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Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 123, No. 18 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

January 21, 2014

Sanders’ father: ‘The responsibility is ours’ revealed that she had not even been aware that she had been shot until she reached the classroom. has already Kendal returned home from Lubbock on a jet. Mother Nickie Sanders described the long road to recovery. She reported that Kendal lost some movement and use of her right arm, but this was expected to be only temporary. Bert said that people need to stop trying to find someone to blame. “Not Mason (Campbell). Not the

JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

The family of Kendal Sanders held a press conference Monday afternoon at Church on the Move, giving an update on her condition. Kendal is the 13-yearold victim of last week’s Berrendo Middle School shooting. She is one of three who were injured when another student opened fire inside the school’s gymnasium. Father Bert Sanders

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TUESDAY

“The problem is not Roswell. We need to pull together. Roswell is a good town. ... It can happen anywhere — at church, at the mall.”

teachers. Not the schools. The responsibility is ours. We as parents need to be more involved.” He argued point by point some of the proposals discussed. He does not think the answer lies in gun control. “We can take guns away, and there will be knives. If we take knives

away, there will be something else.” Neither does he believe that Roswell needs to fortify the schools. “We can put metal detectors in our schools … but evil can still get in,” Sanders said. Sanders also discussed the attitude exhibited by some — it’s Roswell; there’s

always shooting. “The problem is not Roswell. We need to pull together. Roswell is a good town. ... It can happen anywhere — at church, at the mall.” He defended Campbell, the 12-year -old who is charged with the shooting, and the Campbell family. “Mason is not a bad boy,

An unidentified International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspector cuts the connections between the twin cascades for 20 percent uranium enrichment at the Natanz facility, some 200 miles south of the capital Tehran, Iran, Monday.

Iran, US and Europe start nuclear deal

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran unplugged banks of centrifuges involved in its most sensitive uranium enrichment work on Monday, prompting the United States and European Union to partially lift economic

sanctions as a landmark deal aimed at easing concerns over Iran’s nuclear program went into effect. The mutual actions — curbing atomic work in exchange for some sanctions relief — start a six-

month clock for Tehran and the world powers to negotiate a final accord that the Obama administration and its European allies say will be intended to ensure Iran cannot build a nuclear weapon.

In the meantime, the interim deal puts limits on Iran’s program — though it continues low levels of uranium enrichment. Tehran denies its nuclear program is intended to produce a bomb.

He said Kendal and Mason were friends. Both went to Vacation Bible Study together. Kendal shares her father’s forgiving nature. “She is not angry at Mason. She thinks he made bad choices.”

Bert said he believes that discipline is the key, discipline that begins in the home and continues in the schools. Each person bears

County hopes for project funding from Legislature JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

AP Photo

and the Campbells are good people.”

As the 30-day legislative session begins today, Chaves County will wait to hear whether a wish list of projects it submitted will be approved for funding. The county submitted 10 funding requests to its state legislators for road construction, a walking trail, public dumpsites, a new fire engine and other projects. In total, $2.66 million in Chaves County projects were put into a “book” that will be handed to local representatives, said Hubert Quintana, executive director of Southeastern New Mexico Economic Development District. The projects are prioritized, according to need. “We just wait to find out whether we were successful in any of our funding requests,” said Chaves County Development Director Charlotte Andrade. The county’s first priority is a $500,000 request to fix Hobson Road. The road has

See SANDERS, Page A3

deteriorated and needs to be rebuilt from N.M. 256 to the east. The second biggest priority listed is a $500,000 request to fund the construction of a retention pond, improve storm water drainage and construct a dog park and Americans with Disabilities-compliant walking trail in the area around the county administration building. The trail would run around Southeast Main Street to Hobbs Street. The retention pond would be built along Hobbs Street, according to a depiction provided by the county. Another project requested includes a $101,000 funding request for garbage “convenience centers.” The county proposes to purchase six large compactors to be placed at locations in the county and allow residents to dispose of residential waste. The idea would be to decrease litter and debris that is now illegally dumped.

NM’s permanent Speeches, marches honor MLK Jr.’s legacy funds higher than before market crash

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The value of New Mexico’s per manent funds has grown to 16 percent higher than what it was before the market crashed, and the increase in returns on investments has also placed the state among the better -per for ming funds compared to its peers nationwide.

Much has changed since the market first crashed in 2008, State Investment Council board

members and staff told the Albuquerque Journal in a story published Monday. While some of today’s robust returns reflect the current bull market for stock investments, they said improvement in fund per for mance, plus the council’s smooth functioning nowadays, are the result of four years of steady, major reform.

See FUNDS, Page A3

Businessman Joe Green is running for City Council in Ward 3 against incumbent Councilman Art Sandoval.

ter Bernice King said. “Are we afraid, or are we truly committed to the work that must be done?”

community all it can be for the residents, for visitors and for future generations. I didn’t want to look back years from now, knowing that I could have made a difference at such a critical time, instead of standing by and letting others decide the future of Roswell’s economics and the quality of life for the community.” Green has been a business owner for 16 years and owns Enchantment Pest Control. He deals

with different people every day in different situations, he said. Many people have expressed to him different needs of the city and the community, he said. “My main focus is to listen to the community and get their feedback on what needs to be accomplished in Roswell in order for it to grow,” Green said. Green was bor n and raised in Roswell. He graduated from Roswell High School in 1987 and earned

The event in Atlanta featured music, songs and choirs and was one of many celebrations, marches, parades and community service projects held Monday across the nation to honor the slain civil rights leader. It was about 50 years ago today that King had just appeared on the cover of Time magazine as its Man of the Year, and the nation was on the cusp of passing the Civil Rights Act See LEGACY, Page A3

AP Photo

Bernice King, right, hugs Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed after his speech during the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday commemorative service at Ebenezer Baptist Church Monday, in Atlanta.

Business owner Green sees growth potential for Roswell

JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Jill McLaughlin Photo

ATLANTA (AP) — As the nation remembered and reflected Monday on the legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., leaders and everyday Americans talked about how far the country has come in the past 50 years and how much more is to be done. At Ebenezer Baptist Church in King’s hometown of Atlanta, civil rights leaders and members of King’s own family spoke about poverty, violence, health care and voting rights, all themes from the civil rights struggle that still resonate to this day. “There is much work that we must do,” King’s daugh-

See PROJECTS, Page A3

Small-business owner Joe Green decided he wanted to make a difference in Roswell during what he felt was a critical time for the city. Green filed this month to run for City Council in Ward 3 against incumbent Councilor Art Sandoval. “I just feel there’s a great potential here in Roswell,” Green said. “I want to help make this

HIGH 61 LOW 22

TODAY’S FORECAST

• DONALD (DON) “PAPAW” WAYNE PRINCE • CHARLES ATWOOD

• AVIE C. CHAVEZ SR. • DENA M. COX • GARY WAYNE RUSSELL

TODAY’S OBITUARIES PAGE A6

a degree at Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell. He and his wife, Sooky, have three children: a daughter, 20, and two sons, 16 and 14. “I’ve seen good and bad times here,” Green said. “There’s been a lot better times. We’re just not growing. We need to grow. You have other communities around us — Hobbs, Carlsbad, Artesia, Clovis — all of those communities are thriving much more than what we should

CLASSIFIEDS ..........B6 COMICS .................B5 ENTERTAINMENT .....A8 FINANCIAL ..............B4

be.

“At one time, we were the third largest in New Mexico. We need to have something here for the children, so they can stay and have something to be proud of.”

If elected, Green would focus on improving safety and trust in the community, and creating economic growth for small and large businesses. He said he felt See GREEN, Page A3

INDEX GENERAL ...............A2 HOROSCOPES .........A8 LOTTERIES .............A2 OPINION .................A4

SPORTS .................B1

WEATHER ..............A8 WORLD ..................A6


A2 Tuesday, January 21, 2014

GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Some Obama spy changes hampered by complications

WASHINGTON (AP) — Several of the key surveillance reforms unveiled by President Barack Obama face complications that could muddy the proposals’ lawfulness, slow their momentum in Congress and saddle the government with heavy costs and bureaucracy, legal experts warn. Despite Obama’s plans to shift the National Security Agency’s mass storage of Americans’ bulk phone records elsewhere, telephone companies do not want the responsibility. And the government could

face privacy and structural hurdles in relying on any other entity to store the data. Constitutional analysts also question the legal underpinning of Obama’s commitment to setting up an advisory panel of privacy experts to intervene in some proceedings of the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which oversees the NSA’s data mining operations. Obama has asked Congress to set up such a panel, but senior federal judges already oppose the move, citing practical and legal draw-

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Mia Prickett’s ancestor was a leader of the Cascade Indians along the Columbia River and was one of the chiefs who signed an 1855 treaty that helped establish the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde in Oregon.

California to Michigan. “In my entire life, I have always known I was an Indian. I have always known my family’s history, and I am so pr oud of that,” Prickett said. She said her ancestor chief Tumulth was unjustly accused of participating in a revolt and was executed by the U.S. Army — and hence didn’t make it onto the tribe’s roll, which is a membership now requirement. The prospect of losing her membership is “gutwrenching,” Prickett said. “It’s like coming home one day and having the keys taken from you,” she said. “You’r e culturally homeless.” The enrollment battles come at a time when many tribes — long poverty-

backs. The secret courts now operate with only the government making its case to a federal judge for examining someone’s phone data. Civil libertarians have called for a voice in the room that might offer the judge an opposing view. “The devil is in the details of how the government collects and retains phone records,” said Anthony Romero, the executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union, “and I think we’re going to see pretty quickly the lack of specificity behind some

of the president’s promises.” Obstacles to enacting Obama’s plans are expected to mount quickly as administration officials and legislators grapple over what sort of entity will oversee the calling records swept up by the NSA. Obama ordered the Justice Department and intelligence officials to devise a plan within the next two months. Privacy advocates also questioned the administration’s silence on what it will do with hundreds of millions of phone records, at

minimum, that are now kept on file in government inventories. Citing the NSA’s plans to build a vast data storage facility in Utah, Romero said “there was nothing in the president’s speech about what’s already in the government’s hands.” Obama’s task force, the Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies, had recommended cutting the time that the NSA could retain private records from five to two years. But Obama’s proposals do not address the issue of duration, leav-

ing those records still in NSA control for the foreseeable future.

Who or what takes over the storage of private phone records is also at issue. Telephone company executives and their lawyers have bluntly told administration officials they do not want to become the NSA’s data minders. Cellular industry executives prefer the NSA keep control over the surveillance program and would only accept changes if they were legally required and spelled out in legislation.

Disenrollment leaves Natives ‘culturally homeless’ Man punched, pulls out knife during argument But the Grand Ronde now wants to disenroll Prickett and 79 relatives, and possibly hundreds of other tribal members, because they no longer satisfy new enrollment requirements. Prickett’s family is fighting the effort, part of what some experts have dubbed the “disenr ollment epidemic” — a rising number of dramatic clashes over tribal belonging that are sweeping through more than a dozen states, from

STATE BRIEFS

Alcohol-related crashes down in Santa Fe County

SANTA FE (AP) — Santa Fe County has seen the number of crashes involving alcohol drop sharply over the past year, and experts say that’s evidence New Mexico’s drunken driving laws, police enforcement and education are making the state safer. Ignition interlock advocate Tom Starke tells The New Mexican there’s a real trend going on. The report prepared by the Santa Fe Prevention Alliance shows the number of alcohol-related crashes decreased from 128 in 2012 to 106 last year — a drop of 17 percent. The number of DWI arrests was also down, and one less person died in a drunken driving crash in 2013 than the previous year. Starke and others believe one factor is New Mexico’s ignition interlock law, which mandates one of the devices for all DWI offenders. Another factor is city

NOBLE FINANCE

and county forfeiture laws.

National teachers union president visits NM

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The head of the American Federation of Teachers is visiting New Mexico to push the importance of early childhood education. Union officials say president Randi Weingarten met with local AFT leaders, teachers, parents and community members Monday morning at the Parkside Child Development Center in Albuquerque. Weingarten is also visiting Santa Fe, where she will meet with Santa Fe Mayor David Coss, educators and others who are rallying for the “Keep the Promise” agenda as the New Mexico Legislature gets ready to begin its 30day session. The campaign centers on concerns over increasing class sizes, decreasing diversity in curriculums and controversial teacher evaluations and student

Aggravated battery

AP Photo

Mia Prickett holds her Confederated Tribe of Grande Ronde enrollment card along with a recent notice of potential disenrollment from the tribe in Portland, Ore., Thursday.

stricken and oppressed by government policies — are finally coming into their own, gaining wealth and building infrastructur e with revenues from Indian casinos.

Critics of disenrollment say the rising tide of tribal expulsions is due to greed over increased gambling profits, along with political in-fighting and old family and personal feuds.

testing. Also, finding a permanent source of funding for ef forts to improve early childhood education is expected to be hashed out during the session.

20 to find the coins and $1,300 in cash gone.

Woman arrested for stealing pastor’s coins

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Police say a woman accused of stealing a $70,000 coin collection from an Albuquerque pastor is in custody. Authorities say 53-yearold Anita Manalo is facing charges of larceny over $20,000 and receiving and/or disposing of stolen property over $20,000. Police booked her Friday into a county jail on $20,000 bail. According to a court complaint, the pastor asked a friend to watch his home while he went on a month-long mission trip to Africa. The friend had Manalo clean the house several times. The complaint alleges the pastor returned home Dec.

HOBBS (AP) — The U.S. Department of Labor has awarded New Mexico Junior College to a $2.5 million grant to offer more oilfield training to the underemployed.

The Hobbs News-Sun reports the funding will be made available later this year. New Mexico Junior College is the only college in the state to receive such a grant.

The college’s director of institutional effectiveness, Larry Sanderson, says the award is huge for the campus. The goal is to serve unemployed and underemployed workers by providing relevant training as determined by the needs of the region’s energy industry.

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Police were dispatched to the 2500 block of South Lea Avenue, Sunday, where an argument turned physical. According to the report, one man attempted to intercede and was punched. He responded to defend himself, punching the other man, and then pulled a pocket knife from his pocket. The case is under investigation.

Larceny

• Police responded to the 900 block of South Elm Avenue, Saturday, where the lock on an electric meter was cut and the meter was removed. A representative of Xcel Energy was unable to say how long the meter had been missing and how much it would cost to replace it. • Police were called to

the 1200 block of West Third Street, Friday, to take a report of an employee of Job Corps who said someone took a $25 gift card while she was at work. • Police were dispatched to Westminster Presbyterian Church, 2801 W. Fourth St., Saturday, after subjects entered a shed and removed two “weed wackers” valued at $170. • Police recovered a vehicle in the 300 block of West Linda Vista Boulevard, Sunday, that had been stolen from the Chaves County Sheriff’s Office.

Anyone having information about these or any other crimes is asked to contact Crime Stoppers 888-594-TIPS (8477). Callers may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward.

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CALL 622-7710 “Real Estate Corner”

“HOME, SWEET OFFICE HOME”

By Connie DeNio of Roswell 622-7191 or 626-7948

A home with “versonality” can sell quickly and well. What is “versonality”? It’s a word we made up to describe a combination of versatility and personality, like a home wired and arranged as an office. With more people working at home either full time or on the side, having a home office or

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room that can easily be adapted into a home office is a great selling feature, especially in regard to tax benefits. If you have it, advertise it! If any rooms or living spaces can be converted to fit a buyer’s particular needs, showcase your homes’ “versonality”. Call Me Today! © USPS No 471-200

News & Business Telephone 622-7710 Circulation Telephone 622-7730 Charles Fischer Publisher

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“We work for you, the client. We never forget we’re your agent.”

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Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice The entire contents of the Roswell Daily Record, including its flag on Page 1, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the Daily Record.

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GENERAL

2 nabbed at Texas border in Target credit card fraud case Roswell Daily Record

McALLEN, Texas (AP) — Account information stolen during the Target security breach is now being divided up and sold off regionally, a South Texas police chief said Monday following the arrest of two Mexican citizens who authorities say arrived at the border with 96 fraudulent credit cards. McAllen Police Chief Victor Rodriguez said Mary Car men Garcia, 27, and Guardiola Daniel Dominguez, 28, both of Monterrey, Mexico, used cards containing the account infor mation of South Texas residents. Rodriguez said they were used to buy tens of thousands of dollars’ worth of merchandise at national retailers in the area including Best Buy, Wal-Mart and Toys R Us. “They’re obviously selling the data sets by region,” Rodriguez said. Garcia and Guardiola were both being held Monday on state fraud charges. It was not immediately known whether they had retained lawyers. The local police began working with the U.S. Secr et Service after a number of area retailers were hit with fraudulent purchases on Jan. 12. The

Sanders

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responsibility. “It starts with young kids. It starts at home. It starts with the young at the time. At each school shooting, someone knew. Someone could have reported it.” Pastor Troy Smothermon of Church on the Move agreed with his assessment: “We need to return discipline to our schools. Washington, D.C., and Santa Fe are not going to dictate to Roswell what should happen.” Nickie thanked people for their prayers and support, listing the Roswell Independent School District, the Roswell Police Department and the Roswell Fire Department,

Projects

Continued from Page A1

A fourth project is to fund $200,000 for a fire engine for Sierra Volunteer Fire Department. Berrendo Volunteer Fire Department’s Main Station is also requesting $500,000 to expand or replace an outdated station to provide better housing of larger equipment. Midway Volunteer Fire Department is also requesting $100,000 for new command vehicles. The county is also looking for $60,000 for new rescue tools for the East Grand Plains district. A $400,000 request was submitted for a new voting warehouse to house voting machines that are now stored in the west wing of the county building. The county has also sub-

Green

Continued from Page A1

strengthening infrastructure and fiscal sensibility was important for businesses.

“We as a community haven’t made our infrastructure strong enough,” Green said. “I feel we can be a better city and that we can attract business here. We already have businesses that have been here, but they’ve left. We need something

much broader conspiracy. Rodriguez said investigators suspect Garcia and Guardiola were singling out Sundays for their shopping sprees hoping that the banks would not be as quick to detect the fraud.

With the amount of electr onics and other merchandise pur chased on Jan. 12, Rodriguez said the two would have needed an “ar my” to move it all.

Dominguez

Garcia

Secret Service confirmed that the fraudulent accounts traced back to the original Target data breach from late last year. Investigators fanned out to McAllen-area merchants and r eviewed “miles of video” looking for the fraudsters, Rodriguez said. From that, they were able to identify two people and a car with Mexican license plates. With the help of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, investigators confirmed the identities of their suspects from immigration records of when they had entered Texas in the same vehicle. Police

prepared arrest warrants last week and waited for them to return. On Sunday mor ning, federal of ficials alerted police that their two suspects were at the Anzalduas International Bridge trying to re-enter the U.S. They wer e carrying 96 fraudulent car ds, Rodriguez said. He did not know whether they were the first arrests related to the Target data breach. Investigators believe the two were involved in both the acquisition of the fraudulent account data and the production of the car ds, but only part of what must have been a

all the Berrendo Middle School staff, New Mexico State Police Sgt. Gary Smith, teacher John Masterson and the hospital staff in Lubbock, among many others. She said the family had received so many calls from wellwishers that there were too many people to name all of them. Bert, too, thanked people for their support, but said the family was trying to keep visitors to a minimum. He requested that media not attempt to contact the family with questions. “Take the spotlight off our schools and off our children. Just let her be a little girl.” He reminded people that all the students at Berrendo have been traumatized by the incident and he hopes that people

will include the uninjured victims in their prayers. In a press conference held for television last week, Gov. Susana Martinez released the name of the second victim, Nathaniel Tavarez. She told media that doctors repaired slight damage to his heart. She said his face and head were pockmarked by shotgun pellets and both of his eyes were injured. Speaking of Tavarez’s recovery, Bert said Nathaniel was doing wonder fully. However, he urged people to respect the Tavarez family’s privacy also. He admonished the media for relaying so much wrong information on the day of the shooting. Bert was in Artesia at the time. He was notified

mitted a request for $174,000 to purchase five passenger vans and one nine-to-12 passenger van for the Veterans’ T ransportation Network of Southeast New Mexico. The last request is for Save Our Youth Mariachi for $130,000. Andrade said local legislative representatives, who convened at the county chambers two weeks ago, asked questions about the requests and were receptive. “It seemed to go well,” Andrade said. Quintana will be on hand throughout the session in Santa Fe to answer any questions state representatives have, he said. “We provide technical

assistance to our legislators,” Quintana said. Quintana estimates $260 million will be available in severance tax bonds for capital outlay projects this year. Last year, $138 million was available. Each project proposed will become a separate legislative bill. Quintana is taking with him at least a couple of hundred projects, he said. SNMEDD is the largest planning district in the state, covering more than 26,000 square miles. The bills are not given a final blessing and signed until the final days of the session, Quintana said. “It just depends on how much money becomes available,” he said.

better here for when people graduate. We also need a greater support for our businesses that are here, for the ones that are here and the future ones to come.” Green also said he felt the city and county needed to work together to unite the community. “We always need to expand, that’s part of growing,” he said. “We need to somehow bring the county and city together, maybe one day in the future. I really think we do. We need to

bring the whole community together. And I believe we are going to come together. I want to see us all together. We have to, in order for us to grow, and the residents as well.”

Green said he will be working to go door to door in the next few weeks. His campaign manager, Lola Whitfield, and he will be running a campaign to get his message out. To reach his campaign, call 625-1368.

Rodriguez also alluded to a link with Easter n Europe or Russia, but did not pr ovide additional details. He said he expected Garcia and Guardiola to eventually face federal charges.

South Texas authorities have seen large-scale fraudulent cr edit car d schemes before, including one in which they seized machines used to upload information to the cards’ magnetic strips. The security br each involving Minneapolisbased Target is believed to have involved 40 million cr edit and debit car d accounts and the personal information of 70 million customers.

as he was driving back to Roswell that the victims, including his daughter, had died. “It still tears me up. ... There are so many lies out there on Facebook. There are so many rumors.” Kendal will not be returning to school until next year, but teachers have volunteered to homeschool her. Bert vowed to become more personally involved. “We are going to address this. I will be attending school board meetings.” Smothermon described Kendal as a champ and expressed his pride in Roswell as a whole. “Our community has been awesome. ... Our community has come together. It (the shooting) is not tearing us apart. It’s bringing us together.”

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Legacy

Continued from Page A1

of 1964. King would win the Nobel Peace Prize later that year. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal said not many states could boast a native son that merited a national holiday. “But we Georgians can,” he told the audience. Deal said this year he would work with state legislators to find a way to honor King at the Georgia Capitol, which drew a standing ovation. He did not give any specifics, but civil rights leaders have suggested a statue. The only current tribute to King at the state Capitol is a portrait inside the Statehouse. “I think that more than just saying kind thoughts about him we ought to take action ourselves,” said Deal, a Republican. “That’s how we embed truth into our words. I think it’s time for Georgia’s leaders to follow in Dr. King’s footsteps and take action, too.” In the fall, a statue of 19th-century white supremacist politician and newspaperman Tom Watson was removed from the Capitol. Deal also touched on criminal justice reforms his administration has

A3

tried to make, including drug and mental health courts, saying too many people are not being rehabilitated in prisons.

“Let’s build a monument, but the monument should inspire us to build a better world,” said the Atlanta event’s keynote speaker, the Rev. Raphael Warnock. He also said the growing disparities in income, opportunity and health care are indications of a continuing struggle for equality decades after King’s death. The event closed with the choir singing “We Shall Overcome,” with visitors singing verses in Spanish, Hebrew and Italian as audience members joined hands and swayed in unison.

President Barack Obama honored King’s legacy of service by helping a soup kitchen prepare its daily meals. Obama took his wife, Michelle, and daughters Malia and Sasha to DC Central Kitchen, which is a few minutes away from the White House.

New York City’s new Mayor Bill de Blasio marked the day by talking about economic inequality, saying it was “closing doors for hardworking people in this city and all over this country.”

Funds

Continued from Page A1

“The council has carried out one of the biggest portfolio overhauls in the country in the last several years,” SIC spokesman Charles Wollmann said. That includes fundamental changes in everything from the makeup and selection of council members to how decisions are made and how money managers and consultants get hired. Apart from structural changes, the council has carried out a thorough, bottom-up review and realignment of nearly all investments and strategies. “We’ve completely reworked the portfolio,” council member Harold Lavender said. “It had to be totally restructured. We’ve roughly reinvested about $12 billion over the last four

years.” The reforms have imposed a professional management process at all levels, including best practices regarding investment decisions as well as transparency in all council proceedings and transactions, said SIC Vice Chairman Peter Frank. Previously, investment decisions were being driven solely by what the chief investment officers thought should be done, and that opened the door to potential political influence. In 2009, pay-to-play scandals erupted, leading former chief Gary Bland to resign. Lawsuits against Bland and more than a dozen third-party marketers and placement agents followed.


A4 Tuesday, January 21, 2014

OPINION

Legislators should focus on bigger problems SHERRY ROBINSON ALL SHE WROTE

In every legislative session, there are bills with a purpose (whether you agree with it or not) and bills I call noise – the political incendiaries, intended more for show and campaigns. Chances are slim to none that they’ll pass, but lawmakers will burn a lot of time better spent on bigger problems. One four-year-old noisemaker is the governor’s driver’s license bill, but this year the Democrats have lobbed their own noisemakers. Topping the list is the Sen. Jerry Ortiz y Pino’s marijuana initiative. The Albuquerque Democrat has pre-introduced a joint resolution seeking a constitutional amendment that would allow voters to decide the legalization of pot. Speaking last week to New Mexico Press Women, Ortiz y Pino

GUEST EDITORIAL

SHERRY ROBINSON

ALL SHE WROTE

said, “It’s a justice issue. We have forgotten the lesson learned from Prohibition.” He reasons that, if the bill succeeds, it wouldn’t go before voters until next November. After that, the Legislature would have to craft a bill. The problem is lawmakers, not to mention the public, are nowhere near agreement on the issue, so we’re looking at hours of debate during a short session, when we can’t afford the time. And, while I can’t disagree with proponents that our war on drugs has been a bust, I think New Mexico could stand to watch Colorado plow new ground before jumping

in. A bill to eliminate the post of Secretary of Education and return to the old state school board is noise. Sen. Michael Padilla, DAlbuquerque, wants a constitutional amendment to that effect. Padilla argues that because the education secretary carries water for the governor, we could see a drastic shift in doctrine with every change in governor. He says this isn’t about Secretary Hanna Skandera, but I have a feeling it is about Skandera. Otherwise the proposal would have surfaced before. Padilla and everybody else who thinks this is a good idea should refresh their memories. The board could be political to extremes and at times was dominated – or manipulated – by one member. And there was no accountability, which was why an education secretary was part of the school reforms in 2003.

Roswell Daily Record

In 2006, a report from the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation applauded Gov. Bill Richardson’s move to replace the state board of education with a cabinet secretary who answers to him: “It was a bold move that let the state’s leaders and citizens know that education was a priority.” A third noisy constitutional amendment proposal would ban same-sex marriages in New Mexico. Sen. William Sharer, R-Farmington, is responding to the recent Supreme Court decision. This issue has been aired and debated, and most New Mexicans are tired of hearing about it. It says something that a lengthy list of New Mexico clergy published a fullpage ad back in October to support the freedom to marry. Even the governor has said it’s time to move on. A fourth burst of racket isn’t partisan. The New Mexico Municipal League wants to reinstate the

gross receipts tax on food. The league and economist Brian McDonald have argued that removing the tax didn’t benefit the poor in the way everyone expected. More to the point, it dented budgets for municipalities already struggling to maintain services. Let me state the obvious, that the governor is adamantly opposed, and the governor and representatives are up for re-election next year. Who wants to step forward and support a food tax? There will be other fixes in the hopper this year, and lawmakers need to kindly remember local governments. This year’s session promises plenty of flash and bang just in the questions that must be resolved. I hope lawmakers can dispense with the noisemakers early and quickly and not exercise their lungs (trial lawyers, are you listening?) on bills that don’t stand a chance.

Government Should Focus on Fundamentals

All too often, government underperforms at the things most people expect government to do. This makes it all the more maddening when government endeavors to extend beyond its expertise and do things clearly in the private-sector sphere. The Business Coalition for Fair Competition, an organization representing business, free-market, and taxpayer interests, recently published a 2013 list of the “most egregious examples of unfair government-sponsored competition with private enterprise.” The list includes the Defense Department’s 178 grocery stores (commissaries), operated with a $1.4 billion annual subsidy, and dozens of movie theaters on military installations; colleges and universities operating facility rentals, golf courses, recreation and fitness centers and sports camps; the undercutting of private charter buses by federally subsidized local and regional transit authorities; and state health insurance exchange “navigators” to squeeze out private insurance brokers and sign up people under the Affordable Care Act. Under the “Yellow Pages Test,” if a service can be found in the phone book, the government either should not be providing that service in the first place, or should at least contract the service out through a competitive bidding process. In 1808, Thomas Jefferson noted, “It is better for the public to procure at the market whatever the market can supply; because there it is by competition kept up in its quality and reduced to its minimum price.” Government at all levels should heed this lesson, focusing only on the most “core” functions, while allowing the free market to supply goods and services whenever possible. The Orange County Register

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

What happened to innocence as we knew it?

The name of my book (when I have time to begin writing) will no longer be “The Heart of a Child.” What is the heart of a child? I thought it depicted innocence and purity. Another tragedy and so many lives touched — not only the victims and the accused but the families and community as a whole. WHY? Why does this happen? Why does God allow this to happen? Sin has invaded the world since Adam and Eve, but this boy is so young. I truly believe that exposure to violence through TV, video games, peer pressure, bullying, etc., is in large part to blame. There is limited respect for authority, including what is right and wrong (ie. good and evil.) Many families have both parents working to afford or at least put on “credit” all the things they want and don’t really need. This gives way to latchkey children in an increasingly violent world of sex, guns and drugs. I work hard but take for granted, at times, the many blessings that have been bestowed upon me. I grew up in an era of Andy Griffith, “Bonanza,” “My Friend Flicka,” “Mr. Ed,” “I Dream of Jeannie,” etc. The childhood movies that affected me deeply were the “Born Free” series, the “Lassie Come Home” series, and “The Incredible Journey;” I was shattered when I found out that “Elsa” died of Babesia in the bush. Joy Adamson was killed by the very people she hired to help her and George Adamson was killed by poachers in the bush while pursuing his lifetime passion in saving the African lion. Sometimes, I still cry when I realize how sheltered and naive I was as a child. My life was three scheduled meals around the table with family, church on Sunday, and school with continued encouragement to succeed through hard work and study. What happened to innocence as we knew it? Even I am guilty of the very things I outwardly condemn, which includes all the violence on TV. Afterall, my favorite TV program is NBC’s “The Blacklist.” I am captivated by the plot (which is deviant, deceptive, spellbinding and full of incredible suspense). Maybe it is just the secret crush I have on James Spader — not your typical “hunk” but a mastermind of interwoven intelligence. In today’s world, even though we grew up in an era of achievement through hard work, we become the victims of our own successes. God Help Us All, Sue Roswell

Straightforward? Not the best description of Chris Christie — or his pal Karl Rove BY JOE CONASON When Karl Rove praises a politician’s “straightforward” approach to an erupting scandal, it seems wise to expect that something very twisted will instead emerge in due course — and to consider his real objectives. In this instance, the former Bush White House political boss — and current Republican super PAC godfather — was discussing Gov. Chris Christie’s response to “Bridgegate,” as the events surrounding the vengeful closure of

Doonesbury

part of the George Washington Bridge by the New Jersey governor’s aides is now called. Appearing on “Fox News Sunday,” Rove said Christie “did himself a lot of good” during the famous two-hour press conference on the scandal when he sorrowfully announced the firing of a deputy chief of staff and a top state party official for “lying” to him about the bridge affair. “I think his handling of this, being straightforward, taking action — saying, ‘I’m responsible’ — firing the people proba-

bly gives him some street cred with some tea party Republicans, who say, ‘That’s what we want in a leader, somebody who steps up and takes responsibility,’” said Rove. Pandering to the Fox audience, he went on to contrast the righteous Christie with Bill and Hillary Clinton, as well as President Barack Obama, and to note that the IRS and Benghazi “scandals” hadn’t gotten nearly enough attention compared with Bridgegate. While Rove sticks a halo on

the man his old boss Dubya used to call “Big Boy,” everyone else might wait for the documents and testimony forthcoming from investigations at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which operate the bridge; in both chambers of the New Jersey legislature; in the Department of Justice; and in the United States Senate. Observers dazzled by Christie’s press conference performance should perhaps

See CONASON, Page A5

Fear and prayer striking close to home

The sign in the school said, “NO PRAYER IN SCHOOL (EXCEPT IN THE EVENT OF A TORNADO, A HURRICANE, OR A SHOOTING).” I think about many things. Some I have shared with you on our journey over the past 14 years. Some have made it into my computer with the intent of being shared with you, but many of these thoughts don’t make it out of my computer and into the paper. Many other thoughts never make it even into my computer. I have pushed myself to get this column out. It has been a difficult one to write to a mourning, a fearful, and a

learning what happened to your special family member. Regardless of what happened or happen to your loved RICK KRAFT one,didn’t everyone involved has a second chance ... don’t take it for granted. The world our community woke up in on Tuesday, Jan. JUST A THOUGHT 14, was different than the praying community, but let me world in which we woke up in see if I can put my thoughts on Wednesday, Jan. 15. Lives have been changed forever. together coherently. First of all, I can’t imagine Fear arrived early the morning the fear of getting word of a of Jan. 14 and it overwhelmed shooting at a school and not an awesome community. It knowing how your loved one then quickly turned to prayer has been involved. It must and hope. Yet fear continues to hover have seemed like an eternity and linger today. It is real, it is between receiving word and

present, and it is being dealt with in many different ways. We must continue to deal with it or it will rule our world and get the better of us. We fear the unknown. We fear what we don’t understand. President Franklin D. Roosevelt opened his inaugural presidential address on Saturday, March 4, 1933, with the phrase, “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” He continued, “nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance.” Over 80 years ago he hit the See THOUGHT, Page A5


LOCAL

A5

Exercise, diet and nutrition books on tap at the library Roswell Daily Record

LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

Healthy Weight Week is observed during the third week of January. Statistically, people who diet the first week of January will binge during the second week and are ready for better living by the third week. This week promotes healthy lifestyle habits that last a lifetime and prevent weight and eating problems. In conjunction, today is Rid the World of Fad Diets and Gimmicks Day and Thursday is Women’s Healthy Weight Day. The Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania, has books, DVDs, periodicals, and databases available to encourage healthy living and weight control. These include exercise, diet, nutrition, cookbooks, etc. For more infor mation, visit the library, phone 575-622-7101 or go online to the website at www.roswellpubliclibrary.org for the on-line catalog of materials and a list of resources and services provided by the library. Another way to access information is through email at rplref@roswellpubliclibrary.org using “Question” in the subject line, or by texting AskRPL to 66746. The library is open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Monday and Tuesday, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Wednesday through Saturday and from 2-6 p.m. on Sunday. Reference librarians are available to assist patrons in locating the books and information.

Book talk

New Year’s resolutions often include personal weight loss. Rosie Klopfer, interlibrary loan

Conason Continued from Page A4

ask themselves how his top aides managed to pursue this scheme — evidently in revenge against the mayor of Fort Lee, the New Jersey commuter town so badly damaged by the closing of traffic lanes — under his nose. They might ask why the governor continued to believe, as he says he did, that the controversial action resulted from a “traffic safety study” almost a month after the Port Authority’s top executive and two other PA officials testified Dec. 9, 2013, that no such study ever existed. They might further ask about the very curious photograph published by The Wall Street Journal on Jan. 14, showing Christie yukking it up in public with David Wildstein, the Port Authority official who ordered the lane closures at the behest of Bridget Anne Kelly, last Sept. 11, three days into the traffic crisis in Fort Lee. And they might then ask why Christie insisted — at the endless press conference where his candor so impressed Rove — that he has had “no contact with David Wildstein in a long time, a long time, well before the election.” Christie’s description of his supposedly distant relationship with Wildstein is only one among many of his claims of innocence that contradict either the public record or common sense, or both. While awaiting additional information from Wildstein and other potentially immunized defendants, however, it may be worth consider-

librarian, shares books to aid in the goal of maintaining weight control. Deepak Chopra is a pioneer in the field of mind-body medicine, transforming the way the world views physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, and social wellness. “What Are You Hungry For?: The Chopra Solution to Permanent Weight Loss, Well-being, and Lightness of Soul” is the manual for “higher health” that is based on both mainstream and alternative medicine. Chopra believes weight can be brought under control by linking it to personal fulfillment in every area of a reader’s life. To be truly satisfied, you need to nourish each of the following aspects: First, nourish the body with healthy food. Second, nourish the heart with love and compassion. Third, nourish the mind with knowledge. Fourth, nourish the spirit with awareness of self. He creates a vision of weight loss based on a deeper awareness of why people overeat because they are trying to find satisfaction and wind up using food as a substitute for real fulfillment. Julia VanTine joins with Anne Alexander, editorial director of Prevention, in writing “The Sugar Smart Diet: Stop Cravings and Lose Weight While Still Enjoying the Sweets You Love.” This 32day plan helps you beat food cravings, gain energy, lower your risk of heart disease and dia-

betes, and enjoy weight loss like never before; all while reclaiming the pure pleasure of sugar. Understand the attraction, the obvious and hidden sugars, and the foods that do not taste sweet but act like sugar in our bodies fueling the cravings for sugar and refined carbohydrates. Prevention is the leading healthy lifestyle magazine in the U.S. with a total readership of 8.7 million in print and more than 6 million on line. “The 3-1-2-1 Diet: Eat and Cheat Your Way to Weight Loss— Up to 10 Pounds in 21 Days” is by Dolvett Quince, celebrity trainer and star of NBC’s “The Biggest Loser.” His plan is three days of dieting and one day of cheating. No food is off limits because the plan is flexible, so you will not feel deprived. He promises that by alternating “clean” and “cheat” days (in a 3-1-2-1 ratio) and following his 48-minute workout, four times a week, readers can see substantial changes in just three weeks. Dolvett believes that if you make yourself number one, your life will fall in place. Teen girls have a busy life and little time for a fitness program. Erin Whitehead’s “The Girl’s Guide to Fitting in Fitness” aims for a whole-health perspective when it comes to fitness; focusing on nutrition, school sports, and providing flexible workouts for many different lifestyles. The book shows how easy it is to wake up earlier and sharper using yoga and relaxation techniques, the importance of eating healthier foods, and finding the little in-between moments of your day—like the commute to school, or the time between classes—to

Thought

ing the history that links Christie to Rove — and why the Republican strategist is so enamored with the New Jersey governor. Their relationship was first exposed during the Bush administration’s U.S. Attorneys scandal, when investigations of the gross political abuse of the Justice Department by the Bush White House clearly implicated Rove. Among the U.S. Attorneys cited as dubious political appointees was Christie, whose law partner, a top Bush fundraiser and Republican operative, had forwarded his resume to Rove. Later, while still in the U.S. Attorney’s office — where he stage-managed a blatantly political election-year probe of Democratic Sen. Robert Menendez — Christie consulted with Rove about running for governor. Christie is exactly the sort of presidential hopeful that a notorious bully like Rove prefers: a blustering loudmouth with a common touch; an experienced fundraiser who knows how to find the money; a Wall Street conservative capable of stirring up the base without scaring the independents. Without Christie as the GOP’s 2016 frontrunner, Rove has no plausible alternative to tea party hopefuls Rand Paul and T ed Cruz — and may see his own power, already waning, finally eclipsed. To find out more about Joe Conason, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.

Get Classified YOUR CREDIT

“We want to make you a loan”

(575)624-2929

$200 - $2,000

Continued from Page A4

nail on the head. Sometimes I think that one of the most significant measurements of a person’s life is how well they manage and overcome their fears. There have been many things in each of our lives that have not been accomplished because of fears that keep us from taking action. Fears can control a person, a family, an organization, even a community. Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “Fear defeats more people than any other one thing in the world.” Our community must be able to handle its fears and to move forward with courage. Nelson Mandela said, “I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.” John Wayne said, “Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway.” You see, courage isn’t a lack of fear. Courage is about managing your fears. Courage is about being afraid, but being able to do what you have to do anyway. On a bigger level it is about one doing what one is called to do regardless of the fears along the way. It is easy for us to play

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

incorporate a little bit of physical activity that will make a big difference. Colleen Dolphin’s “Cool Exercise: Healthy & Fun Ways to Get Your Body Moving” introduces ways for kids to move their body. There are helpful hints on incorporating healthy living in their daily life and features easy stepby-step photos and instructions on how to play games like homework buddy break or soaring disc hoops. This book is part of the “Checkerboard How-to-Library on Cool Health and Fitness” series located in the Children’s Room. The series encourages wholesome living through eating, exercises, games, and crafts. Each book introduces a cool way for kids to take care of their body and mind and shows easy step-by-step photos and instructions. The series also includes “Cool Eating: Healthy & Fun Ways to Eat Right,” “Cool Body Basics: Healthy & Fun Ways to Care for Your Body,” “Cool Sleeping: Healthy & Fun Ways to Sleep T ight” and “Cool Thinking: Healthy & Fun Ways to T rain Your Brain.” Other titles to enjoy include Tom Venuto’s “Burn the Fat, Feed the Muscle: Transform Your Body Forever Using the Secrets of the Leanest People in the World,” Jordan D. Metzl’s “The Exercise Cure: A Doctor’s All-natural, Nopill Prescription for Better Health & Longer Life” or Leslie Sansone’s DVD, “Belly Blasting Walk.”

What’s happening?

Australia Day is January 26 and commemorates the establishment of the first European settle-

the “what if?” game and to be paralyzed because of possible poor outcomes. There are people who won’t fly on a plane after 9/11. There are people who are prisoners in their own homes because of their fear of crime on the outside. There are people who never take a risk because of their fear of failure. I am not saying we should throw ourselves into zones of danger, but I am saying that we have one life to live and if we are kept from living that life to the fullest and accomplishing what we need to be accomplishing because of fear, we are missing out on our one opportunity in this world ... the opportunity to live our life and to make a difference. I have heard that 97% of what we fear never occurs. FEAR can be defined as “False Evidence Appearing Real.” Nevertheless, fear changes the direction of many lives. I do my best to avoid living a life hindered by fear. I don’t always succeed, but I recognize fear’s role in my life and I respond accordingly. I don’t really fear my life ending. In the trips I have had around the sun I have already lived a full life. I fear losing my loved ones. In response I do my best to live the days I have to the fullest with those I love in case this fear ever becomes real. I don’t want any regrets.

ment at Port Jackson, now part of Sydney, in 1788. All three story and craft hours this week will celebrate Australia. The Wednesday G’Day Mate story times begin at 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. while the Saturday story time begins at 2 p.m. The books could feature “Wonderful Animals of Australia;” “Happy Birthday, Wombat;” “Waking Up Down Under” or “Wombat Stew.” The Wednesday morning program will include songs, rhymes and body movement activities. Children attending the story portion of the program are invited to be creative with crafts such as making a paper bag platypus, creating an “Outback” scene with trees, koalas and kangaroos or assembling a koala mask to wear home. The stories and crafts may vary between programs and the quantities of some craft items may be limited.

Books Again

For those who are still striving to maintain their New Year’s resolutions, Books Again has real bargains. During January, all books related to self help, diet and exercise, cookbooks and religion are on sale for $1 each. Other non-fiction and fiction titles are priced at approximately one-fourth of the original price. Paperback books are 25 cents each. Books Again, 404 W. Second, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday through Saturday. The store is operated by Friends of the Library volunteers and all proceeds are used to benefit the Library. Parking is located behind the store.

Fear often comes from being unable to control the world around us. We seek to control the world we live in. Truth be known, there is very little of the world we can control. Life is 10% what happens to us and 90% how we respond. And I sometimes think the 10% number is high. What happened on Jan. 14 is now a historical event. None of us can change it. But we can each chose how we respond. Regardless of what happened on Jan. 14, we still have today and, God willing, tomorrow. Regardless of the days we have, we must remember that we are just passing through down here. Every generation has worried about the future. Our parents, our grandparents, our great-grandparents have worried about the direction our world is moving. They worried about what the world would be like for those who follow them. It is now our turn to worry about what the future will bring. Our worrying is expected. Our desire is as was our ancestors’, to have a better world to leave to our children and our grandchildren. How should we face this fear? We should pray and take action to make a positive difference. We need to remember in all we do that God is in control and through it all his truth will endure.

This community has been my home for the past three decades and if I live long enough, it will be my home for the next three. I know it will recover and fly higher in response to the tragic events. My challenge to you today is to not let your fears stand in the way of your dreams. We must have dreams that are bigger than our fears. God has the whole world in his hands, including each life touched by the tragedy of Jan. 14. He is ultimately in control. That is good enough for me. Let’s convert fear to prayer and our prayer into positive action and see what he has in store for us. We can respond to Jan. 14 by becoming victims or by taking action and rising above. And let’s respond to Jan. 14 with love because as I John 4:18 tells us, “There is no fear in love. But perfect love drives out fear.” With prayer and love there is nothing our great community can’t do. God bless each one of you and God bless the Roswell community. Just a thought... Rick Kraft is proud to be a member of the Roswell community and believes it is the best city on the planet in which to live. To submit comments, contributions, or ideas, e-mail to rkraft@kraftandhunter.com or write to P.O. Box 850, Roswell, NM, 88202-0850.


A6 Tuesday, January 21, 2014

OBITUARIES/WORLD

Family of man held UN rescinds talks invitation to Iran in NKorea worried SEATTLE (AP) — The family of an American missionary held more than a year in North Korea was heartbroken and encouraged by a brief news conference in which Kenneth Bae, wearing a gray cap and inmate’s uniform with the number 103 on his chest, apologized and said he committed antigovernment acts. “Our end goal is to see Kenneth reunited so he can recover emotionally and physically. He has chronic health problems,” family friend Derek Sciba told The Associated Press. Sciba is a friend of Bae’s sister, Terri Chung of Edmonds, and part of a group pushing for Bae’s release. “On the one hand it’s heartbreaking to see him in a prison uniform at the mercy of folks in North Korea, but on the other hand it’s encouraging to see him and that he’s able to speak,” Sciba said. Bae made the comments at what he called a press conference held at his own request. He was under guard during the appearance. It is not unusual for prisoners in North Korea to say after

OBITUARIES

Donald (Don) “Papaw” Wayne Prince

Funeral service for Donald (Don) “Papaw” Wayne Prince, 80, of Roswell, will be Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014, at 2 p.m. at Grace Community Church with Pastor Sean Lee officiating. Burial is to follow at South Park Cemetery. The family will be accepting visitations Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014, from 4 to 7 p.m. at Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home. Don passed away Saturday, Jan.18, 2014. He will be greatly missed by all

Bae

their release that they spoke in similar situations under duress. Bae spoke in Korean during the brief appearance, which was attended by The Associated Press and several other members of the foreign media in Pyongyang. Bae, the longest-serving American detainee in North Korea in recent years, expressed hope that the U.S. government will do its best to win his release. He said he had not been treated badly in confinement. “I believe that my problem can be solved by close cooperation and agreement between the American gover nment and the government of this country,” he said.

who knew him. Don was bor n Feb. 9, 1933, in Hollis, Okla., to W.L. Prince and Mamie Graham. Don was a member of the Lions Club, a successful business man; owned two motels, several rent houses, owned commercial properties; U-Haul, Culligan Water; invested in oil and gas; and also played football for Roswell High School in the 1950s, and played in a band. Don is survived by son, Kevin Wayne Prince, and wife, Tammy, of Roswell; daughter, Donna Jean Gutierrez, and husband, Michael, of Roswell; grandson, Jason Wayne Prince and wife, Heather, of Roswell; granddaughter, Ashley Dawn Halpain, and husband, Phillip of Quantico, Va.; sister, Wanda Rowland, of Roswell; grandchildren: Rachael Elise and Gabriel Anthony Gutierrez, of Castlerock, Colo.; nieces: Jeanne Jarvis and husband, Keith, of Lexington, Va., Tonya Nicole Brown, of Artesia, and Tanessa Evadeen Kelsey, of Artesia; close nephew, Jack Lovison, of Denver, Colo.; greatgranddaughter, Chloe Gutierrez, of Castlerock, Colo.; and numerous nieces and nephews. Don was preceded in death by his beloved wife, H. Jean Prince; his father, W.L. Prince; mother, Mamie Prince; sister, Patricia Pew; sisters: Irene Renfrow, Evalea Lovison and Meryl Prince; and brothers: Erdman Prince and J.W. Prince.

GENEVA (AP) — A lastminute U.N. invitation for Iran to join this week’s Syria peace talks threw the long-awaited Geneva conference into doubt Monday, forcing U.N. chief Ban Kimoon to rescind his offer under intense U.S. pressure after the opposition threatened to boycott. With the invitation withdrawn, the main Westernbacked opposition group said it would attend the talks aimed at ending Syria’s ruinous three-year civil war. The opposition said the conference should seek to establish a transitional government with full executive powers “in which killers and criminals do not participate.”

Ban Ki-moon

The surprise invitation, extended Sunday by the U.N. secretary-general, set off a flurry of diplomatic activity to salvage the talks. The U.S. said the of fer should be rescinded, and the opposition threatened to skip the event entirely.

Roswell Daily Record

The conference is set to begin Wednesday in the Swiss luxury resort city of Montreux, with high-ranking delegations from the United States, Russia and close to 40 other countries attending. Face-to-face negotiations between the Syrian government and its opponents — the first of the uprising — are to start Friday in Geneva. The uproar over Iran’s invitation put the entire event at risk of being scuttled. The Syrian National Coalition, which had voted late Saturday to attend after months of rancorous debate, issued an ultimatum, saying that Iran must commit publicly within

hours to withdraw its “troops and militias” from Syria and abide by a 2012 roadmap to establish a transitional government. Otherwise, the group said, the U.N. should withdraw its invitation for Tehran to take part.

The confusion surrounding the Iranian invitation underscored the tenuous nature of the diplomatic ef fort to end the bloody conflict, which has morphed from peaceful protests into a vicious civil war with outside powers backing rebels who are fighting not only the government but rival insurgents as well.

Founder of Sipapu ski resort dies at 86

VADITO (AP) — Lloyd Bolander, the founder of Sipapu Ski and Summer Resort in norther n New Mexico, died Monday at his home in Vadito. He was 86.

The resort announced Bolander’s death but did not provide any details about the cause. Bolander’s family said they will announce at a later date how they plan to commemorate his life.

Sipapu managing partner James Coleman said Bolander never stopped learning and striving to be his best. The native New

Pallbearers will be Jason Prince, Phillip Halpain, Joe DeLosSantos, Jeff Dodge, Keith Hickman, and Chuck Haydon. Honorary pallbearers will be McDonald’s Coffee Buddies. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online register at andersonbethany.com. Services are under the direction of AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

Mexican impacted the lives of tens of thousands of people through his work on the slopes, Coleman said.

“Lloyd was one of the last true pioneers of New Mexico. He and Olive had a vision for their family and community that they successfully brought to fruition through their vibrant spirits and sheer determination,” Coleman said, referring to Bolander’s wife. “That vision is carried on by his children and those of us that are blessed to be a part of his family.” Bolander grew up in

sister, Lilly, of Roswell. He was preceded in death by his mother, Marie Sena, and father, Benjamin Chavez, and his brother, Leonard, who we are sure to believe that they are together building race cars and rat rods. You are loved and will always be missed by so many.

Charles Atwood

Services are pending at LaGrone Funeral Chapel for Charles Atwood, 85, of Roswell, who passed away on Jan. 18, 2014. A complete announcement will be made when arrangements are finalized. Condolences can be made online at lagronefuneralchapels.com. Arrangements are under the direction and personal care of LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

Avie C. Chavez Sr.

Avie C. Chavez Sr. passed away on Dec. 31, 2013. He leaves behind his wife of 50 years, Toni; a daughter, Barnadette, of Los Lunas; his son, Avie Jr., of Albuquerque; daughter, Loretta, of Roswell, and his loving eight grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren, who he adored. He is survived by his brothers: Louis and David, of Santa Fe, Frankie, of Albuquerque, and Donald, of Willard; and his favorite

Penasco and began skiing at age 3. In 1950, he and his wife, Olive, bought 13 acres in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Two years later, they opened the ski area, charging at first 50 cents per lift ticket. Over the years, they replaced the lifts, put in new trails and built by hand the resort’s slope-side lodging. Eventually they opened a rental shop, restaurant and store. His family said he was most passionate about teaching others to ski.

Sacramento, Calif.; 10 grandchildren and 26 great-grandchildren. Dena was preceded in death by two children: Jerry Ingram and Patricia Penn; two brothers: Larry and Gerald Ervin; and a sister, Earlene Ervin. Family will serve as pallbearers. Please take a moment to share your thoughts and memories with the family in the online register at andersonbethany.com. Services are under the direction of AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

Dena M. Cox

Graveside service for Dena M. Cox, 81, of Roswell, will be Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, at 11 a.m. at South Park Cemetery. Dena passed away Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014. Dena was born Sept. 19, 1933, in Hamlin, Texas, to William Earl Ervin and Mary Hazel Panders. Dena is survived by her husband of 50 years, Bobby J. Cox, of the family home; daughter, Beverly Estes and W.A., of San Angelo, Texas; daughter, Susan Koon and Robbin, of Roswell; daughter-in-law, Jo Nell Ingram, of Ruidoso; brother, Don Ervin, of

Gary Wayne Russell

Graveside services are scheduled for 2 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 24, 2014, at South Park Cemetery for Gary Wayne Russell, 54, of Roswell, who passed away on Jan. 16, 2014. Rev. Troy Grant of Berrendo Baptist Church will officiate. Gary Wayne Russell was born in Roswell, on March 5, 1959, to JB and Martha Pearlene Russell. He went to school in Roswell. He

Bolander and his wife retired from their daily duties at the resort in 1984, but Bolander visited regularly and often helped his daughter with ski school lessons.

Bolander and his wife were inducted into the New Mexico Ski Hall of Fame in 2004, and he was recognized by the Professional Ski Instructors Association last spring for 55 years of service.

Bolander is survived by his wife, his daughter and son, four grandsons and seven great-grandchildren.

was a mechanic and truck driver all of his life. He had three children: Richard Scoggins, Gary Southern, and Ashley Southern; and four grandchildren. He loved music and his favorite song was “Crystal Chandelier.” Gary found a second dad in his cousin James Hawthor ne, with whom he enjoyed working on cars and sharing stories.

Gary gave his heart to God at home in Jal, in 2009. Though he wasn’t an active member of any church, he loved God and shared a relationship with him. In his final days, Gary insisted on letting his family know he loved each and every one of them.

He is also survived by seven brothers: Johnnie Russell, of Roswell, Lester Russell, of Artesia, Willie Russell, of Roswell, Raymond Russell, of Jal, Michael Russell, of Roswell, Adam Russell, of Levelland, Texas, and Rodney Russell, of Muleshoe, Texas; one sister: Angela Russell, of Clovis; and numerous nieces and nephews.

Pallbearers will be the Russell Brothers.

Condolences may be made online at lagronefuneralchapels.com. Arrangements are under the personal care of LaGrone Funeral Chapel.

DONALD PRINCE

RECYCLE THIS PAPER

Grace Community Church & South Park Cemetery Funeral Services Thursday, January 23 2:00 PM

DENA COX

South Park Cemetery Graveside Services Thursday, January 21 11:00 AM


BUSINESS REVIEW

Roswell Daily Record

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

A7

Shown here is the owner of Gilbert’s Landscaping and Tree Service, Gilbert Bachicha Sr., his son Gilbert Bachicha Jr., and Gilbert senior’s daughter Aliyah Bachicha. They are standing in front of the North Springs townhomes, where Gilbert is contracted. To reach Gilbert’s Landscaping, call 575-626-0052.

Gilbert’s Landscaping and Tree Service, serving Roswell for 25 years

Gilbert, a landscape maintenance specialist and owner of Gilbert’s Landscaping has been a proud resident of Roswell for fourty-nine years, and has twenty- five years of experience in landscaping and Tree Service. Along with his son Gilbert Bachicha Jr., his daughter Aliyah and a few other crew members they will work to form, finish, and maintain your landscape. Contracted with North Springs Town-houses, Gilbert also offers services to the rest of the community of Roswell. Some of the services he provides are: •Lawn care •Weed Control •Tree pruning/removal •Shrub work •Sprinkler maintenance •Rock work •Flagstone •Landscape design/ re-design •Outdoor turf installation •Fencing •Sod or seeding lawn •Concrete landscaping/curbing •Property clean-up

•Landscaping- upgrade and install Gilbert’s Landscaping offers reasonable rates, free estimates, and senior citizen discounts to the community of Roswell. To get in touch with Gilbert’s Landscaping call 575-626-0052 for reasonable rates and quality landscaping service.

Keep your hedges trimmed and your yard looking maintained by calling Gilbert’s Landscaping.

Shown here are some Juniper hedges on the west side of North Springs that Gilbert did trim work on.

Here shown is a flowering shrub that Gilbert’s Landscaping maintains.

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900 S. Main St. Roswell, New Mexico 88203

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A8 Tuesday, January 21, 2014

ENTERTAINMENT / WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Sunny, but cold

Tonight

Clear and cold

Wednesday

Partly sunny

National Cities

Thursday

Friday

Mostly sunny; much colder

Partly sunny

Saturday

Sunday

Milder with some sun

A full day of sunshine

Monday

Clouds and sun; warmer

High 61°

Low 22°

66°/28°

41°/17°

45°/21°

60°/28°

62°/29°

73°/30°

WSW at 3-6 mph POP: 0%

SW at 3-6 mph POP: 0%

NNW at 12-25 mph POP: 0%

WNW at 4-8 mph POP: 25%

WSW at 6-12 mph POP: 0%

NW at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

NW at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

NNW at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 69°/28° Normal high/low ............... 56°/26° Record high ................ 80° in 1911 Record low .................. -2° in 1963 Humidity at noon .................. 10%

Farmington 49/16

Clayton 63/29

Raton 60/18

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Mon. Month to date ....................... Normal month to date .......... Year to date .......................... Normal year to date .............

0.00" 0.00" 0.24" 0.00" 0.24"

Santa Fe 51/24

Gallup 52/9

Tucumcari 62/25

Albuquerque 54/27

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 60/27

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 53/33

T or C 56/29

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed. Last

Jan 23

Rise Set 7:00 a.m. 5:19 p.m. 7:00 a.m. 5:20 p.m. Rise Set 10:35 p.m. 9:49 a.m. 11:33 p.m. 10:23 a.m. New

Jan 30

First

Feb 6

Full

Feb 14

Alamogordo 57/26

Silver City 55/30

ROSWELL 61/22 Carlsbad 60/28

Hobbs 58/31

Las Cruces 56/29

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ### You will feel great, and a partner might appear to be in the same mood — at least until a hot issue is broached. Then, you could find out otherwise. Your ability to draw out others emerges. You know the right move to make. Tonight: Say “yes” to an offer. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ### Your efforts make a difference, yet an associate could have a negative attitude. Fortunately, this person does not rule the world. A friend might share his or her thoughts. Listen carefully, as he or she will be coming from an intuitive level. Tonight: Get some exercise. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) #### You will find a situation provocative. You might feel as if a boss is making assumptions that may not be grounded. Know that you

‘Sleepy Hollow’ star teases ‘revelations’ NEW YORK (AP) — British actor T om Mison, who plays Ichabod Crane on the Fox series “Sleepy Hollow,” predicts fans are in for a sleepless night. Mison said in a recent interview that in the two-hour Season 1 finale, airing Monday at 8 p.m. EST, “There will be so many revelations and so many shocks that you’ll want to stay up and scream at a wall and probably hit your head against a wall and so many surprises that you’re gonna kick yourself that you didn’t see some of these coming.” It might sound dramatic, but the actor said he believes the fans will be surprised because of clues they likely missed along the way. “The seeds have been sewn thr oughout the season, clues as to what’s coming, and as far as I know nobody’s r eally guessed anything,” Mison said.

Roswell Daily Record

“Sleepy Hollow” is described as a retelling of the Washington Irving short story but set in the modern day. Ichabod has awoken two centuries after being killed in the Revolutionary War. He must adjust to this new time period, battle the headless horseman and prevent the looming apocalypse. “There’s nothing else like it r eally,” Mison said. “If you’re a fan of procedurals then you’ll like it. If you’re a fan of horror then you’ll like it.” Plus it’s funny, especially as Ichabod tries to get comfortable in the 21st century. One especially humorous scene featur es him pouring his heart out to the OnStar voice in a car. The cast and crew are on hiatus before Season 2 begins filming.

Fallon, Crystal among Leno’s final guests

PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — Jay Leno will close out his 22year run as host of NBC’s the “Tonight” show with a nod to the future and to the past. His heir apparent, Jimmy Fallon, will kick off Leno’s final week with a guest appearance on Feb. 3. Fallon is taking over the gig after hosting NBC’s “Late Night” since 2009. Leno’s final night, on Feb. 6, will feature Billy Crystal, who was Leno’s first guest in May 1992 when he succeeded Johnny Carson. Country superstar Garth Brooks will also appear. Leno’s last week will also include Betty White, Matthew McConaughey, Sandra Bullock, country singer Blake Shelton, musician Lyle Lovett and NBA Hall of Famer Charles Barkley. Fallon starts his run on Feb. 17 during the second week of the network’s Olympics coverage. As a result, the “Tonight” show will air at midnight following the nightly games coverage from Sochi, Russia. On Feb. 24, the show will revert to its regular 11:35 p.m. slot. NBC Entertainment president Robert Greenblatt is hoping to continue the network’s relationship with Leno after he leaves late night. “I would love him to do specials with us, and we’ve got ideas about other sorts of shows he can host,” Greenblatt said Sunday at the Television Critics Association meeting. “As he told me recently, NBC has really been his only home.”

Regional Cities Today Wed. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

57/26/s 54/27/s 46/12/s 61/28/s 60/28/s 45/16/s 63/29/s 46/19/s 60/27/s 58/25/s 52/25/s 49/16/s 52/9/s 58/31/s 56/29/s 56/27/s 50/28/s 55/23/s 60/32/s 61/28/s 53/15/s 60/18/s 43/11/s 61/22/s 53/33/s 51/24/s 55/30/s 56/29/s 62/25/s 52/28/s

60/30/pc 54/28/pc 45/11/pc 66/38/pc 68/40/pc 42/18/pc 51/16/s 50/23/pc 60/19/s 60/28/pc 53/28/pc 48/22/pc 53/14/pc 65/28/pc 59/33/pc 55/15/pc 49/24/pc 56/27/pc 64/26/pc 60/21/s 52/19/pc 53/16/s 42/10/pc 66/28/pc 57/24/pc 51/22/pc 57/31/pc 58/30/pc 57/22/s 51/25/pc

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE

don’t have to respond to this person’s projections. Be willing to blaze a new trail, and you’ll feel better about your choices. Tonight: Up late. CANCER (June 21-July 22) #### Opt to be with a close friend or associate. Get to the bottom of a problem that might be bothering you. You will know whether the information you are given is correct. How you feel could change dramatically. Tonight: Go along with someone else’s suggestion. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) #### You’ll want to have a friendly chat with a difficult roommate, close friend or loved one. You could find that this person tends to disengage when you start to talk. As a result, you might wonder whether this discussion should be postponed. Tonight: Hang out with a friend. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ### You will jump into a situation without hesitation. Sometimes it is best to allow others to find out what works; they need to go through a similar process to what you did. A partner could be very distracted, which will make it difficult to communicate. Tonight: Relax. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) #### You are energized. A child or loved one adores you wild, creative imagination. This person would be delighted to see this facet of your personality emerge. Keep it light. Be aware of the costs of

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

37/32/sh 44/17/pc 25/8/sn 20/10/sn 49/15/c 9/-2/sf 14/6/sf 50/33/s 58/27/s 10/-2/pc 57/34/s 81/70/pc 58/31/s 16/0/sn 22/18/pc 66/45/s 82/54/pc 59/26/s

38/33/r 38/27/s 19/10/pc 16/5/sn 32/18/pc 12/1/sn 14/8/sf 63/34/s 48/16/s 15/3/sn 61/36/pc 79/62/sh 63/46/s 17/-3/sf 33/2/pc 68/45/pc 84/54/pc 63/19/s

U.S. Extremes

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

76/52/sh 58/31/s -2/-3/pc 57/31/s 22/8/sn 16/13/pc 75/38/pc 24/8/sn 77/49/s 15/-1/sn 45/34/c 45/16/r 16/11/pc 41/24/s 75/52/pc 45/41/c 74/45/s 28/11/sn

63/48/s 65/28/pc 6/-14/c 50/38/s 15/8/pc 24/-6/pc 54/35/s 17/9/pc 74/43/pc 12/5/sf 46/35/c 28/17/pc 32/5/pc 39/24/c 74/51/pc 47/39/c 71/42/pc 21/14/pc

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 85° San Pasqual Valley, Calif. Low: -22°................. Fosston, Minn.

High: 73° ..........................Carlsbad Low: 4° ........................... Angel Fire

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

0s

Precipitation Stationary

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

pursuing what appears to be a fun plan. Tonight: Act as if there were no tomorrow. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ### You could feel tense, as others seem to demand that rules be loosened up some. You might feel somewhat vulnerable and choose to withdraw within. You can’t control others, nor should you try. A psychic thought will come your way. Tonight: Early to bed. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ### You will be focused on a key matter revolving around a friend or a significant meeting. How you handle it and the end results could color your thinking about the whole situation. Emphasize what you want, and speak your mind. Tonight: Where the gang is. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) #### You might want to get to know someone in power better. You both have very different approaches that are effective. A family matter or a domestic issue could trigger unexpected happenings. Go with the flow. Tonight: Burn the candle at both ends. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) #### You might feel more in harmony with someone at distance than you do with many other people. You can’t deny what exists between you. You are intuitive with this person, as is he or she with you. An unexpected call makes you smile. Tonight: Catch up on a friend’s news. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) #### You succeed best when you work closely with someone else. You know what is workable and what needs to happen. Though you tend to come up with ideas from out of left field, this person sees value in them. Tonight: Visit with a favorite person over dinner. BORN TODAY Military commander Stonewall Jackson (1824), fashion designer Christian Dior (1905), golfer Jack Nicklaus (1940)


SPORTS

Tuesday, January 21, 2014 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

DENVER BRONCOS

Roswell Daily Record

Section

SEATTLE SEAHAWKS

SUPER B WL XLVIII Peyton Manning’s Denver Broncos and Richard Sherman’s Seattle Seahawks were the NFL’s best all season, so it’s fitting that they’ll meet in the Super Bowl. Nobody scored as many points or gained as many yards as the Broncos. Nobody allowed as few points or gave up as few yards as the Seahawks. And nobody won as many games as those clubs, either. What a way to finish the season. When the AFC champion Broncos (15-3) play the NFC champion Seahawks (15-3) on Feb. 2 at what could be a chilly MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., it will be the first Super Bowl since 1991 pitting the league’s highest-scoring team in the regular season against the team that was scored on the least, according to STATS. It’s also only the second time in the last 20 Super Bowls that the No. 1 seed in each conference reached the NFL championship game. “It will be a great matchup,” Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said. “I think it’s an extraordinary opportunity to go against a guy that set all the records in the history of the game.” That, of course, would be Manning, the 37-year-old quarterback who is the only four -time NFL MVP — and no one would be sur-

Eric Decker

B

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

prised if No. 5 arrives the night before the Super Bowl. He established marks by throwing for 55 touchdowns and 5,477 yards, helping Denver lead the league with 37.9 points and 457.3 yards per game. Manning is an inescapable pitchman, too, seen Sunday after Sunday during TV commercials. Hey, there he was selling cars during breaks in the broadcast of the NFC title game. Expect even more face time now. Manning’s oft-told tale, certain to be repeated a million times in the coming days, includes his comeback from a series of surgical procedures to his neck, attempts to cure problems that led him to sit out the entire 2011 season. That also led the Indianapolis Colts to send him packing despite two Super Bowl appearances with that club, including a title in 2007. Richard “It’s certainly well-docSherman umented what my journey the past 2 1⁄2 years has been,” said Manning, who could become the first starting QB to lead two franchises to titles, “but this team’s overcome a lot of obstacles this year.” See XLVIII, Page B3

AP Photos

Creighton upsets No. 4 ’Nova MEN’S BASKETBALL

Champ’s finally in AP Photo

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) — Champ Bailey finally gets a chance to live up to his name. The 12-time Pro Bowler is headed to his first Super Bowl in his 15th — and most trying — NFL season, one in which he missed 11 games and parts of two others because of a nagging foot injury. “It hurt not being out there,” Bailey said after Denver topped New England in the AFC championship game, “but here I am. I’m on the field and my team’s still in the running.

That’s what it’s all about.” Bailey’s subdued celebration and measured reaction in delirious Denver stood in stark contrast to the scene in Seattle later Sunday night, where Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman stole the spotlight with his game-saving deflection, his taunting of Michael Crabtree and his television rant on the field afterward. The two contrasting styles will draw much attention in the days leading up to the Super Bowl See FINALLY, Page B3

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Ethan Wragge tied a school record with nine 3-pointers for all 27 points, Doug McDermott hit five 3s and scored 23 points, and Creighton set a team mark with 21 3-pointers in a 96-68 victory over No. 4 Villanova on Monday night. The Bluejays (16-3, 6-1 Big East) topped the school record of 20 3s set in 2005 against Chattanooga. Kyle Korver hit nine 3s against Evansville on Jan. 15, 2003. The Bluejays set a Big East record for most 3s in a game. They hit their first nine 3s and never looked back against Villanova (16-2, 5-1) which had romped its way toward its highest ranking in four years. They made 21 of 35 3-pointers and led by as many as 40 points. Wragge hit eight 3s in the first half and Creighton built a 28-point lead. Wragge tied Korver’s record with his ninth 3-pointer with 13:59 left for a 68-45 lead. McDermott followed with his third 3 and Austin Chatman hit one the next time down for the

See UPSET, Page B3

Creighton’s Doug McDermott (3) puts up a shot against Villanova’s Ryan Arcidiacono during their game, Monday.

Mavericks hang on to beat Cavs

CLEVELAND (AP) — The Dallas Mavericks spent most of Monday afternoon playing as if they had a point to prove. They spent the final minutes barely hanging on for a narrow victory. The Mavericks squandered nearly all of a 24-point lead before finally subduing the Cleveland Cavaliers for a 102-97 win. What appeared to be an easy day turned into a white-knuckler for Dallas coach Rick Carlisle, whose team bounced back from its worst performance of the season in a home loss to Portland on Saturday. “We did a good job of holding them off at the end,” Carlisle said. “We got it done. That’s the bottom line.” Monta Ellis scored 22 points, Shawn Marion added 18 and the Mavericks had six players in double figures, but the game was in doubt until the final seconds. T railing 100-97 with 2.8 seconds

AP Photo

Cleveland’s Luol Deng, right, looks for help as Dallas’ Jose Calderon defends during their game, Monday. Calderon and the Mavericks held on to beat the Cavaliers 102-97.

LOCAL SCHEDULE — TUESDAY, JAN. 21 — • Gateway Chr. at NMMI, 6:30 p.m. • Lake Arthur at Jal, 6:30 p.m. • Ruidoso at Dexter, 7 p.m. • Hagerman at Tatum, 7 p.m. • Mescalero Apache at Hondo Valley, 7 p.m. • Goddard at Lovington, 7 p.m. • Hobbs at Roswell, 7 p.m. BOYS BASKETBALL

AP Photo

• Lake Arthur at Jal, 5 p.m. • Hagerman at Tatum, 5:30 p.m. • Mescalero Apache at Hondo Valley, 5:30 p.m. • Lovington at Goddard, 7 p.m. • Roswell at Hobbs, 7 p.m. GIRLS BASKETBALL

• Carlsbad at Goddard, 6 p.m. PREP WRESTLING

SPOTLIGHT

remaining, the Cavaliers were called for a five-second violation when Jarrett Jack failed to get the ball inbounds. Ellis put the game away with two free throws with 1.1 seconds left. Carlisle called Saturday’s loss, in which the Mavericks trailed by 38 points early in the fourth quarter, “beyond embarrassing.” And while Monday’s game had too much drama, Carlisle was happy to get out of town with a win. “It’s the NBA,” he said “It’s supposed to get hairy.” “This was a big bounce-back win from an embarrassing loss the other day,” Ellis said. “We’ll be a great team if we continue to play like that with our back against the wall when we face adversity.” Kyrie Irving led Cleveland with 26 See HANG ON, Page B4

ON

SPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN ... 1921 — Kenesaw Mountain Landis takes office as 1979 — Terry Bradshaw throws four touchdown baseball’s commissioner. passes to lead the Pittsburgh Steelers to their third 1953 — Dizzy Dean and Al Simmons are elected Super Bowl win, a 35-31 victory over the Dallas to the Baseball Hall of Fame. The baseball writers Cowboys. Bradshaw, the game’s MVP, completes 17 pass over Joe DiMaggio in his first year of eligibility. of 30 passes for 318 yards. 1954 — For the first time in NBA All-Star history, an 2007 — Lovie Smith becomes the first black head overtime period is needed. Boston’s Bob Cousy coach to make it to the Super Bowl when his Chicago scores 10 points in the overtime to give the East a 98- Bears win the NFC championship. Tony Dungy joins 93 victory and Cousy the MVP honors. him when his Indianapolis Colts take the AFC title.


B2 Tuesday, January 21, 2014

SPORTS

Super Bowl XLVIII: Denver slight favorite early

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Oddsmakers had trouble picking the favorite in what figures to be one of the most evenly matched — and heavily bet — Super Bowls ever. Bettors knew who they wanted, though, putting early money on Denver and making the Broncos a slight favorite to beat the Seattle Seahawks in most of this city’s legal betting parlors. Denver was favored by 1 point at several books in the early betting, while others had the Broncos as high as a 3-point pick. The move to the Broncos came after some books had initially made the Seahawks as much as a 2-

Local

Girls basketball

NMMI 54, Gateway Christian 23 Three Colts scored in double figures and NMMI climbed above .500 with win over visiting Gateway Christian at the Godfrey Athletic Center, Monday. Lia Herrera and Katie Flury each hit triples in the opening quarter as NMMI built a 10-2 lead. The Colts pushed the lead to 25-7 by the break and led 39-18 after three quarters. Herrera led all scorers with 13 points, while Chandler Hawkins and Sierra Walker each chipped in 12 for the Colts. NMMI improved to 6-5 with the win. Savannah Fox led the Warriors (3-5) with nine points.

Dexter 44, Capitan 37 CAPITAN — Dexter snapped a fourgame losing skid and won its first game in 2014 with a road victory over Capitan, Monday. The Demons built a three-point lead through one and led by that margin at halftime after the two teams deadlocked at 11 in the second. Dexter pulled away in the third, outscoring the host Tigers 14-8 for a 30-21 lead. Alex Zambrano paced the Demons (910) with 17 points, while Nayely Anderson poured in 13.

Men’s basketball

Howard 59, NMMI 52 BIG SPRING, Texas — The Broncos outscored the host Hawks 35-28 in the second half, but it wasn’t enough on Monday. The 21st-ranked Hawks outscored NMMI 31-17 in the opening half, but the Broncos rallied in the second half. They cut the deficit to six down the stretch, but could get no closer. NMMI (10-8, 0-6 WJCAC) made just 3 of 15 from the charity stripe in the loss. Biron Joseph led NMMI with 17 points. Marcus Roper added 15, and Will Joyce had seven points and 10 rebounds.

College basketball

The AP Top 25 By The Associated Press The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ college basketball poll, with firstplace votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 19, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25thplace vote and last week’s ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Prv 1. Arizona (61) . . . . . . . .18-0 1,621 1 2. Syracuse (4) . . . . . . . .18-0 1,559 2 3. Michigan St. . . . . . . . .17-1 1,497 4 4. Villanova . . . . . . . . . . .16-1 1,377 6 5. Wichita St. . . . . . . . . . .19-0 1,368 5 6. Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . .15-2 1,303 7 7. San Diego St. . . . . . . .16-1 1,211 10 8. Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . .13-4 1,117 15 9. Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . .16-2 1,074 3 10. Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15-3 1,041 14 11. Oklahoma St. . . . . . . .15-3 971 9 12. Louisville . . . . . . . . . .16-3 804 18 13. UMass . . . . . . . . . . . .16-1 781 16 14. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . .13-4 769 13 15. Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .17-2 736 19 16. Iowa St. . . . . . . . . . . .14-3 644 8 17. Ohio St. . . . . . . . . . . .15-3 549 11 18. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-4 447 23 19. Saint Louis . . . . . . . . .17-2 421 24 20. Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . .16-2 419 22 21. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . .13-4 362 — 22. Kansas St. . . . . . . . . .14-4 221 — 23. Memphis . . . . . . . . . .13-4 201 17 24. Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . .13-4 170 12 25. Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . .14-4 111 25 Others receiving votes: Creighton 98, UConn 62, Gonzaga 59, California 44, Colorado 26, UCLA 23, Harvard 12, George Washington 8, Missouri 6, Texas 5, Xavier 4, SMU 2, New Mexico 1, Virginia 1.

USA Today Top 25 Poll The top 25 teams in the USA Today men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 19, points based on 25 points for a firstplace vote through one point for a 25thplace vote and previous ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Pvs 1. Arizona (30) . . . . . . . .18-0 798 1 2. Syracuse (2) . . . . . . . .18-0 769 2 3. Michigan State . . . . . .17-1 736 4 4. Wichita State . . . . . . . .19-0 695 5 5. Villanova . . . . . . . . . . .16-1 657 6 6. Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . .15-2 639 7 7. San Diego State . . . . .16-1 594 11 8. Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . .16-2 506 3 9. Louisville . . . . . . . . . . .16-3 493 14 10. Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15-3 455 16 11. Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . .13-4 454 18 12. UMass . . . . . . . . . . . .16-1 444 15 12. Oklahoma State . . . . .15-3 444 8 14. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . .13-4 371 12 15. Ohio State . . . . . . . . .15-3 326 9 16. Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . .17-2 253 23 17. Iowa State . . . . . . . . .14-3 246 10 18. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-4 245 20 19. Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . .16-2 218 21 20. Saint Louis . . . . . . . . .17-2 176 —

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Tuesday, Jan. 21 MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. ESPN — Indiana at Michigan St. ESPN2 — Kansas St. at Texas ESPNU — Missouri at LSU 7 p.m. ESPN — Texas A&M at Kentucky ESPNU — Georgia Tech at Boston College FS1 — Butler at Providence NHL HOCKEY 6 p.m. NBCSN — Minnesota at Dallas TENNIS 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, quarterfinals, at Melbourne, Australia 1:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, men’s or women’s quarterfinal, at Melbourne, Australia WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 5 p.m. FS1 — Oklahoma at Iowa St.

point pick in the game. “We’re just trying to figure out what the market will be and get a feel of where money will go,” said Jay Kornegay, who runs the LVH sports book and initially had the Seahawks favored. “At this point it doesn’t take a lot to move the line.” At the South Point sports book, Jimmy Vaccaro was on the phone talking about where he thought the line was going to go when a bettor came to the window and put $25,000 on the Broncos. That moved the game from pick ‘em to the Broncos being favored by 1 point, as the odds were adjusted to take in the bet.

21. Gonzaga . . . . . . . . . .16-3 22. Memphis . . . . . . . . . .13-4 23. Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . .13-4 24. Creighton . . . . . . . . . .15-3 25. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . .13-4 25. Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . .14-4

140 134 129 99 88 88

24 17 13 19 — —

Others receiving votes: Kansas State 81, California 23, Colorado 18, Missouri 16, UConn 12, Virginia 12, Oregon 11, George Washington 7, UCLA 7, Southern Miss. 5, Texas 5, Toledo 3, Harvard 1, Stephen F. Austin 1, Xavier 1.

Golf

World Golf Ranking By The Associated Press Through Jan. 19 1. Tiger Woods . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 2. Adam Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . .AUS 3. Henrik Stenson . . . . . . . . . .SWE 4. Phil Mickelson . . . . . . . . . . .USA 5. Justin Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . .ENG 6. Zach Johnson . . . . . . . . . . .USA 7. Rory McIlroy . . . . . . . . . . . .NIR 8. Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 9. Steve Stricker . . . . . . . . . . .USA 10. Jason Day . . . . . . . . . . . . .AUS 11. Sergio Garcia . . . . . . . . . . .ESP 12. Ian Poulter . . . . . . . . . . . . .ENG 13. Jason Dufner . . . . . . . . . . .USA 14. Brandt Snedeker . . . . . . . .USA 15. Dustin Johnson . . . . . . . . .USA 16. Graeme McDowell . . . . . . .NIR 17. Jordan Spieth . . . . . . . . . . .USA 18. Charl Schwartzel . . . . . . . .SAF 19. Webb Simpson . . . . . . . . . .USA 20. Luke Donald . . . . . . . . . . . .ENG 21. Jim Furyk . . . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 22. Keegan Bradley . . . . . . . . .USA 23. Thomas Bjorn . . . . . . . . . . .DEN 24. Hideki Matsuyama . . . . . . .JPN 25. Jamie Donaldson . . . . . . . .WAL 26. Lee Westwood . . . . . . . . . .ENG 27. Louis Oosthuizen . . . . . . . .SAF 28. Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 29. Ernie Els . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SAF 30. Bubba Watson . . . . . . . . . .USA 31. Victor Dubuisson . . . . . . . .FRA 32. Jimmy Walker . . . . . . . . . . .USA 33. Ryan Moore . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 34. Nick Watney . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 35. Hunter Mahan . . . . . . . . . .USA 36. G. Fernandez-Castano . . . .ESP 37. Miguel Angel Jimenez . . . .ESP 38. Kevin Streelman . . . . . . . . .USA 39. Graham DeLaet . . . . . . . . .CAN 40. Billy Horschel . . . . . . . . . . .USA 41. Patrick Reed . . . . . . . . . . .USA 42. Francesco Molinari . . . . . . .ITA 43. Joost Luiten . . . . . . . . . . . .NED 44. Martin Kaymer . . . . . . . . . .GER 46. Harris English . . . . . . . . . . .USA 47. Thongchai Jaidee . . . . . . . .THA 48. Jonas Blixt . . . . . . . . . . . . .SWE 49. Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 50. Branden Grace . . . . . . . . . .SAF 51. David Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . .ENG 52. Rickie Fowler . . . . . . . . . . .USA 53. Pablo Larrazabal . . . . . . . .ESP 54. Peter Hanson . . . . . . . . . . .SWE 55. Richard Sterne . . . . . . . . . .SAF 56. Boo Weekley . . . . . . . . . . .USA 57. Gary Woodland . . . . . . . . .USA 58. Bernd Wiesberger . . . . . . .AUT 59. Scott Piercy . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 60. Kiradech Aphibarnrat . . . . .THA 61. Brendon de Jonge . . . . . . .ZIM 62. D.A. Points . . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 63. Bo Van Pelt . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 64. Stephen Gallacher . . . . . . .SCO 65. Hyung-Sung Kim . . . . . . . .KOR 66. Peter Uihlein . . . . . . . . . . .USA 67. Angel Cabrera . . . . . . . . . .ARG 68. Marc Leishman . . . . . . . . .AUS 69. Thorbjorn Olesen . . . . . . . .DEN 70. Koumei Oda . . . . . . . . . . . .JPN 71. Ryan Palmer . . . . . . . . . . .USA 72. Roberto Castro . . . . . . . . . .USA 73. Ross Fisher . . . . . . . . . . . .ENG 74. Nicolas Colsaerts . . . . . . . .BEL 75. Charles Howell III . . . . . . . .USA

11.05 9.06 8.85 7.16 6.78 6.42 6.40 6.08 5.42 5.08 5.04 5.02 4.93 4.86 4.75 4.73 4.69 4.61 4.43 4.41 4.28 4.13 3.76 3.74 3.46 3.44 3.44 3.34 3.34 3.26 3.24 3.22 3.15 3.08 3.01 2.89 2.78 2.78 2.74 2.70 2.64 2.64 2.63 2.61 2.57 2.56 2.56 2.54 2.51 2.50 2.48 2.36 2.27 2.26 2.23 2.22 2.18 2.09 2.07 2.05 1.99 1.99 1.97 1.96 1.94 1.92 1.90 1.88 1.87 1.79 1.78 1.75 1.74 1.73

PGA Tour FedExCup Leaders By The Associated Press Through Jan. 19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Points Money 1. Jimmy Walker . . . . . .1,233 $2,417,833 2. Chris Kirk . . . . . . . . . . .931 $1,777,358 3. Harris English . . . . . . .896 $1,816,397 4. Zach Johnson . . . . . . .810 $1,699,450 5. Webb Simpson . . . . . .795 $1,690,417 6. Ryan Moore . . . . . . . . .714 $1,690,350 7. Dustin Johnson . . . . . .639 $1,598,750 8. Patrick Reed . . . . . . . .583 $1,154,250 9. Brian Stuard . . . . . . . .574 $1,175,800 10. Jason Bohn . . . . . . . .455 $889,780 11. Charles Howell III . . .419 $819,272 12. Ryan Palmer . . . . . . .387 $763,468 13. Gary Woodland . . . . .386 $907,660 14. Scott Brown . . . . . . . .369 $661,910 15. Jordan Spieth . . . . . .355 $755,000 16. Chris Stroud . . . . . . .355 $772,818 17. Vijay Singh . . . . . . . .346 $593,400

Golf scores

“Take your best shot,” Vaccaro said. “It’s an intriguing matchup with no clear cut favorite.” Time was just running out in Seattle’s win over the San Francisco 49ers when the first odds for the Super Bowl were posted at most books. Bettors quickly reacted by putting most of the early money on the Broncos in an initial burst of enthusiasm for a game so even that some think it will break the record of $98.9 million bet in Nevada’s legal sports books last year. “It’s incredible already, they’re lined up betting this game like it started a half hour from now,” Vaccaro said. “If we don’t do $100

Roswell Daily Record

million on this game I’d be really puzzled.” Kor negay said he made the Seahawks a 2-point favorite in his opening line because the Seahawks have a slightly higher power rating than the Broncos and a defense that might be the key in a game played outdoors in what could be cold temperatures. “With the game being in New York and the early forecast for below normal temperatures that favors a defensive team,” he said. “It also favors a running team and that’s certainly an advantage to the Seahawks.” Bettors, though, liked Peyton Manning and his chances of win-

SCOREBOARD

18. Jeff Overton . . . . . . . .345 19. Ryo Ishikawa . . . . . . .340 20. Briny Baird . . . . . . . . .321 21. Brendon Todd . . . . . .318 22. Tim Clark . . . . . . . . . .316 23. Ian Poulter . . . . . . . . .315 24. Jerry Kelly . . . . . . . . .310 25. Charley Hoffman . . . .307 26. Justin Leonard . . . . . .293 27. Brian Gay . . . . . . . . .279 28. Matt Every . . . . . . . . .257 29. Kevin Na . . . . . . . . . .247 30. Will MacKenzie . . . . .245 31. Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . .241 32. Boo Weekley . . . . . . .240 33. Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . .237 34. Billy Horschel . . . . . .231 35. Kevin Stadler . . . . . . .213 36. Russell Knox . . . . . . .212 37. Kevin Streelman . . . .212 38. Brian Harman . . . . . .210 39. Sergio Garcia . . . . . .205 40. Justin Hicks . . . . . . . .202 41. Graeme McDowell . . .200 42. Keegan Bradley . . . . .195 43. Luke Guthrie . . . . . . .190 44. Rory Sabbatini . . . . . .189 45. Jason Dufner . . . . . . .186 46. Graham DeLaet . . . . .185 47. Daniel Summerhays .184 48. James Driscoll . . . . . .180 49. Hideki Matsuyama . . .177 50. Spencer Levin . . . . . .173 51. J.J. Henry . . . . . . . . .171 52. Jason Kokrak . . . . . .170 53. Camilo Villegas . . . . .163 54. Stuart Appleby . . . . . .157 55. Pat Perez . . . . . . . . .155 56. Chad Collins . . . . . . .153 57. Robert Garrigus . . . . .153 58. Adam Scott . . . . . . . .152 59. John Senden . . . . . . .146 60. Hudson Swafford . . . .145 61. George McNeill . . . . .143 62. Greg Chalmers . . . . .141 63. Aaron Baddeley . . . . .138 64. Fredrik Jacobson . . . .137 65. Charlie Wi . . . . . . . . .137 66. Marc Leishman . . . . .136 67. Brendon de Jonge . . .135 68. Ken Duke . . . . . . . . .132 69. Billy Hurley III . . . . . .130 70. Heath Slocum . . . . . .129

NBA

$607,610 $664,556 $548,375 $514,303 $563,883 $850,000 $577,740 $540,488 $576,322 $477,103 $438,213 $398,650 $451,890 $456,675 $315,972 $489,167 $465,431 $376,698 $243,101 $461,908 $339,392 $526,000 $315,769 $480,000 $379,995 $317,638 $360,513 $378,080 $449,667 $237,945 $205,408 $293,433 $200,760 $235,146 $277,984 $135,013 $239,717 $240,091 $251,173 $207,450 $317,750 $276,855 $197,131 $226,890 $234,929 $299,800 $298,659 $180,650 $247,100 $188,388 $261,768 $185,084 $159,068

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .20 20 .500 Brooklyn . . . . . . . . . . .17 22 .436 New York . . . . . . . . . .15 26 .366 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .14 28 .333 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .13 28 .317 Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 12 .707 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .21 19 .525 Washington . . . . . . . .20 20 .500 Charlotte . . . . . . . . . .18 25 .419 Orlando . . . . . . . . . . .11 30 .268 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . .32 7 .821 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .20 20 .500 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . .17 24 .415 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .15 26 .366 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . . .7 33 .175 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L San Antonio . . . . . . . .32 9 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .28 15 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 18 Memphis . . . . . . . . . .20 20 New Orleans . . . . . . .16 24 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Portland . . . . . . . . . . .31 10 Oklahoma City . . . . . .31 10 Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .20 20 Minnesota . . . . . . . . .19 21 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 28 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L L.A. Clippers . . . . . . .29 14 Golden State . . . . . . .26 16 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . .23 17 L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . .16 26 Sacramento . . . . . . . .14 25 Sunday’s Games L.A. Lakers 112, Toronto 106

PGA-Humana Challenge Scores By The Associated Press Sunday p-PGA West, Palmer Course; 6,950 yards, par 72 n-PGA West, Nicklaus Course; 6,924 yards, par 72 q-La Quinta Country Club; 7,060 yards, par 72 La Quinta, Calif. Purse: $5.7 million Final (Played on Palmer Course) Patrick Reed (500), $1,026,000 . . . . . . . . . .63p-63q-63n-71 — 260 Ryan Palmer (300), $615,600 . . . . . . . . . . .64p-65q-70n-63 — 262 Zach Johnson (163), $330,600 . . . . . . . . . . .65q-68n-68p-62 — 263 Justin Leonard (163), $330,600 . . . . . . . . . .66n-67p-65q-65 — 263 Brian Stuard (110), $228,000 . . . . . . . . . . . .67q-66n-66p-65 — 264 Bill Haas (95), $198,075 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65q-66n-67p-67 — 265 Brendon Todd (95), $198,075 . . . . . . . . . . . .65n-63p-68q-69 — 265 Chad Collins (85), $176,700 . . . . . . . . . . . . .68n-68p-65q-65 — 266 Stuart Appleby (73), $148,200 . . . . . . . . . . .66p-69q-67n-65 — 267 Charlie Beljan (73), $148,200 . . . . . . . . . . . .68q-64n-68p-67 — 267 Ben Crane (73), $148,200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70q-64n-65p-68 — 267 Charley Hoffman (73), $148,200 . . . . . . . . .64q-66n-66p-71 — 267 Russell Knox (56), $103,740 . . . . . . . . . . . .65p-70q-67n-66 — 268 Matt Every (56), $103,740 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65n-68p-69q-66 — 268 Jerry Kelly (56), $103,740 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69q-65n-68p-66 — 268 Will MacKenzie (56), $103,740 . . . . . . . . . . .67n-66p-66q-69 — 268 Matt Jones (56), $103,740 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66n-67p-66q-69 — 268 Brendon de Jonge (51), $74,328 . . . . . . . . .69q-68n-66p-66 — 269 Luke Guthrie (51), $74,328 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69p-67q-67n-66 — 269 Scott Langley (51), $74,328 . . . . . . . . . . . . .69q-68n-65p-67 — 269 Keegan Bradley (51), $74,328 . . . . . . . . . . .69q-66n-65p-69 — 269 James Driscoll (51), $74,328 . . . . . . . . . . . .68p-63q-66n-72 — 269 Webb Simpson (48), $57,000 . . . . . . . . . . . .69p-70q-67n-64 — 270 Charlie Wi (48), $57,000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65p-69q-69n-67 — 270 Ryo Ishikawa (43), $41,681 . . . . . . . . . . . . .66p-69q-69n-67 — 271 Tyrone Van Aswegen (43), $41,681 . . . . . . .69n-67p-67q-68 — 271 Martin Flores (43), $41,681 . . . . . . . . . . . . .69p-65q-69n-68 — 271 Johnson Wagner (43), $41,681 . . . . . . . . . .72p-66q-68n-65 — 271 Martin Laird (43), $41,681 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69n-66p-68q-68 — 271 Hudson Swafford (43), $41,681 . . . . . . . . . .65n-71p-70q-65 — 271 Billy Horschel (43), $41,681 . . . . . . . . . . . . .72p-65q-70n-64 — 271 Roberto Castro (43), $41,681 . . . . . . . . . . . .68p-73q-66n-64 — 271 Camilo Villegas (36), $30,780 . . . . . . . . . . . .70n-66p-68q-68 — 272 Harris English (36), $30,780 . . . . . . . . . . . . .67q-66n-71p-68 — 272 Josh Teater (36), $30,780 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68n-68p-70q-66 — 272 Rickie Fowler (36), $30,780 . . . . . . . . . . . . .68q-71n-67p-66 — 272 Jason Bohn (36), $30,780 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70q-65n-66p-71 — 272 Bryce Molder (29), $21,660 . . . . . . . . . . . . .69p-72q-63n-69 — 273

Orlando 93, Boston 91 Oklahoma City 108, Sacramento 93 San Antonio 110, Milwaukee 82 Phoenix 117, Denver 103 Monday’s Games Dallas 102, Cleveland 97 L.A. Clippers 112, Detroit 103 Washington 107, Philadelphia 99 Charlotte 100, Toronto 95 Brooklyn 103, New York 80 New Orleans 95, Memphis 92 Atlanta 121, Miami 114 Chicago 102, L.A. Lakers 100, OT Houston 126, Portland 113 Indiana at Golden State, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Orlando at Brooklyn, 5:30 p.m. Boston at Miami, 5:30 p.m. Portland at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Sacramento at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Utah, 7 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Atlanta at Orlando, 5 p.m. Boston at Washington, 5 p.m. Chicago at Cleveland, 5 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Charlotte, 5 p.m. Dallas at Toronto, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at New York, 5:30 p.m. Sacramento at Houston, 6 p.m. Detroit at Milwaukee, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 6 p.m. Indiana at Phoenix, 8:30 p.m.

NFL

NFL Playoff Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 4 Indianapolis 45, Kansas City 44 New Orleans 26, Philadelphia 24 Sunday, Jan. 5 San Diego 27, Cincinnati 10 San Francisco 23, Green Bay 20

Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 11 Seattle 23, New Orleans 15 New England 43, Indianpolis 22 Sunday, Jan. 12 San Francisco 23, Carolina 10 Denver 24, San Diego 17

Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 19 Denver 26, New England 16 Seattle 23, San Francisco 17

GB — 2 1⁄2 1 5 ⁄2 7 7 1⁄2

GB — 7 1⁄2 1 8 ⁄2 12 18

GB — 12 1⁄2 16 18 1 25 ⁄2

Pct GB .780 — .651 5 .581 8 1 .500 11 ⁄2 .400 15 1⁄2 Pct GB .756 — .756 — .500 10 1⁄2 .475 11 1⁄2 .333 17 1⁄2 Pct GB .674 — .619 2 1⁄2 .575 4 1⁄2 .381 12 1⁄2 .359 13

Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 26 At Honolulu Team Rice vs. Team Sanders, 5:30 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 2 At East Rutherford, N.J. Denver vs. Seattle, 4:30 p.m. (FOX)

NHL

National Hockey League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Boston . . . . . . .49 31 15 3 Tampa Bay . . .50 29 16 5 Montreal . . . . .49 27 17 5 Toronto . . . . . .51 26 20 5 Detroit . . . . . . .49 21 18 10 Ottawa . . . . . .49 21 19 9 Florida . . . . . . .49 19 23 7 Buffalo . . . . . . .47 13 27 7 Metropolitan Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pittsburgh . . . .49 34 13 2 N.Y. Rangers .51 27 21 3 Philadelphia . .50 25 19 6 Columbus . . . .48 24 20 4 Washington . . .49 22 19 8 New Jersey . . .50 20 19 11 Carolina . . . . .48 20 19 9 N.Y. Islanders .51 20 24 7

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Chicago . . . . . .51 32 8 11 St. Louis . . . . .48 33 10 5 Colorado . . . . .48 31 12 5 Minnesota . . . .51 27 19 5 Nashville . . . . .51 22 22 7 Dallas . . . . . . .49 21 20 8

Pts 65 63 59 57 52 51 45 33

GF GA 141 109 146 123 126 120 145 154 122 134 139 155 116 148 86 133

Pts 70 57 56 52 52 51 49 47

GF GA 157 120 128 128 137 144 138 135 142 150 115 123 117 137 142 166

Pts 75 71 67 59 51 50

GF GA 184 139 170 108 142 122 125 125 125 152 137 152

Gary Woodland (29), $21,660 . . . . . . . . . . .69p-71q-65n-68 — 273 Andrew Svoboda (29), $21,660 . . . . . . . . . .69n-69p-66q-69 — 273 Cameron Tringale (29), $21,660 . . . . . . . . . .68q-66n-70p-69 — 273 Jeff Overton (29), $21,660 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70q-67n-67p-69 — 273 Brian Davis (29), $21,660 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69p-71q-66n-67 — 273 Spencer Levin (29), $21,660 . . . . . . . . . . . .69p-68q-66n-70 — 273 Rory Sabbatini (29), $21,660 . . . . . . . . . . . .68p-67q-67n-71 — 273 Seung-Yul Noh (29), $21,660 . . . . . . . . . . . .68p-66q-66n-73 — 273 James Hahn (29), $21,660 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70p-68q-69n-66 — 273 Justin Hicks (19), $13,817 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64n-71p-70q-69 — 274 John Merrick (19), $13,817 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66q-70n-69p-69 — 274 Kevin Kisner (19), $13,817 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66n-70p-69q-69 — 274 Brad Fritsch (19), $13,817 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67p-70q-67n-70 — 274 Scott Brown (19), $13,817 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67p-68q-70n-69 — 274 Bo Van Pelt (19), $13,817 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70q-68n-67p-69 — 274 Kevin Na (19), $13,817 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68n-68p-68q-70 — 274 Brice Garnett (19), $13,817 . . . . . . . . . . . . .67p-69q-68n-70 — 274 Steven Bowditch (19), $13,817 . . . . . . . . . .71n-67p-68q-68 — 274 Michael Putnam (19), $13,817 . . . . . . . . . . .68q-69n-70p-67 — 274 Harrison Frazar (8), $12,198 . . . . . . . . . . . .69n-68p-68q-70 — 275 Pat Perez (8), $12,198 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69q-70n-66p-70 — 275 Brandt Snedeker (8), $12,198 . . . . . . . . . . .72q-64n-69p-70 — 275 Davis Love III (8), $12,198 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69p-68q-69n-69 — 275 Daniel Summerhays (8), $12,198 . . . . . . . . .64n-69p-73q-69 — 275 Kevin Chappell (8), $12,198 . . . . . . . . . . . . .70q-70n-63p-72 — 275 Charles Howell III (8), $12,198 . . . . . . . . . . .73n-68p-65q-69 — 275 Scott Stallings (8), $12,198 . . . . . . . . . . . . .68n-69p-69q-69 — 275 Jonathan Byrd (8), $12,198 . . . . . . . . . . . . .68p-69q-65n-73 — 275 Stewart Cink (8), $12,198 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73q-63n-71p-68 — 275 Lee Williams (8), $12,198 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70n-68p-69q-68 — 275 Erik Compton (1), $11,172 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70q-66n-70p-70 — 276 Jim Herman (1), $11,172 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67n-68p-68q-73 — 276 Blake Adams (1), $11,172 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70p-70q-66n-70 — 276 Ken Duke (1), $11,172 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71p-70q-65n-70 — 276 Nicholas Thompson (1), $11,172 . . . . . . . . .71p-69q-67n-69 — 276 Chad Campbell (1), $11,172 . . . . . . . . . . . . .71p-68q-68n-69 — 276 John Senden (1), $11,172 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71n-70p-66q-69 — 276 William McGirt (1), $10,659 . . . . . . . . . . . . .70n-70p-64q-73 — 277 Freddie Jacobson (1), $10,659 . . . . . . . . . . .71p-68q-68n-70 — 277 David Lingmerth (1), $10,431 . . . . . . . . . . . .69q-68n-69p-72 — 278 Kevin Stadler (1), $10,431 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69n-66p-72q-71 — 278 Brett Quigley (1), $10,260 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66q-73n-68p-72 — 279 Scott McCarron (1), $10,146 . . . . . . . . . . . .72q-69n-66p-73 — 280 J.J. Henry (1), $9,975 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71n-70p-65q-75 — 281 Brian Harman (1), $9,975 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69n-66p-72q-74 — 281 Jhonattan Vegas (1), $9,804 . . . . . . . . . . . .69n-71p-67q-76 — 283

Winnipeg . . . . .50 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . .GP Anaheim . . . . .51 San Jose . . . . .49 Los Angeles . .50 Vancouver . . . .50 Phoenix . . . . . .49 Calgary . . . . . .49 Edmonton . . . .51

ning another Super Bowl, and they didn’t wait long to bet the Broncos. Sports books adjust the line to try to balance money on each team, and the LVH went from posting Seattle as a 2-point favorite to Denver being favored by 1 point in less than an hour. Most big bettors — the socalled “sharps” who can move a line all by themselves — wait until much closer to the game before placing their bets. “It’s all small stuff now,” Vaccaro said. “The smart guys are not going to grab either side right now until they see how this shakes out.”

22 23 5 49 141 150

W 37 31 29 25 23 16 15

L OT 9 5 12 6 15 6 16 9 17 9 26 7 30 6

Pts 79 68 64 59 55 39 36

GF GA 175 126 158 121 128 103 127 127 141 149 109 156 131 181

Sunday’s Games Chicago 3, Boston 2, SO Tampa Bay 5, Carolina 3 N.Y. Rangers 4, Washington 1 Monday’s Games N.Y. Islanders 4, Philadelphia 3, SO Boston 3, Los Angeles 2 Florida 5, Pittsburgh 1 St. Louis 4, Detroit 1 Nashville 4, Dallas 1 Toronto 4, Phoenix 2 Calgary at San Jose, 8:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Florida at Buffalo, 5 p.m. St. Louis at New Jersey, 5 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 5 p.m. Carolina at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Ottawa at Washington, 5 p.m. Los Angeles at Columbus, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 6 p.m. Toronto at Colorado, 7 p.m. Vancouver at Edmonton, 7:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Anaheim, 8 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Montreal at Pittsburgh, 5 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 6 p.m. Phoenix at Calgary, 7:30 p.m.

Tennis

Australian Open Results By The Associated Press Monday At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Purse: $29.72 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Fourth Round Grigor Dimitrov (22), Bulgaria, def. Roberto Bautista Agut, Spain, 6-3, 3-6, 6-2, 6-4. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Kei Nishikori (16), Japan, 7-6 (3), 7-5, 7-6 (3). Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Stephane Robert, France, 6-1, 6-2, 6-7 (6), 6-2. Roger Federer (6), Switzerland, def. JoWilfried Tsonga (10), France, 6-3, 7-5, 6-4. Women Fourth Round Dominika Cibulkova (20), Slovakia, def. Maria Sharapova (3), Russia, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1. Simona Halep (11), Romania, def. Jelena Jankovic (8), Serbia, 6-4, 2-6, 6-0. Victoria Azarenka (2), Belarus, def. Sloane Stephens (13), United States, 6-3, 6-2. Agnieszka Radwanska (5), Poland, def. Garbine Muguruza, Spain, 6-1, 6-3.

Doubles Men Third Round Eric Butorac, United States, and Raven Klaasen, South Africa, def. Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United States, 7-6 (9), 6-4. Max Mirnyi, Belarus, and Mikhail Youzhny, Russia, def. Julien Benneteau and Edouard Roger-Vasselin (11), France, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, and Robert Lindstedt (14), Sweden, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, and Marcelo Melo (4), Brazil, 5-7, 6-4, 6-4. Daniel Nestor, Canada, and Nenad Zimonjic (8), Serbia, def. Mariusz Fyrstenberg and Marcin Matkowski (9), Poland, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3. Women Third Round Andrea Hlavackova and Lucie Safarova (7), Czech Republic, def. Madison Keys and Alison Riske, United States, 6-4, 6-3. Ekaterina Makarova and Elena Vesnina (3), Russia, def. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, and Lisa Raymond (15), United States, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-2. Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Sania Mirza (6), India, def. Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, and Vera Dushevina, Russia, 6-4, 6-3. Raquel Kops-Jones and Abigail Spears (8), United States, def. Alize Cornet and Caroline Garcia, France, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4.

Transactions

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Agreed to terms with 1B Lyle Overbay on a minor league contract. NEW YORK METS — Agreed to terms with RHP Dillon Gee on a one-year contract. Signed LHP John Lannan to a minor league

contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHICAGO BULLS — Re-signed F Cartier Martin to a second 10-day contract. HOUSTON ROCKETS — Reassigned G Isaiah Canaan to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). WASHINGTON WIZARDS — Assigned G Glen Rice to Iowa (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed OL Braxton Cave and R.J. Mattes, T Jordan Devey, WRs Reggie Dunn and Greg Orton, RB Sam McGuffie and LB Taylor Reed to reserve/future contracts. TENNESSEE TITANS — Named Ray Horton defensive coordinator and Louie Cioffi defensive backs coach. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Named Ike Hilliard receivers coach. Canadian Football League CALGARY STAMPEDERS — Re-signed CB Fred Bennett. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL — Suspended Vancouver coach John Tortorella for 15 days, without pay, for trying to enter the Calgary locker room during the first intermission of their game on Saturday, Jan. 18. Fined Calgary coach Bob Hartley $25,000 for his responsibility for the incident that took place off the opening face-off of their game on Saturday, Jan. 18, MINNESOTA WILD — Recalled D Jonathon Blum and G Johan Gustafsson from Iowa (AHL). MONTREAL CANADIENS — Recalled F Louis Leblanc from Hamilton (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS — Recalled F Stephane Da Costa from Binghamton (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Reassigned G Philipp Grubauer to Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE CHOWAN — Named Lindsay Austin assistant trainer. ELON — Named Damian Wroblewski offensive coordinator and offensive line coach. FRESNO STATE — Agreed to terms with men’s football coach Tim DeRuyter to extend his contract through the 2018 season. INDIANA — Named Brian Knorr defensive coordinator. LIMESTONE — Named Izzy Trottier assistant softball coach. MONTANA TECH — Fired athletic director Charles Bradley. Announced the resignation of women’s basketball coach DeAnn Craft and women’s assistant basketball coach Kesha Watson. Named Bob Green interim athletic director. Named Lindsie Wilson women’s interim basketball coach. SOUTH DAKOTA TECH — Announced it is joining the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference.

Women’s basketball

The AP Top 25 By The Associated Press The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ women’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 19, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Prv 1. UConn (36) . . . . . . . . .19-0 900 1 2. Notre Dame . . . . . . . .16-0 847 2 3. Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18-1 824 3 4. Stanford . . . . . . . . . . .16-1 810 4 5. Louisville . . . . . . . . . . .18-1 742 5 6. Maryland . . . . . . . . . . .16-1 735 6 7. North Carolina . . . . . . .16-3 642 9 8. Oklahoma St. . . . . . . .16-1 613 11 9. Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . .15-3 592 10 10. South Carolina . . . . . .17-2 567 8 11. Tennessee . . . . . . . . .14-3 557 12 12. Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-3 551 7 13. Penn St. . . . . . . . . . . .13-4 422 16 14. Arizona St. . . . . . . . . .15-2 403 19 15. LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-4 341 14 16. Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . . .16-3 340 24 17. Texas A&M . . . . . . . . .15-4 306 25 18. West Virginia . . . . . . .16-2 255 — 19. California . . . . . . . . . .12-4 244 15 20. Iowa St. . . . . . . . . . . .14-3 190 13 21. Nebraska . . . . . . . . . .13-4 170 18 22. Purdue . . . . . . . . . . . .13-5 166 22 23. NC State . . . . . . . . . .16-3 161 20 24. Florida St. . . . . . . . . . .14-4 84 17 25. Gonzaga . . . . . . . . . .16-3 75 —

Others receiving votes: Middle Tennessee 41, Michigan St. 36, Colorado 20, Michigan 19, Rutgers 19, St. John’s 7, San Diego 4, Bowling Green 3, Indiana 3, Chattanooga 2, Saint Joseph’s 2, Southern Cal 2, DePaul 1, Georgia Tech 1, Iowa 1, Saint Mary’s (Cal) 1, Wichita St. 1.

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SPORTS

B3

Patrick Reed gets second win at Humana Challenge Roswell Daily Record

LA QUINTA, Calif. (AP) — Patrick Reed got an early start in golf. “When I was born, there was a golf club in my crib,” Reed said. He got a big jump on the field in the Humana Challenge, too, shooting three straight 9-under 63s to take a seven-stroke lead into the final round. Struggling with the pace of his putts, he needed almost all of that cushion Sunday, closing with a 1-under 71 at PGA West to beat R yan Palmer by two strokes. “A lot tougher than the first three rounds,” Reed said. “My speed was off today. I left a lot of putts short. It seemed like the first three days the ball was just trickling over the front edge, and today it seemed like it came to a screeching halt.” Finally resembling the guy who talked Saturday about

Finally

Continued from Page B1

being in a “putting coma,” Reed ran in an 18-footer for birdie on the par-3 15th to push his lead to three strokes. “It felt comfortable. It felt great,” Reed said. “I was able to play the last three holes just for par rather than trying to make birdies or trying to make something happen.” He did par the last three to finish at 28-under 260 in the three-course event that he opened and closed on the Arnold Palmer Private Course. The 23-year -old Reed has two victories in his first 46 PGA Tour starts, winning the Wyndham Championship in August. He jumped from 69th to 41st in the world ranking, enough to lock up a spot in the 64-man Match Play Championship. “I always play to try to prove to everybody that I belong out here,” Reed said. “As well as, I belong, not only out here on

on Feb. 2. Sherman is the 25-year -old trash-talking leader of the league’s best defense, Bailey the 35-year-old sage of a unit that’s been through the ringer this season, but has come on strong over the past month despite injuries that cost them several starters, including Von Miller and Chris Harris Jr. Bailey is one of the league’s top cornerbacks, but he’s clearly on the downslope of his spectacular career that includes the most Pro Bowls by a defensive back in NFL history. Bailey was greeted in the locker room by for mer teammate John Lynch, who was with him

XLVIII

Continued from Page B1

None more serious, perhaps, than coach John Fox’s absence for about a month because of a heart operation. Other issues included the fax faux pas that precipitated the departure of pass rusher Elvis Dumervil, star linebacker Von Miller’s drug-testing suspension and seasonending knee injury, and the losses of a handful of other starters on defense. “Being in my 16th season, going to my third Super Bowl — I know how hard it is to get there,” Manning said. He threw for 400 yards and two touchdowns in a 26-16 victory over Tom Brady and the New England Patriots in the AFC championship game Sunday. Manning’s of fense scored on six consecutive possessions, accounted for more than 500 yards, had zero tur novers and zero sacks. Ol’ No. 18’s opposite number in two weeks, Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson, provides a real contrast as he seeks his — and the Seahawks’ — first Super Bowl trophy. Wilson is 6 inches shorter, 12 years younger, a skilled scrambler in only his second pro season after slipping to the third round of the draft; he’s a guy who had to transfer colleges to get playing time and thought about pursuing a baseball career instead. “Any time you get to the Super Bowl,” Wilson said after Seattle beat the San Francisco 49ers 23-17 on Sunday, “it’s a special time.” Other members of the Seahawks getting the chance to introduce themselves to a wide audience include rugged running back Marshawn L ynch — fans tossed packs of his favorite candy, Skittles, onto the field after a 40yard TD run in the third quarter — and Carroll, a rah-rah sort who was a title-winning college coach at Southern California. And maybe, just maybe, some of Manning’s lessheralded defensive teammates — the ones who

the PGA Tour, but also with the best players in the world.” Reed took a call from former President Bill Clinton — the tournament is run in partnership with the Clinton Foundation — during his interview session. “He told me to get myself back in that zone more often,” Reed said. “Because he said it was a lot of fun to watch.” Palmer made a 15-foot eagle putt on the final hole for a 63. “What can you do with what Patrick did this week?” Palmer said. “It’s ridiculous what he did. Amazing how good he played. We’ll come up a couple short, but it was a win in my game because I was playing for second today.” Zach Johnson and Justin Leonard tied for third at 25 under. Johnson birdied the final five holes for a 62, the best round of the week.

the previous time he’d come this close to the Super Bowl — 2,919 days earlier. One week after sealing a playoff win with a 100-yard interception return to hand Tom Brady his first playof f loss back in 2006, Bailey had another interception in his grasp and the end zone in his sights, but Hines Ward somehow came down with the football instead and Pittsburgh went on to beat Denver 34-17 for the AFC title following the 2005 season. “I said he’d play really big and I think quietly he really did,” L ynch said. “It’s been a tough year. Everyone thinks he’s old, over the hill, but he’s been a great player throughout his whole career and great players, when it matters most, play great.” Bailey had no spectacular

2013—Baltimore (AFC) 34, San Francisco (NFC) 31 2012—N.Y. Giants (NFC) 21, New England (AFC) 17 2011—Green Bay (NFC) 31, Pittsburgh (AFC) 25 2010—New Orleans (NFC) 31, Indianapolis (AFC) 17 2009—Pittsburgh (AFC) 27, Arizona (NFC) 23 2008—N.Y. Giants (NFC) 17, New England (AFC) 14 2007—Indianapolis (AFC) 29, Chicago (NFC) 17 2006—Pittsburgh (AFC) 21, Seattle (NFC) 10 2005—New England (AFC) 24, Philadelphia (NFC) 21 2004—New England (AFC) 32, Carolina (NFC) 29 2003—Tampa Bay (NFC) 48, Oakland (AFC) 21 2002—New England (AFC) 20, St. Louis (NFC) 17 2001—Baltimore Ravens (AFC) 34, N.Y. Giants (NFC) 7 2000—St. Louis (NFC) 23, Tennessee (AFC) 16 1999—Denver (AFC) 34, Atlanta (NFC) 19 1998—Denver (AFC) 31, Green Bay (NFC) 24 1997—Green Bay (NFC) 35, New England (AFC) 21 1996—Dallas (NFC) 27, Pittsburgh (AFC) 17 1995—San Francisco (NFC) 49, San Diego (AFC) 26 1994—Dallas (NFC) 30, Buffalo (AFC) 13 1993—Dallas (NFC) 52, Buffalo (AFC) 17 1992—Washington (NFC) 37, Buffalo (AFC) 24 1991—N.Y. Giants (NFC) 20, Buffalo (AFC) 19 1990—San Francisco (NFC) 55, Denver (AFC) 10 1989—San Francisco (NFC) 20, Cincinnati (AFC) 16 1988—Washington (NFC) 42, Denver (AFC) 10 1987—N.Y. Giants (NFC) 39, Denver (AFC) 20 1986—Chicago (NFC) 46, New England (AFC) 10 1985—San Francisco (NFC) 38, Miami (AFC) 16 1984—L.A. Raiders (AFC) 38, Washington (NFC) 9 1983—Washington (NFC) 27, Miami (AFC) 17 1982—San Francisco (NFC) 26, Cincinnati (AFC) 21 1981—Oakland (AFC) 27, Philadelphia (NFC) 10 1980—Pittsburgh (AFC) 31, L.A. Rams (NFC) 19 1979—Pittsburgh (AFC) 35, Dallas (NFC) 31 1978—Dallas (NFC) 27, Denver (AFC) 10 1977—Oakland (AFC) 32, Minnesota (NFC) 14 1976—Pittsburgh (AFC) 21, Dallas (NFC) 17 1975—Pittsburgh (AFC) 16, Minnesota (NFC) 6 1974—Miami (AFC) 24, Minnesota (NFC) 7 1973—Miami (AFC) 14, Washington (NFC) 7 1972—Dallas (NFC) 24, Miami (AFC) 3 1971—Baltimore Colts (AFC) 16, Dallas (NFC) 13 1970—Kansas City (AFL) 23, Minnesota (NFL) 7 1969—N.Y. Jets (AFL) 16, Baltimore Colts (NFL) 7 1968—Green Bay (NFL) 33, Oakland (AFL) 14 1967—Green Bay (NFL) 35, Kansas City (AFL) 10 me with a sorry receiver like Crabtree, that’s the result you’re going to get.” Seattle’s only other trip to the big game ended with a loss to the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2006. Denver will be playing in its seventh Super Bowl and eyeing a third title, to go with those from 1998 and 1999, when current executive John Elway was the QB. In addition to Elway, Manning can match his younger brother Eli with a second Super Bowl crown. Eli, a spectator on Sunday in Denver, won two trophies with the New York Giants, whose stadium hosts this year’s Super Bowl, the first to be played outdoors at a cold-weather site.

AP Photo

Patrick Reed hits his approach shot on the ninth hole during the final round of the Humana Challenge, Sunday.

plays this time, no pick-6s or takeaways or forced fumbles or sacks, just his usual steady play and calming leadership. He was hardly tested by Brady at all and finished with three tackles. “I thought yesterday was his best performance of the season,” coach John Fox said Monday. Peyton Manning, who knows a little bit about overcoming injuries and long odds to reach the Super Bowl, said he was “certainly happy for Champ, I know a lot of people are.” “There’s a guy — let’s see, Champ’s one year younger than me so he’s in his 15th season — like I said, it’s hard to get to the Super Bowl. It’s hard to win it, but I’m telling you it’s hard to get there,” Manning said. “... I’m glad that he’s back out there on the field. He’s battled through some injuries and has stayed at

Super Bowl Champions

clamped down on New England’s running game Sunday and limited Brady much of the afternoon — will get their chance to shine, too. Seattle’s defense, led by Sherman, allowed an average of 14.4 points and 273.6 yards, and topped the NFL in takeaways. On Sunday, the Seahawks forced three tur novers in the fourth quarter alone, including a victory-sealing interception by Malcolm Smith after Sherman stretched his left hand to tip Colin Kaepernick’s pass away from receiver Michael Crabtree in the end zone. “I’m the best corner in the game,” said Sherman, an All-Pro. “When you try

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Upset

it and been committed to his rehab.” Bailey started just three games this season, and he finished just one of those, against Jacksonville on Oct. 13. After aggravating his foot injury in his two other starts, he was relegated to slot duty by the time he finally got healthy in midDecember. That changed when Harris got hurt in the Broncos’ playoff win over San Diego and Bailey started Sunday opposite Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, then moved into the slot on passing downs to thwart the heart of the Patriots’ offense. “I knew I’d be back at some point,” Bailey said. “My coaches, teammates, they never gave up on me. They knew I’d be back to 100 percent at some point. Here I am, I’m playing probably my

Continued from Page B1

stunning 29-point lead. Creighton’s first win this season against a ranked team was a mere formality. The Bluejays refused to slow down from 3-point range, with McDermott’s fourth 3 extending the lead to 30 and making them 19 for 31. Oh, and Creighton had 19 3s at the same time Villanova had 16 total field goals. McDermott, the two-time All-America, tied Creighton’s team record with 20 3s not long after, sending the crowd at the home of the NBA’s Philadelphia 76ers headed to the exits. Jahenns Manigat hit

best football of the year — because I haven’t played much. I’m just looking forward to the next one, making sure my body is right for the next game.” And don’t count on him getting caught up in the comparisons at the Super Bowl between him and Sherman, who represents this new breed of cornerback, the bigger, athletic DBs who trash talk as well as any of the receivers they cover. About the only trash-talking that came out of Bailey’s mouth Sunday was when he was asked about how the Broncos shut down the Patriots’ ground game. The Broncos held LeGarrette Blount to 6 yards on five carries a week after scoring four TDs against Indianapolis. “Well,” Bailey said matter-offactly, “they didn’t play the Broncos last week.”

Creighton’s record 21st 3pointer to make it 88-50 with 7:33 left. Somehow, this was the same Creighton team that never led in an 81-68 loss at Providence on Saturday. The Bluejays made only four 3s in the loss. The Wildcats played with their highest ranking since they were No. 3 on Feb. 15, 2010. They are not going to stay No. 4 for long. Villanova might want to work on defending Wragge in the Feb. 16 rematch. James Bell scored 19 points for the Wildcats. Wragge took all of six shots this season inside the 3-point arc, and with good reason. He’s rarely missed from long range. Against Villanova, the 49-percent 3-point shooter didn’t miss at all, at least on his first seven attempts.

His seventh 3 put the Bluejays up 27-8 just 7 1⁄2 minutes into the game. With McDermott running into double teams, Wragge was all alone, even hitting one in front of Villanova’s bench without a defender within 2 feet of him. Even with the hot hand, Wragge hit the bench for a spell — maybe he had a tired arm — to rest up from all those 3s. His teammates picked up the slack. McDer mott, Manigat and Isaiah Zierden each hit two 3s and Creighton finished the first half a whopping 14 of 22 (64 percent) from beyond the arc. Creighton’s season high had been 16 against Chicago State on Dec. 29. The Bluejays had 11 assists on their first 12 baskets and led by as many as 28 points

Federer in quarterfinals again MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — When the draw for the Australian Open was made, it wasn’t Roger Federer who was being widely touted as the prime contender to claim an 18th major title. All that hype surrounded Serena Williams, but she was knocked out in the fourth round. Federer is still three match wins away from that milestone, but after his 6-3, 75, 6-4 demolition of No. 10-seeded JoWilfried Tsonga on Monday night, it’s clear he’s up for the challenge. On a day when No. 3 Maria Sharapova was upset by No. 20 Dominika Cibulkova, following top-ranked Williams out of the tournament and opening up the women’s draw for defending champion Victoria Azarenka, the leading male contenders on the heavily stacked top half advanced to the quarterfinals. Progressing along with Federer were top-ranked Rafael Nadal, who had a 7-6 (3), 7-5, 7-6 (3) win over Kei Nishikori — though he was broken twice and got a time violation in the third set — and Wimbledon champion Andy Murray, who overcame a racket-smashing, frustrating finish to the third set to beat Stephane Robert 6-1, 6-2, 6-7 (6), 6-2. Now for the harder part. Federer is back in the quarterfinals of a Grand Slam for the first time since last year’s French Open — equaling Jimmy Connors’ Open-era record with his 41st trip to the last eight in a major. He next plays Murray, a three-time Australian Open finalist. A win could set up a semifinal against Nadal, who next plays firsttime major quarterfinalist Grigor Dimitrov. A win there for Federer would likely

set up a final against three-time defending champion Novak Djokovic — the only other man who has won four Australian titles in the Open era. Djokovic is playing his quarterfinal Tuesday against No. 8 Stan Wawrinka. “It’s a tough thing to do. I don’t know if it’s been done before,” sixth-seeded Federer said of his tough road to the title. “Then again, if you don’t embrace that challenge, you might as well not enter the draw. You might as well stay at home and watch other guys battle it out. “That’s what I like. I like playing the best ... and you need to take it to them.” Federer certainly did that against Tsonga, barely dropping a point on serve in the first set and putting the 2008 Australian Open finalist under pressure right away with an early break. The 32year -old Swiss star was so relentless that Tsonga, aggravated at not being able to threaten Federer at all, screamed and smacked a ball into the crowd after losing an exchange of close volleys. From Tsonga’s side, it looked like he was facing the Federer of old — before the crisis of confidence, the new racket, and before his record streak of reaching the quarter finals at 36 consecutive majors came to a halt with a shocking second-round defeat at Wimbledon. Azarenka played the second match on Rod Laver Arena and extended her winning streak at Melbourne Park to 18 with a 6-3, 6-2 victory over No. 13-seeded Sloane Stephens, whom she also beat in a contentious semifinal last year. She will next play No. 5 Agnieszka Radwanska, who finished off day eight with a 6-1, 6-3 win over Garbine Muguruza.


B4 Tuesday, January 21, 2014

FINANCIAL / SPORTS

NBA capsules: Millsap scores 26, Hawks beat Heat

ATLANTA (AP) — Paul Millsap scored 26 points and the Atlanta Hawks overcame LeBron James’ 30 points to beat the Miami Heat 121-114 Monday night. DeMarre Carroll added 19 points and Pero Antic had 17 for the Hawks, who snapped a nine-game losing streak in their series with the Heat. Chris Bosh had 21 points for Miami, which was without Dwyane Wade for the second straight game. Atlanta took its first win over Miami since Jan 2, 2012, and its first home win in the series since Nov. 18, 2009. Nets 103, Knicks 80 NEW YORK (AP) — Joe Johnson scored 25 points and Brooklyn sent the Knicks to a fourth straight loss, evening this season’s New York rivalry at a game apiece. Making a triumphant return from London and completing a three-game, three-country road trip, the Nets improved to 7-1 in 2014 and avenged last month’s blowout loss. Andray Blatche had 19 points and 12 rebounds, and Alan Anderson scored 15 points for the Nets. Carmelo Anthony had 26 points and 12 rebounds for the Knicks, who beat the Nets 113-83 in Brooklyn but were hardly ever in this one. They lost on Martin Luther King Jr. Day for the fourth straight time, the last two both at home to the Nets.

Bulls 102, Lakers 100, OT CHICAGO (AP) — Taj Gibson made a layup at the buzzer in overtime, lifting Chicago to victory over Los Angeles. With nine-tenths of a second left, Mike Dunleavy inbounded from underneath the basket and found Gibson cutting down the middle. The athletic forward then muscled toward the hoop for the winning basket, which was confirmed in a video review by the officials.

Hang on

Continued from Page B1

points. Luol Deng, acquired from Chicago on Jan. 7, scored 20 points in his first home game with the Cavaliers while Anderson Varejao had 18 points with 21 rebounds. Dirk Nowitzki scored 17 points and DeJuan Blair added 13 for the Mavericks. Dallas built a 59-35 lead late in the second quarter and maintained a double-figure lead for most of the second half before the Cavaliers rallied. Cleveland cut the lead into single figures early in the fourth quarter. The Cavaliers got the lead to 91-89 on Deng’s 3pointer, but Irving missed a jumper and a 3-point attempt on the same possession when Cleveland had a chance to tie or take the lead. A basket and two free throws by Ellis followed by Marion’s steal and score

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 14 140.00 140.50 139.30 140.35 Apr 14 138.97 139.40 127.82 139.30 Jun 14 131.07 131.50 130.62 131.45 Aug 14 129.17 129.55 128.75 129.55 Oct 14 132.27 132.65 131.97 132.50 Dec 14 133.57 133.72 133.05 133.55 Feb 15 133.60 133.87 133.37 133.70 Apr 15 134.42 135.00 134.20 135.00 Jun 15 130.25 130.80 130.25 130.80 Last spot N/A Est. sales 105446. Thu’s Sales: 99,484 Thu’s open int: 352152, off -133 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jan 14 169.70 170.07 169.37 170.00 Mar 14 167.85 168.27 167.30 167.92 Apr 14 169.00 169.00 168.40 168.65 May 14 169.50 169.82 168.90 169.50 Aug 14 170.65 171.10 170.27 171.10 Sep 14 170.00 170.40 169.57 170.40 Oct 14 168.97 169.25 168.97 169.20 Nov 14 168.75 169.75 168.72 169.75 Last spot N/A Est. sales 9491. Thu’s Sales: 7,804 Thu’s open int: 51171, up +346 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 14 86.77 86.77 82.45 86.17 Apr 14 92.20 92.35 91.17 91.90 May 14 99.35 99.60 98.92 99.60 Jun 14 101.60 101.77 101.10 101.57 Jul 14 100.25 100.27 99.77 100.20 Aug 14 98.00 98.05 97.60 97.77 Oct 14 84.67 84.67 80.00 84.62 Dec 14 79.85 79.90 79.57 79.85 Feb 15 80.97 80.97 80.77 80.85 Apr 15 81.90 81.90 81.67 81.80 May 15 86.35 86.35 86.35 86.35 Jun 15 88.35 Last spot N/A Est. sales 64323. Thu’s Sales: 37,478 Thu’s open int: 266175, off -404

chg.

+.20 +.08 +.18 +.15 -.10 -.40 -.15

+.20 -.33 -.62 -.40 -.05 -.30

-.70 -.35 -.18 -.12 -.20 -.33 -.10 -.05 -.10 +.15

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Mar 14 86.61 87.14 85.89 86.80 May 14 86.89 87.29 86.09 87.05 Jul 14 86.15 86.50 85.50 86.36 Oct 14 81.52 Dec 14 79.70 80.00 79.48 79.88 Mar 15 80.23 80.31 80.05 80.25 May 15 80.29 Jul 15 80.13 Oct 15 79.78 Dec 15 79.38 Mar 16 79.34 May 16 79.34 Jul 16 79.34 Oct 16 79.34 Dec 16 79.34 Last spot N/A Est. sales 25745. Thu’s Sales: 32,459 Thu’s open int: 181203, up +4111

chg.

+.61 +.65 +.49 +.35 +.21 -.05 -.12 -.11 -.05 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.03 +.03

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 572fl 574ü 562fl 563ø May 14 579fl 581ü 569ø 570ø 586ø 587ø 576 577 Jul 14 Sep 14 595 595 584fl 585fl Dec 14 607fl 607fl 597ø 598ø Mar 15 614ø 614ø 608 608fl May 15 618fl 618fl 611 611

chg.

-9ü -9ü -9ø -9ø -9ü -8ü -7fl

Roswell Daily Record

Joakim Noah had 17 points and 21 rebounds for Chicago (20-20), which has won eight of 10 to get back to .500 for the first time since Nov. 27. D.J. Augustin had a season-high 27 points, and Jimmy Butler finished with 13 points and 11 rebounds. Nick Young had 31 points for the Lakers, including a tying baseline jumper with 6 seconds left in overtime.

Rockets 126, Trail Blazers 113 HOUSTON (AP) — Chandler Parsons scored a season-high 31 points and Dwight Howard added 24 points to help Houston snap Portland’s five-game winning streak. The Rockets won their second straight, building a big lead early and answering every time Portland made a run. James Harden added 22 points and had five assists and Patrick Beverley returned from a broken hand to score 17 points. Parsons added 10 rebounds and seven assists while finishing one point shy of his career-high. LaMarcus Aldridge had 27 points and 20 rebounds for the Trail Blazers, who have won seven of their last 11 games. Damian Lillard added 24 points and Wesley Matthews had 18. Clippers 112, Pistons 103 AUBURN HILLS, Mich. (AP) — DeAndre Jordan had 16 points and 21 rebounds, and Los Angeles breezed past Detroit. Jordan made his first seven shots — almost all on dunks. Blake Griffin added 25 points and Jamal Crawford scored 26 for the Clippers, who are 6-2 since losing star point guard Chris Paul to a shoulder injury. J.J. Redick added 20 points for Los Angeles, including two four -point plays when the Pistons fouled him beyond the arc. Rodney Stuckey scored 29 points for

AP Photo

Hawks forward Paul Millsap, right, drives to the basket around Miami’s Shane Battier during their game, Monday. Detroit and Josh Smith added 24, but the Pistons got almost nothing from their starting backcourt. Brandon Jennings went scoreless and Kentavious Caldwell-Pope scored only six points.

Pelicans 95, Grizzlies 92 MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Anthony Davis scored 21 of his 27 points in the second half and grabbed 10 rebounds to help New Orleans beat Memphis and snap an eightgame losing streak. Tyreke Evans added 15 points, 11 in the fourth quarter, and seven assists. Brian Roberts scored 13 points and Eric Gordon finished with 12 for the shorthanded Pelicans, who won for only the second time in January. Alexis Ajinca scored 10 points for New Orleans. Zach Randolph had 23 points and a season-high 20 rebounds for the Grizzlies, who had won five straight. Courtney Lee added 19 points and Marc Gasol finished 14.

pushed the lead to 97-90 with 1:35 to play. Cleveland cut the lead to 98-95, but two free throws by Jose Calderon with 11.1 seconds remaining pushed the lead to five. Varejao’s basket with 5.7 left made it 100-97. Ellis missed two free throws with 2.8 seconds left and gave Cleveland one last chance. The Cavaliers called timeout, but Carlisle put 6-foot-10 center Brandan Wright on Jack, who couldn’t get off the pass on a play that was designed to get Irving the ball. Cavaliers coach Mike Brown thought Irving was open in the far corner on the other side of the floor. “I don’t know if we’ve ever been that wide open before at the end of games on a situation like that,” he said. “Jack just couldn’t see him.” “It was going to be a tough pass,” Irving said. “It was a crucial turnover. Whether I was open or not doesn’t matter. We have to move on and get ready for our next game.”

Jul 15 611 611 605fl 605fl Sep 15 618 618 612 612 Dec 15 624 624 621ü 621ü Mar 16 636ø 636ø 627fl 627fl May 16 636ø 636ø 627fl 627fl Jul 16 626 626 617ü 617ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 88607. Thu’s Sales: 95,038 Thu’s open int: 430297, up +5341 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 427 428 422ü 424 May 14 434 435ü 429fl 431fl Jul 14 440fl 441ø 436ø 438ø Sep 14 445fl 446 441ø 443ü Dec 14 451ø 452 447ø 449 Mar 15 461fl 461fl 457fl 458fl May 15 468 468 464ø 465ü Jul 15 469fl 471ü 469 470 Sep 15 463ø 463ø 462ø 462fl Dec 15 463fl 464 461 461 Mar 16 468 468ø 468 468ø May 16 474fl 474fl 472ø 472ø Jul 16 475fl 476 474ü 474ü Sep 16 468fl 468fl 466ø 466ø Dec 16 461ø 461ø 458ü 458ü Jul 17 468 468 464fl 464fl Dec 17 459fl 459fl 456ü 456ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 180931. Thu’s Sales: 256,733 Thu’s open int: 1299145, up +3522 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 400 401 393ø 399ø May 14 356fl 358fl 352 357ü Jul 14 326 328ø 326 326ø Sep 14 308fl 311 306ø 311 Dec 14 300 300 298ü 298ü Mar 15 299ø 299ø 293ü 293ü May 15 302ü 302ø 302ü 302ø Jul 15 302ü 302ø 302ü 302ø Sep 15 302ü 302ø 302ü 302ø Dec 15 302ü 302ø 302ü 302ø Jul 16 302ü 302ø 302ü 302ø Sep 16 302ü 302ø 302ü 302ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 838. Thu’s Sales: 682 Thu’s open int: 10687, up +217 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 14 1312fl 1318ø 1305ø 1316ø May 14 1294fl 1298ø 1288 1297ü Jul 14 1280 1283ø 1273ü 1282 Aug 14 1241 1241ü 1234ü 1241ü Sep 14 1175 1175 1164ü 1171ø Nov 14 1122ø 1129 1116 1125 Jan 15 1126fl 1133ü 1121fl 1130ü Mar 15 1127fl 1136ü 1127fl 1135 May 15 1132ø 1136 1131ü 1136 Jul 15 1136ü 1140 1136ü 1140 Aug 15 1129 1133ü 1129 1133ü Sep 15 1112fl 1116ø 1112fl 1116ø Nov 15 1111 1113fl 1105ø 1112 Jan 16 1110ø 1113ø 1110ø 1113ø Mar 16 1110 1113 1110 1113 May 16 1108ü 1111ü 1108ü 1111ü Jul 16 1108fl 1111fl 1108fl 1111fl Aug 16 1106ü 1109ü 1106ü 1109ü Sep 16 1093ü 1096ü 1093ü 1096ü Nov 16 1066 1068ü 1066 1068ü Jul 17 1071 1073ü 1071 1073ü Nov 17 1061 1063ü 1061 1063ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 156334. Thu’s Sales: 191,000 Thu’s open int: 605353, up +12396

FUTURES -8ø -9 -8fl -8fl -8fl -8fl

-4 -3fl -3ü -3ü -3ü -3ø -3 -2ø -3 -3ø -2fl -2ü -2ü -2ü -3ü -3ü -3ø

-ü +3ü +ø -ø -1ø -2 +ü +ü +ü +ü +ü +ü

+1ø +1 +fl +1 +2fl +2ø +2fl +2ü +2ü +4ü +3fl +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +2ü +2ü +2ü

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Feb 14 94.17 94.94 93.94 94.37 Mar 14 94.29 95.07 94.06 94.59 Apr 14 94.06 94.83 93.83 94.44 May 14 93.58 94.34 93.41 94.03 Jun 14 92.93 93.73 92.80 93.45 Jul 14 92.44 92.96 92.29 92.70 Aug 14 91.21 92.09 91.21 91.85 Sep 14 90.92 91.25 90.71 91.01 Oct 14 90.12 90.51 89.94 90.26 Nov 14 89.26 89.67 89.26 89.62 Dec 14 88.46 89.30 88.39 89.03 Jan 15 88.10 88.50 88.09 88.30 Feb 15 87.55 87.60 87.50 87.60 Mar 15 86.99 Apr 15 86.36 86.41 86.36 86.41 May 15 85.90 Jun 15 85.30 85.64 84.80 85.42 Jul 15 84.84 Aug 15 84.00 84.35 84.00 84.35 Sep 15 83.80 83.93 83.59 83.93 Oct 15 83.19 83.52 83.19 83.52 Nov 15 83.16 Dec 15 82.53 83.06 82.52 82.85 Jan 16 82.40 Feb 16 81.98 Mar 16 81.60 81.60 81.59 81.59 Last spot N/A Est. sales 446009. Thu’s Sales: 509,874 Thu’s open int: 1625214, up +7286 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Feb 14 2.5944 2.6365 2.5900 2.6204 Mar 14 2.6085 2.8046 2.6040 2.6309 Apr 14 2.7884 2.8272 2.7861 2.8101 May 14 2.7865 2.8253 2.7865 2.8082 Jun 14 2.7666 2.8200 2.7666 2.7876 Jul 14 2.7569 2.7734 2.7520 2.7581 Aug 14 2.7259 2.7347 2.7226 2.7226 Sep 14 2.6919 2.6969 2.6824 2.6824 Oct 14 2.5452 2.5545 2.5399 2.5407 Nov 14 2.5120 2.5182 2.5098 2.5098

chg.

+.41 +.49 +.52 +.55 +.56 +.57 +.57 +.57 +.58 +.59 +.59 +.59 +.58 +.58 +.56 +.54 +.52 +.52 +.51 +.49 +.48 +.47 +.46 +.45 +.43 +.40

+.0253 +.0200 +.0152 +.0138 +.0123 +.0105 +.0080 +.0059 +.0082 +.0097

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE CALL TODAY

575.622.7710

Bobcats 100, Raptors 95 CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Al Jefferson had 22 points and 19 rebounds, and Charlotte held on to beat Toronto for the seventh straight time at home. Jefferson became the first Bobcats player to have a double-double in the first quarter with 10 points and 10 rebounds, sending Charlotte to a 26-11 lead. The Bobcats stretched the lead to 30 in the third quarter but had to withstand a furious Toronto rally. With point guard Kemba Walker out with a sprained ankle, Ramon Sessions and Jannero Pargo combined for 40 points on 10 of 17 shooting. Sessions had 23 points and was 10 of 11 from the line, including two free throws with 1.6 seconds left. DeMar Derozan had 25 points and Kyle Lowry had 21 for the Atlantic Division-leading Raptors, who fell to .500 after their fourth straight road loss.

Wizards 107, 76ers 99 WASHINGTON (AP) — Bradley Beal had 22 points, nine rebounds and eight assists, Marcin Gortat added 19 points and 11 rebounds, and Washington beat Philadelphia to reach .500 for the fourth time this season. Washington has lost each of the previous times it reached .500. On Wednesday against Boston, the Wizards will try to get

Dec 14 2.4917 2.5014 2.4897 2.4918 Jan 15 2.4851 2.4855 2.4851 2.4855 Feb 15 2.4905 Mar 15 2.5040 Apr 15 2.6453 May 15 2.6438 Jun 15 2.6273 Jul 15 2.6068 Aug 15 2.5853 Sep 15 2.5588 Oct 15 2.4228 Nov 15 2.3893 Dec 15 2.3673 Jan 16 2.3673 Feb 16 2.3693 Mar 16 2.3743 Last spot N/A Est. sales 117772. Thu’s Sales: 177,525 Thu’s open int: 258814, up +8188 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Feb 14 4.370 4.385 4.293 4.326 Mar 14 4.313 4.324 4.227 4.259 Apr 14 4.109 4.113 4.057 4.081 May 14 4.073 4.092 4.050 4.068 Jun 14 4.112 4.117 4.074 4.090 Jul 14 4.143 4.143 4.100 4.117 Aug 14 4.144 4.151 4.111 4.125 Sep 14 4.111 4.130 4.096 4.110 Oct 14 4.152 4.152 4.095 4.124 Nov 14 4.166 4.186 4.150 4.165 Dec 14 4.276 4.291 4.251 4.270 Jan 15 4.373 4.380 4.324 4.352 Feb 15 4.330 4.337 4.288 4.318 Mar 15 4.250 4.252 4.250 4.252 Apr 15 3.973 3.980 3.956 3.974 May 15 3.961 3.961 3.940 3.949 Jun 15 3.966 Jul 15 3.990 4.002 3.984 3.984 Aug 15 4.005 4.010 3.984 3.994 Sep 15 3.985 Oct 15 4.010 Nov 15 4.070 4.070 4.048 4.058 Dec 15 4.180 4.185 4.176 4.176 Jan 16 4.291 4.295 4.271 4.271 Feb 16 4.248 Mar 16 4.198 Last spot N/A Est. sales 279832. Thu’s Sales: 601,777 Thu’s open int: 1285168, up +3109

METALS

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Fri. Aluminum -$0.7946 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.3317 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.3785 N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Lead - $2198.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.9443 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1250.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1251.70 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri. Silver - $20.390 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $20.267 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Platinum -$1447.00 troy oz., Handy & Harman. Platinum -$1452.60 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

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over .500 for the first time since they were 2-1 on Oct. 31, 2009. Beal missed 12 of 14 shots in Saturday’s loss to Detroit but snapped back to score 13 in the second quarter and help give Washington a 61-51 lead at halftime. Michael Carter-Williams led Philadelphia, which has lost seven of eight, with 31. Thaddeus Young had 18. Spencer Hawes had 11 points and tied his season high with 14 rebounds.

+.0111 +.0123 +.0143 +.0153 +.0153 +.0148 +.0143 +.0138 +.0133 +.0128 +.0088 +.0083 +.0083 +.0083 +.0083 +.0083

-.056 -.065 -.031 -.024 -.024 -.024 -.025 -.025 -.025 -.022 -.021 -.021 -.022 -.023 -.021 -.022 -.022 -.021 -.021 -.020 -.020 -.020 -.020 -.020 -.020 -.020

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

MARKET SUMMARY AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg BkofAm 938825 17.01 -.07 S&P500ETF897402183.64 -.79 GenElec 656585 26.58 -.62 BestBuy 596662 24.43 -2.40 iShEMkts 568779 39.79 -.20

Name Vol (00) ImmunoCll 141185 RexahnPh 135583 AlldNevG 74889 CheniereEn 37206 NwGold g 26968

Last 1.16 1.10 4.83 45.93 5.81

Name DirGMnBull SunTr wtB RCS Cap n DxGldBll rs RioAltoM g

Last 24.64 6.43 21.45 36.16 2.20

Chg +3.52 +.81 +2.30 +3.00 +.18

%Chg +16.7 +14.3 +12.0 +9.0 +8.9

Name AmDGEn GTT Comm GlblScape B2gold g MAG Slv g

Last 2.40 8.86 2.55 2.50 6.58

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg +.40 +20.0 KingtoneW 12.30 +7.35 +148.5 +.76 +9.4 ChAdCns rs 7.50 +2.51 +50.3 +.21 +9.0 Stemline n 30.44 +8.62 +39.5 +.19 +8.2 GenVec h 3.63 +.81 +28.7 +.48 +7.9 Ninetowns 2.21 +.47 +27.0

Name SilvSpNet n DirGMBear VersoPap CapOne wt DirDGdBr s

Last 17.69 36.14 2.75 31.73 31.49

Chg -5.81 -7.38 -.38 -4.00 -3.16

%Chg -24.7 -17.0 -12.1 -11.2 -9.1

Name CorMedix Oragenics TrioTch ImpacMtg Vicon

Last 2.45 3.99 3.24 6.08 3.25

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg -.30 -10.9 NovaLfstyl 6.45 -2.40 -27.1 -.32 -7.5 ElizArden 27.96 -6.54 -19.0 -.21 -6.1 Performnt 9.00 -1.58 -14.9 -.38 -5.8 QIWI n 40.00 -6.06 -13.2 -.20 -5.8 AtlasAir 38.04 -5.61 -12.8

1,264 1,832 100 3,196 186 19

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

DIARY

Volume

Name AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola Disney EOG Res EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Intel 998544 SiriusXM 475045 MicronT 461302 BlackBerry 424777 Facebook 373717

DIARY

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last 16,458.56 7,427.46 492.70 10,343.46 2,374.26 4,197.58 1,838.70 19,658.71 1,168.43

Net Chg +41.55 -29.08 ... -32.77 -3.91 -21.11 -7.19 -72.40 -4.70

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

Div

PE

Last

Chg

1.84f .90f .04 2.92f 4.00 1.12 .86f .75 3.62f 2.52 .50f .58 1.20a .90 3.80 2.64

25 14 17 25 10 21 22 42 10 10 13 11 9 14 13 21

33.70 -.26 70.16 -.07 17.01 -.07 140.46 +.25 119.29 +.46 39.28 -.43 73.98 -.23 168.96 -1.14 52.99 -.31 99.16 +.22 16.52 -.21 29.80 +.24 48.00 +.51 25.85 -.69 190.09 +1.33 95.06 +.42

DIARY

151,176,759 Volume

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

YTD %Chg Name -4.2 +2.3 +9.2 +2.9 -4.5 -4.9 -3.2 +.7 -7.4 -2.0 +7.1 +6.5 -3.4 -.4 +1.3 +3.8

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

Chg -.69 +.05 -.75 +.52 -.89

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

235 170 25 430 15 2

INDEXES

Last 25.85 3.71 22.38 9.08 56.30

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

3,551,706,036 Volume

52-Week High Low 16,588.25 13,447.49 7,508.74 5,569.78 537.86 456.26 11,334.65 8,671.06 2,471.19 2,186.97 4,219.28 3,093.32 1,850.84 1,463.76 19,760.54 15,444.13 1,173.13 875.42

Chg +.18 -.02 +.03 -.57 +.10

1,064 1,519 116 2,699 174 16

2,088,282,442

% Chg +.25 -.39 ... -.32 -.16 -.50 -.39 -.37 -.40

YTD % Chg -.71 +.36 +.43 -.55 -2.14 +.50 -.52 -.24 +.41

52-wk % Chg +20.58 +30.41 +6.44 +17.64 -.72 +33.91 +23.74 +25.42 +30.87 YTD %Chg

Div

PE

Last

Chg

1.76f 1.12 2.92f .74f 2.27 1.04f 1.56f .16 1.20 1.15 .70e 2.12 1.88 .40 1.20 1.12

31 14 22 20 19 16 13 24 28 16 ... 68 15 15 12 15

51.95 36.38 50.60 24.59 82.20 31.09 76.02 21.22 43.45 64.40 19.85 48.35 76.19 23.06 46.39 28.20

-.55 +3.8 -.51 -2.8 -.21 -3.9 -.08 +1.9 -.66 -.9 -.08 +1.5 +.63 -1.4 -.24 +12.6 +.08 -1.0 -.55 -7.6 -.05 -.7 -.18 -1.6 -.57 -3.2 ... -1.0 ... +2.2 ... +.9\\

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


Roswell Daily Record

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: I just read the letter from “Twice Bitten in Washington” (Nov. 4), who had thanked veterans for their service to our country and received several negative responses. I’m a retired vet, dying from Agent Orange poisoning. I served two tours in Vietnam, and when I retur ned from ‘Nam, I was called a baby killer, spat upon and refused taxi service because I was in uniform. America has had a change in attitude since the Vietnam War. Today, many folks appreciate

what the military is doing. I have been thanked several times while wearing my Vietnam veterans hat and it makes me feel great, to the point my eyes water. Tell “Twice Bitten” to continue thanking the military vets. It means a lot, especially to vets like me. Sure beats being called a baby killer. VIETNAM VET

DEAR VIETNAM VET: I received many letters like yours from Vietnam vets who were also not thanked for their service when they returned home. Like you, they very much appreciate hearing a “delayed” thanks for their service. I would like to thank you and all the readers who responded to that column with such emotional and sometimes gut-wrenching stories. Read on: DEAR ABBY: I would like to offer “Twice” an explanation for the reaction

The Wizard of Id

COMICS

she received. I served two tours in Iraq and lost some good friends. When vets retur n home from war, home is a scary place. The life we lived and breathed is no longer. After spending so much time fearing the unknown and protecting ourselves physically and emotionally, we can’t stop. Many of us came home feeling guilty that we lived while others died — ashamed that we might not have done enough, that we should have been the one who was laid to rest, that maybe if we had looked harder, fought harder, we wouldn’t have lost a soldier. When I retur ned home, I reacted the way “Twice” described. I was resentful that someone would take the time to honor me, but not the friends I lost. It was a long time before I realized that by honoring me with their sincere thanks, they were honoring every soldier we have ever lost. Now when I am thanked, I

shake hands, I hug, and I thank them for their respect.

To “Twice”: Never stop! Do not be afraid. We are not hateful or angry. We are scared and sad. Your expression of thanks means more than any parade, any medal or any award could ever mean.

Family Circus

BRANDON IN INDIANA

DEAR READERS:

May I suggest some other ways to thank vets and those currently in the military? Volunteer at a veterans hospital and bring flowers and toiletries. If you live near a base, volunteer to support the USO at your local airport to make travel more comfortable for our servicemen and women. Donate to Wounded Warriors or similar organizations, or the Veterans of Foreign Wars or Disabled American Veterans.

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Dear Readers: A recent column offered safety hints for using an ATM (automated teller machine). Many of you wrote in with a “safety hint” you wanted to see added to that list. However, the hint is NOT CORRECT and could even be dangerous to use. The hint you shared is about putting your ATM PIN (personal identification number) in backward to help contact police if you are forced to use the ATM by a criminal. The “hint” reports that supposedly the money comes out, and the police do, too. But the robber has no idea that the police have been contacted and are on the way. Sorry, folks, this is not so. While it is true that the technology exists, a Federal Trade Commission study found that it just did not make sense to have it installed in ATMs. Also, the research suggested it may actually be more dangerous to have this system available, and that ATMs are safe enough. So, DO NOT attempt to put your PIN in backward if you are in danger. Give the person what he or she wants, get to a safe place and contact police ASAP. Heloise

#####

Dear Heloise: Why do we always use a bookmark to mark just the pages we are between? I came upon this hint: Place a two-sided bookmark HORIZONTALLY across the print where you stop reading. My bookmark has printing on the side that I leave next to the print in the book, and a picture on the other side. The bookmark protrudes from the side instead of the top of the book, and I can always find just where I stopped reading. Now I save time by not reading the same paragraph again until I find where I left off. Samantha H. in Texas Dear Heloise: A co-worker was scheduled for major surgery and was going to be home recovering for a couple of months. Our office collected DVDs, books and magazines to send home with her so she would have plenty of things to keep her occupied. Co-workers can do even more (depending on office size) by scheduling food drop-offs, collecting restaurant gift cards or offering drives to doctor visits. Carol A. in Louisiana

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

All good heart hints! Don’t forget, “get well” and funny cards do help to brighten a day. Heloise

#####

Dear Heloise: Kids love to play with glue and glitter. My hint is about removing glitter from a child’s face, especially around the eyes. It’s quite simple: Just use a piece of clear office tape. Place the tape lightly over the stubborn glitter and gently pull it off. If it doesn’t come off the first time, use a little more pressure on the tape so it will adhere to the glitter. This is much easier than trying to wash it off. Vivian N. in Ohio

Zits

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

B5


B6 Tuesday, January 21, 2014

CLASSIFIEDS / GENERAL

Wedding insurance expands Claudio Abbado dies at 80 as cost of weddings balloons HAR TFORD, Conn. (AP) — Worried about the groom getting cold feet? There’s an insurance policy for that. With the cost of the average American wedding reaching about $26,000, insurers have been selling a growing number of policies to protect against losses from extreme weather, illness and, in one firm’s case, even a sudden change of heart. Cheryl Winter spent $500 for Hartfordbased Travelers Cos. Inc. to cover her daughter’s $50,000 destination wedding last October in New Orleans, where her biggest concern was a potential hurricane. The weather cooperated, but the limousine never showed up. Her daughter took a taxi cab to the church, and they used the insurance policy to claim the deposit money they couldn’t get back from the limo driver. “No one wants to be walking in the French Quarter in a long gown and high heels,” said Winter, who lives in the Houston area. The insurance is offered by a small number of U.S. companies. Insurers declined to provide data on the number of customers beyond saying they are growing steadily. It can cover losses from issues ranging from bankrupt wedding halls to cancelations forced by unexpected military deployments. Travelers says issues with vendors account for about a quarter of the claims, with most of those

Legals

Notice of Pendency of Action... Publish January 21, 28, February 4, 2014

FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES

TERRY W. LEE Plaintiff, V.

THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF PATRICIA M. CANFIELD, Deceased, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF ALFRED E. COULOMBE, Deceased, URSLEY V. COULOMBE, if living, if deceased, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF URSLEY V. COULOMBE, Deceased, and ALL UNKNOWN CLAIMANTS OF INTEREST, TITLE OR LIEN ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF, Defendants CV-2013-00514

NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION

1. Please be advised that the above captioned lawsuit has been filed against the named Defendants. 2. The lawsuit seeks to Quiet the Title to real property located at 3308 North Bandolina Drive, Chaves County, Roswell, New Mexico. 3. Defendants in this lawsuit are as recited above. Notice is hereby given to the Unknown Heirs of the following named deceased person: Patricia M. Canfield; Unknown Heirs of the following named deceased person: Alfred E. Coulombe; the following named defendant by name, if living; if deceased, her Unknown Heirs: Ursley V. Coulombe; and to Unknown Persons who claim a lien, interest, or title adverse to the Plaintiff; names unknown. 4. The name, address and telephone number of Plaintiff’s Attorney is: David M. Stevens, Attorneys at Law, PC, 400 North Pennsylvania, Suite 940, Roswell, N.M. 88201, 575-622-8777. 5. Be advised that if you fail to answer or otherwise plead to this lawsuit within 30 days of the last date of publication, that a Default Judgment may be taken against you. /s/Freddie J. Romero District Court Judge Division 6

Prepared by: David M. Stevens Attorneys at Law, PC 400 North Pennsylvania Suite 940 Roswell, New Mexico 88201 575-622-8777

related to issues with photographers or videographers. For Travelers, an insurance giant with annual revenue of $26 billion, the policies will not make or break the bottom line. But the wedding insurance it began selling in 2007 is also a way to connect with a couple who might later think of the company for home insurance and other life milestones. “It could be the beginning of a relationship with a young couple,” said Ed Charlebois, a Travelers vice president for personal insurance. Wedsafe, backed by Aon, also offers wedding insurance, which differs little from the specialty insurance that firms may offer for other kinds of events and celebrations. For parents concerned about a relationship souring before the exchange of vows, Fireman’s Fund Insurance Co. offers change of heart insurance. It’s been available since 2007, but the program administrator said the fraud rate soared in the early years as policies were bought for couples who were known to be fighting. That coverage now applies only if the bride or groom calls off the wedding more than nine months beforehand. “Coverage does not exist once you hit the altar,” said administrator Rob Nuccio of R.V. Nuccio & Associates. “The only ones who were buying it were the ones who knew they would have a claim.”

ANNOUNCEMENTS 015. Personals Special Notice

LOOKING FOR BROTHER born 1941 -1942 in Albuquerque, NM in a girls home-orphanage, mother from Roswell, father from Albuquerque, father’s last name Majors 209-573-1130

025. Lost and Found

FOUND DOG this morning 1/15/14 just after 8 a.m. on swinging spear rd and Bandolina nearest cross streets Berrendo and N Main St. She is well mannered and very friendly, she is about 1 years old. Don't want to call the pound to come get her, will try to hold her until owner is found! 910-4653 Lost small black dog, Poodle/Schnauzer cross, 6 mile hill, Ruidoso Hwy,420-8706 FOUND SMALL blind female dog at the Base Allsup’s Jan. 11th. Call to identify, 575-910-8311.

INSTRUCTION

030. Education & Instructions

MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant!NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC Train gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 1-888-926-6073

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities WANTED RECEPTIONIST for busy medical office. Bilingual required. Fax resume to 575-622-5708.

045. Employment Opportunities

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

RENAL MEDICINE ASSOCIATES (Roswell office) is accepting resumes for certified medical assistant (CMA). Position will be part time, approximately 25 hours per week. Anticipated start date is 2/10/2014. Please submit resume to Renal Medicine Associates, 313 W. Country Club, Suite 12, fax to 575-627-5835, susan.d@renalmed.com ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Needed at Family Owned Service Business, Full Time Position, Experience in Accounts Receivable & Microsoft Office. Apply in person at 1206 W. Hobbs ALLSTATE SECURITY Services is currently seeking motivated and dependable individuals for part time and PRN positions. Hours and days may vary. Must be 18 years or older, have reliable transportation and be able to pass a drug screen. Please pick up an application at 1122 S. Union Ave. Fridays from 9 a.m to 1 p.m. You may also drop off your resume in the mail slot.

ROME (AP) — Claudio Abbado, a star in the great generation of Italian conductors revered for developing a rapport with members of the world’s leading orchestras while still allowing them their independence, died Monday. He was 80. Abbado died at home in Bologna after a long illness, said Raffaella Grimaudo, spokeswoman for the Bologna mayor’s office. Abbado made his debut in 1960 at La Scala in his home city of Milan and went on to be its music director for nearly 20 years. Among his many other positions were as music director of the Vienna State Opera, the Berlin Philharmonic and the London Symphony Orchestra and as principal guest conductor of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Even as he battled illness in his later years, sharply cutting back on his appearances, Abbado founded his own all-star orchestra in Lucerne, Switzerland, and devoted more time to training young musicians and founding youth orchestras in Europe. Just last year, Italy’s president paid tribute to him by naming him senator for life.

045. Employment Opportunities LICENSED ELECTRICIAN wanted the Artesia area. Competitive pay, 401k and insurance. Oilfield experience preferred. Call 575-748-5704 for more information

PECOS VALLEY Broadcasting has immediate openings for Advertising Sales Representatives. Help local businesses grow their business by selling them advertising our or many platforms including radio, video and digital. Base salary plus generous commission program. We’ll train! Apply with Gene Dow VP & GM, hireme@pvbcradio.com PVBC is an Equal Opportunity Employer! Women and minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. Tobosa Developmental Services is currently seeking Direct Care Support Staff for the Residential Department. Experience with developmentally disabled preferred but not required. Please submit current resume with completed application, police background check, copy of High School Diploma and driving record at 110 E. Summit, Roswell, NM 88203 or call (575)624-1025. Salary is negotiable based on experience and education level. Applications open until positions are filled. EOE ALL ABOUT SPAS is accepting applications for a full time Service Technician. Understanding of electrical and plumbing helpful but will train the right person. Must be able to pass drug screening & background check. Inquire at All About Spas, 3700 N. Main St., Roswell.

Roswell Daily Record

In an unusually personal message of condolences, President Giorgio Napolitano said Abbado had “honored the great musical tradition of our country in Europe and the rest of the world.” The Berlin Philharmonic, where Abbado was chief conductor from 1990 to 2002, said it was mourning ‘’an extraordinary musician and person.” ‘’His love of music and his insatiable curiosity were an inspiration to us,” a statement on the orchestra’s website said. Symphony Chicago Orchestra Music Director Ricardo Muti said he admired Abbado for the “seriousness and profundity that characterized his life as a musician and as a Maestro.” Abbado was known for his musical ability, for conducting his programs without scores and for his rapport with orchestra members. He had suffered health problems for many years, resigning his Vienna Opera post for unspecified health reasons in 1991 and then undergoing stomach cancer surgery in 2000. La Scala said illness forced the cancellation of

045. Employment Opportunities

THE ROSWELL Daily Record is now accepting applications for the Full Time position of: OUTSIDE SALES The ideal candidate must possess excellent customer service skills, superior organizational skills a self-starter and strong work ethic. This is a full time position. Interested Applicants please send resume & references to: ROSWELL DAILY RECORD Attn: Vonnie Fischer, 2301 N. Main, Roswell, NM 88201 or e-mail to: addirector@rdrnews.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! Family Resource & Referral is looking for qualified individuals to work the 2014 After School Program. Must be at least 18 years old and enjoy working and playing with school age children. Hours are Monday - Friday 2:30 pm - 5:30 pm except on Wednesdays 1:30 pm 5:30 pm. Previous childcare experience is preferred but not required. Please apply at 118 E. 4th Street or call 623-9438. EOE ALL ABOUT SPAS is accepting applications for a full time Service Technician. Understanding of electrical and plumbing helpful but will train the right person. Must be able to pass drug screening & background check. Inquire at All About Spas, 3700 N. Main St., Roswell. Frontier Medical Home Care is currently accepting applications for the following positions: R.N. Full & Part Time positions available C.N.A Part time position. Office Assistant Medical billing experience needed. Please call 627-1112 or stop by 217-A N. Main Street for applications or to drop off resumes.

two highly anticipated concerts in 2010 that were to have marked his return to the Milan opera house for the first time in 25 years and be the 50th anniversary of his conducting debut. The excitement had been such that Abbado had requested that 90,000 trees be planted in his name for the benefit of Milan residents as a living memorial to mark his return to the city. The project was later abandoned by the city as too costly. A tribute on La Scala’s website said Abbado had given the opera house ‘’18 of his finest years,” starting in 1986 when he was named musical director of the orchestra. It hailed Abbado for leaving his mark as a conductor ‘’without confines, as a musician without preconceptions, as a man of theater ready to risk, as a man of thought open to the world.” Abbado is survived by his second wife and four children. A wake was planned for Tuesday in a Bologna church, where music will be played in tribute, the LaPresse agency reported from that city.

045. Employment Opportunities NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT The Town of Carrizozo is seeking applications for a full-time New Mexico Certified Police Officer or eligible to certify by waiver. Salary starts at $16.50 per hour plus health insurance and retirement. Complete job description and applications are available at the Town of Carrizozo City Hall, 400 9th Street, PO Box 247, Carrizozo, NM 88301. Applications will be accepted until positions is filled. Please mail completed applications along wtih resume to Town of Carrizozo, PO Box 828, Carrizozo, NM 88301 Att: Chief Barnett or deliver them to 404 Central Street, Carrizozo, NM 88301. Te;ephone number is 575-648-2351 Email address is: carrizozopolice@tularosa.net

045. Employment Opportunities

Tobosa Developmental Services is seeking a Registered Nurse and/or Licensed Practical Nurse. Position is responsible for maintaining the highest level of nursing documentation as guided by best practices for documentation standards by the mainstream healthcare industry and maintaining a flexible case load of low to moderate acuity patients. Experience with developmentally disabled preferred but not required. Please submit current resume with completed application, police background check, and driving record. Apply at Tobosa Developmental Services, 110 E. Summit, Roswell, NM 88203 or call (575)624-1025. Salary is negotiable based on experience and education level. EOE

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES at ROSWELL FORD Come grow with us! We offer great pay and benefits in an excellent working environment. We will provide training for the right people. Please apply in person 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

SERVICE TECHNICIAN Build your career here! Roswell Ford has an immediate opening for a general service technician. We offer up to $30 an hour, great benefits and a busy shop. See Rick.

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/TITLE CLERK Looking for a full-time position for person with strong computer skills and a willingness to learn new tasks. Apply in person between 9 am and 3pm.

FINANCE MANAGER Previous dealership experience recommended or background in finance, real estate or insurance required. Must be organized and friendly.

ROSWELL FORD 821 NORTH MAIN, ROSWELL, NM • 575-623-3673 www.roswellford.com


Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

REGISTERED DENTAL HYGIENIST Must be comfortable with Soft Tissue Management using Prodentec guidelines. Send resume to PO Box 1897 Unit 365 Roswell, NM 88202

Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR

BREAKFAST & evening server position available, at the new Holiday Inn. Located at 3620 N Main, Apply in person. No phone calls please. Phlebotomy Certification Class (Blood Drawing), January 25 & 26, $300. 505-410-7889 or 505-410-9559 swphlebotomy.com BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE Associates, Inc. is currently hiring for part time receptionist: must be bilingual and able to work weekends and evenings. If interested, bring resume and 3 references to 1010 N. Virginia. Ask for Jacque KYMERA NEW MEDICAL OFFICE POSITIONS:

As a growing Independent Physicians Office, Kymera and is now seeking Qualified Applicants for:

Registered Nurse: FT: Applicants must possess the ability to work with multiple patients in a high volume office setting, background in chart prep, EMR knowledge, familiarity with injections & drawing lab-work. Multi-tasking and patient service skills essential. BS & 2-4 yrs Med Off exp. or equivalent. Fax Resume w/ Cover Ltr to: Kymera HR 575-627-9520

045. Employment Opportunities

DONOR RECRUITMENT REP, FT, ROSWELL, NM. Schedule blood drives w/i center. Directs, trains, and motivates volunteer blood drive coordinators and committee mbrs. Develops new donor sources. Maintains ongoing public and media relations pgrm. Develops annual recruitment plan. Prepare, assess and respond to monthly forecast info. Develop and maintain donor recognition prgrms. Follows established sales/recruitment process (including projection accuracy). Maintains and ensures accuracy and timeliness of acct info. Builds relationships with external depts and internal staff. Communicates effectively. Represents company through personal contacts, public speaking and educational presentations. Varied hours & workdays. Requirements: Relevant Bachelor's degree or equiv combination of educ and exp. Valid in–state driver’s license. 1-year related exp preferred. Effective oral and written comm skills. Sales/territory management skills. Self-motivated and a self-starter with good organization skills. Ability to work flexible hrs incl wkends/evenings. Provide own vehicle for transportation. Proficient computer skills. Exc benefits. Send resume/application by 1/31/14 to Lori Schmittle, United Blood Services, 1515 University Blvd. NE, ABQ, NM 87102; email UBSNMJobs@ bloodsystems.org. List Reference #212-1225-2014-0001. Pre-employment background and drug screening required. EOE M/F/D/V

BEALLS Now hiring full time Sales Associate must be able to work days, evenings & weekends, retail experience preferred. Apply in person. AmeriPride Linen and Apparel

REQUISITION# 106917 Relief Customer Service Rep

Application open from January 6, 2014 to February 5, 2014. High School Diploma/GED, experience with route sales desired, ability to work directly with customers, build relationship with customers by providing resolutions to problems and complaints, clean driving record, ability to lift up to 50 lbs and pass a Department of Transportation drug test and physical. Competitive salary and benefits. Application must be filled out online at careerbuilders.com EOE EMPLOYEE

RMC LOOKING for a FT LPN to fill a position with high volume. Applicant must have at least 2 yrs exp. with knowledge of EMR charting. All applicants are subject to a background check and a drug test. Please send your resume to 111 W. Hobbs St. with reference. No phone calls ADVERTISING SALESPERSON-- Business is booming at Roswell’s leading radio stations Q97.1, KMOU, KSFX and KBCQ. Experience preferred but we’ll train the right person. Fun, challenging, great income potential. Call Bob Entrop 622-6450

CLASSIFIEDS

045. Employment Opportunities

MAINTANCE POSITION available at the new Holiday Inn located at 3620N. Main. Please apply in person. No phone calls please. Do you enjoy people? Do you like to have fun?

Champion Motorsports Southeastern New Mexico's largest motorcycle dealership is accepting Applications Tuesday-Friday January 21-24, 2014 From 10:00am-3:00pm

We are looking for people who: •Understand what great customer service means •Like to have fun •Like to be productive In Exchange We Offer: •Fun people to work with •Competitive pay •Health Insurance •401K •Vacation •All the training you will need to be successful in our store

Champion Motorsports has openings in Motorcycle Sales, Parts & Accessories Sales, and technicians. Only those interested in helping us make Champion Motorsports famous for out of this world service should apply. If that's you stop by to fill out an application Tuesday-Friday January 21-24, 2014 from 10:00am-3:00pm. 2801 West Second Street Roswell, NM. HIRING VACUUM truck drivers, with tanker endorsement, around the local hill area, must have a CDL and clean driving record, and must pass a DOT drug test. For more info 575-677-3371 ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER JOBS in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper to place your ad or log onto www.nmpress.org for more information. HEALTH CARE NAVY RESERVE. Serve part-time. Elite training. Great pay & benefits. Sign-on bonus up to $20K. $ for education. Call Mon-Fri (800) 354-9627 CAR RENTAL Company now hiring counter sales/rental associate. Applicants must have clean driving record and be drug free. Neat appearance and dependability for these positions. Apply at Avis Rent a Car inside airport.

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575)-622-7710 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM MONDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS, need people to start now. No experience necessary, free training, opportunity for advancement. Please call 575-578-4817

SKILLED OR UNSKILLED Due to expansion local company needs hard workers no experience necessary. $1600 per month to start per agreement. START NOW 575-578-4817 Excellent Opportunity Full Time for a reliable outgoing Assistant Manager in a professional office. Strong customer skills & attention to details required. Must have reliable transportation, valid driver’s license & auto insurance. Mon-Fri 35-40 hours/week. Bilingual preferred. Drop off resume at 2601 N. Main, Suite C, No Phone Calls.

TEMPORARY FARM Labor: Salem Operating JV, Inez, TX, has 12 positions rice & irrigation; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.18/hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 2/15/14 – 12/1/14. Apply at nearest NM Workforce Office with Job Order TX3208181 or call 512-475-2571. KYMERA Independent Physicians Roswell, NM MEDICAL OFFICE POSITIONS:

As a growing Independent Physicians’ Office, Kymera is seeking Qualified Applicants for:

Telephone Services Clerk: FT - Customer Svc Skills & ability to work multi-line telephone system required. Applicants should demonstrate friendly/outgoing attitude, and organization skills. Payment Processing Specialist: FT – Experience working medical insurance collections/payments & patient postings required. Computer skills & knowledge of EMR systems preferred.

Radiological Tech: FT - Applicants should be organized, detail-oriented and dependable. Exp. preferred. Radiologic Technologist Certification required. Please Fax resume with cover letter to: HR Mngr 627-9520

045. Employment Opportunities

APPRENTICE ELECTRICIAN opening; Apply in person only at J & G Electric, 512 S Main street. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENTIST - NM Environment Department's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Oversight section, Carlsbad, NM. Observe, assess, and document environmental impacts of activities at the WIPP facility. Work in an office setting, industrial facility, and outdoors to: conduct environmental sampling and monitoring; evaluate and interpret environmental data; and prepare technical reports. Hazardous and radiological training and certification will be required. Qualified applicants must possess a valid NM Driver's License and may be required to qualify for a Department of Energy security clearance and may be subject to random drug testing. Please refer to the State Personnel website http://www.spo.state.nm.us/ referencing Job #____. For more information please contact Ms. Susan Lucas Kamat at 505-845-5933. KRUMLAND AUTO Group has opportunities available for FT clerical positions. Dealership experience helpful but not required. Candidate must be detail oriented and able to work in a fast paced, team oriented environment. Strong organizational skills are a must. Excellent benefit package including: HEALTH, DENTAL, VISION, 401K and PAID VACATION. Fax resumes to (575) 622-5899 Attn: Office Manager or email to officemgr@kagnm.com Dean Baldwin Painting, LP aircraft strip and paint services, is presently looking to fill the following long term, full-time positions: PAINTERS – Exp in stripping and painting aircraft or vehicles. PAINTER HELPERS – Exp preferred but not required. On the job training available! OPTOMETRIC OFFICE seeking receptionist for a 1/2 day/afternoon position. Duties include: answering phone, making appointments, checking in/out patients and general clerical duties. PO Box 1897, Unit #366 Roswell, NM 88202 DISTRICT ATTORNEY’S Office in Roswell has an immediate opening for an experienced secretary who has excellent computer skills. Employment record must reflect good attendance along with good interpersonal skills and organizational skills. Starting salary DOE. Position will remain open until filled. Please send resume by email and/or delivered or mailed to: Valerie Lopez at vlopez@da.state.nm.us or 400 N. Virginia Avenue, Suite G-2, Roswell, NM, 88201. The Roswell Daily Record is currently accepting applications for the position of General Assignment Reporter. Previous reporting experience or strong writing skills required. Applications are available at the Record at 2301 N. Main St. Application materials can also be mailed to: Roswell Daily Record, Attn: Editor, PO Box 1897, Roswell,NM or emailed to editor@rdrnews.com No phone calls, please. CIVIL PROCESS SERVER Chaves County is accepting applications to establish a six month pool of applicants to fill current and future openings for the position of Civil Process Server in the Sheriff's Department. This is an entry level position ($9.80 $12.62/hr DOQ). Position's primary function is the service of civil and criminal process for the state and district courts. This work involves extensive contact with the public, often under unpleasant or tense circumstances. Chaves County offers a competitive benefit package consisting of family, life, vision, and dental insurance plus a retirement plan. Minimum requirements: HS diploma or G.E.D., valid NM driver's license. Must live in Chaves County as a condition of employment. Applicants will not be considered if they have prior felony convictions or D.W.I. conviction within the last 48 months. Chaves County is a drug free employer and all applicants for this position will be required to pass a comprehensive criminal background check and will be subject to post offer, pre-employment drug testing. Required application forms are available at the County's Job Posting Board located in the west wing of the County Administrative Center or by accessing the web site at www.co.chaves.nm.us. Applications may be returned to the County Manager's Suite #180, Chaves County Administrative Center, #1 St. Mary's PL, Roswell, NM 88203 or mailed by closing date to Human Resources, PO Box 1817, Roswell, NM 88202-1817. Applications will be accepted until 5:00 PM, Friday, January 31, 2014. EOE.

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

045. Employment Opportunities

Dennis the Menace

B7

The Albuquerque Job Corps Center has a great job opportunity for a Career Transition Specialist in Roswell, NM. Candidate will provide career, transitional, and follow-up assistance to students graduation from Job Corps for a period of 12 months following placement. Candidate must have a Bachelor’s degree or 4 years experience working with youth. One year experience in sales, marketing, or counselingrelated services.

Send your resume to norris.annette@ jobcorps.org or fax resume to 505-346-2742 TEMPORARY FARM Labor: Harvest 1, Alden, KS, has 7 positions grain & oilseed crops; 6 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days for airbrake endorsement to drive grain & transporter trucks; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; KS - $13.41/hr, CO - $10.89/hr, ND – $13.41 - $3000/mo. + room & boar, SD - $13.41 $2200/mo. + room & board; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 3/1/14 – 12/15/14. Apply at nearest NM Workforce Office with Job Order 9092184 or call 505-383-2721. TEMPORARY FARM Labor: Jeffery Roper Farms, Plains, TX, has 1 positions for grain & oilseed crops; 3 mo. experience required for job duties listed; must be able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.18/hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 2/20/14 – 12/20/14. Apply at nearest NM Workforce Office with Job Order TX3210586 or call 505-383-2721. 6 TEMP positions: Ag. Equipment Operator, 03/01/14 to 12/31/14. We offer $13.41 p/hr at the time work is performed. Housing provided, 48 hrs p/wk. ? guarantee, and transportation and subsistence expenses to worksite paid after 50% completion of contract. Tools, equipment provided at no cost. Duties: drive, plant, harvest, store grain, repair operate tractor, rock picker, plow, disc, drill, harvest equip, sprayer, grain truck. Must be able to lift 60 lbs. Basic literacy and arithmetic required. James & Son Farms, Liberal, KS. Interested? Apply at Garden City Workforce Center, 620-276-2339, job order #9091932. 3 TEMP positions: Ag. Equipment Operator, 03/01/14 to 12/31/14. We offer $13.41 p/hr at the time work is performed. Housing provided, 48 hrs p/wk. ? guarantee, and transportation and subsistence expenses to worksite paid after 50% completion of contract. Tools, equipment provided at no cost. Duties: drive, plant, harvest, store grain, repair operate tractor, rock picker, plow, disc, drill, harvest equip, sprayer, grain truck. Minimum 3 months experience. Must be able to lift 60 lbs. Basic literacy and arithmetic required. Triple T Farms, Colby, KS. Interested? Apply at Hays Workforce Center, or call 785-291-3470, job order #9091941. CHRISTMAS BY KREBS is in search of a Production Master Scheduler. This position is responsible for the analysis of orders received and scheduling production for the manufacturing. The candidate should have the following skills: 1. Associate Degree in Business 2. Proficient in Microsoft Office, Word and Excel 3. Knowledge of Microsoft Access would be a plus 4. Strong Analytical Skills 5. Attention to details 6. Attetion to work with minimum supervision 7. Ability to work closely with management staff to ensure timely production. Applications must be completed at Christmas by Krebs, 3911 South Main St. Please bring resume. TEMPORARY FARM Labor: W&S Turley Ltd Partnership, Durham, OK, has 2 positions grain, hay & livestock; no experience required for duties listed; must be able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.86/hr; three-fourths work period guaranteed from 3/3/14 – 12/15/14. Apply at nearest NM Workforce Office with Job Order OK867318 or call 505-383-2721.

SERVICES

100. Babysitting WILL DO babysitting at my home for reasonable rates, any shift, 317-0963

105. Childcare

CLEAN LICENSED daycare home, all ages, North, reasonable rates 420-6803

140. Cleaning

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

KEEP IT Clean, landscaping, mowing, trimming, cut down trees, clean-up and etc. 910-2033

150. Concrete

Running Bear Concrete Foundations, Driveways, Stamping, Sidewalks, Curbing, Stucco. Lic: 373219. Call 317-6058

185. Electrical

ELECTRICAL SERVICES Meter loops, service upgrades, remodels, additions, service calls. Lowest prices in town. Free estm. Lic#360025. 910-4193

195. Elderly Care

WILL DO home health care and/or housekeeping. Have references. 317-0963 CNA 25 yrs experience, will care for your loved ones, Med certified. 637-1727

200. Fencing

Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100 M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991

210. Firewood/Coal FIREWOOD, oak, pinon, cedar, fur, elm, well season, full or half cord, you pick up or delivered. Call Buz 575-420-9751 or Graves Farm 575-622-1889.

FIREWOOD: $150 per cord = 128 cubic feet. Cash only, blended local woods Mulberry, Ash, Elm, Locust, Dry cut & split. Best value in town. In Roswell 8-5 on Sat. Monday thru Friday, please call first you load what you want any amount. Call 624-1611 For Info CEDAR, PINON firewood seasoned/split. $260 deliver/stacked 420-4532. MOUNTAIN WOOD for sale, Delivery available. 575-420-5124 or 347-0156

220. Furniture Repair WE BUILD and repair furniture. 840-7849 or 626-8466

225. General Construction

Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

Lawn and Landscape Maintenance One time or recurring service available 575-973-1019

285. Miscellaneous Services

Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-661-3783, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping. STRUGGLING WITH YOUR MORTGAGE AND WORRIED ABOUT FORECLOSURE? REDUCE YOUR MORTGAGE & SAVE MONEY. LEGAL LOAN MODIFICATION SERVICES. FREE CONSULTATION. CALL PREFERRED LAW 1-800-915-0432

WRAP UP your Holiday Shopping with 100% guaranteed, delivered–tothe-door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 67% PLUS 4 FREE Burgers - Many Gourmet Favorites ONLY $49.99. ORDER Today 1-800-773-3095 Use Code 49377DLY or www.OmahaSteaks.com/gifts69

310. Painting/ Decorating EXTERIOR/INTERIOR, INSURED. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

www.rancheroswelding.com

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. Call 637-9108.

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552. RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397 www.rancheroswelding.com

www.senaconstruction.com 575-973-1019

230. General Repair

MINOR REPAIRS can make major changes in your home, Call Home Solutions 575-420-9183.

235. Hauling

RWC. BACKHOE, skid steer, dump truck, bom lift, services. Insured. Call Hector 575-910-8397. www.rancheroswelding.com

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Garcia’s Lawn Service, sprinklers & much more at low price. 914-0803. Winter Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242. WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121.

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Professional Roofing, Landscaping, Irrigation, Stucco, Tile, Painting, Concrete and Fence Work (575) 973-1019

395. Stucco Plastering

RWC Lath and Stucco. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

www.rancheroswelding.com

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835 TREE TRIMMING and removal, free estimates, super clean up, 840-9105

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insuranced.

www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397


B8 Tuesday, January 21, 2014 FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale ON LAKE VAN Dexter, great view, 111 Fairway, 706-2114 or 706-1245

2BR/1BA, LARGE living room w/laundry room, 409 W. Summit, 912 sqft, gross living area. 806-729-2383 2310 N. Cole, 1/2br, 1ba, $49,500. Cash down payment required. Handicap access., fenced front & backyard, FP, owner can finance. 575-442-3101 or 434-8900. Immaculate custom home in Briar Ridge, 3yrs old, 3br/2ba, 81 Bent Tree Rd., $132,900. 831-915-0226 OWNER CAN finance, for rent or sale, 2br, 1210 N. Union, you can paint, $53k, $4k down, $550/mo. 622-6786 BY OWNER 3/2 2 car 1836sf. Brick, remodeled, good area, 2203 Barnett. $145K No owner financing, Chris 575-317-3245 2Bd $85K w/house in bk & 3Bd $65K, fncd yrds, call M-Th 8a-noon, 624-1331

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

520. Lots for Sale

LOT at E. Wells at RIAC 113x122 clean lot, $7500, $1500dn, $200mo, 0% int. 575-361-3083. NICE LOT for sale, 1200 W. Stone, $7k terms. 622-6786.

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 1BR EXECUTIVE apt. fully furnished & stocked, central ht/air, utilities, internet, sattelite TV & housekeeping, $1100/mo, $1100/dep. Avail. Feb. 1st. 840-5274

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944

FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944.

1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

JUST OUT OF HOBBS 137 ac. +/- w/1400 cow dairy, a 5 drm., 4 bath, two-story home (over 4,000 sq. ft.) & accompanying improvements. Seller will consider all offers including offers to the divide the property including the home & acreage and/or the dairy & acreage. Please look at our website for information of this property, other dairies, Oklahoma ranches located in a high rainfall area & NM ranches both large & small. We have listed 6 new listings in NM ranging from 480 ac. up to 22,000 ac. to 120,000 ac. Look at website for details and give us a call to discuss these properties, large ranches in NM & OK. ranches in the high rainfall area. www.scottlandcompany.com

www.texascrp.com Ben G. Scott - Broker Krystal M. Nelson - NM Qualifying Broker 800-933-9698

500. Businesses for Sale SELF STORAGE UNITS FOR SALE, 104 units, plus excess land, serious inquiries only. 317-0029

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

COMMERCIAL BLDG. For sale, 14000 Sq. Ft. West 2nd Call 317-0029 FOR SALE OR LEASE 12500 sq. ft commercial building 700ft highway furnished, 6220 SE Main 575-910-3199 1612 S. Main near West Hobbs St. busy intersection approx. 1015 sq. ft. all utilities, $78k owner financing available Joe/Jose 575-317-8310

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

TRIPLE WIDE mobile home in senior park, spacious, 2bd/2ba 1500 Sq. Ft. 3 patios, immaculate new renovation, move in ready, $42,000 OBO. 626-5167 IN SENIOR Park, 2bd/2ba plus add on, cover patio and carport, for additional information contact 505-366-1142

520. Lots for Sale

PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352.

BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $592, 3br/2ba, $674, 5br/2ba $812, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge. Very nice 2br/1.5ba, Apartment. North location, garage, $800/mo, $400/dep, 1 yr lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535.

Beautiful 1BR wtr pd, no pets/smoking, laundry facility. Centrally located in Roswell. Contact John 622-5630 or 910-1648.

Very nice 2br Apartment. 304 W. Mescalero, $625/mo, wtr pd, $300/dep. 6 mo. lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535. EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. 2br/1ba, $625, $400/dep, no HUD or pets. 300 W. Mescalero. 910-1300 1BDRM,1BA, No pets, No Hud,mid-town, water pd., $600 monthly,call 575-703-0073 EFF, 1,2 BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377 CENTURY 21 HOME PLANNING 3117 N Main, 575-622-0021 314 S Birch #C 1bed/1bath $450 2800 W 4th #D 2bed/2bath $550 2403 N Grand #B 2bed/ 1bath $700 2008 Clover 2bed/2bath $850 REMODELED 2BR/2BA, all electric, w/d hookups, $650/mo, $500/dep. 910-0827 TWO BIG 1br appts, nice! Central on bus route, off-street pking. Wtr pd, wash/dry avail. Pet w/approval $500+$550. Call 575-914-8738 2301 N. Grand Apt. A, 2br, 1.5ba, 1car garage & laundry room. 910-4225.

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 EXECUTIVE TOWN House, fully furnished, 3bd., 2 full baths, W/D, 2 car garage, utilities pd., No Hud, No pets, dep. required $1750 monthly. Available 2/1/14, 710 N. Sycamore, call 317-2195 NEED AN extended stay rental, all bills paid? 1-2-3- bedroom homes available now from $50/day-$1495/month. Call anytime www.cozycowboy.com (575) 624-3258, 626-4848, 626-4822. 3BR/1BA, w/all utilities pd including DirecTV & wireless internet, fenced yard w/carport, pets ok w/separate deposit, $1650/mo, great location. 626-4984 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 1516 N. Pontiac, 2 br, 1 ba, near parks, new stove & new ref, W/D hookups, hardwood floors, completely remodeled, fenced yard, very clean and cute, $600 monthly, plus dep., No large dogs (small or medium okay), No HUD. References and Rental History required. Call 578-3034

2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-noon 624-1331 3BR/2.5BA, NICE house, nice area, fenced backyard, $1350/m, 575-637-0777 600 S. Lea, 3br/2ba, ref. air, w/d hookups, fridge & stove, no HUD or pets, $750/mo, $600/dep, 914-5402.

3BR NEAR ENMU-R, #20 Murphy Place, HUD approved, w/garage, ldry rm, new carpet, very clean, $650/mo. 623-6999 or 317-2945 34 H St., $550/mo, $550/dep, 2br/1ba, fenced yard, wtr pd, min. 1yr lease, 627-9942. 3BD/2BA 1800 sq ft. Granite counter top, skylight, walking closet, laundry, 114 W. Oliver St. $950mo, $950dep. No smoking/pet. 702-232-7578 Beautiful 2br/2ba single car garage 55+ condominiums available at 310 W. Mescalero complete with fireplace, full kitchen, washer/dryer hook-ups. Amenities include lawn service, water and electric paid. 2 left under $1000 through January 31st. Call (575) 625-8426. GOOD LOCATION, large 3bd/2ba, appliances, wash/dryer hookups, all electric. $700mo. $600dep. No pets, Hud Ok. 914-0531 3BD/2BA COUNTRY 650 3-1 550, 600, 250 dep. Al 703-0420 Javier 420-0666 2br/1ba, stove & fridge, $500/mo, $275/dep, no HUD. 420-5604 1617 S. Pennsylvania 2br wash/dryer hookup, ref. air, No HUD/pets. $550mo. $500dep. 914-5402 2BR/1BA, 1 yr lease, no pets, HUD accepted, $750/mo. 619-804-5713

CENTURY 21 HOME PLANNING 3117 N Main, 575-622-0021 322 E Bonney 3bed/1bath $600 1403 W Jaffa 3bed/1bath $800 2401 W Alameda 3bed/ 2bath $900 2705 Highland 3bed/ 3bath $2000

3 BDRM, 2BA, 408 S. Cypress. $800m. $600 dep. No pets/HUD. 626-3816 {{{RENTED}}} 1700 N. Pontiac Dr. 2br/1ba, stove & fridge, a/c, heating air, water paid. 2600 CORNELL, $750/mo, $750/dep, no pets or HUD. Call WC Property Management, 575-317-1605. 3br/1ba, 919 Pecan, w/d hookups, $650/mo, $500/dep, no pets or HUD. 575-626-1267

305 S. Evergreen, 2br/1ba, coverd carport, shed, appliances, fenced yard, $750/$500 dep, dogs w/fee, no HUD or utilities pd. 575-405-0163 or kilok9s@gmail.com

NE COUNTRY, nice & clean, RETIRED COUPLE preferred, 3bd/2ba w/carport. Appliances, w/d hu, ref. air, FP, bckyrd w/storage, totally fncd w/security gate, lawn svc, pet approval w/dep., pymnt hstry w/bckgrnd check, wtr pd, NO HUD/SMOKING, 1yr lease, $850/mo, $650/dep. Call 626-3385 or 626-6078. 3br/1ba w/den, stove & fridge, washer/dryer hookups, central heating & air, fenced in backyard w/shed, $950/mo, $600/dep, no bills paid. 420-2831 2BR/2BA, 1 car garage, townhouse, close to Lovelace & ENMMC, $800/mo, $300/dep, 575-910-1605

1111 N. Washington #13, 2br/2ba, detached laundry room. 910-4225

580. Office or Business Places

FOR LEASE, space in Sunwest Centre Office Complex at 500 N. Main St. Various size spaces. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. High floor space available for larger tenants. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 575-623-1652 or mobile 575-420-2546 200 S. Union. Two suites, approximately 1200 sqft and 810 sqft. Great location. Will remodel to suit tenant. Call Jan at 625-2222.

STUDIO HOUSE w/all utilities pd including DirecTV & wireless internet. Has washer & dryer, fenced yard, pets ok w/separate deposit. $1200/mo. Great location. 575-626-4984

2600 N. Main, 750 sqft, $950. Call John Grieves at 626-7813, Broker PELR.

RENTING HOUSE, 716 S. Cedar, 3bd/2ba and office, close to schools, fridge & stove, No smoking no pets. $350/dep. 623-2617

FOR LEASE 3500 Sq. Ft. Excellent location, $1200 mo. $1200 dep. 1 yr lease required. 200 E. College, Call 317-5841 or 317-5796

CLASSIFIEDS

580. Office or Business Places PROFESSIONAL OFFICE in good North Main area. $600 per month plus electric. New carpet tile and paint. Steve 575-420-2100

585. Warehouse and Storage WAREHOUSE ONLY 9000 SF partial a/c & heat, security alarmed, 2 garage doors, 2 standard entry doors, $1000/mo. 2001 S. Main behind Family Furniture. 575-937-0889 or 575-257-0888

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

NEED FURNITURE Shop Blair’s for the best prices on used furniture, beds, dressers, table & chairs, living room sets, patio sets, bookshelves, appliances, antiques, collectibles, home decor & housewares, saddles, tools, movies, plus lots more. Open daily 9-5, closes Wed. 627-2033

Power wheelchair, hospital bed, oxygen cyl. Invacare patient lifter. 622-7638 Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed! DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-315-7043 DIRECTV - Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call Now! Triple savings! $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!! Start saving today! 1-800-264-0340 9 PC. Thomasville DNG. set $999. Thomasville Side table & dresser $200. Broyhill king head board $100. Logan Framers edge mat cutter #650 $225. Frames. 575-623-3284 (2) 3-SHELF brass bathroom space savers, $20 ea.; Pro-Form 56 cross trainer recumbent exercise cycle w/weights, $200. 575-625-2618

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous WE BUY PECANS, Top Prices Paid. 512 W. McGAffey

AH NUTS is buying pecans Monday thru Friday 9am-11:30am, at 4402 N. Brown Road, Last day we will buying is Jan. 24th. 575-208-9575. TOP DOLLAR Paid for furniture, collectibles, appliances, antiques, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We pay cash with same day removal of all items. Compete/partial households & personal estates welcome. 623-0136 or 910-6031

635. Good things to Eat

FROZEN GREEN Chile, dried red chile & chile powder, local pinto beans, peanuts & pecan, ristras, jams & jellies, fountain drinks, fresh eggs, Alfalfa Hay, Wheat, Sudan & Oat hay, small & large bales, we accept credit cards & EBT. GRAVES FARM 622-1889 NEW CROP Western pecans, shelled halves $8.50/lb, quarters $8.00/lb, pieces $7.50/lb. Will deliver in Roswell area only if purchase 5# or more. Call 575-623-3315. BUYING PECANS, Haley Farms, only buying in Jan, fair prices, calibrated scales, Tues. & Thursday, 2pm-5pm, 5018 W. Country Club Rd, new crop only. SHELLED PECANS, Fresh $8.00/pound. 575-622-2353

665. Musical Merchandise

VIOLIN SR Scherl & Rothfor sale $300 OBO. Barely used. 575-491-4025

715. Hay and Feed Sale

ALFALFA BALES 4x8 $225, Sorgum bales 4x8 $75, Oat bales 4x8 $100. Call Janet at 575-626-0159

745. Pets for Sale

WOOD STOVE, reduced price, $200. 622-6786. Commode chair, oxygen concentrator, walker, elevated toilet seat, 622-7638. NEW 163 12x12 Hacienda Rock Port ceramic tile, $65 OBO. 575-578-0242 2013 PECANS mixed 1/2 and pieces $8.00 per lbs. Call 347-8692 FOR SALE Grizzly combinations sander $75. Metal cutting band saw $265, NC whisper saw low boy oven $250, Ryobi 16” Scroll saw $65, miller welder wire feed $225. 627-5412 UPGRADED LENNOX furnace 100,00 BTU $750.00 OBO 317-3930 CHINA CABINET with table and chairs, vintage dresser-mirror, microwave with cart, singer sewing machine with cabinet & seat, patio lawn furniture. Call 575-317-2835 FARM RANCH furniture, dressers, small kitchen table and chairs, microwave. 626-8466

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

ESTATE SETTLEMENT Never throw ANYTHING away before calling us! Our services include Auctions (our facility or yours), Tagged Estate Sales, Complete/Partial Buy-Outs & Real Estate Auctions, Firearms, Jewelry & Collectibles. Prompt removal of entire households and property cleanouts. Whether you need to sell a few items or an entire estate check with us and we will do our best to beat any offer you receive. Call today to find out how our experience can help you get more $$. Wild West Auctions, LLC 623-7355 or 840-8401

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

2 BLACK labs on puppies, ready to go 1/18. $150 each for info call 623-6284 MINI DACHSHUND puppy. Red male, born 11/2/13. Dewormed, first shots. Registered. (575) 605-1039 Carlsbad. TEA CUP poodle 16 weeks, 2 shots, $325. 575-623-1399

RECREATIONAL

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

1999 HARLEY Davidson Super Glide Sport, 88 cubic inch. , $15,800 miles, runs great, must see to appreciate, $5800 negotiable. 575-420-6656 or 625-0983

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com BOAT & RV STORAGE, secure area, $25/mo. Call 623-4200.

REDUCED PRICE, heavy duty flat bed trailer, 3 axles, 6 brand new tires, $3500. Also two axle flat bed trailer $1950. 622-6786 2003 PROWLER Travel Trailer 27ft bumper pull. Excellent condition, loaded. $10,500. 575-914-8316

Roswell Daily Record TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

790. Autos for Sale

2005 LANDROVER, Freelander V6, leather interior, fully loaded, excellent condition, low miles 73k, $6850. 420-1352 2008 FORD Crown Victoria, V8, low miles, excellent cond., $5850, $2800 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352.

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM 2001 FORD Explorer, automatic, low miles, $1000 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352.

1988 NISSAN Pathfinder, runs great, $1850, owner financing with $1000 down. 420-1352

2004 CHEVY Impala, all power, clean, only $2300. 420-1352 2002 FORD Mustang, 5spd, V6, 101K miles, $5000. OBO 622-2835 2003 SATURN VUE, black color, nice & excellent condition, family car, 126k miles, $4300. 910-2900

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2008 FORD F150, ext cab, heavy duty 4x4, tow package, only 88k miles, $13,850. 420-1352 1999 TOYOTA Tacoma, 132k miles, $3900 OBO. Fuel eff. 420-2191

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

1999 DODGE Ram 1500, 132k miles, $4500, quad cab, single owner, Call or lv msg, 625-2477. 1987 DODGE Ram 250, utility truck, only 105k miles, ready to work, well maintained, $2850. 420-1352 FORD PICKUPS (2): #1, 1985 F250. 460 V8, 4-speed. This is one stout truck! $2450. #2, 1989 F350 5.8 V8, 5-speed, crew cab 4-door. $2850. I might consider something in trade. Ph#(575)622-6600

800. Auto. Antique/Classic

‘97 BUICK LeSabre, 4dr, V6 engine, one owner,in good condition, everthing original, in ment cond., 74K ACT miles, call 626-3356 or 624-0876

810. Auto Parts & Accessories

PROPANE CONVERSION: Impco 300 with Siamese twin tanks that fits under the toolbox. $350. Ph#(575)622-6600

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos


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