gross receipts tax on the sales of airplanes that have been brought to salvage or to repair and essentially it will help create jobs by increasing the companies’ ability to repair airplanes in the area,” said state Sen. Cliff Pirtle, RRoswell. “It will be really good for the local econo-

Chicano Studies classic, and it was the subject of conferences over race, miner safety and the role of women. The town of Silver City is scheduled to hold “Salt of the Earth Day” on March 14. The union representing deputies from the same sheriff’s office that once tried to break the strike and run over female strikers is sponsoring a screening and a bus tour of the mining site depicted in the film. “I think there is a lot of atoning going on,” said Miles Conway, an organizer with the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Council 18 in New Mexico, a group sponsoring its own anniversary celebra-

my to help boost Roswell but also help boost the state’s economy as well.”

AerSale Chief Operating Of ficer Robert Nichols said the new bill gives the state a competitive edge in attracting new business in the highly competitive aviation industry. Stewart Industries’ Vice President of Operations Dale Mullinax thanked Martinez for her leadership.

“This is the last element it takes to make it an absolutely wonderful place for our customers to come,” Mullinax said. “This could be the onestop shop. It could be the Wal-Mart of aviation. This only scratches the surface of what’s going to be available in Roswell. Right now, this is going to open a lot of possibilities.”

tion in Silver City. “After all these years, everything is going full circle and we are realizing that the film spoke to all of us.” The film was a retelling of actual events involving Mexican-American miners and their wives in Grant County three years before the film. Director Herbert J. Biberman was one of the “Hollywood Ten” who refused to answer questions from the House Committee on Un-American Activities about being members of the Communist Party. During production, filmmakers and crew faced harsh criticism from lawmakers and threats of violence from vigilante groups. In addition, the FBI scrutinized the film’s

CYFD

Continued from Page A1

vates the situation.

Typically, it takes 4-6 months to be certified as a foster family, Fitts said, and the training is held during four Saturday meetings. The first session for 2014 wraps up this Saturday, and the next cycle of training begins on April 26.

The training consists of two back-to-back Saturday classroom training sessions followed by an “on the job training” weekend where

finances in search of communism connections, labs wouldn’t process the film and projectionists refused to show it. Mexican Rosaura actress Revueltas, who played the lead character, was even deported to Mexico. Manny Maldonado remembers seeing the film “Salt of the Earth” in his high school. The 1954 movie at first appeared dated, but he recalled becoming a big admirer of the film as he came to understand the significance of the story. “That was my family,” said Maldonado, now 35. A deputy with the Grant County Sheriff’s Office and president of a union representing public safety and municipal employees in the potential foster families get to interact with children, Fitts said. “It gives the families a chance to see what age groups might be most suited to their homes for fostering,” she explained. Foster families can be single, married or cohabitating or same-sex couples, Fitts said. Potential foster families have to be able to pass a federal/state/local background check and an abuse and neglect check, and must also be willing to participate in a free SAFE home study. The home study includes

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

A3

AP Photo

This 1956 file photo shows Mexican actress and writer Rosaura Revueltas in Mexico City.

area, Maldonado is now involved in promoting the film’s 60th anniversary. In fact, many unions and government entities that once opposed the strike and the film’s production,

family interviews, home safety check and reference checks, Fitts said. It can be a process lasting between four and six months for the foster families to be certified, Fitts said. Foster parents also have to be legal residents of the U.S. “We still have plenty of work to do when it comes to finding families for children in foster care,” said Gov. Susana Martinez in a news release on Friday. “Regardless of the age of these children or the fact that sibling groups are in need of one home, it is a

are involved in anniversary events to honor it. A film workers’ union, which once distanced itself from the production, is also working to promote the film’s history. driving goal for (CYFD Cabinet Secretary Yolanda) Deines and New Mexico’s child welfare professionals to find all of these children forever families.”

“When you see the children succeed, and you see them learn the tools they need to be successful adults, that is what really makes my job special,” Fitts said. “Children need all the love they can get, and if they have love coming in from not only their birth family, but from a foster family too, how can you go wrong with that?”


A4 Tuesday, March 4, 2014

OPINION

Protecting all of our Omarees isn’t just about funding

Sen. Clemente Sanchez wanted to do something about child abuse and its watchdogs in the Children, Youth and Families Department. From his wife, a former social worker, he heard two words: case load. Our underpaid, overextended social workers can’t monitor each kid in a way that might have saved Omaree Varela from the allegedly brutal treatment of his mother. Five bills in the recently completed legislative session focused on CYFD, but only one passed, an indicator of both complexity and the distance to consensus. Sanchez wanted a limit of 15 cases, which might require another 22 hires. The Child Welfare League of America recommends 12 to 15 children per social worker; the average in CYFD is 12 to 20. His fellow Grants Democrat, House Speaker Ken Martinez, introduced “Omaree’s Law,” which would have required CYFD

EDITORIAL

SHERRY ROBINSON

ALL SHE WROTE

to immediately take custody of a child with injuries consistent with abuse. If abuse was proven, the child would stay in custody until the parent received professional counseling. CYFD argued that in fiscal 2013 it received more than 21,000 reports alleging physical abuse. The bill would have the unintended consequence of overwhelming not only CYFD but the courts. The governor supported a bill to make it clear that everybody is responsible to report abuse, but the law already prescribes that. (Omaree himself and at least one total stranger reported his

abuse.) The only successful effort was by Sen. Michael Padilla, who was himself an abused child and abused foster child. His Senate Joint Memorial 3 passed both chambers and will result in more infor mation about the state’s overloaded foster care system. During budget hearings, understaffing, turnover and burnout within CYFD’s Protective Services came up. The House Appropriations and Finance Committee pressed more money on the reluctant agency to add protective services positions, increase caseworker salaries, and improve foster and protective services care and support. One of the more quoted exchanges took place in the Senate Finance Committee between Sen. George Muñoz, D-Gallup, and CYFD Secretary Yolanda Deines, when Muñoz asked pointedly, “What are you going to do to make sure this doesn’t happen

Roswell Daily Record

again?” Deines answered honestly, “As long as we’re dealing with human behavior and human behavior being as unpredictable as it is, I believe that there is always a possibility, as sad as it is, that we could experience this once more.” In other words, even with a regiment of caseworkers, even with reviews and reforms, it only takes a moment’s lapse for a drugaddled parent and/or caretaker (all too often, the boyfriend) to end a child’s life or inflict permanent injuries. Still, we can do better, and it’s not always about money. I once knew a good social worker whose tur f was a dif ficult, unstable area. When she’d had all the heartache she could endure, she disappeared for a few days or a week. When she returned, she was ready to hit the streets again. Her supervisors were wise enough to not bother her about her absences.

Higher pay would help, but so would mental health time, although the mechanics of creating that within the massive state employee system could be sticky. Child advocates have persistently raised an issue more dangerous than staffing, and that’s CYFD’s emphasis on returning kids to their parents, no matter how iffy the parents are. This may stem from a fear of appearing heavy handed (I remember those headlines too) or the studies showing it’s traumatic for kids to be removed from even bad parents, although it’s time to question those studies. Also, because our foster care system is maxed out (hence, Padilla’s bill), it may often be a decision made between two awful choices. Speaker Martinez described Omaree’s Law as the beginning of a conversation. We need to keep talking.

Tracking our tags

Even though Washington still is grappling with the public backlash over revelations about its data-mining activities with Americans’ phone records, the federal government apparently has not been deterred from exploring new ways to collect information and monitor citizens. The Washington Post reported Tuesday that the Department of Homeland Security is seeking a private contractor to set up a nationwide license-plate scanning system that would give the agency access to records from tag readers across the country. Many local law enforcement agencies already use cameras mounted on police cars, bridges or road signs to read license plates so they can be cross-checked with criminal databases. That’s creepy enough, but it at least is limited in scale to the state and local levels, although they increasingly share the information with each other. The DHS, though, wants to set up a vast federal database of all those plate numbers. Hey, what could go wrong? It’s not like federal officials have ever abused information to spy on political enemies or punish opponents. The FBI and IRS, just to name two, would never compromise their mission, ideals or standards to stoop so low. The federal plate database ostensibly would be run by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency (ICE), which suggests that the primary goal is tracking people who are suspected of being here illegally. However, the solicitation for the contract also says that the vendor will compile licenseplate records “from a variety of sources nationwide, including access control systems, asset recovery specialists, and law enforcement agencies.” So it won’t be strictly border control. The government would be drawing on plate data from everywhere, which could make it useful in many functions. A spokesman for ICE tried to reassure the public by telling the Post that the database “would be run by a commercial enterprise, and the data would be collected and stored by the commercial enterprise, not the government,” and that the data “could only be accessed in conjunction with ongoing criminal investigations or to locate wanted individuals.” Nevertheless, anytime you have a vast, centralized database on people’s communications, commercial transactions, medical history or travel there will be the potential for “mission creep” fueled by the temptation to access it for means other than originally intended. It’s one thing to check it because you are trying to match a plate with a criminal suspect. But the opportunity exists to use it to keep tabs on certain people for noncriminal reasons, or to identify trends of innocent citizens. It’s bad enough that many businesses accumulate such information, although there are ways to limit one’s exposure. It’s worse when the federal government, with its vast powers, seeks to keep a close eye on its people. Abuses can have more far-reaching consequences. DHS should answer some basic questions: How long would this data be stored? What is required to access it? How many other government agencies will have access to it? Driving on a public road is not a private act; eyeballs can spot your vehicle. Still, it’s disconcerting to have the government collecting data on our travels. REPRINTED FROM THE PANAMA CITY NEWS HERALD DEAR DOCTOR K: Is it true that some people are more vulnerable to addiction than others? Why? DEAR READER: We tend to think about the ravages of addiction mainly when it takes a celebrity from us. Recently the actor Philip Seymour Hoffman died, at 46, of an apparent overdose of heroin. In 2012, it was the singer Whitney Houston, at 49. Both were once-in-a-generation talents — and both gone, just like that. The use of illicit drugs and

To defeat GOP’s restrictive voting laws, debunk ‘voter fraud’ JOE CONASON CREATORS SYNDICATE

Growing up in Jim Crow Arkansas, Bill Clinton saw how the state’s dominant political and racial elite maintained power by suppressing the rights of minority voters who threatened its authority — and as a young activist, worked to bring down that illegitimate power structure. So when Clinton says, “There is no greater assault on our core values than the rampant efforts to restrict the right to vote” — as he does in a new video released by the Democratic National Committee — the former president knows of what he speaks. In the segregationist South of Clinton’s youth, the enemies of the universal franchise were Democrats, but times have changed. Not just below the Mason-Dixon Line but across the country, it is Republicans who have sought to limit ballot access and discourage participation by minorities, the poor, the young and anyone else who might vote for a Democratic candidate. No doubt this is why, at long last, the Democratic Party has launched a national organizing project, spearheaded by Clinton, to educate voters, demand refor ms, and push back against restrictive laws. Returning to his role as

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

alcohol takes the lives of nearly 300 people every day in the United States. (Tobacco takes more than 1,000 every day.) Though

the nation’s “explainer -inchief,” Clinton may be able to draw public attention to the travesty of voter ID requirements and all the other tactics of suppression used by Republicans to shrink the electorate. His first task is to debunk the claims of “voter fraud,” fabricated by Republican legislators and right-wing media outlets, as the rationale for restrictive laws. Lent a spurious credibility by the legendary abuses of old-time political machines, those claims make voter suppression seem respectable and even virtuous. Some years ago, the Brennan Center for Justice, based at New York University and led by former Clinton speechwriter Michael Waldman, issued a 45-page report on voter fraud that remains definitive. “There have been a handful of substantiated cases of individual ineligible voters attempting to defraud the election system,” the report noted. “But by any measure, voter fraud is extraordinarily rare.” And because fraud is so unusual, GOP countermeasures, such as voter ID, do much more harm than good. As the Brennan Center study noted, even some Republicans know their leaders have exaggerated stories of fraud for partisan advantage.

most did not become famous in the way that Philip Seymour Hoffman and Whitney Houston were, each had friends and family who mourn their passing. Fortunately, not every person who drinks alcohol or tries drugs becomes dependent. Why, then, do some people develop addiction while others do not? Our genes account for about half of our risk for addiction. The environment in which people grow up and their personal histories also play an important role. People who were abused or neg-

In 2007, the Houston Chronicle quoted Royal Masset, the former political director of the Texas Republican Party, who observed that among Republicans, it is “an article of religious faith that voter fraud is causing us to lose elections.” Masset admitted that suspicion is false but said he believed that requiring voters to provide photo ID could sufficiently reduce participation by legitimate Democratic voters and add 3 percent to Republican tallies. More recently, one of the dimmer lights in the Pennsylvania Republican Party — the majority leader of the state House of Representatives, in fact — boasted that the voter ID statute he had rammed through the Legislature would “allow Gov. Romney to win the election” in November 2012. Although Mike Turzai later insisted that “there has been a history of voter fraud in Pennsylvania,” the state government conceded in court that it could cite no evidence showing that “in-person voter fraud has in fact occurred in Pennsylvania or elsewhere.” Clinton can also consult the President’s Commission on Election Administration, a bipartisan panel appointed by President Barack Obama to improve the country’s voting systems. In its final report issued last January, the commission forthrightly acknowl-

lected as children, for example, have a higher risk of developing addiction than children who were nurtured. People with mental illness are also particularly vulnerable. Still, although some people are more at risk for addiction than others, nobody is immune to addiction. That’s because we are all wired to respond similarly to rewards. The brain registers all forms of pleasure in the same way: by releasing the neurotransmitter dopamine in the brain. That’s

edged that true voter fraud is “rare.” It was a singular admission by a group whose co-chairs included Benjamin Ginsberg, an aggressive Republican election attorney who bears the burden of responsibility for the outcome of Bush-Gore 2000. If he is in a bipartisan mood, as he often is, Clinton would surely find the commission’s report uplifting — especially its recommendations to make voting more modern, more efficient, and above all, more accessible. For both parties to improve and expand, the democratic rights of citizens would be uplifting indeed. But Clinton is more likely to find himself feeling less kindly toward the Republicans, as they continue to promote outrageous suppression while feigning outrage over “fraud.” The Democrats may be equally motivated by partisan selfinterest — but so long as they defend the rights of the intimidated and the disenfranchised, their moral force will be undiminished. To find out more about Joe Conason, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.

true whether the pleasure originates with a drug, a monetary reward, sex or a satisfying meal. (I’ve put an illustration of this reward pathway on my website, AskDoctorK.com.) But drugs of abuse, such as nicotine or heroin, release two to 10 times the amount of dopamine as do natural rewards — and they do it more quickly and more reliably. It’s possible that people who get hooked more easily have a more robust dopamine response. In See DR. K, Page A5


LOCAL

Celebrating National Craft Month at the library

Roswell Daily Record

LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

As part of National Craft Month, a free knitting clinic will be held at the Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania, on Saturday from 10 to 11 a.m. Knitters are encouraged to pull out those unfinished projects and bring them to the clinic for assistance and advice. Two local artists, Donna Davis and Margaret Barry, have years of experience in knitting and other fiber arts. They are available to assist with getting started on a pattern, fixing a mistake or finishing the projects. Since each project can be very different, their assistance will be on a person-to-person basis. Crafts are the creation of useful and functional objects through mental and manual skill and may be a hobby or a profession. The library has many resources for both beginning and advanced crafters. Your library card is the key to accessing these books, magazines, DVDs and Internet databases. One collection of databases is Ebsco, which includes Hobbies & Crafts Reference Center, providing access to full-text articles, patterns, guides, detailing “how-to” instructions and creative ideas to meet the interests of almost any craft enthusiast. One craft category is Needlecrafts & Textiles featuring over 25 subheadings, such as Appliqué, Cross Stitch, Embroidery, Knitting, Quilting, Weaving, etc. Other Ebsco databases are Consumer Health Complete, Auto Repair Reference Center and NoveList, listing novels by author, title, subject and characters.

To access the databases from computers at non-library locations, go to the library’s website at www.roswellpubliclibrary.org. Click on Online Resources for a list of databases provided by the library. The website also features the online catalog of materials, the ability to renew checked out library books and other materials, the Calendar of Events and general information on the various resources and services of the library. Reference librarians are available to assist patrons in accessing databases, locating books and information.

Book talk

Libraries and their books are the storytellers to the nation. In a similar way, television has become the storytellers to the nation, especially through TV series. Frequently, these series are based on novels. A new series, “Resurrected,” will premiere this Sunday and is based on Jason Mott’s novel, “The Returned.” Imagine a world where a few of the dead come back, not like in a modern horror story, but just as they were when they died; looking and acting the same as when they were alive. Matthew Gormley, adult services librarian, investigates this premise in Jason Mott’s “The Returned,” which is available for checkout as a hardbound science fiction title, an E-book and as a “talking book” on CD. Also on E-

book is “The First,” a short story prequel showing how it all began when Edmund Blithe turned up for work a year after he was hit by a bus and dying. After this first spectacular return event, the dead or returned, started reappearing all around the world. In “The Returned,” the impossible is occurring with the reappearance of returned family, friends and others, turning life upside down. Are the returned a miracle to be loved or feared? In the small sleepy town of Arcadia, Agent Bellamy of the International Bureau of the Returned shows up on the doorstep of Harold and Lucille Hargrave with their 8year-old son. Jacob died in 1966 on his birthday when he wandered off and drowned in the river near his home. As the story proceeds, Harold and Lucille must come to terms with the changes in their lives as they readjust to a world where their son is back. They will deal with their own doubts, regrets, and guilt over their son’s death and return. In the process they rediscover who they were and how they have changed in the years since their son’s death. As the Hargraves are coming to terms with their own demons, the town of Arcadia is thrown into turmoil as it is split into two groups. The first group includes those who are willing to accept the returned, while the other includes those who will go to almost any extent to make them leave. Mott will have readers thinking about what would happen in their own lives if one of their loved ones showed back up after being gone for years. With spare, elegant prose and searing emotional depth, award-winning

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

poet Jason Mott explores timeless questions of faith and morality, love and responsibility. Other TV series based on books that are available at Roswell Public Library are: Robert Kirkman’s “The Walking Dead,” George Martin’s “The Game of Thrones,” Craig Johnson’s “Longmire,” Kathy Reichs’ “Bones,” Jeff Lindsay’s “Dexter,” Kelley Armstrong’s “Bitten,” Sara Shepard’s “Pretty Little Liars,” L. J. Smith’s “The Vampire Diaries,” Cecily von Ziegesar’s “Gossip Girls” and Stephen King’s “Under the Dome.”

What’s happening?

Each week, the library features three story and craft hours for children. On Wednesday, the programs begin at 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. and on Saturday, it begins at 2 p.m. This week the story times will feature fairy tales and animal babies. Children attending the story portion of the program are invited to be creative with the related crafts. All materials are provided for the crafts. However, children must arrive within the first 15 minutes of program to participate in the craft session. The stories and crafts may vary between programs and the quantity of some craft items may be limited. ‘Once Upon a Time’ is the traditional beginning of fairy tales. During the Wednesday story times, the fairytales might focus on “Once Upon a Time,” “Snappy Sounds Once Upon a Time,” “The Knight and the Dragon” or a puppet presentation of “The Three Billy Goats Gruff.” The morning programs feature stories, song and movement activi-

A5

ties for toddlers and preschool children. The Wednesday afternoon programs are geared more for older children. Pre-cut materials are provided for crafts that might include making stick puppets of the Billy Goat Gruf f, Three Little Pigs and a Big Bad Wolf, as well as creating a cardboard castle scene, complete with stick puppets of a princess, knight and dragon. Kids could also decorate a crown to wear home. Animal babies are always a story time favorite and the Saturday stories could feature “Is Your Mama a Llama”; “Hatch, Egg, Hatch”; “Ten Little Lambs”; “Five Little Ducklings”; “The Baby Beebee Bird”; “A Nap in a Lap” or a puppet show of “Clifford’s Puppy Days.” For the related crafts, precut materials will be provided to make Clifford the Big Red Dog as a puppy, decorate a spiral with many different kinds of animal babies and assemble a mother hen and her chicks in a nest. Remember, daylight saving time begins on Sunday.

Books Again

Mysteries and ‘Who Dun It’ titles are featured during the March sale with all mystery books costing $1 each. Other fiction and non-fiction books are also a bargain priced at approximately one-fourth of the original price. Paperback books are 25 cents each. Books Again, 404 W. Second, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday through Saturday. The store is operated by Friends of the Library volunteers and all proceeds are used to benefit the library. Parking

Education and indigent funding: Hot topics during and after the session A lot of issues swirl around any given legislative session, but when it comes to doling out the money, education is always at the front of the line. So it should be no surprise that New Mexico’s schools got a lot of attention in this year’s session. If signed as expected by Gov. Susana Martinez, the $6.2 billion budget passed for the coming fiscal year (which begins July 1) includes an overall 5 percent increase in spending over the current fiscal year. That means that additional money will be going into the state’s school funding formula as well as extra money for Public Education Department initiatives. As a result, schools all over the state will go into the 201415 school year with a little more money for operations, something that superintendents and school boards will surely appreciate, while PED gets to continue its reform agenda, which a lot of local educators won’t like one bit. Put another way, the new budget gives greater flexibility to local school districts and a bigger bully pulpit for PED. The issues aren’t all about money. The Legislature also pro-

TOM MCDONALD ROUNDHOUSE DISPATCH

duced bills that give local schools a bit more autonomy when it comes to physical education requirements for graduation and the administering of specified types of emergency medications. But then, local schools lost some autonomy too: a Seal of Bilingualism, to be affixed to high school diplomas belonging to students who are proficient in speaking and writing in more than one language, was passed into law even though some districts already have a bilingual seal. This new law will make it statewide — and based on criteria to be established by PED. So instead of giving local districts control over this matter, it’s actually taking away an option they already had.

BENEFIT RAISES $54,000 FOR YOUTH’S CARE

CLOVIS — Winners were announced in Clovis in a drawing for two works of art donated to raise money for the family of a young Lea County cowboy injured a horse accident. Six-year -old Sterling Decker was severely injured at his family’s ranch in October, and New Mexico artists Curtis Fort and Gary Morton contributed works, a bronze sculpture and a painting, to assist the family with the enormous bills associated with Sterling’s medical care and long-term rehabilitation. Although he still has a long road ahead to get back to his original self, Sterling has taken many big steps toward his full recovery,

and he and his family were on hand for the drawing, held at Joe’s Boot Shop in Clovis. On hand with Fort, Morton, and store owner Coli Hunt, Sterling and his little sister Stoney drew the two winning tickets which belong to Jennifer Weatherford of Hobbs and Stewart Bogle of Dexter. Tickets were purchased by individuals in several states, many of the contributors from agricultural and rural communities. Sales totaled almost $54,000 with all the money going to the Decker family for Sterling’s care and rehabilitation. — Clovis Livestock Market News

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Meanwhile, expect PED will continue to push its teacher evaluations and for merit pay increases — both of which have drawn the ire of a lot of educators who criticize these reforms as unfair, counterproductive and simplistic. Will these hot-button issues remain on the Martinez administration’s front burner in 201415? Maybe, maybe not. Martinez and the PED are in a good position to insist on some local cooperation for its reforms and initiatives, so maybe so. On the other hand, Martinez is up for re-election this year, so she may opt to quell the objections with inaction. We’ll see soon enough. Overall, I’d say the stage is set for a status-quo year in education. The spending increase might just quell the policy disagreements. Both sides may rattle their sabers, but actual action will probably take a back seat to Election Day when Martinez will either fly into a second ter m (and greater national prominence) or crash in an unexpected defeat. Of course, all bills passed during the session must have the gover nor’s signature before

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

some way, they are “wired differently.” I saw Philip Seymour Hoffman play Willy Loman in “Death of a Salesman.” As the play opened, the stage was unlit. At the far left was a luminous blue light, like the sky at the

becoming law. I would be surprised if any of the education measures I’ve mentioned here will be vetoed by Martinez, but I don’t feel so certain about Senate Bill 268. That’s the bill to fund indigent care at hospitals around the state. It’s critically important to struggling hospitals all over the state that need a funding source to replace the Sole Community Provider provision in federal law, which currently funds indigent patient services at hospitals. SB 268 replaces that funding mechanism by tapping into county revenues. What the bill does is pull onetwelfth of a cent from counties’ gross receipts tax revenues to pay for indigent care in nearly all the state’s hospitals. The Lovington Leader reported last week that Lea County anticipates this will cost the county $4 million annually. County commissioners, the Leader reported, directed their county manager to contact an attorney about the constitutionality of the bill. The Association of Counties reluctantly agreed to the legislation after their initial proposal, to pull an eighth of a cent from the counties rather than a

end of a clear day. A man carrying a briefcase in each hand, Loman, is seen in silhouette. He is stooped, trudging slowly, as dejected as a person can be. The road had not been kind. No one was buying. He opens the door to his home, his family waiting for him inside. Suddenly, he is the salesman: confident, jostling with his

twelfth — but Lea County is demonstrating that the association wasn’t speaking for all counties. I’ll bet we will read about other disgruntled counties in the weeks ahead. It may seem the governor has no choice but to sign the bill, since there’s some urgency here. One hospital official said (without identifying his sources) that up to seven rural hospitals in the state could go out of business if this matter isn’t addressed. True enough, small hospitals all over the state are struggling, and the loss of the Sole Community Provider benefit will certainly hurt, but the federal program doesn’t expire until 2015. It would seem the state has time to consider other funding approaches. We’ll soon see what the governor thinks, as a stroke of her pen is all that’s needed to make SB 268 the law. Tom McDonald is editor of the New Mexico Community News Exchange and owner-manager of Gazette Media Services LLC. He may be reached at 505-426-4199 or tmcdonald@gazettemediaservices com.

sons, talking about what a success the trip had been. Playing the role he had to play, to avoid taking his own life. I will remember that entrance, and many other moments from Hoffman’s films, all of my life. Acting doesn’t get any better. Gone, just like that. We have to solve the plague of addiction, and we will. In the past 20

years, scientists have learned a lot about the brain chemistry of addiction. That knowledge will lead to better treatments. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)


A6 Tuesday, March 4, 2014 OBITUARIES

Allie Inez Crandall Durham

Funeral services are scheduled for 2:00 P.M., Wednesday, March 5, 2014 at LaGrone Funeral Chapel for Allie Inez Crandall Durham, age 89, of Roswell, who passed away on March 2, 2014 at her residence. Interment will follow at South Park Cemetery. Pastor Emeritus Rev. Bill Jones of Tinnie Baptist Church will officiate. She will lie in state from 12-7pm on Tuesday, March 3, 2014 at LaGrone Funeral Chapel. Inez was born on April 15, 1924 in Roswell, New Mexico to Mack D. and Allie T innie Taylor. She was also known as Inez, Nana, Granny, and Nez. She married her first husband, Richard Lee Crandall on November 16, 1945 in Hot Springs, New Mexico. After he passed in 1985, she later married E.L. “Frosty” Durham in Globe Arizona, who has also preceded her in death. She has also been preceded in death by her parents, one brother: Mack “Bud” Taylor, one sister -in-law: Valley Taylor, two grandsons: William McIntosh V and Jason Lee Crandall; two great grandchildren: Kale Crandall and Tristin Wesley Nowell. She was a very kind and

PUBLIC RECORDS

Marriage Licenses

Feb. 7 Omar Gonzalez Jr., 21, and Victoria N. Hernandez, 20, both of Dexter. Javier Chavez, 48, and Teresa D. Wallen, 40, both of Roswell. John D. Henry, 30, and Rachael A. Heaton, 25, both of Roswell. Feb. 10 Jessica Nicole Ashby, 26, and Britney Tamra Pigott, 22, both of Houston. Rudy A. Sanchez, 20, and Crystal C. Dimas, 18, both of Roswell. James W. Linck, 48, and Marissa I. Cortez-Martinez, 45. Feb. 11 Joel L. Coronado, 46, and Hilaria B. Sanchez, 39,

OBITUARIES/PUBLIC RECORDS giving person. She was a very hard worker on the farm and ranch, working side by side with her husband. She never complained and was always willing to do whatever needed to be done. She loved to go watch her grandchildren play sports and found that baseball was her favorite. Her grandkids and great grandkids were very special to her, especially babies. She was the best mother-in-law in the world. She loved visiting with people and never met a stranger. She was very faithful to her church and loved many different activities, such as going to the Billy the Kid Pageant, Crocheting, Quilting, going to dances and being the first to arrive and last to leave. Inez is survived by one son: Lee Crandall and wife Donna of Capitan, New Mexico; one daughter: Shirley McIntosh and husband Bill of Roswell; Six Grandchildren: T ravis Crandall and wife Jill of Carlsbad, Sheila Keltner and husband Ty of Ingles, Kansas, Shana Nowell and husband Raif of Capitan, New Mexico, Carrie Milstead and husband Brian of Roswell, Jaime Ambs and husband Pete of Roswell, and Jennifer McIntosh, also of Roswell; Great-Grandchildren: Arya and Warrick Nowell, Mackenzie and Macayla Keltner, Kort and Kace Crandall, Allie Ambs, Spencer Robins, Zachray Harper, Jazin Milstead, William McIntosh VI, Jessica and Presley Biggers; two great nephews: Johnny Mack and Will Dean Copper; Special Niece: Kathleen Arviso and husband Paul of Moriarty, New Mexico. Pallbearers will be Pete

both of Roswell. Matthew K. McDonald, 49, and Dana R. Brown, 45, both of Roswell. Ismael Chavez, 19, and Jocabed Bautista, 20, both of Roswell. Feb. 13 Kathy Michelle Grimes, 38, and April Marie Gaspard, 38, both of Houston. Genaro Mendoza, 29, and Karina Ledezma, 20, both of Roswell. Johnie F. Bryd, 40, of Roswell, and Jamie Clegg, 37, of Albuquerque. Perry Van Jackson, 57, and Richard Edward Hudson, 67, both of Houston. Larry Mendoza, 51, and Rosa Villalobos, 36, both of Roswell. Feb. 14

share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online register at andersonbethany.com. Services are under the direction of AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

Roswell Daily Record

A wake will be at 7 PM Tuesday, March 4, 2014 for Tessamarie Karma Anderson, 14, of Roswell at Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home Chapel. Funeral services will be at 10 AM Wednesday, March 5, 2014 at Church on the Move with Pastor Mike Branch officiating. Burial is to follow at South Park Cemetery. She passed away on Feb. 27, 2014. Visitation will be Tuesday, March 4, 2014 from 10 AM to 8 PM at the funeral home. Tessamarie was bor n April 23, 1999 to Albert Mondragon and Angela

Anderson in Roswell, NM. Tessamarie attended Roswell High School, was a volleyball player, loved to hang out with her friends. She enjoyed listening to music, hanging out with her boyfriend, dance, cheer, and spin. Loved sports, had a great social life, loved track, had aspirations to become a chef, and was a very loving child. She will be missed by all who knew her. She is survived by her mother, Angie Anderson of the home; her father, Derrick Gomez of the home; her siblings: Jaylien Gomez, Chael Gomez and Marissa Gomez all of the home; her great-grandparents, Art Young, Fred and Angie Thomas. Grandparents: Cindy Anderson, Monica and Terry Gallagher, Ruben and Dara Gomez, and Bobby Mondragon; numerous aunts, uncles, cousins and friends. She is also survived by her biological father Albert Mondragon of Roswell, siblings JoeEddy Mondragon of Portales, NM, Raquel Mondragon, Angelina Mondragon and Junior Mondragon all of Roswell. She was preceded in death by her great-grandmother, Mary Young and grandfather Albert Mondragon Sr. Pallbearers will be Shawn Lem, Terry Gallagher, Nathan Berdoza, Jason Anderson, Jadon Anderson, and Chris Clees. Honorary Pallbearers will be Marissa Gomez, Kali Anderson, Aubrey Anderson, Diamond Fulton, Jaden Lawrence, Karie Bratcher, Raquel Mondragon, Angelina Mondragon, Aresbi Egnew, Alondra Ibarra, Annie Guajaca, Nate Garcia and Tomas Marrufo. Please take a moment to

Funeral services for Marilynn Florence Openshaw, 74, who passed away Thursday, February 27, 2014 in Roswell, are scheduled for 2:00 P.M., Tuesday, March 4, 2014 at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church; The Reverend Dale W. Plummer will be officiating with burial to follow at South Park Cemetery. Marilynn will lie in state on Monday, March 3, 2014 from 5 – 7 P.M. at Ballard Funeral Home. Marilynn was born on March 4, 1939 in Buffalo, New York to William Herbert Openshaw and Florence Maloney Openshaw. Her mother Florence Openshaw survives her; she is also survived by her sister Bonnie O’Neal and husband Chuck, nephews Dr. Bryan O’Neal and wife Denise; grandnieces Kathryn, Kara L ynn and Elyssa of Valparaiso, ID; Michael O’Neal and wife Nancy of Sonoma, CA; nephew David Sean O’Neal

and wife Siobhan and grandniece Reilly Nicole of Raleigh, NC; nephew Jason O’Neal and wife Gloria; grandnephew Charlie and grandnieces Kelsey Louise and Grace Emily and her precious dog Dusty. Her father William Openshaw preceded her in death. Marilynn graduated from Roswell Senior High School in 1957 and attended St. Joseph Hospital School of Nursing in Albuquerque, NM for one year and then transferred to the St. Joseph School of X-Ray Technology and graduated in 1960. She then began her professional career at St. Mary’s Hospital in Roswell. Marilynn had spent most of her life in Roswell; she was active in Pecos Valley Horsemen and showed English Horses. She was the New Mexico Champion for English Equitation and English Pleasure for many years. She was also a member of the American Society of Radiologic Technologist, Senior Circle, and St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church. She volunteered with the humane society and she was always active volunteering in numerous organizations. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Andrews Episcopal Church, 505 N. Pennsylvania Ave, Roswell, NM 88201, Roswell Humane Society, 703 E. McGaffey, Roswell, NM 88203 or The Sage Foundation for Dogs, 104 Stone Barn Circle, Holly Springs, NC 27540 or www.sagefoundationfor dogs.org. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at www.ballardfuneralhome.c om

Brandon Dean Collins, 19, and Shay Danielle McCoy, 18, both of Dexter. Jessica Renee Orsak, 24, and Tabatha Nichole Greer, 29, both of Big Spring. Miguel Antonio Arenivaz Jr., 24, and Jolinda Flores, 23, both of Big Spring. Christopher Lee Patterson, 36, and Michael Dane Reeves, 35, both of Lubbock. Antonio R. Leon, 20, of Roswell, and Devani Y. Chavez-Mejia, 18, of Dexter. Feb. 18 James R. Dixon, 19, and Vanessa Quinones, 19, both of Roswell. Jaime Herrera, 48, and Margarita Limas, 40, both of Roswell.

Garrett C. Bondurant, 26, and Amy L. Manire, 25, both of Roswell. Feb. 19 Mark C. Montoya, 27, and Victoria D. Chavez, 18, both of Roswell. Maurice H. Smith, 72, and Velma J. Henderson, 71, both of Roswell. Feb. 21 Jules R. Neal, 26, and Shannon T. Ruiz, 30, both of Roswell. Ramon Diaz-Vasquez, 31, and Irene Mendez, 35, both of Roswell. Feb. 24 Tamara Joann Vaughan, 25, and Jennifer Teresa De La Garza, 30, both of San Antonio. Ruby N. Salazar, 28, and Amanda E. Najar, 22, both

of Roswell. Elijah Ulysses Goodlow Jr., 23, and Lorenzo Pena, 25, both of Roswell. Joshua D. Rico, 33, and Kathryn L. Anderson, 24, both of Roswell. Devan R. Mairot, 21, and Mellissa M. Soliz, 20, both of Roswell. T ravis J. Stewart, 26, and Leah B. Griego, 25, both of Roswell. Feb. 25 Manuel Chacon, 39, and Rosa Hernandez, 29, both of Roswell. Derrick R. Gomez, 30, and Angela M. Anderson, 33, both of Roswell. Feb. 26 Joseph B. Mendoza, 33, and Sheila N. Serna, 30, both of Roswell.

Jorge U. Montoya, 41, and Luz E. Montoya, 41, both of Roswell. Feb. 27 Rocky A. Hargrove, 30, and Brittany A. Gonzales, 33, both of Roswell. Shawn A. Stuffelbeam, 37, and Valerie L. Smith, 31, both of Roswell. Catarino Anthony Ayala III, 28, and Raelynn D. Villareal, 31, both of Roswell. Israel D. Luna, 35, and Emma M. Natera, 41, both of Roswell. Steven R. Newman, 21, and Annabel Renee Beltran, 22, both of Roswell. Feb. 28 Jeffrey Michael Daniels, 29, and Elizabeth Kate Richardson, 28, both of Peoria, AZ.

Ambs, Raif Nowell, Ty Kettner, Brian Milstead, Travis Crandall, and Johnny Parker. Honorary Pallbearers will be Joe Torres, Billy Bird, Larry Newsome, Neil DeFranco, Johnny Welde, Dr. Knoche. Memorials may be made to the American Cancer Society: 1050 Montgomery Blvd. NE, Albuquerque, NM 87111. Friends may leave condolences online at www.lagronefuneralchapels .com. Arrangements are under the directions and personal care of LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Tessamarie Karma Anderson

Marilynn Florence Openshaw

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Anderson Bethany Funeral Home Wake Tuesday, March 4 7:00 PM

Church on the Move & South Park Cemetery Funeral Services Wednesday, March 5 10:00 AM


BUSINESS REVIEW

Roswell Daily Record

Owner Danny Fulkerson (left) and the next generation ready to serve the Roswell Community: Danny’s son Braxton Fulkerson (right) with their antique chevy truck.

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

A7

Fulkerson Services offers over 50 years of experience in Roswell with service that cannot be beat! Their office is at 1600 W Second Street. Call 622-1600 for more information about any of the services Fulkerson offers.

Fulkerson Services Celebrates its 50th Anniversary!

Fulkerson Services, has been offering plumbing heating and air conditioning excellence to the Roswell area for 50 years, always with the highest standards.

A family-owned and operated company, Fulkerson, located at 1600 West Second Street, was founded by Rayford in 1964. Fulkerson Danny and Braxton Fulkerson are proud to carry on the tradition of quality and service that Rayford began way back in '64.

They are also proud to be a part of Lennox's Quality Dealer Standards program. Every Lennox dealer is independently owned and operated, and has to meet Lennox's high standards. It means when you call your Lennox dealer, you are assured of prompt, courteous and professional service.

Fulkerson offers: o Lennox® HVAC equipment. L e n n o x Industries was founded 118 years ago, in 1895. Founder Dave Lennox was the inventor of the riveted steel furnace. In the 1930's, Lennox was the first company to put blowers on furnaces and developed the first forcedair heating systems, forerunners to today's central air systems. In 1952, Lennox introduced the first residential air conditioning system. Today, Lennox is still a worldwide leader in both quality and innovation. Fulkerson offers HVAC service on any brand of equipment, 24/7. o Plumbing. Utilizing 35 employees and over 25 vehicles, Fulkerson offers you quick, ready response for your service needs.

They can take care of every aspect of plumbing, such as water heaters, gas lines, sewer lines, drain cleaning and replacement, faucets, toilets, tubs, showers, kitchen and bathroom sinks, disposals, water softeners and reverse osmosis systems and more! Fulkerson services both residential and commercial clients for installations, new repairs, re-piping and remodeling. o Air duct cleaning. Fulkerson can offer complete air duct cleaning, including your coil and blower since they are licensed to work on them too. o Quality Fulkerson Water Conditioning Products - water softeners and Vertex Water Products reverse osmosis units.

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A8 Tuesday, March 4, 2014

HOROSCOPES / WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Partly sunny and warmer

Cloudy most of the time

Wednesday

Sunny and pleasant

Thursday

Friday

Mostly sunny and warm

Saturday

Partly sunny

Periods of sun; cooler

Sunday

Times of clouds and sun

Mostly sunny and warmer

High 70°

Low 46°

69°/39°

79°/46°

82°/45°

61°/38°

67°/38°

80°/37°

NE at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

E at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

S at 3-6 mph POP: 0%

N at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

WNW at 4-8 mph POP: 10%

S at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

ESE at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 44°/22° Normal high/low ............... 65°/34° Record high ............... 86° in 2009 Record low ................... 9° in 2002 Humidity at noon .................. 53%

Farmington 59/29

Clayton 63/30

Raton 62/26

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Mon. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date .......................... Normal year to date .............

0.00" 0.05" 0.05" 0.07" 0.85"

Santa Fe 59/33

Gallup 58/26

Tucumcari 67/38

Albuquerque 62/40

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 66/36

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 59/41

T or C 66/44

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed. First

Mar 8

Rise Set 6:23 a.m. 5:57 p.m. 6:22 a.m. 5:58 p.m. Rise Set 8:25 a.m. 9:55 p.m. 9:05 a.m. 10:54 p.m. Full

Mar 16

Last

Mar 23

New

Mar 30

Alamogordo 67/43

Silver City 65/45

ROSWELL 70/46 Carlsbad 70/53

Hobbs 68/42

Las Cruces 68/46

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ### You might sense that you have an edge, and you do in a key situation. You’ll have little tolerance for settling for anything less than what you want. Your temper could erupt at any given moment. By mid-afternoon, you’ll become far more poised. Tonight: Treat a loved one. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ### You could go from being somewhat blue or quiet in the morning to being Mr. or Ms. Personality by the afternoon. You’ll express a real sense of direction and draw others in closer. Even someone who does not usually agree with you could emerge. Tonight: Among the crowds. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ### Use the morning for a key project, when your leverage and ability to draw in others is high. By the afternoon, you might resent being bogged down by what you judge to be insignificant details. Hold your tongue, and keep your own counsel. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. CANCER (June 21-July 22) #### You seem to offer a perspective that many people do not have. Your feedback is valued, even if you encounter difficulties with a higherup. This person simply tends to be a bit of a curmudgeon. Refuse to let this person get to you. Tonight: Do what you

Regional Cities Today Wed. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

National Cities

Monday

ENE at 3-6 mph POP: 0%

Almanac

Roswell Daily Record

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

67/43/pc 62/40/pc 48/23/pc 70/55/pc 70/53/pc 47/24/pc 63/30/pc 51/31/pc 66/36/pc 70/41/pc 61/39/pc 59/29/pc 58/26/pc 68/42/pc 68/46/pc 60/32/pc 55/33/pc 65/38/pc 68/42/pc 66/37/pc 56/27/pc 62/26/pc 46/23/pc 70/46/pc 59/41/pc 59/33/pc 65/45/pc 66/44/pc 67/38/pc 58/34/pc

69/38/pc 63/38/s 48/20/pc 70/46/pc 71/42/pc 48/24/pc 56/33/pc 53/30/pc 60/35/pc 71/39/s 62/37/s 59/31/s 58/23/s 69/39/pc 70/44/pc 56/32/pc 55/31/s 64/38/s 69/40/pc 63/35/pc 57/24/s 57/23/pc 45/16/pc 69/39/pc 57/42/pc 58/32/s 66/39/s 66/41/s 62/36/pc 57/33/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

want. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) #### You could be overwhelmed by everything that is going on. Your temper could rise as others aggressively seek you out. Screen your calls rather than blow a fuse. Dealing with work matters might preoccupy your afternoon. Tonight: Out till the wee hours. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ### Deal with a partner, associate or friend directly. Both of you could be the victim of a misunderstanding. Limit the rhetoric, as you attempt to clear the air. Someone else will appreciate your ability to detach and see the big picture. Tonight: Paint the town red. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) #### Though generally you’re known as the sign of diplomacy, lately you seem to be specializing in putting your foot in your mouth. Do not let today be another example of this behavior. In the afternoon, listen to a loved one’s saga. Tonight: Dinner for two. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ### Dive into work, and clear out as much as possible in the morning. Interpersonal interactions will take up a large part of the afternoon. You’ll enjoy the change of pace. Talk with a loved one about what you want for the two of you. Tonight: Go with the flow, but accept an invitation. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) #### You could be frivolous in the morning and efficient in the afternoon. You suddenly might realize how much is on your plate and

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

34/28/sn 50/37/pc 30/12/pc 25/19/pc 44/30/pc 24/19/sn 26/15/sf 48/35/pc 58/32/c 20/15/sn 69/49/pc 78/64/pc 42/34/r 29/21/pc 36/25/pc 72/56/s 69/55/pc 66/41/pc

34/23/sn 60/44/pc 35/27/pc 29/22/c 55/33/pc 30/19/sn 33/25/sn 57/38/c 58/35/pc 27/21/sn 72/45/pc 79/68/pc 58/43/pc 40/29/c 37/23/sn 74/56/s 74/56/pc 63/33/pc

U.S. Extremes

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

83/71/pc 66/42/c 18/6/c 47/41/r 26/22/pc 30/20/pc 80/62/pc 28/16/pc 79/59/pc 28/14/pc 58/46/r 35/26/pc 34/20/pc 54/37/sh 66/57/pc 53/44/r 74/51/pc 30/15/s

83/70/pc 70/37/pc 22/14/c 60/48/c 37/30/pc 32/20/sn 79/62/pc 37/28/pc 82/59/s 40/26/pc 57/47/r 51/32/pc 42/28/c 59/42/pc 67/58/pc 54/44/r 77/54/s 38/31/pc

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 85° .............. Vero Beach, Fla. Low: -44°............ Embarrass, Minn.

High: 64° ............................Socorro Low: 5° ............................... Clayton

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

decide to concentrate on what must be done. Create the possibility of working at home, where you can focus. Tonight: Head home and relax. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) #### You could be more in tune with a child, a new project or a loved one in the afternoon. To someone close, your change in mood from the morning chilliness that emanated from you will make him or her smile. Share more of your emotional side. Tonight: Be naughty and nice. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ### You are likely to speak your mind and cause quite a hullabaloo. By the afternoon, you might wish that you had stayed a little more contained. Consider what might be the best peace offering or at least an expression of your caring. Tonight: Settle in at home. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ### Check out a financial offer or an investment in the morning. The research that you do could prove to be most worthwhile by the afternoon. A discussion could reveal a lot more about what is being offered. Fortunately, you will ask the right questions. Tonight: Hang out. — JACQUELINE BIGAR BORN TODAY Football coach Knute Rockne (1888), composer Antonio Vivaldi (1678), writer Chaz Bono (1969)


SPORTS

B

NMAA releases state basketball brackets Tuesday, March 4, 2014 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

Section

Roswell Daily Record

ALBUQUERQUE — The New Mexico Activities Association released the Class 1A, 2A, 3A, 4A and 5A state basketball tournament brackets on Sunday. Six area teams — four boys teams and two girls teams — earned spots in the brackets. The Roswell boys, Goddard boys, Dexter boys, Hagerman boys, Roswell girls and Hagerman girls were selected in their respective classifications.

In the 4A boys bracket, Roswell is the No. 1 seed and Goddard is the No. 6 seed. The Coyotes will host No. 16 Valencia on Saturday at 5 p.m. at the Coyote Den. The winner meets either No. 8 Gallup or No. 9 Española Valley in the state quarterfinals at The Pit on March 12. The Rockets will host No. 11 Grants on Saturday at 3 p.m. at Ground Zero Gymnasium. The

winner meets either No. 3 St. Pius X, the defending state champion, or No. 14 Belen at The Pit on March 12. The third member of the District 4-4A, Artesia, drew the No. 12 seed and travels to play Kirtland Central on Saturday. Centennial is the No. 4 seed and hosts No. 13 Piedra Vista, Los Lunas is No. 2 and hosts No. 15 Capital and Albuquerque Academy is No. 7 and hosts No.

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

10 Farmington. In the 2A boys bracket, Dexter is the No. 2 seed. The Demons host No. 15 Bosque on Saturday at 4 p.m. at Lewis Gym, with the winner meeting No. 7 Lordsburg or No. 10 Santa Rosa in the state quarterfinals at the Santa Ana Star Center on March 12. The rest of the 2A field is as follows: Defending state champion Laguna-Acoma is the No. 1 seed and hosts No. 16 Eunice; No. 3

Clayton hosts No. 14 Dulce; No. 4 Texico hosts No. 13 Peñasco; No. 5 Santa Fe Prep hosts No. 12 Crownpoint; No. 6 Mesilla Valley Christian hosts No. 11 Mora; No. 8 Tohatchi hosts No. 9 Tularosa. In the 1A boys bracket, Hagerman is the No. 3 seed. The Bobcats host No. 14 Jemez Valley on Saturday at 3 p.m., with the winner meeting No. 6 Logan or No.

Warriors Wilson revels with Rangers at spring training win double OT thriller

See BRACKETS, Page B3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

SURPRISE, Ariz. (AP) — Russell Wilson has enjoyed spending time with the Texas Rangers. Yet the Seattle Seahawks are never far from the young quarterback’s mind. While Wilson sat in the Texas Rangers dugout Monday, fans yelling “Seahawks” filled the spring training stadium. “I couldn’t expect anything less,” Wilson said. “The 12th man fans were unbelievable today. They’re everywhere. The 12th man fans are out in the outfield, they’re on third-base line, first-base line, chanting ‘Seahawks’ the whole way. Hopefully the Dallas fans didn’t get too mad.” Wilson threw for 3,357 yards and 26 touchdowns and helped the Seattle Seahawks rout the Denver Broncos 43-8 in the Super Bowl last month. He also happens to be a pretty good baseball player, drafted three times and hitting .229 with a .350 on-base percentage in 93 games in 2010-11 in the low minors in the Colorado Rockies system. But he’s had instant success in the NFL. “You never say never,” Wilson said. “I’ve always had the dream of playing two

Cort Marley scored just seven points, but three of them came at critical times to help Gateway Christian advance in the District 3-B tournament on Monday. The Warriors reached the semifinals of the district tournament with a 45-42 win in double overtime over visiting Vaughn at the Red Rock Warrior Center. With the fourth-seeded Eagles leading 42-40 with 15 seconds left in the second overtime, Caleb Raney knocked down a triple to put the Warriors ahead. Gateway (8-13) forced a turnover on the next Vaughn possession and Marley sealed the victory with a pair of free throws. Earlier in the game, another Marley free throw is what kept Gateway in the game. With 5 seconds left in regulation, Marley split a pair at the line to forge a 37-all tie and force an extra session. The two teams deadlocked in the first overtime, setting up the deciding second extra stanza. Gateway led 20-19 at the break, but Vaughn rallied for a 33-28 lead going to the fourth. Johnny Worrall paced the Warriors with a double-double of 16 points and 20 rebounds. Marley finished with seven points and nine rebounds, while Raney added eight points. The Warriors will meet second-seeded Lake Arthur in the semifinals in Lake Arthur on Wednesday at 6 p.m.

LOCAL BRIEFS

See WILSON, Page B3

AP Photos

ABOVE: Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson throws to first during a drill at Rangers spring training, Monday. LEFT: Wilson moves into position to field ball, Monday. Wilson, who was acquired by the Rangers in the Rule 5 draft in December, worked out briefly with the team and was in the dugout for Texas’ loss to Cleveland.

Lake Arthur 91, Corona 20 LAKE AR THUR — Behind a pair of

Creamer’s 75-footer seals victory Pistorius murder trial opens in S. Africa

AP Photo

Paula Creamer celebrates after draining a 75-foot eagle putt on the second playoff hole to clinch a victory over Azahara Munoz at the HSBC Women’s Champions, Sunday.

LOCAL SCHEDULE — TUESDAY, MARCH 4 — District 3-B quarterfinals • Gateway Chr. at Vaughn, 6 p.m. • Lake Arthur at Hondo Valley, 6 p.m. GIRLS BASKETBALL

• NMMI at Ronnie Black Invitational, Hobbs, 9 a.m. MEN’S GOLF

• NMMI at Roswell, 3 p.m. PREP TENNIS

SINGAPORE (AP) — Paula Creamer sank a 75-foot eagle putt on the second playoff hole against Azahara Munoz to win the HSBC Women’s Champions on Sunday for her first LPGA title since the 2010 U.S. Women’s Open. Creamer’s putt curled across the 18th green and then rolled slowly down the slope and directly into the hole. She ran across the green, then fell to her knees and put her head on the ground, laughing and pounding the grass. “It’s one of those putts where if you just get it in the right spot, it’s going to fall down,” she said. “But I could stand there all day long and putt that and I don’t think get it within six, seven feet.” Creamer and Munoz finished 72 holes tied at 10under 278, one stroke ahead of Karrie Webb, who led after every round but bogeyed three of her last six See CREAMER, Page B3

PRETORIA, South Africa (AP) — “Bang ... bang, bang, bang.” The murder trial of Oscar Pistorius opened Monday in South Africa with testimony from a neighbor who described the sound of what she said were four gunshots and recalled the “blood-curdling screams” of a woman who prosecutors say was the girlfriend slain by the onetime star athlete in his home. “It’s the most helpless AP Photo feeling I’ve ever had in my life,” university lecturer Oscar Pistorius walks into the court room for the first day Michelle Burger said of lis- of his trial in the murder of Reeva Steenkamp. The tening to the screams. “I Steenkamp family, at right, looks on. knew something terrible The proceedings were was happening in that stood in the dock in a dark gray suit and black tie, broadcast on television, house.” writing in a pad and somethough Burger was not The 27-year-old doubletimes passing notes to shown at her own request, amputee runner, whose defense lawyers. At one and millions of people stature peaked at the 2012 London Olympics and then point, he smiled at a per- around the world followed plummeted when he shot son sitting behind him. a trial where the heady model and television per- Steenkamp’s mother, mix of a celebrity defensonality Reeva Steenkamp June, sat near Pistorius dant and shocking allegain the pre-dawn hours of but there was no commuValentine’s Day last year, nication between them. See TRIAL, Page B3

SPOTLIGHT 1960 — Phil Latrielle of Middlebury scores an NCAArecord 10 goals in a 13-2 victory over Colgate. Latrielle, a three time All-American, would score a record 250 goals in the 85 games of his college ice hockey career. 1962 — Wilt Chamberlain of the Philadelphia Warriors registers his fifth straight 50-point game with 58 against the New York Knicks and sets a season scoring record with 3,921 points. 1968 — Joe Frazier wins the vacant New York world

See BRIEFS, Page B3

ON

SPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN ... heavyweight title with an 11th-round TKO of Buster Mathis at Madison Square Garden. 1981 — Guy LaFleur of the Montreal Canadiens scores his 1,000th point with a goal in a 9-3 rout over the Winnipeg Jets. 1990 — Hank Gathers, one of two Division I players to lead the nation in scoring and rebounding in the same season, dies after collapsing during Loyola Marymount’s West Coast Conference tournament

game against Portland. He was 23. 2006 — Rafael Nadal ends top-ranked Roger Federer’s 56-match hardcourt winning streak with a 26, 6-4, 6-4 victory in the final of the Dubai Open. 2013 — Gonzaga, the small Northwest school that has delivered big NCAA tournament wins, is on top of The Associated Press’ Top 25 for the first time. Riding the best record in Division I at 29-2, the Bulldogs become the 57th school to be ranked No. 1.


B2 Tuesday, March 4, 2014

SPORTS

Class 4A girls bracket: Just another NMAA failure

It was just two days ago when I wrote that Benjamin Franklin’s timeless quip about the certainties of life needed to be modernized a bit. It seems I need to slightly alter my proposed moderation. I’m thinking something along the lines of this: “In this world, nothing can be said to be certain, except death, taxes, a Roswell run and ridiculous decisions by the NMAA.” In yet another head scratcher, the New Mexico Activities Association has found a way to circumvent its own rules and punish one of the member teams it is tasked to assist. The Association’s employees, most of whom rarely watch any basketball games outside of the Albuquerque metro area, make up the committee that is charged with selecting and bracketing the

College basketball

The AP Top 25 By The Associated Press The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ college basketball poll, with firstplace votes in parentheses, records through March 2, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Prv 1. Florida (46) . . . . . . . . .27-2 1,606 1 2. Wichita St. (14) . . . . . .31-0 1,555 2 3. Arizona (5) . . . . . . . . .27-2 1,514 3 4. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23-6 1,364 6 5. Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . .25-5 1,304 12 6. Villanova . . . . . . . . . . .26-3 1,292 8 7. Syracuse . . . . . . . . . . .26-3 1,240 4 8. Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . .22-7 1,200 5 9. Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . .24-5 1,075 14 10. San Diego St. . . . . . . .25-3 995 13 11. Louisville . . . . . . . . . . .24-5 959 7 12. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . .21-7 899 16 13. Creighton . . . . . . . . . .23-5 892 9 14. North Carolina . . . . . .22-7 755 19 15. Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .24-5 737 11 16. Iowa St. . . . . . . . . . . .22-6 613 15 17. Saint Louis . . . . . . . . .25-4 539 10 18. SMU . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23-6 427 23 19. UConn . . . . . . . . . . . .23-6 423 — 20. Memphis . . . . . . . . . .22-7 364 21 21. New Mexico . . . . . . . .23-5 338 25 22. Michigan St. . . . . . . . .22-7 322 18 23. Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . .21-8 183 — 24. Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20-9 94 20 25. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . .21-8 92 17

Others receiving votes: Texas 70, VCU 58, UCLA 45, Gonzaga 38, Stephen F. Austin 38, Kansas St. 19, Saint Joseph’s 19, Ohio St. 17, Green Bay 13, Harvard 7, Arizona St. 5, UMass 5, Colorado 2, Pittsburgh 2, Xavier 2, NC Central 1, Oklahoma St. 1, Southern Miss. 1.

USA Today Top 25 Poll The top 25 teams in the USA Today men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through March 2, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25thplace vote and previous ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Pvs 1. Florida (25) . . . . . . . . .27-2 793 1 2. Wichita State (7) . . . . .31-0 769 2 3. Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . .27-2 741 3 4. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23-6 672 7 5. Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . .25-5 656 11 6. Villanova . . . . . . . . . . .26-3 647 9 7. Syracuse . . . . . . . . . . .26-3 563 5 8. Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . .22-7 559 6 9. Louisville . . . . . . . . . . .24-5 548 4 10. San Diego State . . . . .25-3 511 13 11. Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . .24-5 489 14 12. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . .21-7 455 16 13. Creighton . . . . . . . . . .23-5 411 10 14. North Carolina . . . . . .22-7 352 21 15. Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .24-5 351 12 16. Saint Louis . . . . . . . . .25-4 293 8 17. Iowa State . . . . . . . . .22-6 277 17 18. SMU . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23-6 185 24 19. UConn . . . . . . . . . . . .23-6 170 — 20. Memphis . . . . . . . . . .22-7 160 22 21. New Mexico . . . . . . . .23-5 146 — 22. Michigan State . . . . . .22-7 143 18 23. Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . .21-8 123 25 24. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . .21-8 106 15 25. Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20-9 86 19

Others receiving votes: Texas 50, Kansas State 40, Ohio State 21, UCLA 20, VCU 19, Gonzaga 10, Stephen F. Austin 9, Pittsburgh 7, Southern Miss. 6, Oklahoma State 4, UMass 4, Saint Joseph’s 3, Harvard 1.

LPGA

LPGA Money Leaders By The Associated Press Through March 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Trn 1. Paula Creamer . . . . . . . .4 2. Karrie Webb . . . . . . . . . .3 3. Anna Nordqvist . . . . . . . .3 4. Jessica Korda . . . . . . . . .4 5. Stacy Lewis . . . . . . . . . . .4 6. Azahara Munoz . . . . . . . .4 7. Inbee Park . . . . . . . . . . . .2 8. Chella Choi . . . . . . . . . . .4 9. Michelle Wie . . . . . . . . . .3 10. Morgan Pressel . . . . . . .4 11. Lydia Ko . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 12. Na Yeon Choi . . . . . . . .3 13. Catriona Matthew . . . . .3 14. Gerina Piller . . . . . . . . .4 15. Karine Icher . . . . . . . . . .4 16. Suzann Pettersen . . . . .3 17. Pornanong Phatlum . . .4 18. Angela Stanford . . . . . . .3 19. Sandra Gal . . . . . . . . . .4 20. So Yeon Ryu . . . . . . . . .2 21. Jenny Shin . . . . . . . . . .3 22. Lizette Salas . . . . . . . . .3 23. Lexi Thompson . . . . . . .4 24. Julieta Granada . . . . . . .4 25. Yani Tseng . . . . . . . . . . .3 26. Caroline Hedwall . . . . . .3 27. Amelia Lewis . . . . . . . . .2 28. Hee Young Park . . . . . .4 29. Se Ri Pak . . . . . . . . . . .3 30. Eun-Hee Ji . . . . . . . . . .3 31. Brittany Lincicome . . . . .4 32. Brittany Lang . . . . . . . . .3 33. Dewi Claire Schreefel . .3 34. Christel Boeljon . . . . . . .2 34. P.K. Kongkraphan . . . . .3 36. Sun Young Yoo . . . . . . .3 37. Meena Lee . . . . . . . . . .3 38. Mi Hyang Lee . . . . . . . .2 39. Jodi Ewart Shadoff . . . .3 40. Amy Yang . . . . . . . . . . .3 41. Thidapa Suwannapura .3 42. Cristie Kerr . . . . . . . . . .2 43. Shanshan Feng . . . . . . .2 44. Pernilla Lindberg . . . . . .3 45. Giulia Sergas . . . . . . . . .3 46. Caroline Masson . . . . . .4 47. Ayako Uehara . . . . . . . .4 48. Danielle Kang . . . . . . . .3 49. Moriya Jutanugarn . . . .4 50. Perrine Delacour . . . . . .2 51. Jennifer Johnson . . . . . .3 52. Katherine Kirk . . . . . . . .4 53. Haru Nomura . . . . . . . . .2 54. Jenny Suh . . . . . . . . . . .1 55. Mirim Lee . . . . . . . . . . .2 56. Carlota Ciganda . . . . . .3 57. Sandra Changkija . . . . .2 58. Sarah Kemp . . . . . . . . .1 59. Candie Kung . . . . . . . . .4 60. Haeji Kang . . . . . . . . . . .2 61. Nicole Castrale . . . . . . .2 62. Kristy McPherson . . . . .2 62. Alena Sharp . . . . . . . . . .2

Money $349,132 $294,597 $243,963 $221,904 $206,940 $197,968 $192,410 $165,989 $128,922 $124,705 $116,980 $108,730 $107,294 $97,217 $96,970 $92,352 $88,181 $87,131 $85,995 $80,248 $73,566 $71,784 $67,386 $63,422 $58,745 $52,748 $52,357 $46,237 $44,947 $43,816 $41,225 $38,243 $32,829 $31,543 $31,543 $26,330 $26,042 $25,458 $25,063 $24,300 $23,945 $23,851 $22,388 $22,007 $21,627 $21,302 $21,166 $20,641 $20,427 $20,110 $19,974 $19,909 $19,666 $19,289 $19,120 $18,264 $18,132 $17,171 $15,889 $15,684 $15,658 $15,220 $15,220

KEVIN J. KELLER Sports Editor kjkeller@rdrnews.com

MY THOUGHTS ON PAPER

teams for the state basketball tournament. In years past, that committee has done a fairly admirable job. This is not one of those years. The Association’s own bylaws state that “one district team cannot be seeded or selected higher than another if they came out of district as a lower seed, with regular season taking precedence over tournament play.” The committee, however, seemingly ignored this portion of its

64. Hee Kyung Seo . . . . . . .2 65. Line Vedel . . . . . . . . . . .2 66. Alison Walshe . . . . . . . .4 67. Mina Harigae . . . . . . . . .3 68. Ilhee Lee . . . . . . . . . . . .3 68. Mika Miyazato . . . . . . . .2 70. Jaye Marie Green . . . . .3 71. Sarah Jane Smith . . . . .2 72. Mariajo Uribe . . . . . . . . .3 73. Tiffany Joh . . . . . . . . . . .2 74. Rebecca Lee-Bentham .2 75. Ai Miyazato . . . . . . . . . .3 76. Beatriz Recari . . . . . . . .4 77. Laura Diaz . . . . . . . . . . .1 78. Dori Carter . . . . . . . . . . .2 79. Amy Anderson . . . . . . . .2 79. Becky Morgan . . . . . . . .2 81. Mo Martin . . . . . . . . . . .4 82. Austin Ernst . . . . . . . . . .2 83. Hannah Jun . . . . . . . . . .2 84. Kelly Tan . . . . . . . . . . . .2 85. Irene Coe . . . . . . . . . . .3 86. Lorie Kane . . . . . . . . . . .1 86. Brooke Pancake . . . . . .1 88. Paz Echeverria . . . . . . .2 89. Marina Alex . . . . . . . . . .2 89. Lindsey Wright . . . . . . .1 91. Kathleen Ekey . . . . . . . .2 91. M.J. Hur . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 91. Mindy Kim . . . . . . . . . . .2 91. Erica Popson . . . . . . . . .2 95. Sue Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 95. Sydnee Michaels . . . . . .2 95. Lee-Anne Pace . . . . . . .1 98. Janet Lin . . . . . . . . . . . .2 99. Chie Arimura . . . . . . . . .1 100. Jennifer Song . . . . . . .2

$15,199 $14,628 $14,573 $14,286 $14,280 $14,280 $13,979 $13,853 $13,560 $13,373 $13,009 $12,702 $12,659 $12,386 $11,621 $11,589 $11,589 $10,853 $10,140 $9,193 $9,146 $9,012 $8,847 $8,847 $7,464 $6,322 $6,322 $5,128 $5,128 $5,128 $5,128 $4,984 $4,984 $4,984 $4,611 $4,367 $4,162

NBA

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .33 26 .559 Brooklyn . . . . . . . . . . .29 29 .500 New York . . . . . . . . . .21 40 .344 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .20 40 .333 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .15 45 .250 Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 14 .754 Washington . . . . . . . .31 29 .517 Charlotte . . . . . . . . . .27 33 .450 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .26 32 .448 Orlando . . . . . . . . . . .19 43 .306 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . .46 13 .780 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .33 27 .550 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .24 36 .400 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .24 37 .393 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . .12 47 .203

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L San Antonio . . . . . . . .43 16 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .40 19 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 25 Memphis . . . . . . . . . .34 25 New Orleans . . . . . . .23 37 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Oklahoma City . . . . . .45 15 Portland . . . . . . . . . . .41 19 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .30 29 Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .25 34 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 39 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L L.A. Clippers . . . . . . .41 20 Golden State . . . . . . .36 24 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . .35 24 L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . .21 39 Sacramento . . . . . . . .21 39

GB — 3 1⁄2 13 13 1⁄2 18 1⁄2

GB — 13 1⁄2 1 17 ⁄2 17 1⁄2 26 1⁄2

GB — 13 1⁄2 22 1⁄2 23 34

Pct GB .729 — .678 3 .590 8 .576 9 1 .383 20 ⁄2

Pct GB .750 — .683 4 .508 14 1⁄2 .424 19 1⁄2 .350 24

Pct GB .672 — .600 4 1⁄2 .593 5 .350 19 1⁄2 .350 19 1⁄2

Sunday’s Games Chicago 109, New York 90 Toronto 104, Golden State 98 Orlando 92, Philadelphia 81 Indiana 94, Utah 91 Oklahoma City 116, Charlotte 99 San Antonio 112, Dallas 106 Phoenix 129, Atlanta 120 Monday’s Games Memphis 110, Washington 104 Brooklyn 96, Chicago 80 Miami 124, Charlotte 107 Detroit 96, New York 85 Milwaukee 114, Utah 88 Minnesota 132, Denver 128 L.A. Lakers 107, Portland 106 Sacramento 96, New Orleans 89 Tuesday’s Games Golden State at Indiana, 5 p.m. San Antonio at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Miami at Houston, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Phoenix, 7 p.m. New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Houston at Orlando, 5 p.m. Utah at Washington, 5 p.m. Indiana at Charlotte, 5 p.m. Memphis at Brooklyn, 5:30 p.m. Golden State at Boston, 5:30 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 5:30 p.m. Dallas at Denver, 6 p.m. New York at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Sacramento at Milwaukee, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Portland, 8:30 p.m.

NHL

National Hockey League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Boston . . . . . . .60 38 17 5 Montreal . . . . .62 34 21 7 Tampa Bay . . .61 34 22 5 Toronto . . . . . .63 32 23 8 Detroit . . . . . . .60 28 20 12 Ottawa . . . . . .61 27 23 11 Florida . . . . . . .61 23 31 7 Buffalo . . . . . . .61 18 35 8 Metropolitan Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pittsburgh . . . .60 40 16 4 Philadelphia . .62 32 24 6 N.Y. Rangers .62 33 26 3 Washington . . .62 29 23 10 Columbus . . . .61 31 25 5 New Jersey . . .62 26 23 13 Carolina . . . . .61 26 26 9 N.Y. Islanders .63 23 32 8

Pts 81 75 73 72 68 65 53 44

Pts 84 70 69 68 67 65 61 54

GF GA 188 137 159 152 177 156 186 193 159 165 174 199 151 197 124 183 GF GA 192 149 174 180 162 157 184 186 180 170 148 153 151 173 173 215

own bylaws when it put together the Class 4A girls basketball bracket. In the District 4-4A regular-season standings, Roswell was first, Goddard was second and Artesia was third. Yet, Artesia made the field and Goddard did not. Yes, Goddard and Artesia finished with identical 1-3 records in district play this year. Goddard ended up as the No. 2 seed in the district tournament because of the NMAA’s point-spread tiebreaker. Before you continue, I want you to re-read the last word in the previous sentence at least a handful of times. Soak that word in and let it permeate your brain. Think about it and think about what it means. The word is tiebreaker: As in, break a tie; as in, the tie no longer exists because it is now broken.

Roswell Daily Record

Apparently the brain trust at the NMAA defines the word tiebreaker differently than the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, though. In the same portion of the bylaw that contains the clause about the order in which district teams are selected, this phrase appears: “In the event of a tie in the regular season district standings, the NMAA Staff may use district tournament results or any other head to head competition to determine the selection/seeding order between the two teams that are tied.” What tie? How can there be a tie if you have a procedure for breaking ties? So Goddard and Artesia were tied, then they weren’t because the tie was broken according to the NMAA bylaws, then they somehow ended up tied again?

SCOREBOARD

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT St. Louis . . . . .60 40 14 6 Chicago . . . . . .62 36 12 14 Colorado . . . . .61 39 17 5 Minnesota . . . .62 34 21 7 Dallas . . . . . . .61 29 22 10 Winnipeg . . . . .62 30 26 6 Nashville . . . . .61 26 25 10 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Anaheim . . . . .62 43 14 5 San Jose . . . . .62 39 17 6 Los Angeles . .62 34 22 6 Vancouver . . . .63 28 25 10 Phoenix . . . . . .61 27 23 11 Calgary . . . . . .61 23 31 7 Edmonton . . . .62 20 34 8

Pts 86 86 83 75 68 66 62

Pts 91 84 74 66 65 53 48

GF GA 200 139 213 166 188 164 153 150 173 171 174 178 150 185

GF GA 202 150 188 151 150 133 150 166 169 180 141 185 154 204

Sunday’s Games Philadelphia 5, Washington 4, OT San Jose 4, New Jersey 2 Florida 5, N.Y. Islanders 3 Ottawa 4, Vancouver 2 Boston 6, N.Y. Rangers 3 Colorado 6, Tampa Bay 3 St. Louis 4, Phoenix 2 Anaheim 5, Carolina 3 Monday’s Games Columbus 2, Toronto 1 Dallas 3, Buffalo 2 Minnesota 3, Calgary 2 Montreal at Los Angeles, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Florida at Boston, 5 p.m. Detroit at New Jersey, 5 p.m. Dallas at Columbus, 5 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at St. Louis, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Nashville, 6 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Winnipeg, 6 p.m. Vancouver at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Edmonton, 7:30 p.m. Carolina at San Jose, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Toronto at N.Y. Rangers, 5 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Calgary, 7:30 p.m. Montreal at Anaheim, 8 p.m.

PGA

PGA Tour FedExCup Leaders By The Associated Press Through March 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Points Money 1. Jimmy Walker . . . . . .1,830 $3,785,680 2. Dustin Johnson . . . .1,206 $2,951,150 3. Harris English . . . . . .1,116 $2,318,397 4. Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . .1,017 $1,946,070 5. Bubba Watson . . . . . . .982 $2,160,007 6. Webb Simpson . . . . . .939 $2,019,016 7. Zach Johnson . . . . . . .867 $1,777,825 8. Ryan Moore . . . . . . . . .852 $1,997,050 9. Kevin Stadler . . . . . . . .804 $1,617,152 10. Patrick Reed . . . . . . .776 $1,478,552 11. Jason Day . . . . . . . . .720 $1,909,200 12. Jordan Spieth . . . . . .687 $1,529,255 13. Brian Stuard . . . . . . .672 $1,273,508 14. Ryan Palmer . . . . . . .654 $1,266,290 15. Graham DeLaet . . . . .620 $1,422,466 16. Russell Henley . . . . .591 $1,200,954 17. Scott Stallings . . . . . .575 $1,195,200 18. Charles Howell III . . .557 $1,067,492 19. Russell Knox . . . . . . .527 $873,178 20. Gary Woodland . . . . .505 $1,118,777 21. Will MacKenzie . . . . .496 $982,574 22. Jason Bohn . . . . . . . .491 $923,260 23. Pat Perez . . . . . . . . .478 $979,521 24. Charley Hoffman . . . .457 $871,110 25. Chris Stroud . . . . . . .456 $930,920 26. Hideki Matsuyama . . .446 $820,788 27. Ryo Ishikawa . . . . . . .425 $854,673 28. Matt Every . . . . . . . . .421 $728,426 29. Kevin Na . . . . . . . . . .417 $752,352 30. Graeme McDowell . . .407 $981,300 31. Brendon Todd . . . . . .406 $592,673 32. Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . .396 $667,850 33. Scott Brown . . . . . . . .393 $691,909 34. Brian Harman . . . . . .384 $741,312 35. Vijay Singh . . . . . . . .376 $636,371 36. Keegan Bradley . . . . .376 $701,241 37. Ian Poulter . . . . . . . . .368 $928,018 38. Rory McIlroy . . . . . . .355 $778,500 39. K.J. Choi . . . . . . . . . .355 $698,698 40. Sergio Garcia . . . . . .351 $842,000 41. Jeff Overton . . . . . . . .349 $619,910 42. Justin Leonard . . . . . .348 $629,812 43. Brendan Steele . . . . .345 $601,223 44. Rickie Fowler . . . . . . .342 $834,330 45. Marc Leishman . . . . .335 $675,639 46. Hunter Mahan . . . . . .327 $689,346 47. Daniel Summerhays .326 $447,121 48. Billy Horschel . . . . . .324 $618,721 49. Briny Baird . . . . . . . . .321 $548,375

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Tuesday, March 4 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. FS1 — Preseason, Texas vs. L.A. Angels, at Tempe, Ariz. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 4:30 p.m. ESPNEWS — UCF at Temple 5 p.m. ESPN — Michigan at Illinois ESPN2 — Iowa St. at Baylor ESPNU — Florida at South Carolina FS1 — Creighton at Georgetown 6:30 p.m. ESPNEWS — USF at Houston 7 p.m. ESPN — Alabama at Kentucky ESPNU — Florida St. at Boston College FS1 — Marquette at Providence 9 p.m. FS1 — Arizona St. at Oregon NHL HOCKEY 6 p.m. NBCSN — Tampa Bay at St. Louis

50. Tim Clark . . . . . . . . . .316 51. Stuart Appleby . . . . . .316 52. Jerry Kelly . . . . . . . . .310 53. Brian Gay . . . . . . . . .309 54. Luke Guthrie . . . . . . .308 55. Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . .306 56. Cameron Tringale . . .304 57. George McNeill . . . . .303 58. Jason Kokrak . . . . . .301 59. Robert Garrigus . . . . .295 60. Bryce Molder . . . . . . .294 61. Boo Weekley . . . . . . .290 62. Kevin Streelman . . . .285 63. Justin Hicks . . . . . . . .282 64. Rory Sabbatini . . . . . .272 65. Ernie Els . . . . . . . . . .265 66. Jason Dufner . . . . . . .259 67. James Driscoll . . . . . .259 68. Billy Hurley III . . . . . .256 69. Seung-yul Noh . . . . .252 70. Jim Renner . . . . . . . .245 71. Matt Jones . . . . . . . . .244 72. William McGirt . . . . . .228 73. Aaron Baddeley . . . . .225 74. Camilo Villegas . . . . .223 75. John Senden . . . . . . .219 76. David Hearn . . . . . . .214 77. Spencer Levin . . . . . .213 78. Chesson Hadley . . . .210 79. Kevin Chappell . . . . .210 80. Nick Watney . . . . . . .209 81. Adam Scott . . . . . . . .206 82. Michael Thompson . .203 83. Tim Wilkinson . . . . . .200 84. J.J. Henry . . . . . . . . .200 85. Jonas Blixt . . . . . . . . .200 86. Brian Davis . . . . . . . .200 87. Greg Chalmers . . . . .195 88. Ken Duke . . . . . . . . .194 89. Chad Collins . . . . . . .192 90. Sang-Moon Bae . . . .192 91. Fredrik Jacobson . . . .191 92. Martin Laird . . . . . . . .187 92. Phil Mickelson . . . . . .187 94. Justin Rose . . . . . . . .185 95. Charlie Beljan . . . . . .183 96. Morgan Hoffmann . . .182 97. Tyrone Van Aswegen 179 98. Jim Furyk . . . . . . . . . .178 99. Michael Putnam . . . .176 100. Roberto Castro . . . . .173

Transactions

$563,883 $476,375 $577,740 $508,808 $443,458 $637,167 $503,017 $554,080 $474,259 $364,573 $608,373 $386,172 $557,223 $412,471 $458,378 $677,921 $539,949 $271,227 $440,551 $336,997 $580,800 $351,298 $379,657 $439,219 $196,459 $389,605 $330,534 $241,060 $430,750 $213,895 $264,650 $412,550 $318,837 $404,772 $261,276 $320,513 $270,647 $337,229 $330,195 $289,197 $302,919 $393,459 $247,882 $274,755 $417,779 $311,760 $259,868 $172,161 $367,094 $163,651 $211,268

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League TEXAS RANGERS — Claimed INF Andy Parrino off waivers from Oakland. Placed LHP Derek Holland on the 60-day DL. National League CHICAGO CUBS — Agreed to terms with RHP Jake Arrieta, RHP Dallas Beeler, RHP

Golf scores

Artesia beat Goddard handily in the district tournament and then almost knocked off Roswell in the title game, I get it. But I’m not saying Artesia doesn’t belong in the field. I’m saying that, according to the NMAA bylaws, Goddard belongs in the field and it should be seeded ahead of Artesia. The seeds for the district tournament are determined by your finish in the regular-season district standings. Goddard was No. 2 and Artesia was No. 3. It’s that simple: Tiebreakers break ties. The NMAA’s lone purpose is to protect the best interest of all of its member schools and teams. In this case, they failed miserably. And based on what I’ve seen, another failure is as certain as death, taxes and a Roswell run.

Alberto Cabrera, RHP Justin Grimm, RHP Blake Parker, RHP Neil Ramirez, RHP Hector Rondon, RHP Arodys Vizcaino, LHP Zac Rosscup, LHP Chris Rusin, C Welington Castillo, INF Arismendy Alcantara, INF Mike Olt, INF Christian Villanueva INF Logan Watkins, OF Brett Jackson, OF Junior Lake, OF Matt Szczur and OF Josh Vitters on one-year contracts. NEW YORK METS — Agreed to terms with RHP Victor Black, OF Andrew Brown, C Juan Centeno, C Travis d’Arnaud, RHP Jacob deGrom, OF Matt den Dekker, LHP Josh Edgin, RHP Jeurys Familia, INF Wilmer Flores, RHP Gonzalez Germen, RHP Erik Goeddel, RHP Matt Harvey, OF Juan Lagares, INF Zach Lutz, LHP Steven Matz, RHP Jenrry Mejia, OF Kirk Nieuwenhuis, OF Cesar Puello, C Anthony Recker, RHP Ryan Reid, LHP Scott Rice, INF Josh Satin, RHP Carlos Torres, INF Wilfredo Tovar, RHP Jeff Walters and RHP Zack Wheeler on one-year contracts. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Agreed to terms with RHP Jesse Hahn, RHP Casey Kelly, RHP Donn Roach, RHP Keyvius Sampson, RHP Burch Smith, RHP Dale Thayer, RHP Nick Vincent RHP Joe Wieland, LHP Robbie Erlin, LHP Juan Oramas, LHP Patrick Schuster LHP Alex Torres, C Yasmani Grandal, C Rene Rivera, INF Yonder Alonso, INF Alexi Amarista, INF Jedd Gyorko, INF Ryan Jackson INF Tommy Medica, OF Yeison Asencio, OF Reymond Fuentes and OF Rymer Liriano on one-year contracts. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS — Recalled G Troy Daniels from Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS — Released LB Willie Jefferson. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Designated C Alex Mack as the transition player for 2014. MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed CB Brent Grimes to a four-year contract. PITTSBURGH STEELERS — Designated LB Jason Worilds as the transition player for 2014. TENNESSEE TITANS — Agreed to terms with S Bernard Pollard on a multiyear contract. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Placed the franchise tag on LB Brian Orakpo. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL — Suspended Washington D Dmitry Orlov two games for boarding Philadelphia F Brayden Schenn during a March 2 game. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS — Agreed to terms with F Brandon Bollig on a three-year contract extension through the end of the 2016-17 season. EDMONTON OILERS — Agreed to terms with G Ben Scrivens on a two-year contract extension. FLORIDA PANTHERS — Announced the resignation of president and CEO Michael Yormark. MINNESOTA WILD — Signed RW Kurtis Gabriel to a three-year entry-level contract.

Honda Classic Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At PGA National Resort and Spa, The Champion Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Purse: $6 million Yardage: 7,140; Par 70 Final (x-won on first playoff hole) x-Russell Henley (500), $1,080,000 . . . . . . . . . .64-68-68-72 — 272 Russell Knox (208), $448,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-63-68-71 — 272 Rory McIlroy (208), $448,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63-66-69-74 — 272 Ryan Palmer (208), $448,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-66-69-69 — 272 Billy Hurley III (110), $240,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-67-67-69 — 273 David Hearn (95), $208,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-70-70-67 — 274 Will MacKenzie (95), $208,500 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-68-69-70 — 274 Stuart Appleby (78), $168,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69-65-72 — 275 Luke Donald (78), $168,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-68-68-72 — 275 Sergio Garcia (78), $168,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-68-67 — 275 David Lingmerth (78), $168,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-68-68-70 — 275 Keegan Bradley (54), $94,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-68-66-73 — 276 Paul Casey (54), $94,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-69-67 — 276 Martin Flores (54), $94,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70-68-69 — 276 Freddie Jacobson (54), $94,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69-67-71 — 276 Chris Kirk (54), $94,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-67-72-68 — 276 Matteo Manassero, $94,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-71-67 — 276 George McNeill (54), $94,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-67-69-70 — 276 Andres Romero (54), $94,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68-71-67 — 276 Adam Scott (54), $94,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-69-70-69 — 276 Chris Stroud (54), $94,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-66-73-68 — 276 Daniel Summerhays (54), $94,800 . . . . . . . . . . .70-65-69-72 — 276 Jhonattan Vegas (54), $94,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-66-66-74 — 276 Matt Every (43), $45,400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-73-65-73 — 277 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano (43), $45,400 . . . . . . . .71-69-68-69 — 277 Rickie Fowler (43), $45,400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69-69-70 — 277 Luke Guthrie (43), $45,400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-73-65-72 — 277 Chesson Hadley (43), $45,400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-66-69-69 — 277 Patrick Reed (43), $45,400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-67-70-69 — 277 Brian Stuard (43), $45,400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-65-72 — 277 Tyrone Van Aswegen (43), $45,400 . . . . . . . . . .67-71-68-71 — 277 Nick Watney (43), $45,400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-70-67 — 277 Derek Ernst (35), $30,375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-69-71-72 — 278 Zach Johnson (35), $30,375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-70-68-73 — 278 Brooks Koepka, $30,375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-68-68-71 — 278 Seung-Yul Noh (35), $30,375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-68-72-69 — 278 Rory Sabbatini (35), $30,375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-71-68-74 — 278 Brendan Steele (35), $30,375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-66-71-72 — 278 Josh Teater (35), $30,375 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68-71-69 — 278 Nicholas Thompson (35), $30,375 . . . . . . . . . . .68-70-66-74 — 278 Jason Kokrak (28), $22,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-66-70-73 — 279 Ted Potter, Jr. (28), $22,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-66-67-75 — 279 Cameron Tringale (28), $22,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69-66-75 — 279 Camilo Villegas (28), $22,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-68-69-71 — 279 Boo Weekley (28), $22,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-67-73-71 — 279 Thomas Bjorn, $15,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-66-70-75 — 280 James Driscoll (21), $15,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-70-71 — 280 Graeme McDowell (21), $15,600 . . . . . . . . . . . .70-67-72-71 — 280 Troy Merritt (21), $15,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-69-72-71 — 280 Carl Pettersson (21), $15,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-67-68-73 — 280 John Senden (21), $15,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-63-73-72 — 280 Lee Westwood (21), $15,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-65-73-74 — 280 Charlie Wi (21), $15,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-68-72 — 280 Mark Wilson (21), $15,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-69-73-71 — 280 Jamie Donaldson, $13,680 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-69-72-75 — 281 Charles Howell III (15), $13,680 . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-69-72 — 281 Tim Wilkinson (15), $13,680 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-69-67-75 — 281 Stewart Cink (12), $13,320 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-68-69-76 — 282 Derek Fathauer, $13,320 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-69-75 — 282 Brian Harman (12), $13,320 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-72-69-74 — 282 D.A. Points (10), $13,020 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-69-70-74 — 283 Hudson Swafford (10), $13,020 . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-68-77 — 283 Brendon de Jonge (7), $12,660 . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-64-76-78 — 284 Ken Duke (7), $12,660 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-72-73 — 284 Justin Hicks (7), $12,660 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-71-73 — 284 Vijay Singh (7), $12,660 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-68-76 — 284 Trevor Immelman (4), $12,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69-72-75 — 285 Jeff Overton (4), $12,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-71-74 — 285 Ben Crane (2), $12,120 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-68-71-78 — 286 Made cut, did not finish Mark Calcavecchia (1), $11,700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-70-73 — 212

MONTREAL CANADIENS — Assigned D Davis Drewiske to Hamilton (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Recalled G Pekka Rinne from Milwaukee (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Recalled G Anders Lindback from Syracuse (AHL). Reassigned G Kristers Gudlevskis to Syracuse. WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Recalled D Jack Hillen from Hershey (AHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer CHIVAS USA— Waived F Bryan de la Fuente. Signed MF Daniel Fragoso. LA GALAXY — Acquired a conditional 2016 SuperDraft pick from Chicago for D Greg Cochrane. NEW YORK RED BULLS — Announced the resignation of general manager Jerome de Bontin. COLLEGE NEW JERSEY ATHLETIC CONFERENCE — Announced the additions of Christoper Newport, Frostburg State, Salisbury and Wesley as associate football members in the 2015-16 academic year. UT MARTIN — Fired men’s basketball coach Jason James.

Women’s basketball

The AP Top 25 By The Associated Press The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ women’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through March 2, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Prv 1. UConn (36) . . . . . . . . .30-0 900 1 2. Notre Dame . . . . . . . .29-0 864 2 3. Louisville . . . . . . . . . . .28-2 816 3 4. Stanford . . . . . . . . . . .27-2 802 5 5. South Carolina . . . . . .26-3 718 4 6. Tennessee . . . . . . . . . .23-5 679 10 7. West Virginia . . . . . . . .26-3 668 11 8. Maryland . . . . . . . . . . .24-5 658 9 9. Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . .25-4 650 6 10. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25-5 562 7 11. Penn St. . . . . . . . . . . .22-6 510 8 12. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . .22-7 489 12 13. North Carolina . . . . . .22-8 481 14 14. NC State . . . . . . . . . .24-6 409 13 15. Texas A&M . . . . . . . . .23-7 396 17 16. Nebraska . . . . . . . . . .22-6 352 16 17. Purdue . . . . . . . . . . . .21-7 343 19 18. Oklahoma St. . . . . . . .22-6 299 15 19. Michigan St. . . . . . . . .21-8 242 21 20. California . . . . . . . . . .21-8 190 18 21. Gonzaga . . . . . . . . . .26-4 186 22 22. Middle Tennessee . . .25-4 142 23 23. Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23-7 102 25 24. Rutgers . . . . . . . . . . .21-7 49 24 25. DePaul . . . . . . . . . . . .23-6 41 —

Others receiving votes: Arizona St. 36, Chattanooga 31, Bowling Green 30, Oregon St. 30, BYU 7, Syracuse 5, LSU 4, Vanderbilt 4, UTEP 2, Dayton 1, James Madison 1, St. John’s 1.

Erik Compton (1), $11,700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68-74 — 212 Davis Love III (1), $11,700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-72 — 212 William McGirt (1), $11,700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-69-78 — 212 Scott Brown (1), $11,220 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-73 — 213 Brice Garnett (1), $11,220 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-71-76 — 213 Jamie Lovemark (1), $11,220 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-68-76 — 213 Y.E. Yang (1), $11,220 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-68-74 — 213 Heath Slocum (1), $10,920 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-68-75 — 214

HSBC Women’s Champions Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At Sentosa Golf Club (Serapong Course) Singapore Purse: $1.4 million Yardage: 6,611; Par: 72 Final (x-won on second playoff hole; a-amateur) x-Paula Creamer, $210,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-73-69-69 — 278 Azahara Munoz, $133,681 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-67-70 — 278 Karrie Webb, $96,976 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-69-70-74 — 279 Morgan Pressel, $52,477 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-70-71 — 281 Suzann Pettersen, $52,477 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-70-70 — 281 Angela Stanford, $52,477 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-69-69-75 — 281 So Yeon Ryu, $52,477 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-73-66 — 281 Inbee Park, $52,477 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72-71-68 — 281 Teresa Lu, $31,106 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70-70-75 — 283 Michelle Wie, $31,106 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-69-70 — 283 Eun-Hee Ji, $25,689 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73-71-69 — 284 Na Yeon Choi, $25,689 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-71-72 — 284 Chella Choi, $25,689 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-69-71 — 284 Ha Na Jang, $22,542 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-71-72 — 285 Lydia Ko, $21,224 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-73-71 — 286 Sandra Gal, $17,956 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-76-68-68 — 287 Caroline Hedwall, $17,956 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-73-72-75 — 287 Lexi Thompson, $17,956 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-72-73 — 287 Brittany Lang, $17,956 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-74-68-72 — 287 Se Ri Pak, $17,956 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-71-72-69 — 287 Karine Icher, $17,956 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-72-71 — 287 Jenny Shin, $15,370 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-73-71 — 288 Gerina Piller, $15,370 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75-70-73 — 288 Jaye Marie Green, $13,979 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-70-73-71 — 289 Anna Nordqvist, $13,979 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-67-74-75 — 289 Jiyai Shin, $13,979 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-70-71-74 — 289 Pornanong Phatlum, 12,698 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-75-69-73 — 290 Sun Young Yoo, 12,698 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-73-73-72 — 290 Nicole Castrale, $10,832 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-68-76-74 — 291 Hee Kyung Seo, $10,832 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-67-71-77 — 291 Mika Miyazato, $10,832 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-73-69-74 — 291 Ilhee Lee, $10,832 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-73-69-73 — 291 Hee Young Park, $10,832 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-74-71-71 — 291 Amy Yang, $10,832 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73-73-75 — 291 Haeji Kang, $8,636 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-71-70-75 — 292 Yani Tseng, $8,636 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-74-74 — 292 Jennifer Johnson, $8,636 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-81-69-70 — 292 Alison Walshe, $8,636 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-81-67 — 292 Cristie Kerr, $8,636 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-73-74-73 — 292 Meena Lee, $7,173 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-72-70-77 — 293 Danielle Kang, $7,173 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-79-74 — 293 Stacy Lewis, $7,173 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-72-73-73 — 293 Shanshan Feng, $7,173 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-72-74-75 — 293 Katherine Kirk, $6,441 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-71-71-77 — 294 Catriona Matthew, $5,782 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-77-71-74 — 295 Julieta Granada, $5,782 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-75-74-74 — 295 Brittany Lincicome, $5,782 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71-75-78 — 295 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $5,782 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77-75-70-73 — 295 Mina Harigae, $5,782 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-76-72-72 — 295 Carlota Ciganda, $5,050 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73-74-76 — 296 Ayako Uehara, $5,050 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-73-75-73 — 296 Moriya Jutanugarn, $4,830 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-78-76 — 297 Xiyu Lin, $4,611 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-74-75-74 — 298 Candie Kung, $4,611 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-73-77-74 — 298 Lizette Salas, $4,391 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-76-72-77 — 300 Mo Martin, $4,172 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-79-73-76 — 302 Jessica Korda, $4,172 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-79-71-77 — 302 Irene Coe, $3,879 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-74-76-79 — 304 Caroline Masson, $3,879 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-79-76-79 — 304 Ai Miyazato, $3,660 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-75-79-76 — 305 Giulia Sergas, $3,587 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78-76-78-79 — 311 Amanda Tan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79-81-75-80 — 315


SPORTS

Creamer Continued from Page B1

holes to give up a three-shot lead and finish third. “It might be one of my favorite wins. ... It’s been almost three years and so much has happened,” Creamer said. “Holding that trophy, gosh, it was so nice.” For much of the day, it appeared as if Webb, not Creamer, would take the trophy home. But after avoiding trouble on a tricky Serapong course at Sentosa Golf Club for much of the week, the veteran Australian stumbled late. First, Webb’s three-foot par putt on the 13th caught the edge of the hole and curled away. Then she hooked her tee shot left on the 15th, grimacing as it dropped into the water. She settled for bogey on both. She came undone on the 18th when

Brackets Continued from Page B1

11 To’hajiilee in the state quarterfinals at Bernalillo High School on March 12. The rest of the 1A field is as follows: Defending state champion Cliff is the No. 1 seed and hosts No. 16 Tse’ Yi’ Gai; No. 2 Magdalena hosts No. 15 Shiprock Northwest; No. 4 Dora hosts No. 13 Capitan; No. 5 Escalante hosts No. 12 Floyd; No. 7 Springer hosts No. 10 Fort Sumner; No. 8 Melrose hosts No. 9 McCurdy. In the 4A girls bracket, Roswell is the No. 7 seed. The Coyotes host No. 10

Wilson

Continued from Page B1

sports. If somehow it was a miracle that it could work out, I’d consider it. At the same time, my focus is winning the championship with the Seattle Seahawks and hope to be playing for a long time. “For me, it only being my second year, yeah I won a Super Bowl and all that, but that’s not enough for me. It really isn’t. My goal is to be one of the best quarterbacks to ever play the game, if not the best. I’ve got a long ways to go. I make sure I get up earlier than Tom Brady and Drew Brees and they’re on the East Coast.” The Rangers picked Wilson for $12,000 in the Rule 5 minor league draft in December. He was in the Rangers’ camp Monday, took ground balls in morning drills and brought the Rangers’ lineup to the

another errant tee shot ended up in a bunker. She took a big swing at the ball and it hit the lip of the bunker, plopping back down into the sand to lead to another bogey. “I’m a bit in my head right now,” Webb said after the round. “Just not a lot of good decisions.” Creamer and Munoz, meanwhile, were steady in the closing holes. Webb wasn’t the only one who had a disappointing day. Defending champion Stacy Lewis saw her streak of 13 consecutive top10 finishes broken with her joint-40th place. She had been closing in on Webb’s LPGA record of 16 straight top-10 finishes, set in 1998-99. World No. 1 Inbee Park shot a 68 to finish in joint fourth place at 7-under 281 with No. 2 Suzann Pettersen, So Yeon Ryu, Angela Stanford and Morgan Pressel. Michelle Wie and Teresa Lu were two strokes back in a tie for ninth.

Centennial on Friday at 7 p.m., with the winner meeting No. 2 Santa Fe or No. 15 Grants in the state quarterfinals on March 11 at The Pit. Artesia is the No. 13 seed and travels to play No. 4 Gallup, with the winner meeting No. 5 Espanola Valley or No. 12 Belen on March 11. Goddard, despite finishing ahead of Artesia in the regular -season District 4-4A standings, was not selected. The rest of the 4A field is as follows: Defending state champion Los Lunas is the No. 1 seed and hosts No. 16 Kirtland Central; No. 3 St. Pius X hosts No. 14 Los Alamos; No. 6 Valencia hosts No. umpires before the game, but did not play in the 6-5 loss to Cleveland. “How much did I want to play an inning?” Wilson said. “How much did I want to play the whole game is the question.” He spoke at a Rangers’ dinner on Sunday night for sponsors, suite holders and players and addressed the minor leaguers Monday night. He said he would leave Tuesday for Seattle and “tur n my focus back to football.” So what is most difficult, hitting a curveball or being hit by a 300-pound defensive end? “Hitting a curveball,” Wilson said. “The ball is so small. It looks like a pea.” Wilson worked on throws and pivots at second base in a group with young infielders Jurickson Profar, Luis Sardinas and Rougned Odor. “He surprised me for not being out on the baseball field for a while,” Rangers

11 Del Norte; No. 8 Piedra Vista hosts No. 9 Miyamura. In the 1A girls bracket, Hagerman is the No. 11 seed. The Bobcats travel to meet No. 6 Floyd on Friday at 6 p.m., with the winner meeting No. 3 Melrose or No. 14 Cimarron in the state quarterfinals on March 11 at Bernalillo High School. The rest of the 2A field is as follows: No. 1 Tatum hosts No. 16 Tse’ Yi’ Gai; No. 2 Cliff hosts No. 15 Capitan; No. 4 Magdalena hosts No. 13 Fort Sumner; No. 5 Logan hosts No. 12 Mountainair; No. 7 Springer hosts No. 10 McCurdy; No. 8 Jemez Valley hosts No. 9 Dora. manager Ron Washington said. “I might have burned his legs up a little bit, but he made it through all the drills and did a fantastic job. He’s got tremendous aptitude. That’s why he is who he is. You give him something and he knows how to apply it.” Rangers shortstop Elvis Andrus said Wilson is athletic enough to make it in baseball. “He’s got pretty good hands,” Andrus said. “I’ve got to see him hit so I can answer that, but so far what I saw today it was pretty impressive.” The Surprise Stadium shops selling official Major League gear, predominantly displayed Wilson’s Rangers No. 3 jersey. The one on Wilson’s back, however, will not be sold. “The uniform, man, I’m definitely hanging this up,” Wilson said. “I’m gonna get a few of these and put them up around the house.”

LeBron pours in career-best 61

MIAMI (AP) — Best player. Best game of his career. LeBron James clearly isn’t ready to concede his MVP award to anyone yet. Dazzling from inside and out, James put on the best scoring show of his NBA life Monday night, pouring in 61 points — a career high and franchise record — as the Miami Heat beat the Charlotte Bobcats 124107. It was the eighth straight win for the two-time defending champions, who are starting to roll as the playoffs get near. James made 22 of 33 shots from the field, including his first eight 3-point attempts. “The man above has given me some unbelievable abilities to play the game of basketball,” James said. “I just try to take advantage of it every night. I got the trust of my teammates and my coaching staff to go in there and let it go.” His career best had been 56 points, on March 20, 2005, for Cleveland against Toronto. Glen Rice scored 56 to set the Heat record on April 15, 1995, against Orlando. James had 24 points at halftime, then

Briefs

Continued from Page B1

20-point scorers, Lake Arthur again romped past Corona to reach the semifinals of the district tournament. Luis Velo and Cody Dalton scored 24 and 21, respectively, to pace the Panthers. Lake Arthur (11-13) won each of the four quarters, outscoring the visitors 25-6 in the first, 23-5 in the second, 23-3 in the third and 20-6 in the fourth. Miguel Rubio chipped in 13 and Dominic Pisana had 12. Every Panther scored at least one point on the night.

added 25 in the third quarter. The recordbreaker came with 5:46 left, when James spun through three defenders for a layup that fell as he tumbled to the court. “There was an efficiency to what he was doing,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. “The rim looked like an ocean for him.” Spoelstra walked into his postgame news conference with a confession: He nearly took James out after the third quarter. Good thing he thought better of that plan. “He was in a great groove, obviously,” Spoelstra said. Al Jefferson had 38 points and 19 rebounds for the Bobcats, his huge night merely an afterthought. This was all about LeBron. “You take away his 61 points,” Jefferson said, “and we still had a fighting chance there at the end.” Most points in a game. Most field goals in a game. Most points in any quarter in Heat history, with the 25 in the third. Most points in the second half, 37, by any Heat player ever. “Once he sniffed 60, we knew he was going for it,” Heat forward Shane Battier said. “And the amazing part is the efficiency. Good Lord. Sixty-one on 33 shots, that’s Wilt Chamberlain-esque. That’s pretty amazing. Incredible performance.” When James checked out with 1:24 left, the entire Heat roster met him near midcourt for high-fives and hugs, and the sellout crowd gave him a standing ovation. A second huge roar followed when he waved to the crowd, as “M-V-P” chants rained down. Charlotte has allowed the two biggest single-game scoring totals in the NBA this season. Carmelo Anthony had 62 points for the New York Knicks against the Bobcats on Jan. 24. Chris Bosh scored 15 for the Heat, and Toney Douglas added 10. Chris Douglas-Roberts and Anthony Tolliver each scored 12 for Charlotte.

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

B3

ROSWELL NATIVE GERINA PILLER ON THE LPGA TOUR

PILLER’S

PROFESSION

73 T-22nd E

ROUND SCORE

Hole Par Score

Trial

Continued from Page B1

PLACE

TOTAL TO PAR

ROUND SCORECARD

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total 4 3 4 5 4 4 5 3 4 36 4 4 5 4 3 4 4 3 5 36 72 4 3 4 5 4 5 4 3 4 36 4 4 5 4 3 5 4 3 5 37 73

HKPCN

Roswell Daily Record

Eagles: 0 Birdies: 1 Pars: 15 Bogeys: 2 Others: 0 Fairways hit: 6 of 14 Greens hit: 16 of 18 Putts: 37

tions has drawn comparisons to the O.J. Simpson case two decades ago. Prosecutors allege that Pistorius, who has been free on bail, shot Steenkamp after an argument. He has said he killed her after mistaking her for a nighttime intruder in his home, shooting her through the closed door of the toilet cubicle in his bathroom. Steenkamp, 29, was hit three times — in the head, elbow and hip area; a fourth bullet did not hit her. Early testimony focused on whether the screams that Burger said she heard were those of a terrified woman about to be shot to death, as prosecutors allege, or were instead Pistorius’ desperate shrieks for help after a fatal mistake, as his defense lawyers contend. Burger, who lives about 180 meters (196 yards) from Pistorius’ house, gave her account of the sequence of events in the pre-dawn hours of Feb. 14 last year. “I was woken up by a woman’s petrified screams. I heard her screaming first,” Burger said. “Then I heard her call for help. Then I heard a man call for help three times. I then made a call. ... I gave the phone to my husband and he spoke to security. Afterward, I heard the woman’s petrified screams again.” Burger said she then heard four gunshots, with a gap between the first shot and the rest, and more screaming. “I heard her voice during the shots,” she said. “Shortly after the shots was the last time I heard that woman.” The chief defense lawyer, Barry Roux,

opened his cross-examination by asking Burger if she thought Pistorius was a liar. She didn’t directly answer that, but questioned Pistorius’ version. “I can only tell the court what I heard that evening,” Burger said. “I cannot understand how I could clearly hear a woman scream but Mr. Pistorius could not hear it.” Roux, in an attempt to discredit the idea that Pistorius and Steenkamp had an argument before the shooting, contended that Burger heard just Pistorius screaming for help. He also suggested that she had not heard gunshots, but instead had heard the sound of the athlete breaking down the toilet door with a cricket bat after realizing he had shot Steenkamp. “Could there have been shots fired when you were still asleep and you heard the screams afterward?” he asked. Roux’s constant challenges to Burger’s account of the sequence of events made for a contentious back-and-forth at times. “Shall I repeat my question? It can’t be that difficult,” Roux said at one point, implying that the witness was evasive. On another occasion, Burger said: “I didn’t sit there with a stopwatch and take down the timing of each shot.” Pistorius pleaded not guilty to charges of murder and three other counts relating to shooting guns in public in unrelated incidents and illegal possession of ammunition. Defense lawyer Kenny Oldwadge read a statement from Pistorius in which he said the killing was an accident and that there were inconsistencies in the state’s case.


B4 Tuesday, March 4, 2014

ENTERTAINMENT / FINANCIAL

Diversity the big winner at the Academy Awards LOS ANGELES (AP) — Diversity was perhaps the biggest winner at the 86th annual Academy Awards. For the first time, a film directed by a black filmmaker — Steve McQueen of “12 Years a Slave” — won best picture and a Latino — Alfonso Cuaron of “Gravity” — took home best director in a ceremony presided over by a lesbian host and overseen by the academy’s first black president. And only two of the top six awards went to Americans. McQueen’s grimly historical drama “12 Years a Slave” took best picture, leading the usually sedate filmmaker to jump up and down in celebration after his acceptance speech. The British director dedicated his award to “all of the people who endured slavery and the 21 million people who still suffer slavery today.” Cuaron’s lost-in-space thriller “Gravity” led the Oscars with seven awards, including cinematography, editing, score, visual effects, sound mixing and sound editing. Some in his native Mexico have been critical that since the attention came for a Hollywood release and not a Mexican-themed film, his win didn’t have the same kind of importance. “I’m Mexican so I hope some Mexicans were rooting for me,” he told reporters backstage. The entire Oscar ceremony had

For more on the Academy Awards, including a full list of all the Oscar winners, see Page B6 of today’s Daily Record

the feel of a make-over for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences — an institution that has sometimes seemed stuck in the past. After a Los Angeles Times report revealed the academy was overwhelmingly older white men, new president Cheryl Boone Isaacs has pushed for a more varied membership. The movie industry that the Oscars reflect has also been reluctant to tell a wider range of stories. “Dallas Buyers Club,” the best picture-nominated drama about AIDS in 1980s Texas, took two decades to get made after countless executives balked at financing such a tale. Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto, the two Americans in the top six awards, took best actor and best supporting actor titles for their roles in the film as a heterosexual rodeo rat (McConaughey) and a transgender drug addict (Leto) united by HIV. “Thirty-six million people who have lost the battle to AIDS and to those of you out there who have ever felt injustice because of who you are or who you love, tonight I

AP Photos

The four winners of the major individual Oscars, from left, Matthew McConaughey (best actor; “Dallas Buyers Club”), Cate Blanchett (best actress; “Blue Jasmine”), Lupita Nyong’o (best supporting actress; “12 Years a Slave”) and Jared Leto (best supporting actor; “Dallas Buyers Club”), pose with their trophies after the Academy Awards, Sunday. stand here in front of the world with you and for you,” said Leto in his acceptance speech. Cate Blanchett, the Australian best-actress winner for her bitter, ruined socialite in Woody Allen’s “Blue Jasmine,” used her acceptance speech to trumpet the need to make films with female leads — films like her own and like “Gravi-

Director Steve McQueen, left, celebrates with the cast and crew of “12 Years a Slave” as they accept the award for

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Apr 14 145.17 145.17 127.82 144.12 Jun 14 134.52 135.00 133.90 134.90 Aug 14 132.67 133.45 132.12 133.25 Oct 14 135.70 136.27 135.40 136.25 Dec 14 136.85 137.50 136.55 137.47 Feb 15 137.65 138.35 137.35 138.35 Apr 15 138.00 138.65 138.00 138.65 Jun 15 130.90 Aug 15 130.90 Last spot N/A Est. sales 50976. Fri’s Sales: 50,244 Fri’s open int: 369192, off -458 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Mar 14 171.40 171.90 170.50 171.77 Apr 14 172.50 173.10 171.50 173.07 May 14 172.80 173.75 172.10 173.72 Aug 14 175.00 175.67 173.87 175.57 Sep 14 174.25 175.07 173.50 175.05 Oct 14 174.10 174.65 174.10 174.65 Nov 14 173.25 173.90 173.25 173.90 Jan 15 171.60 171.60 171.60 171.60 Last spot N/A Est. sales 11557. Fri’s Sales: 7,283 Fri’s open int: 49612, off -603 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Apr 14 106.95 109.85 106.50 108.67 May 14 111.42 112.70 111.00 111.55 Jun 14 112.22 114.05 111.60 112.75 Jul 14 111.62 112.57 110.60 111.40 Aug 14 110.95 112.22 110.30 111.35 Oct 14 94.10 94.70 80.00 93.85 Dec 14 86.20 86.65 84.22 85.30 Feb 15 86.00 86.00 85.00 85.25 Apr 15 85.90 85.90 85.40 85.40 May 15 90.50 Jun 15 92.00 92.00 91.42 91.42 Jul 15 90.75 90.75 90.75 90.75 Last spot N/A Est. sales 90043. Fri’s Sales: 80,569 Fri’s open int: 294694, up +21534

chg.

-.85 +.70 +.63 +.50 +.57 +.55 +.45

+.07 +.02 +.15 -.15 -.02

+1.82 +.15 +.53 -.05 +.25 -.15 -.95 -1.07 -.55 -1.08 -.50

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Mar 14 87.80 88.35 86.65 87.86 May 14 87.00 88.58 86.82 88.33 Jul 14 86.71 87.97 86.30 87.67 Oct 14 80.82 Dec 14 77.75 78.60 77.51 78.53 Mar 15 78.20 78.89 78.19 78.89 May 15 78.23 79.09 78.22 79.09 Jul 15 79.30 Oct 15 78.88 Dec 15 78.36 Mar 16 78.26 May 16 78.27 Jul 16 78.27 Oct 16 78.27 Dec 16 78.28 Last spot N/A Est. sales 18194. Fri’s Sales: 19,470 Fri’s open int: 160878, off -732

chg.

+1.27 +1.19 +.78 +.75 +.71 +.59 +.67 +.74 +.78 +.78 +.78 +.78 +.78 +.78 +.78

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 610 640 608ü 626fl May 14 612 644ø 611ü 631ø Jul 14 616 648 616 635fl Sep 14 625 655 625 643ü Dec 14 635 666fl 635 655ü Mar 15 643 670ü 643 662ü May 15 661fl 672ø 658ø 664fl

chg.

+27fl +29ü +27ø +26fl +26ü +23ø +21ø

Roswell Daily Record

Jul 15 640 668ü 640 656fl Sep 15 650 665 650 661 Dec 15 670 677 659fl 670ø Mar 16 680 680 657 675ø May 16 665 674 664fl 674 Jul 16 649 655 649 654fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 225006. Fri’s Sales: 85,076 Fri’s open int: 359674, off -2830 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 459 476ü 457ü 464 May 14 464fl 482fl 464 470ø Jul 14 468ü 486 468ü 474fl Sep 14 468fl 483ü 468ø 474 Dec 14 472ø 484 471ø 476ø Mar 15 480 492 479ü 484 May 15 487 498 486ø 490ø Jul 15 489 500 489 493 Sep 15 477 485 477 477ø Dec 15 475 483 472ü 475 Mar 16 484 486ø 477ø 480fl May 16 485 487ü 484 484 Jul 16 490 491 485 485fl Sep 16 470ø 470ø 470ø 470ø Dec 16 465 465 460 461 Jul 17 474ü 474ü 470ø 470ø Dec 17 455ü 455ü 451ø 451ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 552260. Fri’s Sales: 309,145 Fri’s open int: 1269310, off -6818 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 520 530ø 520 528ø May 14 462ø 482ø 460 482ø Jul 14 407 415ø 406 415ø Sep 14 355 358fl 355 358fl Dec 14 347 360 347 352ø Mar 15 346 354 345 346fl 329ü 345 May 15 329ü 345 Jul 15 317ø 333ü 317ø 333ü Sep 15 317ø 333ü 317ø 333ü Dec 15 317ø 333ü 317ø 333ü Jul 16 318ø 334ü 318ø 334ü Sep 16 318ø 334ü 318ø 334ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 1804. Fri’s Sales: 828 Fri’s open int: 9624, off -183 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 1418ø 1438fl 1401 1407ü May 14 1419 1437ø 1402 1409ü Jul 14 1388 1402ø 1376 1381ø Aug 14 1337 1344 1325ü 1330fl Sep 14 1236fl 1245ü 1229ü 1235fl Nov 14 1169 1179 1164 1171ø Jan 15 1173 1181fl 1168 1175ü Mar 15 1175 1183ü 1173 1177ø May 15 1173ü 1183ø 1171fl 1178 Jul 15 1178fl 1186ø 1175 1181 Aug 15 1156ø 1160ü 1156ø 1160ü Sep 15 1132fl 1132fl 1131ø 1131ø Nov 15 1125 1125 1116fl 1123ø Jan 16 1122 1123ø 1122 1123ø Mar 16 1120 1126ü 1119ø 1119ø May 16 1128ü 1128ü 1123 1123 Jul 16 1125ü 1125ü 1121fl 1121fl Aug 16 1122ø 1122ø 1119 1119 Sep 16 1093ø 1093ø 1090 1090 Nov 16 1078ø 1078ø 1071ü 1077ü Jul 17 1086ø 1089fl 1086ø 1089fl Nov 17 1068ü 1071ø 1068ü 1071ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 202776. Fri’s Sales: 194,661 Fri’s open int: 677326, off -795

FUTURES

+19ø +19 +19ü +18ø +18ø +18fl

+6ø +7 +7ü +6 +5 +3fl +3fl +3ü +1 -ø -1 -ø -ø -3fl -3fl -3fl

+18 +20 +12ü +3fl +5ø +6fl +15fl +15fl +15fl +15fl +15fl +15fl

-7 -4fl -3fl -ü +2 +2ü +3 +3ü +2ø +3fl +3fl -1ü +2fl +1ø -6fl -5ü -3ø -3ø -3ø +3ø +3ü +3ü

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

chg.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Apr 14 103.00 105.22 102.95 104.92 +2.33 May 14 102.18 104.48 102.18 104.22 +2.33 Jun 14 101.33 103.45 101.33 103.16 +2.21 Jul 14 100.39 102.27 100.39 102.03 +2.07 Aug 14 99.25 101.12 99.25 100.85 +1.92 Sep 14 98.20 99.93 98.20 99.69 +1.78 Oct 14 97.48 98.71 97.48 98.57 +1.65 Nov 14 96.40 97.71 96.26 97.54 +1.51 Dec 14 95.30 96.86 95.26 96.56 +1.39 Jan 15 95.39 95.63 95.36 95.47 +1.28 Feb 15 93.90 94.55 93.90 94.41 +1.18 Mar 15 92.60 93.65 92.60 93.42 +1.08 Apr 15 92.15 92.67 91.78 92.55 +.99 May 15 90.99 91.90 90.99 91.76 +.89 Jun 15 90.50 91.26 90.33 91.08 +.82 Jul 15 89.99 90.65 89.99 90.31 +.75 Aug 15 89.22 90.00 89.20 89.66 +.69 Sep 15 88.75 89.45 88.65 89.12 +.64 Oct 15 88.11 88.62 88.11 88.62 +.61 Nov 15 88.20 +.59 Dec 15 87.32 88.00 87.19 87.81 +.56 Jan 16 87.25 +.54 Feb 16 86.73 +.49 Mar 16 86.18 86.25 86.07 86.23 +.44 Apr 16 85.77 +.39 May 16 85.38 +.34 Last spot N/A Est. sales 731800. Fri’s Sales: 353,576 Fri’s open int: 1670584, up +5718 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Apr 14 2.9830 3.0538 2.9830 3.0203 +.0429 May 14 2.9701 3.0413 2.9701 3.0120 +.0445 Jun 14 2.9480 3.0108 2.9480 2.9831 +.0450 Jul 14 2.9102 2.9725 2.9102 2.9491 +.0456 Aug 14 2.8989 2.9186 2.8885 2.9095 +.0459 Sep 14 2.8332 2.8775 2.8332 2.8638 +.0454 Oct 14 2.6820 2.7164 2.6820 2.7130 +.0421 Nov 14 2.6551 2.6917 2.6531 2.6696 +.0408 Dec 14 2.6336 2.9435 2.6219 2.6416 +.0408 Jan 15 2.6306 +.0411

ty,” starring Sandra Bullock. A study by analyst Kevin B. Lee found that last year’s lead actors averaged 100 minutes on screen, but lead actresses averaged only 49 minutes. “To the audiences who went to see the film and perhaps those of us in the industry who are still foolishly clinging to the idea that female films, with women at the center, are niche experiences, they are not,” said Blanchett. “Audiences want to see them and, in fact, they earn money.” “12 Years a Slave” also won awards in the writing and acting categories. John Ridley picked up the trophy for best adapted screenplay, which was based on the 1853 memoir by Solomon Northup. The screenwriter is only the second black writer (Geoffrey Fletcher won for “Precious” in 2009) to win in the category. Backstage, the “12 Years” team mentioned their efforts to include Solomon Northup’s memoir as part of high school study. The National School Boards Association announced in February that the book is now mandatory reading. “It’s important that we understand our history so we can understand who we were and who we are now and most importantly who we’re going to be,” said Brad Pitt, who produced “12 Years.” “We hope that this film remains a gentle reminder that we’re all equal. We all want the same: Dig-

Feb 15 2.6306 Mar 15 2.6381 Apr 15 2.7931 May 15 2.7871 Jun 15 2.7711 Jul 15 2.7491 Aug 15 2.7221 Sep 15 2.6916 Oct 15 2.5551 Nov 15 2.5211 Dec 15 2.4981 Jan 16 2.4981 Feb 16 2.5001 Mar 16 2.5101 Apr 16 2.6351 May 16 2.6351 Last spot N/A Est. sales 105992. Fri’s Sales: 109,717 Fri’s open int: 270864, off -600 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Apr 14 4.690 4.736 4.463 4.492 May 14 4.590 4.650 4.428 4.455 Jun 14 4.604 4.665 4.452 4.478 Jul 14 4.638 4.691 4.486 4.513 Aug 14 4.619 4.674 4.476 4.501 Sep 14 4.626 4.640 4.443 4.467 Oct 14 4.594 4.651 4.454 4.476 Nov 14 4.669 4.685 4.500 4.517 Dec 14 4.780 4.796 4.605 4.624 Jan 15 4.851 4.872 4.200 4.710 Feb 15 4.769 4.784 4.200 4.659 Mar 15 4.680 4.680 4.200 4.543 Apr 15 4.091 4.200 4.018 4.030 May 15 4.020 4.200 3.971 3.987 Jun 15 4.034 4.200 4.000 4.000 Jul 15 4.050 4.200 4.019 4.019 Aug 15 4.055 4.200 4.010 4.023 Sep 15 4.045 4.200 3.977 4.004 Oct 15 4.065 4.200 3.989 4.024 Nov 15 4.070 4.200 4.070 4.076 Dec 15 4.267 4.270 4.200 4.250 Jan 16 4.396 4.400 4.120 4.390 Feb 16 4.374 4.375 4.120 4.365 Mar 16 4.290 4.310 4.120 4.305 Apr 16 3.944 4.140 3.939 3.950 May 16 4.120 4.140 3.959 3.959 Last spot N/A Est. sales 251234. Fri’s Sales: 282,300 Fri’s open int: 1210757, up +16132

METALS

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Mon. Aluminum -$0.7819 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.2192 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.2205 N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Lead - $2115.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9570 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1349.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1350.10 troy oz., NY Merc spot Mon. Silver - $21.585 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $21.448 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Platinum -$1454.00 troy oz., Handy & Harman. Platinum -$1460.70 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

+.0416 +.0416 +.0416 +.0416 +.0416 +.0416 +.0416 +.0416 +.0416 +.0416 +.0416 +.0416 +.0416 +.0416 +.0416 +.0416

-.117 -.095 -.090 -.086 -.085 -.090 -.089 -.088 -.081 -.081 -.075 -.067 -.019 -.013 -.013 -.013 -.013 -.014 -.014 -.010 -.010 -.010 -.009 -.007 +.006 +.005

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name

nity and opportunity.” Lupita Nyong’o was a first-time Oscar winner for her supporting role as field slave Patsey in “12 Years.” “I’m a little dazed,” said Nyong’o backstage. “I can’t believe this is real life.” Nyong’o is the sixth black actress to win in the supporting actress category — and the first major Oscar win for Kenya (the president of Kenya congratulated her in a tweet) — following Hattie McDaniel (“Gone with the Wind”), Whoopi Goldberg (“Ghost”), Jennifer Hudson (“Dreamgirls”), Mo’Nique (“Precious”) and Octavia Spencer (“The Help”). Foreign language film nominees included “The Missing Picture,” the first-ever Oscar -nominated film from Cambodia. “The Act of Killing,” a dark look into the mass killings of communists and ethnic Chinese in Indonesia in the 1960s, was nominated for best documentary feature. In her second time hosting, openly gay Ellen DeGeneres sought to make celebrities more like plain folk. She passed out slices of pizza to the front rows at the Dolby Theatre, then passed the hat to pay for it. She also tweeted a “selfie” with such stars as Meryl Streep, Julie Roberts, Jennifer Lawrence, Bradley Cooper, Pitt and Nyong’o. The shot “made history,” DeGeneres told the audience later. It’s since been retweeted more than 2 million times.

MARKET SUMMARY AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Vol (00) Last Chg Name -.70 -.23 -.27 +2.41

Vol (00) Last 1.42 InovioPhm 135705 3.55 NwGold g 69060 6.21 VirnetX 54384 20.93 VantageDrl 41405 1.74

S&P500ETF1456795184.98 -1.31 RexahnPh 154975

iShEMkts 944249 BkofAm 849891 VerizonCm 553679 B iPVix rs 499781

38.78 16.30 47.31 46.28

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name DrxRsaBear VersoPap PUVixST rs BiP Coff BarcShtB

Chg +.07 +.26 +.10 +1.43 -.01

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Facebook 546296 67.41 Cisco 367246 21.57 PwShs QQQ35865289.67 MicronT 338268 24.48 Zynga 313849 5.24

Chg -1.05 -.23 -.67 +.29 +.18

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Last 20.98 2.74 73.52 39.40 15.55

Chg +3.67 +.29 +7.42 +3.62 +1.37

%Chg +21.2 +11.8 +11.2 +10.1 +9.77

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg RadiantLog 2.99 +.24 +8.7 Vimicro h 4.24 +1.28 InovioPhm 3.55 +.26 +7.9 FateTher n 8.98 +2.01 20.93 +1.43 +7.3 PlugPowr h 5.82 +1.15 VirnetX 2.84 +.18 +6.8 ChiCache 26.07 +4.97 MeetMe AskanoG g 2.30 +.14 +6.5 CleanDsl 3.27 +.57

%Chg +43.2 +28.8 +24.6 +23.6 +21.1

Name Last EPAM Sys 32.02 Luxoft n 28.83 DxRssaBull 14.74 MVRusSC rs31.11 NuSkin 74.61

Chg -9.91 -8.60 -3.58 -3.93 -8.91

%Chg -23.6 -23.0 -19.5 -11.2 -10.7

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg IntellgSys 2.23 -.20 -8.2 QIWI n 38.82 -7.81 GpoSimec 11.24 -.96 -7.9 Yandex 32.23 -5.27 ImpacMtg 6.63 -.36 -5.2 NewLink 39.08 -5.12 Medgen wt 3.70 -.19 -4.9 RXI Ph rs 5.31 -.70 Tofutti 5.24 -.22 -4.0 Synageva 101.36-13.31

%Chg -16.7 -14.1 -11.6 -11.6 -11.6

1,058 2,026 116 3,200 86 20

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

961 1,624 134 2,719 70 20

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

DIARY

Volume

3,356,531,772 Volume

52-Week High Low 16,588.25 13,784.01 7,591.43 5,789.20 537.86 462.66 11,334.65 8,700.73 2,519.24 2,186.97 4,342.59 3,105.37 1,867.92 1,485.01 20,044.39 15,674.94 1,193.50 894.24

Name AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola Disney EOG Res EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

DIARY

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

203 197 25 425 8 4

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

154,547,464 Volume

INDEXES

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 16,168.03 7,302.93 514.19 10,329.79 2,509.00 4,277.30 1,845.73 19,810.73 1,176.36

Net Chg -153.68 -45.44 -4.58 -96.07 -1.98 -30.82 -13.72 -136.11 -6.67

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Div

PE

Last

Chg

1.84f .90 .04 2.92f 4.00 1.22f .86f 1.00f 3.68f 2.52 .50f .58 1.20a .90 3.80 2.64

10 14 16 21 10 20 22 24 ... 10 12 11 12 13 12 19

31.86 -.07 72.26 -.45 16.30 -.23 128.22 -.70 114.84 -.49 38.12 -.08 79.46 -1.35 189.29 -.13 55.50 -.03 95.50 -.77 15.20 -.19 29.73 -.15 44.88 -.19 24.50 -.26 184.26 -.91 91.56 -.56

DIARY

YTD %Chg Name -9.4 +5.4 +4.7 -6.1 -8.1 -7.7 +4.0 +12.8 -3.1 -5.6 -1.5 +6.3 -9.7 -5.6 -1.8 ...

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

2,032,531,566

% Chg -.94 -.62 -.88 -.92 -.08 -.72 -.74 -.68 -.56

YTD % Chg -2.47 -1.32 +4.81 -.68 +3.41 +2.41 -.14 +.53 +1.09

52-wk % Chg +14.44 +20.82 +5.85 +16.05 +4.52 +34.42 +21.02 +23.02 +28.33

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

1.76 1.12 2.92f .74 2.27 1.04f 1.56 .16 1.20 1.27f .68e 2.12 1.92f .40 1.20 1.20f

39 14 23 19 19 16 12 20 25 17 ... 12 15 15 12 16

56.42 37.78 53.19 25.75 79.52 31.98 74.86 22.30 44.58 66.47 19.75 47.31 74.12 22.13 46.15 30.01

-.57 -.53 +.08 -.40 -.55 -.13 ... -.14 -.38 -.66 -.12 -.27 -.58 -.29 -.27 -.28

+12.7 +1.0 +1.0 +6.8 -4.1 +4.4 -2.9 +18.4 +1.5 -4.7 -1.2 -3.7 -5.8 -5.0 +1.7 +7.4

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


Roswell Daily Record

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: I’m a single mother of a beautiful 2-year-old daughter. I have always pictured myself as a mom of four little princesses. When I fantasized about having children, I imagined fairy tales, ballet, cheerleading, dress-up, tea parties — all girl things. Now I’m expecting a little boy and I feel heartbroken. When I lear ned my first was a girl, I couldn’t wait to meet her. I bought her everything pink and frilly. Here I am eight weeks from my due date, and I have yet to buy this baby a single thing.

When I look at baby boy items, I become severely depressed. I’m no longer with the baby’s father. He and his family are very excited about the baby, as he will be the only male grandchild for this generation. The truth is, the more I think about it, the more I am pulled in the direction of signing over my parental rights to my ex. At least he really wants him, whereas I don’t. I know this sounds terrible and selfish. I feel like a monster, but I can’t help it. My family is totally against it. My dad says I shouldn’t even allow my ex to visit our son in the hospital after he’s born. No one will listen to how I feel. They keep saying my feelings will change after the baby is born, but I doubt it. I just need some guidance. UNDESERVING TITLE OF MOMMY DEAR MOMMY: I don’t think you are a monster. I DO think you are not thinking objectively right now.

COMICS

Let me point out that life doesn’t always go the way we fantasize. Because you imagined that you’d be the mother of four little princesses doesn’t guarantee that you WILL be. I see no need to rush into signing any papers right now, regardless of how eager your boyfriend and his parents are about the baby. There will be time for that later, if you still want to. For now, ask your parents to help you select some baby boy outfits, and tell your doctor about all of your feelings because they may be hormonal. You might benefit from some professional counseling right now — more than I can offer you — and I urge you to get it before doing anything you might later regret.

#####

DEAR ABBY: I received a restaurant gift card from some friends. When I presented it at a restaurant, it was refused as “never having

been activated through purchase.”

I called my friends to let them know, thinking it was a mistake on the part of the restaurant at the time it was purchased. They said they would come by and pick up the card. I have heard nothing from them since, and I haven’t written a thank-you note or made any further attempt to contact them.

Family Circus

Was I right in calling them? Do I now ignore the whole thing? GIFT CARD DENIED

DEAR G.C.D.:

You did nothing wrong in calling your friends to tell them what happened. They may not have picked it up because they were embarrassed, or because they really never intended to activate it. I don’t think it’s necessarily worth ending a relationship over — IF you want to continue a friendship with people whose credibility you question.

The Wizard of Id

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE Dear Heloise: Please do not let other people make the same mistake we did. In June of 2010, we leased a new vehicle. With that came free satellite radio for three months. After the three months of FREE RADIO, the radio was automatically shut off. Since November of 2010 until December of 2013, we were billed $16 a month on our credit card. We acknowledge that we did not pay attention to our credit-card statement, as we noticed this only when we paid off our card as a New Year’s resolution. When we called the radio company, it would not reimburse us, and even the credit-card company would go back only three months to help us out. M.O. in New York

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

A good consumer warning! Remember to check credit-card statements every month. You have a much better chance of disputing charges if you notice them right away. Heloise ##### Dear Heloise: I travel often with my two daughters for dance competitions requiring overnight stays in hotels. Hotels typically provide three to four bath towels, which simply are not enough for three females with long hair, who require two towels apiece. Here is my hint: Leave a note with a small gratuity for housekeeping. I even specifically ask, in the note, for the exact amount of towels I would like to be left in the room. I have never been disappointed, and my requests have always been taken care of. Linda W., via email Linda, you also can call housekeeping and ask for extra towels as soon as you arrive. Plus, please do always tip housekeeping — most times they are left out, and they do a very, very hard job! Heloise ##### Dear Readers: Recently, I shared information about the difficulty of recycling prescription bottles. At Heloise Central, we started brainstorming all the uses for these bottles and wanted to give some hints to help keep these bottles out of the trash: * Keep one in the car to hold spare change. * When traveling, use to hold cotton balls or cotton swabs. * Pack with thread, needles and safety pins for an emergency sewing kit. Readers, now it’s your turn. Let us know how you reuse these bottles. Heloise P.S.: You can ask your pharmacist for “not child resistant” caps. These caps can be taken off, turned over and reattached to the same bottle. Now the bottle can be opened with a simple turn instead of having to press down and turn. ONLY do this in households without children. ##### Dear Heloise: I have come up with a great use for old rubber kitchen gloves. When my long-haired, yellow Labrador comes outside with me, I put on old rubber gloves to give him a thorough rubdown. The dog hair comes off in sheets! He loves it because it is a great petting session. This works on cats, also. Joan M. in California

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

B5


B6 Tuesday, March 4, 2014

CLASSIFIEDS / ENTERTAINMENT

Oscarcast: A fine scene hosted by Ellen

NEW YORK (AP) — With only a week to catch our breath after the lengthy cavalcade of Winter Olympics coverage, this year’s Oscarcast may have seemed a refreshingly snug handout of awards. After all, it lasted only slightly more than three and a half hours, aired on ABC from a single venue (Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre), and was emceed by the comfortably reliable Ellen DeGeneres. By comparison to the Sochi games, Oscar went by in a flash. Meanwhile, it had its high moments and a bare minimum of deficits, easily catalogued in cinematic terms: Great scene! Or ... best left on the cutting-room floor. — Great Scene: The show’s kickoff, which, unlike so many years before, wasn’t an extravagant comedic film featuring the host with a bevy of stars, but instead, found DeGeneres arriving on stage to deliver her simple, but satisfyingly funny, monologue. In gently wry style, she ribbed celebs in the hall as well as show biz in general. (The nominees, she declared, had collectively made over 1,400 films, “and you’ve gone to a total of six years of college.”) Then she brought on the first presenter. Brisk and efficient.

Legals

Notice of Change of Name... Publish February March 4, 2014

25,

STATE OF NEW MEXCOUNTY OF ICO CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Joel Gilbert Stark, Case#CV-2014-76

AMENDED NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME

TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 40-8-1 Sec. 40-8-3 through NMSA 1978, the Petitioner Jamie L. Chavez will apply to the Honorable Steven L. Bell, District Judge of the FIfth Judicial District at the Chaves County Courthouse, 400 N. Virginia, in Roswell, New Mexico at 9:00 a.m. on the 5th day of May, 2014 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME from Joel Gilbert Stark to Joel Gilbert Chavez. KENNON CROWHURST Clerk of the District Court /s/Katie Espinoza Deputy Clerk

Submitted by: /s/Jamie Chavez 4708 W. Deming Roswell, NM 88203 (575) 208-8161

After that, she kept the energy flowing through a broadcast predictably sparse in surprises among those who won. Unlike many hosts, she was a regular presence, at one moment gathering stars in the audience for a group selfie to tweet, at another bringing in a pizza delivery guy to share slices with audience members (and then confessing she had no money to pay the bill: “Where’s Harvey Weinstein?”). DeGeneres did what any host should do: Stay involved and make sure everyone has fun. At the same time, she seemed to be committed to an unspoken theme for the evening: Humanize Hollywood’s glitterati for the viewers. In return, the stars were on their best behavior. — Great Scene: Best supporting actor (for “Dallas Buyers Club”) Jared Leto’s acceptance speech paid tribute to his mother, thanking her “for teaching me to dream,” then celebrated the dreams “in places like the Ukraine and Venezuela” — before pledging his support to those who have felt injustice “because of who you are or who you love.” He was the night’s first winner, and, in accepting his trophy, also pulled off a humanistic hat trick.

Legals

Notice to Satisfy Lien... Publish March 1, 4, 2014

NOTICE TO SATISFY LIEN

The below named person is hereby notified that your 1965 Honda Dream Motorcycle, Vin#CA78103367, will be auctioned or disposed of on or about April 8, 2014 at Billy the Kid Storage, 1325 E. Country Club Rd., Roswell, NM 88201. Public auction/disposal is for unpaid rent and late fees of $4,345.00.

Neal Rasmussen 102627 Poulsen Ave. Montclair, CA 97163

GARAGE SALES

INSTRUCTION

006. Southwest

030. Education & Instructions

509 W. Forest Tues-Fri & Sun. Refrigator, commercial copying machine, water fountains, clothes, tools, electronics, chimney, wood stove and much more!

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice TO THE man and woman who saw me fall on Monday, Feb. 17th, in front of Goodwill around 6pm. Please contact me at 625-0956 or 302-268-9347.

MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant!NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC Train gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-888-926-6073

EMPLOYMENT 045. Employment Opportunities

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

— Great Scene: Musical number with Pharrell Williams performing his nominated song, “Happy.” — Great Scene: U2 performing their nominated song, “Ordinary Love.” — Great Scene: Pink performing “Over the Rainbow” against panoramic clips from “The Wizard of Oz” in a salute to that beloved film’s 75th anniversary. — Great Scene: A particularly moving presentation of the In Memoriam roll, free of distracting applause from the audience. After the faces and names of the departed had been seen, Bette Midler sang the evocative “Wind Beneath My Wings.” — Great Scene: The heartfelt acceptance spilling out of best supporting actress Lupita Nyong’o (”12 Years a Slave”), who made it clear she understood that “so much joy in my life is thanks to so much pain in someone else’s.” — Great Scene: The evening’s finale, a joyous reception for best picture winner “12 Years a Slave.” All in all, a sleek show was the Oscarcast. Few bombshells, fewer embarrassments, from fade-in to fade-out. Then, in cinematic terms, that was a wrap.

045. Employment Opportunities

The Albuquerque Job Corps Center has a great job opportunity for a Career Transition Specialist in Roswell, NM. Candidate will provide career, transitional, and follow-up assistance to students graduation from Job Corps for a period of 12 months following placement. Candidate must have a Bachelor’s degree or 4 years experience working with youth. One year experience in sales, marketing, or counselingrelated services.

Send your resume to norris.annette@ jobcorps.org or fax resume to 505-346-2742 Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR OPTOMETRIC OFFICE seeking receptionist for a 1/2 day/afternoon position. Duties include: answering phone, making appointments, checking in/out patients and general clerical duties. PO Box 1897, Unit #366 Roswell, NM 88202

IMMEDIATE OPENING for Journeyman Electrician & 2 yr apprentice, paid vacations & some holidays. Call or fax your resume to 575-734-0335. BIG D’S is accepting resumes for cooks, cashiers and delivery drivers. Bring resume to 505 N. Main between 2-4pm.

045. Employment Opportunities

NOW HIRING CDL driver for local delivery. Must have clean driving record and must pass drug test, call 575-622-1189 or come by 4100 S. Lea Roswell ask for Denis or pick up application. FRESENIUS MEDICAL Care/Southeastern New Mexico Kidney Center is seeking RNs. Full benefits, 401K, medical, vision, dental. PTO after 6 months. Other company benefits. Open Mon-Sat. Off Sundays.12 hour shifts. Competitive pay. Apply online at FMCNA.COM Plant Operator Full Time/Seasonal for asphalt emulsion plant. Loading trucks, batching chemicals, manufacturing materials, testing production. Experience preferred but will train. Pay DOE. Must have valid drivers license, pass drug screen & physical. Physical Requirements: ability to work outdoors, lift up to 50 pounds, and perform work using a full range body motion(stooping and crawling). Subject to on-call and occasional overtime requirements with split shifts. Apply 8am-1pm at: Western Emulsions 49 East Martin St. Roswell, NM 88203 Email:juan@westernemulsions.com There is an immediate part time position open for front office personnel in a small office. The applicant must have good time management skills, extremely organized, have a flexible schedule, punctual, can multitask, and work under pressure in a busy office. The skills that are required for this position are: building worksheets in Excel, have accounting or bookkeeping experience, and be familiar with Quickbooks. Please submit resume to PO Box 1897 unit 356, Roswell NM 88202

Roswell Daily Record

And the Oscar goes to...

Best Picture: “12 Years a Slave.” Actor: Matthew McConaughey, “Dallas Buyers Club.” Actress: Cate Blanchett, “Blue Jasmine.” Supporting Actor: Jared Leto, “Dallas Buyers Club.” Supporting Actress: Lupita Nyong’o, “12 Years a Slave.” Directing: Alfonso Cuaron, “Gravity.” Foreign Language Film: “The Great Beauty,” Italy. Adapted Screenplay: John Ridley, “12 Years a Slave.” Original Screenplay: Spike Jonze, “Her.” Animated Feature Film: “Frozen.” Production Design: “The Great Gatsby.” Cinematography: “Gravity.” Sound Mixing: “Gravity.” Sound Editing: “Gravity.” Original Score: “Gravity,” Steven Price. Original Song: “Let It Go” from “Frozen.” Costume: “The Great Gatsby.” Makeup and Hairstyling: “Dallas Buyers Club.” Animated Short Film: “Mr. Hublot.” Documentary Feature: “20 Feet from Stardom.” Documentary (short subject): “The Lady in Number 6: Music Saved My Life.” Film Editing: “Gravity.” Live Action Short Film: “Helium.” Visual Effects: “Gravity.” Honorary Oscars: Peter W. Anderson; Film-processing labs over past century; Angelina Jolie; Angela Lansbury; Steve Martin; Piero Tosi.

045. Employment Opportunities

TOWNPLACE SUITES by Marriott is accepting applications for FT maintenance person and housekeeping. Must be able to pass background check, no phones calls. Apply in person at 180 E. 19th St. HEAVY EQUIPMENT operator Class A CDL 622-6983 Leave message NOW HIRING mechanic with tools, salary depends on experience. ASE certified if possible, but not necessary. Please send resume to PO Box 1897, Unit 369 Roswell, NM 88202 SERVERS NEEDED: Experienced Servers needed at Pasta Cafe. The best tip environment in town. Apply daily between the hours of 2:00-4:00PM. 1208 N. Main Street Roswell, NM 88201 No phone calls please!! EEO employer Administrative Assistant computer knowledge, Microsoft, QuickBooks, AP, AR, multi-task. Apply in person at #4 Woolbowl Circle. MEDICAL OFFICE Transcription/Case Entry: Full Time M-F 9am-6pm. Excellent grammar, punctuation, spelling, and communication skills mandatory. Typing and grammar testing will be conducted. Please send cover letter with resume and three references to roswellscript@gmail.com Medical Office Billing: Full-time 9-6 M-F. Experience with medical insurance billing, payment posting, CPT and ICD-coding preferred. Insurance contracting a plus. Competitive salary and full benefits including health insurance, 401K, and profit sharing. Preemployment testing will be conducted. Send cover letter with resume and three references to medicalbillingroswell@ gmail.com. Applicants will be held in strictest confidence.

045. Employment Opportunities

NOW HIRING for part time night audit, experienced required. Please apply at 1201 N. Main st. MADDY TAY’S Preschool is currently hiring for a preschool teaching position. The requirements are a high school diploma or GED and the 45 hour certificate. Education in child development or early childhood is also a plus. Pay is based on experience and education. Please apply at 1200 W. Alameda or 102 S. Utah TELLER POSITION open at Valley Bank of Commerce. Please send resume to PO Box 2015, Roswell NM 88202 TEMPORARY FARM Labor: Keimig Harvesting & Trucking, Sterling, KS, has 8 positions for grain & oilseed crops; 6 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days with airbrake endorsement to drive grain & transporter trucks; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.69/hr - $2000/mo. plus room & board depending on location; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 3/26/14 – 12/15/14. Apply at nearest NM Workforce Office with Job Order 9114649 or call 505-383-2721. AMERIPRIDE LINEN Requisition#107074 Stockroom Clerk

Stockroom Clerk needed: High School diploma or GED. Must be able to pass drug test. You must apply online. Ameripride.com, click on career opportunities under quick links and follow the steps or any job websites on line. February 28, 2014 to March 7, 2014 Competitive salary and benefits. No phone calls will be accepted. AA/EEO EMPLOYEE M/F/D/V

045. Employment Opportunities PVT AND FUEGO WIRELESS

CATV SERVICE TECHNICIAN-FUEGO WIRELESS Responsible for CATV and telephone installation along with problem diagnoses to satisfy the customer. Assists in CATV plant design and implementation, and troubleshooting. This position is based at PVT Headquarters in Artesia.

ACCOUNTANT-PVT Performs monthly accounting close functions, reconciles general ledger balance sheet accounts, maintains plant accounting records, performs analysis of the companies' financial records, responsible for reporting property taxes, completes reports, analysis, projects and other duties as assigned. Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or Finance required; four to six years of experience preferred; advanced Microsoft Excel shills preferred; MBA or CPA a plus.

MARKET ANALYST-PVT Responsible for market analysis of all services within Peñasco Valley Telecommunications and its subsidiaries' services areas; assess promotional needs; gathering pertinent data and analyzing the results; evaluate demographics, competition, prices, distribution channels and marketing outlets to develop marketing and sales strategies. PVT and Fuego Wireless provide a competitive wage and benefits package.

Applications may be obtained from www.pvt.com, www.fuegowireless.com, or from PVT Headquarters. Applications and resumes should be sent to HR Dept., Peñasco Valley Telecommunications, 4011 W. Main, Artesia, NM 88210. E-mail to: ritah@pvt.com Fax to: 575.736.1376. Equal Opportunity Employer


Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

A FAMILY Friendly Industry is NOW HIRING. Looking for a CHANGE? Try moving from OIL to SOIL.

Delivery Drivers & Custom Applicators Competitive Wages, full benefits package, 401K with company match and paid time off. Pre-employment drug test required. Drivers must have current CDL w/Hazmat Endorsement & DOT Physical. Serious Inquires apply at: 103 East Mill Road, Artesia, NM 88210 Call 575-748-3510 for directions to our warehouse.

.GUARDSMARK The nation’s leader in security is hiring security officers. No experience required, but customer service skills a must. Must be HS Grad/GED & 21 yrs. EOE Benefits: Free Life Ins. Uniforms/Tuition Assistance. Starting Pay $9.00hr. Apply by calling 505-830-2700 Tues-Fri. 9am-6pm.

Route Sales Representatives Needed

Tobosa Developmental Services is seeking a Registered Nurse and/or Licensed Practical Nurse. Position is responsible for maintaining the highest level of nursing documentation as guided by best practices for documentation standards by the mainstream healthcare industry and maintaining a flexible case load of low to moderate acuity patients. Experience with developmentally disabled preferred but no required. Please submit current resume with completed application, police background check, and driving record. Apply at Tobosa Developmental Services, 110 E, Summit, Roswell, NM 88203 or call (575)624-1025. Salary is negotiable based on experience and education level. Applications open until position is filled.

CF Heller Distributing a leader in Direct Store Delivery (DSD) is seeking highly motivated people to join our team. We are currently looking for Route Sales Representatives for the Roswell, NM area to order, deliver and stock frozen food products at retail grocery accounts and convenience stores. All deliveries will be made with our company trucks which would include Class B CDL requirement. The position will require a high school education, a satisfactory M.V.R. and the ability to lift up to 50 lbs. Qualified candidates must pass background check, pre-employment physical and drug screening. Benefits include medical, dental, vision, 401K, sick and vacation time along with a great starting pay.

If you are interested in joining our team please fax your resume to CF Heller Distributing attn: Human Resources @ 303-298-1997 or email careers@coldfrontdist.com Experienced Housekeepers needed. Apply at the Sally Port Inn, 2000 N. Main.

045. Employment Opportunities

DONOR RECRUITMENT REPRESENTATIVE, FT, ROSWELL, NM. Schedule blood drives w/i center. Directs, trains, and motivates volunteer blood drive coordinators and committee mbrs. Develops new donor sources. Maintains ongoing public and media relations pgrm. Develops annual recruitment plan. Prepare, assess and respond to monthly forecast info. Develop and maintain donor recognition prgrms. Follows established sales/recruitment process (including projection accuracy). Maintains and ensures accuracy and timeliness of acct info. Builds relationships with external depts and internal staff. Communicates effectively. Represents company through personal contacts, public speaking and educational presentations. Varied hours & workdays. Requirements: Relevant Bachelor's degree or equiv combination of educ and exp, Valid in–state driver’s license, 1-year related exp preferred, Effective oral and written comm skills, Sales/territory management skills, Self-motivated and a self-starter with good organization skills, Ability to work flexible hrs incl wkends/evenings, Provide own vehicle for transportation, Proficient computer skills. Exc benefits. Send resume/application by 3/7/14 to Lori Schmittle, United Blood Services, 1515 University Blvd. NE, ABQ, NM 87102; email UBSNMJobs@ bloodsystems.org. List Reference #212-1225-2014-0002. Pre-employment background and drug screening required. EOE M/F/D/V

RDRNEWS.COM

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

Accountant/Bookkeeper needed for a friendly, growing CPA firm. Duties include general ledger preparation through financial statement presentation. Experience in basic tax return preparation is a plus. Advanced tax return preparation experience is a plus. Experience with QuickBooks, Word and Excel would be helpful, but not required. Flexible hours, pleasant working environment and excellent benefits including medical insurance reimbursement, profit-sharing and pension plan. You will be the fifteenth person in our office family and you will enjoy working with us. Please e-mail your resume or letter of introduction to dsc.classified@gmail.com or mail to DSC, PO Box 2034, Roswell, NM 88202-2034. ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER JOBS in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper to place your ad or log onto www.nmpress.org for more information.

CDL DRIVERS Wanted: Regional Routes, home weekends, competitive pay. Must have current physical and clean MVR. Positions to fill immediately. Call 575-461-4221, 1-800-750-4221 or email: jimhayes66@ qwestoffice.net KYMERA NEW MEDICAL OFFICE POSITIONS: As a growing Independent Physicians Office, Kymera is now seeking Qualified Applicants for: EMT- I Certified Medical Assistant: FT 1-2 yrs exp working in a med office. Applicants must possess the ability to work with multiple patients in a high-volume office setting; background in chart preparation, EMR knowledge, familiarity with completing injections and drawing lab-work essential. Cert required. Fax Resume w/ Cover letter to: 575-627-9520 MJG CORPORATION is currently accepting applications for HVAC Techs. We offer: Top Salary and Benefits. Send resume or employment history to 204 W. 4th St. Roswell, New Mexico 88201: Call 575-622-8711 or fax to 575-623-3075 email to: mjgcorp@cs.com

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575)-622-7710 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

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Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

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Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

ELITE MEDICAL is seeking a FT qualified, experienced person for Front Desk position. MA or CNA skills are essential. Must be able to multi-task, answer phones, check-in patients, while providing excellent patient care. Must be bilingual. Bring in your resume to Letty at 109 W. Bland TEMPORARY FARM Labor: Triangle Cattle Co., Hereford, TX, has 1 positions for silage, corn, wheat & livestock; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days; once hired, workers may be required to take random drug tests at no cost to worker; testing positive or failure to comply may result in immediate termination from employment; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.86/hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 4/15/14 – 2/1/15. Apply at nearest NM Workforce Office with Job Order TX2739514 or call 505-383-2721.

045. Employment Opportunities

FULL TIME opening in a professional office setting, prefer college graduate or prior experience, dealing with professionals, staff, & clients. Send resume to P.O. Box 1897 #371 Roswell NM, 88202. TEMPORARY FARM Labor: Randall Schwanke Farms, Scott City, KS, has 2 positions for grain; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days; once hired, workers may be required to take random drug tests at no cost to worker; testing positive or failure to comply may result in immediate termination from employment; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $13.41/hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 4/15/14 – 12/1/14. Apply at nearest NM Workforce Office with Job Order 9131623 or call 505-383-2721. LAB TECHNICIAN Wanted Requirements: •Ability to calibrate and operate laboratory equipment •Good math skills and ability to perform basic to advanced calculations •Computer literate with good knowledge of MS Excel, MS Word, MS Access and other software •Must have excellent attention to detail and strong analytical abilities •Must be able to work under pressure and adhere to strict deadlines •Must demonstrate good decisions making skills •Associate's/Bachelor's degree preferred but not required Duties Include: •Sample preparation •Quality Assurance of products and chemicals •Accurate record keeping and documentation of data •Interpretation of data •Assistance in preparing reports •General maintenance and cleaning of office and lab equipment •Other duties as assigned For consideration, please apply in person at: Par Five Energy Services, LLC 11279 Lovington Hwy. Artesia, NM 88210 CDL DRIVERS, tanker endorsement, no hazmat required, local, great pay. 637-5346 LEARN TO drive in 5 short weeks. Artesia Training Academy has new classes forming. CDL Class A with endorsements. VA approved. 20 years of service to South East New Mexico. Call for more information 575-748-9766 or 1-888-586-0144 visit us at www.artesiatraining.com or visit us on Facebook. HELP WANTED no experience necessary, production bonuses, advancment opoirtunities, up to $400 per week per qualifying agreement, only those who can start immediately, need apply call today 575-578-4817 No experience necessary 15 people needed, potential earning are up to $400 a week to start per agreement. Potential $1000 side on bonus after 30 days of work per qualifications, for immediate interview call today 575-578-4817 PIZZA HUT holding open interviews at Days Inn from 4pm-8pm Thursday March 6th for general managers, assistant managers & shift managers. Applicants must have 1-5 years of restaurant manager experience. Please bring resume

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES at ROSWELL FORD SERVICE TECHNICIAN Build your career here! Roswell Ford has an immediate opening for a general service technician. We offer up to $30 an hour, great benefits and a busy shop. See Rick. Come grow with us! We offer great pay and benefits in an excellent working environment. We will provide training for the right people. Please apply in person 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

ROSWELL FORD 821 NORTH MAIN, ROSWELL, NM • 575-623-3673

www.roswellford.com

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

045. Employment Opportunities

Dennis the Menace

B7

NEED A horseman to work on small horse farm, call 575-420-1860 for interview. BUTCH’S RATHOLE & ANCHOR SERVICE Now hiring Class A CDL drivers for Artesia, NM yard. Insurance & 401K. 575-513-1482, Garry. PEPPERS GRILL & BAR is accepting applications for potential openings. Applications available between 2:00-4:00 pm, 500 N. Main

SERVICES

080. Alterations

ALTERATIONS & Misc. Sewing - 840-8065.

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

345. Remodeling

SUNSHINE WINDOW Services. Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458

Landscaping, mowing, trimming, sprinklers, etc. 575-420-0965

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153.

150. Concrete

Bòidheach Yards and Gardens. Property cleanup & hauling, year round maintenance, landscaping, tree management. You'll love our prices! 578-9404.

NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

Ms. Missyʼs Cleaning Service Packing, organizing, residential, & rentals. Please call or text, 575-686-0881. Running Bear Concrete Foundations, Driveways, Stamping, Sidewalks, Curbing, Stucco. Lic: 373219. Call 317-6058

185. Electrical

ELECTRICAL SERVICES Meter loops, service upgrades, remodels, additions, service calls. Lowest prices in town. Free estm. Lic#360025. 910-4193

195. Elderly Care

WILL DO home health care and/or housekeeping. Have references. 317-0963

200. Fencing

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100 M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

225. General Construction

Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

GUERRO SPRINKLERS and Landscaping. Free estimates. 575-317-9657 Yard work, clean-ups, lawns. Handyman svc. David 637-9580.

Lawn and Landscape Maintenance One time or recurring service available 575-973-1019 Spring Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242. WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121. Executive Lawn/Garden Services for free estimates call Dave 317-7153 WE WORK Yard & alley cutting, garden rototilling, hauling. Call Will at 317-7402 or 317-2573.

HOME REPAIRS No job too small/large Free estimates. 575-317-2357

Professional Yard care, trees, lawns, bushes. 575-910-4581 or 420-6921

www.senaconstruction.com 575-973-1019

STRUGGLING WITH YOUR MORTGAGE AND WORRIED ABOUT FORECLOSURE? REDUCE YOUR MORTGAGE & SAVE MONEY. LEGAL LOAN MODIFICATION SERVICES. FREE CONSULTATION. CALL PREFERRED LAW 1-800-915-0432

230. General Repair

HANDYMAN Tile, drywall, painting, clean up, countertops. Service swam coolers. 420-7728 or 910-5704

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738 RWC. BACKHOE, skid steer, dump truck, bom lift, services. Insured. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Emerald Landscaping Lawn & sprinkler installation, sprinkler repair, sod, gravel, lawn maintenance. Maintenance/Free Estimates/accept credit cards. Lic#89265. Call: Aaron, 575-910-0150 or Chris, 420-3945

285. Miscellaneous Services

Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-661-3783, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.

310. Painting/ Decorating

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. Call 637-9108. EXTERIOR/INTERIOR, INSURED. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

Mack Energy Corporation has a full time position available for a Lease Operator position. Job duties include, maintaining well production, preparing and submitting daily/weekly reports, operation and maintenance of production equipment, etc. A high school diploma or equivalent is required. Must be at least 21 years of age and able to pass a drug screening, background check and meet vehicle insurance requirements. We offer an excellent working environment and outstanding compensation and benefits package.

For consideration, please apply in person at: Mack Energy Corporation 11344 Lovington Hwy. Artesia, NM 88210 Or Apply on-line at www.mackenergycorp.com or Email resume to HR@mec.com Equal Employment Opportunity Employer

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552. RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Professional Roofing, Landscaping, Irrigation, Stucco, Tile, Painting, Concrete and Fence Work (575) 973-1019

395. Stucco Plastering

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991 RWC Lath and Stucco. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

400. Tax Service

ANAYA Gross Receipts Consulting & Tax Service. Contact us to Anayalate your tax problems. Over 25 yrs. exp. Personal & Business. Compare our prices/we e-file. 575-623-1513 508 W. 2nd St. I TIN’S Welcome EXPERT TAX preparation, and accounting services, Call New Mexico Management Services 622-4046 or 420-0880 Fast service, degreed and 30 yrs exp.

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 QUICKCUT TREE service 575-208-8963 best service beat prices, licensed and insured Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835 TREE TRIMMING, topping, and removal. Professional yard care. 910-4581

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insuranced. Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale 6 ACRES, 2800 sq ft home, 5br/3ba, updated 20,000 down. $1670app. North Roswell, owner can finance. 575-973-2353

3BR, 1 3/4ba, north part of town, 3110 N. Bandolina, 1 car garage, all new carpet, paint & roof, 2 blks from swimming pool. Priced to sell, $108,000. Owner may finance w/large down payment. 622-5031 or 420-1022 2Bd $85K w/house in bk & 3Bd $65K, fncd yrds, call M-Th 8a-noon, 624-1331 1730 N. Delaware, $48,500, 3br/2ba. 1717 N. Ohio, $60k, 3br/1ba w/family room & fireplace. Call Gerado at 909-657-7611 anytime after 2:30pm or Yolanda Archuleta at Exit Realty, 575-317-9567. MUST SEE Country Living, close to town N.E. area, 1/2 Acre, 3br/2ba huge kitchen, split plan, large master suite, many updates. Nice landscaping, fenced. 575-626-8533, $179,000


B8 Tuesday, March 4, 2014 490. Homes For Sale Immaculate custom home in Briar Ridge, 3yrs old, 3br/2ba, 81 Bent Tree Rd., $130,900. 831-915-0226

OWNER FINANCING For Sale 2 Bedroom/1Bath SW Roswell, fenced yard, Owner/Broker PJ 317-3103

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

5 ACRES 62 E Orchard Pk Rd $19,000 interesados al 910-0644

500. Businesses for Sale SELF STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE, 104 UNITS, PLUS EXCESS LAND, SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY. 317-0029

RESTAURANT FOR SALE, owner retiring, good catch flow, serious inquiries only. Call 317-0029

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

IN SENIOR Park, 2bd/2ba plus add on, cover patio and carport, for additional information contact 505-366-1142 TRIPLE WIDE 1978 in excellent shape with all new flooring, window coverings, paint, very spacious 1500 Sq ft, 2bd/2ba in North Senior Park $38,500 OBO 575-626-5167 MOBILE HOME for sale 2bd needs work, located at 300 W Linda Vista space #18. Call 575-420-2567.

520. Lots for Sale

1200 W. Stone, 2 blocks west from N. Union, $7500. Terms 575-416-1454 PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352. 74’x100’ RESIDENTIAL Lot, Southwest Roswell. $12k. (575) 910-5749

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

SPACIOUS, COMFORTABLE 2bd/1ba very nicely furnished, WiFi, Call 910-7076 or 910-0851. 1114 S. Kentucky FULLY Furnished studio, washer/dryer, internet, Dish Network, lawn service & utilities all included, NO PETS, $1140/mo. Call 575-551-8281 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. SPACIOUS, COMFORTABLE, clean 2bd/1ba, extra storage, water, gas pd. $600. 1114 S. Kentucky 910-7076 or 910-0851

Town Plaza Apartments NO HUD ACCEPTED ALL UTILITIES PAID Friendly managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs & downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN.

EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348.

540. Apartments Unfurnished

EFF, 1,2 BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377 1BR Apt. ctrl Air, appliances, laundry facility, quiet. $495/520mo + Dep. 2550 Bent Tree. 317-6408. Very nice 2br/1.5ba, Apartment. North location, garage, $800/mo, $400/dep, 1 yr lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535.

Century 21 Home Planning 3117 N Main, 575-622-0021 Please come by and check out our Spring Specials!!! 2br/1ba, $625, $400/dep, no HUD or pets. 300 W. Mescalero. 910-1300

ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944

FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944. 2201 S. Richardson #4, 2br/1.5 ba, 1 car gar., w/d included. Call 910-4225.

BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $592, 3br/2ba, $674, 5br/2ba $812, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge.

1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 2 BDR apt. South location, 6 mo lease. $600/mo, utilities pd. $300 dep. No pets, 420-4535 1203 W. Hobbs, 2br/1ba, laundry room, all appliances, no pets or HUD. Call 910-6161.

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 1bd/1ba, $410/mo. Call or text after 5pm, 915-255-8335

3/4BR, 1.5BA, small fenced yard, 407 W. Albuquerque, NO HUD, $700/mo, $500/dep. Referenced required. Call for application, 575-623-1800. 1207 S. Michigan, 3br, 1 3/4 ba, single garage, cook stove, $750mo, $500dep, no bills pd. 623-7678

4bd 2ba $1200/mo. $800/dep. No Bills Paid, No Pets, Non-smoking. HUD welcome! (619) 392-9140. 3/2/1, w/d connection, lrg backyard, $1100/mo, $1000/dep, $250/pet dep. 914-8698 or 8695

3/2/2, NE on La Fonda Dr, $1100/mo, wtr pd, w/d, $600/dep, No Pets, 575-317-6156, lv msg

Century 21 Home Planning 3117 N Main, 575-622-0021 Please come by and check out our Spring Specials!!! {{{RENTED}}} 1105 W. 14th St. 2br/1ba. $500/mo, $500/dep.

3br/1ba, stove & fridge, $500/mo, $300/dep, 306 E. Reed, No HUD, Pets or Smoking. Call 914-2641 or 575-291-4438. 3/2/1 703 Adams Dr. Close to shopping, RHS $900mo. 575-910-1605 3BD HOUSE for rent, 2 full bath, w/d hookup, refrig. air, large backyard with shed, $950mo $650dep. Pets allowed with pet dep. No bills pd. 1704 N. Washington 623-8922 $500/mo, all bills pd, $200/dep, efficiency. Phillip, 910-6282, 204 S. Ohio. 1009 1/2 S. Lea, 2br/1ba, wtr pd,carport, $500 + $450/dep, No smoking No HUD. 317-1371

2BD/2BA brick, big yard, 4805 Thunderbird Rd. $1350/$1350. 317-7623

4BD/2BA TWO Story House with covered carport for rent. $650/mo $500 Dep. 575-420-5111 301 5 st Dexter 3 y 2 aire refir. $750mes/$500dep. interesados 910-0644

3br/1ba w/den, stove & fridge, washer/dryer hookups, central heating & air, fenced in backyard w/shed, $950/mo, $600/dep, no bills paid. 420-2831 2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished Quiet, private, small 2br suitable for couple/single. Safe area near Mt. View school. East Charleston Rd., $500/mo includes wtr, garbage, $400/dep. 575-527-0875

2600 CORNELL, $750/mo, $750/dep, no pets or HUD. Call WC Property Management, 575-317-1605. {{{RENTED}}} 2bd/1ba $700mo. $500 dep. Dogs allowed. No HUD. Executive home NE, 602 Trailing Heart, 4br/2ba, garage, some appliances, fenced yard, patio, wood stove, pets w/fee, no HUD/utiliities, $1300/mo, $700/dep, 575-405-0163 61 Bent Tree Rd., 3br/2ba, 2 car gar., $950/mo, $950/dep, no pets/HUD. Call WC Property Management at 57-317-1605. 1206 S. Missouri, 3br/2ba, $750/mo, $750/dep. Call WC Property Management at 575-317-1605.

580. Office or Business Places 1139 S. MAIN Over 2200 sqft, all new plumbing, electrical, ref. air, wired for individual offices. $1500/mo. 626-6765 200 S. Union. Two suites, approximately 1200 sqft and 810 sqft. Great location. Will remodel to suit tenant. Call Jan at 625-2222. HUGE STORE front & warehouse for lease, 5000 sqft. All new AC, plumbing, electrical. 107 W. 6th. 575-420-6050 STORE FRONT Professional office suite for lease, 2000 sqft, everything new, AC, plumbing, electrical. Will build to suit. Employee parking in rear. 105 W. 6th. 575-420-6050 FOR LEASE, space in Sunwest Centre Office Complex at 500 N. Main St. Various size spaces. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. High floor space available for larger tenants. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 575-623-1652 or mobile 575-420-2546 LEVEL ENTRY, Professional offices, Plenty of parking, excellent north location. $600 per month plus electric utility. 575-622-7163 ext. 2 MAIN ST. storefront, 2200+sqft, $1200/dep, $1200/mo. 627-9942 For sale or lease: 12,500 sqft building, 700ft hwy frontage, 3.5 acres fenced, large shop w/2 bays, loading dock, 575-910-3199, in Roswell, NM.

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

NEED FURNITURE Shop Blair’s for the best prices on used furniture, beds, dressers, table & chairs, living room sets, patio sets, bookshelves, appliances, antiques, collectibles, home decor & housewares, saddles, tools, movies, plus lots more. Open daily 9-5, closes Wed. 627-2033

CLASSIFIEDS

605. Miscellaneous for Sale FAST TREES Grow 6-10 ft yearly $17.00 +. fasttrees.com or 509-447-4181

THE TREASURE Chest Sofas, chest of drawers, bedroom suite, Prof. 2chimney sweep brushes, book blower & everything you need to start a business, HV blower, tables, Carnival glass. Must come see. 1204 W Hobs 914-1855 Weds-Sat 10-5 42” ROUND table, bath bench, shower chair, commode chair, bed alarm. 575-622-3843 DIRECTV - Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call Now! Triple savings! $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!! Start saving today! 1-800-264-0340 DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-315-7043

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous TOP DOLLAR Paid for furniture, collectibles, appliances, antiques, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We pay cash with same day removal of all items. Compete/partial households & personal estates welcome. 623-0136 or 910-6031

WANT TO buy a used treadmill or elliptical rider in good condition. Call 623-1523 or 626-1524 ESTATE SETTLEMENT Never throw ANYTHING away before calling us! Our services include Auctions (our facility or yours), Tagged Estate Sales, Complete/Partial Buy-Outs & Real Estate Auctions, Firearms, Jewelry & Collectibles. Prompt removal of entire households and property cleanouts. Whether you need to sell a few items or an entire estate check with us and we will do our best to beat any offer you receive. Call today to find out how our experience can help you get more $$. Wild West Auctions, LLC 623-7355 or 840-8401

635. Good things to Eat

FROZEN GREEN Chile, dried red chile & chile powder, local pinto beans, peanuts & pecan, ristras, jams & jellies, fountain drinks, fresh eggs, Alfalfa Hay, Wheat, Sudan & Oat hay, small & large bales, we accept credit cards & EBT. GRAVES FARM 622-1889

715. Hay and Feed Sale

Sorgum bales 4x8 $75, Call Janet at 575-626-0159

745. Pets for Sale

Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed! 25 FT flat bed trailer, two axle, $1800, 3 axle trailer $2,500. Ford tractor and blaid $2,200. 575-416-1454 Commode chair, Invacare patient lifter, walker, elevated toilet seat, 622-7638. ITALIAN EXPRESSO & Cappuccino, double head & single head w/bean grinder, mint condition on both machines. 575-317-2195

RAZOR EDGE 2 males left, serious inquiries only. 575-317-9287

RECREATIONAL

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

2007 HARLEY Davidson Sportster 1200 custom, fuel injected, only 5k miles, forward controls, removable Harley windshield, $5500, excellent condition, 420-1352 2010 MAJESTY motorscooter, 400cc, matching top case, stereo system, touring windshield, shop manual, 17k miles, excellent condition, $4000. 575-644-2593 2007 GUN metal & black Honda Shadow 750. 2134 miles. $5000 420-9944 2002 BLACK Honda Magna 750 4 cyl. $5000 3284 miles. 420-9944

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com BOAT & RV STORAGE, secure area, $25/mo. Call 623-4200. WANTED TO buy: 6’x12’ tandem enclosed cargo trailer w/side door & full ramp rear door in excellent shape. Call 622-1155 between 8am-5pm, Mon-Fri with info. 1988 FOOD trailer, fully loaded. $7500 without snow cone machine. 575-703-4988

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM 72 VW looks/runs good, serious buyers only. 623-2617

1999 DODGE Intrepid, low miles, excellent cond., $2000, owner financing w/$1000 down. 420-1352 RAY'S GALACTIC MOTORS 4907 S. MAIN ST. ROSWELL, NM 575-910-0282 575-420-7203

2006 KIA SORENTO, $5,995 2005 FORD F150 SUPERCAB 4X4, 14,950 2002 FORD _ TON, $4,995 1998 FORD F150 SUPERCAB, $3,995 1991 JEEP WRANGLER, $5,950 MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FROM

Tell City Solid Maple china cabinet, great condition, $599 OBO/trade. 420-2191 Power wheelchair, hospital bed, oxygen cyl. grab bars, lift chair. 622-7638

745. Pets for Sale

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

POMERANIAN PUPPIES for sale, $300, pure bred. 575-626-3639 AKC GOLDEN Retriever puppies, 2F, 443-616-7492 CATS, KITTENS, free to good home, tame, box trained. 575-416-1257 JACK RUSSEL Rat Terrier pups for sale, 1st shots, dewormed. 623-8631 or 317-7024

2003 OLDSMOBILE Alero, excellent cond., 4 cyl., $1500 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352.

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

‘97 F350 crew cab, 4 wd, gooseneck pkg. Will send pictures. Call Charles at 214-850-8712. 2008 FORD F150, ext cab, heavy duty 4x4, tow package, only 88k miles, $13,850. 420-1352

796. SUVS

1999 CHEVY Suburban new vortex 5.0 350 engine and new transmission. 50kmiles ago. Clean 8 passenger three seats, two wheel drive, well maintained, good dependable transportation, runs great, surprisingly good gas mileage. 211K miles. $5500 OBO 626-1721

Roswell Daily Record

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


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