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Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 123, No. 24 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

January 28, 2014

Obama address to focus on what’s achievable

WASHINGTON (AP) — No longer about bold ambitions, this year’s State of the Union address will focus more on what’s actually achievable. For the White House, that dose of realism is aimed at avoiding a repeat of 2013, when a long list of unfulfilled policy goals — including gun control and an immigration overhaul — dragged President Barack Obama down like an anchor. Tuesday’s primetime address will focus

instead on redefining success for Obama — not by what he can jam through Congress but rather by what he can accomplish through his own presidential powers.

He is expected to announce executive actions on job training, retirement security and help for the long-term unemployed in finding work. All are part of the White House focus this year on boosting economic mobility and narrowing the income gap between the

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wealthy and the poor.

enough, a worker could convert the account into a traditional IRA, according to two people who have discussed the proposal with the administration. Those people weren’t authorized to discuss it ahead of the announcement and insisted on anonymity.

Another action Obama is expected to announce is the creation of a new retirement savings plan geared toward workers whose employers don’t currently offer such plans. Because commercial retirement accounts often have fees or high minimum deposits that are onerous for lowwage workers, this program would allow first-time savers to start building up savings in Treasury bonds. Once the savings grew large

“Tomorrow night, it’s time to restore opportunity for all,” Obama said Monday on the video-sharing site Vine, part of the White House’s broad social media promotion of the speech.

Stocks fall on emerging-market fears AP Photo

Trader John Santiago works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Monday.

NEW YORK (AP) — Shaky economies and plunging currencies in the developing world fueled a worldwide sell-off as fearful investors pushed prices lower across Asia and Europe. In the U.S. and other

rich countries with healthier economies, investors also retreated, although the selling was more modest. Major indexes in both Hong Kong and Tokyo fell more than 2 percent. The selling then spread to

Europe and the U.S., as stocks slipped across the board, but the declines were much less than on Friday, when the American market ended its worst week since 2012. Jack Ablin, chief investment officer at BMO Pri-

vate Bank, said he wasn’t surprised that the U.S. losses were limited.

“We have an accelerating economy, low inflation and accommodative monetary policy,” he said. “The world isn’t falling apart.”

Tuesday

“I think the way we have to think about this year is we have a divided government,” White House senior adviser Dan Pfeiffer said. “The Republican Congress is not going to rubber stamp the president’s agenda. The president is not going to sign the Republican Congress’ agenda.”

dent his largest audience of the year. It also provides perhaps his best opportunity to try to persuade skeptical Americans that he still wields substantial power in Washington, even if he can’t break through a divided Congress.

The address, delivered before a joint session of Congress and millions of Americans watching on television and the Internet, typically garners a presi-

The risk for Obama in centering his agenda on his own executive actions is that those directives often are more limited in scope than legislation that requires congressional approval.

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that Texas can proceed with its lawsuit against New Mexico over management of the Rio Grande. Texas contends that groundwater pumping near the Texas-New Mexico border has resulted in Texas far mers and residents being deprived of Rio Grande water. New Mexico argues that downstream users are getting what’s required under a compact between the states and that the Supreme Court should have let lower courts consider the dispute. New Mexico Attor ney General Gary King said Monday he was not surprised by the court’s ruling. “I am confident that the court takes such state-tostate disputes very seriously, and we look forward to being able to tell New Mexico’s side of the story and to have our day in court,” King said. The Supreme Court gave New Mexico 60 days to file a motion seeking the case’s dismissal. Texas would then have an opportunity to respond. The Texas Commission

on Environmental Quality first asked the Supreme Court to weigh in more than a year ago, alleging that New Mexico was violating the 1938 Rio Grande Compact that governs how water is shared by Texas, New Mexico and Colorado. King argued that a 2008 agreement between the federal government and two irrigation districts, one in Texas and the other in New Mexico, unfavorably changed the allocation of water for his state. Of ficials with the Elephant Butte Irrigation District, which serves farmers in southern New Mexico, said the agreement was aimed at heading off a legal battle between the two states that could ultimately har m Dona Ana County farmers by cutting off their right to use groundwater. Nearly all of New Mexico has been mired in drought for the past several years, leaving stretches of the Rio Grande dry at times and reservoirs along the river at record-low levels. Without any promise for moisture this winter, farmers are still making hard choices about whether to grow staple crops such as chile, onions and pecans.

Texas to proceed with NM lawsuit

Public invited to mill United Way exceeds 2013 campaign goal levy forums this week

The public is invited to two forums this week held by Easter n New Mexico University-Roswell to discuss the mill levy election. The first forum will be held from noon to 1 p.m. today at ENMU-R’s Administration Center, 52 University Blvd., in Board Room 135. The second will be from 6 to 7 p.m. in the Bondurant Room at the Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania Ave. John Madden, ENMU-R president, will discuss the

mill levy question proposed on the special election ballot and respond to questions from the public.

Voters will decide whether to approve a threemill levy for continued operations, maintenance and capital improvements at the college. The tax would be indefinite. Early voting is now under way at the county complex, 1 St. Mary’s Place, or at the college campus. Election day is Feb. 4.

JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

The United Way of Chaves County exceeded its 2013 campaign goal by raising $526,038, the organization reported at its luncheon Monday. “I’m proud to be part of this community. Not only does it step up for the United Way, as it has now, but every time I’ve done anything for this community … every time I come up to you, you are always willing to help in some way,” said campaign co-

chair Barbara Gomez. “So thank you Roswell for everything that you do.” The 2013 campaign ran from Aug. 15 to Nov. 15, but donations were accepted after the campaign ended. Last year, the campaign raised $522,547. This year, the organization’s goal was to raise $525,000. During the year, the organization allocated $365,524 to 22 agencies. Some agencies that received funding included the American Red Cross, Assurance Home, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Boys

& Girls Club of Roswell, Chaves County CASA, Esperanza House and the Roswell Literacy Council. Agencies must spend two years as United Way affiliates before applying for membership. Once an organization has achieved membership, it is eligible for United Way donations not earmarked for specific organizations. Executive Director Sherry Mumford said roughly 80 percent of United Way funds are undesignated. The 2013 campaign was supported by nine organizations that donated

money to help cover the cost to run it. Those included Armstrong Energy Corp., Century Link, Eastern New Mexico Medical Center, Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell, KOBR, Lovelace Regional Hospital-Roswell, The Toles Company, Ritter & Company and Xcel Energy.

Outgoing President Clarissa Gonzales-Adams said she has learned so much about the community and the amazing people who volunteer and serve. See UNITED WAY, Page A3

Alto Democrat Mastin announces bid for House seat against Espinoza JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Lincoln County Democrat Dick Mastin announced Monday that he will run for the state House seat held by incumbent state Rep. Nora Espinoza, R-Dist. 59. Espinoza is running for her fifth term. During the last election, she ran unopposed. “The people of New Mexico need a choice,” Mastin said.

“I am disappointed with the current Dist. 59 representative … she doesn’t appreciate New Mexico heritage enough, value education enough, or have the right priorities and training for her elected position,” Mastin said. Mastin has not run for political office previously, but said he takes his responsibility as an American citizen “very seriously.” His top priorities are integrity and honesty, fis-

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cal responsibility, education and jobs. If elected, Mastin said he would love to serve on the financial and education committees. “Education has always been very important to me,” Mastin said. “I’ve enjoyed obtaining an education. I understand what’s involved in a quality education and I would very much like to help improve the quality of education in New Mexico. What we’ve been doing

hasn’t worked. We need new eyes on it and a new commitment.” Mastin said school is sometimes the first place where less-fortunate children have a chance for equal opportunity. “Without a good start in school, these kids could end up already behind in life when they start their adult lives,” he said. Schools and teachers need more of our help and support because they prepare children for responsi-

TODAY’S OBITUARIES PAGE A3, A6 • ELIZABETH MARTINEZ • MABEL BUTTS • MARJORIE HELEN ADAMS BENTLEY • EDWYL “EDIE” OWEN • DELORIS JEAN DAY • CHRISTINE T. MOORHEAD

ble adulthood, he said. He thinks early education for all and more school days could be considered ways to improve state education. Mastin said he also has always been a financially aware person and careful with money. Conservative fiscal responsibility has been second-nature to Mastin throughout his life, he said. He has spent years

See MASTIN, Page A3

CLASSIFIEDS ..........B6 COMICS .................B5 ENTERTAINMENT .....A8 FINANCIAL ..............B4

INDEX GENERAL ...............A2

HOROSCOPES .........A8 LOTTERIES .............A2

Mastin

OPINION .................A4

SPORTS .................B1

WEATHER ..............A8


A2 Tuesday, January 28, 2014

GENERAL

US looks at ways to prevent spying on its spying WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. gover nment is looking at ways to prevent anyone from spying on its own surveillance of Americans’ phone records. As the Obama administration considers shifting the collection of those records from the National Security Agency to requiring that they be stored at phone companies or elsewhere, it’s quietly funding research to prevent phone company employees or eavesdroppers from seeing whom the U.S. is spying on, The Associated Press has learned.

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence has paid at least five research teams across the country to develop a system for highvolume, encrypted searches of electronic records kept outside the government’s possession. The project is among several ideas that would allow the gover nment to discontinue storing Americans’ phone records, but still search them as needed. Under the research, U.S. data mining would be shielded by secret coding that could conceal identifying details from outsiders

and even the owners of the targeted databases, according to public documents obtained by The Associated Press and AP interviews with researchers, corporate executives and government officials. In other developments Monday: —The Justice Department and leading Internet companies agreed to a compromise with the government that would allow the fir ms to reveal how often they are ordered to tur n over infor mation about their customers in national security investiga-

Lawmaker wants judicial finance statements online

SANTA FE (AP) — New Mexicans would have online access to the financial-disclosure statements of judges under legislation proposed by an Albuquerque lawmaker. Judges and other government officials, including legislators and state agency heads, must file annual financial statements with the secretary of state disclosing their sources of income of more than $5,000, business interests of $10,000 or more, and other information revealing possible areas where there could be a conflict of interest with their government duties. The financial statements are available in the secretary of state’s office in Santa Fe and can be obtained through a public records request. Sen. Jacob Candelaria, D-Albuquerque, proposes to require the agency to post the judicial disclosures on its website. They also would be available through state government’s online “sunshine portal.” The goal, he said, is to increase governmental transparency. “I just think that we best preserve public trust by having that information open-

ly accessible to the people,” Candelaria said Monday. Republican Gov. Susana Martinez has agreed to put the proposal on the agenda of the legislative session. By law, 30-day sessions are limited to the budget, taxes and other measures allowed by the governor. In the past, financial disclosures for all government officials were posted online. However, the secretary of state’s office stopped doing that after judicial officials and others voiced security concer ns because the for ms list residential addresses, telephone numbers and other personal identifying information, said Ken Ortiz, chief of staff for Secretary of State Dianna Duran. Candelaria said he is surprised to learn that no financial-disclosure statements currently were available online, and he’ll consider pushing for a change in state law to make clear that all of them should be posted on a government website. “It’s sort of frustrating to hear that they have stopped doing that for the other branches of government,” he said.

Bill would regulate art auction houses SANTA FE (AP) — A bill introduced in the New Mexico Legislature would impose government oversight of art auction houses and change the way some do business. Sen. T im Keller’s bill would authorize the Attorney General’s Office to regulate art auctions and act on consumer complaints. It also mandates certain disclosures, such as minimum prices and whether an auction house has a financial interest in artwork being sold. “Because there’s no statute, there’s no basis for a complaint. Unless these transactions constitute egregious fraud that would be covered under federal contract law, there’s nowhere for people to complain to,” Keller said.

The Albuquerque Democrat said his bill is a response to reports of questionable auction practices that distort prices for expensive pieces of art, the Santa Fe New Mexican reported. “Usually $10,000 and over — fine art — those are the concer ns I’m hearing about,” Keller said. David Clemmer, a former auction house director and now a curator at a Santa Fe gallery, said Keller’s bill could be considered onerous by the businesses involved. Auction houses probably won’t want to disclose pricing details or any financial interests in artwork they are selling, Clemmer said. “There’s a certain amount of theatricality involved in auctions, no

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doubt about it. But that’s part of why people go to auctions,” Clemmer said. Keller said the bill’s disclosure elements get to the heart of the specific complaints that have come to his attention. He would not identify the people whose complaints prompted him to introduce the legislation, except to say that they were gallery owners and art investors. “The fact that they feel they need to stay anonymous to me is another reason that we need the regulation,” Keller said. “Things are clearly bad enough and tense enough that they’re not even comfortable going public with it. Some of them are worried about retribution for the works that they need auction-house services to sell.”

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tions. The deal with Google Inc., Microsoft Corp., Yahoo Inc., Facebook Inc. and LinkedIn Corp. would provide public information in general terms. Other technology companies were also expected to participate. —Published reports said new documents leaked by for mer NSA contactor Edward Snowden suggest that popular mapping, gaming and social networking apps on smartphones can feed the NSA and Britain’s GCHQ eavesdropping agency with personal data, including location infor mation and details

such as political affiliation or sexual orientation. The reports, published by The New York T imes, the Guardian and ProPublica, said the intelligence agencies get routine access to data generated by apps such as the Angry Birds game franchise or the Google Maps navigation service. —When the New York T imes published a censored U.S. document on the smartphone surveillance program, computer experts said they were able to extract what appeared to be the name of an NSA

employee, a Middle Eastern terror group the program was targeting and details about the types of computer files the NSA found useful. Since Snowden began leaking documents in June, his supporters have maintained they have been careful not to disclose any agent’s identity or operational details that would compromise ongoing surveillance. The employee did not return phone or email messages from the AP. A DNI spokesman said they asked the Times to redact, or black out, the material.

Dozens arrested on drug, gun charges

contractor outside a convenience store in Espanola. He then led officers from several law enforcement agencies on a high speed chase to Taos Pueblo, pursued by two tribal police officers in marked vehicles. Authorities say Barth was arrested after he made a U-turn and drove toward one of the tribal officers, who narrowly escaped injury.

Rehoboth McKinley Christian Health Care Services means the hospital will no longer offer its 28-day alcohol detox service. CEO Barry Mousa says the program has been losing money for years and that other agencies now have similar services. Mousa estimates that between 15 and 20 employees will be laid off when the program shuts down at the end of February. Mousa says the hospital also is considering the possibility of downgrading its hospital status to allow it to reduce the number of beds to 25 from 60.

STATE BRIEFS

CARLSBAD (AP) — Dozens of people are in custody after being arrested in southeaster n New Mexico on drug trafficking and weapons charges. The Carlsbad CurrentArgus reports that teams of officers arrested 27 people on Friday after deploying from staging areas in Carlsbad and Artesia. District Attorney Janetta B. Hicks says some suspects may face additional charges because investigators found more firearms. Hicks praises cooperation among federal, state and local agencies.

Man gets prison for assault on a tribal officer

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — An Albuquerque man has been sentenced to more than two years in federal prison for assaulting a tribal officer in Taos Pueblo. Prosecutors say 22-yearold Dallas Chase Barth was sentenced Monday to a 27month prison term followed by two years of supervised release. He was arrested last August based on a criminal complaint charging him with assault with a dangerous weapon. According to court filings, Barth took a van belonging to a U.S. Postal Service

El Paso woman dies in skiing accident

RUIDOSO (AP) — A 23year -old Texas woman is dead as a result of a skiing accident in southern New Mexico. Lincoln County Sheriff Robert Shepperd says 23year -old Jackueline Caballero of El Paso died Saturday afternoon when she lost control and struck a tree while on an intermediate slope at Ski Apache near Ruidoso. Shepperd says the state medical investigator will determine the exact cause of death.

Man convicted in 2006 accident charged again

GALLUP (AP) — A financially troubled hospital in Gallup says its retrenching will include closing its behavior health program. The Gallup Independent reports that the move by

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A Belen man convicted in a 2006 fatal accident involving drunken driving has been arrested in Valencia County in another fatal accident. Authorities say 27-yearold Jacob Williams is jailed in lieu of $20,000 bond on charges of vehicular homicide and aggravated driving while intoxicated. KOB-TV reports that the Saturday accident instantly killed 51-year -old Daniel Sanchez and critically injured his 11-year -old daughter. They were thrown from a motorcycle into a roadside field.

contribute $2 toward the families of Tavarez and Sanders. K-Bob’s Manager Jay Arismendez said, “We sell a lot of Salad Wagon, and we hope to raise a lot of money for Nathaniel and

Kendal’s recovery. Our thoughts and prayers are with these Roswell kids and their families, and K-Bob’s wants to do its small part in helping to make their recovery easier.”

Gallup hospital to close behavior health program

K-BOB’S TO HOLD FUNDRAISER FOR SHOOTING VICTIMS THROUGH MONDAY

In an effort to raise funds for the families of Nathaniel Tavarez and Kendal Sanders, today through Monday, Feb. 3, K-Bob’s Steakhouse invites the Roswell community to “Hitch Up to the Salad Wagon to help Nathaniel and Kendal.”

Every Salad Wagon purchased during the week will

“Real Estate Corner”

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By Connie DeNio of Roswell 622-7191 or 626-7948

The first and last thing to remember when buying a home is that verbal agreements do not hold water. Until your purchase offer is signed by the seller(s), and their signed acceptance is presented to your agent or yourself, the seller can entertain and even accept another offer. Once you have a binding contract, the seller is

usually obligated to sell the home to you, unless you both agree to cancel. But the seller is under no such obligation during the negotiating process unless there is a contract. To avoid disappointment, keep in close contact with your agent until the agreement is signed, sealed and delivered. © Give Me a Call Today

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GENERAL/OBITUARY

Roswell Daily Record

OBITUARY

Elizabeth Martinez

AP Photo

Below-zero temps visit Midwest again Nyjaii Williams, of St. Paul, Minn., is bundled up against the cold wind, Sunday.

CHICAGO (AP) — A second deep freeze in weeks locked the Midwest in its icy grip Monday, prompting schools to close, airlines to cancel flights and the mass mobilization of emergency crews to dig out major roadways. From Chicago, where parents were forced to bring their kids to work or call in sick to stay home and care for them, to South Dakota, where officials were warning about treacherous driving conditions, this latest round of subzero highs in many parts of the Midwest had many people wondering when it would end. “I’m moving to Alaska where it’s warmer,” Kathy Berg said in jest — though

Mastin

Continued from Page A1

defining projects, estimating costs, implementing projects and controlling engineering budgets.

“I think I would do well on a financial committee,” Mastin said. “All of the challenges the state will deal with will involve money to some extent. When there are programs enacted, they almost always cost money and we

it’s in fact true of current weather conditions — as she arrived by train for her job in Chicago wearing a long-sleeved T-shirt, sweatshirt, polar fleece hoodie, winter coat, knit cap, two scarves and two pair of gloves. A persistent weather pattern that’s driving Arctic air south was forecast to force temperatures to plummet for about 2 1/2 days, starting overnight Sunday. Actual temperatures will range from the teens in norther n Kentucky to double-digits below zero in Minnesota, but even colder wind chills were expected — minus 43 in Minneapolis; minus 18 in Dayton, Ohio; minus 14 in Kansas

City, Mo.; and minus 3 in Louisville, Ky. By sunrise Monday, weather forecasters in Chicago were telling viewers that the high temperature for the day had already come and gone and that the low may reach minus 4 degrees with wind chills at 40 below. It was the same in Nebraska and Iowa, where the weather service issued warnings for both subzero temperatures and wind chills that could reach minus 40 degrees — a forecast that had Amy Henry, an employee at a 24-hour drug store in Omaha thinking enough was enough. “I just look at my

T raveling in many places remained treacherous Monday. Officials in many states urged people to stay of f the roads, including in Indiana where 50 mph gusts were recorded early in the day.

have to remain financially solvent. Therefore, every decision made in the House just about involves paying for it.” Mastin was a minister for three years and an aircraft engineer for 32. He from retired Beech/Raytheon Aircraft as a senior project engineer. He has also served as chairman of the Lincoln County Democrats, president of a 200-member, 13-airplane flying club, president of White Moun-

tain Search and Rescue, church board president, church treasurer and county Red Cross chairman. He holds a bachelor of science in mechanical engineering, a master of divinity from San Francisco Theological Seminary and a master of business administration from Wichita State University. Mastin grew up in Albuquerque, where he graduated from the University of New Mexico. He then left for further education

and his career. He lived in Nevada, Califor nia, Nebraska and Kansas. After retiring, he moved back to Alto, where he lives with his wife of 49 years, Milly. The couple has two children and three grandchildren. The district includes most of Lincoln County, except most of Ruidoso, Ruidoso Downs, Glencoe and San Patricio. It also includes the western third of Chaves County, including the western section of Roswell.

(apartment) pool every day and say, ‘Oh, come on, summer,’” said Henry, 36.

Meanwhile, at Donutville U.S.A. in the Detroit suburb of Dearbor n, a couple of guys said they weren’t going to let a little cold keep them from their mor ning cruller.

“We’re here every day — we never miss,” said Angelo Barile, a 72-yearold retired owner of an Italian bakery.

The Martinez family, with great sadness, announces the unexpected passing of Elizabeth Martinez, aka Grammo Sis, Liz, Sis, on Friday, Jan. 24, 2014. She was bor n in Roswell, on Oct. 8, 1925, and remained a lifelong resident, except when her husband Fermin’s military assignment took the family to England, France and Italy. During World War II and Korea era, Fermin was a U.S. Ar my Ranger; he later served in the U.S. Air Force. The family, that included four daughters, returned home in the mid ’60s, when Fer min was reassigned to Walker Air Force Base. When Fermin volunteered to serve his country in Vietnam, Sis cared for and educated their daughters as so many military wives do. A rosary is scheduled for 9:30 a.m., Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014, at Ballard Funeral Home Chapel. Funeral services will follow at 10 a.m. with Deacon Ernesto Martinez of St. John’s Catholic Church officiating. Preceding interment at South Park Cemetery. In 1598, Grammo Sis’ ancestors were a part of the group that established the first colony in what today is New Mexico. Some two and one-half centuries later, her family, the Luceros, settled in the Hondo Valley, and along with other families from the northern part of the state, established the settlements of Lincoln and others along the rivers of the fertile Hondo Valley. The marriage of Inez Lucero McTeigue, of Arabella, and Amos Harden Rue, of Denton, Texas, gave birth to Sis’ mother, Elizabeth Rue. Elizabeth Rue married George Kihias, from Athens, Greece, but she died after giving birth to their only child, who we lovingly knew as Grammo Sis. Her aunt, Martha McTeigue Carrillo, raised Sis as her own daughter. Martha McTeigue Carrillo was known as Mama Mart to her family and to those who loved her. Mama Mart owned two restaurants; one restaurant, the Alto Café, was on Main Street in Roswell, the other restaurant was in Hagerman. Sis married the love of her life, T. Fer min Martinez, on Nov. 15, 1946. The couple was married for

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

51 years and they had four daughters: Nancy, Bertina, Gratia and Rossana. Sis was preceded in death by her grandparents, parents and husband. Those left behind to cherish memories of a kind, generous and caring lady are her daughters: Nancy Burrola, and her husband, Ray; Bertina Telles, Gratia Martinez and Rossana Martinez. Grandchildren: Marcos Burrola, Andrés Burrola and wife, Cara, of Denver, Reina Rascón and husband, Juan, of San Antonio, Texas, Matías Telles, of Carlsbad, Maritza Gomez, and husband, Joshua, of San Antonio, Texas, Estrella Telles, of Las Cruces, Lorena Northup and husband, Cody, of Roswell, Elizabeth Mysza, of Dallas, Texas, and Vincent and Adam Mysza, of Roswell. Great-grandchildren: Luke Burrola, Rocco and Ryder Rascón, Luis and Celeste Calderón, Anais and Adiana Telles, Jonah Gomez and expected sister, Mia Elizabeth Gomez, and Kaylie Rae Van Orden. Special family members include: nephew, Gilbert, and his wife, Juanita Salas, of Lincoln; sister -in-law, Martha Martinez Cadena, of Roswell, and niece Donna Cadena Wilson, of Roswell. Also surviving are numerous nieces, nephews and extended family members. Serving as pallbearers are her grandsons: Marcos, Matías, Andrés, Vincent, Adam and great-grandson, Luis.

The Martinez family would like to thank her caregivers, especially her beloved youngest daughter Rossana, the staf f of Roswell Home Medical and Pecos Valley Rehabilitation Center.

Roswell and New Mexico has lost a grand lady whose pioneering stock led to the development of the state. Her sense of humor and good nature always had the family laughing and she will remain in our hearts and memories all our lives.

Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at ballardfuneralhome.com. See OBITUARIES, Page A6

United Way Continued from Page A1

“It was a real eye-opener to serve as president,” Gonzales-Adams said. “I really appreciate everybody for everything you do out there, whether you’re volunteering, or pitching in or (giving) monetary donations. It’s really important to our community. It really makes our community stronger.”

Jill McLaughlin Photo

The United Way of Chaves County announced that it had exceeded its campaign goal of $525,000 at a luncheon Monday.

Renee Swickard Agent/Owner

Nicole McWilliams Agent/Owner

During the luncheon, Robert Armstrong, president of the United Way of Chaves County Foundation, was awarded the Margie Boles Lifetime Achievement Award.

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Amending the constitution

A4 Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Last year, the Legislature passed a proposed constitutional amendment, changing one word of the N.M. Constitution. Its purpose is to make it easier to vote in local elections and considerably less expensive for local jurisdictions to hold those elections. The amendment will be on the ballot this coming November. The amendment removes the obsolete restriction, written a century ago, that requires school elections to be held at different times from other elections. It changes the word “other” to “partisan.” If it passes, as I fervently hope it does, it will enable local jurisdictions to discuss the possibility of holding school and municipal elections together. It will also offer that option to special districts (such as water and sanitation districts), which get minimal voter participation because most voters don’t know enough about them and they can’t afford to advertise much. I am a huge supporter of this change. I wrote about it last July. I

OPINION

MERILEE

DANNEMANN

TRIPLE SPACED

mention it now as an example of an appropriate use for a constitutional amendment. The only way to change something that is locked in the state constitution is to amend the constitution. This year, a proposed amendment has been introduced (SJR 2, sponsored by Sen. Michael Padilla, DAlbuquerque) to re-reform the state education bureaucracy. The amendment proposes to eliminate the Secretary of Education and recreate the education superintendent hired by the state Board of Education. Regardless of what you think of

Roswell Daily Record

this proposal, it’s framed correctly. A constitutional amendment is required to reverse a previous amendment that some New Mexicans now don’t like. That’s one reason we should be cautious in enacting amendments. In this context, I’m concerned about the proposal on funding new programs for early childhood – SJR 12, sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Michael Sanchez, D-Belen. The proposal diverts money from the Land Grant Permanent Fund and earmarks it for early childhood programs. The programs are a worthy experiment – and, heaven knows, New Mexico needs new solutions for our perenially lagging education system. But I do not trust the possible results of permanent diversion from the fund. Regrettably, any social need can be turned into somebody’s profit center. We are living in a brave new world where corporations make profits from “businesses” such as prisons.

Consider this hypothetical: The amendment is passed. There is now $100 million-plus per year in play. A number of well intentioned groups step forward, form communitybased nonprofits and hire hundreds of workers with kind hearts and the right qualifications. Perhaps some of them are social workers who were displaced in the recent behavioral health debacle. In our scenario, that $100-million honey pot attracts national attention. Along come influential companies from out of state with a clever strategy. Bang! Ethically or otherwise, the rug is pulled out from under those sweet little community organizations. There goes the money, and we have no idea what level of service is being provided to the children. Speculation? Nonsense? That scenario is roughly what happened last year to our behavioral health system. With $100 million waving in the wind, we’d be naive to assume it couldn’t happen again.

The early childhood advocates say in order for the program to work, they need assurance the money will continue for several years. Good point. But assurance is not possible. I used to work for a state agency with a guaranteed non-political source of revenue based on an earmarked tax, the Workers’ Compensation Administration Fund – until legislators started taking little bites out of it. They still do, and nobody stops them. Hardly anybody even notices. That’s just one example. A constitutional amendment is not the assurance the advocates would like it to be. Agreed: New Mexico should do much more to prepare little children for school and in some cases to prepare their parents for parenthood. I’d feel a lot less nervous if we find another way to fund it. Contact Merilee Dannemann t h r o u g h www.triplespacedagain.com.

EDITORIAL Majority can’t take property rights in zeal to stop fracking America’s new oil boom promises peace and prosperity. More energy means more jobs, higher incomes and better-funded governments. Only a breach of civil liberties — only a plan for mob rule — threatens the potential. President Barack Obama flaunted the oil boom during his weekend address last Saturday as an example of this country’s promise under his reign. “For the first time in nearly two decades, we produce more oil here at home than we buy from the rest of the world,” Obama said Jan. 18. Oil production has increased more than 21 percent during Obama’s presidency. Meanwhile, the amount of federal land leased for production has decreased by 17 percent — largely because of Obama’s policies. The oil boom Obama applauds comes mostly from fracking on private land. Take private leases from the equation and we’re right back to creepy alliances and wars that come with foreign oil dependence. We need oil independence if we are to afford pursuits of wind, solar and other sustainable energy. Energy is essential to creation of wealth, which is crucial to human life. Even the old, the ill, the unemployed and the idlepoor cannot survive without oil-intensive economic activity that funds government. The North Dakota energy boom consists of one federal lease. Nearly all the windfall comes from production on private lands. Unemployment has remained below 4 percent for years. If the American oil boom continues, this country will produce more oil than Saudi Arabia within the next six years. The only threat is a growing Not-In-MyBack-Yard zeal that challenges a fundamental civil liberty. The Constitution protects freedom so our country can innovate, produce, trade, prosper and progress. Protection of speech means a majority cannot take from an individual the right to communicate, even in ways that offend or frighten others. A majority cannot take guns from blacks, Latinos, or rednecks. Majorities cannot take basic rights from private parties without proving extraordinary cause on a case-by-case basis. The Constitution’s protection of property rights is no less sacred than protection of religion or speech. It prevents governments and majorities from depriving individuals of private property without due process and reasonable compensation. Successful deprivation involves due process and money. Those who want to peacefully control another’s property have the opportunity to buy it. Communities control sprawl by negotiating acquisition of private tracts and setting them aside. Those communities with the financial means can use the same maneuver to stop fracking on oil-rich properties. But a group called Colorado Community Rights Network would prefer mob rule. The organization is busy this week organizing a petition that would ask Colorado voters to amend the Colorado Constitution in November. They hope the amendment would somehow, in conflict with federal property protections, establish opportunity for communities to ban fracking on private land by force. At least four Colorado communities have already tried, in direct defiance of the law. Of course communities will choose to control private property if given a legal option. Collective reallocation of control benefits recipients who endure little or no personal expense. Besides, most communities would rather enjoy energy that’s produced at the burden of someone else in some distant place. Americans have a constitutional right to make use of private property. It’s a good thing, as that civil liberty has protected new oil production this country desperately needs. Refuse to sign a petition that seeks to quash fundamental liberty at a devastating cost to progress, jobs, national sovereignty and economic welfare. Say no to mob rule. REPRINTED FROM THE COLORADO SPRINGS GAZETTE

To Roger Stone, Bridgegate ‘cover-up’ is another Watergate — and he would know BY JOE CONASON

Very few Republican operatives knew the Nixon gang as intimately as Roger Stone, the legendary trickster whose back is adorned with an enormous Tricky Dick tattoo. And very few know New Jersey politics as well as Stone, who toiled among the party faithful in many campaigns since 1980, when he first ran the Garden State for Ronald Reagan. So when he declares that Bridgegate is Watergate — from the stupidity of the original crime to the peril of the ongoing

Doonesbury

DEAR DOCTOR K: My 9month-old daughter had a seizure last time she had a high fever. The pediatrician said it could happen again. What do I need to know? DEAR READER: The medical term for what your daughter experienced is febrile seizure. I was taught that febrile seizures are caused by a high fever or a sudden rise in body temperature. The effect of the higher body temperature makes the brain “irritable” and causes a seizure. But in the last few years, we’ve learned it may be more complicated than that. Some childhood seizures are caused by a new infection with a common virus, called human herpesvirus-6. This virus infects most children at a young age and remains in their bodies for

cover-up — attention must be paid. Especially on the day when the U.S. Attorney’s office investigating the Port Authority’s decision to close three lanes of traffic on the world’s busiest bridge issues subpoenas to the governor and the New Jersey Republican Party. Speaking with The National Memo on Thursday afternoon, Stone said: “This is about hubris, this is about an arrogance and right out of the dark side of Nixon’s playbook. It’s what ultimately brought Nixon down. There was no reason to break into the Watergate, there

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

the rest of their lives. When a child first is infected with this virus, it travels to the brain, where it causes a fever — and may cause chemical changes in the brain that lead to seizures. We don’t know how many febrile seizures are caused by this virus. We do know that severe febrile seizures that don’t end promptly often are caused by the virus.

was no reason to spy on your enemies. His foreign policy was popular, the economy was good and he was getting re-elected. Just like there was no reason to close these lanes on the George Washington Bridge — although just like with the break-in of Watergate, we still don’t really know why they did that.” He doesn’t buy the theory that the Christie aides were punishing the mayor of Fort Lee for refusing to endorse the Republican governor — and thinks it more likely they were trying to harm State Sen. Loretta Weinberg, a determined Christie

antagonist whose district includes Fort Lee. To Stone, the governor’s explanations rang false from the beginning — and reminded him of the verbal traps Nixon set for himself. He simply doesn’t believe that Bridget Ann Kelly, the deputy chief of staff fired by Christie for “lying” to him, took the initiative to close the bridge lanes. “The mentality that existed around Nixon — that Teutonic, buttoned-down, we-give-youorders-you-carry-them-out —

What is a seizure? The brain’s nerve cells communicate with each other by giving of f tiny electric signals in a tightly controlled process. However, when someone has a seizure, large numbers of cells start firing in an uncontrolled process. (On my website, AskDoctorK.com, I’ve put an illustration of what electrical activity in the brain looks like nor mally and during a seizure.) Depending on where in the brain the seizure starts, and whether the electrical firestorm travels to another part of the brain, seizures have different ef fects on the body. Some seizures cause a person to temporarily lose consciousness. Some cause different muscles in the body to twitch or jerk uncontrollably. Others just

cause temporary strange behavior. As your doctor mentioned, many children who have had a febrile seizure will have another one. One of the best ways to pr event one is to pr event a high fever. If your daughter d e v e l o p s a f e v e r, h a v e h e r drink plenty of water and fruit juices to prevent dehydration. Give her ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others) or acetaminophen (Tylenol), but not aspirin. You cannot stop a seizure once it starts. If your daughter has a seizure, the following can help keep her safe: — Place her on her side or stomach on a safe, flat surface, such as the floor. Keep

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Inspire your heart with Art Day LOCAL

Roswell Daily Record

LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

January is National Hobby Month. Enjoying a hobby offers an opportunity to share quality time, enthusiasm, and skills with family, friends and other enthusiasts throughout the year. Hobbies can include collecting theme items, engaging in creative and artistic pursuits, playing sports, etc. Whether you choose physically oriented hobbies or prefer a quiet time spent indulging in an interest away from the hustle and bustle of everyday life, hobbies open gateways to more intimate knowledge of the self. The whole family will find a variety of areas related to their special hobby and other interests at the Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania. The materials feature books, E-books, magazines, CDs, DVDs and Internet databases to supply knowledge. One collection of databases is Ebsco, which includes the Hobbies & Crafts Reference. This is a hobbyist’s best friend; provides access to articles, patterns, guides, detailing “how-to” instructions and creative ideas to meet the interests of virtually every hobby enthusiast. To access the database from computers at nonlibrary locations and to learn about the library’s other resources and services go to www.roswellpubliclibrary.org. Click on Online Resources, then on Article Databases and Searches, select Ebsco and Home PC, enter your library card number and go to the desired database. Reference Librarians are available

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that mentality exists inside this administration. ... It just doesn’t seem plausible to me that this Kelly woman, who seems perfectly pleasant, stepped up to her computer and said, ‘T ime for traffic problems in Fort Lee.’ Someone told her to do that.” Stone says the dubious effort to blame her and a few others is the telltale sign of “a coverup.” Stone doesn’t personally know Kelly, but he has known David Wildstein, the Port Authority official who resigned after his role in the bridge closings was revealed, for 35 years. “He’s the G. Gordon Liddy of this tale,” he said, referring to the maniacal Watergate conspirator who secretly concocted plots to firebomb and even murder Nixon’s political adversaries. “He’s the 100 percent soldier, the kamikaze. This guy has thrown so many bombs I’m surprised he’s got hands left.” When The Wall Street Journal recently published a photo of Christie with Wildstein taken last Sept. 11 — at the height of the lane-closing crisis — Stone was reminded of a classic Watergate question. The photo sur faced after Christie had claimed during his two-hour Bridgegate press conference that he didn’t know Wildstein well and hadn’t spoken with him for “a long time.” “We’re asked to believe that they never discussed it,” noted Stone with undisguised sarcasm. “What this becomes is, ‘What did the governor know and when did he know it?’ That’s why I argue that (the scandal is) now a tar baby. First of all, there are now so many people with knowledge of what actually happened; some of them will be facing fines or prison and certainly public humiliation; and how do we know that none of them is going to implicate the governor, either through evidence or testimony? We don’t. And because of the governor being very precise about what he knew and when he knew it, anything that proves a contradiction means this guy is history.” In an essay published on Wednesday by Daily Caller — a right-wing website edited by Tucker Carlson where the dapper Stone serves as “fashion editor” — he laid out a series of comparisons between the scandals, casting various characters around Christie as members of Nixon’s Watergate crew: “Port Authority Chairman and former Attorney General David Samson is a gentleman of caution, sober judgment,

to assist in downloading databases and electronic books, as well as locating materials and guide patrons on their quest for information.

Book talk

The library strives to meet the recreational, educational and cultural needs of the community by providing materials for all age levels in a variety of formats. For your quiet time, Deanne Dekle, children’s librarian, suggests enjoying books. Many books are available in multiple formats, including the increasingly popular E-books. After years of taking on lawyers of the adult persuasion, best-selling writer John Grisham turns to a 13-year -old kid lawyer in his “Theodore Boone” series. Theodore is the only son of two lawyers, who hangs out at the courthouse, watches Perry Mason reruns and hasn’t taken the bar, offers advice to his friends. He has a knack for getting to the bottom of things, which consequently leads to some sticky situations. In typical Grisham style, this novel about eminent domain is also funny and will keep middle graders hooked. The series includes “Kid Lawyer,” “The Abduction,” “The Accused” and “The Activist.” This series is offered in three formats; as a juvenile fiction hardback, as an Ebook and a “talking book” on CD.

and integrity. His role is unclear. Like Attorney General John Mitchell with Nixon, Samson has been a calming influence on Christie and his henchmen, one of the few “grey hairs” Christie listens to. Port Authority official and ex-State Sen. Bill Baroni reminds me of (Nixon deputy campaign manager) Jeb Magruder: handsome, articulate, but ineffective. (Christie press secretary Michael) Drewniak plays the role of Nixon flack Ron Ziegler. GOP Chairman Bill Stepien is the scheming (Nixon White House counsel) Chuck Colson. Before it’s over we will hear from all of them. “Just as Nixon fired his top aides H.R Haldeman and John Ehrlichman while insisting he knew nothing of the Watergate break-in or cover -up, Christie fired hatchet man David Wildstein and aide Kelley, laying the blame on them. While Wildstein (whom I have known since 1979, when he was Harold Stassen’s presidential campaign manager) initially pled the Fifth Amendment, he is now prepared, according to his lawyer, to testify fully in return for full immunity. Is Wildstein the Liddy of this drama ... or is he John Dean? Then again maybe Kelley will beat Wildstein to the prosecutors. Maybe she’s John Dean. Stone enthusiastically supported Christie for governor in 2009 over Democratic incumbent Jon Corzine, but never saw him as a potential presidential contender. And while he preferred Christie to Corzine — “a crook” — Stone harbors no illusions about the governor’s swift rise to political prominence. “He was elevated to the U.S. Attorney’s office after his multimillionaire brother (Todd Christie) gave a very, very substantial donation to the Republican National Committee.” Now, he insists, the handicaps that Christie would face as a presidential hopeful are insurmountable. “Christie was the contender of the establishment party (wing). This is where (billionaire GOP financier) Ken Langone is, this is where the Texas money is ... the Rudy (Giuliani) wing. In many ways, Christie is Rudy without the charm,” he quipped. But he also believes that Christie’s powerful backers are still oblivious to the looming disaster. “They’re going to spend a lot of money finding out that he can’t be saved.” He warns of a fundamental problem: “You can’t run a presidential campaign — and

Nora Roberts has hundreds of books waiting to be checked out of the library and almost 60 of these titles are available to be downloaded as E-books. Roberts ventures into paranormal territory the with “Dark Witch,” first segment of her new “Cousins O’Dwyer” trilogy. In search of family, destiny, and home, Iona Sheehan leaves America for Ireland where she connects with distant cousins, Branna and Connor O’Dwyer. Iona learns she has inherited the “magick” of the legendary Dark Witch Sorcha, who centuries earlier sacrificed herself to protect her three children and to destroy the evil wizard Cabhan. Sorcha passed her powers on to her three children. Iona, Branna, and Connor are the latest group of three descendants to wield power and “magick.” This is the beginning to a typical Nora Roberts trilogy. All the characters are introduced and it quickly becomes obvious who’s going to fall in love with whom. There are minor battles with a villain and a temporary happily ever after. Fans will eagerly wait to read the next two installments. The book is located in Science Fiction, Large Print, as an E-book and as a “talking book” on CD. For fans of the Robert Kirkman’s graphic novels and TV series “The Walking Dead,” the library has several titles available as young adult paperbacks. “The Walking Dead: Rise of the Governor” is available as an E-book. The Governor is the series most hated villain and this book tells of his back story and his rise to power after the zombie apoca-

Dr. K

you can’t start one — on defense. ‘Chris Christie was campaigning in New Hampshire today when an email bomb dropped in Trenton that showed ... BA BOOM.’ At the precise time when he needs to be getting a campaign together, he’s on defense.” A Miami resident, Stone closely observed the New Jersey governor’s recent trip to south Florida for the Republican Governors Association, which Christie now chairs — and was not impressed. “You saw in Florida a perfect example of what this would be like if Christie runs for president. He comes down here, he does three private fundraisers — and the addresses aren’t even disclosed to the media because they don’t even want them outside. There’s no press event with the two governors, and he slips in and out of the state, like a thief in the night. And (Florida Gov.) Rick Scott doesn’t even want to be seen with him, which tells a lot.” Speaking of Florida, Stone is perhaps most notorious for his starring role in the “Brooks Brothers riot” during the 2000 presidential recount at the Miami-Dade election office. But after more than 40 years in the GOP, dating back to his chairmanship of the Young Republicans in 1979, he has walked away from his old comrades to join the Libertarian Party. Still, having worked in no fewer than eight Republican presidential campaigns, he admits, “I still have my emotional Republican leanings.” He has very little regard for Rand Paul (“a guy who looks like he slept in his suit”) or Ted Cruz (“doing his best impression of Joseph R. McCarthy”) — which for him may make the current parody of America’s most infamous political scandal a very painful form of entertainment. To find out more about Joe Conason, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.

Copyright Creators.Com

2014

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Tuesday, January 28, 2014

lypse. This can be read alone or as a companion to the graphic novels, however, it does make more sense if you have some background knowledge of the world it takes place in. Fans of the show will definitely appreciate having this inside look into what caused the villain to be so very evil.

What’s happening?

Friday is Inspire Your Heart with Art Day and Saturday is Take Your Child to the Library Day. The free weekly story and craft hours are the perfect time to inspire the heart with art as each story time has a specific theme and concludes with children creating related crafts. The Wednesday story times begin at 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. The morning session includes songs, rhymes and movement activities. The Saturday program begins at 2 p.m. Children attending the story portion of the program are invited to the craft session. All materials are provided for the related crafts. The stories may vary between programs and the quantities of some craft items may be limited. The theme for Wednesday is “No Jumping on the Bed” and the kid favorite, “Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed,” is just the beginning of jumping tales. Other stories might feature “Jump, Frog, Jump”; “Five Ugly Monsters”; “Boing!”; “Jumping!”; or “What Do Parents Do?” Precut animals such as monkeys, bunnies, frogs, kangaroos and dolphins will be on hand to use to decorate a spiral mobile or to use to assemble a 3D kangaroo and movable bunny

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her away from furniture or objects that may cause injury. — Tilt her head to the side to prevent choking. — Do not restrain her, or put anything between her teeth. — Observe her careful-

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figure. On Saturday, kids will celebrate Groundhog Day with stories and activities about groundhogs and shadows. The books could highlight “Gregory’s Shadow,” “Double Trouble Groundhog Day” or “The Groundhog Day Book of Fun and Facts.” The related crafts might include creating a Groundhog Day hat or crafting a groundhog and his shadow stick puppet. An upcoming teen program on Zentangle will be held on Feb. 4 at 6 p.m. in the teen area. For more information, contact Nancy Schummer, young adult librarian. There will also be a class on Computer Basics held on Feb. 4 at 6 p.m. For more information and to register, contact the librarians at the Reference Desk.

Books Again

This week is the end of the New Year’s Resolution Sale with all books related to self help, diet and exercise, cookbooks and religion on sale for $1 each. Other subjects and fiction titles are priced at approximately onefourth of the original price. Paperback mass market books are 25 cents each. In addition, one cart full of books is marked down to one quarter each. This is an inexpensive way to add books to your personal library. Books Again, 404 W. Second, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday through Saturday. The store is operated by Friends of the Library volunteers and all proceeds are used to benefit the library. Parking is located behind the store.

ly so you can describe the events to your doctor. — If the seizure lasts longer than about five minutes, call your doctor. Otherwise, call your doctor after the seizure is o v e r, t o a r r a n g e a n appointment if necessary. It can be extremely distressing to watch your child experience a seizure. Fortunately,

most children outgrow this condition, and febrile seizures generally are not harmful and do not cause long-term problems. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)


A6 Tuesday, January 28, 2014 OBITUARIES

Marjorie Helen Adams Bentley

At age 68, Marjorie Helen Adams Bentley left this world on Jan. 2, 2014. Marjorie was more than just a resident of Roswell. She was an educator and planetarium director for the Roswell Independent School District as well. She was born Aug. 11, 1945, in Greenwood, Miss., to Frederick S. Adams and Gareldine M. Adams. She attended Thomas Jefferson High School in Dallas, Texas. She graduated with a B.A. in Art Education from the University of New Mexico in 1968. She then spent a summer in Oslo, Norway. She taught school in Alamogordo, where she met her husband, Loren B. Bentley Jr. They moved to Dallas, Texas, where she worked as a commercial artist. While in Dallas, she gave birth to her two children, Michelle and Loren. She and her family moved all over the United States before settling in Las Cruces, for many years. She taught school in Las Cruces and El Paso, Texas, before moving to Pasadena, Texas. Eventually, she and Loren found their way to Roswell, where she loved working in the planetarium. She especially looked forward to the summer camps and Alien Festival each year. Her insatiable thirst for knowledge allowed her to ear n two master’s degrees and pursue her Ph.D., all at the University of Phoenix. Marjorie was a world traveler, a pilot, a member of the 99’s, a judo student — who tormented her black belt husband by appliquéing flowers onto her brown belt — a cook, a teacher, a crochet expert, a horse lover, a daughter, a sister, a wife, a mother, a grandmother, an aunt, and a friend. She opened the world to her children by opening her home to exchange students from all over the world. She taught her children by example and made room in her home and heart for one more child who needed a parent, Alana. She is preceded in death by her mother, Gareldine M. Adams, and her hus-

OBITUARIES band, Loren B. Bentley Jr. She is survived by her father, Frederick S. Adams Sr.; her children and their spouses: Catherine Michelle Bentley Fox and Robert Fox, and Loren B. Bentley III and Angela Bentley; her foster daughter, Alana Brumbaugh; her grandchildren: Chase A. Fox, Loren B. Bentley IV and Justin Bentley; her siblings: Elizabeth Adams and Frederick S. Adams Jr.; and her favorite cousin, nieces and great-nieces and nephews. She was a wonderfully creative woman whose talents never ceased to amaze and will be missed. Services will be held Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, 3 p.m. at French – Lomas. Services in Roswell will take place at the NMMI Alumni Chapel on Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014, at 2:30 p.m., with interment to follow at South Park Cemetery. Should friends desire, memorial contributions may be made in her name to the American Cancer Association. Please visit our online guest book for Marjorie Bentley at FrenchFunerals.com.

Mabel Butts

Deloris Jean Day

A private graveside service will be held for Deloris Jean (née Steinfadt) Day at South Park Cemetery, in Roswell, at 1 p.m., Jan. 30. She achieved grace on Jan. 23, 2014. Deloris was born in Le Mars, Iowa, to Dora (née Andriessen) and Herman Steinfadt, both of whom precede her in death. Those among us privileged to cherish our memories of this extraordinary person include her sisters: Gladys Kock, of Le Mars, Iowa, and Mavis Tonne, of Fairmont, Minn.; brothers: Donald Steinfadt and spouse, Virginia, of Grundy Center, Iowa, Marlin Steinfadt, of Le Mars, Iowa; sister-in-law Bonnie Steinfadt and sister -in-law Betty Jacobs, of North Loop, Neb. Also left mourning her loss are her children: Michael Dean Day, his wife, Laura, and his children: Quentin, Clarissa, Amanda and Samantha; Donald David Day, his wife, Brenda, and his children: Mandy, Sara and

Ex-Marlboro man dies from a smoking-related disease LOS ANGELES (AP) — When it came to portraying the rugged wester n outdoorsman who helped transform a pack of filtered cigarettes into the world’s most popular brand, Marlboro Man Eric Lawson was the real deal. Ruggedly handsome, the actor could ride a horse through the wide-open spaces of the Southwest, from Texas to Colorado to Arizona or wherever else the Phillip Morris tobacco company sent him to light up while representing a true American icon, the cowboy. And he really did smoke Marlboro cigarettes, as many as three packs a day. Lawson was still smoking in 2006 when he was diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. He died of the disease at his home in San Luis Obispo on Jan. 10. He was 72. For three years in the late 1970s and early ‘80s, Lawson portrayed one of the most iconic figures in

Stephanie; Berry Lee Day and his children: Crystal, Adam, Alicia and Christopher; and Thomas Raymond Day, his wife, Sharon, and his children: Tiffany and Joshua. She took particular pride and joy in the fact that she had 25 great-grandchildren. Sadly, space limitations prevent listing all of those Deloris held close in her heart. Please take solace in the fact that her love for you knew no barriers, drew no toll, and, as intangible as love might seem at times, was a solid fortification that stood between hardship and those she fiercely defended. Preceding her in death are her husband, Raymond Dean Day; her son, Timothy Ray Day; her brother, Harold Steinfadt; sisters: Betty Stinton and Joyce Moritz; sister-in-law, Diane Steinfadt; brothers-in-law, George Moritz, Clarence Kock, Leonard Jacobs and Rudy Tonne.

A memorial service is scheduled for 2 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014, at First Presbyterian Church of Dexter, for Mabel Butts, 89, who passed away on Saturday, Jan. 25, 2014, at her home surrounded by her loved ones. Rev. Stephen Deutsch of First Presbyterian Church of Dexter will officiate. A private family graveside has taken place. Serving as pallbearers are Robbie Drake, Armilo Montoya, Kenneth Bristow and Shane Kennett. Honorary pallbearers are Roe Babers, Bill Anderson, Tom Morgan, Sandi Van Winkle, Sue Franchini, Sandy Babers, Marva Sykes, J.D. Bristow, Anita Johnson, Lorraine Link, Johnnie Atchley and Wimp Fine. One day, in a very different time, upon a world that was tougher yet kinder, a sweet baby girl was born. You were raised with simple needs and great values. You and your family lived upon the land, had each other’s back and persevered to a new home in the Pecos Valley. You made your way into the Dexter community, the school system and the hearts of many. One being your life-

long best friend, Betty Coats, and the other, your lifelong love, Clifford Butts. You fell in love and began a life together full of adventures, hardships and the most amazing memories. You were a vanilla ice cream kinda gal, yet believed people should try things at least once. You always retur ned to your basics. You were a hardworking woman who enjoyed working alongside your sisters more than anything else. You had spunk and you had sass. You had the funniest, sarcastic type of humor. You took joy in traveling, games of all sorts, family reunions, square-dancing and good ole-fashioned family meals. You were a beautiful mother who raised her children and grandchildren with a stern yet loving heart. You were unwavering in your love to the man whose side you stood by, waited for while he served in WWII and longed to be with after he passed. You had a steadfast sense about your way of life. You were the balance to all the rowdy your loved ones gave. You never asked for anything, as you were a strong, independent lady. You had deep faith and always counted your blessings. And blessings you had plenty of, for you were a blessing yourself. Your full, rich life is a direct reflection of this fact. All that you instilled and taught will live on through all of us. We can only hope to do you justice. We, the rememberers, will continue to tell your story: A story of a woman who lived with a loud reservation and loved her soul mate beyond human comprehension. A story that ended here on Earth yet just began in the heavens above ... give Pop our love. Those left to cherish her memory are her son, Clifford “Wayne” Butts, and wife, Kathie, of Roswell, their children: Shane Butts and family, of Ruidoso; daughters: Debbie Abney, of Oregon, Michelle Butts, of Ruidoso, Kristina Miller, and family, of Redenedo, Calif., and Scott Miller, of North Carolina; her son, Scotty Don Butts, and wife, Belinda, of Roswell, and their children: Jennifer Calzada and family, of Roswell, Shane Kennett, and family of Dallas, Texas, Jessica Brennen Dunn, of Roswell, and Carla Davis and family of Temple, Texas; her daughter, Dayna Link, and husband, Glen, of Dexter, and their children: Chenet Wise and husband, James, and family of Roswell, Skyler Link and wife, Charlene, and family, of Roswell, Clifton Link and family, of Dexter,

Roswell Daily Record and Bobby Bailey, of Pennsylvania; her son, Robbie Kelly, and wife, Nicki, and family, of Odessa, Texas; her brother-in-law, Norman “Babe” Butts and wife, Aileen, of Dexter; sister, Aunt “Teen” and husband, Don Hamilton, of Clovis; special niece, Marva Sykes, of Roswell; 17 grandchildren; 28 great-grandchildren, with one on the way; and 10 great-great-grandchildren. Mabel is preceded in death by her parents: Isacc Newton Bristow and Bobbie Lee Gilcrease Bristow; husband, Clifford Butts; brothers: Nolan Bristow, Grady Bristow, Woodrow Bristow and Urby Bristow; sisters: Lillie Anderson and Olita Hobbs; and her grandson, Todd Butts. Memorial contributions may be made to the New Mexico Children Christian Home, PO Box 629, Portales, NM 88130. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at ballardfuneralhome.com.

Edwyl “Edie” Owen

A visitation will be held at LaGrone Funeral Chapel from 5-7 p.m., on Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014, for Edwyl “Edie” Owen, of Roswell, who passed away on Jan. 25, 2014. Interment will be at Ft. Logan National Cemetery in Denver, Colo. Edie was born on Aug. 29, 1915, in Montrose, Colo., to Benjamin and Opal (Macy) Stout. She graduated high school there and lived there for 25 years. She married Peter Garrity in 1947, in Topeka, Kan. During her first marriage, she traveled all over Europe with her husband, who was in the Army. She loved to travel and spent several years overseas, before coming to Roswell in November of 1974. She married George Owen in 1982, in Roswell. She was a member of the Order of Eastern Star in Junction City, Kan., White Shrine of Jerusalem, Social Order of Beauceant, a charter member of RSVP, a former member of the East-

er n New Mexico Medical Center Auxiliary for over 30 years, Gold Star Wives of America, Roswell Masonic Widows, former member of Colorado City Rebekah, a Grey Lady with American Red Cross in Ger many, Ariz., and California hospitals, and AARP, First Christian Church, and Ladies Guild. She is survived by one niece; one nephew; a stepdaughter, Stephanie Owen, of Roswell; and several cousins in Colorado, California and Kansas. She has been preceded in death by her parents; both husbands; and her brothers. In lieu of flowers, memorials are to be made to the Roswell Humane Society: 703 E. McGaf fey St., Roswell, NM 88203. Condolences may be made online at lagronefuneralchapels.com. Arrangements are under the personal care of LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Christine T. Moorhead July 24, 1926 - Jan. 25, 2014

Christine T. Moorhead passed away at home on Saturday, Jan. 25, 2014. She was born in Kenna, on July 24, 1926, to Edwin T. Denton and Irene E. (Vaughan) Denton. She is survived by her children: sons: Sam E. Moorhead and wife, Carol Ann; Jerry L. Moorhead and wife, Jamie; daughter, Chrissie Moorhead, and husband, Jerry Jeram; grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces, cousins and other family members. She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Sam A. Moorhead; and sister, Dorothy Le Davis. Christine was involved in every aspect of the family cattle ranching business, active in agricultural organizations, and volunteer work during her lifetime. A private family service will be held at a later date. Friends are encouraged to send memorials to a charity of their choice. Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at ballardfuneralhome.com. Su pport t he U ni t ed Wa y

both advertising and popular culture.

And for the past several years, Lawson had spoken out fiercely about the hazards of smoking, doing a public service announcement for the American Cancer Society in the 1990s, years before he was able to bring himself to quit.

Exactly how many rugged he-man types portrayed the Marlboro Man over the years isn’t clear, although Lawson was one of dozens.

His wife said Monday he was friendly with some of the others, including Wayne McLaren, a former rodeo rider who died in 1992 of lung cancer that he blamed on his lifelong smoking habit.

Like Lawson, McLaren spent his final years advocating against smoking. So did David McLean, who died in 1995 of lung cancer that he also blamed on smoking. He was 73.

PABLO RODRIGUEZ St. Peter’s Catholic Church Rosary Tuesday, January 28 7:00 PM

St. Peter’s Catholic Church & Burial at South Park Cemetery Mass Wednesday, January 29 10:00 AM

GENE WARREN

South Park Cemetery Graveside Services Friday, January 31 10:00 AM


BUSINESS REVIEW

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Roswell Daily Record

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

A7

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A8 Tuesday, January 28, 2014

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Partly sunny; very cold

Cold with a starry night

Wednesday

Mostly sunny and warmer

Thursday

Friday

Warmer

Saturday

Partly sunny and warm

Partly sunny and cooler

Sunday

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Monday

Partly sunny and mild

Sunshine and very warm

High 39°

Low 16°

60°/30°

81°/40°

80°/35°

64°/33°

72°/38°

74°/21°

WSW at 6-12 mph POP: 0%

WSW at 4-8 mph POP: 0%

S at 7-14 mph POP: 0%

WNW at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

SW at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

W at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

WSW at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

S at 3-6 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 41°/27° Normal high/low ............... 57°/27° Record high ............... 78° in 1956 Record low ................... 3° in 1895 Humidity at noon .................. 31%

Farmington 45/15

Clayton 30/16

Raton 28/8

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Mon. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date .......................... Normal year to date .............

0.00" 0.00" 0.33" 0.00" 0.33"

Santa Fe 42/18

Gallup 46/10

Tucumcari 33/18

Albuquerque 48/24

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 31/13

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 39/24

T or C 57/26

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed. New

Rise 6:56 a.m. 6:56 a.m. Rise 4:38 a.m. 5:34 a.m. First

Full

Set 5:26 p.m. 5:27 p.m. Set 3:20 p.m. 4:29 p.m. Last

Alamogordo 56/17

Silver City 59/26

Feb 6

Feb 14

Feb 22

NEW YORK (AP) — In a rare feat, Universal Pictures claimed the top two spots at the box office for the second week in a row. Holding atop the box office was the Kevin Hart comedy “Ride Along,” with $21.3 million over the weekend, according to final numbers Monday. Again in second place was the Navy SEAL tale “Lone Survivor,” with $12.9 million in its fifth week. The week’s lone new wide-release, the monster thriller “I, Frankenstein” opened poorly with $8.6 million. The top 10 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by Rentrak, are: 1. “Ride Along,” Universal, $21,299,495, 2,759 locations, $7,720 average, $75,544,805, 2 weeks. 2. “Lone Survivor,” Universal, $12,900,960, 3,131 locations, $4,120 average, $93,914,921, 5 weeks.

Carlsbad 41/17

Hobbs 37/18

Las Cruces 59/25

‘Ride Along,’ ‘Lone Survivor’ stay atop

Jan 30

ROSWELL 39/16

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

3. “The Nut Job,” Open Road, $12,101,118, 3,472 locations, $3,485 average, $40,056,363, 2 weeks. 4. “Frozen,” Disney, $9,118,806, 2,757 locations, $3,308 average, $347,899,011, 10 weeks. 5. “Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit,” Paramount, $9,084,687, 3,387 locations, $2,682 average, $30,452,820, 2 weeks. 6. “I, Frankenstein,” Lionsgate, $8,610,441, 2,753 locations, $3,128 average, $8,610,441, 1 week. 7. “American Hustle,” Sony, $7,061,676, 2,304 locations, $3,065 average, $127,000,429, 7 weeks. 8. “The Wolf Of Wall Street,” Paramount, $5,478,368, 1,804 locations, $3,037 average, $98,508,822, 5 weeks. 9. “August: Osage County,” The Weinstein Company, $5,029,030, 2,411 locations, $2,086 average, $26,514,531, 5 weeks. 10. “Devil’s Due,” 20th Century Fox, $2,786,341, 2,544 locations, $1,095 average, $12,922,304, 2 weeks.

Regional Cities Today Wed. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

56/17/pc 48/24/pc 32/8/pc 40/17/pc 41/17/pc 35/7/pc 30/16/sf 42/13/pc 31/13/pc 62/22/pc 47/24/pc 45/15/pc 46/10/pc 37/18/pc 59/25/pc 31/16/pc 41/22/pc 51/20/pc 38/16/pc 33/15/pc 47/13/pc 28/8/pc 30/8/pc 39/16/pc 39/24/pc 42/18/pc 59/26/s 57/26/pc 33/18/pc 43/22/pc

52/34/s 55/32/s 44/22/s 61/40/s 57/36/s 40/19/s 58/35/s 45/26/s 55/33/s 58/30/s 54/31/s 51/26/s 51/28/s 54/33/s 55/35/s 56/35/s 51/32/s 57/30/s 54/33/s 55/34/s 51/26/s 57/26/s 41/17/s 60/30/s 52/40/s 52/28/s 57/36/s 56/34/s 63/34/s 52/31/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ### When you realize what is going on, you might abruptly head in a different direction. You could be going through a change in your image, perhaps in the community or at your place of employment. Opportunities are likely to come forward. Tonight: A must appearance. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ### You will be on top of your game if you can incorporate a broader view with a better understanding of others. You could gain a new insight in the strangest, most unexpected way. Tonight: Say “yes” to an invitation that sounds too good to be true. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) #### A partner will play a strong role in today’s happenings. You could be startled by what happens in a meeting and/or with this person. Know that he or she is undergoing a tremendous change and might not be as responsive as you would like. Tonight: Opt for togetherness. CANCER (June 21-July 22) #### Defer to others. You will have little choice, as you clearly want to do something else. View others’ demanding ways as a gift of sorts. Be more upbeat and direct in your dealings, even if an associate or family member is unpredictable. Tonight: Sort

Wed. Hi/Lo/W

38/28/pc 36/20/sn 18/8/pc 20/13/pc 31/18/sn 1/-6/pc 6/-3/c 36/18/pc 28/17/pc 3/-5/pc 58/28/pc 77/67/c 34/27/sn 6/0/pc 22/12/s 67/44/s 76/55/pc 33/13/pc

36/25/pc 35/16/pc 24/12/pc 22/13/pc 35/11/pc 19/15/s 14/7/s 47/32/s 57/33/pc 14/8/s 54/39/s 78/67/s 44/27/pc 20/12/s 44/25/pc 68/50/s 77/56/s 54/31/s

U.S. Extremes

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Hi/Lo/W

81/67/pc 34/15/pc -3/-8/pc 35/27/i 18/12/pc 16/4/s 78/56/c 18/11/pc 73/49/s 8/-3/pc 48/41/r 30/22/sn 16/10/s 38/29/pc 69/53/pc 48/43/r 69/41/s 20/13/pc

82/64/c 50/31/s 20/3/pc 36/24/c 22/15/pc 37/17/pc 59/44/c 23/14/pc 74/50/s 13/3/pc 53/38/r 32/10/sn 36/24/pc 48/33/sh 69/54/pc 49/41/r 72/45/s 28/15/pc

State Extremes

High: 85° ................ McAllen, Texas Low: -31°................ Brimson, Minn.

High: 63° ........................ Lordsburg Low: 12° .............................. Grants

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

financially. Listen to others’ feedback, but avoid taking any risks for now. Understand that you already might be taking risks and not even be aware of it. Be a cynic, and you will land well. Tonight: Your treat. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) #### In face of a changing situation, your attitude remains steady. Being steadfast allows others to open up and share where they are coming from. You might have much more information than you know what to do with. Tonight: Beam in whatever you want. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ## Take news with a grain of salt. You might not be ready for a big shock, but in some way, you could be responsible for that reaction. You will understand more by detaching. Make it a point to say little until you have a more complete picture. Tonight: Early to bed. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) #### Zero in on what you want and why you want it. Be more sensitive to someone else’s needs as well. A question could provoke an overreaction. Use as much care as possible when dealing with your finances. No risktaking, please. Tonight: Meet up with friends. — JACQUELINE BIGAR

BORN TODAY Artist Jackson Pollock (1912), actor Alan Alda (1936), actor Elijah Woods (1981)

Dr. Adajar is staying right here, in the heart of Roswell.

He’s just joined a partner in a new practice. Fundador Adajar, M.D., has joined Michael Sarkees, M.D., at Cardiovascular Associates of Roswell. Thousands of patients have entrusted their hearts to these cardiologists. And for good reason. Together, these board-certified cardiologists are devoted to caring for hearts and improving the quality of life for their patients. And providing trusted, convenient, local care. Even better? Same- and next-day appointments are often available. Call today to see either Dr. Adajar or Dr. Sarkees at Cardiovascular Associates of Roswell: 575-624-0400. Se habla español.

601 W. Country Club Road, #202 Roswell • 575-624-0400

Ice

90s 100s 110s

Michael Sarkees, M.D. Board-Certified Interventional Cardiologist

Cardiovascular Associates of Roswell

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

(For the 48 contiguous states)

through your many offers. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) #### The unexpected pops in and out of your life. You could be in the midst of some significant alterations. You might see others’ reactions toward you change as a result. You’ll want to make an adjustment professionally and/or in your dietary habits. Tonight: Live it up. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ##### Your creativity will allow greater giveand-take in a volatile situation. The end results will be satisfying, especially as you seem to have gained understanding. Your perspective could change radically, which might affect your decision making. Tonight: Be more childlike. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) #### Tension could build to an unprecedented level. A personal matter needs to be a higher priority. You might like to pursue an opportunity that offers you more acknowledgment. Your sensitivity will help calm someone down. Tonight: Surprises head your way. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) #### You’ll head in the right direction regarding a decision you’ve made. A loved one might react in an unexpected way that could stop you in your tracks. Be more open about how you see the whole situation when you are not triggered. Tonight: Have a longoverdue conversation. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) #### Understand what is happening

Fundador Adajar, M.D. Board-Certified Cardiologist

Our pledge:

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today Hi/Lo/W

Member of the Medical Staff at


SPORTS

Tuesday, January 28, 2014 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

Section

Roswell Daily Record

Jermaine Kearse

ON THE BRINK Bets abound

LAS VEGAS (AP) — With the Super Bowl approaching, fans are talking trash, buying snacks, and, more than ever, placing bets. Fans bet an unprecedented $99 million on the Super Bowl last year, and the Nevada gambling industry expects to break the record again Sunday, barring a snowstor m. Nevada sports books collected record amounts of football wagers during the tail end of 2013. All of this is changing the role of the humble sports book, which casinos used to see as a low-profit perk that kept customers from going next door. “It’s not just an amenity anymore; it’s not just icing on the cake, it’s part of the meal,” said Jay Kornegay, who runs the LVH sports book. “We’ve seen crowds like we’ve never seen

See BETTING, Page B3

JERSEY CITY, N.J. (AP) — The names are hardly as familiar as Peyton Manning and Richard Sherman. Yet, for all the megastars and AllPros in this Super Bowl, there are guys like Jermaine Kearse and Paris Lenon. Like Michael Robinson and Terrance Knighton. Malcolm Smith and Manny Ramirez. Players who have gone from pretty much nowhere on the NFL landscape to the doorstep of a championship. Perhaps no one is more grateful for the opportunity to grab a ring than these men. Some are veterans who fit the ter m jour neymen. Some are youngsters who went in late rounds of the draft — or were ignored altogether. All recognize they will play some sort of role in Sunday’s championship game. Some might even sneak into a starring part, the way running back Tim Smith did in 1987 or cornerback Larry Brown did in 1996. “You never know who it might be,”

said Knighton, the massive defensive tackle coming off a sensational AFC championship game performance. Knighton could be the poster child for players who graduate from the depths of the NFL — “I did my four years in Jacksonville,” he said — to the top of the pro football ladder. He’s been practically unblockable in the last few weeks, rising from obscurity to recognizability as a leader of an improving defense. “Well I think that’s naturally going to happen when you’re in the middle of the defense and you’re the anchor of the defense,” the 335-pound Knighton said. “I feel like I’m a natural leader; I think wherever I am, people just gravitate towards me, and with that it requires a responsibility to

AP P hoto

See BRINK, Page B3

Wawrinka: The surprise down under AUSTRALIAN OPEN

AP Photo

Stanislas Wawrinka beat Rafael Nadal in finals of the Australian Open to win his first career Grand Slam, Sunday.

B

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — After winning the Australian Open, some players have jumped for joy into the Yarra River. Many pop champagne and indulge in late-night celebrations. Most set new goals and start thinking about the Grand Slams they want to win next. This was not the case for Stan Wawrinka, who woke up Monday morning groggy but sober and still stunned that he had beaten Rafael Nadal to win his first Grand Slam title. “I still don’t completely realize what’s happened. It still feels like a dream,” Wawrinka told reporters, squinting in the sunlight for the winner’s traditional day-after photo shoot on the banks of the river beside Melbourne Park. Handed a bottle of champagne and told to spray it in celebration, he politely obliged and then put it down. Wawrinka was and still is pessimistic about denting the dominance of Roger Federer, Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray — the socalled Big Four who accounted for all but one of the previous 35 major titles. “I really never dreamed about winning a Grand Slam,” he said, clutching his trophy. “I don’t know about doing it again. But I did it, and no one can take it back.” The morning after the biggest day of his career, Wawrinka was more subdued than overjoyed. His night went late but was tame. There was no big dinner or any food at all, no partying, just spending time with his team and having a Skype session with his wife and 3-year-old daughter in Switzerland. Now, he says he’s looking forward to taking some time after the Davis Cup next weekend to reflect on “what happened” in Melbourne. Here’s what happened: Wawrinka won his first Grand Slam. On his way to the title, he upset No. 2-ranked Djokovic in the quarterfinals and then beat No. 1-ranked

Stallings wins 3rd

SAN DIEGO (AP) — In a tournament that was up for grabs, Scott Stallings hit a 4-iron worthy of a winner Sunday in the Farmers Insurance Open. Stallings was in a five-way tie for the lead when he hit his second shot on the par-5 18th hole as hard as he could. It was enough to barely clear the water, and he took two putts from 40 feet for birdie and a 4-under 68 at Torrey Pines. That was enough for a one-shot victory when no one could catch him. It was the third career PGA Tour victory for Stallings, who earned a return trip to the Masters and should move high enough in the world ranking to qualify for the Match Play Championship next month in Arizona. K.J. Choi had the best score of the week on the South Course with a 66 and was among those who tied for second. The pins were set up in favorable positions for birdies, making the course play the easiest it had all week. But that didn’t make it easy — not for Gary Woodland, Jordan Spieth, Pat Perez and so many others who squandered a good chance to win. Woodland appeared to have the best chance to catch Stallings. He was one shot behind — with plenty of length to reach the 18th in two — until he chose fairway metal off the tee on No. 17 and hooked it into the canyon. He felt he had to make his 45-foot par putt to have any chance, and three-putted for double bogey. Woodland missed an easy birdie attempt on the 18th and closed with a 74.

The scene in Sochi Team Rice triumphs in new-look Pro Bowl

I

f you are flying to Sochi for the Winter Games, book a window seat on the right side of the plane. That way you’ll get a bird’s-eye view of how Russia spent $51 billion on gleaming new sports arenas and a cobweb of highways for this southern city on the Black

Sea. That’s the Russia that President Vladimir Putin wants you to see. Russia’s bid to host the 2014 Games, which was championed and overseen in the smallest detail by its power ful leader, is supSee SOCHI, Page B3

HONOLULU (AP) — The NFL’s all-stars are defending their effort in the lowest scoring Pro Bowl in eight years — a game that pitted teammates against each other in a contest decided in the final minute. “The game was as good as an all-star game or Pro Bowl could ever be and it’s been a great week,” said New Orleans tight end Jimmy Graham, who caught an 8-yard touchdown from Saints teammate Drew Brees in the second quarter Sunday en route to a 22-21 victory for Jerry Rice over Deion Sanders. Dallas running back DeMarco Murray caught a See RICE, Page B3

LOCAL SCHEDULE — TUESDAY, JAN. 28 — • Eunice at Hagerman, 5 p.m. • Corona at Gateway Chr., 6:30 p.m. • Hondo Valley at Lake Arthur, 6:30 p.m. • Ruidoso at NMMI, 7 p.m. • Goddard at Hobbs, 7 p.m. • Carlsbad at Roswell, 7 p.m. BOYS BASKETBALL

• Corona at Gateway Chr., 5 p.m. • Hondo Valley at Lake Arthur, 5 p.m. • Eunice at Hagerman, 6:30 p.m. • Roswell at Carlsbad, 7 p.m. GIRLS BASKETBALL

See AUSSIE, Page B3

See GOLF, Page B3

AP Photo

Cowboys running back DeMarco Murray, right, gets past Washington’s Brian Orakpo for a touchdown late in the fourth quarter during the Pro Bowl, Sunday. Mike Tolbert scored a twopoint conversion following the TD, giving Team Rice a 22-21 win over Team Sanders.

SPOTLIGHT 1901 — The American League is founded. The league plans for a 140game schedule, set player rosters at 14 and recognizes the Players Protective Association, the players’ union. 1949 — Monte Irvin and Ford Smith are signed by the New York Giants. They are the first black players to sign with the club.

ON

SPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN ... 1984 — Wayne Gretzky’s record 51game scoring streak is halted as the Angeles Kings post a 4-2 victory. Over the 51 games, Gretzky scored 61 goals and 92 assists. 2001 — Baltimore’s brazen defense backs up its bragging by beating the New York Giants 34-7 in the Super Bowl. The Ravens intercept Kerry Collins four

times, the final pick returned 49 yards for a touchdown by Duane Starks. 2011 — Oklahoma State shuts out Northern Colorado 44-0 to become the second Division I wrestling program in NCAA history to reach 1,000 wins. Oklahoma State, winner of an NCAA record 34 team national championships, joins Iowa State in the exclusive club.


B2 Tuesday, January 28, 2014

SPORTS

College basketball

24. Gonzaga . . . . . . . . . .18-3 25. Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . .16-4

The AP Top 25 The Associated Press The top 25 teams in The Associated Press' college basketball poll, with firstplace votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 26, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25thplace vote and last week's ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Prv 1. Arizona (63) . . . . . . . . .20-0 1,623 1 2. Syracuse (2) . . . . . . . . .19-0 1,561 2 3. Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-2 1,436 6 4. Wichita St. . . . . . . . . . .21-0 1,435 5 5. San Diego St. . . . . . . . .18-1 1,337 7 6. Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . .15-4 1,272 8 7. Michigan St. . . . . . . . . .18-2 1,251 3 8. Oklahoma St. . . . . . . . .16-3 1,067 11 9. Villanova . . . . . . . . . . . .17-2 1,063 4 10. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . .15-4 1,050 21 11. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . .15-4 896 14 12. Louisville . . . . . . . . . .17-3 891 12 13. Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .19-2 793 15 14. Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . .17-3 763 9 15. Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-4 722 10 16. Iowa St. . . . . . . . . . . .15-3 684 16 17. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-4 549 18 18. Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . .18-2 517 20 19. Saint Louis . . . . . . . . .18-2 464 19 20. Creighton . . . . . . . . . .17-3 445 — 21. UMass . . . . . . . . . . . .17-2 353 13 22. Memphis . . . . . . . . . .15-4 262 23 23. Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . .16-4 203 25 24. Ohio St. . . . . . . . . . . .16-4 143 17 25. Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-4 142 —

114 21 85 25

Others receiving votes: Texas 41, Virginia 26, UCLA 22, UConn 18, George Washington 8, Baylor 6, Kansas State 6, Southern Miss. 6, Colorado 5, Toledo 5, SMU 1, Stephen F. Austin 1.

LPGA

LPGA Money Leaders By The Associated Press Through Jan. 26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Trn 1. Jessica Korda . . . . . . . . . .1 2. Stacy Lewis . . . . . . . . . . .1 3. Na Yeon Choi . . . . . . . . . .1 3. Paula Creamer . . . . . . . . .1 3. Pornanong Phatlum . . . . .1 3. Lizette Salas . . . . . . . . . . .1 7. Christel Boeljon . . . . . . . .1 7. Sandra Gal . . . . . . . . . . . .1 7. Lydia Ko . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 7. P.K. Kongkraphan . . . . . . .1 11. Morgan Pressel . . . . . . .1 11. Thidapa Suwannapura . .1 13. Chella Choi . . . . . . . . . . .1 13. Amelia Lewis . . . . . . . . .1 13. Brittany Lincicome . . . . .1 13. Jenny Suh . . . . . . . . . . .1 13. Michelle Wie . . . . . . . . . .1 18. Sandra Changkija . . . . . .1 18. Kristy McPherson . . . . . .1 18. Azahara Munoz . . . . . . .1 18. Hee Young Park . . . . . . .1 18. Alena Sharp . . . . . . . . . .1 23. Jodi Ewart Shadoff . . . . .1 23. Haru Nomura . . . . . . . . .1 25. Laura Diaz . . . . . . . . . . .1 25. Angela Stanford . . . . . . .1 27. Moriya Jutanugarn . . . . .1 27. Gerina Piller . . . . . . . . . .1 27. Line Vedel . . . . . . . . . . .1 30. Karine Icher . . . . . . . . . .1 30. Tiffany Joh . . . . . . . . . . .1 30. Pernilla Lindberg . . . . . .1 33. Austin Ernst . . . . . . . . . .1 33. Julieta Granada . . . . . . .1 33. Danielle Kang . . . . . . . . .1 33. Katherine Kirk . . . . . . . . .1 33. Brittany Lang . . . . . . . . .1 33. Meena Lee . . . . . . . . . . .1 33. Mirim Lee . . . . . . . . . . . .1 33. Se Ri Pak . . . . . . . . . . . .1 33. Sarah Jane Smith . . . . . .1 33. Ayako Uehara . . . . . . . . .1 33. Amy Yang . . . . . . . . . . . .1 44. Paz Echeverria . . . . . . . .1 44. Kathleen Ekey . . . . . . . .1 44. M.J. Hur . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 44. Hannah Jun . . . . . . . . . .1 44. Mindy Kim . . . . . . . . . . .1 44. Caroline Masson . . . . . .1 44. Erica Popson . . . . . . . . .1 44. Sun Young Yoo . . . . . . . .1

Others receiving votes: UConn 67, Gonzaga 51, UCLA 39, Virginia 18, George Washington 5, Green Bay 5, Kansas St. 5, Minnesota 5, SMU 3, American U. 1, Harvard 1, Louisiana Tech 1, New Mexico 1, Southern Miss. 1.

USA Today Top 25 Poll The top 25 teams in the USA Today men's college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 26, points based on 25 points for a firstplace vote through one point for a 25thplace vote and previous ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Pvs 1. Arizona (31) . . . . . . . . .20-0 799 1 2. Syracuse (1) . . . . . . . . .19-0 769 2 3. Wichita State . . . . . . . .21-0 724 4 4. Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . .17-2 694 6 5. San Diego State . . . . . .18-1 653 7 6. Michigan State . . . . . . .18-2 621 3 7. Louisville . . . . . . . . . . .17-3 552 9 7. Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . .15-4 552 11 9. Villanova . . . . . . . . . . . .17-2 509 5 10. Oklahoma State . . . . .16-3 497 12 11. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . .15-4 433 14 12. Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-4 386 10 13. Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . .17-3 368 8 14. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . .15-4 346 25 15. Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .19-2 323 16 16. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-4 298 18 17. Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . .18-2 279 19 18. Iowa State . . . . . . . . .15-3 268 17 19. UMass . . . . . . . . . . . .17-2 265 12 20. Creighton . . . . . . . . . .17-3 229 24 21. Saint Louis . . . . . . . . .18-2 218 20 22. Memphis . . . . . . . . . .15-4 155 22 23. Ohio State . . . . . . . . .16-4 118 15

NBA

Money $195,000 $120,655 $63,581 $63,581 $63,581 $63,581 $31,543 $31,543 $31,543 $31,543 $23,945 $23,945 $19,289 $19,289 $19,289 $19,289 $19,289 $15,220 $15,220 $15,220 $15,220 $15,220 $13,344 $13,344 $12,386 $12,386 $11,230 $11,230 $11,230 $9,975 $9,975 $9,975 $7,531 $7,531 $7,531 $7,531 $7,531 $7,531 $7,531 $7,531 $7,531 $7,531 $7,531 $5,128 $5,128 $5,128 $5,128 $5,128 $5,128 $5,128 $5,128

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE

Golf scores

PGA-Farmers Insurance Open Scores By The Associated Press Sunday s-Torrey Pines, South Course (7,698 yards, par 72) n-Torrey Pines, North Course (7,052 yards, par 72) San Diego Purse: $6.1 million Final (Third and fourth rounds played on South Course) Scott Stallings (500), $1,098,000 . . . . . . . . . . .72s-67n-72-68—279 K.J. Choi (167), $366,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74s-70n-70-66—280 Graham DeLaet (167), $366,000 . . . . . . . . . . .70n-73s-69-68—280 Jason Day (167), $366,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66n-73s-73-68—280 Pat Perez (167), $366,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67s-71n-72-70—280 Marc Leishman (167), $366,000 . . . . . . . . . . . .66n-71s-72-71—280 Charley Hoffman (85), $190,117 . . . . . . . . . . . .69s-70n-75-67—281 Ryo Ishikawa (85), $190,117 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72s-70n-69-70—281 Will MacKenzie (85), $190,117 . . . . . . . . . . . . .72s-69n-70-70—281 Trevor Immelman (64), $135,217 . . . . . . . . . . .68n-74s-71-69—282 Seung-Yul Noh (64), $135,217 . . . . . . . . . . . . .68n-73s-72-69—282 Russell Knox (64), $135,217 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71s-67n-74-70—282 Justin Thomas (0), $135,217 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68n-73s-72-69—282 Brad Fritsch (64), $135,217 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69n-70s-72-71—282 Gary Woodland (64), $135,217 . . . . . . . . . . . .65n-73s-70-74—282 Hideki Matsuyama (54), $97,600 . . . . . . . . . . .72n-72s-70-69—283 Keegan Bradley (54), $97,600 . . . . . . . . . . . . .69n-72s-71-71—283 Morgan Hoffmann (54), $97,600 . . . . . . . . . . . .72s-66n-72-73—283 Erik Compton (51), $76,555 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69n-69s-74-72—284 Robert Streb (51), $76,555 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73s-69n-70-72—284 Nicolas Colsaerts (51), $76,555 . . . . . . . . . . . .69n-67s-75-73—284 Jordan Spieth (51), $76,555 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71s-63n-75-75—284 J.B. Holmes (46), $54,290 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71s-68n-75-71—285 Billy Horschel (46), $54,290 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70s-67n-77-71—285 Luke Guthrie (46), $54,290 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76s-68n-71-70—285 Bubba Watson (46), $54,290 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70n-73s-73-69—285 Rory Sabbatini (46), $54,290 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74s-68n-69-74—285 Stewart Cink (39), $38,023 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64n-71s-79-72—286 Jamie Lovemark (39), $38,023 . . . . . . . . . . . . .72s-67n-76-71—286 Justin Leonard (39), $38,023 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74s-69n-73-70—286 Sang-Moon Bae (39), $38,023 . . . . . . . . . . . . .67n-76s-71-72—286 Robert Garrigus (39), $38,023 . . . . . . . . . . . . .71n-71s-72-72—286 Brendan Steele (39), $38,023 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76s-67n-74-69—286 Y.E. Yang (39), $38,023 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76s-67n-74-69—286 Chad Collins (39), $38,023 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78s-66n-73-69—286 Brian Stuard (39), $38,023 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70s-73n-69-74—286 Brendon Todd (32), $26,840 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69n-73s-72-73—287 Martin Laird (32), $26,840 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69n-71s-74-73—287 Michael Putnam (32), $26,840 . . . . . . . . . . . . .69n-73s-75-70—287 Kevin Tway (32), $26,840 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69s-70n-73-75—287 Charles Howell III (32), $26,840 . . . . . . . . . . . .70n-72s-70-75—287 Tyrone Van Aswegen (32), $26,840 . . . . . . . . .66n-76s-76-69—287 Stuart Appleby (27), $20,740 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74s-69n-72-73—288 Justin Hicks (27), $20,740 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71s-68n-75-74—288 Bill Haas (27), $20,740 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74s-70n-71-73—288 Matt Jones (27), $20,740 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75s-65n-77-71—288 John Merrick (21), $15,479 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69n-74s-72-74—289 Jim Herman (21), $15,479 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66n-75s-74-74—289 Lee Westwood (21), $15,479 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73s-68n-75-73—289 Ian Poulter (21), $15,479 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75s-67n-71-76—289 David Lingmerth (21), $15,479 . . . . . . . . . . . . .72s-70n-75-72—289 Kevin Chappell (21), $15,479 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73s-66n-73-77—289 Hunter Mahan (21), $15,479 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72n-72s-73-72—289 Andres Romero (21), $15,479 . . . . . . . . . . . . .72s-72n-67-78—289 Mark Calcavecchia (15), $13,847 . . . . . . . . . . .70n-74s-71-75—290 David Lynn (15), $13,847 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68n-73s-75-74—290 Tag Ridings (15), $13,847 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73s-70n-73-74—290 Blake Adams (15), $13,847 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75s-69n-72-74—290 Victor Dubuisson (0), $13,176 . . . . . . . . . . . . .72n-69s-74-76—291 Chris Williams (0), $13,176 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71n-72s-72-76—291 D.A. Points (9), $13,176 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67n-74s-75-75—291 Jhonattan Vegas (9), $13,176 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68n-75s-74-74—291 Nick Watney (9), $13,176 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70n-74s-74-73—291 Harrison Frazar (9), $13,176 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68n-74s-77-72—291 D.H. Lee (9), $13,176 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73s-71n-75-72—291 Cameron Tringale (5), $12,627 . . . . . . . . . . . . .71s-71n-76-74—292 Matt Bettencourt (5), $12,627 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71n-73s-74-74—292 Ben Crane (3), $12,383 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77s-67n-73-76—293 Jonathan Byrd (3), $12,383 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70n-72s-77-74—293 Bryce Molder (1), $12,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77s-65n-77-75—294 Nicholas Thompson (1), $12,017 . . . . . . . . . . .72s-70n-76-77—295 Charlie Wi (1), $12,017 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72n-70s-77-76—295 Greg Owen (1), $11,834 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70n-74s-74-82—300 Made cut; did not finish Aaron Baddeley (1), $11,712 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71n-73s-76—220 Camilo Villegas (1), $11,346 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72s-71n-78—221 Brice Garnett (1), $11,346 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75n-68s-78—221 Tim Herron (1), $11,346 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70n-74s-77—221

SCOREBOARD

Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Brooklyn . . . . . . . . . . .20 New York . . . . . . . . . .17 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .14 Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Washington . . . . . . . .21 Charlotte . . . . . . . . . .19 Orlando . . . . . . . . . . .12 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .22 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .16 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . . .8

L 21 23 27 31 31 L 12 21 22 27 33

L 9 22 27 28 36

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L San Antonio . . . . . . . .33 11 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .29 17 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 20 Memphis . . . . . . . . . .22 20 New Orleans . . . . . . .18 25 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Oklahoma City . . . . . .36 10 Portland . . . . . . . . . . .33 12 Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .22 21 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .22 22 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 29 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L L.A. Clippers . . . . . . .32 15 Golden State . . . . . . .27 18 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . .26 18 L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . .16 29 Sacramento . . . . . . . .15 29

Pct GB .523 — .465 2 1⁄2 .386 6 .326 9 1 .311 9 ⁄2

Pct GB .727 — .523 9 .488 10 1⁄2 .413 14 .267 20 1⁄2 Pct .791 .500 .386 .364 .182

GB — 12 1⁄2 17 1⁄2 18 1⁄2 26 1⁄2

Pct GB .750 — .630 5 .565 8 .524 10 .419 14 1⁄2

Pct GB .783 — .733 2 1⁄2 .512 12 1⁄2 .500 13 .356 19 1⁄2

Pct GB .681 — .600 4 .591 4 1⁄2 .356 15 .341 15 1⁄2

Sunday’s Games Miami 113, San Antonio 101 New York 110, L.A. Lakers 103 New Orleans 100, Orlando 92 Phoenix 99, Cleveland 90 Brooklyn 85, Boston 79 Dallas 116, Detroit 106 Golden State 103, Portland 88 Denver 125, Sacramento 117 Monday’s Games Phoenix 124, Philadelphia 113 Toronto 104, Brooklyn 103 Minnesota 95, Chicago 86 Oklahoma City 111, Atlanta 109 L.A. Clippers 114, Milwaukee 86 Utah 106, Sacramento 99 Tuesday's Games New Orleans at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Orlando at Detroit, 5:30 p.m. Boston at New York, 5:30 p.m. San Antonio at Houston, 6 p.m. Memphis at Portland, 8 p.m. Washington at Golden State, 8:30 p.m. Indiana at L.A. Lakers, 8:30 p.m.

Steven Bowditch (1), $11,346 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68n-76s-77—221 Will Claxton (1), $11,346 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71n-73s-77—221 Bobby Gates (1), $10,919 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69n-72s-81—222 Tiger Woods (1), $10,919 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72s-71n-79—222 Michael Block (0), $10,736 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74s-69n-86—229

LPGA Bahamas Classic Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At Ocean Club Golf Course Paradise Island, Bahamas Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,644; Par: 73 Final Jessica Korda, $195,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-66-72-66—273 Stacy Lewis, $120,655 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-71-68-66—274 Pornanong Phatlum, $63,581 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-69-67—276 Paula Creamer, $63,581 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-65-71-69—276 Lizette Salas, $63,581 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-67-66-71—276 Na Yeon Choi, $63,581 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-68-66-72—276 Christel Boeljon, $31,543 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-67-73-66—277 Sandra Gal, $31,543 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-71-66—277 Lydia Ko, $31,543 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70-71-68—277 P.K. Kongkraphan, $31,543 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69-71-68—277 Morgan Pressel, $23,945 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73-69-66—278 Thidapa Suwannapura, $23,945 . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-68-69—278 Brittany Lincicome, $19,289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-71-68—280 Chella Choi, $19,289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-67-71—280 Michelle Wie, $19,289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-65-72-71—280 Amelia Lewis, $19,289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73-66-72—280 Jenny Suh, $19,289 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-66-71-72—280 Alena Sharp, $15,220 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-69-70-68—282 Kristy McPherson, $15,220 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-69-69—282 Hee Young Park, $15,220 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-72-69—282 Sandra Changkija, $15,220 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-72-68-71—282 Azahara Munoz, $15,220 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-69-72—282 Haru Nomura, $13,344 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-74-70-66—283 Jodi Ewart Shadoff, $13,344 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-68-71-69—283 Angela Stanford, $12,386 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73-69-69—284 Laura Diaz, $12,386 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-70-71—284 Line Vedel, $11,230 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-74-70-68—285 Moriya Jutanugarn, $11,230 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-72-70-69—285 Gerina Piller, $11,230 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-75-68-71—285 Pernilla Lindberg, $9,975 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71-74-71—286 Karine Icher, $9,975 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-73-67-72—286 Tiffany Joh, $9,975 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-74-66-73—286 Mirim Lee, $7,531 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-77-72-69—287 Ayako Uehara, $7,531 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-74-72-69—287 Austin Ernst, $7,531 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-74-74-70—287 Se Ri Pak, $7,531 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-73-72-70—287 Brittany Lang, $7,531 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-78-69-71—287 Amy Yang, $7,531 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-69-76-71—287 Julieta Granada, $7,531 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-71-71-72—287 Katherine Kirk, $7,531 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-73-72—287 Meena Lee, $7,531 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68-76-71-72—287 Sarah Jane Smith, $7,531 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-73-69-73—287 Danielle Kang, $7,531 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-71-74—287 Caroline Masson, $5,128 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-72-72-69—288 Mindy Kim, $5,128 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77-70-71-70—288 Sun Young Yoo, $5,128 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-69-76-70—288 Mi Jung Hur, $5,128 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-68-74-71—288 Paz Echeverria, $5,128 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-73-73-72—288 Kathleen Ekey, $5,128 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-69-72-72—288 Hannah Jun, $5,128 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72-71-72—288 Erica Popson, $5,128 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-71-71-72—288 Rebecca Lee-Bentham, $4,162 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-70-76-69—289 Jennifer Song, $4,162 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-76-72-71—289 Kelly Tan, $4,162 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-71-70-72—289 Mi Hyang Lee, $4,162 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69-72-74—289 Seon Hwa Lee, $3,765 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-72-72-71—290 Danah Bordner, $3,765 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-74-75-72—290 Mo Martin, $3,386 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-76-76-69—291 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $3,386 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-71-76-70—291 Lexi Thompson, $3,386 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73-73-72—291 Cindy LaCrosse, $3,386 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74-70-77—291 Lisa Ferrero, $3,105 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-74-74-71—292 Ai Miyazato, $3,105 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-71-75-71—292 Lisa McCloskey, $3,105 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-70-76-72—292 Perrine Delacour, $2,939 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73-78-69—293 Vicky Hurst, $2,939 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-73-73-73—293 Dori Carter, $2,774 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-74-76-71—294 Birdie Kim, $2,774 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72-77-72—294 Candie Kung, $2,774 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72-81-72—294 Megan Grehan, $2,643 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73-76-73—295 Natalie Gulbis, $2,610 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-70-82-74—299

ROSWELL NATIVE GERINA PILLER ON THE LPGA TOUR

PILLER’S

PROFESSION

71 T-27th -7

BAHAMAS LPGA CLASSIC

Hole Par Score

PLACE

TOTAL TO PAR

ROUND SCORECARD

FINAL

ROUND SCORE

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total 4 4 3 5 3 4 5 4 4 36 4 5 3 4 4 5 4 3 5 37 73 4 4 3 5 3 4 6 3 3 35 4 5 3 4 4 5 5 2 4 36 71

Eagles: 0 Birdies: 4 Pars: 12 Bogeys: 2 Others: 0 Fairways hit: 11 of 14 Greens hit: 15 of 18 Putts: 31

Wednesday's Games Oklahoma City at Miami, 5 p.m. Orlando at Toronto, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at Boston, 5:30 p.m. Detroit at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m. New Orleans at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Phoenix at Milwaukee, 6 p.m. Houston at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Charlotte at Denver, 7 p.m. Chicago at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. Memphis at Sacramento, 8 p.m. Washington at L.A. Clippers, 8:30 p.m.

NFL

Browns’ Pettine names O’Neil defensive coordinator

CLEVELAND (AP) — Browns coach Mike Pettine hired Jim O’Neil as his defensive coordinator on Monday, reuniting him with the coach who helped him turn around Buffalo’s defense last season. Pettine also retained special teams coordinator Chris Tabor from Rob Chudzinski’s staff. In addition, Pettine plucked assistants Chuck Driesbach (linebackers), Brian Fleury (assistant linebackers coach) and Jeff Hafley (secondary) off the staff he worked on in Buffalo as defensive coordinator. Pettine made Brian Angelichio, who spent the past two seasons in Tampa Bay, his tight ends coach and kept Bobby Babich (assistant secondary coach) and Shawn Mennenga (assistant special teams coach) from Cleveland’s previous staff. O’Neil was Buffalo’s linebackers coach last season, his fifth straight with Pettine. They were together in New York, spending four seasons on Rex Ryan’s staff with the Jets. Pettine’s connection with O’Neil predates their time in the NFL. O’Neil played for Pettine’s father, Mike Sr., in high school. With the help of Pettine and O’Neil, the Bills set a franchise record with 57 sacks, second most in the NFL. Buffalo finished 10th (333.4) in total defense, after finishing 22nd in 2012. Since being hired by Cleveland last week, the 47-year-old Pettine has been busy assembling his staff. He knew he was behind the rest of the league after it took the Browns nearly a month before hiring him as their seventh coach since 1999. Pettine still needs an offensive coordinator, and one of the reported top names on his list, former Houston coach Gary Kubiak, was hired by Baltimore on Monday. The Browns have reportedly expressed interest in former Titans offensive coordinator Dowell Loggains. He could be hired as coordinator or perhaps coach quarterbacks. The 33-year-old Loggains spent six seasons with Tennessee. He was the team’s offensive coordinator this season, but was not retained by new coach Ken Whisenhunt.

NFL Playoff Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 4 Indianapolis 45, Kansas City 44 New Orleans 26, Philadelphia 24 Sunday, Jan. 5 San Diego 27, Cincinnati 10 San Francisco 23, Green Bay 20

Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 11 Seattle 23, New Orleans 15 New England 43, Indianpolis 22 Sunday, Jan. 12 San Francisco 23, Carolina 10 Denver 24, San Diego 17

Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 19 Denver 26, New England 16 Seattle 23, San Francisco 17

Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 26 At Honolulu Team Rice vs. Team Sanders, 5:30 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 2 At East Rutherford, N.J. Denver vs. Seattle, 4:30 p.m. (FOX)

NHL

National Hockey League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Boston . . . . . . .51 33 15 3 Tampa Bay . . .52 31 16 5 Toronto . . . . . .54 27 21 6 Montreal . . . . .52 27 20 5 Detroit . . . . . . .52 23 18 11 Ottawa . . . . . .52 22 20 10 Florida . . . . . . .52 21 24 7 Buffalo . . . . . . .51 14 30 7

Pts 69 67 60 59 57 54 49 35

GF GA 153 113 155 128 155 168 128 134 135 144 147 165 127 158 97 147

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Tuesday, Jan. 28 MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN — Michigan St. at Iowa ESPN2 — West Virginia at Baylor ESPNU — Missouri at Arkansas 7 p.m. ESPN — Kentucky at LSU ESPNU — Virginia at Notre Dame FS1 — St. John's at Creighton 9 p.m. ESPNU — New Mexico at Utah St. NHL HOCKEY 5:30 p.m. NBCSN — Washington at Buffalo SOCCER 12:55 p.m. NBCSN — Premier League, Everton at Liverpool

Roswell Daily Record Metropolitan Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pittsburgh . . . .53 37 14 2 N.Y. Rangers .54 28 23 3 Carolina . . . . .52 24 19 9 Columbus . . . .52 26 22 4 Philadelphia . .53 25 22 6 New Jersey . . .53 22 20 11 Washington . . .52 23 21 8 N.Y. Islanders .55 21 26 8

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Chicago . . . . . .54 32 10 12 St. Louis . . . . .51 35 11 5 Colorado . . . . .52 33 14 5 Minnesota . . . .54 28 20 6 Dallas . . . . . . .53 24 21 8 Winnipeg . . . . .54 25 24 5 Nashville . . . . .54 23 23 8 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Anaheim . . . . .54 39 10 5 San Jose . . . . .53 34 13 6 Los Angeles . .54 30 18 6 Vancouver . . . .54 27 18 9 Phoenix . . . . . .52 24 18 10 Calgary . . . . . .52 18 27 7 Edmonton . . . .55 17 32 6

Pts 76 59 57 56 56 55 54 50

GF GA 171 128 139 138 134 147 152 148 142 158 127 132 148 154 157 185

Pts 76 75 71 62 56 55 54

GF GA 190 149 177 119 153 137 129 133 154 157 152 158 132 163

Pts 83 74 66 63 58 43 40

GF GA 182 130 165 126 133 113 137 138 151 160 119 165 144 190

Sunday’s Games Florida 5, Detroit 4, SO N.Y. Rangers 7, New Jersey 3 Winnipeg 3, Chicago 1 Edmonton 5, Nashville 1 Vancouver 5, Phoenix 4, OT Monday’s Games Boston 6, N.Y. Islanders 3 Carolina 3, Columbus 2 Pittsburgh 3, Buffalo 0 Colorado 4, Dallas 3 Edmonton 4, Vancouver 2 Los Angeles 1, San Jose 0 Tuesday's Games Florida at Boston, 5 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 5 p.m. Detroit at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Ottawa at Columbus, 5 p.m. Washington at Buffalo, 5:30 p.m. Carolina at Montreal, 5:30 p.m. New Jersey at St. Louis, 6 p.m. Nashville at Winnipeg, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Chicago at Calgary, 7:30 p.m. Minnesota at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Wednesday's Games N.Y. Rangers vs. N.Y. Islanders at Bronx, N.Y., 5:30 p.m. San Jose at Edmonton, 7:30 p.m. Chicago at Vancouver, 8:30 p.m.

PGA

PGA Tour FedExCup Leaders The Associated Press Through Jan. 26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Points Money 1. Jimmy Walker . . . . . .1,233 $2,417,833 2. Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . . . .931 $1,777,358 3. Harris English . . . . . . . .896 $1,816,397 4. Zach Johnson . . . . . . . .810 $1,699,450 5. Webb Simpson . . . . . . .795 $1,690,417 6. Ryan Moore . . . . . . . . .714 $1,690,350 7. Dustin Johnson . . . . . .639 $1,598,750 8. Brian Stuard . . . . . . . . .613 $1,213,823 9. Patrick Reed . . . . . . . . .583 $1,154,250 10. Scott Stallings . . . . . .530 $1,128,421 11. Jason Bohn . . . . . . . . .455 $889,780 12. Charles Howell III . . . .450 $846,112 12. Gary Woodland . . . . .450 $1,042,877 14. Ryo Ishikawa . . . . . . .425 $854,673 15. Jordan Spieth . . . . . . .406 $831,555 16. Charley Hoffman . . . .392 $730,604 17. Ryan Palmer . . . . . . .387 $763,468 18. Scott Brown . . . . . . . .369 $661,910 19. Chris Stroud . . . . . . . .355 $772,818 20. Graham DeLaet . . . . .352 $815,667 21. Brendon Todd . . . . . . .349 $541,143 22. Vijay Singh . . . . . . . . .346 $593,400 23. Jeff Overton . . . . . . . .345 $607,610 24. Ian Poulter . . . . . . . . .336 $865,479 25. Justin Leonard . . . . . .332 $614,345 26. Will MacKenzie . . . . . .330 $642,007 27. Pat Perez . . . . . . . . . .322 $606,091 28. Briny Baird . . . . . . . . .321 $548,375 29. Tim Clark . . . . . . . . . .316 $563,883 30. Jerry Kelly . . . . . . . . .310 $577,740 31. Marc Leishman . . . . . .303 $613,100 32. Brian Gay . . . . . . . . . .279 $477,103 33. Billy Horschel . . . . . . .277 $519,721 34. Russell Knox . . . . . . .276 $378,318 35. K.J. Choi . . . . . . . . . . .271 $550,318 36. Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . . .268 $477,415 37. Matt Every . . . . . . . . .257 $438,213 38. Keegan Bradley . . . . .249 $477,595 39. Kevin Na . . . . . . . . . . .247 $398,650 40. Boo Weekley . . . . . . .240 $315,972 41. Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . .237 $489,167 42. Luke Guthrie . . . . . . . .236 $371,928 43. Rory Sabbatini . . . . . .235 $414,803 44. Hideki Matsuyama . . .231 $391,033 45. Justin Hicks . . . . . . . .228 $336,509 46. Kevin Stadler . . . . . . .213 $376,698 47. Kevin Streelman . . . . .212 $461,908 48. Brian Harman . . . . . . .210 $339,392 49. Sergio Garcia . . . . . . .205 $526,000 50. Graeme McDowell . . .200 $480,000 51. Chad Collins . . . . . . . .192 $289,197 52. Robert Garrigus . . . . .192 $245,473 53. Jason Dufner . . . . . . .186 $378,080 54. Daniel Summerhays . .184 $237,945 55. Stuart Appleby . . . . . .184 $260,457 56. James Driscoll . . . . . .180 $205,408 57. Spencer Levin . . . . . .173 $200,760 58. J.J. Henry . . . . . . . . . .171 $235,146 59. Jason Kokrak . . . . . . .170 $277,984 60. Seung-yul Noh . . . . . .169 $234,847 60. Bubba Watson . . . . . .169 $260,407 62. Jason Day . . . . . . . . .167 $366,000 63. Camilo Villegas . . . . . .163 $146,359 64. Trevor Immelman . . . .162 $255,967 65. Stewart Cink . . . . . . . .160 $275,289 66. Adam Scott . . . . . . . . .152 $317,750 67. Matt Jones . . . . . . . . .150 $188,060 68. Brendan Steele . . . . .147 $188,948 69. John Senden . . . . . . .146 $276,855 70. Hudson Swafford . . . .145 $197,131 71. Michael Putnam . . . . .144 $121,648 72. George McNeill . . . . .143 $226,890 73. Greg Chalmers . . . . . .141 $234,929 74. Aaron Baddeley . . . . .138 $311,512 75. Charlie Wi . . . . . . . . . .137 $192,667 76. Fredrik Jacobson . . . .137 $298,659 77. Tyrone Van Aswegen .136 $126,761 78. Martin Laird . . . . . . . .135 $170,711 78. Brendon de Jonge . . .135 $188,388 80. Kevin Chappell . . . . . .133 $126,801 81. Ken Duke . . . . . . . . . .132 $261,768 82. Billy Hurley III . . . . . . .130 $185,084 83. Heath Slocum . . . . . . .129 $159,068 84. Morgan Hoffmann . . . .128 $157,568 85. Sang-Moon Bae . . . . .126 $162,413 86. Charlie Beljan . . . . . . .125 $184,460 87. Troy Matteson . . . . . .124 $230,550 88. Ben Martin . . . . . . . . .121 $132,980 89. Ricky Barnes . . . . . . .117 $135,407 89. Jonas Blixt . . . . . . . . .117 $188,033 91. Brice Garnett . . . . . . .116 $99,688 92. Justin Rose . . . . . . . . .115 $300,000

93. Josh Teater . . . . . . . . .114 93. Bo Van Pelt . . . . . . . . .114 95. Kevin Kisner . . . . . . . .113 96. Brian Davis . . . . . . . . .112 97. Phil Mickelson . . . . . . .112 98. Scott Langley . . . . . . .110 99. David Hearn . . . . . . . .107 100. Kyle Stanley . . . . . . .107 100. Michael Thompson . .107

Transactions

$119,804 $170,817 $121,384 $126,147 $181,900 $138,178 $108,270 $133,037 $183,760

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with INF Elliott Johnson on a minor league contract. National League CINCINNATI REDS — Agreed to terms with INF Chris Nelson on a minor league contract. COLORADO ROCKIES — Named Jerry Weinstein offensive coordinator, Ron Gideon supervisor for Tulsa (Texas), Don Sneddon manager for Modest (Cal), Mark Brewer pitching coach for Asheville (SAL) and Duane Espy supervisor for Tri-City (NYP). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Assigned G Lorenzo Brown to Delaware (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS — Signed coach Mike Smith and general manager Thomas Dimitroff to one-year contract extensions through the 2016 season and president Rich McKay to a four-year extension through May 2019. BALTIMORE RAVENS — Named Gary Kubiak offensive coordinator. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Named Jim O’Neil defensive coordinator, Chris Tabor special teams coordinator, Brian Angelichio tight ends coach, Bobby Babich assistant secondary coach, Chuck Driesbach linebackers coach, Brian Fleury assistant linebackers coach, Jeff Hafley secondary coach and Shawn Mennenga assistant special teams coach. NEW YORK GIANTS — Named Danny Langsdorf quarterbacks coach, Sean Ryan wide receivers coach and Kevin M. Gilbride tight ends coach. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Promoted Mike Dawson to assistant defensive line coach. Named Bill Musgrave quarterbacks coach and Michael Clay defensive quality control coach. Canadian Football League CALGARY STAMPEDERS — Re-signed DB Keon Raymond to a contract extension. EDMONTON ESKIMOS — Signed OL Adam Baboulas and LB Curtis Dublanko. WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Re-signed DB Alex Suber. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS — Recalled F Brandon Pirri from Rockford (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Assigned G Petr Mrazek to Grand Rapids (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Recalled F Colton Sissons from Milwaukee (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Sent D Matt Donovan and G Anders Nilsson to Bridgeport (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES — Recalled D Connor Murphy from Portland (AHL). Assigned F Jordan Szwarz to Portland. SOCCER Major League Soccer CHIVAS USA — Signed D Fejiro Okiomah and D Donald Toia. NEW YORK RED BULLS — Acquired D Richard Eckersley from Toronto FC for a 2017 fourth round MLS SuperDraft pick. PHILADELPHIA UNION — Acquired MF Maurice Edu from Stoke City FC on a oneyear loan with an option to purchase. COLLEGE ARMSTRONG ATLANTIC — Named Calvain Culberson baseball coach. COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY — Named Dr. Sharon Beverly assistant vice president for student affairs and executive director of athletics and recreation. COLORADO STATE — Announced men’s basketball F Chane Behanan enrolled at the school and will be eligible to play end of the fall term. DOANE — Named Josh Littrell offensive coordinator. GEORGETOWN — Announced senior basketball C Moses Ayegba was suspended by the NCAA for one game for violations related to pre-enrollment rules. NEBRASKA — Announced DT Avery Moss is banned from the Nebraska campus through Dec. 31 and will not play in 2014, after he pleaded no contest to public indecency in connection with a 2012 incident. STANFORD — Named Peter Hansen inside linebackers coach.

Women’s basketball

The AP Top 25 The Associated Press The top 25 teams in The Associated Press' women's college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 26, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week's ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Prv 1. UConn (36) . . . . . . . . .21-0 900 1 2. Notre Dame . . . . . . . . .18-0 852 2 3. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20-1 819 3 4. Stanford . . . . . . . . . . . .18-1 811 4 5. Louisville . . . . . . . . . . .20-1 758 5 6. North Carolina . . . . . . .17-3 688 7 7. South Carolina . . . . . . .18-2 656 10 8. Maryland . . . . . . . . . . .16-2 638 6 9. Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-3 617 12 10. Tennessee . . . . . . . . .16-4 565 11 11. Oklahoma St. . . . . . . .17-2 550 8 12. Penn St. . . . . . . . . . . .15-4 485 13 13. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . .16-4 471 9 14. LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16-4 397 15 15. Arizona St. . . . . . . . . .17-3 389 14 16. Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . . .16-4 351 16 17. Texas A&M . . . . . . . . .16-5 302 17 18. NC State . . . . . . . . . .18-3 261 23 19. Purdue . . . . . . . . . . . .14-5 234 22 20. West Virginia . . . . . . .17-3 219 18 21. California . . . . . . . . . .14-5 140 19 22. Gonzaga . . . . . . . . . .18-3 123 25 23. Florida St. . . . . . . . . . .15-5 102 24 23. Iowa St. . . . . . . . . . . .15-4 102 20 25. Middle Tennessee . . .17-3 84 —

Others receiving votes: Nebraska 63, Rutgers 27, Michigan St. 23, Southern Cal 18, St. John's 14, San Diego 7, Oklahoma 6, Syracuse 6, Wichita St. 5, Saint Joseph's 4, Bowling Green 3, Chattanooga 2, DePaul 2, Iowa 2, Michigan 2, Georgia Tech 1, Texas 1.

Local briefs: FPC edges NMMI BORGER, Texas — The host Plainsmen got a late free throw and edged NMMI 68-67 on Monday in WJCAC play. The Broncos tied the game at 67 with less than 30 seconds left, allowing FPC to set up for a final shot. With 2 seconds left, a foul call in the lane resulted in a trip to the line for the Plainsmen. After FPC split the pair, NMMI’s Marcus Roper got off a 30-foot 3-pointer that hit the back iron and caromed off as the buzzer sounded. NMMI trailed by six, 39-33, at the break, but rallied back and led by as many as six in the second half. Frank Phillips took a two-point lead with a minute left in the game, setting up the dramatic finish. Roper paced the Broncos with 26 points. Biron Joseph poured in 18 for NMMI,

while Antonio Manns had nine. The loss dropped NMMI to 11-9 overall and 1-7 in WJCAC play.

Boys basketball

Goddard JV 63, Gateway Chr. 50 The Goddard JV team broke open a deadlock with a big second half en route to a 13-point win over visiting Gateway Christian at Ground Zero Gymnasium, Monday. The two teams were tied at 26 after the first two quarters, but Goddard outscored the Warriors 37-24 in the second half to pull away for the win. Johnny Worrall led Gateway with 19 points, 21 rebounds and five blocks. Jacob Moody added 12 points for the Warriors. Gateway fell to 4-12 with the loss.


Roswell Daily Record

Sochi

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posed to show Russia as a resurgent economy, capable of turning a semi-obscure seaside resort filled with cheesy bars into an international vacation magnet. All Sochi needs now is some visitors. All the indoor venues for the Winter Games are tucked into a compact Olympic park next to the Black Sea. The outdoor venues in the mountains are about 45 minutes away via a brand new squeaky-clean train. Athletes, Olympic delegations, journalists and spectators on the day of the event all have free train tickets. Visitors to test events that Sochi hosted last year were pleasantly surprised by the army of young volunteers who spoke good English and were eager to help. Expect to see them inside the Olympic bubble as well as at Sochi’s upgraded airport and train stations. Olympic Games these days all have stringent security checks and Sochi even more so since an Islamic insurgency is raging just a few hundred miles (kilometers) away. Railway stations are circled by temporary fencing and all visi-

Betting

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before.” Professional gamblers and odds makers alike attribute the rise in wagering to the increase in televised games, and the increasing ubiquity of sports analysis. Amateur gamblers are more likely to bet on a game they can watch, because the emotional journey is part of the fun. The proliferation of sports podcasts, blogs and websites, as well as the debates that rage on social media, have all made fans feel more educated and confident in their opinions, according to Kornegay, who spent last week furiously working with four staffers to figure out hyper-specific data points like the number of receptions Denver running back Knowshon Moreno is likely to have. Proposition wagers, in which gamblers bet on

Brink

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tors reach venues through a security zone where they face an airport-like body search and an examination of their bags. Trains are patrolled by policemen who walk down the aisles throughout the journey. The Olympic venues are all built — some have been operational for a year — but workers are still busy with finishing touches such as landscaping and road paving. Some of their recent work appears makeshift and hasty: palm trees in the middle of a traffic roundabout were clearly withering away with no grass around them, just fake pine needles. Despite the last-minute labors, Sochi organizing committee head Dmitry Chernyshenko said Friday that all venues have been tested and are ready to go, according to the R-Sport news agency. Outside the Olympic bubble, many streets in downtown Sochi are still pot-holed and muddy. A central boardwalk that had almost perfect paving in early December is all dug up — and it seems workers were removing paving stones to put used slabs back in. Sochi officials have tried to teach locals some English, but two weeks before the games there

elements of the game aside from the final score, account for as much as 60 percent of Super Bowl bets in Nevada. Johnny Avello, who runs the luxurious sports book at Wynn, where the chairs are made of fine leather and the carpet is thick enough to pass out on, believes the stigma is also falling away from the pastime. Avello, who speaks with a Goodfellas-type Brooklyn accent even though he grew up in upstate New York, says this is the biggest change he’s seen in the past decades. “Even Al Michaels on (Sunday) Night Football will say, ‘Wow, they covered the spread,’” he said, grinning in disbelief. When casinos figure out how to attract fantasy sports players to the Strip, profits may soar even further. Some of this growth was hidden by the recession. People scale back on gambling before other discretionary spending, and

help other guys and bring them along.” Coach John Fox praises the work ethic of Knighton, who was buried deep on the depth chart in training camp after being signed as a free agent away from the Jaguars. “I’ll always put it on players,” Fox said of Knighton’s emergence from a who’s-he to a watch-out-for-him performer. “As a coach, we spend a lot of time trying to define players. Basically, our approach is, ‘Don’t let us define you. You are going to be held accountable. It is going to be based on your performance, where you are on the depth chart, how much you are going to play. All of those things, you earn or don’t earn.’ “Really, everything Terrance has done, he did (himself).” Ditto for Seattle’s Kearse, who played at the University of Washington but went undrafted in 2012. He made all of three catches that season after catching on with the Seahawks, and his job was anything but secure when Percy Harvin was acquired in a trade, and with Sidney Rice, Golden Tate and Doug Baldwin in the receiving corps for 2013. All Kearse did was go from afterthought to touchdown threat, and his 35-yard catch for the winning score against San Francisco keyed Seattle’s NFC title win. Some credit Kearse undergoing Lasik eye surgery last winter with his becoming a force, but coach Pete Carroll can’t confirm

Rice

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20-yard touchdown pass with 41 seconds left and Carolina running back Mike Tolbert plunged into the end zone for a 2-point conversion to give Rice the win in the first NFL all-star game to stray from the AFC versus NFC format. Rice also earned fresh bragging rights on Sanders nearly a decade after both players retired from the

SPORTS

B3

Team USA taking record 230 athletes to Sochi COLORADO SPRINGS, Colorado (AP) — The United States will bring 230 athletes to the Sochi Olympics, the largest delegation ever for any country at the Winter Games. The previous record was 216 by the U.S. in 2010 in Vancouver. Todd Lodwick in Nordic combined will become the first American to compete in six Winter Olympics. Lodwick’s teammate Billy Demong and skier Bode Miller are headed to their fifth. Only three U.S. Winter Olympians other than Lodwick had previously accomplished that feat. The U.S. Olympic Committee said Monday that of the 106 returning Olympians, 49 have won medals — 13 of them gold.

Miller has won five medals and needs three more to tie short-track speedskater Apolo Anton Ohno as the most decorated U.S. Winter Olympian. Snowboarder Shaun White and speedskater Shani Davis could become the first American men to win gold in the same event in three straight Winter Games. Two women’s bobsled push athletes, hurdler Lolo Jones and sprinter Lauryn Williams, become the ninth and 10th Americans to compete at both the Winter and Summer Olympics. The oldest member of the team is 46-year-old curler Ann Swishelm while the youngest is 15year-old freestyle skier Maggie Voisin.

were few signs that was working. she said. lenges. The city offered language classes Vyacheslav Yakubovsky, a waitYelena Yaroslavskaya, a young for taxi drivers, but none of the er at the nearby Grill&Coffee, mother walking with her baby in ones an AP reporter spoke to said his burger shop was more a central park, said her apartwent to them or spoke any Eng- popular with foreigners, attract- ment block has been hit by recurlish. ing about 30 a day. He went to rent power shortages ever since Beliye Nochi, a legendary Sochi employer-provided English class- preparations for the games restaurant best known for its es and was confident of his lan- began. khinkali, or Caucasian guage skills. “We still get power shortages all dumplings, offers an English-lanBack in 2007, Sochi residents the time,” Yaroslavskaya said. guage menu with pictures, but may have greeted the news of the “It’s particularly tough when you the restaurant’s staff members upcoming Olympics with jubila- have a kid and live on the 14th acknowledged they are not very tion. Years of enduring Russia’s floor. We’re tired of the Olympics fluent. Manager Svetlana biggest construction project, how- already.” Dzhanayeva said she and several ever, have made them weary. Russian officials insist that waitresses had attended English The billions of Olympic-related electricity cuts across Sochi are classes but rubles poured into Sochi meant just part of maintenance work as lamented that huge construction trucks have a new grid is being put into operthey were too rattled across its streets around ation. Two power stations and the handle— the total brief. the clock for years, caking mud dozens of sub-stations have been amount of money “What can a all over the place. The city is commissioned in the past year, wagered — plummeted in person learn in slowly recovering, but its resi- but things are not getting easier 2009. It was the only fisthree days?” dents still face plenty of chal- for Sochi residents just yet. cal year of the past ten that saw a decline in sports betting. the Farmers Insurance Korda’s 4-iron approach Oddsmakers believe the Open. Perez missed a 10- on 18 scampered through previous Super Bowl Continued from Page B1 foot birdie chance on the the green and up against record, set in 2006, 17th. He closed with a 70. the grandstand. She took would have been upended Marc Leishman of Ausrelief from the grandstand years before 2013 if not Bahamas LPGA Classic tralia had the last chance and, with an official and a for the hard times. PARADISE ISLAND, TV announcer holding up to force a playoff, but his Last fall, gamblers set drive on the 18th went Bahamas (AP) — Jessica cords that would have records in September, well right and bounced off Korda won the season- inter fered with her October and November. In the cart path and a fan. opening Bahamas LPGA stroke, putted under the November, the last month He had no shot at the Classic for her second wires to set up the winfor which statistics have green in two, and his tour title, holing a 6-foot ning birdie. been released, sports wedge for an eagle birdie putt on the final books handled $490 milPaula Creamer, paired stopped a few feet to the hole to beat Stacy Lewis lion in wagers. with Korda all four days, side of the hole. His tap- by a stroke. On Sunday, the Super had a 69 to tie for third The 20-year-old Korda in birdie gave him a 71 Bowl will be played outwith Na Yeon Choi, Lizette closed with a 7-under 66 and a share of second. doors at a site with cold and Por nanong Salas Stallings finished at 9- for a 19-under 273 total weather for the first time, Phatlum at 16 under. on Atlantis Resort’s under 279. and the industry is worPhatlum finished with a Jason Day (68) and Ocean Club course. Lewis ried that snow could 67, Salas had a 71, and parred the final four holes DeLaet of CanaGraham throw of f the handle Choi shot 72. — two of them par 5s — da (68) birdied on the last when the Seahawks meet Lydia Ko, the 16-yearhole to tie for second. So for a 66. the Broncos, favored to Korda tied Lewis for the old New Zealander makdid Perez, the San Diego win by 2.5 points, in New native who grew up at lead with a 12-foot birdie ing her first start as an Jersey. Casual gamblers Torrey Pines and whose putt on the par -3 17th, LPGA Tour member, had might be spooked, unable father is the longtime then got up-and-down for a 68 to tie for seventh at to predict how the weathstarter on the first tee at birdie on the par-5 18th. 15 under. er would af fect their favored team.

Golf

that. He can confirm that Kearse’s importance has steadily risen this season. “I don’t know for a fact that it changed things, but it sure seems like it did,” Carroll said of the surgery. “He has great athleticism, great hand-eye coordination, but he has been over the top since he came back from that. So, subjectively I would say that it had an impact, but he was good anyway. “He has been extraordinary for us in so many ways, but it seems like it gave him confidence. I don’t know what the difference was, but he’s better because of it.” Broncos linebacker Lenon’s confidence had to be waning at various points in his 12-year career. He was on the 0-16 Lions of 2008, eight years after he was not selected in the draft. He was cut by Carolina in 2000, worked for the post office and then wound up in the XFL — if anybody remembers that short-lived league. Yet here he is, a backup to middle linebacker Wesley Woodyard who gets snaps in the regular defense, and plays some special teams. Lenon learned a lot from all that losing with the Lions. By applying those lessons, well, he’s managed another half-decade in the NFL. “When you’re in a situation like that, you have a certain amount of guys that pack it in,” Lenon said. “That’s difficult for me, because I’m not that type of person. I’m going to compete until the end. That’s the most difficult part of being in a situation like that. “Now, it’s a complete reversal.” And a great place to be after you’ve been mired in the other side.

NFL. “They called my number the whole way,” Tolbert said on the field after the game. “Philip (Rivers) told them to give it to me. My old teammate, he told them to give it to me.” Baltimore’s Justin Tucker missed a 67-yard field goal on the game’s final play after missing a 66yarder earlier in the game. Rice’s team came back after Philadelphia quarterback Nick Foles threw a 12-yard touchdown to

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Cleveland tight end Jordan Cameron with less than 5 minutes to play to give Sanders a 21-14 lead. The touchdowns by Cameron and Murray were the only scores of the second half in a game that had eight turnovers — including six interceptions — and nine sacks. Foles was the only quarterback not to throw an interception. He was named offensive MVP, finishing with seven completions for 89 yards.

Aussie

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Nadal in the final, despite having never beaten either before. He became the first man in 21 years to beat the top two players before winning a major. As a result, Wawrinka rises to a career -high ranking of No. 3, moving five spots up from No. 8. The 28-year -old becomes Switzerland’s highest-ranked player for the first time in his career, overtaking 17-time Grand Slam-winner Federer, his friend and mentor, who started the Australian Open at No. 6 and was expected to drop to No. 8 despite reaching the semifinals. “Everything that’s happened is quite crazy,” Wawrinka said. “When you’re No. 3 and you win a Grand Slam, journalists expect you to say, ‘Now I want to be No. 1.’ But I feel it’s so far for me, so far from my level. That’s why it’s not my goal.” Relentlessly aggressive on the court,

Wawrinka gives the impression off-court that he doesn’t want to revel in his success for fear of jinxing it. Occasionally, he allows himself to be proud. “Now I know I can beat everybody. The big stage in a Grand Slam doesn’t matter,” said Wawrinka, but added that he’s in the same position as Juan Martin del Potro, whose title at the 2009 U.S. Open is the only one of the past 35 majors not won by the Big Four. “Since (del Potro) won the U.S. Open everybody wants him to win another Grand Slam. But it’s not that simple.” He doesn’t like to think too far ahead, but indulged one question about what it will be like to walk through the halls of Rod Laver Arena next year and see his picture up on the walls with the other champions. “First thing I will do, I’m going to come back and take a picture of myself,” Wawrinka said. “Again it’s a dream. It’s big. When I see all those champions, for me, they’re the real champions. To be there is just something crazy.”


B4 Tuesday, January 28, 2014

FINANCIAL / SPORTS

NBA capsules: Durant scores 41, hits game winner

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Kevin Durant scored 41 points, including the gamewinning jumper with 1.5 seconds left, and the Oklahoma City Thunder rallied from a 14-point deficit in the second half to beat the Atlanta Hawks 111-109 Monday night for their eighth straight victory. Durant scored 13 in the fourth quarter, including a 16-foot, step-back jumper with 25.5 seconds remaining that put Oklahoma City ahead for the first time since the opening 2 minutes. Paul Millsap tied it for Atlanta before Durant knocked down the decisive 12-footer while being guarded by DeMarre Carroll. Shelvin Mack tried to throw a pass to Millsap on the final play, but Thabo Sefolosha knocked it away. Millsap led the Hawks with 23 points. Durant’s 11-game streak of 30 or more points is the longest in the NBA since T racy McGrady did it in 14 straight games in March and April 2003. Durant had another efficient outing, shooting 15 of 25 from the field and 5 for 7 from 3-point range. During his streak, the star forward has had four 40-point outings. Reggie Jackson had 18 points for Oklahoma City (36-10), which takes the Western Conference’s best record into a showdown Wednesday at Miami, the two-time defending NBA champion. The Hawks led by 14 early in the third quarter and still held a double-digit advantage in the final minute of the period before Durant fueled the Thunder’s rally. His layup with 2:11 left tied the score at 107. Atlanta managed only one basket and two points in the final 3:50. The Hawks hit seven of their first nine 3-point attempts and led by as many as 14 points in the first half before settling for a 57-50 halftime lead. Mack went 3 of 4 fr om behind the ar c and Dennis Schr oder was 2 for 2, putting up 10 points in the half after scoring 12 points combined in his previous 12 games. Atlanta opened the second half with a 10-3 run to extend its lead to 14 points. Oklahoma City scored the next nine points and drew to 67-62 after a 3-pointer by Jackson, but Kyle Korver hit two 3pointers as the Hawks scored eight of the next 10 points to rebuild a double-digit advantage at 75-64. Jer emy Lamb scor ed 14 points for Oklahoma City. Serge Ibaka managed only nine points but the NBA leader in blocked shots had a season-high six. Seven Hawks reached double figures in scoring. Mike Scott had 16 points, including 11 in the fourth quarter. Carroll and Mack had 15 points each, while Korver scored 14 and Lou Williams and Schroder had 10 each. Raptors 104, Nets 103 NEW YORK (AP) — Patrick Patterson stole Deron Williams’ inbounds pass and made the go-ahead jumper with 6 seconds left, and Toronto stopped a five-

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 14 142.90 143.22 142.45 143.15 Apr 14 139.62 140.60 127.82 140.55 Jun 14 131.67 132.40 131.57 132.05 Aug 14 129.77 130.35 129.60 130.20 Oct 14 132.45 133.07 132.40 133.05 Dec 14 133.55 134.20 133.50 134.20 Feb 15 134.00 134.55 133.75 134.55 Apr 15 135.50 Jun 15 132.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 40432. Fri’s Sales: 46,649 Fri’s open int: 363429, up +649 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jan 14 170.92 171.10 170.65 170.97 Mar 14 168.45 169.12 167.50 168.80 Apr 14 169.10 169.40 168.50 169.40 May 14 169.80 170.27 168.85 169.82 Aug 14 171.00 171.07 170.00 171.07 Sep 14 170.20 170.20 169.50 170.02 Oct 14 169.20 169.20 168.80 169.02 Nov 14 169.00 169.00 168.50 168.77 Last spot N/A Est. sales 5267. Fri’s Sales: 5,565 Fri’s open int: 53048, up +165 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 14 85.90 86.05 82.45 85.57 Apr 14 93.75 94.50 93.70 94.30 May 14 100.75 100.85 100.75 100.85 Jun 14 102.35 102.57 101.77 102.32 Jul 14 100.50 101.10 100.15 100.95 Aug 14 98.15 98.60 98.15 98.42 Oct 14 84.40 84.60 80.00 84.57 Dec 14 79.50 79.87 79.25 79.65 Feb 15 80.50 80.92 80.40 80.90 Apr 15 81.65 81.77 81.65 81.77 May 15 86.50 Jun 15 88.50 Last spot N/A Est. sales 33751. Fri’s Sales: 39,420 Fri’s open int: 267625, up +1739

chg.

-.25 +.45 -.07 +.05 +.13 +.50 +.20

+.27 -.07 -.07 -.38 -.25 -.68 -.78 -.63

-.80 +.28 +.30 -.03 +.15 +.12 +.20 +.20 +.02

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Mar 14 86.69 87.16 83.66 84.25 May 14 87.05 87.41 84.24 84.71 Jul 14 86.82 87.14 84.40 84.76 Oct 14 78.54 Dec 14 78.50 78.58 76.55 76.67 Mar 15 78.15 78.70 77.39 77.39 May 15 77.63 Jul 15 77.46 Oct 15 77.06 Dec 15 76.52 Mar 16 76.42 May 16 76.42 Jul 16 76.42 Oct 16 76.42 Dec 16 76.42 Last spot N/A Est. sales 40656. Fri’s Sales: 26,615 Fri’s open int: 188638, up +97

chg.

-2.96 -2.78 -2.65 -2.26 -1.87 -1.66 -1.55 -1.55 -1.55 -1.55 -1.55 -1.55 -1.55 -1.55 -1.55

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 567 572ü 562fl 563ø May 14 572 578ø 569ü 569fl Jul 14 578fl 583ü 574fl 575ü Sep 14 587ø 591ü 583ø 583fl Dec 14 600 604ø 596 596ø Mar 15 613ü 613ü 606ø 606ø May 15 609ø 609ø 607ø 607ø

chg.

-1fl -1fl -1fl -1fl -2ü -2fl -2

game winning streak by Brooklyn for the second time this month. Brooklyn had a three-point lead with 17 seconds left behind Paul Pierce in his best game with the Nets, but John Salmons scored on a drive with 12 seconds remaining before Brooklyn took its last timeout to move the ball into the frontcourt. Patterson stole the pass and fed Kyle Lowry, who got it back to Patterson for his jumper. Pierce was well off on a final attempt. Lowry finished with 31 points and seven assists for the Raptors, who moved 2 1 ⁄ 2 games ahead of the Nets for the Atlantic Division lead. Pierce scored 33 points, making seven 3-pointers in a strong bounce-back performance after going just 2 for 10 in his emotional return to Boston on Sunday. He had the Nets in position to win after scoring their last nine points before Toronto stole it. Timberwolves 95, Bulls 86 CHICAGO (AP) — Kevin Love scored 31 points to lead Minnesota over Chicago. Ronny Turiaf added 14 points off the bench for the T imberwolves, who snapped a seven-game losing streak to the Bulls and won for the fourth time in five games overall. Carlos Boozer had 20 points and 14 rebounds for the Bulls, who played without ailing center Joakim Noah (illness) and guard Kirk Hinrich (strained right hamstring). D.J. Augustin added 19 points. The Timberwolves were also missing their starting center. Nikola Pekovic exit-

Roswell Daily Record

ed with a sore right Achilles tendon midway through the first quarter. He had one point and one rebound in 6 minutes.

No better place these days than Milwaukee to end such a jour ney. The Bucks, an NBA-worst 8-36, were doomed by a 21-2 run in the second quarter. Ersan Ilyasova had 16 points and eight rebounds for the Bucks.

Suns 124, 76ers 113 PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Gerald Green scored 30 points and Goran Dragic had 24 to lead Phoenix past Philadelphia. The Suns led all the way over the hapless 76ers, one night after rallying from an 18-point halftime deficit to win at Cleveland. Phoenix made its first six shots and 10 of 11, and raced to a 16point lead. Green made his first seven shots until he botched a fast-reak dunk. Markieff Morris scored 13 points and had four blocks. The Suns blocked 12 shots. Green and Dragic, Phoenix’s starting backcourt, combined to make 19 of 25 shots and the Suns shot around 60 percent for most of the game. Michael Carter-Williams had 22 points and 11 assists for the Sixers, who have lost 10 of 12.

Jazz 106, Kings 99 SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Derrick Favors had 17 points and 12 rebounds, and Marvin Williams added 16 points and 11 rebounds to power Utah past depleted Sacramento. Enes Kanter added 16 points and Jeremy Evans had 14 points and 10 rebounds as the Jazz took advantage of injuries that have left Sacramento without fr ontcourt starters DeMar cus Cousins and Rudy Gay for the past three games. After the Jazz sent their starters to the bench with the game seemingly in hand, the Kings mounted an unlikely comeback that fell just short. Sacramento trimmed a 20-point lead to five in the final minute but came up empty on three of its final four possessions. Jason Thompson scored a season-high 19 points and grabbed 11 rebounds for the Kings, who lost their fourth consecutive game. Derrick Williams had 17 points and 15 boards. The Jazz set an NBA season high with 53 free throw attempts, topping the previous mark of 52 set by Houston against the Lakers on Nov. 7 and the Los Angeles Clippers against Brooklyn on Dec. 12. Utah went 12 for 25 at the line in the fourth quarter, allowing the Kings to make things interesting.

Clippers 114, Bucks 86 MILWAUKEE (AP) — Blake Griffin dominated the paint with 20 points, Jamal Crawford scored 25 and Los Angeles ended its seven-game road trip with a win over Milwaukee. Darren Collison added 15 points and seven assists in place of Chris Paul for the Clippers, who improved to 9-3 while their star point recovers from a separated shoulder. Los Angeles finished its trip 5-2, a franchise best for its annual sojour n away from Staples Center to make way for the Grammy Awards.

NCAA Top 25 capsules: Sooners upend OK St. NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — Ryan Spangler had 15 points and a career -high 17 rebounds to help No. 23 Oklahoma defeat No. 8 Oklahoma State 88-76 on Monday night. Jordan Woodard scored 18 points and Tyler Neal added a season-high 15 points for the Sooners (17-4, 6-2 Big 12), who won their fourth straight game and claimed their third win over a ranked conference opponent this season. Marcus Smart had 22 points, Phil Forte scored 20 and made all six of his 3-point tries and Markel Brown added 18 points for the Cowboys (16-4, 4-3). OSU’s Le’Bryan Nash, who scored a career -high 29 points against West Virginia on Saturday, fouled out with

Jul 15 600 601fl 600 600 Sep 15 606fl 606fl 606ü 606ü Dec 15 620 620 615 615ø Mar 16 621ø 622 621ø 622 May 16 621ø 622 621ø 622 Jul 16 614fl 614fl 614fl 614fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 106422. Fri’s Sales: 69,025 Fri’s open int: 443785, up +3403 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 428fl 432fl 427 431fl May 14 435ø 439 433ü 438 Jul 14 441 444ø 439 444 Sep 14 443ø 447fl 442ü 447ü Dec 14 448fl 453ü 447ø 452ø Mar 15 458fl 462ø 457ü 462ü May 15 464fl 468fl 464fl 468ø Jul 15 469 472fl 468 472ü Sep 15 462fl 465ø 462fl 465ø Dec 15 460ø 464fl 459fl 464ü Mar 16 469 471ø 469 471ø May 16 472fl 475ø 472fl 475ø Jul 16 475 477ü 475 476fl Sep 16 467 469 467 469 Dec 16 459ø 460fl 459ø 460fl Jul 17 464fl 467ü 464fl 467ü Dec 17 456fl 458fl 456fl 458fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 236566. Fri’s Sales: 256,829 Fri’s open int: 1317997, off -8071 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 395 402ü 395 400fl May 14 354ø 359 354 358 Jul 14 331 335fl 329 335fl Sep 14 305 306ø 305 306ø Dec 14 290 291ü 290 291 Mar 15 289 294 289 294 May 15 306ü 311ü 306ü 311ü Jul 15 306ü 311ü 306ü 311ü Sep 15 306ü 311ü 306ü 311ü Dec 15 306ü 311ü 306ü 311ü Jul 16 306ü 311ü 306ü 311ü Sep 16 306ü 311ü 306ü 311ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 1348. Fri’s Sales: 509 Fri’s open int: 10934, up +105 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 1286 1293 1279 1287fl May 14 1270 1276 1262fl 1271 Jul 14 1257fl 1261ü 1248fl 1256ø Aug 14 1215 1220fl 1210ø 1215ø Sep 14 1153 1153fl 1145ø 1147 Nov 14 1108 1111 1101 1101ø Jan 15 1114 1115fl 1106fl 1106fl Mar 15 1116 1119ø 1111ü 1111ü May 15 1118ü 1120fl 1112ø 1112ø Jul 15 1124fl 1124fl 1116fl 1116fl Aug 15 1120ü 1120ü 1111ü 1111ü Sep 15 1104ü 1104ü 1095ø 1095ø Nov 15 1097ø 1099fl 1091 1091 Jan 16 1101 1101 1092ü 1092ü Mar 16 1100ø 1100ø 1091fl 1091fl May 16 1101ø 1101ø 1095fl 1095fl Jul 16 1100ø 1100ø 1100ø 1100ø Aug 16 1101fl 1101fl 1096 1096 Sep 16 1088fl 1088fl 1083 1083 Nov 16 1058fl 1058fl 1050ü 1050ü Jul 17 1063fl 1063fl 1058 1058 Nov 17 1053fl 1053fl 1047ø 1047ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 195416. Fri’s Sales: 212,130 Fri’s open int: 587808, off -3075

FUTURES

-ø -ø +ø +ø +ø

+4ø +3 +6ü +ø +2 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5

+3 +1 -1ü -3ü -5ü -7fl -8 -8ü -8ü -8 -9 -8fl -8fl -8fl -8fl -5fl -3ø -5fl -5fl -8ø -5fl -6ü

No. 9 Villanova 65, Georgetown 60 WASHINGTON (AP) — James Bell scored 16 points, and Villanova prevailed in a messy, foul-plagued game to hand Georgetown its fifth straight loss. Daniel Ochefu added 12 points on 5-for-5 shooting for the Wildcats (18-2, 7-1 Big East), who forced 18 turnovers while committing 16. Villanova made 22 of 28 free throws and moved into a tie with first-place Creighton atop the Big East.

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

+2ü +2 +2ø +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +2fl +2ø +2ø +2fl +2 +2 +2ø +2ø +2

eight points in 17 minutes. It was the first time both teams have entered a “Bedlam” rivalry game ranked since 2005. The rematch is Feb. 15 at Oklahoma State.

low

settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Mar 14 96.90 97.18 95.21 95.72 Apr 14 96.41 96.72 94.92 95.36 May 14 95.88 96.00 94.36 94.74 Jun 14 94.96 95.16 93.67 93.97 Jul 14 94.04 94.26 92.93 93.12 Aug 14 93.18 93.31 92.08 92.24 Sep 14 92.27 92.37 91.30 91.41 Oct 14 91.28 91.57 90.68 90.68 Nov 14 90.93 90.93 89.98 90.06 Dec 14 90.13 90.42 89.35 89.49 Jan 15 89.61 89.61 88.75 88.77 Feb 15 88.85 88.85 88.05 88.08 Mar 15 88.05 88.19 87.46 87.46 Apr 15 87.50 87.57 86.89 86.89 May 15 87.00 87.00 86.40 86.40 Jun 15 86.39 86.64 85.88 85.92 Jul 15 85.90 85.90 85.31 85.31 Aug 15 85.30 85.30 84.77 84.77 Sep 15 84.80 84.80 84.31 84.31 Oct 15 84.40 84.40 83.86 83.86 Nov 15 84.00 84.00 83.48 83.48 Dec 15 83.50 83.82 83.10 83.15 Jan 16 82.67 Feb 16 82.22 Mar 16 82.20 82.20 81.82 81.82 Last spot N/A Est. sales 446565. Fri’s Sales: 493,442 Fri’s open int: 1590651, off -660 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Feb 14 2.6626 2.6697 2.6149 2.6217 Mar 14 2.6733 2.6769 2.6245 2.6329 Apr 14 2.8468 2.8468 2.8071 2.8150 May 14 2.8416 2.8476 2.8056 2.8138 Jun 14 2.8173 2.8219 2.7854 2.7936 Jul 14 2.7917 2.7921 2.7592 2.7646 Aug 14 2.7600 2.7600 2.7240 2.7280 Sep 14 2.7052 2.7084 2.6764 2.6845 Oct 14 2.5614 2.5650 2.5380 2.5435 Nov 14 2.5233 2.5233 2.5091 2.5091 Dec 14 2.5026 2.5094 2.4838 2.4906

chg.

-.92 -.86 -.82 -.79 -.76 -.73 -.69 -.66 -.64 -.62 -.60 -.57 -.56 -.54 -.52 -.50 -.49 -.48 -.47 -.46 -.45 -.44 -.44 -.43 -.42

-.0415 -.0377 -.0324 -.0314 -.0305 -.0285 -.0263 -.0240 -.0213 -.0198 -.0187

Jan 15 2.4856 Feb 15 2.4921 Mar 15 2.5076 Apr 15 2.6501 May 15 2.6481 Jun 15 2.6311 Jul 15 2.6106 Aug 15 2.5891 Sep 15 2.5626 Oct 15 2.4266 Nov 15 2.3931 Dec 15 2.3660 2.3711 2.3660 2.3711 Jan 16 2.3711 Feb 16 2.3731 Mar 16 2.3781 Last spot N/A Est. sales 90941. Fri’s Sales: 109,402 Fri’s open int: 268380, off -546 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Feb 14 5.153 5.442 4.828 4.847 Mar 14 4.958 5.199 4.650 4.674 Apr 14 4.410 4.532 4.277 4.286 May 14 4.326 4.430 4.226 4.234 Jun 14 4.311 4.439 4.243 4.251 Jul 14 4.415 4.446 4.267 4.273 Aug 14 4.390 4.442 4.266 4.272 Sep 14 4.380 4.450 4.245 4.251 Oct 14 4.365 4.475 4.256 4.265 Nov 14 4.430 4.550 4.305 4.310 Dec 14 4.520 4.683 4.415 4.420 Jan 15 4.689 4.689 4.510 4.512 Feb 15 4.505 4.530 4.466 4.466 Mar 15 4.600 4.600 4.385 4.395 Apr 15 4.131 4.131 3.982 3.997 May 15 4.001 4.001 3.962 3.967 Jun 15 4.005 4.008 3.970 3.986 Jul 15 4.025 4.025 3.996 4.005 Aug 15 4.002 4.015 3.991 4.015 Sep 15 4.006 Oct 15 4.053 4.053 4.019 4.032 Nov 15 4.095 4.095 4.080 4.080 Dec 15 4.190 4.250 4.190 4.203 Jan 16 4.328 4.328 4.301 4.301 Feb 16 4.280 4.280 4.270 4.277 Mar 16 4.225 Apr 16 3.990 Last spot N/A Est. sales 555137. Fri’s Sales: 711,753 Fri’s open int: 1274852, up +850

METALS

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Mon. Aluminum -$0.7829 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.2837 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.2940 N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Lead - $2145.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9155 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1260.50 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1263.60 troy oz., NY Merc spot Mon. Silver - $19.855 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $19.771 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Platinum -$1423.00 troy oz., Handy & Harman. Platinum -$1419.40 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

No. 17 Duke 80, No. 18 Pittsburgh 65 PITTSBURGH (AP) — Jabari Parker scored 21 points and reserve guard Andre Dawkins added 20 for Duke. Amile Jefferson had a season-high 14 points for the Blue Devils (17-4, 6-2 ACC), which brought Pitt’s hot start

-.0172 -.0167 -.0162 -.0137 -.0137 -.0137 -.0137 -.0137 -.0137 -.0137 -.0137 -.0137 -.0137 -.0137 -.0137

-.335 -.324 -.135 -.092 -.087 -.084 -.083 -.087 -.086 -.080 -.069 -.068 -.052 -.035 -.039 -.038 -.036 -.034 -.034 -.033 -.032 -.034 -.028 -.024 -.023 -.022 -.007

in its first Atlantic Coast Conference season to an abrupt halt. Duke made 13 of 25 3point attempts, including four during a 15-3 run midway through the second half that broke open a tight game. Lamar Patterson had 14 points for the Panthers (18-3, 6-2) who fell to 12-1 at home. Dawkins drilled 6 of 7 3point attempts to lift the Blue Devils to their fifth straight victory. Two free throws by Patterson brought Pitt within 52-51 with 9:41 left when the Blue Devils took off. Dawkins knocked down a 3 on three straight possessions for Duke, including a 25-foot heave at the shot clock buzzer that made it 67-54 with 5:32 left.

Markel Starks scored 20 points for the short-handed Hoyas (11-9, 3-6), whose roster underwent two more changes before the game. Georgetown has its longest losing streak since 2011 and has dropped three straight at home for the first time since 2009. The game included 34 turnovers, 41 field goals and 39 fouls.

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

MARKET SUMMARY AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg S&P500ETF1616765178.01-.88 BkofAm 1247221 16.31 -.14 iShEMkts 1083957 38.09 -.15 B iPVix rs 725419 45.39 +.70 SPDR Fncl 637215 20.98 -.13

Name Vol (00) RexahnPh 89116 AlldNevG 55942 Organovo 50996 InovioPhm 38459 NwGold g 37172

Name DirGMBear CSVInvNG YPF Soc DiEurBr3x BioAmb wt

Last 41.37 5.39 25.68 44.50 2.30

Chg +5.75 +.63 +2.66 +4.50 +.23

%Chg +16.1 +13.1 +11.6 +11.3 +11.1

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Ever-Glory 5.42 +.32 +6.3 InfoSonic h 2.92 +.86 +41.7 GlblScape 2.94 +.14 +5.0 ProPhaseL 2.25 +.49 +27.8 USAntimny 2.02 +.07 +3.6 Oramed n 24.38 +4.38 +21.9 2.29 +.36 +18.7 WT EurDbt 22.46 +.73 +3.3 QC Hldgs ComndSec 2.15 +.06 +2.9 OakVlyBcp 11.01 +1.56 +16.5

Name CSVLgNGs DirGMnBull VersoPap NamTai ProSUltNG

Last 28.57 20.17 2.53 5.84 48.61

Chg -5.24 -3.69 -.36 -.80 -5.37

%Chg -15.5 -15.5 -12.5 -12.0 -9.9

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg EnviroStr 2.84 -.40 -12.3 Spherix 5.83 -2.41 -29.2 AlldNevG 4.43 -.43 -8.8 NV5 wt 2.13 -.80 -27.4 ERBA Diag 3.00 -.29 -8.8 ActionSemi 2.31 -.46 -16.6 GoldResrc 4.64 -.43 -8.5 CellThera 3.34 -.66 -16.5 Oragenics 3.40 -.31 -8.4 Biocryst 9.81 -1.79 -15.4

818 2,309 79 3,206 25 79

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

DIARY

Volume

Name AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola Disney EOG Res EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

Chg +.02 -.43 -.73 -.05 -.05

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last AriadP 789502 7.91 Facebook 725509 53.55 PwShs QQQ59232185.90 Cisco 578438 22.00 SiriusXM 541564 3.66

DIARY

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

89 322 16 427 3 4

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Last 15,837.88 7,199.18 492.89 9,981.35 2,329.11 4,083.61 1,781.56 19,041.30 1,127.73

PE

Last

Chg

1.84f .90f .04 2.92f 4.00 1.12 .86f .75 3.62f 2.52 .50f .58 1.20a .90 3.80 2.64

25 13 16 24 10 20 21 40 10 10 12 11 9 13 12 19

33.51 +.09 68.75 -.18 16.31 -.14 137.36 +.71 116.43 +.14 38.73 -.11 72.25 -.47 162.10 -3.43 53.27 -.77 94.92 +.07 15.71 -.12 28.60 +.11 46.71 +.02 24.72 -.09 177.90 -1.74 89.94 -.67

YTD %Chg Name -4.7 +.2 +4.8 +.6 -6.8 -6.2 -5.4 -3.4 -7.0 -6.2 +1.8 +2.2 -6.0 -4.8 -5.2 -1.8

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

585 2,032 94 2,711 49 46

2,335,318,749

Net % Chg Chg -41.23 -.26 -59.54 -.82 +.93 +.19 -53.07 -.53 -24.95 -1.06 -44.56 -1.08 -8.73 -.49 -127.33 -.66 -16.40 -1.43

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Div

DIARY

138,973,260 Volume

INDEXES

Chg -1.08 -.90 -.84 -.20 +.02

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

3,947,008,354 Volume

52-Week High Low 16,588.25 13,626.81 7,591.43 5,691.23 537.86 462.10 11,334.65 8,700.73 2,471.19 2,186.97 4,246.55 3,105.37 1,850.84 1,481.16 19,776.59 15,634.91 1,182.04 891.08

Last 1.02 4.43 8.39 2.49 5.72

YTD % Chg -4.46 -2.72 +.47 -4.03 -4.00 -2.23 -3.61 -3.37 -3.09

52-wk % Chg +14.09 +22.53 +5.04 +12.40 -2.97 +29.46 +18.76 +20.07 +24.38

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

1.76f 1.12 2.92f .74f 2.27 1.04f 1.56f .16 1.20 1.15 .68e 2.12 1.88 .40 1.20 1.12

32 13 23 19 19 16 13 19 24 16 ... 12 14 15 12 15

52.53 36.03 53.09 24.38 82.06 29.66 74.90 20.61 42.64 62.88 19.31 47.69 74.15 22.42 45.53 28.18

+.55 -.78 -.12 +.08 +.63 -.43 +.46 -.23 -.31 -.44 -.10 +.06 -.27 -.11 +.05 +.12

+5.0 -3.7 +.8 +1.1 -1.1 -3.2 -2.9 +9.4 -2.9 -9.8 -3.4 -3.0 -5.8 -3.7 +.3 +.9

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


Roswell Daily Record

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: My two children and I have lived with my parents for a few years because I had some health problems. Now that I am healthy again, I’m ready to return to work and move to a new home, but I am encountering severe resistance from my parents. As I have recovered, our situation has gone from my parents helping me to my assuming the majority of the household responsibilities. My parents say they know I want to go back to work and know it will be good for me to be independent, but because of their own health concerns they need me to stay. I have always felt a strong responsibility toward my

family, but I know that not having a home to call our own limits the personal growth of my children and me. I have been offered a great job in another state that would allow me to provide well for my children, but I feel crushing guilt for even considering leaving my parents to fend for themselves. I know this will be a lifechanging decision for all of us, so please give me an objective point of view. DAD TORN IN TWO DIRECTIONS IN TEXAS

DEAR DAD: On an emotional level, of course your leaving will be traumatic for your parents. They will miss you and the children and all the activity in the house they have become used to. Also, someone may have to assume the household chores that you have been taking care of. If you accept this job — and in my opinion you should if you can’t find one that pays as well closer to your parents — perhaps you could subsidize a housekeeper, a cleaning company or someone to help with the yard work a few times a month. #####

COMICS

DEAR ABBY: I have been married to “Sean” for five years. I am 27, stand 5 feet 7 inches tall and weigh 120 pounds. Sean is constantly pushing me to exercise more, and he comments on my thighs and stomach a lot. He tells me it’s not a weight issue, but I need to “work off some fat and gain more muscle.” He wasn’t like this when we got married. I love my body, and I know I’m not fat or overweight. I walk 4 miles round trip to work. My entire workday is spent on my feet, walking or running. I get plenty of exercise, and I’m healthy and active. This is really hurting my confidence. It bothers me to hear that someone I love thinks my normal body is unattractive because of barely there “fat.” I don’t know what gave Sean this idea. How do I deal with it? JUST RIGHT IN ARIZONA

DEAR JUST RIGHT: The kind of body your husband would like you to have seems more descriptive of a skinny teenager than a healthy young woman. Is he a body builder or a gym rat? You deal with it by asking your husband WHY he

thinks your normal body is unattractive, listen carefully to his response and, if necessary, run it by your doctor. #####

Family Circus

DEAR ABBY: I was wondering if a woman can be considered engaged to a man if she is still married to another man, but separated? I have a friend who has been separated from her husband for two years. They live apart, but not “legally.” Can she be considered engaged? Wouldn’t her ring be a promise ring and not an engagement ring? Please help me clear up this confusion. CONFOUNDED IN WEST VIRGINIA DEAR CONFOUNDED: To declare oneself engaged while legally married to another person does appear to be premature. However, your friend can call herself whatever she wants if it pleases her. The same is true for what she calls the rock she’s wearing. If you value her friendship, you’ll let it slide and don’t contradict her.

The Wizard of Id

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE Dear Heloise: At work recently, a grumpy gentleman told me that when I return change to customers, I should give them the COIN CHANGE FIRST, then the paper money. Although he could have told me nicely, I could see his point. Coins could slip out of someone’s hand if placed on top of the paper money. A Reader, via email

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Ah, yes, the return-change question! Everyone is different, so don’t take offense. Just smile and say, “How would you like your change?” Some want it on the counter; some, coins first, then paper money; others, paper money, then change. I’ve covered this before in the column — let’s do an update! Readers, what do you have to say? Heloise

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

#####

Dear Readers: Many of us (Heloise Central included) place orders for delivery, especially pizza! How often have you placed an order and sensed that the total bill was wrong? Here is a Heloise hint for when in doubt: Go online (if possible) to double-check the order’s accuracy by placing the same order. A total comes up, which allows you to see what you ordered and what the total is. Now you can call the restaurant to make corrections BEFORE the driver arrives. Heloise

Garfield

#####

Dear Heloise: Window-blind cords are not only a danger to children, but to animals as well. I had a cat that wore a collar. He liked to sit on the windowsill. One day, when the blinds were completely down, the cat walked along the back of the sofa (next to the window) and tried to get in behind the blinds to see outside. In the process, he got one of the blind slats between his skin and the collar. He tried to turn around to come out, and his collar twisted tighter. If I had not been there, I’m sure he would have been strangled. Now I hang the cord up high and raise the blinds up a foot from the sill. Patricia in Lake Village, Ind.

Dear Heloise: We have a built-in trash compactor. It’s just my husband and me now, and it takes so long to fill that the smell necessitated it being emptied early. Also, the plastic bags that fit the compactors can be expensive! I now request paper bags when shopping. I place one inside the compactor, with the clean compactor bag in first. Just pull out the brown paper bag when full and put it into the outside garbage. Cathy N. in California Cathy, I do the same at our coast house. We may be there only a few days, so why waste a full trash-compacter bag? Heloise #####

Dear Heloise: Some professional sports stadiums no longer allow purses to be brought inside. They will allow a clear “purse,” which can be expensive. I saved the clear, zippered pouches that linens come in, and even found one with a handle. It was free, worked great and also was a form of recycling! Bobbie B., via email

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

B5


B6 Tuesday, January 28, 2014

EMPLOYMENT

Legals

045. Employment Opportunities

Notice to Creditors... Publish January February 4, 2014

28,

STATE OF NEW MEXCOUNTY OF ICO CHAVES IN THE PROBATE COURT IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF RICHARD J. HILFERTY, Deceased. Probate: 9152

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The undersigned having been appointed Personal Representative of the ESTATE OF RICHARD J. HILFERTY, Deceased. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims (i) within two months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or (ii) within two months after the mailing or delivery of this notice, whichever is later, or be forever barred. /s/Clay Hilferty c/o Mark W. Taylor, Esq. Mark W. Taylor & Associates, P.C. P.O. Box 898 Roswell,NM 88202-0898

GARAGE SALES

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice

LOOKING FOR BROTHER born 1941 -1942 in Albuquerque, NM in a girls home-orphanage, mother from Roswell, father from Albuquerque, father’s last name Majors 209-573-1130 PUBLIC NOTARY available. 575-910-5219

INSTRUCTION

030. Education & Instructions MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant!NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC Train gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-888-926-6073

Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR Journeyman Electrician needed. Must have Valid NM Journeyman License and Valid Driver’s License. Call 575-625-1774 for application information.

HELP WANTED PT, experienced in quickbooks and lawnmower repair helpful but not necessary. Apply at All Seasons Engines 126 S. Main. 575-625-0800. MJG CORPORATION is now hiring cake decorators. Apply at MJG Corp. 304 W. 4th St. Roswell, NM 88201. Ask for Jay or Gary. FACILITY MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR-CHAVES COUNTY DETENTION CENTER

Chaves County is accepting applications for the position of Facility Maintenance Supervisor-Detention. ($12.69 - $15.51/hr + benefits). This position reports to the Facilities Maintenance Director. This is a supervisory position responsible for supervision and performance in all aspects of the maintenance of CCDAC and CCJDC departments to include repair, maintenance, cleaning and supervision of Facility MaintenanceDetention staff member(s). Minimum requirements: High School Diploma or G.E.D., four (4) years' experience, up to two (2) years college/48 hours course work may be substituted for two years of experience and at least one year in supervisory position. Chaves County is a drug-free employer. All applicants for this position will be required to pass a background check and will be subject to post offer, pre-employment drug and physical testing. Required applications forms are available at the County's Job Posting Board located in the west wing of the County Administrative Center or by accessing the Web Site at www.co.chaves.nm.us/jobs Applications may be returned to the County Manager's Suite, Suite 180, Chaves County Administrative Center, #1 St Mary's Place, Roswell, NM 88203 or mailed by closing date to Human Resources, PO Box 1817, Roswell, NM 88202. Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m., Friday, February 7, 2014. EOE.

Legals

Notice of Pendency of Action... Publish January 21, 28, February 4, 2014

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES

TERRY W. LEE Plaintiff, V.

THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF PATRICIA M. CANFIELD, Deceased, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF ALFRED E. COULOMBE, Deceased, URSLEY V. COULOMBE, if living, if deceased, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF URSLEY V. COULOMBE, Deceased, and ALL UNKNOWN CLAIMANTS OF INTEREST, TITLE OR LIEN ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF, Defendants CV-2013-00514

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

1. Please be advised that the above captioned lawsuit has been filed against the named Defendants. 2. The lawsuit seeks to Quiet the Title to real property located at 3308 North Bandolina Drive, Chaves County, Roswell, New Mexico. 3. Defendants in this lawsuit are as recited above. Notice is hereby given to the Unknown Heirs of the following named deceased person: Patricia M. Canfield; Unknown Heirs of the following named deceased person: Alfred E. Coulombe; the following named defendant by name, if living; if deceased, her Unknown Heirs: Ursley V. Coulombe; and to Unknown Persons who claim a lien, interest, or title adverse to the Plaintiff; names unknown. 4. The name, address and telephone number of Plaintiff’s Attorney is: David M. Stevens, Attorneys at Law, PC, 400 North Pennsylvania, Suite 940, Roswell, N.M. 88201, 575-622-8777. 5. Be advised that if you fail to answer or otherwise plead to this lawsuit within 30 days of the last date of publication, that a Default Judgment may be taken against you.

/s/Freddie J. Romero District Court Judge Division 6

Prepared by: David M. Stevens Attorneys at Law, PC 400 North Pennsylvania Suite 940 Roswell, New Mexico 88201 575-622-8777

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

APPRENTICE ELECTRICIAN opening; Apply in person only at J & G Electric, 512 S Main street. LICENSED ELECTRICIAN wanted the Artesia area. Competitive pay, 401k and insurance. Oilfield experience preferred. Call 575-748-5704 for more information BEALLS Now hiring full time Sales Associate must be able to work days, evenings & weekends, retail experience preferred. Apply in person.

WE ARE now hiring and taking applications for FT/PT Customer Service representatives. Must be able to work evening and Sat. Call Bob for interview 575-622-5326. HIRING VACUUM truck drivers, with tanker endorsement, around the local hill area, must have a CDL and clean driving record, and must pass a DOT drug test. For more info 575-677-3371 CONSTRUCTION NAVY RESERVE. Serve part-time. Elite training. Great pay & benefits. Sign on bonus up to $20K. Retirement. Call Mon-Fri (800) 354-9627 BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE Associates, Inc. is currently hiring for part time receptionist: must be bilingual and able to work weekends and evenings. If interested, bring resume and 3 references to 1010 N. Virginia. Ask for Jacque

045. Employment Opportunities

Roswell Daily Record

045. Employment Opportunities

OPTOMETRIC OFFICE seeking receptionist for a 1/2 day/afternoon position. Duties include: answering phone, making appointments, checking in/out patients and general clerical duties. PO Box 1897, Unit #366 Roswell, NM 88202

NOW HIRING Commercial and Residential garage door installers and installer trainees. Valid New Mexico drivers’ license with a clean driving record required. We are a drug free work place and pre-employment drug test is required. Apply in person at Overhead Door Co. located 200 S. Hemlock Avenue, Roswell, NM. Application are available weekdays 8:00am-12:00 & 1:00pm -4:30 pm or by appointment.

Frontier Medical Home Care is currently accepting applications for the following positions: R.N. Full & Part Time positions available C.N.A Part time position. Office Assistant Medical billing experience needed. Please call 627-1112 or stop by 217-A N. Main Street for applications or to drop off resumes.

PECOS VALLEY Broadcasting has immediate openings for Advertising Sales Representatives. Help local businesses grow their business by selling them advertising our or many platforms including radio, video and digital. Base salary plus generous commission program. We’ll train! Apply with Gene Dow VP & GM, hireme@pvbcradio.com PVBC is an Equal Opportunity Employer! Women and minorities are strongly encouraged to apply.

Dean Baldwin Painting, LP aircraft strip and paint services, is presently looking to fill the following long term, full-time positions: PAINTERS – Exp in stripping and painting aircraft or vehicles. PAINTER HELPERS – Exp preferred but not required. On the job training available!

KRUMLAND AUTO Group has opportunities available for FT clerical positions. Dealership experience helpful but not required. Candidate must be detail oriented and able to work in a fast paced, team oriented environment. Strong organizational skills are a must. Excellent benefit package including: HEALTH, DENTAL, VISION, 401K and PAID VACATION. Fax resumes to (575) 622-5899 Attn: Office Manager or email to officemgr@kagnm.com

The Roswell Daily Record is currently accepting applications for the position of General Assignment Reporter. Previous reporting experience or strong writing skills required. Applications are available at the Record at 2301 N. Main St. Application materials can also be mailed to: Roswell Daily Record, Attn: Editor, PO Box 1897, Roswell,NM or emailed to editor@rdrnews.com No phone calls, please.

Legals

Election Proclamation... ELECTION PROCLAMATION

WHEREAS, it is provided in Section 1-22-11, New Mexico Statutes Ann., that the County Clerk shall give notice of the election by proclamation, once each week for two successive weeks with the last publication being made within seven days but not later than two days before the of the school district election, the objects thereof, the offices to be voted for, each question to be submitted to the voters of the school district, the names of the judges of the Election and Poll Clerks and the place where said election is to be held in each precinct and election district; NOW THEREFORE THE CLERK OF CHAVES COUNTY, NEW MEXICO pursuant to said provision of laws and the authority vested in him HEREBY PROCLAIMS, PUBLISH AND GIVE NOTICE Jan. 26 and Feb. 2, 2014 of an Eastern New Mexico University Roswell Branch Community College District Mill Levy Election to be held in Chaves County, New Mexico, Tuesday February 4, 2014 A.D. The College District Election shall be for the purpose whereby the voters may vote in favor or against a Mill Levy question for Eastern New Mexico University Roswell Branch Community College District, Chaves County, New Mexico. Por cuanto, es provisto bajo la seccion 1-22-11, Estatuas de Nuevo Mexico Ann., La Escribana del Condado dara aviso por proclamacion una ves por semana por dos semanas sucesivas con la ultima publicacion no menos de dos dias y no mas se siete dias antes el dia del la eleccion del distrito escolar, los objectivos por consigiente, los nombres de los candidatos, los nombres de los jueces y los escribientes de la eleccion, y el lujar en donde dicha eleccion se llevara acabo en cada precinto y distrito; AHORA, POR CONSIGIENTE, LA ESCRIBANA DEL CONDADO DE CHAVES, NUEVO MEXICO consiguiente la provision de la ley y autoridad investida en el POR ESTE MEDIO PROCLAMA, PUBLICA Y DA AVISO, el dia 26 de enero y 2 de febrero, 2014 de la eleccion del Distrito Universitario de la Universidad Comunal Eastern New Mexico que tomara lugar en el Condado de Chaves estado de Nuevo Mexico, el 4 de Febrero, 2014 A.D. El proposito de que los votantes coten con preferencia por el miembro del Districto Universitario de la Universidad Comunal Eastern New Mexico, Condado de Chaves. All polling places shall be open between the hours of 7:00 A.M. and 7:00 P.M. Lugares de votacion se abriran entre las horas de las 7:00 de la manana hasta las 7:00 de la noche. DAVE KUNKO CHAVES COUNTY CLERK ESCRIBANA DE CONDADO DEL CHAVES

JEFF ORTEGA CHIEF DEPUTY CLERK PRINCIPAL DIPUTADO ESCRIBANA DE CONDADO DE CHAVES MILL LEVY TAX QUESTION Shall the Eastern New Mexico University of Roswell Branch Community College District establish the mill levy tax rate at three dollars ($3.00) for each one thousand dollars ($1000) of net taxable property within the district, the proceeds to be used for current operations, maintenance and capital improvements of the Eastern New Mexico University Roswell Branch Community College, effective January 1, 2015?

PREGUNTA DE IMPUESTOS DE MIL ¿Debe el Distrito Universitario de la Universidad Comunal Eastern New Mexico Roswell establecer el rango de impuesto bono mil a tres d_lares ($3.00) por cada mil d_lares ($1000) de valor imponible neto de todas las propiedades sujetas a impuesto dentro del distrito, las entradas ser_an usadas para las operaciones actuals, mantenci_n y mejoras de capital para la Universidad Comunal Eastern New Mexico University sede Roswell, a ser efectivo a partir del 1 de enero de 2015? TAMARA CHAVEZ FRANCES CARTER JACK L. FISHER DANIEL JOHNSON RAYMOND R. CHAGNON

REP DEM REP DEM REP

PJ JUDGE JUDGE CLERK CLERK

BRENDA SANCHEZ

REP

PJ

045. Employment Opportunities

Excellent Opportunity Full Time for a reliable outgoing Assistant Manager in a professional office. Strong customer skills & attention to details required. Must have reliable transportation, valid driver’s license & auto insurance. Mon-Fri 35-40 hours/week. Bilingual preferred. Drop off resume at 2601 N. Main, Suite C, No Phone Calls.

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

AK SALES & Consulting is looking for installation staff. Person needs to travel around the State of New Mexico and will work both indoors and outdoors. Transportation provided by company. Person will unload trucks and install athletic equipment and furniture. Background check will be done. Person must pass drug test before being hired. Hourly pay will depend on experience. Please send or bring resume to 115 E. Country Club Rd., Roswell, NM 88201.

AMERIPRIDE LINEN Requisition#106961 Production Employee

Production Employee needed: High School diploma or GED. Must be able to pass drug test. 88201. You must apply online at careerbuilders.com January 22, 2014 to January 28, 2014 Competitive salary and benefits. No phone calls will be accepted.

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM AmeriPride Linen and Apparel

REQUISITION# 106917

Voting Convenience Center BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB 201 S. GARDEN, ROSWELL

Voting Convenience Center ROSWELL CONVENTION CENTER

AA/EEO EMPLOYEE M/F/D/V

DEM REP REP REP DEM

JUDGE JUDGE CLERK CLERK CLERK

ROBBIE HIGGINS

REP

PJ

PJ JUDGE

Voting Convenience Center AREA D #1 ST. MARYS PL., ROSWELL

Voting Convenience Center ENMU-R 48 UNIVERSITY BLVD., ROSWELL

REP REP DEM DEM

JUDGE CLERK CLERK CLERK

RITA A. LARA JUSTUS E. BOWE JR RENE MCCOY

REP DEM REP

JUDGE CLERK CLERK

GLENDA RABY MARSHA KIRKHAM

REP DEM

PJ JUDGE

STEPHEN SMITH TARLETON CURRY JR ALBERTA V. CURRY

REP DEM DEM

JUDGE CLERK CLERK

MAGGIE L HERRERA DEBBIE KEZAR TRUCELLA (TRUDY) EVANS STERLING NELSON MCNEIL

DEM REP DEM DTS

PJ JUDGE JUDGE CLERK

CINDY FULLER

REP

PJ

BONNIE GRASSIE JANET BOSWELL JESSIE LOUDERMILK

DEM REP DTS

JUDGE JUDGE CLERK

BEVERLY WEST DELIA B BAILEY

DEM DEM

PJ JUDGE

MARCIA E JOLLEY LOIS WILSON STEPHENS

REP REP

JUDGE CLERK

700 W. COUNTRY CLUB RD., ROSWELL

Voting Convenience Center COMMUNITY CENTER 704 MAINE, LAKE ARTHUR

Voting Convenience Center CENTRAL OFFICE DEXTER SCHOOL 100 N. LINCOLN, DEXTER

Voting Convenience Center HAGERMAN TOWN HALL 209 E. ARGYLE, HAGERMAN

VOTING CONVENIENCE CENTERS The following locations are designated as polling places or Voter Convenience Centers for the conduct of the Eastern New Mexico University Roswell Branch Community College District Mill Levy Election. All voters who are eligible may vote at these locations, regardless of where they live. Boys and Girls Club 201 S. Garden St., Roswell

Roswell Convention Center 912 N. Main St., Roswell

St. Mark's Evangelical Lutheran Church 2911 N. Main St., Roswell Westminster Presbyterian Church 2801 W. 4th St., Roswell Church of Christ - West Country Club 700 W. Country Club Rd., Roswell

ST. MARKS EVANGELICAL CHURCH

Voting Convenience Center

Central Office Dexter School 100 N. Lincoln, Dexter

JUDGE CLERK CLERK CLERK

Voting Convenience Center

CHURCH OF CHRISTWEST COUNTRY CLUB

REP DEM

PJ

REP DEM DEM REP

Voting Convenience Center WESTMINSTER PRESBY2801 W. 4TH ST., ROSWELL

NANCY PILLEY PRESHIA WEAVER

CASSANDRA SPONAGEL RON SPONAGEL HELEN ORTEGA ELIDA ZAMORA

REP

SHIRLEY J. MCALLISTER PATRICIA BOTELLO ELIDA RIVERA LEASA METCALF

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTIST - NM Environment Department's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Oversight section, Carlsbad, NM. Observe, assess, and document environmental impacts of activities at the WIPP facility. Work in an office setting, industrial facility, and outdoors to: conduct environmental sampling and monitoring; evaluate and interpret environmental data; and prepare technical reports. Hazardous and radiological training and certification will be required. Qualified applicants must possess a valid NM Driver's License and may be required to qualify for a Department of Energy security clearance and may be subject to random drug testing. Please refer to the State Personnel website http://www.spo.state.nm.us/ referencing Job #____. For more information please contact Ms. Susan Lucas Kamat at 505-845-5933.

JUDGE

AMANDA SANCHEZ

ST.,

THE ROSWELL Daily Record is now accepting applications for the Full Time position of: OUTSIDE SALES The ideal candidate must possess excellent customer service skills, superior organizational skills a self-starter and strong work ethic. This is a full time position. Interested Applicants please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Vonnie Fischer, 2301 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88201 or e-mail to: addirector@rdrnews.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!

DEM

Chaves County Clerk's Office #1 St. Mary's Pl., Roswell

MAIN

045. Employment Opportunities

ROSIE R. LARA

912 N. MAIN ST., ROSWELL

2911 N. ROSWELL

Legals

FLORENCE WELLS GAIL CARTER CAROL A DOYAL NINA C EDWARDS CARMEN CORDOVA

JUDGE JUDGE CLERK CLERK CLERK

JUDGE

EOE EMPLOYEE

PJ

REP DEM DTS DEM DEM

DEM

Application must be filled out online at careerbuilders.com

DEM

JESSICA LUCERO ANGELICA ROMERO TONI GOMEZ MARYETTA FRANKLIN BERNICE G. FRANKLIN

INEATHA H. GAY

Relief Customer Service Rep

Application open from January 6, 2014 to February 5, 2014. High School Diploma/GED, experience with route sales desired, ability to work directly with customers, build relationship with customers by providing resolutions to problems and complaints, clean driving record, ability to lift up to 50 lbs and pass a Department of Transportation drug test and physical. Competitive salary and benefits.

MELVIN MONTOYA TERIAN CHURCH

Publish January 28, February 2, 2014

POLLING PLACE LUGAR DE VOTAR

045. Employment Opportunities

ENMU-U Roswell Campus 48 University Blvd., Roswell

Hagerman Town Hall 209 E. Argyle, Hagerman Community Center 704 Maine, Lake Arthur


CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record

SERVICES

100. Babysitting WILL DO babysitting at my home for reasonable rates, any shift, 317-0963

105. Childcare

CLEAN LICENSED daycare home, all ages, North, reasonable rates 420-6803

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 ALL SEASONS in & out you will not be dissapointed, ref. Beth 347-5270

150. Concrete

Running Bear Concrete Foundations, Driveways, Stamping, Sidewalks, Curbing, Stucco. Lic: 373219. Call 317-6058

045. Employment Opportunities INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS - Crude Oil Hauling 77% Line Haul Revenue with Trailer. 64% without Trailer. CDL-A, 1 year experience. Hazmat & Tanker Endorsements. Trimac Transportation www.trimac.com (888)698-0172

KYMERA Independent Physicians Roswell, NM MEDICAL OFFICE POSITIONS:

As a growing Independent Physicians’ Office, Kymera is seeking Qualified Applicants for:

Telephone Services Clerk: FT - Customer Svc Skills & ability to work multi-line telephone system required. Applicants should demonstrate friendly/outgoing attitude, and organization skills. Payment Processing Specialist: FT – Experience working medical insurance collections/payments & patient postings required. Computer skills & knowledge of EMR systems preferred.

Radiological Tech: FT - Applicants should be organized, detail-oriented and dependable. Exp. preferred. Radiologic Technologist Certification required. Please Fax resume with cover letter to: HR Mngr 627-9520

045. Employment Opportunities

RMC LOOKING for a FT LPN to fill a position with high volume. Applicant must have at least 2 yrs exp. with knowledge of EMR charting. All applicants are subject to a background check and a drug test. Please send your resume to 111 W. Hobbs St. with reference. No phone calls PROGRAM MANAGER

Progressive Residential Services of New Mexico, Inc., Human Service Agency with 30-year history, is seeking experienced candidates to join its team in the Roswell, New Mexico area. The selected candidate will be responsible for Residential and Day Program Service operations and oversight including development and marketing. Knowledge in the areas of Human Resources, Financial management, State Standards and Compliance requirements is also necessary. Qualified candidates will possess at least a BA/BS Degree with a minimum of 3 years of experience in Human Service delivery. The individual must also have at least 1 year of supervisory experience. The position also requires proficient computer skills, including expertise in Microsoft Office. Enjoy excellent salary and benefits in a family friendly Agency. Interested Candidates should forward their resume and cover letter, including salary requirements to hr.ahs7200@yahoo.com.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES at ROSWELL FORD Come grow with us! We offer great pay and benefits in an excellent working environment. We will provide training for the right people. Please apply in person 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

SERVICE TECHNICIAN Build your career here! Roswell Ford has an immediate opening for a general service technician. We offer up to $30 an hour, great benefits and a busy shop. See Rick.

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/TITLE CLERK Looking for a full-time position for person with strong computer skills and a willingness to learn new tasks. Apply in person between 9 am and 3pm.

FINANCE MANAGER Previous dealership experience recommended or background in finance, real estate or insurance required. Must be organized and friendly.

ROSWELL FORD 821 NORTH MAIN, ROSWELL, NM • 575-623-3673 www.roswellford.com

045. Employment Opportunities

NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT The Town of Carrizozo is seeking applications for a full-time New Mexico Certified Police Officer or eligible to certify by waiver. Salary starts at $16.50 per hour plus health insurance and retirement. Complete job description and applications are available at the Town of Carrizozo City Hall, 400 9th Street, PO Box 247, Carrizozo, NM 88301. Applications will be accepted until positions is filled. Please mail completed applications along wtih resume to Town of Carrizozo, PO Box 828, Carrizozo, NM 88301 Att: Chief Barnett or deliver them to 404 Central Street, Carrizozo, NM 88301. Te;ephone number is 575-648-2351 Email address is: carrizozopolice@tularosa.net EMPLOYEE HEALTH COORDINATOR RN-PT. PT position in Human Resources ENMMC. Apply online at enmmc.com EOE LOCAL FACILITY is growing. 15-20 people needed immediately with no experience necessary. $1600/per month per agreement. Call 575-578-4817

INQUIRE NOW No experience necessary. Rapid advancement. Potential earnings of $1600/per month per agreement. To start call 575-578-4817.

PEPPERS GRILL & Bar is accepting applications for potential openings. Applications available between 2:00-4:00 pm, 500 N. Main BOOKKEEPER

Bank of the Southwest is looking to immediately fill the position of full time Bookkeeper. Job duties to include, but not limited to customer service, telephone etiquette, and excellent organizational skills.

Requirements: Must have a good attitude and basic computer skills. Must be detailed oriented with excellent time management skills. 1 year bank experience preferred. Company offers excellent work environment and salary. Pre-employment drug test and background screen required. Apply in person at Bank of the Southwest, 226 N Main, Roswell, NM by February 9, 2014. EEO/AA A-1 ENTERPRISES has openings as followed: Small Engine Technician, Full Time; Cooling System Technician, Full Time. Apply in person with a resume at 425 E. Second St. in Roswell.

185. Electrical

ELECTRICAL SERVICES Meter loops, service upgrades, remodels, additions, service calls. Lowest prices in town. Free estm. Lic#360025. 910-4193

195. Elderly Care

CNA 25 yrs experience, will care for your loved ones, Med certified. 637-1727 WILL DO home health care and/or housekeeping. Have references. 317-0963

200. Fencing

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100 M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

210. Firewood/Coal FIREWOOD, oak, pinon, cedar, fur, elm, well season, full or half cord, you pick up or delivered. Call Buz 575-420-9751 or Graves Farm 575-622-1889.

FIREWOOD: $150 per cord = 128 cubic feet. Cash only, blended local woods Mulberry, Ash, Elm, Locust, Dry cut & split. Best value in town. In Roswell 8-5 on Sat. Monday thru Friday, please call first you load what you want any amount. Call 624-1611 For Info CEDAR, PINON firewood seasoned/split. $260 deliver/stacked 420-4532. MOUNTAIN WOOD for sale, Delivery available. 575-420-5124 or 347-0156

220. Furniture Repair WE BUILD and repair furniture. 840-7849 or 626-8466

225. General Construction

Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

www.senaconstruction.com 575-973-1019

230. General Repair

MINOR REPAIRS can make major changes in your home, Call Home Solutions 575-420-9183.

230. General Repair

C&N TRUSTED services is offering special rates for quality work for residential painting, dry wall, and more. 910-1168

232. Chimney Sweep

CHIMNEY SWEEP Have your woodstove, fireplace, or pellet stove inspected and cleaned. Dust free Guarantee. 39 yrs Exp., Licensed, Insured. Bulldog Janitorial Services 575-308-9988

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

345. Remodeling

Dennis the Menace

B7

NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738 RWC. BACKHOE, skid steer, dump truck, bom lift, services. Insured. Call Hector 575-910-8397. www.rancheroswelding.com

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Professional Roofing, Landscaping, Irrigation, Stucco, Tile, Painting, Concrete and Fence Work (575) 973-1019 RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397 www.rancheroswelding.com

395. Stucco Plastering

Winter Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242.

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991

Garcia’s Lawn Service, sprinklers & much more at low price. 914-0803.

RWC Lath and Stucco. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121. KEEP IT Clean, landscaping, mowing, trimming, cut down trees, clean-up and etc. 910-2033

Lawn and Landscape Maintenance One time or recurring service available 575-973-1019 Yard work, clean-ups, lawns. Handyman svc. David 637-9580.

285. Miscellaneous Services

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

www.rancheroswelding.com

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217

400. Tax Service

ANAYA Gross Receipts Consulting & Tax Service. Contact us to Anayalate your tax problems. Over 25 yrs. exp. Personal & Business. Compare our prices/we e-file. 575-623-1513 508 W. 2nd St. I TIN’S Welcome

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 TREE TRIMMING and removal, free estimates, super clean up, 840-9105

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

500. Businesses for Sale SELF STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE, 104 units, plus excess land, serious inquiries only. 317-0029

FOR LEASE or rent 7000sq ft building, with office, 416 E 2nd. Call 575-625-0656 Ask for Dean

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

STRUGGLING WITH YOUR MORTGAGE AND WORRIED ABOUT FORECLOSURE? REDUCE YOUR MORTGAGE & SAVE MONEY. LEGAL LOAN MODIFICATION SERVICES. FREE CONSULTATION. CALL PREFERRED LAW 1-800-915-0432

Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

COMMERCIAL BLDG. For sale, 14000 Sq. Ft. West 2nd Call 317-0029

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insuranced.

FOR SALE OR LEASE 12500 sq. ft commercial building 700ft highway furnished, 6220 SE Main 575-910-3199

Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-661-3783, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.

REAL ESTATE

310. Painting/ Decorating

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. Call 637-9108. EXTERIOR/INTERIOR, INSURED. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

www.rancheroswelding.com

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153.

435. Welding

www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL

490. Homes For Sale ON LAKE VAN Dexter, great view, 111 Fairway, 706-2114 or 706-1245

2BR/1BA, LARGE living room w/laundry room, 409 W. Summit, 912 sqft, gross living area. 806-729-2383 FOR SALE: 2310 N. Cole St.; 1 or 2bd/1ba; $49,500; cash downpayment required; handicapped accessible; fenced front and back; fireplace; owner can finance. 575-442-3101 or 575-434-8900. 2Bd $85K w/house in bk & 3Bd $65K, fncd yrds, call M-Th 8a-noon, 624-1331 Immaculate custom home in Briar Ridge, 3yrs old, 3br/2ba, 81 Bent Tree Rd., $132,900. 831-915-0226

1612 S. Main near West Hobbs St. busy intersection approx. 1015 sq. ft. all utilities, $78k owner financing available Joe/Jose 575-317-8310

510. Resort-Out of Town

ADVERTISE YOUR VACATION PROPERTY, to more than 284,000 New Mexico newspaper readers. Your 25-word classified ad will appear in 32 newspapers around the state for only $100. Call this newspaper for more details or visit www.nmpress.org for more info.

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

TRIPLE WIDE mobile home in senior park, spacious, 2bd/2ba 1500 Sq. Ft. 3 patios, immaculate new renovation, move in ready, $42,000 OBO. 626-5167

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

IN SENIOR Park, 2bd/2ba plus add on, cover patio and carport, for additional information contact 505-366-1142

520. Lots for Sale

PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352.

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 1BR EXECUTIVE apt. fully furnished & stocked, central ht/air, utilities, internet, sattelite TV & housekeeping, $1100/mo, $1100/dep. Avail. Feb. 1st. 840-5274

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944. 1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $592, 3br/2ba, $674, 5br/2ba $812, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge. Very nice 2br/1.5ba, Apartment. North location, garage, $800/mo, $400/dep, 1 yr lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535. Very nice 2br Apartment. 304 W. Mescalero, $625/mo, wtr pd, $300/dep. 6 mo. lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535.


B8 Tuesday, January 28, 2014 540. Apartments Unfurnished

EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. EFF, 1,2 BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377

2301 N. Grand Apt. A, 2br, 1.5ba, 1car garage & laundry room. 910-4225. 2BR/2BA, $625/MO and $400/dep. No hud no pets, 2802 W. 4th. 910-1300 1BDRM,1BA, No pets, No Hud,mid-town, water pd., $600 monthly,call 575-420-6988 2br/1ba, $625, $400/dep, no HUD or pets. 300 W. Mescalero. 910-1300 REMODELED 2BR/2BA, all electric, w/d hookups, $650/mo, $500/dep. 910-0827

I BR/1BA nice apartment, stove/refrig. $360 $250dep. 910 Apart. A 626-5290 NICE & clean Efficiency, all bills paid. Call 317-1212 or 622-9011

3BR/2BA, FRESH paint, new carpet, $650/mo, 1212 N. Washington. 420-7294

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 Exchange your hotel room for a private furnished home! 30 day minimum. All utilities paid, TV, recliners, Washer/Dryer, wireless internet, Pet-friendly yards & more. Credit cards accepted. Cozycowboy.com. 575-624-3258, 626-4822. www.cozycowboy.com (575) 624-3258, 626-4848, 626-4822. 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281

RENTING HOUSE, 716 S. Cedar, 3bd/2ba and office, close to schools, fridge & stove, No smoking no pets. $350/dep. 623-2617 3BR/1BA, w/all utilities pd including DirecTV & wireless internet, fenced yard w/carport, pets ok w/separate deposit, $1650/mo, great location. 626-4984

STUDIO HOUSE w/all utilities pd including DirecTV & wireless internet. Has washer & dryer, fenced yard, pets ok w/separate deposit. $1200/mo. Great location. 575-626-4984

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 600 S. Lea, 3br/2ba, ref. air, w/d hookups, fridge & stove, no HUD or pets, $750/mo, $600/dep, 914-5402.

3BR NEAR ENMU-R, #20 Murphy Place, HUD approved, w/garage, ldry rm, new carpet, very clean, $650/mo. 623-6999 or 317-2945 Beautiful 2br/2ba single car garage 55+ condominiums available at 310 W. Mescalero complete with fireplace, full kitchen, washer/dryer hook-ups. Amenities include lawn service, water and electric paid. 2 left under $1000 through January 31st. Call (575) 625-8426. 3BD/2BA COUNTRY 650 3-1 550, 600, 250 dep. Al 703-0420 Javier 420-0666

2600 CORNELL, $750/mo, $750/dep, no pets or HUD. Call WC Property Management, 575-317-1605. 1111 N. Washington #13, 2br/2ba, detached laundry room. 910-4225 2BR/2BA, 1 car garage, townhouse, close to Lovelace & ENMMC, $800/mo, $300/dep, 575-910-1605

710 S. Wyoming Apt. A, x-nice, 2br, appliances, wtr pd, $550/mo, $500/dep. 626-5423

BRIAR RIDGE 3/2 very clean, fenced backyard, fire place, $1250mo. $1000. No pets 707-694-4382 2706 S. Lea, Roswell, clean 3br/1ba, w/d hookups, refrig. & stove, no inside pet, $850/mo, $850/dep, no HUD. Ernie, 420-0744.

105 S. Ohio, 1br/1ba, $550/mo + $300/dep, utilities included. Call 840-6451.

2br/1ba, Stove & fridge, new paint, 501 E. Tilden, No HUD, pets or smoking, $500/mo, $300/dep, pay own bills. 914-2641 or 575-291-4438 1516 N. Pontiac, 2 br, 1 ba, near parks, new stove & new ref, W/D hookups, hardwood floors, completely remodeled, fenced yard, very clean and cute, $600 monthly, plus dep., No large dogs (small or medium okay), No HUD. References and Rental History required. Call 578-3034

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

3br/1ba, Stove & fridge, 306 E. Reed, No HUD, pets or smoking, $500/mo, $300/dep, pay own bills. 914-2641 or 575-291-4438

CLASSIFIEDS

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

Power wheelchair, hospital bed, oxygen cyl. Invacare patient lifter. 622-7638

3br/2ba, 1730 N. Delaware. Please call 575-626-0456.

Commode chair, oxygen concentrator, walker, elevated toilet seat, 622-7638.

NORTH-LARGE 2/2 ht pump, stove, fridge DW, no pets. $625/300. 420-8797

FARM RANCH furniture, dressers, small kitchen table and chairs, microwave. 626-8466

{{{RENTED}}} 1617 S. Pennsylvania 2br wash/dryer hookup, ref. air, No HUD/pets. $550mo. $500dep. 502 HERMOSA NE Roswell. 3br, 2ba, 2100 sf ref. stove, w/d hookup, carport, large family room w/firelpace, separate dining room, carpet, eat in area and large kitchen, ref. air $1250 mo. $1000 dep., No Hud, close to school/shopping. Call Jim for info 575-910-7969 514 E. 6th St. 3br/1ba ref. air/heat. No Hud, no bills pd, small pet only 317-1371 305 S. Evergreen, 2br/1ba, coverd carport, shed, appliances, fenced yard, $750/$500 dep, dogs w/fee, no HUD or utilities pd. 575-405-0163 or kilok9s@gmail.com 2BR/1BA, 1 yr lease, no pets, HUD accepted, $750/mo. 619-804-5713 612 La Paloma -NE 3br/2ba w/gar, walk to schools, fenced yd, stove, ref, w/d hu, fire place, ref. air. Pet on approval. $1000mo/$1000dep. History req. No HUD. 575-578-1264 612 La Paloma -NE 3br/2ba w/gar, walk to schools, fenced yd, stove, ref, w/d hu, fire place, ref. air. Pet on approval. $1000mo/$1000dep. History req. No HUD. 575-578-1264 3br/1ba w/den, stove & fridge, washer/dryer hookups, central heating & air, fenced in backyard w/shed, $950/mo, $600/dep, no bills paid. 420-2831 3109 N Richardson 3/1/1 fresh paint tile flooring stove fridge recent central air $750/mo. 317-8854 Excellent Area 3/2/2, 866 Swinging Spear $1050+ bills $500 dep. 623-7377 or 291-5932 3/2/1, large heated/cooled shop/garage, wood floors, updated kitchen, appliances included. Very nice. Large backyard. $975/mo, $600/dep. 606 Willow Dr. Available 2/1/14 575-840-8222. 3BR/1BA CARPORT, $550mo, $275dep. No HUD 420-5604

555. Mobile Homes for Rent QUIET COUNTRY 2bd, 10 miles East 2nd on River Rd. $550/mo, $550/dep. 575-513-5790

580. Office or Business Places 200 S. Union. Two suites, approximately 1200 sqft and 810 sqft. Great location. Will remodel to suit tenant. Call Jan at 625-2222.

2600 N. Main, 750 sqft, $950. Call John Grieves at 626-7813, Broker PELR.

DIRECTV - Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call Now! Triple savings! $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!! Start saving today! 1-800-264-0340 6-TRUSS’S, 14’, 4x12 Pitch! $30 each. 575-420-9083 DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-315-7043

585. Warehouse and Storage WAREHOUSE ONLY 9000 SF partial a/c & heat, security alarmed, 2 garage doors, 2 standard entry doors, $1000/mo. 2001 S. Main behind Family Furniture. 575-937-0889 or 575-257-0888

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

NEED FURNITURE Shop Blair’s for the best prices on used furniture, beds, dressers, table & chairs, living room sets, patio sets, bookshelves, appliances, antiques, collectibles, home decor & housewares, saddles, tools, movies, plus lots more. Open daily 9-5, closes Wed. 627-2033

Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed!

745. Pets for Sale

CHIHUAHUA’S 4 adults, 2 with pups and one expecting, $175. 575623-1399

I AM interested in buying most anything of value, furniture, appliances, tools, household items & more. 317-6285 TOP DOLLAR Paid for furniture, collectibles, appliances, antiques, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We pay cash with same day removal of all items. Compete/partial households & personal estates welcome. 623-0136 or 910-6031

635. Good things to Eat

FROZEN GREEN Chile, dried red chile & chile powder, local pinto beans, peanuts & pecan, ristras, jams & jellies, fountain drinks, fresh eggs, Alfalfa Hay, Wheat, Sudan & Oat hay, small & large bales, we accept credit cards & EBT. GRAVES FARM 622-1889 NEW CROP Western pecans, shelled halves $8.50/lb, quarters $8.00/lb, pieces $7.50/lb. Will deliver in Roswell area only if purchase 5# or more. Call 575-623-3315.

DINING TABLE, coffee table, brd furniture, recliners. 575-317-1151.

RECREATIONAL 780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com BOAT & RV STORAGE, secure area, $25/mo. Call 623-4200.

2003 PROWLER Travel Trailer 27ft bumper pull. Excellent condition, loaded. $10,500. 575-914-8316 2006 JAYFLIGHT camper trailer. Exc. Cond. $12,200. 910-0833 for appt.

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

SHELLED PECANS, Fresh $8.00/pound. 575-622-2353

640. Household Goods

THE TREASURE Chest A must see collection of depression glass and collectables of all kinds & sofa’s and tables 1204 W Hobs 914-1855 Weds-Sat 10-5

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

SINGLE SLEEPER sofa $400, double recliner $250. Before 4pm, 623-2359

700. Building Materials 6-TRUSS’S, 14’, 4x12 Pitch! $30 each. 575-420-9083

715. Hay and Feed Sale

Sorgum bales 4x8 $75, Oat bales 4x8 $100. Call Janet at 575-626-0159

720. Livestock & Supplies

WE BUY PECANS, Top Prices Paid. 512 W. McGAffey

20FT G-NECK stock trailer, dbl floor, good axles, $1700. 575-626-9868

ESTATE SETTLEMENT Never throw ANYTHING away before calling us! Our services include Auctions (our facility or yours), Tagged Estate Sales, Complete/Partial Buy-Outs & Real Estate Auctions, Firearms, Jewelry & Collectibles. Prompt removal of entire households and property cleanouts. Whether you need to sell a few items or an entire estate check with us and we will do our best to beat any offer you receive. Call today to find out how our experience can help you get more $$. Wild West Auctions, LLC 623-7355 or 840-8401

745. Pets for Sale

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM 04 PT Cruiser 118K miles $3900, 575-201-8218 2002 FORD Mustang, 5spd, V6, 101K miles, $5000. OBO 622-2835

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

1999 DODGE Ram 1500, 132k miles, $4500, quad cab, single owner, Call or lv msg, 625-2477. 2009 FORD F/250 Super duty, 4X4 Crew cab, loaded, excellent condition $19.950. 626-8533 ‘88 CHEVY Silverado 1500, 2 WD, work truck, runs, $1300. ‘99 Dodge Grand Caravan, 135k miles, great condition, $3000. 575-623-9230

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MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575)-622-7710 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

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SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE in good North Main area. $600 per month plus electric. New carpet tile and paint. Steve 575-420-2100 FOR LEASE, space in Sunwest Centre Office Complex at 500 N. Main St. Various size spaces. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. High floor space available for larger tenants. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 575-623-1652 or mobile 575-420-2546

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

Roswell Daily Record

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070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


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