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THE EXPANSION OF EARLY LEARNING AND CHILDCARE IN SCOTLAND REFERENCE DESIGN REPORT - MAY 2018

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1. Introduction


1. Introduction 1.1 Foreword

“The decision to almost double the number of hours and extend the flexibility of free early learning and childcare in Scotland from 2020 is a significant opportunity to explore ways in which refurbished, extended and new facilities can create the additional physical capacity needed to deliver the ambition. Providing a high-quality experience in facilities specifically designed for young children was at the heart of this initiative. The development of three reference designs was very much a collaborative exercise. East Ayrshire Council, the Scottish Futures Trust, architects, consultants and contractors all brought a wealth of experience along with a willingness to consider new ideas and test alternative solutions. The Care Inspectorate has been consulted throughout and will continue to provide comments to East Ayrshire Council to support the development of these designs to provide the best possible outcomes for children. As well as considering the experience for children indoors, the approach to this reference design work also embraces the many benefits that outdoor learning and play can offer in terms of health and wellbeing as well as physical and cognitive development.

Across Scotland many new early years facilities will be developed which will reflect the needs of their local communities. These reference designs provide a platform to inform local choices as to how individual buildings can best respond to local needs and emerging operating models of early learning and childcare. They provide a reference point to show how space in particular models can be designed in an efficient and flexible manner to provide welcoming and accessible facilities for children, staff and families whilst working within Scottish Government’s Early Learning and Childcare Programme Baseline Planning Assumptions metrics for the area and cost of new build facilities. Many of the individual ideas and concepts that have been incorporated in each of the reference designs have the potential to be taken on their own and used as part of a catalogue of ideas to inform options for any refurbishment, extension or new build early learning and childcare facility. This reference design initiative was made possible by the considerable commitment and dedication of all involved and the collaborative approach adopted provides a firm foundation to take the early learning and childcare expansion programme to the next stage.� Grant Robertson - Education Design Director - Scottish Futures Trust Alex McPhee - Depute Chief Executive (Economy and Skills) East Ayrshire Council

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1. Introduction 1.2 Contents

1. Introduction 3 1.1 Foreword 4 1.2 Contents 5 1.3 Preface 6 1.4 The Team 8 • Client Team 8 • Design Team 8 1.5 Executive Summary 9

4. Supporting Consultants 77

2. Building the Brief 11 2.1 Project Objectives 12 2.2 Background Service Demand Projections 13 2.3 Proposed Operating Model 14 2.4 Development of the Strategic Brief 15 2.5 Space to Grow 17 2.6 Summary of Consultations 18

6. Refurbishment Solutions 93

3. The Reference Design 21 3.1 Introduction 22 3.2 Design Considerations 23 • Scale and Massing 23 • Building Organisation 24 • Scalability 28 • Increasing Capacity 29 • Envelope Materiality 30 3.3 Indoor Experience 34 3.4 Outdoor Experience 52 3.5 Programmatic Considerations 66

5. The Model in East Ayrshire 83 5.1 Location 84 5.2 Site Boundary 85 5.3 Site Conditions 86 5.5 Site Context 88 5.6 Development Strategy 89

Appendices 97 List of Figures 99 APPENDIX 1 - Final Brief 101 APPENDIX 2 - Schedule of Accommodation 103 APPENDIX 3 - Stakeholder Consultations 105 APPENDIX 4 - Technical Drawings 107 APPENDIX 5 - Outline Specifications 109 APPENDIX 6 - Consultants’ Reports 111

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1. Introduction 1.3 Preface Background Over the past year SFT has been working with the Scottish Government and all 32 local authorities to support the development of local Early Learning and Childcare (ELC) expansion plans to meet the ambition to almost double the provision of free early learning and childcare in Scotland from 600 to 1140 hours by 2020.

In support of this opportunity, SFT in partnership with East Ayrshire Council (EAC), has developed this reference design material for future ELC settings across Scotland. This work has been informed by consultation and engagement with the Care Inspectorate, Early Years Practitioners and parents of children who currently take up their funded ELC entitlement.

SFT wishes to encourage all stakeholders in the programme to consider new, innovative and affordable solutions for future ELC services. To deliver the forecast increase in registered capacity to reflect future service models and the anticipated demand for early learning and childcare services there is a significant pipeline of capital projects.

The priority for this reference design initiative was to develop early learning and childcare facilities that provide a high-quality environment specifically designed to address the needs of young children, ELC practitioners and parents in a manner that promotes the innovative and efficient utilisation of space.

Whilst local service planning priorities are rooted in making best use of existing assets, it is currently forecast that the ELC expansion programme will require around 140 new-build ELC facilities across Scotland. This expansion programme presents the opportunity for local authorities to collaborate and identify options for commonality in design and building layouts both for indoor and outdoor ELC environments.

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The designs were also required to respond to the requirements and guidance of Space to Grow, showing how suitable outdoor space can be accommodated as part of the design. Another key aspect of this reference design initiative was to provide an evidence base to show how high-quality ELC environments can be delivered in a manner that is compliant with the new build area and cost metrics as set out in the SG’s ELC Baseline Planning Assumptions.


1. Introduction 1.3 Preface Reference Design Development Work

Outputs

Following the submission of each local authorities’ initial ELC expansion plan in September 2017, SFT approached East Ayrshire Council to explore the potential to jointly develop reference design material for future ELC facilities. East Ayrshire Council and SFT agreed that this should be a collaborative exercise and that the outputs of this collaboration would be of benefit to the expansion programme as a whole.

To complement this work EAC’s internal design team have also developed a third option. This reference design is not attached to any site but provides a further illustration as to how an early learning and childcare facility could be developed to provide a high-quality environment for children, staff and parents alike which in a manner that adopts a flexible and efficient use of space and embraces outdoor learning.

It was also agreed that the guidance and advice of the Care Inspectorate would be essential. The input of and guidance from the Care Inspectorate in the development of these reference designs has been greatly appreciated.

For all three reference designs a cost consultant, civil/structural engineer, M&E engineer, an acoustician, fire engineer and interior designer were also appointed to inform the approach to design and the associated costs. A specialist illustrator was appointed to help communicate the designs and lessons learned.

To expose this reference design initiative to as many architectural practices as possible, it was decided to procure the required external support via the hub South West supply chain. Two separate architectural practices (which included input from specialist landscape architects) worked collaboratively to share concepts and ideas, but in turn, developed independent solutions for two separate new build projects currently being considered by EAC.

This Initiative has produced three separate reference designs. All three responded to the same core brief and EAC’s envisaged operating model but are slightly different in terms of the total registered capacity and age groups of the children they are designed for. All three designs have been developed architecturally to RIBA Stage 2 with supporting information from other consultants. All are compliant with the new build area and cost metrics as set out in the SG’s ELC Baseline Planning Assumptions of July 2017. This report is one of three separate reports and it specifically relates to the reference design developed by Anderson Bell + Christie Architects for the proposed facility at Kilmaurs.

Key to the success of this reference design initiative has been the consultation and engagement of staff and parents. Throughout the design development process there has been on-going dialogue to ensure that proposed solutions reflect the envisaged operating model and deliver on the core objective to deliver a high-quality facility.

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1. Introduction 1.4 The Team Client Team

Design Team

Scottish Futures Trust (SFT) facilitated the creation of the Early Learning and Childcare (ELC) Reference Design project and provided expert advice and guidance throughout the process.

Hub South West appointed two architecture practices were appointed to develop separate proposals and these practices were each supported by a practice of landscape architects. The remainder of the design team were appointed to offer expert input to both sets of proposals:

Hub South West generated the scope of services for the Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design project and procured all consultants required for its delivery. Hub South West also facilitated engagement with Tier 1 contractors to allow market testing of costs and provide construction advice.

Architects and Landscape Architect Team 1

Anderson Bell Christie and Hirst Landscape Architects

Architects and Landscape Architect Team 2

Norr and ERZ Landscpae Architects

Architects and Landscape Architect Team 3

East Ayrshire Council and Hirst Landscape Architects

The Care Inspectorate (CI) were key participants in the process and had input throughout the design development of the Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design. This included contribution to brief building, design development and sign-off of the final proposals.

Cost Consultants

Faithful & Gould

Mechanical and Electrical Engineers

Max Fordham

Civil and Structural Engineers

Waterman

East Ayrshire Council (EAC) provided full access to their Early Years, Capital Asset, Education, Design Services and Statutory Approvals teams. East Ayrshire Council also provided two sites to apply the Reference Designs to, which provided a grounding for the projects and allowed all aspects to be thoroughly tested against a real world setting.

Fire Engineer

Jeremy Gardener Associates

Acoustician

RMP

Interior Design

Graven

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1. Introduction 1.5 Executive Summary

Reflecting the Government’s national priorities of giving all children the best start in life, local authorities across Scotland are currently developing their Early Learning and Childcare (ELC) Expansion Plans to meet the requirement to provide 1140 hours of free Early Learning and Childcare (ELC) for all three and four year olds, and eligible two year olds, from August 2020. To meet this challenge, services will require to make the best of existing assets, and to provide a number of stimulating new build ELC facilities. These will be required across Scotland in order to meet the needs of the ELC Expansion Programme. Following the commission of Hub SW by East Ayrshire Council, and working closely with the Scottish Futures Trust (SFT) this report is the output of a exercise to develop a Reference Design and supporting cost information to assist all Local Authorities in responding to the requirements of the Early Learning and Childcare Expansion Programme. Anderson Bell Christie with Hirst Landscape Architects, NORR with erz Landscape Architects and East Ayrshire Council with Hirst Landscape Architects were subsequently appointed to develop an appropriate reference design. All teams, and their supporting consultants, have worked closely with East Ayrshire Council, the SFT and the Care Inspectorate to develop proposals which directly reflect the current requirements of the CI outlined in their recently published “Space to Grow” document.

This report provides a framework which meets the learning and environmental requirements of Space to Grow, whilst also addressing the economic requirements of the metric and budget, demonstrating that the Scottish Government’s Expansion Programme Baseline Planning Assumptions for new build nurseries of 5.8m2 per child and cost metric provision of £3,000/m2 are realistic, achievable and capable of delivering high quality environments. This has been done hand in hand with a full design team and wider stakeholder group, ensuring that a reasonable and prudent set of assumptions has been made. All sites are however different and all have their own unique opportunities and constraints. Consequently 3 models have been developed, with each based on a set of components that can be configured in a variety of ways to suit the particular context and functional requirements. In this instance, the report goes on to test the framework in a ‘real’ context, in a project that East Ayrshire Council have identified as part of their current ELC Expansion Plans on a site in Kilmaurs. This output, together with site and budgetary considerations, has resulted in a simple, dynamic and efficient building design whilst also accommodating the various critical internal relationships required in order to achieve the optimum

child focused environment within. The Reference Design study sought to achieve a comprehensive Stage 2 design. The design and content of this report therefore incorporates design team input to the project noted above. Engagement was also carried out with Statutory Authorities on various aspects of the proposal throughout the process. Whilst the Reference Design project is presented as a whole building solution, it can also be read as a collection of ideas that can be applied to a variety of settings, both new build and refurbishment. The main aim of the Reference Design was to ensure learning opportunities and outcome were at the heart of each project, they prioritise the children’s development throughout and aim to provide functional fun learning spaces where pupils can feel at home whilst providing the opportunity for challenge and development. This has been achieved by ensuring a variety of spaces are provided within the schemes to cater for a multitude of learning experiences and encouraging free flow play to an enriched external landscape.

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2. Building the Brief


2. Building the Brief 2.1 Project Objectives

The Scottish Futures Trust outlined the project objectives as the following; •

The reference designs should be innovative and efficient in space utilisation, and enable learning and childcare to take place in good quality stimulating environments which are specifically designed to address the needs of young children, staff and parents and make them “feel happy” when they visit the building.

The designs should also respond to the requirements and guidance of the recently published Space to Grow document. Further detail on these requirements follows within this section.

The reference designs will be required to accommodate circa 80 children and be scalable (up and down) whilst demonstrating cost affordability within an overall area metric of 5.8 m2/child (total building GIFA) and £3,000/m2 (all in rate including design and development costs as well as furniture, fixtures and equipment at 2Q 2018).

A cost plan based on the Kilmaurs proposal is included within Consultants’ Reports, appended.

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2. Building the Brief 2.2 Background Service Demand Projections

“Children therefore will be spending more time in early learning

and childcare settings, and as such, the environment needs to be of a high quality to support positive outcomes for children. Research confirms that the environment can have both a positive impact on child development and improve learning outcomes for children. Early learning and childcare and out of school care settings must be provided from an environment which is fit for purpose and positively supports children to access play and learning opportunities that will impact on their development, health and well-being and happiness. The environment is also important to both parents and providers. This is a view which is supported by a recent survey carried out by the Care Inspectorate, where 69% of parents said the environment was one of the main factors when choosing the service for their child.”

The basis of the brief is developed from the total GIFA, utilising the area metric of 5.8m2/child, together with cost affordability of £3000/m2. This is outlined in the Scottish Government’s Expansion Programme Baseline Planning Assumptions for new build nurseries. These planning assumptions were issued to local authorities in July 2017 by the Scottish Government as part of a wider suite of capital and revenue cost and planning assumptions. The registered number of children utilising an Early Learning Care setting can be increased by recognition of the importance of outdoor, as well as indoor, learning and care.

for early learning and childcare and out of school care services

The Care Inspectorate, The Scottish Government and Scottish Futures Trust have recommended that a maximum increase of 20% of the total registered number of children is applicable dependent on the quality of outdoor space and plans for how it would be used.

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- Scottish Government (2017). Space to Grow - Design guidance

The reference design requires to provide a comfortable environment and be inclusive for all, and particularly for those with additional support needs. The reference design will strive to create a welcoming, comfortable and considerate design through each zone of the building; from the physical spaces themselves to the lighting, acoustics, surfaces and equipment therein.

“For almost any other special need, the classroom only becomes disabling when a demand to perform a given task is made. For the child with autism, disability begins at the door” - Handbury, M.(2007). Positive Behaviour Strategies to Support Children and Young People with Autism. London

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2. Building the Brief 2.3 Proposed Operating Model

The operating model may of course differ across local authorities. The proposed models for East Ayrshire Council are set out below and will be delivered in either term time or full year centres which will operate from 9.00am - 3.00pm, or 8.00am - 6.00pm respectively.

Staffing - It is proposed that staff who work in full year services will work shift patterns:

Option 1 - Monday to Friday 09:00 - 15.00 (6 hours) term time during the school year (38 weeks)

The number of staff required is based on the adult: child ratio, the model of delivery and the pattern of hours across a day and a week.

Option 2 - 5 block sessions of 4 hours 45 minutes (08.00 to 12.45 or 13.15 to 18.00) per week for 48 weeks of the year, 5 mornings, 5 afternoons or a combination of mornings and afternoons can be chosen to create full daycare. Option 3 - 6 block sessions per week for 38 weeks term time for the school year. Additional hours during the holiday periods may be purchased in blocks of 4hrs 45 minutes, where there is capacity.

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07.45hrs to 15.15hrs

08.45hrs to 16.15hrs and

10.45hrs to 18.15hrs

The current proposed management structure of full year services will consist of a Head of Centre, Depute Manager, Senior early learning and childcare practitioners (ELCPs) and the number of ELCPs required to meet service delivery. There will also be an ELC support assistant and clerical assistant posts to cover the hours of operation. This model may be progressed or revised as EAC develop their ELC expansion programme.

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2. Building the Brief 2.4 Development of the Strategic Brief

A Consultation day was held 02.02.18, at which a diverse range of Stakeholders was invited to participate. These included key staff and parents from existing East Ayrshire Council ELCs, Local Authority Stakeholders, the SFT, Hub SW, the Care Inspectorate and Hub SW Tier 1 Contractors. The day intended to discuss all aspects of what this Reference Design should be with all of the relevant parties, all in order to establish an overall vision for the project, whilst also allowing the designers to listen and to question everyone’s views as the discussion developed. The session began with a presentation on the requirement for 1140 hours and of the model for the provision of these hours as developed by East Ayrshire Council. The workshop then focussed on the need for the delivery and design of ELC to change, and on the need for the Reference Design to be flexible for different Authorities’ requirements, and also for potential future provisions.

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Further sessions during the day focussed on both internal and external spaces; their design, relationships and functionalities. “It is understood that good design continuously evolves, with

innovative solutions constantly being sought as to how to enhance environments in areas such as space, maximising finite resources, the best use of outdoor space, sustainability and how the physical environment can genuinely help to contribute to the best outcomes for Scotland’s children. As such, it is anticipated that this guidance will also evolve as new solutions and new approaches to innovative delivery of settings are identified, allowing these to be incorporated and shared across all those working in this important sector. “ - Scottish Government (2017). Space to Grow - Design guidance

for early learning and childcare and out of school care services

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2. Building the Brief 2.4 Development of the Strategic Brief Workshop 1

Indoor space

The day started with the fundamental, philosophical basis for the increased ELC provision:

The environment should provide a balance between learning experiences and opportunities inside and outside

What is the purpose of the increased ELC provision?

What should the impact be on learner experience?

The learning environment must engage children through space, light, noise, materials to stimulate and nurture

What should the impact be on family experience?

What is success?

Designs should allow for free-flow between inside and outside – indeed boundary must be blurred

How to maximise benefits?

Outdoor space is key in the expansion of ELC and accommodation should be built around the outdoor space

Need for an external covered space to be used in all weathers

Need for flexible and a variety of spaces from small intimate spaces scaled for children and small groups to large spaces

Workshop 2 Focused on the term “outcomes and experiences”. It is key to determining “quality” in particular for the external landscape environment but also for the learning experiences within the building itself. Core questions applied to each theme: •

What are the learning outcomes indoors/outdoors?

What learning experiences should be provided indoors/ outdoors?

How could these be delivered indoors/outdoors?

The following aspects being considered key drivers which the Reference Design project requires to support: •

Previous model doesn’t fit with parents returning to work

Building could become embedded into the community and used by the community after hours and weekends

Success equals happiness for children, parents and staff

Must be inclusive

Must provide opportunities for staff

Can be a social link for parents/carers and provide opportunities for families to access services

Outdoor space •

New Early Learning and Childcare education should provide a coherent and seamless indoor/outdoor environment. This is backed up by policy documents such as the Scottish Government’s ‘Play Strategy for Scotland - Action Plan’ (2013) and the Care Inspectorate’s ‘My World Outdoors’ (2016).

Interaction with nature has a meaningful impact on a child’s health and wellbeing, can promote more engagement from some children and enhance learning, collaboration and social skills.

External space should be safe, but also offer appropriate challenges which encourage children to take more risks.

Provide core outdoor activity of sand pit, mud kitchen, loop route for bikes and trikes, story-telling, loose parts play, performance space, shelter, sensory garden with raised beds & outdoor store.

A collation of the outcomes recorded at each of the engagement sessions can be found within Appendix 3.

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2. Building the Brief 2.5 Space to Grow

The quality of the external environment is fundamental in determining whether the particular ELC actually satisfies the requirements of Space to Grow and can therefore register up to 20% additional capacity. The development of outdoor settings has been increasing over recent years. Not all settings can provide solely outdoor provision, or a blended approach of outdoor and indoor learning and care in many settings. There are some existing early learning and childcare settings where account has already been taken of the quality of, and children’s use of, outdoor space and the number of registered places has been increased accordingly, all in acknowledgement of the positive experiences children have.

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There is no agreed standard for the provision of outdoor space. Consequently we have used parameters on the outdoor space to support registration of an increased number of children within an indoor/outdoor setting. The recommended maximum increase of 20% of the total registered number of children is considered as a guideline. This is however dependent on the suit-ability of the outdoor space and plans for how it would be consistently used. The quality of children’s experiences and their learning outcomes are of paramount importance in the design of external spaces. This reference design therefore seeks to deliver such quality.

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2. Building the Brief 2.6 Summary of Consultations Meal Delivery It is envisaged that the proposals for food preparation and delivery will vary across local authorities to cover the delivery of a lunch and high tea, as well as snacks mid-morning and afternoon. The delivery of such meals requires careful consideration of the sequence of events around dining and the associated spatial implications, as well as the preparation/delivery to the settings and within the playroom. The model that East Ayrshire Council aim to adopt is outlined within Section 3.0. Changing Places Through the consultation process with East Ayrshire Council and the Care Inspectorate it was confirmed that there was no requirement for inclusion of a Changing Places facility in the proposed Reference Design. An accessible WC will be required, accessible to all building users. Insurance Some local authority insurance providers have specific requirements that may influence the overall design; e.g. restriction on use of combustible cladding, such as timber weather boarding, or requirement to provide sprinklers for property protection and CCTV systems. Each local authority will require to seek appropriate advice in relation to each setting. Both sprinklers and CCTV are not a requirement in this classification of building in order to comply with the Building Standards Division Technical Guidance, and as such, these do not form part of the reference design.

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2. Building the Brief 2.6 Summary of Consultations Planning

Roads and Transport

As part of the development of the design specifically for Kilmaurs, ABC met with East Ayrshire Council Planning Department to discuss the existing site conditions and context, proposed building location and massing. This would be a normal procedure to be followed for all buildings with any Local Authority. The detail and extent of dialogue will depend entirely on site location and context.

Through consultation with East Ayrshire Roads Alliance, it was confirmed that car parking standards to be applied to this reference design are based on universal parking standards. There are exceptions to this where parking strategies are outlined as part of Local Plans. As with other Statutory Consultees it would be a normal procedure to meet with all those relevant to each particular site.

Technical Standards and Building Control All materials and works will require to comply with all relevant statutory regulations current at the time of construction (NB the cost plan is based on current Regulations May 2018). In particular all materials and works will comply with the Building (Scotland) Regulations and any amendments current at the time of application for building warrant. Where manufacturers are referenced this is to be assumed as or equal or approved. A more detailed dialogue with Building Control will be arranged during the next stage. Meetings were held with the catering team to establish requirements for the Kitchen facility and food preparation.

Equally the detail and extent of dialogue will depend entirely on site location and context. Further specific detail on the reference design is covered under Section 3.0. Scottish Fire and Rescue Discussions / meetings with Scottish Fire and Rescue will take place during the next stage of the project. Environmental Health East Ayrshire Council’s Environmental Health department has been consulted and have provided comments. These comments have been included in the design. This has resulted in the inclusion of a toilet and changing space dedicated to catering staff. It is understood however that this may not be required by all local authorities.

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3. The Reference Design


3. The Reference Design 3.1 Introduction

The Reference Design has been developed to be applicable in the majority of localities, it provides key information on strategic approaches to specific challenges which can be used together to create a new build scheme or used individually to help develop, upgrade or refurbish existing facilities. The following section describes these component parts, starting with the high level approach, then moving into the detail of the interior and outdoor spaces.

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3. The Reference Design 3.2 Design Considerations Scale and Massing The majority of nurseries will be located in residential areas, either as part of a school estate or a standalone facility. The character of these residential areas may differ, but they will predominantly be one and two storey housing with pitched roofs. Various consultations were taken with Local Authority Planning Departments and it was considered that this sympathetic approach was likely to be acceptable in similar areas. There are two considerations that then dictate the scale and form of the nursery: •

A building typology that has forms recognisable to children.

•

A building form that will be more readily acceptable across planning authorities.

Consequently, the building is no higher than a 2 storey house with a dual pitched roof. The building also presents a gable to the street, this is a recognisable form that will match the streetscape in most localities. The building is then an extrusion of the gable form which sits as subservient to the street facade.

1-2 storey residential 2 storey residential Healthcare building Site

HOUSE

NURSERY

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3. The Reference Design 3.2 Design Considerations Building Organisation The building diagram comprises a zone of play space between two bands of supporting accommodation. The public spaces of the building are concentrated around the entrance, with individual playrooms separated by an island of cloaks, accessible toilet and shared reading space. The building accommodation is split over two levels to catalyse a variety of spaces to enrich learning and give an opportunity for exploration within the play areas. The following sections will go into the detail of the spatial organisation and functional relationships both within the building and out to the external space which wraps around the building in an L shape.

Play Transition Shelter Administration/Circulation Service

Ground Floor

Upper Floor

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3. The Reference Design 3.2 Design Considerations Section A-A

Play

Circulation

Play

Admin

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3. The Reference Design 3.2 Design Considerations Ground Floor Plan A

Head of centre

Cleaner’s Store

Clerical/ Touchdown

Breakout/ Parent’s

Family room

Cooker Space

Plant

WC

Entrance

Shelter

Play / Dining WC

Shelter Reading Nook

Developmental Play

Lift Store

Stair

Laundry

WCs

Nappy Change

WC

A

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Shelter


3. The Reference Design 3.2 Design Considerations Upper Floor Plan

Cooker Space

A

Play

Lift Stair

WCs

A

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3. The Reference Design 3.2 Design Considerations Scalability The building can scale up or down to suit the numbers required for each playroom. Imagine taking opposing corners of the plan and stretching or squashing it. The playrooms will then grow or contract in size, the support spaces in the wings will scale up or down in line with the toilets and staff spaces. Design Option A: Current Proposal

Design Option B: Area reduced to service fewer children

Design Option C: Area increased to service more children

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3. The Reference Design 3.2 Design Considerations Increasing Capacity One method of increasing capacity is by extending the building. The building can be extended by adding onto the end facing the play area with a projecting feature space.

There also options to increase capacity by infilling voids on the upper level, or by bringing further roof space into use.

Ground Floor

Upper Floor

Ground Floor extended

Upper Floor with voids infilled

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3. The Reference Design 3.2 Design Considerations Envelope Materiality The design utilises a rainscreen cladding system. To provide a simplified monolithic aesthetic, one material has been proposed across the wall and roof surfaces. In this case, sinusoidal rainscreen cladding has been used. These sheets have a rhythm and tactility that is pleasant at street level. We envisage children running their hands along the walls and driving toy cars over its surface.

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These sheets can be procured in a variety of colours to suit local preference or style. The strategy of using rainscreen cladding means that any number of materials could be used. For examples, the walls could be brick, or timber, or render or whatever works best in each location


3. The Reference Design 3.2 Design Considerations

Alternate Option 1 - Timber Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design

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3. The Reference Design 3.2 Design Considerations

Text

Alternate Option 2 - Fibre Cement Page 32


3. The Reference Design 3.2 Design Considerations

Text

Alternate Option 3 - Brick Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design

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3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience Introduction With well-crafted design we have the ability to create environments that evoke an emotional response It is within our gift, to create buildings and spaces that make people happy. Our starting point on the Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design project was to consider the principal user of the spaces, the children, then to ask ourselves what sort of space would make them happy? During their early years children learn through play. Observing children at play you quickly realise that they utilise all of their available environment, searching for spaces or opportunities which suit their mood at any given moment. Their world of play is not limited in the way that the adult environment is limited, and to help cater for this the play space has to be truly free-flow.

To date nursery design in the UK has predominantly followed a single storey typology where playrooms are created as a singular volume. The minimum height of the playroom is dictated by adult uses. Elements of challenge and dynamic play in these facilities are typically provided by items of loose equipment within the volume offering a prosaic approach. The building form, the spaces within, the moments it creates, the challenges it provides, they should all be designed from a child’s perspective. Play can be extruded through the height of the building and provided on multiple levels.

It incorporates small spaces which are under and inside.

The Care Inspectorate have been consulted on this approach and are in agreement that a nursery can have registerable play space on two levels. The provisions for creation of a two storey Indoor/Outdoor nursery with free flow play (beyond the standard considerations) are as follows:

It incorporates objects to climb, lift and move.

It incorporates large open spaces to jump, run and move freely.

That the upper and lower play spaces operate as a singular whole.

It incorporates elements of challenge, bridges to cross, chutes to slide and tools to use.

That children are provided with freeflow vertical play elements as the main access between levels as well as discreet assisted access when this is needed.

It incorporates different sensations, heat, touch, smell, light, sound and feeling.

It is a dynamic three dimensional world.

In the following section we will describe the experience from the child’s perspective. The elements of vertical play are not definitive. These can be shaped and augmented as each provider feels is appropriate, provided that they remain objects of play. It is extremely important that there is an equality of access for all children, as such the facility is provided with a platform lift that moves between each play area.

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3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience Adherence to Metrics

Accessibility

The reference design building is sized to accommodate 82no children.

This has been achieved through careful consideration of how to manage the supporting accommodation and has yielded a higher amount of play space per child:

The building itself is sized to accommodate 69no children plus an additional 20% outdoor allocation [13no.] broken down as follows:

3-5 playroom and shared use of the reading nook = 59no. children with 2.5m2 per child

2-3yr playroom and shared use of the reading nook = 10no. children with 3.1m2 per child.

72no 3-5yrs

10no 2-3yrs

The Care Inspectorate noted a preference that for the playrooms the 2-3yr group should not be considered for the outdoor provision. However, in practice they will also be key users of the outdoor space. The outdoor space allocation is a notional allocation that does not specifically require children to be outdoors all of the time.

It is worth noting that this additional play space would actually allow for a higher registrable capacity within the reference design. The building is provided with 8no unisex WCs, inclusive of the nappy change facility, for indoor play which in accordance with space to grow “or part thereof” could notionally provide for up to 84 No. Children.

The reference design has been developed to ensure the building is as accessible as possible to users with a variety of abilities. The proposals have been reviewed with accessibility officers at East Ayrshire Council. Visibility - The central, open plan play area encourages clear lines of sight across the floor plate and beyond to the external areas, assisting in way-finding and easing orientation. Additionally, high levels of glazing and strategically placed voids can ensure the space is bright throughout the day. Sound - lots of children in one space can undoubtedly result in heightened noise levels, however to mitigate this an acoustician has specified material finishes and construction details. This will control the noise to a level appropriate to an educational setting.

In this scenario the building could be registered as follows: The size of the building is based around the Scottish Government’s Expansion Programme Baseline Planning Assumptions of 5.8m2 per child and the area metrics from Space to Grow of 2.3m2 play per child aged 3-5 and 2.8m2 per child aged 2-3:

3-5 playroom inclusive of the reading nook = 65no. children with 2.3m2 per child

2-3yr playroom = 10no. children x 2.8m2 = 28m2

69no x 5.8 = 400.2m2 GIFA

3-5yr playroom = 59no. children x 2.3m2 = 135.7m2

2-3yr playroom = 10no. children x 2.8m2 = 28m2

In addition to that the 20% outdoor allocation would allow for registration of another 14no. children [This is restricted from the full 20%. due to only one WC being available for outdoor use] Total potential registerable capacity: 89No Children

The Anderson Bell Christie Reference Design took full advantage of the 5.8m2 metric and actually allows for the following enhanced play areas: •

3-5yr playroom = 146.3m2

2-3yr playroom = 28.4m2

Reading nook [shared play space] = 4.4m2

In addition to the above, the Play Net areas provide a further 13.2m2 of play space within the 3-5 playroom. This area has not yet confirmed to be registerable however the Care Inspectorate are keen to see the model built to allow them to assess the possibility of inclusion within registerable area, having the potential of adding another 5no. children to the registerable capacity.

Horizontal circulation - Transition between internal spaces, as well as between internal and external ground level is as seamless as possible. Vertical circulation - alongside the traditional stair core with dual height balustrades, the building can be negotiated vertically in a number of different ways. The ‘Climb and Slide’ uses familiar, traditional ‘play’ forms integrated into a child appropriate stair. This is provided alongside a chute to create functional pieces of child appropriate circulation. A platform lift is directly accessed from the playroom to ensure the ascending and descending journeys of children of all abilities start and end at the same points. Accordingly, it will be entered/exited close to the proposed entry/exit of the Climb and Slide.

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3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience

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3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience Visual Connections - First Impressions

forest

rock amphitheatre

sand pit

climb and slide

net tube

As a child enters the playroom they should feel ownership of the space. They should be excited by what is in front, around and above them. The playroom is set out as a linear space with a glass wall at the end, through which the focal point of the garden can be seen. Along the length of the playroom there are elements of vertical play, which invite closer inspection and draw children deeper into the space. Above the children are voids in the floor through which they can see activity on the upper level and through rooflights to the sky. These architectural decisions foster a curiosity and a thirst for exploration. This sequence of events provides full legibility of the building. A child on entering the building will be able to understand their full environment, they will instinctively know how to get to where they want to go. They will understand that this is a space for children in a building created for them. The playroom bleeds out into the garden under a canopy, blurring the inside/outside boundary sparking imagination and offering opportunities for play and fun. Every new layer of activity offers new exciting way to engage in horizontal or vertical play in a truly free-flow environment.

Physical experiences along the route of the nursery

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3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience Zoning Play Playrooms are open plan spaces notionally subdivided into thematic zones using play equipment. For example, art, messy play, construction, literacy, role play and so on. The sequence of these zones in previous nurseries are not typically considered in relation to environmental conditions of each space. The Reference Design sequences the zones in relation to temperature and noise, so that children have optimal play environments. Space to Grow requires that indoor/outdoor nurseries seeking to utilising up to 20% outdoor provision provide free flow play. To achieve free flow, playrooms must open directly onto the outdoor space. The Care Inspectorate define direct access as a single door from the playroom. The door onto the outdoor space should be open at all times except in unfavourable weather conditions at which point the door should be easily openable by a child. As a result of this requirement, play zones nearest the garden access will be cooler than those positioned further away. Mitigating measures have been developed with the M&E Engineer, such as underfloor heating in the ground floor play room, which is radiant and less affected by air temperatures than convection heating methods. This radiant heating approach allows a stable temperature at child height. The heat within the building is then also retained when doors are open. In extreme conditions a sliding door with push to exit pads either side at child height can be utilised to control heat loss. The ground floor has been zoned to accommodate themes that are more active and so need lower temperatures. These zones will also therefore be louder. As the building is two storeys with open voids, heat will rise to the upper level through natural buoyancy. As such spaces on the upper level will be warmer. The further you move to the back of this space the zones become warmer and quieter. The overall acoustic performance of the building has been developed in detail with an acoustician. Page 38

cold

warm

quiet

loud

individual

group


3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience Fixtures, Fittings and Equipment The loose equipment in the building is to be provided from a variety of sources to meet the thematic zones and functional requirements of each space. Loose equipment strategies have been developed with input from Graven, Community Playthings and East Ayrshire Council. The indoor play spaces are zoned in the Developmentally Appropriate Play area as follows: Creative/Art, Construction, Role Play, Mark Marking and Wet Play. The indoor play spaces are zoned in the downstairs Main Playroom area as follows: Sand and Water Play, Vertical Play, Creative/Art, Dining.

Ground Floor

The indoor play spaces are zoned in the upstairs Main Playroom area as follows: Role Play, Literacy, Large Construction, Small World, Maths, Computers, Books, Cosy. There is also a dedicated area for group activities on the upper floor between the floor voids. The thematic grouping of these spaces on the upper and lower floor areas tie’s back to the zoning of play and helps children associate activities with environments whilst leaving them free to flow wherever they want.

Upper Floor

Sand and Water play Vertical Play Creative Art / Dining Reading Creative Art Construction Role Play Mark Making Wet Play

Group Area Maths Literacy Computers Cosy

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3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience 3D play elements - Climb and Slide Vertical movement from the playroom is primarily facilitated by a combined climbing feature and slide. This acts as a stair for children that is fully visible from all parts of the playroom. Children are able to freely move to the upper level, each rise is a soft surface enclosed by oak slats that rise to roof level. This gives the overall appearance of a treehouse, or a tower or a crow’s nest on a tall ship. Some of this vertical play element will be manipulated to facilitate imaginative play. One may act as a shelf, which can become a shop or a cot for a toy. The underside may be missing from another one higher up, so that it may become a pretend TV set when a child stands up with their head inside it, or the stage for a puppet show.

Play and Climbing

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The underside of the feature play element is left open so that children can use the spaces underneath for imaginative play. These are small spaces for children to clamber into, however are easy for staff to access without having to get in themselves. A slide is provided, this starts from a platform part of the way up the feature so that the overall drop equates to that found in most playgrounds. Its aim is to encourage physical activity as children race up and down using the slide, it’s also a perfect mechanism to allow free flow of children from the upper level to outdoors.


3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience

Play Slide entry

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3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience

Vertical climbing experience with the Play Slide

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3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience 3D play elements - Net and Tube A net is provided in the void spaces of the upper floor. The net can be climbed on from the upper level and becomes an extension of the useable floor area, but is not currently counted as registerable play space. The net can take the weight of adults and children without deforming greatly. It is formed using a high tenacity polypropylene fire retardant mesh. The mesh spacing is set at minimum 50mm so that it is easily walked upon and is supportive when used as a hammock. A fine subnet prevents objects passing through. The parameters of the net have been developed in conjunction with the Fire and Structural Engineers. Parts of the net may be connected to the ceiling or run up the wall. In doing so the net takes on a form of its own and acts like topography, mimicking the rises created in the garden area. This also allows children to get up close to the roof lights, as such they can put their head up and get a view of the world, or they can lie on their back on the netting and have a panoramic view of the sky to watch the clouds go by. From one of the nets a robust netting tube goes down to meet the ground offering another opportunity for free flow access between spaces. This is set at an angle where children could in effect safely slide down it, making it impossible to fall. The tube and its openings are of a size where staff can reach in from above or below to access all parts of it.

Views to Sky and down to Lower Level

Most children will be used to this type of installation from soft plays however, the purpose of the netting here is to provide learning opportunities. This may be from the challenge around the physical nature of the installation, it may be from watching the world or alternatively, it may just be a nice place to have a nap. One net is partly screened by a wall to make it more intimate, a ‘secret’ space to watch the people below, while the other is in close proximity to the climb and slide feature. Between each is an area for groups to gather, so the nets may form a natural extension to this function. Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design

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3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience

Vertical play opportunities with the Net Tube

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3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience

Play/relaxation nook on Nets above reception

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3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience Visual Connections - Watching the World This is a building designed from the inside out, from the child’s perspective. As a result, windows and skylights are positioned where children will benefit most from them. They allow children to see activity at different levels.

sky

sky

entrance

Larger apertures give views out to horizons at the front and rear at either end of the playroom. Greater emphasis is placed on the garden to reinforce the feeling of ownership of spaces within the site boundaries and encourage it’s use as part of the complete playscape.

play room

play room horizon

horizon

play

street

Large skylights are positioned at a low level within the eaves of the roof so that children can have a direct visual connection to the sky. Upper Floor views Internal views are also facilitated so that children can see all of the comings and goings. This allows them to get a greater understanding of the rhythms of the day and help to settle into the nursery. These connections also help children to understand the layout of the building and so their spatial awareness. The steel frame construction allows us to position apertures where required while coordinating technical parameters. Work has been undertaken with mechanical and electrical teams to ensure adequate levels of daylighting across the building.

entrance horizon

horizon

play

street

horizon Ground Floor views

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play


3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience

Entrance can be seen from Play Area

Entrance can be seen from Net on upper floor

Developmental Play Area can be seen from Upper Level

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3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience Developmentally Appropriate Play This space is, in most nurseries, designated as a room for children of 2 years old. The space is designed to manage the transition from home to the nursery environment. In practice the space may not only be used by 2 year olds, it may also be used by older children who have not yet developed sufficient confidence to allow them to transition to the main playroom. As such we have referred to this space as Developmentally Appropriate Play, rather than the traditional terminology of, “2s room�. This space is a mirror of the operations and functions of the main playroom. The playroom is zoned in a similar manner as the main playroom, except the more challenging play equipment is not provided. The volumes provided in this space reflect the volumes in the main playrooms so that there is a consistency in the feel of the building and provision of natural light. Crucially, the playroom is physically and acoustically separated from the rest of the building providing an intimate space where children can feel comfortable and challenged but not overwhelmed. There are visual connections through to both levels of the main playroom which are intended as cues to suggest that there is a wider world to explore so that when children are ready they can express an interest in doing so. The playroom, like the main playspace, has direct access free flow access to the outdoor space. Again there is a dedicated play garden that is a mirror of the operations and functions of the main garden. However, there are no barriers proposed between the outdoor spaces, if a child feels drawn to play in the other areas they are able to do so. Developmental Play Area offers views to Play Area on Upper Floor

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3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience Reading Nook

Cooker Space

There is a shared space between the Main Playroom and the Developmentally Appropriate Playroom, named the reading nook. This is intended to provide a private quiet space, useable from both playrooms. It is a space that individual children can retreat to, or it can be used as a managed way to bring a selected group of each cohort together.

Reading Nook between play spaces

Reading Nook

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3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience Dining The AM / PM service model requires careful consideration of the sequence of events around dining and the associated spatial implications. Food will be prepared off site. It will be delivered to the facility each day from a central kitchen in portable appliances that keep the food at temperature. As a result, the kitchen in the nursery is predominantly for reheat purposes and so can be smaller than a catering kitchen. The service model requires all children to be fed lunch. All children are to be fed in a single sitting. Tables and chairs must be provided to accommodate all children indoors at one time. Dining is to happen on the ground floor level. It may also be facilitated outdoors, weather permitting. The 3-5yr playroom must accommodate 72 children, in groups of 7, each with a staff member.

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One sitting, two sittings, or rolling lunch can work with the Refernce Design. a single sitting has been illustrated as this is the most space hungry solution. The single sitting has been illustrated on both levels of the building to provide a variety of opportunities and experiences for children. They can chose what suits them best. Stores are provided on both levelsto accommodate tables and chairs. These are brought out for lunchtime to ensure sufficient play space during the course of the day. It is undersood that the delivery of dining will vary in each level dependant on: •

quality of experience

•

funding models

•

staff supervision


3. The Reference Design 3.3 Indoor Experience

Cooker Space

Play Mode

Lower Level

Upper Level

Cooker Space

Dining Mode

Lower Level (single sitting)

Upper Level (single sitting)

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3. The Reference Design 3.4 Outdoor Experience

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Freeflow between indoors and outdoors


3. The Reference Design 3.4 Outdoor Experience Introduction The garden spaces have been designed with the same child first consideration as applied to the building spaces. The garden provides the same variety of learning outcomes as the inside of the building, however in a notably different manner. This provides contrast, interest and a dynamic learning environment. The Care Inspectorate have reviewed the garden design in context of Space to Grow. This assessment confirms that the experience and outcomes from this environment would allow a nursery to achieve 20% of the registered capacity outdoors. The outside space is designed to be open and unconstrained. Children are free to run around, jump, climb and explore throughout the garden. Interest and challenge is added through natural physical elements provided over generous areas. Woodland, sand, mud, grass, rock are all deployed in large scale. Play outdoors is created as a 3 dimensional experience, reflecting the design philosophy of the indoors. Hills and slopes are formed using landforms created from earth and rock on site, material that is ordinarily sent away for recycling. These are carefully managed so that the highest point is no greater than 1.2m and the transition is carefully managed onto a soft surface.

The garden provides an element of considered risk, here it is deemed that the benefits of the play and learning experience greatly outweighs any other factor. Yet the naturalistic approach to the space presents the challenge in a familiar form to children. There is nothing created in the space that children would not enjoy playing safely with in a woodland or on a beach. The boundary of the space is framed with foliage but there are opportunities to see out of the boundary fence and watch the world. The use of a variety of scale of planting, from shrubs to small birch trees and heavy standard trees gives a rich environment that provides opportunity for learning, not just about the plants but the animals and insects that will be attracted to them. Plenty of space is also afforded to wheeled vehicles. Tarmac is a very practical all weather surface that children can use for riding bikes, trikes, karts and pushing buggies, trolleys and so on. It is also good to draw on in chalk. A balance must be struck between the amount of hard surface for this use in comparison to soft surfaces.

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3. The Reference Design 3.4 Outdoor Experience Spatial Provision An assessment was carried out to assess the spatial requirements associated with the various learning opportunities and outcomes which need to be accommodated in the outdoor environment. Workshops and detailed dialogue with providers and the Care Inspectorate allowed the desired learning outcomes and experiences to be identified. It was acknowledged that the Reference Design may need to be adapted to suit specific sites and as such a strategy evolved based on a kit of parts; the parts themselves being the provision of areas providing different learning opportunities. This was developed under the common concept of an informal design within a wild environment. These parts could be brought together to reflect the particular nuances of a range of site conditions while still retaining the core concept. The Reference Design then needed to establish a series of design parameters which together would inform the overall site area, needed to deliver the required learning outcomes and experiences. Every site will have its own optimal solution, based on topography and existing natural features. Each building will require to be surrounded by an area of hardstanding to act as both a serviceable apron for maintenance purposes, as well as a clean and flexible circulation space suitable for trikes and other wheeled toys. It is anticipated that this apron should be a minimum of 4m deep, but that it’s shape should be articulated in such a way as to provide interest and create links into the wider landscape beyond. The scheme for the reference design includes approximately 230sqm of homogenous hardstanding.

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Beyond this zone, the Reference Design scheme is based upon the creation of a “Jungle Wilderness” and a landform which embraces the garden. To create a meaningful mound, approximately 1m high with 1:3 side slopes and with a 2m wide route along the ridge would command an overall width of nothing less than 8.0m. Over a notional length of 30m, this would occupy approximately 240sqm. In addition to these two core zones, the other principal facilities demanding their own designated spaces, which are considered to be fundamental to the success of any scheme, include a Walk-in Sandpit, (with a provisional allocation of 40sqm); a Growing Area (of approximately 50sqm); and a Mud Kitchen and Dirty/Water Play Area (of approximately 65sqm) - the grand total for these additional facilities being 155sqm. It has been estimated therefore that the aggregated area needed to create a Nursery Garden which responds adequately to the brief, would extend to approximately 625sqm. In the case of the reference design, where the nursery roll is 82 children, this equates to a little over 7.6sqm per child. Obviously, each site will need to be assessed on its own merits, but as a general rule, it is considered that this level of provision would be sufficient to more than cater for a child’s physical, mental and emotional wellbeing and could therefore be used as a benchmark for similar initiatives. This was reviewed with the Care Inspectorate to ensure that the design proposals delivered the necessary learning opportunities and outcomes to achieve the 20% outdoor provision.


3. The Reference Design 3.4 Outdoor Experience

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3. The Reference Design 3.4 Outdoor Experience Nursery Garden To develop the children’s knowledge of plants, food and nutrition, a small allotment area is to be provided in a sunny spot, located discretely off to one side of the playground, in an area away from noisy activities. This will comprise a sizable plot at ground level, divided into smaller beds, which will be accessed via a path of stepping stones. The area will also include a raised timber planter to cater for anybody with impaired mobility. In addition, the boundary fence partially containing the area will be designed to incorporate shelving to support pots and troughs, or alternatively, act as a frame onto which can be attached wall baskets and planting pockets for individual use. The area could be defined by a pergola, over which climbing plants could sprawl, to provide dappled shade. It is anticipated that the children will cultivate their own herbs, fruit and vegetable crops and that this produce will be used in the preparation of meals and snacks. The varied plant types envisaged will also serve as a useful learning tool as well as stimulating the senses of sight (colour and form); touch (texture); smell (aromatic, foliage); and taste. The area could also provide a quiet refuge for the use of children, away from the hustle and bustle of the Main Playground, as well as an intimate Outdoor Classroom with the addition of informal seating.

Nursery Garden offers a variety of experiences

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3. The Reference Design 3.4 Outdoor Experience Space to Explore Children need plenty of space to move. Outside, children are more likely to be running, jumping and playing at speed so we have provided two and half times the amount of play space externally as we have internally. Regular physical exercise outdoors, as noted by The Daily Mile promotes “physical, social, emotional and mental health and wellbeing of our children�. Removing all physical barriers creates a single open space, one that is dynamic, with changes of surface and changes of level. Children can choose where and how they transition between zones, and how they want to move about. Routes are provided through the different zones as a notional guide, they can be used as a running route or bike trail. The boundaries are porous to children on foot, so children can move about and use imaginative play within the spaces and at the transitions. The diagram on this page illustrate how children may move about in the garden and the opportunities available to them.

feet wheels 15

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3. The Reference Design 3.4 Outdoor Experience Instant Forest There’s something special about a forest, perhaps because its usually a special occasion when children venture into the countryside and experience this type of environment. Most homes and certainly most sites earmarked for nursery development are likely to be devoid of such rich vegetation and the challenge has been to replicate nature in a believable way within a limited budget. It has been necessary to create an immediate effect, but one which will nevertheless have the potential to mature and grow over time. To achieve this, we are proposing a matrix of young Birch trees with occasional Bamboo planted at relatively close centres. The delicate tracery of these plants and the light aerial canopy will provide the desired sense of enclosure and volume from the outset, without limiting access or the need to monitor activities within.

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To reinforce the early effect, it is intended to incorporate Bamboo poles up to 3.0m long, both to support the young saplings and as free-standing structural elements, which will give scale as well as providing a sense of drama.

The management of this natural resource will respond appropriately as the plants mature, with pruning and the selective removal of individual specimens occurring on an as needs basis to reflect how the space is being used.

It is envisaged that there will be free flow of movement between the trees - the forest floor developing wildflowers in those pockets where the ground will not be trampled. The opportunities for learning and play in such an environment are considerable and will be enhanced by the introduction of other elements such as logs, tree stumps and branches which can be used variously to construct trim trails and build dens.

This cropping exercise itself will generate its own material, which can then be used for building purposes, or alternatively, left on the forest floor to decay and become its own unique habitat for invertebrates which themselves will attract a host of other small animals and birds.

Over time, the area will become more of a wilderness and it is anticipated that discrete zones will evolve which could include digging pits, bug hotels and the like.

17

18


3. The Reference Design 3.4 Outdoor Experience

Forest experience

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3. The Reference Design 3.4 Outdoor Experience Jungle Bells Within the Bamboo/Birch forest it is envisaged that a trail will evolve which could potentially include rustic elements such as logs, to be used as stepping stones; tree trunks as balance beams and potentially more sophisticated elements such as rope bridges. However, an integral element of the jungle experience will be the provision of a dense thicket of Bamboo poles, suspended from a frame, which would clatter as children push their way through. The varying lengths and diameters of each of these hollow tubes will also resemble a set of Tubular Bells. The availability of sticks and other improvised beaters will add to the piece’s attraction.

Jungle Bells

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Growing Area


3. The Reference Design 3.4 Outdoor Experience Rock Amphitheatre

Fire Pit

An added feature associated with the main sand pit is the rock containing the area at the base of the encircling mound. This will be tiered and provide a natural amphitheatre which can be used as informal seating as well as a climbing zone. Children will be able to sit on these to watch plays, listen to stories or even eat their lunch. It adds a degree of physical challenge and the opportunity to climb and jump into a soft sand surface below. The rocks will have a smooth surface and fit together neatly so joints are minimal.

Naked flames are increasingly anathema to children, who don’t get the opportunity to experience the heat, light and drama of a fire. The closest they get being the family barbeque or the annual organised bonfire on the 5th of November. It is nevertheless an element which children need to learn to respect and enjoy in a safe environment.

Within the Nursery Garden, an area has been created, remote from the building, which could accommodate a free-standing proprietary fire pit which could be brought out from storage from time to time to provide the focus of a supervised social gathering. It is nevertheless recognised that this would only ever be an occasional event and the allocated space has therefore been designed as an integral part of the wider play experience – uncompromised by the absence of the pit.

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3. The Reference Design 3.4 Outdoor Experience Mud Kitchen Role play is an important part in a child’s development. A Mud Kitchen allows them to mimic the activities of grownups without the need for cleanliness. The most attractive installation from a child’s perspective, is a makeshift concoction, made from pallets and off-cuts of timber, but these tend to be elements which are introduced to a garden over time and with the contribution of adults. It would be the aim therefore to try to replicate such informality by providing an item which is rustic in character and contains all the necessary components of a working kitchen i.e. sinks, hobs, ovens and shelving. Proprietary products have been avoided as being too prescriptive. Nevertheless, it is recognised that the basic unit will not be complete without the clutter of the pots, pans, kettles, basins and other utensils which will be added once the kitchens come into use. Scale is important, and the unit has to reflect the child’s size, whilst at the same time, being large enough to accommodate a large group at play together.

Mud Kitchen

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3. The Reference Design 3.4 Outdoor Experience Water Play Water provides an inviting and playful learning opportunity for children. Play facilities should allow them to interact with a versatile array of elements. To exploit this play potential, it is intended to erect two free-standing fence panels, onto which can be attached a variety of rainwater fittings, which could include gutters, pipes, water wheels, funnels, hoses and containers in an infinitely variable configuration to demonstrate how water flows, generates energy and can be collected. The fact that the system can be double-sided also increases capacity. An outdoor tap will be available nearby meaning that the water will need to be transported across the playground – a task which requires dexterity and balance in itself. In addition, it is anticipated that water will constitute a major ingredient within the Mud Kitchen and also the Sand Pit.

Water Play

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3. The Reference Design 3.4 Outdoor Experience Garden Development

Sand Play A trip to the beach provides a variety of opportunities for play and learning. The feel of the sand under foot and the ability to mould the material into mounds and castles and to bury and unearth treasure trove is a source of learning and great fun. Small standalone sand pits are a poor substitute, so we have created a large walk-in immersive space, designed to accommodate a large number of children all at once. This will be naturally contained on all sides but can be entered via shallow “slipways” or jumped into from the projecting from the edge of the playground or alternatively, off of the rock amphitheatre. To heighten the sense of exploration, other small items of interest could be added to the mix. These could include shells, pebbles, coins and other articles which might typically be lost beneath the sand during a family outing to the seaside.

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Water will be available close by and can be used to explore how the character of the sand changes when wet. Like the beach, the sand pit is an empty canvas which, with imagination and the essential tools of “bucket and spade”, can be particularly enticing. In preparation for such an adventure, a smaller, more formal sand pit is to be provided to form part of the developmental play experience - a place to explore before plucking up the courage to venture to the beach with the big children. It is important that these sand pits are provided with adequately designed drainage to ensure that they remain useable.

22

The Reference Design Scheme has endeavoured to create a framework within which play opportunities and play experience can evolve, through the combined contribution of the users – the children, the teachers and parents. It is anticipated that each space will employ similar building blocks, albeit in various configurations. These spaces will only ever be personalised and become unique to that community through the introduction of secondary elements. These might include items of street furniture i.e. benches and picnic tables; or less formal facilities represented by logs and tree trunks. Every available surface will become a canvas, fences and gates can be clad with sheets of chalkboard or acrylic to become Art Walls. Playhouses and storytelling areas can be squeezed into any available niche. Only by populating the Garden with toys, furniture and people, with the space come alive. The outdoor space is not a formal rigid garden it is the framework for an ever-evolving play landscape. The formula applied to the Reference Design should be regarded as being flexible and its adaptation will be a necessary strategy to meet the specific needs of its chosen location.

21


3. The Reference Design 3.4 Outdoor Experience Developmentally Appropriate Garden A garden is provided for use by those children in the Developmentally Appropriate Playroom. This is accessed directly from the space. The garden is a mirror image of the wider garden environment. There is no divide proposed between the gardens. This is to provide the opportunity for children to transition into the main garden area when they feel ready.

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3. The Reference Design 3.5 Programmatic Considerations Entrance Demands The entrance has a large number of competing demands that create a lot of pressure on the space. This diagram indicates the requirements that were placed on the entrance during the development of the Reference Design. Fundamentally, the primary requirement of the entrance is to provide a warm welcome. Adults and children should look forward to visiting the nursery. Adults should feel engaged with the nursery and comfortable to chat with staff and other adults. Children should feel relaxed and even excited about going to nursery.

If their day begins with an adult wary of a stressful drop off the experience can easily become a negative one. If every demand were to be provided in the entrance then the welcome loses its warmth and would most likely become a stressful experience for all. Through the Reference Design process each demand was assessed and a more considered approach was developed. Not all spaces could be accessed from the entrance, however the compromise has created a significantly improved entrance to the nursery. The following sections explain the entrance sequence.

breakout/ parents room

head teacher

reception

family room

entrance developmental play

cloaks

play

accessible toilet

Play Entrance

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3. The Reference Design 3.5 Programmatic Considerations Cloaks The cloaks are embedded within the playroom. This is to encourage parents and carers deeper into the plan of the building to increase interactions with staff and the learning environment. The benefit of this approach is that a much greater space is afforded to the cloakroom experience. This helps to take the pressure out of the changeover and remove some of the stresses for parents and caregivers, while also allowing children the opportunity to move freely into the nursery.

Cloak Area

Cloak Area during play

CLOAKS

PLAY

CLOAKS

Cooker Space

The time period of the peak changeover is short and overlaps with other shifts during the day and so has no impact on the experience for children.

PLAY

Cooker Space

The space immediately in front of the cloak units is registerable play space. Discussion with the Care Inspectorate identified this as an appropriate approach provided that there is no delineation of the cloak zone, such as a change in floor covering, elements of structure or partitioning.

Cloak Area during pick up

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3. The Reference Design 3.5 Programmatic Considerations Family Nursery school is the first point of contact for adults to the education system, not just children. The increase in Early Learning and Childcare childcare provision has been identified as a key opportunity in narrowing the attainment gap. If parents and care givers can be engaged with their child’s education from a young age, then there is a greater opportunity of success for that child. If a parent or care giver who has limited education can be given the opportunity to improve their own learning then they will be able to participate further in their child’s development. To realise the opportunities, it is necessary to connect with parents and care givers. To make the connections then nurseries must be designed in a way to facilitate that engagement.

ut ako bre

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ily fam m o ro

opy

can

Through the Reference design development consideration was given on how to promote engagement. Two key design moves were taken to facilitate this, as shown in the diagram.

Some staff, or the head teacher would be able to have a presence here during peak pick up and drop off times so that there was a visible presence for the adults.

Firstly, a family room was provided by the front door. The family room is able to open up fully onto a concourse, which is partially sheltered beneath a canopy. This creates the opportunity for adults to dwell at the nursery and make connections.

Secondly, the cloaks have been brought inside the playroom. In doing so parents and care givers must come much deeper into the building. This allows them to see the place where their child spends all day. It allows them to meet the playroom staff who work with their child each day.

The family room is a soft and welcoming space, not unlike a living room. Chairs and tables could be placed outside the family room to provide further seating. Adults can share a coffee and spend time together.

By bringing the cloaks into the playroom significantly more space can be created around them. Freeing up the cloaks will create a much more relaxed and less stressful drop-off and pickup.


3. The Reference Design 3.5 Programmatic Considerations

Family Room can open during drop off/pick up times

Entrance during drop off/pick up times

Clear and simple sequence of entry

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3. The Reference Design 3.5 Programmatic Considerations

Staff Desk Area is located close to the entrance

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3. The Reference Design 3.5 Programmatic Considerations Staff - Desk Space

Cooker Space

Staff are provided with a clerical room which has a number of shared desk spaces. The staff room has a generous ceiling height and a large window to provide lots of natural light and a view out.

f do hea tre cen

ff sta s k e d s

out eak

br

ily fam m o ro

y nop

ca

The Reference Design has a separate room for the Head of Centre. An alternative option is to swap the position of the Cleaners Store and then amalgamate the Head of Centre into the Clerical Room. This would provide one generous Clerical Space. The Clerical Space has access to the playroom and also has an opening onto the entrance foyer that acts as a reception desk. This ensures that the reception position always has support and is supervised.

Configuration as proposed for Kilmaurs site

ff sta s k des

f do hea tre cen

t kou

a bre

opy

can

Cooker Space

Cooker Space

ily fam m o ro

For sensitive calls and conversations, either the breakout or the family room can be used, which can be shut off from its adjacent spaces.

Alternative configuration

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3. The Reference Design 3.5 Programmatic Considerations

Entrance during staff lunchtime

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3. The Reference Design 3.5 Programmatic Considerations Staff - Rest Space Staff break times will be staggered, with a maximum of 4no playroom staff and 2no management staff on break at any one time. Staff break times will be determined around shift rotas and so will be scheduled out each day. The activities in the Breakout Room and Family Room will be scheduled taking cognisance of staff break times. Room scheduling will be managed by the centre management staff. Break time will then take place utilizing the kitchenette in the Breakout Room and also use the informal seating of the Family Room.

Cooker Space

When there is good weather staff can use the outdoor space at the front entrance, which allows them outdoor access in an adult only space. This will ensure a level of activity by the entrance through the day.

Staff Breakout Space

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3. The Reference Design 3.5 Programmatic Considerations

Toilets Downstairs: a block of toilets incorporating the nappy change and laundry is shared between Developmentally Appropriate Play and the Main Playroom. This spans each play area and provides an IVS at either end. A staff toilet is accessed from the entrance foyer, which acts as the IVS. A WC is provided off a lobby to the kitchen. This is a requirement of East Ayrshire Council Environmental Health and may not be applicable in all Local Authorities. Upstairs: toilets are provided to suit the registered capacity of the play area. A staff toilet is also provided upstairs. Outdoors: a single toilet is provided to support the 20% outdoor provision. Kitchen The kitchen will be reheat only. The units provided are of a domestic nature with stainless steel worksurface. Direct access to the outside space is required for the daily drop-off of pre-cooked food. A domestic oven is provided so that the kitchen may be used under supervision for the children to try baking. Storage Stores are provided upstairs and downstairs. Future storage may be created by lining the floor of the loft spaces in the first floor with plywood. Ground Floor

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3. The Reference Design 3.5 Programmatic Considerations

Plantroom A 9m2 plantroom is provided. The size has been determined with the input of a Mechanical & Electrical Engineer. More detailed information is available in the appendix. Escape Stair A single stair is provided to building control compliant standards. The escape door opens onto the play area so that children may be gathered in a secure safe location before being escorted through the final exit gate. Platform Lift A platform lift is provided. This has a full door at each level. It is key operated so it can only be used under staff supervision. This type of lift is affordable, does not require a pit or over run and does not need any special fire considerations.

Upper Floor

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4. Supporting Consultants


4. Supporting Consultants

Civil/Structural Waterman Group were appointed to provide outline Structural Engineering input to the reference design. The engineers were asked to provide advice during the design exercise to the architectural team to inform the structural principles in terms of walls, floors, roofs and overall stability of the building framework, resulting in the most economic structural solution(s) to the proposed building design, assuming that ground conditions were favourable. The structural form of the building comprises primarily of a main two storey area with a single storey area to North of the building floorspace, the roof is of duo pitched form and spans from the building perimeter at the Southern wall line to an internal wall line and then continues as a monopitched slope to the Northern perimeter wall. The internal spaces around the building are generally cellular comprising a series of smaller rooms, the walls of which can be utilised as either loadbearing or can accommodate columns within the wall construction. However, the central play area is largely an open space with no internal walls or columns requiring a steel frame structure to support the first floor structure above and transfer loads back to the columns positioned around the perimeter of the area, structural form of the upper floor has been set out to accommodate voids over the main play area and provide viewpoints to the space below.

We have considered viable construction options for the superstructure framework comprising the following construction forms: •

Timber Frame Construction – Only applicable to the single storey area.

Steel Frame Construction

Typical layouts are shown of the attached extract drawings. We would comment on each form of construction as follows; Timber Frame Construction – Single Storey Only Advantages •

Off-site construction leading to increased quality control

Faster on site erection

Can be fabricated and erected by single contractor

Lightweight construction/reduced high point loads to foundations

Disadvantages •

Reduced flexibility for future alterations. Internal shear/ racking walls

Central play space requiring additional steel framing.

Steel Frame Construction Advantages

The roof line continues from the building perimeter at the North East corner and extends outwards creating a canopy over the main entrance and is to be supported on external steel columns in turn supporting steel beams spanning back to the main building structure.

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Increased quality control through European CE marking

Pitched roof can be formed in steel with secondary steel framing

Flat roofs can be formed in steel with secondary steel framing

Faster on site erection

Disadvantages •

Vertical bracing co-ordination with door/window openings

Positioning of vertical bracing to suit wall build up

Infill panels (Masonry/timber/Cold Rolled Steel) between steel columns by secondary subcontractor

Substructure No Geotechnical/Enivironmental assessment information, or information relative to mineral stability of the site, has been provided on the site and as such no assessment has been made of the building substructure beyond what could reasonably be considered as normal ground conditions with an allowable safe bearing capacity of 75kN/m2. Accordingly foundations have been assumed to be traditional pad and strip footings placed at shallow depth commensurate with the building loads. Similarly the ground floor construction has been assumed to be that of a lightly reinforced concrete slab formed on compacted hardcore. A steel frame has been incorporated at this time in the reference design, with the outline envelope design developed coordinating these requirements. The structural design of the building would develop during the next stage of the design process, initially in assessment of a site investigation exercise to establish ground conditions and therefore foundation requirements, together with a drainage design. Similarly the structural design options would be considered more fully and coordinated with the building design as the Design Team would work towards submission of Building Warrants, tender packages and production information.


4. Supporting Consultants

M&E Max Fordham were appointed to provide outline Mechanical and Electrical Engineering input to the reference design. The engineers were asked to provide advice during the design exercise to the architectural team in relation to ventilation, daylighting, thermal comfort, heating, domestic water, lighting, M+E distribution, plant requirements as well as requirements in order to meet the Technical Standards. The key requirements of the design are to ensure compliance with Technical Standards at the time of collation of the report, ensure the M+E design meets the requirements of Space to Grow whilst also ensuring the proposals are in line with the cost plan. The reference design is considered to be generic so it does not take account of local issues such as external noise, pollution, site contamination, or exposed locations such as wind or sea. Availability of utility supplies such as gas, water, electric, data etc. need to be considered. Local council risk assessments, planning requirements and aspirations need to be considered for each individual site.

These are more intuitive to use, easily understood and can be maintained by local teams. The designs can be used as part of the early years learning experience about environmental and sustainable design. The design of the envelope of the reference design incorporates good target u-values, with the design developed to account for building orientation, ensuring good provision of natural daylight and ventilation throughout the building. The proposed heating strategy is reflective of recommendations within Space to Grow. The M+E design of the building will develop further during the next stage of the design process, and take account of each of the specific site related items noted above. Similarly the M+E proposals will be considered more fully and coordinated with the building design as the Design Team would work towards submission of Building Warrants, tender packages and production information. Full details of the Mechanical and Electrical outline proposals are available within the Appendix.

The proposed design will utilise best practice thermal envelope, solar control, day-lighting and natural ventilation to minimise the need for energy and to minimise the reliance on mechanical and electrical installations. The mechanical and electrical installations use contemporary products and solutions that are generally available and avoids overly sophisticated controls or technology.

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4. Supporting Consultants

Fire Consultant

Acoustic Engineer

Jeremy Gardner Associates were appointed to provide a Fire Engineering Review of the proposed reference design and provide commentary on the key points of the fire strategy. The key requirements of the exercise were to highlight any areas of potential non-compliance of the Technical Standards where Fire Engineering could be developed in order to support the reference design proposals.

Robin Mackenzie Partnership were appointed to provide a review of the acoustic design requirements for the reference design in line with the guidance provided in the department for education building bulletin BB93 ‘Acoustics design of schools: performance standards 2015 v17’.

For the purpose of the reference design, no site issues that would affect the design of the envelope or building’s orientation have been assumed. The review of the reference design has reviewed the size of the building with proposed number of occupants in relation to capacity and means of escape, any compartmentation requirements and requirement for provision for fire fighting and automatic fire detection, sprinklers and alarm systems. The next stage will be to review the site plan before preparing a Fire Strategy Report (if required) summarising the proposed fire strategy.

3.

Sound insulation between spaces; Acoustic ratings of proposed partitions have been incorporated to reflect the requirements of the acoustic consultants report. The partitions are specified to achieve the BB93 requirements and provide privacy and quite as required. Rw52dB to partitions separating noise sensitive rooms, Rw40dB to partitions to corridors, Rw50dB to plant room. Glazed screens to be Rw40dB. Doors to noise sensitive spaces to be Rw30dB, with doors between noise sensitive spaces being Rw35dB. The first floor will be provided with a floor finish capable of reducing impact noise to the ground floor.

4.

Control of building services noise; Any building services serving the offices and nursery spaces will be designed to control noise to below LAeq 35 dB. This includes any nonnatural ventilation, heating system and lighting.

Providing a building with the appropriate acoustic environment to enhance children’s ability to develop and learn is a key project aim. For the purpose of the reference design, no site specific acoustic issues that would affect the design of the envelope or building’s orientation have been assumed. The acoustic design of the building covers four areas. Requirements for each aspect as necessary within the reference design are outlined below: 1.

The full summary of the results of the review with regards to the key fire strategy issues is included within the appendix. 2.

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to also supplement in provision of a cushioned vinyl flooring and rugs to cover approximately 25% of the floor area (note the loose rugs are not incorporated within the cost plan).

Control of external noise; The proposal is to naturally ventilate the building through open-able windows. In order to control rain noise on the roof structure the roof build up incorporates mineral fibre insulation or an acoustic membrane were plastic insulation is used. Proposed rooflights are double glazed. 2. Control of reverberant sound to enable good listening and communication; Class C or better absorbent ceiling tiles are proposed to offices, meeting rooms and kitchen areas. A combination of Class C perforated plasterboard to the ceiling and additional Class A absorption panels is proposed to the main nursery play-space with agreement

The starting point for the next stage will be to carry out an acoustic site survey to quantify the acoustic environment. The detailed design should then be developed in conjunction with the project acoustic consultant to ensure the design goals.


4. Supporting Consultants

Interior Consultant Graven were asked to respond to the architecture by developing creative and practical interior design proposals that will support the objectives. In doing so they established their key considerations for this type of building as; safety, durability, sensory stimulation, flexibility and noise attenuation.

Graven prepared an outline interior finishes proposal which will be developed in more detail with the client as part of the development of the next stage. The design proposals and strategy are set out in further detail within the Appendix.

Each of these are in consideration of the range of functions and users, including staff and families. Elements of the proposals have been incorporated into the current design. •

Tactile textures and surfaces invite curiosity and help inform use

Natural materials such as timber and cork add warmth

Organisation of colours & materials helps to visually define areas and their uses

A restrained colour palette means that strong colours can be introduced with loose furniture items & the children’s creativity Pin board surfaces support the easy display of artworks, and other information

Writeable surfaces support creative play

Suspended & wall mounted acoustic shapes help to control sound and add visual interest

Modular products give flexibility including tables and carpet tiles

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5. The Model in East Ayrshire


5. The Model in East Ayrshire 5.1 Location

The site chosen for the Anderson Bell Christie led design is in Kilmaurs, East Ayrshire. Kilmaurs is a commuter town 2 miles outside Kilmarnock. It is close to the M77 motorway with a 21 mile commute to Glasgow. The train line to Newcastle and Glasgow runs through and has a stop in Kilmaurs. The population in Kilmaurs is approximately 2600. This is currently growing as new housing sites are coming to completion in the settlement. The town has an existing Primary School which has a nursery facility within its grounds. The primary school has limited space and cannot accommodate the increase in ELC provision in addition to the growing school role. As such the intention is to create a new nursery in Kilmaurs outwith the school campus. This will provide the space needed for the school. Kilmaurs There is a limited availability of centrally located sites owned by the council. The site identified is currently occupied by a community centre scheduled for demolition. It is located within a short walk to the primary school, railway station and town centre.

Kilmarnock

Scotland

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East Ayrshire


5. The Model in East Ayrshire 5.2 Site Boundary

Glencairn

Terrace

Text

BEN

RIG

AVE

EEAST PARK DRIVE

BENRIG AVE

IRVINE ROAD 24

© Google 2018

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5. The Model in East Ayrshire 5.3 Site Conditions Site Topography/Features

Site Character

Insurance

The site is on the crest of a hill with good views from an elevated position. There are no significant landforms or trees on the site. There is a cross-fall of around 1m on the north south axis of the site. The cross fall will require the use of gabion basket retaining structures on the part of the south and east boundaries. These retaining structures are considered as a site abnormal in the cost plan. Likewise there is a sloped area to the south of the garden, triangular shaped on plan, that is deemed as an abnormal in the Reference Design project. It is likely that this area would be amalgamated into the garden boundary in the as built project.

The character of the site is predominantly residential, the neighbouring homes are one and two storey with dual pitched roofs. The homes are 1970s ex-council stock with roughcast render walls and concrete tile roofs. There are very few trees in the area however hard standing is softened by the use of grass verges in footways.

EAC insurance providers have specific requirements that have had some influence on the Reference Design. Combustible cladding, such as timber weather boarding, is not a preference of the insurers. Other local authorities may not have the same constraints. EAC insurance providers also have requirements for the provision of sprinkler and CCTV systems. Neither of these items are considered a requirement in Building Standards Division Technical Guidance. As a result, they have been omitted from the Reference Design.

The medical and community centres are anomalous in the area and sit distinct to the dominant typology. Key Available development boundary Gas Electricity Water BT Please refer to individual maps in the appendix of this report for further information SEPA Flood Risk (Surface Water) http://map.sepa.org.uk/floodmap/map.htm Coal Authority Note: http://mapapps2.bgs.ac.uk/coalauthority/home. html N/A Tree Preservation Orders: Email from East Ayrshire Council received 06/02/2018 N/A Conservation Area: https://www.east-ayrshire.gov.uk/devser/documents/LocalPlan2010Kilmaurs.pdf N/A

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5. The Model in East Ayrshire 5.4 Site Accessibility

Although the site is well connected with bus and transport links, the topography does not allow an accessible route within the travel distances required by EAC. There is a direct link to the south east of the site, however this is a stepped ramp. Given the proximity of adjacent ownership boundaries and the level change between adopted footpaths it would not be possible to achieve a permissible ramp.

BE

NR

200m walking distance

IG

E PARK DR

Travel and Transport

AV E

Medical practice car parking

Existing car parking on site [12 spaces]

Bus 337

IRVINE ROAD

Existing car parking on site [approx. 16 spaces]

400m walking distance

Bus 113/337

Bus 113/337/9

800m walking distance

600m walking distance

Kilmaurs Primary School

Public transport: Bus 9 [Kilmarnock - Stewarton] Frequency: every 20 - 30mins Bus 113 [Irvine - Stewarton] Frequency: hourly Kilmaurs train station

Bus 337 [Kilmarnock - Beith] Frequency: every 2hours Train [Kilmarnock - Kilmaurs] Frequency: every 30mins

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Š Google 2018

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5. The Model in East Ayrshire 5.5 Site Context

The site itself is located within a residential area comprising mainly of two-storey terraced and semi-detached houses. The local area’s community centre is currently located on the site. To the north of this, separated by shared car parking, lies Kilmaurs Medical Centre. The site is accessed by vehicles from East Park Drive via Benrig avenue. East Park Drive comes to a dead end south of the site.

26

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5. The Model in East Ayrshire 5.6 Development Strategy

NHS FACILITY

Existing Shared Car Park (11no spaces associated with community centre)

The site has an existing NHS facility and shared car park. Half of the parking spaces in this car park are allocated to the community centre site. To the south of the community centre there is an area of tarmac used for parking. The existing tarmac areas could be utilised to generate 24no parking spaces for the nursery. EAC Roads required 24no spaces for the nursery, working to a ratio of 1 space per staff member. Given the high car ownership and usage in Kilmaurs there was no opportunity to reduce this amount.

EAST PARK DRIVE

If Roads require more spaces for the NHS facility then the existing car park could be extended.

The turning head at the end of the dead end street is to be retained.

BUILD ZONE

Opportunity for community garden or allotments to be created by EAC (outwith scope of Reference Design project)

Existing Tarmac Area Unmarked area used by community centre and neighbours. (When space planned holds 14no spaces)

Existing Housing Provision for additional parking in the future has been considered. This may be created by lengthening the shared NHS / EAC car park. The amount of land available on the site is greater than that needed for the nursery. It was decided to retain frontage on the street and utilise the space between the parking areas for the nursery site. The space left over to the west is then available for use by EAC. It was noted that there is a high demand in the area for allotments or community gardens, as such the space may be utilised for this purpose as a distinct EAC project. This would potentially be a complimentary use for the nursery. The nursery building will be located on the position of the community centre. The demolition of the community centre is considered as a site abnormal in the cost plan.

Existing Housing

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5. The Model in East Ayrshire

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5. The Model in East Ayrshire 5.7 Site Proposals

1. Key: 1. NHS Facility 2. 2. Existing Car Parking, shared with the NHS Facility

EAST PARK DRIVE

3. Newly formed Car Parking Bays 4. Existing Housing 5. Opportunity for Allotments 4.

Site Extents

5.

4.

3.

4.

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6. Refurbishment Solutions


6. Refurbishment Solutions

Introduction

Creation of a Gallery or Upper Level

Improving Indoor Learning Environments

It is recognised that a large proportion of the delivery of 1140hrs will be through existing premises. In some cases, refurbishment or alteration work will be required to meet the requirements of Space to Grow.

The Reference Designs show that registerable play area can be created on an upper level. Where existing facilities enjoy the benefit of tall floor to ceiling heights it may be possible to insert a mezzanine or gallery. Creative use of a volume can generate great learning and dynamic play spaces.

Internally there are potentially many aspects that could be considered as part of a refurbishment of an existing setting, and will vary vastly depending on current condition. Considering aspects such as improving provision of natural light and acoustics, and considering decoration and surfaces can improve the comfort and wellbeing for the children and staff.

The Reference Design, although for a new build setting, provides a pool of ideas to draw upon for a refurbishment project. In this section we have outlined some of those that are worth consideration when developing a strategy for an existing premises.

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Consideration should be given to the available height above and below a proposed mezzanine / gallery and how appropriate this is. Every condition will require a different solution and providers should seek professional advice on technical aspects, for instance fire escape strategy and detection and alarm systems is a key consideration.

.

31


6. Refurbishment Solutions

Dining in Refurbishment settings

Outdoor Space Solutions

Addition of External Pods

Dining provision in refurbishment settings will require careful consideration. Thought will need to be allocated to the suitability of catering facilities. Providers should consider whether their kitchen will offer a reheat or full catering provision. The spatial implications of each approach need to be weighed against the ability to achieve the requirements in each setting.

A more natural approach - Achieving up to 20% additional capacity through outdoor play needs full assessment of the learning outcomes and experiences provided outside. Many existing premises have outdoor play areas dominated by hard surfaces and so limit the experiences outdoors. While it is important to retain some hard surface for wheeled play equipment, art and all weather play, consideration should be given to natural environment.

Achieving up to 20% additional capacity through outdoor play needs to be accompanied by suitable provision of supporting accommodation. Principal among the functional requirements is an external toilet. Further support can be provided through a means to store and dry outdoor gear such as waterproofs and wellies. This needs to be considered in tandem with the ability to provide suitable learning experiences and outcomes from the outdoor environment. If these outcomes and experiences are unlikely to be delivered then this may not be a viable approach.

Consideration will also need to be given to the number of children to dine in one sitting, its impact on the day and the availability of appropriate numbers of staff. Decisions here may also have an implication on the quantity of tables and chairs needed. This in turn may generate a need for additional storage within the setting. The quality of the dining experience for the children is paramount and should be regarded as the over-arching factor when taking these strategic and practical decisions.

Before action is taken, learning outcomes and experiences from the outdoor environment needs to be planned. This will then tell providers what action is required to meet those needs. This should form the basis of a design brief for the space. It may be beneficial to seek professional advice on the viability of achieving more natural environment in each location. My world outdoors is a useful document that should be read in conjunction with this process to inform decisions. Opportunities nearby - Learning and play outcomes may be supplemented by looking beyond the boundaries of the nursery facility. Providers should make an assessment of what is locally available and easily accessible. This may be a beach, a park, allotments, museums, woodland and so on. If there is sufficient value in the learning experiences and outcomes then a service may wish to consider how this process could be resourced and managed.

In those instances where outdoor experiences are likely to support the addition provision, it should be considered if minor alterations would facilitate the inclusion of an externally accessible toilet. If it is not possible then one solution could be to introduce a new build toilet support pod. A boot room may a useful addition to ease the flow of children to the outdoors during inclement weather. It could also provides the opportunity for outdoor gear to dry out. This makes the experience of going outdoors in all weathers more pleasant, as you always have access to dry waterproof clothing and wellies. Where possible it should be considered if minor alterations would facilitate the inclusion of a boot room or heated and ventilated cloaks. If it is not possible then one solution could be to introduce a new build boot room support pod.

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Appendices


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Appendices List of Figures

All images contained in this document are owned, or have been created by, Anderson Bell + Christie Architects unless otherwise stated in the list adjacent. All images contained in this document are subject to copyright

01 - View to Entrance (Day) | ABC created image 02 - Children playing | shutterstock.com 03 - Child with train | shutterstock.com 04 - Teacher and group of children | shutterstock.com 05 - Tree tunnel | shutterstock.com 06 - Girl with flower | shutterstock.com 07 - Children building | shutterstock.com 08 - Child cycling | shutterstock.com 09 - Children with leaves | shutterstock.com 10 - Child planting | shutterstock.com 11 - Teacher and group | shutterstock.com 12 - Children and teacher | shutterstock.com 13 - Children running | shutterstock.com 14 - Site Plan | Hirst Landscape Architects 15 - Boy with tricycle | shutterstock.com 16 - Sketch | Hirst Landscape Architects 17 - Child with puddle | shutterstock.com 18 - Landscape Section | Hirst Landscape Architects 19 - Landscape Plan extract | Hirst Landscape Architects 20 - Child playing in sand | shutterstock.com 21 - Child playing with soil | shutterstock.com 22 - Plan view | google.com 23 - Plan view | google.com 24 - Nearby Terrace Housing | ABC-owned Image 25 - Nearby cottage housing | ABC-owned Image 26 - Child playing with teacher | shutterstock.com 27 - Site Plan | Hirst Landscape Architects 28 - Girl with mud | shutterstock.com 29 - Children carrying log | shutterstock.com 30 - Child with hula hoop | shutterstock.com 31 - Children playing | shutterstock.com 32 - View to Entrance (Night) | ABC Created Image

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design

1 11 11 11 12 12 14 14 15 15 20 34 50 53 55 56 56 59 62 63 63 81 83 84 84 86 87 96 96 96 100 116

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Appendices APPENDIX 1 - Final Brief

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design


Early Years Pilot Brief V8 01-05-2018

Registered Capacity Kilmaurs Site: 72no 3-5yr olds & 10no 2yr olds. The building is to be sized for 69no children. An additional 20% of the capacity can be provided outdoors, which is 13no. children.

Registered Capacity Cumnock Site: 64no 3-5yr olds, 10 no 2-3yr olds & 9no 0-2yrs. The building to be sized for 71no children. An additional 20% of the 3-5yr and 2-3yr capacity can be provided outdoors, which is 12no. children.

Funding Envelope: Kilmaurs = 5.8m2 x 69 children x £3000/m2 = £1,200,600.00 Cumnock = 5.8m2 x 71 children x £3000/m2 = £1,235,400.00 The building may not exceed the metric of 5.8m2 The number of children registered outside the building are not included in the funding calculation.

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Entrance zone: Welcoming and clearly identifiable. A single point of entrance is preferred to monitor comings and goings. From the entrance children would ideally disperse to their groups. Opportunities for conversations to take place. Access to admin / centre manager for sign-in purposes? Storage space for childrens coats, bags, shoes; ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐

Wet items should have the opportunity to dry. Opportunity to sit while changing shoes. Sufficient space for up to 82 (Kilmaurs) / 83 (Cumnock) children and their care giver(s) and siblings to access / egress. Parking at a reasonable walking distance from the entrance. At Cumnock parents park at the community centre and walk across. There will be 3no periods of peak flow, 08.00-09.00 / 13.30-14.45 / 15:00-16:30 The facility will accept children at any time of day, however outside of peak times numbers will be significantly reduced. Close proximity of a room for private conversations and small meetings.

EAC will provide wet weather gear for outdoor play. Children must bring indoor shoes.

Early Years Pilot Brief v8  01‐05‐2018  Page 2 of 14           

                                                                                             


Dining: A central kitchen will provide food to the nurseries. Dining refers to Lunch and High Tea. Dining can happen indoor or outdoors, weather and space dependent. Dining can overlap with other functions, such as the playroom. Storage of additional tables and chairs for a single sitting. Tables can be multi-functional, being used for messy play and dining, provided an oil cloth is used. If dining overlaps with the playroom then a single sitting is required. If dining overlaps with other spaces then multiple sittings could be possible. Management of multiple sitting and staff deployment would need consideration. Stainless steel countertops. A single lunch sittings will start at 11.45 If multiple sittings lunch could start at 11.30 Lunch will serve all 82no children at Kilmaurs. High Tea will be served after the PM session children have left at 16:00 High Tea will serve a maximum of 32 children at Kilmaurs and so in a single sitting. High Tea will likely sandwiches and or soup. Opportunity for indoor seating for all children for dining in one sitting. Additional chairs may be required to be brought out for dining. A re-heat kitchen is required with cold and dry food storage, commercial dishwasher, food preparation area, reheat facility. Food will be taken out from the kitchen in serving dishes for self-service. Early Years Pilot Brief v8  01‐05‐2018  Page 3 of 14           

                                                                                             


1no wash hand basin needs to be close to the dining areas. 1no sink needs to be close to the dining areas to allow for children to wash own dishes if managed as part of learning experience. Children wash their hands in the playroom. A trough provides for faster turnaround for all children to wash hands before eating. All taps for childrens use to be sensor. Adult taps to be lever operated

Snacks: Snacks will be given between 9.30-10.30 and 13.45-14:15 Snacks may be prepared in the playroom at a table by the children, or in the kitchen. An area for preparation is required in the playroom. Unless the main kitchen is immediately adjacent to the playroom and accessible through a hatch. The full dining set up is not required for snack time. No cooker is required for snack preparation. Storage space for a third pint of milk per child per day. Domestic cooker in kitchen for heating soup or children to participate in baking etc.

Early Years Pilot Brief v8  01‐05‐2018  Page 4 of 14           

                                                                                             


Milk Kitchen (Cumnock Only): 2 sinks, one hand-wash sink, one cleaning sink Undercounter fridge for milk storage Kitchen unit style storage Space for sterilizing unit

Staff: The building should provide an attractive environment to encourage staff into the profession and reduce turnover of existing staff. Staff Numbers Kilmaurs

Cumnock

For a 72 FTE (3-5 yr) and 10 FTE (2yr olds) :

For a 64 fte (3-5 yr) 10 FtE (2yr olds) and 9 fte (0-2):

1 x Head of Centre

1 x Head of Centre

1 x Depute Manager

1 x Depute Manager

2 x Senior ELCPs

2 x Senior ELCPs

15 x ELCPs

17x ELCPs

1 x support assistant

1 x support assistant

2 x 20hr clerical assistants

2 x 20hr clerical assistant

Quiet space for non-playroom work is required. Space required for a multipurpose printing device. Early Years Pilot Brief v8  01‐05‐2018  Page 5 of 14           

                                                                                             


Space for staff to have a break in an adult environment is required. Staff are expected to work on shifts of 7.45 to 3.15 / 8.45 to 4.15 / 10.45 to 18.15. Staff numbers will be at the maximum point in the middle of the day. Total staff number in building at any one time is 22 at Kilmaurs and 24 at Cumnock. Maximum staffing is between 10.45-15.15 Staff break times will be staggered, with a maximum of 4no playroom staff and 2no management staff on break at any one time. Staff admin times will be staggered, with a maximum of 2no staff on admin at any one time. Staff parking of 24no spaces is required to EAC Roads Department Requirements. Provide 1no cube locker per staff member. Provide a staff only place to hang coats. Space for staff training and CPD. Provide a corporate workspace to accommodate all centre staff with the exception of the Head of Centre. This should include 3no. hot desking spaces that will be shared. Provide a private place to make calls. Provide a private place to have small meetings of a sensitive nature. Provide an informal zone for meeting. Space for staff breaks may be within the workspace provided it is visually and acoustically screened off. Head of Centre to have office with workspace and informal meeting area.

Early Years Pilot Brief v8  01‐05‐2018  Page 6 of 14           

                                                                                             


Families and Community: Should provide opportunities for the family to access services within the building. Opportunity to dwell and converse. Provide a social link for parents / families. Access to a space for private discussion. Opportunity to participate in play in the facility. Provide a Family and Community Room: Informal space with sofas and coffee table. Provision for tea preparation is required. No workspace is required, care givers will be assisted in making applications using a tablet device. An open plan family kitchen with breakfast bar and gated access may be provided. Different activities noted: Speech and Language Therapy, Baby Massage, Cookery Group, Parent & Toddler Group, Parents Group Sessions, Book Bug, Baby Chat etc. Supervised access visits facilitated by social work.

Early Years Pilot Brief v8  01‐05‐2018  Page 7 of 14           

                                                                                             


Sleep: Children will be able to choose where they sleep. Children will be able to sleep when they are tired. Control of light levels in different zones required. At Kilmaurs provide sleep matts for: 3-5yrs 16no. 2-3yrs 8no. At Cumnock provide sleep matts for: 3-5yrs 20 no. 2-3yrs 8 no, 0-2yrs 9 no.

Playrooms: Playroom Sizes Kilmaurs

Cumnock

59 no 3-5yr @ 2.3m2 = 137.5m2 10 no 2yr @ 2.8 = 28m2

53 no 3-5yr @ 2.3m2 = 121.9m2 9 no 2yr @ 2.8 = 25.2m2 9 no 0-2yr @ 3.7 = 33.3m2

Total clear playroom area 163.7m2

Total clear playroom area 180.4m2

A naturalistic approach employing the attributes of biophilic design. A fun and nurturing environment that children are excited to return to each day. Provide a variety of spaces in terms of scale, light, sound. Encourage active play and active learning. An environment that provides challenge for children at different developmental stages. Early Years Pilot Brief v8  01‐05‐2018  Page 8 of 14           

                                                                                             


Developmentally appropriate space for children, to manage their transition into the playroom. Consider the building as the third teacher, as Reggio Emilia. Provide opportunities for child led play. Space must have a constant temperature in all weather conditions for it to be registered. Surfaces must be durable and reflect the activities undertaken. Quiet spaces for small group activities on literacy, numeracy and music are required. Audio visual equipment, 1no adjustable height interactive screen on moveable stand. Acoustic control is important to minimise sensory burden. Freeflow play from inside to outside is required. A transition space for children to put their own outdoor gear on is required. Wet clothes must be capable of drying. Storage is required of approximately 12m2 Match building temperature with activity.

Different Play Areas required; Construction Area

-

Boxed up lego / duplo / megablocks / block play. Large space required.

Role Play

-

Shop / Doctors / Vets

Snack Area

-

Children help to prepare their snacks. Also used for tooth brushing.

Messy Play Area

-

Dough / slime / water / clay

Arts & Crafts

-

Takes up a lot of storage. Easels / glue / paper etc. Hard flooring essential.

Small World Play

-

Dolls House / Cars / Railway

Early Years Pilot Brief v8  01‐05‐2018  Page 9 of 14           

                                                                                             


Many of these spaces can double up as they just require flexible space and storage. Not looking for a defined sleeping area. A smaller, quieter space could be used for any children that needed some quiet time. Comfy seating / bean bags. Play area should be an open, fun space with slides / ladders / nets etc Art / Wet Play Area – Requires an amount of storage. Consider storage built into walls? Moveable units? Could the walls become display spaces? Flooring would have to be vinyl or similar. Reading area - Different in nature to the activity and commotion of the rest of the nursery. Consider smaller pods / lowered ceilings. Doesn’t need formal seats.

Outdoors: Redefine the outdoor space as a garden, a planned and structured environment. Learning outcomes and indoors should be the same.

The external environment should be capable of accommodating all children that may be outside at one moment. 30/50% of time anticipated to be spent outdoors. The local authority will provide high quality outdoor clothing and footwear. There is no metric to determine the minimum area of outdoor space. Children to be clearly visible in all areas, unless in areas agreed for staff supervision. Lighting is required to facilitate outdoor play during hours of darkness, especially important in winter months. There should be challenge and risk for children in the environment. There should be opportunity for warmth outdoors. Early Years Pilot Brief v8  01‐05‐2018  Page 10 of 14           

                                                                                             


The use of fire is possible if risks are managed. Water can be used but must be flowing and shallow. Space for external storage is required which will allow items to dry. Storage to be integrated into a structure and have ease of access. Food growing opportunities should be considered. The outdoor space should be easily maintainable. Opportunity for fauna. External access to toilet facilities preferable.

What should the Garden provide? Woodwork - Arts & Crafts Painting & Making Cooking & Food growing. Gardening vegetables. Musical Noisy Play Changes in level, slopes and stepping stones. Embracing existing natural things – Trees / Vegetation / Slopes / Mini beasts & Bugs Light – Natural light throughout the year. Summer / Winter. Artificial lighting in the evening. Feature lighting. Recycling and sustainability. Accessible and child friendly. Access to toilets from the external space. Hand wash facilities. Water for cleaning. Building structures – willow, bamboo, shelter Fire pit / Barbeque – Forrest School& Forrest School Early Years Pilot Brief v8  01‐05‐2018  Page 11 of 14           

                                                                                             


Training Events / Drama / Puppet Shows / Story Time / Education Eating / Seating Physical energetic play / Bikes / Jumps Transitional areas outdoor to indoor. Drying rooms / cloak rooms / coat hooks Outside power and water. Water for play. Like indoor spaces there should be a choice in terms of size and nature. Mud kitchen – encouraging messy play. Visiting pets – chickens / rabbits / guinea pigs Shuttered off storage areas. Using roof space as play space Greenhouse Seasonality – How things grow / Tying in to the rural environment / Where food comes from / Animals The garden as a sensory environment; Sensory plants / sounds / smells. Wildlife – Birds / Hedgehogs / Foxes – using CCTV to watch visitors to the garden. Rainwater harvesting / Wind turbines / Solar Panels. /Growing walls / Herbs, Fruits and Vegetables Hills for rolling down / climbing up. Slides & Tunnels. Canopies allow outdoor play all year round. Bike space – Hard surface.

Early Years Pilot Brief v8  01‐05‐2018  Page 12 of 14           

                                                                                             


Toilets: All toilets to be unisex. Toilet provision for 72no children is required indoors at Kilmaurs. This equates to 7no. Toilet provision for 74no children is required indoors at Cumnock plus a nappy change within the 0-2 room. This equates to 7no. Heights to be provided relative to age group. 2-3s and 3-5s can share same WCs. Toilet provision for 13no children at Kilmaurs and 12no at Cumnock is required outdoors. This equates to 1no. toilet. Toilet provision for 22no staff at Kilmaurs and 24no at Cumnock is required. 1no. staff toilet should be provided near the playroom and 1no. near the staff room. (2 no up to 25 no, 3 no 25-50 members of staff). Student staffing will be variable, it is anticipated it will peak over the first few years and reduce thereafter. Toilets for children within the playroom should not give access directly outdoors. 1no nappy change is required. Hand wash facility for children and staff i.e. 2 no. ‐ ‐ ‐

Nappy change to have adjustable height changing table. Changing table 1.4m in length. Storage for potties to be provided. Provide deep sink for potty wash and space for drying.

Children should be able to open doors unaided - weight of doors is critical. Finger guards should be provided to all doors.

Early Years Pilot Brief v8  01‐05‐2018  Page 13 of 14           

                                                                                             


Ancillary Space: Plantroom is required, refer to M&E report for more details. A cleaners cupboard is required. This should include a janitorial unit, dilution unit and space for floor buffers. Only one wall needs to be shelved. A laundry room is required. Long thin proportion preferred. High quality domestic washing machine and tumble drier to be provided. A sink with drainer and a separate wash hand basin is to be provided.

Reference Documents: ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐

The Scottish Government Building the Ambition Care Inspectorate Space to Grow Care Inspectorate Nappy Changing facilities in early years, nurseries and large child minding services Care Inspectorate My World Outdoors Care Inspectorate Hand Hygiene BS8300 Smarter Scotland: Pre-Birth to Three Positive Outcomes for Scotland’s Children and Families

Early Years Pilot Brief v8  01‐05‐2018  Page 14 of 14           

                                                                                             


Page 102 |


Appendices APPENDIX 2 - Schedule of Accommodation

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design


Early Years Pilot Design Schedule of Accomodation

Ground Floor Room Area (m2) Accessible WC 4.5 Breakout/Parents' Room 12.3 Circulation 3.7 Cleaner's Store 4.3 Clerical/Touchdown 15.7 Developmental Play 28.5 Entrance Foyer 11.3 Escape Stair 11.4 Ext. WC 2.8 Family Room 13.6 Head of Centre 10.9 IVS 3 IVS 3.3 Kitchen 15.4 Kitchen WC and Change 3.7 Laundry 4 Main Playroom 76 Nappy Change 6.2 Platform Lift 2.5 Reading Nook 4.4 Store 8.2 WCs 13.6 Plant 8.9 Total 268.2

Anderson Bell Christie

Upper Floor Room Area (m2) Escape Stair 11.4 IVS 4.8 Platform Lift 2.5 Playroom 70.3 Staff WC 2 Store 4.5 WCs 9.3 Total 104.8

Building Total

373


Page 104 |


Appendices APPENDIX 3 - Stakeholder Consultations

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design


Workshop 1 Early Learning and Childcare Provision Workshop

The Delivery and design of service delivery must change. Model needs to be flexible.

1140 Hours 55% of parents will sign up for a term timetable 45% of parents will sign up for a calendar year timetable.

Of 72 child spaces at the nursery: 40 children will be there for the full day session 32 children will be there for an AM half day session 32 children will be there for a PM half day session.

This equates to 104 sessions a day in a nursery that can accommodate 72 children at once.

Longer hours give a less broken up, fragmented day for children.

Gives an increased opportunity to help children in need of assistance.

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design - Stakeholder Engagement | Page 1


Workshop 1 Question 1 - What is the Purpose of 1140 Hours?

Giving kids the best possible start and take parents along this route too.

balance safety concerns over outdoor activities while allowing children to explore outside.

Countering deprivation and creating equal opportunities.

The outdoors can promote more engagement from some kids and enhance collaboration, learning and social skills. Also promotes the use of parks and outdoor space – teaching children how to be outdoor adults.

Helping struggling parents. Previous model doesn’t fit the need of parents who wish to go back to work. Parents more economically active.

Counters an over reliance on indoor pursuits such as xbox etc. Challenging the dominance of social media.

Giving children confidence to “Take on the world!” Giving children more choices/freedom and developing risk awareness. Self-directed learning.

Nursery should be installing a knowledge/awareness of growing vegetables etc. Ability to produce seasonal varieties throughout the year. Improves health and wellbeing.

Self-risk assessment: involving kids in health and safety. Have to

Lunches: Social setting for each. Promoting healthy eating food

growing and cooking. Involving kids in preparation of food. Should provide access to facilities outside of school hours. With the loss of many community facilities, the nursery could provide a social function in evenings/weekends. A place to go… A community café? Embedding the facility into the community will make it more likely to be looked after. Community buy in. Gives staff longer to know and support children, from the age of 2. Does this counter parents getting to know their children? Will this lead to an over reliance of the council to nurture/develop/ provide care.

Page 2 |


Workshop 1 What is success?

Success is happiness for Children, Parents & Staff EYC Delivery and Design Must Change Must be Inclusive – providing deeper learning opportunities, experiences (blurring lines between indoor and outdoor), security Must provide opportunities for staff. A balance in work/life experience. Better facilities will make it easier to recruit and retain staff. Something that is difficult at the moment, a continual turnover of staff. Should provide opportunities for the family to access services within the building. Aims of the new facility Build confidence / Life skills / Variety of experiences / Learning to care / Sustainability / Outdoor Rooms Free Play – Indoor / Outdoor – Child decides where to play.

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design - Stakeholder Engagement | Page 3


Workshop 1 Question 2 – How to Maximize Benefits

Starting at 2 years of age for eligible kids. = An early intervention for speech/language and social interaction. Also provides support for parents. ROVIDE A SOCIAL LINK FOR PARENTS, many of whom may be isolated and not have many opportunities to engage with others. Could a café provide a social space for parents to mingle while their kids are in nursery? At the moment there is a parent’s room which is well used. Parents can get involved in activities with the group, observing care delivery that could be adopted at home. Café could become a flexible meeting space used by visiting groups, eg baby massage/teeth cleaning. Could café operate later to allow parents to stay after pick up? Supper club? A query over the kind of kitchen being provided, most likely a regen type kitchen. Could this be used to prepare vegetables grown on site? Kitchen could prepare lunches for the children throughout the day whilst also preparing food for a community café.

DEVELOPING SOCIAL SKILLS FOR KIDS - Confidence/ Language/Caring/Play

In comparison to what is available currently. This should be something different!

How do we nurture confidence? Giving children the confidence to take on the world! The learning environment will go a long way to engaging children: Space/Light/Noise/Materials

What is fun? Slides/Steps/Tunnels/Climbing (Has to be inclusive and accessible.)

The graduation between indoor and outdoor will be crucial. Trying to blur the lines between each. Indoor Space > Covered Outdoor Space > External Space. Boot room/transition space required to clean off outdoor clothes. Large, airy, bright spaces that can be as flexible as possible. Smaller, more intimate spaces will be required for children that can find noise problematic. A variety of spaces that encourage exploring and discovery. Smaller spaces to rest/sleep/calm down/read. The nursery should be a stimulating space and most importantly, it should be a fun place that is appealing to the children. Interesting spaces… Angles and curves.

Colours and materials will be carefully considered. Not just austere white plasterboard walls. Types of play: Creative/ Discovery/Exploration/Role Play/ onstruction & Maths Digital learning is on wheels and can be used flexibly. Role of the Care Inspectorate should be understood and engaged with as early as possible. The focus will be on the quality of outcomes for children

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Workshop 1 Question 2 – How to Maximize Benefits

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design - Stakeholder Engagement | Page 5


Workshop 1 Question 2 – How to Maximize Benefits ENTRANCE Should be welcoming and attractive. Bright and airy. Should not be intimidating to the parent and especially not to the child. Parents/children should feel uplifted upon entering the facility. Should entrance route go past the external play area? An active/ joyous environment. Or would this be problematic for children seeing their parents leaving if they are not fully settled? External play area should be the back garden for children. Should be an alternative social space at the entrance for parents to engage with other parents/teachers etc. Would like parents to engage with the nursery as a whole, not just dropping off children and leaving. A café that could link the nursery to the community, providing a social space for parents to converse. Kitchen could provide lunch to nursery as well as to a small snack/coffee shop. Could just be a larger covered space at the entrance to encourage lingering. Does encouraging parents to stay and join in put working parents at a disadvantage? Parents invited to group time once a month, making them more comfortable coming into the facility. Welcoming with appropriate storage for coats and shoes (allows drying of outdoor wear) Where should this be located? An external covered zone may make this area less crushed. Combine this area with the outdoor clothes zone. Families bringing children in makes it a busy space. Toilets available for visitors & parents in foyer? A quiet room off of the reception would be good for upset children.

Security has to be considered. Challenge the care commission on usable space – making space work harder thus generating other spaces for the community and staff. 2 year olds - Separate room from older kids / Snooze room or space. / Own access to outside.

the room throughout the rest of the day. Would mean there would have to be separate coats to be worn into the external play space. Positioning the cloaks at the threshold to the garden would bring the parents deeper into the nursery, however that means that the activity and disruption of pick up times are brought further into the building too! If kids are to wear their own coats etc it develops a sense of ownership and looking after their things.

ARIVAL Parking/Park and Stride/Walking/Cycling/Taxi Drop off – Will longer hours result in more arriving by car?

Nursery currently has a multipurpose space that is heavily used throughout the week: Speech and Language Therapy - Tuesday Baby Massage - Wednesday

Currently a security door within a community centre. A very tight entrance if you are bringing in a buggy. Also, many parents may have more than one child at the nursery so it can be very congested and hectic getting coats/hats/groves on and off.

Cookery Group - Wednesday Parent & Toddler Group - Thursday Parents Group Sessions - Friday

Could entrance and dining double up as the same space? Might not work depending on clash with morning kids leaving unless lunchtimes were timetabled. Thought to be a good idea to introduce a (loose) structure to the day.

Don’t currently have any fixed kitchenette but would make such a difference if they did.

Need to consider the process of arrival/drop off. Where to position the cloak room? At the front door? Large flexible space, could close off the coat storage and reuse

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Workshop 1 Question 2 – How to Maximize Benefits

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design - Stakeholder Engagement | Page 7


Workshop 2 Internal Spaces Different Play Areas required •

Construction Area - Boxed up lego/duplo/megablocks. Large space required.

Role Play - Shop/Doctors/Vets

Snack Area - Children help to prepare their snacks. Also used for tooth brushing.

Messy Play Area - Dough/slime/water

Arts & Crafts - Takes up a lot of storage. Easels/glue/paper. Hard flooring essential.

Small World Play - Dolls House/Cars/Railway

Walls should not be white plasterboard throughout. Liked idea of using veneered ply in order to provide warmth and texture as well as a robust long lasting finish that is economical as well. Liked the precedent of Hazelwood School for the visually impaired, using cork to clad a central wayfinding wall. Again, a tactile, warm finish. Materials should be selected with acoustic performance in mind. Nurseries are very noisy places and too much noise can be problematic to some children.

Library A quiet space. Different in nature to the activity and commotion of the rest of the nursery. Smaller pods/lowered ceilings. Somewhere to retreat to. Doesn’t need formal seats. Better to have large cushions / bean bags that can be pulled out on the floor.

Many of these spaces can double up as they just require flexible space and storage. Not looking for a defined sleeping area. A smaller, quieter space could be used for any children that needed some quiet time. Comfy seating/bean bags. Play area should be an open, fun space with slides/ladders nets etc Art / Wet Play Area – Requires an amount of storage. Built into walls? Moveable units? Could the walls become display spaces? Flooring would have to be vinyl or similar. Hard wearing / easily maintained flooring throughout. As soon as you start using different kinds of flooring, you are limiting the flexibility of an area.

Page 8 |


Workshop 2 Internal Spaces Wellbeing

Storage

Provision of quiet areas away from the rest of the children in which to have a break. Children should be able to let off steam – Drumming Sessions / Shouting / Running Around

Always an important consideration.

Toilets – Centrally located and available for all age groups with changing facilities if required. Query was raised about whether the handwashing area could double as the wet play area? Concerns over privacy / dignity. Heights to suit the ages attending the nursery. Inclusion cubicle. Location of toilets is critical. Direct access from the playroom is key. Changing facilities for the 2-3 year olds and those with additional support needs. 2 WCs for every 12 children. Toilets should be accessible from inside and out along with changing Facilities. Some changing facilities directly off of play spaces to avoid ‘Walk of Shame’.

Outdoor toys tend to be larger items so a large container type unit accessed from the garden. Play furniture – Kitchens / Bedrooms / Hospital / Santa’s Workshop Ability to change the environment from time to time. An amount of storage in each room allows a practitioner to supervise while accessing new equipment. Currently the nursery has one large central store.

Staff Accommodation Staff room •

Got to provide a working space. Staff get 5 hours a week to write up and plan lessons. Require a location to do this away from the children. Lounge type idea with flexible spaces and kitchenette.

Also need to provide a space to take a break in and have lunch.

Working / Talking / Eating A workplace for the future. National recruitment campaign while retaining best staff. A place is required for staff to get together as a group (CTD Room). Currently use a play room before kids arrive.

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design - Stakeholder Engagement | Page 9


Workshop 2 External Spaces GARDEN Covered Transitional space to the garden. Should provide shade as well as cover. This space is key to the project. Blurring the line between inside and out. How does a free flow between inside and out manifest itself? A Semi heated space? Should include a boot room to store & dry off outdoor gear. Toilet facilities that span the inside / outside divide so that you can access from both sides. 50% of time to be spent outside under new 1140 hours provision. Outside space just as important as inside space in terms of design and materiality. May be the only external experience some children get from day to day. Create contours on a flat site to provide interest. Does the landscape have a theme specific to its site? Ground maintenance, encourage community support to maintain. Should be able to see in and see out. No aversion to being an open asset. Will help embed the facility within the community. Furniture that encourages play and imagination. Furniture should have built in storage, be weatherproof and of good quality. Should be adaptable and not fixed in terms of use and location. Changes in level can be negotiated by ladders/nets/chutes/ climbing walls. Avoid synthetic materials such as rubber ground cover. Shouldn’t have to go through play area to enter the building. Play area should be the ‘back garden’ to the facility. Play space should be maximized at the expense of support spaces such as offices and kitchens that should be made to work harder. A covered garden to allow outdoor play in inclement weather. Good Drainage is essential to allow outdoor play all year round. Page 10 |


Workshop 2 External Spaces What should the Garden provide? •

Woodwork - Arts & Crafts Painting & Making

Cooking & Food growing. Gardening vegetables.

Musical Noisy Play

Changes in level, slopes and stepping stones.

Embracing existing natural things – Trees/Vegetation/

Slopes/Mini beasts & Bugs

Light – Natural light throughout the year. Summer/Winter. Artificial lighting in the evening. Feature lighting.

Like indoor spaces there should be a choice in terms of size and nature.

Mud kitchen – encouraging messy play.

Pets – chickens / rabbits / guinea pigs

Shuttered off storage areas.

Using roof space as play space

Greenhouse

Seasonality – How things grow / Tying in to the rural environment / Where food comes from / Animals

Recycling and sustainability •

The garden as a sensory environment.

Accessible and child friendly. Access to toilets from the external space. Hand wash facilities. Water for cleaning

Sensory plants / sounds / smells.

Building structures – willow, bamboo, shelter

Wildlife – Birds / Hedgehogs / Foxes – using CCTV to watch visitors to the garden.

Fire pit/Barbeque – Forrest School & Forrest School Training •

Events / Drama / Puppet Shows / Story Time / Education

Rainwater harvesting / Wind turbines / Solar Panels / Growing walls / Herbs, Fruits and Vegetables

Eating / Seating

Hills for rolling down / climbing up. Slides & Tunnels.

Physical energetic play / Bikes / Jumps

Canopies allow outdoor play all year round.

Transitional areas outdoor to indoor. Drying rooms/cloak rooms/coat hooks

Bike space – Hard surface.

Outside power and water. Water for play.

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design - Stakeholder Engagement | Page 11


Workshop 2 External Spaces Outcomes

A set of buildings in a garden

Same learning outcomes as inside.

Underground homes – Teletubby mounds with different functions.

Huge amount of options.

50/50 indoor / outdoor space

Modular buildings that link together. Using native trees and vegetation. Fill with woodland and carve spaces out. Get away from one solid building and one defined external space. Adopt a series of pods / shelters. The whole site as a learning environment. Indoor / Outdoor / Shelter. Open, easy access between each. Make moving between them fun – tunnels / slides / nets.

Views & Communication with the external space Roof gardens – Using available space / Take advantage of great views. In terms of practitioners a more external based learning would have benefits: Male / Female balance – perhaps an outdoor environment will attract more men to the profession. Beneficial to mental health being in the fresh air. Practitioners have to buy into the new ideas of working outside – Seating / Comfort / Attractive / Sheltered. Outdoor materials – Pods – Moveable structures – Flexible materials.

Page 12 |


Page 106 |


Appendices APPENDIX 4 - Technical Drawings

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design


Rev

Date

Notes

canopy above

fridge freezer dry store three tier shelves

storage

dishwasher below drainer

Drop Off

Plant 8.9 m²

RISK REGISTER

Cleaner's Store

No.

4.3 m²

Date

Description

Breakout/Parents Room 12.3 m²

Kitchen

Head of Centre

15.4 m²

Family

10.9 m²

fridge freezer

13.6 m²

storage Clerical/Touchdown 15.7 m²

Kitchen WC and Change 3.7 m²

Circulation 3.7 m²

counter freezer outdoor cloaks canopy above messy sink rooflight above

cloaks

rooflight above kids' food prep

rooflight above

rooflight above

rooflight above

Entrance 11.3 m²

slide net above

net above

outdoor handwash

Acc. WC cloaks

4.5 m²

cloaks

vertical play

bench

Play 76.0 m²

NOTES

Developmental Play messy sink

28.5 m²

Lift Landing

net-tubes from cargo net above

Reading Nook 4.4 m²

WCs 13.6 m²

Circulation

8.2 m²

11.4 m²

Laundry 4.0 m²

Ext. WC

IVS 3.0 m²

outdoor cloaks

Store

IVS 3.3 m²

folding drying rack

Lift 2.5 m²

handwash sinks

handwash sinks

Nappy Change 6.2 m²

canopy above

sinks

bench

2.8 m²

DO NOT SCALE The Contractor must check & verify all Site & Building Dimensions, Levels & Sewer Inverts at DCM's before commencing work. This Drawing must be read with the NBS Contract specification and any related Structural Engineer or Specialist Contractors Drawings. COPYRIGHT: The information contained on this drawing is the sole copyright of anderson bell + christie & may not be reproduced without express written permission. Anderson Bell Christie Architect's Licence number for copy or display of OS Data is LIG0388.

INFORMATION Project

Early Years Pilot Client

Scottish Futures Trust Drawing

Ground Floor Job No.

Drg No.

1264 Scale

1:50

When Printing from PDF this line should measure 50mm

50mm

AL(0)001 Sheet

Scale

Sheet

Scale

A1

Drawn

Date

Checked

AC

18.05.18

SR

382 Great western Road Glasgow G4 9HT T:(+44) 0141 339 1515 F:(+44) 0141 339 0505 E:gen@andersonbellchristie.com W:www.andersonbellchristie.com 50mm

0

Rev

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CAD Ref.

CAD Ref

Sheet


Rev

Date

Notes

RISK REGISTER No.

Date

Description

rooflight above

rooflight above

soffit void rooflight above

void

slide

net

net

vertical play

rooflight above

rooflight above

net-tube leading to floor below

void

NOTES

Play

void

70.3 m²

rooflight above

rooflight above rooflight above

rooflight above

rooflight above

Lift Landing

sinks

Staff WC

Lift

2.0 m²

WCs 9.3 m²

roof space

Circulation

Store

11.4 m²

4.5 m²

IVS 4.8 m²

roof space

Waiting Space

DO NOT SCALE The Contractor must check & verify all Site & Building Dimensions, Levels & Sewer Inverts at DCM's before commencing work. This Drawing must be read with the NBS Contract specification and any related Structural Engineer or Specialist Contractors Drawings. COPYRIGHT: The information contained on this drawing is the sole copyright of anderson bell + christie & may not be reproduced without express written permission. Anderson Bell Christie Architect's Licence number for copy or display of OS Data is LIG0388.

INFORMATION Project

Early Years Pilot Client

Scottish Futures Trust Drawing

First Floor Job No.

Drg No.

1264 Scale

1:50

When Printing from PDF this line should measure 50mm

50mm

AL(0)002 Sheet

Scale

Sheet

Scale

A1

Drawn

Date

Checked

AC

18.05.18

SR

382 Great western Road Glasgow G4 9HT T:(+44) 0141 339 1515 F:(+44) 0141 339 0505 E:gen@andersonbellchristie.com W:www.andersonbellchristie.com 50mm

0

Rev

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CAD Ref.

CAD Ref

Sheet


Rev Date A 28.03.18

Notes RL101, RL103 and RL103S omitted. Sun pipes proposed to replace RL101 and RL103, with one of RL102 also substututed with a sun pipe

No.

Description

RISK REGISTER Date

NOTES

PV ZONE 65sqm

DO NOT SCALE The Contractor must check & verify all Site & Building Dimensions, Levels & Sewer Inverts at DCM's before commencing work. This Drawing must be read with the NBS Contract specification and any related Structural Engineer or Specialist Contractors Drawings. COPYRIGHT: The information contained on this drawing is the sole copyright of anderson bell + christie & may not be reproduced without express written permission. Anderson Bell Christie Architect's Licence number for copy or display of OS Data is LIG0388.

INFORMATION Project

Early Years Pilot Client

Scottish Futures Trust Drawing

Roof Plan Job No.

Drg No.

1264 Scale

1:50

When Printing from PDF this line should measure 50mm

50mm

AL(0)003 Sheet

Scale

Sheet

A Scale

A1

Drawn

Date

Checked

AC

18.05.18

SR

382 Great western Road Glasgow G4 9HT T:(+44) 0141 339 1515 F:(+44) 0141 339 0505 E:gen@andersonbellchristie.com W:www.andersonbellchristie.com 50mm

0

Rev

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CAD Ref.

CAD Ref

Sheet


Rev

Date

Notes

RISK REGISTER No.

Date

Description

Play 70.3 m²

FFL 2.600 m Level 1

canopy above

NOTES

Play

Head of Centre

76.0 m²

10.9 m²

kids' food prep

FFL 0.000 m Level 0

1

1

AL(0)004

AL(0)004

DO NOT SCALE The Contractor must check & verify all Site & Building Dimensions, Levels & Sewer Inverts at DCM's before commencing work. This Drawing must be read with the NBS Contract specification and any related Structural Engineer or Specialist Contractors Drawings. COPYRIGHT: The information contained on this drawing is the sole copyright of anderson bell + christie & may not be reproduced without express written permission. Anderson Bell Christie Architect's Licence number for copy or display of OS Data is LIG0388.

INFORMATION Project

Early Years Pilot Client

Scottish Futures Trust Drawing

Section Job No.

Drg No.

1264 Scale

1:50

When Printing from PDF this line should measure 50mm

50mm

AL(0)004 Sheet

Scale

Sheet

Scale

A1

Drawn

Date

Checked

AC

18.05.18

SR

382 Great western Road Glasgow G4 9HT T:(+44) 0141 339 1515 F:(+44) 0141 339 0505 E:gen@andersonbellchristie.com W:www.andersonbellchristie.com 50mm

0

Rev

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CAD Ref.

CAD Ref

Sheet


Rev

Date

Notes

RISK REGISTER No.

1

East Elevation

2

1 : 100

Date

Description

North Elevation 1 : 100

NOTES

3

West Elevation 1 : 100

4

South Elevation 1 : 100

DO NOT SCALE The Contractor must check & verify all Site & Building Dimensions, Levels & Sewer Inverts at DCM's before commencing work. This Drawing must be read with the NBS Contract specification and any related Structural Engineer or Specialist Contractors Drawings. COPYRIGHT: The information contained on this drawing is the sole copyright of anderson bell + christie & may not be reproduced without express written permission. Anderson Bell Christie Architect's Licence number for copy or display of OS Data is LIG0388.

INFORMATION Project

Early Years Pilot Client

Scottish Futures Trust Drawing

Elevations Job No.

Drg No.

1264 Scale

1:50

When Printing from PDF this line should measure 50mm

50mm

AL(0)005 Sheet

Scale

Sheet

Scale

A1

Drawn

Date

Checked

AC

18.05.18

SR

382 Great western Road Glasgow G4 9HT T:(+44) 0141 339 1515 F:(+44) 0141 339 0505 E:gen@andersonbellchristie.com W:www.andersonbellchristie.com 50mm

0

Rev

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CAD Ref.

CAD Ref

Sheet


IMPORTANT The contractor will be held to have examined the site and checked all dimensions and levels before commencing construction work. Do not make assumptions - refer to the Landscape Architect. Do not scale from this drawing. If in doubt - ask! REVISIONS REV A - 27/03/18 - RCG/SJH GENERAL UPDATE. REV B - 11/04/18 - SS/SJH LANDSCAPE LAYOUT UPDATED TO REFLECT COST PLAN. REV C - 09/05/03 - CG/SJH BUILDING FLOOR PLAN UPDATED.

LEGEND/OUTLINE SPECIFICATION ASPHALT PLAYGROUND SURFACE

CONCRETE BLOCK PAVING SELF BINDING GRAVEL SURFACE GOLDEN AMBER SELF BINDING GRAVEL SUPPLIED BY BREEDON, WWW.BREEDON-SPECIAL-AGGREGATE.COM, TELEPHONE: 01332 694001, OR EQUAL APPROVED. MODULAR/SLAB PC CONCRETE PAVING FUSION, 60mm THICK PAVING SUPPLIED BY TOBERMORE, WWW.TOBERMORE.CO.UK, TELEPHONE: 0844 800 5736, EMPLOYING A TWO COLOUR RANDOM MIX, CP BLANC AND GRAPHITE IN EQUAL PROPORTIONS. DECKING HANDMADE POLYURETHANE DECKING BOARDS, 176 x 360 x 32mm THICK SUPPLIED BY MILLBOARD, WWW.MILLBOARD.CO.UK, TELEPHONE: 02476439943, LAID ONTO A SUBFRAME CONSTRUCTED FROM TREATED SOFTWOOD TIMBER.

ACCESS / ESPACE

CAST IN-SITU CONCRETE BASE TO BIN STORE BARK MULCH/GRAVEL MIX AREAS DESIGNATED FOR WATER PLAY TO BE SURFACED WITH A 50mm CONSOLIDATED LAYER OF A MIX OF BARK MULCH AND 10-14mm PEA GRAVEL, LAID ONTO 150mm BASE OF TYPE 1.

STORAGE

PLAY SAND SAND FOR USE IN PLAY PITS IS TO BE WASHED, DRIED AND SIEVED TO PROVIDE A SAFE, NON-TOXIC MATERIAL. THIS SHALL BE LAID TO A MINIMUM DEPTH OF 300mm UPON A STURDY GEOTEXTILE SEPARATION MEMBRANE OVER A 150mm LAYER OF FREE-DRAINING STONE. SAND PITS SHALL INCLUDE SUB-SOIL DRAINAGE WITH A POSITIVE OUTFALL. TO CONFORM TO BS EN 1177.

RP Cooker Space

67.50+ AMPHITHEATRE

FFL 67.50 DECK

STEPS STEPS SHALL BE CREATED USING SECTIONS OF 125 x 250mm, NEW UNTREATED ENGLISH LARCH OR DOUGLAS FIR RAILWAY SLEEPERS, SUPPLIED BY UK SLEEPERS, WWW.UKSLEEPERS.CO.UK, TELEPHONE: 01536 267107, OR EQUAL APPROVED. THE TREAD BACKFILL SHALL BE A SELF-BINDING GOLDEN AMBER GRAVEL, SUPPLIED BY BREEDON AGGREGATES OR EQUAL APPROVED. CLOSE BOARDED TIMBER FENCE THE SECURE BOUNDARY SHALL BE FORMED USING CLOSE BOARDED TIMBER FENCE 2.1M HIGH. WELDMESH FENCE THE SECURE BOUNDARY SHALL BE FORMED USING A POLYESTER POWER COATED AND GALVANISED PROPRIETARY WELDMESH FENCING SYSTEM 2.1M HIGH PALLAS, SUPPLIED BY HERAS. WWW.HERAS.CO.UK, TELEPHONE: 01302 364551 OR EQUAL APPROVED.

SAND

68.00+

STEPS

FP

67.00+

CANOPY ABOVE

ROCKS

GREEN WALL THE GREEN WALL SHALL BE FORMED USING WELDED MESH PANELS AS ABOVE, ONTO WHICH SHALL BE AFFIXED “WALLY ONE” GARDEN PLANTERS, SUPPLIED BY WOOLLY POCKETS, WWW.WOOLLYPOCKET.CO.UK, (ALLOW 20No).

EAST PARK DRIVE

ENTRANCE

SLEEPER RETAINING WALL THE LOG WALL FORMING THE EDGE TO THE WALK-IN SANDPIT IS TO BE CONSTRUCTED FROM SECTIONS OF NEW, UNTREATED ENGLISH LARCH OR DOUGLAS FIR RAILWAY SLEEPERS, AVAILABLE FROM UK SLEEPERS, WWW.UKSLEEPERS.CO.UK, TELEPHONE: 01536 267107, OR EQUAL APPROVED. THE SLEEPERS SHALL BE SET INTO APPROPRIATE CONCRETE FOUNDATIONS AND BE FINISHED FLUSH WITH THE TOP SURFACE.

CANOPY ABOVE NEW FOOTPATH

ROCK ARMOUR STONE SLABBY SANDSTONE ROCKERY STONE, WITH A NOMINAL BLOCK THICKNESS OF 300mm, SUPPLIED IN VARIOUS PLAN SIZES, AVAILABLE FROM CED LIMITED, WWW.CEDSTONE.CO.UK, TELEPHONE: 01324 841321 (OR EQUAL APPROVED) SHALL BE LAID IN TIERS TO PROVIDE A RELATIVELY SMOOTH “TREAD”. SUBSEQUENT LAYERS TO BE STAGGERED TO CREATE A STEPPED/TERRACED EFFECT. VOIDS BETWEEN ADJOINING BLOCKS TO BE FILLED WITH A SUITABLY SIZED AGGREGATE CONTAINING FINES TO ELIMINATE TRIP/TRAP HAZARDS. (3NO. COURSES IN TOTAL, THE BOTTOM ROW TO FORM THE EDGE TO THE SANDPIT).

GROWING

BINS

LOGWALL

NATURAL TURF AREAS SHOWN AS GRASS SHALL BE ESTABLISHED USING A CULTIVATED LAWN TURF, LAID ONTO A MINIMUM 150mm LAYER OF TOPSOIL. STEPPING STONES PROPOSED STEPPING STONES 50mm THICK IN RANDOM SHAPES AND SIZES.

CANOPY ABOVE +67.30

TREES ADVANCED NURSERY STOCK. SEMI-MATURE SPECIMENS WITHIN GARDEN / HEAVY STANDARD TREES WITHIN PUBLIC REALM

MUD KITCHEN & WATER PLAY

FEATHERED TREES FEATHERED BARE-ROOT BIRCH TREES, WITH A HEIGHT OF 125-150cm, PLANTED INTO PREPARED PITS AND SECURED TO 8' LONG (2.44M) 40-45mm NATURAL MOSO BAMBOO POLES, SET 600mm INTO THE GROUND. FEATHERED TREES FEATHERED BARE-ROOT BIRCH TREES, WITH A HEIGHT OF 200-250cm, PLANTED INTO PREPARED PITS AND SECURED TO 8' LONG (2.44M) 40-45mm NATURAL MOSO BAMBOO POLES, SET 600mm INTO THE GROUND. BAMBOO POLES A SERIES OF BAMBOO POLES ARE TO BE SET INTO APPROPRIATE CONCRETE FOUNDATIONS TO PRODUCE A RANDOM, HAPHAZARD EFFECT I.E. THE POLES ARE TO BE ARRANGED AT RAKISH ANGLES. TOTAL NUMBER 60NO. POLES (30NO. 10' (3.05M LONG) 55-70mm MOSO BAMBOO POLES AND 30NO. 12' (3.66M) LONG 40-45mm MOSO BAMBOO POLES. THE GENERAL DISTRIBUTION AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE POLES SHALL BE UNDERTAKEN UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF THE SUPERVISING LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT. POLES AVAILABLE FROM BS BAMBOO. WWW.BS-BAMBOO.CO.UK. TIMBER PERGOLA TIMBER PERGOLAS SHALL BE CONSTRUCTED USING 100 x 100mm LONG POSTS AND 100 x 50mm SECTION BEAMS AND CROSS-MEMBERS. AN ALLOWANCE SHALL BE MADE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF 6.0LIN.M OF DECORATIVE TIMBER TRELLIS, WITH A HEIGHT OF 1.2M.

DECK

66.50+ JUNGLE

SAND PIT MUD KITCHEN

WILLOW TUNNEL +66.30

SHRUB PLANTING A MIX OF ORNAMENTAL CONTAINERISED SHRUBS, PLANTED AT THE AVERAGE DENSITY OF 4 PLANTS PER SQUARE METRE, INTO A MINIMUM 450mm DEPTH OF TOPSOIL. COMPLETED BEDS SHALL BE DRESSED WITH A 50mm LAYER OF ORNAMENTAL BARK NUGGETS APPLIED AS A MULCH. JUNGLE CHIME THE SUPPORT STRUCTURE FOR THIS PLAY ITEM IS TO BE CONSTRUCTED USING 100 x 100mm SECTION TREATED SOFTWOOD, WITH TOP RAILS AND CROSS-MEMBERS BEING PROVIDED USING 50 x 100mm SECTION TIMBER. THESE WILL BE USED TO SUPPORT A GRID OF BAMBOO POLES, OF VARYING DIAMETERS, SUSPENDED AT 300mm CENTRES. THE SUPPORT SYSTEM WILL EMPLOY CHAINS TO ALLOW THE BAMBOO POLES TO SWING FREELY AT A HEIGHT BETWEEN 200 AND 400mm ABOVE THE GROUND. TREE TRUNK SECTIONS SUBSTANTIAL SECTIONS OF LUMBER, 1.5M LONG, WITH A NOMINAL BOLE DIAMETER OF 400mm. THE LOGS SHALL RETAIN TRUNCATED SECTIONS OF LIMBS AND HEAVY BRANCHES TO PROVIDE AN INTERESTING CLIMBING EXPERIENCE. MUD KITCHEN 600mm x 2.4M LONG BESPOKE TIMBER MUD KITCHENS, CONSTRUCTED TO INCORPORATE A STAINLESS-STEEL SINK AND A MOCK HOB, FORMED USING COLOURED SHEETS OF ACRYLIC.

FP

FIRE PIT FREE STANDING STEEL FIRE PIT

WP

WATER PLAY FREE STANDING WELDMESH FENCE PANELS PROVIDED TO SUPPORT RAINWATER FITTINGS GUTTER PIPES, WATER WHEELS, FUNNELS, HOSES AND CONTAINERS.

PROPO

SED C

AR PA R

K (14 S

PACES )

66.00+

18 ROYAL TERRACE, GLASGOW, G3 7NY - T: 0141-332-0292 F: 0141-332-2058 - E: info@hirsts.co.uk - W: www.hirsts.co.uk Issue for

INFORMATION Project

EXTERNAL STORE FALCOLOK 250 STORAGE CONTAINER, 3.98 x 2.495M WIDE SUPPLIED BY FALCO, WWW.FALCO.CO.UK, TELEPHONE 01538 380080.

RP

RAISED PLANTER RAISED PLANTER CONSTRUCTED USING TREATED SOFTWOOD TIMBER, SHALL BE CONSTRUCTED TO AN OVERALL HEIGHT OF 400mm. PLANTERS TO BE LINED WITH A GEO-TEXTILE MEMBRANE, PRIOR TO BACKFILLING WITH A PROPRIETARY GROWING COMPOST. BAMBOO PLANTING A SELECTION OF SPECIMEN BAMBOO PLANTS, PLANTED AROUND THE PLAYGROUND PERIMETER AND IMMEDIATELY ADJACENT TO THE JUNGLE CHIMES.

EAST AYRSHIRE EARLY YEARS PILOT KILMAURS Title

LANDSCAPE MASTERPLAN OUTLINE DESIGN Client

HUB SOUTH WEST SCOTLAND LTD Drawn

Checked

RCG

SJH

Scale

Date

1:100@A1

23/03/18

Job No

1459

Drawing No

01

Revision

C


Page 108 |


Appendices APPENDIX 5 - Outline Specifications

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design


Early Years Reference Design

anderson bell + christie 382 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G4 9HT, t: 0141 339 1515

Outline Specification TO BE READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH REPORTS FROM ALL CONSULTANTS

Revision 1st A

OUTLINE

Date 22.03.2018 02.05.2018

Purpose Pricing Feasability

SPECIFICATION

Notes Initial Issue Updated following Costings Review

P a g e 1 | 13


Early Years Reference Design

anderson bell + christie 382 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G4 9HT, t: 0141 339 1515

Outline Specification Contents 1.0 SUBSUB-STRUCTURE 2.0 SUPER STRUCTURE 2.1 Timber Frame 2.2 Structural Steel Frame 2.3 External Walls 2.4 Internal Walls 2.5 Stairs 2.6 Floor 2.7 Roof 3.0 OPENINGS 3.1 Glazing 3.2 External Doors 3.3 Internal Doors 4.0 FINISHES 4.1 Internal Finishes 4.2 Ceiling Finishes 4.3 Floor Finishes 4.4 Wall Finishes 5.0 FIXTURES & FITTINGS 5.1 Sanitary ware/Sanitary Fittings/IPS/Cubicles 5.2 General Fixtures 6.0 PIPED & DUCTED SERVICES 6.1 Drainage 6.2 Hot & Cold Water 6.3 Heating Installation 6.4 Renewables 6.5 Gas Installation

OUTLINE

SPECIFICATION

P a g e 2 | 13


Early Years Reference Design

anderson bell + christie 382 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G4 9HT, t: 0141 339 1515

7.0 ELECTRICAL SERVICES 7.1 General 7.2 Mechanical Ventilation 7.3 Passive ventilation 7.4 Security System 7.5 Fire Alarm Systems 7.6 Platform Lift 7.7 Exterior Lighting 7.8 Access Controls 7.9 Internal Feature Lighting

8.0 LANDSCAPING 8.1 General

9.0 SECURE BY DESIGN 9.1 General

OUTLINE

SPECIFICATION

P a g e 3 | 13


Early Years Reference Design

anderson bell + christie 382 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G4 9HT, t: 0141 339 1515

1.0

SUBSUB-STRUCTURE - Refer to Structural Engineers’ Specification.

2.0

SUPER STRUCTURE

2.1

2.2

Timber Frame Refer to Structural Engineers specification.

Structural Steel Frame Refer to Structural Engineers specification.

2.3 2.3

External Walls Walls

2.3 2.3.1 • • •

Rainscreen Cladding Sinusoidal Insulated Cladding Panel System. Colour matched fixings. Structural infill framing between steel frame packed with 200mm Knauf Frametherm 32 mineral wool insulation Vapour control layer Service zone formed with 38 x 50mm battens 15mm British Gypsum Duraline plasterboard

• • • 2.3.2 2.3.2 • •

External Finish – Steel Frame [Where Frame Supports First Floor Level] Fire rated to 60mins Factory applied intumescent coating

2.3.3 2.3.3 • •

External Finish – Soffit to Canopy and Undercroft PPC (RAL tbc) 3mm aluminium cladding system Ventilated fire cavity barriers

2.3 2.3.4 •

Accessories PPC (RAL tbc to match 2.3.3) 3mm aluminium window reveals, soffits, cills and flashings with antidrumming compound to underside of cills and aluminium support brackets at 400mm centres.

2.4 2.4

Internal Walls Walls All partition walls to have proprietary acoustic filler above and below. All partition walls to meet flanking requirements of Acoustic Report.

2.4 2.4.1 • • • •

Partitions FR 60 & 30 min Timber/metal studs to SE design. Racking panels to SE design. Sound insulation: Plasterboard and acoustic partition roll as required by Acoustic Report. Partition duty to BS 5234:1 and 2: SEVERE

2.4 2.4.2 • • • •

Internal glazed partitions Deko FG Silent or e/a glazed partition system acoustic rating for meeting rooms: Rw 48 dB Doors within internal glazed system provided by same manufacturer for continuity. Manifestation: refer to art and environment strategy document.

2.4.3 2.4.3

Planar Glazing

OUTLINE

SPECIFICATION

P a g e 4 | 13


Early Years Reference Design

anderson bell + christie 382 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G4 9HT, t: 0141 339 1515

• • • •

Deko FG Silent or e/a glazed partition system Acoustic properties as acoustician’s report. Toughened and laminated glazing. Manifestation – CA choice.

2.5 2.5

Internal Stairs

2.5 2.5.1 • • • • •

General escape and personnel stairs Precast concrete stair Treads: 300mm, Finish suitable for thin sheet Linoleum finish 60min fire resistance Handrails: wall mounted, 50mm diameter, white American oak, rebated and fixed from below, clear lacquer finish Balustrade: steel flat bars and rods, with 50mm diameter handrail (White American Oak, clear lacquer finish, rebated and fixed from below)

OUTLINE

SPECIFICATION

P a g e 5 | 13


Early Years Reference Design

anderson bell + christie 382 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G4 9HT, t: 0141 339 1515

2.6 2.6

Floor

2.6 2.6.1 • • • • • •

Ground Floor [Playspace] 22mm Low profile underfloor heating system to M&E Design 22mm T&G Chipboard 50mm batten zone packed with mineral wool insulation 150mm Thick reinforced concrete slab to SE Design Seperating Layer 100mm Kingspan Kooltherm® K3 floorboard or equal and approved o Thickness: - 100mm. o Compressive strength (minimum): >120 kN/m². o Thermal conductivity (maximum): 0.020 W/m.K. Membranes to SE specification Construction to achieve ‘Green Guide to Specification’ A rating or better

• • 2.6.2 2.6.2 • • • • •

• •

Ground Floor 22mm 22mm T&G Chipboard 75mm batten zone 150mm Thick reinforced concrete slab to SE Design Seperating Layer 100mm Kingspan Kooltherm® K3 floorboard or equal and approved o Thickness: - 100mm. o Compressive strength (minimum): >120 kN/m². o Thermal conductivity (maximum): 0.020 W/m.K. Membranes to SE specification Construction to achieve ‘Green Guide to Specification’ A rating or better

2.6.3 2.6.3 • • • • •

Upper Floors 22mm T&G Chipboard 45*275mm Timber Joist to SE design 12.5mm fireline plasterboard 50mm timber brandering packed with mineral wool 12.5mm rigitone seamless acoustic ceiling board

2.7 2.7

Roof

All verges, flashings etc to be PPC 3mm aluminium. Any parapets to be used with pressure clips. 2.7 2.7.1 • • • •

Roof Type 1 – Warm Roof KS1000 Insulated roofing panel system Roof structure as SE design. 100mm Mineral wool insulation laid across; 12.5mm rigitone suspended seamless acoustic ceiling system

OUTLINE

SPECIFICATION

P a g e 6 | 13


Early Years Reference Design

anderson bell + christie 382 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G4 9HT, t: 0141 339 1515

3.0

OPENINGS

3.1

Glazing

3.1.1 • • • •

General Natural Ventilation: refer to plan and elevation drawings. Refer to M&E information for glazing G-value. Laminated glazing to ground floor. Glazing with any section below 800mm: Toughened.

3.1.2 3.1.2 • •

Curtain Walling Generally Metal Technology or e/a Extruded Aluminium Curtain Walling system, PPC (colour tbc): Metal Technology System 17- Latitude or e/a. Stick system, pressure equalised and mullion drained, incorporating toggle fixings to the double glazing units only at horizontal joints between units. Insulating glass double glazed units with low emissivity, Argon filled U-value 1.6W/m²K Safety requirements: BS6262, Secure by Design for BREEAM HEA06 if required. Incorporated components: AA100CV top hung windows Manifestation, refer to Art and Environment Strategy Document. Trickle Ventilation to be applied.

• • • • • • • 3.1.4 3.1.4 • • • • • • • • • 3.1.5 3.1.5 • •

Windows Metal Technology Tilturn Window, Equal or Approved Extruded aluminium alloy 6063 T6 to BS EN 755-9: 2001 Thermally broken with EPS foam strip U-value 1.1-1.4 W/m²K Inward tilt before turn PPC finish RAL colour tbc Friction stays and restrictors as required Actuators as required by Fire Engineers report, for power and final connections refer to M&E information. Trickle Ventilation to be applied. Roof light Lareine Engineering or equal and approved. For smoke venting and natural ventilation of atrium and stair. Refer Fire Engineer’s Report Controls: Refer to M&E information. Vents connected to fire alarm system. Manual override required for natural ventilation. External actuators for ease of maintenance.

3.2

External Doors

3.2.1 • • • •

Automatic Doors – Main Entrance Lobbies Lobbies (North and South Elevations) GEZE Slimdrive SL-NT-09 bi-part slide or e/a Electro-magnetical Bi-parting sliding sliding door operator All visible surfaces to be PPC to Anodic RAL colour To provide both safety and activation monitored with fire alarm contact (on final escape routes, to comply Scottish Building Regulations)

OUTLINE

SPECIFICATION

P a g e 7 | 13


Early Years Reference Design

anderson bell + christie 382 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G4 9HT, t: 0141 339 1515

3.2.2 3.2.2 • • •

External Doors within Curtain Walling Metal Technology, System 5-20D, or e/a. Actuators as required by Fire Engineers report, for power and final connections refer to M&E information. Protection loops to outward opening doors. Broxap BX14/DB, Galvanised and PPC to match doors.

3.2. 3.2.4 • • • • •

External Secure Doors External Steel Escape door Polyester powder coated, colour tbc Clear double glazing EPDM perimeter weatherseals Protection loops to outward opening doors.

3.2.6 3.2.6 • • • •

Louvered Doors to Plant Room External Louvered Steel Security door Polyester powder coated, colour tbc EPDM perimeter weatherseals Protection loops to outward opening doors.

3.3

Internal Doors

3.3.1 • • • • • • •

Internal nonnon-fire rated nonnon-acoustic doors Flush veneered internal door sets Finish: Laminate, solid colour to architect’s choice. Lippings: 8mm hardwood to all four edges Perimeter seals: Buffer strip Glazing: glazed in laminated safety glass (clear or opal as required), set in NFR glazing system Room ID disc Anti finger trap to hinge side

3.3.2 • • • • • • • •

Internal FD 30 / FD 60 doors Flush veneered internal door sets Doors to be factory fitted with combined intumescent and cold smoke seals as required Fire disc and room ID disc Finish: Laminate, solid colour to architects choice. Lippings: 8mm hardwood to all four edges Perimeter seals: Buffer strip Glazing: glazed in FD30 / FD60 safety glass (clear or opal as required), set in FD60 glazing system Anti finger trap to hinge side

3.3.3

Internal acoustic doors

• • • • • • • • •

Flush veneered internal door sets 35db acoustic rating subject to acoustician’s report Doors to be factory fitted with combined intumescent and cold smoke seals Fire disc (FD 30 doors only) and room ID disc Finish: Laminate, solid colour to architect’s choice. Lippings: 8mm hardwood to all four edges Perimeter seals: Buffer strip Glazing: as required by fire rating (clear or opal as required) Anti finger trap to hinge side

OUTLINE

SPECIFICATION

P a g e 8 | 13


Early Years Reference Design

anderson bell + christie 382 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G4 9HT, t: 0141 339 1515

3.3.4 • • • • • • • •

Sliding Pocket Doors Eclisse Sliding Pocket Door Telescopic Pocket Door System Single Classic Single Pocket Door System Classic 10mm Glass Pocket Door System Patterned plain satin Material: Manufacturer’s standard Finish: Manufacturer’s standard Glazing: glazed in laminated safety glass (clear or opal as required), set in NFR glazing system Accessories: o Syncronisation device o BIAS® soft-close with anti-slam o BIAS® DS Bi-directional soft-close with anti-slam o Self closing mechanism o soft-close o E-Motion linear motor for automatic open/close.

3.3.7 3.3.7

Ironmongery

• • • •

Aspex; Integra Select Satin finish stainless steel Category of duty of doors: Heavy duty Components: door hinges, overhead door closers, floor springs with electromagnetic hold open, door locks, emergency exit devices, door bolts (w. privacy indicator to WC cubicles/ showers/ acc WCs), lever handles, pull handles, push plates, kick plates, door stops

4.0

FINISHES

4.1

Internal Finishes

4.1.1

Intumescent Coating Systems

4.1.1.1 Off site • Off-site coating to unprimed steel concealed beams: Fire resistance to BS 476-21: 60 minutes • Preparation: blast clean • Primer, dry film thickness and colour as per manufacturer’s recommendation 4.1.1.2 4.1.1.2 On site • Fire resistance to BS 476-21: 60 minutes • Preparation and priming by steelwork contractor • Primer: Zinc phosphate 4.2

Ceiling Finishes

4.2.1 • • •

General To be read in conjuction with roof and floor constructions Lining: 1 x 12.5mm Gyproc WallBoard or MR Wallboard to non-play spaces Accessories: Gyproc Profilex access panel

OUTLINE

SPECIFICATION

P a g e 9 | 13


Early Years Reference Design

anderson bell + christie 382 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G4 9HT, t: 0141 339 1515

4.2.4 • • •

Acoustic Ceiling Lining: 1 x 12.5mm Rigitone (acoustic), Accessories: Gyptone access hatch (acoustic) Plasterboard strip to perimeters

4.2.5 4.2.6 •

Comms and Plant Rooms 12.5mm Fireline board

4.3

Floor Finishes Green guide to specification rating ‘A’ or better

4.3.1 •

Entrance Forbo; ‘Nuway Grid’: Ultragrip safety rubber, recessed Aluminium frame AMF213

4.3.3 • • • • • • •

Playrooms Forbo Flooring UK Ltd.; Marmoleum range; exact range/colour tbc Base: Screed with latex levelling compound and DPM Adhesive and seem welding as per manufacturer’s recommendation Accessories: edging and covering strips, transition strips, coved skirtings Paint finish MDF skirtings Colour TBC. Different Colour to 4.3.4 Slip Resistance: R9

4.3.4 • • • • • • • •

Stores / Family Areas Forbo Flooring UK Ltd.; Marmoleum range; exact range/colour tbc Base: Screed with latex levelling compound and DPM Adhesive and seem welding as per manufacturer’s recommendation Accessories: edging and covering strips, transition strips, coved skirtings Refer to art and environment strategy document. Paint finish MDF skirtings Colour TBC. Different Colour to 4.3.3 Slip Resistance: R9

4.3.5 • • • • •

WCs, Cleaners Cleaners Rooms, Rooms, Kitchen, Breakout Areas Forbo Flooring UK Ltd.; Surestep; exact range/colour tbc Base: Screed with latex levelling compound and DPM Adhesive and seem welding as per manufacturer’s recommendation Accessories: edging and covering strips, transition strips, coved skirtings Slip Resistance: R10

4.3.6 4.3.6 • • • • • •

Upper Floor Play, Office areas Ege or e/a Colour and pattern tbc Base: Screed with latex levelling compound and DPM Underlay to manufacturer’s recommendation Adhesive and seem welding as per manufacturer’s recommendation Accessories: edging and covering strips, transition strips, painted MDF skirtings

4.3.7 4.3.7

Plant room

OUTLINE

SPECIFICATION

P a g e 10 | 13


Early Years Reference Design

anderson bell + christie 382 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G4 9HT, t: 0141 339 1515

Floor coating to structural slab: Dulux ‘Epo-dur 2PK Epoxy Floor Paint, or equal

4.4

Wall Finishes

4.4.1 4.4.1 • • •

General ICI Dulux; Emulsion paint to internal plaster boarded surfaces Diamond matte 1 no. initial coat, 1 no. undercoat, 2 no. finishing coats (matt vinyl)

4.4.3 • • •

High Humidity Rooms ICI Dulux; Trade diamond eggshell paint to internal plaster boarded surfaces (pre-primed and sealed 1 no. initial coat: Mist, 1 no. undercoat, 2 no. finishing coats (eggshell) Refer to Floor Finish Plans AS(0)140, AS(0)141 & AS(0)142- high humidity rooms are where an R10 slip resistant floor is shown.

4.4.4 • • •

Wall Lining Splashbacks and at cleaners sink and dilution device and within kitchen Altro Whiterock or e/a Hot weld joints and finishing strips to exposed edges.

4.4.6

White Walls

• •

Tektura Walltalkers WriteOn Adhered to surfaces as manufacturers written recommendation

OUTLINE

SPECIFICATION

P a g e 11 | 13


Early Years Reference Design

anderson bell + christie 382 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G4 9HT, t: 0141 339 1515

5.0

FIXTURES AND FITTINGS

5.1

Sanitary ware/Sanitary Fittings/IPS/Cubicles

5.1.1 • •

Sanitaryware Armitage Shanks Onvo Troughs to Playspaces and external handwash.

5.1.2 •

IPS/cubicles Panel cubicles/system to WC’s and cubicles: Interplan or e/a, 16mm solid grade laminate, full aluminium frame, including child height system Privacy screens to washrooms: Interplan or e/a, 12mm solid grade laminate, engineered anodised aluminium feet ( height adjustable) Vanity ops: Interplan or e/a, Colour contrast to BS8300

• • • 5.2 5.2

General Fixtures

5.2.1 5.2.1 • • • •

Blinds to be confirmed in office spaces, family and play spaces Kaydee Blinds Excluda Balck-Out Roller Blind or equal and approved Material: Standard finish is Black PVC coated polyester, with silver coating on outside to reduce heat radiation Manual crank operation with self-braking gearbox To comply with BS EN 13120:2009 + A1:2014

• •

Signage - internal Door and wall signage system by National Sign Co. Lettering/signs: Refer to art and environment strategy document

• • • •

Signage - external Signage system by National Sign Co. Main building signage to be backlit Lettering/signs: Refer to art and environment strategy document Refer to BS8300

5.3 5.3

5.4 5.4

6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5

SERVICES

Drainage Refer to M&E Engineer’s specification.

Hot & Cold Water Refer to M&E Engineer’s specification.

Heating Installation Refer to M&E Engineer’s specification.

Renewables Refer to M&E Engineer’s specification.

Gas Installation Refer to M&E Engineer’s specification.

OUTLINE

SPECIFICATION

P a g e 12 | 13


Early Years Reference Design

anderson bell + christie 382 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G4 9HT, t: 0141 339 1515

7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6

ELECTRICAL SERVICES

General Refer to M&E Engineer’s specification.

Mechanical Ventilation Refer to M&E Engineer’s specification.

Passive Ventilation Refer to M&E Engineer’s specification.

Security System Refer to M&E Engineer’s specification.

Fire Alarm System Refer to M&E Engineer’s specification.

Platform Lift Refer to M&E Engineer’s specification.

7.6.1 •

Lift Floor/Walls Floor/Walls /Ceiling finishes Tbc by Architect.

7.7 7.7

• •

Exterior Lighting Refer to M&E Engineer’s specification. Backlighting of rainscreen cladding to enhance art and environment strategy.

• •

Access Controls Refer to Fire Engineers Report Refer to M&E information

Internal Feature Lighting TBC

7.8

7.9

8.0 8.1

LANDSCAPING

General Refer to Landscape Architects’ information.

9.0

SECURE BY DESIGN

9.1

General The proposals and items noted throughout this specification are to align with Secure by Design principles.

OUTLINE

SPECIFICATION

P a g e 13 | 13


Page 110 |


Appendices APPENDIX 6 - Consultants’ Reports

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design


EAST AYRSHIRE COUNCIL

Early Years ABC Reference Design RIBA Stage 2 Cost Estimate 18 May 2018

Contains sensitive information


Early Years ABC Reference Design EAST AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 18 May 2018

Document Status Revision

Date

Status or comment

Prepared by

Checked by

Authorised by

0

11.05.18

Draft Issue

H McGreevy

R Gordon

B Young

1

17.05.18

Formal Issue

H McGreevy

R Gordon

B Young

2

18.05.18

Formal Issue

C Hendrie

R Gordon

B Young

Disclaimer This document and its contents have been prepared and are intended solely for the Client’s information and use in relation to SFT Early Years Reference Design. Faithful+Gould assumes no responsibility to any other party in respect of or arising out of or in connection with this document and/or its contents.

Copyright The copyright of this document is vested in Faithful+Gould. This document may not be reproduced in whole or in part without their express written permission.

Contains sensitive information 1

Early Years Stage 2 Cost Estimate - ABC - Rev 1


Early Years ABC Reference Design EAST AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 18 May 2018

Contents 1.0

Executive Summary ................................................................................ 3

2.0

Analysis of Area Metric ........................................................................... 4

3.0

RIBA Stage 2 Cost Estimate benchmarked against Cost Metric ............ 5

4.0

Cost Plan Commentary & Clarifications ................................................. 6

4.1

Commentary ........................................................................................... 6

4.2

Items Assessed and not Required for this Pilot Reference Design ........ 9

5.0

Appendices ........................................................................................... 10

Contains sensitive information 2

Early Years Stage 2 Cost Estimate - ABC - Rev 1


Early Years ABC Reference Design EAST AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 18 May 2018

1.0

Executive Summary

1.1

Our current estimated total project cost for Anderson Bell Christie’s RIBA Stage 2 Reference Design is £1,198,864.00

1.2

The total project cost is inclusive of Main Contractor Preliminaries, Overheads and Profit, Design Team fees, HUBCo fees and Risk.

1.3

The design has produced a Gross Internal Floor Area of 400m2 against the target area metric of 400m2.

1.4

The total project cost represents a cost metric of £2,997/m2 against the target cost metric of £3,000/m2.

1.5

Costs are current and indexed at 2Q2018 rates and prices.

Contains sensitive information 3

Early Years Stage 2 Cost Estimate - ABC - Rev 1


Early Years ABC Reference Design EAST AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 18 May 2018

2.0

Analysis of Area Metric

2.1

Scottish Government “Space to Grow” publication June 2017 references Care Inspectorate expectations around spatial metrics and area compliance. Emphasis is placed on the balance between indoor/outdoor settings and the context of this to calculate the target area of any particular Early Years facility, where “it is recommended that a maximum increase of 20% of the total registered number of children is considered as a guideline”.

2.2

To calculate the guideline gross internal floor area (GIFA) for the Kilmaurs campus, designed by Anderson Bell Christie Architects, we have applied the following calculation:

Registered Capacity

82 nr

20% allocation Outdoor (3-5yrs) 80% allocation Indoor (3-5yrs)

13 nr 69 nr

@

5.8 m2

400 m2

1. where 5.8m2 is considered the optimum area per child. 2. Where 400m2 is therefore the optimum GIFA for the facility. 2.3

The actual GIFA of the Anderson Bell Christie Architects design is 400m2; which is on the target area metric.

Contains sensitive information 4

Early Years Stage 2 Cost Estimate - ABC - Rev 1


Early Years ABC Reference Design EAST AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 18 May 2018

3.0

RIBA Stage 2 Cost Estimate benchmarked against Cost Metric

3.1

The cost metric established for the Early Years Reference Design is ÂŁ3,000/m2 excl. VAT.

3.2

Our current estimated cost for the proposed RIBA Stage 2 Concept Design for the Kilmaurs campus is detailed below:

The overall Internal Gross Floor Area (GIFA) is 400m² with a registered capacity of 82nr children. 3.3

Appendix A enhances the above breakdown and presents this in full NRM1 elemental format.

Contains sensitive information 5

Early Years Stage 2 Cost Estimate - ABC - Rev 1


Early Years ABC Reference Design EAST AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 18 May 2018

4.0

Cost Plan Commentary & Clarifications

4.1

Commentary Facilitating Works •

No allowance for demolitions. The Early Years programme is a new build and not a replacement programme, therefore any demolition enabling works do not form part of the cost metric calculation.

Substructure •

We have assumed pad and strip foundation solution. There are no allowances for abnormal foundations such as piling, vibro compaction, trench fill etc.

There is no allowance for any gas intervention measures such as gas membranes, void protection etc.

We have made an allowance for under slab drainage using a cost/m2 approach.

Superstructure - Frame •

We have used structural steel design and tonnage information provided by Watermans.

We have allowed for minor fire protection to columns/beams supporting first floor slab only.

Superstructure – Upper Floors •

We have allowed for a timber rafter structure to form upper floor with 22mm chipboard deck with mineral wool insulation/sound deadening packed within the rafters.

Superstructure – Roof •

We have allowed for KS1000 insulated roofing panels and rooflights per ABC design; allowing for 1nr actuator opening vent to main rooflight.

We have made an allowance for roof rainwater drainage using a cost/m2 approach.

Superstructure – Stairs •

There is an allowance of £15,750 for forming the quiet room and staircase access including all carcassing and finishing timbers within the 3-5s play zone.

There is an allowance of £6,100 for the dogleg staircase accessing the raised deck above the WC and store zone.

Contains sensitive information 6

Early Years Stage 2 Cost Estimate - ABC - Rev 1


Early Years ABC Reference Design EAST AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 18 May 2018

Superstructure – External Walls •

We have allowed for Sinusoidal insulated wall cladding.

Superstructure – Windows and External Doors •

No comments.

Superstructure - Internal Walls and Partitions •

No comments.

Superstructure – Internal Doors •

No comments.

Internal Finishes – Wall Finishes •

Generally, emulsion paint finish throughout with hygienic wet wall to splashback only.

Internal Finishes – Floor Finishes •

Low/medium grade carpet and marmoleum throughout, with exception of plant room having epoxy floor paint.

Internal Finishes – Ceiling Finishes •

Rigitone acoustic ceiling finish to play and movement space; otherwise wallboard throughout.

Fittings, Furnishings and Equipment •

FF&E allows for fixed and loose fittings.

There is an allowance of £14,978 for loose fittings within play zones.

There is an allowance of £10,208 for dining equipment within play zones.

There is an allowance of £5,000 for domestic kitchen fitout only, with standard white goods and hob/extract unit.

There is an allowance of £800 for tea prep area within parent’s room.

There is an allowance of £500 for waste bins, storage, pin-boards, battery clocks etc.

There is an allowance of £2,200 for internal and external signage.

Contains sensitive information 7

Early Years Stage 2 Cost Estimate - ABC - Rev 1


Early Years ABC Reference Design EAST AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 18 May 2018

Services •

We have market tested the M&E installation based on MaxFordham Stage 2 design. We have analysed the market intelligence we have gleaned and produced a normalised cost/m2 allowance of £550/m2 for full services installation.

No allowance for sprinklers, public address system, CCTV, BMS, TV, projection and/or visual hardware (promethean boards etc), automated clock system, access control throughout the campus. The cost of these installations do not form part of the cost metric calculation.

We have assumed an L1 Fire detection and alarm system.

External Works •

The cost assumes no contamination present.

The cost assumes CBR results will produce a positive outcome with no requirement for structural capping fill below roads/footpaths.

The cost allows for a nominal earthworks exercise, retaining and utilising all site won material from excavations within the site development.

The cost allows for 24nr new car parking spaces.

No allowance for any loose FF&E externally.

There is no allowance for barrier pipework for incoming water pipework.

There is an allowance for external fixtures: mud kitchen, willow tunnel and the likes.

We have made an allowance for site wide drainage using a cost/m2 approach.

We have made an allowance for Point of Connection for all mains utilities. We have assumed there is capacity within the existing network with no allowance for infrastructure upgrades such as substations etc.

No allowance for utility/service diversions.

Preliminaries •

Preliminaries allowance has been established as 15% of the prime cost. This is commensurate with the market intelligence we have gathered. We appreciate the appetite of the market will dictate the level of preliminaries to be applied to a tender submission.

Overheads and Profit •

We have included an allowance of 4.5% of Prime Cost + Preliminaries for Overheads and Profit. This is commensurate with the market intelligence we have gathered. We appreciate the appetite of the market will dictate the level of margin to be applied to a tender submission.

Contains sensitive information 8

Early Years Stage 2 Cost Estimate - ABC - Rev 1


Early Years ABC Reference Design EAST AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 18 May 2018

Design Team Professional Services Fees •

We have included an allowance of 12.14% for Professional Fees.

We have also allowed 0.56% fee for HUBCo fees.

Risk / Contingency •

We have included an allowance of 5% for Risk; commensurate with the end of a Stage 1 HUBCo gateway cost estimate.

Inflation •

4.2

No inflation allowed for. Costs are current and indexed at 2Q2018 rates and prices.

Items Assessed and not Required for this Pilot Reference Design .1

Survey costs such as topographical and geotechnical and the like.

.2

Asbestos surveys and associated removal costs.

.3

Statutory and technical fees and charges.

.4

Demolition costs.

.5

Abnormal foundations such as piling, vibro compaction, trench fill etc.

.6

Gas intervention measures such as gas membranes, void protection etc.

.7

Public address system.

.8

CCTV.

.9

BMS.

.10 TV, projection and/or visual hardware (promethean boards etc). .11 Automated clock system. .12 Access control throughout the campus. .13 Sprinkler Installation to comply with EAC specific insurers requirements. Note we anticipate the cost of a sprinkler installation inclusive of sprinkler heads, distribution pipework, sprinkler tank, pump set, GRP enclosure and sprinkler tank plinth would be in the region of £55,000 excl. VAT. .14 Removal of ground obstructions. Contains sensitive information 9

Early Years Stage 2 Cost Estimate - ABC - Rev 1


Early Years ABC Reference Design EAST AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 18 May 2018

.15 Removal of contaminated material. .16 Structural fill resulting from unfavourable CBR test results. .17 Importing and/or exporting materials to form levels. .18 Utility and Scottish Water upgrades. .19 Barrier pipework. .20 Ecological surveys and associated works. .21 Arboriculturalist surveys and associated works. .22 Additional car parking requirements out with the 24nr car parking provision allowed for within the cost estimate. .23 Any service diversions within and out with the site boundary. .24 Legal fees and charges. .25 Financing fees and charges. .26 VAT.

5.0

Appendices Appendix A

-

Faithful+Gould Stage 2 Elemental Cost Plan.

Contains sensitive information 10

Early Years Stage 2 Cost Estimate - ABC - Rev 1


Early Years ABC Reference Design EAST AYRSHIRE COUNCIL 18 May 2018

Appendix A Faithful+Gould Stage 2 Elemental Cost Plan.

Contains sensitive information 11

Early Years Stage 2 Cost Estimate - ABC - Rev 1


Barry Young Regional Director Faithful+Gould UK AND EUROPE T +44 (0)141 220 2200 F +44 (0)141 220 2201 E barry.young@fgould.com Contains sensitive information


Early Years Reference Design Study Civil & Structural Scope of Works

17th May 2018 Waterman Structures Limited Third Floor, South Suite, 8 Nelson Mandela Place, Glasgow G2 1BT www.watermangroup.com


Client Name:

hub SouthWest / East Ayrshire Council

Document Reference: Project Number:

STR14503/FC/CS/FEE/G STR14503

Quality Assurance – Approval Status This document has been prepared and checked in accordance with Waterman Group’s IMS (BS EN ISO 9001: 2015, BS EN ISO 14001: 2015 and BS OHSAS 18001:2007)

Issue

Date

01

17/05/2018 Michael Stevenson

Comments

Comments

Prepared by

Checked by

Approved by

Frank Chambers

Frank Chambers


Disclaimer This report has been prepared by Waterman Structures Ltd, with all reasonable skill, care and diligence within the terms of the Contract with the client, together with incorporation of our General Terms and Condition of Business, and taking account of the resources developed to us by agreement with the client. We disclaim any responsibility to the client and others in respect of any matters outside the scope of the above. This report is confidential to the client and we accept no responsibility of whatsoever nature to third parties to whom this report, or any part thereof, is made known. Any such party relies on the report at their own risk.


Contents 4.1

CIVIL & STRUCTURAL ............................................................................................................1

Contents Early Years Reference Design Study Project Number: STR14503 Document Reference: STR14503/FC/CS/FEE/G C:\Users\jonathanmcquillan\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\INetCache\Content.Outlook\1SZOK0DR\STR14503_180517_ScopeofWorks_Rep_ABC.DOCX


Timber Frame Construction – Only applicable to the single storey area. Steel Frame Construction

4.1 CIVIL & STRUCTURAL

Typical layouts are shown of the attached extract drawings. Waterman Structures were appointed to provide outline Structural Engineering input to the reference design. For the purposes of a reference design we were requested to provide advice during the design exercise to the architectural team, to stage 1 (stage C), to inform the structural principles in terms of walls, floors, roofs and overall stability of the building framework, resulting in the most economic structural solution(s) to the proposed building design, assuming that ground conditions were favourable.

4.1.1 Superstructure Frame The structural form of the building comprises primarily of a main two storey area with a single storey area to North of the building floorspace, the roof is of duo pitched form and spans from the building perimeter at the Southern wall line to an internal wall line and then continues as a slope to the Northern perimeter wall. The internal spaces around the building are generally cellular comprising a series of smaller rooms, the walls of which can be utilised as either loadbearing or can accommodate columns within the wall construction. However, the central play area is largely an open space with no internal walls or columns requiring a steel frame structure to support the first floor structure above and transfer loads back to the columns positioned around the perimeter of the area, structural form of the upper floor has been set out to accommodate voids over the main play area and provide viewpoints to the space below. The roof line continues from the building perimeter at the North East corner and extends outwards creating a canopy over the main entrance and is to be supported on external steel columns in turn supporting steel beams spanning back to the main building structure.

We would comment on each form of construction as follows; Timber Frame Construction (Designed in accordance with BS EN1995 and UK NAs) Advantages Off-site construction leading to increased quality control Faster on site erection Can be fabricated and erected by single contractor Lightweight construction/reduced high point loads to foundations Disadvantages Reduced flexibility for future alterations. Internal shear/racking walls Central play space requiring additional steel framing. Steel Frame Construction (Designed in accordance with BS EN1993 and UK NAs) Advantages Increased quality control through European CE marking Pitched roof can be formed in steel with secondary steel framing Flat roofs can be formed in steel with secondary steel framing Faster on site erection Disadvantages Vertical bracing co-ordination with door/window openings Positioning of vertical bracing to suit wall build up Infill panels (Masonry/timber/Cold Rolled Steel) between steel columns by secondary subcontractor

We have considered viable construction options for the superstructure framework comprising the following construction forms:

1 Early Years Reference Design Study Project Number: STR14503 Document Reference: STR14503/FC/CS/FEE/G C:\Users\jonathanmcquillan\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\INetCache\Content.Outlook\1SZOK0DR\STR14503_180517_ScopeofWorks_Rep_ABC.DOCX


4.1.2

Substructure

No Geotechnical/Environmental assessment information, or information relative to mineral stability of the site, has been provided on the site and as such no assessment has been made of the building substructure beyond what could reasonably be considered as normal ground conditions with an allowable safe bearing capacity of 75kN/m2. Accordingly foundations have been assumed to be traditional pad and strip footings placed at shallow depth commensurate with the building loads. Similarly the ground floor construction has been assumed to be that of a lightly reinforced concrete slab formed on compacted hardcore. A steel frame has been incorporated at this time in the reference design, with the outline envelope design developed coordinating these requirements. The structural design of the building would develop during the next stage of the design process, initially in assessment of a site investigation exercise to establish ground conditions and therefore foundation requirements, together with a drainage design. Similarly the structural design options would be considered more fully and coordinated with the building design as the Design Team would work towards submission of Building Warrants, tender packages and production information. Full details of the structural options are available within Appendix A.

2 Early Years Reference Design Study Project Number: STR14503 Document Reference: STR14503/FC/CS/FEE/G C:\Users\jonathanmcquillan\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\INetCache\Content.Outlook\1SZOK0DR\STR14503_180517_ScopeofWorks_Rep_ABC.DOCX


Stability Frame

Stability Frame/Braced Bay

Stability Frame

canopy above fridge freezer

dry store

Plant

dishwasher below Kitchen drainer 15.4 m²

8.9 m²

three tier shelves

Cleaner's Store

Stability Frame

storage Drop Off

Breakout/Parents Room

4.3 m²

12.3 m²

Family

Head of Centre fridge freezer 10.9 m²

13.8 m²

Clerical/Touchdown 15.7 m²

storage

Kitchen WC and Change

Circulation

3.7 m²

3.7 m²

counter freezer outdoor cloaks

cloaks

canopy above

rooflight above messyrooflight sink above kids' food prep

rooflight above rooflight above Entrance

cargo net above

11.2 m²

Play

Acc. WC 4.5 m²

71.9 m²

net-tubes from cargo net above

28.0 m²

Reading Nook

3.3 m²

Circulation 11.4 m²

Ext. WC

Laundry 4.0 m²

WCs 13.6 m²

IVS 3.0 m²

Nappy Change 6.2 m²

2.8 m²

Stability Frame/Braced Bay Structural Notes (Primary Frame shown only): 1. Structure to be comprised of steel frame throughout, option to construct single storey unit of timber frame construction. 2. Option to construct internal partitions/external wall of metal stud or timber frame. Steel Column (Typical Column 203 UC to Two Storey, 152 UC to Single Storey)

Stability Frame/Braced Bay

IVS

2.5 m²

8.2 m²

bench

Lift Store

outdoor cloaks

handwash sinks

handwash sinks

4.4 m²

folding drying rack

Stability Frame/Braced Bay

Lift Landing

Developmental Play

sinks

bench

cloaks

vertical play

messy sink

outdoor handwash

cloaks

T 1 yp (O 52 ical pt UC C io t olu n o to S mn ut ing to ilis le b e St e 2 SH or 0 S ey 3 U po C st to s) Tw o

St

or e

y

slide

Stability Frame/Braced Bay

canopy above

Waterman Overmark Proposed Steel Frame - Column Layout 24/04/18 STR1314503-SK180424-01


Stability Frame

Stability Frame

Stability Frame/Braced Bay

Stability Frame

Denotes Roof Steelwork to Single Storey

rooflight above

rooflight above

slide

rooflight above

rooflight above

soffit void void

cargo net

rooflight above

cargo net

rooflight above

cargo net

vertical play void

void rooflight above

rooflight above

rooflight above

sinks Lift

roof space

Circulation

Store

11.4 m²

4.5 m²

roof space

Waiting Space

Stability Frame/Braced Bay

Stability Frame/Braced Bay

Stability Frame/Braced Bay

Lift Landing

Stability Frame/Braced Bay

Structural Notes (Primary Frame shown only): 1. Structure to be comprised of steel frame throughout, option to construct single storey unit of timber frame construction. 2. Option to construct internal partitions/external wall of metal stud or timber frame. Steel Column (Typical Column 203 UC to Two Storey, 152 UC to Single Storey) Steel Beam (Typical Beam 305x165 UB) Denotes span of floor joists. (45x250mm C24 Solid Floor Joists @400mm c/c)

Waterman Overmark Proposed Steel Frame - First Floor Steelwork 24/04/18 STR1314503-SK180424-02


Jeremy Gardner Associates Technical Note Scottish Future Trust Early Years Centre – Kilmaurs Fire Engineering Review CGS322/rm/10abc 24 April 2018

Eu Jin Teh ejteh@jgafire.com Tel: 0141 847 0446 www.jgafire.com

We have completed our Fire Engineering Review of the proposed two-storey Early Years Centre in Kilmaurs. Please find below a summary of the results of our review with regards to the key fire strategy issues. Additional fire strategy design guidance is contained in the Appendix. This Fire Engineering Review is intended to inform design development and is not suitable for submission to the approving authorities.

CARGO NET & VERTICAL PLAY

The use of a cargo net/vertical play over an open void is not covered by the Technical Handbook. We consider this proposal reasonable based on the following:     

Extra supervision to be given by members of staff to children playing on the cargo net/vertical play. Management procedures should be in place to ensure that staff evacuate any children on the cargo net in a short period of time when the fire alarm is raised; A Category L1 automatic fire detection and alarm system throughout the building; No significant fire loads to be located directly beneath the cargo net/vertical play. We will need to carry out a fire engineering risk assessment to determine the restrictions on the allowable content beneath the cargo net/vertical play; Short travel distances to the enclosed stair on the upper floor; and The integrity of the cargo net/vertical play should not fail when exposed to fire and/or high smoke temperatures during the evacuation period.

We recommend that some high level smoke vents are allowed for at this stage to address any potential concerns of children using the cargo net/vertical play.

MEANS OF ESCAPE Single Stair

The single stair configuration currently proposed for the building requires the following criteria to be met:   

The maximum number of occupants at Level 1 should be limited to 60; Travel distances measured to the door of the enclosed stair on the upper floor should be limited to 15m; and The enclosed escape stair should be provided with protected lobbies at Level 0 and 1.

Alternatively, if the building was to be provided with a Category L1 automatic fire detection and alarm system and the total occupancy of the building does not exceed 300; then the protected lobbies described above do not need to be provided.


Occupancy Number & Escape Capacity The occupancy of the building can be established either by using the occupancy load factors provided in the Technical Handbook, or by providing a written occupancy statement of the occupancy capacity of the room/space. The Technical Handbook provides occupancy load factors for some areas of the proposed building, e.g. kitchen, office and staff room areas. However, recommended occupancy load factors are not provided for other areas, such as Playrooms. The nursery will be designed to accommodate 72 children and 24 members of staff. Flexibility is required to provide additional capacity for 13 children outdoors. The double door to the Entrance lobby and the exit via the stair will provide sufficient capacity to serve these occupants. We understand that flexibility is required for community use within the building; therefore, the sliding door to the garden, and the internal sliding door between the Entrance lobby and the play area should be designed as automatic doors which fail open and open automatically from any position when the fire alarm is raised. As an alternative to providing automatic sliding doors, pass doors could be used instead if they are located adjacent to the manual sliding doors.

Open Balconies All escape routes on the upper floor should be away from the open balconies. The stair exit should be located at least 4.5m away from any balcony edge on the upper floor.

Enclosed Nursery Garden Area In order for the enclosed Nursery Garden area beyond the sliding door from the Play area to be considered a place of safety; there should be exits provided from the enclosed Nursery Garden area to an unenclosed area beyond that are of a width equivalent to the same width of the final exits. We recommend that a 2.4m wide gate to outside (swing in the direction of escape) should be provided to the Nursery Garden. The criteria for the escape route in the Nursery Garden are as illustrated in Figure 1 prepared by ABC.

Figure 1 – Escape via Nursery Garden

2


COMPARTMENTATION & STRUCTURE The structure of the building should achieve at least 30 minutes fire resistance. The escape stairs and lift shaft should be enclosed with construction achieving at least 60 minutes fire resistance. Structure supporting the stair enclosure and lift shaft should also achieve at least 60 minutes fire resistance. If the staff toilet at First Floor is to be fire separated from the adjoining accommodation; the door and wall between the First Floor toilet and the escape stair do not need to be fire rated. If the plant room contains any equipment that would make it a place of special fire risk, the plant room should be enclosed with 60 minute fire rated construction.

AUTOMATIC FIRE DETECTION AND ALARM SYSTEM Based on the occupancy of the building not being more 300 occupants, at least a Category L2 automatic fire detection and alarm system should be provided throughout the building. However, to omit the protected lobby to the stair, and to support the cargo net & vertical play over an open void, a Category L1 automatic fire detection and alarm system should be provided throughout the building.

EXTERNAL FIRE SPREAD As sprinklers are not to be provided to the building, the external faรงades may require some protection to address spread between buildings. This can be confirmed once an updated site plan has been provided. As the external faรงade is more than 2m from the external escape routes leading to the gates on site (See Figure 1 above); the external elevations next to the external escape route do not need to be fire rated.

FURTHER WORK

The next stage will be for JGA to review the site plan before preparing a Fire Strategy Report (if required) summarising the proposed fire strategy.

3


APPENDIX

FURTHER INFORMATION

Intention of Review and Design Guidance

This Fire Engineering Review is intended to inform design development and is not suitable for submission to the approving authorities. In line with the above, this Fire Engineering Review should be read in conjunction with Section 2: Fire of the Non-Domestic Technical Handbook. Unless otherwise noted, the fire strategy should be designed in line with the Technical Handbook’s guidance.

Drawing Information Used This review is based on the drawings received on the 23 April 2018.

Additional Design Guidance Fire Fighting Facilities The following fire fighting facilities should be provided:  

Fire fighting stair accessed directly from outside; and A automatically opening smoke vents by means of one of the following: o A ventilator of at least 1m2 at the top of the stair, or o A ventilator of at least 0.5m2 at each storey on an external wall.

Fire Appliance Access Based on the building’s area and perimeter, fire appliance access need only be to one elevation of the building. Fire Hydrants A fire hydrant should be provided at the front of the building. This should be located at least 6m from the building, adjacent to the fire appliance parking position and within 60m of all elevations. Temporary Waiting Spaces A temporary waiting space measuring at least 700mm by 1200mm should be provided within the stair enclosure. An emergency voice communication system should be provided adjacent to the temporary waiting space.

4


East Ayrshire Early Years Centre Kilmaurs Initial concept document

Š Graven 2018


The project involves the design of an Early Years pilot project for 2 to 3 year olds and 3 to 5 year olds. Graven has been asked to respond to the architecture by developing creative and practical interior design proposals that will support the objectives. Our key considerations are: • • • • •

Safety Durability Sensory stimulation Flexibility Noise attenuation

All of these are in consideration of the range of functions and users, including staff and families. • Tactile textures and surfaces invite curiosity and help inform use • Natural materials such as timber and cork add warmth • Organisation of colours & materials helps to visually define areas and their uses • A restrained colour palette means that strong colours can be introduced with loose furniture items & the children’s creativity • Pin board surfaces support the easy display of artworks, and other information • Writeable surfaces support creative play • Suspended & wall mounted acoustic shapes help to control sound and add visual interest • Modular products give flexibility including tables and carpet tiles • Linoleum flooring is used, with the correct slip resistance and suitable for the underfloor heating system

• Linoleum is cove formed and runs up to dado height for lower wall durability, and ease of cleaning • Acoustic Wood/Wool wall tiles are used to help sound absorption and reduce reverberation times • Fitted joinery formed in solid colour wood fibre panels give durability of fitted elements. Some of these may be perforated to add tactile variety • Modular tables to allow re-formatting of the space for lunches and play time avoiding excessive movement and storage of furniture elements • Modular carpet tiles can be swapped out easily if they become damaged • Suspended fabric “clouds” add visual interest to the ceiling and provide sound absorption The following pages illustrate the proposals

© Graven 2018

/ 02


3- 5 years Play Look & Feel / Ground

© Graven 2018

/ 03


Family Area Look & Feel

3D Built Up Signage

internal flooring

suspended pendent light

planting

solid colour joinery

loose seating

high back sofa

furniture linoleum

Š Graven 2018

/ 04


Early Years Centre Materials & Textures

external flooring

cork flooring

flooring to dado height

carpet

acoustic linoleum

timber

suspended acoustic forms

knurled wall

perforated

acoustic panels

pin-able

routered

Š Graven 2018

/ 05


Developmental Play Look & Feel

5.

© Graven 2018

/ 06


3–5 years Play Look & Feel / 1st Floor

12. © Graven 2018

/ 07


Kirsty Lang Director kirsty@graven.co.uk Graven 175 Albion Street Glasgow G1 1RU United Kingdom T +44 (0)141 552 6626 www.graven.co.uk


Early Years Reference Design M&E Summary Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 Rev ABC 17 May 2018


ISSUE HISTORY

Max Fordham LLP Exchange Place 3 3 Semple Street Edinburgh

Issue

Date

Description

Rev ABC

17/5/18

Final

T +44 (0)131 476 6001 maxfordham.com Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership. Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026. Registered office: 42–43 Gloucester Crescent London NW1 7PE This report is for the private and confidential use of the clients for whom the report is undertaken and should not be reproduced in whole or in part or relied upon by third parties for any use whatsoever without the express written authority of Max Fordham LLP © Max Fordham LLP

Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026

Registered office 42–43 Gloucester Crescent, London, NW1 7PE

MAX FORDHAM LLP TEAM CONTRIBUTORS Engineer

Role

Ingrid Berkeley

Sustainability Consultant

Colin Hamilton

Senior Partner

Matt Thomas

Senior Engineer/Team Leader

J6429 Early Years Pilot Study M&E Summary of Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 17 May 2018 / page 2 of 16


CONTENTS 1.0

M&E Summary Scope of Works 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 1.10

Incoming Services Building Envelope Equipment Disposal Systems Water & Gas Distribution Heating & Cooling Ventilation Electrical Power, Distribution and Lighting Communications, Security and Control Systems Transportation Systems

4 4 4 5 5 7 8 9 13 16


1.0 1.1

M&E SUMMARY SCOPE OF WORKS

The following table details the current maximum area weighted average Uvalues required for new buildings as set out in Section 6 from the Scottish Building Standards and our target values for best practice for this new building:

Incoming Services

The proposals described below are subject to final agreement with the suppliers. Allowance has been made for points of connection for the following mains utilities. It has been assumed that there is existing capacity in the network. LV Power A new 3 Phase low voltage electrical supply is required circa 100kVA supply if all electric heating, or about 60kVA if all gas heating. This assumes that a transformer is not required. This needs to be checked in the next stage of the design development. Gas A new, metered, circa 60kW gas supply is required to the new building to terminate in a meter in the plantroom. This load needs to be checked in the next stage of the design development. Water It is assumed that the domestic water supply can be direct from the street mains without any domestic cold water storage, water treatment or filtration. If EAC require storage or the infrastructure cannot deliver a direct supply then water storage will need to be added. This assumption and available mains pressure, quality and flow need to be checked in the next stage of the design development. Telecomms Telephone and data services will be required to the offices. Details to be checked in the next stage of the design development.

1.2

Building Envelope

This section is covered by the Architects specification, however is included here for coordination purposes.

Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026

Registered office 42–43 Gloucester Crescent, London, NW1 7PE

2017 Area Weighted 2 Av / U-value (W/m /K)

Target U Value 2 (W/m /K)

Wall

0.27

0.15

Floor

0.22

0.16

Roof

0.2

0.15

Glazing

2.0

1.5

Element

Air permeability testing has not been enforced under the Building Standards for new developments; however design issues are likely to be required so as to achieve the current 43% reduction in carbon dioxide as set out within the Regulations and it is recommended that buildings be designed to achieve a 3 2 value of 10m /hr/m @50Pa.or better. We recommend reducing this target to 3 2 5m /hr/m @50Pa as it will reduce the quantity of renewables required. Use accredited construction details rather than default PSI values as this will reduce the quantity of renewables required.

1.3

Equipment

N13 Sanitary Appliances / Fittings Sanitaryware will be assessed and selected based on performance, suitability, efficiency of water use and running costs. For example, where possible, sanitaryware such as low flush toilets and sensor controlled taps will be used to minimise water usage. Fixtures and fittings in the childrens toilet area must be sufficiently robust to avoid vandalism. Size and fixing height of sanitaryware must be appropriate for its location and must incorporate the needs of disabled persons. All appliances will be provided with local service valves and all range of appliances will be provided with isolation valves. Sensor flow taps to wash hand basins. J6429 Early Years Pilot Study M&E Summary of Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 17 May 2018 / page 4 of 16


1.4

Disposal Systems

1.5

Water & Gas Distribution

R10 Rainwater Installation

S10 Hot and Cold Water Services

DESIGN PARAMETERS • The Scottish Building Standards 2017- Section 3 (Environment) • CIBSE Guide G: Public Health and Plumbing Engineering :2014 • BS EN12056 • Rainfall Design Intensity: to be confirmed

DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 3 (Environment) & Section 6 (Energy)  The Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations 1999  Pressure Equipment Directive (PED) 97/23/EC, implemented in the UK through the Pressure Equipment Safety Regulations 2016  CIBSE Guide G: Public Health and Plumbing Engineering :2014  CIBSE Commissioning Code W: Water Distribution Systems  CIBSE TM 13: Minimising the Risk of Legionnaires’ Disease  Building Services Research and Information Association (BSRIA)  Variable flow Water Systems ‐ Design, installation and commissioning guidance AG16/2002  Commissioning Water Systems application procedures for buildings, AG 2/89.3  Guide to Legionellosis ‐ Operation and maintenance Log Book BAG BG/58/2015 Guide to Legionellosis ‐ Risk assessment BAG BG/57/2015  Cold Water Storage Tanks TN13/98  Water Regulations Advisory Scheme (WRAS): The Water Regulations Guide, Information and guidance notes  The Water Supply (Water Fittings) Scotland Byelaws 2014  British Standards: BS EN806, BS8558, BS7291, BS EN 1057  BS EN 12828  HSC L8 - Legionnaires' Disease - Control of Legionella Bacteria in Water Systems ACOP + HSG274  IOP Plumber's Engineering Services Design Guide 2002

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION A complete rainwater installation will be provide to convey water from the roof to the below ground drainage points provided by others. The system will be designed in accordance with BS EN 12056 with the design rainfall intensity dependent on the final design of the building. If internal rainwater pipework is installed it will be in uPVC and insulated to control noise and condensation. R11 Above Ground Drainage DESIGN PARAMETERS • The Scottish Building Standards 2017 - Section 3 (Environment) • CIBSE Guide G: Public Health and Plumbing Engineering :2014 • Water Regulations Advisory Scheme (WRAS): The Water Regulations Guide, Information and guidance notes • BS EN12056, BS8000 part 13, BS8301 and all other relevant British Standards SYSTEM DESCRIPTION A complete above ground drainage installation will be provided to convey wastewater from all sanitary and other devices within the building to below ground drainage points provided by others. All above ground drainage will be PVC where enclosed or chrome plated copper where exposed

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION It is assumed that the domestic water supply can be direct from the street mains without any domestic cold water storage, water treatment or filtration. A new metered water supply will be provided to the nursery building. Assume an indirect pressurised hot water cylinder in the plantroom for hot water production. The hot water system will be a sealed system with secondary circulation return (note that trace heating is an alternative if the council prefer).

Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026

Registered office 42–43 Gloucester Crescent, London, NW1 7PE

J6429 Early Years Pilot Study M&E Summary of Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 17 May 2018 / page 5 of 16


 o

Hot water will be distributed at least 60 C for control of legionella. Provide TMV3 approved mixing valves. All hot and cold water services will be distributed to appliances in either copper or cross linked polyethylene pipework installed in service risers and voids. All pipework will be insulated for control of condensation, heat gain and heat loss.

Health & Safety - The Gas safety (Installation and Use) regulations 1994 (Amendment) 2018 British Standards: BS 6400-1, PD CEN/TR 16061, BS EN 1775, BS EN 15001-1, BS 6173, BS EN 12279, BS EN 13611, BS 6891

Available gas pressure: TBC

S14 Irrigation

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION A new metered gas supply will be provided to a utilities meter (location to be agreed). Gas supplies will be provided to the plantroom only.

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Allow for two external taps provided around the building perimeter for external wet play and garden use. External taps will be key operated. Provide backflow protection in accordance with WRAS and water supply regulations.

All internal gas pipework will be medium grade screwed steel painted yellow run within ventilated spaces. A shut off solenoid valve will be provided on the supply to the plantroom to isolate the entire building on fire alarm (TBC as it can be a nuisance). An emergency shut off button will be provided to the plantroom.

S17 Rainwater Reclamation System Assume no rainwater collection and storage.

S60 Fire Fighting Equipment Portable fire fighting equipment (Extinguishers, etc,) are to be provided by others.

S32 Natural Gas DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 2 (Fire), Section 3 (Environment), Section 4 (Safety)  The Gas Safety (installations and use) Regulations 1998 (Amendment) 2018Health & Safety Commission - Approved Code of Practice and Guidance  IGE Gas Measurement (GM) and General Procedures Regulations: IGE/TD/3 & IGE/TD/4  Gas Safe good practice recommendations  British Gas Guide to the safe use of gas in buildings  Gas Safe Technical Bulletin TB008  Pipelines Safety Regulations 1996 - Design, construction and installation of gas service pipes, L81.  CORGI Regulations  Institute of Gas Engineers Publication IGE/UP/2  Gas Installations for Educational Establishments UP11, published by the Institute of Gas Engineers & Managers, 2010.

Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026

Registered office 42–43 Gloucester Crescent, London, NW1 7PE

It is assumed that no new fire hydrants are required on site (to be checked in the next stage of the design development.). Fire strategy and provision for fire fighting to be confirmed by fire consultant JGA. S63 Sprinklers THE FIRE STRATEGY CONSULTANT HAS CONFIRMED THAT SPRINKLERS ARE NOT REQUIRED BY CURRENT BUILDING REGULATIONS. INDIVIDUAL COUNCILS MAY REQUIRE SPRINKLERS. DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 2 (Fire)  NFPA 13  CIBSE TM13 and the HSE’s Approved Code of Practice L8  British Standards: BS EN 12845, BS EN 12259-1

J6429 Early Years Pilot Study M&E Summary of Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 17 May 2018 / page 6 of 16


SYSTEM DESCRIPTION New standalone nursery buildings do not require sprinklers due to their type classification. New standalone nursery buildings may require sprinklers depending on their design. The reference designs have been assessed by architects/JGA fire consultants and are assumed not to require sprinkler systems. Nurseries provided as part of a new school building will require a sprinkler system due to their classification. All cases need to be assessed individually.

1.6

Heating & Cooling

T10 - Gas Boilers DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 2 (Fire), Section 3 (Environment), Section 4 (Safety)  Pressure Equipment Directive (PED)2014/68/EU , implemented in the UK through the Pressure Equipment Regulations 1999  Environment Act 1995, Pollution Prevention & Control Act 1999, Pollution & Prevention Control (Scotland) Regulations 2012, , Air Quality Standards (Scotland) Regulations 2010  Clean Air Act 1993 and Clean Air Act Memorandum  The Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998 (Amendment) 2018  CIBSE: Commissioning Code B 2002, CIBSE B guide, CIBSE AM14 NonDomestic Hot Water Heating Systems, CIBSE KS07 Variable Flow Pipework Systems, CIBSE KS09 Commissioning Variable Flow Pipework Systems  BSRIA: ‒ Energy Efficient Pumping Systems (BG12/2011) ‒ Commissioning Water Systems (BG 2/2010) ‒ Pre-Commission Cleaning of Pipework Systems (BG 29/2012) ‒ Water Treatment for Closed Heating and Cooling Systems (BG50/2013). ‒ Variable Flow Water Systems ‐ Design, installation and commissioning guidance (AG16/2002) Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026

Registered office 42–43 Gloucester Crescent, London, NW1 7PE

Selection of Control Valves in Variable Flow Systems (BG 51/2014) British Standards: BS 5440-2, BS 5546, BS 5854, BS 6880, BS EN 12828, BS EN 12831, BS EN 14336

Design flow temperature for heating system:

70°C max

Design return temperature for heating system: temperature will be higher for hot water calorifier.

40°C max (return

Maximum system working pressure:

3.5bar

Gas Boiler NOx Levels

less than 20mg/kWhr

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION The heat source for space heating and hot water will be gas fired wall hung condensing boilers. Provide at least two boilers to provide continuity of heat during maintenance. Alternate the lead and sequence the starting to meet the load. The boilers will be provided with individual shunt pumps circulating water through a low loss header. Temperature compensation will be provided to maximise system efficiency. T31 Low Temperature Hot Water Heating DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Scottish Building Standards 2017 : Section 3 (Environment), Section 6 (Energy)  Pressure Equipment Directive (PED) 2014/68/EU, implemented in the UK through the Pressure Equipment Regulations 1999  Environment Act 1995, Pollution Prevention & Control Act 1999, Pollution & Prevention Control (Scotland) Regulations 2012, , Air Quality Standards (Scotland) Regulations 2010  Clean Air Act 1993 and Clean Air Act Memorandum  

The Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1998 (Amendment) 2018 CIBSE: Commissioning Code W 2010, CIBSE A guide, CIBSE B guide, CIBSE C guide, AM14 Non-Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems, KS07

J6429 Early Years Pilot Study M&E Summary of Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 17 May 2018 / page 7 of 16


Variable Flow Pipework Systems, KS09 Commissioning Variable Flow Pipework Systems, KS14 Energy Efficient Heating BSRIA: ‒ Commissioning HVAC Systems: Guidance on the division of responsibilities (TM 1/88.1) ‒ Commissioning Water Systems (BG 2/2010) ‒ Commissioning Management (AG 5/2002) ‒ Energy Efficient Pumping Systems (BG 12/2011) ‒ Variable Flow Water Systems ‐ Design, installation and commissioning guidance (AG 16/2002) ‒ Commissioning of Pipe Work Systems (AG 20/95) ‒ Pre-Commission Cleaning of Pipework Systems (BG 29/2012) ‒ Water Treatment for Closed Heating and Cooling Systems (BG 50/2013). ‒ Selection of Control Valves in Variable Flow Systems (BG 51/2014) British Standards: BS 5422, BS 6880, BS EN 12828, BS EN 12831, BS EN 14336

Internal Design Temperature Teaching spaces Internal Design Temperature Offices /staff room Internal Design Temperature Circulation Internal Design Temperature stores External Design Temperature (Note this is location specific) Infiltration rate (unoccupied) Infiltration rate (occupied) Heat emitter warm up margin LTHW flow temp LTHW return temp

21°C 21°C 19°C 16°C -6°C 1.0 AC/H 5l/s/person 10% Max: 80°C Max 70°C

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION A sealed pressurised LTHW system will be provided. Twin head variable speed pump will circulate water from the low loss header to all LST heat emitters in the building. Separate pumped circuit to serve underfloor. All pipework will run in service voids and risers with zone valves provided to zone the building. All internal pipework will be either steel, copper or cross linked polyethylene with integral oxygen diffusion barrier. Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026

Registered office 42–43 Gloucester Crescent, London, NW1 7PE

All low level or accessible heat emitters for the building will be sized to operate at surface temperatures of max 43°C. It is proposed that heating will be provided to the play spaces using underfloor piped water heating and LST radiators in all other areas. The underfloor heating will be in a thin screed construction or light weight timber floor construction to minimise the reaction time. Vinyl or Marmoleum floor finish or other equivalent product is anticipated. It is proposed that temperature control will be via local thermostatic radiator valves to radiators and multiple temperature sensors to control the underfloor heating. Provide simple timeclock heating and HWS control for each circuit. Compensated flow to radiator circuits with outdoor temperature sensor. Underfloor heating control by adjustable temperature set point to enable management to adjust the set point within limits. Building is intended to be used only five days a week so the LST radiator timeclock and the underfloor heating timeclock need to be separate to reflect their different reaction times. T60 Air Conditioning A small IT cabinet will be provided (1.2m high) installed in an area of the office but this is not anticipated to require air conditioning (TBC). All areas would be served by a wireless hub. This means that there are no areas requiring air conditioning.

1.7

Ventilation

U10 General Supply and Extract Ventilation DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 2 (Fire), Section 3 (Environment), Section 6 (Energy)  Environment Act 1995, Pollution Prevention & Control Act 1999, Pollution & Prevention Control (Scotland) Regulations 2012, , Air Quality Standards (Scotland) Regulations 2010  Clean Air Act 1993 and Clean Air Act Memorandum

J6429 Early Years Pilot Study M&E Summary of Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 17 May 2018 / page 8 of 16


      

CIBSE: Commissioning Code A 2006, CIBSE A guide, CIBSE B guide, CIBSE C guide, AM10 Natural Ventilation in Non-Domestic Buildings, AM13 Mixed Mode Ventilation, KS17 Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation BSRIA: ‒ Commissioning HVAC Systems: Guidance on the division of responsibilities (TM 1/88.1), Commissioning Management (AG 5/2002) ‒ Building & Engineering Services Association BESA (formerly B&ES and formerly HVCA ‒ DW143 Guide to Good Practice – Ductwork Air Leakage Testing ‒ DW144 Specification for Sheet Metal Ductwork ‒ DW154 Specification for Plastics Ductwork ‒ TR19 Guide to Good Practice - Internal Cleanliness of Ventilation Systems British Standards: BS 476-24, BS 5422, BS 8233, BS 9999, BS EN 13779, BS EN 15423 Building Bulletin 87, 93, 101 The School Premises Scotland Regulations Comply with the objectives, all relevant British Standards and Codes of Practice, and the IEE Regulations (BS7671:2008) For guidance on ventilating catering kitchens see the following publications: Health and Safety Executive (2000), Catering Information Sheet No 10 www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cais10.pdf Health and Safety Executive (2000), Catering Information Sheet No 11 www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/cais11.pdf

Area

Ventilation Rate

WCs/nappy change

10 air changes per hour.

Laundry/cleaners stores

10 air changes per hour.

Kitchen

Control heat and remove the products of combustion DW172

Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026

Registered office 42–43 Gloucester Crescent, London, NW1 7PE

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION The building will be predominantly naturally ventilated. All accommodation will have openable windows under user control. Acoustically attenuated ventilation paths will be provided to allow cross ventilation through into the corridors/open plan space. Local mechanical extract ventilation will be provided to all WCs and wet areas. Low speed constant background setting with timeclock control of boost for normal hours of use. Electric only oven, hob and microwave/reheat facilities with extract filter hood over hob will be provided as part of the FFE. Provide ducted mechanical extract from hood in kitchen. Provide natural make up air ventilation to lobbies or ducted make up air where controllable natural ventilation is not practical. It is understood from the fire strategy consultant that motorised automatic smoke vents are not required.

1.8

Electrical Power, Distribution and Lighting

V10 Electrical Generation Plant DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Scottish Building Standards 2017 - Section 6 (Energy)  CIBSE: CIBSE F guide, CIBSE J guide, CIBSE K guide, KS15 Capturing Solar Energy, TM38 Renewable Energy Sources for Buildings  BSRIA: BSRIA Power quality guide (AG 2/2000), Design Checks for Electrical Services - A quality control framework for electrical engineers (BG 3/2006)  Energy Networks Association: Connection of Generation > 3.68kW (G59) th  British Standards: BS 7430, BS7671 Wiring Regulations 18 Edition July 2018, BS EN 60947-6, BS IEC 62548  ECA Guide to the Installation of PV Systems – 3rd Edition

J6429 Early Years Pilot Study M&E Summary of Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 17 May 2018 / page 9 of 16


SYSTEM DESCRIPTION At this stage it is proposed that a photovoltaic system is installed to meet the council planning requirements for on-site renewable energy generation. Current proposals are for a system just short of 10kWp (to ensure that the present 4kWp-10kWp Feed-In-Tariff band is met), made up of 30No. 270W PV panels, 2 taking up approximately 50m of the proposed south facing pitched roof. This requires an option study and modelling to determine the optimum solution in the next stage of the design development.. V20 Low Voltage Distribution DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 6 (Energy)  The Memorandum of guidance on the Electricity at Work Regulations rd 1989 (HSR25 3 Edition 2015))  IET Wiring Regulations 18th Edition, July 2018 (BS7671:2008+AMD1:2011+AMD2:2013+AMD3:2015)  CIBSE: CIBSE K guide, CIBSE TM39: Building Energy Metering 2009  BSRIA: ‒ BSRIA Power quality guide (AG 2/2000) ‒ Design Checks for Electrical Services - A quality control framework for electrical engineers (BG 3/2006)  HSG85 Electricity at work: Safe working practices  NICEIC Technical Guidance  British Standards: BS 7430, BS 7671, BS EN 50085-1, BS EN 50085-2-1, BS EN 50085-2-2, BS EN 60947-6 Incoming supply, approx 60kVA 415V, to be checked in the next stage of the design development. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION A new utilities supply will be provided to the supply authorities meter head within the plant room.

basket or tray. Multicore XLPE insulated armoured cable will be used for internal sub-mains with separate CPC’s. V21 General Lighting DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Memorandum of guidance on the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 (the Memorandum)  IET Wiring Regulations 18th Edition, July 2018  (BS7671:2008+AMD1:2011+AMD2:2013+AMD3:2015)  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 6 (Energy)  CIBSE: ‒ CIBSE Guide F: Energy Efficiency in Buildings ‒ CIBSE Guide K: Electricity in Buildings ‒ CIBSE Commissioning Code L: Lighting ‒ SLL Lighting Guides ‒ SLL Code for Lighting 2013 ‒ TM39 Building Energy Metering 2009  BSRIA: Design Checks for Electrical Services (BG3/2006), BSRIA Power Quality Guide (AG2/2000)  NIC/EIC: Technical Guidance  British Standards: BS 7671, BS EN 50085-1, BS EN 50085-2-1, BS EN 50085-2-2, BS EN 60598-1  BB87 & BB90 The uniformity ratio (min/average) across the classrooms, excluding a perimeter zone of 0.5m from the walls, must not be less than 0.6 at desk height. Uniformity over each task area must not be less than 0.8 at desk height. The illuminance of the immediate surrounding area must be related to the illuminance of the task area, with a uniformity of not less than 0.5. The installation shall be designed to achieve a glare index of no more than 19.

A new MCCB will be provided adjacent to the supply head for supplies to local MCB boards, control panels and dispersed loads such as a lift. A final circuit panel board will be provided within plant room for final circuits. All internal sub-mains will run in service risers and voids on heavy duty cable Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026

Registered office 42–43 Gloucester Crescent, London, NW1 7PE

J6429 Early Years Pilot Study M&E Summary of Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 17 May 2018 / page 10 of 16


An intermediate colour temperature of about 4000K and a colour rending index greater than 80 would be preferable for the play/class room areas and CAT 2 glare free diffusers for the offices and teaching spaces. Lighting efficiency shall be >= 80 lumens/W (internal) or >= 70 lumens/W (external) and classroom general lighting shall be <= 3 W/m2 per 100 lux. Note that 60 lamp lumens per circuit Watt is currently the minimum requirement in building regulations March 2018. This is to be confirmed and developed in more detail at the next stage as there may be flexibility on efficiencies for display lighting. Lighting levels tabulated below are at work surface level, unless stated otherwise:

    

In areas with false ceilings such as sanitary areas, lighting will be recessed LED downlights. Appropriately rated IP rated covers will be provided to areas such as changing areas where water spray is likely. Feature lighting will be required at entrances and displays. Stairs will be lit by wall mounted circular fittings or similar The main kitchen will be lit by recessed fittings with appropriately IP rated and wipeable diffusers. Stores and plantrooms are to be generally lit by shatterproof bulkhead style LED fittings. Circulation and other spaces will generally be provided with high efficiency LED downlighters supplemented with localised feature lighting.

Play and Teaching Spaces Generally

300lux

Circulation

150-200lux

Admin and offices

300lux

CONTROL REQUIREMENTS The light fittings will be split into zones to allow separate control of the play/teaching/demonstration space. Each play/teaching space zone and space will be provided with simple on/off switches at low level to encourage use by staff and children as part of the learning experience. Provide a key switch for testing the emergency lighting in each area.

Kitchen

500lux

V22 General LV Power

Store rooms

100lux

Plant Areas

150-200lux

DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Memorandum of guidance on the Electricity at Work Regulations rd 1989 (HSR25 3 Edition 2015 ()  IET Wiring Regulations 18th Edition, July 2018  (BS7671:2008+AMD1:2011+AMD2:2013+AMD3:2015)  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 6 (Energy)  CIBSE: CIBSE K guide, CIBSE TM39: Building Energy Metering  BSRIA: Power quality guide (AG 2/2000), Design Checks for Electrical Services - A quality control framework for electrical engineers (BG 3/2006)  NICEIC: Technical Guidance  British Standards: BS 7430, BS7671 Wiring Regulations 18th Edition (July 2018), BS EN 50085-1, BS EN 50085-2-1, BS EN 50085-2-2, BS EN 60947-6

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Lighting will be provided by high efficiency LED lamp sources. Lighting in play/teaching spaces and admin areas will be predominantly linear LED tube light fittings with up/downlight distribution. This will be further developed at the next stage. Lighting to other areas will generally be as follows:

Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026

Registered office 42–43 Gloucester Crescent, London, NW1 7PE

J6429 Early Years Pilot Study M&E Summary of Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 17 May 2018 / page 11 of 16


SYSTEM DESCRIPTION LV power will be provided from distribution boards to light fittings and electrical accessories with MCB/RCBO protection.

Consideration will be given to various wiring systems on the basis of whole life costs and to enable flexibility in use. Wiring systems to be considered include; -

LSF singles in trunking and conduit

-

Multicore sheathed cables on cable basket tray.

-

Pre-wired modular wiring systems

LV power will be provided from the distribution boards to light fittings and electrical accessories with MCB/RCBO protection. Generally LV containment will run in service risers and voids at high level. Dado trunking will be used within the offices only for power and distribution. Provide power to powered doors and windows and rooflights. Provide power to plantroom frost protection heater. Includes provision of plant room electric heater. Automatic temperature control frost protection to plant room. Provide power to all controls, communications systems, CCTV, access, security, fire, refuge and disabled alarms. V32 Uninterruptible Power Supply There is no requirement for uninterruptible power supplies, surge protection or power factor correction. V40 Emergency Lighting DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 6 (Energy)  CIBSE: ‒ CIBSE Guide F: Energy Efficiency in Buildings ‒ CIBSE Guide K: Electricity in Buildings ‒ CIBSE Commissioning Code L: Lighting ‒ SLL Lighting Guides Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026

Registered office 42–43 Gloucester Crescent, London, NW1 7PE

‒ SLL Code for Lighting 2013 Industry Committee for Emergency Lighting (ICEL) ‒ ICEL 1001:1999: Scheme of Product and Authenticated Photometric data Registration for Emergency Luminaires and Conversion Modules. ‒ ICEL 1004:2014: The use of Emergency Lighting Modification Units ‒ ICEL 1006:2012: Emergency Lighting Guide Building Services Research and Information Association (BSRIA): ‒ Design Checks for Electrical Services (BG3/2006) ‒ BSRIA Power Quality Guide (AG2/2000) British Standards: BS 5266-1, BS 5499-4, BS 7671, BS 9991, BS 9999, BS EN 1838, BS EN 50172, BS EN 60598-1, BS EN 60598-2-22, BS EN 62034, BS EN 50200, BS5489

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION It is not a requirement of building standards to provide emergency lighting in areas of schools or nurseries with natural daylighting and only used during normal school working hours. However, it is proposed to provide emergency lighting throughout the building to enable flexibility for extended working hours and community use. Emergency lighting will be provided throughout the building. Emergency light fittings will be self-contained dedicated emergency LED fittings. Keyswitches will be provided adjacent to the MCB boards for testing.

V41 External Lighting DESIGN PARAMETERS  Comply with the performance objectives and: The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 6 (Energy)  All relevant British Standards and Codes of Practice including  BS EN 13201-2: 2015, BS 5489-1:2013, BS 7671:2008 (IEE Regulations)  Guidance Notes for the Reduction of Light Pollution’, The Institution of Lighting Engineers (ILE), GN01 2011, www.ile.org.uk.  Lighting and Crime’, The Institution of Lighting Engineers (ILE), GN01 2011,, www.ile.org.uk. J6429 Early Years Pilot Study M&E Summary of Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 17 May 2018 / page 12 of 16


   

 

Lighting the Environment – A Guide to Good Urban Lighting’, ILE/CIBSE. The guidelines in the CIBSE code for Exterior Lighting Guide to the Lighting of Urban Areas’, Commission Internationale De L’Eclairage (CIE), 2000, CIE 136-2000. Recommendations for the Lighting of Roads for Motor and Pedestrian Traffic’, Commission Internationale De L’Eclairage (CIE), 1995, CIE 1151995. Guide on the Limitation of the Effects of Obtrusive Light from Outdoor Lighting Installations’, Commission Internationale De L’Eclairage (CIE), 2003, CIE 150-2003. Guidelines for Minimising Sky Glow’, Commission Internationale De L’Eclairage (CIE), 1997, CIE 126-1997. Guidelines for Minimising Urban Sky Glow near Astronomical Observatories’, International Astronomical Union (IAU) / Commission Internationale De L’Eclairage (CIE), 1980, Publication IAU/CIE No1:1980. ‘Secured by Design Principles’, 2014 inc. guidance for New Schools ACPO System Description

The extent of external lighting proposed will provide background and wayfinding lighting on the building to the playground areas to provide a secure, lit route to the entrance gate. Extent and ownership of any lighting to the access road and car park areas to be confirmed by the nursery or Council. The external lighting installation will be designed to minimise light pollution and impact to neighbouring properties, while still supporting natural surveillance of the site and operation of CCTV. All lighting to paths, car park areas and decorative lighting control will be controlled by means of daylight sensors and timeclocks to allow lighting to be switched off between 11pm and 7am to limit light pollution and energy use.

1.9

W12 Public Address System & Sound Amplification It is understood no voice alarm, message system or bell system to be installed. W15 Facilities for the Disabled DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 2 (Fire), Section 4 (Safety)  CIBSE D Guide  BS 8300: 2009  Building Bulletin 77, 91, 94  DDA Act 1995, SENDA Act 2001  Equality Act 2010 SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Disabled alarms will be provided in each disabled toilet. The disabled alarm will comprise a simple pull switch located inside each disabled toilet which when operated, will activate an alarm (buzzer) and warning light outside the toilet and a call controller with on-board audible and visual indication of call and reset, in the reception or other dedicated points. The alarm will stay activated until acknowledged or re-set by the single call controller or a reset button in the disabled WC. ABC design is two storey with lift so requires a disabled refuge intercom at the head of the stair at first floor. A dedicated disabled refuge intercom system will be provided to all disabled refuges to BS 5839 part 9. Each disabled refuge will be equipped with an intercom outstation to communicate with a panel at the base of the stair and back to a central panel in the main reception adjacent to the main fire alarm panel. Induction Loops Allow for one number portable induction loop

Communications, Security and Control Systems

W11 Staff Paging/Location It is not proposed to install any paging system.

Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026

Registered office 42–43 Gloucester Crescent, London, NW1 7PE

J6429 Early Years Pilot Study M&E Summary of Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 17 May 2018 / page 13 of 16


W20 Radio/TV/CCTV DESIGN PARAMETERS  Data Protection Act 1998 + GDPR (Reguaiton (EU) 2016/679)  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 4 (Safety)  CIBSE K Guide  BSRIA: Guidance and Specification for Electronic Security Systems (FMS3/98)  National Security Inspectorate (NSI): Code of Practice NCP 104 for the design, installation and maintenance of CCTV systems  IEC 60728  CCTV installations to BS EN 50132 and BS 8220 BS 8418. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION TV & RADIO No TV or radio distribution will be provided. It is assumed that any audio/TV/projector/screen systems will be part of the FF&E. CCTV No CCTV will be required W21 Projection We understand that a mobile interactive screen will be required. We assume that any audio/TV/projector/screen systems will be part of the FF&E. W23 Clocks We assume that any clocks will be part of the FF&E. W40 Access Control DESIGN PARAMETERS  BS EN 50133  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 2 (Fire), Section 4 (Safety)  CIBSE K Guide  BSRIA: Guidance and Specification for Electronic Security Systems (FMS3/98)

Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026

Registered office 42–43 Gloucester Crescent, London, NW1 7PE

British Standards: BS 7273-4, BS 7671, BS 8300, BS EN 50486, BS EN 60839-11-1, BS EN 60839-11-2

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION Provide video door entry control to the main entrance monitored in reception.

W41 Security, Detection and Alarm DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Scottish Building Standards 2015: Section 2 (Fire), Section 4 (Safety)  CIBSE K Guide  BSRIA: ‒ BSRIA Power Quality Guide (AG2/2000) ‒ Design Checks for Electrical Services (BG3/2006) ‒ Guidance and Specification for Electronic Security Systems (FMS3/98)  British Security Industry Association (BSIA): Technical Guidance  British Standards: BS 7273-4, BS 7671, BS 8300, BS EN 50486, BS EN 60839-11-1, BS EN 60839-11-2 SYSTEM DESCRIPTION There will be an intruder alarm system for the building with magnetic contacts on external doors and PIR detectors to ground floor corridors, staircases and perimeter rooms. The system will be controlled by a central panel with a remote keypad for staff to set and unset the system and will be zoned to allow for various parts of the building to be separately alarmed. The control panel will incorporate a digital communicator to transmit alarm signals to a manned central monitoring station. Wiring will be laid on cable tray or in conduit chased into walls.

W50 Fire Detection & Alarm DESIGN PARAMETERS The system shall comply with the requirements of the following standards and regulations:

J6429 Early Years Pilot Study M&E Summary of Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 17 May 2018 / page 14 of 16


       

The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 2 (Fire), Section 4 (Safety) CIBSE: E Guide, K Guide BSRIA: AG2/2000, BG3/2006, FMS3/98 Fire Industry Association: Technical Guidance British Standards: BS 7671, BS EN 54, BS 9999 British Standard BS 5839 Part 1:2017 and Part 4, systems for Life safety class L1; British Standard BS 7443 Specification for sound systems for emergency purposes; The British Fire Protection Systems Association Code of Practice for the design, installation and servicing of voice alarm systems associated with fire detection systems; The requirements of Building Control and the local Fire Officer

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION The installation will comprise an analogue addressable system with smoke or heat detectors with combined sounders and xenon beacons in all areas of the building(s) and with break glass units at final exits as required by BS5839. A single system control and power supply panel will be provided in the main entrance.

  

    

BSRIA: BSRIA Power quality guide (AG 2/2000), Design Checks for Electrical Services - A quality control framework for electrical engineers (BG 3/2006) Health and Safety Executive: HSG85 Electricity at work: Safe working practices, 2013 NICEIC: Technical Guidance Energy Networks Association: Engineering Recommendation: Guidelines for the Provision of Low Voltage Connections to Multiple Occupancy Buildings (G87/2015), Distribution Code: Engineering Recommendation G12/4 (Requirements for the application of protective multiple earthing to low voltage networks) – a review of Engineering Recommendation G12/3 British Standards: BS 7430, BS 7671, BS EN 62305-1, BS EN 62305-2, BS EN 62305-3, BS EN 62305-4, BIP 2118 Local Electricity Utility supplier requirements (inc. PME Requirements) Electricity Association Engineering Recommendation G12/4 Local Authority and other statutory requirements Electricity at Work Regulations

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION To protect occupants and equipment from the effects of short circuits and fault currents.

It is understood from the fire strategy consultants that an L1 system is required. The lift to receive a fire condition and return to the ground floor. (to be confirmed in the next stage of the design development). W51 Earthing and Bonding DESIGN PARAMETERS The entire LV distribution system shall be designed, installed, tested and commissioned in accordance with the requirements of the IEE Wiring regulations (18th Edition (July 2018), BS 7671:2008) and the following other standards:  

The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 6 (Energy) CIBSE K guide

Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026

Registered office 42–43 Gloucester Crescent, London, NW1 7PE

W52 Lightning Protection DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 6 (Energy)  CIBSE: CIBSE K guide, CIBSE TM39: Building Energy Metering  BSRIA: BSRIA Power quality guide (AG 2/2000), Design Checks for Electrical Services - A quality control framework for electrical engineers (BG 3/2006)  Health and Safety Executive: HSG85 Electricity at work: Safe working practices  NICEIC: Technical Guidance  Energy Networks Association: Engineering Recommendation: Guidelines for the Provision of Low Voltage Connections to Multiple Occupancy Buildings (G87/2010), Distribution Code: Engineering J6429 Early Years Pilot Study M&E Summary of Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 17 May 2018 / page 15 of 16


Recommendation G12/4 (Requirements for the application of protective multiple earthing to low voltage networks) – a review of Engineering Recommendation G12/3 British Standards: BS 7430, BS 7671, BS EN 50171, BS EN 62305-4

Hard wired data connections will be provided to the server rack in the office and from the rack to four data points in the office and to the nominated position in the play area for the mobile interactive screen. All active IT equipment will be provided by the client as part of the ICT fit out.

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION The building fabric will be utilised as far as possible as the lightning protection system. This means that structural steel and concrete reinforcement will all be bonded together and bonded to the ground floor slab, which will in turn be bonded to lightning protection ground termination network. The air termination will be by a metal roof or by aluminium air terminations if a suitable metal roof is not installed. The earth resistance of the ground termination network will be tested to check less than 10ohms, as required by BS EN 62305. A provisional sum should be included in the construction contract for the inclusion of earth rods if further measures are required to bring the resistance to earth down to this level. Earth resistivity needs to be tested on site during ground investigations. W60 Building Management System There is no requirement for a Building Management System. Relay building alarms to a council central monitoring facility W70 Structured Cabling Network DESIGN PARAMETERS  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 4 (Fire), Section 6 (Energy)  ANSI/E1A/T1A 568: Commercial Building Telecommunications Wiring Standard TSB OSI/IEC 11801: Information Technology - Generic Cabling  BS 50174  BS 6701 Pts 1 & 2, BS 7718 and BS 7671 SYSTEM DESCRIPTION At present we have assumed telephony will mainly be by voice over IP technology and a separate phone lines will not be installed. Direct phone lines to critical devices including the lifts, fire and security alarms and security will be provided. Max Fordham LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership Registered in England and Wales Number OC300026

Registered office 42–43 Gloucester Crescent, London, NW1 7PE

1.10 Transportation Systems X10 Lift Installations DESIGN PARAMETERS  Building Regulations, the requirements of the Statutory Authorities, the insurers requirements and all relevant British Standards and Codes of Practice. In particular comply with:  BS 5655, BS EN 81-70, BS 7671:2015 (IEE Regulations),  BS 7255:2012, BS 5588 Pt8:1999, BS 8300,  BS EN 60204-1:2006, BS EN 12015: 2014,  BS EN 12016: 2013, BS EN ISO 11200:1996, BS EN 61000:2001  The Lifts Regulations 2016  The Scottish Building Standards 2017: Section 2 (Fire), Section 3 (Environment), Section 4 (Safety)  CIBSE: Guide D, E, K  DDA  Minimum lift speed 0.15m/s  Doors  Upper Limit for the indoor ambient noise level in neighbouring room  Laeq, 30 mins 40 dB. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION A single 5 person motor room less type platform lift will be installed to meet the requirements of the Building Standards. A keyswitch will be provided to prevent unauthorised access. Assume pit depth of 200mm below ground FFL, headroom of 2500mm AFFL of top floor.

J6429 Early Years Pilot Study M&E Summary of Scope of Works RIBA Stage 2 17 May 2018 / page 16 of 16


16th May 2018 R-8104-RGM-MI

HUB SOUTH WEST SCOTLAND LTD SCOTTISH FUTURES TRUST, EARLY YEARS REFERENCE DESIGN ACOUSTIC DESIGN STRATAGY FOR TWO STORY OPTION Providing a building with the appropriate acoustic environment to enhance children’s ability to develop and learn is a key project aim. The acoustic design of the building will follow the guidance provided in the department for education building bulletin BB93 ‘Acoustics design of schools: performance standards 2015 v17’. The acoustic design of the building covers four areas: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Control of external noise Control of reverberant sound Sound insulation between spaces Control of building services noise

The design criteria and strategy adopted to achieve an appropriate acoustic environment is set out below. Control of external environmental noise As part of the detailed design of the building, an acoustic site survey will be required to quantify the acoustic environment, establishing the presence of transport noise sources, industrial sources and specific environmental sources such as strong prevailing winds, which can be a factor on exposed sites.

Edinburgh Napier University is a registered Scottish charity. Reg. No. SC018373

RMP is a consulting division of Edinburgh Napier University.


R-8104-RGM-MI 16th May 2018

The proposal is to naturally ventilate the building through openable windows. In order to achieve the internal criteria of L Aeq 35 dB the external facade noise level will need to be below LAeq 55 dB. Any facades exposed to higher noise levels will require acoustically attenuated ventilation or a mechanical ventilation system, to avoid excessive noise ingress when windows are opened to provide ventilation. The control of rain noise on the roof structure is also important to avoid excessive internal noise levels. The pitched roof build up will incorporate either mineral fibre insulation or ridged plastic insulation combined with an acoustic dampening membrane to control rain noise. Within the development site, the building orientation and external landscaping should be designed to provide a play area with a noise level below LAeq 55 dB. The design stage external site survey will determine the influence the external noise environment will have on site design. Control of reverberant sound The control of reverberant noise levels is key to providing a quiet learning environment where the children can listen and communicate easily. Controlling noise build up will also ensure good speech intelligibility and help to avoid staff voice strain. The nursery spaces should have a reverberation time of under 0.6 seconds. Offices and meeting rooms should be under 1.0 seconds and ancillary spaces such as kitchens can be under 1.5 seconds. Within the offices, meeting rooms and kitchens, the level of reverberation will be adequately controlled through the specification of an absorbent tiled ceiling of at least Class C. Within the main nursery space, it is proposed to control the reverberation time by specifying minimum Class C acoustic perforated plasterboard to the underside of the roof and the ceiling of the ground floor. The void behind the perforated boards will be filled with absorbent insulation. The perforated plasterboard will not provide enough absorption on its own to achieve the design target.

Robin Mackenzie Partnership

Page 2 of 4


R-8104-RGM-MI 16th May 2018

Additional Class A acoustic wall panelling will be provided to available upper wall areas, particularly in the double height space. Hanging absorbent cubes or clouds will also be utilised were practicable. Ideally an additional Class A equivalent absorption area of 30m2 should be achieved within the main nursery space. The design calculations also allow for additional absorption provided in the main nursery space from a floor finish with an absorption coefficient of 0.1 and rugs supplied as part of fit out covering approximately 25% of the floor area. Sound insulation between spaces It is important to provide a space within the nursery were private conversations can be held. A quiet room for children and families should also be available. In addition noise spill from the main nursery area into the adjacent noise sensitive spaces should be controlled. Partitions separating noise sensitive rooms will have a minimum acoustic rating of Rw 52 dB. Partitions to corridors and separating room interconnected by doors will have a minimum acoustic rating of R w 40 dB. The partition separating the kitchen for head of centre will a minimum acoustic rating of Rw 52 dB. The plant room wall should have a minimum acoustic rating of Rw 50 dB. All acoustic partitions should be taken to the underside of the roof or first floor structure, such that flanking over the partition head is avoided. Glazed screens in walls between noise sensitive spaces will have a minimum acoustic rating of Rw 40 dB. Doors to noise sensitive spaces will have a minimum acoustic rating of Rw 30 dB. Interconnecting doors between noise sensitive spaces should have a minimum acoustic rating of Rw 35 dB. All acoustic doors will require perimeter acoustic seals. Sliding doors between noise sensitive spaces will required acoustic seals and ironmongery specifically designed for this application to achieve Rw 35 dB. The first floor design will need to control excessive impact from footsteps. This will be achieved by a floor finish with a minimum impact performance of Î&#x201D;LW 17 dB. The specification of carpet to the upper floor will achieve this.

Robin Mackenzie Partnership

Page 3 of 4


R-8104-RGM-MI 16th May 2018

Control of building services noise Any building services serving the offices and nursery spaces will be designed to control noise to below L Aeq 35 dB. This includes any non-natural ventilation, heating system and lighting. Any external noise from building services equipment should be controlled to meet the local authorities planning guidelines for noise.

Robin Mackenzie Partnership

Page 4 of 4


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382 Great Western Road Glasgow, G4 9HT 0141 339 1515

18 Royal Terrace Glasgow, G3 7NY 0141 332 0292

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design


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382 Great Western Road Glasgow, G4 9HT 0141 339 1515

18 Royal Terrace Glasgow, G3 7NY 0141 332 0292

Early Learning and Childcare Reference Design


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Early Learning & Childcare Reference Design Report  

The full report of the Anderson Bell Christie Reference Design. Produced in partnership with Hub South West, Scottish Futures Trust and Eas...

Early Learning & Childcare Reference Design Report  

The full report of the Anderson Bell Christie Reference Design. Produced in partnership with Hub South West, Scottish Futures Trust and Eas...

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