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P U B L I S H E D M O N T H L Y B Y T H E S. S. M c C L U R E C O . , 141-155 E. 25TH S T R E E T , N E W Y O R K C I T Y 10 N o r f o l k S t . , S t r a n d , L o n d o n W . C . , E n g . ;

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F O R M A Y , 1900:

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III.

MAGAZINE

for

MCCLURE'S MAGAZINE by

The Life of the Master.

Frontispiece

Corwin K n a p p

Linson.

Part V . The Relations of Jesus with the Samaritans and The Rev. John Watson, D.D. the Pharisees ,

3

W i t h four illustrations in color and pictures in black-and-white, by C o r w i n K n a p p L i n s o n .

IV.

T h e T u r n i n g of the W a y s .

A Story of

To-day in New Y o r k W i t h pictures by H e n r y

V.

Clinton Ross

14

Dean C. Worcester . . .

19

Hutt.

General Lawton's W o r k in the Philip­ pines

W i t h a series of portraits of G e n e r a l L a w t o n , other portraits, and a map.

VI.

T h e Old Jim Horse

. . . . . .

J. Lincoln Steffens

. . .

32

W i t h pictures by E . L . B l u m e n s c h e i n .

VII.

T h e Pasha's Prisoner.

A Story of M o d ­

ern T u r k e y

Robert Barr

35

W i t h pictures by Gustave V e r b e e k .

VIII.

T h e Coming T o t a l Eclipse of the Sun.— What Astronomers Hope to L e a r n from this E c l i p s e . — W h a t T h e y H a v e Learned from Previous Eclipses

Professor Simon Newcomb .

45

Tig h e Hopkins

53

Illustrated from photographs and d r a w i n g s .

IX.

Miss Cullender's Lamb.

T h e Story of a

Singular Prison Friendship W i t h headpiece by H a r r y F e n n .

X.

T h e Début of Bimbashi Joyce.

A Story

of British A r m y Life in E g y p t

XI.

The Biggest Steamship Afloat

.

. .

A. Conan Doyle

. . . .

Earl Mayo

60 64

Illustrated from drawings by Geo. V a r i a n and H e n r y S. W a t s o n and from photographs.

XII.

Willis Irwin

A n Indian Mother Song

74

Illustrated by E . L . B l u m e n s c h e i n .

XIII.

The Governor's Rehearsal.

A Story of

Public Life

Charles Warren

. . . .

76

Ray Stannard Baker . . .

86

W i t h pictures by T . de T h u l s t r u p .

XIV.

The New Prosperity Illustrated by C . E . H o o p e r .

XV. XVI.

Editorial Notes Death in Battle.

95 Alfred Ollivant

A Poem

.

.

.

.

96

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matchless collection

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Liszt Kelley Arditi Emmett Strauss Buck Damrosch Mozart De Koven Faure Gilbert Tosti Brahms Gleason Foster Gounod Chopin Handel Benedict Haydn Kreutzer Mattei Czibulka Molloy Pinsuti Robyn Hatton Bartlett Schumann Beethoven Schubert Balfe Sullivan Wagner Bishop Chwatal Cowen Dibdin Adam Godard Lange Lover Moore Wilson Payne Uussell Smith Verdi : Vndel

350

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Over 2200 Pages 20 Editors and Special Contributors T h i s v a l u a b l e p e r m a n e n t c o l l e c t i o n of m u s i c a l m a s t e r p i e c e s be o b t a i n e d b y those w h o act p r o m p t l y , at

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I K ' o n are a teacher seeking advancement and worthy of it, A N D 1 Li" you knew how many places the School Bulletin A g e n c y filled, and how it filled them,

YOU

• I

C . VV. l ì A l ì D E K N ,

and Ä7 City H a l l

Place,

N e w

s

Torfe.

11

fj^MB J BEJf f l B

W e guarantee that our course corresponden prepare for examinations, i l s o ilc-r^ree c o n d i t i o n ally from our resident institution, lnù anapolla College of L a w , w h i c h h a s a Spring nnd Summer T e r m . A l l c o u r s e s c o m p l e t e . International patronage. Graduates successfully practising. W r i t e for f u l l i n f o r m a t i o n s t a t i n g y o u r d e s i r e .

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Syracuse, N . Y .

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McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE. Massachusetts,

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"Wcircstfpr AraApmv w orcesier /\caaemy*

Prepares

boys for college o r

oi. B u i l d i n g s of modern construction. N e w Science H a l l , 7 groups of laboratories. M a n u a l t r a i n i n g . Infirmary. G y m n a s i u m . O v a l a n d cinder track. 67th year begins Sept. 11, 1000. D . W . ABERCROMHIE. L L . D . , P r i n . s c i e n t i f i c

s c h ü

Michigan College of Mines S u m m e r P r a c t i c e C o u r s e s in Surveying, Shop Practice and Ore Dressing begin | une n t h ; in Mine Surveying and M i n i n g begin May 7 t h ; in Field Geology begin July 23rd. Booklet of half tones illustrating the work, ready May ist. Booklet and catalogue describing all courses sent on application. Address F . W . ItlcN'AI It, P r e s ' t , H o u g h t o n , M i c h .

Washington, D. C , Suburbs. Seven separate buildings. 1'eautiful grounds. A bright, cheery, artistic home. inest advantages. No examinations. Í400 to wo. -'¡ght seeing every h.onday. " t is a uberai education to live in \ ashington." For illustrated catalogue address Box 107, Forest Glen, M d . L

H

M

H

H

M

H

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W

M

M

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W a s h i n g t o n College „ Yo

Gerlach —J

Located in one of the prettiest spots on the Jersey shore—truly an ideal spot for a boys' school. Includes practical instruction in Geometrical, Architectural, , Freehand and Industrial D r a w i n g ; also prepares for American and F.uronean Universities. MILITARY BOARDING SCHOOL

n

W i l l care for y o u r boy while y o u visit

3d a n d T S t s . , N . E . , W a s h i n g t o n , D . C . T r e a t e d w i t h i n t h e N a t i o n a l C a p i t a l ; c h a r m i n g pnrk of ten a c r e s ; enlarged b u i l d i n g ; e l e g a n t l y furnished rooms; college* p h y s i c i a n . P r e p a r a t o r y , certificate, college courses; music, art, e l o c u t i o n . B u i l d i n g s a n d grounds valued at $250,000. C a t a l o g u e and a p p l i c a t i o n for entrance ^sent on request. F. M E NEFEE, President. k

District of Columbia,

New

LEARN

New T h e

New

A R T S C I E N C E OF

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York, Binghamton. L a d y

J a n e

G r e y

S c h o o l

York, Canandaigua.

York, Cornwall-on-Hudson.

N e a r West P o i n t . Prepares for a l l colleges. N o w represented by its graduates i n the a r m y , n a v y , a n d 21 colleges a n d universities. S u m m e r session. F o r catalogues address the SUPERINTENDENT. New

York,

Elmira.

E l m i r a College for W o m e n Its new life a n d new work. N e x t session opens September 19, 1900. N u m b e r of F r e s h m e n registered i n September, 1898, twice, and i n September, 1809, three times greater than the average class since 1855. A m p l e accommodation is being provided for increased number i n September, 1900. Intellectual t r a i n i n g thoro u g h . Social life d e l i g h t f u l . W h o l e s o m e recreation emphasized. W r i t e for a catalogue. A . CAMERON M A C K E N Z I E , D . D . , President.

F a l l term opens F r i -

i , 1900. Classical a n d Scientific Courses. M u s i c a n d A r t . W e l l - e q u i p p e d L i b r a r y , Laboratories*and G y m n a s i u m . R e s i d e n t P h y s i c i a n . A d d r e s s PUKBF. T . S i m . I F F . A . M . Pres., L o c k Box 45. R o c k f o r d . Maryland, Frederick. • ff Confers degrees. ConservS atory of M u s i c a n d A r t . School of E x p r e s s i o n . L i b r a r y , Laboratories, G y m n a s i u m , I n firmary. E n l a r g e d accommodations. U n r i v a l l e d climate. E n dowment. J . H . A i ' i ' i . E , A . M . , President. Massachusetts, Greenfield.

Ihe Woman

r

N e w Y o r k Military Academy

SECURED F 0 » GRADUATES

I • 1 1 1 Successfully t a u g h t by Correspondence. I A U f T h r e e C o u r s e s — S e c u l a r College Course, I II 1 1 Post G r a d u a t e and Business Courses. U n i i Latest i m p r o v e d methods. I n c o r p o r a t e d i n 1892. G r a d u a t e s i n active practice i n nearly eveiy state i n t b e U n i o n . School endorsed byjudges a n d other p r o m i n e n t m e n . F u l l p a r t i c u l a r s sent upon a p p l i c a t i o n . CHICAGO CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL OF L A W , 5 0 3 R E A P E R J B L O C K , CHJU AGO. f

i

In beautiful lake region of Western New York. 25th year begins September 19th. Certificate admits to leading Colleges. Strong Music Department. Academic and College Preparatory Courses. Send for illustrated circular. SAMUEL COLE F"AIRLEY, Principal.

á

Kockiord College tor Women, d a y , Sept.

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Granger Place School for Girls

EFFINGHAM, ILLINOIS.

Illinois, Rockford. < r 1 s** 11

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New

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Mrs. Hyde and Daughters School for G i r l s . Special a n d regular courses. Preparation for C o l l e g e a n d E u r o p e a n t r a v e l . Address Mrs. JANE GREY H Y D E .

P H O T O G R A P H Y Taught according to the most approved methods, in the shortest possible time and at smallest expense. For full pars ticulars and finely illustrated catalogue "

^

of bovs, preparing them to enter P r i n c e t o n or a n y A m e r i c a n college. E n d o r s e d by President and D e a n of Princeton U n i v e r s i t y . For catalogue address JOHN l i . FINE, H e a d Master.

Washington.

HIGH GP.A0Í PHOTOGRAPHY TAUGHT. GOOD POSITIONS

Jersey, Princeton.

Princeton Preparatory School.

Suburb of W a s h i n g t o n . F r e n c h the language of the M l l e . L . M . BIH'LIGNY, P r i n c i p a l , C i t v Post Office. W a s h i n g t o n . D . C . THE

Paris.

Address " MANAGER " for Illustrated Catalogue.

Chevy Chase French and English School for G i r l s . house.

Academy

BR1ELLE, N. J .

4

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College*

New Y o r k , I r v i n g t o n - o n - H u d s o n . (45 m i n . from X . V ) 9 T > _ — — ^j-i. C _ i _ Í will recei e, *or 1900-190T, a limited

ture, fine work , English, L i e six e . in D eMusic, n n e t tArt.OFrench, C n O O lGerm numbe of girls over eenHistory, wishing Psychology, Ethics, and I reparation for oreign i r a v 1, Special tutoring in other branches. For cata.ogue address Miss M A Y F . T E N N E T T . New

Prospect H i l l School for Girls

York, Peekskill-on-Hudson.

T h e Peeksfcill Military Academy.

M h Year. Prepares for colleges a n d G o v ' t schools. T h o r o u g h business 33d year. G r a d u a t e , elective, a n d college precourse. N e w g y m n a s i u m . U . S. A r m y officer detailed by W a r paratory courses. Illustrated c i r c u l a r . Department. B e g i n s Sept. 19th. Address T h e Principals. M i s s I d a F . Foster, M i s s C a r o l i n e R . C l a r k , P r i n s . Please m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers. 11


McCLURE'S New

MAGAZINE.

ACTOR OR ACTRESS

Y o r k , Sing Sing.

Dr. Holbrook's School will re-open Wednesday, Sept. 26,6 p.m. New

Mt.

York,

I.earn this noble profession at home, through the Desberger Method, also E l o c u t i o n , O r a t o r y and the M e m o r y to retain volumes. " T h e A r t of A c t i n g , " w i t h fifty portraits of leading actors and actresses, sent F R E E to all addressing . . .

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Pleasant M i l i t a r y A c a d e m y

The Educational Institute of Drama

Aith year. References: Hon. Joseph H . Choate, Hamilton W . Mabie, L . H . D . , Charles II. Hubbell, formerly President Hoard Education, New York City. For beautifully illustrated year book address

Dept. F , St. Louis, Mo. Thorough, scientific course adapted to inoroi individual needs. Long-established. Responsible. Successful. Prac^ tical. Instructors experi* enced and competent. ^ rft, / Editoi B of S popular Our ^Or*^ f^f jm\ publications, students *- * V • contributions öi# are given preference * at liberal rates. Students ^/(^ successful and pleased. De/W . scriptive catalogue free. Address »

'l'ut-. P R I N C I P A L S .

North Carolina, Asheville.

AsheVÍlle College

T h o r o u g h and elegant F o u n d e d equipment. C o l l e g e , seminary and preparatory courses. K e a u t i (ully situated. Superb climate. H a n d s o m e l y illustrated brochure of information free. A R C H I B A L D A . J O N E S , A . M . . President.

M

Pennsylvania, Germantown, Philadelphia.

Walnut Lane School Prepares for a l l Colleges. Address Mrs.

and Wellesley Preparatory. A c a d e m i c and special courses.

T H E O D O R A B. R I C H A K D S , Miss S A R A L O U I S E T R A C Y ,

Pennsylvania,

S p r a g u o C o r r e s p o n d e n c e S c h o o l of J o u r n a l i s m

No. 108 Majestic Building, Detroit. Mich.

Principal. Associate.

Stride forward

Ogontz.

Cheltenham Military Academy Sí aJSSl

muí

near Philadelphia. Pennsylvania's leading preparatory boarding school, under the military system. Rates—Lower School, $çoo; Upper School, $600. Illustrated Catalogue. Rev. J O H N U. S K I L T O N , A . M . , Principal. Rhode Island, Providence.

Don't feel satisfied to advance slowly in your business when we guarantee to prepare you for a high salaried position. H o l d to you- present occupation and "study between times ' through our unequalled course of

Friends School.

Founded by Friends over a century ago ; but open to all denominations. E n d o w e d . E i g h t e e n States rep­ resented last year. Ideal combination of home and school life. AUGUSTINE JONES, L L . B . ,

New

EDUCATION

Principal.

Y o r k , 13 a n d 15 W e s t 86th S t . , N e w Y o r k .

B O A R D I N G A N D D A Y SCHOOL FOR GIRLS.

New

Art.

Kindergarten

through

Y o r k , N e w Y o r k , 315 R i v e r s i d e D r i v e .

Limited classes for resident students. College certificates. Advanced elective courses. Special French, German, Music and Art, with preparation for travel. Summer classes in Europe. Miss E D I T H

i.

Y o r k , N e w Y o r k , 1440

L. C O O P E R .

Broadway.

Stanhope*Wheatcroft Dramatic School '

Summer Monthly Classes and Private Lessons from May ist. Practical Thorough Dramatic Instruction. Prospectus on ap­ plication. A D E L I N E S T A N H O P E - W H E A T C R O F T , Director.

American Academy of Dramatic Arts FRANKLIN

tive teachers. for catalog.

H . S A R G E N T , President.

A practical training school in conjunction with Mr. Chas. Frohman's Empire Theatre and travelling companies. Apply to E. P. S T E P H E N S O N , Carnegie H a l l , New York.

114

FRENCH, SPANISH, GERMAN C O . , 1132

B r o a d w a y ,

New

b y m a i l o r in o u r classes. Modern art s c h o o l , n o cast d r a w i n g , students b e g i n f r o m living model. Also, practical i n s t r u c t i o n i n the n e w s p a p e r , commercial and book methods in use to-day. Classes in wall paper design and photography. A g r o w i n g f o r c i b l e school of A m e r i c a n art w i t h representa­ S c h o o l o p e n all s u m m e r . C a l l , o r write

N. Y . S C H O O L O F W E S T 34TH STREET,

Our 200-page book. The Origin of Stammering, with full particulars regarding treatment, sent Free to any I I D ET ^% address. Enclose 6 cents to pay postage. Address T H E L E W I S S C H O O L , 21 A d e l a i d e Street. D e t r o i t , M i c h .

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Thousands are successful and gaining better posi­ tions and salaries studying at home by our mail sys­ tem. We teach Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Mechanical Drawing, Electric Light­ ing, Short Popular Electrical Course, Elementary Mathematics, etc.. by mail. Study in spare time only. Institute endorsed by Thomas A . Edison and others. Catalog fn

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TAUGHT BY MAIL

"DO N O T ^ ^ STAMMER"

Electrical Engineer Institute

Dept. B , 240-248 A Went »8<l Street, New York*

BUSINESS

I L L U S T R A T I N G , NEW YORK

STAMMERING

w i t h or without a master, each language 2 volumes, $ 1 . 0 0 per v o l ­ ume. Practical Smattering of Spanish, 30c. E x c e l l e n t books for self-instruction. B E R L I T Z

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in Electrical, Mechanical, Steam, M i n i n g and C i v i l Engineering; Metallurgy, A r t , Architecture, Practical Newspaper Work, Eng­ lish Branches, Stenography, Machine Design and Mechanical Drawing. Low price ; easy terms. Mention subjects interested in when writing to THE U N I T E D C O R R E S P O N D E N C E SCHOOLS, 154, 156, 158 5th Ave., N ;w Y o r k , for catalogue 1 2 .

Mrs. Leslie Morgan's T h o r o u g h E n g l i s h , Languages, College Preparatory.

Mt; V

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E D W I N s. J O H N S T O N .

Dr. I ewis A Sayre, Fifth Ave., N e w York, N . Y . , a world celebrated surgeon, said to his clinic after conversing with a young man who had recently been cured of a severe impediment in speech, by Edwin S Johns on, of I'hiladelphia.and whom he had previous'y examined: " T h e age of mirades, young gentlemen, has passed, but this is as near the miracuous as I have ever expect to see again."

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TYPE

OF

BETHLEHEMITE.

A painting from the life.


McClure's VOL.

XV.

Magazine.

MAY, 1900.

THE BY

LIFE

No. 1.

OF T H E MASTER.

T H EREVEREND

JOHN

WATSON,

D.D.,

Author of "The Mind of the Master," "Beside the Bonnie Brier Bush," etc.

ILLUSTRATED FROM PAINTINGS AND

PART

V.—THE

RELATIONS

DRAWINGS B Y CORWIN K N A P P

OF JESUS

THE

WITH

LINSON.

T H ES A M A R I T A N S A N D

PHARISEES.

IT could not be said with any was called a Samaritan by the Jewish perse­ truthfulness that the atti­ cutors and was said to have a devil. tude of a Jew toward a Gen­ This passion of hatred on the part of the tile was cordial, but it was Jew against the Samaritan had two reasons ; friendly and affectionate and the first, which, indeed, can only by cour­ compared with his feelings tesy be called a reason, appears to have been toward a Samaritan, whom he regarded with that the Samaritan was extremely like a Jew, persistent and virulent hatred. As often as and there is no person whom the average the Jews met for worship in the former times man so intensely dislikes as the person who they cursed the Samaritans, so that they is of other blood and yet claims kinship. A also had their creed in which uncharitable- stranger he may regard with suspicion ; this ness was raised to a virtue, and a hereditary impudent neighbor he will denounce as an enmity was inflamed. No Samaritan was impostor. According to their own account allowed to give evidence in a Jewish court of themselves, the Samaritans were the repre­ of justice, and his position as a man was sentatives of the Ten Tribes, the descendants the position of a slave, and worse—that of the few Jews who may have been left in of a criminal. When a Jew desired to ex­ the northern kingdom when their brethren press his dislike of any man with whose were expatriated, and of those who found theology he did not agree, he called him a their way back from exile. Perhaps a Sa­ Samaritan—just as religious people of our maritan might not contend that his blood day are apt to call any teacher a Unita­ was absolutely pure, without any foreign ad­ rian who does not hold their theory of the mixture, but he prided himself on a strain atonement—by which the Jews did not mean of Jewish blood so undoubted and decided to say that the teacher had been born in that he was entitled to call himself a Jew, Samaria, but only that he was a heretic, and to include himself in the Mosaic cove­ which was quite as bad. This nickname was nant. According to the Jewish account, the handiest (and sharpest) road metal with every one of his brethren of the Ten Tribes which to strike him ; it was the most oppor­ had been deported into heathendom and had tune name with which to bring him into con­ disappeared, and the places of the exiles had tempt, and it is a supreme illustration of the been taken by a pack of Gentiles brought principle of religious abuse, as well as a very from the East; and therefore the later in­ pathetic circumstance, that our Master, who habitants of Samaria lay under this double was of pure Jewish blood, and who was filled stigma, that they had not a single drop of with the noblest spirit of Jewish religion, blood which was not base and alien, and that Copyright, 1900, by the S. S. M C C L U R E C O . All rights reserved.


THE

4

LIFE

OF THE

they were usurpers in the place of the seed of Abraham. There was another and more tangible rea­ son for enmity, and that was not racial but geographical. The Samaritans had set them­ selves down in the very center of the Holy Land, and in a rich and picturesque prov­ ince, so that the country was split as with a wedge by these alien intruders, and its con­ tinuity was broken. The Galilean coming up to worship at Jerusalem on the great

THE

MASTER.

paramount Eastern law of hospitality was disregarded, and the stranger was left with­ out food or water. One has a vivid illustra­ tion of the state of feeling when Jesus and His disciples were refused meat by a Samari­ tan villager, and His two hottest disciples, realizing that a good opportunity for paying back old scores had come at last, wished to call down fire from heaven on the churlish people. The sin of a strong man is tyranny, and the sin of a little man is spite ; and the

V I L L A G E OF SAMARIA FROM T H E ROAD

L E A D I N G TO S A M A R I A

FROM

SHECHEM.

feasts must needs go through Samaria, or make a long detour by the Jordan. As a matter of fact, the Galileans took the near­ est road, and, as may be imagined, there was much friction between the Jewish pil­ grims and the heretic inhabitants. The Sa­ maritans had the power to make it pleasant or unpleasant for travelers, and it was per­ haps human that they were apt to make the journey anything but pleasant for Jews. So strained indeed were the relations that the

Samaritans did certain mean and vexatious injuries to the Jews. It was the patriotic custom of the home Jews to light a fire on a hill near Jerusalem at Passover time, and other Jews passed the signal from hill to hill, till the beacon flashed on distant cities; and distant Jews, eating out their hearts in exile, knew that the feast of deliverance was being kept in the capital and that the Dis­ persion had been remembered. The bitter­ est enemy might well have sympathized with

JESUS AND T H E SAMARITAN WOMAN (opposite page).—Jesus . . . being weaned with his journey, sal thus on the well : and it was about the sixth hour. There cornetti a woman of Samaria to draw water.—JOHN iv. (6, 7. He had traveled ten or twelve miles on foot that morning, supposing Him to have rested over night at the inn at Lebonah. It was rough walking. He reached the well, and sat on ils low curb) to rest. He did not intend entering the town, and sent His dis­ ciples instead to buy bread. In their absence, a woman of the Samaritans (not of the city of Samaria, distant eight miles, but of the sect so despised of the Jews) comes to draw water. Her first words reveal the division and her astonishment at being addressed by a Jew, for the difference between the Mo­ hammedan and the Christian to-day is not more marked than was that between the orthodox Jew and the Samaritan. I

had the good fortune to meet the counterpart of this woman at the same spot. When my dragoman attempted some conver­ sation with her, she drew her veil across her face, and answered warily, with the customary caution of a woman of the land i n dealing with a stranger. The woman came from Sychar, a half mile from Jacob's Well. In the picture the village is seen lying at the foot of Mt. Ebal. It was noon, if the sixth hour is calculated as usual : not the time to go for water, as the late afternoon or evening hours are most used. But it was December, when the mid-day sun was kinder, and that it was noon seems to be evidenced by the fact that she was alone with Jesus until the return of His disciples, while lain- in the day there would be many coming and going if the well were much used.—ARTIST'S NOTE


JESUS

AND

THE

SAMARITAN

WOMAN.


THE

6

LIFE

OF THE

this touching act and allowed it to pass, but it was the cause of just indignation among the Jews that the Samaritans would, out of pure wickedness, light false fires on their hills and throw the anxious exiles into hope­ less confusion. And so the Jew hated the Samaritan, and the Samaritan returned the hatred with interest. When Jesus began His mission, the Samar-

PICTORIAL

MASTER.

vite—classical types of Jewish orthodoxy— who pass the wounded traveler by, and a Samaritan who saves his life; and so the word Samaritan, which in the mouth of a Jew was synonymous with Devil, has by this single touch of Jesus become, through the modern world, another name for Philanthro­ pist. So keenly did Jesus feel the scorn and contempt cast on these unfortunates that He

MAP OF T H E COUNTRY NORTHEASTWARD

FROM SHECHEM.

Shechem (Nablus) lies in a ricli and beautiful valley, with Mt. Ebal on the north and Mt. Gerizim on the south. The latter, dignified, stately, embracing the clusters of houses and their vineyards, suggests an old man with children upon his knees. For the town falls away from Ebal and huddles near to Gerizim, its gardens climbing the slopes and its people spending leisure bonis about the fine spring. The vale of Shechem is rich in groves and orchards of mulberries,figs,almonds, olives. While this opulence of green climbs high up Gerizim, the sides of Ebal are hare, rocky, or overgrown with cactus. I found the people of the town none too friendly to a stranger.—ARTIST'S N O T E .

itans were one of the problems He had to face, and His solution is an example to the Christian Church in every age. It was im­ possible for Jesus- to ignore the Samaritans —they were too much in evidence and too insistent ; it was not expedient for Him to include Samaria in His work—He must con­ fine Himself to Israel, but it was possible and almost imperative that as a Prophet He should state His mind on Samaria, and as the Founder of the Church should declare the re­ lation of His Church to heretics, for Samaria is ever with us. His attitude to the indi­ vidual Samaritan was one of characteristic kindness ; and it is to be remembered that friendliness to the heretic of your own com­ munity is, of all forms of charity, the most difficult and hazardous. Yet Jesus goes out of His way to say a good word for this de­ tested people, and to place them higher even than the Jews; for in one of His most per­ suasive parables it is the priest and the Le­

was ever on the outlook to vindicate their character and give them credit; and so when He points out that, of ten lepers whom He healed, one only gave thanks, He is careful to add, " A n d he was a Samaritan." Be­ tween these national and ecclesiastical out­ casts and Jesus there Avas indeed a pathetic kinship, for He was called by their name, and suffered more than their curse. After His fashion of Divine simplicity the deliverance of our Master on the heretics of Samaria was given, as it were by accident, to a woman on whose kindness Jesus cast Himself at the Well of Sychar. He began by asking water of her from Jacob's Well, and He ended by offering her to drink of the water of life ; but before they parted He had laid down two positions, which are ever to be kept in mind because they are full of light and charity. The first is this: that the Sa­ maritans as well as the Jews are also the children of the one Father. So many of His


THE

TOWN

OF

SHECHEM,

ONCE

CAPITAL

OF

THE

PROVINCE

OF

SAMARIA.


8

THE LIFE

OF THE

MASTER.

children worshiped at Jerusalem, and so many the Divine grace of the first and fifty-third at Mount Gerizim; those at Jerusalem had a chapters of Isaiah to be comforted and saved. fuller Bible and richer privileges; but the In this way of it salvation was of the Jews, fact that the Samaritans had not been so fa­ and it is also of the Church Catholic. This vored as the Jews was no reason to suppose is that body of people which holds the Father­ that God was indifferent to them, and no hood of God, and the Deity of His Son Jesus ground on which to ill-treat them. Jesus Christ, and the indwelling of the Holy Ghost, did not despise the Samaritans because He the victory over sin by the Cross and the Life everlasting ; and was born a Jew the only heretics —far less would worth the name He have perse­ are those who cuted them. His somehow or other attitude was pity have lost the and help. If one heart of this has eyes to see, Faith. Is it not let him thank the case that the God. Why, in Catholic Church the name of God has had a strength and R e a s o n , of faith, a fire of should he rail at zeal, and a glad­ his poor brother ness of hope not who is blind? and given to the oth­ why should he ers ? The Jews wish to push him had Mount Zion, over the preci­ the Samaritans pice ? After all, had only Mount beneath all di­ Sinai, and yet the versities of race Samaritans, with­ and creed lies the out any Prophets, deeper unity of THE V A L L E Y OF MUHKNAH. were waiting for the human broth­ The large plain that leads into the Shechem valley is leached after the M e s s i a h . erhood and the crossing an elevation between it and the valley of Lebonah. From the Divine Father­ ridge one gets the first sight of Gerizim, over the intervening treeless, "When He comhood. Very soon rocky hills. The sketch was made on one of those white, cloudless days eth," said this the slight distinc­ that make the landscape almost unbearably dazzling.—ARTIST'S N O T E . outcast of Sama­ ria," He will tell tions between us all things ; ' ' and to her He revealed Himself Samaria and Jerusalem would pass away and be forgotten in the wider faith and more spiritual as He would not to the rulers of the Jews, for worship of which Jesus was the Teacher. He said, without veil or parable, " I am H e . " Jesus' own spirit was to dissolve all barriers Truly, as the woman said, the ' ' well is deep, ' ' by raising the children of His Heavenly Father and buckets of human creeds and theologies to that level where men forget racial and bring up little water, and often much earth, theological feuds in spiritual fellowship with but He is at hand who giveth unto every God. Like other schismatics, the Samaritans simple soul the water of Everlasting Life. were the witnesses to some unrecognized It is among the surprises which give a rel­ truth, and in their case it was the comprehen­ ish to history that one age not only reverses sive breadth of the Family and Church of Cod. the verdict of another, but that the by-word At the same time Jesus distinctly laid it of one generation becomes the glory of the down that the Samaritans had suffered great centuries which follow. The opportunist loss in being separated from the Jews. They statesmen of his day despised Isaiah of Jeru­ had the Law, and therein they were rich; salem for his Utopian dreams, but the ideal but they had not the Prophets, and therein righteousness of the Hebrew Prophet has they were poor. They worshiped the true taken hold of the modern conscience. The God, but they knew not what they wor­ Apostles of Jesus were considered in their shiped. God the Lawgiver was theirs—the own time dangerous men and disturbers of Jehovah of Moses—not God the Redeemer, the peace, but it is now evident that they the God of Isaiah. That poor unfortunate were the saviors of society and the builders with whom Jesus spoke knew enough law to of civilization. The English ruling class be condemned and ashamed. She knew not looked on the early Puritans as impious and


THE REVEREND

JOHN

9

WATSON.

rebellious persons, but now every one will ing to the idea of the day, has created its admit that they laid the foundations of po­ outcasts. Sometimes they are saints who litical and religious liberty; and while these are sent into the wilderness for their good­ noble men who contended for the abolition ness, sometimes they are heretics who are of slavery have won a high place in the roll ostracized for their error, sometimes they of Christian service, they were counted by are politicians who are driven out for their their contemporaries little better than an­ lawlessness. About the year 30 society in archists. Our Master is another instance of Judea was intensely ecclesiastical and pa­ the reversal of judgment on an appeal to triotic, and the experience of offenders re­ posterity. Jesus was, no doubt, persecuted flected its spirit. If any one had openly in His public life for various reasons, be­ broken the law and especially the seventh cause He was indifferent to dogma, because commandment, or if any one had taken sides He despised ritual, because He would not with the foreigner, these two people were come to terms with religious society, be­ put under the ban. It was therefore to be cause He did not keep the Sabbath after the expected that if a woman flouted morality Jewish way. Perhaps, however, the chief openly by making vice a profession, or a offense of Jesus was a habit and friendship man insulted his nation by collecting Roman which His critics could neither understand taxes, the indignation of society should nor endure. He not only received unfortu­ break on their heads. This woman has ever nate and disreputable people and gave them been as one blasted for the sins of human­ welcome, but He seemed to go out of His ity; and though it be not always the taxway to seek those miserables, and what has gatherer, there is ever some trade to whom been His attraction since was Jesus' re­ no mercy is shown, and in the Gospels the proach then—that He was the Friend of pariahs are the publicans and the harlots. sinners. Between the attitude of Jesus and that of Society is not more intolerant and unchar­ the Pharisees toward those social lepers there itable than the individual, but it has always is a contrast so sharp that Jesus' conduct retained the right of exclusion, and, accord­ must have excited criticism, and may very

THE Samaria depression

occupied

the summit

among surrounding

VILLAGE

OP SAMARIA.

of the hill of Shemer, which Omri bought for a site for his capital.

heights, is like an inverted

cup in a large basin.

here, and his tomb is shown by the Mohammedans.

The town is now a collection

its top.

indolent.

The natives

into vineyards, yard.—MlCAH,

sit in the sun, yawning,

and Herod's columns protrude i . 6.—ARTIST'S NOTE.

dirty, from

the

There is a tradition of mud hovels, sliding

The very atmosphere

fields.

This hill, placed

; the ancient

of a

was beheaded

down the hill, instead

is that of degeneration

" I will make Samaria

in the midst

that John the Baptist

of

crowning

streets are

as an heap of the field, and as plantings

of a

made vine-


THE LIFE

10

A

OF THE

SAMARITAN.

well have been misunderstood. He was on such friendly terms with Levi (or Matthew), the officer in charge of the Capernaum cus­ tom-house, that He called upon him to leave his business and become one of His followers. And when Matthew, in the joy of his heart at this admittance into new associations, gave a feast to his poorer colleagues, Jesus attended and shared the gladness. If He happened to pass through Jericho and needed hospitality, He passed by the houses of re­ spectables, where he could have been a guest, and by deliberate choice passed the night be­ neath the roof of Zaccheus, a chief publican. A woman who was a sinner had been so touched by His Evangel that she had crept into a Pharisee's house where He was dining and sought mercy at His feet, and He who was expected to order her forth sent her into peace. In a fit of morality or hypoc­ risy a gang of Pharisees brought to Jesus a miserable taken in her shame, and they cov­ ered the Master also with shame, but it was her merciless accusers who slunk out of His presence, and it was to the woman Jesus spake kindly. When He made up His Col­ lege of Apostles, He chose one from the publican class, and among His dearest friends was St. Mary Magdalene.

MASTER.

One need not wonder that good people were perplexed and found it hard to do jus­ tice to Jesus ; if they seem to us censorious, they could make a good case for themselves. A man, and much more a prophet, could be known, it would be argued, by his company, and it was Jesus' habit to avoid the Phari­ sees and to consort with the sinners. He was so determined, indeed, in His way, and unabashed, that He would jest on the sub­ ject, saying to His indignant censors : " H o w could you expect Me to associate with you ? I am a physician, and a physician goes to the sick, not to the whole. You are per­ fectly well, as you are always telling the world: I can do you no good. Am I a prophet ? Then, of course, I need not speak with you ; you are wise and good ; you are everything which could be desired, and you know everything : I must work with those ab­ jects which are out of the way, to do some­ thing for them, to teach them something." With such lambent humor Jesus used to play round those dull, pompous Pharisees, and they still more disliked Him. He might be a Teacher from God, but it was strange in that case that He did not associate with God's people ; He might be a good man ; but why was He so much with sinners ? Sometimes His critics were so irritated that they lost all control of their tongues, and allowed themselves the luxury of sheer slander. " H e is a glutton and a wine-bib­ ber," they said in a fit of spleen, not be­ cause Jesus went to feasts, but because He dined with Levi as well as with Simon, and was more at home with the publican than with the Pharisee. Jesus felt these charges, for it is from His lips we hear them, but He did not condescend to defend Himself. There are slanders which refute themselves, and one gathers that His enemies were the an­ grier with Jesus because they knew, as every­ body knew, that He was stainless. He could stoop so low because His soul was so high ; He could risk so much because He was so strong. It is a fallacy to think that the man who has most compassion on a sinner is nearest to his sin, and that he who arraigns the sinner most mercilessly has the cleanest heart. None ever gave such gracious wel­ come to sinners as Jesus, and He changed them into saints; none made men into irrec­ oncilable sinners like a Pharisee, and his heart was a sepulcher full of dead men's bones and all uncleanness. When Jesus thought fit to defend, not His character but His mission, the Master at once lifted the debate to the highest level


THE

REVEREND

of reason and pathos, and offered to the Pharisees the most convincing remonstrance ever addressed to an opponent. It was not His nature to think any one who opposed Him must be dishonest or mad ; He supposed that he was simply mistaken, and it was Jesus' business to correct his mistake. " You have censured and slandered Me, "He said in ef­ fect to the Pharisees: " y o u think that My life is a huge mistake and little short of a sin. This is not because you are bad or be­ cause you desire to do Me injustice: it is simply because you and I have different standpoints. If you saw these sinners with My eyes, you would act toward them as I do, for God has given you a reason and a heart." One day, when His critics had been especially severe, Jesus seized the occasion and made His great apologia in the fifteenth chapter of St. Luke's Gospel. " T h i s man," they murmured in genuine horror, " receiveth sin­ ners and eateth with them." " Yes," Jesus said, " and if you understood, so would you. What man among you ? " The controversy went far deeper than any question of expediency—whether a prophet should have social relations with sinners— it turned on two different views of God and man, and on the scheme of Divine govern­ ment. According to the fancy of the Phari­ sees in all ages the Divine purpose is to select from the bloom on the human tree a few buds and bring them to perfection, while the rest is left to perish. It is to produce from the raw material a web of beautiful pattern and color, which means that there must be much human waste. As regards the world, one nation, the Jews, were the chosen flower, and the Gentiles were the blossom trodden under foot. As regards the Jewish nation itself, the Pharisees were God's finished work and the publicans were the waste. Within the synagogues, as in a safe storehouse, were gathered the favorites of God ; outside lay the huge unsightly waste-heaps. Noth­ ing can be done with the refuse; no one wishes to have anything to do with it. Bet­ ter for the Church and for society to ignore the sinners, and if it were possible, to put them out of sight. It were a good thing for religion if they could be collected together and sunk in the depths of the sea. According to Jesus the sinners were cer­ tainly waste and very dangerous stuff—for He never belittled or condoned sin—but it was culpable waste, the result of imperfect religious processes. Had the elder brother done his duty, the younger would not have remained so long in the far country or grown

JOHN

WATSON.

TYPE

OF WOMAN

11

OF SHECHEM.

so desperate. Mary Magdalene was an of­ fense to the community, but she had not been so helpless or degraded if Simon had not despaired of her and cast her forth. What Jesus implicitly denied at every turn —by His teaching and His death—was that there should or will be any necessary or final waste in humanity. Just as the progress of science is marked by the recovery or utiliza­ tion of what was thought to be worthless stuff, so that out of what is most unsightly is now brought fair colors, so Jesus proposed to make lovely saints out of these forsaken sinners. As a great spiritual inventor, Jesus moved among the residuum of His day, with quick eye and hopeful heart, touching and handling it with deftness and understanding. Nothing of God's human work must be counted worthless ; in the end, nothing of it will be flung away. Lost is a word with two meanings : with the Pharisees it was a de­ scription—cast away; with Jesus it was a prophecy—going to be found. As usual, the Master made His appeal to reason, and asked men's suffrages because His view was the most fitting. Round Him gathered a crowd—hearing the Pharisees' criticisms, waiting for His defense—and He was willing to abide by their decision. First, He addressed a farmer standing in the sec­ ond row—strong, sensible, prejudiced. Last


12

THE

LIFE

OF THE

MASTER.

ence, round whom a very pleasant interest had gathered. He was a man of substance, a country squire and magistrate, respected and beloved, and some years ago he had suf­ fered the keenest of human afflictions, which is not the loss of a son, but his disgrace. His younger son, a headstrong lad, yet lov­ able, had given him trouble at home—too much with the gay company at Tiberias— and then one day he departed to a distant Gentile city, where he played the fool so shamelessly that the tidings came to his Galilean home, and his father aged visibly. Fellow Pharisees, like Simon, with whom he used to feast before he lost heart for feast­ ing, said he was well rid of the wastrel, and that it would be a good thing if he never re­ turned. His father may have also passed careless judgment after that fashion on other prodigals, but circumstances had changed, and he was silent at Simon's advice. He Types of native mills. could not be quite indif­ ferent to the fate of one week his flock of sheep came of his two sons ; and when home one short in the even­ the young man came back ing—only one lost, and an honest, humble penitent, ninety and nine in the fold and his father, sitting —yet this matter-of-fact lonely and sad on the house­ and u n e m o t i o n a l man top, saw him coming down scoured the country-side, the familiar road, he forgot nor rested till his tale of the counsel of Simon and sheep was complete. No all the other Pharisees, and one laughed at him ; no one not only gave him public censured him. Why should joyful welcome, but cele­ they ? It was his property ; brated his return with the and was the Creator of all feast of a king. As Jesus more careless or more touched on this happy foolish than a Galilean romance of love, the faces farmer ? Did He not care about His creatures also, A N A N C I E N T W A T E R - J A R P R E S E R V E D of hard, suspicious Phari­ sees softened ; for they had AT CANA. who were not sheep but kinder hearts, if it came to In the Greek Church at Cana, two immense human beings ? Behind the stone jars, the lower halves only remaining, their own flesh and blood, farmer was a young house­ are shown as the authentic survivors of the six than they allowed to God, wife, and yesterday there mentioned in the account of the miracle of and would not on any ac­ turning water into wine. They are like noth­ had been a little tragedy ing seen to-day, and are certainly very old. count have done the things of domestic life i n her They measure twenty-nine inches in diameter, they imputed to Him with­ are about thirty inches in height,and are four home. As she was hand­ and a half inches thick. The water teas drawn out scruple. It was as ling her necklace of silver from a hole near the base. when the sun shines on coins, one slipped from her fingers and rolled out of sight. A poor gray rock after a shower and softens the little coin, and not worth a thought. Yet face. Had not God also a father's heart as it had its associations, for it had been much as they ? and would not they give Him her mother's, and had been a part of her also the liberty of joy when such a one as dowry. So she rested not till it was found, Mary of Magdala or Matthew the Publican and her neighbors, instead of finding fault came home ? And the Pharisees did not with her, shared her joy. And were not wish to answer Jesus, because they were His human pieces of silver as precious to with Him for once mind and heart. God ? While He was speaking, His eye al­ As the Master revealed the idea of God, ready rested with sympathy on a prominent in whom is gathered and perfected beyond figure standing out from among His audi­ imagination everything which is reasonable


THE

REVEREND

JOHN

WATSON.

13

and beautiful i n man, H e gave at the same snare, an ulcer eating into the very vitals of time to the Pharisees the idea of a sinner, society. She was a sad tragedy, with her and it was something which never could have degraded beauty and gay attire—a woman entered into these prosaic, frigid minds. F o r ruined, a woman ruining. Was she not also the Master was persuaded that a sinner was a soul made in the Divine image and intended miserable, and the very idea was strange and for high ends—a coin which had passed almost diverting to through many un­ a Pharisee. It holy hands, and seemed to him that now lay in the the sinners were m i r e ? She was entirely happy still silver, and had on her the traces after their kind, of h e r o r i g i n . because they were What a wealth of often r i c h , and had passionate love and a certain power, u n r e s e r v e d de­ and gave feasts votion was running and lived riotously. to waste i n this Perhaps there were life! N o w this days when the piece of good saints regarded the money shall be laid sinners w i t h envy out to usury, when because of " t h e the eyes wherewith roses and raptures she tempted men's of v i c e . " Jesus, hearts to destruc­ who knew all men, t ion shall shed and had ever H i s tears on the Mas­ hand on their ter's feet, and the pulse, saw beneath hair wherewith the poor show of she ensnared men's gaiety and the lives s h a l l w i p e mask of bravado. them dry. He knew the selfAnd the Master reproach and sated dared to think that disgust, the bitter every sinner who remorse and wist­ had gone a s t r a y ful regrets of the was missed of God. sinner. A c c o r d i n g It might seem that to the Master the amid the multitude sinners were of H i s creatures hungry and thirsty, one less counted laboring and heavyfor nothing ; but laden, vagrants of i f any P h a r i s e e the highways and OLD WINE-SKINS. thought so, he did hedges, a set of "Neither do men put new wine into old bottles."—-MATT. IX. 17. By not know the despairing miser­ bottles are meant skins, which are of all sizes. The animal is minuteness and the ables. They were skinned whole, save the feet and head, the holes made by these being b r e a d t h o f the sewed up. The skin is cured with tannin, and then soaked in water, as a sheep which, or left fdled for saturation. It is also rubbed with olive oil, and Divine Love. It either through w i l ­ when water-tight is ready for use. The old wine-skins become had no forgetfulspotted with patches, and finally become useless for anything as fulness or foolish­ valuable as "new wine." ness: i t made no ness, has wandered omissions. As a from the flock, and bookman will discover in the dark the absence has lost its way, and is far from the fold, of a tiny volume, as a gardener will mark the rushing hither and thither, torn and bleed­ empty place where a plant has been once, ing, palpitating and terrified. as a workman looks i n vain for the tool The Master also believed firmly that the among many his hand desires, so does the sinner was precious; and neither had this Divine Love have in constant remembrance occurred to a Pharisee. The value of such him who is lost, and will not rest t i l l he be a woman as washed Jesus' feet seemed less restored. than n o t h i n g : she was a disgrace and a


THE

14

TURNING

The Pharisees made their great mistake because they did not know God, and Jesus threw Himself in the way of sinners because He knew the Father. He was indeed the true Elder Brother, who saw the sorrow on the Father's face as He mourned for His lost younger son and could not remain in the

OF THE

WAYS.

Home ; who went Himself into the far country, nor ceased from His search t i l l by His Grace and Passion He had found H i s brother and brought him Home rejoicing. This was the meaning of His strange friendships : this was the secret of His unconquerable hope.

(To be continued.) On the road from Jericho to Jerusalem.

THE

TURNING

OF T H E W A Y S .

B Y C L I N T O N Ross.

A

H

STORY

OF TO-DAY

E R E another subject entered into the talk, suggested by the arch that had been part of yesterday's pageant. " W a r and conquest," said Captain Trevor. "It's the same old world " " A s Caesar's," the older man put in with an amused smile—at himself, at circum­ stances, at the world. His was the face of the diplomatist; Carl's that of the soldier.

IN NEW YORK.

Carl too smiled, he did not know exactly why. " I believe in Caesar," he said, " t o the extent of ' T h e White Man's B u r d e n . ' " " O h , yes, i t ' s true, and Caesar now is spelt trade. But in regard to voting those shares—it's ' yes,' Captain T r e v o r . " " W h y of course ' y e s ' ? Y o u r interest is mine, my advisers say. I am going to defer my own investigation of my affairs some weeks


A STORY

OF TO-DAY

IN NEW

YORK.

15

— a fortnight, anyway. It's very good of you I suppose. I don't envy m y s e l f , " Carl to come here to explain, however. I know said. how valuable your time is, s i r . " But what of questions ? A t least he had " A h , Captain Trevor, I wanted to see a fortnight—yes, a fortnight—to think ; to what kind of man your uncle's heir might get out into the country—over the hills and be, and I am pleased to know you. Y o u are far away—before he should turn to affairs. absolutely free—to have your interests not He would have none of the artificialities of give you a moment's trouble, i f you so elect; the city to disturb him. He would t r y to or " see clearly. Here in America, and every­ "I know, sir, I know ; but I am responsi­ where, all was changing. W e were mightier ble to the family now. I am going at i t — and more involved. He would decide whether the life of a simple gentleman and officer after a f o r t n i g h t . " " T h a t is your uncle's nephew, Captain should cease for something that had i n it servitude. Trevor. W e l l , I must be on my w a y . " The great banker went out, debonair and The death of his uncle, followed closely by smiling, and presently Carl saw his brougham that of his cousin Philip, had left Trevor the draw into the avenue. head of one of the very powerful families; " H e represents all the combinations, and now he held voting strength in railroads t h e n , " C a r l said to himself, in a brown and other corporations, that made him sought study for the moment. " A n d he wants by those at the seat of power. Turning from m e — f o r his pup­ pet." Yes, in this autumn, 1899, this man represented a power that, founded on t r a d e a n d the combination of trad­ i n g interests into a few hands, aspired to secure and to hold in the h o l l o w of one m i g h t y h a n d the whole world, making and unmak­ i n g public opinion, shaping the policy of governments, subdu­ ing a l l to its own ends. A n d as for C a r l , his interest lay with that power. A t twenty-seven he was at the turning of the ways, like his nation. To be rich was to be perplexed ; to be free—an end some few of the moderately well-todo and the unincum­ bered r i c h may reach —was to be liable to an abuse of free­ dom ; to be powerful was to be a subject. In the Square he saw the passing throng. "YOU MUST G I V E ME A L I F T . " " T h e y envy me,


16

THE

TURNING

this brown study, he went down into the Square and up the crowded avenue. It was the season's height, and a great many people knew him. "That is Carl Trevor," he could almost hear them say. " U s e d to be in the army, and then resigned and went everywhere. Now he is the head of the f a m i l y . " People nodded to him, and some stopped and shook hands with this broad-shouldered young man in deep black. Twice carriages drew to the curb, and women spoke to him, and he smiled cynically; for he knew how great a catch he was. The men in the club windows buzzed about him. And so, nodding right and left, he passed on—a man with the might of a king—and few kings were so mighty. But what busi­ ness ability had he ? He had played at sol­ diering, and at knocking about, and at society in five capitals. F o r he had been free. A n d now he was no longer free. He paused for a moment, looking at the town house of the Trevors—his house. Its shuttered front chilled him in some way. His apartment at the hotel was more comfortable. A n d then he heard a voice, and, turning, he saw some­ body in a landau. She was fair to look at after all the women he had known, and she brought back his boyhood and his earlier youth. "Why, H e l e n ! " he said. " I could not resist speaking to you, C a r l , " she said. " I am so glad to see you a g a i n . " " If you are, you must give me a l i f t . " " I will take you about the P a r k , " she said ; and presently they were whirling on, and she never had looked fairer to him than now. " Yes, now it's all over—the funeral and all that—I am wondering at myself," he said. " The world is wondering about you, Carl." " But you, little cousin ? What have you been doing all these years ? " She was a far-removed cousin, but still near enough for the head of the family to feel it permissible to " c o u s i n " her. He remembered that he never had liked Danvers, the man she was engaged to. She was about the nicest girl he ever had known, and Dan­ vers was far from being a "good sort" in a man's estimation. "But women are queer —even the best of t h e m , " is the man's thought over such an occurrence. " O h , " Helen answered, " s o m e shopping, some riding and golfing and yachting and din­ ing—oh, you know. Did you know New Y o r k

OF THE

WAYS.

yesterday ? I never saw so many people—did you ? But I hate the town i n a c r o w d . " " S o do I , " Trevor assented. " B u t you know we should remember that the people's gladness over the country's might and splen­ dor is more than our c o m f o r t , " he added, with a laugh. "Comfort," said Helen. " W h y , it would be so uncomfortable to be anything but an American. But, Carl, I have often wondered why, after serving i n Cuba, you did not g o to the Philippines." " I think I should, i f Uncle Jack had not asked me not t o . " " P o o r Uncle J a c k , " Helen said soberly. " H e was splendid, wasn't h e ? " " Y e s , " Trevor answered; " a n d I don't see how he held up under the weight of a l l his responsibilities." " Your responsibilities n o w . " " N o , not yet. I am going to take a f o r t ­ night—and then " " P o o r C a r l , " the girl cried, " how peo­ ple envy you ! " " They don't know. But to turn to y o u r ­ self. Y o u haven't told me about the w e d ­ ding." " What wedding ? " " Yours, of course." " O h , mine—mine, w h y — " She looked at him, and seeing something in his f a c e , laughed. " That's put off." " Put off ? Y o u believe in long engage­ ments ? ' ' " That depends," said the g i r l . " N o w , you mustn't question me too closely. Á woman never will tell certain t h i n g s . " " Oh, I k n o w , " Carl retorted. " I should think you did know. A n d y o u must tell me about your affairs—after d i n ­ ner ; for you must break every engagement you have, and dine with us. Perkins " — t o the coachman— ' ' home ! ' ' ' ' And for this evening it will be my h o m e , " Trevor said, " despite every engagement y o n have or I have ; " at which Miss Helen Thurs­ ton caught herself blushing, and began t o talk rather rapidly about the parade of yes­ terday and to retail gossip and many matters, which brought them quite to Mrs. Thurston's house. The avenue at this point was thronged, a n d the girl suddenly grew very white. " Stop, Perkins! " she cried. Perkins stopped, and she was out on t h e curb before the man on the box could reach, her. Then Carl, who had been too much, absorbed in his companion to notice anyother object, saw that a woman had been


A STORY

OF TO-DAY

run down, and that she was being carried to the walk. " B r i n g her i n here—carefully," Helen, who had pushed her way through, was cry­ ing.

" T H E AMBULANCE SURGEON MENT

.

.

.

.

.

.

IN NEW

YORK.

sion at Meadowbrook when a man had a nasty fall. When the ambulance surgeon arrived, he found a faded old woman installed in a bed in a front apartment at M r s . Thurston's, and

FOUND A FADED OLD WOMAN INSTALLED IN A BED IN A FRONT APART­

AND MISS THURSTON AND A MAID BUSIED ABOUT HER."

Then Trevor was by her side. " Y e s , take her in to Miss T h u r s t o n ' s , " he ordered. " T h a n k you, C a r l . Help t h e m , " Helen said. " Perkins, get D r . Benton, and then D r . Ranford, and, i f he is not in, D r . Bronson, and—have them get a n u r s e . " She gave her orders with a military preciseness that made Trevor remember her on an occa-

Miss Thurston and a maid busied about her. The old woman was staring at her surround­ ings. " It's a bad f r a c t u r e , " the surgeon said. " We will take her, Miss Thurston." " No, she is to remain h e r e , " Helen said decidedly. " I know i t ' s dangerous t o r e move h e r . "


18

THE

TURNING

" Y e s , I will say I think it i s , " the young surgeon confessed, thinking this young lady the most beautiful in the world. The dinner was late at M r s . Thurston's that night. When, at eight o'clock, Carl returned from his hotel, it was still waiting, and, in fact, he and M r s . Thurston went in by themselves. ' ' Did you ever know such an impulsive g i r l ? " that lady remarked. " S h e

"

I AM TIRED OUT, B U T — A T YOUR

AGE I WAS LIKE BE TIRED OUT. "

is always taking trouble on herself. She has D r . Benton, the best surgeon in New York, there, and a nurse, and all over a woman we don't know a word about." " S h e would make an admirable officer," he answered. " I never knew a better head in an emergency." " I a m not sure that it's a good head that will put a woman picked up from the streets into one's best chamber," Mrs. Thurston an­ swered. Helen, entering, overheard. " I don't

OF THE

WAYS.

care, " s h e cried. " I feel wicked—wicked ! I never knew such poverty. She has been suffering for the necessaries of life, and she is not an impostor. There was five cents in her pocket-book; and that, she says, is all she has—an old woman, born a lady, left all alone. She expected to be turned out; she told me t h i s . " " A n d you believed her, of course," Mrs. T h u r s t o n said. "But h o w is she ? " "Dr. Benton says she may live a week — not much longer. If she had had prop e r f o o d she m i g h t have a better chance. Oh, C a r l , " she went on, " y o u must look to your affairs—your re­ sponsibilities— yourself—to­ n i g h t — n o t to­ morrow. Think of the thousands d e p e n d e n t on you — the thou­ sands and thou­ sands." After dinner Carl was alone with her, and he said, "I will begin t o - n i g h t , Helen — to-night — not after a Henry Hutt fortnight." The girl crossed to him. " I could love you for YOU. AT MINE, YOU TOO WILL that." And he said, "I love you, Helen, for all of D a n v e r s . " She looked at him, and then turned as i f to r u n ; but he caught her. " F o r all of Danvers," he repeated. " T h e r e is no Danvers—now," she said softly. " O h , let me g o . " " I never will, dear," the man answered. That night he wrote Barton that he must withdraw his promise about voting his shares in the Industrial until he should see him. When he had finished, he walked to a win­ dow and looked out on the still city. How


GENERAL

LAWTON'S

WORK IN THE

much was there—life; and life was work, or else i t was death. F o r the nation new responsibilities ; for every man new respon­ sibilities; for himself an endless vista of business details, of demands for charity, for loans, and the importunities of poor relatives on the head of the family. The next morning he entered Barton's office. The great man rose to meet him. " A h , I had your note. Y o u want to know more about it. W e l l , you shall—everything. But you are making yourself more trouble than your uncle ever gave himself." " O h , I know—I know—it's not necessary

GENERAL

LAWTON'S BY

19

for my interest—but I want to put my brain to bear on the things themselves, because they mean so many other interests—so much." The older man looked at him out of worldweary eyes. " I wish you were a son of mine. I don't know whether you are right or wrong. I am tired out, but—at your ago I was like you. A t mine, you too will be tired out. Y e t I am glad you have chosen as you h a v e . " For it has been written that for king or rich man who is a true man there shall be no rest.

WORK D E A N C.

PHILIPPINES.

IN

THE

PHILIPPINES.

WORCESTER,

M e m ber o f the U n i t e d States P h i l i p p i n e s C o m m i s s i o n 1898-1899 ; a u t h o r of " T h e P h i l i p p i n e I s l a n d s and T h e i r P e o p l e "

G E N E R A LH E N R Y W . L A W T O N ' S military career be­ gan when he was but eighteen years of age. Its earlier chapters have re­ cently become so familiar to the public that I shall con­ tent myself with the briefest outline of them. Within three days after President Lincoln's first call for men he had enlisted as a private in the Ninth Indi­ ana Volunteers. He served with this regiment through the Civil W a r , and at its close was mustered out a lieutenant-colonel, after being brevetted colonel " for gallant and meritori­ ous services " and awarded a medal of honor for " distinguished s e r v i c e . " He entered the regular army as a second lieutenant in 1866, serving in the infantry until 1869, and then in the cavalry until 1888. From that time until the outbreak of the war with Spain he was an inspector-general. His remark­ able work i n Indian campaigns on the fron­ tier culminated in that wonderful pursuit of Geronimo, which he pushed to a successful conclusion i n the face of seemingly insuper­ able obstacles. During this period of his service he was repeatedly commended for " v i g i l a n c e and zeal; rapidity and persist­ ence of p u r s u i t , " and " for great skill, per­ severance, and g a l l a n t r y . " Shortly after the declaration of war with Spain, he was made a brigadier-general of volunteers, and on the 8th of July, 1898,

was raised to the rank of major-general of volunteers. It will not soon be forgotten who asked that the order to fall back at E l Caney be put in writing, and improved the time thus gained to hurl his battalions against the heights and plant his country's flag upon their bloody crest. Unfortunately the civil work which Gen­ eral Lawton promptly inaugurated as Gov­ ernor of the Province of Santiago is less well known than are his services in the field, and his reputation in the Philippines before his arrival there was that of " a fighter" pure and simple. Certainly no one can deny that he was a fighter; a splendidly prepared, de­ termined, persistent, dauntless, and invari­ ably successful fighter—quick to detect his enemy's weakest point, and to reach it with a blow so well directed and so crushing as to insure prompt and decisive victory. But those who think that he was only a fighter arc in grievous error. He was an organizer and administrator of the first order. My acquaintance with him began at Manila, on the morning of March 13, 1899, when I clambered up the side of the transport " G r a n t , " which had brought him and his family into the Bay three days before. Five minutes later I was doing my best to answer keen and exhaustive questions about the isl­ ands, their people, the causes of the existing insurrection, and the means best calculated to terminate it. I saw at once that Cenerai Lawton was an extremely well-informed man, who had availed himself to the full of exist-


HENRY W. LAWTON IN 1860.

AGE 17.

F r o m a daguerreotype n o w i n the possession o f M r s . L a w t o n .

FIRST LIEUTENANT IN THE THIRTIETH INDIANA V O L U N ­ TEERS.

FIRST LIEUTENANT

A G E 20.

IN THE TWENTY-FOURTH U. S. IN­

FANTRY.

AGE 27.

F r o m a p h o t o g r a p h t a k e n at P i e d r a s Negras, M e x i c o , J a n u ­ ary 27, 1870, n o w i n the possession of M a j o r George E . Albee.

HENRY

CAPTAIN IN THE FOURTH U . S. C A V A L R Y .

W. LAWTON.

A G E 37.


GENERAL

LAWTON'S

LIEUT.-COLONEL AND INSPECTOR-GENERAL.

WORK IN THE

AGE 45

From a photograph loaned by Major G . E . Albee.

ing sources of information concerning his new field of operations, and who would take up his difficult task, not only with a clear comprehension of the fact that something more than bullets and bayonets was neces­ sary i n order to bring honorable and lasting peace, but with a determination to avail him­ self of every legitimate means to promote that end. Instead of the impetuous military com­ mander, firm i n his conviction of the suffi­ ciency of brute force and eager to crush all opposition by the exercise of it, which, I confess, popular rumor had prepared me to expect, I found a modest, quiet, moderate gentleman, who, in spite of his well-deserved reputation for striking quick and hard when he found it necessary to strike, nevertheless at once made it evident that he preferred to employ gentler methods where they would suffice. This attitude he steadfastly main­ tained to the day of his death. How much the country owes to him for his splendid ser­ vices in the field during his Philippine cam­ paigns can never be generally known until the detailed history of those campaigns has been written and read. In my judgment, it owes him a still heavier debt of gratitude for the admirable tact, the even-handed and prompt justice, and the open-hearted frank­

PHILIPPINES.

MAJOR-GENERAL OF UNITED STATES AGE

21

VOLUNTEERS.

55.

ness and cordiality which characterized him in all his dealings with the natives. N o other officer learned to know them so well, and the confidence which he inspired in the friendly and peaceable Filipinos was, and will remain, no less an honor to him and a potent factor in the restoration of peace than was the fear which he soon aroused i n all who attempted to oppose him in battle. In the course of our first interview Gen­ eral Lawton told me frankly that, in spite of the opportunity which active service brought him, he detested war. He added that he doubted the justice of the struggle in which we were then engaged ; in fact, I remember distinctly that he characterized it as " u n ­ h o l y . " I did not at that time attempt to discuss the point with him, feeling sure that the first-hand acquaintance with facts which he was certain to gain would suffice to set him r i g h t . This belief was fully justified. He sought, and obtained, the truth from every available source. How completely he changed his mind as the result is a matter of common knowledge. I can only echo his wish, made solemn by the fact that he had given up his life ere the letter i n which it was expressed had reached its destination, that those of his countrymen whose mis­ guided efforts have so long fed the flame of


GENERAL

22

LAWTON'S

WORK IN THE

revolt in the Philippines might learn to un­ derstand the situation as well as he under­ stood it.* General Lawton's civilian friends saw lit­ tle of him for many weeks after he landed. On March 18th, he assumed command of the first division of the Eighth Army Corps. He was at first fully occupied in familiarizing himself with his new command and with local conditions in general, and very soon entered upon active operations in the field. On April 10th, he attacked and captured Santa Cruz, an important insurgent strong­ hold at the eastern end of the Laguna de Bay. This movement was admirably planned, and was carried out under his personal direc­ tion. Lawton was not a man who believed in fighting battles in an unknown country at the far end of a telegraph wire. The attack was completely successful. During its prog­ ress he displayed that conspicuous personal gallantry for which he is famous, and at its close he risked his own life in emphasiz­ ing the fact that he would not allow the firing of a needless shot, a principle which guided him i n every engagement he went into. A heavy loss was inflicted on the i n ­ surgents at Santa Cruz, and all of their steam transportation on the lake was captured. Hardly had the city been taken when it was put under guard. There was no burning nor looting. Friendly natives who had remained in their homes were granted the fullest pro­ tection, and the conduct of our troops was such that those who had fled i n fear soon be­ gan to return. They were quick to note and appreciate the difference between the treat­ ment accorded them by the Americans and that which they had received at the hands of their own armed forces.

PHILIPPINES.

a sore trial to General L a w t o n . Without presuming to express an opinion as to the military necessity of this step, I cannot for­ bear to add that to my certain personal knowledge the effect of it was most unfor­ tunate throughout the entire lake region. No sooner had General Lawton returned to Manila than he was ordered to begin the formation of a force of approximately 4,000 men, with which he was to operate on the right flank of the insurgent troops opposing General M a c A r t h u r at the north. It should be borne in mind that i n no one of his im­ portant movements did he have anything like an organized brigade placed at his disposal. He had to pick up a company here, a bat­ talion or possibly a regiment there, in order to make up a command, which was sure to be broken up and scattered again as soon as the work assigned to it had been completed, a fresh force, differently composed, being brought together for each new undertaking.

W i t h characteristic energy and prompt­ ness, Lawton concentrated and organized his command, and on A p r i l 22d began his north­ ward march. The territory through which he moved was known only from maps which proved utterly unreliable, showing roads where no roads existed. He was soon com­ pelled to haul his guns, ammunition, and sup­ plies over steep hills, and through dense and pathless thickets, muddy swamps, and unbridged streams, without so much as a trail to guide him. N o obstacle could stop him. He inspired his men with his own indomi­ table energy. When the intense heat killed the draft animals, officers and soldiers bent to the yoke i n their places, and the expedi­ tion moved on. In one instance a terrible day's work resulted in a gain of but three The abandonment of this important place, miles. which was ordered a few days later from The enemy was promptly encountered, and headquarters, and the resultant leaving of persistently opposed his advance. Engage­ natives who had shown their friendliness to­ ments varying from mere skirmishes to se­ ward us to the mercy of our enemies, was vere fights were of constant occurrence. Lawton continually outflanked the opposing * T h e letter f r o m G e n e r a l L a w t o n to the H o n . J o h n B a r r e t t , forces, thus inflicting heavy losses on them former U n i t e d States M i n i s t e r to S i a m , referred to above, c o n ­ with a minimum of casualties among his own t a i n s the f o l l o w i n g : " I w o u l d to G o d that the w h o l e t r u t h o f t h i s w h o l e P h i l i p ­ men. The insurgents were driven in quick pine situation c o u l d be k n o w n by everyone i n A m e r i c a as I k n o w i t . I f the real history, i n s p i r a t i o n , and c o n d i t i o n s o f t h i s succession from one strong position to an­ insurrection, a n d the influences local a n d e x t e r n a l , as w e l l as the actual possibilities of these islands a n d peoples a n d their other, and were eventually thrown into con­ relations to t h i s great E a s t , c o u l d be understood at home, we fusion by the rapidity and persistency of his w o u l d hear of no m o r e talk of unjust ' s h o o t i n g o f goverm e n t i n t o the F i l i p i n o s or h a u l i n g d o w n the flag i n the pursuit. W i t h so small a force, no line of P h i l i p p i n e s . If the so-railed anti-Imperialists c o u l d honestly He ascertain the t r u t h o n the g r o u n d , a n d not i n d i s t a n t A m e r ­ communications could be maintained. ica, they, w h o m I believe to be honest men m i s i n f o r m e d buried his dead at the nearest town or v il­ w o u l d be c o n v i n c e d of the error o f their statements a n d c o n ­ clusions, and of the unfortunate effects o f t h e i r p u b l i c a t i o n s lage, and carried his wounded forward. 1

here. I f I am shot by a F i l i p i n o bullet, i t may as w e l l c o m e f r o m one of my o w n men, because I k n o w f r o m observation c o n t i n u e d by captured prisoners, that the c o n t i n u a n c e o f fighting is chiefly to reports that are sent out f r o m A m e r ­ ica."—Ed. McClure's MAGAZINE.

A t first the insurgents annoyed his out­ posts. Always ready for each new contin­ gency, he organized scouts, t a k i n g five picked


GENERAL

LAWTON'S

WORK IN THE

men, including a non-commissioned officer, from each company, and giving the command of the body thus formed to a civilian named Y o u n g , whom he personally selected for this important and dangerous honor. F r o m that time on the enemy ceased to molest our out­ posts. They had work nearer home. Young eventually died of wounds received in battle, but the system thus inaugurated was con­ tinued w i t h excellent results. Novaliches, San José, Norzagaray, Angat, San Rafael, and Bustos fell in quick succes­

GENERAL LAWTON IN FIELD UNIFORM.

THE WHITE

PHILIPPINES.

23

to within 250 yards of it, a heavy volley was fired at them. Throwing themselves from their horses to the ground, they worked their way back toward our line, which of course instantly reopened on the enemy. The town was promptly captured. In spite of the shameful and i r r i t a t i n g mis­ use of the white flag, perfect order was main­ tained, and when it was found that the com­ mand was to remain there for a short time, General Lawton, true to his belief that civil affairs should always be in the hands of

HELMET WAS WORN BY GENERAL LAWTON IN A L L OF

HIS CUBAN AND PHILIPPINE ENGAGEMENTS.

sion. A t Baliuag the insurgents had made preparations for a strong stand, but Lawton, through his tact and skill in dealing with the natives, had kept himself fully informed of their operations. He never lacked for spies or couriers who would serve him faithfully. Strong lines of intrenchments protected the town from attack in the direction of Bustos on the one side, and the railroad track on the other. By a quick movement Lawton passed around and attacked the po­ sition unexpectedly from the rear. The fight, which opened at a range of 2,000 yards, had hardly begun when a flag of truce was shown. Captain Case and an orderly were sent for­ ward to meet i t . When they had approached

civilians when practicable, promptly held an election and organized a municipal govern­ ment with native officials. A similar course was followed at Angat, and, in fact, wher­ ever conditions made it at all practicable. The effect of this action was far-reaching, and news of it was received at Manila, from native sources, with almost miraculous promptness. The advance to the northward was soon re­ sumed by way of San Ildefonso, Maasin, and San Miguel de Mayumo, and it ended in the capture of San Isidro, the new insurgent capital. The enemy had long since found that, to use Lawton's own expression, he could " g o to bed with them at night and get up with them in the m o r n i n g , " and they


24

GENERAL

LAWTON'S

WORK IN THE

PHILIPPINES.

rapidly wearied of his constant companion­ stores; that its effect on the peaceable in­ ship. Not only did his resistless and rapid habitants was admirable, convincing them advance utterly demoralize them, but his as it did of the falsity of the vile slanders splendid personal bravery, and his protection which had been diligently circulated in re­ of the lives and property of non-combatants, gard to our troops; and, finally, that its no less than the considerate kindness which moral influence on the insurgent army, up to he showed in all his dealings with them, won the time of the withdrawal from San Isidro, hardly be overstated. F o r that with­ for him a unique place in the hearts of the drawal General Lawton common people—a place certainly cannot be held which he never lost. responsible. H i s position, Meanwhile General Macwith the rainy season at Arthur was pressing for­ hand, may not have been ward along the line of the strong, but he desired to railway, and as a result of strengthen it by advancing, the combined movement, not by r e t i r i n g . which threatened the com­ plete destruction of the No sooner had he re­ insurgent army, commis­ turned to Manila than he sions were being sent to was directed to gather a Manila in rapid succession. force and drive off the Unfortunately they were insurgents under Pio del not empowered to do any­ Pilar, who were commit­ thing practical, but came ting indescribable crimes only to inquire as to our against the inhabitants of intentions and to beg for Morong and the neighbor­ time. ing towns. On June 3d he attacked this force After San Isidro fell, from three directions. Lawton was eager to press Not only did the move­ o n t o Tarlac. On May 17th, ment succeed in its object, he w i r e d h e a d q u a r t e r s but had not General H a l l ' s that his provisions could column been unexpectedly be made to hold out until delayed, it would have re­ the 30th. He was well sulted i n the capture of supplied with ammunition. P i l a r ' s entire command. N e v e r t h e l e s s he w a s ordered to fall back, and F o r many weeks there there began a retrograde had been a tacit truce movement, dispiriting to along the south line, and our men and full of en­ negotiations had been in couragement to the enemy. progress which at one time Commissions ceased to ar­ promised to end i n the rive at Manila, and the peaceable submission of scattered insurgent forces G E N E R A L L A W T O N ' S O N L Y S O N , M A N L E Y the hostile forces i n Cavite reassembled and attacked province. Unfortunately LAWTON. our columns as they with­ this fact became known to drew through Cabiao, Arayat, and Candaba. the insurgent leaders. General Trias, who A permanent garrison was left at Baliuag. was in command south of the Pasig River and The proximity of the rainy season has been Laguna de Bay, was accordingly removed assigned as a reason for the abandonment from his post, and Baldomero Aguinaldo, a of the forward movement. Lawton always cousin of the dictator, was appointed in his contended that he could operate in the rain stead. A s a result of this change, the in­ better than could the insurgents, and later surgents i n Cavite province again became in the year he proved i t . aggressive. On June 7th, L a w t o n was in­ Of this expedition it may be said, in gen­ structed to concentrate a force of approxi­ eral, that it inflicted heavy losses on the en­ mately 4,000 men, and begin active opera­ emy, demoralizing them, and thereby aiding tions against them. General M a c A r t h u r ' s advance, and that it A n attack was made on the morning of destroyed or distributed among the com­ the 10th. It had been planned that parallel mon people immense quantities of insurgent columns under Generals Wheaton and Oven-


GENERAL

LAWTON'S

WORK IN THE

shine should pierce the insurgent line near San Pedro M a c a t i . Wheaton was then to swing toward the lake, and Ovenshine toward the bay, taking the strong insurgent works at ParaĂąaque and L a s Pinas in reverse. The day proved to be the hottest of the year. No drinking water was found along the line of march, and a considerable number of the troops were fresh from the United States, and had not become acclimated. The num-

PHILIPPINES.

25

revolt of '96, and they therefore considered it sacred ground. Before leaving Las P i n a s they went before the native priest of that town and took a solemn oath to hold the Zapote River or die i n their trenches. On the afternoon of June 12th, General Lawton reconnoitered their position from the fighting-top of the gunboat " H e l e n a , " arid later, after landing, went forward with a small detachment, endeavoring to exactly locate

GENERAL LAWTON's DAUGHTERS, FRANCES, CATHERINE, AND LOUISE, AGED, RESPECTIVELY, E L E V E N , NINE, AND SEVEN YEARS.

ber of heat prostrations resulting was so great that it became necessary to abandon the original plan of operations and concentrate the two columns. This was done under the personal direction of General Lawton, and the movement toward L a s Pinas was then continued in the face of determined opposition. The command camped for the night close to the town. Under cover of darkness the enemy withdrew, retreating to a strong position along the southern bank of the Zapote River. A t this very place a small insurgent force had inflicted a severe defeat on a vastly superior body of Spanish troops during the

their left. During this reconnoissance several Mauser volleys, as well as a number of shrapnel shells, were fired at his little party at short range from across the river. On the following day occurred the famous battle of the Zapote River. Before it opened General Lawton took two companies, and moving along the beach, forded the stream at its mouth, passing around the left of the enemy's line, and, under the direction of a native guide, reaching a position well in his rear. One company was left behind as a support, in order to prevent the advance from being cut off, and the other pushed on until within less than 200 yards of the only


26

GENERAL

LAWTON'S

WORK IN THE

road along which the insurgents could re­ treat, when a determined Remington fire was encountered, to which the pop of the Mauser was soon added, showing that the small American force had compelled a vastly supe­ rior body of the enemy to hurry up reënforcements. A single company was opposed by at least a thousand men, and it is difficult to see why it was not annihilated. The enemy closed in until the range was but little more than a hundred yards. A s it seemed desira­ ble to hold the position, and thus permanently weaken the insurgent force along the river, the reserve company was brought up, and a slightly sheltered spot was found for our troops, which they determinedly held. Dur­ ing all this time General Lawton was exposed to a fearful fire at short range. Conspicuous as he was, not only on account of his com­ manding stature, but because of the light uniform and white helmet which he invari­ ably wore in battle, it is little less than a miracle that he escaped alive. The effect of his splendid example on the men can hardly be overestimated. A t one time Captain Sage, in command of the advanced company, was left with nine men to face the enemy, the remainder of his force having fallen back through misunderstanding an order. Under a very hot fire, delivered at a range of but forty yards, Sage held his position, picking up the rifle of a wounded man, and himself dropping five insurgents with it. Having stationed these companies as above indicated, General Lawton then returned to the river to direct the general attack, which was promptly delivered and completely suc­ cessful. A n attempt to rush the bridge de­ veloped the fact that the wooden planking with which a broken stone arch had been re­ paired was burned out, so that it was im­ possible to cross. Our end of this bridge was but thirty-four yards from the insurgent trenches ; nevertheless, the guns of a battery took position on it and opened, while our troops occupied the bank, and coolly picked off every man on the opposite side who showed his head. So deadly was the fire that it was impossible for the insurgents to serve their artillery. I afterward found four bullet marks on the muzzle of one of their guns. Meanwhile our men had crossed the river between the bridge and the bay, and out­ flanked the trenches,'which were then rushed, the enemy retreating in great disorder, closely pressed by our troops. Just beyond Bacoor they made a final stand, but were again routed within twenty minutes, and fled i n confusion toward Imus.

PHILIPPINES.

In his official report of the engagement General Lawton said, " The bearing of offi­ cers and men throughout this battle was magnificent. The conduct of officers whose names are mentioned . . . should be entitled and characterized distinguished gal­ lantry in the presence of the enemy at the battle of the Zapote River. . . . This is probably the first time in history that a battery has been advanced and fought with­ out cover, within thirty yards of strongly manned trenches." He forgets to mention the fact that this gallant advance was made under his own eye, and that he stood calm and impassive beside the guns while they were being served. How much of the splen­ did intrepidity displayed by his officers and men on this and other occasions was due to the magnificent example of their dauntless leader ? He was the most modest of men, and would never talk of himself or his exploits, but he kept a keen eye on those who served with him, and gave them the fullest credit for all that they did. Even when exposed to hot fire, he would dictate to his aide memoranda of the brave acts of others, in order that he might forget nothing. Although he spared neither his men nor himself when duty called, he was nevertheless most considerate of those who served under him, and he was loved and implicitly trusted by his troops. No matter how difficult or dangerous the task, his men never shrank from it, for they felt that under his leadership success was certain. The moral effect of the victory at the Za­ pote was tremendous. The insurgents knew that, having failed to hold this river, there was no position in Cavite which they could hope to maintain. On the morning after the fight, the Gen­ eral and his staff rode into Bacoor. The i n ­ surgent troops had conducted themselves shamefully before abandoning the town. One family of women and girls had suffered espe­ cially. After shooting into their house, the native troops had broken in and plundered it, even going so far as to search the per­ sons of the unfortunate occupants for con­ cealed jewelry. The latter had passed the remainder of the night on their knees, i n constant fear of their lives, and they wel­ comed the General as a deliverer. They were so demonstrative in their joy that, in speaking of the occurrence afterward, he dryly remarked that only his height had saved him from having them literally fall on his neck.

On the following day, the presidente of


GENERAL General Lawton.

LAWTON'S

Captain King.

Garvin Denby.

Manley Lawton. GENERAL

LAWTON

AND PARTY

WORK IN THE

AT CALAMBA.

27

Felipe Calderón.

Dean C. Worcester.

Mrs. Lawton.

PHILIPPINES.

A PHOTOGRAPH

TAKEN

Benito Legarda. T H E MORNING

AFTER

THE CITY

WAS CAPTURED.

Imus came in to announce the voluntary surrender of his town, and to invite the A m e r i cans to garrison it, which was done. General Lawton's attention was immediately turned to bettering the condition of the inhabitants who remained in the captured cities. They had been plundered of their belongings by their own troops, and were in a pitiable condition from lack of food. At Lawton's request, they were supplied with meat and rice from Manila until again able to provide for themselves. A s a result of this kind and humane course, those who had fled soon began to return to their homes. A t this time I made a tour of inspection through Parañaque, L a s Pinas, Bacoor, and Imus, with a view to ascertaining the feeling of the natives toward us and their needs in general. I found everywhere the heartiest appreciation of the kindly treatment which they had received, and a willingness to cooperate with us against what they were learning to consider a common enemy ; but without organization they were helpless to act, and there was a universal and strong desire

for the establishment of some form of municipal government. Having first consulted General Lawton, and found him most heartily in sympathy with my views as to the desirability of attempting such organization, I then laid the facts before General Otis, who promptly instructed Lawton to attend to the matter. A t the latter's request, I had a simple form of municipal government prepared in outline by a good Filipino lawyer. This was submitted to Señor Arrellano, president of the Manila Supreme Court, and after being slightly amended by him, was translated and given to Lawton. He made an order of it, without changing a word, and invited me to accompany him to the various towns within his jurisdiction and aid in putting that order into effect. On the morning of July 1st, we started on our mission in an army ambulance, protected by a cavalry escort, and accompanied by Señor Felipe Calderón, a Filipino who understood both Spanish and Tagalog, and who had a wide acquaintanceship among the people of Cavite province.


28

GENERAL

LAWTON'S

WORK IN THE

PHILIPPINES.

Although not himself a Catholic, he acParaĂąaque was the first town visited. The principalia, or " h e a d m e n , " had assembled, cepted the invitation of the native priest at and when we entered the house where they Imus to attend mass on Sunday morning, and were awaiting us, I saw at once that they I accompanied him. The week before, when were literally (making with fear. I asked on my preliminary tour of investigation, the them the reason, and was informed that fine native band at Imus had turned out in when a Spanish general called the headmen my honor, and thinking that it would proof a town together, under such conditions, mote good feeling between the people and some of them our soldiers i f they usually got shot. would learn to play I explained the sitthe Star Spangled uation to General B a n n e r , I had Lawton, and he taught their leader was on his feet the air. We were in an instant. He surprised and spoke straight touched when that from the heart, beautiful hymn simply, earnestly, was feelingly and to the point, rendered as a part showing an underof the sacred standing of native music during the character and service. Aftermethods of ward the priest thought which told us that on many men would account of the not have gained course which the in years. I transA m e r i c a n s had lated his words followed i n his literally into town, our national Spanish, and Calair would continue deron repeated to form a part of them in Tagalog. the sacred music Their effect was in that church so wonderful. We l o n g as he r e held a successful mained in charge election on the of i t . spot. Before leavThe system of ing, Lawton shook civil government T H E P R E S I D E N T E OP IMUS A N D N A T I V E PRIESTS. hands c o r d i a l l y thus established This Presidente c a m e in a n d s u r r e n d e r e d Iiis t o w n to General with each of the proved so successL a w t o n , thus preventing bloodshed. T h e priest o n the right newly chosen r e n d e r e d important, s e n ice i n the r e s t o r a t i o n a n d m a i n t e n a n c e o f ful that we soon officials, and gave p u b l i c o r d e r . e x t e n d e d i t to him a kindly word Pandacan, Santa of congratulation and advice. When we A n a , San Felipe Nery, and Malibay, the Gentook our departure there was a perfectly eral personally conducting the work i n every spontaneous outburst of enthusiasm, and case. To be sure, our native officials were, the natives cheered him to the echo. as SeĂąor Calderon remarked, " l i k e children Bacoor, Imus, and Las Pinas were then or- with new shoes o n . " They were either incapganized in the order named, two days being able of applying simple general principles or consumed in the work. Wherever we went, unwilling to assume the responsibility of dothe General made the people his friends. ing so, and constantly flocked to Manila for inHe returned the humble salute of every poor structions, occupying much of the time of native whom we passed by the wayside. He Calderon, the General, and myself. Lawton accepted the friendly hospitality of the peo- always gave them a kindly welcome. His ple in the towns that we visited, breaking patience i n dealing with them seemed endbread with them, and sleeping in their homes. less, and I know that they soon learned, There was full and instant justice for all who not only to respect and admire him, but to came to him with reasonable ground for com- love him. He inspired an almost incredible amount of loyalty among them. W e had explaint.


GENERAL

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IN THE

PHILIPPINES.

29

pected dishonesty and treachery, but up to much difficulty he succeeded in obtaining au­ the time of my departure only one man had thorization to do this. He then told me that proved unworthy of the trust imposed i n he wanted half a dozen of the worst men i n him. Cavite province, by preference leaders of On the whole, the troops which garrisoned the bands of tulisanes, or professional ban­ our new municipalities behaved extremely dits, which have infested that district from well. L a w t o n ' s orders as to the mainte­ time immemorial. W i t h the aid of Calderón, nance of public order were severe, and he en­ I got them. The General said that he would forced them to the letter whenever occasion make good citizens of them, and he did. arose. It was of course inevitable that there Other men were secured for him by Captain should be some clashes between the soldiers L a r a of the native police force, and about and the natives, and my relations with the this little nucleus yet others soon gathered. latter were such that abuses were almost The force as finally organized numbered some certain to be brought to my attention. I forty white men and fifty-two natives. It went straight to the General with them, was commanded by Captain Castner. I am and I speak from personal knowledge when indebted to Captain K i n g , of General L a w I say that he was tireless i n his efforts to ton's staff, for information as to the result of this interesting experiment. He tells me bring evil-doers to justice. One instance I recall with especial clear­ that it was a complete success. The native ness. A poor native was assaulted near Mariquina by a couple of drunken soldiers, who wounded him i n the arm and robbed him of a large sum of money. Two women wit­ nessed the occurrence, but were at first afraid to testify against white men. A t L a w ton's request I sent messages to them again and again, i n order to persuade them to come in and bear witness. We were at last successful in getting their evidence, which proved sufficient to convict. The plaintiff went his way rejoicing, after receiv­ ing a sum equivalent to the one he had lost, the necessary amount having been deducted from the pay of his assailants. The latter were sentenced to long terms in Bilibid, while the witnesses, to their utter amazement, received proper compensation for their ser­ vices. A few days later I heard all about this case from natives away to the northward in the province of Bulacan, M A P O F T H E S E C T I O N O F L U Z O N IN W H I C H G E N E R A L L A W T O N C A R R I E D and I know both that the O N HIS O P E R A T I O N S . fame of it spread far and wide, and that the people marveled. They had never heard of such a scouts were brave, efficient, and loyal, Not a gun was lost, nor did a man desert. thing, and could not understand i t . When the final campaign opened in the Lawton was a thorough believer in the na­ tives, and was very anxious to utilize them north, they accompanied Lawton's advance, as soldiers, by forming a mixed body of scouts sometimes even going a full day's march composed of Americans and Tagalogs. After ahead of i t . On one occasion sixteen na-


30

GENERAL

LAWTON'S

WORK IN THE

tives and two white men were given insur­ gent uniforms, and armed with captured Remington and Mauser rifles. Thus equipped they were sent into a village garrisoned by three riflemen and fifty bolo men, which force they captured entire, after first gathering valuable information. The white men of this command soon learned to regard their darkskinned comrades with the respect which one brave man feels toward another. The General was also keenly interested in the enlistment of a strong force from among the Macabebes, who were eager for an op­ portunity to fight their enemies, the Tagalog insurgents. I remember well his satisfac­ tion when he could at last inform me that the organization of three companies had been authorized. Captain K i n g tells me that this number was eventually increased to five. The Macabebes were armed with cavalry car­ bines and put into the field at once. They did magnificent work, fighting bravely and moving very rapidly. They sometimes even kept up with the cavalry on quick marches. It should be remembered that they served under the most trying conditions. Rushed into service immediately, as they were, there was little opportunity for the establishment of discipline. The companies had but one white officer each. They were in the coun­ try of their mortal enemies, and rations were short, yet they did not loot. They proved very loyal. On two occasions they wanted to kill men whose taking off "could hardly have been justified, but their officers re­ strained them without difficulty. They yielded to the fatigues of that ter­ rible campaign more quickly than did the white troops, however, and as they sickened they were left behind at different towns, thirty or forty in a place. Under these try­ ing conditions a few of them gave evidence of their lack of discipline and attempted to commit abuses, but they were promptly and vigorously punished. General Lawton con­ sidered the experiment a pronounced suc­ cess, and he was in a position to know. It is not my purpose to attempt to describe even in outline Lawton's lastcampaign, which, as the Secretary of W a r has well said, " w a s the chief factor in the destruction of the i n ­ surgent power, and was the crowning achieve­ ment of his arduous l i f e . " He conclusively demonstrated the fact that American troops, under such a leader, can operate successfully against native forces in the Philippines in spite of the most trying climatic conditions. Floods of rain and seas of mud were power­ less to check his impetuous advance. He

PHILIPPINES.

kept the enemy so busy running that they had little time to fight. When he could no longer move his transportation, he abandoned it, living off the country, but never forget­ ting to pay for what he took. Toward the end of the campaign his hungry and war­ worn soldiers lay down night after night on the water-soaked ground, without protection of any sort, only to rise in the morning and push on again. His presence and example inspired them to deeds of bravery and endur­ ance which will make one of the brightest pages in the history of the American army. His reputation had preceded him, and the common people welcomed him, but the insur­ gents complained that his troops seemed to rise out of the very ground. In spite of the exhaustion which he must have felt after such arduous duty, he re­ mained i n Manila but a day on his return from the north, and then took the field again, riding all night through the rain in order to personally direct the ill-fated oper­ ations against San Mateo, arriving before that town i n the early morning of December 18th. Always thoughtful of his officers and men, and forgetful of himself, it is characteristic of him that he should have given up his life while trying to aid another. The fight had hardly opened when Lieutenant Breckinridge of his staff was severely wounded. The Gen­ eral, aided by Captain K i n g , Lieutenant F u l ­ ler, and Major Rogers, carried him to a ditch grown full of bushes, which seemed to prom­ ise shelter, but it was found that the insur­ gent fire came directly down i t . The Gen­ eral set out to search for a safer place. He had found one, and was returning when met by Captain K i n g . A t that instant he raised his hand and brushed his coat over the left breast, uttering a low exclamation. K i n g said, " W h a t is it, G e n e r a l ? " He replied, " I am h i t . " K i n g asked, " W h e r e , Gen­ eral?" " T h r o u g h the lung," came the answer. Those were his last words. He wavered, made a desperate effort to recover himself, and sank into the arms of K i n g and Fuller. A surgeon was at hand, but in less than a moment from the time he was struck life had flown. So he died, as I know he would have preferred to die, quickly, pain­ lessly, at the post of duty, his face toward the enemies of his country and his flag. There are those less. This is far too brave a man to but i f he felt that he would do it, no

who say that he was reck­ from the t r u t h . He was expose himself needlessly ; a thing ought to be done, matter how thick the bul-


GENERAL

LAWTON'S

WORK IN THE

lets flew. In order that he might the better perform his whole duty, he took the best possible care of his physical well-being. I know that during his entire stay in the Phil­ ippines he never allowed a drop of alcoholic stimulant to pass his lips under any circum­ stances whatsoever. He did not use tobacco in any form, nor would he touch coffee or tea. It is true that he often exposed himself. He told me that the Zapote River fight was the twenty-seventh occasion on which he had been under hot fire i n the Philippines, and he added that he knew his turn would come sooner or later, i f the war continued, on the mere law of chances. When he sat on his great horse where the bullets were thickest, it was not because he was reckless, but be­ cause his was that higher courage which can look death i n the face without blenching. He felt that, w i t h the force at his disposal and the work which he was called upon to do, his personal presence on the firing line was often a necessity. He was unwilling to take the chance of a little delay, or of a mis­ take on the part of a subordinate, which might lead to a reverse. The distinctive costume which he always wore in the field was intended to make his presence known to his own men. He believed that when they knew he was with them, sharing their hard­ ships and their dangers, they Would never fail him, and he was r i g h t . On the night that I bade him good-by, he told me that his one anxious thought was for the devoted wife who had followed him to the F a r East to make a home for him, and

PHILIPPINES.

31

for the children that gladdened i t . His friends take untold comfort in the fact that the only fear which ever touched the heart of Henry W . Lawton has been forever ban­ ished by the generosity of his countrymen. Who can fittingly sum up, in a few words, the character of such a man ? Simple in all his ways ; true as steel ; a born leader of men; ever successful, yet modest as a g i r l ; always seeking to give credit to others and forgetful of self; loyal to his superiors; pa­ tient under hostile criticism and unjust sus­ picion; loved not alone by his comrades and friends, but by the natives with whom he came in contact—one cannot put it all in words. He was Lawton, and " o n l y a regu­ lar." It is needless to say that his death brought deepest sorrow to his countrymen. But they were not the only ones to mourn his loss. Native women came to mingle their tears with those of the wife and mother who was left desolate. The spokesman who tried to say a few words in behalf of the officials of the towns which he had organized broke down completely and cried like a child. A s I stood the other day beside his bier in the National Cemetery, and saw lying on it the wreaths that dusky hands had placed there in far-off Manila, I felt that I had lived to see the first-fruits of the great work which America has undertaken in the F a r East—a work which General Lawton prosecuted with all his boundless energy, ennobled by his ex­ ample, and consecrated with his life's blood. Surely it cannot be said that he has died in vain.


HEAD

OF

"OLD

JIM."

THE

DRAWN

FROM

LIFE

BY E . L.

BLUMENSCHEIN,

OLD J I M HORSE.

B Y J . LINCOLN STEFFENS.

THE Superintendent of Horses in the New Y o r k Fire Depart­ ment sent a substitute to Thirty-three engine one day a year or two ago, and took away a big roan horse which had served there for eighteen years and nine months. " H o r s e registered N o . 60, unfit," is the way this act was reported officially. But the men, passing the news around the house, and thence from company to company all over town, said: " T h e y ' v e taken the old J i m horse. They're going to sell Thirty-three's old J i m . " Now the firemen all knew that the old J i m horse was unfit for duty. Captain Nash, the foreman of Thirty-three, had been watch­ ing secretly for two or three years the growth of a film over the animal's big, intel­ ligent eyes. No expert superintendent of fire horses was needed to see that J i m was going blind. But what of that ? There

wasn't a horse in the service that knew the business so well as J i m . There wasn't a fireman who loved a big fire more than the roan that ran in the middle of Thirty-three's team of three. "He learned what he had to do in five minutes after he was bought and delivered h e r e , " said Captain N a s h . " H e caught on the first time they showed him. W e never locked him i n a stall. It wasn't necessary; for he never left it without permission, ex­ cept to get a drink or to respond to an alarm of fire. A t the first tap of the gong, he sprang forward to his place. Sometimes he came so fast that he had to slide to stop himself under the harness ; and when we let him out in the street to wander around, he'd run at the call of the gong, stop on the side­ walk, turn about, and back into his place at the pole. W h y , we used to put boxes and chairs in his way from the stall, but he jumped over them and would still be first in the collar. They oughtn't to have con­ demned J i m . He never cost the city a cent


THE

OLD JIM

for doctor's bills. Once he fell down on the way to a fire and was dragged a block over the Broadway cobbles ; but he got up without our stopping, and though he was pretty sore, we never reported him, and he got over i t . Sometimes a hose would burst, but J i m didn't care i f only he could turn his head out of the way. Many a shower of falling glass be has stood without flinching, as the scars on his back show, but he was never laid off a day. H a l f a dozen horses that were mated to him have lived their day and died, t r y i n g to pull up even with old J i m . It isn't so long ago they sent us up a spare horse to take the place of one of J i m ' s mates that was off being shod. There was one run, and Jim chewed the young horse's neck to make him keep up his end, afraid we'd lose first water. He was a great fire horse, was J i m . The only trouble he gave was at meal times, which he knew like a clock ; and i f his feed wasn't set down before him on the minute, he made a fuss, pawing at the side of his stall and starting all the other horses to kicking." Possibly Captain Nash was prejudiced. He and J i m had served together in the same house for eleven years. But i f there was anything so very wrong in concealing J i m ' s aging weaknesses, the captain was not the only one to blame. Hugh Bonner, the Chief of the Department, had his down-town quar­ ters i n Thirty-three's house, and he knew all about J i m , and all about Captain Nash, too, for that matter. Y e t he kept mum. Then there was the Superintendent of Horses : why didn't he do something before ? It is true he had condemned J i m five years ago. This, however, is the way he did i t . After i n ­ specting the horse, he walked up to the cap­ tain and said : " N a s h , the old J i m horse is getting unfit. I guess I ' l l have to send you a sub­ stitute." Captain Nash did not say anything. The substitute came, and he accepted the new horse, but he didn't send J i m away. He handed over another horse. N o w the sta­ bleman did not know the difference, per­ haps, but the Superintendent did. He must have found that he had been fooled ; and the captain, liable to punishment for disobey­ ing orders, worried for a week. But nothing came of i t . Possibly the Superintendent reported the case to the Chief. I f he did, it is curious the Chief never mentioned the matter to Captain Nash. A t any rate, the Chief must have known that the J i m horse had been condemned, and he certainly saw

HORSE.

33

the J i m horse afterwards first at many a fire. A year or two later, the Superintendent condemned J i m again, and he did it rather sharply this time. He did not say, " N a s h , the old J i m horse," and so on. He com­ manded Captain Nash to deliver " r e g i s t e r e d horse N o . 6 0 ; " but after he was out of the door, he paused, turned half around, and said : " H e isn't fit to run to fires, Nash. Y o u better trade him off to me for a good, strong, young horse. Anyhow, P m going to do my duty, and i f you want " The rest was nothing but a grumble which no one could be expected to under­ stand. The new horse arrived. The cap­ tain hesitated, till at last he thumped on his desk, and shouted down to the man on watch to transfer to the training stables the worst horse in the house. The fireman who re­ ceived the order grinned, and delivered the next to the oldest horse, an animal that " n e v e r was no good, nohow." A n d when the trampling of the departing hoofs had died away, the men up-stairs who heard the order stopped the game of cards while one of them went below. He walked around the engine to J i m ' s stall, told him to get back, though the horse was not more than half a foot over the line, then returned to the game. He did not report anything ver­ bally, but the others looked in his face, and resumed the play i n great good humor. Just as they were forgetting the incident, the cap­ tain came out of his room and passed down­ stairs. He had to get something out of the feed-room, which is back of the horses. Old Jim tried to attract the captain's attention, but the captain wouldn't notice him. The third time the Superintendent acted, he did not give the captain a chance for any of his tricky horse-trading. He had " r e g i s ­ tered horse N o . 6 0 " removed without talk­ ing about it, and Captain Nash was at a loss. "I knew what it meant," said the captain afterwards. " W e had a horse here once, the Buck horse. He was a good fire horse, too ; nothing like J i m , but he served faith­ ful for years, and then went lame in his off hind leg. W e did what we could for him till the inspector got onto it and took him away and sold him at auction. About a year after that, when we were all standing out i n front of the house one day, an old, brokendown, lame horse came along the street, pull­ ing one of those carts that go around col­ lecting clam-shells. He balked right oppo­ site the door. W e thought at first he was tired, and I guess he was. Maybe some of


THE OLD JIM

34

"AT

T H E FIRST

HORSE.

T A P OF T H E GONG, H E SPRANG

the younger firemen laughed when the crazy old driver licked his horse. But all of a sudden we took notice of the horse's sore leg, and somebody said : " ' I t ' s the old Buck horse, boys.' " A n d it was. He had stopped because he wanted to come i n home, the old Buck horse did. A n d his leg was worse." So Captain Nash remembered the Buck horse when they took away the J i m horse. He waited till the Chief came to the house. Then he told him. " C h i e f , " he said, " t h e y ' v e come and got the old J i m horse at last." The Chief did not answer.

FORWARD

T O HIS

PLACE."

" I ' d just as lief keep him, C h i e f , " the captain continued. " H e ' s the best horse I had. A little film over his eyes, and pretty old, but he'sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;he's the old J i m horse, Chief." Another pause. " T h e y ' l l sell him into some old ash-cart or to a Polish peddler. A n d J i m ' s served long enough to have a pension." Then the Chief answered : " W h y don't you write his record up to the Board? I ' l l endorse i t . " " I ain't much on the w r i t e , " said Nash, " b u t I ' l l t r y it, i f you say s o . " That was on a Saturday. Captain Nash


THE PASHA'S took Sunday for the job, and here is his formal report to the Board of Fire Commis­ sioners : " I respectfully forward a brief history of the roan team of horses formerly used in the engine of this com­ pany. O f the original J a c k horse I have not much to w r i t e , he being k i l l e d while responding to an alarm for fire at station 236 on M a y 30, 1881, by colliding with the shaft of E n g i n e 13 tender. The point of the shaft entered his breast. . . . A s to the horse J i m , who was received at these quarters on January 14, 1879, and performed duty therein u n t i l November 4, 1897, a period of eighteen years and nine months, the first eleven years of which J i m and his mate had to draw a heavy first-class engine, when the runs were more frequent and much longer than those of the pres­ ent day, when the same i d e n t i c a l engine is drawn by three horses. The J i m horse, i n the opinion of a l l the officers and members ever connected w i t h this com­ pany, and the many distinguished persons who visited these quarters, was such that they expressed the belief that there never was a horse that showed more intelligence than the J i m horse."

PRISONER.

35

" I take great pleasure in t r a n s m i t t i n g for your con­ sideration the history of the J i m horse of E n g i n e 33, for a period of nearly twenty years. . . . H e was about seven years old when purchased, which would make him nearly twenty-seven years of age. I appeal to the Board i n behalf of this faithful animal, that he be retained i n the service of the department, and as­ signed to some company where the duties w i l l be light, and that the Superintendent of Horses be directed to not include i n his sale registered N o . 60, which is the number assigned to this faithful animal."

" T h i s w o r k e d , " said the captain. When these communications were read at the Board meeting, the commissioners were silent a moment. Then the president said that he thought J i m had earned his pension and should be retired. No one objected ; so the Superintendent of Horses was directed to keep J i m for such light work as might turn up, i f there was any such. A t any rate, he was not to be sold. This was the first time in the history of the department that a Here followed a recital of J i m ' s distin­ horse was retired like a fireman ; but it paid. guishing traits i n much the same language F o r example, it put a stop to Captain Nash's grumbling about the new middle horse that as that already quoted from Captain Nash. runs now with Thirty-three engine. Chief Bonner wrote something, too :

THE

PASHA'S

PRISONER.

B Y ROBERT B A R K , A u t h o r o f " W i t h i n a n A c e o f the E n d o f the W o r l d , " " T h e G i f t o f A b n e r G r i c e , " a n d o t h e r s t o r i e s .

A

STORY

OF

MODERN

FEW objects on this earth are more beautiful than a con­ sular kawass. His wages may be small, but that is more than compensated for by the gorgeousness of his clothes. H i s outer garment unites the merits of an Inver­ ness coat, a lady's cloak, an A r a b aba, and an ulster. Sometimes it is short and comes only to his waist; often it is long, reaching down to his heels. It is wonder­ fully embroidered with threads of silver and of gold, and also threads of silk colored green, crimson, yellow, blue, and purple. There are wings attached to this garment at the shoulders, which give the kawass the appearance of a huge bird of tropical climes as he hurries down a Turkish street. A n d as i f this were not enough glory, there is worked on his back the coat-of-arms of the

TURKEY.

country he represents. The emblems of some countries suit the back of a kawass better than the devices of others. There is Austria, for instance, whose double-headed black eagle stands out strongly in contrast with the rainbow splendor of the coat, and an eagle's head standing out on each shoul­ der blade makes the balance perfect. When the consul drives abroad in his car­ riage, the kawass mounts upon the seat with the coachman, and has his hands crossed over the hilt of a broad semi-circular scimitar— that new-moon-shaped sword which we see the executioner i n Eastern pictures wiping on the tail of his coat after he has rolled off a few heads on the pavement. A s the kawass usually has great, sweeping black mustaches, the addition of the sword gives him an appearance of great blood-thirsti­ ness, which is most impressive. A s a mat­ ter of fact, however, he is a harmless indi­ vidual who runs errands for the consul and


36

THE PASHA'S

PRISONER

conducts tourists to mosques and places of an erratic manner that threatened to dis­ that sort, accepting with thankfulness a lodge the fez, and kept the silken tassel swaying to and fro. small gift in recognition of his services. " I — I — I — I ' m a f r a i d , " he said, with a M r . Turner's kawass knocked at the door of the consular room, and, on being told to stammer, " t h a t you don't recognize me, enter, displayed to the consul a face labor­ M r . T u r n e r . " " O h , yes, I d o , " replied the consul; ing under some powerful agitation. " Well, what is it ? " asked Consul Turner. " y o u are M r . McSimmins, who came over " Excellency, the man who disappeared here to convert the Turk by means of a daily bath, quite ignoring my suggestion that the has come b a c k . " Turk already performed his ablutions five " What man who disappeared, Selim ? " times a d a y . " "The cold-water " A h , yes, Consul, man, E x c e l l e n c y . " quite true, quite true; "Oh, McSimmins. but only his hands and He didn't disappear; feet; and I still hold he went home, you that, i f you submerged remember. He sent the Turk once a day, his papers to me about he would prove a dif­ a month ago, with a ferent m a n . " request for a permit " W e l l , " said the to leave the country, consul, " I have often which was quite un­ thought that i f the necessary. You whole country were brought me the papers, submerged for twenty and I gave them back minutes, it would be, to y o u . " on the whole, an im­ " Y e s , Excellency," provement; still that said the kawass ner­ is an opinion that must vously. not be mentioned out­ " S o he h a s r e ­ side the consular resi­ turned, has he ? What dence. But, as I sug­ does he want ? " gested to you before, " Y e s , Excellency, i f cleanliness were and he demands to see y our object, the you ; but I thought it Turkish bath is not better not to let him a l t o g e t h e r unknown in." even in our own coun­ " W h y , Selim ? " try, and is supposed " I think he is in­ t o be reasonably sane, E x c e l l e n c y . " efficient." " O h , that is nothing " Jlr held his nprn hand tremblingly he/ore him." new ; I thought it from " I t is warm and the first." e n e r v a t i n g , " said " H e is here, Excellency, in a Turkish McSimmins, speaking with stuttering hesita­ pasha's uniform, and he will not go away. tion, which seemed to show that his theory Then he acted very strangely, and it may was not perfectly grounded. " I advocate cold water, you k n o w . " not be safe to let him i n . " " O h , nonsense. L e t him come i n . McSim­ " Y e s , I remember you d i d , " began the mins wouldn't hurt anybody." consul ; but he was interrupted by McSim­ The kawass departed with evident re­ mins suddenly precipitating himself on the luctance, and shortly after, an extra­ floor and clutching wildly at the carpet. ordinary figure presented itself to the The consul sprang to his feet with an excla­ consul's view. He wore the costume of mation of dismay. a Turkish pasha, and had stuck on his " I t ' s all r i g h t , " cried McSimmins; " d o n ' t head a red fez with a long silken tassel. be alarmed. The room is spinning round, He came in stepping with caution, as i f but it will steady down i n a minute ; then walking on thin ice. He held his open I ' l l get up. Just wait t i l l things come to a hand tremblingly before him, as i f antici­ stand-still a g a i n . " pating a fall, and his head bobbed about in Presently the groveling man rose to his


ROBERT knees, and then tremulously to his feet. " Y o u w i l l excuse me i f I sit d o w n ? " he asked. " C e r t a i n l y , " said the consul, also seating himself. " W h a t is the trouble ; Saint Vitus's dance or anything of that kind ? " " S o m e t h i n g of that k i n d , " echoed the visitor. " I don't really know what the trouble is, but I ' l l tell you what it feels like. It feels as i f my brain had become loosened from the inside of my skull, like a ripe kernel in a nut; then, i f I walk hur­ riedly, it turns over, and the whole world turns with it, and I have to get down on my hands and knees and shake my head till my brain gets right side up again. Do I make myself clear ?" " O h , perfectly c l e a r , " said the consul, edging his chair back a little. " W i l l you excuse me, M r . McSimmins, while I call in my kawass ? I have some business for him to do, and you can tell your story w i t h per­ fect freedom in his presence, for I make a confidant of him anyhow," and the consul reached his hand toward the bell. McSimmins smiled grimly. " Y o u needn't be afraid, Consul ; I am not going to touch you. Of course no man makes a confidant of his kawass, and you think now that I am crazy. I don't blame you at a l l ; and i f you are really afraid of me, draw your chair near the door, and I ' l l stay over in the remotest corner of the room. But I should like you to listen to what I have to say ; officially, that is what you are here for, you know." " O h , I am not a f r a i d at a l l , " replied the con­ sul, thinking it, however, worth while to add, " I never think my­ self in danger, because I keep my loaded revolver in the drawer here before me." Saying which, he took the weapon out, and placed it on his table. " A most sen­ sible precaution," rejoined McSim­ mins, nodding his head. The nod­ ding seemed to

BARR.

37

be unfortunate, for he paused breathlessly, put his two open palms up to the side of his face, gave his head a few jerks this way and that, and then murmured, with a sigh of contentment, " That's all r i g h t . " The consul thought it well to ignore the re-turning of the brain which was evidently taking place under McSimmins's manipula­ tion, and so he said, as if nothing extraor­ dinary had happened : " When did you return, M r . McSimmins ? " " R e t u r n ; from where ? " " Y o u sailed for home about a month ago." " O h , no, I d i d n ' t , " corrected the visitor. " W e l l , you sent your papers here, and asked for a permit to leave the country, and I wrote a note to you saying that a permit was not necessary, and not hearing from you again, I took it for granted that you had s a i l e d . " " A h , I see," mused McSimmins, about to nod again, which motion he suddenly stopped by putting his hand to his forehead. " I have never left Turkey; in truth, I have been the guest of Zimri Pasha for the last month." " R e a l l y , " said the consul. " W e l l , the pasha is a most excellent man, and I wish there were more officials like him. He told me he took a great interest i n your coldwater scheme and was doing his best to help you, and seemed surprised to hear that I didn't take much interest in it m y s e l f . "

"The consul sprang

to his feet."


38

THE PASHA'S

PRISONER.

Oriental rugs, and here, asking me to be seated, the attendant disappeared between the heavy cur­ tains which hung over the doorway. Presently that obsequious secretary of the pasha came in, fol­ lowed by a servant bear­ ing a tray on which were two tiny cups of coffee. The secretary saluted me with that groveling de­ ference of which he is the cringing master, and asked me to be good enough to give him all my papers, so that the pasha might scrutinize them. The pasha, he added, would have "He took the weapon out, and placed it on his table." pleasure i n meeting me " Y e s , I think I converted h i m , " said socially after the business was transacted. McSimmins; " b u t only this afternoon. I had my passport and other papers in a About a month ago he sent a messenger to blue envelope, reposing i n my inside pocket, me asking me to bring my papers to him, and this envelope I handed to the secretary. and added that he would be glad to learn He then bade me, i n his master's name, re­ something further of the scheme I had in gale myself with the coffee, which I did. I hand, as he was inclined to believe in it and imagine the coffee was drugged, for shortly wished for more information." after taking it I became sleepy, and remem­ " T h a t ' s what he told m e , " remarked the bered no more until I found myself securely consul, " a n d he expressed his regret at pinioned in the Court of the Great Fountain. Have you seen the Court of the Great Foun­ your early departure." " V e r y well. I called on him at the hour tain ? " named, which was after dark. Y o u know " N o , " replied the consul, " I have never the pasha's house perhaps, C o n s u l ? " been admitted further into the residence of " Y e s ; I have visited him somewhat fre­ the pasha than the Court of the T a l m s . " quently. He is, as I have said, the most in­ " T h e pasha's house is an enormous con­ telligent Turkish official I have yet met, and glomeration of buildings, somewhat resem­ seems to have a sincere desire to elevate the bling a stone-walled city. Beautiful as the people." Court of Palms is, it does not compare with " T h a t describes him e x a c t l y , " agreed the magnificence of the Court of the Great McSimmins. " H e delights in the elevation Fountain. The pavement is a mosaic of va­ of the people, and is very successful at it rious colored marbles, all the rest is of the too." purest white. Arabic arches are supported " I shouldn't go so far as to say t h a t , " by slender glistening pillars, which seemed demurred the consul. "I have never ob­ to me to be made of onyx, or some rare served any practical results from his en­ white stone. The arches themselves are of deavors in that l i n e . " marble, looking like carved virgin snow; " A h , there you do him w r o n g , " pleaded these form a broad, cool veranda that com­ McSimmins earnestly. " Y o u see I know pletely surrounds the court. The floor of the pasha better than you do, for I have the veranda is elevated perhaps six inches been his guest for a month. But to go on above the tesselated pavement, and is almost with my story. On entering I was led past covered with rich Persian rugs. But the the semi-public room in which the pasha striking feature of the court is the fountain. transacts his business, taken across the first The water, I imagine, is obtained from some court, in which the palm trees grow, into a stream or lake i n the neighboring mountains, smaller room beyond, a room along the three and the fountain consists of one huge jet as sides of which were divans covered with r i c h thick as a man's thigh, which shoots straight


ROBERT

BARR.

39

up into the air like a liquid palm tree. It falls back musically into a deep, broad pond, which is bor­ dered by a heavy coping of mar­ ble. The convolutions of this coping form a margin to this pond that is amazingly irregular, and which, the pasha told me, spells out i n A r a b i c his favorite text from the K o r a n . " " W h a t an excellent i d e a , " interrupted the consul. " I s n ' t i t ? " agreed his vis­ i t o r . " Perhaps I didn't appreci­ ate i t at the moment as much as I should have done, for 1 found myself i n a most cramped and uncomfortable position. A stout stick had been thrust under my knees, and my arms had been "I became sleepy." drawn under the projecting ends of this stick until my knees struck against my breast. M y wrists were at his pipe and a sip of coffee, he proceeded strapped together, and the straps fastened with the utmost suavity: ' I have been giv­ in some way behind my back. M y ankles ing some attention of late to the cold-water were united by fetters, and I lay thus i n a problem, and have determined to make some helpless heap like a trussed fowl. The pasha practical experiments that w i l l test its value. sat cross-legged on a pile of rugs and pillows The marble coping round the fountain at your under the veranda, peacefully smoking a back was constructed by a Greek slave whom Avater-pipe, of which the hubble-bubble was I once possessed, and who, although he had drowned by the musical plashing of the great most artistic hands, labored under the afflic­ fountain. H e sipped now and then some tion of a flighty head, which I was compelled coffee from a little cup on a table by his side, to remove. Under my directions, he did his and regarded me placidly with that serene, work well, and the coping spells i n Arabic contemplative gaze which you may have the phrase, If you meet a friend in the desert noticed i n his dreamy eyes when he is i n ­ who lacksfor water, give him of your store plenclined to converse on philosophic subjects. teously. I now propose to vivify this motto Standing near him were four stalwart N u ­ by following its counsel on your behalf.' bians, black as ebony, whose tongues the " ' I n d e e d , Pasha,' said I, ' t h e r e is a suf­ pasha afterward informed me he had been ficiency of water about me already, and my compelled to order removed, as irresponsible clothes are even now wet through.' gossip among his menials was irksome to " ' M y Nubians,' returned the pasha calmly, him. ' w e r e reluctantly compelled to dip you i n the " A f t e r a time the pasha was good enough fountain, so that you might return to the to address me. He expressed in choice full enjoyment of your senses, which had phrase his pleasure at seeing me a guest seemingly departed from you. This submer­ under his humble roof, although at the mo­ sion has happily had the desired result, and ment the roof above me was the sky, be­ thus I have the privilege of holding converse sprinkled w i t h brilliant stars. He added with you. B u t my bounty does not stop so that he had been much interested i n my meagerly. The adage says plenteously, and cold-water scheme, and would be pleased to upon that adage I purpose to a c t . ' learn from my own lips how I was getting " ' I beg to call your attention, Pasha, to on since I had honored his district with my the fact that I am a citizen of a country at presence. peace with the government of the Sultan. " I replied, with a glance at my bonds, W i t h the utmost respect toward your au­ that just at the moment I was not getting thority, I hereby protest against my present on with any degree of rapidity. The pasha treatment, and warn you that i f you contem­ was condescending enough to smile at this plate further indignity, you will carry i t out and bow toward me. Then, after a few whiffs at your p e r i l . '


40

THE

PASHA'S

" T h e pasha stroked his beard, and ac­ knowledged my remark with a courteous bow. ' T h a t introduces the elements of an inter­ national discussion into our conversation,' he said with a reproachful tinge in his tone, ' a n d in social intercourse I think anything of a political nature is apt to prove a dis­ turbing subject. L e t us confine ourselves to your cold-water theories.' " W i t h this he made a sign to his Nubians, and two of them, springing forward, picked me up as i f I had been a bale of goods, and swaying me backward and forward, suddenly heaved me into the up-spring of the foun­ tain. The tremendous jet of water struck me on the back as i f it were a battering ram, and I felt myself projected into the air like a shot from a cannon's mouth. Unfortu­ nately, I have not at my command the lan­ guage to depict the horror of that moment. I was whirled round and round with dizzying rapidity, and when I tried to scream, the water dashed into my open mouth with chok­ ing force. M y agony was mental rather than physical, for, except when I turned over and lay mouth downward to the jet, I cannot say there was much bodily inconvenience. Once when I remained for a few moments in a sitting posture, I saw that I was high in the air above the tops of the tallest palms, popping up and down like a pea on a hot griddle. In spite of the motion, I could easily recognize the deserted city lying calm in the moonlight, and so remembering the hard marble pavement far below, I feared that I would tumble helplessly over and be smashed into fragments on the stone. Such a catastrophe, how­ ever, did not hap­ pen, and by and by I realized that it was quite im­ possible to escape from the influence of the water jet. The great danger was of b e i n g smothered in the spray—drowned in m i d - a i r . I had the peculiar sensation of sink­ ing into a watery cushion from which the rebound dandled me as i f I were a baby. Sometimes, when the p o w e r f u l .

PRISONER. fountain gave me an extra fling aloft, I turned over and came head downward with sickening swiftness into what seemed to be a hollow tube of water. Then I came near to suffocation; but at once the heaving column would reassert its power and toss me aloft again, when I could breathe once more. Now and then I caught a glimpse of the full moon in the cloudless blue sky, and it appeared to be dancing a hilarious j i g with me. In spite of the noise of the water, I heard the pasha clap his hands and express approval of the spectacle. ' E x ­ cellent, excellent,' he cried; ' t h e gifted McSimmins dances with gratifying ability.' "My torture ended for that night with a moment of most intense fear. I imagine that the pasha gave a sign, and a slave, with a lever, suddenly turned off the water. I seemed left for an instant suspended i n the sky ; then I dropped like a fall­ ing star. The con­ centrated anguish of that infinitesimal portion of time I

. . "I found myself securely pinioned

in the Court of the Great

Fountain."


ROBERT

BARR.

41

by modifying the torture. The slaves gave periodical jerks at the lever, cut­ ting off a little water at a time, and lowering it a few feet, so that I de­ scended by stages until almost on a level with the veranda ; then I would be shot up into mid-air again. N i g h t after night of t h i s g a v e me t h a t loosening sensation in the brain of which I com­ plained to you, and the result of which you saw when I fell on the carpet. I sometimes got a little sleep in my cell during the day ; but my rest was always broken, for the moment I began to dream I was tossing in the foun­ tain again. A t last I saw that insanity was bound to intervene, so I resolved on suicide. One evening, being more loosely bound than usual, I turned, by a great effort, a kind of somersault, and flung my­ " I cannot say there was much bodily inconvenience." self free of the column of water. I hoped to strike shall never forget. It was in my mind that the marble pavement, but I fell instead into the pasha intended to impale me on the the pond, and was instantly fished out by the stand-pipe from which the jet issued, but Nubians. I told the pasha I was determined such was not the case. The water was turned to k i l l myself, and so for several nights I was on again before I reached the level of the not brought out from my cell. Sometimes 1 veranda, and such was the terrific force of thought that he had relented ; but when I re­ the impact, it rising and I falling, that I be­ viewed the situation carefully, I saw that he came instantly insensible ; and when I woke dare not let me go, for i f I could get my to consciousness, I found myself stretched government to believe the extraordinary tale on some rugs under the veranda, my wet I had to tell, it would be bound to bring him garments removed. But perhaps I weary to book for his conduct. When again I was you with this lengthened recital ? " dragged into the Court of the Great Foun­ " O n the c o n t r a r y , " said the consul, " I tain, I found that in the interval he had built was never more interested in my l i f e . " a sort of basket around the stand-pipe. This The visitor nodded, and having disturbed was made of springy steel or iron, and it his brain by doing so, readjusted it by ma­ opened like a huge flower, upward, some­ nipulating his head with his hands. thing like a metal calla lily, i f you under­ " I was taken to a cell in which there was stand what I mean. no light and very little air, and there I lay " ' I should be delighted, M r . McSimmins,' all night unable to sleep, sprawling round on said the pasha most blandly, ' i f you would the floor, which seemed to be heaving under favor me again with your vault from the top me. N e x t evening I was taken out again, of the column.' and once more flung into the fountain. A l l " I favored him, and fell into the network the while I anticipated that dreadful drop of the basket, and was hurled instantly into again ; but the pasha, fearing probably that the jet, and aloft again almost before I re­ he would k i l l me outright, amused himself alized that I had dropped. This amused the


THE

42

PASHA'S

PRISONER. once more, breathless with its force, I found myself aloft; but this time with arms and legs loose, sprawling like the wings of a wind-mill gone mad. I was amazed to find after a time that, because of this freedom of the limbs, I could somewhat balance myself, and before the night had passed I was able to stand upright and tread water, as it were, keeping my position for some time by the exercise of great care. Of course every now and then all my calculations were over­ set by the sudden ceasing of the fountain, which, removing my support and instantly undermining my confidence, left me flounder­ ing helplessly in the basket, until the stream resumed its play.

"I

.

.

.

projected

myself into the

air

pasha very much, and he was loud i n his praise of the feat. Wishing to test still fur­ ther the efficiency of the basket, he had the fountain gradually shut off, and let me come down into the receptacle ; then the Nubians took me out of it, undid my bonds, and set my limbs free. When this was done, at a sign from the pasha, they flung me sprawl­ ing into the basket. I clasped the network and shrieked, while they pushed me farther in, until at last the water caught me, and

" A f t e r the basket had been constructed, the pasha, apparently selfishly, wished to en­ joy the spectacle alone, and accordingly sent his slaves away, and they remained absent until the clapping of his hands brought them into the court again, when I was lowered and taken to my cell. A n d now, Consul Turner, you see how I have been treated. I have no complaint to make, and do not in­ tend to give you any trouble i n this matter at a l l , but I am fatigued with talking, and if you will charitably allow me a bed in your house to-night, I will be deeply grateful to you." " Certainly, M r . McSimmins, certainly. But how did you escape ? " " If you will permit me, Consul, after the manner of the Arabian Nights, to leave the remainder of the story untold until to-mor­ row morning, it will be a great kindness to me in my present state of f a t i g u e . " " B u t it won't take you long, M r . McSim­ mins, to give me the climax. Do you mean to say that this treatment of you lasted the whole of the past month?" " U p to this very evening, Consul. I have my own reasons for wishing to postpone the culmination of my narrative until to-morrow morning, i f you will be so good as to indulge me. Y o u see that I am in a shattered con­ dition, my nerves are wrecked, and although I do not know that I can sleep, I should like very much to go to b e d . " " Y o u are perfectly safe h e r e , " said the consul, " a n d need have no further anxiety. I will make my kawass sleep outside your door to protect y o u . " " N o , no, Consul. I don't want a Turk near me, and I distrust your kawass and all the rest of them. Would you mind to-night, if you have a double-bedded room, being in the same room with m e ? " " I can do better than t h a t , " said the con-


ROBERT sul. " T h e r e is a room open­ ing off mine, and I w i l l have a bed -put in it ; then no one can come near you without passing through my r o o m . " " T h a t w i l l do e x c e l l e n t l y , " s a i d M c S i m m i n s , seemingly much relieved. " T h e difficulty i n obtaining redress," continued the consul, " w i l l be i n proving what you say ; but somehow I find myself believing your story, incredible as it seems, and 1 also believe the pasha's secretary gave your papers to my kawass, which, in a way, is direct proof. I shall call the pasha to account to-morrow m o r n i n g . " " N o , " said McSimmins, " I do not wish redress, nor do 1 ask you to take the slightest trouble on my account." " B u t such treatment of a free citizen of a friendly coun­ t r y is intolerable, and we must at least attempt to obtain justice, although I am not con­ fident that you w i l l get any satisfaction." " W e l l , i f you don't mind, we will discuss that to-morrow morning. I really feel unable to cope with even the simplest problem to-night. Remember, I spent the fore part of this evening at the top of that fountain." The consul, without more ado, led McSimmins to his chamber, and several times that night heard him thumping round the room on the floor. E a r l y next morning, when he entered his guest's room, he found him lying awake. "I am a f r a i d , " he said, " t h a t you did not have much rest last night." " O h , indeed, I feel quite refreshed, thank you ; although I precipitated myself on the floor several times during the night. I hope I did not disturb you." " N o t at a l l , " replied the consul. " A n d now w i l l you excuse my curiosity and tell me how you escaped ? "

BARR.

43

" In a moment I wan ut his

throat."


te

THE

PASHA'S

PRISONER.

" T h a t was, after a l l , a very simple mat­ ter. I don't know whether I told you that, latterly, to save themselves trouble, they got into the habit of flinging me into the foun­ tain stark naked ; but, as I think I mentioned, I became quite expert at balancing myself on the top of the jet. Last night, when the slaves had departed, I put my hands over my head and projected myself into the air, endeavoring to fall clear of the basket, which I did. In a moment I scrambled over the marble cop­ ing, and I think the pasha was dozing, for he made no motion either to stop me or to call his slaves. I was afraid my brain would play me a trick, and so I acted with intense celerity. In a moment I was at his throat, and had him pinioned and helpless on his back. Gripping his windpipe with my left hand, I undid his scarf with my right, and soon had it bow-stringed round his neck "

street, unimpeded, the watchman opening the gate for me and closing it behind me without a word. That is the beauty of hav­ ing well-trained servants, unaccustomed to question any act a man does. F r o m there I came directly to your residence, and here I remain until you can get me on shipboard." " B u t , McSimmins, you don't mean to say you have left the pasha there all night ? " " I have but followed his own Arabic text, which you will find engraved around his foun­ tain. I have given him water, and plenty of i t . It was not for me to interfere further. I did not tell you last night, fearing you might consider it your duty to intervene. If the pasha likes his position at the top of the fountain, he has doubtless remained there; and I can assure him, from experience, that it will take him several days to learn to make the dive I made."

" Y o u surely did not strangle h i m ? " cried the consul horrified. " O h , no, I shouldn't think of doing such a thing. I have a great respect for the position of pasha. I gagged him so that he could not cry out, and tied his hands so that he could not clap them together. Then, with some difficulty, I stripped him, and dressed myself in his clothes. He seemed stunned very much by the suddenness of my onslaught ; and seeing that he was too panic-stricken to cry out, I ungagged him, and unbound his hands. Then picking him up—all the time I was struggling with him, remember, I saw three pashas, my brain wobbling about like loose nails in a rolling barrel ; but I steadily concentrated my attention on the middle pasha, and resolved to attend to the other two afterwards i f they should be still there—pick­ ing him up, then, as I say, I flung him, back downward, into the basket, and before you could snap your fingers, he was dancing on the water-spout high above the palm trees. The other two pashas had gone up with him ; and so, folding his robes around me, I walked calmly down the passage, through the Mon­ key Court, along the other passage, through the Court of Palms, and so out into the

" O h , but this is most serious, McSimmins, taking the law into your own hands in that way and endangering the person of the pasha." "I took the pasha into my own hands, but there is no law in his caravansary, and I didn't like to trouble my government over a small personal matter like this, knowing they would talk a great deal and do nothing. And, after a l l , one cannot pay a greater compliment to his host than to follow his example." " I must send down at once and see what is the outcome of t h i s . " " C e r t a i n l y , " returned McSimmins; " i t would only be a neighborly thing to d o . " But at that moment the gorgeous kawass rapped at the consul's door. " E x c e l l e n c y , " he said, a t h r i l l of fear in his quivering voice, "news has come that the Pasha Zimri has been found drowned in his own fountain. Mysterious are the ways of A l l a h , the good pasha is gone." " A h , " said McSimmins grimly, " e v e r y situation has its compensations. If he has had too much water in this world, i t is not likely that he will have to complain of an over-supply in the n e x t . "


THE

COMING

TOTAL BY

WHAT

ASTRONOMERS

WHAT

T H E Y

H A V E

ECLIPSE

PROFESSOR SIMON HOPE

TO

LEARNED

How an image of the sun may be throvn on a screen with a small, telescope or a common spy-glass.

A

T O T A L eclipse of the sun is one of the most impressive sights that nature of­ fers to the eye of man. Such a sight will be witnessed by dwellers along a certain line in Louisiana, Mississippi, Georgia, and the Carolinas on the 28th of May. To see it to the best advantage, one should be i n an ele­ vated position commanding the largest pos­ sible view of the surrounding country, espe­ cially i n the direction from which the shadow of the moon is to come. The first indication of anything unusual is to be seen, not on the earth or i n the air, but on the disk of the sun. A t the predicted moment, a little notch will be seen to form somewhere on the western edge of the sun's outline. It increases minute by minute, gradually eat­ ing away as it were the visible sun. No wonder that imperfectly civilized people, when they saw the great luminary thus diminishing in size, fancied that a dragon was devouring its substance.

OF T H E S U N .

NEWCOMB.

L E A R N FROM

FROM

THIS

PREVIOUS

ECLIPSE. ECLIPSES.

For some time, perhaps an hour, nothing will be noticed but the continued progress of the advancing moon. It will be interesting if, during this time, the observer is in the neighborhood of a tree that will permit the sun's rays to reach the ground through the small openings in its foliage. The little im­ ages of the sun which form here and there on the ground will then have the form of the partially eclipsed sun. Soon the latter ap­ pears as the new moon, only instead of i n ­ creasing, the crescent form grows thinner minute by minute. Even then, so well has the eye accommodated itself to the dimin­ ishing light, there may be little noticeable darkness until the crescent has grown very thin. If the observer has a telescope with a dark glass for viewing the sun, he will now have an excellent opportunity of seeing the mountains on the moon. The unbroken limb of the sun will keep its usual soft and uni­ form outline. But the inside of the cres­ cent, the edge of which is formed by the sur­ face of the moon, will be rough and jagged in outline. A few minutes before the last vestige of the sun is to disappear, the growing darkness will become very noticeable. It is a curious fact that the darkness does not seem to come on uniformly, but like a series of shadows, following each other at intervals of a few sec­ onds. The cause of these seeming shadows has been the subject of some discussion ; but there is reason to believe that they are an optical illusion, caused by the unequal rate at which the eye accommodates itself to the diminution of light. A short time before the fading crescent is to disappear, the observer should look toward the point from which the shadow is to come —commonly not far from the west, say be­ tween southwest and northwest. If the air is quite clear, the shadow will first be seen on the distant horizon, advancing at the rate of a mile in every two, three, or four seconds, according to circumstances. The nearer the time is to noon, the slower will


46

THE

Eclipse

COMING

TOTAL

ECLIPSE

OF THE

of June 24, 1778. VIEWS

OF T H E SOLAR

Eclipse CORONA

be the advance, and the more impressive the sight. On it comes. In a moment the spec­ tator will be enveloped in i t . The advanc­ ing mountains on the rugged surface of the moon have reached the sun's edge, and noth­ ing is seen of the latter except a row of broken fragments or points of light, shining between the hollows on the lunar surface. They last but a second or two before they vanish. Now is seen the glory of the spectacle. The sky is clear and the sun in mid-heaven, and yet no sun is visible. Where the latter ought to be, the densely black globe of the moon hangs, as i t were, in mid-air. It is surrounded by an effulgence radiating a saintly glory. This is now known as the " c o r o n a . " Though bright enough to the unaided vision, it is seen to the best advan­ tage with a telescope of very low magnifying power. Even a common opera glass may suffice. W i t h a telescope of high power only a portion of the corona is visible, and thus the finest part of the effect is lost. A common spy-glass, magnifying ten or twelve times, is better, so far as the splendor of the effect is concerned, than the largest tele­ scope. Such an instrument will show, not only the corona itself, but the so-called " p r o m i n e n c e s " — f a n t a s t i c cloud-like forms of rosy color rising here and there, seem­ ingly from the dark body of the moon. The darkness during the height of an eclipse is not so great as i t is sometimes sup­ posed to be. The sun still illuminates the at­ mosphere outside the region of the shadow, casting into the whole dark interior a " d i s ­ astrous t w i l i g h t , " as Milton calls it, strong enough to enable the astronomer to read the time by his chronometer without difficulty. It may be likened to the actual twilight about half an hour after sunset. Under any circumstances the observer w i l l

DURING

TOTAL

SUN.

of June 18, 1806.

ECLIPSES.

have but a short time to enjoy the scene. In a minute or two, perhaps three, four, or five minutes, according to circumstances, sun­ light w i l l be seen coming from the same di­ rection as that from which the shadow ad­ vanced. A few seconds more, and it flashes upon the observer. The glory disappears in a moment, and, except for the partially eclipsed sun, nature assumes her usual aspect. Much has been written about the effect of such an eclipse upon animals. Quite likely these descriptions have been exaggerated. But it has not always been thus in the case of men. A r a g o tells of a g i r l i n the south of France who was tending cattle in the fields during the eclipse of 1842, which was total over the region in which she lived. Filled with alarm at the black object which had usurped the place of the sun, she ran forward crying. When light returned and the sun reappeared, she dried her tears with the exclamation, " O h , beautiful s u n ! " Of late years a powerful aid has been lent to astronomy by photography. W i t h the sensitive chemicals now used in the photo­ graphic art it is possible to photograph celes­ tial objects which are invisible to the eye. Millions of stars are now being charted in the sky, and thousands of faint nebulae discov­ ered, which the human eye would never have seen, even when aided by the most powerful telescope. Now it is hoped that our astron­ omers will apply some method of photograph­ ing the sky around the sun during the coming eclipse. If there is any object or any group of objects there of which the attraction would produce any effect, we hope that it may be discovered. The eclipse w i l l i n some of these particu­ lars be fortunate and in others unfortunate. It is rare indeed that such a phenomenon occurs in a climate where there is so little cloud as i n the region of Georgia and North


PROFESSOR

Eclipse

SIMON

NEWCOMB.

of July 8, 1812. VIEWS

OF T H E SOLAR

Eclipse CORONA

Carolina, over which the shadow of the moon w i l l pass. On the other hand, the duration of totality is very short, little more than a minute near N e w Orleans, and less than a minute and a half in N o r t h Carolina. This compares very unfavorably with the sixminute duration of the eclipses of 1868 and 1883. But we may rest assured that our astronomers will make the best use of the brief moments at their disposal ; and i f anything is to be learned, they will undoubtedly find it out. Eclipses of the sun are of such general i n terest to the public, as well as to the astronomer, that the reader will perhaps not be wearied i f I say something more about them. A sort of dramatic interest is given to them by the fact, so familiar to a l l of us, that the sun and moon are almost exactly of the same apparent size. Each of these bodies is at certain times a little nearer to us than at others. When the moon is nearest to us, i t seems a little larger than the sun, and when farthest away, a little smaller. It makes all the difference i n the world i n the character of an eclipse which of these two is the case. In the first case, the moon w i l l entirely hide the sun; i n the second i t cannot. To see to the best advantage what will happen, the observer on the earth must choose such a place that the center of the moon will pass exactly over the center of the sun. What he then sees is called a central eclipse. If the moon is a little larger in apparent size, it hides the sun, and the eclipse is total. But i f it is smaller, the extreme edge of the sun will be seen all around the dark edge of the moon, forming a r i n g of sunlight. The eclipse is then annular. Such an eclipse does not offer the same advantage i n the study of the sun that a total one does, and is therefore of less scientific interest. But it must be very instructive to any one who

DURING

TOTAL

47

of July 28, 1861.

ECLIPSES.

has the opportunity to see it. On the average the apparent size of the moon is smaller than that of the sun, so that annular eclipses occur a little of tener than total ones. In 1865 an annular eclipse was visible in the Southern States, and another will pass through the Gulf of Mexico and across Florida on June 28, 1908. During the latter the sun will be almost covered. It is remarkable that, though the ancients were familiar with the fact of eclipses, and. the more enlightened of them perfectly understood their causes, some even the laws of their recurrence, there are very few actual accounts of these phenomena in the writings of the ancient historians. The old Chinese annals now and then record the fact that an eclipse of the sun occurred at a certain time i n some province or near some city of the E m pire. But no particulars are given. Quite recently the Assyriologists have deciphered from ancient tablets a statement that an eclipse of the sun was seen at Nineveh, B . c . 763, June 15th. Our astronomical tables show that there actually was a total eclipse of the sun on this day, during which the shadow passed 100 miles or so north of Nineveh. Perhaps the most celebrated of the ancient eclipses, and the one that has given rise to most discussion, is that known as the eclipse of ThaĂŻes. Its principal historical basis is a statement of Herodotus, that i n a battle between the Lydians and the Medes the day was suddenly turned into night. The armies thereupon ceased battle and were more eager to come to terms of peace with each other. It is added that ThaĂŻes, the Milesian, had predicted to the Ionians this change of day, even the very year in which it should occur. A n eclipse of which we have a very explicit statement in the writings of the ancients is now generally known as the eclipse


48

THE

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TOTAL

of Agothocles. Agothocles was tyrant of Syracuse, and was long engaged in war with the Carthaginians. In B.c. 310, the latter were blockading his fleet, of which he was in personal command, in the harbor of his own town. He availed himself of a momen­ tary relaxation in the blockade to sail away for the Carthaginian territory. The second day of his voyage, which lasted six days and nights in a l l , he saw a total eclipse of the sun. This observation would have been of great use to the astronomers of our time in correcting their tables, were they sure of the locality of Agothocles at the time he made it. But it has been an open question whether he sailed directly toward the south or went toward the north, making the circuit of the whole Island of Sicily. The result would be quite different in the two cases. The prob­ ability now seems to be that he passed to the north, and this accords with the conclusions from our most recent investigations on the motion of the moon. In modern times, since it became possible to predict the path of an eclipse along the earth's surface, and the time at which it would begin and end at any given place, the principal interest which astronomers at first took in the phenomenon grew out of the test which it afforded of the tables of the moon's motion. In 1715, the shadow of the moon passed over the western and southeastern parts of England, including London i n its range. Halley, who had just been made as­ tronomer royal, planned a more extended and careful series of observations on this eclipse than had ever before been made. Men in various towns near the edge of the shadow noted carefully whether the sun was totally eclipsed or not, and where it was, how long the total phase lasted. In this way it be­ came possible to lay down on a map, from ob­ servations, the limits of the moon's shadow without an error of more than two or three miles. The times of beginning and end of the total phase were also carefully noted in London and its immediate neighborhood. The French astronomers had a different method of observation, which could be equally well applied whether an eclipse was total or not. They did what any of us can do with the aid of a spy-glass : they pointed a tele­ scope at the sun, and then, instead of look­ ing into the telescope, held a screen at some little distance behind it, on which an image of the sun was thrown. By looking at this image the progress of the eclipse could be noted more easily than by looking at the sun itself, because no dark glass was necessary

ECLIPSE

OF THE

SUN.

and the observer could sit down and watch the affair at his leisure. The diameter of the sun on the screen was marked off into twelve digits, and the time by the clock at which the sun was eclipsed one, two, or three digits, and so on could be recorded. It was not until after the beginning of the nineteenth century that men began to avail themselves of total eclipses to make obser­ vations of the sun's surroundings, with a view of throwing light upon the question of the physical constitution of our great lumi­ nary. The corona and the prominences had been observed since the seventeenth century, and drawings and descriptions of the appear­ ances made ; but it does not seem to have oc­ curred to any one that questions respecting the nature or cause of these objects could be answered. Even now the reader may in­ quire how it is that we can learn anything about the sun by hiding him from our sight, and, i f we can, why a chimney would not an­ swer the purpose as well as the moon. The answer is not far to seek. In the daytime the whole air around the sun is so brightly illuminated that it is impossible to see any­ thing in the immediate neighborhood of that body. W e may cut off the sunlight from our eyes by a chimney, but we cannot cut off the illumination of the air except by an object far above the air. The size and dis­ tance of the moon are such that it cuts off a great deal of light for hundreds of miles around us, and enables us to see the region close around the sun through an almost dark sky. Even when curiosity as to the corona and prominences began to be aroused, it was long before any answers to questions about them were apparent. A n y one could look into a telescope, describe what he saw, and, i f a good draughtsman, make a picture of the scene. But what could he learn from such a picture ? So much in the dark were even the most advanced astronomers on the sub­ ject up to the middle of the nineteenth cen­ tury, that it was not established whether the corona belonged to the sun or to the moon. If, as might be the case, the latter was sur­ rounded by a very rare atmosphere, even one so rare that we could not see it on ordinary occasions, its bright illumination by the rays of the sun might show as a corona around the moon. In 1851 a total eclipse was visi­ ble in Northern Europe, which enabled the question of the whereabouts of the red prom­ inences to be settled. It was found that, as the moon traveled along over the sun, she traveled over the prominences also, advanc-


PROFESSOR

SIMON

NEWCOMB.

49

ing on those in front, uncovering those be­ form of a gas shining by its own light. The hind. This showed that these objects cer­ spectrum of such a gas is composed of bright tainly belonged to the sun and not to the lines, which are but little enfeebled to what­ moon. The same would probably be true of ever extent the spectrum as a whole may be the corona, but in this case it was difficult spread out by the prism through which it to reach so positive a conclusion. passes. But the sun's light reflected from About 1863-64 the spectroscope began the air is more and more enfeebled the more to be applied to researches on the heavenly it is spread out. Consequently, i f a spec­ bodies. M r . (now S i r William) Huggins, of troscope of sufficient power were directed at London, was a pioneer in observing the spec­ the sun just outside its border, the brilliancy t r a of the stars and nebulas. F o r several of the light reflected from the air might be years it did not seem that much was to be so diminished that the bright lines from the learned i n this way about the sun. The year gases surrounding the sun would be seen. 1868 at length arrived. On August 18th It was anticipated that thus the prominences there was to be a remarkable total eclipse of would be made visible. Both of the inves­ the sun, visible i n India. The shadow was tigators we have mentioned endeavored to 140 miles b r o a d ; get a sight of the the duration of prominences in the t o t a l phase this way; but it was more than six was not until Oc­ minutes. The tober 20th, two French sent M r . months after the Janssen, one of Indian eclipse, their leading that M r . Lockyer spectroscopics, succeeded in hav­ to o b s e r v e the ing an instrument eclipse in India of sufficient pow­ and see what he er c o m p l e t e d . could find out. Then, at the first Wonderful was opportunity, he his report. The f o u n d t h a t he red prominences c o u l d see t h e which had per­ prominences plexed scientists w i t h o u t an for two centuries eclipse ! were found to be A t that time immense masses communication of glowing hydro­ M A P S H O W I N G T H E P A T H O F T H E C O M I N G E C L I P S E ( M A Y 28, with India was by gen, rising here 1900), W I T H T H E E X A C T T I M E I N T H E M O R N I N G A T W H I C H mail, so that for and there from T H E E C L I P S E W I L L OCCUR A T VARIOUS POINTS D E S I G N A T E D . the news of M r . various parts of Janssen's discov­ the sun, of a size compared with which our ery astronomers had to wait until a ship earth was a mere speck. This was not a l l . arrived. By a singular coincidence his re­ After the sunlight reappeared, Janssen began port and M r . L o c k y e r ' s communication an­ to watch these objects in his spectroscope. nouncing his own discovery reached the He followed them as more and more of the French Academy of Sciences at the same sun came out, and continued to see them meeting. This eminent body, with pardon­ after the eclipse was over. They could be able enthusiasm, caused a medal to be struck observed at any time when the air was suffi­ in commemoration of the new method of re­ search, i n which the profiles of Lockyer and ciently clear and the sun high in the sky. By a singular coincidence this same dis­ Janssen appeared together as co-discoverers. covery was made independently in London Since that time the prominences are regularly without any eclipse. M r . J . Norman L o c k - mapped out from day to day by spectroscopic yer was then rising into prominence as an observers i n various parts of the world. enthusiastic worker with the spectroscope. It occurred independently to him and to M r . Huggins that the heat in the neighborhood of the sun was so intense that any matter that existed there would probably take the

Up to the present time the question of the corona is an unsettled one. There appears to be some yet unsolved mystery enveloping its origin. E v e r y t h i n g about i t shows that it cannot be an atmosphere of the sun, as


50

THE

COMING

TOTAL

ECLIPSE

was once supposed. Were such the case, it would, unless composed of some substance vastly lighter than hydrogen, be drawn down to the sun's surface by the powerful attrac­ tion of that body. It could not rise hun­ dreds of thousands of miles from the sun, as the corona does; and even i f it did, its light would be smooth and uniform, whereas the coronal light has a sort of hairy or fibrous structure. This may be seen on most of the good photographs of the corona. Professor F . H . Bigelow has noticed a re­ markable resemblance between these seem­ ing fibers and the curves which iron filings scattered over paper assume when we place a magnet under the paper. He has thus formed a theory of the corona based on some action of the sun akin to magnetism. The coincidence between the results of this theory and the general figure of the corona, especially the direction of the fibers, is, to say the least, very curious. Some sort of polarization in the direction of the sun's axis seems to be clearly indicated. But we have here no explanation as to how the matter forming the corona is kept from falling into the sun by the powerful attraction of grav­ ity, which is there twenty-seven times what it is on the earth. Quite likely this is brought about by some form of electrical or other re­ pulsion, similar to that which is seen to act in the tail of a comet. Another mystery is the nature of the long streamers, sometimes extending far beyond the outer parts of the corona. Some anal­ ogy has been suspected between these and the streamers of the aurora. The view has thus arisen that the corona may be an au­ rora around the sun. More observations and studies must be made, both upon the aurora and the phenomena of terrestrial magnetism, before we can reach any decided conclusion on this question. The composite nature of the spectrum of the corona shows that the substance which forms it is not all in the same state. Most of the light which it emits gives an unbroken spectrum, seemingly without dark lines. This shows that it emanates partly from hot par­ ticles, and not wholly from diffusing gases. It is likely that this matter shines partly by its own light and partly by the reflected light of the sun. But there are also bright lines in the spectrum, one of which has particu­ larly attracted the attention of investigators ever since its discovery in 1869. It seems to be emitted by some gas not known to ex­ ist upon the surface of the earth, and to which the name coronium has been given.

OF THE

SUN.

It is interesting to remark in this connection that the solar spectrum shows at least one other substance in the sun which was for­ merly not known to exist on the earth, and which was therefore called helium. But, only a few years ago, this substance was found in clevite, a somewhat rare mineral of N o r w a y . Possibly we may yet discover coronium somewhere on the earth. We may consider i t as certain that the corona, considered as a mass of matter, is a very flimsy affair. When we recall that its extent is to be measured by hundreds of thousands, nay, millions of miles, and that it surrounds a globe of more than a hundred times the diameter of the earth, and there­ fore having more than ten thousand times the earth's surface, we might think of it as a very massive structure. But we should be deceived. A few quarts of water condensed in the air will make a very respectable-look­ ing fog or cloud. Such a cloud in the im­ mediate neighborhood of the sun would shine with a hundred thousand times the light which any terrestial cloud ever shone with in the brightest rays of the sun. Quite likely, if we should surround the earth with a corona like that of the sun, we should never be able to see it, or to detect its existence in the air or above the air, by any research we could make. But an observer on the moon would see i t plainly. It would be the same with the tail of a comet, which is so tenuous that we can see a small star through a million miles of its thickness. F i f t y miles' thick­ ness would not suffice to make it visible in the brightest rays of the sun. Perhaps the most interesting object which the spectroscopists have examined during total eclipses is known as the " r e v e r s i n g l a y e r . " This was first discovered by Pro­ fessor Y o u n g , during the eclipse of 1870, which he observed in Spain. He was no­ ticing the changes in the appearance of the spectrum given by the sun's light when the moon was nearly cutting i t off. A t the very last moment, when no part of the sun was visible except its extreme edge, the dark lines of the spectrum were changed to bright ones. A s the last ray disappeared, all the bright lines of the spectrum flashed out. This showed that the substances which com­ pose the sun exist at its immediate surface as a layer of glowing gases, all substances being vaporized by the fervent heat which there prevails. This heat is more intense than anything we can produce by terrestrial means. The questions that relate to the sun are


PROFESSOR

SIMON

not the only ones that total eclipses enable the astronomer to attack. Such of our readers as have specially interested them­ selves i n celestial science are doubtless aware that the motion of the planet Mercury shows a minute deviation which might be produced by the attraction of a planet, or group of planets, between i t and the sun. This de­ viation was first discovered by L e V e r r i e r , celebrated as having computed the position of Neptune before i t had ever been recog­ nized in the telescope. H i s announcement set people to looking for the supposed planet. About 1860, a D r . Lescarbault, a country physician of France who possessed a small telescope, thought he had seen this planet passing over the disk of the sun. But it was soon proved that he must have been mis­ taken. Another more experienced astron­ omer, who was looking at the sun on the same day, failed to see anything except an ordinary spot, which probably misled the phy­ sician-astronomer. N o w , for forty years the sun has been carefully scrutinized and pho­ tographed from day to day at several stations without anything of the sort being seen. Still, i t is possible that little planets so minute as to escape detection in passing over the sun's disk may revolve i n the region in question. If so, their l i g h t would be com­ pletely obscured by that of the sky, so that they might not ordinarily be visible. B u t there is still a chance that, during a total eclipse of the sun, when the l i g h t is cut off from the sky, they could be seen. Observers have, from time to time, looked for them during total eclipses. In one instance some­ thing of the sort was supposed to be found. D u r i n g the eclipse of 1878, Professor W a t ­ son, of A n n A r b o r , and Professor Lewis Swift, both able and experienced observers, thought that they had detected some such bodies. But c r i t i c a l examination left no doubt that what Watson saw was a pair of fixed stars which had always been i n that place. How it was with the observations of Professor Swift has never been certainly as­ certained, because he was not able to lay down the position with such certainty that positive conclusions could be drawn. The Pickerings, of the H a r v a r d observa­ tory, have devised a special combination of four photographic telescopes, to take the region on each side of the sun during the total phase, and see whether any new objects are found on the negatives. There is a curious law of recurrence of eclipses, which has been known from ancient times. It is based on the fact that the sun

NEWCOMB.

51

and moon return to nearly the same positions relative to the node and perigee of the moon's orbit after a period of 6,585 days, 8 hours, or 18 years and 12 days. Hence, eclipses of every sort repeat themselves at this i n ­ terval. F o r example, the coming eclipse may be regarded as a repetition of those which occurred in the years 1846, 1864, and 1882. B u t when such an eclipse recurs, it is not visible in the same part of the earth, because of the excess of eight hours in the period. During this eight hours the earth performs one-third of a rotation on its axis, which brings a different part under the sun. Each eclipse is visible in a region about onethird of the way round the world, or 120° of longitude, west of where it occurred before. Only after three periods will the recurrence be near the same region. But in the mean­ time the moon's line of motion w i l l have changed so that the path of its shadow will pass farther north or south. A study of the eclipses of the series to which the present one belongs will illustrate the law i n question. The first one that we need mention is that of 1846, A p r i l 25. The middle point of the shadow-path, that is, the point where the total phase occurred at noon, was then in the West Indies, among the Bahama Islands. This was the first eclipse of the series that was really total, and here i t was total only near the middle of the path. The path passed from the Pacific Ocean over northern Mexico, touched the northern end of Cuba, and crossed the A t ­ lantic Ocean to the African coast of the Mediterranean. The central point was in 25° north latitude. The next recurrence was on May 6, 1864. The shadow swept over the Pacific Ocean, and the middle point of its path was i n 32° north latitude. A f t e r the lapse of another period, the eclipse returned in 1882, May 17. The shadow swept across the great desert of Sahara, passed through E g y p t and the continent of A s i a , leaving the earth in the Pacific Ocean south of Japan. The mid­ dle point was now in 39° north latitude. N e x t we have our present eclipse of May 28th. A f t e r passing from New Orleans over the Gulf States along the line shown on our map, the shadow w i l l enter the A t l a n t i c Ocean at Norfolk, cross over to the Spanish Peninsula, and pass along the Mediterranean into Northern A f r i c a . The central point will be i n the Atlantic Ocean, in 55° north latitude. D u r i n g the three periods of recurrence the changes in the respective positions of the sun and moon have been such as to throw


52

THE

COMING

TOTAL

ECLIPSE

the shade some seven degrees farther north at each recurrence, or about twenty degrees in a l l . That is, i t w i l l now pass twenty de­ grees farther north than it passed in 1846. The next period of 6,585 days will bring us to 1918, June 8. The shadow will then pass from near Japan over the northern part of the Pacific Ocean, strike our Pacific coast near the mouth of the Columbia River, and travel over the United States in a southeast­ erly direction, through Oregon, Idaho, south­ west Wyoming, Colorado, Arkansas, and the Gulf States and Florida. Somewhere in Mis­ sissippi or Alabama i t will cross the path of the present eclipse. A t the point of cross­ ing the inhabitants will have the pleasure of seeing two successive total eclipses of the series. Their fortune, however, will not be so remarkable as that of the inhabitants at a point in the Northwest who saw both of the total eclipses of 1869 and 1878. The series will continue at the regular i n ­ tervals we have mentioned until 2044, A u ­ gust 23, when the shadow w i l l barely touch the earth in the region of the N o r t h Pole. After that it will skip our planet entirely. There are two series of eclipses remark­ able for the long duration of the total phase. To one of these the eclipse of 1868, already mentioned, belongs. This recurred in 1886, and will recur again in 1904. Unfortunately, at the first recurrence, the shadow was cast almost entirely on the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, so that it was not favorable for ob­ servation by astronomers. That of 1904, September 9, will be yet more unfortunate for us, because the shadow will pass only over the Pacific Ocean. Possibly, however, it may touch some island where observations may be made. The recurrence of 1922, Sep­ tember 21, will be visible in Northern Aus­ tralia, where the duration of totality will be about four minutes. To the other series belongs the eclipse of 1883. This will recur in 1901, on May 18th, when the moon's shadow will sweep from near Madagascar and cross the Indian Ocean, Sumatra, Borneo, and Papua. Unfortunately, this region is very cloudy, and however care­ fully the preparations for observations may be made, the astronomers w i l l run a great risk of not seeing the eclipse. But hope springs eternal in the human breast ; and i t is not likely that observers will be deterred from an heroic attempt by any threats of the weather.

OF THE

SUN

1973 i t will exceed seven minutes, so that as far as duration is concerned our successors w i l l have a more remarkable opportunity than their ancestors have enjoyed for many centuries. The question may arise as to the degree of precision with which the path of an eclipse can be predicted by the astronomer. It is sometimes supposed that he can determine a hundred years in advance, and to the exact second, when such a phenomenon will begin or end. This is a great exaggeration of his powers. One entertaining such an idea may have a very high opinion of the power of modern mathematics, but he has no concep­ tion of the difficulties of the problem of the moon's motion. The pull which the sun ex­ erts on the earth and moon by its gravita­ tion second after second, minute after min­ ute, hour after hour, day after day, and year after year must be known, and its effect con­ tinually added up by a mathematic method of which man had no conception until the time of Leibnitz and N e w t o n . The changes in the positions of the two bodies caused by the pull of the sun continually changes the action of that pull, because, as one will read­ ily see, the latter depends upon the relative positions, while the positions are continually changed by the pull. This is what makes the problem so complicated.

If we had only the sun to deal with, we might hope to get along. B u t the planets, especially Venus, come i n , and insist on hav­ ing their little pull also. Before their action was found out, there were some deviations in the motion of the moon which are now at­ tributed to the action of Venus. To com­ pute this action is the most complex problem which the mathematical astronomer has to deal w i t h , and he has not yet succeeded in solving i t to his satisfaction. A n d when he has solved i t , he is by no means at the end of his trouble. There are several indications that the rotation of the earth slowly changes from time to time, our planet turning on its axis sometimes a little faster and sometimes a little slower. The change is, indeed, very slow ; not more than two or three thousandths of a second in a day. But, i f it takes to ro­ tating faster even by this minute amount, it will get ahead of its calculated place by a second in a year and a minute in sixty years ; and then the astronomer who fixes his point of observation so that he w i l l be carried to exactly the center of the moon's shadow, according to calculations made sixty years A t the successive recurrences the duration before, may find himself out of the way by of totality will be longer and longer through several miles. the twentieth century. In 1937, 1955, and


MISS

CULLENDER'S

W h a t makes the matter difficult is that these changes i n the earth's rotation can­ not, so far as we have yet learnt, be exactly observed, or even predicted ; they probably arise from changes in the position of ice around the N o r t h Pole, changes in ocean currents, and perhaps i n the movement of the winds. The reason that they cannot be directly determined is that we cannot make any clock which w i l l keep time year after year without the error of a second. The rotation of the earth on its axis affords the astronomer the only measure of time he can use in his work, and i f it goes wrong, he is,

LAMB.

for the time being, left at sea. But his motto to-day is always forward ; he has not lost one particle of enthusiasm because his science has been progressing for 2,000 years. He w i l l leave no device untried to learn everything that is to be learned about the motions of the earth and heavenly bodies, confident that i f he must fail, his succes­ sors will carry on his work to perfection. If to-day he cannot tell his successors of the year 2000 when to expect an eclipse within one minute by the clock, he of the year 2000 may do it for his successor of 2100.

MISS C U L L E N D E R ' S B Y TIGHE

53

LAMB.

HOPKINS,

A u t h o r o f " T h e M a s t e r - k e y o f N e w g a t e , " " A s It F e l l O n t , " " A T a l e o f a T u b , " etc.

T H E

STORY

OF

A

SINGULAR

I'm very sorry to see you back again, B o n e , " said the wardress. " D o n ' t you go g i t t i n ' your hair off about me, M i s s , " returned the pris­ oner imperturbably. She was getting her own hair off, not in the sense of metaphor, as she spoke. It may be superfluous to observe

PRISON

FRIENDSHIP.

that the rules do not allow a prisoner to ad­ dress an officer in this style ; but when the officer is a little bit of a thing, and the c u l ­ prit an impenitent giantess, it is not well to be always thinking of the rules. " Y o u promised us you were going to live quietly; you know you d i d . " " C h a n g e d me m i n d . " " A n d I'm really afraid, Bone, that you have not learned better manners."

C o p y r i g h t , 1900, b y T i g h e H o p k i n s .

A l l rights reserved.


54

MISS

CULLENDER'S

" C o m e back to get a hextra polish on 'em, p'raps. Oh, i t ' s a rare shop for man­ ners, ain't it, Miss ? A n ' I reckon you've about took enough off of m e . " " I shall finish sooner i f you will sit s t i l l . W e l l , now that you are back, I do hope, Bone, you are not going to be very trouble­ some." "Ah! That depends, Miss. I'm goin' to be'ave accordin'. If they comes any of their tricksy-wicksies, i f they don't let me wear me cap same as 1 fancies it, i f they gits messin' of the vittles, i f they puts me to live next a party what prays at night, i f they keeps back my letters to the 'Ome Sekkatary, i f they don't jolly well let me have my little smash when 1 feels like it, i f they reports me more than once a week, i f they starts me schoolin' agen with a spellin'book, i f " " T h e r e , Bone, I think that will do. Y o u know quite well the rules about t a l k i n g . " " A n ' hif," continued the prisoner, with asperity, " I ain't never to be allowed to finish me little say same as any other lady " " B o n e , " said the mild-voiced wardress, " d o you remember what you promised Miss Cullender the day you went out ? " " L o r ' bless me, Miss, i f I hadn't clean bang fergot her! F e r g i t Miss Cullender? W e l l , I'm a black bad un, an' no e r r o r ! Miss, my dear, how is me angel Miss Cul­ lender ? " " I ' m sorry to tell you she has gone, Bone. She left us a month ago. Now, do try and behave as you used to do when she was over you!" But the entreaty was ill-timed. " W h a t ! " cried the giantess. " I don't believe i t ! Where is she ? Where's Miss Cullender— me own Miss C u l l e n d e r ? " " H u s h , hush! Be quiet, Bone, do! The matron will be here, and I shall have to re­ port you on your very first n i g h t . " " R i p - p o r t m e ! " with a scream of con­ tempt in crescendo. " Go and report me, you low little hussy! A lot I care! Ain't I made 'em report me and report me t i l l they was sick on it ? Where's Miss Cullender ? Fetch the men in, and run me into the darks.* Put the waiskit on me, and the darbies too. If Miss Cullender's gone, I lay I make a smash of i t to-night, an' i t ' l l take more than the—lot of you to stop me. I'll " The great swarthy creature was upright * Officers f r o m the m a l e s i d e are o c c a s i o n a l l y s u m m o n e d to t h e f e m a l e s i d e , to t a k e a v i o l e n t w o m a n i n t o c h a r g e . " T h e d a r k s " are t h e o l d - f a s h i o n e d p u n i s h m e n t c e l l s , t h e use o f w h i c h has been entirely discontinued.

LAMB.

now and bellowing, her hair lying in black wisps about her feet. The little wardress, not a bit afraid, was considering her course. She knew that Bone would very likely fall to biting when she had finished barking, but on the female side they are more familiar with parleyings than on the male side, where the " c a t " is always under the governor's coatt a i l s ; and the wardress, although very angry now, was still for a via media. A door at the end of the long bare room opened, and Madam Bone wheeled about, flaming, for a rencounter with her old enemy the matron. But the matron did not appear. Instead, there drifted in two wardresses, carrying between them the placid figure of a young prisoner in a swoon. L i k e Bone, she was evidently a fresh arrival, for her light brown hair was still untouched under the prison cap.* She seemed not above twenty years of age, small and slender, with rather pretty, irregular features ; and the brown serge dress under the blue check apron seemed maliciously to mock a virginal soft outline. There were tear stains on the face. " T h e r e ' s a cruel sight for y o u ! " said Bone. " S t a r t e d on the pore young thing already, have you ? Send her 'ome to her mother." " H o l d your t o n g u e ! " said the first ward­ ress. " I f you speak another word you'll be reported, as you deserve to be. Why have you brought this g i r l here ? " she in­ quired. " S h e just passed through reception," said one of the two wardresses. " I was bring­ ing her to have her hair cut, and she fainted in the corridor. Miss Bromston helped me to carry her i n . " The first wardress—herself such another little countrified slender thing as the faint­ i n g prisoner—glided across the room, and stooped over the unfortunate with a sister's face of pity, not noted of the defiant Bone. " S h e must not stay here. Y o u must please take her up to the infirmary, and let the doctor see her at o n c e . " The other two wardresses raised their weak burden again, the door closed behind them, and the interruption was at an end. " Give us quite a turn, Miss, didn't it ? " observed Bone, but no answer was accorded. " H o ! -Leastways it give me a turn, ' ' con­ tinued Bone; " b u t I expect I'm kind of soft. W e ain't all built the same, an' that's a fact. A n ' now, Miss, i f you've done makin' a show of me, I ' l l withdraw to me apartment, * It is as w e l l to state t h a t t h e h o r r i d p r a c t i c e o f c u t t i n g off the h a i r of f e m a l e p r i s o n e r s has been q u i t e d i s c a r d e d .


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if you please; and just a slice of buttered " I t ' s that T i b ! " she shrieked. "Put toast an' a kipper to me t e a . " her out of i t . D ' y e 'ear, some on you screws ? Put that convick somewheres else. There was a moaning in the officers' mess- I won't 'ave the toad next door to me. room upon the word of Bone's r e t u r n . It Where's the screw that should be sneakin' was two years since she had gone out i n a this ward ? You're there right enough when mood of elegant humility, t a k i n g with her a you ain't wanted. Shove that Tib i n the prayer-book, the gift of her good genius darks, an' gag her! A i n ' t I goin' to get Miss Cullender. Where was that prayer- no sleep ? I'// show y o u ! " book now ? Or, what was more to the point, A new demonstration followed against the where were the fruits of Miss Cullender's door of Bone's cell, which those soles of ministrations, which, dating from her first brass hammered and battered until the prison black eye, closed i n the hour of grace that seemed in danger of collapse. The whole saw the gates shut on Bone, with infinite hall was now aroused, and the defeated, weary wardress went up and down vainly entreat­ promises of good on her part ? " O h ! " said a wardress, dipping into the ing quiet. jam which made a treat on pay-day, "if only The matron was fetched from bed. It Miss Cullender would come back! " was clear that such a breaking-out was i m ­ " W e l l , that's no use, because she w o n ' t , " minent as is known only upon the female from the other side of the table. " Y o u side. The ringleader must be put away, for don't give up being matron to come back the din was spreading, and a hall in revolt and play angel to Bone. Has any one seen on the female side means, sooner or later, a prison in riot. The matron gave the word, the b r u t e ? " " I t ' s enough to have heard her for the and the signal-bell was rung for help. In less than a minute two warders pre­ present. Miss Aylmer was cropping her hair, and she roared out she'd make a smash of i t sented themselves at the light iron gate of the to-night because Miss Cullender had gone. hall, and were passed i n . The cells here were I vote we keep her in the darks a l l the time. furnished with two doors, the outer one an Do you remember the fashion she set in sui­ iron grating, the inner solid. A s the ward­ ress on duty passed her hand through the cides?" " D o I r e m e m b e r ? " cried a chief ward­ grating to draw the bolt of the second door, ress at the head of the table. " I had her Bone rose exultant from the floor. " S a i d I ' d make a smash of it, didn't I? hall. Tied her stay-lace round her neck, and sat down to wait the next comer. The Have the boys come ? That's a l l right. night after, just as I had come off duty, I A i n ' t set eyes on one of 'em this two year. was called down again, and there were thirty- I 'ope they're pretty fresh, 'cos I means L o r ' , Miss Stewart, five idiots s i t t i n g on their beds, their eyes business with 'em. out of their heads, half-throttled i n their m a ' a m " — t o the m a t r o n — " t o think that there 'orrid Tib should ha' fetched you out stay-laces. U g h ! I wish I was out of i t . " A young wardress entered the mess-room of bed! Such rubbish as comes here, I in a flurry, and took the nearest chair. n e v e r ! " "Take this woman to the punishment cells, " T h e r e ' s a beast just come in from recep­ t i o n , " said she, " t h i r t y feet high, as b i g as please," said the matron. Nothing liked Bone better than to get a a town hall, and as black as blacking. She's on her back in the cell, pounding the door warder under one arm and use him as a with her feet, and yelling for Miss Cullender. weapon of offense upon his fellow, a scenic feat without its parallel in that theater. But W h o ' s Miss C u l l e n d e r ? " " T h i s was Miss Cullender's lamb, my one of the knights in waiting that evening was dear," replied somebody. " M i s s Cullen­ old Master Makewell—Johnny M a k e w e l l — der was the only one on the staff who could who had an asthma on his chest and a heart put a ribbon round her neck, and Miss Cul­ passing weak ; and Bone knew him very well. lender's g o n e . " But i n the course of the evening Bone had once more forgotten her Miss Cullender, and was vociferating a new grievance. The ten­ ant of a neighboring cell had voiced a shrill protest against the uproar, and Bone, hav­ ing recognized the voice, had promptly de­ manded the ejection of its owner.

" I t ' s never Johnny ? " says she. " W e l l , Johnny, I always did say, and always shall, that the woman as would lay a hand on you —and who's your pal, my dear ? I couldn't never set about one pore chap by hisself; there must be a pair on ye, or i t a i n ' t fair. So come along, w e ' l l go a little quiet walk together."


56

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And yielding herself up, Bone went forth like Miss Cullender's lamb to the darks. Her cell, finely disarrayed, was l o c k e d ; the matron returned to bed; and the tired ward­ ress gave herself to the task of soothing the raging tenants of the other dens. This is what it is sometimes like on the female side. Over the way, where the shornheads of the other sex abide, it is seldom if ever thus. The rules are alike, or pretty nearly alike, on both sides of the wall ; but whereas on the male side rules are framed for most inevitable observance, the same rules on the female side are for somewhat other and looser application, by those who must Construe the times to their necessities.

On this side, ribs of steel ; on that side, bands to draw tight or to relax at need. Madam Bone, with the strength of two or­ dinary men and the passions of the jungle, could flout and spit upon authority, and at the last reduce it to a mock, being a mere woman. L i t t l e crazy Benjamin Cudd could be scourged red t i l l be spelled authority like his primer, being a lord of creation. In the ward from which Bone had been escorted there lay that night a murderess whom the commotion had greatly moved. It was her first evening in prison, and she shook and sobbed under her coverlet. \ \ ithin an hour or two of her arrival she had given Bone what that wicked beauty called a " t u r n , " by being carried inanimate into the hair-dressing department. Her own light brown locks had been taken from her since then, and she thought this was a punishment added to the sentence of the judge because she had killed her baby. She was twentytwo; her name was Meadows; and the lover who had left her to the law had called her Elsie. There is always an Elsie Meadows in some ward of the prisons. Sometimes she is witless, sometimes flinty and phlegmatic, sometimes very pleased and gay at having missed the gallows, and sometimes listening day and night for the bells of childhood. For a fortnight Belle Bone kept the strict­ est seclusion of the darks, whereby the staff got a little ease of her. F o r the darks were a dwelling apart, in a kind of lobby shut off from the prisoners' wards, and though the officer on duty there could and generally did have a dour time of it, echoes of the explo­ sions which burst at intervals or incessantly from the little black caverns had but a nar­ row range, for the walls were thick and the doors were thickly padded.

LAMB.

Bone's energy and invention in the darks would sure have .

.

.

got the voice in hell for excellence.

She worked incredibly to entertain herself and harass all her keepers. Fed almost en­ tirely on bread and water, she must have nour­ ished herself from within, for her strength abated nothing from day to day. A n hour together she would use her head as a batter­ ing ram against the concrete wall, and would spend an hour or two afterward springing from the floor to the grating above and wrenching at the bars. She played foot­ ball with her tin pint, and maintained a run­ ning comment on the game in bolted lan­ guage. Punctually once a day she hanged herself in her garters or a strip rent from her gown. Fresh bed stuff must be passed in to her every night, for in the morning she made ribbons of i t . She rehearsed in her biggest voice memoirs of the matron in which that overwrought and sober-sided woman was credited with above a dozen gallant pasts. In the same style, and that all might hear who would, she arraigned herself before the visiting director, an elderly magistrate, at once the fear and the butt of the female side, who wore a cherished lock of reddish hair on the summit of a thinly covered scalp. Bone played her own part and the director's in tones that would have filled a colosseum, turning the tables on him at the fall of the curtain with this invariable t a g : " A n ' that's what I think of you, old A l l y Sloper with a top-knot!" These vociferous and studied efforts, issu­ ing from the total dark of the penal cell at all hours of the day and often in the dead middle of the night, had an evil effect on the nerves of a listener, and were not calcu­ lated to make the artist remembered in her orisons by the scapegoat who chanced to be on duty. Nearly all of these wardresses were over­ worked, and many of them had their nerves continually on edge. It was a fifteen or six­ teen hours' day three days a week, and a twelve hours' day the rest. The female side holds a l l the vices that are, and others; and the vehement savage who was always ready to fling a stool, a pint, or a pair of scissors at the convenient head of her officer, had her parallel i n the sullen, quiet schemer who would plot for days to bring trouble or disgrace upon the wardress that had been her steady friend. L y i n g , lewd, cruel, and full of all uncharitableness—of such


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gifts compacted were the animals who kept the darks in tenants and the staff upon the rack. They have not to use on the male side that variety of effort which is needed to discipline the female side. On the male side the day goes mostly, as it were, by c l o c k w o r k ; no departing from the rules ; and very curious it is that the criminal man, who can by no means discipline himself i n freedom, becomes i n prison a very model of obedience and selfrestraint under the harshest code our social system knows. But the fallen, lawlesswoman, who by a l l history's showing is closer " i n Belial's g r i p " than the most wicked man, is often worse in prison than ever she is out of i t . The silent cell, the ordered workroom, the drear, walled yard where she must trudge w i t h even steps along a measured strip of asphalt—these are settings of the life of prison which teach her, not patience, but re­ volt ; and one day she makes what they call a smash of it, after which it is the mischief and all to cajole or coerce her back to steadi­ ness, for she has learned that she can give worse than she can get. Hence, on the part of the staff, that cease­ less sounding of the depths of compromise, those efforts to win over, to interest, to hu­ mor, to appease, to tame, to make the rules apt to the case; for on the male side they govern masses by a word, and on the female side they seek to lead the individual. They tell me that the little pension—so long to wait for—is rarely able to be earned in full in this dreadful service. A t the end of a fortnight's " s o l i t a r y , " Bone expressed herself ready to join the other ladies. There were times when she announced her intention of going to the darks, to " h a v e it out w i t h herself," and it was usually politic to let her go ; and if, when sent there i n disgrace, she thought to put a period to her penance by the promise of behavior, i t was, i n general, the part of wisdom to release her. So, on a Sunday morning, there marched to chapel with about 600 other daughters of the night—thieves, burglars, shop-lifters, murderesses, swindlers, and beautiful harpies who had put off their furs in the reception-room—Belle Bone the Magnificent, Miss Cullender's lamb, with her cap trimmed in defiance of the rules and her gown fixed quite i n the style of fashion. She swept to her place, very b i g and fine, ignor­ ing the frown of the matron, and heeding as little the prisoners' titter of delight. The wardress who sat beside the gigantic woman did not cease to regard her with apprehen­

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sive sidelong glance, but Bone's conduct was exemplary. Right i n front of her was the little fragile Meadows, whose face never lost its look of fear, and who was evidently very close on tears during the hymns. Bone, rejoicing in her thews, and i n the knowledge that she could do almost as it liked her in the prison, eyed the frightened neophyte with a mea­ sured glance. Bone had never been fright­ ened in prison, and had never felt in the least like c r y i n g , but she had come as near to being shocked as was possible with her when she had seen this g i r l carried in fainting on the night of her arrival. A s a class, pris­ oners on the female side are without kind­ ness for one another, but when friendships are made, these storm-tossed creatures are sometimes quite demonic i n their jealousies. A s they filed out of church Bone whispered to the g i r l , " D o n ' t think you ain't got no friend, honey. There's one a-watchin' y o u . " The g i r l , who seemed to draw her breath in terror, neither looked up nor answered, and probably did not know who had spoken to her ; but as Bone went i n front she started with new alarm at the back view of that colossal convict. On Sunday evenings the wards showed a curious sight, when the women sat at the doors of their cells in a dim light and heard prayers read. Bone had observed with a sat­ isfied sniff that the enemy Tib had been re­ moved, and she was now to scheme for the company of the protegee who did not know her. But the g i r l was far away at the other end of the ward, her eyes, as usual, chained downward. Bone was an adept at scrawling on a bit of paper called a " s t i f f " an ungrammatical challenge to an enemy or a fierce protest of affection to a friend, and with all the vigi­ lance of the wardresses, it was not difficult to get such messages conveyed from one end of prison to the other ; but she was shrewd enough to guess the risk of t r y i n g this kind of communication with that little shivering Meadows. There was yet another plan. Prisoners of approved behavior were allowed sometimes to share a cell during certain w o r k i n g hours ; and now and then a woman of gentle ways (many such on the female side) was sent to use them i n the cell of some poor distracted or passion-riven sister. Bone was going to be good, that she might have that whitefaced little Meadows to live w i t h her. Bone would call her by her Christian name. But Bone's aspirations toward a nice con-


58

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duct were so much interfered with. The next day, at exercise, it was the enemy Tib who had prepared a surprise for her. It was December, and the women were muffled up for their hour's sodden tramp, and the ward­ ress was shaking in her bear-skin cloak. Presently Tib, a squat-framed vixen with a mouth like a crater, produced something from beneath her cloak and held it up. It was a rag doll, which a lenient fancy might accept as an effigy of Bone. Down the ranks it went from hand to hand to the tune of a guffaw, until it stayed with Miss Cullender's lamb. Then was that lamb transformed, oh, ter­ ribly! She bounded from her place, gath­ ered the doll-maker in her arms, rushed with her across the yard to where the snow had drifted deep, flung her in there, and then set about her with two efficient hands. The wardress blew her whistle, and others came running ; but this was eminently Bone's morn­ ing out, and they could not drag her from the prey. Last of all came the men, and it was a pity that the one with a beard had not stayed to shave it, for Bone's grip was fatal to those appendages. But as the procession fared tussling and tossing through the corridor, who should be encountered shrinking fearfully against the wall but Elsie Meadows. Bone looked full on her, and grew silent; but the girl re­ mained cowering, with her hands over her face. The lamb went lamb-like to the darks. More than that, when the bolts of the door were shot she was just as quiet, and the as­ tonished wardress doing sentry-go at that usually harassed outpost heard not a sound to fret the dragging hours. Night came, and the silence night should own was felt throughout the darks. It was reported in the wardresses' room, where they thought it more ominous than reassuring. " She's saving it up for a bit later," one of them remarked. " I'm glad I'm not on there to-night." " She may have gone and hanged herself, you know," observed another, and there was a visible brightening of faces, until the ward­ ress who had come off duty in the darks stated that the prisoner was " all there." The officer on night duty in the penal ward must knock every hour at every cell in oc­ cupation, and if the inmate will not answer, she must put her arm through the outer grating and open the trap in the second door, to make sure that nothing awkward has hap­ pened. Sometimes the lamp in the ward­ ress's hand showed a prisoner hanging by

LAMB.

the neck; most often the victim in the darks was snug on her plank, and ignored the challenge merely to give the wardress the trouble of opening the trap, when she would be ready with her, "Sold again!" But Bone this night answered her chal­ lenges as sentry to sentry, and it was a thing most unaccountable and quite irregular. At one in the morning, when the soft " Good-night, Bone," came again, and the prison was uncommonly reposed, the answer passed through the doors, " That you, Miss Aylmer, my dear ? " " Yes, Bone." " J e s t shove the trap up, my dear, and put your hand in. I ain't a-goin' to hurt you." Up went the trap, and through it the hand of the wardress. " Law ! " said Bone, as she took it in her own two, " I could pull you up off your feet, honey"—the trap was high in the door— " an' hold you there till you bloomin' fainted. I done it once with a screw I'd got me knife into." " I ' m not a bit afraid of you, Bone. What do you want?" " I ' m all right, Miss." " C a n ' t you go to s l e e p ? " " A i n ' t botherin' about sleep, my dear. My, what a teeny little soft hand you got ! Like Miss Cullender's. Feel mine. You can sleep any whiles in the darks; leastways I can. Ain't never heard of Miss Cullender since, have you, Miss ? " " She's matron of a prison in the north." " A h ! I'll do me next stretch there." " Do you think Miss Cullender would like to see you there, Bone ? " " If you don't talk like her! I give that Tib a good come over, didn't I ? " " What has made you so quiet since ? " " L a w , if you don't git at me jest like Miss Cullender! Well, I'm good 'cos I'm comin' out." " But you know you're in for another fort­ night, Bone ? " " Yes, an' it might be a bloomin' month; but when I feels like comin' out, my dear, out I comes." The statement made waste paper of the rules, for Bone had received sentence of an­ other fourteen days in the darks ; but Miss Aylmer's experience whispered it to her as the raw, humiliating truth. " Of course you won't come out, Bone," she said ; " and now you must please go to sleep. I'm glad you have been so quiet to-day." " An' when I comes out, Miss, I'm goin' to have that little cotton-faced Meadows in


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me cell with me. I'm goin' to do her a sight of good ; an' good-night, Miss, an' bless you." Now, even as Bone had predicted, and as Miss Aylmer had foreseen, discipline and the rules went by the board again; for the next afternoon as ever was, Bone's mighty inches were uplifted in her proper cell, and over against her sat Elsie Meadows. Bone was sewing, and the same was, for a sign and signal of grace, most strange. Those unapt, indocile digits got pricked, and Bone execrated, but went on sewing. Every now and then she looked hard and long at her fellow-worker, as though by strength of will she would force some im­ pression on her, which the girl could or would by no means receive. Elsie's face, straw-colored and haggard, showed the old fear, but over it was laid a look of wonder­ ment. " A n ' now," said Bone, " you ain't a-goin' to tell me agen that you done it ? " " I d i d , " said the girl slowly. " I t ' s a l i e ! " responded Bone, jabbed her thumb with the needle, uttered a paren­ thetic imprecation, and repeated, " I t ' s a lie!" This crisis had been approached by coax­ ings, questionings, and threats on the part of Bone, who sat now in full possession of the case, the greater part of which she had already known. It was a case in which an element of doubt had proved the girl's salvation—so far, at least, as the gallows was concerned. The judge had clearly thought her guilty, but the prosecution was half-hearted, and the jury would not convict on the capital charge. The little broken-hearted murderess had gone out convicted of manslaughter only; but the prison, where every one was kind to her, was doing her to death more cruelly than the hangman would have done. Bone, who could gauge the effects of prison upon any one, gave her six months of life. The judge, believing she was guilty, had given her " ten years." Bone was in for twelve months. It happened that she had been living in the same tenement with the girl—one of those barracks for everybody, on the Surrey side of the Thames—and this fact she had laid stress upon to Meadows, working up to her ungodly climax. " Look at me, my g a l , " she said, and fixed her with an awful glance. " I ' m a-goin' to tell you truth, an' you better believe me. It was me that done i t ! " As the splendid purport of the lie broke slowly in on Meadows she gasped, and her

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eyes strained at Bone with an expression terrible to watch: the pitiful hunger-look of a thing in a cage that sees the door held open just a little way. Then a better look, though not constant, and a wail from the weak, striving heart: " O h , don't tempt me so ! Don't do it ! I shall die here, and soon ; but I deserve it, for I did i t . " " You listen to me," began Bone again; and one overhearing her might have sworn she spoke truth, so fixed and cool her voice. " I'm a-goin' to say agen" I done it, and I'm a-goin' to stick to it. It's easy. Look here : you was out of the room for a bit be­ fore eleven o'clock that night, wasn't you ? Yes. All right. There come along another party, drunk maybe ; stumbles into your room drunk, mind you ; goes flop on the bed in the dark, the drunken rubbish, an' stifles the child. That's how I done i t . " " It's false, there isn't a word of it true," moaned the girl ; but the wild longing for escape was in her eyes again. " I wasn't away ten minutes, and when I came back he was " " He was dead," said Bone, and blacker lie could ring no truer. The wretched girl was utterly convulsed, and cowered moaning on her stool. The black angel went on, always in the same smooth, compelling tone : " I goes before the guv'nor. I straightens things out along of him. The guv'nor writes to the 'Ome Sekkatary. It's easy. The 'Ome Sekkatary, he gits you a free pard'n. It's easy. You ain't bin in trouble afore ; they thinks it's me, natural. Me an' the guv'nor an' the 'Ome Sekkatary fakes it afore you can turn round. The 'Ome Sekkatary says: ' W a t . Bone! Belle Bone! W'y, a-course she done it ! ' an' the guv'nor says, says he : ' We might ha' knowed it all along! ' " " But you didn't, you didn't, you didn't." " A n ' you goes out agen, F R E E . " " Oh, yes, yes, I will ! Let me go! Only let me go ! " The face of Bone blazed triumphant, ma­ jestic even. " You're a-goin', my g a l , " said she. The door was unlocked, and a wardress entered to take Meadows back to her own cell. " S h e says I shall go free!" cried the girl. " She says I shall go free! " then flung out her arms, and fell prone on the floor of the cell. The doctor was just going his rounds, and he came in. His examination ended, he drew the coarse sheet of the bed over the girl's face.


THE DÉBUT OF B I M B A S H I JOYCE. B Y A . CONAN D O Y L E , Author of "Adventures of Sherlock Holmes," "The Refugees," "A Duet," etc.

A STORY OF BRITISH A R M Y It was in the days when the tide of Mahdism, which had swept in such a flood from the great lakes and Darfur to the con­ fines of Egypt, had at last come to its full and even be­ gun, as some hoped, to show signs of a turn. A t its out­ set it had been terrible. It had engulfed Hicks's army, swept over Gordon and Khar­ tum, rolled behind the British forces as they retired down the river, and finally cast up a spray of raiding parties as far north as As­ souan. Then it found other channels to east and west, to Central Africa and to Abyssinia, and retired a little on the side of Egypt. For ten years there ensued a lull, during which the frontier garrisons looked out upon those distant blue hills of Dongola. Behind the violet mists which draped them lay a land of blood and horror. From time to time some adventurer went south toward those haze-girt mountains, tempted by stories of gum and ivory, but none ever returned. Once a mutilated Egyptian and once a Greek woman, mad with thirst and fear, made their way to the lines. They were the only ex­ ports of that country of darkness. Some­ times the sunset would turn those distant mists into a bank of crimson, and the dark mountains would rise from that sinister reek like islands in a sea of blood. It seemed a grim symbol in the southern heaven when seen from the fort-capped hills by Wady Halfa. Ten years of lust in Khartum, ten years of silent work in Cairo, and then all was ready, and it was time for civilization to take a trip south once more, traveling, as her wont is, in an armored train. Every­ thing was ready, down to the last pack sad­ dle of the last camel, and yet no one sus­ pected it, for an unconstitutional government has its advantages. A great administrator had argued and managed and cajoled ; a great 60

LIFE IN EGYPT.

soldier had organized and planned, and made piasters do the work of pounds. And then, one night, these two master spirits met and clasped hands, and the soldier vanished away upon some business of his own. And just at that time Bimbashi Hilary Joyce, seconded from the Royal Mallow Fusiliers, and tem­ porarily attached to the Ninth Soudanese, made his first appearance in Cairo. Napoleon had said, and Hilary Joyce had noted, that great reputations are only to be made in the East. Here he was in the East, with four tin cases of baggage, a Wilkinson sword, a Bond's slug-throwing pistol, and a copy of Green's " Introduction to the Study of Arabic." With such a start, and the blood of youth running hot in his veins, everything seemed easy. He was a little frightened of the general. He had heard stories of his sternness to young officers, but, with tact and suavity, he hoped for the best. So, leaving his effects at Shepheard's Hotel, he reported himself at head­ quarters. It was not the General, but the head of the Intelligence Department, who received him, the chief being still absent upon that business which had called him. Hilary Joyce found himself in the presence of a short, thick-set officer, with a gentle voice and a placid expression which covered a remark­ ably acute and energetic spirit. With that quiet smile and guileless manner he had un­ dercut and outwitted the most cunning of Orientals. He stood, a cigarette between his fingers, looking at the newcomer. " I heard that you had come. Sorry the chief isn't here to see you. Gone up to the frontier, you know." " My regiment is at Wady Haifa. I sup­ pose, sir, that I should report myself there at once." " No, I was to give you your orders." He led the way to a map upon the wall, and pointed with the end of his cigarette. " Y o u see this place. It's the oasis of Kurkur—a

Copyright, 1900, by A. Conan Doyle. All rights reserved.


A.

CONAN

little quiet, I am afraid, but excellent air. You are to get out there as quick as possible. You'll find a company of the Ninth and half a squadron of cavalry. You will be in command." Hilary Joyce looked at the name, printed at the intersection of two black lines, with­ out another dot upon the map for several inches round it. " A village, sir ? " " No, a well. Not very good water, I'm afraid ; but you soon get accustomed to na­ tron. It's an important post, as being the junction of two caravan routes. All routes are closed now, of course ; but still you never know who might come along them." " We are there, I presume, to prevent raiding." " Well, between you and me, there's really nothing to raid. You are there to intercept messengers. They must call at the wells. Of course, you have only just come out ; but you probably understand already enough about the conditions of this country to know that there is a great deal of disaffection about, and that the khalifa is likely to try and keep in touch with his adherents. Then, again, Senoussi lives up that way"—he waved his cigarette to the westward—" the khalifa might send a message to him along that route. Anyhow, your duty is to arrest every one coming along and get some ac­ count of him before you let him go. You don't talk Arabic, I suppose ? " " I am learning, s i r . " " Well, well; you'll have time enough for study there. And you'll have a native offi­ cer, A l i something or other, who speaks English and can interpret for you. Well, good-by; I ' l l tell the chief that you reported yourself. Get on to your post now as quickly as you can." Railway to Baliani, the post boat to As­ souan, and then two days on a camel in the Libyan desert, with an Ababdeh guide, and three baggage camels to tie one down to their own exasperating pace. However, even two and one-half miles an hour mount up in time, and at last on the third evening, from the blackened slag-heap of a hill which is called the Jebel Kurkur, Hilary Joyce looked down upon a distant clump of palms, and thought that this cool patch of green in the midst of the merciless blacks and yellows was the fairest color effect that he had ever seen. An hour later he had ridden into the little camp, the guard had turned out to sa­ lute him, his native subordinate had greeted him in excellent English, and he had fairly entered into his own.

DOYLE.

61

It was not an exhilarating place for a lengthy residence. There was one large, bowl-shaped, grassy depression sloping down to the three pits of brown and brackish wa­ ter. There was the grove of palm trees also, beautiful to look upon, but exasperating in view of the fact that nature has provided her least shady trees in the very spot where shade is needed most. A single widespread acacia did something to restore the balance. Here Hilary Joyce slumbered in the heat, and in the cool he inspected his square-shoul­ dered, spindle-shanked Soudanese, with their cheery black faces and their funny little pork-pie forage caps. Joyce was a martinet at drill, and the blacks loved being drilled, so the Bimbashi was soon popular among them. But one day was exactly like an­ other. The weather, the view, the employ­ ment, the food, everything was the same. At the end of three weeks he felt that he had been there for interminable years. And then at last there came something to break the monotony. One evening, just as the sun was sinking, Hilary Joyce rode slowly down the old cara­ van road. It had a fascination for him, this narrow track, winding among the boulders and curving up the mullahs, for he remem­ bered how in the map it had gone on and on, stretching away into the unknown heart of Africa. The countless pads of innumerable camels through many centuries had beaten it smooth, so that, now unused and deserted, it still wound away, the strangest of roads, a foot broad and perhaps 2,000 miles in length. Joyce wondered as he rode how long it was since any traveler had journeyed up it from the south, and then he raised his eyes, and there was a man coming along the path. For an instant Joyce thought that it might be one of his own men, but a second glance assured him that this could not be so. The stranger was dressed in the flowing robes of an Arab, and not in the close-fitting khaki of a soldier. He was very tall, and a high turban made him seem gigantic. He strode swiftly along with head erect and the bear­ ing of a man who knows no fear. Who could he be, this formidable giant coming out of the unknown? The precur­ sor possibly of a horde of savage spearmen. And where could he have walked from? The nearest well was a long hundred miles down the track. A t any rate, the frontier post of Kurkur could not afford to receive casual visitors. Hilary Joyce whisked round his horse, galloped into camp, and gave the


62

THE

DÉBUT

OF BIMBASHI

alarm. Then with twenty horsemen at his back he rode out again to reconnoiter. The man was still coming on in spite of these hostile preparations. For an instant he had hesitated when first he saw the cav­ alry, but escape was out of the question, and he advanced with the air of a man who makes the best of a bad job. He made no resistance and said nothing when the hands of two troopers clutched at his shoulders, but walked quietly between their horses into camp. Shortly afterward the patrols came in again. There were no signs of any der­ vishes. The man was alone. A splendid trotting camel had been found lying dead a little way down the track. The mystery of the stranger's arrival was explained. But why and whence and whither?—these were questions for which a zealous officer must find an answer. Hilary Joyce was disappointed that there were no dervishes. It would have been a great start for him in the Egyptian army had he fought a little action on his own ac­ count. But even as it was he had a rare chance of impressing the authorities. He would love to show his capacity to the head of the Intelligence, and even more to that grim chief who never forgot what was smart or forgave what was slack. The prisoner's dress and bearing showed that he was of im­ portance. Mean men do not ride pure-bred trotting camels. Joyce sponged his head with cold water, drank a cup of strong coffee, put on an imposing official tarboosh, instead of his sun helmet, and formed himself into a court of inquiry and judgment under the acacia tree. He would have liked his people to have seen him now, with his two black orderlies in waiting and his Egyptian native officer at his side. He sat behind a camp table, and the prisoner, strongly guarded, was led up to him. The man was a handsome fellow with bold gray eyes and a long black beard. " W h y , " cried Joyce, " the rascal is mak­ ing faces at me ! " A curious contraction had passed over the man's features, but so swiftly that it might have been a nervous twitch. He was now a model of Oriental gravity. " Ask him who he is and what he wants." The native officer did so, but the stranger made no reply save that the same sharp spasm passed once more over his face. " Well, I'm blessed ! " cried Hilary Joyce. " Of all the impudent scoundrels ! He keeps on winking at me. Who are you, you rascal ? Give an account of yourself! D'ye hear ? "

JOYCE.

But the tall Arab was as impervious to English as to Arabic. The Egyptian tried again and again. The prisoner looked at Joyce with his inscrutable eyes, and occasion­ ally twitched his face at him, but never opened his mouth. The Bimbashi scratched his head in bewilderment. " Look here, Mahomet A l i , we've got to get some sense out of this fellow. You say there are no papers on him ? " " No, sir; we found no papers." " No clew of any kind ? " " He has come far, sir. A trotting camel does not die easily. He has come from Dongola at the least." " Well, we must get him to talk." " It is possible that he is deaf and dumb." " Not he. I never saw a man look more all there in my life." " You might send him across to Assouan." " And give some one else the credit. No, thank you. This is my bird. But how are we to get him to find his tongue ? " The Egyptian's dark eyes skirted the en­ campment and rested on the cook's fire. " Perhaps," said he, " i f the Bimbashi thought fit—" He looked at the prisoner and then at the burning wood. " N o , no; it wouldn't do. No, by Jove; that's going too far." " A very little might do i t . " " No, no. It's all very well here, but it would sound just awful if ever it got as far as Fleet Street. But, I say," he whispered, " we might frighten him a bit. There's no harm in that." "No, sir." " Tell them to undo the man's galabeeah. Order them to put a horseshoe in the fire and make it red hot." The prisoner watched the proceedings with an air which had more of amusement than of uneasiness. He never winced as the black sergeant approached with the glowing shoe held upon two bayonets. " Will you speak now ? " asked the Bim­ bashi savagely. The prisoner smiled gently, and stroked his beard. " O h , chuck the infernal thing away!" cried Joyce, jumping up in a passion. " There's no use trying to bluff the fellow. He knows we won't do it. But I can and I will flog him, and you tell him from me that if he hasn't found his tongue by to-morrow morning, I ' l l take the skin off his back as sure as my name's Joyce. Have you said all that ? " " Yes, s i r . "


A.

CONAN

" W e l l , you can sleep upon it, you beauty, and a good night's rest may it give you! " He adjourned the court, and the prisoner, as imperturbable as ever, was led away by the guard to his supper of rice and water. Hilary Joyce was a kind-hearted man, and his own sleep was considerably disturbed by the prospect of the punishment which he must inflict next day. He had hopes that the mere sight of the koorbash and the thongs might prevail over his prisoner's ob­ stinacy. And then again he thought how shocking it would be if the man proved to be really dumb after all. The possibility shook him so that he had almost determined by daybreak that he would send the stranger on unhurt to Assouan. And yet what a tame conclusion it would be to the incident! He lay upon his angareeb still debating it when the question suddenly and effectively settled itself. Ali Mahomet rushed into his tent. " S i r , " he cried, " the prisoner is gone." "Gone!" " Yes, sir, and your own best riding camel as well. There is a slit in the tent, and he got away unseen in the early morning." The Bimbashi acted with all energy. Cav­ alry rode along every track. Scouts exam­ ined the soft sand of the Wadys for signs of the fugitive. But no trace was discovered. The man had utterly disappeared. With a heavy heart Hilary Joyce wrote an official report of the matter and forwarded it to As­ souan. Five days later there came a curt order from the chief that he should report himself there. He feared the worst from the stern soldier who spared others as little as he spared himself. And his worst forebodings were realized. Travel-stained and weary, he reported him­ self one night at the General's quarters. Behind a table piled with papers and strewn with maps, the famous soldier and his chief of intelligence were deep in plans and fig­ ures. Their greeting was a cold one. " I understand, Captain Joyce," said the General, " that you have allowed a very im­ portant prisoner to slip through your fin­ gers." " I am very sorry, s i r . " " No doubt. But that will not mend mat­ ters. Did you ascertain anything about him before you lost him ? " " No, s i r . " " How was that ? " " I could get nothing out of him, s i r . " " Did you try ? " " Yes, sir; I did what I could." " What did you do ? "

DOYLE.

63

" Well, sir, I threatened to use physical force." " What did he say ? " " He never said anything." " What was he like ? " " A tall man, sir. Rather a desperate character, I should think." " A n y way by which we could identify him ? " "A long black beard, sir, gray eyes, and a nervous way of twitching his face." " Well, Captain Joyce," said the General in his stern, inflexible voice, " I cannot con­ gratulate you upon your first exploit in the Egyptian army. You are aware that every English officer in this force is a picked man. I have the whole British army from which to draw. It is necessary, therefore, that 1 should insist upon the very highest efficiency. It would be unfair upon the others to pass over any obvious want of zeal or intelligence. You are seconded from the Royal Mallows, I understand ? ' ' " Yes, sir." " I have no doubt that your colonel will be glad to see you fulfilling your regimental duties again." Hilary Joyce's heart was too heavy for words. He was silent. " I will let you know my final decision to­ morrow morning." Joyce saluted, and turned upon his heel. " You can sleep upon that, you beauty, and a good night's rest may it give you." Joyce turned in bewilderment. Where had those words been used before ? Who was it who had used them ? The General was standing erect. Both he and the chief of intelligence were laughing. Joyce stared at the tall figure, the erect bearing, the inscrutable gray eyes. " No, no ! " he gasped. " Well, well, Captain Joyce, we are quits," said the General, holding out his hands. " You gave me a bad ten minutes with that infernal red-hot horseshoe of yours. I've done as much for you. I don't think we can spare you for the Royal Mallows just yet awhile." " But, sir—but " " The fewer questions the better perhaps. But, of course, it must seem rather amazing. I had a little private business with the Kabbabish. It must be done in person. I did it, and came to your post in my return. I kept on winking at you as a sign that I wanted a word with you alone." " Yes, yes, I begin to understand." " I couldn't give it away before all those


THE

tu

BIGGEST

STEAMSHIP

blacks, or where should I have been the next time I used my false beard and Arab dress? You put me in a very awkward position. But at last I had a word alone with your Egyptian officer, who managed my escape all right."

THE

AFLOAT.

" H e ! Mahomet A l i ! " " I ordered him to say nothing. I had a score to settle with you. But we dine at eight, Captain Joyce. We live plainly here, but I think I can do you a little better than you did me at Kurkur."

BIGGEST STEAMSHIP

AFLOAT.

B Y EARL MAYO.

A GOODLY CITY, WITH FLOATS

A L L T H E MODERN

BETWEEN

AMERICA

Ten thousand tons of steel beams and braces and plates, forming a framework oneseventh of a mile in length, and carrying a mass of pon­ derous machinery of almost equal weight—that is the biggest of ocean steamships in rough analy­ sis. It is easy to forget that she is a ship. When she is lying at a pier her vast form towers up like a great building; and her construction is more akin to that of a modern "sky-scraper" than to that of any of the craft of earlier days. A skeleton of steel girders, rising tier above tier to the height of five stories, is the frame of the " Oceanic's " great body; and over this is a skin of steel plates. These plates vary from an inch to an inch and three-eighths in thickness ; they weigh above two tons apiece ; they were fastened together by the largest riveting machine ever built ; and they make the " Oceanic " the strongest as well as the largest ship of her kind. She is an ocean city—nothing less—a mod­ ern, driving, twentieth century city, teeming with all the occupations that man has devised for himself; an epitome of the two conti­ nents that she helps to unite. Her ordinary population is upward of 2,000 persons. Set up on land her steel timbers would provide the framework of dwellings for all of them. Her plates would surround the town with a solid wall five feet high and eight miles in length. Her bunkers would supply all the coal required by the community for two years. Her stores would stock all its shops. Her electric plant would light all its streets. Her engines would drive machinery sufficient to employ all the inhabitants. What she could do on land she does in more wonderful ways at sea, for there this city must be not

IMPROVEMENTS.

THAT

A N D EUROPE.

only self-contained and self-supporting, but must, in addition, propel itself across 500 miles of ocean waste every day, in storm or calm. To do this—to rise superior to all stress of wind or weather or ordinary mis­ fortune—requires not only vast power, but a vast reserve power. In length the " O c e a n i c " surpasses any other vessel by more than fifty feet. A mere look at her, especially a walk along her decks, reveals in some measure her immen­ sity. But to get a really adequate impres­ sion of her greatness you must descend to that region, unknown of passengers, which lies below decks, and see the ship's heart and lungs and muscles stirring her great bodyto life and action—watch the nice interplay of forces beside which human strength is too insignificant for comparison. To move a body so vast—with cargo aboard the total weight is upwards of 25,000 tons—and to keep steel muscles as thick as a man's body up to their work, re­ quires a deal of nutriment. One mouth is not enough to admit the 500 tons of coal which are the " Oceanic's" daily con­ sumption. She has ninety-six. And into these ninety-six mouths, or furnaces, a solid ton of the Welsh or Pennsylvania hills dis­ appears every three minutes. A ton and a half an hour must be burned beneath each of the large boilers to keep it up to its full energy—an energy that will suffice to turn seventeen tons of water into steam every hour. There are fifteen boilers. The larger ones develop 2,000 horse-power each, and are of such huge dimensions that three men standing one on top of another could scarcely span the diameter of any one. Of like proportions are the giant's nostrils —the funnels through which are breathed out the smoke and gas that cannot be consumed.


IN

THE

ENGINE-ROOM.—TALKS

WITH

THE

ENGINEER.

65

They rise straight away from the fire-bars At the engineer's suggestion, we follow a distance of 128 feet; and if they were laid along one of the shafts. Every few feet on the ground, a double line of trolley cars it is clamped down by great steel collars, could be run through each, with room to stronger than itself, so that it shall not tear spare. Then the two great engines (the the ship apart. The walls of the passage­ ship's heart) beat with a steam pressure of way grow more and more narrow. We have 192 pounds to the square inch—seven and come so far that the sound of the working a half tons bearing upon the space covered engines is subdued and distant. At length by a man's hand. Gleaming pistons of solid we reach a bulkhead beyond which we can­ steel, a foot and a half thick, convey this not go. We have come 190 feet from the power to giant engines ; thirtyc r a n k - shafts five feet farther more than two on, the shaft feet in diam­ terminates in eter. As a pure the propeller. display of power " How much there is nothing does it weigh ? " in any other I ask, naturally mechanism to enough. compare with " Y o u can the operation of figure it out for these engines. yourself," says One does not the engineer. "For conven­ comment upon ience in forging i t ; he holds his and handling, tongue and the shaft is looks. The made in nine motion is not sections. Each rapid. The section weighs stroke is six twenty-four feet, and the tons." revolutions of More than the crank-shaft three - quarters are seventy to of a million the minute. It pounds of steel is the delibera­ simply to con­ tion of a giant vey the energy who knows full from engines to well that noth­ screws! It ing can stand seems a lavish against him. A S T E R N V I E W O F T H E BIGGEST S T E A M S H I P A F L O A T . use of power. The impressiveThe rudder of the biggest steamship weighs fifty-three tons. The two " I f one of ness of the propellers weigh thirty tons each. They each have three blades of man­ these shafts movement is ganese bronze, and each blade cost $6,000. should break, heightened by the fact that we do not see it in its final the ship would be disabled, wouldn't she ? " I application to the propulsion of the ship. ask. The suggestion that such shafts as We see it travel from the engines down the these could break seems almost preposter­ driving-bars. We see it take hold of the ous; but still we have all read of such acci­ giant shafts and set them in motion. Then dents. "Hardly," says the engineer in his mat­ the shafts, thicker than a man's body, hollow, of the finest steel, disappear toward the stern ter-of-fact way. " Look there ! " I look down beside the section of revolving of the ship. We know that they terminate in the propellers, that each revolution drives shaft at my feet, and see a mighty buckle of our 25,000 tons' weight over a distance of steel bent to fit it, and ready with bolt-holes about thirty feet. But we know this because and bolts to be fitted on in an instant. the chief engineer tells us so. All that we " Unless the break was very bad," the en­ see are the great tubes of steel stretching gineer adds, " that piece would be clamped into position, and we should be all right again away interminably, revolving ceaselessly.


66

THE

BIGGEST

STEAMSHIP

AFLOAT.

in the course of an hour or so. There is one gines break down, the quadrant could be con­ of these beside each section of the shaft." nected with a capstan engine that is placed It is the same way in every part of the near by in order to be so used at need ; and ship. Ingenuity has done its utmost to pre­ should the rudder itself give way, the ship vent a break-down; but if a break-down could be controlled by a system of drags. In addition to the two great engines that should occur, the means of repairing it are supply the propelling power, the " Oceanic " ready at hand. It is impossible to get a fair view of the carries a hundred other engines, all of them two propellers of the mammoth ship. If you smaller than the two mentioned, but many look at them when the ship is in dry-dock of them still far from small. Each of them and they are fully exposed, they seem ridicu­ has its individual function, and operates in­ lously small for the work they do. Small, dependently. There are warping engines in fact, they are not, except in comparison fore and aft, and capstan engines and cargo with the bulk of the ship. They weigh thirty hoists and steam-winches. In the stern tons each, and are as tough as anything can there is the double set of engines described be. Every ounce of metal that went into which operate the rudder, and there is an­ them was carefully tested. Even steel was other set forward to handle the giant anchors. not trusted here. It is possible for steel to When the " O c e a n i c ' s " mud-hooks " t a k e break, and the propellers had to be unbreak­ the ground ' ' the ' ' thunder of the hawseable. Therefore, they were made of man­ pipes " is the reverberation of chains each ganese bronze—manganese bronze, too, at link of which weighs 200 pounds. Then $600 the ton, which is a matter of $6,000 there is an electric plant larger than many for each of the six blades (three to each pro­ an enterprising town can boast. It lights peller), or $36,000 in all. the ship, operates fans, hoists ashes and The " Oceanic " has no wheel. Her rudder provisions from below, heats the staterooms weighs fifty-three tons; all the seamen on on the upper deck, boils water, revolves the board could not control it by mere strength brushes in the ship's barber shop, and turns of hands. The ship, however, answers to the the spit on which joints are roasted in the navigator's will as perfectly and as quickly kitchen. There are ten feed-pumps, and five as a thoroughbred horse responds to the circulating-pumps, and four ballast-pumps, jockey's rein. The work is all done by a and three fresh-water pumps, and four brinepair of engines provided for this especial pumps, and two auxiliary pumps, and two purpose and placed in the stern of the ship. evaporating-pumps, and one filtering-pump, Attached to the rudder and facing forward and six sundry pumps, according to the en­ is a quadrant, the arc of which is notched gineer's own statement. There are twenty into heavy cogs. These cogs fit the gear steam fans to keep the air in circulation of the steering-engines, and to change the throughout the ship. There are two refriger­ course of the ship ating plants : one becomes simply a to supply the coldmatter of moving storage rooms, a lever that con­ and one to make trols the engines. ice for the passen­ Only one of these gers' use. engines is in use It is small won­ at any one time. der that fifty gal­ The second one is lons of oil a day for emergencies. are required to Should the one in keep all this ma­ use break down chinery running the other stands smoothly. It does always ready to run s m o o thly. take its place; a Just as the sym­ single movement metry of the great of a lever will vessel's lines dulls throw it into gear, our perception of and it would take her true size when up the work in an TWO O F T H E B O I L E R S . we view her lying instant. Should There are fifteen boilers in all, and the larger ones each consume in mid-channel, so both steering-ena ton and a half of coal an hour. the perfect ad-


ON

THE

BRIDGE.—HOW

THE

justment of her mighty organs retards our realization of the immense power that they exert. The different parts labor together without jar or disturbance. The little noise

THE

"OCEANIC"

GREAT

SHIP

IS

HANDLED.

67

trolling some distant piece of machinery. By moving a lever, communication is had with the engine far abaft which controls the steer­ ing-gear. It is thus possible to swing the

A T T H E MOMENT OF L A U N C H I N G .

The picture shows the spray thrown up by the ship's first contact with the water. Notwithstanding her enormous weight and bulk, she was stopped within thirty seconds after leaving the ways. From a photograph by Lafayette.

that attends their operation is harmonized to a single low monotone. Up a narrow stairway leading from the promenade deck and bearing the prominent warning, "Passengers not allowed," forty feet above the water-line, is the captain's room. And on the platform just outside, all the complex and intricate mechanism of the vessel is brought together under the captain's eye and under the possible direc­ tion of his hand. Here is a row of instru­ ments—automatic devices—each one con-

ship as easily as one might guide a canoe by paddle. Here is a dial on which you read, " F u l l speed ahead;" " H a l f ; " " S l o w ; " " F u l l speed astern." It connects with the engine-room. Move the indicator to any one of these designations, and the ship an­ swers with a corresponding movement as readily as the hand follows the impulse of the will. The control is perfect. In three seconds, by directions of voice and hand, the officer stationed here can reverse the en­ gines, divide the ship into eighteen separate


68

THE

BIGGEST

STEAMSHIP

and water-tight compartments, and summon the men to their emergency posts, whether these be at the fire-hose, beside the life-boats, or in charge of the auxiliary machinery. How soon can the ship be brought to a standstill if danger looms ahead ? That is a question that readily occurs to one as he looks out from the bridge when a thick At­ lantic fog bank shuts down all about. The captain shakes his head when the query is put to him. " T h a t is a question we have never had occasion to answer," he says. " I t would depend upon speed and weather conditions. The screws could be set to re­ volving the other way almost instantly, but it would take a few minutes for them to overcome the forward impetus. She would halt perhaps in two lengths and a half." Two lengths and a half of the " O c e a n i c " means a third of a mile. That is none too small a margin. There is no more beautiful illustration of modern seamanship and the perfect adjust­ ment to conditions which dominates all the op­ erations of a modern steamship than you have in observing the warping of the "Oceanic"

AFLOAT.

into her dock at either end of her trans-At­ lantic journey. Obviously, the landing of a vessel 700 feet long is not a mere matter of steaming up alongside the pier. Many more accidents occur in bringing a steamship to her dock than in sailing her on the high seas; and with the " O c e a n i c " the task is especially delicate. She is longer than the pier itself ; there is, perhaps, no more than two feet between her hull and the bottom of the channel in the spot where she is to lie, and less than that on either side ; and exact allowance must be made for the run of the tide. Hence the distance which each revo­ lution of the propellers will carry her must be very nicely calculated. And yet it is all done as easily and quietly as a girl sets down her biggest doll in a row with its smaller mates. The captain stands silently on the bridge, whence he can survey every yard of the space in which the ship is to be manoeuvered. Near by, at the top of a signal tube, a junior officer is stationed. A t the other end of the tube, alert for every signal, is stationed the chief engineer. A t exactly the point where the ship's accumulated en-

A SECTION OP ONE OF THE TWO PROPELLER SHAFTS. We see the heavy collars and immense rivetings which hold the different parts of the shaft in place. The shaft is 225 feet in length and more than two feet in diameter, and is composed of nine sections each weighing twenty-four tons.


BRINGING

THE

BIGGEST

STEAMSHIP

TO HER

DOCK,

69

IN T H E E N G I N E - R O O M .

The enormous driving-bar, which is well shown here, revolves one of the shafts. Normally the shafts each make seventy-four revolutions a minute, and each revolution of the two shafts drives the 25,000 tons' weight of the ship about thirty feet.

ergy, the set of the tide, and the other fac­ tors in the ship's movements will serve to set her opposite her crib, the captain gives an order. A t once the great engines hold their breath, and the giant ship slows down like a runner at the end of a race. Two

snub-nosed tugs run alongside, one on the forward port quarter, one astern on the star­ board side. Quietly, almost invisibly, they turn the mammoth hulk, against which they themselves look to be little more than futile toys; turn her until she faces her berth.


70

THE

BIGGEST

STEAMSHIP

And then, perhaps, the engines throb again, a few quick inhalations; and softly, as a tired child slips between the covers at night, the ship glides to her moorings. Improved to the last degree as is the " O c e a n i c ' s " machinery, it still will not operate itself. To attend to all the various activities that go on aboard, and to attend to the wants of 1,500 or more passengers, requires a crew of nearly half a thousand men. Of this number not more than sixty are classed as sailors, and their work in­ cludes little that we have been taught to associate with Jack Tar. There is still the duty of standing watch; there is still the boat-drill and the fire-drill and the Sunday review. Aside from these few cherished survivals, the sailor on board the biggest steamship spends his time chiefly in scrub­ bing decks, in handling cargo, and in work­ ing the auxiliary machinery. His lot is not without honor, but his old glory has de­ parted. As the men behind the big guns are the important factor in the modern naval battle, so the important factor in the naviga­ tion of the great ship is the men behind the engines. On the " O c e a n i c " the engineer's depart­ ment includes close upon 200 men. Of these, the larger body are the firemen, consisting of what are called stokers and trimmers. The work of a trimmer is to bring coal from the bunkers and deposit it at the furnace door. On shipboard the space allotted to coal is that which is not available for other purposes. As a consequence, the coal may be at a considerable distance from the fur­ naces. To move the 500 tons consumed each day by the " O c e a n i c " requires the constant labor of twenty-five men working, as do the whole engine-room force, in eight-hour shifts. Then, to serve the coal to the ninety-six fur­ naces occupies thirty men, two to each boiler. Each man handles twelve tons of coal during the time he is on duty. This, with the work of making the fires and keeping them at top heat, constitutes the most arduous labor that man performs anywhere on or within the earth or on or under the waters that cover it. A third class of engine-room workers is the greasers, thirty-five in number. Their work is described in their name. They go about their tasks shining with oil and armed with big handfuls of cotton waste. Numerically, the largest of the three de­ partments into which the operation of the biggest steamship is divided is the one em­ ployed in looking after the wants of passen­ gers. It is presided over by the purser, who,

AFLOAT.

with the chief steward, is directly at the head of 200 men. This number includes nearly a hundred dining-room stewards, half a hun­ dred bedroom stewards, nine stewardesses to look after the wants of women passengers, cooks, scullions, and galley employees of all sorts, store-keepers, linen-keepers, and half a dozen bootblacks. The list of stores required for a single voyage reads like the requisition sheet for an army. Here are a few of the items, copied from the order-book of the chief steward : 31,000 pounds of fresh meat (beef, mutton, and lamb), 2,000 head of chickens and ducks, 1,000 head of game (varied according to sea­ son), 25 tons of potatoes—tons, mind you!— 150 barrels of flour, 6,000 pounds of ham and bacon, 10,000 eggs, 6,400 pounds of sugar. These seem immense quantities ; but they are, in most of the items named, the supplies for a single voyage, and this at a season of the year when travel is not at its height. With such things as fresh meat, poultry, game, eggs, and potatoes it is not practica­ ble to stock for more than one voyage ; but of salt meats, flour, and such supplies an overplus is carried, to guard against want in case the ship should be delayed. In the ordinary way, it is as certain as human in­ genuity can make it that the " O c e a n i c ' s " voyage will end on the sixth day after it be­ gan ; but on any voyage she could remain at sea for twenty-five days before an actual famine would begin. In the old days it was customary to carry along a number of cows to supply the pas­ sengers with fresh milk. To supply the "Oceanic" with dairy products in this way, at least with any such abundance as now prevails, would be to turn her into a cattleship. Her cold storage compartments con­ tain, at the beginning of each voyage, 3,000 quarts of milk and cream, 5,000 pounds of butter, and 3,000 pounds of ice-cream. No less than twenty meals are served each day on the "Oceanic." There are three full meals—breakfast, luncheon, and din­ ner—for the first cabin, for the second cabin, for the steerage, for the officers, and for the crew. In addition to these, the first and second cabin folk have bouillon in the morning, tea in the afternoon, and sup­ per at night, if they care to impose so great a strain upon their stomachs. The first step in the preparation of a day's bill of fare is taken in the afternoon, when the chief stew­ ard retires to his cabin and makes out the menu for the following day for each of his numerous families. These are handed to the


SERVING

TWENTY

ship's printer, who prints the menu cards on a little hand-press. Then each of the chief cooks receives a copy, and makes out a list of the supplies that he will require for his own department. This list is submitted to the chief steward, and after he has approved

MEALS

A

DAY.

71

the cooking is done weighs seventeen tons, and it is only one of many pieces of kitchen furniture. There is a special oven for bak­ ing bread, kept always at a certain tempera­ ture. There is a special compartment in which joints are roasted, and where the spits

TAKING ON A S U P P L Y OF FOOD FOR A TRANS-ATLANTIC VOYAGE. Gangs of men work day and night to get on board the hundreds of tons of supplies required for a voyage.

it, it is valid as an order upon the store­ keepers for the indicated amounts of the articles named in it. Each chief cook has a little workshop to himself and a corps of assistants. The gal­ leys in which their concoctions are prepared for the table are fitted out as completely as any kitchens in the world. In the main gal­ ley, the range upon which a large part of

are kept constantly and evenly revolving by a special electric motor. There is a separate compartment for cooking vegetables; and there is a device for boiling eggs by which the eggs, after remaining in the water just the desired length of time, are brought auto­ matically to the surface. The soup is pre­ pared in three great caldrons, each of a capacity of thirty gallons. On all of the


72

THE

BIGGEST

STEAMSHIP

cooking appliances are sure devices for regu­ lating the heat and keeping it constant, so that it is next to impossible, except through sheer inattention, to either over-cook or under-cook. To serve so many meals a day to so many people naturally requires an immense num­ ber of dishes. There are 2,500 of each of the several varieties of plates, cups, and saucers most in use on the " O c e a n i c " ; and of silver knives, forks, and spoons there are 1,500 each. In the course of a voyage about 3,000 pieces of china are broken. The wash­ ing of so many dishes is, of itself, a consider­ able business. For the most part it is done by machinery. Large baskets full of the heavier dishes are lowered into tanks of boil­ ing water, which cleanses them thoroughly. But they are all wiped by hand ; and the sil­ ver and the more fragile china are washed by hand, a task that keeps fifteen men busy through the entire day. The "Oceanic's" laundry-bag accumulates 50,000 pieces in the course of a voyage. The laundry work is not done on board ; on the ship's arrival at Liverpool, the pieces are sent to the company's general laundry there —a large establishment in which a force of eighty-five washerwomen and seamstresses are kept busy in washing and keeping in repair the linen of all the ships in the com­ pany's fleet. The whole work of the steamship and her crew is ordered by a system of discipline military in its exactitude. The record of each man is kept from the time he enters the company's employ, and all promotion is on the basis of service. The heads of the various departments win their places only by service in the ranks. Under this system an esprit de corps prevails which is seldom found among the employees of purely commercial concerns. To promote discipline, as well as to increase efficiency, there is a daily drill ; and twice each day the ship and the ship's crew undergo a thorough inspection. The morning inspection is the more elaborate, and is conducted by the commander, the purser, the surgeon, and the chief steward. Promptly at half-past ten the ship's bugler sounds the "Three G ' s . " A t the signal every man of the crew, except the members of the engine-room force, who are never taken away from their particular work, moves to an appointed post. The water-tight doors throughout the ship are closed within twenty seconds, and the men stand by silent and at attention. As the officers approach each post, the men salute, throw open the doors,

AFLOAT.

and stand by until the inspection of that di­ vision is completed. They then resume their ordinary duties. The inspection is no mere formality or ceremony. The officers look into every passage-way, room, and compart­ ment. First cabin, second cabin, steerage, forecastle, galley, store-rooms—every por­ tion of the ship from promenade deck to the hold itself is carefully examined, and it goes hard with any man whose quarters are not in perfect order, or who has left so much as a soiled napkin lying out of place. It is a further indication of the immensity of the " O c e a n i c " that two hours of rapid walking are required to complete the inspection. A t half-past nine in the evening the purser and the chief steward make the same rounds again. This thorough oversight and con­ stant supervision secures scrupulous cleanli­ ness and order throughout the great ship, of which the best evidence is, perhaps, the fact that the passenger seldom gives the matter a thought. It will be imagined that the operation of a vessel such as this, and the maintenance of such an army of employees, is a matter of no little cost. The men themselves are not highly paid. The stokers, who do the hard­ est work, receive $25 a month. Trimmers and greasers get $22.50, and the sailors are paid about the same. The stewards, who have valuable perquisites in the form of tips from passengers, receive from $15 to $20. The officers are paid by the month, and re­ ceive salaries a little larger than those of naval men of equal rank. In comparing these wages with those of land labor, it is to be borne in mind that the men also have their board and lodging. Even at such seem­ ingly modest rates, the salary bill of the " O c e a n i c " is not less than $10,000 a month—that is, for each round trip. Her daily coal bill is about $1,600 a day at sea. For food and other items of outfitting there is paid out three-quarters of a million dollars every year. The cost of overhauling the ship in preparation for each voyage is not less than $1,000. Each round trip repre­ sents a complete business transaction. By the English law, the members of a ship's crew must be paid off within twenty-four hours of the vessel's return to her home port, and must sign new articles for each voyage. Similarly, all accounts of passenger and freight receipts, and expenditures for wages, supplies, and repairs, are balanced at the end of every completed voyage. The maximum earning capacity of the big­ gest steamship is about $90,000 a month.


THE COST AND EARNINGS

OF THE BIGGEST

But the period of high tide in ocean travel —and it is only during this period that she can earn so much—lasts rather less than onethird of the year. Considering this fact, and taking into account the cost of opera­ tion, repairs, and insurance, and the deteri­ oration in value of the ship itself, it will be seen that the income from the greatest of ocean vessels is no more than an ordinary return on the investment of $4,500,000 which she represents. ' ' All this wealth of skill and money, ' ' says the penny-wise observer, " lavished in order that a few persons may be carried across 3,000 miles of ocean in the greatest

STEAMSHIP.

73

possible comfort and luxury!" But there is a larger view. The "Oceanic" carries man's subjection of the ocean to his daily business and use one degree farther ; he has it now just so much the more under his sure control. And in the necessary affairs and things of life, as well as in its luxuries and pastimes, it means much if a man embark­ ing at New York can make an engagement in London for the sixth day thereafter and be certain of keeping that engagement. Indeed, in the final import, it means a closer union of the Old World and the New, a step toward the realization of that fond dream—the final brotherhood of all mankind.

ON T H E BRIDGE—FORTY FEET ABOVE WATER. When the big ship is in the delicate operation of entering or leaving a crowded harbor, the scene on the bridge is wonder­ fully impressive. Only the captain, the pilot, and one or two junior officers are there, and hardly a word is said or a gesture made. Almost the only sound is the occasional sharp clink of the instruments that communicate with the various parts of the ship. In this quiet way the movements of the ship, in spite of her 23,000 tons, are directed with the utmost accuracy.


An

Indian Mother Song by W i l l i s

Irwin

SLEEP, little Love Flower, sleep; the Day Chief goes to r e s t â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The watch-fire blazes brightly by his wigwam in the west. Sleep, little Love Flower, sleep. The Night Chief cometh out the east, with spirit warriors in bis train; Their plumes are black above the bills, their shadows fall across the plain; Their purple arrows vein the air, the shafts around us thickly fly. They come, and lo, the council fires are lighted in the sky. Sleep, little Love Flower, sleep. Sweet be thy sleep, and sound, on slumbers happy hunting g r o u n d .


SLEEP, little Love Flower, sleep; the Day Chief lies a t r e s t â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The watch-fire burneth dimly by his wigwam in the west. Sleep, little Love Flower, sleep. The marsh-bird pipes unto her mate,the answering note comes from afar; Wierd voices 'mong the sachem pines are murmuring tales of tribal war; The night-wind calleth from the north, the wood-folk wake with hungry cry, The fireflies hang upon the trees to light the Night Chief passing by. Sleep, little Love Flower,sleep. Sweet be thy sleep, and sound,on slumbers happy hunting ground. -


THE

GOVERNOR'S BY

REHEARSAL.

CHARLES W A H R E N ,

Author of "A Manufacturer of History," and other stories.

A

STORY

OF

PUBLIC

LIFE.

MARK SPENNER had made up a sigh of relief, the door into the Governor's his mind to kill the Gover­ room open, and the visitor hurry out looking nor. That was the reason happy, disappointed, angry, or puzzled, ac­ why Mark Spenner had been cording to the degree of success in his mis­ crouching for nearly two sion. One by one the line lessened; and hours, in the dark, in the Spenner nerved himself for the coming test. farthest corner of a seldom used rubbish Suddenly a tall, sturdy figure appeared at closet leading from the private secretary's the door. It was the Governor himself. He office. He had come up that afternoon to bowed to the waiting men, and, crossing the the State House from Belltown for this ex­ room with a vigorous step, he stood talking in an undertone to the private secretary, not press purpose. About four o'clock he had entered the pri­ six feet away from the last man in the line. Mark Spenner's breath came quick, and the vate secretary's room, and had been assigned his seat at the foot of a line of chairs filled blood rose in his head. He felt behind un­ with impatient visitors awaiting their turn. der his coat, where his hip-pocket was dis­ The private secretary had looked at him tended in a knobby lump. As he made the searchingly, struck with the old man's wild- motion, the Governor happened to glance at ness of eye and intensity of speech. One him, and nodded courteously, as if to an old by one the men ahead of Spenner saw, with acquaintance. Spenner withdrew his hand,

" I N ONE DART MARK SPENNER HAD REACHED THE CLOSET DOOR, FLASHED BEHIND IT AND

CROUCHED

IN THE DARKNESS."

...


A STORY OF PUBLIC and sat hesitating. Just then he caught the last words that the Governor was say­ ing to his secretary, and he trembled with ex­ citement. " Mr. Porter, you and the clerks need not wait after five o'clock to-night. I shall see no one after then, and every one may leave. I am going to Dolliver to-night to declare my position on this strike question, and I want to stay here until half-past six to finish writing out my speech."

"THE

TROOPS HAD FIRED

AND

LIFE.

77

to his stenographer, who sat at the end of the room, to go to the outer corridor and answer the telephone. Then the door to the Governor's room opened again, a man emerged, and the private secretary went in to announce to the Governor the next visitor. Now was the time, thought Spenner. No one was in the room except the two men still ahead of him in line, waiting their turn. He glanced slyly and rapidly at them. One was

NOW E L E V E N MEN L A Y DEAD IN BELLTOWN."

As he heard these words Mark Spenner suddenly changed his plan. He would not kill the Governor now, suddenly, publicly. He would wait until after five o'clock, when the State House would be quiet, and then he could kill him easily and peaceably. He looked around the room. A t the lower end he perceived a door partially open. He rose, and walked down toward it. No one noticed him. The door led into a deep closet. He stood looking out of the window near it. Outside it was growing dark. He heard the private secretary call

reading his newspaper ; the other was look­ ing eagerly at the half-open door in which appeared the private secretary's back. In one dart Mark Spenner had reached the closet door, flashed behind it into the closet, and crouched in the farthest corner in the dark­ ness. No sound had been made. One mo­ ment he had been outside, waiting impa­ tiently like any other visitor. The next mo­ ment he was gone. The private secretary showed the first man in to the Governor, and came back to his desk. The stenographer returned from the


78

THE GOVERNOR'S

telephone. The man with the newspaper still sat waiting. On the surface, that was all. It came the newspaper reader's turn. The private secretary looked for the pale, wildeyed man with the rumpled hair ; but did not see him. " Where is that other man, Jim? " he asked of the stenographer. " I don't know," said Jim. " H e must have got tired waiting and gone out. I didn't notice." "The Governor'll be glad of that. There's been a perfect procession of callers this after­ noon. Tell them outside to admit no one else. It's a quarter of five, and I'm going home." " I ' v e got about twenty minutes' dictation to write out," said Jim. " Good-night." Mark Spenner waited, trembling, to see if any one would come to the closet. No one did. He heard Mr. Porter leave. The typewriter clicked uninterruptedly, and then stopped. The stenographer left. A cab rattled by outside. The clerks in the outer corridor chatted a few minutes. There came a sound of doors shutting with a click and of keys turning in the locks. The sound of steps grew fainter. Then all was very quiet. After a time he heard some one come into the room humming a tune. It was the Gov­ ernor. The steps approached the closet door. Mark Spenner shook, and breathed hard. The steps went away. Then he heard the door of the Governor's room close, and it was very quiet again outside. And Mark Spenner crouched in the closet, deter­ mined to kill the Governor and knowing that his time had come. The facts which had led Mark Spenner to that decision are part of the well-known his­ tory of the tragic political State campaign of that year. Although the Governor had received a sec­ ond renomination in the State Convention three weeks before, his party managers did not underestimate the strength of his opponent, Charles Fondridge ; and they realized that the campaign was to be so close that the re­ sult might hinge on the slightest change of votes. So it happened that a brief tele­ gram brought into the midst of a meeting of the Executive Committee of the State Committee ten days ago had produced an excited change in their plans, and spread a look of cheer around the committee room. The telegram was from the chairman of the City Committee in Belltown, and read, " In­ ternational Mills employees voted this noon to strike."

REHEARSAL.

Belltown was a large manufacturing city that had always cast a heavy vote against the Governor's party. For some months there had been a more or less active strug­ gle going on there between the directors of the International Mills and their 3,000 em­ ployees. The causes of the struggle have nothing to do with this history. No one had believed, however, that there would be any open outbreak. Indeed, Fondridge's politi­ cal managers had been most active in appeal­ ing to the directors and to Jerome Barton, the president of the company, to yield. Bar­ ton had, in fact, been a former treasurer of the party's State Committee. Hence he was so closely connected with the party, that a strike in his mills would inevitably become a political issue ; and real live State issues were the last thing that the managers wanted in this so-called " national " campaign. The news that the strike had come caused, therefore, a corresponding depression in the party ranks of the Governor's opponent. The recusant president and directors of the In­ ternational Mills were called all manner of names, and every argument was employed upon them to bring about a settlement of the strike. But as President Barton said to the committee that waited on him, " Why, gen­ tlemen, we're not running these mills for our health or for politics. We're running them to make money for the stockholders. Per­ sonally, I'd like nothing better than to see Charley Fondridge governor. I'll make you a campaign subscription myself of $5,000, and you can have my personal check when you want it; but what you're asking me to do is impossible. You are practically asking the stockholders of this corpora­ tion to make you a campaign subscription out of their profits, not of $5,000, but more nearly of $500,000; for that is what this strike, unless successful on our side, would mean to us." The committee returned to headquarters discouraged. Meanwhile others were becoming discour­ aged. The fathers of four or five young children, with small credit at the stores and no deposits in the savings-banks and little food in the house; the children who had earned enough to help support the rest of the family ; the young men and young women who had hoped to be married soon—they, too, were beginning to grumble, down in the streets of Belltown. When all went well and they were working hard, they had no time to think about politics; and they had voted—those who had a vote—almost instine-


" T H E GOVERNOR'S WHOLE FRAME SEEMED IN MOTION WITH THE INTENSITY

OF HIS

WORDS."


80

THE

GOVERNOR'S

tively according to habit, tradition, or their father's vote. Now they had time to think for themselves, and they were asking each other whether they had not been deceived ; whether the party to which such a hard­ hearted monster as President Barton be­ longed could possibly be the party for which the workingman should vote. And while these questions were flying round, the Gov­ ernor's party managers, who had hoped for this situation, sent down into the midst of the rising dissatisfaction thousands of cam­ paign documents. Then, one night, the rumor came that the mills were to start up the next day with " s c a b " labor. Men clustered, pale and ex­ cited, on the street corners. Women grew terrified, and tried to keep their sons and their husbands at home, foreseeing that trouble was coming. The non-union men ar­ rived the next day, and in less than an hour large bodies of strikers were gathered along the road leading to the mills and around the gates. There was no violence as yet; but there were hardly suppressed oaths and sav­ age looks and searches of the pawn shops for revolvers. During the next day regular pro­ cessions of strikers carrying banners paraded

"IT

REHEARSAL.

up and down the road past the mill grounds, which stretched along for nearly a mile in the open country outside the city proper. As the non-union men went into the gates they were greeted with every kind of threat and hard name, but no one was molested physi­ cally by the strikers. The outburst was precipitated before its time by the careless act of a small boy who, more in fun than anything else, threw a stone at a window in a shed on the mill grounds. As the glass broke, suddenly the air was thick with stones, bricks, sticks, and iron bolts. The next morning the police were lined up along the road run­ ning by the mills. A non-union man was pulled from their hands, and disappeared through the crowd yelling for help. That night the news spread over the city that the directors of the mills had obtained an injunc­ tion against Matthew Spenner, James Conlon, Peter Lachaude, and fifteen others, active union men. A t the meeting of the union, the injunction was brought in and read. It restrained them " and their agents and ser­ vants or any person in connection, associa­ tion, or combination with them " f r o m " in­ terfering with the management and operation

WAS T H E FINAL SCENE IN THE BELLTOWN

TRAGEDY."


A STORY

OF PUBLIC

of said mills by their owners or those oper­ ating them, either by menaces, threats, force, or any character of intimidation used to pre­ vent the employees of said mills from going to, or from, or working in, said mills." And, further, " the defendants " were " re­ strained from entering upon the property of the owners of the International Mills Cor­ poration, or assembling in the roads leading to and upon said property, for the purpose of interfering with the employees of said corporation either by threats, menaces, or violence." Head and front of all in wild oratory against the courts was young " M a t " Spenner. " We're enjoined off the face of the earth ! " he shouted. " W e must resist or lose all our liberties! Haven't we a right to walk on the streets as well as those bloated monopo­ lists?" Along toward the early dawn, after an excited debate, it was determined that the arrest of Spenner, Lachaude, and their fel­ low-martyrs must be prevented. Meanwhile, that same evening, there was discouragement and cursing at Fondridge's State headquarters when the news came that Barton had secured an injunction. " T h i s caps the climax," said the secretary of the committee. " W e might have made a fair showing on the strike question ; but if they are going to be allowed to bring up the in­ junction issue, it knocks Fondridge's cam­ paign completely." " I see they've persuaded the Governor to go on the stump at last, too," said the chair­ man of the Executive Committee. " H e ' s billed for a speech on this labor business down at Dolliver on Saturday, and I suppose that from now until then he'll be gather­ ing hot shot for us." " I t was hot enough for us last year," said the secretary. "Rollins, what do you think about this wretched mess Barton has got us into with his injunction?" Rollins, the corpulent, shrewd-faced chair­ man of the State Committee, had been sitting for some time silently rubbing the scowls from his forehead. " I think," he said, "that the Governor may be in a tighter hole next Saturday than we are now." " That sounds well. What does it mean ? " asked the treasurer. " D i d it ever occur to y o u , " Rollins re­ plied, " that the Governor might be called upon to order out the troops? And if he did send the troops ; if any—well, we'll say any —accident happened, would that help him with the Belltown voters ?"

LIFE.

81

The secretary whistled. " N o t so bad, not so bad, Rollins. There may be some­ thing in that for us." On Tuesday night Rollins's prophecy was fulfilled. Spenner and his comrades, against the protests of the soberer and wiser men in the union, put into operation their plan of defiance of the injunction, and its enforce­ ment was openly resisted. The sheriff and his posse and the police were unable to take possession of the violators. They were driven back with torn clothes, bruises, and even with serious wounds. Several non-union men also were wounded by missiles, and danger­ ous bonfires were built in lots adjoining the mills. The sheriff was obliged to read the riot act. Finally the mayor of the city, vig­ orously urged by President Barton to call on the Governor for troops, decided not to wait any longer. A delay of a few hours might mean the destruction of the mills. Then, too, the Mayor was not of the Governor's political persuasion, and lie was not at all sorry that some part of the responsibility for the condition of affairs should be shifted to the Governor's shoulders. On Wednesday morning, the Governor re­ ceived the Mayor's telegram asking for the aid of the militia to put down the growing riot. He was not a man who hesitated when he saw his duty plain before him. But this was too serious a matter to decide at once without fullest knowledge of the facts. Two members of his staff and the Adjutant-Gen­ eral of the State were sent immediately to Belltown, and meanwhile the Governor sum­ moned his campaign committee. A sight of their faces, when they were told the news, would have made Rollins and Fondridge laugh in glee. "But, Governor," said the chairman, " you can't think of ordering out the troops ! This is all a political game of the other side. Things aren't so serious as all that down at Belltown. Rollins is trying to put you in a hole," he continued, unconsciously using Rollins's own words. " It will be the worst and most unpopular thing you could possibly do," he added. " That isn't the question," said the Gov­ ernor. " T h e only question is, is it really necessary ? I don't choose to play into Fon­ dridge's hands. But, much as I am in sym­ pathy with- the cause of the strikers, the mills shall have the protection that the law gives them. If the troops are needed at Belltown, the troops shall go there." " But hold on, Governor," said Jim Blakely, the editor; "here it is Wednesday. Election


82

THE GOVERNOR'S

comes next Tuesday. I don't believe there's such a terrible rush about this. If, after Tuesday, Barton needs any soldiers to help run his mills, why let him have all he wants. But, Governor, don't be fool enough to throw away your election until it's really necessary !" " What can you say at Dolliver Saturday night if the troops should—should—should make any trouble ? " groaned the chairman. The Adjutant-General returned, and re­ ported that violence was increasing in Bell­ town and that protection was needed at once. In two hours a part of the Seven­ teenth Regiment of the National Guard was on its way thither. The State Committee waited for the news from that city, discour­ aged and fearful. The news came late that very afternoon. The strikers, led by the very men against whom the injunction had been issued, had attacked the troops. The troops had fired, first into the air, but on the second volley into the mob. And now eleven men lay dead in Belltown and twenty-four wounded. Old Mark Spenner and his daughter, Mary Spenner, lived not far from Central Avenue. Toward dark they had heard the ominous rat­ tling crash echo down the street, and had seen the smoke rise above the low houses op­ posite. And then in less than half an hour, an ambulance came rumbling round the cor­ ner, followed by a confused group of men. As old Mark Spenner went to meet them, they were lifting out a dark mass. Terrified at their sullen looks, he called out, " I t isn't Mat. l t isn't my M a t . " They nodded ; and then Mark Spenner did not know for hours what was taking place about him. His Mat— his one boy, whom he had trained to take his place in the mills—whom he had seen go out that very morning, young and vigorous ! It was not possible. And yet there in the front room lay something that had been, but was not any longer, Matthew Spenner ; and outside in the city of Belltown men in blue uniforms were tramping slowly up and down ; the streets were half deserted, and lights shone in the mill windows, showing that the International Mills were working overtime to make up for lost work. From that moment Mark Spenner began to form his project. For two days he thought of nothing else, until he felt as if all his blood was collecting in his head. His brain seemed to be bursting as this one refrain beat against i t : " W h o killed my son? The soldiers. Who sent the soldiers ? The Governor." There was no question in Mark

REHEARSAL.

Spenner's mind as to the justification for the Governor's act. Very likely the strikers, his son even, may have been wrong. But the fact still remained, his son lay dead, and the Governor had killed him. Therefore he, Mark Spenner, must kill the Governor. The Governor sat writing intently on his Dolliver speech. Every now and then he rose, and walking toward the window, leaned his head against the cool pane. Once he wandered restlessly into the private secre­ tary's room, humming. Since Wednesday night he had been living under great pres­ sure. The deep lines in his face and the tired black look around his eyes showed how heav­ ily the responsibility for the Belltown tragedy was weighing on him. It was only the inner sense of complete justification for his share in that event that kept him from flinching before the torrents of abuse and denuncia­ tion which had ensued after the terrible re­ sults of Wednesday night. The pendulum had swung violently ; and those workingmen who had forsaken Fondridge because of the strike were now flocking back, enraged at the Governor's action, which they regarded as treachery. So it was that his speech at Dolliver, instead of being an attack on Fon­ dridge and his party for their position on the labor question, must now be a defense of his own action ; and the Governor realized that it must be an all-powerful and all-convincing defense if he was to make good, in the three days which remained before election, the loss of the votes of those workingmen who now entirely misunderstood his position. It had been with the greatest sense of re­ lief that he had watched the last visitor leave and had heard his private secretary give or­ ders to admit no one else. He had listened to the steps of the departing clerks as the sound died away down the corridor. Then, left to himself in the quiet of the empty State House, he had set himself to embody in his fateful speech all the eloquence, the passion, and the clear-cut reasoning which had so often before made friends for him out of his ardent foes. It was after six o'clock when the Governor drew in a long breath, pushed his manuscript away from him, and, clasping his hands be­ hind his head, tipped wearily back in his chair. His speech was finished at last, and he felt very well content with it, for he knew that it was as true and real and sincere a thing as he had ever written. But how would it strike home to the workingmen of Dolliver and of the State ? That was the


A STORY

OF PUBLIC

question which could not be answered, per­ haps, until their votes had been counted. The Governor almost wished that he had not let his private secretary go home. He should like to know how the words he had just writ­ ten would impress some one else. He leaned forward again, and, taking up his manuscript, began to read it carefully over. So intent was he that he did not no­ tice the door to the Executive Chamber open very slowly and silently, and close just as slowly and silently. Nor did he see a figure slip cautiously into the room and creep to­ ward him. In reaching forward for his pen to make a correction in his speech the Gov­ ernor looked up. Directly before the flat, square desk stood an elderly man, with a pale face and rumpled hair, holding a re­ volver pointed straight at the Governor's head. In a flash he recognized the peril in which he was placed; for, like all governors, he had had many an experience with insane persons. They were always drawn like a mag­ net toward the head of the State, whom they considered the head of all their troubles. He looked very calmly at the man, and replaced very deliberately his manuscript upon his desk. " Well, my friend," he said, " what is your name, and what can I do for you ? " Mark Spenner still felt the blood flooding up into his head, and it was with difficulty that he could control himself, as he shouted, " I am Mark Spenner, and I've come to kill you." The Governor's face became somewhat pale and rigid, yet his mouth broke slightly into a suave smile. He knew that the only way to deal with an insane man was to humor him. " Very well, my friend ; but will you not tell me why you want to kill me ?" Mark Spenner had not expected this kind of reception, yet he did not lose sight of his prey for a moment. " Because you murdered my son; because you sent the soldiers to Belltown to murder my son, Mat Spenner." The Governor gave a little breathless gasp. He had caught his cue, for he remembered the name and its connection with the Bell­ town tragedy. " L e t me see; you accuse me of murdering your son. And you think, therefore, that you should condemn me to death instead of having me tried by the courts. Very well, we won't discuss that. You may be right." As his lips uttered these words, the Gov­ ernor's brain was considering more things in a short flash of time than had ever driven through it before. Could he reach the side of the room where the electric bell was placed,

LIFE.

83

connecting his room with the watchman's office ? Could he, in some way, get at his desk telephone ? Could he make a sudden dash for the door or for the window ? Could he overpower the aged but burly man hold­ ing the weapon ? While swiftly running over these possibilities in his mind he glanced down at his desk, and noticed in a hazy kind of way the speech in which he had been so enwrapped. Suddenly, like a cool northwest wind driving the heat and fog before it, an idea came to him. Now was the moment for the supreme test of his powers of eloquence and persua­ sion. A few minutes before he had supposed that it was to be later in the evening, at Dolliver. He saw, however, that the time was now, and more than that, if not now, then probably never again in this life. " I will agree, Mark Spenner," he said, " that you shall be my judge and my jury; but you will surely grant me what is allowed to the vilest, lowest murderer or thief. I suppose you have served on a jury some time in your life ? " He looked inquiringly at Spen­ ner, and the latter nodded. " Well, then, you must know that before a poor fellow is condemned to imprisonment or—to death, if it must be so, the judge always gives him a chance to say a word for himself. I ask you, therefore, to hear what I have to say for myself before you execute me. This you owe me as one man to another. I don't ask it because I am a governor, but because I am—or, rather, because you say I am—a murderer." Spenner's eye glittered. " G o o n , " he said roughly; " b u t cut it short. You've got to die whatever you say." The Governor arose, and straightened his tall body to its most commanding height. " D o n ' t you move; sit d o w n ! " said Spen­ ner, advancing his revolver. The Governor smiled, and remained stand­ i n g . " Don't you remember what the judge says, 'Prisoner, stand up. Have you any­ thing to say why sentence of death should not be pronounced according to law ? ' You remember that, don't you ? " Again Spenner nodded in a dazed fashion, evidently not understanding the Governor's tactics. Then the Governor began in almost the same words which he had intended for his Dolliver audience, at first very quietly, but becoming more and more powerful in his ap­ peal. He showed how he had been in sym­ pathy with the strikers and their cause at the beginning. He indignantly denied the accusations made against him—that he was


84

THE

GOVERNOR'S

out of sympathy with the working classes. Then he went on to describe the causes of the Belltown strike. " Had I had the right and power, I would rather have driven this great corporation— this International Mills Company—out of the confines of this State, than to have had one employee treated as unjustly as I believe the company in its demands did treat them. I would rather that this splendid commonwealth of ours should have lost every cent of the taxes which that corporation pays, than that one cent should have been stricken from the wages of one of its workingmen. Yet, that is not the question. I had no legal right or power in the matter. I could not compel the International Mills Company to pay just wages. I could not prevent them from en­ forcing unjust rules so long as they kept within the law as laid down by the courts. You and I know that every man can con­ duct his business mildly or harshly, as he pleases, if he does not break the law laid down by the courts or the law made by the Legislature." The Governor went on to point out what rights the law gave to the mill-owner. " Now what does the law permit to you or me or any one else, union or non-union man, who seeks work ? It says, ' You may seek work or quit work wherever and whenever you please, provided you don't break any ex­ isting contract. You may persuade any other person to quit work, if you don't try to make him break his contract out of pure malice.' On the other side, what does the law forbid you to do ? It forbids you to try to keep the bread out of another's mouth by the use of force or threats against him or his em­ ployer. I am in favor of organized labor. So is the law. Yet I cannot but recognize, and you must recognize, that a non-union man is a human being. He is an American citi­ zen, free and equal. He is entitled to earn his living in peace. He has sons and daughters and a wife, as you or any of us may have." Spenner, who had been standing stiffly and grimly silent, broke in upon the Governor's appeal. " I have no son. Cut your talk short. I cannot wait any longer." The Governor looked into the mouth of the barrel of the revolver without a tremor. " I say the non-union man has the same rights that you or I have, and one of those rights, the law says, is to try to get work from any man he pleases, and when it is ob­ tained, to continue to work with his life safe and free from the fear of threats or violence

REHEARSAL.

or intimidation used by men trying to throw him out of his job. And since the law gives him that right, the State must protect that right for him." Then the Governor, gazing straight into Spenner's eyes, explained in simple and elo­ quent language how one of the ways of en­ forcing this right to protection was the thing of which the very name was odious to the laboring man—an injunction. He showed how the workingmen's hatred of injunctions came largely from their ignorance as to what they were and what they restrained. " Do you realize how important for the protection of each one of you is this same power of the courts to issue injunctions ? Suppose a powerful railroad or telephone com­ pany attempts to encroach on your little, hard-earned piece of land ; how can you stop it ? Go to any judge, and you will, and can, obtain this hated injunction. Suppose with great difficulty you pay a few dollars taxes, and you see the city's money wasted and stolen by corrupt officials, and your tax-rate going up and up ; how can you stop it ? Go to the judge whom you have just called an ' ally of entrenched wealth, ' and you will have given you this thing ' oppressive of labor and of the poor man '—this injunction. Sup­ pose you are working for a railroad which carries mails and goods from State to State, and which seeks to discharge you and your fellow-men because certain other men will not work for the railroad unless you are dis­ charged. Go to that very abused and despised judge of the United States Court, and he will issue in your favor an order which you call ' government by injunction.' " Then the Governor explained exactly what the Belltown injunction did. It restrained from trespassing, and from interfering with others by force or by threats—that was all. " A l l this injunction does is to try to keep you from breaking the law of this State. Now I don't say that I agree with the law. It makes no difference to you whether I agree or not with it. A l l I am Governor for is to enforce the law. I cannot make it, no mat­ ter how much I desire to. I cannot change it if I will. The constitution of this State— the great binding force on all of us—tells me expressly what I can and what I cannot do. It says"—the Governor rolled forth the grand old language in a voice like the deep roar of a cataract—"'In the government of this commonwealth, the legislative depart­ ment shall never exercise the executive and judicial powers or either of them ; the execu-


A STORY

OF PUBLIC

tive shall never exercise the legislative and judicial powers or either of them.' If the law is wrong and hard, it is for you to change it. Send your representatives to the legis­ lature. Make them pass a bill changing the law ; and if the change is a proper one, I will sign it when they send it up to me. " But what would happen in this State if its citizens could break the law simply be­ cause they felt it to be unjust ? Why, you would not be safe for a minute. Your prop­ erty, your life, would be at the mercy of any crank or evil-doer. Your wife, your children, would not be safe "—Spenner gave an angry murmur at the word " children," but con­ tinued to listen intently, for the Governor was not to be stopped. The Governor's whole frame seemed in motion with the in­ tensity of his words ; and Spenner could not keep his eyes away from the glowing face. — " W o u l d not be safe for a second. The law must be obeyed until it is changed. And no good or honest men can believe otherwise." The Governor then described in the sad­ dest and most pitying voice what had hap­ pened at Bell town; how an appeal had been made to send the troops, and how he had taken extra precautions to be sure that they were necessary. Spenner still listened, grow­ ing paler and paler. The Governor moved to one side of his desk; but Spenner made no motion except to follow him with wildly fixed eyes, and he seemed to be unaware of anything. With arms flung out in a wellknown gesture, the Governor spoke on. He, too, seemed almost to have forgotten where he was or under what conditions he was speaking. In tones of earnest conviction and of tumultuous feeling, he spoke of the tremendous struggle that had gone on in him, between his horror at the results which might follow his despatch of the troops and his sense of duty and fealty to the people of the State. " I ask you, Mark Spenner, you yourself, to answer me this. What would you do if you had hired a servant, had entrusted him with the care of your goods, your house, your honor, your wife's honor and safety, and that servant, hearing outside a party of men trying to get in to rob and possibly to kill, had let in these lawbreakers rather than make himself unpopular with them ? And then suppose that, besides merely trusting him, you had made him solemnly swear to protect you and yours, and he broke his oath, what would you say, Mark Spenner, to that servant ? Answer this ! And I know that as you are an honest man, you can only answer it one wav. Answer this, I say."

LIFE.

85

As the Governor flung these words at him, he noticed that Spenner was growing nervous. The hand that held the revolver shook a little, while the muzzle of the revolver turned slightly down toward the table. " I am that servant, hired and trusted. I took that oath to protect you and yours, your neighbor and his, the men and women of Belltown, the men and women all over this State. I swore solemnly to enforce the law of this State, whether I believed in it or not, against any man breaking that law. Standing in that legislative hall, in the midst of hundreds of men who represented your rights and in­ terests, I placed my left hand on the Holy Bible, and, raising my right hand to heaven, I said, ' I do solemnly swear that I will bear true faith and allegiance to this common­ wealth, and that I will faithfully and impar­ tially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent on me as Governor, agreeable to the rules and regulations of the constitution and the laws of this commonwealth, so help me God.' "What is it you would have asked of me ? Not to send the troops to Belltown ? But the law said that it was my duty to do so. The safety of tens of thousands depended on my doing my duty. Would you have had me do otherwise ? No, Mark Spenner, no. You would have said to me, ' My servant, servant of my fellow-people, enforce the law you swore before God and man to enforce. The consequences of your act are not to rest on you. The responsibility for what may happen shall rest on none save upon all the people of the State who made the law, of whom you are the servant. Though some may die, others will be saved. But you, per­ sonally, neither kill nor save. Whatever may happen, you have no choice. You must not be a scoundrel and a perjurer.' And so, Mark Spenner, I say to you, even if I am to be killed the next minute, so help me God, I have done but my sworn duty." The Governor stopped very suddenly, throw­ ing his head back with a superb air. A t the same time he stepped closer to Spenner. The latter appeared confused for a moment, seemed to wish to speak, and faltered. Then he began to recover his self-possession, and the revolver rose once more. Before he had time, however, to bring it up fully, the Gover­ nor, with a great leap, threw himself against him, plunging to obtain hold of the weapon. Spenner uttered an enraged yell, and fell back against a low bookcase, with the Governor almost upon him. A shot rang out, and a drift of smoke clouded the air of the room.


THE NEW

86

Something tumbled heavily to the floor, and lay quite still. The smoke slowly floated away from around where a man stood breath­ ing hard and quick. It was the final scene in the Belltown tragedy. When the watchmen, aroused by the shot, came dashing up the stairs, down the outer corridors, and through the door of the Ex­ ecutive Chamber, they found the Governor leaning against the end of his desk and hold­ ing a revolver. Something black lay at his feet, and there was a disagreeable, pungent smell of powder in the air, while the lights in the room seemed to be burning dimly. " I have killed a man," the Governor said. " Send for the police and an ambulance. Do not let one word of this event be made pub­ lic to-night. Order a carriage for me at once. I go to Dolliver at half-past seven.

Increase

in per capita

circulation

PROSPERITY. No, I don't need any aid. I am not faint. I shall be all right." That night at Dolliver the Governor deliv­ ered his famous speech on the strike ques­ tion. People noticed that he looked very white, and seemed sad and serious ; but never had an audience in that State been so im­ pressed by the words of any man. It was not until the next morning, when they read their newspapers, that they learned how near death had come to silencing those eloquent lips and leaving the speech unpublished to the world. No one knew even then, or for long after, that the speech had been spoken once already, before it was delivered to the voters of Dolliver on that Saturday night. And it is possible that it was due to poor old Mark Spenner that the Governor was elected for his third term.

of money in the United States from

I860 to 1900.

THE N E W PROSPERITY. B Y R A Y STANNARD BAKER.

A

WESTERN writer, summing up the mar­ signifies all of these preliminary comforts. vels of growth, expansion, and pros­ And after paint comes a new front porch, perity of the year 1899 in the United States, a piano, and the boys off to college. added : ' ' And every barn in Kansas and Ne­ But the painting of the West is merely the braska has had a new coat of paint." surface indication of fundamental changes in For any one who knew the West of 1895 the commercial and industrial conditions of and 1896, with its bare, weather-stained the United States that make the years 1898 houses, its dilapidated barns, its farm ma­ and 1899 in many respects the most remark­ chinery standing out in the rain, its ruinous able in the history of the nation. It was in " boom " towns, its discontented inhabitants 1898 that the United States exceeded Great crying out for legislation to relieve their dis­ Britain for the first time in the value of do­ tress, this bit of observation raises a picture mestic exports. In the following year—1899 of improvement and smiling comfort such as —the total foreign business of the United no array of figures, however convincing, States passed for the first time in our history could produce. The West painted again: beyond $2,000,000,000, and the profits— how much that means ! The farmer has pro­ that is, the excess of exports over imports— vided himself with food in plenty and the were nearly $476,000,000. In less than three means for seeding his fields for another years—that is, between 1897 and 1900—so year ; he has clothed himself and his family great were the trade balances in our favor anew ; he has bought an improved harvester, that over a billion dollars of American in­ a buggy, and a sewing-machine; and now, debtedness was wiped from the ledgers of with the deliberation which is born of a sur­ Europe, and in 1899 we beheld the spectacle plus and a sturdy confidence in himself and of London buying money in New York with in the future, he is painting his barn. Paint which to conduct her South African war ; of


SUDDENNESS

OF THE REVIVAL— THE HARD TIMES PRECEDING

87

the exportation of gold to Europe, not be­ steel and iron business. In February, 1899, cause the United States owed it, although the owners of the great iron mines at the many American securities are still held head of Lake Superior contracted nearly abroad, but because we could spare a little their entire output for the season at prices of our plenty to relieve the financial stress twenty-five per cent, higher than those of 1898, only to find, within a few months, the abroad. Eighteen hundred and ninety-nine was a price of pig-iron almost doubled—rising from year of extraordinary records also in the do­ $10.50 a ton in February, 1899, to $20.25 mestic business of the United States, which in August, 1899. In the same way the steel has long been of greater volume by millions men and the coal men, not realizing the tre­ mendous advance then of dollars a year than about to begin, con­ that of any other nation. tracted large quantities The bank clearings, one of t h e i r products at of the surest indications prices which now look of the volume of the remarkably low. Yet country's business, were there were a few manu­ billions of dollars greater facturers who, by shrewd­ than they had ever been ness or good luck, fore­ before in the history of saw what was coming, the nation. In the five and reaped a rich re­ years from 1894 to 1899 ward. they more than doubled, and increased in 1899 Adversity has its value thirty-seven per cent, in the development of a over what they were in nation or a commercial system as surely as it 1898. The r a i l r o a d s has in the hardening and never before experienced refining of a man. The such prosperity, 1899 panic of 1893 followed showing fewer receiver­ a period of great pros­ ships than any year since perity and expansion, in 1882, and larger earnings which ambitious men ex­ than any previous year. tended their credit more Wages for labor increased rapidly than the growth rapidly in every part of in the business of the the country, and never country would warrant. before was there such a During this period, the sudden, and yet sub­ country had become, as stantial, expansion in the various manufacturing The gain of gold between 1897 and 1900 by the European a Western orator ex­ pressed it, vigorously, if industries. Steel rails banks of issue as compared with the gain in the not beautifully, "rotten United States during the same period. doubled in price between with mortgages." The February and August; cotton suddenly became a profitable crop; Baring failure of 1890 in London shook the copper made unprecedented rises. And never temple of credit until it trembled, but the before was there so much money in circula­ crash did not come until 1893. In that tion in the country, either in volume or in single year there were no fewer than 15,242 failures in the United States, with liabilities per capita distribution; and never before reaching the enormous total of nearly $347,were the totals of the people's savings in the 000,000, the greatest in any one year in the banks so enormous. It was also a year of history of the nation. In each of the two suc­ extraordinary coal, gold, iron, lumber, cop­ ceeding years, 1894 and 1895, more than per, and corn production; the year of the 13,000 business houses went into liquidation, most extensive and profitable lake and coast­ and in 1896, the year of the Presidential wise shipping traffic since the Civil War, and campaign, the number increased again to by all odds the greatest year of business and more than 15,000. profits on the stock exchanges. In order, therefore, to do any business The suddenness of the business revival is one of its most singular features. No whatever, it became necessary for manufac­ branch of industry is more sensitive to the turers, wheat-growers, miners, and business delicate variations of the times than the men generally to use their wits as never be-


88

THE NEW

PROSPERITY.

fore. Profits being small, and competition of Kansas farm loans are lower now than sharp, they sought for greater economies in they ever were before. Finally, in like manner, weak, unstable, and production. A t the height of the hard times in 1894, iron was manufactured in the South inflated railroads were forced to reorganize at six dollars a ton, whereas it had cost a on a rational business basis. Fixed charges few years before from eight dollars to nine were generally reduced, and there was a gen­ dollars a ton, an enormous percentage of eral healing of financial sores. A l l fictitious saving. Similarly, the great packers of valuations were remorselessly wiped out, and Chicago, finding that there was no longer although the country was poor, it was honest any paying profit in selling the ordinary again, and it was ready for prosperity. products of t h e i r P r o s p e r i t y must slaughter-houses— always begin with the the beef and the hides producer. Something —used greater efforts must be obtained from to abate the waste of the soil which can be parts of the animal sold for money, and theretofore discarded this money must start as valueless. In the the wheels of com­ report of a single merce. It so hap­ concern for 1899, it pened that in 1896 appears that these the price of wheat in former ' ' waste the United States be­ products " of the gan to rise, although packing-house were the crop of that year made to yield 4,000,was s m a l l . Then 000 pounds of neat'scame 1897 with an foot oil, 105,000,000 Increase in the average individual deposit in savings banks enormous crop, the pounds of fertilizers, largest by all odds between 1891 and 1899. 6,250,000 pounds of in many years. At glue, 12,000,000 pounds of material used in the same time the wheat crops of Russia making artificial butter, and more than 31,- and India were short (to the verge of famine 000,000 pounds of crude fats, for all of in the last-named country), and the great con­ which there was a ready sale. Indeed, one sumers of Europe, England especially, were of the officials of this company asserted that compelled to turn to America for food to its dividends for the year 1899 were paid a much greater extent than usual. Conse­ entirely from the sales of by-products which quently, the price of wheat went booming upward, assisted by wild speculation on the formerly went to waste. Chicago Board of Trade, in which much of In the same way that the manufacturers the money of a famous millionaire was un­ reduced the cost of production by ingenuity intentionally distributed among the wheat and economy, the farmers and stock-raisers producers of the West. The average price reduced their expenses to the lowest possi­ per bushel on the farm in 1897 reached ble degree. Singularly enough, men are apt nearly eighty-one cents, whereas in 1894 it to go into debt in good times and get out of had been only forty-nine cents ; in 1895, less debt in hard times. There were millions of than fifty-one cents ; and in 1896, seventydollars of mortgages in the West in the early three cents. Here was not only the largest nineties, held by Eastern capitalists at ruinous crop of years, but the highest price per rates of interest. With the crash of 1893, bushel. Foreign money and the money of capital, suffering its own hardships, began our own great population centers began at to withdraw its investments, and the farmers once to flow into the great wheat States of were forced to pay off their loans or else the Middle West. The farmers had pinched surrender their land. And pay they did, by along for years, and they needed every sort the hardest kind of economy. In the single of commodity ; but clothing, food, and farm­ State of Kansas the farm mortgages, which ing tools first of all. When they began to in 1890 amounted to the sum of $240,000,spend money, the local merchants, who had 000, much of it bearing the exorbitant in­ allowed their stocks to run to the lowest, terest of twelve per cent., had been reduced began to order goods of the wholesalers; in 1899 to less than $41,000,000, certainly and this set the factories to going more a remarkable evidence of the paying capacity rapidly, and increased the freight business for a period of hard times. And the rates


THE IMPROVEMENT

Churches. Prívate

gifts to public

Art Galleries. institutions

BEGINS

WITH

Libraries.

THE

FARMER.

89

Colleges.

in the United States in 1899—gifts of less than $1,000 are not included

in these totals.

on the railroads. A l l this expansion, though the labor of the country for thousands of it was slow at first and noticeable only in the unemployed men, because some 250,000 men special lines of clothing, food, and farm ma­ in gainful pursuits went into the war—all chinery, compelled the employment of more within a few months, thus relieving, at least men; and thus the wheels of general com­ partially, one of the direst distresses of hard merce, lubricated by the money of the wheat times—that of want of employment". And farmers, began to turn a little more rapidly. then the war had the interesting and power­ It is curious and wonderful to see how ex­ ful psychological effect of diverting the mind actly the industries of the world tread in of the American from his own woes, his cur­ lock-step, and how the man of the soil, the rency troubles, his tariffs, his hard times ; it farmer, towers huge and powerful at the was efficacious as a mind cure. He began to head of the line. When his tread is slow think of glory and patriotism and expansion ; and heavy, the iron-master, the transporter, he went into the throes of hero-worship over the miner, the manufacturer, must also tread Dewey, Sampson, Roosevelt, Wood ; and when slowly, and depression and hard times are the war was over, he returned to business in abroad in the land. But when the man of a cheerful, confident frame of mind, believ­ the soil increases his speed, those behind ing himself to be quite the bravest and most him move more rapidly; for he represents successful man on earth. Perhaps this very the world's primary need—food. Indeed, feeling had more to do with the suddenness this farmer is a wonderful and a powerful of the arrival of the " boom " in the early force in the United States. There are up­ months of 1899 than most people imagine. After the war was over, business continued ward of 8,500,000 of him as against 5,000,000 manufacturing workers and only 386,000 to improve, though somewhat slowly for a mining producers. So much is heard of the few months. Then in the fall of 1898 came another amazing wheat immensity of America's crop, more than 675,m a n u f a c t u r i n g indus­ 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 bushels, the tries, and yet the farmer largest wheat crop in has an invested capital the history of America. nearly three times that There were also large of the m a n u f a c t u r e r , and richly profitable corn and more than twelve and oats crops, and the times that of the miner, South raised its greatest a l t h o u g h the manu­ Total charities of the American in 1898 and in 1899. crop of cotton. Along f a c t u r e r produces a with these great crops greater value of com­ there came, most fortunately, a very large modities per capita than the farmer. increase in the production of gold, not only The march toward prosperity was already under way when the "Maine" was blown in the United States, but all over the world, up in Havana Harbor and war with Spain was thus enabling the nations to maintain large declared. The war did not work wholly in one stocks of currency. The Klondike had been direction in its effect on the business of the discovered, as well as, later, the American country. On the one hand, it withheld timid mines at Cape Nome; and the South Afri­ can gold mines produced at a rate theretofore capital from expansive enterprises: capital unequalled. In the United States the pro­ always waits until there is no bogy near, duction of 1898 exceeded that of 1896 by before it ventures far from its strong box. nearly $11,000,000, and reached the enor­ On the other hand, the Government paid out mous total of over $64,000,000. The pro­ within a few months more than $150,000,000 duction of the world rose from $202,000,000 to the producers, manufacturers, and wage in 1896 to over $287,000,000 in 1898. earners of the country. It also drew on


90

THE NEW

PROSPERITY.

This immense production of gold and the States could have been divided up, giving an enormous sums of money which foreign coun­ equal share to every man, woman, and child tries paid to the United States for exported in the country, there would have been $13.85 commodities during 1898 and 1899 have very for each. By 1880, this per capita share of greatly increased the money in circulation. the circulation was $19.41, and in 1890 it The total money of the United States on Feb­ was $22.82. It rose to $24.28 in 1894, and ruary 1, 1900, had passed to the two-billion- then it began to fall, reaching $21.10 in dollar mark, by all odds the greatest total 1896, during the currency agitation. Then of money that the country has ever had. In it went up again, until on February 1, 1900, less than three and one-half years—that is, it reached $25.75, the highest in the history between July 1, 1896, and December 1, 1899 of the nation. Our greatest commercial —the increase was over $476,000,000, or rival, England, has a per capita circulation 311/2per cent. Europe has not been able to of only a little more than $17.05; Germany, keep pace, even distantly, with the United also highly prosperous and progressive, has States in gold accumulation. All the banks only $19.84. Of all the great nations, of issue in Europe, taken together, gained France is the only one that exceeds the only $4,000,000 between 1897 and 1900, United States; she has a circulation of and in 1899 they suffered an actual loss. $36.15 to every inhabitant, but France uses The United States, on the other hand, gained cash in trade much more than this country. the enormous sum of $323,000,000, which Our recent great increase in money has been made the total stock of gold only one-third an important factor in the return of pros­ less than that of the combined banks of issue perity, although it is as much a result of in Europe—certainly a condition quite the prosperity as it is a cause. reverse of stringency. It is difficult to give a consecutive narra­ And the circulation has been increasing tive of the progress of the prosperity wave. considerably faster than the population. Beginning with the winter of 1898-99, all Back in 1860, if the money in the United at once the entire country seemed to revive ; a hundred industries began almost simultane­ ously to flourish; and by April, 1899, the country was ringing with stories of growth, expansion, and progress. With the hint of returning confidence the banks had begun to loan money at very low interest—two and three per cent. Specula­ tors, finding that they could borrow at such rates, began to trade more freely, and their confidence stimulated capital owners, who had long been without profits, to invest. That curious and'potent microbe of a rising market had begun its work, and there was a tremen­ dous rush to buy before prices went any higher. Wall Street, feeling confident that the time for a " boom " had come and that the profits would be immense, loaded up with stocks of every description. But still there were not stocks enough to supply the de­ mand, and idle capital still sought invest­ ment. It is easier to manufacture stocks than it is to build a steel-mill, and the profits from this industry, while they are not as certain as the profits from a steel-mill, may possibly be much more quickly gained. Stocks now began to be manufactured to sup­ ply the rabid speculators. And these stocks were the " industrials," the " trusts," the birth of which caused such a ferment during the winter of 1898-99. In the first seven months of 1899, hundreds of these huge cor­ More pianos were sold in the Northwest in six months, in 1899, than porations, or " trusts," were authorized in during the previous six years.


UNPRECEDENTED

BUSINESS

the State of New Jersey alone, with a total capitalization of more than $4,000,000,000. These inflated combinations are the natural flowering of hard times. Following the panic of the late seventies came the railroad com­ bination in which Jay Gould, " Jim " Fiske, and other great speculators played such im­ portant parts. It is easy to effect such a combination after a period of depression. There has been little money in business, and discouraged competitors are easily bought out or forced into a combination, for there is much plausibility as well as reason in the argument that a single great corporation can conduct a business more cheaply than many smaller ones, and therefore earn larger profits. And the fact that the combination may be a monopoly with the power of raising prices arbitrarily, if it chooses, appeals to greed and cupidity. Thus came the "indus­ trials," many of them merely inflated stock­ jobbing combinations, and the stocks were dumped in enormous quantities on the market, and they, too, were bought up with tremendous avidity. The record of the stock market during 1893 and 1899 tells a graphic story of the progress and effects of the wave. In 1894 the number of shares of stock bought and sold on 'Change in New York was a fraction over 49,000,000. In 1895, the number crept up to 66,000,000, fell to 56,000,000 in 1896, and rose to 77,000,000 in 1897. Then came 1898, with a record of 112,000,000 shares, and 1899, with 175,000,000. Although the business of 1898 reached the unprecedented total of 112,000,000 shares, the prosperity wave did not really affect the stock market in New York until August of that year. It reached its climax in January, 1899, the most remarkable month in the history of the stock exchange. The figures for that month showed the phenomenal aggregate of 24,143,610 shares, which was almost one-fourth of the entire business done in the previous twelve months, nearly 15,000,000 shares greater than that of the corresponding month in 1898, and more than double that of any month in that year. But while all this excitement was ferment­ ing on the exchanges, the legitimate manu­ facturing industries of the country were rising slowly and quietly, but mightily, and demanding money with which to meet the in­ creased calls of expansion. In the winter of 1898 the West wanted money also to move its huge crops. In poor times the money of the country gathers in New York, but with new activities everywhere this money began

ON THE STOCK EXCHANGES.

91

to drain westward and southward. Many of the capitalists who had been playing with stock speculation withdrew for more substantial and not less promising enter­ prises, and Wall Street suddenly realized, in the spring of 1899, that the public was not biting at its " industrials " as eagerly as it had been. Moreover, the rates of money, owing to a sharper demand, had been creeping up. In the great speculation month of Janu­ ary, 1899, the lowest rate for call loans was two per cent., with six per cent, for the high­ est rate. By March the highest was nine per cent., in April sixteen per cent., and then came the first break of the season—a little rift in the lute—a warning to the wise ones that the pace set was too fast. During the summer of 1899 the rates were compara­ tively low, and still other millions of " indus­ trials " were poured into the market, and still there were crazy buyers. In October, how­ ever, when there came considerable demands in the West for money to move the crops, and a demand for gold in England to conduct the Transvaal war, call money in New York reached forty per cent. In December, money demanded the extraordinary call loan interest of 186 per cent., and a panic followed. This high rate was only for speculation loans; mercantile paper at the same time ranged about 6 per cent. Speculators who had been carrying immense quantities of stock on margins could not get any more money to advance and were compelled to sell. Much selling reduces prices just as much buying advances them. As a result, down went the price of stocks. The " industrial " balloon was pricked, and in falling it carried with it the stocks of really stable and powerful cor­ porations which were in a highly prosperous condition. It was that anomaly, a prosper­ ity panic. Perhaps the most notable thing about the recent upward wave is the manner in which it has swept the entire country, scarcely a single locality or a single industry having escaped its welcome stimulation. Nothing will give better proofs of this than the bank clearings of the various American cities. It was to be expected that New York, the national money center, would show enor­ mous increases, although not such an in­ crease as it really did show (from $42,000,000,000 to $60,000,000,000 in the single year from 1898 to 1899) ; but people were not prepared for the astonishing showing made all over the country. Only six cities in the Union showed losses from 1898, the highest of these being less than seven per


92

THE

NEW

PROSPERITY.

cent. ; and in the country as a whole there liabilities of nearly $347,000,000, to only was an average gain of thirty-six per cent, 9,337 in 1899, with liabilities of less than over 1898 and sixty-three per cent, over $91,000,000. Remarkably enough, the av­ erage liability of the failed concerns also 1897. Another proof that the returning prosperity decreased sharply. In 1893 every failure is general as well as great is found in the mar­ meant liabilities of nearly $23,000, while in 1899 the average was velous showing for 1899 of only $9,733, which is much the savings and State banks the lowest ever reported in of the country. The savings this country. banks are patronized for An interesting feature of the most part by the poorer the situation, and one that classes of people—the work­ furnishes an especially strik­ ing woman with her bank­ ing proof of the unusual book, the laborer, the miner, volume of the home business the manufacturing employé. —the business between the On June 30, 1899, there small buyers and the retail were over 5,200,000 depos­ store—is the remarkable itors in savings banks in the demand on the national United States, compared Treasury for the smaller with 4,800,000 in 1894, and denominations of coins and 3,800,000 in 1889, a gain bills. George E . Roberts, of 1,400,000 in ten years. D i r e c t o r of the United And each of these depositors States Mint, told me that had, in the average, more never before was the demand money to his account than for them so great. A fewever before, the average figures furnished by Mr. amount on deposit rising Roberts will show this con­ from $369 for each person dition exactly. In 1879, in 1894 to $419 in 1899. when specie payment was The deposits in all the banks, resumed by the Government, national and State as well the vaults of the Treasury as savings, representing up­ at Washington began to fill ward of 13,000,000 indi­ diamonds imported into the United with dimes, quarters, and vidual depositors, actually Value of States in 1837, 1898, and 1899. half dollars, some of which doubled i n ten years, amounting in 1899 to the enormous sum of were sent back from foreign countries whither $7,514,000,000. Of this great total the they had been driven in the paper-money savings banks and the State banks, the de­ days of the Civil War. The Government's positories of the poorer people, held nearly store of these coins kept increasing until one-half of the total, leaving to the national 1885, when many big vaults in the Treasury banks and the trust companies the other half. building were full of them, and they amounted to nearly $32,000,000. By September, 1899, If the laboring people have been prosper­ there was only a little more than $2,000,000 ous, have been laying up money and paying of them remaining in the Treasury. That is, off debts, we may be sure the business men, the working people of the United States were bankers, manufacturers, railroad owners, have handling and using $11,000,000 more of not been less fortunate. More than fifty dimes, quarters, and half dollars in Sep­ public companies in the United States de­ tember, 1899, than they had been using in clared their first dividend in 1899 ; a score September, 1897—two years—a most re­ increased their rate of dividend, and thirty markable and quite unprecedented record. made extra dividend payments to their And the use of nickels and pennies increased stockholders. The banks of New York never in proportion. had a more generally profitable year than 1899. The railroads of the country, mineNot only has the use of small currency owners almost without exception, steel and thus greatly increased, but the postal busi­ iron men, many other manufacturers, and ness of the country, which also indicates wholesale and retail merchants also have much as to the financial condition of people been large profit-earners. On the other at large, reached an unprecedented volume in hand, the number of commercial failures the year 1899. The Government money-order shrunk from over 15,000 in 1893, with total department transacts the banking business


INCREASED

USE FOR SMALL

DENOMINATIONS

OF MONEY.

93

of people who do not maintain accounts with great industries. The farmer, on the other banks and have no occasion to remit money hand, although his wheat and corn went frequently. Postmaster-General Charles Em­ down in price in 1899, was well able to ory Smith furnished me with a number of stand the change, because the crops of 1896, significant facts in regard to this business 1897, and 1898, all of which had sold at during the past few years. The increase of high prices, had left him in excellent con­ the money-order business for the year ended dition; and, besides, his cattle were bringing June 30, 1899, over that of the year 1895 him more money than ever before. The was more than 7,000,000 orders issued ; and greatest rise in prices was in the commodi­ the increase in amount was $55,000,000. ties for which the foreigner and the great Not only this, but the average amount of corporations paid their money, notably in money sent by money orders was increased building materials, including iron and steel, in which the advance was in the one year 1899 by about forty-four per cent. forty cents. For some time Metals came next, with a previous to 1899 the aver­ gain of forty per cent. ; age had been $7 to an then coal and coke, with a order ; in 1899 it was $7.40. gain of 3 9 | per cent. ; then The increased volume of the hides and leather, twentymoney orders sent to foreign six per cent. Raw cotton countries indicates the in­ and wool made specially creased prosperity of Ameri­ noteworthy advances, and, cans of foreign birth, many from being among the most of whom belong to the depressed of industries, the h u m b l e s t c l a s s of d a y textile manufacturing trades laborers. In a single week are now among the busiest. preceding Christmas, 1899, It is significant that, while the aggregate amount of the average increase in the orders sent by Americans price of commodities in to their friends in Europe America in 1899 was seven­ and elsewhere was over teen per cent., the British $2,500,000. A n d there gain in prices was only was a remarkable increase twelve per cent.—a con­ in the amount of money clusive showing that while sent from the United States England, and indeed the in this manner in the three whole world, was extraordi­ years ending in 1899. For narily prosperous in 1899, the fiscal year of 1897, the the United States was at t o t a l b u s i n e s s done the summit of the wave. amounted to nearly $108,000,000 ; in 1899 the amount It is especially interesting rose to over $122,000,000, Value of hats and bonnets imported into the and instructive to consider what may be called the an increase in two years of United States in 1897 and 1899. moral, or rather collateral, over $14,000,000. The general business revival showed a effect of such an upward movement in the most notable effect in the rise of the prices of business of a great country. A nation is many commodities in 1899. The breadstuff's wondrously like a man. Adversity purifies —wheat, corn, oats, barley, rye, flour—which it and hardens its character; a period of are the food of the poor, together with mut­ adversity is a time of good resolutions, ton, tea, eggs, rice, and tobacco, decreased economy, development. It was to be ex­ in price, according to Bradstreet's report, pected, therefore, that when expansion came although the decrease was small. With other again to business, it would also come to food stuffs, such as beef, pork, butter, coffee, many other departments of human activity. sugar, and vegetables, there was an advance, And this, indeed, happened in 1899. Take, although so small, except in the case of beef for example, the matter of donations and and pork, that many consumers probably bequests for public causes and institutions. failed to notice it. But fuel and all kinds The year 1899 shows a record in this quite of clothing, including shoes, were consider­ as extraordinary as in the bank clearings or the railroad earnings. While Wall Street ably higher. Wages advanced and employ­ was frantic with stock speculation and steel ment was steadier, however, in nearly all the


THE NEW

94

was doubling in price, the big, comfortable, benevolent American was giving away over $79,000,000, which exceeded the gifts of 1898 by the astounding sum of over $55,000,000, a gain of nearly fifty per cent., and gifts under $1,000 are not counted. In that single year Andrew Carnegie established no fewer than twenty-one libraries in various parts of the country, his donations exceed­ ing $2,582,000. Thirty-four persons made donations ranging from $100,000 to $28,000,000. Indeed, it seemed as though every millionaire in the country, once good times had come again, opened his heart and pursestrings. To charities there was donated or bequeathed during the year a total of $13,036,676. Churchesreceived $2,961,593. The museums and art galleries of the country were the gainers by the year's liberalities to the extent of $2,686,500. To the libraries was given a total of $5,012,400. The amount donated or bequeathed to universities, col­ leges, and academies surpasses all the other items combined, being $55,581,817. More­ over, never before was there such a tide of students to the colleges as in 1899, and the same tendency appeared even in the district schools. More curious still, reports from various States showthat crime everywhere decreased. Take, for instance, the showing in the single State of Illinois. For the year ending Sep­ tember 30, 1895, during the hard times, 927 convicts were sent to the State peniten­ tiary. In the year ending September 30, 1899, the number was only 506, or hardly more than half. The decrease unquestionably is due to lessened idleness. The army of the unem­ ployed is no longer an army and no longer unemployed; and there is, in consequence, less drunkenness and less tendency to crime. Prosperity also brings with it a feeling of hope. Things must improve, there is money to be made, and comforts to be gained. The

FRANCE

U.S.

PROSPERITY. legitimate means of acquiring fortune have suddenly become easier than thieving. Prosperity is expansive ; it loves its com­ forts, its fine china, its music, its theaters, its rich wines, its fine tobaccos, its jewelry, its silks, and its satins. After six years of pinching and saving, is it any wonder that the country takes a long breath and buys the new top-buggy, the necklace, the piano, upon which it has been building its desires ? The year 1899 brought unexampled prosperity to all of those trades which lie just beyond the borders of hard necessity over against lux­ ury. Last fall a railroad manager in St. Paul told me that more pianos had been transported to the Northwest during the six months ending July 1, 1899, than during the preceding six years. Then there are the items of diamonds and top-buggies—diamonds being a standard of 1uxury to the East and top-buggies to the West. I haven't the exact figures on top-buggies, but I was told by a manufacturer that more business in buggies was done in 1899 than ever in any year before, twice over. As for diamonds, in the fiscal year of 1897 the total value imported into the country was only about $2,000,000; in 1898, the amount had increased to $7,000,000, whereas in 1899 the diamonds imported had a value of over $12,000,000. And, finally, in the supreme lux­ ury of fine foreign bonnets and millinery materials, the value of the importations for 1899 was $2,644,000, an increase of $400,000 over 1898, and of $533,000 over 1897. Like increases appeared in the importation of pictures and works of art, the value for 1899 being $2,800,000, compared with only $2,300,000 in 1898. In short, in almost every article of life, whether luxurious or essential, as in almost every way of life, the heightened prosperity shows itself decisively ; and all the present in­ dications are for its substantial continuance.

GERMANY

Per capita circulation ofmone y in four leading nations in 1899.

ENGLAND


EDITORIAL NOTES. wrought out into completed articles, our readers will make due acquaintance with IN MCCLURE'S MAGAZINE for March, 1899, them in the pages of the Magazine. the following editorial announcement Although this announcement completes the was made : formal contest, we wish it known that there One thousand dollars will be paid for subjects or is a perpetual competition for good ideas, ideas for twelve articles for MCCLURE'S MAGAZINE. and that we will gladly pay any correspond­ The suggestions may be for a series of articles or for ent for original ideas available for magazine single articles. The only condition is that they prove available to the editors of the Magazine and are not on articles, according to their worth. It should subjects already under consideration. The prize-win­ be remembered, however, that articles are ners will be given the first opportunity to write the planned months and sometimes years ahead, articles. For a smaller number of successful ideas a and that consequently subjects may not pro rata sum will be paid. always be new to us even when they are so S. S. MCCLURE. to those who submit them. Perhaps no magazine ever made another offer of this kind to which there were so many responses, and the great number of T H E S. S. M c C L U R E C O M P A N Y ' S the responses has caused an unavoidable N E W BOOKS. delay in making and announcing the awards. W E have the privilege of announcing from The offer of $ 1 , 0 0 0 was for the twelve best suggestions, and not, as some assumed, our Book Department three attractive vol­ for the best twelve from any one person. umes for immediate publication. Many persons sent a score or more each, and our task has been to select the best twelve CONAN D O Y L E . from all the thousands submitted. In only As shown by "The Adventures of Sher­ one case did more than one of the sugges­ lock Holmes," Dr. Doyle is at his best in tions submitted by the same person prove to short stories. " T h e Green Flag, and other be available. This was in the instance of Stories of War and Sport " will be published Dr. W. C . Mitchell, two of whose suggestions at once by the S. S. McClure Company in share in the award. The award has been connection with the two books noted below. made on the basis of $ 8 3 . 3 4 for each sugges­ The collection includes the author's most tion accepted. The following are the names important recent work. and addresses of the persons submitting the twelve finally accepted : THE SUGGESTION CONTEST.

Dr. WILLIAM C . MITCHELL (2), Mr. H . H . BRIMLEY, Mr. JAMES BARNES, Rev. CYRUS T . BRADY, Mr. SAMUEL T . CLOVER, Mr. CHARLES A . DANCY, Mr. ADACHI KINNOSUKÉ, Mr. W . J . LAMPTON, Mr. SAMUEL E . MOFFETT, Mr. CHAUNCEY THOMAS, Mrs. MARTHA MCCULLOCH WILLIAMS,

Denver. Raleigh, N . C . New York City. Philadelphia. Chicago. New Orleans. Los Angeles. New York City. New York City. Denver. New York City.

We have worked for many months with the greatest care over the suggestions sub­ mitted, in order to be perfectly just to all concerned; and as, after all, the Magazine itself was to be the final gainer or loser by the choice, it will be seen that there was no partiality possible. For business reasons, it is thought best not to announce the sug­ gestions themselves at present. As they are

HENRY

DRUMMOND.

During a career which continued for nearly forty years, the late Dwight L . Moody brought a spiritual uplift to thousands of homes in this country and Great Britain. The con­ secration of strong common sense and organ­ izing ability made him the greatest evangelist of his time. Such a man as Henry Drummond had no hesitancy in saying, " He is the biggest human I have ever met. "Some little time before his own death, Professor Drummond wrote a series of articles which the closest friends of the evangelist characterized as " the best appreciation of Mr. Moody ever written. " As a young man Professor Drummond first met Mr. Moody during the wonder­ ful revival in Great Britain in 1 8 7 3 - 7 5 , and from that time remained in close touch with him. The words of the distinguished Scotch95


DEATH

96

IN

man concerning his contemporary and friend are a product of rare insight and fine sym­ pathy. The S. S. McClure Company is glad to be able to give to the public in book form Professor Drummond's appreciation of Mr. Moody. BOOTH

TARKINGTON.

The name of Mr. Tarkington is well known to readers of M C C L U R E ' S M A G A Z I N E , for this magazine published serially " The Gentleman from Indiana," the first of this author's books to meet the public eye. "Monsieur Beaucaire" has also appeared serially in M C C L U R E ' S , but there is a wide demand for it in individual shape, just as there was

BATTLE. for the former book. The S. S. McClure Company will therefore put the story out in book form, handsomely printed, and illus­ trated in two colors. "Monsieur Beau­ c a i r e " differs widely in conception and treatment from " T h e Gentleman from In­ diana," but the author seems as much at home in the resorts of London fashion dur­ ing the eighteenth century as he has shown himself to be in the county-seats of Indiana. The old friends of the story will welcome it in its permanent form, while new friends will certainly not be slow to find it out. In the near future announcement will be made of books by many other well-known writers.

DEATH IN BATTLE. BY

ALFRED

OLLIVANT,

A u t h o r of " B o b , S o n o f B a t t l e . "

His hand upon th' Impregnable, he blunders Headlong in the Cataract of War, Blasted on by flaming-throated thunders, Founders in the Deluge ; sinks to soar, Hugely borne upon Jehovah-handed surges, Whose crests out-tower the bulwarks far of Mars, Thro' bellowing abysses, till he emerges In the still sweet silence of the stars. From the roar of ruin'd firmaments and riot, He slides into his sleep, As a ship into the haven's sudden quiet From the clamor of the hungering outer deep. Peace from th' intolerable jangling, Tumult, and drunken din of War ; In place of petty worlds' perpetual wrangling, The Majesty of Peace for Evermore. He lies in the hush of hallowed places, Sleeping ; and ever, as he sleeps, Drifts through the silent starry spaces, Upward across the tranquil deeps Of Night and High Heaven ; nor aught awakes him, Drifting, the Peace upon his brow, To the lattice whence the Lord leans and takes him Gently, lest He wake him ; whispering low— "Come, Weary Warrior ! A r t thou sleeping, Worn with thy faring o'er the deep ? Sleep on until the time of reaping : Deep be thy sleep, deep be thy sleep."


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

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Dr. JOHN W I L S O N GIBBS' THE ONLY

Electric Massage Roller. (Patented United States, Europe, Canada, Cuba, etc.) " A new beautifier which is warranted to pro­ duce a perfect complexion, removing -wrinkles and alt facial blemishes. W i l l develop or re­ duce, as desired. A very pretty addition to the Trade Mark Registered. toilet-table."—Chicago Tribune. " This delicate Electric Beautifier removes all facial blemishes. It is the only positive remover of wrinkles and crow'sfeet. It never fails to perform all that is expected."— Chicago Times-Herald. " T h e Electric Roller is certainly productive of good results. I believe it the best of any appliances. It is safe and effective." — H A R R I E T H U B B A R D A Y E R , New York World.

FOR M A S S A G E A N D C U R A T I V E P U R P O S E S . An Electric Roller in all the term implies. ( l î n l l c r m m a g n e t i z e d o r til i n c h e d t o b a t t e r l e » n r c n o t E l e c t r i c R o l l e r * . ) T h e invention of a physician and electrician known throughout this country and Europe. A most perfect complexion beautifier. W i l l remove wrinkles, "crow-feet" (premature or from age), and all facial b l e m i s h e s — P O S I T I V E . Whenever electricity is to be used for massaging or curative purposes, it has no equal. No charging. Will last forever. Always ready for use on A L L P A R T S O F T H E B O D Y , for all diseases. For Rheumatism, Sciatica, Neuralgia, Nervous and Circulatory Diseases, a specific. T h e professional standing of the inven­ tor, with the approval of this country and Europe, is a perfect guarantee. P R I C E : G O L D , $4.00; S I L V E R , $3.00. By mail, or office of Gibbs' Com­ pany, 1 8 7 0 B R O A D W A Y , N E W Y O R K . Book free. Positively, the Only E l e c t r i c M i n t a g e R o l l e r . ALI, O I'll FKS SO CAI.LKD OR HAANKT1ZEII A R E F U W 1 U L V N T .

" Can take a pound a day off a patient, or put it on."—New York Sun, August 30, 1891. Send for lecture on " Great Subject of F a t , " and Blank. No melina. No Hard Work.

DR. JOHN W I L S O N GIBBS' O B E S I T Y C U R E For the P e r m a n e n t R e d u c t i o n and C u r e o f Obesity. Purely Vegetable. Harmless and Positive. NO F A I L U R E . Your reduction Isassured—reducetostav. One month's treatment, # 5 . 0 0 . M a i l , or office, 1 3 7 0 U r o a d way* N e w Y o r k . REDUCTION G U A R A N T E E D . " On obesity, Dr. Gibbs is the recognized authority."—N. Y. Press, 1899. " T h e cure is based on Nature's laws."—N. Y. Herald, July 9, 1893.

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to a d v e r t i s e r s

18


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

W e have no agents o r branch stores.

A l l orders s h o u l d be sent d i r e c t to u s

vl/

I

New Summer Suits, 5. 1 ? w vl/

vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/

$

W e have just received from abroad some entirely n e w styles in Suits and Skirts for s u m m e r wear. W e have had these illustrated on a S u p p l e m e n t Sheet, w h i c h will be sent free, t o g e t h e r w i t h our S p r i n g Catalogue and a choice collec足 tion of samples of suitings, to the lady who wishes to dress w e l l at moderate cost. W e make every gar足 ment to order, thus i n s u r i n g that perfec足 tion of fit a n d finish which is not to be found in ready-made goods.

We pay all express charges. O u r catalogue illus足 trates : New Designs in Summer Suits, $4 up.

vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/

vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vi; vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ v!/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/ vl/

In Pique, Crash, Cotton Covert Cloths, Duck, Linens, etc.

Yachting and Outing Suits, $4 up. Tailor-Made Suits, $5 up. In All-wool Serpes, Cheviots, Broadcloths, Covert Cloths, Venetians, etc.

!

vl/

1

Extra Values in Duck, Pique and Crash Skirts, $3 up. t Separate Skirts, $4 up.

vl/ vl/ vl/ fabrics, $5 up. vl/ vl> vl/ vl/

L i n e d with Percaline, well stiffened and bound with Corduroy; made of All-wool Cloths, Serges, Cheviots, etc., in the latest effects.

Special Values in Bicycle Suits in newest Separate Bicycle Skirts, $3.50 up. Rainy-Day Suits and Skirts made of double-face materials.

Our line of samples includes the newest materials, many of them being exclusive novelties not shown elsewhere. W e also have a special line of black goods and fabrics for second m o u r n i n g . A l l orders filled with the greatest promptness ; a suit or skirt can be made i n three days w h e n necessary. Write to-day for C a t a l o g u e , Supplement and Samples ; y o u w i l l get them free by return m a i l .

THE NATIONAL CLOAK

C O M P A N Y , 119 a n d 121 W e s t 23d S t r e e t , N e w Y o r k .

mention M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to adv 19

i

i vi/ vi/ vi/ vi/ vi/ vi/ vi/ vi/


McCLURE'S

MA GAZI

XE.

i

Healthy Food. The cereal made of hard Spring wheat, noted for its health-giving, strength sustaining qualities, rich in gluten and phosphates, is

Pillsbury's Vitos The ideal wheat food. All grocers sell Pillsbury's Vitos. Ask yours for book of Pillsbury's Recipes.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Free. Pillsbury-Washburn

Flour

Mills

C o . , L t d . , Minneapolis,

M a k e r s o f Pillsbury's V i t o s a n d P i l l s b u r y ' s O u t s .

Ptease mention M c C l u r e ' s when you write to advertisers. 20

Minn.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

5end for our FREE book! of 72 pages, " The Test of T i m e . " In it you will probably find a letter from some neighbor or friend that is just as strong as the following from the Rev. J O S . A . SE1SS, D . D . , P h i l a d e l p h i a , P a . Messrs. OSTERMOOR & C o . , 1338 Spring Garden Street, Jan. 10, 1900. SIRS :—I have had one of your Patent Elastic Felt Mattresses in constant use for twenty-eight years past—it is not in the least matted down, but is just as soft, clean and elastic as when new, althcugh the ticking is very badly worn, so that I think re-covering is necessary. I certainly would not have a mattress for personal use except the Ostermoor Patent Elastic Felt, for there is not, to my knowledge, anything so satisfactory and enduring as your mattress possible to be obtained. Surely the sight of this twenty-eight year old mattress, and my remarkable experience, must convince doubters, if any are left. T h e Lutheran Theological Seminary at Mt. Airy, we furnished throughout with your mattresses, where they are proving just as satisfactory. Yours truly, JOS. A . SEISS.

I The Ostermoor Patent $ I Elastic Felt Mattress,

15

Express Prepaid

© to y o u r door. is always " S E N T O N S U S P I C I O N , " which means just this : S L E E P O N IT 30 N I G H T S and if itisnot if you don't believe it to be the equal in cleanliness, durability and even all you have hoped for, if comfort of any $50 hair mattress ever made, you can get your money back by return mail— "no questions asked. ' There will be no unpleasantness about it at all. • $ 8.3s 1 wide, 30 lbs. 10.00 whether you need a mattress now 33 feet 6 inches wide, ¡ • 1.70 or not. It will interest you to 4 feet feet wide. 40 lbs. '3 35 know about the best and cheapM a d e i n t w o p a r t s , 50 c e n t15.00 s e x t rJa . est mattress in the world.

Send for Our Book " T H E TEST OF TIME,"

3 feet 6 inches wide, 25 lbs

We have cushioned 25,000 Churches.

Send/or

our book "Church

New

Cushions"

* * %

«

T a k e Care ! Don't Be Cheated ! There is not a single store in the country that carries our mattress ; almost every store now has an imitation so-called " felt," which is kept i n stock to sell on our advertising. Our name and guarantee on every waitress. Can be bought only of

O S T E R M O O R & C O M P A N Y , 112 E l i z a b e t h S t r e e t ,

*•

York.

%

* *

A Goodform Closet Set w i l l m a k e y o u r closet l o o k l i k e this picture. T r y i t s i x m o n t h s . Money back if y o u s a y so. Men's Set. 12 g a r m e n t yokes, 6 nickel - plated trousers hangers, 2 shelf bars a n d 1 loop. Women's Set. 12 g a r m e n t yokes, 12 skirt hangers, 2 shelf bars a n d 2 loops. See loop on door. Sets $3.00 each — t w o i n one shipment, $5.50, express paid. Ours is the famous automatic nickel-plated trousers hanger. Sample, one, 30c; four, $1.00; six and 1 loop, $1.50 delivered. Sold in first-class dry goods stores and by clothiers and furnishers. Booklet showing men's and women's sets free for the asking. Remit to us if not found in your city. CHICAGO FORM CO., 83, 125 La Salle St., Chicago Send no m o n e y to u s i f y o u are near a n y o f the f o l l o w i n g Selling Agents: Boston—R. H . White & C o . Hartford—Brown, Thomson & Co. Providence—Callendar, McAuslan & Troup Co. Brooklyn—Fred'k Loeser &- Co. New York City—Hamiltons, 23d and 6th Avenue. Buffalo, N . Y . — W m . Hengerer Co. Watertown, N . Y.—Jas. R . Miller. Jersey City—Wood & Menagh. Washington, D . C — E . H . Morseli. Pittsburg—Jas. Phelan. Detroit—Hunter & Hunter. Grand Rapids— Gardiner & Baxter. Cincinnati—Pickering Hardware Co. Sandusky, 0.—Harris & Schumacher. Columbus, 0.—Cooney & Co. Indianapolis—Paul H . Krauss.

San Francisco—Palace Hardware Co. Denver—Daniels & Fisher. Butte, Mont.—Hennessy Merc. Co. Lawrence, K a s . — W m . Bromelsick. Chicago—Marshall F i e l d & Co. Schlesinger & Mayer. Albany, N . Y . — W . M . Whitney & Co. Omaha—Hayden Bros. Allentown, Pa.—Hess Bros. Newark, N . J . — L . S. Plaut & Co. San L u i s Potosi, Mexico— I . H Farwell St. Louis—Simmons Hardware Co. " L a d i e s ' Outfitting Co. Cleveland—Levv & Stearn. *' The May Co. Racine, Wis.—Williams & Breese. Milwaukee, Wis.—Gimbel Bros. St. Paul—Shuneman & Evans.

G O O D F O R M C L 0 5 E L 5 E T •

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to advertisers. 21


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

JUST

ONE

SUPPORTE* Thai

H O O D S T O O T H POWDER " Everybody Says It i s E x c e l l e n t . " It thoroughly cleanses and whitens the teeth, has no unfavorable action on their substance and does not irritate nor inflame the tissues of the mouth. I t hardens and reddens the gums, neutralizes a l l acid se足 cretions and sweetens the breath.

G E T and KEEP a PERFECT FIGURE you

must wear the Combined Belt and Front Pad

Foster Dose Supporter

Large Bottle, 25c.

(Patented Dee. 5, 1899)

C . I. H o o d & C o .

Mammoth Size, Three times as much, 50c,

Lowell, Mass.

Free Sample.

See that the, name FOSTER is on every pair. First-class Dealers sell them; if not, write us. When order足 ing be sure and give your height and "waist measure. THE FOSTER HOSE SUPPORTER C O M P A N Y ,

mm

3999 Cottage Grove Ave., Chicago,

H O O D S

UI.^^^H^^^^g

Medicated Proclaimed by T h o u s a n d s of W e a r e r s the M o s t Perfect F i t t i n g Ladiei F o o t w e a r ever produced.

SOAP The Best F o r Everybody's Skin. Cleanses, disinfects, heals, makes and keeps the skin pure and healthy; beautifies and preserves the com足 plexion; lathers easily and abun足 dantly, has a delicate fragrance, and is without an equal for the nursery, toilet, bath, and shaving. Trial size, lOc. Full size, 2 5 c . Free Sample.

C . I. H O O D & C O . ,

Lowell, Mass.

THE

PANEL OF ELASTIC

GORING

in both Shoes a n d O x f o r d s causes them to

FIT EITHER HIGH OR LOW INSTEP PERFECTLj and to yield to every action of the foot. T h e y are made of the Choicest K i d , i n B l a c k or T a n , inali sizes, i n a l l the latest shapes of toe, a n d a l l w i d t h s from A to EE,

McKay Sewed Lace Boot, $3.25 ; Oxfords, $2.25 Hand Turned Lace Boot, $3.50 ; Oxfords, $2.50 A U K i d or w i t h F a n c y V e s t i n g T o p s at same price. Sent Express Prepaid upon receipt of price a n d 25 cents. Write for Illustrated Catalogue

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 22

THE Dept. L .

RICH S H O E CO. Milwaukee, Wis


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

THE

ITS METHOD OF

Y O C A I I O I Ï

T out i : -1» it o n r c -

Ii DISTIIÏCTIVE II¥ THE EXQUISITE ^ITAIITT OE ITS TOHE

TIO\

O

IS

CALLT EST

It 41>I-

DIFFER-

IBOffl ALL OTHERS

W e wish to call the attention o f all church societies c o n t e m p l a t i n g the purchase o f an organ to our Style zz. Organs w i l l be shipped o n approval to i n t e n d i n g purchasers w h o are unable to call at our warerooms. Details upon request. W r i t e for Catalogue A .

RGANS built on the V o c a l i o n

system are preeminently fitted for church services. T h e y have a full, rich diapason tone and a peculiar delicacy i n the string registers which make them o f inestimable value as an accompaniment to the human voice.

T h e distinctive features o f the V o c a l i o n are : ZZ. P R I C E , $1,200. Other styles from $Z"JS to $J,ooo. STYLE

T H E VOCAIIOM OIS«* V \ COUPAIT

18 W e s t Twenty-third Street, H e w Y o r k City F l e m i n g & C a r n r i c k Press, N e w Y o r k

T o n a l superiority; Compactness o f form i n proport i o n to c a p a c i t y ; V a r i e t y o f registration; a n d Price.

Says : " I take great pleasure in recommend-

ing the Lewis Union Suits for women i n all Mrs, Elizabeth Cady Stanton stations. Dress has so much to do with health. Nothing could be more beautiful and desirable than the various materials of which the

LEWIS UNION

SUITS

a r e K n i t t e d . V e r i l y t h e y a r e a d r e a m o f b e a u t y , a n d every one should t r y them f o r the c o m i n g summer."—Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

A P r o m i n e n t Officer W r i t e s : "I have worn L e w i s U n i o n S u i t s f o r years w i t h every s a t i s f a c t i o n i n style, m a t e r i a l a n d fit, a n d m y w i f e says s h e ' c a n n o t g e t a l o n g w i t h o u t them —she is now t e s t i n g t h e m i n t h e T r o p i c s . A s u m m e r c a m p a i g n i n C u b a c o n v i n c e d m e there are n o n e so g o o d as y o u r S l L T K I N E U N I O N S U I T S . " " S e n d s a m p l e f a b r i c s so t h a t I m a y o r d e r f o r s p r i n g . " — U . S . C O N S U L , M E X I C O . These testimonials prove that for S u m m e r W e a r M i t r i n e U n i o n S u i t s are the highest grade of knit-to-fit perfection, unsurpassed for coolness and comfort. For their perfection, finish, comfort, fit and durability In wear considered, although they are the best goods ou the market they are absolutely the cheapest in the end. Ask your dealer for these Suits. Don't accept a substitute, but send 2-cent stamp for new illustrated (from life) catalogue, sample fabrics—linen, silk, siltrine, lisle, Balbriggan and wool—and testimonials that prove all our claims.

LEWIS

KNITTING

COMPANY,

204-

Main

Street, Janesville, Wis.

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when you write to advertisers. 23


McCLURE'S

"OUT

MAGAZINE.

OF SIGHT" TROUSERS

RACK

Saves Time, Saves Trouble, S a v e s Space, S a v e s T r o u s e r s and Saves Profanity A handy device to attach to your closet or bed-room door, k e e p i n g y o u r trousers in proper shape and in s m a l l space. Simple to put up-—easy to operate. H a n d s o m e l y finished in hard wood, all metal parts of brass. Does not mark o r stretch the material. Saves pressing, saves time, saves trouble. Holds from one to ten pairs of trousers, and each pair readily get-at-able. H a n g s all your neckties too. Indispensable when you once get it. C o m e s apart and goes in your trunk ready to use anywhere.

Don't Hang Up this Opportunity but Hang Your Trousers on it Price $2.50 delivered, all charges prepaid. Satisfaction guaranteed. nptly returned. Send for illustrated booklet.

THE

B u y a rack and give it 10 days trial.

If not satisfactory, m

O. O. S. C O M P A N Y , Dept. C, 914 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, P a . YOUR INSTEP

LOW?

GILBERT'S HEEL CUSHIONS Worn

Chid

inside

the

shoe"

Arch the Instep, Increast Height, Make Better Fitting Shoes, Remove Jar In Walking. Indorsed by physiciani. -.imply placed m t h e heel, telt down. Don't require larger shoes. % inj £¿ HJP" 35c; i in., 50c. per pair. A t shoe and department stores. Send name, size shoe, height desired, and 2c. stamp for pair on • ten days' trial.

Cuffs

READ

GILBERT MFG. C0. 63EllSt.,Rocliester K.Î, 1

The latest idea—a linen cuff that fits well, looks well, wears well. DoeB not crack or fray .sets perfectly. Keeps the sleeve in shape. The correct cuff for all occasions. Sent direct prepaid on receipt of price, 25 cts. per pair, $3.00 per dozen. Address C h i d Cuff Company, 912 Mppinrott liuildiiig, Philadelphia.

HARDY

R h o d o d e n d r o n s , A z a l e a s , Roses, Evergreens, Shrubs, Japanese M a p l e s , Shade Trees. Planting plans, estimates and suggestions furnished.

H I R A M T . J 0 1 Ï E S , U n i o n C o u n t y N u r s e r i e s , E l i z a b e t h , If. J.

New Buggy

FAY

$26

Two e n o r m o u s f a c t o r i e s produciti!! buggies by automatic machinery, from materials bought for cash. W e sell direct and SAVE DEALERS PROFITS. Can't stop runnins factories. Enormous sacrifi c e s on overstocked lines. Writo immediately for s p e c i a l o f f e r . UNION BUGGY COMPANY il-Ai Saginaw Street, PONTIAC, M I C H .

Write for our

)

No. No.

S T O C K I N G S FOR

LADIES AND CHILDREN.

No supporters. U p t o s t a y . Button to waist H a v e no equal for health, durability or comfort. I d e a l stocking for summer or winter. Two separate parts. Children's, 25 cts. to 45 cts. Ladies', 55 cts. to 65 cts. If not kept by your dealer, sent on approval, post-paid, on receipt of price. Circulars free. Try them. THE

F A Y S T O C K I N G C O . , 56 B St., E l y r i a . 0.

3502. S A S H B E L T K I N G S 3503. Same, heavily gilded

Spring Supplement showing the latest Belt Clasps and Rings, and how they are to be worn; also other novelties and some suggestions for

Wedding Gifts in Sterling Silver. A1

D A N I E L

L O W

& C

• > Sterline Silver, heavy and well made. Illustration actua size. Similar design, smaller puppies, No. 3504, * I .:;.->. Same ches .heavily eilded. No. 3505. # l . T b . These rings are for mounting on a sash belt about 3• inI—m shorter than the waist measure. Pieces of iV, in. ribbon, sewed on each end, pass through the opposite ring and tic in a bow knot, taking the place of a clasp

C

SILVERSMITHS

.

.

.

2

2

S

ESSEX

P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e to a d v e r t i s e r s 24

STREET,

S A L E M , MASS.


McCLURE'S

THE

MAGAZINE.

PIANOLA

IS A N I N S T R U M E N T B Y M E A N S O F W H I C H ANY ONE C A N PLAY T H E PIANO The

Pianola

is

T h e claims made

b r i n g i n g i n t o use

for

thousands

are m a r v e l o u s —

of

the Pianola

pianos that have

so also

been

endorsements

silent

many

for

years.

are t h e it

has r e c e i v e d f r o m t h e great artists.

Trice,

$250.00

T h e Pianola looks like a small cabinet. It has small felt-covered fingers that rest on the keys of the piano, and operated by pneumatic power, strike the keys with a pliant, yielding-, and remarkably sympathetic touch that is almost identical with that of the human fingers. When not in use the Pianola may be easily rolled away from the piano and moved to another part of the room. The Pianola can be used in connection with any piano and does not in any way mar or disfigure the instrument. It can be easily and quickly adjusted by any one.

J H E D I S T I N C T I V E feature o f the Pianola is that it satisfies the artistic demands o f the musically c u l ­ tured. ' J ' H E E X P R E S S I O N is controlled by the player; the rendition has therefore a musical personality, the same as when played b y h u m a n fingers. ^ p H E P I A N O L A is m a k i n g play­ ers o f people w h o , l a c k i n g musical training, had never expected to experi­ ence the pleasure o f p r o d u c i n g music for themselves. JT

I S increasing the repertoire o f amateur and professional pianists b y making the entire literature o f the piano

T H E NUMBER

instantly available without study and without practice. T N T H E summer home, away from musical entertainment, the Pianola has special usefulness. TT

I S an invaluable aid to the hostess as well as a constant source o f pleas­ ure to all the members o f the house­ hold. ' T H E P I A N O L A is the only pianoplayer which has received the en­ dorsement o f musicians. U N A B L E to I F instrument, send

call and hear the for Catalogue Y , g i v i n g full description.

A E O L I A N 18 W E S T

TWENTY-THIRD

C O M P A N Y STREET,

N E W YORK

Chicago, 111.—Lyon & Healy, Wabash Avenue and Adams Street. Boston, Mass.—The M . Steinert & Sons C o . , 162 Bnylston Street. Baltimore, M d . — W m . Knabe & Co., 22-24 East Baltimore Street. Philadelphia, P a . — C . J. Heppe & Son, 1117 Chestnut Street. Fleming- & Carnrick Press, New York

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to advertisers. 25


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

C O M E L I N E S S . T h e w o n d e r f u l success of t h e R A L S T O N H E A L T H S H O E is d u e t o three t h i n g s : T h e c o m e l i n e s s of s t y l e w h i c h a p p e a l s t o t h e y o u n g m a n ' s f a n c y a n d the business m a n ' s sense ; a l s o o u r r e a l i z a t i o n of t h e needs of the h u m a n foot ; e x c e l l e n c e of m a t e r i a l u s e d , a n d f o o t c o m f o r t , w h i c h is p r o v i d e d f o r i n e v e r y p a i r . T h e s e shoes are m a d e i n a l l the p o p u l a r k i n d s of l e a t h e r a n d on e i g h t different s t y l e s of o u r footf o r m lasts. T h e letters of a p p r o v a l f r o m o u r c u s t o m e r s are s i m p l y v o l u m i n o u s . W e h a v e s t a r t e d a r e f o r m i n f o o t w e a r t h a t has l o n g been needed. W e h a v e a l r e a d y q u i t e a n u m b e r of i m i t a t o r s , b u t y o u are p r o t e c t e d b y o u r r e g i s t e r e d t r a d e - m a r k o n t h e b o t t o m of e v e r y p a i r of o u r shoes, a n d t h e n a m e " R a l s t o n H e a l t h S h o e " w o v e n i n t o a l l t h e p u l l s t r a p s . Our Spring catalogue is now ready for mailing. It's free; i t t e l l s y o u a l l a b o u t h o w t o b u y shoes, a n d t h e care of the feet. RALSTON HEALTH SHOE MAKERS, CAMPELLO (BROCKTON)

VICI K I D P A I R

VICI K I D

S

e

s o

t e s i

u

c

a

n

* ^ ^ - leather y ° put b a b y ' s t e n d e r feet. It is the toughest handsomest, best-wearing leather you can put o n child" w o m a n ' s , o r m a n ' s feet. T h e w o r l d ' s s t a n d a r d o f fi shoe-leather. A n y baby born in 1000 m.iy lie taken to your shoe-dealer. Let him measure its feet as carefully as for a grown-up person, and send the measurements to us. We will have a pair of handsome Vici K i d Shoes made specially and returned to the dealer for you.

VICI DRESSING

P leather soft and pliable w h e n i n use. It should double the " life " of £ shoe.

^

e

e

VICI PASTE POLISH

s

P " t s a mirror shine on the shoe

—a shine that wet w o n ' t hurt and that w o n ' t r u b off on the whitest s k i r t or the daintiest trousers.

VICI COMBINATION.

F

o

r

convenience.

Pasto and

Dress-ing- i n one case. t w ^ . Ask your shoe-dealer. The fame of Vici Producís covers ßve continents. No one else makes them or can make them. S H O E - O I O G Y is our book on Shoes and Shoe Treatment. It is free to any asker.

ROBERT H T O E R D E R E R ,

Fh

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when you write to advertisers, 26

-

M A S S . , U . S . A.

SHOES FREE FOR B A B Y

Not a Cent to Pay

THE F I R S T

-


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Don't Tear Napkins

B y fastening them w i t h pins. N e i t h e r tuck them i n the child's neck to make h i m uncomfortable a n d to fall constantly i n his plate. Fasten them securely w i t h the

NAPKIN

for Neck Comfort the collar above shown, and for stand­ ard styles those shown below, illustrate the wide range of our Helmet Brand. W e are "up with the times" i n style, but maintain our " o l d t i m e " reputa­ tion of best goods for the least cost. Wo make Collars and Cuffs — nothing else. A s k for Helmet Brand Collars —15 cents each, two for 25 cents. If your dealer does not sell them, send to us, stating size. A l l our styles are illustrated in a catalogue sent free, which also tells men what to wear on all occasions.

HOLDER

M a d e w i t h the W a s h b u r n e ' s I m p r o v e d Patent Fasteners. H o l d s w i t h a firm g r i p . Instantly released by lifting the little lever. M a d e w i t h a silk cord t w o inches l o n g . I t is easy to substitute a longer cord or an elastic if desired. B Y

M A I L ,

20c.

Dept. B, Troy, N. Y.

Illustrated booklet of the Washburne attachments, free on request.

THE

AMERICAN

Corliss, Coon & Co.

RING CO.,

Box K , Waterbury, Conn.

AMEER LISCO CA5MA

1

Sii 23-41N 2 I-4IN

CORLISSXOONficCO. Please mention M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers. 27


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

FORSYTHE WAIST D o y o u k n o w that N e w Y o r k is the centre of F a s h ions for the U n i t e d States, and that we are the o n l y house i n A m e r i c a manufact u r i n g W a i s t s exclusively for our customers, w i t h agents seeking novelties i n every part of the world? - T h i s is why the FORSYTHE WAIST is the correct thing. O u r M a i l O r d e r Department brings o u r waists directly to ladies i n the remotest parts of the country. T h i s illustrates Style N o . 5, made from genuine Scotch M a d r a s in over 2,000 patterns. Price $3.50. A l l sizes i n stock from 32 to 42. T h e assortment of other m a terials is almost u n l i m i t e d . A p p l i c a t i o n s for samples, inquiries r e g a r d i n g styles, a n d orders w i l l receive most prompt and considerate attention. Address Dept. A . J O H N

F O R S Y T H E ,

Shirt Waist

865 B r o a d w a y , N e w

Maker

York.

AN accomplished! A R T I S T A T SIX*

W i t h the " Angelus " Plano Player a child that has never before seen a piano can render the most difficult compositions, In a manner possible onlytothemostaccompllshed and practical pianist.

Y

O U w i l l not get " h o t u n d e r the c o l l a r " if y o u w e a r L i o n B r a n d goods this S u m m e r . T h e i r perfect u n i t y of pattern m a k e s t h e m set e a s i l y , increases their s t y l i s h appearance, a n d prevents that b i n d i n g w h i c h first causes w a r m t h , a n d t h e n m o p s u p the perspiration, w i l t i n g collars, cuffs a n d shirts alike. A w i d e v a r i e t y of design a n d style affords satisfaction for e v e r y f a n c y . Two collars or t w o cuffs cost 25 cents. It doesn't p a y to p a y m o r e . Shirts cost $1.00, $1.50 a n d $2.00, a c c o r d i n g to the k i n d y o u w a n t . A s k y o u r furnisher.

(ANGELUS P I A N O P L A Y E R It Plays ar.y Piano. A n y one can play it. , The AiigelusOrchestral'Ms the original Cabinet Piano TO?,hf; ° ananyotherpianoplayermade. S * ucanproduceanyoftheseflveefEects: 1. Piano ™d v L / ^ ? „ L J : 4-Piano of " A n ^ l n ? » « i > o « t ? ° ' , ° Qrîm ^ r ? Angelus Orchestral, $ 2 5 0 . SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE " C"

1

l t w l l l d o m

r e t h

S o

0 :

P

f

UNITED SHIRT & COLLAR TROY,

CO., MAKERS

l

a

Pia

2

2

5

n

V

o

a

n

I C e

d

V l o l l n

a

n

d

D u e t

F l u , e

T r i o

P r i c e

.

N. Y. WILCOX

0

r

lMYKIDEN, S Ê r r CONN. & Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers 28

a

«:

WHITE

CO.

I I ^ wiY opiFTlI r k S . l e sAVE. rooms: 1 6


McCLÜRE'S

BUYING FROM KRAMER'S S

a

v

e

s

$

ON

8

MAGAZINE.

SAMPLES

t o

$

2

0

Y O U R SUIT. If you wish to be correctly dressed in every particular—Style. Cloth, Lining, Workmanship — in fact, everything that pertains to a perfect suit at NO M O R E E X P E N S E than if you wore ready-made clothes, send for KRAMER'S S I M P L E S OF

$12 Suits

ALL W O O L GOODS actually cut, trimmed and made to your order in any style. Fit guaran­ teed. We do not handle ready-made clothes, custom-made clothes, tailormade clothes, as many houses advertise but A C T U A L L Y M A K E each in­ dividual garment according to your measure. All our garments are strictly Mer­ chant Tailor Made. Others are nuIImfled. so why not make use of our 2'A years' experience and have your clothes made by us. Trousers $8.75 and up, Suit* $13 and up. F u l l I>re*g Suits *25 and up. Overcoats $12 and up. All garments sent C. O. D. with privilege of examination and trying on before you pay for them. I l l F are the only exclusive merchant tailors in America that l i b prepay e y pre*-* chargea. New Spring and Summer booklet with F i v e R e a s o n s W h y we sell our Suits below others, w i t h samples, fashion plate and tape measure F r e e .

THE p r a c t i c a l ; TROUSERS HANGER ° PRESSI AN

is or if "

indispensable to every man whether he have few many clothes. It keeps trousers " s m o o t h a s i r o n e d " — r e n d e r s every garment separately g e t = a t = a b l e " and d o u b l e s closet c a p a c i t y . It is an absolutely perfect device i n design, finish and c o n s t r u c t i o n . It is as m u c h i n advance of a l l other articles intended for the same pur­ pose as the modern railroad train is ahead of the old-time stage coach. It has been on the market O v e r s e v e n y e a r s , d u r i n g w h i c h time it has satisfied the most exacting.

KRAMER & CO.

Adams Ex. Bid*., Dept. I, CHICAGO We also desire a responsible local representative in every ity or Town where we are not already represented.

T h e

B e s t

S h i r t

O n

E a r t h

OUR 1 0 0 P A G E illustrated descriptive b o o k (free o n request) contains the endorsements of o u r device b y more than 3 0 O O w e l l = k n O w n g e n t l e m e n , every one of w h o m is u s i n g at least one of our $ 5 - 0 0 s e t s . The F i v e - D o l l a r Set, which consists of 6 " P r a c t i c a l " Trousers Hangers and 3 " Practical" Closet Rods, is sent express prepaid on receipt of price. The closet shown is fitted with a $5.00 set. It meets the average requirements. For $1.00 we will send prepaid one hanger and one rod and afterward when wanted the remainder of the $5.00 set for $4.00. Single hangers, 75 cts.; single rods, 25 cts.

ASK YOUR DEALER FOR T H E M , T A K E NO OTHERS SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE &. C R O S S E T T E MAKERS FACTORY WAREROOMS Elgin, i l l . Chicago, i l l .

G U A R A N T E E O F F E R . d a y s ; i f i t i s n ' t a l l y o u e x p e c t e d o r h o p e d for, r e t u r n i t a t o u r e x p e n s e ; and we w i l l i m m e d i a t e l y refund the f u l l purchase p r i c e .

C U T T E R

P R A C T I C A L N O V E L T Y CO 4 3 5

W A L N U T

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 29

S T .

P H I L A , P A , . ,


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

The

Regal SOMERSET.

Photographed from Russet K i n g Calf (lace S t y l e ) . Russet King- Calf, lace Single B l a c k K i n g K i d , lace Single Patent Calf, lace Single Patent Calf, congress (black c l o t h l o p s , p l a i n toe) Single Russet K i n g Calf, Oxford Single Patent Calf, Oxford Single

Shoe Soles Soles Soles Soles Soles Soles

The Somerset is e s p e c i a l l y designed for those w h o c a n n o t or do not w i s h to w e a r the c u r v e d , f o o t - f o r m s h o e .

Price $ J

5 0 per

pair.

Delivered, carriage charges prepaid, to any address in tbe United States, Canada, Mexico and Germany upon receipt of $3.75 per pair. Also to any point within the limits of the Parcels Postal Service. T h e R e g a l Shoes are the most sensible shoes to wear. T h e y are not a l l made o n one last. T h e r e are 147 different shapes a n d 121 different sizes. Y o u get a shoe that fits your foot, not the maker's idea of what your foot ought to be like. F o r this reason R e g a l Shoes are perfectly c o m ­ fortable shoes and insure strong, healthy feet. T h e y are just as handsome, and distinctive, and durable, and i n every way satisfactory as any shoe y o u can buy anywhere at any price. T h e y cost but S3-50 because the R e g a l system eliminates a l l m i d d l e m e n and b r i n g s the shoes direct from the tannery to the consumer w i t h o n l y one small profit added. If a R e g a l store is not convenient to y o u we can fit y o u to y o u r perfect satisfaction by m a i l , or your money refunded. S E N D P O S T A L F O R C A T A L O G U E T, and B O O K L E T ON " T H E C A R E OF S H O E S . "

L. C. BLISS & CO., M a l l Order Department, 109 Summer St., BOSTON, MASS. Western B r a n c h , M a i l Order Department, 103 Dearborn St., CHICAGO, I L L . STORES.—Boston, loo Summer St.; Providence, 220 Westmin­ ster St.; New York, 115 Nassau St., 1347 Broadway, 291 Broadway ; Brooklyn, 357 Fulton St., i n Broadway ; Baltimore, 219 East Balti­ more St.; Philadelphia, 1218 Market St., 8th and Chestnut Sts.; Washington, D. C , 1003 Penn Ave.; Pittsburg, 309 Fifth Ave.; Buffalo, 362 Main St,; Cincinnati, 13-15 Fountain Sq.; St. Louis, 618 Olive St.; Chicago, 103Dearborn St., 215 Dearborn St.; Detroit, 122 Woodward Ave.; Cleveland, 17 Euclid Ave.; Denver, 423 Six­ teenth St.; Albany, N. Y , 34 Maiden Lane ; Atlanta, Ga , 6 White­ hall St.; Milwaukee, Wis., 212 Grand Ave. Factory, Whitman, Mass. Regal Dressing is the finest leather preservative and beautifier that it is possible to make. Of course it is to our interest to furnish only a dressing of the highest possible character and to make Regal Shoes last longer and look better than other shoes Regal Dressing is made of pure, refined oils which will give you better satisfaction than any other dressing you can find. Our Traveler's Package will be sent by mail, postpaid, or with Regal Shoes, upon receipt of 15 cents. Large size, 30 cents

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 30


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

N o b b y Suits For Summer

A

T the seashore, i n the t r a i n , a b o a r d the T r a n s - A t l a n t i c steamers, at the s u m m e r resorts, y o u w i l l see dressy m e n w e a r i n g H a r t , Schaffner & M a r x suits. F o r t r a v e l i n g a n d o u t i n g wear our n o b b y s a c k suits h a v e three qualities that m a k e t h e m i m m e n s e l y p o p u l a r : T h e y are stylish, they are d u r a b l e , they are inexpensive. T r y one of o u r l i g h t - w e i g h t suits this s u m m e r " j u s t to k n o c k about i n , " a n d y o u w i l l be so w e l l satisfied w i t h the H . S. & M . i d e a y o u ' l l w a n t one of o u r business suits f o r f a l l . W e w i s h to r e m i n d y o u a g a i n that o u r clothes are u n l i k e any o t h e r readyto-wear g o o d s y o u h a v e ever seen o r tried. T h e y fit, keep t h e i r shape, l o o k better a n d wear longer, because t h e y are i n t e l l i g e n t l y cut a n d t a i l o r e d . T h e y h a v e a smartness a n d style y o u r m e r c h a n t t a i l o r strives for i n v a i n . W h a t e v e r y o u r r e q u i r e m e n t s y o u can get a n H . S. & M . suit to please y o u r taste at a price to fit y o u r p o c k e t - b o o k . W e m a k e a l l the correct t h i n g s : — S a c k s , C u t a w a y s , Double-breasted F r o c k s , Topcoats, Raglans, E n g l i s h W a l k i n g C o a t s , etc. P r i c e s , $1$ to $30. S t y l e B o o k " D " tells a l l about t h e m . T h e i l l u s t r a t i o n here is not a " fashion-plate " but the portrait of a m a n w e a r i n g one of our suits. It is t a k e n f r o m life. OTHER S T Y L E S IN T H E O T H E R M A G A Z I N E S THIS M O N T H Business suits, Fancy Worsted, Cassimere and Cheviot, neat stripes, checks, plaids and mixtures, plain blue, black or dark gray goods, cut in regular sack or the new " M i l i t a r y " style, j g ^ Ç> t O $ 2 5 2

Sack suits for traveling, outing and warm-weather wear ; fancy stripe flannels, blue Serges and Worsteds; coat and trousers to wear with negligee shirt and belt. Some of the trousers have "cuffs" <£ t C tr\ (£oC to roll up at bottom, . . 3> *> 4>^D A

GET

YOUR

L

U

SIZE

Ask your clothier tor Hart, Schaffner & Marx Tailormade Clothes. If he cannot supply you write at once to us. You may know our goods by this trade-mark sewed

inside the collar of the coat. Glad to send you our new Style-Book " D , " free of charge. Every man should have it. H a r t , S c h a f f n e r g p M a r x C

H

I

C

A

G

O

Largest Makers in the World of Fine Clothing for Men Copyright. ¡900, Hart. Schaffner & Ma Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 31


McCLURE'S

Ask

T H

U

T

R

A

it.

N

O matter h o w m a n y shoes you have, it is economy to b u y a p a i r of U l t r a S h o e s . It w i l l m a k e a l l the others wear better, used alternately, and w h e n b y comparison you have p r o v e d the superior comfort and perfect i o n of the U l t r a S h o e you w i l l see the economy of u s i n g it altogether.

Oxfords,

SHOE for women

for

Our earnest ofEorts to m a k e a better shoe than has been offered you before, do you no good unless y o u ask for it, b u y it a n d wear it. Our guarantee protects y o u . T h i s dainty O x f o r d is a S u m m e r suggestion that has a variety of attractive c o m panions - i n our free catalogue

E

L

MAGAZINE.

-

$3.00 3.50

Boots,

50 Moore-Sñafer

Shoe M f g . Co.

19S M a i n St., B r o c k p o r t , N . Y .

Stop

Pounding

on hard leather—wasting energy—jarring the system. G e t a c o u p l e o f soft s p o t s u n der y o u r heels. T h i s m a k i n g the paths of life uncomfortable is not o n l y unwise, but unnecessary w h e n

O'SuIlivaiTs wVlk,no , , e

HEELS c a n be attached to the shoes y o u are n o w w e a r i n g b y a n y dealer for a trifle. B u t it is j u m p i n g f r o m the f r y i n g p a n i n t o t h e fire to accept a substitute for O'Sullivan's. Insist on h a v i n g virgin r u b b e r i f you h a v e to send to L o w e l l for i t . I t c o s t s you no more —35c a n d a t r i f l e f o r attaching. O'Sulllvan Rubber Co. Lowell, Mass.

R u s s i a n

B l o u s e

S u i t 1

Made of light blue serge, with sailor collar—white shield, hand embroidered 1 with light blue and white, and lapHs \ covered with rows of white silk soutache , braid. To be worn with white kid or black . patent leather belt. Sizes 3 to 8 years. $ 8 . 5 0 . This handsome little suit is an ex- j ample of the good results obtained J from the work of specialists. Tailors J who make boys' clothing only are more í likely to make it right. Thisprinciple { applies to every department of the Children's Store. j Catalogue with

Í

O v e r 1,000 I l l u s t r a t i o n s ^ of everything for boys, girls and babies, from hats to J í shoes, sent for 4e. postage. Ì

\ 60-62 West 23d Street, New York \ Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 32


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

PIN REQUISITES s That

it s h a l l

penetrate

easily and

not bury

its head

smoothly. That

it s h a l l

the That

in

cloth.

it s h a ' l

not bend.

The SOVRAN PIN MEETS

THESE FULLY,

It h a s a l o n g , It h a s

smooth,

oval

point.

a large, deep, convex

and is easily It

REQUIREMENTS BECAUSE:

is made

head,

withdrawn.

of wire

from

f o r m u l a , g i v i n g it great with the necessary

a special stiffness flexibility.

FREE SAMPLES,

postage, and we will,' furnish a sample card of these pins, and ask that in , the above requisites of a perfect pin they be compared , ' with the pins you are now using. OAKVILLE

COMPANY, Waterbury,

Conn.

"LINENE"

COLLARS and C U F F S

They

They

conceal

grace-

the

fully

too

pronounced

round the over slender

curves of the

figure.

stouter

form. * (Reg. Trade Mark)

Braided Wire

A L W A Y S SATISFACTORY S t y l i s h , c o n v e n i e n t , e c o n o m i c a l , m a d e of fine c l o t h a n d finished alike o n b o t h sides. T h e turn d o w n collars are reversible a n d g i v e d o u b l e s e r v i c e .

B U S T L E S a n d FORÍ1S c a n ' t be d e t e c t e d .

A r e dainty and

NO L A U N D R Y W O R K W h e n soiled o n b o t h sides, d i s c a r d . T e n C o l l a r s o r f i v e p a i r s o f C u f f s , 2 5 c ; by mail, 30c. S e n d 6cï in'stam'ps' for s a m p l e c o l l a r a n d pair of cuffs. N a m e size a n d style.

cool.

B r a i d e d W i r e H a i r R o l l s are a l w a y s fresh and clean.

M a t c h any hair.

REVERSIBLE COLLAR CO., D e p t .

Sold i n all stores. Insist o n h a v i n g " B r a i d e d W i r e . " If you don't find them, we will send, postpaid, o n receipt of price. Write for our kooilet, "Hidden

Helfi."

The Weston & W e l l s M f g . Co.,1112 Noble St., P h i l a d e l p h i a

ANGELO R A P H A f . I

v% S i © II ®

&

DANTE

TASSO

P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o n write t o a d v e r t i s e r s . 33

10, Boston

MURILLO

riuBENS


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Tailor Made S u i t $599 J

'* ^¿í

L a t e n t S t y l e f o r Spring u n d S u m m e r o f FINE

T l i e

S

t

o

|

a

n

w

with Safety

1

w

ftftm

e

1 1

e

t

B e n (

DA D T D F R E E ^ 7 l the n a m e s o f 5 boy i Al til I rienda over lü j 'rs of age we w i l l s e n d j o u t h e S t a r f o r 3 m o ' a free. I t la th« . - . - i i - lx>y* p a p e r p u b l i s h e d . A d d r e s s w i t h a t a m p , T h e B T A R , i o X & r i o n b t - , 0 & k P a r k , Ili.

BOYS

Pins

1

IT COSTS NOTHING to t r y o u r Sewing Machines, w e s h i p d i r e c t f r o m f a c t o r y to c o n s u mer. S a v e a g e n t s proflts. 30 d a y s f r e e trial. 117.500 s o l d . Warranted 20 Years. A U a t t a c h m e n t s free.

« 4 0 . 0 0 Arlington for $14.00 « 4 5 . 0 0 Arllneton for $16.00 « 6 0 . 0 0 K e n w o o d for «31.50 O t h e r Machines at « 8 , « 9 & 8 1 1 . 5 0

Send 50 cents for sample pair—silk Send 25 cents for sample pair—cotton

I. B. K L E I N ERT R U B B E R CO. 724 Broadway, New York

freig-ht offer.

B Illustrated catalogne and testimonials free. W r i t e at onee for o u r special Address, C A S H B U Y E R S ' UNION.

1 5 8 - 1 6 4 W . V a n C u re n S t . . B

B I N D I N G I U Í E S S E S T H E R E IS N O T H I N G E Q U A L T O A GOOD BRAID.

164,

Cbicafro.Ill.

J Make Your Own Shirt Waists J

GOFF'S BRAIDS are the BEST MADE

ISAsk-For- and

(

-JgfcäTS

B e i n g h o o k e d o n t h e lowest corset c l a s p it keeps the corset d o w n a n d close to the b o d y , p r e v e n t i n g the point of t h e corset f r o m p r o t r u d i n g , t h e r e b y g r e a t l y r e d u c i n g t h e p r o m i n e n c e of t h e a b d o m e n . The H O O K O N cannot become unfastened; a l w a y s c o m f o r t a b l e , no m a t t e r w h a t p o s i t i o n t h e w e a r e r m a y a s s u m e . M a d e of best m a t e r i a l s , a n d w i l l wear l o n g e r t h a n o t h e r hose supporters. F o r sale at l e a d i n g stores.

FOR

n

p

L A D I E S ' SUITS F R E E " « m ri i t t o w e a r w h i l e y o u a r e e a r n i n g o n e . Its reat chance to get a suit free. S e n d o n e Si-cent Htanip to help pay mailing charges for complet« utfit with which you can easily earn a suit. Write today. T H E C. L O U I S YE1ION CO., 1 5 5 W . J a c k s o n S t r e e t , C h i c a g o , III. 0U

away

1900.

l l i t

u n d Olir c a t a l o g c o n t a i n i n g m a n y o t h e r rare b a r g a i n * In «ultn from $0 to $20, and of jackets, capes and skirts all at wholesale prices. We make all grades and styles of ladies' garments and sell at lowest wholesale factory prices. Write today.

holds the Stockings Up Holds the Corset Down Does

s

WOOL . " ' ^ 'lilors ' from EvuflH t*t - i a l l « ui A L K E Ä T C L O T H , famous for ¡ti ,. _.id beautiful weave. The Jacket is made Id liloOT)] gle hreasted style, beautifully lined with fina a\ silk, elegantly silk faced and superbly trimmed pure satin ribbon. The skirt is cut full width, led and interlined, has latest style back, nobby welted seams, hangs graceful and stylish. Guaranteed strictly tailor made and worth fully $10.00. C h o i c e of b l a c k a n d b l u e colors. PWn T H I S A D V ' »end free a CfMU I D I O H U V . p| „f | i e cloth

HOSE SUPPORTER

ALL

à

B u y your Exclusive Patterns in Madras and Cheviot Fabrics.

Insist on Having

P A R K E R

t

Cor.

A.

J E N K S ,

Randolph & Dearborn

H a b e r d a si .h e r , S t . , C h i c ai ggoo. .

Send 8c in stamps for our line of samples. Refs. : Bradstreet or Bon.

> J W W

NEW IDEA IN T R U N K S do

T h e S t a l l man Dresser Trunk is constructed on new principles. Drawers instead of trays. A place for everything and everything in its place. T h e bottom as accessible as the top. Defies the baggage smasher. Costs no more than a good box trunk. Sent I". O . D . with privilege of examination. Send 2C. stamp for illus trated catalogue.

il m

BRAID D.

THE

GOFF

A SON8, Pawtuclict, R. I.

OMO

Dress

is only

RS

F. A. S T A X L M A N , \ V . S p r i n g St., C o l u m b u s O.

the perfect

Shield Odorless.

as. K R E M E N T Z

Impervious. No

Chemicals.

No

Rubber.

ONE

Washable. Every

Pair

Warranted.

Recommended for their hygienic Qualities by Journal» of H e a l t h . If your dealer does not keep them¡ send 25 cents for satnple pair to

OMO

MFG. C O .

Middletown, Please

PIECE

BUTTON

KREMENTZ & CO.,

Conn.

mention

COLLAR

H a s the n a m e " K r e m e n t z " s t a m p e d on the b a c k , s h o w i n g quality, w h e t h e r s o l i d o r plate as o u r p l a t e outwears, s o m e s o l i d buttons. B e w a r e of imitations. Y o u g e t a n e w o n e w i t h o u t c h a r g e in case e n u i n e K r e m e n t z b u t t o n is d a m a g e d f r o m a n y cause. Special s t y l e s for L a d i e s ' S h i r t W a i s t s a n d C h i l d r e n ' s Dresses. Sold bv all jewelers. T h e S t o r y of a C o l l a r b u t t o n free on request

MeClure's w wh h ee n n y yo ou u write write 34

51 C H E S T N U T ST., N E W A R K , N . J . to a ad dv ve er r tt ii ss e er r ss .. to


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

¥ y

w - ^ m m. T m—« m ^ - - - .

tot-

Dress Shields

Only 3 5 Cents. R e m i t us $2.10 f o r b o o k of i T> c o u p o n s , e a c h of w h i c h you s e l l to f r i e n d s at 35 cents e a c h <$1.75\ a n d reor s h i r t w a i s t , as p r e f e r r e d .

The

Olympia

for

satisfaction,

l

Skirt

r

l

2

C h i l d r e n ' ,7ror °

is

the

only

perfect

s h i e l d , a n d the s h i e l d that g i v e s m o r e any other.

Silk

£

OLYMPIA

Style and Quality Guaranteed. B y o a r c o u p o n system a $10 g a r m e n t c a u be s e c u r e d

$7 T a f f e t a

.

KLEINERT'S

LADIES' SKIRTS A N D * SHIRT WAISTS.

can

wear

and

comfort

It is the o n l y s h i e l d

than that

be

5C

C o u p o n book $1.50. T h e s e offers are • perfectly l e g i t i m a t e a n d we d o e x a c t l y as we say. F u l l information and printed matter on request.

T h e " A U T O " SILK C O . , Ttie A r c a d e , 3 6 t h S t . & Cottage ürove A v . , CHICAGO.

Toile-du-Nord

A

Qingham

ShirtWaist V e r y stylish, f a n c y s p e c i a l s t r i p e s ; blue, r e d , h e l o t r o p e a n d b l a c k . F a s t colors. Will launder beautifullv. Exceptíonalvalueforíl.OO. P o s t p a i d . Guaranteed as r 'presented o r y o u r money b a c k . S a t u p l e s n n d i l l u s t r a t e d | Sprinîï F a s h i o n C a t n l o f r u e of | goods f o r w o m e n ' s w e a r F R E E .

LADIES' S U P P L Y CO.,

Y E A R L Y S A L A R Y . G e n e r a l A f f e n tut t o A p p o i n t Agents* Some to Travel* i o t h e r s f o r L o c a l —W o r k . I d e a l e m p l o y m e n t f o r m e n and w o m e n of good address. Our General Agents do no canvassing', but act only as employers, m a k i n g work dignified and agreeable. New brilliant lines.. L o c a l agents and local field managers also wanted. Steady positions. R i g pay. Experience unnecessary. Address B U T L E R , A L G E R , & CO., • N e wH a v e n , Conn.

Agents ' Wanted.

109-1 I I W a b a s h A v e . , Dept. 17, C h i c a g o , Ills. The "Mascot" Cuff-Holder enables you to wear your round culls as reversible link cuffs. V

"

via h , . -

(Jan be used on A N Y Cuff. Sure to jilease you. Pair post paid for 15 cents. NOVELTY

STEWART'S

Duplex Safety Pins

M ' F ' G CO., Worcester, Mass.

all W o o l S e r g e S u i t

Fasten

from

through.

either

Effective

side

but

guard.

do

not

slip

Imitated

but

not d u p l i c a t e d by any other m a k e r .

$4.95

MAM'S SUIT PARKERS SERGE

MADE FROM BEST BLUE CHEVIOT

nl rich dark blue , famous for its perfect we 1 color. Its rine all wool, n 'liuili weight, and p positively not fade. Guaranteed equal to others $ 1 0 . 0 0 ill make the suit in latest ,ck style, to fit perfect, line , with tine suner gloss fanner satin, pat) and stiffen it will always re tai.i its perfect shape and sew with silk and linen thread.

EXPERT TAILORS

atniu

i nia

muv.

¡ a p j p t f

H

o

(

|

|

l

i

m

p

U

.

o

f

t

he H A V E

b l u e n u r s e c h e v i o t s u i t u n d o u r biff b o o k c o n t i i l n l n f f 5 0 li l u - c l o t h H i i m p l f H of other made to .rder suits from # 5 . 9 5 to #20.<JO. We make all grades .iiid styles of suits to order in our own m am moth tailor shops and sell to consumers at lowest wholesale factory Write today. suits away free and M E N ' S SUITS F R E E furnish a suit to wear while you are earning one, in addition y o u c a n m a k e # 2 . 0 0 to # 5 . 0 0 a d a y while earning suit. H'mdrerìs are doing it. You can too. S E N D O N E tf-CENT S T A M P to help pay mailing charges for complete outfit with which you can easily earn a suit and make hig wages. Write today. T H E C. LOUIS 1 5 5 W .J a c k s o n Street,

"Consolidated Safety P i n C o . " ON None If

mention MeClure's

dealers

E V E R Y

without cannot

s t a m p s for s a m p l e o f

our supply

makers

of Holdfast

w h e n y o u write to a d v e r t i s e r s . 35

you,

on send

SAFETY BOX

Also

C A R D name

card. 3

two-cent

12 a s s o r t e d sizes.

CONSOLIDATED

VE H O S CO.. C h i c a g o , III.

Please

genuine

Hairpins

PIN CO.

18, B L O O M F I E L O , N . .1.


McCLURE'S

The New and Improved

MAGAZINE.

Irwin B a t h Cabinets

Turkish Thermal or Vapor

contain all the best features of all the other cabinets with several entirely new ones fully pprotected by themthe the "only "onlyperfect perfect Bath BathCabinets." Cabinets." They Theyare are absolutely absolutelythe the only (inly Cabinets_aKtoma(lf. Cabinet patents, making<them ally constructedÎ iso that you can supply yourself with drinking water and mop or sponge your tace without ey are self purifying, the noxious (¡ases from pores being promptly removed and replaced by assistance. The^ yin- .its full quota of oxygen, which equalizes and stimulates its effect. Better results at fresh heat, carryu. lower temperature and without oppression. Latest improved heating apparatus. Türkith Baths and all kinds of Medicated and Perfumed Vapor Raths at home at a cost of only j cents per bath. Will break up a Cold or the Grip immediately, and curl or relieve most any disease. T h e M o s t Complete Line of B a t h Cabinets i n the W o r l d . Ne st Designs, Latest Improvements and Patents. We make Cabinets from !*3.30 lo 8 1 Í Í . 5 0 . Be sure to send for our catalogue before buying a Bath Cabinet if you -want to have the best. SPECIAL PRICES W H E R E W E HAVE NO REPRESENTATIVE. We give better value for same money than any one. Beware of catch-penny methods and misleading offers. Hook " Health and Beauty" free. A G E N T S W A N T E D : one sold 1,000 in four months. pending E . I R W I N M A N U F A C T U R I N G C O . , 1 2 3 C h a m b e r s S t . , N e w Y o r k rt

<°*G0UT,&

RHEUMATISM

ALLENS FOOT-EASE

use the G r e a t E n g l i s h R e m e d y

A

B L A I R ' S P I L L S Safe, Sure, Effective. 50c. A 91 DRUGGISTS, or 3ii William St., K. Y.

P o w d e r for the Shake

"Oh.WhatRest and Comfort !"

Into

Your

Feet. Shoes

Allen's Foot=Ease, a p o w d e r f o r the f e e t . It cures painful, swollen, smarting, nervous feet, and instantly takes the tine i.ut of corns and bunions. 1 1 ' » t h e greate s t c o m f o r t d i s c o v e r y o f t h e age. Allen's F on t= Ease rankes tight-fittiDg or new shoes feel easy. It is a certain cure for ingrowine nnils, sweating, calions and hot, ti red, aching feet. We have over 30, (HK) testimoninls. T 1 Ì Y I T T O - D A Y . Sold by all Druggist s and Shoe Stores, 25c. D o not a c c e p t a n i m i t a t i o n . Sent by mail for 25c. in stani re. p p p p TRIAL PACKAGE f i i C i b sent by mail. Address ^ U J E H ^ S ^ O L M S T E D , L e Roy, N. Y. - Mention this magazine)

OUR

HEALTH

HOME

The Steuben Sanitarium: Hornellsville, N . Y . Charming location. Buildings modern and* complete. Unsurpassed for thoroughness of equipment. Highest medical skill. Every form of bath < and electricity. Write for brochure to <

NO N A U S E O U S MEDICINES TO SWALLOW " for N 0 5 E

T H R G A T i

L U N G S

BEN-MYR helps you breathe, cleans the throat and lungs, is healing and soothing. Especially valuable in Whooping Cough, Croup, Asthma, Head Colds, Catarrh, Hay Fever, Grippe, Consumption. FfiFF OFFFR* P II 1\L,L, LílV o postpaid, a sample free, or a large package for to cents. Write to-dav. The EUCALOL CO., 108 Fulton Street, New York. T

o

r o v e

i t s

m e r i t

w

e

w i | 1

Dr. J . E . Walker,;

s e n d i

T

H

E

M

A

Hornellsville, N . Y.

G

N

E

Greatest A

T

I

C

H

E

M e d i c a i D i s c o v e r y P h y s i c i a n

In

Your

A of

Own

U the

N

G

C

U

P

C e n t u r y

Home

This Cup is a thoroughly scientific discovery. It heals every ill like magic and cures all forms of disease without the use ol drugs by directly increasing the vital healing torce and restoring to their normal state all functions of the body. It has resulted in marvelous cures in thousands of cases of KHEOMATISM, DYSPEPSIA, CONSTIPATION, NERVOUS PROSTRATION, INSOMNIA. HEADACHE, LIVER and KIDNEY TROUBLE, and all other forms of disease. The II HI,in •/!«• If paling Cup is the wonder of all who have investigated its merits and have secntheeuresperformedbvitsu.se. The testimony of those who have been cured is the best evidence of its merits. Each cup will Inst a year and can then he recharged. It is absolutely harmless—a child can use it—and it will not interfere, but rather assist in any other treatment you may be using. If you will enclose a description of your case when ordering the F r e e T r e a t m e n t cup. you will receive a personal letter, written by one of our medical consultants, that will give you explicit directions for the trentment of your case. Ser.d for free Book'et containin; full description and testimonials. Agents wanted everywhere, Write for particulars. \

MAGNETIC

HEALING

CUP

CO.,

Room

307,

Post

36

Office

Bldg.,

S t a t i o n

M,

CHICAGO,

ILL,


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

The only natural and perfect skin purifier, preservative and beautifier is CASSANDRA

CREAM

It removes p i m p l e s , wrinkles and other disfigurements, and makes the skin strong but velvety. It is a natural skin food and builds up and fortifies the skin as well as making it smooth and beautiful. The well known writer, E v e l y n Hunt, in a book called "Womanly Beauty" (regular price 50CI, tells women how to acquire and retain a lovely face and figure. If you have not read this book you ought to. We w i l l send you a copy free, together with a trial size box of Cassandra Cream and a trial cake of Cassandra Soap, on receipt of ten cents.

M i l l i o n s of W o m e n Use C u t i c u r a So e x c l u s i v e l y for preserving, p u r i f y i n g , and beautifying the skin, for cleansing the scalp of crusts, scales, aud dandruff, and the stopping of falling hair, for softening, whitening, a u d healing red, rough, and sore hands, i n the form of baths for annoying irritations, inflammations, and chafings, or too free or offensive perspiration. In the form of washes for ulcerative weaknesses and for many sanative antiseptic purposes which'readily, suggest themselves to women, a n d especially mothers, for ail the purposes of the toilet, bath, and nursery, and for preserving and p u r i f j i n g the skin, scalp, and hair of infants and child r e n . N o other medicated soap ever compounded is to be compared with it for preserving, purifying, and beautifying the skin, scalp, hair, a n d hands. N o othtr foreign or domestic toilet soap, however expensive, is to be compared With i t for all the purposes of the toilet, bath, and nursery. T h u s it combines i n O n e Soap at On e P r i c k , viz., T w e n t y , f i v e C e n t s , the b e s t skin and complexion soap, the b e s t toilet and b e s t baby soap i n the w o r l d .

THE MARILÙ COMPANY, 108 F u l t o n S t . , New York.

So'd throughout the world. P o t t r r D r u g a n d Chem. C o r p . , Sole Props., Boston. " A l l about the S k i n , " free. I n B t a n t l y r e l i e v e d a n d B p e e d i l y c u r e d b y Cutic u E A Remkdius, Tue mit, $ l . 2 â .

SKIN HUMORS

The á ^ r

Shaving

TI

Outfit-

flflk

s ' Contains our own make, full concaved F O X R A Z O R istate if you wish narrow, medium or wide blade, square or rounded point), a genuine Horsehide and linen web double swing Strop, a collapsing Badger hair lather brush, shaving stick, astringent pc -.cil. Cosmetic. Magnesia and Aluminum Comb. Every Article A No. 1 and fully warranted. Put up in plush lined bather covered case. Sent prepaid on receipt of *3.oo; or on receipt of o cts , balance C . O . D . . with privilege of examination. We made Fox Razors for over 25 years and guarantee to please you. We grind, hone und repair Razors. W r i t e us. FOX C U T L E R Y C O . of N e w Y o r k , 48 Center Street tddress orders and repair work to 928 Main St., Dubuque lo-wa.

can be enlarged 1 i n c h and strengthened 50 per cent i n o n e m o n t h bv u s i n g the H e r c u l e s G r a d u a t e d G y m n a s t i c C l u b and" S t r e n g t h T e s t e r 5 m i n u t e s e a c h d a y . I t w i l l develoj) and strengthen the arms, chest, back and waist i n less than one-half the time required by any other apparatus known. The busiest man can become strong and healthy by its use. Write for descriptive pamphlet and price-list to H E R C U L E S , BOX 3 5 5 9 A BOSTON, MASS.

5

I

Y o u r

t

O P E N S T H E P O R E S This is the secret of the wonderful curative power of the B u c k e y e Foldin B a t h Cabinet. A l l the beneficial effects of Turkish, Vapor and Medicated Baths may be had at home at a trifling cost. Properly taken, every pore is opened and the medicated vapcrs are naturally absorbed, strengthen ingtr " entire body. T h e B u c k e y e B a t h Cabinet is manufactured at our own factory under personal supervision. The cabinet is supplied w i t h a l o o r and an opening for the a r m , convenient for bathers in removnç perspiration from the face or otherwise adding to their comfort. It is absolutely germ proof and needs no care and is light and simple in construction. We sell on approval to be returned at our expense if not satisfactory. Price $5.00. including Alcohol Safety Stove and Recipes for all kinds of medicated baths. L A D I E S should have our READY FOR C o m p l e x i o n Steamer, used in conjunction with the Cabinet. The USE. only sure method of drawing awav all impurities, leaving the skin clear and soft as velvet. Price $1.00 extra. A G E N T S and S A L E S M E N . - We want agents and salesmen to represent us in every section and we offer money m a k i n g t e r m s to active men and women. FREE.—Descriptive Booklet and testimonials to all who write. Address M O L L E N K O P P & M c C R E E R Y , 910 Dorr Street, Toledo, O h i o . Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 37


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

WAKEFIELD'S COUGH SYRUP PROMPTLY AND EFFECTUALLY

COUCH SYRUP C U R E S

WXSZ

M

E

A

S

L

E

S

WHOOPING C O U G H ,

FIRST S T A G E S OF C O N S U M

P

T " T I

O

N

CURES Coughs, Colds, Croup, Measles, Bronchitis, Asthma, W h o o p i n g Cough, L a Grippe

TYPHOID F E V E R .

A n d all T H R O A T A N D LUNG TROUBLES

M A N U F A C T U R E D O N L Y BY iBlíl C . W A K E F I E L D

&

fig

£ BLOOMINGT0N.ILL <L c e n t :

P R I C E

WAKEITELDS

C O U G H S Y R U P is for sale by all Leading Druggists. Price 3 5 C e n t s a n d 5 0 C e n t s . If not on sale l'y your druggist, it ivill be sent, prepaid, on receipt of price.

T R A D E H A R K A N D LA I;EL BRS1HTGUED.

WAKEFIELD'S GOLDEN OINTMENT has no equal as a cure for S o r e T h r o a t , C a t a r r h , C o l d i n H e a d , Q u i n s y , a n d E r y s i p e l a s . For years it has had an unequalled record in healing O l d Sores, K n r n s , C u t s , B o i l s , F e l o n s , C h a p p e d H a n d s , and all Skin D i s e a s e s . It has made thorough cures of P i l e s and C o r n s . W A K E F I E L D ' S G O L D E N O I N T M E N T is put up in a neat Jar, and will be sent, prepaid, » 1 . 0 0 . A sample bottle will be sent, prepaid, for 2 5 c e n t s .

WAKEFIELD'S BLACKBERRY

to any address,

on receipt cf

BALSAM

is a positive cure for C h o l e r a M o r b u s , D i a r r h o e a , D y s e n t e r y , C h o l e r a I n f a n t u m , and all forms oí Summer C o m p l a i n t . Excellent for C h i l d r e n T e e t h i n g . Pleasant to the Taste. H i g h l y recommended by Physicians, Professional Nurses, and First-class Druggists for more than half a century. If not on sale by your

druggist,

a full-size

bottle ivill

W A K E F I E L D ' S LIVER

be sent, ßref>aid

druggist,

send 8 5 C e n t s for

a box, prepaid.

of 3 5 C e n t s .

PILLS

do not g pe, but act promptly on the Liver, Kidneys, Stomach, and Bowels. S i c k H e a d a c h e , I n d i g e s t i o n , and B i l i o u s n e s s . If not for sale by your

on receipt

y

Invaluable for C o s t i v e n e s s , .Jaundice,

State whether

large

or small

sized pill

is

prefcrrtd.

W A K E F I E L D ' S R E M E D I E S have been endorsed by thousands, i n whose families t h e y have been USED FOR M O R E T H A N H A L F A C E N T U R Y , and are manufactured only b y blished Dr. C . W A K E F I E L D & C O . ,E s t a1846,

B l o o m i n g t o n ,

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 38

III.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

COLUMBUS, OHIO.

The H A R T M A N S A N I T A R I U M ,

A

M O D E R N

I N S T I T U T I O N for the treat­

ment of c h r o n i c diseases, equipped and

Every

room

scientifically

methodically

in

the

conducted.

building

absolutely

aseptic.

Each bed-room

fixtures,

new.

furnished with

Ideal spiral s p r i n g s

and

the

finest

N o odors, The

of

the

quartered

entire oak,

in

Mineral

rendering them perfectly Incandescent

electric

bells, h y d r a u l i c finest

from a

Sanitarium with

lights, electric

bath-rooms,

i n c l u d i n g the

ity f o r a c c u r a t e l y

gauge;

the

the t h e r m o m e t e r , clock, w i t h t r a i n e d Electricitv,

call-

fitted up a c c o r d i n g of

every

Electric,

or

ascertaining

temperature and

duration

descrip­

"Radiant every

the

used, r a n g i n g f r o m t e n t o t h i r t y - f i v e the

A

flowing

galvanic

solar

regulated,

d r i n k i n g water,

absolutely

w e l l 187 f e e t and

pure,

deep.

h e a t i n g the m o s t

modern

the b u i l d i n g s .

corps

Just

of

facil­

experienced

word

physicians

have failed

to

and

as

to

may you

matter

what

W e will

and

if to

send frankly

your letter. addressed

you tell

confidential,

treat

letter

will

strictly

No us.

You which

a i l m e n t is o n e w e are f u l l y e q u i p p e d

pounds,

static.

a cure.

for

your

full you

particulars. so

A l l communications

and

should

R . S um my, M . D . , Supt.,

«

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 39

Columbus,

If

return

to D.

and

reader.

your

not, we

by

find

the

ailment

y o u r a i l m e n t is, w r i t e

treat, we w i l l

proper

to

chronic

pressure

applied by a

one some

attendants.

faradic,

and

cure.

scientifically

throughout

have

Baths

gymnastics,

nurses in attendance.

noiseless.

Heat Baths," '(Kellogg's) ; w i t h

by

are rugs,

elevators.

methods.

for rest

Ventilation

strewn

therapeutic

nurses.

Diet,

institu­

and

manufactured.

Calisthenics,

arcade,

the purest of air.

floors

polished

lartiest

Massage, manual, Swedish and mechanical.

bed.

the

the

T h e i n s t i t u t i o n is also p r o v i d e d w i t h

tion, u n d e r o u r o w n s u p e r v i s i o n .

tion,

most modern

best quality of

curled hair mattresses, m a d e

The

s t a t i c m a c h i n e is o n e o f

trained

Decorations, furniture,

to l a t e s t

Our

Ohio.

be


McCLURE'S

T H E

MAGAZINE.

I Inebriety-A Disease J^êeley j

Inebriety, Morphine, and other Drny habits are dependent upon a diseased condition of the nervous system. The victim of the disease again and again puts forth the m«st hertrc efforts to reform, but his disease is too absolutely overpowering to be ronquered by resolutions. The will power he would exercise if he could is no longer supreme. Alcoholic stimulants have so congested the delicate nerve cells that they canno* respond to the performance of their functional duties, and the helplessness of the victim's condition is as inexplicable to himself as it seems inexcusable to his friends. The Keeley treatment cures this disease by restoring the nerves toa perfectly healthy state. It cures b y r e m o v i n g t h e cause. The result is that the patient is left in a normal and healthy condition, and he Produce each a disease has neither craving , desire, nor necessity for stimulants. I A l c o h o l , having definite patholOver 300,000 men and women to-day have been permanently cured of ogy. T h e disease yields the disease of inebriety through Dr. Keeley's treatment, which is adminI O p i u m , easily to the Double istered only at institutions authorized by him. Chloride of G o l d TreatThe treatment at these institutions is pleasant ; no restraint is imT o b a c c o ment as administered at posed ; it is like taking a four weeks* vacation ; the patient only knows he the following Keeley is cured. U s i n g & Institutes. Detailed information of t h i s t r e a t m e n t and proofs of its success sent free upon application to any of the f o l l o w i n g institutions : Philadelphia, Pa., Providence, K. I. White Plains. N.Y. Lexington, Mass. Address Til K KEELEY Richmond, Va. 812 North Broad St. Greensboro, N. C. Dwifrht, 111. Minneapolis, Minn., INSTITUTE tit either Manon, Ind., Pittsburg, Pa.. Columbus, ' )hio, • E. Marshall St Cor. 10th St. He Park Av 90 N. Fourth St. 4246 Fifth Ave. Hot Springs, Ark. Waukesha, Wis. 1903 South Adams S St. Louis, Mo., San Francisco, Cal., Crab Orchard, Ky. 2803 Locust St. 1170 Market St. New Orleans, La., Adi!rcM> the In-l'lut? RfMttl you. North Conway, N. H. West Haven, Conn. 1628-38 Felicity St. Buffalo. N. Y.. Washington, D. C , Portland. Me., • N imi - II i-n d i t \ of Inebriety," by D r . Leslie K. Keeley, 358 Niagara St. 211 North Capitol St. 151 Congress St. mulled upon application. ••••••••M* • • • • » » • » • • • • • • - » - » • • • • • • • • + + + +* + 4 + + » + * + <

urej

!

1

r

ï

DIABETES AND KIDNEY TROUBLE CURE

D I T M A I M ' S S E A - S A L T The Natural Salt of Pure Sea Water TONIC, STRENGTHENING, INVIGORATING Used for Quarter Century Address D i t m a n , 2 B a r c l a y S t r e e t , N e w Y o r k

I will guarantee to cure Diatietes. Ao Cure, No Pay. Would thank youin advance for names and P. O. Addresses uf persons that are afflicted with Diabetes, also with Bright's Disease and with other Kidney Troubles. Write for terms. State a?e, and bow lontr you have been afflicted. Address r K . P O U T E R , ft. O. Box 3ÎM, Of tum« a. Iowa. f \ ^ m~ mm m Tetter, S a l t R h e u m , Barber's t l / 4 L I Y I #•% Itch, Scald Head, R i n g Worm, I t c h i n g P i l e s , Sore E y e l i d s , F a c i a l Blemishes, and all Skin Diseases promptly cured by Spencer's Ointment. Sent to any address, on receipt of 25 cents. A . O. P I L S O N , Pharmacist, 1327 W . B a l t i m o r e Street, B a l t i m o r e , Iftd. P R E V E N T S D - That indescribable misery and discomfort to which many persons are subject on Veft.eli». t ' i i r . and Vehicles is II I I - \ :ui -c :i -liiruiirli 8llie1d. It absolutelyils prevented by wearingJ and tthe Aworks to give satisfaction equally well on land or water. •er fails Mailed, on receipt of £2.00. further information on application. iled, prepaid, pre A X T 1 - \ A I > K \ I'.VIt CO.. lto.v 14?-B. Cincinnati, 0. M O R P H I N E H a b i t and Neurasthenia CURED at Home (no Pain) w i t h D E N A R C O . Sample and book free. TheComstock Remedy Co., Depi.M.LaFayette.lnd.

SEASICKNESS

Founded 1859. i Locomotor Ataxia conI quered at last. Doctor* " p u z z l e d . Specialista amazed at recovery of patients thought incurable, bj D R . C H A S E ' S JSLOOD A N D N E R V E F O O D , Write me about your case. Advice and proof of curai f BEE. DR. CHASE, 2 2 4 N . l O t h S t . , PHILADELPHIA, PA.

PARALYSIS!

O P I U M

fftk mVSBiy •% ér\ Sendusyournddress V . ™ J » Ck l l O l f ^ 1 1 P A Iwewillshowyou X * Ä Q U U V O U I C howtomakeWaday •LU M l J B w absolutely sore; we ^BmmW furnish the wurk and teach you free; yon work in the locality where you live. Send us your address and we will exDltiin the business fully; remeniher we guarantee a clear profit of for every day's work, absolutely sure, write at once. ftOIAL MAÄUFACTLRUiÜ CO., Box 5 9 , DETROIT,HIC* 1,1

Jf\| i n

B A m i I The specific O I I E S I T I N E reI V . ft I A f I duces fat even after repeated failI I if m\ I * ' " ' so-called other cures. U l i N U l i I 11 I I Respiration impr I at once; safe; • • • w • • • no dieting; no purge. "J" ¿> c e n t s and S I . 5 0 . G O O D R I C H & C O . , Dept. K, 935 Arch Street, 8

Philadelphia, Pa.

u r e s

v

Samples and Circulars

1

FREE.

Hair L i k e This \A/F

\A/11 I

M A H F R F F on application, to any address, full information how to grow 1 ' i n i U r n t t . hair upon ihe baldest head, stop hair falling, cure weak eye brows and eyelashes, scanty parting, scurf, dandruff, itching scalp, and restore gray and faded hair to its natural color, after all other remedies have failed. Enclose 2-cent stamp for sealed package, Address

G. L0RR1MER & CO., 334 N. Howard St.,

^kÊ^M ^Lff

^ • J

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t

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e

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T

J U L^ m ^ <^ ii WnotrnViatmentanà àevïcç yrWKout m jg\ V\«lp- Finally I cureà nysity by Qalraníc £ltcViCi%yL^m\ ^ ^ouare èc<4 or {jronitja itale orkav« kcaa-ftOlSefc i o n \ . warti Vunft and mont_y as I did. Vfri\e me ani

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 40


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

CURES AILMENTS PECULIAR TO WOMEN TRIAL F R E E W e received letters from 10,714 women who bought o u r B r a c e d u r i n g the year 1899. O f these 10,428 found i n it the relief they sought. O n l y 286 were disappointed; they were probably chronic incurables or p a r t i e s w h o failed to use the B r a c e properly. These facts tell their own story with sledge hammer force. N o other remedial agent has such a record for success. A majority of those relieved b y the Brace i n 1899 were women who h a d long considered erpetual suffering as their legacy; but they ound i n this simple, easy device a cure. It brings rest, strength, comfort, a b i l i t y t o enjoy life, grace a n d freedom for a l l exercise. A priceless boon to the feeble woman ; a benefit to a l l women. W o r n w i t h any dress, w i t h o r w i t h o u t corset, wholly external, adjustable to any figure, i n v a l u a b l e t o t h e p r o s p e c t i v e m o t h e r . We receive annually many thousands of letters l i k e t h i s : H A Z E N , P A . , Sept. 16, 1800. 1 h a d suffered three years from backache, headache, bearing down pains, pain a r o u n d the heart, constipation, sleeplessness and extreme nervousness. I a m now completely cured, and the Brace did it. I gained 13 pounds i n six weeks. I have not taken a d r o p o f medicine since I began to wear the B r a c e . MRS. J. M. RAUGHT.

W r i t e for ovtr free trial offer, prices a n d i l l u s t r a t e d book, all mailed free, i n p l a i n , sealed envelope. Address THE

NATURAL BODY BRACE CO.,

-

Box 138, Salina, Kansas.

S I M P L E IN C O N S T R U C T I O N — C O M F O R T A B L E — A D J U S T A B L E T O A N Y CHILDREN Mrs.

TEETHING.

W i n s l . o w ' s S o o t h i n g S y r u p has been used for o v e r

Y E A R S by M I L L I O N S of M O T H E R S WHILE

T E E T H I N G ,

SOOTHES

with

the C H I L D .

PICURE.

for their

P E R F E C T

SOFTENS

F I F T Y

C H I L D R E N

SUCCESS.

the G U M S ,

It

A L L A Y S

a l l P A I N ; C U R E S W I N D C O L I C , a n d is t h e b e s t r e m e d y f o r DIARRHŒA. Be

Sold b y Druggists in every part o f the w o r l d .

sure a n d a s k f o r " M r s . W i n s l o w ' s

take n o o t h e r k i n d .

Soothing Syrup," and

T w e n t y five c e n t s a b o t t l e .

JAS.

ARE

Y O U A S H A M E D

O FY O U R

By reason o f the unprecedented d e m a n d made upon us we have at last concluded to put out a

5 DAYS' TRIAL TREATMENT FREE

TO

MAKE

TO

W i l l most positively remove a n d permanently cure a l l Pimples, B l a c k h e a d s , F r e c k l e s , R e d , R o u g h , S a l l o w or O i l y Skin. M a k e the Skin Soft, F a i r , Smooth a n d Clear. R e storing the most faded complexion to the natural vigor a n d brilliancy of youth so dear to a l l . F U I I Ç C T CONTAINING F I F T Y DAYS' * 1 f\ A O C I , TREATMENT, *P • • M a i l e d to any address, upon receipt of price.

HIS HAIR

15, 1S9*

GROW, AND

RESTORE THE COLOR.

M R S . C E R V A I S E G R A H A M 1262 MICHIGAN A V E . , CHICAGO. M c K E S S O N A l í o Ii 1! I N S . N e w Y o r k . E n n t e r i i A g e n t s . Sold in New York by M a l t e r S. K o c L e y , Broadway and 43d St., 8 t h A v e . and 35th St., Broadway and 65th St., 9 t h A v e . and 42d St..

v

Goodwill Chemical Co., 326 N . Charles St., B a l t i m o r e , M d . mention

C. U O I O I A N , Aug.

B o t h g u a r a n t e e d h a r m l e s s as w a t e r . Sold by best Druggists or sent in p l a i n s e a l e d w r a p p e r b y e x p r e s s , p r e p a i d . P r i c e , $1.00 each. Send for F R E E B O O K : " A Confidential Chat with Bald H e a d e d , T h i n Haired and Gray Haired Men and Women." G o o d Agents wanted.

A. B. C . F A C E R E M E D I E S for both s e x e s .

Please

JAS.

Quick Hair Restorer

to all w h o will send ten cents to cover cost of postage, w r a p p i n g , m a i l i n g , etc. This grand offer will s t a n d for a short time only and is made solely that y o u may become q u i c k l y acquainted with a real blessing.

v

1897

He Used Mrs. Graham's Cactico Hair Grower

F A C E ?

1

C. (1011)1 I N , F e b . 4 ,

McClure's when 41

y o u write to a d v e r t i s e r s .


MeCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

38,478 Sold Last M o n t h - E v e r y b o d y Buys

SQUARE QUAKER

NEW STYLE

BATH CABINET

FOLDING H O T A I R , AND V A P - R

Our Cabinet will surprise and delight you,

> u t u r e V II« Ii I ' r c N i T v i T . A b * u l u l e H o m e iieceasity. J'rolniig* Life. Saves M t - i l l c l i i e a n d l>r. K l l l n . Every Man, W o m a n u n d C h i l d n h o u l d une It w e e k l y . So confident are we our Cabinet will please you

l ' K O I > ( Î C E 8 perfect health, cleanliness, vigor and beauty. Makes your n e r v e s strong, sleep sound, appetite good. I H S l ' K L i S colds, fevers, skin diseases, eruptions. P R E V E N T S disease, Small-Pox, Hydrophobia. Cancer, etc. €l'KEM Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Quinsy, Bronchitis, Indigestion, Catarrh, Malaria, Headlo lie rei it med at « M I T v\ pense und y o u r ache, Female complaints, E c z e m a , Dropsy, all none} refunded II' not Juwt U H repreBlood, S k i n , Nerve, K i d n e y trouble. sented. T u r k i s h , R u s s i a n , S u l p h u r , H o t A i r , P e r f u m e d o r M e d i c a t e d Steam Ito I h . a i H o m e « e . E u c h . Water baths cleanse the surface only. Our Cabinet Bath cleanses inwardly and ojtwartlly, purifies the blood, invigorates and tones up entire system by opening the 5,nu0,000 pores of the skin, thus enabling nature in her own w a y to expel by profuse perspiration all impure salts, acids and poisonous matter, which, if retained, poison the system, causing disease, debility and sluggishness. • O Y E l i 1,000,000 U S E R S and « 7 , 0 0 0 P H Y S I C I A N S E N D O R S E IT. Not only u P r e v e n t i v e , hut u Punitive i u r e • M A T CDDIIIPC I T UAIir of Disease, i m m e d i a t e r e l i e f K i i i i i i u i t e e d In ft M ITI L w o r s t cawew. i l e u c t t t s e v e r y a i l m e n t . . D E S C 1 C 1 P T I O N . — It's not a cheap, flimsy affair, but a genuine a r t K l e , handsomely made' lasts 2iJ years. Has real swinging door, heavy steel frame, lop curtains, rubber lined, l a t e s t improve' inents. Weighs 10 lbs. Easily carried. Folds, flat in 1 inch space. Anyone can operate it. Especially lor family use, no attendant, no danger G u a r a n t e e d t o b e t h e b e s t o f n i l C a b i n e t s oil t h e m a r k e t o r y o u r m o n e y r e f u n d e d . T h e P r i c e I» V V o i i d c r t u l l v L o w - S e n t to any address by express on receipt of S5.00. complete with heater, directions a n d formulas. Head and Face Steamer ?1 ! » extra O l f l " | í | { T 0 . 1 » V Y - y o ü won't be disappointed. We're responsible, capital sioo.oou.00. K e i u n d y o u r m o n e y a l l e r 8(1 d a y s ' use i f n o t us r e p r e s e n t e d . Remit by P. 0 . or Express Money Order, Draft, Certified Check, or Registered Letter. (O* W r i t e u» f o r O u r D e s c r i p t i v e W e r e the largest manufrs of AGEBi'lS W I N ! E D - M E H AMD.WOMEN, " B o o k o n B a t h s , " T e s t i m o n i a l s , etc., Bath Cabinets in the world. | $ 3 0 , 0 0 t o $ 5 0 . O O W E E K L Y , W r i t e Us. A d d r e s s T h e S o l e M a n u f a c t u r e r s , T H E W O R L D M ' F ' G C O . , 1 9 S « W o r l d B u i l d i n g - » C i n c i n n a t i , Olilo. CEF E O T

CAIHNKT.

We Send it on 30 Days'Trial

HUI d r n l H U d A l

(J

CDPP r R B B I

! »

• «asusta

ENNEN'S

D'O YOU EVER

ENJOY A MEAL

TALCUM

IN BED?

N o t unless the m e a l * was served upon a table • so arranged as to extend • A Posit ire Keiiff/or PltlCKEY HEAT, CH AFINO, and » I M i l i t Y , and all

afflictions of the skin. "A little

• • k i ^ M

W^Bi^T/ higher in prier perhaps, than Jpf ~?*&rworthless substitutes,but a reason for _uBW*^r^^y/ " r . , . n t o v e s a l l o d o r o f p * r s p i r a t i o n . D e l i g h t f u l " — ^ - ^ " " ¿ f í e r S b a v i ' ç. S o l d e v e m r h c r * . or m a i l e d on receiptor25c

I G e t M e r m e n ' s , the

«¿TIARA N T R E

T 1 Wanted — a case of b a d h e a l t h that R I P A N S will n o t benefit. One g i v e s relief. No m a t t e r what's the matter, one will do y o u g o o d . A c u r e m a y r e s u l t if d i r e c t i o n s are followed. T h e y banish p a i n , i n d u c e sleep, p r o l o n g life. S o l d at a l l d r u g s t o r e s , t e n f c r five c e n t s . B e sure to get the genuine. D o n ' t be f o o l e d b y s u b s t i t u t e s . T e n samples and a t h o u s a n d t e s t i m o n i a l s to a n y a d d r e s s f o r five c e n t s , f o r w a r d e d to the R i p a n s C h e m i c a l C o . , N o . io S p r u c e Street, N e w Y o r k .

original.

N O P A Y

r.

O.

Simplelree. G E R H A R D M E N S E N

T O

C l ' K E

Hex 755.

R.

> E " , K K , N J .

I) f A R E T E ! * . P O R T E R ,

W H E E L CHAIRS

RWAMS

CO,

N O

OTTUMWA,

CURE

low.».

other

INVALIDS' GOODS. RECLINING

CHAIRS.

C o m f o r t for A H . Catalogue F r e e .

Steveus Cùair Co. 204

SIXTH

ST., P I T T S B U R G ,

PA.

P A D O N A iSPeS H A I R

FROM THE FACE, NECK AND ARMS,

A n d o t h e r p a r t s o f the b o d y w i t h o u t t h e s l i g h t e s t i n j u r y , a n d l e a v e s t h e s k i n w h i t e , s o f t a n d b e a u t i f u l . R e a d what those s a y w h o h a v e t r i e d l a d o n a : *• 1 h a v e u s e d i t w i t h g r e a t s a t i s f a c t i o n . " " I find i t a g r e a t success a n d very h a r m l e s s . " " M y face is as o l e a r a s g l a s s ; I h i g h l y r e c o m m e n d P a d o n a to a l l w h o a r e t r o u b l e d l i k e I was." "FiiTii P a d o n a better t h a n a n y t h i n g I h a v e e v e r u s e d . " *' 1 h a v e t r i e d P a d o n a w i t h p e r f e c t success." I c e r t i f y the foreg o i n g a r e t r u e e x t r a c t s f r o m l e t t e r s r e c e i v e d b y T h e P a d o n a C o m p a n y , a n d t h a t t h e y h a v e a l a r g e number ol s u c h l e t t e r s i n t h e i r possession. ( S i g n e d ) , G . A . B R O O K S , N o t a r y P u b l i c , H a m i l t o n C o . , O h i o . (Seal.) E a c h p a c k a g e i s a b s o l u t e l y g u a r a n t e e d . P a d o n a is s e n t p o s t a g e p a i d , s e c u r e l y s e a l e d f r o m observation, i n safety m a i l i n g case, o n receipt o f 81.00 p e r p a c k a g e . A H c o r r e s p o n d e n c e s t r i c t l y c o n f i d e n t i a l . $1,000.00 F O R F E I T U P . PADOITA N E V E R FAILS. J

The Padona Company, Dept. C, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Dit. C A M P B E L L ' S S A F E A K S E M C CO.1I. F L E X I O N W V E E R S , F O U L D ' S A K S E N 1 C A R R E N A I . I N K ( ' I t E A S T are the most wonderful preparations in the world for the complexion. 1 1 F K E C K I i E S . K I I K M I S M O T H . S A I . L O W N E S S , T A N , REDNESS. 1 » 1 1 , 1 ft*S>. and all other facial and bodily blemishes. 1 hese Preparations brighten and beautify the complexion as no other remedies on earth can Wafers, per box, 50c. and * i ; 6 large boxes, » 5 : Soap, 5 0 c . : A r s e n a l i n e C r e a m , çoc. Address all orders to H . B. F O U l . D , Dept. A , 214 6th Ave.rNew Y o r k . S O I , I ) It Y D R I K J G I S T S E V E R Y W H E R E .

BEAUTY IS P O W ER nuil ? , . 7 F í ? ^ ! . T,' Î*' lll.Al

.-OAF

e

P

I ' O 1I ' E R 'S 1 M E

ToUh

r

a pr ophvlactic R n , « h » a rropnylactic Tooth Brush." a

VLook " , /

N o w m o s t dean

° ™ * h " ' ycommon-sensible Persons s a y : « 1 want at the brush and see how simple and it is.

w

a

n

t

a

l

o

l

h

b

u

SOLD O N L Y I N A Y E L L O W ü o x - f o r your protection. Curved handle and face to lit the mouth. Bris k m irregular tufts— cleans between the teeth. Hole in handle and honk to hold it. This means iiiuui to Cleanly persons —the only ones who like our brush. A d u l t s ' 3 5 c . Youths' 2 5 0 Children's 25c. By 111.nl or at dealers'. Send for our free booklet •• Tooth Truths."

F L O R E N C E M ' F ' G CO., 132 Pine St., Florence, Mass,

Prophylactic Toothbrush 42


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Dr.W. S. Ilice, the W e l l Known Authority, Sends a T r i a l of His Famous Method Free To A l l .

ALCOHOLÍSM

There are people w h o h a v e been t o r t u r i n g t h e m s e l v e s for y e a r s with trusses. It is h o p e d t h e i r a t t e n t i o n w i l l be d r a w n to D r . Rice's free offer. A n e l d e r l y a n d r e t i r e d p h y s i c i a n . D r . S. B a l l of

IS A CURABLE DISEASE

FREE TO THE RUPTURED

T h e B a r t l e t t C u r e is t a k e n at h o m e , w i t h o u t p u b l i c i t y or d e t e n t i o n f r o m business, s a v i n g t i m e a n d e x p e n s e . T h e r e are n o h y p o d e r m i c i n j e c t i o n s used. T h e t r e a t m e n t is s e l f - a d m i n istered, under constant instruction by m a i l f r o m D r . B a r t l e t t , a p p l y i n g to e a c h i n d i v i d u a l case. T h e craving for d r i n k is p e r m a n e n t l y r e m o v e d , a n d the g e n e r a l h e a l t h b e n e f i t e d b y r e m o v i n g the diseased conditions w h i c h cause the d e s i r e for s t i m u l a n t s . 1>R.

S.

BALL.

L. S. Coffin, P r e s . of the R a i l r o a d T e m p e r a n c e A s s o c i a t i o n of A m e r i c a , says: " D r . H a r r i e t t ' s w o r k is a l m o s t m i r a c u l o u s . " D r . B a r t l e t t lias j u s t p u b l i s h e d a new e d i t i o n of his b o o k o n " A l c o h o l i s m , its Causes, Effects and C u r e , " w h i c h w i l l be m a i l e d free on a p p l i c a t i o n .

Marion, A l a . , is one of the h u n d r e d s a t t r a c t e d to this g e n e r o u s announcement a n d as a r e s u l t he is now c o m p l e t e l y c u r e d of a bad rupture w h i c h was v e r y h a r d to h o l d . A l t h o u g h 72 y e a r s of age he had the c o u r a g e a n d d e t e r m i n a t i o n to t r y this new a n d novel method a n d now he l i v e s i n p e a c e , c o n t e n t m e n t a n d s e c u r i t y . Dr. Ball looks back to the o l d d a y s of c r u d e m e t h o d s a n d in c o m parison hails the w o n d e r f u l m e t h o d of D r . R i c e as a m a r v e l o u s God-send to the present g e n e r a t i o n s . B y a l l m e a n s write at once to D r . W . S. R i c e , 303 S. M a i n S t r e e t , A d a m s , N . Y . , a n d he will send you a free trial of his r e m a r k a b l e h o m e c u r e for r u p t u r e . There is no p a i n , d a n g e r , o p e r a t i o n or a n h o u r ' s loss of t i m e , a n d by starting now y o u w i l l be s o u n d a n d w e l l in a s h o r t t i m e .

THE

BARTLETT CURE CO. 1). C . B A R T L E T T , M . D .

S u i t e 15,

155

W a s h i n g t o n St.,

1123 O . B r o a d w a y , N E W

CHICAGO.

YORK.

BLINDNESS P R E V E N T E D

AND

C U R E D

THE BLIND SEE... B Y

T H E

C R E A T

"ACTINA"

All ingredients used in t h e i r m a n u f a c t u r e a r e c a r e f u l l y selected and combined b y a p r a c t i c a l D e r m a t o l o g i s t w h o has d e v o t e d the best efforts of his life to t r e a t i n g a n d c u r i n g affections of the s k i n , and if scientific a t t a i n m e n t a n d l o n g e x p e r i e n c e c o u n t for a n y thing, he o u g h t to k n o w w h a t is best to c l e a n s e , p u r i f y a n d beautify the h u m a n s k i n a n d k e e p it b r i g h t a n d h e a l t h y . For full i n f o r m a t i o n or b o o k , c a l l or write the D o c t o r —

NEW YORK & LONDON ELECTRIC A S S ' N ,

J O H N H. W O O D B U R Y D. I., 26 West 23d Street, New V o r k . 128 Tremont Street, Boston. 1306 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 308 Chemical Blag.-, St. Louis.

^¿^&

nüon

M

c

C

W

s

R E S T O R E R

A C T I N A i s a m a r v e l of t h e n i n e t e e n t h c e n t u r y , f o r b y i t s u s e t h e B l i n d See, t h e D e a f H e a r a n d C a t a r r h is i m p o s s i b l e . A c t i n a is a c e r t a i n t y i n the cure of Cataracts, P t e r y g i u m s , Granulated Lids, Glaucoma,Amaurosis, Myopia, Presbyopia, Comm o n Sore Uyes or W e a k e n e d Vision from any c a u s e . T h e r e need not b e a spectacle used on tho streets of the w o r l d , a n d r a r e l y to read w i t h . Street glasses a b a n d o n e d . A c t i n a also cures Deafness, C a t a r r h , Asthma, Bronchitis. La G r i p p e , C o l d s , Weak L u n g s , N e u r a l g i a , Headache, etc. A c t i n a i s n o t a s n u f f o r l o t i o n , b u t a Perfect E l e c t r i c Battery, u s a b l e at a l l t i m e s a n d i n a l l places by y o u n g or old. T h e one i n s t r u m e n t w i l l c u r e a w h o l e f a m i l y o f a n y o f the above'form s of disease. NO C U T T I N G . NO DRUGGING, NINETEEN YEARS O F S U C C E S S . A V A L U A B L E BOOK F R E E . Prof. Wilson's D i c t i o n a r y of D i s e a s e s e n t on a p p l i c a t i o n .

Strictly for use 011 the f a c e a n d ^ to c l e a n s e t h e human skin. They clear the complexion a n d keep the s k i n y o u n fresh a n d h e a l t h y .

163 State Street, cor.

E Y E

A PERFECT ELECTRIC POCKET BATTERY.

Dept. E , 9 2 9 Walnut St., K a n s a s City, M o . A g e n t s Wanted, w r i t e for Terms.

4 3;

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to a d v e r t i s e r s


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

iwesTYsd"sOewV«

JAS. GODFREY WILSON

Rolling Partitions for S c h o o l s a n d C h u r c h e s .

r

Outside Venetian Blind and A w n i n g .

Inside Venetian Blinds.

V e n e t i a n B l i n d s fur Piazzas,

A l s o W i r e Window Screens, Steel Ceilings, Rolling Steel Shutters, etc.

WORK

A WONDERFUL LIGHT.

Qf

Send

for

Catalogue

No. 3.

SHOPS

wood and metal workers, without steam power, equipped with

B A R N E S ' F O O T P O W E R f'J™ M A C H I N E R Y bids on jolrs and give greater profit on the work. Machines sent on trial if desired. Catalogue free.

C o s t s for service one-fifth as m u c h as e l e c t r i c i t y , o n e - t h i r t e e n t h as m u c h as a c e t y l i n e , o n e - e l e v e n t h as m u c h as g a s , C A N T O N yet a pleasanter, b r i g h t e r l i g h t t h a n a n y I n c a n d e s c e n t of these. F i n e print r e a d 45 feet a w a y . Gasoline B u r n s v a p o r i z e d g a s o l i n e : 100 c a n d l e L a m ps. p o w e r t w e n t y h o u r s costs 3 cents. N o o d o r , noise or s m o k e . N e v e r out o f o r d e r . Lasts a lifetime. O r n a m e n t a l ; portable. Best for c o u n t r y or c i t y , h o m e o r office. Guaranteed as represented or money refunded. A l l styles. W r i t e for c a t a ­ logue. Agents wanted.

W. F.& JOHN B A R N E S C O . , 200 Ruby Street, R o c k f o r d , 111.

w

00D or METAL Workers

Without Steam Power should use oux Foot a n d H a n d Power Machinery. Send for Catalogues

CANTON INCANDESCENT LIGHT C O . , C h e r r y a n d 7th Streets, Canton, Ohio.

A—Wood-working B—Lathes,

Machinery,

etc.

SENECA F A L L S M F G . CO. 6 7 9 Water St., Seneca F a i l s , N . V . .

Don't imagine that

"A Home After Your Own Heart"

HARDWOOD FLOORS are all alike. Quite the contrary. Some never look well. Some look well at first, but soon give out be­ cause not honestly made. Others look well at first and continue to look well because they are honest­ ly made. We guarantee our floors against all defects that may ever arise from faulty material ór work­ manship, and our guarantee is good. We could not afford to do this un­ less we did our work well. We can satisfy you on this point. All we ask is that the floors have reasonable care. We furnish wax and brushes for keeping floors in order. We will tell you all about these things if you will write us. Catalogue free. WOOD-MOSAIC CO.,Rochester,N.Y.

D o you want to k n o w how a m o d e r n house should be built containing; a l l the advantages of superior construction and elegancy of finish ? O u r new books. " M O D E R N H O M E S , " show m a n y different plans for a l l kinds of houses; no two a l i k e . E a c l i house has distinctive features and perfect floor plans. V i e w s of exteriors, i d e a s ol e x q u i s i t e i n t e r i o r e f f e c t s a n d exact guaranteed cost. SEND F O R T H E M . W e prepare special plans from your o w n ideas for any k i n d of a b u i l d i n g you may desire, at any cost a n d have a large corps of experts at our differeni offices so as to give complete architectural service including superintendence i n anv direction. W e can please you. W r i t e for our books to-day. " M O D E R N HOMES," one book for $ 1 . 0 0 ; two for $ 1 . 5 0 ; three for $ 2 . 0 0 .

Century Architectural Company I Main Office : 807 American Trust Bldgr., CLEVELAND, 0.

P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to a d v e r t i s e r s . 44


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

fflMIHI

m

B a t t e r y H a n g i n g Larapg,$10.00 T e l e p h o n e , complete, . 5.95 E l e c t r i c D o o r B e l l s , . . 1.00 E l e c t r i c C a r r i a g e L i g h t , 8 95 B a t t e r y F a n M o t o r , . . 5.95 E l e c t r i c H a n d L a n t e r n s , 2.00 Pocket F l a s h L i g h t s , . 1.50 M i n i a t u r e E l e c t r i c L a m p s , .40 Í8 M e d i c a l Batteries, . . 8.95 G e n u i n e E l e c t r i c Belts, . 1.00 $12 B e l t w i t h Suspensory, 2.50 G e n u i n e E l e c t r i c Insoles, .25 T e l e g r a p h Outfits, . . . 2.25 B a t t e r y M o t o r s from $1 to 12.00 B a t t e r y T a b l e L a m p s , . 8.00 N e c k t i e L i g h t s , 75cts. to 8.00 $6 B i c y c l e E l e c t r i c L i g h t s , 2.75 E l e c t r i c C a p L i g h t s , . . 1.75 E l e c t r i c R a i l w a y , . . . 2.95 B a t t e r y Student L a m p , . 4.00 D r y Batteries, per d o z e n , 2.25 A l l E l e c t r i c a l B o o k s at low prices.

95Ç

NO TEARING TROM ROLLER Ask

S

OHIO ELECTRIC WORKS 1

fe/

SHRUNKEN FLOORS

H

A

R

T

H

A

D

E

Wood

S

MY-

C r a c k and C r e v i c e

R

O

R L

N L

E

R

Tin

Rollers,

CHORD.

THE CALDWELL SASH BALANCE

•W'ISriCjÍDHtSWE-

O R I P P I N ' S Wood,

O

LOST

WlKGßRACKS

MADE GOOD AS NEW.

H

Rollers*

THE .

I m p r o v e d

With this roller the shade cannot tear, and it will never pull off. If the roller offered you has not the auto­ graph signature of Stewart Hartshorn on label, be­ ware of it, it is not a Hartshorn.

C L E V E L A N D . O. Headquarters for Electric Nov­ elties and Supplies. Agents wanted. Send for New Catalogue just out.

1

I)' "

your dealer to show y o u The

We undersell all on Everything Electrical.

fea

IMP. ovTo r/A _ SELF- ACTPNO * S H A D E ROLLER

HARTSHORN'S

F i l l e r

10 Years Success has made it the standard substitute for weights and cords, for balanc­ ing window sash. Can be ap­ plied to old windows which have no weight pockets. W r i t e for catalog and price list.

A non-shrinkable, tough, elastic filler, that will not crack, and will make old floors air-tight, water and vermin proof. Y o u C a n A p p l y It Y o u r s e l f . Booklet tedino; a l l a b o u t it sent free. G r i p p i n ' s Deck a n d S e a m F i l l e r F O R Y A C H T S . Sold by Hardware Dealers.

GRIPPIN MFG. CO., Newark, New York.

CALDWELL M F C . CO., I I Jones St., Rochester, N. Y .

NOBODY APPRECIATES

I

WATER

m o r e than those people w h o h a v i n g sanitary appliances i n their houses find their w a t e r s u p p l y u n c e r t a i n . I f they h a d a

Riders Ericsson Hot Air Pumping Engine certainty w o u l d take the place o f uncertainty. Catalogue

"Q"

on application

to nearest

office.

RIDER=ERICSSON ENGINE CO. 22 86

Cortlandt Street, N e w York.

Lake St., Chicago.

10 N . 7 t h S t . , P h i l .

2 3 9 a n d 241 F r a n k l i n S t . , B o s t o n . '

22a, Pitt S t . , S y d n e y , N . S. W .

692 Craig St., Montreal, P. Q.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers.

45


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

The House'sDressmaker The dressmaker and the tailor k n o w the styles and how to a p p l y them. T h e w o m a n o r m a n c a n be becomingly dressed i n a thousand different combinations—all stylish. There is little house painting done that i s " s t y l i s h ; " practically none that is ' 'becoming. ' ' W e have placed o n the market for 1900 a line of entirely new a n d delicate tints w h i c h w o r k w i t h our heavier colors into the most beautiful and stylish combinations. W e have also created a n " A r t Department" i n charge of talented artists and master painters w h o w i l l without cost to y o u guide y o u and your painter i n the selection of a combination of our tints w h i c h w i l l " b e c o m e " your house and actually add to its cash value. W e m a k e the following business proposition to home owners who i n 1900 w i l l use

a i t e 6 d

Hammar Paint fine f pars

W e w i l l give y o u an exclusive, stylish color p l a n for y o u r house F R E E , (see paragraph below) fur­ nish H a m m a r P a i n t to y o u at f i . 2 5 per gallon, (when m i x e d ) guarantee that its use w i l l cost y o u less than a n y other paint, lead a n d o i l , or any other materials,

a n d p u t our $200,000 cash capital

behind a guarantee that i t w i l l last five years— keep y o u r money i n trust to return to y o u i f o u r claims are not proven. A glance at D u n or B r a d street w i l l show y o u whether we can d o what we say o r not. There is too m u c h nonsense t h r o w n about the paint business, a n d we are g o i n g to explode some of i t .

The secret of a beautiful floor lies i n its finish ::: Progressive housekeepers every­ where use J O H N S O N ' S P R E P A R E D W A X , because::: It enhances the natural beauty of the wood ::: It is durable, economical and easily applied ::: It does not show scratches or heel marks ::: Is not slippery, and easily kept in beautiful condition ::: Worn spots may be refinished without refinishing the entire floor ::: Our booklet, "The Proper Treatment for Floors," con­ tains, i n condensed form, all we have learned during seventeen years of floor experience ::: A s k for it : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :

A SAMPLE HALF POUND CAN Sufficient to finish 150 square feet of floor surface, to anyone who has a floor ::: O u r catalogue of Hardwood Floors shows many beautiful designs which your carpenter can lay over your floors at about the cost of a good carpet ::: Free too ::: U s e J O H N S O N ' S P O W D E R E D W A X for dancing floors : : :

W r i t e full information about the house y o u m e a n to p a i n t — s i z e , l o c a t i o n , s t y l e o f a r c h i t e c t u r e , p r o x ­ imity to other houses a n d foliage—on a hill o r the level—(send photo, if possible), a n d w e w i l l send y o u a number of beautifully colored reproductions of houses painted w i t h o u r n e w line of stylish tints a n d a c o p y of o u r guarantee. W e will also inclose blanks for further information, o n the receipt of w h i c h w e w i l l s u g g e s t a n e x c l u s i v e color p l a n for y o u r h o u s e F R E E O F C H A R G E .

F. H A M M A R PAINT C O M P A N Y

S. C . J O H N S O N

1221 Spruce Street, S T . L O U I S , M O .

R A C I N E , W I S . , U . S. A .

Please mention

M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write t o a d v e r t i s e r s . 46


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

A REMARKABLE PAIR OF SCISSORS / {

-y»iZ?

"TRADEMARK REGISTERED NOV. 24,1896."

-4

fiiiiimiiiHiBiinütjij.'iiiu:

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LENGTH

Can actually be put to the following uses : 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Screw-Driver. Tracing Pattern W h e e l , Scissors. Cigar-Cutter. Glass-Cutter. Hammer. Wire-Cutter. Erasing.Knife. Penknife.

EVERY SENTED,

io. n. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

Stereoscope. Glass-Breaker. Ruler. Cartridge-Extractor. Buttonhole. Scissors. Gas-Pipe Tongs. Nail-File. C i g a r - B o x Opener. Measure.

SCISSOR GUARANTEED OR MONEY CHEERFULLY

A USEFUL

AS

OXYDONOR i n s t i l l s n e w life, t e e m i n g w i t h health a n d vigor, gently a n d unconsciously, into y o u r s y s t e m w h i l e y o u rest. Y o u soon feel a s a n e w p e r s o n . L i t e r a l l y , O x y d o n o r forces disease o u t of y o u r b o d y a n d rejuvenates y o u . O x y d o n o r gives the req u i r e d v i t a l e n e r g y to a l l t h e o r g a n s , to p e r f o r m t h e f u n c t i o n s for w h i c h t h e y were m a d e b y N a t u r e . N o dangerous d r u g s a r e used. N o surgical operations are r e q u i r e d to see w h a t is w r o n g , or to r e m o v e a n y p a r t . The h e a l i n g a n d r e p a i r a l l take p l a c e n a t u r a l l y , through extraordinary " v i s medicatrix naturae," i n creased a n d intensified by O x y d o n o r , b y m a x i m u m f u n c t i o n a l a c t i v i t y of t h e s y s t e m . O x y d o n o r begets the p r i m a r y e n e r g y , a n d as w h e n f u e l is s u p p l i e d i n food a n d d r i n k , N a t u r e does t h e rest. T h e r e is h o d i f f i c u l t y , n o p a i n , no s e n s a t i o n , n o d a n g e r in u s i n g O x y d o n o r , a n d a n y sane person c a n use it s u c c e s s i u l l y . B u c k l e t h e d i s k at one e n d o f its c o r d to one a n k l e , a n d d r o p t h e v o c o r at t h e o t h e r e n d of its c o r d into c o l d water, a n d t h e r e v i t a l i z i n g process b e g i n s . Oxydonor w i l l last a life t i m e , a n d serve a w h o l e f a m i l y . T h e p u r c h a s e is t h e o n l y cost. N o periodical investment is r e q u i r e d . B o o k of d i r e c t i o n s w i t h e a c h O x y d o n o r .

ARTICLE.

THE UNIVERSAL SCISSOR, TOOL AND NOVELTY CO., D e p t . L, 648 B r o a d w a y , N e w Y o r k C i t y .

Sample

i consisting of two bottles—enough of «

"OUR

FAVORITE" g o l d

• W B M M M B B M B B a B M l

F E V E R . Mr. E . M . S m i t h , President Bank of Thomasville, Thomasville. G a . , writes May 2 6 , 1 8 0 9 : " I tested Oxydonor thoroughly on myself for fever, and also on my little boy, with success. I would not be without it for its weight in gold." RHEUMATISM. Mr. . l i u i K - * S t e w a r t , J r . , President Peekskill Hat M f g . Co., Peekskill, New York, writes Nov. 3, 1899 : " Oxydonor as a sleep inducer and for Rheumatism is of great value to me." I N F L A M M A T O R Y RHEUMATISM. Mr. A . F . A B B O T T , 42 Bank St., Waterbury. C o n n . , writes May 18, 1P99 : " M y wife, aged 65, used Oxydonor two years ago for Inflammatory Rheumatism (a severe case), and was wonderfully relieved. She has enjoyed remarkably good health since." B Y S P E P N I A. Mr. I I . 8. G - o l d e y , Proprietor Goldey "Wilmington Commercial College, writes March 7, 1900: " I amemphatic iriin'y belief that Oxydonor has permanently cured me of Dyspepsia of five years standing." Mr. C . W . B A L L E R T , T o l e d o . O . , writes Nov. 16, 1899: " Have used Oxydonor fur a number of years in various emergencies with great success. Have not found a pain that Oxydonor could not stop." C A U T I O N " . — Imitations of Oxydonor are dangerous to use. Refuse to accept them. D r . H . Sanche is the Inventor and Originator, and has obtained final decision in Supreme Court, in Washington, D . C , against imitators. Also on Oct. 16, 1899, the United States Court granted us an injunction restraining Agents from selling an imitation of Oxydonor. We invite full investigation of our claims. Our bonk containing Grateful Reports from users of Oxydonor sent free.

1 Washable

to gild a small frame, also a brush to apply it with, to any one mentioning this paper and enclosing a two-cent stamp for postage. As b r i l l i a n t a n d smooth as g o l d leaf. R e a d y f o r use. A c h i l d c a n a p p l y it. S h o w s n o b r u s h - m u r k s , t a n be w a s h e d w i t h o u t t u r n l - h l n i r . G i l d s e v e r y t h i n g , suchas chairs, frames, bric-a-brac, chandeliers, baskets, etc. Also made in A l u m i n u m S i l v e r . Sold by dealers generally, or we will send 25-cent full size box or large size (three times the quantity), 5 0 c e n t s , express prepaid.

GERSTENDORFER

BROS.

4Ì B P a r k Place, New York City.

* Everybody has Something to M e n d .

MENDS ALL

Mends Iverything _ h i n a , glass, íarble, b r i c - a . , etc. R e q u i r e s no brush. Colorless, o d o r l e s s ; will stand hot walcr. S a m p l e bottle sont p o s t p a i d o n r e c e i p t o r ar»c. A g e n t s w a n t e d i n every locality. G o o d agents can m a k e b i g m o n e y . W r i t e us a b o u t y o u r locality.

GEM CHEMICAL C O .

ABSORB NEW LIFE.

REPREREFUNDED.

O n receipt of c a s h o r p o s t a l o r d e r f o r O N E D O L L A R will send y o u o n e p o s t - p a i d . A g e n t s w a n t e d . S e n d for circulars of o u r o t h e r sellers. F o r sale b y a l l first-class S t a t i o n ery, F a n c y G o o d s , D r u g , D r y G o o d s a n d C u t l e r y stores.

FREE

'

WEM

Dr. H . S A N C H E & CO. «1 F I F T H

ST., D E T R O I T ,

261 Fifth Ave., N E W Y O R K . CANADA

2268 S T . C A T H E R I N E

Baltimore, M d .

P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to a d v e r t i s e r s . 47

Dept. A M it'll.

57 State St., CHICAGO, I L L . OFFICE :

ST., M O N T R E A L , Q U E -


McCLURE'S

T H E

MAGAZINE.

M O N R O E

Porceläin-Lined

Refrigerators

Dainty—Cleanly—Healthful—Economical — Odorless

A

nybody who wants a refrigerator would have a M O N R O E if he knew all about it. And it is due to yourself that you know about it. You choose for a lifetime. Better spend a halt hour to learn w.iich is best. You will select the M O N R O E . Every food compartment is lined with white porcelain, moulded into one piece, with rounded corners. No crevices. No joints where food may lodge and decay. The whiteness throws light into every comer, so that you may see any uncleanliness. The glaze enables you to wipe it up with a cloth — about all the cleaning ever necessary. Common porcelain put to such uses would break, crack, craze or peel. M O N R O E porcelain never does. It is the ideal lining — the lining that makes ours the only refrigerators that are absolutely healthful and odorless. The M O N R O E costs more than common refrigerators, but that cost is economy. It isn't on account of the linings. The whole construction is so skillful, the insulation so perfect, that the M O N R O E saves its cost over and over in the ice that the other refrigerators waste. The cost gives you an honest refrigerator, cheaper by far than the common kind, even were the common kind free; for the main cost is the ice cost. We save you all middlemen's profits by selling direct, freight prepaid. Dealers must pay what you pay. We sell on approval, to be returned at our expense if not satisfactory. Our new catalogue, with pictures in colors, shows how dainty they are; write direct to us for it. These refrigerators are always sold direct from factory to user. But for convenience in showing we have exhibits in the following cities, for no one who sees a M O N R O E will be content with the common kind: Baltimore. Binghamton. Birmingham. Boston. Buffalo. Chicago. Cincinnati. Columbus. Betrolt. Kansas C l t j . liOnlsville. Milwaukee. Nashville.

New O r l e a n s . .New R o c h e l l e . Sew York City. Omaha. Philadelphia.

John Turnbull, Jr. & Co., Furniture, 18-20 W . B a l t i m o r e S t . Innes & D e m a r e s t , H e a t e r s , 128 State St. H o p k i n s Stove & T i n w a r e C o . , 2012 S e c o n d A v e . A b r a m F r e n c h C o . , C h i n a , 89 F r a n k l i n St. W m . Scott, F l o r i s t , C o r . M a i n a n d B a l c o m S t s . J a c o b R e t t e r e r , S t o v e s , 169 L a k e S t . , 2d floor. K o c h & B r a u n s t e i n , C h i n a , 22 E . F o u r t h S t . T h e H a s b r o o k - B a r g a r C o . , C h i n a , 87 N . H i g h St. L . B . K i n g & C o . , C h i n a , 103 W o o d w a r d A v e . T . M . J a m e s & S o n s , C h i n a , 1020 W a l n u t St. W . H . M c K n i g h t , Sons & C o . , Carpets, 225 F o u r t h A v e . a n d 328 M a i n St. Slater, Price & Dempsey Co., Furniture, 137 W i s c o n s i n S t . P h i l l i p s & B u t t o r f f M f g . C o . . Stoves, etc., 217 C o l l e g e S t .

Pittsburg. Hirhmond. St. L o u i s . St. P a n i . Syracuse. Toledo. Washington.

,

E . Offner. C h i n a , 908 C a n a l St. T h o s . J . R e i d & S o n , 62 M e c h a n i c S t . S i e b r e c h t & S o n , F l o r i s t s , 409 F i f t h A v e . M . H . B l i s s , C h i n a , 1410 F a m u m St. Tyndale & Mitchell Co., China. 1217 C h e s t n u t St. W . P . G r e e r , C h i n a . 524 W o o d S t . The E . B . Taylor Co., China, i o n E . M a i n St. a n d 9 E . B r o a d St. R . B . C r a y C h i n a C o . , 312 N . B r o a d w a y . Wemott, Howard & Co. Agents, China, 385-387 J a c k s o n S t . F . M . F e a t h e r l y , C h i n a . 209 W . F a y e t t e St. , D a u d t G l a s s & C r o c k e r y C o . , 236 S u m m i t St. D u l i n & M a r t i n C o . (Inc.), C h i n a . 1215 F St. N . W .

For Catalogue address M O N R O E R E F R I G E R A T O R C O . , Box J , Lockland, Ohio.

A

M e x i c a n On of

Monthly Payment dollars are b e i n g

Bank

Stocks.

Send

Investment

Plan. made for

H u n d r e d s of yearly.

Pays

thousands better

particulars a n d

ABSOLUTELY

SAFE

free

than book.

-

MISSOURI COFFEE & R U B B E R CO., 2 1 0 - 2 1 2

L a e l e d e

B u i l d i n g ,

Bank reference : German Savings Institution.

S T .

Capital, $250,000.

Please mention McCIure's when you write to advertisers

48

L O U I S ,

M O .

Surplus, $500,000.


McCLURES

MAGAZINE.

It costs no m o r e to apply paints that wear live years than it does to put on those that last only two years, ration's Sun Proof Paints are actually less expensive than the best white lead paints, and they wear fully twice as long.

Fan and Battery, flexible wire, and chemicals for sixty hours' continuous use —

$

express charges prepaid for

12.^

Patton's S u n Proof

M o n e y Refunded if U n s a t i s f a c t o r y .

arc

This is a very desirable outfit. Fan 8 inches in diameter, has t h r e e b l a d e s , and brass guard. It is portable, and will bring comfort to the bedroom, dining-room, onice—in city or country. Simple; effective; cannot get out of order.

They form a hard, glossy, lasting, weather-resisting surface. The S u n P r o o f Paint book explains the m a k i n g o f good paints, and tells how to apply them. Shows m a n y color combinations. Write for it. L i b e r a l inducement and agency to dealers.

Other sizes from $ 2 up. A l l the same quality. Difference only in size. Send for F R E E catalogue of fans and motors for all purposes—running sewing machines, etc. Additional chemicals to run at 1 cent per hour. " Oddo " goods at dealers, or address Dept. D , .

AMERICAN ODDITY CO., 170 West Broadway, New York.

JAS. E . P A T T O N C O . , 215Lake St., Milwaukee, Wis.

T O I N T R O D U C E OUR Golden Finish Q u a r t e r

S a w e d

Veneered

O a k

Mantels

We are offering 200 of a- special design, at the remarkable price of CfìOCfc E A C H , including best a w quality enameled tile facing, and 60 x 20 hearth, firebrick and brass plated Club House grate and frame. These Mantels are well made and the richest grain effects are used in every part. Sample of wood, showing lamber used, and illustrated catalogne free.

WE PAY THE FREIGHT

to a l l pointa east of

the M i s s i s s i p p i R i v e r and rmrth of S. C a r o l i n a .

ALCOTT, ROSS & SCULLY CO. 2913 N. Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa.

A BA TH FOR 2

Paints

all-weather p r o o f

CENTS

Is F u r n i s h e d by the

Victor Instantaneous Water Heater which occupies but little room ; is ready for f use night or day; furn- * ishes hot water instancy for bathing, shaving, sickness and all domestic purposes when hot water is required. U Gas or Gasolines. Ask your dealer for it, or send f i r free catalogue.

W. J . ADAM, JOLIET, ILL.

49


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

T T 7 ^ 4 | \J\J I I t~ Y y J[ A

1 he latest and best designs of £ F i r e p l a c e M a n t e l s are made S O r n a m e n t a l B r i c k in Colonial, Elizabethan, Empire, Old Vienna, and other styles. S There is no other kind so suitable < and good. O u r s are c h a r m i n g £ —our c u s t o m e r s s a y so. 1 hey / W \ ' W \ W M A A A / W ' look the best—last the longestare the most artistic and pleasing—are not too costly. Any capable brickmason can set them up from our plans. Improve the decorative opportunities of the chimneypiece. It's money well spent. Our Sketch Cook tells all about 59 designs of mantels costing from $ 1 2 upwards. Write for it. Write to-day.

Fine Floors In Famous Houses

For

are finished with utmost care. T h e y are never oiled or varnished, but are waxed with

© l b

E n g l i s h

floov

M a *

because it is the best finish. Easy to apply, economical to use, never marked or marred, it gives the lustrous polished surface, considered the perfect finish for hardwood floors. For D a n c i n g F l o o r s use B . B . P o w d e r e d W a x . " W a x e d F l o o r s , ' * a booklet, tells how tu treat h a r d w o o d floors—FREE."

PHIL A . P. 0. B o x 8512,

í

r

o

m

It

& BOSTOIÏ F A C E B R I C K C O . , -

Boston, Mass.

The Barron, Boyle Co., Dept. L , Cincinnati, U. S. A .

Do Yon Want a Picturesque Comfortable Home!

A 9600 Summer Cottnee.

One b u i l t to suit y o u r site, y o u r needs a n d y o u r taste ? T h e n h a v e m e m a k e your plans. Y o u will be satisfied ; whether it is a S u m m e r Cottage or y o u r p e r m a n e n t home. M y b o o k s show s o m e t h i n g o f what I can do. S e n d for t h e m . Picturesque Summer Cottages, c o n t a i n i n g D e s i g n s for S u m m e r H o m e s . Camps, L o g C a b i n s , C l u b and R o a d H o u s e s . T h e best b o o k o f the k i n d ever p u b l i s h e d , $ i . Picturesque Houses ( N e w ) , D e s i e n s for houses from $2,500 to $15,000. B y mail, Ji. Picturesque Cottages, 57 D e s i g n s for houses from $ÌOO to $2,500. B y m a i l , 50 cts. I m a k e a s p e c i a l t y o f p l a n n i n g for Private P a r k s . S p e c i a l d e s i g n s a n d sketches made to order. E . E . 1IOL.MAX, Architect, 1020 Chestnut St., P h i l a d e l p h i a , Pa.

W a s Your House Warm Last Winter? Send for Illustrated Book describing our F U R M A N S T E A M and H O T W A T E R BOILERS and system of Heating. We can save from 25 to 33 per cent, of your Fuel. Your local steam fitter can easily erect the apparatus. T H E H E R E N D E E N M F G . C O . , 90 L U R E S T . , G E N E V A , N . Y .

Taste in Building One's reputation for taste in building' depends mostly on the outside of the house—comparatively few people ever see the inside. Beautiful houses are made more beautiful, commonplace houses are redeemed, and even ugly houses become attractive, when colored with the soft, harmonious tones of

Cabot's Creosote Shingle Stains Stained Cedar samples in 24 colors, and color-chart of combinations, sent free on request. S a m u e l C a b o t , Sole M a n u f a c t u r e r , 68 K i l b y Street, B o s t o n , M a s s . AGENTS A L L OVER

T H E COUNTRY. H . H . W a t e r m a n , Arch't, Chicago.

50


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

When a Housewife SEES T H E TRADE= MARK BELOW On Enameled Ware it is Safe_to_Buy ; not till then. N O P O I S O N can lurk in Agate N i c k e l S t e e Ware (send for pamphlet showing ïuhy) but without this mark there is no immunity from danger. A recent analysis made of 17 different makes showed in every instance one of these three poisons as a part of their coating, viz.:

ARSENIC, L E A D AND ANTIMONY. Each Cooking Utensil (we make 5000 different kinds) of the " L . & G. Agate NickelSteel Ware" has, besides this Trade-Mark, burnt in the enamel, a label attached with Chemists' certificate as a guaranty of

L i k e a child when it comes to caring for ice cream. W h y not have it then, whenever you wish ? Bought of a confectioner it is expensive and not always convenient. Made at home it costs only the material and is no trouble at any time with a Peerless Iceland Freezer. The Peerless Iceland Freezer has only

ABSOLUTE SAFETY Pamphlet

Free.

Lalance & Grosjean M f g . Co., New

York.

Boston.

The

IDEAL

Chicago.

Steam Cooker

Cooks a whole meal over one burner, on gasoline,

oii

t

gas,

or common

cook stove.

Reduces Fuel Bills One-half. M a k e s tough meats tender. Prevents steam and odors. W h i s t l e blows when cooker needs more water. D i n n e r S e t s , Bic3'<*les, Watchew, and o i l i e r V a l u a b l e PremliiniH elvcn with order for Cookers. S e n d for ¡ l l u s t r : i i í M c a t a logue. We. pay exprm: AGENTS WANÏEW. T O L E D O C O O K E R C O . , B o i T», Toledo. O. Dialogues, Speakers, Amusement Books. Catalog free. T . S. D E M M 1 J I , Publisher, l>ept. 48, CHICAGO.

PLAYS

•Aï! MAGIC LANTERNS, $14 to $100 MOVING PICTURE MACHINES, $25 to

One Motion the can revolves around the stationary dasher. F e w parts—little friction. Runs easier and lasts longer than a many-motioned freezer. Smooth delicious ice cream in three minutes. Dasher cleaned by simply dipping in hot water. A l l gearing is enclosed. Costs no more than a poor freezer and the saving of time and ice makes the Peerless Iceland the most economical ice cream freezer made.

A Four Quart Freezer ptv>/> and Peerless Ice Chipper • • $65

10,000 Slides for E d u c a t i o n a l Purposes. 30,000 Slides for C h u r c h and Lecture U s e . O u r most profitable lecture sets are :— F o r t y eight slides i l l u s t r a t i n g " I n H i s S t e p s , " s i x t y - t w o slides o n the Transvaal W a r . A l s o 100 H y m n s a n d Songs i n c l u d i n g the " H o l y City " b e a u t i f u l l y i l l u s t r a t e d . M o v i n g F i l m s , $2.50, $-¡.00, $4.00.^5.50. Send for free b a r g a i n list, or 35c in stamps for " E x h i b i t o r ' s M a n u a l .

If not on sale in your town, write for information how to obtain the above Absolutely free. On request, we will send you our booklet, "Ice Cream Secrets," which tells the secret of making fine ice cream, like the best confectioners'.

DANA & CO., Dept. S, Cincinnati, Ohio. Who

also make the

W I L L I A M S , B R O W N & E A R L E , Dept. G, Philadelphia Please wh h ee n n y Please mention mention M M ec C ClIuurree' 'ss w yo ou u w w rr ii tt ee to to advertisers. advertisers.

51 SI

" Toy ''—for 1 pint of cream.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Wt

THE

BEST

RESULTS A R E W H A T Y O U W A N T .

USE

(Cnglt^ jingle ^tatnjs AND G E T T H E TRANSPARENT, ARTISTIC E F F E C T W H I C H IS E N S U R E D B V T H E I R USE SEND F O R SAMPLE BOARDS AND COLOR PLATES T O

Dertcr Brothers 55 & 57 B R O A D S T R E E T

STEPHENSON & GREENE, ARCHITECTS, NEW YORK

-

-

BOSTON

The following firms act as our Agents: H. M. Hooker Co., 57 W. Randolph St., Chicago. 111. ; W. S, Hueston, 45 Cliff Street, New York ; W. W. Lawrence & Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.; Smith & Young, San Francisco, Cal.; The I.. J. Mattison Co., Cleveland, Ohio ; Henry Seim & Co.. Baltimore. Md.; Gerald Lomcr, Montreal, Can.; Curtis & Bartfett Co., Lincoln, Neb.; Porterai Viali Rochester,N. Y.; Samuel Bettle, Jr., 514 Walnut Street,Philadelphia, Pa.

Artistic « monuments

Enamel the old" hath tuh with

C O S T NO M O R E T H A N P L A I N O N E S IN « « « «

NealS Enamels

Marble is entirely out of date. Granite soon gets mossgrown, discolored, requires constant expense and care, a n d eventually crumbles back to Mother Earth. Besides, it is very expen-

CUnite Bronze.

the genuine.

Klbite Bronze is strictly everlasting. It cannot crumble with the action of frost. Mossgrowth is an impossibility. It is more a r t i s t i c than any stone. Then why not investigate it ? It has been adopted for nearly one hundred public monuments, and by thousands of delighted customers in all parts of the country. It has been on the market over twenty years and is an established success. We have designs from $4,00 to $4,000.00. Write at once for free designs and information. It puts you under no obligations. We deal direct and deliver everywhere.

Che monumental Bronze Co. 354 Howard Avenue,

-

-

A N old bath tub can be given a solid, smooth enamel finish, which ^* will resist wear airi hot water, and at the same time you can enamel all the woodwork of the bath-room, either in pure white or any of the tints. Your dealer ought to have it. If he lias not, write us, sending his name. We will see that you get it. Address I>ept. D* ACME WHITE LEAD AND COLOR WORKS, Detroit, Mich. Our booklet. ** E n n m c l * und E n a m e l i n g , " with samples of colors, Kent free.

Bridgeport, Conn.

HOME SEEKERS, HOW WILL THIS DO? T H E L A D I E S all n d m i r e ihis R e c e p t i o n H a l l especially, and the w h o l e p l a n is l i a r d t o e x c e l , cost considered, which is now ¡ 8 3 8 0 0 with h a r d w o o d finish first floor. No heating. I f interested s e n d 3 c s t a m p t< r the figured floor plans and l a r g e r v i e w of this design. If y o u h a v e any i d e a s of your own for floor p l a n s send them in and 1 will place them in p r a c t i c a l s h a p e for you. giving e s t i m a t e c o s t and p r i c e s for full plans. This is No. 260, Book No. 12. Designs n e w and up to date. My 5 other Classified P,ooks are ail full of g o o d i d e a s . Order Books as per price House you want. Book No. fi has fifi designs from $250 to $1.500 2,500 r r>? •' •• i,fioo 8,500 8 " 54 " •• 8,(Ì00 10,000 ,'i.OOO " » " 80 (12 stables) ¡i,COO " 10 " 8 Î ( 2 0 one-story) 450 •• » "18 50 [g^nialj 1,800 " 5,000 with modifications to Views, plans, descriptions, dimensions, estimates, ... each. Price, #1 each; any two. $1.50; any four, ¿ 8 : any five, t)8.50i all six, $8. Booklet of 30 sample designs, " How to Start Right and SAVB M O N E Y , " 25 cents (silver). Booklet anil 55 other designs, 50 cents. All postpaid.

D. S. HOPKINS, Architect, 74 McClure s when you write to advertisers. Please mention McClure's 52

Monroe St., Grand Rapids, Mich.


McCLURE'S

T h e

O l d s

MAGAZINE.

G a s o l i n e E n g i n e

The Modern Home E M B O D I E S light, comfort, health. The same power which pumps water to supply domestic and farm uses, will inexpensively illuminate the home with electricity and by a simple adjustment also L

<

Run the Sewing Machine so helpful when run this way, so harmful run by treading.

An Olds Does It— Gas or Gasoline.

OLDS' MOTOR WORKS 1308 Jefferson Av., Detroit, Mich.

* " E n t i r e l y of T i l e " •

The improved Shingle Stain and preservative. Imparts an artistic finish to shingles and prolongs their life by penetrating the pores of the wood and retarding decay. Shingletint is made in all desirable shades, is easily applied, the colors are permanent, and money is saved by its use Full information and finished sample of wood mailed free for the asking. B E R R Y B R O T H E R S , Limited,

Do you want the newest and best refrigerator, made of porcelain outside and inside—doors with tile, no chance to warp, no odor, always clean, and will last a lifetime ?

Varnish

If so, send for descriptive catalogue to

DETROIT,

THE WILKE MFG. CO., Anderson, Ind. Cor.

23rd

and St. Charles Sts.

Manufacturers,

#

Please mention McCIure's when you write to advertisers.

53

MICH.

NEW Y O R K . 2r>2 P e a r l S t . CHICAGO. 15 a n d 17 L a k e S t . BOSTON. 520 A t l a n t i c A v e . CINCINNATI. 304 M a i n S t . PHILADELPHIA. 26 & 28 N. F o u r t h S t . ST. LOUIS, 112 S. F o u r t h S t . BALTIMORE, 22 E . L o m b a r d S t . SAN FRANCISCO, 117 & 119 M a r k e t S t .


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Easy Cooking The kitchen is as pleasant as the parlor in the home where a Detroit Jewel Gas Range reigns. It makes cooking comfortable—makes it easier, cleaner, better than is possible with any other stove. Ask the housewife who has used a

Detroit Jewel

GAS RANGE

if she would be willing to go back to other-day methods. Ask any woman who has learned the economy of time, labor and fuel that comes with cooking on this most modern of household helps how much she values it. Our booklet " Cooking by Gas" contains much to interest those who wish to know more about kitchen comfort and economy. Send for it—it's free if you mention

McCIure's

DETROIT STOVE DETROIT, M ICH.

E

The above picture taken from life shows the BERRY BROTHERS' TOY WAGON in use. ASK

YOUR

DEALER

ABOUT

PAINTS

IT, O R D R O P

WILL M A I L PICTURE NEW

IN

PHILADELPHIA,26&28N.Fourth B A L T I M O R E , 22 E . L o m b a r d St.

I

A N A l f

1

Can be easily taken apart and cleaned thoroughly with­ out back-breaking effort. 'Ihey are cleaner, colder, dryer, than any other kind. T h e scientific construction, arrangement of flues and eight walls for insulation are exclusive features which save the ice and produce a lower l o w e r ttemperature. empe for this style. Size, 25x17x40, others equally as low. Freight prepaid east of the Rockies. Privilege of returning if not satisfactory. Souvenir free.

A N DW E

AND PARTICULARS.

B O S T O N , 520 A t l a n t i c A v e .

LEONARD C L E REFRIGERATORS

A PERFECT FOOD PRESERVER.

YOU COPY OF ABOVE

Y O R K , 252 Pearl St.

C H I C A G O , ILL.

(Scientific and E l e g a n t !

A N D VARNISHES

US A LINE

WORKS,

C H I C A G O , 15 a n d 17 L a k e St.

$8.25|

C I N C I N N A T I , 304 M a i n St. St. S T . L O U I S , 112 S . F o u r t h St. S A N F R A N C I S C O , 117 & 119 M a r k e t St.

WRITE TELLS

B E R R Y B R O T H E R S , Limited

FOR FREE BOOK ABOUT OUR OTHER

L THAT STYLES.

G R A N D R A P I D S R E F R I G E R A T O R CO., 12 to 30 Ottawa St., Grand Rapids, Mich.

Varnish Manufacturers

DETROIT, MICH. Please mention M c C lIuurree''ss •when hen y o u write to advertisers.

54

Â


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

^ X ^ E offer you the best, most economical and efficient line of heaters, from which to make your selections. We are specialists in our line and devote all our time and energies to boiler making;: as a result, we are able to produce the best goods. We keep in mind the fact that a heater to be satisfactory must save coal. The Ourney does this. It is also free from dust, durable, and gives an even, agreeable, and healthful heat in all parts of the house. Now is the season to install it.

For sale through the Steam and Hot Water Fitting Trade. Have your architect specify the Gurney and insist on yourfitterusing the Gurney Avoid substitutes. Write for handsome illustrated book entitled,

" H o w Best to Heat O u r Homes.'*

GURNEY HEATER MANUFACTURING CO. 74 FRANKLIN STREET, Corner Arch Street, BOSTON, MASS. New York Office : 1 1 1 Fifth Avenue, corner 18th Street, New York City. Western Selling Agents :

Bicycle Lamps, Student " $7. Carriage " $12 pr Headlights, - ¿10. lanterns, - - $3.50. Express prepaid.

lames B . Clow & Sons, 2 2 2 - 2 2 4 Lake Street, Chicago, 111.

Burns 5 hours.

Absolutely Non-explosive and Odorless.

"THE

LIGHT

THAT

NEVER

FAILS'*

Our system of water control cannot be surpassed. It's absolutely automatic and generates apure, dry gas of great illuminating power. Our blotting-paper conduits give an even moisture throughout the entire carbide charge, thus giving the light a longer life than any other. Can't be jarred or blown out. Can be relighted repeatedly. A l l parts interchangeable.

w h i l e as b r i l l i a n t as gas o r e l e c t r i c i t y g i v e s no more heat a n d for this reason it is the l i g h t par e x c e l l e n c e for w a r m w e a t h e r . I t s c o m p a r a t i v e l y l i t t l e beat has b r o u g h t about i t s e x t e n d e d a d o p t i o n i n m a n y places where other s y s t e m s w o u l d be unbeara b l e . H u n d r e d s of s u m m e r homes are e q u i p p e d w i t h it to the e x c l u s i o n o f a l l other s y s t e m s . It n e v e r s m o k e s , s m e l l s , g e t s out o f order o r m a k e s a n u i s a n c e o f itself, i s l i g h t e d a n d e x t i n g u i s h e d as e a s i l y as gas a n d w i l l save its e n t i r e cost i n a short t i m e . A b o u t e i g h t e e n cents' w o r t h o f o i l b u r n s for o n e m o n t h . Its great feature " NO-UND E E - S H A D O W » insures a l l the l i g h t f a l l i n g d i r e c t l y d o w n w a r d a n d o u t w a r d j u s t where i t is n e e d e d . T h o u s a n d s are i n i.se i n h o m e s , stores, offices, c h u r c h e s , factories, halls, l i b r a r i e s , etc., a n d we h a v e h u n d r e d s upon h u n d r e d s o f letters c o n t a i n i n g h i g h e s t p r a i s e . O u r c a t a l o g u e D shows a l l styles from 51.80 u p . S e n t ó n request

Ask your dealer, or write to ws for particulars.

The Angle Lamp Co., 76 Park Place, New York City.

Burns 8 hours.

BlINDY LAMP CO., Box E, Elmira, N.Y. Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers,

55


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE. T H E

In

the Year

F O S T E R

DETACHABLE

BUCKLE

Different from any other belt-buckle on the market. NO S E W I N G or pins are required in attaching it to belt. You merely have to insert the belt-ends through loops in the buckle, press the loops together and the belt will be secured. All of which you can do in a minute. The F o s t e r B u c k l e is made of durable metal finished with pure gold, silver, oxidized silver, or black enamel, and is guaranteed for one year. The new pulley rings will be furnished if desired instead of clasps. State which finish and whether pulley rings or clasps are desired. B u y o f t h e M a n u f a c t u r e r . Send for particulars illustrating 2 4 different style buckles. 72-Paye Catalogue Free, describing our immense stock of Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry and Silverware. : : : : : : : : : : : :

J . A . FOSTER CO., Manufacturing Jewelers (CAPITALIZED $275,000'

&9 Articles of personal or domestic use were, perhaps, a trifle crude or homely i n ^ - 5 s ) design, but they had one desirable feature, M they were exactly what they represented (it was before the era of imitations) and were made for wear. In the year " 1847" Rogers silverplated Spoons, etc. (which have become famous) were first made. The wearing qualities at that time exhibited by this brand are still a leading feature of the original and genuine.

130-138 DORRANCB STREBT,

• • PROVIDENCE, R. I.

The New System.

"1847 "Rogers Bros." Spoons, Forks, Knives, Etc.

The MONITOR or The GUARDIAN

If you would have the good old wearing quality combined with the beautiful design and fine finish of modern times, it is only necessary to see that each piece bears the above trade mark. Remember "1847"the year this brand was first made—that is your saf egi lard ,as there are other ' Rogers. ' Send tor Catalogue No. 53 A .

CASH REGISTER FOR STORES, RESTAURANTS, B A R B E R SHOPS A N D SODA FOUNTAINS. In nine cases out of ten a register from our stock will do the work better than one costing ten times as much. Registers any sale from one cent to $99.00. Separates departments, also each salesman's sales as well as amounts ** Paid Out," " Paid on Account," or " Charge Sales." Highly ornamental, beautifully finished, and thoroughly made. Two types, M o n i t o r and G u a r d i a n . Nine Styles, $10.00 to $40.00. Descriptive circulars on application to

Itsbows the progress in Spoon m a t i n g from 1847 _ to the present time. INTERNATIONAL SILVER C o . , Successor to

MERIDEN BRITANNIA CO., Meriden,Conn. N E W Y O R K , CHICAGO, S A N

FRANCISCO.

Sold by leading dealers everywhere. /i?jrC¿

WHITING

MFG.

C O . , Makers,

NORTHBOROUGH,

MASS..

U.S.A.

Please mention McCIure's when you write to advertisers.

56

A


McCLURE'S

fn'-?ArM*m:+f#ï:*ï*w

MAGAZINE.

T-' i)

of

YOU WILL

ALWAYS "ON

BE

TIME"

If You Own One of the Reliable

Ä c c u rate-to-îhe -Second D U E B E R W

A

T

H A M P D E N C

H

E

S

"Lever Set" and Cannot "Set" in the Pocket. ' S P E C I A L R A I L W A Y " 23 Jewels. Look for the Name "Dueber" in case. ' S P E C I A L R A I L W A Y " 21 Jewels. Look for these "Trade Marks'' on the Works.' J O H N H A N C O C K " 21 Jewels. Our THE

"Guide

to W a t c h

DUEBER= H A M P D E N

B u y e r s " WATCH

Sent

Free.

' N E W R A I L W A Y " 17 Jewels. • T H E 4 0 0 " Ladies' W a t c h .

WORKS,

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers, 57

CANTON,

OHIO.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

jiama's (hina Won't do that Insane

China,

or, as the housewife would term it, "Crazyware," does r.ct appear h the home where the ware is stamped with the Laughlin Eagle ¿c Lion hall-mark. Can any better evidence cf careful manufacture and absolute reliability be furnished the buyer of china ? That mark means the luxury of style and good taste in laying the table at a price within the reach of all. Good merchants carry and endorse the goods. Your favorite dealer will order for you anything he does not have in stock.

The Homer Laugblin China-Co., East Liverpool, Ohio.

N G E R S O

11

12

"J?

•10

[9 ..H

A Marvel of Cheapness—An Exampe l of Accuracy Hiere is not a man nor a boy in the land who. in justice to him! ? ! . « n afford to get along without an I N G E R S O L L . D O L L A R WATCH. 1 here is no one too good to wear it, no one too poor to buy it. 1 he favorite of all ; it is worn by the millionaire sportsman and clubman (to save his hundred dollar one) as much as bv those who cannot afford a costlier time piece. A more accurate time-keeper cannot be had at any price, while for grace and beauty it is unsurpassed. Positively guaranteed to keep perfect time for one year or it will be repaired or exchanged without charge. •^°Jo ' ° dealers throughout the country or sent postpaid in United States and Canada bv the makers. f

b y

Address

I 0

0 0

ROßT, 11.1NGER50U & BRO, Dept.

49

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 58

M


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

W e T r u s t Y o u FOR

The

Genuine Article

Straight

South They

never

grow

from

Africa

old.

Nothing

else

in

the

spending thoughtlessly

will

world like them. The

money buy

you

one

are

in

Our New Way SEND 4 CENTS IN STAMPS FOR C A T A L O G U E AND PARTICULARS Geo. Diamond Importer

E.

Marshall lot State Street, Chicago

"Buy China and Class Right "

WIGGINS Í S E I T E R ; UNE

CHINA

T h e u n u s u a l b e a u t y i n d e s i g n a n d finish bearing the famous m a r k

of all silver

1835 R. W A L L A C E has created a new era in silver-plate manufacture. It h a s t h e d i s t i n c t i v e t o n e a n d fine a p p e a r a n c e o f s o l i d silver w i t h a l l its w e a r i n g qualities. T h e n e w patterns

" J O A N , " "ASTORIA," a n d " S T U A R T " ;W

Illustrated catalogue, N o . io M , w i t h reproduced in exact color—iree to p u r c h a s e t h e i r C h i n a a n d G l a s s at " 1 - 4 lesa t h a n elsewh 50=54 W e s t 2 2 d S t r e e t -

30 s t y l e s o f C h i n a those d e s i r i n g to prices averaging ere" N e w York

are e x t r e m e l y attractive. O u r richly illustrated cat­ a l o g u e N o . 75 A w i l l h e l p y o u to select silver w h i c h will make y o u r table beautiful. S e n t free o n r e q u e s t .

Leading deniers sell Wallace goods. R. W A L L A C E & S O N S M F G . C O .

Wallingford, Conn. Stores i n N e w Y o r k , Chicago, San Francisco, L o n d o n .

Please m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to

59

advertisers.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

My latest books of plans, giv. V>. 68, as B u i l t In Trenton, N . J . ing sizes, costs, views, etc., are ; COSt $ 2 9 5 0 . «S SfmllfRofSiim.C'tfç's. $ .50 il i'.i-u I, A r jf M-S, .an 17 f i M i - l i . ; i l blttblfS, . , .50 20 »oiihlv Huns's, Kbit-,eh'., .50 50 i oMng«*,U>s«.hii.i$800, (iL* Costing £800 lo $1 200, ,5« ïO » M ' . ¿1200 iu * looo, ,fifl 114 »• ilium m «2000, 1.110 1*20 *' «2000 lu 920OO, I.iiu 110 " *250O (o $3000, 1.00 100 " «aooo m $1000,1.00 NO " $-1000 ami iiit'il, 1.00 1 00 mostly* I ;.O0 to «350 «,1.00 IO Model Hchonlhoiiffex, , 1.00 23 Modern (li un-Ii es, , . 2. DU K> il l i ' - Homi itulld<T,m :_;'.-.;ir. • iOiAM FB'NING R M io plans. All news-stands '] il*S 6 10e copy; year, $1.00. A single one of my designs published in the Ladies" Homi ¿.TTÍNG ^ r ^ f l F 1 .-^r Journal has been built over 500 ROOM NALL'iüli'L, CHAM J times. I can please you alsu. run h -f P A R CHAM W . J . K E I T H , Arrhlletl 11,15 1 '^4 L 235 Lumber I i< li mire MINNEAPOLIS, MINX. PORCn !

FOOT OF C O M M O N H O U S E F L Y MAGNIFIED 2 0 2 5 TIMES

1(U

L

;

\^>.

0

C

r

W

flRAT rLCORJ

TIME

PROVES

A L L THINGS

Law Office, D I C K E R S O N & B R O W N ,

New York City. "I have used your tubs several years; have them in my house in New York City, in my country house at Kar Rockaway, and shooting box in North Carolina. Have found them very satisfactory and a great convenience. The water-heater works well." E . N. DICKERSON. Cat'g of Tubs and Heaters free. BRI MO S E L Y F O L D I N G BATH TIB CO. 358 ''A D." Dearborn St., Chicago.

EARN A B I C Y C L E ! TYPHOID

PNEUMONIA

DIPHTHERIA

CONSUMPTION

T h e above disease germs are magnified 1 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 t i m e s . T h e foot of the fly o n l y 2 0 2 5 t i m e s . O n e c a n imagine that very many germs w i l l adhere to a f l y ' s foot. You c a n catch the fly and prevent infection by the germ it carries by u s i n g

By selling Baker's Tens. etc. No Money required; just take orders among friends and earn a splendid bicycle tor a Lady or (ienllemen or B o y or GtrL Hundreds of premiums in Watches, Furniture. Crockery, Cameras, Mackintoshes, etc. Express prepaid. Write to-day.

Fly Tanglefoot Sticky Paper

W. G . B A K E R ( Dept. M \ Springfield, Mass.

2 LBS. GILL'S FAMOUS

It Catches the GERM as well as the FLY.

Chocolates and Bon Bons Spanish Mauser Rifles

and

Packed in handsome metal box, including Elegant Capitol Souvenir Spoon, ^ ^» sent express prepaid, anywhere JS I ,3(J in the United States, for . . . 1

Carbines

in complete first-class serviceable order, captured in late war. io.ooo sold to us by Û. S. Government, with five million ball cartridges in c'ips. Before exporting, we otter limited number at fio.oo each, packed for shipment. Cartridges, {3.00 per one hundred. F. UANNEKMAN, 579 Broadway, New York, Dealer in Military Gonds and War Relics.

W. S. GILL 1223 Pennsy'vania Ave., Washington, 0. C.

LAUNCH!

14 TO 30 F T

SAFE AND RELIABLE. WE GUARANTEE YOU CAN RUN THEM. OUR BEAUTIFUL CATALOG ILLUSTRATED IN COLORS. FREE. SEND FOR rr. PIERCE ENGINE (0. BOX 8. RACINE JCT.VIS._ Cat this ad. ont and send to H B , state whether you wish (JENTS^ OR LAOILS' BICYCLE, also color and gear wanted, and wo will send you this HIGH GRADE

SEND ONE DOLLAR

1900 MODEL ACME JEWEL BICYCLE, You can examine at y U U R E X P R E S S office, and if found perfectly satisfactory, exactly ns represented, (lie MOST WONDERFUL VALUE you ever saw or heard of, equal to bicycles that retail as h i : h a s $40.00, if you think , you can sell ell •' it at 210.00 profit any dar, pa"ythe express agent OUR I SPECIAL PRICE, $13.75, less thefl.OO'sent with order, or $12.75 and ! express charges. W h i l e our special Bicycle Cat nlogue, mailed free I for tho asking, shows all bicycles below alt other houses, stripped ] bicycles at $3.00, Í 6 . 0 0 , $ J. 50, $8.00 and $9.00, the new lOOOClnclnnattus complete at $11.75, yet OUR ACME JEWEL AT $13.75 Is by far tho irreal est bargain ever offered at the price. It is covered by a BINDING GUARANTEE, strictly high grade, latest of everything. Famous Be (Jen Hanger, fino equipment Guaranteed Pneumatic Tires, high grade Saddle, Pedals, Handle Bnr, Tools and Toolbag. Enameled black, green or maroon. IF YOU WANT ANT OTHER BICYCLE advertised In this paper or In any catalogne, wrlle ns and wo will save von at least $3.00 to $10.00 on I I . V O i : t AN M A R K ¿ 5 0 0 . 0 0 T H I S Y E A l i e r - A ö e nnTDI IS* IS a f*r\ /Inn \ /«UirAOÌÌ sellini: this bicycle at $25.00. Address. SEARS, ROEBUCK « C O . (<nC.) C H I C A U U . Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers.

60


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

W i e k e s ' refrigerators

H O M E BILLIARD

TABLES.

PORCELAIN-LINED INSIDE AND OUTSIDE, or oak exteriors, are now for the first time offered to private families. Can be had in all sizes. They easily pay for themselves in the saving of ice. The leading packing houses everywhere recognize Wiekes' system as the acme of perfection in refrigerators and all their refrigerator c a r s . This is the best test of their merit. CATALOGUE

of the adjustable top which we supply, this table is readily converted Into a handsome dining or library table.

S O L D ON E A S Y

PAYMENTS.

C a t a l o g u e showing d i f f e r e n t s i z e t a b l e s on a p p l i c a t i o n , a n d w e will mail b o o k showing 100 new " s h o t s " on r e c e i p t o f 20 c e n t s . A d d r e s s

O N APPLICATION.

B R U N S W ! G K - B A L K E - C U L L E N D E R

We make Billiard Tables for private home use a specialty. The table as illustrated above $ 8 5 with our guarantee that it is equal to any of our $200 tables for playing purposes. A smaller size, $65.00. By means

C O . , ¿ C H I C A G O ,

ILL.

Branch Offices

:{M?Ìr

A c . .

Cbe " f l e w 6 c m S a î e t y ^ R a z o r s

DESIGNS/TRADEMARKS CAVEArS.COPYRIOHTS & 0.

IMPOSSIBLE TO CUT THE FACE.

Our fee returned i f we f a i l . Any one sending sketch a n d description of any invention will promptly receive our o p i n i o n free concerning the patentability of same. "How to Obtain a Patent" sent upon request. Patents secured through us advertised for sale at our expense. Patents taken out through us receive special notice, without charge, i n T H E P A T E N T R E C ORD, an illustrated and widely circulated journal, consulted by Manufacturers and Investors. Send for sample copy F R E E . Address,

It's the B E S T and SIMPLEST Safety ever devisedNo experience required. W e g u a r a n t e e and keep them sharp for one year.

weil, Time» Fine !

VICTOR J. EVANS & CO., {Patent Attorneys,)

SIMMONS HARDWARE CO., St. Louis, Mo.

Evans Building, WASHINGTON, D. C.

fe^

Price $2, Postpaid.

ZS° Send for Illustrated Price List.

A DOLLAR'S V A L U E FOR 25 CENTS

W e w i l l s e n d , p o s t p a i d , six choice Rose p l a n t s , assorted—one each, r e d , w h i t e , y e l l o w , and p i n k , t w o of i n t e r m e d i a t e colors—to a n y person w h o w i l l s e n d us t w e n t y - f i v e cents for a s i x - m o n t h s ' t r i a l s u b s c r i p t i o n for o u r g r e a t m o n t h l y m a g a z i n e , H O W T O G R O W FLOWERS. T h i s offer is good for a l i m i t e d t i m e o n l y . T h e s e R o s e s are sold b y f l o r i s t s for ten c e n t s e a c h . T h e p l a n t s we send out are v i g o r o u s a n d t h r i f t y . T h e y are on t h e i r o w n roots, A N D W I L L B L O O M THIS S U M M E R . T h e k i n d s w i l l be specially selected to s u i t y o u r c l i m a t e . T h i s offer m a y be t a k e n a d v a n t a g e of o n l y b y p e r s o n s not a l r e a d y s u b s c r i b e r s for H O W T O G R O W F L O W E R S . Order t o - d a y . HOW T O G R O W F L O W E R S i s b y far the best floral j o u r n a l p u b l i s h e d . H O W T O G R O W F L O W E R S is a work o f art, a l l the i l l u s t r a t i o n s m a d e Each n u m b e r c o n t a i n s s6 large p a g e ' , p r i n t e d o n fine b o o k paper, beautifrom p h o t o g r a p h s , thus s h o w i n g flowers as t h e y a c t u a l l y are. T h e great m e r i t fully illustrated. It t e l l s w h e n h o w ' a n d what to p l a n t , w h e n a n d h o w to o f our m a g a z i n e , t h o u g h , is its p r a c t i c a l helpfulness to a l l w h o l o v e a n d g r o w prune, when a n d how to m u l c h how to protect i n W i n t e r , how to g e t r i d o f flowers. It is a n i n d i s p e n s a b l e a i d , w h e t h e r y o u have a s i n g e p l a n t or a large insects, water a n d heat n e e d e d , how to bed out p l a n t s , the best varieties, about collection N o flower lover can afford to be w i t h o u t i t . W e w a n t y o u to t r y floraldecorations.andgivescompletedirectionsforhavingsuccesswithflowers. H O W T O G R O W F L O W E R S , b e l i e v i n g once y o u have seen i t y o u w i l l a l It is the o n l y floral paper not r u n b y c o m m e r c i a l florists. W o r t h a d o l l a r a y e a r . w a y s be a s u b s c r i b e r . H e n c e this great s p e c i a l offer, g o o d for t h i r t y d a y s o n l y . SIX HOSE PLANTS A N D THIS G R E A T M A G A Z I N E SIX MONTHS ONLY 35 CENTS The Roses alone are worth twice the money. T h i s i s t h e b i g g e s t b a r g a i n i n flowers e v e r o f f e r e d . F i v e c o l l e c t i o n s a n d five s u b scriptions for one d o l l a r G e t f o u r o f y o u r n e i g h b o r s t o s u b s c r i b e , a n d s e c u r e y o u r o w n p a p e r a n d p l a n t s free. Address

THE FLORAL PUBL I S H I N G C O . , 65 South Stone St., S P R I N G F I E L D , Ohio. Please m e n t i o n M c C I u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers. 61


McCLURE'S MAGAZINE.

G o l f

P l a y i n g The Best 25c Card Made.

C a r d Ask 25

THE

mm

AMERICAN

your dealer for them or send cents

to

PLAYING

us

for

sample

CARD C O . .

pack. Kalamazoo,

Mich.

Thousands are successful and gaining better posi­ tions and salaries studying at home by our mail sys­ tem. We teach Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Mechanical Drawing, Electric Light­ ing, Short Popular Electrical Course, Elementary Mathematics, etc.. by mail. Study in spare time only. Institute endorsed by Thomas A . Edison and others. Catalog free.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TAUGHT BY MAIL

magazine

An Illustrated Catholic Monthly for Young and Old.

E l e c t r i c a l Engineer Institute

SUBSCRIPTION,

$1.00 A

YEAR.

I>ept. B , 340-243 West 23d Street, X e w Y o r k

The easiest "way to subseri' e is to send a dollar bill to • BENZIGER BROTHERS, 30 Barclay Street, fiew York. Handsomely Printed, Profusely Illustrated, and a Literary Gem. The Finest Catholic Magazine Published. «• BENZIGER'S MAGAZINE CONTAINS : Original the

Stories

Best

Special

by

Writers.

Articles

on

Interesting Subjects Current

Events,

Photography, Dressmaking, Puzzles, Tots,"

Prize

Science

and

Stenography, Games,

If You Will Sell

Inventions,

OUR J E W E L R Y N o v e l t i e s we will give you WATCHES, C A VIE It A S , BRACE­ L E T S & G O L D R I N G S for your trouble.

Household,

Amusements,

Questions,

" For

Little

N o money is required. Send us your name and full address a n d we will send you 18 gold plate scarf and stick pins all set with different colored stones, to sell for 10 cents each. W h e n you have sold them we w i l l send you your choice of the above articles and many other p r e m i u m s on our large illustrated list w h i c h we send you with the pins. N O V E L T Y M F G .

etc.

NUMEROUS

FINE

ILLUSTRATIONS.

Noiv is the best time to subscribe. BENZIGER Dept.

E , 36 Barclay

BROTHERS, Street,

CO.,

91 Bailey St., Attleboro,

New Y o r k .

Other Lights are Dim Beside " T H E B E S T " Incandescent

Vapor

Gas Light.

The cheapest and strongest light on earth. More brilliant than electric or acetvlene gas, cheaper than a kerosene lamp. It makes its own gas, is portable, requires no wires or gas machine, no wicks to trim, no smoke, no smell, no danger. Approved by Fire Insur­ ance Underwriters. l o o candle power costs o n l y 2 cents for 15 h o u r s ; gives a powerful, steady, pure white light. For residences, (city orcountry) stores, of­ fices, etc., it has no equal. Send for booklet. The Best Street Lamp is superior to any other. Agents wanted everywhere. The Best Light Co., 829 E . Fifth St., Canton, 0.

62

Mass.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

DIRECT

Letters Copied While Writing,

FROM

THE FACTORY

K e e p a copy o f a l l l e t t e r s ; no press; i water; no brush; no work. Any ink; any pen ; any paper. O u r P e n - C a r b o n nev smuts ; o u r c l i p holds paper firm. Write w i t h no e x t r a pressure, a n d our Pea-Carbon Letter Book produces a perfect c o p y . C a n be used a n y w h e r e . I f y o u r stationer does not keep it, write ioxfreespecimen of work. Pcn-Carhon

HnulfoM Co., 145 Centre St. New York. Dept. D.

FILING CABINET Direct from the F a c t o r y , freight prefinid, sent Oil A p p r o v a ) ^ ' to be returned at our expense^ i f not positively the best 12-drawer filing cabinet ever sold at so low a price. E a c h drawer is fitted w i t h a good index,polished brass labelholder p u l l , a n d strong nickel plated s p r i n g compressor. Front, top a n d ends are best quarter-sawed oak w i t h a fine polish finish. A t retail this size and q u a l i t y sells for $18 to $25. The above is but one of m a n y s i z e s of L e t t e r Files made by us a n d sold Direct from the F a c t o r y at F a c t o r y Prices." 4

"Save Twenty Per Cent, of a Bookkeeper's Time."

SMITH'S ADJUSTABLE INDEX TAGS 400 kinds of P r i n t e d T a g s k e p t in s t o c k . Printed Ledger T a g . • . Exet

Ma Chas.

.

™ OS ro

3 er

fi

TJ

m z w m

6

THE

, 1

, 1

FRED MACEY CO. Grand Rapids, Mich. M a k e r s of Office and L i b r a r y F u r n i t u r e

Toronto.

Rock the Baby or Yourself in the

Wayne Lawn and Veranda Swing An outdoor delight in summer on lawn or porch—an indoor pleasure all the year 'round, in attic, playroom or nursery. Appreciated alike by grown-ups and littleones. Safe, restful, strongly made, noiseless, adjustable to any reclining or upright positions. Supercedes the lifimmoclt. Can be occupied and operated by one to four persons. Gives the same sweep as a 10 ft. swiDg, yet is only 4'/» feet high, 7 feet long, 3^ feet wide, Takes no more room than a couch. Will sustain a ton weight. The pressure of the foot gives the motion, as easily operated as a rocking chair. Fnce from $10 up, according to finish. Free Booklet with descriptions and $10 up, prices upon request.

LOUIS R A S T E T T E R & S O N S ,

1

sippi and north of South Carolina. 1 (Points beyond on an equal basis.) Write for Catalogue No. "£4."

Dept. B, CHAS. C SMITH, Mfr., Exeter, Nebraska. & TOY.

1

We Prepay Freight S ^ S Ä f f i

Instantly a p p l i e d or moved—stay—don't t e a r . Used by Am. Sugar Refining- Co., New York ; Illinois Central Railroad Co., Chicago; Northern Pacific Steamship Co., Portland, Ore., etc. Catalog and P r i c e L i s t F R E E . Sample T a g , 6 c e n t » . GRAND

I

l t

% INCH SIZE

Canadian Representatives,

i

Ft. 63

Wayne, Ind.


McCLURE'S MAGAZINE.

Fine Furniture from Factory to Fireside

THIS CHAIR IS COVERED WITH

PANTASOTE WATERPROOF

GREASE PROOF

Looks exactly like a n d costs h a l f as

STAIN

Buy from the m a k e r s . S a v e r e t a i l e r ' s a n d j o b b e r ' s pre fits a n d c a s h d i s c o u n t s .

PROOF '

leather much.

U n l i k e the common imi ta­ lions of leather, P a n i a m o l e docs not rot, peel, or crack, contains no rubber, cellulose, or other dangerously inflam­ mable substances, and is not affected by heat, cold, or climate. '.' Jested for il i n <* y * ' i n's b y a i < leading furniture .,(!::-

• kf W

V W

materials, and

< r '11. I •

b u i l d e r s , rail­ ways and steam­ ship lines w i t h perfect success. M a d e in stand­ ard colors, plain r figured. E n o u g h to coveradiningchair s e a t or footstool s e n t for Q S o . in s t a m p s . SAMPLE

FREE!

1 5 x 5 inches for 2c. stamp and your upholsterer's address. CAUTION! There are worthless ana dangerous imita— — t i o n s . See that "Pantasote ' is stamped on the goods.

best e v e r sold be r e t u r n e d at

1

PANTASOTE CO•f

Art I III \>\J =

r

l

m

m

n

s

f° u n c o m m o n l y handsome s m o k i n g c a b i n e t . N o . 3633. It is just he g for the m a n w h o smokes or w h o keeps a s u p p l y o f l i q u o r s a n d A s m o k i n g m a t e r i a l s t o r his friends. I t is a l s o u s e d b y w o m e n t o r sew­ ing materials, p a i n t i n g a n d drawing as a g e n e r a l u t i l i t y c a b i n e t . H a s t w o doors, t h r e e d r a w e r s , a n d open space l o r c i g a r s , bottles, etc. H a s v e r t i c a l ve­ neer. F r e n c h legs, and beautifully rounded c o r n e r s a n d edges and r a i l . I t is h a n d rubbed and polished. Prices : q u a r t e r e d w h i t e oak. $25.00: solid mahogany, $30.00. T h r o u g h a dealer it w o u l d cost from $40.00 to $55.00. T h i s is o n l y a sample of o u r g r e a t variety of o u t o f the o r d i n a r y fur­ niture. W h e n c a s h accom­ p a n i e s o r d e r w e pre­ p a y f r e i g h t to points east o f t h e Mississippi. If not f o u n d to be the a t s u c h l o w p r i c e s , a n y o f o u r goods may o u r expense a n d m o n e y w i l l be refunded. t

t

S e n d for n e w c a t a l o g u e of the ever produced.

(Dept. F . j , 89 Broadway, î i e w Y o r k City.

finest

l i n e o f furniture

JONES FURNITURE CO., Dept. C, Syracuse, N. Y.

No.

179

This i s One o f Our Latest. : is one of 60 styles illustrated and described in our c je B " for 1900, of 11

Rolling and Carrying Chairs. The case of i n v a l i d i s m doesn't exist for w h i c h we cannot furnish a suitable chair. We also make the best types as w e l l as the largest variety to be found, of

Reclining Chairs and Adjustable Couches

Tue MM Type of Music Box Ever Manufactured

FOR

REGINA MUSIC BOX C f l . 8 . Ä Ä Ä ,

M

SICK

FOLKS,

WELL FOLKS,

AND L A Z Y

FOLKS.

A l l of \yliich are illustrated and described i n our catalogue C. In w r i t i n g for i n f o r m a t i o n , please particularize.

The only disk Music Box made that changes its tune sheets auto­ matically. Wonderfully improved in tone. Perfect acting vet simple mechanism. Boxes from $7 up. Illustrated catalogue free.

.

GEO.

F. SARGENT

COMPANY,

289c F o u r t h A v e n u e , n e x t 2 3 d S t r e e t ,

Please mention M c C I u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers. 64

N E W YORK.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

^Beacon Lijffhf~ fie fc ' Business Worf< i is, t h e ..

off

The mechanism of every k i n d o f m a c h i n e shows some i m p r o v e ­ ment in latest models, a n d t y p e w r i t e r s are no e x c e p t i o n to the rule. T h e old style t y p e w r i t e r s p r i n t up-side-down, so that the operator cannot see w h a t is w r i t t e n w i t h o u t l i f t i n g the carriage. T h e

/ V I S I B L E WRITING W - %

OLIVER

TYPEWRITER

is built right-side up, a n d the w o r k is i n s i g h t . Operators w h o use the O l i v e r can correct m i s t a k e s as soon as m a d e . Their minds are not distracted from t h e i r w o r k b y w o n d e r i n g w h e t h e r or not the printed page is c o m i n g out c o r r e c t l y w r i t t e n . Agents wanted in towns where we have none to s h o w a n d sell the O l i v e r . Please write us to-day for booklet entitled " Twenty-five Reasons," giving that many points in which T h e Oliver Typewriter excels all others. THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER C O . , 93 D e a r b o r n Street, C h i c a g o

HAVE

YOU

SEEN

THE

Columbia Bar-Lock No. 10? This latest model bas

BALL-BEARING CARRIAGE in addition to the other well-known features of the Bar-Lock Type­ writer. This gives unsurpassed

EASE OF OPERATION Write for

a descriptive

catalogue •

vßi (JÄ COLUMBIA TYPEWRITER MFG. CO. 39 W e s t

ii6th Street, N e w York

Main. Office, 309.'Broadway/-New Yoris:; Please m e n t i o n M c C I u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to 65

advertisers.

City


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

^ite^fetuett Built for service i n every d a y business. Its heavy hangers a n d t y p e b a r s m a k e it t h e most powerful m a n i f o l d e r . It

WRITES 30 COPIES AT ONCE W h i l e b e i n g d u r a b l e a n d ready for heavy w o r k , the J E W E T T also has a light, responsive touch a n d is easy to operate. Write for booklet, which illustrates and explains everything. TEWETT T Y P E W R I T E R CO.. 604 L o c u s t Street, Des Moines, l a .

"Best in the World

Drawers in both pedestals instead of closet, if preferred. IrilN

S1ANDAKD

J f%

75

Roll-Top Desk, 10

11

Well, at last Jones has an American Typewriter. Now from this letter I can tell what he is driving at, —and what a relief from his pen-scribbled puzzles! Jones will undoubtedly do some business now."

Freight prepaid to any point In the United States Bast of Mississippi River. I >esk is Solid O a k and measureS48 in. long; 30 in. deep; 45 in. high. Mounted on casters ; drawers and closet below writing bed. Has 2 extension leaves. Pigeonhole case is overhung same as all high-priced desks, and contains: 2 medium-sized drawers; 2 racks for pens, pencils, etc.; 2 memo, strips for cards, blotters, etc.

ARE Y O U LIKE J O N E S ? If you are in business you haven t time to write well with the pen. If you do not write well you are liable to expensive errors, and an American $ro Typewriter may save its cost the very first week. It does the best of «rork, and is as well made as the highest priced machines, but more simple. For seven years it has held this field without a competitor. Catalogues and sample of work free if you mention MCCLURE'S.

Entire Desk locks automatically without a key, when top is rolled down, by means of a spring-lock —one key unlocks entire desk.

JOSEPH L. SHOEMAKER

& Co.

A M E R I C A N

T Y P E W R I T E R

B'dway opiM>t»lte Court House

Salesrooms : 924 ARCH ST., Philadelphia, Penn.

NEW

Send 2-cent stamp for Catalogue M .

Practical Demonstration of the w o r k t h a t D i x o n ' s P e n c i l s d o , w i l l c o n v i n c e a n y pencil user t h a t t h e y a r e e x a c t l y suited to h i s i n d i v i d u a l needs. A m u l t i t u d e of styles If your dealer doesn't keep them, send 1« cents for samples worth twice thai sum. JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO., J e r s e y City, (f. J .

~~

" ¡ M Í ' R " ^

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 6 6

PC

Y O R K

C O . , CITY


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

im-

Ï

Elastic A System of Units

It Is Not Necessary To Pay $100 ForaFirst-ClassTypewriter T n

e Wellington costs only $60 and doei all that any 8100 machine will do, besides having advantages peculiarly its own. . ° prove this, we will send it to any address for trial. It not perfectly satisfactory money will be returned. What, more can we d o ! Illustrated Catalogue Free. T U E W I L L I A M S M F G . CO., Ltd., Box 40, P l a t t s b u r g , í ¡ . Y . T

the Largest Contract Ever Given for Typewriters

250 Underwood Typewriters

A living book-case—grows with your library and always fits it. Small enough for 10 or large enough for 10,000 books. An ideal book-case for the home. Fitted with dust-proof disappearing doors, simple and perfect in operation. Furnished in grades and prices to suit all tastes and requirements. Handled by responsible dealers in all principal cities—send for list and handsome booklet describing the beauties of this case. Wernicke pays the freight.

•sui alie!»

''I'

Il

ir-ïlÉst::: ¿BgSEEEEEE5S!.D

mm

The U . S. Government buys 2 5 0 Machines. WASHINGTON, Feb. 26.—Secretary L o n g of the N a v y Department has decided to accept report of special board appointed to investigate the merits of Typewriters as to advantages, speed,

*Yfért>tckc€o.

durability, etc., which was, that the bid of the Wagner T y p e writer Co. for 2UO to 250 Underwood Typewriters was the most advantageous, and the Department decided to accept it, against Remington, Densmore,

Remington-Scholes,

Jewett.

183 Bartlett St.,

Oliver,

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.

Hammond and others.

WAGNER TYPEWRITER COMPANY, 218-220 Broadway, New York. mention Please m e n t i o n McClure's M c C l u r e ' s when you y o u write to advertisers. 67 67


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

The

E d i s o n

Diaphragm M i m e o g r a p h A

new style h a n d

operating

M i m e o g r a p h for the

reduplication of T y p e = W r i t i n g , D r a w i n g s ,

H a n d = W r i t i n g ,

M a p s ,

M u s i c ,

etc.

T h e stencil is protected b y a f i x e d c l o t h d i a p h r a g m insuring b e t t e r w o r k a n d s a v i n g o f s u p p l i e s , l a b o r and time.

A

Great Improvement.

Its many advantages fully

set out i n our booklet A.

Branch

Quickly

B. DICK

to be

Appreciated.

h a d free

47 Nassau S t . , N e w Y o r k .

152=>54 L a k e

for a l l . C e l e b r a t e d P e i ' n î n m e t h o d . Q u i c k l y learned^ no s h a d i n g ; no p o sition; connective vowels; highest a w a r d W o r l d ' s F a i r ; self t a u g h t o r b y m a i l ; text-book on approval. W r i t e H . M . Pernin, A u t h o r , Detroit, M i c h .

P l a n e t a r y ^

SHORTHAND

Shipped C A R R I A G E S *C . O . D . t o C o m b i n a t i o n Go-Cart» anyone. ^ D i r e c t f r o m factory at lowest wholesale prices. Dealers large profits saved. N o money i n advance. $18 C a r r i a g e , $ 9 . 0 0 I $5.00 C a r r i a g e $3.00 ^$12 " $6.00 J GO-CARTS from $3.00 n p . 3Send f o r free i l l u s t r a t e d catalog and special offer CASH B DVERS' UNION, 1 6 4 W e s t V a n B u r e n St., 15-164, C h i c a g o , 111«.

I

N

C

O

R

P

O

R

A

T

E

D

the

asking.

St.,

CHICAGO.

P e n c i l

P o i n t e r

N e e d e d i n e v e r y office, school, 'home. S a v e s i t s c o s t i n lead. M e c h a n i c a l perfection. No toy. Free circulars.

BABY

Business

for

COMPANY,

A. B. DICE COMPANY, 1 5 2 - 1 5 4 L a k e S t . , CHICAGO. 47 S a s s a u S t . , N . Y .

T Y P E W R I T E R

HEADQUARTERS,

102 F u l t o n s t . , N e w Y o r k , s e l l a l l m a k e s u n d e r h a l f p r i c e . Don't b u y before w r i t i n g t h e m f o r u n p r e j u d i c e d a d v i c e a n d prices. Exchanges. Immense stock for selection. S h i p p e d for trial. G u a r a n t e e d first c l a s s . D e a l e r s s u p p l i e d . 5 2 - p a g e i l l u s . c a t . free.

?

T h e advantages over a person o r firm s h o w n b y the C o r p o r a t i o n H a n d B o o k , p r i c e $1.50, p o s t p a i d . B o o k l e t — " H o w to I n c o r p o r a t e , ' 25c. C i r c u l a r s free.

a

YPEWRITER3m ak 3 E

B A N K E R S '

S U P P L Y

C O . , 97

Quincy

Street,

Chicago.

ALL THE STANDARD MACHINES FOB Sale o r R e n t at Halt MA NOP ACTUE EES' PRICES. EACH MACHINE FULLY GUARANTEED. SHIPPED WITH PRIVILEGE OF EXAMINATION. WEITE FOR CATALOGUE.

Typewriter Emporium,

"V,All A r i t h m e t i c a l Problems

zo

st

%èîciol

A n d s a v e r . Print y o u r o w n cards, circular, b o o k , newspaper, w i t h o u r $s o r $18 M a k e r p r i n t i n g press. T y p e s e t t i n g easy, printed rules sent. F o r m a n o r b o y . S e n d for c a t a l o g , p r e s s e s , t y p e , p a p e r , t o factory.

M o n e y -

solved rapidly a n d accurately b y the Comptometer. S a v e s 60 p e r c e n t o f time a n dentirely relieves nervous a n d mental strain. A d a p t e d t o a l l com* m e r e i a i a n d scientillc computation. E v e r y office s h o u l d h a v e o n e .

Write for Pamp/iíct.

FELT A TARRANT MFG. CO., Chicago,

THE PRESS CO., Meriden, Conn. A

GOOD T Y P E W R I T E R I N Y O U R OFFICE will demonstrate its advantages.

t

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I f i r ^ ^ - ^ T I P U T

P E I *

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-

S e n d f o r s a m p l e s o f w r i t i n g , w i t h p r i c e s , etc. J L a r g e s t a n d m o s t c o m p l e t e s t o c k o f s e c o n d - h a n d T y p e w r i t e r s o f a n y h o u s e i n the Machines shipped, privilege of inspection. T i t l e t o e v e r y m a c h i n e guaranteed. Í

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- H o l l l m o r c St., Baltimore, Md. W i . n d . t t e Street, K....»a. City. I S Î l M L Ï I S U ï . ' S h t S ' ^ u ' A ? « 8 N o r t h N i n t h S t r e e t . S t . I.o.ih.. 4 8 - D i a m o n d St., l'ltt.bi.rßli. P a , 5 8 « C a l i f o r n i a St., S a n Franetseo.Cul. M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers 1

B o 9 t o

g'S


McCLURE'S For

MAGAZINE.

Sale by A l l Dealers.

¥ L e a d

DESTINY

and

C o l o r e d P e n c i l s .

¥ S t a t i o n e r s ' R u b b e r G o o d s .

¥ i n k s .

¥ Mark the initials

A.

W.

before the name of

FABER.

¥

A N Y B O D Y

E s t a b l i s h e d

Here,

T h e r e

1761.

who

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a n d

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uses

T

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S

E v e r y w h e r e many persons of great prominence

have

I

endorsed

is

W a t e r m a n ' s

N

K

destined

to

be

S A T I S F I E D . 4 0 years of study a n d

I d e a l

accumula­

tive c h e m i c a l k n o w l e d g e for

F o u n t a i n

the

Uncle

P e n as

Sam

ments.

Carter's

uses it i n all

A l l of the great

Ink.

depart­

railroads

use it a n d the s c h o o l boards of all

the

Best

q u a l i t y of

accounts

W r i t i n g

the

I n s t r u m e n t

large

cities b u y

it to

the

ex­

c l u s i o n of a l l o t h e r m a k e s of i n k . It is the o n e f o u n t a i n p e n e n t i r e l y s a t i s f a c t o r y . A trial permitted ; exchanges are invited. Inquire at y o u r l o c a l d e a l e r ' s , o r w r i t e f o r b o o k l e t .

Carter's

I n k o u g h t to m e e t

your

needs. L.

E .

W a t e r m a n

C o .

There

Largest Fountain Pen Manufacturers in the World

157 B r o a d w a y , N e w Y o r k 12 Golden Lane, London McClure

are

mention

from — only

one

of

kind — T h e

Best.

each

M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to

69

kinds

choose

50 Please

sixteen

advertisers.

to

quality


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

T h e " C O M F O R T "

c

h

a

i

r

T h e ** C o m f o r t " R e c l i n i n g S w i n g C h a i r i s w h a t y o u o u g h t t o h a v e for t h e p o r c h a n d l a w n d u r i n g t h e c o m i n g s e a s o n . It is easier a n d m o r e c o m f o r t a b l e t h a n a h a m m o c k , t a k e s u p less r o o m , is n o t i n o t h e r p e o p l e ' s w a y , a n d c a n be e a s i l y m o v e d f r o m p l a c e to place just as a n o r d i n a r y c h a i r c o u l d . Y o u c a n lie d o w n i n it, or sit u p i n it, or s w i n g i n it w i t h but the s l i g h t e s t effort. It i n s t a n t l y r e s p o n d s t o t h e s l i g h t e s t m o v e m e n t o f t h e o c c u p a n t . It is light but strong, a n d neat a n d h a n d s o m e i n a p p e a r a n c e . F o r s h i p p i n g a n d s t o r i n g i t c a n be f o l d e d i n t o a c o m p a c t s p a c e o f only b y 31 i n c h e s . O r d e r at least o n e o f these C h a i r s n o w a n d get t h e full benefit o f i t d u r i n g the S u m m e r months. A s k your furniture dealer for them. I f he doesn't h a n d l e t h e m , w e w i l l s e n d y o u o n e f o r $4-25, c a s h w i t h o r d e r , f . o . b . C h i c a g o , o r $4.75, f r e i g h t p r e p a i d to a l l parts of the U n i t e d States east of t h e R o c k y M o u n t a i n s a n d north of N o r t h C a r o l i n a a n d N e w M e x i c o . h

HAGGARD

& M A R C U S S O N

C O . , 410 S o u t h C a n a l S t r e e t , C h i c a g o , SII.

The SECURE

from

"HANN"

EIRE

Hammock!

W h y keep your valuable papers — Deeds, Bonds, Contracts, Mortgages, Notes, Insurance Policies, R e c e i p t s , etc.— i n a n o l d t i n b o x or bureau d r a w e r w h e r e t h e y w i l l b e d e s t r o y e d i n c a s e o f fire, w h e n for $ 8 . 0 0 w e w i l l s h i p y o u t h i s GUARANTEED F I R E - P R O O F

B

O

$

w i l l p r e s e r v e i t s c o n t e n t s p e r f e c t l y i n fhe W r i t e for p a m p h l e t a n d our n e w 140-page i l l u s t r a t e d S a f e c a t a l o g u e .

very hottest fire?

SWINGING With + * * * side D i m e n s i o n s io i n . long, 6 i n . wide, 3 i n . deep A p p r o x i m a t e w e i g h t , 50 l b s . V I C T O R

S A F E

£,

L O C K

CHAIR

Adjustable Head

Rest

Instantly adjusted to any desired h e i g h t o f seat. S t r o n g e n o u g h f o r grown people. Folds into space 6 i n . b y 2 ft. W e m a n u f a c t u r e t h e m a n d prepay express charges east of R o c k y m o u n t a i n s . Size 2 x 3 feet. N o . 10, w i t h 4 i n . f r i n g e , $ 1 . 5 0 N o . 30, w i t h 8 i n . f r i n g e , $ 1 « 7 5 N o . 40, w i t h 8 i n . f r i n g e , $ 2 . 0 O

C O . T H E

1 7

C I N C I N N A T I ,

H A N N

M F G . C O .

ONIO 133

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s

0

0

I

H o l d s [ts f u l l w i d t h at a l l t i m e s . H a s a d j u s t a b l e a r m s . A swing- 4 i n g a r m c h a i r , c o n f o r m i n g t o t h e b o d y a n d r e s t s o n e a l l over. • M a d e o f b r i g h t f a n c y s t r i p e d D u c k , s t r o n g e n o u g h for h e a v y * people. S i z e 7 ft. b y 31 i n . W e m a n u f a c t u r e t h e m a n d prepay-^ e x p r e s s east o f R o c k y m o u n t a i n s . N o . i o , w i t h 4 i n . fringe, • £ 3 . 0 0 ; N o . 20, w i t h 5 i n . f r i n g e , $ 3 . 2 5 ; N o . 30, with 6 in. f r i n g e , $ 3 . 5 0 ; N o . 40, w i t h 8 i n . f r i n g e . » 3 . 7 5 : N o . 50, with 10 in. fringe, $ 4 . 0 0 .

^ M A R G U E R I T E "

T H E

.

Instantly Convertible Troni Sitting tu li .-Mining Position.

X

which

Department

3

E . Long

w h e n y o u w r i t e to

70

St., Columbus, 0 .

advertisers.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

S P A U L D I N G & Co., P A R I S :

G o l d s m i t h s ,

86Avedel'Oper.,

a n d

S i l v e r s m i t h s

„ . , . . . „

JeWelerS.

S p r i n g

,

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StateSt.

W e d d i n g s .

T h e a b u n d a n c e o f artistic a n d a p p r o p r i a t e gifts to be h a d at o u r establishment, a l l of assured quality, unique and exclusive in design, and at consistent prices should attract those w h o are interested i n a p p r o a c h ­ ing weddings. Our S p a u l d i n g

&

"Suggestion B o o k " m a i l e d on

C o . ,

J a c k s o n

B l v d .

application.

c o r .

S t a t e

S t . ,

C h i c a g o .

DIRECT FROM THE FACTORY . 8 5

B U Y S THIS EXCELLENT

$19

"MACEY"

N o . l o - H , direct from the f a c t o r y , Freight Pre­ paid, s e n t " O n A p p r o v a l , " t o b e r e t u r n e d a t o u r e x p e n s e i f not found p o s i t i v e l y the best roll top desk ever sold at so low a price. W o r t h at r e t a i l $ 2 8 . 0 0 to $35-00. Desk,

T h i s d e s k i s 48 i n . l o n g , 3 0 i n . w i d e , 48 i n . h i g h . It has a fine q u a r t e r - s a w e d o a k f r o n t , c l o s e d b a c k , f r o n t b a s e m o u l d , 22 p i g e o n h o l e s , file b o x e s , 2 a r m r e s t s , ball bearing c a s t e r s , and 3 c o m p l e t e letter files. Beautiful polish finish.

9

ssa MM

PATENT

«

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P r rp ep pn da yv

Carolina.

M

t

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(Points beyond on an equal

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THE FRED MACEY CO., Makers

************** Please mention

F n re p i i yn hmt

POI

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n n

t d

s

e n

a o

s

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of the M i s t

h

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basis.)

iVrite for our Complete Catalogue No. E3.

m BOSTON,

APPLI E U

of Office a n d

G r a n d Rapids, M i c h . Library

***********>•

M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e to a d v e r t i s e r s .

Furniture.

I


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

WHY PAY $60*» MORE f o r a e u r r e y t h a n Is a c t u a l l y n e c e s s a r y . I f y o u b u y a j o b a s g o o d a s t h i s Iron, a d e a l e r o r a g e n t h e w i l l c h a r g e y o u a b o u t t h a t a m o u n t i n c o m m i s bien. B u y d i r e c t f r o m o n r f a c t o r y a n d s a v e i t . W e ore the . a r g e n t

m a n u l u «-tu r e m of Vehicles and Harness In the world selling: to the consumer exclusively.

WE HA VE NO

AGENTS

W e m a k e 178 s t y l e s o f v e h i c l e s a n d 6 5 B t y i e s o f h a r ness a n d s h i p a n y w h e r e f o r e x a m l n a t i o n , g u a r a n Tin «11—Canopy-top Surrey, hss long-distance t e e i n g safe d e l i v e r y . Y o u t a k e n o riek. as all o u r a l l « , open rubber h e a d s p r i n g s and Bradley quick w o r k I s g u a r a n t e e d a s t o q u a l i t y , s t y l e a n d finish. couriers. Price, complete w i t h curtains, storm apron. Y o u h a v e the a d v a n t a g e * the largest Btock i n . t h e c o u n t r y t o s e l e c t f r o m . D o n i b u y a v e h i c l e W ,un .bade and fia. lJnp.»135. A . good as otberssell o r h a r n e s s o f a n y k i n d u n t i l y o u g e t a f r e e c o p y P . for »50 more than our pnce, of o u r largì I l l u s t r a t e d c a t a l o g u e . No. 77—Single Surrey Harness. Prlce,»17.60.Equal to those selling for 910 more.

à

Elkhart Carriage and Harness Mfg. Co.,

S I M P L E X L A U N C H ENGINES

Cut the Cost of a Carriage *1

§ t

a

b y b u y i n g it o f tho m a k e r s . P a y only o n e , i n s t e a d o f t w o or three profits. N o o t h e r factory can build finer, handsomer or more s u b s t a n t i a l vehicles than t h o s e w h i c h we I X o . 2 0 n — Canopy Top S u r r e y s h i p d i r e c t to P r i c e , »89.75. buyers—instead of s e l l i n g t h r o u g h d e a l e r s . O u r g r e a t f a c i l i ties a n d l o n g e x p e r i e n c e e n a b l e u s to s e c u r e the highest quality of m a t e r i a l a n d workm a n s h i p at tho l o w e s t cost.

B u r n N a p h t h a or G a s o l i n e . E x c e l in Safety, Simplicity and D e s i g n . Most Reliable M o t o r s f o r Small Routs.

F A I R B A N K S , MORSE & C O . ,

Chicago, St. l.oiil*. S t . P a u l . L o u i s v i l l e . Cleveland, Denver, < i h i i h h il 11. San Francisco, P o r t l a n d , Ore.

A l l trie l a r g e s t and fastest tías -propelled yachts on the Great Lakes are equipped with

W e m a k e h a r n e s s as w e l l a s c a r r i a g e s , a n d s e l l g r e a t q u a n t i t i e s o f robes, b l a n k e t s , a n d all h o r s e a c c e s s o r i e s — a l l a t p r i c e s t h a t w i l l save y o u dollars. T h e purchaser m a y return a n y t h i n g w i t h w h i c h he is n o t satisfied, a n d get h i s m o n e y b a c k . ,

iiiïot ©äs um ©im us S i N T z G a s Engine Godfrey Avenue

Our complete catalogue—free o n request —plainly pictures a n d fully describes our entire line. W r i t e for it.

THE C O L U M B U S CARRIAGE & HARNESS C O M P A N Y , C O L U M B U S . OHIO.

1

1

l\

W E M A K E T H E M AND S E L L DIRECT TO YOU AT LESS THAN W H O L E S A L E P R I C E S - • » F u l l line of Buggies, Carriages, Canopy Top and Extension Top Surreys, Open Stick Seat Surreys, Phaetons, Traps, Driving Wagons, Concords, Spring Wagons and all kinds of single and double harness. E v e r y articSe guaranteed. Shipped anywhere subject to buyer's approval. If not satisfactory, return at our expense. W e save y o u $25 to $75, according t o the job. Get our free catalogue before buying. . c

Ri

oC

Co.

Grand Rapids.Mich.

¡

Have a Carriage, Sir?

KALAMAZOO

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4

72

ÍAI


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

BAUSCH & LOMB-ZEISS

STEREO BINOCULAR Differ

from

all

GLASSES.

others.

L e n s e s are

farther

T h i s gives

Stereoscopic Effect.

T h e

apart

than

ordinary stereoscope

photograph

stand

out

the

makes

eyes.

objects

in

a

in relief.

Stereoscopic Effect i n Distant o b j e c t s s t a n d o u t ,

these

Glasses

lifelike a n d

makes

plainly.

SMALLER—LIGHTER— MORE

POWERFUL.

IMMENSE Booklet S O L D

Catalog

B Y

FIELD

OF

VIEW.

Free

A L L

D E A L E R S .

of Photo or Microscopic Goods on Chemicals of all Kinds.

Application,

B A U S C H & LOMB OPTICAL CO., N E W

Y O R K .

R O C H E S T E R , N . Y .

CHICAGO.

G L O B E GASOLINE ENGINES, ..

F 0 R M A R I N E - " « > 5 T A T I Q r l A R Y

S E R V I C E .

L A U N C H E S , Y A C H T S a m d W O R K I N G B O A T S ALSO FOR S U P P L Y I N G AUXILIARY POWER FOR SAILING CRAFT*.

A l w a V s

R e a d y '

N o ExpeKse

F o r

E x c e p t When

mention McClure's

In

| y g £

I NewYtirk 0 FFice 6zi Buoadway B Ü Please

Instant

w h e n y o u write to 73

S e r v i c e ,

Operat'ON,

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advertisers.

InformatiomI


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

The firmness and the ease

The give and the take

^ You CAN break it, but not by ordinary causes

The most unbreakable corset material

"FLEXIBONE" THE FLEXIBONE MOULDED CORSET ;nds free but holds moulded formation always Has —by

a n elasticity with a strength a n d shape-holding- quality c o m b i n e d w h i c h it tits i n a n e a s y w a y y e t l a s t i n g l y m o d e l s t h e figure.

NOWHERE ABOUT IT, IS RUST A THINC POSSIBLE It is o f greater assistance than a n y other corset made, i n p r e s e r v i n g b e a u t y o f s h a p e w i t h c o n t i n u e d w e a r b y t h e figure fitted. W h e n p r o p e r l y fitted w i t h a " F l e x i b o n e M o u l d e d " y o u r corset w o r r y will be over.

PRICE $ 1 . 5 0 AT DEALERS Uoi-l.inai.hli.p a n d fallile noticeably wupprlor. . . «

T h e best c l a s s of s t o r e s a r e w h e r e t h e y ' r e found ; i n the ones that do m e r c h a n d i s i n g with integrity and intelligence

Scut, i nitty and tfa •• r o u g h In rliii-h. . . .

T H E I i U C K E R O L L E D C I G A R H a s b y its u n d e n i a b l e m e r i t w o n a n e n v i a b l e p o s i t i o n i n t h e regard of the A m e r i c a n smoker. M a d e o f tender y o u n g leaves of t h e m o s t d e l i c a t e P o r t o R i c a n g r o w t h , t h e y h a v e a flavor e q u a l i to a n y i m p o r t e d c i g a r o n t h e m a r k e t , and at one=fourth the] cost. T h e y s u p p l y w h a t h a s l o n g b e e n s o u g h t f o r ; a l u x u r i o u s ! s a t i s f y i n g s m o k e at a n e c o n o m i c a l p r i c e . It's l i k e s a v i n g money t o s m o k e t h e L u c k e c i g a r s ; b u t it's the q u a l i t y , n o t t h e price, t h a t r e c o m m e n d s t h e m . n V U A l l T h e L u c k e R o l l e d i ï i t u r . I — A 50, p r e p a i d to a n v a d O T IVI A l l — dress i n the the U U nn ii t e d States, for «" 1 . S 6 , or 100 t u c k e H o l l s iress m (the s m a l l e d i t i o n ) for $ 1 . 0 0 . S a t i s f a ction g u a r a n t e e d your money back.

J. H. LUCKE & CO,, Lucke Block, CINCINNATI, OHIO.

H A S

T

H

E F L A V O R Please mention

O

FA

P E R F E C T O

M c C I u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers. 74


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

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An offer made by one of the corset conceros In the United

/ /

largest States.

T h e Coronet Corset C o m p a n y ' s p l a n t / is the most i m p r o v e d a n d complete i n " existence. It turns o u t the finest a n d richest class o f goods made i n the w o r l d . N o w h e r e else except i n P a r i s . F r a n c e , are goods m a d e o f equal high-class. W e are t h r o w i n g o p e n o u r entire department o f Special O r d e r s f o rthe benefit o f allwomen w h o are particular about their c o r s e t s a n d — a t Factory Prices—will make u p f o measure a n Advertising Special build of t h e m a t c h l e s s

F i è x i b o n e

M o u l d e d

C

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Nearby

MILES

FROM

J U M M E R

Resorts

CM I C A C O SO

100 IOO I O S

t

1 / 6

s o l d b y d e a l e r s a t S i . 5 0 t o $ 5 . 0 0 f t h e l a t t e r figure w h e n made to order). O u r Department of Special Orders h a s o p e r a t e d f o r y e a r s i n fitting s p e c i a l s h a p e s a t special prices f o r dealers under this same system o f measurement. M e a s u r i n g f o ra Corset is simple ;the difficulty i s to m a k e u p a corset a n d to m o u l d i ti n its s i n e w s a n d s t a y s a c c o r d i n g t o t h e i n d i v i d u a l measures as taken.

1 4 5 1 6 6 1 9 4 3 7 9 3 8 4

SEE NUMBERS IN CUT ABOVE.

4O0

I Bust Measure ; 2 Waist Measure ; 3 H i p Measure ; 4 U n d e r A r m to waist line; 5 From waist line to bottom line o f present corset ; o r h i g h e r or l o w e r than same, i f desired. T h i s corset w i l l b e m a d e a n d f o r w a r d e d to y o u upon the receipt o f $1.00. S h o u l d y o u require a size i n w a i s t m e a s u r e a b o v e 30. o r a b l a c k l i n e d c o r s e t , a d d 25 c e n t s t o y o u r r e m i t t a n c e . W e protect y o u absolutely, a n d g u a r a n t e e c o m p l e t e pleased satisfact i o n b y a s e c o n d fitting i f n e c e s s a r y . W e m a k e this r e m a r k a b l e offer f o r a p u r p o s e —not for y o u r d o l l a r — w e d o it to b r i n g t h e F l e x i b o n e r i g h t h o m e to y o u i n a m o r e direct w a y than a n y o r d i n a r y advertising could doand toshow you w h y a Flexibone at $1.50 is w o r t h t h r e e o f a n y o r d i n a r y $ i corset sold i n stores.

4 3 S 4 7 7

II Is t h e c h a n c e o f y o u r l i f e - t i m e t o get a c o r s e t t h a t i s a fitted, m o u l d e d e x q u i s i t e g a r m e n t — a i cost t o m a k e . Only one made for a n y one person. Future orders a n d inquiries w i l l all be referred to dealers. R i g h t n o w a n d d i r e c t f r o m f a c t o r y Is t h e o n l y Way you can obtain a Flexibone Advertising SpeC i a f , - m a d e a n d m o u l d e d t o o r d e r — f o r $1. A d d r e s s

F o x L ake D c /«a L a ud( fid ¿i /e W<? uA es h a Gconomowoc Elkhart hake X^Aactison K.11 bourn Marquette M in oc Qu a Sfar hake M in netonAa Spirit Lake

<SH /ULAJVIJ

i CORONET CORSET CO.,Box E.Jackson.Mich.

T/fArr/c Manage*

<JÍO H. JltAFFOiiO <j£h£xal

fí*sscNG£fí

Acent.

C H I C A G O M I L W A U K E E f ST. P A U L R Y C M I C A O O IUI-. Please mention M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers. 75


McCLURE'S Dairying

o n

MAGAZINE.

B u s i n e s s

P r i n c i p l e s

means that o n l y the best m i l c h c o w s shall be kept, a n d that they shall get the k i n d o f food that w i l l produce all the rich m i l k it is possible to produce.

SM ALLEY'S FAMILY OF FEED SA VERS should be a part o f every w e l l - e q u i p p e d dairy. S e n d f o r free i l l u s t r a t e d b o o k l e t , " F a r m i n g on Business P r i n c i p l e s . "

.S»f t i l l

MOVING PICTURE

1 VI G r ,

BUILT for SERVICE

MACHINES

^

VVe S k i p D i r e c t to t h e consumer A t Itowett Wholesale Prices the most reliable line of i v e h i c l e s . e t c . t o be f o u n d a n y J where. B u i l t substantially of Ihonest material—workman' s h i p t h e best—one o f them ' ' w i l l outlast t w o of the ordinftry k i.... n d -- i i u a r a n t p e d a s r e p r e s e n t e d o r y o u r m o n e y b a c k . W e will ship C.O.D.with privilege o fexamination. Y o u r i s k n o t h i n g . R e l i a b l e T o p B u g g y , # 8 4 . 0 0 ; fine s p r i n g Wagon,$8tf.OO; strongtwo noise F a r m Wagon.#44.00; h a n d s o m e Surrey. # 5 4 . 0 0 ; w e l l made P o r t l a n d Cutter. $ 1 7 . 2 5 ; Carts. #i».50 up. Single harness $ 4 . 5 0 ; F a r m h a r n e s s . * 1 "i. !•.">. S e n d f o r f r e e i I l u s t r a t e d c a t a l o g u e . " C A S H B U Y E R S ' U N I O N , 158 W . V a n B u r e o S t . , B - 1 6 4 , C b i c a g o

C T F R P i l P T I P i l K K Y o u Can Make B I G M O N E Y O I C n L U r H U U I I O Entertaining the P u b l i c N o t h i n g affords better o p p o r t u n i ­ ties for m e a w i t h s m a l l c a p i t a l . W e start you,f u r n i s h i n g complete outfits a n d e x p l i c i t i n s t r u c t i o n s at a s u r p r i s i n g l y l o w cost.

I

Xlanitoteoc, Wis.

CO.

T H E FIELD IS L A R G E

ising the regular theatre ( ca on md p rlecture c i r c u i t , also local fields i n C h u r c h e s , P u b l i c Schools Lodges a n d General Pubi i Gatherings. O u r Entertainment S u p p l y C a t a l o g u e a n d special offer f u l l y e x p l a i n s e v e r y t h i n g , S e n t F r e e * C H I C A G O P R O J E C T I N G C O . , 2 2 5 Dearborn St., Dept. Y , C h i c a g o c

burrhll

engine

T H E

E n c l o s e

Before Buying

5

C e n t s

1 9 0 0 T Y P E U S E S G A S OR G A S O L I N E . Compact. Simple. Reliable and Artistic. Built in Quantities. Parts Interchangeable. Material a n d Workmanship the Best. Ac. H . P . Weight. T i m e Price. Spot Cash. 15a 600 »140.00 »185.0« 8 900 16O.00 145.00 All E n g i n e s G u a r a n t e e d . Sole Makers. 8 K I L L I N " A-R I C H A R D S M F G . CO., 3 4 5 S. J e f f e r s o n S t . , C h i c a g o , I l l s .

in

stamps to pay postage on 208-page Illustrated Cata­ logue of Custom Made

a New

Oak-Tanned Leather Harness, direct to the consumer from the manufacturer, at wholesale prices. W e can save you money. 1 2 0

y e a r s '

YOU

D

O V

N I

1

T

/

/

%

m

HalJ

Í15

and up to a day made by A G E N T S taking orders for Custom Tailor Made

U M |

Suits

from $»10

up.

H a n s e n T a í l o r í n g

CAN EASILY

Hook w i t h "40 samples free. 1626 N . C l a r k S t . , o . C hicago.

C

EARN

bicycles, sewing machines, house f u r n i s h i n g s , ladies' or gentlemen s watches, cameras, m a n d o l i n s , guitars, violins, Bilverware, d i n n e r sets, guns, a n d y o u r choice of a h u n d r e d other articles, a l l g u a r a n t e e d . S i m p l y introduce a f e w boxes of o u r u n e x c e l l e d toilet soaps and a n y of them are yours. Send no money. We t r u s t y o u . G i r l s a n d boys do as w e l l as older people. W r i t e at once for f u l l i n f o r m a t i o n . We m a i l handsome i l l u s t r a t e d catalog free. Address Ci r e a t N o r t h e r n S o a p W o r k * . 6 4 L.ikoSt.« O a t P a r k , III.

T A K F m

a

t o measure.

211 Church St., Owego, N . Y .

\

,

e x p e r i e n c e .

The K I N G H A R N E S S CO., Mfrs.

H IS M GRADE

6

m

T I M F

R

E

A

D

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H

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advertisement

J

— — * * * M l V M M d u n l e s s Y o u or Your Friends Have a Vegetable Garden o r a Lawn. If y o u h a v e a v e g e t a b l e g a r d e n , n o m a t t e r h o w s m a l l , w e c a n m a k e i t e a s v t o c a r e for, a n d a s o u r c e o f p l e a s u r e a n d profit W e U n a t h a t n o t o n e t o w n - d w e l l e r o r v i l l a g e r i n t e n . w h o lias a f a m i l y vegetable g a r d e n , k n o w s t h e f u l l v a l u e o f the " f l a u e t J r . " t o o l s . E v e r y large f a m i l y g a r d e n i m p e r a t i v e l y needs t h e services o f t h e " P l a n e t J r . " N o . 2 5 S e e d e r a n d C u l t i v a t o r . E x a m i n e the*cut. T h e The small f a m i l y vegetable garden requires the [ N o 8 5 w i l l sow- a l l y o u r g a r d e n s e e d s " P l a n e t J r . " N o . 1 6 , S i n g l e W h e e l H o c . ^exactly right, either i n hills o r drills. It W o r k i n g i t is a delight. It hoes, plows, r a k e s opens, sows, covers, r o l l s a m i m a r k s the a n d c u l t i v a t e s w i t h the greatest ease; a l l w i t h - ' n e x t r o w . T h e n a s a h o e , p l o w a n d i n t h e e a s y s t r e n g t h o f â m a n , w o m a n <fcá> cultivator, i t makes easy a l l work o f or a boy, a n d i t w i l l cost y o u o n l y . . s P O the g a r d e n f r o m s p r i n g All of ourimplements are made of the v e n till fall. P r i c e o n l y best m a t e r i a l a n d a r e f u l l y w a r r a n t e d . E i t h e r o f t h e s e w i l l be s e n t p r o m p t l y o n r e c e i p t o f p r i c e , o r t h e y » " be o b t a i n e d f r o m y o u r dealer, o r w r i t e f o r f u l l d e s c r i p t i v e catalogne. A n y advice y o u m a y want we will gladlv give to the best o f o u r a b i l i t y .

$14

N°16

S. L . A L L E N & CO., Box

711-F,

K D *

j r ^

P H I L A D E L P H I A , P A .

Please

mention

M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e t o advertisers.

76


McCLURE'S

T H E

MAGAZINE.

M O N T A U K Ì The

cAlvuays Strictly High Grade.

h e

Price, $15 to $150.

G.

GENNERT,

difference beb

d i

Itween . fMcO' N ? T^ A U. ,î; K

22 E a s t 1 3 t h S t r e e t , N e w Y o r k .

CAMERAS and others is very m u c h as the difference between factory-made clothing and the product of the justly celebrated tailor. The latter, like the Montauk Camera, has quality, style, goodness and individuality. It looks different and is different from the factory-made product. Send for our 1900 Catalogue, also Valuable Pamphlet on Hauff''s Developers, Metol, Oriol, Adurol.

P

The Greatest Photographic Offer Ever Made. 3

W

NEHRING'S

e

E n l a r g e

^ C O N V E R T I B L E AMPLISCOPES PUT

1 1 I 1 1

U P IN A N E A T C A S E

CONTAINING

Copying anil Enlarging Lens, Portrait Leus, Wide Angle I.ens, Tele Photo J,ens. Orthocliromatic Kay Screen. These lenses can be used with any camera made, fitted mit h a rectilinear or an anastigmat lens.

Price per set, containing the above lenses, 4 x 5—$5-00 ; 5x7 $6.00. 1 he above lenses can be had singly at $2.00 each in the 4 x 5 size, and $2.25 each in the 5x7 size. U. N E H R I N Q , Dept. H , 16 East 42a St., N . Y .

P h o t o g r a p h s Most amateur photographers have many negatives stored away that would make pretty enlargements. Possibly you did not know that beautiful wall pictures can be made from these small negatives. Pick out one of the best, send it to us with $i, and we will make a beautiful enlargement, mounted on 16 x 20 dark bevel edge card, and express it prepaid. Smaller sizes from 35c. Write to-day for full information concerning sizes, prices, styles and catalogue of Cameras, Photographic Supplies and Monogram Stationery. FRANKLIN PRINTING AND ENGRAVING CO., 302-306 Superior Street, Toledo, Ohio.

Produci of 1900

SUNART VICI MAGAZINE CAMERAS Size 4 x 5 , $8.00.

At one loading 12 Plates or 24 Tilms

IMPROVED PNEUMATIC SHUTTER. Àsk your dealer to show the latest Magazine Camera and Automatic Tripod.

LENS.

EVERY CAMERA

ACHROMATIC

GUARANTEED

Folding and Cycle Cameras from $5.00 to $50.00. Catalogue free SUNART PHOTO CO., Rochester, N. Y., U. S. A., No. 21 Aqueduct St.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 77


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

If it isn't an Eastman it isn't a Kodak. Picture T a k i n g w i t h

The Folding Pocket Kodak m e a n s a full r e a l i z a t i o n o f the c h a r m s o f p h o t o g r a p h y w i t h o u t the d r a w b a c k s of b u r d e n s o m e a p p a r a t u s , w i t h o u t b u l k y plate h o l d e r s o r h e a v y , fragile glass plates. T h e F o l d i n g P o c k e t K o d a k s h a v e the finest m e n i s c u s a c h r o m a t i c l e n s e s , o u r automatic r o t a r y s h u t t e r s , sets o f t h r e e stops a n d accurate view finders. T h e y a r e , i n s h o r t , e q u i p p e d f o r the finest p h o t o ­ g r a p h i c w o r k , a n d l i k e a l l K o d a k s t h e y u s e o u r film c a r t r i d g e s a n d

Load i n Daylight. $10.00 12.CO 15.00

Folding Pocket Kodak No. 1, for pictures 2>4 x 3)4 inches, Folding Pocket Kodak No. 1 A, for pictures 2Yz x 4!4 inches. Folding Pocket Kodak No. 2, for pictures 3)4 x 3'4 inches,

K o d a k s $5.00 to $35.00. EASTMAN

KODAK

Catalogues free at the dealers or by mail. Please

CO. Rochester, N . Y.

mention M c C l u r e ' s when yon write to advertisers. 73


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

"It works of itself."

" It is time wasted to make a good negative and lose it a l l i n a poor print."

Aristo Self-Toning

AMERICAN ARISTO PAPERS

P A P E R is equal i n permanency to o u r celebrated Aristo=Platino. No bothersome developers or uncertain toners ; no fading. Sold by piloto stock dealers everywhere,

produce the full value of the negative, are fadeless and reliable. That's why they are used the world over b y leading professional photographers. A l l p h o t o g r a p h e r s of r e p u t a t i o n a n d s k i l l w i l l finish y o u r w o r k o n A m e r i c a n Aristo products without the asking— O t h e r s w i l l i f y o u i n s i s t u p o n it. TRADE MARK

Aristo Platino lor Matt Surface Effects. Aristo Self Toning tor Glossy Surface.

This trade-mark appears on every package ol genuine American Arista Paper.

AMERICAN ARISTOTYPE C O . J A M E S T O W N , N. Y .

The Lovell L J l €\4rCk

¿ lClLw are

using

*

st

n

e

coming

Photographic plate. If y o u it y o u are using

the best. If not, try it and you

Just a Few Seconds

w i l l become a constant user.

The Lovell D r y Plate is

exposure to gas or lamp light and a few more seconds for development makes a

guaranteed and p r o v e d to be as fast as any and more rapid than most. C o m p a r e the prices of all standard plates and note the saving i n using The Lovell. Shipped promptly i n S u m m e r as well as i n W i n t e r — n o delay. A l l dealers sell them.

VELOX Print.

Exquisitely soft matte effects.

NEPERA CHEMICAL CO.

O n receipt o f 15 cents w e w i l l s e n d a s a m p l e package, carriage p a i d , 4 x 5 o n l y , i f y o u m e n t i o n t h i s magazine. O u r b o o k l e t , " S u n M a g i c , " free.

D i v i s i o n of the G e n e r a l Aristo C o . N

For sale by

THE LOVELL DRY PLATE MFG. COMPANY

all dealers,

(Ç^S&S^t

e

P

e

r

a

P

a

r

k

'

N . Y«

New Rochelle, N. Y.

4 x 5 WENO $ HAWK=EYE

goo

U s e s Daylight L o a d i n g F i l m and i s fitted with fixed focus M e n i s c u s lens of superior quality, an adjustable speed rotary shutter, set of three stops, view finders and tripod sockets for both vertical and horizontal exposures. H a s nickeled fittings and fine morocco grain c o v e r i n g . Perfect in design, w o r k m a n s h i p and finish and is positively the most convenient 4 x 5 camera made. A l l dealers s e l l i t . Hawk-Eye

catalogue

free

by mail.

BLAIR CAMERA CO. Rochester,

Formerly of Boston. Please mention o u write Please mention M M cc C C ll uu rr ee '' ss w w hh ee nn yyou write to to advertisers. advertisers. 79 "9

N . Y.


McCLURE'S

Cruder' Binoculari

MAGNIFY

3 to |2 diameters prices from $4450ro*72.s°

rL__L

MAGAZINE.

Magnify at equal size 8 to 10 times more than o l d style glasses and at equal magnification show 8 to 10 times larger field. Unexcelled for R a c i n g , H u n t i n g , Field, Yachting and Military purposes ; also for Theater use.

1

Mm

mm Risasi,

HEAD OFFICES: B E R L I N - F R I E D E N A U , * B R A N C H E S : 2 2 R u e de l'Entrepôt. PARIS. 4 - 5 H o l b o r n - C i r c u s , L O N D O N , EC.

Tbe names C. P . Goerz and Criéder-BInocle tve on every glass. Illustrated descriptive price list free on application to any dealer In optical goods, or direct to

C. P. Goerz Optical Works : 5 2 E. Untoli Sr^a.-e. N. Ï .

It's easy t o load a n Adlake Plateholder.

In the Light of Experience

The Fascination of ADLAKE PHOTOGRAPHY is e n h a n c e d b y t h e ease w i t h w h i c h A d l a k e P l a t e h o l d e r s m a y be h a n d l e d a n d w h i c h g i v e s to A d l a k e C a m e r a s a d i s tinctive value over all other makes. Twelve Adlake Plateholders loaded, o c c u p y but a f r a c t i o n of a n i n c h m o r e t h a n 12 g l a s s p l a t e s . E a c h is a s e p a r a t e thin metal portfolio w h i c h shuts like a watch case—light-tight, dust proof. Buy A d l a k e s of y o u r d e a l e r if y o u c a n , if n o t , s e n d t o u s .

T r a v e l e r s use R a y C a m e r a s b e c a u s e they are reliable, c o m p a c t a n d s i m p l e . T h e y are never out of order. T h e i r m o d e r a t e p r i c e puts them w i t h i n the reach of a l l . T h e y use E u r o p e a n sizes of plates as w e l l as A m e r i c a n . Before deciding your purchase, send for our new catalogue fully describing our many styles.

Adlake C a m e r a s , $ 8 . 0 0 to $13.50 S e n d for new A d l a k e B o o k l e t

Price, $2.50 and up.

T H E A D A M S & W E S T L A K E CO., 118 O n t a r i o S t . , C h i c a g o .

Our " 1900 " Catalogue is now ready. i T h e R A Y C A M E R A CO.,

42 Capron St.. Rochester, N.V,

FIVE CAMERAS IN ONE Do

not

buy

a

Camera

examined

until

you

FOR THE PRICE OF ONE have

the

"AL-VISTA" PANORAMIC CAMERAS. W i t h the patent l o n g a n d short negative attachment you can take a 4 x 4, 4 x 6, 4 x 8, 4 x 10 a n d 8 4 x 1 2 tnch picture, as desired. Consequently vou have five cameras i n one. A n d t h e " A L - V I S T A " is made for time and snap-shot w o r k , too. Uses the ordinary 4 x 5 d a y l i g h t l o a d i n g film o n spools. D r o p u s a postal a n d get o u r 190O catalogue.

M U L T I S C O P E & F I L M C O . , Burlington, Wis. Please mention M c C C lî uurree''ss w h e n you y o u write to advertisers.

So 80


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

1900 Vives

T h e m o s t Beautifully Finished, Practical a n d Reliable C a m e r a s sold this year. T h e superiority of

Vive Lenses gives them

the

LEAD EVERYWHERE Daylight Loading a n d Mechan= ical F i x e d F o c u s a n d Focusing Cameras

$ 5 2 ° to

$1522

Mahogany Folding Cameras

$1022 to

$7022

Y o u w i l l regret b u y i n g any camera without first carefully e x a m i n i n g our elerant 1 9 0 0 Art Catalogue and Illustrated Brochure F R . L E . Embossed mounted photo 5c extra.

VIVE CAMERA COMPANY Manufacturers, N. W. Cor. State and Washington Sts. TAKEN

•|

WITH

A

S5.00

Regent House, Regent St. W, LONDON.

VI V e

W e are S e l l i n g

At Our

New

Store

(Cycle and Folding)

than yours

ASCOT CAMERAS

Folding Magazine Camera.

Our Catalogue

at

SeriesB.

Prices u n t i l S t o c k is e x h a u s t e d CAMERAS OF A L L KINDS

BUCKEYES PREIYÌOS

•S

KODAKS CYCLONES

and a c o m p l e t e stock of

PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES Catalogue

F(cee.

E, & H . T . A N T H O N Y & C O . 1 2 2 - 1 2 4 F i f t h Ave., New York 45-W-40 E . R a n d o l p h S t . ,

EIGHTEEN 4x5 àlass pi A i e s cvt one l o a d i n g W e are f r e q u e n t v t M d r h a t ' o i n - Series lì, $10.00 M a g a z i n e C a m e r a is e n t i r e l y too fine for the m o n e y . It is a superb i n s t r u m e n t , ' beautiful Ln d e s i g n a n d finishM a h o g a n y front, s p e c i a l adjustable L e n s a n d s p e c i a l Shutter. T h e M a g a z i n e Av,i£k^..with-the speed a n d a c c u r a c y o f a r e p e a t i n g ríríe. - T h e tvvo-point d e s c r i p tive F i x e d F o c u s Scale .is a ijevy a n d - v a l u a b l e feature o f t l i i s C a m e r a m a k i n g it; as s i m p l e to m a n i p u l a t e . a s a F i x e d locus C a m e r a without'-s'iiffering aiijf o f its

l i m i t a t i o n s . Catalogue No.3 free. Magazine Camera* from $10.00 to $40.00. T H E BULLARO CO., Springfield, Mass.

Chicago.

mention rPlease iease m ention M M ec C ll uu rr ee ' s

when y o u write to advertisers. 81


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE

It 's a l l i n t h e L e n s "

Three Minutes

T h e most popular Camera of the day is the

LONG FOCUS KORONA S E R I E S VI.

During the past few months the orders for this Camera have increased greatly. It appeals to both the amateur and skilled photographer, and is worthy of ex­ amination by all who care for this most interesting art. It has a Double=Siiding Front Convertible Lens Among It has Double Swing Back Its Rack and Pinion Advantages The Back is Quickly Reversible Korona Shutter Time, Bulb and Instantaneous Exposure Write for Catalogue and full particulars. G U N D L A C H O P T I C A L CO., Rochester, N . Y. "Not

Only r e q u i r e d to take, develop, a n d finish the above picture w i t h the

in the

Trust"

Chase BOX Magazine Camera

NODARK CAMERA Size of c a m e r a , 3% i n . wide, 4 % i n . h i g h , 12 i n . l o n g . Size of pictures, 1% i n . x 3% in.

W i t h this camera the entire tedious a n d dif­ ficult science of photography is reduced to such simplicity that any child can use it.

NO

DARK

BOOM.

No Costly Chemicals. No Printing Frames. No Blurs or Hazy Results. T h e process is so perfect t h a t e v e r y plate comes o u t right. T h e r e is no secret about t h e N o d a r k C a m e r a — s i m p l y a n e w d r y - p l a t e t i n t y p e is used instead of glass plates or films. E v e r y N o d a r k C a m e r a is c o m p l e t e a n d

perfect. Also includes 2 6 plates, 1 developing chamber, 2 bottles of solution, and instructions how to operate and make t h e pictures.

Price $6.00. B u y from y o u r dealer.

us.

If he won't s u p p l y y o u , write

Free, booklet sent on request* Send for FREE

POPULAR

PHOTOGRAPH

COMPANY,

Catalogue.

K O Z Y C A M E R A CO.,

114 and 116 Bleecker Street, New Y o r k .

24 W a r r e n Street, Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to advertisers

82

BOSTON,

MASS.,

U.S.A.


McCLURE'S

I

A L L

MAGAZINE.

W H O

Examine

The

PO

M a g a z i n e

C y c l o n e

C a m e r a

are a m a z e d at its s i m p l i c i t y a n d the b e a u t y o f Its p i c t u r e s . z¿ T h e finest p i c t u r e s c a n c o m e o n l y f r o m g l a s s p l a t e s . J G l a s s plates u s e d a n d c a r r i e d a s e a s i l y a s a r o l l o f f i l m , y but w i t h better r e s u l t s , i s w h a t the C y c l o n e d o e s . It's «ä o u r i d e a l , a n d w i l l be y o u r s i f y o u I n v e s t i g a t e its m e r i t s . §

Price,

$ 6

to

S . n d for fine i l l u s t r a t e d C a t a l o e u e , m a i l e d o n r e q u e s t .

I

WESTERN C A M E R A M F G . CO., 142 Wabash A v e . , Chicago, 111.

KID G L O V E S C E N T E M E R I

P

&

AMERICANS

D E M A N D

T H E BEST.

The P o c o has a l l a d j u s t m e n t s f o r h a n d o r t r i p o d w o r k . F i t t e d with Rochester S y m m e t r i c a l L e n s a n d U n i c u m Shutter. A H S i z e s o f F o r e i g n - M a d e P l a t e s c a n he u s e d i n the P o c o , b y m e a n s of interchangeable holders. flew Illustrated Catalogue P r î r p $ 5 anrf n n w A r r l c mailed on application. rfice, a n a upwaras. Rochester Camera & Supply Co. 42 South St., Rochester, N . V .

$ 1 0 .

&

C O

" C E J i T E M E R I " are the best. S o l d i n p r i n c i p a l cities. Catalogues free.

C O . ,

PI I

Broadway, N . Y .

i H O T O G R A P H E R S U T

" "

H A N D L E S ON Y O U R

A

.

S E N D S I Z E OF P L A T E

mL'Ziïtr

PLATES

Uses Both Glass Plates and Daylight Loading Film. T l i e P r e m o ts t h e i d e a l c a m e r a f o r t o u r i s t s . M a n y s t y l e s of P r e m o C a m e r a s h a v e l o n g b e l l o w s e x t e n s i o n , enabling- objects at ? g r e a t distance t o b e p h o t o g r a p h e d f u l l of d e t a i l . T r a v e l e r s o a t h e C o n t i n e n t are d e l i g h t e d to find that P r o m o C a m e r a s c a n be fitted w i t h h o l d e r s , i n w h i c h the o d d E u r o p e a n s i z e d p l a t e s c a n be u s e d . Send for catalogue. Price,

$10.00 and

Upwards.

ROCHESTER OPTICAL C O . , 42 South St., Rochester, N . Y .

P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to a d v e r t i s e r s . 83


McCLURE'S Loans,

IIKil.es

x4

MAGAZINE.

Kxpo-

sures, a n d u n l o a d s i:i 17

seconds.

THE DAYLIGHT ..LOADING

CAMERAS

T l i e o n l y o n e i n t h e w o r l d t h a t l o a d s 12 g l a s s p l a t e s i n d a y l i g h t . Loads 12 t o 3 6 A l m s i n d a y l i g h t an.I p e r m i t s t h e vt m o v a l o f a n y e x p o s u r e a t w i l l . I t c a n a l s o b e u s e d as a n o r d i n a r y m a g a z i n e c a m e r a , w i t h a n y m a k e o f p l a t e s . NO

D A R K

BOOM

OR R E L O A D I N G A P P A R A T U S

REQUIRED.

I n f a c t , i t s i m p l y s e p a r a t e s t h e d r u g g e r y f r o m t h e f a s c i n a t i n g p a r t of p h o t o g r a p h y . E l e g a n t l y finished i n b l a c k seal g r a i n a n d o x i d i z e d copper, F o r m a k i n g 3% x 4% p h o t o s « 8 . 0 0 . F o r 4 x 5 s i z e $ 1 0 . 0 0 O u r I n t e r c h a n g e a b l e M a g a z i n e fits a l l f o l d i n g c a m e r a s , t r a n s f o r m i n g t h e m into Magazine Cameras loading i n daylight. P r i c e SG.00.

Afiiromatic

Here's

BENNETT D. STRAIGHT & CO., Mfrs.,

Lens.

What Y o u ' r e

e x p l a i n

Bid ., 6

Chicago

Looking For !

No more t i m e w a s t e d m o r n i n g s h u n t i n g for y o u r s b a v i n e outfit. O u r h a n d y device bears out the o l d s a y i n g :

" A Place for Everything and Everything in its Place."

The Cardinal

Shaving Cabinet of

raado in G o l d e n O a k or Mahogany finish, i s 14 i n . h i g h b y 12 i n . w i d e a n d b a n g o on the wall o r back o f d o o r always ready f o r use B e v e l French Plate M i r r o r i n front as a d r e s s i n g " m i r r o r . door f o r use while shaving,

STORE FIXTURES. If you want something out of the ordinary in store, office or bank fixtures, write us ; let us send you designs. Our designs are original, and we submit them free. We compete with anyone on prices, yet we give you a style, a uniqueness that others cannot furnish. Our designs are now found in many of the largest and finest stores in the country. East and West; yet we give to the small buyer just as careful attention as to the large buyer. Tell us what you want.

Y o u c a n jpet t h o C a b i n e t , n C a t ' * o f W i l l i a m « * S h a v i n g Soap, T o r r e y R a z o r Strop, H a r d R u b b e r S h a v i n g K r i i s h , Porcelain fihovlng Muir, Witch H a z e l Lavender Cologne and a Cake of Magnesia—

The Complete Outfit, $6.50

fe»

C a b i n e t w i t h o u t O u t f i t , $ 4 . 5 0 , Expresó P a i d .

It Saves in Delays Us Cost Many Times Over. C a b i n e t i s m a d e t o k e o p e v e r y t h i n g dust; p r o o f . Think o f i t ! H e r e i s a n e w c o n v e n i e n c e y o u can't a f f o r d t o b e without. R e m i t o r write forfurther particulars to

THE

CARDINAL CABINET CO., ST. LOUIS, M 0 .

fe_ ^

RACINE FIXTURE CO., Racine, Wis. 3 <","<¿ *Z¿ *Z¿ <¿ < ¿ • !

-C

<.

-f- -<-• *z¿--r-»r¿ **•

*\

• s--^

A $25.00 M A U S E R R I F L E F O R O N L Y $10.00 Til E LITTLE

BIO GUN.

Shoots a ball small enough fora squirrel, big enough for a bear. T h e s e are the g e n u i n e s-shot r e p e a t i n g S p a n i s h M a u s e r s c a p t u r e d from the S p a n i s h at S a n t i a g o . Our agent has purchased the entire lot, with m i l l i o n s o f c a r t r i d g e s , at a p r i c e w h i c h enables us to m a k e this low offer. F o r *1© we furnish M a u s e r rifles, In complete serviceable condition, with g r a d u a t i n g (tights a n d cleaning rods. T h es e guns hai e all been cleaned a n d e x a m i n e d at our expense a n d are g u a r a n t e e d . T h e s e are of m o d e r n pattern a n d i m p r o v e m e n t s , w i t h the p o p u l a r s l i d i n g breechb l o c k a c t i o n , automatic s h e l l ejectin g a n d l o a d i n g . M a g a z i n e holds 5 c a r t r i d g e s . W e o w n these guns at the lowest possible figure and we are vfferinc them to the p u b l i c at a price below what the G o v e r n m e n t were a s k i n g . T h e y cannot be o b t a i n e d now from a n y other source T h e g u n s w£ offer are oí tin desirable 7 m i l l i m e t r e a n d 7.65 m i l l i m e t r e c a l i u r e , a n d w e i g h f r o m ? to 8 p o u n d s ; l e n g t h o f b a r r e l , 28 i n c h e s . V m m 11 ni t ion fur" these riñes is made by tue manufacturers i n this c o u n t r y . C o n s e q u e n t l y a s u p p l y o f a m m u n i t i o n c a n a l w a y s be s e c u r e d . W e have a n a l m o s t i n e x h a u s t i b l e stock of capture* a m m u n i t i o n which we s u p p l y at a s t o n i s n i n g low rates. W i t h each g u n we send a s u p p l y o f c a r t r i d g e s . T h e rifle is c o n v e n i e n t l y adapt I i>. I < th large and s m a l l game; the b a l l , b e i n g s m a l l , does not tear s m a l l game; i t goes w i t h such a terrine force (2,400 feet to the second) that it pierces the s k u l l of a bea" " buffalo a n d traverses the entire l e n g t h o f his b o d y . B y the use o f the i m p r o v e d s m o k e l e s s c a r t r i d g e s , is more effective for l a r ? ' game t m the nld ¡w ca" T

1

1

b

SOME THINGS THE MAUSER WILL DO: t A Í 4 & ' A without u s i n g g r a d u a t e d s i g h t s : v o u can shoot point b l a n k 500 v a r d s . It is a j r u e a n d true s h o o t i n g to the h i g h e s t deeTce - at o v a r d s in skilled hands, can h i t a nenn v. T H E P R I C E of these rifles H A S H E R E T O F O R E B E E N $ 3 5 . B U T T O Añ>VESÍTl*E our tiouse w e . w i l l sell a part of our stock FOR, »10, a n i o n receipt o f as e v i d e n c e o f g o o d faith, we w i l l s h i p the rifle b y express, w i t h l o a d e d s m o k e l e s s p o w d e r - b a l l cartridges, ™y for i m m e d i a t e use, a n d trust to y o u r h o n o r to nay trie hiliT-e, <i.so m d e x i r e s s charges, w h e n yon receive i t a',d k n ^ w i t t o ' " a* represented and just what you want. C o u l d a n y t h i n g be more fair? W E W A R R A N T KVEIÎ Y G U N to be s erv i ceab l e a n d i n g c o d c o n d i t i o n a n d h'St as renreserted or money r e f u n d e ! . T h i s is a rare change to get a n e x c e l l e n t rifle at less t h i n o n e - h a l f o r i c e a n d at the same time have a v a l u a b l e «on venir ot* the Sprinl^h war which w i l l increase in value as years roll hv. Y o u can e a s i l v d o u b l e v o u r m n n - v o n t-hese rifles i f v o n want to sell *~iistomers who h i v e p u n Vase' Mauser rifles report that th^v are h i g h l v nleased with their trood l u a l i t i e s . W H \ T A C U S T O M E R S A Y S ; T h e h u r t rlfi ' nurchnaert of you ts all rfffht. It I* a wonderful g u n ; the mo«t nowerful and accurate shooter T ever saw. H a v e shot through 8 « Inches of solid hard blrcn wood and through 2 Inches of lime-tone. T h e M a n s e r is the best a n d most famous rifle i n the w o r l d . It i<= m a k i n g historv at oresent w i t h t h e B o e r s i n Smith Africa- F v e r v sportsman and even souvenir collector wants one o f these rifles. A d d r e s s K I R T L A N D B R O S . Jk C O . , Oept. K- $ » 6 B R O A D W A V * N K W YORKt c

re

1

84


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

It will PAY YOU to INVESTIGATE T H E

POLICIES

OF

T H E

Guaranteed Cash Values Greater than those of any other Company

WE G U A R A N T E E W H A T OTHERS ESTIMATE Postal Card will bring you F u l l

MANN & TOWNSLEY 174

c h a r l e s w.

B R O A D W A Y

N E W

Information

^

Y O R K

townsley

W I L L I A M B. M A N N

General Agents

W A L T E R E . B R O W N , Special Representative Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when you write to advertisers.

85


McCLURE'S

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B U Y

A .

BANNER

Ride in a Riker

G A S

L A M P .

GUARANTEED ~ S E L F OPERATING i \ O N A l l ROADS t% - Í BURNS L O O S E CARBIDE

I

tè* ^<S^' T

\

E X A M I N E IT EX AMU BETÖRE BF.TORE B U Y I N G

'55?

The perfect automobile. THE PLCMEi'ATWOODI MFG. CO O.. NEW YORK

CH1CAÇ)

W H E N NOT K E P T BY DEALERS,\v'ILL BE „. C H A R G E D PREPAID ON R E C E I P T O F P R I C E

JuiaiiiiiiiiniiiiiiBBiiiiiBiiiiiim.

VVINTOA ^

A \ O T O R ^ ~ C A P 11 A G E S

U p h i l l , down dale, rough roads a n d smooth are a l like when y o u Ride in a Riker. E v e r y jolt and jar is absorbed b y a flexible frame. The motor and r u n n i n g gear being attached to this frame, vibration is entirely prevented. The r u n n i n g gear of a

Riker Electric

Vehicle

is constructed upon an entirely new principle. T h e vehicle is under perfect control, i t b e i n g impossible for rut or stone to change the course. A Ride in a Riker is the most c o n v i n c i n g proof of its perfection, speed a n d beauty.

JOYS O F T H E SEASON.

I f y o n w i l l t e l l ns w h e t h e r y o u w a n t a c a r r i a g e f o r p l e a s u r e or a w a g o n f o r b u s i n e s s wo w i l l m a i l y o u a c a t a l o g u e a c c u r a t e l y d e s c r i b i n g t h e m i n p i c t u r e s a n d words.

I he Winton Motor Carriage Co., Cleveland, Ohio. E a s t e r n D e p a r t m e n t , 120 B r o a d w a y , N e w Y o r k .

Please

mention M c C l u r e ' s

w h e n y o u write to

86

advertisers


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

m

The Only Craft that Flies the Stars and Stripes at Paris Exposition. T h i s d i s t i n c t i o n has b e e n a w a r d e d the D O Z I E R L a u n c h . A f t e r careful i n s p e c t i o n a n d due c o n s i d e r a t i o n i t was s e l e c t e d as the o m c i a l l a u n c h o f the U n i t e d States C o m m i s s i o n o f the P a r i s E x p o s i t i o n o n the R i v e r S e i n e , d u r i n g the c o m i n g s u m m e r United otates is p u t t i n g its best foot f o r w a r d , a n d o n l y the best w i l l represent i t . T h e R i v e r S e i n e has been c o n v e r t e d i n t o a ยกrrand c a n a l a n d one craft o f each n a t i o n w i l l be p e r m i t t e d to c a r r y its o w n flag. T h e L O Z I E R L a u n c h w i l l be the o n l y craft o n the S e i n e flying the stars a n d s t r i p e s . T h e r e were reasons for the s e l e c t i o n . A r e l i a b l e p o w e r was the first r e q u i s i t e ; an e n g i n e that was p e r f e c t l y l u b r i c a t e d - one i n w h i c h the c o m b u s t i o n w a s p e r f e c t ; a p o w e r that w o u l d r u n the s a m e i n foul as i n fair w e a t h e r ; one that the m o s t c h a n g e a b l e ' c l i m a t e w o u l d not affect; a n e n g i n e that was as r e l i a b l e as a s t e a m e n g i n e . T h e L O Z I E R E n g i n e , filling a l l these r e q u i r e m e n t s , was selected. T h e n the d o u b l e c o c k p i t " R e v e n u e C u t t e r " also came i n for its share o f g l o r y . R o o m y , s p e e d y , a w o r k o f art, it was a c c e p t e d as the best t h i s c o u n t r y p r o d u c e d . I t i s a c r e a t i o n i n m a r i n e a r c h i t e c t u r e . T h e h o n o r o f the n a t i o n was at s t a k e , a n d the L O Z I E R E n g i n e a n d L a u n c h were selected to protect i t .

M a r i n e Department, L O Z I E R M O T O R C O M P A N Y , 84 Gardner B l o c k , T O L E D O , O H I O . W e h a v e c a t a l o g u e s to s e n d y o u .

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MOTIVE P O W E R SAFETY

is

1

Less tî" * operate.

RELIABILITY.

TTTT T 1 1 J

L

1

- * -'

^ 0

Steam.

guaranteed.

ECONOMY.

SPEED

i s

11

o

n

e

cent per m i l e

to

A d o p t e d by N . Y . F i r e D e p t .

m a y be as g r e a t as d e s i r e d . a

r

e

e

a

s

v

f

o r

t

n

e

' Locomobile. M t . Washington.

REPAIRS

c a n be m a d e b y a n y

NO O B J E C T I O N A B L E

It c l i m b e d

Mechanic.

FEATURES

E n t i r e freedom from Noise, O d o r , and J a r .

r.-nd for Illustrated Catalogîie. Delivery in JO days.

Style K d

« jCocomobilé"

SpitUO.

Company of imerici

11 Broadway, New York. BW \ N C H E S :

7flth St. and Broadway. N . Y . Citv. Arcade, Rmnire Bldp\, 71 Broadway, N . Y . 07-B9 Greenwich St., N . Y . 8 Central Ave., N e - a r k . N . T. Ifl2fl Connecticut Av«*.. Washing-ton, P . C . FOREIGN

REPRFSFN'l

ATIVF^:

American Automobile and Motor Co., L t d 19 Rue Diiret. Paris. H . T. Haisev, 62 Sussex P l . , South Kensington, London

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when

88

you

write to

advertisers.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

WOODS ELECTRIC

ROAD W A G O N T h e lightest, smartest l o o k i n g a n d most graceful A u t o m o b i l e ever built. Is a regular three-quarter size, p i a n o b o x , s i d e b a r b u g g y w i t h 3 2 - i n c h w h e e l s , 6 0 - i n c h b o x a n d 3 6 - i n c h seat ; i ^ - i n c h h a r d r u b b e r t i r e s . W e i g h t c o m p l e t e , 900 p o u n d s . S p e e d , I 12 miles p e r h o u r . M i l e a g e c a p a c i t y o n o n e c h a r g e o f t h e b a t t e r i e s , 25 m i l e s . W i l l c l i m b [ a 12 p e r c e n t , g r a d e . P a i n t e d to s u i t p u r c h a s e r . T r i m m e d i n w h i p c o r d , dark cloth or ' leather, as d e s i r e d . E l e c t r i c lights a n d bell. U n e x c e l l e d f o r r e l i a b i l i t y , ease o f m a n a g e ment and e c o n o m y . N o c o m p l i c a t e d m a c h i n e r y , noise o r jar. A l w a y s ready for immediate service. P R O M P T D E L I V E R Y . O n request we w i l l send o u r illustrated Catalogue i n colors showing; m a n y designs of W o o d s C a r r i a g e s — a l l manufactured bv o u r o w n s k i l l e d w o r k m e n under one roof. W e equip Private or P u b l i c Stables completely.

WOODS

VEHICLE

NEW Y O R K , 44th St. and Vanderbilt A v e .

GI\irfc

CW T T

rllMLl U U I

a

a

D

O

U

COMPANY C H I C A G O , 545=549 W a b a s h Avenue

t

" E l e c t r i c A u t o m o b i l e s , their d a i c , construction a n d operation, in book p u b l i s h e d b y H e r b e r t s . Stone & C o . , C h i c a g o . $ 1 . 2 5 .

a

Automobiles for

Pleasure Price, $1,500—No Discounts.

THE H A Y N E S

Gasoline System

A P P E R S O N CO.

KOKOMO, IND., U. S . A . T H E O L D E S T M A N U F A C T U R E R S IN A M E R I C A Seven years' actur.l e x p e r i e n c e i n this line w i l l save o u r c u s t o m e r s m o n e y . Write us before buying experiments. O u r Carriages a r e substantially built, easily m a n a g e d , w i l l r u n a n y s p e e d , g o o d h i l l c l i m b e r s . Anyone can use them. Vleañiire

Auto-

mobiles

Tang-

ing

in

from to

price $1,000 T H E H U B is the l e a d i n g j o u r n a l in the ( a r r i a r e a n d ¡ mobile trade a n d ^ives c o m p l e t e i n f o r m a t i o n o n A u t o m o i D o n ' t b u y a n A u t o m o b i l e until v o u h a v e read a n d stu THEHUn. E s t a b l i s h e d 42 years. P u b l i s h e d m o n t h l y at $2.00 a year ; s i n g l e copies at news stands. 25 c e n t s . In order that e v e r y b o d y m a y h a v e a n o p p o r t u n i t y to e x a m i n e T H E H U B , we w i l l send it for three m o n t h s for 25 cents to a n y o n e m e n t i o n i n g M C C L U R E ' S .

$1,800

Coo'.clct

describ-

ing our

Gasoline

system, 10 cents

Descriptive Circular Free

T R A D E N E W S P U B L I S H I N G C O . , Room 8, 26 M u r r a y St., New Y o r k P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to a d v e r t i s e r s

89

|


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

The cycling season of 1900 Legins with Hartford Tires more popular than ever. There are reasons for this popularity. H A R T F O R D

SINGLE

T U B E

TIRES

are and have always been made r.gardless of any expense that could help to make them better. They cost more than other tires, but they are worth more, and they are the most economical in the end. If you insist, you can have them on any high grade wheel without extra cost to you. Don't be induced to accept substitutes on the statement that they are " just as good as Harlfords." If HartfOldS were not the Standard Single Tube Tires and known to be the best, they would not be quoted in the comparison. Remember, the better the tire, the easier the wheel will run. $1,000

IN C A S H

PRIZES

will be offered b y us during the season of igoo. The competition is open to all bicyclists, both men and women. Write for Prize Ccrrpetiticn Ecoklet, enclosing this advertisement and one two-cent stamp. HARTFORD R U B B E R WOREG CO., HARTFORD,CONH.

B a r n i m

O T H E R S

A R E : N O T

A

\i) fciVl'LItl'KlMMi SIEN, i u any section, we offer a splendid oppor- tunity to make money by the manufacture and sale of an article of universal and enormous consumption. Our circular, mailed free, tells a plain, straightforward story. Address, G I R A R D M F Q . C O . , 1930 Westmoreland St., Phila.

,

MARKER

m m m

s»le

new'99 model Bicycles < carried over must be * SACRIFICED AT ONCE., SEi. U.^-IUNL) wheels, good as $ 0 Til $ ! H new, over 5 ) makes and models ö ¡y S w e l l I O C O M o d e l s , S I I yn S O f l HIGHEST

G o l f

G o o d s

SPECIALTIES ^ FORK SPLICED C L U B S

GRADS GUABAXTEED.

C P A T E M T E O.I

SOCKET $ \ ykß^ß. '?xÉÈï&

^

EVERYTHING PERTAINING TO G O L F . i S ^ W r i t e f o r c a t a l o g u e with * Elementary Illustration to • -T>e^inners by rfr

THE

CLUBS.

J o h n D . D u n n

:

BRIDGEPORT

, , ( Ä Ä v

G U N IMPLEMENT CO.

.,„„ W Ü H L , « ' * . S ^ ' S Í ' S T .

I I

,

u

¿U

W E DMIP T O A N Y O N E O N APPROVAL AND TRIAL BEFORE PAYME.N r. One R I D E R A G E k J T i n each town can obtain F'REE TSE of samr'e wheel to ride and exhibit. Write for ART CATALOGUE, BARGAIN LIST AND OUR SPECIAL OFFE It. M E A D C Y C L E C O , Dept,134N Chicago

E x a m i n e i[-.e

Canfield Coaster Brake carefully and you w i l l f i n d it t o b e t h e simplest, neatest, strongest and most efficient. Best i n side. Best outside. Fitsany hub. Anyone can a p p l y it. Bookl3t free. A d d res3

CANFIELD BRAKE CO , Corning, N. Y., U. S. A

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s w h e n you write to advertisers, 90


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

F o r E m e r g e n c i e s l i k e this a p

FOREHAND

Perfection '

REVOLVER

A FOREHAND "Perfection

" I

REVOLVER is m a d e o f t h e best m a t e r i a l s b y the m o s t s k i l l e d w o r k m e n . I t ' s h a n d s o m e a n d serviceable It's e a s i l y c l e a n e d e n d k e p t i:i order. It w i l l o n l y g o off w h e n y o u w a n t i t to. Jt C A N ' T L e f o r e , as i t h a s a n autom a t i c h a m m e r block a n d positive cylinder stop. T h e p r i c e f r o m y o u r dealer o r f r o m O u r b e a u t i f u l c a t a l o g u e o ' o t h e r r e v o l v e r s a n d rju'.u se;¡t o n request.

SEND FOR O U R CATALOCUE

FOREHAND

ARMS

CO.

SN ITH & WESSON REVOLVERS

Worcester,

M

Mass*? C. S. A»

AFILI N

THE WORLD'S STANDARD

MARLIN TAKE-DOWNREPEATING SHOTGUNS U ^ " ^ TO KILL T h e y are not o n l y elegant in appearance and easily taken apart but they possess the superiority in sighting, Ihe rapidity of f i r e , and magazine capacity thai has always b e e n characteristic of the M a r l i n Repeating Rifle • N = A = Î Î S e n d 3 stamps for complete catalog

T*MARUN FIRE ARMS G» NEW HAVEN

CONN-

R E P E A T E R S Please m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers.

91


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Insist and your dealer will put one on your 1900 Bicycle Don't have any other makeshift bar for there is only one good one and that is T H E KELLY ADJUSTABLE Send for Catalogue

Has 25 different positions 15 inches adjustment You can't sit in a position thatyoucan't adjust this bar to fit Perfectly made of forged parts—No castings or stampings

THE LITTLE DETECTIVE POCKET SEARCH

LIGHT.

T h e most useful a n d durable elec­ tric l i g h t e v e r m a d e . K o r policemen, , n i g h t w a t c h m e n , at h o m e or in busi'hew.'in case of b u r g l a r "it is better t h a n a g u n . P r i c e , prepaid,. «8.00. We make everything electrical. Special $12.00 Belt with Suspensory, 52.50. None better made. }6.oo Bicycle L a m p , $2.75. Ajax Motor, $1.00. Send quick. Catalogue free, illustrated. C L E V E 1 A \ 1 > S E A R C H L I G H T C O . , C l e v e l a n d , Ohio, U.S.A.

OUNLOP

PNEUMATIC

jft\ fj\v for I 1 - hit "v 1 !

1 I ( •II* J * e y

V

\

S e n d for booklet.

^

- The American Dunlop Tire Co.,

THESE ARE THE ONLY

TOOLS Y O U ' L L N E E D . Dust and the

or

mud

money

in

for

bicycle

repairs.

gear As

causes your

of

time

watch-case

loss

saves

x

r

.

„,T

TÎS3

P r o t e c t s wearing- parts f r o m grit a n d y o u r clothes f r o m grease.

Twenty-four

attention "

...

Belleville, N . J . C h i c a g o , 111.

watch,

The Frost Gear Case of

TIRES

Bicycles fon Carriages for Automobiles

Bicycle the

to

c h a i n , its

hundred record.

B r e a t h i n g , " and

celebrated

Frost

read

miles without W r i t e for o u r what

G e a r Case

oil

or

booklet,

p r o f e s s i o n a l s say

in

rain

and

dust.

N a m e y o u r wheel w h e n w r i t i n g for p r i c e of gear case. UNIVERSAL

GEAR CASE

WORKS

620 S o u t h M e r i d i a n S t . , Indianapolis, Ind. Please m e n t i o n

The New Tire

î.attiiia C e l l u l a r T i r e ends a l l tire trouble. M a r k s t h e beginning o f a n e w e r a i n w h e e l i n g . C a n n o t be punc­ t u r e d , R e q u i r e s n o i n f l a t i o n . A l w a y s the s a m e . Possesses t h e h i g h e s t d e g r e e of resil­ iency. S m a l l e r t h a n p n e u m a t i c , lighter t h a n a s o l i d t i r e , m o r e d u r a b l e a n d cheaper t h a n e i t h e r . M a d e f o r e v e r y k i n d o f wheel f r o m a h i c v e l e to a n a u t o m o b i l e . T H E R U B B E R T I R E CO., Philo.,Pa. Samples shown and contracts made onlv bv LATTA * J t H L C O N R O Y . 1315 Market St., PhlMn.

M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to a d v e r t i s e r s .

92


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

T H A T IS T H E

O.K.

1900

Acetylene Gas L a m p , and it is " O . K . " '1 he d i s a d v a n t a g e s of h e a v y weight and cumbers o m e size overcome. B e s t m a t e r i a l and w o r k m a n s h i p a n d all the latest improvements in gas lamps. Reversible bracket, all o w i n g c h a n g e in elev a t i o n of f o u r i n c h e s . N o o t h e r l a m p h a s this. If y o u r d e a l e r d o e s n ' t c a r r y it we s e n d , express p r e p a i d , to a n y p o i n t i n the U . S. for $2.50. Descriptive b o o k l e t free.

SEAL LOCK CO.

Not How Much You Pay But What it Costs! G

& J Tires m a y c o s t m o s t i n t h e

b e g i n n i n g , but cost n o t h i n g for repairs. Other Tires m a y c o s t less i n t h e b e g i n n i n g a n d prove most the

expensive in

end. Our

c a t a l o g explains it a l l .

G

& J T I R E CO.,

160 Washington St.

INDIANAPOLIS.

Chicago, 111.

the

MORROW COASTER-HUB BRAKE

FITS ANY WITH

THIS

BICYCLE

YOU

RIDE 50 MILES BUT PEDAL ONLY 35

Wheel Always Under Control

SKINNER Automatic Pump. It ¡aflates t h e t i r e w h i l e v o u r i d e . I t d o e s n o t d i s f i g u r e t h e wheel. It w i l l fit a n y w h e e l . I t m a k e s p u m p i n g e a s y a n d is aiwava r e a d y . It c a n b e t h r o w n o u t o f p e a r a r i d l e f t o n w h e e l . It can b e i n s t a n t l y d e t a c h e d a n d p l a c e d i n T o o l b a g i f d e s i r e d . It weighs s i x o u n c e s a n d c o s t s b u t ¡ S 8 . 0 0 , d e l i v e r e d to any p o i n t i n t h e U . S . Write for descriptive booklet.

SKINNER MFG.

CO.,

Thousands in use. Coast with your feet on the pedals. A slight back pressure applies the, brake. No continuous strain on the leg muscles after brake is applied. " You can roast down every little decline without removing your feet from the pedals. Adds roo per cent, to the pleasures of cycling. Send for printed matter.

Superior to any yet shown. Best generator made. Fool proof—Simply Can't get out of order. Illustrated pamphlet giving detailed information of both the Brake and the Lamp— free on request.

E C L I P S E B I C Y C L E CO.,

B o x P, E l m i r a , N . Y .

206 Mechanic St., Jackson, Mich. P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e to advertisers. Please mention M c C I u r e ' s when

93 93

Eclipse Acetylene Gas Lamp.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

101,000

CRESCENT w e r e

s o l d

t h a n

a n y

t r i b u t e

w h e e l

i n

W

The

h

y

w h e n

in

bicycle

qualities

Bevel

Chainless

Boys'

Chain

a n d Girls'

T H E W e l l s

Street,

you

c a n

o t h e r g e t

t h e

construction

of

the

a

s a m e

is

Crescent

demonstrated Bevel-Gear

the

$ 6 0

$ 2 5

$ 2 6

$ 3 0

M o d e l s

for

in

Chainless.

M o d e l s

M o d e l s

Send

501

a n y

f o r

smooth-running

Adults'

b u y

p o p u -

?

perfection

G e a r

w h e e l — a

C r e s c e n t

C r e s c e n t m o n e y

1 8 9 9 — m o r e

o t h e r

t o

larity.

BICYCLES

$ 3 9 $ 2 5

Crescent

C R E S C E N T

C h i c a g o

Catalogue

B I C ï T L E 3 6

W a r r e n

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to advertisers. 94

Street,

N e w

Y o r k


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

â&#x20AC;˘e

T H E COLUMBIA BEVEL=QEAR CHAINLESS has won a leading place among bicycles because it meets every requirement of the cyclist. It is always ready to ride. T h e adjustment is peculiarly simple, direct and effective. There is nothing to entangle or soil the skirt. T h e mechanism is dirt-proof and weather-proof, and does not deteriorate with use. T h e transmission of power is direct, utilizing every ounce of driving force expended. It is the easiest running, the most practical and most trustworthy bicycle. Price $75. COLUMBIA,

HARTFORD, STORMER

and P E N N A N T CHAIN W H E E L S embody every Improvement possible to the chain type.

Prices : $50, $35, $30, $25.

T H E C O L U M B I A C O A S T E R B R A K E is simple and sure in action and saves fully one-third of the pedaling necessary in ordinary riding. A n hour's practice will bring any one to a realization of its merits as a labor-saving device. Price $5.00 when ordered with a new machine. Applicable to both Chainless and Chain Models. See

Columbia

and

Stornier

Catalogues.

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to advertisers.

95


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

^pbocníx Bicycles ONLY ONE GRADE BUILT BUT T H A T - T H E BEST FOR

T H EP A S T

T W E L V E

YEARS

PHOENIX T H E PRICE IS

BICYCLES THE

1900

H A V E BEEN PATTERNS

M A N U F A C T U R E D A R E FAR

A N Y T H I N G PREVIOUSLY

A N D

$40.00

SUPERIOR T O

OFFERED

j» jt

jt

jt

"They Stand the Racket" MONARCH HEADQUARTERS,

>*

L A K E , H A L S T E D A N D F U L T O N S T S . , CHICAGO No. 2 0 W A R R E N S T . , N E W Y O R K

L

.JñELEcáic

BICYCLES S A V E

Y O U R

S T R E N G T H

Y o u can cover the same g r o u n d w i t h less energy b y u s i n g the

CLIPPER

Bevel-Gear

CHAINLESS

T h e secret is i n the BevelGear. Price, $ 6 o a n d $ 7 5 . C h a i n W h e e l s , $50 a n d $40. Adapted

to the Quick and Economical Delivery of Light Merchandise. Top Removable : Rear Seat Adjustable. A Profitable Proposition for Business or Pleasure. Eighteen Models—Guaranteed. Catalogue mailed for two two-cent stamps. W A V E R L E Y F A C T O R Y , INDIANAPOLIS, IND., New York Office, 941 Eighth Avenue.

U . S.

F o r C a t a l o g u e , address the R a m b l e r office, N o r t h F r a n k l i n Street a n d Instit u t e P l a c e , C h i c a g o , 111.

A .

Please mention M c C l' u r e ' s w when y o u write to advertisers.

96


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

T h e y are the Standard Acetylene Gas

Cycle Lamps, and their great

success is due to the patented system of gas generation which secures a steady bright white light. Your dealer will sell them to you for $3.00 each, or we will send them to you express prepaid at this price. Our booklet—Solar System—sent free upon application. T H E BADGER BRASS MFG. CO. KENOSHA, WISCONSIN.

P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e to advertisers.

97


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

û p j s p

mm

AH®

ÖLONPILRLLCÖ-BVrPALO -

Prices K N O W I N G

BOSTON -

NEW YORK

Chainless, for Men and Women, $75.00 Chain, for Men and Women,

55.00

C Y C L I S T S

•fc. will not ride without a reliable " mile-teller/* Only one has stood Ik the test of t

BICYCLES are l i k e w e l l groomed p e o p l e . T h e g e n t e e l app e a r a n c e b e s p e a k s caref u l a t t e n t i o n to the fitness of l i t t l e d e t a i l s w h i c h go to m a k e the p e r f e c t h i g h grade wheel. (

N O wheels

B E T T E R are

made

than

BICYCLES' ORDINARY

TRIP*

P r i c e

$ 4 0

are perfect instru N o b e t t e r R a m b l e r was e v e r b u i l t t h a n the 1900 model.

merits—dust proof, water proof,

positive

a c t i o n — a s useful as j o u r watch.

M a d e for 2 4 , 2 6 ,

agencies everywhere.

28 " J u s t o£ A g e " b o o k l e t , free

and 3 0 - i n c h wheels Ordinary, 10,000 miles and repeat, nickeled, . Gold-plated and engraved $2.50" Trip Cyclometer, nickeled $1 50 Gold-plated and engraved ' $4 00

American Bicycle C o . G O R H U L L Y

&

SALES DEPT.

THE VEEDER MFG. CO., Hartford, Conn. Makers of Cyclometers, Odometers, Counting Machines and Fine Castings Please mention M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e to advertisers

98

JEffERY Chicago


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

A R N I C A TOOTH

Í

SOAP

Jabotí de Savon Dentifrice Arnica Zahn

o j t e n

V i r a c e

Arnica. D'Arnica. Seife.

The Only International Dentifrice. T h e S t a n d a r d for 30 y e a r s . Preserves a n d whitens the teeth, strengthens the gums—sweetens t h e b r e a t h . 25c a t A l l D r u g g i s t s . C

H . STRONG. & C O . , Props., C H I C A G O , U . S. A .

A L L I S O N

S i c k l e s *

t o

V k e

S

CORN E R A S E R THE FOOT P O U S H E K A NEW AND E F F E C T I V E C U R E

frSRSK"

io

This instrument is l%x4 inches in size and consists of a Steel Cylinder on which is placed a polishing cloth, held by nickel plated steel caps. A bottle of lotion for curing the soft corn, together with an extra cloth, packed inside each cylinder. P o l i s h i n g w i t h t i l l s I n s t r u m e n t easily r e m o v e s c o r n s a n d p r e v e n t s a c c u m u l a t i o n o f c a l l o u s

t K c

cuticle, keeping the 6kin clean and healthy. Satisfaction guaranteed. M a i l e d o n r e c e i p t of 35 c e n t s . Chicago, HI.

728

Lake

a n d .

n o t e

3 L i j

National Bank.

WEALTH

A S H E L F F O R Y O U R I P A O if T h e B. B. Chair-has two of | ™ » » V * ö • them for rest and comfort. W r i t e , C . S. B E E B E ,

5

REFERENCE, America

J . F . A L L I S O N , Mfff. T o i l e t A r t i c l e s ,

K4 A W a b a s h A v e n u e ,

Po &\ wm

U

Ave.,

Racine,

FOR EVERYBODY. B I C Y C L E S NO M O N E Y IN A D V A N C E . Shipped direct to anyone and guaranteed as represented o r money j*el unded. Save agents large profits a n d get a wheel a t r o c k bottom wholesale Jpriee. l ' t i r A r l i n g t o n M o d e l K is the greatest b a r g a i n everoffered; i n lots of \ o n e o r m o r e at $14.8S $35 " A r l i n g t o n " $16.50 $40 " $18.50 $50 " O a k w o o d " $21.50

Wis.

fc

O

NE OF T H E L A R G E S T AGENCY C O N C E R N S IN T H E C O U N TRY o f f e r i n g - a P A Y I N G and P E R M A N E N T opport u n i t y to a c t i v e m e n de• sires to place additional M i l E I m e n i n e v e r y state of the I U n i o n . S e n d 2-eent s t a m p for book containing full particulars. State y o u r n a m e , address, age and present occupation.

C a n wheel, $12.50,$11.00 & $10.00 Stripped Wheels « ¡ 7 f i n the A r l i n g t o n & O a k w o o d are s t r i c t l y h i g h gra<ie«P« and the best t h a t can be made. T h o r o u g h l y tested and f u l l y guaranteed. O v e r 100.0OO riders can testify to their s u p e r i o r q u a l i t y , stvle, construction and w o r k m a n s h i p . I l l u s t r a t e d c a t a l o g free. C A S H B U Y E R S ' U N I O N , 1 6 3 W . V a n B u r e n St., B - 1 6 4 , C h i c a g o , I l l s .

Postoffice Box 802, Chicago, III.

£ #

H O W

TO

F U R N I S H

D E C O R A T E Y O U R

A N D

R O O M .

$f 7*

=

Send a, list o f articles you. n o w h a v e i n a n y one r o o m w i t h r o u g h d i a g r a m s h o w i n g windows a n d doors, s t a t i n g whether windows open on street,-or front or back y a r d s , a n d o u r e x p e r t d e c o r a t o r w i l l describe n o w to r e a r r a n g e a n d f u r n i s h y o u r r o o m a r t i s t i c a l l y — n o t expensively—provided y o u send. $1.00 f o r a y e a r ' s s u b s c r i p t i o n to K e i t h ' s H o m e B u i l d e r . T h i s magazine contains e v e r y m o n t h p l a n s for ten o r m o r e a r t i s t i c h o m e s , besides m u c h v a l u a b l e up-to-date m a t t e r on inside furnishings, T h i s offer l i m i t e d t o S O d a y s f r o m M a y 1st. W. « / . KEITH, A r c h i t e c t . Publisher, 239 Lumber Exchange, Minneapolis, Minn,

Snow U w a n t a

White

Cotton Down

M a t t r e s s

S 6 . 5 0

I f w a n t e d In t w o pieces, l i t e c u t . 97. F r e i g h t prepaid to a l l points n o r t h o í the s o u t h l i n e of Tennessee a n d east of the M i s s o u r i R i v e r a n d of a l i n e d r a w n d i r e c t l y sonth f r o m K a n s a s C i t y . P a r t of the f r e i g h t p a i d to m o r e d i s t a n t points. A b s o l u t e P e r f e c t i o n . A s soft as a $40 h a i r mattress a n d to be preferred, because i t never packs, is c l e a n e r , m o r e s a n i t a r y a n d never attracts moths. G u a r a n t e e d to last a l i f e t i m e w i t h o u t m a k i n g over. T h e y may be returned after t h i r t y days' t r i a l at o u r expense, i f not p o s i t i v e l y the best mattress t h a t money can buy, a n d your money w i l l be instantly a n d c h e e r f u l l y r e f u n d e d . _ , , „ . . . ., F R O M F A C T O R Y T O C U S T O M E R . T h e U w a n t a M a t t r e s s can be h a d o n l y of us. I f sold by r e t a i l e r s , the p r i c e w o u l d be f r o m $12 to $16 W h a t Is C o t t o n D o w n ! I t is the snow-white selected cotton fresh f r o m the fields, i n o r i g i n a l bales, made i n t o Cotton D o w n by b e i n g put t h r o u g h o u r patented process u n t i l i t is almost as fluffy as feathers. S o m e c a l l i t felt w h e n thus treated a n d i t is u n d o u b t e d l y the best mattress m a t e r i a l k n o w n to t h e trade. I n o r d e r i n g give the w i d t h of your bed. m e a s u r i n g from the i n s i d e o f t h e s i d e r a i l s . A M mattresses are 6 feet 8 i n c h e s l o n g . P O R T W A Y N E F U R N I T U R E C O M P A N Y , Fort Wayrle, Indiana. Also manufacturers o f Sideboards, E x t e n s i o n Tables and D i n i n g - H o o m Chairs. Send for Catalogne. Please m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to a d v e r t i s e r s , . 99


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J AMERICAN RAILROADS. THEIR

RELATION

COMMERCIAL,

INDUSTRIAL

AGRICULTURAL

" R e a d s like a

T O AND

INTERESTS.

Romance." —Louisville

Courier-Journal.

" S h o u l d be read in a l l o u r h i g h e r p u b l i c — Criterion.

schools." N e w York.

" P e r h a p s the m o s t i m p o r t a n t a d d r e s s before the Inter­ n a t i o n a l C o m m e r c i a l C o n g r e s s at P h i l a d e l p h i a . " — 'I'he Outlook, N e w Y o r k . " O n e of the most i n s t r u c t i v e a n d i m p o r t a n t made before the C o m m e r c i a l C o n g r e s s . " —Evening Star, P h i l a d e l p h i a . " A g o o d lesson to teach a C o m m e r c i a l C o n g r e s s . " —Plaindea 1er, C l e v e l a n d , 0 . " I t shows that the ing." "No

t h o u g h t s of the p e o p l e are widen­ —Inter-Ocean, Chicago.

more significant o r i m p r e s s i v e estimate of the c o m m e r c i a l t r i u m p h of the U n i t e d States than is c o n t a i n e d in this a d d r e s s . " —Home Journal, N e w Y o r k .

Sent free, post-paid, to any address in the world on receipt of a twocent stamp. Address R o o m N o . 323. C r a n d C e n t r a l Station, New York.

The Paris Exposition Opened April

THE FOR

14

RUSH

ACCOMMODATIONS

IS

N O W ON

W e have expended thousands of dollars to engage Desirable B e r t h s on P o p u l a r S t e a m e r s and S a i l i n g Dates and Rooms at E u r o p e a n Hotels, w h i c h we are A l l o t t i n g D a i l y in connection w i t h our Select E s c o r t e d T o u r s , i n c l u d i n g not only the Parli E x p o s i t i o n , but THE

OBERAMMERGAU PASSION PLAY

THE

RHINE, S W I T Z E R L A N D , AND

THE

LANDS OF

S C O T T AND

ITALY

SHAKESPEARE

A l s o Several D e l i g h t f u l S u m m e r Cruises B y O u r P a l a t i a l , S p e c i a l l y C h a r t e r e d Steam-Yacht

"ARGONAUT" (3254 tons, 4000 horse-power, l e n g t h 332 feet) Visiting NORWAY AND " THE

THE

L A N D OF

NORTH CAPE

THE

MIDNIGHT

S T . P E T E R S B U R G AND MOSCOW S a i l i n g from H u l l , E n g l a n d , i n connection w i t h transatlantic steamers.

SUN" the leading

OUR

P R I C E S I N C L U D E A L L INCIDENTAL E X P E N S E S AS SPECIFIED M a n y i n t e n d i n g visitors w i l l be absolutely unable to secure steamship a n d hotel a c c o m m o d a t i o n s , because they delay 1« a p p l y i n g . Several of our sailings are already full. W r i t e t o - d a y for Illustrated P r o g r a m , naming Tour or C r u i s e y o u wish to take.

THE EUROPEAN TOURIST COMPANY 156 F i f t h A v e n u e , New Please mention M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers. 100

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(hkägo inoriti Western Railway C.STP.M.&O.RY F.E.&M.V.R.R. AND S.C.&P.RR«

IB

?ï •if«I ""COPYfUSKTÏPB/ CAK5tR?.ie»7.

EVERY

DAY IN T H E YEAR

THE OVERLAND LIMITED A strictly first-class train, consisting of BUFFET-SMOKING AND LIBRARY PULLMAN DOUBLE DRAWING-ROOM SLEEPING CARS AND DINING runs through between Chicago and ^ ^ ^ ^

,

CARS. CARS

FOBP «>3Days <^^^

without change via the

CHICAGO, UNION PACIFIC & NORTH-WESTERN LINE THE HAWAIIAN AND PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, CHINA AND JAPAN. FOR I N F O R M A T I O N A N D D E S C R I P T I V E 868 461 193 SOI 801

WASHINGTON STREET, BROADWAY CLARK STREET, . CHESTNUT STREET, . MAIN STREET,

P A M P H L E T S A P P L Y T OPRINCIPAL

.

.

. .

.

BOSTON. N E W YORK. . . CHICAGO. . PHILADELPHIA. BUFFALO.

AGENCIES:

4 8 5 VINE STREET 8 0 7 SMITH FIELD STREET, 127 T H E A R C A D E 17 C A M P U S - M A R T I U S No. 2 KING STREET. EAST,

.

.

.

CINCINNATI. PITTSBURG. CLEVELAND. DETROIT. TORONTO, ONT.

ALL AGENTS S E L L TICKETS VIA THE

CHICAGO & NORTH-WESTERN P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e to advertisers. IOI 101

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EVERY ONE MAY NOW DRINK TEA I

Tannin conquered at last j¡j Healthful Nutritious

27te Greatest 'Discovery of the cAge

E A - E T T E is Pure T e a of the best grades, treated by a process which modifies the Tannin without destroying the good qualities of the T e a . T E A - E T T E is the result of careful scientific research. Instead of tanning the stomach and exciting the nerves it aids Digestion, Builds U p and Strengthens the Nervous System, and is rapidly finding favor with those who are fond of tea and know the bad effects of Tannin. T E A - E T T E is the Purest T e a in the Market. If your grocer has not yet included it in his stock, ask h i m to get it, or on receipt of 50 cents we w i l l m a i l one-half pound package. State kind of tea y o u drink, O o l o n g , English-Breakfast or M i x e d .

R O Y A L T E A - E T T E CO., 43 Wallabout Market, B r o o k l y n , N . Y . , w i l l bring it.

Ü Ü Ü Ü Ü Ü Ü Ü Ü

Ù

U 8 a a u

ß S

s s Û û,

COINS

A BIG INCOME

HARDWOOD FLOORS Parquetry and Wood Carpet Excelsior Floor Finish HARD WAX FLOOR POLISH

$60 to S300 per week. Pleasant e m p l o y m e n t a n d a n v m a n c a n operate t h e m . C O M P L E T E O U T F I T S , i n c l u d ing l a r g e i l l u s t r a t e d a d v e r t i s i n g hills (18x 24) a d m i s s i o n tickets, i n s t r u c t i o n b o o k , business guide. etc.,$3!>.iH) and up. Most i n t e r e s t i n g and s e n s a t i o n a l subjects, just out. W i l l be sent C O . D . , subject to e x a m i n a t i o n . W r i t e f o r c a t a l o g u e a n d copies o f l e t t e r s f r o m e x h i b i t o r s who are M A K I M . B I O M O N E Y w i t h o u r outfits. ENTERTAINMENT SUPPLY CO. Dept. F . 56 58 F I F T H A V E . , H I I C A O Û .

W r i t e at Booklet J. D U N F E E 1M-106

once f o r our F R E E a n d s p e c i a l offer, & C O . , Dept. C, F r a n k l i n St., cnicago, 111.

A PLACE m SHOES

The Black f Tan Shoe Polisher Successor to the Shoe Brush.

where they can a l w a y s be f o u n d — i n order i —pairs together—off the floor—out o f the w a y — y e t right at hand—is p r o v i d e d b y the^

Saves money, time and leather ; a beautiful polish in two minutes, without soiling the fingers. Complete, one dollar, prepaid.

Eveready Shoe and Slipper Holder

Our Patent Coat and Hat Hanger.

useful as a n y coat or s k i r t hanger or trousers r a c k . H o l d s a n y size shoe. Fits a n y closet or wardrobe door. Utilizes waste space. Saves time a n d labor. . P r i c e $1.50 prepaid. M o n e y b a c k if y o u w a n t it. W M - S. H A L L O W E L L » B o x ao6, W y n c o t e , P a .

Best of its kind ; twenty-five cents, prepaid.

The Black and Tan Polisher Co. (Inc.) Painesville, 0.

PATENTS GUARANTEED

Our fee returned if we fail. A n y one sending sketch a n d description of any invention will promptly receive our opinion free concerni ng the patentability of same. ' -How to Obtain a Patent" sent upon request. Patents secured through us advertised for sale at our expense. Patents taken out through us receive special notice, without charge,in T H E P A T E N T R E C O R D , an illustrated and widely circulated journal, consulted by Manufacturers and Investors. Send for sample c o p y F R E E . Address,

VICTOR

J. EVANS

{Patent

Evans Building,

a

STAMPS

Selections sent on a p p r o v a l . date 11. U. I X A Y , 411.. C l o i . i f ! , . . x f i , H i St.. Philn

Can be m a d e GIVING PIBLIC ENTERTAINMENTS i n C h u r c h e s . H a l l s , a n d T h e a t r e s w i t h MOTION 1 ' K T I B E S Hie NEW GRAPIIOAIIPLIPHONEMISICAL und Tulling: Combination a n d Panoramic Stereouticon Views.

Circulars free.

S'200 F O R 1832 $5.00 G O L D

& CO.,

Attorneys,)

-

W A S H I N G T O N , D. C .

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o IO

Q

,ilmw

lífuji

Ml

%r i-----rìi.|]

- u_|i /,

1 The " L o n g Tom " o f cigars—the cigar which easily demolishes all competitors in its class—is the well-known and popular

General Arthur

Cigar

It is made of the finest tobaccos that our buyers, who are constantly on the spot, can buy in Cuba. They have standing instructions to let no one else outbid them when choice tobaccos are to be obtained. General Arthurs are not only right in material but they are made by the best workmanship in America. They are mild, pleasant, harmless smokes of perfect flavor. You can smoke General Arthurs as much as you choose without suffering any ill effects, which are sure to follow after smoking heavy, imported cigars. If you have not tried the General Arthur you certainly ought to do so. Ask your dealer for them. If he doesn't keep them send us f i . o o for a dozen General Arthurs packed in a tin box. ;KERBS,

WERTHEIM

& SCHIFFER,

1014

Second Ave.,

New

F o r a t w o - c e n t s t a m p we w i l l send y o u a n o v e l a n d r a c y little folder.

Please m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers.

103

York

City

Iff


McCLURES

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STEINWAY & SONS

vose

MANUFACTURERS OF

Grand and

PIANOS

¡

are r e c e i v i n g m o r e f a v o r a b l e c o m m e n t s day f r o m a n artistic s t a n d p o i n t t h a n other makes combined.

S t e i n w a y & S o n s b e g to a n n o u n c e that t h e y h a v e been officially a p p o i n t e d by p a t e n t s a n d d i p l o m a s , w h i c h a r e d i s p l a y e d for public i n s p e c t i o n at t h e i r w a r e r o o m s , m a n u f a c t u r e r s to

toall

His

WE

i

Challenge Comparisons.

m

t

By o u r easy p a y m e n t p l a n , e v e r y f a m i l y in m o d e r a t e c i r c u m s t a n c e s c a n o w n a fine piano. W e allow a liberal price for o l d i n struments in exchange, a n d deliver the p i a n o in your house free of expense. Y o u can d e a l with us at a distant p o i n t t h e s a m e as in Boston. S e n d for catalogue and full information.

vose & 160

SONS PIANO

Upright Pianos

M a j e s t y , N i c h o l a s I I . . the C z a r of R u s s i a

His

Majesty, W i l l i a m I I . , E m p e r o r of Germany

His

Majesty, F r a n z Joseph. E m p e r o r of Austria and K i n g of H u n g a r y

Her The

Their Royal Highnesses P r i n c e a n d P r i n c e s s o f W a l e s , ar.d the D u k e of Edinburgh His

1

Majesty. V i c t o r i a , Queen of Great Britain

Majesty, O s t a r II., K i n g of Sweden and Norway His

M a j e s t y , U m b e r t o I . , the K i n g o f I t a l y His

His

s

Majesty, Albert, K i n g of Saxony

Majesty. Mousaffer-ed-Din, Shah of Persia Her

M a j e s t y , the Q u e e n R e g e n t o f S p a i n

Illustrated catalogues

CO.

mailed free upon application

S T E I N W A Y

Boylstoa Street, - - - Boston.

&

S O N S

WAREROOMS

S T E I N W A Y H A L L , 107-109 East 14th Street, NEW t » H U H t H H M I M M I I M t t H »

FOR

61

MADE ON LOUDNESS or CLEARNESS

A n

from your TALKING MACHINE with a SMALL TIN HORN.

workmanship, singing tone,

elasticity and great

S E N T ON T R I A L W I T H O U T C O S T T O YOU.

our

S o l d for cash o r i n s t a l l m e n t s . Old pianos taken in exchange. C a t a l o g u e D a n d p r i n t e d m a t t e r m a i l e d free.

EDISON PHONOGRAPH CO.,

A. M. McPHAIL PIANO

Race Street a n d A r c a d e , C i n c i n n a t i , Ohio. (Sole

H o n e s t P i a n o a t a n H o n e s t P r i c e !

durability, m a k e t h e m the i n s t r u m e n t to purchase that w i l l g i v e as great s a t i s f a c t i o n 10 years hence as when first r e c e i v e d .

Special Catalogues of Talking Machines, Loud Records, and Supplies.

THE

HONOR SOLD ON MERIT.

reliable. T h e artistic of action, wonderful

Boxed and Shipped complete, with Folding Stand, on receipt of $ 3 . 8 5 . for

Y E H R S

M c P h a i l P i a n o s have been on the market 61 years ; have e s t a b l i s h e d a r e p u t a t i o n as b e i n g always

Polished Brass 30=inch Amplifying Horn, with Flaring Bell. Y o u will be delighted with the result. T h r o w it away, a n d get o u r

Seid

YORK

M M H t H t t ••)

784

Licensees a n d O w n e r s of the E d i s o n P h o n o g r a p h Patents for the State of Ohio.)

MccC Clluurree''ss w h e n y Please mention M o u write to advertisers. you

104 104

CO.,

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McCL

URE'S

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Does

Its

O w n

T a l k

T H E

Double Bell OPINIONS F r o m the

^ m \ ^

OF

New

Wonder

EXPERTS

Y o r k n u s i c Trades:

( F u l l y Protected by

" M r . C o n n first a d j u s t e d t h e S i n g l e B e l l i n o r d e r that t h e c o n t r a s t m i g h t b e s h o w n b e t w e e n it a n d the D o u b l e B e l l . W h e n t h e M a c h i n e was w o u n d up a q u a r t e t t e o f v o i c e s was h e a r d s i n g i n g " M y Old K e n t u c k y Home.'* T h e n t h e d o u b l e b e l l was adjusted, a n d t h e s a m e s o n g was h e a r d . T h e c o n trast was t r u l y g r e a t ; f o r w i t h t h e D o u b l e B e l l t h e voices c o u l d be h e a r d m o r e d i s t i n c t l y ; w i t h i n creased v o l u m e , clearness^ a n d p u r i t y o f tonequality."

THE

BEST

MACHINE

Patents)

ON T H E

MARKET.

E a c h bell is as l o u d and c l e a r as an o r d i n a r y m a c h i n e ; and

F r o m the New Y o r k H u s i c T r a d e R e v i e w : " T h i s is t h e age o f T a l k i n g M a c h i n e s ; a n d t h e most w o n d e r f u l o f t h e m a l l is t h e W o n d e r D o u b l e B e l l T a l k i n g M a c h i n e m a d e by C . G. C o n n . T h e 'Review' h a d t h e p l e a s u r e o f b e i n g p r e s e n t t h i s week w h e n a very e x h a u s t i v e test was m a d e o f t h i s machine a n d comparisons m a d e w i t h the numerous m a c h i n e s now o n t h e m a r k e t . T h e m o s t i m p o r t a n t points upon w h i c h the superiority of the W o n d e r • T a l k i n g M a c h i n e is based are its surpassing volume, clearness a n d p u r i t y of tone a n d d i s t i n c t ­ ness o f e n u n c i a t i o n . A d d t o t h i s t h e s i m p l i c i t y and d u r a b i l i t y o f its m e c h a n i s m , a n d it is p o s s i b l e V to u n d e r s t a n d w h y t h i s i n s t r u m e n t s h o u l d b e c o m e m a t r e m e n d o u s f a v o r i t e w i t h t h e p u b l i c at l a r g e . "

b o t h in u n i s o n g i v e d o u b l e the

volume

of t o n s .

Machines sent for trial. Price w i t h t w o records, $ 2 0 , complete.

S 0 \

Address

C

f |

{ T E M I S I

VJ»

V

If y o u

34

V

/

l

~

l

"

Latest i

Musical

flanufacturer

in

Instrument the

World

need a m u s i c a l i n s t r u m e n t w r i t e for p r i c e s .

East

14th Street,

New York

City

M a i n Factories, E l k h a r t , Indiana.

I V E R S & P O N D PIANOS. Our

Offer.

W h e r e v e r i n the U n i t e d States we have no dealer, we s e n d P i a n o s o n t r i a l ( o n e a s y p a y m e n t s if d e s i r e d ) , a n d guar­ antee to suit y o u as w e l l as if y o u l i v e d in B o s t o n . If unsatisfactory, we p t y railroad freights b o t h ways. T h i s m a y seem risky to y o u — i t has c e a s e d to s e e m so to us. I f y o u are u n a c q u a i n t e d w i t h our house, we w i l l g l a d l y give u n q u e s ­ tionable references as to o u r financial responsibility, the h i g h m e r i t of o u r piano, a n d o u r r e p u t a t i o n for h o n o r a b l e dealing. T h e N e w E n g l a n d C o n s e r v a ­ tory of M u s i c has b o u g h t , since 1 8 8 2 , over 2 3 0 I v e r s & P o n d P i a n o s . W e refer to this a n d the o t h e r 2 0 0 s c h o o l s a n d colleges n o w u s i n g o u r P i a n o s . Old Pianos t a k e n i n e x c h a n g e . C a t a l o e u e a n d p e r s o n a l letter q u o t i n g lowest prices, with v a l u a b l e i n f o r m a t i o n about p i a n o - b u y i n g , i n c l u d i n g our u n i q u e e a s y p a y m e n t p l a n s , g i v i n g f r o m one to three y e a r s to complete p u r c h a s e , free u p o n request. I V E R S

&

P

O

N

D

P I A N O Please mention

C O . ,

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McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

A New Overland Route St.

Louis

URUNGTON ROUTE ANO WESTERN CONDUCTIONS SHOWING THE

to

Puget

Sound

n p R A V E L to the cities of Puget Sound, such as Portland, Seattle and Tacoma, has increased so wonderfully of late years, especially since the discoveryof gold in Alaska, that a distinct public demand has arisen for better transportation facilities. We shall, commencing M a y ist, start a

NEW OVERLAND ROUTE

N e w t r a i n o f c o m f o r t a b l e , w i d e v e s t i b u l e d P u l l m a n s l e e p i n g cars, R e c l i n i n g chair cars, (seats free,) D i n i n g car a n d b a g g a g e car, t o leave S t . L o u i s e v e r y d a y at 9.00 A . M . K a n s a s C i t y at 4.00 P . M . , a n d r u n b y w a y o f L i n c o l n a n d B i l l i n g s , thence o v e r the N o r t h e r n Pacific R y . through to Seattle in 77 hours. P.

S.

E U S T I S ,

B R A S S

G E N E R A L

P A S S E N G E R

A G E N T ,

C.

B.

GERE

BOAT

G

H E A L Y , CHICAGO.

R.,

C H I C A G O ,

III.

A

S

E Z T X T G r l T X T E

W E B S T E R M F G . C O . , 1081 W e s t 15th St., Chicago. Eastern Branch : 38-D Dey Street, New York City. Southern Agents : Boland & Gschwind Co., L t d . So. Peter and Lafayette Sts., New Orleans, L a .

ENGINES WKS.

R.

for $ l o O , less 10 per cent, discount for cash. Built cm interchangeable plan. Built of best material. Made in lots of 100, therefore we can make the price. Boxed for shipment, weight 800 lbs. Made for Gas or Gasoline. Also Horizontal E n g i n e s , 4 to 30 h. p.

LAUNCHES ^ l l l i i l l l g g 'ÎTlfÔ.'tt.TERTYACHT-'-« L A U N C H

Q.

This beats W i n d , Steam, or Horse Power. We offer the W E B S T E R 2J2 actual horse power

B A N D

I n s t r u m e n t s , D r a m s , U n i f o r m s a n d S u p p l i e s . W r i t e l o r C a t a l o g , 445 i l l n s t r a t i o n s , F R E E ; it g i v e s i n f o r m a t i o n for m u s i c i a n s a n d new bïinds.

L I O N «fc 49 Adams Street,

&

V A P O R E N G I N E S L: L A U N C H E S

^

GRAND-fiADIDS.MICtl. ' *J»itM •••••>

TITTLE

20th C E N T U R Y

E

L

S

r

T h i s ideal G e n t l e m a n ' s launch elegantly finished, simple, seaworthy, safe, reliable. Seats 8. Speed 6 miles. G u a r a n t e e d for one year. Price $200.00. O r d e r now, avoid Spring rush. Send 10c for handsome 76 page catalogue of Steam and Sail Y a c h t s , L a u n c h e s , Row Boats, Canoes. R A C I N E

B O A T

M F G . C O . (Riverfront) Racine,

C O . — C A M A S T O X \ J * T Y . . CATALOGUE FREE

Wis.

\ No f i r e , Smoke tir llrnt. i

AtwolutcTy s ü í o .

TRTJSCOTT B O A T

Si'iidfivt>stamps for rntiitogue.,;

M F Gr. C O . . S T . J O S E P H .

LAUNCHES—ENGINES " M

MICH.

i

(cAsouNE)

O N I T O R V N O ' ü O G L E'

AL S O POWER OUTIFITFOR BOATS «NO CARBIACfS M O N I T O R ENGINE CO., GRAHD RAPIDS,MICH.

ACME

FOl.ltlN'C

I t o A T C O . , M f A M I » I H l i t;. O, Please

mention

A d o p t e d by Governments of C a n a d a , U . S., and E n g l a n d . Indorsed by Commodore Bourke, British N a v y ; C o m p t . W h i t e , N . W . M . P o l i c e ; M a j . W a l s h , F.x-Gov. Klondike; Dr. D a w s o n , C a n a d a G e o l . Survey, and others. 16 it. boat, holds 1500 lbs , folds into cylinder ç f t . x l o i n d i a m . A l s o smaller sizes. H a n d s o m e smooth model. Perfect for pleasure use. E n t i r e l y safe. Catalorfue free. A C M E F O L D I N G B O A T C O . , M I A M I S B U R G , O H I O M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e to 106

advertisers.


_

McCLURE'S

T H I S

W I L L

to get

a piece for

E C L I P S E

of

R E M I N D smoked

the

O F

glass

and

MAGAZINE.

Y O UI j watch

H

E

Q

Q _

3

6

t

.

n

^

Q Q Q

Annual Statement

approaching

T

Q

OF T H E

S U N

T R A V E L E R S PHONOGRAPH

INSURANCE Chartered 1«63. JAMES

(Stock.)

COMPANY. Life and Accident Insurance.

G.BATTERSON,

Président.

H a r t f o r d , C o n n . , J a n u a r y 1, 1900.

PAID-UP

CAPITAL,

$

1 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0

ASSETS. R e a l Estate, C a s h on h a n d a n d in B a n k , L o a n s o n b o n d a n d m o r t g a g e , teal estate, Interest accrued but not due, L o a n s on collateral security, . . . L o a n s on this C o m p a n y ' s Policies. Deferred Life Premiums. P r e m s , d u e a n d u n r e p o r t e d o n L i f e Policies. G o v e r n m e n t lionds, C o u n t y a n d m u n i c i p a l bonds, . . . R a i l r o a d stocks a n d bonds, B a n k stocks. O t h e r stocks a n d bonds, -

$3,043,222.72 1,810,269.96 5,981,842.52 245,983.39 1,497,175.51 1,305,307.27 340,997.04 259,449.36 789,016.96 3,114,997.64 7,819,225.19 1,258,674.00 1,288,350.00

T h e o n l y perfect r e p r o d u c t i o n s o f s o u n d are i Total

[tained by u s i n g E d i s o n R e c o r d s o n t h e P h o n o g r a p h ]

Assets,

Prices from $7.50 to $100. Catalogues from a l l Phonograph Dealers

LIABILITIES. R e s e r v e , 3Va p e r cent., L i f e D e p a r t m e n t , Reserve l o r Re-insurance, Accident De­ partment, P r e s e n t v a l u e I n s t a l l m e n t L i f e Policies, R e s e r v e t o r C l a i m s against E m p l o y e r s , Losses in process of a d j u s t m e n t , L i f e P r e m i u m s p a i d in a d v a n c e , Special R e s e r v e f o r u n p a i d taxes, rents, etc., Special Keserve, L i a b i l i t y D e p a r t m e n t , -

NATIONAL PHONOGRAPH C O . NEW YORK.

M A Y

T W E N T Y - E I G H T H ,

1 9 0 0

visible p a r t i a l l y o r t o t a l l y t h r o u g h o u t t h e w h o l e o f N o r t h America, between the h o u r s of 7 a n d g i n the m o r n i n g . P u t your r u l e r o n a m a p o f t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s a n d d r a w a l i n e through N o r f o l k , V a . , a n d N e w O r l e a n s , a n d y o u h a v e the path o f t h e T o t a l E c l i p s e . I n a l l o t h e r p a r t s o f t h e c o u n t r y , t h e sun w i l l be o n l y p a r t i a l l y o b s c u r e d ; t h e n b u y a P h o n o g r a p h : it is the perfect talking machine.

E x c e s s S e c u r i t y to P o l i c y - h o l d e r s , Surplus,

-

-

-

$20,406,734.00 1,500,369.22 783,193.00 586,520.26 219,833.02 33,178.11 110.000.00 100,000.00

$23.730-827.61

Total Liabilities, -

-

-

STATISTICS

-

T O

4,020,683.95 $3,020,683.95

D A T E .

Life Department. L i f e I n s u r a n c e in f o r c e , $100,334,554.00 N e w L i f e I n s u r a n c e w r i t t e n i n 1899, 17,165,686.00 Insurance on installment plan at commuted value. $1,522,417.06 R e t u r n e d to P o l i c y - h o l d e r s i n 1899. 16,039,380.95 R e t u r n e d t o P o l i c y - h o l d e r s since 1864,

IMPORTANT TO INVESTORS! F o r the past three m o n t h s we h a v e i n f o r m e d y o u in each issue of this m a g a z i n e t h a t m o n e y c o u l d be m a d e in M i n i n g Stocks, that we h a d sold stock last y e a r w h i c h b a d increased from 500 to 1500 p e r c e n t . , t h a t we h a v e h a d y e a r s of suc­ cessful e x p e r i e n c e i n M i n i n g m a t t e r s . W e n o w c a l l y o u r attention to a p a r t i c u l a r l y p r o m i s i n g i n v e s t m e n t , a c o m b i ­ nation o f M i n i n g a n d S m e l t i n g i n one of t h e most solid e n ­ terprises i n that line e v e r offered o n t h e m a r k e t . A sure m o n e y t n a k e r a n d d i v i d e n d p a y e r . O n e t h a t will c o n s t a n t l y increase i n v a l u e a n d d i v i d e n d s . R e m e m b e r t h a t we f u r n i s h t h e h i g h e s t references a n d g u a r a n t e e e v e r y s t a t e m e n t we m a y m a k e . W r i t e for par­ ticulars to

Accident Department. N u m b e r A c c i d e n t C l a i m s p a i d i n 1899, Whole n u m b e r Accident Claims paid. R e t u r n e d to P o l i c y - h o l d e r s i n 1899, R e t u r n e d to P o l i c y - h o l d e r s sin< e 1864,

15,386 339.636 $1,237.977 54 23.695.539-94

Totals. R e t u r n e d to P o l i c y - h o l d e r s in 1899, R e t u r n e d to P o l i c y - h o l d e r s since 1864,

The Kendrick Promotion Co. DENVER,

$27,760,511.56

$3,750,394.40 39.734,920.89

S Y L V E S T E R C. D U N H A M , Vice-Pres't. J O H N E . M O R R I S , Secretary. H . J . M E S S E N G E R , Actuary. E D W A R D V . P R E S T O N , S u p ' t of A g e n c i e s . J . B. L E W I S , M . D . , Surgeon and Adjuster.

COLO.

C a p i t a l a n d S u r p l u s , $200,000. Mention this Magazine.

P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers. 107


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

" C o l o r a d o t h e

M a g n i f i c e n t "

has many beautiful resorts, but the loveliest is famous watering place, Manitou, near Color Springs, best reached by the GREAT ROCK ISLAND ROUTE, the only direct line from the East—also best line to Deríber. Limited Train —Broad Vestibuled Sleepers—Buffet Library Cars—Best Dining Car Service» Write for " Colorado the Magnificent, descriptive of Rocky Mountain health and pleasure resorts, sent free by John Sebastian, G. P. A,, Chicag ff

ADVERTISERS

PROVE

IT

ITS

CIRCULATION

T A K E S

T H R E E

GIANTS

Three Triple Deck Presses to run off the circulation of the

Minneapolis Journal It lias the greatest press capacity o f a n y paper i n the Northwest. T h e s e presses p r i n t 75,000 twelve-page papers per hour. T h e J o u r n a l ' s S u p e r i o r i t y o f C i r c u l a t i o n is proven another w a y :

A D V E R T I S E R S P R O V E IT "HE J O U R N A L carried more a d v e r t i s i n g i n i t s s i x issues than any daily a n d Sunday paper c o m b i n e d i n the two cities.

A Peep at the Journal Presses. The following is a correct statement of the advertising carried by the Minneapolis and St. Paul papers for month of February, iooo : The Journal (24 days), Hit i*. I T Column* THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL T H E T R I B U N E (24 days), 519-15 " LUCIAN S W I F T , M A N A G E R T H E T R I B U N E (daily and Sunday combined, 28 days), 701.05 " T H E T I M E S (24 days), 550.07 " Furelitn Advertí*!»* Department : C. J. KIJ.I.SON, Mgr. T H E T I M E S (daily and Sunday combined, 28 days), 794.11 " T H E D I S P A T C H (24 days), . . . . . » New York Office: 86-87-88 T R I B U N E B L D G . T H E P I O N E E R PRESS (24 days), . . . . 375.09 " Chicago Office : 308 S T O C K K X C H A N G E B L D G . T H R P I O N E E R PRESS (daily and Sun.combined, 28days) 623.16 " T H E G L O B E (24 days), 371 .n " RALPH II. BOOTH, Maiiuger Western Department. T H E G L O B E (daily and Sunday combined, 28 days), 389.05 " 77I

ADVERTISERS

PROVE

ITS

CIRCULATION

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 108


McCLURE'S

SWISS

MAGAZINE.

GUIDES,

brought from Switzerland for the purpose, w i l l show holders of

Canadian Pacific Railway Tickets the wonders oí

BANFF

in the LAKES

Canadian m

THE CLOUDS O F T H E S E L K I R K S ON THE

GLACIERS C A N A D I A N

T H R E E

Rockies

P A C I F I C

SISTERS

IN

T H E

R A I L W A Y

CANADIAN ROCKIES.

Address any agent of the Company for illustrated pamphlets, m New York Philadelphia Baltimore Washington Boston Buffalo Detroit Chicago

351 Broadway 62Ò Chestnut Street 129 East Baltimore Street 1229 Pennsylvania Avenue 197 Washington Street 2^3 Main Street « Street, W. 228 South Clark Street F < , r t

E . V. Skinner H. McMurtrie C. G. Osburn W. W. MerKle H. J. Colvin A. J. Shulman A. E. Edmonds J. F. Lee

Minneapolis 11-9 South Third Street W.B. Chandler St. Paul W. S. Thorn Pittsburg 400 Smith Building F . W. Salisbury San Francisco 627 Market Street M. M. Stern Toronto 1 King Street, Kast A. H. Notman Montreal General Passenger Agent C. E. E. Ussher Winnipeg General Passenger Agent C.E.McPherson Vancouver Ass't General Passenger Agt. E. J. COyle

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 109


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Upon the specially constructed and magnificently appointed new LONG). C R S Ä " The unqualified success met with bv the Annual Summer Cruises of the Hamburg-American Line to.the Land of the Midnight Sun and to the Orient has prompted this Company to extend this delightful teature of its services to a CRUISE AROUND T H E W O R L D With this end in view, it has constructed a Twin-Screw Cruising Yacht, which is to be used exclusively for these Cruises, and which by its size and especial arrangements will add materially to the pleasures of this delightful trio. She will carrvfirst-classpassengers only, and will not carry mails or cargo. Ine state-rooms are equipped with everything to enhance comfort. Suites with private baths and toilets, staterooms for the occupancy of single mssengers, magnificent saloons, a gymnasium for exercise and recreation, and a grand promenade are provided. THE FIRST C R U I S F ^nich ">= followim* itinerary ispropnsed: from IlnmburB. Sept. 95 ; from CherIIIL, I ^ K U I 3 C , borrir Sent 87 1900. Direct connection can be made from New York by the HamburgAmerican Line's Twin-Screw Express S.S. Auguste Victoria, leaving New York Sept. 13. 1900,011e in Cherbourg Sept 20 ana 111 Hamburg Sept. 21, 1900, or bv any earlier steamer of ihis line LI*hon. íühraltar. Mee, Genoa. Athens. Constantinople, Jaffa (Jerusalem), Port Said (Egypt), lámanla (Egypt). Rombai ("visits to Poona, Khandalla. Karl! Cave, Elephanta Island). At Bombay passengers may al^o leave the yacht and make the grand overland tour through northern India, visiting Ahmrdahad. Jeyfiorc, Dtllu, Acra, La-wnfore LucknoTU, Renarli, Darftelitif, and Calmita, where thev will a™ain board the " Prinzessin Victoria I.uise." which will have proceeded from Bombay, via Colombo to Pnlenttn. After enibarkin" the passeneers, the cruise will be continued to Singapore. Manila. Honekonç (excursions to Macao and Caniori). Shanghai. RaaMkl. Kobe (here facilities will be provided to take the passengers for an Inland tour to Hiozc Osaka, A'ara, and Kioto), The steamer then proceerlsto Yokohama ( in order not to overtax the facilities at hand the passengers will be divided into four sections, in torn visitin" (il Fiwshima and Kamakura : (2) Miyanoshita ; (3) Tokyo; Mflfttta), Honolulu, thence to Hilo and San Franchino, where the American passengers will leave the yacht, and from where they will receive railroad transportation to their homes. T H F S P r O N I Ì f D I I I Ç P starting from San Francisco on lanuarv 26. root, will follow about the same itineraryas ina-, v r v u i d U , above in reversed order. For further particulars, rates, etc., address NEW YORK, 37 Broadway. LOUIS 100 No. Broadway. CHICAGO, 159 Randolph St. l o s St. ™ 80 State SAN FRANCISCO, 401 California St.

Prinzessin Uictorîa Cuise" ™*

T

f o r

fiambura-flmerican Cine,

ggf

Y. lavo Ace/'cf

T o u r

I M

o f

t h e

jgreat

M a c k i n a c is I n d i a n f o r " I s l a n d of g G i a n t F a i r i e s " — o n e o f t h e m they say formed Arched Rock. O d d formations, a n d h i s t o r i c interest m a k e M a c k i n a c t i t e a " C e m o f the I n l a n d S e a s . " T i c k e t s , S t . L o u i s t o l * Detroit, through Lake H u r o n to M a c k i n a c a t h r o u g h L a k e M i c h i g a n t o C h i c a g o , back t o i l S t . L o u i s , cost $ 2 5 . 5 0 . O u r b o o k l e t suggests |

Ei. .

-•vit

l ^ k e s j

'Js

Summer Tours $ 2 0 to $ 1 0 0 illustrates t h e m w i t h b e a u t i f u l engravings a n d gives valuable i n f o r m a t i o n t o the c o n t e m p l a t i n g s u m m e r v a c a t i o n i s t . Bound in c l o t h — y o u w i l l w a n t t o preserve i t . It is free. for any inform.H,"you, '"H?" T

f

y

r S

m m e r

"1 t n " " y o "u h

o a t

h

:

ou

' ^ °™ «««* >' -ant it to eot you, etc. A.k W w

question, and 5n make I I , ' ' t^" í " '' / " « '» cheerfully anawer any and all pea^roofyonr "ummerou^ * ' V >"> ™°™y ™ ¿ «'''<»«« the but two cents postage. Address, We may be able to suggest just the trip you have been looking for. It will cost you S

v o , n mind

hich

S U M M E R

T O U R

D E P A R T M E N T ,

u

W A B A S H

RAILROAD,

Please mention McCIure's when you write to advertisers. 110


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

YOUR V A C A T I O N IN C O L O R A D O D

Burlington Rome

O you quite realize that in all the world there is no scenery more gorgeous, more majestic and awe-inspiring than that of Colorado ? Couple this with these facts — T h a t the climate of Colorado is simply delightful. That the dry, pure air is wonderfully healthful and invigor­ ating; and that the hotels are of unusual excellence. T h e n consider the question of spending your vacation there this summer.

C o l o r a d o is not f a r a w a y . T h e B u r l i n g t o n R o u t e runs " o n e n i g h t o n the r o a d " trains f r o m both C h i c a g o a n d S t . L o u i s , a n d they are l u x u r i o u s l y f u r n i s h e d . S u m p t u o u s l i b r a r y s m o k i n g cars a n d d i n i n g cars à la carte m a k e the trip s e e m very s h o r t . T h e n d u r i n g the s u m m e r m o n t h s t o u r i s t tickets are s o l d at g r e a t l y r e d u c e d rates, s o the e x p e n s e is not great. L e t m e s e n d y o u m a p s , t i m e tables, t i c k e t rates ; a n d i f y o u want to k n o w m o r e about the c o u n t r y enclose s i x cents i n p o s t a g e f o r o u r book on Colorado. It is a b e a u t i f u l w o r k , of l i t e r a r y excellence a n d p r o f u s e l y i l l u s t r a t e d .

P . S. E U S T I S , General Passenger Agent, C . B . & Q. R . R., Chicago, 111.

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s

when you 111

w r i t e to

advertisers.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

AGENTS EARN SELLING

lé. «

4fe

TRANSPARENT HANDLE

WANT

AGENTS Good Commission

DOUBLE DUTY j^^^

to

$ 2 5 0 . 0 0

a month

KNIVES.

A n a r t i c l e o f e v e r y d a y u s e j e v e r y p e r s o n a p o s s i b l e cust o m e r ; b e s t of m a t e r i a l s a n d w o r k m a n s h i p . N a m e , a d d r e s s and e m b l e m s of societies a n d trades, p h o t o s , etc., beneath handles. M a n y o t h e r a d v a n t a g e s m a k e l a r g e a n d r a p i d sales.

WE

TRADE

$ 7 5 . 0 0

EVERYWHERE. Paid.

S e n d 2-cent s t a m p f o r terms a n d

circulars.

NOVELTY CUTLERY CO., 5 Bar St., Canton, 0.

It needs no skill, It needs no art, Á child can work The hardest part. Lightning Freezer.

MARK

ï-acid cured T h i s is the best tobacco pouch made (special non-ac ires that uiiii appeal at once 1to every ubber) containing new features pipe iîr.i> and a n d cigarette r-'ttrziTftti* smoker. cmnlrcr T Tlhi fe lseparate i f n a r a t i ' nrtrkf-r. pocket, made lili of a single strip, holds matches or paper, keeping them always handy and dry. Athletes, bicyclists, sportsmen, yachtsmen, canoeists and smokers generally, say they are the best and o s t convenientt pouches repoucnes they iney ever ever used. useu. T ih nee corners cornerb are arc rcing double wear. Three standard sizes : No. 4, 60c ; No. 5,70c; No. 6, 80c. Ask your dealer. If he cannot supply you one will be mailed on receipt of price in money order or stamps. m

"LOOK FOR THE POCKET" COSMIC U T I L I T Y C O . Dept. B .

18 C O R T L A N D T

A beautiful child's book In three colors free. A d dress North Bros. M f g . C o . . Philadelphia. P a .

ST., N E W YORK

SURE PAYING BUSINESS. $12 5 GOLD, SILVER, NICKEL AND METAL PLATING. MR, R E E D MADE »88 FIRST 8 DATS.

NEW QUICK

A

MONTH

EASY. PROCESS.

Mr. Cox -writes:

" G e t all I can do. Plate 30 seti a day. Agents all making money. So can you. Gents or leadle*, you ean positively make #6 to $15 a day, at home or traveling taking orders, using and selling Prof. Gray's Platers. Unequaled for plating watches, jewelry, tableware, bicycles, all metal goods. Heavy plate. W armnted. No experience necessary. L E T US START YOU IN BUSINESS. "We do plating ourselves. Have experience. Manufacture the only practical outfits, including all tools, lathes and materials. A l l sizes complete. Ready for work when received. GuarElegant business."

Mr. Woodward earns $170 a month.

anteed. \ c « modern methods. W E T E A C H VOU the art, furnish recipes, formulas and trade secrets F R F E . Failure Impossible. T H E ROYAL, OUR NEW DIPPING PROCESS. Quick. Easy. Latest method. Goods dipped in melted metal, taken out istnutly wjth finest most brilliant plate, ready to deliver. T h i c k plate every time. Guaranteed 6 to 10 years. A bov plates from 2O0 to 800 pieces tableware dally. Ño polishing:, grinding'or worli necessary. DEMAND FOR PLATING IS ENORMOUS. Every family.hotel and restaurant have goods plated instead of buying new. It's cheaper and better. You will not need to canvass. Our agents have al! the work they c a n do. People bring it. You can hire boys cheap to do your plating, the same as we, and solicitors to gather work for a small per cent. Replating is honest and legitimate. Customers always delighted. W E A R E AN OLD ESTABLISHED F I R M . Been in business for years. Know what is required. Our customers have the

benefit of our experience. W E A R E RESPONSIBLE a n d Guarantee Everything:. Reader, here is a chance of a lifetime to eo in business for yourself. WE START YOU. Now Is the time to make money. W R I T E TO-DAY. Our new Plan, Samples, Testimonials and Circulare F R E E . Don't r.T.5t.

S e n d us vour address any way.

Address,

D . F . G R A Y & C O . . PLATING WORKS, 505 E L M ST., CINCINNATI, OHIO. Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 112


McCLURE'S

FACTORY

THE

OF T H E

LARGEST

MOBILE

COMPANY

AUTOMOBILE

MAGAZINE.

OF

AMERICA—VIEW

FACTORY

LOOKING

IN

SOUTH.

T H E

WORLD.

LOCATED AT KINGSLAND POINT ON THE FAMOUS PHILIPSE MANOR PROPERTY. THE WORK OF PREPARATION REQUIRED TO BUILD SIX HUNDRED CARRIAGES PER MONTH. HISTORY OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE HORSELESS CARRIAGE IN THE UNITED STATES.

T

H E first M O B I L E S were turned out at the factory of T H E M O B I L E C O M P A N Y O F A M E R I C A at K i n g s l a n d - P o i n t - o n - t h e - H u d s o n d u r i n g the m o n t h of M a r c h .

N i n e months before, two hundred a n d

thirty-three acres of the famous P h i l i p s e M a n o r property, h a v i n g nearly a mile of river frontage on the

H u d s o n a n d bisected b y the N e w Y o r k C e n t r a l R a i l w a y , was purchased w i t h the idea of b u i l d i n g there an automobile factory of such extent that the cost of p r o d u c t i o n c o u l d be b r o u g h t to the lowest possible

figure.

While

the factory was i n course of erection, a corps of engineers and experts under the direction of the M e s s r s . F r a n c i s and F r e e l a n d Stanley was engaged in s t r e n g t h e n i n g and i m p r o v i n g the carriage a n d perfecting methods

and

special tools for the manufacture of the a u t o m o b i l e carriage invented by the M e s s r s . Stanley. The

carriage thus perfected is to be k n o w n as the " W E S T C H E S T E R

COUNTY

tinguish it from the carriages of the S t a n l e y design turned out at the w o r k s in Massachusetts.

M O D E L " to dis It carries the very

latest improvements, a n d the orders for its c o n s t r u c t i o n have been to use only the finest quality of material and to spare no pains to t u r n out the best of w h i c h the most skilful w o r k m a n s h i p is capable. "WESTCHESTER

It is believed that the

C O U N T Y M O D E L , " built at the factory of T H E M O B I L E C O M P A N Y O F A M E R I C A ,

is not excelled in strength, d u r a b i l i t y a n d excellence of d e s i g n .

WHAT THE MOBILE IS. The " W E S T C H E S T E R

COUNTY

M O D E L , " built b y T H E M O B I L E C O M P A N Y O F A M E R I C A ,

is a horseless carriage w e i g h i n g less than five h u n d r e d pounds, a n d c o s t i n g but six h u n d r e d and fifty d o l l a r s . Compactly built, w i t h w o r k m a n s h i p of the finest q u a l i t y , capable of t r a v e l i n g twenty miles or more an hour or reducing its speed so that it c a n take its place in the s l o w l y m o v i n g a n d s t o p p i n g line of travel i n the great cities, ¡t is operated

by steam u n d e r circumstances w h i c h render it absolutely safe.

M o r e than a thousand Stanley

carriages of the Massachusetts m o d e l are now i n p u b l i c use, and there has never been a single b o i l e r accident. The fuel shuts off a u t o m a t i c a l l y w h e n the steam reaches one h u n d r e d and sixty pounds. which opens at one h u n d r e d a n d seventy p o u n d s .

T h e r e is a safety-valve

E a c h boiler is w o u n d w i t h piano-wire a n d tested up to six

hundred pounds pressure, a n d is c a l c u l a t e d to w i t h s t a n d a strain up to thirty-five hundred pounds pressure to the square i n c h .

R e c e n t l y , as an experiment, a boiler was placed in an excavation, a l l valves closed, and the fire

turned on full head.

A gauge carried off to a distance showed a steam pressure of twelve hundred p o u n d s .

Then

the steam began to d r o p , o w i n g to a s l i g h t escape around the head of each of the copper tubes w h i c h compose the boiler flues, a n d the pressure d i d not rise above the twelve hundred pounds indicated, u n t i l a l l the water was exhausted.

I f ' t h e water s u p p l y s h o u l d be exhausted i n the boiler t h r o u g h oversight, the pressure drops and the

boiler ceases to p r o d u c e steam, a n d w i t h the decreased pressure of the steam the carriage comes to a stop a n d the pump w h i c h supplies water ceases to w o r k .

Please mention McClure s when you write to advertisers. 112a


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

REGARDING THE PRICE OF $650. T h e factory of the c o m p a n y has been fitted u p w i t h the most perfect m a c h i n e r y a n d special tools, all new and o f the latest design for m a n u f a c t u r i n g o n the most extensive scale. b r i n g the price w i t h i n

the reach of every class.

made i s S I X H U N D R E D

A N D FIFTY

I n this w a y the c o m p a n y proposes to

T h e charge

D O L L A R S , payable

u p o n delivery at the K i n g s l a n d P o i n t station of the N e w Y o r k Central Railway.

T h e c l a i m made for T H E M O B I L E

PANY'S " W E S T C H E S T E R

COUNTY

COM­

M O D E L " is that it

has no superior i n the w o r l d ' s markets to-day.

THE MOBILE'S RADIUS OF MOTION. One of the improvements i n the " W E S T C H E S T E R C O U N T Y M O D E L " is a tank made from seamless copper t u b i n g , g i v i n g a fuel-storage capacity double that i n the o r i g i n a l Stanley carriage, a n d equal to one hundred miles' run o n smooth, level roads. T h e M O B I L E can travel over a n y class of road, rough or smooth; b u t it must be d i s t i n c t l y understood that the rougher the road the more fuel required.

THE MOBILE BUILT TO CLIMB THE STEEPEST HILL ROADS. NOK1H

E N D MOBILE COMPANY'S

FACTORY.

T h e question of steep grades is an a n n o y i n g one for the average horseless carriage. N o t so for the M O B I L E . I t can c l i m b o n à fairly made road up a fourteen per cent, grade (which is considered a pretty steep country road) at the rate of fifteen m i l e s an hour. During last summer, M r . F r e e l a n d O . Stanley a n d his wife ascended the l o n g , steep road u p M o u n t W a s h i n g t o n in two hours a n d twenty minutes.

IN THE MATTER OF COMFORT. T h e M O B I L E is perfectly smooth i l l operation. It moves without j a r o r v i b r a t i o n of a n y k i n d . When in m o t i o n , the products of c o m b u s t i o n are carried underneath the carriage, a n d neither heat n o r odor of any kind arises. T h e machinery is noiseless except i n c l i m b i n g stiff grades, when a slight puffing is a u d i b l e , but nothing in the least degree objectionable. T h e r e are more than a dozen improvements in the present carriage over the Stanley carriage as originally put out. T h e first and most important of these is i n the engine. T h e second relates to the gasoline tank which now holds double the quantity of o i l formerly carried. A seamless copper tube, very s t r o n g i n construction and elliptical i n shape, secures this much to be desired result. A n o t h e r marked improvement is i n the ball bearings of the engine, w h i c h are one-half i n c h instead of three-eighths i n c h as formerly, experience s h o w i n g that the increase of strength thus obtained is an item of great importance. T h e other improvements are largely i n details of c o n s t r u c t i o n , no effort i n time o r money h a v i n g been spared to work out the most perfect results. T h e question is frequently asked, " W h a t guarantee is g i v e n to the i n t e n d i n g p u r c h a s e r ? " T o this we reply that we guarantee o u r materials a n d w o r k m a n s h i p to be the best that money c a n produce. O u r factory, however, is open to the inspection of i n t e n d i n g purchasers, a n d it o n l y needs a visit to the various departments to satisfy an expert as to the excellence of the w o r k b e i n g turned o u t . T h e claims w h i c h the M O B I L E makes upon the p u b l i c confidence may be briefly s u m m e d u p as follows :— ' First. The lightest, most compact, best designed and most perfect horseless carriage now before the public. Second. The highest class of materials and workmanship. Third.

Cost—but $ 6 5 0 .

Fourth. Simplicity i n construction, odorless when running, and almost noiseless. Fifth. It can speed at a gait u p to thirty miles per hour or follow the slowest truck. Sixth. It is operated by steam, the standard power cf the world, under perfect regulation and test. Seventh. Its fuel is inexpensive ; i t carries a supply for fifty to one hundred miles, according to the character of the road, which can be procured at any drug-store at slight expense. Eighth. It embraces all the latest improvements, and is confidently recommended as the

most perfect piece of machinery now on the market. T h e probabilities are that not one automobile carriage will be built during the coming season where t will be required to supply the demand. T h e impression prevails that there are a great n u m b e r of horseless car­ riage factories b e i n g erected a n d that the output w i l l be large d u r i n g the c o m i n g season.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 112b

T h e fact remains that


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

there are not i n o p e r a t i o n i n the U n i t e d States at this time factories capable of t u r n i n g out twenty machines a day other than the S t a n l e y carriage. A f t e r three years of experiment o n the part of the M e s s r s . Stanley and nine months spent on the c o n s t r u c t i o n of a factory, we are o n l y n o w in a position to turn out carriages on a considerable scale! A c a r e f u l l y p r e p a r e d b o o k of i n s t r u c t i o n s w i l l be furnished w i t h each carriage sold, a n d it is possible for any one w i t h some m e c h a n i c a l k n o w l e d g e to master the h a n d l i n g of the M O B I L E therein g i v e n .

U n m e c h a n i c a l purchasers

from the

instructions

l i v i n g at a distance who cannot come to the factory for instructions

are advised to secure a careful a n d competent engineer, a m a n of g o o d j u d g m e n t and l i k e l y to be t h o r o u g h , who can master the m a c h i n e a n d then instruct the purchaser. INSPECTION

T h e M O B I L E carriage, " W E S T C H E S T E R

OK

VEHICLES.

COUNTY

M O D E L , " may be found from 9 A . M . to 6 P . M .

in front of the N e w Y o r k Offices of the c o m p a n y , F i f t h A v e n u e a n d F o r t y - s e c o n d S t . , and the T i m e s B u i l d i n g ,

THE

HEADLESS

HOKSEMAN

S

BKIDGE

AS

IT

WAS

FOKMEKLV.

I n t e n d i n g purchasers are i n v i t e d to visit the factory at K i n g s l a n d P o i n t , T a r r y t o w n - o n - t h e - I I u d s o n , where i n s t r u c t i o n w i l l be given i n h a n d l i n g the carriage. KINGSLAND

POINT

WELL

ADAPTED

FOR

TRYING

AUTOMOBILES.

T h e P h i l i p s e M a n o r property contains m a n y beautiful roadways,

steep, level, g o o d , and some b a d , so

that the purchaser or i n t e n d i n g purchaser w i l l find it a d m i r a b l y adapted as a place to try automobiles. T a r r y t o w n is a little more than half an hour's r u n from N e w Y o r k b y the fast trains.

O f the fifty-nine

a c c o m m o d a t i o n trains w h i c h stop at T a r r y t o w n station, fourteen each day stop at K i n g s l a n d P o i n t u p o n a p p l i c a ­ t i o n to the conductor. the H u d s o n .

K i n g s l a n d P o i n t itself is considered to be one of the two or three most beautiful places o n

It stands w e l l out i n the T a p p a n Zee w i t h G r a n t ' s T o m b visible o n a clear day to the south, a n d a

great stretch of water to the n o r t h off i n t o the H i g h l a n d s .

T h e place is full of historic memories.

P h i l i p s e M a n o r and m i l l , more t h a n two h u n d r e d years o l d , are s t i l l s t a n d i n g . B r i d g e " is near b y .

Horseman's

T h e m a n s i o n was the center o r i g i n a l l y of the P h i l i p s e estate, w h i c h embraced two h u n d r e d

square miles and reached from S p u y t e n D u y v e l to P e e k s k i l l . manufacture

The original

T h e " Headless

It seems proper that here should be opened the

of automobiles, for here were b e g u n more than two hundred years ago m a n u f a c t u r i n g

operations

on the H u d s o n .

T H E " M O B I L E " C O M P A N Y OF AMERICA IOHN BRISBEN WALKER, President

WILLIAM A . BELL, Vice-President

NEW Y O R K CITY OFFICES : Fifth Avenue and Forty-Second Street

180 Times Building

Factory: Kingsland Point, Tarrytown-on-Hudson, N . Y . P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u rr ee ' s w h e n y o u write to

112C II2C

advertisers.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

7

if.

BUYS A DESK CASE

Worth 47 Pigeonholes and any number of books. Placed in the top drawer of your desk it becomes a receptacle for all sorts of information that, in its absence, is scattered throughout your desk and office. It brings to your notice each day those matters that should have immediate attention. It replaces note books that are useless because not properly indexed and because the worth­ less matter cannot be removed. ü

m a

eo

f

THF T A ^ F ^ selected quarter-sawed white oak, with three 1***3 V / i O C built-up bottom, isfinelyfinishedin golden oak, rubbed and bizhly poLLahed, fitted with adjustable follower, andfilledwith 400 Linen Bristol Record Cards, 3x5 inches, ruled ;1 set ot Alphabetical Indexes; 1 set I H T Indexes; 20 Blank Guide Cards, Tariouf colors, for special indexes. The box is nine inches Ion*. Include I Oc. extra for each alditional inch required to fit the width of your desk drawer. If not satisfactory, we will return your money. S E N D FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOG.

THE SHAW=WALKER CO., MUSKE00N, MICH. The Largest Eielmire MflkprS of Card SvSteHlS '° 'he World.

SPECIAL OFFER

LITERARY

ir, a n d S ^ ' ^ Ö

THE EARLY LIFE OP LINCOLN, by Ida M. Tarbett.

FOLK.

W e pay cash for short stories, poems, etc. We

Foreign orders for Magazine and Book will require fr.io additional for postage

THE S. S. McCLURE CO., 141 = 155 E . 25th St., New York.

are looking- for another " D a v i d H a r u m . "

We Start

beginners o n the road to fame and fortune. Some writers, to-day u n k n o w n , w i l l be famous next year—are you one ? S e n d self-addressed s t a m p e d envelope for particulars to the SUBSCRIBERS' 82

MONTHLY Fifth

PUBLISHING

Popular Library Edition

THE

LIFE By

COMPANY,

Avenue, N e w Y o r k . 6 0 l h Thousand

O F NAPOLEON

Miss I D A M .

TARBELL,

Conceded to be the most complete, accurate, and yet concise Short Life of Napoleon ever published. Ä50 ILLUSTRATIONS including many of the now famous portraits of Napoleon, and the most renowned of the his­ torical pictures made prominent during his career. Handsomely bound in Buckram, -withgold lettering and borders • $z.00

THE S. S. McCLURE CO., 1 « East 25th Street, New York City

yard.

A BEAUTIFUL MANTEL

7c Ä yard,

W e offer this mantel as i l l u s t r a t e d , made of q u a r t e r sawed oak or b i r c h w i t h a nice polish finish, complete with best q u a l i t y enameled t i l e - f a c i n g a n d hearth Í 6 0 X 1 8 inches) with club h o u s e g r a t e a n d plated frame at the recordb r e a k i n g price,

AT ALL FIRST CLASS DRY GOODS; STORES O R WRITE TO

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C E N T R A L MAWTEL CO.,

NEW' YORK.

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for Illustrated Catalogue.

1003 Pine Street. St. Louis. Mo.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

TM

It does away with the slightest hint o f a ridge at bust and shoulder blades! E v e r y line of the figure is rounded off so's to give the waist a trim and chic appearance. It's a luxuriously cozy modelâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;low-busted and medium, and made of cool, tough French Lisle net or batiste with dainty touches o f lace and baby ribbon at top and bottom. E v e r y dealer has them for you. There's a special "Shirt Waist" corset for every figure. See that y o u get the style built and intended for your proportions. T h e price, $ 1 . 0 0 .

If you can't obtain your size at home, write to us, mentioning your dealer's name and enclose the price of the corset and we will forward the corset to you prepaid the day of the receipt of your letter.

WEINGARTEN BROS., Department C.

&

377

Manufacturers.

179 Broadway, New York.

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McCLURE'S MAGAZINE ANNOUNCEMENT The June and other c o m i n g numbers, besides .interesting matter of various other kinds, will be especially notable in authoritative articles descriptive of the latest new devices and enterprises that are practically

Building the World Anew The Nicaragua C a n a l . — T h e Canal is now practically assured, and it will be the greatest achievement in constructive engineering that the world has thus far seen. M r . Charles M . L i n c o l n , of the editorial staff of the New York Herald, after making a life-long study of the general subject and spending months with the engineers in Nicaragua, has written an article telling through what k i n d of country the C a n a l will run, how the immense difficulties in its path will be surmounted, and the wonderful advantages it will give to the world of commerce. In an early number, w i t h maps, diagrams, and pictures. The Cape Nome Gold Fields.—These seem io be the richest gold fields ever discovered, and thousands upon thousands of people will make the long journey to them this summer. A fully illustrated article in the June number w i l l tell how to reach them and what the traveler will find when he gets there, besides g i v i n g an account of the almost fabulous richness that the fields have thus far disclosed. Railroad Development in C h i n a . — A n article by M r . W . B . Parsons, chiefengineer of the A m e r i c a n - C h i n a Development C o . , and author of the interesting article in the A p r i l number on " T h e A m e r i c a n Invasion of C h i n a , " w i l l tell just how China is off to-day for railroads and what immense development in that respect—to the revolu­ tion of the world's trade—is now impending. T h e article will be fully illustrated from photographs taken by the author himself in his journeys in China. Engineering Feats in Bridge-Building.—In no department have the engi­ neers been more constantly beating their own best record—to the shoving of the severed quarters of the earth into each other's arms—than in bridge-building. T h e i r feats in this have been marvelous and fairly heroic; and the story of them is more interesting than any fiction. It will be told in an early article, and fully illustrated. New Experiments in F l y i n g . — M r . O. Chanute, who has been studying and experimenting to solve the problem of human flight for over forty years, will describe, in the June number, some machines of his own that seem to prepare the way toward the final flying-machine and his recent experiences and adventures with them. Illustrated from photographs taken by the author.

SINGULAR From the Secret Diplomatic

5T0RIE5 History of the United States

These are strange unpublished chapters of our own history. E a c h will be written by some person especially conversant with the particular matters of which it treats. In several instances, the writers have been themselves actors in the episode that they relate, and are perhaps the only persons l i v i n g who could tell the story of it.

112f


McCL

URE'S

MAGAZINE—

ANNOUNCEMEN

T.

THE 19th AND 20th CENTURIES As Presented at the Paris Exposition, the One in Its Achievements, the Other in Its Promises T h i s will be an Interpretation—not a conventional description—of the Paris E x p o s i t i o n . It will be in the form of interviews and articles, g i v i n g the impressions of various eminent experts who will visit the E x p o s i t i o n to study in assemblage the latest performance and promise in their several specialties. It will be a series of conclusions by the highest authorities, from this greatest of exhibitions, regarding the recent past and the near future in many departments of human knowledge and activity.

PROFESSIONAL CRIMINALS AND THEIR LIFE Stories by Josiah Flynt Willard of the Men Outside the Law F o l l o w i n g his well-known studies of tramp life, M r . W i l l a r d has lived a year as one of themselves among the professional criminals of the large cities. In a series of interesting articles, he will exhibit them as they really are, and as no writer has ever qualified himself by actual observation and experience to portray them before. H e will describe their relations to each other and to the administrators of the law in dread of whom a l l their life is passed; how they ply their several nefarious tricks and crafts; and what they are as simple human beings—in their minds and hearts, in their hopes, habits, and desires. E a c h article will be fully illustrated.

SHORT STORIES Strong, interesting short stories, depicting usually some of the finer or stranger phases of the life of to-day, and usually illustrated by the best artists, will be a special feature of each number. We have good stories in hand by all the young writers who have lately won general recognition through the medium of M C C L U R E ' S ; and in early numbers will also appear stories by Bret Marte Robert Barr Tighe Hopkins

Sarah Orne Jewett Hamlin Garland Gillett Burgess

Shan F. Bullock W. A. Fraser Clinton Ross

But as heretofore, fine, stirring, noble true stories, no less than be a constant feature ; and among such we may m e n t i o n :

COLONIAL

fiction,

will

FIGHTS A N D FIGHTERS

A New Series of Oreat Stories from History by the Rev. C. T. Brady In the June number, M r . B r a d y will tell the story of R e i d ' s great sea fight in the " G e n e r a l A r m s t r o n g " against a whole British squadron. Then he will begin his new series, one d e p i c t i n g the more heroic men and achievement of the Colonial period. These stories, while dramatically presented, will always be strictly historic; and not only so, but in many instances M r . Brady will be able to give new facts drawn from unpublished material to which he has access. T h e stories will be fully illustrated.

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rams M o v e the WorlJL. iteep t l x e m HeaWVv

hxsX ntvei* mii{3,

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Makers of "Ideal" Spring Beds.

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XIV

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thing ir*

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T H E L A R G E S T ANI> BEST E0T7IPPEBP R I V A T E INSTITUTION IN T H E WORLD.

For the exclusive treatment of cancer, tumors and all other forms of malignant and benign new growths, except cancer and tumors within the abdominal cavity. The Berkshire Hills Sanatorium is conducted by a graduate of the regular School of medicine. Remedies are not withheld as secret from physicians ofstanding. Ask your family physician to make a personal investigation. He will be given every opportunity to gain a knowledge of our method and its success. "When writing for information please describe the case as clearly as is possible and state its situation. Address Ors. W. E. BROWN *fc SON, North Adam«. Mans.

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Impure Blood, Pimples, Tetter, Eczema and Acne

MAGAZINE.

4

A r e p e r m a n e n t l y c u r e d by

Sulphurne Price $i, express paid. is pure s u l p h u r in liquid f o r m , — a new chemical discovery. S u l p h u r heretofore was considered insoluble. S u l p h u m e w h e n taken internally, and applied as a lotion, will cure any s k i n disease.

SULPHUME

S U L P H U M E B A T H S can be taken at home, h a v i n g all the advantages (and more) of the most famous S u l p h u r Springs. One bottle of S u l p h u m e makes 12 strong s u l p h u r baths, or 1200 doses. S U L P H U M E S O A P is the only soap i n the world made with Liquefied sulphur. T h a t is w h y it is a Genuine S u l p h u r Soap. It stops i t c h i n g a n d a l l s k i n irritations, softens and whitens the s k i n , and has no equal for the toilet and bath. One cake for trial mailed on receipt of 25 cents. S U L P H U M E PILLS

act directly on the liver, kidneys i n d bowels, but do not g r i p e o r nauseate. Price 25 cents. A L L intelligent people k n o w what valuable remedial properties s u l p h u r possesses, but F E W realize what wonderful cures are effected by liquid s u l p h u r , S u l p h u m e . G a r g l i n g once will cure an ordinary sore throat.

Drop a postal card and we'll mad you our SULPHUME BOOK and SKIN BOOK both FREE. When you write for our books, if you will mention the particular complaint you are interested in, we will send you a special letter of advice. Correspondence invited. Consultation FREE, and strictly confidential. SULPHUME COflPANY,

i l l narine Building, C H I C A G O .

L y m a n , Sons & C o . , M o n t r e a l , Canadian Depot.

YOUISTG Hair Health is w a r r a n t e d to restore g r a y ,

H A V E

w h i t e or b l e a c h e d h a i r to its y o u t h t u l color and b e a u t y . It r e m o v e s d a n d r u f f and stops f a l l i n g a n d b r e a k i n of the h a i r . It is not a dye.and will not d i s c o l o r s c a l p or c l o t h i n g . T h i s h a i r f o o d acts on the r o o t s , g i v i n g t h e m the r e q u i r e d nourishment and positively produces l u x u r i a n t h a i r on bald heads. Keeps the s c a l p c l e a n a n d healthy. D o e s not rub off a n d is not g r e a s y . HAY'S

WEAK EYES ? FILMS or SORE EYES ? WHITE SPOTS ? CATARACTS ? HEAD NOISES ? BLINDNESS ? DEAFNESS ?

DR. O N E A L can cure you, if a cure is possible. He removes Cataracts and similar growths on the eyes by his New Absorption Method. No knife and no danger.

HAIR HEALTH is a b l e s s i n g to t h o u s a n d s w h o now h a v e a fine h e a d of h a i r . Most baldness is c a u s e d by dandruff. T o keep the h a i r , s c a l p a n d b e a r d in h e a l t h y c o n d i t i o n , m a k e a s t r o n g l a t h e r w i t h Harfina Soap a n d s h a m p o o freely. If it is desired to restore g r a y or f a d e d h a i r to y o u t h f u l color, a p p l y Hay's Hair-Health after s h a m p o o i n g w i t h Harfina Soap, a n d the g r a y n e s s w i l l d i s a p p e a r a n d the h a i r w i l l g r o w forth its o r i g i n a l y o u t h f u l color a n d b e a u t y . GUARANTEE. — A n y person p u r c h a s i n g Hay's Hair-Health a n y w h e r e in the U n i t e d S t a t e s , w h o has not been benefited, m a y h a v e his m o n e y b a c k by a d d r e s s i n g L o n d o n S u p p l y C o .

FREE

SOAP

OFFER:

Hair=-Health sent b y e x p r e s s , p r e p a i d , in p l a i n sealed p a c k a g e s , by I -ONDON S U P P L Y C O . , 85^ B r o a d w a y , N e w Y o r k , t o g e t h e r w i t h a 25c. c a k e of Harfina Medicated Soap, the best s o a p y o u c a n use for H a i r , S c a l p , l i a t h a n d T o i l e t , a l l o n r e c e i p t of 60 cents. None genuine ivitJtoiit signature of Philo Hay ôn outside wrapper. Large 50 cent Bottles at Leading Drug Stores.

Only mild medicine used. Dr. Oneal s treatment is something new and thoroughly scientific. H e is a most successful oculist and aunst. and his work is endorsed by leading men and women of the nation. Dr. Oneal's T r e a t i s e on N O S E A N D T H R O A T is W r i t e for it.

by my invisible Tubular Ear-Phone. Whispers heard. Warranted to help more cases than all similar devices Helps ears as glasses help eyes. Sold by F . HISCOX p|^££ Please mention

DISEASES O F T H E E V E , EAR, sent free. It is fully illustrated.

DR. O R E N

NESS & HEAD NOISES CURED

D E A F

Y O U

52 Dearborn Street,

M c C I u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to

112J

ONEAL,

Suites A and B ,

advertisers.

CHICAGO.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 112k

Ã


McCLURE'S

Copyright, 1900, by T l

MAGAZINE.

itific Physical Culture.

SCIENTIFIC PHYSICAL CULTURE Successfully Taught by Mail No apparatus whatever is required, and only ten minutes time in your own room iust befure retiring. The very latest, up-to-date, scientific method of concentrated exercise, which results in per-

fect physical development in an incredibly »hart time.

A Positive Cure for Constipation, Dyspepsia, Indigestion, Insomnia, Shortness of Breath, Nervous Exhaustion, Etc. Mr. Frederick W . Stone, Director of Athletics of T h e Stone School of Scientific Physical Culture, has been Director of Athletics of Columbia College, T h e Manhattan Athletic Association, The Knickerbocker Athletic Association, and is at present acting in that capacity with T h e Chicago Athletic Association. Every pupil is given Individual Instruction according to his physical condition. Does not overtax the heart. Both sexes and all ages—from 15 to 85—are alike benefited. Illustrated descriptive booklet and measurement blank sent free. Write today. Address

THE STONE SCHOOL OF SCIENTIFIC PHYSICAL CULTURE Suite 1610, M a s o n i c T e m p l e , C H I C A G O , I L L .

A SWELL

AFFAIR <-

GOOD HEALTH for $5.00

_ DENTS ^ Toothache Gum IVV

I I IHV.I

PURIFY YOUR BEFORE

Ms

THE

$2.00 BOOK FREE

A

T

BATH

H

E

R

CABINET

G R E A T MAY

OFFER.

BEWARE OF SPURIOUS IMITATIONS. S e n d us y o u r a d d r e s s valuable information.

15 c or by mail upon receipt of price.

((è.S.DÉNT & Co. DETROIT MICH.

ROBINSON VAPOR

E

P o s i t i v e l y c u r e s R h e u m a t i s m , K i d n e y a n d S t o m a c h trouble. It makes you clean a n d well. T h e O N L Y patent Screen Folding Cabinet made. G e t no o t h e r . with cabinet. W r i t e for

The only Perfect Remedy. It ¡5 antiseptic arrests decay, is healthful to the teeth ¡y and gums highly recommended by leading Dentists, AII druggists j^i?

W

BLOOD

WE

on

postal

and

we

w i l l forward you

WANT COOD ACENTS EVERYWHERE.

ROBINSON THERMAL BATH CO,, 702-717 Jefferson St, Toledo, Ohio

5

112l


McCLURE'S

P a b s t

MAGAZINE.

m a l t

E x t r a c t

" B a b y ' s F i r s t A d v e n t u r e " is the prettiest, most artistic picture of the day. Painted by the celebrated Herman Kaulbach. The original has been purchased by the owners of Pabst Malt Extract expressly for this reproduction.

For Cool, Steady Nerve " W f E live in an intensely ambi" tiousworld. W h a t w o n d e r w e breakdown! A l l of us overtax ourselves at times, so thatweoften need a bracer like Pabst Malt Extract, The "Best" T o n i c . It allays nervousness, brings sound sleep, and as you sleep it feeds the nerves, feeds them with grain strength, not with drugs. T h i s makes it a real nerve tonic, a remedy that will restore exhausted nerves to their full health and vigor. Taken four times a day, once before bed-time, a bottle daily, it works wonders with a shattered nervous system. That's what the doctors say when ordering it for patients.

H o w to G e t this Picture Free V y / H E N you buy your " first six bottles your druggist will make you a present of a lovely Artotype entitled, "Baby's First Adventure."

This

fine picture cannot be bought at art stores nor obtained by any other method than that plainly outlined here. Picture fprtifirafp

seraneare

The undersigned agrees to give the b e a r e r o f t h ¡ s c e r

Most druggists sell The " B e s t " T o n i c . If y o u r s does not, send u s $1.50 for a half dozen bottles and one p i c t u r e , o r $2.50 for one dozen bottles and two pictures. Express charges fully prepaid. Address Pabst BrewingCo. Milwaukee, Wis. The Druggist can cancel each oneol these spaces

by private Initial, date, or mark. Each space

.

tificate one copy, 13x17, of the Artotype in fifteen colors, reproducing Kaulbach's famous picure. Baby's First Adventure." when each of the numbers on the end hereof has been canceled upon the p u r c h a s e of a bottle of The " B Í S Í " Tonic. Druggist's Signature

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To the Public:

represents one bottle of THE "BEST" TONIC sold

6 the bearer ol the certificate for 25 cents.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

T u r k i s h Baths for 3 Cents* T h e best of all bath cabinets is now sold at maker's prices direct to the user. Sold even lower than the inconvenient affairs that are advertised for this ser­ vice. A tight, double-walled room, rub­ ber coated inside and outside, and fitted with a door. Made so that merely tip­ ping folds it into a 6-inch space. H a n d ­ some, convenient and strong.

Prices from S5.00 to $12.00 Express or Freight Prepaid.

With this cabinet, Turkish, vapor and medicated baths may be taken at home, exactly the same as in Turkish Bath rooms. The cost is three cents per bath. Nothing else is so effective in keeping the blood pure, preventing sickness, stopping colds and curing most chronic diseases. Nothing else accomplishes perfect cleanliness, or so clears the complexion, so quickly quiets the nervous and rests the tired. The habit of Turkish bathing keeps the mind and body up to the highest vigor.

The Racine Cabinet is guaranteed to be the best one on the market. We sell on ap­ proval, to be returned at our expense if not satisfactory. Sold direct to users at from $ 5 to $12., express or freight prepaid ; alcohol stove, vaporizer and face steaming attachment in­ cluded. Send today for our handsome illustrated catalogue, and order from that.

RACINE B A T H CABINET CO., Box A , RACINE, WIS.

HEALING!

BEAUTIFYING!

Hyomei Antiseptic Skin Soap M a d e from

the fresh g r e e n

leaves

of the T a s m a n i a n l î l u e G u m T r e e .

" A bath w i t h H y o m e i Soap is a rare l u x u r y . " S o l d by d r u g g i s t s e v e r y w h e r e or sent by m a i l .

P r i c e , 25c.

T H E R . T . B O O T H C O . , 35 A v e . B , Ithaca, N . Y . S e n d 5 cts. for s a m p l e c a k e of H y o m e i S o a p .

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McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Not Like Others, Better Than Others. It is a scientific medicinal preparation (not simply a dusting powder), indispensable for the nursery, toilet, and sick room.

A Medicated Powder for infants, children, and adults. Unequaled i n the field o f medicine for controlling and healing all inflammation and affections o f the skin. At Druggists. ^c. a n d 50.

â&#x20AC;˘A

Perfumes are so like tbz flowers that one never tires of them. 44

Swiss Rose

SPECIAL O F F E R .

is lasting, withal delicate and won= drously true to nature. S o l d b y a l l d e a l e r s , o r w i l l be sent, p r e p a i d , o n receipt of $1.00.

L A D T ; <te C O F F I N ,

T o introduce C o m f o r t P o w d e r into families where it is not n o w used, w e w i l l send a box on receipt of 50 cents, a n d also a year's subscription free to T R A I N K D M O T H E R H O O D , a monthly magazine that every mother needs. T h i s bright magazine contains helpful a n d i n ­ teresting advice pertaining to the baby's health, comfort, c l o h i n g , education, a n d so forth, from the world's best authorities. T h e subscription price alone is one d o l l a r ; y o u therefore get the best m e d i c i n a l powder a n d the best mother's magazine i n the w o r l d for 50 cents. T H E COMFORT POWDER C O . , HARTFORD, COMN.

,

2A B a r c l a y St., N e w Y o r k Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when you write to advertisers.

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McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

LEA & PERKINS SAUCE Originai & Genuine worcesTerswre-

T h e

Makes all Chafing-dish cookery palatable and digestible.- Gives a delicate flavor to Welsh rarebits,Lobster Newburgh.Oysters.etc M

a%«'^2££?*'

on every bottle

Jofin Ouncaris 5ons, Agents -Stew York.

Artistic Homes

DELICIOUS DESSERTS Easy and quick to make, follow a few minutes' work with a TRIPLE MOTION WHITE MOUNTAIN FREEZER. L a c k i n g nothing a freezer needs, it has good points no other freezer possesses. More than halt of a l l the freezers i n use are W h i t e M o u n t a i n Freezers. Frozen Dainties Sent Free. A book o f practical receipts compiled by Mrs L i n c o l n of cook book fame. Address, The

ARE

Y O UGOINQ T O B U I L D ?

How

to P l a n

How

to B u i l d them.

and

Gives instructions on the best methods of Building a Home. Ileautifully illustrated. Sent for 25 cents, if you mention price house wanted.

White Mountain Freezer Co.,

D E P A R T M E N T

D.

N A S H U A ,

Modern Dwellings—Book of Standard Designs and P l a n s all styles, all prices, Superb edition, $1.00 Homes and Barns, [low cost houses] 50

N . H .

We execute High-class special work in all Modern and Classic Designs . ^ g ^ . GEO.

$Q.OO and UP

THE

HEMET

LANDS

A R E L O C A T E D IN

Southern California

Ron Ton DESK, 20,000

F . BARBER & CO., Architects, Knoxville, Tenn.

must be s o l d Greatest output i n U . S . A l l s t y l e s and sizes Quality sure to please. P r i c e s so, l o w a g e n t s can sell at g o o d profit. House Furniture, .Refrigerators, B a b y Carriages, etc. a l l at f a c t o r y pr'ces Catalog No. 6 9 , Office Furniture. Catalog No. TO, House Fornitore. E. H . STAFFORD & BROS., Steinway Hall, CHICAGO 1

Soil and climate suitable to the culture of the O r a n g e , Lemon and Olive. A l l other products successfully grown. Abundance of water. G o o d market. E d u c a t i o n a l a n d religious advantages. F R E E , large illustrated p a m p h l e t giving reliable facts and figures about good C a l i f o r n i a irrigable lands in tracts to suit, o n easy payments. T i t l e perfect. A d d r e s s H E M E T L A N D C O M P A N Y DEPT. D, HEMET, RIVERSIDE COUNTY,

Send any Photo and 25c in silver and 2c stamp to pay return postage and we will make and send to you 12 beautiful miniature Photos. Address F . K . S N Y D E K , O X F O R D . O H I O

E U R O P E A N T O U R S MINIATURE PHOTOS

19tll Y e a r . Select partie I. T e r m s reasonable ducted by D R . & M R S . H . S. P A I N E , Glens Kails

ConN. Y.

RESTORE SIGHT! r.i Ac GLASSES RENDER DEFECTIVE VISION CHRONIC. Write for our ILLUSTRATED TREATISE, mailed free. THE IDEAL COMPANY

m

239 Broadway, SJi WT> ^¿9

IN W H A T D I S T R E S S W E N O T E T H I S L A S S IS DISFIGURED WITH HER HIDEOUS C L A S S E S . '

CAL.

New York.

112p

S E E NOW T H E F A C E BRICHT A S A U R O R A DUE TO U S E O F T H E SIGHT R E S T O R E R .


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

TOO LATE TO BEGIN caring for the teeth, for they are about gone. Good, sound, white teeth may be had in old age through the use of

\

:

Frederiaflnfmm&fë!,, S6TeMSûm,

Rub ifoatti

ßelrcU,Mufi.\

the Perfect Liquid Dentifrice, which not only arrests and prevents decay, but keeps the teeth white as pearls, gums healthy and the breath sweet.

The mental annoyance i n after years when dandruff ends i n baldness is far greater than mere pam o f the flesh.

GoKeDandmUGiire

THE TIME TO BEGIN

is the preventative for baldness. It removes the cause o f baldness—dandruff. I f it doesn't, here's your money back.

is when the teeth first come. The delicious fragrance and soothing qualities of Rubifoam please the children.

Tho only hair preparation admitted to the Paris Exposition. Physicians not only prescribe it but use it themselves. Druggists sell it. Barbers use it. If yours does not, send one dollar and his name lor a bottle, prepaid, by express. Many so-called "Hair Restoratives" contain poison ous minerals that cause paralysis. Avoid them.

Popular price 25 cts.

All Druggists.

Sample Vial for a 2-ct. stamp. E.

A . R . B r e m e r C o . . 33 L a S a l l e S t r e e t . C h i c a g o .

W.

HOYT

& CO

C A X A D I A K D E P O T — L y m a n Bros. & C o . , Ltd., Toronto.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 113

LOWELL,

MASS.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

S w e e t Slumber FOR T H E

LITTLE ONES CAN DY ACATHARTIC

1<K

ALL

éÍ2L^k while you 5 ^ D R U G G I S T S THE ONLY SAFE LAXATIVE FOR CHILDREN

LOST 40 lbs. OF FAT. Are You T o o Stout?

You

If so, why not reduce your weight and be comfortable! Obesity predisposes to Heart Trouble, Paralysis, Liver Dis­ eases, Constipation, Rheuma­ tism, Apoplexy, etc., and is not only dangerous but extremely annoying to people of refined taste. We do not care how many R E D U C T I O N remedies you may have taken without success, we have a treatment that will re­ duce weight, as thousands can testify. The following are a few who have been reduced in weight and greatly improved in health by its use: Mrs. C . Bliss, 50 Hudson B'k, Rochester, N . Y . , reduced 3 0 lbs. Mrs. Laura L . Martin, Buck Creek, Ind., reduced 65 lbs. Mrs. M . M . Cummins, Ottawa, 111., reduced 7 8 lbs. Miss M . Hoisington, Lake View, M i c h . , reduced 60 lbs. M r s . Helen W e b e r of Marietta, O . , says: "It reduced my weight 40lbs. without M r . W . A . Pollock, Harting­ ton, Neb., reduced 6 0 lbs. sickness or any inconvenience whatever."

Hear!

w h e n y o u use •q Common 0

Wilson's» Sense s ""

Ear Drums

We are going to give away barrels and

D ADDCI C DAnnCLO

T h e only scientific sound conductors. Invisible, comfortable, efficient. T h e y fit i n the ear. Doctors recommend them. Thousands testify to their perfection a n d to benefit derived.

o

f

Sample Boxes Free,

just to prove how effective, pleasant and safe this remedy is, to reduce weight. If you want one, send us your name and address and 4 cents to cover postage. Each box is mailed in a plain sealed package with no advertising on it to indicate what it contains. Price, large size box, $t.oo, postpaid. Correspondence strictly confidential.

Information and book of letters from many users,free. Wilson Ear Drum Co., 108 Trust Bldg., Louisville, Ky.

HALL CHEMICAL CO., Dept. N. E. St. Louis, Mo.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 114


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Wl LLIAMS

'SHAVING STICK Height, 4 feet. Diameter, 19 in. = Contains = 465 lbs. of Soap

Mammoth Shaving Stick Sent to the Paris Exoosition.

A WILLIAMS S h a v i n g S t i c k of the ordinary size will furnish about 300 shaves. T h i s m a m m o t h shav­ ing stick is equal to 4,450 of the or­ d i n a r y size — or enough to shave a man every day in the year for 3,657 years!

T

he size is exaggerated, but it is impossible to exaggerate the splendid qualities which have given W i l l i a m s ' S h a v i n g S t i c k world-wide fame. T h e deliciously creamy, permeating lather, its remark­ ably softening effect upon the beard, its convenience of form, a n d its strong, unique case, m a k e W i l l i a m s ' S h a v i n g S t i c k the very perfection of s h a v i n g soap. Williams' Shaving Soaps are used by all firit-c'iass barbers, and are sold everywhere. B y mail if your dealer does not supply you. Williams' Shaving Stick, 25 cents. Luxury Shaving Tablet, 25 cents. Genuine Yankee Shaving Soap, 1 0 cents. White Glycerine Toilet Soap, 1 0 cents. Williams' Shaving Soap (Barbers') 6 round cakes, 1 lb., 40 cts. Exquisite also for toilet. Trial tablet for 2-cent stamp. LONDON PARIS

T H E J. B. WILLIAMS CO., Glastonbury, Conn. Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 115

DRESDEN SYDNEY


McCLURE'S

Others

MAGAZINE.

Cured, Why Mot

You?

The answer depends entirely upon yourself. You have certainly heard and read enough about Hood's Sarsaparilla to be convinced that it is a good medicine. There is a genuineness about its testimo­ nials which strikes you favorably. It has a pleasant and true medicinal taste, which will impress you with its curative powers. After a few doses you will feel a thrill of benefit and health which will convince you of coming good. And in a reasonable time and with a fair trial you will realize satisfactory results or cure, as thousands of others have done. No better time to take it than now. Read what people say: IS

Ex-Sheriff

IT

D Y S P E P S I A

T h a t T r o u b l e s Y o u ? Is Y o u r Blood Impure? Read This. " I had suffered for 12 years with what the doctors called water brash. I had severe pains across my shoulders and these soon extended to my stomach causing great distress. I fre­ quently had symptoms of nausea and the attacks left me very weak. The longer I went without doctoring the offener and more severe would be each succeeding spell. Since first taking Hood's Sarsaparilla I have kept it continually in the house. It has done me so much good that I am now able to do all my work. Hood's Sarsaparilla has also benefited my husband, and built uj. my son after a severe attack of the

Ripple

O f "Warsaw, Indiana, for 12 years was Sheriff and Deputy-Sheriff. F o r over 10 years was foreman and lumber inspector with the- G . B . Lesh M f g . Co ; is a trustee of the Baptist church. He says: "I have taken Hood's Sarsaparilla as a tonic and blood purifier for over 10 years. When I feel out of sorts, and principally in the spring, I take several bottles, always with most gratify­ ing results. It builds up the system and im­ proves the appetite when one feels debilitated, and makes me feel like a new man. I con­ scientiously recommend Hood's Sarsaparilla for an effective blood purifier." L O U I S R I P P L E , 318 Indiana Street, Warsaw, Ind.

grip. I am glad to recommend Hood's Sar­ saparilla." M R S . P E T E R B O B B Y , cor. West and Maple "Avenues, Leominster, Mass.

Is a highly concentrated extract, carefully prepared from the best-known remedies of the vegetable kingdom, such as sarsaparilla, yellow dock, mandrake, gentian, wintergreen, uva ursi, juniper berries, pipsissewa, etc., — which are gathered for us at the seasons when they possess their greatest remedial value. They are combined in a proportion and by a process peculiar to itself, and which gives to Hood's Sarsaparilla the power to cure when all other medicines fail. Therefore always ask for H O O D ' S .

HOOD'S Sarsaparilla

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116


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

IS FOUND ON EVERY WELL APPOINTED T A R I F '

'

'"

,

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McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Tbd Vim and life without the Bite

I

WWm

WÊM White Rock is selected for the club not only for its exclusive mellow drinking quality, so enjoyable with lunch or dinner, but because it mixes perfectly with all beverages,giving them the vim and life without the bite. It makes the appetite keen and keeps the intellect clear. Four pints of White Rock will be sent anywhere in the United States, prepaid, upon receipt of «1.00. After drinking four pints you will buy it regularly of your dealer. B o o k l e t F r e e . WHITE ROCK MINERAL SPRING CO., Waukesha, Wis.

G e l a t i n e is distinguished b y a " Checkered

"

Wrapper

For greater profit some dealers substitute other makes when C O X ' S is ordered. As Gelatine varies in strength, the innocent use of a substitute may bring disappointment in results. The result is certain •when C O X ' S is used. "Desserts, by Oscar, of the Waldorf-Astoria." Copies forwarded without charge on application to J . & O . C O X , L t d . , Established 1725, ' 105 Hudson S t . , N e w Y o r k .

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 118


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

KNOXS GELATINE

Crt ^urilte tv 4Ă­fr.

has revolutionized the gelatine trade of America. Housewives marvel at its lack of odor and at its transparency.

D E V I L E D

Each packet makes at least a pint more jelly than any other packet of equal size. It is apura calves'-stock gelatineâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that's the whole secret. Any one in America can make it, but I am the only one who does. It is time for the truth to be known about gelatine.

I WILL MAIL FREE my 32-page book of seventy recipes, called " Dainty Desserts for Dainty People," to every applicant. Send for it to-day. For 5 cents in stamps (to cover postage and packing), I will mail the book and full pint sample. I wish you would at least give it this trial. For 15 cents and the name of your grocer, I will mail the book and a full 2-quart package (two for 25 cents). Pink gelatine for fancy desserts in every package.

C H A R L E S B. K N O X , 1 Knox Avenue,

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 119

Johnstown, N . Y .


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

mmum

Burnett's dui Why do you use a vanilla extract that is not satisfactory when you can always have Burnett's Vanilla

Extract

by insisting upon it. Send ten cents for a book on Vanilla, its growth and culture. Joseph Burnett C o . , Boston, Mass.

1

Vanilla Hurry up Papa;

WELCH QRAPE JUICE

Ralsfo

D r i n k i t for its deliciousness— d r i n k it for health. There's no other beverage l i k e it, but i t is more than a mere beverage—it is food and d r i n k i n one. W e l c h ' s Grape Juice is fruit nutrition i n fluid form. It gives richness to the blood, vigor to the brain and nerves, sustenance to the whole body. Those who d r i n k i t regularly have no need for medicine or false stimulants.

is ready r

"Mammacooked it in 5 minutes". The fine flavor of

Ralston Breakfast Food, finds immediate favor with folks ¿*¡j; discriminating i n , the foods they eat'

Sola ay Druggists and Grocers.

They never tire of it. Ask your Grocer first; if he does not keep Ralston, send | u s 11 i s namef or a free sample. Purina Health Flour, (thewhole of G l u t e r e a n Wheat) makes Brain Bread. Packed In 12 lb. Sacks and 5 lb. Cartons.

PURINA .773

Extract

A 3-oz. b o t t l e b y m a i l for 1 0 cents. If your dealer will not supply you, send us $3 for 12 pints (14 case) shipped express prepaid anywhere in United States east of Omaha

The W e l c h Grape J u i c e Co.

MILLS,

WESTFIELD, N. Y.

'Where Purity is Paramount"

GRATIOT ST..

ST.

LOUIS.

Mo.

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McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

A PROMINENT CLERGYMAN WRITES ABOUT THIS LITTLE GIRL Not expected to live. Transformed

by

L o s t weight the first six weeks.

the use of E s k a y ' s Food into a picture of with firm flesh and well formed body.

health,

" W h e n our little girl, Elizabeth, was about six weeks old, no one who saw her thought she would live. Her mother could not nurse her, and she weighed less than when she was two weeks old. We could not find anything that agreed with her. O n our physician's recommendation we tried E S K A Y ' S F O O D and found it to be a perfect substitute for the mother's milk. E S K A Y ' S F O O D agreed with her from the very first and she has grown ranidly and naturally on it. Her flesh is firm and her body is well formed. She i s a picture of h e a l t h . She has used the F O O D about seventeen months, and still cries for her bottle of E S K A Y ' S . " â&#x20AC;&#x201D; R E V . FREDERICK GETTY, Phila. Conference, M . E . Church. E S K A Y ' S FOOD is the Ideal Food for Infants, Invalids and Dyspeptics. We will send a sample of E S K A Y ' S FOOD free upon request, and our little book, " How to Care for the Baby," with valuable information for every mother.

IT N O U R I S H E S F R O M INFANCY T O O L D A G E . SMITH,

K L I N E

P H I L A D E L P H I A ,

& F R E N C H CO.

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121

P A .

i


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

oup:

Tomato, Chicken, Bouillon, Vegetable, Mock Turtle, Ox Tail, Beef, Consomme, Cream of Celery, Chicken Gumbo, Mullagatawny, Tomato Okra and Clam Chowder.

VAN CAMP PACKING CO., 308 Kentucky Atenué,

Indianapolis, Ind.

Simple Simon met apiernan goingtotheiair. Said&mple ! Simen Mepieman/letmetisteyoTir DmteesSdad Dressing" p n p p . n v ' C C •

Send for FREE BOOKLET on "Salads: How to Make and Dress Them," (riving many valuable and novel recipes for Salads, Sandwiches, Sauces, Luncheon Dishes, etc. Sample 10 cents.

E . R. D U R K E E & CO., 538 Washington Street, New York. Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 122


McCLURE'S

i

L i b b y ' s

MAGAZINE.

ti

/

V e a l

L o a f

When placed on the market more than a year ago, was the first and only product of its kind ever offered the American people, perfectly cooked, seasoned and ready to serve from convenient sized key opening cans. It was the greatest food success of 1899. A l l who knew about it, bought it, liked it and told their friends about it. Success attracts imitators.

Libby's Veal Loaf is the Original. All other brands of Veal Loaf in tins are imitations of Libby's. When you want a delicious lunch or supper of daintily seasoned meat, get Libby's Veal Loaf, Chicken Loaf, Cottage Loaf. There are 71 Varieties of L i b b y ' s Foods in tins. We publish a neat little book called " H o w to Make Good Things to E a t , " which we send free to everyone who requests it by letter or postal. It tells all about Libby's foods and gives recipes for preparing them.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 123


McCLURE'S

HP

J

I 3SlC«

MAGAZINE.

There is no sense more accurate than the taste. a

n

d

i

t

s

c r u e l

t

o

a

b

u

s

c

i L

B

L

A

N

K

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F

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It is hard work to deceive it

T

' BLEND C O F F E E delights this sense because it is blended to the taste. Mr. C . F. Blanke knows just the smooth­ ness, the proper strength and the exact aroma required to hold this remarkable coffee to its stand­ ard. That is the reason Faust Blend is used on more dining cars and by more first-class hostelries with famous cuisines than any other coffee on the market. A 3-lb. can, whole, ground or pulverized, of your grocer. $ 1 . 3 0 , or of us, prepaid, if he will not supply you. Signature on every can.

C. F. B L A N K E & C O . , St. Louis, Mo. Some of the most prominent hostelries in the U. $. where BLANKE'S FAUST BLEND Is served are 1 T O N Y F A U S T ' S , St. L o u i s H O T E L P F I S T E R , Milwaukee. B A T T E R Y P A R K , Asheville, N. C W A B A S H R. R . D i n i n g C a r s G R A N D PACIFIC, Chicago

A R L I N G T O N , Hot Springs, A r k . B A R T H O L D I , New Y o r k C O T T O N B E L T P a r l o r Cafe C a r s R U S S E L L H O U S E , Detroit

D E N V E R & R I O G R A N D E D i n i n g Cars S C H E N L E Y H O T E L , Pittsburgh B . & O. S. W . D i n i n g C a r s G R A N D H O T E L , Y a r m o u t h , N o v a Sootla

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 124


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

CHOCOLAT BONBONS

Most Delicious, Most Famous of Confections F O U R M I L L I O N P A C K A G E ^ S O L D IN 1899 If you have not tried them we have a trial package that we send for ten cents in stamps. Their celebrity is due to their delightful quality, dainty flavors and perfect purity. More than one hundred varieties. Âż t t i t j t ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ * - W h e n not to he h n d of dealers we w i l l send on r e c e i p t of price : i - l b . b o x . 60 cts.; 2 - l h . b o x . $ 1 . 2 0 ; 3.1b. b o x , $1.80 ; J - l b . b o x . $3.00. Del i v e r e d free in U n i t e d States. A d d r e s s a l l c o r r e s p o n d e n c e to . . .

T H E W A L T E R M . L O W N E Y CO., New York Retail Store, I J23 Broadway.

125

Department E , B O S T O N , MASS. Boston Retail Store, 416 Washington St.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Of Ii

More good-natured, strong, robust, healthy babies are raised on

Borden's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk than on all other (so-called) infant foods combined. It has stood the test for more than F O R T Y Y E A R S . B O R D E N ' S C O N D E N S E D M I L K C O . , 69 Hudson St., New Y o r k

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 126


McCLURE'S

f PACIFIC

unire

MAGAZINE.

une ¡a

P g t t i f O ^ ^ Rr^akfa^t food I > * /|ALL the wheat but the overcoat 11 ****** \

That satisfied—well-fed feeling. There's a satisfied—well-fed feeling after a breakfast of delicious Petti) ohn's. It satisfies that natural craving for wholesome food. Pettijohn's is a rich full-flaked wheat food, not an illogical granular or powdered wheat that cooks into a tasteless, starchy mass. Pettijohn's is full-flaked. It never deceives. B e s i d e s b e i n g a n e a s i l y a n d q u i c k l y prepared b r e a k f a s t d i s h , delicate, appetizing- a n d n o u r i s h ing, P e t t i j o h n ' s B r e a k f a s t F o o d m a k e s u n e q u a l l e d Griddle Cakes, Gems, Muffins a n d P u d d i n g s . A l s o a n excellent t h i c k e n i n g f o r S o u p s . C o l d P e t t i j o h n ' s P o r r i d g e is d e l i c i o u s w h e n f r i e d l i k e c o r n - m e a l m u s h . W r i t e for o u r C e r e a l C o o k B o o k , e d i t e d b y M r s . R o r e r . I t t e l l s a l l about c o o k i n g a l l k i n d s of cereals a l l sorts of w a y s . Sent free, p o s t p a i d . „, . T H E A M E R I C A N C E R E A L Co., M o n a d n o c k B l d g . , C h i c a g o , 111.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 137


McCLURE'S

The

COPYRIGHT

1900

BY T H E

MAGAZINE.

White

PROCTER A GAMBLE

CO.

Squadron,

CINCINNATI

Over the waters of the world float the ships of our white squadron. They are essential to the peace and dignity of the nation. Over the waters of thousands of domestic seas float cakes of Ivory Soap, the white squadron of Ameri­ can homes. 4

99>rSo Per Cent. Pure.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 128


m

I

" TO SEE OURSEL'S A S ITHERS SEE US "

X

USE

SAFOLIO

T H E ONLY NAPHTHA O V E R 3,000 IN U S E

LAUNCH

Perfection in Power Pleasure Boats

Steam and Sail Yachts Send 10 cents in stamps for Catalogue.

G A S ENGINE & P O W E R C O .

and

C H A R L E S L . S E A B U R Y & CO.

CONSOLIDATED,

Morris Heights on the Harlem, and 5 0 Broadway, New York City


+„««»»«»«*»»»«»»««»»*»*«*»«•»*««»•*•»»*•••+<'

I This Trade-Mark

Ò

WILL B E F O U N D O N E V E R Y G E N U I N E P A C K A G E O F T H E F A M O U S

i

COCOA

AND

CHOCOLATE

PREPARATIONS M A D E

4

BY

Walter Baker £» Co. Ltd., S Established 1780.

Dorchester, Mass. I Reject A l u m Baking: P o w d e r s — T h e y D e s t r o y H e a l t h

The

Name

of

Hall's

Swift

Vegetable Sicilian

O n Hams, Bacon and L a r d Is a G u a r a n t e e o f P u r i t y Swift's P r e m i u m H a m s a n d B a c o n have the h i g h q u a l i t y , the fine taste and flavor that makes them different from other hams. Selected a n d p r e p a r e d with the greatest possible care. Swift's Silver Leaf L a r d is America's standard lard. A t best dealers

Swift a n d C o m p a n y Chicago St. Louis

Kansas City St. Joseph

THE

Omaha St

rw

M C C L U R C Press, 141 ics

Renewer always restores color to gray hair, the dark, rich color it used to have. The hair grows rapidly, stops coming out, and dandruff disappears. IT jour druggist cannot eupply you, send Ç1.Q0 to R . P , Hall & Co.. Nashua, N . H .

E . 25TH St., Xcvr

YORK CITY, U.

S.A.

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McClure's Magazine 1900-05 vintage  

Vintage

McClure's Magazine 1900-05 vintage  

Vintage

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