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Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 123, No. 37 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

February 11, 2014

www.rdrnews.com

TUESDAY

Another delay in health law’s employer requirement

WASHINGTON (AP) — Angling to avoid political peril, the Obama administration Monday granted employers another delay in a heavily criticized requirement that medium-to-larger firms cover their workers or face fines. In one of several concessions in a complex Treasury Department regulation of more than 200 pages, the administration said companies with 50 to 99 employees will have an additional year to comply with the coverage requirement, until January 1,

2016. For businesses with 100 or more employees the requirement will still take effect in 2015. But other newly announced provisions, affecting technical issues such as the calculation of working hours, may help some of those firms. More than 90 percent of companies with 50 or more employees already cover their workers without the government telling them to do so, but the debate has revolved around the potential impact on new and growing firms. Most small

businesses have fewer than 50 workers and are exempt from the mandate. However, employer groups were also uneasy with a requirement that defines a fulltime worker as someone averaging 30 hours a week. Republicans trying to take control of the Senate in the November elections have once again made President Barack Obama’s health care law their top issue, casting it as job killer. They want to use the employer mandate to build that case, with anecdotes of bosses reluctant

to hire a 50th worker, or slashing the hours of lowwage workers who need to pay household bills. Monday’s moves by the administration seemed calibrated to reduce that risk.

The reaction of business groups was mixed.

“These final regulations secured the gold medal for gr eatest assistance to retailers, and other businesses, and our employees,” said Neil Trautwein, a vice pr esident of the National Retail Federation.

AP Photo

This photo taken Jan. 31, 2014, shows Tina Wilson, who was a victim of sexual assault while serving in the Navy, outside of her brother’s home in Del City, OK.

AP Photo

This Nov. 27, 2013, file photo shows part of the HealthCare.gov website page featuring information about the SHOP Marketplace.

Senator seeking military records on sexual assault

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon is coming under pressure to give Congress detailed information on the handling of sex crime cases in the armed forces following an Associated Press investigation that found a patter n of inconsistent judgments and light penalties for sexual assaults at U.S. bases in Japan. Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, who’s led efforts in Congress to address military sexual crimes, is pressing the Defense Department to turn over case information from four major U.S. bases: Fort Hood in Texas, Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia,

the Marine Corps’ Camp Pendleton in California, and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. Such records would shed more light on how military commanders make decisions about court martials and punishments in sexual assault cases and whether the inconsistent judgments seen in Japan are more widespread. AP’s investigation, which was based on hundreds of inter nal military documents it first began requesting in 2009, found that what appeared to be strong cases were often See ASSAULT, Page A3

Lawsuit targets NM Fairgrounds lease criticized in Senate hearing child welfare agency

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — New Mexico’s embattled child welfare agency is the target of a federal lawsuit alleging civil rights violations. The complaint, filed last week in U.S. District Court in Albuquerque, spells out the details of a custody battle that attor ney Colin Hunter says resulted in a young girl being emotionally and physically abused at the hands of strangers. Hunter said Monday the case is the latest example of incompetence within the state Children, Youth and Families Department, which has come under scrutiny in the weeks since the death of Omaree Varela, a 9-year-old Albuquerque boy who police say was kicked repeatedly by

his mother. In the lawsuit involving the girl, Hunter said a senior investigator with the state agency had called on Belen police to stop the girl’s father, remove the child from his vehicle and return her to her mother despite an earlier court order that had established the father’s custody. The police stop happened Feb. 6, 2012, the same day a special court commissioner had dismissed a temporary restraining order against the father that stemmed from the mother’s ef forts to overtur n the court order. Hunter said the child welfare agency investigator took action despite the See LAWSUIT, Page A3

SANTA FE (AP) — Current and former governmental appointees of Republican Gov. Susana Martinez criticized her administration on Monday for rushing through a 25year lease in 2011 for a company to build a larger casino at the New Mexico fairgrounds. Former State Board of Finance member Tom Tinnin told the Senate Rules Committee on Monday that the lease “didn’t smell right.” He resigned shortly before the board was to review the deal in late 2011. The lease allowed the Downs of Albuquerque, which has long operated a horse-racing track and casino at the fairgrounds, to open a larger casino with more slot machines. Critics have questioned whether political contributions by track owners influenced the deal. Former State Fair Commissioner Charlotte Rode outlined objections she’s previously voiced that commissioners were excluded from much of the process. “They wanted to keep the information secretive,” Rode said.

Enrique Knell, a spokesman for the governor’s office, defended the lease in a statement and dismissed the legislative hearing. “That was nothing more than a taxpayer -funded political circus orchestrated by a desperate candidate for governor where not a single new piece of infor mation was revealed,” Knell said in a statement issued after the hearing. The committee chairman, Sen. Linda Lopez of Albuquerque, is among five Democrats running for governor against Martinez this year. No representative of the Martinez administration appeared before the committee, although Martinez, her political adviser and the state fair manager were invited. Only one GOP committee member attended. The governor’s 2010 campaign and her political action committee received about $70,000 in contributions from two Louisiana owners of the track and businesses connected to them. But Martinez officials have repeatedly said the contributions didn’t play a role in the fairgrounds

lease. “The administration put this lease out for competitive bid, the winner was selected by an independent selection committee, and the administration negotiated a lease with the winning bidder that was in the best interests of the state and would keep the state fair open,” Knell said. Attor ney General Gary King’s office has been reviewing the deal, spokesman Phil Sisneros said in an interview. “We have to separate rumors from fact, and all of that takes time,” Sisneros said. King also is running for governor. The FBI has questioned people about the lease, but the agency won’t confirm or deny there is an investigation of the deal. Commissioner Kenneth “Twister” Smith said he felt pressured to quickly approve the lease because he was repeatedly told a new lease was critical to the fair’s financial success and it was needed before an older contract with the Downs expired in 2012.

State’s Extraterrestrial Culture Day recognizes otherworldly visitors JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Have you hugged an extraterrestrial today? Today’s state-recognized Extraterrestrial Culture Day gives you a chance to do just that. After all, these visitors have come a long way this year to gaining at least some respect. Locally, the town rallied when a baby alien was abducted in July from a mural on Bill Marley’s ranch along Hwy. 285. The loss was heart-wrenching.

Many hoped the child was temporarily lost in space and would return home on its own. “We had hoped it would leave a trail of Reese’s Pieces to find its way back home,” said Roswell Chamber of Commerce Director Dorrie FaubusMcCarty. The Chaves County Sheriff’s Department investigated the incident to no avail. Chief Deputy Britt Snyder expressed concern for its safety. The community gathered Oct. 22 to celebrate the alien child’s replacement.

HIGH 47 LOW 28

TODAY’S FORECAST

Another grand day arrived July 8 when Internet searchers worldwide were greeted with the now famous Roswell Incident “Google Doodle.” The sketch seen around the world marked the 66th anniversary of the spaceship crash-landing scenario. Other interesting events marked 2013 for Roswell’s mystery busters. The Federal Bureau of Investigation posted a 63year-old memo in March of an interview taken in New Mexico from an Air Force investigator who reported

recovering three flying saucers, each occupied by three small human-shaped bodies dressed in blackout suits. The memo was never investigated but viewed 1 million times. In August, expert researchers of the 1947 Roswell Incident weighed in about whether the CIA’s admission of the existence of Area 51, a top-secret site in the Nevada desert, would lead to further proof of crashing flying saucers See E.T. DAY, Page A3

TODAY’S OBITUARIES PAGE A7 • FREDERICO “LICO” LUJAN • LUCILLA L. ORTEGA • IRENE C. “GRANNY” MAJOWICH • VICTORIA J. (VICKI) HERRON • VINA LENORE BRISCOE LARSON • ANGELINA ROBINSON

Jill McLaughlin Photo

New Mexico celebrates Extraterrestrial Culture Day today, to "celebrate and honor all past, present and future extraterrestrial visitors." These cuddly greenies can be found at Roswell Landing Gift Shop on Main Street.

CLASSIFIEDS ..........B5 COMICS .................A9 ENTERTAINMENT ...A10 FINANCIAL ..............B4

INDEX GENERAL ...............A2 HOROSCOPES .......A10

LOTTERIES .............A2

OPINION .................A4

SPORTS .................B1

WEATHER ............A10


A2 Tuesday, February 11, 2014

GENERAL

Bill repealing state driver’s license law stalls

SANTA FE (AP) — A bill that would have stopped New Mexico from granting driver’s licenses to most immigrants without proper documentation stalled Saturday on a tie vote by a House committee. The Santa Fe New Mexican reports the legislation could not overcome the House Labor and Human Resources Committee’s 4-4 vote, which was along party lines. Committee members debated more than three

hours. House Speaker Kenny Martinez, a committee member, and three other Democrats voted against the bill, which is backed by Gov. Susana Martinez. The bill, sponsored by Republican Rep. Paul Pacheco of Albuquerque, would allow temporary driver’s licenses for certain immigrant youths but stop the state from granting licenses to other foreign nationals without proper

immigration documents. “It’s very frustrating,” Pacheco said of the tie vote. “I think that the issue is fairly simple.” Pacheco said he is unsure whether he will attempt to move the bill through the full House of Representatives with a floor vote. He tried that strategy during last year’s session, and it failed. Speaker Martinez says the measure would take away licenses from nine

Democrat defends vote against state budget

Co. of Hughson, Calif., for $18.5 million. Sunland’s attorneys had estimated the bankrupt firm’s assets at close to $50 million in earlier court filings. But lawyers for Sunland’s three major creditors, CoBank, Production Credit Association (PCA) and Costco, said they feared Sunland was overestimating its value, the Portales News-T ribune reports. The Food and Drug Administration shuttered the plant in September 2012 after its products were linked to 41 salmonella cases in 20 states. Most of those were linked to natural peanut butter the company made for Trader Joe’s. The plant reopened last May. But it filed for bankruptcy and closed in October, apparently unable to recover from the financial hit of an eight-month-long shutdown and lawsuits from the salmonella outbreak. Sunland processed Valencia peanuts, a sweet variety of peanut that is unique to the region and preferred for natural butters because it is flavorful without additives. The shutdown left many stores scrambling for months to find alter native natural peanut butters.

unresponsive child. The caller told police a couple was in the lobby arguing and the 7-month-old child would not wake up. The child was taken to a local hospital and placed into the custody of the Children, Youth and Families Department. Allen said Monday the boy is doing well. The child’s father, 22year-old Shanevan Beyale, is facing charges of criminal sexual penetration of a minor, child abuse, battery on a household member and possession of drug paraphernalia. The boy’s mother, Keasha Morales, is charged with child abuse. It’s not clear if either has an attorney.

STATE BRIEFS

SANTA FE (AP) — Democratic Rep. Sandra Jeff of Crownpoint says she’s been unfairly criticized for her vote against a $6 billion budget bill, which stalled last week on a tie vote in the House. Jeff said in a House floor speech Monday there have been automated phone calls in her district suggesting that she doesn’t support public education. She said she expected opposition in her re-election bid this year. Jeff also expressed concern that some lawmakers might try to retaliate by opposing a new gambling compact with the Navajo Nation, of which Jeff is an enrolled member. “I will not change my vote,” Jeff said. She also declared, “I will always be a Democrat.” Jeff was the only Democrat who voted against the budget, joining House Republicans who were in opposition.

Company seeks peanut-butter plant for $18.5M

PORTALES (AP) — A California company has made a bid to buy a New Mexico peanut-butter plant that went bankrupt after a salmonella outbreak shuttered its operations and prompted a nationwide recall. The bankruptcy trustee for Sunland Inc., which was the nation’s largest producer of organic peanut butter, has requested the court approve selling the eastern New Mexico company to Ready Roast Nut

Police arrest parents in child abuse case

FARMINGTON (AP) — Farmington police say an infant is in state custody and his parents are facing abuse charges. Police spokeswoman Georgette Allen says officers arrived at a Farmington motel Thursday after getting a call about an

LOTTERY NUMBERS

Roadrunner Cash 1-17-18-19-30

Police: Death of man in freezer tied to meth

HOBBS (AP) — Police in Hobbs are identifying a man whose body was found in a kitchen freezer and they say he died accidentally from methamphetamine. According to police, the body of 22-year-old Everett Willford was found in the freezer on Sept. 3 when officers responded to a call about a suspicious odor coming from the home. The body was taken to the state Office of the Medical Investigator to determine identification and cause of death. Officer Mike Stone says the home was vacant and didn’t have power and that neighbors started smelling the odor about 10 days before calling police. Stone says circumstances of how Willford’s body ended up in the freezer remain unknown and that there may be no further action in the case.

classes of legal immigrants. Other Democrats argued that stripping driver’s licenses would keep taxpaying immigrants from getting to work and taking care of their families. A state law enacted in 2003 allows for immigrants in the U.S. illegally to get a driver’s license. According to the Albuquerque Journal, Pacheco’s proposal represents the fifth time in the past four years the Legislature has debated

PUBLIC RECORDS Marriage Licenses

Jan. 22 Jose D. Denis-Delatorre, 22, and Angelica Y. Calderon, 23, both of Roswell. Zachaery T. Artrip, 22, and Jotie P. Orquiz, 29, both of Artesia. Jan. 23 Kelly M. Scott, 54, and Corliss J. Clees, 56, both of Roswell. Brandon Clark, 29, and Amanda J. Cook, 25, both of Roswell. Fernando Damian-Ruiz, 38, and Valerie C. Urbie, 33, both of Roswell. Ger man BanuelosChavez, 25, and Elizabeth Herrera, 26, both of Roswell. Jan. 24 Edmund Herrera, 24, and Flor E. Salcido-Barraza, 24, both of Roswell. Martin Mendez-Hernandez, 47, and Margarita A. Chairez, 50, both of Roswell. R yann T. Hill, 42, and Waleska Toro-Hernandez, 29, both of Artesia. Allan C. Rehrig, 25, and Susan D. Freisinger, 25, both of Dexter. Jan. 27 Adolfo Renteria-Alvarado, 20, and Ana K. Solis, 20, both of Roswell. Richard W. Marr, 21, and Lilliy Ruiz, 20, both of Roswell. Jan. 29 Jose E. Briseno-Martinez, 19, and Laura N. Marin, 19, both of Roswell. Mary K. Beard, 53, and Paula Ann Ogea, 56, both

6-9-1

Rep. Miguel Garcia, a Democrat from Albuquerque and the committee chair man, called those fears “a manufactured crisis.” “It’s not that 97 percent of people in the driver’s license program who are creating the crime. It’s that 3 percent,” Garcia said. “We have that 3 percent corrupt element in all institutions in our country.”

Roswell. Jason R. Leonardi, 34, and Beverly N. Newton, 29, both of Roswell. Feb. 7 Miguel A. Olivas, 21, and Marlene Acedo, 19, both of Roswell.

Accidents

Jan. 27 3:14 p.m. — Unknown address, and unknown drivers. 8:23 a.m. — 25 W. Martin Street; drivers — Orlando Lucero, and Kyla S. Satterfield. 11:22 p.m. — South Main and West Chisum; drivers — Ashley Wood, and Mayra Ceballos. Jan. 28 12:19 p.m. — 1835 N. Main; drivers — Rose Tarin, and Juan Oropesa. 4:30 p.m. — 311 W. Country Club; drivers — Jessica L. Bell, and Neira S. Reyes. Jan. 29 10:01 a.m. — 4500 N. Main parking lot; drivers unknown. 8:35 p.m. — North Garden and East Second; drivers — Ricardo L. Barrera, and Miguel A. Delgado. 9:02 p.m. — 1835 N. Main; drivers — Daniel Rodriguez Sanchez, and Christopher Sifuentes. 9:06 p.m. — 1504 S. Union; drivers Cody D. Hairston.

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of Bandera, Texas. Chad Anthony Luckette, 28, and Jeanette Amariz Montezuma, 29, both of Roswell. Jan. 31 Jodi D. Montoya, 40, and Shenna Dian Carroll, 29, both of Roswell. Angela Marie Cross, 42, and Sophia Pilar Dominguez, 24, both of Lubbock. James P. Romo, 42, and Brandy M. Duncan, 38, both of Roswell. Feb. 3 Abel Hernandez, 40, and Amanda V. Encinias, 33, both of Roswell. Domingo J. Martinez, 18, and Leslie A. Munoz, 17, both of Roswell. Joel Saenz Jr., 24, and Marisela Gandarilla, 21, both of Roswell. Feb. 4 Christopher A. Lucero, 23, and Amanda A. Griego, 20, both of Roswell. Feb. 5 David S. Olivas, 49, and Petra L. Jackson, 49, both of Dexter. Rene Ruiz, 21, and Adrianna M. Vargas, 20, both of Roswell. Vicente A. QuinonezTagle, 24, and Jessica M. Mendoza, 36, both of Roswell. Feb. 6 Roberto Ramos-Rosas, 31, and Maria Dejesus Pena-Samaniego, 23, both of Roswell. Ricardo Ramirez-Plascencia, 31, and Maria Guadalupe Lupercio-Hernandez, 31, both of

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repealing it. Supporters of the repeal say issuing licenses to immigrants living in the U.S. illegally would not make New Mexico compliant with the federal Real ID Act, which says stateissued licenses and ID cards can be accepted for “official purposes” such as boarding planes. Vulnerability to fraud and human trafficking are also some of the arguments put forth by those wanting to deny

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GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

A3

AP Photos

These undated images released by 33PHOTO and Arte en la Charrería show a silver inlaid spur, left, and an ornate saddle, above, on display at the Albuquerque Museum as part of the exhibition “Arte en la Charreria: The Artisanship of Mexican Equestrian Culture.”

Museum highlights culture of Mexican horsemen ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — There’s no mass production here, just evidence of the slow and patient work that went into handcrafting the costumes and tools behind one of Mexico’s most important traditions. From fine embroidery to ornate saddles and silver inlaid spurs, more than 150 pieces are on display at the Albuquerque Museum as part of the exhibition “Arte en la Charreria: The Artisanship of Mexi-

can Equestrian Culture,” which is on display through March 30. The artifacts, some dating to the 1800s, were culled from prestigious collections throughout Mexico. Each item reflects different elements of the culture of the legendary charro — the Mexican horseman. “Too often, we in the West get lost in the stories of cowboy culture, unwary of its foundation,” said

Assault

Continued from Page A1

reduced to lesser charges. Suspects were unlikely to serve time even when military authorities agreed a crime had been committed. In two rape cases, commanders overruled recommendations to court-martial and dropped the charges instead. Gillibrand, who leads the Senate Ar med Services personnel panel, wrote Monday to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel asking for “all reports and allegations of rape, forcible sodomy, sexual assault, sex in the barracks, adultery and attempts, conspiracies or solicitations to commit these crimes,” for the last five years. She said AP’s investigation is “disturbing evidence” that some commanders refuse to prosecute sexual assault cases and the Pentagon should have provided the records more quickly. The documents may build momentum for legislation she has introduced that would strip senior officers of their authority to decide whether serious crimes, including sexual assault cases, go to trial. The bill would place that judgment with trial counsels who have prosecutorial experience and hold the rank of colonel or above. The legislation, expected to be voted on in coming weeks, is short of the 60 votes needed to prevent a filibuster. Defense Department officials have acknowledged the problem of sexual assaults in the ranks and said they are taking aggressive steps to put a stop to the crimes.

Lawsuit

Continued from Page A1

court order and knowing that the mother was a transient and did not have the means to care for the girl. “This is not a case of an overwhelmed system allowing a child to fall through the cracks. This is a case of poorly trained and poorly supervised gover nment agencies flagrantly disobeying a court order and placing a child in danger,” the lawsuit states. The girl’s grandparents hired a private investigator to find her. She was found with strangers in a mobile home in Espanola and her mother’s whereabouts were unknown, according to the lawsuit. While in her mother’s custody, the father and grandparents claim the girl was often left unattended, did not go to school and was abused by strangers. Belen Police Chief Dan Robb said he was unaware

museum director Cathy Wright. “‘Arte en la Charreria’ gives our visitors a chance to experience the beauty, color and expressiveness of this wonderful Mexican tradition, which continues to infor m Southwestern fashion and material culture today.” The roots of the charreria culture first emerged centuries ago with the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors and their horses. By the 19th century,

“This isn’t a sprint,” said Jill Loftus, director of the Navy’s sexual assault prevention program. “This is a marathon and it’s going to take a while.” Col. Alan Metzler, deputy director of the Defense Department’s Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office, said numerous changes in military law and policy made by Congress and the Pentagon are creating a culture where victims trust that their allegations will be taken seriously and perpetrators will be punished. Defense officials noted that the cases in Japan preceded changes the Pentagon implemented in May. The information acquired by AP through the open records law consists of more than 1,000 reports of sex crimes involving U.S. military personnel between 2005 and early 2013. Although AP sought the full investigative file for the cases, to include detail-rich exhibits, the Pentagon mainly provided summaries of cases from the U.S. Naval Criminal Investigative Service. That service, which handles the Navy and Marine Corps, excised the names of U.S. commanders from the records, affording senior officers the same degree of privacy as the alleged victims. But with their identities kept secret, commanders can’t be held publicly accountable for how they handled the cases. Gillibrand’s request doesn’t seek the exhibits for cases. She is asking for reports and recommendations made in Article 32 proceedings, the military’s version of a grand jury, and the results of all courts-martial that

celebrations similar to rodeos were being organized around Mexico in which charros would compete, showing of f their skills. In the early 1930s, the color ful equestrian style was declared the national sport of Mexico. Museum curators say there’s meaning behind every component of the costumes worn by charros and charras. In some cases, layers of leather are applied to fabric and then

were convened to adjudicate rapes and other serious sex crimes.

She said it’s been a struggle to get timely and accurate data from the Defense Department about sexual assault cases.

“They are maintaining a closed system when what we really need is sunshine,” Gillibrand said in an AP interview. “What we really need is light and transparency so we can get to the root of the problem and then find the right solutions.” But Metzler cautioned that too much openness could result in fewer victims stepping forward to report crimes.

“To suggest that we need to be very public about what’s going on in each individual case risks the trust that we want to build with those victims,” Metzler said. Such information, however, is publicly available in the civilian justice system.

The top U.S. officer in Japan, Lt. Gen. Salvatore Angelella, was unable to make a scheduled appearance Monday at the Japan National Press Club in Tokyo due to heavy snow. Angelella took questions submitted in advance over Skype but did not respond to AP’s question about the adjudication of sexual assault cases involving U.S. personnel in Japan.

adorned with intricate silver buttons. Embroidery, sequins and beading often provide another layer. Even the sculptural iron spurs are decorated with tooled and stamped silver. All the leather, velvet and suede make for an exploration of texture and detail, not just a history lesson. It would be impossible to pick a favorite from the items in the exhibition, said Deb Slaney, the

E.T. Day

Continued from Page A1

or alien autopsies. “My suspicion is that they will stay quiet about that for a long, long time,” said Roswell UFO researcher Don Burleson, who is also area director of the national Mutual UFO Network. Today’s Extraterrestrial Culture Day, proposed in 2003 by Rep. Dan Foley, R-Roswell, is meant to “celebrate and honor all past, present and future extraterrestrial visitors” to New Mexico.” Yes, many of the creatures remain in surgery

museum’s curator of history. “There is no best example. They’re all fabulous,” she said. ——— If You Go... ALBUQUERQUE MUSEUM: 2000 Mountain Road, Albuquerque; albuquerquemuseum.org or 505-243-7255. TuesdaySunday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Adults $4; teens $3; seniors $2; and children 4-12, $1.

under heat lamps in the downtown museum. And their distant cousins have reduplicated in astounding numbers as neon-green blow-up toys. A born-again, praying alien statue had even become victim of a burglary earlier this month, only to be recovered by the local police. But, last year’s UFO Festival drew more than 1,350 visitors in its first day to the museum for its lectures and authors. The museum’s and Roswell’s popularity is proof that Roswell celebrates every day, said Executive Director Mark Briscoe. “The rest of the country is just catching up with us,” Briscoe said.

In an earlier statement to AP, Angelella said the military takes the issue of sexual assault “very seriously.”

“Sexual assault is a crime and a contradiction to everything we stand for,” he said.

!"#$%&'"(')*+,$%'-%")$!.'/&&#$!.-' of the case. Children, Youth and Families Department spokesman Henry Varela called the lawsuit frivolous, noting that the child had never been in the agency’s custody. “Because the state of New Mexico never had legal custody of the child, CYFD never had any legal authority to decide where a child should be placed,” he said, without addressing the allegations against the investigator. Gov. Susana Martinez has acknowledged the agency has had a “revolving door” largely because of employee burnout and the difficult nature of the job. She has said she’s been trying to turn that around, but critics say caseloads have risen to unmanageable levels and the lack of follow-up is concerning. In the case of Omaree

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Varela, critics have said the child welfare agency and Albuquerque police failed the boy by not removing him from his home.

Hunter said his clients are angry that their granddaughter was removed from a safe environment and placed in danger.

“I don’t know the cause or the reason, and it’s not that I don’t think people don’t care over there, but something has to change,” he said, referring to the agency. “These jobs are just too important.”

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Governor election could be determined by what else is on the ballot

A4 Tuesday, February 11, 2014

The 2014 election is officially under way with the filing of qualifying petitions last week. Five Democrats have lined up to challenge Gov. Susana Martinez. All five met the goal, submitting petitions with more than 3,000 signatures. Though there’s little media attention so far, the race is already energetic. Martinez doesn’t have re-election locked in. She’s believed to be the heavy favorite today against an unnamed Democrat, but she could be vulnerable on a number of counts. So far, she’s managed to keep her public image separate from the most serious controversies of her administration. But we don’t know yet what voters are thinking. The Democratic nominee could make hay of Martinez’s many out-of-state trips pursuing her own or her party’s political interests. Her well-publicized jaunt to New Jersey in November, cam-

OPINION

MERILEE

DANNEMANN

TRIPLE SPACED

paigning for the re-election of Gov. Chris Christie, could turn out to be a liability – maybe because his reputation is now in question, or maybe just because she was gadding about the country instead of doing her job in New Mexico. We still don’t know whether her administration’s controversial education policies are infuriating only teachers or also angering the voters at large; or whether the public has grasped the damage done in last year’s behavioral health debacle, when the state’s fragile system of behavioral health services was virtually dismantled.

Roswell Daily Record

We don’t know who the Democrats’ nominee will be. Five candidates are running, and there’s formidable opposition to early favorite Gary King. And there are some potential wild cards in the deck: all those pesky proposed constitutional amendments now in consideration before the legislature. Those amendments could have a big effect on voter turnout. The initiative to legalize marijuana is a case in point. A few days before the session, Sen. Jerry Ortiz y Pino, D-Albuquerque, sponsor of the amendment, was speaker at a luncheon I attended. Someone asked if we could have a show of hands on the attendees’ views of that issue. We did. I was one of a small minority voting against (I favor decriminalizing marijuana, but not through the constitution). This was a group of staid and sober adults. It’s a safe guess that young, otherwise unengaged

voters would show up in numbers never before seen in New Mexico to vote for this. We could also reasonably guess that they wouldn’t vote Republican. There’s also a proposal for an amendment prohibiting gay marriage, sponsored by Republican Sen. William Sharer, of Farmington, which could also work against Martinez by shifting voter turnout. For an object lesson, consider the recent special election in Albuquerque. In the regular (officially nonpartisan) city election, Republican Janice Arnold-Jones, running for city council, failed by a hair to get the 50 percent required by the city charter. So a special election was held a month later. That special election also carried a referendum question on late-term abortion. Arnold-Jones lost in the special election to Democrat Diane Gibson. The regular city election, which

included a mayoral race, had a mediocre turnout. The turnout in the special election was much larger, driven by the abortion question. The anti-abortion initiative was soundly defeated. No doubt the abortion issue brought out voters who would not have bothered to show up just for a city council race and helped Gibson defeat Arnold-Jones. A recent poll shows New Mexicans are leaning slightly in favor of gay marriage. If the issue gets on the ballot, it will bring out yet another constituency and could give an advantage to Gov. Martinez’s opponent. Neither of those amendments appears to be moving quickly in the Legislature. But things can move with lightning speed during the last few days of the session. The election is not a foregone conclusion by any means. Contact Merilee Dannemann t h r o u g h www.triplespacedagain.com.

EDITORIAL

Confessions of a Former TSA screener

Jason Edward Harrington is no Edward Snowden. But, Mr. Harrington, a former Transportation Security Administration officer, in his own way, has done almost as much damage to TSA’s image among the American people as the notorious leaker did to the National Security Agency’s. Like Mr. Snowden, Mr. Harrington had misgivings about certain of his agency’s standard operating procedures. ‘It was a job that had me patting down the crotches of children, the elderly and even infants as part of the post-9/11 airport security show,’ he recalled, in a firstperson account published last week by Politico. He disclosed that TSA had a secret Selectee Passport List, which subjected air travelers hailing from any one of 12 nations to be pulled aside for full-body pat downs and to have their luggage inspected item by item. Now, hardly anyone would quarrel with the dozen countries that made TSA’s watch list, which included such nonfriendly states as North Korea, Iran and Yemen. And we suspect that not too many Americans would be troubled that foreign nationals from certain parts of the world automatically receive enhanced screening. But Mr. Harrington, who was based at Chicago’s O’Hare airport, asserts that the selectee list was ‘purely political.’ Indeed, he wrote, ‘There was no Saudi Arabia or Pakistan on a list of states historically known to harbor, aid or abet terrorists.’ Neither U.S. citizens nor foreign air travelers holding passports from nations other than the dozen on TSA’s watch list had to worry about being automatically directed to secondary screening. But they, too, were subject to certain indignities. And without their knowledge. Among other offensive practices, wrote Mr. Harrington, male TSA agents used code words to alert each other to attractive women passing through screening lines. ‘Fanny Pack, Lane 2,’ for instance, referred to a woman queued up. Code Red, another code, denoted a woman wearing, yes, red. Then, there’s the full-body scanners TSA installed at airports throughout the country, promising the flying public that there was no danger of TSA officers gawking at their nude images. Au contraire, Mr. Harrington attested. ‘Many of the images we gawked at were overweight people, their every fold and dimple on awful display.’ Also, he wrote, ‘Piercings of every kind were visible. Women who’d had mastectomies were easy to discern — their chests showed up on our screens as dull, pixilated regions.’ Of course, the full-body scanners were deployed by TSA — at $150,000 a pop — to detect hidden weapons and explosives. But Mr. Harrington wr ote that the instructor who taught him and his fellow TSA officers confided that they ‘wouldn’t be able to distinguish plastic explosives from body fat and that guns were practically invisible if they were turned sideways in a pocket.’ TSA of ficials suggest that airport screening has changed since Mr. Harrington left his job last year. Many of the ‘procedures and policies’ the former TSA officer disclosed to Politico — including the controversial full-body scans — ‘are no longer in place or are characterized inaccurately,’ officials say. Perhaps. But, rather than take TSA’s word for it, we’d like to see a congressional oversight committee investigate. Reprinted from The Orange County Register

Deficit of truth: What Republicans hope you don’t know and never find out

JOE CONASON CREATORS SYNDICATE

Listening to Republicans in Congress wailing incessantly about our spendthrift culture raises a nagging question: What would they do, besides talking, if they actually wanted to reduce federal deficits and, eventually, the national debt? First, they would admit that President Barack Obama’s policies, including health care refor m, have

Doonesbury

DEAR DOCTOR K: I’ve just scheduled LASIK surgery. Can you explain what will happen during the procedure? DEAR READER: To understand LASIK surgery, you first need to know a few things about the eye and what it does. Basically, your eye is like a camera: It focuses the light coming into it to make a sharp image. That image then is captured on a kind of film (or, in digital cameras, a sensor). The parts of the eye that focus the image are primarily

already reduced deficits sharply, as promised. Second, they would desist from their hostage-taking tactics over the debt ceiling, which have only damaged America’s economy and international prestige. And then they would finally admit that basic investment and job creation, rather than cutting food stamps, represent the best way to reduce both deficits and debt — indeed, the only way — through economic growth.

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

the cornea and the lens. The part that captures the image is the retina, a flat layer of nerve cells at the back of the eye. The cells of the retina then

Fortunately for those Republicans and sadly for everyone else, the American public has little comprehension of current fiscal realities. Most people don’t even know that the deficit is shrinking rather than growing. According to a poll released on Feb. 4 by the Huffington Post and YouGov, an Internet marketing firm, well over half believe the budget deficit has increased since 2009, while less than 20 percent are aware that it has steadily

decreased. (Another 14 percent believe the deficit has remained constant during Obama’s presidency.) Unsurprisingly, perhaps, it is Republican voters, misinfor med by Fox News, who most fervently and consistently insist on these mistaken ideas, with 85 percent telling pollsters that the deficit has increased. Less than a third of Democrats gave that answer. But nearly

send the image to the back of the brain — the part that allows us to see and interpret the images. During LASIK surgery, your doctor uses a laser to reshape your cornea. The cornea is the clear, round “window” of tissue that allows light to enter the front of the eye. By reshaping the cornea, the surgeon adjusts the focus of light on the retina. LASIK can improve vision in people who are nearsighted, farsighted or have astigmatism.

You will meet with your surgeon and his or her team before your procedure. During this exam, the team will take precise measurements of your eyes, including the shape and thickness of your cornea. On the day of your procedure, your doctor may give you a mild sedative to help you relax. You will lie down in a reclining chair. You’ll be given numbing eye drops so you will not feel pain or dis-

See CONASON, Page A5

See DR. K, Page A5


LOCAL

A5

Celebrate Galileo’s 450th birthday with the library Roswell Daily Record

LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

Galileo Galilei’s 450th birth anniversary is Saturday. Galileo is known as the “Father of Science,” Father of Scientific Reason,” “Father of Modern Observational Astronomy,” “Father of Moder n Physics” and even “Father of Modern Science” for his major contributions to the fields of physics, astronomy, cosmology, mathematics and philosophy. His flair for self-promotion ear ned him power ful friends among Italy’s ruling elite and enemies among the Catholic Church’s leaders. His advocacy of the controversial sun-centered or heliocentric universe brought him before religious authorities in 1616 and again in 1633, when he was forced to recant and placed under house arrest for the rest of his life. The Roswell Public Library’s non-fiction section contains biographies of Galileo Galilei and other scientists, as well as books on the subjects of physics, astronomy, cosmology, mathematics, philosophy and other scientific topics. One definition of a geek is a person who is singleminded or accomplished in scientific or technical pursuits. Since Galileo was accomplished in scientific or technical pursuits, in today’s society, he might be considered a geek. Fortunately, you need not be a geek, nerd or techie to take advantage of the resources and services of the library. To locate books or information, visit the library at 301 N. Pennsylvania, phone 575-6227101 or go to the website at www.roswellpubliclibrary.org.

LETTER

This site contains the online catalog of materials, the ability to renew checked out materials and the Calendar of Events. Questions may be e-mailed to rplref@roswellpubliclibrary.org using “Question” in the subject line, or by texting AskRPL to 66746. Reference librarians are available to assist patrons. The library is open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Monday and Tuesday, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Wednesday through Saturday and from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday. The library will be closed on Monday in observance of President’s Day.

Book talk

Geeks, nerds and techies enjoy fantasy and science fiction books, superhero movies, role playing, and video games. The library is full of books, music, and DVDs to help them satiate their nerdy desires, unless they want a conclusion to the Star Wars versus Star Trek debate. Robert Briggs, Circulation Department supervisor, suggests the library is the place to get your geek on. Eric Smith’s “The Geek’s Guide to Dating” is a hilarious advice book for geeks looking for love. The cover is reminiscent of the old timey video game “Donkey Kong,” and there is more eight-bit artwork scattered throughout the book. He effectively relates dating to things that geeks love. Referencing “The Highlander,” “Lord of the Rings,” old Square RPGs, and all things Nintendo, “The Geek’s

Letter to Editor Re: CVC & tobacco How about that? CVC has decided to cease selling tobacco products. It’s about time! Though I applaud them for the decision, I can’t help wondering what took so long. Will Walgreens follow? I certainly hope so. And when will they both recognize the fact that the liquor departments need to be closed out, booze is as harmful to one’s health as tobacco, only in different ways. We do not see independent pharmacies selling either booze or tobacco, there is a reason. I have been irked for many long years over the fact that those of us of a certain age in need of our meds and who have trouble just making it from the parking lot to the front door then have to trek to the back

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

comfort. An instrument will be positioned to keep your eyelids open, and a ringlike suction device will be placed on the front of your eyes to hold your cornea in place. The surgeon will use a delicate instrument to slice a tiny, hinged flap of tissue from the front of your cornea. You will not see or feel the instrument cutting your cornea. The surgeon will remove the suction ring from your eye and fold back the hinged flap of cornea. At this point, the surgeon will use the laser to reshape the underlying protein fibers of your cornea. This reshaping is based on the precise measurements made during your pre-surgery exam. Finally, the doctor will reposition the hinged flap of cornea. No stitches are necessary. (I’ve put an illustration of the LASIK procedure on my

AskDocwebsite, torK.com.) LASIK is an outpatient procedure; it generally takes 10 to 15 minutes for each eye. Some surgeons work on both eyes at one sitting, while others operate on only one eye per sitting. The cornea heals quickly. You may notice dramatic improvements in vision almost immediately following your surgery. By the way, I’ll bet you’re eager to know the full medical name for which LASIK is the abbreviation. It’s: LaserAssisted in situ Keratomileusis. If you already knew that, you’re smarter than I am: I had to look it up. Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115. USPS No 471-200

News & Business Telephone 622-7710 Circulation Telephone 622-7730

Roswell Daily Record

Charles Fischer Publisher

cfischer@rdrnews.com

Vonnie Fischer Advertising Director

addirector@rdrnews.com

R. Cory Beck Publisher (1987-2006)

Jim Dishman .....................................................Circulation Director jdishman@rdrnews.com Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice

The entire contents of the Roswell Daily Record, including its flag on Page 1, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the Daily Record.

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MAIL SUBSCRIPTION RATES: ALL NEW MEXICO 882 ZIP CODES, $12 ONE MONTH, $36 THREE MONTHS, $72 SIX MONTHS, $144 ONE YEAR. All other New Mexico zip codes, $13 one month, $39 three months, $78 six months, $156 one year. All other states in USA, $18 one month, $54 three months, $108 six months, $216 one year. Periodical-postage paid at Roswell, N.M. Postmaster: Please mail change of address to Roswell Daily Record, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202-1897. All postal subscriptions will stop at expiration unless payment is made prior to expiration.

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Guide to Dating” gives sound advice to interacting with possible romantic interests by speaking geek language. Smith addresses the reader as “Player One,” providing tips on how to “hack” online dating profiles, the proper etiquette for approaching women on Facebook and Twitter, as well as the best locations for meeting like-minded women in real life. This book is obviously geared toward straight men, however, all geeks will appreciate the clever references, whether or not the reader is looking to find a date or female love interest. Amigurumi is the popular new Japanese crochet technique for making cloth toys. Erin Clark’s “Itty Bitty Crocheted Critters: Amigurumi With Attitude” instructs readers on how to create adorable animals using smaller versions of the tools that would normally be found in every crocheter’s tool kit. Because this book takes amigurumi down to an even smaller scale than normal, it’s probably best if the reader is a little familiar with a crochet hook before taking on any of the projects in the book. That being said, the instructions are clear enough for anyone who knows how to work a hook and the pictures help motivate the crocheter to finish each project. Clark even shows how to display each critter in it’s own tiny environment. The DVD of “War Games” is the 25th anniversary edition of the classic 1983 science fiction film. The events of the movie were highly unlikely at the time of it’s release, but the appeal to geeks is timeless. David, a brilliant young hacker, accidentally accesses the

United States Defense Department’s super -computer. David believes that he has merely accessed a simulation. He assumes the identity of the Soviets and starts a “game” of thermo-nuclear war, causing the super-computer to start a simulation that convinces the military that the Soviets are attacking. Once David learns of his mistake, he and his friends must put his genius to work preventing the computer from causing a nuclear Armageddon.

What’s happening?

Non-geeks who are unfamiliar with computers are invited to a Computer Basics class held on Saturday at 10 a.m. To register, visit or phone the library’s Reference Department. Children will love the Wednesday and Saturday story and craft hours. On Wednesday, the story times begin at 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. and will celebrate Valentine’s Day. The Saturday program will profile pigs and begins at 2 p.m. Children attending the story portion of the program are invited to be creative during the following related craft session. The stories may vary between programs and all materials are provided, but the quantity of some craft items may be limited. “Splat the Cat” could make a Valentine’s Day appearance in “Love, Splat.” Other related stories are “The Night Before Valentine’s Day,” “Bee Mine,” “Valentine’s Day at the Zoo,” “Give a Little Love” or “My Froggy Valentine.” Kids will love creating crafts such as making a headband with hearts on pipe cleaners, assembling a paper tube love

of the store to pick up prescriptions, talk to a pharmacist, etc., while smokers, dippers, chewers and guzzlers can slip in the front door and within ten feet get their choice of addictive substance and be out the door before the pharmacy customer can get to the back of the store. When Walgreens built the two new stores I thought surely they would remedy that situation. But Oh H*&# no, they made it an even longer trip to the back of the store. Do sincerely hope that the CVC decision will influence all their competitors, but corporate America being what it is, I have my doubts. Randy Flax

Conason Continued from Page A4

60 percent of independent voters agree with the Republicans on that question, and only 30 percent of Democrats understand the truth — an implicit repudiation, as The Huffington Post noted, of the president’s political decision to prioritize deficit reduction rather than job creation. The facts are simple enough even for a tea party politician to understand. The federal deficit reached its peak — in dollar amount and as a share of the national economy — in 2009, which happens to be the year that Obama took office. Thanks to the profligate war and tax policies of the Bush administration — which undid the fiscal stabilization achieved under for mer

LETTER POLICY

bug or butterfly, decorating a large paper heart, folding a heart shaped box or creating a Valentine’s Day card to give to someone special. Pigs in stories and crafts will scramble into the Saturday story time with books that might include “Pig Scramble,” “If You Give a Pig a Pancake,” “The Pig in the Pond,” “The Long-nosed Pig,” “This Little Piggie” or “Oink-adoodle-moo.” For crafts, kids will create a paper bag piggy puppet, make a headband piggy mask or use a large cardboard tube to turn into a piggy bank. An upcoming program for adults, teens and older children about spring planting will be held next Tuesday at 6 p.m. in the Bondurant Room. Sandra Barraza, Chaves County Extension Agriculture agent, will be speaking about fruit trees and other plants.

Books Again

Non-fiction books on all subjects will be on sale during February for $1 each. Fiction books will sell for approximately one-fourth of the original price. Mass market paperback books sell for 25 cents. Add books to your personal home library or select as a gift to family and friends. Books Again, 404 W. Second, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday through Saturday. The store is operated by Friends of the Library volunteers and all proceeds are used to benefit the library. Parking is located behind the store.

The Daily Record welcomes and attempts to publish all letters to the editor that meet guidelines. To be published, letters must include the writer’s first and last name, address and telephone number. Addresses and telephone numbers will not be published unless the letter asks for a response. Addresses and telephone numbers are used for verification or to contact the letter writer for more information. All letters except those sent by e-mail must be signed. Letters which are libelous, written in poor taste, promote or attack individual businesses or concern active civil court cases will not be published. Letters must either be typed or written or printed legibly. Because of limited space, letters should not exceed 600 words. Because of the large volume of letters received, those unpublished may not be acknowledged or returned and a maximum of two letters a month will be printed by any individual writer. The Daily Record reserves the right to reject any letter.

President Bill Clinton — the T reasury had no financial margin when the Great Recession struck. Federal spending required to avoid another (and possibly far worse) worldwide depression, combined with declining tax revenues that resulted from economic stagnation and tax cuts, led inevitably to that record deficit.

Over the past five years, the red ink has swiftly faded. This year’s deficit will be about $514 billion, or about one-third of the $1.5 trillion deficit in 2009; next year’s will be even lower, at around $478 billion. As when Clinton was president, those marked fiscal improvements are mainly the product of a slowly recovering economy and growing incomes, along with federal budget cuts. But not only is the good news about the

shrinking deficit widely ignored; it isn’t actually good news at all. By avoiding a mostly mythical “budget crisis,” federal policy has created a very real jobs crisis that persists, with particular harm to working families. The latest Congressional Budget Office report on the fiscal outlook for the coming decade strongly suggests that the cost of reducing the deficit has been — and will continue to be — substantial losses in potential economic growth and employment.

The ironic consequence, as former White House economist Jared Ber nstein recently explained, is that the fiscal outlook for the next 10 years will be somewhat dimmer than expected. In other words, we will return to higher deficits because fiscal austerity — enforced by Republicans and accept-

ed by Obama — is still dragging the economy down. To restore the kind of growth that lets families prosper and ultimately erases deficits, the Republicans would have to listen to the president — especially when he calls for public investment in infrastructure and an increased minimum wage, first steps toward robust growth and fiscal stability. If Americans understood the truth about deficits and debt — and how the federal budget af fects their jobs and income — the congressional obstruction caucus, also known as the GOP, would have no other choice. To find out more about Joe Conason, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. Copyright 2014 Creators.com


A6 Tuesday, February 11, 2014

NATION

Man sentenced to 30 years in border agent’s death

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — Kelly Terry-Willis did not hesitate to look into the eyes of the orange-jumpsuit-clad man involved in the shooting death of her big brother, telling him his “evil decision” took from her a loving confidant, dance partner and dedicated family man. She tur ned to face Manuel Osorio-Arellanes numer ous times as she spoke about her brother Brian T erry, who was killed during a December 2010 shootout near the U.S.-Mexico border. Osorio-Ar ellanes was sentenced Monday to 30 years on a federal mur der charge in Terry’s death, making him the first person involved in the killing to go to prison in the U.S. The case br ought to light the botched Fast and

Furious operation in which federal agents trying to track guns allowed criminals to buy them for smugglers. weapons Instead, agents lost track of 1,400 of the 2,000 guns involved in the sting operation, including two weapons found at the scene of Terry’s killing. Addr essing him by name, T erry-Willis told Osorio-Arellanes that he was a cowar d who had chosen the wrong path in life. She described her brother as a loving and devoted family man and friend. “He was a man who loved God and life.” The two loved to have dance-of fs, whether in public or private. “I would give anything to have one more dance-of f with my brother,” Terry-Willis said.

U.S. District Court Judge David C. Bury asked Osorio-Arellanes if he wanted to speak, but he initially declined through his attorney, Clay Her nandez. Her nandez said the defendant was extremely nervous and felt he lacked the proper education to speak. Nudged by the judge, Osorio-Arellanes finally apologized several times in Spanish and r eiterated that he, too, was wounded in the shootout. He was shot three times and spent two weeks in the hospital. Prosecutor Todd Robinson took issue with the notion that Osorio-Arellanes, from the state of Sinaloa, Mexico, was a victim. “There is one victim and one victim only,” he said. “That is Brian Terry.”

Roswell Daily Record

AP Photo

Bob Heyer, cousin of Brian A. Terry and the chairman of the Brian Terry Foundation, speaks during a news conference following the sentencing of Manuel Osorio-Arellanes, the only man convicted for the 2010 shooting death of Terry.

Officials weigh drone attack on US terror suspect

AP Photo

Is Georgia ready for snow this time?

Traffic inches along the connector of Interstates 75 and 85 as snow blankets Metro Atlanta on Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 28, as seen from the Pryor Street overpass.

ATLANTA (AP) — Just two weeks ago, Atlanta became a national punch line when a few inches of snow crippled the city. Comedians said the gridlocked highways looked more like a zombie apocalypse than the South’s bustling business hub. On Monday, of ficials were quick to act as the winter weather zeroed in, deter mined not be the butt of jokes like the Saturday Night Live parody that r eferr ed to the “devil’s dandruf f” and “Yankee’s slush.” Before a single dr op of fr eezing

rain or snow fell, Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal had declared a state of emergency for nearly a third of the state, schools canceled classes and workers were staying home. Still, people were skeptical the state would be better prepared this time. “I’m not counting on it. I’ve been in Georgia on and off for 20 years. It’s usually the same scenario, not enough preparations and not enough equipment,” said T erri Her od, who bought a large bag of sand and a shovel at a Home Depot.

She said her sister told the stranded. Of ficials her to also buy kitty litter r eported one accidentin case her car gets stuck related death. on an ice patch. This stor m could be The memories of the worse this time. A onelast storm were too fresh two punch of winter for some. Late last weather was expected for month, students wer e Atlanta and norther n trapped on buses or at Georgia. Rain and snow schools and thousands of were forecast Tuesday, cars wer e abandoned followed by sleet and along highways as short freezing rain Wednesday. commutes tur ned into Downed power lines and odysseys. One woman icy r oads were a major gave birth on a jammed worry. Salt trucks and interstate. In the chaos, snow plows were ready to though, there were stories r oll and the National of Southern hospitality — Guard has 1,400 four people opening up homes wheeled drive vehicles to and businesses to help help anyone stranded.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The case of an American citizen and suspected member of al-Qaida who is allegedly planning attacks on U.S. targets overseas underscores the complexities of President Barack Obama’s new stricter targeting guidelines for the use of deadly drones. The CIA drones watching him cannot strike because he’s a U.S. citizen. The Pentagon drones that could are barred from the country where he’s hiding, and the Justice Department has not yet finished building a case against him. Four U.S. officials said the American suspected terrorist is in a country that refuses U.S. military action on its soil and that has proved unable to go after him. And Obama’s new policy says American suspected terrorists overseas can only be killed by the military, not the CIA, creating a policy conundrum for the White House. Two of the of ficials described the man as an alQaida facilitator who has been directly responsible for deadly attacks against U.S. citizens overseas and who continues to plan attacks against them that would use improvised explosive devices. The officials said the suspected terrorist is wellguarded and in a fairly remote location, so any unilateral attempt by U.S.

troops to capture him would be risky and even more politically explosive than a U.S. missile strike. White House press secretary Jay Carney said Monday he would not comment on specific operations and pointed to Obama’s comments in the major counterterrorism speech last May about drone policy. “When a U.S. citizen goes abroad to wage war against America and is actively plotting to kill U.S. citizens, and when neither the United States, nor our partners are in a position to capture him before he carries out a plot, his citizenship should no more serve as a shield than a sniper shooting down on an innocent crowd should be protected from a SWAT team,” Carney said, quoting from Obama’s speech last year. Under new guidelines Obama addressed in the speech made to calm anger overseas at the extent of the U.S. drone campaign, lethal force must only be used “to prevent or stop attacks against U.S. persons, and even then, only when capture is not feasible and no other reasonable alternatives exist to address the threat effectively.” The target must also pose “a continuing, imminent threat to U.S. persons” — the legal definition of catching someone in the act of plotting a lethal attack.

Couples sue to force Neb. city to reconsider 2010 immigration law Ohio to recognize same-sex marriage

CINCINNATI (AP) — Four legally married gay couples filed a federal civil rights lawsuit Monday seeking a court order to force Ohio to recognize same-sex marriages on birth certificates despite a statewide ban, echoing arguments in a similar successful lawsuit concerning death certificates. The couples filed the suit in federal court in Cincinnati, arguing that the state’s practice of listing only one partner in a gay marriage as a parent on birth certificates violates the U.S. Constitution. “We want to be afforded the same benefits and rights as every other citizen of the United States,” said one of the plaintiffs, Joe Vitale, 45, who lives in Manhattan with his husband and their adopted 10month-old son, who was born in Ohio. The pair married in 2011 shortly after New York legalized gay marriage.

Rob Nichols, a spokesman for Republican Gov. John Kasich, said his office doesn’t comment on pending litigation, “except to say that the governor believes marriage is between a man and a woman.” A spokesman for Ohio Attor ney General Mike DeWine, whose office will fight the lawsuit, declined to comment.

Previously, DeWine has said he has a duty to defend Ohio’s constitution and statutes, including the statewide ban on gay marriage, passed overwhelmingly by voters in 2004. Gay marriage supporters are working to put the issue back on the Ohio ballot in November.

The other plaintif fs in Monday’s lawsuit are three lesbian couples living in the Cincinnati area who married in states that have legalized gay marriage.

FREMONT, Neb. (AP) — Almost four years after a small Nebraska city tried to crack down on illegal immigration, the town is having second thoughts about requiring all renters to swear that they have legal permission to be in the United States. In an election Tuesday, voters in Fremont will have a chance to repeal the housing restrictions, which critics say are less effective and more costly than anyone expected and damaging to the city’s image. This conservative agricultural hub near Omaha, population 26,000, was one of a handful of cities that have acted on their own over the last decade to curb illegal immigration. Most of those efforts have become mired in costly court battles. The same is true in Fremont, where the regulations were adopted in 2010 but put on hold while courts reviewed the law. The 8th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals upheld most of the ordinance in 2013, and the city was getting ready to enforce

the housing restrictions for the first time last fall when elected of ficials decided to schedule another vote. Supporters of the ordinance want city officials to stop quarreling about the issue and start enforcing the rental rules. “We voted on it and told you how we felt. They are just ignoring the will of the people,” said Micaela Shuster, a resident who said elected officials seem to be asking the same questions over and over until they get the outcome they want. Critics of the restrictions say they have hurt the city’s reputation without accomplishing much. “Most people agree we need to change our federal immigration system. This ordinance doesn’t address that,” Virginia Meyer said while taking a break from distributing roughly 500 yard signs encouraging people to vote against the rules. Supporters insist the measure does not target Hispanics, but the topic can make for awkwar d conversation given Fre-

AP Photo

In this Thursday, Feb. 6, photo, Ron McKenzie holds a prayer program titled "Love Conquers Fear" following a service at the First United Methodist Church in Fremont, Neb.

mont’s gr owing immigrant population. The number of Hispanics jumped from 165 in 1990 to 1,085 in 2000 and 3,149 in 2010, mostly because of jobs at the nearby Hormel and Fremont Beef plants. The law passed with 57 percent of the vote. The key to Tuesday’s outcome will be how many people have changed their minds and whether turnout surpasses the 6,916 people who cast ballots last time.

“I don’t think it’s so much that people have shifted (since 2010) as much as they are more aware of the issues,” said Krista Anderson, who also campaigned against the original ordinance. The town’s small liberal-arts university could be another factor. For this vote, Midland University’s pr ofessors and 1,300 students will be on campus. The last vote took place during the school’s summer break.


A7 Tuesday, February 11, 2014 OBITUARIES

Frederico “Lico” Lujan

A rosary with mass to follow for Frederico “Lico” Lujan, 68, of Roswell, NM will be Tuesday, February 11, 2014 at 9:00 AM at St. John’s Catholic Church (Ave Maria Center) with Deacon Ernesto Martinez officiating. Military Honors will be provided by the Roswell Veterans Honor Guard. Lico passed away Friday, February 7, 2014 in Albuquerque, NM. Lico will be greatly missed by all who knew him. Frederico “Lico” Lujan was born September 16, 1945 in Roswell, NM to George Lujan and Bengina Carrillo. Lico served as a Staff Sargent; CO. E, 14th Battalion-47th Infantry-9th Division; Lico was a U.S. Army Veteran and earned the Bronze Star, Purple Heart, National Defense Service Medal, Republic of Vietnam Service, Military Merit, and Army Commendation Medal. Lico is survived by his sisters, Hope and husband Bob Gann of Kokomo, IN; Emma and husband, Bob Rietsch of Castle Rock, CO; Bennie Lujan of Levelland, TX; Mary Lujan of Roswell, NM; brother, Ignacio and wife Amparo Lujan of Roswell, NM; daughters, Stephanie Lujan Vasquez of Bowling Green, KY; Loretta Lujan and husband Leo Rodriguez of Tucson AZ; Catrina Chavez of Albuquerque, NM; Sivilia Lujan of Roswell, NM; grandchildren, Whitley Mills of Bowling Green, KY; Johnny Mills of Florissant, CO; Andrew Nunez of Coral Springs, FL; Michael Barth of Bowling Green, KY; Jacob Nunez of Bozeman, MT; Sarah Barth of Hendersonville, TN and Eric Rodriguez of Tucson, AZ. Lico was preceded in death by his parents, George and Bengina Lujan;

OBITUARIES sister, Sivilia Lujan; brother, George “Choche” Lujan II; sister, Rosie Meeks; sister, Elvira Lujan; sister Ira Correa; brother, Chris “Chencho” Lujan; his sons, Fred “Lico” Lujan Jr. and Francisco “Kiko” Lujan; numerous aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins. Frederico “Lico” Lujan On this day, February 7, 2014, Frederico Lujan has gone to be with our Lord Jesus Christ. We now can rest knowing that he suffers no more on this earth. The Lord has his name written in the book of life. Lico was a kind man with a heart full of love for his family and friends. He was always there to lend a hand. Tio Lico lived to help others. A son, a brother, a father, a grandfather, an uncle, a soldier, a builder, a counselor, and a friend to all he knew he left his smile. We will all miss you. Till we meet again, forever in our hearts. Love, Tere. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online register at andersonbethany.com. Services are under the direction of AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

son: Joseph Majowich and his wife Darlene of Lakeland, Florida; one daughter: Barbara Browne of Roswell; one brother: David Dragon; two sisters: Dorothy Wolfe of Omaha, Nebraska and Mary Anne Filipowicz of Omaha, Nebraska; four grandchildren: Matthew D. Wade, Frankie Majowich, Dorothy “Dottie” A. Cleveland, Martha “Toni” L ynch; six great-grandchildren: Matthew Eric Wade, Heidi Renae Wade, David Micah Wade, Heather Nicole Borg, Lacey Dawn L ynch, and Fayth Renee Lynch. She worked as a Seamstress and in the stock room at JC Penney’s for many years. Irene was involved in many volunteering activities, such as RSVP, the Grandparents program at Del Norte Elementary School. She was a member of Assumption Catholic Church. Friends may leave condolences online at www.lagronefuneralchapels .com. Arrangements are under the personal care of LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Vina loved the sport of golf. She was an avid seamstress. Made all (or a lot of) her and Bills clothes. During her lifetime she worked in a bakery, in real estate, and retired after years of service as a secretary in the District Attorney’s office. The spelling of her name when born was Vinah but she hated the sound of it and preferred the tone of Vine-aha, so she adopted the spelling of Vina. She learned to read before she entered school by staying close to her twin sisters when they entered school. Vina was from a family that had two sets of twins. Vina never had any children, but she was loved and cared for in her frail years by second cousin Robert E. Odell, giving her the affection only a mother would receive. Vina’s lifelong friend June Fowler had become family with thanksgiving dinners, weddings and births of grandchildren. She will be dearly missed by Robert, June, L ynn Baesler and Janet White as well as numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at www.ballardfuneralhome.c om

Roswell Daily Record and wife Cora; sisters Rebecca Varela and husband Johnny, Mary Helen Rinne and husband David and Leonor Valdivia and Donald Romero; sisters-inlaw Frances and husband Ben Sanchez and Isabel Passmore as well as numerous nieces and nephews. Angelina had lived in Roswell, NM for forty-nine years coming from Victorville, CA. She was of the catholic faith and a member of St. John’s Catholic Church. Angelina enjoyed reading and going to library. She loved her family very much as her family loved her very much. Angelina will be missed deeply by all who knew and loved her. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at www.ballardfuneralhome.c om

Lucilla L. Ortega

Services are pending at Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory for Lucilla L. Ortega, 84, passed away Saturday, February 8, 2014 at her home. A further announcement will be made once arrangements have been finalized.

Vina Lenore Briscoe

Irene C. “Granny” Majowich

Funeral services are scheduled for 9:30 A.M., on Tuesday, February 11, 2014 at LaGrone Funeral Chapel for Irene C. “Granny” Majowich, age 93, of Roswell. She will be interred at Santa Fe. National Cemetery. Father Josh Duplissey of Assumption Catholic Church will officiate. Irene was bor n on November 28, 1920 in Omaha, Nebraska to Matthew and Antonette Dragon. She married Florian Majowich on February 14, 1942 in Omaha, Nebraska. He preceded her in death on December 10, 1992. She has also been preceded in death by her parents, 10 brothers and 1 sister. Irene enjoyed many different things, and family was very important to her. She loved working on scrapbooks, shopping, traveling and cooking. Her Croatian Nut Bread has been passed on through generations. She is survived by her

Graveside services are scheduled for 2 P.M., Thursday, February 13, 2014 at South Park Cemetery for Vina Briscoe, 98, who passed Sunday, February 9, 2014 at Sunset Villa Care Center. Pastor Richard Grisham of Bethel Baptist Church will officiate. Visitation is scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday, February 11and 12, 2014 from 8 am to 7 pm at Ballard Funeral Home. Vina was born September 22, 1915 in Okemah County, near Okfusgee, Oklahoma to William Alexander and Nancy Louellen Carter Bowers. Both parents preceded her in death. She married Robert “Bill” Craddock Briscoe on November 10, 1940 in Grandview, TX; he preceded her in death on April 24, 1981. Also preceding her in death is her sisters, Bessie, twin sisters Ida Wright and Emma Bowers, Bertie Bowers, Ollie McCullogh, twin sisters Eula Marcey and Beulah Cassity; brothers Melvin Bowers, Clarence Bowers and Winford C. Bowers. Vina was the last survivor in her family of eleven children.

Graveside services are scheduled for 10 am, Wednesday, February 12, 2014 at South Park Cemetery for Angelina Robinson, 70, who passed peacefully at her home on Saturday, February 8, 2014 surrounded by the love of her family. Deacon Er nesto Martinez of St. John’s Catholic Church will officiate. Angelina was born January 8, 1944 in Guadalajara, Mexico to Primitivo Valdivia and Angelina Quinones. Her parents preceded her in death. She is also preceded in death by her daughter Leonor and brother Alfred. Angelina married Victor Robinson on October 24, 1964; he survives her at the family home in Roswell, NM. Also surviving her are her daughter Eleonor Robinson and Curtis Falkenberg of Albuquerque, NM; brothers Tony Valdivia, George Valdivia, Robert Valdivia and Frankie Valdivia

Funeral services for Victoria J. (Vicki) Herron Larson, 62, of Roswell, will be held at 1pm Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014 at Country Club Church of Christ with Pastor Doug Austin officiating. Burial to follow at Memory Lawn Cemetery. Victoria passed away on Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014 in Lubbock, TX. Visitation will be Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2014, 8am - 8pm at the funeral home. Victoria was born on July 30, 1952 to Gabe and Martha (Bullard) Herron in Roswell, NM. She married Larry Larson on Feb. 16, 1991. Vicki was a very sweet, fun loving wife, mother, grandmother, aunt and friend, absolutely lit up a room with her presence, everyone adored her. She worked at TMC, Levi Strauss, Snelling and Snelling and KBCQ in the 70’s and 80’s. Went to Roswell College and Cosmetology in the early 1980’s because a Cosmetol-

a republic. Dahl’s conclusions were strongly challenged in the 1970s by sociologist G. William Domhoff, who used research provided in part by Dahl himself to find that he had underestimated the power of the business community and overestimated the divisions among New Haven’s leaders. Domhoof alleged that Dahl relied too much on the people he spoke with. “It may be that the most serious criticism I can make of Dahl is that he never should have done this interview-based study in the first place, for it was doomed from the start to fall victim to the ambitions and plans of the politicians, planners, lawyers and businessmen that he was interviewing,” Domhoff wrote. Dahl himself tried to bring more democracy to the Yale campus, especially during the uprisings of the

1960s and ’70s. In 1965, he headed a committee that gave students a role in granting tenure to faculty members. Six years later, he chaired a committee that led the school to start a program for AfricanAmerican studies. Dahl was bor n in Inwood, Iowa, in 1915, and a decade later moved to Alaska, when it was still a territory. He graduated from the University of Washington in 1936, and received a Ph.D. from Yale in 1940. During World War II, he was an economist on the War Production Board and later served as first lieutenant in the Ar my, receiving a Bronze Star. He joined the Yale faculty in 1946. He became president of the American Political Science Association and won several prizes, including the Talcott Parsons Prize for social science. His other

works included a popular textbook, “Democracy in the United States”; and “Polyarchy,” a term coined by Dahl for a moder n, decentralized democracy. Connor, his daughter, said Friday that he prided himself on making political science accessible to “general readers.”

Angelina Robinson

Victoria J. (Vicki) Herron Larson

Robert Dahl, political scientist, dead at 98

NEW YORK (AP) — Robert A. Dahl, an esteemed and influential political scientist who in such books as “Who Governs?” championed democracy in theory and critiqued it in practice, has died. He was 98. A professor emeritus at Yale University, Dahl died Wednesday at a nursing home in Hamden, Conn., according to his daughter Sara Connor. His career lasted for more than half a century, but he was best known for the 1961 publication “Who Gover ns?” Cited by the Times Literary Supplement as among the 100 most influential books since World War II, “Who Governs?” probed the political system of Dahl’s own community at the time, New Haven, which he considered an ideal microcosm for the country: two strong parties, a long history and

a careful progression from patrician rule to self-made men to party rule, where candidates of varied ethnic and economic backgrounds — a garage owner, an undertaker, a director of publicity — might succeed.

Dahl wanted to know who really ran the city, and, by extension, the country. Sociologist C. Wright Mills, in “The Power Elite,” had written that wealth and power were concentrated within a tiny group of people. Dahl believed no single entity was in charge. Instead, there were competing ones — social, economic and political leaders whose goals often did not overlap. He acknowledged that many citizens did not participate in local issues and that the rich had advantages over the poor, but concluded that New Haven, while a “republic of unequal citizens,” was still

Dahl established several conditions he considered necessary for democracy (and polyarchy), including freedom from foreign interference, the peaceful transfer of power and the right to vote.

In recent years, he increasingly questioned whether any existing government fully deserved to be called democratic. He worried that economic inequality made political equality impossible, yet believed that open markets were needed to counteract government control.

ogist later owned Shear Encounters on S. Sunset St. and co-owned Shear Encounters II on West 2nd St. co-owned Salon Sensations in the Monterrey Shopping Center Victoria’s Impressions at 214 W. McGaffey then Victoria’s in Cochise , Arizona. Retired due to health reasons 81/2 years ago. We all will carry great memories in our hearts. My Mom had a very special gift of making us all happy and feel truly loved.

Vicki is survived by her husband, Larry Larson of the family home; son, John George; daughter, Melissa Duran and her husband, Paul; step-daughters, Daphinie Lidgard and her husband Shawn and Jennifer Larson; step-son, Jeff Larson and his wife, Ali Gould and daughter/niece, Amanda Basso and her husband, Mike; grandchildren, Shawn Duran of Roswell, Shane and Mayra Duran also of Roswell; Shaye and Crystil Rosas Duran; Ethan Lidgard of Phoenix; Gage Lidgard of Phoenix; Madison Lidgard of Phoenix; and Brooklyn Basso of Tampa; one greatgrandson, Kevin Duran of Roswell; brother, Charlie Herron and his wife, Diane of Odessa, TX; sister, Betty Walker of Roswell; numerous nieces and nephews.

She was preceded in death by her sisters, Maye Cox, Faye Parris, Marilyn Herron, Margaret Clements, Albert Herron, Sammy Herron; nieces, Teresa Wines, Cheryl Griffith, Martha Ann Moon; great niece, Cassandra Herron; nephew, Eddie Herron.

Pallbearers will be Shawn, Paul and Shaye Duran, Crystil Rosas, Randy Estrada and Paul Pharr.

Honorary pallbearers will be John George, Garret Pharr, Mike Basso, Jef f Larson, Ethan and Shawn Lidgard, Gerald Cox, Rick Herron, Tommy Herron, Jr. and Charlie Calderon, Daren and Doyal Lasiter, Mark and Cody Brown, Gary Hoosier, Steven, Melvin and Jeremy Herron, Carlos Pacheco, Gage Richardson and Robert Herron.

Family dinner will be at 3:30 pm after the service at West Country Club Church of Christ.

Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online register at andersonbethany.com.

Services are under the direction of AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

FRED "LICO" LUJAN

St. John’s Catholic Church (Ave Maria Center) Memorial Services Tuesday, February 11 9:00 AM

VICTORIA "VICKI" LARSON Country Club Church of Christ & Memory Lawn Cemetery

Funeral Services Thursday, February 13 1:00 PM


A8 Tuesday, February 11, 2014

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A10 Tuesday, February 11, 2014

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Times of clouds and sun

Mainly clear

Wednesday

Sunshine and warmer

Thursday

Friday

Brilliant sunshine

Saturday

A full day of sunshine

Sunny

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities

Sunday

Monday

Mostly sunny

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Mostly sunny and breezy

High 47°

Low 28°

64°/34°

81°/42°

81°/41°

84°/39°

84°/41°

83°/31°

S at 7-14 mph POP: 0%

S at 10-20 mph POP: 0%

WNW at 3-6 mph POP: 0%

NNW at 10-20 mph POP: 0%

WSW at 3-6 mph POP: 0%

E at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

SSE at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

WNW at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 38°/29° Normal high/low ............... 60°/30° Record high ............... 82° in 1962 Record low ................... 0° in 1929 Humidity at noon .................. 72%

Farmington 49/23

Clayton 45/26

Raton 45/19

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Mon. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date .......................... Normal year to date .............

0.00" 0.02" 0.15" 0.02" 0.53"

Santa Fe 48/27

Gallup 51/19

Tucumcari 47/27

Albuquerque 52/33

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 43/27

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 44/37

T or C 58/36

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed. Full

Feb 14

Rise 6:46 a.m. 6:45 a.m. Rise 3:06 p.m. 3:59 p.m. Last

Feb 22

New

Mar 1

Set 5:39 p.m. 5:40 p.m. Set 4:21 a.m. 5:01 a.m. First

Mar 8

Alamogordo 57/32

Silver City 59/37

ROSWELL 47/28 Carlsbad 48/29

Hobbs 44/28

Las Cruces 59/37

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) #### Opportunities will pop up from out of the blue, but conflict might surround whatever path you choose. Someone could push to have his or her way. Initially, you will try to be caring, but later you could become sarcastic. Maintain your boundaries. Tonight: A must appearance. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ### Your ability to communicate emerges, which allows greater give-and-take between you and others. Focus on a get-together, where you will see potential supporters and friends. You might be taken aback by an insight you gain through a conversation. Tonight: Hang out with friends. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) #### You could be far more in tune with the potential of a money and/or business offer than the person presenting the idea. Realize the ramifications of heading in that direction with others who are not as aware as you would like them to be. Share news with a friend. Tonight: Your treat. CANCER (June 21-July 22) #### You will be in a situation that allows you to look past the obvious. Touch base with someone at a distance. A higher-up could be unpredictable and create additional tension in a meeting. You might feel far more upbeat than you have in a while. Tonight: Feeling great. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) #### You might want to do something very differently once you gain an understanding of what is happening around you. You will gain more

8. “The Nut Job,” Open Road, $3,753,080, 3,004 locations, $1,249 average, $55,025,744, 4 weeks. 9. “Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit,” Paramount, $3,531,287, 2,139 locations, $1,651 average, $44,400,702, 4 weeks. 10. “Labor Day,” Paramount, $3,184,785, 2,584 locations, $1,233 average, $10,127,181, 2 weeks. 11. “American Hustle,” Sony, $3,068,641, 1,640 locations, $1,871 average, $138,085,721, 9 weeks. 12. “The Wolf Of Wall Street,” Paramount, $2,582,764, 1,167 locations, $2,213 average, $107,896,588, 7 weeks. 13. “Gravity,” War ner Bros., $1,671,437, 701 locations, $2,384 average, $266,474,237, 19 weeks. 14. “August: Osage County,” The Weinstein Company, $1,481,391, 1,327 locations, $1,116 average, $34,290,511, 7 weeks. 15. “I, Frankenstein,” Lionsgate, $1,476,556, 1,427 locations, $1,035 average, $17,483,849, 3 weeks. 16. “12 Years A Slave,” Fox Searchlight, $816,563, 678 locations, $1,204 average, $47,347,837, 17 weeks. 17. “Philomena,” The Weinstein Company, $797,653, 504 locations, $1,583 average,

YOUR CREDIT

“We want to make you a loan”

(575)624-2929

$200 - $2,000

Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

57/32/pc 52/33/pc 40/13/pc 47/35/pc 48/29/c 41/18/pc 45/26/pc 43/11/pc 43/27/c 63/32/s 51/32/pc 49/23/s 51/19/s 44/28/sn 59/37/s 43/25/pc 46/27/pc 54/29/pc 46/31/c 45/27/c 48/19/s 45/19/pc 38/16/pc 47/28/pc 44/37/pc 48/27/pc 59/37/s 58/36/s 47/27/pc 48/28/pc

64/34/s 57/37/s 43/19/s 63/42/s 65/38/s 42/23/s 54/34/s 51/18/s 57/34/s 67/34/s 55/36/s 53/30/s 57/24/s 63/38/s 65/40/s 51/35/s 50/32/s 60/34/s 61/39/s 57/35/s 53/26/s 53/24/s 40/17/s 64/34/s 55/45/s 52/30/s 63/39/s 63/40/s 60/36/s 52/33/s

YOUR HOROSCOPE

insight into what makes someone tick. Be willing to distance yourself from a difficult person in your life. Tonight: Not to be found.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ### You might want to take action regarding a loved one. When push comes to shove, this person will head in the direction that you have chosen for him or her. As a result, the two of you will see eye to eye far more than you might have thought. Tonight: Only where the action is.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ##### You might not want to know what is ailing a higher-up. You’ll see a situation with far more openness and ingenuity than others, which will make you the natural leader. Others follow your lead. Be willing to talk through a situation and root out a problem. Tonight: Out late. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ### You might want to head in a new direction. Get feedback from those who embrace more progressive thinking. Your ability to see someone more clearly than many other people do will help

Wed. Hi/Lo/W

15/2/s 37/27/r 27/11/pc 27/12/s 34/25/sn 12/2/s 16/2/pc 35/24/sn 48/24/s 16/2/s 57/37/pc 82/68/s 40/34/r 17/6/pc 21/14/s 65/47/s 76/54/s 37/25/sn

11/4/pc 32/24/i 27/23/pc 27/25/s 32/25/sn 25/15/pc 28/11/pc 49/33/s 54/35/pc 23/13/pc 66/42/s 81/69/c 55/35/pc 29/17/pc 34/23/pc 71/50/s 79/56/s 56/33/s

U.S. Extremes

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Wed.

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82/69/s 40/25/sn 14/10/pc 50/42/r 26/14/s 21/15/s 79/59/pc 26/12/s 75/53/s 18/3/pc 49/43/r 34/25/c 21/13/pc 47/35/pc 71/54/s 49/42/r 73/45/s 31/17/pc

82/71/pc 61/36/s 20/14/sn 51/38/r 27/23/pc 33/20/c 80/59/r 27/23/pc 77/54/s 28/14/pc 52/42/r 32/30/sn 34/24/pc 50/37/sh 72/54/s 50/38/r 76/48/s 32/26/pc

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 84° ...........Death Valley, Calif. Low: -30°............ Embarrass, Minn.

High: 73° .....................Alamogordo Low: 14° .........................Las Vegas

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

JACQUELINE BIGAR

‘Lego’ snaps into top spot

NEW YORK (AP) — “The Lego Movie” snapped into place for moviegoers with a $69.1 million debut. The strong opening was the biggest yet of 2014 and assured Warner Bros. of a new animated franchise devoted to the interlocking toy bricks. Also debuting over the weekend was George Clooney’s “The Monuments Men,” about Allied forces’ effort to rescue artworks taken by the Nazis in World War II. It earned $22 million, according to final box office figures Monday. The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by Rentrak, are: 1. “The Lego Movie,” War ner Bros., $69,050,279, 3,775 locations, $18,291 average, $69,050,279, 1 week. 2. “The Monuments Men,” Sony, $22,003,433, 3,083 locations, $7,137 average, $22,003,433, 1 week. 3. “Ride Along,” Universal, $9,589,940, 2,800 locations, $3,425 average, $105,312,530, 4 weeks. 4. “Frozen,” Disney, $6,872,811, 2,460 locations, $2,794 average, $368,637,437, 12 weeks. 5. “Lone Survivor,” Universal, $5,565,860, 2,869 locations, $1,940 average, $112,852,146, 7 weeks. 6. “That Awkward Moment,” Focus Features, $5,237,186, 2,809 locations, $1,864 average, $16,545,221, 2 weeks. 7. “Vampire Academy,” The Weinstein Company, $3,921,742, 2,676 locations, $1,466 average, $3,921,742, 1 week.

Regional Cities Today Wed.

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guide you in the right direction. Tonight: Read between the lines. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) #### You might feel as if you can’t get enough done. You tend to be very sympathetic to an emotional family member who often wants to share his or her feelings. You might not realize how much this person needs you. Tonight: Why not go for some fun? CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) #### You might want to be more direct with someone, but on some level you fear this person’s reaction. You intuitively know what to say, and you’ll follow through accordingly. Understand what your goals are and how the two of you might need to work together. Tonight: Hang out. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ### Your nurturing side emerges. Listen to others, and you will know how to handle a problem. Honor a change, and be more forthright. A person you deal with daily might make a big difference in your life. Let this person know that he or she is appreciated. Tonight: Make it early. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) #### Your imagination will lead to some fun as you start to share your thoughts. Someone close to you could find you humorous. Even if you both are tense, the laughter will take the edge off. Follow your gut with someone you really care about. Tonight: Let your hair down.

BORN TODAY Inventor Thomas Edison (1847), actress Jennifer Aniston (1969), musician Sheryl Crow (1962)

FREE SYMPHONY CONCERT TICKETS

FOR SENIOR CITIZENS (60+)

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2014 – 7:30 P.M

GUEST ARTIST: AXEL STRAUSS, VIOLIN NMMI PEARSON AUDITORIUM

The merchants, professional community, and private citizens and others listed below, are sponsoring tickets for each of this season’s Roswell Symphony Orchestra concerts. This gesture is their “thank you” for your patronage and for your support of the City of Roswell and surrounding communities. Tickets are limited and available only by mail. Requests will be honored on a first received, first served, no choice basis. Each pair of tickets will be for adjoining seats. Also note that the tickets are pre-assigned to specific row and seat numbers. Remember sponsors do not have tickets.

Coupon must be mailed with a self-addressed, stamped envelope to:

ROSWELL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 1717 WEST 2ND, SUITE 205 ROSWELL NM 88201

COUPONS PRESENTED IN PERSON AT THE RSO OFFICE CANNOT BE HONORED.

$28,672,575, 12 weeks. 18. “Her,” Warner Bros., $731,145, 457 locations, $1,600 average, $22,464,032, 8 weeks. 19. “Nebraska,” Paramount, $703,207, 525 locations, $1,339 average, $14,943,275, 13 weeks. 20. “The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug,” Warner Bros., $688,196, 537 locations, $1,282 average, $255,398,374, 9 weeks.

FREE TRANSPORTATION WILL BE PROVIDED FOR SENIORS 60+ TO AND FROM THE CONCERT BY CHAVES COUNTY J.O.Y. CENTERS, INC. SEATING IS LIMITED. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON TRANSPORTATION OR TO RESERVE YOUR SEAT PLEASE CALL BARRY WILKINSON 575-623-4866.

DIRECTORY OF SPONSORS

Notice: The Roswell Symphony Orchestra is in the midst of the 2013-2014 Send a Senior Campaign. The following is a list of some of last year's contributors as well as some current. Future ads will be updated with any changes.

Insurance & Investments Marlin Wells & Associates

Real Estate Kimble Hibbard, Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Charlotte Thompson, Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Carole Schlatter, Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors

Physicians & Surgeons Dr. & Mrs. Donald E. Wenner

Friends of Music The Alcorn Family Shirley C. Childress Xcel Energy

Accounting Services Stacie L. Sexe, CPA

Attorneys Sanders, Bruin, Coll & Worley, PA Tom Dunlap Law Firm

Oil & Gas Industry Armstrong Energy Corporation Johnson Enterprises

“Send a Senior” sponsorships are still being accepted for this season.

SENIOR CITIZEN TICKET REQUEST FEBRUARY 22 CONCERT

Please circle: “1” or “2” tickets / “Balcony” or “Main Floor

NAME

STREET, CITY, STATE, ZIP

Enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope & mail to: Roswell Symphony Orchestra, 1717 W. 2nd, Ste. 205, Roswell, NM 88201


Roswell Daily Record

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: My best friend of 20 years, “Claire,” has suffered bouts of depression ever since I have known her. She recently confided to me that her brother had repeatedly sexually abused her as a child. When she went to her mother for help, her mother told her she needed to “thank God that it was happening because it would make her a stronger person.” Her mother is dead now, but her father is still alive. I am furious at him for allowing the abuse to happen under his roof. Abby, the family acts like it

never happened! Claire invites her dad to events we plan together like birthdays. How do I attend knowing what I know? I don’t want to sit across a table from him. My husband is an abuse survivor and feels even more strongly than I do. It has made get-togethers miserable for us. Should we just smile and pretend we don’t know because we can’t fight my best friend’s fight for her? How do we get over the anger? CONFUSED IN OKLAHOMA DEAR CONFUSED: Years ago, someone explained to me that depression is anger turned inward. Your friend is enduring these bouts of depression because she was never allowed to express her anger where it belonged — at her brother and her mother. Whether the mother ever told her husband what was going on, or whether it was the continuation of a long family tradition of sexual abuse, is something we don’t know. But if you haven’t suggested to Claire that she could benefit from

COMICS

counseling, you should. As to you and your husband participating in these family gatherings, my advice is to stop doing it. Celebrate special occasions with your friend right before or after these occasions; many people have pre- or post-birthday get-togethers, and that’s what I recommend in a case like this. #####

DEAR ABBY: I recently became involved with a longtime female friend of mine when she was in town. I have always loved “Miranda” as a friend, but now I also feel attracted to her as a potential perfect match. The problem is she lives far away. We keep in touch almost daily. I love that, but it makes me miss her, and I end up thinking about her all day, which doesn’t help. She says she has feelings for me, too, but “the timing isn’t in our favor.” What can I do to go about my day without letting thoughts of Miranda rule my brain? I am 27

and haven’t felt like this about anyone before. We’ll see each other in a couple of months and the time couldn’t be crawling by any slower. Abby, are long-distance relationships even worth trying? ANXIOUS IN COLORADO

Family Circus

DEAR ANXIOUS: Of course they are. As the saying goes, “nothing ventured, nothing gained.” Years ago, couples who were separated by distances courted via the mail. In fact, some of them wrote beautiful poetry and love letters that are classics. (Check out the letters of Victorian writers Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning.) Couples separated by war before the invention of the Internet also managed to nurture relationships that led to marriage. So consider yourself lucky that you and Miranda can be in touch every day, even though at this point it’s frustrating. As to the problem of her dominating your thoughts all day, a way to deal with it is to STAY BUSY.

Beetle Bailey

The Wizard of Id

HINTS

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE Dear Readers:

If you ORDER PRODUCTS online or by phone, are you aware of your legal rights? Sellers can face penalties due to the Federal Trade Commission’s “Mail/Telephone Order Merchandise Rule.” Here are some things you should be aware of so you don’t get taken:

Dilbert

* The date the seller advertises for delivery of the product is the date by which it must be delivered.

* If you do not have a set delivery date, the seller has 30 days to deliver the item after getting an order.

* Notice must be given by the seller if the delivery date will not be met so that you can cancel your order for a refund or agree to a later delivery date.

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Remember to read the fine print!

#####

For Better or For Worse

Heloise

Dear Heloise:

I enjoy your column in The Winchester (Va.) Star. With two large dogs, pet beds are a necessity, but they can be expensive — at minimum, $50. We keep two big dog beds in the living room.

For nighttime, when the dogs want to sleep next to our bed, instead of falling over a regular dog bed, I purchased two microfiber bathmats. They can easily go into the washer. The dogs love them, and I don’t fall over them!

Garfield

Pam W. in Virginia

Dear Heloise:

I have always heard that you need to let your car warm up, after starting it first thing in the morning, before driving off. Is this still the case? Margaret D., via email

With modern cars, the answer is NO — you don’t have to “warm up” the auto before driving off! For older cars (say, before the 1980s), it used to be the advice because of the way engines were designed.

Hagar the Horrible

Today, you don’t need to sit in the car “warming up the engine” and getting all the oil moving! You are just wasting gas, and if your auto is in a garage, you have a potential problem with fumes.

The only hint is to start the car and drive normally for the first few minutes — no crazy stopping and starting. However, if you still feel you should, sit there for only three to five minutes!

#####

Snuffy Smith

Heloise

Dear Heloise:

On a recent trip, the hotel-room curtains would not stay closed to keep the light from outside from coming through. I went to the closet and got one of the skirt hangers with the clips. After clipping it to the curtains, I could finally rest peacefully! Claire D., via email

Dear Heloise:

I had been trying to thread a needle on my sewing machine for 15 minutes. My friend called and said that if I was using white thread, I should hold some dark paper behind the needle. And if I was using a dark thread, use white paper behind it. It works like magic! Mariann D. in Tennessee

Zits

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

A9


SPORTS AN OPENLY,

Tuesday, February 11, 2014 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

Section

Roswell Daily Record

I

Reigning SEC Defensive Player of the Year and NFL prospect Michael Sam says he is gay

AM PROUD GAY MAN M

issouri All-American Michael Sam says he is gay, and the defensive end could become the first openly homosexual player in the NFL. In interviews with ESPN, The New York Times and Outsports that were published Sunday, Sam said he came out to all his teammates and coaches at Missouri in August. “I am an openly, proud gay man,” he said. Sam will participate in the NFL combine later this month in Indianapolis and is currently projected to be a mid-round draft pick in May. “It’s a big deal. No one has done this before. And it’s kind of a nervous process, but I know what I want to be ... I want to be a football player in the NFL,” he told ESPN. The 6-foot-2, 255-pound Sam participated in the Senior Bowl in Mobile, Ala., last month after leading the South-

B

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

eastern Conference in sacks (11.5) and tackles for loss (19). He was the SEC Defensive Player of the Year. There have been a few NFL players who have come out after their playing days, including Kwame Harris and Dave Kopay. Last year, NBA player Jason Collins announced he was gay after the season. Collins, a 35-year-old backup center, was a free agent when he came out and has not signed with a new team this season. MLS star and U.S. national team player Robbie Rogers also came out a year ago. “His courage will inspire millions to live their truth,” Rogers tweeted about Sam. Division III Willamette kicker Conner Mertens, a redshirt freshman, said last month he was bisexual. “We admire Michael Sam’s honesty and courage,” the NFL said in a statement. “Michael is a football player. Any player with ability and determination can succeed in the NFL. We look forward to welcoming and supporting Michael Sam in 2014.” Sam’s announcement comes at a time gay rights issues and sports have collided at the Olympics in Sochi. Russia’s anti-gay law has received much attenSee SAM, Page B3

AP Photos

Broncos topple Midland LOCAL BRIEFS

Colt girls even record at 8-8

The New Mexico Military Institute Bronco basketball team won its first game over Midland in more than a decade on Monday, upending the Chaparrals 69-64 at the Cahoon Armory. “You have no idea (how good this feels), for the guys, for me too as well,” said Bronco coach Sean Schooley, who earned his first win over the Chaparrals as a head coach. “It’s been a long time since we’ve gotten Midland. ... It’s been a long time coming to get Midland.” The Chaparrals scored on the game’s opening possession and maintained that lead until late in the second half. Biron Joseph tied the game for just the third time at 64 with a pair of free throws with 41 seconds left, setting the stage for NMMI’s dominating finish. The Bronco defense forced a turnover on Midland’s ensuing possession and Schooley called a timeout to set up a final play.

See BRIEFS, Page B3

Kevin J. Keller Photo

NMMI’s Marcus Roper, front, penetrates past Midland’s Kenan Guzonjic during their game, Monday. Roper and the Broncos won 69-64.

AP Photo

Mancuso medals

Julia Mancuso passes a gate in the slalom portion of the women’s supercombined to win the bronze medal, Monday.

KRASNAYA POL YANA, Russia (AP) — For years, Julia Mancuso’s skiing accomplishments — and there were many — were overshadowed by Lindsey Vonn’s. When it comes to Olympic Alpine events, though, no American woman comes close. Turning in a terrific run to lead after the downhill, then recovering from a rattling start in the slalom, Mancuso ear ned the bronze in the super-combined at the Sochi Games on Monday for her fourth medal at an Olympics. She already was the only U.S. female Alpine racer with more than two, which is Vonn’s total.

“Skiing and growing up with someone like Lindsey, who’s just amazing on the World Cup and breaking records left and right there — to have something that I can break records in at the same time is also fun and exciting for me,” said Mancuso, whose two-run time of 2 minutes, 35.15 seconds was 0.53 slower than champion Maria HoeflRiesch of Germany. “If I can keep the Olympics as my thing, that’s fine,” Mancuso said, “and I’m really proud of it.” It sure showed Monday, the way she punched the air and screamed for joy after the slalom, did a jig See MANCUSO, Page B3

Canada’s Bilodeau repeats in moguls KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia (AP) — Alex Bilodeau carried the Canadian flag along with the prodigy who pushed him to history. Moments later, the greatest moguls skier of his time bearhugged his inspiration, pulling him over the fence in the process. The first two-time Olympic gold medalist in freestyle skiing will take the hardware, just not the credit. Slashing through the slush in snow better suited for a Slurpee, Bilodeau fended off teammate Mikael Kingsbury to capture his second straight Olympic title Monday night, then celebrated with older brother Frederic, whose life with cerebral palsy provides a daily reality

AP Photo

Canada’s Alex Bilodeau makes his last run in the men’s moguls final at the 2014 Winter Olympics, Monday.

LOCAL SCHEDULE — TUESDAY, FEB. 11 — • Cloudcroft at Hagerman, 4:30 p.m. • Vaughn at Lake Arthur, 6:30 p.m. • Eunice at NMMI, 6:30 p.m. • Dexter at Loving, 7 p.m. • Hondo Valley at Corona, 7 p.m. • Roswell at Artesia, 7 p.m. BOYS BASKETBALL

• Vaughn at Lake Arthur, 5 p.m. • Eunice at NMMI, 5 p.m. • Dexter at Loving, 5:30 p.m. • Hondo Valley at Corona, 5:30 p.m. • Roswell at Artesia, 5:30 p.m. • Cloudcroft at Hagerman, 6 p.m. • Goddard at Ruidoso, 7 p.m. GIRLS BASKETBALL

SPOTLIGHT

check on the considerable gifts Bilodeau has been granted. “He has dreams like you and I but he can’t go after most of those dreams,” Bilodeau said. “I have the ability that I can go after those dreams. And out of respect for him, I go after them.” Kingsbury claimed silver to give Canada its second one-two moguls finish in three days, while Russia’s Alexandr Smyshlyaev won bronze in front of a frenzied crowd waving the home country’s red-white-and-blue flags. “It’s victory,” Smyshlyaev said. “It’s one big victory for Russian moguls.” Considering the stranglehold Canada has on the sport at the moment, bronze is as good as gold for everybody else. In one final stand on the world stage,

ON

See REPEAT, Page B3

SPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN ... 1878 — The Boston Bicycle Club, the first bicycle Angeles Lakers 108-90 to set an NBA record for the club in the United States, is formed. most consecutive losses in a season at 20. 1957 — The NHL Players Association is formed 1982 — Houston Rockets center Moses Malone and Ted Lindsay of the Detroit Red Wings is elected grabs an NBA-record 21 offensive rebounds in a 117president. 100 win over Seattle. 1970 — The Atlanta Hawks score 97 points, the 1990 — Mike Tyson loses for the first time when most ever scored in the second half of an NBA game, James “Buster” Douglas knocks him out in the 10th en route to a 155-131 win at San Diego. round and captures the heavyweight championship in 1973 — The Philadelphia 76ers lose to the Los one of the biggest upsets in boxing history.


B2 Tuesday, February 11, 2014

SPORTS

Danny Davis, a man with no Olympic expectations

KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia (AP) — He’s the man with the best chance of taking down Shaun White at the Olympics. No matter. Danny Davis says he’ll drop into the halfpipe Tuesday with “no expectations.” “I’ve had a great season so far. I’ve had a blast. Like I’ve said, this is just another halfpipe contest for me,” Davis says. Not that he doesn’t value the importance of the Olympics, or the heartache they can cause. Davis all but punched his ticket to Vancouver four years ago when he shockingly beat White in an Olympic qualifier in California. Not long after that, he was celebrating, and broke his pelvis in an alcohol-infused ride on an allterrain vehicle. That injury scrubbed him out of the Olympics. A broken femur two years later — when he bashed into a pole while trying to ride around a fence, of all things — set him back again. Asked in an interview last December whether he’s trying to take care of unfinished business or make a comeback, he didn’t hesitate. “It’s a comeback,” he said. “It’s all about being a better snowboarder and being good again. Unfinished business is like I had it set in my head that I was going to the Olympics. But going to the Olympics is a tough, ridiculous thing in the States.”

Prep basketball

Monday’s Scores By The Associated Press Boys Basketball Tularosa 59, Estancia 32 Zuni 65, Navajo Prep 48 Girls Basketball NMMI 55, Lake Arthur 34 Pojoaque Valley 49, Robertson 47 Santa Fe 61, Capital 26 Tularosa 62, Estancia 29 West Las Vegas 70, Ruidoso 39

College basketball

The AP Top 25 By The Associated Press The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ college basketball poll, with firstplace votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 9, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25thplace vote and last week’s ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Prv 1. Syracuse (65) . . . . . . .23-0 1,625 1 2. Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . .23-1 1,525 2 3. Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . .21-2 1,477 3 4. Wichita St. . . . . . . . . . .25-0 1,445 4 5. San Diego St. . . . . . . .21-1 1,373 5 6. Villanova . . . . . . . . . . .21-2 1,288 6 7. Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . .18-5 1,234 8 8. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19-5 1,130 11 9. Michigan St. . . . . . . . .20-4 1,025 9 10. Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .22-3 970 7 11. Iowa St. . . . . . . . . . . .18-4 925 16 12. Saint Louis . . . . . . . . .22-2 908 13 13. Louisville . . . . . . . . . .19-4 866 14 14. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . .18-5 769 18 15. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . .17-6 702 10 16. Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18-6 686 17 17. Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . .19-5 608 20 18. Creighton . . . . . . . . . .19-4 552 12 19. Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .18-5 417 15 20. Memphis . . . . . . . . . .18-5 333 24 21. Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . .19-5 242 — 22. Ohio St. . . . . . . . . . . .19-5 214 — 23. SMU . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19-5 205 — 24. UConn . . . . . . . . . . . .18-5 194 22 25. Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . .20-4 175 25

Others receiving votes: Oklahoma 99, Gonzaga 44, UCLA 43, New Mexico 23, Oklahoma St. 10, George Washington 6, Southern Miss. 6, Stephen F. Austin 3, Arizona St. 1, Kansas St. 1, North Carolina 1.

USA Today Top 25 Poll The top 25 teams in the USA Today men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 9, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Pvs 1. Syracuse (32) . . . . . . .23-0 800 1 2. Wichita State . . . . . . . .25-0 744 2 3. Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . .23-1 742 3 4. Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . .21-2 711 4 5. San Diego State . . . . .21-1 675 5 6. Villanova . . . . . . . . . . .21-2 629 6 7. Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . .18-5 569 9 8. Louisville . . . . . . . . . . .19-4 529 10 9. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19-5 511 11 10. Michigan State . . . . . .20-4 479 8 11. Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .22-3 467 7 12. Saint Louis . . . . . . . . .22-2 427 15

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All Times EST Tuesday, Feb. 11 MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN — Florida at Tennessee ESPN2 — Oklahoma St. at Texas ESPNU — Wake Forest at NC State FS1 — Marquette at Seton Hall 7 p.m. ESPN — Michigan at Ohio St. ESPNU — Mississippi at Alabama FS1 — Xavier at Butler 9 p.m. ESPNU — San Diego St. at Wyoming SOCCER 12:55 p.m. NBCSN — Premier League, Chelsea at West Bromwich WINTER OLYMPICS At Sochi, Russia All events taped unless noted as Live NBC 1 p.m. Men’s and Women’s Cross-Country Individual Sprint Gold Medal Finals; Women’s Luge - Gold Medal Final Runs; Women’s Freestyle Skiing Slopestyle Competition 6 p.m. Men’s Snowboarding - Halfpipe Gold Medal Final; Figure Skating - Pairs’ Short Program; Women’s Freestyle

Roswell Daily Record

AP Photo

Danny Davis, seen here competing at last month’s Winter X Games, might be the only real threat to Shaun White in the halfpipe at the 2014 Winter Olympics.

True to that, Davis looked like he wouldn’t make the trip to Sochi. He finished seventh and 14th in the first two qualifiers and simply wasn’t performing at the level he’s capable. After a break and some more practice, he flipped the script. He got one victory in a qualifier White didn’t take part in, then finished second to him two days later.

13. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . .18-5 14. Iowa State . . . . . . . . .18-4 15. Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18-6 16. Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . .19-5 17. Creighton . . . . . . . . . .19-4 18. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . .17-6 19. Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .18-5 20. Ohio State . . . . . . . . .19-5 21. Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . .19-5 22. Memphis . . . . . . . . . .18-5 23. Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . .20-4 24. Gonzaga . . . . . . . . . .21-4 25. Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . .18-6

403 369 333 310 305 254 170 162 158 152 148 78 55

14 17 13 21 12 16 18 25 24 — 22 20 23

Others receiving votes: UConn 54, Kansas State 38, SMU 37, Southern Miss. 25, UMass 15, UCLA 15, New Mexico 12, Oklahoma State 10, George Washington 6, Colorado 5, Stephen F. Austin 1, VCU 1, West Virginia 1.

NBA

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB — Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .27 24 .529 3 Brooklyn . . . . . . . . . . .23 26 .469 7 New York . . . . . . . . . .20 31 .392 9 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .19 34 .358 13 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .15 38 .283 Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 14 .714 — 10 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .25 24 .510 Washington . . . . . . . .25 25 .500 10 1⁄2 14 Charlotte . . . . . . . . . .22 29 .431 21 Orlando . . . . . . . . . . .16 37 .302 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct GB Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . .40 11 .784 — Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .25 25 .500 14 1⁄2 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .22 29 .431 18 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .18 33 .353 22 31 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . . .9 42 .176

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L San Antonio . . . . . . . .37 15 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .35 17 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 21 Memphis . . . . . . . . . .27 23 New Orleans . . . . . . .22 29 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Oklahoma City . . . . . .41 12 Portland . . . . . . . . . . .36 15 Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .24 26 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .24 28 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 33 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L L.A. Clippers . . . . . . .36 18 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . .30 20 Golden State . . . . . . .31 21 L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . .18 33 Sacramento . . . . . . . .17 34

Pct GB .712 — .673 2 .596 6 .540 9 1 .431 14 ⁄2

Pct GB .774 — .706 4 .480 15 1⁄2 .462 16 1⁄2 .340 22 1⁄2

Pct GB .667 — .600 4 .596 4 .353 16 1⁄2 .333 17 1⁄2

Sunday’s Games Oklahoma City 112, New York 100 Chicago 92, L.A. Lakers 86 Orlando 93, Indiana 92 Brooklyn 93, New Orleans 81 Dallas 102, Boston 91

Skiing - Slopestyle Gold Medal Final; Women’s Ski Jumping - Individual K95 Gold Medal Final 10:05 p.m. Women’s Speedskating - 500 Gold Medal Final; Women’s Biathlon 10km Pursuit Gold Medal Final NBCSN 4 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Cross-Country Individual Sprint Gold Medal Finals (LIVE) 8 a.m. Figure Skating - Pairs’ Short Program (LIVE) 11:30 a.m. Women’s Ski Jumping - Individual K95 Gold Medal Final (LIVE); Women’s Speedskating - 500 Gold Medal Final 3 p.m. Game of the Day: Hockey 1 a.m. Men’s Curling - United States vs. Denmark; Men’s Nordic Combined Individual K-95, Ski Jumping (LIVE) MSNBC 8 a.m. Women’s Hockey - Russia vs. Japan (LIVE) 1 a.m. Women’s Hockey - Switzerland vs. Finland (LIVE) CNBC 3 p.m. Women’s Curling - United States vs. Britain USA 3 a.m. Women’s Curling - United States vs. China (LIVE)

His victory at the Winter X Games two weeks ago was a defining moment. He won with lots of stylish tricks — fancy grabs, tough spins — but bypassed some of the most difficult gymnastics-like moves that White will try. It’s the way Davis wants to approach these Olympics, regardless of whether he wins or not. “The Olympics, luckily, for our

kind of sport, doesn’t define us as athletes,” Davis said. “There’s much bigger things for us in our futures.” A look at the five riders who could take the gold if White slips up: DAVIS: At Winter X, his backside 360 and switch method grab had the snowboarding purists — and the judges — swooning. If he can pull them off here as nicely

SCOREBOARD

Washington 93, Sacramento 84 Cleveland 91, Memphis 83, OT L.A. Clippers 123, Philadelphia 78 Monday’s Games Indiana 119, Denver 80 Toronto 108, New Orleans 101 Detroit 109, San Antonio 100 Houston 107, Minnesota 89 Boston 102, Milwaukee 86 Golden State 123, Philadelphia 80 Tuesday’s Games Sacramento at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Dallas at Charlotte, 5 p.m. Atlanta at Chicago, 6 p.m. Washington at Memphis, 6 p.m. Miami at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Portland, 8 p.m. Utah at L.A. Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Memphis at Orlando, 5 p.m. Dallas at Indiana, 5 p.m. Atlanta at Toronto, 5 p.m. Charlotte at Brooklyn, 5:30 p.m. San Antonio at Boston, 5:30 p.m. Cleveland at Detroit, 5:30 p.m. Sacramento at New York, 5:30 p.m. Denver at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Washington at Houston, 6 p.m. New Orleans at Milwaukee, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Utah, 7 p.m. Miami at Golden State, 8:30 p.m. Portland at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m.

NHL

National Hockey League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Boston . . . . . . .57 37 16 4 Tampa Bay . . .58 33 20 5 Montreal . . . . .59 32 21 6 Toronto . . . . . .60 32 22 6 Detroit . . . . . . .58 26 20 12 Ottawa . . . . . .59 26 22 11 Florida . . . . . . .58 22 29 7 Buffalo . . . . . . .57 15 34 8 Metropolitan Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pittsburgh . . . .58 40 15 3 N.Y. Rangers .59 32 24 3 Philadelphia . .59 30 23 6 Columbus . . . .58 29 24 5 Washington . . .59 27 23 9 Carolina . . . . .57 26 22 9 New Jersey . . .59 24 22 13 N.Y. Islanders .60 22 30 8

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT St. Louis . . . . .57 39 12 6 Chicago . . . . . .60 35 11 14 Colorado . . . . .58 37 16 5 Minnesota . . . .59 31 21 7 Dallas . . . . . . .58 27 21 10 Winnipeg . . . . .60 28 26 6 Nashville . . . . .59 25 24 10 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Anaheim . . . . .60 41 14 5 San Jose . . . . .59 37 16 6 Los Angeles . .59 31 22 6 Phoenix . . . . . .58 27 21 10 Vancouver . . . .60 27 24 9

Golf scores

Pts 78 71 70 70 64 63 51 38

GF GA 176 125 168 145 148 142 178 182 151 163 169 191 139 183 110 172

Pts 83 67 66 63 63 61 61 52

GF GA 186 138 155 146 162 167 170 161 171 175 144 158 135 146 164 200

Pts 84 84 79 69 64 62 60

GF GA 196 135 207 163 174 153 145 147 164 164 168 175 146 180

Pts 87 80 68 64 63

GF GA 196 147 175 142 139 128 163 169 146 160

Calgary . . . . . .58 22 29 7 51 137 179 Edmonton . . . .60 20 33 7 47 153 199

Sunday’s Games No games scheduled Monday’s Games No games scheduled Tuesday’s Games No games scheduled Wednesday’s Games No games scheduled

PGA

PGA Tour FedExCup Leaders By The Associated Press Through Feb. 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Points Money 1. Jimmy Walker . . . . . .1,733 $3,605,833 2. Harris English . . . . . . .976 $1,996,197 3. Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . . . .940 $1,803,270 4. Dustin Johnson . . . . . .884 $2,179,550 5. Webb Simpson . . . . . .870 $1,857,817 6. Zach Johnson . . . . . . .810 $1,699,450 7. Ryan Moore . . . . . . . . .805 $1,898,050 8. Kevin Stadler . . . . . . . .736 $1,511,197 9. Patrick Reed . . . . . . . .686 $1,334,152 10. Brian Stuard . . . . . . .629 $1,228,108 11. Graham DeLaet . . . . .597 $1,361,267 12. Charles Howell III . . .542 $1,053,812 13. Scott Stallings . . . . . .530 $1,128,421 14. Jordan Spieth . . . . . .528 $1,121,955 15. Jason Bohn . . . . . . . .491 $923,260 16. Gary Woodland . . . . .482 $1,070,777 17. Pat Perez . . . . . . . . .477 $966,791 18. Ryan Palmer . . . . . . .446 $818,290 19. Ryo Ishikawa . . . . . . .425 $854,673 20. Kevin Na . . . . . . . . . .417 $752,352 21. Bubba Watson . . . . . .414 $806,007 22. Chris Stroud . . . . . . .402 $836,120 23. Charley Hoffman . . . .400 $743,810 24. Will MacKenzie . . . . .385 $758,607 25. Brendon Todd . . . . . .372 $559,642 26. Scott Brown . . . . . . . .369 $661,910 27. Hideki Matsuyama . . .354 $663,833 28. Vijay Singh . . . . . . . .347 $604,932 29. Jeff Overton . . . . . . . .345 $607,610 30. Ian Poulter . . . . . . . . .336 $865,479 31. Justin Leonard . . . . . .332 $614,345 32. Briny Baird . . . . . . . . .321 $548,375 33. Russell Knox . . . . . . .318 $425,178 34. Tim Clark . . . . . . . . . .316 $563,883 35. Jerry Kelly . . . . . . . . .310 $577,740 36. Brian Gay . . . . . . . . .309 $508,808 37. Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . .304 $510,895 38. Marc Leishman . . . . .303 $613,100 39. K.J. Choi . . . . . . . . . .297 $571,398 40. Matt Every . . . . . . . . .289 $466,113 41. Graeme McDowell . . .285 $685,700 42. Billy Horschel . . . . . .277 $519,721 43. Justin Hicks . . . . . . . .276 $399,811 44. Jason Kokrak . . . . . .273 $452,059 45. Robert Garrigus . . . . .250 $306,618 46. Keegan Bradley . . . . .249 $477,595 47. Jim Renner . . . . . . . .245 $580,800 48. Hunter Mahan . . . . . .243 $525,879 49. Boo Weekley . . . . . . .240 $315,972 50. Brendan Steele . . . . .238 $396,648 51. Rory Sabbatini . . . . . .238 $428,003 52. James Driscoll . . . . . .238 $255,627 53. Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . .237 $489,167 54. Luke Guthrie . . . . . . .236 $371,928 55. Matt Jones . . . . . . . . .234 $336,759 56. Daniel Summerhays .232 $309,720 57. Kevin Streelman . . . .228 $476,192 58. Cameron Tringale . . .218 $353,517 59. Seung-Yul Noh . . . . .217 $306,622 60. Stuart Appleby . . . . . .215 $289,596

AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At Pebble Beach, Calif. p-Pebble Beach: 6,816 yards, par-72 s-Spyglass Hill GC: 6,953 yards, par-72 m-Monterey Peninsula: 6,867 yards, par-71 Purse: $6.6 million Final (Final round played at Pebble Beach) Jimmy Walker (500), $1,188,000 . . . . . . . . .66p-69s-67m-74 — 276 Dustin Johnson (245), $580,800 . . . . . . . . .68s-73m-70p-66 — 277 Jim Renner (245), $580,800 . . . . . . . . . . . .65m-73p-72s-67 — 277 Jordan Spieth (123), $290,400 . . . . . . . . . .67s-67m-78p-67 — 279 Kevin Na (123), $290,400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72p-68s-70m-69 — 279 Hunter Mahan (100), $237,600 . . . . . . . . . .68p-68s-72m-72 — 280 Graeme McDowell (85), $205,700 . . . . . . . .71s-71m-72p-67 — 281 Pat Perez (85), $205,700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69m-70p-71s-71 — 281 Tim Wilkinson (85), $205,700 . . . . . . . . . . .67p-72s-69m-73 — 281 Bryce Molder (70), $165,000 . . . . . . . . . . . .72m-71p-69s-70 — 282 Chesson Hadley (70), $165,000 . . . . . . . . .71s-70m-70p-71 — 282 Richard H. Lee (70), $165,000 . . . . . . . . . .65m-72p-72s-73 — 282 Will MacKenzie (56), $116,600 . . . . . . . . . .69m-74p-70s-70 — 283 Cameron Tringale (56), $116,600 . . . . . . . .70p-73s-71m-69 — 283 Patrick Reed (56), $116,600 . . . . . . . . . . . .69s-70m-75p-69 — 283 Victor Dubuisson (0), $116,600 . . . . . . . . . .73m-67p-74s-69 — 283 Brian Davis (56), $116,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . .68p-74s-70m-71 — 283 Scott Gardiner (56), $116,600 . . . . . . . . . . .65m-73p-77s-68 — 283 Steven Bowditch (49), $71,775 . . . . . . . . . .68m-70p-75s-71 — 284 Seung-Yul Noh (49), $71,775 . . . . . . . . . . .72m-71p-71s-70 — 284 Daniel Summerhays (49), $71,775 . . . . . . .69m-69p-74s-72 — 284 Jason Kokrak (49), $71,775 . . . . . . . . . . . . .74s-68m-70p-72 — 284 Roberto Castro (49), $71,775 . . . . . . . . . . .70s-73m-71p-70 — 284 Brice Garnett (49), $71,775 . . . . . . . . . . . . .75p-68s-68m-73 — 284 Michael Thompson (49), $71,775 . . . . . . . .71s-68m-72p-73 — 284 Phil Mickelson (49), $71,775 . . . . . . . . . . . .66m-73p-71s-74 — 284 Padraig Harrington (42), $46,860 . . . . . . . .72p-69s-72m-72 — 285 Andrew Loupe (42), $46,860 . . . . . . . . . . . .63m-73p-76s-73 — 285 Russell Knox (42), $46,860 . . . . . . . . . . . . .70p-72s-70m-73 — 285 Jim Herman (42), $46,860 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70m-70p-71s-74 — 285 Robert Garrigus (42), $46,860 . . . . . . . . . . .67m-71p-73s-74 — 285 Wes Roach (38), $39,050 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67m-74p-72s-73 — 286 Robert Streb (38), $39,050 . . . . . . . . . . . . .67p-75s-72m-72 — 286 Ryan Palmer (38), $39,050 . . . . . . . . . . . . .72s-66m-72p-76 — 286

61. Spencer Levin . . . . . .213 62. Brian Harman . . . . . .210 63. Bryce Molder . . . . . . .206 64. Sergio Garcia . . . . . .205 65. Michael Thompson . .203 66. Brian Davis . . . . . . . .200 67. Camilo Villegas . . . . .195 68. Greg Chalmers . . . . .195 69. Chad Collins . . . . . . .192 70. Phil Mickelson . . . . . .187 71. Jason Dufner . . . . . . .186 72. Morgan Hoffmann . . .182 72. Martin Laird . . . . . . . .182 74. Tim Wilkinson . . . . . .181 75. Michael Putnam . . . .175 76. Roberto Castro . . . . .173 77. Aaron Baddeley . . . . .172 78. Ken Duke . . . . . . . . .172 79. J.J. Henry . . . . . . . . .171 80. Jason Day . . . . . . . . .170 81. Chesson Hadley . . . .167 82. Brice Garnett . . . . . . .165 83. Kevin Chappell . . . . .164 84. Trevor Immelman . . .162 85. George McNeill . . . . .160 86. Stewart Cink . . . . . . .160 87. John Merrick . . . . . . .154 88. Jonas Blixt . . . . . . . . .153 89. Adam Scott . . . . . . . .152 90. Brendon de Jonge . . .151 91. Ricky Barnes . . . . . . .149 92. John Senden . . . . . . .146 93. Hudson Swafford . . . .145 94. Nick Watney . . . . . . .143 95. William McGirt . . . . . .138 96. Charlie Wi . . . . . . . . .137 97. Freddie Jacobson . . .137 98. Tyrone Van Aswegen 136 99. Sang-Moon Bae . . . .134 100. Richard H. Lee . . . . .131 101. Billy Hurley III . . . . . .130 102. Heath Slocum . . . . . .129 103. Charlie Beljan . . . . . .125 104. John Rollins . . . . . . .124 105. Troy Matteson . . . . .124 106. Ben Martin . . . . . . . .121 107. David Hearn . . . . . . .119 108. Jim Herman . . . . . . .118 109. Kevin Kisner . . . . . . .116 110. Ben Crane . . . . . . . . .116 110. Kyle Stanley . . . . . . .116 112. Justin Rose . . . . . . . .115 113. Josh Teater . . . . . . . .114 113. Bo Van Pelt . . . . . . . .114 115. Scott Langley . . . . . .113 116. Erik Compton . . . . . .111 117. Robert Streb . . . . . . .109 118. Woody Austin . . . . . .108 119. Sean O’Hair . . . . . . .108 119. Scott Piercy . . . . . . .108 121. John Peterson . . . . .105 122. Robert Allenby . . . . .105 123. Rory McIlroy . . . . . . .100 124. John Huh . . . . . . . . . .99 125. Martin Kaymer . . . . . .99 126. Rickie Fowler . . . . . . .99 127. Brandt Snedeker . . . .97 128. Steven Bowditch . . . .94 129. Y.E. Yang . . . . . . . . . .93 130. Retief Goosen . . . . . .92 131. Russell Henley . . . . . .91 132. Ernie Els . . . . . . . . . . .91 133. Scott Gardiner . . . . . .87 134. Peter Malnati . . . . . . .86 135. Jhonattan Vegas . . . .85 136. Wes Roach . . . . . . . . .83 137. Brad Fritsch . . . . . . . .82 138. Andrew Svoboda . . . .81 139. David Toms . . . . . . . . .76 140. Carl Pettersson . . . . .74 141. Bob Estes . . . . . . . . . .73 142. James Hahn . . . . . . . .72 143. D.A. Points . . . . . . . . .71 144. David Lynn . . . . . . . . .70 145. Ben Curtis . . . . . . . . .68

as he did there, he’ll receive a high mark. I-POD: Full name: Iouri Podladtchikov. Born in Russia but competing now for Switzerland, he invented the toughest trick going in the game: The four-twisting “Yolo.” I-Pod landed it at the Europe Winter X Games last winter and White immediately went to work to match it. White has landed it twice in the lead-up to the Olympics. At the Winter XGames, I-Pod fell all three times he tried it. AYUMU HIRANO: The 15-yearold from Japan exploded onto the scene when he landed back-toback double cork 1080s and finished second to White at the 2013 X Games. He’s one of the highest jumpers in the business, though he hasn’t been seen much lately. He finished sixth at a Dew Tour event in December and pulled out of the X Games with a foot injury. GREG BRETZ: Somebody did beat White on a halfpipe this season. It was Bretz, the 23-year-old from Anaheim, Calif. White was riding on a freshly injured ankle that day. SCOTTY JAMES: He has grown nearly a foot since 2010, when he made his Olympic debut at 15. Took a big tumble on the slopestyle course, but halfpipe is his stronger event. He finished fourth at the X Games last month.

$241,060 $339,392 $391,460 $526,000 $318,837 $270,647 $174,259 $337,229 $289,197 $274,755 $378,080 $259,868 $234,013 $377,223 $150,787 $211,268 $342,069 $302,068 $235,146 $379,200 $385,350 $171,463 $155,940 $255,967 $242,367 $275,289 $229,018 $221,513 $317,750 $202,673 $163,307 $276,855 $197,131 $171,250 $151,044 $192,667 $298,659 $126,761 $175,619 $231,010 $185,084 $159,068 $184,460 $134,846 $230,550 $132,980 $122,034 $122,331 $134,584 $205,003 $147,293 $300,000 $119,804 $170,817 $163,654 $141,048 $138,740 $168,299 $137,434 $189,115 $133,224 $149,489 $231,500 $122,404 $175,951 $158,930 $226,654 $133,996 $111,304 $161,808 $120,954 $134,890 $142,433 $130,400 $81,413 $88,400 $149,033 $108,810 $67,925 $138,320 $156,000 $50,855 $145,523 $102,250 $71,897

Jim Furyk (32), $29,139 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70s-70m-73p-74 — 287 James Driscoll (32), $29,139 . . . . . . . . . . . .69s-71m-73p-74 — 287 Dicky Pride (32), $29,139 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66m-72p-74s-75 — 287 Dudley Hart (32), $29,139 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71p-68s-73m-75 — 287 David Duval (32), $29,139 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72p-68s-74m-73 — 287 Bronson La’Cassie (32), $29,139 . . . . . . . .70p-72s-72m-73 — 287 Kevin Chappell (32), $29,139 . . . . . . . . . . .73s-68m-73p-73 — 287 Stuart Appleby (32), $29,139 . . . . . . . . . . . .65m-74p-76s-72 — 287 Michael Putnam (32), $29,139 . . . . . . . . . . .69s-71m-75p-72 — 287 Kevin Foley (32), $29,139 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68m-76p-71s-72 — 287 Kevin Stadler (23), $18,499 . . . . . . . . . . . . .67m-73p-73s-75 — 288 Matt Jones (23), $18,499 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68m-74p-70s-76 — 288 Brian Gay (23), $18,499 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70s-70m-72p-76 — 288 Woody Austin (23), $18,499 . . . . . . . . . . . . .73p-70s-69m-76 — 288 Bud Cauley (23), $18,499 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73p-69s-72m-74 — 288 Brendon Todd (23), $18,499 . . . . . . . . . . . .70s-68m-73p-77 — 288 Blake Adams (23), $18,499 . . . . . . . . . . . . .69s-69m-72p-78 — 288 Doug LaBelle II (18), $15,477 . . . . . . . . . . .70m-74p-70s-75 — 289 George McNeill (18), $15,477 . . . . . . . . . . .67m-74p-73s-75 — 289 Andres Romero (18), $15,477 . . . . . . . . . . .71s-70m-74p-74 — 289 Russell Henley (18), $15,477 . . . . . . . . . . .73s-70m-72p-74 — 289 Aaron Baddeley (13), $14,784 . . . . . . . . . . .69m-70p-73s-78 — 290 Ben Kohles (13), $14,784 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72p-73s-69m-76 — 290 Alex Cejka (13), $14,784 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69s-71m-75p-75 — 290 Sean O’Hair (13), $14,784 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70p-71s-74m-75 — 290 Greg Owen (13), $14,784 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67m-74p-74s-75 — 290 J.B. Holmes (9), $14,256 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68p-75s-70m-78 — 291 Kyle Stanley (9), $14,256 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74s-69m-72p-76 — 291 Chris Kirk (9), $14,256 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71s-68m-76p-76 — 291 Made cut, did not finish Rory Sabbatini (3), $13,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67s-72m-77p — 216 Lee Janzen (3), $13,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68m-73p-75s — 216 Scott Langley (3), $13,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69m-75p-72s — 216 Kiradech Aphibarnrat (0), $13,200 . . . . . . . . . .69s-74m-73p — 216 Will Wilcox (3), $13,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72p-69s-75m — 216 Jamie Lovemark (3), $13,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73m-69p-74s — 216 Retief Goosen (3), $13,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71p-73s-72m — 216 Jason Day (3), $13,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68m-77p-71s — 216 Kevin Kisner (3), $13,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72s-69m-75p — 216 John Mallinger (3), $13,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71s-71m-74p — 216 Rafael Cabrera Bello (0), $13,200 . . . . . . . . . .74p-71s-71m — 216 John Peterson (3), $13,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70s-72m-74p — 216 Fabian Gomez (3), $13,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72m-74p-70s — 216

146. Chad Campbell . . . . .68 147. J.B. Holmes . . . . . . . .67 148. Will Wilcox . . . . . . . . .66 149. John Mallinger . . . . . .63 150. Nicolas Colsaerts . . . .63 150. Danny Lee . . . . . . . . .63

Transactions

$66,516 $82,310 $132,200 $143,400 $90,319 $45,657

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL National League WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Agreed to terms with RHP Tyler Clippard on a oneyear contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association DETROIT PISTONS — Promoted assistant coach John Loyer to interim head coach. HOUSTON ROCKETS — Called up F Robert Covington from Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Named Jake Reynolds vice president of ticket sales and service. FOOTBALL National Football League DETROIT LIONS — Named Jim Bob Cooter quarterbacks coach. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Waived OL Justin Anderson. Signed S David Sims, LB Henoc Muamba and OL Jack Breckner. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Named Robert Saleh linebackers coach, Scottie Hazelton assistant linebackers coach and Scott Trulock trainer. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Named Hank Fraley assistant offensive line coach. NEW YORK JETS — Promoted Tony Sparano Jr. to offensive assistant. Named Eric Smith seasonal intern. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Signed TE Travis Beckum, DB Terrance Parks and LB Mike Taylor to future contracts. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Named Doug Williams personnel executive. Canadian Football League SASKATCHEWAN ROUGHRIDERS — Announced the retirement of FB Graeme Bell. BLUE BOMBERS — WINNIPEG Announced the retirement of LS Chris Cvetkovic. Acquired DB Chris Randle from Calgary for their 24th overall 2014 draft pick and signed Randle to a contract extension. Arena Football League ORLANDO PREDATORS — Traded QB Aaron Garcia to Jacksonville for QB Bernard Morris, OL Trevis Turner and DL Matt Marcorelle. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Reassigned LW Emerson Etem to Norfolk (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled RW Mikael Samuelsson from Grand Rapids (AHL). Assigned RW Tomas Jurco and C Riley Sheahan to Grand Rapids. SOCCER Major League Soccer FC DALLAS — Promoted Academy coach Josema Bazan to assistant coach. COLLEGE ALABAMA — Named Erwin van Bennekom assistant soccer coach. DEPAUL — Announced men’s basketball F Cleveland Melvin has left the school. DUKE — Promoted receivers coach Scottie Montgomery to offensive coordinator. KANSAS — Named Rob Ianello director of football research and running backs coach Reggie Mitchell recruiting coordinator. MONTANA STATE — Named Cody Kempt receivers coach and Michael Pitre running backs coach.

Women’s basketball

The AP Top 25 By The Associated Press The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ women’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 9, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Prv 1. UConn (36) . . . . . . . . .25-0 900 1 2. Notre Dame . . . . . . . .23-0 864 2 3. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22-2 811 5 4. Louisville . . . . . . . . . . .23-2 758 4 5. South Carolina . . . . . .22-2 739 6 6. Stanford . . . . . . . . . . .22-2 737 3 7. Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . .19-3 710 7 8. Tennessee . . . . . . . . . .19-4 659 8 9. Maryland . . . . . . . . . . .19-4 604 10 10. NC State . . . . . . . . . .21-3 541 14 11. Penn St. . . . . . . . . . . .18-5 525 9 12. Oklahoma St. . . . . . . .19-4 452 12 13. West Virginia . . . . . . .20-3 448 17 14. Texas A&M . . . . . . . . .18-6 380 19 15. Arizona St. . . . . . . . . .20-4 359 11 16. Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . . .17-5 355 18 17. North Carolina . . . . . .17-6 317 13 18. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . .17-6 298 15 19. LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18-6 274 16 20. Gonzaga . . . . . . . . . .22-3 235 20 21. Nebraska . . . . . . . . . .17-5 202 22 22. California . . . . . . . . . .16-7 118 23 23. Purdue . . . . . . . . . . . .17-7 113 25 24. St. John’s . . . . . . . . . .18-5 69 — 25. Michigan St. . . . . . . . .16-8 61 24

Others receiving votes: Middle Tennessee 32, Rutgers 31, Wichita St. 29, Iowa 14, Oklahoma 12, Texas 12, Chattanooga 10, DePaul 9, Bowling Green 5, Florida St. 5, Florida 3, Georgia Tech 3, James Madison 3, Michigan 2, Syracuse 1.


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Sam

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tion, and criticism, because of the games. “By rewriting the script for countless young athletes, Michael has demonstrated the leadership that, along with his impressive skills on the field, makes him a natural fit for the NFL,” said Sarah Kate Ellis, president of GLAAD, a leading lesbian gay, bisexual and transgender media advocacy organization. “With acceptance of LGBT people rising across our coasts — in our schools, churches, and workplaces — it’s clear that America is ready for an openly gay football star.” The NFL’s sexual orientation, anti-discrimination and harassment policy states: Coaches, General Managers and others responsible for interviewing and hiring draft-eligible players and free agents must not seek information concerning or make personnel decisions based on a player’s sexual orientation. This includes asking questions during an interview that suggest that the player’s sexual orientation will be a factor in the decision to draft or sign him. Examples: Do you like women or men? How well do you do with the ladies? Do you have a girlfriend? Carolina Panthers running back DeAngelo Williams tweeted: “I could care less about a man’s

sexual preference! i care about winning games and being respectful in the locker room!” Williams’ teammate, cornerback Drayton Florence, posted on his Twitter account: “No comment but it can be a distraction in the locker room. At least he’s open with it much respect!” Sam said many people at the Senior Bowl, an all-star game for NFL prospects, seemed to know he was gay. “I didn’t realize how many people actually knew, and I was afraid that someone would tell or leak something out about me,” he told ESPN. “I want to own my truth. ... No one else should tell my story but me.” Sam told the Times he dated a man on the Missouri swim team and came out to teammates L’Damian Washington and Marvin Foster about a year ago, before letting the whole team know during last preseason. “Coaches just wanted to know a little about ourselves, our majors, where we’re from, and something that no one knows about you,” Sam told ESPN. “And I used that opportunity just to tell them that I was gay. And their reaction was like, ‘Michael Sam finally told us.”’ Missouri linebacker Donovan Bonner was a teammate of Sam’s for five years. “We knew of his status for 5 years and not one team member, coach, or staff member said anything says a lot about our family atmosphere,” Bonner tweeted.

SPORTS

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

B3

Pinkel, Mizzou applaud Sam’s courage COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Michael Sam was just another recruit when he left his small Texas hometown and arrived in Missouri. Playing for the Tigers, he turned into a private loquacious leader ready to make a trailblazing announcement. The defensive star wants to become the first openly gay NFL player. “I told him: This is going to be mammoth,” coach Gary Pinkel said Monday, a day after Sam came out to the world. “I don’t have a word, OK, for how big this is going to be.” It’s a bigger deal for the older generation. Sam’s teammates and acquaintances easily made the adjustment, plus he proved himself on the field. “He’s a leader,” former 49ers great running back Roger Craig said. “I would definitely welcome him on my team. I’d play with him any day. I like people who stand up for themselves.” Sam revealed he was gay at one of the football team’s get-acquainted dinners last summer hosted by Pinkel and assistant coaches. The next day, Pinkel said, Sam told the entire team. Realizing the enormity of the situation, Pinkel left the next move up to the senior who blossomed into one of the best defensive ends in the country — and one surrounded by teammates who didn’t worry one bit about sexual orientation or reveal his secret until he came out on Sunday. Athletes across the campus approve. “Love is love,” basketball guard Jordan Clarkson said. “That’s their personal life.” Pinkel, athletic director Mike Alden and other school officials applauded Sam’s courage Monday at Faurot Field. As a backdrop, the first two letters of Sam’s last name were etched in snow to join the giant “M” just beyond the north end zone. “Pretty cool,” Pinkel said. Coaches and Sam agreed that making an

announcement during the season might be a distraction. It was Sam’s call to skip all the weekly media days and postgame news conferences, too, the better to avoid the risk of the topic coming up. Sam broke his silence prior to the Cotton Bowl and the conversation stayed on football, just like he wanted. Sam was prompted to make his decision to come out after the Senior Bowl, where it became apparent the player’s sexual orientation was widely known. This meant a declaration just days before the NFL combine and shouldering the pressure that goes along with the historic declaration. “It’s very clear that everybody in the NFL knew,” said Howard Bragman, a consultant hired by Sam’s agent to help manage the announcement in the media. The NFL and many others, including the White House, publicly applauded Sam’s decision. President Barack Obama’s spokesman, first lady Michelle Obama and Vice President Joe Biden all called him a courageous and inspirational athlete. But now, after a few high-profile interviews, it’s back to silent Sam. The fifth level of the stadium was jammed with dozens of reporters for Monday’s news conference but there was no sign of the star attraction. Bragman said Sam was traveling Monday to a camp at an undisclosed location where he’ll prepare for the combine. Though he’s been a most reticent public speaker, Pinkel described Sam as a virtual chatterbox. “He drove me crazy a lot of times, he doesn’t shut up sometimes,” Pinkel said with a chuckle. “He talks and talks and talks. “You always know he’s in with my secretary because I can hear him and I have to close the door — I can’t concentrate.”

Ligety gets into action with super-combi training

Mancuso Continued from Page B1

on her step of the podium during the flower ceremony, then ran around with a U.S. flag, hugging family members. She won the gold in the giant slalom at the 2006 Turin Games, then silvers in the super-combined and downhill at Vancouver in 2010. Only two other Winter Olympians from the U.S., speedskater Bonnie Blair and short-track star Apolo Anton Ohno, have won individual medals at three editions of the games. “She is everything you want your athletes to be,” said Bill Marolt, CEO of the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association. “She brings herself to her best possible level of preparation and puts it all out there.” Only four women from anywhere own more Alpine medals than Mancuso, who can increase her total over the next two weeks, starting with Wednesday’s downhill. The record of six is shared by Croatia’s Janica Kostelic and Sweden’s Anja Paerson. The 29-year -old Mancuso, who grew up in Squaw Valley, Calif., was asked what’s dif ferent about her when she’s in an Olympic start hut. “I feel more nervous. It’s not nerves of failure, it’s just nerves,” she

KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia (AP) — Ted Ligety will test the Sochi Olympics snow for the first time while the Tuesday, women’s field will try to replicate Julia Mancuso’s line in the final downhill training session. Men’s super -combined and women’s downhill training sessions are scheduled for Tuesday, followed by the women’s downhill race Wednesday. Here are five things to know about Alpine skiing heading into Tuesday’s action: TED’S TIME: Ligety has big medal ambitions for these games but he hasn’t raced yet because he did not enter the downhill. His first action will come in downhill training for Friday’s super-combined race. Ligety won gold in combined under the old format of one downhill run and two slalom legs at the 2006 Turin Games. He won again under the current format of explained. “There’s just a lot of emotion and knowing that, ‘This is my chance. This is my shot.”’ At the 2010 Olympics, Vonn edged Mancuso in the downhill and added a bronze in the super -G. But because of recent knee surgery, Vonn is back in the U.S. this time around, commentating for NBC instead of competing. While Vonn’s resume includes 59 World Cup race victories and four overall titles, Mancuso’s never enjoyed that sort of success. Mancuso has seven career World Cup wins, and really struggled this season, never better than seventh. There were problems figuring which boots to use. There was the potential for a real crisis of confidence. In December, she took time off to gather herself with an eye to the Olympics. “You definitely start to doubt things, for sure. ... The best thing we could have done is take a break for Christmas and New Year and then get back into it,” said Chris Knight, Mancuso’s personal coach on the U.S. team. “It was like pressing the reset button for her, and it has worked.” Knight, who’s from New Zealand, also offered a theory for why Mancuso thrives at the Winter Games. “She loves peaking for

one downhill run and one slalom leg at last year’s world championships in Schladming, Austria, setting him up as one of the top favorites for the Olympic event. Ligety will be even a bigger favorite for the giant slalom next week, as that is the event he has dominated on the World Cup circuit for the past two seasons, winning nine of 14 races. IMITATING MANCUSO: Julia Mancuso was so fast in the downhill portion of Monday’s super-combined that other skiers will spend hours in front of video screens studying her line before Wednesday’s race. “I think every girl will look this evening (at) her line,” Austria Alpine director Hans Pum said. “After this downhill in the morning, she is the favorite for this downhill. And with the bronze medal, too, now she has no pressure.” While she ended up third after the slalom leg, Man-

the big events. I mean, America doesn’t know what’s going on outside of the Olympics, right?” he said. After Mancuso’s strong downhill Monday morning gave her a nearly half-second lead on the field, she still had to deal with a steep slalom course, one that nine of 31 starters failed to complete in the afternoon. No small matter, given that it had been more than a year since she completed a full slalom. And the last time she raced such a challenging slalom? “It’s been a while,” U.S. women’s coach Alex Hoedlmoser said with a laugh. But with the lights along the Rosa Khutor course gleaming off her neon orange helmet, and a gold scar f tucked under her chin, Mancuso was good enough to sneak into the medals, 0.13 behind silver winner Nicole Hosp of Austria, and 0.10 ahead of fourth-place finisher T ina Maze of Slovenia, last season’s overall World Cup champion. “It’s really inspiring,” U.S. teammate Leanne Smith said, “for everyone here to see how much of a gamer she is, every Olympics.”

cuso sped down the 2.7kilometer (1.69-mile) Rosa Khutor course in 1 minute, 42.68 seconds, 0.47 faster than second-place Lara Gut of Switzerland. “She definitely put the smackdown in the downhill portion and that gave her enough cushion for the slalom,” U.S. women’s head coach Alex Hoedlmoser said. Eventual gold medalist Maria Hoefl-Riesch was only fifth in the downhill leg, trailing Mancuso by 1.04. “It was a decent down-

Briefs

hill,” Ger many women’s head coach Thomas Stauffer said of Hoefl-Riesch’s run. “It wasn’t a great run. She still had some mistakes on the top.” INNERHOFER IS IN: After taking silver in the downhill, Italy’s Christof Innerhofer has changed his mind and entered the super-combined. Before the games, Innerhofer had said he wouldn’t race the super-combi due to persistent back pain, which would af fect him more in the slalom leg. He won silver in super -

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Instead of a final play, Midland was whistled for a foul in the backcourt, which sent Shaquan Rhodes to the freethrow line with 13 seconds left. Rhodes calmly sank both to give NMMI (12-12, 2-10 WJCAC) its first lead of the game. On Midland’s next possession, LeBrent Walker was whistled for a traveling violation near the top of the key, giving the ball back to the Broncos. Dane Williams split a pair at the line after Midland fouled, then grabbed his first steal of the night on the ensuing inbound pass and hammered home a thunderous dunk to provide the exclamation point. “I thought, tonight, we played with a ton of energy,” Schooley said. “We didn’t play real smart at times, but if you’re going to play not real smart, at least bring all the energy and I thought the guys did tonight. “It was a great, great win for these guys. They needed this one.” Joseph and Antonio Manns paced

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Bilodeau put together what he called the finest run in a career that includes being the first Canadian to win Olympic gold on home soil four years ago in Vancouver. Racing fourth in the six-man final, his blazing yet graceful sprint down Rosa Khutor Extreme Park resulted in an eyepopping score of 26.31. “I know that guy can put down a better run than me, he’s got more talent than I do,” Bilodeau said of Kingsbury. “I just wanted to go out and do the best I could and see if I could put some pressure on.” Standing atop the hill, Kingsbury watched the familiar scene unfold. The world’s two best moguls skiers have been playing tug-of-war for No. 1 in the world for the better part of three years. Yet Kingsbury’s attempt to yank gold out of Bilodeau’s hands ended halfway down the mountain, where a small spreading of the knees in a discipline that requires them to be attached like magnets ended any hopes of reaching the top of the podium. “I felt pretty good at the top of the gate,” Kingsbury said. “I wasn’t going for silver or bronze. I was going for gold and I made a small mistake.” Not Bilodeau, who figured only perfection would do while facing “that guy,” as

combi at the 2011 world championships in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. KOSTELIC’S KNEES: Ivica Kostelic is worried about the size of the jumps and the heavy landing impacts on the downhill course for the super-combined. Only to a certain extent, though. “My knees are already so damaged that there isn’t much to damage anymore,” said the Croatian, who has had 10-plus knee surgeries.

four Broncos in double figures with 13 apiece. Williams had 11 and Marcus Roper added 10. Ronell Abaekobe had nine points and nine boards. Rhodes finished with nine points. Kenan Guzonjic led all scorers with 15 for Midland (11-14, 3-9).

Girls basketball

NMMI 55, Lake Arthur 34 NMMI pulled away in the second half and evened its record at 8-8 with a win over Lake Arthur at the Godfrey Athletic Center, Monday. The Panthers took a 10-8 lead after one, but NMMI rebounded to take a onepoint halftime lead by outscoring the Panthers 14-11 in the second. The Colts broke the game open in the third, outscoring Lake Arthur 17-4. They then won the fourth 16-9 to seal the win. Victoria Odell led three Colts in double figures with 18 points. Chandler Hawkins added 13 and Sierra Walker poured in 10. For Lake Arthur, Mayra Davila had 18 points and Jaque Velo added 10. he calls him — the man who has pushed him in ways he never imagined. “I really wanted to defend my medal,” Bilodeau said. “But there was no way I was expecting to ski that way. And that’s because of that kid. If he wasn’t here, I wouldn’t have pushed that hard.” At times, it appeared both were intimidated by the stage. While they dominated qualifying, they were hardly sharp in the first knockout round. Kingsbury slogged to one of the slowest times of the competition while Bilodeau nearly fell on his backside after landing his first jump and finished eighth, uncomfortably close to the 12-man cutoff. Still, it ultimately came down to what is has repeatedly come down to in most of the past four years, the 26-year -old Bilodeau against the 21-year-old Kingsbury in a fight for supremacy. In the end, it wasn’t close. The final margin was the moguls equivalent of a threetouchdown blowout in football. Kingsbury flashed a wry smile after crossing the finish line, knowing he’d been beaten. The two friendly rivals embraced, though it was Bilodeau who flashed the “No. 1” sign during the flower ceremony. It’s a title Bilodeau — who is retiring at the end of the season — figures he won’t hold for long. “That kid next to me is going to win two in a row also,” he said while pointing to Kingsbury.


B4 Tuesday, February 11, 2014

FINANCIAL

NBA capsules: Pistons win in Loyer’s debut

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. (AP) — Brandon Jennings scored 21 points, and the Detroit Pistons beat the San Antonio Spurs 109100 on Monday night in John Loyer’s first game as interim coach. Detroit abruptly fired Maurice Cheeks on Sunday after only 50 games as coach, but although they’ve been unimpressive for the most part this season, the Pistons have played better lately. The comfortable win over the Spurs was Detroit’s fifth in seven games. Rodney Stuckey scored 20 points for the Pistons, and Greg Monroe added 15 points and 10 rebounds. Marco Belinelli led the Spurs with 20 points. Detroit pulled even with Charlotte for the final playoff spot in the Eastern Con-

ference, and the Pistons have shown flashes recently of the potential they thought they’d have this season. After signing Josh Smith and trading for Jennings in the offseason, Detroit is barely ahead of last season’s pace in terms of wins and losses. Jennings has been terrific lately, though. After scoring 35 points with 12 assists Saturday against Denver, he orchestrated another strong offensive effort Monday. San Antonio, meanwhile, turned the ball over eight times in the third quarter, when Detroit pushed its lead from 11 to 20. With Loyer — an assistant under Cheeks — hoarsely shouting defensive instructions from the sideline, the Pistons went on a 12-2 run in the third to take a 73-52 lead. There were a few other highlights later in the period, too. Smith threw down a one-

Roswell Daily Record

handed dunk after a tur nover by San Antonio, and Jennings made a layup after Detroit’s Andre Drummond blocked Aron Baynes’ shot emphatically off the glass. After Jennings missed from the perimeter, he stole the ball near midcourt and went in for a three-point play to make it 84-62. San Antonio is in the midst of a ninegame road swing. Belinelli was back after dealing with back spasms, but the Spurs were without Manu Ginobili (left hamstring) and Kawhi Leonard (right hand). The Pistons went on a 15-4 run in the second quarter, capped by a 3-pointer by Jennings that put them ahead 57-45.

had 18 points and 15 rebounds, and the surging Houston Rockets used a fourthquarter push to hold off the Minnesota Timberwolves for their sixth consecutive victory. Chandler Parsons had 20 points and James Harden scored 19 for the Rockets, who have won six straight for the first time since taking seven in a row from Jan. 1323, 2012. Back after missing one game with a bruised left quadriceps, Kevin Love led Minnesota with 31 points and 10 rebounds. Chase Budinger had 15 points for the Timberwolves, who have lost four straight and six of seven.

Pacers 119, Nuggets 80 INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — David West scored 25 points and Roy Hibbert added 14 as the Indiana Pacers routed the shorthanded Denver Nuggets. Indiana snapped a five-game skid in the series, beating the Nuggets for the first time since a 31-point blowout in November 2010. The Pacers (40-11) still have the NBA’s best record, the league’s best home record (25-2) and now lead two-time defending champion Miami by four games in the Eastern Conference. Wilson Chandler scored 17 points to lead the Nuggets (24-26), who have lost three straight. They played without several injured players, including Andre Miller, Danilo Gallinari, JaVale McGee, Nate Robinson and Ty Lawson.

Rockets 107, Timberwolves 89 MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Dwight Howard

NCAA Top 25 capsules: K-State upsets Kansas MANHATTAN, Kan. (AP) — Marcus Foster scored 20 points, including two free throws in the closing seconds of overtime, and Kansas State held on to beat No. 7 Kansas 85-82 on Monday night. Will Spradling added 15 points for the Wildcats (17-7, 7-4 Big 12), who blew a nine-point lead with less than 2 minutes left in regulation, only to survive for just their third win over the Jayhawks (18-6, 9-2) in 26 games played at Bramlage Coliseum. Hundreds of students flooded the court when the final buzzer sounded to celebrate the end of a six-game skid against Kansas. The Wildcats, who had lost 48 of the last 51 in the series, hadn’t beaten their rivals in their on-campus octagon since Feb. 14, 2011. Andrew Wiggins scored 16 points for the Jayhawks, including a putback of his own miss with 6.9 seconds left to force overtime. Perry Ellis had 19 points, Naadir Tharpe added 13 and Brannen Greene scored 10 for Kansas. The Wildcats took the lead with 17:34 left in the second half, and never trailed until Tarik Black scored the opening basket of overtime. But every time the Jayhawks tried to build a lead, the Wildcats had an answer — a three-point play by Foster, a free throw by Omari Lawrence, or a big putback from unheralded big man D.J. Johnson, who had nine points. Still, it wasn’t over until Foster’s two free throws with 21.9 seconds left gave Kansas State an 83-79 lead, and Wiggins missed a 3-pointer at the other end. Black missed another shot, and the Wildcats finally corralled the rebound, allowing time to run out. It was the first victory in six tries against Kansas for Wildcats coach Bruce Weber, and just the fourth loss in 26 games against Kansas State for his counterpart, Bill Self. Unlike the first meeting in January,

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 14 141.25 141.77 140.37 141.50 Apr 14 140.45 140.75 127.82 140.17 Jun 14 132.00 132.30 131.10 131.57 Aug 14 130.50 130.67 129.55 130.27 Oct 14 133.72 134.00 133.00 133.70 Dec 14 134.90 135.15 134.80 135.15 Feb 15 135.20 135.40 135.20 135.40 Apr 15 135.75 Jun 15 131.25 Last spot N/A Est. sales 42130. Fri’s Sales: 68,242 Fri’s open int: 369519, off -8509 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Mar 14 167.70 168.20 167.12 167.90 Apr 14 168.70 168.82 168.25 168.80 May 14 169.35 169.67 168.75 169.52 Aug 14 171.55 171.60 170.90 171.47 Sep 14 170.70 171.00 170.55 170.97 Oct 14 169.97 169.97 169.87 169.97 Nov 14 169.30 169.30 169.25 169.25 Jan 15 168.10 Last spot N/A Est. sales 8797. Fri’s Sales: 7,802 Fri’s open int: 46441, off -539 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 14 86.42 86.67 82.45 86.35 Apr 14 94.55 94.87 94.40 94.75 May 14 102.85 103.10 102.85 103.10 Jun 14 105.07 105.47 105.05 105.42 Jul 14 105.05 105.15 104.80 105.12 Aug 14 103.05 103.10 102.87 102.90 Oct 14 88.47 89.10 80.00 89.05 Dec 14 82.10 82.55 81.95 82.50 Feb 15 82.95 83.00 82.75 82.95 Apr 15 83.40 83.45 83.25 83.25 May 15 87.20 Jun 15 89.70 Last spot N/A Est. sales 36574. Fri’s Sales: 37,193 Fri’s open int: 273918, up +10424ø

chg.

+.30 -.23 -.53 -.30 -.17 +.18 +.15

+.10 +.28 +.32 +.17 +.22 +.07 -.10

-.22 +.03 -.05 +.07 +.20 -.10 +.60 +.40 +.30

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Mar 14 87.96 88.84 87.04 87.37 May 14 88.25 89.25 87.48 87.90 Jul 14 87.50 88.52 86.89 87.18 Oct 14 80.00 Dec 14 77.93 77.93 77.35 77.82 Mar 15 78.40 78.40 78.18 78.36 May 15 78.62 78.67 78.50 78.67 Jul 15 78.84 Oct 15 78.54 Dec 15 78.00 Mar 16 77.90 May 16 77.90 Jul 16 77.90 Oct 16 77.90 Dec 16 77.90 Last spot N/A Est. sales 42236. Fri’s Sales: 52,660 Fri’s open int: 174481, off -1451

chg.

-.10 +.05 +.07 +.12 -.12 -.11 +.05 +.07 +.07 +.07 +.07 +.07 +.07 +.07 +.07

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 574ø 590ø 570ø 584fl May 14 577 590fl 572 585 Jul 14 581ø 595ø 577ü 589fl Sep 14 589 603ø 587ø 598ü Dec 14 600 616ø 598fl 611 Mar 15 614 623ø 614 620fl May 15 620 626 616 621fl

chg.

+7ü +5fl +6 +6ü +6ü +6ø +5fl

West Virginia 102, No. 11 Iowa St. 77 MORGANTOWN, W.Va. (AP) — Remi Dibo scored a career-high 20 points as West Virginia handed Iowa State its most lopsided loss in three years. Juwan Staten added 19 points and Eron Harris and Terry Henderson each had 16 points for the Mountaineers (1510, 7-5 Big 12). Iowa State (18-5, 6-5) had five players in double figures, led by Georges Niang’s 17 points. But Melvin Ejim, coming off a Big 12-record 48 points and a career high 18 rebounds against TCU, was held to six points on 1-of-9 shooting. The Cyclones fell behind by double digits midway through the first half and trailed by as many as 32 points late in the game. It was their worst loss since a 23-point setback at Texas in January 2011. West Virginia shot 54 percent (35 of 65) from the field, including 13 of 22 from 3point range.

when the Jayhawks raced out to a big lead and then simply nursed it through the second half, the rivals played to a draw Monday night. Kansas State surged to an early lead thanks to some poor shooting by the Jayhawks, only to go into a slump of its own. Both teams eventually got into foul trouble as the game began to resemble an old Big Eight tussle, and the result was a 2929 halftime tie. In fact, there may have been more bodies on the court than baskets made, and the Jayhawks’ Black even had to limp off after twisting his ankle while going up for a rebound. The angst reached a crescendo midway through the second half, when Thomas Gipson of the Wildcats and Kansas guard Frank Mason got into a shoving match. Both were given technical fouls. Kansas was already playing without reserve forward Jamari Traylor, whom Self sat for disciplinary reasons. With the nagging injury to Black on top of the foul trouble, one of the deepest teams in the nation had its depth tested in one of the rare instances all season. The Jayhawks didn’t quite respond the way Self would have liked. After taking a 35-34 lead with 17:34 remaining, the Wildcats ripped off the next nine points. And even when Foster turned his right ankle and briefly went to the locker room, Kansas State was still able to match the Jayhawks basket for basket. The Wildcats couldn’t close the game in regulation, though. Wesley Iwundu made one of two free throws with 30 seconds left to give Kansas State a 69-65 lead, but Tharpe quickly answered with a layup. Iwundu was fouled again but missed the front end of a 1-and-1, giving Wiggins a chance to send the game to overtime.

FUTURES

Jul 15 615ø 619ø 612ü 617ø +5ü Sep 15 618ø 623ø 618ø 623ø +5 Dec 15 627ü 632ø 627ü 632ø +5ü Mar 16 633ø 639ø 633ø 639ø +6 May 16 635 641 635 641 +6 Jul 16 630 636 630 636 +6 Last spot N/A Est. sales 240134. Fri’s Sales: 206,986 Fri’s open int: 432321, off -1850 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 442fl 449 440 443 -1ü May 14 448ø 454ø 445ø 448fl -1ü Jul 14 454ü 460 451 454fl -fl Sep 14 455fl 461 453ü 456 -1 Dec 14 459 463ü 456 458ü -1fl Mar 15 467ü 471ø 464ü 466fl -2ü May 15 472ü 477ø 471ü 473 -1fl Jul 15 476ü 481 475 476ø -1ø Sep 15 470 470ü 465 467 -2ü Dec 15 468 472fl 465ø 467ü -2 Mar 16 475fl 479 474ø 474ø -1ø May 16 478fl 478fl 477ü 477ü -1ø Jul 16 480 480 479ø 479ø -1ü Sep 16 462ø 462ø 461ø 461ø -1 Dec 16 456 460 454 454fl -1 Jul 17 466 466 465 465 -1 Dec 17 455 455 452ü 452ü -1ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 592190. Fri’s Sales: 384,116 Fri’s open int: 1327536, up +8223 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 428fl 437ø 416ø 422 -14ø May 14 366ø 376ø 356ü 364 -2fl Jul 14 331 339 327ø 329ü -4 Sep 14 314ø 315ü 314ø 315ü +fl Dec 14 305 310 304 307fl +2fl Mar 15 300 304ü 300 304ü +4ü 303ü +4ü May 15 299 303ü 299 Jul 15 297 301ü 297 301ü +4ü Sep 15 297 301ü 297 301ü +4ü Dec 15 297 301ü 297 301ü +4ü Jul 16 297 301ü 297 301ü +4ü Sep 16 297 301ü 297 301ü +4ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 4407. Fri’s Sales: 1,556 Fri’s open int: 11454, up +1 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 1327 1340 1318ø 1325ø -6 May 14 1312ø 1326 1305 1312ü -5ü Jul 14 1293ø 1307ø 1288 1295ø -2ø Aug 14 1248ü 1260 1242ø 1249ø -1ø -4ø Sep 14 1176 1181ø 1167ü 1170 Nov 14 1118 1129 1114 1116ü -5ø Jan 15 1126 1133fl 1120 1121 -5ø Mar 15 1131 1136ø 1123fl 1125 -5ø May 15 1136ü 1137fl 1127 1127 -4ø Jul 15 1137ø 1138ø 1130ø 1130ø -3fl Aug 15 1125 1125 1121ü 1121ü -3fl Sep 15 1109fl 1109fl 1106ü 1106ü -3ø Nov 15 1110 1113ü 1101fl 1103ø -4fl Jan 16 1109ü 1109ü 1104fl 1104fl -4ø Mar 16 1109ü 1109ü 1104fl 1104fl -4ø May 16 1111ü 1111ü 1106fl 1106fl -4ø Jul 16 1109ø 1109ø 1105 1105 -4ø Aug 16 1105ø 1105ø 1101 1101 -4ø Sep 16 1082ø 1082ø 1078 1078 -4ø Nov 16 1062fl 1062fl 1060ü 1060ü -2ø Jul 17 1070ø 1070ø 1068 1068 -2ø Nov 17 1058ü 1058ü 1053 1053 -5ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 308361. Fri’s Sales: 201,616 Fri’s open int: 667899, up +12965

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Mar 14 100.05 100.55 99.11 100.06 Apr 14 99.59 99.89 98.59 99.44 May 14 98.76 99.06 97.89 98.65 Jun 14 97.89 98.71 97.19 97.81 Jul 14 97.04 97.31 96.38 96.99 Aug 14 96.16 96.36 95.52 96.11 Sep 14 95.53 95.54 94.62 95.23 Oct 14 94.66 94.70 94.05 94.40 Nov 14 93.83 93.93 93.07 93.66 Dec 14 93.00 93.25 92.39 92.97 Jan 15 91.87 92.22 91.85 92.15 Feb 15 91.68 91.68 91.23 91.38 Mar 15 90.71 Apr 15 90.11 May 15 89.58 Jun 15 88.89 89.30 88.73 89.06 Jul 15 88.42 Aug 15 87.83 Sep 15 87.29 87.33 87.29 87.33 Oct 15 86.85 Nov 15 86.07 86.43 86.07 86.43 Dec 15 86.32 86.35 85.67 86.04 Jan 16 85.56 85.56 85.51 85.51 Feb 16 85.05 85.05 85.02 85.02 Mar 16 84.57 Apr 16 84.16 Last spot N/A Est. sales 576203. Fri’s Sales: 617,648 Fri’s open int: 1616854, up +18831 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Mar 14 2.7525 2.7604 2.7160 2.7248 Apr 14 2.9302 2.9339 2.8960 2.9043 May 14 2.9245 2.9283 2.8925 2.9005 Jun 14 2.8996 2.9028 2.8703 2.8772 Jul 14 2.8667 2.8716 2.8414 2.8463 Aug 14 2.8322 2.8322 2.8005 2.8087 Sep 14 2.7822 2.7822 2.7550 2.7642 Oct 14 2.6258 2.6262 2.6082 2.6119 Nov 14 2.5748 2.5769 2.5624 2.5668 Dec 14 2.5603 2.5603 2.5395 2.5395

chg.

+.18 +.09 +.03 -.03 -.05 -.05 -.05 -.05 -.05 -.05 -.06 -.07 -.08 -.10 -.12 -.14 -.14 -.14 -.15 -.15 -.15 -.16 -.17 -.18 -.19 -.20

-.0241 -.0195 -.0200 -.0200 -.0194 -.0188 -.0189 -.0193 -.0193 -.0201

Raptors 108, Pelicans 101 TORONTO (AP) — Kyle Lowry had 19 points and 12 assists, Patrick Patterson scored a season-high 22 and the Toronto Raptors beat the New Orleans Pelicans. DeMar DeRozan also had 22 points, Terrence Ross added 14 and Tyler Hansbrough scored 12 for Toronto, which has won five consecutive meetings and seven of eight against New Orleans. The first-place Raptors moved three games ahead of Brooklyn in the Atlantic Division by winning for the ninth time in 11 home games. Tyreke Evans had 23 points and 10 assists, and Anthony Davis scored 19 for the Pelicans, who lost their second straight and have dropped four consecutive games in Toronto.

No. 17 Virginia 61, Maryland 53 CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — Joe Harris scored 19 points and Virginia stretched its winning streak to eight games by beating Maryland in its last visit as an ACC rival. Malcolm Brogdon added 14 points and Akil Mitchell had 13 for the Cavaliers (20-5, 11-1 Atlantic Coast Conference), who continued their best start in conference play since the 1981-82 team opened 12-1. Seth Allen scored 15 points and Dez Wells had 12 for Maryland (14-11, 6-6), which had won three of four. The victory was Virginia’s sixth straight in the series. As the clock wound down in the final minute, Cavaliers fans stood chanting “ACC! ACC!” to mock the Terrapins’ move to the Big 10 next season.

Jan 15 2.5295 Feb 15 2.5339 Mar 15 2.5479 Apr 15 2.6989 May 15 2.6969 Jun 15 2.6799 Jul 15 2.6574 Aug 15 2.6311 Sep 15 2.6011 Oct 15 2.4651 Nov 15 2.4316 Dec 15 2.4200 2.4200 2.4096 2.4096 Jan 16 2.4096 Feb 16 2.4116 Mar 16 2.4216 Apr 16 2.5466 Last spot N/A Est. sales 112097. Fri’s Sales: 163,260 Fri’s open int: 277952, up +4643 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Mar 14 4.660 4.787 4.563 4.579 Apr 14 4.450 4.519 4.244 4.406 May 14 4.429 4.493 4.382 4.395 Jun 14 4.451 4.516 4.410 4.421 Jul 14 4.482 4.547 4.440 4.456 Aug 14 4.490 4.537 4.444 4.449 Sep 14 4.456 4.511 4.410 4.426 Oct 14 4.465 4.529 4.423 4.439 Nov 14 4.527 4.575 4.476 4.484 Dec 14 4.625 4.691 4.598 4.604 Jan 15 4.752 4.791 4.155 4.701 Feb 15 4.732 4.732 4.155 4.647 Mar 15 4.590 4.623 4.155 4.546 Apr 15 4.090 4.190 4.028 4.037 May 15 4.015 4.190 3.986 3.986 Jun 15 4.030 4.190 3.997 3.997 Jul 15 4.028 4.190 4.014 4.014 Aug 15 4.050 4.190 4.021 4.021 Sep 15 4.155 4.190 4.007 4.007 Oct 15 4.155 4.190 4.031 4.031 Nov 15 4.087 4.190 4.070 4.073 Dec 15 4.244 4.244 4.155 4.233 Jan 16 4.370 4.370 4.068 4.363 Feb 16 4.345 4.345 4.068 4.336 Mar 16 4.310 4.310 4.068 4.283 Apr 16 4.068 4.165 3.933 3.933 Last spot N/A Est. sales 363263. Fri’s Sales: 447,561 Fri’s open int: 1274455, up +8385

METALS

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Mon. Aluminum -$0.7611 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.2657 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.2720 N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Lead - $2117.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9234 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1277.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1274.80 troy oz., NY Merc spot Mon. Silver - $20.145 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $20.099 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Platinum -$1390.00 troy oz., Handy & Harman. Platinum -$1385.90 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

-.0209 -.0209 -.0219 -.0199 -.0199 -.0199 -.0199 -.0199 -.0199 -.0199 -.0199 -.0199 -.0199 -.0199 -.0199 -.0199

-.196 -.110 -.095 -.091 -.085 -.085 -.086 -.086 -.087 -.087 -.086 -.081 -.073 -.022 -.018 -.018 -.018 -.018 -.018 -.018 -.018 -.016 -.016 -.014 -.012 -.002

Celtics 102, Bucks 86 MILWAUKEE (AP) — Jeff Green scored 29 points and Kelly Olynyk added 14 points and 11 rebounds as the Boston Celtics pulled away from the Milwaukee Bucks in the fourth quarter. The Celtics used a 12-4 run to start the final quarter to break open what had been a tight game. Green had seven points during the spurt and 11 overall in the quarter, while Olynyk scored 10 after Boston entered the fourth clinging to a 70-68 lead. Jared Sullinger added 13 points and 10 rebounds for Boston. Brandon Knight had 22 points for Milwaukee, which also got 17 points from Gary Neal and 16 points from John Henson.

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

MARKET SUMMARY

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 876106 16.72 -.10 S&P500ETF731146180.01 +.33 iShEMkts 644327 38.30 -.43 MktVGold 434270 24.70 +.79 GenMotors 427412 34.90 -1.21

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) RexahnPh 240835 InovioPhm 85880 AlldNevG 55748 Augusta g 42329 NwGold g 35645

Last 1.12 2.73 4.91 2.95 5.68

Chg -.06 +.16 +.11 +.67 +.17

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Cisco Facebook SiriusXM Zynga MicronT

Vol (00) 447731 429207 377291 356360 281360

Last 22.83 63.55 3.49 4.56 24.87

Chg +.16 -.77 +.01 +.03 +.36

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg AmrRlty 9.47 +1.78 +23.1 Augusta g 2.95 +.67 +29.4 CombiM wt 3.00 +1.58 +111.3 BioAmb wt 2.58 +.46 +21.7 HallwdGp 12.44 +2.71 +27.9 YouOnDm 5.62 +2.31 +69.8 32.95 +8.57 +35.2 DirGMnBull 30.74 +3.57 +13.1 GoldResrc 5.15 +.53 +11.5 Suprtex 8.72 +.92 +11.8 IncOpR 6.49 +.67 +11.5 ChinaInfo 5.20 +1.06 +25.6 hhgregg TrnsRty 15.49 +1.56 +11.2 AlexcoR g 2.06 +.17 +9.0 AutoNavi 20.57 +4.03 +24.4

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name BdwlkPpl DirGMBear CSVLgNGs DirDGdBr s NiskaGsSt

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg 13.01-11.08 24.77 -3.63 23.59 -2.77 25.40 -2.67 14.54 -1.31

DIARY

Volume

AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola Disney EOG Res EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

Name Versar HMG SwGA Fn LiberMed Sifco

1,809 1,282 120 3,211 65 17

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

3,219,163,475 Volume

52-Week High Low 16,588.25 13,784.01 7,591.43 5,789.20 537.86 462.66 11,334.65 8,700.73 2,471.19 2,186.97 4,246.55 3,105.37 1,850.84 1,485.01 19,776.59 15,674.94 1,182.04 894.24

Name

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

%Chg -46.0 -12.8 -10.5 -9.5 -8.3

Last 4.16 17.51 11.31 4.52 26.50

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg -.47 -10.2 NwstBio wt 2.65 -.34 -.99 -5.4 Changyou 26.74 -3.21 -.64 -5.3 IntriCon 4.31 -.51 -.23 -4.8 EchelonC 2.86 -.31 -1.16 -4.2 Reliv Intl 2.13 -.22

DIARY

253 150 24 427 9 3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

DIARY

148,609,916 Volume

INDEXES

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 15,801.79 7,171.47 506.70 10,050.40 2,310.71 4,148.17 1,799.84 19,235.41 1,118.73

Net Chg +7.71 -70.86 +2.85 -4.97 +11.36 +22.31 +2.82 +31.50 +2.18

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg Name

1.84f .90f .04 2.92f 4.00 1.12 .86f .75 3.68f 2.52 .50f .58 1.20a .90 3.80 2.64

10 12 17 21 10 20 21 43 10 10 11 11 8 13 12 19

32.44 65.68 16.72 127.16 111.69 38.57 77.06 174.20 54.15 89.52 14.84 28.81 43.74 24.29 177.14 91.07

+.14 -1.08 -.10 +.14 -.36 +.62 +1.39 -2.30 -.12 -1.06 -.13 -.26 -1.23 +.09 -.11 +1.03

-7.7 -4.2 +7.4 -6.8 -10.6 -6.6 +.9 +3.8 -5.4 -11.5 -3.8 +3.0 -12.0 -6.4 -5.6 -.6

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

%Chg -11.4 -10.7 -10.6 -9.7 -9.2

1,515 1,041 137 2,693 70 12

1,767,546,491

% Chg +.05 -.98 +.57 -.05 +.49 +.54 +.16 +.16 +.20

YTD % Chg -4.67 -3.10 +3.29 -3.36 -4.76 -.68 -2.63 -2.39 -3.86

52-wk % Chg +13.10 +21.36 +6.71 +12.69 -3.42 +29.96 +18.64 +20.04 +22.53

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

1.76f 1.12 2.92f .74f 2.27 1.04f 1.56 .16 1.20 1.27f .68e 2.12 1.88 .40 1.20 1.12

38 14 23 19 19 16 12 19 24 16 ... 12 14 15 12 15

54.89 +.12 36.80 +.24 54.52 +.57 24.38 +.05 80.60 +.38 31.47 +.25 72.27 -2.01 21.02 -.41 42.36 +.41 63.65 -.26 19.29 -.01 46.91 +.10 73.76 +.01 22.00 +.08 45.52 +.15 28.75 +.12

+9.7 -1.6 +3.6 +1.1 -2.8 +2.7 -6.3 +11.6 -3.5 -8.7 -3.5 -4.5 -6.3 -5.5 +.3 +2.9

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record Legals

ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE

Publish February 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 2014 PRIMARY ELECTION PROCLAMATION

Pursuant to the Primary Election Law, NMSA 1978 ยง 1-8-10 to 52 (1969, as amended through 2013), I, Susana Martinez, Governor of the State of New Mexico, by virtue of the authority vested in me, do hereby issue the following proclamation:

That a Primary Election is called to be held throughout the State of New Mexico and in each county and precinct thereof on June 3, 2014;

That a Primary Election shall be applicable to the following political parties: the Democratic Party and the Republican Party; and

That the Primary Election shall be for the purpose of permitting the Democratic Party and the Republican Party to nominate candidates for the following offices: ONE UNITED STATES SENATOR

SIX-YEAR TERM

THREE UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVES

District 1: Bernalillo county precincts 2 through 79, 81 through 83, 86 through 92, 94 through 99, 101 through 114, 116, 119 through 125, 131 through 144, 150 through 154, 161 through 166, 170, 171, 180 through 187, 191 through 197, 211, 212, 214 through 217, 221, 223 through 226, 241 through 246, 251 through 258, 271 through 275, 278, 281 through 287, 289 through 308, 311 through 318, 321 through 324, 326 through 333, 341 through 347, 351 through 358, 371 through 375, 381 through 387, 400 through 456, 461 through 466, 471 through 478, 480 through 500, 502 through 573 and 601 through 603; Sandoval county precincts 1 through 5, 28, 29, 38, 52, 55 through 57, 64, 74 and 76; Santa Fe county precincts 15, 73 and 84; Torrance county; and Valencia county precincts 6, 16, 22, 28 and Census tabulation block 3506119703031019 in Valencia county precinct 36, as defined in the Final Judgment and Order in the matter of Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., First Judicial District Court cause No. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidated).

District 2: Bernalillo county precinct 93; Catron county; Chaves county; Cibola county; De Baca county; Dona Ana county; Eddy county; Grant county; Guadalupe county; Hidalgo county; Lea county; Lincoln county; Luna county; McKinley county precincts 26, 27, 29 and 30; Otero county; Roosevelt county precincts 3 through 6, 10, 11, 19 and all of Roosevelt county precinct 2 except for Census tabulation block 350410002001111; Sierra county; Socorro county; and Valencia county precincts 1 through 5, 7 through 15, 17 through 21, 23 through 27, 29 through 35, 37 through 41 and all of Valencia county precinct 36 except for Census Tabulation block 350611973031019 as defined in the Final Judgment and Order in the matter of Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., First Judicial District Court cause No. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidated).

District 3: Bernalillo county precincts 1, 80, 84, 85, 115, 117, 118 and 127 through 129; Colfax county; Curry county; Harding county; Los Alamos county; McKinley county precincts 1 through 25, 28, 31 through 50 and 52 through 59; Mora county; Quay county; Rio Arriba county; Roosevelt county precincts 1, 7 through 9, 12, 13, 15, 17, 18, 21 and Census tabulation block 350410002001111 in Roosevelt county precinct 2; San Juan county; San Miguel county; Sandoval county precincts 6 through 27, 30 through 37, 39 through 51, 53, 54, 58 through 63, 65 through 73, 75 and 78 through 86; Santa Fe county precincts 1 through 14, 16 through 72, 74 through 83 and 85 through 88; Taos county; and Union county as defined in the Final Judgment and Order in the matter of Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., First Judicial District Court cause No. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidated).

STATE, DISTRICT AND METROPOLITAN OFFICES

ONE GOVERNOR ONE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR ONE SECRETARY OF STATE ONE STATE AUDITOR ONE STATE TREASURER ONE ATTORNEY GENERAL ONE COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC LANDS

ONE JUDGE OF THE COURT OF APPEALS

SEVENTY MEMBERS OF THE STATE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

TWO YEAR TERM

TWO YEAR TERM

TWO YEAR TERM

FOUR-YEAR TERM FOUR-YEAR TERM FOUR-YEAR TERM FOUR-YEAR TERM FOUR-YEAR TERM FOUR-YEAR TERM FOUR-YEAR TERM

TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM

Districts 1-70, as defined in the Final Judgment and Order issued by the court in the matter of Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., First Judicial District Court cause No. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidated).

TWO YEAR TERM

District 2: Bernalillo county precincts 303, 551 through 559 and 570 through 573; Chaves county; Colfax county; Curry county; De Baca county; Eddy county; Guadalupe county; Harding county; Lea county; Lincoln county precincts 1, 3 through 5, 12, 14 through 16 and 19; Mora county precincts 3 and 7 through 11; Otero county precincts 1 through 13, 19, 20, 22 through 33, 35 and 37 through 41; Quay county; Roosevelt county; San Miguel county precincts 1 through 22 and 24 through 28; Santa Fe county precincts 15, 18, 19, 73, 84 and 85; Torrance county precincts 1 through 9 and 11 through 16; and Union county as defined in the Final Judgment and Order in the matter of Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., First Judicial District Court cause No. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidated).

FOUR YEAR TERM

THREE MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC REGULATION COMMISSION

District 4: Bernalillo county precincts 31 through 38, 40 through 56, 58 through 67, 71 through 77, 88, 90 through 99, 101 through 106, 109, 122 through 124, 132, 133, 135 through 144, 214, 217, 221 and 223 through 226; Cibola county; McKinley county; Rio Arriba county precincts 24 through 27, 29 and 30; San Juan county; Sandoval county precincts 7 through 10, 14 through 27, 78 and 79; Santa Fe county precincts 12 and 72; Socorro county precincts 15 and 26; and Valencia county precincts 13 as defined in the Final Judgment and Order in the matter of Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., First Judicial District Court cause No. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidated).

FOUR YEAR TERM

District 5: Catron county; Dona Ana county; Grantcounty; Hidalgo county; Lincoln county precincts 2, 6 through 11, 13, 17, 18, 20 and 21; Luna county; Otero county precincts 14 through 18, 21, 34 and 36; Sierra county; Socorro county precincts 1 through 14 and 16 through 25; Torrance county precincts 10; and Valencia county precincts 1 through 12 and 14 through 41 as defined in the Final Judgment and Order in the matter of Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., First Judicial District Court cause No. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidated).

FOUR YEAR TERM

District 2: Bernalillo county precincts 289 through 302, 304 through 308, 316 through 318, 321 through 324, 328 through 333, 406 through 410, 413 through 430, 440, 447 through 454, 456, 461 through 466, 471 through 478, 480 through 500, 502 through 550, 560 through 569 and 601 through 603, as enumerated in laws of 2011, 1st Special Session, Chapter 4, Section 7.

FOUR YEAR TERM

SIX MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC EDUCATION COMMISSION

District 3: Bernalillo county precincts 2 through 19, 68, 69, 78, 79, 84 through 86, 89, 101 through 108, 116, 121 through 125, 131 through 133, 135, 150 through 154, 161 through 166, 171, 180 through 187, 191 through 197, 211, 212, 214 through 217, 221, 223 through 226, 241 through 246, 251 through 256, 271 through 275, 278, 281 through 287, 311 through 315, 326, 327, 341 through 347, 351 through 358, 371 through 375, 381 through 387, 400 through 405, 411, 412, 431 through 439, 441 through 446 and 455, as enumerated in laws of 2011, 1st Special Session, Chapter 4, Section 8.

FOUR YEAR TERM

District 4: Bernalillo county precincts 1, 80, 87, 115, 117, 118, 127 through TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM 129, 170, 303, 553 through 559 and 570 through 573; Los Alamos county; Sandoval county precincts 1 through 23, 27 through 76 and 78 through 86; and Santa Fe county precincts 11, 12, 15 through 19, 63, 72, 73, 80, 82, 84 and 85, as enumerated in laws of 2011, 1st Special Session, Chapter 4, Section 9.

District 5: McKinley county; Rio Arriba county precincts 24 and 29; San Juan TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM county; and Sandoval county precincts 24 through 26, as enumerated in laws of 2011, 1st Special Session, Chapter 4, Section 10.

District 6: Bernalillo county precincts 31 and 93; Catron county; Cibola county; Dona Ana county precincts 1 through 3, 60 and 95; Grant county; Hidalgo county; Luna county; Sierra county; Socorro county precincts 1 through 11 and 13 through 26; Valencia county, as enumerated in laws of 2011, 1st Special Session, Chapter 4, Section 11.

District 7: Dona Ana county precincts 4 through 59, 61 through 94 and 96 through 120; and Otero county precincts 1 and 41, as enumerated in laws of 2011, 1st Special Session, Chapter 4, Section 12.

TEN DISTRICT JUDGES

FOUR YEAR TERM

FOUR YEAR TERM

1st Judicial District, Divisions 1, 4, and 6 2nd Judicial District, Divisions 3 and 9 4th Judicial District, Division 1 5th Judicial District, Divisions 1 and 6 9th Judicial District, Division 3 12th Judicial District, Division 4

TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM

Division 7 Division 8 Division 13 Division 14 Division 15

TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM

FIVE JUDGES OF THE BERNALILLO COUNTY METROPOLITAN COURT

BERNALILLO COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 5

COUNTY OFFICES

B5

Legals

Primary Election Proclamation...

FEDERAL OFFICES

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

FOUR-YEAR TERM FOUR-YEAR TERM

CATRON COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE

CHAVES COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 5 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE TWO MAGISTRATE JUDGES DIVISION 1 DIVISION 2

CIBOLA COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE TWO MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2

COLFAX COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE TWO MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2

CURRY COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE TWO MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2

DE BACA COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE Division 1

DONA ANA COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE SIX MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2 Division 3 Division 4 Division 5 Division 6

EDDY COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 4 ONE COUNTY CLERK ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE PROBATE JUDGE THREE MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2 Division 3

GRANT COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE TWO MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2

GUADALUPE COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE Division 1

HARDING COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE Division 1

HIDALGO COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Position 1 Position 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE

LEA COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 2 District 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE FOUR MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2 Division 3 Division 4

LINCOLN COUNTY THREE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 2 District 4 District 5 ONE COUNTY CLERK ONE COUNTY TREASURER TWO MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2 LOS ALAMOS COUNTY FOUR COUNTY COUNCILORS ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE ONE MUNICIPAL JUDGE

LUNA COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE

MCKINLEY COUNTY THREE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2

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B6 Tuesday, February 11, 2014

CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record

Legals District 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE THREE MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2 Division 3

MORA COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE

OTERO COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE TWO MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2

QUAY COUNTY ONE COUNTY COMMISSIONER District 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE Division 1

RIO ARRIBA COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE TWO MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2

ROOSEVELT COUNTY THREE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 3 District 4 District 5 ONE COUNTY CLERK ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE SAN JUAN COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE SIX MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2 Division 3 Division 4 Division 5 Division 6

SAN MIGUEL COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE TWO MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2

SANDOVAL COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE THREE MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2 Division 3

SANTA FE COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE FOUR MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2 Division 3 Division 4

SIERRA COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE

SOCORRO COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE

TAOS COUNTY THREE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 District 5 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE TWO MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2

TORRANCE COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE Division 1 UNION COUNTY TWO COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 2 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE

VALENCIA COUNTY THREE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS District 1 District 3 District 5 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE THREE MAGISTRATE JUDGES Division 1 Division 2 Division 3

Legals FOUR-YEAR TERM TO FILL UNEXPIRED TERM FOUR-YEAR TERM FOUR-YEAR TERM FOUR-YEAR TERM FOUR-YEAR TERM FOUR-YEAR TERM

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FOUR-YEAR TERM FOUR-YEAR TERM FOUR-YEAR TERM

Declarations of candidacy by pre-primary convention designation and nominating petitions for the office of United States senator, United States representative, governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, state auditor, state treasurer, attorney general, commissioner of public lands and judge of the Court of Appeals shall be filed with the Secretary of State on Tuesday, February 4, 2014 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

Declarations of candidacy for retention for one justice of the Supreme Court and three judges of the Court of Ap-

peals for the General Election shall be filed with the Secretary of State on Tuesday, February 4, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Declarations of candidacy for retention for all affected district judicial offices for the General Election shall be filed with the Secretary of State on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Declarations of candidacy and nominating petitions for state representatives in multi-county legislative districts, district judges for partisan election, public education commissioners and public regulation commissioners shall be filed with the Secretary of State on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

Declarations of candidacy and nominating petitions for the five Bernalillo county metropolitan court judges for partisan election and state representatives in legislative districts wholly within one county or composed of only one county shall be filed with the respective county clerk on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

Declarations of candidacy and filing fees or, in lieu thereof, pauper statements for probate judges shall be filed with the respective county clerk on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

Declarations of candidacy and nominating petitions for the magistrate judges shall be filed with the respective county clerk on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

Declarations of candidacy and filing fees or, in lieu thereof, pauper statements for all other elective county offices shall be filed with the respective county clerk on Tuesday, March 11, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

Declarations of retention for the fourteen Bernalillo county metropolitan court judges for the General Election shall be filed with the Bernalillo County Clerk on Tuesday, March 11, 2014 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

Declarations of candidacy and nominating petitions for candidates who seek, but fail to receive pre-primary convention designation for a statewide office or the office of United States representative or United States senator shall be filed with the Secretary of State either ten days following the date of the pre-primary convention or on Tuesday, March 11, 2014 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., whichever is later.

Declarations of intent to be a write-in candidate for the offices of United States representative, members of the legislature representing multi-county districts, district judges, public regulation commissioners, public education commissioners, and statewide offices shall be filed with the Secretary of State on Tuesday, March 18, 2014 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Declarations of intent to be a write-in candidate for magistrate judge shall be filed with the respective county clerk on Tuesday, March 18, 2014, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

No state convention for designating Primary Election candidates shall be held later than Sunday, March 9, 2014.

Certificates of designation of Primary Election candidates shall be filed by political parties with the Secretary of State no later than 5:00 p.m. on the first Tuesday succeeding the state convention. SIGNED AT THE EXECUTIVE OFFICE THIS 27th DAY OF JANUARY 2014.

ATTEST:

WITNESS MY HAND AND THE GREAT SEAL OF THE STATE OF NEW MEXICO.

DIANNA J. DURAN SECRETARY OF STATE

SUSANA MARTINEZ GOVERNOR

PROCLAMACION DE ELECCION PRIMARIA

Conforme a la Ley de Elección Primaria, NMSA 1978 § 1-8-10 al 52 (1969,como enmendado hasta el año del 2013),Yo, Susana Martinez, Gobernadora del Estado de Nuevo México, por virtud de la autoridad otorgada a mí, por la presente emito la proclamación a continuación:

Que una Elección Primaria es convocada para que se lleve a cabo en todas partes del Estado de Nuevo México y en cada condado y precinto electoral del mismo, el día tres de junio del 2014;

Que la Elección Primaria será aplicable a los siguientes partidos políticos: el Partido Demócrata y el Partido Republicano; y Que la Elección Primaria tendrá el fin de permitir que el Partido Demócrata y el Partido Republicano nominen candidatos para los cargos a continuación: CARGOS FEDERALES

UN SENADOR DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS

PLAZO DE SEIS AÑOS

TRES REPRESENTANTES PARA EL CONGRESO DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS

Distrito 1: Condado de Bernalillo precintos 2 al 79, 81 al 83, 86 al 92, 94 al 99, 101 al 114, 116, 119 al 125, 131 al 144, 150 al 154, 161 al 166, 170, 171, 180 al 187, 191 al 197, 211, 212, 214 al 217, 221, 223 al 226, 241 al 246, 251 al 258, 271 al 275, 278, 281 al 287, 289 al 308, 311 al 318, 321 al 324, 326 al 333, 341 al 347, 351 al 358, 371 al 375, 381 al 387, 400 al 456, 461 al 466, 471 al 478, 480 al 500, al 573 y 601 al 603; Condado de Sandoval precintos 1 al 5, 28, 29, 38,52, 55 al 57, 64, 74 al 76; Condado de Santa Fé precintos 15, 73 al 84; Condado de Torrance; y Condado de Valeny el bloque de Tabulación del Censo cia precintos 6, 16, 22, 28 06119703031019 en el Condado de Valencia precinto 36, según onsta en la Decisión Definitiva Y Orden en el asunto de Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, Corte del Primer Distrito Judicial, causa núm. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidada).

Distrito 2: Condado de Bernalillo precinto 93; Condado de Catron; Condado de Chaves; Condado de Cibola; Condado de De Baca; Condado de Doña Ana; Condado de Eddy; Condado de Grant; Condado de Guadalupe; Condado de Hidalgo; Condado de Lea; Condado de Lincoln; Condado de Luna; Condado de McKinley precintos 26, 27, 29 y 30; Condado de Otero; Condado de Roosevelt precintos 3 al 6, 10, 11, 19 y todo el precinto 2 del condado de Roosevelt excepto por el bloque de tabulación del Censo 350410002001111; Condado de Sierra; Condado de Socorro; y Condado de Valencia precintos 1 al 5, 7 al 15, 17 al 21, 23 al 27, 29 al 35, 37 al 41 y todo el precinto 36 del Condado de Valencia excepto por el bloque de tabulación del Censo 350611973031019 según consta en la Decisión Definitiva y Orden en el asunto de Egolf Jr. et al. v. Duran, et al. Corte del Primer Distrito Judicial causa num. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidada).

Distrito 3: Condado de Bernalillo precintos 1, 80, 84, 85115, 117, 118, y 127 al 129; Condado de Colfax; Condado de Curry; Condado de Harding; Condado de Los Alamos; Condado de McKinley precintos 1 al 25, 28, 31 al 50 y 52 al 59; Condado de Mora; Condado de Quay ; Condado de Rio Arriba; Condado de Roosevelt precintos 1, 7 al 9, 12, 13, 15, 17, 18, 21, y el bloque de tabulación del Censo 350410002001111en el Condado de Roosevelt precinto 2; Condado de San Juan; Condado de San Miguel; Condado de Sandoval precintos 6 al 27, 30 al 37, 39 al 51, 53, 54, 58 al 63, 65 al 73, 75 y 78 al 86; Condado de Santa Fé precintos 1 al 14, 16 al 72, 74 al 83 y 85 al 88; Condado de Taos; y Condado de Union según consta en la Decisión Definitiva y Orden en el asunto de Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., Corte del Primer Distrito Judicial, causa num. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidada). UN UN UN UN UN UN UN UN

PLAZO DE DOS AÑOS

PLAZO DE DOS AÑOS

PLAZO DE DOS AÑOS

CARGOS DEL ESTADO, DISTRITO Y METROPOLITANOS

GOBERNADOR TENIENTE GOBERNADOR SECRETARIO DEL ESTADO AUDITOR DEL ESTADO TESORERO DEL ESTADO PROCURADOR GENERAL COMISIONADO DE TIERRAS PUBLICAS JUEZ DE LA CORTE DE APELACIONES

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO

SETENTA MIEMBROS DE LA CAMARA DE REPRESENTANTES DEL ESTADO

Distritos 1-70, según consta en la Decisión Definitiva y Orden en el asunto de Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al., Corte del Primer Distrito Judicial, causa núm. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidada).

PLAZO DE DOS AÑOS

TRES MIEMBROS DE LA COMISION DE REGULACION PUBLICA

Distrito 2: Condado de Bernalillo precintos 303, 551 al 559 y 570 al 573; Condado de Chaves; Condado de Colfax; Condado de Curry; Condado de De Baca; Condado de Eddy; Condado de Guadalupe; Condado de Harding; Condado de Lea; Condado de Lincoln precintos 1,3 al 5, 12, 14 al 16 y 19; Condado de Mora precintos 3 y 7 al 11; Condado de Otero precintos 1 al 13, 19,20,22 al 33, 35 y 37 al 41; Condado de Quay; Condado de Roosevelt; Condado de San Miguel precintos 1 al 22 y 24 al 28; Condado de Santa Fe precintos 15, 18, 19, 73, 84 y 85; Condado de Torrance precintos 1 al 9 y 11 al 16; y Condado de Union según consta en la Decisión Definitiva y Orden en el asunto de Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al. Corte del Primer Distrito Judicial causa núm. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidada).

Distrito 4 : Condado de Bernalillo precintos 31 al 38, 40 al 56, 58 al 67, 71 al 77, 88, 90 al 99, 101 al 106, 109, 122 al 124, 132, 133, 135 al 144, 214, 217, 221 y 223 al 226; Condado de Cibola; Condado de McKinley; Condado de Rio Arriba precintos 24 al 27, 29 y 30; Condado de an Juan; Condado de Sandoval precintos 7 al 10, 14 al 27, 78 y 79; Condado de Santa Fe precintos 12 y 72; Condado de Socorro precintos 15 y 26; y Condado de Valencia precinto 13, según consta en la Decisión Definitiva y Orden en el asunto de Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al.,Corte del Primer Distrito Judicial, causa núm. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidada).

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

Distrito 5 : Condado de Catron; Condado de Dona Ana; Condado de PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS Grant; Condado de Hidalgo; Condado de Lincoln precintos 2, 6 al 11, 13,17, 18, 20 y 21; Condado de Luna; Condado de Otero precintos 14 al 18, 21, 34 y 36; Condado de Sierra; Condado de Socorro precintos 1 al 14 y 16 al 25; Condado de Torrance precinto 10; y Condado de Valencia precintos 1 al 12 Y 14 al 41 según consta en la Decisión Definitiva y Orden en el asunto de Egolf Jr., et al. v. Duran, et al. Corte del Primer Distrito Judicial, causa núm. D-101-CV-2011-02942 (consolidada). SEIS MIEMBROS DE LA COMISION DE EDUCACION PUBLICA

Distrito 2 : Condado de Bernalillo precintos 289 al 302, 304 al 308, PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 316 al 318, 321 al 324, 328 al 333, 406 al 410, 413 al 430, 440, 447 al 454, 456, 461 al 466, 471 al 478, 480 al 500, 502 al 550, 560 al 569 y 601 al 603, según están enumerados en las Leyes del 2011, Primera Sesión Especial, Capítulo 4, Sección 7. Distrito 3 : Condado de Bernalillo precintos 2 al 19, 68, 69, 78, 79, 84 al 86, 89, 101 al 108, 116, 121 al 125, 131 al 133, 135, 150 al 154, 161 al

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS


CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record Legals

Distrito 4 : Condado de Bernalillo precintos 1, 80, 87, 115, 117, 118, 127 al 129, 170, 303, 553 al 559 y 570 al 573; Condado de Los Alamos; Condado de Sandoval precintos 1 al 23, 27 al 76 y 78 al 86; y Condado de Santa Fe precintos 11, 12, 15 al 19, 63, 72, 73, 80, 82, 84 y 85, según están enumerados en las Leyes del 2011 Primera Sesión Especial, Capítulo 4, Sección 9.

Distrito 5 : Condado de McKinley; Condado de Rio Arriba precintos 24 y 29; Condado de San Juan; y Condado de Sandoval precintos 24 al 26, según están enumerados en las Leyes del 2011, Primera Sesión Especial, Capítulo 4, Sección 10.

Distrito 6 : Condado de Bernalillo precintos 31 y 93; Condado de Catron; Condado de Cibola; Condado de Dona Ana precintos 1 al 3, 60 y 95; Condado de Grant; Condado de Hidalgo; Condado de Luna; Condado de Sierra; Condado de Socorro precintos 1 al 11 y 13 al 26; Condado de Valencia, según están enumerados en las Leyes del 2011, Primera Sesión Especial, Capítulo 4, Sección 11.

PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO

PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

Distrito 7 : Condado de Dona Ana precintos 4 al 59, 61 al 94 y 96 al PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS 120; y Condado de Otero precintos 1 y 41, según están enumerados en las Leyes del 2011, Primera Sesión Especial, Capítulo 4, Sección 12.

1er Distrito Judicial, Divisiones 1,4, y 6 2do Distrito Judicial, Divisiones 3 y 9 4to Distrito Judicial, División 1 5to Distrito Judicial, Divisiones 1 y 6 9no Distrito Judicial, División 3 12mo Distrito Judicial, División 4

PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO

División 7 División 8 División 13 División 14División 15

PARA LLENAR PARA LLENAR PARA LLENAR PARA LLENAR

CINCO JUECES DE LA CORTE METROPOLITANA DEL CONDADO DE BERNALILLO

FUNCIONARIOS EN LOS CONDADOS

CONDADO DE BERNALILLO DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 5 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS

CONDADO DE CATRON DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO

CONDADO DE CHAVES DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 5 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2

CONDADO DE CIBOLA DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 3 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2

CONDADO DE COLFAX DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2

CONDADO DE CURRY DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 3 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2

CONDADO DE DE BACA DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO División 1

CONDADO DE DOÑA ANA DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 3 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS SEIS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2 División 3 División 4 División 5 División 6

CONDADO DE EDDY DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 4 UN ESCRIBANO DE CONDADO UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS TRES JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2 División 3

CONDADO DE GRANT DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2

CONDADO DE GUADALUPE DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO División 1

CONDADO DE HARDING DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO División 1

CONDADO DE HIDALGO DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Posición 1

B7

Legals

166, 171, 180 al 187, 191 al 197, 211, 212, 214 al 217, 221, 223 al 226, 241 al 246, 251 al 256, 271 al 275, 278, 281 al 287, 311 al 315, 326, 327, 341 al 347, 351 al 358, 371 al 375, 381 al 387, 400 al 405, 411, 412, 431 al 439, 441 al 446 y 455, según están enumerados en las Leyes del 2011, Primera Sesión Especial, Capítulo 4, Sección 8.

DIEZ JUECES DE DISTRITO

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

Posición 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO

CONDADO DE LEA DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 2 Distrito 3 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS CUATRO JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2 División 3 División 4

CONDADO DE LINCOLN TRES COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 2 Distrito 4 Distrito 5 UN ESCRIBANO DE CONDADO UN TESORERO DE CONDADO DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2

CONDADO DE LOS ALAMOS CUATRO CONSEJEROS DE CONDADO UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO UN JUEZ MUNICIPAL

CONDADO DE LUNA DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO

CONDADO DE MCKINLEY TRES COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 Distrito 3 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS TRES JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2 División 3

CONDADO DE MORA DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO

CONDADO DE OTERO DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2

CONDADO DE QUAY UN COMISIONADO DE CONDADO Distrito 3 ONE COUNTY ASSESSOR ONE COUNTY SHERIFF ONE PROBATE JUDGE ONE MAGISTRATE JUDGE División 1

CONDADO DE RIO ARRIBA DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2

CONDADO DE ROOSEVELT TRES COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 3 Distrito 4 Distrito 5 UN ESCRIBANO DE CONDADO UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO

CONDADO DE SAN JUAN DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS SEIS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2 División 3 División 4 División 5 División 6

CONDADO DE SAN MIGUEL DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 3 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2

CONDADO DE SANDOVAL DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 3 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS TRES JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2 División 3

CONDADO DE SANTA FE DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 3 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS CUATRO JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 3 División 4

CONDADO DE SIERRA DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO

CONDADO DE SOCORRO DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 3 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS


B8 Tuesday, February 11, 2014 CONDADO DE TAOS TRES COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 Distrito 5 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS DOS JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2

CLASSIFIEDS

Legals

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

CONDADO DE TORRANCE DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO División 1

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

CONDADO DE UNION DOS COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 2 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS UN JUEZ MAGISTRADO

CONDADO DE VALENCIA TRES COMISIONADOS DE CONDADO Distrito 1 Distrito 3 Distrito 5 UN ASESOR DE CONDADO UN ALGUACIL DE CONDADO UN JUEZ DE SUCESIONES Y TESTAMENTOS TRES JUECES MAGISTRADOS División 1 División 2 División 3

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PARA LLENAR EL PLAZO NO VENCIDO PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS PLAZO DE CUATRO AÑOS

Las declaraciones de candidatura por designación en la convención pre-primaria y peticiones de nominación para la Oficina de senador de los Estados Unidos, representante de los Estados Unidos, Gobernador, teniente Gobernador, secretario del estado, auditor del estado, procurador general del estado, comisionado de tierras publicas y juez de la Corte de Apelaciones serán presentadas en la Oficina de la Secretaria de Estado el martes 4 de febrero, 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 pm.

Las declaraciones para que sigan desempeñando un cargo de juez de la Corte Suprema, y tres cargos de Juez de la Corte de Apelaciones para la elección general serán presentadas en la Oficina de la Secretaria de Estado el martes, 4 de febrero de 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m.

Las declaraciones de candidutura para la retención de todas las oficinas judiciales del distrito afectados para las elecciones generales deberán ser presentados ante la Secretaria de Estado el martes,11de marzo 2014, entre las horas de 9:00 am y 5:00 pm.

Las declaraciones de candidatura y peticiones de nominación para representantes del estado, miembros de la legislatura de distritos en multiples condados, jueces de distrito para una elección partidaria, comisionados para educación pública y comisionados para regulación públicas serán presentadas en la Oficina de la Secretaria de Estado el martes, 11 de marzo 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m.

Las declaraciones de candidatura y peticiones de nominación para los jueces de las cinco cortes Metropolitanas para eleccion partidista en el condado de Bernalillo y representantes del estado para distritos legislativos localizados dentro de un condado o que consisten únicamente de un condado, serán presentadas en la oficina del respectivo escribano de condado el martes, 11 de marzo de 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m.

Las declaraciones de candidatura y cuotas de presentación, o en vez de cuotas de presentación, declaraciones en forma pauperis para los jueces de sucesiones y testamentos serán presentadas en la oficina del respectivo escribano del condado el martes, 11 de marzo 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m.

Las declaraciones de candidatura y peticiones de nominación para los jueces juez magistrados serán presentadas en la oficina del respectivo escribano del condado el martes, 11 de marzo 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m.

Las declaraciones de candidatura y cuotas de presentación, para todos los otros cargos del condado serán presentados en la oficina del respectivo escribano del condado el martes, 11 de marzo 2014, entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m.

Las declaraciones de retención de los catorce jueces de la corte metropolitana del condado de Bernalillo el martes, 11 de marzo 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m.

Las declaraciones de candidatura y peticiones de nominación para candidatos que aspiran a la designación pre-primaria, elección para cargos públicos dentro del estado o para el cargo de Representante en el Congreso de los Estados Unidos pero no la reciben, serán presentadas en la Oficina de la Secretaria de Estado ya sea diez días a partir de la fecha de la convención pre-primaria o el martes, 11 de marzo 2014 entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m., lo cual de las dos sea posterior.

Las declaraciones de la intención del candidato por escrito para los cargos de Representante en el Congreso de los Estados Unidos, miembros de la Legislatura de distritos en multiples condados, Jueces de Distrito, comisionados de regulación pública, comisionados de educación pública y cualquier cargo público del estado serán presentadas en la Oficina de la Secretaria de Estado el martes, 18 de marzo 2014, entre las 9:00a.m. y las 5:00 p.m.

Las declaraciones de la intención del candidato por escrito para el juez magistrado serán presentadas con el respectivo escribano del Condado el martes 18 de marzo 2014, entre las 9:00 a.m. y las 5:00 p.m.

Ninguna de las convenciones del estado para designar candidatos para la Elección Primaria se llevara a cabo a más tardar el domingo 9 de marzo 2014.

Los partidos políticos presentarán los certificados para designaciones de candidatos en la Elección Primaria en la Oficina de la Secretaria de Estado, no más tardar, a las 5:00 p.m el primer martes despues de la Convención. HECHO EN LA OFICINA EJECUTIVA ESTE DIA 27 DE ENERO, 2014.

DOY FE:

DANDO FE DE MI FIRMA Y EL GRAN SELLO DEL ESTADO DE NUEVO MEXICO.

DIANNA J. DURAN SECRETARIA DE ESTADO

Second Notice of Sale... Publish February 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT No. D-504-CV-2013-00201

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., vs.

Plaintiff,

JILL B. STANLEY,

Defendant.

SECOND NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that on March 5, 2014, at the hour of 11:30 am the undersigned Special Master, or her designee, will, at the west steps entrance of the Chaves County Courthouse, at 400 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88202, sell all of the rights, title and interest of the above-named Defendant, in and to the hereinafter described real estate to the highest bidder for cash. The property to be sold is located at 1000 W Deming Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88203, (if there is a conflict between the legal description and the street address, the legal description shall control) and is more particularly described as follows: LOT ONE (1) in BLOCK THREE (3) of LODEWICK ADDITION, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk's Office on April 10, 1944, and recorded in Book B of Plat Records, Chaves County, New Mexico, at Page 37,

including any improvements, fixtures, and attachments, such as, but not limited to, mobile homes. Subject to all taxes, utility liens and other restrictions and easements of record, and subject to a one (1) month right of redemption by the Defendant upon entry of an order approving sale. The foregoing sale will be made to satisfy a foreclosure judgment rendered

Legals

Legals

by this Court in the above-entitled and numbered cause on September 4, 2013, being an action to foreclose a mortgage on the above-described property. The Plaintiff's judgment is $86,702.44, and the same bears interest at the rate of 6.3500% per annum, which accrues at the rate of $15.08 per diem, commencing on September 24, 2013, with the Court reserving entry of final judgment against said Defendant Jill B. Stanley for the amount due after foreclosure sale, for costs and attorney's fees, plus interest as may be assessed by the Court. The Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale all of its judgment amount and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. The sale may be postponed and rescheduled at the discretion of the Special Master. The Court's decree, having duly appointed its Special Master to advertise and immediately offer for sale the subject real estate and to apply the proceeds of sale, first to the costs of sale and the Special Master's fees, then to pay the above-described judgment, interest, and costs of sale, and to pay unto the registry of the Court any balance remaining to satisfy future adjudication of priority mortgage holders; NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that in the event that said property is not sooner redeemed, the undersigned will as set forth above, offer for sale and sell to the highest bidder for cash or equivalent, the lands and improvements described above for the purpose of satisfying, in the adjudged order of priorities, the judgment described herein and decree of foreclosure together with any additional costs and attorney's fees, costs of advertisement and publication, a reasonable receiver and Special Master's fee to be fixed by the Court. The total amount of the judgment due is $86,702.44, plus interest to and including date of sale of $2,458.04 for a total judgment plus interest of $89,160.48. Sale is subject to the entry of an order of the Court approving the terms and conditions of this sale. Witness my hand this 31st day of January, 2014.

025. Lost and Found

Notice of Suit...

LOST 1-18-14 near Berrendo and Garden, Brown and white weiner dog, blue collar and Casa Querencia tag, health issues, reward. Call 443-340-8378

Publish February 4, 11, 18, 2014

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

LOST DOG, Reward, male gray miniature poodle, vicinity of Old Dexter Hwy & Poe. 575-910-4400

No. D-504-CV-2013-00164

BENEFICIAL FINANCIAL I INC., vs.

Plaintiff,

THE ESTATE OF BERNICE COSTIN A/K/A BERNICE EILEEN COSTIN, DECEASED, CASSANDRA KERMODE, AS KNOWN HEIR AND AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES AND LEGATEES OF BERNICE COSTIN A/K/A BERNICE EILEEN COSTIN, DECEASED, Defendants.

NOTICE OF SUIT

TO: DEFENDANTS, UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND LEGATEES OF BERNICE COSTIN A/K/A BERNICE EILEEN COSTIN, DECEASED,

You are hereby notified that a civil action has been filed against you in the District Court of Chaves County, New Mexico, by Plaintiff, Beneficial Financial I Inc., in which Plaintiff prays for foreclosure on its Note and Mortgage on real property located in Chaves County, New Mexico, as described in the claim in said cause against Defendants named above, that the said real property be sold according to law and practice of this Court to pay the lien of the Plaintiff, and that the interest of the Defendants, and each of them, and all persons claiming under or through them and all other persons bound by these proceedings be barred and foreclosed of all rights, interest of claims to said real property, and for such other and further relief as the Court may deem just and proper. The property involved is the real estate and improvements located at 911 East Hermosa, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, and more particularly described as: Lots 17 and 18 in Block 5 of Linda Vista Estates Number 5 Redivision, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk's Office on April 13, 1962 and recorded in Book D, Page 9, Real Property Records of Chaves County, New Mexico,

including any improvements, fixtures, and attachments, such as, but not limited to, mobile homes. If there is a conflict between the legal description and the street address, the legal description shall control. You are further notified that unless you enter or cause to be entered your appearance or file responsive pleadings or motions in said cause within thirty (30) days of the third consecutive publication of this Notice of Suit, judgment will be rendered in said cause against you and each of you by default, and the relief prayed for will be granted. The name of the attorneys for Beneficial Financial I Inc. is Rose L. Brand & Associates, P.C., 7430 Washington Street, NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87109, Telephone: (505) 833-3036. BY ORDER OF the Honorable Freddie J. Romero, District Judge of the Fifth Judicial District Court of the State of New Mexico, and the Seal of the District Court of Chaves County, entered on January 22, 2014. By:/s/Janet Bloomer DEPUTY CLERK

Legals

Legals

Notice of Hearing... Publish February 18, 2014

11,

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF CHAVES STATE OF NEW MEXICO

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MARION K. CAVIN, Deceased

D-504-PB-2014-000088

SUSANA MARTINEZ GOBERNADORA

Legals

Roswell Daily Record

NOTICE OF HEARING BY PUBLICATION

Unknown heirs of To: Marion K. Cavin, deceased, and all unknown persons who have or claim any interest in the estate of Marion K. Cavin, deceased.

You are hereby notified that a hearing on the Petition filed by the undersigned requesting the Court enter a judicial order formally probating the decedent's Will, a determination of the heirs of the decedent, the appointment of the undersigned as Formal Personal Representative of the estate, without bond in an unsupervised administration, and the issuing of Letters Testamentary to Petitioner, will be held in the Chaves County District Court, 400 N. Virginia, Roswell, Chaves County, New Mexico 88201, on the 17th day of March, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. DATED this 6th day February, 2014.

DISTRICT CLERK

COURT

BY:/s/Cynthia Brackeen

SANDERS, BRUIN, COLL & WORLEY, P.A. By:/s/ Steven P. Fisher Steven P. Fisher Attorneys for Petitioner P.O. Box 550 Roswell, NM 88202-0550 (575) 622-5440

/s/ Bernadette F. Gutierrez - Electronically Filed BERNADETTE F. GUTIERREZ, Special Master PO Box 91988 Albuquerque, NM 87199-1988 Telephone: (505) 433-4576 Facsimile: (505) 433-4577 E-mail: bernadette@ancillaryls.com

VISIT US ONLINE AT RDRNEWS.COM

Notice to Creditors... Publish February 18, 2014

11,

STATE OF NEW MEXCOUNTY OF ICO CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN R. JOHNSON, Deceased Case#D-504-PB-2014-00010

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of this estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the Personal Representative, Jovan E. Johnson, c/o the Law Office of Benjamin Hancock, One Towne Centre, 6121 Indian School Road NE, Suite 206, Albuquerque, NM 87110, or filed with the Fifth Judicial District Court of Chaves County, New Mexico.

DATED: 2014

February 6,

/s/Jovan E. Johnson Personal Representative

Respectfully submitted, LAW OFFICE OF BENJAMIN HANCOCK, P.C.

/s/Benjamin Hancock One Towne Centre 6121 Indian School Road NE, Suite 206 Albuquerque, NM 87110 Phone 505-508-4343 Fax 505-508-4323

GARAGE SALES

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice LOOKING FOR BROTHER born 1941 -1942 in Albuquerque, NM in a girls home-orphanage, mother from Roswell, father from Albuquerque, father’s last name Majors 209-573-1130 PUBLIC NOTARY available. 575-910-5219

030. Education & Instructions

MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant!NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC Train gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-888-926-6073

045. Employment Opportunities

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

PECOS VALLEY Broadcasting has immediate openings for Advertising Sales Representatives. Help local businesses grow their business by selling them advertising our or many platforms including radio, video and digital. Base salary plus generous commission program. We’ll train! Apply with Gene Dow VP & GM, hireme@pvbcradio.com PVBC is an Equal Opportunity Employer! Women and minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. The Roswell Daily Record is currently accepting applications for the position of General Assignment Reporter. Previous reporting experience or strong writing skills required. Applications are available at the Record at 2301 N. Main St. Application materials can also be mailed to: Roswell Daily Record, Attn: Editor, PO Box 1897, Roswell,NM or emailed to editor@rdrnews.com No phone calls, please.

TEMPORARY JOBS for 1 Ranch worker. Needed to care for and feed cattle and horses. Mow, bail hay, weld, build fences. $10.86/hr, 6 days a week, housing available and equipment provided. 3/1/14 through 12-1-14. Transportation reimbursed if necessary when 50% of job is completed. W. Staley, Weston, TX. Apply for this job at the state workforce agency using job listing number TX6924430.

EMPLOYEES NEEDED for growing constructions company, any construction experience helpful, supervisors and laborers needed. Call 623-1824 or come by #4 Wool Bowl for application. LEARN TO drive in 5 short weeks. Artesia Training Academy has new classes forming. CDL Class A with endorsements. VA approved. 20 years of service to South East New Mexico. Call for more information 575-748-9766 or 1-888-586-0144 visit us at www.artesiatraining.com or visit us on Facebook. ROSWELL NISSAN is currently looking for a dependable, hard working, detailed oriented individual for the position of Detailer/Lot Attendant. Apply online at www.roswellnissan.com

MEDICAL ASSISTANT wanted for front desk experience and billing encoding and insurance verification. Please bring resume to 313 W. Country Club, Suite #10 and ask for Office Manager, Karen.

HR GENERALIST Immediate position open for an experienced Human Resource professional preferably with a PHR certification in Artesia. Must have a minimum of 5 years general clerical and HR related experience. Will be responsible for interviewing and new hire processing and administering progressive discipline, and payroll processing. Please submit cover letter and resume to asalmon@highdesertfs.com

Tired of being underpaid and overworked? Stop right here! 15 people needed, no experience necessary, rapid advancement, earn incentive, vacations, start earning potential of $400 weekly per start per agreement. Call to set interview 575-578-4817

045. Employment Opportunities

FULL-CHARGE BOOKKEEPER well established Construction Company, RHOADS, CO. Must have: Min 5 yrs exp w/bookkeeping skills incl. payroll, AR, AP & job cost. Skills: Computer, w/proficiencies in Word & Excel. Knowledge of “The Construction Manager” & an Accounting Degree a plus. Must be people person w/good character & ability to multi-task. Salary determined w/qualifications. Benefits: Retirement plan & health insurance. Send cover letter, resume and references to rmays@rhoadsco.com or to Human Resources, PO Box 2899, Roswell, NM 88202. www.RHOADSCO.com The New Mexico Youth Challenge Academy is seeking qualified individuals to fill multiple Cadre positions to train and mentor 16-18 year old high school dropouts in a Quasi-Military environment. Qualified applicants must have a high school diploma or GED, minimum of two years experience working with youth and a valid driver’s license. To apply, go to the State Personnel Office Website. http://www.spo.state.nm.us For more information contact: CPT Chris Lara @ 575-347-7601 Ritter & Company, LLC, Certified Public Accountants, has an immediate opening for a full charge bookkeeper. Successful candidate will have significant experience using QuickBooks and a working knowledge of Microsoft Excel and Word. This position provides multiple clients with payroll, payroll taxes, gross receipts tax, general ledger and QuickBooks training services. Candidate must be organized and be able to multi task and work under pressure. Competitive salary and benefits with a causal work environment. To apply please email resume and cover letter to Jim Hill at jhill@rcocpa.com or mail to P.O Box 1836, Roswell, NM 88202-1836

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Wanted Full Time: Job entails answering phones, filing, light bookkeeping, scheduling, selling/renting items and miscellaneous needs. Person needs to great with customers, trustworthy, dependable and have transportation. Knowledge of computers is a plus. Please apply in person with resume at 1607 N. Garden 8-4 Mon-Fri. EOE CLASS A CDL drivers for Roswell Carlsbad area:

AZ based trucking co seeking qualified candidates for multiple pickups/deliveries in SE NM. Qualified candidates must possess a clean driving record with hazmat & doubles endorsements. Please do not respond if you do not meet all of these requirements. Great hourly wage and home every night. Please email work history ( resume) to criser@cazfrt.com Hiring for Housekeeping, PT, also FT. Only experienced housekeepers need apply. $7.50/hr. To fill out application come by Budget Inn North, 2101 N. Main St, 9am-5pm. TAKING APPLICATIONS for CDL Instructors. Great opportunity to share your experience and skills. Must have 5 years driving experience, a clean driving record. 575-748-9766 DEAN BALDWIN Painting is currently seeking a Purchasing Manager for its Roswell, NM facility. The right candidate should have a Strong Knowledge of inventory Control practices, and is responsible for entering purchase orders and coordinating delivery. Please apply at Dean Baldwin Painting or Online at www.deanbaldwinpainting.com

The Roswell Job Corps Center is accepting resumes for substitute instructors to instruct students, ages 16-24 in any of these areas: Academics (Reading & Math); Health Occupations; Painting; Facilities Maintenance; Law Enforcement; Culinary Arts; Auto Repair; or Electrical. Education: A High School Diploma plus a minimum of 50 college hours. Hours are from 7:30 am to 4:00 pm. Minimum salary is $15.00 an hour. Interested applicants must submit a resume and credentials to gonzalez.mary@ jobcorps.org. Career Opportunities is an Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V. THE SLIPPER gentlemen’s club South of Artesia is now hiring Dancer’s. Must be 18 yrs old or older, no experience necessary. Stop y 6110 7 River’s Hwy or call 505-402-6777 BUTCH’S RATHOLE & ANCHOR SERVICE Now hiring Class A CDL drivers for Artesia, NM yard. Insurance & 401K. 575-513-1482, Garry. Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR


CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record

045. Employment Opportunities

OPTOMETRIC OFFICE seeking receptionist for a 1/2 day/afternoon position. Duties include: answering phone, making appointments, checking in/out patients and general clerical duties. PO Box 1897, Unit #366 Roswell, NM 88202

045. Employment Opportunities

BILLY RAY’S is now taking applications for Experienced Servers. Must be 21 years of age and liquor certified. Old applicants please re-apply. Apply in person at 118 E. 3rd. No phone calls. Excellent Opportunity Full Time for a reliable outgoing Assistant Manager in a professional office. Strong customer skills & attention to details required, willing to learn and be self motivated. WILL TRAIN THE PROPER PERSON. Must have reliable transportation, valid driver’s license & auto insurance. Mon-Fri 40 hours/week. Apply in person at 2601 N. Main, Suite C, No Phone Calls. GUARDSMARK The nation’s leader in security is hiring security officers. No experience required, but customer service skills a must. Must be HS Grad/GED & 21 yrs. EOE Benefits: Free Life Ins. Uniforms/Tuition Assistance. Starting Pay $9.00hr. Apply by calling 505-830-2700 Tues-Fri. 9am-6pm.

TEMPORARY FARM Labor: Bruce & Devon White, LaWard, TX, has 2 positions for corn & cotton; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.86/hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 3/15/14 – 12/15/14. Apply at nearest NM Workforce Office with Job Order TX4957875 or call 505-383-2721.

045. Employment Opportunities

ALBERTSONS IS currently taking applications for experienced cake decorator. Please apply at www.albertsons.com The Roswell Job Corps Center is accepting resumes for a Purchasing Specialist who will be responsible for purchasing materials, equipment, and contract services for the Center. A Bachelor’s degree is preferred. Must have three years experience in purchasing, FAR background, and excellent computer skills. Interested applicants must submit a resume and credentials to gonzalez.mary@ jobcorps.org. Career Opportunities is an Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V. DEXTER CONSOLIDATED SCHOOLS Notice of Vacancy Bus Assistant

Accepting Applications until filled

Applications are available from Human Resources, PO Box 159, Dexter, NM 88230 or on our website www.dexterdemons.org and choose Employment/Applications for Employment. Preliminary screening will be made on the basis of information received. Selected applicants will be invited to interview. The Dexter Consolidated School District is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, national origin, religion, age, sex, marital status or disability in compliance with federal and state laws.

045. Employment Opportunities

The Roswell Job Corps Center is accepting resumes for a Career Technical Education Clerk who will be responsible for providing clerical services to the Technical and Education departments. Job requirements are: a High School diploma, three years experience in the clerical or secretarial field, and excellent computer skills. Interested applicants must submit a resume and credentials to gonzalez.mary@ jobcorps.org. Career Opportunities is an Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/D/V.

OUR COMPANY is looking for a professional and friendly Maintenance/ Handyman. You will be in charge of building maintenance for an established Roswell business. Applicants must have experience in building maintenance or comparable position and must have a valid drivers license and be able to pass a drug test. Send Resume to: Application Po Box 85 Roswell NM 88201 CONSTRUCTION HELPER positions open for concrete, drywall, carpenter. Benefits include retirement program, paid vacation/holidays, tool allowance, mileage. Valid driver license, good driving record, and DT required. Applications at 7 Petro Dr., Roswell. No phone calls please.

110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair

TEMPORARY FARM Labor: T&R Farms, Dalhart, TX, has 1 positions for hay & grain; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.86/hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 3/21/14 – 12/20/14. Apply at nearest NM Workforce Office with Job Order TX2736918 or call 505-383-2721. ROSWELL JOB CORPS is currently accepting resumes for the following vacancies:

Independent Living Advisor – two positions On-call Independent Living Advisors Supervise students while in the dormitory and on Center sponsored activities Qualifications High School Diploma or GED, Associates degree preferred. Valid drivers license and good driving record. Please email resume to aranda.irma@jobcorps.org

CIRCLE ME, if you are in need of extra money, if you are ambitious, if you are available immediately call 575-578-4817

ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER JOBS in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper to place your ad or log onto www.nmpress.org for more information.

225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets

320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX Announcements 005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found Instruction 030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted Employment 045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F Services 070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare

2 TEMP positions: Ag. Equipment Operator, 03/02/14 to 12/31/14. We offer $10.86 p/hr at the time work is performed. Housing provided, 48 hrs p/wk. 3/4 guarantee, and transportation and subsistence expenses to worksite paid after 50% completion of contract. Tools, equipment provided at no cost. Duties: drive, plant, harvest, store grain, repair operate tractor, rock picker, plow, disc, drill, harvest equip, sprayer, grain truck. Minimum 3 months experience. Must be able to obtain a driver’s license within 30-90 days of hire. Isaacs Farms, LLC, Turpin, OK. Interested? Apply at nearest OK State Workforce Agency, or call 580-468-1814, job order #OK864678.

045. Employment Opportunities

KELLY CABLE of NM is now taking application for CDL drivers class A class B. Utility workers must have communication work experience, must have references and valid driver’s license. 1303 E. McGaffey LOCAL INSURANCE office seeks a career-oriented service professional. Position best suits individual who is passionate about serving customers, taking on challenges, attentive to detail, excellent communication and multi-tasking skills. Company will invest in training and offers opportunity for growth. Email resume to: resume9393@gmail.com 4 TEMP positions: Crop Farmworker, 03/16/14 to 12/31/14. We offer $10.89 p/hr at the time work is performed. Housing provided, 48 hrs p/wk. 3/4 guarantee, and transportation and subsistence expenses to worksite paid after 50% completion of contract. Tools, equipment provided at no cost. Duties: drive, plant, harvest, store grain, repair operate tractor, rock picker, plow, disc, drill, harvest equip, sprayer, grain truck. Minimum 3 months experience. Must be able to lift 60 lbs. Basic literacy and arithmetic required. Mike & Jim Kruse Partnership, Ft. Lupton, CO. Interested? Apply at Adam’s County Workforce & Business Center, or call 720-523-6943, job order #CO5737869. PARALEGAL Fast paced law office seeking energetic, dependable person for full time position. This position requires a team player with strong word processing skills including proficiency with word and WordPerfect, superior clerical and organizational skills, bilingual preferred. Excellent work environment. Send letter of interest and resume to PO Box 3171, Roswell, NM 88202. OFFICE HELP needed for busy and growing companies. Applicant must have computer experience, knowledge of office procedures, strong basic math and spelling skills, honest, and dependable. Duties will include answering phones, working with time cards, posting, typing, internet e-mail, filing, QuickBooks, and many other duties that may turn up. This is not connected to the medical field. Please send resume to PO Box 1897, Unit 368, Roswell, NM 88202.

ADVANCED HOME CARE of Roswell, is hiring for the position of CNA/caregiver we offer competitive pay and flexible hours. Please call 627-6256 ask for Jamie

435 Welding 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted Financial 455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities Real Estate 490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

080. Alterations

Dennis the Menace

B9

ALTERATIONS & Misc. Sewing - 840-8065.

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 ALL SEASONS in & out you will not be dissapointed, ref. Beth 347-5270

200. Fencing

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100 M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

210. Firewood/Coal

CEDAR, PINON firewood seasoned/split. $260 deliver/stacked 420-4532. MOUNTAIN WOOD for sale, Delivery available. 575-420-5124 or 347-0156 FIREWOOD, oak, pinon, cedar, fur, elm, well season, full or half cord, you pick up or delivered. Call Buz 575-420-9751 or Graves Farm 575-622-1889. FIREWOOD, HALF a cord $150 and a cord $300. Delivered and stack, 678-464-0942 Lori 770-990-9543

220. Furniture Repair WE BUILD and repair furniture. 840-7849 or 626-8466

225. General Construction

www.senaconstruction.com 575-973-1019 Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

230. General Repair

MINOR REPAIRS can make major changes in your home, Call Home Solutions 575-420-9183.

232. Chimney Sweep

CHIMNEY SWEEP Have your woodstove, fireplace, or pellet stove inspected and cleaned. Dust free Guarantee. 39 yrs Exp., Licensed, Insured. Bulldog Janitorial Services 575-308-9988

530 Real Estate Wanted Rentals 535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent Merchandise 605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales,

235. Hauling PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738 RWC. BACKHOE, skid steer, dump truck, bom lift, services. Insured. Call Hector 575-910-8397. www.rancheroswelding.com

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork Garcia’s Lawn Service, sprinklers & much more at low price. 914-0803. Winter Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242.

Lawn and Landscape Maintenance One time or recurring service available 575-973-1019 Yard work, clean-ups, lawns. Handyman svc. David 637-9580. WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121. Emerald Landscaping Lawn & sprinkler installation, sprinkler repair, sod, gravel, lawn maintenance. Maintenance/Free Estimates/accept credit cards. Lic#89265. Call: Aaron, 575-910-0150 or Chris, 420-3945

Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

CHAVEZ SPRINKLER CO. COMPLETE LANDSCAPING AND SPRINKLER SYSTEM & REPAIRS, ROCK WORK, TREES, SHRUBS, TRACTOR & DUMP TRUCK WORK. FREE ESTIMATES. CALL HECTOR 420-3167

285. Miscellaneous Services

STRUGGLING WITH YOUR MORTGAGE AND WORRIED ABOUT FORECLOSURE? REDUCE YOUR MORTGAGE & SAVE MONEY. LEGAL LOAN MODIFICATION SERVICES. FREE CONSULTATION. CALL PREFERRED LAW 1-800-915-0432 Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-661-3783, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.

310. Painting/ Decorating EXTERIOR/INTERIOR, INSURED. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

www.rancheroswelding.com

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. Call 637-9108.

345. Remodeling

NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale Recreational 750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted Transportation 790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


B10 Tuesday, February 11, 2014 345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153.

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Professional Roofing, Landscaping, Irrigation, Stucco, Tile, Painting, Concrete and Fence Work (575) 973-1019 RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397 www.rancheroswelding.com

395. Stucco Plastering

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991 RWC Lath and Stucco. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

www.rancheroswelding.com

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217

400. Tax Service

ANAYA Gross Receipts Consulting & Tax Service. Contact us to Anayalate your tax problems. Over 25 yrs. exp. Personal & Business. Compare our prices/we e-file. 575-623-1513 508 W. 2nd St. I TIN’S Welcome

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

8AC, 7.2AC senior water rights, horse & hay barns, arena, 3/2/2 brick home, in EGP. Melodi Salas, 626-7663, Ranchline / Taylor & Taylor Realtors.

500. Businesses for Sale

FOR LEASE or rent 7000sq ft building, with office, 416 E 2nd. Call 575-625-0656 Ask for Dean SELF STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE, 104 UNITS, PLUS EXCESS LAND, SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY. 317-0029

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

FSBO 40 acres N. Catron Co. 626-5807 financing avail. willing to subdivide

490. Homes For Sale

FSBO 3/2/1 Great Condition, lots of features & extras $91,000. 622-1204

FSBO, 3br/2ba, 1/2 acre farm track, large security, fenced in backyard, maintained well, 4610 Acacia Rd., $185K. 575-626-3275 2BR/1BA, LARGE living room w/laundry room, 409 W. Summit, 912 sqft, gross living area. 806-729-2383 FOR SALE 2br/1ba, fenced, refrig A/C. 1005 S. Plains Park. $52,000. 6 ACRES, 2800 sq ft home, 5br/3ba, updated 20,000 down. $1670app. North Roswell, owner can finance. 575-973-2353

3BR, 1 3/4ba, north part of town, 3110 N. Bandolina, 1 car garage, all new carpet, paint & roof, 2 blks from swimming pool. Priced to sell, $108,000. Owner may finance w/large down payment. 622-5031 or 420-1022

Immaculate custom home in Briar Ridge, 3yrs old, 3br/2ba, 81 Bent Tree Rd., $131,900. 831-915-0226 2BR/1BA PLUS large storage building, 1210 N Union, $3000 down $500 a month. $49,000. 575-416-1454

NICE 2BR/1BA unattached garage, 609 S. Union $59,000. $300 down, $500 month. 575-416-1454

2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331

2301 N. Grand Apt. A, 2br, 1.5ba, 1car garage & laundry room. 910-4225. 2 BR, $345m $200dep.. gas/water paid, 511 W. Mt. View Rd. #1. 317-4307 2BR & 1br, 1 bath, stove & refrigerator. Call 840-4333 or 910-8170. SPACIOUS, COMFORTABLE, clean 2bd/1ba, extra storage, water, gas pd. $600. 1114 S. Kentucky 910-7076 or 910-0851 Century 21 Home Planning 3117 N Main, 575-622-0021 3875 Hobson Apt A Studio $400 2405 S Sunset Apt A 2bed/1bath $550 36 C Bent Tree, 2bed/2bath $825 2008 Clover Lane 2bed/2bath $850 Please call or stop by for more listings

1111 N. Washington #13, 2br/2ba, detached laundry room. 910-4225 3br/2ba, no smoking/pets, close to Sierra school, $350/dep, $750/mo. 623-2617 2BR/1BA FENCED backyard, fridge/stove included, 1706 N. Kentucky. $600mo/500dep. 575-937-7491 AVAILABLE MARCH 1st.Townhouse at 3013 Alhambra, 3bd., 2bts., double garage. Frpl., fenced yard. Call Sherley Taylor, 575-42-1978 or 575-624-2219 3BR/1BA, $500/MO, $500/dep. Call Dean at 625-0656 or 420-6270. 3br/2ba, 2 car gar, No HUD, $1000/mo, $500/dep, 412 Evergreen. 910-1300 FORE RENT 2br/1ba + office space, $650/mo, $650/dep, 575-840-7568.

1br, appliances included, utilities pd, $575/mo, $300/dep, No pets. 317-3905

West Roswell, 5 acres, Capitan View, Covenants, No mobile homes. Lot #6 Avenida De Vista St. West of Mark Rd. $45,000. 626-2247

2Bd $85K w/house in bk & 3Bd $65K, fncd yrds, call M-Th 8a-noon, 624-1331

BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $592, 3br/2ba, $674, 5br/2ba $812, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge.

2401 S. Sunset, Mountain View Apartments, 2br/1ba, carport, laundry rm, I pay wtr, NO PETS or HUD. 575-910-6161

520. Lots for Sale

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

2BR/1BA, 1 yr lease, no pets, HUD accepted, $695/mo. 619-804-5713

REMODELED 2BR/2BA, all electric, w/d hookups, $650/mo, $500/dep. 910-0827

7 LOTS -corner of Lea & Horton, utilities avail.12,000 cash or 15,000 N payments with 3,000 down. 347-2277

Hector (575) 910-8397

1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331

THIS IS Ruidoso close to midcamp. Older mobile home, lots of extras, on two & one half lots, nice! $65K 806-340-1470

TREE TRIMMING, topping, and removal. Professional yard care. 910-4581

www.rancheroswelding.com

HOUSE FOR sale 2bd/1ba. #5 Hobbs place in Roswell. Call 840-7212

Good location, large 2br, w/d hookup, appliances, wtr pd. $550/mo, $350/dep, HUD ok. 575-914-0531

Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352.

435. Welding

EFF, 1,2 BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377

FSBO 4BR, 2ba, dbl wide on 1 acre, Artesia area. 575-626-4708

TREE TRIMMING and removal, free estimates, super clean up, 840-9105

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insuranced.

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

Century 21 Home Planning 3117 N Main, 575-622-0021 518 W Mc Gaffey 2bed/1bath $525 3 Hillcrest 2bed/1bath $800 1403 W Jaffa 3bed/2bath $800 838 Broken Arrow 3bed/2bath $1400 Please call or stop by for more listings

PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848.

Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

540. Apartments Unfurnished

CLASSIFIEDS

1200 W. Stone, 2 blocks west from N. Union, $7500. Terms 575-416-1454

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 SPACIOUS, COMFORTABLE 2bd/1ba very nicely furnished, WiFi, Call 910-7076 or 910-0851. 1114 S. Kentucky

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944. EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348.

There are jobs, and then there are jobs at Lovelace Regional Hospital. We’re about so much more than time clocks and paychecks. Here, our employees create higher and better standards for health care in the Southwest. It’s our legacy. If you or someone you know has what it takes to continue that legacy, Apply on line at: http://www.lovelacehealthsystemjobs.com/

Very nice 2br/1.5ba, Apartment. North location, garage, $800/mo, $400/dep, 1 yr lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535.

Town Plaza Apartments NO HUD ACCEPTED ALL UTILITIES PAID Friendly managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs & downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 2BR BILLS pd, $700 mo, $350 dep, Feb bal free with Mar rent & dep 624 1331 2br/1ba, w/d hkup + carport. 2313 N. Grand Apt B, 910-0099 for info.

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281

FOR RENT - 2br housefully furnished - 2 car garage across from golf course great location $850 plus utilities. Call 622-7770 or 910-2902 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 4BR/2BA, $650 3br/1ba $600. Al 575-703-0420 or Javier 420- 0666

2BR/1BA NEW carpet and paint, references, No HUD no pets, adults preferred. Call for appt. 575-626-5791 2706 S. Lea, Roswell, clean 3br/1ba, w/d hookups, refrig. & stove, no inside pet, $800/mo, $850/dep, no HUD. Ernie, 420-0744. INVITING STUDIO apt. 55+ community located at 2801 N. Kentucky Ave. included with rent, housekeeping, laundry facilities, cable and three meals daily. $850. Call 575-622-1656 3/2/2, NE on La Fonda Dr, $1200/mo, wtr pd, w/d avail., $600/dep, No Pets, Avail. 3/15. 575-627-7349 lv msg 2813 EMERALD 4 bdr/3bth Stove and refrigerator, references needed. $800/mo. plus utilities $600 dep. 575-910-2510 3BR/2BA, NEWLY remodeled, $500/dep, $950/mo. 303-944-8670

580. Office or Business Places 1139 S. MAIN Over 2200 sqft, all new plumbing, electrical, ref. air, wired for individual offices. $1500/mo. 626-6765

FOR LEASE, space in Sunwest Centre Office Complex at 500 N. Main St. Various size spaces. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. High floor space available for larger tenants. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 575-623-1652 or mobile 575-420-2546

580. Office or Business Places 114 E. 4th St.- South of Chaves County Court House 1625 sq. ft Ground floor Medical/Professional office space, plumbed & wired for dental office Cable for TV Contact Llano Land & Exploration @ 575-625-0144 PROFESSIONAL OFFICE, $600.00 monthly, Plus elec. three offices, new carpet, tile and paint. 104 E. Linda Vista Steve at 420-2100 200 S. Union. Two suites, approximately 1200 sqft and 810 sqft. Great location. Will remodel to suit tenant. Call Jan at 625-2222. FOR LEASE 3500 Sq. Ft. Excellent location, $1200 mo. $1200 dep. 1 yr lease required. 200 E. College, Call 317-5841 or 317-5796

585. Warehouse and Storage WAREHOUSE ONLY 9000 SF partial a/c & heat, security alarmed, 2 garage doors, 2 standard entry doors, $1000/mo. 2001 S. Main behind Family Furniture. 575-937-0889 or 575-257-0888

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

Commode chair, oxygen concentrator, walker, elevated toilet seat, 622-7638. FARM RANCH furniture, dressers, small kitchen table and chairs, microwave. 626-8466 FOR SALE 15” Roping saddle fab $300. 15” American barrel saddle $300. 15” Hereford all around $600 like new. Call 575-627-2237 NEED FURNITURE Shop Blair’s for the best prices on used furniture, beds, dressers, table & chairs, living room sets, patio sets, bookshelves, appliances, antiques, collectibles, home decor & housewares, saddles, tools, movies, plus lots more. Open daily 9-5, closes Wed. 627-2033

Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed! Power wheelchair, hospital bed, oxygen cyl. grab bars, lift chair. 622-7638 QUESTIONS ABOUT JESUS CHRIST? Any Question on the Bible is Answered. Open Forum/Dynamic Bible Query. Call 513-476-0486 Now: FamilyRadio.com OR LesFeldick.ORG WHITE WHIRLPOOL refrig like new, top freezer double door $300 347-2514 DIRECTV - Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call Now! Triple savings! $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!! Start saving today! 1-800-264-0340 DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-315-7043

Roswell Daily Record 605. Miscellaneous for Sale

25 FT flat bed trailer, two axle, $1800, 3 axle trailer $ 2,500. 4 trailer and blaid $2,200. 575-416-1454 SONY 32” flat screen TV $, TV cable with glass shelf, DVD player/video to set recorder $175 for all OBO 420-8333

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

ESTATE SETTLEMENT Never throw ANYTHING away before calling us! Our services include Auctions (our facility or yours), Tagged Estate Sales, Complete/Partial Buy-Outs & Real Estate Auctions, Firearms, Jewelry & Collectibles. Prompt removal of entire households and property cleanouts. Whether you need to sell a few items or an entire estate check with us and we will do our best to beat any offer you receive. Call today to find out how our experience can help you get more $$. Wild West Auctions, LLC 623-7355 or 840-8401 WANT TO buy 1956 RHS year book, Clardy’s milk bottle, 831-625-6126, Sue Clardy, PO Box 3136, Carmel, CA 93921.

FROZEN GREEN Chile, dried red chile & chile powder, local pinto beans, peanuts & pecan, ristras, jams & jellies, fountain drinks, fresh eggs, Alfalfa Hay, Wheat, Sudan & Oat hay, small & large bales, we accept credit cards & EBT. GRAVES FARM 622-1889

SPINNETT WURLITZER upright piano in good shape, $300 obo. 575-914-8316

Leprino Foods Company, the nation’s premier manufacturer of mozzarella cheese, is currently seeking qualified applicants for the position of Forklift Operator.

Successful candidates should possess a minimum of oneyear forklift experience and possess or have the ability to possess a Class “A” license. Experience operating a standup forklift preferred. Candidates must have the ability to work in freezers that are -20 Fahrenheit. Knowledge of computer inventory systems helpful. Must have strong communication skills and proven ability to work safely in a fast-paced environment. Potential candidates must possess a High School diploma or GED. Positions start at $14.87 with step increases at 6 months, 12 months and 18 months. Also, a night deferential of $.35 per hour is added for hours work between 6 PM and 6 AM.

Leprino Foods Company offers a competitive benefits package that includes health, dental, vision and life insurance; paid vacation; 401K matched retirement program and a Profit Sharing retirement program. If you possess the above qualifications please apply online at www.leprinofoods.com/careers/

Leprino Foods is an equal opportunity employer supporting a drug and tobacco free workplace M/F/D/V

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com

TACK & SADDLE AUCTION Sat. Feb. 15th, 7:00pm Preview 5:30pm Liquidating 70 Saddles + a entire stores worth of inventory at public auction, regardless of loss or cost. Top brand and custom made Saddles, Bridles, Blankets, too much to list. Everything used on or around a horse. Cash, Cards, NO CHECKS 10% BP. Auctioneer Murphy Elks Lodge 1720 N Montana Ave, Roswell, NM (575) 578 - 1118

BOAT & RV STORAGE, secure area, $25/mo. Call 623-4200. WANTED TO buy: 6’x12’ tandem enclosed cargo trailer w/side door & full ramp rear door in excellent shape. Call 622-1155 between 8am-5pm, Mon-Fri with info.

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

MALTESE DESIGNER PUPS. So CUTE and FLUFFY. Non-shedding, Hypo-allergenic. Papers, shots, health guarantee and potty pad trained. PAYPAL accepted. debit/credit cards. $300-1000 575-910-1818 txt4pics

2001 FORD Explorer, automatic, low miles, $1000 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352.

2003 OLDSMOBILE Alero, excellent cond., 4 cyl., $1500 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352. V-8 FORD 12 passenger, 2001 Van, $7900. 3&4br homes, $5k down. Al 703-0420, Javier 420-0666. ‘96 BUICK Regal, runs great, $1950, owner financing w/$1000 dn, 420-1352 99 HONDA Acccord, 5 speed, 575-616-9480. $5000 OBO.

REGISTERED GERMAN Shepherd puppies. 575-910-1730 TOY CHIHUAHUAS for sale, 2 males, 4 fem. 627-2183

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2008 FORD F150, ext cab, heavy duty 4x4, tow package, only 88k miles, $13,850. 420-1352

German Shepherd puppies, 4 mos. old, Sable in blood, shots. 575-416-0854 AKC GOLDEN Retriever puppies, 5F, 2M, ready for Valentine’s day. 443-616-7492

1999 TOYOTA Tacoma, 132k miles, $3900 OBO. Fuel eff. 420-2191

796. SUVS

2011 JEEP Liberty 4x4 limited edition, 55k miles, loaded, excellent condition, white w/brown leather interior, below book $18,500. 575-626-9803

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS 50 WHITE mice for sale. Call 575-317-9197.

• Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575)-622-7710 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

FOR SALE large 5 piece sectional couch, includes high of bed, and two recliner in pieces. $500 in good cond. 622-6701

FORKLIFT OPERATOR

725. Livestock Wanted

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

745. Pets for Sale

TOP DOLLAR Paid for furniture, collectibles, appliances, antiques, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We pay cash with same day removal of all items. Compete/partial households & personal estates welcome. 623-0136 or 910-6031

665. Musical Merchandise

RECREATIONAL

Sorgum bales 4x8 $75, Oat bales 4x8 $100. Call Janet at 575-626-0159

THE TREASURE Chest Sofas, chest of drawers, tables, chairs, Carnival & Depression glass, cups, saucers. Anna’s back! 1204 W Hobs 914-1855 Weds-Sat 10-5

635. Good things to Eat

715. Hay and Feed Sale

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02 11 14 Roswell Daily Record  

02 11 14 Roswell Daily Record

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