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Roswell Daily Record THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

Madden uncertain about mill levy vote Vol. 123, No. 30 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell’s president was confident he has support for today’s mill levy election but he remained uncertain if he will have the votes in the final hours before election day. “We know that we have the majority of support of the residents of Chaves County,” said President John Madden. “The question is, will they vote?”

Madden, however, said he has faced strong opposition in the past few weeks over ENMU-R’s decision to ask county residents for the increase in property taxes to fund operating expenses. The tax would be indefinite. He said the group was a type of “virulent strain” of an anti-tax group and unfortunately they were vocal. “They are scum,” Madden said. “I think these people are anti-everything. And

February 4, 2014

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I’m angry. I go to meetings and I get booed. … It’s as if because they are bad people, they can do whatever they want.” A failure of the mill levy could have an immediate negative impact, Madden said. “The hard part for us will be Wednesday morning. It could be a really ugly day and I don’t think the community understands that,” Madden said. The result could determine whether the college

will continue to offer its vast array of programs. ENMU-R offers the highest percentage of complex courses (44 percent) of community colleges in the souther n region of New Mexico. Madden and his instructors have actively been in the classroom discussing the mill levy election with ENMU-R students, he confirmed Monday. One English teacher, Annemarie Oldfield, used editorial cartoons to dis-

Officials: Car-to-car communication could save lives

TUESDAY

cuss with her students how she felt the media was biased against the school’s election and “how important information was being neglected and what sorts of scare tactics were being used.”

“We think the truth is important,” Madden said. “We are trying our utmost to spread the truth. Yes, our students ask questions because they don’t understand the misinformation in the community. (The liars) make me angry. They

City candidates present plans during forum JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

AP Photo

This May 22, 2012, file photo shows a side mirror warning signal in a Ford Taurus at an automobile testing area in Oxon Hill, Md. Your car might see a deadly crash coming even if you don’t, the government says, indicating it will require automakers to equip new vehicles with technology that lets cars warn each other. The action, still some years off, has “game-changing potential” to cut collisions, deaths and injuries, federal transportation officials said at a news conference on Monday. A radio signal would continually transmit a vehicle’s position, heading, speed and other information.

are liars and they’re damn liars.” One of the new polling places, put in place with the Voting Convenience Center system, is located on the ENMU-R campus. The new voting system will be a first in the county. Registered voters will be able to vote at any of the 10 sites. Chaves County Clerk Dave Kunko expects a significant voter turnout — up

City Council and mayoral candidates were given the chance to speak about their ideas Monday night during a forum at the First Baptist Church. Crime and economic development topped the list across the board for the candidates as each one answered a series of questions from Leadership Roswell Alumni Association’s Rick Kraft. The forum was broadcast on Cable One’s channel 75 and will be rebroadcast at 6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. The program can also be streamed starting today on Leadership Roswell’s website at lraa.info/. “The questions were put together by a candidate forum committee,” Kraft said. “None of the questions have been told to candidates ahead of time.”

See MILL LEVY, Page A3

Candidates from each ward were given an opportunity to answer a series of questions about their visions for the city and thoughts about important issues. Mayor Del Jur ney and mayoral candidate Dennis Kintigh ended the evening. Jurney listed off a series of achievements he, the council and city staff had achieved in the past four years. “Each of these individual (accomplishments) are noteworthy. Each tells a story of strong confident leadership,” Jurney said. Jurney said better days are yet to come. He was looking forward to aggressively pursuing the downtown master plan, the convention center, neighborhood parks and familyfriendly activities, and possibly a theme park. “Roswell is a great com-

Officer pulls woman Bill requires in-state tuition rates for vets out from house fire A Roswell Police officer responding to a house fire Saturday morning kicked open a door to rescue a woman and drag her to safety in the backyard. Officer Chris King arrived on scene to the house on the 300 block of Swinging Spear Road shortly after midnight, according to spokeswoman Sabrina Morales. The woman, another resident and a neighbor were all taken to a local hospital. Two of the victims were treated and released.

The woman rescued by King was flown to Lubbock for further treatment, Morales said. Crews from three fire stations responded to the fire, said Roswell Fire Chief Chad Hamill. “The house is not a complete loss, but the contents of the house had heavy smoke damage,” Hamill said. Fire crews found a victim in the backyard when they arrived, Hamill said. The fire is still under investigation. Names have not been released and the condition of the victim in Lubbock was unknown Monday, Hamill said.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are starting to lay the blame on President Barack Obama if an overhaul of the nation’s broken immigration system fails to become law. The GOP’s emerging plan on immigration is to criticize Obama as an untrustworthy leader and his administration as an unreliable enforcer of any laws that might be passed. Perhaps realizing the odds of finding a consensus on immigration are long, the Republicans have started

telling voters that if the GOP-led House doesn’t take action this election year, it is Obama’s fault. “If the president had been serious about this the last five years, we’d be further along in this discussion,” Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, a Republican, said Sunday. House Republicans last week unveiled a road map for an overhaul of the nation’s broken immigration system that calls for increased border security, better law enforcement

JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House overwhelmingly passed legislation Monday that would require public universities around the country to charge veterans in-state tuition rates or face financial penalty. Congress intended for veterans from the Iraq and Afghanistan era to go to college for free at the public school of their choice. And for most, that’s the case. But, on occasion, veterans end up living in a new state once their service has ended. Then, they find that the federal government’s reimbursement to colleges won’t fully cover the higher tuition rates that generally apply to students who come in from out of state. “There are many veterans through no fault of their own who are forced to pay exorbitant tuition rates to schools simply because of the transit nature of their military service,”

said Rep. Jeff Miller, the Republican chairman of the House Committee on Veterans Affairs. About half the states already have waivers in place designed to attract veterans to attend their public universities. Lawmakers and veterans groups are pushing for a national approach. Budget scorekeepers estimate the provision would affect about 3,800 veterans initially and save the federal government about $139 million over the next decade. The bill passed by a vote of 390-0. Some have complained that Congress is putting in place another unfunded federal mandate. When the bill came up before a congressional subcommittee last year, the American Association of State Colleges and Universities sad that establishing tuition policy is a clear state right. “This bill screams of gov-

Republicans blame Obama for immigration stall

HIGH 60 LOW 29

TODAY’S FORECAST

within the U.S. and a pathway to legal status — but not citizenship — for millions of adults who live in America unlawfully. The proposal requires those here illegally to pay back taxes and fines. But one of its backers, Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, said distrust of Obama poisons interest among some in his Republican caucus. “Here’s the issue that all Republicans agree on: We don’t trust the president to enforce the law,” said

Ryan, his party’s vice presidential nominee in 2012. R yan said a plan that puts security first could only pass the House if lawmakers believe the administration would enforce it — an unlikely prospect given Republicans’ deep opposition to Obama. The president’s waivers for provisions in his 4-year -old health care law have increased suspicions among Republicans. “This isn’t a trust-butverify, this is a verify-thentrust approach,” Ryan said.

TODAY’S OBITUARIES PAGE A6 • HELEN JOY PADILLA • OSCAR E. (PETE) KUNKEL • ADAN MERAZ • DONALD GENE BROOKS • MARGARET LOUISE BROWN • HEIDI L. WILIAMS BOWEN • THELMA (LUPOLD) RITZ • OFELIA A. CARRILLO

See FORUM, Page A3

ernment overreach,” the association said at the time.

But the arguments from veterans groups won out. The groups said military veterans are the only Americans that sometimes cannot physically be present in a state long enough to satisfy residency requirements simply because they were serving their country.

In all, 20 states already have laws designed to help veterans get the instate rate. Another 12 have legislation pending. Eight more have individual schools or school systems that provide veterans with waivers so they can get the in-state tuition rate, according to Student Veterans of America, an advocacy group.

The bill stipulates that the in-state tuition requirement would only apply to veterans who enroll within three years of leaving the service.

AP Photo

Hilda Vasquez makes tamales in her kitchen in Edinburg, Texas, on Wednesday, Dec. 4. She raised the $680 for her U.S. citizenship application by selling batches of homemade tamales at South Texas offices. CLASSIFIEDS ..........B5 COMICS .................B4 ENTERTAINMENT .....A8 FINANCIAL ..............B3

INDEX GENERAL ...............A2 HOROSCOPES .........A8 LOTTERIES .............A2 OPINION .................A4

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WEATHER ..............A8 WORLD ..................A6


A2 Tuesday, February 4, 2014

GENERAL

Lobbyists dole out $400K in campaign contributions

Roswell Daily Record

SANTA FE (AP) — Lobbyists and their clients handed out about $403,000 in campaign contributions to legislators, Gov. Susana Martinez and others in the months leading up to this year’s legislative session, according to the latest state disclosure reports. The oil and gas industry accounted for not quite half of the lobbyist campaign contributions from late April through the end of last year, according to an analysis by The Associated Press of disclosures filed by lobbyists with the

secretary of state’s office. But state law makes it impossible to track the source of campaign contributions listed in spending reports by some lobbyists. Most lobbyists voluntarily disclose the names of clients on whose behalf they provided political contributions. In other instances, the company employing the lobbyist files a separate report disclosing their spending, including campaign contributions. But at least $130,000 was contributed by lobby-

ists — some with a dozen or more clients — with no infor mation to indicate whether the money was given personally or the donation came from certain clients. Eventually, the information will be disclosed by candidates receiving the donations. However, legislators don’t have to file campaign finance reports until later in the year — well after the legislative session ends. Ken Ortiz, chief of state for Secretary of State Dianna Duran, said state

law doesn’t require a lobbyist to identity the clients on whose behalf they are making contributions. Instead, lobbyists must list in their expenditure reports only the amount, date and recipient of contributions they are making personally or providing from a client. The leader of a government watchdog group said the disclosure loophole should be fixed. “It completely obscures where this money is coming from,” Viki Harrison, executive director of Com-

SANTA FE (AP) — A proposal to bring Amtrak’s Southwest Chief train through New Mexico and two other states could get stopped in its tracks by Gov. Susana Martinez.

months that Amtrak is funded by Congress and any agreement should not leave New Mexico taxpayers with a large bill.

tenance costs and ensure the train route remain active beyond 2015. The partnering states and railroads would have to provide roughly $4 million a year each for a decade.

said. “To my knowledge, nobody has come out and said, ‘I can’t support that.’ Our hurdle is the Governor’s Office.”

mon Cause New Mexico, said Monday. “We think anybody who contributes to these candidates, whether they are a lobbyist, their clients or somebody completely different, should be listed.” The contributions from lobbyists are in addition to about $660,000 spent by lobbyists last year for food, drinks, gifts and entertainment for lawmakers and other state officials. The top source of campaign money from the oil and gas industry was Devon Energy, an inde-

pendent oil and natural gas producer with operations in New Mexico. The company contributed $65,700, including $10,400 to the governor in October and the rest to more than 30 legislators a month before this year’s legislative session convened. The industry opposed a proposal last year in the Legislature that would have raised the fines for water pollution from oil and gas production. The measure died in the House.

Gov. could derail Amtrak partnership Heat pump, wiring stolen from home

While her office did not respond to questions Friday seeking comment, Martinez has said in recent

STATE BRIEFS

Immigrant license fraud trial begins

LAS CRUCES (AP) — Jury selection has begun for a Chinese national on trial for helping more than 50 people suspected of being in the country illegally get New Mexico driver’s licenses. The trial of Hai Gan, of The Colony, Texas, began Monday in U.S. District Court in Las Cruces. The 56-year-old is one of several people over the years linked to running such rings for Chinese nationals living in other states to obtain driver’s licenses in New Mexico. Authorities say Gan advertised in Chinese-language newspapers and told immigrants suspected of being in the country illegally he could help them get licenses by using a New Mexico address. New Mexico law allows such immigrants living in the state to get driver’s licenses. Gov. Susana Martinez has highlighted similar fraud cases as reasons to repeal the law.

Committee votes to bar spending of Spaceport tax

SANTA FE (AP) — A Sen-

CORRECTION

In Sunday’s edition, a photo on page A1 said the National Dance Institute of New Mexico’s Statewide Residency Outreach Program’s per for mance of “Eureka!” would be held

Under the plan, New Mexico, Colorado, Kansas and would split track main-

ate panel has endorsed a bill that would prohibit the fledging Spaceport America from using hundreds of thousands of dollars in local taxes to fund its operations. The Senate Corporations and Transportation Committee on Monday backed the bill by Sen. Lee Cotter that would bar spaceport from using excess money from a gross receipts tax collected in Sierra and Dona Ana counties to help pay off bond debt. Spaceport America Executive Director Christine Anderson said the extra money is needed to fund vital services while the state tries to recruit more tenants to the quarter-billion dollar project and waits for Virgin Galactic to begin its space tourism flights. Backers of the bill say if the project needs more money, it should get it from the state, not local taxpayers.

Navajo Nation to build new homes for military vets

FARMINGTON (AP) — The signing of a contract for building materials allows the start of construction of new homes for Navajo veterans.

A bill introduced by State Rep. Roberto “Bobby” Gonzales that would call for New Mexico to contribute funding is scheduled for a hearing Tuesday before the House Transportation and Public Works Committee, which Gonzales chairs.

“As far as the legislative part, the committee, there’s not a problem,” Gonzales

The Daily Times reports that the Navajo Nation’s veterans affairs department plans to build 75 homes across the sprawling reservation. The $1.9 million contract will provide housing material for 75 energy-efficient homes through Dec. 30. The homes will have one, two or three bedrooms. The material is to be delivered in phases so it isn’t damaged by bad weather during construction. The reservation is located in northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico and southeastern Utah.

Carlsbad school facilities ranked as poor

CARLSBAD (AP) — The facilities at Carlsbad schools are among the most inadequate and unsafe for students, a recently released report says. The Carlsbad CurrentArgus reports the New Mexico Public School Facility Authority says Carlsbad and 32 other districts in the state have aging structures that need repair and improvement. School board members are hoping voters will approve a special bond

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election Tuesday that would bring in $60 million to build four schools. Carlsbad Municipal Schools Superintendent Gary Perkowski says new schools would help with overcrowding. The report says Carlsbad’s schools have buildings older than the expected 40 to 50-year life cycle. It also rated Carlsbad “poor” for maintenance effectiveness. The assessment concludes that new maintenance strategies could save an estimated $27 million.

Lawsuit against New Mexico seeks marijuana license

SANTA FE (AP) — A Santa Fe man is suing New Mexico health officials to address what he says is a severe medical marijuana shortage. The Albuquerque Journal reports Mark Springer filed a lawsuit Monday against the state Department of Health. In the suit, filed in state District Court, Springer, who owns Medical Marijuana Inc., requests that the department reopen the application period for eligible marijuana growers and permit them to grow more of the plant.

Larceny from a home

An of ficer was dispatched at 9 a.m. Friday to the 500 block of Trailing Heart Road when a heat pump and wiring was removed from a residence. The value of the theft was $3,000.

Burglary from a residence

An officer responded at 4:30 p.m. Friday when a resident reported the forced entry to a home at the 3200 block of Radclif fe Drive. The item

reported taken was a signed athletic jersey valued at $2,500.

Burglary to a motor vehicle

A motor vehicle burglary was reported to have occurred sometime between Saturday and Sunday on the 200 block of East 19th Street. The vehicle appeared unlocked, according to the officer’s report. Items taken were a cell phone, camera, jacket and a pair of headphones. Total value of items were some $1,900.

OIL DROPS ON US, CHINA MANUFACTURING DATA

NEW YORK (AP) — The price of oil dropped Monday after reports of weaker manufacturing activity in the U.S. and China. Benchmark oil for March delivery dropped $1.06 to close at $96.43 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Brent crude, used to set prices for international varieties of crude, fell 36 cents to $106.04 on the ICE exchange in London. A Chinese index reported Saturday by a governmentaffiliated agency fell from 51 points in December to 50.5 in January, just above the 50 level that signifies expansion. Meanwhile, U.S. manufacturing barely expanded last month as cold weather delayed shipments of raw materials and caused some factories to shut down, a trade group of purchasing managers said Monday. The group said its index of manufacturing activity fell to 51.3 in January from 56.5 in December. Weaker manufacturing in the world’s two biggest economies could reduce global demand for energy. U.S. drivers are paying an average of $3.28 per gallon of gasoline, AAA said Monday. That’s down 4 cents than a month ago and 23 cents below where the average price was at this time last year.

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In Colorado, the Southwest Chief expansion seems to be garnering more support across the board. Eric Brown, a spokesman for Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, says the Democrat wants to keep the passenger train going and expand its route.

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The New Mexican reports that proponents fear the plan to run Southwest Chief on tracks owned by Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway will hinge on the Republican governor’s support.

“According to the New Mexico (Department of Transportation), the state has never provided State funds for Amtrak service,” Martinez’s of fice said in January. “We’re willing to work together on this issue, but any agreement needs to take that reality into account.”

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GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

A3

Student kills teacher, policeman in Moscow school MOSCOW (AP) — A 10th-grade student with two rifles burst into his Moscow school on Monday, killing his geography teacher and a policeman in front of about 20 students, investigators said. His father played a key role in freeing those students before police stor med the classroom and took his son into custody, the city police chief said.

The student gunman also seriously wounded a second police officer who had responded to an alar m from the school, investigators said.

None of the approximately 400 children in School No. 263 at the time were hurt, said Karina Sabitova, a police spokeswoman. But students were so fearful that some ran from the building with their teachers without stopping to put on coats in below-freezing temperatures. The school in northeast Moscow is for children in grades one through 11.

Such shootings in Russian schools are extremely rare. Any attack on a school, however, unavoidably brings back memories of the Beslan school siege

in 2004, when Islamic militants from Russia’s North Caucasus took about 1,000 people hostage, most of them children. More than 300 hostages were killed when Russian security forces stormed that school.

Russia is also now on alert for terrorist attacks, especially after Islamic militants asserted responsibility for twin suicide bombings in the city of Volgograd in December and threatened to strike during the Sochi Winter Olympics, which begin Friday in the Black Sea resort.

CLINTON TO ENCOURAGE READING IN HISPANIC FAMILIES WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton is helping initiate a public service campaign encouraging Hispanic families to read, sing and talk more to their young children so they’re better prepared for school. About a quarter of all babies and toddlers in the U.S. are Hispanic, but these kids are half as likely to have family members read to them and a third less likely to have songs sung to them than white, non-Latino children, according to a recent report by the Robert R. McCormick Foundation. The effort is part of the “Too Small to Fail” campaign started last year by the Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Foundation and Next Generation, a San Francisco-based non-profit. A partner in the effort is Univision Communications Inc., a New York-based Spanish language network that will run a series of public service announcements and news programs with segments focused on the topic. Clinton was expected to participate in

Mill levy

Continued from Page A1

to 25 percent — for the special election. Early voters turned out in heavy numbers. More than 5 percent had voted by Friday. ENMU-R is asking voters for an

the campaign launch today at a bilingual Head Start program in East Harlem in New York. Clinton, a longtime supporter of early childhood programs, is a former secretary of state, first lady and senator of New York. She is considering another White House bid in 2016 and expects to make a decision later this year. The focus is simple: tackling what’s known as the “word gap” by encouraging Hispanic families to focus on these activities for at least 15 minutes daily.

Research published by the late University of Kansas researchers Betty Hart and Todd Risley in the ’90s highlighted the phenomenon in which children in professional families hear an average of 30 million more words by the time they were 4 than children of parents accepting public assistance, and 15 million more words than children from working-class families. Children with less exposure are more likely to start school behind their peers and not catch up. increase in property tax to fund its operations at current levels. If passed, the increase is expected to generate $2.1 million a year for the school. For a homeowner of a $100,000 home, once the current building construction bond retires this year, the proposed mill levy would add $66.67 next year. The total paid to ENMU-R would be $96.57.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Monday’s attack, however, raised no suspicions of any link to terrorism.

The ethnic Russian teenager entered the school after threatening its security guard, who managed to hit an alarm before following the student to his classroom, said Vladimir Markin, spokesman for Russia’s Investigative Committee, its main investigative agency. “Without saying a word, he fired several shots at the geography teacher,” Markin said.

Forum

Continued from Page A1

AP Photo

Police officers evacuate children from a Moscow school on Monday.

munity and a great place to call home,” Jur ney said. “This is not the time to change the city’s leadership.” Kintigh stressed his experience in law enforcement as a way to deal with crime and therefore economic development in Roswell. “Public safety is the foundation on which you can build economic development,” Kintigh said. We together as a community need to make this a safe and clean city. To attempt to do otherwise is to put the proverbial cart before the horse. “We’ve got a problem. The problem is public safety,” Kintigh said. “We must confront it. I recognize the challenge and I’m prepared to face it. The airport is a tremendous asset. It’s under-utilized and not reaching its full potential. “I’m a bold person. I will not sit back. I will strive to make this the best possible community in the Southwest.” Kintigh said to deal with crime, Roswell needs to admit “we have a problem.” The city needs to work to retain officers, he said. “In the last three years, we’ve lost 48 sworn officers. That’s more than half the department,” Kintigh said. “We’ve been able to recruit, we’ve not been able to

retain.”

The city needs to look at code enforcement and remove derelict structures, he said.

“Appearance affects behavior,” he said. “If we have that, it will change our reputation.”

Jur ney said there was no question Roswell had progressed to a point that there was a problem.

“I don’t think anybody hides that,” Jurney said. “What we’re not looking at is the progress being made. The steps being taken. The officers dedicating themselves. We’re not giving them the credit they deserve. … We need to start staying in the positive direction we’re headed in at this time.”

The city is looking to reduce the crime that takes place in the areas most prone to crime, he said. In the area of economic development, Jurney pointed to the growth in the aerospace business at the Roswell International Air Center. Kintigh said oil and gas, agriculture, aviation and tourism were the area’s economic strengths. Oil drilling in the Permian Basin presents potential, he said.

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Connecting the DOTs and the communities A4 Tuesday, February 4, 2014

In the legislative hopper with more attention-grabbing bills is one that’s a cry for help. R e p . Bobby Gonzales, D-Taos, is carrying a bill that’s the equivalent of a suicide mission. In an election year for House members, Gonzales wants to raise fuel taxes to fund 10 major r oad projects, knowing well that even if it passes, the governor won’t sign it. Why? Because we’r e appr oaching a point of no retur n. Our roads are falling apart. The state Department of Transportation has been patching, patching, patching, but that only goes so far. To some readers, who have nice new roads, this may come as a surprise. But to Gonzales, who sees new deterioration in the road to Taos every time he drives home from Santa Fe, it’s becoming a crisis. I’ve listened to three trans-

EDITORIAL

OPINION

SHERRY ROBINSON

ALL SHE WROTE

portation hearings this session, and the message is alarming. Last week Transportation Secretary-designate Tom Church told the Senate Transportation and Corporations Committee that the DOT road fund, supported by fuel taxes, is down by $5.9 million since last year. Blame the economy, which isn’t as str ong as we’d like, and blame efficient cars, which don’t consume fuel like they used to. The department’s debt load is $162 million, which is one-third of its budget. Church explained that the state borrowed money to build all those roads in the

Roswell Daily Record

last 15 or 20 years, and now it’s time to repay the debt. “Right now we’re maintaining roads,” he said. “We have 2,400 employees doing chip seals and pavement overlays. Last year, we did a million miles of snow removal.” DOT, like other state departments, has about 10 percent of its positions vacant. “We can make do, but we’ll try to fill positions,” he said. “We’re taking as much operating funding as we can and putting it on roads.” In a different hearing, state Transportation Commissioner Pete Rahn said, “We can’t keep repairing and not replacing.” By allowing roads to degrade, the state will eventually have to replace all of its roads, a very costly prospect. The public, Rahn said, doesn’t understand where road funds come from and may assume the federal government will buy us some new r oads. That’s not

going to happen. The federal gover nment hasn’t raised its fuel tax in years and is limping along on small transfers from the general fund, he said. Roads are wasting away all over the country, Church said. Ironically, New Mexico still has a better road system than other states. I’ve been listening to these discussions for several years. The state has three choices: • Direct some general fund money into the road fund. Fuel taxes support the general fund and the road fund, so there’s a legitimate argument for taking some back for road work. • Raise taxes. Lawmakers have tried several times to raise fuel taxes, but the governor has said she won’t sign such a bill. Meanwhile, W yoming, a r ed state, raised its gasoline tax by 10 cents, and the world didn’t end.

• Build toll roads. This is an option embraced by many states. We don’t like the idea here, but it is a pay-as-you-go solution. Rahn said the gover nor is awar e of the dwindling r oad fund, but her State of the State speech contained not a word about transportation. So here is HB 74. Gonzales, who chairs the House T ransportation and Public Works Committee, would raise fuel taxes for the next 10 years to pay for 10 major road projects. Other fuel tax bills in years past have been stillborn. Economic development and tourism bills are getting lots of attention, but products must be shipped, and tourists must travel. Somebody needs to make the connection between roads and economic development.

What kids and young adults should know about tattoos In a cool-hipster part of Seattle lurks acclaimed young tattoo artist Electric Alivia. Even her name is cool. An Electric Alivia skin stain could be the Dolce Gabbana of tattoos.

So listen up, tattoo consumers. Alivia actually cares about the people who pay her.

Alivia has joined a growing cadre of tattoo professionals who refuse to work on hands, necks, fingers and faces. Parents, guardians and mentors should share her explanation with children, teens and young adults. One reason involves tattoo science: — “Tattoo ink remains a liquid underneath your skin ... the ideal placement for this pigment is right between the epidermis and dermis, seems simple right? It’s really not,” Alivia wrote on Tumblr. “The tissue on your face/hands/feet is so thin it takes skill and practice to ‘float’ the pigment in the perfect spot. Too shallow and pigment will fall out when your skin naturally regenerates, too deep and your tattoo will appear blurred, blobby, or permanently bruised ... even an experienced artist can misjudge depth.” The more compelling rationale behind Alivia’s policy involves a realistic view of society:

— Employment: “Does not only your current job but your desired lifetime career allow visible tattoos? This does not mean ‘I work at Taco Bell and they don’t care.’ Unless your life plan includes working at Taco Bell for the long haul, THINK TOWARD THE FUTURE. TATTOOS ARE FOR (expletive) EVER ... How do you think hand/neck tattoos affect you applying for a business loan from a bank?”

— Law Enforcement: “You have your neck tattooed? Congratulations you are now an object of interest for every cop you walk past. Police will stare down your tattoos checking for gang/criminal imagery and excuses to (expletive) with you... You may notice routine traffic stops are no longer so routine as well. I sure did.” Additionally, most lawyers know visible tattoos disadvantage clients in court.

— Culture: “There are still plenty of folk happy to assume you are a prostitute, drug dealer, or gang banger because you like to wear your art, and you’re more likely to draw these negative assumptions with hand/head/neck/face tattoos. I live in the most liberal neighborhood in Seattle and still overhear “nice neck tattoo, have fun making minimum wage the rest of your life.” Sometimes you just wanted to buy some milk without being judged as a human being. The just-as-horrible flipside in having a permanently visible tattoo means every (expletive) that ever got/wanted a tattoo will feel the need to approach you in public and tell you about tattoos they want, invade your personal space by touching your tattoos, or remove their clothes to show you theirs (when you didn’t ask)... Like I said, sometimes you just want to buy some milk and get out of the grocery store without seeing Johnny Whitetrash’s (butt) when he lifts his shirt over his head to show you his hatchet man tattoo he got in Craig’s kitchen. But this will happen to you. A lot.”

Concealable tattoos can be harmless in private or at the beach. Permanently visible images probably won’t derail the financial prospects of a tiny percentage of people who can make fortunes as entrepreneurs or rock stars. For most everyone else, tattoos that can’t hide under short-sleeved shirts and slacks become lifelong liabilities. Tattoo artists in the Pikes Peak region, abundant with young military personnel and college students, should consider Electric Alivia’s policy.

“I’m not gonna put some stupid (expletive) on your neck for the rest of your life so I can make $50 bucks,” Alivia wrote. REPRINTED FROM THE COLORADO SPRINGS GAZETTE

Universal Pre-K? Ask these red state Republicans — and then ask Grover Norquist JOE CONASON CREATORS SYNDICATE

Among the biggest policy mistakes of the past 50 years is our continuing failure to provide quality early childhood education to all of America’s kids. For children, families and society as a whole, the benefits of “universal preK” are not only significant and well-documented, but offset the financial cost many times over. Although we’ve been aware of these basic facts since the early ’60s, most

Doonesbury

DEAR DOCTOR K: I saw my doctor for some problems with my hearing. Why did she want a detailed list of my medications? DEAR READER: When you think of risk factors for hearing loss, medications probably aren’t at the top of the list. But several over-the-counter and prescription drugs can harm the nerves in the inner ear. This can cause sudden hearing loss, ringing in the ears or vertigo (dizziness). Two studies done by colleagues at Harvard Medical School suggest that frequent use of even the most common pain relievers — ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and acetaminophen (Tylenol) — may cause hearing loss. In the studies,

politicians have preferred to squander billions of dollars on malfunctioning weaponry, catastrophic wars and petroleum subsidies. If this outstanding example of stupid is corrected any time soon, the nation will owe thanks to President Barack Obama and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, both of whom have argued forcefully on behalf of quality preschool for all. Yet while the president and the mayor deserve credit for their efforts, perhaps even greater gratitude will be due

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

women who took the pain relievers at least twice a week were more likely to have hearing loss. More frequent usage further increased the risk. It’s possible that pain relievers damage the cochlea, the snail-shaped hearing mechanism in your inner ear. One author of the studies, Dr. Sharon Curhan, instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical

to public officials in Georgia and Oklahoma — where conservative Republicans have proved the value of universal preschool programs beyond any doubt for children and families of every income level and ethnic background. Even if there were no economic upside to starting the education of every child at 3 or 4 years of age, the obvious social benefits would be vital for any country that aspires to cultivating a vibrant democratic republic. Citizens who can read and do math (and

perhaps take an interest in science!) are more likely to succeed at self-government. They are also far more likely to succeed in life. Enhancing personal opportunity is how universal preschool generates universal public savings — estimated by a large cohort of studies to lie somewhere between $7 and $17 for every single dollar spent. Human brains mostly develop well before age 5, so children who attend quality

School, explained that ibuprofen can reduce blood flow to the cochlea. This could cause cell damage and death. And acetaminophen may deplete an antioxidant that protects the cochlea from damage. Does this mean you should think twice before popping a pill for a headache or back pain? As always, it’s important to balance risks and benefits. These medicines do provide good pain relief for many people. With short courses of over -the-counter drugs, any hearing problems that might develop likely would be temporary. Ringing in the ears and vertigo also fade over time. Longer courses of prescription drugs (high-dose ibuprofen) would seem to be more likely

to lead to permanent changes in hearing. Pain relievers are not the only drugs that can af fect hearing. Other commonly used drugs that can cause hearing loss include certain antibiotics, diuretics, and drugs used to treat erectile dysfunction. Aspirin is a problem only when it’s taken too often or in too high a dose. As I’ve said before, take all medications mindfully. Always try to take the lowest possible dose for the shortest amount of time to minimize the risk of side effects. Studies like those I discuss above don’t prove that ibuprofen and acetaminophen cause

See CONASON, Page A5

See DR. K, Page A5


LOCAL

Roswell Daily Record

A5

Celebrate Library Lovers’ Month at the Roswell Public Library LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

February is Library Lovers Month, celebrating all libraries; public, educational and private. Lovers of libraries embrace words; words found in books, magazine and newspaper articles, databases, documents, etc. Public libraries contain shelves full of fiction and non-fiction books, along with magazines and newspapers. Computers and databases are a convenient addition to searching for knowledge. However, it is important to understand that not everything is available on the Inter net. Libraries have vast stores of information through books and other materials. Of all the services and resources located within the library, the librarians and staff are the most important as they aid patrons in locating information or books. The Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania, offers a variety of services and resources. For the on-line catalog of materials, the calendar of events, to access the databases or for information, visit the library, phone 575-622-7101 or go to the webat site www.roswellpubliclibrary.org. Reference librarians are available to provide assistance in locating information and books. The library’s goal is to meet the recreational, educational and cultural needs of patrons of all ages. The Children’s Room contains materials for juveniles from toddlers to preteens. There are board books with bright colors and durable pages, just right for

LETTER

toddlers and small hands. The Easy books range from A-B-C and “I Can Read” books to stories that would challenge a good third-grade level reader. The J fiction and J non-fiction are on the interest level of older children. The information in these non-fiction books is as factual as the information in adult books. These materials cover as wide a range of subjects as children, and adults, have interests. The Teen/Young Adult collection contains written topics of special interest to teens. Adults will discover a wide range of books to infor m and entertain. The fiction collection ranges from literary classics to romance, sports, humor, historical, folklore, political, legal and other aspects of life. In addition, there are books placed in the special fictional genres collections of Mystery, Western and Science Fiction. Fiction and nonfiction are featured in the following special collection. The Southwest collection contains titles that portray New Mexico and her unique region. The Spanish collection features books for Latino readers. The Large Print versions of books are on a variety of subjects with print designed for ease in reading. Other collections feature magazines in the Periodical section that range from reaching for the stars with “Astronomy” to planting both feet on the ground with “Farm and Ranch Living” as well

Regarding ENMU-R Bond Election - Have you heard of MOOC MOOC means Massive Open Online Classes and is the face of higher education now and certainly in the near future. More and more colleges and universities are going to online degrees. They are streamlining courses, freezing salaries, and prioritizing teaching methods. Brick and mortar (B+M) classes will therefore become less and less important and in fact it is predicted that half of all colleges in America may be closing their doors in the next decade. Consider this, college student debt has now risen to 1 TRILLION DOLLARS! The cost of B+M education far exceeds the current cost of living. Many students are graduating with huge student loan debts that take years to pay off. Late payments or default of this debt adversely affects credit scores. Credit scores affect everything from ability to get a job, purchase a home, cars and what insurance companies charge. The Federal Bankruptcy Law does not eliminate Student Loan Debt. Could this be the reason why enrollment at ENMU-R has dropped by 1,000 students in this past year as noted recently in the RDR article about increased tuition? Are students getting credits instead online, or do they not want to go into debt in these uncertain times? While on the other hand, the student that earns his or her degree through MOOC can graduate virtually debt free! There are no text books (which can cost as much as half the tuition in B+M colleges) and therefore a textbook-free degree. Universities such as MIT are offering top-rated engineering classes, Harvard University offering law

Dr. K

Continued from Page A4

hearing loss. For example, it could be that some other unrecognized illness caused study participants’ hearing loss and caused them pain — which then prompted them to take pain relievers. Sometimes I get letters from readers who ask why I mention studies that suggest, but don’t prove, that a particular practice may have health risks. My answer is that I generally don’t mention such studies unless I think they are particularly strong scientifically.

Unfortunately, very few medical studies come to definitive answers. It usually takes many studies before a possible health threat is considered proven. But I also keep my eye on studies that don’t offer absolute proof but are strong enough to make me think twice — in this case, about the bedtime acetaminophen I take to relieve some arthritis pain. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.) USPS No 471-200

News & Business Telephone 622-7710 Circulation Telephone 622-7730

Roswell Daily Record

Charles Fischer Publisher

cfischer@rdrnews.com

Vonnie Fischer Advertising Director

addirector@rdrnews.com

R. Cory Beck Publisher (1987-2006)

Jim Dishman .....................................................Circulation Director jdishman@rdrnews.com Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice

The entire contents of the Roswell Daily Record, including its flag on Page 1, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the Daily Record.

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MAIL SUBSCRIPTION RATES: ALL NEW MEXICO 882 ZIP CODES, $12 ONE MONTH, $36 THREE MONTHS, $72 SIX MONTHS, $144 ONE YEAR. All other New Mexico zip codes, $13 one month, $39 three months, $78 six months, $156 one year. All other states in USA, $18 one month, $54 three months, $108 six months, $216 one year. Periodical-postage paid at Roswell, N.M. Postmaster: Please mail change of address to Roswell Daily Record, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202-1897. All postal subscriptions will stop at expiration unless payment is made prior to expiration.

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

as covering the areas in between. The newspapers include the “Roswell Daily Record” on microfilm back to 1903. Computer databases are purchased by the library to offer digital information that may be accessed either at the library or from off-site computers. CDs of “Talking Books” allow patrons to hear the spoken words of the book as they drive, do chores, take a walk or otherwise occupied. DVDs are available on a wide range of non-fiction topics, along with classic movies and dramatizations of bestselling books.

Book talk

The library has an increasing number of electronic books. Debra Thomas, Technical Services supervisor, has selected two E-books by award-winning authors with Valentine’s Day in mind. Julie Lessman’s “Love at Any Cost” brings a feisty, albeit penniless, Texas oil heiress to San Francisco to stay with her cousins for the summer. She is dead set on avoiding men and healing her broken heart. Then she meets impoverished Jamie McKenna, who thinks Cassidy is as wealthy as her cousins. When he discovers she’s broke, Cassidy is jilted for a second time. This fun, first book in a new series brings the Gilded Age to life with surprising revelations and a chance for happiness. In Margaret Watson’s “Bending the Rules,” Nathan Deveraux is not looking for anything even remotely resembling responsibility; he has just finished up a very long haul of that while raising his siblings. At least, not until the day he walks into FreeZone,

his sister’s teen event center where he meets an enigmatic woman with a mass of blond curls, honey-colored eyes, and a sassy smile. She also happens to be the guardian of a daughter he never knew existed. Events from the past make the road to parenthood and romance rough to travel.

What’s happening?

Tonight at 6 p.m. in the Teen area, teens are invited to succumb to the doodle addiction as they attend a program on Zentangle, a form of artistic meditation that uses repetitive patterns to create images. People who are unfamiliar with computers are invited to a Computer Basics class tonight at 6 p.m. This class will be repeated on Saturday at 10 a.m. Please contact the Reference librarians to register for the class. Three free story and craft hours for children are held each week. The Wednesday programs begin at 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. The morning session will also feature fun body movement and song activities. The Saturday program begins at 2 p.m. Children attending the story portion of the program are invited to be creative during the following craft session. The stories may vary between programs and the quantity of some craft items may be limited. The Wednesday story times welcome kids to A Three Hat Day event. The hat stories might focus on “A Three Hat Day,” “Mrs. Honey’s Hat,” “Caps for Sale” or “Big Trucks Pop-Up Storybook.” Precut craft materials will be provided for the crafts.

degrees, Regent University offering various numbers of degrees, etc. Imagine one top professor can teach online students all over the country and even the world! Our computer savvy young people love this cost-effective way to receive degrees in virtually all venues without the mindboggling paying tuition, books, living expenses, travelling, scheduling, hours and hours sitting through classes at the B+M universities. Just think how the internet has grown and changed our world in just the past 10 years! Before you vote Yes or No on the ENMU-R Bond TODAY go online to 700Club.com and go to 2-3-14 broadcast, search for MOOC for further information. The founder of the 700 Club, Pat Robertson, also founded Regent University, a brick and mortar school. He says they are initiating more and more online classes and degrees because it makes sense! With this information, it makes common sense to vote No (or against) the permanent bond increase which will permanently increase all property taxes in Chaves County!

Conason Continued from Page A4

preschool enter kindergarten with social skills, confidence and knowledge that boosts achievement for many years. The fewer children who arrive unprepared to learn, as so many now do, the fewer who end up using extremely expensive special education programs, repeating grades, requiring remedial studies or dropping out before graduation from high school. Naturally, better school achievement means higher employment and ear ning potential, lower rates of arrest and incarceration, better health habits, less demand for welfare support and even lower outof-wedlock birth rates. Well, aren’t those the outcomes that conserva-

Charlee Longmire

tives want? So they constantly tell us. And so they ought to study Oklahoma and Georgia, two of the most conservative states in the union, where studies have indicated that universal pre-K is one of the best investments we can make. In Oklahoma, where every child has been entitled to free preschool since 1998, a well-known study by Georgetown University educators found substantially improved cognitive skills and test scores among Tulsa students who had attended public pre-K. The program made the difference between falling below national norms and moving up to achieve them. In Georgia, first to implement universal state-funded preschool almost 20 years ago, painstaking research has likewise showed gains in math and reading that

LETTER POLICY

During the morning session, kids will make a hat with feather, decorate a visor hat and will glue paper party hats onto a headband. During the after noon crafts, participants will make a hat with feather, create a visor hat and decorate large party hat. Valentine’s Day in stories and crafts will be celebrated on Saturday. The stories could include “The Night Before Valentine’s Day,” “Bee Mine,” “Valentine’s Day at the Zoo,” “Give a Little Love or My Froggy Valentine.” The crafts might feature making a headband with hearts on pipe cleaners, assembling a paper tube love bug or butterfly, decorating a large paper heart, folding a heart shaped box or creating a Valentine’s Day card.

Books Again

All non-fiction books, whatever the subject or age range, will be on sale for $1 each during the February special sale. Fiction titles will sell for approximately one-fourth of the original price. Paperback mass market books and VHS videos are 25 cents each. Books on cassette are $2 and books on CD are $5 each. DVDs and music CDs are $3. Books Again, 404 W. Second, is a used book store operated by Friends of the Library volunteers. The store is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday through Saturday. All proceeds are used to benefit the library. Parking is located behind the store. There are books and other materials for children, teens and adults at bargain prices.

The Daily Record welcomes and attempts to publish all letters to the editor that meet guidelines. To be published, letters must include the writer’s first and last name, address and telephone number. Addresses and telephone numbers will not be published unless the letter asks for a response. Addresses and telephone numbers are used for verification or to contact the letter writer for more information. All letters except those sent by e-mail must be signed. Letters which are libelous, written in poor taste, promote or attack individual businesses or concern active civil court cases will not be published. Letters must either be typed or written or printed legibly. Because of limited space, letters should not exceed 600 words. Because of the large volume of letters received, those unpublished may not be acknowledged or returned and a maximum of two letters a month will be printed by any individual writer. The Daily Record reserves the right to reject any letter.

lasted through eighth grade, especially among underprivileged rural and urban children. Neither of those deepred states would give up its preschools now. But right-wing Republicans in Washington who reflexively scorn the Obama and de Blasio initiatives can look even closer to home — ideologically and geographically — for advice on this question. They should ask Grover Norquist, the renowned anti-tax activist, why he sends his own toddlers to the District of Columbia’s free pre-K program, operated by the public school system, which accepts children starting at age 3. As much as Norquist despises government, he and his wife seem to believe that preschool is valuable to their kids — and as a taxpaying city resident, he is certainly

entitled to its benefits. He says, “it’s not free but paid for through property and income taxes,” and notes that his children “like their teachers and the school.” In a country where liberal Democrats have inaugurated so many of the past century’s advances, it is pleasantly ironic to see hardcore Republicans — in two states, anyway — pushing forward on early childhood development. Perhaps we can hope that their fellow conservatives someday will have the wit and wisdom to endorse universal preschool as a fiscally sound contribution to social progress. Even if it is Obama’s idea. To find out more about Joe Conason, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com. Copyright 2014 Creators.Com


A6 Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Official: Hotel delays not affecting families of Olympic competitors SOCHI, Russia (AP) — Family and friends of Olympic athletes have been unaffected by unfinished hotel rooms in the mountains near Sochi, an IOC official said Monday. Although the problem provoked embarrassment for local organizers over the weekend, Olympics Games executive director Gilbert Felli said rooms “will all be delivered” by the end of Wednesday. “We are not yet discover(ing) any problems from families,” Felli said after his fact-finding visit to Krasnaya Polyana. Sochi organizers have said three hotels for accredited media were not fully operational, with heavy rain causing delays. Felli said several hundred rooms — of 41,000 available at the games — were either not finished,

OBITUARIES

Helen Joy Padilla

Memorial services for Helen Joy Padilla, 45, of Roswell, will be Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014, at 2 p.m. at Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home Chapel with Deacon Jesus Herrera officiating. Burial to follow at South Park Cemetery. Joy passed away Friday, Jan. 31, 2014. Joy was bor n July 11, 1968, in Roswell, to Nick C. Padilla and Helen Sedillo. Joy attended Roswell High School, worked as a certified nurse assistant before she became ill, she loved her family and friends, and enjoyed listening to music. Joy is survived by her mother, Helen, of the family home; a sister, Edna Bryant and husband, Ed, of Colorado; a brother, Nick W. Padilla and wife, Josephina, of Roswell; nephews and nieces: Nick W. Padilla Jr., Frances, Gabriel Tapia, James Padilla, Vincent Salcido, Mario Otero, Stephanie Rico and Elena Padilla; great-niece, Nicolette Padilla; numerous great-nieces, nephews, uncles and cousins. Joy was preceded in death by her father, Nick C. Padilla, in 1968. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online registry at andersonbethany.com. Services are under the direction of AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

Adan Meraz

Services are pending at Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory for Adan Meraz, 87, who passed away on Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014. A further announcement will be made once arrangements have been finalized.

not cleaned or were missing telephones and televisions.

“It does not mean that it’s a catastrophe, that people do not have a room. People have not been put outside,” Felli said after a news conference hosted by IOC President Thomas Bach.

Families of athletes are expected to arrive in greater numbers ahead of qualifying events starting Thursday. The opening ceremony is Friday.

Russia’s Deputy Prime Minister, Dmitry Kozak, said the problems would be resolved by some “final cleaning.”

“All the hotels in Sochi which will be hosting guests of the Olympic Games are built and ready,” Kozak said Monday at a public meeting in the coastal city.

They have preceded her in death, as well as Marge Cunningham and Jim Heiman. Margaret married Paul Brown on June 15, 1957, in Taos. He also has preceded her in death. She is survived by two sons: Wes and Les Brown, both of Dexter; two daughters: Paula Louise Cox and her husband, Chuck, of Greenville, Tenn., and Muriel Lynne Irwin and her husband, Daniel, of Edmond, Okla.; two brothers: William “Bud” Heiman, of Florida, and Gerald “Red” Heiman, of De Norte, Colo.; two sisters: Janet Heiman and Dixie Lee Heiman, both of Alamosa, Colo.; five grandchildren and numerous great-grandchildren. Memorials may be made to the Roswell Humane Society, 703 E. McGaffey, Roswell, NM 88203. Condolences may be made online at lagronefuneralchapels.com. Arrangements are under the personal care of LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Thelma (Lupold) Ritz

Thelma (Lupold) Ritz, 88, formerly of Roswell, passed away Feb. 1, 2014. She is survived by three children: Debbie (Ken) Smith, Patricia (David) Sauer and Thomas (Teresa) Ritz; six grandchildren; and a greatgrandson. She was predeceased by her husband, Ralph C. Ritz, in 1995; two brothers: Earl and George Lupold; and sister, Irene Elliott. Services are private. Interment will be in Santa Fe National Cemetery, with her husband. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Dominic Church, 6 Canandaigua St., Shortsville, NY 14548. Arrangements are by JohnsonKennedy Funeral Home, Inc., Canandaigua, NY. Condolences may be of fered at johnsonkennedy.com.

Margaret Louise Brown

No services are scheduled at this time for Margaret Louise Brown, 75, of Roswell, who passed away on Jan. 31, 2014. A visitation is scheduled for Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014, at LaGrone Funeral Chapel from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Margaret was bor n on Feb. 16, 1939, to William Earl and Margaret Louise Heiman in Alamosa, Colo.

Oscar E. (Pete) Kunkel

Services are scheduled at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014, at Immanuel Lutheran Church for Oscar E. (Pete) Kunkel, who passed away on Jan. 31,

OBITUARIES/WORLD

Al-Qaida breaks with Syria group

CAIRO (AP) — Al-Qaida’s central leadership broke with one of its most powerful branch commanders in an apparent attempt to stem the deadly infighting that has erupted in Syria among the militant Islamic factions trying to bring down President Bashar Assad. More broadly, the announcement Monday appeared to be a move by al-Qaida leader Ayman al-

Zawahri to reassert the terror network’s prominence in the jihad movement across the Middle East amid the mushrooming of extremist groups during the upheaval of the past three years. The dispute is between al-Qaida’s central leadership and a faction known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the head of al-Qaida’s

Roswell Daily Record

branch in Iraq, formed the Islamic State last spring to expand his operations into neighboring Syria, defying direct orders by al-Zawahri not to do so. Al-Zawahri named a different group, the Nusra Front, as alQaida’s branch in Syria. Now, the break is likely to spark a competition for resources and fighters between the two sides in what has become a civil war within a civil war. The

test for al-Zawahri’s influence will be whether his decision leads fighters to quit the Islamic State.

In Washington, which has viewed the increasing influence of Islamic extremism in Syria’s rebel movement with unease, State Department spokesman Jen Psaki noted that both the Islamic State and the Nusra Front are considered terrorist organizations.

Italian Justice Ministry investigating Knox judge

MILAN (AP) — Italy’s justice minister on Monday announced an investigation into comments to the Italian media made by the judge who read the guilty verdicts against Amanda Knox and her former Italian boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito. Annamaria Cancellieri said in a one-line statement that she has asked the inspector general to make a “preliminary assessment” of the remarks published by two Italian newspapers over the weekend. The newspapers quoted Florence judge Alessandro Nencini as saying, among other things, that Sollecito’s decision not to testify on the witness 2014. Rev. Daniel Preauner of Immanuel Lutheran Church will officiate. Pete was bor n Aug. 5, 1925, in Dexter, to Oscar T. and Mary S. Kunkel. They have both preceded him in death. He was baptized at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Roswell. He was confirmed on Palm Sunday, April 6, 1941, at Immanuel Lutheran Church. His confirmation verse was John 15:7. On June 14, 1949, he married Dorothy O. Osbor ne at Immanuel Lutheran Church. Pete is survived by four sons: Bud Kunkel and his wife, Laura, of Roswell, Tim Kunkel and his wife, Pat, of Artesia, Bob Kunkel and his wife, Pat, of Albuquerque, and Ted Kunkel, of Richland, Wash.; three sisters: Mary Ellen Tisler, of Colorado Springs, Colo.; Thelma Klein, of Hopewell, Va.; and Elva Leinberger, of Roswell; eight grandchildren: Katy Kunkel Arvidson, of Eagle River, Ala.; Jill Kunkel Williams, of Riegelsville, Pa.; Matthew Kunkel, of Socorro; Amy Kunkel Everitt, of Roswell; David Kunkel, of Albuquerque; Chuck Kunkel, of El Prado; Kim Kunkel Bishop, of Clovis; Molly Kunkel, of Santa Fe; two greatgrandchildren: Josephine Williams, of Riegelsville, Pa.; Naomi Kunkel of El Prado; and numerous nieces and nephews. One sister, Elsie Clark, and one brother, John Kunkel, predeceased Pete. Pete graduated from Dexter High School in 1943. His initial military service was in the Army from 1944 to 1946. He was assigned to a training unit in Alabama and was in the postWWII occupation forces on Kyushu Island in Japan. He later served in the U.S. Army Reserves from 1950 to 1970 and attained the rank of captain. He attended New Mexico A&M from 1946 to 1948. He transferred to Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa, and graduated with a degree in Agricultural Operations in June 1950. After graduation from Iowa State University, Pete and Dorothy returned to Dexter, to operate the homeplace farm. Pete also operated other farms in the Dexter and Roswell area and a farm near Hooper, Colorado. Pete and Dorothy raised their family, ensuring they were baptized and confirmed in the Christian faith at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Roswell. Even though Pete and his family lived 20-plus miles south of Roswell, the Church was the focus of family activities. Pete served in virtually all positions on the ILC board of directors and always

stand deprived the defendant of a voice. The judge also commented on the difficulty of reaching a verdict, due to the vast amount of evidence as well as the intense media attention, and acknowledged that assigning a motive for the 2007 murder of British student Meredith Kercher was one of the most “controversial” aspects of the case.

A Sollecito attorney, Luca Maori, said earlier Monday that the comments on the defense strategy are “serious” and could for m part of their appeal to Italy’s highest court on last week’s verdict. Maori said the defense team would seek an

ensured his sons were at Sunday services and Sunday School, Saturday mor ning confir mation classes, and youth activities on Sunday evenings. Pete later served as a member of the Rocky Mountain District board of directors for the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod. Pete honored his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ with his life in how he conducted his business and with everyone in which he came in contact. His example of putting Christ and others first in his life will always be remembered by family, friends and business associates. Pete was a respected member of the Dexter community. He served for several years on the Dexter School Board, as had his father before him. He was a very active member of the community, especially when considering raising four sons. He coached Little League and assisted in their high school activities. He was instrumental in developing a strong 4-H program in Dexter and Chaves County. During these years, he developed the largest registered sheep flock in New Mexico, selling club lambs from California to Texas to Kansas. In 2010, Pete was honored for his many years of service to the agricultural community in Southeastern New Mexico when he was selected to serve as grand marshal for the Eastern New Mexico State Fair. He was honored in 2012 by being inducted into the Dexter High School Hall of Fame. Pete’s second career began after 1968, when the homeplace farm was hailed out three years in a row and the farm feedlot lost over two hundred head of cattle. That forced a new career to support his family. He became involved in the real estate appraisal business as a Chaves County appraiser, an appraiser for Pioneer Savings and Loan for about eight years, and then started his own appraisal firm in the early 1980s. Kunkel and Associates grew into the largest fullservice real estate appraisal firm in Southern New Mexico. Pete began by providing residential appraisal services and continued to expand his services providing agricultural and commercial services, primarily in Southeastern New Mexico. He became the go-to appraiser for dairy appraisal services for the rapidly expanding dairy industry in Southern New Mexico, but especially Chaves, Roosevelt, Curry, and Lea counties. Pete was highly respected in the appraisal profes-

investigation into the judge’s comments with the ministry, as well as the magistrates’ oversight body and the high Court of Cassation.

“This is not a vendetta because a judge handed down a verdict other than what we expected,” Maori said by telephone on Monday.

Knox defense lawyer Carlo Dalla Vedova said in an emailed statement that the interviews were “not appropriate,” but he reserved comment on any action until the court’s reasoning for the verdict is issued, expected within 90 days of the sentence.

sion. He ear ned his RM designation from the American Institute of Real Estate Appraisers and served as the first president of the New Mexico-West Texas Chapter of the Appraisal Institute in 1990, after the merger of the two predecessor professional appraisal organizations. After an extremely successful business and professional career, having served in many leadership positions, and receiving several awards for service throughout his working career, Pete still remained an active church member. He could be counted on to always be present at Sunday morning service and Bible class and Tuesday morning Bible study. His church and his strong belief in God, upheld him after Dorothy’s passing in November 2010. His desire for those following him is that they always recognize and encourage their children and grandchildren to have faith in Jesus Christ, as Lord and Savior. Honorary pallbearers are: Ed Osbor ne, Segundo Armendariz, Gene Balderston, Gene Peterson, Rev. O.E. Krohn, and Donald Kuykendall. The family requests that memorials be made to the Immanuel Lutheran School, 1405 North Sycamore, Roswell, NM 88201. We want to acknowledge and especially thank Mary Coker and the staff with Frontier Medical, the staff with Personal Care by Design, and the staff at the New Mexico Rehabilitation Center, Villa Del Rey, La Villa, and Mission Arch Care Center who did everything in their power to take excellent care of Pete. You may provide your condolences on-line at lagronefuneralchapels.com. Funeral arrangements are under the direction of LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Donald Gene Brooks

Services are pending at Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory for Donald Gene Brooks, 68, who passed away on Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014. A further announcement will be made once arrangements have been finalized.

Heidi L. Wiliams Bowen

Services are pending for Heidi L. Wiliams Bowen, 34, of Roswell. A further announcement will be made.

Ofelia A. Carrillo

Funeral services are scheduled for 10 a.m., Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014, at 10 a.m. at Ballard Funeral Home Chapel with interment at South Park

Cemetery for Ofelia A. Carrillo, 70, of Dexter, who passed away Friday, Jan. 31, 2014, in Lubbock, Texas.

Ofelia was born on April 2, 1943, in Oaxaca, Mexico, and is survived by husband, Lorenzo Carrillo; son, Lupe M. Castillo, of Phoenix, Ariz.; daughter, Maribel Castillo Frank (Doug), of Glenrock, Wyo.; and granddaughter, Mischa Castillo, 9, also of Phoenix, Ariz.

In addition to Ofelia’s involvement in the Dexter community, she had been an active part of founding the new church La Puerta es Cristo in the Roswell/Dexter area. As Ofelia loved flowers in her life, friends are welcome to send flowers to Ballard Funeral Home.

Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at ballardfuneralhome.com.

CRUZ LUEVANO

St. Peter’s Church & South Park Cemetery Funeral Services Tuesday, February 4 10:00 AM

RICHARD MIRANDA Anderson Bethany Funeral Home Chapel Memorial Services Saturday, February 8 11:00 AM

HELEN JOY PADILLA Anderson Bethany Funeral Home & Burial at South Park Cemetery Memorial Services Wednesday, February 5 2:00 PM

JULIO CARREON

St. Peters Catholic Church & Burial at South Park Cemetery Mass Tuesday, February 4 2:00 PM

JONATHAN VENEGAS St. Peters Catholic Church & Burial at South Park Cemetery Mass Tuseday, February 4 2:00 PM


BUSINESS REVIEW

Roswell Daily Record

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

A7

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A8 Tuesday, February 4, 2014

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Partly sunny and warmer

Partly cloudy

Wednesday

Thursday

Partly sunny and colder

Friday

Morning snow showers

Saturday

Cloudy and warmer

Partly sunny and breezy

Sunday

Mostly sunny

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Monday

Mostly cloudy and warmer

High 60°

Low 29°

43°/17°

35°/23°

61°/31°

55°/23°

52°/28°

64°/36°

NNW at 4-8 mph POP: 0%

NNW at 6-12 mph POP: 0%

WNW at 6-12 mph POP: 25%

WSW at 7-14 mph POP: 60%

WSW at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

W at 3-6 mph POP: 25%

SSW at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

S at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 33°/30° Normal high/low ............... 58°/28° Record high ............... 82° in 1893 Record low .................. -8° in 2011 Humidity at noon .................. 92%

Farmington 38/15

Clayton 28/6

Raton 28/7

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Mon. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date .......................... Normal year to date .............

trace trace 0.04" trace 0.42"

Santa Fe 39/16

Gallup 37/12

Tucumcari 42/11

Albuquerque 44/25

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 46/13

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 42/23

T or C 51/29

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed. First

Feb 6

Rise Set 6:52 a.m. 5:32 p.m. 6:51 a.m. 5:33 p.m. Rise Set 9:51 a.m. 11:10 p.m. 10:30 a.m. none Full

Feb 14

Last

Feb 22

Alamogordo 53/30

Silver City 46/29

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) #### A situation involving money might add to an existing feeling of vulnerability. A hostile remark could trigger words and events that you will wish had never happened. Try to relax. You are in control of your feelings. Tonight: Whatever makes you happy. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) #### Remain sure of yourself, and honor what is going on within you. You could be more irritable than you think, as you are maintaining a hectic pace. Your demeanor might change later in the day, when you sense someone’s implied demands. Tonight: Make it easy. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) #### You could find it difficult to hold back, as you’ll want to run with an idea or a solution. Friends might encourage you to slow down. This suggestion will seem off to you. Refuse to get into a fight,

Hoffman leaves amazing legacy

CALL 622-7710

NOBLE FINANCE

“We want to make you a loan”

$200 - $2,000 (575)622-0900

Hobbs 59/24

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

Mar 1

ROSWELL DAILY RECORD

Carlsbad 62/41

Las Cruces 53/32

New

NEW YORK (AP) — He was only 46, busy as ever and secure in his standing as one of the world’s greatest actors. There were no dissenters about the gifts and achievements of Philip Seymour Hoffman, whose death Sunday in New York brought a stunning halt to his extraordinary and unpredictable career. An Oscar winner and multiple nominee, Hoffman could take on any character with almost unnerving authority, whether the religious leader in command of his every word in “The Master,” a trembling mess in “Boogie Nights,” or the witty, theatrical Truman Capote in “Capote.” Fearless in his choices, encyclopedic in his preparation, he was a Shakespearean performer in modern dress, bringing depth and variety to charlatans, slackers, curmudgeons and loners. “Hearing that Philip Seymour Hof fman passed away came as much as a shock to me as to anyone else I’d imagine,” says Anton Corbijn, director of “A Most Wanted Man,” one of two films (the other being “In God’s Pocket”) starring Hoffman that premiered last month at the Sundance Film Festival.

ROSWELL 60/29

He was not only the most gifted actor I ever worked with,” Corbijn added, “...he had also become an incredibly inspiring and supportive friend.” Friends, peers, family members and his countless fans were in grief after Hoffman was found in his Greenwich Village apartment with what law enforcement of ficials said was a syringe in his arm. The two officials told The Associated Press that glassine envelopes containing what was believed to be heroin were also found with Hof fman. Those items are being tested. The law enforcement officials, who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to speak about evidence found at the scene, said the cause of death was believed to be a drug overdose. Police will only say the investigation is continuing. An autopsy is planned for Monday, according to medical examiner spokeswoman Julie Bolcer. Hof fman’s family called the news “tragic and sudden.” Hoffman is survived by his partner of 15 years, Mimi O’Donnell, and their three children.

NOTICE TO O U T- O F - T O W N SUBSCRIBERS

Listed below are our distributors in your local delivery area:

Buena Vida, Picacho, Tinnie, Hondo, Glencoe

Dan Parson 575.937.6539

Capitan, Lincoln, Carrizozo, Fort Stanton

Dan Parson 575.937.6539

Ruidoso, Alto, Ruidoso Downs

Artesia (Inside City Limits)

Dexter, Rural Dexter

Hagerman, Rural Hagerman

Rural Artesia, Lake Arthur

Rural Roswell

Dan Parson 575.937.6539

Carmen Scafella 575.840.6503 Patricia Hariston 575.840.6928

Victoria Garcia 575.420.0727

Carmen Scafella 575.840.6503

Circulation Department 575.622.9480 Any questions or comments? Call 1-888-842-4121

Regional Cities Today Wed. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

53/30/pc 44/25/sf 29/5/sn 62/40/pc 62/41/pc 28/8/sf 28/6/sn 32/17/pc 46/13/pc 52/28/s 43/24/sf 38/15/pc 37/12/pc 59/24/pc 53/32/pc 35/8/sf 36/17/sf 46/22/pc 56/24/pc 47/15/pc 36/14/pc 28/7/sn 26/5/sn 60/29/pc 42/23/pc 39/16/sf 46/29/s 51/29/pc 42/11/c 38/18/sf

49/26/pc 43/24/c 27/6/sn 44/28/pc 48/28/pc 27/9/c 15/-4/pc 37/16/pc 28/6/pc 54/29/pc 42/23/c 36/22/pc 40/24/pc 36/16/pc 51/30/pc 26/5/c 35/16/c 47/22/pc 38/16/pc 31/9/pc 39/18/pc 20/0/sn 26/5/sn 43/17/pc 36/16/pc 36/14/c 48/27/pc 49/27/pc 26/8/pc 37/17/c

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

or you could cause your own delay. Tonight: Allow your energy to flow. CANCER (June 21-July 22) #### You might feel frustrated when dealing with a parent or supervisor. Your creativity seems off at this point, and you might find that you need to take a different approach in order to get your point heard. You could wind up in an argument, so try to avoid that. Tonight: A must show. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) #### If you can detach, you will see a situation in a new light. You might feel torn, as you see and understand the different sides of an argument. Be smart, and say little around a hot-headed person in your life. Your words easily could be misconstrued. Tonight: Hang in there. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) #### Focus on getting the best results. The key is to maintain one-on-one contact with those who are instrumental. You could feel as if you need to pull back and evaluate what is happening. You can do this quickly while still keeping your present pace. Tonight: Dinner for two. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) #### You have been very active lately, which seems to have caused you a problem. Many might wish that you would return to your charming, diplomatic self. Perhaps you’ve been sitting on uncomfortable feelings for too long. Tonight: Go along with someone else’s wishes, if you can. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ### Get plenty of exercise, and know full well that you need it on many levels. Tension and stress will lessen as a result. You could feel uncomfortable in your day-to-day life. Make a point of moving a situation forward. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) #### Allow your creativity to make a stronger project or plan if you feel that the present one is weak. Rather than loll around with a sense of dissatisfaction, take action; it will prove to be

Wed. Hi/Lo/W

26/11/s 50/49/r 36/31/pc 37/26/s 42/41/r 25/16/sn 30/21/c 56/24/r 16/-7/sn 26/17/c 55/34/pc 72/67/r 62/41/r 30/20/sn 24/4/sn 53/39/s 63/46/s 52/16/c

28/15/s 58/31/sh 44/24/sh 34/22/sn 67/34/c 21/-2/sf 27/10/sn 39/18/pc 7/-10/c 24/8/sn 54/28/pc 78/70/r 54/36/s 28/1/c 8/-11/c 53/37/s 65/48/s 30/10/pc

U.S. Extremes

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Hi/Lo/W

82/73/pc 58/24/pc 12/-15/pc 74/49/sh 36/29/s 22/-6/sn 82/65/sh 36/30/pc 62/45/s 35/29/c 37/22/pc 41/41/r 30/14/sn 28/15/pc 62/51/pc 36/22/pc 57/40/s 37/33/pc

83/71/pc 38/14/pc 1/-19/pc 60/37/pc 37/24/i 6/-11/pc 84/64/t 40/23/r 65/45/s 33/11/sn 28/19/pc 66/34/sh 23/-3/c 29/17/pc 60/51/s 30/20/pc 63/43/s 52/27/sh

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 86° ................. Plant City, Fla. Low: -27°......................Merrill, Wis.

High: 60° ...................... Las Cruces Low: 5° ..........................Eagle Nest

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE

the best way to handle a budding problem. Tonight: Something spontaneous works. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) #### A friend might not intend to give you bad advice, but that appears to be what you receive. Clear out quickly, rather than becoming more enmeshed in the present situation. Try to establish stronger foundations and a better sense of direction. Tonight: Order in. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ##### Keep conversations moving. You might hit a snafu with a boss who cares a lot about you. Nevertheless, a situation could become problematic. Your ability to brainstorm and come up with solutions will pull through. Tonight: Make a point of catching up on a neighbor’s news. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ### Your intuition comes through for you, especially regarding your finances. As a result, you will be heading down an interesting path. Not all financial situations are logical; sometimes they are more complicated than you think. Emotions could come into play. Tonight: Your treat. BORN TODAY Boxer Oscar de la Hoya (1973), former U.S. Vice President Dan Quayle (1947), civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913)

He’s just joined a partner in a new practice. Fundador Adajar, M.D., has joined Michael Sarkees, M.D., at Cardiovascular Associates of Roswell. Thousands of patients have entrusted their hearts to these cardiologists. And for good reason. Together, these board-certified cardiologists are devoted to caring for hearts and improving the quality of life for their patients. And providing trusted, convenient, local care. Even better? Same- and next-day appointments are often available. Call today to see either Dr. Adajar or Dr. Sarkees at Cardiovascular Associates of Roswell: 575-624-0400. Se habla español.

601 W. Country Club Road, #202 Roswell • 575-624-0400

Ice

90s 100s 110s

Dr. Adajar is staying right here, in the heart of Roswell.

Cardiovascular Associates of Roswell

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Michael Sarkees, M.D. Board-Certified Interventional Cardiologist

Fundador Adajar, M.D. Board-Certified Cardiologist

Our pledge:

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today Hi/Lo/W

Member of the Medical Staff at


SPORTS

Tuesday, February 4, 2014 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

Section

Roswell Daily Record

B

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

F LY I N ’ HIGH

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) — Waiting to get their hands on the Lombardi Trophy, the Seahawks were surrounded by security guards in orange jackets. It was the first time anyone in that color stopped them all night. The Seahawks stayed true to their mantra to make each day a championship day. They made Super Bowl Sunday the best day of all with one of the greatest performances in an NFL title game — sparked by a defense that ranks among the best ever.

MVP? ‘No way’ says Smith

The Seahawks won their first Super Bowl crown by punishing Peyton Manning and the Denver Broncos 43-8. That masterful defense, the NFL’s stingiest, never let the five-time MVP get going, disar ming the highest-scoring offense in league history. “The only way we could say we were the best defense was to take down the best offense,” linebacker Bobby Wagner said. Seattle (16-3) was too quick, too physical and just too good for Denver. What was hyped as a classic matchup between an unstoppable offense and a miserly defense turned into a rout. “We’ve been relentless all season,” quarterback Russell Wilson said. “Having that mentality of having a championship day every day. At the end of the day, you want to play your best football and that is what we did today.” Punctuating Seattle’s dominance were a 69-

AP Photos

AP Photo

Seattle linebacker Malcolm Smith holds up the Lombardi Trophy after the Seahawks won Super Bowl XLVIII, Sunday. Smith was named the game’s MVP.

NEW YORK (AP) — Three words raced through Seattle Seahawks linebacker Malcolm Smith’s mind as he streaked toward the end zone in the Super Bowl, returning his interception of a pass by Peyton Manning: “Don’t get caught.” That, Smith explained Monday at a news conference, would be the “typical thoughts a defensive player (would have) with the ball.” And he heeded his own advice, going 69 yards for a touchdown on that play. He added a fumble recovery later and earned MVP honors as Seattle beat Manning’s Denver Broncos 43-8 for the Seahawks’ first NFL championship. At no moment during Sunday’s action did Smith think he would take home

Super Bowl sets ratings record, again

NEW YORK (AP) — For the fourth time in five years, the Super Bowl has set a record for the most-watched television event in U.S. history, drawing 111.5 million viewers even though the Seattle Seahawks’ 43-8 victory over the Denver Broncos wasn’t really competitive. The ratings record is further evidence of how live events are becoming dependable and valuable properties for broadcast television at a time the audience is fragmenting and ratings for regular entertainment shows continue to fall. “Big-event television is a great way for people to have a communal event, to talk about it socially and to talk about it as a group,” said Bill Wanger, executive vice president for programming and research at

Fox Sports. “You see that in the Super Bowl numbers of the past four or five years. They’ve just gone up to a different level.” The game also set standards for the most-streamed sports event online and, with 24.9 million tweets, the biggest U.S. live TV event on Twitter. The Seattle victory eclipsed the 111.3 million viewers who watched the 2012 Super Bowl between the New York Giants and New England Patriots, according to the Nielsen company. Until last year’s game dipped slightly to 108.7 million, the Super Bowl had set ratings records for the previous three years in a row. See RATINGS, Page B3

— TUESDAY, FEB. 4 — • Hagerman at Cloudcroft, 6 p.m. • Lake Arthur at Gateway Chr., 6:30 p.m. • NMMI at Loving, 6:30 p.m. • Hondo Valley at Vaughn, 7 p.m. • Artesia at Goddard, 7 p.m. • Ruidoso at Roswell, 7 p.m. • Eunice at Dexter, 7:30 p.m.

• Hagerman at Cloudcroft, 4:30 p.m. • Lake Arthur at Gateway Chr., 5 p.m. • Hondo Valley at Vaughn, 5:30 p.m. • Artesia at Goddard, 5:30 p.m. • Eunice at Dexter, 6 p.m. GIRLS BASKETBALL

• Goddard at Roswell, 5 p.m. PREP WRESTLING

LOCAL BRIEFS

See MVP, Page B3

LOCAL SCHEDULE BOYS BASKETBALL

See SEAHAWKS, Page B3

NMMI Sports Press Photo

NMMI’s Biron Joseph (1) penetrates past NMJC’s Nevin Johnson during their game, Monday. Johnson and the Thunderbirds beat the Broncos 71-59.

Thunderbirds beat in-state rival NMMI The NMMI men’s basketball team struggled mightily from the field on Monday and fell to in-state and conference rival NMJC 71-59 at the Cahoon Armory. The Thunderbirds led wire-to-wire, taking the lead for good on a steal and runout layup by Kenrich Williams on their third possession of the game. NMJC pushed its lead to as many as 14 in the opening half, but the Broncos didn’t go away. They outscored the visi-

SPOTLIGHT

tors 13-3 in the final 4 1⁄2 minutes of the half to close within 34-30 at halftime. The Thunderbirds pulled away at the start of the second half, though, outscoring NMMI 14-3 to push their lead to 15, the largest of the night. NMMI (11-11, 1-9 WJCAC) trimmed the deficit to seven, but could never get any closer. The Broncos shot just 34 percent from

See BRIEFS, Page B2

ON

SPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN ... 1861 — The Philadelphia Athletics beat Charter 1971 — The Baseball Hall of Fame establishes a Oak 36-27 in a baseball game played on frozen separate section for players from the old Negro Litchfield Pond in Brooklyn, N.Y., with the players Leagues. In July, commissioner Bowie Kuhn, along wearing ice skates. with Hall president Paul Kirk, announce a change of 1932 — The Winter Olympics open in Lake Placid, heart and scrap plans for the separate section. N.Y., the first Winter Games in the United States. 1976 — U.S. District Court Judge John W. Oliver 1969 — The 24 major league owners unanimously upholds the ruling of arbitrator Peter Seitz that select Bowie Kuhn as commissioner for a one-year declared Andy Messersmith and Dave McNally free term at a salary of $100,000. agents.


B2 Tuesday, February 4, 2014

SPORTS

Three tie for title in Pigskin Prognostications

Roswell Daily Record

For the second time in four years, there is a tie for the Daily Record’s Pigskin Prognostications contest title. The three members of the Daily Record’s sports department — sports editor Kevin J. Keller, assistant sports editor Lawrence Foster and photographer Shawn Naranjo — tied for the title with matching 87-18 records. NMMI assistant golf professional Randy Doerhoefer finished fourth, KEND broadcaster and Roswell girls basketball coach Joe Carpenter was fifth and NMMI sports information director Geoff Gunn was sixth. The victory was Keller’s third in the contest to go with his wins in 2010 (co-champion with Joe Carpenter) and 2011. Foster won his second straight crown after winning the contest outright in 2012. It was Naranjo’s first victory.

FINAL STANDINGS

Overall Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Record Kevin J. Keller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87-18 Lawrence Foster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87-18 Shawn Naranjo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87-18 Randy Doerhoefer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85-20 Joe Carpenter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80-25 Geoff Gunn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77-28

College basketball

The AP Top 25 By The Associated Press The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ college basketball poll, with firstplace votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 2, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25thplace vote and last week’s ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Prv 1. Syracuse (65) . . . . . . .21-0 1,625 2 2. Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . .21-1 1,517 1 3. Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . .19-2 1,482 3 4. Wichita St. . . . . . . . . . .23-0 1,447 4 5. San Diego St. . . . . . . .19-1 1,370 5 6. Villanova . . . . . . . . . . .19-2 1,252 9 7. Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .21-2 1,182 13 8. Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . .16-5 1,141 6 9. Michigan St. . . . . . . . .19-3 1,136 7 10. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . .16-5 949 10 11. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-5 940 17 12. Creighton . . . . . . . . . .18-3 790 20 13. Saint Louis . . . . . . . . .20-2 728 19 14. Louisville . . . . . . . . . .18-4 723 12 15. Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-4 719 25 16. Iowa St. . . . . . . . . . . .16-4 717 16 17. Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-5 669 15 18. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . .16-5 653 11 19. Oklahoma St. . . . . . . .16-5 420 8 20. Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . .17-5 364 — 21. Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . .17-5 361 23 22. UConn . . . . . . . . . . . .17-4 252 — 23. Gonzaga . . . . . . . . . .20-3 237 — 24. Memphis . . . . . . . . . .16-5 114 22 25. Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . .18-4 110 18

Others receiving votes: Wisconsin 79, Ohio St. 45, VCU 44, SMU 15, New Mexico 12, California 9, UCLA 9, Harvard 4, George Washington 3, LSU 3, Tennessee 2, American U. 1, Southern Miss. 1.

USA Today Top 25 Poll The top 25 teams in the USA Today men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 2, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Pvs 1. Syracuse (32) . . . . . . .21-0 800 2 2. Wichita State . . . . . . . .23-0 745 3 3. Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . .21-1 725 1 4. Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . .19-2 720 4 5. San Diego State . . . . .19-1 680 5 6. Villanova . . . . . . . . . . .19-2 596 9 7. Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .21-2 570 15 8. Michigan State . . . . . .19-3 546 6 9. Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . .16-5 498 7 10. Louisville . . . . . . . . . .18-4 474 7 11. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-5 409 16 12. Creighton . . . . . . . . . .18-3 404 20 13. Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-5 377 12 14. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . .16-5 372 11 15. Saint Louis . . . . . . . . .20-2 362 21 16. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . .16-5 328 14 17. Iowa State . . . . . . . . .16-4 290 18 18. Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-4 287 — 19. Oklahoma State . . . . .16-5 227 10 20. Gonzaga . . . . . . . . . .20-3 214 24 21. Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . .17-5 197 — 22. Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . .18-4 99 17 23. Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . .17-5 94 25 24. Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . .17-5 72 13 25. Ohio State . . . . . . . . .17-5 67 23

Others receiving votes: Memphis 58, UConn 47, VCU 26, Southern Miss. 25, UMass 24, UCLA 20, New Mexico 16, SMU 10, Baylor 7, California 5, Harvard 4, George Washington 2, Saint Joseph’s 1, Stephen F. Austin 1, Toledo 1.

NBA

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .26 22 .542 Brooklyn . . . . . . . . . . .21 25 .457 New York . . . . . . . . . .19 29 .396 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .16 33 .327 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .15 34 .306 Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 13 .723 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .25 21 .543 Washington . . . . . . . .24 23 .511 Charlotte . . . . . . . . . .21 28 .429 Orlando . . . . . . . . . . .13 37 .260 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . .37 10 .787 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .23 24 .489 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .19 28 .404 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .16 32 .333 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . . .9 39 .188 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct San Antonio . . . . . . . .35 13 .729

GB — 4 7 10 1⁄2 1 11 ⁄2

GB — 8 1⁄2 10 14 22 1⁄2

GB — 14 18 21 1⁄2 28 1⁄2

TV SPORTSWATCH

GB —

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Tuesday, Feb. 4 MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN — Ohio St. at Iowa ESPN2 — Kansas at Baylor ESPNU — Mississippi at Kentucky FS1 — St. John’s at Providence 7 p.m. ESPN — Missouri at Florida ESPNU — Wake Forest at Duke FS1 — Butler at Marquette NHL HOCKEY 5:30 p.m. NBCSN — N.Y. Islanders at Washington

Houston . . . . . . . . . . .32 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Memphis . . . . . . . . . .26 New Orleans . . . . . . .20 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Oklahoma City . . . . . .39 Portland . . . . . . . . . . .34 Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .23 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L.A. Clippers . . . . . . .34 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . .29 Golden State . . . . . . .29 L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . .16 Sacramento . . . . . . . .16

17 21 21 27

L 11 14 23 24 32 L 17 18 19 31 32

.653 .571 .553 .426

3 1⁄2 7 1⁄2 8 1⁄2 14 1⁄2

Pct GB .780 — .708 4 .500 14 .489 14 1⁄2 .333 22

Pct GB .667 — .617 3 1 .604 3 ⁄2 .340 16 .333 16 1⁄2

Sunday’s Games Boston 96, Orlando 89 Monday’s Games Indiana 98, Orlando 79 Washington 100, Portland 90 Brooklyn 108, Philadelphia 102 Miami 102, Detroit 96 Oklahoma City 86, Memphis 77 Milwaukee 101, New York 98 San Antonio 102, New Orleans 95 Dallas 124, Cleveland 107 Denver 116, L.A. Clippers 115 Toronto 94, Utah 79 Sacramento 99, Chicago 70 Tuesday’s Games Indiana at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Chicago at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Charlotte at Golden State, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Detroit at Orlando, 5 p.m. Boston at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. San Antonio at Washington, 5 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Houston, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Dallas at Memphis, 6 p.m. Atlanta at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Portland at New York, 6 p.m. Milwaukee at Denver, 7 p.m. Toronto at Sacramento, 8 p.m. Miami at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m.

— —

Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 11 Seattle 23, New Orleans 15 New England 43, Indianapolis 22 Sunday, Jan. 12 San Francisco 23, Carolina 10 Denver 24, San Diego 17

Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 26 At Honolulu Team Rice 22, Team Sanders 21

Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 2 At East Rutherford, N.J. Seattle 43, Denver 8

NHL

43 8

TEAM STATISTICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sea Den 18 First downs . . . . . . . . . . .17 306 Total Net Yards . . . . . . . .341 Rushes-yards . . . . . . .29-135 14-27 279 Passing . . . . . . . . . . . . .206 Punt Returns . . . . . . . . .0-0 1-9 Kickoff Returns . . . . . . .2-107 5-105 Interceptions Ret. . . . . .2-71 0-0 Comp-Att-Int . . . . . . . .18-26-0 34-49-2 Sacked-Yards Lost . . . . .0-0 1-1 Punts . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-45.0 2-30.0 Fumbles-Lost . . . . . . . . .0-0 4-2 Penalties-Yards . . . . . .10-104 5-44 Time of Possession . . .31:53 28:07

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Seattle, Harvin 2-45, Lynch 15-39, Wilson 3-26, Turbin 9-25. Denver, Moreno 5-17, Anderson 2-9, Ball 6-1,

National Hockey League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Boston . . . . . . .54 35 16 3 Tampa Bay . . .55 32 18 5 Toronto . . . . . .57 30 21 6 Montreal . . . . .56 29 21 6 Detroit . . . . . . .56 25 19 12 Ottawa . . . . . .56 24 21 11 Florida . . . . . . .55 21 27 7 Buffalo . . . . . . .55 15 32 8 Metropolitan Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pittsburgh . . . .56 39 15 2 N.Y. Rangers .56 30 23 3 Columbus . . . .56 29 23 4 Philadelphia . .56 27 23 6 Carolina . . . . .54 25 20 9 Washington . . .56 25 22 9 New Jersey . . .57 23 21 13 N.Y. Islanders .57 21 28 8

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Chicago . . . . . .57 33 10 14 St. Louis . . . . .54 37 12 5 Colorado . . . . .55 36 14 5 Minnesota . . . .57 29 21 7 Dallas . . . . . . .55 25 21 9 Nashville . . . . .57 25 23 9 Winnipeg . . . . .57 27 25 5 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Anaheim . . . . .58 40 13 5 San Jose . . . . .56 35 15 6 Los Angeles . .57 30 21 6 Vancouver . . . .57 27 21 9 Phoenix . . . . . .55 26 19 10 Calgary . . . . . .55 21 27 7 Edmonton . . . .58 19 33 6

Waste Management Phoenix Open Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At TPC Scottsdale Scottsdale, Ariz. Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,152; Par: 71 Final Kevin Stadler (500), $1,116,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-68-67-68 — 268 Graham DeLaet (245), $545,600 . . . . . . . . . . . .67-72-65-65 — 269 Bubba Watson (245), $545,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . .64-66-68-71 — 269 Hunter Mahan (123), $272,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-71-65-68 — 270 Hideki Matsuyama (123), $272,800 . . . . . . . . . .66-67-68-69 — 270 Charles Howell III (92), $207,700 . . . . . . . . . . . .70-69-67-65 — 271 Brendan Steele (92), $207,700 . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-74-62-69 — 271 Ryan Moore (92), $207,700 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-71-64-70 — 271 Harris English (80), $179,800 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-67-69-71 — 272 Webb Simpson (75), $167,400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-67-66 — 273 Pat Perez (70), $155,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-68-70-71 — 274 Cameron Tringale (61), $130,200 . . . . . . . . . . . .71-67-69-68 — 275 John Mallinger (61), $130,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-72-67-69 — 275 Matt Jones (61), $130,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-65-72-73 — 275 Scott Piercy (55), $102,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-67-75-67 — 276 Morgan Hoffmann (55), $102,300 . . . . . . . . . . . .69-66-70-71 — 276 Greg Chalmers (55), $102,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-67-71-73 — 276 Jason Kokrak (55), $102,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66-69-68-73 — 276 John Merrick (48), $63,302 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-65-69-68 — 277 Michael Thompson (48), $63,302 . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-70-67 — 277 Kevin Na (48), $63,302 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-68-69 — 277 William McGirt (48), $63,302 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-69-73-70 — 277 Justin Hicks (48), $63,302 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-69-67 — 277 Martin Laird (48), $63,302 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-68-71-71 — 277 John Rollins (48), $63,302 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-67-67-71 — 277 Patrick Reed (48), $63,302 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-67-71-72 — 277 Roberto Castro (48), $63,302 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-69-70-66 — 277 Chris Stroud (48), $63,302 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-67-68-72 — 277 Geoff Ogilvy (40), $40,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-68-69 — 278 Ken Duke (40), $40,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-67-72-69 — 278 Bryce Molder (40), $40,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-71-70-70 — 278 Spencer Levin (40), $40,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-69-70-72 — 278 Nick Watney (40), $40,300 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-68-68-73 — 278 Bill Haas (36), $33,480 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-68-71-71 — 279 Jason Bohn (36), $33,480 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-70-69 — 279

Pts 73 69 66 64 62 59 49 38

GF GA 164 119 162 137 170 176 137 139 146 158 159 178 133 174 107 164

Pts 80 63 62 60 59 59 59 50

GF GA 178 133 145 140 167 156 152 163 137 151 164 172 133 142 159 191

Pts 80 79 77 65 59 59 59

GF GA 200 158 185 125 167 143 140 144 158 160 142 172 161 166

Pts 85 76 66 63 62 49 44

Sunday’s Games Washington 6, Detroit 5, OT Winnipeg 2, Montreal 1 Monday’s Games Edmonton 3, Buffalo 2 Pittsburgh 2, Ottawa 1, OT Detroit 2, Vancouver 0 Colorado 2, New Jersey 1, OT Columbus 4, Anaheim 2 Chicago at Los Angeles, 8:30 p.m. Philadelphia at San Jose, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Vancouver at Boston, 5 p.m. Colorado at N.Y. Rangers, 5 p.m. Winnipeg at Carolina, 5 p.m. Calgary at Montreal, 5:30 p.m. Toronto at Florida, 5:30 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Washington, 5:30 p.m. Ottawa at St. Louis, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Dallas at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 5:30 p.m. Chicago at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Dallas at San Jose, 8:30 p.m.

PGA

Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 19 Denver 26, New England 16 Seattle 23, San Francisco 17

SCORING SUMMARY First Quarter Sea—Avril safety, 14:48. Sea—FG Hauschka 31, 10:21. Sea—FG Hauschka 33, 2:16. Second Quarter Sea—Lynch 1 run (Hauschka kick), 12:00. Sea—Smith 69 interception return (Hauschka kick), 3:21. Third Quarter Sea—Harvin 87 kickoff return (Hauschka kick), 14:48. Sea—Kearse 23 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 2:58. Den—D.Thomas 14 pass from Manning (Welker pass from Manning), :00. Fourth Quarter Sea—Baldwin 10 pass from Wilson (Hauschka kick), 11:45. A—82,529.

Golf scores

Manning 1-0. PASSING—Seattle, Wilson 18-25-0206, Jackson 0-1-0-0. Denver, Manning 3449-2-280. RECEIVING—Seattle, Baldwin 5-66, Kearse 4-65, Tate 3-17, Willson 2-17, Lockette 1-19, Miller 1-10, Robinson 1-7, Harvin 1-5. Denver, D.Thomas 13-118, Welker 8-84, J.Thomas 4-27, Moreno 3-20, Tamme 2-9, Ball 2-2, Anderson 1-14, Decker 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

NFL Playoff Glance By The Associated Press Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 4 Indianapolis 45, Kansas City 44 New Orleans 26, Philadelphia 24 Sunday, Jan. 5 San Diego 27, Cincinnati 10 San Francisco 23, Green Bay 20

NFL

Super Bowl XLVIII Box Score SCORES BY QUARTER Seattle . . . . . . . . .8 14 14 7 Denver . . . . . . . .0 0 8 0

SCOREBOARD

GF GA 191 143 168 134 134 122 142 149 159 164 132 173 150 196

PGA Tour FedExCup Leaders By The Associated Press Through Feb. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Points Money 1. Jimmy Walker . . . . . .1,233 $2,417,833 2. Harris English . . . . . . .976 $1,996,197 3. Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . . . .931 $1,789,014 4. Webb Simpson . . . . . .870 $1,857,817 5. Zach Johnson . . . . . . .810 $1,699,450 6. Ryan Moore . . . . . . . . .805 $1,898,050 7. Kevin Stadler . . . . . . . .713 $1,492,698 8. Dustin Johnson . . . . . .639 $1,598,750 9. Patrick Reed . . . . . . . .631 $1,217,552 10. Brian Stuard . . . . . . .629 $1,228,108 11. Graham DeLaet . . . . .597 $1,361,267 12. Charles Howell III . . .542 $1,053,812 13. Scott Stallings . . . . . .530 $1,128,421 14. Jason Bohn . . . . . . . .491 $923,260 15. Gary Woodland . . . . .482 $1,070,777 16. Ryo Ishikawa . . . . . . .425 $854,673 17. Bubba Watson . . . . . .414 $806,007 18. Ryan Palmer . . . . . . .408 $779,240 19. Jordan Spieth . . . . . .406 $831,555 20. Chris Stroud . . . . . . .402 $836,120 21. Charley Hoffman . . . .400 $743,810 22. Pat Perez . . . . . . . . .392 $761,091 23. Scott Brown . . . . . . . .369 $661,910 24. Hideki Matsuyama . . .354 $663,833 25. Brendon Todd . . . . . .349 $541,143 26. Vijay Singh . . . . . . . .347 $604,932 27. Jeff Overton . . . . . . . .345 $607,610 28. Ian Poulter . . . . . . . . .336 $865,479 29. Justin Leonard . . . . . .332 $614,345 30. Will MacKenzie . . . . .330 $642,007 31. Briny Baird . . . . . . . . .321 $548,375 32. Tim Clark . . . . . . . . . .316 $563,883 33. Jerry Kelly . . . . . . . . .310 $577,740 34. Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . .304 $510,895 35. Marc Leishman . . . . .303 $613,100 36. K.J. Choi . . . . . . . . . .297 $571,398 37. Kevin Na . . . . . . . . . .294 $461,952 38. Matt Every . . . . . . . . .289 $466,113 39. Brian Gay . . . . . . . . .286 $490,309 40. Billy Horschel . . . . . .277 $519,721 41. Russell Knox . . . . . . .276 $378,318 42. Justin Hicks . . . . . . . .276 $399,811 43. Keegan Bradley . . . . .249 $477,595 44. Boo Weekley . . . . . . .240 $315,972 45. Brendan Steele . . . . .238 $396,648 46. Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . .237 $489,167 47. Luke Guthrie . . . . . . .236 $371,928 48. Rory Sabbatini . . . . . .235 $414,803 49. Kevin Streelman . . . .228 $476,192 50. Jason Kokrak . . . . . .225 $380,284 51. Spencer Levin . . . . . .213 $241,060 52. Matt Jones . . . . . . . . .211 $318,260 53. Brian Harman . . . . . .210 $339,392 54. Robert Garrigus . . . . .208 $259,758 55. James Driscoll . . . . . .206 $226,488 56. Sergio Garcia . . . . . .205 $526,000 57. Graeme McDowell . . .200 $480,000 58. Camilo Villegas . . . . .195 $174,259 59. Greg Chalmers . . . . .195 $337,229 60. Chad Collins . . . . . . .192 $289,197

Jonas Blixt (36), $33,480 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-71-72-68 — 279 Camilo Villegas (32), $27,900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-68-71 — 280 Gary Woodland (32), $27,900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-72-72-69 — 280 Brian Davis (32), $27,900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-69-70-69 — 280 Matt Every (32), $27,900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-66-67-75 — 280 Ricky Barnes (32), $27,900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-67-67-75 — 280 Chris Smith (27), $21,080 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-69-71-71 — 281 Phil Mickelson (27), $21,080 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-67-72-71 — 281 James Driscoll (27), $21,080 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-70-73-71 — 281 David Lingmerth (27), $21,080 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68-68-73 — 281 K.J. Choi (27), $21,080 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-69-71 — 281 Ben Crane (27), $21,080 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69-69-74 — 281 Erik Compton (21), $15,773 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-72-71-72 — 282 Ryan Palmer (21), $15,773 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-64-70-72 — 282 David Lynn (21), $15,773 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-66-70-74 — 282 Aaron Baddeley (21), $15,773 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70-73-71 — 282 Jhonattan Vegas (21), $15,773 . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-66-75-70 — 282 Brendon de Jonge (16), $14,285 . . . . . . . . . . . .66-73-70-74 — 283 Robert Garrigus (16), $14,285 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70-70-73 — 283 Brian Stuard (16), $14,285 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-68-69-73 — 283 Martin Kaymer (16), $14,285 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-71-72 — 283 Kevin Streelman (16), $14,285 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-68-74-70 — 283 David Hearn (12), $13,764 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70-73-73 — 284 Nicolas Colsaerts (12), $13,764 . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-68-74-73 — 284 J.B. Holmes (12), $13,764 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-68-70-73 — 284 Charley Hoffman (8), $13,206 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-69-75 — 285 Jonathan Byrd (8), $13,206 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-73-69-75 — 285 Brandt Snedeker (8), $13,206 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-64-72-79 — 285 Brian Gay (8), $13,206 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-71-74 — 285 Sang-Moon Bae (8), $13,206 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67-73-71-74 — 285 John Peterson (8), $13,206 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70-74-73 — 285 Kiradech Aphibarnrat (0), $12,710 . . . . . . . . . . .66-71-73-76 — 286 Fred Funk (4), $12,710 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-76-70 — 286 Y.E. Yang (1), $12,276 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64-73-75-75 — 287 Mark Calcavecchia (1), $12,276 . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-71-75 — 287 Scott Langley (1), $12,276 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-71-75 — 287 Derek Ernst (1), $12,276 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-69-72-74 — 287 Steven Bowditch (1), $12,276 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-75-72 — 287 Ben Curtis (1), $11,842 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-72-73-75 — 288 Joe Ogilvie (1), $11,842 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-70-77-70 — 288 Chris Kirk (1), $11,656 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-73-75-76 — 289 Vijay Singh (1), $11,532 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-75-76 — 292

61. Jason Dufner . . . . . . .186 62. Daniel Summerhays .184 63. Stuart Appleby . . . . . .184 64. Morgan Hoffmann . . .182 64. Martin Laird . . . . . . . .182 66. Ken Duke . . . . . . . . .172 67. J.J. Henry . . . . . . . . .171 68. Seung-yul Noh . . . . .169 69. Jason Day . . . . . . . . .167 70. Cameron Tringale . . .163 71. Trevor Immelman . . .162 72. Stewart Cink . . . . . . .160 73. Aaron Baddeley . . . . .159 74. Michael Thompson . .154 75. John Merrick . . . . . . .154 76. Jonas Blixt . . . . . . . . .153 77. Adam Scott . . . . . . . .152 78. Brendon de Jonge . . .151 79. Ricky Barnes . . . . . . .149 80. John Senden . . . . . . .146 81. Hudson Swafford . . . .145 82. Brian Davis . . . . . . . .144 83. Michael Putnam . . . .144 84. Hunter Mahan . . . . . .143 84. Nick Watney . . . . . . .143 86. George McNeill . . . . .143 87. William McGirt . . . . . .138 88. Phil Mickelson . . . . . .138 89. Charlie Wi . . . . . . . . .137 90. Fredrik Jacobson . . . .137 91. Tyrone Van Aswegen 136 92. Bryce Molder . . . . . . .136 93. Sang-Moon Bae . . . .134 94. Kevin Chappell . . . . .133 95. Billy Hurley III . . . . . .130 96. Heath Slocum . . . . . .129 97. Charlie Beljan . . . . . .125 98. John Rollins . . . . . . . .124 99. Roberto Castro . . . . .124 100. Troy Matteson . . . . .124

Transactions

$378,080 $237,945 $260,457 $259,868 $234,013 $302,068 $235,146 $234,847 $366,000 $236,917 $255,967 $275,289 $327,285 $247,062 $229,018 $221,513 $317,750 $202,673 $163,307 $276,855 $197,131 $154,047 $121,648 $288,279 $171,250 $226,890 $151,044 $202,980 $192,667 $298,659 $126,761 $226,460 $175,619 $126,801 $185,084 $159,068 $184,460 $134,846 $139,493 $230,550

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Agreed to terms with INF Alex Gonzalez on a minor league contract. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Agreed to terms with 3B David Freese and RHP Kevin Jepsen. Signed INF Chad Tracy to a minorleague contract. TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with RHP Daniel Bard, RHP Che-Hsuan Lin and RHP Armando Galarraga on minor league contracts. Released RHP Tyler Tufts. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Signed manager Kirk Gibson and general manager Kevin Towers to contract extensions. COLORADO ROCKIES — Agreed to terms with RHP Manny Corpas and RHP Nick Masset on minor league contracts. NEW YORK METS — Agreed to terms with RHP Kyle Farnsworth on a minor-league contract. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Named Fred Stanley special assistant, player personnel; Russ Morman manager for Richmond (EL); Lenn Sakata manager for San Jose (Cal); Andy Skeels hitting coach for Fresno (PCL) and Todd Linden hitting coach for Augusta (SAL). Promoted Shane Turner to director of player development; Steve Decker to coordinator of minor league instruction and hitting; and Carlos Valderrama to manager of the Dominican Summer League Giants. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS — Signed G Sasha Vujacic to a 10-day contract. PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Recalled G Lorenzo Brown from Delaware (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League

Briefs

Continued from Page B1

the field for the game, connecting on just 18 of their 53 tries. They were 6 for 23 (26.1 percent) from the field in the second half. Dane Williams paced NMMI with a game-high 15 points to go with a team-best six rebounds. Antonio Manns had 11, Shaquan Rhodes had nine, and Marcus Roper had eight points and six boards. Rashaun Madison led the visitors with 13 points. Chris Boucher had a double-double of 12 points and 12 boards, while Williams and Jeff Neverson each had 11. Jeff Newberry added 10.

Girls basketball

Dexter 38, NMMI 37 NMMI won three of the four quarters, but Dexter claimed a victory on Monday at the Godfrey Athletic Center. The Colts outscored Dexter 12-11 in the first

OAKLAND RAIDERS — Named Joe Woods defensive backs coach and Marcus Robertson assistant secondary coach. Canadian Football League WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Re-signed OL Chris Kowalczuk and DL Ryan Lucas. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS — Recalled D Sami Vatanen from Norfolk (AHL). MONTREAL CANADIENS — Traded D Raphael Diaz to Vancouver for F Dale Weise. Assigned F Christian Thomas to Hamilton (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Activated D Peter Harrold from injured reserve. SOCCER Major League Soccer CHIVAS USA — Loaned MF Gabriel Farfan to Chiapas FC (Liga MX). PHILADELPHIA UNION — Signed G Brian Holt. COLLEGE MOUNTAIN WEST CONFERENCE — Suspended Wyoming men’s basketball G Josh Adams one game striking an opponent in a Feb. 1 game against Utah State. AKRON — Named Otis Mounds cornerbacks coach. ARKANSAS — Reinstated junior basketball F Alandise Harris and sophomore basketball G Michael Qualls from their one-game suspensions. BAKER — Announced the resignation of baseball coach Phil Hannon, effective at the end of the 2014 season. FLAGLER — Named Kelly Holloway women’s interim volleyball coach. HOLY CROSS — Named Mike Kashurba defensive coordinator. OKLAHOMA STATE — Dismissed freshman basketball G Stevie Clark.

Women’s basketball

The AP Top 25 By The Associated Press The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ women’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Feb. 2, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Prv 1. UConn (36) . . . . . . . . .23-0 900 1 2. Notre Dame . . . . . . . .21-0 863 2 3. Stanford . . . . . . . . . . .21-1 827 4 4. Louisville . . . . . . . . . . .22-1 775 5 5. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21-2 766 3 6. South Carolina . . . . . .20-2 707 7 7. Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . .18-3 680 9 8. Tennessee . . . . . . . . . .18-4 647 10 9. Penn St. . . . . . . . . . . .17-4 595 12 10. Maryland . . . . . . . . . .17-4 545 8 11. Arizona St. . . . . . . . . .19-3 465 15 12. Oklahoma St. . . . . . . .18-3 464 11 13. North Carolina . . . . . .17-5 453 6 14. NC State . . . . . . . . . .19-3 436 18 15. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . .17-5 435 13 16. LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-5 354 14 17. West Virginia . . . . . . .19-3 344 20 18. Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . . .17-5 298 16 19. Texas A&M . . . . . . . . .17-6 243 17 20. Gonzaga . . . . . . . . . .20-3 194 22 21. Middle Tennessee . . .18-3 134 25 22. Nebraska . . . . . . . . . .15-5 102 — 23. California . . . . . . . . . .14-7 93 21 24. Michigan St. . . . . . . . .15-7 88 — 25. Purdue . . . . . . . . . . . .15-7 85 19

Others receiving votes: Iowa St. 68, St. John’s 28, Rutgers 22, Syracuse 17, Florida St. 16, Wichita St. 14, Oklahoma 12, Bowling Green 7, Chattanooga 6, DePaul 4, James Madison 3, Michigan 3, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 3, Texas 3, Iona 1.

quarter and led 20-15 at the break after winning the second 8-4. The Demons grabbed the lead going to the fourth, though, by outscoring the hosts 157 for a 30-27 advantage. Late in the fourth quarter, NMMI took a 37-36 lead with 25 seconds left. Out of a Dexter timeout, Alex Zambrano penetrated and fed Nayely Anderson off a backdoor cut and Anderson connected on the game-winning layup with 4 seconds left. NMMI was unable to get off a final shot as the horn sounded. Anderson paced Dexter (11-10) with 12 points, while Zambrano added 10. Pamela Munoz chipped in seven for the Demons. Lia Herrera led all scorers with 14 points for NMMI, which fell to 7-8 with the loss. Chandler Hawkins added eight points for the Colts.


FINANCIAL / SPORTS

Roswell Daily Record

Seahawks Continued from Page B1

yard interception return touchdown by linebacker Malcolm Smith to make it 22-0, and Percy Harvin’s sensational 87-yard kickoff return to open the second half. “I always imagined myself making great plays,” said Smith, the game’s MVP. “Never thought about being the MVP.” When the Seahawks, up by 29 points, forced a Denver punt early in the third quarter, the 12th Man — and there were legions of them in MetLife Stadium — began chanting “L-O-B, LO-B.” As in Legion of Boom, the Seahawks’ hard-hitting secondary, part of a young team with an average age of 26 years, 138 days. “This is an amazing team. Took us four years to get to this point, but they never have taken a step sideways,” coach Pete Carroll said. “These guys would not take anything but winning this ballgame.”

MVP

The loss by the Broncos again raised questions about Manning’s ability to win the biggest games. He is 11-12 in the postseason, 12 in Super Bowls. After the game, he brushed off questions about his legacy. “Certainly to finish this way is very disappointing. It’s not an easy pill to swallow,” said Manning, who threw for a record 55 touchdowns in 2013, two years after missing an entire season because of neck surgeries. “I don’t know if you ever really get over it.” He never looked comfortable against a defense some will begin comparing to the 1985 Bears and 2000 Ravens — other NFL champions who had runaway Super Bowl victories. Seattle forced four turnovers; Denver had 26 all season. All-Pro cor nerback Richard Sherman left with a high ankle sprain in the fourth quarter. He celebrated on crutches. “I hope we etched our names in the history books,” Sher man said. Wilson, who has an NFL-record 28 wins in his first two pro sea-

He went on: “You might have been overlooked. You might feel like you can make plays and never got the opportunity.” Truth is, the Seahawks were the lucky ones. Because even though Smith was not supposed to be a starter this season, a player with zero interceptions in his first two years in the league, he always was ready when called upon. Pegged mainly as a special teams guy, Smith earned notice with his speed and ability to handle both outside linebacker slots. When Bruce Irvin was suspended for four games in May for violating the league’s policy on performance-enhancing substances, it was Smith who filled in as a starter. When Bobby Wagner was sidelined, and K.J. Wright slid over to middle linebacker, Smith got another opportunity to start. And when Wright broke his right foot late in the season, guess who Seattle called upon: Yep, Smith, of course. Then suddenly, on Sunday, there he was at the Super Bowl, in the right place and right time, as usual. It was Smith who wound up with the victorysealing interception at the end of Seattle’s NFC championship game victory two weeks ago, grabbing the football after Richard Sherman deflected a pass in the end zone. And then, in the biggest game of all, Smith’s pick-6 off a fluttering ball — after teammate Cliff Avril made contact with Manning during the throw — made it 22-0 late in the first half Sunday, and Seattle was on its way. “I was like, ‘Again!? No way.’ I didn’t believe it,” Smith said. He grabbed a fumble later, too, capping quite a late-season surge. “I’ve always just been taught to run to the ball and good things will happen for me,” Smith said. “I played running back as a kid, so it’s always been the most exciting thing to have the ball in my hands.”

Continued from Page B1

the award. His teammates did. “Even during the game,” Smith recalled, “guys were like, ‘You might be MVP.’ And I was like, ‘No way. No way. Not me.’ But to be here, it’s just pretty cool.” Smith is not one of those players who long ago seemed destined to wind up getting the keys to a new vehicle the day after the Super Bowl, a sponsor’s prize for the big game’s best player. Coming out of college at Southern California — where he was coached by the Seahawks’ current boss, Pete Carroll — Smith wasn’t invited to the NFL combine, where top prospects are measured and evaluated. Then, when the 2011 draft rolled around, he wasn’t taken until the seventh round, the 242nd player chosen. Seems to fit right in with the Seahawks, more than a third of whom weren’t even drafted at all. “He didn’t like it, but he had to go in the seventh round. He’s proven otherwise, just like a lot of other guys in our program,” Carroll said. “I think it was extraordinary last night to see Jermaine Kearse score a touchdown, and Doug Baldwin score a touchdown, and Malcolm gets in the end zone and scoops up another fumble,” he continued. “Guys that are not the heralded guys coming in competed in our program and found a way to contribute in enormous ways.” By way of explaining in a euphoric locker room Sunday night why he was an appropriate choice for an MVP from these Seahawks, Smith said: “I’m just fortunate to be a part of it, fortunate to get opportunities. I’m happy to be amongst a bunch of guys that play with attitudes and chips on their shoulders. I’m happy to represent that.”

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 14 141.72 141.72 140.15 140.37 Apr 14 140.17 140.17 127.82 139.40 Jun 14 131.47 131.57 130.55 131.17 Aug 14 129.67 129.82 128.87 129.60 Oct 14 132.70 133.05 132.65 132.67 Dec 14 133.70 134.00 133.65 133.92 Feb 15 134.30 134.40 134.05 134.40 Apr 15 135.50 Jun 15 131.50 Last spot N/A Est. sales 48485. Fri’s Sales: 76,535 Fri’s open int: 378108, up +4646 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Mar 14 169.10 169.10 167.80 168.00 Apr 14 169.00 169.00 168.30 168.40 May 14 169.55 169.70 168.72 169.05 Aug 14 170.45 171.02 170.12 170.45 Sep 14 170.00 170.00 169.60 169.80 Oct 14 169.30 169.30 169.15 169.15 Nov 14 169.05 169.05 168.50 168.55 Jan 15 168.10 Last spot N/A Est. sales 6766. Fri’s Sales: 7,903 Fri’s open int: 50718, off -1207 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 14 86.22 86.22 82.45 84.87 Apr 14 94.80 94.82 92.77 92.85 May 14 102.45 102.70 100.70 102.70 Jun 14 104.72 104.90 103.45 103.55 Jul 14 103.30 103.30 102.25 102.25 Aug 14 100.80 100.80 99.90 100.00 Oct 14 85.77 85.77 80.00 85.52 Dec 14 80.00 80.35 80.00 80.27 Feb 15 80.95 81.30 80.95 81.20 Apr 15 82.00 82.05 82.00 82.05 May 15 87.20 Jun 15 88.50 Last spot N/A Est. sales 45793. Fri’s Sales: 61,179 Fri’s open int: 270038, up +2987+2ü

chg.

-1.30 -1.02 -.33 -.22 -.60 -.43 -.40

-1.42 -1.27 -1.02 -.90 -.35 -.35 -.80

-1.35 -1.95 -1.27 -1.15 -1.00 -.45 -.10 +.10 -.25

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Mar 14 85.70 85.89 84.76 85.01 May 14 86.34 86.45 85.34 85.57 Jul 14 86.00 86.19 85.00 85.16 Oct 14 78.12 Dec 14 76.41 76.45 75.96 76.36 Mar 15 76.70 76.94 76.70 76.91 May 15 77.08 Jul 15 77.23 Oct 15 76.93 Dec 15 76.39 Mar 16 76.29 May 16 76.29 Jul 16 76.29 Oct 16 76.29 Dec 16 76.29 Last spot N/A Est. sales 23381. Fri’s Sales: 27,570 Fri’s open int: 179072, off -3801

chg.

-.82 -.76 -.78 -.41 -.04 +.05 -.04 -.04 -.04 -.04 -.04 -.04 -.04 -.04 -.04

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 555 564ü 554 563fl May 14 558 566ü 556ø 565fl Jul 14 561ü 569ü 560 568fl Sep 14 570 577fl 568ø 577 Dec 14 582ø 590ü 581ü 589fl Mar 15 592ø 600 592ü 600 May 15 595fl 602ø 595fl 602ø

chg.

+8 +7ø +7ü +7 +7 +7ü +6fl

Jul 15 592 598ø 592 598ø Sep 15 598ü 604fl 598ü 604fl Dec 15 607ü 614 607ü 614 Mar 16 614 620fl 614 620fl May 16 614 624fl 614 624fl Jul 16 616ø 622ø 616ø 622ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 86424. Fri’s Sales: 91,555 Fri’s open int: 442995, off -1587 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 433ø 438fl 433ü 435fl May 14 438fl 444ø 438fl 441fl Jul 14 443ø 449fl 443ü 446fl Sep 14 445fl 451ø 445fl 449 Dec 14 449fl 455ø 449ø 453 Mar 15 459 464ø 459 462 May 15 467 470ø 465fl 468 Jul 15 471fl 474 469ø 471 Sep 15 467 467 466 466ü Dec 15 460fl 466ø 460ü 463fl Mar 16 472 472 471 471 May 16 472ü 474ø 472ü 474ø Jul 16 475 477ø 475 475fl Sep 16 462ø 464 462ø 464 Dec 16 457 459 457 457ø Jul 17 465fl 467ü 465fl 467ü Dec 17 456 456 456 456 Last spot N/A Est. sales 330709. Fri’s Sales: 271,231 Fri’s open int: 1304900, off -5682 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 406 417 404ø 414fl May 14 361ø 369ø 361ø 368ü Jul 14 333ø 338 333ø 337ø Sep 14 308 310ü 308 310ü Dec 14 295 296 291ü 295fl Mar 15 295 298fl 295 298fl 315 315 May 15 316 316 Jul 15 316 316 315 315 Sep 15 316 316 315 315 Dec 15 316 316 315 315 Jul 16 316 316 315 315 Sep 16 316 316 315 315 Last spot N/A Est. sales 1609. Fri’s Sales: 1,473 Fri’s open int: 11248, off -5 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 1281fl 1299fl 1278ø 1292fl May 14 1267fl 1285 1264fl 1278ü Jul 14 1250ø 1267fl 1248fl 1262ü Aug 14 1210 1223fl 1207 1220 Sep 14 1145ø 1155 1144ø 1151 Nov 14 1103ø 1113 1099 1108ø Jan 15 1110 1117ü 1105ü 1113ø Mar 15 1111fl 1121ø 1109fl 1118 May 15 1117ü 1121fl 1117ü 1119ü Jul 15 1118ü 1123fl 1116ü 1122ø Aug 15 1111 1113fl 1111 1113fl Sep 15 1097ø 1099fl 1097ø 1099fl Nov 15 1090ø 1099fl 1089fl 1096ø Jan 16 1095ü 1097ø 1095ü 1097ø Mar 16 1095ø 1097fl 1095ø 1097fl May 16 1097ø 1099fl 1097ø 1099fl Jul 16 1098ø 1099ü 1098ø 1099ü Aug 16 1093ü 1094 1093ü 1094 Sep 16 1071ü 1072ü 1071ü 1072ü Nov 16 1051ü 1052fl 1051ü 1052fl Jul 17 1058 1060ü 1058 1060ü Nov 17 1047ø 1048ø 1047ø 1048ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 173380. Fri’s Sales: 144,422 Fri’s open int: 612079, up +3045

sons, including playoffs, had a 23-yard TD pass to Jer maine Kearse late in the third quarter to make it 36-0. Wilson also hit Doug Baldwin for a 10-yard score in the final period in what had become one of the most lopsided Super Bowls. For the fifth time in six meetings between the NFL’s No. 1 offense and defense, the D dominated. “It’s all about making history,” All-Pro safety Earl Thomas said. “This was a dominant performance from top to bottom.” Denver fell to 2-5 in Super Bowls, and by the end many of Manning’s passes resembled the “ducks” Sherman said the All-Pro quarterback sometimes threw. The victory was particularly sweet for Carroll, fired in 1994 by the Jets. He led the Patriots for three seasons and again was canned. After a short stint out of coaching, he took over at Souther n Califor nia and won two national titles. But he always felt there was unfinished business in the NFL. Carroll finished that business by lifting the Vince Lombardi Trophy, four years after taking

FUTURES

+6ø +6ø +6fl +6fl +10fl +15fl

+1fl +2ü +2fl +2fl +3 +2fl +2ü +1ø +1fl +2fl +2ü +2ü +1fl +1ø +1ø +1ø -1ü

+9 +7 +5fl +2ü +3fl +3fl -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

+10 +9fl +10ü +9ø +6ø +4 +3fl +3ø +3ü +2fl +2fl +2ü +2ü +2ü +2ü +2ü +fl +fl +1 +1ø +2ü +1

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

chg.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Mar 14 97.30 97.94 96.26 96.43 -1.06 Apr 14 96.51 96.98 95.46 95.72 -.99 May 14 95.61 95.97 94.62 94.90 -.90 Jun 14 94.68 95.00 93.73 94.02 -.83 Jul 14 93.44 94.00 92.85 93.13 -.74 Aug 14 92.72 93.04 92.02 92.26 -.64 Sep 14 91.96 92.12 91.15 91.45 -.55 Oct 14 91.10 91.26 90.54 90.74 -.47 Nov 14 90.38 90.59 89.76 90.14 -.40 Dec 14 89.79 90.08 89.12 89.58 -.34 Jan 15 89.22 89.22 88.88 88.88 -.27 Feb 15 88.49 88.51 87.82 88.19 -.21 Mar 15 87.74 87.74 87.57 87.57 -.17 Apr 15 87.01 -.13 May 15 86.51 -.10 Jun 15 86.25 86.25 85.64 86.02 -.07 Jul 15 85.41 -.04 Aug 15 84.88 -.01 Sep 15 84.44 +.02 Oct 15 84.02 +.05 Nov 15 83.66 +.07 Dec 15 83.20 83.60 82.85 83.33 +.09 Jan 16 82.83 +.11 Feb 16 82.38 +.13 Mar 16 81.97 +.15 Apr 16 81.62 +.17 Last spot N/A Est. sales 590078. Fri’s Sales: 558,549 Fri’s open int: 1572413, off -8441 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Mar 14 2.6349 2.6440 2.5942 2.6069 -.0245 Apr 14 2.8114 2.8247 2.7831 2.7957 -.0176 May 14 2.8076 2.8227 2.7800 2.7957 -.0168 Jun 14 2.7930 2.8010 2.7661 2.7775 -.0149 Jul 14 2.7636 2.7700 2.7389 2.7504 -.0126 Aug 14 2.7187 2.7339 2.7037 2.7164 -.0105 Sep 14 2.6845 2.6965 2.6607 2.6757 -.0090 Oct 14 2.5415 2.5445 2.5248 2.5349 -.0058 Nov 14 2.4942 2.4994 2.4872 2.4947 -.0052 Dec 14 2.4760 2.4924 2.4599 2.4743 -.0038

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Mon. Aluminum -$0.7545 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.2163 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.1995 N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Lead - $2091.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8915 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1262.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1260.40 troy oz., NY Merc spot Mon. Silver - $19.445 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $19.389 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Platinum -$1386.00 troy oz., Handy & Harman. Platinum -$1386.60 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

B3

“This is an amazing team. ... These guys would not take anything but winning this ballgame.”

— Seahawks coach Pete Carroll

“I hope we etched our names in the history books.”

— Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman

charge in Seattle and eight years after the Seahawks lost in their only previous Super Bowl to Pittsburgh. No Super Bowl had been played outdoors in a cold-weather city — not that the Big Apple was anything close to frozen Sunday, when it was 49 degrees at kickoff. Things went sour for Manning and the Broncos from the very first scrimmage play, and by halftime they were down 22-0 — their biggest deficit of the season and the only time they didn’t score in a half. On that first play, Manning stepped up toward the line just as center Manny Ramirez snapped the ball. It flew past his incredulous quarterback into the end zone, where Knowshon Moreno dived on it for a safety. A mere 12 seconds in, Seattle led 2-0 with the quickest score in Super Bowl history, beating Chicago’s Devin Hester’s kickoff return to open the 2007 game — against Manning’s Colts. That one ended much better for

Jan 15 2.4693 Feb 15 2.4758 Mar 15 2.4913 Apr 15 2.6403 May 15 2.6383 Jun 15 2.6213 Jul 15 2.5988 Aug 15 2.5725 Sep 15 2.5425 Oct 15 2.4065 Nov 15 2.3730 Dec 15 2.3510 Jan 16 2.3510 Feb 16 2.3530 Mar 16 2.3580 Apr 16 2.4580 Last spot N/A Est. sales 100566. Fri’s Sales: 107,302 Fri’s open int: 254866, off -574 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Mar 14 4.848 4.986 4.751 4.905 Apr 14 4.441 4.564 4.388 4.507 May 14 4.382 4.494 4.333 4.450 Jun 14 4.401 4.485 4.385 4.469 Jul 14 4.423 4.510 4.370 4.490 Aug 14 4.394 4.528 4.391 4.485 Sep 14 4.404 4.472 4.383 4.464 Oct 14 4.424 4.524 4.375 4.479 Nov 14 4.480 4.535 4.444 4.529 Dec 14 4.596 4.655 4.575 4.646 Jan 15 4.675 4.752 4.190 4.744 Feb 15 4.640 4.687 4.190 4.684 Mar 15 4.544 4.590 4.190 4.577 Apr 15 4.050 4.205 4.023 4.035 May 15 3.982 4.205 3.975 3.994 Jun 15 4.000 4.205 4.000 4.011 Jul 15 4.190 4.205 4.030 4.030 Aug 15 4.031 4.205 4.031 4.041 Sep 15 4.190 4.205 4.031 4.031 Oct 15 4.095 4.205 4.040 4.057 Nov 15 4.100 4.205 4.100 4.111 Dec 15 4.190 4.252 4.190 4.252 Jan 16 4.354 4.367 4.150 4.367 Feb 16 4.330 4.342 4.150 4.342 Mar 16 4.271 4.287 4.150 4.287 Apr 16 4.150 4.150 3.997 3.997 Last spot N/A Est. sales 269839. Fri’s Sales: 380,680 Fri’s open int: 1239114, up +894

METALS

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Manning as Indianapolis won the championship. This one was a fiasco throughout. Steven Hauschka made 31and 33-yard field goals for 8-0. Then the Seahawks began scoring touchdowns. Manning’s third-down pass to Julius Thomas sailed way too high and directly to safety Kam Chancellor, giving the Seahawks the ball at Denver’s 37. A thirddown pass interference call on Tony Carter brought Seattle to the 1, and Marshawn L ynch scored to make it 15-0. Then Smith made his second huge play in two weeks. His interception clinched the NFC championship win over San Francisco. Cliff Avril got to Manning’s arm as he was throwing, the ball fluttered directly to Smith, who took off down the left sideline for a 69yard interception TD. Manning trudged to the sideline, a look of disgust on his face, Denver’s reputation as an unstoppable force erased.

Ratings

Super Bowl-related tweets was up from 24.1 million last year. The moment of peak activity on Twitter came after Harvin’s TD jaunt. Harvin’s run produced a 381,605 tweet per minute average, the company said. The next biggest peaks of activity came when Jermaine Kearse caught a touchdown pass and Malcolm Smith returned an interception for a touchdown. There was a big boost in people going to Twitter during particularly memorable parts of the game, said Brian Poliakoff, Twitter spokesman. It was a big night — and day after — for halftime star Bruno Mars, too. Nielsen said an estimated 115.3 million people watched Mars and his guests, the Red Hot Chili Peppers. That makes it the mostwatched Super Bowl halftime show ever, eclipsing Madonna’s performance two years ago. Mars’ album, “Unorthodox Jukebox,” moved into No. 1 on the iTunes album chart on Monday, while his debut “DooWops & Hooligans” is at No. 3. Mars has 11 songs in the top 100 of the iTunes singles chart.

Continued from Page B1

“We were a little surprised, absolutely,” Wanger said. The blowout had some at Fox worried that enough people would tune out in the fourth quarter to ruin any chance at a ratings record. So when Percy Harvin ran the opening kickoff of the second half back for a touchdown to give the Seahawks a 29-0 lead, “let’s just say we weren’t popping Champagne bottles,” he said. But initial interest in the game — perhaps fueled by its New York-area setting — was high enough to overcome the lopsided score. Ratings for the opening kickoff were 12 percent higher than they were for last year’s game, Fox said. For the New York market, the Super Bowl rating was higher than it was two years ago when the hometown Giants were winning in dramatic fashion. Fox said an average of 528,000 people watched the live Inter net stream of the game, peaking at the end of the third quarter. The number of

-.0017 -.0017 -.0017 -.0002 -.0002 -.0002 -.0002 -.0002 -.0002 -.0002 -.0002 -.0002 -.0002 -.0002 -.0002 -.0002

-.038 +.053 +.071 +.073 +.072 +.070 +.071 +.069 +.062 +.050 +.045 +.044 +.033 +.012 +.012 +.011 +.010 +.010 +.009 +.008 +.011 +.018 +.023 +.023 +.023 +.020

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name

MARKET SUMMARY AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Vol (00) Last Chg Name

Name Vol (00) Last SiriusXM 769006 3.55 Zynga 734772 4.49 Facebook 732424 61.48 PwShs QQQ61041584.29 Cisco 599403 21.55

BkofAm 1550522 16.35 iShEMkts 1118189 37.11 SPDR Fncl1025282 20.53 FordM 910323 14.55

-.40 -1.08 -.53 -.41

Vol (00) Last 1.11 AlldNevG 62495 4.81 InovioPhm 44334 2.49 CheniereEn 33475 43.04 NwGold g 32723 5.74

Name BarcShtB PUVixST rs C-TrCitiVol Comcst29 DxMCBr rs

%Chg +18.7 +14.2 +12.7 +11.5 +10.5

Name RetractTc Tofutti Medgenics B2gold g Air Inds

Chg +.91 +1.61 +1.32 +.51 +.44

%Chg +31.0 +22.1 +13.8 +11.5 +11.0

%Chg -12.2 -11.9 -10.9 -10.2 -10.2

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg Medgen wt 3.01 -.49 -14.0 Oramed n 16.77 -5.32 InfuSystem 2.61 -.37 -12.4 DicernaP n 32.66 -8.46 WirelessT 3.05 -.35 -10.3 GalenaBio 4.22 -1.05 LiqTech 2.29 -.26 -10.2 VandaPhm 11.11 -2.12 ComndSec 2.09 -.22 -9.54 RetOpp wt 2.10 -.36

%Chg -24.1 -20.6 -19.9 -16.0 -14.6

466 2,673 77 3,216 37 127

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

362 2,285 85 2,732 48 75

S&P500ETF 2270543174.17 -4.01 RexahnPh 102528

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Last Chg 25.86 +4.08 99.94+12.41 4.60 +.52 43.50 +4.50 21.29 +2.02

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last FdAgricA 23.10 KindrM wt 2.60 PrUPM400 s 77.33 DrxMCBull 66.58 YuMe n 7.01

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg -3.20 -.35 -9.50 -7.59 -.80

DIARY

Volume

Name AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola Disney EOG Res EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Last 3.95 4.40 7.99 2.45 8.72

DIARY

Last 3.85 8.90 10.91 4.93 4.44

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

133 272 28 433 6 12

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

DIARY

117,120,380 Volume

INDEXES

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 15,372.80 7,053.75 501.67 9,741.58 2,260.12 3,996.96 1,741.89 18,643.10 1,094.58

Net Chg -326.05 -235.43 -4.59 -226.07 -27.42 -106.92 -40.70 -462.14 -36.30

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg Name

1.84f .90f .04 2.92f 4.00 1.12 .86f .75 3.68f 2.52 .50f .58 1.20a .90 3.80 2.64

10 13 16 21 10 20 20 40 10 10 11 11 8 13 11 18

31.95 67.06 16.35 123.08 111.14 37.20 69.99 161.74 54.89 90.05 14.55 28.04 45.06 23.95 172.90 86.78

-1.37 -1.27 -.40 -2.18 -.49 -.62 -2.62 -3.50 -.62 -2.11 -.41 -.96 -1.24 -.59 -3.78 -1.69

-9.1 -2.2 +5.0 -9.8 -11.0 -9.9 -8.4 -3.6 -4.1 -11.0 -5.7 +.2 -9.3 -7.7 -7.8 -5.3

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

Chg -.03 +.09 -1.09 -1.98 -.36

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg %Chg Name +.40 +11.3 SiebertFn +.31 +7.6 BioTelem +.42 +5.5 CSVxSht rs +.12 +5.2 Dynatron +.25 +3.0 CordiaBc rs

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

4,654,723,974 Volume

52-Week High Low 16,588.25 13,784.01 7,591.43 5,757.05 537.86 462.66 11,334.65 8,700.73 2,471.19 2,186.97 4,246.55 3,105.37 1,850.84 1,485.01 19,776.59 15,674.94 1,182.04 894.24

Chg -.04 -.10 -.09 -.90 ...6

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

2,558,826,787

% Chg -2.08 -3.23 -.91 -2.27 -1.20 -2.61 -2.28 -2.42 -3.21

YTD % Chg -7.26 -4.69 +2.26 -6.33 -6.85 -4.30 -5.76 -5.39 -5.93

52-wk % Chg +10.75 +21.19 +6.43 +10.04 -6.15 +27.65 +16.46 +18.04 +21.72

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

1.76f 1.12 2.92f .74f 2.27 1.04f 1.56f .16 1.20 1.15 .68e 2.12 1.88 .40 1.20 1.12

31 14 22 19 18 15 12 19 24 15 ... 12 14 14 11 15

52.08 36.48 52.36 24.01 78.57 30.60 71.36 20.43 41.50 61.52 18.95 46.41 72.66 20.89 44.43 28.61

-.89 -1.36 +.53 -.64 -1.79 +.20 -1.73 -.52 -.90 -1.31 -.29 -1.61 -2.02 -.99 -.91 -.30

+4.1 -2.5 -.6 -.5 -5.3 -.1 -7.5 +8.4 -5.5 -11.8 -5.2 -5.6 -7.7 -10.3 -2.1 +2.4

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


B4 Tuesday, February 4, 2014 DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: My husband and I live in a 55plus retirement community. We do many things together, but we also do things independently. One resident decided to form two men’s clubs. One meets every week for breakfast, and the other twice a month at night. The members go to each other’s homes for the evening meetings. Abby, the man who started these clubs is chauvinistic. He made a rule that women are not allowed in their own homes when their husbands host a meeting — “no skirts allowed.” Therefore,

even though the wife prepares everything for her husband’s meeting, she’s told to slip out of the house before anyone arrives. My husband agrees that this is ridiculous and is considering quitting the club, but he has formed friendships with some of the men. The guys are bamboozled by the leader and tell their wives that anything said at a meeting is “confidential.” The obvious solution would be to meet at a coffee shop, but the man in charge says the homes provide a more intimate setting. My husband feels bad about it, and I don’t want him to quit a group he enjoys. Any suggestions? GOOD LITTLE VEGAS WIFE DEAR GOOD LITTLE WIFE: It appears the founder of the clubs has his head stuck firmly in the 1950s. And while we can’t change that, I do have some suggestions. The first is that the wives stop preparing anything and let the “bachelors” do it themselves or

COMICS

order takeout or deli for their meetings. The second is that the “widows” join together for an evening of fun while the men are having their meetings. Of course, nothing that happens during these ladies’ evenings of fun should be shared with the husbands — including what they did or what clubs they may have visited. P.S. Because your husband feels bad about how the women are being treated, perhaps he should consider attending only the breakfast get-togethers and seeing those men in the evening group he has bonded with independently.

#####

DEAR ABBY: My girlfriend loses her keys, wallet, credit cards or iPad every day. I have suggested ways to avoid losing her keys. For example — always use the same pocket in her purse or put them in a bowl by the door. She doesn’t do it. I think it is to spite me. She has now become resentful

that I have become impatient about it. I’m frustrated because this is something that can easily be fixed, and I’m tired of searching for 20 minutes for whatever she has misplaced. What can I do? BEYOND FRUSTRATED IN L.A.

Family Circus

DEAR BEYOND FRUSTRATED: The first thing you should do is understand that your girlfriend isn’t doing this to upset you, and it’s possible that she becomes as upset as you do when it happens. While I agree that part of the problem is that she’s disorganized, it could also be that her thinking is scattered. When she puts something down, she isn’t fully in the moment. Her thoughts may be on something else. Frankly, there isn’t anything you can do about it. If there is a solution to your girlfriend’s problem, it’s that she should slow down and think about EXACTLY what she’s doing when she’s doing it, which is sometimes easier said than done.

Beetle Bailey

The Wizard of Id

HINTS

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE Dear Heloise:

I try to recycle anything and everything. Can you tell me if there is a place that will recycle all of the brownish, small PRESCRIPTION BOTTLES? My city curbside recycling program does not accept them.

Dilbert

Janet D. in Texas

Unfortunately, these prescription bottles are not easy to “take care of”! Most curbside recycling programs will not accept them because of the small size: They can’t easily run through the automated recycling machines. If they get into the machine, they break into pieces, fall through and end up in the landfill anyway.

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Heloise Central (meaning my office staff, whom I call my magpies!) found that no pharmacies would accept the bottles back. There are some mail-back programs, but you would need to do research on any programs that are available in your area. With more readers wanting to recycle these bottles, hopefully the pharmacies will start taking them back. If you have no recycling option, then take the empty bottles, being sure to remove the labels, and place them in the garbage. #####

For Better or For Worse

Heloise

Dear Heloise: Many of us hang a tea towel over the handle on the oven door. I used to, until one day when I was making a meatloaf in too shallow a pan. Some fat must have sputtered out of the pan, hit the hot element and sent out a quick flash of flame, just enough to set the tea towel on fire. I happened to walk into the kitchen, and there it was, burning away! Now I hang the towel on the refrigerator door.

Garfield

Linda M., via email

Oh dear! How lucky you happened to walk into the kitchen! This is a reminder to NOT leave the house with something in the oven cooking! #####

Heloise

Hagar the Horrible

Dear Readers:

More and more of us use reusable bags when shopping, but how often do you clean those bags? Here are some hints for using and cleaning reusable bags: * When checking out in the grocery store, ask that foods such as meats and fish be placed in plastic bags before being packed in reusable bags. This will cut down on any leaks and cross-contamination from these foods to the bags.

* Have separate reusable bags for nonfood items only.

Snuffy Smith

* Plastic-lined reusable bags should be hand-washed using soap and hot water. Let air-dry.

* Cloth reusable bags should be washed according to the care label. Otherwise, wash in the washing machine with laundry detergent. Then dry in a dryer, or let air-dry. #####

Heloise

Dear Heloise: I use empty sixpack cartons (Heloise here: cardboard type that holds various drinks) to tote and store spraypaint cans. Tim K. in Idaho

Dear Heloise:

When I use my hot-glue gun, I wrap the tips of my fingers in foil to protect them from hot-glue burn marks. There are things you can buy for your fingertips, but the foil is cheaper. Lydia in Indiana

Zits

Roswell Daily Record


CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record

GARAGE SALES 007. West

Alice’s Antiques/Thrift Store 4502 W. 2nd open every 1st week of ea. mo. 1-6p Call 505-508-7334

045. Employment Opportunities

and physical. Competitive salary and benefits. Application must be filled out online at careerbuilders.com

ANNOUNCEMENTS

EOE EMPLOYEE

015. Personals Special Notice

LOOKING FOR BROTHER born 1941 -1942 in Albuquerque, NM in a girls home-orphanage, mother from Roswell, father from Albuquerque, father’s last name Majors 209-573-1130 PUBLIC NOTARY available. 575-910-5219

INSTRUCTION

030. Education & Instructions

MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant!NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC Train gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-888-926-6073

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

PECOS VALLEY Broadcasting has immediate openings for Advertising Sales Representatives. Help local businesses grow their business by selling them advertising our or many platforms including radio, video and digital. Base salary plus generous commission program. We’ll train! Apply with Gene Dow VP & GM, hireme@pvbcradio.com PVBC is an Equal Opportunity Employer! Women and minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. AmeriPride Linen and Apparel

REQUISITION# 106917

GED and Cognitive Instructor

Experienced individual needed to prepare inmate students for reentry through GED completion and cognitive programs. Teaching License, or Bachelor Degree in related field and NM Teacher Basic Skills Assessment required; education experience preferred. Work will be performed in a prison setting. Excellent pay and benefits. Please submit cover letter, resume, and unofficial transcripts to Supervisor of Education, Roswell Correctional Center, 578 W. Chickasaw Rd., Hagerman, NM 88232 or email to: Sharon.Steen@state.nm.us

by Feb. 7, 2014. REGISTRAR

Experienced individual needed to maintain student records including data entry, proctoring standardized test sessions, and processing student enrollments at Roswell Correctional Center. Teaching License, or Bachelor Degree in related field and NM Teacher Basic Skills Assessment required; education experience preferred. Work will be performed in a prison setting. Excellent pay and benefits. Please submit cover letter, resume, and unofficial transcripts to Supervisor of Education, Roswell Correctional Center, 578 W. Chickasaw Rd., Hagerman, NM 88232 or email to: Sharon.Steen@state.nm.us

by Feb. 7, 2014.

NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT The Town of Carrizozo is seeking applications for a full-time New Mexico Certified Police Officer or eligible to certify by waiver. Salary starts at $16.50 per hour plus health insurance and retirement. Complete job description and applications are available at the Town of Carrizozo City Hall, 400 9th Street, PO Box 247, Carrizozo, NM 88301. Applications will be accepted until positions is filled. Please mail completed applications along wtih resume to Town of Carrizozo, PO Box 828, Carrizozo, NM 88301 Att: Chief Barnett or deliver them to 404 Central Street, Carrizozo, NM 88301. Te;ephone number is 575-648-2351 Email address is: carrizozopolice@tularosa.net

Legals

Notice to Creditors... Publish January February 4, 2014

28,

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES IN THE PROBATE COURT IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF RICHARD J. HILFERTY, Deceased. Probate: 9152

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The undersigned having been appointed Personal Representative of the ESTATE OF RICHARD J. HILFERTY, Deceased. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims (i) within two months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or (ii) within two months after the mailing or delivery of this notice, whichever is later, or be forever barred.

/s/Clay Hilferty c/o Mark W. Taylor, Esq. Mark W. Taylor & Associates, P.C. P.O. Box 898 Roswell,NM 88202-0898

Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR HIRING VACUUM truck drivers, with tanker endorsement, around the local hill area, must have a CDL and clean driving record, and must pass a DOT drug test. For more info 575-677-3371 OPTOMETRIC OFFICE seeking receptionist for a 1/2 day/afternoon position. Duties include: answering phone, making appointments, checking in/out patients and general clerical duties. PO Box 1897, Unit #366 Roswell, NM 88202 The Roswell Daily Record is currently accepting applications for the position of General Assignment Reporter. Previous reporting experience or strong writing skills required. Applications are available at the Record at 2301 N. Main St. Application materials can also be mailed to: Roswell Daily Record, Attn: Editor, PO Box 1897, Roswell,NM or emailed to editor@rdrnews.com No phone calls, please. WE ARE now hiring and taking applications for FT/PT Customer Service representatives. Must be able to work evening and Sat. Call Bob for interview 575-622-5326. PROGRAM MANAGER

Progressive Residential Services of New Mexico, Inc., Human Service Agency with 30-year history, is seeking experienced candidates to join its team in the Roswell, New Mexico area. The selected candidate will be responsible for Residential and Day Program Service operations and oversight including development and marketing. Knowledge in the areas of Human Resources, Financial management, State Standards and Compliance requirements is also necessary. Qualified candidates will possess at least a BA/BS Degree with a minimum of 3 years of experience in Human Service delivery. The individual must also have at least 1 year of supervisory experience. The position also requires proficient computer skills, including expertise in Microsoft Office. Enjoy excellent salary and benefits in a family friendly Agency. Interested Candidates should forward their resume and cover letter, including salary requirements to hr.ahs7200@yahoo.com.

Legals

Relief Customer Service Rep

Application open from January 6, 2014 to February 5, 2014. High School Diploma/GED, experience with route sales desired, ability to work directly with customers, build relationship with customers by providing resolutions to problems and complaints, clean driving record, ability to lift up to 50 lbs and pass a Department of Transportation drug test

045. Employment Opportunities

Notice of Pendency of Action... Publish January 21, 28, February 4, 2014

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES TERRY W. LEE Plaintiff, V.

THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF PATRICIA M. CANFIELD, Deceased, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF ALFRED E. COULOMBE, Deceased, URSLEY V. COULOMBE, if living, if deceased, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF URSLEY V. COULOMBE, Deceased, and ALL UNKNOWN CLAIMANTS OF INTEREST, TITLE OR LIEN ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF, Defendants CV-2013-00514

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

1. Please be advised that the above captioned lawsuit has been filed against the named Defendants. 2. The lawsuit seeks to Quiet the Title to real property located at 3308 North Bandolina Drive, Chaves County, Roswell, New Mexico. 3. Defendants in this lawsuit are as recited above. Notice is hereby given to the Unknown Heirs of the following named deceased person: Patricia M. Canfield; Unknown Heirs of the following named deceased person: Alfred E. Coulombe; the following named defendant by name, if living; if deceased, her Unknown Heirs: Ursley V. Coulombe; and to Unknown Persons who claim a lien, interest, or title adverse to the Plaintiff; names unknown. 4. The name, address and telephone number of Plaintiff’s Attorney is: David M. Stevens, Attorneys at Law, PC, 400 North Pennsylvania, Suite 940, Roswell, N.M. 88201, 575-622-8777. 5. Be advised that if you fail to answer or otherwise plead to this lawsuit within 30 days of the last date of publication, that a Default Judgment may be taken against you. /s/Freddie J. Romero District Court Judge Division 6

Prepared by: David M. Stevens Attorneys at Law, PC 400 North Pennsylvania Suite 940 Roswell, New Mexico 88201 575-622-8777

045. Employment Opportunities

TEMPORARY FARM Labor: Don Oppliger Farms, Dalhart, TX, has 8 positions for silage & oilseed crops; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.86/hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 3/1/14 – 12/1/14. Apply at nearest NM Workforce Office with Job Order TX4955863 or call 505-383-2721. MJG CORPORATION is now hiring cake decorators. Apply at MJG Corp. 204 W. 4th St. Roswell, NM 88201. Ask for Jay or Gary. EMPLOYEE HEALTH COORDINATOR RN-PT. PT position in Human Resources ENMMC. Apply online at enmmc.com EOE EMPLOYEES NEEDED for growing constructions company, any construction experience helpful, supervisors and laborers needed. Call 623-1824 or come by #4 Wool Bowl for application. BOOKKEEPER

Bank of the Southwest is looking to immediately fill the position of full time Bookkeeper. Job duties to include, but not limited to customer service, telephone etiquette, and excellent organizational skills.

Requirements: Must have a good attitude and basic computer skills. Must be detailed oriented with excellent time management skills. 1 year bank experience preferred. Company offers excellent work environment and salary. Pre-employment drug test and background screen required. Apply in person at Bank of the Southwest, 226 N Main, Roswell, NM by February 9, 2014. EEO/AA

045. Employment Opportunities

THE ROSWELL Daily Record is now accepting applications for the Full Time position of: OUTSIDE SALES The ideal candidate must possess excellent customer service skills, superior organizational skills a self-starter and strong work ethic. This is a full time position. Interested Applicants please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Vonnie Fischer, 2301 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88201 or e-mail to: addirector@rdrnews.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! ROSWELL NISSAN is currently looking for a dependable, hard working, detailed oriented individual for the position of Detailer/Lot Attendant. Apply online at www.roswellnissan.com HOUSE OF Pain is looking for counter help. Customer skills a must. Call House of Pain at 622-6192 IMMEDIATE OPENING Southwestern Wireless has a position open for Broadband Installation Technician. Applicant needs to be a self-starter with customer service and organizational skills. Must have computer knowledge and be able to troubleshoot and configure TCP/IP and Router configurations. Applicant must be able to pass a drug test. Mail resume to Southwestern Wireless, PO Box 2528, Roswell, NM 88202 or email john@swwmail.net FARMERS COUNTRY Market - Uptown is looking for part-time cashiers and sackers. You must be clean, dependable and able to work well with people. Cashiers must be 21 years old with a great attitude. Sackers must be at least 16 years old. Serious applicates only! Pick up application at 2810 North Main. No phone calls please.

Legals

Notice of Suit... Publish February 4, 11, 18, 2014

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT No. D-504-CV-2013-00164

BENEFICIAL FINANCIAL I INC., vs.

Plaintiff,

THE ESTATE OF BERNICE COSTIN A/K/A BERNICE EILEEN COSTIN, DECEASED, CASSANDRA KERMODE, AS KNOWN HEIR AND AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES AND LEGATEES OF BERNICE COSTIN A/K/A BERNICE EILEEN COSTIN, DECEASED, Defendants.

NOTICE OF SUIT

TO: DEFENDANTS, UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, AND LEGATEES OF BERNICE COSTIN A/K/A BERNICE EILEEN COSTIN, DECEASED,

You are hereby notified that a civil action has been filed against you in the District Court of Chaves County, New Mexico, by Plaintiff, Beneficial Financial I Inc., in which Plaintiff prays for foreclosure on its Note and Mortgage on real property located in Chaves County, New Mexico, as described in the claim in said cause against Defendants named above, that the said real property be sold according to law and practice of this Court to pay the lien of the Plaintiff, and that the interest of the Defendants, and each of them, and all persons claiming under or through them and all other persons bound by these proceedings be barred and foreclosed of all rights, interest of claims to said real property, and for such other and further relief as the Court may deem just and proper. The property involved is the real estate and improvements located at 911 East Hermosa, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, and more particularly described as: Lots 17 and 18 in Block 5 of Linda Vista Estates Number 5 Redivision, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk's Office on April 13, 1962 and recorded in Book D, Page 9, Real Property Records of Chaves County, New Mexico,

including any improvements, fixtures, and attachments, such as, but not limited to, mobile homes. If there is a conflict between the legal description and the street address, the legal description shall control. You are further notified that unless you enter or cause to be entered your appearance or file responsive pleadings or motions in said cause within thirty (30) days of the third consecutive publication of this Notice of Suit, judgment will be rendered in said cause against you and each of you by default, and the relief prayed for will be granted. The name of the attorneys for Beneficial Financial I Inc. is Rose L. Brand & Associates, P.C., 7430 Washington Street, NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87109, Telephone: (505) 833-3036. BY ORDER OF the Honorable Freddie J. Romero, District Judge of the Fifth Judicial District Court of the State of New Mexico, and the Seal of the District Court of Chaves County, entered on January 22, 2014. By:/s/Janet Bloomer DEPUTY CLERK

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

045. Employment Opportunities

PECOS VALLEY EQUIPMENT Seeking young motivated service tech. Experience a plus, Relocation assistance available. Apply at 312 W. Richey Ave Artesia NM, 88210 1015 S. Atkinson Ave Roswell, NM 88201 575-748-1400 Email: laustin@pecosvalleyequipment.com Southwestern Wireless has a position available for two-way radio technician to serve southeastern New Mexico. Two-way radio experience is a plus. Must be self-motivated and willing to work occasional long hours. Must have a clean driving record and pass a drug test. FCC license and or ETA certifications a plus. Salary DOE. Mail resume to PO Box 25828, Roswell, NM 88202 or email to mason@swwmail.net FULL-CHARGE BOOKKEEPER well established Construction Company, RHOADS, CO. Must have: Min 5 yrs exp w/bookkeeping skills incl. payroll, AR, AP & job cost. Skills: Computer, w/proficiencies in Word & Excel. Knowledge of “The Construction Manager” & an Accounting Degree a plus. Must be people person w/good character & ability to multi-task. Salary determined w/qualifications. Benefits: Retirement plan & health insurance. Send cover letter, resume and references to rmays@rhoadsco.com or to Human Resources, PO Box 2899, Roswell, NM 88202. www.RHOADSCO.com

045. Employment Opportunities

MEDICAL ASSISTANT wanted for front desk experience and billing encoding and insurance verification. Please bring resume to 313 W. Country Club, Suite #10 and ask for Office Manager, Karen. A K Sales & Consulting is looking for an office staff person. Initially this person will train on tracking of shipments and scheduling installations. Later will train on creation of estimates for certain products. Applicants needs to have good working knowledge of various software including word and excel or similar products. Good comunication skills both verbal and written. Starting salary dependent on experience of applicant. Send or bring in resume to 115 E Country Cllub Rd, Roswell, NM BUSY LAW firm seeking motivated student for afternoon hours. Applicant must have a valid driver’s license, auto insurance, and a dependable vehicle. Must be computer literate and able to quickly learn our filing system. Bring resume and references to Kraft & Hunter, LLP, 111 West Third Street, Roswell or mail to Human Resources, PO Box 850, Roswell, NM 88202-0850. BILLY RAY’S is now taking applications for Experienced Servers. Must be 21 years of age and liquor certified. Old applicants please re-apply. Apply in person at 118 E. 3rd. No phone calls.

Legals

Second Notice of Sale... Publish February 4, 11, 18, 25, 2014 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT No. D-504-CV-2013-00201

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., vs.

Plaintiff,

JILL B. STANLEY,

Defendant.

SECOND NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that on March 5, 2014, at the hour of 11:30 am the undersigned Special Master, or her designee, will, at the west steps entrance of the Chaves County Courthouse, at 400 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88202, sell all of the rights, title and interest of the above-named Defendant, in and to the hereinafter described real estate to the highest bidder for cash. The property to be sold is located at 1000 W Deming Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88203, (if there is a conflict between the legal description and the street address, the legal description shall control) and is more particularly described as follows: LOT ONE (1) in BLOCK THREE (3) of LODEWICK ADDITION, in the City of Roswell, County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the Official Plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk's Office on April 10, 1944, and recorded in Book B of Plat Records, Chaves County, New Mexico, at Page 37,

including any improvements, fixtures, and attachments, such as, but not limited to, mobile homes. Subject to all taxes, utility liens and other restrictions and easements of record, and subject to a one (1) month right of redemption by the Defendant upon entry of an order approving sale. The foregoing sale will be made to satisfy a foreclosure judgment rendered by this Court in the above-entitled and numbered cause on September 4, 2013, being an action to foreclose a mortgage on the above-described property. The Plaintiff's judgment is $86,702.44, and the same bears interest at the rate of 6.3500% per annum, which accrues at the rate of $15.08 per diem, commencing on September 24, 2013, with the Court reserving entry of final judgment against said Defendant Jill B. Stanley for the amount due after foreclosure sale, for costs and attorney's fees, plus interest as may be assessed by the Court. The Plaintiff has the right to bid at such sale all of its judgment amount and submit its bid verbally or in writing. The Plaintiff may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. The sale may be postponed and rescheduled at the discretion of the Special Master. The Court's decree, having duly appointed its Special Master to advertise and immediately offer for sale the subject real estate and to apply the proceeds of sale, first to the costs of sale and the Special Master's fees, then to pay the above-described judgment, interest, and costs of sale, and to pay unto the registry of the Court any balance remaining to satisfy future adjudication of priority mortgage holders; NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that in the event that said property is not sooner redeemed, the undersigned will as set forth above, offer for sale and sell to the highest bidder for cash or equivalent, the lands and improvements described above for the purpose of satisfying, in the adjudged order of priorities, the judgment described herein and decree of foreclosure together with any additional costs and attorney's fees, costs of advertisement and publication, a reasonable receiver and Special Master's fee to be fixed by the Court. The total amount of the judgment due is $86,702.44, plus interest to and including date of sale of $2,458.04 for a total judgment plus interest of $89,160.48. Sale is subject to the entry of an order of the Court approving the terms and conditions of this sale. Witness my hand this 31st day of January, 2014. /s/ Bernadette F. Gutierrez - Electronically Filed BERNADETTE F. GUTIERREZ, Special Master PO Box 91988 Albuquerque, NM 87199-1988 Telephone: (505) 433-4576 Facsimile: (505) 433-4577 E-mail: bernadette@ancillaryls.com

B5

045. Employment Opportunities

NOW HIRING for part time maintance. Please apply at 1201 N. Main St. SEEKING INDIVIDUAL for office position at local plumbing company. Must be well organized, customer service, scheduling of jobs, great communication skills, detail oriented, light cleaning, trustworthy, and reliable. Mon-Fri, 8am-5pm. Beginning pay, $8.50/hr. Please send resume to PO Box 1897, Unit 367, Roswell, NM 88202. THE HOLIDAY Inn Express & Suites is located at 2300 N Main Street. Our hotel is looking for a friendly and professional Guest service Representative to join our busy team. Ideally you will have at least one year of experience in a hotel front desk environment, be able to demonstrate initiative and deliver great service. please apply in person M-F 9am to 3pm. INQUIRE NOW No experience necessary. Rapid advancement. Potential earnings of $1600/per month per agreement. To start call 575-578-4817.

HVAC TECHNICIAN Full Time position in Plant Operations. Focus on HVAC equipment/metasys control devices. Apply online at enmmc.com EOE IMMEDIATE OPENING for a part-time bookkeeper. Will be responsible for bank reconciliations, maintaing the general ledger, and preparing financial statements. Also requires performing general office responsibilities,data entry, and working with other employees. Experienced preferred. Fax resume in confidence to 575-627-7002 or email to bellgasinc@aol.com or mail to Personnel Manager P.O. Box 490, Roswell, 88202. AMERIPRIDE LINEN Requisition#107006 Production Employee

Production Employee needed: High School diploma or GED. Must be able to pass drug test. You must apply online. Ameripride.com, click on career opportunities under quick links and follow the steps January 31, 2014 to February 7, 2014 Competitive salary and benefits. No phone calls will be accepted. AA/EEO EMPLOYEE M/F/D/V

LAS CRUCES Sun News, DISTRICT SALES MANAGER Circulation Department Las Cruces, New Mexico Full-Time The Las Cruces Sun News, a daily newspaper in Las Cruces, New Mexico is seeking a District Sales Manager to lead our Home Delivery Department who will be responsible for motivating, coaching, training, developing, and supervising a District Supervisor and District Runners. This position’s responsibilities include the contracting of independent contractors. In addition, ensuring the department meets all service, sales and collection goals, departmental standards and procedures and other duties as required Job Requirements: • High school graduate or the equivalent is required with a college degree preferred. • Previous experience in sales and/or customer service or in a print media circulation department. • Must possess excellent customer service, interpersonal, communication and bookkeeping skills. • Must be able to work early morning hours, have reliable transportation, a current driver’s license, proof of liability insurance and a safe driving record. Please apply be emailing your resume to cpogorzel@ elpasotimes.com We are an equal opportunity employer. We recognize and appreciate the benefits of diversity in the workplace. Those who share this belief or reflect a diverse background are encouraged to apply. In addition to a competitive salary, we offer excellent benefits to those who qualify including medical, dental, vision, flexible spending account, life insurance, 401K, and an opportunity for outstanding growth potential. Our concern is for the health and safety of our employees; therefore we offer a smoke-free work environment and conduct pre-employment drug testing.Due to the large number of applications and resumes received, only those chosen for further consideration will be contacted.


B6 Tuesday, February 4, 2014 045. Employment Opportunities

Come be part of the Elite Team! Elite Gymnastics Academy now accepting applications for coaching positions. Experience preferred or athletic background, train in-house. Apply in person, 4pm-7pm, Monday-Thurs. at 1315 N. Virginia. 575-622-1511 Ritter & Company, LLC, Certified Public Accountants, has an immediate opening for a full charge bookkeeper. Successful candidate will have significant experience using QuickBooks and a working knowledge of Microsoft Excel and Word. This position provides multiple clients with payroll, payroll taxes, gross receipts tax, general ledger and QuickBooks training services. Candidate must be organized and be able to multi task and work under pressure. Competitive salary and benefits with a causal work environment. To apply please email resume and cover letter to Jim Hill at jhill@rcocpa.com or mail to P.O Box 1836, Roswell, NM 88202-1836

045. Employment Opportunities

INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS - Crude Oil Hauling 77% Line Haul Revenue with Trailer. 64% without Trailer. CDL-A, 1 year experience. Hazmat & Tanker Endorsements. Trimac Transportation www.trimac.com (888)698-0172 GREAT OPPORTUNITY for a Licensed Practical Nurse currently certified in the State of New Mexico. Work hours are Monday thru Friday from 7:00 am to 4:00 pm, no on-call, no nights, and week-ends off. The LPN assists the Wellness Manager in the operation of the Wellness Department by providing medical, mental, and emotional care to students by assessing their specific needs. Must have a minimum of one year experience. Interested and qualified individuals are to send their resume and copy of the current NM certification to gonzalez.mary@ jobcorps.org or fax to 575-347-7491 or mail to Roswell Job Corps Center, 57 G. Street, Roswell, NM 88203.

045. Employment Opportunities LOOKING FOR a new and exciting career where you can change lives and launch careers? Then consider joining the forces at Roswell Job Corps Center! The Albuquerque Job Corps Center has a great job opportunity for a Career Transition Specialist. This position is based at the Roswell Job Corps Center. Candidate will provide career, transitional, and follow-up assistance to students graduation from Job Corps for a period of 12 months following placement.

Candidate must have a Bachelor’s degree or 4 years experience working with youth. One year experience in sales, marketing, or counseling-related services. Bilingual preferred. Send your resume to aranda.irma@jobcorps.org fax to 575-347-7492

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

LEARN TO drive in 5 short weeks. Artesia Training Academy has new classes forming. CDL Class A with endorsements. VA approved. 20 years of service to South East New Mexico. Call for more information 575-748-9766 or 1-888-586-0144 visit us at www.artesiatraining.com or visit us on Facebook. FIREFIGHTER PAID training to join elite U.S. Navy team. Good pay, medical/dental, promotions, vacation. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (800) 354-9627 LOCAL FACILITY is growing. 15-20 people needed immediately with no experience necessary. $1600/per month per agreement. Call 575-578-4817 CABLE ONE IS HIRING. You must have a go get ‘em attitude and enjoy customer service, to be considered for this career. •Start at 11.00 an hour and get FREE Cable, internet and phone. •Install and service Cable One’s video, phone and internet services. •Must be able to operate power tools and hand tools safely and work in all seasons and some scheduled weekends. • Lift 80 pound ladder. •Gladly educate customers as to the proper operation of all services and equipment. • Must possess a valid driver’s license. •Must pass pre-employment testing that includes Math skills. Pass background-check along with physical and drug screening. Apply in person at 2005 S. Main. No calls.

Roswell Daily Record

045. Employment Opportunities

A COOK is needed at My Kiddos Center, 1111 S. Union, 420-6002. Experienced, flexible hours, bring or mail application, address Maria. TAKING APPLICATIONS for CDL Instructors. Great opportunity to share your experience and skills. Must have 5 years driving experience, a clean driving record. 575-748-9766

150. Concrete

Running Bear Concrete Foundations, Driveways, Stamping, Sidewalks, Curbing, Stucco. Lic: 373219. Call 317-6058

160. Crafts-Arts

ART RESTORATION- oil painting, cleaning, tear repair, and candas relining. Free estimates-pick updelivery. Call Karl 420-3777

185. Electrical

ELECTRICAL SERVICES Meter loops, service upgrades, remodels, additions, service calls. Lowest prices in town. Free estm. Lic#360025. 910-4193

Experienced Housekeeper needed. Apply at 2000 N. Main. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Wanted Full Time: Job entails answering phones, filing, light bookkeeping, scheduling, selling/renting items and miscellaneous needs. Person needs to great with customers, trustworthy, dependable and have transportation. Knowledge of computers is a plus. Please apply in person with resume at 1607 N. Garden 8-4 Mon-Fri. EOE ALBERTSONS IS currently taking applications for experienced cake decorator. Please apply at www.albertsons.com

195. Elderly Care

WILL DO home health care and/or housekeeping. Have references. 317-0963 Angel Touch, Touch A Life David A. Martinez, Cell Phone 505-386-8729

200. Fencing

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100 M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

SERVICES

100. Babysitting WILL DO babysitting at my home for reasonable rates, any shift, 317-0963

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 ALL SEASONS in & out you will not be dissapointed, ref. Beth 347-5270

Dennis the Menace

210. Firewood/Coal

FIREWOOD: $150 per cord = 128 cubic feet. Cash only, blended local woods Mulberry, Ash, Elm, Locust, Dry cut & split. Best value in town. In Roswell 8-5 on Sat. Monday thru Friday, please call first you load what you want any amount. Call 624-1611 For Info

210. Firewood/Coal

CEDAR, PINON firewood seasoned/split. $260 deliver/stacked 420-4532. MOUNTAIN WOOD for sale, Delivery available. 575-420-5124 or 347-0156 FIREWOOD, oak, pinon, cedar, fur, elm, well season, full or half cord, you pick up or delivered. Call Buz 575-420-9751 or Graves Farm 575-622-1889. CEDAR-PINON-JUNIPERPINE MIX $230 a cord 3 left. Pine $150 a cord 4 left. Weekend delivery’s call for appointment 625-0105

220. Furniture Repair WE BUILD and repair furniture. 840-7849 or 626-8466

225. General Construction

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos

STRUGGLING WITH YOUR MORTGAGE AND WORRIED ABOUT FORECLOSURE? REDUCE YOUR MORTGAGE & SAVE MONEY. LEGAL LOAN MODIFICATION SERVICES. FREE CONSULTATION. CALL PREFERRED LAW 1-800-915-0432 Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-661-3783, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.

310. Painting/ Decorating

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. Call 637-9108. EXTERIOR/INTERIOR, INSURED. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

www.rancheroswelding.com

www.senaconstruction.com 575-973-1019 Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

285. Miscellaneous Services

• Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575)-622-7710 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







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Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

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Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153.

230. General Repair

NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

232. Chimney Sweep

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

MINOR REPAIRS can make major changes in your home, Call Home Solutions 575-420-9183.

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS

345. Remodeling

CHIMNEY SWEEP Have your woodstove, fireplace, or pellet stove inspected and cleaned. Dust free Guarantee. 39 yrs Exp., Licensed, Insured. Bulldog Janitorial Services 575-308-9988

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738 RWC. BACKHOE, skid steer, dump truck, bom lift, services. Insured. Call Hector 575-910-8397. www.rancheroswelding.com

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Garcia’s Lawn Service, sprinklers & much more at low price. 914-0803. Winter Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242.

Lawn and Landscape Maintenance One time or recurring service available 575-973-1019 Yard work, clean-ups, lawns. Handyman svc. David 637-9580. Mow Grass, Trim Bushes, Clean Ups, Hauling Trash Leaf Raking, flower beds, tree pruning, rock yards & rototilling, pick up pecans, concrete jobs, repair sprinklers & fences. 347-8156, 347-8157 Pedro WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121.

285. Miscellaneous Services

PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL MESH? Did you undergo transvaginal placement of mesh for pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence between 2005 and the present? If the mesh caused complications, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Charles H.Johnson Law and speak with female staff members 1-800-535-5727

350. Roofing

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Professional Roofing, Landscaping, Irrigation, Stucco, Tile, Painting, Concrete and Fence Work (575) 973-1019 RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397 www.rancheroswelding.com

395. Stucco Plastering

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991 RWC Lath and Stucco. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

www.rancheroswelding.com

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217

400. Tax Service

ANAYA Gross Receipts Consulting & Tax Service. Contact us to Anayalate your tax problems. Over 25 yrs. exp. Personal & Business. Compare our prices/we e-file. 575-623-1513 508 W. 2nd St. I TIN’S Welcome

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 TREE TRIMMING and removal, free estimates, super clean up, 840-9105 Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insuranced.

www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale ON LAKE VAN Dexter, great view, 111 Fairway, 706-2114 or 706-1245


Roswell Daily Record 490. Homes For 500. Businesses Sale for Sale 2Bd $85K w/house in bk & 3Bd $65K, fncd yrds, call M-Th 8a-noon, 624-1331

FSBO, 3br/2ba, 1/2 acre farm track, large security, fenced in backyard, maintained well, 4610 Acacia Rd., $185K. 575-626-3275 FSBO 3/2/1 Great Condition, lots of features & extras $91,000. 622-1204 2BR/1BA, LARGE living room w/laundry room, 409 W. Summit, 912 sqft, gross living area. 806-729-2383 FOR SALE 2br/1ba, fenced, refrig A/C. 1005 S. Plains Park. $52,000. Immaculate custom home in Briar Ridge, 3yrs old, 3br/2ba, 81 Bent Tree Rd., $132,900. 831-915-0226

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

SELF STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE, 104 units, plus excess land, serious inquiries only. 317-0029

FOR LEASE or rent 7000sq ft building, with office, 416 E 2nd. Call 575-625-0656 Ask for Dean

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property COMMERCIAL BLDG. For sale, 14000 Sq. Ft. West 2nd Call 317-0029 FOR SALE OR LEASE 12500 sq. ft commercial building 700ft highway furnished, 6220 SE Main 575-910-3199

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

TRIPLE WIDE mobile home in senior park, spacious, 2bd/2ba 1500 Sq. Ft. 3 patios, immaculate new renovation, move in ready, $42,000 OBO. 626-5167

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

8AC, 7.2AC senior water rights, horse & hay barns, arena, 3/2/2 brick home, in EGP. Melodi Salas, 626-7663, Ranchline / Taylor & Taylor Realtors.

FSBO 4BR, 2ba, dbl wide on 1 acre, Artesia area. 575-626-4708

520. Lots for Sale PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352.

520. Lots for Sale

LOT IN Buena Vida, 6440 acres, $13,000. Call Moises 416-0606. FSBO 40 acres N. Catron Co. 626-5807 financing avail. willing to subdivide

RENTALS

CLASSIFIEDS

540. Apartments Unfurnished

BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $592, 3br/2ba, $674, 5br/2ba $812, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge.

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

2301 N. Grand Apt. A, 2br, 1.5ba, 1car garage & laundry room. 910-4225.

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944. ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 Very nice 2br Apartment. 304 W. Mescalero, $625/mo, wtr pd, $300/dep. 6 mo. lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535. EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. EFF, 1,2 BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377 2BR & 1br, 1 bath, stove & refrigerator. Call 840-4333 or 910-8170. 2br/1ba, $625, $400/dep, no HUD or pets. 300 W. Mescalero. 910-1300 2BR/2BA, $625/MO and $400/dep. No hud no pets, 2802 W. 4th. 910-1300

FORKLIFT OPERATOR

Leprino Foods Company, the nation’s premier manufacturer of mozzarella cheese, is currently seeking qualified applicants for the position of Forklift Operator.

Successful candidates should possess a minimum of oneyear forklift experience and possess or have the ability to possess a Class “A” license. Experience operating a standup forklift preferred. Candidates must have the ability to work in freezers that are -20 Fahrenheit. Knowledge of computer inventory systems helpful. Must have strong communication skills and proven ability to work safely in a fast-paced environment. Potential candidates must possess a High School diploma or GED. Positions start at $14.87 with step increases at 6 months, 12 months and 18 months. Also, a night deferential of $.35 per hour is added for hours work between 6 PM and 6 AM.

Leprino Foods Company offers a competitive benefits package that includes health, dental, vision and life insurance; paid vacation; 401K matched retirement program and a Profit Sharing retirement program. If you possess the above qualifications please apply online at www.leprinofoods.com/careers/

Leprino Foods is an equal opportunity employer supporting a drug and tobacco free workplace M/F/D/V

NORTH-LARGE 2/2 ht pump, stove, fridge DW, no pets. $625/300. 420-8797

2 BR, $345m $200dep.. gas/water paid, 511 W. Mt. View Rd. #1. 317-4307 2br/1ba, w/d hkup + carport. $400/dep, $750/mo, 2313 N. Grand Apt B, 910-0099 for info.

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281

FOR RENT - 2br housefully furnished - 2 car garage across from golf course great location $850 plus utilities. Call 622-7770 or 910-2902 1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

3BR NEAR ENMU-R, #20 Murphy Place, HUD approved, w/garage, ldry rm, new carpet, very clean, $650/mo. 623-6999 or 317-2945 BRIAR RIDGE 3/2 very clean, fenced backyard, fire place, $1250mo. $1000. No pets 707-694-4382 2br/1ba, Stove & fridge, new paint, 501 E. Tilden, No HUD, pets or smoking, $500/mo, $300/dep, pay own bills. 914-2641 or 575-291-4438 1516 N. Pontiac, 2 br, 1 ba, near parks, new stove & new ref, W/D hookups, hardwood floors, completely remodeled, fenced yard, very clean and cute, $600 monthly, plus dep., No large dogs (small or medium okay), No HUD. References and Rental History required. Call 578-3034 3br/1ba, Stove & fridge, 306 E. Reed, No HUD, pets or smoking, $500/mo, $300/dep, pay own bills. 914-2641 or 575-291-4438 3/2/1, large heated/cooled shop/garage, wood floors, updated kitchen, appliances included. Very nice. Large backyard. $975/mo, $600/dep. 606 Willow Dr. Available 2/1/14 575-840-8222. Excellent Area 3/2/2, 866 Swinging Spear $1050+ bills $500 dep. 623-7377 or 291-5932 4BR/2BA, $650 3br/1ba $600. Al 575-703-0420 or Javier 420- 0666 3br/1ba, Pecan, $650/mo, $500/dep, 575-626-1257 2706 S. Lea, Roswell, clean 3br/1ba, w/d hookups, refrig. & stove, no inside pet, $800/mo, $850/dep, no HUD. Ernie, 420-0744. 4BD/2BA TWO Story House with covered carport for rent. $650/mo $500 Dep. 575-420-5111

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

HOUSE FOR sale 2bd/1ba. #5 Hobbs place in Roswell. Call 840-7212 2BR/1BA, 1 yr lease, no pets, HUD accepted, $750/mo. 619-804-5713 2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 3109 N Richardson 3/1/1 fresh paint tile flooring stove fridge recent central air $750/mo. 317-8854 3br/1ba w/den, stove & fridge, washer/dryer hookups, central heating & air, fenced in backyard w/shed, $950/mo, $600/dep, no bills paid. 420-2831 1111 N. Washington #13, 2br/2ba, detached laundry room. 910-4225 305 S. Evergreen, 2br/1ba, coverd carport, shed, some appliances, fenced yard, $750/$500 dep, dogs w/fee, no HUD or utilities pd. 575-405-0163 or kilok9s@gmail.com 710 S. Wyoming Apt. A, x-nice, 2br, appliances, wtr pd, $550/mo, $500/dep. 626-5423 3BR/1.5BA 1CAR garage, laundry room, 412 Aspen $750mo. $600dep. 626-1267 NEWLY REMODLED 2br/1ba, $550mo/275dep No HUD 420-5604 3BR/2BA, MUST see to appreciate, w/d hookup, 900 Davidson Dr., $800/mo, $800/dep, No HUD. 575-420-7338 3br/2ba, no smoking/pets, close to Sierra school, $350/dep, $750/mo. 623-2617 FOR LEASE, 502 Hermosa in NE Roswell, 3br/2ba, 2100 sqft, recently updated, fridge & stove, w/d hookups, carport, large family room w/fireplace, separate dining area, office, large kitchen w/eat-in area, central heat/air, $1200/mo, $1000/dep, No HUD, close to schools & shopping. Call Jim for info, 575-910-7969.

580. Office or Business Places 200 S. Union. Two suites, approximately 1200 sqft and 810 sqft. Great location. Will remodel to suit tenant. Call Jan at 625-2222.

1139 S. MAIN Over 2200 sqft, all new plumbing, electrical, ref. air, wired for individual offices. $1500/mo. 626-6765 FOR LEASE, space in Sunwest Centre Office Complex at 500 N. Main St. Various size spaces. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. High floor space available for larger tenants. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 575-623-1652 or mobile 575-420-2546 114 E. 4th St.- South of Chaves County Court House 1625 sq. ft Ground floor Medical/Professional office space, plumbed & wired for dental office Cable for TV Contact Llano Land & Exploration @ 575-625-0144

585. Warehouse and Storage WAREHOUSE ONLY 9000 SF partial a/c & heat, security alarmed, 2 garage doors, 2 standard entry doors, $1000/mo. 2001 S. Main behind Family Furniture. 575-937-0889 or 575-257-0888

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

Power wheelchair, hospital bed, oxygen cyl. Invacare patient lifter. 622-7638 Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed! Commode chair, oxygen concentrator, walker, elevated toilet seat, 622-7638. FARM RANCH furniture, dressers, small kitchen table and chairs, microwave. 626-8466 FOR SALE 15” Roping saddle fab $300. 15” American barrel saddle $300. 15” Hereford all around $600 like new. Call 575-627-2237 ALL ALUMINUM handicap ramp, asking $1800. 575-746-7708 CEMETERY PLOT $600 South Park Block 49 Lot 454, Call 575-894-2620 LARGE OBLONG oak table w/ chairs, $475. 624-1573 ELECTRIC DRYER & refrigerator & gas dryer, $150 each. 575-420-6303 NEED FURNITURE Shop Blair’s for the best prices on used furniture, beds, dressers, table & chairs, living room sets, patio sets, bookshelves, appliances, antiques, collectibles, home decor & housewares, saddles, tools, movies, plus lots more. Open daily 9-5, closes Wed. 627-2033 DIRECTV - Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call Now! Triple savings! $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!! Start saving today! 1-800-264-0340 DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-315-7043 KENMORE 600 washer, heavy duty, Whirlpool dryer, super capacity, clean. 420-3487 CANNON DOWNRIGGER, mini-mag 2, $150. 575-623-9280

610. Garage Sales, Individuals

AAA BY Jo Feb 6-8 10:00 3:00. Amazing Sale! 5,000 sq ft of high end furniture, clothing, Patio, decor and Misc. Many items are new! 2290 Hwy 303, Rio Communities (east of Belen)

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous TOP DOLLAR Paid for furniture, collectibles, appliances, antiques, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We pay cash with same day removal of all items. Compete/partial households & personal estates welcome. 623-0136 or 910-6031

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

ESTATE SETTLEMENT Never throw ANYTHING away before calling us! Our services include Auctions (our facility or yours), Tagged Estate Sales, Complete/Partial Buy-Outs & Real Estate Auctions, Firearms, Jewelry & Collectibles. Prompt removal of entire households and property cleanouts. Whether you need to sell a few items or an entire estate check with us and we will do our best to beat any offer you receive. Call today to find out how our experience can help you get more $$. Wild West Auctions, LLC 623-7355 or 840-8401

630. Auction Sales

ADVERTISE YOUR AUCTION in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper for more details. Or log onto www.nmpress.org for a list of participating newspapers.

635. Good things to Eat

NEW CROP Western pecans, shelled halves $8.50/lb, quarters $8.00/lb, pieces $7.50/lb. Will deliver in Roswell area only if purchase 5# or more. Call 575-623-3315. FROZEN GREEN Chile, dried red chile & chile powder, local pinto beans, peanuts & pecan, ristras, jams & jellies, fountain drinks, fresh eggs, Alfalfa Hay, Wheat, Sudan & Oat hay, small & large bales, we accept credit cards & EBT. GRAVES FARM 622-1889

665. Musical Merchandise

SPINNETT WURLITZER upright piano in good shape, $300 obo. 575-914-8316

700. Building Materials

METAL ROOFING, brown and green, hail damage. 575-802-3114

715. Hay and Feed Sale

Sorgum bales 4x8 $75, Oat bales 4x8 $100. Call Janet at 575-626-0159

745. Pets for Sale

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

MALTESE DESIGNER PUPS. So CUTE and FLUFFY. Non-shedding, Hypo-allergenic. Papers, shots, health guarantee and potty pad trained. PAYPAL accepted. debit/credit cards. $300-1000 575-910-1818 txt4pics

B7

745. Pets for Sale

REGISTERED GERMAN Shepherd puppies. 575-910-1730 CATS, KITTENS, free to good home, tame, box trained. 575-416-1257 TOY CHIHUAHUAS for sale, 2 males, 4 fem. 627-2183 POODLE PUPPIES, tiny & toy, shots, wormed, $250 & up. 575-623-1399

RECREATIONAL 780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com BOAT & RV STORAGE, secure area, $25/mo. Call 623-4200.

1989 PROWLER Lynx gooseneck camper, sleeps 4 to 6, $4100, 623-8514

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM 2002 FORD Mustang, 5spd, V6, 101K miles, $5000. OBO 622-2835

2001 FORD Explorer, automatic, low miles, $1000 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352. 2003 OLDSMOBILE Alero, excellent cond., 4 cyl., $1500 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352. V-8 FORD 12 passenger, 2001 Van, $7900. 3&4br homes, $5k down. Al 703-0420, Javier 420-0666. 2003 SATURN Vve black color 126 K miles, nice clean family car. $3,900. 910-2900 ‘96 BUICK Regal, runs great, $1950, owner financing w/$1000 dn, 420-1352

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2008 FORD F150, ext cab, heavy duty 4x4, tow package, only 88k miles, $13,850. 420-1352 {{{SOLD}}} 1993 Ford F150, 4WD, $850 obo. 2008 TOYOTA Tacoma, Pre-runner V6, SR5 TRO access cab, all options, 52k miles, NADA value $21K, first $17k takes it. 3303 Encanto Dr., 575-317-1373


B8 Tuesday, February 4, 2014

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Roswell Daily Record


02 04 14 Roswell Daily Record